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Sample records for ahlers phys rev

  1. Addendum and Erratum: Nature of vibrational excitations in vitreous silica [Phys. Rev. B 56, 8605 (1997)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shcheblanov, Nikita S.; Povarnitsyn, Mikhail E.; Taraskin, Sergei N.; Elliott, Stephen R.

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this paper is to clarify details of the projectional analysis for atomic vibrations in vitreous silica presented in a paper by Taraskin and Elliott [Phys. Rev. B 56, 8605 (1997), 10.1103/PhysRevB.56.8605]. The description of the stretching and bending modes has been discussed in detail while a description of the rotational modes and the procedure of their calculation have not been given in full detail. We specify the method for calculating the rotational modes omitted in the paper. We also correct a misprint in the expression for the B2(E ) mode which, unfortunately, has been reproduced in the vibrational analysis of the E mode in some publications.

  2. Erratum: Studying the precision of ray tracing techniques with Szekeres models [Phys. Rev. D 92, 023532 (2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koksbang, S. M.; Hannestad, S.

    2015-09-01

    This erratum serves to give corrections of two errors made in Koksbang and Hannestad [Phys. Rev. D, 92, 023532 (2015)]. One error consists of having used the expression for the Doppler convergence for a flat background to study the convergence on curved backgrounds. The other error which was made, is a typo in the numerical code used to study the convergence in onion models with curved backgrounds. After correcting this typo, the results of Sec. VI A in Koksbang and Hannestad [Phys. Rev. D, 92, 023532 (2015)] were recomputed. Contrary to the original results, the new results show that the ray-tracing scheme studied in Koksbang and Hannestad [Phys. Rev. D, 92, 023532 (2015)] can reproduce the exact results in LTB onion models very well. The corrections and new results are described more elaborately below.

  3. Comment on “Diffusion of n-type dopants in germanium” [Appl. Phys. Rev. 1, 011301 (2014)

    SciTech Connect

    Cowern, N. E. B. Simdyankin, S.; Goss, J. P.; Napolitani, E.; De Salvador, D.; Bruno, E.; Mirabella, S.; Ahn, C.; Bennett, N. S.

    2015-09-15

    The authors of the above paper call into question recent evidence on the properties of self-interstitials, I, in Ge [Cowern et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 155501 (2013)]. We show that this judgment stems from invalid model assumptions during analysis of data on B marker-layer diffusion during proton irradiation, and that a corrected analysis fully supports the reported evidence. As previously stated, I-mediated self-diffusion in Ge exhibits two distinct regimes of temperature, T: high-T, dominated by amorphous-like mono-interstitial clusters—i-morphs—with self-diffusion entropy ≈30 k, and low-T, where transport is dominated by simple self-interstitials. In a transitional range centered on 475 °C both mechanisms contribute. The experimental I migration energy of 1.84 ± 0.26 eV reported by the Münster group based on measurements of self-diffusion during irradiation at 550 °C < T < 680 °C further establishes our proposed i-morph mechanism.

  4. New hyper-K{umlt a}hler manifolds by fixing monopoles

    SciTech Connect

    Houghton, C.J.

    1997-07-01

    The construction of new hyper-K{umlt a}hler manifolds by taking the infinite monopole mass limit of certain Bogomol{close_quote}nyi-Prasad-Sommerfield monopole moduli spaces is considered. The one-parameter family of hyper-K{umlt a}hler manifolds due to Dancer is shown to be an example of such manifolds. A new family of fixed monopole spaces is constructed. They are the moduli spaces of four SU{sub 4} monopoles, in the infinite mass limit of two of the monopoles. These manifolds are shown to be nonsingular when the fixed monopole positions are distinct. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  5. The Phys4Entry database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laricchiuta, Annarita

    2012-10-01

    The Phys4Entry DB is a database of state-selected dynamical information for elementary processes relevant to the state-to-state kinetic modeling of planetary-atmosphere entry conditions. The DB is intended to the challenging goal of complementing the information in the existing web-access databases, collecting and validating data of collisional dynamics of elementary processes involving ground and excited chemical species, with resolution on the electronic, vibrational and rotational degrees of freedom. Four relevant classes of elementary processes are considered, i.e. electron-molecule collisions, atom/molecule-molecule collisions, atom/molecule surface interaction and photon-induced processes, constructing a taxonomy for process classification. Data populating the DB are largely originated by the coordinated research activity done in the frame of the Phys4Entry FP7 project, considering different theoretical approaches from quantum to semi-classical or quasi-classical molecular dynamics. Nevertheless the results, obtained in the Bari plasma chemistry labs in years of research devoted to the construction of reliable state-to-state kinetic models for hydrogen and air plasmas, are also transferred to the DB. Two DB interfaces have been created for different roles allowed to different actions: the contributor, uploading new processes, and the inquirer, submitting queries, to access the complete information about the records, through a graphical tool, displaying energy or roto-vibrational dependence of dynamical data, or through the export action to download ascii datafiles. The DB is expected to have a significant impact on the modeling community working also in scientific fields different from the aerothermodynamics (i.e. fusion, environment, ), making practicable the state-to-state approach.

  6. Erratum: Poisson's ratio in layered two-dimensional crystals [Phys. Rev. B 93, 075420 (2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woo, Sungjong; Park, Hee Chul; Son, Young-Woo

    2016-12-01

    We present first-principles calculations of elastic properties of multilayered two-dimensional crystals such as graphene, h-BN and 2H-MoS2 which shows that their Poisson's ratios along out-of-plane direction are negative, near zero and positive, respectively, spanning all possibilities for sign of the ratios. While the in-plane Poisson's ratios are all positive regardless of their disparate electronic and structural properties, the characteristic interlayer interactions as well as layer stacking structures are shown to determine the sign of their out-of-plane ratios. Thorough investigation of elastic properties as a function of the number of layers for each system is also provided, highlighting their intertwined nature between elastic and electronic properties.

  7. Corrected Article: Wormholes in Einstein-Born-Infeld theory [Phys. Rev. D 80, 104033 (2009)

    SciTech Connect

    Richarte, Martin G.; Simeone, Claudio

    2010-05-15

    Spherically symmetric thin-shell wormholes are studied within the framework of Einstein-Born-Infeld theory. We analyze the exotic matter content, and find that for certain values of the Born-Infeld parameter the amount of exotic matter on the shell can be reduced in relation with the Maxwell case. We also examine the mechanical stability of the wormhole configurations under radial perturbations preserving the spherical symmetry.

  8. Publisher's Note: Non-Markovian dynamics of a qubit [Phys. Rev. A 73, 012111 (2006)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maniscalco, Sabrina; Petruccione, Franceso

    2006-02-01

    This paper was published online on 24 January 2006 with an incorrect electronic address in the first author’s byline footnote. The electronic address for the first author should read “sabrina.maniscalco@utu.fi.” The byline footnote has been corrected as of 26 January 2006. The byline footnote is correct in the printed version of the journal.

  9. Publisher's Note: Non-Markovian dynamics of a qubit [Phys. Rev. A 73, 012111 (2006)

    SciTech Connect

    Maniscalco, Sabrina; Petruccione, Franceso

    2006-02-15

    This paper was published online on 24 January 2006 with an incorrect electronic address in the first author's byline footnote. The electronic address for the first author should read 'sabrina.maniscalco at utu.fi'. The byline footnote has been corrected as of 26 January 2006. The byline footnote is correct in the printed version of the journal.

  10. Erratum: Three-cluster dynamics within an ab initio framework [Phys. Rev. C 88 , 034320 (2013)

    DOE PAGES

    Quaglioni, Sofia; Romero-Redondo, Carolina; Navrátil, Petr

    2016-07-14

    In this study, we have discovered a typographical error in the portion of code used in our original article to compute the probability distribution of Figs. 7–9 of Sec. III B 2. The correct results are shown in the figures below. The correct probability distribution now shows the characteristic prominence of the “dineutron” over the “cigar” configuration. In addition, the most-probable distance between the two neutrons in the latter configuration is close to 4 fm (rather than the erroneously reported 5 fm). The other results and conclusion of the original paper remain unaffected.

  11. Erratum: Nonlinear Dirac equation solitary waves in external fields [Phys. Rev. E 86, 046602 (2012)

    SciTech Connect

    Mertens, Franz G.; Quintero, Niurka R.; Cooper, Fred; Khare, Avinash; Saxena, Avadh

    2016-05-10

    In Sec. IV of our original paper, we assumed a particular conservation law Eq. (4.6), which was true in the absence of external potentials, to derive some particular potentials for which we obtained solutions to the nonlinear Dirac equation (NLDE). Because the conservation law of Eq. (4.6) for the component T11 of the energy-momentum tensor is not true in the presence of these external potentials, the solutions we found do not satisfy the NLDEs in the presence of these potentials. Thus all the equations from Eq. (4.6) through Eq. (4.44) are not correct, since the exact solutions that followed in that section presumed Eq. (4.6) was true. Also Eqs. (A3)–(A5) are a restatement of Eq. (4.6) and also are not correct. These latter equations are also not used in Sec. V and beyond. The rest of our original paper (starting with Sec. V) was not concerned with exact solutions, rather it was concerned with how the exact solitary-wave solutions to the NLDE in the absence of an external potential responded to being in the presence of various external potentials. This Erratum corrects this mistake.

  12. Erratum: Nonlinear Dirac equation solitary waves in external fields [Phys. Rev. E 86, 046602 (2012)

    DOE PAGES

    Mertens, Franz G.; Quintero, Niurka R.; Cooper, Fred; ...

    2016-05-10

    In Sec. IV of our original paper, we assumed a particular conservation law Eq. (4.6), which was true in the absence of external potentials, to derive some particular potentials for which we obtained solutions to the nonlinear Dirac equation (NLDE). Because the conservation law of Eq. (4.6) for the component T11 of the energy-momentum tensor is not true in the presence of these external potentials, the solutions we found do not satisfy the NLDEs in the presence of these potentials. Thus all the equations from Eq. (4.6) through Eq. (4.44) are not correct, since the exact solutions that followed inmore » that section presumed Eq. (4.6) was true. Also Eqs. (A3)–(A5) are a restatement of Eq. (4.6) and also are not correct. These latter equations are also not used in Sec. V and beyond. The rest of our original paper (starting with Sec. V) was not concerned with exact solutions, rather it was concerned with how the exact solitary-wave solutions to the NLDE in the absence of an external potential responded to being in the presence of various external potentials. This Erratum corrects this mistake.« less

  13. Summary of PhysPAG Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritz, Steven M.

    2013-01-01

    The Physics of the Cosmos (PCOS) Program Analysis Group (PhysPAG) provides an important interface between the scientific community and NASA in matters related to PCOS objectives, and also provides opportunities for community discussions. An Executive Committee facilitates the work of several subgroups, including an Inflation Probe Science Analysis Group (IPSAG), an X-ray group (XRSAG) , a gamma-ray,group (GRSAG), a gravitational wave group (GWSAG), and a cosmic-ray group (CRSAG). In addition to identifying opportunities and issues, these groups also help articulate technology needs. Membership in all the SAGs is completely open, with information and newsletter signups available on the PhysPAG pages at the PCOS program website. The PhysPAG reports to the Astrophysics Subcommittee of the NASA Advisory Council. A summary of PhysPAG activities will be given, along with time for questions and discussion.

  14. Summary of PhysPAG Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nousek, John A.

    2014-01-01

    The Physics of the Cosmos Program Analysis Group (PhysPAG) is responsible for solicitiing and coordinating community input for the development and execution of NASA's Physics of the Cosmos (PCOS) program. In this session I will report on the activity of the PhysPAG, and solicit community involvement in the process of defining PCOS objectives, planning SMD architecture, and prioritizing PCOS activities. I will also report on the activities of the PhysPAG Executive Committee, which include the chairs of the Science Analysis Groups/ Science Interest Groups which fall under the PhysPAG sphere of interest. Time at the end of the presentation willl be reserved for questions and discussion from the community.

  15. Summary of PhysPAG Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritz, Steven M.

    2012-01-01

    The Physics of the Cosmos (PCOS) Program Analysis Group (PhysPAG) provides an important interface between the scientific community and NASA in matters related to PCOS objectives. An Executive Committee facilitates the work of several subgroups, including a Technology Science Analysis Group and an Inflation Probe Science Analysis Group. Work is also starting in areas of X-ray, gamma-ray, and gravitational wave astrophysics. The PAG reports to the Astrophysics Subcommittee of the NASA Advisory Council. A summary of PhysPAG activities will be given, along with time for questions and discussion.

  16. Comment on "The universal instability in general geometry" [Phys. Plasmas 22, 090706 (2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smolyakov, A. I.; Yagi, M.; Kishimoto, Y.

    2016-11-01

    It is pointed out that the destabilization mechanism recently discussed by Helander and Plunk in relation to the universal instability was studied previously by Smolyakov et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 89, 125005 (2002)]. Moreover, the contribution of the trapped particles as discussed by Helander and Plunk is closely related to the mechanism of the ubiquitous instability previously studied by Coppi and Pegoraro [Nucl. Fusion 17, 969 (1977)].

  17. Expanding the PhysTEC Coalition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, Fredrick

    2003-04-01

    The Physics Teacher Education Coalition (PhysTEC) is a community of physics departments representing scientists and educators at institutions dedicated to improving the science preparation of future K-12 teachers. Now in its second year, PhysTEC requires physics and education faculty to work together to provide an education for future teachers that emphasizes interactive engagement and a student-centered approach to learning science. The first six Coalition members are the physics departments at Ball State University, Oregon State University, University of Arizona, University of Arkansas, Western Michigan University, and Xavier University of Louisiana. PhysTEC is creating a broad, active Coalition of physics departments that have implemented or are interested in implementing one or more of the PhysTEC Program Components. · A long-term, active collaboration among the physics department, the department of education, and the local schools. · A Teacher-in-Residence (TIR) program that provides for a full-time participant in assisting faculty in course revisions. · The redesign of physics courses based on results from physics education research. · The redesign of elementary and secondary science methods courses with an emphasis on inquiry-based teaching and learning. · The establishment of a mentoring program to provide a valuable induction experience for novice science teachers. · The participation of physics faculty in the improvement and expansion of school experiences. www.phystec.org

  18. Keynote Address: Rev. Mark Massa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Massa, Mark S.

    2011-01-01

    Rev. Mark S. Massa, S.J., is the dean and professor of Church history at the School of Theology and Ministry at Boston College. He was invited to give a keynote to begin the third Catholic Higher Education Collaborative Conference (CHEC), cosponsored by Boston College and Fordham University. Fr. Massa's address posed critical questions about…

  19. Stable complex formation between HIV Rev and the nucleosome assembly protein, NAP1, affects Rev function

    SciTech Connect

    Cochrane, Alan; Murley, Laura Lea; Gao Mian; Wong, Raymond; Clayton, Kiera; Brufatto, Nicole; Canadien, Veronica; Mamelak, Daniel; Chen, Tricia; Richards, Dawn; Zeghouf, Mahel; Greenblatt, Jack; Burks, Christian; Frappier, Lori

    2009-05-25

    The Rev protein of HIV-1 is essential for HIV-1 proliferation due to its role in exporting viral RNA from the nucleus. We used a modified version of tandem affinity purification (TAP) tagging to identify proteins interacting with HIV-1 Rev in human cells and discovered a prominent interaction between Rev and nucleosome assembly protein 1 (Nap1). This interaction was also observed by specific retention of Nap1 from human cell lysates on a Rev affinity column. Nap1 was found to bind Rev through the Rev arginine-rich domain and altered the oligomerization state of Rev in vitro. Overexpression of Nap1 stimulated the ability of Rev to export RNA, reduced the nucleolar localization of Rev, and affected Rev nuclear import rates. The results suggest that Nap-1 may influence Rev function by increasing the availability of Rev.

  20. Publisher's Note: Search for the Rare Leptonic Decay B+→μ+νμ [ Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 221803 (2004)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; Gaillard, J.-M.; Hicheur, A.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J. P.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; Palano, A.; Pompili, A.; Chen, J. C.; Qi, N. D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y. S.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B.; Abrams, G. S.; Borgland, A. W.; Breon, A. B.; Brown, D. N.; Button-Shafer, J.; Cahn, R. N.; Charles, E.; Day, C. T.; Gill, M. S.; Gritsan, A. V.; Groysman, Y.; Jacobsen, R. G.; Kadel, R. W.; Kadyk, J.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Kukartsev, G.; Leclerc, C.; Levi, M. E.; Lynch, G.; Mir, L. M.; Oddone, P. J.; Orimoto, T. J.; Pripstein, M.; Roe, N. A.; Ronan, M. T.; Shelkov, V. G.; Telnov, A. V.; Wenzel, W. A.; Ford, K.; Harrison, T. J.; Hawkes, C. M.; Morgan, S. E.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, N. K.; Fritsch, M.; Goetzen, K.; Held, T.; Koch, H.; Lewandowski, B.; Pelizaeus, M.; Peters, K.; Schmuecker, H.; Steinke, M.; Boyd, J. T.; Chevalier, N.; Cottingham, W. N.; Kelly, M. P.; Latham, T. E.; Mackay, C.; Wilson, F. F.; Abe, K.; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; Thiessen, D.; Kyberd, P.; McKemey, A. K.; Teodorescu, L.; Blinov, V. E.; Bukin, A. D.; Golubev, V. B.; Ivanchenko, V. N.; Kravchenko, E. A.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Solodov, E. P.; Yushkov, A. N.; Best, D.; Bruinsma, M.; Chao, M.; Eschrich, I.; Kirkby, D.; Lankford, A. J.; Mandelkern, M.; Mommsen, R. K.; Roethel, W.; Stoker, D. P.; Buchanan, C.; Hartfiel, B. L.; Gary, J. W.; Layter, J.; Shen, B. C.; Wang, K.; del Re, D.; Hadavand, H. K.; Hill, E. J.; Macfarlane, D. B.; Paar, H. P.; Rahatlou, Sh.; Sharma, V.; Berryhill, J. W.; Campagnari, C.; Dahmes, B.; Levy, S. L.; Long, O.; Lu, A.; Mazur, M. A.; Richman, J. D.; Verkerke, W.; Beck, T. W.; Beringer, J.; Eisner, A. M.; Heusch, C. A.; Lockman, W. S.; Schalk, T.; Schmitz, R. E.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Spradlin, P.; Walkowiak, W.; Williams, D. C.; Wilson, M. G.; Albert, J.; Chen, E.; Dubois-Felsmann, G. P.; Dvoretskii, A.; Erwin, R. J.; Hitlin, D. G.; Narsky, I.; Piatenko, T.; Porter, F. C.; Ryd, A.; Samuel, A.; Yang, S.; Jayatilleke, S.; Mancinelli, G.; Meadows, B. T.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Abe, T.; Blanc, F.; Bloom, P.; Chen, S.; Clark, P. J.; Ford, W. T.; Nauenberg, U.; Olivas, A.; Rankin, P.; Roy, J.; Smith, J. G.; van Hoek, W. C.; Zhang, L.; Harton, J. L.; Hu, T.; Soffer, A.; Toki, W. H.; Wilson, R. J.; Zhang, J.; Altenburg, D.; Brandt, T.; Brose, J.; Colberg, T.; Dickopp, M.; Feltresi, E.; Hauke, A.; Lacker, H. M.; Maly, E.; Müller-Pfefferkorn, R.; Nogowski, R.; Otto, S.; Schubert, J.; Schubert, K. R.; Schwierz, R.; Spaan, B.; Bernard, D.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Brochard, F.; Grenier, P.; Thiebaux, Ch.; Vasileiadis, G.; Verderi, M.; Bard, D. J.; Khan, A.; Lavin, D.; Muheim, F.; Playfer, S.; Andreotti, M.; Azzolini, V.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Cibinnetto, G.; Luppi, E.; Negrini, M.; Piemontese, L.; Sarti, A.; Treadwell, E.; Baldini-Ferroli, R.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Finocchiaro, G.; Patteri, P.; Piccolo, M.; Zallo, A.; Buzzo, A.; Capra, R.; Contri, R.; Crosetti, G.; Lo Vetere, M.; Macri, M.; Monge, M. R.; Passaggio, S.; Patrignani, C.; Robutti, E.; Santroni, A.; Tosi, S.; Bailey, S.; Morii, M.; Won, E.; Dubitzky, R. S.; Langenegger, U.; Bhimji, W.; Bowerman, D. A.; Dauncey, P. D.; Egede, U.; Gaillard, J. R.; Morton, G. W.; Nash, J. A.; Taylor, G. P.; Grenier, G. J.; Lee, S.-J.; Mallik, U.; Cochran, J.; Crawley, H. B.; Lamsa, J.; Meyer, W. T.; Prell, S.; Rosenberg, E. I.; Yi, J.; Davier, M.; Grosdidier, G.; Höcker, A.; Laplace, S.; Le Diberder, F.; Lepeltier, V.; Lutz, A. M.; Petersen, T. C.; Plaszczynski, S.; Schune, M. H.; Tantot, L.; Wormser, G.; Brigljević, V.; Cheng, C. H.; Lange, D. J.; Simani, M. C.; Wright, D. M.; Bevan, A. J.; Coleman, J. P.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Gamet, R.; Kay, M.; Parry, R. J.; Payne, D. J.; Sloane, R. J.; Touramanis, C.; Back, J. J.; Harrison, P. F.; Mohanty, G. B.; Brown, C. L.; Cowan, G.; Flack, R. L.; Flaecher, H. U.; George, S.; Green, M. G.; Kurup, A.; Marker, C. E.; McMahon, T. R.; Ricciardi, S.; Salvatore, F.; Vaitsas, G.; Winter, M. A.; Brown, D.; Davis, C. L.; Allison, J.; Barlow, N. R.; Barlow, R. J.; Hart, P. A.; Hodgkinson, M. C.; Lafferty, G. D.; Lyon, A. J.; Williams, J. C.; Farbin, A.; Hulsbergen, W. D.; Jawahery, A.; Kovalskyi, D.; Lae, C. K.; Lillard, V.; Roberts, D. A.; Blaylock, G.; Dallapiccola, C.; Flood, K. T.; Hertzbach, S. S.; Kofler, R.; Koptchev, V. B.; Moore, T. B.; Saremi, S.; Staengle, H.; Willocq, S.; Cowan, R.; Sciolla, G.; Taylor, F.; Yamamoto, R. K.; Mangeol, D. J. J.; Patel, P. M.; Robertson, S. H.; Lazzaro, A.; Palombo, F.; Bauer, J. M.; Cremaldi, L.; Eschenburg, V.; Godang, R.; Kroeger, R.; Reidy, J.; Sanders, D. A.; Summers, D. J.; Zhao, H. W.; Brunet, S.; Cote-Ahern, D.; Taras, P.; Nicholson, H.; Cartaro, C.; Cavallo, N.; de Nardo, G.; Fabozzi, F.; Gatto, C.; Lista, L.; Paolucci, P.; Piccolo, D.; Sciacca, C.; Baak, M. A.; Raven, G.; Wilden, L.; Jessop, C. P.; Losecco, J. M.; Gabirel, T. A.; Allmmendinger, T.; Brau, B.; Gan, K. K.; Honscheid, K.; Hufnagel, D.; Kagan, H.; Kass, R.; Pulliam, T.; Ter-Antonyan, R.; Wong, Q. K.; Brau, J.; Frey, R.; Igonkina, O.; Potter, C. T.; Sinev, N. B.; Strom, D.; Torrence, E.; Colecchia, F.; Dorigo, A.; Galeazzi, F.; Margoni, M.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simonetto, F.; Stroli, R.; Tiozzo, G.; Voci, C.; Benayoun, M.; Briand, H.; Chauveau, J.; David, P.; de La Vaissière, Ch.; del Buono, L.; Hamon, O.; John, M. J. J.; Leruste, Ph.; Ocariz, J.; Pivk, M.; Roos, L.; T'jampens, S.; Therin, G.; Manfredi, P. F.; Re, V.; Behera, P. K.; Gladney, L.; Guo, Q. H.; Panetta, J.; Anulli, F.; Biasini, M.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Pioppi, M.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Bondioli, M.; Bucci, F.; Calderini, G.; Carpinelli, M.; del Gamba, V.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Marchiori, G.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Morganti, M.; Neri, N.; Paoloni, E.; Rama, M.; Rizzo, G.; Sandrelli, F.; Walsh, J.; Haire, M.; Hudd, D.; Paick, K.; Wagoner, D. E.; Danielson, N.; Elmer, P.; Lu, C.; Miftakov, V.; Olsen, J.; Smith, A. J. S.; Varnes, E. W.; Bellini, F.; Cavoto, G.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Gaspero, M.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Morganti, S.; Pierini, M.; Piredda, G.; Safai Tehrani, F.; Voena, C.; Christ, S.; Wagner, G.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; de Groot, N.; Franek, B.; Geddes, N. I.; Gopal, G. P.; Olaiya, E. O.; Xella, S. M.; Aleksan, R.; Emery, S.; Gaidot, A.; Ganzhur, S. F.; Giraud, P.-F.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Kozanecki, W.; Langer, M.; Legendre, M.; London, G. W.; Mayer, B.; Schott, G.; Vasseur, G.; Yeche, Ch.; Zito, M.; Purohit, M. V.; Weidemann, A. W.; Yumiceva, F. X.; Aston, D.; Bartoldus, R.; Berger, N.; Boyarski, A. M.; Buchmueller, O. L.; Convery, M. R.; Cristinziani, M.; Dong, D.; Dorfan, J.; Dujmic, D.; Dunwoodie, W.; Elsen, E. E.; Field, R. C.; Glanzman, T.; Gowdy, S. J.; Hadig, T.; Holyo, V.; Hryn'ova, T.; Innes, W. R.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kim, P.; Kocian, M. L.; Leith, D. W. G. S.; Libby, J.; Luitz, S.; Luth, V.; Lynch, H. L.; Marsiske, H.; Messner, R.; Muller, D. R.; O'Grady, C. P.; Ozcan, V. E.; Perazzo, A.; Perl, M.; Petrak, S.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Roodman, A.; Salnikov, A. A.; Schindler, R. H.; Schwiening, J.; Simi, G.; Snyder, A.; Soha, A.; Stelzer, J.; Su, D.; Sullivan, M. K.; Va'Vra, J.; Wagner, S. R.; Weaver, M.; Weinstein, A. J. R.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Wright, D. H.; Young, C. C.; Buchat, P. R.; Edwards, A. J.; Meyer, T. I.; Peterson, B. A.; Roat, C.; Ahmed, M.; Ahmed, S.; Alam, M. S.; Ernst, J. A.; Saeed, M. A.; Saleem, M.; Wappler, F. R.; Bugg, W.; Krishnamurthy, M.; Spanier, S. M.; Eckmann, R.; Kim, H.; Ritchie, J. L.; Satpathy, A.; Schwitters, R. F.; Izen, J. M.; Kitayama, I.; Lou, X. C.; Ye, S.; Bianchi, F.; Bona, M.; Gallo, F.; Gamba, D.; Borean, C.; Bosisio, L.; Cossutti, F.; della Ricca, G.; Dittongo, S.; Grancagnolo, S.; Lanceri, L.; Poropat, P.; Vitale, L.; Vuagnin, G.; Panvini, R. S.; Banerjee, Sw.; Brown, C. M.; Fortin, D.; Jackson, P. D.; Kowalewski, R.; Roney, J. M.; Band, H. R.; Dasu, S.; Datta, M.; Eichenbaum, A. M.; Johnson, J. R.; Kutter, P. E.; Li, H.; Liu, R.; di Lodovico, F.; Mihalyi, A.; Mohapatra, A. K.; Pan, Y.; Prepost, R.; Sekula, S. J.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J. H.; Wu, J.; Wu, S. L.; Yu, Z.; Neal, H.

    2004-10-01

    We have performed a search for the rare leptonic decay B+ --> mu+ nu_mu with data collected at the Upsilon(4S) resonance by the BABAR experiment at the PEP-II storage ring. In a sample of 88.4 million BBbar pairs, we find no significant evidence for a signal and set an upper limit on the branching fraction BR(B+ --> mu+ nu_mu) < 6.6 x 10^{-6} at the 90% confidence level.

  1. Erratum: Creation of X-Ray Transparency of Matter by Stimulated Elastic Forward Scattering [Phys. Rev. Lett. 115 , 107402 (2015)

    SciTech Connect

    Stöhr, J.; Scherz, A.

    2016-01-06

    X-ray absorption by matter has long been described by the famous Beer-Lambert law. Here we show how this fundamental law needs to be modified for high-intensity coherent x-ray pulses, now available at x-ray free electron lasers, due to the onset of stimulated elastic forward scattering. We present an analytical expression for the modified polarization-dependent Beer-Lambert law for the case of resonant core-to-valence electronic transitions and incident transform limited x-ray pulses. Upon transmission through a solid, the absorption and dichroic contrasts are found to vanish with increasing x-ray intensity, with the stimulation threshold lowered by orders of magnitude through a super-radiative coherent effect. Our results have broad implications for the study of matter with x-ray lasers.

  2. Erratum: Three-cluster dynamics within an ab initio framework [Phys. Rev. C 88 , 034320 (2013)

    SciTech Connect

    Quaglioni, Sofia; Romero-Redondo, Carolina; Navrátil, Petr

    2016-07-14

    In this study, we have discovered a typographical error in the portion of code used in our original article to compute the probability distribution of Figs. 7–9 of Sec. III B 2. The correct results are shown in the figures below. The correct probability distribution now shows the characteristic prominence of the “dineutron” over the “cigar” configuration. In addition, the most-probable distance between the two neutrons in the latter configuration is close to 4 fm (rather than the erroneously reported 5 fm). The other results and conclusion of the original paper remain unaffected.

  3. Comment on 'Power loss in open cavity diodes and a modified Child-Langmuir law' [Phys. Plasmas 12, 093102 (2005)

    SciTech Connect

    Swanekamp, S. B.; Ottinger, P. F.

    2007-09-15

    In this Comment, it is shown that no modification of the Child-Langmuir law [Phys. Rev.32, 492 (1911); Phys. Rev. 2, 450 (1913)] is necessary to treat the space-charge-limited flow from a diode with an open boundary as reported in Phys. Plasmas 12, 093102 (2005). The open boundary condition in their simulations can be represented by a voltage source and a resistor whose value is the vacuum-wave impedance of the opening. The diode can be represented as a variable resistor whose value depends on the voltage drop across the diode (as measured by the line integral of E across the diode gap). This is a simple voltage-divider circuit whose analysis shows that the real diode voltage drops as the vacuum-wave impedance increases. Furthermore, it is shown that in equilibrium, the voltage drop between the anode and cathode is independent of the path chosen for the line integral of the electric field so that E=-{nabla}{phi} is valid. In this case, the equations of electrostatics are applicable. This clearly demonstrates that the electric field is electrostatic and static fields DO NOT RADIATE. It is shown that the diode voltage drops as the vacuum wave impedance increases and the current drops according to the Child-Langmuir law. Therefore, the observed drop in circuit current can be explained by a real drop in voltage across the diode and not an effective drop as claimed by the authors.

  4. Comment on ``Unified explanation of the anomalous dynamic properties of highly asymmetric polymer blends'' [J. Chem. Phys. 138, 054903 (2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colmenero, J.

    2013-05-01

    In a recent paper by Ngai and Capaccioli ["Unified explanation of the anomalous dynamic properties of highly asymmetric polymer blends," J. Chem. Phys. 138, 054903 (2013), 10.1063/1.4789585] the authors claimed that the so-called coupling model (CM) provides a unified explanation of all dynamical anomalies that have been reported for dynamically asymmetric blends over last ten years. Approximately half of the paper is devoted to chain-dynamic properties involving un-entangled polymers. According to the authors, the application of the CM to these results is based on the existence of a crossover at a time tc ≈ 1-2 ns of the magnitudes describing chain-dynamics. Ngai and Capaccioli claimed that the existence of such a crossover is supported by the neutron scattering and MD-simulation results, corresponding to the blend poly(methyl methacrylate)/poly(ethylene oxide), by Niedzwiedz et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 168301 (2007), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.98.168301] and Brodeck et al. [Macromolecules 43, 3036 (2010), 10.1021/ma902820a], respectively. Being one of the authors of these two papers, I will demonstrate here that there is no evidence supporting such a crossover in the data reported in these papers.

  5. Optimized Chemical Probes for REV-ERBα

    PubMed Central

    Trump, Ryan P.; Bresciani, Stefano; Cooper, Anthony W. J.; Tellam, James P.; Wojno, Justyna; Blaikley, John; Orband-Miller, Lisa A.; Kashatus, Jennifer A.; Dawson, Helen C.; Loudon, Andrew; Ray, David; Grant, Daniel; Farrow, Stuart N.; Willson, Timothy M.; Tomkinson, Nicholas C. O.

    2015-01-01

    REV-ERBα has emerged as an important target for regulation of circadian rhythm and its associated physiology. Herein, we report on the optimization of a series of REV-ERBα agonists based on GSK4112 (1) for potency, selectivity, and bioavailability. Potent REV-ERBα agonists 4, 10, 16, and 23 are detailed for their ability to suppress BMAL and IL-6 expression from human cells while also demonstrating excellent selectivity over LXRα. Amine 4 demonstrated in vivo bioavailability after either IV or oral dosing. PMID:23656296

  6. Optimized chemical probes for REV-ERBα.

    PubMed

    Trump, Ryan P; Bresciani, Stefano; Cooper, Anthony W J; Tellam, James P; Wojno, Justyna; Blaikley, John; Orband-Miller, Lisa A; Kashatus, Jennifer A; Boudjelal, Mohamed; Dawson, Helen C; Loudon, Andrew; Ray, David; Grant, Daniel; Farrow, Stuart N; Willson, Timothy M; Tomkinson, Nicholas C O

    2013-06-13

    REV-ERBα has emerged as an important target for regulation of circadian rhythm and its associated physiology. Herein, we report on the optimization of a series of REV-ERBα agonists based on GSK4112 (1) for potency, selectivity, and bioavailability. (1) Potent REV-ERBα agonists 4, 10, 16, and 23 are detailed for their ability to suppress BMAL and IL-6 expression from human cells while also demonstrating excellent selectivity over LXRα. Amine 4 demonstrated in vivo bioavailability after either iv or oral dosing.

  7. Research-based resources on PhysPort

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayre, Eleanor

    2017-01-01

    PhysPort (http://physport.org) is a website that supports physics faculty in implementing research-based teaching practices in their classrooms. We provide expert recommendations and practical information about teaching methods and assessment. The PhysPort Data Explorer is an intuitive online tool for physics faculty to analyze their assessment data. Faculty upload their students' responses using our secure interface. The Data Explorer matches their pre/post data, scores it, compares it to national data, and graphs it in an interactive and intuitive manner. The Periscope collection on Physport brings together classroom video of students working groups with professional development materials for faculty, pre-service teachers, and learning assistants. To support PhysPort's development efforts, we conduct research on faculty needs around teaching and assessment, secondary analysis of published PER studies, and primary analysis of assessment data. In this talk, I'll introduce some of PhysPort's research-based resources and the research results which support them.

  8. Characterization of bovine immunodeficiency virus rev cDNAs and identification and subcellular localization of the Rev protein.

    PubMed Central

    Oberste, M S; Williamson, J C; Greenwood, J D; Nagashima, K; Copeland, T D; Gonda, M A

    1993-01-01

    One of the six putative accessory genes of bovine immunodeficiency virus (BIV) is similar to those identified as rev in the human immunodeficiency virus and visna virus genomes. To further analyze the BIV rev gene locus, protein, and function, rev cDNAs were cloned and characterized. BIV rev mRNA is derived from the full-length transcript by multiple splicing events and consists of three exons, including the untranslated leader sequence and two coding exons. BIV rev cDNA was expressed in bacteria and in a mammalian in vitro translation expression system. A 23-kDa Rev protein (p23rev) was immunologically detected in lysates from both systems by using an antiserum made to a synthetic Rev peptide. Recombinant p23rev made in bacteria was purified and used to make a polyvalent antiserum. Antisera to Rev peptide and recombinant p23rev immunoprecipitated p23rev from BIV-infected mammalian cells but not from virions. A mammalian expression vector using the BIV rev cDNA was constructed; p23rev was immunoprecipitated with anti-Rev serum from 32P-labeled lysates of monkey cells transfected with this plasmid, demonstrating that BIV Rev is phosphorylated. Immunofluorescence and immunoelectron microscopy with anti-BIV Rev antisera localized Rev in the nucleus and, particularly, in the nucleoli of BIV-infected cells. In functional studies, the expression of BIV Rev was shown to positively regulate the appearance both of Gag protein, which is translated from the unspliced primary viral transcript, and of singly spliced env mRNA but not that of the multiply spliced tat mRNA. These results demonstrate that BIV Rev activity correlates with the known function of lentivirus Rev proteins. Images PMID:8411341

  9. The PhysTEC Teacher Education Program at FIU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramer, Laird

    2010-10-01

    The FIU PhysTEC Project is an integral component of the Physics Department's educational transformation that has led to more than a ten-fold increase in majors. The transformation seeks to increase the quality and quantity of physics majors and future physics teachers, including those from historically underrepresented groups. Elements of the efforts include transformed introductory physics courses, establishment of a physics research and learning community, engagement of stakeholders spanning high school through the university administration, and advocacy by a physics education research group. The PhysTEC Project supports future physics teachers through a Learning Assistant program coupled to newly revised secondary education programs. The Learning Assistant program is an experiential program that recruits new students into teaching careers while providing a mechanism for transforming courses - undergraduates experience the rewards and intellectual challenges of teaching through providing interactive engagement learning experiences for their peers in introductory physics courses. Students that continue in the program enroll in a multidisciplinary teacher preparation program and may receive significant financial support. FIU is a minority-serving urban public research institution in Miami, Florida serving over 39,000 students, of which 64% are Hispanic, 13% are Black, and 56% are women. Programmatic strategies and impacts of the program will be provided.

  10. The PhysTec Project of APS, AIP, and AAPT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jansen, Henri

    2002-04-01

    We will describe the development of the PhysTEC program at Oregon State University. The goal of this program is to enhance the number of secondary physics teachers and to improve the physics training of primary teachers and secondary teachers in related fields. Key elements of the plan include: (1) a seamless five-year program leading to a M.S. in science education and a B.S. in physics with a specialty in physics education, which takes advantage of our unique undergraduate physics curriculum (the Paradigms project); (2) a teacher-in-residence with joint duties in the Department of Physics and the Department of Science and Math Education; (3) inquiry-based and pedagogically-oriented lab and recitation sections in calculus-based introductory physics; (4) an inquiry-based physical science course for preservice elementary teachers; (5) outreach projects that enhance the preservice experience and support the methods and pedagogy training offered elsewhere in the curriculum.

  11. PREFACE: Prospects in Neutrino Physics 2013 - NuPhys2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2015-04-01

    The first "Prospects in Neutrino Physics 2013 - NuPhys2013" conference was held at the Institute of Physics, IoP, London, 19-20 December 2013 and was attended by about 130 delegates from institutions worldwide. Lunch and coffee breaks allowed discussions among delegates and speakers to take place in an informal setting. This conference is unique in discussing the worldwide strategy to address unresolved issues in neutrino physics, and shape the future directions of particle physics. We discussed the current status and focussed especially on the prospects of future experiments, their performance and physics reach. It is particularly timely due to the recent measurements in neutrino physics and planned worldwide experiments. The following topics were addressed: • Theory and Phenomenology Perspectives • Future Long and Short Baseline Neutrino Oscillation Experiments • Reactor neutrino and flux • Neutrinoless double beta decays • Solar, atmospheric, supernova neutrinos • Neutrino cosmology in which both the phenomenological and experimental aspects were equally addressed. World-leading experts in the different neutrino areas were invited to give review talks. To encourage and facilitate the participation of early-career researchers and PhD students, a poster session formed a key aspect of this meeting. The conference was organized by Francesca Di Lodovico and Silvia Pascoli. It was sponsored by the IoP through their Topic Research Meeting Grant, and also supported by Durham IPPP, ERC-207282, FP7 invisibles project, Queen Mary University of London.

  12. Publisher's Note: Search for ultrahigh energy neutrinos in highly inclined events at the Pierre Auger Observatory [Phys. Rev. D 84, 122005 (2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Ahlers, M.; Ahn, E. J.; Albuquerque, I. F. M.; Allard, D.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Allison, P.; Almela, A.; Alvarez Castillo, J.; Alvarez-Muñiz, J.; Ambrosio, M.; Aminaei, A.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andringa, S.; Anticic, T.; Aramo, C.; Arganda, E.; Arqueros, F.; Asorey, H.; Assis, P.; Aublin, J.; Ave, M.; Avenier, M.; Avila, G.; Bäcker, T.; Badescu, A. M.; Balzer, M.; Barber, K. B.; Barbosa, A. F.; Bardenet, R.; Barroso, S. L. C.; Baughman, B.; Bäuml, J.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker, B. R.; Becker, K. H.; Bellétoile, A.; Bellido, J. A.; Benzvi, S.; Berat, C.; Bertou, X.; Biermann, P. L.; Billoir, P.; Blanco, F.; Blanco, M.; Bleve, C.; Blümer, H.; Bohácová, M.; Boncioli, D.; Bonifazi, C.; Bonino, R.; Borodai, N.; Brack, J.; Brancus, I.; Brogueira, P.; Brown, W. C.; Bruijn, R.; Buchholz, P.; Bueno, A.; Burton, R. E.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Caccianiga, B.; Caramete, L.; Caruso, R.; Castellina, A.; Catalano, O.; Cataldi, G.; Cazon, L.; Cester, R.; Chauvin, J.; Cheng, S. H.; Chiavassa, A.; Chinellato, J. A.; Chirinos Diaz, J.; Chudoba, J.; Clay, R. W.; Coluccia, M. R.; Conceição, R.; Contreras, F.; Cook, H.; Cooper, M. J.; Coppens, J.; Cordier, A.; Coutu, S.; Covault, C. E.; Creusot, A.; Criss, A.; Cronin, J.; Curutiu, A.; Dagoret-Campagne, S.; Dallier, R.; Dasso, S.; Daumiller, K.; Dawson, B. R.; de Almeida, R. M.; de Domenico, M.; de Donato, C.; de Jong, S. J.; de La Vega, G.; de Mello, W. J. M., Jr.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; de Mitri, I.; de Souza, V.; de Vries, K. D.; Del Peral, L.; Del Río, M.; Deligny, O.; Dembinski, H.; Dhital, N.; di Giulio, C.; Díaz Castro, M. L.; Diep, P. N.; Diogo, F.; Dobrigkeit, C.; Docters, W.; D'Olivo, J. C.; Dong, P. N.; Dorofeev, A.; Dos Anjos, J. C.; Dova, M. T.; D'Urso, D.; Dutan, I.; Ebr, J.; Engel, R.; Erdmann, M.; Escobar, C. O.; Espadanal, J.; Etchegoyen, A.; Facal San Luis, P.; Fajardo Tapia, I.; Falcke, H.; Farrar, G.; Fauth, A. C.; Fazzini, N.; Ferguson, A. P.; Fick, B.; Filevich, A.; Filipcic, A.; Fliescher, S.; Fracchiolla, C. E.; Fraenkel, E. D.; Fratu, O.; Fröhlich, U.; Fuchs, B.; Gaior, R.; Gamarra, R. F.; Gambetta, S.; García, B.; Garcia Roca, S. T.; Garcia-Gamez, D.; Garcia-Pinto, D.; Gascon, A.; Gemmeke, H.; Ghia, P. L.; Giaccari, U.; Giller, M.; Glass, H.; Gold, M. S.; Golup, G.; Gomez Albarracin, F.; Gómez Berisso, M.; Gómez Vitale, P. F.; Gonçalves, P.; Gonzalez, D.; Gonzalez, J. G.; Gookin, B.; Gorgi, A.; Gouffon, P.; Grashorn, E.; Grebe, S.; Griffith, N.; Grigat, M.; Grillo, A. F.; Guardincerri, Y.; Guarino, F.; Guedes, G. P.; Guzman, A.; Hansen, P.; Harari, D.; Harmsma, S.; Harrison, T. A.; Harton, J. L.; Haungs, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heck, D.; Herve, A. E.; Hojvat, C.; Hollon, N.; Holmes, V. C.; Homola, P.; Hörandel, J. R.; Horneffer, A.; Horvath, P.; Hrabovský, M.; Huber, D.; Huege, T.; Insolia, A.; Ionita, F.; Italiano, A.; Jarne, C.; Jiraskova, S.; Josebachuili, M.; Kadija, K.; Kampert, K. H.; Karhan, P.; Kasper, P.; Kégl, B.; Keilhauer, B.; Keivani, A.; Kelley, J. L.; Kemp, E.; Kieckhafer, R. M.; Klages, H. O.; Kleifges, M.; Kleinfeller, J.; Knapp, J.; Koang, D.-H.; Kotera, K.; Krohm, N.; Krömer, O.; Kruppke-Hansen, D.; Kuehn, F.; Kuempel, D.; Kulbartz, J. K.; Kunka, N.; La Rosa, G.; Lachaud, C.; Lauer, R.; Lautridou, P.; Le Coz, S.; Leão, M. S. A. B.; Lebrun, D.; Lebrun, P.; Leigui de Oliveira, M. A.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; Link, K.; López, R.; Lopez Agüera, A.; Louedec, K.; Lozano Bahilo, J.; Lu, L.; Lucero, A.; Ludwig, M.; Lyberis, H.; Macolino, C.; Maldera, S.; Mandat, D.; Mantsch, P.; Mariazzi, A. G.; Marin, J.; Marin, V.; Maris, I. C.; Marquez Falcon, H. R.; Marsella, G.; Martello, D.; Martin, L.; Martinez, H.; Martínez Bravo, O.; Mathes, H. J.; Matthews, J.; Matthews, J. A. J.; Matthiae, G.; Maurel, D.; Maurizio, D.; Mazur, P. O.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Melissas, M.; Melo, D.; Menichetti, E.; Menshikov, A.; Mertsch, P.; Meurer, C.; Micanovic, S.; Micheletti, M. I.; Miramonti, L.; Molina-Bueno, L.; Mollerach, S.; Monasor, M.; Monnier Ragaigne, D.; Montanet, F.; Morales, B.; Morello, C.; Moreno, E.; Moreno, J. C.; Mostafá, M.; Moura, C. A.; Muller, M. A.; Müller, G.; Münchmeyer, M.; Mussa, R.; Navarra, G.; Navarro, J. L.; Navas, S.; Necesal, P.; Nellen, L.; Nelles, A.; Neuser, J.; Newton, D.; Nhung, P. T.; Niechciol, M.; Niemietz, L.; Nierstenhoefer, N.; Nitz, D.; Nosek, D.; Nožka, L.; Nyklicek, M.; Oehlschläger, J.; Olinto, A.; Ortiz, M.; Pacheco, N.; Pakk Selmi-Dei, D.; Palatka, M.; Pallotta, J.; Palmieri, N.; Parente, G.; Parizot, E.; Parra, A.; Pastor, S.; Paul, T.; Pech, M.; Pekala, J.; Pelayo, R.; Pepe, I. M.; Perrone, L.; Pesce, R.; Petermann, E.; Petrera, S.; Petrinca, P.; Petrolini, A.; Petrov, Y.; Pfendner, C.; Piegaia, R.; Pierog, T.; Pieroni, P.; Pimenta, M.; Pirronello, V.; Platino, M.; Ponce, V. H.; Pontz, M.; Porcelli, A.; Privitera, P.; Prouza, M.; Quel, E. J.; Querchfeld, S.; Rautenberg, J.; Ravel, O.; Ravignani, D.; Revenu, B.; Ridky, J.; Riggi, S.; Risse, M.; Ristori, P.; Rivera, H.; Rizi, V.; Roberts, J.; Rodrigues de Carvalho, W.; Rodriguez, G.; Rodriguez Martino, J.; Rodriguez Rojo, J.; Rodriguez-Cabo, I.; Rodríguez-Frías, M. D.; Ros, G.; Rosado, J.; Rossler, T.; Roth, M.; Rouillé-D'Orfeuil, B.; Roulet, E.; Rovero, A. C.; Rühle, C.; Saftoiu, A.; Salamida, F.; Salazar, H.; Salesa Greus, F.; Salina, G.; Sánchez, F.; Santo, C. E.; Santos, E.; Santos, E. M.; Sarazin, F.; Sarkar, B.; Sarkar, S.; Sato, R.; Scharf, N.; Scherini, V.; Schieler, H.; Schiffer, P.; Schmidt, A.; Scholten, O.; Schoorlemmer, H.; Schovancova, J.; Schovánek, P.; Schröder, F.; Schulte, S.; Schuster, D.; Sciutto, S. J.; Scuderi, M.; Segreto, A.; Settimo, M.; Shadkam, A.; Shellard, R. C.; Sidelnik, I.; Sigl, G.; Silva Lopez, H. H.; Sima, O.; Smialkowski, A.; Šmída, R.; Snow, G. R.; Sommers, P.; Sorokin, J.; Spinka, H.; Squartini, R.; Srivastava, Y. N.; Stanic, S.; Stapleton, J.; Stasielak, J.; Stephan, M.; Stutz, A.; Suarez, F.; Suomijärvi, T.; Supanitsky, A. D.; Šuša, T.; Sutherland, M. S.; Swain, J.; Szadkowski, Z.; Szuba, M.; Tapia, A.; Tartare, M.; Tascau, O.; Tavera Ruiz, C. G.; Tcaciuc, R.; Tegolo, D.; Thao, N. T.; Thomas, D.; Tiffenberg, J.; Timmermans, C.; Tkaczyk, W.; Todero Peixoto, C. J.; Toma, G.; Tomé, B.; Tonachini, A.; Travnicek, P.; Tridapalli, D. B.; Tristram, G.; Trovato, E.; Tueros, M.; Ulrich, R.; Unger, M.; Urban, M.; Valdés Galicia, J. F.; Valiño, I.; Valore, L.; van den Berg, A. M.; Varela, E.; Vargas Cárdenas, B.; Vázquez, J. R.; Vázquez, R. A.; Veberic, D.; Verzi, V.; Vicha, J.; Videla, M.; Villaseñor, L.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrlich, P.; Wainberg, O.; Walz, D.; Watson, A. A.; Weber, M.; Weidenhaupt, K.; Weindl, A.; Werner, F.; Westerhoff, S.; Whelan, B. J.; Widom, A.; Wieczorek, G.; Wiencke, L.; Wilczynska, B.; Wilczynski, H.; Will, M.; Williams, C.; Winchen, T.; Wommer, M.; Wundheiler, B.; Yamamoto, T.; Yapici, T.; Younk, P.; Yuan, G.; Yushkov, A.; Zamorano, B.; Zas, E.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zavrtanik, M.; Zaw, I.; Zepeda, A.; Zhu, Y.; Zimbres Silva, M.; Ziolkowski, M.

    2012-01-01

    The Surface Detector of the Pierre Auger Observatory is sensitive to neutrinos of all flavours above 0.1 EeV. These interact through charged and neutral currents in the atmosphere giving rise to extensive air showers. When interacting deeply in the atmosphere at nearly horizontal incidence, neutrinos can be distinguished from regular hadronic cosmic rays by the broad time structure of their shower signals in the water-Cherenkov detectors. In this paper we present for the first time an analysis based on down-going neutrinos. We describe the search procedure, the possible sources of background, the method to compute the exposure and the associated systematic uncertainties. No candidate neutrinos have been found in data collected from 1 January 2004 to 31 May 2010. Assuming an E^-2 differential energy spectrum the limit on the single flavour neutrino is (E^2 * dN/dE) < 1.74x10^-7 GeV cm^-2 s^-1 sr^-1 at 90% C.L. in the energy range 1x10^17 eV < E < 1x10^20 eV.

  13. Publisher's Note: Level structure 18Ne and its importance in the 14O(α,p)17F reaction rate [Phys. Rev. C 86, 025801(2012)

    DOE PAGES

    Almaraz-Calderon, S.; Tan, W. P.; Aprahamian, A.; ...

    2012-08-10

    The level structure of 18Ne above the α-decay threshold has been studied using the 16O(3He,n) reaction. A coincidence measurement of neutrons and charged particles decaying from populated states in 18Ne has been made. Decay branching ratios were measured for six resonances and used to calculate the 14O(α,p)17F reaction rate which is a measure of one of two breakout paths from the Hot CNO cycle. As a result, the new experimental information combined with previous experimental and theoretical information, provides a more accurate calculation of the reaction rate.

  14. Erratum: Evidence of b-jet quenching in PbPb collisions at sNN=2.76TeV [Phys. Rev. Lett. 113 , 132301 (2014)

    DOE PAGES

    Chatrchyan, S.

    2015-07-10

    In our Letter, there was a component of the statistical uncertainty from the simulated PbPb Monte Carlo samples. This uncertainty was not propagated to all of the results. Figures 3 and 4 have been updated to reflect this source of uncertainty. In this case, the statistical uncertainties remain smaller than the systematic uncertainties in all cases such that the conclusions of the Letter are unaltered.

