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Sample records for ahc critical region

  1. GnRH pulse frequency differentially regulates steroidogenic factor 1 (SF1), dosage-sensitive sex reversal-AHC critical region on the X chromosome gene 1 (DAX1), and serum response factor (SRF): potential mechanism for GnRH pulse frequency regulation of LH beta transcription in the rat.

    PubMed

    Burger, Laura L; Haisenleder, Daniel J; Marshall, John C

    2011-06-01

    The issue of how rapid frequency GnRH pulses selectively stimulate LH transcription is not fully understood. The rat LHβ promoter contains two GnRH-responsive regions: the proximal region has binding elements for SF1, and the distal site contains a CArG box, which binds SRF. This study determined whether GnRH stimulates pituitary SF1, DAX1 (an endogenous SF1 inhibitor), and SRF transcription in vivo, and whether regulation is frequency dependent. Male rats were pulsed with 25 ng GnRH i.v. every 30 min or every 240 min for 1-24 h, and primary transcripts (PTs) and mRNAs were measured by real time PCR. Fast frequency GnRH pulses (every 30 min) increased SF1 PT (threefold) within 1 h, and then declined after 6 h. SF1 mRNA also increased within 1 h and remained elevated through 24 h. Fast frequency GnRH also stimulated a transient increase in DAX1 PT (twofold after 1 h) and mRNA (1.7-fold after 6 h), while SRF mRNA rose briefly at 1 h. Slow frequency pulses did not affect gene expression of SF1, DAX1, or SRF. These findings support a mechanistic link between SF1 in the frequency regulation of LHβ transcription by pulsatile GnRH.

  2. Meeting the Challenge of Chronic Conditions in a Sustainable Manner: Building on the AHC Learning.

    PubMed

    Delgado, Pedro

    2016-01-01

    The Atlantic Healthcare Collaboration for Innovation and Improvement in Chronic Disease (AHC) set out to achieve three aims: to create a patient- and family-centred approach to manage chronic diseases; to build a network of organizational, regional and provincial teams to share evidence-informed, systems-level solutions and work together to develop, implement and sustain improvement initiatives; and to promote the sustainability of the participating health systems. Important elements of all three aims were achieved and the synthesis provides a meaningful contribution to systems working to improve chronic care. This paper explores those achievements as well as some of the areas for improvement, including replicability, expanded outcome measurement, greater detail around patient and family engagement, increased focus on specific outcomes and processes, and further articulation of lessons learned and recommendations.

  3. Characterisation of the Angelman syndrome critical region

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, H.L.; Buxton, J.; Chan, C.T.J.

    1994-09-01

    Angelman syndrome (AS) and Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) are distinct neurogenetic disorders associated with a deletion of 15q11-13, a region subject to genomic imprinting. The chromosomal deletions are either maternal (AS) or paternal (PWS) in origin. The AS critical region was previously defined by an inherited deletion of approximately 1.5 Mb, encompassing TD3-21, LS6-1 and GABRB3. An individual with classical AS has been identified whose deletion includes LS6-1 but not TD3-21 or GABRB3. Both maternal and paternal methylation patterns at ZNF127, PW71B and SNRPN are present, suggesting that the AS gene itself is a disrupted, rather than imprinting sequences, as proposed recently for some familial cases. Initially, the deletion was detected by (CA)n repeat analysis. Cosmids derived from a 260 kb LS6-1 YAC were then used to confirm the deletion by fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH). Neither end cosmid from the YAC is deleted, suggesting that the AS critical region is less than 200 kb. Fragments isolated from the cosmids which span the deletion were used to further delineate the AS critical region by Southern blot analysis. Single copy genomic fragments within this region were then used to search for differential parental methylation patterns and potential coding sequences. We have used cosmids from the region in exon-trapping experiments. Using this combination of approaches, we aim to identify candidate genes for AS.

  4. Regional analgesia in postsurgical critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Moliner Velázquez, S; Rubio Haro, R; De Andrés Serrano, C; De Andrés Ibáñez, J

    2017-03-01

    Regional analgesia intrinsically, based on its physiological effects, is routinely used for the perioperative treatment of pain associated with surgical procedures. However, in other areas such as the non-surgical treatment of acute pain for patients in a critical condition, it has not been subjected to specific prospective studies. If we confine ourselves to the physiological effects of the nerve block, in a situation of stress, the indications for regional anaesthesia in this group of patients extend to the management of a wide variety of medical as well as postsurgical conditions, of trauma patients and of other painful procedures performed in the patient's bed. The critical patient certainly must be analyzed individually as their own primary conditions is of vital importance, as well as any associated conditions they have developed that can potentially increase the risk of systemic toxicity or morbidity, such as, coagulopathies, infection, immunosuppressive states, sedation and problems associated with mechanical ventilation. This review aims to assess the role of regional analgesia in critically ill patients, placing it within the algorithm decision tree of the professional responsible for patients in critical care units, all based on the evidence of potential benefits according to the published literature.

  5. CRISPR/Cas9-mediated Dax1 knockout in the monkey recapitulates human AHC-HH.

    PubMed

    Kang, Yu; Zheng, Bo; Shen, Bin; Chen, Yongchang; Wang, Lei; Wang, Jianying; Niu, Yuyu; Cui, Yiqiang; Zhou, Jiankui; Wang, Hong; Guo, Xuejiang; Hu, Bian; Zhou, Qi; Sha, Jiahao; Ji, Weizhi; Huang, Xingxu

    2015-12-20

    Mutations in the DAX1 locus cause X-linked adrenal hypoplasia congenita (AHC) and hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (HH), which manifest with primary adrenal insufficiency and incomplete or absent sexual maturation, respectively. The associated defects in spermatogenesis can range from spermatogenic arrest to Sertoli cell only syndrome. Conclusions from Dax1 knockout mouse models provide only limited insight into AHC/HH disease mechanisms, because mouse models exhibit more extensive abnormalities in testicular development, including disorganized and incompletely formed testis cords with decreased number of peritubular myoid cells and male-to-female sex reversal. We previously reported successful clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated protein 9 (Cas9)-mediated genome targeting in cynomolgus monkeys. Here, we describe a male fetal monkey in which targeted genome editing using CRISPR/Cas9 produced Dax1-null mutations in most somatic tissues and in the gonads. This DAX1-deficient monkey displayed defects in adrenal gland development and abnormal testis architecture with small cords, expanded blood vessels and extensive fibrosis. Sertoli cell formation was not affected. This phenotype strongly resembles findings in human patients with AHC-HH caused by mutations in DAX1. We further detected upregulation of Wnt/β-catenin-VEGF signaling in the fetal Dax1-deficient testis, suggesting abnormal activation of signaling pathways in the absence of DAX1 as one mechanism of AHC-HH. Our study reveals novel insight into the role of DAX1 in HH and provides proof-of-principle for the generation of monkey models of human disease via CRISPR/Cas9-mediated gene targeting.

  6. Teaching Critical Thinking in World Regional Geography through Stakeholder Debate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sziarto, Kristin M.; McCarthy, Linda; Padilla, Nicholas L.

    2014-01-01

    Using a stakeholder debate based on a real-world case of regional construction--that of Turkey's application to join the European Union--improved students' critical thinking in an introductory world regional geography course. Such courses are a staple offering among US geography departments, and often the only exposure of non-majors to geographic…

  7. Critical region for an Ising model coupled to causal triangulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerda-Hernández, J.

    2017-02-01

    This paper extends the results obtained by Hernández et al for the annealed Ising model coupled to two-dimensional causal dynamical triangulations. We employ the Fortuin‑Kasteleyn (FK) representation in order to determine a region in the quadrant of the parameters β,μ >0 where the critical curve for the annealed model is possibly located. This can be done by outlining a region where the model has a unique infinite-volume Gibbs measure, and a region where the finite-volume Gibbs measure does not have weak limit (in fact, does not exist if the volume is large enough). We also improve the region where the model has a one dimensional geometry with respect to the unique weak limit measure, which implies that the Ising model on causal triangulation does not have phase transition in this region. Furthermore, we provide a better approximation of the free energy for the coupled model.

  8. Simple Model for Identifying Critical Regions in Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Nicholas S.

    2015-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common abnormal heart rhythm and the single biggest cause of stroke. Ablation, destroying regions of the atria, is applied largely empirically and can be curative but with a disappointing clinical success rate. We design a simple model of activation wave front propagation on an anisotropic structure mimicking the branching network of heart muscle cells. This integration of phenomenological dynamics and pertinent structure shows how AF emerges spontaneously when the transverse cell-to-cell coupling decreases, as occurs with age, beyond a threshold value. We identify critical regions responsible for the initiation and maintenance of AF, the ablation of which terminates AF. The simplicity of the model allows us to calculate analytically the risk of arrhythmia and express the threshold value of transversal cell-to-cell coupling as a function of the model parameters. This threshold value decreases with increasing refractory period by reducing the number of critical regions which can initiate and sustain microreentrant circuits. These biologically testable predictions might inform ablation therapies and arrhythmic risk assessment. PMID:25635565

  9. Simple Model for Identifying Critical Regions in Atrial Fibrillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, Kim; Manani, Kishan A.; Peters, Nicholas S.

    2015-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common abnormal heart rhythm and the single biggest cause of stroke. Ablation, destroying regions of the atria, is applied largely empirically and can be curative but with a disappointing clinical success rate. We design a simple model of activation wave front propagation on an anisotropic structure mimicking the branching network of heart muscle cells. This integration of phenomenological dynamics and pertinent structure shows how AF emerges spontaneously when the transverse cell-to-cell coupling decreases, as occurs with age, beyond a threshold value. We identify critical regions responsible for the initiation and maintenance of AF, the ablation of which terminates AF. The simplicity of the model allows us to calculate analytically the risk of arrhythmia and express the threshold value of transversal cell-to-cell coupling as a function of the model parameters. This threshold value decreases with increasing refractory period by reducing the number of critical regions which can initiate and sustain microreentrant circuits. These biologically testable predictions might inform ablation therapies and arrhythmic risk assessment.

  10. Critical review of studies on atmospheric dispersion in coastal regions

    SciTech Connect

    Shearer, D.L.; Kaleel, R.J.

    1982-09-01

    This study effort was required as a preliminary step prior to initiation of field measurements of atmospheric dispersion in coastal regions. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is in the process of planning an extensive field measurement program to generate data which will serve as improved data bases for licensing decisions, confirmation of regulations, standards, and guides, and for site characterizations. The study being reported here is an effort directed to obtaining as much information as is possible from existing studies that is relevant toward NRC's objectives. For this study, reports covering research and meteorological measurements conducted for industrial purposes, utility needs, military objectives, and academic studies were obtained and critically reviewed in light of NRC's current data needs. This report provides an interpretation of the extent of existing usable information, an indication of the potential for tailoring existing research toward current NRC information needs, and recommendations for several follow-on studies which could provide valuable additional information through reanalysis of the data. Recommendations are also offered regarding new measurement programs. Emphasis is placed on the identification and acquisition of data from atmospheric tracer studies conducted in coastal regions. A total of 225 references were identified which deal with the coastal atmosphere, including meteorological and tracer measurement programs, theoretical descriptions of the relevant processes, and dispersion models.

  11. Criticality and quenched disorder: Harris criterion versus rare regions.

    PubMed

    Vojta, Thomas; Hoyos, José A

    2014-02-21

    We employ scaling arguments and optimal fluctuation theory to establish a general relation between quantum Griffiths singularities and the Harris criterion for quantum phase transitions in disordered systems. If a clean critical point violates the Harris criterion, it is destabilized by weak disorder. At the same time, the Griffiths dynamical exponent z' diverges upon approaching the transition, suggesting unconventional critical behavior. In contrast, if the Harris criterion is fulfilled, power-law Griffiths singularities can coexist with clean critical behavior, but z' saturates at a finite value. We present applications of our theory to a variety of systems including quantum spin chains, classical reaction-diffusion systems and metallic magnets, and we discuss modifications for transitions above the upper critical dimension. Based on these results we propose a unified classification of phase transitions in disordered systems.

  12. Sustaining critical social services during extended regional power blackouts.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, Anu; Morgan, M Granger

    2012-07-01

    Despite continuing efforts to make the electric power system robust, some risk remains of widespread and extended power outages due to extreme weather or acts of terrorism. One way to alleviate the most serious effects of a prolonged blackout is to find local means to secure the continued provision of critical social services upon which the health and safety of society depend. This article outlines and estimates the incremental cost of a strategy that uses small distributed generation, distribution automation, and smart meters to keep a set of critical social services operational during a prolonged power outage that lasts for days or weeks and extends over hundreds of kilometers.

  13. Aggregation propensity of critical regions of the protein Tau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muthee, Micaiah; Ahmed, Azka; Larini, Luca

    The Alzheimer's disease is an irreversible, progressive brain disorder that slowly destroys memory and thinking skills, which eventually leads to the ability to not able to carry out the simplest tasks. The Alzheimer's disease is characterized by the formation of protein aggregates both within and outside of the brain's cells, the neurons. Within the neurons, the aggregation of the protein tau leads to the destruction of the microtubules in the axon of the neuron. Tau belongs to a group of proteins referred to as Microtubule-Associated Proteins. It is extremely flexible and is classified as an intrinsically unstructured protein due to its low propensity to form secondary structure. Tau promotes tubulin assembly into microtubules thereby stabilizing the cytoskeleton of the axon of the neurons. The microtubule binding region of tau consists of 4 pseudo-repeats. In this study, we will focus on the aggregation propensity of two fragments. In this study we will focus on the PHF43 fragment that contains the third pseudo-repeat and has been shown experimentally to aggregate readily. Another fragment that contains the second pseudo-repeat will be considered as well. Mutations in this region are associated with various form of dementia and for this reason we will consider the mutant P301L.

  14. Identifying critical regions in small-world marine metapopulations.

    PubMed

    Watson, James R; Siegel, David A; Kendall, Bruce E; Mitarai, Satoshi; Rassweiller, Andrew; Gaines, Steven D

    2011-10-25

    The precarious state of many nearshore marine ecosystems has prompted the use of marine protected areas as a tool for management and conservation. However, there remains substantial debate over their design and, in particular, how to best account for the spatial dynamics of nearshore marine species. Many commercially important nearshore marine species are sedentary as adults, with limited home ranges. It is as larvae that they disperse greater distances, traveling with ocean currents sometimes hundreds of kilometers. As a result, these species exist in spatially complex systems of connected subpopulations. Here, we explicitly account for the mutual dependence of subpopulations and approach protected area design in terms of network robustness. Our goal is to characterize the topology of nearshore metapopulation networks and their response to perturbation, and to identify critical subpopulations whose protection would reduce the risk for stock collapse. We define metapopulation networks using realistic estimates of larval dispersal generated from ocean circulation simulations and spatially explicit metapopulation models, and we then explore their robustness using node-removal simulation experiments. Nearshore metapopulations show small-world network properties, and we identify a set of highly connected hub subpopulations whose removal maximally disrupts the metapopulation network. Protecting these subpopulations reduces the risk for systemic failure and stock collapse. Our focus on catastrophe avoidance provides a unique perspective for spatial marine planning and the design of marine protected areas.

  15. Characterization of local self-similarity and criticality in the solar active regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosa, R. R.; Vats, H. O.; Ramos, F. M.; Zanandrea, A.; Rodrigues Neto, C.; Fernandes, F. C. R.; Bolzan, M. J. A.; Rempel, E. L.; Brito, R. C.; Vijaykumar, N. L.; Sawant, H. S.

    From solar radio burst data we computed wavelet transforms and frequency distribution for investigation of self-similar temporal variability and power-laws, as the fundamental conditions for characterization of dynamical criticality (self or forced) in the solar active regions. The main result indicates that, as for the global activity, the local coronal magnetic field, in millisecond time scales, can be in a critical state where the dynamics of solar active regions works as avalanches of many small intermittent particle acceleration events.

  16. Physical mapping by FISH of the DiGeorge critical region (DGCR): Involvement of the region in familial cases

    SciTech Connect

    Desmaze, C.; Aikem, M.; Demczuk, S.; Zucman, J.; Plougastel, B.; Delattre, O.; Aurias, A. ); Prieur, M. ); Amblard, F. ); LeDeist, F. ); Croquette, M.F. ); Breviere, G.M. ); Huon, C. ); Le Merrer, M. ); Mathieu, M. ); Sidi, D. ); Stephan, J.L. )

    1993-12-01

    The authors describe the relative ordering, by fluorescence in situ hybridization, of cosmid loci and translocation breakpoints in the DiGeorge syndrome (DGS) critical region of chromosome 22. This physical map enables us to define a large region, commonly deleted in a majority of affected patients, and the smallest deleted region which, when lost, is sufficient to produce DGS. In four instances, a similar large deleted region is observed in a familial context. In these pedigrees, the deletion is encountered in one parent with mild features of the disease. 42 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Longitudinal Evaluation of the Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Testicular Function in 8 Boys with Adrenal Hypoplasia Congenita (AHC) Due to NR0B1 Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Galeotti, Caroline; Lahlou, Zineb; Goullon, Domitille; Sarda-Thibault, Hélène; Cahen-Varsaux, Juliette; Bignon-Topalovic, Joëlle; Bashamboo, Anu; McElreavey, Ken; Brauner, Raja

    2012-01-01

    Background Boys carrying mutations in the NR0B1 gene develop adrenal hypoplasia congenita (AHC) and impaired sexual development due to the combination of hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (HH) and primary defects in spermatogenesis. Methods We analysed the evolution of hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular function of 8 boys with AHC due to NR0B1 mutations. Our objective was to characterize and monitor the progressive deterioration of this function. Results The first symptoms appeared in the neonatal period (n = 5) or between 6 months and 8.7 years (n = 3). Basal plasma adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH) concentrations increased in all boys, whilst cortisol levels decreased in one case. The natremia was equal or below 134 mmol/L and kaliemia was over 5 mmol/L. All had increased plasma renin. In 3 of 4 patients diagnosed in the neonatal period and evaluated during the first year, the basal plasma gonadotropins concentrations, and their response to gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) test (n = 2), and those of testosterone were normal. The plasma inhibin B levels were normal in the first year of life. With the exception of two cases these concentrations decreased to below the normal for age. Anti-Müllerian hormone concentrations were normal for age in all except one case, which had low concentrations before the initiation of testosterone treatment. In 3 of the 8 cases the gene was deleted and the remaining 5 cases carried frameshift mutations that are predicted to introduce a downstream nonsense mutation resulting in a truncated protein. Conclusions The decreases in testosterone and inhibin B levels indicated a progressive loss of testicular function in boys carrying NR0B1 mutations. These non-invasive examinations can help to estimate the age of the testicular degradation and cryopreservation of semen may be considered in these cases as investigational procedure with the aim of restoring fertility. PMID:22761912

  18. Effective Scalar Properties of the Critical Region in Functionality Graded Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Van Siclen, Clinton D

    2003-05-01

    The critical region in a compositionally graded material occurs where the dominant phase ceases to percolate, and so is poorly treated by effective medium theories. To address this problem, equations for the size and effective scalar properties of that region are obtained from percolation theory.

  19. Identification and Development of Critical Workforce Skills in the Chattanooga Region

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dorris, John Peter

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this quantitative study was to identify the workforce skills perceived to be critical in the Chattanooga region, and to explore how colleges and businesses can partner to effectively develop those skills. Data from a June 2011 survey of workforce stakeholders in the Chattanooga region were analyzed. The 78 survey respondents…

  20. Wide quantum critical region of valence fluctuations: Origin of robust quantum criticality in quasicrystal Yb15Al34Au51 under pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Shinji; Miyake, Kazumasa

    2015-03-01

    The mechanism of the emergence of robust quantum criticality in the heavy- electron quasicrystal YR15Al34Au51 is analyzed theoretically. By constructing a minimal model for the quasicrystal and its crystalline approximant, which contain concentric shell structures with Yb and Al-Au clusters, we show that a set of quantum critical points of the first-order valence transition of Yb appears as spots in the ground-state phase diagram. Their critical regions overlap each other, giving rise to a wide quantum critical region. This well explains the robust criticality observed in YR15Al34Au51 under pressure, and predicts the emergence of the common criticality in the crystalline approximant under pressure. The wider critical region in the quasicrystal than that in the crystalline approximant in the T-P phase diagram and the field-induced valence-crossover "region" in the T-H phase diagram are predicted to appear.

  1. A yeast artificial chromosome contig of the critical region for cri-du-chat syndrome.

    PubMed

    Goodart, S A; Simmons, A D; Grady, D; Rojas, K; Moyzis, R K; Lovett, M; Overhauser, J

    1994-11-01

    Cri-du-chat is a chromosomal deletion syndrome characterized by partial deletion of the short arm of chromosome 5. The clinical symptoms include growth and mental retardation, microcephaly, hypertelorism, epicanthal folds, hypotonia, and a high-pitched monochromatic cry that is usually considered diagnostic for the syndrome. Recently, a correlation between clinical features and the extent of the chromosome 5 deletions has identified two regions of the short arm that appear to be critical for the abnormal development manifested in this syndrome. Loss of a small region in 5p15.2 correlates with all of the clinical features of cri-du-chat with the exception of the cat-like cry, which maps to 5p15.3. Here we report the construction of a YAC contig that spans the chromosomal region in 5p15.2 that plays a major role in the etiology of the cri-du-chat syndrome. YACs that span the 2-Mb cri-du-chat critical region have been identified and characterized. This YAC contig lays the groundwork for the construction of a transcriptional map of this region and the eventual identification of genes involved in the clinical features associated with the cri-du-chat syndrome. It also provides a new diagnostic tool for cri-du-chat in the shape of a YAC clone that may span the entire critical region.

  2. A yeast artificial chromosome contig of the critical region for cri-du-chat syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Goodart, S.A.; Rojas, K.; Overhauser, J.

    1994-11-01

    Cri-du-chat is a chromosomal deletion syndrome characterized by partial deletion of the short arm of chromosome 5. The clinical symptoms include growth and mental retardation, microcephaly, hypertelorism, epicanthal folds, hyptonia, and a high-pitched monochromatic cry that is usually considered diagnostic for the syndrome. Recently, a correlation between clinical features and the extent of the chromosome 5 deletions has identified two regions of the short arm that appear to be critical for the abnormal development manifested in this syndrome. Loss of a small region in 5p15.2 correlates with all of the clinical features of cri-du-chat with the exception of the cat-like cry, which maps to 5p15.3. Here the authors report the construction of a YAC contig that spans the chromosomal region in 5p15.2 that plays a major role in the etiology of the cri-du-chat syndrome. YACs that span the 2-Mb cri-du-chat critical region have been identified and characterized. This YAC contig lays the groundwork for the construction of a transcriptional map of this region and the eventual identification of genes involved in the clinical features associated with the cri-du-chat syndrome. It also provides a new diagnostic tool for cri-du-chat in the shape of a YAC clone that may span the entire critical region. 24 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Universities and Regional Development: A Critical Assessment of Tensions and Contradictions. International Studies in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinheiro, Romulo, Ed.; Benneworth, Paul, Ed.; Jones, Glen A., Ed.

    2012-01-01

    Universities are under increasing pressure to help promote socio-economic growth in their local communities. However until now, no systematic, critical attention has been paid to the factors and mechanisms that currently make this process so daunting. In Universities and Regional Development, scholars from Europe, the Americas, Africa, and Asia…

  4. Heart Mountain Relocation Center: A Lesson Using Primary Source Documents To Critically Analyze the Relocation of Japanese Americans to Wyoming. AHC Primary Sources in the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyoming Univ., Laramie. American Heritage Center.

    This lesson, for grades 7-12, correlates with Era 8, Standard 3c of the National History Standards for United States History: "evaluate the internment of Japanese Americans during World War II and assess the implication for civil liberties." The lesson provides background on the internment of Japanese Americans during the war and…

  5. Cloning of a balanced translocation breakpoint mapping in the DiGeorge syndrome critical region

    SciTech Connect

    Demczuk, S.; Zucman, J.; Desmaze, C.

    1994-09-01

    DiGeorge syndrome (DGS) is a developmental defect of thymus, parathyroids and heart, which is associated with microdeletions in chromosomal region 22q11.2. A detailed physical map of the region has been established and a shortest region of overlap based on deletions and unbalanced translocations giving rise to DGS has been derived. Moreover, the breakpoint of a balanced translocation borne by a DGS patient has been localized in that critical region; thereby suggesting that the translocation breakpoint interrupts the or one of the major gene(s) implicated in DGS. We have initiated a chromosome walk by establishing cosmid contigs from probes distally flanking the breakpoint. One contig covers 150 kb of genomic DNA and a second one spans 350 kb in the region and contains the balanced translocation breakpoint. Phylogenetically conserved sequences are being searched for in the vicinity of the breakpoint to be used as probes in order to isolate cDNAs.

  6. Neonatal and pediatric regionalized systems in pediatric emergency mass critical care

    PubMed Central

    Barfield, Wanda D.; Krug, Steven E.; Kanter, Robert K.; Gausche-Hill, Marianne; Brantley, Mary D.; Chung, Sarita; Kissoon, Niranjan

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Improved health outcomes are associated with neonatal and pediatric critical care in well-organized, cohesive, regionalized systems that are prepared to support and rehabilitate critically ill victims of a mass casualty event. However, present systems lack adequate surge capacity for neonatal and pediatric mass critical care. In this document, we outline the present reality and suggest alternative approaches. Methods In May 2008, the Task Force for Mass Critical Care published guidance on provision of mass critical care to adults. Acknowledging that the critical care needs of children during disasters were unaddressed by this effort, a 17-member Steering Committee, assembled by the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education with guidance from members of the American Academy of Pediatrics, convened in April 2009 to determine priority topic areas for pediatric emergency mass critical care recommendations. Steering Committee members established subcommittees by topic area and performed literature reviews of MEDLINE and Ovid databases. The Steering Committee produced draft outlines through consensus-based study of the literature and convened October 6–7, 2009, in New York, NY, to review and revise each outline. Eight draft documents were subsequently developed from the revised outlines as well as through searches of MEDLINE updated through March 2010. The Pediatric Emergency Mass Critical Care Task Force, composed of 36 experts from diverse public health, medical, and disaster response fields, convened in Atlanta, GA, on March 29–30, 2010. Feedback on each manuscript was compiled and the Steering Committee revised each document to reflect expert input in addition to the most current medical literature. Task Force Recommendations States and regions (facilitated by federal partners) should review current emergency operations and devise appropriate plans to address the population-based needs of infants and children in large-scale disasters. Action at

  7. Light Scattering Tests of Fundamental Theories of Transport Properties in the Critical Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gammon, R. W.; Moldover, M. R.

    1985-01-01

    The objective of this program is to measure the decay rates of critical density fluctuations in a simple fluid (xenon) very near its liquid-vapor critical point using laser light scattering and photon correlation spectroscopy. Such experiments have been severely limited on Earth by the presence of gravity which causes large density gradients in the sample when the compressibility diverges approaching the critical point. The goal is to measure decay rates deep in the critical region where the scaled wavevector is the order of 1000. This will require loading the sample to 0.01% of the critical density and taking data as close as 3 microKelvin to the critical temperature (Tc = 289.72 K). Other technical problems have to be addressed such as multiple scattering and the effect of wetting layers. The ability to avoid multiple scattering by using a thin sample (100 microns) was demonstrated, as well as a temperature history which can avoid wetting layers satisfactory temperature control and measurement, and accurate sample loading. Thus the questions of experimental art are solved leaving the important engineering tasks of mounting the experiment to maintain alignment during flight and automating the state-of-the-art temperature bridges for microcomputer control of the experiment.

  8. Delimiting the Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome critical region to 750 kilobase pairs

    SciTech Connect

    Altherr, M.R. |; Wright, T.J.; Denison, K.

    1997-07-11

    Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome (WHS) is a multiple anomaly condition characterized by mental and developmental defects, resulting from the absence of the distal segment of one chromosome 4 short arm (4p16.3). Owing to the complex and variable expression of this disorder, it is thought that the WHS is a contiguous gene syndrome with an undefined number of genes contributing to the phenotype. The 2.2 Mbp genomic segment previously defined as the critical region by the analyses of patients with terminal or interstitial deletions is extremely gene dense and an intensive investigation of the developmental role of all the genes contained within it would be daunting and expensive. Further refinement in the definition of the critical region would be valuable but depends on available patient material and accurate clinical evaluation. In this study, we have utilized fluorescence in situ hybridization to further characterize a WHS patient previously demonstrated to have an interstitial deletion and demonstrate that the distal breakpoint occurs between the loci FGFR3 and D4S168. This reduces the critical region for this syndrome to less than 750 kbp. This has the effect of eliminating several genes previously proposed as contributing to this syndrome and allows further research to focus on a more restricted region of the genome and a limited set of genes for their role in the WHS syndrome. 56 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Real-time Determination of F-region Critical Frequencies Using SuperDARN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, J. M.; Bristow, W. A.

    2004-12-01

    In addition to detecting backscatter from ionospheric field-aligned irregularities, SuperDARN radars are sensitive to ground scatter returns. The profiles of these returns vary in a systematic manner with frequency and can be used to determine HF propagation characteristics and ionospheric critical frequencies. The large spatial coverage and good time resolution provided by the SuperDARN network make it possible to produce maps of high-latitude critical frequencies approximately every 15 minutes. Recent upgrades to the SuperDARN operating software provide the capability to receive the ground scatter profiles and angle of arrival information in real-time via the internet and we use these data to construct near real-time maps of F-region critical frequencies. In this paper, the technique will be described and representative data will be discussed.

  10. Critical probability of percolation over bounded region in N-dimensional Euclidean space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roubin, Emmanuel; Colliat, Jean-Baptiste

    2016-03-01

    Following Tomita and Murakami (Research of Pattern Formation ed R Takaki (Tokyo: KTK Scientific Publishers) pp 197-203) we propose an analytical model to predict the critical probability of percolation. It is based on the excursion set theory which allows us to consider N-dimensional bounded regions. Details are given for the three-dimensional (3D) case and statistically representative volume elements are calculated. Finally, generalisation to the N-dimensional case is made.

  11. Analysis and prediction of the critical regions of antimicrobial peptides based on conditional random fields.

    PubMed

    Chang, Kuan Y; Lin, Tung-pei; Shih, Ling-Yi; Wang, Chien-Kuo

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are potent drug candidates against microbes such as bacteria, fungi, parasites, and viruses. The size of AMPs ranges from less than ten to hundreds of amino acids. Often only a few amino acids or the critical regions of antimicrobial proteins matter the functionality. Accurately predicting the AMP critical regions could benefit the experimental designs. However, no extensive analyses have been done specifically on the AMP critical regions and computational modeling on them is either non-existent or settled to other problems. With a focus on the AMP critical regions, we thus develop a computational model AMPcore by introducing a state-of-the-art machine learning method, conditional random fields. We generate a comprehensive dataset of 798 AMPs cores and a low similarity dataset of 510 representative AMP cores. AMPcore could reach a maximal accuracy of 90% and 0.79 Matthew's correlation coefficient on the comprehensive dataset and a maximal accuracy of 83% and 0.66 MCC on the low similarity dataset. Our analyses of AMP cores follow what we know about AMPs: High in glycine and lysine, but low in aspartic acid, glutamic acid, and methionine; the abundance of α-helical structures; the dominance of positive net charges; the peculiarity of amphipathicity. Two amphipathic sequence motifs within the AMP cores, an amphipathic α-helix and an amphipathic π-helix, are revealed. In addition, a short sequence motif at the N-terminal boundary of AMP cores is reported for the first time: arginine at the P(-1) coupling with glycine at the P1 of AMP cores occurs the most, which might link to microbial cell adhesion.

  12. Critical period of weed control in oilseed rape in two Moroccan regions.

    PubMed

    Maataoui, A; Bouhache, M; Benbella, M; Talouizte, A

    2003-01-01

    The determination of critical period of weed control in oilseed rape is necessary to know the weed control period. To determine the critical period, two fields experiments were carried out during 1995-96 growth season in Loukkos and Saïs regions at two oilseed densities (D1 = 24 and D2 = 36 plants m(-2)). Ten treatments corresponding to plots left weed free or weeded plots until four leaves, flowers bud, flowering, puds formation, and maturity stages of oilseed rape were tested. Density and biomass of weeds were determined at each oilseed stages. Results showed that weed density and biomass were higher in Saïs than in Loukkos sites. For a 10% yield loss, critical period of weed control in Loukkos was from 458 to 720 degree days after emergence (D degrees AE) and from 480 to 720 D degrees AE in oilseed conducted at densities D1 and D2, respectively. In Saïs, critical period of weed control was from 474 to 738 D degrees AE and from 468 to 675 D degrees AE in oilseed conducted at D1 and D2, respectively. It was concluded that the length of the critical period of weed control in oilseed rape grain yield seems to be dependant of the level of the infestation.

  13. The identification of five novel genes in the cri-du-chat critical region

    SciTech Connect

    Simmons, A.D.; Gallardo, T.D.; Lovett, M.

    1994-09-01

    Cri-du-chat is a contiguous gene syndrome associated with deletions in the short arm of chromosome 5 (chr 5). Chr 5p-specific markers have been used to define two critical regions: a larynx malformation region, located at 5p15.3, and a region responsible for the remaining clinical features of the syndrome, which maps to 5p15.2. Thirty cosmids that map to this latter region have been isolated from the LANL chr 5-specific library using 5 STSs. More recently, we have constructed a YAC contig of the region which encompasses 2-3 Mb. The 30 framework cosmids were used in a direct selection with cDNAs from placenta, activated T-cells and cerebellum to isolate an initial set of expressed sequences from this region. Since no genes, to date, have been isolated or localized within the cri-du-chat deletion, a cosmid containing a control reporter gene (ANX6) was used to monitor enrichment. ANX6 cDNAs were enriched by several thousand-fold in the selected cDNAs. A total of nine non overlapping cDNA fragments were obtained from the cDNA pools. These have been ordered within the YAC contig, map to 5 discrete cosmid sets in the critical region and thus conservatively represent five discrete transcription units. The DNA sequences of these fragments are novel by sequence database comparisons. PCR primers were constructed and were used to confirm gene placements in the YAC contig, as well as to investigate the expression profile of these genes in several different tissues and cell types. In one case, these primer sets enabled two of the nine fragments to be linked into a larger cDNA. The nine cDNAs showed various patterns of differential expression in a panel of tissues. These expressed sequences represent the first genes isolated within the cri-du-chat critical region and represent the initial steps in the derivation of a comprehensive inventory and expression profile of the estimated 100 genes that may reside in this region.

  14. County-level effects of prehospital regionalization of critically ill patients: a simulation study

    PubMed Central

    Seymour, Christopher W.; Alotaik, Osama; Wallace, David J.; Elhabashy, Ahmed E.; Chhatwal, Jagpreet; Rea, Thomas D; Angus, Derek C.; Nichol, Graham; Kahn, Jeremy M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Regionalization may improve critical care delivery, yet stakeholders cite concerns about its feasibility. We sought to determine the operational effects of prehospital regionalization of non-trauma, non-arrest critical illness. Design Discrete event simulation study Patients and setting All 2006 hospital discharge data from King County, Washington, linked to all adult, eligible patients transported by county EMS agencies. Methods We simulated active triage of high-risk patients to designated referral centers using a validated prehospital risk score; we studied three regionalization scenarios: (1) up triage, (2) up & down triage, (3) up & down triage after reducing intensive care unit (ICU) beds by 25%. We determined the effect on patient routing, ICU occupancy at referral and non-referral hospitals, and EMS transport times. Measurements and Main Results 119,117 patients were hospitalized at 11 non-referral centers and 76,817 patients were hospitalized at three referral centers. Among 20,835 EMS patients, 7,817 (43%) patients were eligible for up triage and 10,242 (57%) patients were eligible for down triage. At baseline mean daily ICU bed occupancy was 61% referral and 47% at non-referral hospitals. Up-triage increased referral ICU occupancy to 68%, up and down triage to 64%, and up and down triage with bed reduction to 74%. Mean daily non-referral ICU occupancy did not exceed 60%. Total EMS transport time increased by less than 3% with up and down triage. Conclusions Regionalization based on prehospital triage of the critically ill can allocate high-risk patients to referral hospitals without adversely affecting ICU occupancy or prehospital travel time. PMID:26102251

  15. Ontogeny of opiate receptors in the rat medial preoptic area: Critical periods in regional development.

    PubMed

    Hammkr, R P

    1985-01-01

    Opiate receptor labeling was examined throughout the early postnatal period using autoradiography to localize and quantify [(3)H]naloxone binding to μ-type opiate receptors in the medial preoptic area (MPOA). This region begins to exhibit sexual dimorphism of volume and dendritic growth shortly after birth. A distinct concentration of opiate receptor labeling appears on postnatal day 3 in females: this labeling is directly associated with the sexually dimorphic nucleus of the preoptic area (SDN-POA). SDN-POA labeling becomes denser through postnatal day 10 in females and the densely labeled area increases in size to encompass and surround the SDN-POA. These changes in opiate receptor labeling occur only in females, since males show relatively uniform labeling across the region throughout the early postnatal period. The critical time of formation of dense MPOA opiate receptor labeling may be related to endogenous MPOA opioid function and to the critical period of dendritic growth of SDN-POA neurons. The timing of these critical periods and their focus in the SDN-POA are coincident. The possible role of MPOA opiate receptors in modulating growth of MPOA neurons is discussed.

  16. Rare-Region-Induced Avoided Quantum Criticality in Disordered Three-Dimensional Dirac and Weyl Semimetals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pixley, J. H.; Huse, David A.; Das Sarma, S.

    2016-04-01

    We numerically study the effect of short-ranged potential disorder on massless noninteracting three-dimensional Dirac and Weyl fermions, with a focus on the question of the proposed (and extensively theoretically studied) quantum critical point separating semimetal and diffusive-metal phases. We determine the properties of the eigenstates of the disordered Dirac Hamiltonian (H ) and exactly calculate the density of states (DOS) near zero energy, using a combination of Lanczos on H2 and the kernel polynomial method on H . We establish the existence of two distinct types of low-energy eigenstates contributing to the disordered density of states in the weak-disorder semimetal regime. These are (i) typical eigenstates that are well described by linearly dispersing perturbatively dressed Dirac states and (ii) nonperturbative rare eigenstates that are weakly dispersive and quasilocalized in the real-space regions with the largest (and rarest) local random potential. Using twisted boundary conditions, we are able to systematically find and study these two (essentially independent) types of eigenstates. We find that the Dirac states contribute low-energy peaks in the finite-size DOS that arise from the clean eigenstates which shift and broaden in the presence of disorder. On the other hand, we establish that the rare quasilocalized eigenstates contribute a nonzero background DOS which is only weakly energy dependent near zero energy and is exponentially small at weak disorder. We also find that the expected semimetal to diffusive-metal quantum critical point is converted to an avoided quantum criticality that is "rounded out" by nonperturbative effects, with no signs of any singular behavior in the DOS at the energy of the clean Dirac point. However, the crossover effects of the avoided (or hidden) criticality manifest themselves in a so-called quantum critical fan region away from the Dirac energy. We discuss the implications of our results for disordered Dirac and Weyl

  17. Chromosome Breakage Hotspots and Delineation of the Critical Region for the 9p-Deletion Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Christ, Laurie A.; Crowe, Carol A.; Micale, Mark A.; Conroy, Jeffrey M.; Schwartz, Stuart

    1999-01-01

    Summary The clinical features of the 9p-deletion syndrome include dysmorphic facial features (trigonocephaly, midface hypoplasia, upward-slanting palpebral fissures, and a long philtrum) and mental retardation. The majority of these patients appear to have similar cytogenetic breakpoints in 9p22, but some cases show phenotypic heterogeneity. To define the breakpoints of the deleted chromosomes, we studied 24 patients with a deletion of 9p, by high-resolution cytogenetics, FISH with 19 YACs, and PCR using 25 different sequence-tagged sites. Of 10 different breakpoints identified, 9 were localized within an ∼5-Mb region, in 9p22-p23, that encompasses the interval between D9S1869 (telomeric) and D9S162 (centromeric). Eight unrelated patients had a breakpoint (group 1) in the same interval, between D9S274 (948h1) and D9S285 (767f2), suggesting a chromosome-breakage hotspot. Among 12 patients, seven different breakpoints (groups 3–9) were localized to a 2-Mb genomic region between D9S1709 and D9S162, which identified a breakpoint-cluster region. The critical region for the 9p-deletion syndrome maps to a 4–6-Mb region in 9p22-p23. The results from this study have provided insight into both the heterogeneous nature of the breakage in this deletion syndrome and the resultant phenotype-karyotype correlations. PMID:10521304

  18. Deletion of 150 kb in the minimal DiGeorge/velocardiofacial syndrome critical region in mouse.

    PubMed

    Kimber, W L; Hsieh, P; Hirotsune, S; Yuva-Paylor, L; Sutherland, H F; Chen, A; Ruiz-Lozano, P; Hoogstraten-Miller, S L; Chien, K R; Paylor, R; Scambler, P J; Wynshaw-Boris, A

    1999-11-01

    Deletions or rearrangements of human chromosome 22q11 lead to a variety of related clinical syndromes such as DiGeorge syndrome (DGS) and velo--cardiofacial syndrome (VCFS). In addition, patients with 22q11 deletions have an increased incidence of schizophrenia and several studies have mapped susceptibility loci for schizophrenia to this region. Human molecular genetic studies have so far failed to identify the crucial genes or disruption mechanisms that result in these disorders. We have used gene targeting in the mouse to delete a defined region within the conserved DGS critical region (DGCR) on mouse chromosome 16 to prospectively investigate the role of the mouse DGCR in 22q11 syndromes. The deletion spans a conserved portion ( approximately 150 kb) of the proximal region of the DGCR, containing at least seven genes ( Znf74l, Idd, Tsk1, Tsk2, Es2, Gscl and Ctp ). Mice heterozygous for this deletion display no findings of DGS/VCFS in either inbred or mixed backgrounds. However, heterozygous mice display an increase in prepulse inhibition of the startle response, a manifestation of sensorimotor gating that is reduced in humans with schizophrenia. Homozygous deleted mice die soon after implantation, demonstrating that the deleted region contains genes essential for early post-implantation embryonic development. These results suggest that heterozygous deletion of this portion of the DGCR is sufficient for sensorimotor gating abnormalities, but not sufficient to produce the common features of DGS/VCFS in the mouse.

  19. Identify fracture-critical regions inside the proximal femur using statistical parametric mapping

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wenjun; Kornak, John; Harris, Tamara; Keyak, Joyce; Li, Caixia; Lu, Ying; Cheng, Xiaoguang; Lang, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    We identified regions inside the proximal femur that are most strongly associated with hip fracture. Bone densitometry based on such fracture-critical regions showed improved power in discriminating fracture patients from controls. Introduction Hip fractures typically occur in lateral falls, with focal mechanical failure of the sub-volumes of tissue in which the applied stress exceeds the strength. In this study, we describe a new methodology to identify proximal femoral tissue elements with highest association with hip fracture. We hypothesize that bone mineral density (BMD) measured in such sub-volumes discriminates hip fracture risk better than BMD in standard anatomic regions such as the femoral neck and trochanter. Materials and Methods We employed inter-subject registration to transform hip QCT images of 37 patients with hip fractures and 38 age-matched controls into a voxel-based statistical atlas. Within voxels, we performed t-tests between the two groups to identify the regions which differed most. We then randomly divided the 75 scans into a training set and a test set. From the training set, we derived a fracture-driven region of interest (ROI) based on association with fracture. In the test set, we measured BMD in this ROI to determine fracture discrimination efficacy using ROC analysis. Additionally, we compared the BMD distribution differences between the 29 patients with neck fractures and the 8 patients with trochanteric fractures. Results By evaluating fracture discrimination power based on ROC analysis, the fracture-driven ROI had an AUC (area under curve) of 0.92, while anatomic ROIs (including the entire proximal femur, the femoral neck, trochanter and their cortical and trabecular compartments) had AUC values between 0.78 and 0.87. We also observed that the neck fracture patients had lower BMD (p=0.014) in a small region near the femoral neck and the femoral head, and patients with trochanteric fractures had lower BMD in trochanteric regions

  20. Critical linkages between land-use transition and human health in the Himalayan region.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jianchu; Sharma, Rita; Fang, Jing; Xu, Yufen

    2008-02-01

    This article reviews critical linkages between land-use transition and human health in the Himalayan region by applying ecosystem approaches to human health (or EcoHealth). Land-use transition in the Himalayan and similar regions includes sedentarization, agricultural intensification, habitat modification, migration, change of livelihoods and lifestyles, biodiversity loss, and increasing flash floods. These transitions, which can have impacts on human health, are driven by state policies, a market economy, and climate change. Human health is dependent on access to ecosystem services for food, nutrition, medicine, fiber and shelter, fresh water, and clear air. Ecosystem management has been a key means of controlling disease vectors and creating suitable habitats for human well-being. The paper identifies the web of environmental factors that influence human health. Institutional and policy issues for land-use and health transitions are also discussed.

  1. Gas Bearing Control for Safe Operation in Critical Speed Regions - Experimental Verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theisen, Lukas R. S.; Niemann, Hans H.; Galeazzi, Roberto; Santos, Ilmar F.

    2015-11-01

    Gas bearings are popular for their high speed capabilities, low friction and clean operation, but require low clearances and suffer from poor damping properties. The poor damping properties cause high disturbance amplification near the natural frequencies. These become critical when the rotation speed coincides with a natural frequency. In these regions, even low mass unbalances can cause rub and damage the machine. To prevent rubbing, the variation of the rotation speed of machines supported by gas bearings has to be carefully conducted during run-ups and run-downs, by acceleration and deceleration patterns and avoidance of operation near the critical speeds, which is a limiting factor during operation, specially during run-downs. An approach for reducing the vibrations is by feedback controlled lubrication. This paper addresses the challenge of reducing vibrations in rotating machines supported by gas bearings to extend their operating range. Using H∞-design methods, active lubrication techniques are proposed to enhance the damping, which in turn reduces the vibrations to a desired safe level. The control design is validated experimentally on a laboratory test rig, and shown to allow safe shaft rotation speeds up to, in and above the two first critical speeds, which significantly extends the operating range.

  2. Endoscopic endonasal anatomy of superior orbital fissure and orbital apex regions: critical considerations for clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Dallan, Iacopo; Castelnuovo, Paolo; de Notaris, Matteo; Sellari-Franceschini, Stefano; Lenzi, Riccardo; Turri-Zanoni, Mario; Battaglia, Paolo; Prats-Galino, Alberto

    2013-05-01

    The superior orbital fissure is a critical three-dimensional space connecting the middle cranial fossa and the orbit. From an endoscopic viewpoint, only the medial aspect has a clinical significance. It presents a critical relationship with the lateral sellar compartment, the pterygopalatine fossa and the middle cranial fossa. The connective tissue layers and neural and vascular structures of this region are described. The role of Muller's muscle is confirmed, and the utility of the maxillary and optic strut is outlined. Muller's muscle extends for the whole length of the inferior orbital fissure, passes over the maxillary strut and enters the superior orbital fissure, representing a critical surgical landmark. Dividing the tendon between the medial and inferior rectus muscle allows the identification of the main trunk of the oculomotor nerve, and a little laterally, it is usually possible to visualize the first part of the ophthalmic artery. Based on a better knowledge of anatomy, we trust that this area could be readily addressed in clinical situations requiring an extended approach in proximity of the orbital apex.

  3. Scaled equation of state parameters for gases in the critical region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sengers, J. M. H. L.; Greer, W. L.; Sengers, J. V.

    1976-01-01

    In the light of recent theoretical developments, the paper presents an accurate characterization of anomalous thermodynamic behavior of xenon, helium 4, helium 3, carbon dioxide, steam and oxygen in the critical region. This behavior is associated with long range fluctuations in the system and the physical properties depend primarily on a single variable, namely, the correlation length. A description of the thermodynamic behavior of fluids in terms of scaling laws is formulated, and the two successfully used scaled equations of state (NBS equation and Linear Model parametric equation) are compared. Methods for fitting both equations to experimental equation of state data are developed and formulated, and the optimum fit for each of the two scaled equations of the above gases are presented and the results are compared. By extending the experimental data for the above one-component fluids to partially miscible binary liquids, superfluid liquid helium, ferromagnets and solids exhibiting order-disorder transitions, the principle of universality is concluded. Finally by using this principle, the critical regions for nine additional fluids are described.

  4. Critical anatomic region of nasopalatine canal based on tridimensional analysis: cone beam computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Alonso, Ana; Suárez-Quintanilla, Juan Antonio; Muinelo-Lorenzo, Juan; Varela-Mallou, Jesús; Smyth Chamosa, Ernesto; Suárez-Cunqueiro, María Mercedes

    2015-08-06

    The study aim of this was to define the critical anatomic region of the premaxilla by evaluating dimensions of nasopalatine canal, buccal bone plate (BBP) and palatal bone plate (PBP). 230 CBCTs were selected with both, one or no upper central incisors present (+/+, -/+, -/-) and periodontal condition was evaluated. T-student test, ANOVA, Pearson's correlation and a multivariant-linear regression model (MLRM) were used. Regarding gender, significant differences at level 1 (lower NC) were found for: buccal-palatal, transversal and sagittal NC diameters, and NC length (NCL). Regarding dental status, significant differences were found for: total BBP length (tBL) and PBP width (PW2) at level 2 (NCL midpoint). NCL was correlated with PW2, tBL, and PBP length at level 3 (foramina of Stenson level). An MLRM had a high prediction value for NCL (69.3%). Gender is related to NC dimensions. Dental status has an influence on BBP dimensions, but does not influence on NC and PBP. Periodontal condition should be evaluated for precise premaxillae analysis NC diameters at the three anatomical planes are related to each other, while NCL is related to BBP and PBP lengths. A third of premaxilla is taken up by NC, thus, establishing the critical anatomic region.

  5. Transfusion in critical care - a UK regional audit of current practice.

    PubMed

    Plumb, J O M; Taylor, M G; Clissold, E; Grocott, M P W; Gill, R

    2017-02-18

    A consistent message within critical care publications has been that a restrictive transfusion strategy is non-inferior, and possibly superior, to a liberal strategy for stable, non-bleeding critically ill patients. Translation into clinical practice has, however, been slow. Here, we describe the degree of adherence to UK best practice guidelines in a regional network of nine intensive care units within Wessex. All transfusions given during a 2-month period were included (n = 444). Those given for active bleeding or within 24 h of major surgery, trauma or gastrointestinal bleeding were excluded (n = 148). The median (IQR [range]) haemoglobin concentration before transfusion was 73 (68-77 [53-106]) g.l(-1) , with only 34% of transfusion episodes using a transfusion threshold of < 70 g.l(-1) . In a subgroup analysis that did not study patients with a history of cardiac disease (n = 42), haemoglobin concentration before transfusion was 72 (68-77 [50-98]) g.l(-1) , with only 36% of transfusion episodes using a threshold of < 70 g.l(-1) (see Fig. 3). Most blood transfusions given to critically ill patients who were not bleeding in this audit used a haemoglobin threshold > 70 g.l(-1) . The reason why recommendations on transfusion triggers have not translated into clinical practice is unclear. With a clear national drive to decrease usage of blood products and clear evidence that a threshold of 70 g.l(-1) is non-inferior, it is surprising that a scarce and potentially dangerous resource is still being overused within critical care. Simple solutions such as electronic patient records that force pause for thought before blood transfusion, or prescriptions that only allow administration of a single unit in non-emergency circumstances may help to reduce the incidence of unnecessary blood transfusions.

  6. Deletion mapping of 22q11 in CATCH22 syndrome: Identification of a second critical region

    SciTech Connect

    Kurahashi, Hiroki; Nakayama, Takahiro; Nishisho, Isamu

    1996-06-01

    The deletion at 22q11.2 implicates a variety of congenital anomaly syndromes, for which the acronym CATCH22 has been proposed . Most patients with these syndromes share the common large deletion spanning 1-2 Mb, while the phenotypic variability of the patients does not seem to correlate with the extent of the deletions. On the basis of the deletions of rare cases with unbalanced translocation, the shortest region of overlap (SRO) had been identified in the most-centromeric region of the common large deletion. One patient (ADU) has been reported to carry a balanced translocation with the breakpoint located in the SRO. Recently, three transcripts were identified at or very close to the ADU breakpoint (ADUBP), making them strong candidates for CATCH22 syndrome. Here, we describe one patient with a unique deletion at 22q11.2 revealed by quantitative hybridization and/or FISH with six DNA markers in the common large deletion. The patient was dizygous at loci within the SRO and hemizygous only at the most-telomeric locus in the common large deletion. This finding suggests that there must be another critical region in the common large deletion besides the breakpoint of the ADU and that haploinsufficiency of genes in this deletion may also play a major role in CATCH22 pathogenesis. 15 refs., 3 figs.

  7. Minute supernumerary ring chromosome 22 associated with cat eye syndrome: Further delineation of the critical region

    SciTech Connect

    Mears, A.J.; McDermid, H.E.; El-Shanti, H.

    1995-09-01

    Cat eye syndrome (CES) is typically associated with a supernumerary bisatellited marker chromosome (inv dup 22pter-22q11.2) resulting in four copies of this region. We describe an individual showing the inheritance of a minute supernumerary double ring chromosome 22, which resulted in expression of all cardinal features of CES. The size of the ring was determined by DNA dosage analysis and FISH analysis for five loci mapping to 22q11.2. The probes to the loci D22S9, D22S43, and ATP6E were present in four copies, whereas D22S57 and D22S181 were present in two copies. This finding further delineates the distal boundary of the critical region of CES, with ATP6E being the most distal duplicated locus identified. The phenotypically normal father and grandfather of the patient each had a small supernumerary ring chromosome and demonstrated three copies for the loci D22S9, D22S43, and ATP6E. Although three copies of this region have been reported in other cases with CES features, it is possible that the presence of four copies leads to greater susceptibility. 35 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Minute supernumerary ring chromosome 22 associated with cat eye syndrome: further delineation of the critical region.

    PubMed

    Mears, A J; el-Shanti, H; Murray, J C; McDermid, H E; Patil, S R

    1995-09-01

    Cat eye syndrome (CES) is typically associated with a supernumerary bisatellited marker chromosome (inv dup 22pter-22q11.2) resulting in four copies of this region. We describe an individual showing the inheritance of a minute supernumerary double ring chromosome 22, which resulted in expression of all cardinal features of CES. The size of the ring was determined by DNA dosage analysis and FISH analysis for five loci mapping to 22q11.2. The probes to the loci D22S9, D22S43, and ATP6E were present in four copies, whereas D22S57 and D22S181 were present in two copies. This finding further delineates the distal boundary of the critical region of CES, with ATP6E being the most distal duplicated locus identified. The phenotypically normal father and grandfather of the patient each had a small supernumerary ring chromosome and demonstrated three copies for the loci D22S9, D22S43, and ATP6E. Although three copies of this region have been reported in other cases with CES features, it is possible that the presence of four copies leads to greater susceptibility.

  9. Emotional intelligence moderates the relationship between regional gray matter volume in the bilateral temporal pole and critical thinking disposition.

    PubMed

    Yao, Xiaonan; Yuan, Shuge; Yang, Wenjing; Chen, Qunlin; Wei, Dongtao; Hou, Yuling; Zhang, Lijie; Qiu, Jiang; Yang, Dong

    2017-03-29

    Critical thinking enables people to form sound beliefs and provides a basis for emotional life. Research has indicated that individuals with better critical thinking disposition can better recognize and regulate their emotions, though the neuroanatomical mechanisms involved in this process remain to be elucidated. Further, the influence of emotional intelligence on the relationship between brain structure and critical thinking disposition has not been examined. The present study utilized voxel-based morphometry (VBM) to investigate the neural structures underlying critical thinking disposition in a large sample of college students (N = 296). Regional gray matter volume (rGMV) in the bilateral temporal pole, which reflects an individual's ability to process social and emotional information, was negatively correlated with critical thinking disposition. In addition, rGMV in bilateral para hippocampal regions -regions involved in contextual association/emotional regulation-exhibited negative correlation with critical thinking disposition. Further analysis revealed that emotional intelligence moderated the relationship between rGMV of the temporal pole and critical thinking disposition. Specifically, critical thinking disposition was associated with decreased GMV of the temporal pole for individuals who have relatively higher emotional intelligence rather than lower emotional intelligence. The results of the present study indicate that people who have higher emotional intelligence exhibit more effective and automatic processing of emotional information and tend to be strong critical thinkers.

  10. Experimental Study of the Isochoric Heat Capacity of Diethyl Ether (DEE) in the Critical and Supercritical Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polikhronidi, N. G.; Abdulagatov, I. M.; Batyrova, R. G.; Stepanov, G. V.; Wu, J. T.; Ustuzhanin, E. E.

    2012-02-01

    Two- and one-phase liquid and vapor isochoric heat capacities ( C V ρ T relationship) of diethyl ether (DEE) in the critical and supercritical regions have been measured with a high-temperature and high-pressure nearly constant-volume adiabatic calorimeter. The measurements were carried out in the temperature range from 347 K to 575 K for 12 liquid and 5 vapor densities from 212.6 kg·m-3 to 534.6 kg·m-3. The expanded uncertainties (coverage factor k = 2, two-standard deviation estimate) for values of the heat capacity were 2% to 3% in the near-critical region, 1.0% to 1.5% for the liquid isochores, and 3% to 4% for the vapor isochores. The uncertainties of density ( ρ) and temperature ( T) measurements were 0.02% and 15 mK, respectively. The values of the internal energy, U( T, V), and second temperature derivative of pressure, (∂2 P/∂ T 2) ρ , were derived using the measured C V data near the critical point. The critical anomaly of the measured C V and derived values of U( T, V) and (∂2 P/∂ T 2) ρ in the critical and supercritical regions were interpreted in terms of the scaling theory of critical phenomena. The asymptotic critical amplitudes {({A_0^+} and {A_0^- )}} of the scaling power laws along the critical isochore for one- and two-phase C V were calculated from the measured values of C V . Experimentally derived values of the critical amplitude ratio for {CV left({A_0^+ /A_0^- = 0.521}right)} are in good agreement with the values predicted by scaling theory. The measured C V data for DEE were analyzed to study the behavior of loci of isothermal and isochoric C V maxima and minima in the critical and supercritical regions.

  11. New Resolved Resonance Region Evaluation for 63Cu and 65Cu for Nuclear Criticality Safety Program

    SciTech Connect

    Sobes, Vladimir; Leal, Luiz C; Guber, Klaus H; Forget, Benoit; Kopecky, S.; Schillebeeckx, P.; Siegler, P.

    2014-01-01

    A new resolved resonance region evaluation of 63Cu and 65Cu was done in the energy region from 10-5 eV to 99.5 keV. The R-Matrix SAMMY method using the Reich-Moore approximation was used to create a new set of consistent resonance parameters. The new evaluation was based on three experimental transmission data sets; two measured at ORELA and one from MITR, and two radiative capture experimental data sets from GELINA. A total of 141 new resonances were identied for 63Cu and 117 for 65Cu. The corresponding set of external resonances for each isotope was based on the identied resonances above 99.5 keV from the ORELA transmission data. The negative external levels (bound levels) were determined to match the dierential thermal cross section measured at the MITR. Double dierential elastic scattering cross sections were calculated from the new set of resonance parameters. Benchmarking calculations were carried out on a set of ICSBEP benchmarks. This work is in support of the DOE Nuclear Criticality Safety Program.

  12. Risk prediction of Critical Infrastructures against extreme natural hazards: local and regional scale analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosato, Vittorio; Hounjet, Micheline; Burzel, Andreas; Di Pietro, Antonio; Tofani, Alberto; Pollino, Maurizio; Giovinazzi, Sonia

    2016-04-01

    Natural hazard events can induce severe impacts on the built environment; they can hit wide and densely populated areas, where there is a large number of (inter)dependent technological systems whose damages could cause the failure or malfunctioning of further different services, spreading the impacts on wider geographical areas. The EU project CIPRNet (Critical Infrastructures Preparedness and Resilience Research Network) is realizing an unprecedented Decision Support System (DSS) which enables to operationally perform risk prediction on Critical Infrastructures (CI) by predicting the occurrence of natural events (from long term weather to short nowcast predictions, correlating intrinsic vulnerabilities of CI elements with the different events' manifestation strengths, and analysing the resulting Damage Scenario. The Damage Scenario is then transformed into an Impact Scenario, where punctual CI element damages are transformed into micro (local area) or meso (regional) scale Services Outages. At the smaller scale, the DSS simulates detailed city models (where CI dependencies are explicitly accounted for) that are of important input for crisis management organizations whereas, at the regional scale by using approximate System-of-Systems model describing systemic interactions, the focus is on raising awareness. The DSS has allowed to develop a novel simulation framework for predicting earthquakes shake maps originating from a given seismic event, considering the shock wave propagation in inhomogeneous media and the subsequent produced damages by estimating building vulnerabilities on the basis of a phenomenological model [1, 2]. Moreover, in presence of areas containing river basins, when abundant precipitations are expected, the DSS solves the hydrodynamic 1D/2D models of the river basins for predicting the flux runoff and the corresponding flood dynamics. This calculation allows the estimation of the Damage Scenario and triggers the evaluation of the Impact Scenario

  13. Molecular cytogenetic analysis of Xq critical regions in premature ovarian failure

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background One of the frequent reasons for unsuccessful conception is premature ovarian failure/primary ovarian insufficiency (POF/POI) that is defined as the loss of functional follicles below the age of 40 years. Among the genetic causes the most common one involves the X chromosome, as in Turner syndrome, partial X deletion and X-autosome translocations. Here we report a case of a 27-year-old female patient referred to genetic counselling because of premature ovarian failure. The aim of this case study to perform molecular genetic and cytogenetic analyses in order to identify the exact genetic background of the pathogenic phenotype. Results For premature ovarian failure disease diagnostics we performed the Fragile mental retardation 1 gene analysis using Southern blot technique and Repeat Primed PCR in order to identify the relationship between the Fragile mental retardation 1 gene premutation status and the premature ovarion failure disease. At this early onset, the premature ovarian failure affected patient we detected one normal allele of Fragile mental retardation 1 gene and we couldn’t verify the methylated allele, therefore we performed the cytogenetic analyses using G-banding and fluorescent in situ hybridization methods and a high resolution molecular cytogenetic method, the array comparative genomic hybridization technique. For this patient applying the G-banding, we identified a large deletion on the X chromosome at the critical region (ChrX q21.31-q28) which is associated with the premature ovarian failure phenotype. In order to detect the exact breakpoints, we used a special cytogenetic array ISCA plus CGH array and we verified a 67.355 Mb size loss at the critical region which include total 795 genes. Conclusions We conclude for this case study that the karyotyping is definitely helpful in the evaluation of premature ovarian failure patients, to identify the non submicroscopic chromosomal rearrangement, and using the array CGH technique we can

  14. The Left Fusiform Gyrus is a Critical Region Contributing to the Core Behavioral Profile of Semantic Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Junhua; Chen, Keliang; Chen, Yan; Fang, Yuxing; Yang, Qing; Lv, Yingru; Lin, Nan; Bi, Yanchao; Guo, Qihao; Han, Zaizhu

    2016-01-01

    Given that extensive cerebral regions are co-atrophic in semantic dementia (SD), it is not yet known which critical regions (SD-semantic-critical regions) are really responsible for the semantic deficits of SD. To identify the SD-semantic-critical regions, we explored the relationship between the degree of cerebral atrophy in the whole brain and the severity of semantic deficits in 19 individuals with SD. We found that the gray matter volumes (GMVs) of two regions [left fusiform gyrus (lFFG) and left parahippocampal gyrus (lPHG)] significantly correlated with the semantic scores of patients with SD. Importantly, the effects of the lFFG remained significant after controlling for the GMVs of the lPHG. Moreover, the effects of the region could not be accounted for by the total GMV, general cognitive ability, laterality of brain atrophy, or control task performance. We further observed that each atrophic portion of the lFFG along the anterior–posterior axis might dedicate to the loss of semantic functions in SD. These results reveal that the lFFG could be a critical region contributing to the semantic deficits of SD. PMID:27242479

  15. Critical Reflectance Derived from MODIS: Application for the Retrieval of Aerosol Absorption over Desert Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wells, Kelley C.; Martins, J. Vanderlei; Remer, Lorraine A.; Kreidenweis, Sonia M.; Stephens, Graeme L.

