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Sample records for ahc critical region

  1. Meeting the Challenge of Chronic Conditions in a Sustainable Manner: Building on the AHC Learning.

    PubMed

    Delgado, Pedro

    2016-01-01

    The Atlantic Healthcare Collaboration for Innovation and Improvement in Chronic Disease (AHC) set out to achieve three aims: to create a patient- and family-centred approach to manage chronic diseases; to build a network of organizational, regional and provincial teams to share evidence-informed, systems-level solutions and work together to develop, implement and sustain improvement initiatives; and to promote the sustainability of the participating health systems. Important elements of all three aims were achieved and the synthesis provides a meaningful contribution to systems working to improve chronic care. This paper explores those achievements as well as some of the areas for improvement, including replicability, expanded outcome measurement, greater detail around patient and family engagement, increased focus on specific outcomes and processes, and further articulation of lessons learned and recommendations. PMID:27009644

  2. Characterisation of the Angelman syndrome critical region

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, H.L.; Buxton, J.; Chan, C.T.J.

    1994-09-01

    Angelman syndrome (AS) and Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) are distinct neurogenetic disorders associated with a deletion of 15q11-13, a region subject to genomic imprinting. The chromosomal deletions are either maternal (AS) or paternal (PWS) in origin. The AS critical region was previously defined by an inherited deletion of approximately 1.5 Mb, encompassing TD3-21, LS6-1 and GABRB3. An individual with classical AS has been identified whose deletion includes LS6-1 but not TD3-21 or GABRB3. Both maternal and paternal methylation patterns at ZNF127, PW71B and SNRPN are present, suggesting that the AS gene itself is a disrupted, rather than imprinting sequences, as proposed recently for some familial cases. Initially, the deletion was detected by (CA)n repeat analysis. Cosmids derived from a 260 kb LS6-1 YAC were then used to confirm the deletion by fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH). Neither end cosmid from the YAC is deleted, suggesting that the AS critical region is less than 200 kb. Fragments isolated from the cosmids which span the deletion were used to further delineate the AS critical region by Southern blot analysis. Single copy genomic fragments within this region were then used to search for differential parental methylation patterns and potential coding sequences. We have used cosmids from the region in exon-trapping experiments. Using this combination of approaches, we aim to identify candidate genes for AS.

  3. The elusive Angelman syndrome critical region.

    PubMed Central

    Trent, R J; Sheffield, L J; Deng, Z M; Kim, W S; Nassif, N T; Ryce, C; Woods, C G; Michaelis, R C; Tarleton, J; Smith, A

    1997-01-01

    DNA mapping studies in two families provide further information on the Angelman syndrome critical region, which has recently been defined by the gene UBE3A. The first family has probable familial Angelman syndrome with a maternally imprinted inheritance pattern. A 5 year old girl with this disorder has a 14 year old brother and an 11 year old male cousin who have less typical clinical features. DNA microsatellite analysis has shown that the three share a common segment of the same grandpaternal chromosome 15q11-q13 that overlaps with UBE3A. The child with typical Angelman syndrome has an additional maternal recombination 5' to UBE3A. The second family is a mother and son both of whom have mental retardation but no other features of Angelman syndrome despite an extensive DNA deletion on the telomeric side of UBE3A. Together, the two families identify a region between loci D15S210 and D15S986 which forms part of the Angelman syndrome critical region. A new microsatellite (D15S1234) is described which can be used in place of the LS6-1 marker at locus D15S113. Images PMID:9321755

  4. A modeling and experiment framework for the emergency management in AHC transmission.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bin; Ge, Yuanzheng; Zhang, Laobing; Zhang, Yongzheng; Zhong, Ziming; Liu, Xiaocheng

    2014-01-01

    Emergency management is crucial to finding effective ways to minimize or even eliminate the damage of emergent events, but there still exists no quantified method to study the events by computation. Statistical algorithms, such as susceptible-infected-recovered (SIR) models on epidemic transmission, ignore many details, thus always influencing the spread of emergent events. In this paper, we first propose an agent-based modeling and experiment framework to model the real world with the emergent events. The model of the real world is called artificial society, which is composed of agent model, agent activity model, and environment model, and it employs finite state automata (FSA) as its modeling paradigm. An artificial campus, on which a series of experiments are done to analyze the key factors of the acute hemorrhagic conjunctivitis (AHC) transmission, is then constructed to illustrate how our method works on the emergency management. Intervention measures and optional configurations (such as the isolation period) of them for the emergency management are also given through the evaluations in these experiments. PMID:24693330

  5. Delivering informatics capabilities to an AHC research community through public/private partnerships (PPP).

    PubMed

    Smith, Kevin A; Athey, Brian D; Chahal, Amar P S; Sahai, Priti

    2008-01-01

    Velos eResearch is a commercially-developed, regulatory-compliant, web-based clinical research information system from Velos Inc. Aithent Inc. is a software development services company. The University of Michigan (UM) has public/private partnerships with Velos and Aithent to collaborate on development of additional capabilities, modules, and new products to better support the needs of clinical and translational research communities. These partnerships provide UM with a mechanism for obtaining high-quality functionally comprehensive capabilities more quickly and at lower cost, while the corporate partners get a quality advisory and development partner--this benefits all parties. The UM chose to partner with Velos in part because of its commitment to interoperability. Velos is an active participant in the NCI caBIG project and is committed to caBIG compatibility. Velos already provides interoperability with other Velos sites in the CTSA context. One example of the partnership is co-development of integrated specimen management capabilities. UM spent more than a year defining business requirements and technical specifications for, and is funding development of, this capability. UM also facilitates an autonomous user community (20+ institutions, 7 CTSA awardees); the broad goal of the group is to share experiences, expertise, identify collaborative opportunities, and support one another as well as provide a source of future needs identification to Velos. Advantages and risks related to delivering informatics capabilities to an AHC research community through a public/private partnership will be presented. The UM, Velos and Aithent will discuss frameworks, agreements and other factors that have contributed to a successful partnership. PMID:18999086

  6. Teaching Critical Thinking in World Regional Geography through Stakeholder Debate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sziarto, Kristin M.; McCarthy, Linda; Padilla, Nicholas L.

    2014-01-01

    Using a stakeholder debate based on a real-world case of regional construction--that of Turkey's application to join the European Union--improved students' critical thinking in an introductory world regional geography course. Such courses are a staple offering among US geography departments, and often the only exposure of non-majors to…

  7. Axial dependence of optical weak measurements in the critical region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araújo, M. P.; De Leo, Stefano; Maia, Gabriel G.

    2015-03-01

    The interference between optical beams of different polarizations plays a fundamental role in reproducing the optical analog of the electron spin weak measurement. The extraordinary point in optical weak measurements is represented by the possibility of estimating with great accuracy the Goos-Hänchen (GH) shift by measuring the distance between the peaks of the outgoing beams for two opposite rotation angles of the polarizers located before and after the dielectric block. Starting from the numerical calculation of the GH shift, which clearly shows a frequency crossover for incidence near the critical angle, we present a detailed study of the interference between s and p polarized waves in the critical region. This makes it possible to determine in which conditions axial deformations can be avoided and the GH curves reproduced. In view of a possible experimental implementation, we give the expected weak measurement curves for Gaussian lasers of different beam waist sizes propagating through borosilicate (BK7) and fused silica dielectric blocks.

  8. Simple Model for Identifying Critical Regions in Atrial Fibrillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, Kim; Manani, Kishan A.; Peters, Nicholas S.

    2015-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common abnormal heart rhythm and the single biggest cause of stroke. Ablation, destroying regions of the atria, is applied largely empirically and can be curative but with a disappointing clinical success rate. We design a simple model of activation wave front propagation on an anisotropic structure mimicking the branching network of heart muscle cells. This integration of phenomenological dynamics and pertinent structure shows how AF emerges spontaneously when the transverse cell-to-cell coupling decreases, as occurs with age, beyond a threshold value. We identify critical regions responsible for the initiation and maintenance of AF, the ablation of which terminates AF. The simplicity of the model allows us to calculate analytically the risk of arrhythmia and express the threshold value of transversal cell-to-cell coupling as a function of the model parameters. This threshold value decreases with increasing refractory period by reducing the number of critical regions which can initiate and sustain microreentrant circuits. These biologically testable predictions might inform ablation therapies and arrhythmic risk assessment.

  9. Genetic dissection of the Down syndrome critical region.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xiaoling; Liu, Chunhong; Yu, Tao; Zhang, Li; Meng, Kai; Xing, Zhuo; Belichenko, Pavel V; Kleschevnikov, Alexander M; Pao, Annie; Peresie, Jennifer; Wie, Sarah; Mobley, William C; Yu, Y Eugene

    2015-11-15

    Down syndrome (DS), caused by trisomy 21, is the most common chromosomal disorder associated with developmental cognitive deficits. Despite intensive efforts, the genetic mechanisms underlying developmental cognitive deficits remain poorly understood, and no treatment has been proven effective. The previous mouse-based experiments suggest that the so-called Down syndrome critical region of human chromosome 21 is an important region for this phenotype, which is demarcated by Setd4/Cbr1 and Fam3b/Mx2. We first confirmed the importance of the Cbr1-Fam3b region using compound mutant mice, which carry a duplication spanning the entire human chromosome 21 orthologous region on mouse chromosome 16 [Dp(16)1Yey] and Ms1Rhr. By dividing the Setd4-Mx2 region into complementary Setd4-Kcnj6 and Kcnj15-Mx2 intervals, we started an unbiased dissection through generating and analyzing Dp(16)1Yey/Df(16Setd4-Kcnj6)Yey and Dp(16)1Yey/Df(16Kcnj15-Mx2)Yey mice. Surprisingly, the Dp(16)1Yey-associated cognitive phenotypes were not rescued by either deletion in the compound mutants, suggesting the possible presence of at least one causative gene in each of the two regions. The partial rescue by a Dyrk1a mutation in a compound mutant carrying Dp(16)1Yey and the Dyrk1a mutation confirmed the causative role of Dyrk1a, whereas the absence of a similar rescue by Df(16Dyrk1a-Kcnj6)Yey in Dp(16)1Yey/Df(16Dyrk1a-Kcnj6)Yey mice demonstrated the importance of Kcnj6. Our results revealed the high levels of complexities of gene actions and interactions associated with the Setd4/Cbr1-Fam3b/Mx2 region as well as their relationship with developmental cognitive deficits in DS. PMID:26374847

  10. Regional Health and Function in the hippocampus: Evolutionary compromises for a critical brain region

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Travis C.; Foster, Thomas C.

    2009-01-01

    The hippocampus is especially vulnerable to damage caused by metabolic dysregulation. However distinct sub-regions within the hippocampus differ by their relative susceptibility to such damage. Region CA1 pyramidal neurons are most sensitive to metabolic perturbations while region CA3 pyramidal neurons show more resistance, and these unique profiles of susceptibility are but one example that differentiates CA1/CA3 neurons. We present here a hypothesis that inextricably links the unique biochemistries of learning and memory in region CA1, to that of cell survival signaling, and in so doing, suggest an explanation for region CA1 susceptibility to metabolic dysfunction. Further, we propose a signaling mechanism to explain how both pathways can be simultaneously regulated. Critical to this process is the protein phosphatase PHLPP1. Finally we discuss the implications of this hypothesis and the inherent challenges it poses for treatment of neurological disorders resulting in reduced hippocampal function by increased neuron death. PMID:20161206

  11. Critical review of studies on atmospheric dispersion in coastal regions

    SciTech Connect

    Shearer, D.L.; Kaleel, R.J.

    1982-09-01

    This study effort was required as a preliminary step prior to initiation of field measurements of atmospheric dispersion in coastal regions. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is in the process of planning an extensive field measurement program to generate data which will serve as improved data bases for licensing decisions, confirmation of regulations, standards, and guides, and for site characterizations. The study being reported here is an effort directed to obtaining as much information as is possible from existing studies that is relevant toward NRC's objectives. For this study, reports covering research and meteorological measurements conducted for industrial purposes, utility needs, military objectives, and academic studies were obtained and critically reviewed in light of NRC's current data needs. This report provides an interpretation of the extent of existing usable information, an indication of the potential for tailoring existing research toward current NRC information needs, and recommendations for several follow-on studies which could provide valuable additional information through reanalysis of the data. Recommendations are also offered regarding new measurement programs. Emphasis is placed on the identification and acquisition of data from atmospheric tracer studies conducted in coastal regions. A total of 225 references were identified which deal with the coastal atmosphere, including meteorological and tracer measurement programs, theoretical descriptions of the relevant processes, and dispersion models.

  12. Criticality and quenched disorder: Harris criterion versus rare regions.

    PubMed

    Vojta, Thomas; Hoyos, José A

    2014-02-21

    We employ scaling arguments and optimal fluctuation theory to establish a general relation between quantum Griffiths singularities and the Harris criterion for quantum phase transitions in disordered systems. If a clean critical point violates the Harris criterion, it is destabilized by weak disorder. At the same time, the Griffiths dynamical exponent z' diverges upon approaching the transition, suggesting unconventional critical behavior. In contrast, if the Harris criterion is fulfilled, power-law Griffiths singularities can coexist with clean critical behavior, but z' saturates at a finite value. We present applications of our theory to a variety of systems including quantum spin chains, classical reaction-diffusion systems and metallic magnets, and we discuss modifications for transitions above the upper critical dimension. Based on these results we propose a unified classification of phase transitions in disordered systems. PMID:24579616

  13. Longitudinal Evaluation of the Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Testicular Function in 8 Boys with Adrenal Hypoplasia Congenita (AHC) Due to NR0B1 Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Galeotti, Caroline; Lahlou, Zineb; Goullon, Domitille; Sarda-Thibault, Hélène; Cahen-Varsaux, Juliette; Bignon-Topalovic, Joëlle; Bashamboo, Anu; McElreavey, Ken; Brauner, Raja

    2012-01-01

    Background Boys carrying mutations in the NR0B1 gene develop adrenal hypoplasia congenita (AHC) and impaired sexual development due to the combination of hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (HH) and primary defects in spermatogenesis. Methods We analysed the evolution of hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular function of 8 boys with AHC due to NR0B1 mutations. Our objective was to characterize and monitor the progressive deterioration of this function. Results The first symptoms appeared in the neonatal period (n = 5) or between 6 months and 8.7 years (n = 3). Basal plasma adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH) concentrations increased in all boys, whilst cortisol levels decreased in one case. The natremia was equal or below 134 mmol/L and kaliemia was over 5 mmol/L. All had increased plasma renin. In 3 of 4 patients diagnosed in the neonatal period and evaluated during the first year, the basal plasma gonadotropins concentrations, and their response to gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) test (n = 2), and those of testosterone were normal. The plasma inhibin B levels were normal in the first year of life. With the exception of two cases these concentrations decreased to below the normal for age. Anti-Müllerian hormone concentrations were normal for age in all except one case, which had low concentrations before the initiation of testosterone treatment. In 3 of the 8 cases the gene was deleted and the remaining 5 cases carried frameshift mutations that are predicted to introduce a downstream nonsense mutation resulting in a truncated protein. Conclusions The decreases in testosterone and inhibin B levels indicated a progressive loss of testicular function in boys carrying NR0B1 mutations. These non-invasive examinations can help to estimate the age of the testicular degradation and cryopreservation of semen may be considered in these cases as investigational procedure with the aim of restoring fertility. PMID:22761912

  14. Sustaining critical social services during extended regional power blackouts.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, Anu; Morgan, M Granger

    2012-07-01

    Despite continuing efforts to make the electric power system robust, some risk remains of widespread and extended power outages due to extreme weather or acts of terrorism. One way to alleviate the most serious effects of a prolonged blackout is to find local means to secure the continued provision of critical social services upon which the health and safety of society depend. This article outlines and estimates the incremental cost of a strategy that uses small distributed generation, distribution automation, and smart meters to keep a set of critical social services operational during a prolonged power outage that lasts for days or weeks and extends over hundreds of kilometers. PMID:22133104

  15. Intermittent criticality on a regional scale in Bhuj

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padhy, Simanchal

    2004-08-01

    The statistics of the Bhuj earthquake population are examined to investigate the proximity of the system to the critical state, defined through an entropy-energy relationship based on the tools of statistical mechanics. The results are compared with a theoretical model corresponding to a Boltzmann probability density distribution of degenerate microscopic energy states of the form p(E) ~E-B-1 e-E/θ. The data exhibit fluctuations in characteristic energy θ at a constant B-value of the form S~B. Features such as (1) time-dependent variations in seismicity during the period of presumably uncorrelated stress field following a major event, and (2) +/-12 per cent fluctuations in the macroscopic thermodynamic variable (entropy) support the intermittent criticality of Bhuj crust.

  16. Aggregation propensity of critical regions of the protein Tau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muthee, Micaiah; Ahmed, Azka; Larini, Luca

    The Alzheimer's disease is an irreversible, progressive brain disorder that slowly destroys memory and thinking skills, which eventually leads to the ability to not able to carry out the simplest tasks. The Alzheimer's disease is characterized by the formation of protein aggregates both within and outside of the brain's cells, the neurons. Within the neurons, the aggregation of the protein tau leads to the destruction of the microtubules in the axon of the neuron. Tau belongs to a group of proteins referred to as Microtubule-Associated Proteins. It is extremely flexible and is classified as an intrinsically unstructured protein due to its low propensity to form secondary structure. Tau promotes tubulin assembly into microtubules thereby stabilizing the cytoskeleton of the axon of the neurons. The microtubule binding region of tau consists of 4 pseudo-repeats. In this study, we will focus on the aggregation propensity of two fragments. In this study we will focus on the PHF43 fragment that contains the third pseudo-repeat and has been shown experimentally to aggregate readily. Another fragment that contains the second pseudo-repeat will be considered as well. Mutations in this region are associated with various form of dementia and for this reason we will consider the mutant P301L.

  17. Investigation of the critical region in monotectic systems by viscosity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plevachuk, Yu; Sklyarchuk, V.; Alekhin, O.; Bulavin, L.; Bilous, O.

    2008-02-01

    Viscosity measurements were performed for liquid In-Se alloys in the temperature-concentration range of a limited solubility. Critical parameters describing the peculiarities of the viscosity in the critical region are evaluated. The dynamic theory of phase transitions was used for this evaluation. The results are compared with previously obtained data for immiscible dielectric solutions and metallic melts.

  18. Physical mapping by FISH of the DiGeorge critical region (DGCR): Involvement of the region in familial cases

    PubMed Central

    Desmaze, C.; Prieur, M.; Amblard, F.; Aïkem, M.; LeDeist, F.; Demczuk, S.; Zucman, J.; Plougastel, B.; Delattre, O.; Croquette, M.-F.; Brevière, G.-M.; Huon, C.; Le Merrer, M.; Mathieu, M.; Sidi, D.; Stephan, J.-L.; Aurias, A.

    1993-01-01

    We describe the relative ordering, by fluorescence in situ hybridization, of cosmid loci and translocation breakpoints in the DiGeorge syndrome (DGS) critical region of chromosome 22. This physical map enables us to define a large region, commonly deleted in a majority of affected patients, and the smallest deleted region which, when lost, is sufficient to produce DGS. In four instances, a similar large deleted region is observed in a familial context. In these pedigrees, the deletion is encountered in one parent with mild features of the disease. ImagesFigure 1Figure 3Figure 2Figure 4 PMID:8250039

  19. Physical mapping by FISH of the DiGeorge critical region (DGCR): Involvement of the region in familial cases

    SciTech Connect

    Desmaze, C.; Aikem, M.; Demczuk, S.; Zucman, J.; Plougastel, B.; Delattre, O.; Aurias, A. ); Prieur, M. ); Amblard, F. ); LeDeist, F. ); Croquette, M.F. ); Breviere, G.M. ); Huon, C. ); Le Merrer, M. ); Mathieu, M. ); Sidi, D. ); Stephan, J.L. )

    1993-12-01

    The authors describe the relative ordering, by fluorescence in situ hybridization, of cosmid loci and translocation breakpoints in the DiGeorge syndrome (DGS) critical region of chromosome 22. This physical map enables us to define a large region, commonly deleted in a majority of affected patients, and the smallest deleted region which, when lost, is sufficient to produce DGS. In four instances, a similar large deleted region is observed in a familial context. In these pedigrees, the deletion is encountered in one parent with mild features of the disease. 42 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Identification and Development of Critical Workforce Skills in the Chattanooga Region

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dorris, John Peter

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this quantitative study was to identify the workforce skills perceived to be critical in the Chattanooga region, and to explore how colleges and businesses can partner to effectively develop those skills. Data from a June 2011 survey of workforce stakeholders in the Chattanooga region were analyzed. The 78 survey respondents…

  1. Wide quantum critical region of valence fluctuations: Origin of robust quantum criticality in quasicrystal Yb15Al34Au51 under pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Shinji; Miyake, Kazumasa

    2015-03-01

    The mechanism of the emergence of robust quantum criticality in the heavy- electron quasicrystal YR15Al34Au51 is analyzed theoretically. By constructing a minimal model for the quasicrystal and its crystalline approximant, which contain concentric shell structures with Yb and Al-Au clusters, we show that a set of quantum critical points of the first-order valence transition of Yb appears as spots in the ground-state phase diagram. Their critical regions overlap each other, giving rise to a wide quantum critical region. This well explains the robust criticality observed in YR15Al34Au51 under pressure, and predicts the emergence of the common criticality in the crystalline approximant under pressure. The wider critical region in the quasicrystal than that in the crystalline approximant in the T-P phase diagram and the field-induced valence-crossover "region" in the T-H phase diagram are predicted to appear.

  2. Microdeletion of the Down syndrome critical region at 21q22.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Hideki; Torii, Chiharu; Kosaki, Rika; Yamaguchi, Shinya; Kudoh, Jun; Hayashi, Kumiko; Takahashi, Takao; Kosaki, Kenjiro

    2010-04-01

    The concept of the Down syndrome critical region implies the existence of several dosage-sensitive genes that result in an abnormal phenotype when duplicated. Among the genes in the presumed Down syndrome critical region, DYRK1A and SIM2 are thought to be particularly important because of their critical roles in the development of the central nervous system in model organisms. Considering that regulatory imbalances resulting in an altered amount of expression from crucial target genes tend to produce phenotypic effects in both monosomics and trisomics, haploinsufficiency for the Down syndrome critical region is expected to be associated with an abnormal phenotype. We report on a patient with severe microcephaly, a developmental delay, hypospadias, and corneal opacity who had a microdeletion spanning the Down syndrome critical region, including DYRK1A and SIM2. He presented with intrauterine growth retardation, hypospadias, corneal clouding, arched eyebrows, upslanting and narrow palpebral fissures, bifid uvula, prominent nasal root, short columella, prominent central incisors, pegged shaped teeth, retrognathia, hypoplastic nipples, and severe developmental delay. His G-banded karyotype was normal, but array comparative genomic hybridization showed a de novo deletion of 3.97 Mb at chromosome 21q22. The extreme degree of microcephaly in this patient may be ascribed to the haploinsufficiency of DYRK1A, since brain size is severely reduced in heterozygotes for the Dyrk1a null mutation in mice. PMID:20358607

  3. A yeast artificial chromosome contig of the critical region for cri-du-chat syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Goodart, S.A.; Rojas, K.; Overhauser, J.

    1994-11-01

    Cri-du-chat is a chromosomal deletion syndrome characterized by partial deletion of the short arm of chromosome 5. The clinical symptoms include growth and mental retardation, microcephaly, hypertelorism, epicanthal folds, hyptonia, and a high-pitched monochromatic cry that is usually considered diagnostic for the syndrome. Recently, a correlation between clinical features and the extent of the chromosome 5 deletions has identified two regions of the short arm that appear to be critical for the abnormal development manifested in this syndrome. Loss of a small region in 5p15.2 correlates with all of the clinical features of cri-du-chat with the exception of the cat-like cry, which maps to 5p15.3. Here the authors report the construction of a YAC contig that spans the chromosomal region in 5p15.2 that plays a major role in the etiology of the cri-du-chat syndrome. YACs that span the 2-Mb cri-du-chat critical region have been identified and characterized. This YAC contig lays the groundwork for the construction of a transcriptional map of this region and the eventual identification of genes involved in the clinical features associated with the cri-du-chat syndrome. It also provides a new diagnostic tool for cri-du-chat in the shape of a YAC clone that may span the entire critical region. 24 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Odd Viscosity in the Quantum Critical Region of a Holographic Weyl Semimetal.

    PubMed

    Landsteiner, Karl; Liu, Yan; Sun, Ya-Wen

    2016-08-19

    We study odd viscosity in a holographic model of a Weyl semimetal. The model is characterized by a quantum phase transition from a topological semimetal to a trivial semimetal state. Since the model is axisymmetric in three spatial dimensions there are two independent odd viscosities. Both odd viscosity coefficients are nonvanishing in the quantum critical region and nonzero only due to the mixed axial gravitational anomaly. It is therefore a novel example in which the mixed axial gravitational anomaly gives rise to a transport coefficient at first order in derivatives at finite temperature. In the quantum critical region, the physics of viscosities as well as conductivities is governed by the quantum critical point. PMID:27588846

  5. Universities and Regional Development: A Critical Assessment of Tensions and Contradictions. International Studies in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinheiro, Romulo, Ed.; Benneworth, Paul, Ed.; Jones, Glen A., Ed.

    2012-01-01

    Universities are under increasing pressure to help promote socio-economic growth in their local communities. However until now, no systematic, critical attention has been paid to the factors and mechanisms that currently make this process so daunting. In Universities and Regional Development, scholars from Europe, the Americas, Africa, and Asia…

  6. Physical map of the 850 kb Van der Woude critical region

    SciTech Connect

    Sander, A.; Schmelzle, R.; Schute, B.C.

    1994-09-01

    The VWS gene was recently localized for fine structure mapping within a 2 cM region of 1q32 between D1S245 and D1S205. D1S205 detected an allelic loss in one family where a developmental delay was cosegregating with typical features of VWS consistent with a submicroscopic deletion. D1S491 was mapped to the critical interval and proved to be heterozygous in at least one affected member of that family which narrows the critical interval to 1.6 cM. A YAC contig was constructed across this interval by screening the CEPH YAC {open_quote}A{close_quote} and {open_quote}B{close_quote} libraries with marker STSs and YAC end-clone STSs. A total of 16 YACs were identified and of these, 10 retested positive (5 from {open_quotes}A{close_quotes} and 5 from {open_quotes}B{close_quotes}). In addition, 2 other YACs were identified using data from the CEPH-Genethon Human Physical Map. The relative order of each YAC was deduced from the order of the genetic markers. The 12 YACs could be assembled into a single contig of about 4 Mb which includes the critical region. The maximum distance of the critical region is 850 kb based on the size of a single YAC which contains both flanking markers. We also mapped the microdeletion to this YAC by PCR using a human-hamster somatic cell hybrid whose human chromosome 1 component only contains the microdeletion. In addition, we mapped D1S70 to the critical interval and are testing a recently identified STRP from this clone in families with critical recombinants. Using the YAC clones and the microdeletion hybrid cell line, we excluded TAX1 and fibromodulin as candidate genes for VWS.

  7. Critical regions of heat transfer during the nucleate boiling of oxygen under conditions of reduced gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirichenko, Iu. A.; Gladchenko, G. M.; Rusanov, K. V.

    1984-11-01

    Heat transfer during the nucleate boiling of liquid oxygen under conditions of simulated microgravity is investigated experimentally over a wide range of pressures (600-70,000 Pa) and relative accelerations (0.01-1). The objective of the study is to verify some of the existing models for the critical region of heat transfer. Formulas are obtained yielding different acceleration dependences of the critical density of the heat flux for high and low pressures, which is consistent with experimental data on oxygen boiling.

  8. Scaled parametric equation of state for oxygen in the critical region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levelt Sengers, J. M. H.; Greer, W. L.; Sengers, J. V.

    1974-01-01

    Thermodynamic properties show an anomalous nonanalytic behavior in the critical region that cannot be represented by analytic equations used in engineering correlations. The formulation of scaling laws is discussed, taking into account an approach proposed by Schofield et al. (1969). A procedure for data analysis is described. The model considered has been found to give satisfactory results in tests conducted with a number of gases. The application of the described approach to density profiles is discussed. Attention is given to the model parameters, the critical exponents, and the coefficients for oxygen.

  9. Neonatal and pediatric regionalized systems in pediatric emergency mass critical care

    PubMed Central

    Barfield, Wanda D.; Krug, Steven E.; Kanter, Robert K.; Gausche-Hill, Marianne; Brantley, Mary D.; Chung, Sarita; Kissoon, Niranjan

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Improved health outcomes are associated with neonatal and pediatric critical care in well-organized, cohesive, regionalized systems that are prepared to support and rehabilitate critically ill victims of a mass casualty event. However, present systems lack adequate surge capacity for neonatal and pediatric mass critical care. In this document, we outline the present reality and suggest alternative approaches. Methods In May 2008, the Task Force for Mass Critical Care published guidance on provision of mass critical care to adults. Acknowledging that the critical care needs of children during disasters were unaddressed by this effort, a 17-member Steering Committee, assembled by the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education with guidance from members of the American Academy of Pediatrics, convened in April 2009 to determine priority topic areas for pediatric emergency mass critical care recommendations. Steering Committee members established subcommittees by topic area and performed literature reviews of MEDLINE and Ovid databases. The Steering Committee produced draft outlines through consensus-based study of the literature and convened October 6–7, 2009, in New York, NY, to review and revise each outline. Eight draft documents were subsequently developed from the revised outlines as well as through searches of MEDLINE updated through March 2010. The Pediatric Emergency Mass Critical Care Task Force, composed of 36 experts from diverse public health, medical, and disaster response fields, convened in Atlanta, GA, on March 29–30, 2010. Feedback on each manuscript was compiled and the Steering Committee revised each document to reflect expert input in addition to the most current medical literature. Task Force Recommendations States and regions (facilitated by federal partners) should review current emergency operations and devise appropriate plans to address the population-based needs of infants and children in large-scale disasters. Action at

  10. Delimiting the Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome critical region to 750 kilobase pairs

    SciTech Connect

    Altherr, M.R. |; Wright, T.J.; Denison, K.

    1997-07-11

    Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome (WHS) is a multiple anomaly condition characterized by mental and developmental defects, resulting from the absence of the distal segment of one chromosome 4 short arm (4p16.3). Owing to the complex and variable expression of this disorder, it is thought that the WHS is a contiguous gene syndrome with an undefined number of genes contributing to the phenotype. The 2.2 Mbp genomic segment previously defined as the critical region by the analyses of patients with terminal or interstitial deletions is extremely gene dense and an intensive investigation of the developmental role of all the genes contained within it would be daunting and expensive. Further refinement in the definition of the critical region would be valuable but depends on available patient material and accurate clinical evaluation. In this study, we have utilized fluorescence in situ hybridization to further characterize a WHS patient previously demonstrated to have an interstitial deletion and demonstrate that the distal breakpoint occurs between the loci FGFR3 and D4S168. This reduces the critical region for this syndrome to less than 750 kbp. This has the effect of eliminating several genes previously proposed as contributing to this syndrome and allows further research to focus on a more restricted region of the genome and a limited set of genes for their role in the WHS syndrome. 56 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Regions of different critical behavior of the two-flavor Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model

    SciTech Connect

    Xiong Juan; Jin Meng; Li Jiarong

    2011-02-15

    We study the chiral phase diagram in the T-{mu}-m{sub 0} space of the two-flavor Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model with the approach of the Landau theory of phase transitions. The tricritical point (TCP) is an endpoint of a line of triple points as well as a crosspoint of three {lambda}-transition lines. These double characters bring the connective and consistent problem of a critical phenomenon at the TCP. There is a crossover region from normal critical to tricritical behavior near the TCP, no matter whether the current quark mass is zero or not. The critical exponents need to be renormalized when one approaches the TCP along the first-order phase-transition line.

  12. Analysis and Prediction of the Critical Regions of Antimicrobial Peptides Based on Conditional Random Fields

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Kuan Y.; Lin, Tung-pei; Shih, Ling-Yi; Wang, Chien-Kuo

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are potent drug candidates against microbes such as bacteria, fungi, parasites, and viruses. The size of AMPs ranges from less than ten to hundreds of amino acids. Often only a few amino acids or the critical regions of antimicrobial proteins matter the functionality. Accurately predicting the AMP critical regions could benefit the experimental designs. However, no extensive analyses have been done specifically on the AMP critical regions and computational modeling on them is either non-existent or settled to other problems. With a focus on the AMP critical regions, we thus develop a computational model AMPcore by introducing a state-of-the-art machine learning method, conditional random fields. We generate a comprehensive dataset of 798 AMPs cores and a low similarity dataset of 510 representative AMP cores. AMPcore could reach a maximal accuracy of 90% and 0.79 Matthew’s correlation coefficient on the comprehensive dataset and a maximal accuracy of 83% and 0.66 MCC on the low similarity dataset. Our analyses of AMP cores follow what we know about AMPs: High in glycine and lysine, but low in aspartic acid, glutamic acid, and methionine; the abundance of α-helical structures; the dominance of positive net charges; the peculiarity of amphipathicity. Two amphipathic sequence motifs within the AMP cores, an amphipathic α-helix and an amphipathic π-helix, are revealed. In addition, a short sequence motif at the N-terminal boundary of AMP cores is reported for the first time: arginine at the P(-1) coupling with glycine at the P1 of AMP cores occurs the most, which might link to microbial cell adhesion. PMID:25803302

  13. Critical probability of percolation over bounded region in N-dimensional Euclidean space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roubin, Emmanuel; Colliat, Jean-Baptiste

    2016-03-01

    Following Tomita and Murakami (Research of Pattern Formation ed R Takaki (Tokyo: KTK Scientific Publishers) pp 197-203) we propose an analytical model to predict the critical probability of percolation. It is based on the excursion set theory which allows us to consider N-dimensional bounded regions. Details are given for the three-dimensional (3D) case and statistically representative volume elements are calculated. Finally, generalisation to the N-dimensional case is made.

  14. Critical period of weed control in oilseed rape in two Moroccan regions.

    PubMed

    Maataoui, A; Bouhache, M; Benbella, M; Talouizte, A

    2003-01-01

    The determination of critical period of weed control in oilseed rape is necessary to know the weed control period. To determine the critical period, two fields experiments were carried out during 1995-96 growth season in Loukkos and Saïs regions at two oilseed densities (D1 = 24 and D2 = 36 plants m(-2)). Ten treatments corresponding to plots left weed free or weeded plots until four leaves, flowers bud, flowering, puds formation, and maturity stages of oilseed rape were tested. Density and biomass of weeds were determined at each oilseed stages. Results showed that weed density and biomass were higher in Saïs than in Loukkos sites. For a 10% yield loss, critical period of weed control in Loukkos was from 458 to 720 degree days after emergence (D degrees AE) and from 480 to 720 D degrees AE in oilseed conducted at densities D1 and D2, respectively. In Saïs, critical period of weed control was from 474 to 738 D degrees AE and from 468 to 675 D degrees AE in oilseed conducted at D1 and D2, respectively. It was concluded that the length of the critical period of weed control in oilseed rape grain yield seems to be dependant of the level of the infestation. PMID:15149131

  15. The identification of five novel genes in the cri-du-chat critical region

    SciTech Connect

    Simmons, A.D.; Gallardo, T.D.; Lovett, M.

    1994-09-01

    Cri-du-chat is a contiguous gene syndrome associated with deletions in the short arm of chromosome 5 (chr 5). Chr 5p-specific markers have been used to define two critical regions: a larynx malformation region, located at 5p15.3, and a region responsible for the remaining clinical features of the syndrome, which maps to 5p15.2. Thirty cosmids that map to this latter region have been isolated from the LANL chr 5-specific library using 5 STSs. More recently, we have constructed a YAC contig of the region which encompasses 2-3 Mb. The 30 framework cosmids were used in a direct selection with cDNAs from placenta, activated T-cells and cerebellum to isolate an initial set of expressed sequences from this region. Since no genes, to date, have been isolated or localized within the cri-du-chat deletion, a cosmid containing a control reporter gene (ANX6) was used to monitor enrichment. ANX6 cDNAs were enriched by several thousand-fold in the selected cDNAs. A total of nine non overlapping cDNA fragments were obtained from the cDNA pools. These have been ordered within the YAC contig, map to 5 discrete cosmid sets in the critical region and thus conservatively represent five discrete transcription units. The DNA sequences of these fragments are novel by sequence database comparisons. PCR primers were constructed and were used to confirm gene placements in the YAC contig, as well as to investigate the expression profile of these genes in several different tissues and cell types. In one case, these primer sets enabled two of the nine fragments to be linked into a larger cDNA. The nine cDNAs showed various patterns of differential expression in a panel of tissues. These expressed sequences represent the first genes isolated within the cri-du-chat critical region and represent the initial steps in the derivation of a comprehensive inventory and expression profile of the estimated 100 genes that may reside in this region.

  16. Regional citrate anticoagulation for RRTs in critically ill patients with AKI.

    PubMed

    Morabito, Santo; Pistolesi, Valentina; Tritapepe, Luigi; Fiaccadori, Enrico

    2014-12-01

    Hemorrhagic complications have been reported in up to 30% of critically ill patients with AKI undergoing RRT with systemic anticoagulation. Because bleeding is associated with significantly increased mortality risk, strategies aimed at reducing hemorrhagic complications while maintaining extracorporeal circulation should be implemented. Among the alternatives to systemic anticoagulation, regional citrate anticoagulation has been shown to prolong circuit life while reducing the incidence of hemorrhagic complications and lowering transfusion needs. For these reasons, the recently published Kidney Disease Improving Global Outcomes Clinical Practice Guidelines for Acute Kidney Injury have recommended regional citrate anticoagulation as the preferred anticoagulation modality for continuous RRT in critically ill patients in whom it is not contraindicated. However, the use of regional citrate anticoagulation is still limited because of concerns related to the risk of metabolic complications, the complexity of the proposed protocols, and the need for customized solutions. The introduction of simplified anticoagulation protocols based on citrate and the development of dialysis monitors with integrated infusion systems and dedicated software could lead to the wider use of regional citrate anticoagulation in upcoming years. PMID:24993448

  17. Identification of a critical region in the Drosophila ryanodine receptor that confers sensitivity to diamide insecticides.

    PubMed

    Tao, Yong; Gutteridge, Steven; Benner, Eric A; Wu, Lihong; Rhoades, Daniel F; Sacher, Matthew D; Rivera, Michel A; Desaeger, Johan; Cordova, Daniel

    2013-09-01

    Anthranilic diamides, which include the new commercial insecticide, chlorantraniliprole, are an exciting new class of chemistry that target insect ryanodine receptors. These receptors regulate release of stored intracellular calcium and play a critical role in muscle contraction. As with insects, nematodes express ryanodine receptors and are sensitive to the plant alkaloid, ryanodine. However the plant parasitic nematode, Meloidogyne incognita, is insensitive to anthranilic diamides. Expression of a full-length Drosophila melanogaster ryanodine receptor in an insect cell line confers sensitivity to the receptor agents, caffeine and ryanodine along with nanomolar sensitivity to anthranilic diamides. Replacement of a 46 amino acid segment in a highly divergent region of the Drosophila C-terminus with that from Meloidogyne results in a functional RyR which lack sensitivity to diamide insecticides. These findings indicate that this region is critical to diamide sensitivity in insect ryanodine receptors. Furthermore, this region may contribute to our understanding of the differential selectivity diamides exhibit for insect over mammalian ryanodine receptors. PMID:23806522

  18. Rare-Region-Induced Avoided Quantum Criticality in Disordered Three-Dimensional Dirac and Weyl Semimetals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pixley, J. H.; Huse, David A.; Das Sarma, S.

    2016-04-01

    We numerically study the effect of short-ranged potential disorder on massless noninteracting three-dimensional Dirac and Weyl fermions, with a focus on the question of the proposed (and extensively theoretically studied) quantum critical point separating semimetal and diffusive-metal phases. We determine the properties of the eigenstates of the disordered Dirac Hamiltonian (H ) and exactly calculate the density of states (DOS) near zero energy, using a combination of Lanczos on H2 and the kernel polynomial method on H . We establish the existence of two distinct types of low-energy eigenstates contributing to the disordered density of states in the weak-disorder semimetal regime. These are (i) typical eigenstates that are well described by linearly dispersing perturbatively dressed Dirac states and (ii) nonperturbative rare eigenstates that are weakly dispersive and quasilocalized in the real-space regions with the largest (and rarest) local random potential. Using twisted boundary conditions, we are able to systematically find and study these two (essentially independent) types of eigenstates. We find that the Dirac states contribute low-energy peaks in the finite-size DOS that arise from the clean eigenstates which shift and broaden in the presence of disorder. On the other hand, we establish that the rare quasilocalized eigenstates contribute a nonzero background DOS which is only weakly energy dependent near zero energy and is exponentially small at weak disorder. We also find that the expected semimetal to diffusive-metal quantum critical point is converted to an avoided quantum criticality that is "rounded out" by nonperturbative effects, with no signs of any singular behavior in the DOS at the energy of the clean Dirac point. However, the crossover effects of the avoided (or hidden) criticality manifest themselves in a so-called quantum critical fan region away from the Dirac energy. We discuss the implications of our results for disordered Dirac and Weyl

  19. Paramagnetic short-range order in MnF 2 beyond the critical region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hohlwein, Dietmar; Zeiske, Thomas

    2000-03-01

    Measurements of paramagnetic diffuse scattering in a single crystal of MnF 2 were done in complete ( h k 0) and ( h 0 l) planes at the Flat-cone diffractometer E2 of the Berlin reactor. The data have been evaluated with an extended molecular field theory up to a temperature of 170 K ( TN=67.4 K). Good agreement with the experiment could be achieved by introducing a renormalized temperature as parameter. This parameter describes the transition between the critical and the molecular field region.

  20. Gas Bearing Control for Safe Operation in Critical Speed Regions - Experimental Verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theisen, Lukas R. S.; Niemann, Hans H.; Galeazzi, Roberto; Santos, Ilmar F.

    2015-11-01

    Gas bearings are popular for their high speed capabilities, low friction and clean operation, but require low clearances and suffer from poor damping properties. The poor damping properties cause high disturbance amplification near the natural frequencies. These become critical when the rotation speed coincides with a natural frequency. In these regions, even low mass unbalances can cause rub and damage the machine. To prevent rubbing, the variation of the rotation speed of machines supported by gas bearings has to be carefully conducted during run-ups and run-downs, by acceleration and deceleration patterns and avoidance of operation near the critical speeds, which is a limiting factor during operation, specially during run-downs. An approach for reducing the vibrations is by feedback controlled lubrication. This paper addresses the challenge of reducing vibrations in rotating machines supported by gas bearings to extend their operating range. Using H∞-design methods, active lubrication techniques are proposed to enhance the damping, which in turn reduces the vibrations to a desired safe level. The control design is validated experimentally on a laboratory test rig, and shown to allow safe shaft rotation speeds up to, in and above the two first critical speeds, which significantly extends the operating range.

  1. Particle acceleration in solar active regions being in the state of self-organized criticality.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlahos, Loukas

    We review the recent observational results on flare initiation and particle acceleration in solar active regions. Elaborating a statistical approach to describe the spatiotemporally intermittent electric field structures formed inside a flaring solar active region, we investigate the efficiency of such structures in accelerating charged particles (electrons and protons). The large-scale magnetic configuration in the solar atmosphere responds to the strong turbulent flows that convey perturbations across the active region by initiating avalanche-type processes. The resulting unstable structures correspond to small-scale dissipation regions hosting strong electric fields. Previous research on particle acceleration in strongly turbulent plasmas provides a general framework for addressing such a problem. This framework combines various electromagnetic field configurations obtained by magnetohydrodynamical (MHD) or cellular automata (CA) simulations, or by employing a statistical description of the field’s strength and configuration with test particle simulations. We work on data-driven 3D magnetic field extrapolations, based on a self-organized criticality models (SOC). A relativistic test-particle simulation traces each particle’s guiding center within these configurations. Using the simulated particle-energy distributions we test our results against observations, in the framework of the collisional thick target model (CTTM) of solar hard X-ray (HXR) emission and compare our results with the current observations.

  2. Critical anatomic region of nasopalatine canal based on tridimensional analysis: cone beam computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Alonso, Ana; Antonio Suárez-Quintanilla, Juan; Muinelo-Lorenzo, Juan; Varela-Mallou, Jesús; Smyth Chamosa, Ernesto; Mercedes Suárez-Cunqueiro, María

    2015-01-01

    The study aim of this was to define the critical anatomic region of the premaxilla by evaluating dimensions of nasopalatine canal, buccal bone plate (BBP) and palatal bone plate (PBP). 230 CBCTs were selected with both, one or no upper central incisors present (+/+, −/+, −/−) and periodontal condition was evaluated. T-student test, ANOVA, Pearson´s correlation and a multivariant-linear regression model (MLRM) were used. Regarding gender, significant differences at level 1 (lower NC) were found for: buccal-palatal, transversal and sagittal NC diameters, and NC length (NCL). Regarding dental status, significant differences were found for: total BBP length (tBL) and PBP width (PW2) at level 2 (NCL midpoint). NCL was correlated with PW2, tBL, and PBP length at level 3 (foramina of Stenson level). An MLRM had a high prediction value for NCL (69.3%). Gender is related to NC dimensions. Dental status has an influence on BBP dimensions, but does not influence on NC and PBP. Periodontal condition should be evaluated for precise premaxillae analysis NC diameters at the three anatomical planes are related to each other, while NCL is related to BBP and PBP lengths. A third of premaxilla is taken up by NC, thus, establishing the critical anatomic region. PMID:26245884

  3. Scaled equation of state parameters for gases in the critical region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sengers, J. M. H. L.; Greer, W. L.; Sengers, J. V.

    1976-01-01

    In the light of recent theoretical developments, the paper presents an accurate characterization of anomalous thermodynamic behavior of xenon, helium 4, helium 3, carbon dioxide, steam and oxygen in the critical region. This behavior is associated with long range fluctuations in the system and the physical properties depend primarily on a single variable, namely, the correlation length. A description of the thermodynamic behavior of fluids in terms of scaling laws is formulated, and the two successfully used scaled equations of state (NBS equation and Linear Model parametric equation) are compared. Methods for fitting both equations to experimental equation of state data are developed and formulated, and the optimum fit for each of the two scaled equations of the above gases are presented and the results are compared. By extending the experimental data for the above one-component fluids to partially miscible binary liquids, superfluid liquid helium, ferromagnets and solids exhibiting order-disorder transitions, the principle of universality is concluded. Finally by using this principle, the critical regions for nine additional fluids are described.

  4. A regional approach for mineral soil weathering estimation and critical load assessment in boreal Saskatchewan, Canada.

    PubMed

    Whitfield, Colin J; Watmough, Shaun A

    2012-10-15

    In boreal regions of the province of Saskatchewan, Canada, there is concern over emerging acid precursor emission sources associated with the oil sands industry. Base cation weathering rates (BC(w)) and steady-state critical loads of sulfur (CL(S)) were identified for upland forest soil plots (n=107) in 45 ecodistricts according to a new method for approximation of BC(w) in the region. This method was developed by regression of simple soil and site properties with BC(w) calculated through application of a soil chemical model (PROFILE). PROFILE was parameterized using detailed physicochemical data for a subset (n=35) of the sites. Sand content, soil moisture and latitude emerged as important predictive variables in this empirical regression approximation. Base cation weathering varied widely (0.1-8000 mmol(c) m(-3) yr(-1)) across the study sites, consistent with their contrasting soil properties. Several sites had lower rates than observed in other acid-sensitive regions of Canada owing to quartz dominated mineralogy and coarse-textured soils with very low surface area. Weathering was variable within ecodistricts, although rates were consistently low among ecodistricts located in the northwest of the province. Overall, half of the forest plots demonstrated CL(S) less than 45 mmol(c) m(-2) yr(-1). Historically, the acidification risk in this region has been considered low and monitoring has been limited. Given the very low CL(S) in many northern ecodistricts and the potential for increased acid deposition as oil sands activities expand, soil acidification in these regions warrants further study. PMID:22940479

  5. Minute supernumerary ring chromosome 22 associated with cat eye syndrome: Further delineation of the critical region

    SciTech Connect

    Mears, A.J.; McDermid, H.E.; El-Shanti, H.

    1995-09-01

    Cat eye syndrome (CES) is typically associated with a supernumerary bisatellited marker chromosome (inv dup 22pter-22q11.2) resulting in four copies of this region. We describe an individual showing the inheritance of a minute supernumerary double ring chromosome 22, which resulted in expression of all cardinal features of CES. The size of the ring was determined by DNA dosage analysis and FISH analysis for five loci mapping to 22q11.2. The probes to the loci D22S9, D22S43, and ATP6E were present in four copies, whereas D22S57 and D22S181 were present in two copies. This finding further delineates the distal boundary of the critical region of CES, with ATP6E being the most distal duplicated locus identified. The phenotypically normal father and grandfather of the patient each had a small supernumerary ring chromosome and demonstrated three copies for the loci D22S9, D22S43, and ATP6E. Although three copies of this region have been reported in other cases with CES features, it is possible that the presence of four copies leads to greater susceptibility. 35 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Enhanced Stability and Controllability of an Ionic Diode Based on Funnel-Shaped Nanochannels with an Extended Critical Region.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Kai; Xie, Ganhua; Zhang, Zhen; Kong, Xiang-Yu; Liu, Qian; Li, Pei; Wen, Liping; Jiang, Lei

    2016-05-01

    The enhanced stability and controllability of an ionic diode system based on funnel-shaped nanochannels with a much longer critical region is reported. The polarity of ion transport switching from anion/cation-selective to ambipolar can be controlled by tuning the length and charge of the critical region. This nanofluidic structure anticipates potential applications in single-molecule biosensing, water resource monitoring, and healthcare. PMID:26928676

  7. Body region shocked need not critically define the neurochemical basis of stress analgesia.

    PubMed

    Cannon, J T; Terman, G W; Lewis, J W; Liebeskind, J C

    1984-12-10

    Both opioid and non-opioid forms of stress-induced analgesia have been demonstrated in rats, although the conditions leading to their selective activation are still being investigated. We have shown that variations in shock intensity, duration or temporal pattern can determine whether opioid or non-opioid stress analgesia occurs. Others have suggested that body region shocked is the critical determinant, analgesia from front paw shock being opioid and that from hind paw shock non-opioid. We now report that either opioid or non-opioid stress analgesia can be evoked from either front or hind paws depending only on footshock intensity when duration and temporal pattern are held constant. PMID:6525518

  8. Regional differences in the critical period neurodevelopment in the mouse: implications for neonatal seizures.

    PubMed

    Litzinger, M J; Mouritsen, C L; Grover, B B; Esplin, M S; Abbott, J R

    1994-01-01

    The voltage-sensitive calcium channel probe 125I-omega-GVIA conotoxin has been shown to be a developmental marker in whole brain preparations of Swiss Webster mice. The present study looks more carefully at regional dissections of the mouse brain (cerebrum, cerebellum, and brain stem) at postnatal day 8 and postnatal day 16. 125I-omega-GVIA conotoxin binding, thought to be presynaptic, showed a dramatic increase between postnatal days 8 and 16 in the cerebral cortex, a decrease in the cerebellum, and no change in the brain stem. The dramatic cerebral cortex increases indicated by these binding data correspond to a critical period between postnatal day 11 and postnatal day 14 in Swiss Webster mice; during this critical period, dendrites exhibit rapid outgrowth, sensory modalities come on line, electroencephalographic patterns mature, and the cortex reaches adult proportions. This period parallels a similar initiation of electrical maturation in the 28- to 32-week neonatal human brain. We conclude from these data that the unusual clinical presentation of neonatal seizures is not just the result of immature myelin formation. It includes incomplete synapse formation linking the cortex to the brain stem. PMID:8151090

  9. Comparative Genomic Sequence Analysis of the Human Chromosome 21 Down Syndrome Critical Region

    PubMed Central

    Toyoda, Atsushi; Noguchi, Hideki; Taylor, Todd D.; Ito, Takehiko; Pletcher, Mathew T.; Sakaki, Yoshiyuki; Reeves, Roger H.; Hattori, Masahira

    2002-01-01

    Comprehensive knowledge of the gene content of human chromosome 21 (HSA21) is essential for understanding the etiology of Down syndrome (DS). Here we report the largest comparison of finished mouse and human sequence to date for a 1.35-Mb region of mouse chromosome 16 (MMU16) that corresponds to human chromosome 21q22.2. This includes a portion of the commonly described “DS critical region,” thought to contain a gene or genes whose dosage imbalance contributes to a number of phenotypes associated with DS. We used comparative sequence analysis to construct a DNA feature map of this region that includes all known genes, plus 144 conserved sequences ≥100 bp long that show ≥80% identity between mouse and human but do not match known exons. Twenty of these have matches to expressed sequence tag and cDNA databases, indicating that they may be transcribed sequences from chromosome 21. Eight putative CpG islands are found at conserved positions. Models for two human genes, DSCR4 and DSCR8, are not supported by conserved sequence, and close examination indicates that low-level transcripts from these loci are unlikely to encode proteins. Gene prediction programs give different results when used to analyze the well-conserved regions between mouse and human sequences. Our findings have implications for evolution and for modeling the genetic basis of DS in mice. [Sequence data described in this paper have been submitted to the DDBJ/GenBank under accession nos. AP003148 through AP003158, and AB066227. Supplemental material is available at http://www.genome.org.] PMID:12213769

  10. A microdeletion proximal of the critical deletion region is associated with mild Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hannes, Femke; Hammond, Peter; Quarrell, Oliver; Fryns, Jean-Pierre; Devriendt, Koenraad; Vermeesch, Joris R

    2012-05-01

    It is generally accepted that the facial phenotype of Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome is caused by deletions of either Wolf-Hirschhorn critical regions 1 or 2 (WHSCR 1-2). Here, we identify a 432 kb deletion located 600 kb proximal to both WHSCR1-2 in a patient with a WHS facial phenotype. Seven genes are underlying this deletion region including FAM193a, ADD1, NOP14, GRK4, MFSD10, SH3BP2, TNIP2. The clinical diagnosis of WHS facial phenotype was confirmed by 3D facial analysis using dense surface modeling. Our results suggest that the WHSCR1-2 flanking sequence contributes directly or indirectly to the severity of WHS. Sequencing the Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome candidate 1 and 2 genes did not reveal any mutations. Long range position effects of the deletion that could influence gene expression within the WHSCR were excluded in EBV cell lines derived from patient lymphoblasts. We hypothesize that either (1) this locus harbors regulatory sequences which affect gene expression in the WHSCR1-2 in a defined temporal and spatial developmental window or (2) that this locus is additive to deletions of WHSCR1-2 increasing the phenotypic expression. PMID:22438245

  11. New Resolved Resonance Region Evaluation for 63Cu and 65Cu for Nuclear Criticality Safety Program

    SciTech Connect

    Sobes, Vladimir; Leal, Luiz C; Guber, Klaus H; Forget, Benoit; Kopecky, S.; Schillebeeckx, P.; Siegler, P.

    2014-01-01

    A new resolved resonance region evaluation of 63Cu and 65Cu was done in the energy region from 10-5 eV to 99.5 keV. The R-Matrix SAMMY method using the Reich-Moore approximation was used to create a new set of consistent resonance parameters. The new evaluation was based on three experimental transmission data sets; two measured at ORELA and one from MITR, and two radiative capture experimental data sets from GELINA. A total of 141 new resonances were identied for 63Cu and 117 for 65Cu. The corresponding set of external resonances for each isotope was based on the identied resonances above 99.5 keV from the ORELA transmission data. The negative external levels (bound levels) were determined to match the dierential thermal cross section measured at the MITR. Double dierential elastic scattering cross sections were calculated from the new set of resonance parameters. Benchmarking calculations were carried out on a set of ICSBEP benchmarks. This work is in support of the DOE Nuclear Criticality Safety Program.

  12. Experimental Study of the Isochoric Heat Capacity of Diethyl Ether (DEE) in the Critical and Supercritical Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polikhronidi, N. G.; Abdulagatov, I. M.; Batyrova, R. G.; Stepanov, G. V.; Wu, J. T.; Ustuzhanin, E. E.

    2012-02-01

    Two- and one-phase liquid and vapor isochoric heat capacities ( C V ρ T relationship) of diethyl ether (DEE) in the critical and supercritical regions have been measured with a high-temperature and high-pressure nearly constant-volume adiabatic calorimeter. The measurements were carried out in the temperature range from 347 K to 575 K for 12 liquid and 5 vapor densities from 212.6 kg·m-3 to 534.6 kg·m-3. The expanded uncertainties (coverage factor k = 2, two-standard deviation estimate) for values of the heat capacity were 2% to 3% in the near-critical region, 1.0% to 1.5% for the liquid isochores, and 3% to 4% for the vapor isochores. The uncertainties of density ( ρ) and temperature ( T) measurements were 0.02% and 15 mK, respectively. The values of the internal energy, U( T, V), and second temperature derivative of pressure, (∂2 P/∂ T 2) ρ , were derived using the measured C V data near the critical point. The critical anomaly of the measured C V and derived values of U( T, V) and (∂2 P/∂ T 2) ρ in the critical and supercritical regions were interpreted in terms of the scaling theory of critical phenomena. The asymptotic critical amplitudes {({A_0^+} and {A_0^- )}} of the scaling power laws along the critical isochore for one- and two-phase C V were calculated from the measured values of C V . Experimentally derived values of the critical amplitude ratio for {CV left({A_0^+ /A_0^- = 0.521}right)} are in good agreement with the values predicted by scaling theory. The measured C V data for DEE were analyzed to study the behavior of loci of isothermal and isochoric C V maxima and minima in the critical and supercritical regions.