  15. Erratum: I-Love-Q relations for gravastars and the approach to the black-hole limit [Phys. Rev. D 92, 124030 (2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pani, Paolo

    2017-02-01

    We point out two mistakes which affect the computation of the moment of inertia and of the tidal Love number in the original paper. Both mistakes have been corrected in Ref. [1] and the correct tidal Love number agrees with the recent computation of Ref. [2].

  16. Corrected Article: Measure of the impact of future dark energy experiments based on discriminating power among quintessence models [Phys. Rev. D 78, 043528 (2008)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnard, Michael; Abrahamse, Augusta; Albrecht, Andreas; Bozek, Brandon; Yashar, Mark

    2009-12-01

    We evaluate the ability of future data sets to discriminate among different quintessence dark energy models. This approach gives an alternative (and complementary) measure for assessing the impact of future experiments, as compared with the large body of literature that compares experiments in abstract parameter spaces (such as the well-known w0-wa parameters) and more recent work that evaluates the constraining power of experiments on individual parameter spaces of specific quintessence models. We use the Dark Energy Task Force (DETF) models of future data sets and compare the discriminative power of experiments designated by the DETF as stages 2, 3, and 4 (denoting increasing capabilities). Our work reveals a minimal increase in discriminating power when comparing stage 3 to stage 2, but a very striking increase in discriminating power when going to stage 4 (including the possibility of completely eliminating some quintessence models). We also see evidence that even modest improvements over DETF stage 4 (which many believe are realistic) could result in even more dramatic discriminating power among quintessence dark energy models. We develop and demonstrate the technique of using the independently measured modes of the equation of state (derived from principle component analysis) as a common parameter space in which to compare the different quintessence models, and we argue that this technique is a powerful one. We use the pseudo-Nambu-Goldstone boson, exponential, Albrecht-Skordis, and inverse tracker (or inverse power law) quintessence models for this work. One of our main results is that the goal of discriminating among these models sets a concrete measure on the capabilities of future dark energy experiments. Experiments have to be somewhat better than DETF stage 4 simulated experiments to fully meet this goal.

  17. Publisher's Note: State-projective scheme for generating pair coherent states in traveling-wave optical fields [Phys. Rev. A 84, 023810 (2011)

    SciTech Connect

    Gerry, Christopher C.; Mimih, Jihane; Birrittella, Richard

    2011-08-15

    This paper was published online on 9 August 2011 with a duplication of Fig. 4 in place of Fig. 1. Figure 1 has been correctly replaced as of 22 August 2011. Figure 1 is correct in the printed version of the journal.

  18. Publisher's Note: Evidence for CP Violation in Time-Integrated D0→h-h+ decay rates [Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 111602 (2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaij, R.; Abellan Beteta, C.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Adrover, C.; Affolder, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Alkhazov, G.; Alvarez Cartelle, P.; Alves, A. A., Jr.; Amato, S.; Amhis, Y.; Anderson, J.; Appleby, R. B.; Aquines Gutierrez, O.; Archilli, F.; Arrabito, L.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Bailey, D. S.; Balagura, V.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Bates, A.; Bauer, C.; Bauer, Th.; Bay, A.; Bediaga, I.; Belogurov, S.; Belous, K.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Benayoun, M.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Bernet, R.; Bettler, M.-O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bien, A.; Bifani, S.; Bird, T.; Bizzeti, A.; Bjørnstad, P. M.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blanks, C.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bobrov, A.; Bocci, V.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borghi, S.; Borgia, A.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bozzi, C.; Brambach, T.; van den Brand, J.; Bressieux, J.; Brett, D.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brook, N. H.; Brown, H.; Büchler-Germann, A.; Burducea, I.; Bursche, A.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Callot, O.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Camboni, A.; Campana, P.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carson, L.; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Casse, G.; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Chiapolini, N.; Ciba, K.; Cid Vidal, X.; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coca, C.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Constantin, F.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombes, M.; Corti, G.; Cowan, G. A.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; David, P.; David, P. N. Y.; de Bonis, I.; de Capua, S.; de Cian, M.; de Lorenzi, F.; de Miranda, J. M.; de Paula, L.; de Simone, P.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Degaudenzi, H.; Del Buono, L.; Deplano, C.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Dickens, J.; Dijkstra, H.; Diniz Batista, P.; Domingo Bonal, F.; Donleavy, S.; Dordei, F.; Dosil Suárez, A.; Dossett, D.; Dovbnya, A.; Dupertuis, F.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Easo, S.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; van Eijk, D.; Eisele, F.; Eisenhardt, S.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; Elsasser, Ch.; Elsby, D.; Esperante Pereira, D.; Estève, L.; Falabella, A.; Fanchini, E.; Färber, C.; Fardell, G.; Farinelli, C.; Farry, S.; Fave, V.; Fernandez Albor, V.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forty, R.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Frosini, M.; Furcas, S.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; Garnier, J.-C.; Garofoli, J.; Garra Tico, J.; Garrido, L.; Gascon, D.; Gaspar, C.; Gauvin, N.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gibson, V.; Gligorov, V. V.; Göbel, C.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gordon, H.; Grabalosa Gándara, M.; Graciani Diaz, R.; Granado Cardoso, L. A.; Graugés, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Greening, E.; Gregson, S.; Gui, B.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S. C.; Hampson, T.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harji, R.; Harnew, N.; Harrison, J.; Harrison, P. F.; Hartmann, T.; He, J.; Heijne, V.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Hernando Morata, J. A.; van Herwijnen, E.; Hicks, E.; Holubyev, K.; Hopchev, P.; Hulsbergen, W.; Hunt, P.; Huse, T.; Huston, R. S.; Hutchcroft, D.; Hynds, D.; Iakovenko, V.; Ilten, P.; Imong, J.; Jacobsson, R.; Jaeger, A.; Jahjah Hussein, M.; Jans, E.; Jansen, F.; Jaton, P.; Jean-Marie, B.; Jing, F.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Jost, B.; Kaballo, M.; Kandybei, S.; Karacson, M.; Karbach, T. M.; Keaveney, J.; Kenyon, I. R.; Kerzel, U.; Ketel, T.; Keune, A.; Khanji, B.; Kim, Y. M.; Knecht, M.; Koopman, R.; Koppenburg, P.; Kozlinskiy, A.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krocker, G.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Kruzelecki, K.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; La Thi, V. N.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.; Lambert, R. W.; Lanciotti, E.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; van Leerdam, J.; Lees, J.-P.; Lefèvre, R.; Leflat, A.; Lefrançois, J.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Li, L.; Li Gioi, L.; Lieng, M.; Liles, M.; Lindner, R.; Linn, C.; Liu, B.; Liu, G.; von Loeben, J.; Lopes, J. H.; Lopez Asamar, E.; Lopez-March, N.; Lu, H.; Luisier, J.; Mac Raighne, A.; Machefert, F.; Machikhiliyan, I. V.; Maciuc, F.; Maev, O.; Magnin, J.; Malde, S.; Mamunur, R. M. D.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Mangiafave, N.; Marconi, U.; Märki, R.; Marks, J.; Martellotti, G.; Martens, A.; Martin, L.; Martín Sánchez, A.; Martinez Santos, D.; Massafferri, A.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.; Matveev, M.; Maurice, E.; Maynard, B.; Mazurov, A.; McGregor, G.; McNulty, R.; Meissner, M.; Merk, M.; Merkel, J.; Messi, R.; Miglioranzi, S.; Milanes, D. A.; Minard, M.-N.; Molina Rodriguez, J.; Monteil, S.; Moran, D.; Morawski, P.; Mountain, R.; Mous, I.; Muheim, F.; Müller, K.; Muresan, R.; Muryn, B.; Muster, B.; Musy, M.; Mylroie-Smith, J.; Naik, P.; Nakada, T.; Nandakumar, R.; Nasteva, I.; Nedos, M.; Needham, M.; Neufeld, N.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Nicol, M.; Niess, V.; Nikitin, N.; Nomerotski, A.; Novoselov, A.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Oggero, S.; Ogilvy, S.; Okhrimenko, O.; Oldeman, R.; Orlandea, M.; Otalora Goicochea, J. M.; Owen, P.; Pal, K.; Palacios, J.; Palano, A.; Palutan, M.; Panman, J.; Papanestis, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Parkes, C.; Parkinson, C. J.; Passaleva, G.; Patel, G. D.; Patel, M.; Paterson, S. K.; Patrick, G. N.; Patrignani, C.; Pavel-Nicorescu, C.; Pazos Alvarez, A.; Pellegrino, A.; Penso, G.; Pepe Altarelli, M.; Perazzini, S.; Perego, D. L.; Perez Trigo, E.; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A.; Perret, P.; Perrin-Terrin, M.; Pessina, G.; Petrella, A.; Petrolini, A.; Phan, A.; Picatoste Olloqui, E.; Pie Valls, B.; Pietrzyk, B.; Pilař, T.; Pinci, D.; Plackett, R.; Playfer, S.; Plo Casasus, M.; Polok, G.; Poluektov, A.; Polycarpo, E.; Popov, D.; Popovici, B.; Potterat, C.; Powell, A.; Prisciandaro, J.; Pugatch, V.; Navarro, A. Puig; Qian, W.; Rademacker, J. H.; Rakotomiaramanana, B.; Rangel, M. S.; Raniuk, I.; Raven, G.; Redford, S.; Reid, M. M.; Dos Reis, A. C.; Ricciardi, S.; Rinnert, K.; Roa Romero, D. A.; Robbe, P.; Rodrigues, E.; Rodrigues, F.; Rodriguez Perez, P.; Rogers, G. J.; Roiser, S.; Romanovsky, V.; Rosello, M.; Rouvinet, J.; Ruf, T.; Ruiz, H.; Sabatino, G.; Saborido Silva, J. J.; Sagidova, N.; Sail, P.; Saitta, B.; Salzmann, C.; Sannino, M.; Santacesaria, R.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santinelli, R.; Santovetti, E.; Sapunov, M.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Savrie, M.; Savrina, D.; Schaack, P.; Schiller, M.; Schleich, S.; Schlupp, M.; Schmelling, M.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, O.; Schopper, A.; Schune, M.-H.; Schwemmer, R.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Seco, M.; Semennikov, A.; Senderowska, K.; Sepp, I.; Serra, N.; Serrano, J.; Seyfert, P.; Shapkin, M.; Shapoval, I.; Shatalov, P.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shears, T.; Shekhtman, L.; Shevchenko, O.; Shevchenko, V.; Shires, A.; Silva Coutinho, R.; Skwarnicki, T.; Smith, A. C.; Smith, N. A.; Smith, E.; Sobczak, K.; Soler, F. J. P.; Solomin, A.; Soomro, F.; Souza de Paula, B.; Spaan, B.; Sparkes, A.; Spradlin, P.; Stagni, F.; Stahl, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Stoica, S.; Stone, S.; Storaci, B.; Straticiuc, M.; Straumann, U.; Subbiah, V. K.; Swientek, S.; Szczekowski, M.; Szczypka, P.; Szumlak, T.; T'Jampens, S.; Teodorescu, E.; Teubert, F.; Thomas, C.; Thomas, E.; van Tilburg, J.; Tisserand, V.; Tobin, M.; Topp-Joergensen, S.; Torr, N.; Tournefier, E.; Tran, M. T.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tuning, N.; Ubeda Garcia, M.; Ukleja, A.; Urquijo, P.; Uwer, U.; Vagnoni, V.; Valenti, G.; Vazquez Gomez, R.; Vazquez Regueiro, P.; Vecchi, S.; Velthuis, J. J.; Veltri, M.; Viaud, B.; Videau, I.; Vilasis-Cardona, X.; Visniakov, J.; Vollhardt, A.; Volyanskyy, D.; Voong, D.; Vorobyev, A.; Voss, H.; Wandernoth, S.; Wang, J.; Ward, D. R.; Watson, N. K.; Webber, A. D.; Websdale, D.; Whitehead, M.; Wiedner, D.; Wiggers, L.; Wilkinson, G.; Williams, M. P.; Williams, M.; Wilson, F. F.; Wishahi, J.; Witek, M.; Witzeling, W.; Wotton, S. A.; Wyllie, K.; Xie, Y.; Xing, F.; Xing, Z.; Yang, Z.; Young, R.; Yushchenko, O.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, W. C.; Zhang, Y.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhong, L.; Zverev, E.; Zvyagin, A.

    2012-03-01

    A search for time-integrated CP violation in D0 -> h-h+ (h=K, pi) decays is presented using 0.62 fb^-1 of data collected by LHCb in 2011. The flavor of the charm meson is determined by the charge of the slow pion in the D*+ -> D0 pi+ and D*- -> D0bar pi- decay chains. The difference in CP asymmetry between D0 -> K-K+ and D0 -> pi-pi+, Delta ACP = ACP(K-K+) - ACP(pi-pi+), is measured to be [-0.82 \\pm 0.21(stat.) \\pm 0.11(syst.)]%. This differs from the hypothesis of CP conservation by 3.5 standard deviations.

  19. A nucleolar localizing Rev binding element inhibits HIV replication

    PubMed Central

    Michienzi, Alessandro; De Angelis, Fernanda G; Bozzoni, Irene; Rossi, John J

    2006-01-01

    The Rev protein of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) facilitates the nuclear export of intron containing viral mRNAs allowing formation of infectious virions. Rev traffics through the nucleolus and shuttles between the nucleus and cytoplasm. Rev multimerization and interaction with the export protein CRM1 takes place in the nucleolus. To test the importance of Rev nucleolar trafficking in the HIV-1 replication cycle, we created a nucleolar localizing Rev Response Element (RRE) decoy and tested this for its anti-HIV activity. The RRE decoy provided marked inhibition of HIV-1 replication in both the CEM T-cell line and in primary CD34+ derived monocytes. These results demonstrate that titration of Rev in the nucleolus impairs HIV-1 replication and supports a functional role for Rev trafficking in this sub-cellular compartment. PMID:16712721

  20. Suppression of atherosclerosis by synthetic REV-ERB agonist

    SciTech Connect

    Sitaula, Sadichha; Billon, Cyrielle; Kamenecka, Theodore M.; Solt, Laura A.; Burris, Thomas P.

    2015-05-08

    The nuclear receptors for heme, REV-ERBα and REV-ERBβ, play important roles in the regulation of metabolism and inflammation. Recently it was demonstrated that reduced REV-ERBα expression in hematopoetic cells in LDL receptor null mice led to increased atherosclerosis. We sought to determine if synthetic REV-ERB agonists that we have developed might have the ability to suppress atherosclerosis in this model. A previously characterized synthetic REV-ERB agonist, SR9009, was used to determine if activation of REV-ERB activity would affect atherosclerosis in LDL receptor deficient mice. Atherosclerotic plaque size was significantly reduced (p < 0.05) in mice administered SR9009 (100 mg/kg) for seven weeks compared to control mice (n = 10 per group). SR9009 treatment of bone marrow-derived mouse macrophages (BMDM) reduced the polarization of BMDMs to proinflammatory M1 macrophage while increasing the polarization of BMDMs to anti-inflammatory M2 macrophages. Our results suggest that pharmacological targeting of REV-ERBs may be a viable therapeutic option for treatment of atherosclerosis. - Highlights: • Synthetic REV-ERB agonist treatment reduced atherosclerosis in a mouse model. • Pharmacological activation of REV-ERB decreased M1 macrophage polarization. • Pharmacological activation of REV-ERB increased M2 macrophage polarization.

  1. Preface: phys. stat. sol. (a) 202/12

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumann, Wolfgang; Stutzmann, Martin; Hildebrandt, Stefan

    2005-09-01

    The present special issue contains a collection of Original Papers dedicated to Professor Johannes Heydenreich on the occasion of his 75th birthday.Johannes Heydenreich, born on 20 June 1930 in Plauen/Vogtland near Dresden, studied physics at the Pädagogische Hochschule Potsdam, where he obtained his first academic degree Dipl. Phys. in 1958. He received his doctoral degree at the Martin Luther University in Halle in 1961 and the Habilitation degree in 1969. Already during his studies in Potsdam, he showed an interest in electron microscopy due to the influence of his teacher and supervisor Prof. Picht, one of the pioneers in electron optics. His interests were strengthened when Johannes Heydenreich did the experimental work for his Diploma degree at the Institute for Experimental Physics of the University of Halle, where he met Prof. Heinz Bethge for the first time. This was the beginning of a fruitful and longstanding collaboration. In 1962 Johannes Heydenreich joined the team of the later Institute for Solid State Physics and Electron Microscopy of the Academy of Sciences of the GDR, in Halle, for which the basis was laid by Prof. Bethge in 1960.Heydenreich has been working as Assistant Director for many years and played a decisive role in introducing and organising the various techniques of electron microscopy in the institute.The research activities of Prof. Heydenreich covered a broad spectrum over the years. At the beginning of his career he made significant contributions in the field of electron mirror microscopy. After that, his main interests were focused on transmission electron microscopy, ranging from diffraction contrast analysis of crystal defects to high-resolution electron microscopy and image processing. His favourite field was studies of defect-induced phenomena in advanced materials. The so-called Bethge-Heydenreich, the book Electron Microscopy in Solid State Physics, published at first in a German edition in 1982 and later in a revised

  2. Physics of the Cosmos Program Analysis Group (PhysPAG) Report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nousek, John A.

    2015-01-01

    The Physics of the Cosmos Program Analysis Group (PhysPAG) serves as a forum for soliciting and coordinating input and analysis from the scientific community in support of the PCOS program objectives. I will outline the activities of the PhysPAG over the past year, since the last meeting during the AAS meeting in National Harbor, and mention the activities of the PhysPAG related Scientific Interest Groups.

  3. Biallelic inactivation of REV7 is associated with Fanconi anemia

    PubMed Central

    Masliah-Planchon, Julien; Clairmont, Connor; Rousseau, Alix; Ceccaldi, Raphael; Dubois d’Enghien, Catherine; Bluteau, Olivier; Cuccuini, Wendy; Gachet, Stéphanie; Peffault de Latour, Régis; Leblanc, Thierry; Socié, Gérard; Baruchel, André; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; D’Andrea, Alan D.

    2016-01-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a recessive genetic disease characterized by congenital abnormalities, chromosome instability, progressive bone marrow failure (BMF), and a strong predisposition to cancer. Twenty FA genes have been identified, and the FANC proteins they encode cooperate in a common pathway that regulates DNA crosslink repair and replication fork stability. We identified a child with severe BMF who harbored biallelic inactivating mutations of the translesion DNA synthesis (TLS) gene REV7 (also known as MAD2L2), which encodes the mutant REV7 protein REV7-V85E. Patient-derived cells demonstrated an extended FA phenotype, which included increased chromosome breaks and G2/M accumulation upon exposure to DNA crosslinking agents, γH2AX and 53BP1 foci accumulation, and enhanced p53/p21 activation relative to cells derived from healthy patients. Expression of WT REV7 restored normal cellular and functional phenotypes in the patient’s cells, and CRISPR/Cas9 inactivation of REV7 in a non-FA human cell line produced an FA phenotype. Finally, silencing Rev7 in primary hematopoietic cells impaired progenitor function, suggesting that the DNA repair defect underlies the development of BMF in FA. Taken together, our genetic and functional analyses identified REV7 as a previously undescribed FA gene, which we term FANCV. PMID:27500492

  4. DNA nuclease activity of Rev-coupled transition metal chelates.

    PubMed

    Joyner, Jeff C; Keuper, Kevin D; Cowan, J A

    2012-06-07

    Artificial nucleases containing Rev-coupled metal chelates based on combinations of the transition metals Fe(2+), Co(2+), Ni(2+), and Cu(2+) and the chelators DOTA, DTPA, EDTA, NTA, tripeptide GGH, and tetrapeptide KGHK have been tested for DNA nuclease activity. Originally designed to target reactive transition metal chelates (M-chelates) to the HIV-1 Rev response element mRNA, attachment to the arginine-rich Rev peptide also increases DNA-binding affinity for the attached M-chelates. Apparent K(D) values ranging from 1.7 to 3.6 µM base pairs for binding of supercoiled pUC19 plasmid DNA by Ni-chelate-Rev complexes were observed, as a result of electrostatic attraction between the positively-charged Rev peptide and negatively-charged DNA. Attachment of M-chelates to the Rev peptide resulted in enhancements of DNA nuclease activity ranging from 1-fold (no enhancement) to at least 13-fold (for Cu-DTPA-Rev), for the rate of DNA nicking, with second order rate constants for conversion of DNA(supercoiled) to DNA(nicked) up to 6 × 10(6) M(-1) min(-1), and for conversion of DNA(nicked) to DNA(linear) up to 1 × 10(5) M(-1) min(-1). Freifelder-Trumbo analysis and the ratios of linearization and nicking rate constants (k(lin)/k(nick)) revealed concerted mechanisms for nicking and subsequent linearization of plasmid DNA for all of the Rev-coupled M-chelates, consistent with higher DNA residency times for the Rev-coupled M-chelates. Observed rates for Rev-coupled M-chelates were less skewed by differing DNA-binding affinities than for M-chelates lacking Rev, as a result of the narrow range of DNA-binding affinities observed, and therefore relationships between DNA nuclease activity and other catalyst properties, such as coordination unsaturation, the ability to consume ascorbic acid and generate diffusible radicals, and the identity of the metal center, are now clearly illustrated in light of the similar DNA-binding affinities of all M-chelate-Rev complexes. This work

  5. Specific binding of a basic peptide from HIV-1 Rev.

    PubMed Central

    Kjems, J; Calnan, B J; Frankel, A D; Sharp, P A

    1992-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type I (HIV-1) encodes a regulatory protein, Rev, which is required for cytoplasmic expression of incompletely spliced viral mRNA. Rev activity is mediated through specific binding to a cis-acting Rev responsive element (RRE) located within the env region of HIV-1. A monomer Rev binding site corresponding to 37 nucleotides of the RRE (IIB RNA) was studied by RNA footprinting, modification interference experiments and mutational analysis. Surprisingly, a 17 amino acid peptide, corresponding to the basic domain of Rev, binds specifically to this site at essentially identical nucleotides and probably induces additional base pairing. The Rev protein and related peptide interact primarily with two sets of nucleotides located at the junction of single and double stranded regions, and at an additional site located within a helix. This suggests that the domains of proteins responsible for specific RNA binding can be remarkably small and that the interaction between RNA and protein can probably induce structure in both constituents. Images PMID:1547776

  6. Comment on ``Heat transfer in vacuum packaged microelectromechanical system devices'' [Phys. Fluids 20, 017103 (2008)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sone, Yoshio

    2009-11-01

    It is pointed out that the solution of a free molecular gas in a bounded domain proposed as speculation in Sec. II of Cai [Phys. Fluids 20, 017103 (2008)] and in Sec. II of Cai and Liu [Phys. Fluids 20, 067105 (2008)] and its result of the vanishing of flow velocity were rigorously derived under a more general situation and boundary condition more than 20 years ago.

  7. Response to 'Comment on 'Undamped electrostatic plasma waves''[Phys. Plasmas 20, 034701 (2013)

    SciTech Connect

    Valentini, F.; Perrone, D.; Veltri, P.; Califano, F.; Pegoraro, F.; Morrison, P. J.; O'Neil, T. M.

    2013-03-15

    Numerical and experimental evidence is given for the occurrence of the plateau states and concomitant corner modes proposed in Valentini et al.[Phys. Plasmas 19, 092103 (2012)]. It is argued that these states provide a better description of reality for small amplitude off-dispersion disturbances than the conventional Bernstein-Greene-Kruskal or cnoidal states such as those proposed in Schamel [Phys. Plasmas 20, 034701 (2013)].

  8. Proflavine acts as a Rev inhibitor by targeting the high-affinity Rev binding site of the Rev responsive element of HIV-1.

    PubMed

    DeJong, Eric S; Chang, Chia-en; Gilson, Michael K; Marino, John P

    2003-07-08

    Rev is an essential regulatory HIV-1 protein that binds the Rev responsive element (RRE) within the env gene of the HIV-1 RNA genome, activating the switch between viral latency and active viral replication. Previously, we have shown that selective incorporation of the fluorescent probe 2-aminopurine (2-AP) into a truncated form of the RRE sequence (RRE-IIB) allowed the binding of an arginine-rich peptide derived from Rev and aminoglycosides to be characterized directly by fluorescence methods. Using these fluorescence and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods, proflavine has been identified, through a limited screen of selected small heterocyclic compounds, as a specific and high-affinity RRE-IIB binder which inhibits the interaction of the Rev peptide with RRE-IIB. Direct and competitive 2-AP fluorescence binding assays reveal that there are at least two classes of proflavine binding sites on RRE-IIB: a high-affinity site that competes with the Rev peptide for binding to RRE-IIB (K(D) approximately 0.1 +/- 0.05 microM) and a weaker binding site(s) (K(D) approximately 1.1 +/- 0.05 microM). Titrations of RRE-IIB with proflavine, monitored using (1)H NMR, demonstrate that the high-affinity proflavine binding interaction occurs with a 2:1 (proflavine:RRE-IIB) stoichiometry, and NOEs observed in the NOESY spectrum of the 2:1 proflavine.RRE-IIB complex indicate that the two proflavine molecules bind specifically and close to each other within a single binding site. NOESY data further indicate that formation of the 2:1 proflavine.RRE-IIB complex stabilizes base pairing and stacking within the internal purine-rich bulge of RRE-IIB in a manner analogous to what has been observed in the Rev peptide.RRE-IIB complex. The observation that proflavine competes with Rev for binding to RRE-IIB by binding as a dimer to a single high-affinity site opens the possibility for rational drug design based on linking and modifying it and related compounds.

  9. Rethinking the Meaning of "REV" in Modeling Fractured Rock Aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wellman, T. P.; Poeter, E. P.

    2006-12-01

    Discrete fracture network (DFN) models are often useful in characterizing fracture controlled flow and transport, as evidenced by their application in numerous studies over the last 20 years. Collectively, numerical models of fractured aquifers may be coarsely categorized as DFN, continuum, or mixed approach, the latter method representing major features explicitly with the remainder as volume-averaged continuum. A mixed model is often ideal for large-scale fractured aquifers where large features are known deterministically and structural simplification for remaining fractures is helpful to render models computational feasible. The term "REV" (Representative Elementary Volume) is often associated with this simplification. Generally, the classical "REV" approach identifies a single scale at which regions may be represented as continuum, and where parameter values are considered deterministic and scalar. As an alternative, stochastic continuum methodologies allow for distributions of parameter values in a probabilistic framework, and while the scale of continuum is considered important, the classical "REV" definition is not considered entirely relevant. Also, there may be additional influences on "REV" imposed by a model's governing equations, the model parameter(s) of primary interest, and the scale of analysis. Thus, appropriate "REVs" differ depending on the scale at which model predictions are needed to facilitate decision making. For the purpose of evaluating water resources, we provide estimates of basin-scale continuum suitable for managing regional water resources in Turkey Creek Basin near Denver, Colorado using spatial averaging of hydraulic head observations. We also evaluate the commonly discussed requirements of "REV", such as the need for fracture networks to be dense and well connected, and for features to be much smaller than the scale of interest. While these conditions often meet classical "REV" requirements they are neither universally acceptable

  10. Comment on "A study of vertical and in-plane electron mobility due to interface roughness scattering at low temperature in InAs-GaSb superlattices" [J. Appl. Phys. 114, 053712 (2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szmulowicz, F.

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of this comment is to point out that the paper by Safa, Asgari, and Faraone [J. Appl. Phys. 114, 053712 (2013)] (SAF) on electronic transport in superlattices contains a number of errors in physics and execution. By dealing with a finite number of periods and forcing the wave function to be zero at the upper and lower boundaries of the superlattice stack, SAF have turned the system into a quantum well for which the momentum along the growth axis is not a good quantum number, so that the bands in the growth direction are flat and the corresponding carrier velocities and vertical mobilities are zero. A number of other errors allow the authors to get nonzero results and to reach conclusions that qualitatively mirror those of Szmulowicz, Haugan, Elhamri, and Brown [Phys. Rev. B 84, 155307 (2011)].

  11. Comment on ``Curvy-steps approach to constraint-free extended-Lagrangian ab initio molecular dynamics, using atom-centered basis functions: Convergence toward Born-Oppenheimer trajectories'' [J. Chem. Phys. 121, 11542 (2004)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iyengar, Srinivasan S.; Schlegel, H. Bernhard; Scuseria, Gustavo E.; Millam, John M.; Frisch, Michael J.

    2005-07-01

    The curvy-extended-Lagrangian molecular-dynamics (ELMD) approach [J. M. Herbert and M. Head-Gordon, J. Chem. Phys. 121, 11542 (2004)] is similar to atom-centered density-matrix propagation (ADMP) [H. B. Schlegel, J. M. Millam, S. S. Iyengar, G. A. Voth, A. D. Daniels, G. E. Scuseria, and M. J. Frisch, J. Chem. Phys. 114, 9758 (2001); S. S. Iyengar, H.B. Schlegel, J.M. Millam, G.A. Voth, G.E. Scuseria, and M.J. Frisch, ibid.115, 10291 (2001); H.B. Schlegel, S.S. Iyengar, X. Li, J.M. Millam, G.A. Voth, G.E. Scuseria, and M.J. Frisch, ibid. 117, 8694 (2002); S.S. Iyengar, H.B. Schlegel, G.A. Voth, J.M. Millam, G.E. Scuseria, and M.J. Frisch, Israel J. Chem. 42, 191 (2002)] and based on Car-Parrinello [Phys. Rev. Lett. 55, 2471 (1985)] extended-Lagrangian [H.C. Andersen, J. Chem. Phys. 72, 2384 (1980)] molecular dynamics. Similarities between curvy-ELMD and ADMP arise from using unconverged electronic single-particle density matrices within Gaussian basis functions as dynamical variables. Curvy-ELMD differs from ADMP in not requiring idempotency to be explicitly enforced. In this Comment, we address several misleading remarks in Refs. 1 [J.M. Herbert and M. Head-Gordon, J. Chem. Phys. 121, 11542 (2004)] and 8 [J.M. Herbert and M. Head-Gordon, J. Chem. Phys. (submitted)].

  12. Altered Sleep Homeostasis in Rev-erbα Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Mang, Géraldine M.; La Spada, Francesco; Emmenegger, Yann; Chappuis, Sylvie; Ripperger, Jürgen A.; Albrecht, Urs; Franken, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: The nuclear receptor REV-ERBα is a potent, constitutive transcriptional repressor critical for the regulation of key circadian and metabolic genes. Recently, REV-ERBα's involvement in learning, neurogenesis, mood, and dopamine turnover was demonstrated suggesting a specific role in central nervous system functioning. We have previously shown that the brain expression of several core clock genes, including Rev-erbα, is modulated by sleep loss. We here test the consequences of a loss of REV-ERBα on the homeostatic regulation of sleep. Methods: EEG/EMG signals were recorded in Rev-erbα knockout (KO) mice and their wild type (WT) littermates during baseline, sleep deprivation, and recovery. Cortical gene expression measurements after sleep deprivation were contrasted to baseline. Results: Although baseline sleep/wake duration was remarkably similar, KO mice showed an advance of the sleep/wake distribution relative to the light-dark cycle. After sleep onset in baseline and after sleep deprivation, both EEG delta power (1–4 Hz) and sleep consolidation were reduced in KO mice indicating a slower increase of homeostatic sleep need during wakefulness. This slower increase might relate to the smaller increase in theta and gamma power observed in the waking EEG prior to sleep onset under both conditions. Indeed, the increased theta activity during wakefulness predicted delta power in subsequent NREM sleep. Lack of Rev-erbα increased Bmal1, Npas2, Clock, and Fabp7 expression, confirming the direct regulation of these genes by REV-ERBα also in the brain. Conclusions: Our results add further proof to the notion that clock genes are involved in sleep homeostasis. Because accumulating evidence directly links REV-ERBα to dopamine signaling the altered homeostatic regulation of sleep reported here are discussed in that context. Citation: Mang GM, La Spada F, Emmenegger Y, Chappuis S, Ripperger JA, Albrecht U, Franken P. Altered sleep homeostasis in Rev

  13. International Field Reversible Thermal Connector (RevCon) Challenge

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-07-01

    of Figures Figure Page Figure 1: Comparison Temperature History of T3 from each Thermal Connector........................ 6...OHP Thermal Connector Delivered by MissStateU .................................................. 54 Figure 49: Comparison Temperature History of T1...88 Figure A2: Schematic of Temperature Monitoring and Vibration Detection Setup for RevCon IV

  14. Comment on: “Quantum exam” [Phys. Lett. A 350 (2006) 174

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Jie; Zhang, Shou

    2007-01-01

    In the Letter [B.A. Nguyen, Phys. Lett. A 350 (2006) 174], a quantum exam protocol was presented. Here we show a cheating protocol, by which any student can get the other students' solution without being detected. Then we propose a possible modified protocol against this attacking strategy.

  15. Comment on ``Derivation of paleoclassical key hypothesis'' [Phys. Plasmas 14, 040701 (2007)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thyagaraja, A.; Roach, C. M.; Hazeltine, R. D.

    2008-01-01

    The paleoclassical hypothesis, derived in Callen [Phys. Plasmas 14, 040701 (2007)], proposes that electron guiding centers experience additional diffusion which is absent from neoclassical theory. This is claimed to be associated with the diffusion of poloidal magnetic flux, and to be most significant in cold resistive plasmas. In this comment we explain why the paleoclassical hypothesis contradicts electrodynamics.

  16. Chemistry Teacher Education Coalition: Extending the PhysTEC Model to Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirchhoff, Mary

    2012-02-01

    The American Association of Employment in Education reports that chemistry, like physics, faces ``some shortage'' of educators. Inspired by the success of the Physics Teacher Education Coalition (PhysTEC), the American Chemical Society (ACS) is developing the Chemistry Teacher Education Coalition (CTEC) to actively engage chemistry departments in the preparation of future chemistry teachers. Engaging chemistry departments in teacher preparation would increase the number and diversity of well-prepared high school chemistry teachers while catalyzing cultural change within chemistry departments. Many features of PhysTEC, such as a grant competition to create model teacher preparation programs and regular conferences, are directly applicable to chemistry. This presentation will provide an overview of ACS efforts to launch a successful CTEC initiative.

  17. Improving Science Teacher Preparation through the APS PhysTEC and NSF Noyce Programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Tasha; Tyler, Micheal; van Duzor, Andrea; Sabella, Mel

    2013-03-01

    Central to the recruitment of students into science teaching at a school like CSU, is a focus on the professional nature of teaching. The purpose of this focus is twofold: it serves to change student perceptions about teaching and it prepares students to become teachers who value continued professional development and value the science education research literature. The Noyce and PhysTEC programs at CSU place the professional nature of teaching front and center by involving students in education research projects, paid internships, attendance at conferences, and participation in a new Teacher Immersion Institute and a Science Education Journal Reading Class. This poster will focus on specific components of our teacher preparation program that were developed through these two programs. In addition we will describe how these new components provide students with diverse experiences in the teaching of science to students in the urban school district. Supported by the NSF Noyce Program (0833251) and the APS PhysTEC Program.

  18. Comment on Weakly dissipative dust-ion acoustic wave modulation (J. Plasma Phys. 82, 905820104, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kourakis, I.; Elkamash, I. S.

    2016-10-01

    In a recent article (J. Plasma Phys., vol. 82, 2009, 905820104), weakly dissipative dust-ion acoustic wave modulation in dusty plasmas was considered. It is shown in this Comment that the analysis therein involved severe fallacies, and is in fact based on an erroneous plasma fluid model, which fails to satisfy an equilibrium condition, among other shortcomings. The subsequent analysis therefore is dubious and of limited scientific value.

  19. Comment on ``Multireference configuration-interaction calculations for positronium halides'' [J. Chem. Phys. 122, 054302 (2005)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitroy, J.; Bromley, M. W. J.

    2005-07-01

    Large-scale configuration-interaction calculations of the binding energies and annihilation rates of the positronium halides, PsF, PsCl, PsBr, and PsI [S. L. Saito, J. Chem. Phys. 122 054302 (2005)], have made erroneous predictions about the structures of these atoms. The predictions were based on small annihilation rates, which result from using a small basis and additionally invalid estimates of the contributions from single-particle orbitals with ℓ >8 .

  20. Nuclear Export Signal Masking Regulates HIV-1 Rev Trafficking and Viral RNA Nuclear Export.

    PubMed

    Behrens, Ryan T; Aligeti, Mounavya; Pocock, Ginger M; Higgins, Christina A; Sherer, Nathan M

    2017-02-01

    HIV-1's Rev protein forms a homo-oligomeric adaptor complex linking viral RNAs to the cellular CRM1/Ran-GTP nuclear export machinery through the activity of Rev's prototypical leucine-rich nuclear export signal (NES). In this study, we used a functional fluorescently tagged Rev fusion protein as a platform to study the effects of modulating Rev NES identity, number, position, or strength on Rev subcellular trafficking, viral RNA nuclear export, and infectious virion production. We found that Rev activity was remarkably tolerant of diverse NES sequences, including supraphysiological NES (SNES) peptides that otherwise arrest CRM1 transport complexes at nuclear pores. Rev's ability to tolerate a SNES was both position and multimerization dependent, an observation consistent with a model wherein Rev self-association acts to transiently mask the NES peptide(s), thereby biasing Rev's trafficking into the nucleus. Combined imaging and functional assays also indicated that NES masking underpins Rev's well-known tendency to accumulate at the nucleolus, as well as Rev's capacity to activate optimal levels of late viral gene expression. We propose that Rev multimerization and NES masking regulates Rev's trafficking to and retention within the nucleus even prior to RNA binding.

  1. User Instructions for the Systems Assessment Capability, Rev. 1, Computer Codes Volume 3: Utility Codes

    SciTech Connect

    Eslinger, Paul W.; Aaberg, Rosanne L.; Lopresti, Charles A.; Miley, Terri B.; Nichols, William E.; Strenge, Dennis L.

    2004-09-14

    This document contains detailed user instructions for a suite of utility codes developed for Rev. 1 of the Systems Assessment Capability. The suite of computer codes for Rev. 1 of Systems Assessment Capability performs many functions.

  2. Recognition of the high affinity binding site in rev-response element RNA by the human immunodeficiency virus type-1 rev protein.

    PubMed Central

    Iwai, S; Pritchard, C; Mann, D A; Karn, J; Gait, M J

    1992-01-01

    The Human Immunodeficiency Virus type-1 rev protein binds with high affinity to a bubble structure located within the rev-response element (RRE) RNA in stemloop II. After this initial interaction, additional rev molecules bind to the RRE RNA in an ordered assembly process which requires a functional bubble structure, since mutations in the bubble sequence that reduce rev affinity block multiple complex formation. We have used synthetic chemistry to characterize the interaction between rev protein and its high affinity binding site. A minimal synthetic duplex RNA (RBC6) carrying the bubble and 12 flanking base pairs is able to bind rev with 1 to 1 stoichiometry and with high affinity. When the bubble structure is inserted into synthetic RNA molecules carrying longer stretches of flanking double-stranded RNA, rev forms additional complexes resembling the multimers observed with the RRE RNA. The ability of rev to bind to RBC6 analogues containing functional group modifications on base and sugar moieties of nucleoside residues was also examined. The results provide strong evidence that the bubble structure contains specific configurations of non-Watson--Crick G:G and G:A base pairs and suggest that high affinity recognition of RRE RNA by rev requires hydrogen bonding to functional groups in the major groove of a distorted RNA structure. Images PMID:1282702

  3. RNA helicase MOV10 functions as a co-factor of HIV-1 Rev to facilitate Rev/RRE-dependent nuclear export of viral mRNAs

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Feng; Zhang, Junsong; Zhang, Yijun; Geng, Guannan; Liang, Juanran; Li, Yingniang; Chen, Jingliang; Liu, Chao; Zhang, Hui

    2015-12-15

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) exploits multiple host factors during its replication. The REV/RRE-dependent nuclear export of unspliced/partially spliced viral transcripts needs the assistance of host proteins. Recent studies have shown that MOV10 overexpression inhibited HIV-1 replication at various steps. However, the endogenous MOV10 was required in certain step(s) of HIV-1 replication. In this report, we found that MOV10 potently enhances the nuclear export of viral mRNAs and subsequently increases the expression of Gag protein and other late products through affecting the Rev/RRE axis. The co-immunoprecipitation analysis indicated that MOV10 interacts with Rev in an RNA-independent manner. The DEAG-box of MOV10 was required for the enhancement of Rev/RRE-dependent nuclear export and the DEAG-box mutant showed a dominant-negative activity. Our data propose that HIV-1 utilizes the anti-viral factor MOV10 to function as a co-factor of Rev and demonstrate the complicated effects of MOV10 on HIV-1 life cycle. - Highlights: • MOV10 can function as a co-factor of HIV-1 Rev. • MOV10 facilitates Rev/RRE-dependent transport of viral mRNAs. • MOV10 interacts with Rev in an RNA-independent manner. • The DEAG-box of MOV10 is required for the enhancement of Rev/RRE-dependent export.

  4. Using the PhysX engine for Physics-based Virtual Surgery with Force Feedback

    PubMed Central

    Maciel, Anderson; Halic, Tansel; Lu, Zhonghua; Nedel, Luciana P.; De, Suvranu

    2010-01-01

    Background The development of modern surgical simulators is highly challenging as they must support complex simulation environments. The demand for higher realism in such simulators has driven researchers to adopt physics-based models which are computationally very demanding. This poses a major problem since real time interactions must permit graphical updates of 30 Hz and a much higher rate of 1 kHz for force feedback (haptics). Recently several physics engines have been developed which offer multi-physics simulation capabilities including rigid and deformable bodies, cloth and fluids. While such physics engines provide unique opportunities for the development of surgical simulators, their higher latencies, compared to what is necessary for real time graphics and haptics, offer significant barriers to their use in interactive simulation environments. Methods In this work, we propose solutions to this problem and demonstrate how a multimodal surgical simulation environment may be developed based on NVIDIA’s PhysX physics library. Hence, models that are undergoing relatively low frequency updates in PhysX can exist in an environment that demands much higher frequency updates for haptics. We use a collision handling layer to interface between the physical response provided by PhysX and the haptic rendering device to provide both real time tissue response and force feedback. Results Our simulator integrates a bimanual haptic interface for force-feedback and per-pixel shaders for graphics realism in real time. To demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach, we present the simulation of the Laparoscopic Adjustable Gastric Banding (LAGB) procedure as a case study. Conclusions To develop complex and realistic surgical trainers with realistic organ geometries and tissue properties demands stable physics-based deformation methods which are not always compatible with the interaction level required for such trainers. We have shown that combining different modeling

  5. Comment on 'General nonlocality in quantum fields'[J. Math. Phys. 49, 033513 (2008)

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Haijun

    2010-05-15

    In a recent paper [H.-J. Wang, J. Math. Phys. 49, 033513 (2008)] a complex-geometry model was proposed to interpret the interaction of electromagnetism and the interaction between quarks while the nonlocal effects are involved. In that theoretical frame, from the metric matrix one can obtain a determinant-form condition to describe qualitatively the typical characteristics for the aforementioned interactions. In this comment we attempt to extend this kind of qualitative description to weak interaction by finding out an appropriate metric tensor for it.

  6. Comment on ``Quasirelativistic theory equivalent to fully relativistic theory'' [J. Chem. Phys. 123, 241102 (2005)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filatov, Michael

    2006-09-01

    The connection between the exact quasirelativistic approach developed in the title reference [W. Kutzelnigg and W. Liu, J. Chem. Phys. 123, 241102 (2005)] and the method of elimination of the small component in matrix form developed previously by Dyall is explicitly worked out. An equation that links Hermitian and non-Hermitian formulations of the exact quasirelativistic theory is derived. Besides establishing a kinship between the existing formulations, the proposed equation can be employed for the derivation of new formulations of the exact quasirelativistic theory.

  7. Comment on 'Thermodynamic cycles and the calculation of p Ka' [Chem. Phys. Lett. 367 (2003) 145

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Silva, Clarissa O.; da Silva, Edilson C.; Nascimento, Marco A. C.

    2003-11-01

    In a recent Letter, Pliego [Chem. Phys. Lett. 367 (2003) 145] has raised some questions about the methodology that we have employed for calculating p Ka values in aqueous solutions. In this comment we show that the problem with Pliego's analysis is the fact that he used Ben-Naim's definition of Δ Gsol for both the solute and the solvent, which implies that the concentration, for both components, should be equal to 1 M. For the solute, this is a reference state fully compatible with the quantum description, but for the solvent this choice is unphysical, as discussed in the Letter.

  8. Analysis of the virulence-associated RevSR two-component signal transduction system of Clostridium perfringens.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Jackie K; Wisniewski, Jessica A; Adams, Vicki M; Quinsey, Noelene S; Rood, Julian I

    2016-09-01

    Clostridium perfringens is a Gram-positive, anaerobic, spore-forming bacterium that causes human gas gangrene (clostridial myonecrosis) and food poisoning. Early studies showed that virulence was regulated by the VirSR two-component signal transduction system. However, our identification of the RevR orphan response regulator indicated that more than one system was involved in controlling virulence. To further characterize this virulence-associated regulator, gel mobility shift experiments, coupled with DNase I footprinting, were used to identify the RevR DNA binding sequence. Bioinformatics analysis suggested that an orphan sensor histidine kinase, CPE1757 (renamed RevS), was the cognate sensor of RevR. Interaction between RevS and RevR was demonstrated by use of a bacterial two-hybrid system and validated by protein-protein interaction studies using biolayer interferometry. To assess the involvement of RevS in virulence regulation, the revS gene was inactivated by Targetron insertion. When isogenic wild-type, revS and complemented revS strains were tested in a mouse myonecrosis model, the revS mutant was found to be attenuated in virulence, which was similar to the attenuation observed previously with the revR mutant. However, transcriptional analysis of selected RevR-regulated genes in the revS mutant revealed a different pattern of expression to a revR mutant, suggesting that the RevSR system is more complex than originally thought. Taken together, the results have led to the identification and characterization of the two essential parts of a new regulatory network that is involved in the regulation of virulence in C. perfringens.

  9. Comment on "Diffusion by a random velocity field" [Phys. Fluids 13, 22 (1970)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saad, Tony; Sutherland, James C.

    2016-11-01

    This comment aims at addressing a mass conservation issue in a paper published in the physics of fluids. The paper [R. H. Kraichnan, "Diffusion by a random velocity field," Phys. Fluids 13(1), 22 (1970)] introduces a novel method to generate synthetic isotropic turbulence for computational purposes. The method has been used in the literature to generate inlet boundary conditions and to model aeroacoustic noise as well as for validation and verification purposes. However, the technique uses a continuous formulation to derive the mass conservation constraint. In this comment, we argue that the continuous constraint is invalid on a discrete grid and provide an alternative derivation using the discrete divergence. In addition, we present an analysis to quantify the impact of a pressure projection on the kinetic energy of a non-solenoidal velocity field.

  10. Comment on ``Global thermodynamics of hydrophobic cavitation, dewetting, and hydration'' [J. Chem. Phys. 123, 184504 (2005)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graziano, Giuseppe

    2006-07-01

    It is pointed out that in a Ben-Amotz in a recent article [J. Chem. Phys.123, 184504 (2005)] attributed a noncorrect meaning to the entropy convergence temperature, claiming that the latter corresponds to the temperature at which the hydration entropy of a series of solutes crosses zero. A short resumé of the entropy convergence phenomenon and of the provided statistical mechanical analyses is accomplished. In addition, it is brought out that the different temperature dependence of the cavity entropy change on increasing the cavity diameter, pointed out by Ben-Amotz, originates from the assumption that the work of cavity creation should be proportional to the experimental surface tension of liquid water for cavities large on a molecular scale.

  11. The Nuclear Receptor Rev-erbα Controls Circadian Thermogenic Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Gerhart-Hines, Zachary; Everett, Logan J.; Loro, Emanuele; Briggs, Erika R.; Bugge, Anne; Hou, Catherine; Ferrara, Christine; Seale, Patrick; Pryma, Daniel A.; Khurana, Tejvir S.; Lazar, Mitchell A.

    2013-01-01

    Circadian oscillation of body temperature is a basic, evolutionary-conserved feature of mammalian biology1. Additionally, homeostatic pathways allow organisms to protect their core temperatures in response to cold exposure2. However, the mechanism responsible for coordinating daily body temperature rhythm and adaptability to environmental challenges is unknown. Here we show that the nuclear receptor Rev-erbα, a powerful transcriptional repressor, links circadian and thermogenic networks through the regulation of brown adipose tissue (BAT) function. Mice exposed to cold fare dramatically better at 5 AM (Zeitgeber time 22) when Rev-erbα is barely expressed than at 5 PM (ZT10) when Rev-erbα is abundant. Deletion of Rev-erbα markedly improves cold tolerance at 5 PM, indicating that overcoming Rev-erbα-dependent repression is a fundamental feature of the thermogenic response to cold. Physiological induction of uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1) by cold temperatures is preceded by rapid down-regulation of Rev-erbα in BAT. Rev-erbα represses UCP1 in a brown adipose cell-autonomous manner and BAT UCP1 levels are high in Rev-erbα-null mice even at thermoneutrality. Genetic loss of Rev-erbα also abolishes normal rhythms of body temperature and BAT activity. Thus, Rev-erbα acts as a thermogenic focal point required for establishing and maintaining body temperature rhythm in a manner that is adaptable to environmental demands. PMID:24162845

  12. Human REV3 DNA Polymerase Zeta Localizes to Mitochondria and Protects the Mitochondrial Genome.

    PubMed

    Singh, Bhupendra; Li, Xiurong; Owens, Kjerstin M; Vanniarajan, Ayyasamy; Liang, Ping; Singh, Keshav K

    2015-01-01

    To date, mitochondrial DNA polymerase γ (POLG) is the only polymerase known to be present in mammalian mitochondria. A dogma in the mitochondria field is that there is no other polymerase present in the mitochondria of mammalian cells. Here we demonstrate localization of REV3 DNA polymerase in the mammalian mitochondria. We demonstrate localization of REV3 in the mitochondria of mammalian tissue as well as cell lines. REV3 associates with POLG and mitochondrial DNA and protects the mitochondrial genome from DNA damage. Inactivation of Rev3 leads to reduced mitochondrial membrane potential, reduced OXPHOS activity, and increased glucose consumption. Conversely, inhibition of the OXPHOS increases expression of Rev3. Rev3 expression is increased in human primary breast tumors and breast cancer cell lines. Inactivation of Rev3 decreases cell migration and invasion, and localization of Rev3 in mitochondria increases survival and the invasive potential of cancer cells. Taken together, we demonstrate that REV3 functions in mammalian mitochondria and that mitochondrial REV3 is associated with the tumorigenic potential of cells.

  13. RNA-guided assembly of Rev-RRE nuclear export complexes.

    PubMed

    Bai, Yun; Tambe, Akshay; Zhou, Kaihong; Doudna, Jennifer A

    2014-08-27

    HIV replication requires nuclear export of unspliced and singly spliced viral transcripts. Although a unique RNA structure has been proposed for the Rev-response element (RRE) responsible for viral mRNA export, how it recruits multiple HIV Rev proteins to form an export complex has been unclear. We show here that initial binding of Rev to the RRE triggers RNA tertiary structural changes, enabling further Rev binding and the rapid formation of a viral export complex. Analysis of the Rev-RRE assembly pathway using SHAPE-Seq and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) reveals two major steps of Rev-RRE complex formation, beginning with rapid Rev binding to a pre-organized region presenting multiple Rev binding sites. This step induces long-range remodeling of the RNA to expose a cryptic Rev binding site, enabling rapid assembly of additional Rev proteins into the RNA export complex. This kinetic pathway may help maintain the balance between viral replication and maturation.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03656.001.

  14. REV3L modulates cisplatin sensitivity of non-small cell lung cancer H1299 cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenjie; Sheng, Wenjiong; Yu, Chenxiao; Cao, Jianping; Zhou, Jundong; Wu, Jinchang; Zhang, Huojun; Zhang, Shuyu

    2015-09-01

    Lung cancer remains the leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) accounts for approximately 80-85% of all cases of lung cancer. Cisplatin plays a significant role in the management of human lung cancer. Translesion DNA synthesis (TLS) is involved in DNA damage repair. DNA polymerase ζ (Pol ζ) is able to mediate the DNA replication bypass of DNA damage, which is suggested to be involved in chemoresistance. REV3L is the catalytic subunit of Pol ζ. Due to its critical role in translesion DNA synthesis, whether REV3L modulates cisplatin response in NSCLC cells remains unknown. In this study, REV3L overexpression and silencing H1299 cell lines were established. The reports showed that cisplatin induced the expression of REV3L by recruiting Sp1 to its promoter. Similar results were obtained when the ability of the cells to express luciferase from a platinated plasmid was measured. Co-transfection of the reporter with the REV3L overexpression vector or REV3L plus REV7L significantly enhanced the reporter activity. Nuclear condensation and fragmentation of shRNA-REV3L H1299 cells were more pronounced than shRNA-NC H1299 cells after cisplatin exposure, indicating that REV3L overexpression abolished cisplatin-induced DNA damage. Moreover, a forced expression of REV3L conferred the resistance of H1299 cells to cisplatin, whereas the knockdown of REV3L sensitized cisplatin efficacy in H1299 cells. Taken together, we demonstrated that inhibition of REV3L sensitized lung cancer H1299 cells to cisplatin treatment. Thus, REV3L may be a novel target for the chemotherapy of NSCLC.