    2012-01-01

    Aerosols are tiny suspended particles in the atmosphere that scatter and absorb sunlight. Smoke particles are aerosols, as are sea salt, particulate pollution and airborne dust. When you look down at the earth from space sometimes you can see vast palls of whitish smoke or brownish dust being transported by winds. The reason that you can see these aerosols is because they are reflecting incoming sunlight back to the view in space. The reason for the difference in color between the different types of aerosol is that the particles arc also absorbing sunlight at different wavelengths. Dust appears brownish or reddish because it absorbs light in the blue wavelengths and scatters more reddish light to space, Knowing how much light is scattered versus how much is absorbed, and knowin that as a function of wavelength is essential to being able to quantify the role aerosols play in the energy balance of the earth and in climate change. It is not easy measuring the absorption properties of aerosols when they are suspended in the atmosphere. People have been doing this one substance at a time in the laboratory, but substances mix when they are in the atmosphere and the net absorption effect of all the particles in a column of air is a goal of remote sensing that has not yet been completely successful. In this paper we use a technique based on observing the point at which aerosols change from brightening the surface beneath to darkening it. If aerosols brighten a surface. they must scatter more light to space. If they darken the surface. they must be absorbing more. That cross over point is called the critical reflectance and in this paper we show that critical reflectance is a monotonic function of the intrinsic absorption properties of the particles. This parameter we call the single scattering albedo. We apply the technique to MODIS imagery over the Sahara and Sahel regions to retrieve the single scattering albedo in seven wavelengths, compare these retrievals to ground

  16. Long-range mapping and construction of a YAC contig within the cat eye syndrome critical region.

    PubMed

    McDermid, H E; McTaggart, K E; Riazi, M A; Hudson, T J; Budarf, M L; Emanuel, B S; Bell, C J

    1996-12-01

    Cat eye syndrome (CES) is typically associated with a supernumerary bisatellited marker chromosome derived from human chromosome 22pter to 22q11.2. The region of 22q duplicated in the typical CES marker chromosome extends between the centromere and locus D22S36. We have constructed a long-range restriction map of this region using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and probes to 10 loci (11 probes). The map covers -3.6 Mb. We have also used 15 loci to construct a yeast artificial chromosome contig, which encompasses about half of the region critical to the production of the CES phenotype (centromere to D22S57). Thus, the CES critical region has been mapped and a substantial portion of it cloned in preparation for the isolation of genes in this region.

  17. A YAC contig encompassing the Treacher Collins syndrome critical region at 5q31. 3-32

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, J.; Gladwin, A.J.; Perveen, R.; Dixon, M.J. ); Loftus, S.K.; Wasmuth, J.J. ); Riley, J.H.; Anand, R.

    1994-08-01

    Treacher Collins syndrome (TCOF1) is an autosomal dominant disorder of craniofacial development the features of which include conductive hearing loss and cleft palate. Previous studies have localized the TCOF1 locus between D5S519 (proximal) and SPARC (distal), a region of 22 centirays as estimated by radiation hybrid mapping. In the current investigation the authors have created a contig across the TCOF1 critical region, using YAC clones. Isolation of a novel short tandem repeat polymorphism corresponding to the end of one of the YACs has allowed reduction of the size of the critical region to [approximately] 840 kb, which has been covered with three nonchimeric YACs. Restriction mapping has revealed that the region contains a high density of clustered rare-cutter restriction sites, suggesting that it may contain a number of different genes. The results of the present investigation have further allowed confirmation that the RPS14 locus lies proximal to the critical region and can thereby be excluded from a role in the pathogenesis of TCOF1, while ANX6 lies within the TCOF1 critical region and remains a potential candidate for the mutated gene. 26 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Quantum-critical region of the disorder-driven superconductor-insulator transition.

    SciTech Connect

    Baturina, T. T.; Bilusic, A.; Mironov, A. Yu.; Vinokur, V. M.; Baklanov, M. R.; Strunk, C.

    2007-11-01

    We investigate low temperature transport properties of thin TiN superconducting films, differing by the degree of disorder. At zero magnetic field we find an extremely sharp separation between the superconducting- and insulating phases, indicating a direct superconductor-insulator transition without an intermediate metallic phase. We show that in the critical region of the transition a peculiar highly inhomogeneous insulating state with superconducting correlations forms. The insulating films exhibit thermally activated conductivity and huge positive magnetoresistance at low magnetic fields. A sharp depinning transition at some voltage V{sub T} is observed in the I-V curves at very low temperatures. We propose a percolation type of depinning with the threshold voltage determined by the Coulomb blockade energy for the Cooper pairs between neighboring self-induced superconducting islands, with V{sub T} being the total voltage along the first conduction path. The observed hysteretic behavior of the threshold and steps on the dI/dV vs. V curves support this percolation picture of the depinning transition.

  19. Structure of the dimerization domain of DiGeorge critical region 8

    SciTech Connect

    Senturia, R.; Faller, M.; Yin, S.; Loo, J.A.; Cascio, D.; Sawaya, M.R.; Hwang, D.; Clubb, R.T.; Guo, F.

    2010-09-27

    Maturation of microRNAs (miRNAs, {approx}22nt) from long primary transcripts [primary miRNAs (pri-miRNAs)] is regulated during development and is altered in diseases such as cancer. The first processing step is a cleavage mediated by the Microprocessor complex containing the Drosha nuclease and the RNA-binding protein DiGeorge critical region 8 (DGCR8). We previously reported that dimeric DGCR8 binds heme and that the heme-bound DGCR8 is more active than the heme-free form. Here, we identified a conserved dimerization domain in DGCR8. Our crystal structure of this domain (residues 298-352) at 1.7 {angstrom} resolution demonstrates a previously unknown use of a WW motif as a platform for extensive dimerization interactions. The dimerization domain of DGCR8 is embedded in an independently folded heme-binding domain and directly contributes to association with heme. Heme-binding-deficient DGCR8 mutants have reduced pri-miRNA processing activity in vitro. Our study provides structural and biochemical bases for understanding how dimerization and heme binding of DGCR8 may contribute to regulation of miRNA biogenesis.

  20. Global differential expression of genes located in the Down Syndrome Critical Region in normal human brain

    PubMed Central

    Montoya, Julio Cesar; Fajardo, Dianora; Peña, Angela; Sánchez, Adalberto; Domínguez, Martha C; Satizábal, José María

    2014-01-01

    Background: The information of gene expression obtained from databases, have made possible the extraction and analysis of data related with several molecular processes involving not only in brain homeostasis but its disruption in some neuropathologies; principally in Down syndrome and the Alzheimer disease. Objective: To correlate the levels of transcription of 19 genes located in the Down Syndrome Critical Region (DSCR) with their expression in several substructures of normal human brain. Methods: There were obtained expression profiles of 19 DSCR genes in 42 brain substructures, from gene expression values available at the database of the human brain of the Brain Atlas of the Allen Institute for Brain Sciences", (http://human.brain-map.org/). The co-expression patterns of DSCR genes in brain were calculated by using multivariate statistical methods. Results: Highest levels of gene expression were registered at caudate nucleus, nucleus accumbens and putamen among central areas of cerebral cortex. Increased expression levels of RCAN1 that encode by a protein involved in signal transduction process of the CNS were recorded for PCP4 that participates in the binding to calmodulin and TTC3; a protein that is associated with differentiation of neurons. That previously identified brain structures play a crucial role in the learning process, in different class of memory and in motor skills. Conclusion: The precise regulation of DSCR gene expression is crucial to maintain the brain homeostasis, especially in those areas with high levels of gene expression associated with a remarkable process of learning and cognition. PMID:25767303

  1. Structure of the dimerization domain of DiGeorge critical region 8.

    PubMed

    Senturia, Rachel; Faller, Michael; Yin, Sheng; Loo, Joseph A; Cascio, Duilio; Sawaya, Michael R; Hwang, Daniel; Clubb, Robert T; Guo, Feng

    2010-07-01

    Maturation of microRNAs (miRNAs, approximately 22nt) from long primary transcripts [primary miRNAs (pri-miRNAs)] is regulated during development and is altered in diseases such as cancer. The first processing step is a cleavage mediated by the Microprocessor complex containing the Drosha nuclease and the RNA-binding protein DiGeorge critical region 8 (DGCR8). We previously reported that dimeric DGCR8 binds heme and that the heme-bound DGCR8 is more active than the heme-free form. Here, we identified a conserved dimerization domain in DGCR8. Our crystal structure of this domain (residues 298-352) at 1.7 A resolution demonstrates a previously unknown use of a WW motif as a platform for extensive dimerization interactions. The dimerization domain of DGCR8 is embedded in an independently folded heme-binding domain and directly contributes to association with heme. Heme-binding-deficient DGCR8 mutants have reduced pri-miRNA processing activity in vitro. Our study provides structural and biochemical bases for understanding how dimerization and heme binding of DGCR8 may contribute to regulation of miRNA biogenesis.

  2. Caspases cleave and inhibit the microRNA processing protein DiGeorge Critical Region 8.

    PubMed

    Gong, Ming; Chen, Yanqiu; Senturia, Rachel; Ulgherait, Matthew; Faller, Michael; Guo, Feng

    2012-06-01

    DGCR8 (DiGeorge Critical Region 8) is an essential microRNA (miRNA) processing protein that recognizes primary transcripts of miRNAs (pri-miRNAs) and triggers their cleavage by the Drosha nuclease. We previously found that Fe(III) heme binds and activates DGCR8. Here we report that in HeLa cells, DGCR8 undergoes two proteolytic events that produce two C-terminal fragments called DGCR8(C1) and DGCR8(C2) , respectively. DGCR8(C2) accumulates during apoptosis and is generated through cleavage by a caspase. The caspase cleavage site is located in the central loop of the heme-binding domain. Cleavage of DGCR8 by caspase-3 in vitro results in loss of the otherwise tightly bound Fe(III) heme cofactor, dissociation of the N- and C-terminal proteolytic fragments, and inhibition of the pri-miRNA processing activity. These results reveal an intrinsic mechanism in the DGCR8 protein that seems to have evolved for regulating miRNA processing via association with Fe(III) heme and proteolytic cleavage by caspases. Decreased expression of miRNAs has been observed in apoptotic cells, and this change was attributed to caspase-mediated cleavage of a down-stream miRNA processing nuclease Dicer. We suggest that both the Drosha and Dicer cleavage steps of the miRNA maturation pathway may be inhibited in apoptosis and other biological processes where caspases are activated.

  3. A critical review of controlled clinical trials for peripheral neuropathic pain and complex regional pain syndromes.

    PubMed

    Kingery, W S

    1997-11-01

    The purpose of this review was to identify and analyze the controlled clinical trial data for peripheral neuropathic pain (PNP) and complex regional pain syndromes (CRPS). A total of 72 articles were found, which included 92 controlled drug trials using 48 different treatments. The methods of these studies were critically reviewed and the results summarized and compared. The PNP trial literature gave consistent support (two or more trials) for the analgesic effectiveness of tricyclic antidepressants, intravenous and topical lidocaine, intravenous ketamine, carbamazepine and topical aspirin. There was limited support (one trial) for the analgesic effectiveness of oral, topical and epidural clonidine and for subcutaneous ketamine. The trial data were contradictory for mexiletine, phenytoin, topical capsaicin, oral non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medication, and intravenous morphine. Analysis of the trial methods indicated that mexiletine and intravenous morphine were probably effective analgesics for PNP, while non-steroidals were probably ineffective. Codeine, magnesium chloride, propranolol, lorazepam, and intravenous phentolamine all failed to provide analgesia in single trials. There were no long-term data supporting the analgesic effectiveness of any drug and the etiology of the neuropathy did not predict treatment outcome. Review of the controlled trial literature for CRPS identified several potential problems with current clinical practices. The trial data only gave consistent support for analgesia with corticosteroids, which had long-term effectiveness. There was limited support for the analgesic effectiveness of topical dimethylsulfoxyde (DMSO), epidural clonidine and intravenous regional blocks (IVRBs) with bretylium and ketanserin. The trial data were contradictory for intranasal calcitonin and intravenous phentolamine and analysis of the trial methods indicated that both treatments were probably ineffective for most patients. There were consistent trial

  4. A Paternally Inherited Duplication in the Prader-Willi/Angelman Syndrome Critical Region: A Case and Family Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veltman, Marijcke W. M.; Thompson, Russell J.; Craig, Ellen E.; Dennis, Nicholas R.; Roberts, Sian E.; Moore, Vanessa; Brown, Josie A.; Bolton, Patrick F.

    2005-01-01

    The Prader-Willi/Angelman Critical Region (PWACR; Chromosome 15q11-13) is of interest as a potential locus for genes conferring susceptibility to autism spectrum disorders (ASD). This report describes a female proband referred for evaluation of a possible ASD. Genetic analyses indicated that the proband, her father and one of her sisters, carried…

  5. Zitkala-Sa and the Problem of Regionalism: Nations, Narratives, and Critical Traditions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Totten, Gary

    2005-01-01

    Although Yankton Sioux writer Zitkala-Sa (Gertrude Bonnin, 1876-1938) was, as P. Jane Hafen notes, "virtually unknown for many decades," much critical work has appeared since Dexter Fisher's 1979 article,"Zitkala-Sa: Evolution of a Writer." Some critics desiring to bring Zitkala-Sa into the conversation about turn-of-the-century American women…

  6. Choked flow of fluid nitrogen with emphasis on the thermodynamic critical region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, R. C.; Simoneau, R. J.; Ehlers, R. C.

    1972-01-01

    Experimental measurements of critical flow rate and pressure ratio for nitrogen flowing through a nozzle are presented. Data for selected stagnation isotherms from 87.5 to 234 K with pressures to 9.3 MN/m2 are compared to an equilibrium model with real fluid properties and also a nonequilibrium model. Critical flow pressure ratio along an isotherm tends to peak while the flow rate indicates an inflection. The point is closely associated with the transposed critical temperature and represents a change in the fluid structure.

  7. A region of mouse chromosome 16 is syntenic to the DiGeorge, velocardiofacial syndrome minimal critical region.

    PubMed

    Galili, N; Baldwin, H S; Lund, J; Reeves, R; Gong, W; Wang, Z; Roe, B A; Emanuel, B S; Nayak, S; Mickanin, C; Budarf, M L; Buck, C A

    1997-01-01

    DGS and VCFS, haploinsufficiencies characterized by multiple craniofacial and cardiac abnormalities, are associated with a microdeletion of chromosome 22q11.2. Here we document synteny between a 150-kb region on mouse chromosome 16 and the most commonly deleted portion of 22q11.2. Seven genes, all of which are transcribed in the early mouse embryo, have been identified. Of particular interest are two serine/threonine kinase genes and a novel goosecoid-like homeobox gene (Gscl). Comparative sequence analysis of a 38-kb segment reveals similarities in gene content, order, exon composition, and transcriptional direction. Therefore, if deletion of these genes results in DGS/VCFS in humans, then haploinsufficiencies involving this region of chromosome 16 should recapitulate the developmental field defects characteristic of this syndrome.

  8. Long-range mapping and construction of a YAC contig within the cat eye syndrome critical region

    SciTech Connect

    Riazi, M.A.; Mears, A.J.; McDermid, H.E.

    1994-09-01

    Cat eye syndrome is characterized cytogenetically by the presence of a supernumerary marker chromosome derived from duplicated regions of 22pter-22q11.2. In order to study this syndrome, we have mapped and cloned within the CES critical region (CESCR) in 22q11.2. A long-range map was constructed using probes previously mapped to the CESCR by somatic cell hybrids. The map spans from probes LN63 to D22S36 and covers approximately 3 Mb. Probes within the region were used to isolate YACs, producing a contig of approximately 1.5 Mb (cLN63-D22S57). DNA studies of a cat eye patient with an unusual marker chromosome refined the minimal critical region proximal to D22S57, indicating that most of the CESCR is now cloned. The physical map will allow us to further delineate the CESCR and isolate genes in the region. Towards this end, we have performed {open_quotes}exon-trapping{close_quotes}on a cosmid, CN63, in this region. A 250 bp exon was isolated which maps to the CESCR and has no homology in GenBank. Further characterization of the gene containing this exon is in progress.

  9. Water Information System Platforms Addressing Critical Societal Needs in the Mena Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Habib, Shahid; Kfouri, Claire; Peters, Mark

    2012-01-01

    The MENA region includes 18 countries, the occupied Palestinian territories and Western Sahara. However, the region of interest for this study has a strategic interest in countries adjacent to the Mediterranean Sea, which includes, Morocco, Tunisia, Egypt, Lebanon and Jordan. The 90% of the water in the MENA region is used for the agriculture use. By the end of this century. this region is projected to experience an increase of 3 C to 5 C in mean temperatures and a 20% decline in precipitation (lPCC, 2007). Due to lower precipitation, water run-off is projected to drop by 20% to 30% in most of MENA by 2050 Reduced stream flow and groundwater recharge might lead to a reduction in water supply of 10% or greater by 2050. Therefore, per IPCC projections in temperature rise and precipitation decline in the region, the scarcity of water will become more acute with population growth, and rising demand of food in the region. Additionally, the trans boundary water issues will continue to plague the region in terms of sharing data for better management of water resources. Such pressing issues have brought The World Bank, USAID and NASA to jointly collaborate for establishing integrated, modern, up to date NASA developed capabilities for countries in the MENA region for addressing water resource issues and adapting to climate change impacts for improved decision making and societal benefit. This initiative was launched in October 2011 and is schedule to be completed by the end of2015.

  10. Weak measurement of the composite Goos-Hänchen shift in the critical region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santana, Octávio J. S.; Carvalho, Silvânia A.; De Leo, Stefano; de Araujo, Luís E. E.

    2016-08-01

    By using a weak measurement technique, we investigated the interplay between the angular and lateral Goos-Haenchen shift of a focused He-Ne laser beam for incidence near the critical angle. We verified that this interplay dramatically affects the composite Goos-Haenchen shift of the propagated beam. The experimental results confirm theoretical predictions that recently appeared in the literature.

  11. Detection of Critical LUCC Indices and Sensitive Watershed Regions Related to Lake Algal Blooms: A Case Study of Taihu Lake

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chen; Ma, Ronghua; Su, Zhihu; Zhu, Qing

    2015-01-01

    Taihu Lake in China has suffered from severe eutrophication over the past 20 years which is partly due to significant land use/cover change (LUCC). There is an increasing need to detect the critical watershed region that significantly affects lake water degradation, which has great significance for environmental protection. However, previous studies have obtained conflicting results because of non–uniform lake indicators and inadequate time periods. To identify the sensitive LUCC indices and buffer distance regions, three lake divisions (Meiliang Lake, Zhushan Lake and Western Coastal region) and their watershed region within the Taihu Lake basin were chosen as study sites, the algal area was used as a uniform lake quality indicator and modeled with LUCC indices over the whole time series. Results showed that wetland (WL) and landscape index such as Shannon diversity index (SHDI) appeared to be sensitive LUCC indices when the buffer distance was less than 5 km, while agricultural land (AL) and landscape fragmentation (Ci) gradually became sensitive indices as buffer distances increased to more than 5 km. For the relationship between LUCC and lake algal area, LUCC of the WC region seems to have no significant effect on lake water quality. Conversely, LUCC within ML and ZS region influenced algal area of corresponding lake divisions greatly, while the most sensitive regions were found in 3 km to 5 km, rather than the whole catchment. These results will be beneficial for the further understanding of the relationship between LUCC and lake water quality, and will provide a practical basis for the identification of critical regions for lake. PMID:25642691

  12. Detection of critical LUCC indices and sensitive watershed regions related to lake algal blooms: a case study of Taihu Lake.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chen; Ma, Ronghua; Su, Zhihu; Zhu, Qing

    2015-01-29

    Taihu Lake in China has suffered from severe eutrophication over the past 20 years which is partly due to significant land use/cover change (LUCC). There is an increasing need to detect the critical watershed region that significantly affects lake water degradation, which has great significance for environmental protection. However, previous studies have obtained conflicting results because of non-uniform lake indicators and inadequate time periods. To identify the sensitive LUCC indices and buffer distance regions, three lake divisions (Meiliang Lake, Zhushan Lake and Western Coastal region) and their watershed region within the Taihu Lake basin were chosen as study sites, the algal area was used as a uniform lake quality indicator and modeled with LUCC indices over the whole time series. Results showed that wetland (WL) and landscape index such as Shannon diversity index (SHDI) appeared to be sensitive LUCC indices when the buffer distance was less than 5 km, while agricultural land (AL) and landscape fragmentation (Ci) gradually became sensitive indices as buffer distances increased to more than 5 km. For the relationship between LUCC and lake algal area, LUCC of the WC region seems to have no significant effect on lake water quality. Conversely, LUCC within ML and ZS region influenced algal area of corresponding lake divisions greatly, while the most sensitive regions were found in 3 km to 5 km, rather than the whole catchment. These results will be beneficial for the further understanding of the relationship between LUCC and lake water quality, and will provide a practical basis for the identification of critical regions for lake.

  13. Weak measurement of the composite Goos-Hänchen shift in the critical region.

    PubMed

    Santana, Octávio J S; Carvalho, Silvânia A; De Leo, Stefano; de Araujo, Luís E E

    2016-08-15

    By using a weak measurement technique, we investigated the interplay between the angular and the lateral Goos-Hänchen shift of a focused He-Ne laser beam for incidence near the critical angle. We verified that this interplay dramatically affects the composite Goos-Hänchen shift of the propagated beam. The experimental results confirm theoretical predictions that recently appeared in the literature.

  14. A chicken model for DGCR6 as a modifier gene in the DiGeorge critical region.

    PubMed

    Hierck, Beerend P; Molin, Danil G M; Boot, Marit J; Poelmann, Robert E; Gittenberger-de Groot, Adriana C

    2004-09-01

    DGCR6 is the most centromeric gene in the human DiGeorge critical region and is the only gene in the region with a second functional copy on a repeat localized more distally on chromosome 22. We isolated the chicken ortholog of DGCR6 and showed an embryonic expression pattern that is initially broad but becomes gradually restricted to neural crest cell derivatives of the cardiovasculature. Retrovirus based gene transduction was used to deliver sense and antisense messages to premigrating neural crest cells in vivo. Embryos in which DGCR6 expression was attenuated revealed cardiovascular anomalies reminiscent of those found in DiGeorge syndrome. Moreover, the expression profiles of three other genes from the DiGeorge critical region, TBX-1, UFD1L, and HIRA, were shown to be altered in this model. TBX-1 and UFD1L levels were increased, whereas HIRA was decreased in the hearts and pharyngeal arches of embryos treated with antisense or partial sense constructs, but not with sense constructs for DGCR6. The expression changes were transient and followed the normal DGCR6 expression profile. These data show that neural crest cells might have a role in the distribution of modulator signals to the heart and pharyngeal arches. Moreover, it shows a repressor function for DGCR6 on the expression of TBX-1 and UFD1L. For the first time, DiGeorge syndrome is shown to be a contiguous gene syndrome in which not only several genes from the critical region, but also different cell types within the embryo, interact in the development of the phenotype.

  15. Comparative study of approaches based on the differential critical region and correlation functions in modeling phase-transformation kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomellini, Massimo; Fanfoni, Massimo

    2014-11-01

    The statistical methods exploiting the "Correlation-Functions" or the "Differential-Critical-Region" are both suitable for describing phase transformation kinetics ruled by nucleation and growth. We present a critical analysis of these two approaches, with particular emphasis to transformations ruled by diffusional growth which cannot be described by the Kolmogorov-Johnson-Mehl-Avrami (KJMA) theory. In order to bridge the gap between these two methods, the conditional probability functions entering the "Differential-Critical-Region" approach are determined in terms of correlation functions. The formulation of these probabilities by means of cluster expansion is also derived, which improves the accuracy of the computation. The model is applied to 2D and 3D parabolic growths occurring at constant value of either actual or phantom-included nucleation rates. Computer simulations have been employed for corroborating the theoretical modeling. The contribution to the kinetics of phantom overgrowth is estimated and it is found to be of a few percent in the case of constant value of the actual nucleation rate. It is shown that for a parabolic growth law both approaches do not provide a closed-form solution of the kinetics. In this respect, the two methods are equivalent and the longstanding overgrowth phenomenon, which limits the KJMA theory, does not admit an exact analytical solution.

  16. Comparative study of approaches based on the differential critical region and correlation functions in modeling phase-transformation kinetics.

    PubMed

    Tomellini, Massimo; Fanfoni, Massimo

    2014-11-01

    The statistical methods exploiting the "Correlation-Functions" or the "Differential-Critical-Region" are both suitable for describing phase transformation kinetics ruled by nucleation and growth. We present a critical analysis of these two approaches, with particular emphasis to transformations ruled by diffusional growth which cannot be described by the Kolmogorov-Johnson-Mehl-Avrami (KJMA) theory. In order to bridge the gap between these two methods, the conditional probability functions entering the "Differential-Critical-Region" approach are determined in terms of correlation functions. The formulation of these probabilities by means of cluster expansion is also derived, which improves the accuracy of the computation. The model is applied to 2D and 3D parabolic growths occurring at constant value of either actual or phantom-included nucleation rates. Computer simulations have been employed for corroborating the theoretical modeling. The contribution to the kinetics of phantom overgrowth is estimated and it is found to be of a few percent in the case of constant value of the actual nucleation rate. It is shown that for a parabolic growth law both approaches do not provide a closed-form solution of the kinetics. In this respect, the two methods are equivalent and the longstanding overgrowth phenomenon, which limits the KJMA theory, does not admit an exact analytical solution.

  17. Placing Engagement: Critical Readings of Interaction between Regional Communities and Comprehensive Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Tami Lea

    2008-01-01

    This dissertation explores organizational narratives of engagement initiatives involving two comprehensive universities and the larger regional communities they serve. The purpose of this study is to develop a holistic description of engagement initiatives, reflecting data collected through interviews, documents and other artifacts from…

  18. Applying Critical Discourse Analysis in Health Policy Research: Case Studies in Regional, Organizational, and Global Health.

    PubMed

    Evans-Agnew, Robin A; Johnson, Susan; Liu, Fuqin; Boutain, Doris M

    2016-08-01

    Critical discourse analysis (CDA) is a promising methodology for policy research in nursing. As a critical theoretical methodology, researchers use CDA to analyze social practices and language use in policies to examine whether such policies may promote or impede social transformation. Despite the widespread use of CDA in other disciplines such as education and sociology, nursing policy research employing CDA methodology is sparse. To advance CDA use in nursing science, it is important to outline the overall research strategies and describe the steps of CDA in policy research. This article describes, using exemplar case studies, how nursing and health policy researchers can employ CDA as a methodology. Three case studies are provided to discuss the application of CDA research methodologies in nursing policy research: (a) implementation of preconception care policies in the Zhejiang province of China, (b) formation and enactment of statewide asthma policy in Washington state of the United States, and (c) organizational implementation of employee antibullying policies in hospital systems in the Pacific Northwest of the United States. Each exemplar details how CDA guided the examination of policy within specific contexts and social practices. The variations of the CDA approaches in the three exemplars demonstrated the flexibilities and potentials for conducting policy research grounded in CDA. CDA provides novel insights for nurse researchers examining health policy formation, enactment, and implementation.

  19. Rare regions and Griffiths singularities at a clean critical point: the five-dimensional disordered contact process.

    PubMed

    Vojta, Thomas; Igo, John; Hoyos, José A

    2014-07-01

    We investigate the nonequilibrium phase transition of the disordered contact process in five space dimensions by means of optimal fluctuation theory and Monte Carlo simulations. We find that the critical behavior is of mean-field type, i.e., identical to that of the clean five-dimensional contact process. It is accompanied by off-critical power-law Griffiths singularities whose dynamical exponent z' saturates at a finite value as the transition is approached. These findings resolve the apparent contradiction between the Harris criterion, which implies that weak disorder is renormalization-group irrelevant, and the rare-region classification, which predicts unconventional behavior. We confirm and illustrate our theory by large-scale Monte Carlo simulations of systems with up to 70(5) sites. We also relate our results to a recently established general relation between the Harris criterion and Griffiths singularities [Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 075702 (2014)], and we discuss implications for other phase transitions.

  20. Resonance Region Cross-Section Data Advancements for Nuclear Criticality Safety Applications and ENDF/B-VII.1

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, Michael E; Leal, Luiz C; Guber, Klaus H; Arbanas, Goran; Wiarda, Dorothea; Sayer, Royce O; Derrien, Herve; HARVEY, JACK

    2011-01-01

    ORNL has completed new resonance region cross-section evaluations with covariance data to support nuclear criticality safety applications. This paper summarizes some of the most recent cross-section evaluations that have been completed and will be made available to process into nuclear data libraries for use with radiation transport codes. Specifically, the paper summarizes the work that has been completed for {sup 35}Cl, {sup 37}Cl , {sup 50}Cr, {sup 52}Cr, {sup 53}Cr, {sup 54}Cr, {sup 39}K, {sup 41}K, {sup 19}F, {sup 55}Mn, {sup 58}Ni, {sup 60}Ni, {sup 235}U, {sup 238}U, and {sup 239}Pu. Many of the new cross-section evaluations are based on new differential data measurements in the resonance region. Furthermore, corresponding covariance data analyses have been performed in conjunction with the resonance evaluation effort thereby providing a consistent set of covariance data to complement the resonance region cross-section evaluations. As a result, the new cross-section evaluations with covariance data can be used to support sensitivity/uncertainty analyses for criticality safety applications.

  1. Mapping Region of Human Restriction Factor APOBEC3H Critical for Interaction with HIV-1 Vif.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Masaaki; Tsuzuki, Shinya; Awazu, Hiroaki; Hamano, Akiko; Okada, Ayaka; Ode, Hirotaka; Maejima, Masami; Hachiya, Atsuko; Yokomaku, Yoshiyuki; Watanabe, Nobuhisa; Akari, Hirofumi; Iwatani, Yasumasa

    2017-03-21

    The APOBEC3 (A3) family of cellular cytidine deaminases comprises seven members (A, B, C, D, F, G, and H) that potently inhibit retroviral replication. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Vif is a small pleiotropic protein that specifically inactivates these enzymes, targeting them for ubiquitin-mediated proteasomal degradation. A3 Vif-interaction sites are presumed to fall into three distinct types: A3C/D/F, A3G, and A3H. To date, two types of A3G and A3C/D/F sites have been well characterized, whereas the A3H Vif-binding site remains poorly defined. Here, we explore the residues critical for the A3H-type Vif interaction. To avoid technical difficulties in performing experiments with human A3H haplotype II (hapII), which is relatively resistant to HIV-1 Vif, we employed its ortholog chimpanzee A3H (cA3H), which displays high Vif sensitivity, for a comparison of sensitivity with that of A3H hapII. The Vif susceptibility of A3H hapII-cA3H chimeras and their substitution mutants revealed a single residue at position 97 as a major determinant for the difference in their Vif sensitivities. We further surveyed critical residues by structure-guided mutagenesis using an A3H structural model and thus identified eight additional residues important for Vif sensitivity, which mapped to the α3 and α4 helices of A3H. Interestingly, this area is located on a surface adjacent to the A3G and A3C/D/F interfaces and is composed of negatively charged and hydrophobic patches. These findings suggest that HIV-1 Vif has evolved to utilize three dispersed surfaces for recognizing three types of interfaces on A3 proteins under certain structural constraints.

  2. Left hemisphere regions are critical for language in the face of early left focal brain injury.

    PubMed

    Raja Beharelle, Anjali; Dick, Anthony Steven; Josse, Goulven; Solodkin, Ana; Huttenlocher, Peter R; Levine, Susan C; Small, Steven L

    2010-06-01

    A predominant theory regarding early stroke and its effect on language development, is that early left hemisphere lesions trigger compensatory processes that allow the right hemisphere to assume dominant language functions, and this is thought to underlie the near normal language development observed after early stroke. To test this theory, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging to examine brain activity during category fluency in participants who had sustained pre- or perinatal left hemisphere stroke (n = 25) and in neurologically normal siblings (n = 27). In typically developing children, performance of a category fluency task elicits strong involvement of left frontal and lateral temporal regions and a lesser involvement of right hemisphere structures. In our cohort of atypically developing participants with early stroke, expressive and receptive language skills correlated with activity in the same left inferior frontal regions that support language processing in neurologically normal children. This was true independent of either the amount of brain injury or the extent that the injury was located in classical cortical language processing areas. Participants with bilateral activation in left and right superior temporal-inferior parietal regions had better language function than those with either predominantly left- or right-sided unilateral activation. The advantage conferred by left inferior frontal and bilateral temporal involvement demonstrated in our study supports a strong predisposition for typical neural language organization, despite an intervening injury, and argues against models suggesting that the right hemisphere fully accommodates language function following early injury.

  3. Critical and direct involvement of the CD23 stalk region in IgE binding

    PubMed Central

    Selb, Regina; Eckl-Dorna, Julia; Twaroch, Teresa E.; Lupinek, Christian; Teufelberger, Andrea; Hofer, Gerhard; Focke-Tejkl, Margarete; Gepp, Barbara; Linhart, Birgit; Breiteneder, Heimo; Ellinger, Adolf; Keller, Walter; Roux, Kenneth H.; Valenta, Rudolf; Niederberger, Verena

    2017-01-01

    Background The low-affinity receptor for IgE, FcεRII (CD23), contributes to allergic inflammation through allergen presentation to T cells, regulation of IgE responses, and enhancement of transepithelial allergen migration. Objective We sought to investigate the interaction between CD23, chimeric monoclonal human IgE, and the corresponding birch pollen allergen Bet v 1 at a molecular level. Methods We expressed 4 CD23 variants. One variant comprised the full extracellular portion of CD23, including the stalk and head domain; 1 variant was identical with the first, except for an amino acid exchange in the stalk region abolishing the N-linked glycosylation site; and 2 variants represented the head domain, 1 complete and 1 truncated. The 4 CD23 variants were purified as monomeric and structurally folded proteins, as demonstrated by gel filtration and circular dichroism. By using a human IgE mAb, the corresponding allergen Bet v 1, and a panel of antibodies specific for peptides spanning the CD23 surface, both binding and inhibition assays and negative stain electron microscopy were performed. Results A hitherto unknown IgE-binding site was mapped on the stalk region of CD23, and the non–N-glycosylated monomeric version of CD23 was superior in IgE binding compared with glycosylated CD23. Furthermore, we demonstrated that a therapeutic anti-IgE antibody, omalizumab, which inhibits IgE binding to FcεRI, also inhibited IgE binding to CD23. Conclusion Our results provide a new model for the CD23-IgE interaction. We show that the stalk region of CD23 is crucially involved in IgE binding and that the interaction can be blocked by the therapeutic anti-IgE antibody omalizumab. PMID:27343203

  4. Molecular evolution of VP3, VP1, 3C(pro) and 3D(pol) coding regions in coxsackievirus group A type 24 variant isolates from acute hemorrhagic conjunctivitis in 2011 in Okinawa, Japan.

    PubMed

    Nidaira, Minoru; Kuba, Yumani; Saitoh, Mika; Taira, Katsuya; Maeshiro, Noriyuki; Mahoe, Yoko; Kyan, Hisako; Takara, Taketoshi; Okano, Sho; Kudaka, Jun; Yoshida, Hiromu; Oishi, Kazunori; Kimura, Hirokazu

    2014-04-01

    A large acute hemorrhagic conjunctivitis (AHC) outbreak occurred in 2011 in Okinawa Prefecture in Japan. Ten strains of coxsackievirus group A type 24 variant (CA24v) were isolated from patients with AHC and full sequence analysis of the VP3, VP1, 3C(pro) and 3D(pol) coding regions performed. To assess time-scale evolution, phylogenetic analysis was performed using the Bayesian Markov chain Monte Carlo method. In addition, similarity plots were constructed and pairwise distance (p-distance) and positive pressure analyses performed. A phylogenetic tree based on the VP1 coding region showed that the present strains belong to genotype 4 (G4). In addition, the present strains could have divided in about 2010 from the same lineages detected in other countries such as China, India and Australia. The mean rates of molecular evolution of four coding regions were estimated at about 6.15 to 7.86 × 10(-3) substitutions/site/year. Similarity plot analyses suggested that nucleotide similarities between the present strains and a prototype strain (EH24/70 strain) were 0.77-0.94. The p-distance of the present strains was relatively short (<0.01). Only one positive selected site (L25H) was identified in the VP1 protein. These findings suggest that the present CA24v strains causing AHC are genetically related to other AHC strains with rapid evolution and emerged in around 2010.

  5. An integrated map with cosmid/PAC contigs of a 4-Mb down syndrome critical region

    SciTech Connect

    Osoegawa, Kazutoyo; Susukida, Rie; Okano, Saishi

    1996-03-05

    The major phenotypic features of Down syndrome have been correlated with partial trisomies of chromosome 21, allowing us to define the candidate gene region to a 4-Mb segment on the 21q22.2 band. We present here a high resolution physical map with megabase-sized cosmid/PAC contigs. This ordered clone library has provided unique material for the integration of a variety of mappable objects, including exons, cDNAs, restriction sites etc. Furthermore, our results have emplified a strategy for the completion of the chromosome 21 map to sequencing. 42 refs., 5 figs.

  6. New Resolved Resonance Region Evaluation for 63,65Cu for Nuclear Criticality Safety Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobes, V.; Leal, L. C.; Guber, K.; Forget, B.; Kopecky, S.; Schillebeeckx, P.; Siegler, P.

    2014-04-01

    A new resolved resonance region evaluation of 63,65Cu was done in the energy region from 10-5 eV to 99.5 keV. The R-Matrix SAMMY method using the Reich-Moore approximation was used to create a new set of consistent resonance parameters. The new evaluation is based on three experimental transmission data sets: two measured at ORELA and one at MITR, plus two radiative capture experimental data sets from GELINA. A total of 141 new resonances were identified for 63Cu and 117 for 65Cu. The corresponding set of external resonances for each isotope is based on the identified resonances above 99.5 keV from the ORELA transmission data. The negative external levels (bound levels) have been determined to match the thermal cross section measured at the MITR. Differential elastic scattering cross sections have been calculated from the new set of resonance parameters. Benchmarking calculations were carried out on a set of ICSBEP benchmarks.

  7. Functional Androdioecy in Critically Endangered Gymnocladus assamicus (Leguminosae) in the Eastern Himalayan Region of Northeast India

    PubMed Central

    Choudhury, Baharul Islam; Khan, Mohammed Latif; Dayanandan, Selvadurai

    2014-01-01

    Gymnocladus assamicus is a critically endangered tree species endemic to Northeast India, and shows sexual dimorphism with male and hermaphrodite flowers on separate trees. We studied phenology, reproductive biology and mating system of the species. The flowers are small, tubular, odorless and last for about 96 hours. Pollen grains in both morphs were viable and capable of fertilization leading to fruit and seed set. Scanning electron micrographs revealed morphologically similar pollen in both male and hermaphrodite flowers. The fruit set in open pollinated flowers was 43.61 percent, while controlled autogamous and geitonogamous pollinations yielded 76.81 and 65.58 percent fruit set respectively. Xenogamous pollinations between male and hermaphrodite flowers resulted in 56.85 percent fruit set and pollinations between hermaphrodite flowers yielded 67.90 percent fruit set. This indicates a functionally androdioecious mating system and pollination limited fruit set in G. assamicus. Phylogenetic analyses of Gymnocladus and the sister genus Gleditsia are needed to assess if the androdioecious mating system in G. assamicus evolved from dioecy as a result of selection for hermaphrodites for reproductive assurance during colonization of pollination limited high altitude ecosystems. PMID:24586267

  8. Functional androdioecy in critically endangered Gymnocladus assamicus (Leguminosae) in the Eastern Himalayan Region of Northeast India.

    PubMed

    Choudhury, Baharul Islam; Khan, Mohammed Latif; Dayanandan, Selvadurai

    2014-01-01

    Gymnocladus assamicus is a critically endangered tree species endemic to Northeast India, and shows sexual dimorphism with male and hermaphrodite flowers on separate trees. We studied phenology, reproductive biology and mating system of the species. The flowers are small, tubular, odorless and last for about 96 hours. Pollen grains in both morphs were viable and capable of fertilization leading to fruit and seed set. Scanning electron micrographs revealed morphologically similar pollen in both male and hermaphrodite flowers. The fruit set in open pollinated flowers was 43.61 percent, while controlled autogamous and geitonogamous pollinations yielded 76.81 and 65.58 percent fruit set respectively. Xenogamous pollinations between male and hermaphrodite flowers resulted in 56.85 percent fruit set and pollinations between hermaphrodite flowers yielded 67.90 percent fruit set. This indicates a functionally androdioecious mating system and pollination limited fruit set in G. assamicus. Phylogenetic analyses of Gymnocladus and the sister genus Gleditsia are needed to assess if the androdioecious mating system in G. assamicus evolved from dioecy as a result of selection for hermaphrodites for reproductive assurance during colonization of pollination limited high altitude ecosystems.

  9. Spatial approximations between residues 6 and 12 in the amino-terminal region of glucagon-like peptide 1 and its receptor: a region critical for biological activity.

    PubMed

    Chen, Quan; Pinon, Delia I; Miller, Laurence J; Dong, Maoqing

    2010-08-06

    Understanding the molecular basis of natural ligand binding and activation of the glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP1) receptor may facilitate the development of agonist drugs useful for the management of type 2 diabetes mellitus. We previously reported molecular approximations between carboxyl-terminal residues 24 and 35 within GLP1 and its receptor. In this work, we have focused on the amino-terminal region of GLP1, known to be critical for receptor activation. We developed two high-affinity, full agonist photolabile GLP1 probes having sites of covalent attachment in positions 6 and 12 of the 30-residue peptide (GLP1(7-36)). Both probes bound to the receptor specifically and covalently labeled single distinct sites. Chemical and protease cleavage of the labeled receptor identified the juxtamembrane region of its amino-terminal domain as the region of covalent attachment of the position 12 probe, whereas the region of labeling by the position 6 probe was localized to the first extracellular loop. Radiochemical sequencing identified receptor residue Tyr(145), adjacent to the first transmembrane segment, as the site of labeling by the position 12 probe, and receptor residue Tyr(205), within the first extracellular loop, as the site of labeling by the position 6 probe. These data provide support for a common mechanism for natural ligand binding and activation of family B G protein-coupled receptors. This region of interaction of peptide amino-terminal domains with the receptor may provide a pocket that can be targeted by small molecule agonists.

  10. Hydrogeochemistry of prairie pothole region wetlands: Role of long-term critical zone processes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goldhaber, Martin B.; Mills, Christopher; Morrison, Jean M.; Stricker, Craig A.; Mushet, David M.; LaBaugh, James W.

    2014-01-01

    Results from the CWLSA were scaled up to a 9700 km2 area surrounding CWLSA using ~ 1800 drill logs and literature data on wetland water chemistry for 178 wetlands within this larger area. The oxidized brown zone depth and wetland water compositional trends are very similar to the CWLSA. Additionally, surface water data from 176 southern Canadian pothole wetlands that conform to the same wetland water geochemical trends as those recorded in the CWLSA further corroborate that SO42 − accumulation driven by pyrite oxidation is a nearly ubiquitous process in the prairie pothole region and distinguishes PPR wetlands from other wetlands worldwide that have a similar overall hydrology.

  11. Critical brain regions for action recognition: lesion symptom mapping in left hemisphere stroke.

    PubMed

    Kalénine, Solène; Buxbaum, Laurel J; Coslett, Harry Branch

    2010-11-01

    A number of conflicting claims have been advanced regarding the role of the left inferior frontal gyrus, inferior parietal lobe and posterior middle temporal gyrus in action recognition, driven in part by an ongoing debate about the capacities of putative mirror systems that match observed and planned actions. We report data from 43 left hemisphere stroke patients in two action recognition tasks in which they heard and saw an action word ('hammering') and selected from two videoclips the one corresponding to the word. In the spatial recognition task, foils contained errors of body posture or movement amplitude/timing. In the semantic recognition task, foils were semantically related (sawing). Participants also performed a comprehension control task requiring matching of the same verbs to objects (hammer). Using regression analyses controlling for both the comprehension control task and lesion volume, we demonstrated that performance in the semantic gesture recognition task was predicted by per cent damage to the posterior temporal lobe, whereas the spatial gesture recognition task was predicted by per cent damage to the inferior parietal lobule. A whole-brain voxel-based lesion symptom-mapping analysis suggested that the semantic and spatial gesture recognition tasks were associated with lesioned voxels in the posterior middle temporal gyrus and inferior parietal lobule, respectively. The posterior middle temporal gyrus appears to serve as a central node in the association of actions and meanings. The inferior parietal lobule, held to be a homologue of the monkey parietal mirror neuron system, is critical for encoding object-related postures and movements, a relatively circumscribed aspect of gesture recognition. The inferior frontal gyrus, on the other hand, was not predictive of performance in any task, suggesting that previous claims regarding its role in action recognition may require refinement.

  12. DGCR6 at the proximal part of the DiGeorge critical region is involved in conotruncal heart defects

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Wenming; Higaki, Takashi; Eguchi-Ishimae, Minenori; Iwabuki, Hidehiko; Wu, Zhouying; Yamamoto, Eiichi; Takata, Hidemi; Ohta, Masaaki; Imoto, Issei; Ishii, Eiichi; Eguchi, Mariko

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac anomaly is one of the hallmarks of DiGeorge syndrome (DGS), observed in approximately 80% of patients. It often shows a characteristic morphology, termed as conotruncal heart defects. In many cases showing only the conotruncal heart defect, deletion of 22q11.2 region cannot be detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), which is used to detect deletion in DGS. We investigated the presence of genomic aberrations in six patients with congenital conotruncal heart defects, who show no deletion at 22q11.2 in an initial screening by FISH. In these patients, no abnormalities were identified in the coding region of the TBX1 gene, one of the key genes responsible for the phenotype of DGS. However, when copy number alteration was analyzed by high-resolution array analysis, a small deletion or duplication in the proximal end of DiGeorge critical region was detected in two patients. The affected region contains the DGCR6 and PRODH genes. DGCR6 has been reported to affect the expression of the TBX1 gene. Our results suggest that altered dosage of gene(s) other than TBX1, possibly DGCR6, may also be responsible for the development of conotruncal heart defects observed in patients with DGS and, in particular, in those with stand-alone conotruncal heart defects. PMID:27081520

  13. Pokeweed antiviral protein region Gly209-Lys225 is critical for RNA N-glycosidase activity of the prokaryotic ribosome.

    PubMed

    Nagasawa, Yoshimi; Fujii, Kazuyuki; Yoshikawa, Takafumi; Kobayashi, Yoshinori; Kondo, Toshiya

    2008-05-01

    Pokeweed antiviral protein (PAP) isolated from Phytolacca americana is a ribosome-inactivating protein (RIP) that has RNA N-glycosidase (RNG) activity towards both eukaryotic and prokaryotic ribosomes. In contrast, karasurin-A (KRN), a RIP from Trichosanthes kirilowii var. japonica, is active only on eukaryotic ribosomes. Stepwise selection of chimera proteins between PAP and KRN indicated that the C-terminal region of PAP (residues 209-225) was critical for RNG activity toward prokaryotic ribosomes. When the region of PAP (residues 209-225) was replaced with the corresponding region of KRN the PAP chimera protein, like KRN, was active only on eukaryotic ribosomes. Furthermore, insertion of the region of PAP (residues 209-225) into the KRN chimera protein resulted not only in the detectable RNG activity toward prokaryotic ribosome, but also activity toward the eukaryotic ribosomes as well that was seven-fold higher than for the original KRN. In this study, the possibility of genetic manipulation of the activity and substrate specificity of RIPs is demonstrated.

  14. DGCR6 at the proximal part of the DiGeorge critical region is involved in conotruncal heart defects.

    PubMed

    Gao, Wenming; Higaki, Takashi; Eguchi-Ishimae, Minenori; Iwabuki, Hidehiko; Wu, Zhouying; Yamamoto, Eiichi; Takata, Hidemi; Ohta, Masaaki; Imoto, Issei; Ishii, Eiichi; Eguchi, Mariko

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac anomaly is one of the hallmarks of DiGeorge syndrome (DGS), observed in approximately 80% of patients. It often shows a characteristic morphology, termed as conotruncal heart defects. In many cases showing only the conotruncal heart defect, deletion of 22q11.2 region cannot be detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), which is used to detect deletion in DGS. We investigated the presence of genomic aberrations in six patients with congenital conotruncal heart defects, who show no deletion at 22q11.2 in an initial screening by FISH. In these patients, no abnormalities were identified in the coding region of the TBX1 gene, one of the key genes responsible for the phenotype of DGS. However, when copy number alteration was analyzed by high-resolution array analysis, a small deletion or duplication in the proximal end of DiGeorge critical region was detected in two patients. The affected region contains the DGCR6 and PRODH genes. DGCR6 has been reported to affect the expression of the TBX1 gene. Our results suggest that altered dosage of gene(s) other than TBX1, possibly DGCR6, may also be responsible for the development of conotruncal heart defects observed in patients with DGS and, in particular, in those with stand-alone conotruncal heart defects.

  15. Critical role of dendritic cells in T cell retention in the interfollicular region of Peyer's patches.

    PubMed

    Obata, Takashi; Shibata, Naoko; Goto, Yoshiyuki; Ishikawa, Izumi; Sato, Shintaro; Kunisawa, Jun; Kiyono, Hiroshi

    2013-07-15

    Peyer's patches (PPs) simultaneously initiate active and quiescent immune responses in the gut. The immunological function is achieved by the rigid regulation of cell distribution and trafficking, but how the cell distribution is maintained remains to be elucidated. In this study, we show that binding of stromal cell-derived lymphoid chemokines to conventional dendritic cells (cDCs) is essential for the retention of naive CD4(+) T cells in the interfollicular region (IFR) of PPs. Transitory depletion of CD11c(high) cDCs in mice rapidly impaired the IFR structure in the PPs without affecting B cell follicles or germinal centers, lymphoid chemokine production from stromal cells, or the immigration of naive T cells into the IFRs of PPs. The cDC-orchestrated retention of naive T cells was mediated by heparinase-sensitive molecules that were expressed on cDCs and bound the lymphoid chemokine CCL21 produced from stromal cells. These data collectively reveal that interactions among cDCs, stromal cells, and naive T cells are necessary for the formation of IFRs in the PPs.

  16. The role of critical zone processes in the evolution of the Prairie Pothole Region wetlands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goldhaber, Martin B.; Mills, Christopher T.; Stricker, Craig A.; Morrison, Jean M.

    2011-01-01

    The Prairie Pothole Region, which occupies 900,000 km2 of the north central USA and south central Canada, is one of the most important ecosystems in North America. It is characterized by millions of small wetlands whose chemistry is highly variable over short distances. The study involved the geochemistry of surface sediments, wetland water, and groundwater in the Cottonwood Lakes area of North Dakota, USA, whose 92 ha includes the dominant wetland hydrologic settings. The data show that oxygenated groundwater interacting with pyrite resident in a component of surficial glacial till derived from the marine Pierre Shale Formation has, over long periods of time, focused SO 4 2 - -bearing fluids from upland areas to topographically low areas. In these low areas, SO 4 2 - -enriched groundwater and wetlands have evolved, as has the CaSO4 mineral gypsum. Sulfur isotope data support the conclusion that isotopically light pyrite from marine shale is the source of SO 4 2 - . Literature data on wetland water composition suggests that this process has taken place over a large area in North Dakota.

  17. The role of critical zone processes in the evolution of the Prairie Pothole Region wetlands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goldhaber, M.B.; Mills, C.; Stricker, C.A.; Morrison, J.M.

    2011-01-01

    The Prairie Pothole Region, which occupies 900,000 km2 of the north central USA and south central Canada, is one of the most important ecosystems in North America. It is characterized by millions of small wetlands whose chemistry is highly variable over short distances. The study involved the geochemistry of surface sediments, wetland water, and groundwater in the Cottonwood Lakes area of North Dakota, USA, whose 92 ha includes the dominant wetland hydrologic settings. The data show that oxygenated groundwater interacting with pyrite resident in a component of surficial glacial till derived from the marine Pierre Shale Formation has, over long periods of time, focused SO2-4-bearing fluids from upland areas to topographically low areas. In these low areas, SO2-4-enriched groundwater and wetlands have evolved, as has the CaSO4 mineral gypsum. Sulfur isotope data support the conclusion that isotopically light pyrite from marine shale is the source of SO2-4. Literature data on wetland water composition suggests that this process has taken place over a large area in North Dakota.

  18. Two critical residues in p-loop regions of puffer fish Na+ channels on TTX sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Maruta, Satoshi; Yamaoka, Kaoru; Yotsu-Yamashita, Mari

    2008-03-01

    We previously showed that Asn-383 and Thr-1569 residues of p-loop regions in domains I and IV, respectively, of the puffer fish, Fugu pardialis, skeletal muscle Na(v) (fNa(v)1.4a), are anomalous to those of other species of TTX-sensitive Na(+) channels, where the aromatic residues of Phe or Tyr, and Gly are the counterparts [Yotsu-Yamashita, M., Nishimori, K., Nitanai, Y., Isemura, M., Sugimoto, A., Yasumoto, T., 2000. Binding properties of (3)H-PbTx-3 and (3)H-saxitoxin to brain membranes and to skeletal muscle membranes of puffer fish Fugu pardalis and the primary structure of a voltage-gated Na(+) channel alpha-subunit (fMNa1) from skeletal muscle of F. pardalis. Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 267, 403-412]. The former was suggested to confer TTX resistance by using Y401N mutant of rNa(v)1.4 [Venkatesh, V., Lu, S.Q., Dandona, N., See, S.L., Benner, S., Soong, T.W., 2005. Genetic basis of tetrodotoxin resistance in pufferfishes. Curr. Biol. 15, 2069-2072]. The latter function remained to be elucidated. Thus, we further explored the function of these two residues, electrophysiologically, by evaluating the K(d) (dissociation constants) values of TTX for F385N, F385A, F385Q, G1718T, and F385N/G1718T mutants of rNa(v)1.2a, transiently expressed in HEK-293 cells. F385N caused 3000-fold increase of the K(d), while G1718T and F385N/G1718T caused 2- and 3-fold increases compared with those of WT and F385N, respectively, suggesting that G1718T further enhanced TTX resistivity caused by F385N. The K(d) for F385A and F385Q were 2- and 11-fold larger than that of F385N, respectively, suggesting that the longer side chain in the non-aromatic amino acid residue causes the larger decrease of TTX sensitivity. Despite drastic changes in the K(d), the mutations at F385 caused only small changes in the k(off) from that of WT, suggesting that the K(d) for TTX receptors are mainly determined by the k(on).

  19. Priority persistent contaminants in people dwelling in critical areas of Campania Region, Italy (SEBIOREC biomonitoring study).

    PubMed

    De Felip, Elena; Bianchi, Fabrizio; Bove, Crescenzo; Cori, Liliana; D'Argenzio, Angelo; D'Orsi, Giancarlo; Fusco, Mario; Miniero, Roberto; Ortolani, Rosanna; Palombino, Raffaele; Parlato, Antonino; Pelliccia, Maria Grazia; Peluso, Filomena; Piscopo, Giovanni; Pizzuti, Renato; Porpora, Maria Grazia; Protano, Domenico; Senofonte, Oreste; Spena, Silvana Russo; Simonetti, Andrea; di Domenico, Alessandro

    2014-07-15

    To investigate if protracted living in degraded environments of the Caserta and Naples provinces (Campania Region, Italy) had an impact on exposure of local people, highly toxic persistent contaminants were measured in blood, blood serum, and human milk of a large number of healthy donors. Sampling was carried out from 2008 to 2009. Blood was collected from over 850 20-64-year old donors; by pooling, 84 blood and 84 serum samples were obtained. Milk was donated by 52 mothers: specimens were pooled into six samples. Polychlorodibenzodioxins (PCDDs), polychlorodibenzofurans (PCDFs), and polychlorobiphenyls (PCBs, dioxin-like (DL) and non-dioxin-like (Σ6PCBs)), arsenic (As), cadmium (Cd), mercury (Hg), and lead (Pb) were measured in serum (organic biomarkers) and blood (metals); these chemicals and polybromobiphenyl ethers (Σ9PBDEs) were analyzed in milk. PCDD+PCDF, DL-PCB, TEQTOT, and Σ6PCB concentration ranges (medians) in serum were 6.26-23.1 (12.4), 3.42-31.7 (11.5), 10.0-52.8 (23.9) pgTEQ97/g fat, and 55.5-647 (219) ng/g fat, respectively, while in milk concentration ranges were 5.99-8.77, 4.02-6.15, 10.0-14.2 pgTEQ97/g fat, and 48.7-74.2 ng/g fat. Likewise, As, Cd, Hg, and Pb findings in blood spanned 2.34-13.4 (5.83), 0.180-0.930 (0.475), 1.09-7.60 (2.60), 10.2-55.9 (28.8) μg/L, respectively; only Pb could be measured in milk (2.78-5.99 μg/L). Σ9PBDE levels in milk samples were 0.965-6.05 ng/g fat. Biomarkers' concentrations were found to be compatible with their current values in European countries and in Italy, and consistent with an exposure primarily determined by consumption of commercial food from the large distribution system. Based on relatively higher biomarker values within the hematic biomonitoring database, the following municipalities were flagged as possibly deserving attention for health-oriented interventions: Brusciano and Caivano (As), Giugliano (Hg), Pianura (PCDDs+PCDFs), and Qualiano-Villaricca (As, Hg). The analysis of samples

  20. Structural and mutational analysis of a conserved gene (DGSI) from the minimal DiGeorge syndrome critical region.

    PubMed

    Gong, W; Emanuel, B S; Galili, N; Kim, D H; Roe, B; Driscoll, D A; Budarf, M L

    1997-02-01

    The majority of patients with DiGeorge syndrome (DGS), velocardiofacial syndrome (VCFS), conotruncal anomaly face syndrome (CTAFS) and some individuals with familial or sporadic conotruncal cardiac defects have hemizygous deletions of chromosome 22. Most patients with these disorders share a common large deletion, spanning > 1.5 Mb within 22q11.21-q11.23. Recently, the smallest region of deletion overlap has been narrowed to a 250 kb area, the minimal DGS critical region (MDGCR), which includes the locus D22S75 (N25). We have isolated and characterized a novel, highly conserved gene, DGSI, within the MDGCR. DGSI has 10 exons and nine introns encompassing 1702 bp of cDNA sequence and 11 kb of genomic DNA. The encoded protein has 476 amino acids with a predicted mol. wt of 52.6 kDa. The intron-exon boundaries have been analyzed and conform to the consensus GT/AG motif. The corresponding murine Dgsi has been isolated and localized to proximal mouse chromosome 16. The mouse gene contains the same number of exons and introns, and the predicted protein has 479 amino acids with 93.2% identity to that of the human DGSI gene. By database searching, both genes have significant homology to a Caenorhabditis elegans hypothetical protein, F42H10.7. Further, mutation analysis has been performed in 16 patients, who have no detectable 22q11.2 deletion and some of the characteristic clinical features of DGS/VCFS. We have detected eight sequence variants in DGSI. These occurred in the 5'-untranslated region, the coding region and the intronic regions adjacent to the intron-exon boundaries of the gene. Seven of the eight variants were also present in normal controls or unaffected family members, suggesting they may not be of etiologic significance.

  1. A high-resolution linkage map of the achondroplasia critical region on human chromosome 4q16.3

    SciTech Connect

    Tiller, G.E.; Polumbo, P.A.