  13. Molecular cytogenetic analysis of Xq critical regions in premature ovarian failure

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background One of the frequent reasons for unsuccessful conception is premature ovarian failure/primary ovarian insufficiency (POF/POI) that is defined as the loss of functional follicles below the age of 40 years. Among the genetic causes the most common one involves the X chromosome, as in Turner syndrome, partial X deletion and X-autosome translocations. Here we report a case of a 27-year-old female patient referred to genetic counselling because of premature ovarian failure. The aim of this case study to perform molecular genetic and cytogenetic analyses in order to identify the exact genetic background of the pathogenic phenotype. Results For premature ovarian failure disease diagnostics we performed the Fragile mental retardation 1 gene analysis using Southern blot technique and Repeat Primed PCR in order to identify the relationship between the Fragile mental retardation 1 gene premutation status and the premature ovarion failure disease. At this early onset, the premature ovarian failure affected patient we detected one normal allele of Fragile mental retardation 1 gene and we couldn’t verify the methylated allele, therefore we performed the cytogenetic analyses using G-banding and fluorescent in situ hybridization methods and a high resolution molecular cytogenetic method, the array comparative genomic hybridization technique. For this patient applying the G-banding, we identified a large deletion on the X chromosome at the critical region (ChrX q21.31-q28) which is associated with the premature ovarian failure phenotype. In order to detect the exact breakpoints, we used a special cytogenetic array ISCA plus CGH array and we verified a 67.355 Mb size loss at the critical region which include total 795 genes. Conclusions We conclude for this case study that the karyotyping is definitely helpful in the evaluation of premature ovarian failure patients, to identify the non submicroscopic chromosomal rearrangement, and using the array CGH technique we can

  14. Risk prediction of Critical Infrastructures against extreme natural hazards: local and regional scale analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosato, Vittorio; Hounjet, Micheline; Burzel, Andreas; Di Pietro, Antonio; Tofani, Alberto; Pollino, Maurizio; Giovinazzi, Sonia

    2016-04-01

    Natural hazard events can induce severe impacts on the built environment; they can hit wide and densely populated areas, where there is a large number of (inter)dependent technological systems whose damages could cause the failure or malfunctioning of further different services, spreading the impacts on wider geographical areas. The EU project CIPRNet (Critical Infrastructures Preparedness and Resilience Research Network) is realizing an unprecedented Decision Support System (DSS) which enables to operationally perform risk prediction on Critical Infrastructures (CI) by predicting the occurrence of natural events (from long term weather to short nowcast predictions, correlating intrinsic vulnerabilities of CI elements with the different events' manifestation strengths, and analysing the resulting Damage Scenario. The Damage Scenario is then transformed into an Impact Scenario, where punctual CI element damages are transformed into micro (local area) or meso (regional) scale Services Outages. At the smaller scale, the DSS simulates detailed city models (where CI dependencies are explicitly accounted for) that are of important input for crisis management organizations whereas, at the regional scale by using approximate System-of-Systems model describing systemic interactions, the focus is on raising awareness. The DSS has allowed to develop a novel simulation framework for predicting earthquakes shake maps originating from a given seismic event, considering the shock wave propagation in inhomogeneous media and the subsequent produced damages by estimating building vulnerabilities on the basis of a phenomenological model [1, 2]. Moreover, in presence of areas containing river basins, when abundant precipitations are expected, the DSS solves the hydrodynamic 1D/2D models of the river basins for predicting the flux runoff and the corresponding flood dynamics. This calculation allows the estimation of the Damage Scenario and triggers the evaluation of the Impact Scenario

  15. Terminal regions of β-catenin are critical for regulating its adhesion and transcription functions.

    PubMed

    Dar, Mohd Saleem; Singh, Paramjeet; Singh, Gurjinder; Jamwal, Gayatri; Hussain, Syed Sajad; Rana, Aarti; Akhter, Yusuf; Monga, Satdarshan P; Dar, Mohd Jamal

    2016-09-01

    β-Catenin, the central molecule of canonical Wnt signaling pathway, has multiple binding partners and performs many roles in the cell. Apart from being a transcriptional activator, β-catenin acts as a crucial effector component of cadherin/catenin complex to physically interact with actin cytoskeleton along with α-catenin and E-cadherin for regulating cell-cell adhesion. Here, we have generated a library of β-catenin point and deletion mutants to delineate regions within β-catenin that are important for α-catenin-β-catenin interaction, nuclear localization, and transcriptional activity of β-catenin. We observed a unique mechanism for nuclear localization of β-catenin and its mutants and show that N-terminal exon-3 region and C-terminal domain of β-catenin are critical for this activity of β-catenin. Furthermore, we show HepG2 cells have high β-catenin mediated transcriptional activity due to the presence of an interstitial deletion at the N-terminal region of β-catenin. Due to this deletion mutant (hereupon called TM), GSK3β and HDAC inhibitors failed to show any impact whereas curcumin significantly inhibited β-catenin mediated transcriptional activity reiterating that TM is primarily responsible for the high transcriptional activity of HepG2 cells. Moreover, we show the recombinant TM does not physically interact with α-catenin, localizes predominantly in the nucleus, and has nearly two-fold higher transcriptional activity than the wildtype β-catenin. PMID:27368802

  16. The Left Fusiform Gyrus is a Critical Region Contributing to the Core Behavioral Profile of Semantic Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Junhua; Chen, Keliang; Chen, Yan; Fang, Yuxing; Yang, Qing; Lv, Yingru; Lin, Nan; Bi, Yanchao; Guo, Qihao; Han, Zaizhu

    2016-01-01

    Given that extensive cerebral regions are co-atrophic in semantic dementia (SD), it is not yet known which critical regions (SD-semantic-critical regions) are really responsible for the semantic deficits of SD. To identify the SD-semantic-critical regions, we explored the relationship between the degree of cerebral atrophy in the whole brain and the severity of semantic deficits in 19 individuals with SD. We found that the gray matter volumes (GMVs) of two regions [left fusiform gyrus (lFFG) and left parahippocampal gyrus (lPHG)] significantly correlated with the semantic scores of patients with SD. Importantly, the effects of the lFFG remained significant after controlling for the GMVs of the lPHG. Moreover, the effects of the region could not be accounted for by the total GMV, general cognitive ability, laterality of brain atrophy, or control task performance. We further observed that each atrophic portion of the lFFG along the anterior–posterior axis might dedicate to the loss of semantic functions in SD. These results reveal that the lFFG could be a critical region contributing to the semantic deficits of SD. PMID:27242479

  17. Narrowing the critical regions for mouse t complex transmission ratio distortion factors by use of deletions.

    PubMed Central

    Lyon, M F; Schimenti, J C; Evans, E P

    2000-01-01

    Previously a deletion in mouse chromosome 17, T(22H), was shown to behave like a t allele of the t complex distorter gene Tcd1, and this was attributed to deletion of this locus. Seven further deletions are studied here, with the aim of narrowing the critical region in which Tcd1 must lie. One deletion, T(30H), together with three others, T(31H), T(33H), and T(36H), which extended more proximally, caused male sterility when heterozygous with a complete t haplotype and also enhanced transmission ratio of the partial t haplotype t(6), and this was attributed to deletion of the Tcd1 locus. The deletions T(29H), T(32H), and T(34H) that extended less proximally than T(30H) permitted male fertility when opposite a complete t haplotype. These results enabled narrowing of the critical interval for Tcd1 to between the markers D17Mit164 and D17Leh48. In addition, T(29H) and T(32H) enhanced the transmission ratio of t(6), but significantly less so than T(30H). T(34H) had no effect on transmission ratio. These results could be explained by a new distorter located between the breakpoints of T(29H) and T(34H) (between T and D17Leh66E). It is suggested that the original distorter Tcd1 in fact consists of two loci: Tcd1a, lying between D17Mit164 and D17Leh48, and Tcd1b, lying between T and D17Leh66E. PMID:10835400

  18. Critical Reflectance Derived from MODIS: Application for the Retrieval of Aerosol Absorption over Desert Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wells, Kelley C.; Martins, J. Vanderlei; Remer, Lorraine A.; Kreidenweis, Sonia M.; Stephens, Graeme L.

    2012-01-01

    Aerosols are tiny suspended particles in the atmosphere that scatter and absorb sunlight. Smoke particles are aerosols, as are sea salt, particulate pollution and airborne dust. When you look down at the earth from space sometimes you can see vast palls of whitish smoke or brownish dust being transported by winds. The reason that you can see these aerosols is because they are reflecting incoming sunlight back to the view in space. The reason for the difference in color between the different types of aerosol is that the particles arc also absorbing sunlight at different wavelengths. Dust appears brownish or reddish because it absorbs light in the blue wavelengths and scatters more reddish light to space, Knowing how much light is scattered versus how much is absorbed, and knowin that as a function of wavelength is essential to being able to quantify the role aerosols play in the energy balance of the earth and in climate change. It is not easy measuring the absorption properties of aerosols when they are suspended in the atmosphere. People have been doing this one substance at a time in the laboratory, but substances mix when they are in the atmosphere and the net absorption effect of all the particles in a column of air is a goal of remote sensing that has not yet been completely successful. In this paper we use a technique based on observing the point at which aerosols change from brightening the surface beneath to darkening it. If aerosols brighten a surface. they must scatter more light to space. If they darken the surface. they must be absorbing more. That cross over point is called the critical reflectance and in this paper we show that critical reflectance is a monotonic function of the intrinsic absorption properties of the particles. This parameter we call the single scattering albedo. We apply the technique to MODIS imagery over the Sahara and Sahel regions to retrieve the single scattering albedo in seven wavelengths, compare these retrievals to ground

  19. Probabilistic map of critical functional regions of the human cerebral cortex: Broca's area revisited.

    PubMed

    Tate, Matthew C; Herbet, Guillaume; Moritz-Gasser, Sylvie; Tate, Joseph E; Duffau, Hugues

    2014-10-01

    The organization of basic functions of the human brain, particularly in the right hemisphere, remains poorly understood. Recent advances in functional neuroimaging have improved our understanding of cortical organization but do not allow for direct interrogation or determination of essential (versus participatory) cortical regions. Direct cortical stimulation represents a unique opportunity to provide novel insights into the functional distribution of critical epicentres. Direct cortical stimulation (bipolar, 60 Hz, 1-ms pulse) was performed in 165 consecutive patients undergoing awake mapping for resection of low-grade gliomas. Tasks included motor, sensory, counting, and picture naming. Stimulation sites eliciting positive (sensory/motor) or negative (speech arrest, dysarthria, anomia, phonological and semantic paraphasias) findings were recorded and mapped onto a standard Montreal Neurological Institute brain atlas. Montreal Neurological Institute-space functional data were subjected to cluster analysis algorithms (K-means, partition around medioids, hierarchical Ward) to elucidate crucial network epicentres. Sensorimotor function was observed in the pre/post-central gyri as expected. Articulation epicentres were also found within the pre/post-central gyri. However, speech arrest localized to ventral premotor cortex, not the classical Broca's area. Anomia/paraphasia data demonstrated foci not only within classical Wernicke's area but also within the middle and inferior frontal gyri. We report the first bilateral probabilistic map for crucial cortical epicentres of human brain functions in the right and left hemispheres, including sensory, motor, and language (speech, articulation, phonology and semantics). These data challenge classical theories of brain organization (e.g. Broca's area as speech output region) and provide a distributed framework for future studies of neural networks. PMID:24970097

  20. Measurements of saturation densities in critical region and critical loci for binary R-32/125 and R-125/143a systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kishizawa, G.; Sato, H.; Watanabe, K.

    1999-05-01

    R-32/125 (difluoromethane/pentafluoroethane) and R-125/143a (pentafluoroethane/1,1,1-trifluoroethane) binary systems are promising alternative refrigerants to replace conventional refrigerants, i.e., R-22 and R-502. The saturated vapor- and liquid-density data in the critical region of these mixtures were measured using the visual observation of the miniscus disappearance in an optical cell. For the R-32/125 system, 35 saturation density data were measured at three compositions, 10, 35, and 50 mass % R-32. Nineteen saturation density data were also measured for R-125/143a (50/50 mass %). The critical temperatures and densities for these binary refrigerants were determined by taking into consideration the level and location of the meniscus disappearance as well as the intensity of the critical opalescence. Correlations to represent the critical loci of these binary refrigerants for an entire range of compositions have been developed. The experimental uncertainties of the saturation density data are estimated to be within 9 mK in temperature and 0.5 to 5.0 kg{center{underscore}dot}m{sup {minus}3} in density. The uncertainties of the critical temperature and density are estimated to be within 12 to 14 mK and 4 to 8 kg{center{underscore}dot}m{sup {minus}3}, respectively.

  1. Measurements of the vapor-liquid coexistence curve in the critical region and the critical parameters of 1,1,2,2,-tetrafluoroethane

    SciTech Connect

    Tatoh, Jun; Kuwabara, Shigeo; Sata, Haruki; Watanabe, Koichi . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

    1993-01-01

    The vapor-liquid coexistence curve in the critical region of 1,1,2,2-tetrafluoroethane (HFC-134) was measured by a visual observation of the meniscus in an optical cell. Eighteen saturated liquid densities and 10 saturated vapor densities have been obtained in a temperature range from 364 K to the critical temperature, corresponding to a density range from 243 to 1001 kg/m[sup 3]. The experimental uncertainties of temperature and density measurements are estimated to be within [plus minus]10 mK and between [plus minus]0.11% and [plus minus]0.44%, respectively. Not only the level where the meniscus disappeared but also the intensity of the critical opalescence was considered in the determination of the critical temperature and density being 391.74 [plus minus] 0.02 K (ITS-90) and 536 [plus minus] 2 kg/m[sup 3], respectively. The critical exponent of the power law, [beta], was also determined as 0.347 [plus minus] 0.002. A saturated vapor-liquid density correlation has been developed on the basis of the present measurements.

  2. A YAC contig encompassing the Treacher Collins syndrome critical region at 5q31. 3-32

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, J.; Gladwin, A.J.; Perveen, R.; Dixon, M.J. ); Loftus, S.K.; Wasmuth, J.J. ); Riley, J.H.; Anand, R.

    1994-08-01

    Treacher Collins syndrome (TCOF1) is an autosomal dominant disorder of craniofacial development the features of which include conductive hearing loss and cleft palate. Previous studies have localized the TCOF1 locus between D5S519 (proximal) and SPARC (distal), a region of 22 centirays as estimated by radiation hybrid mapping. In the current investigation the authors have created a contig across the TCOF1 critical region, using YAC clones. Isolation of a novel short tandem repeat polymorphism corresponding to the end of one of the YACs has allowed reduction of the size of the critical region to [approximately] 840 kb, which has been covered with three nonchimeric YACs. Restriction mapping has revealed that the region contains a high density of clustered rare-cutter restriction sites, suggesting that it may contain a number of different genes. The results of the present investigation have further allowed confirmation that the RPS14 locus lies proximal to the critical region and can thereby be excluded from a role in the pathogenesis of TCOF1, while ANX6 lies within the TCOF1 critical region and remains a potential candidate for the mutated gene. 26 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Structure of the dimerization domain of DiGeorge critical region 8

    SciTech Connect

    Senturia, R.; Faller, M.; Yin, S.; Loo, J.A.; Cascio, D.; Sawaya, M.R.; Hwang, D.; Clubb, R.T.; Guo, F.

    2010-09-27

    Maturation of microRNAs (miRNAs, {approx}22nt) from long primary transcripts [primary miRNAs (pri-miRNAs)] is regulated during development and is altered in diseases such as cancer. The first processing step is a cleavage mediated by the Microprocessor complex containing the Drosha nuclease and the RNA-binding protein DiGeorge critical region 8 (DGCR8). We previously reported that dimeric DGCR8 binds heme and that the heme-bound DGCR8 is more active than the heme-free form. Here, we identified a conserved dimerization domain in DGCR8. Our crystal structure of this domain (residues 298-352) at 1.7 {angstrom} resolution demonstrates a previously unknown use of a WW motif as a platform for extensive dimerization interactions. The dimerization domain of DGCR8 is embedded in an independently folded heme-binding domain and directly contributes to association with heme. Heme-binding-deficient DGCR8 mutants have reduced pri-miRNA processing activity in vitro. Our study provides structural and biochemical bases for understanding how dimerization and heme binding of DGCR8 may contribute to regulation of miRNA biogenesis.

  4. Global differential expression of genes located in the Down Syndrome Critical Region in normal human brain

    PubMed Central

    Montoya, Julio Cesar; Fajardo, Dianora; Peña, Angela; Sánchez, Adalberto; Domínguez, Martha C; Satizábal, José María

    2014-01-01

    Background: The information of gene expression obtained from databases, have made possible the extraction and analysis of data related with several molecular processes involving not only in brain homeostasis but its disruption in some neuropathologies; principally in Down syndrome and the Alzheimer disease. Objective: To correlate the levels of transcription of 19 genes located in the Down Syndrome Critical Region (DSCR) with their expression in several substructures of normal human brain. Methods: There were obtained expression profiles of 19 DSCR genes in 42 brain substructures, from gene expression values available at the database of the human brain of the Brain Atlas of the Allen Institute for Brain Sciences", (http://human.brain-map.org/). The co-expression patterns of DSCR genes in brain were calculated by using multivariate statistical methods. Results: Highest levels of gene expression were registered at caudate nucleus, nucleus accumbens and putamen among central areas of cerebral cortex. Increased expression levels of RCAN1 that encode by a protein involved in signal transduction process of the CNS were recorded for PCP4 that participates in the binding to calmodulin and TTC3; a protein that is associated with differentiation of neurons. That previously identified brain structures play a crucial role in the learning process, in different class of memory and in motor skills. Conclusion: The precise regulation of DSCR gene expression is crucial to maintain the brain homeostasis, especially in those areas with high levels of gene expression associated with a remarkable process of learning and cognition. PMID:25767303

  5. Effects of transvenous regional guanethidine block in the treatment of critical finger ischemia.

    PubMed

    Stümpflen, A; Ahmadi, A; Attender, M; Gschwandtner, M; Hofmann, S; Maca, T; Schnürer, G; Minar, E

    2000-02-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effects of transvenous regional guanethidine block in the treatment of patients with critical finger ischemia. Twenty-seven patients (17 collagen vascular disease, four thromboangiitis obliterans, three embolism, three atherothrombosis) presenting with ischemic rest pain and/or ulcerations of the fingers received a single block with 5 mg guanethidine injected in 60 mL into the clinically more affected hand under 30 minutes of arterial arrest. Marked hyperemia was induced in the treated upper limb, increases (p < 0.01) in finger blood flow, finger skin temperature, and laser Doppler flux were higher and longer lasting than in forearm blood flow, persisting for a whole month. Effects in patients with ischemic finger ulcers were less pronounced than in those without, yet statistically significant increases of all evaluated parameters were observed in these patients too. No effects were seen in the contralateral untreated upper limb or in systemic blood pressure. Subjective symptoms (reduction of rest pain, numbness, vasospastic attacks) were improved in 25/27 (92.6%) patients, ischemic rest pain disappeared in 20/27 (74.1%), and complete healing of finger tip ulcerations within 1 month was achieved in 10/12 (83.3%) affected patients. No side effects were observed. This described method combines good clinical efficacy with lack of undesirable side effects and can be repeated easily. Therefore, this technique is recommended for broader clinical use. PMID:10701719

  6. Conserved Regions of Gonococcal TbpB Are Critical for Surface Exposure and Transferrin Iron Utilization

    PubMed Central

    Ostberg, Karen L.; DeRocco, Amanda J.; Mistry, Shreni D.; Dickinson, Mary Kathryne

    2013-01-01

    The transferrin-binding proteins TbpA and TbpB enable Neisseria gonorrhoeae to obtain iron from human transferrin. The lipoprotein TbpB facilitates, but is not strictly required for, TbpA-mediated iron acquisition. The goal of the current study was to determine the contribution of two conserved regions within TbpB to the function of this protein. Using site-directed mutagenesis, the first mutation we constructed replaced the lipobox (LSAC) of TbpB with a signal I peptidase cleavage site (LAAA), while the second mutation deleted a conserved stretch of glycine residues immediately downstream of the lipobox. We then evaluated the resulting mutants for effects on TbpB expression, surface exposure, and transferrin iron utilization. Western blot analysis and palmitate labeling indicated that the lipobox, but not the glycine-rich motif, is required for lipidation of TbpB and tethering to the outer membrane. TbpB was released into the supernatant by the mutant that produces TbpB LSAC. Neither mutation disrupted the transport of TbpB across the bacterial cell envelope. When these mutant TbpB proteins were produced in a strain expressing a form of TbpA that requires TbpB for iron acquisition, growth on transferrin was either abrogated or dramatically diminished. We conclude that surface tethering of TbpB is required for optimal performance of the transferrin iron acquisition system, while the presence of the polyglycine stretch near the amino terminus of TbpB contributes significantly to transferrin iron transport function. Overall, these results provide important insights into the functional roles of two conserved motifs of TbpB, enhancing our understanding of this critical iron uptake system. PMID:23836816

  7. Zitkala-Sa and the Problem of Regionalism: Nations, Narratives, and Critical Traditions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Totten, Gary

    2005-01-01

    Although Yankton Sioux writer Zitkala-Sa (Gertrude Bonnin, 1876-1938) was, as P. Jane Hafen notes, "virtually unknown for many decades," much critical work has appeared since Dexter Fisher's 1979 article,"Zitkala-Sa: Evolution of a Writer." Some critics desiring to bring Zitkala-Sa into the conversation about turn-of-the-century American women…

  8. A Paternally Inherited Duplication in the Prader-Willi/Angelman Syndrome Critical Region: A Case and Family Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veltman, Marijcke W. M.; Thompson, Russell J.; Craig, Ellen E.; Dennis, Nicholas R.; Roberts, Sian E.; Moore, Vanessa; Brown, Josie A.; Bolton, Patrick F.

    2005-01-01

    The Prader-Willi/Angelman Critical Region (PWACR; Chromosome 15q11-13) is of interest as a potential locus for genes conferring susceptibility to autism spectrum disorders (ASD). This report describes a female proband referred for evaluation of a possible ASD. Genetic analyses indicated that the proband, her father and one of her sisters, carried…

  9. Identification of critical regions in mouse granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor by scanning-deletion analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Shanafelt, A B; Kastelein, R A

    1989-01-01

    Structure-function relationships for mouse granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor were examined by generating a series of small deletions scanning the entire length of the molecule. Deletions of three amino acids were introduced at intervals of five amino acids by site-directed mutagenesis of the mature mouse granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor gene. The mutant proteins were expressed in Escherichia coli and assayed for biological activity. This procedure identified four regions critical to activity. These critical regions were further delineated by additional three-amino acid deletion mutants. Larger deletions at each terminus were also made, as well as changes of specific amino acid residues. The four critical regions span amino acid residues 18-22, 34-41, 52-61, and 94-115. The disulfide bridge between Cys-51 and Cys-93 was also shown to be essential for activity, whereas that between Cys-85 and Cys-118 could be removed without loss of activity. The possible structural and/or functional roles of the critical regions are discussed. Images PMID:2662186

  10. Choked flow of fluid nitrogen with emphasis on the thermodynamic critical region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, R. C.; Simoneau, R. J.; Ehlers, R. C.

    1972-01-01

    Experimental measurements of critical flow rate and pressure ratio for nitrogen flowing through a nozzle are presented. Data for selected stagnation isotherms from 87.5 to 234 K with pressures to 9.3 MN/m2 are compared to an equilibrium model with real fluid properties and also a nonequilibrium model. Critical flow pressure ratio along an isotherm tends to peak while the flow rate indicates an inflection. The point is closely associated with the transposed critical temperature and represents a change in the fluid structure.

  11. Extrapolation of IAPWS-IF97 data: The saturation pressure of H2O in the critical region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ustyuzhanin, E. E.; Ochkov, V. F.; Shishakov, V. V.; Rykov, A. V.

    2015-11-01

    Some literature sources and web sites are analyzed in this report. These sources contain an information about thermophysical properties of H2O including the vapor pressure Ps. (Ps,T)-data have a form of the international standard tables named as “IAPWS-IF97 data”. Our analysis shows that traditional databases represent (Ps,T)-data at t > 0.002, here t = (Tc - T)/Tc is a reduced temperature. It is an interesting task to extrapolate IAPWS-IF97 data in to the critical region and to get (Ps,T)-data at t < 0.002. We have considered some equations Ps(t) and estimated that previous models do not follow to the degree laws of the scaling theory (ST). A combined model (CM) is chosen as a form, F(t,D,B), to express a function ln(Ps/Pc) in the critical region including t < 0.002, here D = (α, Pc,Tc,...) are critical characteristics, B are adjustable coefficients. CM has a combined structure with scaling and regular parts. The degree laws of ST are taken into account to elaborate F(t, D, B). Adjustable coefficients (B) are determined by fitting CM to input (Ps,T)-points those belong to IAPWS-IF97 data. Application results are got with a help of CM in the critical region including values of the first and the second derivatives for Ps(T). Some models Ps(T) are compared with CM.

  12. Long-range mapping and construction of a YAC contig within the cat eye syndrome critical region

    SciTech Connect

    Riazi, M.A.; Mears, A.J.; McDermid, H.E.

    1994-09-01

    Cat eye syndrome is characterized cytogenetically by the presence of a supernumerary marker chromosome derived from duplicated regions of 22pter-22q11.2. In order to study this syndrome, we have mapped and cloned within the CES critical region (CESCR) in 22q11.2. A long-range map was constructed using probes previously mapped to the CESCR by somatic cell hybrids. The map spans from probes LN63 to D22S36 and covers approximately 3 Mb. Probes within the region were used to isolate YACs, producing a contig of approximately 1.5 Mb (cLN63-D22S57). DNA studies of a cat eye patient with an unusual marker chromosome refined the minimal critical region proximal to D22S57, indicating that most of the CESCR is now cloned. The physical map will allow us to further delineate the CESCR and isolate genes in the region. Towards this end, we have performed {open_quotes}exon-trapping{close_quotes}on a cosmid, CN63, in this region. A 250 bp exon was isolated which maps to the CESCR and has no homology in GenBank. Further characterization of the gene containing this exon is in progress.

  13. Water Information System Platforms Addressing Critical Societal Needs in the Mena Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Habib, Shahid; Kfouri, Claire; Peters, Mark

    2012-01-01

    The MENA region includes 18 countries, the occupied Palestinian territories and Western Sahara. However, the region of interest for this study has a strategic interest in countries adjacent to the Mediterranean Sea, which includes, Morocco, Tunisia, Egypt, Lebanon and Jordan. The 90% of the water in the MENA region is used for the agriculture use. By the end of this century. this region is projected to experience an increase of 3 C to 5 C in mean temperatures and a 20% decline in precipitation (lPCC, 2007). Due to lower precipitation, water run-off is projected to drop by 20% to 30% in most of MENA by 2050 Reduced stream flow and groundwater recharge might lead to a reduction in water supply of 10% or greater by 2050. Therefore, per IPCC projections in temperature rise and precipitation decline in the region, the scarcity of water will become more acute with population growth, and rising demand of food in the region. Additionally, the trans boundary water issues will continue to plague the region in terms of sharing data for better management of water resources. Such pressing issues have brought The World Bank, USAID and NASA to jointly collaborate for establishing integrated, modern, up to date NASA developed capabilities for countries in the MENA region for addressing water resource issues and adapting to climate change impacts for improved decision making and societal benefit. This initiative was launched in October 2011 and is schedule to be completed by the end of2015.

  14. Detection of Critical LUCC Indices and Sensitive Watershed Regions Related to Lake Algal Blooms: A Case Study of Taihu Lake

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chen; Ma, Ronghua; Su, Zhihu; Zhu, Qing

    2015-01-01

    Taihu Lake in China has suffered from severe eutrophication over the past 20 years which is partly due to significant land use/cover change (LUCC). There is an increasing need to detect the critical watershed region that significantly affects lake water degradation, which has great significance for environmental protection. However, previous studies have obtained conflicting results because of non–uniform lake indicators and inadequate time periods. To identify the sensitive LUCC indices and buffer distance regions, three lake divisions (Meiliang Lake, Zhushan Lake and Western Coastal region) and their watershed region within the Taihu Lake basin were chosen as study sites, the algal area was used as a uniform lake quality indicator and modeled with LUCC indices over the whole time series. Results showed that wetland (WL) and landscape index such as Shannon diversity index (SHDI) appeared to be sensitive LUCC indices when the buffer distance was less than 5 km, while agricultural land (AL) and landscape fragmentation (Ci) gradually became sensitive indices as buffer distances increased to more than 5 km. For the relationship between LUCC and lake algal area, LUCC of the WC region seems to have no significant effect on lake water quality. Conversely, LUCC within ML and ZS region influenced algal area of corresponding lake divisions greatly, while the most sensitive regions were found in 3 km to 5 km, rather than the whole catchment. These results will be beneficial for the further understanding of the relationship between LUCC and lake water quality, and will provide a practical basis for the identification of critical regions for lake. PMID:25642691

  15. Detection of critical LUCC indices and sensitive watershed regions related to lake algal blooms: a case study of Taihu Lake.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chen; Ma, Ronghua; Su, Zhihu; Zhu, Qing

    2015-02-01

    Taihu Lake in China has suffered from severe eutrophication over the past 20 years which is partly due to significant land use/cover change (LUCC). There is an increasing need to detect the critical watershed region that significantly affects lake water degradation, which has great significance for environmental protection. However, previous studies have obtained conflicting results because of non-uniform lake indicators and inadequate time periods. To identify the sensitive LUCC indices and buffer distance regions, three lake divisions (Meiliang Lake, Zhushan Lake and Western Coastal region) and their watershed region within the Taihu Lake basin were chosen as study sites, the algal area was used as a uniform lake quality indicator and modeled with LUCC indices over the whole time series. Results showed that wetland (WL) and landscape index such as Shannon diversity index (SHDI) appeared to be sensitive LUCC indices when the buffer distance was less than 5 km, while agricultural land (AL) and landscape fragmentation (Ci) gradually became sensitive indices as buffer distances increased to more than 5 km. For the relationship between LUCC and lake algal area, LUCC of the WC region seems to have no significant effect on lake water quality. Conversely, LUCC within ML and ZS region influenced algal area of corresponding lake divisions greatly, while the most sensitive regions were found in 3 km to 5 km, rather than the whole catchment. These results will be beneficial for the further understanding of the relationship between LUCC and lake water quality, and will provide a practical basis for the identification of critical regions for lake. PMID:25642691

  16. Pre-weaning sensorial and motor development in mice transpolygenic for the critical region of trisomy 21.

    PubMed

    Roubertoux, Pierre L; Bichler, Zoë; Pinoteau, Walter; Jamon, Marc; Sérégaza, Zohra; Smith, Desmond J; Rubin, Edward; Migliore-Samour, Danièle

    2006-05-01

    Trisomy 21 occurs every 1/800 births and is the most frequent genetic cause of mental retardation. Children with trisomy 21 show delayed sensorial and motor development as well as cognitive disorders. We selected a mouse model of trisomy 21 (TRS21): transgenic mice carrying extra copies of a HSA21 region corresponding to the D21S17-ETS2 region (previously referred to as "Down syndrome critical region 1"). Sensorial and motor development was measured in these partially transgenic mice, from birth to weaning. The four HSA21 regions contributed unequally to sensorial and motor development delay. The more centromeric region (230E8) modified 4 of the development indicators plus the size of the effect, indicated by partial eta(2)(eta(p)(2), reached a median value of 14.5%. The neighboring 141G6 region contributed to 5 developmental differences (eta(p)(2) median value 14%). The most telomeric region (285E6) only modified one development indicator. An extra copy of an HSA21 fragment (referred to here as the 152F7 region) induced modifications to 14 of the 18 indicators measured with a eta(2) median value reaching 20%. The results indicate a noticeable contribution of the 152F7 region to sensorial and motor development. The contribution of this region to cognitive functioning and its neurobiological basis has been already reported. This set of result suggests the location in the D21S17-ETS2 region of several genes playing crucial role in cognitive and developmental impairment observed in TRS21. PMID:16514474

  17. The Repeat Region of the Circumsporozoite Protein is Critical for Sporozoite Formation and Maturation in Plasmodium

    PubMed Central

    Patzewitz, Eva-Maria; Wall, Richard J.; Hopp, Christine S.; Poulin, Benoit; Mohmmed, Asif; Malhotra, Pawan; Coppi, Alida; Sinnis, Photini; Tewari, Rita

    2014-01-01

    The circumsporozoite protein (CSP) is the major surface protein of the sporozoite stage of malaria parasites and has multiple functions as the parasite develops and then migrates from the mosquito midgut to the mammalian liver. The overall structure of CSP is conserved among Plasmodium species, consisting of a species-specific central tandem repeat region flanked by two conserved domains: the NH2-terminus and the thrombospondin repeat (TSR) at the COOH-terminus. Although the central repeat region is an immunodominant B-cell epitope and the basis of the only candidate malaria vaccine in Phase III clinical trials, little is known about its functional role(s). We used the rodent malaria model Plasmodium berghei to investigate the role of the CSP tandem repeat region during sporozoite development. Here we describe two mutant parasite lines, one lacking the tandem repeat region (ΔRep) and the other lacking the NH2-terminus as well as the repeat region (ΔNΔRep). We show that in both mutant lines oocyst formation is unaffected but sporozoite development is defective. PMID:25438048

  18. Delineation of the critical deletion region for congenital heart defects, on chromosome 8p23.1.

    PubMed Central

    Devriendt, K; Matthijs, G; Van Dael, R; Gewillig, M; Eyskens, B; Hjalgrim, H; Dolmer, B; McGaughran, J; Bröndum-Nielsen, K; Marynen, P; Fryns, J P; Vermeesch, J R

    1999-01-01

    Deletions in the distal region of chromosome 8p (del8p) are associated with congenital heart malformations. Other major manifestations include microcephaly, intrauterine growth retardation, mental retardation, and a characteristic hyperactive, impulsive behavior. We studied genotype-phenotype correlations in nine unrelated patients with a de novo del8p, by using the combination of classic cytogenetics, FISH, and the analysis of polymorphic DNA markers. With the exception of one large terminal deletion, all deletions were interstitial. In five patients, a commonly deleted region of approximately 6 Mb was present, with breakpoints clustering in the same regions. One patient without a heart defect or microcephaly but with mild mental retardation and characteristic behavior had a smaller deletion within this commonly deleted region. Two patients without a heart defect had a more proximal interstitial deletion that did not overlap with the commonly deleted region. Taken together, these data allowed us to define the critical deletion regions for the major features of a del8p. PMID:10090897

  19. Comparative study of approaches based on the differential critical region and correlation functions in modeling phase-transformation kinetics.

    PubMed

    Tomellini, Massimo; Fanfoni, Massimo

    2014-11-01

    The statistical methods exploiting the "Correlation-Functions" or the "Differential-Critical-Region" are both suitable for describing phase transformation kinetics ruled by nucleation and growth. We present a critical analysis of these two approaches, with particular emphasis to transformations ruled by diffusional growth which cannot be described by the Kolmogorov-Johnson-Mehl-Avrami (KJMA) theory. In order to bridge the gap between these two methods, the conditional probability functions entering the "Differential-Critical-Region" approach are determined in terms of correlation functions. The formulation of these probabilities by means of cluster expansion is also derived, which improves the accuracy of the computation. The model is applied to 2D and 3D parabolic growths occurring at constant value of either actual or phantom-included nucleation rates. Computer simulations have been employed for corroborating the theoretical modeling. The contribution to the kinetics of phantom overgrowth is estimated and it is found to be of a few percent in the case of constant value of the actual nucleation rate. It is shown that for a parabolic growth law both approaches do not provide a closed-form solution of the kinetics. In this respect, the two methods are equivalent and the longstanding overgrowth phenomenon, which limits the KJMA theory, does not admit an exact analytical solution. PMID:25493802

  20. A Longitudinal Regional Educational Model for Pulmonary and Critical Care Fellows Emphasizing Small Group- and Simulation-based Learning.

    PubMed

    Shah, Nirav G; Seam, Nitin; Woods, Christian J; Fessler, Henry E; Goyal, Munish; McAreavey, Dorothea; Lee, Burton W

    2016-04-01

    Recent trends have necessitated a renewed focus on how we deliver formal didactic and simulation experiences to pulmonary and critical care medicine (PCCM) fellows. To address the changing demands of training PCCM fellows, as well as the variability in the clinical training, fund of knowledge, and procedural competence of incoming fellows, we designed a PCCM curriculum that is delivered regionally in the Baltimore/Washington, DC area in the summer and winter. The educational curriculum began in 2008 as a collaboration between the Critical Care Medicine Department at the National Institutes of Health and the Pulmonary and Critical Care Section of the Department of Medicine at MedStar Washington Hospital Center and now includes 13 individual training programs in PCCM, critical care medicine, and pulmonary diseases in Baltimore and Washington, DC. Informal and formal feedback from the fellows who participated led to substantial changes to the course curriculum, allowing for continuous improvement. The educational consortium has helped build a local community of educators to share ideas, support each other's career development, and collaborate on other endeavors. In this article, we describe how we developed and deliver this curriculum and report on lessons learned. PMID:26845063

  1. Classical Wolf-Hirschhorn Syndrome confirmed molecularly despite normal results using commercially available probes: Redefinition of critical region

    SciTech Connect

    Zackai, E.H.; McDonald-McGinn, D.M.; Spinner, N.

    1994-09-01

    Wolf-Hirschhorn Syndrome, WHS, (4p-) is a clinically recognized entity where the deletion ranges from one half of the short arm of 4p to being subtle and cytogenetically undetectable. Because such variations do not result in significant differences in the WMS phenotype it has been suggested that them is a critical region involved in the distal portion of chromosome 4, within 4p16.3. This has been recently localized to a 2.5 Mb segment 100-300 kb from the telomere. A cosmid probe, pC847.351, that maps to distal 4p16.3 (locus D4F26) is commercially available for diagnostic use. We present a child with classical feature of Wolf-Hirschhorn Syndrome whose chromosome analyses, including high resolution banding, looking specifically at the 4p region, were normal, and in whom FISH using the commercially available cosmid probe for the 4p16.3 region did not demonstrate a deletion. Insistence on the clinician`s part that the child`s features were classic for WHS prompted further investigation. Four additional cosmid clones distal to the HD gene were tested by FISH on metaphase chromosomes from the proband. Cosmids representing the loci D4S95 and D4S43, which are {approximately}3.5 and 2.5 Mb, Respectively, proximal to D4F26 were present. However, cosmids for the loci D4S98 and FGFR3, which are within 100 kb of each other and {approximately}300 kb distal to D4S43 were deleted. This deletion is the smallest reported to date in a patient with typical WHS. Previous studies of patients both lacking the WHS phenotype and deleted using cosmid probe pC847.351 have suggested that the most distal region (150 kb) of 4p16.3 is not part of the WHS critical region. This is confirmed by our study. Estabrooks` report, together with our case, suggests redefinition of the WHS critical region proximal to D4F26 and distal to D4S43. We caution against ruling out WHS with the above probe since there may be other cases where the most distal region is intact.

  2. Rare regions and Griffiths singularities at a clean critical point: the five-dimensional disordered contact process.

    PubMed

    Vojta, Thomas; Igo, John; Hoyos, José A

    2014-07-01

    We investigate the nonequilibrium phase transition of the disordered contact process in five space dimensions by means of optimal fluctuation theory and Monte Carlo simulations. We find that the critical behavior is of mean-field type, i.e., identical to that of the clean five-dimensional contact process. It is accompanied by off-critical power-law Griffiths singularities whose dynamical exponent z' saturates at a finite value as the transition is approached. These findings resolve the apparent contradiction between the Harris criterion, which implies that weak disorder is renormalization-group irrelevant, and the rare-region classification, which predicts unconventional behavior. We confirm and illustrate our theory by large-scale Monte Carlo simulations of systems with up to 70(5) sites. We also relate our results to a recently established general relation between the Harris criterion and Griffiths singularities [Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 075702 (2014)], and we discuss implications for other phase transitions. PMID:25122283

  3. 10q26.1 Microdeletion: Redefining the critical regions for microcephaly and genital anomalies.

    PubMed

    Choucair, Nancy; Abou Ghoch, Joelle; Fawaz, Ali; Mégarbané, André; Chouery, Eliane

    2015-11-01

    Distal 10q deletion syndrome is a well-characterized chromosomal disorder consisting of neurodevelopmental impairment, facial dysmorphism, cardiac malformations, genital and urinary tract defects, as well as digital anomalies. Patients with interstitial deletions involving band 10q26.1 present a phenotype similar to the ones with the distal 10q deletion syndrome, which led to the definition of a causal 600 kb smallest region of overlap (SRO). In this report, we describe a male patient with an interstitial 4.5 Mb deletion involving exclusively the 10q26.1 segment. He had growth and psychomotor retardation, microcephaly, flat feet, micropenis, and cryptorchidism. The patient's deleted region does not overlap the 10q SRO. We reviewed the clinical phenotype of patients with similar deletions and suggest the presence of two new SROs, one associated with microcephaly, growth and psychomotor retardation, and the other associated to genital anomalies. Interestingly, we narrowed those regions to segments encompassing five and two genes, respectively. FGFR2, NSMCE4A, and ATE1 were suggested as candidates for facial dysmorphism, growth cessation, and heart defects, respectively. WDR11 was linked to idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism and Kallmann syndrome. Its haploinsufficiency could play a crucial role in the genital anomalies of these patients. PMID:26114870

  4. Left hemisphere regions are critical for language in the face of early left focal brain injury.

    PubMed

    Raja Beharelle, Anjali; Dick, Anthony Steven; Josse, Goulven; Solodkin, Ana; Huttenlocher, Peter R; Levine, Susan C; Small, Steven L

    2010-06-01

    A predominant theory regarding early stroke and its effect on language development, is that early left hemisphere lesions trigger compensatory processes that allow the right hemisphere to assume dominant language functions, and this is thought to underlie the near normal language development observed after early stroke. To test this theory, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging to examine brain activity during category fluency in participants who had sustained pre- or perinatal left hemisphere stroke (n = 25) and in neurologically normal siblings (n = 27). In typically developing children, performance of a category fluency task elicits strong involvement of left frontal and lateral temporal regions and a lesser involvement of right hemisphere structures. In our cohort of atypically developing participants with early stroke, expressive and receptive language skills correlated with activity in the same left inferior frontal regions that support language processing in neurologically normal children. This was true independent of either the amount of brain injury or the extent that the injury was located in classical cortical language processing areas. Participants with bilateral activation in left and right superior temporal-inferior parietal regions had better language function than those with either predominantly left- or right-sided unilateral activation. The advantage conferred by left inferior frontal and bilateral temporal involvement demonstrated in our study supports a strong predisposition for typical neural language organization, despite an intervening injury, and argues against models suggesting that the right hemisphere fully accommodates language function following early injury. PMID:20466762

  5. Left hemisphere regions are critical for language in the face of early left focal brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Dick, Anthony Steven; Josse, Goulven; Solodkin, Ana; Huttenlocher, Peter R.; Levine, Susan C.; Small, Steven L.

    2010-01-01

    A predominant theory regarding early stroke and its effect on language development, is that early left hemisphere lesions trigger compensatory processes that allow the right hemisphere to assume dominant language functions, and this is thought to underlie the near normal language development observed after early stroke. To test this theory, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging to examine brain activity during category fluency in participants who had sustained pre- or perinatal left hemisphere stroke (n = 25) and in neurologically normal siblings (n = 27). In typically developing children, performance of a category fluency task elicits strong involvement of left frontal and lateral temporal regions and a lesser involvement of right hemisphere structures. In our cohort of atypically developing participants with early stroke, expressive and receptive language skills correlated with activity in the same left inferior frontal regions that support language processing in neurologically normal children. This was true independent of either the amount of brain injury or the extent that the injury was located in classical cortical language processing areas. Participants with bilateral activation in left and right superior temporal-inferior parietal regions had better language function than those with either predominantly left- or right-sided unilateral activation. The advantage conferred by left inferior frontal and bilateral temporal involvement demonstrated in our study supports a strong predisposition for typical neural language organization, despite an intervening injury, and argues against models suggesting that the right hemisphere fully accommodates language function following early injury. PMID:20466762

  6. An integrated map with cosmid/PAC contigs of a 4-Mb down syndrome critical region

    SciTech Connect

    Osoegawa, Kazutoyo; Susukida, Rie; Okano, Saishi

    1996-03-05

    The major phenotypic features of Down syndrome have been correlated with partial trisomies of chromosome 21, allowing us to define the candidate gene region to a 4-Mb segment on the 21q22.2 band. We present here a high resolution physical map with megabase-sized cosmid/PAC contigs. This ordered clone library has provided unique material for the integration of a variety of mappable objects, including exons, cDNAs, restriction sites etc. Furthermore, our results have emplified a strategy for the completion of the chromosome 21 map to sequencing. 42 refs., 5 figs.

  7. New Resolved Resonance Region Evaluation for 63,65Cu for Nuclear Criticality Safety Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobes, V.; Leal, L. C.; Guber, K.; Forget, B.; Kopecky, S.; Schillebeeckx, P.; Siegler, P.

    2014-04-01

    A new resolved resonance region evaluation of 63,65Cu was done in the energy region from 10-5 eV to 99.5 keV. The R-Matrix SAMMY method using the Reich-Moore approximation was used to create a new set of consistent resonance parameters. The new evaluation is based on three experimental transmission data sets: two measured at ORELA and one at MITR, plus two radiative capture experimental data sets from GELINA. A total of 141 new resonances were identified for 63Cu and 117 for 65Cu. The corresponding set of external resonances for each isotope is based on the identified resonances above 99.5 keV from the ORELA transmission data. The negative external levels (bound levels) have been determined to match the thermal cross section measured at the MITR. Differential elastic scattering cross sections have been calculated from the new set of resonance parameters. Benchmarking calculations were carried out on a set of ICSBEP benchmarks.

  8. Model assessment of atmospheric pollution control schemes for critical emission regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Shixian; An, Xingqin; Liu, Zhao; Sun, Zhaobin; Hou, Qing

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, the atmospheric environment in portions of China has become significantly degraded and the need for emission controls has become urgent. Because more international events are being planned, it is important to implement air quality assurance targeted at significant events held over specific periods of time. This study sets Yanqihu (YQH), Beijing, the location of the 2014 Beijing APEC (Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation) summit, as the target region. By using the atmospheric inversion model FLEXPART, we determined the sensitive source zones that had the greatest impact on the air quality of the YQH region in November 2012. We then used the air-quality model Models-3/CMAQ and a high-resolution emissions inventory of the Beijing-Tianjian-Hebei region to establish emission reduction tests for the entire source area and for specific sensitive source zones. This was achieved by initiating emission reduction schemes at different ratios and different times. The results showed that initiating a moderate reduction of emissions days prior to a potential event is more beneficial to the air quality of Beijing than initiating a high-strength reduction campaign on the day of the event. The sensitive source zone of Beijing (BJ-Sens) accounts for 54.2% of the total source area of Beijing (BJ), but its reduction effect reaches 89%-100% of the total area, with a reduction efficiency 1.6-1.9 times greater than that of the entire area. The sensitive source zone of Huabei (HuaB-Sens.) only represents 17.6% of the total area of Huabei (HuaB), but its emission reduction effect reaches 59%-97% of the entire area, with a reduction efficiency 4.2-5.5 times greater than that of the total area. The earlier that emission reduction measures are implemented, the greater the effect they have on preventing the transmission of pollutants. In addition, expanding the controlling areas to sensitive provinces and cities around Beijing (HuaB-sens) can significantly accelerate the reduction

  9. Hydrogeochemistry of prairie pothole region wetlands: Role of long-term critical zone processes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goldhaber, Martin B.; Mills, Christopher; Morrison, Jean M.; Stricker, Craig A.; Mushet, David M.; LaBaugh, James W.

    2014-01-01

    Results from the CWLSA were scaled up to a 9700 km2 area surrounding CWLSA using ~ 1800 drill logs and literature data on wetland water chemistry for 178 wetlands within this larger area. The oxidized brown zone depth and wetland water compositional trends are very similar to the CWLSA. Additionally, surface water data from 176 southern Canadian pothole wetlands that conform to the same wetland water geochemical trends as those recorded in the CWLSA further corroborate that SO42 − accumulation driven by pyrite oxidation is a nearly ubiquitous process in the prairie pothole region and distinguishes PPR wetlands from other wetlands worldwide that have a similar overall hydrology.

  10. Clinical comparison of 10q26 overlapping deletions: delineating the critical region for urogenital anomalies.

    PubMed

    Vera-Carbonell, Ascensión; López-González, Vanesa; Bafalliu, Juan Antonio; Ballesta-Martínez, María J; Fernández, Asunción; Guillén-Navarro, Encarna; López-Expósito, Isabel

    2015-04-01

    The 10q26 deletion syndrome is a clinically heterogeneous disorder. The most common phenotypic characteristics include pre- and/or postnatal growth retardation, microcephaly, developmental delay/intellectual disability and a facial appearance consisting of a broad nasal bridge with a prominent nose, low-set malformed ears, strabismus, and a thin vermilion of the upper lip. In addition, limb and cardiac anomalies as well as urogenital anomalies are occasionally observed. In this report, we describe three unrelated females with 10q26 terminal deletions who shared clinical features of the syndrome, including urogenital defects. Cytogenetic studies showed an apparently de novo isolated deletion of the long arm of chromosome 10, with breakpoints in 10q26.1, and subsequent oligo array-CGH analysis confirmed the terminal location and defined the size of the overlapping deletions as ∼ 13.46, ∼ 9.31 and ∼ 9.17 Mb. We compared the phenotypic characteristics of the present patients with others reported to have isolated deletions and we suggest that small 10q26.2 terminal deletions may be associated with growth retardation, developmental delay/intellectual disability, craniofacial features and external genital anomalies whereas longer terminal deletions affecting the 10q26.12 and/or 10q26.13 regions may be responsible for renal/urinary tract anomalies. We propose that the haploinsufficiency of one or several genes located in the 10q26.12-q26.13 region may contribute to the renal or urinary tract pathogenesis and we highlight the importance of FGFR2 and probably of CTBP2 as candidate genes. PMID:25655674

  11. DGCR6 at the proximal part of the DiGeorge critical region is involved in conotruncal heart defects

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Wenming; Higaki, Takashi; Eguchi-Ishimae, Minenori; Iwabuki, Hidehiko; Wu, Zhouying; Yamamoto, Eiichi; Takata, Hidemi; Ohta, Masaaki; Imoto, Issei; Ishii, Eiichi; Eguchi, Mariko

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac anomaly is one of the hallmarks of DiGeorge syndrome (DGS), observed in approximately 80% of patients. It often shows a characteristic morphology, termed as conotruncal heart defects. In many cases showing only the conotruncal heart defect, deletion of 22q11.2 region cannot be detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), which is used to detect deletion in DGS. We investigated the presence of genomic aberrations in six patients with congenital conotruncal heart defects, who show no deletion at 22q11.2 in an initial screening by FISH. In these patients, no abnormalities were identified in the coding region of the TBX1 gene, one of the key genes responsible for the phenotype of DGS. However, when copy number alteration was analyzed by high-resolution array analysis, a small deletion or duplication in the proximal end of DiGeorge critical region was detected in two patients. The affected region contains the DGCR6 and PRODH genes. DGCR6 has been reported to affect the expression of the TBX1 gene. Our results suggest that altered dosage of gene(s) other than TBX1, possibly DGCR6, may also be responsible for the development of conotruncal heart defects observed in patients with DGS and, in particular, in those with stand-alone conotruncal heart defects. PMID:27081520

  12. Disruption of Neurogenesis and Cortical Development in Transgenic Mice Misexpressing Olig2, A Gene In The Down Syndrome Critical Region

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wei; Zhou, Hui; Liu, Lei; Zhao, Chuntao; Deng, Yaqi; Chen, Lina; Wu, Laiman; Mandrycky, Nicole; McNabb, Christopher T.; Peng, Yuanbo; Fuchs, Perry N; Lu, Jie; Sheen, Volney; Qiu, Mengsheng; Mao, Meng; Lu, Q. Richard

    2015-01-01

    The basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor Olig2 is crucial for mammalian central nervous system development. Human ortholog OLIG2 is located in the Down syndrome critical region in trisomy 21. To investigate the effect of Olig2 misexpression on brain development, we generated a developmentally regulated Olig2-overexpressing transgenic line with a Cre/loxP system. The transgenic mice with Olig2 misexpression in cortical neural stem/progenitor cells exhibited microcephaly, cortical dyslamination, hippocampus malformation, and profound motor deficits. Ectopic misexpression of Olig2 impaired cortical progenitor proliferation and caused precocious cell cycle exit. Massive neuronal cell death was detected in the developing cortex of Olig2-misexpressing mice. In addition, Olig2 misexpression led to a significant downregulation of neuronal specification factors including Ngn1, Ngn2 and Pax6, and a defect in cortical neurogenesis. Chromatin-immunoprecipitation and sequencing (ChIP-Seq) analysis indicates that Olig2 directly targets the promoter and/or enhancer regions of Nfatc4, Dscr1/Rcan1 and Dyrk1a, the critical neurogenic genes that contribute to Down syndrome phenotypes, and inhibits their expression. Together, our study suggests that Olig2 misexpression in neural stem cells elicits neurogenesis defects and neuronal cell death, which may contribute to developmental disorders including Down syndrome, where OLIG2 is triplicated on chromosomal 21. PMID:25747816

  13. Critical role of dendritic cells in T cell retention in the interfollicular region of Peyer's patches.

    PubMed

    Obata, Takashi; Shibata, Naoko; Goto, Yoshiyuki; Ishikawa, Izumi; Sato, Shintaro; Kunisawa, Jun; Kiyono, Hiroshi

    2013-07-15

    Peyer's patches (PPs) simultaneously initiate active and quiescent immune responses in the gut. The immunological function is achieved by the rigid regulation of cell distribution and trafficking, but how the cell distribution is maintained remains to be elucidated. In this study, we show that binding of stromal cell-derived lymphoid chemokines to conventional dendritic cells (cDCs) is essential for the retention of naive CD4(+) T cells in the interfollicular region (IFR) of PPs. Transitory depletion of CD11c(high) cDCs in mice rapidly impaired the IFR structure in the PPs without affecting B cell follicles or germinal centers, lymphoid chemokine production from stromal cells, or the immigration of naive T cells into the IFRs of PPs. The cDC-orchestrated retention of naive T cells was mediated by heparinase-sensitive molecules that were expressed on cDCs and bound the lymphoid chemokine CCL21 produced from stromal cells. These data collectively reveal that interactions among cDCs, stromal cells, and naive T cells are necessary for the formation of IFRs in the PPs. PMID:23772027

  14. The role of critical zone processes in the evolution of the Prairie Pothole Region wetlands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goldhaber, M.B.; Mills, C.; Stricker, C.A.; Morrison, J.M.

    2011-01-01

    The Prairie Pothole Region, which occupies 900,000 km2 of the north central USA and south central Canada, is one of the most important ecosystems in North America. It is characterized by millions of small wetlands whose chemistry is highly variable over short distances. The study involved the geochemistry of surface sediments, wetland water, and groundwater in the Cottonwood Lakes area of North Dakota, USA, whose 92 ha includes the dominant wetland hydrologic settings. The data show that oxygenated groundwater interacting with pyrite resident in a component of surficial glacial till derived from the marine Pierre Shale Formation has, over long periods of time, focused SO2-4-bearing fluids from upland areas to topographically low areas. In these low areas, SO2-4-enriched groundwater and wetlands have evolved, as has the CaSO4 mineral gypsum. Sulfur isotope data support the conclusion that isotopically light pyrite from marine shale is the source of SO2-4. Literature data on wetland water composition suggests that this process has taken place over a large area in North Dakota.

  15. The role of critical zone processes in the evolution of the Prairie Pothole Region wetlands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goldhaber, Martin B.; Mills, Christopher T.; Stricker, Craig A.; Morrison, Jean M.

    2011-01-01

    The Prairie Pothole Region, which occupies 900,000 km2 of the north central USA and south central Canada, is one of the most important ecosystems in North America. It is characterized by millions of small wetlands whose chemistry is highly variable over short distances. The study involved the geochemistry of surface sediments, wetland water, and groundwater in the Cottonwood Lakes area of North Dakota, USA, whose 92 ha includes the dominant wetland hydrologic settings. The data show that oxygenated groundwater interacting with pyrite resident in a component of surficial glacial till derived from the marine Pierre Shale Formation has, over long periods of time, focused SO 4 2 - -bearing fluids from upland areas to topographically low areas. In these low areas, SO 4 2 - -enriched groundwater and wetlands have evolved, as has the CaSO4 mineral gypsum. Sulfur isotope data support the conclusion that isotopically light pyrite from marine shale is the source of SO 4 2 - . Literature data on wetland water composition suggests that this process has taken place over a large area in North Dakota.

  16. The critical behavior of the dielectric constant in the polar + polar binary liquid mixture nitromethane + 3-pentanol: an unusual sign of its critical amplitude in the one-phase region.

    PubMed

    Leys, Jan; Losada-Pérez, Patricia; Troncoso, Jacobo; Glorieux, Christ; Thoen, Jan

    2011-07-14

    Dielectric constant measurements have been carried out in the one- and two-phase regions near the critical point of the polar + polar binary liquid mixture nitromethane + 3-pentanol. In the two-phase region, evidence for the |t|(2β) singularity in the coexistence-curve diameter has been detected, thus confirming the novel predictions of complete scaling theory for liquid-liquid criticality. In the one-phase region, an "unusual" negative sign for the amplitude of the |t|(1-α) singularity has been encountered for the first time in an upper critical solution temperature type of binary liquid mixture at atmospheric pressure. Mass density measurements have also been carried out to provide additional information related to such experimental finding, which entails an increase of the critical temperature T(c) under an electric field. PMID:21766958

  17. Priority persistent contaminants in people dwelling in critical areas of Campania Region, Italy (SEBIOREC biomonitoring study).