  15. Publisher's Note: High-temperature superconductivity stabilized by electron-hole interband coupling in collapsed tetragonal phase of KFe2As2 under high pressure [Phys. Rev. B 91 , 060508(R) (2015)

    DOE PAGES

    Nakajima, Yasuyuki; Wang, Renxiong; Metz, Tristin; ...

    2015-03-09

    Here, we report a high-pressure study of simultaneous low-temperature electrical resistivity and Hall effect measurements on high quality single-crystalline KFe2As2 using designer diamond anvil cell techniques with applied pressures up to 33 GPa. In the low pressure regime, we show that the superconducting transition temperature Tc finds a maximum onset value of 7 K near 2 GPa, in contrast to previous reports that find a minimum Tc and reversal of pressure dependence at this pressure. Upon applying higher pressures, this Tc is diminished until a sudden drastic enhancement occurs coincident with a first-order structural phase transition into a collapsed tetragonalmore » phase. The appearance of a distinct superconducting phase above 13 GPa is also accompanied by a sudden reversal of dominant charge carrier sign, from hole- to electron-like, which agrees with our band calculations predicting the emergence of an electron pocket and diminishment of hole pockets upon Fermi surface reconstruction. Our results suggest the high-temperature superconducting phase in KFe2As2 is substantially enhanced by the presence of nested electron and hole pockets, providing the key ingredient of high-Tc superconductivity in iron pnictide superconductors.« less

  16. Erratum: Evolution of precipitate morphology during heat treatment and its implications for the superconductivity in KxFe1.6+ySe2 single crystals [Phys. Rev. B 86 , 144507 (2012)

    DOE PAGES

    Liu, Y.; Xing, Q.; Dennis, K. W.; ...

    2015-08-14

    In this article, we study the relationship between precipitate morphology and superconductivity in KxFe1.6+ySe2 single crystals grown by self-flux method. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) measurements revealed that the superconducting phase forms a network in the samples quenched above iron vacancy order-disorder transition temperature Ts, whereas it aggregates into micrometer-sized rectangular bars and aligns as disconnected chains in the furnace-cooled samples.

  17. Comment on “Effects of damping solitary wave in a viscosity bounded plasma” [Phys. Plasmas 21, 022118 (2014)

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Uday Narayan Chatterjee, Prasanta; Roychoudhury, Rajkumar

    2015-07-15

    Recently Gun Li et al. discussed “Effects of damping solitary wave in a viscosity bounded plasma” [Phys. Plasmas 21, 022118 (2014)]. The paper contains some serious errors which have been pointed out in this Comment.

  18. Comment on ``On the imaginary-real ratio rule of power spectra'' [J. Math. Phys. 50, 063301 (2009)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yong

    2010-04-01

    For the three-state ergodic Markov process, the condition of all the fluctuation spectra (i.e., power spectra) with respect to real observables being monotonic over [0,+∞) [Y. Chen, Fluct. Noise Lett. 7, L181 (2007) (Theorem 2.6)] is deduced from Theorem 1 of Qian and Xie [J. Math. Phys. 50, 063301 (2009)]. In addition, we present two examples using Theorem 3 of Qian and Xie [J. Math. Phys. 50, 063301 (2009)].

  19. Proteasomal regulation of the mutagenic translesion DNA polymerase, Saccharomyces cerevisiae Rev1.

    PubMed

    Wiltrout, Mary Ellen; Walker, Graham C

    2011-02-07

    Translesion DNA synthesis (TLS) functions as a tolerance mechanism for DNA damage at a potentially mutagenic cost. Three TLS polymerases (Pols) function to bypass DNA damage in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: Rev1, Pol ζ, a heterodimer of the Rev3 and Rev7 proteins, and Pol η (Rad30). Our lab has shown that S. cerevisiae Rev1 protein levels are under striking cell cycle regulation, being ∼50-fold higher during G2/M than during G1 and much of S phase (Waters and Walker, 2006). REV1 transcript levels only vary ∼3-fold in a similar cell cycle pattern, suggesting a posttranscriptional mechanism controls protein levels. Here, we show that the S. cerevisiae Rev1 protein is unstable during both the G1 and the G2/M phases of the cell cycle, however, the protein's half-life is shorter in G1 arrested cells than in G2/M arrested cells, indicating that the rate of proteolysis strongly contributes to Rev1's cell cycle regulation. In the presence of the proteasome inhibitor, MG132, the steady-state levels and half-life of Rev1 increase during G1 and G2/M. Through the use of a viable proteasome mutant, we confirm that the levels of Rev1 protein are dependent on proteasome-mediated degradation. The accumulation of higher migrating forms of Rev1 under certain conditions shows that the degradation of Rev1 is possibly directed through the addition of a polyubiquitination signal or another modification. These results support a model that proteasomal degradation acts as a regulatory system of mutagenic TLS mediated by Rev1.

  20. PyDecay/GraphPhys: A Unified Language and Storage System for Particle Decay Process Descriptions

    SciTech Connect

    Dunietz, Jesse N.; /MIT /SLAC

    2011-06-22

    To ease the tasks of Monte Carlo (MC) simulation and event reconstruction (i.e. inferring particle-decay events from experimental data) for long-term BaBar data preservation and analysis, the following software components have been designed: a language ('GraphPhys') for specifying decay processes, common to both simulation and data analysis, allowing arbitrary parameters on particles, decays, and entire processes; an automated visualization tool to show graphically what decays have been specified; and a searchable database storage mechanism for decay specifications. Unlike HepML, a proposed XML standard for HEP metadata, the specification language is designed not for data interchange between computer systems, but rather for direct manipulation by human beings as well as computers. The components are interoperable: the information parsed from files in the specification language can easily be rendered as an image by the visualization package, and conversion between decay representations was implemented. Several proof-of-concept command-line tools were built based on this framework. Applications include building easier and more efficient interfaces to existing analysis tools for current projects (e.g. BaBar/BESII), providing a framework for analyses in future experimental settings (e.g. LHC/SuperB), and outreach programs that involve giving students access to BaBar data and analysis tools to give them a hands-on feel for scientific analysis.

  1. Comment on ``Modeling shock waves in orthotropic elastic materials'' [J. Appl. Phys. 104, 044904 (2008)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukyanov, Alexander A.

    2010-09-01

    This comment identifies two main problems with the paper Vignjevic et al. [J. Appl. Phys. 104, 044904 (2008)] related to shock waves modeling in composites. (1) The authors claim that they have proposed two different stress decompositions based on the assumption that the stress tensor is split into two components: one component is due to volumetric strain and the other is due to deviatoric strain. Following this, the authors defined a pressure as the state of stress resulting only from volumetric deformation. However, neither the first nor second decomposition of the stress tensor proposed by the authors provides a procedure for separating the material volumetric compression from the deviatoric strain tensor which results in a state of stress corresponding to volumetric deformation. Furthermore, the uniquely correct decomposition of the stress tensor based on the same second order material tensors has already been published (see, for example, [Int. J. Plast. 24, 140 (2008)]). Also, the second decomposition of the stress tensor includes serious mistakes and inconsistencies. (2) In addition, the numerical simulation results proposed by the authors cannot be justified. An analytical calculation of the Hugoniot stress levels and the acoustic speed of sound through the thickness orientation for a selected carbon-fiber epoxy composite show that the stress decompositions and material properties reported by the authors do not agree with the experimental data for this material and, more importantly, contradict the shock wave stability requirements.

  2. Production of avian leukosis virus particles in mammalian cells can be mediated by the interaction of the human immunodeficiency virus protein Rev and the Rev-responsive element.

    PubMed Central

    Nasioulas, G; Hughes, S H; Felber, B K; Whitcomb, J M

    1995-01-01

    In human immunodeficiency virus type 1-infected cells, the efficient expression of viral proteins from unspliced and singly spliced RNAs is dependent on two factors: the presence in the cell of the viral protein Rev and the presence in the viral RNA of the Rev-responsive element (RRE). We show here that the HIV-1 Rev/RRE system can increase the expression of avian leukosis virus (ALV) structural proteins in mammalian cells (D-17 canine osteosarcoma) and promote the release of mature ALV virions from these cells. In this system, the Rev/RRE interaction appears to facilitate the export of full-length unspliced ALV RNA from the nucleus to the cytoplasm, allowing increased production of the ALV structural proteins. Gag protein is produced in the cytoplasm of the ALV-transfected cells even in the absence of a Rev/RRE interaction. However, a functional Rev/RRE interaction increases the amount of Gag present intracellularly and, more strikingly, results in the release of mature ALV particles into the supernatant. RCAS virus containing an RRE is replication-competent in chicken embryo fibroblasts; however, we have been unable to determine whether the particles produced in D-17 cells are as infectious as the particles produced in chicken embryo fibroblasts. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8524879

  3. The DNA polymerase activity of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Rev1 is biologically significant.

    PubMed

    Wiltrout, Mary Ellen; Walker, Graham C

    2011-01-01

    A cell's ability to tolerate DNA damage is directly connected to the human development of diseases and cancer. To better understand the processes underlying mutagenesis, we studied the cell's reliance on the potentially error-prone translesion synthesis (TLS), and an error-free, template-switching pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The primary proteins mediating S. cerevisiae TLS are three DNA polymerases (Pols): Rev1, Pol ζ (Rev3/7), and Pol η (Rad30), all with human homologs. Rev1's noncatalytic role in recruiting other DNA polymerases is known to be important for TLS. However, the biological significance of Rev1's unusual conserved DNA polymerase activity, which inserts dC, is much less well understood. Here, we demonstrate that inactivating Rev1's DNA polymerase function sensitizes cells to both chronic and acute exposure to 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide (4-NQO) but not to UV or cisplatin. Full Rev1-dependent resistance to 4-NQO, however, also requires the additional Rev1 functions. When error-free tolerance is disrupted through deletion of MMS2, Rev1's catalytic activity is more vital for 4-NQO resistance, possibly explaining why the biological significance of Rev1's catalytic activity has been elusive. In the presence or absence of Mms2-dependent error-free tolerance, the catalytic dead strain of Rev1 exhibits a lower 4-NQO-induced mutation frequency than wild type. Furthermore, Pol ζ, but not Pol η, also contributes to 4-NQO resistance. These results show that Rev1's catalytic activity is important in vivo when the cell has to cope with specific DNA lesions, such as N(2)-dG.

  4. Dosimetric characterization of model Cs-1 Rev2 cesium-131 brachytherapy source in water phantoms and human tissues with MCNP5 Monte Carlo simulation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianhua; Zhang, Hualin

    2008-04-01

    A recently developed alternative brachytherapy seed, Cs-1 Rev2 cesium-131, has begun to be used in clinical practice. The dosimetric characteristics of this source in various media, particularly in human tissues, have not been fully evaluated. The aim of this study was to calculate the dosimetric parameters for the Cs-1 Rev2 cesium-131 seed following the recommendations of the AAPM TG-43U1 report [Rivard et al., Med. Phys. 31, 633-674 (2004)] for new sources in brachytherapy applications. Dose rate constants, radial dose functions, and anisotropy functions of the source in water, Virtual Water, and relevant human soft tissues were calculated using MCNP5 Monte Carlo simulations following the TG-43U1 formalism. The results yielded dose rate constants of 1.048, 1.024, 1.041, and 1.044 cGy h(-1) U(-1) in water, Virtual Water, muscle, and prostate tissue, respectively. The conversion factor for this new source between water and Virtual Water was 1.02, between muscle and water was 1.006, and between prostate and water was 1.004. The authors' calculation of anisotropy functions in a Virtual Water phantom agreed closely with Murphy's measurements [Murphy et al., Med. Phys. 31, 1529-1538 (2004)]. Our calculations of the radial dose function in water and Virtual Water have good agreement with those in previous experimental and Monte Carlo studies. The TG-43U1 parameters for clinical applications in water, muscle, and prostate tissue are presented in this work.

  5. 48 CFR 53.301-18 - SF 18 (Rev. 6/95), Request for Quotations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false SF 18 (Rev. 6/95), Request for Quotations. 53.301-18 Section 53.301-18 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION (CONTINUED) CLAUSES AND FORMS FORMS Illustrations of Forms 53.301-18 SF 18 (Rev. 6/95),...

  6. 48 CFR 53.301-18 - SF 18 (Rev. 6/95), Request for Quotations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false SF 18 (Rev. 6/95), Request for Quotations. 53.301-18 Section 53.301-18 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION (CONTINUED) CLAUSES AND FORMS FORMS Illustrations of Forms 53.301-18 SF 18 (Rev. 6/95),...

  7. 48 CFR 53.301-1414 - SF 1414 (Rev. 10/93) Consent of Surety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false SF 1414 (Rev. 10/93) Consent of Surety. 53.301-1414 Section 53.301-1414 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION (CONTINUED) CLAUSES AND FORMS FORMS Illustrations of Forms 53.301-1414 SF 1414 (Rev....

  8. 48 CFR 53.301-18 - SF 18 (Rev. 6/95), Request for Quotations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false SF 18 (Rev. 6/95), Request for Quotations. 53.301-18 Section 53.301-18 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION (CONTINUED) CLAUSES AND FORMS FORMS Illustrations of Forms 53.301-18 SF 18 (Rev. 6/95),...

  9. 48 CFR 53.301-18 - SF 18 (Rev. 6/95), Request for Quotations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false SF 18 (Rev. 6/95), Request for Quotations. 53.301-18 Section 53.301-18 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION (CONTINUED) CLAUSES AND FORMS FORMS Illustrations of Forms 53.301-18 SF 18 (Rev. 6/95),...

  10. 48 CFR 53.301-18 - SF 18 (Rev. 6/95), Request for Quotations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false SF 18 (Rev. 6/95), Request for Quotations. 53.301-18 Section 53.301-18 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION (CONTINUED) CLAUSES AND FORMS FORMS Illustrations of Forms 53.301-18 SF 18 (Rev. 6/95),...

  11. Biological Characterization of CVRM2-BAC, A Recombinant CV1988 Virus Containing an REV LTR Insertion

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    It has been previously reported that avian retroviruses, i.e. avian leukosis virus (ALV) and reticoloendotheliosis virus (REV), integrate in the Marek’s disease virus genome affecting MDV pathogenicity. RM-2 is an attenuated serotype 1 MDV virus generated by insertion of the REV LTR in the genome of...

  12. Pharmacological and Genetic Modulation of REV-ERB Activity and Expression Affects Orexigenic Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Amador, Ariadna; Wang, Yongjun; Banerjee, Subhashis; Kameneka, Theodore M.; Solt, Laura A.; Burris, Thomas P.

    2016-01-01

    The nuclear receptors REV-ERBα and REV-ERBβ are transcription factors that play pivotal roles in the regulation of the circadian rhythm and various metabolic processes. The circadian rhythm is an endogenous mechanism, which generates entrainable biological changes that follow a 24-hour period. It regulates a number of physiological processes, including sleep/wakeful cycles and feeding behaviors. We recently demonstrated that REV-ERB-specific small molecules affect sleep and anxiety. The orexinergic system also plays a significant role in mammalian physiology and behavior, including the regulation of sleep and food intake. Importantly, orexin genes are expressed in a circadian manner. Given these overlaps in function and circadian expression, we wanted to determine whether the REV-ERBs might regulate orexin. We found that acute in vivo modulation of REV-ERB activity, with the REV-ERB-specific synthetic ligand SR9009, affects the circadian expression of orexinergic genes in mice. Long term dosing with SR9009 also suppresses orexinergic gene expression in mice. Finally, REV-ERBβ-deficient mice present with increased orexinergic transcripts. These data suggest that the REV-ERBs may be involved in the repression of orexinergic gene expression. PMID:26963516

  13. Impact of circadian nuclear receptor REV-ERBα on midbrain dopamine production and mood regulation.

    PubMed

    Chung, Sooyoung; Lee, Eun Jeong; Yun, Seongsik; Choe, Han Kyoung; Park, Seong-Beom; Son, Hyo Jin; Kim, Kwang-Soo; Dluzen, Dean E; Lee, Inah; Hwang, Onyou; Son, Gi Hoon; Kim, Kyungjin

    2014-05-08

    The circadian nature of mood and its dysfunction in affective disorders is well recognized, but the underlying molecular mechanisms are still unclear. Here, we show that the circadian nuclear receptor REV-ERBα, which is associated with bipolar disorder, impacts midbrain dopamine production and mood-related behavior in mice. Genetic deletion of the Rev-erbα gene or pharmacological inhibition of REV-ERBα activity in the ventral midbrain induced mania-like behavior in association with a central hyperdopaminergic state. Also, REV-ERBα repressed tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) gene transcription via competition with nuclear receptor-related 1 protein (NURR1), another nuclear receptor crucial for dopaminergic neuronal function, thereby driving circadian TH expression through a target-dependent antagonistic mechanism. In conclusion, we identified a molecular connection between the circadian timing system and mood regulation, suggesting that REV-ERBα could be targeting in the treatment of circadian rhythm-related affective disorders.

  14. HIV-1 pre-mRNA commitment to Rev mediated export through PSF and Matrin 3

    SciTech Connect

    Kula, Anna; Gharu, Lavina; Marcello, Alessandro

    2013-01-20

    Human immunodeficiency virus gene expression and replication are regulated at several levels. Incompletely spliced viral RNAs and full-length genomic RNA contain the RRE element and are bound by the viral trans-acting protein Rev to be transported out of the nucleus. Previously we found that the nuclear matrix protein MATR3 was a cofactor of Rev-mediated RNA export. Here we show that the pleiotropic protein PSF binds viral RNA and is associated with MATR3. PSF is involved in the maintenance of a pool of RNA available for Rev activity. However, while Rev and PSF bind the viral pre-mRNA at the site of viral transcription, MATR3 interacts at a subsequent step. We propose that PSF and MATR3 define a novel pathway for RRE-containing HIV-1 RNAs that is hijacked by the viral Rev protein.

  15. Comment on "Fluid modeling of a high-voltage nanosecond pulsed xenon microdischarge" [Phys. Plasmas 23, 073513 (2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koulakis, J.; Bataller, A.; Pree, S.; Putterman, S.

    2016-11-01

    Simulations of sparks in 10 atmosphere Xenon gas by Levko and Raja [Phys. Plasmas 23, 073513 (2016)] are unable to reproduce the experimental fact of their opacity to visible light [Bataller et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 105, 223501 (2014)]. Levko and Raja have argued the discrepancy is due to enhanced ionization from the probing laser radiation and/or cathode field emission. Having observed comparable opacity in similar systems without probing lasers and without electrodes, we instead argue that the enhanced ionization is a thermodynamic result of dense plasma screening effects that lower the effective ionization potential. Levko and Raja do not adequately address these density effects in their spark discharge simulations.

  16. Comment on "Temperature dependence of atomic vibrations in mono-layer graphene" [J. Appl. Phys. 118, 074302 (2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Susi, T.; Kotakoski, J.

    2016-02-01

    In an interesting recent study [Allen et al., J. Appl. Phys. 118, 074302 (2015)] (see also their Erratum [Allen et al., J. Appl. Phys. 118, 159902 (2015)]), Allen and co-workers measured the mean square amplitudes of graphene lattice vibrations between 100 and 1300 K and used a simplified theoretical approximation for the acoustic phonon modes to evaluate the maximum phonon wavelengths supported by the lattice. By fitting their data using the smallest wave-vector as the fitting parameter, they found this to be significantly smaller than the physical size of the graphene crystallites.

  17. Comment on “Temperature dependence of atomic vibrations in mono-layer graphene” [J. Appl. Phys. 118, 074302 (2015)

    SciTech Connect

    Susi, T. Kotakoski, J.

    2016-02-14

    In an interesting recent study [Allen et al., J. Appl. Phys. 118, 074302 (2015)] (see also their Erratum [Allen et al., J. Appl. Phys. 118, 159902 (2015)]), Allen and co-workers measured the mean square amplitudes of graphene lattice vibrations between 100 and 1300 K and used a simplified theoretical approximation for the acoustic phonon modes to evaluate the maximum phonon wavelengths supported by the lattice. By fitting their data using the smallest wave-vector as the fitting parameter, they found this to be significantly smaller than the physical size of the graphene crystallites.

  18. Comment on ``The application of the thermodynamic perturbation theory to study the hydrophobic hydration'' [J. Chem. Phys. 139, 024101 (2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graziano, Giuseppe

    2013-09-01

    It is shown that the behaviour of the hydration thermodynamic functions obtained in the 3D Mercedes-Benz model of water by Mohoric et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 139, 024101 (2013)] is not qualitatively correct with respect to experimental data for a solute whose diameter is 1.5-fold larger than that of a water molecule. It is also pointed out that the failure is due to the fact that the used 3D Mercedes-Benz model of water [A. Bizjak, T. Urbic, V. Vlachy, and K. A. Dill, J. Chem. Phys. 131, 194504 (2009)] does not reproduce in a quantitatively correct manner the peculiar temperature dependence of water density.

  19. RevBayes: Bayesian Phylogenetic Inference Using Graphical Models and an Interactive Model-Specification Language.

    PubMed

    Höhna, Sebastian; Landis, Michael J; Heath, Tracy A; Boussau, Bastien; Lartillot, Nicolas; Moore, Brian R; Huelsenbeck, John P; Ronquist, Fredrik

    2016-07-01

    Programs for Bayesian inference of phylogeny currently implement a unique and fixed suite of models. Consequently, users of these software packages are simultaneously forced to use a number of programs for a given study, while also lacking the freedom to explore models that have not been implemented by the developers of those programs. We developed a new open-source software package, RevBayes, to address these problems. RevBayes is entirely based on probabilistic graphical models, a powerful generic framework for specifying and analyzing statistical models. Phylogenetic-graphical models can be specified interactively in RevBayes, piece by piece, using a new succinct and intuitive language called Rev. Rev is similar to the R language and the BUGS model-specification language, and should be easy to learn for most users. The strength of RevBayes is the simplicity with which one can design, specify, and implement new and complex models. Fortunately, this tremendous flexibility does not come at the cost of slower computation; as we demonstrate, RevBayes outperforms competing software for several standard analyses. Compared with other programs, RevBayes has fewer black-box elements. Users need to explicitly specify each part of the model and analysis. Although this explicitness may initially be unfamiliar, we are convinced that this transparency will improve understanding of phylogenetic models in our field. Moreover, it will motivate the search for improvements to existing methods by brazenly exposing the model choices that we make to critical scrutiny. RevBayes is freely available at http://www.RevBayes.com [Bayesian inference; Graphical models; MCMC; statistical phylogenetics.].

  20. The orphan receptor Rev-erbα gene is a target of the circadian clock pacemaker

    PubMed Central

    Triqueneaux, Gérard; Thenot, Sandrine; Kakizawa, Tomoko; Antoch, Marina P; Safi, Rachid; Takahashi, Joseph S; Delaunay, Franck; Laudet, Vincent

    2013-01-01

    Rev-erbα is a ubiquitously expressed orphan nuclear receptor which functions as a constitutive transcriptional repressor and is expressed in vertebrates according to a robust circadian rhythm. We report here that two Rev-erbα mRNA isoforms, namely Rev-erbα1 and Rev-erbα2, are generated through alternative promoter usage and that both show a circadian expression pattern in an in vitro system using serum-shocked fibroblasts. Both promoter regions P1 (Rev-erbα1) and P2 (Rev-erbα2) contain several E-box DNA sequences, which function as response elements for the core circadian-clock components: CLOCK and BMAL1. The CLOCK–BMAL1 heterodimer stimulates the activity of both P1 and P2 promoters in transient transfection assay by 3–6-fold. This activation was inhibited by the overexpression of CRY1, a component of the negative limb of the circadian transcriptional loop. Critical E-box elements were mapped within both promoters. This regulation is conserved in vertebrates since we found that the CLOCK–BMAL1 heterodimer also regulates the zebrafish Rev-erbα gene. In line with these data Rev-erbα circadian expression was strongly impaired in the livers of Clock mutant mice and in the pineal glands of zebrafish embryos treated with Clock and Bmal1 antisense oligonucleotides. Together these data demonstrate that CLOCK is a critical regulator of Rev-erbα circadian gene expression in evolutionarily distant vertebrates and suggest a role for Rev-erbα in the circadian clock output. PMID:15591021

  1. RevBayes: Bayesian Phylogenetic Inference Using Graphical Models and an Interactive Model-Specification Language

    PubMed Central

    Höhna, Sebastian; Landis, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Programs for Bayesian inference of phylogeny currently implement a unique and fixed suite of models. Consequently, users of these software packages are simultaneously forced to use a number of programs for a given study, while also lacking the freedom to explore models that have not been implemented by the developers of those programs. We developed a new open-source software package, RevBayes, to address these problems. RevBayes is entirely based on probabilistic graphical models, a powerful generic framework for specifying and analyzing statistical models. Phylogenetic-graphical models can be specified interactively in RevBayes, piece by piece, using a new succinct and intuitive language called Rev. Rev is similar to the R language and the BUGS model-specification language, and should be easy to learn for most users. The strength of RevBayes is the simplicity with which one can design, specify, and implement new and complex models. Fortunately, this tremendous flexibility does not come at the cost of slower computation; as we demonstrate, RevBayes outperforms competing software for several standard analyses. Compared with other programs, RevBayes has fewer black-box elements. Users need to explicitly specify each part of the model and analysis. Although this explicitness may initially be unfamiliar, we are convinced that this transparency will improve understanding of phylogenetic models in our field. Moreover, it will motivate the search for improvements to existing methods by brazenly exposing the model choices that we make to critical scrutiny. RevBayes is freely available at http://www.RevBayes.com. [Bayesian inference; Graphical models; MCMC; statistical phylogenetics.] PMID:27235697

  2. Comment on 'Nonlinear properties of small amplitude dust ion acoustic solitary waves' [Phys. Plasmas 7, 3594 (2000)

    SciTech Connect

    Duha, S. S.; Mamun, A. A.

    2008-10-15

    The aim of this comment is to show how the model equations used by Ghosh et al. [Phys. Plasmas 7, 3594 (2000)] are completely inconsistent, and to provide a guideline for a consistent dusty plasma model which is appropriate for the study of the nonlinear properties of the dust ion acoustic solitary waves.

  3. Erratum: “Hamiltonian magnetohydrodynamics: Lagrangian, Eulerian, and dynamically accessible stability—Theory” [Phys. Plasmas 20, 092104 (2013)

    SciTech Connect

    Andreussi, T.; Morrison, P. J.; Pegoraro, F.

    2015-03-15

    An algebraic mistake in the rendering of the Energy Casimir stability condition for a symmetric magnetohydrodynamics plasma configuration with flows made in the article Andreussi et al. “Hamiltonian magnetohydrodynamics: Lagrangian, Eulerian, and dynamically accessible stability—Theory,” Phys. Plasmas 20, 092104 (2013) is corrected.

  4. Response to 'Comment on 'Nonlinear properties of small amplitude dust ion acoustic solitary waves'' [Phys. Plasmas 15, 104703 (2008)

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, M. R.; Sarkar, S.; Khan, Manoranjan; Ghosh, Samiran

    2008-10-15

    The objections are not justified. It should have been noted that ion charge number z{sub i}=1 throughout the referred paper [Ghosh et al., Phys. Plasmas 7, 3594 (2000)]. There is no inconsistency in the formulation of the referred paper as explained in the text.

  5. Comments on ''theory of dissipative density-gradient-driven turbulence in the tokamak edge'' (Phys. Fluids 28, 1419 (1985))

    SciTech Connect

    Krommes, J.A.

    1985-11-01

    The author critiques the model of tokamak edge turbulence by P.W. Terry and P.H. Diamond (Phys. Fluids 28, 1419, 1985). The critique includes a discussion of the physical basis, consistency and quantitative accuracy of the Terry-Diamond model. 19 refs. (WRF)

  6. Comment on "On the Crooks fluctuation theorem and the Jarzynski equality" [J. Chem. Phys. 129, 091101 (2008)].

    PubMed

    Adib, Artur B

    2009-06-28

    It has recently been argued that a self-consistency condition involving the Jarzynski equality (JE) and the Crooks fluctuation theorem (CFT) is violated for a simple Brownian process [L. Y. Chen, J. Chem. Phys.129, 091101 (2008)]. This note adopts the definitions in the original formulation of the JE and CFT and demonstrates the contrary.

  7. Comment on "Soret motion in non-ionic binary molecular mixtures" [J. Chem. Phys. 135, 054102 (2011)].

    PubMed

    Semenov, Semen N; Schimpf, Martin E

    2012-09-28

    The material transport equations derived in the article by Leroyer and Würger [J. Chem. Phys. 135, 054102 (2011)] do not adequately provide a description of material transport in liquid binary systems. An alternate approach based on non-equilibrium thermodynamics is presented.

  8. Comment on 'Energy transfer in nanowire solar cells with photon-harvesting shells' [J. Appl. Phys. 105, 124509 (2009)

    SciTech Connect

    Markvart, T.; Danos, L.; Greef, R.

    2010-07-15

    In a recent article, Peters et al. [J. Appl. Phys. 105, 124509 (2009)] claim to have observed photosensitization of crystalline silicon by energy transfer from an optically absorbing thin polymer film. We show that this claim is not justified. Their experimental design is not adequate to establish enhanced photoexcitation of silicon; moreover, the theoretical arguments in their interpretation do not stand up to scrutiny.

  9. Rev-erb beta regulates the Srebp-1c promoter and mRNA expression in skeletal muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ramakrishnan, Sathiya N.; Lau, Patrick; Crowther, Lisa M.; Cleasby, Mark E.; Millard, Susan; Leong, Gary M.; Cooney, Gregory J.; Muscat, George E.O.

    2009-10-30

    The nuclear hormone receptor, Rev-erb beta operates as a transcriptional silencer. We previously demonstrated that exogenous expression of Rev-erb{beta}{Delta}E in skeletal muscle cells increased Srebp-1c mRNA expression. We validated these in vitro observations by injection of an expression vector driving Rev-erb{beta}{Delta}E expression into mouse tibialis muscle that resulted in increased Srebp-1c mRNA expression. Paradoxically, Rev-erb{beta} siRNA expression in skeletal muscle cells repressed Srebp-1c expression, and indicated that Rev-erb{beta} expression was necessary for Srebp-1c expression. ChIP analysis demonstrated that Rev-erb{beta} was recruited to the Srebp-1c promoter. Moreover, Rev-erb{beta} trans-activated the Srebp-1c promoter, in contrast, Rev-erb{beta} efficiently repressed the Rev-erb{alpha} promoter, a previously characterized target gene. Finally, treatment with the Rev-erb agonist (hemin) (i) increased the trans-activation of the Srebp-1c promoter by Rev-erb{beta}; and (ii) increased Rev-erb{beta} and Srebp-1c mRNA expression. These data suggest that Rev-erb{beta} has the potential to activate gene expression, and is a positive regulator of Srebp-1c, a regulator of lipogenesis.

  10. Rev1 is a base excision repair enzyme with 5′-deoxyribose phosphate lyase activity

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Rajendra; Poltoratsky, Vladimir; Hou, Esther W.; Wilson, Samuel H.

    2016-01-01

    Rev1 is a member of the Y-family of DNA polymerases and is known for its deoxycytidyl transferase activity that incorporates dCMP into DNA and its ability to function as a scaffold factor for other Y-family polymerases in translesion bypass events. Rev1 also is involved in mutagenic processes during somatic hypermutation of immunoglobulin genes. In light of the mutation pattern consistent with dCMP insertion observed earlier in mouse fibroblast cells treated with a base excision repair-inducing agent, we questioned whether Rev1 could also be involved in base excision repair (BER). Here, we uncovered a weak 5′-deoxyribose phosphate (5′-dRP) lyase activity in mouse Rev1 and demonstrated the enzyme can mediate BER in vitro. The full-length Rev1 protein and its catalytic core domain are similar in their ability to support BER in vitro. The dRP lyase activity in both of these proteins was confirmed by NaBH4 reduction of the Schiff base intermediate and kinetics studies. Limited proteolysis, mass spectrometry and deletion analysis localized the dRP lyase active site to the C-terminal segment of Rev1's catalytic core domain. These results suggest that Rev1 could serve as a backup polymerase in BER and could potentially contribute to AID-initiated antibody diversification through this activity. PMID:27683219

  11. The Nuclear Receptor REV-ERBα Regulates Fabp7 and Modulates Adult Hippocampal Neurogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Schnell, Anna; Chappuis, Sylvie; Schmutz, Isabelle; Brai, Emanuele; Ripperger, Jürgen A.; Schaad, Olivier; Welzl, Hans; Descombes, Patrick; Alberi, Lavinia; Albrecht, Urs

    2014-01-01

    The function of the nuclear receptor Rev-erbα (Nr1d1) in the brain is, apart from its role in the circadian clock mechanism, unknown. Therefore, we compared gene expression profiles in the brain between wild-type and Rev-erbα knock-out (KO) animals. We identified fatty acid binding protein 7 (Fabp7, Blbp) as a direct target of repression by REV-ERBα. Loss of Rev-erbα manifested in memory and mood related behavioral phenotypes and led to overexpression of Fabp7 in various brain areas including the subgranular zone (SGZ) of the hippocampus, where neuronal progenitor cells (NPCs) can initiate adult neurogenesis. We found increased proliferation of hippocampal neurons and loss of its diurnal pattern in Rev-erbα KO mice. In vitro, proliferation and migration of glioblastoma cells were affected by manipulating either Fabp7 expression or REV-ERBα activity. These results suggest an important role of Rev-erbα and Fabp7 in adult neurogenesis, which may open new avenues for treatment of gliomas as well as neurological diseases such as depression and Alzheimer. PMID:24932636

  12. Rev1, Rev3, or Rev7 siRNA Abolishes Ultraviolet Light-Induced Translesion Replication in HeLa Cells: A Comprehensive Study Using Alkaline Sucrose Density Gradient Sedimentation

    PubMed Central

    Takezawa, Jun; Ishimi, Yukio; Aiba, Naomi; Yamada, Kouichi

    2010-01-01

    When a replicative DNA polymerase stalls upon encountering a lesion on the template strand, it is relieved by other low-processivity polymerase(s), which insert nucleotide(s) opposite the lesion, extend by a few nucleotides, and dissociate from the 3′-OH. The replicative polymerase then resumes DNA synthesis. This process, termed translesion replication (TLS) or replicative bypass, may involve at least five different polymerases in mammals, although the participating polymerases and their roles have not been entirely characterized. Using siRNAs originally designed and an alkaline sucrose density gradient sedimentation technique, we verified the involvement of several polymerases in ultraviolet (UV) light-induced TLS in HeLa cells. First, siRNAs to Rev3 or Rev7 largely abolished UV-TLS, suggesting that these 2 gene products, which comprise Polζ, play a main role in mutagenic TLS. Second, Rev1-targeted siRNA also abrogated UV-TLS, indicating that Rev1 is also indispensable to mutagenic TLS. Third, Polη-targeted siRNA also prevented TLS to a greater extent than our expectations. Forth, although siRNA to Polι had no detectable effect, that to Polκ delayed UV-TLS. To our knowledge, this is the first study reporting apparent evidence for the participation of Polκ in UV-TLS. PMID:21151666

  13. REV-ERBα regulates Fgf21 expression in the liver via hepatic nuclear factor 6.

    PubMed

    Chavan, Rohit; Preitner, Nadia; Okabe, Takashi; Strittmatter, Laureen Mansencal; Xu, Cheng; Ripperger, Jürgen A; Pitteloud, Nelly; Albrecht, Urs

    2017-01-15

    The circadian clock contributes to the timing of many body functions including metabolism and reproduction. The hepatokine fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) is a critical metabolic regulator involved in modulation of fertility. Here we show that lack of the clock component REV-ERBα elevates FGF21 levels in liver and plasma. At the molecular level, REV-ERBα modulates the expression of FGF21 via the liver-specific hepatic nuclear factor 6 (HNF6). We conclude that REV-ERBα regulates metabolism and reproduction, at least in part, via regulation of Fgf21.

  14. REV-ERBα regulates Fgf21 expression in the liver via hepatic nuclear factor 6

    PubMed Central

    Chavan, Rohit; Preitner, Nadia; Okabe, Takashi; Strittmatter, Laureen Mansencal; Xu, Cheng; Ripperger, Jürgen A.; Pitteloud, Nelly

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The circadian clock contributes to the timing of many body functions including metabolism and reproduction. The hepatokine fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) is a critical metabolic regulator involved in modulation of fertility. Here we show that lack of the clock component REV-ERBα elevates FGF21 levels in liver and plasma. At the molecular level, REV-ERBα modulates the expression of FGF21 via the liver-specific hepatic nuclear factor 6 (HNF6). We conclude that REV-ERBα regulates metabolism and reproduction, at least in part, via regulation of Fgf21. PMID:27875243

  15. FANCD2 and REV1 cooperate in the protection of nascent DNA strands in response to replication stress.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yeran; Liu, Zhenbo; Wang, Fengli; Temviriyanukul, Piya; Ma, Xiaolu; Tu, Yingfeng; Lv, Lingna; Lin, Yu-Fen; Huang, Min; Zhang, Ting; Pei, Huadong; Chen, Benjamin P C; Jansen, Jacob G; de Wind, Niels; Fischhaber, Paula L; Friedberg, Errol C; Tang, Tie-Shan; Guo, Caixia

    2015-09-30

    REV1 is a eukaryotic member of the Y-family of DNA polymerases involved in translesion DNA synthesis and genome mutagenesis. Recently, REV1 is also found to function in homologous recombination. However, it remains unclear how REV1 is recruited to the sites where homologous recombination is processed. Here, we report that loss of mammalian REV1 results in a specific defect in replication-associated gene conversion. We found that REV1 is targeted to laser-induced DNA damage stripes in a manner dependent on its ubiquitin-binding motifs, on RAD18, and on monoubiquitinated FANCD2 (FANCD2-mUb) that associates with REV1. Expression of a FANCD2-Ub chimeric protein in RAD18-depleted cells enhances REV1 assembly at laser-damaged sites, suggesting that FANCD2-mUb functions downstream of RAD18 to recruit REV1 to DNA breaks. Consistent with this suggestion we found that REV1 and FANCD2 are epistatic with respect to sensitivity to the double-strand break-inducer camptothecin. REV1 enrichment at DNA damage stripes also partially depends on BRCA1 and BRCA2, components of the FANCD2/BRCA supercomplex. Intriguingly, analogous to FANCD2-mUb and BRCA1/BRCA2, REV1 plays an unexpected role in protecting nascent replication tracts from degradation by stabilizing RAD51 filaments. Collectively these data suggest that REV1 plays multiple roles at stalled replication forks in response to replication stress.

  16. 78 FR 27971 - Determination That REV-EYES (Dapiprazole Hydrochloride Ophthalmic Solution), 0.5%, Was Not...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-13

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Determination That REV-EYES (Dapiprazole Hydrochloride... determined that REV-EYES (dapiprazole hydrochloride ophthalmic solution), 0.5%, was not withdrawn from sale... refer to a listed drug. REV-EYES (dapiprazole hydrochloride ophthalmic solution), 0.5%, is the...

  17. FANCD2 and REV1 cooperate in the protection of nascent DNA strands in response to replication stress

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yeran; Liu, Zhenbo; Wang, Fengli; Temviriyanukul, Piya; Ma, Xiaolu; Tu, Yingfeng; Lv, Lingna; Lin, Yu-Fen; Huang, Min; Zhang, Ting; Pei, Huadong; Chen, Benjamin P.C.; Jansen, Jacob G.; de Wind, Niels; Fischhaber, Paula L.; Friedberg, Errol C.; Tang, Tie-Shan; Guo, Caixia

    2015-01-01

    REV1 is a eukaryotic member of the Y-family of DNA polymerases involved in translesion DNA synthesis and genome mutagenesis. Recently, REV1 is also found to function in homologous recombination. However, it remains unclear how REV1 is recruited to the sites where homologous recombination is processed. Here, we report that loss of mammalian REV1 results in a specific defect in replication-associated gene conversion. We found that REV1 is targeted to laser-induced DNA damage stripes in a manner dependent on its ubiquitin-binding motifs, on RAD18, and on monoubiquitinated FANCD2 (FANCD2-mUb) that associates with REV1. Expression of a FANCD2-Ub chimeric protein in RAD18-depleted cells enhances REV1 assembly at laser-damaged sites, suggesting that FANCD2-mUb functions downstream of RAD18 to recruit REV1 to DNA breaks. Consistent with this suggestion we found that REV1 and FANCD2 are epistatic with respect to sensitivity to the double-strand break-inducer camptothecin. REV1 enrichment at DNA damage stripes also partially depends on BRCA1 and BRCA2, components of the FANCD2/BRCA supercomplex. Intriguingly, analogous to FANCD2-mUb and BRCA1/BRCA2, REV1 plays an unexpected role in protecting nascent replication tracts from degradation by stabilizing RAD51 filaments. Collectively these data suggest that REV1 plays multiple roles at stalled replication forks in response to replication stress. PMID:26187992

  18. 75 FR 10524 - NUREG-0654/FEMA-REP-1, Rev. 1, Supplement 3, Guidance for Protective Action Recommendations for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-08

    ... COMMISSION NUREG-0654/FEMA-REP-1, Rev. 1, Supplement 3, Guidance for Protective Action Recommendations for... document entitled: ``NUREG-0654/FEMA-REP-1, Rev. 1, Supplement 3, Guidance for Protective Action...-4737, or by e-mail to pdr.resource@nrc.gov . NUREG-0654/FEMA-REP-1, Rev. 1, Supplement 3,...

  19. 75 FR 27840 - NUREG-0654/FEMA-REP-1, Rev. 1, Supplement 3, Guidance for Protective Action Recommendations for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-18

    ...: 2010-11842] NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [NRC-2010-0080] NUREG-0654/FEMA-REP-1, Rev. 1, Supplement 3...: ``NUREG-0654/FEMA-REP-1, Rev. 1, Supplement 3, Guidance for Protective Action Recommendations for General... the existing guidance contained in Supplement 3 to NUREG- 0654/FEMA-REP-1, Rev. 1, ``Criteria...

  20. Pharmacological Targeting the REV-ERBs in Sleep/Wake Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Amador, Ariadna; Huitron-Resendiz, Salvador; Roberts, Amanda J.; Kamenecka, Theodore M.; Solt, Laura A.; Burris, Thomas P.

    2016-01-01

    The circadian clock maintains appropriate timing for a wide range of behaviors and physiological processes. Circadian behaviors such as sleep and wakefulness are intrinsically dependent on the precise oscillation of the endogenous molecular machinery that regulates the circadian clock. The identical core clock machinery regulates myriad endocrine and metabolic functions providing a link between sleep and metabolic health. The REV-ERBs (REV-ERBα and REV-ERBβ) are nuclear receptors that are key regulators of the molecular clock and have been successfully targeted using small molecule ligands. Recent studies in mice suggest that REV-ERB-specific synthetic agonists modulate metabolic activity as well as alter sleep architecture, inducing wakefulness during the light period. Therefore, these small molecules represent unique tools to extensively study REV-ERB regulation of sleep and wakefulness. In these studies, our aim was to further investigate the therapeutic potential of targeting the REV-ERBs for regulation of sleep by characterizing efficacy, and optimal dosing time of the REV-ERB agonist SR9009 using electroencephalographic (EEG) recordings. Applying different experimental paradigms in mice, our studies establish that SR9009 does not lose efficacy when administered more than once a day, nor does tolerance develop when administered once a day over a three-day dosing regimen. Moreover, through use of a time response paradigm, we determined that although there is an optimal time for administration of SR9009 in terms of maximal efficacy, there is a 12-hour window in which SR9009 elicited a response. Our studies indicate that the REV-ERBs are potential therapeutic targets for treating sleep problems as those encountered as a consequence of shift work or jet lag. PMID:27603791

  1. Inhibition of REV3 Expression Induces Persistent DNA Damage and Growth Arrest in Cancer Cells12

    PubMed Central

    Knobel, Philip A; Kotov, Ilya N; Felley-Bosco, Emanuela; Stahel, Rolf A; Marti, Thomas M

    2011-01-01

    REV3 is the catalytic subunit of DNA translesion synthesis polymerase ζ. Inhibition of REV3 expression increases the sensitivity of human cells to a variety of DNA-damaging agents and reduces the formation of resistant cells. Surprisingly, we found that short hairpin RNA-mediated depletion of REV3 per se suppresses colony formation of lung (A549, Calu-3), breast (MCF-7, MDA-MB-231), mesothelioma (IL45 and ZL55), and colon (HCT116 +/-p53) tumor cell lines, whereas control cell lines (AD293, LP9-hTERT) and the normal mesothelial primary culture (SDM104) are less affected. Inhibition of REV3 expression in cancer cells leads to an accumulation of persistent DNA damage as indicated by an increase in phospho-ATM, 53BP1, and phospho-H2AX foci formation, subsequently leading to the activation of the ATM-dependent DNA damage response cascade. REV3 depletion in p53-proficient cancer cell lines results in a G1 arrest and induction of senescence as indicated by the accumulation of p21 and an increase in senescence-associated β-galactosidase activity. In contrast, inhibition of REV3 expression in p53-deficient cells results in growth inhibition and a G2/M arrest. A small fraction of the p53-deficient cancer cells can overcome the G2/M arrest, which results in mitotic slippage and aneuploidy. Our findings reveal that REV3 depletion per se suppresses growth of cancer cell lines from different origin, whereas control cell lines and a mesothelial primary culture were less affected. Thus, our findings indicate that depletion of REV3 not only can amend cisplatin-based cancer therapy but also can be applied for susceptible cancers as a potential monotherapy. PMID:22028621

  2. Comment on “Maxwell's equations and electromagnetic Lagrangian density in fractional form” [J. Math. Phys. 53, 033505 (2012)

    SciTech Connect

    Rabei, Eqab M.; Al-Jamel, A.; Widyan, H.; Baleanu, D.

    2014-03-15

    In a recent paper, Jaradat et al. [J. Math. Phys. 53, 033505 (2012)] have presented the fractional form of the electromagnetic Lagrangian density within the Riemann-Liouville fractional derivative. They claimed that the Agrawal procedure [O. P. Agrawal, J. Math. Anal. Appl. 272, 368 (2002)] is used to obtain Maxwell's equations in the fractional form, and the Hamilton's equations of motion together with the conserved quantities obtained from fractional Noether's theorem are reported. In this comment, we draw the attention that there are some serious steps of the procedure used in their work are not applicable even though their final results are correct. Their work should have been done based on a formulation as reported by Baleanu and Muslih [Phys. Scr. 72, 119 (2005)].

  3. Comment on "Maxwell's equations and electromagnetic Lagrangian density in fractional form" [J. Math. Phys. 53, 033505 (2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabei, Eqab M.; Al-Jamel, A.; Widyan, H.; Baleanu, D.

    2014-03-01

    In a recent paper, Jaradat et al. [J. Math. Phys. 53, 033505 (2012)] have presented the fractional form of the electromagnetic Lagrangian density within the Riemann-Liouville fractional derivative. They claimed that the Agrawal procedure [O. P. Agrawal, J. Math. Anal. Appl. 272, 368 (2002)] is used to obtain Maxwell's equations in the fractional form, and the Hamilton's equations of motion together with the conserved quantities obtained from fractional Noether's theorem are reported. In this comment, we draw the attention that there are some serious steps of the procedure used in their work are not applicable even though their final results are correct. Their work should have been done based on a formulation as reported by Baleanu and Muslih [Phys. Scr. 72, 119 (2005)].

  4. Rev-erbα in the brain is essential for circadian food entrainment

    PubMed Central

    Delezie, Julien; Dumont, Stéphanie; Sandu, Cristina; Reibel, Sophie; Pevet, Paul; Challet, Etienne

    2016-01-01

    Foraging is costly in terms of time and energy. An endogenous food-entrainable system allows anticipation of predictable changes of food resources in nature. Yet the molecular mechanism that controls food anticipation in mammals remains elusive. Here we report that deletion of the clock component Rev-erbα impairs food entrainment in mice. Rev-erbα global knockout (GKO) mice subjected to restricted feeding showed reduced elevations of locomotor activity and body temperature prior to mealtime, regardless of the lighting conditions. The failure to properly anticipate food arrival was accompanied by a lack of phase-adjustment to mealtime of the clock protein PERIOD2 in the cerebellum, and by diminished expression of phosphorylated ERK 1/2 (p-ERK) during mealtime in the mediobasal hypothalamus and cerebellum. Furthermore, brain-specific knockout (BKO) mice for Rev-erbα display a defective suprachiasmatic clock, as evidenced by blunted daily activity under a light-dark cycle, altered free-running rhythm in constant darkness and impaired clock gene expression. Notably, brain deletion of Rev-erbα totally prevented food-anticipatory behaviour and thermogenesis. In response to restricted feeding, brain deletion of Rev-erbα impaired changes in clock gene expression in the hippocampus and cerebellum, but not in the liver. Our findings indicate that Rev-erbα is required for neural network-based prediction of food availability. PMID:27380954

  5. Comment on "Analysis of single-layer metamaterial absorber with reflection theory" [J. Appl. Phys. 117, 154906 (2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tung, Nguyen Thanh

    2016-03-01

    In a recent paper, Xiong et al. [J. Appl. Phys. 117, 154906 (2015)] presented the simulated results of a Jerusalem-cross structure in an attempt to elaborate their proposed reflection theory for metamaterial absorbers. Noting that even at non-resonant frequencies the real part of the permeability shows an over-high average value and its imaginary part drops abruptly from positivity to negativity, we argue that their simulated results are unphysical, resulting from an incomplete understanding of the retrieval procedure.

  6. Comment on “Theoretical analysis of high-field transport in graphene on a substrate” [J. Appl. Phys. 116, 034507 (2014)

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Michael L. P.; Arora, Vijay K.

    2014-12-21

    In a recent article, Serov et al. [J. Appl. Phys. 116, 034507 (2014)] claim: “This study represents the first time that the high-field behavior in graphene on a substrate was investigated taking into account intrinsic graphene properties,” ignoring the most recent anisotropic distribution function [V. K. Arora et al., J. Appl. Phys. 112, 114330 (2012)] also published in J. Appl. Phys., targeting the same experimental data [V. E. Dorgan et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 97, 082112 (2010)]. The claim of Serov et al. of being first is refuted and many shortcomings of the hydrodynamic model for a highly quantum and degenerate graphene nanolayer are pointed out.

  7. The vital role of polymerase ζ and REV1 in mutagenic, but not correct, DNA synthesis across benzo[a]pyrene-dG and recruitment of polymerase ζ by REV1 to replication-stalled site.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Keiji; Cho, Youngjin; Yang, In-Young; Akagi, Jun-ichi; Ohashi, Eiji; Tateishi, Satoshi; de Wind, Niels; Hanaoka, Fumio; Ohmori, Haruo; Moriya, Masaaki

    2012-03-16

    The DNA synthesis across DNA lesions, termed translesion synthesis (TLS), is a complex process influenced by various factors. To investigate this process in mammalian cells, we examined TLS across a benzo[a]pyrene dihydrodiol epoxide-derived dG adduct (BPDE-dG) using a plasmid bearing a single BPDE-dG and genetically engineered mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs). In wild-type MEFs, TLS was extremely miscoding (>90%) with G → T transversions being predominant. Knockout of the Rev1 gene decreased both the TLS efficiency and the miscoding frequency. Knockout of the Rev3L gene, coding for the catalytic subunit of pol ζ, caused even greater decreases in these two TLS parameters; almost all residual TLS were error-free. Thus, REV1 and pol ζ are critical to mutagenic, but not accurate, TLS across BPDE-dG. The introduction of human REV1 cDNA into Rev1(-/-) MEFs restored the mutagenic TLS, but a REV1 mutant lacking the C terminus did not. Yeast and mammalian three-hybrid assays revealed that the REV7 subunit of pol ζ mediated the interaction between REV3 and the REV1 C terminus. These results support the hypothesis that REV1 recruits pol ζ through the interaction with REV7. Our results also predict the existence of a minor REV1-independent pol ζ recruitment pathway. Finally, although mutagenic TLS across BPDE-dG largely depends on RAD18, experiments using Polk(-/-) Polh(-/-) Poli(-/-) triple-gene knockout MEFs unexpectedly revealed that another polymerase(s) could insert a nucleotide opposite BPDE-dG. This indicates that a non-Y family polymerase(s) can insert a nucleotide opposite BPDE-dG, but the subsequent extension from miscoding termini depends on REV1-polζ in a RAD18-dependent manner.