    1994-09-01

    Achondroplasia is the most common nonlethal skeletal dysplasia, with an incidence of greater than 1/40,000 births. Recently, a random search of the genome using highly polymorphic autosomal markers has localized the gene for achondroplasia to the distal portion of human chromosome 4p. We report here the construction of a high-resolution linkage map of the critical region including the achondroplasia locus. The CEPH panel of pedigrees was genotyped at several loci using highly polymorphic markers, including the Huntington locus (IT15), D4S43, D4S115, and the gene for the {beta}-subunit of rod cGMP phosphodiesterase (PDEB). These data were incorporated into the CEPH v.6.6 database and a multipoint map was generated using the LINKAGE programs v.5.1. Based on reported recombination events in achondroplasia pedigrees, the gene for achondroplasia lies distal to the anonymous marker D4S43, in the 8 cM region defined as follows: cen-IT15-D4S43-D4S98-[D4S115-D4S111]-D4S90-PDEB. The disparity between the genetic distance and the physical distance (2 mB) among these markers likely reflects the high rate of recombination within the region. Extension of this linkage map further toward the telomere and identification of distal recombinant markers should expedite efforts directed toward isolation of the gene for achondroplasia.

  2. Physical findings in 21q22 deletion suggest critical region for 21q - phenotype in q22

    SciTech Connect

    Thedoropoulos, D.S.; Cowan, J.M.; Elias, E.R.; Cole, C.

    1995-11-06

    Multiple abnormalities were observed in a newborn infant with a deletion in the long arm of chromosome 21, from band 22q22.1{yields}qter. The phenotype of this infant was similar to that previously described in infants with deletions spanning the long arm of chromosome 21, from the centromere to 21q22. However, as a phenotypically normal child with normal intelligence and with deletion of 21q11.1-21q21.3 has also been identified, this case suggests that the critical region of deletion for the 21q - phenotype lies distal to 21q21, within 21q22.1-22.2. 10 refs., 2 figs.

  3. A 32 kb Critical Region Excluding Y402H in CFH Mediates Risk for Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Kidd, Jeffrey M.; Itsara, Andy; Kopplin, Laura J.; Chen, Wei; Hagstrom, Stephanie A.; Peachey, Neal S.; Francis, Peter J.; Klein, Michael L.; Chew, Emily Y.; Ramprasad, Vedam L.; Tay, Wan-Ting; Mitchell, Paul; Seielstad, Mark; Stambolian, Dwight E.; Edwards, Albert O.; Lee, Kristine E.; Leontiev, Dmitry V.; Jun, Gyungah; Wang, Yang; Tian, Liping; Qiu, Feiyou; Henning, Alice K.; LaFramboise, Thomas; Sen, Parveen; Aarthi, Manoharan; George, Ronnie; Raman, Rajiv; Das, Manmath Kumar; Vijaya, Lingam; Kumaramanickavel, Govindasamy; Wong, Tien Y.; Swaroop, Anand; Abecasis, Goncalo R.; Klein, Ronald; Klein, Barbara E. K.; Nickerson, Deborah A.; Eichler, Evan E.; Iyengar, Sudha K.

    2011-01-01

    Complement factor H shows very strong association with Age-related Macular Degeneration (AMD), and recent data suggest that multiple causal variants are associated with disease. To refine the location of the disease associated variants, we characterized in detail the structural variation at CFH and its paralogs, including two copy number polymorphisms (CNP), CNP147 and CNP148, and several rare deletions and duplications. Examination of 34 AMD-enriched extended families (N = 293) and AMD cases (White N = 4210 Indian = 134; Malay = 140) and controls (White N = 3229; Indian = 117; Malay = 2390) demonstrated that deletion CNP148 was protective against AMD, independent of SNPs at CFH. Regression analysis of seven common haplotypes showed three haplotypes, H1, H6 and H7, as conferring risk for AMD development. Being the most common haplotype H1 confers the greatest risk by increasing the odds of AMD by 2.75-fold (95% CI = [2.51, 3.01]; p = 8.31×10−109); Caucasian (H6) and Indian-specific (H7) recombinant haplotypes increase the odds of AMD by 1.85-fold (p = 3.52×10−9) and by 15.57-fold (P = 0.007), respectively. We identified a 32-kb region downstream of Y402H (rs1061170), shared by all three risk haplotypes, suggesting that this region may be critical for AMD development. Further analysis showed that two SNPs within the 32 kb block, rs1329428 and rs203687, optimally explain disease association. rs1329428 resides in 20 kb unique sequence block, but rs203687 resides in a 12 kb block that is 89% similar to a noncoding region contained in ΔCNP148. We conclude that causal variation in this region potentially encompasses both regulatory effects at single markers and copy number. PMID:22022419

  4. A 32 kb critical region excluding Y402H in CFH mediates risk for age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Sivakumaran, Theru A; Igo, Robert P; Kidd, Jeffrey M; Itsara, Andy; Kopplin, Laura J; Chen, Wei; Hagstrom, Stephanie A; Peachey, Neal S; Francis, Peter J; Klein, Michael L; Chew, Emily Y; Ramprasad, Vedam L; Tay, Wan-Ting; Mitchell, Paul; Seielstad, Mark; Stambolian, Dwight E; Edwards, Albert O; Lee, Kristine E; Leontiev, Dmitry V; Jun, Gyungah; Wang, Yang; Tian, Liping; Qiu, Feiyou; Henning, Alice K; LaFramboise, Thomas; Sen, Parveen; Aarthi, Manoharan; George, Ronnie; Raman, Rajiv; Das, Manmath Kumar; Vijaya, Lingam; Kumaramanickavel, Govindasamy; Wong, Tien Y; Swaroop, Anand; Abecasis, Goncalo R; Klein, Ronald; Klein, Barbara E K; Nickerson, Deborah A; Eichler, Evan E; Iyengar, Sudha K

    2011-01-01

    Complement factor H shows very strong association with Age-related Macular Degeneration (AMD), and recent data suggest that multiple causal variants are associated with disease. To refine the location of the disease associated variants, we characterized in detail the structural variation at CFH and its paralogs, including two copy number polymorphisms (CNP), CNP147 and CNP148, and several rare deletions and duplications. Examination of 34 AMD-enriched extended families (N = 293) and AMD cases (White N = 4210 Indian = 134; Malay = 140) and controls (White N = 3229; Indian = 117; Malay = 2390) demonstrated that deletion CNP148 was protective against AMD, independent of SNPs at CFH. Regression analysis of seven common haplotypes showed three haplotypes, H1, H6 and H7, as conferring risk for AMD development. Being the most common haplotype H1 confers the greatest risk by increasing the odds of AMD by 2.75-fold (95% CI = [2.51, 3.01]; p = 8.31×10(-109)); Caucasian (H6) and Indian-specific (H7) recombinant haplotypes increase the odds of AMD by 1.85-fold (p = 3.52×10(-9)) and by 15.57-fold (P = 0.007), respectively. We identified a 32-kb region downstream of Y402H (rs1061170), shared by all three risk haplotypes, suggesting that this region may be critical for AMD development. Further analysis showed that two SNPs within the 32 kb block, rs1329428 and rs203687, optimally explain disease association. rs1329428 resides in 20 kb unique sequence block, but rs203687 resides in a 12 kb block that is 89% similar to a noncoding region contained in ΔCNP148. We conclude that causal variation in this region potentially encompasses both regulatory effects at single markers and copy number.

  5. A Conserved Region between the Heptad Repeats of Paramyxovirus Fusion Proteins is Critical for Proper F Protein Folding†

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, Amanda E.; Martin, Kimberly L.; Dutch, Rebecca E.

    2008-01-01

    Paramyxoviruses are a diverse family which utilizes a fusion (F) protein to enter cells via fusion of the viral lipid bilayer with a target cell membrane. Although certain regions of F are known to play critical roles in membrane fusion, the function of much of the protein remains unclear. Sequence alignment of a set of paramyxovirus F proteins and analysis utilizing Block Maker identified a region of conserved amino acid sequence in a large domain between the heptad repeats of F1, designated CBF1. We employed site-directed mutagenesis to analyze the function of completely conserved residues of CBF1 in both the simian virus 5 (SV5) and Hendra virus F proteins. The majority of CBF1 point mutants were deficient in homotrimer formation, proteolytic processing, and transport to the cell surface. For some SV5 F mutants, proteolytic cleavage and surface expression could be restored by expression at 30°C, and varying levels of fusion promotion were observed at this temperature. In addition, the mutant SV5 F V402A displayed a hyperfusogenic phenotype at both 30°C and 37°C, indicating this mutation allows for efficient fusion with only an extremely small amount of cleaved, active protein. The recently published prefusogenic structure of PIV5/SV5 F [Yin, H.S., et al. (2006) Nature 439, 38–44] indicates that residues within and flanking CBF1 interact with the fusion peptide domain. Together, these data suggest that CBF1-fusion peptide interactions are critical for the initial folding of paramyxovirus F proteins from across this important viral family, and can also modulate subsequent membrane fusion promotion. PMID:17417875

  6. Active Folding In The Puli Basin, Constraints On Strain Across A Sub-Critical Region Of The Taiwanese Orogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilcox, T.; Mueller, K.; Chen, Y.

    2006-12-01

    The Puli topographic embayment in central western Taiwan is interpreted as a region of sub-critical taper (assuming uniform decollement geometry) within the otherwise critically tapered wedge of the Taiwanese orogen. This sub-critical portion of the thrust belt drives the current orogenic architecture and reorganization of strain in and around Puli. Age dating and mapping of fold axis' that deform Late Quaternary terrace deposits in the Puli Basin suggest that at least 380 meters of fault slip (or a minimum of about 350 meters of horizontal shortening) has occurred over the last 50-60 Ka, yielding a minimum slip rate of 8mm/yr for the Shuilikeng blind thrust and fault-related fold. Given our existing age constraints, which only define the oldest Late Quaternary strata in the Puli Basin, the slip rate on this same structure could approach 13mm/yr (i.e. we use strain in younger deposits as a starting point for measuring shortening). Geodetic convergence rates (with respect to Asia) in the northern half of the island average ~10mm/yr or less, while convergence rates in the southwestern part of the orogen average ~40mm/yr. Previous maps of geodetic strain suggest the Puli Basin, corresponds with strain gradients of about 15mm/yr. Identifiable kink bends in terrace deposits were used to define the kinematics of actively growing folds, indicating the sense and magnitude of slip on blind thrusts that currently accommodate strain. This implies that active contraction occurs over a broader area across Puli than in other parts of Taiwan, but within the Basin contraction appears most likely limited to slip on a single fault (in addition to rapidly slipping thrusts in the foreland). Backstepping of thrusts at Puli is due to the first-order decrease in mass of the wedge at this latitude. While decreased mass in the wedge can be initially estimated by its thickness (as measured by the distance between the decollement as mapped at depth by microseismicity and average topography

  7. The variations of ionosphere critical frequency of E layer over the equatorial geomagnetic region in Southeast Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenpankho, Prasert; Ishii, Mamoru; Supnithi, Pornchai

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the values of the critical frequency of the ionospheric E layer, foE, obtained at Chumphon ionospheric observatory station, Thailand. For a declining phase of the solar cycle 23 during the year 2005-2008 and an inclining phase of the solar cycle 24 during the year 2009-2013, the foE data have been used to investigate the foE variations over the equatorial geomagnetic region in Southeast Asia. A comparison between the observation data and International Reference Ionosphere (IRI) 2012 model has also been investigated and studied. The results show that the foE obtained from IRI 2012 model underestimates foE from Chumphon station especially during the period of 7-11 am and after 6 pm for each day and all seasons. As the results combining with the previous investigations, we suggest that the underestimation of ionospheric foE by IRI 2012 model is helpful for the correction and improvement of IRI model in an equatorial Asia region.

  8. Identification of a Major Dimorphic Region in the Functionally Critical N-Terminal ID1 Domain of VAR2CSA

    PubMed Central

    Doritchamou, Justin; Sabbagh, Audrey; Jespersen, Jakob S.; Renard, Emmanuelle; Salanti, Ali; Nielsen, Morten A.; Deloron, Philippe; Tuikue Ndam, Nicaise

    2015-01-01

    The VAR2CSA protein of Plasmodium falciparum is transported to and expressed on the infected erythrocyte surface where it plays a key role in placental malaria (PM). It is the current leading candidate for a vaccine to prevent PM. However, the antigenic polymorphism integral to VAR2CSA poses a challenge for vaccine development. Based on detailed analysis of polymorphisms in the sequence of its ligand-binding N-terminal region, currently the main focus for vaccine development, we assessed var2csa from parasite isolates infecting pregnant women. The results reveal for the first time the presence of a major dimorphic region in the functionally critical N-terminal ID1 domain. Parasite isolates expressing VAR2CSA with particular motifs present within this domain are associated with gravidity- and parasite density-related effects. These observations are of particular interest in guiding efforts with respect to optimization of the VAR2CSA-based vaccines currently under development. PMID:26393516

  9. Critical frequency and maximum electron density of F2 region over four stations in the North American sector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ezquer, R. G.; Cabrera, M. A.; López, J. L.; Albornoz, M. R.; Mosert, M.; Marcó, P.; Buresova, D.

    2011-03-01

    Ionosonde measurements obtained at College (64.9°N, 212.0°E), Goose Bay (53.39°N, 299.7°E), Boulder (40°N, 254.7°E) and Wallops Island (37.9°N, 284.5°E) during low solar activity years were used to check the performance of International Reference Ionosphere model to predict the critical frequency of the F2 region (foF2) of the ionosphere. Data were obtained from the University of Massachusetts Lowell DIDBase through internet and correspond to low solar activity years. CCIR and URSI options were used to model calculations. The results show that the modeled values given for Goose Bay, Boulder and Wallops Island are better than those given for the other station. For the middle latitude stations, in general, the deviations between modeled and measured foF2 are lower than 20%. Cases with very good agreement between predictions and measurements have been obtained. The worst predictions are given for the high latitude station. The study of maximum electron density of the F2 region (NmF2) shows cases where the deviation between modeled and measured NmF2 reaches values as high as 40% or more. The effects of these disagreements on ionospheric modelling are stressed. Additional studies considering other solar activities are needed.

  10. Delineation of a deletion region critical for corpus callosal abnormalities in chromosome 1q43-q44.

    PubMed

    Nagamani, Sandesh C Sreenath; Erez, Ayelet; Bay, Carolyn; Pettigrew, Anjana; Lalani, Seema R; Herman, Kristin; Graham, Brett H; Nowaczyk, Malgorzata Jm; Proud, Monica; Craigen, William J; Hopkins, Bobbi; Kozel, Beth; Plunkett, Katie; Hixson, Patricia; Stankiewicz, Pawel; Patel, Ankita; Cheung, Sau Wai

    2012-02-01

    Submicroscopic deletions involving chromosome 1q43-q44 result in cognitive impairment, microcephaly, growth restriction, dysmorphic features, and variable involvement of other organ systems. A consistently observed feature in patients with this deletion are the corpus callosal abnormalities (CCAs), ranging from thinning and hypoplasia to complete agenesis. Previous studies attempting to delineate the critical region for CCAs have yielded inconsistent results. We conducted a detailed clinical and molecular characterization of seven patients with deletions of chromosome 1q43-q44. Using array comparative genomic hybridization, we mapped the size, extent, and genomic content of these deletions. Four patients had CCAs, and shared the smallest region of overlap that contains only three protein coding genes, CEP170, SDCCAG8, and ZNF238. One patient with a small deletion involving SDCCAG8 and AKT3, and another patient with an intragenic deletion of AKT3 did not have any CCA, implying that the loss of these two genes is unlikely to be the cause of CCA. CEP170 is expressed extensively in the brain, and encodes for a protein that is a component of the centrosomal complex. ZNF238 is involved in control of neuronal progenitor cells and survival of cortical neurons. Our results rule out the involvement of AKT3, and implicate CEP170 and/or ZNF238 as novel genes causative for CCA in patients with a terminal 1q deletion.

  11. Experimental study of the critical point region of aluminum under the action of the powerful nanosecond laser pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherepetskaya, E. B.; Karabutov, A. A.; Kaptilniy, A. G.; Ksenofontov, D. M.; Makarov, V. A.; Podymova, N. B.

    2015-12-01

    This paper is a report on the novel experimental method of the study of the thermodynamic parameters of thin aluminum films in the critical point region. The controlled supercritical state of aluminum is achieved for the first time as a result of the heating of these films by the absorption of the powerful nanosecond pulse of Q-switched Nd:YAG laser at the fundamental wavelength. The possibility is demonstrated to find simultaneously the temporal dependencies of the temperature, of the pressure and of the density of aluminum during the experiment with the thin aluminum films confined at both sides by the quartz glass substrates. These dependencies are obtained taking into account the nonlinear dependence on the incident laser intensity of the light reflection coefficient from the irradiated surface of aluminum. For the first time the thermodynamic cooling cycle of aluminum after its heating by the powerful nanosecond laser pulse is plotted in the space of variables’ temperature—pressure and temperature—density that get into the supercritical region.

  12. Induced Pib Expression and Resistance to Magnaporthe grisea are Compromised by Cytosine Demethylation at Critical Promoter Regions in Rice.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuan; Xia, Qiong; Kou, Hongping; Wang, Dan; Lin, Xiuyun; Wu, Ying; Xu, Chunming; Xing, Shaochen; Liu, Bao

    2011-10-01

    Pib is a well-characterized rice blast-resistance gene belonging to the nucleotide binding site (NBS) and leucine-rich repeat (LRR) superfamily. Expression of Pib was low under non-challenged conditions, but strongly induced by the blast-causing fungal pathogen Magnaporthe grisea, thereby conferring resistance to the pathogen. It is generally established that cytosine methylation of the promoter-region often plays a repressive role in modulating expression of the gene in question. We report here that two critical regions of the Pib promoter were heavily CG cytosine-methylated in both cultivars studied. Surprisingly, induced expression of Pib by M. grisea infection did not entail its promoter demethylation, and partial demethylation by 5-azacytidine-treatment actually reduced Pib expression relative to wild-type plants. Accordingly, the blast disease-resistance was compromised in the 5'-azaC-treated plants relative to wild-type. In contrast, the disease susceptibility was not affected by the 5'-azaC treatment in another two rice cultivars that did not contain the Pib gene, ruling out effects of other R genes and non-specific genotoxic effects by the drug-treatment as a cause for the compromised Pib-conditioned blast-resistance. Taken together, our results suggest that promoter DNA methylation plays a novel enhancing role in conditioning high-level of induced expression of the Pib gene in times of M. grisea infection, and its conferred resistance to the pathogen.

  13. A CRITICAL ASSESSMENT OF NONLINEAR FORCE-FREE FIELD MODELING OF THE SOLAR CORONA FOR ACTIVE REGION 10953

    SciTech Connect

    DeRosa, Marc L.; Schrijver, Carolus J.; Aschwanden, Markus J.; Cheung, Mark C. M.; Lites, Bruce W.; Amari, Tahar; Canou, Aurelien; McTiernan, James M.; Regnier, Stephane; Thalmann, Julia K.; Wiegelmann, Thomas; Inhester, Bernd; Tadesse, Tilaye; Valori, Gherardo; Wheatland, Michael S.; Conlon, Paul A.; Fuhrmann, Marcel

    2009-05-10

    Nonlinear force-free field (NLFFF) models are thought to be viable tools for investigating the structure, dynamics, and evolution of the coronae of solar active regions. In a series of NLFFF modeling studies, we have found that NLFFF models are successful in application to analytic test cases, and relatively successful when applied to numerically constructed Sun-like test cases, but they are less successful in application to real solar data. Different NLFFF models have been found to have markedly different field line configurations and to provide widely varying estimates of the magnetic free energy in the coronal volume, when applied to solar data. NLFFF models require consistent, force-free vector magnetic boundary data. However, vector magnetogram observations sampling the photosphere, which is dynamic and contains significant Lorentz and buoyancy forces, do not satisfy this requirement, thus creating several major problems for force-free coronal modeling efforts. In this paper, we discuss NLFFF modeling of NOAA Active Region 10953 using Hinode/SOT-SP, Hinode/XRT, STEREO/SECCHI-EUVI, and SOHO/MDI observations, and in the process illustrate three such issues we judge to be critical to the success of NLFFF modeling: (1) vector magnetic field data covering larger areas are needed so that more electric currents associated with the full active regions of interest are measured, (2) the modeling algorithms need a way to accommodate the various uncertainties in the boundary data, and (3) a more realistic physical model is needed to approximate the photosphere-to-corona interface in order to better transform the forced photospheric magnetograms into adequate approximations of nearly force-free fields at the base of the corona. We make recommendations for future modeling efforts to overcome these as yet unsolved problems.

  14. The core microprocessor component DiGeorge syndrome critical region 8 (DGCR8) is a nonspecific RNA-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Roth, Braden M; Ishimaru, Daniella; Hennig, Mirko

    2013-09-13

    MicroRNA (miRNA) biogenesis follows a conserved succession of processing steps, beginning with the recognition and liberation of an miRNA-containing precursor miRNA hairpin from a large primary miRNA transcript (pri-miRNA) by the Microprocessor, which consists of the nuclear RNase III Drosha and the double-stranded RNA-binding domain protein DGCR8 (DiGeorge syndrome critical region protein 8). Current models suggest that specific recognition is driven by DGCR8 detection of single-stranded elements of the pri-miRNA stem-loop followed by Drosha recruitment and pri-miRNA cleavage. Because countless RNA transcripts feature single-stranded-dsRNA junctions and DGCR8 can bind hundreds of mRNAs, we explored correlations between RNA binding properties of DGCR8 and specific pri-miRNA substrate processing. We found that DGCR8 bound single-stranded, double-stranded, and random hairpin transcripts with similar affinity. Further investigation of DGCR8/pri-mir-16 interactions by NMR detected intermediate exchange regimes over a wide range of stoichiometric ratios. Diffusion analysis of DGCR8/pri-mir-16 interactions by pulsed field gradient NMR lent further support to dynamic complex formation involving free components in exchange with complexes of varying stoichiometry, although in vitro processing assays showed exclusive cleavage of pri-mir-16 variants bearing single-stranded flanking regions. Our results indicate that DGCR8 binds RNA nonspecifically. Therefore, a sequential model of DGCR8 recognition followed by Drosha recruitment is unlikely. Known RNA substrate requirements are broad and include 70-nucleotide hairpins with unpaired flanking regions. Thus, specific RNA processing is likely facilitated by preformed DGCR8-Drosha heterodimers that can discriminate between authentic substrates and other hairpins.

  15. A mathematical recursive model for accurate description of the phase behavior in the near-critical region by Generalized van der Waals Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jibeom; Jeon, Joonhyeon

    2015-01-01

    Recently, related studies on Equation Of State (EOS) have reported that generalized van der Waals (GvdW) shows poor representations in the near critical region for non-polar and non-sphere molecules. Hence, there are still remains a problem of GvdW parameters to minimize loss in describing saturated vapor densities and vice versa. This paper describes a recursive model GvdW (rGvdW) for an accurate representation of pure fluid materials in the near critical region. For the performance evaluation of rGvdW in the near critical region, other EOS models are also applied together with two pure molecule group: alkane and amine. The comparison results show rGvdW provides much more accurate and reliable predictions of pressure than the others. The calculating model of EOS through this approach gives an additional insight into the physical significance of accurate prediction of pressure in the nearcritical region.

  16. The significance of regional hemoglobin oxygen saturation values and limb-to-arm ratios of near-infrared spectroscopy to detect critical limb ischemia.

    PubMed

    Boezeman, Reinout Pe; Boersma, Doeke; Wille, Jan; Kelder, Johannes C; Visscher, Mareije I; Waanders, Frans Gj; Moll, Frans L; de Vries, Jean-Paul Pm

    2016-10-01

    This study examines the application of near-infrared spectroscopy to noninvasively detect critical limb ischemia using regional hemoglobin oxygen saturation in percentage values and regional hemoglobin oxygen saturation limb-to-arm ratios. The regional hemoglobin oxygen saturation values and regional hemoglobin oxygen saturation limb-to-arm ratios were calculated in 61 patients with critical limb ischemia (group A). Measurements were performed in rest at four fixed spots at the most affected lower limb and at a reference spot at both upper arms. Similar measurements were performed in the left lower limb of 30 age-matched control patients without peripheral arterial disease (group B). The regional hemoglobin oxygen saturation values and regional hemoglobin oxygen saturation limb-to-arm ratios were significantly different at all measured spots between the groups (all p < 0.001), except for the regional hemoglobin oxygen saturation limb-to-arm ratios of the distal vastus lateralis (p = 0.056). However, a broad overlap of individual regional hemoglobin oxygen saturation values and regional hemoglobin oxygen saturation limb-to-arm ratios was found in both groups, which resulted in poor discriminative predictive value of single measurements. Single measurements of regional hemoglobin oxygen saturation values and regional hemoglobin oxygen saturation limb-to-arm ratios at all measured spots have poor discriminative predictive value in detection of critical limb ischemia. Measurement of regional hemoglobin oxygen saturation values and regional hemoglobin oxygen saturation limb-to-arm ratios at any of the measurement spots has no added value in detecting lower limb ischemia in individuals compared with current diagnostic modalities.

  17. Noonan like appearance and familial deletion of the 22q11 Shprintzen-DiGeorge critical region

    SciTech Connect

    Piussan, C.; Mathieu, M.; Boudailliez, B.

    1994-09-01

    Shprintzen velocardiofacial syndrome (VCFS) and reported cases of autosomal dominant DiGeorge sequence (DGS) both belong to a heterogeneous developmental field defect due to the familial segregation of a 22q11 deletion. Two sisters present with mental retardation, dysmorphia and multiple congenital anomalies. The eldest has a Noonan-like appearance; short stature, short webbed neck, low posterior hairline, widely spaced nipples, hemivertebrae, speech disability and mild hypoparathyroidism. Her younger sister has prominent eyes, floppy ears, pulmonary valvular stenosis, hypoplastic right kidney, left multicystic kidney, hypoparathyroidism and renal failure causing death at age 3. Their retarded mother has a typical Shprintzen phenotype and no hypoparathyroidism. A deletion of the critical DiGeorge-Shprintzen conotruncal malformation region was found by FISH in the mother and her Noonan-like daughter. In the mother`s family exist 3 cleft palates, an imperforate anus, a stillbirth and one infant died at age 3 months because of heart malformation. To our knowledge, another case of Noonan-like appearance in a DG patient affected with monosomy 22q11 has been reported in 1992 by Wilson et al. Whether resulting from the hemizygosity of a gene or from the deletion of contiguous genes, the wide DGS-VCFS spectrum encompasses quite variable phenotypes, discordant for palatal and conotruncal defects as well as for hypoparathyroidism, dysmorphic features and multiple congenital anomalies. Physical mapping of both the large 22q11 region commonly lost and the smallest deletion sufficient to produce DGS has been done and may account for the broadening spectrum, the variable expression and the frequently delayed diagnosis of this syndrome.

  18. Biochemical characterisation of the proteins encoded by the DiGeorge critical region 6 (DGCR6) genes.

    PubMed

    Pfuhl, Thorsten; Dürr, Matthias; Spurk, Andreas; Schwalbert, Björn; Nord, Ruth; Mysliwietz, Josef; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Grässer, Friedrich A

    2005-06-01

    The DiGeorge critical region 6 (DGCR6) gene exists in two highly homologous copies (DGCR6 and DGCR6L) on chromosome 22q11 and is deleted in patients with velo-cardio-facial syndrome/DiGeorge syndrome (VCFS/DGS). The DGCR6 mRNA levels are increased in metastatic mammary tumour cells and regulate the expression of neighbouring genes at the 22q11 region. Newly developed monoclonal antibodies detected predominantly nuclear phosphoproteins of approximately 25 kDa, with low expression levels in the cytoplasm. Both proteins have half-lives of about 2.5 h. Exogenously expressed DGCR6 and DGCR6L migrated with slightly different mobility in SDS-gels in accordance with two immunoreactive bands observed for the endogenous proteins. DGCR6 is found at low levels in primary human fibroblasts or peripheral blood mononuclear cells, while tumour cells, B-cells transformed by EBV as well as activated normal human T cells, contain elevated levels of the proteins. The proteins are differentially expressed in mammalian tissues, with high protein levels in heart, liver and skeletal muscle. These observations are important as some patients with DGCR6 syndrome exhibit a T-cell deficiency and/or cardiac malformations. As the DGCR6 protein(s) influence gene expression in trans, we analysed the influence of DGCR6/DGCR6L on the Epstein-Barr virus-encoded oncoproteins EBNA2 and EBNA3c in the activation of the viral LMP1 promoter, as well as LMP1-mediated activation of NFkB, but found no effect in either setting.

  19. Faulting in the Yucca Mountain region: Critical review and analyses of tectonic data from the central Basin and Range

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrill, D.A.; Stirewalt, G.L.; Henderson, D.B.; Stamatakos, J.; Morris, A.P.; Spivey, K.H.; Wernicke, B.P.

    1996-03-01

    Yucca Mountain, Nevada, has been proposed as the potential site for a high-level waste (HLW) repository. The tectonic setting of Yucca Mountain presents several potential hazards for a proposed repository, such as potential for earthquake seismicity, fault disruption, basaltic volcanism, magma channeling along pre-existing faults, and faults and fractures that may serve as barriers or conduits for groundwater flow. Characterization of geologic structures and tectonic processes will be necessary to assess compliance with regulatory requirements for the proposed high level waste repository. In this report, we specifically investigate fault slip, seismicity, contemporary stain, and fault-slip potential in the Yucca Mountain region with regard to Key Technical Uncertainties outlined in the License Application Review Plan (Sections 3.2.1.5 through 3.2.1.9 and 3.2.2.8). These investigations center on (i) alternative methods of determining the slip history of the Bare Mountain Fault, (ii) cluster analysis of historic earthquakes, (iii) crustal strain determinations from Global Positioning System measurements, and (iv) three-dimensional slip-tendency analysis. The goal of this work is to assess uncertainties associated with neotectonic data sets critical to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses` ability to provide prelicensing guidance and perform license application review with respect to the proposed HLW repository at Yucca Mountain.

  20. Delineation of a 1.65 Mb critical region for hemihyperplasia and digital anomalies on Xq25.

    PubMed

    Ricks, Christian B; Masand, Ruchi; Fang, Ping; Roney, Erin K; Cheung, Sau Wai; Scott, Daryl A

    2010-02-01

    Duplications involving portions of the long arm of the X-chromosome can be associated with mental retardation, short stature, microcephaly, panhypopituitarism, and a wide range of physical findings. Less common are duplications in distal Xq associated with hemihyperplasia and digital anomalies. We report on a 4-year-old female with hemihyperplasia, syndactyly of fingers and toes, bilateral 5th finger clinodactyly, short stature, developmental delay, and microcephaly associated with an 11.2 Mb duplication of Xq25-Xq27.1. The boundaries of this duplication were mapped using high resolution array comparative genome hybridization and follow-up studies revealed that the same duplication was carried by the patient's mother who has short stature and cognitive disabilities. Using the duplication boundaries from this case, and data from previously published reports, we have delineated a 1.65 Mb critical region for hemihyperplasia and digital anomalies on chromosome Xq25. Based on these findings physicians should consider obtaining array comparative genome hybridization studies on individuals with hemihyperplasia especially when accompanied by digital findings since identification of an Xq25 duplication can dramatically change recurrence risk estimations and may also provide insight into the possible comorbidities.

  1. Observation of parametric instabilities in the quarter critical density region driven by the Nike KrF laser

    SciTech Connect

    Weaver, J. L.; Kehne, D.; Brown, C. M.; Obenschain, S. P.; Serlin, V.; Schmitt, A. J.; Oh, J.; Lehmberg, R. H.; Mclean, E.; Manka, C.; Phillips, L.; Afeyan, B.; Seely, J.; Feldman, U.

    2013-02-15

    The krypton-fluoride (KrF) laser is an attractive choice for inertial confinement fusion due to its combination of short wavelength ({lambda}=248 nm), large bandwidth (up to 3 THz), and superior beam smoothing by induced spatial incoherence. These qualities improve the overall hydrodynamics of directly driven pellet implosions and should allow use of increased laser intensity due to higher thresholds for laser plasma instabilities when compared to frequency tripled Nd:glass lasers ({lambda}=351 nm). Here, we report the first observations of the two-plasmon decay instability using a KrF laser. The experiments utilized the Nike laser facility to irradiate solid plastic planar targets over a range of pulse lengths (0.35 ns{<=}{tau}{<=}1.25 ns) and intensities (up to 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2}). Variation of the laser pulse created different combinations of electron temperature and electron density scale length. The observed onset of instability growth was consistent with the expected scaling that KrF lasers have a higher intensity threshold for instabilities in the quarter critical density region.

  2. Isolation of novel cDNA encompassing the ADU balanced translocation break point in the DiGeorge critical region.

    PubMed

    Kim, M H; Hur, H; Park, J; Kim, Y J

    2001-03-01

    DiGeorge syndrome (DGS) is a developmental field defect of the third and fourth pharyngeal pouches that are associated with congenital heart defects, hypoparathyroidism, cell-mediated immunodeficiency, velopharyngeal insufficiency, and craniofacial anomalities. Approximately 90% of patients exhibit monosomy in the 22q11 region. In order to isolate the critical gene responsible for DGS, the cDNA libraries were screened with a probe containing the ADU balanced translocation break point, that is a locus reported in one patient (ADU) caused by a balanced translocation between chromosomes 22 and 2. Out of 10(6) clones, three independent overlapping clones were isolated, which were assumed to have originated from a single transcript, DGCR7. This transcript contained a 175-aa long open reading frame (ORF), encoding an acidic (pI = 5.81) and a proline-rich peptide, which are often found in the activation domain of several transcription factors. Also, it was predicted to be a nuclear protein. Northern hybridization detected an approx 1.9 kb transcript in all fetal and adult tissues tested, with strong expression in the fetal liver and kidney. In the case of adult tissues, strong expression was also detected in areas such as the heart, skeletal muscle, liver, and kidney.

  3. Physical mapping of the holoprosencephaly critical region in 21q22.3, exclusion of SIM2 as a candidate gene for holoprosencephaly, and mapping of SIM2 to a region of chromosome 21 important for Down syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Muenke, M.; Bone, L.J.; Mitchell, H.F.

    1995-11-01

    We set out to define the holoprosencephaly (HPE) critical region on chromosome 21 and also to determine whether there were human homologues of the Drosophila single-minded (sim) gene that might be involved in HPE. Analysis of somatic cell hybrid clones that contained rearranged chromosomes 21 from HPE patients defined the HPE minimal critical region in 21q22.3 as D21S113 to qter. We used established somatic cell hybrid mapping panels to map SIM2 to chromosome 21 within subbands q22.2-q22.3. Analysis of the HPE patient-derived somatic cell hybrids showed that SIM2 is not deleted in two of three patients and thus is not a likely candidate for HPE1, the HPE gene on chromosome 21. However, SIM2 does map within the Down syndrome critical region and thus is a candidate gene that might contribute to the Down syndrome phenotype. 31 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Segregation of anterior temporal regions critical for retrieving names of unique and nonunique entities reflects underlying long-range connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Sonya; Inoue, Kayo; Rudrauf, David; Damasio, Hanna; Tranel, Daniel; Grabowski, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Lesion-deficit studies support the hypothesis that the left anterior temporal lobe (ATL) plays a critical role in retrieving names of concrete entities. They further suggest that different regions of the left ATL process different conceptual categories. Here we test the specificity of these relationships and whether the anatomical segregation is related to the underlying organization of white matter connections. We reanalyzed data from a previous lesion study of naming and recognition across five categories of concrete entities. In voxelwise logistic regressions of lesion-deficit associations, we formally incorporated measures of disconnection of long-range association fiber tracts (FTs) and covaried for recognition and non-category specific naming deficits. We also performed fiber tractwise analyses to assess whether damage to specific FTs was preferentially associated with category-selective naming deficits. Damage to the basolateral ATL was associated with naming deficits for both unique (famous faces) and non-unique entities, whereas the damage to the temporal pole was associated with naming deficits for unique entities only. This segregation pattern remained after accounting for comorbid recognition deficits or naming deficits in other categories. The tractwise analyses showed that damage to the uncinate fasciculus was associated with naming impairments for unique entities, while damage to the inferior longitudinal fasciculus was associated with naming impairments for non-unique entities. Covarying for FT transection in voxelwise analyses rendered the cortical association for unique entities more focal. These results are consistent with the partial segregation of brain system support for name retrieval of unique and non-unique entities at both the level of cortical components and underlying white matter fiber bundles. Our study reconciles theoretic accounts of the functional organization of the left ATL by revealing both category-related processing and

  5. A 1.5-Mb contig within the cat eye syndrome critical region at human chromosome 22q11.2.

    PubMed

    Johnson, A; Minoshima, S; Asakawa, S; Shimizu, N; Shizuya, H; Roe, B A; McDermid, H E

    1999-04-15

    We have constructed a 1.5-Mb contig spanning the distal half of the critical region for cat eye syndrome on human chromosome 22 from D22S543 to D22S181. The contig consists of 20 P1 artificial chromosome (PAC) clones and 11 bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones screened from 2 BAC and 2 PAC libraries. Continuous overlap between the clones was confirmed using vectorette PCR and riboprobes. Despite the instability of this region in a previous YAC contig, only 1 BAC showed a minor instability and then in only one isolation. This contig is now providing the basis for genomic sequencing and gene identification in the cat eye syndrome critical region.

  6. The use of ERTS-1 data for the inventory of critical land resources for regional land use planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clapp, J. L.; Kiefer, R. W.; Mccarthy, M. M.; Niemann, B. J., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    Computer-generated spatial and statistical comparisons of critical land resource data derived from conventional sources, RB-57 photographs, and ERTS images, for an eastern Wisconsin test site, suggest that certain critical land resource data can be mapped from ERTS images on a statewide basis. This paper presents one of the biotic resources, wetlands, as an example of the use of ERTS imagery to inventory land resources.

  7. Critical loads of acidity for 90,000 lakes in northern Saskatchewan: A novel approach for mapping regional sensitivity to acidic deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cathcart, H.; Aherne, J.; Jeffries, D. S.; Scott, K. A.

    2016-12-01

    Atmospheric emissions of sulphur dioxide (SO2) from large point sources are the primary concern for acidic deposition in western Canada, particularly in the Athabasca Oil Sands Region (AOSR) where prevailing winds may potentially carry SO2 over acid-sensitive lakes in northern Saskatchewan. A novel catchment-scale regression kriging approach was used to assess regional sensitivity and critical loads of acidity for the total lake population of northern Saskatchewan (89,947 lakes). Lake catchments were delineated using Thiessen polygons, and surface water chemistry was predicted for sensitivity indicators (calcium, pH, alkalinity, and acid neutralizing capacity). Critical loads were calculated with the steady state water chemistry model using regression-kriged base cations, sulphate, and dissolved organic carbon concentrations modelled from surface water observations (n > 800) and digital landscape-scale characteristics, e.g., climate, soil, vegetation, landcover, and geology maps. A large region (>13,726 km2) of two or more indicators of acid sensitivity (pH < 6 and acid neutralizing capacity, alkalinity, calcium < 50 μeq L-1) and low critical loads < 5 meq m-2 yr-1 were predicted on the Athabasca Basin. Exceedance of critical loads under 2006 modelled total sulphate deposition was predicted for 12% of the lakes (covering an area of 3742 km2), primarily located on the Athabasca Basin, within 100 km of the AOSR. There have been conflicting scientific reports of impacts from atmospheric emissions from the AOSR; the results of this study suggest that catchments in the Athabasca Basin within 100 km of the AOSR have received acidic deposition in excess of their critical loads and many of them may be at risk of ecosystem damage owing to their sensitivity.

  8. Down syndrome critical region 2 protein inhibits the transcriptional activity of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {beta} in HEK293 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Hae Jin; Park, Joongkyu; Seo, Su Ryeon; Kim, Jongsun; Paik, Seung R.; Chung, Kwang Chul

    2008-11-21

    Down syndrome is mainly caused by a trisomy of chromosome 21. The Down syndrome critical region 2 (DSCR2) gene is located within a part of chromosome 21, the Down syndrome critical region (DSCR). To investigate the function of DSCR2, we sought to identify DSCR2-interacting proteins using yeast two-hybrid assays. A human fetal brain cDNA library was screened, and DSCR2 was found to interact with a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {beta}, (PPAR{beta}). A co-immunoprecipitation assay demonstrated that DSCR2 physically interacts with PPAR{beta} in mammalian HEK293 cells. DSCR2 also inhibited the ligand-induced transcriptional activity of PPAR{beta}. Furthermore, PPAR{beta} also decreased the solubility of DSCR2, which increased levels of insoluble DSCR2.

  9. Patient with a 22q11.2 deletion with no overlap of the minimal DiGeorge syndrome critical region (MDGCR).

    PubMed

    McQuade, L; Christodoulou, J; Budarf, M; Sachdev, R; Wilson, M; Emanuel, B; Colley, A

    1999-09-03

    The apparent lack of genotype/phenotype correlation in patients with the DiGeorge anomaly and velocardiofacial syndrome (DGA/VCFS; the "22q11 deletion syndrome") indicates a complex genetic condition. Most cases, whatever the phenotype, have a 1.5-3 Mb chromosomal deletion that includes the minimal DiGeorge critical region (MDGCR). Another potential critical region on 22q11 has been suggested based on two patients with distal deletions outside the MDGCR. We report on a patient with a VCFS phenotype who has a deletion, mapped by short tandem repeat polymorphic loci and fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis, distal to and not overlapping the MDGCR. This patient is deleted for several genes, including the T-box 1 gene (TBX1; a transcription regulator expressed early in embryogenesis) and catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT; involved in neurotransmitter metabolism). We discuss the role these two genes may play in the clinical phenotype of the patient.

  10. A 600 kb triplication in the cat eye syndrome critical region causes anorectal, renal and preauricular anomalies in a three-generation family.

    PubMed

    Knijnenburg, Jeroen; van Bever, Yolande; Hulsman, Lorette O M; van Kempen, Chantal A P; Bolman, Galhana M; van Loon, Rosa Laura E; Beverloo, H Berna; van Zutven, Laura J C M

    2012-09-01

    Cat eye syndrome (CES) is caused by a gain of the proximal part of chromosome 22. Usually, a supernumerary marker chromosome is present, containing two extra copies of the chromosome 22q11.1q11.21 region. More sporadically, the gain is present intrachromosomally. The critical region for CES is currently estimated to be about 2.1 Mb and to contain at least 14 RefSeq genes. Gain of this region may cause ocular coloboma, preauricular, anorectal, urogenital and congenital heart malformations. We describe a family in which a 600 kb intrachromosomal triplication is present in at least three generations. The copy number alteration was detected using MLPA and further characterized with interphase and metaphase FISH and SNP-array. The amplified fragment is located in the distal part of the CES region. The family members show anal atresia and preauricular tags or pits, matching part of the phenotype of this syndrome. This finding suggests that amplification of the genes CECR2, SLC25A18 and ATP6V1E1, mapping within the critical region for CES, may be responsible for anorectal, renal and preauricular anomalies in patients with CES.

  11. Structural Organization of the WD repeat protein-encoding gene HIRA in the DiGeorge syndrome critical region of human chromosome 22.

    PubMed

    Lorain, S; Demczuk, S; Lamour, V; Toth, S; Aurias, A; Roe, B A; Lipinski, M

    1996-01-01

    The human gene HIRA lies within the smallest critical region for the DiGeorge syndrome (DGS), a haploinsufficiency developmental disorder associated with instertitial deletions in most patients in a juxtacentromeric region of chromosome 22. The HIRA protein sequence can be aligned over its entire length with Hir1 and Hir2, two yeast proteins with a regulatory function in chromatin assembly. The HIRA transcription unit was found to spread over approximately 100 kb of the DGS critical region. The human transcript is encoded from 25 exons between 59 and 861 bp in size. Domains of highest conservation with Hir1 and Hir2 are encoded from exons 1-11 and 13-25, respectively. The amino- and carboxy-terminal regions of homology are separated from each other by a domain unique to HIRA that is encoded from a single exon. Seven WD repeats are conserved between yeast and man in the amino-terminal region of the HIR proteins. Individual repeats were found to be encoded from one, two, or three exons of the HIRA gene. End sequences have been obtained for all 24 introns, opening the way to PCR amplification of the entire coding sequence starting from genomic DNA. Point mutations can also be sought in 16 of the 24 introns that are readily PCR-amplifiable.

  12. Super- and sub-critical regions in shocks driven by radio-loud and radio-quiet CMEs

    PubMed Central

    Bemporad, Alessandro; Mancuso, Salvatore

    2012-01-01

    White-light coronagraphic images of Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) observed by SOHO/LASCO C2 have been used to estimate the density jump along the whole front of two CME-driven shocks. The two events are different in that the first one was a “radio-loud” fast CME, while the second one was a “radio quiet” slow CME. From the compression ratios inferred along the shock fronts, we estimated the Alfvén Mach numbers for the general case of an oblique shock. It turns out that the “radio-loud” CME shock is initially super-critical around the shock center, while later on the whole shock becomes sub-critical. On the contrary, the shock associated with the “radio-quiet” CME is sub-critical at all times. This suggests that CME-driven shocks could be efficient particle accelerators at the shock nose only at the initiation phases of the event, if and when the shock is super-critical, while at later times they lose their energy and the capability to accelerate high energetic particles. PMID:25685431

  13. Super- and sub-critical regions in shocks driven by radio-loud and radio-quiet CMEs.

    PubMed

    Bemporad, Alessandro; Mancuso, Salvatore

    2013-05-01

    White-light coronagraphic images of Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) observed by SOHO/LASCO C2 have been used to estimate the density jump along the whole front of two CME-driven shocks. The two events are different in that the first one was a "radio-loud" fast CME, while the second one was a "radio quiet" slow CME. From the compression ratios inferred along the shock fronts, we estimated the Alfvén Mach numbers for the general case of an oblique shock. It turns out that the "radio-loud" CME shock is initially super-critical around the shock center, while later on the whole shock becomes sub-critical. On the contrary, the shock associated with the "radio-quiet" CME is sub-critical at all times. This suggests that CME-driven shocks could be efficient particle accelerators at the shock nose only at the initiation phases of the event, if and when the shock is super-critical, while at later times they lose their energy and the capability to accelerate high energetic particles.

  14. A transcription map in the CATCH22 critical region: identification, mapping, and ordering of four novel transcripts expressed in heart.

    PubMed

    Lindsay, E A; Rizzu, P; Antonacci, R; Jurecic, V; Delmas-Mata, J; Lee, C C; Kim, U J; Scambler, P J; Baldini, A

    1996-02-15

    The acronym CATCH22 is used to indicate collectively a group of related phenotypes, namely velocardiofacial syndrome (VCFS), DiGeorge anomaly (DGA), and conotruncal anomaly face, which are associated with deletions within 22q11.2 in the great majority of patients. A deletion map has allowed us to delimit a smallest region of deletion overlap, considerably smaller than the commonly deleted region. We have mapped within this region the chromosomal breakpoint of a balanced translocation patient presenting with a DGA/VCFS phenotype, making this region the strongest candidate for the location of the gene(s) responsible for the disease phenotype. We report a systematic gene search in this region and show the presence of at least six distinct transcripts, two of which have been previously described. The region searched was approximately 270 kb; therefore, an average of one transcript every 45 kb was found. We generated eight new ESTs and mapped two ESTs present in public databases. All six transcripts are expressed in heart, an organ involved in 70%-80% of CATCH22 patients. We show that the multimethod approach to search for expressed sequences is effective and indeed necessary for a comprehensive search and provides molecular tools for further characterization of the potential genes identified.

  15. Critical period of weed control in winter canola (Brassica napus L.) in a semi-arid region.

    PubMed

    Aghaalikhani, M; Yaghoobi, S R

    2008-03-01

    In order to determine the critical period of weed control in winter canola (Brassica napus L. cv. Okapi) an experiment was carried out at research field of Tarbiat Modarres University, Tehran, Iran on 2004-2005 growing season. Fourteen experimental treatments which divided into two sets were arranged in Randomized complete blocks design with four replications. In the first set, the crop was kept weed-free from emergence time to two-leaf stage (V2), four-leaf stage (V4), six-leaf stage (V6), eight-leaf stage (V8), early flowering (IF), 50% of silique set (50% SS) and final harvest (H). In the second set, weeds where permitted to grow with the crop until above mentioned stages. In this study critical period of weed control was determined according to evaluate seed bank emerged weed biomass effect on canola grain yield loss using Gompertz and logistic equations. Result showed a critical time of weed control about 25 days after emergence (between four to six-leaf stages) with 5% accepted yield loss. Therefore, weed control in this time could provide the best result and avoid yield loss and damage to agroecosystem.

  16. High-density single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) map in the 96-kb region containing the entire human DiGeorge syndrome critical region 2 (DGCR2) gene at 22q11.2.

    PubMed

    Iida, A; Ohnishi, Y; Ozaki, K; Ariji, Y; Nakamura, Y; Tanaka, T

    2001-01-01

    We constructed a high-density single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) map in the 96-kb region containing the DiGeorge syndrome critical region 2 (DGCR2) gene at chromosome 22q11.2, a human counterpart of mouse seizure-related gene SEZ-12. A total of 102 SNPs were isolated from the region by systematic screening among 48 Japanese individuals: 9 SNPs in the 5' flanking region, 3 in the 5' untranslated region, 2 in the coding regions, 77 in introns, 7 in the 3' untranslated region, and 4 in the 3' flanking region. By a comparison of our data with SNPs deposited in the dbSNP database in the National Center for Biotechnology Information, 80 SNPs (78.4%) were considered to be novel. The ratio of transition to transversion was 3.08:1. In addition, eight other types of genetic variations (one GA dinucleotide polymorphism and seven insertion/deletion polymorphisms) were discovered. The high-resolution map that we constructed will be a useful resource for analyzing gene scans of complex diseases mapped to this local segment on chromosome 22.

  17. A new case of 8q22.1 microdeletion restricts the critical region for Nablus mask-like facial syndrome.

    PubMed

    Debost-Legrand, Anne; Eymard-Pierre, Eleonore; Pebrel-Richard, Céline; Gouas, Laetitia; Goumy, Carole; Giollant, Michel; Ayed, Wiem; Tchirkov, Andreï; Francannet, Christine; Vago, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Microdeletions of 8q21.3-8q22.1 have been identified in all patients with Nablus mask-like facial syndrome (NMLFS). A recent report of a patient without this specific phenotype presented a 1.6 Mb deletion in this region that partially overlapped with previously reported 8q21.3 microdeletions, thus restricting critical region for this syndrome. We report on another case of an 8q21.3 deletion revealed by array comparative genome hybridization (aCGH) in a 4-year-old child with global developmental delay, autism, microcephaly, but without Nablus phenotype. The size of the interstitial deletion was estimated to span 5.2 Mb. By combining the data from previous reports on 8q21.3-8q22.1 deletions and our case, we were able to narrow the critical region of Nablus syndrome to 0.5 Mb. The deleted region includes FAM92A1, which seems to be a potential candidate gene in NMLFS.

  18. X-linked mixed deafness (DFN3): Cloning and characterization of the critical region allows the identification of novel microdeletions and a duplication

    SciTech Connect

    Cremers, F.P.M.; de Kok, Y.J.M.; Huber, I.

    1994-09-01

    We have constructed a 1.8 megabase YAC contig in the Xq21.41 region using DXS169, DXS26, and DXS995. This contig encompasses the X-linked mixed deafness (DFN3) gene(s) as judged from detailed physical mapping of large Xq21 deletions associated with contiguous gene syndromes and two microdeletions associated with classical DFN3. As a prerequisite for positional cloning of the DFN3 gene, a 850-kb cosmid contig spanning the critical region was constructed by subcloning of two YACs and by cosmid walking in the ICRF X-chromosome library. Using Southern- and PFGE-analysis, we were able to identify 2 novel microdeletions and a 150-kb duplication associated with DFN3. We also identified a sizeable deletion in a patient suffering from choroideremia and mental retardation. This deletion encompasses 40 kb of the distal end of the cosmid contig. Since this patient does not show hearing loss, this finding positions the distal boundary of the DFN3 critical region in our cosmid contig. Our observations suggest that the DFN3 gene is very large (>400 kb) spanning the loci DXS26 and DXS995. In collaboration with Drs. B. Korn and A. Poustka (DKFZ, Heidelberg), cosmids from the contig were used to enrich for cDNAs from the relevant region. Detailed characterization of these cDNAs should soon enable us to identify the DFN3 gene(s).

  19. A conserved region in the prM protein is a critical determinant in the assembly of flavivirus particles.

    PubMed

    Yoshii, Kentaro; Igarashi, Manabu; Ichii, Osamu; Yokozawa, Kana; Ito, Kimihito; Kariwa, Hiroaki; Takashima, Ikuo

    2012-01-01

    Flaviviruses are assembled to bud into the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and are secreted through the vesicle transport pathway, but the details of the molecular mechanism of virion assembly remain largely unknown. In this study, a highly conserved region in the prM protein was identified among flaviviruses. In the subviral particle (SP) system of tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV) and Japanese encephalitis virus, secretion of SPs was impaired by a mutation in the conserved region in the prM protein. Viral proteins were sparse in the Golgi complex and accumulated in the ER. Ultrastructural analysis revealed that long filamentous structures, rather than spherical SPs, were observed in the lumen of the ER as a result of the mutation. The production of infectious virions derived from infectious cDNA of TBEV was also reduced by mutations in the conserved region. Molecular modelling analysis suggested that the conserved region is important for the association of prM-envelope protein heterodimers in the formation of a spike of immature virion. These results are the first demonstration that the conserved region in the prM protein is a molecular determinant for the flavivirus assembly process.

  20. Enhancement of Structural fluctuation in the region connecting two kinds of critical points in temperature-pressure-composition three-dimensional phase diagram: Raman studies of benzene/CO2 binary systems up to supercritical region.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Hideyuki; Murai, Miki; Tono-oka, Mariko; Masuda, Kumiko; Ishii, Kikujiro

    2007-03-01

    Pressure dependence of Raman spectra of benzene/CO2 two-component systems was systematically studied at different temperatures and compositions. We estimated the magnitude of inhomogeneous component in Raman bandwidth to get information on the structural fluctuation in the system. It was found that the inhomogeneous bandwidth attains a maximum on an isothermal plane in the temperature-pressure-composition three-dimensional phase diagram when the state point crosses the line connecting the region where the density fluctuation is large (the vicinity of the critical point of neat CO2) and the region where the concentration fluctuation in a binary system is enhanced (the vicinity of the critical solution point). By accumulating such data, we found that the points of large structural fluctuation comprise a sheet that includes the extension line of the gas-liquid equilibrium line in the phase diagram of neat CO2 and the line connecting critical solution points of the two-component system at different temperatures. Interaction between benzene and CO2 molecules in the supercritical region is briefly discussed.

  1. Determination of the 'critical region' for cat-like cry of Cri-du-chat syndrome and analysis of candidate genes by quantitative PCR.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qingfa; Niebuhr, Erik; Yang, Huanming; Hansen, Lars

    2005-04-01

    Cri-du-chat (CDC, OMIM 123450) is a chromosomal syndrome that results from partial deletions on the short arm of chromosome 5. The clinical features of CDC normally include high-pitched cat-like cry, mental retardation, microcephaly, hypertelorism and epicanthic folds. The cat-like cry is the most prominent clinical characteristic in newborn children and is usually considered as diagnostic for the CDC syndrome. Using a strategy of 'phenotype dissection', the critical region for cat-like cry was mapped to the chromosomal segment 5p15.3-5p15.2 in previous reports. In this study, the distal breakpoints of two interstitial deletions in two clinical distinctive CDC patients are analysed, one with and one without the cat-like cry. Using PCR, the critical region for the cat-like cry is mapped to a short 640 kbp region on chromosome 5p. Genome analysis of this critical region reveals a gene-rich sequence containing five known genes, five putative genes and three spliced EST sequences, altogether 71 predicted exons. Three genes, FLJ25076, a homolog to a ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme UBC-E2, FLJ20303, a nucleolar protein NOP2, which may play a role in the regulation of the cell cycle and MGC5309, a protein with similarity to Nut2, a Drosophila transcriptional coactivator, have been characterized and expression profiles determined by quantitative PCR. These results suggest that one candidate gene, FLJ25076, encodes a ubiquitin-conjugated enzyme E2 type, which is locally expressed in thoracic and scalp tissues. The other two genes are expressed uniformly in all tissues tested, which suggest that they are housekeeping genes.

  2. Isolation of novel genes from the CMT1A duplication/HNPP deletion critical region in 17p11.2-p12.

    PubMed

    Murakami, T; Sun, Z S; Lee, C C; Lupski, J R

    1997-01-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A (CMT1A) is associated with a 1.5-Mb tandem DNA duplication in chromosome 17p11.2-p12, while hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) is associated with a 1.5-Mb deletion at this locus. The 1.5-Mb CMT1A monomer unit duplicated in CMT1A and deleted in HNPP is flanked by low-copy repeats termed CMT1A-REPs. Both diseases appear to be caused by an altered copy number of the peripheral myelin protein 22 gene (PMP22), which lies within the critical region. To identify additional genes rapidly, we used a cosmid contig of this region and reciprocal probing of arrayed chromosome 17-specific cosmid and cDNA libraries. Three cDNA clones were identified within the CMT1A duplication/HNPP deletion region and one just proximal to the critical region. The cDNA for human heme A:farnesyltransferase (COX10) mapped 10 kb centromeric to the distal CMT1A-REP. The other two cDNA clones from within the critical interval mapped to cosmid 126D1 at the mfd41 (D17S261) DNA marker, and their conceptual translation showed homology to 60S ribosomal protein L9 (RPL9) and chromosomal protein RMSA-1 (RMSA-1). A gene that is homologous to human peroxisome proliferator activated receptor alpha (hPPARA) was identified near the proximal CMT1A-REP.

  3. Linkage analysis in Rett syndrome families suggests that there may be a critical region at Xq28.

    PubMed Central

    Webb, T; Clarke, A; Hanefeld, F; Pereira, J L; Rosenbloom, L; Woods, C G

    1998-01-01

    A whole X chromosome study of families in which Rett syndrome had been diagnosed in more than one member indicated that the region between Xq27 and Xqter was the most likely region to harbour a gene which may be involved in the aetiology of the disease. Further, more detailed studies of Xq28 detected weak linkage and a higher than expected sharing of maternally inherited alleles. It is suggested that there may be more than one gene involved in the aetiology of this syndrome, particularly as the very rare families in which more than one girl is affected often show variable clinical symptoms. Images PMID:9863596

  4. Nucleotide sequence and transcriptional analysis of the flanking region of the gene (spb) for the trans-acting factor that controls light-mediated expression of the puf operon in Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    PubMed

    Mizoguchi, H; Masuda, T; Nishimura, K; Shimada, H; Ohta, H; Shioi, Y; Takamiya, K

    1997-05-01

    We recently reported the existence of a trans-acting factor (SPB) in Rhodobacter sphaeroides that repressed the expression of the puf operon during illumination. SPB was somewhat homologous to HvrA of Rhodobacter capsulatus, but these proteins appear to have functionally different properties. We now report an analysis of the flanking region of spb in the genome of R.sphaeroides, and we show that spb is a positional counterpart of hvrA of R. capsulatus. The region directly downstream of spb was found to contain three genes, two of which were highly homologous to orf5 and ahcY in R. capsulatus. However, a gene corresponding to hvrB, which controls the expression of orf5 and ahcY in R. capsulatus, was absent in R. sphaeroides. The level of the transcript of ahcY did not change in cells grown under photosynthetic and by respiratory conditions. By contrast, orf5 was transcribed at a higher rate in photosynthetically grown cells under high-intensity light than under low-intensity light, indicating features of transcription different from those in R. capsulatus. A third gene, orf318, which was absent in the corresponding region of R. capsulatus, encoded an amino acid sequence that was significantly homologous to the consensus sequence of RfaI and RfaJ of E.coli, which are glycosyl transferases involved in the synthesis of lipopolysaccharide. orf318 was transcribed in the opposite direction to ahcY, and at only a low level, under all conditions tested.

  5. Identification of Regions Critically Affecting Kinetics and Allosteric Regulation of the Escherichia coli ADP-Glucose Pyrophosphorylase by Modeling and Pentapeptide-Scanning Mutagenesis▿

    PubMed Central

    Ballicora, Miguel A.; Erben, Esteban D.; Yazaki, Terutaka; Bertolo, Ana L.; Demonte, Ana M.; Schmidt, Jennifer R.; Aleanzi, Mabel; Bejar, Clarisa M.; Figueroa, Carlos M.; Fusari, Corina M.; Iglesias, Alberto A.; Preiss, Jack

    2007-01-01

    ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (ADP-Glc PPase) is the enzyme responsible for the regulation of bacterial glycogen synthesis. To perform a structure-function relationship study of the Escherichia coli ADP-Glc PPase enzyme, we studied the effects of pentapeptide insertions at different positions in the enzyme and analyzed the results with a homology model. We randomly inserted 15 bp in a plasmid with the ADP-Glc PPase gene. We obtained 140 modified plasmids with single insertions of which 21 were in the coding region of the enzyme. Fourteen of them generated insertions of five amino acids, whereas the other seven created a stop codon and produced truncations. Correlation of ADP-Glc PPase activity to these modifications validated the enzyme model. Six of the insertions and one truncation produced enzymes with sufficient activity for the E. coli cells to synthesize glycogen and stain in the presence of iodine vapor. These were in regions away from the substrate site, whereas the mutants that did not stain had alterations in critical areas of the protein. The enzyme with a pentapeptide insertion between Leu102 and Pro103 was catalytically competent but insensitive to activation. We postulate this region as critical for the allosteric regulation of the enzyme, participating in the communication between the catalytic and regulatory domains. PMID:17496097

  6. A 1.5-Mb cosmid contig of the CMT1A duplication/HNPP deletion critical region in 17p11.2-p12

    SciTech Connect

    Murakami, Tatsufumi; Lupski, J.R.

    1996-05-15

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A (CMT1A) is associated with a 1.5-Mb tandem duplication in chromosome 17p11.2-p12, and hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) is associated with a 1.5-Mb deletion at this locus. Both diseases appear to result from an altered copy number of the peripheral myelin protein-22 gene, PMP22, which maps within the critical region. To identify additional genes and characterize chromosomal elements, a 1.5-Mb cosmid contig of the CMT1A duplication/HNPP deletion critical region was assembled using a yeast artificial chromosome (YAC)-based isolation and binning strategy. Whole YAC probes were used for screening a high-density arrayed chromosome 17-specific cosmid library. Selected cosmids were spotted on dot blots and assigned to bins defined by YACs. This binning of cosmids facilitated the subsequent fingerprint analysis. The 1.5-Mb region was covered by 137 cosmids with a minimum overlap set of 52 cosmids assigned to 17 bins and 9 contigs. 20 refs., 2 figs.