    PubMed

    De Felip, Elena; Bianchi, Fabrizio; Bove, Crescenzo; Cori, Liliana; D'Argenzio, Angelo; D'Orsi, Giancarlo; Fusco, Mario; Miniero, Roberto; Ortolani, Rosanna; Palombino, Raffaele; Parlato, Antonino; Pelliccia, Maria Grazia; Peluso, Filomena; Piscopo, Giovanni; Pizzuti, Renato; Porpora, Maria Grazia; Protano, Domenico; Senofonte, Oreste; Spena, Silvana Russo; Simonetti, Andrea; di Domenico, Alessandro

    2014-07-15

    To investigate if protracted living in degraded environments of the Caserta and Naples provinces (Campania Region, Italy) had an impact on exposure of local people, highly toxic persistent contaminants were measured in blood, blood serum, and human milk of a large number of healthy donors. Sampling was carried out from 2008 to 2009. Blood was collected from over 850 20-64-year old donors; by pooling, 84 blood and 84 serum samples were obtained. Milk was donated by 52 mothers: specimens were pooled into six samples. Polychlorodibenzodioxins (PCDDs), polychlorodibenzofurans (PCDFs), and polychlorobiphenyls (PCBs, dioxin-like (DL) and non-dioxin-like (Σ6PCBs)), arsenic (As), cadmium (Cd), mercury (Hg), and lead (Pb) were measured in serum (organic biomarkers) and blood (metals); these chemicals and polybromobiphenyl ethers (Σ9PBDEs) were analyzed in milk. PCDD+PCDF, DL-PCB, TEQTOT, and Σ6PCB concentration ranges (medians) in serum were 6.26-23.1 (12.4), 3.42-31.7 (11.5), 10.0-52.8 (23.9) pgTEQ97/g fat, and 55.5-647 (219) ng/g fat, respectively, while in milk concentration ranges were 5.99-8.77, 4.02-6.15, 10.0-14.2 pgTEQ97/g fat, and 48.7-74.2 ng/g fat. Likewise, As, Cd, Hg, and Pb findings in blood spanned 2.34-13.4 (5.83), 0.180-0.930 (0.475), 1.09-7.60 (2.60), 10.2-55.9 (28.8) μg/L, respectively; only Pb could be measured in milk (2.78-5.99 μg/L). Σ9PBDE levels in milk samples were 0.965-6.05 ng/g fat. Biomarkers' concentrations were found to be compatible with their current values in European countries and in Italy, and consistent with an exposure primarily determined by consumption of commercial food from the large distribution system. Based on relatively higher biomarker values within the hematic biomonitoring database, the following municipalities were flagged as possibly deserving attention for health-oriented interventions: Brusciano and Caivano (As), Giugliano (Hg), Pianura (PCDDs+PCDFs), and Qualiano-Villaricca (As, Hg). The analysis of samples

  18. Constitutional and somatic deletions of the Williams-Beuren syndrome critical region in non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Guenat, David; Quentin, Samuel; Rizzari, Carmelo; Lundin, Catarina; Coliva, Tiziana; Edery, Patrick; Fryssira, Helen; Bermont, Laurent; Ferrand, Christophe; Soulier, Jean; Borg, Christophe; Rohrlich, Pierre-Simon

    2014-01-01

    Here, we report and investigate the genomic alterations of two novel cases of Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma (NHL) in children with Williams-Beuren syndrome (WBS), a multisystem disorder caused by 7q11.23 hemizygous deletion. Additionally, we report the case of a child with NHL and a somatic 7q11.23 deletion. Although the WBS critical region has not yet been identified as a susceptibility locus in NHL, it harbors a number of genes involved in DNA repair. The high proportion of pediatric NHL reported in WBS is intriguing. Therefore, the role of haploinsufficiency of genes located at 7q11.23 in lymphomagenesis deserves to be investigated. PMID:25388916

  19. Physical findings in 21q22 deletion suggest critical region for 21q - phenotype in q22

    SciTech Connect

    Thedoropoulos, D.S.; Cowan, J.M.; Elias, E.R.; Cole, C.

    1995-11-06

    Multiple abnormalities were observed in a newborn infant with a deletion in the long arm of chromosome 21, from band 22q22.1{yields}qter. The phenotype of this infant was similar to that previously described in infants with deletions spanning the long arm of chromosome 21, from the centromere to 21q22. However, as a phenotypically normal child with normal intelligence and with deletion of 21q11.1-21q21.3 has also been identified, this case suggests that the critical region of deletion for the 21q - phenotype lies distal to 21q21, within 21q22.1-22.2. 10 refs., 2 figs.

  20. Liquid-vapor relations in the critical region of the system NaCl-H2O from 380 to 415°C: A refined determination of the critical point and two-phase boundary of seawater

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bischoff, James L.; Rosenbauer, Robert J.

    1988-01-01

    Pressure-temperature-composition (P-T-x) relations for coexisting vapor and liquid phases in the system NaCl-H2O were determined experimentally in the critical region from 380 to 415°C. The results provide much improved control on the P-T-x critical line in this region. The critical point of seawater (3.2 wt% NaCl solution), which is bracketed in the present study, is at 407°C and 298.5 bar. In addition, the P-T two-phase boundary of seawater was re-determined. These results provide increased precision and accuracy for theoretical models of critical phenomena in this important two-component system and of the limiting P- Tconditions of seawater in seafloor geothermal systems.

  1. Maternal transcription of non-protein coding RNAs from the PWS-critical region rescues growth retardation in mice.

    PubMed

    Rozhdestvensky, Timofey S; Robeck, Thomas; Galiveti, Chenna R; Raabe, Carsten A; Seeger, Birte; Wolters, Anna; Gubar, Leonid V; Brosius, Jürgen; Skryabin, Boris V

    2016-01-01

    Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) is a neurogenetic disorder caused by loss of paternally expressed genes on chromosome 15q11-q13. The PWS-critical region (PWScr) contains an array of non-protein coding IPW-A exons hosting intronic SNORD116 snoRNA genes. Deletion of PWScr is associated with PWS in humans and growth retardation in mice exhibiting ~15% postnatal lethality in C57BL/6 background. Here we analysed a knock-in mouse containing a 5'HPRT-LoxP-Neo(R) cassette (5'LoxP) inserted upstream of the PWScr. When the insertion was inherited maternally in a paternal PWScr-deletion mouse model (PWScr(p-/m5'LoxP)), we observed compensation of growth retardation and postnatal lethality. Genomic methylation pattern and expression of protein-coding genes remained unaltered at the PWS-locus of PWScr(p-/m5'LoxP) mice. Interestingly, ubiquitous Snord116 and IPW-A exon transcription from the originally silent maternal chromosome was detected. In situ hybridization indicated that PWScr(p-/m5'LoxP) mice expressed Snord116 in brain areas similar to wild type animals. Our results suggest that the lack of PWScr RNA expression in certain brain areas could be a primary cause of the growth retardation phenotype in mice. We propose that activation of disease-associated genes on imprinted regions could lead to general therapeutic strategies in associated diseases. PMID:26848093

  2. Maternal transcription of non-protein coding RNAs from the PWS-critical region rescues growth retardation in mice

    PubMed Central

    Rozhdestvensky, Timofey S.; Robeck, Thomas; Galiveti, Chenna R.; Raabe, Carsten A.; Seeger, Birte; Wolters, Anna; Gubar, Leonid V.; Brosius, Jürgen; Skryabin, Boris V.

    2016-01-01

    Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) is a neurogenetic disorder caused by loss of paternally expressed genes on chromosome 15q11-q13. The PWS-critical region (PWScr) contains an array of non-protein coding IPW-A exons hosting intronic SNORD116 snoRNA genes. Deletion of PWScr is associated with PWS in humans and growth retardation in mice exhibiting ~15% postnatal lethality in C57BL/6 background. Here we analysed a knock-in mouse containing a 5′HPRT-LoxP-NeoR cassette (5′LoxP) inserted upstream of the PWScr. When the insertion was inherited maternally in a paternal PWScr-deletion mouse model (PWScrp−/m5′LoxP), we observed compensation of growth retardation and postnatal lethality. Genomic methylation pattern and expression of protein-coding genes remained unaltered at the PWS-locus of PWScrp−/m5′LoxP mice. Interestingly, ubiquitous Snord116 and IPW-A exon transcription from the originally silent maternal chromosome was detected. In situ hybridization indicated that PWScrp−/m5′LoxP mice expressed Snord116 in brain areas similar to wild type animals. Our results suggest that the lack of PWScr RNA expression in certain brain areas could be a primary cause of the growth retardation phenotype in mice. We propose that activation of disease-associated genes on imprinted regions could lead to general therapeutic strategies in associated diseases. PMID:26848093

  3. Identification of a Major Dimorphic Region in the Functionally Critical N-Terminal ID1 Domain of VAR2CSA.

    PubMed

    Doritchamou, Justin; Sabbagh, Audrey; Jespersen, Jakob S; Renard, Emmanuelle; Salanti, Ali; Nielsen, Morten A; Deloron, Philippe; Tuikue Ndam, Nicaise

    2015-01-01

    The VAR2CSA protein of Plasmodium falciparum is transported to and expressed on the infected erythrocyte surface where it plays a key role in placental malaria (PM). It is the current leading candidate for a vaccine to prevent PM. However, the antigenic polymorphism integral to VAR2CSA poses a challenge for vaccine development. Based on detailed analysis of polymorphisms in the sequence of its ligand-binding N-terminal region, currently the main focus for vaccine development, we assessed var2csa from parasite isolates infecting pregnant women. The results reveal for the first time the presence of a major dimorphic region in the functionally critical N-terminal ID1 domain. Parasite isolates expressing VAR2CSA with particular motifs present within this domain are associated with gravidity- and parasite density-related effects. These observations are of particular interest in guiding efforts with respect to optimization of the VAR2CSA-based vaccines currently under development. PMID:26393516

  4. Identification of a Major Dimorphic Region in the Functionally Critical N-Terminal ID1 Domain of VAR2CSA

    PubMed Central

    Doritchamou, Justin; Sabbagh, Audrey; Jespersen, Jakob S.; Renard, Emmanuelle; Salanti, Ali; Nielsen, Morten A.; Deloron, Philippe; Tuikue Ndam, Nicaise

    2015-01-01

    The VAR2CSA protein of Plasmodium falciparum is transported to and expressed on the infected erythrocyte surface where it plays a key role in placental malaria (PM). It is the current leading candidate for a vaccine to prevent PM. However, the antigenic polymorphism integral to VAR2CSA poses a challenge for vaccine development. Based on detailed analysis of polymorphisms in the sequence of its ligand-binding N-terminal region, currently the main focus for vaccine development, we assessed var2csa from parasite isolates infecting pregnant women. The results reveal for the first time the presence of a major dimorphic region in the functionally critical N-terminal ID1 domain. Parasite isolates expressing VAR2CSA with particular motifs present within this domain are associated with gravidity- and parasite density-related effects. These observations are of particular interest in guiding efforts with respect to optimization of the VAR2CSA-based vaccines currently under development. PMID:26393516

  5. Critical frequency and maximum electron density of F2 region over four stations in the North American sector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ezquer, R. G.; Cabrera, M. A.; López, J. L.; Albornoz, M. R.; Mosert, M.; Marcó, P.; Buresova, D.

    2011-03-01

    Ionosonde measurements obtained at College (64.9°N, 212.0°E), Goose Bay (53.39°N, 299.7°E), Boulder (40°N, 254.7°E) and Wallops Island (37.9°N, 284.5°E) during low solar activity years were used to check the performance of International Reference Ionosphere model to predict the critical frequency of the F2 region (foF2) of the ionosphere. Data were obtained from the University of Massachusetts Lowell DIDBase through internet and correspond to low solar activity years. CCIR and URSI options were used to model calculations. The results show that the modeled values given for Goose Bay, Boulder and Wallops Island are better than those given for the other station. For the middle latitude stations, in general, the deviations between modeled and measured foF2 are lower than 20%. Cases with very good agreement between predictions and measurements have been obtained. The worst predictions are given for the high latitude station. The study of maximum electron density of the F2 region (NmF2) shows cases where the deviation between modeled and measured NmF2 reaches values as high as 40% or more. The effects of these disagreements on ionospheric modelling are stressed. Additional studies considering other solar activities are needed.

  6. The variations of ionosphere critical frequency of E layer over the equatorial geomagnetic region in Southeast Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenpankho, Prasert; Ishii, Mamoru; Supnithi, Pornchai

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the values of the critical frequency of the ionospheric E layer, foE, obtained at Chumphon ionospheric observatory station, Thailand. For a declining phase of the solar cycle 23 during the year 2005-2008 and an inclining phase of the solar cycle 24 during the year 2009-2013, the foE data have been used to investigate the foE variations over the equatorial geomagnetic region in Southeast Asia. A comparison between the observation data and International Reference Ionosphere (IRI) 2012 model has also been investigated and studied. The results show that the foE obtained from IRI 2012 model underestimates foE from Chumphon station especially during the period of 7-11 am and after 6 pm for each day and all seasons. As the results combining with the previous investigations, we suggest that the underestimation of ionospheric foE by IRI 2012 model is helpful for the correction and improvement of IRI model in an equatorial Asia region.

  7. A mathematical recursive model for accurate description of the phase behavior in the near-critical region by Generalized van der Waals Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jibeom; Jeon, Joonhyeon

    2015-01-01

    Recently, related studies on Equation Of State (EOS) have reported that generalized van der Waals (GvdW) shows poor representations in the near critical region for non-polar and non-sphere molecules. Hence, there are still remains a problem of GvdW parameters to minimize loss in describing saturated vapor densities and vice versa. This paper describes a recursive model GvdW (rGvdW) for an accurate representation of pure fluid materials in the near critical region. For the performance evaluation of rGvdW in the near critical region, other EOS models are also applied together with two pure molecule group: alkane and amine. The comparison results show rGvdW provides much more accurate and reliable predictions of pressure than the others. The calculating model of EOS through this approach gives an additional insight into the physical significance of accurate prediction of pressure in the nearcritical region.

  8. Critical assessment of the forecasting capability of L-band scintillation over the magnetic equatorial region - Campaign results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagiya, Mala S.; Sridharan, R.; Sunda, Surendra; Jose, Lijo; Pant, Tarun K.; Choudhary, Rajkumar

    2014-04-01

    A critical evaluation of the novel method suggested by Sridharan et al. (2012) to forecast L-band scintillation is made using the results from a special campaign conducted from Trivandrum (8.5°N, 76.91°E, dip latitude 0.5°N), India, during April 2012. The significance of the campaign lies in the fact that, (1) efforts are made to minimise the uncertainties due to the movement of the satellite platform (TEC and S4 observations from GNSS satellites) by choosing a recently launched GSAT-8 geostationary satellite for ionospheric scintillation in L1 band, (2) unlike the previous study (Sridharan et al., 2012) wherein the GPS derived TEC fluctuations were treated as representative of ionospheric perturbations, in the present exercise, the fluctuating component of the foF2 data from the ground based digital Ionosonde have been taken as a measure of the perturbations and (3) though both the GSAT and Ionosonde are stationary, still the ionospheric regions they represent are physically separated and in order to correlate the scintillation over the GSAT location to the forecast perturbations over the ionosonde location, the required zonal velocity of the perturbations/irregularities is estimated using GSAT and GPS scintillation data during one of the close-by GPS passes and this is taken to represent the particular solar epoch and season. Following the earlier method of Sridharan et al. (2012) the relative amplitudes and phase integrity of the perturbations have been maintained and extended throughout night. By adopting the above changes, it has been noted that the forecasting capability of L band scintillation has remarkably improved vindicating the role of perturbations in the evolution of the scintillation, thus making it more useful for practical applications. The nonoccurrence of scintillation on occasions in the prescribed time windows has also been understood based on the changes in the background conditions. A threshold upward velocity for the evening F-region as

  9. Noonan like appearance and familial deletion of the 22q11 Shprintzen-DiGeorge critical region

    SciTech Connect

    Piussan, C.; Mathieu, M.; Boudailliez, B.

    1994-09-01

    Shprintzen velocardiofacial syndrome (VCFS) and reported cases of autosomal dominant DiGeorge sequence (DGS) both belong to a heterogeneous developmental field defect due to the familial segregation of a 22q11 deletion. Two sisters present with mental retardation, dysmorphia and multiple congenital anomalies. The eldest has a Noonan-like appearance; short stature, short webbed neck, low posterior hairline, widely spaced nipples, hemivertebrae, speech disability and mild hypoparathyroidism. Her younger sister has prominent eyes, floppy ears, pulmonary valvular stenosis, hypoplastic right kidney, left multicystic kidney, hypoparathyroidism and renal failure causing death at age 3. Their retarded mother has a typical Shprintzen phenotype and no hypoparathyroidism. A deletion of the critical DiGeorge-Shprintzen conotruncal malformation region was found by FISH in the mother and her Noonan-like daughter. In the mother`s family exist 3 cleft palates, an imperforate anus, a stillbirth and one infant died at age 3 months because of heart malformation. To our knowledge, another case of Noonan-like appearance in a DG patient affected with monosomy 22q11 has been reported in 1992 by Wilson et al. Whether resulting from the hemizygosity of a gene or from the deletion of contiguous genes, the wide DGS-VCFS spectrum encompasses quite variable phenotypes, discordant for palatal and conotruncal defects as well as for hypoparathyroidism, dysmorphic features and multiple congenital anomalies. Physical mapping of both the large 22q11 region commonly lost and the smallest deletion sufficient to produce DGS has been done and may account for the broadening spectrum, the variable expression and the frequently delayed diagnosis of this syndrome.

  10. Faulting in the Yucca Mountain region: Critical review and analyses of tectonic data from the central Basin and Range

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrill, D.A.; Stirewalt, G.L.; Henderson, D.B.; Stamatakos, J.; Morris, A.P.; Spivey, K.H.; Wernicke, B.P.

    1996-03-01

    Yucca Mountain, Nevada, has been proposed as the potential site for a high-level waste (HLW) repository. The tectonic setting of Yucca Mountain presents several potential hazards for a proposed repository, such as potential for earthquake seismicity, fault disruption, basaltic volcanism, magma channeling along pre-existing faults, and faults and fractures that may serve as barriers or conduits for groundwater flow. Characterization of geologic structures and tectonic processes will be necessary to assess compliance with regulatory requirements for the proposed high level waste repository. In this report, we specifically investigate fault slip, seismicity, contemporary stain, and fault-slip potential in the Yucca Mountain region with regard to Key Technical Uncertainties outlined in the License Application Review Plan (Sections 3.2.1.5 through 3.2.1.9 and 3.2.2.8). These investigations center on (i) alternative methods of determining the slip history of the Bare Mountain Fault, (ii) cluster analysis of historic earthquakes, (iii) crustal strain determinations from Global Positioning System measurements, and (iv) three-dimensional slip-tendency analysis. The goal of this work is to assess uncertainties associated with neotectonic data sets critical to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses` ability to provide prelicensing guidance and perform license application review with respect to the proposed HLW repository at Yucca Mountain.

  11. Observation of parametric instabilities in the quarter critical density region driven by the Nike KrF laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weaver, J. L.; Oh, J.; Phillips, L.; Afeyan, B.; Seely, J.; Kehne, D.; Brown, C. M.; Obenschain, S. P.; Serlin, V.; Schmitt, A. J.; Feldman, U.; Lehmberg, R. H.; Mclean, E.; Manka, C.

    2013-02-01

    The krypton-fluoride (KrF) laser is an attractive choice for inertial confinement fusion due to its combination of short wavelength (λ =248 nm), large bandwidth (up to 3 THz), and superior beam smoothing by induced spatial incoherence. These qualities improve the overall hydrodynamics of directly driven pellet implosions and should allow use of increased laser intensity due to higher thresholds for laser plasma instabilities when compared to frequency tripled Nd:glass lasers (λ =351 nm). Here, we report the first observations of the two-plasmon decay instability using a KrF laser. The experiments utilized the Nike laser facility to irradiate solid plastic planar targets over a range of pulse lengths (0.35 ns≤τ≤1.25 ns) and intensities (up to 2×1015 W/cm2). Variation of the laser pulse created different combinations of electron temperature and electron density scale length. The observed onset of instability growth was consistent with the expected scaling that KrF lasers have a higher intensity threshold for instabilities in the quarter critical density region.

  12. Observation of parametric instabilities in the quarter critical density region driven by the Nike KrF laser

    SciTech Connect

    Weaver, J. L.; Kehne, D.; Brown, C. M.; Obenschain, S. P.; Serlin, V.; Schmitt, A. J.; Oh, J.; Lehmberg, R. H.; Mclean, E.; Manka, C.; Phillips, L.; Afeyan, B.; Seely, J.; Feldman, U.

    2013-02-15

    The krypton-fluoride (KrF) laser is an attractive choice for inertial confinement fusion due to its combination of short wavelength ({lambda}=248 nm), large bandwidth (up to 3 THz), and superior beam smoothing by induced spatial incoherence. These qualities improve the overall hydrodynamics of directly driven pellet implosions and should allow use of increased laser intensity due to higher thresholds for laser plasma instabilities when compared to frequency tripled Nd:glass lasers ({lambda}=351 nm). Here, we report the first observations of the two-plasmon decay instability using a KrF laser. The experiments utilized the Nike laser facility to irradiate solid plastic planar targets over a range of pulse lengths (0.35 ns{<=}{tau}{<=}1.25 ns) and intensities (up to 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2}). Variation of the laser pulse created different combinations of electron temperature and electron density scale length. The observed onset of instability growth was consistent with the expected scaling that KrF lasers have a higher intensity threshold for instabilities in the quarter critical density region.

  13. [Construction of the collaborative relationship for the complicated patients with the Critical care centers and the Emergency departments in regional hospitals in Japan].

    PubMed

    Miyake, Yasufumi

    2016-02-01

    All the people have the right to die with dignity, but increase of elderly people and progress of the depauperation and isolation in Japan make it more difficult in this decade. As one of some solutions, we propose structuring the collaborative relationship between the critical care centers and the regional hospitals for the complicated patients. Patients inferred seriously ill should be transported first to the critical care center with substantial medical equipment and enough staff, diagnosed and stabilized in it. After those procedures, patients are transfered to and followed in the regional hospital for a certain period. These allotments of functions between hospitals are useful in the present condition. PMID:26915264

  14. Physical mapping of the holoprosencephaly critical region in 21q22.3, exclusion of SIM2 as a candidate gene for holoprosencephaly, and mapping of SIM2 to a region of chromosome 21 important for Down syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Muenke, M.; Bone, L.J.; Mitchell, H.F.

    1995-11-01

    We set out to define the holoprosencephaly (HPE) critical region on chromosome 21 and also to determine whether there were human homologues of the Drosophila single-minded (sim) gene that might be involved in HPE. Analysis of somatic cell hybrid clones that contained rearranged chromosomes 21 from HPE patients defined the HPE minimal critical region in 21q22.3 as D21S113 to qter. We used established somatic cell hybrid mapping panels to map SIM2 to chromosome 21 within subbands q22.2-q22.3. Analysis of the HPE patient-derived somatic cell hybrids showed that SIM2 is not deleted in two of three patients and thus is not a likely candidate for HPE1, the HPE gene on chromosome 21. However, SIM2 does map within the Down syndrome critical region and thus is a candidate gene that might contribute to the Down syndrome phenotype. 31 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Posterior kV-CBCT scanning of the head and neck region minimizes doses to critical organs with sustained image quality.

    PubMed

    Khamfongkhruea, Chirasak; Utapom, Kitsana; Munsing, Siwapon; Suttiprapha, Sittipong; Tannanonta, Chirapha; Yabsantia, Sumalee

    2015-07-01

    We evaluated the absorbed dose to critical organs, as well as the image quality, at different partial angles in kV-CBCT (Cone Beam Computed Tomography) scanning of the head and neck region. CBCT images of phantom from a 200° rotation were performed by using three different scanning paths, anterior, posterior, and right lateral with Catphan504 and RANDO phantoms. Critical organ dose was measured using TLD 100H in the RANDO phantom. The image quality of those phantoms was evaluated, using HU uniformity, HU linearity, contrast-to-noise ratio, low contrast visibility and spatial resolution with the Catphan504 dataset; and 5-point grading scales for the RANDO phantom dataset by five radiation oncologists. The image qualities from Catphan504 and RANDO phantom of every scanning path were comparable, with no statistically significant difference (p ≥ 0.05). However, there was a significant difference in the critical organ dose in all paths (p < 0.05), depending on the critical organ location and the scanning direction. Scanning directions show no effects on the image quality. Differences in absorbed dose to critical organs should were evaluated. The posterior scanning path for the CBCT was deemed preferable due because of considerably lower doses to several critical organs of the head and neck region. PMID:25921330

  16. The use of ERTS-1 data for the inventory of critical land resources for regional land use planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clapp, J. L.; Kiefer, R. W.; Mccarthy, M. M.; Niemann, B. J., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    Computer-generated spatial and statistical comparisons of critical land resource data derived from conventional sources, RB-57 photographs, and ERTS images, for an eastern Wisconsin test site, suggest that certain critical land resource data can be mapped from ERTS images on a statewide basis. This paper presents one of the biotic resources, wetlands, as an example of the use of ERTS imagery to inventory land resources.

  17. Down syndrome critical region 2 protein inhibits the transcriptional activity of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {beta} in HEK293 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Hae Jin; Park, Joongkyu; Seo, Su Ryeon; Kim, Jongsun; Paik, Seung R.; Chung, Kwang Chul

    2008-11-21

    Down syndrome is mainly caused by a trisomy of chromosome 21. The Down syndrome critical region 2 (DSCR2) gene is located within a part of chromosome 21, the Down syndrome critical region (DSCR). To investigate the function of DSCR2, we sought to identify DSCR2-interacting proteins using yeast two-hybrid assays. A human fetal brain cDNA library was screened, and DSCR2 was found to interact with a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {beta}, (PPAR{beta}). A co-immunoprecipitation assay demonstrated that DSCR2 physically interacts with PPAR{beta} in mammalian HEK293 cells. DSCR2 also inhibited the ligand-induced transcriptional activity of PPAR{beta}. Furthermore, PPAR{beta} also decreased the solubility of DSCR2, which increased levels of insoluble DSCR2.

  18. Super- and sub-critical regions in shocks driven by radio-loud and radio-quiet CMEs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bemporad, Alessandro; Mancuso, Salvatore

    2013-05-01

    White-light coronagraphic images of Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) observed by SOHO/LASCO C2 have been used to estimate the density jump along the whole front of two CME-driven shocks. The two events are different in that the first one was a "radio-loud" fast CME, while the second one was a "radio quiet" slow CME. From the compression ratios inferred along the shock fronts, we estimated the Alfvén Mach numbers for the general case of an oblique shock. It turns out that the "radio-loud" CME shock is initially super-critical around the shock center, while later on the whole shock becomes sub-critical. On the contrary, the shock associated with the "radio-quiet" CME is sub-critical at all times. This suggests that CME-driven shocks could be efficient particle accelerators at the shock nose only at the initiation phases of the event, if and when the shock is super-critical, while at later times they lose their energy and the capability to accelerate high energetic particles.

  19. Education for Sustainable Development Networks, Potential and Challenge: A Critical Reflection on the Formation of the Caribbean Regional Network

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Down, Lorna; Nurse, Henderson

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we seek to reflect critically on the process of establishing a Caribbean Network for the reorientation of teacher education to address sustainability. We begin by addressing the origin and purpose/value of the network. As a sub-network of the UNITWIN/UNESCO International Network for the Reorientation of Teacher Education to Address…

  20. Critical period of weed control in winter canola (Brassica napus L.) in a semi-arid region.

    PubMed

    Aghaalikhani, M; Yaghoobi, S R

    2008-03-01

    In order to determine the critical period of weed control in winter canola (Brassica napus L. cv. Okapi) an experiment was carried out at research field of Tarbiat Modarres University, Tehran, Iran on 2004-2005 growing season. Fourteen experimental treatments which divided into two sets were arranged in Randomized complete blocks design with four replications. In the first set, the crop was kept weed-free from emergence time to two-leaf stage (V2), four-leaf stage (V4), six-leaf stage (V6), eight-leaf stage (V8), early flowering (IF), 50% of silique set (50% SS) and final harvest (H). In the second set, weeds where permitted to grow with the crop until above mentioned stages. In this study critical period of weed control was determined according to evaluate seed bank emerged weed biomass effect on canola grain yield loss using Gompertz and logistic equations. Result showed a critical time of weed control about 25 days after emergence (between four to six-leaf stages) with 5% accepted yield loss. Therefore, weed control in this time could provide the best result and avoid yield loss and damage to agroecosystem. PMID:18819576

  1. X-linked mixed deafness (DFN3): Cloning and characterization of the critical region allows the identification of novel microdeletions and a duplication

    SciTech Connect

    Cremers, F.P.M.; de Kok, Y.J.M.; Huber, I.

    1994-09-01

    We have constructed a 1.8 megabase YAC contig in the Xq21.41 region using DXS169, DXS26, and DXS995. This contig encompasses the X-linked mixed deafness (DFN3) gene(s) as judged from detailed physical mapping of large Xq21 deletions associated with contiguous gene syndromes and two microdeletions associated with classical DFN3. As a prerequisite for positional cloning of the DFN3 gene, a 850-kb cosmid contig spanning the critical region was constructed by subcloning of two YACs and by cosmid walking in the ICRF X-chromosome library. Using Southern- and PFGE-analysis, we were able to identify 2 novel microdeletions and a 150-kb duplication associated with DFN3. We also identified a sizeable deletion in a patient suffering from choroideremia and mental retardation. This deletion encompasses 40 kb of the distal end of the cosmid contig. Since this patient does not show hearing loss, this finding positions the distal boundary of the DFN3 critical region in our cosmid contig. Our observations suggest that the DFN3 gene is very large (>400 kb) spanning the loci DXS26 and DXS995. In collaboration with Drs. B. Korn and A. Poustka (DKFZ, Heidelberg), cosmids from the contig were used to enrich for cDNAs from the relevant region. Detailed characterization of these cDNAs should soon enable us to identify the DFN3 gene(s).

  2. Beyond the horizon: the role of academic health centers in improving the health of rural communities.

    PubMed

    Gazewood, John D; Rollins, Lisa K; Galazka, Sim S

    2006-09-01

    Academic health centers (AHCs) face increasing pressures from federal, state, and community stakeholders to fulfill their social missions to the communities they serve. Yet, in the 21st century, rural communities in the United States face an array of health care problems, including a shortage of physicians, health problems that disproportionately affect rural populations, a need to improve quality of care, and health disparities related to disproportionate levels of poverty and shifting demographics. AHCs have a key role to play in addressing these issues. AHCs can increase physician supply by targeting their admissions policies and educational programs. Specific health concerns of rural populations can be further addressed through increased use of telemedicine consultations. By partnering with providers in rural areas and through the use of innovative technologies, AHCs can help rural providers increase the quality of care. Partnerships with rural communities provide opportunities for participatory research to address health disparities. In addition, collaboration between AHCs, regional planning agencies, and rural communities can lead to mutually beneficial outcomes. At a time when many AHCs are operating in an environment with dwindling resources, it is even more critical for AHCs to build creative partnerships to help meet the needs of their regional communities. PMID:16936482

  3. CADM1 is a strong neuroblastoma candidate gene that maps within a 3.72 Mb critical region of loss on 11q23

    PubMed Central

    Michels, Evi; Hoebeeck, Jasmien; De Preter, Katleen; Schramm, Alexander; Brichard, Bénédicte; De Paepe, Anne; Eggert, Angelika; Laureys, Geneviève; Vandesompele, Jo; Speleman, Frank

    2008-01-01

    Background Recurrent loss of part of the long arm of chromosome 11 is a well established hallmark of a subtype of aggressive neuroblastomas. Despite intensive mapping efforts to localize the culprit 11q tumour suppressor gene, this search has been unsuccessful thus far as no sufficiently small critical region could be delineated for selection of candidate genes. Methods To refine the critical region of 11q loss, the chromosome 11 status of 100 primary neuroblastoma tumours and 29 cell lines was analyzed using a BAC array containing a chromosome 11 tiling path. For the genes mapping within our refined region of loss, meta-analysis on published neuroblastoma mRNA gene expression datasets was performed for candidate gene selection. The DNA methylation status of the resulting candidate gene was determined using re-expression experiments by treatment of neuroblastoma cells with the demethylating agent 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine and bisulphite sequencing. Results Two small critical regions of loss within 11q23 at chromosomal band 11q23.1-q23.2 (1.79 Mb) and 11q23.2-q23.3 (3.72 Mb) were identified. In a first step towards further selection of candidate neuroblastoma tumour suppressor genes, we performed a meta-analysis on published expression profiles of 692 neuroblastoma tumours. Integration of the resulting candidate gene list with expression data of neuroblastoma progenitor cells pinpointed CADM1 as a compelling candidate gene. Meta-analysis indicated that CADM1 expression has prognostic significance and differential expression for the gene was noted in unfavourable neuroblastoma versus normal neuroblasts. Methylation analysis provided no evidence for a two-hit mechanism in 11q deleted cell lines. Conclusion Our study puts CADM1 forward as a strong candidate neuroblastoma suppressor gene. Further functional studies are warranted to elucidate the role of CADM1 in neuroblastoma development and to investigate the possibility of CADM1 haploinsufficiency in neuroblastoma. PMID

  4. Critical regions and residues for self-interaction of grapevine leafroll-associated virus 2 protein p24.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qing; Guo, Ran; Li, Mingjun; Feng, Ming; Wang, Xianyou; Wang, Qi; Cheng, Yuqin

    2016-07-15

    The 24-kDa protein (p24) encoded by grapevine leafroll-associated virus 2 (GLRaV-2) is an RNA-silencing suppressor. In this work, a yeast two-hybrid system (YTHS) and bimolecular fluorescence complementation analyses showed that GLRaV-2 p24 can interact with itself, and that this interaction occurs in the cytoplasm of Nicotiana benthamiana cells. To identify the functional region(s) and crucial amino acid residues required for p24 self-interaction, various truncated and substitution mutants were generated. YTHS assay showed that in both homologous pairing and pairing with the wild-type p24, the functional regions mapped to aa 10-180 or 1-170 which contain, respectively, all seven α-helices or the first six α-helices and the N-terminal end (aa 1-9) of the protein. When only the full-length p24 was an interaction partner, the functional region of aa 1-170 could be further mapped to aa 1-140 which contains four α-helices plus most of the fifth α-helix. Further analysis with substitution mutants demonstrated that hydrophobic residues I35/F38/V85/V89/W149 and V162/L169/L170, which may, respectively, mediate the inter-domain interaction of the same p24 monomer and the tail-to-tail association between two p24 counterparts, are crucial for homotypic p24-p24 interaction. In addition, substitution of two basic residues-R2 or R86-of p24, which may play important functional roles in RNA binding, did not seem to affect self-interaction of the mutants in yeast but had obvious effects in plant cells. Taken together, our results demonstrate the functional regions and crucial amino acids for p24 self-interaction. PMID:27084306

  5. Deletion involving D15S113 in a mother and son without Angelman syndrome: Refinement of the Angelman syndrome critical deletion region

    SciTech Connect

    Michaelis, R.C.; Skinner, S.A.; Lethco, B.A.

    1995-01-02

    Deletions of 15q11-q13 typically result in Angelman syndrome when inherited from the mother and Prader-Willi syndrome when inherited from the father. The critical deletion region for Angelman syndrome has recently been restricted by a report of an Angelman syndrome patient with a deletion spanning less than 200 kb around the D15S113 locus. We report here on a mother and son with a deletion of chromosome 15 that includes the D15S113 locus. The son has mild to moderate mental retardation and minor anomalies, while the mother has a borderline intellectual deficit and slightly downslanting palpebral fissures. Neither patient has the seizures, excessive laughter and hand clapping, ataxia or the facial anomalies which are characteristic of Angelman syndrome. The proximal boundary of the deletion in our patients lies between the D15S10 and The D15S113 loci. Our patients do not have Angelman syndrome, despite the deletion of the D15S113 marker. This suggests that the Angelman syndrome critical deletion region is now defined as the overlap between the deletion found in the previously reported Angelman syndrome patient and the region that is intact in our patients. 28 refs., 6 figs.

  6. A 1.5-Mb cosmid contig of the CMT1A duplication/HNPP deletion critical region in 17p11.2-p12

    SciTech Connect

    Murakami, Tatsufumi; Lupski, J.R.

    1996-05-15

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A (CMT1A) is associated with a 1.5-Mb tandem duplication in chromosome 17p11.2-p12, and hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) is associated with a 1.5-Mb deletion at this locus. Both diseases appear to result from an altered copy number of the peripheral myelin protein-22 gene, PMP22, which maps within the critical region. To identify additional genes and characterize chromosomal elements, a 1.5-Mb cosmid contig of the CMT1A duplication/HNPP deletion critical region was assembled using a yeast artificial chromosome (YAC)-based isolation and binning strategy. Whole YAC probes were used for screening a high-density arrayed chromosome 17-specific cosmid library. Selected cosmids were spotted on dot blots and assigned to bins defined by YACs. This binning of cosmids facilitated the subsequent fingerprint analysis. The 1.5-Mb region was covered by 137 cosmids with a minimum overlap set of 52 cosmids assigned to 17 bins and 9 contigs. 20 refs., 2 figs.

  7. A large, dominant pedigree of atrioventricular septal defect (AVSD): Exclusion from the Down syndrome critical region on chromosome 21

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, L.; Curtis, A.; Stephenson, A.; Goodship, J.; Burn, J. ); Korenberg, J.R.; Schipper, R.D. ); Allan, L. ); Chenevix-Trench, G. )

    1993-12-01

    The authors describe a large pedigree of individuals with autosomal dominant atrioventricular septal defect (AVSD). The pedigree includes affected individuals and individuals who have transmitted the defect but are not clinically affected. AVSDs are a rare congenital heart malformation that occurs as only 2.8% of isolated cardiac lesions. They are the predominant heart defect in children with Down syndrome, making chromosome 21 a candidate for genes involved in atrioventricular septal development. The authors have carried out a linkage study in the pedigree by using 10 simple-sequence polymorphisms from chromosome 21. Multipoint linkage analysis gives lod scores of less than [minus]2 for the region of trisomy 21 associated with heart defects, which excludes a locus within this region as the cause of the defect in this family. 34 refs., 5 figs.

  8. A large, dominant pedigree of atrioventricular septal defect (AVSD): exclusion from the Down syndrome critical region on chromosome 21.

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, L; Curtis, A; Korenberg, J R; Schipper, R D; Allan, L; Chenevix-Trench, G; Stephenson, A; Goodship, J; Burn, J

    1993-01-01

    We describe a large pedigree of individuals with autosomal dominant atrioventricular septal defect (AVSD). The pedigree includes affected individuals and individuals who have transmitted the defect but are not clinically affected. AVSDs are a rare congenital heart malformation that occurs as only 2.8% of isolated cardiac lesions. They are the predominant heart defect in children with Down syndrome, making chromosome 21 a candidate for genes involved in atrioventricular septal development. We have carried out a linkage study in the pedigree by using 10 simple-sequence polymorphisms from chromosome 21. Multipoint linkage analysis gives lod scores of less than -2 for the region of trisomy 21 associated with heart defects, which excludes a locus within this region as the cause of the defect in this family. Images Figure 3 PMID:8250042

  9. An unbalanced 5;22 translocation in a patient with features of VCFS: Confirmation by FISH of loss of the DGS/VCFS critical region

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.J.; McGlothlin, J.C.; Lindsay, E.A.

    1994-09-01

    A 14-month-old male with a history of ventricular septal defect (VSD) and cleft lip and palate (CL/P) was referred for evaluation because of growth retardation, developmental delay and hypotonia. The initial cytogenetic analysis was 45,XY,-5,-22,+der(5)t(5q:22q). Determination of breakpoints 5q35.3 and 22q11.2 were made on G-banded chromosomes with band lengths of over 550. However, with both regions being light G bands, it was difficult to tell if the break in 22 was proximal to or distal to the DiGeorge syndrome/velocardiofacial syndrome (DGS/VCFS) critical region. Since the patient had a VSD and CL/P, velocardiofacial syndrome and a deletion of the DGS/VCFS critical region was suspected. FISH analysis of the derivative chromosome was performed with a cocktail containing two probes (ONCOR), D22S75, which maps to the DGS/VCFS region in 22q11.2 and D22S39, which maps to 22q13.3 and is used as a control for the presence of chromosome 22. Three fluorescent signals were observed, two on the normal 22 and the third on the terminal end of the derivative 5 chromosome verifying the translocation of 22q to 5q. No signal was observed for D22S75 on the proximal part of the translocated segment, verifying a deletion of the DGS/VCFS region in a patient whose clinical evaluation is consistent with velocardiofacial syndrome. Experiments with additional probes are underway to determine the deletion boundaries.

  10. Two distinct regions in the model protein Peb1 are critical for its heterologous transport out of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Escherichia coli is frequently the first-choice host organism in expression of heterologous recombinant proteins in basic research as well as in production of commercial, therapeutic polypeptides. Especially the secretion of proteins into the culture medium of E. coli is advantageous compared to intracellular production due to the ease in recovery of the recombinant protein. Since E. coli naturally is a poor secretor of proteins, a few strategies for optimization of extracellular secretion have been described. We have previously reported efficient secretion of the diagnostically interesting model protein Peb1 of Campylobacter jejuni into the growth medium of Escherichia coli strain MKS12 (ΔfliCfliD). To generate a more detailed understanding of the molecular mechanisms behind this interesting heterologous secretion system with biotechnological implications, we here analyzed further the transport of Peb1 in the E. coli host. Results When mature Peb1 was expressed without its SecA-YEG -dependent signal sequence and without the putative signal peptidase II recognition sequence in E. coli MKS111ΔHBB lacking the flagellar secretion complex, the protein was found in the periplasm and growth medium which indicated a flagellum-independent translocation. We assessed the Peb1 secretion proficiency by an exhaustive search for transport-affecting regions using a transposition-based scanning mutagenesis strategy. Strikingly, insertion mutagenesis of only two segments, called TAR1 (residues 42 and 43) and TAR2 (residues 173 to 180), prevented Peb1 secretion individually. We confirmed the importance of TAR regions by subsequent site-specific mutagenesis and verified that the secretion deficiency of Peb1 mutants was not due to insolubility or aggregation of the proteins in the cytoplasm. We found by cell fractionation that the mutant proteins were present in the periplasm as well as in the cytoplasm of MKS12. Hence, mutagenesis of TAR regions did not affect export of

  11. The linker region of breast cancer resistance protein ABCG2 is critical for coupling of ATP-dependent drug transport.

    PubMed

    Macalou, S; Robey, R W; Jabor Gozzi, G; Shukla, S; Grosjean, I; Hegedus, T; Ambudkar, S V; Bates, S E; Di Pietro, A

    2016-05-01

    The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters of class G display a different domain organisation than P-glycoprotein/ABCB1 and bacterial homologues with a nucleotide-binding domain preceding the transmembrane domain. The linker region connecting these domains is unique and its function and structure cannot be predicted. Sequence analysis revealed that the human ABCG2 linker contains a LSGGE sequence, homologous to the canonical C-motif/ABC signature present in all ABC nucleotide-binding domains. Predictions of disorder and of secondary structures indicated that this C2-sequence was highly mobile and located between an α-helix and a loop similarly to the C-motif. Point mutations of the two first residues of the C2-sequence fully abolished the transport-coupled ATPase activity, and led to the complete loss of cell resistance to mitoxantrone. The interaction with potent, selective and non-competitive, ABCG2 inhibitors was also significantly altered upon mutation. These results suggest an important mechanistic role for the C2-sequence of the ABCG2 linker region in ATP binding and/or hydrolysis coupled to drug efflux. PMID:26708291

  12. Two pedigrees of autosomal dominant atrioventricular canal defect (AVCD): Exclusion from the critical region on 8p

    SciTech Connect

    Amati, F.; Mari, A.; Mingarelli, R.

    1995-07-03

    Atrioventricular canal defects (AVCD) constitute the predominant congenital heart defect in Down`s syndrome. For this reason, a candidate gene involved in atrioventricular canal development was previously searched and excluded in dominant pedigrees of AVCD, using linkage analysis of polymorphisms from chromosome 21. Because of the striking association between 8p deletion and AVCD, a search for an AVCD gene was carried out in two pedigrees of individuals with autosomal dominant AVCD using a set of DNA markers of the 8pter{r_arrow}q12 region. These two families include affected individuals and subjects who have transmitted the defect but are not clinically affected. Two-point lod scores were significantly negative for all markers at penetrance levels of 90% and 50%. Multipoint analysis excluded the region covered by the markers LPL-D8S262 and 30 cM to either side of this area. This result corroborates heterogeneity of this heart defect and indicates that the genetic basis of familial AVCD is different from AVCD associated to either trisomy 21 or 8p deletion. 25 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. The Interdomain Linker Region of HIV-1 Capsid Protein is a Critical Determinant of Proper Core Assembly and Stability

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Jiyang; Ablan, Sherimay; Derebail, Suchitra; Hercík, Kamil; Soheilian, Ferri; Thomas, James A.; Tang, Shixing; Hewlett, Indira; Nagashima, Kunio; Gorelick, Robert J.; Freed, Eric O.; Levin, Judith G.

    2011-01-01

    The HIV-1 capsid protein consists of two independently folded domains connected by a flexible peptide linker (residues 146–150), the function of which remains to be defined. To investigate the role of this region in virus replication, we made alanine or leucine substitutions in each linker residue and two flanking residues. Three classes of mutants were identified: (i) S146A and T148A behave like wild type (WT); (ii) Y145A, I150A, and L151A are noninfectious, assemble unstable cores with aberrant morphology, and synthesize almost no viral DNA; and (iii) P147L and S149A display a poorly infectious, attenuated phenotype. Infectivity of P147L and S149A is rescued specifically by pseudotyping with vesicular stomatitis virus envelope glycoprotein. Moreover, despite having unstable cores, these mutants assemble WT-like structures and synthesize viral DNA, although less efficiently than WT. Collectively, these findings demonstrate that the linker region is essential for proper assembly and stability of cores and efficient replication. PMID:22036671

  14. Study of the anomalies in critical frequency of F2 layer prior to earthquakes in South American region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Soujan; Chakrabarti, Sandip Kumar; Sasmal, Sudipta; Midya, Subrata kumar

    2016-07-01

    Earthquake precursors study is very important. Earthquake preparation process starts almost 1-30 days before its occurrence. Several large earthquakes hit the west coast of South America after the year 2000. We consider five large earthquakes (mag > 6) and analyze temporal variation of Ionospheric parameters fifteen days before and fifteen days after main shocks. These parameters measured by the ground based station Jicamarca (lat 11.95 S, long 76.87 W) which lies at a distance within a radius of 1000km from the epicentre of these large earthquakes. In this paper, we define a parameter and named it as 'F-Parameter', containing critical frequency of F2 layer (f0F2) and virtual height of F layer (h'F) to examine the ionospheric variation during earthquake. The f0F2 values also revealed anomaly which has been considered as a supporting evidence for the observed correlation. We also check Dst, Kp, Ap index to confirm that these amomalies are due to seismic events only. The final results showed that the value of ionospheric parameter (F-Parameter) increased 12-3 days prior to earthquake. The increment is over +3σ from the normal variation of the parameter value.

  15. Physical Connectivity Mapping by Circular Permutation of Human Telomerase RNA Reveals New Regions Critical for Activity and Processivity.

    PubMed

    Mefford, Melissa A; Zappulla, David C

    2015-01-01

    Telomerase is a specialized ribonucleoprotein complex that extends the 3' ends of chromosomes to counteract telomere shortening. However, increased telomerase activity is associated with ∼90% of human cancers. The telomerase enzyme minimally requires an RNA (hTR) and a specialized reverse transcriptase protein (TERT) for activity in vitro. Understanding the structure-function relationships within hTR has important implications for human disease. For the first time, we have tested the physical-connectivity requirements in the 451-nucleotide hTR RNA using circular permutations, which reposition the 5' and 3' ends. Our extensive in vitro analysis identified three classes of hTR circular permutants with altered function. First, circularly permuting 3' of the template causes specific defects in repeat-addition processivity, revealing that the template recognition element found in ciliates is conserved in human telomerase RNA. Second, seven circular permutations residing within the catalytically important core and CR4/5 domains completely abolish telomerase activity, unveiling mechanistically critical portions of these domains. Third, several circular permutations between the core and CR4/5 significantly increase telomerase activity. Our extensive circular permutation results provide insights into the architecture and coordination of human telomerase RNA and highlight where the RNA could be targeted for the development of antiaging and anticancer therapeutics. PMID:26503788

  16. Amplified segment in the 'Down syndrome critical region' on HSA21 shared between Down syndrome and euploid AML-M0 excludes RUNX1, ERG and ETS2.

    PubMed

    Canzonetta, Claudia; Hoischen, Alexander; Giarin, Emanuela; Basso, Guiseppe; Veltman, Joris A; Nacheva, Elisabeth; Nizetic, Dean; Groet, Jürgen

    2012-04-01

    Children with Down syndrome have a 20- to 50-fold increased risk of acute lymphocytic or myeloid leukaemia. Whole or partial gains of chromosome 21 have been described in multiple childhood leukaemias, and have recently been reported as a likely primary event in B-precursor-acute lymphoblastic leukaemia. It is unclear which amplified gene(s) on chromosome 21 play a key role in leukaemia progression. We describe a minimal amplified segment within the so-called 'Down syndrome critical region' shared between two cases of AML-M0; a Down syndrome, and a constitutionally normal individual. Interestingly, the amplified region does not include the oncogenes RUNX1, ETS2 and ERG. PMID:22221250

  17. D5S351 and D5S1414 located at the spinal muscular atrophy critical region represent novel informative markers in the Iranian population

    PubMed Central

    Sedghi, Maryam; Vallian, Sadeq

    2015-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a degenerative neuromuscular disease associated with progressive symmetric weakness and atrophy of the limb muscles. In view of the involvement of numerous point mutations and deletions associated with the disease, the application of polymorphic markers flanking the SMA critical region could be valuable in molecular diagnosis of the disease. In the present study, D5S351 and D5S1414 polymorphic markers located at the SMA critical region in the Iranian populations were characterized. Genotyping of the markers indicated the presence of six and nine different alleles for D5S351 and D5S1414, respectively. Haplotype frequency estimation in 25 trios families and 75 unrelated individuals indicated the presence of six informative haplotypes with frequency higher than 0.05 in the studied population. Furthermore, the D′ coefficient and the χ2 value for D5S351 and D5S1414 markers revealed the presence of linkage disequilibrium between the two markers in the Iranians. These data suggested that D5S351 and D5S1414 could be suggested as informative markers for linkage analysis and molecular diagnosis of SMA in the Iranian population. PMID:26693404

  18. Identification of Critical Region Responsible for Split Hand/Foot Malformation Type 3 (SHFM3) Phenotype through Systematic Review of Literature and Mapping of Breakpoints Using Microarray Data

    PubMed Central

    Li, Catherine F.; Angione, Katie; Milunsky, Jeff M.

    2015-01-01

    Split hand/foot malformation (SHFM) is a limb malformation with underdeveloped or absent central digital rays, clefts of hands and feet, and variable syndactyly of the remaining digits. There are six types of SHFM. Here, we report a boy with SHFM type 3 having normal 4th and 5th digits, absent 2nd and 3rd digits, and a 4th finger flexion deformity, as well as absent 2nd, 3rd and 4th toes bilaterally. His father, two paternal uncles, and two paternal first cousins have similar phenotype. Chromosome analysis showed a normal male karyotype. A 514 kb gain at 10q24.31–q24.32 (chr10:102,962,134–103,476,346, hg19) was identified using 6.0 Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) microarray, resulting in the duplication of nine genes, including BTRC and FBXW4. A detailed systematic review of literature and mapping of breakpoints using microarray data from all reported cases in PubMed and DECIPHER were conducted, and exon 1 of BTRC gene was identified as the critical region responsible for the SHFM3 phenotype. The potential mechanism and future studies of this critical region causing the SHFM3 phenotype are discussed.

  19. The N-terminal Helical Region of the Hepatitis C Virus p7 Ion Channel Protein Is Critical for Infectious Virus Production

    PubMed Central

    Scull, Margaret A.; Schneider, William M.; Fung, Canny; Jones, Christopher T.; van de Belt, Marieke; Penin, François; Rice, Charles M.

    2015-01-01

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) p7 protein is required for infectious virus production via its role in assembly and ion channel activity. Although NMR structures of p7 have been reported, the location of secondary structural elements and orientation of the p7 transmembrane domains differ among models. Furthermore, the p7 structure-function relationship remains unclear. Here, extensive mutagenesis, coupled with infectious virus production phenotyping and molecular modeling, demonstrates that the N-terminal helical region plays a previously underappreciated yet critical functional role, especially with respect to E2/p7 cleavage efficiency. Interrogation of specific N-terminal helix residues identified as having p7-specific defects and predicted to point toward the channel pore, in a context of independent E2/p7 cleavage, further supports p7 as a structurally plastic, minimalist ion channel. Together, our findings indicate that the p7 N-terminal helical region is critical for E2/p7 processing, protein-protein interactions, ion channel activity, and infectious HCV production. PMID:26588073

  20. Shared and Distinct Neuroanatomic Regions Critical for Tool-related Action Production and Recognition: Evidence from 131 Left-hemisphere Stroke Patients.

    PubMed

    Tarhan, Leyla Y; Watson, Christine E; Buxbaum, Laurel J

    2015-12-01

    The inferior frontal gyrus and inferior parietal lobe have been characterized as human homologues of the monkey "mirror neuron" system, critical for both action production (AP) and action recognition (AR). However, data from brain lesion patients with selective impairment on only one of these tasks provide evidence of neural and cognitive dissociations. We sought to clarify the relationship between AP and AR, and their critical neural substrates, by directly comparing performance of 131 chronic left-hemisphere stroke patients on both tasks--to our knowledge, the largest lesion-based experimental investigation of action cognition to date. Using voxel-based lesion-symptom mapping, we found that lesions to primary motor and somatosensory cortices and inferior parietal lobule were associated with disproportionately impaired performance on AP, whereas lesions to lateral temporo-occipital cortex were associated with a relatively rare pattern of disproportionately impaired performance on AR. In contrast, damage to posterior middle temporal gyrus was associated with impairment on both AP and AR. The distinction between lateral temporo-occipital cortex, critical for recognition, and posterior middle temporal gyrus, important for both tasks, suggests a rough gradient from modality-specific to abstract representations in posterior temporal cortex, the first lesion-based evidence for this phenomenon. Overall, the results of this large patient study help to bring closure to a long-standing debate by showing that tool-related AP and AR critically depend on both common and distinct left hemisphere neural substrates, most of which are external to putative human mirror regions. PMID:26351989

  1. Research on critical groundwater level under the threshold value of land subsidence in the typical region of Beijing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Y.; Liu, J.-R.; Luo, Y.; Yang, Y.; Tian, F.; Lei, K.-C.

    2015-11-01

    Groundwater in Beijing has been excessively exploited in a long time, causing the groundwater level continued to declining and land subsidence areas expanding, which restrained the economic and social sustainable development. Long years of study show good time-space corresponding relationship between groundwater level and land subsidence. To providing scientific basis for the following land subsidence prevention and treatment, quantitative research between groundwater level and settlement is necessary. Multi-linear regression models are set up by long series factual monitoring data about layered water table and settlement in the Tianzhu monitoring station. The results show that: layered settlement is closely related to water table, water level variation and amplitude, especially the water table. Finally, according to the threshold value in the land subsidence prevention and control plan of China (45, 30, 25 mm), the minimum allowable layered water level in this region while settlement achieving the threshold value is calculated between -18.448 and -10.082 m. The results provide a reasonable and operable control target of groundwater level for rational adjustment of groundwater exploited horizon in the future.

  2. A critical review of measurements of water vapor absorption in the 840 to 1100 cm(-1) spectral region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, William B.

    1987-01-01

    A set of eleven measurements of the water vapor continuum absorption in the 840 to 1100 sq cm spectral region is reviewed and compared with spectral models maintained by the Air Force Geophysics Laboratory. The measurements were made in four different ways: spectrometer with a White cell, CO2 laser with a White cell, CO2 laser with a spectrophone, and broadband radiation source over a long atmospheric path. Where possible, the data were selected at a water vapor partial pressure of ten torr buffered to 760 torr with N2 or synthetic air and a temperature of between 296 and 300 K. The intercomparison of the data leads to several observations and conclusions. First, there are four sets of laboratory data taken with nitrogen as the buffer gas which generally agree well mutually and with AFGL's HITRAN code. Second, there is one set of laboratory data that shows that using air as the buffer gas gives a few percent decrease in the water vapor continuum compared with using nitrogen as the buffer gas. Third, the atmospheric long-path measurements for water vapor partial pressure below about 12 torr are roughly grouped within 20 percent of the HITRAN values. Fourth, there are three sets of spectrophone data for water vapor in synthetic air which are significantly higher than any of the other measurements. This discrepancy is attributed to the effects of impurity gases in the cell.

  3. Refinement of the conformation of a critical region of charge-charge interaction between cholecystokinin and its receptor.