  8. Structure of the Human Rev1-DNA-dNTP Ternary Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Swan, M.; Johnson, R; Prakash, L; Prakash, S; Aggarwal, A

    2009-01-01

    Y-family DNA polymerases have proven to be remarkably diverse in their functions and in strategies for replicating through DNA lesions. The structure of yeast Rev1 ternary complex has revealed the most radical replication strategy, where the polymerase itself dictates the identity of the incoming nucleotide, as well as the identity of the templating base. We show here that many of the key elements of this highly unusual strategy are conserved between yeast and human Rev1, including the eviction of template G from the DNA helix and the pairing of incoming deoxycytidine 5'-triphosphate with a surrogate arginine residue. We also show that the catalytic core of human Rev1 is uniquely augmented by two large inserts, I1 and I2, wherein I1 extends > 20 A away from the active site and may serve as a platform for protein-protein interactions specific for Rev1's role in translesion DNA synthesis in human cells, and I2 acts as a 'flap' on the hydrophobic pocket accommodating template G. We suggest that these novel structural features are important for providing human Rev1 greater latitude in promoting efficient and error-free translesion DNA synthesis through the diverse array of bulky and potentially carcinogenic N2-deoxyguanosine DNA adducts in human cells.

  9. Rev3, the catalytic subunit of Polζ, is required for maintaining fragile site stability in human cells

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, Audesh; Qin, Zhoushuai; Xiao, Wei

    2013-01-01

    It has been long speculated that mammalian Rev3 plays an important, yet unknown role(s) during mammalian development, as deletion of Rev3 causes embryonic lethality in mice, whereas no other translesion DNA synthesis polymerases studied to date are required for mouse embryo development. Here, we report that both subunits of Polζ (Rev3 and Rev7) show an unexpected increase in expression during G2/M phase, but they localize independently in mitotic cells. Experimental depletion of Rev3 results in a significant increase in anaphase bridges, chromosomal breaks/gaps and common fragile site (CFS) expression, whereas Rev7 depletion primarily causes lagging chromosome defect with no sign of CFS expression. The genomic instability induced by Rev3 depletion seems to be related to replication stress, as it is further enhanced on aphidicolin treatment and results in increased metaphase-specific Fanconi anemia complementation group D type 2 (FANCD2) foci formation, as well as FANCD2-positive anaphase bridges. Indeed, a long-term depletion of Rev3 in cultured human cells results in massive genomic instability and severe cell cycle arrest. The aforementioned observations collectively support a notion that Rev3 is required for the efficient replication of CFSs during G2/M phase, and that the resulting fragile site instability in Rev3 knockout mice may trigger cell death during embryonic development. PMID:23303771

  10. Comment on ``Amorphization and defect recombination in ion implanted silicon carbide'' [J. Appl. Phys. 81, 7181 (1997)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heera, V.

    1998-04-01

    It is demonstrated that the simplified analysis of Rutherford backscattering\\channeling data on damage production in SiC performed by Grimaldi et al. [J. Appl. Phys. 81, 7181 (1997)] cannot be used to calculate the atomic displacement energy. The value of 12 eV at which the authors arrive is much too small. Moreover, their conclusion of similar displacement energies in Si and SiC is essentially wrong. The general reasons for that are discussed and illustrated by an example.

  11. Comment on "The physics origin of the hierarchy of bodies in space" [J. Appl. Phys. 119, 094901 (2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swartz, C. H.

    2016-09-01

    A recent paper [A. Bejan and R. W. Wagstaff, J. Appl. Phys. 119, 094901 (2016)] concludes that bodies of the same size suspended uniformly in space are in a state of high internal tension. The tension is then relieved by rearrangement of the bodies into a non-uniform distribution of mass. In this Comment, it is shown that the conclusions are based upon calculations which are in error, and that the amount of tension is not in fact decreased by such a rearrangement.

  12. Comment on "Size-efficient metamaterial absorber at low frequencies: Design, fabrication, and characterization" [J. Appl. Phys. 117, 243105 (2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lulu; Liu, Shaobin; Zhang, HaiFeng; Kong, Xiangkun; Yang, Hua; Ding, Guowen; Xu, Ce; Wang, Lingling; Shi, Wei

    2016-06-01

    In a recent article, Khuyen et al. [J. Appl. Phys. 117, 243105 (2015)] proposed a metamaterial perfect absorber (MPA) with a self-asymmetric structure and claimed that it could produce dual-band "perfect absorption." In this report, we demonstrate that the self-asymmetric structure is not a true MPA. The cross-polarization reflection, which is induced by coupling between the induced magnetic field and the incident electric field, is ignored in calculation of absorptivity of that structure. The real absorption rate of this structure is below 60%, which indicates that the structure cannot be called a perfect absorber.

  13. Comment on “On the quantum theory of molecules” [J. Chem. Phys. 137, 22A544 (2012)

    SciTech Connect

    Sutcliffe, Brian T.; Woolley, R. Guy

    2014-01-21

    In our previous paper [B. T. Sutcliffe and R. G. Woolley, J. Chem. Phys. 137, 22A544 (2012)] we argued that the Born-Oppenheimer approximation could not be based on an exact transformation of the molecular Schrödinger equation. In this Comment we suggest that the fundamental reason for the approximate nature of the Born-Oppenheimer model is the lack of a complete set of functions for the electronic space, and the need to describe the continuous spectrum using spectral projection.

  14. Rev-erbalpha, a heme sensor that coordinates metabolic and circadian pathways.

    PubMed

    Yin, Lei; Wu, Nan; Curtin, Joshua C; Qatanani, Mohammed; Szwergold, Nava R; Reid, Robert A; Waitt, Gregory M; Parks, Derek J; Pearce, Kenneth H; Wisely, G Bruce; Lazar, Mitchell A

    2007-12-14

    The circadian clock temporally coordinates metabolic homeostasis in mammals. Central to this is heme, an iron-containing porphyrin that serves as prosthetic group for enzymes involved in oxidative metabolism as well as transcription factors that regulate circadian rhythmicity. The circadian factor that integrates this dual function of heme is not known. We show that heme binds reversibly to the orphan nuclear receptor Rev-erbalpha, a critical negative component of the circadian core clock, and regulates its interaction with a nuclear receptor corepressor complex. Furthermore, heme suppresses hepatic gluconeogenic gene expression and glucose output through Rev-erbalpha-mediated gene repression. Thus, Rev-erbalpha serves as a heme sensor that coordinates the cellular clock, glucose homeostasis, and energy metabolism.

  15. Estimation of REV Size for Fractured Rock Mass Based on Damage Coefficient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Pengpeng; Wang, Shuhong; Wang, Cungen; Zhang, Simiao

    2017-03-01

    Estimation of representative elementary volume (REV) is significant to analyze fractured rock mass in the framework of continuum mechanics. Engineers can therefore simplify the analysis by using an equivalent rock block with an average property, and the influence of fractures can be neglected in finite element modelling. The indicators to determine the REV size based on the joint geometrical parameters include the volumetric fracture intensity ( P 32) and the fracture tensor, but this type of calculation generally provides a lower bound evaluation. A novel conceptual framework of damage coefficient is introduced in this paper to consider the mechanical properties of fractures, such as joint aperture and roughness. A parametric study has been performed to establish the correlation between the proposed dimensionless damage coefficient and the traditional derived P 32 value. The effectiveness of the developed method is demonstrated by a case study, where a larger mechanical REV size is indeed calculated based on the damage coefficient.

  16. Mildly Increased Mechanical Nociceptive Sensitivity in REV-ERBα Knock-out Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jaehyun; Ko, Hyoung-Gon; Kim, Kyungjin

    2016-01-01

    Nociception is one of the most complex senses that is affected not only by external stimulation but also internal conditions. Previous studies have suggested that circadian rhythm is important in modulating nociception. REV-ERBα knock-out (KO) mice have disrupted circadian rhythm and altered mood-related phenotypes. In this study, we examined the role of REV-ERBα in inflammatory nociception. We found that the nociceptive sensitivity of KO mice was partially enhanced in mechanical nociception. However, this partial alteration was independent of the circadian rhythm. Taken together, deletion of REV-ERBα induced a mild change in mechanical nociceptive sensitivity but this alteration was not dependent on the circadian rhythm. PMID:28035185

  17. Genetic and functional analysis of HIV-1 Rev Responsive Element (RRE) sequences from North-India

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    HIV-1 Rev protein regulates the expression of HIV-1 transcripts by binding to a highly structured stem loop structure called the Rev Responsive Element (RRE) present in the genomic and partially spliced RNAs. Genetic variation in this structure is likely to affect binding of Rev protein and ultimately overall gene expression and replication. We characterized RRE sequences from 13 HIV-1 infected individuals from North India which also included two mother-child pairs following vertical transmission. We observed high degree of conservation of sequences, including the 9-nt (CACUAUGGG) long sequence in stem-loop B, required for efficient binding of Rev protein. All of our 13 RRE sequences possessed G to A (position 66) mutation located in the critical branched-stem-loop B which is not present in consensus C or B sequence. We derived a consensus RRE structure which showed interesting changes in the stem-loop structures including the stem-loop B. Mother-Child RRE sequences showed conservation of unique polymorphisms as well as some new mutations in child RRE sequences. Despite these changes, the ability to form multiple essential stem-loop structures required for Rev binding was conserved. RRE RNA derived from one of the samples, VT5, retained the ability to bind Rev protein under in vitro conditions although it showed alternate secondary structure. This is the first study from India describing the structural and possible functional implications due to very unique RRE sequence heterogeneity and its possible role in vertical transmission and gene expression. PMID:20682034

  18. Comment on ``Study of dielectric relaxations of anhydrous trehalose and maltose glasses'' [J. Chem. Phys. 134, 014508 (2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaminski, K.; Wlodarczyk, P.; Paluch, M.

    2011-10-01

    Very recently Kwon et al. [H.-J. Kwon, J.-A. Seo, H. K. Kim, and Y. H. Hwang, J. Chem. Phys. 134, 014508 (2011)] published an article on the study of dielectric relaxation in trehalose and maltose glasses. They carried out broadband dielectric measurements at very wide range of temperatures covering supercooled liquid as well as glassy state of both saccharides. It is worth to mention that authors have also applied a new method for obtaining anhydrous glasses of trehalose and maltose that enables avoiding their caramelization. Four relaxation processes were identified in dielectric spectra of both saccharides. The slower one was identified as structural relaxation process the next one, not observed by the others, was assigned as Johari-Goldstein (JG) β-relaxation, while the last two secondary modes were of the same nature as found by Kaminski et al. [K. Kaminski, E. Kaminska, P. Wlodarczyk, S. Pawlus, D. Kimla, A. Kasprzycka, M. Paluch, J. Ziolo, W. Szeja, and K. L. Ngai, J. Phys. Chem. B 112, 12816 (2008)]. In this comment we show that the authors mistakenly assigned the slowest relaxation process as structural mode of disaccharides. We have proven that this relaxation process is an effect of formation of thin layer of air or water between plate of capacitor and sample. The same effect can be observed if plates of capacitor are oxidized. Thus, we concluded that their slowest mode is connected to the dc conduction process while their β JG process is primary relaxation of trehalose and maltose.

  19. Unprecedented NES non-antagonistic inhibitor for nuclear export of Rev from Sida cordifolia.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Satoru; Kaneko, Masafumi; Shiomi, Atsushi; Yang, Guang-Ming; Yamaura, Toshiaki; Murakami, Nobutoshi

    2010-03-15

    Bioassay-guided separation from the MeOH extract of the South American medicinal plant Sida cordifolia resulted in isolation of (10E,12Z)-9-hydroxyoctadeca-10,12-dienoic acid (1) as an unprecedented NES non-antagonistic inhibitor for nuclear export of Rev. This mechanism of action was established by competitive experiment by the biotinylated probe derived from leptomycin B, the known NES antagonistic inhibitor. Additionally, structure-activity relationship analysis by use of the synthesized analogs clarified cooperation of several functionalities in the Rev-export inhibitory activity of 1.

  20. A rev1-vpu polymorphism unique to HIV-1 subtype A and C strains impairs envelope glycoprotein expression from rev-vpu-env cassettes and reduces virion infectivity in pseudotyping assays

    SciTech Connect

    Kraus, Matthias H.; Parrish, Nicholas F.; Shaw, Katharina S.; Decker, Julie M.; Keele, Brandon F.; Salazar-Gonzalez, Jesus F.; Grayson, Truman; McPherson, David T.; Ping, Li-Hua; Anderson, Jeffrey A.; Swanstrom, Ronald; Williamson, Carolyn; Shaw, George M.; Hahn, Beatrice H.

    2010-02-20

    Functional studies of HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins (Envs) commonly include the generation of pseudoviruses, which are produced by co-transfection of rev-vpu-env cassettes with an env-deficient provirus. Here, we describe six Env constructs from transmitted/founder HIV-1 that were defective in the pseudotyping assay, although two produced infectious virions when expressed from their cognate proviruses. All of these constructs exhibited an unusual gene arrangement in which the first exon of rev (rev1) and vpu were in the same reading frame without an intervening stop codon. Disruption of the rev1-vpu fusion gene by frameshift mutation, stop codon, or abrogation of the rev initiation codon restored pseudovirion infectivity. Introduction of the fusion gene into wildtype Env cassettes severely compromised their function. The defect was not due to altered env and rev transcription or a dominant negative effect of the expressed fusion protein, but seemed to be caused by inefficient translation at the env initiation codon. Although the rev1-vpu polymorphism affects Env expression only in vitro, it can cause problems in studies requiring Env complementation, such as analyses of co-receptor usage and neutralization properties, since 3% of subtype A, 20% of subtype C and 5% of CRF01{sub A}/E viruses encode the fusion gene. A solution is to eliminate the rev initiation codon when amplifying rev-vpu-env cassettes since this increases Env expression irrespective of the presence of the polymorphism.

  1. Comment on “Stationary self-focusing of Gaussian laser beam in relativistic thermal quantum plasma” [Phys. Plasmas 20, 072703 (2013)

    SciTech Connect

    Habibi, M.; Ghamari, F.

    2014-06-15

    Patil and Takale in their recent article [Phys. Plasmas 20, 072703 (2013)], by evaluating the quantum dielectric response in thermal quantum plasma, have modeled the relativistic self-focusing of Gaussian laser beam in a plasma. We have found that there are some important shortcomings and fundamental mistakes in Patil and Takale [Phys. Plasmas 20, 072703 (2013)] that we give a brief description about them and refer readers to important misconception about the use of the Fermi temperature in quantum plasmas, appearing in Patil and Takale [Phys. Plasmas 20, 072703 (2013)].

  2. REV7 counteracts DNA double-strand break resection and impacts PARP inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Guotai; Yuan, Jingsong; Mistrik, Martin; Bouwman, Peter; Bartkova, Jirina; Gogola, Ewa; Warmerdam, Daniël; Barazas, Marco; Jaspers, Janneke E.; Watanabe, Kenji; Pieterse, Mark; Kersbergen, Ariena; Sol, Wendy; Celie, Patrick H. N.; Schouten, Philip C.; van den Broek, Bram; Salman, Ahmed; Nieuwland, Marja; de Rink, Iris; de Ronde, Jorma; Jalink, Kees; Boulton, Simon J.; Chen, Junjie; van Gent, Dik C.; Bartek, Jiri; Jonkers, Jos; Borst, Piet; Rottenberg, Sven

    2015-01-01

    Summary Error-free repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) is achieved by homologous recombination (HR), and BRCA1 is an important factor for this repair pathway1. In the absence of BRCA1-mediated HR, administration of PARP inhibitors induces synthetic lethality of tumor cells of patients with breast or ovarian cancers2,3. Despite the benefit of this tailored therapy, drug resistance can occur by HR restoration4. Genetic reversion of BRCA1-inactivating mutations can be the underlying mechanism of drug resistance, but this does not explain resistance in all cases5. In particular, little is known about BRCA1-independent restoration of HR. Here, we show that loss of REV7 (also known as MAD2L2) re-establishes CtIP-dependent end resection of DSBs in BRCA1-deficient cells, leading to HR restoration and PARP inhibitor resistance, reversed by ATM kinase inhibition. REV7 is recruited to DSBs in a manner dependent on the H2AX-MDC1-RNF8-RNF168-53BP1 chromatin pathway, and appears to block HR and promote end joining in addition to its regulatory role in DNA damage tolerance6. Finally, we establish that REV7 blocks DSB resection to promote non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) during immunoglobulin class switch recombination. Our results reveal an unexpected critical function of REV7 downstream of 53BP1 in coordinating pathological DSB repair pathway choices in BRCA1-deficient cells. PMID:25799992

  3. The HIV-2 Rev-response element: determining secondary structure and defining folding intermediates

    PubMed Central

    Lusvarghi, Sabrina; Sztuba-Solinska, Joanna; Purzycka, Katarzyna J.; Pauly, Gary T.; Rausch, Jason W.; Grice, Stuart F. J. Le

    2013-01-01

    Interaction between the viral protein Rev and the RNA motifs known as Rev response elements (RREs) is required for transport of unspliced and partially spliced human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 and HIV-2 RNAs from the nucleus to the cytoplasm during the later stages of virus replication. A more detailed understanding of these nucleoprotein complexes and the host factors with which they interact should accelerate the development of new antiviral drugs targeting cis-acting RNA regulatory signals. In this communication, the secondary structures of the HIV-2 RRE and two RNA folding precursors have been identified using the SHAPE (selective 2′-hydroxyl acylation analyzed by primer extension) chemical probing methodology together with a novel mathematical approach for determining the secondary structures of RNA conformers present in a mixture. A complementary chemical probing technique was also used to support these secondary structure models, to confirm that the RRE2 RNA undergoes a folding transition and to obtain information about the relative positioning of RRE2 substructures in three dimensions. Our analysis collectively suggests that the HIV-2 RRE undergoes two conformational transitions before assuming the energetically most favorable conformer. The 3D models for the HIV-2 RRE and folding intermediates are also presented, wherein the Rev-binding stem–loops (IIB and I) are located coaxially in the former, which is in agreement with previous models for HIV-1 Rev-RRE binding. PMID:23640333

  4. De novo mutations in PLXND1 and REV3L cause Möbius syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Tomas-Roca, Laura; Tsaalbi-Shtylik, Anastasia; Jansen, Jacob G.; Singh, Manvendra K.; Epstein, Jonathan A.; Altunoglu, Umut; Verzijl, Harriette; Soria, Laura; van Beusekom, Ellen; Roscioli, Tony; Iqbal, Zafar; Gilissen, Christian; Hoischen, Alexander; de Brouwer, Arjan P. M.; Erasmus, Corrie; Schubert, Dirk; Brunner, Han; Pérez Aytés, Antonio; Marin, Faustino; Aroca, Pilar; Kayserili, Hülya; Carta, Arturo; de Wind, Niels; Padberg, George W.; van Bokhoven, Hans

    2015-01-01

    Möbius syndrome (MBS) is a neurological disorder that is characterized by paralysis of the facial nerves and variable other congenital anomalies. The aetiology of this syndrome has been enigmatic since the initial descriptions by von Graefe in 1880 and by Möbius in 1888, and it has been debated for decades whether MBS has a genetic or a non-genetic aetiology. Here, we report de novo mutations affecting two genes, PLXND1 and REV3L in MBS patients. PLXND1 and REV3L represent totally unrelated pathways involved in hindbrain development: neural migration and DNA translesion synthesis, essential for the replication of endogenously damaged DNA, respectively. Interestingly, analysis of Plxnd1 and Rev3l mutant mice shows that disruption of these separate pathways converge at the facial branchiomotor nucleus, affecting either motoneuron migration or proliferation. The finding that PLXND1 and REV3L mutations are responsible for a proportion of MBS patients suggests that de novo mutations in other genes might account for other MBS patients. PMID:26068067

  5. Bioavailable inhibitors of HIV-1 RNA biogenesis identified through a Rev-based screen.

    PubMed

    Prado, Silvia; Beltrán, Manuela; Coiras, Mayte; Bedoya, Luis M; Alcamí, José; Gallego, José

    2016-05-01

    New antiretroviral agents with alternative mechanisms are needed to complement the combination therapies used to treat HIV-1 infections. Here we report the identification of bioavailable molecules that interfere with the gene expression processes of HIV-1. The compounds were detected by screening a small library of FDA-approved drugs with an assay based on measuring the displacement of Rev, and essential virus-encoded protein, from its high-affinity RNA binding site. The antiretroviral activity of two hits was based on interference with post-integration steps of the HIV-1 cycle. Both hits inhibited RRE-Rev complex formation in vitro, and blocked LTR-dependent gene expression and viral transcription in cellular assays. The best compound altered the splicing pattern of HIV-1 transcripts in a manner consistent with Rev inhibition. This mechanism of action is different from those used by current antiretroviral agents. The screening hits recognized the Rev binding site in the viral RNA, and the best compound did so with substantial selectivity, allowing the identification of a new RNA-binding scaffold. These results may be used for developing novel antiretroviral drugs.

  6. TextRev: A Window into How General and Organic Chemistry Students Use Textbook Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Bradley D.; Jacobs, Dennis C.

    2003-01-01

    Points out the important use of textbooks and their ancillary resources in lower-division chemistry courses and the scientific misconceptions found in them. Introduces the TextRev Project which is a new resource for data collection and analysis. Investigates how first and second year chemistry students use and value their textbooks and their study…

  7. Athabaskan Stories from Anvik. Rev. John W. Chapman's "Ten'a Texts and Tales."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapman, John W.; Kari, James, Ed.

    Sixteen Deg Hit'an (Ingalik) Athabaskan stories recorded by Rev. John W. Chapman during 1887-1905 in Anvik, Alaska, are presented. The stories are retranscribed with the help of current Deg Hit'an speakers, and are accompanied by both interlinear and free translations in English. The materials are intended to serve as reading material for students…

  8. Robust Controller for Turbulent and Convective Boundary Layers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-08-01

    integration technique (Gottlieb & Orszag 1977; Canuto et al. 1986; Bodenschatz, Pesch & Ahlers 2000). Marcus (1984) provided a detailed description of the...in channel flows with stochastic excitation. Phys. Fluids 13, 3258–3269. Bodenschatz, E., Pesch , W. & Ahlers, G. 2000 New developments in Rayleigh

  9. Comment on 'The diatomic dication CuZn{sup 2+} in the gas phase' [J. Chem. Phys. 135, 034306 (2011)

    SciTech Connect

    Fiser, Jiri; Diez, Reinaldo Pis; Franzreb, Klaus; Alonso, Julio A.

    2013-02-21

    In this Comment, the density functional theory (DFT) calculations carried out by Diez et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 135, 034306 (2011)] are revised within the framework of the coupled-cluster single double triple method. These more sophisticated calculations allow us to show that the {sup 2}{Sigma}{sup +} electronic ground state of CuZn{sup 2+}, characterized as the metastable ground state by DFT calculations, is a repulsive state instead. The {sup 2}{Delta} and {sup 2}{Pi} metastable states of CuZn{sup 2+}, on the other hand, should be responsible for the formation mechanism of the dication through the near-resonant electron transfer CuZn{sup +}+ Ar{sup +}{yields} CuZn{sup 2+}+ Ar reaction.

  10. Comment on “Deterministic six states protocol for quantum communication” [Phys. Lett. A 358 (2006) 85

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Orany, Faisal A. A.

    2010-02-01

    In [J.S. Shaari, M. Lucamarini, M.R.B. Wahiddin, Phys. Lett. A 358 (2006) 85] the deterministic six states protocol (6DP) for quantum communication has been developed. This protocol is based on three mutually unbiased bases and four encoding operators. Information is transmitted between the users via two qubits from different bases. Three attacks have been studied; namely intercept-resend attack (IRA), double-CNOT attack (2CNOTA) and quantum man-in-the-middle attack. In this Letter, we show that the IRA and 2CNOTA are not properly addressed. For instance, we show that the probability of detecting Eve in the control mode of the IRA is 70% instead of 50% in the previous study. Moreover, in the 2CNOTA, Eve can only obtain 50% of the data not all of it as argued earlier.

  11. Comment on "Unexpected size effect in the thermopower of thin-film stripes" [J. Appl. Phys. 110, 083709 (2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szakmany, Gergo P.; Orlov, Alexei O.; Bernstein, Gary H.; Porod, Wolfgang

    2014-06-01

    In a recent article, Sun et al. [J. Appl. Phys. 110, 083709 (2011)] claim to measure a size-dependent thermoelectric effect in a micron-scale single-metal thermocouple. In this Comment, we demonstrate that the observed phenomenon is not due to a size-dependent Seebeck effect as claimed, but is rather wire-size-dependent heat transport that causes unequal heating at the bonding pads. As a result, the bonding pads are at two different temperatures, and the observed voltage corresponds to a thermoelectric effect of a parasitic thermocouple formed between their metal structure and the bonding-pad wires. We provide simulations and suggest a control experiment based on their structure that supports our contention that the observation depends on width-dependent heat transport in the wires.

  12. Molecular typing of Brucella melitensis endemic strains and differentiation from the vaccine strain Rev-1.

    PubMed

    Noutsios, Georgios T; Papi, Rigini M; Ekateriniadou, Loukia V; Minas, Anastasios; Kyriakidis, Dimitrios A

    2012-03-01

    In the present study forty-four Greek endemic strains of Br. melitensis and three reference strains were genotyped by Multi locus Variable Number Tandem Repeat (ML-VNTR) analysis based on an eight-base pair tandem repeat sequence that was revealed in eight loci of Br. melitensis genome. The forty-four strains were discriminated from the vaccine strain Rev-1 by Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (RFLP) and Denaturant Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (DGGE). The ML-VNTR analysis revealed that endemic, reference and vaccine strains are genetically closely related, while most of the loci tested (1, 2, 4, 5 and 7) are highly polymorphic with Hunter-Gaston Genetic Diversity Index (HGDI) values in the range of 0.939 to 0.775. Analysis of ML-VNTRs loci stability through in vitro passages proved that loci 1 and 5 are non stable. Therefore, vaccine strain can be discriminated from endemic strains by allele's clusters of loci 2, 4, 6 and 7. RFLP and DGGE were also employed to analyse omp2 gene and reveled different patterns among Rev-1 and endemic strains. In RFLP, Rev-1 revealed three fragments (282, 238 and 44 bp), while endemic strains two fragments (238 and 44 bp). As for DGGE, the electrophoretic mobility of Rev-1 is different from the endemic strains due to heterologous binding of DNA chains of omp2a and omp2b gene. Overall, our data show clearly that it is feasible to genotype endemic strains of Br. melitensis and differentiate them from vaccine strain Rev-1 with ML-VNTR, RFLP and DGGE techniques. These tools can be used for conventional investigations in brucellosis outbreaks.

  13. The amino terminal domain of HIV-1 Rev is required for discrimination of the RRE from nonspecific RNA.

    PubMed

    Daly, T J; Doten, R C; Rusche, J R; Auer, M

    1995-10-20

    The ability of HIV-1 Rev to successfully discriminate between specific Rev-responsive elements (RRE) and nonspecific binding sites in the presence of excess nonspecific RNA was examined using filter binding, gel shift, and gel filtration techniques, using purified M4 Rev mutant protein and endoproteinase Lys-C cleaved wild-type Rev. The M4 Rev displayed a slightly reduced binding affinity to the RRE, as well as a tenfold decrease in its ability to discriminate the RRE from non-specific RNA compared to the wild-type Rev. Gel shift and gel filtration chromotography data also showed decreased ability of the mutant to multimerize in the absence or presence of the RRE. The Lys-C cleaved Rev, which lacks the amino-terminal 20 amino acids of the protein, displayed less ability to discriminate the RRE from nonspecific RNA compared to either the wild-type or the M4 mutant Rev and appeared unable to form protein-protein interactions, yet still bound sense and antisense RNA species with high affinity (Kd was in the nanomolar concentration range). A 40 amino acid peptide containing the arginine-rich RRE binding domain of Rev was also observed to interact with both the RRE and antisense RNA fragments with a binding constant of about 1 x 10(-9) M. However, the peptide displayed almost no ability to discriminate between the RRE and a comparably sized antisense RRE. The loss in ability to discriminate correct from incorrect binding sites correlates with overall decreases in the alpha-helical character of the protein and perturbations within the amino terminus. The amino terminus of Rev is likely to maintain the conformational integrity of the arginine rich RRE binding domain which is required for specific RNA binding site discrimination or stabilization of specific Rev-RRE interactions.

  14. Notes on "Soliton solutions by Darboux transformation and some reductions for a new Hamiltonian lattice hierarchy" [Phys. Scr. 82 (2010) 015008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xi-Xiang

    We demonstrate that the Darboux transformation in the paper "Soliton solutions by Darboux transformation and some reductions for a new Hamiltonian lattice hierarchy" [Phys. Scr. 82 (2010) 015008] is incorrect, and establish a correct Darboux transformation.

  15. Comment on "Fe2: As simple as a Herculean labour. Neutral (Fe2), cationic (Fe2+), and anionic (Fe2-) species" [J. Chem. Phys. 142, 244304 (2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoyer, Chad E.; Li Manni, Giovanni; Truhlar, Donald G.; Gagliardi, Laura

    2016-01-01

    A recent paper on Fe2 [A. Kalemos, J. Chem. Phys. 142, 244304 (2015)] critiqued our previous work on the system [Hoyer et al., J. Chem. Phys. 141, 204309 (2014)]. In this comment, we explain the nature of our previously reported potential energy curve for Fe2 and we discuss our computed properties for Fe2. Additionally, we fix a labeling error that was present in our previous work, although this error is unrelated to the main point of discussion.

  16. Borrelia burgdorferi RevA Significantly Affects Pathogenicity and Host Response in the Mouse Model of Lyme Disease

    PubMed Central

    Byram, Rebecca; Gaultney, Robert A.; Floden, Angela M.; Hellekson, Christopher; Stone, Brandee L.; Bowman, Amy; Stevenson, Brian; Johnson, Barbara J. B.

    2015-01-01

    The Lyme disease spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi, expresses RevA and numerous outer surface lipoproteins during mammalian infection. As an adhesin that promotes bacterial interaction with fibronectin, RevA is poised to interact with the extracellular matrix of the host. To further define the role(s) of RevA during mammalian infection, we created a mutant that is unable to produce RevA. The mutant was still infectious to mice, although it was significantly less well able to infect cardiac tissues. Complementation of the mutant with a wild-type revA gene restored heart infectivity to wild-type levels. Additionally, revA mutants led to increased evidence of arthritis, with increased fibrotic collagen deposition in tibiotarsal joints. The mutants also induced increased levels of the chemokine CCL2, a monocyte chemoattractant, in serum, and this increase was abolished in the complemented strain. Therefore, while revA is not absolutely essential for infection, deletion of revA had distinct effects on dissemination, arthritis severity, and host response. PMID:26150536

  17. Strand-biased defect in C/G transversions in hypermutating immunoglobulin genes in Rev1-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Jansen, Jacob G; Langerak, Petra; Tsaalbi-Shtylik, Anastasia; van den Berk, Paul; Jacobs, Heinz; de Wind, Niels

    2006-02-20

    Somatic hypermutation of Ig genes enables B cells of the germinal center to generate high-affinity immunoglobulin variants. Key intermediates in somatic hypermutation are deoxyuridine lesions, introduced by activation-induced cytidine deaminase. These lesions can be processed further to abasic sites by uracil DNA glycosylase. Mutagenic replication of deoxyuridine, or of its abasic derivative, by translesion synthesis polymerases is hypothesized to underlie somatic hypermutation. Rev1 is a translesion synthesis polymerase that in vitro incorporates uniquely deoxycytidine opposite deoxyuridine and abasic residues. To investigate a role of Rev1 in mammalian somatic hypermutation we have generated mice deficient for Rev1. Although Rev1-/- mice display transient growth retardation, proliferation of Rev1-/- LPS-stimulated B cells is indistinguishable from wild-type cells. In mutated Ig genes from Rev1-/- mice, C to G transversions were virtually absent in the nontranscribed (coding) strand and reduced in the transcribed strand. This defect is associated with an increase of A to T, C to A, and T to C substitutions. These results indicate that Rev1 incorporates deoxycytidine residues, most likely opposite abasic nucleotides, during somatic hypermutation. In addition, loss of Rev1 causes compensatory increase in mutagenesis by other translesion synthesis polymerases.

  18. 75 FR 32493 - NUREG-0654/FEMA-REP-, Rev. 1, Supplement 3, Guidance for Protective Action Recommendations for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-08

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency NUREG-0654/FEMA-REP-, Rev. 1, Supplement 3, Guidance for... be held to discuss the proposed Supplement 3 to NUREG-0654/FEMA-REP-1, Rev.1, Guidance for Protective Action Recommendations for General Emergencies (NUREG Supp 3). NUREG Supp 3 addresses onsite and...

  19. A novel human immunodeficiency virus type 1 protein, tev, shares sequences with tat, env, and rev proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Benko, D M; Schwartz, S; Pavlakis, G N; Felber, B K

    1990-01-01

    We have characterized a novel 28-kilodalton protein, p28tev, detected in human immunodeficiency virus type 1-infected cells. tev is recognized by both tat and rev monospecific antibodies. tev is initiated at the tat AUG and contains the first exon of tat at its amino terminus, a small portion of env in the middle, and the second exon of rev at its carboxy terminus. A cDNA clone producing tev was cloned and expressed in human cells. Sequence analysis revealed that the tev mRNA is generated by splicing to a novel exon located in the env region. This identifies a fourth class of multiply spliced human immunodeficiency virus mRNAs, produced in infected and transfected cells. tev is regulated during the virus life cycle similarly to the other regulatory proteins, tat, rev, and nef, and displays both tat and rev activities in functional assays. Since tev contains important functional domains of tat and rev and is produced very early after transfection, it may be an important regulator in the initial phase of virus expression. Another rev-related protein, p18(6)Drev, containing env and rev sequences, was characterized and was found not to have detectable rev activity. Images PMID:2186172

  20. Structural and functional characterization of rev-like transcripts of equine infectious anemia virus.

    PubMed Central

    Rosin-Arbesfeld, R; Rivlin, M; Noiman, S; Mashiah, P; Yaniv, A; Miki, T; Tronick, S R; Gazit, A

    1993-01-01

    Three cDNA clones representing structurally distinct transcripts were isolated from a cDNA library prepared from cells infected with equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) by using a probe representing the S3 open reading frame, which is thought to encode Rev. One species, designated p2/2, contained four exons and was identical to a previously described polycistronic mRNA that encodes Tat. This transcript was predicted to also direct the synthesis of a truncated form of the transmembrane protein and a putative Rev protein whose N-terminal 29 amino acids, derived from env, are linked to S3 sequences. The second cDNA, p176, also consisted of four exons which were generated by two of three of the same splicing events that occur with p2/2 but not with the Tat mRNA. The alternative splice site giving rise to the second exon of p176 results in a bicistronic message that would encode the same transmembrane and Rev proteins as p2/2. The first exon of the third transcript, p20, was identical to those of p2/2 and p176 but was spliced directly to S3. This monocistronic message could encode a second form of Rev that lacks env sequences, provided that Rev synthesis would initiate at a non-AUG codon. The coding capacity of each cDNA was assessed in a eukaryotic system using S3 antisera. Two putative Rev proteins with apparent molecular masses of 18 and 16 kDa were expressed by p2/2 and p176, while p20 expressed only a 16-kDa species. Analysis of EIAV-infected cells with S3 antisera revealed the presence of an 18-kDa protein. Surprisingly, the same protein was detected in purified virions. By using a reporter construct, the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene linked to EIAV env sequences, we were able to demonstrate greatly enhanced chloramphenicol acetyltransferase activity in cells cotransfected with this construct and any of the three cDNAs. Images PMID:8394464

  1. Identification of Brucella melitensis Rev.1 vaccine-strain genetic markers: Towards understanding the molecular mechanism behind virulence attenuation.

    PubMed

    Issa, Mohammad Nouh; Ashhab, Yaqoub

    2016-09-22

    Brucella melitensis Rev.1 is an avirulent strain that is widely used as a live vaccine to control brucellosis in small ruminants. Although an assembled draft version of Rev.1 genome has been available since 2009, this genome has not been investigated to characterize this important vaccine. In the present work, we used the draft genome of Rev.1 to perform a thorough genomic comparison and sequence analysis to identify and characterize the panel of its unique genetic markers. The draft genome of Rev.1 was compared with genome sequences of 36 different Brucella melitensis strains from the Brucella project of the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard. The comparative analyses revealed 32 genetic alterations (30 SNPs, 1 single-bp insertion and 1 single-bp deletion) that are exclusively present in the Rev.1 genome. In silico analyses showed that 9 out of the 17 non-synonymous mutations are deleterious. Three ABC transporters are among the disrupted genes that can be linked to virulence attenuation. Out of the 32 mutations, 11 Rev.1 specific markers were selected to test their potential to discriminate Rev.1 using a bi-directional allele-specific PCR assay. Six markers were able to distinguish between Rev.1 and a set of control strains. We succeeded in identifying a panel of 32 genome-specific markers of the B. melitensis Rev.1 vaccine strain. Extensive in silico analysis showed that a considerable number of these mutations could severely affect the function of the associated genes. In addition, some of the discovered markers were able to discriminate Rev.1 strain from a group of control strains using practical PCR tests that can be applied in resource-limited settings.

  2. The "effects" of Rev-1 vaccination of sheep and goats on human brucellosis in Greece.

    PubMed

    Minas, A; Minas, M; Stournara, A; Tselepidis, S

    2004-06-10

    Vaccination of young animals (3-6-month-old sheep and goats) with Rev-1 vaccine for 15 years in Greece, importantly decreased the abortions in sheep and goats as well as the incidence of brucellosis in humans. After the stop of vaccination in 1994, all over Greece, the prevalence of brucellosis in animals and the incidence in humans quickly increased. It was a positive rank correlation (0.90) among these variables. Once an emergency mass-vaccination programme of young and adult animals with Rev-1 vaccine was started in 1998, the human incidence again decreased. The association of the vaccination coverage of animals and incidence of brucellosis in humans was not linear; the decrease in human brucellosis incidence was observed when the vaccination coverage of animals was >30%.

  3. Rapid and Efficient Purification of RNA-Binding Proteins: Application to HIV-1 Rev

    PubMed Central

    Marenchino, Marco; Armbruster, David W.; Hennig, Mirko

    2009-01-01

    Non-specifically bound nucleic acid contaminants are an unwanted feature of recombinant RNA-binding proteins purified from Escherichia coli (E. coli). Removal of these contaminants represents an important step for the proteins’ application in several biological assays and structural studies. The method described in this paper is a one-step protocol which is effective at removing tightly bound nucleic acids from over-expressed tagged HIV-1 Rev in E. coli. We combined affinity chromatography under denaturing conditions with subsequent on-column refolding, to prevent self-association of Rev while removing the nucleic acid contaminants from the end product. We compare this purification method with an established, multi-step protocol involving precipitation with polyethyleneimine (PEI). As our tailored protocol requires only one step to simultaneously purify tagged proteins and eliminate bound cellular RNA and DNA, it represents a substantial advantage in time, effort, and expense. PMID:18852051

  4. A Naturally Occurring rev1-vpu Fusion Gene Does Not Confer a Fitness Advantage to HIV-1

    PubMed Central

    Langer, Simon M.; Hopfensperger, Kristina; Iyer, Shilpa S.; Kreider, Edward F.; Learn, Gerald H.; Lee, Lan-Hui; Hahn, Beatrice H.; Sauter, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Background Pandemic strains of HIV-1 (group M) encode a total of nine structural (gag, pol, env), regulatory (rev, tat) and accessory (vif, vpr, vpu, nef) genes. However, some subtype A and C viruses exhibit an unusual gene arrangement in which the first exon of rev (rev1) and the vpu gene are placed in the same open reading frame. Although this rev1-vpu gene fusion is present in a considerable fraction of HIV-1 strains, its functional significance is unknown. Results Examining infectious molecular clones (IMCs) of HIV-1 that encode the rev1-vpu polymorphism, we show that a fusion protein is expressed in infected cells. Due to the splicing pattern of viral mRNA, however, these same IMCs also express a regular Vpu protein, which is produced at much higher levels. To investigate the function of the fusion gene, we characterized isogenic IMC pairs differing only in their ability to express a Rev1-Vpu protein. Analysis in transfected HEK293T and infected CD4+ T cells showed that all of these viruses were equally active in known Vpu functions, such as down-modulation of CD4 or counteraction of tetherin. Furthermore, the polymorphism did not affect Vpu-mediated inhibition of NF-кB activation or Rev-dependent nuclear export of incompletely spliced viral mRNAs. There was also no evidence for enhanced replication of Rev1-Vpu expressing viruses in primary PBMCs or ex vivo infected human lymphoid tissues. Finally, the frequency of HIV-1 quasispecies members that encoded a rev1-vpu fusion gene did not change in HIV-1 infected individuals over time. Conclusions Expression of a rev1-vpu fusion gene does not affect regular Rev and Vpu functions or alter HIV-1 replication in primary target cells. Since there is no evidence for increased replication fitness of rev1-vpu encoding viruses, this polymorphism likely emerged in the context of other mutations within and/or outside the rev1-vpu intergenic region, and may have a neutral phenotype. PMID:26554585

  5. International AIDS Society conference update. Compound targeting Rev protein promising. Orphaned approach still looking for home.

    PubMed

    2005-09-01

    While clinicians and HIV/AIDS patients anxiously watch the trend of the virus developing resistance to multiple antiretroviral therapies, the question remains whether new drug research will continue to save the day. Some suggest there will need to be multiple new classes of antiretroviral drugs developed in order to stretch further the life span of longtime HIV patients. One potential new class would target the Rev protein, an approach that has received very little attention from the research and pharmaceutical communities.

  6. Haloarcula marismortui (Volcani) sp. nov., nom. rev., an extremely halophilic bacterium from the Dead Sea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oren, A.; Ginzburg, M.; Ginzburg, B. Z.; Hochstein, L. I.; Volcani, B. E.

    1990-01-01

    An extremely halophilic red archaebacterium isolated from the Dead Sea (Ginzburg et al., J. Gen. Physiol. 55: 187-207, 1970) belongs to the genus Haloarcula and differs sufficiently from the previously described species of the genus to be designated a new species; we propose the name Haloarcula marismortui (Volcani) sp. nov., nom. rev. because of the close resemblance of this organism to "Halobacterium marismortui," which was first described by Volcani in 1940. The type strain is strain ATCC 43049.

  7. Comment on ``Three-dimensional photonic-crystal emitter for thermal photovoltaic power generation'' [Appl. Phys. Lett. 83, 380 (2003)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trupke, Thorsten; Würfel, Peter; Green, Martin A.

    2004-03-01

    In a recent article, Lin et al. [Appl. Phys. Lett. 83, 380 (2003)] reported on the light-emitting properties of three-dimensional tungsten photonic crystals and their potential applications as improved thermal emitters in thermophotovoltaic (TPV) systems. Their findings have attracted considerable interest throughout the media and the application of this type of materials has been praised as a potential superior future energy source; e.g., in waste heat-driven electrical generators (http://www.photonics.com). The results of the theoretical modeling in the work of Lin et al. suggest that a TPV system can achieve higher heat to electric energy conversion efficiencies in combination with a three-dimensional tungsten photonic crystal than with any conventional selective thermal emitter. These theoretical results are based on the experimental observation that the photonic crystal, when heated to a given temperature, emits more radiation in certain spectral regimes than a black body of the same temperature. This experimental observation shall briefly be discussed here.

  8. Comment on ``Preserving the Boltzmann ensemble in replica-exchange molecular dynamics'' [J. Chem. Phys. 129, 164112 (2008)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuda, Ikuo

    2010-03-01

    A brief discussion of the ergodic description of constant temperature molecular dynamics (MD) is provided; the discussion is based on the analysis of criticisms raised in a recent paper [B. Cooke and S. C. Schmidler, J. Chem. Phys.129, 164112 (2008)]. In the paper, the following criticisms relating to the basic concepts of constant temperature MD are made in mathematical manners: (I) the Nosé-Hoover (NH) equation is not measure-preserving; (II) NH system and NH chain system are not ergodic under the Boltzmann measure; and (III) the Nosé Hamiltonian system as well as the Nosé-Poincaré Hamiltonian system is not ergodic. In this comment, I show the necessity for the reconsideration of these criticisms. The NH equation is measure-preserving, where the measure carries the Boltzmann-Gibbs density; this fact provides the compatibility between MD equation and the Boltzmann-Gibbs distribution. The arguments advanced in support of the above criticisms are unsound; ergodicities of those systems are still not theoretically judged. I discuss exact ergodic-theoretical expressions appropriate for constant temperature MD, and explain the reason behind the incorrect recognitions.

  9. REV-ERBα influences the stability and nuclear localization of the glucocorticoid receptor.

    PubMed

    Okabe, Takashi; Chavan, Rohit; Fonseca Costa, Sara S; Brenna, Andrea; Ripperger, Jürgen A; Albrecht, Urs

    2016-11-01

    REV-ERBα (encoded by Nr1d1) is a nuclear receptor that is part of the circadian clock mechanism and regulates metabolism and inflammatory processes. The glucocorticoid receptor (GR, encoded by Nr3c1) influences similar processes, but is not part of the circadian clock, although glucocorticoid signaling affects resetting of the circadian clock in peripheral tissues. Because of their similar impact on physiological processes, we studied the interplay between these two nuclear receptors. We found that REV-ERBα binds to the C-terminal portion and GR to the N-terminal portion of HSP90α and HSP90β, a chaperone responsible for the activation of proteins to ensure survival of a cell. The presence of REV-ERBα influences the stability and nuclear localization of GR by an unknown mechanism, thereby affecting expression of GR target genes, such as IκBα (Nfkbia) and alcohol dehydrogenase 1 (Adh1). Our findings highlight an important interplay between two nuclear receptors that influence the transcriptional potential of each other. This indicates that the transcriptional landscape is strongly dependent on dynamic processes at the protein level.

  10. REV-ERBα influences the stability and nuclear localization of the glucocorticoid receptor

    PubMed Central

    Okabe, Takashi; Chavan, Rohit; Fonseca Costa, Sara S.; Brenna, Andrea; Ripperger, Jürgen A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT REV-ERBα (encoded by Nr1d1) is a nuclear receptor that is part of the circadian clock mechanism and regulates metabolism and inflammatory processes. The glucocorticoid receptor (GR, encoded by Nr3c1) influences similar processes, but is not part of the circadian clock, although glucocorticoid signaling affects resetting of the circadian clock in peripheral tissues. Because of their similar impact on physiological processes, we studied the interplay between these two nuclear receptors. We found that REV-ERBα binds to the C-terminal portion and GR to the N-terminal portion of HSP90α and HSP90β, a chaperone responsible for the activation of proteins to ensure survival of a cell. The presence of REV-ERBα influences the stability and nuclear localization of GR by an unknown mechanism, thereby affecting expression of GR target genes, such as IκBα (Nfkbia) and alcohol dehydrogenase 1 (Adh1). Our findings highlight an important interplay between two nuclear receptors that influence the transcriptional potential of each other. This indicates that the transcriptional landscape is strongly dependent on dynamic processes at the protein level. PMID:27686098

  11. Chimeric RNase H-competent oligonucleotides directed to the HIV-1 Rev response element.

    PubMed

    Prater, Chrissy E; Saleh, Anthony D; Wear, Maggie P; Miller, Paul S

    2007-08-15

    Chimeric oligo-2'-O-methylribonucleotides containing centrally located patches of contiguous 2'-deoxyribonucleotides and terminating in a nuclease resistant 3'-methylphosphonate internucleotide linkage were prepared. The oligonucleotides were targeted to the 3'-side of HIV Rev response element (RRE) stem-loop IIB RNA, which is adjacent to the high affinity Rev protein binding site and is critical to virus function. Thermal denaturation experiments showed that chimeric oligonucleotides form very stable duplexes with a complementary single-stranded RNA, and gel electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA) showed that they bind with high affinity and specificity to RRE stem-loop II RNA (K(D) approximately 200 nM). The chimeric oligonucleotides promote RNase H-mediated hydrolysis of RRE stem-loop II RNA and have half-lives exceeding 24h when incubated in cell culture medium containing 10% fetal calf serum. One of the chimeric oligonucleotides inhibited RRE mediated expression of chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) approximately 60% at a concentration of 300 nM in HEK 293T cells co-transfected with p-RRE/CAT and p-Rev mammalian expression vectors.

  12. Overexpression of SlREV alters the development of the flower pedicel abscission zone and fruit formation in tomato.

    PubMed

    Hu, Guojian; Fan, Jing; Xian, Zhiqiang; Huang, Wei; Lin, Dongbo; Li, Zhengguo

    2014-12-01

    Versatile roles of REVOLUTA (REV), a Class III homeodomain-leucine zipper (HD-ZIP III) transcription factor, have been depicted mainly in Arabidopsis and Populus. In this study, we investigated the functions of its tomato homolog, namely SlREV. Overexpression of a microRNA166-resistant version of SlREV (35S::REV(Ris)) not only resulted in vegetative abnormalities such as curly leaves and fasciated stems, but also caused dramatic reproductive alterations including continuous production of flowers at the pedicel abscission zone (AZ) and ectopic fruit formation on receptacles. Microscopic analysis showed that meristem-like structures continuously emerged from the exodermises of the pedicel AZs and that ectopic carpels formed between the first and second whorl of floral buds in 35S::REV(Ris) plants. Transcriptional data suggest that SlREV may regulate genes related to meristem maintenance and cell differentiation in the development of the flower pedicel abscission zone, and modulate genes in homeodomain and MADS-box families and hormone pathways during fruit formation. Altogether, these results reveal novel roles of SlREV in tomato flower development and fruit formation.

  13. Characterization of the HIV-1 RNA associated proteome identifies Matrin 3 as a nuclear cofactor of Rev function

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Central to the fully competent replication cycle of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is the nuclear export of unspliced and partially spliced RNAs mediated by the Rev posttranscriptional activator and the Rev response element (RRE). Results Here, we introduce a novel method to explore the proteome associated with the nuclear HIV-1 RNAs. At the core of the method is the generation of cell lines harboring an integrated provirus carrying RNA binding sites for the MS2 bacteriophage protein. Flag-tagged MS2 is then used for affinity purification of the viral RNA. By this approach we found that the viral RNA is associated with the host nuclear matrix component MATR3 (Matrin 3) and that its modulation affected Rev activity. Knockdown of MATR3 suppressed Rev/RRE function in the export of unspliced HIV-1 RNAs. However, MATR3 was able to associate with Rev only through the presence of RRE-containing viral RNA. Conclusions In this work, we exploited a novel proteomic method to identify MATR3 as a cellular cofactor of Rev activity. MATR3 binds viral RNA and is required for the Rev/RRE mediated nuclear export of unspliced HIV-1 RNAs. PMID:21771346

  14. WBN-1 Cycle 10 TPBAR Tritium Release, Deduced From Analysis of RCS Data TTP-1-3046-00, Rev 0

    SciTech Connect

    Shaver, Mark W.; Niehus, Mark T.; Love, Edward F.

    2012-02-19

    This document contains the calculation of the TPBAR tritium release from the Mark 9.2 design TPBARs irradiated in WBN cycle 10. The calculation utilizes the generalized cycle analysis methodology given in TTP-1-3045 Rev. 0.

  15. Potent Inhibition of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Replication by an Intracellular Anti-Rev Single-Chain Antibody

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Lingxun; Bagasra, Omar; Laughlin, Mark A.; Oakes, Joseph W.; Pomerantz, Roger J.

    1994-05-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) has a complex life cycle, which has made it a difficult target for conventional therapeutic modalities. A single-chain antibody moiety, directed against the HIV-1 regulatory protein Rev, which rescues unspliced viral RNA from the nucleus of infected cells, has now been developed. This anti-Rev single-chain construct (SFv) consists of both light and heavy chain variable regions of an anti-Rev monoclonal antibody, which, when expressed intracellularly within human cells, potently inhibits HIV-1 replication. This intracellular SFv molecule is demonstrated to specifically antagonize Rev function. Thus, intracellular SFv expression, against a retroviral regulatory protein, may be useful as a gene therapeutic approach to combat HIV-1 infections.