  7. Isolation of a novel gene from the DiGeorge syndrome critical region with homology to Drosophila gdl and to human LAMC1 genes.

    PubMed

    Demczuk, S; Thomas, G; Aurias, A

    1996-05-01

    DiGeorge syndrome, and more widely the CATCH 22 syndrome, are associated with microdeletions in chromosomal region 22q11.2. A critical region of 500 kb has been delimited within which maps the breakpoint of a balanced translocation associated with mild CATCH 22 phenotypes. We report the isolation from this critical region of a novel gene, DGCR6, which maps 115 kb centromeric to the balanced translocation breakpoint. The DGCR6 gene product shares homology with the Drosophila melanogaster gonadal protein, which participates in gonadal and germ-line cells development, and with the human laminin. gamma-1 chain, which upon polymerization with alpha- and beta- chains forms the laminin molecule. Laminin binds to cells through interaction with a receptor and has functions in cell attachment, migration and tissue organization during development. DGCR6 could be a candidate for involvement in the DiGeorge syndrome pathology by playing a role in neural crest cell migration into the third and fourth pharyngeal pouches, the structures from which derive the organs affected in DiGeorge syndrome.

  8. Deletion involving D15S113 in a mother and son without Angelman syndrome: Refinement of the Angelman syndrome critical deletion region

    SciTech Connect

    Michaelis, R.C.; Skinner, S.A.; Lethco, B.A.

    1995-01-02

    Deletions of 15q11-q13 typically result in Angelman syndrome when inherited from the mother and Prader-Willi syndrome when inherited from the father. The critical deletion region for Angelman syndrome has recently been restricted by a report of an Angelman syndrome patient with a deletion spanning less than 200 kb around the D15S113 locus. We report here on a mother and son with a deletion of chromosome 15 that includes the D15S113 locus. The son has mild to moderate mental retardation and minor anomalies, while the mother has a borderline intellectual deficit and slightly downslanting palpebral fissures. Neither patient has the seizures, excessive laughter and hand clapping, ataxia or the facial anomalies which are characteristic of Angelman syndrome. The proximal boundary of the deletion in our patients lies between the D15S10 and The D15S113 loci. Our patients do not have Angelman syndrome, despite the deletion of the D15S113 marker. This suggests that the Angelman syndrome critical deletion region is now defined as the overlap between the deletion found in the previously reported Angelman syndrome patient and the region that is intact in our patients. 28 refs., 6 figs.

  9. A 1.5-Mb cosmid contig of the CMT1A duplication/HNPP deletion critical region in 17p11.2-p12.

    PubMed

    Murakami, T; Lupski, J R

    1996-05-15

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A (CMT1A) is associated with a 1. 5-Mb tandem duplication in chromosome 17p11.2-p12, and hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) is associated with a 1.5-Mb deletion at this locus. Both diseases appear to result from an altered copy number of the peripheral myelin protein-22 gene, PMP22, which maps within the critical region. To identify additional genes and characterize chromosomal elements, a 1.5-Mb cosmid contig of the CMT1A duplication/HNPP deletion critical region was assembled using a yeast artificial chromosome (YAC)-based isolation and binning strategy. Whole YAC probes were used for screening a high-density arrayed chromosome 17-specific cosmid library. Selected cosmids were spotted on dot blots and assigned to bins defined by YACs. This binning of cosmids facilitated the subsequent fingerprint analysis. The 1.5-Mb region was covered by 137 cosmids with a minimum overlap set of 52 cosmids assigned to 17 bins and 9 contigs.

  10. A large, dominant pedigree of atrioventricular septal defect (AVSD): Exclusion from the Down syndrome critical region on chromosome 21

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, L.; Curtis, A.; Stephenson, A.; Goodship, J.; Burn, J. ); Korenberg, J.R.; Schipper, R.D. ); Allan, L. ); Chenevix-Trench, G. )

    1993-12-01

    The authors describe a large pedigree of individuals with autosomal dominant atrioventricular septal defect (AVSD). The pedigree includes affected individuals and individuals who have transmitted the defect but are not clinically affected. AVSDs are a rare congenital heart malformation that occurs as only 2.8% of isolated cardiac lesions. They are the predominant heart defect in children with Down syndrome, making chromosome 21 a candidate for genes involved in atrioventricular septal development. The authors have carried out a linkage study in the pedigree by using 10 simple-sequence polymorphisms from chromosome 21. Multipoint linkage analysis gives lod scores of less than [minus]2 for the region of trisomy 21 associated with heart defects, which excludes a locus within this region as the cause of the defect in this family. 34 refs., 5 figs.

  11. An unbalanced 5;22 translocation in a patient with features of VCFS: Confirmation by FISH of loss of the DGS/VCFS critical region

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.J.; McGlothlin, J.C.; Lindsay, E.A.

    1994-09-01

    A 14-month-old male with a history of ventricular septal defect (VSD) and cleft lip and palate (CL/P) was referred for evaluation because of growth retardation, developmental delay and hypotonia. The initial cytogenetic analysis was 45,XY,-5,-22,+der(5)t(5q:22q). Determination of breakpoints 5q35.3 and 22q11.2 were made on G-banded chromosomes with band lengths of over 550. However, with both regions being light G bands, it was difficult to tell if the break in 22 was proximal to or distal to the DiGeorge syndrome/velocardiofacial syndrome (DGS/VCFS) critical region. Since the patient had a VSD and CL/P, velocardiofacial syndrome and a deletion of the DGS/VCFS critical region was suspected. FISH analysis of the derivative chromosome was performed with a cocktail containing two probes (ONCOR), D22S75, which maps to the DGS/VCFS region in 22q11.2 and D22S39, which maps to 22q13.3 and is used as a control for the presence of chromosome 22. Three fluorescent signals were observed, two on the normal 22 and the third on the terminal end of the derivative 5 chromosome verifying the translocation of 22q to 5q. No signal was observed for D22S75 on the proximal part of the translocated segment, verifying a deletion of the DGS/VCFS region in a patient whose clinical evaluation is consistent with velocardiofacial syndrome. Experiments with additional probes are underway to determine the deletion boundaries.

  12. Substantial reduction of the gastric carcinoma critical region at 6q16.3-q23.1.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, B; Seruca, R; Carneiro, F; Buys, C H; Kok, K

    1999-09-01

    Deletions of the long arm of chromosome 6 are a common event in gastric carcinomas. In a previous study, deletion mapping of 6q identified two smallest regions of overlap (SROs) of heterozygous deletions: one interstitial, spanning 12-16 cM, bordered by D6S268 (6q16.3-q21) and ARG1 (6q22.3-q23.1), and one distal to IFNGR1 (6q23-q24), spanning more than 30 cM. Loss of heterozygosity (LOH) of the interstitial SRO was detected in 50% of informative tumors. We analyzed 60 primary gastric tumors with 19 highly polymorphic markers from 6q16.3-q23.3 to delimit the interstitial SRO further. Of the 50 tumors that were informative for at least one locus, 18 (36%) showed allelic imbalance (AI). The overlap of these cases allowed us to define an SRO of approximately 3 Mb flanked by D6S278 and D6S404. AI or LOH of this region occurs in all histologic types of gastric carcinoma and in early stages of development, indicating that loss of a gene from this region of 6q is a crucial step in a main route of gastric carcinogenesis. For cases with retention of 6q, alternative routes of gastric carcinogenesis may exist. Genes Chromosomes Cancer 26:29-34, 1999.

  13. Two distinct regions in the model protein Peb1 are critical for its heterologous transport out of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Escherichia coli is frequently the first-choice host organism in expression of heterologous recombinant proteins in basic research as well as in production of commercial, therapeutic polypeptides. Especially the secretion of proteins into the culture medium of E. coli is advantageous compared to intracellular production due to the ease in recovery of the recombinant protein. Since E. coli naturally is a poor secretor of proteins, a few strategies for optimization of extracellular secretion have been described. We have previously reported efficient secretion of the diagnostically interesting model protein Peb1 of Campylobacter jejuni into the growth medium of Escherichia coli strain MKS12 (ΔfliCfliD). To generate a more detailed understanding of the molecular mechanisms behind this interesting heterologous secretion system with biotechnological implications, we here analyzed further the transport of Peb1 in the E. coli host. Results When mature Peb1 was expressed without its SecA-YEG -dependent signal sequence and without the putative signal peptidase II recognition sequence in E. coli MKS111ΔHBB lacking the flagellar secretion complex, the protein was found in the periplasm and growth medium which indicated a flagellum-independent translocation. We assessed the Peb1 secretion proficiency by an exhaustive search for transport-affecting regions using a transposition-based scanning mutagenesis strategy. Strikingly, insertion mutagenesis of only two segments, called TAR1 (residues 42 and 43) and TAR2 (residues 173 to 180), prevented Peb1 secretion individually. We confirmed the importance of TAR regions by subsequent site-specific mutagenesis and verified that the secretion deficiency of Peb1 mutants was not due to insolubility or aggregation of the proteins in the cytoplasm. We found by cell fractionation that the mutant proteins were present in the periplasm as well as in the cytoplasm of MKS12. Hence, mutagenesis of TAR regions did not affect export of

  14. Two pedigrees of autosomal dominant atrioventricular canal defect (AVCD): Exclusion from the critical region on 8p

    SciTech Connect

    Amati, F.; Mari, A.; Mingarelli, R.

    1995-07-03

    Atrioventricular canal defects (AVCD) constitute the predominant congenital heart defect in Down`s syndrome. For this reason, a candidate gene involved in atrioventricular canal development was previously searched and excluded in dominant pedigrees of AVCD, using linkage analysis of polymorphisms from chromosome 21. Because of the striking association between 8p deletion and AVCD, a search for an AVCD gene was carried out in two pedigrees of individuals with autosomal dominant AVCD using a set of DNA markers of the 8pter{r_arrow}q12 region. These two families include affected individuals and subjects who have transmitted the defect but are not clinically affected. Two-point lod scores were significantly negative for all markers at penetrance levels of 90% and 50%. Multipoint analysis excluded the region covered by the markers LPL-D8S262 and 30 cM to either side of this area. This result corroborates heterogeneity of this heart defect and indicates that the genetic basis of familial AVCD is different from AVCD associated to either trisomy 21 or 8p deletion. 25 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Extension of Case's method to the two-region critical cylinder and its application as an analytic standard. Ph.D. Thesis - Virginia Univ.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Westfall, R. M.

    1974-01-01

    The normal mode expansion technique is applied to the transformed monoenergetic integral transport equation to develop a solution for the rotationally invariant and axially infinite, critical, two-region cylinder with a finite outer reflector boundary. Isotropic scattering and identical neutron mean free paths in the core and reflector regions are assumed. The solution in terms of singular integral equations is obtained by applying a completeness theorem found for the singular eigenfunctions. Numerical results for a variety of core and reflector multiplying properties and reflector thickness are presented and compared with the results of other method. An example of this type of application is given in a study of approximations inherent in the neutronic design analysis of a small, fast-neutron-spectrum reactor concept proposed as a space power source.

  16. Localization of the human mitochondrial citrate transporter protein gene to chromosome 22Q11 in the DiGeorge syndrome critical region.

    PubMed

    Heisterkamp, N; Mulder, M P; Langeveld, A; ten Hoeve, J; Wang, Z; Roe, B A; Groffen, J

    1995-09-20

    A high percentage of patients with DiGeorge syndrome and velo-cardio-facial syndrome have interstitial deletions on chromosome 22q11. The shortest region of overlap is currently estimated to be around 55 kb. Two segments of DNA from chromosome 22q11, located 160 kb apart, were cloned because they contained NotI restriction enzyme sites. In the current study we demonstrate that these segments are absent from chromosomes 22 carrying microdeletions of two different DiGeorge patients. Fluorescence in situ and Southern blot hybridization was further used to show that this locus is within the DiGeorge critical region. Phylogenetically conserved sequences adjacent to one human cell lines. cDNAs isolated with a probe from this segment showed it to contain the gene for teh human mitochondrial citrate transporter protein. Deletion of this gene in DiGeorge syndrome and velocardio-facial syndrome may contribute to the mental deficiency seen in the patients.

  17. Study of the anomalies in critical frequency of F2 layer prior to earthquakes in South American region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Soujan; Chakrabarti, Sandip Kumar; Sasmal, Sudipta; Midya, Subrata kumar

    2016-07-01

    Earthquake precursors study is very important. Earthquake preparation process starts almost 1-30 days before its occurrence. Several large earthquakes hit the west coast of South America after the year 2000. We consider five large earthquakes (mag > 6) and analyze temporal variation of Ionospheric parameters fifteen days before and fifteen days after main shocks. These parameters measured by the ground based station Jicamarca (lat 11.95 S, long 76.87 W) which lies at a distance within a radius of 1000km from the epicentre of these large earthquakes. In this paper, we define a parameter and named it as 'F-Parameter', containing critical frequency of F2 layer (f0F2) and virtual height of F layer (h'F) to examine the ionospheric variation during earthquake. The f0F2 values also revealed anomaly which has been considered as a supporting evidence for the observed correlation. We also check Dst, Kp, Ap index to confirm that these amomalies are due to seismic events only. The final results showed that the value of ionospheric parameter (F-Parameter) increased 12-3 days prior to earthquake. The increment is over +3σ from the normal variation of the parameter value.

  18. Deletion of ETS-1, a gene in the Jacobsen syndrome critical region, causes ventricular septal defects and abnormal ventricular morphology in mice.

    PubMed

    Ye, Maoqing; Coldren, Chris; Liang, Xingqun; Mattina, Teresa; Goldmuntz, Elizabeth; Benson, D Woodrow; Ivy, Dunbar; Perryman, M B; Garrett-Sinha, Lee Ann; Grossfeld, Paul

    2010-02-15

    Congenital heart defects comprise the most common form of major birth defects, affecting 0.7% of all newborn infants. Jacobsen syndrome (11q-) is a rare chromosomal disorder caused by deletions in distal 11q. We have previously determined that a wide spectrum of the most common congenital heart defects occur in 11q-, including an unprecedented high frequency of hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS). We identified an approximately 7 Mb 'cardiac critical region' in distal 11q that contains a putative causative gene(s) for congenital heart disease. In this study, we utilized chromosomal microarray mapping to characterize three patients with 11q- and congenital heart defects that carry interstitial deletions overlapping the 7 Mb cardiac critical region. We propose that this 1.2 Mb region of overlap harbors a gene(s) that causes at least a subset of the congenital heart defects that occur in 11q-. We demonstrate that one gene in this region, ETS-1 (a member of the ETS family of transcription factors), is expressed in the endocardium and neural crest during early mouse heart development. Gene-targeted deletion of ETS-1 in mice in a C57/B6 background causes, with high penetrance, large membranous ventricular septal defects and a bifid cardiac apex, and less frequently a non-apex-forming left ventricle (one of the hallmarks of HLHS). Our results implicate an important role for the ETS-1 transcription factor in mammalian heart development and should provide important insights into some of the most common forms of congenital heart disease.

  19. [The perioperative period in cancer surgery: a critical moment! Is there a role for regional anesthesia in preventing cancer recurrence?].

    PubMed

    Beloeil, H; Nouette-Gaulain, K

    2012-06-01

    Surgical treatment of cancer is usually necessary but it can paradoxically aggravate the patient outcome by increasing the risk of recurrence. Many perioperative factors have been shown to contribute to the dissemination of the tumor: surgery itself, stress, inflammation, pain, anaesthetic drugs, blood transfusion, etc. The type of anaesthesia chosen in the cancer patient could then be crucial and influence the evolution of the disease. Experimental, preclinical and retrospective studies have suggested that a regional anesthesia associated or not with a general anesthesia for carcinologic surgery might reduce the risk of cancer recurrence. This text reviews the factors promoting the recurrence of tumors after carcinologic surgery and the potential possibilities of protection associated with the type of anaesthesia chosen.

  20. Direct selection of conserved cDNAs from the DiGeorge critical region: isolation of a novel CDC45-like gene.

    PubMed

    McKie, J M; Wadey, R B; Sutherland, H F; Taylor, C L; Scambler, P J

    1998-08-01

    We have used a modified direct selection technique to detect transcripts that are both evolutionary conserved and developmentally expressed. The enrichment for homologous mouse cDNAs by use of human genomic DNA as template is shown to be an efficient and rapid approach for generating transcript maps. Deletions of human 22q11 are associated with several clinical syndromes, with overlapping phenotypes, for example, velocardiofacial syndrome (VCFS) and DiGeorge syndrome (DGS). A large number of transcriptional units exist within the defined critical region, many of which have been identified previously by direct selection. However, no single obvious candidate gene for the VCFS/DGS phenotype has yet been found. Our technique has been applied to the DiGeorge critical region and has resulted in the isolation of a novel candidate gene, Cdc45l2, similar to yeast Cdc45p. [The sequence data described in this paper have been submitted to the EMBL data library under accession nos. AJ0223728 and AF0223729.

  1. Shared and Distinct Neuroanatomic Regions Critical for Tool-related Action Production and Recognition: Evidence from 131 Left-hemisphere Stroke Patients.

    PubMed

    Tarhan, Leyla Y; Watson, Christine E; Buxbaum, Laurel J

    2015-12-01

    The inferior frontal gyrus and inferior parietal lobe have been characterized as human homologues of the monkey "mirror neuron" system, critical for both action production (AP) and action recognition (AR). However, data from brain lesion patients with selective impairment on only one of these tasks provide evidence of neural and cognitive dissociations. We sought to clarify the relationship between AP and AR, and their critical neural substrates, by directly comparing performance of 131 chronic left-hemisphere stroke patients on both tasks--to our knowledge, the largest lesion-based experimental investigation of action cognition to date. Using voxel-based lesion-symptom mapping, we found that lesions to primary motor and somatosensory cortices and inferior parietal lobule were associated with disproportionately impaired performance on AP, whereas lesions to lateral temporo-occipital cortex were associated with a relatively rare pattern of disproportionately impaired performance on AR. In contrast, damage to posterior middle temporal gyrus was associated with impairment on both AP and AR. The distinction between lateral temporo-occipital cortex, critical for recognition, and posterior middle temporal gyrus, important for both tasks, suggests a rough gradient from modality-specific to abstract representations in posterior temporal cortex, the first lesion-based evidence for this phenomenon. Overall, the results of this large patient study help to bring closure to a long-standing debate by showing that tool-related AP and AR critically depend on both common and distinct left hemisphere neural substrates, most of which are external to putative human mirror regions.

  2. X-linked mixed deafness (DFN3): cloning and characterization of the critical region allows the identification of novel microdeletions.

    PubMed

    Huber, I; Bitner-Glindzicz, M; de Kok, Y J; van der Maarel, S M; Ishikawa-Brush, Y; Monaco, A P; Robinson, D; Malcolm, S; Pembrey, M E; Brunner, H G

    1994-07-01

    We have found that the microsatellite marker AFM207zg5 (DXS995) maps to all previously described deletions which are associated with X-linked mixed deafness (DFN3) with or without choroideremia and mental retardation. Employing this marker and pHU16 (DXS26) we have identified two partially overlapping yeast artificial chromosome clones which were used to construct a complete 850 kb cosmid contig. Cosmids from this contig have been tested by Southern blot analysis on DNA from 16 unrelated males with X-linked deafness. Two novel microdeletions were detected in patients which exhibit the characteristic DFN3 phenotype. Both deletions are completely contained within one of the known DFN3-deletions, but one of them does not overlap with two previously described deletions in patients with contiguous gene syndromes consisting of DFN3, choroideremia, and mental retardation. Assuming that only a single gene is involved, this suggests that the DFN3 gene spans a chromosomal region of at least 400 kb.

  3. Partial monosomy of chromosome 1p36.3: Characterization of the critical region and delineation of a syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Reish, O.; Berry, S.A.; Hirsch, B.

    1995-12-04

    We describe 5 patients ranging in age from 3 to 47 years, with karyotypic abnormalities resulting in monosomy for portion of 1p36.3, microcephaly, mental retardation, prominent forehead, deep-set eyes, depressed nasal bridge, flat midface, relative prognathism, and abnormal ears. Four patients have small hands and feet. All exhibited selfabusive behavior. Additional findings in some of the patients include brain anomalies, optic atrophy, hearing loss and skeletal deformities. The breakpoints within chromosome 1 were designated at 1p36.31 (3 cases), 1p36.32 (1 case) and 1p36.33 (1 case). Thus, the smallest region of deletion overlap is 1p36.33{r_arrow}pter. Detection of the abnormal 1 relied on high resolution G-band analysis. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) utilizing a DNA probe (Oncor D1Z2) containing the repetitive sequences in distal 1p36, confirmed a deletion of one 1 homologue in all 5 cases. The abnormal 1 resulted from a de novo deletion in only one patient. The remaining patients were either confirmed (3 cases) or suspected (1 case) to have unbalanced translocations. Despite the additional genetic imbalance present in these four cases, monosomy of 1p36.33 appears to be responsible for a specific clinical phenotype. Characterization of this phenotype should assist in the clinical diagnosis of this chromosome abnormality. 26 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Extending the phenotype of monosomy 1p36 syndrome and mapping of a critical region for obesity and hyperphagia.

    PubMed

    D'Angelo, Carla S; Kohl, Ilana; Varela, Monica Castro; de Castro, Cláudia I E; Kim, Chong A; Bertola, Débora R; Lourenço, Charles M; Koiffmann, Célia P

    2010-01-01

    Rearrangements of 1p36 are the most frequently detected abnormalities in diagnostic testing for chromosomal cryptic imbalances and include variably sized simple terminal deletions, derivative chromosomes, interstitial deletions, and complex rearrangements. These rearrangements result in the specific pattern of malformation and neurodevelopmental disabilities that characterizes monosomy 1p36 syndrome. Thus far, no individual gene within this region has been conclusively determined to be causative of any component of the phenotype. Nor is it known if the rearrangements convey phenotypes via a haploinsufficiency mechanism or through a position effect. We have used multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification to screen for deletions of 1p36 in a group of 154 hyperphagic and overweight/obese, PWS negative individuals, and in a separate group of 83 patients initially sent to investigate a variety of other conditions. The strategy allowed the identification and delineation of rearrangements in nine subjects with a wide spectrum of clinical presentations. Our work reinforces the association of monosomy 1p36 and obesity and hyperphagia, and further suggests that these features may be associated with non-classical manifestations of this disorder in addition to a submicroscopic deletion of approximately 2-3 Mb in size. Multiplex ligation probe amplification using the monosomy 1p36 syndrome-specific kit coupled to the subtelomeric kit is an effective approach to identify and delineate rearrangements at 1p36.

  5. A critical review of measurements of water vapor absorption in the 840 to 1100 cm(-1) spectral region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, William B.

    1987-01-01

    A set of eleven measurements of the water vapor continuum absorption in the 840 to 1100 sq cm spectral region is reviewed and compared with spectral models maintained by the Air Force Geophysics Laboratory. The measurements were made in four different ways: spectrometer with a White cell, CO2 laser with a White cell, CO2 laser with a spectrophone, and broadband radiation source over a long atmospheric path. Where possible, the data were selected at a water vapor partial pressure of ten torr buffered to 760 torr with N2 or synthetic air and a temperature of between 296 and 300 K. The intercomparison of the data leads to several observations and conclusions. First, there are four sets of laboratory data taken with nitrogen as the buffer gas which generally agree well mutually and with AFGL's HITRAN code. Second, there is one set of laboratory data that shows that using air as the buffer gas gives a few percent decrease in the water vapor continuum compared with using nitrogen as the buffer gas. Third, the atmospheric long-path measurements for water vapor partial pressure below about 12 torr are roughly grouped within 20 percent of the HITRAN values. Fourth, there are three sets of spectrophone data for water vapor in synthetic air which are significantly higher than any of the other measurements. This discrepancy is attributed to the effects of impurity gases in the cell.

  6. Two-phase flow characteristic of inverted bubbly, slug and annular flow in post-critical heat flux region

    SciTech Connect

    Ishii, M.; Denten, J.P.

    1988-01-01

    Inverted annular flow can be visualized as a liquid jet-like core surrounded by a vapor annulus. While many analytical and experimental studies of heat transfer in this regime have been performed, there is very little understanding of the basic hydrodynamics of the post-CHF flow field. However, a recent experimental study was done that was able to successfully investigate the effects of various steady-state inlet flow parameters on the post-CHF hydrodynamics of the film boiling of a single phase liquid jet. This study was carried out by means of a visual photographic analysis of an idealized single phase core inverted annular flow initial geometry (single phase liquid jet core surrounded by a coaxial annulus of gas). In order to extend this study, a subsequent flow visualization of an idealized two-phase core inverted annular flow geometry (two-phase central jet core, surrounded by a coaxial annulus of gas) was carried out. The objective of this second experimental study was to investigate the effect of steady-state inlet, pre-CHF two-phase jet core parameters on the hydrodynamics of the post-CHF flow field. In actual film boiling situations, two-phase flows with net positive qualities at the CHF point are encountered. Thus, the focus of the present experimental study was on the inverted bubbly, slug, and annular flow fields in the post dryout film boiling region. Observed post dryout hydrodynamic behavior is reported. A correlation for the axial extent of the transition flow pattern between inverted annular and dispersed droplet flow (the agitated regime) is developed. It is shown to depend strongly on inlet jet core parameters and jet void fraction at the dryout point. 45 refs., 9 figs., 4 tabs.

  7. Prader-Willi Critical Region, a Non-Translated, Imprinted Central Regulator of Bone Mass: Possible Role in Skeletal Abnormalities in Prader-Willi Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Yue; Zolotukhin, Sergei; Kulkarni, Rishikesh N.; Enriquez, Ronaldo F.; Purtell, Louise; Lee, Nicola J.; Wee, Natalie K.; Croucher, Peter I.; Campbell, Lesley; Herzog, Herbert; Baldock, Paul A.

    2016-01-01

    Prader-Willi Syndrome (PWS), a maternally imprinted disorder and leading cause of obesity, is characterised by insatiable appetite, poor muscle development, cognitive impairment, endocrine disturbance, short stature and osteoporosis. A number of causative loci have been located within the imprinted Prader-Willi Critical Region (PWCR), including a set of small non-translated nucleolar RNA’s (snoRNA). Recently, micro-deletions in humans identified the snoRNA Snord116 as a critical contributor to the development of PWS exhibiting many of the classical symptoms of PWS. Here we show that loss of the PWCR which includes Snord116 in mice leads to a reduced bone mass phenotype, similar to that observed in humans. Consistent with reduced stature in PWS, PWCR KO mice showed delayed skeletal development, with shorter femurs and vertebrae, reduced bone size and mass in both sexes. The reduction in bone mass in PWCR KO mice was associated with deficiencies in cortical bone volume and cortical mineral apposition rate, with no change in cancellous bone. Importantly, while the length difference was corrected in aged mice, consistent with continued growth in rodents, reduced cortical bone formation was still evident, indicating continued osteoblastic suppression by loss of PWCR expression in skeletally mature mice. Interestingly, deletion of this region included deletion of the exclusively brain expressed Snord116 cluster and resulted in an upregulation in expression of both NPY and POMC mRNA in the arcuate nucleus. Importantly, the selective deletion of the PWCR only in NPY expressing neurons replicated the bone phenotype of PWCR KO mice. Taken together, PWCR deletion in mice, and specifically in NPY neurons, recapitulates the short stature and low BMD and aspects of the hormonal imbalance of PWS individuals. Moreover, it demonstrates for the first time, that a region encoding non-translated RNAs, expressed solely within the brain, can regulate bone mass in health and disease

  8. Characterization and mutation analysis of goosecoid-like (GSCL), a homeodomain-containing gene that maps to the critical region for VCFS/DGS on 22q11.

    PubMed

    Funke, B; Saint-Jore, B; Puech, A; Sirotkin, H; Edelmann, L; Carlson, C; Raft, S; Pandita, R K; Kucherlapati, R; Skoultchi, A; Morrow, B E

    1997-12-15

    Velocardiofacial syndrome (VCFS) is a developmental disorder characterized by conotruncal heart defects, craniofacial anomalies, and learning disabilities. VCFS is phenotypically related to DiGeorge syndrome (DGS) and both syndromes are associated with hemizygous 22q11 deletions. Because many of the tissues and structures affected in VCFS/DGS derive from the pharyngeal arches of the developing embryo, it is believed that haploinsufficiency of a gene(s) involved in embryonic development may be responsible for its etiology. A homeodomain-containing gene, Goosecoidlike (GSCL), has been recently described, and it resides in the critical region for VCFS/DGS on 22q11. GSCL is related to the Goosecoid gene (GSC) in both sequence of the homeodomain and genomic organization. Gsc in the mouse is expressed during early and midembryogenesis and is required for craniofacial rib, and limb development. The chick homolog of GSCL, termed GSX, is expressed during early chick embryogenesis. We detected GSCL expression in human embryos and biphasic expression in mouse embryos. It is possible that the vertebrate GSCL gene is also required for embryonic development. Due to its location in the critical region on 22q11, GSCL is an excellent candidate gene for VCFS/DGS. The vertebrate GSC protein has the same DNA binding specificity as the Drosophila morphogen, bicoid. Upon examination of the putative GSCL promoter, we found three sequence elements with an exact match to the reverse complement of the bicoid DNA recognition motif, suggesting that GSC, or possibly GSCL itself, regulates the transcription of GSCL. Sequence analysis of the putative promoter and the coding region of GSCL was performed on the DNA template from 17 VCFS patients who did not have a detectable 22q11 deletion to identify mutations. We did not detect a mutation in this set of VCFS patients. A polymorphism was detected in codon 47 of exon 1.

  9. Prader-Willi Critical Region, a Non-Translated, Imprinted Central Regulator of Bone Mass: Possible Role in Skeletal Abnormalities in Prader-Willi Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Khor, Ee-Cheng; Fanshawe, Bruce; Qi, Yue; Zolotukhin, Sergei; Kulkarni, Rishikesh N; Enriquez, Ronaldo F; Purtell, Louise; Lee, Nicola J; Wee, Natalie K; Croucher, Peter I; Campbell, Lesley; Herzog, Herbert; Baldock, Paul A

    2016-01-01

    Prader-Willi Syndrome (PWS), a maternally imprinted disorder and leading cause of obesity, is characterised by insatiable appetite, poor muscle development, cognitive impairment, endocrine disturbance, short stature and osteoporosis. A number of causative loci have been located within the imprinted Prader-Willi Critical Region (PWCR), including a set of small non-translated nucleolar RNA's (snoRNA). Recently, micro-deletions in humans identified the snoRNA Snord116 as a critical contributor to the development of PWS exhibiting many of the classical symptoms of PWS. Here we show that loss of the PWCR which includes Snord116 in mice leads to a reduced bone mass phenotype, similar to that observed in humans. Consistent with reduced stature in PWS, PWCR KO mice showed delayed skeletal development, with shorter femurs and vertebrae, reduced bone size and mass in both sexes. The reduction in bone mass in PWCR KO mice was associated with deficiencies in cortical bone volume and cortical mineral apposition rate, with no change in cancellous bone. Importantly, while the length difference was corrected in aged mice, consistent with continued growth in rodents, reduced cortical bone formation was still evident, indicating continued osteoblastic suppression by loss of PWCR expression in skeletally mature mice. Interestingly, deletion of this region included deletion of the exclusively brain expressed Snord116 cluster and resulted in an upregulation in expression of both NPY and POMC mRNA in the arcuate nucleus. Importantly, the selective deletion of the PWCR only in NPY expressing neurons replicated the bone phenotype of PWCR KO mice. Taken together, PWCR deletion in mice, and specifically in NPY neurons, recapitulates the short stature and low BMD and aspects of the hormonal imbalance of PWS individuals. Moreover, it demonstrates for the first time, that a region encoding non-translated RNAs, expressed solely within the brain, can regulate bone mass in health and disease.

  10. Array comparative genomic hybridisation analysis of boys with X linked hypopituitarism identifies a 3.9 Mb duplicated critical region at Xq27 containing SOX3

    PubMed Central

    Solomon, N; Ross, S; Morgan, T; Belsky, J; Hol, F; Karnes, P; Hopwood, N; Myers, S; Tan, A; Warne, G; Forrest, S; Thomas, P

    2004-01-01

    Introduction: Array comparative genomic hybridisation (array CGH) is a powerful method that detects alteration of gene copy number with greater resolution and efficiency than traditional methods. However, its ability to detect disease causing duplications in constitutional genomic DNA has not been shown. We developed an array CGH assay for X linked hypopituitarism, which is associated with duplication of Xq26–q27. Methods: We generated custom BAC/PAC arrays that spanned the 7.3 Mb critical region at Xq26.1–q27.3, and used them to search for duplications in three previously uncharacterised families with X linked hypopituitarism. Results: Validation experiments clearly identified Xq26–q27 duplications that we had previously mapped by fluorescence in situ hybridisation. Array CGH analysis of novel XH families identified three different Xq26–q27 duplications, which together refine the critical region to a 3.9 Mb interval at Xq27.2–q27.3. Expression analysis of six orthologous mouse genes from this region revealed that the transcription factor Sox3 is expressed at 11.5 and 12.5 days after conception in the infundibulum of the developing pituitary and the presumptive hypothalamus. Discussion: Array CGH is a robust and sensitive method for identifying X chromosome duplications. The existence of different, overlapping Xq duplications in five kindreds indicates that X linked hypopituitarism is caused by increased gene dosage. Interestingly, all X linked hypopituitarism duplications contain SOX3. As mutation of this gene in human beings and mice results in hypopituitarism, we hypothesise that increased dosage of Sox3 causes perturbation of pituitary and hypothalamic development and may be the causative mechanism for X linked hypopituitarism. PMID:15342697

  11. Critical region in 2q31.2q32.3 deletion syndrome: Report of two phenotypically distinct patients, one with an additional deletion in Alagille syndrome region

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Standard cytogenetic analysis has revealed to date more than 30 reported cases presenting interstitial deletions involving region 2q31-q32, but with poorly defined breakpoints. After the postulation of 2q31.2q32.3 deletion as a clinically recognizable disorder, more patients were reported with a critical region proposed and candidate genes pointed out. Results We report two female patients with de novo chromosome 2 cytogenetically visible deletions, one of them with an additional de novo deletion in chromosome 20p12.2p12.3. Patient I presents a 16.8 Mb deletion in 2q31.2q32.3 while patient II presents a smaller deletion of 7 Mb in 2q32.1q32.3, entirely contained within patient I deleted region, and a second 4 Mb deletion in Alagille syndrome region. Patient I clearly manifests symptoms associated with the 2q31.2q32.3 deletion syndrome, like the muscular phenotype and behavioral problems, while patient II phenotype is compatible with the 20p12 deletion since she manifests problems at the cardiac level, without significant dysmorphisms and an apparently normal psychomotor development. Conclusions Whereas Alagille syndrome is a well characterized condition mainly caused by haploinsufficiency of JAG1 gene, with manifestations that can range from slight clinical findings to major symptoms in different domains, the 2q31.2q32.3 deletion syndrome is still being delineated. The occurrence of both imbalances in reported patient II would be expected to cause a more severe phenotype compared to the individual phenotype associated with each imbalance, which is not the case, since there are no manifestations due to the 2q32 deletion. This, together with the fact that patient I deleted region overlaps previously reported cases and patient II deletion is outside this common region, reinforces the existence of a critical region in 2q31.3q32.1, between 181 to 185 Mb, responsible for the clinical phenotype. PMID:22550961

  12. The gene encoding DRAP (BACE2), a glycosylated transmembrane protein of the aspartic protease family, maps to the down critical region.

    PubMed

    Acquati, F; Accarino, M; Nucci, C; Fumagalli, P; Jovine, L; Ottolenghi, S; Taramelli, R

    2000-02-18

    We applied cDNA selection methods to a genomic clone (YAC 761B5) from chromosome 21 located in the so-called 'Down critical region' in 21q22.3. Starting from human fetal heart and brain mRNAs we obtained and sequenced several cDNA clones. One of these clones (Down region aspartic protease (DRAP), named also BACE2 according to the gene nomenclature) revealed a striking nucleotide and amino acid sequence identity with several motifs present in members of the aspartic protease family. In particular the amino acid sequences comprising the two catalytic sites found in all mammalian aspartic proteases are perfectly conserved. Interestingly, the predicted protein shows a typical membrane spanning region; this is at variance with most other known aspartic proteases, which are soluble molecules. We present preliminary evidence, on the basis of in vitro translation studies and cell transfection, that this gene encodes a glycosylated protein which localizes mainly intracellularly but to some extent also to the plasma membrane. Furthermore DRAP/BACE2 shares a high homology with a newly described beta-secretase enzyme (BACE-1) which is a transmembrane aspartic protease. The implications of this finding for Down syndrome are discussed.

  13. A rare form of persistent right aorta arch in linkage disequilibrium with the DiGeorge critical region on CFA26 in German Pinschers.

    PubMed

    Philipp, Ute; Menzel, Julia; Distl, Ottmar

    2011-01-01

    Persistent right aortic arch (PRAA) is a congenital vascular ring anomaly common in several dog breeds. In German Pinscher, the disorder is characterized by a left retroesophageal subclavian artery in combination with a ligamentum arteriosum originating at the aberrant left subclavian artery (PRAA-SA-LA). In this study, we genotyped 38 microsatellite markers on canine chromosome 26 (CFA26) in German Pinschers and tested them for linkage and association. We found a chromosome-wide significantly linked genomic region on CFA26, which corresponds to the human DiGeorge syndrome critical region (DGCR). Therefore, we analyzed sequences from 13 genes of DGCR and the canine t-box gene TBX1. We identified a total of 26 polymorphisms in German Pinschers. Three of these SNPs located within TBX1 and one in the mitochondrial ribosomal protein L40 gene (MRPL40) were associated with the PRAA-SA-LA phenotype in German Pinscher. Despite linkage and association between PRAA-SA-LA and the canine DGCR, none of these mutations appeared responsible for PRAA-SA-LA. As the orthologue human region on HSA22q11.2 is known for high susceptibility to genomic rearrangements, we suspect that in German Pinschers, chromosomal aberrations might cause PRAA-SA-LA.

  14. The DiGeorge syndrome minimal critical region contains a goosecoid-like (GSCL) homeobox gene that is expressed early in human development.

    PubMed

    Gottlieb, S; Emanuel, B S; Driscoll, D A; Sellinger, B; Wang, Z; Roe, B; Budarf, M L

    1997-05-01

    The majority of patients with DiGeorge syndrome (DGS) and velocardiofacial syndrome (VCFS) have deletions of chromosomal region 22q11.2. The abnormalities observed in these patients include conotruncal cardiac defects, thymic hypoplasia or aplasia, hypocalcemia, and characteristic facial features. To understand the genetic basis of these disorders, we have characterized genes within the region that is most consistently deleted in patients with DGS/VCFS, the minimal DiGeorge critical region (MDGCR). In this report, we present the identification and characterization of a novel gene, GSCL, in the MDGCR, with homology to the homeodomain family of transcription factors. Further, we provide evidence that this gene is expressed in a limited number of adult tissues as well as in early human development. The identification of GSCL required a genomic sequence-based approach because of its restricted expression and high GC content. The early expression, together with the known role of homeobox-containing proteins in development, make GSCL an outstanding candidate for some of the abnormalities seen in DGS/VCFS.

  15. Analysis of the cat eye syndrome critical region in humans and the region of conserved synteny in mice: a search for candidate genes at or near the human chromosome 22 pericentromere.

    PubMed

    Footz, T K; Brinkman-Mills, P; Banting, G S; Maier, S A; Riazi, M A; Bridgland, L; Hu, S; Birren, B; Minoshima, S; Shimizu, N; Pan, H; Nguyen, T; Fang, F; Fu, Y; Ray, L; Wu, H; Shaull, S; Phan, S; Yao, Z; Chen, F; Huan, A; Hu, P; Wang, Q; Loh, P; Qi, S; Roe, B A; McDermid, H E

    2001-06-01

    We have sequenced a 1.1-Mb region of human chromosome 22q containing the dosage-sensitive gene(s) responsible for cat eye syndrome (CES) as well as the 450-kb homologous region on mouse chromosome 6. Fourteen putative genes were identified within or adjacent to the human CES critical region (CESCR), including three known genes (IL-17R, ATP6E, and BID) and nine novel genes, based on EST identity. Two putative genes (CECR3 and CECR9) were identified, in the absence of EST hits, by comparing segments of human and mouse genomic sequence around two solitary amplified exons, thus showing the utility of comparative genomic sequence analysis in identifying transcripts. Of the 14 genes, 10 were confirmed to be present in the mouse genomic sequence in the same order and orientation as in human. Absent from the mouse region of conserved synteny are CECR1, a promising CES candidate gene from the center of the contig, neighboring CECR4, and CECR7 and CECR8, which are located in the gene-poor proximal 400 kb of the contig. This latter proximal region, located approximately 1 Mb from the centromere, shows abundant duplicated gene fragments typical of pericentromeric DNA. The margin of this region also delineates the boundary of conserved synteny between the CESCR and mouse chromosome 6. Because the proximal CESCR appears abundant in duplicated segments and, therefore, is likely to be gene poor, we consider the putative genes identified in the distal CESCR to represent the majority of candidate genes for involvement in CES.

  16. Enthalpy of solution of 1,4-naphthoquinone in CO2 + n-pentane in the critical region of the binary mixture: mechanism of solubility enhancement.

    PubMed

    Mu, Tiancheng; Zhang, Xiaogang; Liu, Zhimin; Han, Buxing; Li, Zhonghao; Jiang, Tao; He, Jun; Yang, Guanying

    2004-01-23

    The enthalpy of solution (Delta(solv)H(m)) and solubility of 1,4-naphthoquinone in CO(2) + n-pentane were measured at 308.15 K in the critical region of the binary fluid. In order to study the effect of phase behavior of the mixed solvent on Delta(solv)H(m), the experiments were carried out in the supercritical (SC) and subcritical region of the binary solvent. The density of the mixed solvent in different conditions was determined. The isothermal compressibility (K(T)) of the mixed solvent, and the partial molar volume (V(n-pentane)) of n-pentane in the solution were calculated. It was demonstrated that the Delta(solv)H(m) was negative in all conditions. Delta(solv)H(m) is nearly independent of pressure or density in all the solvents in a high-density region, in which compressibility of the solvent is very small; this indicates that the intermolecular interaction between the solvent and the solute is similar to that for liquid solutions. It is very interesting that Delta(solv)H(m) in the mixed SC fluid differs from the Delta(solv)H(m) in mixed subcritical fluids. The absolute value of Delta(solv)H(m) in the mixed SC fluid is close to that in pure SC CO(2) in the high-density region, and is much lower than that in pure SC CO(2) in the low-density region. In the mixed subcritical fluids, the Delta(solv)H(m) is also close to that in the pure CO(2) in the high-density region. However, at the same density, the absolute value of Delta(solv)H(m) in the binary subcritical fluid is larger than that in pure CO(2) in the high-compressible region of the mixed solvent. The main reason for this is that the degree of clustering in the SC solutions is small at the density in which the degree of clustering is large in the subcritical solutions. It can be concluded that solubility enhancement by n-pentane in the mixed SC fluid is entropy driven. In contrast, the solubility enhancement by n-pentane in subcritical fluids is enthalpy driven. The intermolecular interaction in the SC

  17. Three-Year Follow-Up of a Prenatally Ascertained Apparently Non-Mosaic sSMC(10): Delineation of a Non-Critical Region.

    PubMed

    Barranco, Laura; Costa, Marta; Lloveras, Elisabet; Ordóñez, Elena; Maiz, Nerea; Hernando, Cristina; Villa, Olaya; Cirigliano, Vincenzo; Plaja, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Small supernumerary marker chromosomes (sSMC) originating from chromosome 10 are rare and usually found in mosaic form. We present a de novo apparently non-mosaic sSMC(10) prenatally diagnosed in amniotic fluid and postnatally confirmed in peripheral blood. Characterization by array-CGH showed a pericentromeric duplication of 7.1 Mb of chromosome 10. The fetus did not show ultrasound abnormalities, and a normal female phenotype was observed during a 3-year postnatal follow-up. The absence of phenotypic abnormalities in the present case provides evidence of a non-critical pericentromeric region in 10p11.21q11.1 (hg19 35,355,570-42,448,569) associated with a duplication.

  18. Localized superconductivity in the quantum-critical region of the disorder-driven superconductor-insulator transition in TiN thin films.

    PubMed

    Baturina, T I; Mironov, A Yu; Vinokur, V M; Baklanov, M R; Strunk, C

    2007-12-21

    We investigate low-temperature transport properties of thin TiN superconducting films in the vicinity of the disorder-driven superconductor-insulator transition. In a zero magnetic field, we find an extremely sharp separation between superconducting and insulating phases, evidencing a direct superconductor-insulator transition without an intermediate metallic phase. At moderate temperatures, in the insulating films we reveal thermally activated conductivity with the magnetic field-dependent activation energy. At very low temperatures, we observe a zero-conductivity state, which is destroyed at some depinning threshold voltage V{T}. These findings indicate the formation of a distinct collective state of the localized Cooper pairs in the critical region at both sides of the transition.

  19. Duplication 12p and Pallister-Killian syndrome: a case report and review of the literature toward defining a Pallister-Killian syndrome minimal critical region.

    PubMed

    Izumi, Kosuke; Conlin, Laura K; Berrodin, Donna; Fincher, Christopher; Wilkens, Alisha; Haldeman-Englert, Chad; Saitta, Sulagna C; Zackai, Elaine H; Spinner, Nancy B; Krantz, Ian D

    2012-12-01

    Pallister-Killian syndrome (PKS) is a multisystem sporadic genetic condition characterized by facial anomalies, variable developmental delay and intellectual impairment, hypotonia, hearing loss, seizures, pigmentary skin differences, temporal alopecia, diaphragmatic hernia, congenital heart defects, and other systemic abnormalities. PKS is typically caused by the presence of a supernumerary isochromosome composed of the short arms of chromosome 12 resulting in tetrasomy 12p, which is often present in a tissue limited mosaic state. The PKS phenotype has also often been observed in individuals with complete or partial duplications of 12p (trisomy 12p rather than tetrasomy 12p) as the result of an interstitial duplication or unbalanced translocation. We have identified a proposita with PKS who has two small de novo interstitial duplications of 12p which, along with a review of previously reported cases, has allowed us to define a minimum critical region for PKS.

  20. Cloning of a balanced translocation breakpoint in the DiGeorge syndrome critical region and isolation of a novel potential adhesion receptor gene in its vicinity.

    PubMed

    Demczuk, S; Aledo, R; Zucman, J; Delattre, O; Desmaze, C; Dauphinot, L; Jalbert, P; Rouleau, G A; Thomas, G; Aurias, A

    1995-04-01

    Deletions of the 22q11.2 have been associated with a wide range of developmental defects (notably DiGeorge syndrome, velocardiofacial syndrome, conotruncal anomaly face syndrome and isolated conotruncal cardiac defects) classified under the acronym CATCH 22. A DiGeorge syndrome patient bearing a balanced translocation whose breakpoint maps within the critical region has been previously described. We report the construction of a cosmid contig spanning the translocation breakpoint and the isolation of a gene mapping 10 kb telomeric to the breakpoint. This gene encodes a novel putative adhesion receptor protein, which could play a role in neural crest cells migration, a process which has been proposed to be altered in DiGeorge syndrome.

  1. Partial duplication of 18q including a distal critical region for Edwards Syndrome in a patient with normal phenotype and oligoasthenospermia: case report.

    PubMed

    Quiroga, R; Monfort, S; Oltra, S; Ferrer-Bolufer, I; Roselló, M; Mayo, S; Martinez, F; Orellana, C

    2011-01-01

    Several authors have attempted to construct a phenotype map for duplications of different portions of chromosome 18 to identify a possible critical region (CR) for Edwards Syndrome. Partial duplications of 18q have been reported in the literature involving the distal CR in patients with some clinical features of Edwards Syndrome. Here, we describe a phenotypically normal male with a large duplication on chromosome 18 that involves the proposed distal CR. The lack of clinical features is remarkable, except for pathological semen analysis, which suggests that terminal 17.4 Mb of 18q do not contain the Edwards Syndrome CR. Alternatively, unknown modifier factors or undetected somatic mosaicism might cause incomplete penetrance of this duplication.

  2. Systematic analysis of enhancer and critical cis-acting RNA elements in the protein-encoding region of the hepatitis C virus genome.

    PubMed

    Chu, Derrick; Ren, Songyang; Hu, Stacy; Wang, Wei Gang; Subramanian, Aparna; Contreras, Deisy; Kanagavel, Vidhya; Chung, Eric; Ko, Justine; Amirtham Jacob Appadorai, Ranjit Singh; Sinha, Sanjeev; Jalali, Ziba; Hardy, David W; French, Samuel W; Arumugaswami, Vaithilingaraja

    2013-05-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) causes chronic hepatitis, cirrhosis, and liver cancer. cis-acting RNA elements of the HCV genome are critical for translation initiation and replication of the viral genome. We hypothesized that the coding regions of nonstructural proteins harbor enhancer and essential cis-acting replication elements (CRE). In order to experimentally identify new cis RNA elements, we utilized an unbiased approach to introduce synonymous substitutions. The HCV genome coding for nonstructural proteins (nucleotide positions 3872 to 9097) was divided into 17 contiguous segments. The wobble nucleotide positions of each codon were replaced, resulting in 33% to 41% nucleotide changes. The HCV genome containing one of each of 17 mutant segments (S1 to S17) was tested for genome replication and infectivity. We observed that silent mutations in segment 13 (S13) (nucleotides [nt] 7457 to 7786), S14 (nt 7787 to 8113), S15 (nt 8114 to 8440), S16 (nt 8441 to 8767), and S17 (nt 8768 to 9097) resulted in impaired genome replication, suggesting CRE structures are enriched in the NS5B region. Subsequent high-resolution mutational analysis of NS5B (nt 7787 to 9289) using approximately 51-nucleotide contiguous subsegment mutant viruses having synonymous mutations revealed that subsegments SS8195-8245, SS8654-8704, and SS9011-9061 were required for efficient viral growth, suggesting that these regions act as enhancer elements. Covariant nucleotide substitution analysis of a stem-loop, JFH-SL9098, revealed the formation of an extended stem structure, which we designated JFH-SL9074. We have identified new enhancer RNA elements and an extended stem-loop in the NS5B coding region. Genetic modification of enhancer RNA elements can be utilized for designing attenuated HCV vaccine candidates.

  3. Yeast artificial chromosome cloning in the glycerol kinase and adrenal hypoplasia congenita region of Xp21

    SciTech Connect

    Worley, K.C.; Ellison, K.A.; Zhang, Y.H.; Wang, D.F.; Mason, J.; Roth, E.J.; Adams, V.; Fogt, D.D.; Zhu, X.M.; Towbin, J.A.

    1993-05-01

    The adrenal hypoplasia congenita (AHC) and glycerol kinase (GK) loci are telomeric to the Duchenne muscular dystrophy locus in Xp21. The authors developed a pair of yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) contigs spanning at least 1.2 Mb and encompassing the region from the telomeric end of the Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) locus to beyond YHX39 (DXS727), including the genes for AHC and GK. The centromeric contig consists of 13 YACs reaching more than 600 kb from DMD through GK. The telomeric contig group consists of 8 YACs containing more than 600 kb including the markers YHX39 (DXS727) and QST-59 (DXS319). Patient deletion breakpoints in the region of the two YAC contigs define at least eight intervals, and seven deletion breakpoints are contained within these contigs. In addition to the probes developed from YAC ends, they have mapped eight Alu-PCR probes amplified from a radiation-reduced somatic cell hybrid, two anonymous DNA probes, and one Alu-PCR product amplified from a cosmid end, for a total of 26 new markers within this region of 2 Mb or less. One YAC in the centromeric contig contains an insert encompassing the minimum interval for GK deficiency defined by patient deletion breakpoints, and this clone includes all or part of the GK gene. 33 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  4. Deletion of 3p25.3 in a patient with intellectual disability and dysmorphic features with further definition of a critical region.

    PubMed

    Kellogg, Gregory; Sum, John; Wallerstein, Robert

    2013-06-01

    Several recent reports of interstitial deletions at the terminal end of the short arm of chromosome 3 have helped to define the critical region whose deletion causes 3p deletion syndrome. We report on an 11-year-old girl with intellectual disability, obsessive-compulsive tendencies, hypotonia, and dysmorphic facial features in whom a 684 kb interstitial 3p25.3 deletion was characterized using array-CGH. This deletion overlaps with interstitial 3p25 deletions reported in three recent case reports. These deletions share a 124 kb overlap region including only three RefSeq annotated genes, THUMPD3, SETD5, and LOC440944. The current patient had phenotypic similarities, including intellectual disability, hypotonia, depressed nasal bridge, and long philtrum, with previously reported patients, while she did not have the cardiac defects, seizures ormicrocephaly reported in patients with larger deletions. Therefore, this patient furthers our knowledge of the consequences of 3p deletions, while suggesting genotype-phenotype correlations.

  5. Loss of Goosecoid-like and DiGeorge syndrome critical region 14 in interpeduncular nucleus results in altered regulation of rapid eye movement sleep

    PubMed Central

    Funato, Hiromasa; Sato, Makito; Sinton, Christopher M.; Gautron, Laurent; Williams, S. Clay; Skach, Amber; Elmquist, Joel K.; Skoultchi, Arthur I.; Yanagisawa, Masashi

    2010-01-01

    Sleep and wakefulness are regulated primarily by inhibitory interactions between the hypothalamus and brainstem. The expression of the states of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep and non-REM (NREM) sleep also are correlated with the activity of groups of REM-off and REM-on neurons in the dorsal brainstem. However, the contribution of ventral brainstem nuclei to sleep regulation has been little characterized to date. Here we examined sleep and wakefulness in mice deficient in a homeobox transcription factor, Goosecoid-like (Gscl), which is one of the genes deleted in DiGeorge syndrome or 22q11 deletion syndrome. The expression of Gscl is restricted to the interpeduncular nucleus (IP) in the ventral region of the midbrain–hindbrain transition. The IP has reciprocal connections with several cell groups implicated in sleep/wakefulness regulation. Although Gscl−/− mice have apparently normal anatomy and connections of the IP, they exhibited a reduced total time spent in REM sleep and fewer REM sleep episodes. In addition, Gscl−/− mice showed reduced theta power during REM sleep and increased arousability during REM sleep. Gscl−/− mice also lacked the expression of DiGeorge syndrome critical region 14 (Dgcr14) in the IP. These results indicate that the absence of Gscl and Dgcr14 in the IP results in altered regulation of REM sleep. PMID:20921407

  6. Localization of the human mitochondrial citrate transporter protein gene to chromosome 22q11 in the DiGeorge syndrome critical region

    SciTech Connect

    Heisterkamp, N.; Hoeve, J.T.; Groffen, J.

    1995-09-20

    A high percentage of patients with DiGeorge syndrome and velo-cardio-facial syndrome have interstitial deletions on chromosome 22q11. The shortest region of overlap is currently estimated to be around 500 kb. Two segments of DNA from chromosome 22q11, located 160 kb apart, were cloned because they contained NotI restriction enzyme sites. In the current study we demonstrate that these segments are absent from chromosomes 22 carrying microdeletions of two different DiGeorge patients. Fluorescence in situ and Southern blot hybridization was further used to show that this locus is within the DiGeorge critical region. Phylogenetically conserved sequences adjacent to one of the two NotI sites hybridized to mRNAs in different human cell lines. cDNAs isolated with a probe from this segment showed it to contain the gene for the human mitochondrial citrate transporter protein. Deletion of this gene in DiGeorge may contribute to the mental deficiency seen in the patients. 35 refs., 5 figs.

  7. Loss of Goosecoid-like and DiGeorge syndrome critical region 14 in interpeduncular nucleus results in altered regulation of rapid eye movement sleep.

    PubMed

    Funato, Hiromasa; Sato, Makito; Sinton, Christopher M; Gautron, Laurent; Williams, S Clay; Skach, Amber; Elmquist, Joel K; Skoultchi, Arthur I; Yanagisawa, Masashi

    2010-10-19

    Sleep and wakefulness are regulated primarily by inhibitory interactions between the hypothalamus and brainstem. The expression of the states of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep and non-REM (NREM) sleep also are correlated with the activity of groups of REM-off and REM-on neurons in the dorsal brainstem. However, the contribution of ventral brainstem nuclei to sleep regulation has been little characterized to date. Here we examined sleep and wakefulness in mice deficient in a homeobox transcription factor, Goosecoid-like (Gscl), which is one of the genes deleted in DiGeorge syndrome or 22q11 deletion syndrome. The expression of Gscl is restricted to the interpeduncular nucleus (IP) in the ventral region of the midbrain-hindbrain transition. The IP has reciprocal connections with several cell groups implicated in sleep/wakefulness regulation. Although Gscl(-/-) mice have apparently normal anatomy and connections of the IP, they exhibited a reduced total time spent in REM sleep and fewer REM sleep episodes. In addition, Gscl(-/-) mice showed reduced theta power during REM sleep and increased arousability during REM sleep. Gscl(-/-) mice also lacked the expression of DiGeorge syndrome critical region 14 (Dgcr14) in the IP. These results indicate that the absence of Gscl and Dgcr14 in the IP results in altered regulation of REM sleep.

  8. Structural Insight into the Critical Role of the N-Terminal Region in the Catalytic Activity of Dual-Specificity Phosphatase 26

    PubMed Central

    Won, Eun-Young; Lee, Sang-Ok; Lee, Dong-Hwa; Lee, Daeyoup; Bae, Kwang-Hee; Lee, Sang Chul; Kim, Seung Jun; Chi, Seung-Wook

    2016-01-01

    Human dual-specificity phosphatase 26 (DUSP26) is a novel target for anticancer therapy because its dephosphorylation of the p53 tumor suppressor regulates the apoptosis of cancer cells. DUSP26 inhibition results in neuroblastoma cell cytotoxicity through p53-mediated apoptosis. Despite the previous structural studies of DUSP26 catalytic domain (residues 61–211, DUSP26-C), the high-resolution structure of its catalytically active form has not been resolved. In this study, we determined the crystal structure of a catalytically active form of DUSP26 (residues 39–211, DUSP26-N) with an additional N-terminal region at 2.0 Å resolution. Unlike the C-terminal domain-swapped dimeric structure of DUSP26-C, the DUSP26-N (C152S) monomer adopts a fold-back conformation of the C-terminal α8-helix and has an additional α1-helix in the N-terminal region. Consistent with the canonically active conformation of its protein tyrosine phosphate-binding loop (PTP loop) observed in the structure, the phosphatase assay results demonstrated that DUSP26-N has significantly higher catalytic activity than DUSP26-C. Furthermore, size exclusion chromatography-multiangle laser scattering (SEC-MALS) measurements showed that DUSP26-N (C152S) exists as a monomer in solution. Notably, the crystal structure of DUSP26-N (C152S) revealed that the N-terminal region of DUSP26-N (C152S) serves a scaffolding role by positioning the surrounding α7-α8 loop for interaction with the PTP-loop through formation of an extensive hydrogen bond network, which seems to be critical in making the PTP-loop conformation competent for phosphatase activity. Our study provides the first high-resolution structure of a catalytically active form of DUSP26, which will contribute to the structure-based rational design of novel DUSP26-targeting anticancer therapeutics. PMID:27583453

  9. Construction of a YAC contig and STS map spanning 2.5 Mbp in Xq25, the critical region for the X-linked lymphoproliferative (XLP) gene

    SciTech Connect

    Lanyi, A.; Li, B.F.; Li, S.

    1994-09-01

    X-linked lymphoproliferative disease (XLP) is characterized by a marked vulnerability in Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection. Infection of XLP patients with EBV invariably results in fatal mononucleosis, agammaglobulinemia or B-cell lymphoma. The XLP gene lies within a 10 cM region in Xq25 between DXS42 and DXS10. Initial chromosome studies revealed an interstitial, cytogenetically visible deletion in Xq25 in one XLP family (43-004). We estimated the size of the Xq25 deletion by dual laser flow karyotyping to involve 2% of the X chromosome, or approximately 3 Mbp of DNA sequences. To further delineate the deletion we performed a series of pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) analyses which showed that DXS6 and DXS100, two Xq25-specific markers, are missing from 45-004 DNA. Five yeast artificial chromosomes (YACs) from a chromosome X specific YAC library containing sequences deleted in patient`s 43-004 DNA were isolated. These five YACs did not overlap, and their end fragments were used to screen the CEPH MegaYAC library. Seven YACs were isolated from the CEPH MegaYAC library. They could be arranged into a contig which spans between DXS6 and DXS100. The contig contains a minimum of 2.5 Mbp of human DNA. A total of 12 YAC end clone, lambda subclones and STS probes have been used to order clones within the contig. These reagents were also used in Southern blot and patients showed interstitial deletions in Xq25. The size of these deletions range between 0.5 and 2.5 Mbp. The shortest deletion probably represents the critical region for the XLP gene.

  10. Structural and functional properties of CiNTH, an endonuclease III homologue of the ascidian Ciona intestinalis: critical role of N-terminal region.