    PubMed

    Ding, Xi-Qin; Pinon, Delia I; Furse, Kristina E; Lybrand, Terry P; Miller, Laurence J

    2002-05-01

    Insight into the molecular basis of cholecystokinin (CCK) binding to its receptor has come from receptor mutagenesis and photoaffinity labeling studies, with both contributing to the current hypothesis that the acidic Tyr-sulfate-27 residue within the peptide is situated adjacent to basic Arg(197) in the second loop of the receptor. Here, we refine our understanding of this region of interaction by examining a structure-activity series of these positions within both ligand and receptor and by performing three-dimensional molecular modeling of key pairs of modified ligand and receptor constructs. The important roles of Arg(197) and Tyr-sulfate-27 were supported by the marked negative impact on binding and biological response with their natural partner molecule when the receptor residue was replaced by acidic Asp or Glu and when the peptide residue was replaced by basic Arg, Lys, p-amino-Phe, p-guanidino-Phe, or p-methylamino-Phe. Complementary ligand-receptor charge-exchange experiments were unable to regain the lost function. This was supported by the molecular modeling, which demonstrated that the charge-reversed double mutants could not form a good interaction without extensive rearrangement of receptor conformation. The models further predicted that R197D and R197E mutations would lead to conformational changes in the extracellular domain, and this was experimentally supported by data showing that these mutations decreased peptide agonist and antagonist binding and increased nonpeptidyl antagonist binding. These receptor constructs also had increased susceptibility to trypsin degradation relative to the wild-type receptor. In contrast, the relatively conservative R197K mutation had modest negative impact on peptide agonist binding, again consistent with the modeling demonstration of loss of a series of stabilizing inter- and intramolecular bonds. The strong correlation between predicted and experimental results support the reported refinement in the three

  4. Prader-Willi Critical Region, a Non-Translated, Imprinted Central Regulator of Bone Mass: Possible Role in Skeletal Abnormalities in Prader-Willi Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Khor, Ee-Cheng; Fanshawe, Bruce; Qi, Yue; Zolotukhin, Sergei; Kulkarni, Rishikesh N; Enriquez, Ronaldo F; Purtell, Louise; Lee, Nicola J; Wee, Natalie K; Croucher, Peter I; Campbell, Lesley; Herzog, Herbert; Baldock, Paul A

    2016-01-01

    Prader-Willi Syndrome (PWS), a maternally imprinted disorder and leading cause of obesity, is characterised by insatiable appetite, poor muscle development, cognitive impairment, endocrine disturbance, short stature and osteoporosis. A number of causative loci have been located within the imprinted Prader-Willi Critical Region (PWCR), including a set of small non-translated nucleolar RNA's (snoRNA). Recently, micro-deletions in humans identified the snoRNA Snord116 as a critical contributor to the development of PWS exhibiting many of the classical symptoms of PWS. Here we show that loss of the PWCR which includes Snord116 in mice leads to a reduced bone mass phenotype, similar to that observed in humans. Consistent with reduced stature in PWS, PWCR KO mice showed delayed skeletal development, with shorter femurs and vertebrae, reduced bone size and mass in both sexes. The reduction in bone mass in PWCR KO mice was associated with deficiencies in cortical bone volume and cortical mineral apposition rate, with no change in cancellous bone. Importantly, while the length difference was corrected in aged mice, consistent with continued growth in rodents, reduced cortical bone formation was still evident, indicating continued osteoblastic suppression by loss of PWCR expression in skeletally mature mice. Interestingly, deletion of this region included deletion of the exclusively brain expressed Snord116 cluster and resulted in an upregulation in expression of both NPY and POMC mRNA in the arcuate nucleus. Importantly, the selective deletion of the PWCR only in NPY expressing neurons replicated the bone phenotype of PWCR KO mice. Taken together, PWCR deletion in mice, and specifically in NPY neurons, recapitulates the short stature and low BMD and aspects of the hormonal imbalance of PWS individuals. Moreover, it demonstrates for the first time, that a region encoding non-translated RNAs, expressed solely within the brain, can regulate bone mass in health and disease

  5. Deletion of ETS-1, a gene in the Jacobsen syndrome critical region, causes ventricular septal defects and abnormal ventricular morphology in mice

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Maoqing; Coldren, Chris; Liang, Xingqun; Mattina, Teresa; Goldmuntz, Elizabeth; Benson, D. Woodrow; Ivy, Dunbar; Perryman, M.B.; Garrett-Sinha, Lee Ann; Grossfeld, Paul

    2010-01-01

    Congenital heart defects comprise the most common form of major birth defects, affecting 0.7% of all newborn infants. Jacobsen syndrome (11q-) is a rare chromosomal disorder caused by deletions in distal 11q. We have previously determined that a wide spectrum of the most common congenital heart defects occur in 11q-, including an unprecedented high frequency of hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS). We identified an ∼7 Mb ‘cardiac critical region’ in distal 11q that contains a putative causative gene(s) for congenital heart disease. In this study, we utilized chromosomal microarray mapping to characterize three patients with 11q- and congenital heart defects that carry interstitial deletions overlapping the 7 Mb cardiac critical region. We propose that this 1.2 Mb region of overlap harbors a gene(s) that causes at least a subset of the congenital heart defects that occur in 11q-. We demonstrate that one gene in this region, ETS-1 (a member of the ETS family of transcription factors), is expressed in the endocardium and neural crest during early mouse heart development. Gene-targeted deletion of ETS-1 in mice in a C57/B6 background causes, with high penetrance, large membranous ventricular septal defects and a bifid cardiac apex, and less frequently a non-apex-forming left ventricle (one of the hallmarks of HLHS). Our results implicate an important role for the ETS-1 transcription factor in mammalian heart development and should provide important insights into some of the most common forms of congenital heart disease. PMID:19942620

  6. Effects of dipyridamole and aminophylline on hemodynamics, regional myocardial blood flow and thallium-201 washout in the setting of a critical coronary stenosis

    SciTech Connect

    Granato, J.E.; Watson, D.D.; Belardinelli, L.; Cannon, J.M.; Beller, G.A. )

    1990-12-01

    Experiments were performed to characterize the interaction of intravenous dipyridamole and aminophylline on thallium-201 transport kinetics, regional myocardial blood flow and systemic hemodynamics in the presence of a critical coronary artery stenosis. In 12 dogs with a critical left anterior descending coronary artery stenosis, arterial pressure decreased from a mean value (+/- SEM) of 107 +/- 6 to 94 +/- 3 mm Hg and distal left anterior descending artery pressure decreased from 70 +/- 7 to 55 +/- 4 mm Hg after intravenous administration of dipyridamole. In the left anterior descending perfusion zone, the endocardial/epicardial flow ratio decreased from 0.70 to 0.36 and the intrinsic thallium washout rate was significantly prolonged. Intravenous aminophylline reversed the dipyridamole-induced systemic hypotension and transmural coronary steal and restored the thallium washout rate to baseline values. In six other dogs, aminophylline alone resulted in no alterations in systemic and coronary hemodynamics or regional myocardial blood flow. As expected, dipyridamole-induced vasodilation and coronary steal were prevented by aminophylline pretreatment. These data show that in a canine model of partial coronary stenosis, systemic hypotension, adverse regional flow effects and prolonged thallium-201 washout consequent to intravenously administered dipyridamole are promptly reversed by intravenous aminophylline administration. Aminophylline alone had no significant hemodynamic and coronary flow effects. This study provides further insight into the altered thallium kinetics occurring as a consequence of dipyridamole-induced vasodilation and suggests that the prompt reversal of symptoms and signs of ischemia with aminophylline in patients receiving intravenous dipyridamole for clinical imaging studies probably reflects the reversal of transmural coronary steal.

  7. Prader-Willi Critical Region, a Non-Translated, Imprinted Central Regulator of Bone Mass: Possible Role in Skeletal Abnormalities in Prader-Willi Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Yue; Zolotukhin, Sergei; Kulkarni, Rishikesh N.; Enriquez, Ronaldo F.; Purtell, Louise; Lee, Nicola J.; Wee, Natalie K.; Croucher, Peter I.; Campbell, Lesley; Herzog, Herbert; Baldock, Paul A.

    2016-01-01

    Prader-Willi Syndrome (PWS), a maternally imprinted disorder and leading cause of obesity, is characterised by insatiable appetite, poor muscle development, cognitive impairment, endocrine disturbance, short stature and osteoporosis. A number of causative loci have been located within the imprinted Prader-Willi Critical Region (PWCR), including a set of small non-translated nucleolar RNA’s (snoRNA). Recently, micro-deletions in humans identified the snoRNA Snord116 as a critical contributor to the development of PWS exhibiting many of the classical symptoms of PWS. Here we show that loss of the PWCR which includes Snord116 in mice leads to a reduced bone mass phenotype, similar to that observed in humans. Consistent with reduced stature in PWS, PWCR KO mice showed delayed skeletal development, with shorter femurs and vertebrae, reduced bone size and mass in both sexes. The reduction in bone mass in PWCR KO mice was associated with deficiencies in cortical bone volume and cortical mineral apposition rate, with no change in cancellous bone. Importantly, while the length difference was corrected in aged mice, consistent with continued growth in rodents, reduced cortical bone formation was still evident, indicating continued osteoblastic suppression by loss of PWCR expression in skeletally mature mice. Interestingly, deletion of this region included deletion of the exclusively brain expressed Snord116 cluster and resulted in an upregulation in expression of both NPY and POMC mRNA in the arcuate nucleus. Importantly, the selective deletion of the PWCR only in NPY expressing neurons replicated the bone phenotype of PWCR KO mice. Taken together, PWCR deletion in mice, and specifically in NPY neurons, recapitulates the short stature and low BMD and aspects of the hormonal imbalance of PWS individuals. Moreover, it demonstrates for the first time, that a region encoding non-translated RNAs, expressed solely within the brain, can regulate bone mass in health and disease

  8. The Effects of High Level Magnesium Dialysis/Substitution Fluid on Magnesium Homeostasis under Regional Citrate Anticoagulation in Critically Ill

    PubMed Central

    Los, Ferdinand; Brodska, Helena

    2016-01-01

    Background The requirements for magnesium (Mg) supplementation increase under regional citrate anticoagulation (RCA) because citrate acts by chelation of bivalent cations within the blood circuit. The level of magnesium in commercially available fluids for continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) may not be sufficient to prevent hypomagnesemia. Methods Patients (n = 45) on CRRT (2,000 ml/h, blood flow (Qb) 100 ml/min) with RCA modality (4% trisodium citrate) using calcium free fluid with 0.75 mmol/l of Mg with additional magnesium substitution were observed after switch to the calcium-free fluid with magnesium concentration of 1.50 mmol/l (n = 42) and no extra magnesium replenishment. All patients had renal indications for CRRT, were treated with the same devices, filters and the same postfilter ionized calcium endpoint (<0.4 mmol/l) of prefilter citrate dosage. Under the high level Mg fluid the Qb, dosages of citrate and CRRT were consequently escalated in 9h steps to test various settings. Results Median balance of Mg was -0.91 (-1.18 to -0.53) mmol/h with Mg 0.75 mmol/l and 0.2 (0.06–0.35) mmol/h when fluid with Mg 1.50 mmol/l was used. It was close to zero (0.02 (-0.12–0.18) mmol/h) with higher blood flow and dosage of citrate, increased again to 0.15 (-0.11–0.25) mmol/h with 3,000 ml/h of high magnesium containing fluid (p<0.001). The arterial levels of Mg were mildly increased after the change for high level magnesium containing fluid (p<0.01). Conclusions Compared to ordinary dialysis fluid the mildly hypermagnesemic fluid provided even balances and adequate levels within ordinary configurations of CRRT with RCA and without a need for extra magnesium replenishment. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01361581 PMID:27391902

  9. Identification of amino acids in the V3 region of gp120 critical for virus neutralization by human HIV-1-specific antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Broliden, P A; Mäkitalo, B; Akerblom, L; Rosen, J; Broliden, K; Utter, G; Jondal, M; Norrby, E; Wahren, B

    1991-01-01

    The importance of the dependence on single amino acids in the V3 region of HIV-1 gp120 was evaluated for virus neutralization and antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC). Synthetic overlapping 15-mer peptides and a set of omission peptides covering amino acids 301-317 were used. Sera from 29 HIV-1-infected individuals at different stages of disease were tested for neutralization, ADCC and specific IgG reactivity. Six HIV-1 neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (mAb) acted as controls. All mAb reacted with a region (amino acids 304-318) of gp120, previously shown to induce neutralizing antibodies. The amino acids essential for reactivity were identified to be within the sequence GPGR (amino acids 312-315). The importance of this region for occurrence of neutralizing antibodies in infected humans was investigated using the same set of peptides. Out of 29 individuals, 21 were found to have neutralizing antibodies in titres between 100 and 1000. Among the neutralization-positive sera, 17/21 (81%) reacted with amino acids 304-318, compared with only one of eight sera (13%) negative in neutralization. When any of the four amino acids G, P, G or R were deleted, the seroreactivity decreased considerably. The conserved sequence GPGR was therefore considered to be the most important for neutralization in this region in human sera as well. Thus, the conserved sequence GPGR in the V3 region of gp120 is critical for virus neutralization by human HIV-1-specific antibodies. PMID:1916888

  10. Yeast artificial chromosome cloning in the glycerol kinase and adrenal hypoplasia congenita region of Xp21

    SciTech Connect

    Worley, K.C.; Ellison, K.A.; Zhang, Y.H.; Wang, D.F.; Mason, J.; Roth, E.J.; Adams, V.; Fogt, D.D.; Zhu, X.M.; Towbin, J.A.

    1993-05-01

    The adrenal hypoplasia congenita (AHC) and glycerol kinase (GK) loci are telomeric to the Duchenne muscular dystrophy locus in Xp21. The authors developed a pair of yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) contigs spanning at least 1.2 Mb and encompassing the region from the telomeric end of the Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) locus to beyond YHX39 (DXS727), including the genes for AHC and GK. The centromeric contig consists of 13 YACs reaching more than 600 kb from DMD through GK. The telomeric contig group consists of 8 YACs containing more than 600 kb including the markers YHX39 (DXS727) and QST-59 (DXS319). Patient deletion breakpoints in the region of the two YAC contigs define at least eight intervals, and seven deletion breakpoints are contained within these contigs. In addition to the probes developed from YAC ends, they have mapped eight Alu-PCR probes amplified from a radiation-reduced somatic cell hybrid, two anonymous DNA probes, and one Alu-PCR product amplified from a cosmid end, for a total of 26 new markers within this region of 2 Mb or less. One YAC in the centromeric contig contains an insert encompassing the minimum interval for GK deficiency defined by patient deletion breakpoints, and this clone includes all or part of the GK gene. 33 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  11. Clinical and molecular genetic analysis of a Chinese family with congenital X-linked adrenal hypoplasia caused by novel mutation 1268delA in the DAX-1 gene*

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, Zhe; FENG, Ye; YE, Dan; LI, Cheng-jiang; DONG, Feng-qin; TONG, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Congenital X-linked adrenal hypoplasia (AHC) is a rare disease characterized by primary adrenal insufficiency before adolescence and by hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (HHG) during adolescence. In this paper, we present a Chinese family with AHC. Two brothers, misdiagnosed with adrenal insufficiency of unknown etiology at the age of 9, were correctly diagnosed with AHC when delayed puberty, HHG, and testicular defects were observed. We investigated the clinical features and identified the dosage-sensitive sex reversal AHC critical region of the X chromosome gene 1 (DAX-1) mutation in this kindred. Direct sequencing of the DAX-1 gene revealed that the two siblings have a novel mutation (1268delA) of which their mother is a heterozygous carrier. This mutation causes a frameshift and a premature stop codon at position 436, encoding a truncated protein. It is important to increase knowledge of the mutational spectrum in genes related to this disease, linking phenotype to genotype. PMID:26537215

  12. Bose-Einstein condensation in mesoscopic systems: The self-similar structure of the critical region and the nonequivalence of the canonical and grand canonical ensembles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocharovsky, V. V.; Kocharovsky, Vl. V.; Tarasov, S. V.

    2016-01-01

    The analytical theory of Bose-Einstein condensation of an ideal gas in mesoscopic systems has been briefly reviewed in application to traps with arbitrary shapes and dimension. This theory describes the phases of the classical gas and the formed Bose-Einstein condensate, as well as the entire vicinity of the phase transition point. The statistics and thermodynamics of Bose-Einstein condensation have been studied in detail, including their self-similar structure in the critical region, transition to the thermodynamic limit, effect of boundary conditions on the properties of a system, and nonequivalence of the description of Bose-Einstein condensation in different statistical ensembles. The complete classification of universality classes of Bose-Einstein condensation has been given.

  13. Phenomena induced by powerful HF pumping towards magnetic zenith with a frequency near the F-region critical frequency and the third electron gyro harmonic frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blagoveshchenskaya, N. F.; Carlson, H. C.; Kornienko, V. A.; Borisova, T. D.; Rietveld, M. T.; Yeoman, T. K.; Brekke, A.

    2009-01-01

    Multi-instrument observational data from an experiment on 13 October 2006 at the EISCAT/HEATING facility at Tromsø, Norway are analysed. The experiment was carried out in the evening hours when the electron density in the F-region dropped, and the HF pump frequency fH was near and then above the critical frequency of the F2 layer. The distinctive feature of this experiment is that the pump frequency was just below the third electron gyro harmonic frequency, while both the HF pump beam and UHF radar beam were directed towards the magnetic zenith (MZ). The HF pump-induced phenomena were diagnosed with several instruments: the bi-static HF radio scatter on the London-Tromsø-St. Petersburg path, the CUTLASS radar in Hankasalmi (Finland), the European Incoherent Scatter (EISCAT) UHF radar at Tromsø and the Tromsø ionosonde (dynasonde). The results show thermal electron excitation of the HF-induced striations seen simultaneously from HF bi-static scatter and CUTLASS radar observations, accompanied by increases of electron temperature when the heater frequency was near and then above the critical frequency of the F2 layer by up to 0.4 MHz. An increase of the electron density up to 25% accompanied by strong HF-induced electron heating was observed, only when the heater frequency was near the critical frequency and just below the third electron gyro harmonic frequency. It is concluded that the combined effect of upper hybrid resonance and gyro resonance at the same altitude gives rise to strong electron heating, the excitation of striations, HF ray trapping and extension of HF waves to altitudes where they can excite Langmuir turbulence and fluxes of electrons accelerated to energies that produce ionization.

  14. Loss of Goosecoid-like and DiGeorge syndrome critical region 14 in interpeduncular nucleus results in altered regulation of rapid eye movement sleep

    PubMed Central

    Funato, Hiromasa; Sato, Makito; Sinton, Christopher M.; Gautron, Laurent; Williams, S. Clay; Skach, Amber; Elmquist, Joel K.; Skoultchi, Arthur I.; Yanagisawa, Masashi

    2010-01-01

    Sleep and wakefulness are regulated primarily by inhibitory interactions between the hypothalamus and brainstem. The expression of the states of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep and non-REM (NREM) sleep also are correlated with the activity of groups of REM-off and REM-on neurons in the dorsal brainstem. However, the contribution of ventral brainstem nuclei to sleep regulation has been little characterized to date. Here we examined sleep and wakefulness in mice deficient in a homeobox transcription factor, Goosecoid-like (Gscl), which is one of the genes deleted in DiGeorge syndrome or 22q11 deletion syndrome. The expression of Gscl is restricted to the interpeduncular nucleus (IP) in the ventral region of the midbrain–hindbrain transition. The IP has reciprocal connections with several cell groups implicated in sleep/wakefulness regulation. Although Gscl−/− mice have apparently normal anatomy and connections of the IP, they exhibited a reduced total time spent in REM sleep and fewer REM sleep episodes. In addition, Gscl−/− mice showed reduced theta power during REM sleep and increased arousability during REM sleep. Gscl−/− mice also lacked the expression of DiGeorge syndrome critical region 14 (Dgcr14) in the IP. These results indicate that the absence of Gscl and Dgcr14 in the IP results in altered regulation of REM sleep. PMID:20921407

  15. Mild phenotype due to inverse duplication 4p16.3 - P15.3 including the Wolf-Hirschhorn critical region.

    PubMed

    Tschernigg, M; Petek, E; Wagner, K; Kroisel, P M

    2002-01-01

    Duplication of distal 4p results in a recognizable clinical phenotype. We report here on a 3 year old girl with a de novo inverse duplication of the chromosome segment 4p16.3-p15.3. The symptoms in this patient are milder than those of previously described patients with 4p duplication syndrome and include a deep hairline, deep-set eyes, short pug nose, full cheeks, simian crease, clinodactily of the fifth digit, no speech development and a moderate psychomotor retardation. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using a chromosome 4 painting probe confirmed that the extra material is of chromosome 4 origin. Further analysis with the Wolf-Hirschhorn critical region probe demonstrated the duplication of this region. The lysosomal hydrolase alpha-L-iduronidase (IDUA) gene which is mutated in mucopolysaccaridosis type I (MPS I) and mapped to 4p16.3 might be responsible for some of the MPS like facial features. A phenotype-genotype correlation analysis in combination with literature review was undertaken to allow a further delineation of partial trisomy 4p syndromes. PMID:12017235

  16. Low Genetic Diversity and Strong Geographical Structure of the Critically Endangered White-Headed Langur (Trachypithecus leucocephalus) Inferred from Mitochondrial DNA Control Region Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Weiran; Qiao, Yu; Pan, Wenshi; Yao, Meng

    2015-01-01

    Many Asian colobine monkey species are suffering from habitat destruction and population size decline. There is a great need to understand their genetic diversity, population structure and demographic history for effective species conservation. The white-headed langur (Trachypithecus leucocephalus) is a Critically Endangered colobine species endemic to the limestone karst forests in southwestern China. We analyzed the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) control region sequences of 390 fecal samples from 40 social groups across the main distribution areas, which represented one-third of the total extant population. Only nine haplotypes and 10 polymorphic sites were identified, indicating remarkably low genetic diversity in the species. Using a subset of 77 samples from different individuals, we evaluated genetic variation, population structure, and population demographic history. We found very low values of haplotype diversity (h = 0.570 ± 0.056) and nucleotide diversity (π = 0.00323 ± 0.00044) in the hypervariable region I (HVRI) of the mtDNA control region. Distribution of haplotypes displayed marked geographical pattern, with one population (Chongzuo, CZ) showing a complete lack of genetic diversity (having only one haplotype), whereas the other population (Fusui, FS) having all nine haplotypes. We detected strong population genetic structure among habit patches (ΦST = 0.375, P < 0.001). In addition, the Mantel test showed a significant correlation between the pairwise genetic distances and geographical distances among social groups in FS (correlation coefficient = 0.267, P = 0.003), indicting isolation-by-distance pattern of genetic divergence in the mtDNA sequences. Analyses of demographic history suggested an overall stable historical population size and modest population expansion in the last 2,000 years. Our results indicate different genetic diversity and possibly distinct population history for different local populations, and suggest that CZ and FS should be

  17. Structural Insight into the Critical Role of the N-Terminal Region in the Catalytic Activity of Dual-Specificity Phosphatase 26.

    PubMed

    Won, Eun-Young; Lee, Sang-Ok; Lee, Dong-Hwa; Lee, Daeyoup; Bae, Kwang-Hee; Lee, Sang Chul; Kim, Seung Jun; Chi, Seung-Wook

    2016-01-01

    Human dual-specificity phosphatase 26 (DUSP26) is a novel target for anticancer therapy because its dephosphorylation of the p53 tumor suppressor regulates the apoptosis of cancer cells. DUSP26 inhibition results in neuroblastoma cell cytotoxicity through p53-mediated apoptosis. Despite the previous structural studies of DUSP26 catalytic domain (residues 61-211, DUSP26-C), the high-resolution structure of its catalytically active form has not been resolved. In this study, we determined the crystal structure of a catalytically active form of DUSP26 (residues 39-211, DUSP26-N) with an additional N-terminal region at 2.0 Å resolution. Unlike the C-terminal domain-swapped dimeric structure of DUSP26-C, the DUSP26-N (C152S) monomer adopts a fold-back conformation of the C-terminal α8-helix and has an additional α1-helix in the N-terminal region. Consistent with the canonically active conformation of its protein tyrosine phosphate-binding loop (PTP loop) observed in the structure, the phosphatase assay results demonstrated that DUSP26-N has significantly higher catalytic activity than DUSP26-C. Furthermore, size exclusion chromatography-multiangle laser scattering (SEC-MALS) measurements showed that DUSP26-N (C152S) exists as a monomer in solution. Notably, the crystal structure of DUSP26-N (C152S) revealed that the N-terminal region of DUSP26-N (C152S) serves a scaffolding role by positioning the surrounding α7-α8 loop for interaction with the PTP-loop through formation of an extensive hydrogen bond network, which seems to be critical in making the PTP-loop conformation competent for phosphatase activity. Our study provides the first high-resolution structure of a catalytically active form of DUSP26, which will contribute to the structure-based rational design of novel DUSP26-targeting anticancer therapeutics. PMID:27583453

  18. Construction of a YAC contig and STS map spanning 2.5 Mbp in Xq25, the critical region for the X-linked lymphoproliferative (XLP) gene

    SciTech Connect

    Lanyi, A.; Li, B.F.; Li, S.

    1994-09-01

    X-linked lymphoproliferative disease (XLP) is characterized by a marked vulnerability in Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection. Infection of XLP patients with EBV invariably results in fatal mononucleosis, agammaglobulinemia or B-cell lymphoma. The XLP gene lies within a 10 cM region in Xq25 between DXS42 and DXS10. Initial chromosome studies revealed an interstitial, cytogenetically visible deletion in Xq25 in one XLP family (43-004). We estimated the size of the Xq25 deletion by dual laser flow karyotyping to involve 2% of the X chromosome, or approximately 3 Mbp of DNA sequences. To further delineate the deletion we performed a series of pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) analyses which showed that DXS6 and DXS100, two Xq25-specific markers, are missing from 45-004 DNA. Five yeast artificial chromosomes (YACs) from a chromosome X specific YAC library containing sequences deleted in patient`s 43-004 DNA were isolated. These five YACs did not overlap, and their end fragments were used to screen the CEPH MegaYAC library. Seven YACs were isolated from the CEPH MegaYAC library. They could be arranged into a contig which spans between DXS6 and DXS100. The contig contains a minimum of 2.5 Mbp of human DNA. A total of 12 YAC end clone, lambda subclones and STS probes have been used to order clones within the contig. These reagents were also used in Southern blot and patients showed interstitial deletions in Xq25. The size of these deletions range between 0.5 and 2.5 Mbp. The shortest deletion probably represents the critical region for the XLP gene.

  19. District health planning at a time of transition: a critical review and lessons learnt from the implementation of regional planning in Uganda.

    PubMed

    Curtale, Filippo; Musila, Timothy; Opigo, Jimmy; Nantamu, Dyogo; Ezati, Isaac Alidria

    2016-05-01

    A quarter of a century after the Harare Declaration on Strengthening District Health Systems Based on Primary Health Care (1987) was conceived, district health teams (DHTs) are facing a markedly changed situation. Rapid population growth, urbanization, a rapidly developing private sector, and the increasing role of vertical programs and global initiatives have marginalized the planning process and weakened the entire district health system (DHS). The Ugandan Ministry of Health (MoH) responded to these challenges by beginning a review of district planning: a key action point of the Harare Declaration. The first step was a critical review of relevant literature, then central and district health staff were engaged with to provide their input in developing the new strategy. Through a field experiment started in 2012-13, and still underway, the MoH is developing an innovative regional approach to health planning, which aims to encompass the complexity of the new context of health care provision and coordinate all new actors (private health providers, projects and local government staff from other sectors) operating in the health sector. A strategic revision of the planning process represents an opportunity to develop an appropriate 'Theory of Change', intended as a broader approach of thinking about the entire DHS and the relative role and functions of the DHT. Leadership and stewardship capacities of MoH staff, at central and peripheral level, must be strengthened and supported to achieve the expected changes and results. PMID:27178674

  20. Hexasomy of the Prader-Willi/Angelman critical region, including the OCA2 gene, in a patient with pigmentary dysplasia: case report.

    PubMed

    Kraoua, Lilia; Chaabouni, Myriam; Ewers, Elisabeth; Chelly, Imen; Ouertani, Ines; Ben Jemaa, Lamia; Maazoul, Faouzi; Liehr, Thomas; Chaabouni, Habiba

    2011-01-01

    Derivatives of chromosome 15, often referred to as inv dup(15), represent the most common supernumerary marker chromosome (SMC). SMC(15)s can be classified into two major groups according to their length: small SMC(15) and large ones. Depending on the amount of euchromatin, the carriers may either present with a normal phenotype or with a recognizable syndrome. Here we describe a patient with severe mental retardation, epilepsy, dysmorphic features and pigmentary dysplasia. His karyotype was 47,XY,+mar[41]/46,XY[9]. Chromosomal fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) showed the SMC to be originating from chromosome 15, dicentric and containing four copies of the Prader-Willi/Angelman Syndrome Critical Region (PWACR), including the OCA2 gene. Molecular studies indicated that it is maternally derived. This report supports the previous observations assuming that severity of phenotype in patients with SMC(15) depends on the dosage of the PWACR and that skin pigmentation is correlated to OCA2 gene copy number. PMID:21621018

  1. Molecular and cytogenetic characterization of a recurrent unbalanced translocation (4;21) (p16.3;q22.1): Relevance to the Wolf-Hirschhorn and Down syndrome critical regions

    SciTech Connect

    Sebastio, G.; Perone, L.; Guzzetta, V.

    1996-05-17

    We report on an aneuploidy syndrome due to the unbalanced segregation of a familial translocation (4;21)(p16.3;q22.1) causing a partial 4p monosomy and a partial 21q trisomy. The three affected children presented with severe failure to thrive, short stature, microcephaly, profound hypotonia, and mental retardation. The face, very similar in the three children, is characterized by frontal bossing, upslanting of the palpebral fissures, short nose, and deep set ears, giving the overall appearance of the Down syndrome. The molecular study has defined the aneuploid segment on both 4p and 21q. Most of the Down syndrome critical region was found to be trisomic, while only part of the candidate Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome critical region was deleted, suggesting that this region is not critical for the major malformations characteristic for WHS. 15 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Critical Climate Controls and Information Needs for the Glen Canyon Adaptive Management Program and Environmental Assessment in the Grand Canyon Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melis, T. S.; Jain, S.; Topping, D. J.; Pulwarty, R. S.; Eischeid, J. K.

    2005-12-01

    Climatic drivers of episodic to interdecadal variations to the observed changes in the flood magnitude, timing and spatial scales affect the sediment inputs to the Colorado River ecosystem. Since the 1963 closure of Glen Canyon Dam, the dominant sole major supplier of sand to the Colorado River in the upper portion of Grand Canyon is the Paria River, which supplies about 6% of the pre-dam supply of sand at the upstream boundary of Grand Canyon National Park. Sand is delivered by the Paria River during short-duration (< 24 hours), large magnitude (up to 300 cubic meters/second) floods that occur primarily during the warm season (July-October). The planning and decision processes in the Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Program (GCD-AMP) strive to balance numerous, often competing, objectives, such as,water supply, hydropower generation, low flow maintenance, maximizing conservation of the tributary supplied sediment, endangered species recovery, and cultural resources. In this work, we focus on a key concern identified by the AMP, related to the timing and volume of sediment input into Grand Canyon. Adequate sediment inputs into the river ecosystem Canyon combined with active flow management, of the timed in the form of strategically timed bypass releases from Glen Canyon Dam, support the restoration and maintenance of sand bar habitats and instream ecology. Variability in regional precipitation distribution on multiple time scales is diagnosed with emphasis on understanding the relative role of East Pacific tropical storms, North Pacific sea surface temperatures, and subtropical moisture sources. On longer time scales, structured variations in the sediment supply imply a changing baseline for mean ecological and geomorphological conditions in the Canyon, counter to the static view taken in the current environmental impact assessments. Better understanding of the coupled climate-hydrologic variations on multiple time scales is increasingly recognized as critical

  3. Miscanthus Establishment and Overwintering in the Midwest USA: A Regional Modeling Study of Crop Residue Management on Critical Minimum Soil Temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Kucharik, Christopher J.; VanLoocke, Andy; Lenters, John D.; Motew, Melissa M.

    2013-01-01

    Miscanthus is an intriguing cellulosic bioenergy feedstock because its aboveground productivity is high for low amounts of agrochemical inputs, but soil temperatures below −3.5°C could threaten successful cultivation in temperate regions. We used a combination of observed soil temperatures and the Agro-IBIS model to investigate how strategic residue management could reduce the risk of rhizome threatening soil temperatures. This objective was addressed using a historical (1978–2007) reconstruction of extreme minimum 10 cm soil temperatures experienced across the Midwest US and model sensitivity studies that quantified the impact of crop residue on soil temperatures. At observation sites and for simulations that had bare soil, two critical soil temperature thresholds (50% rhizome winterkill at −3.5°C and −6.0°C for different Miscanthus genotypes) were reached at rhizome planting depth (10 cm) over large geographic areas. The coldest average annual extreme 10 cm soil temperatures were between −8°C to −11°C across North Dakota, South Dakota, and Minnesota. Large portions of the region experienced 10 cm soil temperatures below −3.5°C in 75% or greater for all years, and portions of North and South Dakota, Minnesota, and Wisconsin experienced soil temperatures below −6.0°C in 50–60% of all years. For simulated management options that established varied thicknesses (1–5 cm) of miscanthus straw following harvest, extreme minimum soil temperatures increased by 2.5°C to 6°C compared to bare soil, with the greatest warming associated with thicker residue layers. While the likelihood of 10 cm soil temperatures reaching −3.5°C was greatly reduced with 2–5 cm of surface residue, portions of the Dakotas, Nebraska, Minnesota, and Wisconsin still experienced temperatures colder than −3.5°C in 50–80% of all years. Nonetheless, strategic residue management could help increase the likelihood of overwintering of miscanthus rhizomes in the first

  4. Epilepsy is a possible feature in Williams-Beuren syndrome patients harboring typical deletions of the 7q11.23 critical region.

    PubMed

    Nicita, Francesco; Garone, Giacomo; Spalice, Alberto; Savasta, Salvatore; Striano, Pasquale; Pantaleoni, Chiara; Spartà, Maria Valentina; Kluger, Gerhard; Capovilla, Giuseppe; Pruna, Dario; Freri, Elena; D'Arrigo, Stefano; Verrotti, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Seizures are rarely reported in Williams-Beuren syndrome (WBS)--a contiguous-gene-deletion disorder caused by a 7q11.23 heterozygous deletion of 1.5-1.8 Mb--and no previous study evaluated electro-clinical features of epilepsy in this syndrome. Furthermore, it has been hypothesized that atypical deletion (e.g., larger than 1.8 Mb) may be responsible for a more pronounced neurological phenotypes, especially including seizures. Our objectives are to describe the electro-clinical features in WBS and to correlate the epileptic phenotype with deletion of the 7q11.23 critical region. We evaluate the electro-clinical features in one case of distal 7q11.23 deletion syndrome and in eight epileptic WBS (eWBS) patients. Additionally, we compare the deletion size-and deleted genes-of four epileptic WBS (eWBS) with that of four non-epileptic WBS (neWBS) patients. Infantile spasms, focal (e.g., motor and dyscognitive with autonomic features) and generalized (e.g., tonic-clonic, tonic, clonic, myoclonic) seizures were encountered. Drug-resistance was observed in one patient. Neuroimaging discovered one case of focal cortical dysplasia, one case of fronto-temporal cortical atrophy and one case of periventricular nodular heterotopia. Comparison of deletion size between eWBS and neWBS patients did not reveal candidate genes potentially underlying epilepsy. This is the largest series describing electro-clinical features of epilepsy in WBS. In WBS, epilepsy should be considered both in case of typical and atypical deletions, which do not involve HIP1, YWHAG or MAGI2. PMID:26437767

  5. A critical assessment of oral care protocols for patients under radiation therapy in the regional University Hospital Network of Madrid (Spain)

    PubMed Central

    Lanzós, Isabel; Lanzós, Eduardo; Sanz, Mariano

    2015-01-01

    Background This research was aimed to critically evaluate, under the light of the available scientific evidence, the oral care protocols recommended by different hospitals in head and neck cancer (HNC) patients under radiation therapy. Material and Methods A questionnaire requesting all the relevant information for the oral care of these patients was sent to the 9 University Hospitals in Madrid. The answers were categorized and analyzed. In addition, an electronic search was conducted to identify the most relevant papers (systematic reviews [SR] and randomized clinical trials [RCTs]) assessing oral care protocols for patients treated for HNC with radiation therapy. Results Eight out of nine centers answered the questionnaire and the retrieved information was tabulated and compared. These recommendations were analyzed by a computerized search on MEDLINE and the Cochrane Oral Health Collaboration Database. The results of the analysis clearly shown a great heterogeneity, in terms of oral health care protocols, regarding the management of irradiated patients (for HNC) within the Hospitals of Madrid region. In addition, some of the recommendations lack solid scientific support. Conclusions The present survey revealed that the recommendations provided by the different hospitals were clearly different. The available evidence, supported by SR and RCTs, suggested the need of an oral assessment before cancer treatment, in order to prevent and treat dental pathologies and avoiding potential complications; during cancer treatment, it is relevant monitoring the patient in order to decrease the severity of the side effects, and to avoid any tooth extraction or surgery and special attention should be paid to mucositis, xerostomia and candidiasis; after cancer treatment, the following are relevant aspects: the risk of osteoradionecrosis, trismus, caries and the risks associated to dental implants. Key words:Head and neck cancer, supportive care in cancer, radiotherapy

  6. Segregation of anterior temporal regions critical for retrieving names of unique and non-unique entities reflects underlying long-range connectivity.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Sonya; Inoue, Kayo; Rudrauf, David; Damasio, Hanna; Tranel, Daniel; Grabowski, Thomas

    2016-02-01

    Lesion-deficit studies support the hypothesis that the left anterior temporal lobe (ATL) plays a critical role in retrieving names of concrete entities. They further suggest that different regions of the left ATL process different conceptual categories. Here we test the specificity of these relationships and whether the anatomical segregation is related to the underlying organization of white matter connections. We reanalyzed data from a previous lesion study of naming and recognition across five categories of concrete entities. In voxelwise logistic regressions of lesion-deficit associations, we formally incorporated measures of disconnection of long-range association fiber tracts (FTs) and covaried for recognition and non-category-specific naming deficits. We also performed fiber tractwise analyses to assess whether damage to specific FTs was preferentially associated with category-selective naming deficits. Damage to the basolateral ATL was associated with naming deficits for both unique (famous faces) and non-unique entities, whereas the damage to the temporal pole was associated with naming deficits for unique entities only. This segregation pattern remained after accounting for comorbid recognition deficits or naming deficits in other categories. The tractwise analyses showed that damage to the uncinate fasciculus (UNC) was associated with naming impairments for unique entities, while damage to the inferior longitudinal fasciculus (ILF) was associated with naming impairments for non-unique entities. Covarying for FT transection in voxelwise analyses rendered the cortical association for unique entities more focal. These results are consistent with the partial segregation of brain system support for name retrieval of unique and non-unique entities at both the level of cortical components and underlying white matter fiber bundles. Our study reconciles theoretic accounts of the functional organization of the left ATL by revealing both category-related processing

  7. A Demonstration of the Continuous Phase (Second-Order) Transition of a Binary Liquid System in the Region around Its Critical Point

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Michael R.

    2006-01-01

    In most general chemistry and introductory physical chemistry classes, critical point is defined as that temperature-pressure point on a phase diagram where the liquid-gas interface disappears, a phenomenon that generally occurs at relatively high temperatures or high pressures. Two examples are: water, with a critical point at 647 K (critical…

  8. Bioengineering applied to erosion and stability control in the North Apennines (Emilia-Romagna Region, Italy): a check about critical aspects of the works.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selli, Lavinia; Cavazza, Claudio; Pavanelli, Donatella

    2013-04-01

    Because of its geological structure, in the Emilia-Romagna Region over 32,000 landslides have been identified. Several works have been made in order to control mass movement's dynamics and to secure of Reno and Lamone Mountain Basin Rivers, the road network and near by villages and towns. Most of the control works dealt with bioengineering practices: palisades piles, geotextiles, seedings, surface flow control works, dikes within main drainage ditches. In order to check about critical aspects related to the use of these techniques in the Apennines, a survey in this basins was designed with specific interest in the several kinds of works realised, in which plant species were mostly used and in the factors that affected the success or failure of the works. Territory encompasses steep slopes covered with woods to low reliefs covered with grasslands. It is characterized by prevailing clays, inducing instability, and arenaceous lithology with impermeable soils; drainage density is quite high and hillsides suffer extensive and severe erosion and slope stability problems. Chestnut woods mainly represent land use at higher altitudes, while coppice, pastures and crops are present on milder hillsides. The remaining part of the basin is covered by vineyards, orchards, ponds and urban areas, which are basically located in the valley floor. Precipitation events mainly consist of rainfall ranging between 950-1015 mm per year; few snowfalls occur during winter and a long dry season lasts from June until September. We have analyzed 187 works designed mainly for the consolidation of slope instabilities through a widespread enhancement of the vegetation cover. The surveyed works are classified as a function of their building features: it can be seen that cribwalls and palisades are by far the most common types, being the 24% and the 34% respectively of the works. As far as the most adopted plant species, they were silver willow (Salix alba), Spanish Broom (Spartium Junceum) and

  9. Chromosomal Minimal Critical Regions in Therapy-Related Leukemia Appear Different from Those of De Novo Leukemia by High-Resolution aCGH

    PubMed Central

    Itzhar, Nathalie; Dessen, Philippe; Toujani, Saloua; Auger, Nathalie; Preudhomme, Claude; Richon, Catherine; Lazar, Vladimir; Saada, Véronique; Bennaceur, Anelyse; Bourhis, Jean Henri; de Botton, Stéphane; Bernheim, Alain

    2011-01-01

    Therapy-related acute leukemia (t-AML), is a severe complication of cytotoxic therapy used for primary cancer treatment. The outcome of these patients is poor, compared to people who develop de novo acute leukemia (p-AML). Cytogenetic abnormalities in t-AML are similar to those found in p-AML but present more frequent unfavorable karyotypes depending on the inducting agent. Losses of chromosome 5 or 7 are observed after alkylating agents while balanced translocations are found after topoisomerase II inhibitors. This study compared t-AML to p-AML using high resolution array CGH in order to find copy number abnormalities (CNA) at a higher resolution than conventional cytogenetics. More CNAs were observed in 30 t-AML than in 36 p-AML: 104 CNAs were observed with 63 losses and 41 gains (mean number 3.46 per case) in t-AML, while in p-AML, 69 CNAs were observed with 32 losses and 37 gains (mean number of 1.9 per case). In primary leukemia with a previously “normal” karyotype, 18% exhibited a previously undetected CNA, whereas in the (few) t-AML with a normal karyotype, the rate was 50%. Several minimal critical regions (MCRs) were found in t-AML and p-AML. No common MCRs were found in the two groups. In t-AML a 40kb deleted MCR pointed to RUNX1 on 21q22, a gene coding for a transcription factor implicated in frequent rearrangements in leukemia and in familial thrombocytopenia. In de novo AML, a 1Mb MCR harboring ERG and ETS2 was observed from patients with complex aCGH profiles. High resolution cytogenomics obtained by aCGH and similar techniques already published allowed us to characterize numerous non random chromosome abnormalities. This work supports the hypothesis that they can be classified into several categories: abnormalities common to all AML; those more frequently found in t-AML and those specifically found in p-AML. PMID:21339820

  10. Determinants of Calcium Infusion Rate During Continuous Veno-venous Hemofiltration with Regional Citrate Anticoagulation in Critically Ill Patients with Acute Kidney Injury

    PubMed Central

    Liu, De-Lin; Huang, Li-Feng; Ma, Wen-Liang; Ding, Qi; Han, Yue; Zheng, Yue; Li, Wen-Xiong

    2016-01-01

    Background: It is unclear that how to decide the calcium infusion rate during continuous veno-venous hemofiltration (CVVH) with regional citrate anticoagulation (RCA). This study aimed to assess the determinants of calcium infusion rate during CVVH with RCA in critically ill patients with acute kidney injury (AKI). Methods: A total of 18 patients with AKI requiring CVVH were prospectively analyzed. Postdilution CVVH was performed with a fixed blood flow rate of 150 ml/min and a replacement fluid flow rate of 2000 ml/h for each new circuit. The infusion of 4% trisodium citrate was started at a rate of 29.9 mmol/h prefilter and adjusted according to postfilter ionized calcium. The infusion of 10% calcium gluconate was initiated at a rate of 5.5 mmol/h and adjusted according to systemic ionized calcium. The infusion rate of trisodium citrate and calcium gluconate as well as ultrafiltrate flow rate were recorded at 1, 2, 4, 6, 12, and 24 h after starting CVVH, respectively. The calcium loss rate by CVVH was also calculated. Results: Fifty-seven sessions of CVVH were performed in 18 AKI patients. The citrate infusion rate, calcium loss rate by CVVH, and calcium infusion rate were 31.30 (interquartile range: 2.70), 4.60 ± 0.48, and 5.50 ± 0.35 mmol/h, respectively. The calcium infusion rate was significantly higher than that of calcium loss rate by CVVH (P < 0.01). The correlation coefficient between the calcium and citrate infusion rates, and calcium infusion and calcium loss rates by CVVH was −0.031 (P > 0.05) and 0.932 (P < 0.01), respectively. In addition, calcium infusion rate (mmol/h) = 1.77 + 0.8 × (calcium loss rate by CVVH, mmol/h). Conclusions: The calcium infusion rate correlates significantly with the calcium loss rate by CVVH but not with the citrate infusion rate in a fixed blood flow rate during CVVH with RCA. PMID:27411455

  11. Critical Thinking.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callison, Daniel

    1998-01-01

    Distinguishes between critical and creative thinking and discusses critical-thinking in relation to modern instructional programs and information literacy. Outlines goals in critical-thinking curriculum, critical thinking skills (student disposition, interpretation, analysis, evaluation, inference, presenting argument, and reflection), and…

  12. The human homologue of the Drosophila melanogaster flightless-I gene (fliI) maps within the Smith-Magenis microdeletion critical region in 17p11.2

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, K.S.; Gunaratne, P.H.; Greenberg, F.; Shaffer, L.G.; Lupski, J.R.; Hoheisel, J.D.; Young, I.G.; Miklos, G.L.G.; Campbell, H.D.

    1995-01-01

    The Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS) appears to be a contiguous-gene-deletion syndrome associated with a proximal deletion of the short arm of chromosome 17 in band p11.2. The spectrum of clinical findings includes short stature, brachydactyly, developmental delay, dysmorphic features, sleep disturbances, and behavioral problems. The complex phenotypic features suggest deletion of several contiguous genes. However, to date, no protein-encoding gene has been mapped to the SMS critical region. Recently, the Drosophila melanogaster flightless-I gene, fliI, and the homologous human cDNA have been isolated. Mutations in fliI result in loss of flight ability and, when severe, cause lethality due to incomplete cellularization with subsequent abnormal gastrulation. Here, we demonstrate that the human homologue (FLI) maps within the SMS critical region. Genomic cosmids were used as probes for FISH, which localized this gene to the 17p11.2 region. Somatic-cell hybrid-panel mapping further localized this gene to the SMS critical region. Southern blot analysis of somatic-cell hybrids and/or FISH analysis of lymphoblastoid cell lines from 12 SMS patients demonstrates the deletion of one copy of FLI in all SMS patients analyzed. 47 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Thinking Critically about Critical Thinking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulnix, Jennifer Wilson

    2012-01-01

    As a philosophy professor, one of my central goals is to teach students to think critically. However, one difficulty with determining whether critical thinking can be taught, or even measured, is that there is widespread disagreement over what critical thinking actually is. Here, I reflect on several conceptions of critical thinking, subjecting…

  14. Effect of global warming and increases in atmospheric [CO{sub 2}] on water stress in soybeans during critical reproductive stages: A regional study of Iowa

    SciTech Connect

    Haskett, J.D.; Pachepsky, Y.A.; Acock, B.

    1997-12-31

    The anthropogenic increase in radiatively active gases in the atmosphere has been well documented. Recently the impact of this increase on the earth`s climate has been confirmed. Agriculture is vulnerable to climatic change, and estimating the likely response to such changes is critical. Many studies of these responses have included soybeans both because they are an important commodity and because they are sensitive to changes in atmospheric CO, concentration. Such studies have generally focused on yield response. While this is critical it does not provide information on the underlying causal link between climate and atmospheric change and changes in soybean yield. The current work examines the impact of climatic change on water stress during the critical periods of soybean reproductive development.

  15. GIS-based landslide hazard evaluation at the regional scale: some critical points in the permanent displacement approach for seismically-induced landslide maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vessia, Giovanna; Parise, Mario

    2013-04-01

    Landslide susceptibility and hazard are commonly developed by means of GIS (Geographic Information Systems) tools. Many products such as DTM (Digital Terrain Models), and geological, morphological and lithological layers (often, to be downloaded for free and integrated within GIS) are nowadays available on the web and ready to be used for urban planning purposes. The multiple sources of public information enable the local authorities to use these products for predicting hazards within urban territories by limited investments on technological infrastructures. On the contrary, the necessary expertise required for conducting pertinent hazard analyses is high, and rarely available at the level of the local authorities. In this respect, taking into account the production of seismically-induced landslide hazard maps at regional scale drawn by GIS tool, these can be performed according to the permanent displacement approach derived by Newmark's sliding block method (Newmark, 1965). Some simplified assumptions are considered for occurrence of a seismic mass movement, listed as follows: (1) the Mohr-Coulomb criterion is used for the plastic displacement of the rigid block; (2) only downward movements are accounted for; (3) a translative sliding mechanism is assumed. Under such conditions, several expressions have been proposed for predicting permanent displacements of slopes during seismic events (Ambresys and Menu, 1988; Luzi and Pergalani 2000; Romeo 2000; Jibson 2007, among the others). These formulations have been provided by researchers for different ranges of seismic magnitudes, and for indexes describing the seismic action, such as peak ground acceleration, peak ground velocity, Arias Intensity, and damage potential. With respect to the resistant properties of the rock units, the critical acceleration is the relevant strength variable in every expressions; it is a function of local slope, groundwater level, unit weight shear resistance of the surficial sediments, and

  16. Disturbances in the F2 region critical frequency before the earthquake of September 11, 2008 off the coast of Hokkaido, Japan, and during a moderate magnetic storm based on data from ground-based vertical ionosphere sounding stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legen'ka, A. D.; Hegai, V. V.; Kim, V. P.

    2016-05-01

    Based on data from ground-based vertical sounding stations, the behaviors of the ionosphere F region before a strong M 6.8 earthquake off the coast of Hokkaido, Japan, and during the moderate magnetic storm before this earthquake are compared. It was found that the critical frequency of the ionosphere F region ( foF2) above the Wakkanai ground-based ionosphere vertical sounding station, which was located in the preparation zone of this earthquake, suffered a long-term disturbance of slightly more than an hour nearly half a day before the earthquake. The magnitude of earthquake-induced disturbance is comparable to that caused by a magnetic storm.

  17. Equation of state and thermodynamic properties of pure D[sub 2]O and D[sub 2]O + H[sub 2]O mixtures in and beyond the critical regions

    SciTech Connect

    Kiselev, S.B.; Abdulagatov, I.M.; Harvey, A.H. . Physical and Chemical Properties Div.)

    1999-03-01

    A parametric crossover model is adapted to represent the thermodynamic properties of pure D[sub 2]O in the extended critical region. The crossover equation of state for D[sub 2]O incorporates scaling laws asymptotically close to the critical point and is transformed into a regular classical expansion far from the critical point. An isomorphic generalization of the law of corresponding states is applied to the prediction of thermodynamic properties and the phase behavior of D[sub 2]O + H[sub 2]O mixtures over a wide region around the focus of vapor liquid critical points. A comparison is made with experimental data for pure D[sub 2]O and for the D[sub 2]O + H[sub 2]O mixture. The equation of state yields a good representation of thermodynamic property data in the range of temperatures 0.8[Tc](x)[le]T[le]1.5[Tc](x) and densities 0.35[rho][sub c](x)[le][rho][le]1.65 [rho][sub c](x).

  18. Equation of state and thermodynamic properties of pure D{sub 2}O and D{sub 2}O + H{sub 2}O mixtures in and beyond the critical regions

    SciTech Connect

    Kiselev, S.B.; Abdulagatov, I.M.; Harvey, A.H.

    1999-03-01

    A parametric crossover model is adapted to represent the thermodynamic properties of pure D{sub 2}O in the extended critical region. The crossover equation of state for D{sub 2}O incorporates scaling laws asymptotically close to the critical point and is transformed into a regular classical expansion far from the critical point. An isomorphic generalization of the law of corresponding states is applied to the prediction of thermodynamic properties and the phase behavior of D{sub 2}O + H{sub 2}O mixtures over a wide region around the focus of vapor liquid critical points. A comparison is made with experimental data for pure D{sub 2}O and for the D{sub 2}O + H{sub 2}O mixture. The equation of state yields a good representation of thermodynamic property data in the range of temperatures 0.8{Tc}(x){le}T{le}1.5{Tc}(x) and densities 0.35{rho}{sub c}(x){le}{rho}{le}1.65 {rho}{sub c}(x).

  19. Critical Care

    MedlinePlus

    Critical care helps people with life-threatening injuries and illnesses. It might treat problems such as complications from surgery, ... attention by a team of specially-trained health care providers. Critical care usually takes place in an ...

  20. Influence of working fluid evaporation temperature in the near-critical point region on the effectiveness of ORC power plant operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowak, Władysław; Borsukiewicz-Gozdur, Aleksandra; Wiśniewski, Sławomir

    2012-09-01

    In the paper presented are definitions of specific indicators of power which characterize the operation of the organic Rankine cycle (ORC) plant. These quantities have been presented as function of evaporation temperature for selected working fluids of ORC installation. In the paper presented also is the procedure for selection of working fluid with the view of obtaining maximum power. In the procedure of selection of working fluid the mentioned above indicators are of primary importance. In order to obtain maximum power there ought to be selected such working fluids which evaporate close to critical conditions. The value of this indicator increases when evaporation enthalpy decreases and it is known that the latent heat of evaporation decreases with temperature and reaches a value of zero at the critical point.

  1. The C-terminal Region and SUMOylation of Cockayne Syndrome Group B Protein Play Critical Roles in Transcription-coupled Nucleotide Excision Repair.

    PubMed

    Sin, Yooksil; Tanaka, Kiyoji; Saijo, Masafumi

    2016-01-15

    Cockayne syndrome (CS) is a recessive disorder that results in deficiencies in transcription-coupled nucleotide excision repair (TC-NER), a subpathway of nucleotide excision repair, and cells from CS patients exhibit hypersensitivity to UV light. CS group B protein (CSB), which is the gene product of one of the genes responsible for CS, belongs to the SWI2/SNF2 DNA-dependent ATPase family and has an ATPase domain and an ubiquitin-binding domain (UBD) in the central region and the C-terminal region, respectively. The C-terminal region containing the UBD is essential for the functions of CSB. In this study, we generated several CSB deletion mutants and analyzed the functions of the C-terminal region of CSB in TC-NER. Not only the UBD but also the C-terminal 30-amino acid residues were required for UV light resistance and TC-NER. This region was needed for the interaction of CSB with RNA polymerase II, the translocation of CS group A protein to the nuclear matrix, and the association of CSB with chromatin after UV irradiation. CSB was modified by small ubiquitin-like modifier 2/3 in a UV light-dependent manner. This modification was abolished in a CSB mutant lacking the C-terminal 30 amino acid residues. However, the substitution of lysine residues in this region with arginine did not affect SUMOylation or TC-NER. By contrast, substitution of a lysine residue in the N-terminal region with arginine decreased SUMOylation and resulted in cells with defects in TC-NER. These results indicate that both the most C-terminal region and SUMOylation are important for the functions of CSB in TC-NER. PMID:26620705

  2. Critical Thoughts on Critical Thinking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cody, Dean E.

    2006-01-01

    Scholars in many academic areas, including librarians, devote a significant amount of thought to critical thinking. Surveying views of its use and possibility, the author considers some key librarians' thoughts on critical thinking. In conclusion, the inability to define critical thinking means that librarians need to emphasize control of…

  3. Critical Thinking vs. Critical Consciousness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doughty, Howard A.

    2006-01-01

    This article explores four kinds of critical thinking. The first is found in Socratic dialogues, which employ critical thinking mainly to reveal logical fallacies in common opinions, thus cleansing superior minds of error and leaving philosophers free to contemplate universal verities. The second is critical interpretation (hermeneutics) which…

  4. Critically Thinking about Critical Thinking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weissberg, Robert

    2013-01-01

    In this article, the author states that "critical thinking" has mesmerized academics across the political spectrum and that even high school students are now being called upon to "think critically." He furthers adds that it is no exaggeration to say that "critical thinking" has quickly evolved into a scholarly…

  5. How Critical Is Critical Thinking?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, Ryan D.

    2014-01-01

    Recent educational discourse is full of references to the value of critical thinking as a 21st-century skill. In music education, critical thinking has been discussed in relation to problem solving and music listening, and some researchers suggest that training in critical thinking can improve students' responses to music. But what exactly is…

  6. Critical fluid light scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gammon, Robert W.

    1988-01-01

    The objective is to measure the decay rates of critical density fluctuations in a simple fluid (xenon) very near its liquid-vapor critical point using laser light scattering and photon correlation spectroscopy. Such experiments were severely limited on Earth by the presence of gravity which causes large density gradients in the sample when the compressibility diverges approaching the critical point. The goal is to measure fluctuation decay rates at least two decades closer to the critical point than is possible on earth, with a resolution of 3 microK. This will require loading the sample to 0.1 percent of the critical density and taking data as close as 100 microK to the critical temperature. The minimum mission time of 100 hours will allow a complete range of temperature points to be covered, limited by the thermal response of the sample. Other technical problems have to be addressed such as multiple scattering and the effect of wetting layers. The experiment entails measurement of the scattering intensity fluctuation decay rate at two angles for each temperature and simultaneously recording the scattering intensities and sample turbidity (from the transmission). The analyzed intensity and turbidity data gives the correlation length at each temperature and locates the critical temperature. The fluctuation decay rate data from these measurements will provide a severe test of the generalized hydrodynamic theories of transport coefficients in the critical regions. When compared to equivalent data from binary liquid critical mixtures they will test the universality of critical dynamics.

  7. Molecular mapping of uncharacteristically small 5q deletions in two patients with the 5q-syndrome: Delineation of the critical region on 5q and identification of a 5q-breakout

    SciTech Connect

    Boultwood, J.; Fidler, C.; Lewis, S.; Littlewood, T.J.; Wainscoat, J.S.; Buckle, V.J. ); Kelly, S. ); Sheridan, H. )

    1994-02-01

    Molecular mapping techniques have defined the region of gene loss in two patients with the 5q-syndrome and uncharacteristically small 5q deletions (5q31-q33). The allelic loss of 10 genes localized to 5q23-qter (centromere-CSF2-EGR1-FGFA-GRL-ADRB2-CSF1R-SPARC-GLUH1-NKSF1-FLT4-telomere) was investigated in peripheral blood cell fractions. Gene dosage experiments demonstrated that CSF2, EGR1, NKSF1, and FLT4 were retained on the 5q-chromosome in both patients and that FGFA was retained in one patient, thus placing these genes outside the critical region. GRL, ADRB2, CSF1R, SPARC, and GLUH1 were shown to be deleted in both patients. The proximal breakpoint is localized between EGR1 and FGFA in one patient and between FGFA and ADRB2 in the other, and the distal breakpoint is localized between GLUH1 and NKSF1 in both patients. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis was used to map the 5q deletion breakpoints, and breakpoint-specific fragments were detected with FGFA in the granulocyte but not the lymphocyte fraction of one patient. This study has established the critical region of gene loss of the 5q-chromosome in the 5q-syndrome, giving the location for a putative tumor-suppressor gene in the 5.6-Mb region between FGFA and NKSF1. 54 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Water footprint, extended water footprint and virtual water trade of the Cantabria region, Spain. A critical appraisal of results, uncertainties and methods.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz-Alcaide, Silvia; Martinez-Santos, Pedro; Willaarts, Barbara; Hernández-Moreno, Enrique; Llamas, M. Ramon

    2015-04-01

    Water footprint assessments have gradually gained recognition as valuable tools for water management, to the point that they have been officially incorporated to water planning in countries such as Spain. Adequate combinations of the virtual water and water footprint concepts present the potential to link a broad range of sectors and issues, thus providing appropriate frameworks to support optimal water allocation and to inform production and trade decisions from the water perspective. We present the results of a regional study carried out in Cantabria, a 5300 km2 autonomous region located in northern Spain. Our approach deals with the municipal, shire and regional scales, combining different methods to assess each of the main components of Cantabria's water footprint (agriculture, livestock, forestry, industry, mining, tourism, domestic use and reservoirs), as well as exploring the significance of different approaches, assumptions and databases in the overall outcomes. The classic water footprint method is coupled with extended water footprint analyses in order to provide an estimate of the social and economic value of each sector. Finally, virtual water imports and exports are computed between Cantabria and the rest of Spain and between Cantabria and the world. The outcome of our work (a) highlights the paramount importance of green water (mostly embedded in pastures) in the region's water footprint and virtual water exports; (b) establishes the role of the region as a net virtual water exporter; (c) shows the productivity of water (euro/m3 and jobs/m3) to be highest in tourism and lowest in agriculture and livestock; and (d) demonstrates that statistical databases are seldom compiled with water footprint studies in mind, which is likely to introduce uncertainties in the results. Although our work shows that there is still plenty of room for improvement in regional-scale water footprint assessments, we contend that the available information is sufficient to

  9. Criticality Model

    SciTech Connect

    A. Alsaed

    2004-09-14

    The ''Disposal Criticality Analysis Methodology Topical Report'' (YMP 2003) presents the methodology for evaluating potential criticality situations in the monitored geologic repository. As stated in the referenced Topical Report, the detailed methodology for performing the disposal criticality analyses will be documented in model reports. Many of the models developed in support of the Topical Report differ from the definition of models as given in the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management procedure AP-SIII.10Q, ''Models'', in that they are procedural, rather than mathematical. These model reports document the detailed methodology necessary to implement the approach presented in the Disposal Criticality Analysis Methodology Topical Report and provide calculations utilizing the methodology. Thus, the governing procedure for this type of report is AP-3.12Q, ''Design Calculations and Analyses''. The ''Criticality Model'' is of this latter type, providing a process evaluating the criticality potential of in-package and external configurations. The purpose of this analysis is to layout the process for calculating the criticality potential for various in-package and external configurations and to calculate lower-bound tolerance limit (LBTL) values and determine range of applicability (ROA) parameters. The LBTL calculations and the ROA determinations are performed using selected benchmark experiments that are applicable to various waste forms and various in-package and external configurations. The waste forms considered in this calculation are pressurized water reactor (PWR), boiling water reactor (BWR), Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF), Training Research Isotope General Atomic (TRIGA), Enrico Fermi, Shippingport pressurized water reactor, Shippingport light water breeder reactor (LWBR), N-Reactor, Melt and Dilute, and Fort Saint Vrain Reactor spent nuclear fuel (SNF). The scope of this analysis is to document the criticality computational method. The criticality

  10. Critical Care

    MedlinePlus

    Critical care helps people with life-threatening injuries and illnesses. It might treat problems such as complications from surgery, accidents, infections, and severe breathing problems. It involves ...