  16. Involvement of the clock gene Rev-erb alpha in the regulation of glucagon secretion in pancreatic alpha-cells.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Elaine; Marroquí, Laura; Figueroa, Ana Lucia C; Merino, Beatriz; Fernandez-Ruiz, Rebeca; Nadal, Angel; Burris, Thomas P; Gomis, Ramon; Quesada, Ivan

    2013-01-01

    Disruption of pancreatic clock genes impairs pancreatic beta-cell function, leading to the onset of diabetes. Despite the importance of pancreatic alpha-cells in the regulation of glucose homeostasis and in diabetes pathophysiology, nothing is known about the role of clock genes in these cells. Here, we identify the clock gene Rev-erb alpha as a new intracellular regulator of glucagon secretion. Rev-erb alpha down-regulation by siRNA (60-70% inhibition) in alphaTC1-9 cells inhibited low-glucose induced glucagon secretion (p<0.05) and led to a decrease in key genes of the exocytotic machinery. The Rev-erb alpha agonist GSK4112 increased glucagon secretion (1.6 fold) and intracellular calcium signals in alphaTC1-9 cells and mouse primary alpha-cells, whereas the Rev-erb alpha antagonist SR8278 produced the opposite effect. At 0.5 mM glucose, alphaTC1-9 cells exhibited intrinsic circadian Rev-erb alpha expression oscillations that were inhibited by 11 mM glucose. In mouse primary alpha-cells, glucose induced similar effects (p<0.001). High glucose inhibited key genes controlled by AMPK such as Nampt, Sirt1 and PGC-1 alpha in alphaTC1-9 cells (p<0.05). AMPK activation by metformin completely reversed the inhibitory effect of glucose on Nampt-Sirt1-PGC-1 alpha and Rev-erb alpha. Nampt inhibition decreased Sirt1, PGC-1 alpha and Rev-erb alpha mRNA expression (p<0.01) and glucagon release (p<0.05). These findings identify Rev-erb alpha as a new intracellular regulator of glucagon secretion via AMPK/Nampt/Sirt1 pathway.

  17. XRCC1 interaction with the REV1 C-terminal domain suggests a role in post replication repair.

    PubMed

    Gabel, Scott A; DeRose, Eugene F; London, Robert E

    2013-12-01

    The function of X-ray cross complementing group 1 protein (XRCC1), a scaffold that binds to DNA repair enzymes involved in single-strand break and base excision repair, requires that it be recruited to sites of damaged DNA. However, structural insights into this recruitment are currently limited. Sequence analysis of the first unstructured linker domain of XRCC1 identifies a segment consistent with a possible REV1 interacting region (X1RIR) motif. The X1RIR motif is present in translesion polymerases that can be recruited to the pol /REV1 DNA repair complex via a specific interaction with the REV1 C-terminal domain. NMR and fluorescence titration studies were performed on XRCC1-derived peptides containing this putative RIR motif in order to evaluate the binding affinity for the REV1 C-terminal domain. These studies demonstrate an interaction of the XRCC1-derived peptide with the human REV1 C-terminal domain characterized by dissociation constants in the low micromolar range. Ligand competition studies comparing the XRCC1 RIR peptide with previously studied RIR peptides were found to be inconsistent with the NMR based Kd values. These discrepancies were resolved using a fluorescence assay for which the RIR–REV1 system is particularly well suited. The structure of a REV1-XRCC1 peptide complex was determined by using NOE restraints to dock the unlabeled XRCC1 peptide with a labeled REV1 C-terminal domain. The structure is generally homologous with previously determined complexes with the pol κ and pol η RIR peptides, although the helical segment in XRCC1 is shorter than was observed in these cases. These studies suggest the possible involvement of XRCC1 and its associated repair factors in post replication repair.

  18. HIV-1 Rev protein specifies the viral RNA export pathway by suppressing TAP/NXF1 recruitment.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Ichiro; Mabuchi, Naoto; Ohno, Mutsuhito

    2014-06-01

    Nuclear RNA export pathways in eukaryotes are often linked to the fate of a given RNA. Therefore, the choice of export pathway should be well-controlled to avoid an unfavorable effect on gene expression. Although some RNAs could be exported by more than one pathway, little is known about how the choice is regulated. This issue is highlighted when the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Rev protein induces the export of singly spliced and unspliced HIV-1 transcripts. How these RNAs are exported is not well understood because such transcripts should have the possibility of utilizing CRM1-dependent export via Rev or cellular TAP/NXF1-dependent export via the transcription/export (TREX) complex, or both. Here we found that Rev suppressed TAP/NXF1-dependent export of model RNA substrates that recapitulated viral transcripts. In this effect, Rev interacted with the cap-binding complex and inhibited the recruitment of the TREX complex. Thus, Rev controls the identity of the factor occupying the cap-proximal region that determines the RNA export pathway. This ribonucleoprotein remodeling activity of Rev may favor viral gene expression.

  19. A novel, mouse mammary tumor virus encoded protein with Rev-like properties

    SciTech Connect

    Indik, Stanislav; Guenzburg, Walter H.; Salmons, Brian . E-mail: salmons@austrianova.com; Rouault, Francoise

    2005-06-20

    We have identified a novel, multiple spliced, subgenomic mRNA species in MMTV producing cells of different origin containing an open reading frame encoding a 39-kDa Rev-like protein, Rem (regulator of expression of MMTV). An EGFP-Rem fusion protein is shown to be predominantly in the nucleolus. Further leptomycin B inhibits the nuclear export of nonspliced MMTV transcripts, implicating Rem in nuclear export by the Crm1 pathway in MMTV. Rem is thus reminiscent of the Rec protein from the related endogenous human retrovirus, HERV-K.

  20. Permeability computation on a REV with an immersed finite element method

    SciTech Connect

    Laure, P.; Puaux, G.; Silva, L.; Vincent, M.

    2011-05-04

    An efficient method to compute permeability of fibrous media is presented. An immersed domain approach is used to represent the porous material at its microscopic scale and the flow motion is computed with a stabilized mixed finite element method. Therefore the Stokes equation is solved on the whole domain (including solid part) using a penalty method. The accuracy is controlled by refining the mesh around the solid-fluid interface defined by a level set function. Using homogenisation techniques, the permeability of a representative elementary volume (REV) is computed. The computed permeabilities of regular fibre packings are compared to classical analytical relations found in the bibliography.

  1. Comment on 'Wave functions for a Duffin-Kemmer-Petiau particle in a time-dependent potential' [J. Math. Phys. 48, 073515 (2007)

    SciTech Connect

    Castro, L. B.; Castro, A. S. de

    2010-03-15

    It is shown that the paper 'Wave functions for a Duffin-Kemmer-Petiau particle in a time-dependent potential' by Merad and Bensaid [J. Math. Phys. 48, 073515 (2007)] is not correct in using inadvertently a non-Hermitian Hamiltonian in a formalism that does require Hermitian Hamiltonians.

  2. Note: Derivation of two-photon circular dichroism—Addendum to “Two-photon circular dichroism” [J. Chem. Phys. 62, 1006 (1975)

    SciTech Connect

    Friese, Daniel H.

    2015-09-07

    This addendum shows the detailed derivation of the fundamental equations for two-photon circular dichroism which are given in a very condensed form in the original publication [I. Tinoco, J. Chem. Phys. 62, 1006 (1975)]. In addition, some minor errors are corrected and some of the derivations in the original publication are commented.

  3. Response to ``Comment on `Slow Debye-type peak observed in the dielectric response of polyalcohols' '' [J. Chem. Phys. 134, 037101 (2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergman, R.; Jansson, H.; Swenson, J.

    2011-01-01

    In our recent article [R. Bergman et al., J. Chem. Phys. 132, 044504 (2010)] we investigated some polyalcohols, i.e., glycerol, xylitol, and sorbitol by dielectric spectroscopy. In the study, a low-frequency peak of Debye character that normally is hidden by the large low-frequency dispersion due to conductivity was revealed by analyzing the real part of the permittivity and by using a thin Teflon film to suppress the low-frequency dispersion. We agree with the comment by Paluch et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 134, 037101 (2011)] that the Teflon film setup will indeed create a peak due to the dc conductivity. However, due to the fact that the location of the peak was almost identical in measurement with and without Teflon, we unfortunately mainly showed the data measured with Teflon, despite that it could also be observed in the real part of the permittivity without using the Teflon setup, as shown in our original article [R. Bergman et al., J. Chem. Phys. 132, 044504 (2010)]. Here, we show that the low-frequency peak of Debye character can also be observed by subtracting the dc conductivity. Furthermore, we show that the modulus representation used in Paluch et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 134, 037101 (2011).] is also not suitable for detecting processes hidden by the conductivity.

  4. Comment on ``Barut-Girardello and Klauder-Perelomov coherent states for the Kravchuk functions'' [J. Math. Phys. 48, 112106 (2007)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fakhri, H.; Dehghani, A.

    2008-04-01

    We call attention to the misconstructions in a paper recently published in this journal [A. Chenaghlou and O. Faizy, J. Math. Phys. 48, 112106 (2007)]. It is shown that the constructed Barut-Girardello coherent states are problematic from the view points of the definition and the measure. The claimed coherencies for the Kravchuk functions cannot actually exist.

  5. Comment on: “From classical to modern ether-drift experiments: the narrow window for a preferred frame” [Phys. Lett. A 333 (2004) 355

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerra, Vasco; de Abreu, Rodrigo

    2007-02-01

    In a recent article [M. Consoli, E. Costanzo, Phys. Lett. A 333 (2004) 355], M. Consoli and E. Costanzo have investigated classical and modern aether drift experiments and explored the narrow window for detection of a preferred reference frame. This Letter proposes an easy to perform variant of Fizeau's experiment, which may confirm or deny Consoli Costanzo's claims.

  6. Comment on "In situ imaging of ultra-fast loss of nanostructure in nanoparticle aggregates" [J. Appl. Phys. 115, 084903 (2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levitas, Valery I.; Hwang, Yong Seok

    2016-02-01

    One of the conclusions of a recent article by Egan et al. [J. Appl. Phys. 115, 084903 (2014)] was that since the melt-dispersion mechanism (MDM) of the reaction of aluminum nanoparticles was not observed in their experiments, this mechanism is very unlikely. Our main point here is to demonstrate that, in fact, these experiments do not disprove the MDM.

  7. Comment on "Superposition of elliptic functions as solutions for a large number of nonlinear equations" [J. Math. Phys. 56, 032104 (2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yi; Li, Ji-Bin

    2015-08-01

    By using the method of planar dynamical systems, we solve exactly a nonlinear Schrödinger (NLS) equation discussed by Khare and Saxena [J. Math. Phys. 56, 032104 (2015)], and give the exact explicit parametric representations of all the traveling wave solutions.

  8. The non-canonical protein binding site at the monomer-monomer interface of yeast proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) regulates the Rev1-PCNA interaction and Polζ/Rev1-dependent translesion DNA synthesis.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Neeru M; Kochenova, Olga V; Shcherbakova, Polina V

    2011-09-23

    Rev1 and DNA polymerase ζ (Polζ) are involved in the tolerance of DNA damage by translesion synthesis (TLS). The proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), the auxiliary factor of nuclear DNA polymerases, plays an important role in regulating the access of TLS polymerases to the primer terminus. Both Rev1 and Polζ lack the conserved hydrophobic motif that is used by many proteins for the interaction with PCNA at its interdomain connector loop. We have previously reported that the interaction of yeast Polζ with PCNA occurs at an unusual site near the monomer-monomer interface of the trimeric PCNA. Using GST pull-down assays, PCNA-coupled affinity beads pull-down and gel filtration chromatography, we show that the same region is required for the physical interaction of PCNA with the polymerase-associated domain (PAD) of Rev1. The interaction is disrupted by the pol30-113 mutation that results in a double amino acid substitution at the monomer-monomer interface of PCNA. Genetic analysis of the epistatic relationship of the pol30-113 mutation with an array of DNA repair and damage tolerance mutations indicated that PCNA-113 is specifically defective in the Rev1/Polζ-dependent TLS pathway. Taken together, the data suggest that Polζ and Rev1 are unique among PCNA-interacting proteins in using the novel binding site near the intermolecular interface of PCNA. The new mode of Rev1-PCNA binding described here suggests a mechanism by which Rev1 adopts a catalytically inactive configuration at the replication fork.

  9. Rev-mediated nuclear export of RNA is dominant over nuclear retention and is coupled to the Ran-GTPase cycle.

    PubMed

    Fischer, U; Pollard, V W; Lührmann, R; Teufel, M; Michael, M W; Dreyfuss, G; Malim, M H

    1999-11-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type-1 Rev protein induces the nuclear export of intron-containing viral mRNAs that harbor its binding site, the Rev response element (RRE). A leucine-rich region of Rev, the activation domain, is essential for function and has been shown to be a nuclear export signal (NES). Although Rev exports viral RNAs that resemble cellular mRNAs, competition studies performed using microinjected Xenopus laevis oocytes have previously indicated that Rev utilizes a non-mRNA export pathway. Here, we show that Rev is able to induce the export of both spliceable and non-spliceable RRE-containing pre-mRNAs and that this activity is not dependent on the location of the RRE within the RNA. Importantly, even RNA molecules of different classes, such as U3 snoRNA and U6 snRNA, which are retained in the nucleus by non-pre-mRNA mechanisms, are exported to the cytoplasm in response to Rev. Consistent with the notion that Rev-mediated export of RRE-containing RNA is mechanistically distinct from the export of processed cellular mRNA, a chimeric Rev protein in which its NES is replaced by the NES of hnRNP A1 does not induce the export of a Rev-responsive mRNA. Finally, we demonstrate that Rev/RRE-activated RNA export is, like other nuclear export pathways, linked to the Ran-GTPase cycle.

  10. Determinants of G quadruplex-induced epigenetic instability in REV1-deficient cells

    PubMed Central

    Schiavone, Davide; Guilbaud, Guillaume; Murat, Pierre; Papadopoulou, Charikleia; Sarkies, Peter; Prioleau, Marie-Noëlle; Balasubramanian, Shankar; Sale, Julian E

    2014-01-01

    REV1-deficient chicken DT40 cells are compromised in replicating G quadruplex (G4)-forming DNA. This results in localised, stochastic loss of parental chromatin marks and changes in gene expression. We previously proposed that this epigenetic instability arises from G4-induced replication fork stalls disrupting the accurate propagation of chromatin structure through replication. Here, we test this model by showing that a single G4 motif is responsible for the epigenetic instability of the BU-1 locus in REV1-deficient cells, despite its location 3.5 kb from the transcription start site (TSS). The effect of the G4 is dependent on it residing on the leading strand template, but is independent of its in vitro thermal stability. Moving the motif to more than 4 kb from the TSS stabilises expression of the gene. However, loss of histone modifications (H3K4me3 and H3K9/14ac) around the transcription start site correlates with the position of the G4 motif, expression being lost only when the promoter is affected. This supports the idea that processive replication is required to maintain the histone modification pattern and full transcription of this model locus. PMID:25190518

  11. Trimethylguanosine capping selectively promotes expression of Rev-dependent HIV-1 RNAs.

    PubMed

    Yedavalli, Venkat S R K; Jeang, Kuan-Teh

    2010-08-17

    5'-mRNA capping is an early modification that affects pre-mRNA synthesis/splicing, RNA cytoplasmic transport, and mRNA translation and turnover. In eukaryotes, a 7-methylguanosine (m7G) cap is added to newly transcribed RNA polymerase II (RNAP II) transcripts. A subset of RNAP II-transcribed cellular RNAs, including small nuclear RNA (snRNA), small nucleolar RNA (snoRNA), and telomerase RNA, is further hypermethylated at the exocyclic N2 of the guanosine to create a trimethylguanosine (TMG)-capped RNA. Some of these TMG-capped RNAs are transported within the nucleus and from the nucleus to the cytoplasm by the CRM-1 (required for chromosome region maintenance) protein. CRM-1 is also used to export Rev/RRE-dependent unspliced/ partially spliced HIV-1 RNAs. Here we report that like snRNAs and snoRNAs, some Rev/RRE-dependent HIV-1 RNAs are TMG-capped. The methyltransferase responsible for TMG modification of HIV-1 RNAs is the human PIMT (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-interacting protein with methyltransferase) protein. TMG capping of unspliced/partially spliced HIV-1 RNAs represents a new regulatory mechanism for selective expression.

  12. The structural basis of gas-responsive transcription by the human nuclear hormone receptor REV-ERBbeta.

    PubMed

    Pardee, Keith I; Xu, Xiaohui; Reinking, Jeff; Schuetz, Anja; Dong, Aiping; Liu, Suya; Zhang, Rongguang; Tiefenbach, Jens; Lajoie, Gilles; Plotnikov, Alexander N; Botchkarev, Alexey; Krause, Henry M; Edwards, Aled

    2009-02-24

    Heme is a ligand for the human nuclear receptors (NR) REV-ERBalpha and REV-ERBbeta, which are transcriptional repressors that play important roles in circadian rhythm, lipid and glucose metabolism, and diseases such as diabetes, atherosclerosis, inflammation, and cancer. Here we show that transcription repression mediated by heme-bound REV-ERBs is reversed by the addition of nitric oxide (NO), and that the heme and NO effects are mediated by the C-terminal ligand-binding domain (LBD). A 1.9 A crystal structure of the REV-ERBbeta LBD, in complex with the oxidized Fe(III) form of heme, shows that heme binds in a prototypical NR ligand-binding pocket, where the heme iron is coordinately bound by histidine 568 and cysteine 384. Under reducing conditions, spectroscopic studies of the heme-REV-ERBbeta complex reveal that the Fe(II) form of the LBD transitions between penta-coordinated and hexa-coordinated structural states, neither of which possess the Cys384 bond observed in the oxidized state. In addition, the Fe(II) LBD is also able to bind either NO or CO, revealing a total of at least six structural states of the protein. The binding of known co-repressors is shown to be highly dependent upon these various liganded states. REV-ERBs are thus highly dynamic receptors that are responsive not only to heme, but also to redox and gas. Taken together, these findings suggest new mechanisms for the systemic coordination of molecular clocks and metabolism. They also raise the possibility for gas-based therapies for the many disorders associated with REV-ERB biological functions.

  13. The Structural Basis of Gas-Responsive Transcription by the Human Nuclear Hormone Receptor REV-ERBβ

    PubMed Central

    Pardee, Keith I; Xu, Xiaohui; Reinking, Jeff; Schuetz, Anja; Dong, Aiping; Liu, Suya; Zhang, Rongguang; Tiefenbach, Jens; Lajoie, Gilles; Plotnikov, Alexander N; Botchkarev, Alexey; Krause, Henry M; Edwards, Aled

    2009-01-01

    Heme is a ligand for the human nuclear receptors (NR) REV-ERBα and REV-ERBβ, which are transcriptional repressors that play important roles in circadian rhythm, lipid and glucose metabolism, and diseases such as diabetes, atherosclerosis, inflammation, and cancer. Here we show that transcription repression mediated by heme-bound REV-ERBs is reversed by the addition of nitric oxide (NO), and that the heme and NO effects are mediated by the C-terminal ligand-binding domain (LBD). A 1.9 Å crystal structure of the REV-ERBβ LBD, in complex with the oxidized Fe(III) form of heme, shows that heme binds in a prototypical NR ligand-binding pocket, where the heme iron is coordinately bound by histidine 568 and cysteine 384. Under reducing conditions, spectroscopic studies of the heme-REV-ERBβ complex reveal that the Fe(II) form of the LBD transitions between penta-coordinated and hexa-coordinated structural states, neither of which possess the Cys384 bond observed in the oxidized state. In addition, the Fe(II) LBD is also able to bind either NO or CO, revealing a total of at least six structural states of the protein. The binding of known co-repressors is shown to be highly dependent upon these various liganded states. REV-ERBs are thus highly dynamic receptors that are responsive not only to heme, but also to redox and gas. Taken together, these findings suggest new mechanisms for the systemic coordination of molecular clocks and metabolism. They also raise the possibility for gas-based therapies for the many disorders associated with REV-ERB biological functions. PMID:19243223

  14. Overlapping cis sites used for splicing of HIV-1 env/nef and rev mRNAs.

    PubMed

    Swanson, A K; Stoltzfus, C M

    1998-12-18

    Alternative splicing is used to generate more than 30 human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) spliced and unspliced mRNAs from a single primary transcript. The abundance of HIV-1 mRNAs is determined by the efficiencies with which its different 5' and 3' splice sites are used. Three splice sites (A4c, A4a, and A4b) are upstream of the rev initiator AUG. RNAs spliced at A4c, A4a, and A4b are used as mRNAs for Rev. Another 3' splice site (A5) is immediately downstream of the rev initiator. RNAs spliced at A5 are used as mRNAs for Env and Nef. In this report, primer extension analysis of splicing intermediates was used to show that there are eight branch points in this region, all of which map to adenosine residues. In addition, cis elements recognized by the cellular splicing machinery overlap; the two most 3' branch points overlap with the AG dinucleotides at rev 3' splice sites A4a and A4b. Competition of the overlapping cis sites for different splicing factors may play a role in maintaining the appropriate balance of mRNAs in HIV-1-infected cells. In support of this possibility, mutations at rev 3' splice site A4b AG dinucleotide dramatically increased splicing of the env/nef 3' splice site A5. This correlated with increased usage of the four most 3' branch points, which include those within the rev 3' splice site AG dinucleotides. Consistent with these results, analysis of a mutant in which three of the four env/nef branch points were inactivated indicated that use of splice site A5 was inhibited and splicing was shifted predominantly to the most 5' rev 3' splice site A4c with preferential use of the two most 5' branch points. Our results suggest that spliceosomes formed at rev A4a-4b, rev A4c, and env/nef A5 3' splice sites each recognize different subsets of the eight branch point sequences.

  15. Metabolism and apoptotic properties of elevated ceramide in HT29rev cells.

    PubMed Central

    Veldman, R J; Klappe, K; Hoekstra, D; Kok, J W

    1998-01-01

    Ceramide (Cer) has been implicated in the regulation of apoptosis. In this study, we elevated cellular Cer levels in human colon-carcinoma (HT29(rev)) cells by incubating the cells in the presence of bacterial sphingomyelinase (bSMase) or, alternatively, in the presence of C2-Cer, a short-chain analogue of the sphingolipid. bSMase treatment did not induce apoptosis in these cells, as revealed by a lack of both DNA fragmentation and cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase. In contrast, apoptosis did occur upon addition of C2-Cer. These findings led us to study whether differences in the metabolic fate of the excess of Cer, as generated by both treatments, contributed to the observed difference in apoptosis-inducing capacity. C2-Cer was rapidly taken up by HT29(rev) cells and accumulated due to the absence of substantial metabolic conversion. Upon addition of bSMase, hydrolysis of sphingomyelin resulted in a reduction of that pool to 20% compared with control values, accompanied by a multi-fold increase in Cer level. In spite of the continuous presence of active bSMase, the Cer increase turned out to be transient. Cer levels reached their maximum 1-2 h after addition of bSMase, followed by a significant decrease. Excessive Cer was mainly turned over via cerebrosides into complex glycolipids, including gangliosides. In the presence of glucosylceramide synthase- and/or ceramidase inhibitors, this conversion was significantly blocked and bSMase-generated Cer accumulated in the cells. However, even under these conditions apoptosis did not occur. In conclusion, the inability of bSMase to induce apoptosis of HT29(rev) cells does not appear to be due to rapid metabolic conversion of excessive Cer. Since apoptosis is induced upon addition of C2-Cer, we therefore propose that the intracellular target involved in the propagation of the apoptotic signal is reached by C2-Cer, but not by bSMase-generated Cer. PMID:9531498

  16. Development of a real-time quantitative RT-PCR to detect REV contamination in live vaccine.

    PubMed

    Luan, Huaibiao; Wang, Yixin; Li, Yang; Cui, Zhizhong; Chang, Shuang; Zhao, Peng

    2016-09-01

    Based on the published Avian reticuloendotheliosis virus (REV) whole genome sequence, primers and TaqMan probes were designed and synthesized, and the TaqMan probe fluorescence real-time quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) method for detecting the REV pol gene was established by optimizing the reaction conditions. Sensitivity analysis showed that the qRT-PCR method had a sensitivity that was 1,000-fold higher than conventional PCR. Additionally, no amplification signals were obtained when we attempted to detect DNA or cDNA of ALV-A/B/J, MDV, CIAV, IBDV, ARV, NDV, AIV, or other viruses, suggesting a high specificity for our method. Various titers of REV were artificially "spiked" into the FPV and MDV vaccines to simulate REV contamination in attenuated vaccines to validate this qRT-PCR method. Our findings indicated that this qRT-PCR method could detect REV contamination at a dose of 1 TCID50/1,000 feathers, which was 10,000-fold more sensitive than the regular RT-PCR detection (10(4) TCID50/1000 feathers).

  17. Synthesis and in Vitro Anticancer Activity of the First Class of Dual Inhibitors of REV-ERBβ and Autophagy.

    PubMed

    Torrente, Esther; Parodi, Chiara; Ercolani, Luisa; De Mei, Claudia; Ferrari, Alessio; Scarpelli, Rita; Grimaldi, Benedetto

    2015-08-13

    Autophagy inhibition is emerging as a promising anticancer strategy. We recently reported that the circadian nuclear receptor REV-ERBβ plays an unexpected role in sustaining cancer cell survival when the autophagy flux is compromised. We also identified 4-[[[1-(2-fluorophenyl)cyclopentyl]amino]methyl]-2-[(4-methylpiperazin-1-yl)methyl]phenol, 1 (ARN5187), as a novel dual inhibitor of REV-ERBβ and autophagy. 1 had improved cytotoxicity against BT-474 breast cancer cells compared to chloroquine, a clinically relevant autophagy inhibitor. Here, we present the results of structure-activity studies, based around 1, that disclose the first class of dual inhibitors of REV-ERBβ and autophagy. This study led to identification of 18 and 28, which were more effective REV-ERBβ antagonists than 1 and were more cytotoxic to BT-474. The combination of optimal chemical and structural moieties of these analogs generated 30, which elicited 15-fold greater REV-ERBβ inhibitory and cytotoxic activities compared to 1. Furthermore, 30 induced death in a panel of tumor cell lines at doses 5-50 times lower than an equitoxic amount of chloroquine but did not affect the viability of normal mammary epithelial cells.

  18. Reply to: Comment on: polarity effects and apparent ion recombination in microionization chambers [Med. Phys. 43(5) 2141-2152 (2016)].

    PubMed

    Miller, Jessica R; Hooten, Brian D; Micka, John A; DeWerd, Larry A

    2017-03-01

    We would like to thank Dr. Brivio et al. [Med. Phys.] for their comment on our recent paper. Miller et al. [Med. Phys. 43 (2016) 2141-2152] determined the primary cause of voltage-dependent polarity effects in microchambers to be a potential difference between the guard and collecting electrodes. In their comment, Brivio et al., offer an explanation for the cause of such potential differences. Brivio et al. attribute the potential difference to the disparity in the work functions between guard and collecting electrodes composed of different materials. However, all of the microchambers investigated in Miller et al. contained a guard and collecting electrode which were composed of the same material. Therefore, the explanation offered by Brivio et al. that "the electric potential perturbation arises from the work function difference of the disparate materials electrodes" does not explain the polarity effects exhibited by the microchambers investigated in Miller et al., all of which contain electrodes composed of the same materials.

  19. Update to Rev6 ignition designs NIF, with details about support tent in particular

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haan, S. W.; Berzak Hopkins, L.; Clark, D. S.; Eder, D.; Hammel, B. A.; Hamza, A.; Ho, D.; Jones, O. S.; Kritcher, A.; Lafortune, K.; MacGowan, B. J.; Meezan, N. B.; Milovich, J.; Peterson, J. L.; Robey, H. F.; Salmonson, J. D.; Spears, B. K.; Town, R. P.; Kline, J. L.; Wilson, D. C.; Simakov, A. N.; Yi, S. A.; Nikroo, A.; Huang, H.; Hoover, D.

    2013-10-01

    Ignition experiments on the National Ignition Facility will use an indirectly driven spherical implosion to assemble and ignite a mass of DT fuel. Requirements describing the specifics of the experiment and the corresponding expected performance were established several years prior. These requirements include laser features, target fabrication and characterization, and data obtained from pre-ignition experiments. Since those requirements were originally set, various NIF experiments using surrogate targets have motivated updates to the target designs and requirements. A summary of these updates will be presented. Rev6 designs for CH(Si), C(W), and Be(Cu) will be summarized. One particularly significant change regards the thickness of the tent films supporting the capsule, and the presentation will include updated thickness goals and the experimental motivation for the change. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  20. Rev-erbα and the Circadian Transcriptional Regulation of Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Gerhart-Hines, Zachary; Lazar, Mitchell A.

    2015-01-01

    The circadian clock orchestrates the coordinated rhythmicity of numerous metabolic pathways to anticipate daily and seasonal changes in energy demand. This vital physiological function is controlled by a set of individual clock components that are present in each cell of the body, and regulate each other as well as clock output genes. A key factor is the nuclear receptor, Reverbα, a transcriptional repressor which functions not only as a clock component but also as a modulator of metabolic programming in an array of tissues. This chapter explores the role of Rev-erbα in mediating this crosstalk between circadian rhythm and tissue-specific biological networks and its relevance to organismal physiology. PMID:26332963

  1. Modelling one row of Horns Rev wind farm with the Actuator Line Model with coarse resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Draper, M.; Guggeri, A.; Usera, G.

    2016-09-01

    Actuator models have been used to represent the presence of wind turbines in a simulation in the past few years. The Actuator Line Model (ALM) has shown to reproduce with reasonable accuracy the wind flow through wind turbines under different operational conditions. Nevertheless, there are not many simulations of wind farms performed with the ALM mainly because of its computational cost. The aim of the present paper is to evaluate the ALM in spatial resolutions coarser than what is generally recommended, also using larger time steps, in a simulation of a real wind farm. To accomplish this, simulations of one row of Horns Rev wind farm are performed, for different wind directions. It is concluded that the ALM is able to capture the main features of the interaction between wind turbines relaxing its resolution requirements. A sensitivity analysis is performed to assess the influence of the smearing factor and the spatial resolution.

  2. Safeguards Summary Event List (SSEL), January 1, 1990--December 31, 1996, Vol. 2, Rev. 5

    SciTech Connect

    1997-07-01

    The Safeguards Summary Event List (SSEL), Vol. 2, Rev. 5, provides brief summaries of several hundred safeguards-related events involving nuclear material or facilities regulated by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) which occurred and were reported from January 1, 1990, through December 31, 1996. Because of public interest, the Miscellaneous category includes a few events which involve either source material, byproduct material, or natural uranium which are exempt from safeguards requirements. Events are described under the categories of Bomb-related, Intrusion, Missing and/or Allegedly Stolen, Transportation-related, Tampering/Vandalism, Arson, Firearms, Radiological Sabotage, Nonradiological Sabotage, and Miscellaneous. The information contained in the event descriptions is derived primarily from official NRC reporting channels.

  3. Response to 'Comment on 'Solitary waves and double layers in an ultra-relativistic degenerate dusty electron-positron-ion plasma' '[Phys. Plasmas 19, 064703 (2012)

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, N.

    2012-06-15

    The investigation of the occurrence of nonlinear electrostatic waves (viz., solitary waves and double layers) in degenerate plasmas was the main concern of the article presented by Roy et al.[Phys. Plasmas 19, 033705 (2012)]. The equations of state used in the article were the limits explained by Chandrasekhar [Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc. 170, 405 (1935)]. It was designated as 'misleading' by some authors, which is opposed in this reply with explanation.

  4. Comment on 'Nonplanar dust-ion acoustic Gardner solitons in a dusty plasma with q-nonextensive electron velocity distribution' [Phys. Plasmas 19, 033703 (2012)

    SciTech Connect

    Mannan, A.; Tanjia, F.; Yasmin, S.

    2013-04-15

    The basic characteristics of cylindrical and spherical dust-ion acoustic Gardner solitary waves in a dusty plasma with q-nonextensive electron velocity distribution have been represented by Ghosh et al.[Phys. Plasmas 19, 033703 (2012)]. In this manuscript, they use the double layer stationary solution of the standard Gardner equation but they explain the whole article in terms of Gardner solitons which is completely incorrect.

  5. Comment on ``Monte Carlo investigation of current voltage and avalanche noise in GaN double-drift impact diodes'' [J. Appl. Phys. 97, 043709 (2005)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dash, G. N.

    2005-11-01

    The avalanche noise behavior of impact avalanche transit-time (IMPATT) diodes has been modeled by Reklaitis and Reggiani [J. Appl. Phys. 97, 043709 (2005)]. They have obtained general agreement of their results with those of McIntyre [IEEE Trans. Electron Devices ED-13, 164 (1966)]. However, McIntyre's theory predicts the opposite noise behavior from that observed in the IMPATT diode. Hence the applicability of the noise model of Reklaitis and Reggiani to IMPATT diode is questionable.

  6. Comment on “General rotating quantum vortex filaments in the low-temperature Svistunov model of the local induction approximation” [Phys. Fluids 26, 065105 (2014)

    SciTech Connect

    Hietala, Niklas Hänninen, Risto

    2014-11-15

    Van Gorder considers a formulation of the local induction approximation, which allows the vortex to move in the direction of the reference axis [“General rotating quantum vortex filaments in the low-temperature Svistunov model of the local induction approximation,” Phys. Fluids 26, 065105 (2014)]. However, in his analytical and numerical study he does not use it. A mistake in the torsion of a helical vortex is also corrected.

  7. Response to “Comment on ‘Stationary self-focusing of Gaussian laser beam in relativistic thermal quantum plasma’” [Phys. Plasmas 21, 064701 (2014)

    SciTech Connect

    Patil, S. D.; Takale, M. V.

    2014-06-15

    Habibi and Ghamari have presented a Comment on our paper [Phys. Plasmas 20, 072703 (2013)] by examining quantum dielectric response in thermal quantum plasma. They have modeled the relativistic self-focusing of Gaussian laser beam in cold and warm quantum plasmas and reported that self-focusing length does not change in both situations. In this response, we have reached the following important conclusions about the comment itself.

  8. Comment on ``Measurement of the ion drag force on falling dust particles and its relation to the void formation in complex (dusty) plasmas'' [Phys. Plasmas 10, 1278 (2003)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khrapak, S. A.; Ivlev, A. V.; Morfill, G. E.; Thomas, H. M.; Zhdanov, S. K.; Konopka, U.; Thoma, M. H.; Quinn, R. A.

    2003-11-01

    It is shown that the quantitative interpretation of recent experiments to determine the ion drag force in complex (dusty) plasmas [C. Zafiu, A. Melzer, and A. Piel, Phys. Plasmas 9, 4794 (2002); 10, 1278 (2003)] is not correct. A comparison of different models of the ion drag force is carried out to illustrate the complexity of this issue and to highlight the current level of the research.

  9. Protection against brucellosis in goats, five years after vaccination with reduced-dose Brucella melitensis Rev 1 vaccine.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Aparicio, E; Hernández, L; Suárez-Güemes, F

    2004-02-01

    The protection conferred by the reduced-dose Rev 1 Brucella melitensis vaccine in goats that had been immunized 5 years previously was evaluated. Sixteen goats vaccinated 5 years before with Rev 1 (1 x 10(5) cfu) and 5 non-vaccinated goats were challenged with B. melitensis 16M (4 x 10(5) cfu) using the conjunctival route. After giving birth or aborting, the goats were sacrificed and tissue samples were taken for bacteriological study. The challenge strain was recovered in 12%, of the animals from the vaccinated group, and in (80% of the control group. It is concluded, therefore that the use of reduced-dose Rev 1 protects goats vaccinated in endemic areas for at least 5 years after immunization.

  10. Cloning and characterization of cDNAs encoding equine infectious anemia virus tat and putative Rev proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Stephens, R M; Derse, D; Rice, N R

    1990-01-01

    We isolated and characterized six cDNA clones from an equine infectious anemia virus-infected cell line that displays a Rev-defective phenotype. With the exception of one splice site in one of the clones, all six cDNAs exhibited the same splicing pattern and consisted of four exons. Exon 1 contained the 5' end of the genome; exon 2 contained the tat gene from mid-genome; exon 3 consisted of a small section of env, near the 5' end of the env gene; and exon 4 contained the putative rev open reading frame from the 3' end of the genome. The structures of the cDNAs predict a bicistronic message in which Tat is encoded by exons 1 and 2 and the presumptive Rev protein is encoded by exons 3 and 4. tat translation appears to be initiated at a non-AUG codon within the first 15 codons of exon 1. Equine infectious anemia virus-specific tat activity was expressed in transient transfections with cDNA expression plasmids. The predicted wild-type Rev protein contains 30 env-derived amino acids and 135 rev open reading frame residues. All of the cDNAs had a frameshift in exon 4, leading to a truncated protein and thus providing a plausible explanation for the Rev-defective phenotype of the original cells. We used peptide antisera to detect the faulty protein, thus confirming the cDNA sequence, and to detect the normal protein in productively infected cells. Images PMID:2164593

  11. Temperature inducible β-sheet structure in the transactivation domains of retroviral regulatory proteins of the Rev family

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thumb, Werner; Graf, Christine; Parslow, Tristram; Schneider, Rainer; Auer, Manfred

    1999-11-01

    The interaction of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) regulatory protein Rev with cellular cofactors is crucial for the viral life cycle. The HIV-1 Rev transactivation domain is functionally interchangeable with analog regions of Rev proteins of other retroviruses suggesting common folding patterns. In order to obtain experimental evidence for similar structural features mediating protein-protein contacts we investigated activation domain peptides from HIV-1, HIV-2, VISNA virus, feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) and equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) by CD spectroscopy, secondary structure prediction and sequence analysis. Although different in polarity and hydrophobicity, all peptides showed a similar behavior with respect to solution conformation, concentration dependence and variations in ionic strength and pH. Temperature studies revealed an unusual induction of β-structure with rising temperatures in all activation domain peptides. The high stability of β-structure in this region was demonstrated in three different peptides of the activation domain of HIV-1 Rev in solutions containing 40% hexafluoropropanol, a reagent usually known to induce α-helix into amino acid sequences. Sequence alignments revealed similarities between the polar effector domains from FIV and EIAV and the leucine rich (hydrophobic) effector domains found in HIV-1, HIV-2 and VISNA. Studies on activation domain peptides of two dominant negative HIV-1 Rev mutants, M10 and M32, pointed towards different reasons for the biological behavior. Whereas the peptide containing the M10 mutation (L 78E 79→D 78L 79) showed wild-type structure, the M32 mutant peptide (L 78L 81L 83→A 78A 81A 83) revealed a different protein fold to be the reason for the disturbed binding to cellular cofactors. From our data, we conclude, that the activation domain of Rev proteins from different viral origins adopt a similar fold and that a β-structural element is involved in binding to a

  12. Cloning and sequencing of 28 kDa outer membrane protein gene of Brucella melitensis Rev. 1.

    PubMed

    Chaudhuri, Pallab; Kumar, S Vinoth; Prasad, Rajeev; Srivastava, S K; Yadav, M P

    2005-09-01

    Brucella melitensis is an organism of paramount zoonotic importance. The 28 kDa outer membrane protein (OMP) is one of the immunodominant antigens of B. melitensis. The gene encoding 28 kDa OMP (omp28) has been amplified from B. melitensis Rev. 1 strain. A PCR product of 753 bp, encoding complete omp28 gene of B. melitensis, was obtained. The gene was further cloned and sequenced. The nucleotide sequence of B. melitensis Rev. 1 strain showed substitution of 2 nucleotides from that of 16M strain.

  13. A stably expressed llama single-domain intrabody targeting Rev displays broad-spectrum anti-HIV activity.

    PubMed

    Boons, Eline; Li, Guangdi; Vanstreels, Els; Vercruysse, Thomas; Pannecouque, Christophe; Vandamme, Anne-Mieke; Daelemans, Dirk

    2014-12-01

    The HIV Rev protein mediates the transport of partially and unspliced HIV mRNA from the nucleus to the cytoplasm. Rev multimerizes on a secondary stem-loop structure present in the viral intron-containing mRNA species and recruits the cellular karyopherin CRM1 to export viral mRNAs from the nucleus to the cytoplasm. Previously we have identified a single-domain intrabody (Nb(190)), derived from a llama heavy-chain antibody, which efficiently inhibits Rev multimerization and suppresses the production of infectious virus. We recently mapped the epitope of this nanobody and demonstrated that Rev residues K20 and Y23 are crucial for interaction while residues V16, H53 and L60 are important to a lesser extent. Here, we generated cell lines stably expressing Nb(190) and assessed the capacity of these cell lines to suppress the replication of different HIV-1 subtypes. These cells stably expressing the single-domain antibody are protected from virus-induced cytopathogenic effect even in the context of high multiplicity of infection. In addition, the replication of different subtypes of group M and one strain of group O is significantly suppressed in these cell lines. Next, we analysed the natural variations of Rev amino acids in sequence samples from HIV-1 infected patients worldwide and assessed the effect of Nb(190) on the most prevalent polymorphisms occurring at the key epitope positions (K20 and Y23) in Rev. We found that Nb(190) was able to suppress the function of these Rev variants except for the K20N mutant, which was present in only 0.7% of HIV-1 sequence populations (n = 4632). Cells stably expressing the single-domain intrabody Nb(190) are protected against virus-induced cytopathogenic effect and display a selective survival advantage upon infection. In addition, Nb(190) suppresses the replication of a wide range of different HIV-1 subtypes. Large-scale sequence analysis reveals that the Nb(190) epitope positions in Rev are well conserved across major HIV-1

  14. The error-prone DNA polymerase zeta catalytic subunit (Rev3) gene is ubiquitously expressed in normal and malignant human tissues.

    PubMed

    Kawamura, K; O-Wang, J; Bahar, R; Koshikawa, N; Shishikura, T; Nakagawara, A; Sakiyama, S; Kajiwara, K; Kimura, M; Tagawa, M

    2001-01-01

    Mutagenesis induced by UV light and chemical agents in yeast is largely dependent on the function of Rev3, the catalytic subunit of DNA polymerase zeta that carries out translesion DNA synthesis. Human and mouse homologues of the yeast Rev3 gene have recently been identified, and inhibition of Rev3 expression in cultured human fibroblasts by Rev3 anti-sense was shown to reduce UV-induced mutagenesis, indicating that Rev3 also plays a crucial role in mutagenesis in mammalian cells. A common variant transcript with an insertion of 128-bp between nucleotides +139 and +140 is found in both human and mouse Rev3 cDNAs, but its biological significance has not been defined. We show here that the insertion variant is not translatable either under in vitro or in vivo conditions. We also found that the translational efficiency of Rev3 gene is enhanced by the 5' untranslated region that contains a putative stem-loop structure postulated to inhibit the translation. Since the human Rev3 gene is localized to chromosome 6q21, a region previously shown to contain genes involved in tumor suppression and cellular senescence, we examined its expression in various normal and malignant tissues. Rev3 and its insertion variant transcripts were ubiquitously detected in all 27 normal human tissues studied, with an additional variant species found in tissues with relatively high levels of Rev3 expression. Levels of Rev3 transcripts were similar in lung, gastric, colon and renal tumors compared to normal tissue counterparts. The data indicate that Rev3 expression is ubiquitous and is not dysregulated in malignancies.

  15. Deletion of the GI-2 integrase and the wbkA flanking transposase improves the stability of Brucella melitensis Rev 1 vaccine.

    PubMed

    Mancilla, Marcos; Grilló, María-Jesús; de Miguel, María-Jesús; López-Goñi, Ignacio; San-Román, Beatriz; Zabalza-Baranguá, Ana; Moriyón, Ignacio

    2013-10-31

    Brucella melitensis Rev 1 is the best vaccine available for the prophylaxis of small ruminant brucellosis and, indirectly, for reducing human brucellosis. However, Rev 1 shows anomalously high rates of spontaneous dissociation from smooth (S) to rough (R) bacteria, the latter being inefficacious as vaccines. This S-R instability results from the loss of the O-polysaccharide. To overcome this problem, we investigated whether some recently described mechanisms promoting mutations in O-polysaccharide genes were involved in Rev 1 S-R dissociation. We found that a proportion of Rev 1 R mutants result from genome rearrangements affecting the wbo O-polysaccharide loci of genomic island GI-2 and the wbkA O-polysaccharide glycosyltransferase gene of the wbk region. Accordingly, we mutated the GI-2 int gene and the wbk IS transposase involved in those arrangements, and found that these Rev 1 mutants maintained the S phenotype and showed lower dissociation levels. Combining these two mutations resulted in a strain (Rev 2) displaying a 95% decrease in dissociation with respect to parental Rev 1 under conditions promoting dissociation. Rev 2 did not differ from Rev 1 in the characteristics used in Rev 1 typing (growth rate, colonial size, reactivity with O-polysaccharide antibodies, phage, dye and antibiotic susceptibility). Moreover, Rev 2 and Rev 1 showed similar attenuation and afforded similar protection in the mouse model of brucellosis vaccines. We conclude that mutations targeting genes and DNA sequences involved in spontaneous O-polysaccharide loss enhance the stability of a critical vaccine phenotype and complement the empirical stabilization precautions taken during S Brucella vaccine production.

  16. 48 CFR 53.301-1415 - SF 1415 (Rev. 7/93) Consent of Surety and Increase of Penalty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false SF 1415 (Rev. 7/93) Consent of Surety and Increase of Penalty. 53.301-1415 Section 53.301-1415 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION (CONTINUED) CLAUSES AND FORMS FORMS Illustrations of Forms...

  17. Endogenous rhythmicity of Bmal1 and Rev-erb alpha in the hamster pineal gland is not driven by norepinephrine.

    PubMed

    Wongchitrat, Prapimpun; Felder-Schmittbuhl, Marie-Paule; Phansuwan-Pujito, Pansiri; Pévet, Paul; Simonneaux, Valérie

    2009-05-01

    Pineal melatonin is synthesized with daily and seasonal rhythms following the hypothalamic clock-driven release of norepinephrine (NE). The pineal gland of rats and mice, like the biological clock, expresses a number of clock genes. However, the role of pineal clock elements in pineal physiology is still unknown. We examined the expression and regulation of several clock genes (Per1, Cry2, Bmal1 and Rev-erb alpha) under different lighting conditions or following adrenergic treatments in the Syrian hamster, a seasonal rodent. We found that Per1 and Cry2 genes were similarly regulated by the nocturnal release of NE: levels of Per1 and Cry2 mRNA displayed a nocturnal increase that was maintained after 2 days in constant darkness (DD) but abolished after 2 days under constant light (LL), a condition that suppresses endogenous NE release, or after an early night administration of the adrenergic antagonist propranolol. In contrast, Bmal1 and Rev-erb alpha exhibited a different pattern of expression and regulation. mRNA levels of both clock genes displayed a marked daily variation, maintained in DD, with higher values at midday for Bmal1 and at day/night transition for Rev-erb alpha. Remarkably, the daily variation of both Bmal1 and Rev-erb alpha mRNA was maintained in LL conditions and was not affected by propranolol. This study confirms the daily regulation of Per1 and Cry2 gene expression by NE in the pineal gland of rodents and shows for the first time that a second set of clock genes, Bmal1 and Rev-erb alpha are expressed with a circadian rhythm independent of the hypothalamic clock-driven noradrenergic signal.

  18. Comment on “Two-dimensional positive column structure in a discharge tube with radius discontinuity” [Phys. Plasmas 21, 113503 (2014)

    SciTech Connect

    Demidova, M. V.; Kudryavtsev, A. A.; Kurlyandskaya, I. P.; Saifutdinov, A. I.; Stepanova, O. M.

    2015-09-15

    Zobnin et al. have published a paper [Phys. Plasmas, 21, 113503 (2014)] on a topic of discharge physics in the presence of a sharp change in cylindrical discharge geometry. In the comment it is pointed out that for untrapped electrons a full kinetic equation, which includes dependences on spatial coordinates and energies, has to be used for the electron velocity distribution function determination. It is also unclear what probe theories Zobnin et al. have used in their paper for the calculation of electron current to the discharge tube wall.

  19. Comment on “Generalized dispersion relation for electron Bernstein waves in a non-Maxwellian magnetized anisotropic plasma” [Phys. Plasmas 17, 102114 (2010)

    SciTech Connect

    Sharifi, M. Parvazian, A.

    2015-02-15

    In a recent paper [Deeba et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 102114 (2010)], a generalized dielectric constant for the electron Bernstein waves using non-Maxwellian distribution functions was derived in a collisionless, uniform magnetized plasma. Using the Neumann series expansion for the products of Bessel functions, Deeba, Ahmad, and Murtaza derived the dispersion relations for both kappa and the generalized (r, q) distributions in a straightforward manner. However, their results are questionable, since the Neumann series expansion for the products of Bessel functions is valid for small argument, while for perpendicular propagation, it is necessary to evaluate special integrands for small as well as large arguments.

  20. Reply to ``Comments on `Effects of using the more accurate intrinsic concentration on bipolar transistor modeling' '' [J. Appl. Phys. 68, 5911 (1990)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liou, J. J.

    1991-10-01

    This reply addresses the issues raised by Rode and Rosenbaum regarding the bipolar junction transistor model developed in the subject paper [J. Appl. Phys. 68, 5911(1990)]. The error associated with Eq. (4) in the subject paper is discussed and corrected, the value of the space-charge-region recombination time used is specified, and the results are recalculated. It is shown that the error in Eq. (4) does not alter notably the trends of the current gain calculated using the two different intrinsic concentrations.

  1. Comment on “The two dimensional motion of a particle in an inverse square potential: Classical and quantum aspects” [J. Math. Phys. 54, 053509 (2013)

    SciTech Connect

    Bietenholz, Wolfgang Chryssomalakos, Chryssomalis Salgado, Marcelo

    2015-10-15

    We comment on a fatal flaw in the analysis contained in the work of Martínez-y-Romero et al., [J. Math. Phys. 54, 053509 (2013)], which concerns the motion of a point particle in an inverse square potential, and show that most conclusions reached there are wrong. In particular, the manifestly senseless claim that, in the attractive potential case, no bounded orbits exist for negative energies, is traced to a sign error. Several more mistakes, both in the classical and the quantum cases, are pointed out.

  2. Comment on “Shape transition of unstrained flattest single-walled carbon nanotubes under pressure” [J. Appl. Phys. 115, 044512 (2014)

    SciTech Connect

    Vassilev, Vassil M. Djondjorov, Peter A.; Mladenov, Ivaïlo M.

    2015-05-21

    Recently, Mu et al. [J. Appl. Phys. 115, 044512 (2014)] have developed an analytic approach to describe some special shapes of a single-wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) under hydrostatic pressure. These authors have found approximate analytic expressions for the parametric equations of the tube cross section profile and its curvature at the convex-to-concave transition pressure using a shell-like 2D continuum model describing the shapes of such nanotubes. In this comment, we provide additional insight into this problem taking into account the exact analytic representation of the shapes that a SWCNT attains when subjected to hydrostatic pressure according to the very same continuum model.

  3. Response to ``Comment on `Application of Kolmogorov entropy to the self-amplified spontaneous emission free-electron lasers' '' [Phys. Plasmas 17, 084701 (2010)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shi-Chang; Elgin, John

    2010-08-01

    In this response, we conceptually and quantitatively demonstrate that the criticism in the Comment by Maraghechi and Salehi [Phys. Plasmas 17, 084701 (2010)] is unacceptable and the following conclusions obtained in our previous paper do hold on: (1) the self-fields of the electron beam have an effect of stabilizing the electron's dynamic behavior and (2) the adiabatic magnetic field of a linearly polarized one-dimensional planar wiggler has trivial influence to the stability of the electron's dynamic behavior, although it is helpful to the electrons to enter the cavity smoothly.

  4. Reply to ``Comment on `Quasisaddles as relevant points of the potential energy surface in the dynamics of supercooled liquids' '' [J. Chem. Phys. 118, 5263 (2002)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelani, L.; Di Leonardo, R.; Ruocco, G.; Scala, A.; Sciortino, F.

    2003-03-01

    We reply to the Comment on the paper "Quasisaddles as relevant points of the potential energy surface in the dynamics of supercooled liquids" [J. Chem. Phys. 116, 10297 (2002)]. While we agree with J. P. K. Doye and D. J. Wales on their improved enumeration of zero curvature directions at quasisaddle points, we criticize their statement that this has important implications for the interpretation of our results. Indeed, we show here that the temperature dependence of the order of quasisaddles and true saddles are numerically coincident, providing a strong support to our previous interpretation.

  5. Comment on “Scaling behavior of one-dimensional Pt chains migration on Pt(110)-(1×2) surface”. [Phys. Lett. A 268 (2000) 413

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montalenti, F.; Ferrando, R.

    2000-11-01

    We show that the recently proposed scaling laws [see G. Zhuang, W. Wang, Phys. Lett. A 268 (2000) 413] for chain diffusion on missing-row Pt(110) have no real meaning, since they cannot be extended outside the narrow chain-length range which has been considered by Zhuang and Wang. The only asymptotic scaling law gives a chain mobility which is inversely proportional to the chain length; however this asymptotic scaling behaviour is not physically important due to the occurrence of multiple upward promotions for long chains.

  6. Comment on ``The two dimensional motion of a particle in an inverse square potential: Classical and quantum aspects'' [J. Math. Phys. 54, 053509 (2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bietenholz, Wolfgang; Chryssomalakos, Chryssomalis; Salgado, Marcelo

    2015-10-01

    We comment on a fatal flaw in the analysis contained in the work of Martínez-y-Romero et al., [J. Math. Phys. 54, 053509 (2013)], which concerns the motion of a point particle in an inverse square potential, and show that most conclusions reached there are wrong. In particular, the manifestly senseless claim that, in the attractive potential case, no bounded orbits exist for negative energies, is traced to a sign error. Several more mistakes, both in the classical and the quantum cases, are pointed out.