    PubMed

    Kato, Seiji; Hashiguchi, Kazunari; Igarashi, Kento; Moriwaki, Takahito; Yonekura, Shin-Ichiro; Zhang-Akiyama, Qiu-Mei

    2012-01-01

    Oxidatively damaged bases in DNA can cause cell death, mutation and/or cancer induction. To overcome such deleterious effects of DNA base oxidation, cells are equipped with base excision repair (BER) initiated by DNA glycosylases. Endonuclease III (Nth), a major DNA glycosylase, mainly excises oxidatively damaged pyrimidines from DNA. The aims of this study were to obtain an overview of the repair mechanism of oxidatively damaged bases and to elucidate the function of BER in maintaining genome stability during embryogenesis and development. In this study, we used the ascidian Ciona intestinalis because at every developmental stage it is possible to observe the phenotype of individuals with DNA damage or mutations. Sequence alignment analysis revealed that the amino acid sequence of Ciona intestinalis Nth homologue (CiNTH) had high homology with those of Escherichia coli, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, Caenorhabditis elegans and human Nth homologues. It was evident that two domains, the Helix-hairpin-Helix and 4Fe-4S cluster domains that are critical regions for the Nth activity, are well conserved in CiNTH. CiNTH efficiently complemented the sensitivity of E. coli nth nei mutant to H(2)O(2). CiNTH was bifunctional, with DNA glycosylase and AP lyase activities. It removed thymine glycol, 5-formyluracil and 8-oxoguanine paired with G from DNA via a β-elimination reaction. Interestingly, the N-terminal 44 amino acids were essential for the DNA glycosylase activity of CiNTH.

  11. Systematic reanalysis of partial trisomy 21 cases with or without Down syndrome suggests a small region on 21q22.13 as critical to the phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Pelleri, Maria Chiara; Cicchini, Elena; Locatelli, Chiara; Vitale, Lorenza; Caracausi, Maria; Piovesan, Allison; Rocca, Alessandro; Poletti, Giulia; Seri, Marco; Strippoli, Pierluigi; Cocchi, Guido

    2016-01-01

    A ‘Down Syndrome critical region’ (DSCR) sufficient to induce the most constant phenotypes of Down syndrome (DS) had been identified by studying partial (segmental) trisomy 21 (PT21) as an interval of 0.6–8.3 Mb within human chromosome 21 (Hsa21), although its existence was later questioned. We propose an innovative, systematic reanalysis of all described PT21 cases (from 1973 to 2015). In particular, we built an integrated, comparative map from 125 cases with or without DS fulfilling stringent cytogenetic and clinical criteria. The map allowed to define or exclude as candidates for DS fine Hsa21 sequence intervals, also integrating duplication copy number variants (CNVs) data. A highly restricted DSCR (HR-DSCR) of only 34 kb on distal 21q22.13 has been identified as the minimal region whose duplication is shared by all DS subjects and is absent in all non-DS subjects. Also being spared by any duplication CNV in healthy subjects, HR-DSCR is proposed as a candidate for the typical DS features, the intellectual disability and some facial phenotypes. HR-DSCR contains no known gene and has relevant homology only to the chimpanzee genome. Searching for HR-DSCR functional loci might become a priority for understanding the fundamental genotype-phenotype relationships in DS. PMID:27106104

  12. The CLIP region of invariant chain plays a critical role in regulating major histocompatibility complex class II folding, transport, and peptide occupancy.

    PubMed

    Romagnoli, P; Germain, R N

    1994-09-01

    Invariant chain (Ii) contributes in a number of distinct ways to the proper functioning of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules. These include promoting effective association and folding of newly synthesized MHC class II alpha and beta subunits, increasing transit of assembled heterodimers out of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), inhibiting class II peptide binding, and facilitating class II movement to or accumulation in endosomes/lysosomes. Although the cytoplasmic tail of Ii makes a key contribution to the endocytic localization of class II, the relationship between the structure of Ii and its other diverse functions remains unknown. We show here that two thirds of the lumenal segment of Ii can be eliminated without affecting its contributions to the secretory pathway events of class II folding, ER to Golgi transport, or inhibition of peptide binding. These same experiments reveal that a short (25 residue) contiguous internal segment of Ii (the CLIP region), frequently found associated with purified MHC class II molecules, is critical for all three functions. Together with other recent findings, these results raise the possibility that the contributions of Ii to the early postsynthetic behavior of class II may depend on its interaction with the class II binding site. This would be consistent with the intracellular behavior of unoccupied MHC class I and class II molecules as incompletely folded proteins and imply a related structural basis for the similar contributions of Ii to class II and of short peptides to class I assembly and transport.

  13. A human homolog of the S. cerevisiae HIR1 and HIR2 transcriptional repressors cloned from the DiGeorge syndrome critical region.

    PubMed

    Lamour, V; Lécluse, Y; Desmaze, C; Spector, M; Bodescot, M; Aurias, A; Osley, M A; Lipinski, M

    1995-05-01

    The DiGeorge syndrome (DGS) is a developmental disorder affecting derivatives of the third and fourth pharyngeal pouches. DGS patients present an interstitial deletion in one of their two chromosomes 22. Cosmid DAC30 was mapped to the DGS smallest critical region. Iterative cDNA library screening initiated with a DAC30 gene fragment candidate yielded a cDNA contig whose assembled nucleotide sequence is consistent with the widely transcribed, 4.2-4.4 kb long, messengers detected by northern analysis. The deduced protein sequence, 1017 amino acids in length, entirely encompasses the 766 amino acids previously designated as TUPLE1. The completed protein has been renamed HIRA because it contains various features matching those found in HIR1 and HIR2, two repressors of histone gene transcription characterized in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Strikingly alike in their N-terminal third, HIRA and HIR1 contain seven copies of the WD repeat, a motif implicated in protein-protein interactions, suggesting that they might define a new subfamily of functionally homologous proteins. The remainder of the human polypeptide highly resembles a corresponding fragment in HIR2. We propose that HIRA, alone, could have a part in mechanisms of transcriptional regulation similar to that played by HIR1 and HIR2 together. The presence of a single copy of the HIRA gene in DGS patients possibly accounts for some of the abnormalities associated with this syndrome.

  14. A transcription map of the DiGeorge and velo-cardio-facial syndrome minimal critical region on 22q11.

    PubMed

    Gong, W; Emanuel, B S; Collins, J; Kim, D H; Wang, Z; Chen, F; Zhang, G; Roe, B; Budarf, M L

    1996-06-01

    The majority of patients with DiGeorge syndrome (DGS) and velo-cardio-facial syndrome (VCFS) have a microdeletion of 22q11. Using translocation breakpoints and fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis (FISH), the minimal DiGeorge critical region (MDGCR) has been narrowed to 250 kb in the vicinity of D22S75 (N25). The construction of a detailed transcription map covering the MDGCR is an essential first step toward the identification of genes important to the etiology of DGS/VCFS, two complex disorders. We have identified a minimum of 11 transcription units encoded in the MDGCR using a combination of methods including cDNA selection, RT-PCR, RACE and genomic sequencing. This approach is somewhat unique and may serve as a model for gene identification. Of the 11 transcripts, one is the previously reported DGCR2/IDD/LAN gene, and three revealed a high level of similarity to mammalian genes: a Mus musculus serine/threonine kinase, a rat tricarboxylate transport protein and a bovine clathrin heavy chain. The remaining transcripts do not demonstrate any significant homology to genes of known function. The identification of these transcription units in the MDGCR will facilitate their further characterization and help elucidate their role in the etiology of DGS/VCFS.

  15. The human DiGeorge syndrome critical region gene 8 and Its D. melanogaster homolog are required for miRNA biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Landthaler, Markus; Yalcin, Abdullah; Tuschl, Thomas

    2004-12-14

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) represent a family of small noncoding RNAs that are found in plants and animals (for recent reviews, see ). miRNAs are expressed in a developmentally and tissue-specific manner and regulate the translational efficiency and stability of partial or fully sequence-complementary mRNAs. miRNAs are excised in a stepwise process from double-stranded RNA precursors that are embedded in long RNA polymerase II primary transcripts (pri-miRNA). Drosha RNase III catalyzes the first excision event, the release in the nucleus of a hairpin RNA (pre-miRNA), which is followed by export of the pre-miRNA to the cytoplasm and further processing by Dicer to mature miRNAs. Here, we characterize the human DGCR8, the DiGeorge syndrome critical region gene 8, and its Drosophila melanogaster homolog. We provide biochemical and cell-based readouts to demonstrate the requirement of DGCR8 for the maturation of miRNA primary transcripts. RNAi knockdown experiments of fly and human DGCR8 resulted in accumulation of pri-miRNAs and reduction of pre-miRNAs and mature miRNAs. Our results suggest that DGCR8 and Drosha interact in human cells and reside in a functional pri-miRNA processing complex.

  16. Molecular and cytogenetic characterization of a recurrent unbalanced translocation (4;21) (p16.3;q22.1): Relevance to the Wolf-Hirschhorn and Down syndrome critical regions

    SciTech Connect

    Sebastio, G.; Perone, L.; Guzzetta, V.

    1996-05-17

    We report on an aneuploidy syndrome due to the unbalanced segregation of a familial translocation (4;21)(p16.3;q22.1) causing a partial 4p monosomy and a partial 21q trisomy. The three affected children presented with severe failure to thrive, short stature, microcephaly, profound hypotonia, and mental retardation. The face, very similar in the three children, is characterized by frontal bossing, upslanting of the palpebral fissures, short nose, and deep set ears, giving the overall appearance of the Down syndrome. The molecular study has defined the aneuploid segment on both 4p and 21q. Most of the Down syndrome critical region was found to be trisomic, while only part of the candidate Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome critical region was deleted, suggesting that this region is not critical for the major malformations characteristic for WHS. 15 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Critical Climate Controls and Information Needs for the Glen Canyon Adaptive Management Program and Environmental Assessment in the Grand Canyon Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melis, T. S.; Jain, S.; Topping, D. J.; Pulwarty, R. S.; Eischeid, J. K.

    2005-12-01

    Climatic drivers of episodic to interdecadal variations to the observed changes in the flood magnitude, timing and spatial scales affect the sediment inputs to the Colorado River ecosystem. Since the 1963 closure of Glen Canyon Dam, the dominant sole major supplier of sand to the Colorado River in the upper portion of Grand Canyon is the Paria River, which supplies about 6% of the pre-dam supply of sand at the upstream boundary of Grand Canyon National Park. Sand is delivered by the Paria River during short-duration (< 24 hours), large magnitude (up to 300 cubic meters/second) floods that occur primarily during the warm season (July-October). The planning and decision processes in the Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Program (GCD-AMP) strive to balance numerous, often competing, objectives, such as,water supply, hydropower generation, low flow maintenance, maximizing conservation of the tributary supplied sediment, endangered species recovery, and cultural resources. In this work, we focus on a key concern identified by the AMP, related to the timing and volume of sediment input into Grand Canyon. Adequate sediment inputs into the river ecosystem Canyon combined with active flow management, of the timed in the form of strategically timed bypass releases from Glen Canyon Dam, support the restoration and maintenance of sand bar habitats and instream ecology. Variability in regional precipitation distribution on multiple time scales is diagnosed with emphasis on understanding the relative role of East Pacific tropical storms, North Pacific sea surface temperatures, and subtropical moisture sources. On longer time scales, structured variations in the sediment supply imply a changing baseline for mean ecological and geomorphological conditions in the Canyon, counter to the static view taken in the current environmental impact assessments. Better understanding of the coupled climate-hydrologic variations on multiple time scales is increasingly recognized as critical

  18. Miscanthus Establishment and Overwintering in the Midwest USA: A Regional Modeling Study of Crop Residue Management on Critical Minimum Soil Temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Kucharik, Christopher J.; VanLoocke, Andy; Lenters, John D.; Motew, Melissa M.

    2013-01-01

    Miscanthus is an intriguing cellulosic bioenergy feedstock because its aboveground productivity is high for low amounts of agrochemical inputs, but soil temperatures below −3.5°C could threaten successful cultivation in temperate regions. We used a combination of observed soil temperatures and the Agro-IBIS model to investigate how strategic residue management could reduce the risk of rhizome threatening soil temperatures. This objective was addressed using a historical (1978–2007) reconstruction of extreme minimum 10 cm soil temperatures experienced across the Midwest US and model sensitivity studies that quantified the impact of crop residue on soil temperatures. At observation sites and for simulations that had bare soil, two critical soil temperature thresholds (50% rhizome winterkill at −3.5°C and −6.0°C for different Miscanthus genotypes) were reached at rhizome planting depth (10 cm) over large geographic areas. The coldest average annual extreme 10 cm soil temperatures were between −8°C to −11°C across North Dakota, South Dakota, and Minnesota. Large portions of the region experienced 10 cm soil temperatures below −3.5°C in 75% or greater for all years, and portions of North and South Dakota, Minnesota, and Wisconsin experienced soil temperatures below −6.0°C in 50–60% of all years. For simulated management options that established varied thicknesses (1–5 cm) of miscanthus straw following harvest, extreme minimum soil temperatures increased by 2.5°C to 6°C compared to bare soil, with the greatest warming associated with thicker residue layers. While the likelihood of 10 cm soil temperatures reaching −3.5°C was greatly reduced with 2–5 cm of surface residue, portions of the Dakotas, Nebraska, Minnesota, and Wisconsin still experienced temperatures colder than −3.5°C in 50–80% of all years. Nonetheless, strategic residue management could help increase the likelihood of overwintering of miscanthus rhizomes in the first

  19. Cloning and characterization of a putative human holocytochrome c-type synthetase gene (HCCS) isolated from the critical region for microphthalmia with linear skin defects (MLS)

    SciTech Connect

    Schaefer, L.; Ballabio, A.; Zoghbi, H.Y.

    1996-06-01

    Microphthalmia with linear skin defects syndrome (MLS) is an X-linked male-lethal disorder associated with X chromosomal rearrangements resulting in monosomy from Xpter to Xp22. Features include microphthalmia, sclerocornea, linear skin defects, and agenesis of the corpus callosum. Using a cross-species conservation strategy, an expressed sequence from the 450- to the 550-kb MLS critical region on Xp22 was identified by screening a human embryo cDNA library. Northern analysis revealed a transcript of {approx}2.6 kb in all tissues examined, with weaker expression of {approx}1.2- and {approx}5.2-kb transcripts. The strongest expression was observed in heart and skeletal muscle. Sequence analysis of a 3-kb cDNA contig revealed an 807-bp open reading frame encoding a putative 268-amino-acid-protein. Comparison of the sequence with sequences in the databases revealed homology with holocytochrome c-type synthetases, which catalyze the covalent addition of a heme group onto c-type cytochromes in the mitochondria. The c-type cytochromes are required for proper functioning of the electron transport pathway. The human gene (HGMW-approved symbol HCCS) and the corresponding murine gene characterized in this paper are the first mammalian holocytochrome c-type synthetases to be described in the literature. Because of the lack of a neuromuscular phenotype in MLS, it is uncertain whether the deletion of a mitochondrial holocytochrome synthetase would contribute to the phenotype seen in MLS. The expression pattern of this gene and knowledge about the function of holocytochrome synthetases, however, suggest that it is a good candidate for X-linked encephalomyopathies typically associated with mitochondrial dysfunction. 25 refs., 4 figs.

  20. A critical assessment of oral care protocols for patients under radiation therapy in the regional University Hospital Network of Madrid (Spain)

    PubMed Central

    Lanzós, Isabel; Lanzós, Eduardo; Sanz, Mariano

    2015-01-01

    Background This research was aimed to critically evaluate, under the light of the available scientific evidence, the oral care protocols recommended by different hospitals in head and neck cancer (HNC) patients under radiation therapy. Material and Methods A questionnaire requesting all the relevant information for the oral care of these patients was sent to the 9 University Hospitals in Madrid. The answers were categorized and analyzed. In addition, an electronic search was conducted to identify the most relevant papers (systematic reviews [SR] and randomized clinical trials [RCTs]) assessing oral care protocols for patients treated for HNC with radiation therapy. Results Eight out of nine centers answered the questionnaire and the retrieved information was tabulated and compared. These recommendations were analyzed by a computerized search on MEDLINE and the Cochrane Oral Health Collaboration Database. The results of the analysis clearly shown a great heterogeneity, in terms of oral health care protocols, regarding the management of irradiated patients (for HNC) within the Hospitals of Madrid region. In addition, some of the recommendations lack solid scientific support. Conclusions The present survey revealed that the recommendations provided by the different hospitals were clearly different. The available evidence, supported by SR and RCTs, suggested the need of an oral assessment before cancer treatment, in order to prevent and treat dental pathologies and avoiding potential complications; during cancer treatment, it is relevant monitoring the patient in order to decrease the severity of the side effects, and to avoid any tooth extraction or surgery and special attention should be paid to mucositis, xerostomia and candidiasis; after cancer treatment, the following are relevant aspects: the risk of osteoradionecrosis, trismus, caries and the risks associated to dental implants. Key words:Head and neck cancer, supportive care in cancer, radiotherapy

  1. A Demonstration of the Continuous Phase (Second-Order) Transition of a Binary Liquid System in the Region around Its Critical Point

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Michael R.

    2006-01-01

    In most general chemistry and introductory physical chemistry classes, critical point is defined as that temperature-pressure point on a phase diagram where the liquid-gas interface disappears, a phenomenon that generally occurs at relatively high temperatures or high pressures. Two examples are: water, with a critical point at 647 K (critical…

  2. Criticality in epidemiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stollenwerk, Nico; Jansen, Vincent A. A.

    For a long time criticality has been considered in epidemiological models. We review the body of theory developed over the last twenty five years for the simplest models. It is at first glance difficult to imagine that an epidemiological system operates at a very fine tuned critical state as opposed to any other parameter region. However, the advent of self-organized criticality has given hints in how to interpret large fluctuations observed in many natural systems including epidemiological systems. We show some scenarios where criticality has been observed (e.g., measles under vaccination) and where evolution towards a critical state can explain fluctuations (e.g., meningococcal disease.)

  3. Bioengineering applied to erosion and stability control in the North Apennines (Emilia-Romagna Region, Italy): a check about critical aspects of the works.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selli, Lavinia; Cavazza, Claudio; Pavanelli, Donatella

    2013-04-01

    Because of its geological structure, in the Emilia-Romagna Region over 32,000 landslides have been identified. Several works have been made in order to control mass movement's dynamics and to secure of Reno and Lamone Mountain Basin Rivers, the road network and near by villages and towns. Most of the control works dealt with bioengineering practices: palisades piles, geotextiles, seedings, surface flow control works, dikes within main drainage ditches. In order to check about critical aspects related to the use of these techniques in the Apennines, a survey in this basins was designed with specific interest in the several kinds of works realised, in which plant species were mostly used and in the factors that affected the success or failure of the works. Territory encompasses steep slopes covered with woods to low reliefs covered with grasslands. It is characterized by prevailing clays, inducing instability, and arenaceous lithology with impermeable soils; drainage density is quite high and hillsides suffer extensive and severe erosion and slope stability problems. Chestnut woods mainly represent land use at higher altitudes, while coppice, pastures and crops are present on milder hillsides. The remaining part of the basin is covered by vineyards, orchards, ponds and urban areas, which are basically located in the valley floor. Precipitation events mainly consist of rainfall ranging between 950-1015 mm per year; few snowfalls occur during winter and a long dry season lasts from June until September. We have analyzed 187 works designed mainly for the consolidation of slope instabilities through a widespread enhancement of the vegetation cover. The surveyed works are classified as a function of their building features: it can be seen that cribwalls and palisades are by far the most common types, being the 24% and the 34% respectively of the works. As far as the most adopted plant species, they were silver willow (Salix alba), Spanish Broom (Spartium Junceum) and

  4. Chromosomal Minimal Critical Regions in Therapy-Related Leukemia Appear Different from Those of De Novo Leukemia by High-Resolution aCGH

    PubMed Central

    Itzhar, Nathalie; Dessen, Philippe; Toujani, Saloua; Auger, Nathalie; Preudhomme, Claude; Richon, Catherine; Lazar, Vladimir; Saada, Véronique; Bennaceur, Anelyse; Bourhis, Jean Henri; de Botton, Stéphane; Bernheim, Alain

    2011-01-01

    Therapy-related acute leukemia (t-AML), is a severe complication of cytotoxic therapy used for primary cancer treatment. The outcome of these patients is poor, compared to people who develop de novo acute leukemia (p-AML). Cytogenetic abnormalities in t-AML are similar to those found in p-AML but present more frequent unfavorable karyotypes depending on the inducting agent. Losses of chromosome 5 or 7 are observed after alkylating agents while balanced translocations are found after topoisomerase II inhibitors. This study compared t-AML to p-AML using high resolution array CGH in order to find copy number abnormalities (CNA) at a higher resolution than conventional cytogenetics. More CNAs were observed in 30 t-AML than in 36 p-AML: 104 CNAs were observed with 63 losses and 41 gains (mean number 3.46 per case) in t-AML, while in p-AML, 69 CNAs were observed with 32 losses and 37 gains (mean number of 1.9 per case). In primary leukemia with a previously “normal” karyotype, 18% exhibited a previously undetected CNA, whereas in the (few) t-AML with a normal karyotype, the rate was 50%. Several minimal critical regions (MCRs) were found in t-AML and p-AML. No common MCRs were found in the two groups. In t-AML a 40kb deleted MCR pointed to RUNX1 on 21q22, a gene coding for a transcription factor implicated in frequent rearrangements in leukemia and in familial thrombocytopenia. In de novo AML, a 1Mb MCR harboring ERG and ETS2 was observed from patients with complex aCGH profiles. High resolution cytogenomics obtained by aCGH and similar techniques already published allowed us to characterize numerous non random chromosome abnormalities. This work supports the hypothesis that they can be classified into several categories: abnormalities common to all AML; those more frequently found in t-AML and those specifically found in p-AML. PMID:21339820

  5. CO and NO bind to Fe(II) DiGeorge critical region 8 heme but do not restore primary microRNA processing activity.

    PubMed

    Hines, Judy P; Smith, Aaron T; Jacob, Jose P; Lukat-Rodgers, Gudrun S; Barr, Ian; Rodgers, Kenton R; Guo, Feng; Burstyn, Judith N

    2016-12-01

    The RNA-binding heme protein DiGeorge critical region 8 (DGCR8) and its ribonuclease partner Drosha cleave primary transcripts of microRNA (pri-miRNA) as part of the canonical microRNA (miRNA) processing pathway. Previous studies show that bis-cysteine thiolate-coordinated Fe(III) DGCR8 supports pri-miRNA processing activity, while Fe(II) DGCR8 does not. In this study, we further characterized Fe(II) DGCR8 and tested whether CO or NO might bind and restore pri-miRNA processing activity to the reduced protein. Fe(II) DGCR8 RNA-binding heme domain (Rhed) undergoes a pH-dependent transition from 6-coordinate to 5-coordinate, due to protonation and loss of a lysine ligand; the ligand bound throughout the pH change is a histidine. Fe(II) Rhed binds CO and NO from 6- and 5-coordinate states, forming common CO and NO adducts at all pHs. Fe(II)-CO Rhed is 6-coordinate, low-spin, and pH insensitive with the histidine ligand retained, suggesting that the protonatable lysine ligand has been replaced by CO. Fe(II)-NO Rhed is 5-coordinate and pH insensitive. Fe(II)-NO also forms slowly upon reaction of Fe(III) Rhed with excess NO via a stepwise process. Heme reduction by NO is rate-limiting, and the rate would be negligible at physiological NO concentrations. Importantly, in vitro pri-miRNA processing assays show that both CO- and NO-bound DGCR8 species are inactive. Fe(II), Fe(II)-CO, and Fe(II)-NO Rhed do not bear either of the cysteine ligands found in the Fe(III) state. These data support a model in which the bis-cysteine thiolate ligand environment of Fe(III) DGCR8 is necessary for establishing proper pri-miRNA binding and enabling processing activity.

  6. The human homologue of the Drosophila melanogaster flightless-I gene (fliI) maps within the Smith-Magenis microdeletion critical region in 17p11.2

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, K.S.; Gunaratne, P.H.; Greenberg, F.; Shaffer, L.G.; Lupski, J.R.; Hoheisel, J.D.; Young, I.G.; Miklos, G.L.G.; Campbell, H.D.

    1995-01-01

    The Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS) appears to be a contiguous-gene-deletion syndrome associated with a proximal deletion of the short arm of chromosome 17 in band p11.2. The spectrum of clinical findings includes short stature, brachydactyly, developmental delay, dysmorphic features, sleep disturbances, and behavioral problems. The complex phenotypic features suggest deletion of several contiguous genes. However, to date, no protein-encoding gene has been mapped to the SMS critical region. Recently, the Drosophila melanogaster flightless-I gene, fliI, and the homologous human cDNA have been isolated. Mutations in fliI result in loss of flight ability and, when severe, cause lethality due to incomplete cellularization with subsequent abnormal gastrulation. Here, we demonstrate that the human homologue (FLI) maps within the SMS critical region. Genomic cosmids were used as probes for FISH, which localized this gene to the 17p11.2 region. Somatic-cell hybrid-panel mapping further localized this gene to the SMS critical region. Southern blot analysis of somatic-cell hybrids and/or FISH analysis of lymphoblastoid cell lines from 12 SMS patients demonstrates the deletion of one copy of FLI in all SMS patients analyzed. 47 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  7. GIS-based landslide hazard evaluation at the regional scale: some critical points in the permanent displacement approach for seismically-induced landslide maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vessia, Giovanna; Parise, Mario

    2013-04-01

    Landslide susceptibility and hazard are commonly developed by means of GIS (Geographic Information Systems) tools. Many products such as DTM (Digital Terrain Models), and geological, morphological and lithological layers (often, to be downloaded for free and integrated within GIS) are nowadays available on the web and ready to be used for urban planning purposes. The multiple sources of public information enable the local authorities to use these products for predicting hazards within urban territories by limited investments on technological infrastructures. On the contrary, the necessary expertise required for conducting pertinent hazard analyses is high, and rarely available at the level of the local authorities. In this respect, taking into account the production of seismically-induced landslide hazard maps at regional scale drawn by GIS tool, these can be performed according to the permanent displacement approach derived by Newmark's sliding block method (Newmark, 1965). Some simplified assumptions are considered for occurrence of a seismic mass movement, listed as follows: (1) the Mohr-Coulomb criterion is used for the plastic displacement of the rigid block; (2) only downward movements are accounted for; (3) a translative sliding mechanism is assumed. Under such conditions, several expressions have been proposed for predicting permanent displacements of slopes during seismic events (Ambresys and Menu, 1988; Luzi and Pergalani 2000; Romeo 2000; Jibson 2007, among the others). These formulations have been provided by researchers for different ranges of seismic magnitudes, and for indexes describing the seismic action, such as peak ground acceleration, peak ground velocity, Arias Intensity, and damage potential. With respect to the resistant properties of the rock units, the critical acceleration is the relevant strength variable in every expressions; it is a function of local slope, groundwater level, unit weight shear resistance of the surficial sediments, and

  8. Thinking Critically about Critical Thinking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulnix, Jennifer Wilson

    2012-01-01

    As a philosophy professor, one of my central goals is to teach students to think critically. However, one difficulty with determining whether critical thinking can be taught, or even measured, is that there is widespread disagreement over what critical thinking actually is. Here, I reflect on several conceptions of critical thinking, subjecting…

  9. The EBNA-2 arginine-glycine domain is critical but not essential for B-lymphocyte growth transformation; the rest of region 3 lacks essential interactive domains.

    PubMed Central

    Tong, X; Yalamanchili, R; Harada, S; Kieff, E

    1994-01-01

    Since deletion of region 3 (amino acids [aa] 333 to 425) of Epstein-Barr virus nuclear protein 2 (EBNA-2) results in EBV recombinants which cannot transform primary B lymphocytes (J. I. Cohen, F. Wang, and E. Kieff, J. Virol. 65:2545-2554, 1991), the role of domains of region 3 was investigated. Deletion of the Arg-Gly repeat domain, R-337GQSRGRGRGRGRGRGKG354, results in EBV recombinants that transform primary B lymphocytes with modestly decreased activity. The transformed cells grow slowly and are difficult to expand. EBNA-2 deleted for the Arg-Gly domain does not associate with the nuclear chromatin fraction. The Arg-Gly repeat has an intrinsic ability to bind to histone H1, to other proteins, including EBNA-1, and to nucleic acids, especially poly(G). Two independent deletions of each part of the rest of region 3 (aa 359 to 383 and 385 to 430) have little effect on transformation, while deletion of the rest of region 3 (aa 361 to 425) as a single segment substantially reduces transformation efficiency. EBNA-2 deleted for all of region 3 can still transactivate the LMP1 promoter in transient expression assays but is less active than EBNA-2 in transactivating the BamHI-C promoter. EBNA-2 deleted for the Arg-Gly domain is better than EBNA-2 at transactivating the LMP1 promoter and is as active as EBNA-2 in transactivating the BamHI-C promoter. These data are most compatible with a model in which the Arg-Gly domain of region 3 is a modulator of EBNA-2 interactions and activities, while the rest of region 3 is important in positioning the region 2 J kappa binding domain relative to the region 4 acidic transactivating domain. Despite the null phenotype of the region 3 deletion, region 3 is unlikely to mediate essential interactions with other proteins. Images PMID:8083959

  10. Critical Care

    MedlinePlus

    Critical care helps people with life-threatening injuries and illnesses. It might treat problems such as complications from surgery, ... attention by a team of specially-trained health care providers. Critical care usually takes place in an ...

  11. Archetypal Criticism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chesebro, James W.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Argues that archetypal criticism is a useful way of examining universal, historical, and cross-cultural symbols in classrooms. Identifies essential features of an archetype; outlines operational and critical procedures; illustrates archetypal criticism as applied to the cross as a symbol; and provides a synoptic placement for archetypal criticism…

  12. A common cis-acting sequence in the DiGeorge critical region regulates bi-directional transcription of UFD1L and CDC45L.

    PubMed

    Kunte, A; Ivey, K; Yamagishi, C; Garg, V; Yamagishi, H; Srivastava, D

    2001-10-01

    Two to three megabase deletions on chromosome 22q11 are the cytogenetic findings most commonly associated with cardiac and craniofacial defects in humans. The constellation of clinical findings associated with these deletions is termed the 22q11 deletion syndrome. We had earlier described a patient with the 22q11 deletion phenotype who was hemizygous for an atypical 20 kb microdeletion in this region. The deletion included coding regions of two genes organized head-to-head, UFD1L and CDC45L, along with an 884 bp CpG-rich intervening region. Based on this genomic organization, we hypothesized that both genes may be co-expressed and co-regulated by sequences within this region. We demonstrate that expression of both genes is enhanced in a similar pattern in precursors of structures affected by the deletion. The intergenic region is sufficient to direct transcription most strongly in the developing pharyngeal arches and limb buds of transgenic mice and can also direct bi-directional transcriptional activation in a neural crest-derived cell line. Deletion analyses revealed that a 404 bp fragment closest to UFD1L is necessary and sufficient to direct this bi-directional transcriptional activity. These results reveal the presence of a conserved regulatory region in the 22q11 deletion locus that can direct simultaneous transcription of genes involved in ubiquitin mediated protein processing (UFD1L) and cell cycle control (CDC45L).

  13. How Critical Is Critical Thinking?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, Ryan D.

    2014-01-01

    Recent educational discourse is full of references to the value of critical thinking as a 21st-century skill. In music education, critical thinking has been discussed in relation to problem solving and music listening, and some researchers suggest that training in critical thinking can improve students' responses to music. But what exactly is…

  14. Critically Thinking about Critical Thinking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weissberg, Robert

    2013-01-01

    In this article, the author states that "critical thinking" has mesmerized academics across the political spectrum and that even high school students are now being called upon to "think critically." He furthers adds that it is no exaggeration to say that "critical thinking" has quickly evolved into a scholarly…

  15. Critical Thinking vs. Critical Consciousness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doughty, Howard A.

    2006-01-01

    This article explores four kinds of critical thinking. The first is found in Socratic dialogues, which employ critical thinking mainly to reveal logical fallacies in common opinions, thus cleansing superior minds of error and leaving philosophers free to contemplate universal verities. The second is critical interpretation (hermeneutics) which…

  16. Water footprint, extended water footprint and virtual water trade of the Cantabria region, Spain. A critical appraisal of results, uncertainties and methods.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz-Alcaide, Silvia; Martinez-Santos, Pedro; Willaarts, Barbara; Hernández-Moreno, Enrique; Llamas, M. Ramon

    2015-04-01

    Water footprint assessments have gradually gained recognition as valuable tools for water management, to the point that they have been officially incorporated to water planning in countries such as Spain. Adequate combinations of the virtual water and water footprint concepts present the potential to link a broad range of sectors and issues, thus providing appropriate frameworks to support optimal water allocation and to inform production and trade decisions from the water perspective. We present the results of a regional study carried out in Cantabria, a 5300 km2 autonomous region located in northern Spain. Our approach deals with the municipal, shire and regional scales, combining different methods to assess each of the main components of Cantabria's water footprint (agriculture, livestock, forestry, industry, mining, tourism, domestic use and reservoirs), as well as exploring the significance of different approaches, assumptions and databases in the overall outcomes. The classic water footprint method is coupled with extended water footprint analyses in order to provide an estimate of the social and economic value of each sector. Finally, virtual water imports and exports are computed between Cantabria and the rest of Spain and between Cantabria and the world. The outcome of our work (a) highlights the paramount importance of green water (mostly embedded in pastures) in the region's water footprint and virtual water exports; (b) establishes the role of the region as a net virtual water exporter; (c) shows the productivity of water (euro/m3 and jobs/m3) to be highest in tourism and lowest in agriculture and livestock; and (d) demonstrates that statistical databases are seldom compiled with water footprint studies in mind, which is likely to introduce uncertainties in the results. Although our work shows that there is still plenty of room for improvement in regional-scale water footprint assessments, we contend that the available information is sufficient to

  17. Insights into the Conformation of the Membrane Proximal Regions Critical to the Trimerization of the HIV-1 gp41 Ectodomain Bound to Dodecyl Phosphocholine Micelles

    PubMed Central

    Louis, John M.; Baber, James L.; Ghirlando, Rodolfo; Aniana, Annie; Bax, Ad; Roche, Julien

    2016-01-01

    The transitioning of the ectodomain of gp41 from a pre-hairpin to a six-helix bundle conformation is a crucial aspect of virus-cell fusion. To gain insight into the intermediary steps of the fusion process we have studied the pH and dodecyl phosphocholine (DPC) micelle dependent trimer association of gp41 by systematic deletion analysis of an optimized construct termed 17–172 (residues 528 to 683 of Env) that spans the fusion peptide proximal region (FPPR) to the membrane proximal external region (MPER) of gp41, by sedimentation velocity and double electron-electron resonance (DEER) EPR spectroscopy. Trimerization at pH 7 requires the presence of both the FPPR and MPER regions. However, at pH 4, the protein completely dissociates to monomers. DEER measurements reveal a partial fraying of the C-terminal MPER residues in the 17–172 trimer while the other regions, including the FPPR, remain compact. In accordance, truncating nine C-terminal MPER residues (675–683) in the 17–172 construct does not shift the trimer-monomer equilibrium significantly. Thus, in the context of the gp41 ectodomain spanning residues 17–172, trimerization is clearly dependent on FPPR and MPER regions even when the terminal residues of MPER unravel. The antibody Z13e1, which spans both the 2F5 and 4E10 epitopes in MPER, binds to 17–172 with a Kd of 1 ± 0.12 μM. Accordingly, individual antibodies 2F5 and 4E10 also recognize the 17–172 trimer/DPC complex. We propose that binding of the C-terminal residues of MPER to the surface of the DPC micelles models a correct positioning of the trimeric transmembrane domain anchored in the viral membrane. PMID:27513582

  18. Criticality Model

    SciTech Connect

    A. Alsaed

    2004-09-14

    The ''Disposal Criticality Analysis Methodology Topical Report'' (YMP 2003) presents the methodology for evaluating potential criticality situations in the monitored geologic repository. As stated in the referenced Topical Report, the detailed methodology for performing the disposal criticality analyses will be documented in model reports. Many of the models developed in support of the Topical Report differ from the definition of models as given in the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management procedure AP-SIII.10Q, ''Models'', in that they are procedural, rather than mathematical. These model reports document the detailed methodology necessary to implement the approach presented in the Disposal Criticality Analysis Methodology Topical Report and provide calculations utilizing the methodology. Thus, the governing procedure for this type of report is AP-3.12Q, ''Design Calculations and Analyses''. The ''Criticality Model'' is of this latter type, providing a process evaluating the criticality potential of in-package and external configurations. The purpose of this analysis is to layout the process for calculating the criticality potential for various in-package and external configurations and to calculate lower-bound tolerance limit (LBTL) values and determine range of applicability (ROA) parameters. The LBTL calculations and the ROA determinations are performed using selected benchmark experiments that are applicable to various waste forms and various in-package and external configurations. The waste forms considered in this calculation are pressurized water reactor (PWR), boiling water reactor (BWR), Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF), Training Research Isotope General Atomic (TRIGA), Enrico Fermi, Shippingport pressurized water reactor, Shippingport light water breeder reactor (LWBR), N-Reactor, Melt and Dilute, and Fort Saint Vrain Reactor spent nuclear fuel (SNF). The scope of this analysis is to document the criticality computational method. The criticality

  19. Critical Climate-Sensitive and Important Grain-Producing Regions: Grain Production/Yield Variations Due to Climate Fluctuations. Volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welker, J. E.

    2004-01-01

    Ideally, the Crop Country Inventory, CCI, is a methodology for the pre-harvest prediction of large variations in a country s crop production. This is accomplished by monitoring the historical climatic fluctuations, especially during the crop calendar period, in a climate sensitive large crop production region or sub-country, rather than the entire country. The argument can be made that the climatic fluctuations in the climatic sensitive region are responsible for the major annual crop country variations and that the remainder of the country, without major climatic fluctuations for a given year, can be assumed to be a steady-state crop producer. The principal data set that has been used is the Global Climate Mode (GCM) data from the National Center for Environmental Prediction (NCEP), taken over the last half century. As a test of its accuracy, GCM data can and has been correlated with the actual meteorological station data at the station site.

  20. Holoprosencephaly with cerebellar vermis hypoplasia in 13q deletion syndrome: Critical region for cerebellar dysgenesis within 13q32.2q34.

    PubMed

    Mimaki, Masakazu; Shiihara, Takashi; Watanabe, Mio; Hirakata, Kyoko; Sakazume, Satoru; Ishiguro, Akio; Shimojima, Keiko; Yamamoto, Toshiyuki; Oka, Akira; Mizuguchi, Masashi

    2015-08-01

    We describe two unrelated patients with terminal deletions in the long arm of chromosome 13 showing brain malformation consisting of holoprosencephaly and cerebellar vermis hypoplasia. Array comparative genomic hybridization analysis revealed a pure terminal deletion of 13q31.3q34 in one patient and a mosaic ring chromosome with 13q32.2q34 deletion in the other. Mutations in ZIC2, located within region 13q32, cause holoprosencephaly, whereas the 13q32.2q32.3 region is associated with cerebellar vermis hypoplasia (Dandy-Walker syndrome). The rare concurrence of these major brain malformations in our patients provides further evidence that 13q32.2q32.3 deletion, harboring ZIC2 and ZIC5, leads to cerebellar dysgenesis.

  1. Giant electromagnetic vortex and MeV monoenergetic electrons generated by short laser pulses in underdense plasma near quarter critical density region.

    PubMed

    Zhidkov, Alexei; Nemoto, Koshichi; Nayuki, Takuya; Oishi, Yuji; Fuji, Takashi

    2007-07-01

    Very efficient generation of monoenergetic, about 1MeV , electrons from underdense plasma with its electron density close to the critical, when irradiated by an intense femtosecond laser pulse, is found via two dimensional particle-in-cell simulation. The stimulated Raman scattering of a laser pulse with frequency omega< or =2omega(pl max) gives rise to a giant electromagnetic vortex. In contrast to electron acceleration by the well-known laser pulse wake, injected plasma electrons are accelerated up to vortex ponderomotive potential forming a quite monoenergetic distribution. A relatively high charge of such an electron source makes very efficient generation of soft gamma rays with homega>300 keV .

  2. An N-terminal region of Lassa virus L protein plays a critical role in transcription but not replication of the virus genome.

    PubMed

    Lelke, Michaela; Brunotte, Linda; Busch, Carola; Günther, Stephan

    2010-02-01

    The central domain of the 200-kDa Lassa virus L protein is a putative RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. N- and C-terminal domains may harbor enzymatic functions important for viral mRNA synthesis, including capping enzymes or cap-snatching endoribonucleases. In the present study, we have employed a large-scale mutagenesis approach to map functionally relevant residues in these regions. The main targets were acidic (Asp and Glu) and basic residues (Lys and Arg) known to form catalytic and binding sites of capping enzymes and endoribonucleases. A total of 149 different mutants were generated and tested in the Lassa virus replicon system. Nearly 25% of evolutionarily highly conserved acidic and basic side chains were dispensable for function of L protein in the replicon context. The vast majority of the remaining mutants had defects in both transcription and replication. Seven residues (Asp-89, Glu-102, Asp-119, Lys-122, Asp-129, Glu-180, and Arg-185) were selectively important for mRNA synthesis. The phenotype was particularly pronounced for Asp-89, Glu-102, and Asp-129, which were indispensable for transcription but could be replaced by a variety of amino acid residues without affecting genome replication. Bioinformatics disclosed the remote similarity of this region to type IIs endonucleases. The mutagenesis was complemented by experiments with the RNA polymerase II inhibitor alpha-amanitin, demonstrating dependence of viral transcription from the cellular mRNA pool. In conclusion, this paper describes an N-terminal region in L protein being important for mRNA, but not genome synthesis. Bioinformatics and cell biological experiments lend support to the hypothesis that this region could be part of a cap-snatching enzyme.

  3. Cloning, genomic organization, and chromosomal localization of human citrate transport protein to the DiGeorge/velocardiofacial syndrome minimal critical region.

    PubMed

    Goldmuntz, E; Wang, Z; Roe, B A; Budarf, M L

    1996-04-15

    DiGeorge syndrome (DGS) and velocardiofacial syndrome have been shown to be associated with microdeletions of chromosomal regions 22q11. More recently, patients with conotruncal anomaly face syndrome and some nonsyndromic patients with isolated forms of conotruncal cardiac defects have been found to have 22q11 microdeletions as well. The commonly deleted region, called the DiGeorge chromosomal region (DGCR), spans approximately 1.2 Mb and is estimated to contain at least 30 genes. We report a computational approach for gene identification that makes use of large-scale sequencing of cosmids from a contig spanning the DGCR. Using this methodology, we have mapped the human homolog of a rodent citrate transport protein to the DGCR. We have isolated a partial cDNA containing the complete open reading frame and have determined the genomic structure by comparing the genomic sequence from the cosmid to the sequence of the cDNA clone. Whether the citrate transport protein can be implicated in the biological etiology of DGS or other 22q11 microdeletion syndromes remains to be defined.

  4. Cloning, genomic organization, and chromosomal localization of human citrate transport protein to the DiGeorge/velocardiofacial syndrome minimal critical region

    SciTech Connect

    Goldmuntz, E.; Budarf, M.L.; Wang, Zhili; Roe, B.A.

    1996-04-15

    DiGeorge syndrome (DGS) and velocardiofacial syndrome have been shown to be associated with microdeletions of chromosomal region 22q11. More recently, patients with conotruncal anomaly face syndrome and some nonsyndromic patients with isolated forms of conotruncal cardiac defects have been found to have 22q11 microdeletions as well. The commonly deleted region, called the DiGeorge chromosomal region (DGCR), spans approximately 1.2 mb and is estimated to contain at least 30 genes. We report a computational approach for gene identification that makes use of large-scale sequencing of cosmids from a contig spanning the DGCR. Using this methodology, we have mapped the human homolog of a rodent citrate transport protein to the DGCR. We have isolated a partial cDNA containing the complete open reading frame and have determined the genomic structure by comparing the genomic sequence from the cosmid to the sequence of the cDNA clone. Whether the citrate transport protein can be implicated in the biological etiology of DGS or other 22q11 microdeletion syndromes remains to be defined. 36 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Critical thinking.

    PubMed

    Price, A; Price, B

    1996-05-01

    Critical thinking is a process applied to midwifery theory, research and experience. It is a positive activity, responsive to context, drawing on negative and positive triggers and emotions to suggest ways of acting in future. Practice-based and reflective midwifery assignments should reflect the midwifery goals of critical thinking. This may require adjustments in assessment criteria and a questioning of standard academic conventions.

  6. Critical Muralism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosette, Arturo

    2009-01-01

    This study focuses on the development and practices of Critical Muralists--community-educator-artist-leader-activists--and situates these specifically in relation to the Mexican mural tradition of los Tres Grandes and in relation to the history of public art more generally. The study examines how Critical Muralists address artistic and…

  7. Positional mapping of loci in the DiGeorge critical region at chromosome 22q11 using a new marker (D22S183).

    PubMed

    Mulder, M P; Wilke, M; Langeveld, A; Wilming, L G; Hagemeijer, A; van Drunen, E; Zwarthoff, E C; Riegman, P H; Deelen, W H; van den Ouweland, A M

    1995-08-01

    The majority of patients with DiGeorge syndrome (DGS) and velo-cardio-facial syndrome (VCFS) and a minority of patients with non-syndromic conotruncal heart defects are hemizygous for a region of chromosome 22q11. The chromosomal region that is commonly deleted is larger than 2 Mb. It has not been possible to narrow the smallest region of overlap (SRO) of the deletions to less than ca 500 kb, which suggests that DGS/VCFS might be a contiguous gene syndrome. The saturation cloning of the SRO is being carried out, and one gene (TUPLE1) has been identified. By using a cosmid probe (M51) and fluorescence in situ hybridization, we show here that the anonymous DNA marker locus D22S183 is within the SRO, between TUPLE1 and D22S75 (probe N25). A second locus with weak homology to D22S183, recognized by cosmid M56, lies immediately outside the common SRO of the DGS and VCFS deletions, but inside the SRO of the DGS deletions. D22S183 sequences are strongly conserved in primates and weaker hybridizing signals are found in DNA of other mammalian species; no transcripts are however detected in polyA+ RNA from various adult human organs. Probe M51 allows fast reliable screening for 22q11 deletions using fluorescence in situ hybridization. A deletion was found in 11 out of 12 DGS patients and in 3 out of 7 VCFS patients. Two patients inherited the deletion from a parent with mild (atypical) symptoms.

  8. GNB1L, a gene deleted in the critical region for DiGeorge syndrome on 22q11, encodes a G-protein beta-subunit-like polypeptide.

    PubMed

    Gong, L; Liu, M; Jen, J; Yeh, E T

    2000-11-15

    CATCH 22 syndromes, which include DiGeorge syndrome and Velocardiofacial syndrome, are the most common cause of congenital heart disease which involve microdeletion of 22q11. Using a strategy including EST searching, PCR amplification and 5'-RACE, we have cloned a 1487 bp cDNA fragment from human heart cDNA library. The cloned GNB1L cDNA encodes a G-protein beta-subunit-like polypeptide, and the GNB1L gene is located in the critical region for DiGeorge syndrome. A comparison of GNB1L cDNA sequence with corresponding genomic DNA sequence revealed that this gene consists of seven exons and spans an approximately 60 kb genomic region. Northern blot analysis revealed GNB1L is highly expressed in the heart.

  9. Critics and Criticism of Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ornstein, Allan C.

    1977-01-01

    Radical educational critics, such as Edgar Friedenberg, Paul Goodman, A. S. Neill, John Holt, Jonathan Kozol, Herbert Kohl, James Herndon, and Ivan Illich, have few constructive goals, no strategy for broad change, and a disdain for modernization and compromise. Additionally, these critics, says the author, fail to consider social factors related…

  10. Stress and fluid-pressure changes associated with oil-field operations: A critical assessment of effects in the focal region of the earthquake

    SciTech Connect

    Segall, P.; Yerkes, R.F.

    1990-01-01

    The proximity of the May 2 earthquake to the active oil fields on Anticline Ridge has led to speculation that this earthquake might have been triggered by oil-field operations. Elsewhere, earthquakes have been associated with pore-pressure increases resulting from fluid injection and with subsidence resulting from fluid extraction. Simple calculations show that shale units, which underlie the oil-producing strata, hydraulically isolate the oil field from the earthquake focal region. The large volumes of fluid extracted from the oil fields caused a 50% decline in reservoir pressures from 1938 to 1983. These observations independently rule out substantial increases in pore pressure at focal depths due to fluid injection. The authors use a theoretical method, based on Biot's constitutive theory for fluid-infiltrated elastic media, to evaluate the change in stresses acting in the focal region resulting from fluid extraction in the overlying oil fields. As an independent check on this method, the subsidence of the Earth's surface in response to fluid withdrawal is calculated and compared with measured elevation changes on Anticline Ridge. The producing horizons are taken to be horizontal permeable layers, bounded above and below by impermeable horizons. Strains within the producing layers are related to extraction-induced changes in pore-fluid mass. Contraction of the producing layers causes the free surface to subside and strains the elastic surroundings. The calculated subsidence rate of Anticline Ridge between 1933 and 1972 if 3 mm/yr, in good agreement with the measured subsidence rate of 3.3 {plus minus} 0.7 mm/yr.

  11. Identifying candidate genes for X-linked hypophosphatemic rickets (HYP) in the critical region X(p22.1-p22.2)

    SciTech Connect

    Holm, L.A.; Freedner, N.L.; Maizoub, J.A.

    1994-09-01

    X-linked hypophosphatemic rickets (HYP) is the most common inherited form of rickets, characterized by a proximal renal tubular phosphate leak leading to phosphate-wasting and abnormal 1.25-dihydroxyvitamin D metabolism. The primary defect is unknown, and the candidate gene approach has thus far been unsuccessful in identifying the gene. The HYP locus has been mapped to X(p22.1-p22.2) and more recently to a 500,000 base pair region spanned by two YACs, E01138 and A0472. In an effort to identify the HYP gene in the 500 kb region, we are taking the direct selection approach. Since the tissue expressing the HYP gene is unknown, we are using cDNA libraries from a number of tissues for direct selection, including kidney, liver, thyroid, brain, spinal cord, total fetus, bone, and an osteosarcoma cell line. The tissue cDNA is hybridized to the YACs A0472 and EO1138 (obtained courtesy of Fiona Francis, Imperial Cancer Research Fund, London) in the presence of quenchers, which block repeated and ribosomal sequences on the YACs. A selected library is created from the tissues cDNAs that hybridize to the YACs. The selected cDNA library is first screened to eliminate inserts containing repeated and ribosomal sequences. The presence of the inserts on the YAC and on X(p22.1-p22.2) is then verified using mapping panels. Candidate cDNAs that make it through this analysis are sequenced. Our first attempts at making selected libraries resulted in a number of contaminants. Three separate libraries are currently under construction, using the following combinations of tissue cDNA libraries: (1) kidney, liver, and thyroid; (2) brain, spinal cord, and total fetus; and (3) bone and an osteosarcoma cell line. We will discuss transcripts obtained from these libraries.

  12. Critical Careers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowles, Roger A.

    2001-01-01

    Reports the critical shortage of qualified equipment technicians, especially in biomedical equipment. Cites the importance of encouraging careers in this field and describes a source of occupational information. (SK)

  13. Detailed phenotype-genotype study in five patients with chromosome 6q16 deletion: narrowing the critical region for Prader-Willi-like phenotype.

    PubMed

    Bonaglia, Maria Clara; Ciccone, Roberto; Gimelli, Giorgio; Gimelli, Stefania; Marelli, Susan; Verheij, Joke; Giorda, Roberto; Grasso, Rita; Borgatti, Renato; Pagone, Filomena; Rodrìguez, Laura; Martinez-Frias, Maria-Luisa; van Ravenswaaij, Conny; Zuffardi, Orsetta

    2008-12-01

    Most patients with an interstitial deletion of 6q16 have Prader-Willi-like phenotype, featuring obesity, hypotonia, short hands and feet, and developmental delay. In all reported studies, the chromosome rearrangement was detected by karyotype analysis, which provides an overview of the entire genome but has limited resolution. Here we describe a detailed clinical presentation of five patients, two of whom were previously reported, with overlapping interstitial 6q16 deletions and Prader-Willi-like phenotype. Our patients share the following main features with previously reported cases: global developmental delay, hypotonia, obesity, hyperphagia, and eye/vision anomalies. All rearrangement breakpoints have been accurately defined through array-CGH at about 100 Kb resolution. We were able to narrow the shortest region of deletion overlap for the presumed gene(s) involved in the Prader-Willi-like syndrome to 4.1 Mb located at 6q16.1q16.2. Our results support the evidence that haploinsufficiency of the SIM1 gene is responsible for obesity in these patients. A possible involvement of the GRIK2 gene in autistic-like behaviour, of POPDC3 in heart development, and of MCHR2 in the control of feeding behaviour and energy metabolism is also hypothesized.

  14. Mutation of Gtf2ird1 from the Williams-Beuren syndrome critical region results in facial dysplasia, motor dysfunction, and altered vocalisations.

    PubMed

    Howard, Monique L; Palmer, Stephen J; Taylor, Kylie M; Arthurson, Geoffrey J; Spitzer, Matthew W; Du, Xin; Pang, Terence Y C; Renoir, Thibault; Hardeman, Edna C; Hannan, Anthony J

    2012-03-01

    Insufficiency of the transcriptional regulator GTF2IRD1 has become a strong potential explanation for some of the major characteristic features of the neurodevelopmental disorder Williams-Beuren syndrome (WBS). Genotype/phenotype correlations in humans indicate that the hemizygous loss of the GTF2IRD1 gene and an adjacent paralogue, GTF2I, play crucial roles in the neurocognitive and craniofacial aspects of the disease. In order to explore this genetic relationship in greater detail, we have generated a targeted Gtf2ird1 mutation in mice that blocks normal GTF2IRD1 protein production. Detailed analyses of homozygous null Gtf2ird1 mice have revealed a series of phenotypes that share some intriguing parallels with WBS. These include reduced body weight, a facial deformity resulting from localised epidermal hyperplasia, a motor coordination deficit, alterations in exploratory activity and, in response to specific stress-inducing stimuli; a novel audible vocalisation and increased serum corticosterone. Analysis of Gtf2ird1 expression patterns in the brain using a knock-in LacZ reporter and c-fos activity mapping illustrates the regions where these neurological abnormalities may originate. These data provide new mechanistic insight into the clinical genetic findings in WBS patients and indicate that insufficiency of GTF2IRD1 protein contributes to abnormalities of facial development, motor function and specific behavioural disorders that accompany this disease.

  15. Feline leukemia virus outbreak in the critically endangered Iberian lynx (Lynx pardinus): high-throughput sequencing of envelope variable region A and experimental transmission.

    PubMed

    Geret, C P; Cattori, V; Meli, M L; Riond, B; Martínez, F; López, G; Vargas, A; Simón, M A; López-Bao, J V; Hofmann-Lehmann, R; Lutz, H

    2011-05-01

    The Iberian lynx is the most endangered felid species. During winter/spring 2006/7, a feline leukemia virus (FeLV) outbreak of unexpected virulence killed about 2/3 of the infected Iberian lynxes. All FeLV-positive animals were co-infected with feline hemoplasmas. To further characterize the Iberian lynx FeLV strain and evaluate its potential virulence, the FeLV envelope gene variable region A (VRA) mutant spectrum was analyzed using the Roche 454 sequencing technology, and an in vivo transmission study of lynx blood to specified-pathogen-free cats was performed. VRA mutations indicated weak apolipoprotein B mRNA editing enzyme and catalytic polypeptide-like cytidine deaminase (APOBEC) restriction of FeLV replication, and variants characteristic of aggressive FeLV strains, such as FeLV-C or FeLV-A/61C, were not detected. Cats exposed to FeLV/Candidatus Mycoplasma haemominutum-positive lynx blood did not show a particularly severe outcome of infection. The results underscore the special susceptibility of Iberian lynxes to infectious diseases.

  16. [Spatial representativeness of monitoring stations for air quality in Florence (Tuscany Region, Central Italy) according to ARPAT e LaMMA. Critical observations].

    PubMed

    Grechi, Daniele

    2016-01-01

    On March 2015, the Environmental Protection Agency of Tuscany Region (Central Italy) and the Laboratory of monitoring and environmental modelling published a Report on spatial representativeness of monitoring stations for Tuscan air quality, where they supported the decommissioning of modelling stations located in the Florentine Plain. The stations of Signa, Scandicci, and Firenze-Bassi, located in a further South area, were considered representative Believing that air quality of the Plain could be evaluated by these stations is a stretch. In this text the author show the inconsistency of the conclusion of the Report through correlation graphs comparing daily means of PM10 detected in the disposed stations and in the active ones, showing relevant differences between the reported values and the days when the limits are exceeded. The discrepancy is due to the fact that uncertainty of theoretical estimates is greater than the differences recorded by the stations considered as a reference and the areas they may represent. The area of the Plain has a population of 150,000 individuals and it is subject to a heavy environmental pression, which will change for the urban works planned for the coming years. The population's legitimate request for the analytical monitoring of air pollution could be met through the organization of participated monitoring based on the use of low-cost innovative tools.

  17. Microprocessor complex subunit DiGeorge syndrome critical region gene 8 (Dgcr8) is required for schwann cell myelination and myelin maintenance.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hsin-Pin; Oksuz, Idil; Hurley, Edward; Wrabetz, Lawrence; Awatramani, Rajeshwar

    2015-10-02

    We investigated the role of a key component of the Microprocessor complex, DGCR8, in the regulation of myelin formation and maintenance. We found that conditionally ablating Dgcr8 in Schwann cells (SCs) during development results in an arrest of SC differentiation. Dgcr8 conditional knock-out (cKO) SCs fail to form 1:1 relationships with axons or, having achieved this, fail to form myelin sheaths. The expression of genes normally found in immature SCs, such as sex-determining region Y-box 2 (Sox2), is increased in Dgcr8 cKO SCs, whereas the expression of myelin-related genes, including the master regulatory transcription factor early growth response 2 (Egr2), is decreased. Additionally, expression of a novel gene expression program involving sonic hedgehog (Shh), activated de novo in injured nerves, is elevated in Dgcr8 cKOs but not in Egr2 null mice, a model of SC differentiation arrest, suggesting that the injury-related gene expression program in Dgcr8 cKOs cannot be attributed to differentiation arrest. Inducible ablation of Dgcr8 in adult SCs results in gene expression changes similar to those found in cKOs, including an increase in the expression of Sox2 and Shh. Analyses of these nerves mainly reveal normal myelin thickness and axon size distribution but some dedifferentiated SCs and increased macrophage infiltration. Together our data suggest that Dgcr8 is responsible for modulation of gene expression programs underlying myelin formation and maintenance as well as suppression of an injury-related gene expression program.

  18. The human homologue of the Drosophila melanogaster flightless-I gene (fliI) maps within the Smith-Magenis microdeletion critical region in 17p11.2

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, K.S.; Nguyen, D.; Greenberg, F.

    1994-09-01

    The Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS) appears to be a contiguous gene deletion syndrome associated with a proximal deletion of the short arm of chromosome 17 in band p11.2. The spectrum of clinical findings includes short stature, brachydactyly, developmental delay, dysmorphic features, sleep disturbances and behavioral problems. The complex phenotypic features suggest deletion of several contiguous genes. However, to date no protein encoding gene has been mapped to the SMS critical region. Recently, Campbell described the cloning and characterization of D. melanogaster fli cDNAs and of homologous cDNAs from caenorhabditis elegans and from humans. Mutations in fliI result in loss of flight ability and, when severe, cause lethality due to incomplete cellularization with subsequent abnormal gastrulation. The amino acid sequence deduced from the FLI cDNA has 52% similarity to the human gelsolin protein and also has a N-terminal leucine-rich domain with 16 consecutive leucine-rich repeats (LRR). Here, we demonstrate that the human homologue (FLI) maps within the SMS critical region. Genomic cosmids were used as probes for fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and localized this gene to the 17p11.2 region. Somatic cell hybrids and/or FISH analysis of lymphoblastoid cell lines form 12 SMS patients demonstrate that one copy of the FLI gene is deleted in all SMS patients analyzed with the common deletion. Further studies are required to determine if haploinsufficiency of FLI or other as yet unidentified genes is important for the expression of the SMS phenotype.

  19. Vapor-liquid coexistence curves in the critical region and the critical temperatures and densities of 1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane (R-134a), 1,1,1-trifluoroethane (R-143a), and 1,1,1,2,3,3-hexafluoropropane (R-236ea)

    SciTech Connect

    Aoyama, H.; Kishizawa, G.; Sato, H.; Watanabe, K.

    1996-09-01

    The vapor-liquid coexistence curves in the critical region of 1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane (R-134a), 1,1,1-trifluoroethane (R-143a), and 1,1,1,2,3,3-hexafluoropropane (R-236ea) were measured by a visual observation of the meniscus disappearance in an optical cell. Seventeen saturated-vapor and -liquid densities have been measured for R-134a. Thirty-five saturated-vapor and -liquid densities have been measured for R-143a. Twenty-seven saturated-vapor and -liquid densities have been measured for R-236ea. The level and location of the meniscus, as well as the intensity of the critical opalescence were considered in the determination of the critical temperature and density for each fluid. R-134a was found to have (374.083 {+-} 0.010) K and (509 {+-} 1) kg/m{sup 3}, R-143a, (345.860 {+-} 0.010) K and (434 {+-} 1) kg/m{sup 3}, and R-236ea, (412.375 {+-} 0.015) K and (568 {+-} 1) kg/m{sup 3}.