  11. Developing Strategies at the Pre-Service Level to Address Critical Teacher Attraction and Retention Issues in Australian Rural, Regional and Remote Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trinidad, Sue; Sharplin, Elaine; Lock, Graeme; Ledger, Sue; Boyd, Don; Terry, Emmy

    2011-01-01

    This ALTC project is a collaborative endeavour between the four public universities involved in teacher education in Western Australia (Curtin University, Edith Cowan University, Murdoch University and The University of Western Australia), focussed on improving the quality of preparation of pre-service teachers for rural, regional and remote…

  12. The region between the two polyprotein initiation codons of foot-and-mouth disease virus is critical for virulence in cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Translation of the viral polyprotein in picornaviruses initiates at an AUG located immediately after the internal ribosome entry site (IRES) in the 5’UTR. In the case of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV), there are two functional AUG in this region separated by 75-84 nucleotides (inter-AUG) with A...

  13. Insights into the Conformation of the Membrane Proximal Regions Critical to the Trimerization of the HIV-1 gp41 Ectodomain Bound to Dodecyl Phosphocholine Micelles

    PubMed Central

    Louis, John M.; Baber, James L.; Ghirlando, Rodolfo; Aniana, Annie; Bax, Ad; Roche, Julien

    2016-01-01

    The transitioning of the ectodomain of gp41 from a pre-hairpin to a six-helix bundle conformation is a crucial aspect of virus-cell fusion. To gain insight into the intermediary steps of the fusion process we have studied the pH and dodecyl phosphocholine (DPC) micelle dependent trimer association of gp41 by systematic deletion analysis of an optimized construct termed 17–172 (residues 528 to 683 of Env) that spans the fusion peptide proximal region (FPPR) to the membrane proximal external region (MPER) of gp41, by sedimentation velocity and double electron-electron resonance (DEER) EPR spectroscopy. Trimerization at pH 7 requires the presence of both the FPPR and MPER regions. However, at pH 4, the protein completely dissociates to monomers. DEER measurements reveal a partial fraying of the C-terminal MPER residues in the 17–172 trimer while the other regions, including the FPPR, remain compact. In accordance, truncating nine C-terminal MPER residues (675–683) in the 17–172 construct does not shift the trimer-monomer equilibrium significantly. Thus, in the context of the gp41 ectodomain spanning residues 17–172, trimerization is clearly dependent on FPPR and MPER regions even when the terminal residues of MPER unravel. The antibody Z13e1, which spans both the 2F5 and 4E10 epitopes in MPER, binds to 17–172 with a Kd of 1 ± 0.12 μM. Accordingly, individual antibodies 2F5 and 4E10 also recognize the 17–172 trimer/DPC complex. We propose that binding of the C-terminal residues of MPER to the surface of the DPC micelles models a correct positioning of the trimeric transmembrane domain anchored in the viral membrane. PMID:27513582

  14. Insights into the Conformation of the Membrane Proximal Regions Critical to the Trimerization of the HIV-1 gp41 Ectodomain Bound to Dodecyl Phosphocholine Micelles.

    PubMed

    Louis, John M; Baber, James L; Ghirlando, Rodolfo; Aniana, Annie; Bax, Ad; Roche, Julien

    2016-01-01

    The transitioning of the ectodomain of gp41 from a pre-hairpin to a six-helix bundle conformation is a crucial aspect of virus-cell fusion. To gain insight into the intermediary steps of the fusion process we have studied the pH and dodecyl phosphocholine (DPC) micelle dependent trimer association of gp41 by systematic deletion analysis of an optimized construct termed 17-172 (residues 528 to 683 of Env) that spans the fusion peptide proximal region (FPPR) to the membrane proximal external region (MPER) of gp41, by sedimentation velocity and double electron-electron resonance (DEER) EPR spectroscopy. Trimerization at pH 7 requires the presence of both the FPPR and MPER regions. However, at pH 4, the protein completely dissociates to monomers. DEER measurements reveal a partial fraying of the C-terminal MPER residues in the 17-172 trimer while the other regions, including the FPPR, remain compact. In accordance, truncating nine C-terminal MPER residues (675-683) in the 17-172 construct does not shift the trimer-monomer equilibrium significantly. Thus, in the context of the gp41 ectodomain spanning residues 17-172, trimerization is clearly dependent on FPPR and MPER regions even when the terminal residues of MPER unravel. The antibody Z13e1, which spans both the 2F5 and 4E10 epitopes in MPER, binds to 17-172 with a Kd of 1 ± 0.12 μM. Accordingly, individual antibodies 2F5 and 4E10 also recognize the 17-172 trimer/DPC complex. We propose that binding of the C-terminal residues of MPER to the surface of the DPC micelles models a correct positioning of the trimeric transmembrane domain anchored in the viral membrane. PMID:27513582

  15. STAT5 plays a critical role in regulating the 5'-flanking region of the porcine whey acidic protein gene in transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Ji, Mi-Ran; Lee, Sang In; Jang, Ye-Jin; Jeon, Mi-Hyang; Kim, Jeom Sun; Kim, Kyung-Woon; Park, Jin-Ki; Yoo, Jae Gyu; Jeon, Ik-Soo; Kwon, Dae-Jin; Park, Choon-Keun; Byun, Sung June

    2015-12-01

    The mammary gland serves as a valuable bioreactor system for the production of recombinant proteins in lactating animals. Pharmaceutical-grade recombinant protein can be harvested from the milk of transgenic animals that carry a protein of interest under the control of promoter regions genes encoding milk proteins. Whey acidic protein (WAP), for example, is predominantly expressed in the mammary gland and is regulated by lactating hormones during pregnancy. We cloned the 5'-flanking region of the porcine WAP gene (pWAP) to confirm the sequence elements in its promoter that are required for gene-expression activity. In the present study, we investigated how lactogenic hormones--including prolactin, hydrocortisone, and insulin--contribute to the transcriptional activation of the pWAP promoter region in mammalian cells, finding that these hormones activate STAT5 signaling, which in turn induce gene expression via STAT5 binding sites in its 5'-flanking region. To confirm the expression and hormonal regulation of the 5'-flanking region of pWAP in vivo, we generated transgenic mice expressing human recombinant granulocyte colony stimulating factor (hCSF2) in the mammary gland under the control of the pWAP promoter. These mice secreted hCSF2 protein in their milk at levels ranging from 242 to 1,274.8 ng/ml. Collectively, our findings show that the pWAP promoter may be useful for confining the expression of foreign proteins to the mammary gland, where they can be secreted along with milk. PMID:26256125

  16. Critical Muralism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosette, Arturo

    2009-01-01

    This study focuses on the development and practices of Critical Muralists--community-educator-artist-leader-activists--and situates these specifically in relation to the Mexican mural tradition of los Tres Grandes and in relation to the history of public art more generally. The study examines how Critical Muralists address artistic and…

  17. Critical Climate-Sensitive and Important Grain-Producing Regions: Grain Production/Yield Variations Due to Climate Fluctuations. Volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welker, J. E.

    2004-01-01

    Ideally, the Crop Country Inventory, CCI, is a methodology for the pre-harvest prediction of large variations in a country s crop production. This is accomplished by monitoring the historical climatic fluctuations, especially during the crop calendar period, in a climate sensitive large crop production region or sub-country, rather than the entire country. The argument can be made that the climatic fluctuations in the climatic sensitive region are responsible for the major annual crop country variations and that the remainder of the country, without major climatic fluctuations for a given year, can be assumed to be a steady-state crop producer. The principal data set that has been used is the Global Climate Mode (GCM) data from the National Center for Environmental Prediction (NCEP), taken over the last half century. As a test of its accuracy, GCM data can and has been correlated with the actual meteorological station data at the station site.

  18. Small break critical discharge: The roles of vapor and liquid entrainment in a stratified two-phase region upstream of the break

    SciTech Connect

    Schrock, V E; Revankar, S T; Mannheimer, R; Wang, C H

    1986-12-01

    The main objective of this research program was to perform an experimental investigation on the phenomena of two-phase critical flow through small break from a horizontal pipe which contained a stratified two phase flow. Stagnation conditions investigated were saturated steam-water, and air-cold water at pressures ranging from 0.37 MPa to 1.07 MPa. The small breaks employed were cylindrical tubes of diameters 3.96 mm, 6.32 mm, and 10.1 mm with sharp-edged entrance. For breaks resulting from a small hole in a primary coolant pipe or in a small pipe, a sharp-edged orifice or a sharp-edged tube can be the approximation.

  19. Critical behavior and finite volume

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanchenko, Yu.M.; Filippov, A.E.; Lisyanskii, A.A.

    1986-10-01

    An exactly solvable model is used to investigate the influence of the finite size of a system on its critical behavior. The renormalization of the critical temperature is calculated together with the critical exponents and the correlation function. A crossover of the critical exponents from their scaling values to the exponents of mean field theory is obtained. The possibility of complete disappearance of the region of scaling under the influence of the finite size of the system is demonstrated.

  20. Critics and Criticism of Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ornstein, Allan C.

    1977-01-01

    Radical educational critics, such as Edgar Friedenberg, Paul Goodman, A. S. Neill, John Holt, Jonathan Kozol, Herbert Kohl, James Herndon, and Ivan Illich, have few constructive goals, no strategy for broad change, and a disdain for modernization and compromise. Additionally, these critics, says the author, fail to consider social factors related…

  1. Construction of a YAC contig and STS map spanning at least 10 cM in 1q41, the critical region of Usher II gene

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.Y.; Zhen, D.K.; Li, B.F.

    1994-09-01

    Usher syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder causing congenital hearing loss, progressive retinitis pigmentosa and vestibular dysfunction. The Usher syndrome is both clinically and genetically heterogeneous. At least three genetic types of Usher syndrome are know to exist. The Usher II (USH2) syndrome has originally been linked to 1q41 between D1S70 and D1S81. more recently its location was refined and placed between D1S217 and D1S229. We have constructed a YAC contig containing 23 clones and a minimum of 10 Mbp of human DNA. A total of three NotI linking clones, fourteen polymorphic microsatelite markers, eight YAC end clones and twenty lambda and cosmid subclones have been used to order the YACs and assess their integrity. The YAC subclones were used to reassess the location of the USH2 gene. Seven CpG islands have already been identified in the region. Several potential exons have been identified by exon amplification in the cosmid subclones. This map of overlapping clones, the set of densely spaced physical markers and potential exons will promote our understanding of the 1q1 region, its associated genes and eventually the gene mutated in Usher syndrome type II.

  2. Mapping of the human dentin matrix acidic phosphoprotein gene (DMP1) to the dentinogenesis imperfecta type II critical region at chromosome 4q21

    SciTech Connect

    Aplin, H.M.; Hirst, K.L.; Crosby, A.H.; Dixon, M.J.

    1995-11-20

    Dentinogenesis imperfecta type II (DGI1) is an autosomal dominant disorder of dentin formation, which has been mapped to human chromosome 4q12-q21. The region most likely to contain the DGI1 locus is a 3.2-cM region surrounding the osteopontin (SPP1) locus. Recently, a novel dentin-specific acidic phosphoprotein (dmp1) has been cloned in the rat and mapped to mouse chromosome 5q21. In the current investigation, we have isolated a cosmid containing the human DMP1 gene. The isolation of a short tandem repeat polymorphism at this locus has allowed us to map the DMP1 locus to human chromosome 4q21 and demonstrate that it is tightly linked to DGI1 in two families (Z{sub max} = 11.01, {theta} = 0.001). The creation of a yeast artificial chromosome contig around SPP1 has further allowed us to demonstrate that DMP1 is located within 150 kb of the bone sialoprotein and 490 kb of the SPP1 loci, respectively. DMP1 is therefore a strong candidate for the DGI1 locus. 12 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Using pre-critical PKiKP-PcP phases to constrain the regional structures of the inner core boundary beneath East Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Zhongyin; Ai, Yinshuang; He, Yumei; Jiang, Mingming

    2016-03-01

    We collected 177 pre-critical PKiKP-PcP records, assembling a wealth of traveltime and amplitude data. These observations sample the inner core boundary (ICB) beneath East Asia with good spatial coverage. Combined with previous studies, our results demonstrate a 100-km-wide anomaly with positive PKiKP-PcP traveltime residuals surrounded by negatives beneath the Yellow Sea area (123°E, 33°N) (Yellow Sea anomaly). After correcting the elliptic effects and mantle Vp heterogeneities based on the tomography models, the residuals of the Yellow Sea anomaly remain at least 0.6 s faster than those of the surrounding areas, suggesting a thickening of 2-3 km between the ICB and core mantle boundary (CMB). Due to the negative CMB topography along the western Pacific rim, we attribute this anomaly mainly to negative ICB topography. Across the northern border of the Yellow Sea anomaly, PKiKP/PcP amplitude ratios increase by approximately 50% from north to south, which can be explained by an approximately 0.6 g/cm3 raise in ICB density contrast. These traveltime and amplitude features suggest a mosaic structure at the ICB beneath the Yellow Sea areas.

  4. Variations in the critical frequency of the ionospheric F-region during magnetic storms in 2008-2012 at auroral latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blagoveshchensky, D. V.

    2014-09-01

    Fifty-one magnetic storms occurred during the last solar half-cycle of transition from the epoch minimum to the epoch maximum are considered. Ionospheric ( foF2) and magnetic ( X component) data from Sodankyla observatory, Finland, were used for the analysis, as well as values of the Σ Kp indices of magnetic activity. The dependence of variations in the critical frequency foF2 was studied before, during, and after each storm. It has been revealed that a major effect (ME) takes place for all of the storms analyzed. It consists in the following: the first maximum in foF2 values occurs several days before the onset of the active phase of a storm, then foF2 attains its minimum during the active phase, and the second maximum occurred after the active phase. Five principals, the most frequent types of variation in foF2 during a storm, have been revealed. However, special cases (30%) in which an ME exists but shifts rightward several days along the time axis are observable. Ionospheric "memory" (inertia) from 8-9 h to 2 days has been revealed. It has been ascertained that the occurrence of the first ME maximum can be considered a magnetic storm precursor. Such a precursor potentially can be used for forecasting the beginning of magnetic storm development, which is important for space weather problems.

  5. Evidence supporting a critical contribution of intrinsically disordered regions to the biochemical behavior of full-length human HP1γ.

    PubMed

    Velez, Gabriel; Lin, Marisa; Christensen, Trace; Faubion, William A; Lomberk, Gwen; Urrutia, Raul

    2016-01-01

    HP1γ, a non-histone chromatin protein, has elicited significant attention because of its role in gene silencing, elongation, splicing, DNA repair, cell growth, differentiation, and many other cancer-associated processes, including therapy resistance. These characteristics make it an ideal target for developing small drugs for both mechanistic experimentation and potential therapies. While high-resolution structures of the two globular regions of HP1γ, the chromo- and chromoshadow domains, have been solved, little is currently known about the conformational behavior of the full-length protein. Consequently, in the current study, we use threading, homology-based molecular modeling, molecular mechanics calculations, and molecular dynamics simulations to develop models that allow us to infer properties of full-length HP1γ at an atomic resolution level. HP1γ appears as an elongated molecule in which three Intrinsically Disordered Regions (IDRs, 1, 2, and 3) endow this protein with dynamic flexibility, intermolecular recognition properties, and the ability to integrate signals from various intracellular pathways. Our modeling also suggests that the dynamic flexibility imparted to HP1γ by the three IDRs is important for linking nucleosomes with PXVXL motif-containing proteins, in a chromatin environment. The importance of the IDRs in intermolecular recognition is illustrated by the building and study of both IDR2 HP1γ-importin-α and IDR1 and IDR2 HP1γ-DNA complexes. The ability of the three IDRs for integrating cell signals is demonstrated by combined linear motif analyses and molecular dynamics simulations showing that posttranslational modifications can generate a histone mimetic sequence within the IDR2 of HP1γ, which when bound by the chromodomain can lead to an autoinhibited state. Combined, these data underscore the importance of IDRs 1, 2, and 3 in defining the structural and dynamic properties of HP1γ, discoveries that have both mechanistic and

  6. Identifying candidate genes for X-linked hypophosphatemic rickets (HYP) in the critical region X(p22.1-p22.2)

    SciTech Connect

    Holm, L.A.; Freedner, N.L.; Maizoub, J.A.

    1994-09-01

    X-linked hypophosphatemic rickets (HYP) is the most common inherited form of rickets, characterized by a proximal renal tubular phosphate leak leading to phosphate-wasting and abnormal 1.25-dihydroxyvitamin D metabolism. The primary defect is unknown, and the candidate gene approach has thus far been unsuccessful in identifying the gene. The HYP locus has been mapped to X(p22.1-p22.2) and more recently to a 500,000 base pair region spanned by two YACs, E01138 and A0472. In an effort to identify the HYP gene in the 500 kb region, we are taking the direct selection approach. Since the tissue expressing the HYP gene is unknown, we are using cDNA libraries from a number of tissues for direct selection, including kidney, liver, thyroid, brain, spinal cord, total fetus, bone, and an osteosarcoma cell line. The tissue cDNA is hybridized to the YACs A0472 and EO1138 (obtained courtesy of Fiona Francis, Imperial Cancer Research Fund, London) in the presence of quenchers, which block repeated and ribosomal sequences on the YACs. A selected library is created from the tissues cDNAs that hybridize to the YACs. The selected cDNA library is first screened to eliminate inserts containing repeated and ribosomal sequences. The presence of the inserts on the YAC and on X(p22.1-p22.2) is then verified using mapping panels. Candidate cDNAs that make it through this analysis are sequenced. Our first attempts at making selected libraries resulted in a number of contaminants. Three separate libraries are currently under construction, using the following combinations of tissue cDNA libraries: (1) kidney, liver, and thyroid; (2) brain, spinal cord, and total fetus; and (3) bone and an osteosarcoma cell line. We will discuss transcripts obtained from these libraries.

  7. [Spatial representativeness of monitoring stations for air quality in Florence (Tuscany Region, Central Italy) according to ARPAT e LaMMA. Critical observations].

    PubMed

    Grechi, Daniele

    2016-01-01

    On March 2015, the Environmental Protection Agency of Tuscany Region (Central Italy) and the Laboratory of monitoring and environmental modelling published a Report on spatial representativeness of monitoring stations for Tuscan air quality, where they supported the decommissioning of modelling stations located in the Florentine Plain. The stations of Signa, Scandicci, and Firenze-Bassi, located in a further South area, were considered representative Believing that air quality of the Plain could be evaluated by these stations is a stretch. In this text the author show the inconsistency of the conclusion of the Report through correlation graphs comparing daily means of PM10 detected in the disposed stations and in the active ones, showing relevant differences between the reported values and the days when the limits are exceeded. The discrepancy is due to the fact that uncertainty of theoretical estimates is greater than the differences recorded by the stations considered as a reference and the areas they may represent. The area of the Plain has a population of 150,000 individuals and it is subject to a heavy environmental pression, which will change for the urban works planned for the coming years. The population's legitimate request for the analytical monitoring of air pollution could be met through the organization of participated monitoring based on the use of low-cost innovative tools. PMID:27290885

  8. Elucidation of the aggregation pathways of helix-turn-helix peptides: Stabilization at the turn region is critical for fibril formation

    PubMed Central

    Do, Thanh D.; Chamas, Ali; Zheng, Xueyun; Barnes, Aaron; Chang, Dayna; Veldstra, Tjitske; Takhar, Harmeet; Dressler, Nicolette; Trapp, Benjamin; Miller, Kylie; McMahon, Audrene; Meredith, Stephen C.; Shea, Joan-Emma; Cantrell, Kristi Lazar; Bowers, Michael T.

    2015-01-01

    Aggregation of proteins to fiber-like aggregates often involves a transformation of native monomers to β-sheet-rich oligomers. This general observation underestimates the importance of α-helical segments in the aggregation cascade. Here, using a combination of experimental techniques and accelerated molecular dynamics simulations, we investigate the aggregation of a 43-residue, apolipoprotein A-I mimetic peptide and its E21Q and D26N mutants. Our study indicates a strong propensity of helical segments not to adopt cross-β fibrils. The helix-turn-helix monomeric conformation of the peptides is preserved in the mature fibrils. Furthermore, we reveal opposite effects of mutations on and near the turn region in the self-assembly of these peptides. We show that the E21-R24 salt bridge is a major contributor to helix-turn-helix folding, subsequently leading to abundant fibril formation. On the other hand, the K19-D26 interaction is not required to fold the native helix-turn-helix. However, removal of the charged D26 residue decreases the stability of helix-turn-helix monomer, and consequently reduces aggregation. Finally, we provide a more refined assembly model for the helix-turn-helix peptides from apolipoprotein A-I based on the parallel stacking of helix-turn-helix dimers. PMID:26070092

  9. Mutation of Gtf2ird1 from the Williams-Beuren syndrome critical region results in facial dysplasia, motor dysfunction, and altered vocalisations.

    PubMed

    Howard, Monique L; Palmer, Stephen J; Taylor, Kylie M; Arthurson, Geoffrey J; Spitzer, Matthew W; Du, Xin; Pang, Terence Y C; Renoir, Thibault; Hardeman, Edna C; Hannan, Anthony J

    2012-03-01

    Insufficiency of the transcriptional regulator GTF2IRD1 has become a strong potential explanation for some of the major characteristic features of the neurodevelopmental disorder Williams-Beuren syndrome (WBS). Genotype/phenotype correlations in humans indicate that the hemizygous loss of the GTF2IRD1 gene and an adjacent paralogue, GTF2I, play crucial roles in the neurocognitive and craniofacial aspects of the disease. In order to explore this genetic relationship in greater detail, we have generated a targeted Gtf2ird1 mutation in mice that blocks normal GTF2IRD1 protein production. Detailed analyses of homozygous null Gtf2ird1 mice have revealed a series of phenotypes that share some intriguing parallels with WBS. These include reduced body weight, a facial deformity resulting from localised epidermal hyperplasia, a motor coordination deficit, alterations in exploratory activity and, in response to specific stress-inducing stimuli; a novel audible vocalisation and increased serum corticosterone. Analysis of Gtf2ird1 expression patterns in the brain using a knock-in LacZ reporter and c-fos activity mapping illustrates the regions where these neurological abnormalities may originate. These data provide new mechanistic insight into the clinical genetic findings in WBS patients and indicate that insufficiency of GTF2IRD1 protein contributes to abnormalities of facial development, motor function and specific behavioural disorders that accompany this disease. PMID:22198572

  10. Critical periods for chlorpyrifos-induced developmental neurotoxicity: alterations in adenylyl cyclase signaling in adult rat brain regions after gestational or neonatal exposure.

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Armando; Seidler, Frederic J; Aldridge, Justin E; Tate, Charlotte A; Cousins, Mandy M; Slotkin, Theodore A

    2004-01-01

    Developmental exposure to chlorpyrifos (CPF) alters the function of a wide variety of neural systems. In the present study we evaluated the effects in adulthood of CPF exposure of rats during different developmental windows, using the adenylyl cyclase (AC) signaling cascade, which mediates the cellular responses to numerous neurotransmitters. Animals were exposed on gestational days (GD) 9-12 or 17-20 or on postnatal days (PN) 1-4 or 11-14 and assessed at PN60. In addition to basal AC activity, we evaluated the responses to direct AC stimulants (forskolin, Mn2+) and to isoproterenol, which activates signaling through ss-adrenoceptors coupled to stimulatory G-proteins. CPF exposure in any of the four periods elicited significant changes in AC signaling in a wide variety of brain regions in adulthood. In general, GD9-12 was the least sensitive stage, requiring doses above the threshold for impaired maternal weight gain, whereas effects were obtained at subtoxic doses for all other regimens. Most of the effects were heterologous, involving signaling elements downstream from the receptors, and thus shared by multiple stimulants; superimposed on this basic pattern, there were also selective alterations in receptor-mediated responses, in G-protein function, and in AC expression and subtypes. Exposures conducted at GD17-20 and later all produced sex-selective alterations. These results suggest that developmental exposure to CPF elicits long-lasting alterations in cell-signaling cascades that are shared by multiple neurotransmitter and hormonal inputs; the resultant abnormalities of synaptic communication are thus likely to occur in widespread neural circuits and their corresponding behaviors. PMID:14998743

  11. 2-Deoxy-D-glucose-induced hypothermia in anesthetized rats: Lack of forebrain contribution and critical involvement of the rostral raphe/parapyramidal regions of the medulla oblongata.

    PubMed

    Osaka, Toshimasa

    2015-07-01

    Systemic or central administration of 2-deoxy-d-glucose (2DG), a competitive inhibitor of glucose utilization, induces hypothermia in awake animals and humans. This response is mediated by the central nervous system, though the neural mechanism involved is largely unknown. In this study, I examined possible involvement of the forebrain, which contains the hypothalamic thermoregulatory center, and the medullary rostral raphe/parapyramidal regions (rRPa/PPy), which mediate hypoxia-induced heat-loss responses, in 2DG-induced hypothermia in urethane-chloralose-anesthetized, neuromuscularly blocked, artificially ventilated rats. The intravenous injection of 2DG (250mgkg(-1)) elicited an increase in tail skin temperature and decreases in body core temperature and the respiratory exchange ratio, though it did not induce any significant change in the metabolic rate. These results indicate that the hypothermic response was caused by an increase in heat loss, but not by a decrease in heat production and that it was accompanied by a decrease in carbohydrate utilization and/or an increase in lipid utilization as energy substrates. Complete surgical transection of the brainstem between the hypothalamus and the midbrain had no effect on the 2DG-induced hypothermic responses, suggesting that the hindbrain, but not the forebrain, was sufficient for the responses. However, pretreatment of the rRPa/PPy with the GABAA receptor blocker bicuculline methiodide, but not with vehicle saline, greatly attenuated the 2DG-induced responses, suggesting that the 2DG-induced hypothermia was mediated, at least in part, by GABAergic neurons in the hindbrain and activation of GABAA receptors on cutaneous sympathetic premotor neurons in the rRPa/PPy. PMID:26146232

  12. Microprocessor complex subunit DiGeorge syndrome critical region gene 8 (Dgcr8) is required for schwann cell myelination and myelin maintenance.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hsin-Pin; Oksuz, Idil; Hurley, Edward; Wrabetz, Lawrence; Awatramani, Rajeshwar

    2015-10-01

    We investigated the role of a key component of the Microprocessor complex, DGCR8, in the regulation of myelin formation and maintenance. We found that conditionally ablating Dgcr8 in Schwann cells (SCs) during development results in an arrest of SC differentiation. Dgcr8 conditional knock-out (cKO) SCs fail to form 1:1 relationships with axons or, having achieved this, fail to form myelin sheaths. The expression of genes normally found in immature SCs, such as sex-determining region Y-box 2 (Sox2), is increased in Dgcr8 cKO SCs, whereas the expression of myelin-related genes, including the master regulatory transcription factor early growth response 2 (Egr2), is decreased. Additionally, expression of a novel gene expression program involving sonic hedgehog (Shh), activated de novo in injured nerves, is elevated in Dgcr8 cKOs but not in Egr2 null mice, a model of SC differentiation arrest, suggesting that the injury-related gene expression program in Dgcr8 cKOs cannot be attributed to differentiation arrest. Inducible ablation of Dgcr8 in adult SCs results in gene expression changes similar to those found in cKOs, including an increase in the expression of Sox2 and Shh. Analyses of these nerves mainly reveal normal myelin thickness and axon size distribution but some dedifferentiated SCs and increased macrophage infiltration. Together our data suggest that Dgcr8 is responsible for modulation of gene expression programs underlying myelin formation and maintenance as well as suppression of an injury-related gene expression program. PMID:26272614

  13. The human homologue of the Drosophila melanogaster flightless-I gene (fliI) maps within the Smith-Magenis microdeletion critical region in 17p11.2

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, K.S.; Nguyen, D.; Greenberg, F.

    1994-09-01

    The Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS) appears to be a contiguous gene deletion syndrome associated with a proximal deletion of the short arm of chromosome 17 in band p11.2. The spectrum of clinical findings includes short stature, brachydactyly, developmental delay, dysmorphic features, sleep disturbances and behavioral problems. The complex phenotypic features suggest deletion of several contiguous genes. However, to date no protein encoding gene has been mapped to the SMS critical region. Recently, Campbell described the cloning and characterization of D. melanogaster fli cDNAs and of homologous cDNAs from caenorhabditis elegans and from humans. Mutations in fliI result in loss of flight ability and, when severe, cause lethality due to incomplete cellularization with subsequent abnormal gastrulation. The amino acid sequence deduced from the FLI cDNA has 52% similarity to the human gelsolin protein and also has a N-terminal leucine-rich domain with 16 consecutive leucine-rich repeats (LRR). Here, we demonstrate that the human homologue (FLI) maps within the SMS critical region. Genomic cosmids were used as probes for fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and localized this gene to the 17p11.2 region. Somatic cell hybrids and/or FISH analysis of lymphoblastoid cell lines form 12 SMS patients demonstrate that one copy of the FLI gene is deleted in all SMS patients analyzed with the common deletion. Further studies are required to determine if haploinsufficiency of FLI or other as yet unidentified genes is important for the expression of the SMS phenotype.

  14. Vapor-liquid coexistence curves in the critical region and the critical temperatures and densities of 1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane (R-134a), 1,1,1-trifluoroethane (R-143a), and 1,1,1,2,3,3-hexafluoropropane (R-236ea)

    SciTech Connect

    Aoyama, H.; Kishizawa, G.; Sato, H.; Watanabe, K.

    1996-09-01

    The vapor-liquid coexistence curves in the critical region of 1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane (R-134a), 1,1,1-trifluoroethane (R-143a), and 1,1,1,2,3,3-hexafluoropropane (R-236ea) were measured by a visual observation of the meniscus disappearance in an optical cell. Seventeen saturated-vapor and -liquid densities have been measured for R-134a. Thirty-five saturated-vapor and -liquid densities have been measured for R-143a. Twenty-seven saturated-vapor and -liquid densities have been measured for R-236ea. The level and location of the meniscus, as well as the intensity of the critical opalescence were considered in the determination of the critical temperature and density for each fluid. R-134a was found to have (374.083 {+-} 0.010) K and (509 {+-} 1) kg/m{sup 3}, R-143a, (345.860 {+-} 0.010) K and (434 {+-} 1) kg/m{sup 3}, and R-236ea, (412.375 {+-} 0.015) K and (568 {+-} 1) kg/m{sup 3}.

  15. Dynamical critical scaling of electric field fluctuations in the greater cusp and magnetotail implied by HF radar observations of F-region Doppler velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parkinson, M. L.

    2006-03-01

    Akasofu's solar wind ɛ parameter describes the coupling of solar wind energy to the magnetosphere and ionosphere. Analysis of fluctuations in ɛ using model independent scaling techniques including the peaks of probability density functions (PDFs) and generalised structure function (GSF) analysis show the fluctuations were self-affine (mono-fractal, single exponent scaling) over 9 octaves of time scale from ~46 s to ~9.1 h. However, the peak scaling exponent α0 was a function of the fluctuation bin size, so caution is required when comparing the exponents for different data sets sampled in different ways. The same generic scaling techniques revealed the organisation and functional form of concurrent fluctuations in azimuthal magnetospheric electric fields implied by SuperDARN HF radar measurements of line-of-sight Doppler velocity, vLOS, made in the high-latitude austral ionosphere. The PDFs of vLOS fluctuation were calculated for time scales between 1 min and 256 min, and were sorted into noon sector results obtained with the Halley radar, and midnight sector results obtained with the TIGER radar. The PDFs were further sorted according to the orientation of the interplanetary magnetic field, as well as ionospheric regions of high and low Doppler spectral width. High spectral widths tend to occur at higher latitude, mostly on open field lines but also on closed field lines just equatorward of the open-closed boundary, whereas low spectral widths are concentrated on closed field lines deeper inside the magnetosphere. The vLOS fluctuations were most self-affine (i.e. like the solar wind ɛ parameter) on the high spectral width field lines in the noon sector ionosphere (i.e. the greater cusp), but suggested multi-fractal behaviour on closed field lines in the midnight sector (i.e. the central plasma sheet). Long tails in the PDFs imply that "microbursts" in ionospheric convection occur far more frequently, especially on open field lines, than can be captured using

  16. Two Membrane-Associated Regions within the Nodamura Virus RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase Are Critical for both Mitochondrial Localization and RNA Replication

    PubMed Central

    Gant, Vincent U.; Moreno, Stephanie; Varela-Ramirez, Armando

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Viruses with positive-strand RNA genomes amplify their genomes in replication complexes associated with cellular membranes. Little is known about the mechanism of replication complex formation in cells infected with Nodamura virus. This virus is unique in its ability to lethally infect both mammals and insects. In mice and in larvae of the greater wax moth (Galleria mellonella), Nodamura virus-infected muscle cells exhibit mitochondrial aggregation and membrane rearrangement, leading to disorganization of the muscle fibrils on the tissue level and ultimately in hind limb/segment paralysis. However, the molecular basis for this pathogenesis and the role of mitochondria in Nodamura virus infection remains unclear. Here, we tested the hypothesis that Nodamura virus establishes RNA replication complexes that associate with mitochondria in mammalian cells. Our results showed that Nodamura virus replication complexes are targeted to mitochondria, as evidenced in biochemical, molecular, and confocal microscopy studies. More specifically, we show that the Nodamura virus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase interacts with the outer mitochondrial membranes as an integral membrane protein and ultimately becomes associated with functional replication complexes. These studies will help us to understand the mechanism of replication complex formation and the pathogenesis of Nodamura virus for mammals. IMPORTANCE This study will further our understanding of Nodamura virus (NoV) genome replication and its pathogenesis for mice. NoV is unique among the Nodaviridae in its ability to infect mammals. Here we show that NoV establishes RNA replication complexes (RCs) in association with mitochondria in mammalian cells. These RCs contain newly synthesized viral RNA and feature a physical interaction between mitochondrial membranes and the viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp), which is mediated by two membrane-associated regions. While the nature of the interaction needs to be

  17. Critical Thinking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Villano, Matt

    2006-01-01

    True excellence in technology implementation emerges when IT, administrative, and academic leaders link IT to mission-critical institutional objectives, investing in hardware and software to serve an explicit purpose and a distinct population of users. This article illustrates that at public institutions of higher education in New Hampshire as…

  18. Structural analysis of a novel rabbit monoclonal antibody R53 targeting an epitope in HIV-1 gp120 C4 region critical for receptor and co-receptor binding

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Ruimin; Chen, Yuxin; Vaine, Michael; Hu, Guangnan; Wang, Shixia; Lu, Shan; Kong, Xiang -Peng

    2015-07-15

    The fourth conserved region (C4) in the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) gp120 is a structural element that is important for its function, as it binds to both the receptor CD4 and the co-receptor CCR5/CXCR4. It has long been known that this region is highly immunogenic and that it harbors B-cell as well as T-cell epitopes. It is the target of a number of antibodies in animal studies, which are called CD4-blockers. However, the mechanism by which the virus shields itself from such antibody responses is not known. Here, we determined the crystal structure of R53 in complex with its epitope peptide using a novel anti-C4 rabbit monoclonal antibody R53. Our data show that although the epitope of R53 covers a highly conserved sequence 433AMYAPPI439, it is not available in the gp120 trimer and in the CD4-bound conformation. Our results suggest a masking mechanism to explain how HIV-1 protects this critical region from the human immune system.

  19. Structural analysis of a novel rabbit monoclonal antibody R53 targeting an epitope in HIV-1 gp120 C4 region critical for receptor and co-receptor binding.

    PubMed

    Pan, Ruimin; Chen, Yuxin; Vaine, Michael; Hu, Guangnan; Wang, Shixia; Lu, Shan; Kong, Xiang-Peng

    2015-07-01

    The fourth conserved region (C4) in the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) gp120 is a structural element that is important for its function, as it binds to both the receptor CD4 and the co-receptor CCR5/CXCR4. It has long been known that this region is highly immunogenic and that it harbors B-cell as well as T-cell epitopes. It is the target of a number of antibodies in animal studies, which are called CD4-blockers. However, the mechanism by which the virus shields itself from such antibody responses is not known. Here, we determined the crystal structure of R53 in complex with its epitope peptide using a novel anti-C4 rabbit monoclonal antibody R53. Our data show that although the epitope of R53 covers a highly conserved sequence (433)AMYAPPI(439), it is not available in the gp120 trimer and in the CD4-bound conformation. Our results suggest a masking mechanism to explain how HIV-1 protects this critical region from the human immune system. PMID:26251831

  20. Structural analysis of a novel rabbit monoclonal antibody R53 targeting an epitope in HIV-1 gp120 C4 region critical for receptor and co-receptor binding

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Ruimin; Chen, Yuxin; Vaine, Michael; Hu, Guangnan; Wang, Shixia; Lu, Shan; Kong, Xiang-Peng

    2015-01-01

    The fourth conserved region (C4) in the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) gp120 is a structural element that is important for its function, as it binds to both the receptor CD4 and the co-receptor CCR5/CXCR4. It has long been known that this region is highly immunogenic and that it harbors B-cell as well as T-cell epitopes. It is the target of a number of antibodies in animal studies, which are called CD4-blockers. However, the mechanism by which the virus shields itself from such antibody responses is not known. Here, we determined the crystal structure of R53 in complex with its epitope peptide using a novel anti-C4 rabbit monoclonal antibody R53. Our data show that although the epitope of R53 covers a highly conserved sequence 433AMYAPPI439, it is not available in the gp120 trimer and in the CD4-bound conformation. Our results suggest a masking mechanism to explain how HIV-1 protects this critical region from the human immune system. PMID:26251831

  1. Structural analysis of a novel rabbit monoclonal antibody R53 targeting an epitope in HIV-1 gp120 C4 region critical for receptor and co-receptor binding

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Pan, Ruimin; Chen, Yuxin; Vaine, Michael; Hu, Guangnan; Wang, Shixia; Lu, Shan; Kong, Xiang -Peng

    2015-07-15

    The fourth conserved region (C4) in the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) gp120 is a structural element that is important for its function, as it binds to both the receptor CD4 and the co-receptor CCR5/CXCR4. It has long been known that this region is highly immunogenic and that it harbors B-cell as well as T-cell epitopes. It is the target of a number of antibodies in animal studies, which are called CD4-blockers. However, the mechanism by which the virus shields itself from such antibody responses is not known. Here, we determined the crystal structure of R53 in complex with its epitopemore » peptide using a novel anti-C4 rabbit monoclonal antibody R53. Our data show that although the epitope of R53 covers a highly conserved sequence 433AMYAPPI439, it is not available in the gp120 trimer and in the CD4-bound conformation. Our results suggest a masking mechanism to explain how HIV-1 protects this critical region from the human immune system.« less

  2. Mapping of the Tacaribe Arenavirus Z-Protein Binding Sites on the L Protein Identified both Amino Acids within the Putative Polymerase Domain and a Region at the N Terminus of L That Are Critically Involved in Binding▿

    PubMed Central

    Wilda, Maximiliano; Lopez, Nora; Casabona, Juan Cruz; Franze-Fernandez, Maria T.

    2008-01-01

    Tacaribe virus (TacV) is the prototype of the New World group of arenaviruses. The TacV genome encodes four proteins: the nucleoprotein (N), the glycoprotein precursor, the polymerase (L), and a RING finger protein (Z). Using a reverse genetics system, we demonstrated that TacV N and L are sufficient to drive transcription and replication mediated by TacV-like RNAs and that Z is a powerful inhibitor of these processes (Lopez et al., J. Virol. 65:12241-12251, 2001). More recently, we provided the first evidence of an interaction between Z and L and showed that Z's inhibitory activity was dependent on its ability to bind to L (Jácamo et al., J. Virol. 77:10383-10393, 2003). In the present study, we mapped the TacV Z-binding sites on the 2,210-amino-acid L polymerase. To that end, we performed deletion analysis and point mutations of L and studied the Z-L interaction by coimmunoprecipitation with specific sera. We found that the C-terminal region of L was not essential for the interaction and identified two noncontiguous regions that were critical for binding: one at the N-terminus of L between residues 156 and 292 and a second one in the polymerase domain (domain III). The importance of domain III in binding was revealed by substitutions in D1188 and H1189 within motif A and in each residue of the conserved SDD sequence (residues 1328, 1329, and 1330) within motif C. Our results showed that of the substituted residues, only H1189 and D1329 appeared to be critically involved in binding Z. PMID:18799569

  3. Vulnerability of critical infrastructures : identifying critical nodes.

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, Roger Gary; Robinson, David Gerald

    2004-06-01

    The objective of this research was the development of tools and techniques for the identification of critical nodes within critical infrastructures. These are nodes that, if disrupted through natural events or terrorist action, would cause the most widespread, immediate damage. This research focuses on one particular element of the national infrastructure: the bulk power system. Through the identification of critical elements and the quantification of the consequences of their failure, site-specific vulnerability analyses can be focused at those locations where additional security measures could be effectively implemented. In particular, with appropriate sizing and placement within the grid, distributed generation in the form of regional power parks may reduce or even prevent the impact of widespread network power outages. Even without additional security measures, increased awareness of sensitive power grid locations can provide a basis for more effective national, state and local emergency planning. A number of methods for identifying critical nodes were investigated: small-world (or network theory), polyhedral dynamics, and an artificial intelligence-based search method - particle swarm optimization. PSO was found to be the only viable approach and was applied to a variety of industry accepted test networks to validate the ability of the approach to identify sets of critical nodes. The approach was coded in a software package called Buzzard and integrated with a traditional power flow code. A number of industry accepted test networks were employed to validate the approach. The techniques (and software) are not unique to power grid network, but could be applied to a variety of complex, interacting infrastructures.

  4. A critical role for heat shock transcription factor in establishing a nucleosome-free region over the TATA-initiation site of the yeast HSP82 heat shock gene.

    PubMed Central

    Gross, D S; Adams, C C; Lee, S; Stentz, B

    1993-01-01

    Heat shock genes are poised for rapid transcriptional activation in response to environmental stress. A universal structural characteristic of such genes is the presence of a nucleosome-free, DNase I hypersensitive promoter region. Here we investigate the structural and functional effects of mutating HSE1, the preferred heat shock factor (HSF) binding site upstream of the yeast HSP82 gene. In situ deletion or substitution of this sequence reduces both basal and induced transcription by at least two orders of magnitude. Moreover, such mutations lead to a dramatic transition in chromatin structure: the DNase I hypersensitive region is replaced by two stable, sequence-positioned nucleosomes. One of these is centered over the mutated heat shock element, while the other--as revealed by DNase I genomic footprinting--is precisely positioned in a rotational sense over the TATA-initiation site. Overexpression of yeast HSF strongly suppresses the null phenotype of the induced hsp82-delta HSE1 gene and re-establishes DNase I hypersensitivity over its promoter. Such suppression is mediated through sequence disposed immediately upstream of HSE1 and containing two low affinity heat shock elements. These data imply a critical role for HSF in displacing stably positioned nucleosomes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and suggest that HSF transcriptionally activates HSP82 at least partly through its ability to alleviate nucleosome repression of the core promoter. Images PMID:8404861

  5. Charged/Polar-Residue Scanning of the Hydrophobic Face of Transmembrane Domain 9 of the Yeast Glutathione Transporter, Hgt1p, Reveals a Conformationally Critical Region for Substrate Transport

    PubMed Central

    Thakur, Anil; Bachhawat, Anand K.

    2015-01-01

    Unraveling the mechanistic workings of membrane transporters has remained a challenging task. We describe a novel strategy that involves subjecting the residues of the hydrophobic face of a transmembrane helix to a charged/polar scanning mutagenesis. TMD9 of the yeast glutathione transporter, Hgt1p, has been identified as being important in substrate binding, and two residues, F523 and Q526, are expected to line the substrate translocation channel while the other face is hydrophobic. The hydrophobic face of TMD9 helix consists of residues A509, V513, L517, L520, I524, and I528, and these were mutated to lysine, glutamine, and glutamic acid. Among the 16 charged mutants created, six were nonfunctional, revealing a surprising tolerance of charged residues in the hydrophobic part of TM helices. Furthermore, the only position that did not tolerate any charged residue was I524, proximal to the substrate binding residues. However, P525, also proximal to the substrate binding residues, did tolerate charged/polar residues, suggesting that mere proximity to the substrate binding residues was not the only factor. The I524K/E/Q mutants expressed well and localized correctly despite lacking any glutathione uptake capability. Isolation of suppressors for all nonfunctional mutants yielded second-site suppressors only for I524K and I524Q, and suppressors for these mutations appeared at G202K/I and G202K/Q, respectively. G202 is in the hydrophilic loop between TMD3 and TMD4. The results suggest that I524 in the hydrophobic face interacts with this region and is also in a conformationally critical region for substrate translocation. PMID:25784163

  6. The gene for human U2 snRNP auxiliary factor small 35-kDa subunit (U2AF1) maps to the progressive myoclonus epilepsy (EPM1) critical region on chromosome 21q22.3

    SciTech Connect

    Lalioti, M.D.; Rossier, C.; Antonarakis, S.E.

    1996-04-15

    We used targeted exon trapping to clone portions of genes from human chromosome 21q22.3. One trapped sequence showed complete homology with the cDNA of human U2AF{sup 35} (M96982; HGM-approved nomenclature U2AF1), which encodes for the small 35-kDa subunit of the U2 snRNP auxiliary factor. Using the U2AF1 cDNA as a probe, we mapped this gene to cosmid Q15D2, a P1, and YAC 350F7 of the Chumakov et al. contig, close to the cystathionine-{beta}-synthase gene (CBS) on 21q22.3. This localization was confirmed by PCR using oligonucleotides from the 3{prime} UTR and by FISH. As U2AF1 associated with a number of different factors during mRNA splicing, overexpression in trisomy 21 individuals could contribute to some Down syndrome phenotypes by interfering with the splicing process. Furthermore, because this gene maps in the critical region for the progressive myoclonus epilepsy I locus (EPM1), mutation analysis will be carried out in patients to evaluate the potential role of U2AF1 as a candidate for EPM1. 24 refs., 1 fig.

  7. Criticism of News Media in City Magazines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burd, Gene; Young, C. Dianne

    A survey of 80 city and regional magazines was undertaken to examine articles of media criticism. Of those, 78.5% responded. A total of 420 articles were received and were divided according to subject and geographical distribution. A critical analysis of representative articles determined that they represented significant criticism as defined in…

  8. Critical phenomena in magnetic nanowires.

    PubMed

    Kamalakar, M Venkata; Raychaudhuri, A K

    2009-09-01

    In this paper we report the first experimental study of critical phenomena in case of magnetic nanowires of nickel near the ferromagnetic-paramagnetic transition from the electrical transport properties. Nickel nanowire arrays, prepared by potentiostatic electrodeposition of nickel inside pores of nanoporous anodic alumina template were well characterized by X-ray Diffraction, Transmission electron microscopy and Energy dispersive Spectroscopy. Precise electrical resistance measurement of the nanowire arrays of wire diameter 20 nm have been done in the temperature range between 300 K to 700 K. We see a drop in the Curie temperature as observed from the resistivity anomaly. We analyzed the resistance data near the critical region and extracted the critical exponent alpha directly from the resistance. We observed a decrease in the critical part of the resistivity including a decrease in the magnitude of the critical exponent alpha and severe modification in the correction to scaling. PMID:19928208

  9. Critical Pedagogy for Critical Mathematics Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tutak, Fatma Aslan; Bondy, Elizabeth; Adams, Thomasenia L.

    2011-01-01

    This article provides a brief introduction to critical pedagogy and further discussion on critical mathematics education. Critical mathematics education enables students to read the world with mathematics. Three emerging domains of mathematics education related to critical mathematics education are discussed in this manuscript: ethnomathematics,…

  10. Viscosity of nitrogen near the critical point

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Basu, R. S.; Sengers, J. V.

    1978-01-01

    The formulation of a quantitative description of the critical enhancement in the shear viscosity of fluids near the gas-liquid critical point is considered. The critical point is a point of marginal thermodynamic stability. In the vicinity of the critical point, large-scale density fluctuations are present in the fluid. The critical enhancement of the transport properties is related to the correlation length. The correlation length is related to the compressibility, thus providing consistency between the equations for the transport properties and the equation of state in the critical region. The critical region parameters for nitrogen are presented in a table. It is found that the critical viscosity enhancement observed by Zozulya and Blagoi (1974) for nitrogen is consistent with current theoretical predictions

  11. The immunodominant CD8+ T cell epitope region of Theiler’s virus in resistant C57BL/6 mice is critical for anti-viral immune responses, viral persistence, and binding to the host cells.

    PubMed Central

    Myoung, Jinjong; Hou, Wanqiu; Kang, Bongsu; Lyman, Michael A.; Kang, Jeong-Ah; Kim, Byung S.

    2007-01-01

    Theiler’s virus infection induces an immune-mediated demyelinating disease, providing a relevant animal model of human multiple sclerosis. VP2121–130-specific CD8+ T cells in resistant H-2b mice account for the majority of CNS-infiltrating CD8+ T cells. To further study the role of the CD8+ T cells, we generated a panel of mutant viruses substituted with L, G, or T at the anchor residue (M130) of the VP2121–130 epitope. M130L virus (M130L-V) with a substitution of M with L displayed similar properties as wild-type virus (WT-V). However, M130G-V and M130T-V could not establish a persistent infection in the CNS. The level of both virus-specific CD8+ and CD4+ T cell responses is significantly reduced in mice infected with these variant viruses. While all mutant and wild-type viruses replicate comparably in BHK cells, replication of M130G-V and M130T-V in macrophages was significantly lower compared to those infected with WT-V and M130L-V. Interestingly, these mutant viruses deficient in replication in primary mouse cells showed drastically reduced binding ability to the cells. These results suggest that the anchor residue of the predominant CD8+ T cell epitope of TMEV in resistant mice is critical for the virus to infect target cells and this deficiency may result in poor viral persistence leading to correspondingly low T cell responses in the periphery and CNS. Thus, selection of the cellular binding region of the virus as the predominant epitope for CD8+ T cells in resistant mice may provide a distinct advantage in controlling viral persistence by preventing escape mutations. PMID:17095033

  12. Critical interpretation of CH– and OH– stretching regions for infrared spectra of methanol clusters (CH{sub 3}OH){sub n} (n = 2–5) using self-consistent-charge density functional tight-binding molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Nishimura, Yoshifumi; Lee, Yuan-Pern; Irle, Stephan; Witek, Henryk A.

    2014-09-07

    Vibrational infrared (IR) spectra of gas-phase O–H⋅⋅⋅O methanol clusters up to pentamer are simulated using self-consistent-charge density functional tight-binding method using two distinct methodologies: standard normal mode analysis and Fourier transform of the dipole time-correlation function. The twofold simulations aim at the direct critical assignment of the C–H stretching region of the recently recorded experimental spectra [H.-L. Han, C. Camacho, H. A. Witek, and Y.-P. Lee, J. Chem. Phys. 134, 144309 (2011)]. Both approaches confirm the previous assignment (ibid.) of the C–H stretching bands based on the B3LYP/ANO1 harmonic frequencies, showing that ν{sub 3}, ν{sub 9}, and ν{sub 2} C–H stretching modes of the proton-accepting (PA) and proton-donating (PD) methanol monomers experience only small splittings upon the cluster formation. This finding is in sharp discord with the assignment based on anharmonic B3LYP/VPT2/ANO1 vibrational frequencies (ibid.), suggesting that some procedural faults, likely related to the breakdown of the perturbational vibrational treatment, led the anharmonic calculations astray. The IR spectra based on the Fourier transform of the dipole time-correlation function include new, previously unaccounted for physical factors such as non-zero temperature of the system and large amplitude motions of the clusters. The elevation of temperature results in a considerable non-homogeneous broadening of the observed IR signals, while the presence of large-amplitude motions (methyl group rotations and PA-PD flipping), somewhat surprisingly, does not introduce any new features in the spectrum.

  13. Anisotropy of the upper critical fields and the paramagnetic Meissner effect in La1.85Sr0.15CuO4 single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felner, I.; Tsindlekht, M. I.; Drachuck, G.; Keren, A.

    2013-02-01

    Optimally doped La1.85Sr0.15CuO4 single crystals have been investigated by dc and ac magnetic measurements. These crystals have rectangular needle-like shapes with the long needle axis parallel to the crystallographic c axis (c-crystal) or parallel to the basal planes (a-crystal). In both crystals, the temperature dependence of the upper critical fields (HC2) and the surface critical field (HC3) were measured. The H-T phase diagram is presented. Close to TC = 35 K, for the c-crystal, {\\boldsymbol{\\gamma}}^{c}={H}_{{C3}}^{c}/{H}_{{C2}}^{c}=1.8 0(2), whereas for the a-crystal the {\\boldsymbol{\\gamma}}^{a}={H}_{{C3}}^{a}/{H}_{{C2}}^{a}=4.0(2) obtained is much higher than 1.69, predicted by the ideal mathematical model. At low applied dc fields, positive field-cooled branches known as the ‘paramagnetic Meissner effect’ (PME) are observed; their magnitude is inversely proportional to H. The anisotropic PME is observed in both a- and c-crystals, only when the applied field is along the basal planes. It is speculated that the high γa and the PME are connected to each other.

  14. Anisotropy of the upper critical fields and the paramagnetic Meissner effect in La1.85Sr0.15CuO4 single crystals.

    PubMed

    Felner, I; Tsindlekht, M I; Drachuck, G; Keren, A

    2013-02-13

    Optimally doped La(1.85)Sr(0.15)CuO(4) single crystals have been investigated by dc and ac magnetic measurements. These crystals have rectangular needle-like shapes with the long needle axis parallel to the crystallographic c axis (c-crystal) or parallel to the basal planes (a-crystal). In both crystals, the temperature dependence of the upper critical fields (H(C2)) and the surface critical field (H(C3)) were measured. The H-T phase diagram is presented. Close to T(C) = 35 K, for the c-crystal, γ(C) = H(C3)(c)/H(C2)(c) = 1.80(2), whereas for the a-crystal the γ(a) = H(C3)(a)/H(C2)(a) = 4.0(2) obtained is much higher than 1.69, predicted by the ideal mathematical model. At low applied dc fields, positive field-cooled branches known as the 'paramagnetic Meissner effect' (PME) are observed; their magnitude is inversely proportional to H. The anisotropic PME is observed in both a- and c-crystals, only when the applied field is along the basal planes. It is speculated that the high γ(a) and the PME are connected to each other. PMID:23315336

  15. Clinical trials at AHCs: the perspective of an academic clinical trials office.

    PubMed

    Paller, Mark S; Hostetler, Lisa; Dykhuis, Debra A

    2002-12-01

    Industry-sponsored clinical trials represent a substantial portion of the clinical investigator's portfolio of patient-oriented research. In academia's efforts to reclaim lost ground with respect to the performance of industry-sponsored clinical trials, many academic health centers have established clinical trials offices. An underlying assumption has been that with improved service on the part of universities will come new opportunities for clinical research. The experiences and vantage points of academic research offices have sometimes been ignored and an analysis of what new business might ensue has not been reported. The authors discuss the rationale for creating a centralized clinical trials office and the means of financing such an effort. They then describe the initial experiences (1997-2000) of a central clinical trials office (the Research Services Organization, or RSO) at the University of Minnesota Academic Health Center, analyze the value of such an office to the academic health center, and, based on their experiences with the RSO and elsewhere, consider how industry and academia might further enhance their collaborations. Of 354 clinical research proposals evaluated by the RSO, only 62% were found to be acceptable or highly likely to be acceptable to investigators and the institution. Reasons for not participating in specific clinical trials are discussed. Academic health centers contemplating developing clinical trials offices must be aware of the significant overhead cost associated with evaluating the appropriateness and feasibility of clinical trial proposals that may never be performed. Valuable lessons learned from working with sponsors and from working with investigators are also reviewed. PMID:12480622

  16. Critical Care Team

    MedlinePlus

    ... Please enable scripts and reload this page. About Critical Care Currently selected Team Questions During the ICU Chronic ... Team Currently selected Questions Patients and Families > About Critical Care > Team Tweet Team Page Content ​The critical care ...

  17. Critical Materials Institute

    SciTech Connect

    Alex King

    2013-01-09

    Ames Laboratory Director Alex King talks about the goals of the Critical Materials Institute in diversifying the supply of critical materials, developing substitute materials, developing tools and techniques for recycling critical materials, and forecasting materials needs to avoid future shortages.

  18. Critical Materials Institute

    ScienceCinema

    Alex King

    2013-06-05

    Ames Laboratory Director Alex King talks about the goals of the Critical Materials Institute in diversifying the supply of critical materials, developing substitute materials, developing tools and techniques for recycling critical materials, and forecasting materials needs to avoid future shortages.

  19. Nuclear criticality safety guide

    SciTech Connect

    Pruvost, N.L.; Paxton, H.C.

    1996-09-01

    This technical reference document cites information related to nuclear criticality safety principles, experience, and practice. The document also provides general guidance for criticality safety personnel and regulators.

  20. Nonextensive critical effects in the NJL model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozynek, Jacek

    2015-05-01

    It is shown how nonextensive Nambu-Jona-Lasinio (NJL) calculations in the critical region in the vicinity of phase transition to quark matter allow to determine a nonextensive parameter q from a specific heat capacity Cq.