  7. Comment on ``Molecular dynamics simulation study of nonconcatenated ring polymers in a melt. I. Statics'' [J. Chem. Phys. 134, 204904 (2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittmer, J. P.; Meyer, H.; Johner, A.; Obukhov, S.; Baschnagel, J.

    2013-12-01

    Recent computational studies on melts of nonconcatenated rings suggest compact configurations of fractal dimension df = 3. This begs the question of whether the irregular surfaces of these compact rings may be characterized by a fractal surface dimension ds < 3. We revisit the scaling analysis of the form factor by Halverson et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 134, 204904 (2011)] implying ds ≈ 2.8. Our analysis suggests that this conclusion might be due to the application of the Generalized Porod Law at large wavevectors where length scales other than the total chain size do matter. We present an alternative "decorated Gaussian loop" model which does not require ds < 3.

  8. Comment on “Competition between coherent emission and broadband spontaneous emission in the quantum free electron laser” [Phys. Plasmas 20, 033106 (2013)

    SciTech Connect

    Petrillo, V.; Rossi, A. R.; Serafini, L.

    2013-12-15

    We point out that in the equation for the electron distribution evolution during Thomson/Compton or undulator radiation used in the paper: “Competition between coherent emission and broadband spontaneous emission in the quantum free electron laser” by G. R. M. Robb and R. Bonifacio [Phys. Plasmas 20, 033106 (2013)], the weight function should be the distribution of the number of emitted photons and not the photon energy distribution. Nevertheless, the considerations expressed in this comment do not alter the conclusions drawn in the paper in object.

  9. Comment on ``Competition between coherent emission and broadband spontaneous emission in the quantum free electron laser'' [Phys. Plasmas 20, 033106 (2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrillo, V.; Rossi, A. R.; Serafini, L.

    2013-12-01

    We point out that in the equation for the electron distribution evolution during Thomson/Compton or undulator radiation used in the paper: "Competition between coherent emission and broadband spontaneous emission in the quantum free electron laser" by G. R. M. Robb and R. Bonifacio [Phys. Plasmas 20, 033106 (2013)], the weight function should be the distribution of the number of emitted photons and not the photon energy distribution. Nevertheless, the considerations expressed in this comment do not alter the conclusions drawn in the paper in object.

  10. Erratum: Evidence of b-jet quenching in PbPb collisions at sNN=2.76TeV [Phys. Rev. Lett. 113 , 132301 (2014)

    SciTech Connect

    Chatrchyan, S.

    2015-07-10

    In our Letter, there was a component of the statistical uncertainty from the simulated PbPb Monte Carlo samples. This uncertainty was not propagated to all of the results. Figures 3 and 4 have been updated to reflect this source of uncertainty. In this case, the statistical uncertainties remain smaller than the systematic uncertainties in all cases such that the conclusions of the Letter are unaltered.

  11. Publisher's Note: High-temperature superconductivity stabilized by electron-hole interband coupling in collapsed tetragonal phase of KFe2As2 under high pressure [Phys. Rev. B 91 , 060508(R) (2015)

    SciTech Connect

    Nakajima, Yasuyuki; Wang, Renxiong; Metz, Tristin; Wang, Xiangfeng; Wang, Limin; Cynn, Hyunchae; Weir, Samuel T.; Jeffries, Jason R.; Paglione, Johnpierre

    2015-03-09

    Here, we report a high-pressure study of simultaneous low-temperature electrical resistivity and Hall effect measurements on high quality single-crystalline KFe2As2 using designer diamond anvil cell techniques with applied pressures up to 33 GPa. In the low pressure regime, we show that the superconducting transition temperature Tc finds a maximum onset value of 7 K near 2 GPa, in contrast to previous reports that find a minimum Tc and reversal of pressure dependence at this pressure. Upon applying higher pressures, this Tc is diminished until a sudden drastic enhancement occurs coincident with a first-order structural phase transition into a collapsed tetragonal phase. The appearance of a distinct superconducting phase above 13 GPa is also accompanied by a sudden reversal of dominant charge carrier sign, from hole- to electron-like, which agrees with our band calculations predicting the emergence of an electron pocket and diminishment of hole pockets upon Fermi surface reconstruction. Our results suggest the high-temperature superconducting phase in KFe2As2 is substantially enhanced by the presence of nested electron and hole pockets, providing the key ingredient of high-Tc superconductivity in iron pnictide superconductors.

  12. In Vitro Metabolic Studies of REV-ERB Agonists SR9009 and SR9011

    PubMed Central

    Geldof, Lore; Deventer, Koen; Roels, Kris; Tudela, Eva; Van Eenoo, Peter

    2016-01-01

    SR9009 and SR9011 are attractive as performance-enhancing substances due to their REV-ERB agonist effects and thus circadian rhythm modulation activity. Although no pharmaceutical preparations are available yet, illicit use of SR9009 and SR9011 for doping purposes can be anticipated, especially since SR9009 is marketed in illicit products. Therefore, the aim was to identify potential diagnostic metabolites via in vitro metabolic studies to ensure effective (doping) control. The presence of SR9009 could be demonstrated in a black market product purchased over the Internet. Via human liver microsomal metabolic assays, eight metabolites were detected for SR9009 and fourteen metabolites for SR9011 by liquid chromatography–high resolution mass spectrometry (LC–HRMS). Structure elucidation was performed for all metabolites by LC–HRMS product ion scans in both positive and negative ionization mode. Retrospective data analysis was applied to 1511 doping control samples previously analyzed by a full-scan LC–HRMS screening method to verify the presence of SR9009, SR9011 and their metabolites. So far, the presence of neither the parent compound nor the metabolites could be detected in routine urine samples. However, to further discourage use of these potentially harmful compounds, incorporation of SR9009 and SR9011 into screening methods is highly recommended. PMID:27706103

  13. Effect of nacelle on the wake meandering in Horns Rev wind farm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaolei; Foti, Daniel; Sotiropoulos, Fotis

    2016-11-01

    Turbine wake meandering has considerable effects on the velocity deficit and turbulence intensity in the wake. However, the mechanism for wake meandering is still not well understood and low-order models cannot take into account the wake meandering effects accurately. A recent work by Kang, Yang and Sotiropoulos showed that the nacelle has a significant effect on the wake meandering of a hydrokinetic turbine. To examine the nacelle contributions to wake meandering and wake interactions in utility-scale wind farms, we simulate the atmospheric turbulent flow over the Horns Rev wind farm using large-eddy simulation with actuator type models. In a preliminary simulation on a coarse grid using actuator line model for turbine blades without a nacelle model, the computed power shows overall good agreement with field measurements. Fine grid simulations using an actuator surface model for turbine blades with and without a nacelle model are being carried out. The corresponding results will be presented with analysis on wake meandering dynamics using the technique proposed by Horward et al. and Foti et al.. This work was supported by DOE (DE-AC04-94AL85000), Xcel Energy (Grant RD4-13) and Sandia National Laboratories. Computational resources were provided by National Renewable Energy Laboratory and University of Minnesota Supercomputing Institute.

  14. Modeling RNA-ligand interactions: the Rev-binding element RNA-aminoglycoside complex.

    PubMed

    Leclerc, F; Cedergren, R

    1998-01-15

    An approach to the modeling of ligand-RNA complexes has been developed by combining three-dimensional structure-activity relationship (3D-SAR) computations with a docking protocol. The ability of 3D-SAR to predict bound conformations of flexible ligands was first assessed by attempting to reconstruct the known, bound conformations of phenyloxazolines complexed with human rhinovirus 14 (HRV14) RNA. Subsequently, the same 3D-SAR analysis was applied to the identification of bound conformations of aminoglycosides which associate with the Rev-binding element (RBE) RNA. Bound conformations were identified by parsing ligand conformational data sets with pharmacophores determined by the 3D-SAR analysis. These "bioactive" structures were docked to the receptor RNA, and optimization of the complex was undertaken by extensive searching of ligand conformational space coupled with molecular dynamics computations. The similarity between the bound conformations of the ligand from the 3D-SAR analysis and those found in the docking protocol suggests that this methodology is valid for the prediction of bound ligand conformations and the modeling of the structure of the ligand-RNA complexes.

  15. Dynamical mechanism of Bmal 1 / Rev- erbα loop in circadian clock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ying; Liu, Zengrong

    2015-07-01

    In mammals, the circadian clock is driven by multiple integrated transcriptional feedback loops involving three kinds of central clock-controlled elements (CCEs): E-boxes, D-boxes and ROR-elements. With the aid of CCEs, the concentrations of the active proteins are approximated by the delayed concentrations of mRNAs, which simplifies the circadian system drastically. The regulatory loop composed by BMAL1 and REV-ERB- α plays important roles in circadian clock. With delay differential equations, we gave a mathematical model of this loop and investigated its dynamical mechanisms. Specially, we theoretically provided the sufficient conditions for sustained oscillation of the loop with Hopf bifurcation theory. The total of delays determines the emergence of oscillators, which explains the crucial roles of delays in circadian clock revealed by biological experiments. Numerically, we studied the amplitude and period against the variations of delays and the degradation rates. The different sensitivities of amplitude and period on these factors provide ideas to adjust the amplitude or period of circadian oscillators.

  16. Rev1 promotes replication through UV lesions in conjunction with DNA polymerases η, ι, and κ but not DNA polymerase ζ

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Jung-Hoon; Park, Jeseong; Conde, Juan; Wakamiya, Maki; Prakash, Louise; Prakash, Satya

    2015-01-01

    Translesion synthesis (TLS) DNA polymerases (Pols) promote replication through DNA lesions; however, little is known about the protein factors that affect their function in human cells. In yeast, Rev1 plays a noncatalytic role as an indispensable component of Polζ, and Polζ together with Rev1 mediates a highly mutagenic mode of TLS. However, how Rev1 functions in TLS and mutagenesis in human cells has remained unclear. Here we determined the role of Rev1 in TLS opposite UV lesions in human and mouse fibroblasts and showed that Rev1 is indispensable for TLS mediated by Polη, Polι, and Polκ but is not required for TLS by Polζ. In contrast to its role in mutagenic TLS in yeast, Rev1 promotes predominantly error-free TLS opposite UV lesions in humans. The identification of Rev1 as an indispensable scaffolding component for Polη, Polι, and Polκ, which function in TLS in highly specialized ways opposite a diverse array of DNA lesions and act in a predominantly error-free manner, implicates a crucial role for Rev1 in the maintenance of genome stability in humans. PMID:26680302

  17. Public Data Set: Erratum: "Multi-point, high-speed passive ion velocity distribution diagnostic on the Pegasus Toroidal Experiment" [Rev. Sci. Instrum. 83, 10D516 (2012)

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, Marcus G.; Fonck, Raymond J.; Bongard, Michael W.; Schlossberg, David J.; Winz, Gregory R.

    2016-07-18

    This data set contains openly-documented, machine readable digital research data corresponding to figures published in M.G. Burke et al., 'Erratum: "Multi-point, high-speed passive ion velocity distribution diagnostic on the Pegasus Toroidal Experiment" [Rev. Sci. Instrum. 83, 10D516 (2012)],' Rev. Sci. Instrum. 87, 079902 (2016).

  18. Rev1 is essential in generating G to C transversions downstream of the Ung2 pathway but not the Msh2+Ung2 hybrid pathway.

    PubMed

    Krijger, Peter Hugo Lodewijk; Tsaalbi-Shtylik, Anastasia; Wit, Niek; van den Berk, Paul Cornelius Maria; de Wind, Niels; Jacobs, Heinz

    2013-10-01

    Somatic hypermutation (SHM) and class switch recombination (CSR) of immunoglobulin (Ig) genes are initiated by the enzymatic deamination of cytosine (C) to uracil (U). Uracil-DNA-glycosylase (Ung2) converts uracils into apyrimidinic (AP) sites, which is essential for the generation of transversions (TVs) at G/C basepairs during SHM and for efficient DNA break formation during CSR. Besides Ung2, the mismatch repair protein Msh2 and the translesion synthesis (TLS) DNA polymerase (Pol) Rev1 are implicated in SHM and CSR. To further unravel the role of Rev1, we studied WT, Rev1-deficient, Msh2-deficient, and Rev1, Msh2 double-deficient B cells. Loss of Rev1 only slightly reduced CSR. During SHM G/C to C/G TVs are generated in both Ung2- and Ung+Msh2-dependent fashions. We found that Rev1 is essential for the Msh2-independent generation of these TVs downstream of Ung2-induced AP sites. In the Ung+Msh2 hybrid pathway, Rev1 is not essential and can be substituted by an alternative TLS Pol, especially when Rev1 is lacking.

  19. Dominant negative mutants of human T-cell leukemia virus type I Rex and human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Rev fail to multimerize in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Bogerd, H; Greene, W C

    1993-01-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I) Rex and human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Rev are essential gene products required for the replication of these two pathogenic human retroviruses. Both Rex and Rev act at a posttranscriptional level by binding to highly structured RNA-response elements, the Rex-response element in HTLV-I and the Rev-response element in HIV-1. Using a sensitive in vivo assay of protein-protein interaction, we now demonstrate that the HTLV-I Rex and HIV-1 Rev proteins readily form homomultimeric complexes in the absence of their cognate RNA-response elements yet fail to form heteromultimeric complexes with each other. Dominant negative mutations have been identified in both the rex and rev genes which presumably specify a critical activation or effector domain in each of these viral transactivators. Surprisingly, these dominant negative mutants of Rex and Rev fail to interact in vivo. These findings raise the possibility that the binding of nonfunctional monomers rather than functional multimers underlies the transdominant phenotype of these Rex and Rev mutants. Further, it seems likely that the assembly of functional and stable multimers of Rex and Rev in vivo may depend not only on the intrinsic multimerization domains of these proteins but also on the binding of a bridging cellular cofactor to the related activation domains present in each viral transactivator. Images PMID:8474155

  20. Response to ``Comment on `Isotope effects in liquid water by infrared spectroscopy. IV. No free OH groups in liquid water''' [J. Chem. Phys. 135, 117101 (2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Max, Jean-Joseph; Chapados, Camille

    2011-09-01

    The original infrared spectra in the OH stretch region that Riemenschneider and Ludwig (thereafter, RL) have obtained for pure water and aqueous salt solutions are very similar to what we have previously reported [J.-J. Max and C. Chapados, J. Chem. Phys. 115, 6803 (2001)]. In our 2010 paper, we claimed that "free" OH is not present in pure liquid water. The difference spectra from the salt solutions and pure water spectrum give small negative components situated near 3655 cm-1. Because this position is in the range where free OH groups should absorb RL assigned the negative peaks to free OH removed from pure water. That is, RL consider that pure liquid water contains free OH groups which are removed in the salt solutions. Obviously, the removal of all free OH present in pure water will produce maximum negative intensities in the difference spectra. In this response, we present unpublished difference spectra between several salt solutions and pure water where negative peaks are higher than that claimed by RL for pure water. Since this is impossible it demonstrates that the assignment proposed by RL to free OH is incorrect. The negative peaks come from the difference between large components that differ a little between salt solutions and pure water [J.-J. Max and C. Chapados, J. Chem. Phys. 115, 6803 (2001)]. Recall that the ionized salts do not absorb but perturb the surrounding water molecules.

  1. Response to "Comment on `A model for phosphate glass topology considering the modifying ion sub-network"' [J. Chem. Phys. 142, 107103 (2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermansen, Christian; Mauro, John C.; Yue, Yuanzheng

    2015-03-01

    In our recent paper [C. Hermansen, J. C. Mauro, and Y.-Z. Yue, J. Chem. Phys. 140, 154501 (2014)], we applied temperature-dependent constraint theory to model the glass transition temperature (Tg) and liquid fragility index (m) of alkali phosphate glasses. Sidebottom commented on this paper concerning the m values obtained by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) [D. L. Sidebottom, J. Chem. Phys. 142, ⬛ (2015)]. We have considered Sidebottom's comments carefully and conclude that the m values of phosphate liquids obtained by DSC are reliable, except for the NaPO3 and possibly P2O5 compositions. Based on his dynamic light scattering measurements, Sidebottom has found that P2O5 is a strong liquid with m ≈ 20. However, based on the heat capacity jump at Tg and the stretching exponent of the relaxation function, P2O5 should be classified as an intermediate fragile liquid with m ≈ 40. We also argue that m cannot be universally related to the average connectivity of the network and point out several inconsistencies with this view.

  2. Comment on 'Continuum modes in rotating plasmas: General equations and continuous spectra for large aspect ratio tokamaks'[Phys. Plasmas 18, 092103 (2011)

    SciTech Connect

    Goedbloed, J. P.

    2012-06-15

    It is shown that some of the main results of the recent paper by Lakhin and Ilgisonis [Phys. Plasmas 18, 092103 (2011)], viz. the derivation of the equations for the continuous spectra of poloidally and toroidally rotating plasmas and their special solution for large aspect ratio tokamaks with large parallel flows were obtained before by Goedbloed, Belieen, van der Holst, and Keppens [Phys. Plasmas 11, 28 (2004)]. A further rearrangement of the system of equations for the coupled Alfven and slow continuous spectra clearly exhibits: (a) coupling through a single tangential derivative, which is a generalization of the geodesic curvature; (b) the 'transonic' transitions of the equilibrium, which need to be carefully examined in order to avoid entering hyperbolic flow regimes where the stability formalism breaks down. A critical discussion is devoted to the implications of this failure, which is generally missed in the tokamak literature, possibly as a result of the wide-spread use of the sonic Mach number of gas dynamics, which is an irrelevant and misleading parameter in 'transonic' magnetohydrodynamics. Once this obstacle in understanding is removed, further application of the theory of trans-slow Alfven continuum instabilities to both tokamaks, with possible implications for the L-H transition, and astrophysical objects like 'fat' accretion disks, with a possible new route to magnetohydrodynamic turbulence, becomes feasible.

  3. Mapping Wind Farm Loads and Power Production - A Case Study on Horns Rev 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galinos, Christos; Dimitrov, Nikolay; Larsen, Torben J.; Natarajan, Anand; Hansen, Kurt S.

    2016-09-01

    This paper describes the development of a wind turbine (WT) component lifetime fatigue load variation map within an offshore wind farm. A case study on the offshore wind farm Horns Rev I is conducted with this purpose, by quantifying wake effects using the Dynamic Wake Meandering (DWM) method, which has previously been validated based on CFD, Lidar and full scale load measurements. Fully coupled aeroelastic load simulations using turbulent wind conditions are conducted for all wind directions and mean wind speeds between cut-in and cut-out using site specific turbulence level measurements. Based on the mean wind speed and direction distribution, the representative 20-year lifetime fatigue loads are calculated. It is found that the heaviest loaded WT is not the same when looking at blade root, tower top or tower base components. The blade loads are mainly dominated by the wake situations above rated wind speed and the highest loaded blades are in the easternmost row as the dominating wind direction is from West. Regarding the tower components, the highest loaded WTs are also located towards the eastern central location. The turbines with highest power production are, not surprisingly, the ones facing a free sector towards west and south. The power production results of few turbines are compared with SCADA data. The results of this paper are expected to have significance for operation and maintenance planning, where the schedules for inspection and service activities can be adjusted to the requirements arising from the varying fatigue levels. Furthermore, the results can be used in the context of remaining fatigue lifetime assessment and planning of decommissioning.

  4. Reply to the 'Comment on "trans-1,2-Disiloxybenzocyclobutene, an adequate partner for the auto-oxidation: EPR/spin trapping and theoretical studies"' by H.-G. Korth, P. Mulder and T. Paul, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2017, 19, C6CP04187F.

    PubMed

    Carissan, Yannick; Nava, Paola; Tuccio, Béatrice; Commeiras, Laurent; Parrain, Jean-Luc

    2017-01-25

    The proposal and the comments made by Korth et al. on a biradical intermediate along the isomerization path of the reaction of trans-1,2-tert-butyldimethyldisilyloxybenzocyclobutene 1 with dioxygen are unsuitable in our case. The mechanism scenario that we proposed is in agreement with our experimental observations. Moreover, new calculations were able to give an answer to the crucial question, "is the biradical an intermediate or a transition state?" together with the localization of the two radicals. This full article is a response to the "Comment on "trans-1,2-Disiloxybenzocyclobutene, an adequate partner for the auto-oxidation: EPR/spin trapping and theoretical studies" by J. Drujon et al., Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 2014, 16, 7513".

  5. Final Report - Sulfate Solubility in RPP-WTP HLW Glasses, VSL-06R6780-1, Rev. 0

    SciTech Connect

    Kruger, Albert A.; Pegg, I. L.; Feng, A.; Gan, H.; Kot, W. K.

    2013-12-03

    This report describes the results of work and testing specified by Test Specifications 24590-HLW-TSP-RT-01-006 Rev 1, Test Plans VSL-02T7800-1 Rev 1 and Test Exceptions 24590-HLW-TEF-RT-05-00007. The work and any associated testing followed established quality assurance requirements and were conducted as authorized. The descriptions provided in this report are an accurate account of both the conduct of the work and the data collected. Results required by the Test Plans are reported. Also reported are any unusual or anomalous occurrences that are different from the starting hypotheses. The test results and this report have been reviewed and verified.

  6. Transdominant Rev and Protease Mutant Proteins of HIV-SIV as Potential Antiviral Agents in Vitro and in Vivo (AIDS)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-10-30

    hammerhead ribozymes (7-9) and a hairpin ribozyme (10) directed against HIV-l RNA has been shown to confer significant resistance to HIV-I infection...antisense oligodeoxynucleotides (ODN) directed to the Rev Response Element (RRE) and ribozymes that target viral mRNAs. The ribozyme approach, in...particular, has yielded extremely encouraging positive data. We showed that a hairpin ribozyme designed to cleave HIV-1 RNA in the 5’ leader sequence

  7. A new Method to Estimate the Representative Elementary Volume (REV) for Porosity in Heterogeneous Karst Aquifers Using Geographic Information Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross, M. R.; Manda, A. K.

    2004-12-01

    Karst limestones are characterized by solution-enhanced macropores and conduits that lead to exceptional heterogeneity at the aquifer scale. The interconnected network of solution cavities often results in a conduit flow regime that bypasses the less permeable rock matrix. Efforts to manage and protect karst aquifers, which are vital water resources in many parts of the world, will benefit from meaningful characterizations of the heterogeneity inherent in these formations. To this end, we propose a new method to estimate the representative elementary volume (REV) for macroporosity within karst aquifers using techniques borrowed from remote sensing and geospatial analysis. The REV represents a sampling window in which numerous measurements of a highly-variable property (e.g., porosity, hydraulic conductivity) can be averaged into a single representative value of statistical and physical significance. High-resolution borehole images are classified into binary images consisting of pixels designated as either rock matrix or pore space. A two-dimensional porosity is calculated by summing the total area occupied by pores within a rectangular sampling window placed over the binary image. Small sampling windows quantify the heterogeneous nature of porosity distribution in the aquifer, whereas large windows provide an estimate of overall porosity. Applying this procedure to imagery taken from the Biscayne aquifer of south Florida yields a macroporosity of ~40%, considerably higher than the ~28% porosity measured from recovered core samples. Geospatial analysis may provide the more reliable estimate because it incorporates large solution cavities and conduits captured by the borehole image. The REV is estimated by varying the size of sampling windows around prominent conduits and evaluating the change in porosity as a function of window size. Average porosities decrease systematically with increasing sampling size, eventually converging to a constant value and thus

  8. Field Demonstration Report Applied Innovative Technologies for Characterization of Nitrocellulose- and Nitroglycerine Contaminated Buildings and Soils, Rev 1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-05

    samples are washed initially with methanol and water, agitated on a shaker , centrifuged , and then decanted. The residue is then extracted with...acetone, agitated on a shaker , centrifuged , and decanted. The 1/5/2007 ESTCP/BAAAP Field Demonstration Rev 1 C14811.doc 2-17 acetone extracts are...2-3 2.3 Testing Design and Description...........................................................................2-4 2.4

  9. Study of the HIV-2 Env Cytoplasmic Tail Variability and Its Impact on Tat, Rev and Nef

    PubMed Central

    Bakouche, Nordine; Vandenbroucke, Anne-Thérèse; Goubau, Patrick; Ruelle, Jean

    2013-01-01

    Background The HIV-2 env’s 3’ end encodes the cytoplasmic tail (CT) of the Env protein. This genomic region also encodes the rev, Tat and Nef protein in overlapping reading frames. We studied the variability in the CT coding region in 46 clinical specimens and in 2 reference strains by sequencing and by culturing. The aims were to analyse the variability of Env CT and the evolution of proteins expressed from overlapping coding sequences. Results A 70% reduction of the length of the CT region affected the HIV-2 ROD and EHO strains in vitro due to a premature stop codon in the env gene. In clinical samples this wasn’t observed, but the CT length varied due to insertions and deletions. We noted 3 conserved and 3 variable regions in the CT. The conserved regions were those containing residues involved in Env endocytosis, the potential HIV-2 CT region implicated in the NF-kB activation and the potential end of the lentiviral lytic peptide one. The variable regions were the potential HIV-2 Kennedy region, the potential lentiviral lytic peptide two and the beginning of the potential lentiviral lytic peptide one. A very hydrophobic region was coded downstream of the premature stop codon observed in vitro, suggesting a membrane spanning region. Interestingly, the nucleotides that are responsible for the variability of the CT don’t impact rev and Nef. However, in the Kennedy-like coding region variability resulted only from nucleotide changes that impacted Env and Tat together. Conclusion The HIV-2 Env, Tat and Rev C-terminal part are subject to major length variations in both clinical samples and cultured strains. The HIV-2 Env CT contains variable and conserved regions. These regions don’t affect the rev and Nef amino acids composition which evolves independently. In contrast, Tat co-evolves with the Env CT. PMID:24223892

  10. REV1 restrains DNA polymerase zeta to ensure frame fidelity during translesion synthesis of UV photoproducts in vivo.

    PubMed

    Szüts, Dávid; Marcus, Adam P; Himoto, Masayuki; Iwai, Shigenori; Sale, Julian E

    2008-12-01

    Exposure to ultraviolet light induces a number of forms of damage in DNA, of which (6-4) photoproducts present the most formidable challenge to DNA replication. No single DNA polymerase has been shown to bypass these lesions efficiently in vitro suggesting that the coordinate use of a number of different enzymes is required in vivo. To further understand the mechanisms and control of lesion bypass in vivo, we have devised a plasmid-based system to study the replication of site-specific T-T(6-4) photoproducts in chicken DT40 cells. We show that DNA polymerase zeta is absolutely required for translesion synthesis (TLS) of this lesion, while loss of DNA polymerase eta has no detectable effect. We also show that either the polymerase-binding domain of REV1 or ubiquitinated PCNA is required for the recruitment of Polzeta as the catalytic TLS polymerase. Finally, we demonstrate a previously unappreciated role for REV1 in ensuring bypass synthesis remains in frame with the template. Our data therefore suggest that REV1 not only helps to coordinate the delivery of DNA polymerase zeta to a stalled primer terminus but also restrains its activity to ensure that nucleotides are incorporated in register with the template strand.

  11. Exome sequencing reveals recurrent REV3L mutations in cisplatin-resistant squamous cell carcinoma of head and neck

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Kie Kyon; Jang, Kang Won; Kim, Sangwoo; Kim, Han Sang; Kim, Sung-Moo; Kwon, Hyeong Ju; Kim, Hye Ryun; Yun, Hwan Jung; Ahn, Myung Ju; Park, Keon Uk; Ramnarayanan, Kalpana; McPherson, John R.; Zhang, Shenli; Rhee, Je-Keun; Vettore, André L.; Das, Kakoli; Ishimoto, Takatsugu; Kim, Joo Hang; Koh, Yoon Woo; Kim, Se Hun; Choi, Eun Chang; Teh, Bin Tean; Rozen, Steven G.; Kim, Tae-Min; Tan, Patrick; Cho, Byoung Chul

    2016-01-01

    Dacomitinib, an irreversible pan-HER inhibitor, had shown modest clinical activity in squamous cell carcinoma of head and neck (SCCHN) patients. Therefore, validated predictive biomarkers are required to identify patients most likely to benefit from this therapeutic option. To characterize the genetic landscape of cisplatin-treated SCCHN genomes and identify potential predictive biomarkers for dacomitinib sensitivity, we performed whole exome sequencing on 18 cisplatin-resistant metastatic SCCHN tumors and their matched germline DNA. Platinum-based chemotherapy elevated the mutation rates of SCCHN compared to chemotherapy-naïve SCCHNs. Cisplatin-treated SCCHN genomes uniquely exhibited a novel mutational signature characterized by C:G to A:T transversions at CCR sequence contexts that may have arisen due to error-prone translesional synthesis. Somatic mutations in REV3L, the gene encoding the catalytic subunit of DNA polymerase ζ involved in translesional synthesis, are significantly enriched in a subset of patients who derived extended clinical benefit to dacomitinib (P = 0.04). Functional assays showed that loss-of-function of REV3L dramatically enhanced the sensitivity of SCCHN cells to dacomitinib by the loss of both translesion synthesis and homologous recombination pathways. Our data suggest that the ‘platinum’ mutational signature and inactivation of REV3L may inform treatment options in patients of recurrent SCCHN. PMID:26790612

  12. Safety and efficacy of reduced doses of Brucella melitensis strain Rev. 1 vaccine in pregnant Iranian fat-tailed ewes.

    PubMed

    Ebrahimi, Mohammad; Nejad, Ramin Bagheri; Alamian, Saeed; Mokhberalsafa, Ladan; Abedini, Fatemeh; Ghaderi, Rainak; Jalali, Hamid Reza

    2012-01-01

    Brucellosis is one of the most important zoonotic diseases and is a significant cause of abortion in animals. Brucella melitensis strain Rev. 1 is recommended as the most effective vaccine for small ruminants but the application of full doses in adult animals is restricted. This study was conducted to determine a proper reduced dose of vaccine which confers protection but which is not abortifacient in Iranian fat-tailed sheep. A total of 51 non-vaccinated pregnant ewes were divided into three main groups and several subgroups. Ewes in different groups were vaccinated at different stages of pregnancy and various subgroups were subcutaneously immunised with different quantities of the micro-organism (7.5 × 10(6), 10(6), 5 × 10(5)). Ewes again became pregnant a year later and were challenged with the wild-type strain to evaluate the protection conferred. Results revealed that the proportion of vaccination-induced abortions was significantly higher in ewes immunised with 7.5 × 10(6) Rev. 1 organisms than in those which received 10(6) or 5 × 10(5) bacteria. While 80% of non-vaccinated ewes aborted after challenge, none of the vaccinated ewes aborted post-challenge. This study indicated that a reduced dose of Rev. 1 vaccine containing 10(6) or 5 × 10(5) live cells could be safely used to induce protection in Iranian fat-tailed sheep at various stages of pregnancy.

  13. Coexpression of the simian immunodeficiency virus Env and Rev proteins by a recombinant human adenovirus host range mutant.

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, S M; Lee, S G; Ronchetti-Blume, M; Virk, K P; Mizutani, S; Eichberg, J W; Davis, A; Hung, P P; Hirsch, V M; Chanock, R M

    1992-01-01

    Recombinant human adenoviruses (Ads) that replicate in the intestinal tract offer a novel, yet practical, means of immunoprophylaxis against a wide variety of viral and bacterial pathogens. For some infectious agents such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), the potential for residual infectious material in vaccine preparations must be eliminated. Therefore, recombinant human Ads that express noninfectious HIV or other microbial proteins are attractive vaccine candidates. To test such an approach for HIV, we chose an experimental model of AIDS based on simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infection of macaques. Our data demonstrate that the SIV Env gene products are expressed in cultured cells after infection with a recombinant Ad containing both SIV env and rev genes. An E3 deletion vector derived from a mutant of human Ad serotype 5 that efficiently replicates in both human and monkey cells was used to bypass the usual host range restriction of Ad infection. In addition, we show that the SIV rev gene is properly spliced from a single SIV subgenomic DNA fragment and that the Rev protein is expressed in recombinant Ad-SIV-infected human as well as monkey cells. The expression of SIV gene products in suitable live Ad vectors provides an excellent system for studying the regulation of SIV gene expression in cultured cells and evaluating the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of SIV proteins in macaques. Images PMID:1404612

  14. WELLOG: computer software system for analyzing and plotting well log data (a user's guide to WELLOG. REV2)

    SciTech Connect

    Atwood, J.W.; Killpack, T.J.; Glenn, W.E.; Nutter, C.

    1980-11-01

    WELLOG is a software system that has been developed to plot digitized well log data in a manner suitable for analysis. Multiple logs can be plotted side by side for correlation analysis, and up to three logs can be plotted on a cross plot. Data entry, editing, and modification functions are also provided by the program. Digitizing is accomplished by a TEKTRONIX 4954 (on-line) digitizing tablet, and plotting is done on a TEKTRONIX 4014 graphics terminal, a STATOS 42 electrostatic plotter, or a CALCOMP pen plotter using a device independent plotting system. This program (WELLOG.REV2) is not as system-dependent as the former version (WELLOG.REV1). The user must supply a program to digitize the data and supply subroutines to interface the program with file manipulation and plotting routines of their system. One major improvement is the use of an on-line digitizing system whereby the program accesses disk files rather than reading the data from tape. In REV2 the merge file has been automated such that the file is initialized automatically upon creation and also delete protected. The randomly spaced data capabilities have been greatly improved allowing the averaging and cross plotting of the data. Routines have been added which allow all of the cross plots excepting the Z-plot to be printed on a line printer. Dresser Atlas' A-K plot has also been added. The program is almost completely self-contained needing only a few interfacing and system subroutines.

  15. Response to “Comment on ‘Twin symmetry texture of energetically condensed niobium thin films on sapphire substrate’ ” [J. Appl. Phys. 112, 016101 (2012)

    DOE PAGES

    Zhao, X.; Philips, L.; Reece, C. E.; ...

    2012-07-01

    Welander is correct about the misidentified crystal-directions in the top-view sapphire lattice (Fig. 4 [Zhao et al., J. Appl. Phys. 110, 033523 (2011)]). He is also correct about the misorientation of the pole figures in Fig. 4. In Fig. 1 of this response, we have corrected these errors. Perhaps because of these errors, Welander misconstrued our discussion of the Nbcrystal growth as claiming a new 3D registry. That was not our intention. Rather, we wished to highlight the role of energetic condensation that drives low-defect crystal growth by a combination of non-equilibrium sub-plantation that disturbs the substrate lattice and thermalmore » annealing that annihilates defects and promotes large-grain crystal growth.« less

  16. Comment on “Rethinking first-principles electron transport theories with projection operators: The problems caused by partitioning the basis set” [J. Chem. Phys. 139, 114104 (2013)

    SciTech Connect

    Brandbyge, Mads

    2014-05-07

    In a recent paper Reuter and Harrison [J. Chem. Phys. 139, 114104 (2013)] question the widely used mean-field electron transport theories, which employ nonorthogonal localized basis sets. They claim these can violate an “implicit decoupling assumption,” leading to wrong results for the current, different from what would be obtained by using an orthogonal basis, and dividing surfaces defined in real-space. We argue that this assumption is not required to be fulfilled to get exact results. We show how the current/transmission calculated by the standard Greens function method is independent of whether or not the chosen basis set is nonorthogonal, and that the current for a given basis set is consistent with divisions in real space. The ambiguity known from charge population analysis for nonorthogonal bases does not carry over to calculations of charge flux.

  17. Comment on "Rethinking first-principles electron transport theories with projection operators: The problems caused by partitioning the basis set" [J. Chem. Phys. 139, 114104 (2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandbyge, Mads

    2014-05-01

    In a recent paper Reuter and Harrison [J. Chem. Phys. 139, 114104 (2013)] question the widely used mean-field electron transport theories, which employ nonorthogonal localized basis sets. They claim these can violate an "implicit decoupling assumption," leading to wrong results for the current, different from what would be obtained by using an orthogonal basis, and dividing surfaces defined in real-space. We argue that this assumption is not required to be fulfilled to get exact results. We show how the current/transmission calculated by the standard Greens function method is independent of whether or not the chosen basis set is nonorthogonal, and that the current for a given basis set is consistent with divisions in real space. The ambiguity known from charge population analysis for nonorthogonal bases does not carry over to calculations of charge flux.

  18. Comment on ‘To stack or not to stack: Performance of a new density functional for the uracil and thymine dimers’ [Chem. Phys. Lett. 459 (2008) 164

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Mourik, Tanja

    2009-04-01

    A Letter by Gu et al. [J. Gu, J. Wang, J. Leszczynski, Y. Xie, H.F. Schaefer III, Chem. Phys. Lett. 459 (2008) 164] presented MP2/6-31+G(d) and MP2/TZVPP stacking energies for the uracil and thymine dimers, with the aim to assess the performance of the new M06-2X density functional. However, the stacking energies were not corrected for the basis set superposition error (BSSE). Here we show that correction for this error dramatically changes the results. BSSE correction severely reduces the stacking energy of the thymine dimer, whereas the stacked uracil dimer structure considered by Gu et al. is not even a minimum on the MP2/6-31+G(d) potential energy surface.

  19. Comment on ``Glass transition in pure and doped amorphous solid water: An ultrafast microcalorimetry study'' [J. Chem. Phys. 125, 094501 (2006)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johari, G. P.

    2007-10-01

    On investigating the data of Chonde et al. [J. Chem. Phys.125, 094501 (2006)], we find that (i) the relaxation time of the test liquid toluene used for determining the ultrafast scans' reliability was mistaken by several decades and incorrectly plotted, (ii) extrinsic effects had led to an exceptionally broad endotherm showing an enthalpy relaxation occurring implausibly at 500ps time scale, (iii) enthalpy relaxation times at structural unfreezing and at crystallization temperatures were assumed to be the same, equal to the reciprocal of the heating rate, and (iv) the data for water were incorrectly analyzed. An appropriate analysis would alter their conclusion and would be useful for discussing other ultrafast scans and nanocalorimetry data.

  20. Decoy approach using RNA-DNA chimera oligonucleotides to inhibit the regulatory function of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Rev protein.

    PubMed Central

    Nakaya, T; Iwai, S; Fujinaga, K; Sato, Y; Otsuka, E; Ikuta, K

    1997-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) encodes two regulatory proteins, Tat and Rev, that bind to target RNA sequences. These are the trans-activation responsive (TAR) RNA and the Rev-responsive element (RRE), respectively. The Rev protein shifts RNA synthesis to viral transcripts by binding to the RRE within the env gene. In the present study we prepared a RNA-DNA chimera consisting of 29 or 31 nucleotides to inhibit the Rev regulatory function by means of the decoy approach. The chimera oligonucleotides (anti-Rev oligonucleotides [AROs]) contained an RNA "bubble" structure (13 oligonucleotides; the Rev-binding element in RRE) that bound Rev with a high affinity in an in vitro assay. The controls were RNA-DNA chimera oligonucleotides (negative control oligonucleotides [NCOs]) similar to ARO, but without the bubble structure, that bound with considerably less affinity to Rev. When the inhibitory effects of these decoys on HIV-1 replication were examined, we found that AROs, but no NCOs, reduced more than 90% of the HIV-1 production generated by productively infected human T-cell lines. The production of primary HIV-1 isolates in healthy donor-derived peripheral blood mononuclear cells was also similarly inhibited by AROs. In addition, the induction of viral mRNAs and antigens in latently HIV-1-infected ACH-2 cells by tumor necrosis factor alpha was specifically inhibited by AROs, but not by NCOs. No apparent cytotoxicity was caused by either decoy. Thus, the use of a Rev-binding element-based decoy, the RNA-DNA chimera oligonucleotide, may represent a safer approach to gene therapy for reducing the virus load in HIV-1-infected individuals. PMID:9021186

  1. Tissue damage drives co-localization of NF-κB, Smad3, and Nrf2 to direct Rev-erb sensitive wound repair in mouse macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Eichenfield, Dawn Z; Troutman, Ty Dale; Link, Verena M; Lam, Michael T; Cho, Han; Gosselin, David; Spann, Nathanael J; Lesch, Hanna P; Tao, Jenhan; Muto, Jun; Gallo, Richard L; Evans, Ronald M; Glass, Christopher K

    2016-01-01

    Although macrophages can be polarized to distinct phenotypes in vitro with individual ligands, in vivo they encounter multiple signals that control their varied functions in homeostasis, immunity, and disease. Here, we identify roles of Rev-erb nuclear receptors in regulating responses of mouse macrophages to complex tissue damage signals and wound repair. Rather than reinforcing a specific program of macrophage polarization, Rev-erbs repress subsets of genes that are activated by TLR ligands, IL4, TGFβ, and damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPS). Unexpectedly, a complex damage signal promotes co-localization of NF-κB, Smad3, and Nrf2 at Rev-erb-sensitive enhancers and drives expression of genes characteristic of multiple polarization states in the same cells. Rev-erb-sensitive enhancers thereby integrate multiple damage-activated signaling pathways to promote a wound repair phenotype. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13024.001 PMID:27462873

  2. Noise strength in shaken granular media near onset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreft, Jennifer

    2005-11-01

    The effects of fluctuations in Rayleigh-Benard (RB) convection near the onset of long range order have been found to be described well by the stochastic Swift-Hohenberg (SH) equation with a noise strength proportional to kT [J. Oh and G. Ahlers, Phys. Rev. Lett. 91, 094501, (2003)]. Similar behavior has been found in vertically oscillated granular material where the thermal fluctuations are negligible [D. I. Goldman, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett.92, 174302, (2004)]. We conjecture that fluctuations in the granular system arise from the small number of particles per wavelength, typically of order 10, in contrast to the 10^6 particles per wavelength in RB convection. Here, we investigate the onset of patterns in an event-driven molecular dynamics simulation of vertically oscillated frictional hard spheres, and we use the SH equation to quantify the strength of the noise for different wavelengths. We show that the noise decreases as the wavelength increases, but is independent of layer depth, suggesting that only the fluidized grains on the surface of the bulk contribute.

  3. Rayleigh-Bénard convection in nematic liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, Pesch

    2000-03-01

    Rayleigh-Bénard convection (RBC) in thin layers of nematic liquid crystals (LCs) heated from below or even from above, leads to a rich variety of new phenomena not found in isotropic fluids. The orientational degrees of freedom of the rod-like molecules of the LCs are of crucial importance as in the electro-convection in these materials. For instance a new type of convection rolls (``abnormal rolls''), due to a spontaneous symmetry breaking of the orientational ordering, has recently motivated considerable activities. A system of coupled Ginzburg-Landau-type equations describes very well the bifurcation sequences near onset [1]. LCs also offer a convenient opportunity to study convection in the presence of a first-order phase change, which is relevant in the earth mantle [2]. It will be demonstrated that theory can scope sucessfully also with this case. [1] E. Plaut and W. Pesch, Phys. Rev. E, 59, 1247 (1999) and references therein [2] S. Sakurai, A. Tschammer, W. Pesch and G. Ahlers, Phys. Rev. E, 60, 539 (1999)

  4. Quantitative and qualitative characterization of zigzag spatiotemporal chaos in a system of amplitude equations for nematic electroconvection.

    PubMed

    Oprea, Iuliana; Triandaf, Ioana; Dangelmayr, Gerhard; Schwartz, Ira B

    2007-06-01

    It has been suggested by experimentalists that a weakly nonlinear analysis of the recently introduced equations of motion for the nematic electroconvection by M. Treiber and L. Kramer [Phys. Rev. E 58, 1973 (1998)] has the potential to reproduce the dynamics of the zigzag-type extended spatiotemporal chaos and localized solutions observed near onset in experiments [M. Dennin, D. S. Cannell, and G. Ahlers, Phys. Rev. E 57, 638 (1998); J. T. Gleeson (private communication)]. In this paper, we study a complex spatiotemporal pattern, identified as spatiotemporal chaos, that bifurcates at the onset from a spatially uniform solution of a system of globally coupled complex Ginzburg-Landau equations governing the weakly nonlinear evolution of four traveling wave envelopes. The Ginzburg-Landau system can be derived directly from the weak electrolyte model for electroconvection in nematic liquid crystals when the primary instability is a Hopf bifurcation to oblique traveling rolls. The chaotic nature of the pattern and the resemblance to the observed experimental spatiotemporal chaos in the electroconvection of nematic liquid crystals are confirmed through a combination of techniques including the Karhunen-Loeve decomposition, time-series analysis of the amplitudes of the dominant modes, statistical descriptions, and normal form theory, showing good agreement between theory and experiments.

  5. Residual virulence and immunogenicity of CGV26 and CGV2631 B. melitensis Rev. 1 deletion mutant strains in sheep after subcutaneous or conjunctival vaccination.

    PubMed

    Guilloteau, Laurence A; Laroucau, Karine; Olivier, Michel; Grillo, Maria Jesus; Marin, Clara M; Verger, Jean-Michel; Blasco, Jose-Maria

    2006-04-24

    The CGV26 and CGV2631 strains are novel engineered Brucella melitensis Rev.1 mutant strains deleted for the bp26 gene or for both bp26 and omp31 genes, respectively, coding for proteins of diagnostic significance. The residual virulence and immunogenicity of both mutants were compared to the parental Rev.1 strain in sheep after subcutaneous or conjunctival vaccination. The deletion of the bp26 gene or both bp26 and omp31 genes had no significant effect on the intracellular survival of the Rev.1 strain in ovine macrophage cultures. The kinetics of infection induced by both mutants in sheep was similar to the Rev.1 strain, and inoculation by the subcutaneous route produced wider and more generalized infections than the conjunctival route. All strains were cleared from lymph nodes and organs within 3 months after inoculation. The CGV26 and CGV2631 mutants induced both specific systemic antibody response and lymphoproliferation in sheep. The kinetics of the responses induced by the mutants was quite similar to that of the parental Rev.1 strain, except for the intensity of the lymphoproliferative response, which was attenuated for the CGV2631 mutant. In conclusion, the residual virulence of both CGV26 and CGV2631 mutants in sheep was similar to that of the parental Rev.1 vaccine strain. These mutants induced also significant specific antibody and cell-mediated immunity in sheep and are suitable to be evaluated as potential vaccine candidates against B. melitensis and B. ovis infections in sheep.

  6. Structure of Rev-erbalpha bound to N-CoR reveals a unique mechanism of nuclear receptor-co-repressor interaction.

    PubMed

    Phelan, Caroline A; Gampe, Robert T; Lambert, Millard H; Parks, Derek J; Montana, Valerie; Bynum, Jane; Broderick, Timothy M; Hu, Xiao; Williams, Shawn P; Nolte, Robert T; Lazar, Mitchell A

    2010-07-01

    Repression of gene transcription by the nuclear receptor Rev-erbalpha plays an integral role in the core molecular circadian clock. We report the crystal structure of a nuclear receptor-co-repressor (N-CoR) interaction domain 1 (ID1) peptide bound to truncated human Rev-erbalpha ligand-binding domain (LBD). The ID1 peptide forms an unprecedented antiparallel beta-sheet with Rev-erbalpha, as well as an alpha-helix similar to that seen in nuclear receptor ID2 crystal structures but out of register by four residues. Comparison with the structure of Rev-erbbeta bound to heme indicates that ID1 peptide and heme induce substantially different conformational changes in the LBD. Although heme is involved in Rev-erb repression, the structure suggests that Rev-erbalpha could also mediate repression via ID1 binding in the absence of heme. The previously uncharacterized secondary structure induced by ID1 peptide binding advances our understanding of nuclear receptor-co-repressor interactions.

  7. Comment on "A model for phosphate glass topology considering the modifying ion sub-network" [J. Chem. Phys. 140, 154501 (2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidebottom, David L.

    2015-03-01

    In a recent paper, Hermansen, Mauro, and Yue [J. Chem. Phys. 140, 154501 (2014)] applied the temperature-dependent constraint theory to model both the glass transition temperature, Tg, and fragility, m, of a series of binary alkali phosphate glasses of the form (R2O)x (P2 O 5) 1 - x , where R represents an alkali species. Key to their success seems to be the retention of linear constraints between the alkali ion (R+) and the non-bridging oxygens near Tg, which allows the model to mimic a supposed minimum for both Tg(x) and m(x) located near x = 0.2. However, the authors have overlooked several recent studies that clearly show there is no minimum in m(x). We argue that the retention of the alkali ion constraints at these temperatures is unjustified and question whether the model calculations can be revised to meet the actual experimental data. We also discuss alternative interpretations for the fragility based on two-state thermodynamics that can accurately account for its compositional dependence.

  8. Response to Comment on '#28;Twin Symmetry Texture of Energetically Condensed 2 Niobium Thin Films on Sapphire Substrate' #29; [J. Appl. Phys. 110, 033523(2011)

    SciTech Connect

    Xin Zhao, Charles Reece, Phillips Larry, Mahadevan Krishnan, Kang Seo

    2012-07-01

    Welander commented that in our article [J. Appl. Phys. 110, 033523(2011)] , Zhao et al claim to have found a new three-dimensional (3D) relationship for niobium-on-sapphire epitaxy”. Welander might have misunderstood the purpose of our article, which was to show that energetic condensation of Nb on sapphire drives crystal growth that is quite distinct from the type of epitaxy encountered in lower energy deposition. Welander is correct about the misidentified crystal-directions in the top-view sapphire lattice (Fig.4[ref.1]). He is also correct about the misorientation of the pole figures in Fig4[ref.1]. In Fig.1 of this response, we have corrected these errors. Perhaps because of these errors, Welander misconstrued our discussion of the Nb crystal growth as claiming a new 3D registry. That was not our intention. Rather, we wished to highlight the role of energetic condensation that drives low-defect crystal growth by a combination of non-equilibrium sub-plantation that disturbs the substrate lattice and thermal annealing that annihilates defects and promotes large-grain crystal growth.

  9. Erratum to "Multi-modal fission in collinear ternary cluster decay of 252Cf(sf,fff)" [Phys. Lett. B 746 (2015) 223

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Oertzen, W.; Nasirov, A. K.; Tashkodjaev, R. B.

    2016-11-01

    The scale of the ordinate axis of Fig. 4 on page 226 of PLB 746 (2015) 223 was incorrect. The new version of Fig. 4 (which is "Fig. 1" in the present note) with the correct ordinate axis is given here (upper part). The lower part shows the previous version. Five potential wells and barriers are shown. Considering a sequential process two barriers are relevant for the decay, with equal barriers for the symmetric cases with a smaller fragment at the center (in these cases only one barrier is shown). For the asymmetric case of 70Ni + 50Ca + 132Sn, two different barriers appear, denoted as (B1) and (B2), which correspond to the interactions of the middle cluster 50Ca with the outer nuclei 70Ni and 132Sn, respectively. In a sequential mechanism the separation of 132Sn from the other part via the barrier B2 having the smaller height, is favoured for the first step. For the second step the barrier (B1) between Ni and Ca, appears at smaller distances (dot-dashed curve) and is higher. The order of the barriers of the five channels is unchanged, compared to the figure in Ref. W. von Oertzen et al., Phys. Lett. B 746 (2015) 223.

  10. Corrigendum to "Multi-modal Fission in Collinear Ternary Cluster decay of 252Cf(sf,fff)" [Phys. Lett. B 746 (2015) 223

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Oertzen, W.; Nasirov, A. K.; Tashkodjaev, R. B.

    2017-02-01

    The scale of the ordinate axis of Fig. 4 on page 226 of PLB 746 (2015) 223 was incorrect. The new version of Fig. 4 (which is "Fig. 1" in the present note) with the correct ordinate axis is given here (upper part). The lower part shows the previous version. Five potential wells and barriers are shown. Considering a sequential process, two barriers are relevant for the sequential decay, with equal barriers for the symmetric cases with a smaller fragment at the center (in these cases only one barrier is shown). For the asymmetric case of 70Ni + 50Ca + 132Sn, two different barriers appear, denoted as (B1) and (B2), which correspond to the interactions of the middle cluster 50Ca with the outer nuclei 70Ni and 132Sn, respectively. In a sequential mechanism the separation of 132Sn from the other part via the barrier B2 has the smaller height, thus it is favored for the first step. For the second step the barrier (B1) between Ni and Ca, appears at smaller distances (dot-dashed curve) and is higher. The order of the barriers of the five channels is unchanged, compared to the figure in Ref. W. von Oertzen et al., Phys. Lett. B 746 (2015) 223.

  11. Comment on “A model for phosphate glass topology considering the modifying ion sub-network” [J. Chem. Phys. 140, 154501 (2014)

    SciTech Connect

    Sidebottom, David L.