  20. A large-scale survey of the novel 15q24 microdeletion syndrome in autism spectrum disorders identifies an atypical deletion that narrows the critical region

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The 15q24 microdeletion syndrome has been recently described as a recurrent, submicroscopic genomic imbalance found in individuals with intellectual disability, typical facial appearance, hypotonia, and digital and genital abnormalities. Gene dosage abnormalities, including copy number variations (CNVs), have been identified in a significant fraction of individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). In this study we surveyed two ASD cohorts for 15q24 abnormalities to assess the frequency of genomic imbalances in this interval. Methods We screened 173 unrelated subjects with ASD from the Central Valley of Costa Rica and 1336 subjects with ASD from 785 independent families registered with the Autism Genetic Resource Exchange (AGRE) for CNVs across 15q24 using oligonucleotide arrays. Rearrangements were confirmed by array comparative genomic hybridization and quantitative PCR. Results Among the patients from Costa Rica, an atypical de novo deletion of 3.06 Mb in 15q23-q24.1 was detected in a boy with autism sharing many features with the other 13 subjects with the 15q24 microdeletion syndrome described to date. He exhibited intellectual disability, constant smiling, characteristic facial features (high anterior hairline, broad medial eyebrows, epicanthal folds, hypertelorism, full lower lip and protuberant, posteriorly rotated ears), single palmar crease, toe syndactyly and congenital nystagmus. The deletion breakpoints are atypical and lie outside previously characterized low copy repeats (69,838-72,897 Mb). Genotyping data revealed that the deletion had occurred in the paternal chromosome. Among the AGRE families, no large 15q24 deletions were observed. Conclusions From the current and previous studies, deletions in the 15q24 region represent rare causes of ASDs with an estimated frequency of 0.1 to 0.2% in individuals ascertained for ASDs, although the proportion might be higher in sporadic cases. These rates compare with a frequency of about 0.3% in

  1. Structural analysis of a novel rabbit monoclonal antibody R53 targeting an epitope in HIV-1 gp120 C4 region critical for receptor and co-receptor binding

    DOE PAGES

    Pan, Ruimin; Chen, Yuxin; Vaine, Michael; ...

    2015-07-15

    The fourth conserved region (C4) in the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) gp120 is a structural element that is important for its function, as it binds to both the receptor CD4 and the co-receptor CCR5/CXCR4. It has long been known that this region is highly immunogenic and that it harbors B-cell as well as T-cell epitopes. It is the target of a number of antibodies in animal studies, which are called CD4-blockers. However, the mechanism by which the virus shields itself from such antibody responses is not known. Here, we determined the crystal structure of R53 in complex with its epitopemore » peptide using a novel anti-C4 rabbit monoclonal antibody R53. Our data show that although the epitope of R53 covers a highly conserved sequence 433AMYAPPI439, it is not available in the gp120 trimer and in the CD4-bound conformation. Our results suggest a masking mechanism to explain how HIV-1 protects this critical region from the human immune system.« less

  2. Structural analysis of a novel rabbit monoclonal antibody R53 targeting an epitope in HIV-1 gp120 C4 region critical for receptor and co-receptor binding

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Ruimin; Chen, Yuxin; Vaine, Michael; Hu, Guangnan; Wang, Shixia; Lu, Shan; Kong, Xiang -Peng

    2015-07-15

    The fourth conserved region (C4) in the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) gp120 is a structural element that is important for its function, as it binds to both the receptor CD4 and the co-receptor CCR5/CXCR4. It has long been known that this region is highly immunogenic and that it harbors B-cell as well as T-cell epitopes. It is the target of a number of antibodies in animal studies, which are called CD4-blockers. However, the mechanism by which the virus shields itself from such antibody responses is not known. Here, we determined the crystal structure of R53 in complex with its epitope peptide using a novel anti-C4 rabbit monoclonal antibody R53. Our data show that although the epitope of R53 covers a highly conserved sequence 433AMYAPPI439, it is not available in the gp120 trimer and in the CD4-bound conformation. Our results suggest a masking mechanism to explain how HIV-1 protects this critical region from the human immune system.

  3. A 6.5 mb deletion at 3q24q25.2 narrows Wisconsin syndrome critical region to a 750 kb interval: A potential role for MBNLI.

    PubMed

    Bertini, Veronica; Orsini, Alessandro; Mazza, Roberta; Mandava, Vineela; Saggese, Giuseppe; Azzara', Alessia; Bonuccelli, Alice; Valetto, Angelo

    2017-01-01

    We report on a patient with a 6.5 Mb interstitial de novo deletion in 3q24q25.2, characterized by array CGH. The patient is a 4-year and 2-month-old girl, who presented to us with mild developmental delay, absence of language, facial dysmorphism, hirsutism, strabismus, and Dandy-Walker Malformation. The main clinical signs typical of WS (Wisconsin syndrome) are evident in the patient. The molecular mapping of WS in 3q23q25 allowed geneticists to define the syndrome more accurately. Comparing the present patient's phenotype with that of cases with a molecular characterization so far reported, it was possible to narrow the critical region for WS to an interval of 750 Kb, where two genes (MBNL1 and TMEM14E) are harbored. The potential role of MBNL1 in causing the WS phenotype is discussed. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Mapping of the Tacaribe Arenavirus Z-Protein Binding Sites on the L Protein Identified both Amino Acids within the Putative Polymerase Domain and a Region at the N Terminus of L That Are Critically Involved in Binding▿

    PubMed Central

    Wilda, Maximiliano; Lopez, Nora; Casabona, Juan Cruz; Franze-Fernandez, Maria T.

    2008-01-01

    Tacaribe virus (TacV) is the prototype of the New World group of arenaviruses. The TacV genome encodes four proteins: the nucleoprotein (N), the glycoprotein precursor, the polymerase (L), and a RING finger protein (Z). Using a reverse genetics system, we demonstrated that TacV N and L are sufficient to drive transcription and replication mediated by TacV-like RNAs and that Z is a powerful inhibitor of these processes (Lopez et al., J. Virol. 65:12241-12251, 2001). More recently, we provided the first evidence of an interaction between Z and L and showed that Z's inhibitory activity was dependent on its ability to bind to L (Jácamo et al., J. Virol. 77:10383-10393, 2003). In the present study, we mapped the TacV Z-binding sites on the 2,210-amino-acid L polymerase. To that end, we performed deletion analysis and point mutations of L and studied the Z-L interaction by coimmunoprecipitation with specific sera. We found that the C-terminal region of L was not essential for the interaction and identified two noncontiguous regions that were critical for binding: one at the N-terminus of L between residues 156 and 292 and a second one in the polymerase domain (domain III). The importance of domain III in binding was revealed by substitutions in D1188 and H1189 within motif A and in each residue of the conserved SDD sequence (residues 1328, 1329, and 1330) within motif C. Our results showed that of the substituted residues, only H1189 and D1329 appeared to be critically involved in binding Z. PMID:18799569

  5. Critical Information at Critical Moments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fierman, Ben; Thrower, Raymond H., Jr.

    2011-01-01

    On a daily basis, administrators are reminded of the potential, perhaps the likelihood, of violence or natural crises on their campuses. Comprehensive studies have been conducted and point to recommendations and best practices for planning, preparing, responding to, and recovering from critical incidents. The International Association of Campus…

  6. Vulnerability of critical infrastructures : identifying critical nodes.

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, Roger Gary; Robinson, David Gerald

    2004-06-01

    The objective of this research was the development of tools and techniques for the identification of critical nodes within critical infrastructures. These are nodes that, if disrupted through natural events or terrorist action, would cause the most widespread, immediate damage. This research focuses on one particular element of the national infrastructure: the bulk power system. Through the identification of critical elements and the quantification of the consequences of their failure, site-specific vulnerability analyses can be focused at those locations where additional security measures could be effectively implemented. In particular, with appropriate sizing and placement within the grid, distributed generation in the form of regional power parks may reduce or even prevent the impact of widespread network power outages. Even without additional security measures, increased awareness of sensitive power grid locations can provide a basis for more effective national, state and local emergency planning. A number of methods for identifying critical nodes were investigated: small-world (or network theory), polyhedral dynamics, and an artificial intelligence-based search method - particle swarm optimization. PSO was found to be the only viable approach and was applied to a variety of industry accepted test networks to validate the ability of the approach to identify sets of critical nodes. The approach was coded in a software package called Buzzard and integrated with a traditional power flow code. A number of industry accepted test networks were employed to validate the approach. The techniques (and software) are not unique to power grid network, but could be applied to a variety of complex, interacting infrastructures.

  7. [Critical incidents].

    PubMed

    Scheidegger, D

    2005-03-01

    In medicine real severe mishaps are rare. On the other hand critical incidents are frequent. Anonymous critical incident reporting systems allow us to learn from these mishaps. This learning process will make our daily clinical work safer Unfortunately, before these systems can be used efficiently our professional culture has to be changed. Everyone in medicine has to admit that errors do occur to see the need for an open discussion. If we really want to learn from errors, we cannot punish the individual, who reported his or her mistake. The interest is primarily in what has happened and why it has happened and not who has committed this mistake. The cause for critical incidents in medicine is in over 80% the human factor Poor communication, work under enormous stress, conflicts and hierarchies are the main cause. This has been known for many years, therefore have already 15 years ago high-tech industries, like e.g. aviation, started to invest in special courses on team training. Medicine is a typical profession were until now only the individual performance decided about the professional career Communication, conflict management, stress management, decision making, risk management, team and team resource management were subjects that have never been taught during our preor postgraduate education. These points are the most important ones for an optimal teamwork. A multimodular course designed together with Swissair (Human Aspect Development medical, HADmedical) helps to cover, as in aviation, the soft factor and behavioural education in medicine and to prepare professionals in health care to work as a real team.

  8. The gene for human U2 snRNP auxiliary factor small 35-kDa subunit (U2AF1) maps to the progressive myoclonus epilepsy (EPM1) critical region on chromosome 21q22.3

    SciTech Connect

    Lalioti, M.D.; Rossier, C.; Antonarakis, S.E.

    1996-04-15

    We used targeted exon trapping to clone portions of genes from human chromosome 21q22.3. One trapped sequence showed complete homology with the cDNA of human U2AF{sup 35} (M96982; HGM-approved nomenclature U2AF1), which encodes for the small 35-kDa subunit of the U2 snRNP auxiliary factor. Using the U2AF1 cDNA as a probe, we mapped this gene to cosmid Q15D2, a P1, and YAC 350F7 of the Chumakov et al. contig, close to the cystathionine-{beta}-synthase gene (CBS) on 21q22.3. This localization was confirmed by PCR using oligonucleotides from the 3{prime} UTR and by FISH. As U2AF1 associated with a number of different factors during mRNA splicing, overexpression in trisomy 21 individuals could contribute to some Down syndrome phenotypes by interfering with the splicing process. Furthermore, because this gene maps in the critical region for the progressive myoclonus epilepsy I locus (EPM1), mutation analysis will be carried out in patients to evaluate the potential role of U2AF1 as a candidate for EPM1. 24 refs., 1 fig.

  9. Activation of JAK3, but not JAK1, is critical to interleukin-4 (IL4) stimulated proliferation and requires a membrane-proximal region of IL4 receptor alpha.

    PubMed

    Malabarba, M G; Kirken, R A; Rui, H; Koettnitz, K; Kawamura, M; O'Shea, J J; Kalthoff, F S; Farrar, W L

    1995-04-21

    The tyrosine kinases JAK1 and JAK3 have been shown to undergo tyrosine phosphorylation in response to interleukin-2 (IL), IL4, IL7, and IL9, cytokines which share the common IL2 receptor gamma-chain (IL2R gamma), and evidence has been found for a preferential coupling of JAK3 to IL2R gamma and JAK1 to IL2R beta. Here we show, using human premyeloid TF-1 cells, that IL4 stimulates JAK3 to a larger extent than JAK1, based upon three different evaluation criteria. These include a more vigorous tyrosine phosphorylation of JAK3 as measured by anti-phosphotyrosine immunoblotting, a more marked activation of JAK3 as determined by in vitro tyrosine kinase assays and a more manifest presence of JAK3 in activated IL4-receptor complexes. These observations suggest that IL4 receptor signal transduction does not depend on equimolar heterodimerization of JAK1 and JAK3 following IL4-induced heterodimerization of IL4R alpha and IL2R gamma. Indeed, when human IL4R alpha was stably expressed in mouse BA/F3 cells, robust IL4-induced proliferation and JAK3 activation occurred without detectable involvement of JAK1, JAK2, or TYK2. The present study suggests that JAK1 plays a subordinate role in IL4 receptor signaling, and that in certain cells exclusive JAK3 activation may mediate IL4-induced cell growth. Moreover, mutational analysis of human IL4R alpha showed that a membrane-proximal cytoplasmic region was critical for JAK3 activation, while the I4R motif was not, which is compatible with a role of JAK3 upstream of the recruitment of the insulin receptor substrate-1/4PS signaling proteins by IL4 receptors.

  10. Anisotropy of the upper critical fields and the paramagnetic Meissner effect in La1.85Sr0.15CuO4 single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felner, I.; Tsindlekht, M. I.; Drachuck, G.; Keren, A.

    2013-02-01

    Optimally doped La1.85Sr0.15CuO4 single crystals have been investigated by dc and ac magnetic measurements. These crystals have rectangular needle-like shapes with the long needle axis parallel to the crystallographic c axis (c-crystal) or parallel to the basal planes (a-crystal). In both crystals, the temperature dependence of the upper critical fields (HC2) and the surface critical field (HC3) were measured. The H-T phase diagram is presented. Close to TC = 35 K, for the c-crystal, {\\boldsymbol{\\gamma}}^{c}={H}_{{C3}}^{c}/{H}_{{C2}}^{c}=1.8 0(2), whereas for the a-crystal the {\\boldsymbol{\\gamma}}^{a}={H}_{{C3}}^{a}/{H}_{{C2}}^{a}=4.0(2) obtained is much higher than 1.69, predicted by the ideal mathematical model. At low applied dc fields, positive field-cooled branches known as the ‘paramagnetic Meissner effect’ (PME) are observed; their magnitude is inversely proportional to H. The anisotropic PME is observed in both a- and c-crystals, only when the applied field is along the basal planes. It is speculated that the high γa and the PME are connected to each other.

  11. Crossover critical phenomena in fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostrowicka Wyczalkowska, Anna Judyta

    In fluids the effects of critical density fluctuations remain significant over a large range of temperatures and densities. The nonanalytical behavior observed in real fluids in the vicinity of the critical point is well described by renormalization-group theory. This theory accounts properly for the influence of the critical fluctuations in density which are entirely neglected by the classical equations. Specifically, fluids asymptotically close to the critical point belong to the universality class of the 3-dimensional Ising model and their behavior near the critical point is governed by scaling laws with critical exponents appropriate for this universality class. The validity of the asymptotic power laws is, however, restricted to a very small region near the critical point. An approach to deal with the nonasymptotic behavior of fluids including the crossover from Ising behavior in the immediate vicinity of the critical point to classical behavior far away from the critical point has been developed by Chen and coworkers and is further improved in this thesis. This approach is based on earlier work of Nicoll and coworkers and it leads to a transformation of a classical Landau expansion to incorporate the effects of critical fluctuations. Here we show how this transformation applies to real fluids: water and sulfurhexafluoride. Nevertheless, even such a crossover Landau expansion still fails to make a connection with the behavior of the fluid very far away from the critical point like the ideal-gas limit at low densities. We demonstrate how a procedure, earlier developed to include the effects of critical fluctuations into a classical Landau expansion of the Helmholtz-energy density, can also be applied to a closed-form classical equation of state like the equation of van der Waals. One of the consequences of accounting for the presence of the critical fluctuations is a shift in the location of the critical point. The resulting equation incorporates the

  12. Critical Viewing: Stimulant to Critical Thinking.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Reilly, Kevin; Splaine, John

    This document is intended to improve the critical viewing skills and increase the understanding and appreciation of what is viewed. Included are the chapters: (1) "Critical Thinking: The Parts of an Argument," intended to develop a process to help a person judge arguments in what is read, seen, and heard; (2) "Critical Viewing:…

  13. Critical point fluctuations in supported lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Connell, Simon D; Heath, George; Olmsted, Peter D; Kisil, Anastasia

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate that it is possible to observe many aspects of critical phenomena in supported lipid bilayers using atomic force microscopy (AFM) with the aid of stable and precise temperature control. The regions of criticality were determined by accurately measuring and calculating phase diagrams for the 2 phase L(d)-L(o) region, and tracking how it moves with temperature, then increasing the sampling density around the estimated critical regions. Compositional fluctuations were observed above the critical temperature (T(c)) and characterised using a spatial correlation function. From this analysis, the phase transition was found to be most closely described by the 2D Ising model, showing it is a critical transition. Below T(c) roughening of the domain boundaries occurred due to the reduction in line tension close to the critical point. Smaller scale density fluctuations were also detected just below T(c). At T(c), we believe we have observed fluctuations on length scales greater than 10 microm. The region of critically fluctuating 10-100 nm nanodomains has been found to extend a considerable distance above T(c) to temperatures within the biological range, and seem to be an ideal candidate for the actual structure of lipid rafts in cell membranes. Although evidence for this idea has recently emerged, this is the first direct evidence for nanoscale domains in the critical region.

  14. Maturation of limbic regions in Asperger syndrome: a preliminary study using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy and structural magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Finian M; Page, Lisa; O'Gorman, Ruth L; Bolton, Patrick; Sharma, Ajay; Baird, Gillian; Daly, Eileen; Hallahan, Brian; Conroy, Ronán M; Foy, Catherine; Curran, Sarah; Robertson, Dene; Murphy, Kieran C; Murphy, Declan G M

    2010-11-30

    People with autistic spectrum disorders (ASD, including Asperger syndrome) may have developmental abnormalities in the amygdala-hippocampal complex (AHC). However, in vivo, age-related comparisons of both volume and neuronal integrity of the AHC have not yet been carried out in people with Asperger syndrome (AS) versus controls. We compared structure and metabolic activity of the right AHC of 22 individuals with AS and 22 healthy controls aged 10-50 years and examined the effects of age between groups. We used structural magnetic resonance imaging (sMRI) to measure the volume of the AHC, and magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H-MRS) to measure concentrations of N-acetyl aspartate (NAA), creatine+phosphocreatine (Cr+PCr), myo-inositol (mI) and choline (Cho). The bulk volume of the amygdala and the hippocampus did not differ significantly between groups, but there was a significant difference in the effect of age on the hippocampus in controls. Compared with controls, young (but not older) people with AS had a significantly higher AHC concentration of NAA and a significantly higher NAA/Cr ratio. People with AS, but not controls, had a significant age-related reduction in NAA and the NAA/Cr ratio. Also, in people with AS, but not controls, there was a significant relationship between concentrations of choline and age so that choline concentrations reduced with age. We therefore suggest that people with AS have significant differences in neuronal and lipid membrane integrity and maturation of the AHC.

  15. Critical Materials Institute

    ScienceCinema

    Alex King

    2016-07-12

    Ames Laboratory Director Alex King talks about the goals of the Critical Materials Institute in diversifying the supply of critical materials, developing substitute materials, developing tools and techniques for recycling critical materials, and forecasting materials needs to avoid future shortages.

  16. Critical Materials Institute

    SciTech Connect

    Alex King

    2013-01-09

    Ames Laboratory Director Alex King talks about the goals of the Critical Materials Institute in diversifying the supply of critical materials, developing substitute materials, developing tools and techniques for recycling critical materials, and forecasting materials needs to avoid future shortages.

  17. A short-term ionospheric forecasting empirical regional model (IFERM) to predict the critical frequency of the F2 layer during moderate, disturbed, and very disturbed geomagnetic conditions over the European area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietrella, M.

    2012-02-01

    A short-term ionospheric forecasting empirical regional model (IFERM) has been developed to predict the state of the critical frequency of the F2 layer (foF2) under different geomagnetic conditions. IFERM is based on 13 short term ionospheric forecasting empirical local models (IFELM) developed to predict foF2 at 13 ionospheric observatories scattered around the European area. The forecasting procedures were developed by taking into account, hourly measurements of foF2, hourly quiet-time reference values of foF2 (foF2QT), and the hourly time-weighted accumulation series derived from the geomagnetic planetary index ap, (ap(τ)), for each observatory. Under the assumption that the ionospheric disturbance index ln(foF2/foF2QT) is correlated to the integrated geomagnetic disturbance index ap(τ), a set of statistically significant regression coefficients were established for each observatory, over 12 months, over 24 h, and under 3 different ranges of geomagnetic activity. This data was then used as input to compute short-term ionospheric forecasting of foF2 at the 13 local stations under consideration. The empirical storm-time ionospheric correction model (STORM) was used to predict foF2 in two different ways: scaling both the hourly median prediction provided by IRI (STORM_foF2MED,IRI model), and the foF2QT values (STORM_foF2QT model) from each local station. The comparison between the performance of STORM_foF2MED,IRI, STORM_foF2QT, IFELM, and the foF2QT values, was made on the basis of root mean square deviation (r.m.s.) for a large number of periods characterized by moderate, disturbed, and very disturbed geomagnetic activity. The results showed that the 13 IFELM perform much better than STORM_foF2,sub>MED,IRI and STORM_foF2QT especially in the eastern part of the European area during the summer months (May, June, July, and August) and equinoctial months (March, April, September, and October) under disturbed and very disturbed geomagnetic conditions, respectively

  18. Nuclear criticality safety guide

    SciTech Connect

    Pruvost, N.L.; Paxton, H.C.

    1996-09-01

    This technical reference document cites information related to nuclear criticality safety principles, experience, and practice. The document also provides general guidance for criticality safety personnel and regulators.

  19. Critical Access Hospitals (CAH)

    MedlinePlus

    ... use requirements for Critical Access Hospitals related to Electronic Health Records (EHRs)? Critical Access Hospital (CAH) are eligible for Electronic Health Record (EHR) incentive payments and can receive ...

  20. Productive criticism. Part 1: Criticism that works.

    PubMed

    Weisinger, H D

    1995-01-01

    Criticism affects almost all aspects of your job: the quality of work you do, how you feel about your performance, and your relationships with your boss, coworkers, and subordinates. Used productively, criticism is a powerful tool that helps you improve your work, enhance your working relationships, increase your job satisfaction, and achieve better overall results. Improperly used, it impedes performance, demoralizes you, discourages you from wanting to try again, and creates friction in the workplace. In short, the ability to give and take criticism significantly determines how well you do on the job. In Part I, we will examine the traditional negative approach to criticism and develop new management tools to turn criticism into an opportunity for growth and education. By explaining new evaluation and communication techniques, we will show the reader how to use productive criticism to increase job performance and satisfaction.

  1. Critical Thinking Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Word's Worth: A Quarterly Newsletter of the Lifelong Learning Network, 1998

    1998-01-01

    This issue of a quarterly newsletter focuses on the theme of critical thinking skills. "Critical Thinking Skills: An Interview with Dr. Richard Paul" (Barbara Christopher) is the text of an interview in which the director of research at Sonoma State University's Center for Critical Thinking examines the meaning of critical thinking and…

  2. A Critical Humanist Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magill, Kevin; Rodriguez, Arturo

    2015-01-01

    This essay is a critical humanist discussion of curriculum; a departure from the technicist view of education [education meant to support a global capitalist economy] and an analysis of curriculum considering critical humanism, political economy and critical race theory among other modes of critical analysis and inquiry. Our discussion supports a…

  3. Revalorizing the Critical Attitude for Critical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amsler, Sarah S.

    2011-01-01

    This article argues that at a moment of crisis in education, the defence of critical pedagogy is vitally important. However, it also suggests that such a defence should be more than a "cri de coeur" that asserts principles and methods of criticality against those of neoliberal or conservative education policy. Narratives of a totalising "crisis of…

  4. Being Critical of Criticality in the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Beggs, John M.; Timme, Nicholas

    2012-01-01

    Relatively recent work has reported that networks of neurons can produce avalanches of activity whose sizes follow a power law distribution. This suggests that these networks may be operating near a critical point, poised between a phase where activity rapidly dies out and a phase where activity is amplified over time. The hypothesis that the electrical activity of neural networks in the brain is critical is potentially important, as many simulations suggest that information processing functions would be optimized at the critical point. This hypothesis, however, is still controversial. Here we will explain the concept of criticality and review the substantial objections to the criticality hypothesis raised by skeptics. Points and counter points are presented in dialog form. PMID:22701101

  5. What makes critical-solvent processes work

    SciTech Connect

    Brule, M.R.; Corbett, R.W.

    1984-06-01

    Critical-solvent processing (sometimes called supercritical-gas extraction) is an ongoing technology based on phase-equilibrium phenomena in the critical region. Many new practical applications of critical-solvent processing are being conceived and implemented in the food, drug and chemical industries. The advantages afforded by critical-solvent processing in performing difficult separations such as caffeine from coffee, nicotine from tobacco, chemotherapeutic drugs from plants, and chemical feedstocks from petroleum and synfuels residua have been realized just in the last decade or so.

  6. Anomalous critical fields in quantum critical superconductors

    PubMed Central

    Putzke, C.; Walmsley, P.; Fletcher, J. D.; Malone, L.; Vignolles, D.; Proust, C.; Badoux, S.; See, P.; Beere, H. E.; Ritchie, D. A.; Kasahara, S.; Mizukami, Y.; Shibauchi, T.; Matsuda, Y.; Carrington, A.

    2014-01-01

    Fluctuations around an antiferromagnetic quantum critical point (QCP) are believed to lead to unconventional superconductivity and in some cases to high-temperature superconductivity. However, the exact mechanism by which this occurs remains poorly understood. The iron-pnictide superconductor BaFe2(As1−xPx)2 is perhaps the clearest example to date of a high-temperature quantum critical superconductor, and so it is a particularly suitable system to study how the quantum critical fluctuations affect the superconducting state. Here we show that the proximity of the QCP yields unexpected anomalies in the superconducting critical fields. We find that both the lower and upper critical fields do not follow the behaviour, predicted by conventional theory, resulting from the observed mass enhancement near the QCP. Our results imply that the energy of superconducting vortices is enhanced, possibly due to a microscopic mixing of antiferromagnetism and superconductivity, suggesting that a highly unusual vortex state is realized in quantum critical superconductors. PMID:25477044

  7. Toward critical bioethics.

    PubMed

    Árnason, Vilhjálmur

    2015-04-01

    This article deals with the question as to what makes bioethics a critical discipline. It considers different senses of criticism and evaluates their strengths and weaknesses. A primary method in bioethics as a philosophical discipline is critical thinking, which implies critical evaluation of concepts, positions, and arguments. It is argued that the type of analytical criticism that restricts its critical role to critical thinking of this type often suffers from other intellectual flaws. Three examples are taken to demonstrate this: premature criticism, uncritical self-understanding of theoretical assumptions, and narrow framing of bioethical issues. Such flaws can lead both to unfair treatment of authors and to uncritical discussion of topics. In this context, the article makes use of Häyry's analysis of different rationalities in bioethical approaches and argues for the need to recognize the importance of communicative rationality for critical bioethics. A radically different critical approach in bioethics, rooted in social theory, focuses on analyses of power relations neglected in mainstream critical thinking. It is argued that, although this kind of criticism provides an important alternative in bioethics, it suffers from other shortcomings that are rooted in a lack of normative dimensions. In order to complement these approaches and counter their shortcomings, there is a need for a bioethics enlightened by critical hermeneutics. Such hermeneutic bioethics is aware of its own assumptions, places the issues in a wide context, and reflects critically on the power relations that stand in the way of understanding them. Moreover, such an approach is dialogical, which provides both a critical exercise of speech and a normative dimension implied in the free exchange of reasons and arguments. This discussion is framed by Hedgecoe's argument that critical bioethics needs four elements: to be empirically rooted, theory challenging, reflexive, and politely skeptical.

  8. Poetry: Sources for Criticism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Noate, Judith, Comp.

    This handout is a guide to library resources in the J. Murrey Atkins Library at the University of North Carolina-Charlotte for the criticism of poetry. The guide enables the reader to find sources of criticism on poetry, including critical articles and essays about single poems, or writings on the work of a single author. The guide's sections…

  9. Teaching Critical Reflection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    Despite long-standing commitment to the notion of critical reflection across the healthcare professions it is unusual for critical theory and practice to be taught as explicit subjects in healthcare higher education. There is evidence to show that reflective techniques such as critical portfolios and reflective diaries can help students to…

  10. Creating a Critical Thinker

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piergiovanni, Polly R.

    2014-01-01

    A college education is expected to improve students' critical thinking skills. Keeping students active in class--through writing activities and class discussion--has been shown to help students think critically. In this article, creative hands-on activities, which are common in engineering courses, are shown to improve students' critical thinking…

  11. Foundations for Critical Thinking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bers, Trudy; Chun, Marc; Daly, William T.; Harrington, Christine; Tobolowsky, Barbara F.

    2015-01-01

    "Foundations for Critical Thinking" explores the landscape of critical-thinking skill development and pedagogy through foundational chapters and institutional case studies involving a range of students in diverse settings. By establishing a link between active learning and improved critical thinking, this resource encourages all higher…

  12. Reconceptualising Critical Digital Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pangrazio, Luciana

    2016-01-01

    While it has proved a useful concept during the past 20 years, the notion of "critical digital literacy" requires rethinking in light of the fast-changing nature of young people's digital practices. This paper contrasts long-established notions of "critical digital literacy" (based primarily around the critical consumption of…

  13. Reimagining Critical Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rexhepi, Jevdet; Torres, Carlos Alberto

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses Critical Theory, a model of theorizing in the field of the political sociology of education. We argue for a "reimagined" Critical Theory to herald an empowering, liberatory education that fosters curiosity and critical thinking, and a means for successful bottom-up, top-down political engagement. We present arguments…

  14. Theory of critical phenomena in fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reatto, L.; Meroni, A.; Parola, A.

    1990-12-01

    The authors discuss a differential approach to the theory of fluids, the hierarchical reference theory, which, above the critical temperature, has been shown to be (i) as accurate as the most widespread theories of liquid state in the high density region and (ii) able to reproduce the renormalization group results in the critical region. In this region it predicts both the universal and the non-universal quantities. The authors have studied the Lennard-Jones fluid in detail but the method can be directly applied to more realistic interactions between molecules. The treatment of temperatures below the critical one presents some additional difficulties due to the presence of the inhomogeneous two-phase region. Preliminary results indicate that the theory gives the coexistence curve with the correct scaling behaviour without any need for an ad hoc Maxwell construction. The extension of the formalism to binary mixtures is under way.

  15. Volumetric behavior of the {CO2 (1) + C2H6 (2)} system in the subcritical (T = 293.15 K), critical, and supercritical (T = 308.15 K) regions.

    PubMed

    Gil, Laura; Martínez-López, José F; Artal, Manuela; Blanco, Sofía T; Muñoz Embid, José; Fernández, Javier; Otín, Santos; Velasco, Inmaculada

    2010-04-29

    The volumetric behavior for the {CO2 (1) + C2H6 (2)} system has been studied. Density measurements of {CO2 (1) + C2H6 (2)} binary mixtures at 293.15 and 308.15 K, at several pressures and compositions, and density measurements for infinitely dilute solutions at 304.21 and 308.15 K were carried out using an Anton Paar DMA 512-P vibrating-tube densimeter calibrated with the forced path mechanical calibration model. The mean relative standard deviation of density, s(rho)(r), was estimated to be better than 0.1%, and the uncertainties in temperature and pressure were estimated as +/-0.01 K and +/-0.001 MPa, respectively. In the experimental setup, an uncertainty in the mole fraction of u(x(j)) = +/-0.0015 has been achieved. Other properties related to P-rho-T-x data such as the compressibility factor, Z, excess molar volumes, V(m)(E), and partial molar volumes, V(i) and V(i)(infinity) have been calculated. The volumetric behavior has been compared with literature data and with that obtained from the PC-SAFT EoS rescaled parameters; these parameters have been obtained from our previous experimental values for the critical temperature and pressure of pure compounds. The value for the Krichevskii parameter, A(Kr), was obtained from the experimental density data for infinitely dilute solutions measured in this work, and it has been compared with that obtained from critical properties. Structural properties such as direct and total correlation function integrals and cluster size were calculated using the Krichevskii function concept.

  16. Tandem repeat polymers of a critical region of the human interferon-beta promoter exhibit a marked constitutive activity and enhanced responsiveness to transcriptional regulators in transfected HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Dron, M; Rebouillat, D; Tovey, M G

    1992-10-01

    Multiple copy tandem repeats polymers of an authentic 30-bp region of the human interferon-beta (IFN-beta) promoter between positions-91 to -62 relative to the cap site or the hexanucleotide GAAAGT derived from this region, both acted as strong constitutive regulatory elements in transfected HeLa cells. Such polymers were unresponsive to treatment with IFN-alpha despite their considerable homology with the IFN-responsive elements of other genes but were highly responsive to treatment of HeLa cells with IFN-gamma. Virus induction of HeLa cells transfected with polymers of the 30-bp region linked to a CAT gene increased the activity of the reporter gene 500- to 2,000-fold over baseline levels. Treatment with IFN-alpha prior to virus induction did not increase further CAT activity. Cotransfection of HeLa cells with the CAT gene under the control of a 12-element tandem repeat polymer of the human IFN-beta promoter and an expression vector for the IRF-1 transcriptional activator markedly increased CAT activity while cotransfection of HeLa cells with the IFN-beta construct together with an expression vector for the transcriptional regulator IRF-2 markedly decreased CAT activity relative to cells transfected with the IFN-beta polymer alone.

  17. Refined genetic mapping of autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa locus RP18 reduces the critical region to 2 cM between D1S442 and D1S2858 on chromosome 1q.

    PubMed

    Xu, S Y; Rosenberg, T; Gal, A

    1998-04-01

    Linkage analysis was performed on a large Danish family to refine the position of RP18, the locus for autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa, mapped previously between D1S534 and D1S305 in chromosome 1p13-q21. We genotyped the family members for five microsatellite-type DNA polymorphisms and mapped RP18 between D1S422 and D1S2858 to a region of less than 2 cM. No obvious candidate gene has yet been assigned to the chromosomal interval defined here.

  18. About Region 8’s Central Regional Laboratory

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Region 8 laboratory plays a critical role in protecting people's health and the environment through the analysis of air, water, soil, and biota samples (plant, fish, and occasionally, mammalian tissue).

  19. Critical Psychologies for Critical Health Literacies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corcoran, Tim

    2014-01-01

    Health education is largely informed by psychological theories and practices that pursue reductionist views of people learning. However, critical attention is moving to understand health in ways that reconsider relationships to context and the forms of life within which everyday living takes place. This shift is apparent in theoretical…

  20. Criticality Model Report

    SciTech Connect

    J.M. Scaglione

    2003-03-12

    The purpose of the ''Criticality Model Report'' is to validate the MCNP (CRWMS M&O 1998h) code's ability to accurately predict the effective neutron multiplication factor (k{sub eff}) for a range of conditions spanned by various critical configurations representative of the potential configurations commercial reactor assemblies stored in a waste package may take. Results of this work are an indication of the accuracy of MCNP for calculating eigenvalues, which will be used as input for criticality analyses for spent nuclear fuel (SNF) storage at the proposed Monitored Geologic Repository. The scope of this report is to document the development and validation of the criticality model. The scope of the criticality model is only applicable to commercial pressurized water reactor fuel. Valid ranges are established as part of the validation of the criticality model. This model activity follows the description in BSC (2002a).

  1. Critical incident reporting systems.

    PubMed

    Ahluwalia, Jag; Marriott, Lin

    2005-02-01

    Approximately 10% of all hospital admissions are complicated by critical incidents in which harm is caused to the patient - this amounts to more than 850,000 incidents annually. Critical incident reporting (CIR) systems refer to the structured reporting, collation and analysis of such incidents. This article describes the attributes required for an effective CIR system. Example neonatal trigger events and a management pathway for handling a critical incident report are described. The benefits and limitations of CIR systems, reactive and prospective approaches to the analysis of actual or potential critical incidents and the assessment of risk are also reviewed. Individual human error is but one contributor in the majority of critical incidents. Recognition of this and the fostering of an organisational culture that views critical incident reports as an opportunity to learn and to improve future patient care is vital if CIR systems are to be effective.

  2. Critical Viscosity of Xenon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The Critical Viscosity of Xenon Experiment (CVX-2) on the STS-107 Research 1 mission in 2002 will measure the viscous behavior of xenon, a heavy inert gas used in flash lamps and ion rocket engines, at its critical point. Because xenon near the critical point will collapse under its own weight, experiments on Earth (green line) are limited as they get closer (toward the left) to the critical point. CVX in the microgravity of space (red line) moved into unmeasured territory that scientists had not been able to reach.

  3. Critical Anomalies of Two SN1 Hydrolysis Reactions in Critical Binary Solutions.

    PubMed

    Hao, Zhiguo; Yin, Handi; Zheng, Peizhu; Zhao, Jihua; Shen, Weiguo

    2015-08-20

    Rates of SN1 hydrolysis reactions for 2-chloro-2-methylbutane in the critical solution of isobutyric acid + water and for 2-bromo-2-methylpropane in the critical solution of triethylamine + water in the one-phase region and at various temperatures have been determined respectively by conductance measurements. It was found that the reaction rates at different temperatures for those two SN1 reactions were well described by the Arrhenius equation in the noncritical region, whereas near the critical points the critical slowing down was clearly detected. These results are inconsistent with a previous report in the literature (J. Phys. Chem. A 2003, 107, 8435 - 8443). Reanalyzing the literature data, we found that if an Arrhenius equation appropriate to either the one-phase region or the two-phase region being examined was used as the background, a critical slowing down rather than a speeding up was detected for the reaction in both the one-phase region and the two-phase region. The experimental data from different sources were fitted with a simplified crossover formalism characterizing the critical effect on the reactions to determine the critical slowing down exponents, which were found to be about 0.04, showing that only a dynamic critical slowing down could be detected for these reaction systems. This phenomenon was attributed to the fact that the SN1 hydrolysis reaction is neither a first-order nor a pseudo-first-order reaction in the reverse direction and the kinetic measurements were carried out in a region quite far from the equilibrium of the reactions.

  4. Two critical tests for the Critical Point earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzanis, A.; Vallianatos, F.

    2003-04-01

    It has been credibly argued that the earthquake generation process is a critical phenomenon culminating with a large event that corresponds to some critical point. In this view, a great earthquake represents the end of a cycle on its associated fault network and the beginning of a new one. The dynamic organization of the fault network evolves as the cycle progresses and a great earthquake becomes more probable, thereby rendering possible the prediction of the cycle’s end by monitoring the approach of the fault network toward a critical state. This process may be described by a power-law time-to-failure scaling of the cumulative seismic release rate. Observational evidence has confirmed the power-law scaling in many cases and has empirically determined that the critical exponent in the power law is typically of the order n=0.3. There are also two theoretical predictions for the value of the critical exponent. Ben-Zion and Lyakhovsky (Pure appl. geophys., 159, 2385-2412, 2002) give n=1/3. Rundle et al. (Pure appl. geophys., 157, 2165-2182, 2000) show that the power-law activation associated with a spinodal instability is essentially identical to the power-law acceleration of Benioff strain observed prior to earthquakes; in this case n=0.25. More recently, the CP model has gained support from the development of more dependable models of regional seismicity with realistic fault geometry that show accelerating seismicity before large events. Essentially, these models involve stress transfer to the fault network during the cycle such, that the region of accelerating seismicity will scale with the size of the culminating event, as for instance in Bowman and King (Geophys. Res. Let., 38, 4039-4042, 2001). It is thus possible to understand the observed characteristics of distributed accelerating seismicity in terms of a simple process of increasing tectonic stress in a region already subjected to stress inhomogeneities at all scale lengths. Then, the region of

  5. Putting the Critical Back in Critical Infrastructure

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    anonymous online survey to capture the perceptions and views of critical infrastructure professionals across the nation. The survey included an evaluation...on the perceptions and views of the business process, program maturity and implementation, as well as the current state of outcomes. This thesis...foundational nature of this work. A formative program evaluation was conducted through an anonymous online survey to capture the perceptions and views of

  6. Robust Critical Point Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Bhatia, Harsh

    2016-07-28

    Robust Critical Point Detection is a software to compute critical points in a 2D or 3D vector field robustly. The software was developed as a part of the author's work at the lab as a Phd student under Livermore Scholar Program (now called Livermore Graduate Scholar Program).

  7. CRITICAL LOADS METHODS

    EPA Science Inventory

    I summarize the results of an interagency project that 1) defines a generic approach to quantifying and reporting critical loads, and 2) exercises that generic approach by examining a data rich system -- the critical loads of sulfur deposition and it's effect on the chronic acidi...

  8. Critical Care Team

    MedlinePlus

    ... patient, the family and the care team. A registered nurse (RN) who is certified in critical care is ... certified by the American Association of Critical-Care Nurses. Pharmacist: An expert in ... Registered dietitian: A caregiver trained and licensed in nutrition ...

  9. Criticism and the Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Paul; Foulke, Robert D.

    1964-01-01

    A revised English curriculum, based upon different kinds of literary criticism, is counseled in this two-part paper. Part 1 identifies four kinds of criticism--formalist, synoptic, extrinsic, and stylistic. A conventional English Curriculum is briefly outlined. Curricular theories are discussed and positive and negative attempts to define…

  10. Against Critical Thinking Pedagogy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayes, David

    2015-01-01

    Critical thinking pedagogy is misguided. Ostensibly a cure for narrowness of thought, by using the emotions appropriate to conflict, it names only one mode of relation to material among many others. Ostensibly a cure for fallacies, critical thinking tends to dishonesty in practice because it habitually leaps to premature ideas of what the object…

  11. The Need for Critics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Purves, Alan C.

    1994-01-01

    Responds to an article in the same issue of this journal about educational criticism as a form of qualitative inquiry. Argues that research in education has become a dead end. Agrees in the main with the article, but finds its view of criticism somewhat limited. Discusses the classroom itself as hypertext. (SR)

  12. Rethinking Critical Thinking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Downs, Christopher J.

    2008-01-01

    Critical thinking is of primary importance in higher education, yet the concept remains slippery and the skill elusive. The author argues that most current critical thinking textbooks are out of line with the seminal work of John Dewey. Rather than logical argument and justification, it is suggested that carefulness, open-mindedness and creativity…

  13. Critical Pedagogy and Faith

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neumann, Jacob W.

    2011-01-01

    Critical pedagogy has often been linked in the literature to faith traditions such as liberation theology, usually with the intent of improving or redirecting it. While recognizing and drawing from those previous linkages, Jacob Neumann goes further in this essay and develops the thesis that critical pedagogy can not just benefit from a connection…

  14. Critical Chain Exercises

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doyle, John Kevin

    2010-01-01

    Critical Chains project management focuses on holding buffers at the project level vs. task level, and managing buffers as a project resource. A number of studies have shown that Critical Chain project management can significantly improve organizational schedule fidelity (i.e., improve the proportion of projects delivered on time) and reduce…

  15. Critical Literacy: Foundational Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luke, Allan

    2012-01-01

    The term "critical literacy" refers to use of the technologies of print and other media of communication to analyze, critique, and transform the norms, rule systems, and practices governing the social fields of everyday life (A. Luke, 2004). Since Freire's (1970) educational projects in Brazil, approaches to critical literacy have been…

  16. A Passage into Critical Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynn, Steven

    1990-01-01

    Shows how a single passage might be handled by New Criticism, structuralism, deconstructionism, psychological criticism, and feminist criticism. Concludes that a plurality of critical approaches is better than a unity of approach. (RS)

  17. The Possibility of Film Criticism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poague, Leland; Cadbury, William

    1989-01-01

    Examines the role of critical language in film criticism. Compares and contrasts Monroe Beardsley's philosophy on film aesthetics with the New Criticism. Outlines some of the contributions Beardsley has made to the study of film criticism. (KM)

  18. A holographic critical point

    SciTech Connect

    DeWolfe, Oliver; Rosen, Christopher; Gubser, Steven S.

    2011-04-15

    We numerically construct a family of five-dimensional black holes exhibiting a line of first-order phase transitions terminating at a critical point at finite chemical potential and temperature. These black holes are constructed so that the equation of state and baryon susceptibilities approximately match QCD lattice data at vanishing chemical potential. The critical end point in the particular model we consider has temperature 143 MeV and chemical potential 783 MeV. Critical exponents are calculated, with results that are consistent with mean-field scaling relations.

  19. Mission Critical Networking

    SciTech Connect

    Eltoweissy, Mohamed Y.; Du, David H.C.; Gerla, Mario; Giordano, Silvia; Gouda, Mohamed; Schulzrinne, Henning; Youssef, Moustafa

    2010-06-01

    Mission-Critical Networking (MCN) refers to networking for application domains where life or livelihood may be at risk. Typical application domains for MCN include critical infrastructure protection and operation, emergency and crisis intervention, healthcare services, and military operations. Such networking is essential for safety, security and economic vitality in our complex world characterized by uncertainty, heterogeneity, emergent behaviors, and the need for reliable and timely response. MCN comprise networking technology, infrastructures and services that may alleviate the risk and directly enable and enhance connectivity for mission-critical information exchange among diverse, widely dispersed, mobile users.

  20. Complexity, contingency, and criticality.

    PubMed Central

    Bak, P; Paczuski, M

    1995-01-01

    Complexity originates from the tendency of large dynamical systems to organize themselves into a critical state, with avalanches or "punctuations" of all sizes. In the critical state, events which would otherwise be uncoupled become correlated. The apparent, historical contingency in many sciences, including geology, biology, and economics, finds a natural interpretation as a self-organized critical phenomenon. These ideas are discussed in the context of simple mathematical models of sandpiles and biological evolution. Insights are gained not only from numerical simulations but also from rigorous mathematical analysis. Images Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:11607561

  1. Semiholographic Quantum Criticality

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, Kristan

    2011-12-02

    We identify the near-critical effective theory (EFT) for a wide class of low-temperature phase transitions found via holography. The EFT is of the semiholographic type and describes both holographic Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless and second-order transitions with nontrivial scaling. It is a simple generalization of the Ginzburg-Landau-Wilson paradigm to systems with an emergent (or hidden) conformal sector. Having identified the near-critical EFT, we explore its basic phenomenology by computing critical exponents and low-frequency correlators.

  2. Greening critical care

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Climate change and environmental stewardship are phrases that have been defining the past few decades and promoting change in our societies. The sensitivities of intensive care as a specialty make the process of greening an intensive care unit a challenge, but not one that is insurmountable. This paper discusses opportunities for critical care to reduce its environmental impact and provide a framework change. The article includes suggestions of what can be done as an individual, as a unit and as a hospital. Generally, practices in critical care are accepted without questioning the environmental consequences. We believe it is time for change, and critical care should give environmental stewardship a higher priority. PMID:21635700

  3. Nutrition in critical care.

    PubMed

    Bartlett, Robert H; Dechert, Ronald E

    2011-06-01

    Critical care has evolved from a prolonged recovery room stay for cardiac surgery patients to a full medical and nursing specialty in the last 5 decades. The ability to feed patients who cannot eat has evolved from impossible to routine clinical practice in the last 4 decades. Nutrition in critically ill patients based on measurement of metabolism has evolved from a research activity to clinical practice in the last 3 decades. The authors have been involved in this evolution and this article discusses past, present, and likely future practices in nutrition in critically ill patients.

  4. Investigating Cell Criticality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serra, R.; Villani, M.; Damiani, C.; Graudenzi, A.; Ingrami, P.; Colacci, A.

    Random Boolean networks provide a way to give a precise meaning to the notion that living beings are in a critical state. Some phenomena which are observed in real biological systems (distribution of "avalanches" in gene knock-out experiments) can be modeled using random Boolean networks, and the results can be analytically proven to depend upon the Derrida parameter, which also determines whether the network is critical. By comparing observed and simulated data one can then draw inferences about the criticality of biological cells, although with some care because of the limited number of experimental observations. The relationship between the criticality of a single network and that of a set of interacting networks, which simulate a tissue or a bacterial colony, is also analyzed by computer simulations.

  5. Critical Care Statistics

    MedlinePlus

    ... in critically ill patient groups, such as Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) IV for adult ... unit length of stay: benchmarking based on Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) IV. Crit Care ...

  6. About critical thinking.

    PubMed

    Hynes, Patricia; Bennett, Jocelyn

    2004-01-01

    Although a universally accepted definition of critical thinking has yet to be determined, there is much discussion in the literature about its meaning and, in particular, how it can be expressed in professional nursing practice. The simultaneous use of related terms such as reflective thinking, problem solving and clinical decision-making contributes to the lack of clarity around exactly what critical thinking is and, subsequently, how it can be taught and evaluated in the clinical setting. The purpose of this article is to provide an overview of the various components of critical thinking and to discuss barriers, facilitators and strategies that can enhance nurses' attainment of this core competency. Few would argue that registered nurses today must be able to think critically in order to effectively communicate a nursing perspective that reflects a meaningful clinical grasp and preparedness to act.

  7. The Critical Thinking Workout.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Masters, Terry McDaniel

    1991-01-01

    Presents a critical thinking exercise program, modeled on a physical exercise workout, for elementary teachers to use in the classroom. It includes warm-up exercises, a more strenuous workout, and a cool-down period for the brain. (SM)

  8. Art Criticism and Reading.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feldman, Edmund Burke; Woods, Don

    1981-01-01

    The authors review a body of theory and accumulating evidence which suggests that critical study of the arts facilitates the development of cognitive skills, including those essential to reading. (Author/SJL)

  9. Chronic Critical Illness

    MedlinePlus

    ... ICU) on a breathing machine (mechanical ventilator or respirator) for many days, this information about chronic critical ... a Tracheotomy? A breathing machine (mechanical ventilator or respirator) helps the lungs breathe and provides oxygen. When ...

  10. Heavy fermion quantum criticality.

    PubMed

    Nazario, Zaira; Santiago, David I

    2008-09-26

    During the last few years, investigations of rare-earth materials have made clear that heavy fermion quantum criticality exhibits novel physics not fully understood. In this work, we write for the first time the effective action describing the low energy physics of the system. The f fermions are replaced by a dynamical scalar field whose nonzero expected value corresponds to the heavy fermion phase. The effective theory is amenable to numerical studies as it is bosonic, circumventing the fermion sign problem. Via effective action techniques, renormalization group studies, and Callan-Symanzik resummations, we describe the heavy fermion criticality and predict the heavy fermion critical dynamical susceptibility and critical specific heat. The specific heat coefficient exponent we obtain (0.39) is in excellent agreement with the experimental result at low temperatures (0.4).

  11. Critical chemotactic collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lushnikov, Pavel M.

    2010-04-01

    A Keller-Segel model describes macroscopic dynamics of bacterial colonies and biological cells as well as dynamics of a gas of self-gravitating Brownian particles. Bacteria secret chemical which attracts other bacteria so that they move towards chemical gradient creating nonlocal attraction between bacteria. If bacterial (or Brownian particle) density exceeds a critical value then the density collapses (blows up) in a finite time which corresponds to bacterial aggregation or gravitational collapse. Collapse in the Keller-Segel model has striking qualitative similarities with a nonlinear Schrödinger equation including critical collapse in two dimensions and supercritical collapse in three dimensions. A self-similar solution near blow up point is studied in the critical two-dimensional case and it has a form of a rescaled steady state solution which contains a critical number of bacteria. Time dependence of scaling of that solution has square root scaling law with logarithmic modification.

  12. Critical Limb Ischemia (CLI)

    MedlinePlus

    ... High blood pressure Family history of vascular disease Warning Signs You may have critical limb ischemia if ... blood flow to the limb. Other treatments include laser atherectomy, where small bits of plaque are vaporized ...

  13. Critical Viscosity of Xenon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The Critical Viscosity of Xenon Experiment (CVX-2) on the STS-107 Research 1 mission in 2002 will measure the viscous behavior of xenon, a heavy inert gas used in flash lamps and ion rocket engines, at its critical point. Shear thirning will cause a normally viscous fluid -- such as pie filling or whipped cream -- to deform and flow more readily under high shear conditions. In shear thinning, a pocket of fluid will deform and move one edge forward, as depicted here.

  14. Edge Diffraction Coefficients around Critical Rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fradkin, L.; Harmer, M.; Darmon, M.

    2014-04-01

    The classical GTD (Geometrical Theory of Diffraction) gives a recipe, based on high-frequency asymptotics, for calculating edge diffraction coefficients in the geometrical regions where only diffracted waves propagate. The Uniform GTD extends this recipe to transition zones between irradiated and silent regions, known as penumbra. For many industrial materials, e.g. steels, and frequencies utlized in industrial ultrasonic transducers, that is, around 5 MHz, asymptotics suggested for description of geometrical regions supporting the head waves or transition regions surrounding their boundaries, known as critical rays, prove unsatisfactory. We present a numerical extension of GTD, which is based on a regularized, variable step Simpson's method for evaluating the edge diffraction coefficients in the regions of interference between head waves, diffracted waves and/or reflected waves. In mathematical terms, these are the regions of coalescence of three critical points - a branch point, stationary point and/or pole, respectively. We show that away from the shadow boundaries, near the critical rays the GTD still produces correct values of the edge diffraction coefficients.

  15. DEVELOPMENT OF PROTOCOLS TO IDENTIFY CRITICAL ECOSYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Healthy, functioning ecosystems are critical to the sustainability of human and natural communities, but the identification of areas of healthy ecosystems in an area as large as Region 5 is difficult due to time and information constraints. Geographic Information Systems (GIS) a...

  16. Erik Erikson: critical times, critical theory.

    PubMed

    Douvan, E

    1997-01-01

    The work and legacy of Erik Erikson are described in this brief outline of his career, his theories, and his impact on psychoanalysis, psychology, history, and the broader culture. His conception of the adolescent task-weaving internal tastes, talents, and values together with elements of one's life history and the demands of one's culture into a coherent identity-has had profound effects on developmental psychology and the way in which sophisticated youth construct and describe their lives. His extension of development through adulthood and old age established the field of life course development. His emphasis on the impact of history and culture on development was a critical element in the developing field of ego psychology. Many of his major contributions can be fruitfully understood in the context of his personal history and individual qualities.

  17. A primer on criticality safety

    DOE PAGES

    Costa, David A.; Cournoyer, Michael E.; Merhege, James F.; ...

    2017-05-01

    Criticality is the state of a nuclear chain reacting medium when the chain reaction is just self-sustaining (or critical). Criticality is dependent on nine interrelated parameters. Moreover, we design criticality safety controls in order to constrain these parameters to minimize fissions and maximize neutron leakage and absorption in other materials, which makes criticality more difficult or impossible to achieve. We present the consequences of criticality accidents are discussed, the nine interrelated parameters that combine to affect criticality are described, and criticality safety controls used to minimize the likelihood of a criticality accident are presented.

  18. A primer on criticality safety

    SciTech Connect

    Costa, David Alan; Cournoyer, Michael Edward; Garcia, Vincent Elmer; Sandoval, Arnold M.; Merhege, James Fidel Jr.

    2016-12-24

    Criticality is the state of a nuclear chain reacting medium when the chain reaction is just self-sustaining (or critical). Criticality is dependent on nine interrelated parameters. Moreover, we design criticality safety controls in order to constrain these parameters to minimize fissions and maximize neutron leakage and absorption in other materials, which makes criticality more difficult or impossible to achieve. We present the consequences of criticality accidents are discussed, the nine interrelated parameters that combine to affect criticality are described, and criticality safety controls used to minimize the likelihood of a criticality accident are presented.

  19. Minimum Critical Values Study

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, P.B.

    2005-07-11

    This report provides minimum critical values for various 30-cm water-reflected uranium and plutonium oxide and nitrate aqueous mixtures as calculated by the SCALE CSAS1X sequence using the 238-group ENDF/B-V neutron cross-section library. The minimum values were determined through parametric searches in one-dimensional geometry. The calculations have been performed to obtain the minimum values: critical volume and mass for spheres, critical radius for cylinders, critical thickness for slabs, and minimum critical concentration (infinite geometry) for the following homogeneous mixtures: (1) UO{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O for 3, 4, 5, 20, and 100 wt % {sup 235}U; (2) UNH for 3, 4, 5, 20, and 100 wt % {sup 235}U; (3) PuO{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O for 100/0/0, 95/5/0, 90/5/5, 80/10/10, and 71/17/11/1 wt % of {sup 239}Pu/{sup 240}Pu/{sup 241}Pu(/{sup 242}Pu); and (4) PuNH for 100/0/0, 95/5/0, 90/5/5, 80/10/10, and 71/17/11/1 wt % of {sup 239}Pu/{sup 240}Pu/{sup 241}Pu(/{sup 242}Pu). All bounding surfaces were fully reflected by 30 cm of H{sub 2}O.

  20. Predictability of critical transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaozhu; Kuehn, Christian; Hallerberg, Sarah

    2015-11-01

    Critical transitions in multistable systems have been discussed as models for a variety of phenomena ranging from the extinctions of species to socioeconomic changes and climate transitions between ice ages and warm ages. From bifurcation theory we can expect certain critical transitions to be preceded by a decreased recovery from external perturbations. The consequences of this critical slowing down have been observed as an increase in variance and autocorrelation prior to the transition. However, especially in the presence of noise, it is not clear whether these changes in observation variables are statistically relevant such that they could be used as indicators for critical transitions. In this contribution we investigate the predictability of critical transitions in conceptual models. We study the quadratic integrate-and-fire model and the van der Pol model under the influence of external noise. We focus especially on the statistical analysis of the success of predictions and the overall predictability of the system. The performance of different indicator variables turns out to be dependent on the specific model under study and the conditions of accessing it. Furthermore, we study the influence of the magnitude of transitions on the predictive performance.

  1. Flow dichroism in critical colloidal fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Lenstra, T. A. J.; Dhont, J. K. G.

    2001-06-01

    Due to long-range correlations and slow dynamics of concentration fluctuations in the vicinity of the gas-liquid critical point, shear flow is very effective in distorting the microstructure of near-critical fluids. The anisotropic nature of the shear-field renders the microstructure highly anisotropic, leading to dichroism. Experiments on the dichroic behavior can thus be used to test theoretical predictions on microstructural order under shear flow conditions. We performed both static and dynamic dichroism and turbidity measurements on a colloid-polymer mixture, existing of silica spheres (radius 51 nm) and polydimethylsiloxane polymer (molar weight 204 kg/mol). Sufficiently far away from the critical point, in the mean-field region, the experimental data are in good agreement with theory. Very close to the critical point, beyond mean field, for which no theory exists yet, an unexpected decrease of dichroism on approach of the critical point is observed. Moreover, we do not observe critical slowing down of shear-induced dichroism, right up to the critical point, in contrast to the turbidity.

  2. Critical Management in Knowledge Organizations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macpherson, Reynold

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to invite educational managers and management educators to reflect critically on practice. Design/methodology/approach: Using the point of Socrates' death, the paper suggests ways of reflecting on actions using ethically-critical, socially-critical, environmentally-critical, politically-critical and…

  3. The Anatomy of Critical Discourse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenfield, Lawrence W.

    1968-01-01

    Critical discourse is best understood when its logical features are identified. An examination of the basic elements and modes of rhetorical criticism (a form of critical discourse) produces a finite set of options for the critic, thus enabling him to develop a system of alternatives in his critical efforts. For example, by selecting from among…

  4. Morphogenesis at criticality?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krotov, Dmitry; Dubuis, Julien; Gregor, Thomas; Bialek, William

    2014-03-01

    Spatial patterns in the early fruit fly embryo emerge from a network of interactions among transcription factors, the gap genes, driven by maternal inputs. Such networks can exhibit many qualitatively different behaviors, separated by critical surfaces. At criticality, we should observe strong correlations in the fluctuations of different genes around their mean expression levels, a slowing of the dynamics along some but not all directions in the space of possible expression levels, correlations of expression fluctuations over long distances in the embryo, and departures from a Gaussian distribution of these fluctuations. Analysis of recent experiments on the gap genes shows that all these signatures are observed, and that the different signatures are related in ways predicted by theory. While there might be other explanations for these individual phenomena, the confluence of evidence suggests that this genetic network is tuned to criticality.

  5. Critical Viscosity of Xenon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The Critical Viscosity of Xenon Experiment (CVX-2) on the STS-107 Research 1 mission in 2002 will measure the viscous behavior of xenon, a heavy inert gas used in flash lamps and ion rocket engines, at its critical point. The sample cell at the heart of CVX-2 will sit inside a thermostat providing three layers of insulation. The cell itself comprises a copper body that conducts heat efficiently and smoothes out thermal variations that that would destroy the xenon's uniformity. Inside the cell, the oscillating screen viscometer element is supported between two pairs of electrodes that deflect the screen and then measure screen motion.

  6. Critical Viscosity of Xenon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The Critical Viscosity of Xenon Experiment (CVX-2) on the STS-107 Research 1 mission in 2001 will measure the viscous behavior of xenon, a heavy inert gas used in flash lamps and ion rocket engines, at its critical point. The thermostat for CVX sits inside the white cylinder on a support structure that is placed inside a pressure canister. A similar canister holds the electronics and control systems. The CVX-2 arrangement is identical. The principal investigator is Dr. Robert F. Berg (not shown) of the National Institutes of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD. This is a detail view of MSFC 0100143.