  1. A Critical Humanist Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magill, Kevin; Rodriguez, Arturo

    2015-01-01

    This essay is a critical humanist discussion of curriculum; a departure from the technicist view of education [education meant to support a global capitalist economy] and an analysis of curriculum considering critical humanism, political economy and critical race theory among other modes of critical analysis and inquiry. Our discussion supports a…

  2. Criticism and Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McElhinney, James H.

    This brief paper on work-related criticism begins by describing the school learning area, which is composed of social and work relationships. It discusses criticism and the importance of constructive criticism that is work related. An outline then lists practices that are advocated regarding work-related criticism. The first major section of the…

  3. Critical Thinking Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Word's Worth: A Quarterly Newsletter of the Lifelong Learning Network, 1998

    1998-01-01

    This issue of a quarterly newsletter focuses on the theme of critical thinking skills. "Critical Thinking Skills: An Interview with Dr. Richard Paul" (Barbara Christopher) is the text of an interview in which the director of research at Sonoma State University's Center for Critical Thinking examines the meaning of critical thinking and the ways…

  4. A Critical Look into Critical Pedagogy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pishghadam, Reza; Meidani, Elham Naji

    2012-01-01

    In line with postmodern philosophy, critical pedagogy has gained considerable importance and has become a valuable educational goal. The purpose of this study is to dig into the effects of critical pedagogy in a modernist educational system. To this aim, 15 Iranian university students were asked to write down their feelings at the end of a course…

  5. Revalorizing the Critical Attitude for Critical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amsler, Sarah S.

    2011-01-01

    This article argues that at a moment of crisis in education, the defence of critical pedagogy is vitally important. However, it also suggests that such a defence should be more than a "cri de coeur" that asserts principles and methods of criticality against those of neoliberal or conservative education policy. Narratives of a totalising "crisis of…

  6. Critical Approaches to Critical Pedagogy in Greece

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grollios, George; Liambas, Anastassios

    2015-01-01

    This paper is an initial review of the presentations and uses of critical pedagogy in Greek educational literature since the mid-1980s. These have appeared in the form of three books and an edited volume (translated in Greek), all written by American critical educators, as well as in texts produced by Greek educators who have either written the…

  7. How critical is chronic critical leg ischaemia?

    PubMed

    Kroese, A J; Stranden, E

    1998-01-01

    "Critical" according to the Oxford dictionary means: a "turning point" where an acute change for better or worse may be anticipated. Thus, the meaning of the word "critical" complies with its use in relation to ischaemia. We don't really know, prospectively, what will happen to the critically ischaemic limb, whether it will improve or worsen. The answer to the question "How critical is critical leg ischaemia (CLI)?" must be: "We don't know!" The addition of ankle systolic pressure as an objective haemodynamic measurement has not made the definition of the Second European Consensus Group significantly better than the original Fontaine classification, grade III and IV. For clinical practice the Fontaine classification will be sufficient. For scientific purposes macro- and microcirculatory assessments and information about the patient's risk profile should be added. PMID:9676324

  8. The Promoter of a Lysosomal Membrane Transporter Gene, CTNS, Binds Sp-1, Shares Sequences with the Promoter of an Adjacent Gene, CARKL, and Causes Cystinosis If Mutated in a Critical Region

    PubMed Central

    Phornphutkul, Chanika; Anikster, Yair; Huizing, Marjan; Braun, Paula; Brodie, Chaya; Chou, Janice Y.; Gahl, William A.

    2001-01-01

    Although >55 CTNS mutations occur in patients with the lysosomal storage disorder cystinosis, no regulatory mutations have been reported, because the promoter has not been defined. Using CAT reporter constructs of sequences 5′ to the CTNS coding sequence, we identified the CTNS promoter as the region encompassing nucleotides −316 to +1 with respect to the transcription start site. This region contains an Sp-1 regulatory element (GGCGGCG) at positions −299 to −293, which binds authentic Sp-1, as shown by electrophoretic-mobility–shift assays. Three patients exhibited mutations in the CTNS promoter. One patient with nephropathic cystinosis carried a −295 G→C substitution disrupting the Sp-1 motif, whereas two patients with ocular cystinosis displayed a −303 G→T substitution in one case and a −303 T insertion in the other case. Each mutation drastically reduced CAT activity when inserted into a reporter construct. Moreover, each failed either to cause a mobility shift when exposed to nuclear extract or to compete with the normal oligonucleotide’s mobility shift. The CTNS promoter region shares 41 nucleotides with the promoter region of an adjacent gene of unknown function, CARKL, whose start site is 501 bp from the CTNS start site. However, the patients’ CTNS promoter mutations have no effect on CARKL promoter activity. These findings suggest that the CTNS promoter region should be examined in patients with cystinosis who have fewer than two coding-sequence mutations. PMID:11505338

  9. What makes critical-solvent processes work

    SciTech Connect

    Brule, M.R.; Corbett, R.W.

    1984-06-01

    Critical-solvent processing (sometimes called supercritical-gas extraction) is an ongoing technology based on phase-equilibrium phenomena in the critical region. Many new practical applications of critical-solvent processing are being conceived and implemented in the food, drug and chemical industries. The advantages afforded by critical-solvent processing in performing difficult separations such as caffeine from coffee, nicotine from tobacco, chemotherapeutic drugs from plants, and chemical feedstocks from petroleum and synfuels residua have been realized just in the last decade or so.

  10. Toward critical bioethics.

    PubMed

    Árnason, Vilhjálmur

    2015-04-01

    This article deals with the question as to what makes bioethics a critical discipline. It considers different senses of criticism and evaluates their strengths and weaknesses. A primary method in bioethics as a philosophical discipline is critical thinking, which implies critical evaluation of concepts, positions, and arguments. It is argued that the type of analytical criticism that restricts its critical role to critical thinking of this type often suffers from other intellectual flaws. Three examples are taken to demonstrate this: premature criticism, uncritical self-understanding of theoretical assumptions, and narrow framing of bioethical issues. Such flaws can lead both to unfair treatment of authors and to uncritical discussion of topics. In this context, the article makes use of Häyry's analysis of different rationalities in bioethical approaches and argues for the need to recognize the importance of communicative rationality for critical bioethics. A radically different critical approach in bioethics, rooted in social theory, focuses on analyses of power relations neglected in mainstream critical thinking. It is argued that, although this kind of criticism provides an important alternative in bioethics, it suffers from other shortcomings that are rooted in a lack of normative dimensions. In order to complement these approaches and counter their shortcomings, there is a need for a bioethics enlightened by critical hermeneutics. Such hermeneutic bioethics is aware of its own assumptions, places the issues in a wide context, and reflects critically on the power relations that stand in the way of understanding them. Moreover, such an approach is dialogical, which provides both a critical exercise of speech and a normative dimension implied in the free exchange of reasons and arguments. This discussion is framed by Hedgecoe's argument that critical bioethics needs four elements: to be empirically rooted, theory challenging, reflexive, and politely skeptical

  11. Foundations for Critical Thinking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bers, Trudy; Chun, Marc; Daly, William T.; Harrington, Christine; Tobolowsky, Barbara F.

    2015-01-01

    "Foundations for Critical Thinking" explores the landscape of critical-thinking skill development and pedagogy through foundational chapters and institutional case studies involving a range of students in diverse settings. By establishing a link between active learning and improved critical thinking, this resource encourages all higher…

  12. Criticism, Visible and Invisible.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frye, Northrop

    1964-01-01

    The central activity of literary criticism, the understanding of literature, is related to the process of establishing a context for the works of literature being studied. Choosing not to discuss the factual elements of literary criticism, the author clarifies and concentrates on the "lower" and "upper" limits of criticism. While the "lower" limit…

  13. Teaching Critical Reflection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    Despite long-standing commitment to the notion of critical reflection across the healthcare professions it is unusual for critical theory and practice to be taught as explicit subjects in healthcare higher education. There is evidence to show that reflective techniques such as critical portfolios and reflective diaries can help students to…

  14. Reimagining Critical Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rexhepi, Jevdet; Torres, Carlos Alberto

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses Critical Theory, a model of theorizing in the field of the political sociology of education. We argue for a "reimagined" Critical Theory to herald an empowering, liberatory education that fosters curiosity and critical thinking, and a means for successful bottom-up, top-down political engagement. We present arguments at a…

  15. Reconceptualising Critical Digital Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pangrazio, Luciana

    2016-01-01

    While it has proved a useful concept during the past 20 years, the notion of "critical digital literacy" requires rethinking in light of the fast-changing nature of young people's digital practices. This paper contrasts long-established notions of "critical digital literacy" (based primarily around the critical consumption of…

  16. Critical Approaches to Film.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bywater, Timothy Robert

    This study deals primarily with recent academically oriented critical material, but it also embraces the range of film criticism that has been written for the mass audience in newspapers and periodicals. The study considers eight types of critical approaches to analyzing film: the journalistic approach, which contains both a reportorial-review and…

  17. Poetry: Sources for Criticism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Noate, Judith, Comp.

    This handout is a guide to library resources in the J. Murrey Atkins Library at the University of North Carolina-Charlotte for the criticism of poetry. The guide enables the reader to find sources of criticism on poetry, including critical articles and essays about single poems, or writings on the work of a single author. The guide's sections…

  18. Critical care in Nicaragua.

    PubMed

    Simko, L C

    1997-08-01

    Critical care nursing in Nicaragua is vastly different than critical care practiced in the United States. The current status of critical care nursing in Nicaragua is challenging at best. Medical personnel do not have access to arterial blood gases, blood cultures, and capillary blood glucose monitoring. The strengths and challenges present in Nicaraguan critical care has made the nursing staff rely on keen and astute nursing assessment of their patients. Due to the lack of technology in Nicaragua, creativity and improvising are a must in caring for a critically ill patient. However, the concerns and issues facing the nurses in Nicaragua are very similar to those experienced by critical care nurses in the United States. Critical care nursing in Nicaragua is indeed true nursing at its finest. PMID:9313419

  19. Bilateral multiple axillary apocrine hidrocystomas accompanied by apocrine hyperplasia: a rare presentation.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Shailaja; Patiri, Karsing; Pujani, Mukta; Komal, Singh Bhawana

    2014-01-01

    Apocrine hidrocystomas (AHC) are uncommon cystic lesions of apocrine glands and are most often solitary. They are usually found in the head and neck region. Multiple AHC have been rarely reported in the literature usually in the eyelids and face. On extensive search of literature, we came across only a single case report of multiple axillary AHC. We report a case of a 31-year-old female who presented with fullness and discomfort in bilateral axillae, so a clinical diagnosis of bilateral accessory breast was made. However on histopathological examination, it turned out to be bilateral multiple AHC associated with apocrine hyperplasia. PMID:24943766

  20. Governance of the academic health center: striking the balance between service and scholarship.

    PubMed

    Wietecha, Mark; Lipstein, Steven H; Rabkin, Mitchell T

    2009-02-01

    Academic health centers (AHCs) rank among the most complex organizations. Spanning the domains of university, clinical practice, hospital, and research, AHCs encompass a range of strikingly different business models, each with its own economic potential. The ability to bring these diverse enterprises actively working together has been the unique strength of the AHC as a vehicle of patient care, education, and discovery. Unfortunately, the AHC has also proved at times to be a frustrating organizational matrix of indecision wrought by different aims and distributed influence, presenting substantial challenges to the success of these institutions. The question of how best to organize the fiduciary and executive management structures of the AHC continues to be the subject of much interest to those trustees responsible for these complex institutions. Although the question of what is the best governance model for an AHC is sometimes approached in simple terms of "one leader, or multiple," success is more likely defined by how well other critical factors are organized and managed. These include considerations of governance, including selection and education of key trustees, their ability to access key data for their specific institution and the AHC as a whole, performance evaluation of the operating executives with respect to both specific institutional criteria and those for the AHC as a whole, and management oversight by boards across the AHC. When more than one governing body is involved, joint participation of boards and key executives is recommended for selected aspects of these processes. PMID:19174659

  1. Critical Psychologies for Critical Health Literacies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corcoran, Tim

    2014-01-01

    Health education is largely informed by psychological theories and practices that pursue reductionist views of people learning. However, critical attention is moving to understand health in ways that reconsider relationships to context and the forms of life within which everyday living takes place. This shift is apparent in theoretical…

  2. Variable expressivity of a familial 1.9 Mb microdeletion in 3q28 leading to haploinsufficiency of TP63: Refinement of the critical region for a new microdeletion phenotype.

    PubMed

    Ponzi, Emanuela; Asaro, Alessia; Orteschi, Daniela; Genuardi, Maurizio; Zollino, Marcella; Gurrieri, Fiorella

    2015-08-01

    We report on a 3-year-old male with intellectual disability (ID), characteristic facial features, polydactyly and epilepsy carrying a paternally inherited 3q28 deletion of 1.9 Mb. The father, carrying the same deletion, presents with cleft palate, nail dystrophy and learning difficulties. The deleted region in this family is one of the smallest so far reported among genomic deletions affecting 3q27-3q28 for which some phenotypic descriptions are available. In particular, since the phenotype of our proband is strikingly similar to that previously described in a patient with a 9.3 Mb deletion, the deletion identified in this report contributes to the definition of the molecular boundaries of a genomic region responsible for a distinct clinical phenotype. Within the deleted interval there are 9 annotated genes, including TP63. Gain of function mutations of TP63 are known to be responsible for a group of conditions with distal limb and ectodermal involvement, such as ADULT, EEC, LMS, and SHFM4 syndromes. Interestingly, our cases demonstrate a milder phenotypic effect for loss of function of this gene. PMID:26117585

  3. Critical Viscosity of Xenon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The Critical Viscosity of Xenon Experiment (CVX-2) on the STS-107 Research 1 mission in 2002 will measure the viscous behavior of xenon, a heavy inert gas used in flash lamps and ion rocket engines, at its critical point. Because xenon near the critical point will collapse under its own weight, experiments on Earth (green line) are limited as they get closer (toward the left) to the critical point. CVX in the microgravity of space (red line) moved into unmeasured territory that scientists had not been able to reach.

  4. Driven Markovian Quantum Criticality.

    PubMed

    Marino, Jamir; Diehl, Sebastian

    2016-02-19

    We identify a new universality class in one-dimensional driven open quantum systems with a dark state. Salient features are the persistence of both the microscopic nonequilibrium conditions as well as the quantum coherence of dynamics close to criticality. This provides a nonequilibrium analogue of quantum criticality, and is sharply distinct from more generic driven systems, where both effective thermalization as well as asymptotic decoherence ensue, paralleling classical dynamical criticality. We quantify universality by computing the full set of independent critical exponents within a functional renormalization group approach. PMID:26943517

  5. Two critical tests for the Critical Point earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzanis, A.; Vallianatos, F.

    2003-04-01

    It has been credibly argued that the earthquake generation process is a critical phenomenon culminating with a large event that corresponds to some critical point. In this view, a great earthquake represents the end of a cycle on its associated fault network and the beginning of a new one. The dynamic organization of the fault network evolves as the cycle progresses and a great earthquake becomes more probable, thereby rendering possible the prediction of the cycle’s end by monitoring the approach of the fault network toward a critical state. This process may be described by a power-law time-to-failure scaling of the cumulative seismic release rate. Observational evidence has confirmed the power-law scaling in many cases and has empirically determined that the critical exponent in the power law is typically of the order n=0.3. There are also two theoretical predictions for the value of the critical exponent. Ben-Zion and Lyakhovsky (Pure appl. geophys., 159, 2385-2412, 2002) give n=1/3. Rundle et al. (Pure appl. geophys., 157, 2165-2182, 2000) show that the power-law activation associated with a spinodal instability is essentially identical to the power-law acceleration of Benioff strain observed prior to earthquakes; in this case n=0.25. More recently, the CP model has gained support from the development of more dependable models of regional seismicity with realistic fault geometry that show accelerating seismicity before large events. Essentially, these models involve stress transfer to the fault network during the cycle such, that the region of accelerating seismicity will scale with the size of the culminating event, as for instance in Bowman and King (Geophys. Res. Let., 38, 4039-4042, 2001). It is thus possible to understand the observed characteristics of distributed accelerating seismicity in terms of a simple process of increasing tectonic stress in a region already subjected to stress inhomogeneities at all scale lengths. Then, the region of

  6. Substrate properties of C1 inhibitor Ma (alanine 434----glutamic acid). Genetic and structural evidence suggesting that the P12-region contains critical determinants of serine protease inhibitor/substrate status.

    PubMed

    Skriver, K; Wikoff, W R; Patston, P A; Tausk, F; Schapira, M; Kaplan, A P; Bock, S C

    1991-05-15

    The serine protease inhibitor (serpin) C1 inhibitor inactivates enzymes involved in the regulation of vascular permeability. A patient from the Ma family with the genetic disorder hereditary angioedema inherited a dysfunctional C1 inhibitor allele. Relative to normal plasma, the patients's plasma contained an additional C1 inhibitor immunoreactive band, which comigrated with normal C1 inhibitor cleaved by plasma kallikrein, C1s, or factor XIIa. C1 inhibitor Ma did not react with a monoclonal antibody to a neoepitope that is present in complexed and cleaved normal C1 inhibitor, suggesting conformational differences between cleaved normal C1- inhibitor and cleaved C1 inhibitor Ma. Molecular cloning and sequencing of exon 8 of the C1 inhibitor Ma allele revealed a single C to A mutation, changing alanine 434 to glutamic acid. Ala 434 of C1 inhibitor aligns with the P12 residue of the prototypical serpin alpha 1-antitrypsin. The P12 amino acid of all inhibitory serpins is alanine, and it is present in a highly conserved region on the amino-terminal side of the serpin-reactive center loop. Whereas normal C1 inhibitor expressed by transfected COS-1 cells formed complexes with and was cleaved by kallikrein, fXIIa, and C1s, COS-1-expressed Ala434---Glu C1 inhibitor was cleaved by these enzymes but did not form complexes with them. These results, together with evidence from other studies, suggest that serpin protease inhibitor activity is the result of protein conformational change that occurs when the P12 region of a serpin moves from a surface location, on the reactive site loop of the native molecule, to an internal location within sheet A of the complexed inhibitor. PMID:2026621

  7. Empathy and the Critic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jurecic, Ann

    2011-01-01

    "Empathy" is a much-discussed term in the humanities these days. While some critics value it and argue that literature desirably promotes it, other critics worry that appeals to this emotion will neglect important matters of social context. In the literature classroom, the best approach is to take time to consider how texts complicate the impulse…

  8. Critical Pedagogy and Faith

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neumann, Jacob W.

    2011-01-01

    Critical pedagogy has often been linked in the literature to faith traditions such as liberation theology, usually with the intent of improving or redirecting it. While recognizing and drawing from those previous linkages, Jacob Neumann goes further in this essay and develops the thesis that critical pedagogy can not just benefit from a connection…

  9. Creating a Critical Thinker

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piergiovanni, Polly R.

    2014-01-01

    A college education is expected to improve students' critical thinking skills. Keeping students active in class--through writing activities and class discussion--has been shown to help students think critically. In this article, creative hands-on activities, which are common in engineering courses, are shown to improve students' critical…

  10. Critically Reflective Leadership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cunningham, Christine L.

    2012-01-01

    Critical Reflective Practice (CRP) has a proven reputation as a method for teacher-researchers in K-12 classrooms, but there have been few published examples of this method being used to document school leaders' work-based practice. This paper outlines adaptations made by the author from an original CRP method to a Critically Reflective Leadership…

  11. Critical Chain Exercises

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doyle, John Kevin

    2010-01-01

    Critical Chains project management focuses on holding buffers at the project level vs. task level, and managing buffers as a project resource. A number of studies have shown that Critical Chain project management can significantly improve organizational schedule fidelity (i.e., improve the proportion of projects delivered on time) and reduce…

  12. Paraprofessionals: Critical Job Requirements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santopolo, Frank A.; Kell, Karolyn

    1976-01-01

    An evaluation of the Kentucky Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program used the critical incident technique to (1) identify on-the-job behavior to determine critical job requirements and (2) draw implications for training. The aides identified continuous personal contact with clients and an enthusiastic attitude as crucial to success.…

  13. Critical Education Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boxley, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Education Studies as an academic discipline within HE in the UK is a contested area. One thing most Education Studies programmes might agree on is that they are "critical". But what is a genuinely critical Education Studies degree? And, how could such a programme survive within the hostile neoliberal environment of the contemporary UK?…

  14. Against Critical Thinking Pedagogy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayes, David

    2015-01-01

    Critical thinking pedagogy is misguided. Ostensibly a cure for narrowness of thought, by using the emotions appropriate to conflict, it names only one mode of relation to material among many others. Ostensibly a cure for fallacies, critical thinking tends to dishonesty in practice because it habitually leaps to premature ideas of what the object…

  15. Criticism and the Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Paul; Foulke, Robert D.

    1964-01-01

    A revised English curriculum, based upon different kinds of literary criticism, is counseled in this two-part paper. Part 1 identifies four kinds of criticism--formalist, synoptic, extrinsic, and stylistic. A conventional English Curriculum is briefly outlined. Curricular theories are discussed and positive and negative attempts to define…

  16. Encouragement for Thinking Critically

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olivares, Sonia; Saiz, Carlos; Rivas, Silvia F.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Here we report the results obtained in an innovative teaching experience that encourages the development of Critical Thinking skills through motivational intervention. Understanding Critical Thinking as a theory of action, "we think to solve problems", and accompanying this concept with a program aimed at teaching/learning…

  17. Rethinking Critical Thinking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Downs, Christopher J.

    2008-01-01

    Critical thinking is of primary importance in higher education, yet the concept remains slippery and the skill elusive. The author argues that most current critical thinking textbooks are out of line with the seminal work of John Dewey. Rather than logical argument and justification, it is suggested that carefulness, open-mindedness and creativity…

  18. CRITICAL LOADS METHODS

    EPA Science Inventory

    I summarize the results of an interagency project that 1) defines a generic approach to quantifying and reporting critical loads, and 2) exercises that generic approach by examining a data rich system -- the critical loads of sulfur deposition and it's effect on the chronic acidi...

  19. Critical Teaching and Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, R. E.

    1988-01-01

    This essay begins with a description of Jurgen Habermas's theory of communicative action, emphasizing aspects which relate to a critical theory of teaching/learning. Existing theory and research is reviewed. A critical theory of pedagogy as a form of communicative action or interaction is presented. (MT)

  20. Nurturing critical thinkers.

    PubMed

    Dickerson, Pamela S

    2005-01-01

    The continuing education environment offers unique opportunities to assist nurse learners in developing critical thinking skills. Adjustments in typical teaching strategies and learner approaches to learning are required to facilitate this process. Suggestions are provided to assist the continuing education educator in developing, implementing, and evaluating learning activities that stimulate critical thinking abilities. PMID:15835581

  1. Critical Literacy: Foundational Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luke, Allan

    2012-01-01

    The term "critical literacy" refers to use of the technologies of print and other media of communication to analyze, critique, and transform the norms, rule systems, and practices governing the social fields of everyday life (A. Luke, 2004). Since Freire's (1970) educational projects in Brazil, approaches to critical literacy have been developed…

  2. Telemedicine in Critical Care

    PubMed Central

    Murias, Gastón; Sales, Bernat; Garcia-Esquirol, Oscar; Blanch, Lluis

    2009-01-01

    Critical care medicine is the specialty that cares for patients with acute life-threatening illnesses where intensivists look after all aspects of patient care. Nevertheless, shortage of physicians and nurses, the relationship between high costs and economic restrictions, and the fact that critical care knowledge is only available at big hospitals puts the system on the edge. In this scenario, telemedicine might provide solutions to improve availability of critical care knowledge where the patient is located, improve relationship between attendants in different institutions and education material for future specialist training. Current information technologies and networking capabilities should be exploited to improve intensivist coverage, advanced alarm systems and to have large critical care databases of critical care signals. PMID:19452034

  3. Critical Schwinger Pair Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gies, Holger; Torgrimsson, Greger

    2016-03-01

    We investigate Schwinger pair production in spatially inhomogeneous electric backgrounds. A critical point for the onset of pair production can be approached by fields that marginally provide sufficient electrostatic energy for an off-shell long-range electron-positron fluctuation to become a real pair. Close to this critical point, we observe features of universality which are analogous to continuous phase transitions in critical phenomena with the pair-production rate serving as an order parameter: electric backgrounds can be subdivided into universality classes and the onset of pair production exhibits characteristic scaling laws. An appropriate design of the electric background field can interpolate between power-law scaling, essential Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless-type scaling, and a power-law scaling with log corrections. The corresponding critical exponents only depend on the large-scale features of the electric background, whereas the microscopic details of the background play the role of irrelevant perturbations not affecting criticality.

  4. Critical Schwinger Pair Production.

    PubMed

    Gies, Holger; Torgrimsson, Greger

    2016-03-01

    We investigate Schwinger pair production in spatially inhomogeneous electric backgrounds. A critical point for the onset of pair production can be approached by fields that marginally provide sufficient electrostatic energy for an off-shell long-range electron-positron fluctuation to become a real pair. Close to this critical point, we observe features of universality which are analogous to continuous phase transitions in critical phenomena with the pair-production rate serving as an order parameter: electric backgrounds can be subdivided into universality classes and the onset of pair production exhibits characteristic scaling laws. An appropriate design of the electric background field can interpolate between power-law scaling, essential Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless-type scaling, and a power-law scaling with log corrections. The corresponding critical exponents only depend on the large-scale features of the electric background, whereas the microscopic details of the background play the role of irrelevant perturbations not affecting criticality. PMID:26991162

  5. The Possibility of Film Criticism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poague, Leland; Cadbury, William

    1989-01-01

    Examines the role of critical language in film criticism. Compares and contrasts Monroe Beardsley's philosophy on film aesthetics with the New Criticism. Outlines some of the contributions Beardsley has made to the study of film criticism. (KM)

  6. The 7-amino-acid site in the proline-rich region of the N-terminal domain of p53 is involved in the interaction with FAK and is critical for p53 functioning.

    PubMed

    Golubovskaya, Vita M; Finch, Richard; Zheng, Min; Kurenova, Elena V; Cance, William G

    2008-04-01

    It is known that p53 alterations are commonly found in tumour cells. Another marker of tumorigenesis is FAK (focal adhesion kinase), a non-receptor kinase that is overexpressed in many types of tumours. Previously we determined that the N-terminal domain of FAK physically interacted with the N-terminal domain of p53. In the present study, using phage display, sitedirected mutagenesis, pulldown and immunoprecipitation assays we localized the site of FAK binding to a 7-amino-acid region(amino acids 65-71) in the N-terminal proline-rich domain of human p53. Mutation of the binding site in p53 reversed the suppressive effect of FAK on p53-mediated transactivation ofp21, BAX (Bcl-2-associated X protein) and Mdm2 (murine double minute 2) promoters. In addition, to functionally test this p53 site, we conjugated p53 peptides [wild-type (containing the wild-type binding site) and mutant (with a mutated 7-aminoacid binding site)] to a TAT peptide sequence to penetrate the cells, and demonstrated that the wild-type p53 peptide disrupted binding of FAK and p53 proteins and significantly inhibited cell viability of HCT116 p53+/+ cells compared with the control mutant peptide and HCT116 p53-/- cells. Furthermore, the TAT-p53 peptide decreased the viability of MCF-7 cells, whereas the mutant peptide did not cause this effect. Normal fibroblast p53+/+ and p53-/- MEF (murine embryonic fibroblast) cells and breast MCF10A cells were not sensitive to p53 peptide. Thus, for the first time, we have identified the binding site of the p53 andFAK interaction and have demonstrated that mutating this site and targeting the site with peptides affects p53 functioning and viability in the cells. PMID:18215142

  7. Society of Critical Care Medicine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Critical Care Medicine Podcasts Hosts iCritical Care App Social Media Critical Care Statistics eCommunity Media Relations SmartBrief SCCM ... Critical Care Medicine Podcasts Hosts iCritical Care App Social Media Critical Care Statistics eCommunity Media Relations SmartBrief SCCM ...

  8. Mission Critical Networking

    SciTech Connect

    Eltoweissy, Mohamed Y.; Du, David H.C.; Gerla, Mario; Giordano, Silvia; Gouda, Mohamed; Schulzrinne, Henning; Youssef, Moustafa

    2010-06-01

    Mission-Critical Networking (MCN) refers to networking for application domains where life or livelihood may be at risk. Typical application domains for MCN include critical infrastructure protection and operation, emergency and crisis intervention, healthcare services, and military operations. Such networking is essential for safety, security and economic vitality in our complex world characterized by uncertainty, heterogeneity, emergent behaviors, and the need for reliable and timely response. MCN comprise networking technology, infrastructures and services that may alleviate the risk and directly enable and enhance connectivity for mission-critical information exchange among diverse, widely dispersed, mobile users.

  9. A holographic critical point

    SciTech Connect

    DeWolfe, Oliver; Rosen, Christopher; Gubser, Steven S.

    2011-04-15

    We numerically construct a family of five-dimensional black holes exhibiting a line of first-order phase transitions terminating at a critical point at finite chemical potential and temperature. These black holes are constructed so that the equation of state and baryon susceptibilities approximately match QCD lattice data at vanishing chemical potential. The critical end point in the particular model we consider has temperature 143 MeV and chemical potential 783 MeV. Critical exponents are calculated, with results that are consistent with mean-field scaling relations.

  10. Greening critical care

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Climate change and environmental stewardship are phrases that have been defining the past few decades and promoting change in our societies. The sensitivities of intensive care as a specialty make the process of greening an intensive care unit a challenge, but not one that is insurmountable. This paper discusses opportunities for critical care to reduce its environmental impact and provide a framework change. The article includes suggestions of what can be done as an individual, as a unit and as a hospital. Generally, practices in critical care are accepted without questioning the environmental consequences. We believe it is time for change, and critical care should give environmental stewardship a higher priority. PMID:21635700

  11. Critical chemotactic collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lushnikov, Pavel M.

    2010-04-01

    A Keller-Segel model describes macroscopic dynamics of bacterial colonies and biological cells as well as dynamics of a gas of self-gravitating Brownian particles. Bacteria secret chemical which attracts other bacteria so that they move towards chemical gradient creating nonlocal attraction between bacteria. If bacterial (or Brownian particle) density exceeds a critical value then the density collapses (blows up) in a finite time which corresponds to bacterial aggregation or gravitational collapse. Collapse in the Keller-Segel model has striking qualitative similarities with a nonlinear Schrödinger equation including critical collapse in two dimensions and supercritical collapse in three dimensions. A self-similar solution near blow up point is studied in the critical two-dimensional case and it has a form of a rescaled steady state solution which contains a critical number of bacteria. Time dependence of scaling of that solution has square root scaling law with logarithmic modification.

  12. Quantum Critical Elasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zacharias, Mario; Paul, Indranil; Garst, Markus

    2015-07-01

    We discuss elastic instabilities of the atomic crystal lattice at zero temperature. Because of long-range shear forces of the solid, at such transitions the phonon velocities vanish, if at all, only along certain crystallographic directions, and, consequently, the critical phonon fluctuations are suppressed to a lower dimensional manifold and governed by a Gaussian fixed point. In the case of symmetry-breaking elastic transitions, a characteristic critical phonon thermodynamics arises that is found, e.g., to violate Debye's T3 law for the specific heat. We point out that quantum critical elasticity is triggered whenever a critical soft mode couples linearly to the strain tensor. In particular, this is relevant for the electronic Ising-nematic quantum phase transition in a tetragonal crystal as discussed in the context of certain cuprates, ruthenates, and iron-based superconductors.

  13. Critical Access Hospitals (CAH)

    MedlinePlus

    ... CAH Conditions of Participation . What are the location requirements for CAH status? Critical Access Hospitals must be ... clinic that does not meet the CAH distance requirements? As of January 1, 2008, all CAHs, including ...

  14. Dealing with criticism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Giles

    2013-03-01

    Physics graduates are accustomed to receiving feedback from teachers, tutors and lecturers, but different expectations and norms prevail in the workplace. Giles Morris discusses how to handle criticism at work.

  15. Learning: The Critical Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carnevale, Anthony Patrick

    1992-01-01

    Economic progress and the networked international society make learning critical. The complex interaction between learning and economic progress involves seven processes: scientific inquiry, invention, innovation, emulation, investment, commercialization, and cumulative learning. (JOW)

  16. The Critical Thinking Workout.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Masters, Terry McDaniel

    1991-01-01

    Presents a critical thinking exercise program, modeled on a physical exercise workout, for elementary teachers to use in the classroom. It includes warm-up exercises, a more strenuous workout, and a cool-down period for the brain. (SM)

  17. Mission critical technology development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliwa, Nancy

    1991-01-01

    Mission critical technology development is presented in the form of the viewgraphs. The following subject areas are covered: organization/philosophy overview; fault management technology; and introduction to optical processing.

  18. About Critical Care Nursing

    MedlinePlus

    ... Join Now Our Community Value of Belonging Member Benefits and Savings Awards Certification Apply Online Renew Your ... and traveling critical care nurses to fill staffing gaps in every part of the U.S. These requests ...

  19. Quantum Critical Elasticity.

    PubMed

    Zacharias, Mario; Paul, Indranil; Garst, Markus

    2015-07-10

    We discuss elastic instabilities of the atomic crystal lattice at zero temperature. Because of long-range shear forces of the solid, at such transitions the phonon velocities vanish, if at all, only along certain crystallographic directions, and, consequently, the critical phonon fluctuations are suppressed to a lower dimensional manifold and governed by a Gaussian fixed point. In the case of symmetry-breaking elastic transitions, a characteristic critical phonon thermodynamics arises that is found, e.g., to violate Debye's T(3) law for the specific heat. We point out that quantum critical elasticity is triggered whenever a critical soft mode couples linearly to the strain tensor. In particular, this is relevant for the electronic Ising-nematic quantum phase transition in a tetragonal crystal as discussed in the context of certain cuprates, ruthenates, and iron-based superconductors. PMID:26207483

  20. CRITICALITY SAFETY POSTING GUIDELINES

    SciTech Connect

    JENSEN, M.A.

    2001-11-01

    This document provides a set of guidelines in the preparation of criticality safety postings. Guidance is provided in word choice, word arrangement, common human factors considerations. and use of color to highlight limits, cautions, and permissives.

  1. Critical Viscosity of Xenon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The Critical Viscosity of Xenon Experiment (CVX-2) on the STS-107 Research 1 mission in 2002 will measure the viscous behavior of xenon, a heavy inert gas used in flash lamps and ion rocket engines, at its critical point. Shear thirning will cause a normally viscous fluid -- such as pie filling or whipped cream -- to deform and flow more readily under high shear conditions. In shear thinning, a pocket of fluid will deform and move one edge forward, as depicted here.

  2. The critical behavior of the refractive index near liquid-liquid critical points.

    PubMed

    Losada-Pérez, Patricia; Glorieux, Christ; Thoen, Jan

    2012-04-14

    The nature of the critical behavior in the refractive index n is revisited in the framework of the complete scaling formulation. A comparison is made with the critical behavior of n as derived from the Lorentz-Lorenz equation. Analogue anomalies to those predicted for the dielectric constant ε, namely, a leading |t|(2β) singularity in the coexistence-curve diameter in the two-phase region and a |t|(1-α) along the critical isopleth in the one phase region, are expected in both cases. However, significant differences as regards the amplitudes of both singularities are obtained from the two approaches. Analysis of some literature data along coexistence in the two-phase region and along the critical isopleth in the one-phase region provide evidence of an intrinsic effect, independent of the density, in the critical anomalies of n. This effect is governed by the shift of the critical temperature with an electric field, which is supposed to take smaller values at optical frequencies than at low frequencies in the Hz to MHz range. PMID:22502528

  3. Critical experiment data archiving

    SciTech Connect

    Koponen, B.L. ); Clayton, E.D.; Doherty, A.L. )

    1991-01-01

    Critical experiment facilities produced a large number of important data during the past 45 years; however, many useful data remain unpublished. The unpublished material exists in the form of experimenters' logbooks, notes, photographs, material descriptions, etc., This data could be important for computer code validation, understanding the physics of criticality, facility design, or for setting process limits. In the past, criticality specialists have been able to obtain unpublished details by direct contact with the experimenters. Obviously, this will not be possible indefinitely. Most of the US critical experiment facilities are now closed, and the experimenters are moving to other jobs, retiring, or otherwise becoming unavailable for this informal assistance. Also, the records are in danger of being discarded or lost during facility closures, cleanup activities, or in storage. A project was begun in 1989 to ensure that important unpublished data from critical experiment facilities in the United States are archived and made available as a resource of the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Nuclear Criticality Information System (NCIS). The objective of this paper is to summarize the project accomplishments to date and bring these activities to the attention of those who might be aware of the location of source information needed for archiving and could assist in getting the materials included in the archive.

  4. Erik Erikson: critical times, critical theory.

    PubMed

    Douvan, E

    1997-01-01

    The work and legacy of Erik Erikson are described in this brief outline of his career, his theories, and his impact on psychoanalysis, psychology, history, and the broader culture. His conception of the adolescent task-weaving internal tastes, talents, and values together with elements of one's life history and the demands of one's culture into a coherent identity-has had profound effects on developmental psychology and the way in which sophisticated youth construct and describe their lives. His extension of development through adulthood and old age established the field of life course development. His emphasis on the impact of history and culture on development was a critical element in the developing field of ego psychology. Many of his major contributions can be fruitfully understood in the context of his personal history and individual qualities. PMID:9256525

  5. DEVELOPMENT OF PROTOCOLS TO IDENTIFY CRITICAL ECOSYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Healthy, functioning ecosystems are critical to the sustainability of human and natural communities, but the identification of areas of healthy ecosystems in an area as large as Region 5 is difficult due to time and information constraints. Geographic Information Systems (GIS) a...

  6. Culture Regions in Geography Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boehn, Dieter L.

    One of the demands imposed on geography instruction is to inform about the world, but there is some disagreement on how this is to be achieved. Criticism is most frequently directed at the regional geography approach of subdividing the world into culture regions. This paper addresses the question of whether global subdivision by culture regions…

  7. Self-organized criticality

    SciTech Connect

    Per Bak ); Kan Chen )

    1991-01-01

    Just as the proverbial straw broke the camel's back, catastrophes, from earthquakes and avalanches to a stock market crash, can be triggered by a minor event. The authors argue that complex systems naturally evolve to a critical state. Their theory already has improved understanding of motion in the earth's crust, economies and ecosystems. The theory of self-organized criticality states that many composite systems naturally evolve to a critical state in which a minor event starts a chain reaction that can affect any number of elements in the system. Although composite systems produce more minor events than catastrophes, chain reactions of all sizes are an integral part of the dynamics. According to the theory, the mechanism that leads to minor events is the same one that leads to major events. Furthermore, composite systems never reach equilibrium but instead evolve from one metastable state to the next. Self-organized criticality is a holistic theory: the global features, such as the relative number of large and small events, do not depend on the microscopic mechanisms. Consequently, global features of the system cannot be understood by analyzing the parts separately. To the authors' knowledge, self-organized criticality is the only model or mathematical description that has led to a holistic theory for dynamic systems.

  8. Predictability of critical transitions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaozhu; Kuehn, Christian; Hallerberg, Sarah

    2015-11-01

    Critical transitions in multistable systems have been discussed as models for a variety of phenomena ranging from the extinctions of species to socioeconomic changes and climate transitions between ice ages and warm ages. From bifurcation theory we can expect certain critical transitions to be preceded by a decreased recovery from external perturbations. The consequences of this critical slowing down have been observed as an increase in variance and autocorrelation prior to the transition. However, especially in the presence of noise, it is not clear whether these changes in observation variables are statistically relevant such that they could be used as indicators for critical transitions. In this contribution we investigate the predictability of critical transitions in conceptual models. We study the quadratic integrate-and-fire model and the van der Pol model under the influence of external noise. We focus especially on the statistical analysis of the success of predictions and the overall predictability of the system. The performance of different indicator variables turns out to be dependent on the specific model under study and the conditions of accessing it. Furthermore, we study the influence of the magnitude of transitions on the predictive performance. PMID:26651760

  9. Nuclear criticality information system

    SciTech Connect

    Koponen, B.L.; Hampel, V.E.

    1981-11-30

    The nuclear criticality safety program at LLNL began in the 1950's with a critical measurements program which produced benchmark data until the late 1960's. This same time period saw the rapid development of computer technology useful for both computer modeling of fissile systems and for computer-aided management and display of the computational benchmark data. Database management grew in importance as the amount of information increased and as experimental programs were terminated. Within the criticality safety program at LLNL we began at that time to develop a computer library of benchmark data for validation of computer codes and cross sections. As part of this effort, we prepared a computer-based bibliography of criticality measurements on relatively simple systems. However, it is only now that some of these computer-based resources can be made available to the nuclear criticality safety community at large. This technology transfer is being accomplished by the DOE Technology Information System (TIS), a dedicated, advanced information system. The NCIS database is described.

  10. Predictability of critical transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaozhu; Kuehn, Christian; Hallerberg, Sarah

    2015-11-01

    Critical transitions in multistable systems have been discussed as models for a variety of phenomena ranging from the extinctions of species to socioeconomic changes and climate transitions between ice ages and warm ages. From bifurcation theory we can expect certain critical transitions to be preceded by a decreased recovery from external perturbations. The consequences of this critical slowing down have been observed as an increase in variance and autocorrelation prior to the transition. However, especially in the presence of noise, it is not clear whether these changes in observation variables are statistically relevant such that they could be used as indicators for critical transitions. In this contribution we investigate the predictability of critical transitions in conceptual models. We study the quadratic integrate-and-fire model and the van der Pol model under the influence of external noise. We focus especially on the statistical analysis of the success of predictions and the overall predictability of the system. The performance of different indicator variables turns out to be dependent on the specific model under study and the conditions of accessing it. Furthermore, we study the influence of the magnitude of transitions on the predictive performance.

  11. Minimum Critical Values Study

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, P.B.

    2005-07-11

    This report provides minimum critical values for various 30-cm water-reflected uranium and plutonium oxide and nitrate aqueous mixtures as calculated by the SCALE CSAS1X sequence using the 238-group ENDF/B-V neutron cross-section library. The minimum values were determined through parametric searches in one-dimensional geometry. The calculations have been performed to obtain the minimum values: critical volume and mass for spheres, critical radius for cylinders, critical thickness for slabs, and minimum critical concentration (infinite geometry) for the following homogeneous mixtures: (1) UO{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O for 3, 4, 5, 20, and 100 wt % {sup 235}U; (2) UNH for 3, 4, 5, 20, and 100 wt % {sup 235}U; (3) PuO{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O for 100/0/0, 95/5/0, 90/5/5, 80/10/10, and 71/17/11/1 wt % of {sup 239}Pu/{sup 240}Pu/{sup 241}Pu(/{sup 242}Pu); and (4) PuNH for 100/0/0, 95/5/0, 90/5/5, 80/10/10, and 71/17/11/1 wt % of {sup 239}Pu/{sup 240}Pu/{sup 241}Pu(/{sup 242}Pu). All bounding surfaces were fully reflected by 30 cm of H{sub 2}O.

  12. Criticality calculations and criticality monitoring studies of the slagging pyrolysis incinerator facility

    SciTech Connect

    Close, D.A.; Booth, T.E.; Caldwell, J.T.

    1981-01-01

    It was determined that the criticality hazard associated with the Slagging Pyrolysis Incinerator (SPI) Facility would be minimal if a three-level criticality-hazard prevention program were implemented. The first strategy consists of screening all incoming wastes for fissile content. The second prevention level is provided by introducing a small concentration of a neutron-absorbing compound, such as B/sub 2/O/sub 3/, into the input waste stream. The third prevention level is provided by direct criticality-hazard monitoring using sensitive neutron detectors in all regions of the facility where a significant hazard has been identified - principally the drying, pyrolysis, and slag regions. The facility could be shut down rapidly for cleanout if the measurements indicate an unsafe condition is developing. The criticality safety provided by the product of these three independent measures should reduce the hazard to a negligible level.

  13. The Anatomy of Critical Discourse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenfield, Lawrence W.

    1968-01-01

    Critical discourse is best understood when its logical features are identified. An examination of the basic elements and modes of rhetorical criticism (a form of critical discourse) produces a finite set of options for the critic, thus enabling him to develop a system of alternatives in his critical efforts. For example, by selecting from among…

  14. Educational Criticism: Reflections and Reconsiderations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCutcheon, Gail

    1982-01-01

    This paper presents reflections and reconsiderations of notions about educational criticism. Several issues about the process of educational criticism need to be explored: (1) the metaphor of criticism; (2) exemplifying and elaborating methods for criticism; and (3) exploring the critic's role. (CJ)

  15. Critical Management in Knowledge Organizations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macpherson, Reynold

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to invite educational managers and management educators to reflect critically on practice. Design/methodology/approach: Using the point of Socrates' death, the paper suggests ways of reflecting on actions using ethically-critical, socially-critical, environmentally-critical, politically-critical and…

  16. Morphogenesis at criticality?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krotov, Dmitry; Dubuis, Julien; Gregor, Thomas; Bialek, William

    2014-03-01

    Spatial patterns in the early fruit fly embryo emerge from a network of interactions among transcription factors, the gap genes, driven by maternal inputs. Such networks can exhibit many qualitatively different behaviors, separated by critical surfaces. At criticality, we should observe strong correlations in the fluctuations of different genes around their mean expression levels, a slowing of the dynamics along some but not all directions in the space of possible expression levels, correlations of expression fluctuations over long distances in the embryo, and departures from a Gaussian distribution of these fluctuations. Analysis of recent experiments on the gap genes shows that all these signatures are observed, and that the different signatures are related in ways predicted by theory. While there might be other explanations for these individual phenomena, the confluence of evidence suggests that this genetic network is tuned to criticality.

  17. Morphogenesis at criticality

    PubMed Central

    Krotov, Dmitry; Dubuis, Julien O.; Gregor, Thomas; Bialek, William

    2014-01-01

    Spatial patterns in the early fruit fly embryo emerge from a network of interactions among transcription factors, the gap genes, driven by maternal inputs. Such networks can exhibit many qualitatively different behaviors, separated by critical surfaces. At criticality, we should observe strong correlations in the fluctuations of different genes around their mean expression levels, a slowing of the dynamics along some but not all directions in the space of possible expression levels, correlations of expression fluctuations over long distances in the embryo, and departures from a Gaussian distribution of these fluctuations. Analysis of recent experiments on the gap gene network shows that all these signatures are observed, and that the different signatures are related in ways predicted by theory. Although there might be other explanations for these individual phenomena, the confluence of evidence suggests that this genetic network is tuned to criticality. PMID:24516161

  18. Critical Viscosity of Xenon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The Critical Viscosity of Xenon Experiment (CVX-2) on the STS-107 Research 1 mission in 2002 will measure the viscous behavior of xenon, a heavy inert gas used in flash lamps and ion rocket engines, at its critical point. The sample cell at the heart of CVX-2 will sit inside a thermostat providing three layers of insulation. The cell itself comprises a copper body that conducts heat efficiently and smoothes out thermal variations that that would destroy the xenon's uniformity. Inside the cell, the oscillating screen viscometer element is supported between two pairs of electrodes that deflect the screen and then measure screen motion.

  19. Critical Viscosity of Xenon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The Critical Viscosity of Xenon Experiment (CVX-2) on the STS-107 Research 1 mission in 2001 will measure the viscous behavior of xenon, a heavy inert gas used in flash lamps and ion rocket engines, at its critical point. The thermostat for CVX sits inside the white cylinder on a support structure that is placed inside a pressure canister. A similar canister holds the electronics and control systems. The CVX-2 arrangement is identical. The principal investigator is Dr. Robert F. Berg (not shown) of the National Institutes of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD. This is a detail view of MSFC 0100143.

  20. Critical care by cytapheresis.

    PubMed

    Kawamura, Akio; Tsuchihashi, Seiichiro; Yonekawa, Motoki; Saitoh, Masao; Tamaki, Tohru; Meguro, Jun-ichi; Kukita, Kazutaka

    2002-06-01

    We report our experience of cytapheresis using a nonwoven polyester fiber filter to treat critical states of immune diseases. In 7 critical states of ulcerative colitis (UC), cytapheresis was effective in improving symptoms of UC. Administration of steroids was important in some cases. In 3 cases of renal transplantation, cytapheresis was also effective in controlling rejection. IgA nephropathy of transplanted cases was well controlled. Furthermore, an original disease such as focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FCGS) in a transplant patient was well treated by extracorporeal immune modulation of the cytapheresis. PMID:12109944

  1. Critical Technology Accessibility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Academies Press, 2006

    2006-01-01

    In 2003, the Defense Intelligence Agency asked the NRC to form a standing committee to help develop study topics about technology warning. One issue that was identified was the growing dependence on foreign suppliers of critical technology as a result of the increase in globalization of economic activity. Two important questions emerged for study:…

  2. Stateline: Critical Mass

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christie, Kathy

    2005-01-01

    In Physics "critical mass" refers to the minimum amount of fissionable material required to sustain a chain reaction. The adoption of state education policy isn't often equated with this concept, but occasionally solutions and ideas seem to gather around a common problem. If the solution at hand is simple, easily understood, and strengthened with…

  3. Critical Skills Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education Digest: Essential Readings Condensed for Quick Review, 2010

    2010-01-01

    As the U.S. economy begins to show signs of improvement, executives say they need a workforce fully equipped with skills beyond just the basics of reading, writing, and arithmetic (the three Rs). Skills such as critical thinking and problem solving, communication, collaboration, and creativity and innovation (the four Cs) will become even more…

  4. Critical Thinking Concept Reconstructed

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minter, Mary Kennedy

    2010-01-01

    This paper explores the proposition that teaching of critical thinking (CT) should include: (1) identifying and addressing the many environmental variables acting as barriers to our human thinking, i.e., an open system approach, and (2) utilizing the interrelatedness of the CT building blocks, i.e., creative thinking techniques, levels of…

  5. The Critical Life.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pelias, Ronald J.

    2000-01-01

    Offers an autoethnographic essay which follows one individual throughout his day to explore how evaluation functions as a fundamental orientation of a scholar's academic life. Questions the individual's relationship to criticism and its presence in the ongoing process of doing one's job and of living one's life. (SR)

  6. Criticizing the Role.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Arthur M.

    Critics of the community college are justified in challenging unsubstantiated statements about the institution by college spokespersons or in public relations releases disguised as institutional analyses. During the 1960's, for example, increasing enrollments were often cited as evidence of public support for community colleges--without reference…

  7. Conductive Critical Thinking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paetkau, Mark

    2007-01-01

    One of my goals as an instructor is to teach students critical thinking skills. This paper presents an example of a student-led discussion of heat conduction at the first-year level. Heat loss from a human head is calculated using conduction and radiation models. The results of these plausible (but wrong) models of heat transfer contradict what…

  8. CRITICAL READING DEVELOPS EARLY.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LEE, DORRIS; AND OTHERS

    THIS ISSUE OF THE READING AIDS SERIES PRESENTS A DISCUSSION OF THE POTENTIAL FOR CRITICAL READING AMONG YOUNG CHILDREN AND HOW IT CAN BE DEVELOPED. IT OFFERS SUGGESTIONS FOR THE MAXIMUM DEVELOPMENT OF THINKING SKILLS AND ATTITUDES OF INQUIRY AND EVALUATION. SOME OF THE TOPICS DISCUSSED ARE -- (1) THE DEVELOPMENT OF PERCEPTS, CONCEPTS, AND COMMON…

  9. Critical Practice: Teaching "Shakespeare."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mellor, Bronwyn; Patterson, Annette

    2000-01-01

    Describes how the authors taught their students to read "Hamlet" from a critical literacy perspective, analyzing how particular readings of texts and characters are constructed or produced; how they are determined by historical and cultural conventions; analyzing values that various readings support or challenge--rather than trying to get closer…

  10. SEMANTICS AND CRITICAL READING.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    FLANIGAN, MICHAEL C.

    PROFICIENCY IN CRITICAL READING CAN BE ACCELERATED BY MAKING STUDENTS AWARE OF VARIOUS SEMANTIC DEVICES THAT HELP CLARIFY MEANINGS AND PURPOSES. EXCERPTS FROM THE ARTICLE "TEEN-AGE CORRUPTION" FROM THE NINTH-GRADE SEMANTICS UNIT WRITTEN BY THE PROJECT ENGLISH DEMONSTRATION CENTER AT EUCLID, OHIO, ARE USED TO ILLUSTRATE HOW SEMANTICS RELATE TO…

  11. Critical Thinking and Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mason, Mark

    2007-01-01

    This paper introduces some of the debates in the field of critical thinking by highlighting differences among thinkers such as Siegel, Ennis, Paul, McPeck, and Martin, and poses some questions that arise from these debates. Does rationality transcend particular cultures, or are there different kinds of thinking, different styles of reasoning? What…

  12. Audience, Style and Criticism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pimm, David; Sinclair, Nathalie

    2009-01-01

    The primary focus for this article involves aspects of professional mathematical writing and examines the possibility of a form of literary criticism in relation to it. By means of examples from contemporary style guides for academic articles in mathematics (AMS, MAA), as well as the writing of mathematicians (Hamilton, Dedekind) from earlier…

  13. Replies to Criticisms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, James R.

    2009-01-01

    In this essay, Hamilton responds to criticisms of his book "The Art of Theater" (Malden, MA: Blackwell, 2007). Acknowledging that he expected that the central proposals in "The Art of Theater" would seem a little strange to philosophers, he reiterates his belief that the three general facts of any theatrical performance are its presentation, its…

  14. Translation as Literary Criticism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    di Stefano, B. Follkart

    1982-01-01

    It is proposed that literary translation is intrinsically an act of literary criticism. This theory is illustrated by discussion of specific problems in translating Sartre's "La Nausee" and Leonard Forest's "Le pays de la Sagouine," especially the use of verb tense. (MSE)

  15. Light Touch Critical Friendship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swaffield, Sue

    2007-01-01

    Critical friendship is a flexible form of support for school colleagues and one that is increasingly being applied to different contexts, including the New Relationship with Schools and School Improvement Partners. The ESRC/TLRP "Learning How to Learn" (LHTL) project was interested in, among other things, the scaling up of innovation, and…

  16. Creativity and Critical Thinking.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kollen, Patsy Phillips

    How to deal with the absence of creativity and critical thinking in the educational setting is discussed. All efforts to improve education will be futile if we don't take into account the absence of relationship among the participants and between the participants and the content of education. Relationship--i.e., connecting with others and with…

  17. The Failure of Criticism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodheart, Eugene

    Presenting the argument that contemporary criticism has lost its moral authority (and blaming modernism for that loss), Goodheart focuses on contending spiritual views. In particular he analyzes the dialectic between the Protestant-inspired humanist tradition of Carlyle, Arnold, Ruskin, and Lawrence and the decay of Catholicism represented by…

  18. From Self-Organized to Extended Criticality

    PubMed Central

    Lovecchio, Elisa; Allegrini, Paolo; Geneston, Elvis; West, Bruce J.; Grigolini, Paolo

    2012-01-01

    We address the issue of criticality that is attracting the attention of an increasing number of neurophysiologists. Our main purpose is to establish the specific nature of some dynamical processes that although physically different, are usually termed as “critical,” and we focus on those characterized by the cooperative interaction of many units. We notice that the term “criticality” has been adopted to denote both noise-induced phase transitions and Self-Organized Criticality (SOC) with no clear connection with the traditional phase transitions, namely the transformation of a thermodynamic system from one state of matter to another. We notice the recent attractive proposal of extended criticality advocated by Bailly and Longo, which is realized through a wide set of critical points rather than emerging as a singularity from a unique value of the control parameter. We study a set of cooperatively firing neurons and we show that for an extended set of interaction couplings the system exhibits a form of temporal complexity similar to that emerging at criticality from ordinary phase transitions. This extended criticality regime is characterized by three main properties: (i) In the ideal limiting case of infinitely large time period, temporal complexity corresponds to Mittag-Leffler complexity; (ii) For large values of the interaction coupling the periodic nature of the process becomes predominant while maintaining to some extent, in the intermediate time asymptotic region, the signature of complexity; (iii) Focusing our attention on firing neuron avalanches, we find two of the popular SOC properties, namely the power indexes 2 and 1.5 respectively for time length and for the intensity of the avalanches. We derive the main conclusion that SOC emerges from extended criticality, thereby explaining the experimental observation of Plenz and Beggs: avalanches occur in time with surprisingly regularity, in apparent conflict with the temporal complexity of physical

  19. Leadership in Academic Health Centers: Transactional and Transformational Leadership.

    PubMed

    Smith, Patrick O

    2015-12-01

    Leadership is a crucial component to the success of academic health science centers (AHCs) within the shifting U.S. healthcare environment. Leadership talent acquisition and development within AHCs is immature and approaches to leadership and its evolution will be inevitable to refine operations to accomplish the critical missions of clinical service delivery, the medical education continuum, and innovations toward discovery. To reach higher organizational outcomes in AHCs requires a reflection on what leadership approaches are in place and how they can better support these missions. Transactional leadership approaches are traditionally used in AHCs and this commentary suggests that movement toward a transformational approach is a performance improvement opportunity for AHC leaders. This commentary describes the transactional and transformational approaches, how they complement each other, and how to access the transformational approach. Drawing on behavioral sciences, suggestions are made on how a transactional leader can change her cognitions to align with the four dimensions of the transformational leadership approach. PMID:26604205

  20. Building a transcontinental affiliation: a new model for academic health centers.

    PubMed

    Sostman, H Dirk; Forese, Laura L; Boom, Marc L; Schroth, Lynn; Klein, Arthur A; Mushlin, Alvin I; Hagale, John E; Pardes, Herbert; Girotto, Ronald G; Gotto, Antonio M

    2005-11-01

    The recent affiliation of The Methodist Hospital (TMH) with Weill Medical College (WMC) of Cornell University and NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital is the first transcontinental primary affiliation between major, not-for-profit academic health centers (AHCs) in the United States. The authors describe the process followed, the issues involved, the initial accomplishments, and the opportunities envisioned. The key enablers of this affiliation were a rapid process, mutual trust based on existing professional relationships, and commitment to the project by Board leadership. Because of their geographic separation, the parties were not competitors in providing clinical care to their regional populations. The affiliation is nonexclusive, but is reciprocally primary in New York and Texas. Members of the TMH medical staff are eligible for faculty appointments at WMC. The principal areas of collaboration will be education, research, quality improvement, information technology, and international program development. The principal challenge has been the physical distance between the parties. Although extensive use of videoconferencing has been successful, personal contact is essential in establishing relationships. External processes impose a slower sequence and tempo of events than some might wish. This new model for AHCs creates exciting possibilities for the tripartite mission of research, education, and patient care. Realizing the potential of these opportunities will require unconstrained ideas and substantial investment of time and other critical resources. Since many consider that AHCs are in economic and cultural crisis, successful development of such possibilities could have importance beyond the collective interests of these three institutions. PMID:16249304

  1. Critical Education, Critical Pedagogies, Marxist Education in the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foley, Jean Ann; Morris, Doug; Gounari, Panayota; Agostinone-Wilson, Faith

    2015-01-01

    As critical pedagogy becomes more mainstream on the educational landscape in the United States, it is important to revisit the original tenets of critical pedagogy and explore their current manifestations. Since the beginning of "criticalism" from the theoretical/foundational work of the Frankfurt School of Critical Social Theory,…

  2. Critical concentrations of cumulative scattered damage

    SciTech Connect

    Ignatovich, S.R.