    2015-03-14

    In a recent paper, Hermansen, Mauro, and Yue [J. Chem. Phys. 140, 154501 (2014)] applied the temperature-dependent constraint theory to model both the glass transition temperature, T{sub g}, and fragility, m, of a series of binary alkali phosphate glasses of the form (R{sub 2}O){sub x}(P{sub 2}O{sub 5}){sub 1−x}, where R represents an alkali species. Key to their success seems to be the retention of linear constraints between the alkali ion (R{sup +}) and the non-bridging oxygens near T{sub g}, which allows the model to mimic a supposed minimum for both T{sub g}(x) and m(x) located near x = 0.2. However, the authors have overlooked several recent studies that clearly show there is no minimum in m(x). We argue that the retention of the alkali ion constraints at these temperatures is unjustified and question whether the model calculations can be revised to meet the actual experimental data. We also discuss alternative interpretations for the fragility based on two-state thermodynamics that can accurately account for its compositional dependence.

  12. Molecular cloning, expression analyses and primary evolution studies of REV- and TB1-like genes in bamboo.

    PubMed

    Peng, Hua-Zheng; Lin, Er-Pei; Sang, Qing-Liang; Yao, Sheng; Jin, Qun-Ying; Hua, Xi-Qi; Zhu, Mu-Yuan

    2007-09-01

    Most cultured bamboos are perennial woody evergreens that reproduce from rhizomes. It is unclear why some rhizome buds develop into aerial bamboo shoots instead of new rhizomes. REVOLUTA (REV)-like Class III homeodomain leucine-zipper (HD-Zip) proteins and TEOSINTE BRANCHED1 (TB1)-like transcription factors have been shown to play regulatory roles in meristem initiation and outgrowth. We cloned and analyzed the bamboo (Phyllostachys praecox C.D. Chu & C.S. Chao.) REV- (PpHB1) and TB1-like (PpTB1) gene. Gene expression was mainly detected by in situ hybridization. PpHB1 expression was detected in the tips of lateral buds, on the adaxial portion of the leaf and within the developing procambium, indicating its close correlation to rhizome bud formation and procambial development. PpTB1 expression was mainly detected on the top of buds at later developmental stages, suggesting it was more likely involved in bud outgrowth. Meristem genes might therefore serve as specific molecular markers of rhizome bud development and could be useful in studies designed to elucidate the mechanisms underlying bamboo shoot development. In addition, meristem genes such as TB1-like sequences may be useful in phylogenetic analyses of bamboo species.

  13. A human homolog of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae REV3 gene, which encodes the catalytic subunit of DNA polymerase ζ

    PubMed Central

    Gibbs, Peter E. M.; McGregor, W. Glenn; Maher, Veronica M.; Nisson, Paul; Lawrence, Christopher W.

    1998-01-01

    To get a better understanding of mutagenic mechanisms in humans, we have cloned and sequenced the human homolog of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae REV3 gene. The yeast gene encodes the catalytic subunit of DNA polymerase ζ, a nonessential enzyme that is thought to carry out translesion replication and is responsible for virtually all DNA damage-induced mutagenesis and the majority of spontaneous mutagenesis. The human gene encodes an expected protein of 3,130 residues, about twice the size of the yeast protein (1,504 aa). The two proteins are 29% identical in an amino-terminal region of ≈340 residues, 39% identical in a carboxyl-terminal region of ≈850 residues, and 29% identical in a 55-residue region in the middle of the two genes. The sequence of the expected protein strongly predicts that it is the catalytic subunit of a DNA polymerase of the pol ζ type; the carboxyl-terminal domain possesses, in the right order, the six motifs characteristic of eukaryotic DNA polymerases, most closely resembles yeast pol ζ among all polymerases in the GenBank database, and is different from the human α, δ, and ɛ enzymes. Human cells expressing high levels of an hsREV3 antisense RNA fragment grow normally, but show little or no UV-induced mutagenesis and are slightly more sensitive to killing by UV. The human gene therefore appears to carry out a function similar to that of its yeast counterpart. PMID:9618506

  14. Complement C5-inhibitor rEV576 (coversin) ameliorates in-vivo effects of antiphospholipid antibodies.

    PubMed

    Romay-Penabad, Z; Carrera Marin, A L; Willis, R; Weston-Davies, W; Machin, S; Cohen, H; Brasier, A; Gonzalez, E B

    2014-10-01

    Activation of the complement cascade is an important mechanism for antiphospholipid antibody-mediated thrombosis. We examined the effects of rEV576 (coversin), a recombinant protein inhibitor of complement factor 5 activation, on antiphospholipid antibody-mediated tissue factor up-regulation and thrombosis. Groups of C57BL/6J mice (n=5) received either IgG from a patient with antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) or control IgG from normal human serum (NHS). Each of these groups of mice had IgG administration preceded by either rEV576, or phosphate buffer control. For each of the four treatment groups, the size of induced thrombus, tissue factor activity in carotid homogenates, anticardiolipin and anti-β2glycoprotein I (anti-β2GPI) levels were measured 72 h after the first injection. Mice treated with IgG-APS had significantly higher titers of anticardiolipin antibodies and anti-β2GPI at thrombus induction compared with those treated with IgG-NHS. The IgG-APS/phosphate buffer treatment induced significantly larger thrombi and tissue factor activity compared with other groups. Mice treated with IgG-APS/rEV576 had significantly smaller thrombi and reduced tissue factor activity than those treated with IgG-APS/phosphate buffer. The data confirm involvement of complement activation in antiphospholipid antibody-mediated thrombogenesis and suggest that complement inhibition might ameliorate this effect.

  15. Reliability of Concentric, Eccentric and Isometric Knee Extension and Flexion when using the REV9000 Isokinetic Dynamometer.

    PubMed

    de Carvalho Froufe Andrade, Alberto César Pereira; Caserotti, Paolo; de Carvalho, Carlos Manuel Pereira; de Azevedo Abade, Eduardo André; da Eira Sampaio, António Jaime

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the reliability of isokinetic and ISO knee extensor and flexor muscle strength when using the REV9000 (Technogym) isokinetic dynamometer. Moreover, the reliability of several strength imbalance indices and bilateral ratios were also examined. Twenty-four physically active healthy subjects (age 23±3 years) underwent three testing sessions, two on the same day and a third, 7 days later. All sessions proceeded in the same order: five concentric contractions at 60ºs-1 followed by an isometric contraction (5 seconds) and five eccentric contractions (60ºs-1). The results of this study showed a high reproducibility in eccentric (0.95-0.97), concentric (0.95-0.96) and isometric (0.93-0.96), isokinetic strength for knee extensor and flexor muscles, thus indicating that the REV9000 isokinetic dynamometer can be used in future sports performance studies. A low-to-moderate reliability was found in the isokinetic strength bilateral ratios while the Hamstring:Quadricep concentric ratio showed moderate reliability. The highest reliability (>0.90) was observed in the dynamic control ratio (Hamstring eccentric:Quadricep concentric) which consequently confirms that it is a more valid indicator for imbalanced reciprocal parameters and can be used in rehabilitation and sports medicine.

  16. Identification of new and unusual rev and nef transcripts expressed by an HIV type 1 primary isolate.

    PubMed

    Vega, Yolanda; Delgado, Elena; Carrera, Cristina; Nebreda, Paloma; Fernández-García, Aurora; Cuevas, María Teresa; Pérez-Álvarez, Lucía; Thomson, Michael M

    2013-07-01

    We analyzed RNA splice site usage in three HIV-1 subtype B primary isolates through reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) amplification of spliced RNAs using a fluorescently labeled primer, with computerized size determination and quantification of PCR products, which were also identified by clone sequencing. In one isolate, P2149-3, unusual and unreported spliced transcripts were detected. This isolate preferentially used for rev RNA generation a 3' splice site (3'ss) located five nucleotides upstream of A4a, previously identified only in a T cell line-adapted virus and in a group O isolate, and designated A4d. P2149-3 also used an unreported 3'ss for rev RNA generation, designated A4h, located 20 nucleotides upstream of 3'ss A4c. Additionally, unusual nef RNAs using 3'ss A5a and A7a and with exon composition 1.3.7 were identified. The identification of several unusual and unreported spliced transcripts in an HIV-1 primary isolate suggests a greater diversity of splice site usage in HIV-1 than previously appreciated.

  17. Identification of New and Unusual rev and nef Transcripts Expressed by an HIV Type 1 Primary Isolate

    PubMed Central

    Vega, Yolanda; Delgado, Elena; Carrera, Cristina; Nebreda, Paloma; Fernández-García, Aurora; Cuevas, María Teresa; Pérez-Álvarez, Lucía

    2013-01-01

    Abstract We analyzed RNA splice site usage in three HIV-1 subtype B primary isolates through reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) amplification of spliced RNAs using a fluorescently labeled primer, with computerized size determination and quantification of PCR products, which were also identified by clone sequencing. In one isolate, P2149-3, unusual and unreported spliced transcripts were detected. This isolate preferentially used for rev RNA generation a 3′ splice site (3′ss) located five nucleotides upstream of A4a, previously identified only in a T cell line-adapted virus and in a group O isolate, and designated A4d. P2149-3 also used an unreported 3′ss for rev RNA generation, designated A4h, located 20 nucleotides upstream of 3′ss A4c. Additionally, unusual nef RNAs using 3′ss A5a and A7a and with exon composition 1.3.7 were identified. The identification of several unusual and unreported spliced transcripts in an HIV-1 primary isolate suggests a greater diversity of splice site usage in HIV-1 than previously appreciated. PMID:23540799

  18. Molecular mechanisms of transcriptional control by Rev-erbα: An energetic foundation for reconciling structure and binding with biological function

    PubMed Central

    Vaissière, Anaïs; Berger, Sylvie; Harrus, Deborah; Dacquet, Catherine; Le Maire, Albane; Boutin, Jean A; Ferry, Gilles; Royer, Catherine A

    2015-01-01

    Rev-erbα and β are nuclear receptors that function as transcriptional repressors of genes involved in regulating circadian rhythms, glucose, and cholesterol metabolism and the inflammatory response. Given these key functions, Rev-erbs are important drug targets for treatment of a number of human pathologies, including cancer, heart disease, and type II diabetes. Transcriptional repression by the Rev-erbs involves direct competition with transcriptional activators for target sites, but also recruitment by the Rev-erbs of the NCoR corepressor protein. Interestingly, Rev-erbs do not appear to interact functionally with a very similar corepressor, Smrt. Transcriptional repression by Rev-erbs is thought to occur in response to the binding of heme, although structural, and ligand binding studies in vitro show that heme and corepressor binding are antagonistic. We carried out systematic studies of the ligand and corepressor interactions to address the molecular basis for corepressor specificity and the energetic consequences of ligand binding using a variety of biophysical approaches. Highly quantitative fluorescence anisotropy assays in competition mode revealed that the Rev-erb specificity for the NCoR corepressor lies in the first two residues of the β-strand in Interaction Domain 1 of NCoR. Our studies confirmed and quantitated the strong antagonism of heme and corepressor binding and significant stabilization of the corepressor complex by a synthetic ligand in vitro. We propose a model which reconciles the contradictory observations concerning the effects of heme binding in vitro and in live cells. PMID:25969949

  19. SIVsm Tat, Rev, and Nef1: functional characteristics of r-GV internalization on isotypes, cytokines, and intracellular degradation

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Recombinant gas vesicles (r-GV) from Halobacterium sp. strain SD109 expressing cassettes with different SIVsm inserts, have potential utility as an effective antigen display system for immunogen testing in vivo and for initial epitope assessments in vitro. Previous mouse model studies demonstrated immunization with r-GV expressing selected exogenous sequences elicited a prolonged immune response. Here we tested segments from three SIVsm genes (tat, rev, and nef) each surface displayed by r-GV. As with HIV, for SIVsm the proteins encoded by tat, rev and nef respectively serve critical and diverse functions: effects on efficient viral RNA polymerase II transcription, regulation of viral gene expression and effects on specific signaling functions through the assembly of multiprotein complexes. Humoral responses to r-GVTat, Rev or Nef1 elicited in vivo, associated changes in selected cell cytokine production following r-GV internalization, and the capacity of J774A.1 macrophage cells to degrade these internalized display/delivery particles in vitro were examined. Results The in vivo studies involving r-GV immunizations and in vitro studies of r-GV uptake by J774A.1 macrophages demonstrated: (i) tests for antibody isotypes in immunized mice sera showed activation and re-stimulation of memory B cells, (ii) during long term immune response to the epitopes, primarily the IgG1 isotype was produced, (iii) in vitro, macrophage degradation of r-GV containing different SIVsm inserts occurred over a period of days resulting in an inherent slow breakdown and degradation of the SIVsm peptide inserts, (iv) vesicle specific GvpC, a larger protein, degraded more slowly than the recombinant peptide inserts and (v) in vitro uptake and degradation of the r-GV populations tested was associated with SIVsm insert specific patterns for cytokines IL-10, IL-12 and IL-18. Conclusions Together these findings provide new information underscoring r-GV potential. They can clearly

  20. Amchitka Mud Pit Sites 2006 Post-Closure Monitoring and Inspection Report, Amchitka Island, Alaska, Rev. No.: 0

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, Patrick

    2006-09-01

    In 2001, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA/NSO) remediated six areas associated with Amchitka mud pit release sites located on Amchitka Island, Alaska. This included the construction of seven closure caps. To ensure the integrity and effectiveness of remedial action, the mud pit sites are to be inspected every five years as part of DOE's long-term monitoring and surveillance program. In August of 2006, the closure caps were inspected in accordance with the ''Post-Closure Monitoring and Inspection Plan for Amchitka Island Mud Pit Release Sites'' (Rev. 0, November 2005). This post-closure monitoring report provides the 2006 cap inspection results.

  1. X-33 (Rev-F) Aeroheating Results of Test 6770 in NASA Langley 20-Inch Mach 6 Air Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berry, Scott A.; Horvath, Thomas J.; Kowalkowski, Matthew K.; Liechty, Derek S.

    1999-01-01

    Aeroheating characteristics of the X-33 Rev-F configuration have been experimentally examined in the Langley 20-Inch Mach 6 Air Tunnel (Test 6770). Global surface heat transfer distributions, surface streamline patterns, and shock shapes were measured on a 0.013-scale model at Mach 6 in air. Parametric variations include angles-of-attack of 20-deg, 30-deg, and 40-deg; Reynolds numbers based on model length of 0.9 to 4.9 million; and body-flap deflections of 10-deg and 20-deg. The effects of discrete roughness elements on boundary layer transition, which included trip height, size, and location, both on and off the windward centerline, were investigated. This document is intended to serve as a quick release of preliminary data to the X-33 program; analysis is limited to observations of the experimental trends in order to expedite dissemination.

  2. A comprehensive experiment for molecular biology: Determination of single nucleotide polymorphism in human REV3 gene using PCR-RFLP.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xu; Shao, Meng; Gao, Lu; Zhao, Yuanyuan; Sun, Zixuan; Zhou, Liping; Yan, Yongmin; Shao, Qixiang; Xu, Wenrong; Qian, Hui

    2017-02-01

    Laboratory exercise is helpful for medical students to understand the basic principles of molecular biology and to learn about the practical applications of molecular biology. We have designed a lab course on molecular biology about the determination of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in human REV3 gene, the product of which is a subunit of DNA polymerase ζ and SNPs in this gene are associated with altered susceptibility to cancer. This newly designed experiment is composed of three parts, including genomic DNA extraction, gene amplification by PCR, and genotyping by RFLP. By combining these activities, the students are not only able to learn a series of biotechniques in molecular biology, but also acquire the ability to link the learned knowledge with practical applications. This comprehensive experiment will help the medical students improve the conceptual understanding of SNP and the technical understanding of SNP detection. © 2017 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 2017.

  3. Response to {open_quotes}Comment on {open_quote}Reversible work of formation of an embryo of a new phase within a uniform macroscopic mother phase{close_quote}thinsp{close_quotes} [J. Chem. Phys. {bold 111}, 3769 (1999)

    SciTech Connect

    Debenedetti, P.G.; Reiss, H.

    1999-08-01

    External constraints are necessary in order to calculate the energetics of embryo formation when the embryo is not a critical nucleus. The expression for the reversible work of formation obtained in by Debenedetti and Reiss [J. Chem. Phys. {bold 108}, 5498 (1998)] is rigorous and valid regardless of the relative densities of the embryo and mother phase. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  4. Comment on: “Effects of including the counterrotating term and virtual photons on the eigenfunctions and eigenvalues of a scalar photon collective emission theory” [Phys. Lett. A 372 (2008) 2514

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svidzinsky, Anatoly; Chang, Jun-Tao

    2008-08-01

    In a recent Letter [R. Friedberg, J.T. Manassah, Phys. Lett. A 372 (2008) 2514] Friedberg and Manassah argue that effect of virtual photons has serious consequences for large atomic samples. Here we show that such effect is negligible for evolution of a uniformly excited atomic state prepared by absorption of a single photon.

  5. c-Myc-miR-29c-REV3L signalling pathway drives the acquisition of temozolomide resistance in glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Luo, Hui; Chen, Zhengxin; Wang, Shuai; Zhang, Rui; Qiu, Wenjin; Zhao, Lin; Peng, Chenghao; Xu, Ran; Chen, Wanghao; Wang, Hong-Wei; Chen, Yuanyuan; Yang, Jingmin; Zhang, Xiaotian; Zhang, Shuyu; Chen, Dan; Wu, Wenting; Zhao, Chunsheng; Cheng, Gang; Jiang, Tao; Lu, Daru; You, Yongping; Liu, Ning; Wang, Huibo

    2015-12-01

    Resistance to temozolomide poses a major clinical challenge in glioblastoma multiforme treatment, and the mechanisms underlying the development of temozolomide resistance remain poorly understood. Enhanced DNA repair and mutagenesis can allow tumour cells to survive, contributing to resistance and tumour recurrence. Here, using recurrent temozolomide-refractory glioblastoma specimens, temozolomide-resistant cells, and resistant-xenograft models, we report that loss of miR-29c via c-Myc drives the acquisition of temozolomide resistance through enhancement of REV3L-mediated DNA repair and mutagenesis in glioblastoma. Importantly, disruption of c-Myc/miR-29c/REV3L signalling may have dual anticancer effects, sensitizing the resistant tumours to therapy as well as preventing the emergence of acquired temozolomide resistance. Our findings suggest a rationale for targeting the c-Myc/miR-29c/REV3L signalling pathway as a promising therapeutic approach for glioblastoma, even in recurrent, treatment-refractory settings.

  6. Mutagenic and Recombinagenic Responses to Defective DNA Polymerase δ Are Facilitated by the Rev1 Protein in pol3-t Mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Mito, Erica; Mokhnatkin, Janet V.; Steele, Molly C.; Buettner, Victoria L.; Sommer, Steve S.; Manthey, Glenn M.; Bailis, Adam M.

    2008-01-01

    Defective DNA replication can result in substantial increases in the level of genome instability. In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the pol3-t allele confers a defect in the catalytic subunit of replicative DNA polymerase δ that results in increased rates of mutagenesis, recombination, and chromosome loss, perhaps by increasing the rate of replicative polymerase failure. The translesion polymerases Pol η, Pol ζ, and Rev1 are part of a suite of factors in yeast that can act at sites of replicative polymerase failure. While mutants defective in the translesion polymerases alone displayed few defects, loss of Rev1 was found to suppress the increased rates of spontaneous mutation, recombination, and chromosome loss observed in pol3-t mutants. These results suggest that Rev1 may be involved in facilitating mutagenic and recombinagenic responses to the failure of Pol δ. Genome stability, therefore, may reflect a dynamic relationship between primary and auxiliary DNA polymerases. PMID:18711219

  7. Analysis of mice deficient in both REV1 catalytic activity and POLH reveals an unexpected role for POLH in the generation of C to G and G to C transversions during Ig gene hypermutation.

    PubMed

    Kano, Chie; Hanaoka, Fumio; Wang, Ji-Yang

    2012-03-01

    Multiple DNA polymerases are involved in the generation of somatic mutations during Ig gene hypermutation. Mice expressing a catalytically inactive REV1 (REV1AA) exhibit reduction of both C to G and G to C transversions and moderate decrease of A/T mutations, whereas DNA polymerase η (POLH) deficiency causes greatly reduced A/T mutations. To investigate whether REV1 and POLH interact genetically and functionally during Ig gene hypermutation, we established REV1AA Polh(-/-) mice and analyzed Ig gene hypermutation in the germinal center (GC) B cells. REV1AA Polh(-/-) mice were born at the expected ratio and developed normally with no apparent gross abnormalities. B-cell development, maturation, Ig gene class switch and the GC B-cell expansion were not affected in these mice. REV1AA Polh(-/-) B cells also exhibited relatively normal sensitivity to etoposide and ionizing radiation. Analysis of somatic mutations in the J(H)4 intronic region revealed that REV1AA Polh(-/-) mice had a further decrease of overall mutation frequency compared with REV1AA or Polh(-/-) mice, indicating that the double deficiency additively affected the generation of mutations. Remarkably, REV1AA Polh(-/-) mice had nearly absent C to G and G to C transversions, suggesting that POLH is essential for the generation of residual C to G and G to C transversions observed in REV1AA mice. These results reveal genetic interactions between REV1 catalytic activity and POLH and identify an alternative pathway, mediated by non-catalytic REV1 and POLH, in the generation of C to G and G to C transversions.

  8. Modeling turbine wakes and power losses within the Horns Rev offshore wind farm using large-eddy simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yu-Ting; Porte-Agel, Fernando

    2013-04-01

    A recently-developed large-eddy simulations (LES) framework is implemented to predict multiple wake flows and the associated power losses within the Horns Rev offshore wind farm under near-neutral stability conditions. A tuning-free Lagrangian scale-dependent dynamic subgrid-scale (SGS) model is used for the parametrization of the SGS stresses. The turbine-generated power outputs and the turbine-induced forces (e.g., thrust, lift, drag) are parameterized using two models: (a) the traditional actuator-disk model without rotation (ADM-NR), which uses the 1D momentum theory to relate the power output and the thrust force with a representative velocity over the rotor (e.g., the disk-averaged velocity); and (b) the actuator-disk model with rotation (ADM-R), which adopts blade element theory to calculate the lift and drag forces (that produce thrust, rotor shaft torque, and power) based on the local blade and flow characteristics. In general, the predicted power outputs obtained using the ADM-R are in good agreement with observed power data from the Horns Rev wind farm. The ADM-NR tends to underestimate the power output. A similar under-prediction is obtained using industry-standard wind-farm models such as the Wind Atlas Analysis and Application Program (WAsP). Simulations using different inflow conditions show that the mean wind direction has a strong effect on the spatial distributions of the time-averaged velocity and the turbulence intensity within the farm. These, in turn, affect the power output and the fatigue loads on the turbines. When the prevailing wind direction is parallel to the turbine rows (i.e., a full wake condition), the velocity deficit and the power losses are largest, and the turbulence intensity levels are highest and have a symmetric pattern (dual-peak at hub height) on both sides of the turbine wakes. A detailed analysis of the turbulence kinetic energy budget in the full wake condition shows an important effect of the increased turbulence level

  9. Comparative Analysis of in vivo Interactions Between Rev1 Protein and Other Y-Family DNA Polymerases in Animals and Yeasts

    PubMed Central

    Kosarek, J. Nicole; Woodruff, Rachel V.; Rivera-Begeman, Amanda; Guo, Caixia; D’Souza, Sanjay; Koonin, Eugene V.; Walker, Graham C.; Friedberg, Errol C.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Eukaryotes are endowed with multiple specialized DNA polymerases, some (if not all) of which are believed to play important roles in the tolerance of base damage during DNA replication. Among these DNA polymerases, Rev1 protein (a deoxycytidyl transferase) from vertebrates interacts with several other specialized polymerases via a highly conserved C-terminal region. The present studies assessed whether these interactions are retained in more experimentally tractable model systems, including yeasts, flies, and the nematode C. elegans. We observed a physical interaction between Rev1 protein and other Y-family polymerases in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. However, despite the fact that the C-terminal region of Drosophila and yeast Rev1 are conserved from vertebrates to a similar extent, such interactions were not observed in S. cerevisiae or S. pombe. With respect to regions in specialized DNA polymerases that are required for interaction with Rev1, we find predicted disorder to be an underlying structural commonality. The results of this study suggest that special consideration should be exercised when making mechanistic extrapolations regarding translesion DNA synthesis from one eukaryotic system to another. PMID:18242152

  10. Erratum: “Multi-point, high-speed passive ion velocity distribution diagnostic on the Pegasus Toroidal Experiment” [Rev. Sci. Instrum. 83, 10D516 (2012)

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, Marcus G.; Fonck, Raymond J.; Bongard, Michael W.; Schlossberg, David J.; Winz, Gregory R.

    2016-07-18

    This article corrects an error in M.G. Burke et al., 'Multi-point, high-speed passive ion velocity distribution diagnostic on the Pegasus Toroidal Experiment,' Rev. Sci. Instrum. 83, 10D516 (2012) pertaining to ion temperature. The conclusions of this paper are not altered by the revised ion temperature measurements.

  11. Specificity of RSG-1.2 peptide binding to RRE-IIB RNA element of HIV-1 over Rev peptide is mainly enthalpic in origin.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Santosh; Bose, Debojit; Suryawanshi, Hemant; Sabharwal, Harshana; Mapa, Koyeli; Maiti, Souvik

    2011-01-01

    Rev is an essential HIV-1 regulatory protein which binds to the Rev responsive element (RRE) present within the env gene of HIV-1 RNA genome. This binding facilitates the transport of the RNA to the cytoplasm, which in turn triggers the switch between viral latency and active viral replication. Essential components of this complex have been localized to a minimal arginine rich Rev peptide and stem IIB region of RRE. A synthetic peptide known as RSG-1.2 binds with high binding affinity and specificity to the RRE-IIB than the Rev peptide, however the thermodynamic basis of this specificity has not yet been addressed. The present study aims to probe the thermodynamic origin of this specificity of RSG-1.2 over Rev Peptide for RRE-IIB. The temperature dependent melting studies show that RSG-1.2 binding stabilizes the RRE structure significantly (ΔT(m) = 4.3°C), in contrast to Rev binding. Interestingly the thermodynamic signatures of the binding have also been found to be different for both the peptides. At pH 7.5, RSG-1.2 binds RRE-IIB with a K(a) = 16.2±0.6×10(7) M(-1) where enthalpic change ΔH = -13.9±0.1 kcal/mol is the main driving force with limited unfavorable contribution from entropic change TΔS = -2.8±0.1 kcal/mol. A large part of ΔH may be due to specific stacking between U72 and Arg15. In contrast binding of Rev (K(a) = 3.1±0.4×10(7) M(-1)) is driven mainly by entropy (ΔH = 0 kcal/mol and TΔS = 10.2±0.2 kcal/mol) which arises from major conformational changes in the RNA upon binding.

  12. Rev and the fate of pre-mRNA in the nucleus: implications for the regulation of RNA processing in eukaryotes.

    PubMed Central

    Malim, M H; Cullen, B R

    1993-01-01

    Although a great deal is known about the regulation of gene expression in terms of transcription, relatively little is known about the modulation of pre-mRNA processing. In this study, we exploited a genetically regulated system, human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and its trans-activator Rev, to examine events that occur between the synthesis of pre-mRNA in the nucleus and the translation of mRNA in the cytoplasm. Unlike the majority of eukaryotic pre-mRNAs whose introns are efficiently recognized and spliced prior to nucleocytoplasmic transport, HIV-1 mRNAs containing functional introns must be exported to the cytoplasm for the expression of many viral proteins. Using human T cells containing stably integrated proviruses, we demonstrate that such incompletely spliced viral mRNAs are exported to the cytoplasm only in the presence of the Rev trans-activator. In the absence of Rev, these intron-containing RNAs are sequestered in the T-cell nucleus and either spliced or, more commonly, degraded. Because Rev does not inhibit the expression of fully spliced viral mRNA species in T cells, we propose that Rev, rather than inhibiting viral pre-mRNA splicing, is acting here both to prevent the nuclear degradation of HIV-1 pre-mRNAs and to induce their translocation to the cytoplasm. Taken together, these findings indicate that the cellular factors responsible for the nuclear retention of unspliced pre-mRNAs, although most probably splicing factors, do not invariably commit these RNAs to productive splicing and can, instead, program such transcripts for degradation. Images PMID:8105371

  13. Specific Marking of HIV-1 Positive Cells using a Rev-dependent Lentiviral Vector Expressing the Green Fluorescent Protein

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yuntao

    2010-01-01

    Most of HIV-responsive expression vectors are based on the HIV promoter, the long terminal repeat (LTR). While responsive to an early HIV protein, Tat, the LTR is also responsive to cellular activation states and to the local chromatin activity where the integration has occurred. This can result in high HIV-independent activity, and has restricted the usefulness of LTR-based reporter to mark HIV positive cells 1,2,3. Here, we constructed an expression lentiviral vector that possesses, in addition to the Tat-responsive LTR, numerous HIV DNA sequences that include the Rev-response element and HIV splicing sites 4,5,6. The vector was incorporated into a lentiviral reporter virus, permitting highly specific detection of replicating HIV in living cell populations. The activity of the vector was measured by expression of the green fluorescence protein (GFP). The application of this vector as reported here offers a novel alternative approach to existing methods, such as in situ PCR or HIV antigen staining, to identify HIV-positive cells. The vector can also express therapeutic genes for basic or clinical experimentation to target HIV-positive cells. PMID:20972394

  14. Numerical modelling of the flow in the resin infusion process on the REV scale: A feasibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jabbari, M.; Jambhekar, V. A.; Gersborg, A. R.; Spangenberg, J.; Hattel, J. H.; Helmig, R.

    2016-06-01

    The resin infusion process (RIP) has developed as a low cost method for manufacturing large fibre reinforced plastic parts. However, the process still presents some challenges to industry with regards to reliability and repeatability, resulting in expensive and inefficient trial and error development. In this paper, we show the implementation of 2D numerical models for the RIP using the open source simulator DuMuX. The idea of this study is to present a model which accounts for the interfacial forces coming from the capillary pressure on the so-called representative elementary volume (REV) scale. The model is described in detail and three different test cases — a constant and a tensorial permeability as well as a preform/Balsa domain — are investigated. The results show that the developed model is very applicable for the RIP for manufacturing of composite parts. The idea behind this study is to test the developed model for later use in a real application, in which the preform medium has numerous layers with different material properties.

  15. Brucellosis control in Tajikistan using Rev 1 vaccine: change in seroprevalence in small ruminants from 2004 to 2009.

    PubMed

    Ward, D; Jackson, R; Karomatullo, H; Khakimov, T; Kurbonov, K; Amirbekov, M; Stack, J; El-Idrissi, A; Heuer, C

    2012-01-01

    Cross-sectional serological surveys of 13,006 small ruminants were conducted in 2003 to establish baseline levels of seropositivity to brucellosis and of 12,102 again in 2009 to evaluate the efficacy of controls based on biannual conjunctival vaccination with Rev 1. Seroprevalence dropped by 80 per cent in five years in eight pilot programme districts where vaccination was generally well implemented, and the prevalence of households with evidence of infection in their animals dropped from 25.1 to 7.5 per cent. Seroprevalence was reduced by 40 per cent in 10 districts where vaccination was intermittent with low coverage during some seasons. There were no changes in 19 districts where no vaccinations were carried out. Sheep vaccinated one or more times were found to be 2.5 times more likely to be serotest positive than were non-vaccinated sheep, whereas vaccinated goats were 6.4 times more likely to be serotest positive than non-vaccinated goats.

  16. ORNL Drawing Q-6240-2 (Rev. 3) and Parts List Q-6240-5 (Engineering Materials)

    SciTech Connect

    Kryter, R.C.

    1989-06-22

    Copies of ORNL Drawing Q-6240-2 (Rev. 3), along with related drawings and fabrication information, were provided by me to Sammie C. Harris of the Office of Technology Applications on December 20, 1988 for his distributions to companies that have established formal licensing agreements with MMES for commercial use of Motor Current Signature Analysis (MCSA) technology developed at ORNL. This printed circuit board layout was provided to Mr. Harris in four forms: as a blueprint, a full-size negative transparency, a full-size positive transparency, and as a machine readable file on 5.25-inch flexible disk. The flexible disk, which Archer Haskins now wishes to clear for outside'' distribution, contains no ASCII text but rather a single data file (filename-Q6240-2.DRA) which can be input to a P870 printed circuit board (pcb) layout computer program to regenerate the original drawing (or a modified version thereof) in hardcopy form suitable for pcb manufacture.

  17. Erratum to “Axial and transverse acoustic radiation forces on a fluid sphere placed arbitrarily in Bessel beam standing wave tweezers” [Ann. Phys. 342 (3) (2014) 158-170

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitri, F. G.

    2014-09-01

    A typographical error is corrected in three equations in the article [Ann. Phys. 342 (3) (2014) 158-170, http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.aop.2013.12.009]. They are Eqs. (12)-(14), where the factor (1+Sp,q) should have been printed as (1+sp(ka)). The numerical computations and plots used the correct factor (1+sp(ka)) in the related equations.

  18. Response to “Comment on ‘General rotating quantum vortex filaments in the low-temperature Svistunov model of the local induction approximation’” [Phys. Fluids 26, 119101 (2014)

    SciTech Connect

    Van Gorder, Robert A.

    2014-11-15

    In R. A. Van Gorder, “General rotating quantum vortex filaments in the low-temperature Svistunov model of the local induction approximation,” Phys. Fluids 26, 065105 (2014) I discussed properties of generalized vortex filaments exhibiting purely rotational motion under the low-temperature Svistunov model of the local induction approximation. Such solutions are stationary in terms of translational motion. In the Comment [N. Hietala, “Comment on ‘General rotating quantum vortex filaments in the low-temperature Svistunov model of the local induction approximation’ [Phys. Fluids 26, 065105 (2014)],” Phys. Fluids 26, 119101 (2014)], the author criticizes my paper for not including translational motion (although it was clearly stated that the filament motion was assumed rotational). As it turns out, if one is interested in studying the geometric structure of solutions (which was the point of my paper), one obtains the needed qualitative results on the structure of such solutions by studying the purely rotational case. Nevertheless, in this Response I shall discuss the vortex filaments that have both rotational and translational motions. I then briefly discuss why one might want to study such generalized rotating filament solutions, in contrast to simple the standard helical or planar examples (which are really special cases). I also discuss how one can study the time evolution of filaments which exhibit more complicated dynamics than pure translation and rotation. Doing this, one can study non-stationary solutions which initially appear purely rotational and gradually display other dynamics as the filaments evolve.

  19. TRACKED VEHICLE Rev 75

    SciTech Connect

    Raby, Eric Y.

    2007-05-08

    Revision 75 of the Tracked Vehicle software is a soft real-time simulation of a differentially steered, tracked mobile robot, which, because of the track flippers, resembles the iRobot PackBot (http://www.irobot.com/). Open source libraries are used for the physics engine (http://www.ode.org/), the display and user interface (http://www.mathies.com/cpw/), and the program command line and configuration file parameters (http://www.boost.org/). The simulation can be controlled by a USB joystick or the keyboard. The configuration file contains demonstration model parameters of no particular vehicle. This simulation can be used as a starting point for those doing tracked vehicle simulations. This simulation software is essentially a research tool which can be modified and adapted for certain types of tracked vehicle research. An open source license allows an individual researchers to tailor the code to their specific research needs.

  20. Multinational Operations (REV)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-07

    military operations with an acceptable level of risk . See JP 3-0, Joint Operations, and JP 4-02, Health Service Support, for information on planning...perform their mission. It will also ensure that the associated risks in utilizing contingency contracting support (force protection, health issues...Support ............................................................................................. III-36 • Health Service Support

  1. Rev Your Engines!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blanchard, Margaret; Sharp, Jennifer; Grable, Lisa

    2009-01-01

    As part of the "Car Lab Project," students constructed rubber band cars, raced them, and worked through a number of automotive activities. The students engaged in this project certainly had fun, but they also used high-tech gear such as motion sensors and graphing calculators to gather data on the distance and time cars traveled and to generate…

  2. Specificities of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae rad6, rad18, and rad52 mutators exhibit different degrees of dependence on the REV3 gene product, a putative nonessential DNA polymerase.

    PubMed

    Roche, H; Gietz, R D; Kunz, B A

    1995-06-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae rad6, rad18, and rad52 mutants exhibit DNA repair deficiencies and distinct mutator phenotypes. DNA replication past unrepaired spontaneous damage might contribute to the specificities of these mutators. Because REV3 is thought to encode a DNA polymerase that specializes in translesion synthesis, we determined the REV3 dependence of the rad mutator specificities. Spontaneous mutagenesis at a plasmid-borne SUP4-o locus was examined in isogenic strains having combinations of normal or mutant REV3 and RAD6, RAD18, or RAD52 alleles. For the rad6 and rad18 mutators, the mutation rate increase relied largely, but not exclusively, on REV3 whereas the rad52 mutator was entirely REV3 dependent. The influence of REV3 on the specificity of the rad6 mutator differed markedly depending on the mutational class examined. However, the requirement of rev3 for the production of G.C-->T.A transversions by the rad18 mutator, which induces only these substitutions, was similar to that for rad6-mediated G.C-->T.A transversion. This supports a role for the Rad6-Rad18 protein complex in the control of spontaneous mutagenesis. The available data imply that the putative Rev3 polymerase can process a variety of spontaneous DNA lesions that normally are substrates for error-free repair.

  3. High energy neutrinos from astrophysical accelerators of cosmic ray nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anchordoqui, Luis A.; Hooper, Dan; Sarkar, Subir; Taylor, Andrew M.

    2008-02-01

    . Rev. Lett.6619912697(Erratum-ibid. 69 (1992) 2738)F.W.SteckerPhys. Rev. D722005107301A.AtoyanC.D.DermerPhys. Rev. Lett.872001221102L.A.AnchordoquiH.GoldbergF.HalzenT.J.WeilerPhys. Lett. B6002004202E.WaxmanJ.N.BahcallPhys. Rev. Lett.7819972292C.D.DermerA.AtoyanPhys. Rev. Lett.912003071102D.GuettaD.HooperJ.Alvarez-MunizF.HalzenE.ReuveniAstropart. Phys.202004429J.Alvarez-MunizF.HalzenD.W.HooperPhys. Rev. D622000093015A.LoebE.WaxmanJCAP06052006003S. Inoue, G. Sigl, F. Miniati, E. Armengaud, arXiv:astro-ph/0701167.E.WaxmanJ.N.BahcallPhys. Rev. D591999023002Phys. Rev. D642001023002K.MannheimR.J.ProtheroeJ.P.RachenPhys. Rev. D632001023003arXiv:astro-ph/9908031M.AhlersL.A.AnchordoquiH.GoldbergF.HalzenA.RingwaldT.J.WeilerPhys. Rev. D722005023001E.WaxmanAstrophys. J.4521995L1Note that the neutrino spectral shape can deviate from that for protons if the Feynman plateau is not flat in pseudo-rapidity space;L.AnchordoquiH.GoldbergC.NunezPhys. Rev. D712005065014This is in fact suggested by Tevatron data;F.AbeCDF CollaborationPhys. Rev. D4119902330J.G.LearnedS.PakvasaAstropart. Phys.31995267F.HalzenD.SaltzbergPhys. Rev. Lett.8119984305J.F.BeacomN.F.BellD.HooperS.PakvasaT.J.WeilerPhys. Rev. D682003093005(Erratum-ibid. D 72 (2005) 019901)L.A.AnchordoquiH.GoldbergF.HalzenT.J.WeilerPhys. Lett. B593200442L.A.AnchordoquiH.GoldbergF.HalzenT.J.WeilerPhys. Lett. B621200518A.M.HillasAnn. Rev. Astron. Astrophys.221984425For a general discussion on the acceleration time-scale in these sources see, e.g.,D.F.TorresL.A.AnchordoquiRep. Prog. Phys.6720041663M.C.BegelmanB.RudakM.SikoraAstrophys. J.362199038M.J.ChodorowskiA.A.ZdziarskiM.SikoraAstrophys. J.4001992181S.MichalowskiD.AndrewsJ.EickmeyerT.GentileN.MistryR.TalmanK.UenoPhys. Rev. Lett.391977737J.L.PugetF.W.SteckerJ.H.BredekampAstrophys. J.2051976638D.HooperS.SarkarA.M.TaylorAstropart. Phys.272007199The non-thermal energy release in GRBs is much smaller than that output by AGN.P.L.BiermannP.A.StrittmatterAstrophys. J.3221987643R.J.ProtheroeA.P.SzaboPhys

  4. RevSex duplication-induced and sex-related differences in the SOX9 regulatory region chromatin landscape in human fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Lybæk, Helle; de Bruijn, Diederik; den Engelsman-van Dijk, Anke HA; Vanichkina, Darya; Nepal, Chirag; Brendehaug, Atle; Houge, Gunnar

    2014-01-01

    It was recently shown that duplications of the RevSex element, located 0.5 Mb upstream of SOX9, cause XX-disorder of sex development (DSD), and that deletions cause XY-DSD. To explore how a 148 kb RevSex duplication could have turned on gonadal SOX9 expression in the absence of SRY in an XX-male, we examined the chromatin landscape in primary skin fibroblast cultures from the index, his RevSex duplication-carrier father and six controls. The ENCODE project supports the notion that chromatin state maps show overlap between different cell types, i.e., that our study of fibroblasts could be of biological relevance. We examined the SOX9 regulatory region by high-resolution ChIP-on-chip experiments (a kind of “chromatin-CGH”) and DNA methylation investigations. The RevSex duplication was associated with chromatin changes predicting better accessibility of the SRY-responsive TESCO enhancer region 14–15 kb upstream of SOX9. Four kb downstream of the TESCO evolutionary conserved region, a peak of the enhancer/promoter-associated H3K4me3 mark was found together with a major dip of the repressive H3K9me3 chromatin mark. Similar differences were also found when three control males were compared with three control females. A marked male/female difference was a more open chromatin signature in males starting ~400 kb upstream of SOX9 and increasing toward the SOX9 promoter. In the RevSex duplication-carrier father, two positions of DNA hypomethylation were also found, one corresponding to the H3K4me3 peak mentioned above. Our results suggest that the RevSex duplication could operate by inducing long-range epigenetic changes. Furthermore, the differences in chromatin state maps between males and females suggest that the Y chromosome or X chromosome dosage may affect chromatin conformation, i.e., that sex-dependent gene regulation may take place by chromatin modification. PMID:24351654

  5. RevSex duplication-induced and sex-related differences in the SOX9 regulatory region chromatin landscape in human fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Lybæk, Helle; de Bruijn, Diederik; den Engelsman-van Dijk, Anke H A; Vanichkina, Darya; Nepal, Chirag; Brendehaug, Atle; Houge, Gunnar

    2014-03-01

    It was recently shown that duplications of the RevSex element, located 0.5 Mb upstream of SOX9, cause XX-disorder of sex development (DSD), and that deletions cause XY-DSD. To explore how a 148 kb RevSex duplication could have turned on gonadal SOX9 expression in the absence of SRY in an XX-male, we examined the chromatin landscape in primary skin fibroblast cultures from the index, his RevSex duplication-carrier father and six controls. The ENCODE project supports the notion that chromatin state maps show overlap between different cell types, i.e., that our study of fibroblasts could be of biological relevance. We examined the SOX9 regulatory region by high-resolution ChIP-on-chip experiments (a kind of "chromatin-CGH") and DNA methylation investigations. The RevSex duplication was associated with chromatin changes predicting better accessibility of the SRY-responsive TESCO enhancer region 14-15 kb upstream of SOX9. Four kb downstream of the TESCO evolutionary conserved region, a peak of the enhancer/promoter-associated H3K4me3 mark was found together with a major dip of the repressive H3K9me3 chromatin mark. Similar differences were also found when three control males were compared with three control females. A marked male/female difference was a more open chromatin signature in males starting ~400 kb upstream of SOX9 and increasing toward the SOX9 promoter. In the RevSex duplication-carrier father, two positions of DNA hypomethylation were also found, one corresponding to the H3K4me3 peak mentioned above. Our results suggest that the RevSex duplication could operate by inducing long-range epigenetic changes. Furthermore, the differences in chromatin state maps between males and females suggest that the Y chromosome or X chromosome dosage may affect chromatin conformation, i.e., that sex-dependent gene regulation may take place by chromatin modification.

  6. Use of mass vaccination with a reduced dose of REV 1 vaccine for Brucella melitensis control in a population of small ruminants.

    PubMed

    Scharp, D W; al Khalaf, S A; al Muhanna, M W; Cheema, R A; Godana, W

    1999-06-01

    Mass vaccination with reduced dose 1/50 Rev 1 strain live vaccine (1-2 10(9) colony forming units), administered subcutaneously, over a four and a half year period reduced the prevalence of Brucella melitensis in Kuwait's small ruminant population from 5.8% in 1993 to 2.02% in 1997. Serological test results using the Rose Bengal Plate Test, Rivanol Agglutination Test and Complement Fixation showed no evidence of persistence of positive serology in animals nine or more months after vaccination. Questionnaires and post-vaccination flock inspections found that the effects on gestation (abortions) were minimal--and not proven to be due to the vaccine. The conclusion from these findings is that mass vaccination with reduced dose Rev 1 administered by the subcutaneous route is a practical field strategy for control of Brucella melitensis.

  7. Final Report - DuraMelter 100 Tests to Support LAW Glass Formulation Correlation Development, VSL-06R6480-1, Rev. 0

    SciTech Connect

    Kruger, Albert A.; Muller, I. S.; Gong, W.; Pegg, I. L.; Matlack, K. S.

    2013-12-03

    This report describes the results of work and testing specified by Test Specifications 24590-LAW-TSP-RT-04-004, Rev. 0, Test Plans VSL-05T5480-1, Rev. 0 and Text Exceptions 24590-LAW-TEF-RT-05-00002. The work and any associated testing followed established quality assurance requirements and was conducted as authorized. The descriptions provided in this test report are an accurate account of both the conduct of the work and the data collected. Results required by the Test Plan are reported. Also reported are any unusual or anomalous occurences that are different from the starting hypotheses. The test results and this report have been reviewed and verified.

  8. Inhibitory role of REV-ERBα in the expression of bone morphogenetic protein gene family in rat uterus endometrium stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Tasaki, Hirotaka; Zhao, Lijia; Isayama, Keishiro; Chen, Huatao; Yamauchi, Nobuhiko; Shigeyoshi, Yasufumi; Hashimoto, Seiichi; Hattori, Masa-aki

    2015-04-01

    Uterus circadian rhythms have been implicated in the gestation processes of mammals through entraining of the clock proteins to numerous downstream genes. Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs), having clock-controlled regulatory sites in their gene promoters, are expressed in the uterus during decidualization, but the regulation of the Bmp gene expression is poorly understood. The present study was designed to dissect the physiological roles of the uterus oscillators in the Bmp expression using the uterus endometrial stromal cells (UESCs) isolated from Per2-dLuc transgenic rats on day 4.5 of gestation. The in vitro decidualization of UESCs was induced by medroxyprogesterone acetate and 2-O-dibutyryl cAMP. A significant decline of Per2-dLuc bioluminescence activity was induced in decidual cells, and concomitantly, the expression of canonical clock genes was downregulated. Conversely, the expression of the core Bmp genes Bmp2, Bmp4, Bmp6, and Bmp7 was upregulated. In UESCs transfected with Bmal1-specific siRNA, in which Rev-erbα expression was downregulated, Bmp genes, such as Bmp2, Bmp4, and Bmp6 were upregulated. However, Bmp1, Bmp7, and Bmp8a were not significantly affected by Bmal1 silencing. The expression of all Bmp genes was enhanced after treatment with the REV-ERBα antagonist (SR8278), although their rhythmic profiles were differed from each other. The binding of REV-ERBα to the proximal regions of the Bmp2 and Bmp4 promoters was revealed by chromatin immunoprecipitation-PCR analysis. Collectively, these results indicate that the Bmp genes are upregulated by the attenuation of the cellular circadian clock; in particular, its core component REV-ERBα functions as a transcriptional silencer in the Bmp gene family.

  9. Comment on "Photoelectron angular distributions as a probe of alignment in a polyatomic molecule: Picosecond time- and angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy of S1 p-difluorobenzene" [J. Chem. Phys. 111, 1438 (1999)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Midgley, Jonathan; Davies, Julia A.; Reid, Katharine L.

    2013-09-01

    In this Comment we submit the results of an experiment in which we use the technique of time-resolved photoelectron velocity map imaging to probe the intramolecular dynamics occurring following the preparation of the 3151 vibrational level in S1 p-difluorobenzene with a 1 ps laser pulse. The extracted photoelectron angular distributions are discussed in the context of earlier comparable measurements from our group [J. Chem. Phys. 111, 1438 (1999)], and we conclude that the specific interpretation of the earlier results was incorrect as a consequence of systematic errors that are removed in the present study.

  10. High Affinity Heme Binding to a Heme Regulatory Motif on the Nuclear Receptor Rev-erbβ Leads to Its Degradation and Indirectly Regulates Its Interaction with Nuclear Receptor Corepressor.

    PubMed

    Carter, Eric L; Gupta, Nirupama; Ragsdale, Stephen W

    2016-01-29

    Rev-erbα and Rev-erbβ are heme-binding nuclear receptors (NR) that repress the transcription of genes involved in regulating metabolism, inflammation, and the circadian clock. Previous gene expression and co-immunoprecipitation studies led to a model in which heme binding to Rev-erbα recruits nuclear receptor corepressor 1 (NCoR1) into an active repressor complex. However, in contradiction, biochemical and crystallographic studies have shown that heme decreases the affinity of the ligand-binding domain of Rev-erb NRs for NCoR1 peptides. One explanation for this discrepancy is that the ligand-binding domain and NCoR1 peptides used for in vitro studies cannot replicate the key features of the full-length proteins used in cellular studies. However, the combined in vitro and cellular results described here demonstrate that heme does not directly promote interactions between full-length Rev-erbβ (FLRev-erbβ) and an NCoR1 construct encompassing all three NR interaction domains. NCoR1 tightly binds both apo- and heme-replete FLRev-erbβ·DNA complexes; furthermore, heme, at high concentrations, destabilizes the FLRev-erbβ·NCoR1 complex. The interaction between FLRev-erbβ and NCoR1 as well as Rev-erbβ repression at the Bmal1 promoter appear to be modulated by another cellular factor(s), at least one of which is related to the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. Our studies suggest that heme is involved in regulating the degradation of Rev-erbβ in a manner consistent with its role in circadian rhythm maintenance. Finally, the very slow rate constant (10(-6) s(-1)) of heme dissociation from Rev-erbβ rules out a prior proposal that Rev-erbβ acts as an intracellular heme sensor.

  11. High Affinity Heme Binding to a Heme Regulatory Motif on the Nuclear Receptor Rev-erbβ Leads to Its Degradation and Indirectly Regulates Its Interaction with Nuclear Receptor Corepressor*

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Eric L.; Gupta, Nirupama; Ragsdale, Stephen W.

    2016-01-01

    Rev-erbα and Rev-erbβ are heme-binding nuclear receptors (NR) that repress the transcription of genes involved in regulating metabolism, inflammation, and the circadian clock. Previous gene expression and co-immunoprecipitation studies led to a model in which heme binding to Rev-erbα recruits nuclear receptor corepressor 1 (NCoR1) into an active repressor complex. However, in contradiction, biochemical and crystallographic studies have shown that heme decreases the affinity of the ligand-binding domain of Rev-erb NRs for NCoR1 peptides. One explanation for this discrepancy is that the ligand-binding domain and NCoR1 peptides used for in vitro studies cannot replicate the key features of the full-length proteins used in cellular studies. However, the combined in vitro and cellular results described here demonstrate that heme does not directly promote interactions between full-length Rev-erbβ (FLRev-erbβ) and an NCoR1 construct encompassing all three NR interaction domains. NCoR1 tightly binds both apo- and heme-replete FLRev-erbβ·DNA complexes; furthermore, heme, at high concentrations, destabilizes the FLRev-erbβ·NCoR1 complex. The interaction between FLRev-erbβ and NCoR1 as well as Rev-erbβ repression at the Bmal1 promoter appear to be modulated by another cellular factor(s), at least one of which is related to the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. Our studies suggest that heme is involved in regulating the degradation of Rev-erbβ in a manner consistent with its role in circadian rhythm maintenance. Finally, the very slow rate constant (10−6 s−1) of heme dissociation from Rev-erbβ rules out a prior proposal that Rev-erbβ acts as an intracellular heme sensor. PMID:26670607

  12. Identification of positive and negative splicing regulatory elements within the terminal tat-rev exon of human immunodeficiency virus type 1.

    PubMed Central

    Staffa, A; Cochrane, A

    1995-01-01

    The requirement of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 to generate numerous proteins from a single primary transcript is met largely by the use of suboptimal splicing to generate over 30 mRNAs. To ensure that appropriate quantities of each protein are produced, there must be a signal(s) that controls the efficiency with which any particular splice site in the RNA is used. To identify this control element(s) and to understand how it operates to generate the splicing pattern observed, we have initially focused on the control of splicing of the tat-rev intron, which spans the majority of the env open reading frame. Previous analysis indicated that a suboptimal branchpoint and polypyridimine tract in this intron contribute to its suboptimal splicing (A. Staffa and A. Cochrane, J. Virol. 68:3071-3079, 1994). In this report, we identify two additional elements within the 3'-terminal exon, an exon-splicing enhancer (ESE) and an exon splicing silencer (ESS), that modulate the overall efficiency with which the 3' tat-rev splice site is utilized. Both elements are capable of functioning independently of one another. Furthermore, while both the ESE and ESS can function in a heterologous context, the function of the ESS is extremely sensitive to the sequence context into which it is placed. In conclusion, it would appear that the presence of a suboptimal branchpoint and a polypyrimidine tract as well as the ESE and ESS operate together to yield the balanced splicing of the tat-rev intron observed in vivo. PMID:7623851

  13. Identification of new splice sites used for generation of rev transcripts in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 subtype C primary isolates.