  7. From Self-Organized to Extended Criticality

    PubMed Central

    Lovecchio, Elisa; Allegrini, Paolo; Geneston, Elvis; West, Bruce J.; Grigolini, Paolo

    2012-01-01

    We address the issue of criticality that is attracting the attention of an increasing number of neurophysiologists. Our main purpose is to establish the specific nature of some dynamical processes that although physically different, are usually termed as “critical,” and we focus on those characterized by the cooperative interaction of many units. We notice that the term “criticality” has been adopted to denote both noise-induced phase transitions and Self-Organized Criticality (SOC) with no clear connection with the traditional phase transitions, namely the transformation of a thermodynamic system from one state of matter to another. We notice the recent attractive proposal of extended criticality advocated by Bailly and Longo, which is realized through a wide set of critical points rather than emerging as a singularity from a unique value of the control parameter. We study a set of cooperatively firing neurons and we show that for an extended set of interaction couplings the system exhibits a form of temporal complexity similar to that emerging at criticality from ordinary phase transitions. This extended criticality regime is characterized by three main properties: (i) In the ideal limiting case of infinitely large time period, temporal complexity corresponds to Mittag-Leffler complexity; (ii) For large values of the interaction coupling the periodic nature of the process becomes predominant while maintaining to some extent, in the intermediate time asymptotic region, the signature of complexity; (iii) Focusing our attention on firing neuron avalanches, we find two of the popular SOC properties, namely the power indexes 2 and 1.5 respectively for time length and for the intensity of the avalanches. We derive the main conclusion that SOC emerges from extended criticality, thereby explaining the experimental observation of Plenz and Beggs: avalanches occur in time with surprisingly regularity, in apparent conflict with the temporal complexity of physical

  8. Translation as Literary Criticism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    di Stefano, B. Follkart

    1982-01-01

    It is proposed that literary translation is intrinsically an act of literary criticism. This theory is illustrated by discussion of specific problems in translating Sartre's "La Nausee" and Leonard Forest's "Le pays de la Sagouine," especially the use of verb tense. (MSE)

  9. Critical Skills Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education Digest: Essential Readings Condensed for Quick Review, 2010

    2010-01-01

    As the U.S. economy begins to show signs of improvement, executives say they need a workforce fully equipped with skills beyond just the basics of reading, writing, and arithmetic (the three Rs). Skills such as critical thinking and problem solving, communication, collaboration, and creativity and innovation (the four Cs) will become even more…

  10. The Failure of Criticism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodheart, Eugene

    Presenting the argument that contemporary criticism has lost its moral authority (and blaming modernism for that loss), Goodheart focuses on contending spiritual views. In particular he analyzes the dialectic between the Protestant-inspired humanist tradition of Carlyle, Arnold, Ruskin, and Lawrence and the decay of Catholicism represented by…

  11. Talking Critical Thinking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Facione, Peter A.; Facione, Noreen C.

    2007-01-01

    This article presents a scenario in which the dean of the faculty of a fictional college discusses the issue of critical thinking (CT) with other school officials, using their insights into its nature and roots to prepare a course of action to present to the board of trustees. She learns that college graduates need to have strong CT…

  12. Replies to Criticisms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, James R.

    2009-01-01

    In this essay, Hamilton responds to criticisms of his book "The Art of Theater" (Malden, MA: Blackwell, 2007). Acknowledging that he expected that the central proposals in "The Art of Theater" would seem a little strange to philosophers, he reiterates his belief that the three general facts of any theatrical performance are its presentation, its…

  13. Stateline: Critical Mass

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christie, Kathy

    2005-01-01

    In Physics "critical mass" refers to the minimum amount of fissionable material required to sustain a chain reaction. The adoption of state education policy isn't often equated with this concept, but occasionally solutions and ideas seem to gather around a common problem. If the solution at hand is simple, easily understood, and…

  14. Audience, Style and Criticism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pimm, David; Sinclair, Nathalie

    2009-01-01

    The primary focus for this article involves aspects of professional mathematical writing and examines the possibility of a form of literary criticism in relation to it. By means of examples from contemporary style guides for academic articles in mathematics (AMS, MAA), as well as the writing of mathematicians (Hamilton, Dedekind) from earlier…

  15. Deconfined Quantum Critical Points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senthi, T.; Vishwanath, Ashvin; Balents, Leon; Sachdev, Subir; Fisher, Matthew P. A.

    The theory of second-order phase transitions is one of the foundations of modern statistical mechanics and condensed-matter theory. A central concept is the observable order parameter, whose nonzero average value characterizes one or more phases. At large distances and long times, fluctuations of the order parameter(s) are described by a continuum field theory, and these dominate the physics near such phase transitions. We show that near second-order quantum phase transitions, subtle quantum interference effects can invalidate this paradigm, and we present a theory of quantum critical points in a variety of experimentally relevant two-dimensional antiferromagnets. The critical points separate phases characterized by conventional "confining" order parameters. Nevertheless, the critical theory contains an emergent gauge field and "deconfined" degrees of freedom associated with fractionalization of the order parameters. We propose that this paradigm for quantum criticality may be the key to resolving a number of experimental puzzles in correlated electron systems and offer a new perspective on the properties of complex materials.

  16. Critical Technology Accessibility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Academies Press, 2006

    2006-01-01

    In 2003, the Defense Intelligence Agency asked the NRC to form a standing committee to help develop study topics about technology warning. One issue that was identified was the growing dependence on foreign suppliers of critical technology as a result of the increase in globalization of economic activity. Two important questions emerged for study:…

  17. Critical Practice: Teaching "Shakespeare."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mellor, Bronwyn; Patterson, Annette

    2000-01-01

    Describes how the authors taught their students to read "Hamlet" from a critical literacy perspective, analyzing how particular readings of texts and characters are constructed or produced; how they are determined by historical and cultural conventions; analyzing values that various readings support or challenge--rather than trying to…

  18. Critical Thinking Concept Reconstructed

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minter, Mary Kennedy

    2010-01-01

    This paper explores the proposition that teaching of critical thinking (CT) should include: (1) identifying and addressing the many environmental variables acting as barriers to our human thinking, i.e., an open system approach, and (2) utilizing the interrelatedness of the CT building blocks, i.e., creative thinking techniques, levels of…

  19. Quantum Critical Higgs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellazzini, Brando; Csáki, Csaba; Hubisz, Jay; Lee, Seung J.; Serra, Javi; Terning, John

    2016-10-01

    The appearance of the light Higgs boson at the LHC is difficult to explain, particularly in light of naturalness arguments in quantum field theory. However, light scalars can appear in condensed matter systems when parameters (like the amount of doping) are tuned to a critical point. At zero temperature these quantum critical points are directly analogous to the finely tuned standard model. In this paper, we explore a class of models with a Higgs near a quantum critical point that exhibits non-mean-field behavior. We discuss the parametrization of the effects of a Higgs emerging from such a critical point in terms of form factors, and present two simple realistic scenarios based on either generalized free fields or a 5D dual in anti-de Sitter space. For both of these models, we consider the processes g g →Z Z and g g →h h , which can be used to gain information about the Higgs scaling dimension and IR transition scale from the experimental data.

  20. SEMANTICS AND CRITICAL READING.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    FLANIGAN, MICHAEL C.

    PROFICIENCY IN CRITICAL READING CAN BE ACCELERATED BY MAKING STUDENTS AWARE OF VARIOUS SEMANTIC DEVICES THAT HELP CLARIFY MEANINGS AND PURPOSES. EXCERPTS FROM THE ARTICLE "TEEN-AGE CORRUPTION" FROM THE NINTH-GRADE SEMANTICS UNIT WRITTEN BY THE PROJECT ENGLISH DEMONSTRATION CENTER AT EUCLID, OHIO, ARE USED TO ILLUSTRATE HOW SEMANTICS RELATE TO…

  1. Platelets in Critical Illness.

    PubMed

    Levi, Marcel

    2016-04-01

    In patients with critical illness, thrombocytopenia is a frequent laboratory abnormality. However frequent this may occur, a low platelet count is not an epiphenomenon, but a marker with further significance. It is always important to assess the proper cause for thrombocytopenia in critically ill patients because different underlying disorders may precipitate different diagnostic and therapeutic management strategies. Platelets are part of the first-line defense of the body against bleeding; hence, thrombocytopenia may increase the risk of hemorrhage. In case of systemic inflammatory syndromes, such as the response to sepsis, disseminated intravascular platelet activation may occur. This will contribute to microvascular failure and thereby play a role in the development of organ dysfunction. Platelets are circulating blood cells that will normally not interact with the intact vessel wall but that may swiftly respond to endothelial disruption (which is often part of the pathogenesis of critical illness) by adhering to subendothelial structures, followed by interaction with each other, thereby forming a platelet aggregate. The activated platelet (phospholipid) membrane may form a suitable surface on which further coagulation activation may occur. A low platelet count is a strong and independent predictor of an adverse outcome in critically ill patients, thereby facilitating a simple and practically risk assessment in these patients and potentially guiding the use of complex or expensive treatment strategies.

  2. Conductive Critical Thinking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paetkau, Mark

    2007-01-01

    One of my goals as an instructor is to teach students critical thinking skills. This paper presents an example of a student-led discussion of heat conduction at the first-year level. Heat loss from a human head is calculated using conduction and radiation models. The results of these plausible (but wrong) models of heat transfer contradict what…

  3. AVLIS Criticality risk assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Brereton, S.J., LLNL

    1998-04-29

    Evaluation of criticality safety has become an important task in preparing for the Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (AVLIS) uranium enrichment runs that will take place during the Integrated Process Demonstration (IPD) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). This integrated operation of AVLIS systems under plant-like conditions will be used to verify the performance of process equipment and to demonstrate the sustained integrated enrichment performance of these systems using operating parameters that are similar to production plant specifications. Because of the potential criticality concerns associated with enriched uranium, substantial effort has been aimed towards understanding the potential system failures of interest from a criticality standpoint, and evaluating them in detail. The AVLIS process is based on selective photoionization of uranium atoms of atomic weight 235 (U-235) in a vapor stream, followed by electrostatic extraction. The process is illustrated in Figure 1. Two major subsystems are involved: the uranium separator and the laser system. In the separator, metallic uranium is fed into a crucible where it is heated and vaporized by an electron beam. The atomic U-235/U-238 vapor stream moves away from the molten uranium and is illuminated by precisely tuned beams of dye laser light. Upon absorption of the tuned dye laser light, the U-235 atoms become excited and eject electrons (become photoionized), giving them a net positive charge. The ions of U-235 are moved preferentially by an electrostatic field to condense on the product collector, forming the enriched uranium product. The remaining vapor, which is depleted in U-235 (tails), passes unaffected through the photoionization/extractor zone and accumulates on collectors in the top of the separator. Tails and product collector surfaces operate at elevated temperatures so that deposited materials flow as segregated liquid streams. The separated uranium condensates (uranium enriched in

  4. Critical care nursing.

    PubMed

    Dracup, K

    1987-01-01

    The research pertaining to the delivery of nursing care in the ICU was reviewed to describe: the impact of the unit structure and organization, including policies and procedures, on patients, nurses, and families; the process of critical care nursing; the outcomes of critical care nursing; some of the ethical issues germane to the care of the critically ill patient. Although these areas of inquiry are quite diverse, a number of similarities can be identified. The most obvious of the similarities was that, with few exceptions, the studies pertaining to delivery of nursing care were performed by researchers from a variety of disciplines other than nursing, including medicine, psychology, public health, and economics. In many instances, such as the studies of patients' stress experiences in ICUs, these efforts enhanced our knowledge of the phenomena and complemented or replicated the efforts of nurse researchers. Unfortunately, in some areas nurse researchers were quite absent, with the result that the studies lacked a nursing perspective. For example, the large body of knowledge related to the effects of critical care on patient outcome reflected medicine's orientation toward cure. While it is important to measure the effect of nursing care in the ICU on patient survival, the effect of nursing efforts on short- and long-term quality of life, functional status, and health maintenance is also critical and remains unknown. Nurse researchers need to build on the data base already acquired about critical care. Even more important, they need to fashion programs of research focused on the concepts central to the discipline of nursing. A second similarity relates to the increasing quality of the reported research over the past decade. In general, early descriptive studies were conducted in a single critical care unit with a small and often biased sample. These gave way to more carefully designed, multicenter studies, although lack of randomization procedures continued to be

  5. Redefining critical in critical dimension metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Askary, Farid; Sullivan, Neal T.

    2001-08-01

    Critical dimension (CD) metrology as practiced in semiconductor industry displays characteristics not observed in other metrology disciplines. This paper will present some of the unusual aspects of CD metrology and attempt to elucidate the causes for the observed behavior. Through an examination of the characteristics of measurement accuracy, it is possible to observe these situations where CD metrology departs from the ideal. The typical process for achieving accuracy involves the use of certified standards in a well-defined calibration procedure. However, calibrating CD instruments with linewidth standards will not necessarily guarantee sufficient accuracy of subsequent measurements of production samples. This well-known result follows from lack of physical models to relate the detected signal to sample shape in combination with the many-to-one nature of the mathematical mapping that describes the process of obtaining CD from feature shape. Despite this limitation, monitoring tools such as CD-SEM systems have demonstrated to be useful for process control and are extensively used in semiconductor manufacturing. The requisites for a well-behaved measurement process will be described in detail. The unusual characteristics of CD metrology will be identified, as will the underlying reasons for the behavior. These results will be examined in the light of common process control techniques to explain how CD-SEM measurements still add value despite the flaws. In conclusion the role and value of certified standards in feature shape determination will be placed in the context of CD metrology. Reference Measurement Systems in conjunction with calibration standards are recommended to characterize process variations and determine feature shapes across a variety of samples. In order to ensure that the high throughput monitoring metrology tools flag process excursions for not meeting specifications, feature shapes must be quantified with additional metrics besides a single

  6. Critical Education, Critical Pedagogies, Marxist Education in the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foley, Jean Ann; Morris, Doug; Gounari, Panayota; Agostinone-Wilson, Faith

    2015-01-01

    As critical pedagogy becomes more mainstream on the educational landscape in the United States, it is important to revisit the original tenets of critical pedagogy and explore their current manifestations. Since the beginning of "criticalism" from the theoretical/foundational work of the Frankfurt School of Critical Social Theory,…

  7. Critical Viewing: Stimulant to Critical Thinking. Teacher's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Reilly, Kevin; Splaine, John

    The purpose of this guide is to implement the teaching of "Critical Viewing: Stimulant to Critical Thinking," a guide for students. Part one of the guide is an overview of the organization, methodologies, and evaluation procedures used in "Critical Viewing." Suggestions and activities for teaching the six chapters in "Critical Viewing" are given…

  8. Critical level statistics for weakly disordered graphene.

    PubMed

    Amanatidis, E; Kleftogiannis, I; Katsanos, D E; Evangelou, S N

    2014-04-16

    In two dimensions chaotic level statistics with the Wigner spacing distribution P(S) is expected for massless fermions in the Dirac region. The obtained P(S) for weakly disordered finite graphene samples with zigzag edges turns out, however, to be neither chaotic (Wigner) nor localized (Poisson). It is similar to the intermediate statistics at the critical point of the Anderson metal-insulator transition. The quantum transport of finite graphene for weak disorder, with critical level statistics can occur via edge states as in topological insulators, and for strong disorder, graphene behaves as an ordinary Anderson insulator with Poisson statistics.

  9. Self-organized criticality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turcotte, Donald L.

    1999-10-01

    The concept of self-organized criticality was introduced to explain the behaviour of the sandpile model. In this model, particles are randomly dropped onto a square grid of boxes. When a box accumulates four particles they are redistributed to the four adjacent boxes or lost off the edge of the grid. Redistributions can lead to further instabilities with the possibility of more particles being lost from the grid, contributing to the size of each avalanche. These model 'avalanches' satisfied a power-law frequency-area distribution with a slope near unity. Other cellular-automata models, including the slider-block and forest-fire models, are also said to exhibit self-organized critical behaviour. It has been argued that earthquakes, landslides, forest fires, and species extinctions are examples of self-organized criticality in nature. In addition, wars and stock market crashes have been associated with this behaviour. The forest-fire model is particularly interesting in terms of its relation to the critical-point behaviour of the site-percolation model. In the basic forest-fire model, trees are randomly planted on a grid of points. Periodically in time, sparks are randomly dropped on the grid. If a spark drops on a tree, that tree and adjacent trees burn in a model fire. The fires are the `avalanches' and they are found to satisfy power-law frequency-area distributions with slopes near unity. This forest-fire model is closely related to the site-percolation model, that exhibits critical behaviour. In the forest-fire model there is an inverse cascade of trees from small clusters to large clusters, trees are lost primarily from model fires that destroy the largest clusters. This quasi steady-state cascade gives a power-law frequency-area distribution for both clusters of trees and smaller fires. The site-percolation model is equivalent to the forest-fire model without fires. In this case there is a transient cascade of trees from small to large clusters and a power

  10. Critical Mach Numbers of Thin Airfoil Sections with Plain Flaps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pardee, Otway O'm.; Heaslet, Max A.

    1946-01-01

    Critical Mach number as function of lift coefficient is determined for certain moderately thick NACA low-drag airfoils. Results, given graphically, included calculations on same airfoil sections with plain flaps for small flap deflections. Curves indicate optimum critical conditions for airfoils with flaps in such form that they can be compared with corresponding results for zero flap deflections. Plain flaps increase life-coefficient range for which critical Mach number is in region of high values characteristic of low-drag airfoils.

  11. Critical anomalies of alkaline fading of phenolphthalein in the critical solution of 2-butoxyethanol + water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Zhongyu; Yin, Handi; Hao, Zhiguo; Zheng, Peizhu; Shen, Weiguo

    2013-12-01

    We have used three-wavelength UV-spectrophotometry to study the reaction of the alkaline fading of phenolphthalein in the critical solution of 2-butoxyethanol + water. It was found that when the temperature was far away from the critical point, the values of the natural logarithm of the rate constant k and the natural logarithm of the chemical equilibrium K determined in our experiments had good linear relationships with the reciprocal of temperature, which served as the backgrounds and were used for correcting k and K in the critical region. The critical slowing down of the reaction and the critical anomaly of the chemical equilibrium were detected near the critical point. The value of the critical exponent characterizing the slowing down effect of the reaction rate was obtained to be 0.156, which was close to the value 0.11 associated with the heat capacity divergence and agreed with the theoretical prediction. The experimental result also confirmed the theoretical prediction of 0.11 for the critical exponent characterizing the weak divergence of the singularity of the chemical equilibrium.

  12. Second-sound generation in superfluids: Critically driven porous loudspeakers

    SciTech Connect

    Grabinski, M.; Liu, M.

    1985-08-01

    The function of a porous loudspeaker or oscillating superleak transducer driven hard enough to generate critical velocity in its pores, is investigated theoretically. Two distinct regions of critical behavior with a number of experimentally accessible phenomena are predicted and summarized in a graphic exposition. In addition, the recently found discrepancy between theory and experiment is resolved.

  13. Prognosis in critical care.

    PubMed

    Ohno-Machado, Lucila; Resnic, Frederic S; Matheny, Michael E

    2006-01-01

    Prognostic risk prediction models have been employed in the intensive care unit (ICU) setting since the 1980s and provide health care providers with important information to help inform decisions related to treatment and prognosis, as well as to compare outcomes across institutions. Prognostic models for critical care are among the most widely utilized and tested predictive models in healthcare. In this article, we review and compare mortality prediction models, including the APACHE (1981), SAPS (1984), APACHE-II (1985), MPM (1987), APACHE-III (1991), SAPS-II (1993), and MPM-II (1993). We emphasize the importance of model calibration in this domain. In addition, we present a brief review of the statistical methodology, multiple logistic regression, which underlies most of the models currently used in critical care.

  14. Critical Viscosity of Xenon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The Critical Viscosity of Xenon Experiment (CVX-2) on the STS-107 Research 1 mission in 2002 will measure the viscous behavior of liquid xenon, a heavy inert gas used in flash lamps and ion rocket engines, at its critical point. Resembling a tiny bit of window screen, the oscillator at the heart of CVX-2 will vibrate between two pairs of paddle-like electrodes. The slight bend in the shape of the mesh has no effect on the data. What counts are the mesh's displacement in the xenon fluid and the rate at which the displacement dampens. The unit shown here is encased in a small test cell and capped with a sapphire windown to contain the xenon at high pressure.

  15. Generic criticality safety issues

    SciTech Connect

    Hively, L.M.

    1991-01-01

    An independent group has been designated by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., (MMES) to internally review Safety Analysis Reports for Packaging (SARPs) that describe containers for shipment of radioactive material. This group is called the Energy Systems Independent Review Group (ESIRG), reporting to the MMES Transportation Safety Manager as part of a central staff function. The ESIRG focus is Y-12 Plant packages, with additional review responsibilities for the Paducah Tiger UF{sub 6} overpack and 6M package. Review questions are posed directly to the SARP preparers. This paper addresses three generic issues that arose during the ESIRG criticality reviews: analysis tools, uncertainties in results, and resulting (finite) probability of criticality. 6 refs., 1 tab.

  16. Challenges in Critical Language Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pessoa, Rosane Rocha; de Urzeda Freitas, Marco Tulio

    2012-01-01

    This article is based on the conception of language teaching as a liberatory practice. Drawing on some principles of critical pedagogy (Ellsworth, 1992; Freire, 2005; hooks, 1994; Norton & Toohey, 2004), critical applied linguistics (Pennycook, 1990, 2001), critical language teaching (Ferreira, 2006; Pennycook, 1999), and critical language…

  17. Toward a Gramscian Critical Rhetoric.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zompetti, Joseph P.

    1997-01-01

    Contends A. Gramsci can provide a perspective on the cultural dominance of rhetoric and formation of a critical "telos"--his work can contribute to understanding critical rhetoric. Demonstrates that Gramscian notions can extend critical rhetoric into an enterprise that permits critical self-reflexivity and praxis and create new…

  18. Affecting Critical Thinking through Speech.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Keefe, Virginia P.

    Intended for teachers, this booklet shows how spoken language can affect student thinking and presents strategies for teaching critical thinking skills. The first section discusses the theoretical and research bases for promoting critical thinking through speech, defines critical thinking, explores critical thinking as abstract thinking, and tells…

  19. Hypermedia Authoring as Critical Literacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, Jamie; Beach, Richard

    2001-01-01

    Discusses three pedagogical frameworks in which students have used hypermedia authoring tools to generate a practice of critical literacy, including critical inquiry into social worlds, critical response to literature, and knowledge construction in the classroom through hypermedia. Discusses how, in hypermedia authoring for critical literacy,…

  20. Critical care cardiology.

    PubMed

    Marks, S L; Abbott, J A

    1998-11-01

    Emergency management of the patient with cardiac disease is an important part of veterinary practice. Although the causes of cardiac disease may be diverse, the understanding of basic pathophysiology will enable the clinician to formulate a rational diagnostic and therapeutic plan. The veterinary clinician must be able to triage the emergency patient, assess the clinical condition, and provide appropriate therapy. Close monitoring of the critically ill patient is crucial to patient survival and will help tailor therapy.

  1. Education for Critical Thinking

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-02-01

    leaders are dissatisfied with their Professional Military Education ( PME ), particularly in the areas of critical thinking and problem solving. This...very distinct from what it means to a mid-career finance officer), and they hit an impasse. Few are able to provide an effective defense of their views...years of PME . Our common understanding of what to do often fails us when we try to apply our knowledge in a real-world setting. In their excellent

  2. Carahunge - A Critical Assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-García, A. César

    Carahunge is a megalithic monument in southern Armenia that has often been acclaimed as the oldest observatory. The monument, composed of dozens of standing stones, has some perforated stones. The direction of the holes has been measured and their orientation is related to the sun, moon, and stars, obtaining a date for the construction of such devices. After a critical review of the methods and conclusions, these are shown as untenable.

  3. Criticality safety training

    SciTech Connect

    Woodruff, S.K.

    1997-06-01

    Criticality safety training is an important element of the Plutonium Facility safety program at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Training consists of student self-study handbooks and hands-on performance-based training in a mock-up laboratory containing gloveboxes, trolley conveyor system, and self-monitoring instruments. A 10-minute video tape and lecture was presented to describe how training in this area is conducted.

  4. Horizon as critical phenomenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sung-Sik

    2016-09-01

    We show that renormalization group flow can be viewed as a gradual wave function collapse, where a quantum state associated with the action of field theory evolves toward a final state that describes an IR fixed point. The process of collapse is described by the radial evolution in the dual holographic theory. If the theory is in the same phase as the assumed IR fixed point, the initial state is smoothly projected to the final state. If in a different phase, the initial state undergoes a phase transition which in turn gives rise to a horizon in the bulk geometry. We demonstrate the connection between critical behavior and horizon in an example, by deriving the bulk metrics that emerge in various phases of the U( N ) vector model in the large N limit based on the holographic dual constructed from quantum renormalization group. The gapped phase exhibits a geometry that smoothly ends at a finite proper distance in the radial direction. The geometric distance in the radial direction measures a complexity: the depth of renormalization group transformation that is needed to project the generally entangled UV state to a direct product state in the IR. For gapless states, entanglement persistently spreads out to larger length scales, and the initial state can not be projected to the direct product state. The obstruction to smooth projection at charge neutral point manifests itself as the long throat in the anti-de Sitter space. The Poincare horizon at infinity marks the critical point which exhibits a divergent length scale in the spread of entanglement. For the gapless states with non-zero chemical potential, the bulk space becomes the Lifshitz geometry with the dynamical critical exponent two. The identification of horizon as critical point may provide an explanation for the universality of horizon. We also discuss the structure of the bulk tensor network that emerges from the quantum renormalization group.

  5. Critical Path Web Site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Judith L.; Charles, John B.; Rummel, John A. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Approximately three years ago, the Agency's lead center for the human elements of spaceflight (the Johnson Space Center), along with the National Biomedical Research Institute (NSBRI) (which has the lead role in developing countermeasures) initiated an activity to identify the most critical risks confronting extended human spaceflight. Two salient factors influenced this activity: first, what information is needed to enable a "go/no go" decision to embark on extended human spaceflight missions; and second, what knowledge and capabilities are needed to address known and potential health, safety and performance risks associated with such missions. A unique approach was used to first define and assess those risks, and then to prioritize them. This activity was called the Critical Path Roadmap (CPR) and it represents an opportunity to develop and implement a focused and evolving program of research and technology designed from a "risk reduction" perspective to prevent or minimize the risks to humans exposed to the space environment. The Critical Path Roadmap provides the foundation needed to ensure that human spaceflight, now and in the future, is as safe, productive and healthy as possible (within the constraints imposed on any particular mission) regardless of mission duration or destination. As a tool, the Critical Path Roadmap enables the decisionmaker to select from among the demonstrated or potential risks those that are to be mitigated, and the completeness of that mitigation. The primary audience for the CPR Web Site is the members of the scientific community who are interested in the research and technology efforts required for ensuring safe and productive human spaceflight. They may already be informed about the various space life sciences research programs or they may be newcomers. Providing the CPR content to potential investigators increases the probability of their delivering effective risk mitigations. Others who will use the CPR Web Site and its content

  6. Critical Path Web Site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Judith L.; Charles, John B.; Rummel, John A. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Approximately three years ago, the Agency's lead center for the human elements of spaceflight (the Johnson Space Center), along with the National Biomedical Research Institute (NSBRI) (which has the lead role in developing countermeasures) initiated an activity to identify the most critical risks confronting extended human spaceflight. Two salient factors influenced this activity: first, what information is needed to enable a "go/no go" decision to embark on extended human spaceflight missions; and second, what knowledge and capabilities are needed to address known and potential health, safety and performance risks associated with such missions. A unique approach was used to first define and assess those risks, and then to prioritize them. This activity was called the Critical Path Roadmap (CPR) and it represents an opportunity to develop and implement a focused and evolving program of research and technology designed from a "risk reduction" perspective to prevent or minimize the risks to humans exposed to the space environment. The Critical Path Roadmap provides the foundation needed to ensure that human spaceflight, now and in the future, is as safe, productive and healthy as possible (within the constraints imposed on any particular mission) regardless of mission duration or destination. As a tool, the Critical Path Roadmap enables the decision maker to select from among the demonstrated or potential risks those that are to be mitigated, and the completeness of that mitigation. The primary audience for the CPR Web Site is the members of the scientific community who are interested in the research and technology efforts required for ensuring safe and productive human spaceflight. They may already be informed about the various space life sciences research programs or they may be newcomers. Providing the CPR content to potential investigators increases the probability of their delivering effective risk mitigations. Others who will use the CPR Web Site and its

  7. Morphogenesis at criticality?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krotov, Dmitry; Dubuis, Julien; Wieschaus, Eric; Gregor, Thomas; Bialek, William

    2013-03-01

    Embryonic development of many multicellular organisms begins with the generation of spatially varying patterns of morphogens that encode the body plan of the future organism. We study the spatial pattern formed by the gap gene proteins in the early fruit fly embryo, which is anchored by ``crossing points'' between expression levels of different genes; these are thought to result from mutual repression. We explore a broad class of models for such interacting genes and show that the parameters implied implied by recent quantitative measurements are non-generic, but rather tuned to certain values, so that the entire gap gene network operates close to the critical surface in its phase diagram. We develop a mean field description of this system as well as derive signatures of critical behavior in the structure of expression noise. One such signature is that fluctuations are dominated by a single ``massless'' mode, so that fluctuations of expression levels of different genes are highly correlated/anticorrelated. We find a surprisingly high degree of anticorrelation in the real experimental data. These results suggest an interesting possibility that the network of genes responsible for development is operating near criticality.

  8. Relative Critical Points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Debra

    2013-05-01

    Relative equilibria of Lagrangian and Hamiltonian systems with symmetry are critical points of appropriate scalar functions parametrized by the Lie algebra (or its dual) of the symmetry group. Setting aside the structures - symplectic, Poisson, or variational - generating dynamical systems from such functions highlights the common features of their construction and analysis, and supports the construction of analogous functions in non-Hamiltonian settings. If the symmetry group is nonabelian, the functions are invariant only with respect to the isotropy subgroup of the given parameter value. Replacing the parametrized family of functions with a single function on the product manifold and extending the action using the (co)adjoint action on the algebra or its dual yields a fully invariant function. An invariant map can be used to reverse the usual perspective: rather than selecting a parametrized family of functions and finding their critical points, conditions under which functions will be critical on specific orbits, typically distinguished by isotropy class, can be derived. This strategy is illustrated using several well-known mechanical systems - the Lagrange top, the double spherical pendulum, the free rigid body, and the Riemann ellipsoids - and generalizations of these systems.

  9. [The critical scientists' voice].

    PubMed

    Lewgoy, F

    2000-01-01

    The intricate debate over genetically modified organisms (GMOs) involves powerful economic interests, as well as ethical, legal, emotional and scientific aspects, some of which are dealt with in this paper.(It is possible to identify two main groups of scientists across the GMOs divide: the triumphalist and the critical group.) Scientists in the triumphalist group state that GMOs and their derivatives are safe for the environment and do not offer health hazards any more than similar, non-genetically modified, products. This view is disputed by the critical scientists, who are prompted by the scarcity of studies on the environmental impacts and toxicity of GMOs, and who point out flaws in tests performed by the same companies which hold the patents. They are also critical of the current state of the process of gene transference, lacking accuracy, a fact which, coupled with the scant knowledge available about 97% of the genome functions, may produce unforseeable effects with risks for the environment and public health yet to be assessed. Examples of such effects are: the transference of alien genes [??] to other species, the emergence of toxins, the creation of new viruses, the impacts on beneficial insects and on biodiversity in general.

  10. Building a transcontinental affiliation: a new model for academic health centers.

    PubMed

    Sostman, H Dirk; Forese, Laura L; Boom, Marc L; Schroth, Lynn; Klein, Arthur A; Mushlin, Alvin I; Hagale, John E; Pardes, Herbert; Girotto, Ronald G; Gotto, Antonio M

    2005-11-01

    The recent affiliation of The Methodist Hospital (TMH) with Weill Medical College (WMC) of Cornell University and NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital is the first transcontinental primary affiliation between major, not-for-profit academic health centers (AHCs) in the United States. The authors describe the process followed, the issues involved, the initial accomplishments, and the opportunities envisioned. The key enablers of this affiliation were a rapid process, mutual trust based on existing professional relationships, and commitment to the project by Board leadership. Because of their geographic separation, the parties were not competitors in providing clinical care to their regional populations. The affiliation is nonexclusive, but is reciprocally primary in New York and Texas. Members of the TMH medical staff are eligible for faculty appointments at WMC. The principal areas of collaboration will be education, research, quality improvement, information technology, and international program development. The principal challenge has been the physical distance between the parties. Although extensive use of videoconferencing has been successful, personal contact is essential in establishing relationships. External processes impose a slower sequence and tempo of events than some might wish. This new model for AHCs creates exciting possibilities for the tripartite mission of research, education, and patient care. Realizing the potential of these opportunities will require unconstrained ideas and substantial investment of time and other critical resources. Since many consider that AHCs are in economic and cultural crisis, successful development of such possibilities could have importance beyond the collective interests of these three institutions.

  11. Leadership in Academic Health Centers: Transactional and Transformational Leadership.

    PubMed

    Smith, Patrick O

    2015-12-01

    Leadership is a crucial component to the success of academic health science centers (AHCs) within the shifting U.S. healthcare environment. Leadership talent acquisition and development within AHCs is immature and approaches to leadership and its evolution will be inevitable to refine operations to accomplish the critical missions of clinical service delivery, the medical education continuum, and innovations toward discovery. To reach higher organizational outcomes in AHCs requires a reflection on what leadership approaches are in place and how they can better support these missions. Transactional leadership approaches are traditionally used in AHCs and this commentary suggests that movement toward a transformational approach is a performance improvement opportunity for AHC leaders. This commentary describes the transactional and transformational approaches, how they complement each other, and how to access the transformational approach. Drawing on behavioral sciences, suggestions are made on how a transactional leader can change her cognitions to align with the four dimensions of the transformational leadership approach.

  12. Weightless experiments to probe universality of fluid critical behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lecoutre, C.; Guillaument, R.; Marre, S.; Garrabos, Y.; Beysens, D.; Hahn, I.

    2015-06-01

    Near the critical point of fluids, critical opalescence results in light attenuation, or turbidity increase, that can be used to probe the universality of critical behavior. Turbidity measurements in SF6 under weightlessness conditions on board the International Space Station are performed to appraise such behavior in terms of both temperature and density distances from the critical point. Data are obtained in a temperature range, far (1 K) from and extremely close (a few μ K ) to the phase transition, unattainable from previous experiments on Earth. Data are analyzed with renormalization-group matching classical-to-critical crossover models of the universal equation of state. It results that the data in the unexplored region, which is a minute deviant from the critical density value, still show adverse effects for testing the true asymptotic nature of the critical point phenomena.

  13. Concepts and methods for describing critical phenomena in fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sengers, J. V.; Sengers, J. M. H. L.

    1977-01-01

    The predictions of theoretical models for a critical-point phase transistion in fluids, namely the classical equation with third-degree critical isotherm, that with fifth-degree critical isotherm, and the lattice gas, are reviewed. The renormalization group theory of critical phenomena and the hypothesis of universality of critical behavior supported by this theory are discussed as well as the nature of gravity effects and how they affect cricital-region experimentation in fluids. The behavior of the thermodynamic properties and the correlation function is formulated in terms of scaling laws. The predictions of these scaling laws and of the hypothesis of universality of critical behavior are compared with experimental data for one-component fluids and it is indicated how the methods can be extended to describe critical phenomena in fluid mixtures.

  14. An undulation theory for condensation in open end slit pores: critical hysteresis temperature & critical hysteresis pore size.

    PubMed

    Fan, Chunyan; Zeng, Yonghong; Do, D D; Nicholson, D

    2014-06-28

    A new theory of condensation in an open end slit pore, based on the concept of temperature dependent undulation, at the interface separating the adsorbed phase and the gas-like region, is presented. The theory, describes, for the first time, the microscopic origin of the critical hysteresis temperature and the critical hysteresis pore size, properties which are not accessible to any classical theories.

  15. Potts-model critical manifolds revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scullard, Christian R.; Lykke Jacobsen, Jesper

    2016-03-01

    We compute critical polynomials for the q-state Potts model on the Archimedean lattices, using a parallel implementation of the algorithm of Jacobsen (2014 J. Phys. A: Math. Theor 47 135001) that gives us access to larger sizes than previously possible. The exact polynomials are computed for bases of size 6 × 6 unit cells, and the root in the temperature variable v={{{e}}}K-1 is determined numerically at q = 1 for bases of size 8 × 8. This leads to improved results for bond percolation thresholds, and for the Potts-model critical manifolds in the real (q, v) plane. In the two most favourable cases, we find now the kagome-lattice threshold to eleven digits and that of the (3,{12}2) lattice to thirteen. Our critical manifolds reveal many interesting features in the antiferromagnetic region of the Potts model, and determine accurately the extent of the Berker-Kadanoff phase for the lattices studied.

  16. The interfacility transport of critically ill newborns.

    PubMed

    Whyte, Hilary Ea; Jefferies, Ann L

    2015-01-01

    The practice of paediatric/neonatal interfacility transport continues to expand. Transport teams have evolved into mobile intensive care units capable of delivering state-of-the-art critical care during paediatric and neonatal transport. While outcomes are best for high-risk infants born in a tertiary care setting, high-risk mothers often cannot be safely transferred. Their newborns may then have to be transported to a higher level of care following birth. The present statement reviews issues relating to transport of the critically ill newborn population, including personnel, team competencies, skills, equipment, systems and processes. Six recommendations for improving interfacility transport of critically ill newborns are highlighted, emphasizing the importance of regionalized care for newborns.

  17. Applicability of ZPR critical experiment data to criticality safety

    SciTech Connect

    Schaefer, R.W.; Aumeier, S.E.; McFarlane, H.F.

    1995-12-31

    More than a hundred zero power reactor (ZPR) critical assemblies were constructed, over a period of about three decades, at the Argonne National Laboratory ZPR-3, ZPR-6, ZPR-9 and ZPPR fast critical assembly facilities. To be sure, the original reason for performing these critical experiments was to support fast reactor development. Nevertheless, data from some of the assemblies are well suited to form the basis for valuable, new criticality safety benchmarks. The purpose of this paper is to describe the ZPR data that would be of benefit to the criticality safety community and to explain how these data could be developed into practical criticality safety benchmarks.

  18. Critical Lines in Binary Mixtures of Components with Multiple Critical Points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artemenko, Sergey; Lozovsky, Taras; Mazur, Victor

    The principal aim of this work is a comprehensive analysis of the fluid phase behavior of binary fluid mixtures via the van der Waals like equation of state (EoS) which has a multiplicity of critical points in metastable region. We test the modified van der Waals equation of state (MVDW) proposed by Skibinski et al. (2004) which displays a complex phase behavior including three critical points and identifies four fluid phases (gas, low density liquid (LDL), high density liquid (HDL), and very high density liquid (VHDL)). An improvement of repulsive part doesn't change a topological picture of phase behavior in the wide range of thermodynamic variables. The van der Waals attractive interaction and excluded volume for mixture are calculated from classical mixing rules. Critical lines in binary mixtures of type III of phase behavior in which the components exhibit polyamorphism are calculated and a continuity of fluid-fluid critical line at high pressure is observed.

  19. Critical behaviors near the (tri-)critical end point of QCD within the NJL model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Ya; Du, Yi-Lun; Cui, Zhu-Fang; Zong, Hong-Shi

    2015-10-01

    We investigate the dynamical chiral symmetry breaking and its restoration at finite density and temperature within the two-flavor Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model, and mainly focus on the critical behaviors near the critical end point (CEP) and tricritical point (TCP) of quantum chromodynamics. The multi-solution region of the Nambu and Wigner ones is determined in the phase diagram for the massive and massless current quark, respectively. We use the various susceptibilities to locate the CEP/TCP and then extract the critical exponents near them. Our calculations reveal that the various susceptibilities share the same critical behaviors for the physical current quark mass, while they show different features in the chiral limit.

  20. Criticality accident alarm system

    SciTech Connect

    Malenfant, R.E.

    1991-01-01

    The American National Standard ANSI/ANS-8.3-1986, Criticality Accident Alarm System provides guidance for the establishment and maintenance of an alarm system to initiate personnel evacuation in the event of inadvertent criticality. In addition to identifying the physical features of the components of the system, the characteristics of accidents of concern are carefully delineated. Unfortunately, this ANSI Standard has led to considerable confusion in interpretation, and there is evidence that the minimum accident of concern'' may not be appropriate. Furthermore, although intended as a guide, the provisions of the standard are being rigorously applied, sometimes with interpretations that are not consistent. Although the standard is clear in the use of absorbed dose in free air of 20 rad, at least one installation has interpreted the requirement to apply to dose in soft tissue. The standard is also clear in specifying the response to both neutrons and gamma rays. An assembly of uranyl fluoride enriched to 5% {sup 235}U was operated to simulate a potential accident. The dose, delivered in a free run excursion 2 m from the surface of the vessel, was greater than 500 rad, without ever exceeding a rate of 20 rad/min, which is the set point for activating an alarm that meets the standard. The presence of an alarm system would not have prevented any of the five major accidents in chemical operations nor is it absolutely certain that the alarms were solely responsible for reducing personnel exposures following the accident. Nevertheless, criticality alarm systems are now the subject of great effort and expense. 13 refs.

  1. Critical Manifestations of Pneumoscrotum

    PubMed Central

    Dagur, Gautam; Lee, Min Y.; Warren, Kelly; Imhof, Reese; Khan, Sardar A.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Pneumoscrotum is a critical, physical finding that may indicate significant morbidity and mortality. Accumulation of gas in the scrotum can be primary or secondary. Objective This paper discusses rapid diagnosis and treatment options. Material and Methods PubMed searches for pneumoscrotum, etiology, diagnosis, and treatment. Results: We review the historical perspective, classification, etiology, diagnosis, and treatment options of pneumoscrotum, as well as the presentation of pneumoscrotum in neonates/infants. Conclusion It is crucial to diagnose the etiology pneumoscrotum and designing a treatment option based off that. PMID:27390577

  2. Critically damped quantum search.

    PubMed

    Mizel, Ari

    2009-04-17

    Although measurement and unitary processes can accomplish any quantum evolution in principle, thinking in terms of dissipation and damping can be powerful. We propose a modification of Grover's algorithm in which the idea of damping plays a natural role. Remarkably, we find that there is a critical damping value that divides between the quantum O(sqrt[N]) and classical O(N) search regimes. In addition, by allowing the damping to vary in a fashion we describe, one obtains a fixed-point quantum search algorithm in which ignorance of the number of targets increases the number of oracle queries only by a factor of 1.5.

  3. Safety Critical Mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, Brandan

    2008-01-01

    Spaceflight mechanisms have a reputation for being difficult to develop and operate successfully. This reputation is well earned. Many circumstances conspire to make this so: the environments in which the mechanisms are used are extremely severe, there is usually limited or no maintenance opportunity available during operation due to this environment, the environments are difficult to replicate accurately on the ground, the expense of the mechanism development makes it impractical to build and test many units for long periods of time before use, mechanisms tend to be highly specialized and not prone to interchangeability or off-the-shelf use, they can generate and store a lot of energy, and the nature of mechanisms themselves, as a combination of structures, electronics, etc. designed to accomplish specific dynamic performance, makes them very complex and subject to many unpredictable interactions of many types. In addition to their complexities, mechanism are often counted upon to provide critical vehicle functions that can result in catastrophic events should the functions not be performed. It is for this reason that mechanisms are frequently subjected to special scrutiny in safety processes. However, a failure tolerant approach, along with good design and development practices and detailed design reviews, can be developed to allow such notoriously troublesome mechanisms to be utilized confidently in safety-critical applications.

  4. Design of Critical Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, Robert C.; Zaretsky, Erwin V.

    2001-01-01

    Critical component design is based on minimizing product failures that results in loss of life. Potential catastrophic failures are reduced to secondary failures where components removed for cause or operating time in the system. Issues of liability and cost of component removal become of paramount importance. Deterministic design with factors of safety and probabilistic design address but lack the essential characteristics for the design of critical components. In deterministic design and fabrication there are heuristic rules and safety factors developed over time for large sets of structural/material components. These factors did not come without cost. Many designs failed and many rules (codes) have standing committees to oversee their proper usage and enforcement. In probabilistic design, not only are failures a given, the failures are calculated; an element of risk is assumed based on empirical failure data for large classes of component operations. Failure of a class of components can be predicted, yet one can not predict when a specific component will fail. The analogy is to the life insurance industry where very careful statistics are book-kept on classes of individuals. For a specific class, life span can be predicted within statistical limits, yet life-span of a specific element of that class can not be predicted.

  5. Plant critical concept

    SciTech Connect

    O`Regan, P.J.

    1995-12-31

    The achievement of operation and maintenance (O&M) cost reductions is a prime concern for plant operators. Initiatives by the nuclear industry to address this concern are under way and/or in development. These efforts include plant reliability studies, reliability-centered maintenance, risk ranking and testing philosophies, performance-based testing philosophies, graded quality assurance, and so forth. This paper presents the results of an effort to develop a methodology that integrates and applies the common data and analysis requirements for a number of risk-based and performance-based initiatives. This initial phase of the effort applied the methodology and its results to two initiatives. These were the procurement function and the preventive maintenance function. This effort integrated multiple programs and functions to identify those components that are truly critical from an integrated plant performance perspective. The paper describes the scope of the effort, the development of a methodology to identify plant critical components, and the application of these results to the maintenance rule compliance, preventive maintenance, and procurement functions at the candidate plant.

  6. What Makes Critical Thinking Critical for Adult ESL Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miekley, Joshua P.

    2014-01-01

    Critical-thinking skills help to prepare adult education students for a successful transition to college degree programs and for job advancement. Yet fostering critical thinking poses a challenge to ESL instructors. Brookfield (2012) provides a way forward for adult educators when he explains that the crux of critical thinking is to discover one's…

  7. Writer, Reader, Critic: Comparing Critical Theories as Discourse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Beaugrande, Robert

    1984-01-01

    Attempts to show how each of three influential critical theories--deconstructionism, reader response criticism, and authorial intention--implies a particular view of how literary discourse is or should be processed and indicates that each view is in part justified, but not to the extent claimed by the critics themselves. (CRH)

  8. Critical Literature Pedagogy: Teaching Canonical Literature for Critical Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borsheim-Black, Carlin; Macaluso, Michael; Petrone, Robert

    2014-01-01

    This article introduces Critical Literature Pedagogy (CLP), a pedagogical framework for applying goals of critical literacy within the context of teaching canonical literature. Critical literacies encompass skills and dispositions to understand, question, and critique ideological messages of texts; because canonical literature is often…

  9. Jaguar critical habitat designation causes concern for Southwestern ranchers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Svancara, Colleen; Lien, Aaron M.; Vanasco, Wendy T.; Laura Lopez-Hoffman,; Ruyle, George B.

    2015-01-01

    The designation of jaguar critical habitat in April 2014 in southern Arizona and southwestern New Mexico created concern for livestock ranchers in the region. We interviewed ranchers to understand their concerns with the jaguar critical habitat designation and their attitudes toward jaguars, wildlife conservation, and resource management in general. Ranchers we interviewed were concerned about direct impacts of designated critical habitat on ranching, as well as possible alternative agendas of critical habitat advocates and issues specific to the borderlands region. The ranchers were less concerned about the presence of jaguars but were more concerned about possible limiting effects of the Endangered Species Act (ESA), distrust of government entities, and litigious environmental groups. To maximize effectiveness, government agencies should work to foster trust in the ranching community, be cognizant of sensitive issues specific to the region that may challenge endangered species conservation goals, recognize the opportunity to work with ranchers for endangered species management, and provide outreach about implications of the ESA.

  10. Creative critical-thinking strategies.

    PubMed

    Chubinski, S

    1996-01-01

    Are you looking for strategies to teach critical thinking? The author presents a variety of quick, creative strategies to facilitate teaching critical-thinking skills. These strategies engage students in their learning and are adaptable to any nursing course.

  11. Critical Infrastructure Modeling System

    SciTech Connect

    2004-10-01

    The Critical Infrastructure Modeling System (CIMS) is a 3D modeling and simulation environment designed to assist users in the analysis of dependencies within individual infrastructure and also interdependencies between multiple infrastructures. Through visual cuing and textual displays, a use can evaluate the effect of system perturbation and identify the emergent patterns that evolve. These patterns include possible outage areas from a loss of power, denial of service or access, and disruption of operations. Method of Solution: CIMS allows the user to model a system, create an overlay of information, and create 3D representative images to illustrate key infrastructure elements. A geo-referenced scene, satellite, aerial images or technical drawings can be incorporated into the scene. Scenarios of events can be scripted, and the user can also interact during run time to alter system characteristics. CIMS operates as a discrete event simulation engine feeding a 3D visualization.

  12. Critical Density Interaction Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Young, P; Baldis, H A; Cheung, P; Rozmus, W; Kruer, W; Wilks, S; Crowley, S; Mori, W; Hansen, C

    2001-02-14

    Experiments have been performed to study the propagation of intense laser pulses to high plasma densities. The issue of self-focusing and filamentation of the laser pulse as well as developing predictive capability of absorption processes and x-ray conversion efficiencies is important for numerous programs at the Laboratory, particularly Laser Program (Fast Ignitor and direct-drive ICF) and D&NT (radiography, high energy backlighters and laser cutting). Processes such as resonance absorption, profile modification, linear mode conversion, filamentation and stimulated Brillouin scattering can occur near the critical density and can have important effects on the coupling of laser light to solid targets. A combination of experiments have been used to study the propagation of laser light to high plasma densities and the interaction physics of intense laser pulses with solid targets. Nonparaxial fluid codes to study nonstationary behavior of filamentation and stimulated Brillouin scattering at high densities have also been developed as part of this project.

  13. [Nutrition in critical illness].

    PubMed

    Ökrös, Ilona

    2014-12-21

    Critically ill patients are often unable to eat by themselves over a long period of time, sometimes for weeks. In the acute phase, serious protein-energy malnutrition may develop with progressive muscle weakness, which may result in assisted respiration of longer duration as well as longer stay in intensive care unit and hospital. In view of the metabolic processes, energy and protein intake targets should be defined and the performance of metabolism should be monitored. Enteral nutrition is primarily recommended. However, parenteral supplementation is often necessary because of the disrupted tolerance levels of the gastrointestinal system. Apparently, an early parenteral supplementation started within a week would be of no benefit. Some experts believe that muscle loss can be reduced by increased target levels of protein. Further studies are needed on the effect of immune system feeding, fatty acids and micronutrients.

  14. Against the Bureaucratization of Criticism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nothstine, William L.; Copeland, Gary A.

    The proliferation of critics and critical approaches has produced a trend toward fragmentation and isolation among the practitioners involved. A suggestive counter-trend indicates that there is intense curiosity among critics to watch colleagues encounter texts, grapple with the preliminary questions of stance and method, and share the experience…

  15. Critical Quantitative Inquiry in Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stage, Frances K.; Wells, Ryan S.

    2014-01-01

    This chapter briefly traces the development of the concept of critical quantitative inquiry, provides an expanded conceptualization of the tasks of critical quantitative research, offers theoretical explanation and justification for critical research using quantitative methods, and previews the work of quantitative criticalists presented in this…

  16. Critical Initial Flaw Size Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dawicke, David S.; Raju, Ivatury S.; Cheston, Derrick J.

    2008-01-01

    An independent assessment was conducted to determine the critical initial flaw size (CIFS) for the flange-to-skin weld in the Ares I-X Upper Stage Simulator (USS). The USS consists of several "tuna can" segments that are approximately 216 inches in diameter, 115 inches tall, and 0.5 inches thick. A 6 inch wide by 1 inch thick flange is welded to the skin and is used to fasten adjacent tuna cans. A schematic of a "tuna can" and the location of the flange-to-skin weld are shown in Figure 1. Gussets (shown in yellow in Figure 1) are welded to the skin and flange every 10 degrees around the circumference of the "tuna can". The flange-to-skin weld is a flux core butt weld with a fillet weld on the inside surface, as illustrated in Figure 2. The welding process may create loss of fusion defects in the weld that could develop into fatigue cracks and jeopardize the structural integrity of the Ares I-X vehicle. The CIFS analysis was conducted to determine the largest crack in the weld region that will not grow to failure within 4 lifetimes, as specified by NASA standard 5001 & 5019 [1].

  17. Applying critical thinking to nursing.

    PubMed

    Price, Bob

    2015-08-19

    Critical thinking and writing are skills that are not easy to acquire. The term 'critical' is used differently in social and clinical contexts. Nursing students need time to master the inquisitive and ruminative aspects of critical thinking that are required in academic environments. This article outlines what is meant by critical thinking in academic settings, in relation to both theory and reflective practice. It explains how the focus of a question affects the sort of critical thinking required and offers two taxonomies of learning, to which students can refer when analysing essay requirements. The article concludes with examples of analytical writing in reference to theory and reflective practice.

  18. Are Earthquakes a Critical Phenomenon?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos, O.

    2014-12-01

    Earthquakes, granular avalanches, superconducting vortices, solar flares, and even stock markets are known to evolve through power-law distributed events. During decades, the formalism of equilibrium phase transition has coined these phenomena as critical, which implies that they are also unpredictable. This work revises these ideas and uses earthquakes as the paradigm to demonstrate that slowly driven systems evolving through uncorrelated and power-law distributed avalanches (UPLA) are not necessarily critical systems, and therefore not necessarily unpredictable. By linking the correlation length to the pdf of the distribution, and comparing it with the one obtained at a critical point, a condition of criticality is introduced. Simulations in the classical Olami-Feder-Christensen (OFC) earthquake model confirm the findings, showing that earthquakes are not a critical phenomenon. However, one single catastrophic earthquake may show critical properties and, paradoxically, the emergence of this temporal critical behaviour may eventually carry precursory signs of catastrophic events.

  19. Cohort: critical science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Digney, Bruce L.

    2007-04-01

    Unmanned vehicle systems is an attractive technology for the military, but whose promises have remained largely undelivered. There currently exist fielded remote controlled UGVs and high altitude UAV whose benefits are based on standoff in low complexity environments with sufficiently low control reaction time requirements to allow for teleoperation. While effective within there limited operational niche such systems do not meet with the vision of future military UxV scenarios. Such scenarios envision unmanned vehicles operating effectively in complex environments and situations with high levels of independence and effective coordination with other machines and humans pursing high level, changing and sometimes conflicting goals. While these aims are clearly ambitious they do provide necessary targets and inspiration with hopes of fielding near term useful semi-autonomous unmanned systems. Autonomy involves many fields of research including machine vision, artificial intelligence, control theory, machine learning and distributed systems all of which are intertwined and have goals of creating more versatile broadly applicable algorithms. Cohort is a major Applied Research Program (ARP) led by Defence R&D Canada (DRDC) Suffield and its aim is to develop coordinated teams of unmanned vehicles (UxVs) for urban environments. This paper will discuss the critical science being addressed by DRDC developing semi-autonomous systems.

  20. Chiropractic: a critical evaluation.

    PubMed

    Ernst, Edzard

    2008-05-01

    Chiropractic was defined by D.D. Palmer as "a science of healing without drugs." About 60,000 chiropractors currently practice in North America, and, worldwide, billions are spent each year for their services. This article attempts to critically evaluate chiropractic. The specific topics include the history of chiropractic; the internal conflicts within the profession; the concepts of chiropractic, particularly those of subluxation and spinal manipulation; chiropractic practice and research; and the efficacy, safety, and cost of chiropractic. A narrative review of selected articles from the published chiropractic literature was performed. For the assessment of efficacy, safety, and cost, the evaluation relied on previously published systematic reviews. Chiropractic is rooted in mystical concepts. This led to an internal conflict within the chiropractic profession, which continues today. Currently, there are two types of chiropractors: those religiously adhering to the gospel of its founding fathers and those open to change. The core concepts of chiropractic, subluxation and spinal manipulation, are not based on sound science. Back and neck pain are the domains of chiropractic but many chiropractors treat conditions other than musculoskeletal problems. With the possible exception of back pain, chiropractic spinal manipulation has not been shown to be effective for any medical condition. Manipulation is associated with frequent mild adverse effects and with serious complications of unknown incidence. Its cost-effectiveness has not been demonstrated beyond reasonable doubt. The concepts of chiropractic are not based on solid science and its therapeutic value has not been demonstrated beyond reasonable doubt.

  1. Teaching critical thinking.

    PubMed

    Holmes, N G; Wieman, Carl E; Bonn, D A

    2015-09-08

    The ability to make decisions based on data, with its inherent uncertainties and variability, is a complex and vital skill in the modern world. The need for such quantitative critical thinking occurs in many different contexts, and although it is an important goal of education, that goal is seldom being achieved. We argue that the key element for developing this ability is repeated practice in making decisions based on data, with feedback on those decisions. We demonstrate a structure for providing suitable practice that can be applied in any instructional setting that involves the acquisition of data and relating that data to scientific models. This study reports the results of applying that structure in an introductory physics laboratory course. Students in an experimental condition were repeatedly instructed to make and act on quantitative comparisons between datasets, and between data and models, an approach that is common to all science disciplines. These instructions were slowly faded across the course. After the instructions had been removed, students in the experimental condition were 12 times more likely to spontaneously propose or make changes to improve their experimental methods than a control group, who performed traditional experimental activities. The students in the experimental condition were also four times more likely to identify and explain a limitation of a physical model using their data. Students in the experimental condition also showed much more sophisticated reasoning about their data. These differences between the groups were seen to persist into a subsequent course taken the following year.

  2. Teaching critical thinking

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, N. G.; Wieman, Carl E.; Bonn, D. A.

    2015-01-01

    The ability to make decisions based on data, with its inherent uncertainties and variability, is a complex and vital skill in the modern world. The need for such quantitative critical thinking occurs in many different contexts, and although it is an important goal of education, that goal is seldom being achieved. We argue that the key element for developing this ability is repeated practice in making decisions based on data, with feedback on those decisions. We demonstrate a structure for providing suitable practice that can be applied in any instructional setting that involves the acquisition of data and relating that data to scientific models. This study reports the results of applying that structure in an introductory physics laboratory course. Students in an experimental condition were repeatedly instructed to make and act on quantitative comparisons between datasets, and between data and models, an approach that is common to all science disciplines. These instructions were slowly faded across the course. After the instructions had been removed, students in the experimental condition were 12 times more likely to spontaneously propose or make changes to improve their experimental methods than a control group, who performed traditional experimental activities. The students in the experimental condition were also four times more likely to identify and explain a limitation of a physical model using their data. Students in the experimental condition also showed much more sophisticated reasoning about their data. These differences between the groups were seen to persist into a subsequent course taken the following year. PMID:26283351

  3. Osteoarthritis: A Critical Review

    PubMed Central

    Onishi, Kentaro; Utturkar, Amol; Chang, Eric; Panush, Richard; Hata, Justin; Perret-Karimi, Danielle

    2015-01-01

    Patients with osteoarthritis (OA) are faced with a barrage of treatment options, from recommendations from friends and social media to medications prescribed by the primary care physician. The purpose of this article is to critically review current approaches to generalized or monoarticular OA based on available evidence and to illustrate multidisciplinary and multimodal treatment strategies for the management of OA. Treatment options assessed for efficacy include patient education; oral and topical pharmacological agents; complementary and alternative medicine; surgery; manual medicine; acupuncture; interventional procedures (corticosteroid injection, viscosupplementation, and pulsed radiofrequency); bracing; assistive devices; physical therapy; and physical modalities. Multidisciplinary and multimodal treatment strategies combined with early detection and prevention strategies provide the best benefit to patients. This review also illustrates that traditional and alternative modalities of treatment can be both synergistic and beneficial. Physicians should be aware of the variety of tools available for the management of OA and the associated symptoms. Those healthcare providers who can best individualize treatment plans for specific patients and inspire their patients to embrace healthy lifestyle modifications will achieve the best results. PMID:25750483

  4. T-Shaped Frame Critical and Post-Critical Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doicheva, Albena

    2016-03-01

    The paper shows solution of a T-shaped frame, strength- ened with two linear springs, regarding critical and post-critical analysis. The solution is exact using the Euler elastic approach and the frame of reference, originated in the point of column axis inflexion. The derived Numerical results show the effect of the springs strengthening for the crit- ical and the post-critical system behaviour. The influence of the geometry change is analyzed, as well.

  5. Representative equations for the thermodynamic and transport properties of fluids near the gas-liquid critical point

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sengers, J. V.; Basu, R. S.; Sengers, J. M. H. L.

    1981-01-01

    A survey is presented of representative equations for various thermophysical properties of fluids in the critical region. Representative equations for the transport properties are included. Semi-empirical modifications of the theoretically predicted asymtotic critical behavior that yield simple and practical representations of the fluid properties in the critical region are emphasized.

  6. Electron profile stiffness and critical gradient studies

    SciTech Connect

    DeBoo, J. C.; Petty, C. C.; Burrell, K. H.; Smith, S. P.; White, A. E.; Doyle, E. J.; Hillesheim, J. C.; Rhodes, T. L.; Schmitz, L.; Wang, G.; Zeng, L.; Holland, C.; McKee, G. R.

    2012-08-15

    Electron profile stiffness was studied in DIII-D L-mode discharges by systematically varying the heat flux in a narrow region with electron cyclotron heating and measuring the local change produced in {nabla}T{sub e}. Electron stiffness was found to slowly increase with toroidal rotation velocity. A critical inverse temperature gradient scale length 1/L{sub C} {approx} 3 m{sup -1} was identified at {rho}=0.6 and found to be independent of rotation. Both the heat pulse diffusivity and the power balance diffusivity, the latter determined by integrating the measured dependence of the heat pulse diffusivity on -{nabla}T{sub e}, were fit reasonably well by a model containing a critical inverse temperature gradient scale length and varying linearly with 1/L{sub T} above the threshold.

  7. The microbiome and critical illness

    PubMed Central

    Dickson, Robert P

    2016-01-01

    The central role of the microbiome in critical illness is supported by a half century of experimental and clinical study. The physiological effects of critical illness and the clinical interventions of intensive care substantially alter the microbiome. In turn, the microbiome predicts patients’ susceptibility to disease, and manipulation of the microbiome has prevented or modulated critical illness in animal models and clinical trials. This Review surveys the microbial ecology of critically ill patients, presents the facts and unanswered questions surrounding gut-derived sepsis, and explores the radically altered ecosystem of the injured alveolus. The revolution in culture-independent microbiology has provided the tools needed to target the microbiome rationally for the prevention and treatment of critical illness, holding great promise to improve the acute and chronic outcomes of the critically ill. PMID:26700442

  8. Television Criticism: A Deca-Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oseguera, A. Anthony

    Noting that one of the greatest criticisms of television is the lack of television criticism itself, this paper proposes a multidimensional approach to the subject, based on current forms of criticism and theory. The 10 forms of criticism or theory discussed in the paper are (1) rhetorical criticism, (2) dramatic criticism, (3) literary criticism,…

  9. Human Resources Policy and the Education of Future Health Professionals: Report of an AHC/FASHP Retreat.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cocolas, George H.; Rubin, Elaine

    1991-01-01

    Results of a meeting on human resources policy in the health professions are summarized. Aspects of accreditation, licensure, and certification were discussed across a range of health professions, including similarities and differences, impact on each profession, and potential for interaction and cooperation for problem solving. (MSE)

  10. Critical dynamics of classical systems under slow quench

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priyanka; Jain, Kavita

    2016-10-01

    We study the slow quench dynamics of a one-dimensional nonequilibrium lattice gas model which exhibits a phase transition in the stationary state between a fluid phase with homogeneously distributed particles and a jammed phase with a macroscopic hole cluster. Our main result is that in the critical region (i.e., at the critical point and in its vicinity) where the dynamics are assumed to be frozen in the standard Kibble-Zurek argument, the defect density exhibits an algebraic decay in the inverse annealing rate with an exponent that can be understood using critical coarsening dynamics. However, in a part of the critical region in the fluid phase, the standard Kibble-Zurek scaling holds. We also find that when the slow quench occurs deep into the jammed phase, the defect density behavior is explained by the rapid quench dynamics in this phase.