    1995-12-01

    A statistical model is constructed to describe the formation of associations (clusters) of several defects randomly scattered within a limited region of the material. The dependence of the number of such clusters on the total concentration of defects is determined. Two criteria of the limiting state are established for multiple fracture, these criteria corresponding to the critical concentrations of cumulative scattered damage. The critical concentrations are the threshold concentration at which individual defects begin to merge and the concentration characterizing the transition to the stage in which defects coalesce on a massive scale.

  3. Critical anomalies of alkaline fading of phenolphthalein in the critical solution of 2-butoxyethanol + water.

    PubMed

    Du, Zhongyu; Yin, Handi; Hao, Zhiguo; Zheng, Peizhu; Shen, Weiguo

    2013-12-14

    We have used three-wavelength UV-spectrophotometry to study the reaction of the alkaline fading of phenolphthalein in the critical solution of 2-butoxyethanol + water. It was found that when the temperature was far away from the critical point, the values of the natural logarithm of the rate constant k and the natural logarithm of the chemical equilibrium K determined in our experiments had good linear relationships with the reciprocal of temperature, which served as the backgrounds and were used for correcting k and K in the critical region. The critical slowing down of the reaction and the critical anomaly of the chemical equilibrium were detected near the critical point. The value of the critical exponent characterizing the slowing down effect of the reaction rate was obtained to be 0.156, which was close to the value 0.11 associated with the heat capacity divergence and agreed with the theoretical prediction. The experimental result also confirmed the theoretical prediction of 0.11 for the critical exponent characterizing the weak divergence of the singularity of the chemical equilibrium. PMID:24329072

  4. Critical Viscosity of Xenon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The Critical Viscosity of Xenon Experiment (CVX-2) on the STS-107 Research 1 mission in 2002 will measure the viscous behavior of liquid xenon, a heavy inert gas used in flash lamps and ion rocket engines, at its critical point. Resembling a tiny bit of window screen, the oscillator at the heart of CVX-2 will vibrate between two pairs of paddle-like electrodes. The slight bend in the shape of the mesh has no effect on the data. What counts are the mesh's displacement in the xenon fluid and the rate at which the displacement dampens. The unit shown here is encased in a small test cell and capped with a sapphire windown to contain the xenon at high pressure.

  5. Critical care in India.

    PubMed

    Udwadia, F E; Guntupalli, K K; Vidyasagar, D

    1997-04-01

    India is a vast democracy of nearly one billion people. Before the British rule ended in 1947, the life span of an Indian was a mere 21 years. Within a short span of 50 years, it increased to an impressive 63 years, largely due to public health measures initiated by the government. This created a pool of more than 300 million middle class Indians who could afford the benefits of modern and specialized care when needed. Critical care medicine, as practiced in the West, is still confined to large Metropolitan areas. A large pool of expatriate Indian physicians from all over the world are helping bridge the resource gap between the West and India by transfer of technology and providing appropriate training to physicians and paramedical personnel. This article describes the history and current status of development of critical care medicine in India. PMID:9107510

  6. Criticality safety training

    SciTech Connect

    Woodruff, S.K.

    1997-06-01

    Criticality safety training is an important element of the Plutonium Facility safety program at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Training consists of student self-study handbooks and hands-on performance-based training in a mock-up laboratory containing gloveboxes, trolley conveyor system, and self-monitoring instruments. A 10-minute video tape and lecture was presented to describe how training in this area is conducted.

  7. Carahunge - A Critical Assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-García, A. César

    Carahunge is a megalithic monument in southern Armenia that has often been acclaimed as the oldest observatory. The monument, composed of dozens of standing stones, has some perforated stones. The direction of the holes has been measured and their orientation is related to the sun, moon, and stars, obtaining a date for the construction of such devices. After a critical review of the methods and conclusions, these are shown as untenable.

  8. Critical Path Web Site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Judith L.; Charles, John B.; Rummel, John A. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Approximately three years ago, the Agency's lead center for the human elements of spaceflight (the Johnson Space Center), along with the National Biomedical Research Institute (NSBRI) (which has the lead role in developing countermeasures) initiated an activity to identify the most critical risks confronting extended human spaceflight. Two salient factors influenced this activity: first, what information is needed to enable a "go/no go" decision to embark on extended human spaceflight missions; and second, what knowledge and capabilities are needed to address known and potential health, safety and performance risks associated with such missions. A unique approach was used to first define and assess those risks, and then to prioritize them. This activity was called the Critical Path Roadmap (CPR) and it represents an opportunity to develop and implement a focused and evolving program of research and technology designed from a "risk reduction" perspective to prevent or minimize the risks to humans exposed to the space environment. The Critical Path Roadmap provides the foundation needed to ensure that human spaceflight, now and in the future, is as safe, productive and healthy as possible (within the constraints imposed on any particular mission) regardless of mission duration or destination. As a tool, the Critical Path Roadmap enables the decisionmaker to select from among the demonstrated or potential risks those that are to be mitigated, and the completeness of that mitigation. The primary audience for the CPR Web Site is the members of the scientific community who are interested in the research and technology efforts required for ensuring safe and productive human spaceflight. They may already be informed about the various space life sciences research programs or they may be newcomers. Providing the CPR content to potential investigators increases the probability of their delivering effective risk mitigations. Others who will use the CPR Web Site and its content

  9. Critical Path Web Site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Judith L.; Charles, John B.; Rummel, John A. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Approximately three years ago, the Agency's lead center for the human elements of spaceflight (the Johnson Space Center), along with the National Biomedical Research Institute (NSBRI) (which has the lead role in developing countermeasures) initiated an activity to identify the most critical risks confronting extended human spaceflight. Two salient factors influenced this activity: first, what information is needed to enable a "go/no go" decision to embark on extended human spaceflight missions; and second, what knowledge and capabilities are needed to address known and potential health, safety and performance risks associated with such missions. A unique approach was used to first define and assess those risks, and then to prioritize them. This activity was called the Critical Path Roadmap (CPR) and it represents an opportunity to develop and implement a focused and evolving program of research and technology designed from a "risk reduction" perspective to prevent or minimize the risks to humans exposed to the space environment. The Critical Path Roadmap provides the foundation needed to ensure that human spaceflight, now and in the future, is as safe, productive and healthy as possible (within the constraints imposed on any particular mission) regardless of mission duration or destination. As a tool, the Critical Path Roadmap enables the decision maker to select from among the demonstrated or potential risks those that are to be mitigated, and the completeness of that mitigation. The primary audience for the CPR Web Site is the members of the scientific community who are interested in the research and technology efforts required for ensuring safe and productive human spaceflight. They may already be informed about the various space life sciences research programs or they may be newcomers. Providing the CPR content to potential investigators increases the probability of their delivering effective risk mitigations. Others who will use the CPR Web Site and its

  10. Toward a Gramscian Critical Rhetoric.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zompetti, Joseph P.

    1997-01-01

    Contends A. Gramsci can provide a perspective on the cultural dominance of rhetoric and formation of a critical "telos"--his work can contribute to understanding critical rhetoric. Demonstrates that Gramscian notions can extend critical rhetoric into an enterprise that permits critical self-reflexivity and praxis and create new opportunities and…

  11. Challenges in Critical Language Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pessoa, Rosane Rocha; de Urzeda Freitas, Marco Tulio

    2012-01-01

    This article is based on the conception of language teaching as a liberatory practice. Drawing on some principles of critical pedagogy (Ellsworth, 1992; Freire, 2005; hooks, 1994; Norton & Toohey, 2004), critical applied linguistics (Pennycook, 1990, 2001), critical language teaching (Ferreira, 2006; Pennycook, 1999), and critical language teacher…

  12. Slowdown mechanisms of ultraintense laser propagation in critical density plasma.

    PubMed

    Iwawaki, T; Habara, H; Yabuuchi, T; Hata, M; Sakagami, H; Tanaka, K A

    2015-07-01

    We use one- and two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations to demonstrate that the propagation of an ultraintense laser (I=10(19)W/cm(2)) in critical density plasma can be interfered with by a high density plasma wall region generated at the propagation front. When the electron flow speed of the wall region exceeds a certain relativistic threshold, the region behaves as an overdense plasma due to a decrease of the effective critical density. The region forms then very small overdense plasma islands. The islands impede the propagation intermittently and slow down the propagation speed significantly. PMID:26274293

  13. Morphogenesis at criticality?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krotov, Dmitry; Dubuis, Julien; Wieschaus, Eric; Gregor, Thomas; Bialek, William

    2013-03-01

    Embryonic development of many multicellular organisms begins with the generation of spatially varying patterns of morphogens that encode the body plan of the future organism. We study the spatial pattern formed by the gap gene proteins in the early fruit fly embryo, which is anchored by ``crossing points'' between expression levels of different genes; these are thought to result from mutual repression. We explore a broad class of models for such interacting genes and show that the parameters implied implied by recent quantitative measurements are non-generic, but rather tuned to certain values, so that the entire gap gene network operates close to the critical surface in its phase diagram. We develop a mean field description of this system as well as derive signatures of critical behavior in the structure of expression noise. One such signature is that fluctuations are dominated by a single ``massless'' mode, so that fluctuations of expression levels of different genes are highly correlated/anticorrelated. We find a surprisingly high degree of anticorrelation in the real experimental data. These results suggest an interesting possibility that the network of genes responsible for development is operating near criticality.

  14. [The critical scientists' voice].

    PubMed

    Lewgoy, F

    2000-01-01

    The intricate debate over genetically modified organisms (GMOs) involves powerful economic interests, as well as ethical, legal, emotional and scientific aspects, some of which are dealt with in this paper.(It is possible to identify two main groups of scientists across the GMOs divide: the triumphalist and the critical group.) Scientists in the triumphalist group state that GMOs and their derivatives are safe for the environment and do not offer health hazards any more than similar, non-genetically modified, products. This view is disputed by the critical scientists, who are prompted by the scarcity of studies on the environmental impacts and toxicity of GMOs, and who point out flaws in tests performed by the same companies which hold the patents. They are also critical of the current state of the process of gene transference, lacking accuracy, a fact which, coupled with the scant knowledge available about 97% of the genome functions, may produce unforseeable effects with risks for the environment and public health yet to be assessed. Examples of such effects are: the transference of alien genes [??] to other species, the emergence of toxins, the creation of new viruses, the impacts on beneficial insects and on biodiversity in general. PMID:16683329

  15. Relative Critical Points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Debra

    2013-05-01

    Relative equilibria of Lagrangian and Hamiltonian systems with symmetry are critical points of appropriate scalar functions parametrized by the Lie algebra (or its dual) of the symmetry group. Setting aside the structures - symplectic, Poisson, or variational - generating dynamical systems from such functions highlights the common features of their construction and analysis, and supports the construction of analogous functions in non-Hamiltonian settings. If the symmetry group is nonabelian, the functions are invariant only with respect to the isotropy subgroup of the given parameter value. Replacing the parametrized family of functions with a single function on the product manifold and extending the action using the (co)adjoint action on the algebra or its dual yields a fully invariant function. An invariant map can be used to reverse the usual perspective: rather than selecting a parametrized family of functions and finding their critical points, conditions under which functions will be critical on specific orbits, typically distinguished by isotropy class, can be derived. This strategy is illustrated using several well-known mechanical systems - the Lagrange top, the double spherical pendulum, the free rigid body, and the Riemann ellipsoids - and generalizations of these systems.

  16. Second-sound generation in superfluids: Critically driven porous loudspeakers

    SciTech Connect

    Grabinski, M.; Liu, M.

    1985-08-01

    The function of a porous loudspeaker or oscillating superleak transducer driven hard enough to generate critical velocity in its pores, is investigated theoretically. Two distinct regions of critical behavior with a number of experimentally accessible phenomena are predicted and summarized in a graphic exposition. In addition, the recently found discrepancy between theory and experiment is resolved.

  17. Concepts and methods for describing critical phenomena in fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sengers, J. V.; Sengers, J. M. H. L.

    1977-01-01

    The predictions of theoretical models for a critical-point phase transistion in fluids, namely the classical equation with third-degree critical isotherm, that with fifth-degree critical isotherm, and the lattice gas, are reviewed. The renormalization group theory of critical phenomena and the hypothesis of universality of critical behavior supported by this theory are discussed as well as the nature of gravity effects and how they affect cricital-region experimentation in fluids. The behavior of the thermodynamic properties and the correlation function is formulated in terms of scaling laws. The predictions of these scaling laws and of the hypothesis of universality of critical behavior are compared with experimental data for one-component fluids and it is indicated how the methods can be extended to describe critical phenomena in fluid mixtures.

  18. Weightless experiments to probe universality of fluid critical behavior.

    PubMed

    Lecoutre, C; Guillaument, R; Marre, S; Garrabos, Y; Beysens, D; Hahn, I

    2015-06-01

    Near the critical point of fluids, critical opalescence results in light attenuation, or turbidity increase, that can be used to probe the universality of critical behavior. Turbidity measurements in SF6 under weightlessness conditions on board the International Space Station are performed to appraise such behavior in terms of both temperature and density distances from the critical point. Data are obtained in a temperature range, far (1 K) from and extremely close (a few μK) to the phase transition, unattainable from previous experiments on Earth. Data are analyzed with renormalization-group matching classical-to-critical crossover models of the universal equation of state. It results that the data in the unexplored region, which is a minute deviant from the critical density value, still show adverse effects for testing the true asymptotic nature of the critical point phenomena. PMID:26172640

  19. Weightless experiments to probe universality of fluid critical behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lecoutre, C.; Guillaument, R.; Marre, S.; Garrabos, Y.; Beysens, D.; Hahn, I.

    2015-06-01

    Near the critical point of fluids, critical opalescence results in light attenuation, or turbidity increase, that can be used to probe the universality of critical behavior. Turbidity measurements in SF6 under weightlessness conditions on board the International Space Station are performed to appraise such behavior in terms of both temperature and density distances from the critical point. Data are obtained in a temperature range, far (1 K) from and extremely close (a few μ K ) to the phase transition, unattainable from previous experiments on Earth. Data are analyzed with renormalization-group matching classical-to-critical crossover models of the universal equation of state. It results that the data in the unexplored region, which is a minute deviant from the critical density value, still show adverse effects for testing the true asymptotic nature of the critical point phenomena.

  20. The interfacility transport of critically ill newborns.

    PubMed

    Whyte, Hilary Ea; Jefferies, Ann L

    2015-01-01

    The practice of paediatric/neonatal interfacility transport continues to expand. Transport teams have evolved into mobile intensive care units capable of delivering state-of-the-art critical care during paediatric and neonatal transport. While outcomes are best for high-risk infants born in a tertiary care setting, high-risk mothers often cannot be safely transferred. Their newborns may then have to be transported to a higher level of care following birth. The present statement reviews issues relating to transport of the critically ill newborn population, including personnel, team competencies, skills, equipment, systems and processes. Six recommendations for improving interfacility transport of critically ill newborns are highlighted, emphasizing the importance of regionalized care for newborns. PMID:26175564

  1. Potts-model critical manifolds revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scullard, Christian R.; Lykke Jacobsen, Jesper

    2016-03-01

    We compute critical polynomials for the q-state Potts model on the Archimedean lattices, using a parallel implementation of the algorithm of Jacobsen (2014 J. Phys. A: Math. Theor 47 135001) that gives us access to larger sizes than previously possible. The exact polynomials are computed for bases of size 6 × 6 unit cells, and the root in the temperature variable v={{{e}}}K-1 is determined numerically at q = 1 for bases of size 8 × 8. This leads to improved results for bond percolation thresholds, and for the Potts-model critical manifolds in the real (q, v) plane. In the two most favourable cases, we find now the kagome-lattice threshold to eleven digits and that of the (3,{12}2) lattice to thirteen. Our critical manifolds reveal many interesting features in the antiferromagnetic region of the Potts model, and determine accurately the extent of the Berker-Kadanoff phase for the lattices studied.

  2. The interfacility transport of critically ill newborns

    PubMed Central

    Whyte, Hilary EA; Jefferies, Ann L

    2015-01-01

    The practice of paediatric/neonatal interfacility transport continues to expand. Transport teams have evolved into mobile intensive care units capable of delivering state-of-the-art critical care during paediatric and neonatal transport. While outcomes are best for high-risk infants born in a tertiary care setting, high-risk mothers often cannot be safely transferred. Their newborns may then have to be transported to a higher level of care following birth. The present statement reviews issues relating to transport of the critically ill newborn population, including personnel, team competencies, skills, equipment, systems and processes. Six recommendations for improving interfacility transport of critically ill newborns are highlighted, emphasizing the importance of regionalized care for newborns. PMID:26175564

  3. Critical properties of aluminum.

    PubMed

    Bhatt, Divesh; Jasper, Ahren W; Schultz, Nathan E; Siepmann, J Ilja; Truhlar, Donald G

    2006-04-01

    Gibbs ensemble Monte Carlo calculations are performed using a validated embedded-atom potential to obtain the vapor-liquid coexistence curve for elemental aluminum in good agreement with available experimental data up to the boiling point. These calculations are then extended to make a reliable prediction of the critical temperature, pressure, and density of Al, which have previously been known only with very large uncertainties. This demonstrates the ability of modern simulations to predict fundamental physical properties that are extremely difficult to measure directly. PMID:16568986

  4. Critical exponent for viscosity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berg, Robert F.; Moldover, Michael R.

    1990-01-01

    The critical exponent y characterizing the divergence of the viscosity for carbon dioxide and xenon has been measured. The values of y for both fluids fall within the range y = 0.041 + or - 0.001 and are consistent with the range y = 0.042 + or - 0.002 spanned by earlier data for four binary liquid mixtures. This agreement is the strongest evidence that pure fluids and binary liquids are in the same dynamic universality class; however, the results for y are inconsistent with the recent theoretical value of 0.032.

  5. Critical Manifestations of Pneumoscrotum

    PubMed Central

    Dagur, Gautam; Lee, Min Y.; Warren, Kelly; Imhof, Reese; Khan, Sardar A.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Pneumoscrotum is a critical, physical finding that may indicate significant morbidity and mortality. Accumulation of gas in the scrotum can be primary or secondary. Objective This paper discusses rapid diagnosis and treatment options. Material and Methods PubMed searches for pneumoscrotum, etiology, diagnosis, and treatment. Results: We review the historical perspective, classification, etiology, diagnosis, and treatment options of pneumoscrotum, as well as the presentation of pneumoscrotum in neonates/infants. Conclusion It is crucial to diagnose the etiology pneumoscrotum and designing a treatment option based off that. PMID:27390577

  6. Critical Lines in Binary Mixtures of Components with Multiple Critical Points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artemenko, Sergey; Lozovsky, Taras; Mazur, Victor

    The principal aim of this work is a comprehensive analysis of the fluid phase behavior of binary fluid mixtures via the van der Waals like equation of state (EoS) which has a multiplicity of critical points in metastable region. We test the modified van der Waals equation of state (MVDW) proposed by Skibinski et al. (2004) which displays a complex phase behavior including three critical points and identifies four fluid phases (gas, low density liquid (LDL), high density liquid (HDL), and very high density liquid (VHDL)). An improvement of repulsive part doesn't change a topological picture of phase behavior in the wide range of thermodynamic variables. The van der Waals attractive interaction and excluded volume for mixture are calculated from classical mixing rules. Critical lines in binary mixtures of type III of phase behavior in which the components exhibit polyamorphism are calculated and a continuity of fluid-fluid critical line at high pressure is observed.

  7. Critical behaviors near the (tri-)critical end point of QCD within the NJL model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Ya; Du, Yi-Lun; Cui, Zhu-Fang; Zong, Hong-Shi

    2015-10-01

    We investigate the dynamical chiral symmetry breaking and its restoration at finite density and temperature within the two-flavor Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model, and mainly focus on the critical behaviors near the critical end point (CEP) and tricritical point (TCP) of quantum chromodynamics. The multi-solution region of the Nambu and Wigner ones is determined in the phase diagram for the massive and massless current quark, respectively. We use the various susceptibilities to locate the CEP/TCP and then extract the critical exponents near them. Our calculations reveal that the various susceptibilities share the same critical behaviors for the physical current quark mass, while they show different features in the chiral limit.

  8. Safety Critical Mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, Brandan

    2008-01-01

    Spaceflight mechanisms have a reputation for being difficult to develop and operate successfully. This reputation is well earned. Many circumstances conspire to make this so: the environments in which the mechanisms are used are extremely severe, there is usually limited or no maintenance opportunity available during operation due to this environment, the environments are difficult to replicate accurately on the ground, the expense of the mechanism development makes it impractical to build and test many units for long periods of time before use, mechanisms tend to be highly specialized and not prone to interchangeability or off-the-shelf use, they can generate and store a lot of energy, and the nature of mechanisms themselves, as a combination of structures, electronics, etc. designed to accomplish specific dynamic performance, makes them very complex and subject to many unpredictable interactions of many types. In addition to their complexities, mechanism are often counted upon to provide critical vehicle functions that can result in catastrophic events should the functions not be performed. It is for this reason that mechanisms are frequently subjected to special scrutiny in safety processes. However, a failure tolerant approach, along with good design and development practices and detailed design reviews, can be developed to allow such notoriously troublesome mechanisms to be utilized confidently in safety-critical applications.

  9. Rethinking Critical Adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franck, Carl; Peach, Sarah; Polak, Robert D.

    1996-03-01

    Recent reflectivity experiments on near-critical mixtures of carbon disulfide and nitromethane contained in glass cells footnote Niraj S. Desai, Sarah Peach, and Carl Franck, Phys. Rev. E 52, 4129 (1995) have shown that preferential adsorption of one liquid component onto the wall can be controlled by chemical modification of the glass. The glass was treated with varying amounts of hexamethyldisilazane to decrease surface polarity and therefore enhance the adsorption of carbon disulfide in a surprisingly continuous way. The effect of the glass wall on the local liquid composition can be described by two different scaling hypotheses: using a short range field on the liquid closest to the wall, or pinning the amplitude of the order parameter at the surface. We have found that only the second approach is consistent with the experimental data, although this is difficult to reconcile with observed wetting critical phenomena. We also have reexamined the issue of substrate inhomogeneity and conclude that the substrates were indeed homogeneous on relevant length scales. Supported by the NSF under DMR-9320910 and the central facilities of the Materials Science Center at Cornell University.

  10. Design of Critical Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, Robert C.; Zaretsky, Erwin V.

    2001-01-01

    Critical component design is based on minimizing product failures that results in loss of life. Potential catastrophic failures are reduced to secondary failures where components removed for cause or operating time in the system. Issues of liability and cost of component removal become of paramount importance. Deterministic design with factors of safety and probabilistic design address but lack the essential characteristics for the design of critical components. In deterministic design and fabrication there are heuristic rules and safety factors developed over time for large sets of structural/material components. These factors did not come without cost. Many designs failed and many rules (codes) have standing committees to oversee their proper usage and enforcement. In probabilistic design, not only are failures a given, the failures are calculated; an element of risk is assumed based on empirical failure data for large classes of component operations. Failure of a class of components can be predicted, yet one can not predict when a specific component will fail. The analogy is to the life insurance industry where very careful statistics are book-kept on classes of individuals. For a specific class, life span can be predicted within statistical limits, yet life-span of a specific element of that class can not be predicted.

  11. Internet's critical path horizon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valverde, S.; Solé, R. V.

    2004-03-01

    Internet is known to display a highly heterogeneous structure and complex fluctuations in its traffic dynamics. Congestion seems to be an inevitable result of user's behavior coupled to the network dynamics and it effects should be minimized by choosing appropriate routing strategies. But what are the requirements of routing depth in order to optimize the traffic flow? In this paper we analyse the behavior of Internet traffic with a topologically realistic spatial structure as described in a previous study [S.-H. Yook et al., Proc. Natl Acad. Sci. USA 99, 13382 (2002)]. The model involves self-regulation of packet generation and different levels of routing depth. It is shown that it reproduces the relevant key, statistical features of Internet's traffic. Moreover, we also report the existence of a critical path horizon defining a transition from low-efficient traffic to highly efficient flow. This transition is actually a direct consequence of the web's small world architecture exploited by the routing algorithm. Once routing tables reach the network diameter, the traffic experiences a sudden transition from a low-efficient to a highly-efficient behavior. It is conjectured that routing policies might have spontaneously reached such a compromise in a distributed manner. Internet would thus be operating close to such critical path horizon.

  12. Critical Literature Pedagogy: Teaching Canonical Literature for Critical Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borsheim-Black, Carlin; Macaluso, Michael; Petrone, Robert

    2014-01-01

    This article introduces Critical Literature Pedagogy (CLP), a pedagogical framework for applying goals of critical literacy within the context of teaching canonical literature. Critical literacies encompass skills and dispositions to understand, question, and critique ideological messages of texts; because canonical literature is often…

  13. Actions Following Words: Critical Race Theory Connects to Critical Pedagogy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, Laurence; Stovall, David O.

    2004-01-01

    In this essay the authors discuss some of the ways that critical race theory (CRT) could be linked to critical pedagogy in order to provide a more comprehensive analytical framework to analyze the role of race-class dynamics. This approach will attempt to address some of the gaps and silences that critical pedagogy has had regarding critical…

  14. Jaguar critical habitat designation causes concern for Southwestern ranchers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Svancara, Colleen; Lien, Aaron M.; Vanasco, Wendy T.; Laura Lopez-Hoffman; Ruyle, George B.

    2015-01-01

    The designation of jaguar critical habitat in April 2014 in southern Arizona and southwestern New Mexico created concern for livestock ranchers in the region. We interviewed ranchers to understand their concerns with the jaguar critical habitat designation and their attitudes toward jaguars, wildlife conservation, and resource management in general. Ranchers we interviewed were concerned about direct impacts of designated critical habitat on ranching, as well as possible alternative agendas of critical habitat advocates and issues specific to the borderlands region. The ranchers were less concerned about the presence of jaguars but were more concerned about possible limiting effects of the Endangered Species Act (ESA), distrust of government entities, and litigious environmental groups. To maximize effectiveness, government agencies should work to foster trust in the ranching community, be cognizant of sensitive issues specific to the region that may challenge endangered species conservation goals, recognize the opportunity to work with ranchers for endangered species management, and provide outreach about implications of the ESA.

  15. Critical Infrastructure Modeling System

    2004-10-01

    The Critical Infrastructure Modeling System (CIMS) is a 3D modeling and simulation environment designed to assist users in the analysis of dependencies within individual infrastructure and also interdependencies between multiple infrastructures. Through visual cuing and textual displays, a use can evaluate the effect of system perturbation and identify the emergent patterns that evolve. These patterns include possible outage areas from a loss of power, denial of service or access, and disruption of operations. Method ofmore » Solution: CIMS allows the user to model a system, create an overlay of information, and create 3D representative images to illustrate key infrastructure elements. A geo-referenced scene, satellite, aerial images or technical drawings can be incorporated into the scene. Scenarios of events can be scripted, and the user can also interact during run time to alter system characteristics. CIMS operates as a discrete event simulation engine feeding a 3D visualization.« less

  16. [Spirituality in critical care].

    PubMed

    Schaller, M D; Martinuz, M; Kraehenbuehl, N; Odier, C

    2006-12-13

    Taking care of a critically-ill patient is of high complexity level, as it includes bio-pschosocial and cultural aspects. Until recently, physicians have paid little attention to spirituality, although it constitutes the essential of human being. Spiritual need may reveal to be of utmost importance and has influence on bio-psycho-social aspects for a patient experiencing severe disease with threatening outcome and near death. A physician may transfer the problem to a specialist, a chaplain, or may personally be able to assess this need. To put a bio-psycho-social-spiritual model of care into practice, health care givers including chaplains should set up a team work. Their educational programs should include spirituality care training. Swiss intensivists should acquire the competency to take care of their patients in a holistic manner. PMID:17236327

  17. Critical Infrastructure Modeling System

    SciTech Connect

    2004-10-01

    The Critical Infrastructure Modeling System (CIMS) is a 3D modeling and simulation environment designed to assist users in the analysis of dependencies within individual infrastructure and also interdependencies between multiple infrastructures. Through visual cuing and textual displays, a use can evaluate the effect of system perturbation and identify the emergent patterns that evolve. These patterns include possible outage areas from a loss of power, denial of service or access, and disruption of operations. Method of Solution: CIMS allows the user to model a system, create an overlay of information, and create 3D representative images to illustrate key infrastructure elements. A geo-referenced scene, satellite, aerial images or technical drawings can be incorporated into the scene. Scenarios of events can be scripted, and the user can also interact during run time to alter system characteristics. CIMS operates as a discrete event simulation engine feeding a 3D visualization.

  18. Critical Density Interaction Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Young, P; Baldis, H A; Cheung, P; Rozmus, W; Kruer, W; Wilks, S; Crowley, S; Mori, W; Hansen, C

    2001-02-14

    Experiments have been performed to study the propagation of intense laser pulses to high plasma densities. The issue of self-focusing and filamentation of the laser pulse as well as developing predictive capability of absorption processes and x-ray conversion efficiencies is important for numerous programs at the Laboratory, particularly Laser Program (Fast Ignitor and direct-drive ICF) and D&NT (radiography, high energy backlighters and laser cutting). Processes such as resonance absorption, profile modification, linear mode conversion, filamentation and stimulated Brillouin scattering can occur near the critical density and can have important effects on the coupling of laser light to solid targets. A combination of experiments have been used to study the propagation of laser light to high plasma densities and the interaction physics of intense laser pulses with solid targets. Nonparaxial fluid codes to study nonstationary behavior of filamentation and stimulated Brillouin scattering at high densities have also been developed as part of this project.

  19. Against the Bureaucratization of Criticism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nothstine, William L.; Copeland, Gary A.

    The proliferation of critics and critical approaches has produced a trend toward fragmentation and isolation among the practitioners involved. A suggestive counter-trend indicates that there is intense curiosity among critics to watch colleagues encounter texts, grapple with the preliminary questions of stance and method, and share the experience…

  20. Transforming Critical Thinking: Thinking Constructively.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thayer-Bacon, Barbara J.

    This book presents a reconceptualization of critical thinking theory. Drawing on pragmatic, feminist, and postmodern philosophies, the book offers an overview of the history of critical thinking and identifies its major theorists. It critiques how critical thinking is conceptualized and applied in classrooms and offers a newly delineated platform…

  1. A Critically Reflective Social Studies?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, Marge

    1990-01-01

    Examines social studies in the twenty-first century from a critical theory perspective. Traces critical reflection's origins from Marxist educational theories to Jurgen Habermas's critical theory. Highlights Fred Newmann's curricular model, "Education for Citizen Action," for developing competent action in public affairs. Advocates infusing…

  2. What Is Critical about Sociology?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buechler, Steven

    2008-01-01

    Critical thinking is often presented as a generic technique. This article develops an alternative that links critique more closely to the sociological perspective. I suggest three answers to the above question: that the sociological perspective is critical for comprehending complex issues, that all sociology is implicitly critical by virtue of its…

  3. Critical Quantitative Inquiry in Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stage, Frances K.; Wells, Ryan S.

    2014-01-01

    This chapter briefly traces the development of the concept of critical quantitative inquiry, provides an expanded conceptualization of the tasks of critical quantitative research, offers theoretical explanation and justification for critical research using quantitative methods, and previews the work of quantitative criticalists presented in this…

  4. Critical Initial Flaw Size Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dawicke, David S.; Raju, Ivatury S.; Cheston, Derrick J.

    2008-01-01

    An independent assessment was conducted to determine the critical initial flaw size (CIFS) for the flange-to-skin weld in the Ares I-X Upper Stage Simulator (USS). The USS consists of several "tuna can" segments that are approximately 216 inches in diameter, 115 inches tall, and 0.5 inches thick. A 6 inch wide by 1 inch thick flange is welded to the skin and is used to fasten adjacent tuna cans. A schematic of a "tuna can" and the location of the flange-to-skin weld are shown in Figure 1. Gussets (shown in yellow in Figure 1) are welded to the skin and flange every 10 degrees around the circumference of the "tuna can". The flange-to-skin weld is a flux core butt weld with a fillet weld on the inside surface, as illustrated in Figure 2. The welding process may create loss of fusion defects in the weld that could develop into fatigue cracks and jeopardize the structural integrity of the Ares I-X vehicle. The CIFS analysis was conducted to determine the largest crack in the weld region that will not grow to failure within 4 lifetimes, as specified by NASA standard 5001 & 5019 [1].

  5. Building effective critical care teams.

    PubMed

    Manthous, Constantine; Nembhard, Ingrid M; Hollingshead, Andrea B

    2011-01-01

    Critical care is formulated and delivered by a team. Accordingly, behavioral scientific principles relevant to teams, namely psychological safety, transactive memory and leadership, apply to critical care teams. Two experts in behavioral sciences review the impact of psychological safety, transactive memory and leadership on medical team outcomes. A clinician then applies those principles to two routine critical care paradigms: daily rounds and resuscitations. Since critical care is a team endeavor, methods to maximize teamwork should be learned and mastered by critical care team members, and especially leaders. PMID:21884639

  6. Applying critical thinking to nursing.

    PubMed

    Price, Bob

    2015-08-19

    Critical thinking and writing are skills that are not easy to acquire. The term 'critical' is used differently in social and clinical contexts. Nursing students need time to master the inquisitive and ruminative aspects of critical thinking that are required in academic environments. This article outlines what is meant by critical thinking in academic settings, in relation to both theory and reflective practice. It explains how the focus of a question affects the sort of critical thinking required and offers two taxonomies of learning, to which students can refer when analysing essay requirements. The article concludes with examples of analytical writing in reference to theory and reflective practice. PMID:26285997

  7. Building effective critical care teams

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Critical care is formulated and delivered by a team. Accordingly, behavioral scientific principles relevant to teams, namely psychological safety, transactive memory and leadership, apply to critical care teams. Two experts in behavioral sciences review the impact of psychological safety, transactive memory and leadership on medical team outcomes. A clinician then applies those principles to two routine critical care paradigms: daily rounds and resuscitations. Since critical care is a team endeavor, methods to maximize teamwork should be learned and mastered by critical care team members, and especially leaders. PMID:21884639

  8. Criticality in the brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Arcangelis, L.; Lombardi, F.; Herrmann, H. J.

    2014-03-01

    Spontaneous brain activity has been recently characterized by avalanche dynamics with critical features for systems in vitro and in vivo. In this contribution we present a review of experimental results on neuronal avalanches in cortex slices, together with numerical results from a neuronal model implementing several physiological properties of living neurons. Numerical data reproduce experimental results for avalanche statistics. The temporal organization of avalanches can be characterized by the distribution of waiting times between successive avalanches. Experimental measurements exhibit a non-monotonic behaviour, not usually found in other natural processes. Numerical simulations provide evidence that this behaviour is a consequence of the alternation between states of high and low activity, leading to a balance between excitation and inhibition controlled by a single parameter. During these periods both the single neuron state and the network excitability level, keeping memory of past activity, are tuned by homoeostatic mechanisms. Interestingly, the same homoeostatic balance is detected for neuronal activity at the scale of the whole brain. We finally review the learning abilities of this neuronal network. Learning occurs via plastic adaptation of synaptic strengths by a non-uniform negative feedback mechanism. The system is able to learn all the tested rules and the learning dynamics exhibits universal features as a function of the strength of plastic adaptation. Any rule could be learned provided that the plastic adaptation is sufficiently slow.

  9. Teaching critical thinking

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, N. G.; Wieman, Carl E.; Bonn, D. A.

    2015-01-01

    The ability to make decisions based on data, with its inherent uncertainties and variability, is a complex and vital skill in the modern world. The need for such quantitative critical thinking occurs in many different contexts, and although it is an important goal of education, that goal is seldom being achieved. We argue that the key element for developing this ability is repeated practice in making decisions based on data, with feedback on those decisions. We demonstrate a structure for providing suitable practice that can be applied in any instructional setting that involves the acquisition of data and relating that data to scientific models. This study reports the results of applying that structure in an introductory physics laboratory course. Students in an experimental condition were repeatedly instructed to make and act on quantitative comparisons between datasets, and between data and models, an approach that is common to all science disciplines. These instructions were slowly faded across the course. After the instructions had been removed, students in the experimental condition were 12 times more likely to spontaneously propose or make changes to improve their experimental methods than a control group, who performed traditional experimental activities. The students in the experimental condition were also four times more likely to identify and explain a limitation of a physical model using their data. Students in the experimental condition also showed much more sophisticated reasoning about their data. These differences between the groups were seen to persist into a subsequent course taken the following year. PMID:26283351

  10. Osteoarthritis: A Critical Review

    PubMed Central

    Onishi, Kentaro; Utturkar, Amol; Chang, Eric; Panush, Richard; Hata, Justin; Perret-Karimi, Danielle

    2015-01-01

    Patients with osteoarthritis (OA) are faced with a barrage of treatment options, from recommendations from friends and social media to medications prescribed by the primary care physician. The purpose of this article is to critically review current approaches to generalized or monoarticular OA based on available evidence and to illustrate multidisciplinary and multimodal treatment strategies for the management of OA. Treatment options assessed for efficacy include patient education; oral and topical pharmacological agents; complementary and alternative medicine; surgery; manual medicine; acupuncture; interventional procedures (corticosteroid injection, viscosupplementation, and pulsed radiofrequency); bracing; assistive devices; physical therapy; and physical modalities. Multidisciplinary and multimodal treatment strategies combined with early detection and prevention strategies provide the best benefit to patients. This review also illustrates that traditional and alternative modalities of treatment can be both synergistic and beneficial. Physicians should be aware of the variety of tools available for the management of OA and the associated symptoms. Those healthcare providers who can best individualize treatment plans for specific patients and inspire their patients to embrace healthy lifestyle modifications will achieve the best results. PMID:25750483

  11. Cohort: critical science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Digney, Bruce L.

    2007-04-01

    Unmanned vehicle systems is an attractive technology for the military, but whose promises have remained largely undelivered. There currently exist fielded remote controlled UGVs and high altitude UAV whose benefits are based on standoff in low complexity environments with sufficiently low control reaction time requirements to allow for teleoperation. While effective within there limited operational niche such systems do not meet with the vision of future military UxV scenarios. Such scenarios envision unmanned vehicles operating effectively in complex environments and situations with high levels of independence and effective coordination with other machines and humans pursing high level, changing and sometimes conflicting goals. While these aims are clearly ambitious they do provide necessary targets and inspiration with hopes of fielding near term useful semi-autonomous unmanned systems. Autonomy involves many fields of research including machine vision, artificial intelligence, control theory, machine learning and distributed systems all of which are intertwined and have goals of creating more versatile broadly applicable algorithms. Cohort is a major Applied Research Program (ARP) led by Defence R&D Canada (DRDC) Suffield and its aim is to develop coordinated teams of unmanned vehicles (UxVs) for urban environments. This paper will discuss the critical science being addressed by DRDC developing semi-autonomous systems.

  12. T-Shaped Frame Critical and Post-Critical Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doicheva, Albena

    2016-03-01

    The paper shows solution of a T-shaped frame, strength- ened with two linear springs, regarding critical and post-critical analysis. The solution is exact using the Euler elastic approach and the frame of reference, originated in the point of column axis inflexion. The derived Numerical results show the effect of the springs strengthening for the crit- ical and the post-critical system behaviour. The influence of the geometry change is analyzed, as well.

  13. The microbiome and critical illness.

    PubMed

    Dickson, Robert P

    2016-01-01

    The central role of the microbiome in critical illness is supported by a half century of experimental and clinical study. The physiological effects of critical illness and the clinical interventions of intensive care substantially alter the microbiome. In turn, the microbiome predicts patients' susceptibility to disease, and manipulation of the microbiome has prevented or modulated critical illness in animal models and clinical trials. This Review surveys the microbial ecology of critically ill patients, presents the facts and unanswered questions surrounding gut-derived sepsis, and explores the radically altered ecosystem of the injured alveolus. The revolution in culture-independent microbiology has provided the tools needed to target the microbiome rationally for the prevention and treatment of critical illness, holding great promise to improve the acute and chronic outcomes of the critically ill. PMID:26700442

  14. Electron profile stiffness and critical gradient studies

    SciTech Connect

    DeBoo, J. C.; Petty, C. C.; Burrell, K. H.; Smith, S. P.; White, A. E.; Doyle, E. J.; Hillesheim, J. C.; Rhodes, T. L.; Schmitz, L.; Wang, G.; Zeng, L.; Holland, C.; McKee, G. R.

    2012-08-15

    Electron profile stiffness was studied in DIII-D L-mode discharges by systematically varying the heat flux in a narrow region with electron cyclotron heating and measuring the local change produced in {nabla}T{sub e}. Electron stiffness was found to slowly increase with toroidal rotation velocity. A critical inverse temperature gradient scale length 1/L{sub C} {approx} 3 m{sup -1} was identified at {rho}=0.6 and found to be independent of rotation. Both the heat pulse diffusivity and the power balance diffusivity, the latter determined by integrating the measured dependence of the heat pulse diffusivity on -{nabla}T{sub e}, were fit reasonably well by a model containing a critical inverse temperature gradient scale length and varying linearly with 1/L{sub T} above the threshold.

  15. Representative equations for the thermodynamic and transport properties of fluids near the gas-liquid critical point

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sengers, J. V.; Basu, R. S.; Sengers, J. M. H. L.

    1981-01-01

    A survey is presented of representative equations for various thermophysical properties of fluids in the critical region. Representative equations for the transport properties are included. Semi-empirical modifications of the theoretically predicted asymtotic critical behavior that yield simple and practical representations of the fluid properties in the critical region are emphasized.

  16. Television Criticism: A Deca-Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oseguera, A. Anthony

    Noting that one of the greatest criticisms of television is the lack of television criticism itself, this paper proposes a multidimensional approach to the subject, based on current forms of criticism and theory. The 10 forms of criticism or theory discussed in the paper are (1) rhetorical criticism, (2) dramatic criticism, (3) literary criticism,…

  17. The Liver in Critical Illness.

    PubMed

    Damm, Tessa W; Kramer, David J

    2016-07-01

    Caring for critically ill patients with acute and/or chronic liver dysfunction poses a unique challenge. Proper resuscitation and early consideration for transfer to liver transplant centers have resulted in improved outcomes. Liver support devices and cellular models have not yet shown mortality benefit, but they hold promise in the critical care of patients with liver disease. This article reviews pertinent anatomic and physiologic considerations of the liver in critical illness, followed by a selective review of associated organ dysfunction. PMID:27339681

  18. Protein requirement in critical illness.

    PubMed

    Hoffer, Leonard John

    2016-05-01

    How much protein do critically ill patients require? For the many decades that nutritional support has been used there was a broad consensus that critically ill patients need much more protein than required for normal health. Now, however, some clinical investigators recommend limiting all macronutrient provision during the early phase of critical illness. How did these conflicting recommendations emerge? Which of them is correct? This review explains the longstanding recommendation for generous protein provision in critical illness, analyzes the clinical trials now being claimed to refute it, and concludes with suggestions for clinical investigation and practice. PMID:26914090

  19. Critical Viscosity of Xenon investigators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Dr. Dr. Robert F. Berg (right), principal investigator and Dr. Micheal R. Moldover (left), co-investigator, for the Critical Viscosity of Xenon (CVX/CVX-2) experiment. They are with the National Institutes of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD. The Critical Viscosity of Xenon Experiment (CVX-2) on the STS-107 Research 1 mission in 2002 will measure the viscous behavior of xenon, a heavy inert gas used in flash lamps and ion rocket engines, at its critical point. Although it does not easily combine with other chemicals, its viscosity at the critical point can be used as a model for a range of chemicals.

  20. TUM Critical Zone Observatory, Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Völkel, Jörg; Eden, Marie

    2014-05-01

    Founded 2011 the TUM Critical Zone Observatory run by the Technische Universität München and partners abroad is the first CZO within Germany. TUM CZO is both, a scientific as well as an education project. It is a watershed based observatory, but moving behind this focus. In fact, two mountainous areas are integrated: (1) The Ammer Catchment area as an alpine and pre alpine research area in the northern limestone Alps and forelands south of Munich; (2) the Otter Creek Catchment in the Bavarian Forest with a crystalline setting (Granite, Gneiss) as a mid mountainous area near Regensburg; and partly the mountainous Bavarian Forest National Park. The Ammer Catchment is a high energy system as well as a sensitive climate system with past glacial elements. The lithology shows mostly carbonates from Tertiary and Mesozoic times (e.g. Flysch). Source-to-sink processes are characteristic for the Ammer Catchment down to the last glacial Ammer Lake as the regional erosion and deposition base. The consideration of distal depositional environments, the integration of upstream and downstream landscape effects are characteristic for the Ammer Catchment as well. Long term datasets exist in many regards. The Otter Creek catchment area is developed in a granitic environment, rich in saprolites. As a mid mountainous catchment the energy system is facing lower stage. Hence, it is ideal comparing both of them. Both TUM CZO Catchments: The selected catchments capture the depositional environment. Both catchment areas include historical impacts and rapid land use change. Crosscutting themes across both sites are inbuilt. Questions of ability to capture such gradients along climosequence, chronosequence, anthroposequence are essential.

  1. How Critical Is Critical Thinking? FACTC Focus, 2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doerr, Mark, Ed.

    2010-01-01

    "FACTC Focus" is a publication of Faculty Association of Community and Technical Colleges (FACTC) with the purpose of presenting diverse views on faculty issues. Included in this issue are: (1) LOL: The Easy ROUTE TO Critical Thinking (Barbara B. Parsons); (2) Critical Thinking: We Know It When We (Don't) See It (Jared Anthony); (3) Critical…

  2. Do Critical Thinking Exercises Improve Critical Thinking Skills?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cotter, Ellen M.; Tally, Carrie Sacco

    2009-01-01

    Although textbooks routinely include exercises to improve critical thinking skills, the effectiveness of these exercises has not been closely examined. Additionally, the connection between critical thinking skills and formal operational thought is also relatively understudied. In the study reported here, college students completed measures of…

  3. Discipline-Based Art Education: Its Criticisms and Its Critics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eisner, Elliot W.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the criticisms of discipline-based art education published in the March 1988 issue of "Art Education." Responds to the arguments of Peter London, Helen Muth, Norma K. Pittard, and Karen Hamblen. States that art education would be better served if the energy devoted to criticism was directed toward constructive ends. (GEA)

  4. A new conceptual framework for academic health centers.

    PubMed

    Borden, William B; Mushlin, Alvin I; Gordon, Jonathan E; Leiman, Joan M; Pardes, Herbert

    2015-05-01

    Led by the Affordable Care Act, the U.S. health care system is undergoing a transformative shift toward greater accountability for quality and efficiency. Academic health centers (AHCs), whose triple mission of clinical care, research, and education serves a critical role in the country's health care system, must adapt to this evolving environment. Doing so successfully, however, requires a broader understanding of the wide-ranging roles of the AHC. This article proposes a conceptual framework through which the triple mission is expanded along four new dimensions: health, innovation, community, and policy. Examples within the conceptual framework categories, such as the AHCs' safety net function, their contributions to local economies, and their role in right-sizing the health care workforce, illustrate how each of these dimensions provides a more robust picture of the modern AHC and demonstrates the value added by AHCs. This conceptual framework also offers a basis for developing new performance metrics by which AHCs, both individually and as a group, can be held accountable, and that can inform policy decisions affecting them. This closer examination of the myriad activities of modern AHCs clarifies their essential role in our health care system and will enable these institutions to evolve, improve, be held accountable for, and more fully serve the health of the nation. PMID:25785679

  5. Critical market crashes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sornette, D.

    2003-04-01

    patterns have been documented for essentially all crashes on developed as well as emergent stock markets, on currency markets, on company stocks, and so on. We review this discovery at length and demonstrate how to use this insight and the detailed predictions obtained from these models to forecast crashes. For this, we review the major crashes of the past that occurred on the major stock markets of the planet and describe the empirical evidence of the universal nature of the critical log-periodic precursory signature of crashes. The concept of an “anti-bubble” is also summarized, with the Japanese collapse from the beginning of 1991 to present, taken as a prominent example. A prediction issued and advertised in January 1999 has been until recently born out with remarkable precision, predicting correctly several changes of trends, a feat notoriously difficult using standard techniques of economic forecasting. We also summarize a very recent analysis the behavior of the U.S. S&P500 index from 1996 to August 2002 and the forecast for the two following years. We conclude by presenting our view of the organization of financial markets.

  6. RHIC CRITICAL POINT SEARCH: ASSESSING STARs CAPABILITIES.

    SciTech Connect

    SORENSEN,P.

    2006-07-03

    In this report we discuss the capabilities and limitations of the STAR detector to search for signatures of the QCD critical point in a low energy scan at RHIC. We find that a RHIC low energy scan will cover a broad region of interest in the nuclear matter phase diagram and that the STAR detector--a detector designed to measure the quantities that will be of interest in this search--will provide new observables and improve on previous measurements in this energy range.

  7. The Importance of Critical Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Janks, Hilary

    2012-01-01

    This paper is divided into three parts. It begins by making an argument for the ongoing importance of critical literacy at a moment when there are mutterings about its being passe. The second part of the paper formulates the argument with the use of illustrative texts. It concludes with examples of critical literacy activities that I argue, are…

  8. Harnessing Critical Incidents for Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patahuddin, Sitti Maesuri; Lowrie, Tom

    2015-01-01

    A critical incident is a situation or event that holds significance for learning, both for the students and teachers. This paper presents four examples of critical incidents from a Year 7 teacher's lesson excerpts in Indonesia involving teaching of fractions, to show how they shaped classroom situation, brought forward elements of conflict, and…

  9. Critical Pedagogy in Health Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    Objective: This review investigated how the three-phase model of critical pedagogy, based on the writings of Paulo Freire, can be put into practice in health education. Design: The study considers literature related to the fields of health education, health promotion and critical pedagogy. Setting: The study is a scholarly review completed as part…

  10. Continuous-time adaptive critics.

    PubMed

    Hanselmann, Thomas; Noakes, Lyle; Zaknich, Anthony

    2007-05-01

    A continuous-time formulation of an adaptive critic design (ACD) is investigated. Connections to the discrete case are made, where backpropagation through time (BPTT) and real-time recurrent learning (RTRL) are prevalent. Practical benefits are that this framework fits in well with plant descriptions given by differential equations and that any standard integration routine with adaptive step-size does an adaptive sampling for free. A second-order actor adaptation using Newton's method is established for fast actor convergence for a general plant and critic. Also, a fast critic update for concurrent actor-critic training is introduced to immediately apply necessary adjustments of critic parameters induced by actor updates to keep the Bellman optimality correct to first-order approximation after actor changes. Thus, critic and actor updates may be performed at the same time until some substantial error build up in the Bellman optimality or temporal difference equation, when a traditional critic training needs to be performed and then another interval of concurrent actor-critic training may resume. PMID:17526332

  11. Understanding Friendship between Critical Friends

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibbs, Paul; Angelides, Panayiotis

    2008-01-01

    This conceptual article discusses the issue of friendship implied by the term "critical friends". Our argument relates to the generalized use of the term "friendship" and the assumptions that it may carry compared with the actuality of the roles played by critical friends. We attempt to build a more precise definition of friendship which we…

  12. Scrutiny of Critical Thinking Concept

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atabaki, Ali Mohammad Siahi; Keshtiaray, Narges; Yarmohammadian, Mohammad H.

    2015-01-01

    Learning critical thinking skills are the goal of educational systems so the term "critical thinking" (CT) is frequently found in educational policy documents. Despite this frequency, however, precise understandings among teachers of what CT really means do not exit. The present study is designed to answer the following question. We can…

  13. Traditional Literacy and Critical Thinking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dando, Priscille

    2016-01-01

    How school librarians focus on activating critical thinking through traditional literacy development can proactively set the stage for the deep thinking that occurs in all literacy development. The critical-thinking skills students build while becoming accomplished readers and writers provide the foundation for learning in a variety of…

  14. Democratic Education and Critical Pedagogy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knight, Tony; Pearl, Art

    2000-01-01

    Makes the case for democratic education, criticizing critical pedagogy for its absence of a coherent, testable theory, lack of understanding of democracy, and inapplicability to the reality of classroom experiences. The paper presents six attributes of democracy that are generally recognized and applies them to education, adding a seventh that…

  15. Willa Cather as Drama Critic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jensen, Marvin D.

    Although Willa Cather is known primarily for her short fiction and novels, she began her writing career as a literary and drama critic while still a student at the University of Nebraska. Her writing experience with the university literary periodical led her to become the drama critic for the "Nebraska State Journal," and later for the "Lincoln…

  16. Critical Thinking in Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Humphries, Charlotte

    2014-01-01

    Changes in American education require that teachers are evaluated more often, and expectations increasingly include teaching to develop critical thinking skills. This article uses Bloom's taxonomy in describing ways physical educators can include critical thinking in their lessons, both to enhance their teaching and to meet expectations of…

  17. The Oilcan Theory of Criticism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blocker, H. Gene

    1975-01-01

    In teaching criticism, the author argued for the need to focus on the goal of critical discussion in real aesthetic contexts, placing emphasis more on the social dynamics of aesthetic debate than on the formal determination of truth and falsity. (Author/RK)

  18. Critical thinking in physics education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadidi, Farahnaz

    2016-07-01

    We agree that training the next generation of leaders of the society, who have the ability to think critically and form a better judgment is an important goal. It is a long-standing concern of Educators and a long-term desire of teachers to establish a method in order to teach to think critically. To this end, many questions arise on three central aspects: the definition, the evaluation and the design of the course: What is Critical Thinking? How can we define Critical Thinking? How can we evaluate Critical Thinking? Therefore, we want to implement Critical Thinking in physics education. How can we teach for Critical Thinking in physics? What should the course syllabus and materials be? We present examples from classical physics and give perspectives for astro-particle physics. The main aim of this paper is to answer the questions and provide teachers with the opportunity to change their classroom to an active one, in which students are encouraged to ask questions and learn to reach a good judgment. Key words: Critical Thinking, evaluation, judgment, design of the course.

  19. Diagnosing Disputes in Film Criticism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schultz, Robert A.

    1979-01-01

    By classifying and analyzing actual disputes in film criticism, the author considers the following questions: Are there connections between film theory and film criticism? If so, which are healthy and which are diseased? If not, what alternative healthy function might film theory have? (Author/SJL)

  20. Critical Issues Facing School Principals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Styron, Ronald A., Jr.; Styron, Jennifer L.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to further extend research initially conducted in 2003 pertaining to the critical issues K-12 principals address on a daily basis. The study involved surveying school principals within the state of Mississippi to discover the critical issues they identified, the significance level of these issues, and the rationale…

  1. Cabbage Worms and Critical Thinking.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braswell, Patricia

    1993-01-01

    Argues that an approach to composition instruction that emphasizes critical thinking skills produces a more analytical writer. Describes a school project that examined research on critical thinking, implemented changes in the teaching of thinking and composition, and assessed student learning. (HB)

  2. Quantifying Learning in Critical Thinking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fliegel, Richard; Holland, John

    2013-01-01

    This article describes a three-year study assessing change in critical thinking demonstrated in essays written for regular class assignments. A rubric was designed and scorers trained to assess critical thinking holistically without knowledge of the writing prompt or author's status. The longitudinal improvement in scores earned by freshmen…

  3. A Place for Critical Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beck, Ann S.

    2005-01-01

    The critical literacy classroom is characterized by an emphasis on students' voices and on dialogue as a tool with which students reflect on and construct meanings from texts and discourses. Is it appropriate, however, to teach critical literacy in settings such as penal institutions where student voices are deliberately discouraged and silenced?…

  4. Education Studies: Issues & Critical Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kassem, Derek; Mufti, Emmanuel; Robinson, John

    2006-01-01

    This major text for Education Studies students provides a critical account of key issues in education today. The text features: (1) A critical analysis of key issues in Education Studies to encourage students' thinking about education in the broadest terms; (2) Themed sections with introductions to link the issues discussed in each chapter; (3)…

  5. Interplay of critical Casimir and dispersion forces.

    PubMed

    Dantchev, Daniel; Schlesener, Frank; Dietrich, S

    2007-07-01

    Using general scaling arguments combined with mean-field theory we investigate the critical (T approximately Tc) and off-critical (T not equal Tc) behavior of the Casimir forces in fluid films of thickness L governed by dispersion forces and exposed to long-ranged substrate potentials which are taken to be equal on both sides of the film. We study the resulting effective force acting on the confining substrates as a function of T and of the chemical potential mu. We find that the total force is attractive both below and above Tc. If, however, the direct substrate-substrate contribution is subtracted, the force is repulsive everywhere except near the bulk critical point (Tc, mu(c)), where critical density fluctuations arise, or except at low temperatures and (L/a)(beta(Delta)(mu))=O(1), with Delta(mu)=mu-mu(c)<0 and a the characteristic distance between the molecules of the fluid, i.e., in the capillary condensation regime. While near the critical point the maximal amplitude of the attractive force if of order of L(-d) in the capillary condensation regime the force is much stronger with maximal amplitude decaying as L(-1). In the latter regime we observe that the long-ranged tails of the fluid-fluid and the substrate-fluid interactions further increase that amplitude in comparison with systems with short-range interactions only. Although in the critical region the system under consideration asymptotically belongs to the Ising universality class with short-ranged forces, we find deviations from the standard finite-size scaling for xi(ln)(xi/xi0(+/-)) >L even for xi, L>xi0(+/-), where xi[t=(T-Tc)/Tc-->+/-0,Delta(mu)=0]=xi0(+/-)/t/-nu, is the bulk correlation length. In this regime the dominant finite-size contributions to the free energy and to the force stem from the long-ranged algebraically decaying tails of the interactions; they are not exponentially small in L, as it is the case there in systems governed by purely short-ranged interactions, but exhibit a power

  6. Alerting of Laboratory Critical Values

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Sang Hoon; Park, Kyoung Un; Song, Junghan; Paik, Hyeon Young; Lee, Chi Woo; Bang, Su Mi; Hong, Joon Seok; Lee, Hyun Joo; Cho, In-Sook; Kim, Jeong Ah; Kim, Hyun-Young; Kim, Yoon

    Critical value is defined as a result suggesting that the patient is in danger unless appropriate action is taken immediately. We designed an automated reporting system of critical values and evaluated its performance. Fifteen critical values were defined and 2-4 doctors were assigned to receive short message service (SMS).Laboratory results in LIS and EMR were called back to the DIA server. The rule engine named U-brain in the CDSS server was run in real-time and decision if the laboratory data was critical was made. The CDSS system for alerting of laboratory critical values was fast and stable without additional burden to the entire EMR system. Continuous communication with clinicians and feedback of clinical performance are mandatory for the refinement and development of user-friendly CDSS contents. Appropriate clinical parameters are necessary for demonstration of the usefulness of the system.

  7. Appalachian Regional Commission: 1984 Annual Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Appalachian Regional Commission, Washington, DC.

    Federal appropriations totalling over $162 million during fiscal year 1984 enabled the Appalachian Regional Commission (ARC) to attack the region's most critical needs. Area development appropriations ($43 million) were used to create almost 10,550 new jobs and retain nearly 4,100 jobs, give special assistance to Appalachia's neediest 80 counties…

  8. Griffiths phases and the stretching of criticality in brain networks.

    PubMed

    Moretti, Paolo; Muñoz, Miguel A

    2013-01-01

    Hallmarks of criticality, such as power-laws and scale invariance, have been empirically found in cortical-network dynamics and it has been conjectured that operating at criticality entails functional advantages, such as optimal computational capabilities, memory and large dynamical ranges. As critical behaviour requires a high degree of fine tuning to emerge, some type of self-tuning mechanism needs to be invoked. Here we show that, taking into account the complex hierarchical-modular architecture of cortical networks, the singular critical point is replaced by an extended critical-like region that corresponds--in the jargon of statistical mechanics--to a Griffiths phase. Using computational and analytical approaches, we find Griffiths phases in synthetic hierarchical networks and also in empirical brain networks such as the human connectome and that of Caenorhabditis elegans. Stretched critical regions, stemming from structural disorder, yield enhanced functionality in a generic way, facilitating the task of self-organizing, adaptive and evolutionary mechanisms selecting for criticality. PMID:24088740

  9. Griffiths phases and the stretching of criticality in brain networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moretti, Paolo; Muñoz, Miguel A.

    2013-10-01

    Hallmarks of criticality, such as power-laws and scale invariance, have been empirically found in cortical-network dynamics and it has been conjectured that operating at criticality entails functional advantages, such as optimal computational capabilities, memory and large dynamical ranges. As critical behaviour requires a high degree of fine tuning to emerge, some type of self-tuning mechanism needs to be invoked. Here we show that, taking into account the complex hierarchical-modular architecture of cortical networks, the singular critical point is replaced by an extended critical-like region that corresponds—in the jargon of statistical mechanics—to a Griffiths phase. Using computational and analytical approaches, we find Griffiths phases in synthetic hierarchical networks and also in empirical brain networks such as the human connectome and that of Caenorhabditis elegans. Stretched critical regions, stemming from structural disorder, yield enhanced functionality in a generic way, facilitating the task of self-organizing, adaptive and evolutionary mechanisms selecting for criticality.

  10. Electron stars for holographic metallic criticality

    SciTech Connect

    Hartnoll, Sean A.; Tavanfar, Alireza

    2011-02-15

    We refer to the ground state of a gravitating, charged ideal fluid of fermions held at a finite chemical potential as an ''electron star.'' In a holographic setting, electron stars are candidate gravity duals for strongly interacting finite fermion density systems. We show how electron stars develop an emergent Lifshitz scaling at low energies. This IR scaling region is a consequence of the two-way interaction between emergent quantum critical bosonic modes and the finite density of fermions. By integrating from the IR region to an asymptotically AdS{sub 4} spacetime, we compute basic properties of the electron stars, including their electrical conductivity. We emphasize the challenge of connecting UV and IR physics in strongly interacting finite density systems.

  11. Photodissociation Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollenbach, David J.; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The interstellar medium of galaxies is the reservoir out of which stars are born and into which stars inject newly created elements as they age. The physical properties of the interstellar medium are governed in part by the radiation emitted by these stars. Far-ultraviolet (6 eV< hNu < 13.6 eV) photons from massive stars dominate the heating and influence the chemistry of the neutral atomic gas and much of the molecular gas in galaxies. Predominantly neutral regions of the interstellar medium in which the heating and chemistry are regulated by far ultraviolet photons are termed Photodissociation Regions (PDRs). These regions are the origin of most of the non-stellar infrared (IR) and the millimeter and submillimeter CO emission from galaxies. The importance of PDRs has become increasingly apparent with the advances in IR and submillimeter astronomy. The IR emission from PDRs includes fine structure lines of C, C(+) and O; rovibrational lines of H2; rotational lines of CO; broad mid-IR features of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons; and a luminous underlying IR continuum from interstellar dust. The transition of H to H2 and C(+) to CO occurs within PDRs. Comparison of observations with theoretical models of PDRs enables one to determine the density and temperature structure, the elemental abundances, the level of ionization, and the radiation field. PDR models have been applied to interstellar clouds near massive stars, planetary nebulae, red giant outflows, photoevaporating planetary disks around newly formed stars, diffuse clouds, the neutral intercloud medium, and molecular clouds in the interstellar radiation field-in summary, much of the interstellar medium in galaxies. Theoretical PDR models explain the observed correlations of the [CII] 158, micrometers with the CO J=1-0 emission, the CO J=1-0 luminosity with the interstellar molecular mass, and the [CII] 158 micrometers plus [OI] 63 micrometers luminosity with the IR continuum luminosity. On a more global

  12. Bures metric over thermal state manifolds and quantum criticality

    SciTech Connect

    Zanardi, Paolo; Campos Venuti, Lorenzo; Giorda, Paolo

    2007-12-15

    We analyze the Bures metric over the manifold of thermal density matrices for systems featuring a zero temperature quantum phase transition. We show that the quantum critical region can be characterized in terms of the temperature scaling behavior of the metric tensor itself. Furthermore, the analysis of the metric tensor when both temperature and an external field are varied, allows one to complement the understanding of the phase diagram including crossover regions which are not characterized by any singular behavior. These results provide a further extension of the scope of the metric approach to quantum criticality.

  13. Implication of Migration Pattern For Critical Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Y.; Rundle, J. B.

    2012-12-01

    Seismicity migration has been shown by improved pattern informatics (PI) method in retrospective studies. The retrospective studies also show that the migration patterns are dependent on the tectonic setting and parameters used in statistical calculation. For the purpose of a forecast, the critical parameters for a specified efficient forecast period have to be learned. In this study we propose that a forecast and its critical parameters, that is, the magnitude and precursory time, can be learned from a series of empirical migration patterns. We also make the forecast with half year of efficient forecast period for three densely populated seismic regions in Taiwan, Japan, and California based on the migration patterns. The seismic catalog in each region was cut in depth according to the seismogenic layer. Considering the activity of seismicity, the cut magnitudes Mc are given at 3.0, 3.5, and 4.0. The magnitude Mt of the target events are 5.0, 5.5, and 6.0, but the eventual magnitude of the event which can be forecast was determined by the performance of the migration pattern. We calculate the migration pattern with different cut magnitudes and time parameters and count the number of migration hotspots Nhs and the number of hit hotspots Nhit; the migration hotspots means the grids which seismicity migrate toward and the hit hotspots are the migration hotspots with M>Mt target events occurred in the following efficient time on them. The performance of the migration pattern depends both on the ratio of the number of hit hotspots Nhit to the number of target event Nevent which occurred in the following efficient time and the ratio Nhit/Nhs. Giving the criteria of the performance that highest Nhit/Nhs with Nhit/Nevent=1, we obtained the critical parameters for each region. In western Taiwan, the M>=5 events can be forecast using earthquakes with cut magnitude 4.0 and the total precursory time could be about 2.5 years. In Kanto region, the M>=5 events can be forecast

  14. On the criticality of inferred models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mastromatteo, Iacopo; Marsili, Matteo

    2011-10-01

    Advanced inference techniques allow one to reconstruct a pattern of interaction from high dimensional data sets, from probing simultaneously thousands of units of extended systems—such as cells, neural tissues and financial markets. We focus here on the statistical properties of inferred models and argue that inference procedures are likely to yield models which are close to singular values of parameters, akin to critical points in physics where phase transitions occur. These are points where the response of physical systems to external perturbations, as measured by the susceptibility, is very large and diverges in the limit of infinite size. We show that the reparameterization invariant metrics in the space of probability distributions of these models (the Fisher information) are directly related to the susceptibility of the inferred model. As a result, distinguishable models tend to accumulate close to critical points, where the susceptibility diverges in infinite systems. This region is the one where the estimate of inferred parameters is most stable. In order to illustrate these points, we discuss inference of interacting point processes with application to financial data and show that sensible choices of observation time scales naturally yield models which are close to criticality.

  15. Adaptive critics for dynamic optimization.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Raghavendra V; Venayagamoorthy, Ganesh Kumar

    2010-06-01

    A novel action-dependent adaptive critic design (ACD) is developed for dynamic optimization. The proposed combination of a particle swarm optimization-based actor and a neural network critic is demonstrated through dynamic sleep scheduling of wireless sensor motes for wildlife monitoring. The objective of the sleep scheduler is to dynamically adapt the sleep duration to node's battery capacity and movement pattern of animals in its environment in order to obtain snapshots of the animal on its trajectory uniformly. Simulation results show that the sleep time of the node determined by the actor critic yields superior quality of sensory data acquisition and enhanced node longevity. PMID:20223635

  16. Critical appraisal of clinical guidelines.

    PubMed

    Netsch, Debra S; Kluesner, Jean A

    2010-01-01

    Utilization of clinical guidelines is gaining in popularity due to their significant impact on clinical practice. While a plethora of guidelines exist, many are lacking in quality, based on current critical appraisal standards. It then becomes necessary for the end users of the guidelines to adopt or develop those that are deemed adequate for implementation. This often requires that users possess critical appraisal skills as they become proficient in discerning between guidelines of varying quality. This article provides direction and tools to support the critical appraisal process in the adoption of clinical guidelines. PMID:20838314

  17. Regional Renewable Energy Cooperatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazendonk, P.; Brown, M. B.; Byrne, J. M.; Harrison, T.; Mueller, R.; Peacock, K.; Usher, J.; Yalamova, R.; Kroebel, R.; Larsen, J.; McNaughton, R.

    2014-12-01

    We are building a multidisciplinary research program linking researchers in agriculture, business, earth science, engineering, humanities and social science. Our goal is to match renewable energy supply and reformed energy demands. The program will be focused on (i) understanding and modifying energy demand, (ii) design and implementation of diverse renewable energy networks. Geomatics technology will be used to map existing energy and waste flows on a neighbourhood, municipal, and regional level. Optimal sites and combinations of sites for solar and wind electrical generation (ridges, rooftops, valley walls) will be identified. Geomatics based site and grid analyses will identify best locations for energy production based on efficient production and connectivity to regional grids and transportation. Design of networks for utilization of waste streams of heat, water, animal and human waste for energy production will be investigated. Agriculture, cities and industry produce many waste streams that are not well utilized. Therefore, establishing a renewable energy resource mapping and planning program for electrical generation, waste heat and energy recovery, biomass collection, and biochar, biodiesel and syngas production is critical to regional energy optimization. Electrical storage and demand management are two priorities that will be investigated. Regional scale cooperatives may use electric vehicle batteries and innovations such as pump storage and concentrated solar molten salt heat storage for steam turbine electrical generation. Energy demand management is poorly explored in Canada and elsewhere - our homes and businesses operate on an unrestricted demand. Simple monitoring and energy demand-ranking software can easily reduce peaks demands and move lower ranked uses to non-peak periods, thereby reducing the grid size needed to meet peak demands. Peak demand strains the current energy grid capacity and often requires demand balancing projects and

  18. Autoclave nuclear criticality safety analysis

    SciTech Connect

    D`Aquila, D.M.; Tayloe, R.W. Jr.

    1991-12-31

    Steam-heated autoclaves are used in gaseous diffusion uranium enrichment plants to heat large cylinders of UF{sub 6}. Nuclear criticality safety for these autoclaves is evaluated. To enhance criticality safety, systems are incorporated into the design of autoclaves to limit the amount of water present. These safety systems also increase the likelihood that any UF{sub 6} inadvertently released from a cylinder into an autoclave is not released to the environment. Up to 140 pounds of water can be held up in large autoclaves. This mass of water is sufficient to support a nuclear criticality when optimally combined with 125 pounds of UF{sub 6} enriched to 5 percent U{sup 235}. However, water in autoclaves is widely dispersed as condensed droplets and vapor, and is extremely unlikely to form a critical configuration with released UF{sub 6}.

  19. Nonadditivity of critical Casimir forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paladugu, Sathyanarayana; Callegari, Agnese; Tuna, Yazgan; Barth, Lukas; Dietrich, Siegfried; Gambassi, Andrea; Volpe, Giovanni

    2016-04-01

    In soft condensed matter physics, effective interactions often emerge due to the spatial confinement of fluctuating fields. For instance, microscopic particles dissolved in a binary liquid mixture are subject to critical Casimir forces whenever their surfaces confine the thermal fluctuations of the order parameter of the solvent close to its critical demixing point. These forces are theoretically predicted to be nonadditive on the scale set by the bulk correlation length of the fluctuations. Here we provide direct experimental evidence of this fact by reporting the measurement of the associated many-body forces. We consider three colloidal particles in optical traps and observe that the critical Casimir force exerted on one of them by the other two differs from the sum of the forces they exert separately. This three-body effect depends sensitively on the distance from the critical point and on the chemical functionalisation of the colloid surfaces.

  20. HELIOS Critical Design Review: Reliability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benoehr, H. C.; Herholz, J.; Prem, H.; Mann, D.; Reichert, L.; Rupp, W.; Campbell, D.; Boettger, H.; Zerwes, G.; Kurvin, C.

    1972-01-01

    This paper presents Helios Critical Design Review Reliability form October 16-20, 1972. The topics include: 1) Reliability Requirement; 2) Reliability Apportionment; 3) Failure Rates; 4) Reliability Assessment; 5) Reliability Block Diagram; and 5) Reliability Information Sheet.

  1. Nonadditivity of critical Casimir forces.

    PubMed

    Paladugu, Sathyanarayana; Callegari, Agnese; Tuna, Yazgan; Barth, Lukas; Dietrich, Siegfried; Gambassi, Andrea; Volpe, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    In soft condensed matter physics, effective interactions often emerge due to the spatial confinement of fluctuating fields. For instance, microscopic particles dissolved in a binary liquid mixture are subject to critical Casimir forces whenever their surfaces confine the thermal fluctuations of the order parameter of the solvent close to its critical demixing point. These forces are theoretically predicted to be nonadditive on the scale set by the bulk correlation length of the fluctuations. Here we provide direct experimental evidence of this fact by reporting the measurement of the associated many-body forces. We consider three colloidal particles in optical traps and observe that the critical Casimir force exerted on one of them by the other two differs from the sum of the forces they exert separately. This three-body effect depends sensitively on the distance from the critical point and on the chemical functionalisation of the colloid surfaces. PMID:27097797

  2. Television Criticism: A Multifarious Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oseguera, A. Anthony

    Recognizing the need for a multifarious approach to television, this paper provides the reader with the following multidimensional approaches to television criticism: rhetorical, dramatic, literary, cinematic, content analysis, myth, linguistics, semiotics, phenomenalism, phenomenology, interpersonal communication, public relations, image,…

  3. Identity Politics and Critical Pedagogy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bromley, Hank

    1989-01-01

    This essay investigates what identity politics may have to contribute to the reformation of Marxist theories of education through considering how it would theorize the practice of explicitly critical pedagogy. (IAH)

  4. Critical Theory in Historical Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardt, Hanno

    1986-01-01

    Reviews two books by Martin Jay on the intellectual history of Western Marxism and critical theory "in exile" that detail the complex foundations of an ideological critique of culture and society and evaluates their meaning for communications scholarship. (JD)

  5. Critical Barriers to Science Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawkins, David

    1978-01-01

    The author illustrates and discusses some critical barrier phenomena, such as the optics of mirrors and heat and cold, which most people have difficulty extending beyond an everyday understanding. (Author/MA)

  6. Nonadditivity of critical Casimir forces

    PubMed Central

    Paladugu, Sathyanarayana; Callegari, Agnese; Tuna, Yazgan; Barth, Lukas; Dietrich, Siegfried; Gambassi, Andrea; Volpe, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    In soft condensed matter physics, effective interactions often emerge due to the spatial confinement of fluctuating fields. For instance, microscopic particles dissolved in a binary liquid mixture are subject to critical Casimir forces whenever their surfaces confine the thermal fluctuations of the order parameter of the solvent close to its critical demixing point. These forces are theoretically predicted to be nonadditive on the scale set by the bulk correlation length of the fluctuations. Here we provide direct experimental evidence of this fact by reporting the measurement of the associated many-body forces. We consider three colloidal particles in optical traps and observe that the critical Casimir force exerted on one of them by the other two differs from the sum of the forces they exert separately. This three-body effect depends sensitively on the distance from the critical point and on the chemical functionalisation of the colloid surfaces. PMID:27097797

  7. Critical rolling angle of microparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farzi, Bahman; Vallabh, Chaitanya K. P.; Stephens, James D.; Cetinkaya, Cetin

    2016-03-01

    At the micrometer-scale and below, particle adhesion becomes particularly relevant as van der Waals force often dominates volume and surface proportional forces. The rolling resistance of microparticles and their critical rolling angles prior to the initiation of free-rolling and/or complete detachment are critical in numerous industrial processes and natural phenomenon involving particle adhesion and granular dynamics. The current work describes a non-contact measurement approach for determining the critical rolling angle of a single microparticle under the influence of a contact-point base-excitation generated by a transient displacement field of a prescribed surface acoustic wave pulse and reports the critical rolling angle data for a set of polystyrene latex microparticles.

  8. Lecture notes for criticality safety

    SciTech Connect

    Fullwood, R.

    1992-03-01

    These lecture notes for criticality safety are prepared for the training of Department of Energy supervisory, project management, and administrative staff. Technical training and basic mathematics are assumed. The notes are designed for a two-day course, taught by two lecturers. Video tapes may be used at the options of the instructors. The notes provide all the materials that are necessary but outside reading will assist in the fullest understanding. The course begins with a nuclear physics overview. The reader is led from the macroscopic world into the microscopic world of atoms and the elementary particles that constitute atoms. The particles, their masses and sizes and properties associated with radioactive decay and fission are introduced along with Einstein`s mass-energy equivalence. Radioactive decay, nuclear reactions, radiation penetration, shielding and health-effects are discussed to understand protection in case of a criticality accident. Fission, the fission products, particles and energy released are presented to appreciate the dangers of criticality. Nuclear cross sections are introduced to understand the effectiveness of slow neutrons to produce fission. Chain reactors are presented as an economy; effective use of the neutrons from fission leads to more fission resulting in a power reactor or a criticality excursion. The six-factor formula is presented for managing the neutron budget. This leads to concepts of material and geometric buckling which are used in simple calculations to assure safety from criticality. Experimental measurements and computer code calculations of criticality are discussed. To emphasize the reality, historical criticality accidents are presented in a table with major ones discussed to provide lessons-learned. Finally, standards, NRC guides and regulations, and DOE orders relating to criticality protection are presented.

  9. Lecture notes for criticality safety

    SciTech Connect

    Fullwood, R.

    1992-03-01

    These lecture notes for criticality safety are prepared for the training of Department of Energy supervisory, project management, and administrative staff. Technical training and basic mathematics are assumed. The notes are designed for a two-day course, taught by two lecturers. Video tapes may be used at the options of the instructors. The notes provide all the materials that are necessary but outside reading will assist in the fullest understanding. The course begins with a nuclear physics overview. The reader is led from the macroscopic world into the microscopic world of atoms and the elementary particles that constitute atoms. The particles, their masses and sizes and properties associated with radioactive decay and fission are introduced along with Einstein's mass-energy equivalence. Radioactive decay, nuclear reactions, radiation penetration, shielding and health-effects are discussed to understand protection in case of a criticality accident. Fission, the fission products, particles and energy released are presented to appreciate the dangers of criticality. Nuclear cross sections are introduced to understand the effectiveness of slow neutrons to produce fission. Chain reactors are presented as an economy; effective use of the neutrons from fission leads to more fission resulting in a power reactor or a criticality excursion. The six-factor formula is presented for managing the neutron budget. This leads to concepts of material and geometric buckling which are used in simple calculations to assure safety from criticality. Experimental measurements and computer code calculations of criticality are discussed. To emphasize the reality, historical criticality accidents are presented in a table with major ones discussed to provide lessons-learned. Finally, standards, NRC guides and regulations, and DOE orders relating to criticality protection are presented.

  10. Training in critical care echocardiography

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Echocardiography is useful for the diagnosis and management of hemodynamic failure in the intensive care unit so that competence in some elements of echocardiography is a core skill of the critical care specialist. An important issue is how to provide training to intensivists so that they are competent in the field. This article will review issues related to training in critical care echocardiography. PMID:21906268

  11. Brane worlds in critical gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Feng-Wei; Liu, Yu-Xiao; Zhong, Yuan; Wang, Yong-Qiang; Wu, Shao-Feng

    2013-11-01

    Recently, Lü and Pope proposed critical gravities in [Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 181302 (2011)]. In this paper we construct analytic brane solutions in critical gravity with matter. The Gibbons-Hawking surface term and junction condition are investigated, and the thin and thick brane solutions are obtained. All these branes are embedded in five-dimensional anti-de Sitter spacetimes. Our solutions are stable against scalar perturbations, and the zero modes of scalar perturbations cannot be localized on the branes.

  12. Critical realism and the dialectic.

    PubMed

    Roberts, J M

    2001-12-01

    A prominent strand within both sociological and social theory has been concerned to develop a 'systems approach' with which to explore social life. One of the most original contributions to a systems approach has arisen within critical realism. In particular critical realism demonstrates that it is possible to abstract the causal powers of different objects of analysis to examine their interaction within concrete and contingent 'open systems'. The recent dialectical turn of critical realism develops this systems approach in a much more rigorous manner. However, in this paper I argue that the (dialectical) critical realist mode of abstraction ultimately fails to embed concepts and categories internally within the specific ideological and historical forms of social relations. Or rather, critical realists do not seek to develop concepts that reflect the self-movement of a historical and contradictory essence. This self-movement is what I prefer to call a 'system'. Consequently critical realists are led to separate method from system in theory construction and such a separation leads to a problematic dualist mode of theorizing. I make these observations from a Hegelian-Marxist position. PMID:11853063

  13. Tourism and the Conservation of Critically Endangered Frogs

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, Clare; Simpkins, Clay; Castley, J. Guy; Buckley, Ralf C.

    2012-01-01

    Protected areas are critical for the conservation of many threatened species. Despite this, many protected areas are acutely underfunded, which reduces their effectiveness significantly. Tourism is one mechanism to promote and fund conservation in protected areas, but there are few studies analyzing its tangible conservation outcomes for threatened species. This study uses the 415 IUCN critically endangered frog species to evaluate the contribution of protected area tourism revenue to conservation. Contributions were calculated for each species as the proportion of geographic range inside protected areas multiplied by the proportion of protected area revenues derived from tourism. Geographic ranges were determined from IUCN Extent of Occurrence maps. Almost 60% (239) of critically endangered frog species occur in protected areas. Higher proportions of total range are protected in Nearctic, Australasian and Afrotopical regions. Tourism contributions to protected area budgets ranged from 5–100%. These financial contributions are highest for developing countries in the Afrotropical, Indomalayan and Neotropical regions. Data for both geographic range and budget are available for 201 critically endangered frog species with proportional contributions from tourism to species protection ranging from 0.8–99%. Tourism's financial contributions to critically endangered frog species protection are highest in the Afrotropical region. This study uses a coarse measure but at the global scale it demonstrates that tourism has significant potential to contribute to global frog conservation efforts. PMID:22984440

  14. Tourism and the conservation of critically endangered frogs.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Clare; Simpkins, Clay; Castley, J Guy; Buckley, Ralf C

    2012-01-01

    Protected areas are critical for the conservation of many threatened species. Despite this, many protected areas are acutely underfunded, which reduces their effectiveness significantly. Tourism is one mechanism to promote and fund conservation in protected areas, but there are few studies analyzing its tangible conservation outcomes for threatened species. This study uses the 415 IUCN critically endangered frog species to evaluate the contribution of protected area tourism revenue to conservation. Contributions were calculated for each species as the proportion of geographic range inside protected areas multiplied by the proportion of protected area revenues derived from tourism. Geographic ranges were determined from IUCN Extent of Occurrence maps. Almost 60% (239) of critically endangered frog species occur in protected areas. Higher proportions of total range are protected in Nearctic, Australasian and Afrotopical regions. Tourism contributions to protected area budgets ranged from 5-100%. These financial contributions are highest for developing countries in the Afrotropical, Indomalayan and Neotropical regions. Data for both geographic range and budget are available for 201 critically endangered frog species with proportional contributions from tourism to species protection ranging from 0.8-99%. Tourism's financial contributions to critically endangered frog species protection are highest in the Afrotropical region. This study uses a coarse measure but at the global scale it demonstrates that tourism has significant potential to contribute to global frog conservation efforts. PMID:22984440

  15. Critical Decay Index at the Onset of Solar Eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuccarello, F. P.; Aulanier, G.; Gilchrist, S. A.

    2015-12-01

    Magnetic flux ropes are topological structures consisting of twisted magnetic field lines that globally wrap around an axis. The torus instability model predicts that a magnetic flux rope of major radius R undergoes an eruption when its axis reaches a location where the decay index -d({ln}{B}{ex})/d({ln}R) of the ambient magnetic field Bex is larger than a critical value. In the current-wire model, the critical value depends on the thickness and time evolution of the current channel. We use magnetohydrodynamic simulations to investigate whether the critical value of the decay index at the onset of the eruption is affected by the magnetic flux rope’s internal current profile and/or by the particular pre-eruptive photospheric dynamics. The evolution of an asymmetric, bipolar active region is driven by applying different classes of photospheric motions. We find that the critical value of the decay index at the onset of the eruption is not significantly affected by either the pre-erupitve photospheric evolution of the active region or the resulting different magnetic flux ropes. As in the case of the current-wire model, we find that there is a “critical range” [1.3-1.5], rather than a “critical value” for the onset of the torus instability. This range is in good agreement with the predictions of the current-wire model, despite the inclusion of line-tying effects and the occurrence of tether-cutting magnetic reconnection.

  16. Asymmetric criticality of the osmotic compressibility in binary mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Tianxiang; Liu, Shixia; Xie, Jingjing; Shen, Weiguo

    2013-01-01

    Heat capacities in the critical and the non-critical regions for {benzonitrile + tridecane} and {benzonitrile + pentadecane}, and light scattering for {benzonitrile + undecane}, {benzonitrile + dodecane}, {benzonitrile + tridecane}, {benzonitrile + tetradecane}, {benzonitrile + pentadecane}, and {benzonitrile + hexadecane} in the critical two-phase region were measured. Light scattering measurements confirmed the existence of the asymmetry for the osmotic compressibility while no such asymmetry was observed for the correlation length. An analysis of the osmotic compressibility asymmetry suggested the dominance of the singular term | {Δ hat T} |^β, which supports the complete scaling theory. The consistency of the complete scaling theory in descriptions of different asymmetry behaviors was also discussed. Moreover, it was found that the contribution of the heat capacity-related term is also important in describing the asymmetry of the osmotic compressibility as it was observed in studies of the diameters of the coexistence curves.

  17. DEVELOPMENT OF PROTOCOLS TO STUDY TO IDENTIFY CRITICAL ECOSYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Healthy, functioning ecosystems are critical to the sustainability of human and natural communities, but the identification of areas of healthy ecosystems in an area as large as Region 5 is difficult due to time and information constraints. Geographic Information Systems (GIS) a...

  18. Psychopharmacology in pediatric critical care.

    PubMed

    Stoddard, Frederick J; Usher, Craigan T; Abrams, Annah N

    2006-07-01

    Psychopharmacologic treatment in pediatric critical care requires a careful child or adolescent psychiatric evaluation, including a thorough review of the history of present illness or injury, any current or pre-existing psychiatric disorder, past history, and laboratory studies. Although there is limited evidence to guide psychopharmacologic practice in this setting, psychopharmacologic treatment is increasing in critical care, with known indications for treatment, benefits, and risks; initial dosing guidelines; and best practices. Treatment is guided by the knowledge bases in pediatric physiology, psycho-pharmacology, and treatment of critically ill adults. Pharmacologic considerations include pharmacokinetic and pharmcodynamic aspects of specific drugs and drug classes, in particular elimination half-life, developmental considerations, drug interactions, and adverse effects. Evaluation and management of pain is a key initial step, as pain may mimic psychiatric symptoms and its effective treatment can ameliorate them. Patient comfort and safety are primary objectives for children who are acutely ill and who will survive and for those who will not. Judicious use of psychopharmacolgic agents in pediatric critical care using the limited but growing evidence base and a clinical best practices collaborative approach can reduce anxiety,sadness, disorientation, and agitation; improve analgesia; and save lives of children who are suicidal or delirious. In addition to pain, other disorders or indications for psychopharmacologic treatment are affective disorders;PTSD; post-suicide attempt patients; disruptive behavior disorders (especially ADHD); and adjustment, developmental, and substance use disorders. Treating children who are critically ill with psychotropic drugs is an integral component of comprehensive pediatric critical care in relieving pain and delirium; reducing inattention or agitation or aggressive behavior;relieving acute stress, anxiety, or depression; and

  19. How do surgical pathologists evaluate critical diagnoses (critical values)?

    PubMed Central

    Mireskandari, Masoud

    2008-01-01

    Background After introduction of the concept of critical value (CV) in laboratory medicine, some efforts were performed to define possible critical values in surgical pathology. Critical diagnosis (critical value) is a concept recently established in surgical pathology and is a challenging issue among pathologists and clinical specialists. The concept may be the subject of variation according to the geographical or work setting differences. The current study was performed to bring the contribution of the Iranian pathologists to the evolving concept of critical diagnoses (critical values) in surgical pathology. Materials and methods During annual meeting of Iranian Pathologist Society, November 2006, Tehran, Iran, anonymous questionnaires were distributed among participants. They were requested to openly name conditions in which a pathologist should communicate the results immediately with clinicians. Results 147 pathologists completed the questionnaire. They were varied in their level of experience and setting of workplace. Each participant referred to 1–7 (mean 3) conditions as CV. About 90 different conditions which were considered as CV by participants were extracted from the questionnaires. Discussion The list of conditions obtained through this survey as CVs in surgical pathology covered most items previously described in literature. Major differences are low number (or lack) of refers to some relatively routine and potentially important conditions and considering many unimportant conditions as CV by participants of present survey. Almost all conducted surveys have been performed on this issue so far (including the present survey) suffer from lack of supportive scientific evidences and based mainly on experience and common sense of participants in survey. Potential problems with application of CV concept in daily routine work flow of pathology, particularly in developing countries like Iran, were discussed. PMID:18620590

  20. Disordered regions in transmembrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Tusnády, Gábor E; Dobson, László; Tompa, Peter

    2015-11-01

    The functions of transmembrane proteins in living cells are widespread; they range from various transport processes to energy production, from cell-cell adhesion to communication. Structurally, they are highly ordered in their membrane-spanning regions, but may contain disordered regions in the cytosolic and extra-cytosolic parts. In this study, we have investigated the disordered regions in transmembrane proteins by a stringent definition of disordered residues on the currently available largest experimental dataset, and show a significant correlation between the spatial distributions of positively charged residues and disordered regions. This finding suggests a new role of disordered regions in transmembrane proteins by providing structural flexibility for stabilizing interactions with negatively charged head groups of the lipid molecules. We also find a preference of structural disorder in the terminal--as opposed to loop--regions in transmembrane proteins, and survey the respective functions involved in recruiting other proteins or mediating allosteric signaling effects. Finally, we critically compare disorder prediction methods on our transmembrane protein set. While there are no major differences between these methods using the usual statistics, such as per residue accuracies, Matthew's correlation coefficients, etc.; substantial differences can be found regarding the spatial distribution of the predicted disordered regions. We conclude that a predictor optimized for transmembrane proteins would be of high value to the field of structural disorder. PMID:26275590

  1. Intact quasiparticles at an unconventional quantum critical point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutherland, M. L.; O'Farrell, E. C. T.; Toews, W. H.; Dunn, J.; Kuga, K.; Nakatsuji, S.; Machida, Y.; Izawa, K.; Hill, R. W.

    2015-07-01

    We report measurements of in-plane electrical and thermal transport properties in the limit T →0 near the unconventional quantum critical point in the heavy-fermion metal β -YbAlB4 . The high Kondo temperature TK≃200 K in this material allows us to probe transport extremely close to the critical point, at unusually small values of T /TK<5 ×10-4 . Here we find that the Wiedemann-Franz law is obeyed at the lowest temperatures, implying that the Landau quasiparticles remain intact in the critical region. At finite temperatures we observe a non-Fermi-liquid T -linear dependence of inelastic-scattering processes to energies lower than those previously accessed. These processes have a weaker temperature dependence than in comparable heavy fermion quantum critical systems, revealing a temperature scale of T ˜0.3 K which signals a sudden change in the character of the inelastic scattering.

  2. Confinement of monopoles and scaling theory near unconventional critical points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell, Stephen

    2013-02-01

    Conventional ordering transitions, described by the Landau paradigm, are characterized by the symmetries broken at the critical point. Within the constrained manifold occurring at low temperatures in certain frustrated systems, unconventional transitions are possible that defy this type of description. While the critical point exists only in the limit where defects in the constraint are vanishingly rare, unconventional criticality can be observed throughout a broad region of the phase diagram. This work presents a formalism for incorporating the effects of such defects within the framework of scaling theory and the renormalization group, leading to universal results for the critical behavior. The theory is applied to two transitions occurring within a model of spin ice, and the results are confirmed using Monte Carlo simulations. Relevance to experiments, particularly in the spin-ice compounds, is discussed, along with implications for simulations of related transitions, such as the cubic dimer model and the O(3) sigma model with “hedgehog” suppression.

  3. The complexities of individual financial conflicts of interest.

    PubMed

    Rubin, Eugene H

    2005-01-01

    Academic health centers (AHCs) are unique resources that are critical for the advancement of science and the training of health care providers, scientists, and educators. AHCs depend on public trust. Certain financial relationships between medical school faculty and industry create situations that have the potential to be deleterious to AHCs. Yet, the translation of clinically relevant, scientific advances to products that directly impact patients' lives benefits from entrepreneurial activities, and such activities necessitate interactions between academia and industry. Society has a vested interest in protecting human research participants, maintaining objectivity in scientific research, and encouraging creative research with clinical applications. Conflicts of interest (COI) committees have been created by AHCs to evaluate faculty financial COI and to develop strategies to eliminate, reduce, or manage such conflicts. Issues involving financial COI are relevant to psychiatry. These issues are reviewed from the perspective of regulatory oversight provided by a medical school's COI committee. PMID:15470374

  4. Understanding the Fluvial Critical Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bätz, N.; Lane, S. N.; Temme, A. J. A. M.; Lang, F.

    2012-04-01

    Geomorphological modelling has evolved significantly the representation of the link between river morphology, flow processes and sediment transport; notably recently, with an emphasis upon the interactions between vegetation dynamics and morphodynamics. Nevertheless, vegetation dynamics have tended to be treated as a simplistic "black box" in which time replaces the more complex underlying processes. Thus, riparian vegetation dynamics not only result from interactions between surface-flow, topography and vegetation resistance to disturbance, but also soil development within the fluvial zone, which affects nutrient and water supply. More generally labeled the critical zone, there is a lack of considering the "critical fluvial zone" in geomorphological models. Understanding the key drivers of this system, thus the processes interrelating vegetation, topography, soil (formation), subsurface- and surface-flow, are crucial to understand how riverine landscapes respond to increasing human pressure and to climate change. In this poster, we consider the likely nature of a braided river critical fluvial zone. Braided rivers in deglaciated forelands provide an opportunity to study the fluvial critical zone due to their dynamic properties, the restricted physical size, the simple ecosystems and the space-for-time relation caused by glacier retreatment after the "Little Ice Age". The poster aims to commence a discussion on the fluvial critical zone, showing first results about: a) the system understanding of a braided river set in a recently deglaciated alpine foreland; b) methodological approaches to quantify the identified interrelating key processes; c) how quantitative understanding can be integrated into fluvial geomorphological modelling.

  5. Criticism and the Teaching of Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, James E., Jr., Ed.

    1965-01-01

    Articles contained in this publication are (1) "Criticism in Teaching Literature" by Wayne Booth; (2) "Criticism and Literature: A Reply" (to Booth's article) by Frederick J. Hoffman; (3) "Criticism in Context" by Helen C. White; (4) "Formalist Criticism and Shakespeare" by Kester Svendsen; (5) "Grammar, History, and Criticism" by Kenneth S.…

  6. Critical and Alternative Directions in Applied Linguistics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pennycook, Alastair

    2010-01-01

    Critical directions in applied linguistics can be understood in various ways. The term "critical" as it has been used in "critical applied linguistics," "critical discourse analysis," "critical literacy" and so forth, is now embedded as part of applied linguistic work, adding an overt focus on questions of power and inequality to discourse…

  7. Teamwork in obstetric critical care

    PubMed Central

    Guise, Jeanne-Marie; Segel, Sally

    2016-01-01

    Whether seeing a patient in the ambulatory clinic environment, performing a delivery or managing a critically ill patient, obstetric care is a team activity. Failures in teamwork and communication are among the leading causes of adverse obstetric events, accounting for over 70% of sentinel events according to the Joint Commission. Effective, efficient and safe care requires good teamwork. Although nurses, doctors and healthcare staff who work in critical care environments are extremely well trained and competent medically, they have not traditionally been trained in how to work well as part of a team. Given the complexity and acuity of critical care medicine, which often relies on more than one medical team, teamwork skills are essential. This chapter discusses the history and importance of teamwork in high-reliability fields, reviews key concepts and skills in teamwork, and discusses approaches to training and working in teams. PMID:18701352

  8. Update in Critical Care 2015.

    PubMed

    Dres, Martin; Mancebo, Jordi; Curley, Gerard F

    2016-07-01

    This review documents important progress made in 2015 in the field of critical care. Significant advances in 2015 included further evidence for early implementation of low tidal volume ventilation as well as new insights into the role of open lung biopsy, diaphragmatic dysfunction, and a potential mechanism for ventilator-induced fibroproliferation. New therapies, including a novel low-flow extracorporeal CO2 removal technique and mesenchymal stem cell-derived microparticles, have also been studied. Several studies examining the role of improved diagnosis and prevention of ventilator-associated pneumonia also showed relevant results. This review examines articles published in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine and other major journals that have made significant advances in the field of critical care in 2015. PMID:27367886

  9. Transmission of information at criticality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luković, Mirko; Vanni, Fabio; Svenkeson, Adam; Grigolini, Paolo

    2014-12-01

    We study the problem of information transmission in complex cooperative systems to prove that adaptivity rather than diffusion is the main source of information transport at criticality. We adopt two different cooperative models, the two-dimensional Decision Making Model (DMM), and the one-dimensional Flock Model (FM) inspired by the cooperation between birds. The criticality-induced consensus is intermittently broken by the occurrence of moments of high susceptibility, which we call free-will states. We construct a network A based on the DMM and FM that is perturbed by a similar network B. Some units of A, called lookout birds, follow the directions of the mean field generated by B, while the rest are blind to B. When both networks are at criticality a small percentage of lookout birds establish the synchronization between B and A as a result of the nonergodic nature of the free-will state dynamics.

  10. Critical Gravity in Four Dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Lue, H.; Pope, C. N.

    2011-05-06

    We study four-dimensional gravity theories that are rendered renormalizable by the inclusion of curvature-squared terms to the usual Einstein action with a cosmological constant. By choosing the parameters appropriately, the massive scalar mode can be eliminated and the massive spin-2 mode can become massless. This ''critical'' theory may be viewed as a four-dimensional analogue of chiral topologically massive gravity, or of critical 'new massive gravity' with a cosmological constant, in three dimensions. We find that the on-shell energy for the remaining massless gravitons vanishes. There are also logarithmic spin-2 modes, which have positive energy. The mass and entropy of standard Schwarzschild-type black holes vanish. The critical theory might provide a consistent toy model for quantum gravity in four dimensions.

  11. Critical neuroscience meets medical humanities.

    PubMed

    Slaby, Jan

    2015-06-01

    This programmatic theory paper sketches a conceptual framework that might inspire work in critical Medical Humanities. For this purpose, Kaushik Sunder Rajan's account of biocapital is revisited and discussed in relation to the perspective of a critical neuroscience. Critical neuroscience is an encompassing positioning towards the recent public prominence of the brain and brain-related practices, tools and discourses. The proposed analytical scheme has five focal nodes: capital, life, technoscience, (neoliberal) politics and subjectivity. A special emphasis will be placed on contemporary framings of subjectivity, as it is here where deep-reaching entanglements of personhood with scientific practice and discourse, medical and informational technologies, and economic formations are most evident. Notably, the emerging subject position of the 'prospective health consumer' will be discussed as it figures prominently in the terrain between neuroscience and other medico-scientific disciplines. PMID:26052114

  12. Critical Qualitative Research Reader. Critical Qualitative Research. Volume 2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steinberg, Shirley R., Ed.; Cannella, Gaile S., Ed.

    2012-01-01

    This volume of transformed research utilizes an activist approach to examine the notion that nothing is apolitical. Research projects themselves are critically examined for power orientations, even as they are used to address curricular problems and educational or societal issues. Philosophical perspectives that have facilitated an understanding…

  13. Critical Thinking: A Stage Theory of Critical Thinking. Part I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elder, Linda; Paul, Richard

    1996-01-01

    Discusses six stages of the development of critical thinkers: unreflective, challenged, beginning, practicing, advanced, and master thinkers. For each stage, describes the defining feature, the principle challenge, the knowledge or insight into thinking expressed, and the individual's skill in thinking. (AJL)

  14. Critical Thinking: A Stage Theory of Critical Thinking: Part II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elder, Linda; Paul, Richard

    1996-01-01

    Describes the following six stages that individuals go through as they develop as critical thinkers: reflective, challenged, beginning, practicing, advanced, and master thinker. For each stage, describes relevant intellectual traits, the self-assessment needed to move forward, and potential obstacles. (AJL)

  15. Enhancing Critical Thinking with Aesthetic, Critical, and Creative Inquiry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lampert, Nancy

    2006-01-01

    Inquiry-based classroom activities require students to solve problems and answer questions that have more than one possible resolution. These types of activities stimulate critical thinking skills and dispositions in students. PreK-12 art classrooms are rich with opportunity for inquiry-based activities for children and adolescents. This article…

  16. In Defense of a Liberal Education: Criticizing the Critical

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Attard, John

    2013-01-01

    In this article, the author reports on an awareness of controversial incidents on campuses around North America surrounding "politically correct" speech codes and thought control measures instituted at the behest of faculty and students of this ideological persuasion. It seems that critical theory is going beyond "critical…

  17. Clinical review: Critical care transport and austere critical care

    PubMed Central

    Rice, David H; Kotti, George; Beninati, William

    2008-01-01

    The development of modern intensive care units (ICUs) has allowed the survival of patients with advanced illness and injury, although at a cost of substantial infrastructure. Natural disasters and military operations are two common situations that can create critically ill patients in an environment that is austere or has been rendered austere. This has driven the development of two related strategies to care for these casualties. Portable ICU capability can be rapidly established in the area of need, providing relatively advanced capability but limited capacity and sustainability. The other strategy is to rapidly evacuate critically ill and injured patients following their initial stabilization. This permits medical personnel in the austere location to focus resources on a larger number of less critical patients. It also permits the most vulnerable patients to receive care in an advanced center. This strategy requires careful planning to overcome the constraints of the transport environment. The optimal strategy has not been determined, but a combination of these two approaches has been used in recent disasters and military operations and is promising. The critical care delivered in an austere setting must be integrated with a long-term plan to provide follow-on care. PMID:18373882

  18. Critical Geragogy: Developing Practical Possibilities for Critical Educational Gerontology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Formosa, Marvin

    2002-01-01

    Situates geragogy, the practice of teaching older adults, within critical gerontology. Explains principles of geragogy: embodiment of political rationale, commitment to transformation of ageism, refutation of myths of empowerment through education, outreach to all segments of the older population, emphasis on self-help culture, and engagement in…

  19. Davies Critical Point and Tunneling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La, Hoseong

    2012-04-01

    From the point of view of tunneling, the physical meaning of the Davies critical point of a second-order phase transition in the black hole thermodynamics is clarified. At the critical point, the nonthermal contribution vanishes so that the black hole radiation is entirely thermal. It separates two phases: one with radiation enhanced by the nonthermal contribution, the other suppressed by the nonthermal contribution. We show this in both charged and rotating black holes. The phase transition is also analyzed in the cases in which emissions of charges and angular momenta are incorporated.

  20. Team science and critical care.

    PubMed

    Manthous, Constantine A; Hollingshead, Andrea B

    2011-07-01

    Because critical care is administered by multidisciplinary teams, it is plausible that behavioral methods to enhance team performance may impact the quality and outcomes of care. This review highlights the social and behavioral scientific principles of team building and briefly reviews four features of teams--leadership, psychological safety, transactive memory, and accountability--that are germane to critical care teams. The article highlights how team principles might be used to improve patient care and navigate hospital hierarchies, and concludes with implications for future educational and scientific efforts. PMID:21471081

  1. Cyberspace Policy For Critical Infrastructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkin, Dorsey; Raines, Richard; Williams, Paul; Hopkinson, Kenneth

    The first step in preparing any battlespace is to define the domain for attack and maneuver. The various military service components have directed authority to focus their efforts in specific domains of operations (e.g., naval operations are mainly in the maritime domain). However, cyberspace operations pose challenges because they span multiple operational domains. This paper focuses on U.S. cyberspace policy related to defending and exploiting critical infrastructure assets. Also, it examines the issues involved in delineating responsibility for U.S. defensive and offensive operations related to critical infrastructures.

  2. Critical Viscosity of Xenon team

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The Critical Viscosity of Xenon Experiment (CVX-2) on the STS-107 Research 1 mission in 2002 will measure the viscous behavior of xenon, a heavy inert gas used in flash lamps and ion rocket engines, at its critical point. The thermostat for CVX sits inside the white cylinder on a support structure (at left) that is placed inside a pressure canister. A similar canister (right) holds the electronics and control systems. The CVX-2 arrangement is identical. The principal investigator is Dr. Robert F. Berg (left) of the National Institutes of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD.

  3. Critical Viscosity of Xenon team

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The Critical Viscosity of Xenon Experiment (CVX-2) on the STS-107 Research 1 mission in 2002 will measure the viscous behavior of xenon, a heavy inert gas used in flash lamps and ion rocket engines, at its critical point. The thermostat for CVX sits inside the white cylinder on a support structure (at left) that is placed inside a pressure canister. A similar canister (right) holds the electronics and control systems. The CVX-2 arrangement is identical. The principal investigator is Dr. Robert F. Berg (not shown) of the National Institutes of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD.

  4. The professions: a critical review.

    PubMed

    Cripps, Y

    1986-09-13

    The professions have recently been subjected to intense scrutiny in the media. Increasingly, criticism is levelled at the professions collectively rather than at individual professions. Even when difficulties afflict a particular profession the resulting public debate affects other professional bodies. The changes that one profession makes to meet such criticisms inevitably influence the others. If, for example, a professional group decides to permit advertising by its members, the case of those who prefer to retain a restriction is weakened. If barristers may at some future date be consulted without the intermediation of a solicitor, why should not surgeons receive patients who have not visited a general practitioner? PMID:3776027

  5. Criticality and unpredictability in macroevolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soléand, Ricard V.; Manrubia, Susanna C.

    1997-04-01

    A recently presented model of large-scale evolution exhibiting self-organized criticality is explored from the dynamical point of view. It is shown that the system approaches the critical state in an anomalous way, with a dynamical exponent z=0. At the same time, the complexity of the interactions among species increases, leading to higher unpredictability. The dynamic evolution is able to generate phylogenetic fractal trees with dimension close to the one obtained from real taxonomy. Some analytic results are presented and an interesting interpretation of the macroevolutionary process is suggested.

  6. Thinking creatively is thinking critically.

    PubMed

    Gruenfeld, Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    The Cartoneras projects aim to promote the celebration of language, culture, and creativity through a collaboration between top literary minds and cardboard collectors in Buenos Aires and Lima. They produce and publish beautiful books with hand-painted cardboard covers that speak of the wonderful literature inside. Inspired by those projects, the Paper Picker Press (PPP) program in Boston aims to engage higher-order thinking through an arts-based approach to rediscovering literature through play. PPP starts with the premise that a student who is thinking creatively is also thinking critically. Creative play is critical thinking. PMID:20391619

  7. Northeast Regional Biomass Energy Program

    SciTech Connect

    O'Connell, R.A.

    1992-02-01

    The Northeast Regional Biomass Program (NRBP) is entering its ninth year of operation. The management and the objectives have virtually remained unchanged and are stated as follows. The program conducted by NRBP has three basic features: (1) a state grant component that provides funds (with a 50 percent matching requirement) to each of the states in the region to strengthen and integrate the work of state agencies involved in biomass energy; (2) a series of technical reports and studies in areas that have been identified as being of critical importance to the development of biomass energy in the region; and (3) a continuous long range planning component with heavy private sector involvement that helps to identify activities necessary to spur greater development and use of biomass energy in the Northeast.

  8. Evidence for Self-organized Criticality in Tokamak Plasma Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moyer, R. A.; Lehmer, R.; Rhodes, T. H.; Doyle, E. J.; Peebles, W. A.; Rettig, C. L.; Groebner, R. J.

    1998-11-01

    Measurements of turbulence spectra and particle flux probability distributions from the DIII-D tokamak exhibit significant agreement with predictions of self organized criticality (SOC) theories. Power spectra of density tilde n, floating potential, and particle flux Γ have three regions of frequency dependence: low frequency f^0, intermediate frequency f-1, and high frequency f-4, consistent with power spectra observed in SOC modeling of various systems. The particle flux probability distribution function P(Γ) for radially outgoing flux shows a Γ-1 dependent region extending over two decades of Γ, a clear indication of self organized behavior. Radially inward flux, representing toppling events up the density gradient (which are outside the scope of the models), also displays a Γ-1 dependent region. These measurements indicate that the plasma is in a state consistent with self organized criticality, and place a significant constraint on plasma transport models.

  9. Cooperative monitoring of regional security agreements

    SciTech Connect

    Pregenzer, A.L.; Vannoni, M.; Biringer, K.L.

    1996-11-01

    This paper argues that cooperative monitoring plays a critical role in the implementation of regional security agreements and confidence building measures. A framework for developing cooperative monitoring options is proposed and several possibilities for relating bilateral and regional monitoring systems to international monitoring systems are discussed. Three bilateral or regional agreements are analyzed briefly to illustrate different possibilities. These examples illustrate that the relationship of regional or bilateral arms control or security agreements to international agreements depends on a number of factors: the overlap of provisions between regional and international agreements; the degree of interest in a regional agreement among the international community; efficiency in implementing the agreement; and numerous political considerations. Given the importance of regional security to the international community, regions should be encouraged to develop their own infrastructure for implementing regional arms control and other security agreements. A regional infrastructure need not preclude participation in an international regime. On the contrary, establishing regional institutions for arms control and nonproliferation could result in more proactive participation of regional parties in developing solutions for regional and international problems, thereby strengthening existing and future international regimes. Possible first steps for strengthening regional infrastructures are identified and potential technical requirements are discussed.

  10. What Is a Pediatric Critical Care Specialist?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Email Print Share What is a Pediatric Critical Care Specialist? Page Content Article Body If your child ... PICU. What Kind of Training Do Pediatric Critical Care Specialists Have? Pediatric critical care specialists are medical ...

  11. The critical compressibility factor value: Associative fluids and liquid alkali metals

    SciTech Connect

    Kulinskii, V. L.

    2014-08-07

    We show how to obtain the critical compressibility factor Z{sub c} for simple and associative Lennard-Jones fluids using the critical characteristics of the Ising model on different lattices. The results show that low values of critical compressibility factor are correlated with the associative properties of fluids in critical region and can be obtained on the basis of the results for the Ising model on lattices with more than one atom per cell. An explanation for the results on the critical point line of the Lennard-Jones fluids and liquid metals is proposed within the global isomorphism approach.

  12. Vapor-liquid equilibrium, coexistence curve, and critical locus for difluoromethane + pentafluoroethane (R-32 + R-125)

    SciTech Connect

    Higashi, Yukihiro

    1997-11-01

    The vapor-liquid equilibrium for difluoromethane + pentafluoroethane (R-32 + R-125) was measured by the static method in the temperature range between 283 K and 313 K. The vapor-liquid coexistence curve near the critical point was measured by the observation of the meniscus disappearance. The critical temperatures and critical densities of a 30 mass % R-32 and a 60 mass % R-32 mixture were determined on the basis of the saturation densities along the coexistence curve in the critical region. In addition, the critical locus for the R-32 + R-125 mixture is correlated as the function of composition.

  13. Critical Surface of the Hexagonal Polygon Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimmett, Geoffrey R.; Li, Zhongyang

    2016-05-01

    The hexagonal polygon model arises in a natural way via a transformation of the 1-2 model on the hexagonal lattice, and it is related to the high temperature expansion of the Ising model. There are three types of edge, and three corresponding parameters α ,β ,γ >0. By studying the long-range order of a certain two-edge correlation function, it is shown that the parameter space (0,∞)^3 may be divided into subcritical and supercritical regions, separated by critical surfaces satisfying an explicitly known formula. This result complements earlier work on the Ising model and the 1-2 model. The proof uses the Pfaffian representation of Fisher, Kasteleyn, and Temperley for the counts of dimers on planar graphs.

  14. Conformal field theory of critical Casimir forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emig, Thorsten; Bimonte, Giuseppe; Kardar, Mehran

    2015-03-01

    Thermal fluctuations of a critical system induce long-ranged Casimir forces between objects that couple to the underlying field. For two dimensional conformal field theories (CFT) we derive exact results for the Casimir interaction for a deformed strip and for two compact objects of arbitrary shape in terms of the free energy of a standard region (circular ring or flat strip) whose dimension is determined by the mutual capacitance of two conductors with the objects' shape; and a purely geometric energy that is proportional to conformal charge of the CFT, but otherwise super-universal in that it depends only on the shapes and is independent of boundary conditions and other details. The effect of inhomogenous boundary conditions is also discussed.

  15. Critical telomerase activity for uncontrolled cell growth.

    PubMed

    Wesch, Neil L; Burlock, Laura J; Gooding, Robert J

    2016-01-01

    The lengths of the telomere regions of chromosomes in a population of cells are modelled using a chemical master equation formalism, from which the evolution of the average number of cells of each telomere length is extracted. In particular, the role of the telomere-elongating enzyme telomerase on these dynamics is investigated. We show that for biologically relevant rates of cell birth and death, one finds a critical rate, R crit, of telomerase activity such that the total number of cells diverges. Further, R crit is similar in magnitude to the rates of mitosis and cell death. The possible relationship of this result to replicative immortality and its associated hallmark of cancer is discussed. PMID:27500377

  16. Critical telomerase activity for uncontrolled cell growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wesch, Neil L.; Burlock, Laura J.; Gooding, Robert J.

    2016-08-01

    The lengths of the telomere regions of chromosomes in a population of cells are modelled using a chemical master equation formalism, from which the evolution of the average number of cells of each telomere length is extracted. In particular, the role of the telomere-elongating enzyme telomerase on these dynamics is investigated. We show that for biologically relevant rates of cell birth and death, one finds a critical rate, R crit, of telomerase activity such that the total number of cells diverges. Further, R crit is similar in magnitude to the rates of mitosis and cell death. The possible relationship of this result to replicative immortality and its associated hallmark of cancer is discussed.

  17. Dynamics and Thermodynamics beyond the critical point

    PubMed Central

    Gorelli, F. A.; Bryk, T.; Krisch, M.; Ruocco, G.; Santoro, M.; Scopigno, T.

    2013-01-01

    Sudden changes in the dynamical properties of a supercritical fluid model have been found as a function of pressure and temperature (T/Tc = 2–5 and P/Pc = 10–103), striving with the notion of a single phase beyond the critical point established by thermodynamics. The sound propagation in the Terahertz frequency region reveals a sharp dynamic crossover between the gas like and the liquid like regimes along several isotherms, which involves, at sufficiently low densities, the interplay between purely acoustic waves and heat waves. Such a crossover allows one to determine a dynamic line in the phase diagram which exhibits a very tight correlation with a number of thermodynamic observables, showing that the supercritical state is remarkably more complex than thought so far. PMID:23383373

  18. Critical thinking: assessing the risks to the future security of supply of critical metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunn, Gus

    2015-04-01

    supplies of raw materials. These have led to major new programmes of research throughout the minerals value chain, in order to improve the raw materials knowledge base, to develop best practices and promote international collaboration. Although recycling will make an increasingly important contribution to supply, it can never meet the total requirement when demand is increasing. Therefore, new resources of primary materials, identified through geological research, will continue to be required. The availability of regional baseline datasets, comprising geological, geophysical and geochemical data, is fundamental to the identification of exploration targets. However, in order to focus exploration we also require robust mineral deposit models for the critical metals which hitherto these have been largely neglected because of their limited economic importance. For commodities such as the platinum-group metals (PGM), cobalt, niobium, indium, rare earth elements (REE) and cobalt we have some knowledge of the processes controlling their mobilisation and concentration under certain conditions although we have little understanding of the mechanisms of deposit formation elsewhere. We also need effective techniques to explore for these metals. This may involve the development of new geophysical techniques to explore on the sea-floor or beneath thick cover, or new analytical methods for the determination of these elements in exploration samples. Improved metallurgical techniques are also required for effective and energy-efficient recovery of critical metals from ores and concentrates. References European Commission (2010). Critical raw materials for the EU. Report of the Ad-hoc Working Group on Defining Critical Raw Materials. European Commission (2014). Report on Critical raw materials for the EU. Report of the Ad-hoc Working Group on Defining Critical Raw Materials.

  19. Lessons for Teaching Art Criticism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrett, Terry, Ed.; Clark, Gilbert, Ed.

    This collection of lessons is meant to be a practical guide to help teachers engage children in art criticism. The lessons generally follow a similar format. Most suggest an age group but may be modified for use with younger or older students. Several authors suggest variations and extensions for lessons that include studio activities. A broad…

  20. Critical Thinking or Cony Cozenage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matulich, Loretta

    Teachers of history, introductory chemistry, and literature from Portland State University, Portland Community College, Clark College, Mt. Hood Community College, and Clackamas Community College (Oregon) have been working together to foster critical thinking in their students. Teachers in these disciplines have been meeting at their respective…