  11. An introduction to critical paths.

    PubMed

    Coffey, Richard J; Richards, Janet S; Remmert, Carl S; LeRoy, Sarah S; Schoville, Rhonda R; Baldwin, Phyllis J

    2005-01-01

    A critical path defines the optimal sequencing and timing of interventions by physicians, nurses, and other staff for a particular diagnosis or procedure. Critical paths are developed through collaborative efforts of physicians, nurses, pharmacists, and others to improve the quality and value of patient care. They are designed to minimize delays and resource utilization and to maximize quality of care. Critical paths have been shown to reduce variation in the care provided, facilitate expected outcomes, reduce delays, reduce length of stay, and improve cost-effectiveness. The approach and goals of critical paths are consistent with those of total quality management (TQM) and can be an important part of an organization's TQM process.

  12. Quantum criticality from Fisher information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Hongting; Luo, Shunlong; Fu, Shuangshuang

    2017-04-01

    Quantum phase transition is primarily characterized by a qualitative sudden change in the ground state of a quantum system when an external or internal parameter of the Hamiltonian is continuously varied. Investigating quantum criticality using information-theoretic methods has generated fruitful results. Quantum correlations and fidelity have been exploited to characterize the quantum critical phenomena. In this work, we employ quantum Fisher information to study quantum criticality. The singular or extremal point of the quantum Fisher information is adopted as the estimated thermal critical point. By a significant model constructed in Quan et al. (Phys Rev Lett 96: 140604, 2006), the effectiveness of this method is illustrated explicitly.

  13. Protein requirement in critical illness.

    PubMed

    Hoffer, Leonard John

    2016-05-01

    How much protein do critically ill patients require? For the many decades that nutritional support has been used there was a broad consensus that critically ill patients need much more protein than required for normal health. Now, however, some clinical investigators recommend limiting all macronutrient provision during the early phase of critical illness. How did these conflicting recommendations emerge? Which of them is correct? This review explains the longstanding recommendation for generous protein provision in critical illness, analyzes the clinical trials now being claimed to refute it, and concludes with suggestions for clinical investigation and practice.

  14. Critical Viscosity of Xenon investigators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Dr. Dr. Robert F. Berg (right), principal investigator and Dr. Micheal R. Moldover (left), co-investigator, for the Critical Viscosity of Xenon (CVX/CVX-2) experiment. They are with the National Institutes of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD. The Critical Viscosity of Xenon Experiment (CVX-2) on the STS-107 Research 1 mission in 2002 will measure the viscous behavior of xenon, a heavy inert gas used in flash lamps and ion rocket engines, at its critical point. Although it does not easily combine with other chemicals, its viscosity at the critical point can be used as a model for a range of chemicals.

  15. TUM Critical Zone Observatory, Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Völkel, Jörg; Eden, Marie

    2014-05-01

    Founded 2011 the TUM Critical Zone Observatory run by the Technische Universität München and partners abroad is the first CZO within Germany. TUM CZO is both, a scientific as well as an education project. It is a watershed based observatory, but moving behind this focus. In fact, two mountainous areas are integrated: (1) The Ammer Catchment area as an alpine and pre alpine research area in the northern limestone Alps and forelands south of Munich; (2) the Otter Creek Catchment in the Bavarian Forest with a crystalline setting (Granite, Gneiss) as a mid mountainous area near Regensburg; and partly the mountainous Bavarian Forest National Park. The Ammer Catchment is a high energy system as well as a sensitive climate system with past glacial elements. The lithology shows mostly carbonates from Tertiary and Mesozoic times (e.g. Flysch). Source-to-sink processes are characteristic for the Ammer Catchment down to the last glacial Ammer Lake as the regional erosion and deposition base. The consideration of distal depositional environments, the integration of upstream and downstream landscape effects are characteristic for the Ammer Catchment as well. Long term datasets exist in many regards. The Otter Creek catchment area is developed in a granitic environment, rich in saprolites. As a mid mountainous catchment the energy system is facing lower stage. Hence, it is ideal comparing both of them. Both TUM CZO Catchments: The selected catchments capture the depositional environment. Both catchment areas include historical impacts and rapid land use change. Crosscutting themes across both sites are inbuilt. Questions of ability to capture such gradients along climosequence, chronosequence, anthroposequence are essential.

  16. Do Critical Thinking Exercises Improve Critical Thinking Skills?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cotter, Ellen M.; Tally, Carrie Sacco

    2009-01-01

    Although textbooks routinely include exercises to improve critical thinking skills, the effectiveness of these exercises has not been closely examined. Additionally, the connection between critical thinking skills and formal operational thought is also relatively understudied. In the study reported here, college students completed measures of…

  17. How Critical Is Critical Thinking? FACTC Focus, 2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doerr, Mark, Ed.

    2010-01-01

    "FACTC Focus" is a publication of Faculty Association of Community and Technical Colleges (FACTC) with the purpose of presenting diverse views on faculty issues. Included in this issue are: (1) LOL: The Easy ROUTE TO Critical Thinking (Barbara B. Parsons); (2) Critical Thinking: We Know It When We (Don't) See It (Jared Anthony); (3) Critical…

  18. Discipline-Based Art Education: Its Criticisms and Its Critics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eisner, Elliot W.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the criticisms of discipline-based art education published in the March 1988 issue of "Art Education." Responds to the arguments of Peter London, Helen Muth, Norma K. Pittard, and Karen Hamblen. States that art education would be better served if the energy devoted to criticism was directed toward constructive ends. (GEA)

  19. A Critical "Critical Inquiry" Proposition in Health and Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leahy, Deana; O'Flynn, Gabrielle; Wright, Jan

    2013-01-01

    A critical inquiry approach is one of five key characteristics that have shaped the development of the new Australian Curriculum: Health and Physical Education (AC: HPE). However, what this means is open to interpretation. In the various documents leading to the consultation draft AC: HPE and in this document itself, critical inquiry is used in…

  20. Double criticality in the magnetic field driven transition of a high-TC superconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leridon, Brigitte; Vanacken, Johan; Moshchalkov, V. V.; Vignolle, Baptiste; Porwal, Rajni; Budhani, R. C.

    2015-03-01

    The magnetic-field driven transition of a set of high critical temperature La2 - x Srx CuO4 superconducting thin films has been investigated using high pulsed magnetic fields. For the underdoped samples, the existence of two distinct critical regions in the superconductor/insulator transition has been evidenced for the first time. The first quantum critical region is observed at intermediate magnetic fields (~= 19 T)and temperatures and gives way at lower temperature to a quantum critical point at about twice critical magnetic field and resistance per square. The critical exponents inferred from scaling behaviour are markedly different for the two regions. We attribute this behaviour to the existence of a clean/dirty crossover due to the presence of electronic inhomogeneities. This work has been supported by a SESAME grant from Region Ile-de-France. Part of the experiments at KULeuven have been founded by EuroMagNET II under the EU Contract Number 228043.

  1. Merger of Nuclear Data with Criticality Safety Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Derrien, H.; Larson, N.M.; Leal, L.C.

    1999-09-20

    In this paper we report on current activities related to the merger of differential/integral data (especially in the resolved-resonance region) with nuclear criticality safety computations. Techniques are outlined for closer coupling of many processes � measurement, data reduction, differential-data analysis, integral-data analysis, generating multigroup cross sections, data-testing, criticality computations � which in the past have been treated independently.

  2. Unconventional Quantum Criticality Due to Critical Valence Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyake, Kazumasa; Watanabe, Shinji

    2014-06-01

    Quantum criticality due to the valence transition in some Yb-based heavy fermion metals has gradually turned out to play a crucial role to understand the non-Fermi liquid properties that cannot be understood from the conventional quantum criticality theory due to magnetic transitions. Namely, critical exponents giving the temperature (T) dependence of the resistivity ρ(T), the Sommerfeld coefficient, C(T)/T, the magnetic susceptibility, χ(T), and the NMR relaxation rates, 1/(T1T), can be understood as the effect of the critical valence fluctuations of f electrons in Yb ion in a unified way. There also exist a series of Ce-based heavy fermion metals that exhibit anomalies in physical quantities, enhancements of the residual resistivity ρ0 and the superconducting critical temperature (Tc) around the pressure where the valence of Ce sharply changes. Here we review the present status of these problems both from experimental and theoretical aspects.

  3. Quantum critical temperature of a modulated oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Lingzhen; Peano, Vittorio; Marthaler, M.; Dykman, M. I.

    2013-06-01

    We show that the rate of switching between the vibrational states of a modulated nonlinear oscillator is characterized by a quantum critical temperature Tc1∝ℏ2. Above Tc1 there emerges a quantum crossover region where the switching rate displays a steep and characteristic temperature dependence, followed by a qualitatively different temperature dependence for higher T. In contrast to the crossover between tunneling and thermal activation in equilibrium systems, here the crossover occurs between different regimes of switching activated by quantum fluctuations. The results go beyond the standard real-time instanton technique of the large-deviation theory.

  4. RHIC CRITICAL POINT SEARCH: ASSESSING STARs CAPABILITIES.

    SciTech Connect

    SORENSEN,P.

    2006-07-03

    In this report we discuss the capabilities and limitations of the STAR detector to search for signatures of the QCD critical point in a low energy scan at RHIC. We find that a RHIC low energy scan will cover a broad region of interest in the nuclear matter phase diagram and that the STAR detector--a detector designed to measure the quantities that will be of interest in this search--will provide new observables and improve on previous measurements in this energy range.

  5. Critical market crashes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sornette, D.

    2003-04-01

    patterns have been documented for essentially all crashes on developed as well as emergent stock markets, on currency markets, on company stocks, and so on. We review this discovery at length and demonstrate how to use this insight and the detailed predictions obtained from these models to forecast crashes. For this, we review the major crashes of the past that occurred on the major stock markets of the planet and describe the empirical evidence of the universal nature of the critical log-periodic precursory signature of crashes. The concept of an “anti-bubble” is also summarized, with the Japanese collapse from the beginning of 1991 to present, taken as a prominent example. A prediction issued and advertised in January 1999 has been until recently born out with remarkable precision, predicting correctly several changes of trends, a feat notoriously difficult using standard techniques of economic forecasting. We also summarize a very recent analysis the behavior of the U.S. S&P500 index from 1996 to August 2002 and the forecast for the two following years. We conclude by presenting our view of the organization of financial markets.

  6. Cultural Criticism: Past and Present.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poovey, Mary

    1990-01-01

    Argues that modern cultural and literary forces have altered the direction of literary criticism. Suggests that structuralist criticism has given way to poststructuralism. Asserts that poststructuralism represses differences between apparently separate things while holding that words assume meaning through the operation of language. Critiques…

  7. Education Studies: Issues & Critical Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kassem, Derek; Mufti, Emmanuel; Robinson, John

    2006-01-01

    This major text for Education Studies students provides a critical account of key issues in education today. The text features: (1) A critical analysis of key issues in Education Studies to encourage students' thinking about education in the broadest terms; (2) Themed sections with introductions to link the issues discussed in each chapter; (3)…

  8. Critical thinking in physics education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadidi, Farahnaz

    2016-07-01

    We agree that training the next generation of leaders of the society, who have the ability to think critically and form a better judgment is an important goal. It is a long-standing concern of Educators and a long-term desire of teachers to establish a method in order to teach to think critically. To this end, many questions arise on three central aspects: the definition, the evaluation and the design of the course: What is Critical Thinking? How can we define Critical Thinking? How can we evaluate Critical Thinking? Therefore, we want to implement Critical Thinking in physics education. How can we teach for Critical Thinking in physics? What should the course syllabus and materials be? We present examples from classical physics and give perspectives for astro-particle physics. The main aim of this paper is to answer the questions and provide teachers with the opportunity to change their classroom to an active one, in which students are encouraged to ask questions and learn to reach a good judgment. Key words: Critical Thinking, evaluation, judgment, design of the course.

  9. Scrutiny of Critical Thinking Concept

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atabaki, Ali Mohammad Siahi; Keshtiaray, Narges; Yarmohammadian, Mohammad H.

    2015-01-01

    Learning critical thinking skills are the goal of educational systems so the term "critical thinking" (CT) is frequently found in educational policy documents. Despite this frequency, however, precise understandings among teachers of what CT really means do not exit. The present study is designed to answer the following question. We can…

  10. Harnessing Critical Incidents for Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patahuddin, Sitti Maesuri; Lowrie, Tom

    2015-01-01

    A critical incident is a situation or event that holds significance for learning, both for the students and teachers. This paper presents four examples of critical incidents from a Year 7 teacher's lesson excerpts in Indonesia involving teaching of fractions, to show how they shaped classroom situation, brought forward elements of conflict, and…

  11. Critical Thinking in Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Humphries, Charlotte

    2014-01-01

    Changes in American education require that teachers are evaluated more often, and expectations increasingly include teaching to develop critical thinking skills. This article uses Bloom's taxonomy in describing ways physical educators can include critical thinking in their lessons, both to enhance their teaching and to meet expectations of…

  12. A Place for Critical Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beck, Ann S.

    2005-01-01

    The critical literacy classroom is characterized by an emphasis on students' voices and on dialogue as a tool with which students reflect on and construct meanings from texts and discourses. Is it appropriate, however, to teach critical literacy in settings such as penal institutions where student voices are deliberately discouraged and silenced?…

  13. Critical Pedagogy in Health Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    Objective: This review investigated how the three-phase model of critical pedagogy, based on the writings of Paulo Freire, can be put into practice in health education. Design: The study considers literature related to the fields of health education, health promotion and critical pedagogy. Setting: The study is a scholarly review completed as part…

  14. Teaching Students to Think Critically

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Black, Susan

    2005-01-01

    In this article, the author stresses that teachers need to teach their students to think critically and to reason their way. One prerequisite for teaching critical thinking is a classroom climate of high expectations, teacher warmth and encouragement, and pleasant physical surroundings. Schools should see to it that students become progressively…

  15. Critical Thinking: Schemata vs. Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brandhorst, Allan R.

    1989-01-01

    Refutes the idea that critical thinking is not a skill by analyzing it from the phenomenological perspective of Edmund Husserl, and from the hermeneutic perspective of Martin Heidegger. Develops the thesis that critical thinking is a restructuring of schemata. Addresses the problem of attention or student engagement. (LS)

  16. Diagnosing Disputes in Film Criticism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schultz, Robert A.

    1979-01-01

    By classifying and analyzing actual disputes in film criticism, the author considers the following questions: Are there connections between film theory and film criticism? If so, which are healthy and which are diseased? If not, what alternative healthy function might film theory have? (Author/SJL)

  17. Cabbage Worms and Critical Thinking.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braswell, Patricia

    1993-01-01

    Argues that an approach to composition instruction that emphasizes critical thinking skills produces a more analytical writer. Describes a school project that examined research on critical thinking, implemented changes in the teaching of thinking and composition, and assessed student learning. (HB)

  18. Angela: On a Critical Curve

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Obenchain, Kathryn M.; Pennington, Julie L.; Orr, Angela

    2010-01-01

    This qualitative case study examines one secondary social studies teacher's enactment of her critical constructivist beliefs in teaching for democratic citizenship education. Results are organized around the knowledge, skills, and dispositions addressed, and their consistency with critical constructivism. The teacher's practices were consistent…

  19. Quantifying Learning in Critical Thinking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fliegel, Richard; Holland, John

    2013-01-01

    This article describes a three-year study assessing change in critical thinking demonstrated in essays written for regular class assignments. A rubric was designed and scorers trained to assess critical thinking holistically without knowledge of the writing prompt or author's status. The longitudinal improvement in scores earned by freshmen over…

  20. The Importance of Critical Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Janks, Hilary

    2012-01-01

    This paper is divided into three parts. It begins by making an argument for the ongoing importance of critical literacy at a moment when there are mutterings about its being passe. The second part of the paper formulates the argument with the use of illustrative texts. It concludes with examples of critical literacy activities that I argue, are…

  1. Traditional Literacy and Critical Thinking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dando, Priscille

    2016-01-01

    How school librarians focus on activating critical thinking through traditional literacy development can proactively set the stage for the deep thinking that occurs in all literacy development. The critical-thinking skills students build while becoming accomplished readers and writers provide the foundation for learning in a variety of…

  2. Impediments to Implementing Critical Thinking.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKee, Saundra J.

    1988-01-01

    Highlighting the fact that little critical thinking actually occurs in secondary social studies education, McKee presents the findings from a three-year school district-university project to foster critical thinking in social studies classes. Addressing methodology and implications, McKee reports that, even with intensive training and teacher…

  3. Griffiths phases and the stretching of criticality in brain networks.

    PubMed

    Moretti, Paolo; Muñoz, Miguel A

    2013-01-01

    Hallmarks of criticality, such as power-laws and scale invariance, have been empirically found in cortical-network dynamics and it has been conjectured that operating at criticality entails functional advantages, such as optimal computational capabilities, memory and large dynamical ranges. As critical behaviour requires a high degree of fine tuning to emerge, some type of self-tuning mechanism needs to be invoked. Here we show that, taking into account the complex hierarchical-modular architecture of cortical networks, the singular critical point is replaced by an extended critical-like region that corresponds--in the jargon of statistical mechanics--to a Griffiths phase. Using computational and analytical approaches, we find Griffiths phases in synthetic hierarchical networks and also in empirical brain networks such as the human connectome and that of Caenorhabditis elegans. Stretched critical regions, stemming from structural disorder, yield enhanced functionality in a generic way, facilitating the task of self-organizing, adaptive and evolutionary mechanisms selecting for criticality.

  4. An arthroscopic evaluation of the anatomical "critical zone".

    PubMed

    Naidoo, Nerissa; Lazarus, Lelika; Osman, Shameem Ahmed; Satyapal, Kapil Sewsaran

    2016-09-26

    The "critical zone", a region of speculated vascularity, is situated approximately 10mm proximal to the insertion of the supraspinatus tendon. Despite its obvious role as an anatomical landmark demarcator, its patho-anatomic nature has been identified as the source of rotator cuff pathology. Although many studies have attempted to evaluate the vascularity of this region, the architecture regarding the exact length, width and shape of the critical zone, remains unreported. This study aimed to determine the shape and morphometry of the "critical zone" arthroscopically. The sample series, which comprised of 38 cases (n = 38) specific to pathological types, employed an anatomical investigation of the critical zone during routine real-time arthroscopy. Demographic representation: i) Sex: 19 Males, 19 Females; ii) Age range: 18 - 76 years old; iii) Race: White (29), Indian (7) and Coloured (2). The incidence of shape and the mean lengths and widths of the critical zone were determined in accordance with the relevant demographic factors and patient history. Although the cresenteric shape was predominant, hemispheric and sail-shaped critical zones were also identified. The lengths and widths of the critical zone appeared markedly increased in male individuals. While the increase in age may account for the increased incidence of rotator cuff degeneration due to poor end vascular supply, the additional factors of height and weight presented as major determinants of the increase in size of the critical zone. In addition, the comparisons of length and width with each other and shape yielded levels of significant difference, therefore indicating a directly proportional relationship between the length and width of the critical zone. This detailed understanding of the critical zone may prove beneficial for the success of post-operative rotator cuff healing.

  5. Critical thinking in nurse managers.

    PubMed

    Zori, Susan; Morrison, Barbara

    2009-01-01

    Formal education and support is needed for nurse managers to effectively function in their role in the current health care environment. Many nurse managers assume their positions based on expertise in a clinical role with little expertise in managerial and leadership skills. Operating as a manager and leader requires ongoing development of critical thinking skills and the inclination to use those skills. Critical thinking can have a powerful influence on the decision making and problem solving that nurse managers are faced with on a daily basis. The skills that typify critical thinking include analysis, evaluation, inference, and deductive and inductive reasoning. It is intuitive that nurse managers require both the skills and the dispositions of critical thinking to be successful in this pivotal role at a time of transformation in health care. Incorporating critical thinking into education and support programs for the nurse manager is necessary to position the nurse manager for success.

  6. Regional Renewable Energy Cooperatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazendonk, P.; Brown, M. B.; Byrne, J. M.; Harrison, T.; Mueller, R.; Peacock, K.; Usher, J.; Yalamova, R.; Kroebel, R.; Larsen, J.; McNaughton, R.

    2014-12-01

    We are building a multidisciplinary research program linking researchers in agriculture, business, earth science, engineering, humanities and social science. Our goal is to match renewable energy supply and reformed energy demands. The program will be focused on (i) understanding and modifying energy demand, (ii) design and implementation of diverse renewable energy networks. Geomatics technology will be used to map existing energy and waste flows on a neighbourhood, municipal, and regional level. Optimal sites and combinations of sites for solar and wind electrical generation (ridges, rooftops, valley walls) will be identified. Geomatics based site and grid analyses will identify best locations for energy production based on efficient production and connectivity to regional grids and transportation. Design of networks for utilization of waste streams of heat, water, animal and human waste for energy production will be investigated. Agriculture, cities and industry produce many waste streams that are not well utilized. Therefore, establishing a renewable energy resource mapping and planning program for electrical generation, waste heat and energy recovery, biomass collection, and biochar, biodiesel and syngas production is critical to regional energy optimization. Electrical storage and demand management are two priorities that will be investigated. Regional scale cooperatives may use electric vehicle batteries and innovations such as pump storage and concentrated solar molten salt heat storage for steam turbine electrical generation. Energy demand management is poorly explored in Canada and elsewhere - our homes and businesses operate on an unrestricted demand. Simple monitoring and energy demand-ranking software can easily reduce peaks demands and move lower ranked uses to non-peak periods, thereby reducing the grid size needed to meet peak demands. Peak demand strains the current energy grid capacity and often requires demand balancing projects and

  7. A new conceptual framework for academic health centers.

    PubMed

    Borden, William B; Mushlin, Alvin I; Gordon, Jonathan E; Leiman, Joan M; Pardes, Herbert

    2015-05-01

    Led by the Affordable Care Act, the U.S. health care system is undergoing a transformative shift toward greater accountability for quality and efficiency. Academic health centers (AHCs), whose triple mission of clinical care, research, and education serves a critical role in the country's health care system, must adapt to this evolving environment. Doing so successfully, however, requires a broader understanding of the wide-ranging roles of the AHC. This article proposes a conceptual framework through which the triple mission is expanded along four new dimensions: health, innovation, community, and policy. Examples within the conceptual framework categories, such as the AHCs' safety net function, their contributions to local economies, and their role in right-sizing the health care workforce, illustrate how each of these dimensions provides a more robust picture of the modern AHC and demonstrates the value added by AHCs. This conceptual framework also offers a basis for developing new performance metrics by which AHCs, both individually and as a group, can be held accountable, and that can inform policy decisions affecting them. This closer examination of the myriad activities of modern AHCs clarifies their essential role in our health care system and will enable these institutions to evolve, improve, be held accountable for, and more fully serve the health of the nation.

  8. Critical behavior of anhydride cured epoxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trappe, V.; Richtering, W.; Burchard, W.

    1992-07-01

    Critical behavior was studied with a crosslinking system obtained by living anionic polymerization, where the primary chain length was kept constant and the crosslinking density was varied. Gelation was found at a critical ratio of crosslinker per chain X_c=0.884± 0.004. Different samples from the pre gel region were studied by dynamic and static light scattering in dilute solution and oscillatory rheology in melt. The exponents γ = 1.75± 0.38 and ν = 0.98± 0.19, determined from M_w and R_g dependence on (X_c-X), are in accordance with three dimensional percolation theory. The distribution of diffusion coefficients obtained by inverse Laplace transformation of the time correlation function shows power law behavior in a limited interval, from which an exponent tau = 2.17± 0.03 is derived. Rheological measurements show a systematic change of G^{prime}(ω) and G''(ω) from typical liquid to the critical gel behavior, where tan δ = G''(ω)/G^{prime}(ω) becomes frequency independent.

  9. Neural responses to maternal criticism in healthy youth

    PubMed Central

    Siegle, Greg J.; Dahl, Ronald E.; Hooley, Jill M.; Silk, Jennifer S.

    2015-01-01

    Parental criticism can have positive and negative effects on children’s and adolescents’ behavior; yet, it is unclear how youth react to, understand and process parental criticism. We proposed that youth would engage three sets of neural processes in response to parental criticism including the following: (i) activating emotional reactions, (ii) regulating those reactions and (iii) social cognitive processing (e.g. understanding the parent’s mental state). To examine neural processes associated with both emotional and social processing of parental criticism in personally relevant and ecologically valid social contexts, typically developing youth were scanned while they listened to their mother providing critical, praising and neutral statements. In response to maternal criticism, youth showed increased brain activity in affective networks (e.g. subcortical–limbic regions including lentiform nucleus and posterior insula), but decreased activity in cognitive control networks (e.g. dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and caudal anterior cingulate cortex) and social cognitive networks (e.g. temporoparietal junction and posterior cingulate cortex/precuneus). These results suggest that youth may respond to maternal criticism with increased emotional reactivity but decreased cognitive control and social cognitive processing. A better understanding of children’s responses to parental criticism may provide insights into the ways that parental feedback can be modified to be more helpful to behavior and development in youth. PMID:25338632

  10. Harmonic Measure of Critical Curves

    SciTech Connect

    Bettelheim, E.; Rushkin, I.; Gruzberg, I.A.; Wiegmann, P.

    2005-10-21

    Fractal geometry of critical curves appearing in 2D critical systems is characterized by their harmonic measure. For systems described by conformal field theories with central charge c{<=}1, scaling exponents of the harmonic measure have been computed by Duplantier [Phys. Rev. Lett. 84, 1363 (2000)] by relating the problem to boundary two-dimensional gravity. We present a simple argument connecting the harmonic measure of critical curves to operators obtained by fusion of primary fields and compute characteristics of the fractal geometry by means of regular methods of conformal field theory. The method is not limited to theories with c{<=}1.

  11. Critical behavior of gravitating sphalerons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millward, R. Steven; Hirschmann, Eric W.

    2003-07-01

    We examine the gravitational collapse of sphaleron type configurations in the Einstein-Yang-Mills-Higgs theory. Working in spherical symmetry, we investigate the critical behavior in this model. We provide evidence that for various initial configurations, there can be three different critical transitions between possible end states with different critical solutions sitting on the threshold between these outcomes. In addition, we show that within the dispersive and black hole regimes there are new possible end states: namely, a stable, regular sphaleron and a stable, hairy black hole.

  12. Autoclave nuclear criticality safety analysis

    SciTech Connect

    D`Aquila, D.M.; Tayloe, R.W. Jr.

    1991-12-31

    Steam-heated autoclaves are used in gaseous diffusion uranium enrichment plants to heat large cylinders of UF{sub 6}. Nuclear criticality safety for these autoclaves is evaluated. To enhance criticality safety, systems are incorporated into the design of autoclaves to limit the amount of water present. These safety systems also increase the likelihood that any UF{sub 6} inadvertently released from a cylinder into an autoclave is not released to the environment. Up to 140 pounds of water can be held up in large autoclaves. This mass of water is sufficient to support a nuclear criticality when optimally combined with 125 pounds of UF{sub 6} enriched to 5 percent U{sup 235}. However, water in autoclaves is widely dispersed as condensed droplets and vapor, and is extremely unlikely to form a critical configuration with released UF{sub 6}.

  13. The critics return to flight.

    PubMed

    Jones, Thomas D

    2005-08-01

    A former astronaut justifies human space exploration and provides a rebuttal to criticism of continued exploration. The discussion includes examples of skeptics' arguments and examples of NASA achievements that have had direct economic and social impacts on the United States.

  14. Mission Critical: Preventing Antibiotic Resistance

    MedlinePlus

    ... Button Past Emails CDC Features Mission Critical: Preventing Antibiotic Resistance Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Can ... spp. So, what can we do to prevent antibiotic resistance in healthcare settings? Patients, healthcare providers, healthcare ...

  15. Critical rolling angle of microparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farzi, Bahman; Vallabh, Chaitanya K. P.; Stephens, James D.; Cetinkaya, Cetin

    2016-03-01

    At the micrometer-scale and below, particle adhesion becomes particularly relevant as van der Waals force often dominates volume and surface proportional forces. The rolling resistance of microparticles and their critical rolling angles prior to the initiation of free-rolling and/or complete detachment are critical in numerous industrial processes and natural phenomenon involving particle adhesion and granular dynamics. The current work describes a non-contact measurement approach for determining the critical rolling angle of a single microparticle under the influence of a contact-point base-excitation generated by a transient displacement field of a prescribed surface acoustic wave pulse and reports the critical rolling angle data for a set of polystyrene latex microparticles.

  16. Nonadditivity of critical Casimir forces

    PubMed Central

    Paladugu, Sathyanarayana; Callegari, Agnese; Tuna, Yazgan; Barth, Lukas; Dietrich, Siegfried; Gambassi, Andrea; Volpe, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    In soft condensed matter physics, effective interactions often emerge due to the spatial confinement of fluctuating fields. For instance, microscopic particles dissolved in a binary liquid mixture are subject to critical Casimir forces whenever their surfaces confine the thermal fluctuations of the order parameter of the solvent close to its critical demixing point. These forces are theoretically predicted to be nonadditive on the scale set by the bulk correlation length of the fluctuations. Here we provide direct experimental evidence of this fact by reporting the measurement of the associated many-body forces. We consider three colloidal particles in optical traps and observe that the critical Casimir force exerted on one of them by the other two differs from the sum of the forces they exert separately. This three-body effect depends sensitively on the distance from the critical point and on the chemical functionalisation of the colloid surfaces. PMID:27097797

  17. Cooperative Learning and Critical Thinking.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, James L.

    1995-01-01

    Contends that, in many ways, college teaching has remained largely unchanged since the days of the medieval university. Discusses the role of cooperative learning in higher education and maintains that the technique can enhance critical thinking skills. (CFR)

  18. Psychoanalytic Criticism and Teaching Shakespeare.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wheeler, Richard P.

    1987-01-01

    Presents a brief overview of previous psychoanalytically based theories of Shakespeare's plays, particularly "Hamlet," and defends the notion of introducing undergraduates to psychoanalytically based criticism because of the insights it may give students into their own lives. (JC)

  19. Television Criticism: A Multifarious Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oseguera, A. Anthony

    Recognizing the need for a multifarious approach to television, this paper provides the reader with the following multidimensional approaches to television criticism: rhetorical, dramatic, literary, cinematic, content analysis, myth, linguistics, semiotics, phenomenalism, phenomenology, interpersonal communication, public relations, image,…

  20. Autism: a "critical period" disorder?

    PubMed

    LeBlanc, Jocelyn J; Fagiolini, Michela

    2011-01-01

    Cortical circuits in the brain are refined by experience during critical periods early in postnatal life. Critical periods are regulated by the balance of excitatory and inhibitory (E/I) neurotransmission in the brain during development. There is now increasing evidence of E/I imbalance in autism, a complex genetic neurodevelopmental disorder diagnosed by abnormal socialization, impaired communication, and repetitive behaviors or restricted interests. The underlying cause is still largely unknown and there is no fully effective treatment or cure. We propose that alteration of the expression and/or timing of critical period circuit refinement in primary sensory brain areas may significantly contribute to autistic phenotypes, including cognitive and behavioral impairments. Dissection of the cellular and molecular mechanisms governing well-established critical periods represents a powerful tool to identify new potential therapeutic targets to restore normal plasticity and function in affected neuronal circuits.

  1. The Perceptual Criticism of Drama

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Styan, J. L.

    1975-01-01

    Defines perceptual criticism as an act of verbalizing sight and sound perceptions and contends that this creative synthesizing gives a play its meaning. Speech and Drama, 205 Ashby Road, Loughborough, Leicestershire, England. Subscription Rate: $6.00 per year. (MH)

  2. Advanced Analytic Cognition: Critical Thinking

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-01

    Published online ahead of print: 12/16/2010) 39 Beyer, B.K. Practical Strategies for the Teaching of Thinking, Allyn and Bacon , Boston, MA, 1987, p. 32...or critical thinking as such has no part in this linkage.78 David Schum and Francis Hume discussed critical reasoning within the context of...Teaching of Thinking, Allyn and Bacon , Boston, MA, 1987, p. 211. 110 Dewey, J. How We Think: A Restatement of the Relation of Reflective Thinking to

  3. Lecture notes for criticality safety

    SciTech Connect

    Fullwood, R.

    1992-03-01

    These lecture notes for criticality safety are prepared for the training of Department of Energy supervisory, project management, and administrative staff. Technical training and basic mathematics are assumed. The notes are designed for a two-day course, taught by two lecturers. Video tapes may be used at the options of the instructors. The notes provide all the materials that are necessary but outside reading will assist in the fullest understanding. The course begins with a nuclear physics overview. The reader is led from the macroscopic world into the microscopic world of atoms and the elementary particles that constitute atoms. The particles, their masses and sizes and properties associated with radioactive decay and fission are introduced along with Einstein`s mass-energy equivalence. Radioactive decay, nuclear reactions, radiation penetration, shielding and health-effects are discussed to understand protection in case of a criticality accident. Fission, the fission products, particles and energy released are presented to appreciate the dangers of criticality. Nuclear cross sections are introduced to understand the effectiveness of slow neutrons to produce fission. Chain reactors are presented as an economy; effective use of the neutrons from fission leads to more fission resulting in a power reactor or a criticality excursion. The six-factor formula is presented for managing the neutron budget. This leads to concepts of material and geometric buckling which are used in simple calculations to assure safety from criticality. Experimental measurements and computer code calculations of criticality are discussed. To emphasize the reality, historical criticality accidents are presented in a table with major ones discussed to provide lessons-learned. Finally, standards, NRC guides and regulations, and DOE orders relating to criticality protection are presented.

  4. Critical health literacy: a review and critical analysis.

    PubMed

    Chinn, Deborah

    2011-07-01

    Though there has been a considerable expansion of interest in the health literacy concept worldwide, there has also been criticism that this concept has been poorly defined, that it stretches the idea of "literacy" to an indefensible extent and more specifically, that it adds little to the existing concerns and intervention approaches of the better established discipline of health promotion. This paper takes as a starting point the expanded model of health literacy advanced by Nutbeam (2000) and addresses these concerns by interrogating the concept of "critical health literacy" in order to draw conclusions about its utility for advancing the health of individuals and communities. The constituent domains of critical health literacy are identified; namely information appraisal, understanding the social determinants of health, and collective action, and as far as possible each are clearly delineated, with links to related concepts made explicit. The paper concludes that an appreciation of work undertaken in a range of different disciplines, such as media studies, medical sociology, and evidence-based medicine can enhance our understanding of the critical health literacy construct and help us understand its usefulness as a social asset which helps individuals towards a critical engagement with health information. There is some evidence that aspects of critical health literacy have indeed been found to be a resource for better health outcomes, but more research is needed in this area, both to develop quantitative and qualitative approaches to evaluating health literacy skills, and to offer convincing evidence that investment in programmes designed to enhance critical health literacy are worthwhile.

  5. Tourism and the Conservation of Critically Endangered Frogs

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, Clare; Simpkins, Clay; Castley, J. Guy; Buckley, Ralf C.

    2012-01-01

    Protected areas are critical for the conservation of many threatened species. Despite this, many protected areas are acutely underfunded, which reduces their effectiveness significantly. Tourism is one mechanism to promote and fund conservation in protected areas, but there are few studies analyzing its tangible conservation outcomes for threatened species. This study uses the 415 IUCN critically endangered frog species to evaluate the contribution of protected area tourism revenue to conservation. Contributions were calculated for each species as the proportion of geographic range inside protected areas multiplied by the proportion of protected area revenues derived from tourism. Geographic ranges were determined from IUCN Extent of Occurrence maps. Almost 60% (239) of critically endangered frog species occur in protected areas. Higher proportions of total range are protected in Nearctic, Australasian and Afrotopical regions. Tourism contributions to protected area budgets ranged from 5–100%. These financial contributions are highest for developing countries in the Afrotropical, Indomalayan and Neotropical regions. Data for both geographic range and budget are available for 201 critically endangered frog species with proportional contributions from tourism to species protection ranging from 0.8–99%. Tourism's financial contributions to critically endangered frog species protection are highest in the Afrotropical region. This study uses a coarse measure but at the global scale it demonstrates that tourism has significant potential to contribute to global frog conservation efforts. PMID:22984440

  6. Tourism and the conservation of critically endangered frogs.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Clare; Simpkins, Clay; Castley, J Guy; Buckley, Ralf C

    2012-01-01

    Protected areas are critical for the conservation of many threatened species. Despite this, many protected areas are acutely underfunded, which reduces their effectiveness significantly. Tourism is one mechanism to promote and fund conservation in protected areas, but there are few studies analyzing its tangible conservation outcomes for threatened species. This study uses the 415 IUCN critically endangered frog species to evaluate the contribution of protected area tourism revenue to conservation. Contributions were calculated for each species as the proportion of geographic range inside protected areas multiplied by the proportion of protected area revenues derived from tourism. Geographic ranges were determined from IUCN Extent of Occurrence maps. Almost 60% (239) of critically endangered frog species occur in protected areas. Higher proportions of total range are protected in Nearctic, Australasian and Afrotopical regions. Tourism contributions to protected area budgets ranged from 5-100%. These financial contributions are highest for developing countries in the Afrotropical, Indomalayan and Neotropical regions. Data for both geographic range and budget are available for 201 critically endangered frog species with proportional contributions from tourism to species protection ranging from 0.8-99%. Tourism's financial contributions to critically endangered frog species protection are highest in the Afrotropical region. This study uses a coarse measure but at the global scale it demonstrates that tourism has significant potential to contribute to global frog conservation efforts.

  7. Critical Decay Index at the Onset of Solar Eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuccarello, F. P.; Aulanier, G.; Gilchrist, S. A.

    2015-12-01

    Magnetic flux ropes are topological structures consisting of twisted magnetic field lines that globally wrap around an axis. The torus instability model predicts that a magnetic flux rope of major radius R undergoes an eruption when its axis reaches a location where the decay index -d({ln}{B}{ex})/d({ln}R) of the ambient magnetic field Bex is larger than a critical value. In the current-wire model, the critical value depends on the thickness and time evolution of the current channel. We use magnetohydrodynamic simulations to investigate whether the critical value of the decay index at the onset of the eruption is affected by the magnetic flux rope’s internal current profile and/or by the particular pre-eruptive photospheric dynamics. The evolution of an asymmetric, bipolar active region is driven by applying different classes of photospheric motions. We find that the critical value of the decay index at the onset of the eruption is not significantly affected by either the pre-erupitve photospheric evolution of the active region or the resulting different magnetic flux ropes. As in the case of the current-wire model, we find that there is a “critical range” [1.3-1.5], rather than a “critical value” for the onset of the torus instability. This range is in good agreement with the predictions of the current-wire model, despite the inclusion of line-tying effects and the occurrence of tether-cutting magnetic reconnection.

  8. A methodology for critical science in nursing.

    PubMed

    Fontana, Joyce S

    2004-01-01

    There is confusion surrounding critical science in nursing. Many studies which could be considered critical do not identify themselves as such. Reasons for this may be the lack of a clear definition of critical science in nursing or the failure of the discipline to identify the defining characteristics of a critical methodology. This article addresses the confusion by defining critical science in nursing in addition to presenting a critical methodology synthesizing 7 common processes seen in critical research.

  9. Southeast Regional Experiment Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1994-08-01

    This is the final report of the Southeast Regional Experiment Station project. The Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC), a research institute of the University of Central Florida (UCF), has operated the Southeast Regional Experiment Station (SE RES) for the US Department of Energy (DOE) since September 1982. Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque (SNLA) provides technical program direction for both the SE RES and the Southwest Regional Experiment Station (SW RES) located at the Southwest Technology Development Institute at Las Cruces, New Mexico. This cooperative effort serves a critical role in the national photovoltaic program by conducting system evaluations, design assistance and technology transfer to enhance the cost-effective utilization and development of photovoltaic technology. Initially, the research focus of the SE RES program centered on utility-connected PV systems and associated issues. In 1987, the SE RES began evaluating amorphous silicon (a-Si) thin-film PV modules for application in utility-interactive systems. Stand-alone PV systems began receiving increased emphasis at the SE RES in 1986. Research projects were initiated that involved evaluation of vaccine refrigeration, water pumping and other stand-alone power systems. The results of this work have led to design optimization techniques and procedures for the sizing and modeling of PV water pumping systems. Later recent research at the SE RES included test and evaluation of batteries and charge controllers for stand-alone PV system applications. The SE RES project provided the foundation on which FSEC achieved national recognition for its expertise in PV systems research and related technology transfer programs. These synergistic products of the SE RES illustrate the high visibility and contributions the FSEC PV program offers to the DOE.

  10. DEVELOPMENT OF PROTOCOLS TO STUDY TO IDENTIFY CRITICAL ECOSYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Healthy, functioning ecosystems are critical to the sustainability of human and natural communities, but the identification of areas of healthy ecosystems in an area as large as Region 5 is difficult due to time and information constraints. Geographic Information Systems (GIS) a...

  11. Critical dynamics on a large human Open Connectome network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ódor, Géza

    2016-12-01

    Extended numerical simulations of threshold models have been performed on a human brain network with N =836 733 connected nodes available from the Open Connectome Project. While in the case of simple threshold models a sharp discontinuous phase transition without any critical dynamics arises, variable threshold models exhibit extended power-law scaling regions. This is attributed to fact that Griffiths effects, stemming from the topological or interaction heterogeneity of the network, can become relevant if the input sensitivity of nodes is equalized. I have studied the effects of link directness, as well as the consequence of inhibitory connections. Nonuniversal power-law avalanche size and time distributions have been found with exponents agreeing with the values obtained in electrode experiments of the human brain. The dynamical critical region occurs in an extended control parameter space without the assumption of self-organized criticality.

  12. Critical behavior and Griffiths effects in the disordered contact process.

    PubMed

    Vojta, Thomas; Dickison, Mark

    2005-09-01

    We study the nonequilibrium phase transition in the one-dimensional contact process with quenched spatial disorder by means of large-scale Monte Carlo simulations for times up to 10(9) and system sizes up to 10(7) sites. In agreement with recent predictions of an infinite-randomness fixed point, our simulations demonstrate activated (exponential) dynamical scaling at the critical point. The critical behavior turns out to be universal, even for weak disorder. However, the approach to this asymptotic behavior is extremely slow, with crossover times of the order of 10(4) or larger. In the Griffiths region between the clean and the dirty critical points, we find power-law dynamical behavior with continuously varying exponents. We discuss the generality of our findings and relate them to a broader theory of rare region effects at phase transitions with quenched disorder.

  13. Asymmetric criticality of the osmotic compressibility in binary mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Tianxiang; Liu, Shixia; Xie, Jingjing; Shen, Weiguo

    2013-01-01

    Heat capacities in the critical and the non-critical regions for {benzonitrile + tridecane} and {benzonitrile + pentadecane}, and light scattering for {benzonitrile + undecane}, {benzonitrile + dodecane}, {benzonitrile + tridecane}, {benzonitrile + tetradecane}, {benzonitrile + pentadecane}, and {benzonitrile + hexadecane} in the critical two-phase region were measured. Light scattering measurements confirmed the existence of the asymmetry for the osmotic compressibility while no such asymmetry was observed for the correlation length. An analysis of the osmotic compressibility asymmetry suggested the dominance of the singular term | {Δ hat T} |^β, which supports the complete scaling theory. The consistency of the complete scaling theory in descriptions of different asymmetry behaviors was also discussed. Moreover, it was found that the contribution of the heat capacity-related term is also important in describing the asymmetry of the osmotic compressibility as it was observed in studies of the diameters of the coexistence curves.

  14. Critical dynamics on a large human Open Connectome network.

    PubMed

    Ódor, Géza

    2016-12-01

    Extended numerical simulations of threshold models have been performed on a human brain network with N=836733 connected nodes available from the Open Connectome Project. While in the case of simple threshold models a sharp discontinuous phase transition without any critical dynamics arises, variable threshold models exhibit extended power-law scaling regions. This is attributed to fact that Griffiths effects, stemming from the topological or interaction heterogeneity of the network, can become relevant if the input sensitivity of nodes is equalized. I have studied the effects of link directness, as well as the consequence of inhibitory connections. Nonuniversal power-law avalanche size and time distributions have been found with exponents agreeing with the values obtained in electrode experiments of the human brain. The dynamical critical region occurs in an extended control parameter space without the assumption of self-organized criticality.

  15. Derivation of criticality safety benchmarks from ZPR fast critical assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Schaefer, R.W.; McKnight, R.D.

    1997-12-01

    Scores of critical assemblies were constructed, over a period of about three decades, at the Argonne National Laboratory ZPR-3, ZPR-6, ZPR-9, and zero power plutonium reactor (ZPPR) fast critical assembly facilities. Most of the assemblies were mock-ups of various liquid-metal fast breeder reactor designs. These tended to be complex, containing, for example, mock-ups of control rods and control rod positions. Some assemblies, however, were {open_quotes}physics benchmarks.{close_quotes} These relatively {open_quotes}clean{close_quotes} assemblies had uniform compositions and simple geometry and were designed to test fast reactor physics data and methods. Assemblies in this last category are well suited to form the basis for new criticality safety benchmarks. The purpose of this paper is to present an overview of some of these benchmark candidates and to describe the strategy being used to create the benchmarks.

  16. Derivation of criticality safety benchmarks from ZPR fast critical assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Schaefer, R.W.; McKnight, R.D.

    1997-09-01

    Scores of critical assemblies were constructed, over a period of about three decades, at the Argonne National Laboratory ZPR-3, ZPR-6, ZPR-9, and ZPPR fast critical assembly facilities. Most of the assemblies were mockups of various liquid-metal fast breeder reactor designs. These tended to be complex, containing, for example, mockups of control rods and control rod positions. Some assemblies, however, were `physics benchmarks`. These relatively `clean` assemblies had uniform compositions and simple geometry and were designed to test fast reactor physics data and methods. Assemblies in this last category are well suited to form the basis for new criticality safety benchmarks. The purpose of this paper is to present an overview of some of these benchmark candidates and to describe the strategy being used to create the benchmarks.

  17. Confinement of monopoles and scaling theory near unconventional critical points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell, Stephen

    2013-02-01

    Conventional ordering transitions, described by the Landau paradigm, are characterized by the symmetries broken at the critical point. Within the constrained manifold occurring at low temperatures in certain frustrated systems, unconventional transitions are possible that defy this type of description. While the critical point exists only in the limit where defects in the constraint are vanishingly rare, unconventional criticality can be observed throughout a broad region of the phase diagram. This work presents a formalism for incorporating the effects of such defects within the framework of scaling theory and the renormalization group, leading to universal results for the critical behavior. The theory is applied to two transitions occurring within a model of spin ice, and the results are confirmed using Monte Carlo simulations. Relevance to experiments, particularly in the spin-ice compounds, is discussed, along with implications for simulations of related transitions, such as the cubic dimer model and the O(3) sigma model with “hedgehog” suppression.

  18. Universal short-time quantum critical dynamics in imaginary time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Shuai; Mai, Peizhi; Zhong, Fan

    2014-04-01

    We propose a scaling theory for the universal imaginary-time quantum critical dynamics for both short and long times. We discover that there exists a universal critical initial slip related to a small initial order parameter M0. In this stage, the order parameter M increases with the imaginary time τ as M ∝M0τθ with a universal initial-slip exponent θ. For the one-dimensional transverse-field Ising model, we estimate θ to be 0.373, which is markedly distinct from its classical counterpart. Apart from the local order parameter, we also show that the entanglement entropy exhibits universal behavior in the short-time region. As the critical exponents in the early stage and in equilibrium are identical, we apply the short-time dynamics method to determine quantum critical properties. The method is generally applicable in both the Landau-Ginzburg-Wilson paradigm and topological phase transitions.

  19. Northeast Regional Biomass Energy Program

    SciTech Connect

    O'Connell, R.A.

    1992-04-01

    The Northeast Regional Biomass Program (NRBP) is entering its ninth year of operation. The management and the objectives have virtually remained unchanged and are stated as follows. The program conducted by NRBP has three basic features: (1) a state grant component that provides funds (with a 50 percent matching requirement) to each of the states in the region to strengthen and integrate the work of state agencies involved in biomass energy; (2) a series of technical reports and studies in areas that have been identified as being of critical importance to the development of biomass energy in the region; and (3) a continuous long range planning component with heavy private sector involvement that helps to identify activities necessary to spur greater development and use of biomass energy in the Northeast.

  20. Northeast Regional Biomass Energy Program

    SciTech Connect

    O'Connell, R.A.

    1992-02-01

    The Northeast Regional Biomass Program (NRBP) is entering its ninth year of operation. The management and the objectives have virtually remained unchanged and are stated as follows. The program conducted by NRBP has three basic features: (1) a state grant component that provides funds (with a 50 percent matching requirement) to each of the states in the region to strengthen and integrate the work of state agencies involved in biomass energy; (2) a series of technical reports and studies in areas that have been identified as being of critical importance to the development of biomass energy in the region; and (3) a continuous long range planning component with heavy private sector involvement that helps to identify activities necessary to spur greater development and use of biomass energy in the Northeast.

  1. Cooperative monitoring of regional security agreements

    SciTech Connect

    Pregenzer, A.L.; Vannoni, M.; Biringer, K.L.

    1996-11-01

    This paper argues that cooperative monitoring plays a critical role in the implementation of regional security agreements and confidence building measures. A framework for developing cooperative monitoring options is proposed and several possibilities for relating bilateral and regional monitoring systems to international monitoring systems are discussed. Three bilateral or regional agreements are analyzed briefly to illustrate different possibilities. These examples illustrate that the relationship of regional or bilateral arms control or security agreements to international agreements depends on a number of factors: the overlap of provisions between regional and international agreements; the degree of interest in a regional agreement among the international community; efficiency in implementing the agreement; and numerous political considerations. Given the importance of regional security to the international community, regions should be encouraged to develop their own infrastructure for implementing regional arms control and other security agreements. A regional infrastructure need not preclude participation in an international regime. On the contrary, establishing regional institutions for arms control and nonproliferation could result in more proactive participation of regional parties in developing solutions for regional and international problems, thereby strengthening existing and future international regimes. Possible first steps for strengthening regional infrastructures are identified and potential technical requirements are discussed.

  2. Critical and Alternative Directions in Applied Linguistics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pennycook, Alastair

    2010-01-01

    Critical directions in applied linguistics can be understood in various ways. The term "critical" as it has been used in "critical applied linguistics," "critical discourse analysis," "critical literacy" and so forth, is now embedded as part of applied linguistic work, adding an overt focus on questions of power and inequality to discourse…

  3. Application of minimal subtraction renormalization to crossover behavior near the (sup )3He liquid vapor critical point

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhong, F.; Barmatz, M.; Hahn, I.

    2003-01-01

    Parametric expressions are used to calculate the isothermal susceptibility, specific heat, order parameter, and correlation length along the critical isochore and coexistence curve from the asymptotic region to crossover region.

  4. Returning "Region" to World Regional Geography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rees, Peter W.; Legates, Margaret

    2013-01-01

    World regional geography textbooks rarely focus on the process of region formation, despite frequent calls to reincorporate a regional approach to teaching global geography. An instructional strategy using problem-based learning in a small honors section of a large world regional geography course is described. Using a hypothetical scenario…

  5. Teamwork in obstetric critical care.

    PubMed

    Guise, Jeanne-Marie; Segel, Sally

    2008-10-01

    Whether seeing a patient in the ambulatory clinic environment, performing a delivery or managing a critically ill patient, obstetric care is a team activity. Failures in teamwork and communication are among the leading causes of adverse obstetric events, accounting for over 70% of sentinel events according to the Joint Commission. Effective, efficient and safe care requires good teamwork. Although nurses, doctors and healthcare staff who work in critical care environments are extremely well trained and competent medically, they have not traditionally been trained in how to work well as part of a team. Given the complexity and acuity of critical care medicine, which often relies on more than one medical team, teamwork skills are essential. This chapter discusses the history and importance of teamwork in high-reliability fields, reviews key concepts and skills in teamwork, and discusses approaches to training and working in teams.

  6. Critical neuroscience meets medical humanities.

    PubMed

    Slaby, Jan

    2015-06-01

    This programmatic theory paper sketches a conceptual framework that might inspire work in critical Medical Humanities. For this purpose, Kaushik Sunder Rajan's account of biocapital is revisited and discussed in relation to the perspective of a critical neuroscience. Critical neuroscience is an encompassing positioning towards the recent public prominence of the brain and brain-related practices, tools and discourses. The proposed analytical scheme has five focal nodes: capital, life, technoscience, (neoliberal) politics and subjectivity. A special emphasis will be placed on contemporary framings of subjectivity, as it is here where deep-reaching entanglements of personhood with scientific practice and discourse, medical and informational technologies, and economic formations are most evident. Notably, the emerging subject position of the 'prospective health consumer' will be discussed as it figures prominently in the terrain between neuroscience and other medico-scientific disciplines.

  7. The NMT-5 criticality database

    SciTech Connect

    Cort, B.; Perkins, B.; Cort, G.

    1995-05-01

    The NMT-5 Criticality Database maintains criticality-related data and documentation to ensure the safety of workers handling special nuclear materials at the Plutonium Facility (TA-55) at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The database contains pertinent criticality safety limit information for more than 150 separate locations at which special nuclear materials are handled. Written in 4th Dimension for the Macintosh, it facilitates the production of signs for posting at these areas, tracks the history of postings and related authorizing documentation, and generates in Microsoft Word a current, comprehensive representation of all signs and supporting documentation, such as standard operating procedures and signature approvals. It facilitates the auditing process and is crucial to full and effective compliance with Department of Energy regulations. It has been recommended for installation throughout the Nuclear Materials Technology Division at Los Alamos.

  8. Critical gravity in four dimensions.

    PubMed

    Lü, H; Pope, C N

    2011-05-06

    We study four-dimensional gravity theories that are rendered renormalizable by the inclusion of curvature-squared terms to the usual Einstein action with a cosmological constant. By choosing the parameters appropriately, the massive scalar mode can be eliminated and the massive spin-2 mode can become massless. This "critical" theory may be viewed as a four-dimensional analogue of chiral topologically massive gravity, or of critical "new massive gravity" with a cosmological constant, in three dimensions. We find that the on-shell energy for the remaining massless gravitons vanishes. There are also logarithmic spin-2 modes, which have positive energy. The mass and entropy of standard Schwarzschild-type black holes vanish. The critical theory might provide a consistent toy model for quantum gravity in four dimensions.

  9. Teamwork in obstetric critical care

    PubMed Central

    Guise, Jeanne-Marie; Segel, Sally

    2016-01-01

    Whether seeing a patient in the ambulatory clinic environment, performing a delivery or managing a critically ill patient, obstetric care is a team activity. Failures in teamwork and communication are among the leading causes of adverse obstetric events, accounting for over 70% of sentinel events according to the Joint Commission. Effective, efficient and safe care requires good teamwork. Although nurses, doctors and healthcare staff who work in critical care environments are extremely well trained and competent medically, they have not traditionally been trained in how to work well as part of a team. Given the complexity and acuity of critical care medicine, which often relies on more than one medical team, teamwork skills are essential. This chapter discusses the history and importance of teamwork in high-reliability fields, reviews key concepts and skills in teamwork, and discusses approaches to training and working in teams. PMID:18701352

  10. Critical Gravity in Four Dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Lue, H.; Pope, C. N.

    2011-05-06

    We study four-dimensional gravity theories that are rendered renormalizable by the inclusion of curvature-squared terms to the usual Einstein action with a cosmological constant. By choosing the parameters appropriately, the massive scalar mode can be eliminated and the massive spin-2 mode can become massless. This ''critical'' theory may be viewed as a four-dimensional analogue of chiral topologically massive gravity, or of critical 'new massive gravity' with a cosmological constant, in three dimensions. We find that the on-shell energy for the remaining massless gravitons vanishes. There are also logarithmic spin-2 modes, which have positive energy. The mass and entropy of standard Schwarzschild-type black holes vanish. The critical theory might provide a consistent toy model for quantum gravity in four dimensions.

  11. Transmission of information at criticality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luković, Mirko; Vanni, Fabio; Svenkeson, Adam; Grigolini, Paolo

    2014-12-01

    We study the problem of information transmission in complex cooperative systems to prove that adaptivity rather than diffusion is the main source of information transport at criticality. We adopt two different cooperative models, the two-dimensional Decision Making Model (DMM), and the one-dimensional Flock Model (FM) inspired by the cooperation between birds. The criticality-induced consensus is intermittently broken by the occurrence of moments of high susceptibility, which we call free-will states. We construct a network A based on the DMM and FM that is perturbed by a similar network B. Some units of A, called lookout birds, follow the directions of the mean field generated by B, while the rest are blind to B. When both networks are at criticality a small percentage of lookout birds establish the synchronization between B and A as a result of the nonergodic nature of the free-will state dynamics.

  12. Clinical review: critical care transport and austere critical care.

    PubMed

    Rice, David H; Kotti, George; Beninati, William

    2008-01-01

    The development of modern intensive care units (ICUs) has allowed the survival of patients with advanced illness and injury, although at a cost of substantial infrastructure. Natural disasters and military operations are two common situations that can create critically ill patients in an environment that is austere or has been rendered austere. This has driven the development of two related strategies to care for these casualties. Portable ICU capability can be rapidly established in the area of need, providing relatively advanced capability but limited capacity and sustainability. The other strategy is to rapidly evacuate critically ill and injured patients following their initial stabilization. This permits medical personnel in the austere location to focus resources on a larger number of less critical patients. It also permits the most vulnerable patients to receive care in an advanced center. This strategy requires careful planning to overcome the constraints of the transport environment. The optimal strategy has not been determined, but a combination of these two approaches has been used in recent disasters and military operations and is promising. The critical care delivered in an austere setting must be integrated with a long-term plan to provide follow-on care.

  13. In Defense of a Liberal Education: Criticizing the Critical

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Attard, John

    2013-01-01

    In this article, the author reports on an awareness of controversial incidents on campuses around North America surrounding "politically correct" speech codes and thought control measures instituted at the behest of faculty and students of this ideological persuasion. It seems that critical theory is going beyond "critical…

  14. Clinical review: Critical care transport and austere critical care

    PubMed Central

    Rice, David H; Kotti, George; Beninati, William

    2008-01-01

    The development of modern intensive care units (ICUs) has allowed the survival of patients with advanced illness and injury, although at a cost of substantial infrastructure. Natural disasters and military operations are two common situations that can create critically ill patients in an environment that is austere or has been rendered austere. This has driven the development of two related strategies to care for these casualties. Portable ICU capability can be rapidly established in the area of need, providing relatively advanced capability but limited capacity and sustainability. The other strategy is to rapidly evacuate critically ill and injured patients following their initial stabilization. This permits medical personnel in the austere location to focus resources on a larger number of less critical patients. It also permits the most vulnerable patients to receive care in an advanced center. This strategy requires careful planning to overcome the constraints of the transport environment. The optimal strategy has not been determined, but a combination of these two approaches has been used in recent disasters and military operations and is promising. The critical care delivered in an austere setting must be integrated with a long-term plan to provide follow-on care. PMID:18373882

  15. Critical Geragogy: Developing Practical Possibilities for Critical Educational Gerontology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Formosa, Marvin

    2002-01-01

    Situates geragogy, the practice of teaching older adults, within critical gerontology. Explains principles of geragogy: embodiment of political rationale, commitment to transformation of ageism, refutation of myths of empowerment through education, outreach to all segments of the older population, emphasis on self-help culture, and engagement in…

  16. Critical Qualitative Research Reader. Critical Qualitative Research. Volume 2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steinberg, Shirley R., Ed.; Cannella, Gaile S., Ed.

    2012-01-01

    This volume of transformed research utilizes an activist approach to examine the notion that nothing is apolitical. Research projects themselves are critically examined for power orientations, even as they are used to address curricular problems and educational or societal issues. Philosophical perspectives that have facilitated an understanding…

  17. Ionospheric research. [E region, F region, D region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Progress is reported in the following areas: D-region theory; E and F-region; wave propagation; mass spectrometer measurements; and atmospheric reactions. Various supporting operations are included: design and construction of instrumentation; and programming.

  18. Smectic-C* alpha-smectic-C* Phase Transition and Critical Point in Binary Mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Liu,Z.; Wang, S.; McCoy, B.; Cady, A.; Pindak, R.; Caliebe, W.; Takekoshi, K.; Ema, K.; Nguyen, H.; Huang, C.

    2006-01-01

    We have investigated the smectic-C*{sub {alpha}}-smectic-C* (SmC*{sub {alpha}}-SmC*) transition in a series of binary mixtures with resonant x-ray diffraction, differential optical reflectivity, and heat capacity measurements. Results show that the phases are separated by a first-order transition that ends at a critical point. We report the observation of such a critical point. We have proposed the appropriate order parameter and obtained values of two critical exponents associated with this transition. The values of the critical exponents suggest that long-range intersections are present in the SmC*{sub {alpha}}-SmC* critical regions.

  19. The critical compressibility factor value: Associative fluids and liquid alkali metals

    SciTech Connect

    Kulinskii, V. L.

    2014-08-07

    We show how to obtain the critical compressibility factor Z{sub c} for simple and associative Lennard-Jones fluids using the critical characteristics of the Ising model on different lattices. The results show that low values of critical compressibility factor are correlated with the associative properties of fluids in critical region and can be obtained on the basis of the results for the Ising model on lattices with more than one atom per cell. An explanation for the results on the critical point line of the Lennard-Jones fluids and liquid metals is proposed within the global isomorphism approach.

  20. Critical percolation in bidimensional coarsening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cugliandolo, Leticia F.

    2016-11-01

    I discuss a recently unveiled feature in the dynamics of two dimensional coarsening systems on the lattice with Ising symmetry: they first approach a critical percolating state via the growth of a new length scale, and only later enter the usual dynamic scaling regime. The time needed to reach the critical percolating state diverges with the system size. These observations are common to Glauber, Kawasaki, and voter dynamics in pure and weakly disordered systems. An extended version of this account appeared in 2016 C. R. Phys. . I refer to the relevant publications for details.