    PubMed

    Delgado, Elena; Carrera, Cristina; Nebreda, Paloma; Fernández-García, Aurora; Pinilla, Milagros; García, Valentina; Pérez-Álvarez, Lucía; Thomson, Michael M

    2012-01-01

    The HIV-1 primary transcript undergoes a complex splicing process by which more than 40 different spliced RNAs are generated. One of the factors contributing to HIV-1 splicing complexity is the multiplicity of 3' splice sites (3'ss) used for generation of rev RNAs, with two 3'ss, A4a and A4b, being most commonly used, a third site, A4c, used less frequently, and two additional sites, A4d and A4e, reported in only two and one isolates, respectively. HIV-1 splicing has been analyzed mostly in subtype B isolates, and data on other group M clades are lacking. Here we examine splice site usage in three primary isolates of subtype C, the most prevalent clade in the HIV-1 pandemic, by using an in vitro infection assay of peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Viral spliced RNAs were identified by RT-PCR amplification using a fluorescently-labeled primer and software analyses and by cloning and sequencing the amplified products. The results revealed that splice site usage for generation of rev transcripts in subtype C differs from that reported for subtype B, with most rev RNAs using two previously unreported 3'ss, one located 7 nucleotides upstream of 3'ss A4a, designated A4f, preferentially used by two isolates, and another located 14 nucleotides upstream of 3'ss A4c, designated A4g, preferentially used by the third isolate. A new 5' splice site, designated D2a, was also identified in one virus. Usage of the newly identified splice sites is consistent with sequence features commonly found in subtype C viruses. These results show that splice site usage may differ between HIV-1 subtypes.

  14. PHYS-MA-TECH. An Integrated Partnership.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scarborough, Jule Dee

    This document contains 45 integrated physics, mathematics, and technology curriculum modules developed by teachers at 5 Illinois schools. An introduction discusses the collaborative project, in which teams of one mathematics, physics, and technology teacher from each school developed innovative instructional delivery models that enabled the three…

  15. Actinobacillus rossii sp. nov., Actinobacillus seminis sp. nov., nom. rev., Pasteurella bettii sp. nov., Pasteurella lymphangitidis sp. nov., Pasteurella mairi sp. nov., and Pasteurella trehalosi sp. nov.

    PubMed

    Sneath, P H; Stevens, M

    1990-04-01

    Evidence from numerical taxonomic analysis and DNA-DNA hybridization supports the proposal of new species in the genera Actinobacillus and Pasteurella. The following new species are proposed: Actinobacillus rossii sp. nov., from the vaginas of postparturient sows; Actinobacillus seminis sp. nov., nom. rev., associated with epididymitis of sheep; Pasteurella bettii sp. nov., associated with human Bartholin gland abscess and finger infections; Pasteurella lymphangitidis sp. nov. (the BLG group), which causes bovine lymphangitis; Pasteurella mairi sp. nov., which causes abortion in sows; and Pasteurella trehalosi sp. nov., formerly biovar T of Pasteurella haemolytica, which causes septicemia in older lambs.

  16. Response to "Comment on `Construction of the landscape for multi-stable systems: Potential landscape, quasi-potential, A-type integral and beyond"' [J. Chem. Phys. 145, 147104 (2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Peijie; Li, Tiejun

    2016-10-01

    The uniqueness issue of SDE decomposition theory proposed by Ao and his co-workers has recently been discussed. A comprehensive study to investigate connections among different landscape theories [J. Chem. Phys. 144, 094109 (2016)] has pointed out that the decomposition is generally not unique, while Ao et al. recently argue that such conclusions are "incorrect" because the uniqueness of the decomposition for Ornstein-Uhlenbeck (O-U) process has been claimed before. In this response, we will demonstrate that the claimed "uniqueness" of the O-U process decomposition is invalid to serve as a counterexample according to the original definition of SDE decomposition. The absence of effective and concrete boundary conditions in previous SDE decomposition papers will be pointed out, and some other issues in the comment will also be responded.

  17. Comment on “Motion of a helical vortex filament in superfluid {sup 4}He under the extrinsic form of the local induction approximation” [Phys. Fluids 25, 085101 (2013)

    SciTech Connect

    Hietala, Niklas Hänninen, Risto

    2014-01-15

    We comment on the paper by Van Gorder [“Motion of a helical vortex filament in superfluid {sup 4}He under the extrinsic form of the local induction approximation,” Phys. Fluids 25, 085101 (2013)]. We point out that the flow of the normal fluid component parallel to the vortex will often lead into the Donnelly–Glaberson instability, which will cause the amplification of the Kelvin wave. We explain why the comparison to local nonlinear equation is unreasonable, and remark that neglecting the motion in the x-direction is not reasonable for a Kelvin wave with an arbitrary wavelength and amplitude. The correct equations in the general case are also derived.

  18. Comments on "Including the effects of temperature-dependent opacities in the implicit Monte Carlo algorithm" by N.A. Gentile [J. Comput. Phys. 230 (2011) 5100-5114

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Karabi

    2017-02-01

    We briefly comment on a paper by N.A. Gentile [J. Comput. Phys. 230 (2011) 5100-5114] in which the Fleck factor has been modified to include the effects of temperature-dependent opacities in the implicit Monte Carlo algorithm developed by Fleck and Cummings [1,2]. Instead of the Fleck factor, f = 1 / (1 + βcΔtσP), the author derived the modified Fleck factor g = 1 / (1 + βcΔtσP - min [σP‧ (a Tr4 - aT4) cΔt/ρCV, 0 ]) to be used in the Implicit Monte Carlo (IMC) algorithm in order to obtain more accurate solutions with much larger time steps. Here β = 4 aT3 / ρCV, σP is the Planck opacity and the derivative of Planck opacity w.r.t. the material temperature is σP‧ = dσP / dT.

  19. Response to 'Comment on 'Resonant dissociative electron transfer of the presolvated electron to CCl{sub 4} in liquid: Direct observation and lifetime of the CCl{sub 4}*{sup -} transition state' [J. Chem. Phys. 129, 027101 (2008)]'

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C.-R.; Drew, K.; Luo, T.; Lu, M.-J.; Lu, Q.-B.

    2008-07-14

    In our recent paper [J. Chem. Phys.128, 041102 (2008)], we reported a femtosecond time-resolved laser spectroscopic study of the electron transfer reaction of CCl{sub 4} in liquid ethanol. Our results provide direct evidence of the resonant dissociative electron transfer (RDET) of the presolvated electron to CCl{sub 4}, and indicate that RDET can be an efficient process in an aqueous environment. In a recent Comment, the author argues that the relevance of diethanolamine (DEA) induced destruction of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) in the polar stratosphere as a possible pathway for chemical ozone destruction should not be a motivation for further studies of DEA on CFC molecules, as no correlation is observed between polar chemical ozone loss and cosmic ray activity. Here, we show that this claim is misleading: it is made by using inconclusive and ambiguous data while ignoring pronounced and well-documented data.

  20. Model-based investigation of the circadian clock and cell cycle coupling in mouse embryonic fibroblasts: Prediction of RevErb-α up-regulation during mitosis.

    PubMed

    Traynard, Pauline; Feillet, Céline; Soliman, Sylvain; Delaunay, Franck; Fages, François

    2016-11-01

    Experimental observations have put in evidence autonomous self-sustained circadian oscillators in most mammalian cells, and proved the existence of molecular links between the circadian clock and the cell cycle. Some mathematical models have also been built to assess conditions of control of the cell cycle by the circadian clock. However, recent studies in individual NIH3T3 fibroblasts have shown an unexpected acceleration of the circadian clock together with the cell cycle when the culture medium is enriched with growth factors, and the absence of such acceleration in confluent cells. In order to explain these observations, we study a possible entrainment of the circadian clock by the cell cycle through a regulation of clock genes around the mitosis phase. We develop a computational model and a formal specification of the observed behavior to investigate the conditions of entrainment in period and phase. We show that either the selective activation of RevErb-α or the selective inhibition of Bmal1 transcription during the mitosis phase, allow us to fit the experimental data on both period and phase, while a uniform inhibition of transcription during mitosis seems incompatible with the phase data. We conclude on the arguments favoring the RevErb-α up-regulation hypothesis and on some further predictions of the model.

  1. Applying the relativistic quantization condition to a three-particle bound state in a periodic box

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Maxwell T.; Sharpe, Stephen R.

    2017-02-01

    Using our recently developed relativistic three-particle quantization condition [Phys. Rev. D 90, 116003 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevD.90.116003; Phys. Rev. D 92, 114509 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevD.92.114509], we study the finite-volume energy shift of a spin-zero three-particle bound state. We reproduce the result obtained using nonrelativistic quantum mechanics by Meißner et al. in [Phys. Rev. Lett. 114, 091602 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.114.091602] and generalize the result to a moving frame.

  2. Identification of the Brucella melitensis vaccine strain Rev.1 in animals and humans in Israel by PCR analysis of the PstI site polymorphism of its omp2 gene.

    PubMed

    Bardenstein, Svetlana; Mandelboim, Michal; Ficht, Thomas A; Baum, Miriam; Banai, Menachem

    2002-04-01

    Adverse effects of strain persistence and secretion in milk have been encountered with the Brucella melitensis vaccine strain Rev.1. Field isolates obtained from vaccinated animals and from a human resembled the vaccine strain Rev.1 by conventional bacteriological tests. The lack of a specific molecular marker that could specifically characterize the commercial vaccine strain prevented confirmation of the homology of the Rev.1-like field isolates to the vaccine strain. The composition of the omp2 locus from two gene copies with differences in their PstI restriction endonuclease sites was used to establish an epidemiologic fingerprint for the omp2 gene in the Rev.1 vaccine strain. Primers designed to amplify DNA sequences that overlap the PstI site revealed a single 282-bp DNA band common to all Brucella spp. Agarose gel electrophoresis of the PstI digests of the PCR products from strains 16M and the vaccine strain Rev.1 revealed a distinctive profile that included three bands: one band for the intact 282-bp fragment amplified from omp2a and two bands resulting from the digestion of the amplified omp2b gene fragment, 238- and 44-bp DNA fragments, respectively. Amplified fragments of 37 Rev.1-like isolates, including 2 human isolates, also exhibited this pattern. In contrast, DNA digests of all other Israeli field isolates, including atypical B. melitensis biotype 1 and representatives of the biotype 2 and 3 isolates, produced two bands of 238 and 44 bp, respectively, corresponding with the digestion of both omp2a and omp2b genes. This method facilitates identification of the Rev.1 vaccine strain in both animals and humans in Israel.

  3. Journal of Applied Physics. Volume 63. Number 8. Part 2B. Proceedings of the Annual conference on Magnetism and Magnetic Materials (32nd) Held in Chicago, Illinois on 9-12 November 1987

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-04-15

    linear coupling. ’K. H. Michel and J. Naudts, Phys. Rev. Let. 39, 212 (1977). , I’Ph. Depondt and M. Debeau, 3, Phys. (Paris) 48, 1513 (1987). ’K. H... Michel , Phys. Rev. Lett. 57, 2188 (1986). IV. THE ROTATIONAL STATE HYPOTHESIS AND "’. Galam, Phys. Lett. A 122, 271 (1987). EXPERIMENTS "S. Galam, J...Reiter, Phys. Rev. 175, 631 (1968); F. Schwabl and K. H. Michel , Phys.Jo w )’- 1 . ) Rev. B 2,189 (1970). ’T. Schneider and H. R. Jauslin, Phys. Rev

  4. The Rev protein of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 counteracts the effect of an AU-rich negative element in the human papillomavirus type 1 late 3' untranslated region.

    PubMed Central

    Tan, W; Schwartz, S

    1995-01-01

    We have identified a sequence in the late 3' untranslated region of human papillomavirus type 1 mRNAs that acts posttranscriptionally to repress gene expression. Deletion analysis localized the inhibitory element to an AU-rich sequence between nucleotides 6958 and 6984 on the human papillomavirus type 1 genome. This sequence inhibits gene expression in an orientation-dependent manner. Upon transfection of eucaryotic cells with plasmids containing this sequence, approximately 4-fold-lower cytoplasmic mRNA levels and 64- to 128-fold-lower protein levels were produced compared with those produced by plasmids lacking the inhibitory sequence. Interestingly, providing the constitutive transport element of simian retrovirus type 1 in sense orientation counteracted inhibition exerted by the human papillomavirus type 1 sequence. Inhibition could also be overcome by the presence of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Rev protein in trans and its target sequence, the Rev-responsive element, in cis. Rev is a nuclear protein and acts by promoting nuclear export of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 mRNAs encoding structural proteins. Our results are consistent with a model for human papillomavirus type 1 late-gene expression in which mRNAs containing human papillomavirus type 1 inhibitory sequences enter a nonproductive route in the nucleus, resulting in inefficient mRNA utilization. Rev directs mRNA containing inhibitory sequences to a productive route by interacting with the Rev-responsive element. PMID:7707519

  5. Nuclear receptors Homo sapiens Rev-erbβ and Drosophila melanogaster E75 are thiolate-ligated heme proteins, which undergo redox-mediated ligand switching and bind CO and NO

    PubMed Central

    Marvin, Katherine A.; Reinking, Jeffrey L.; Lee, Andrea J.; Pardee, Keith M.; Krause, Henry M.; Burstyn, Judith N.

    2009-01-01

    Nuclear receptors E75, which regulates development in D. melanogaster, and Rev-erbβ, which regulates circadian rhythm in humans, bind heme within their ligand binding domains (LBD). The heme-bound ligand binding domains of E75 and Rev-erbβ were studied using electronic absorption, MCD, resonance Raman and EPR spectroscopies. Both proteins undergo redox-dependent ligand switching and CO- and NO-induced ligand displacement. In the Fe(III) oxidation state, the nuclear receptor hemes are low-spin and 6-coordinate with cysteine(thiolate) as one of the two axial heme ligands. The sixth ligand is a neutral donor, presumably histidine. When the heme is reduced to the Fe(II) oxidation state, the cysteine(thiolate) is replaced by a different neutral donor ligand, whose identity is not known. CO binds to the Fe(II) heme in both E75(LBD) and Rev-erbβ(LBD) opposite a sixth neutral ligand, plausibly the same histidine that served as the sixth ligand in the Fe(III) state. NO binds to the heme of both proteins; however, the NO-heme is 5-coordinate in E75 and 6-coordinate in Rev-erbβ. These nuclear receptors exhibit coordination characteristics that are similar to other known redox and gas sensors, suggesting that E75 and Rev-erbβ may function in heme-, redox- or gas-regulated control of cellular function. PMID:19405475

  6. Nuclear receptors homo sapiens Rev-erbbeta and Drosophila melanogaster E75 are thiolate-ligated heme proteins which undergo redox-mediated ligand switching and bind CO and NO.

    PubMed

    Marvin, Katherine A; Reinking, Jeffrey L; Lee, Andrea J; Pardee, Keith; Krause, Henry M; Burstyn, Judith N

    2009-07-28

    Nuclear receptors E75, which regulates development in Drosophila melanogaster, and Rev-erbbeta, which regulates circadian rhythm in humans, bind heme within their ligand binding domains (LBD). The heme-bound ligand binding domains of E75 and Rev-erbbeta were studied using electronic absorption, MCD, resonance Raman, and EPR spectroscopies. Both proteins undergo redox-dependent ligand switching and CO- and NO-induced ligand displacement. In the Fe(III) oxidation state, the nuclear receptor hemes are low spin and 6-coordinate with cysteine(thiolate) as one of the two axial heme ligands. The sixth ligand is a neutral donor, presumably histidine. When the heme is reduced to the Fe(II) oxidation state, the cysteine(thiolate) is replaced by a different neutral donor ligand, whose identity is not known. CO binds to the Fe(II) heme in both E75(LBD) and Rev-erbbeta(LBD) opposite a sixth neutral ligand, plausibly the same histidine that served as the sixth ligand in the Fe(III) state. NO binds to the heme of both proteins; however, the NO-heme is 5-coordinate in E75 and 6-coordinate in Rev-erbbeta. These nuclear receptors exhibit coordination characteristics that are similar to other known redox and gas sensors, suggesting that E75 and Rev-erbbeta may function in heme-, redox-, or gas-regulated control of cellular function.

  7. Comment on: Measurement of the force exerted on the surface of an object immersed in a plasma. Eur. Phys. J. D 69: 91 (2015), DOI: 10.1140/epjd/e2015-50743-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czarnetzki, Uwe; Tsankov, Tsanko V.

    2015-10-01

    Surfaces exposed to a plasma experience a certain pressure that pushes them away from the volume. This effect has been investigated experimentally in a recent article by Thomas Trottenberg, Thomas Richter, and Holger Kersten from Kiel University/Germany [Eur. Phys. J. D 69, 91 (2015)]. The experimental results are impressive and have actually drawn the attention of the community to an interesting question which so far has been largely ignored. In addition to their experimental results the Kiel group proposes also a rough concept in order to explain their findings which provides certainly a basic qualitative understanding of the physical processes involved. However, on a closer inspection the picture developed so far is not entirely satisfying and the problem seems to require a more fundamental approach. This comment shows that the effect of the wall pressure can be described exactly using only analytical methods. The physical situation is analyzed by three different approaches. First, the simple case of only one spatial dimension is presented in detail. Second, the case of spherical symmetry is analyzed by some simplifying assumptions in order to investigate the effect of higher dimensionality. Third, a formal derivation for arbitrary geometry is given. This general result includes the one-dimensional case but does not allow a convenient connection between the pressures at the wall and in the center. Finally, the results are summarized and some conclusions are drawn.

  8. Comment on “Magnetic field mediated low-temperature resistivity upturn in electron-doped La{sub 1−x}Hf{sub x}MnO{sub 3} manganite oxides” [J. Appl. Phys. 112, 123710 (2012)

    SciTech Connect

    Rozenberg, E.

    2014-01-21

    In a recent paper, Guo et al. [J. Appl. Phys. 112, 123710 (2012)] reported on characteristic features of the temperature (T) and magnetic field (H) dependences of electrical resistivity (ρ) in polycrystalline La{sub 1−x}Hf{sub x}MnO{sub 3} (x = 0.2 and 0.3) manganites. In particular, shallow minima were observed at some T{sub min} below 100 K on ρ(T) curves. Application of an external H ≤ 5 T leads first to a decrease in the T{sub min} value, while this value increases notably at H > 0.75 T. The authors attributed this complex behavior to competitive electron-electron interaction and Kondo-like spin dependent scattering of carriers. It is shown in the comment that such interpretation is very questionable due to the fundamental inapplicability of this approach for analysis of low-T conductivity in polycrystalline manganites. It seems that the most likely reason for the appearance of the low temperature minima on ρ(T) curves and their evolution upon field application is the well known grain boundary effects in magnetically and structurally inhomogeneous samples.

  9. Comment on "Solitons, Bäcklund transformation, and Lax pair for the (2 + 1)-dimensional Boiti-Leon- Pempinelli equation for the water waves" [J. Math. Phys. 51, 093519 (2010)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xin-Yi

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies on the water waves have been impressive. Of current interest in fluid physics, Jiang et al. [J. Math. Phys. 51, 093519 (2010)] have reported certain soliton interactions along with binary-Bell-polynomial-type Bäcklund transformation and Lax pair for the (2 + 1)-dimensional Boiti-Leon-Pempinelli system for water waves. However, the story introduced by that paper can be made more complete, since in fluid physics and other fields, the variable-coefficient models can describe many physical processes more realistically than their constant-coefficient counterparts. Hereby, on a (2 + 1)-dimensional variable-coefficient Boiti-Leon-Pempinelli generalization, water-wave symbolic computation is performed. For the horizontal velocity of the water wave as well as the wave elevation, variable-coefficient-dependent auto-Bäcklund transformation is constructed out, along with some variable-coefficient-dependent shock-wave-type solutions. Relevant variable-coefficient constraints are also given, with respect to water waves.

  10. Nuclear receptor Rev-erb alpha (Nr1d1) functions in concert with Nr2e3 to regulate transcriptional networks in the retina.

    PubMed

    Mollema, Nissa J; Yuan, Yang; Jelcick, Austin S; Sachs, Andrew J; von Alpen, Désirée; Schorderet, Daniel; Escher, Pascal; Haider, Neena B

    2011-03-08

    The majority of diseases in the retina are caused by genetic mutations affecting the development and function of photoreceptor cells. The transcriptional networks directing these processes are regulated by genes such as nuclear hormone receptors. The nuclear hormone receptor gene Rev-erb alpha/Nr1d1 has been widely studied for its role in the circadian cycle and cell metabolism, however its role in the retina is unknown. In order to understand the role of Rev-erb alpha/Nr1d1 in the retina, we evaluated the effects of loss of Nr1d1 to the developing retina and its co-regulation with the photoreceptor-specific nuclear receptor gene Nr2e3 in the developing and mature retina. Knock-down of Nr1d1 expression in the developing retina results in pan-retinal spotting and reduced retinal function by electroretinogram. Our studies show that NR1D1 protein is co-expressed with NR2E3 in the outer neuroblastic layer of the developing mouse retina. In the adult retina, NR1D1 is expressed in the ganglion cell layer and is co-expressed with NR2E3 in the outer nuclear layer, within rods and cones. Several genes co-targeted by NR2E3 and NR1D1 were identified that include: Nr2c1, Recoverin, Rgr, Rarres2, Pde8a, and Nupr1. We examined the cyclic expression of Nr1d1 and Nr2e3 over a twenty-four hour period and observed that both nuclear receptors cycle in a similar manner. Taken together, these studies reveal a novel role for Nr1d1, in conjunction with its cofactor Nr2e3, in regulating transcriptional networks critical for photoreceptor development and function.

  11. Viral diversity and diversification of major non-structural genes vif, vpr, vpu, tat exon 1 and rev exon 1 during primary HIV-1 subtype C infection.

    PubMed

    Rossenkhan, Raabya; Novitsky, Vladimir; Sebunya, Theresa K; Musonda, Rosemary; Gashe, Berhanu A; Essex, M

    2012-01-01

    To assess the level of intra-patient diversity and evolution of HIV-1C non-structural genes in primary infection, viral quasispecies obtained by single genome amplification (SGA) at multiple sampling timepoints up to 500 days post-seroconversion (p/s) were analyzed. The mean intra-patient diversity was 0.11% (95% CI; 0.02 to 0.20) for vif, 0.23% (95% CI; 0.08 to 0.38) for vpr, 0.35% (95% CI; -0.05 to 0.75) for vpu, 0.18% (95% CI; 0.01 to 0.35) for tat exon 1 and 0.30% (95% CI; 0.02 to 0.58) for rev exon 1 during the time period 0 to 90 days p/s. The intra-patient diversity increased gradually in all non-structural genes over the first year of HIV-1 infection, which was evident from the vif mean intra-patient diversity of 0.46% (95% CI; 0.28 to 0.64), vpr 0.44% (95% CI; 0.24 to 0.64), vpu 0.84% (95% CI; 0.55 to 1.13), tat exon 1 0.35% (95% CI; 0.14 to 0.56 ) and rev exon 1 0.42% (95% CI; 0.18 to 0.66) during the time period of 181 to 500 days p/s. There was a statistically significant increase in viral diversity for vif (p = 0.013) and vpu (p = 0.002). No associations between levels of viral diversity within the non-structural genes and HIV-1 RNA load during primary infection were found. The study details the dynamics of the non-structural viral genes during the early stages of HIV-1C infection.

  12. Phonon Squeezing by Raman Scattering.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nori, Franco; Hu, Xuedong

    1997-03-01

    We have studied quantum fluctuation properties of a crystal lattice, and proposed several mechanisms to achieve this goal(X. Hu and F. Nori, Phys. Rev. Lett. 76, 2294 (1996); Phys. Rev. B 53, 2419 (1996); preprint.).

  13. Reclassification of Brevibacterium imperiale (Steinhaus) and "Corynebacterium laevaniformans" (Dias and Bhat) in a Redefined Genus Microbacterium (Orla-Jensen), as Microbacterium imperiale comb. nov. and Microbacterium laevaniformans nom. rev.; comb. nov.

    PubMed

    Collins, M D; Jones, D; Kroppenstedt, R M

    1983-01-01

    Chemical, morphological and physiological data indicate a close relationship between Brevibacterium imperiale (Steinhaus), "Corynebacterium laevaniforms" (Dias and Bhat) and the species Microbacterium lacticum (Orla-Jensen). It is suggested that B. imperiale and "C. laevaniformans" be reclassified in a redefined genus Microbacterium, as Microbacterium imperiale (Steinhaus) comb. nov. and Microbacterium laevaniformans (Dias and Bhat) nom. rev.; comb, nov., respectively.

  14. The Autism Spectrum Screening Questionnaire (ASSQ)-Revised Extended Version (ASSQ-REV): An Instrument for Better Capturing the Autism Phenotype in Girls? A Preliminary Study Involving 191 Clinical Cases and Community Controls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kopp, Svenny; Gillberg, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    We wanted to develop and validate an extension of the Autism Spectrum Screening Questionnaire (ASSQ)-the ASSQ Revised Extended Version (ASSQ-REV)--for better capturing the female phenotype of autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Clinic girls and Clinic boys, most of whom with ASD and/or attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and Community…

  15. Construction of peptides with nucleobase amino acids: design and synthesis of the nucleobase-conjugated peptides derived from HIV-1 Rev and their binding properties to HIV-1 RRE RNA.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, T; Hamasaki, K; Ueno, A; Mihara, H

    2001-04-01

    In order to develop a novel molecule that recognizes a specific structure of RNA, we have attempted to design peptides having L-alpha-amino acids with a nucleobase at the side chain (nucleobase amino acid (NBA)), expecting that the function of a nucleobase which can specifically recognize a base in RNA is regulated in a peptide conformation. In this study, to demonstrate the applicability of the NBA units in the peptide to RNA recognition, we designed and synthesized a variety of NBA-conjugated peptides, derived from HIV-1 Rev. Circular dichroism study revealed that the conjugation of the Rev peptide with an NBA unit did not disturb the peptide conformation. RNA-binding affinities of the designed peptides with RRE IIB RNA were dependent on the structure of the nucleobase moieties in the peptides. The peptide having the cytosine NBA at the position of the Asn40 site in the Rev showed a higher binding ability for RRE IIB RNA, despite the diminishing the Asn40 function. Furthermore, the peptide having the guanine NBA at the position of the Arg44 site, which is the most important residue for the RNA binding in the Rev, bound to RRE IIB RNA in an ability similar to Rev34-50 with native sequence. These results demonstrate that an appropriate NBA unit in the peptide plays an important role in the RNA binding with a specific contact such as hydrogen bonding, and the interaction between the nucleobase in the peptide and the base in the RNA can enhance the RNA-binding affinity and specificity.

  16. Interface Properties of Wide Bandgap Semiconductor Structures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-12-01

    Appl. Phys., 44 (1973) 292. 3. J. A. Sajurjo, E. Lopez -Cruz, P.Vogh and M. Cardona, Phys. Rev., B28 (1983) 4579. 4. J. Sumakeris, Z. Sitar, K. S...Rev. 146,543 (1966). 22. P. J. Gielisse, S. S. Mitra, J. N. Plendi, R. D. Griffis, L. C. Mansur, R. Marshall, and E. A. Pascoe , Phys. Rev. 155, 1039

  17. The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) Rev-binding protein (HRB) is a co-factor for HIV-1 Nef-mediated CD4 downregulation.

    PubMed

    Landi, Alessia; Timermans, Cristina Garcia; Naessens, Evelien; Vanderstraeten, Hanne; Stove, Veronique; Verhasselt, Bruno

    2016-03-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-mediated CD4 downregulation is an important determinant of viral replication in vivo. Research on cellular co-factors involved in this process could lead to the identification of potential therapeutic targets. We found that CD4 surface levels were significantly higher in HIV-1-infected cells knocked-down for the HIV Rev-binding protein (HRB) compared with control cells. HRB knock-down affected CD4 downregulation induced by Nef but not by HIV-1 Vpu. Interestingly, the knock-down of the related protein HRBL (HRB-like), but not of the HRB interaction partner EPS15 (epidermal growth factor receptor pathway substrate 15), increased CD4 levels in Vpu-expressing cells significantly. Both of these proteins are known to be involved in HIV-1-mediated CD4 downregulation as co-factors of HIV-1 Nef. These results identify HRB as a previously unknown co-factor for HIV-1 Nef-mediated CD4 downregulation and highlight differences with the related protein HRBL, which affects the CD4 downregulation in a dual role as co-factor of both HIV-1 Nef and Vpu.

  18. Comment on ``Implementing of a precision fast thermoelectric cooler using a personal computer parallel port connection and ADN8830 controller'' [Rev. Sci. Instrum. 74, 3862 (2003)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sloman, A. W.

    2004-03-01

    Eli Flaxer has described a feedback controlled circuit to drive a Peltier junction to control the temperature of a specimen in the range 0 to 50 °C in a room temperature environment [Rev. Sci. Instrum. 74, 3862 (2003)]. The amount of heat transferred per unit current by a Peltier junction varies substantially with the temperature difference across the Peltier junction. Flaxer's circuit does not provide any mechanism to compensate for this variation. This means that if the proportional-integral-differential control loop he uses is optimized at any particular temperature differential, the control loop with be over-damped at lower specimen temperatures, and under-damped at higher specimen temperatures. A circuit using a second thermistor to monitor the temperature of the exhaust side of the Peltier junction, and a digital control loop, can minimize this problem [A. W. Sloman, Paul Buggs, James Molloy, and Douglas Stewart, Meas. Sci. Technol. 7, 1653 (1996)]. This circuit has the incidental advantage of offering ten times better temperature stability.

  19. The REV project -- Experiments, techniques and theoretical considerations with a view to an ILW and spent HTR fuel emplacement test at the Asse salt mine

    SciTech Connect

    Niephaus, D.

    1993-12-31

    In the Federal Republic of Germany, radioactive waste forms of pronounced decay heat generation shall be disposed of in deep vertical boreholes in the planned underground repository at Gorleben site. The disposal technique for heat generating intermediate-level waste and for spent HTR fuel is under development in the R and D project, entitled ``Intermediate-Level Waste and Spent HTR Fuel element Test Disposal in Boreholes`` (MHV Project). The project work is divided in two subprojects and has been going on since 1983. In the subproject ``Retrievable Emplacement Test`` (REV project) an emplacement test with already existing waste packages, i.e. steel drums with cladding hulls, fuel hardware and dissolver sludges from LWR-FE reprocessing and steel canisters with spent HTR pebble bed fuel will be conducted in the Asse salt mine. This paper deals with the results obtained from a long term precursory test program, the description of the installation work that has been done with a view to measure and analyze gases released into the atmospheres of the unlined emplacement boreholes, and a brief description of engineered equipment needed for handling, shipping and emplacing the waste packages.

  20. [Genetically modified crops: promises and good intentions are not enough (refutation to Espinoza et aL 2004, Rev. Biol. Trop. 52 (3): 727-732)].

    PubMed

    García, Jaime E G

    2007-06-01

    The arguments presented by Espinoza et al. in their paper "Relationship of genetically modified crops with the environment and health of the Costa Rican human population" published in this journal (Rev. Biol. Trop. 52: 727-732, 2004) are questioned and refuted. The arguments are confronted with evidence offered by scientists and national and international independent organizations around the world (e.g. World Health Organization, Consumers International, Physicians and Scientists for Responsible Application of Science and Technology, International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources, the Council of the University of Costa Rica, and the Independent Science Panel) showing the current uncertainty and limitations of science in this area, as well as those of proposed and applied biosafety approaches. Environment, biodiversity and food security are so important and basic matters, that there is need of serious testing, particularly when promises seem to be based on environmentally dangerous ideas promoted half a century ago by the so called "green revolution". Debate should continue, based on a holistic analysis of facts and with ethical reasoning, avoiding emotional positions that can confuse virtual reality with reality.

  1. PhysDoc: A Distributed Network of Physics Institutions: Collecting, Indexing, and Searching High Quality Documents by Using Harvest; The Dublin Core Metadata Initiative: Mission, Current Activities, and Future Directions; Information Services for Higher Education: A New Competitive Space; Intellectual Property Conservancies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Severiens, Thomas; Hohlfeld, Michael; Zimmermann, Kerstin; Hilf, Eberhard R.; von Ossietzky, Carl; Weibel, Stuart L.; Koch, Traugott; Hughes, Carol Ann; Bearman, David

    2000-01-01

    Includes four articles that discuss a variety to topics, including a distributed network of physics institutions documents called PhysDocs which harvests information from the local Web-servers of professional physics institutions; the Dublin Core metadata initiative; information services for higher education in a competitive environment; and…

  2. Project Execution Plan, Rev. 3

    SciTech Connect

    IT Corporation, Las Vegas

    2002-08-01

    This plan addresses project activities encompassed by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office, Environmental Restoration Division and conforms to the requirements contained in the Life-Cycle Asset Management, DOE Order 430.1A; The Joint Program Office Policy on Project Management in Support of DOE Order 430.1; Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets, DOE Order 413.3; the Project Execution and Engineering Management Planning Guide, GPG-FM-010; and other applicable Good Practice Guides; and the FY 2001 Integrated Planning, Accountability, and Budgeting System Policy Guidance. The plan also reflects the milestone philosophies of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, as agreed to by the State of Nevada, the DOE, and the U.S. Department of Defense; and traditional project management philosophies such as the development of life-cycle costs, schedules, and work scope; identification o f roles and responsibilities; and baseline management and controls.

  3. Inhibition of HIV-1 gene expression by novel macrophage-tropic DNA enzymes targeted to cleave HIV-1 TAT/Rev RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Unwalla, H; Banerjea, A C

    2001-01-01

    Many regions of the HIV-1 genome have been targeted in earlier studies by RNA-cleaving DNA enzymes possessing the 10-23 catalytic motif, and efficient inhibition of HIV-1 gene expression was reported. All these studies employed charged synthetic lipids to introduce the catalytic DNA into the mammalian cells, which severely limits its practical application and usefulness in vivo. Taking advantage of the ability of G residues to interact directly with the scavenger receptors on the macrophages, we synthesized a DNA enzyme 5970 that contained 10 G residues at the 3' end. With the aim of improving the intracellular stability of the DNA enzyme 5970, we added two short stretches of stem-loop structures that were 12 bases long on either side of the DNA enzyme 5970. DNA enzyme 5970 without the poly-G tracts cleaved the synthetic RNA of HIV-1 TAT/Rev, two important regulatory proteins of HIV, very efficiently in a sequence-specific manner. Addition of 10 G residues at the 3' end of the DNA enzyme affected the cleavage efficiency only marginally whereas the same DNA enzyme with stem-loop structures on either end was significantly less efficient. The DNA enzyme with the poly-G tract at its 3' end was taken up specifically by a human macrophage-specific cell line directly in the absence of Lipofectin and was also able to inhibit HIV-1 gene expression in a transient-expression system as well as when challenged with the virus. The potential applications of these novel macrophage-tropic DNA enzymes are discussed. PMID:11415445

  4. Modifier genes as therapeutics: the nuclear hormone receptor Rev Erb alpha (Nr1d1) rescues Nr2e3 associated retinal disease.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Nelly M; Yuan, Yang; Leehy, Barrett D; Baid, Rinku; Kompella, Uday; DeAngelis, Margaret M; Escher, Pascal; Haider, Neena B

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear hormone receptors play a major role in many important biological processes. Most nuclear hormone receptors are ubiquitously expressed and regulate processes such as metabolism, circadian function, and development. They function in these processes to maintain homeostasis through modulation of transcriptional gene networks. In this study we evaluate the effectiveness of a nuclear hormone receptor gene to modulate retinal degeneration and restore the integrity of the retina. Currently, there are no effective treatment options for retinal degenerative diseases leading to progressive and irreversible blindness. In this study we demonstrate that the nuclear hormone receptor gene Nr1d1 (Rev-Erbα) rescues Nr2e3-associated retinal degeneration in the rd7 mouse, which lacks a functional Nr2e3 gene. Mutations in human NR2E3 are associated with several retinal degenerations including enhanced S cone syndrome and retinitis pigmentosa. The rd7 mouse, lacking Nr2e3, exhibits an increase in S cones and slow, progressive retinal degeneration. A traditional genetic mapping approach previously identified candidate modifier loci. Here, we demonstrate that in vivo delivery of the candidate modifier gene, Nr1d1 rescues Nr2e3 associated retinal degeneration. We observed clinical, histological, functional, and molecular restoration of the rd7 retina. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the mechanism of rescue at the molecular and functional level is through the re-regulation of key genes within the Nr2e3-directed transcriptional network. Together, these findings reveal the potency of nuclear receptors as modulators of disease and specifically of NR1D1 as a novel therapeutic for retinal degenerations.

  5. Immunological assay after vaccination of goats with Brucella melitensis Rev. I and Brucella abortus 45/20 vaccines at Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Taher, S A; Ewais, M A

    1997-01-01

    The living smooth Brucella melitensis Rev. I vaccine given in the normal dose (7x10(8) organism) to goats 3 to 5 months of age stimulated a marked increase in agglutinin titer. Fractionation of pools of serum by gel filtration by anion exchange chromatography, using diethylaminoethyl (DEAE -) cellulose showed that both IgM and IgG agglutinins were present from 12 to 47 days after goats were vaccinated. Only mercaptoethanol (ME)-sensitive agglutinins were detected in most goats 4 months after vaccination, but 2 of 30 goats retained ME-resistant agglutinins for the 13 1/2 - month observation period. Fractionation of serums from goats representative of these 2 types of serologic response indicated that most goats had only IgM agglutinins, whereas the 2 given goats had activity in the IgG fraction. Adult goats given Brucella abortus 42/20 adjuvant vaccine and revaccinated 5 months later developed low agglutination titers to smooth antigen, and all became test positive to the antiglobulin test. Fractionation of serum of pools taken 1 week and 8 months after revaccination indicated that antibody activity was restricted to the IgG fraction. Sera from 5 vaccinated and nonvaccinated goats which were positive by bacteriological culture examination at necropsy 31 to 47 days after goats were given conjunctival inoculation of virulent B. melitensis had antibody activity in both IgG and IgM fractions. Test positive reaction to the ME, complement-fixation (CF), and antiglobulin (AG) test were restricted to the IgG-containing fractions of serum, whereas reactions to the agglutination (STT) and the card tests appeared with either or both fractions. The effect of these findings on the choice of tests for the differentiation of vaccination response is discussed.

  6. Rough mutants defective in core and O-polysaccharide synthesis and export induce antibodies reacting in an indirect ELISA with smooth lipopolysaccharide and are less effective than Rev 1 vaccine against Brucella melitensis infection of sheep.

    PubMed

    Barrio, María B; Grilló, María J; Muñoz, Pilar M; Jacques, Isabelle; González, David; de Miguel, María J; Marín, Clara M; Barberán, Montserrat; Letesson, Jean-J; Gorvel, Jean-P; Moriyón, Ignacio; Blasco, José M; Zygmunt, Michel S

    2009-03-10

    Classical brucellosis vaccines induce antibodies to the O-polysaccharide section of the lipopolysaccharide that interfere in serodiagnosis. Brucella rough (R) mutants lack the O-polysaccharide but their usefulness as vaccines is controversial. Here, Brucella melitensis R mutants in all main lipopolysaccharide biosynthetic pathways were evaluated in sheep in comparison with the reference B. melitensis Rev 1 vaccine. In a first experiment, these mutants were tested for ability to induce anti-O-polysaccharide antibodies, persistence and spread through target organs, and innocuousness. Using the data obtained and those of genetic studies, three candidates were selected and tested for efficacy as vaccines against a challenge infecting 100% of unvaccinated ewes. Protection by R vaccines was 54% or less whereas Rev 1 afforded 100% protection. One-third of R mutant vaccinated ewes became positive in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay with smooth lipopolysaccharide due to the core epitopes remaining in the mutated lipopolysaccharide. We conclude that R vaccines interfere in lipopolysaccharide immunosorbent assays and are less effective than Rev 1 against B. melitensis infection of sheep.

  7. Erratum: Evolution of precipitate morphology during heat treatment and its implications for the superconductivity in KxFe1.6+ySe2 single crystals [Phys. Rev. B 86 , 144507 (2012)

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Y.; Xing, Q.; Dennis, K. W.; McCallum, R. W.; Lograsso, T. A.

    2015-08-14

    In this article, we study the relationship between precipitate morphology and superconductivity in KxFe1.6+ySe2 single crystals grown by self-flux method. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) measurements revealed that the superconducting phase forms a network in the samples quenched above iron vacancy order-disorder transition temperature Ts, whereas it aggregates into micrometer-sized rectangular bars and aligns as disconnected chains in the furnace-cooled samples.

  8. Control of Brucella melitensis infection in a large camel herd in Saudi Arabia using antibiotherapy and vaccination with Rev. 1 vaccine.

    PubMed

    Radwan, A I; Bekairi, S I; Mukayel, A A; al-Bokmy, A M; Prasad, P V; Azar, F N; Coloyan, E R

    1995-09-01

    The authors describe an attempt to control Brucella melitensis infection in a large camel herd in Saudi Arabia. Sera from the entire herd (2,536) were examined by the Rose Bengal and standard United States of America buffered plate agglutination tests. The overall Brucella seroprevalence was 8%. Milk samples from the 120 seropositive milking camels were cultured on Brucella-selective media. B. melitensis biovars 1, 2 and 3 were isolated from 41 camels (34%). Seropositive camels (202) were treated for the first time with a combination of long-acting oxytetracycline (OTC) at a dose of 25 mg/kg administered intramuscularly (i.m.) every 2 days for 30 days and streptomycin at 25 mg/kg i.m. every 2 days for 16 days. In addition, milking camels were given OTC-intramammary infusion at a rate of 10 ml/teat every 2 days for 8 days. This regimen was found to be effective in eliminating the shedding of Brucella organisms by camels, with no relapse. Moreover, all treated camels became seronegative within 16 months after treatment. Seronegative camels (2,331) were vaccinated for the first time with the B. melitensis Rev. 1 strain vaccine, as follows: a) 175 young camels (aged three months to one year) were each inoculated subcutaneously with a full dose (1-2 x 10(9) viable organisms in 1 ml). Brucella antibody titres between 1:50 and 1:200 were detected 2-4 weeks post-vaccination. Brucella antibodies decreased gradually until the animals became seronegative 8 months after vaccination. b) 2,156 camels aged more than one year were each inoculated subcutaneously with a reduced dose (1-2 x 10(6) viable organisms in 1 ml). Antibody titres measured 2-4 weeks post-vaccination varied from 1:25 to 1:200. The titres decreased gradually, until the animals became seronegative 3 months post-vaccination. No Brucella organisms were recovered from repeated udder secretion samples from all vaccinated milking camels, and no abortions were recorded among pregnant vaccinated camels.

  9. Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 552: Area 12 Muckpile and Ponds, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0 with Errata Sheet

    SciTech Connect

    Laura Pastor

    2005-09-01

    This Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD)/Closure Report (CR) has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 552, Area 12 Muckpile and Ponds, Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nevada. The corrective actions proposed in this document are in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (FFACO) that was agreed to by the State of Nevada, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and the U.S. Department of Defense (FFACO, 1996). The NTS is approximately 65 miles (mi) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada (Figure 1-1). Corrective Action Unit 552 is comprised of the corrective action site (CAS) that is shown on Figure 1-2 and listed below: 12-23-05, Ponds. The ponds were originally constructed to catch runoff from the muckpile. As the muckpile continued to be extended to the north and to the east, it became impossible to ensure that all of the runoff from the muckpile was funneled into the pond. Some of the runoff from the muckpile continues to be caught in the upper pond, but portions of the muckpile have eroded, diverting much of the runoff away from the ponds. Regarding the other ponds, there is no evidence that any of the overflow ponds ever received runoff from overflow of the upper pond. The muckpile was removed from CAU 552 because an active leachfield exists within the muckpile and there are current activities at G-Tunnel. A detailed discussion of the history of this CAU is presented in the ''Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) for Corrective Action Unit 552: Area 12 Muckpile and Ponds, Nevada Test Site, Nevada'', Rev. 1 (NNSA/NSO, 2005). Corrective Action Unit 552, Area 12 Muckpile and Ponds, consists of one site located in the southern portion of Area 12. Corrective Action Site 12-23-05 consists of dry ponds adjacent to the G-Tunnel muckpile. The ponds were used to contain effluent from the G-Tunnel. The purpose of this CADD/CR is to provide justification for the closure of CAU 552 with no further corrective action. This justification is based on

  10. Supplement to the paper "Quadratic Sagnac effect — the influence of the gravitational potential of the Coriolis force on the phase difference between the arms of a rotating Michelson interferometer (an explanation of D C Miller's experimental results, 1921 - 1926)" (Usp. Fiz. Nauk 185 431 (2015) [Phys. Usp. 58 398 (2015)])

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malykin, G. B.; Pozdnyakova, V. I.

    2015-08-01

    The paper "Quadratic Sagnac effect — the influence of the gravitational potential of the Coriolis force on the phase difference between the arms of a rotating Michelson interferometer (an explanation of D C Miller's experimental results, 1921 - 1926)" (Usp. Fiz. Nauk 185 431 (2015) [Phys. Usp. 58 398 (2015)]) is amended and supplemented with information concerning earlier work on the influence of rotation on Michelson - Morley's nonzero results.

  11. Molecular Optics Nonlinear Optical Processes in Organic and Polymeric Crystals and Films. Part 1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-11-01

    Rev. All, 1507 (1975) [711 Bonifacio, R. and Lugiato, L.A., Phys. Rev. A12, 587 (1975) j [72] Orenstein , M., Katriel, J., and Speiser, S., Phys. Rev...A35, 1192 (1987) [73] Orenstein , M., Katriel, J., and Speiser, S., Phys. Rev. A35, 2175 (1987) I [74] Speiser, S., and Chisena, F.L., SPIE vol. 824...Function Approaches to Stochastic Problems in Con- densed Matter, ed. Evans , M.W., Grigolini, P., and Pastoriparravicini, G., Advances in Chemical Physics

  12. Series of (2+1)-dimensional stable self-dual interacting conformal field theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Meng; Xu, Cenke

    2016-12-01

    Using the duality between seemingly different (2+1)-dimensional [(2 +1 )d ] conformal field theories (CFT) proposed recently [D. T. Son, Phys. Rev. X 5, 031027 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevX.5.031027; M. A. Metlitski and A. Vishwanath, Phys. Rev. B 93, 245151 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevB.93.245151; C. Wang and T. Senthil, Phys. Rev. X 6, 011034 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevX.6.011034; C. Wang and T. Senthil, Phys. Rev. X 5, 041031 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevX.5.041031; C. Wang and T. Senthil, Phys. Rev. B 93, 085110 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevB.93.085110; C. Xu and Y.-Z. You, Phys. Rev. B 92, 220416 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevB.92.220416; D. F. Mross et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 117, 016802 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.117.016802; A. Karch and D. Tong, arXiv:1606.01893; N. Seiberg et al., arXiv:1606.01989; P.-S. Hsin and N. Seiberg, arXiv:1607.07457], we study a series of (2 +1 )d stable self-dual interacting CFTs. These CFTs can be realized (for instance) on the boundary of the 3 d bosonic topological insulator protected by U(1) and time-reversal symmetry (T ), and they remain stable as long as these symmetries are preserved. When realized as a boundary system, these CFTs can be driven into anomalous fractional quantum Hall states once T is broken. We demonstrate that the newly proposed dualities allow us to study these CFTs quantitatively through a controlled calculation, without relying on a large flavor number of matter fields. We also propose a numerical test for our results, which would provide strong evidence for the originally proposed duality between Dirac fermion and QED.

  13. Qualification of the Savannah River National Laboratories Coulometer, Model SRNL-Rev. 2 (Serial # SRNL-003 Coulometer) for use in Process 3401a, Plutonium Assay by Controlled Coulometer

    SciTech Connect

    Tandon, Lav; Colletti, Lisa M.; Drake, Lawrence R.; Lujan, Elmer J. W.; Garduno, Katherine

    2012-08-22

    This report discusses the process used to prove in the SRNL-Rev.2 coulometer for isotopic data analysis used in the special plutonium material project. In May of 2012, the PAR 173 coulometer system that had been the workhorse of the Plutonium Assay team since the early 1970s became inoperable. A new coulometer system had been purchased from Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and installed in August of 2011. Due to funding issues the new system was not qualified at that time. Following the failure of the PAR 173, it became necessary to qualify the new system for use in Process 3401a, Plutonium Assay by Controlled Coulometry. A qualification plan similar to what is described in PQR -141a was followed. Experiments were performed to establish a statistical summary of the performance of the new system by monitoring the repetitive analysis of quality control sample, PEOL, and the assay of plutonium metals obtained from the Plutonium Exchange Program. The data for the experiments was acquired using work instructions ANC125 and ANC195. Figure 1 shows approximately 2 years of data for the PEOL material obtained using the PAR 173. The required acceptance criteria for the sample are that it returns the correct value for the quality control material of 88.00% within 2 sigma (95% Confidence Interval). It also must meet daily precision standards that are set from the historical data analysis of decades of data. The 2 sigma value that is currently used is 0.146 % as evaluated by the Statistical Science Group, CCS-6. The average value of the PEOL quality control material run in 10 separate days on the SRNL-03 coulometer is 87.98% with a relative standard deviation of 0.04 at the 95% Confidence interval. The date of data acquisition is between 5/23/2012 to 8/1/2012. The control samples are run every day experiments using the coulometer are carried out. It is also used to prove an instrument is in statistical control before any experiments are undertaken. The total number of

  14. Chemical Reactions at the Metal/Silicon Interface.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-10-31

    Sci. Technol. 16, 1120 (1979). 8. J.D. Riley, L. Ley and J. Azoulay , Phys. Rev. B20, 776 (1979). 9. A.R. Williams, J. Kubler and C.D. Gelatt, Jr., Phys...Tauc, and B. G. Bagley, Phys. Rev. B 13, 3284 (1976). 42. J. D. Riley, L. Ley, J. Azoulay , and K. Terakura, Phys. Rev. B 20, 776, (1979). 43. P

  15. Evolution of the Antisense Overlap between Genes for Thyroid Hormone Receptor and Rev-erbα and Characterization of an Exonic G-Rich Element That Regulates Splicing of TRα2 mRNA

    PubMed Central

    Munroe, Stephen H.; Morales, Christopher H.; Duyck, Tessa H.; Waters, Paul D.

    2015-01-01

    The α-thyroid hormone receptor gene (TRα) codes for two functionally distinct proteins: TRα1, the α-thyroid hormone receptor; and TRα2, a non-hormone-binding variant. The final exon of TRα2 mRNA overlaps the 3’ end of Rev-erbα mRNA, which encodes another nuclear receptor on the opposite strand of DNA. To understand the evolution of this antisense overlap, we sequenced these genes and mRNAs in the platypus Orthorhynchus anatinus. Despite its strong homology with other mammals, the platypus TRα/Rev-erbα locus lacks elements essential for expression of TRα2. Comparative analysis suggests that alternative splicing of TRα2 mRNA expression evolved in a stepwise fashion before the divergence of eutherian and marsupial mammals. A short G-rich element (G30) located downstream of the alternative 3’splice site of TRα2 mRNA and antisense to the 3’UTR of Rev-erbα plays an important role in regulating TRα2 splicing. G30 is tightly conserved in eutherian mammals, but is absent in marsupials and monotremes. Systematic deletions and substitutions within G30 have dramatically different effects on TRα2 splicing, leading to either its inhibition or its enhancement. Mutations that disrupt one or more clusters of G residues enhance splicing two- to three-fold. These results suggest the G30 sequence can adopt a highly structured conformation, possibly a G-quadruplex, and that it is part of a complex splicing regulatory element which exerts both positive and negative effects on TRα2 expression. Since mutations that strongly enhance splicing in vivo have no effect on splicing in vitro, it is likely that the regulatory role of G30 is mediated through linkage of transcription and splicing. PMID:26368571

  16. Reclassification of Xanthomonas campestris pv. citri (ex Hasse 1915) Dye 1978 forms A, B/C/D, and E as X. smithii subsp. citri (ex Hasse) sp. nov. nom. rev. comb. nov., X. fuscans subsp. aurantifolii (ex Gabriel 1989) sp. nov. nom. rev. comb. nov., and X. alfalfae subsp. citrumelo (ex Riker and Jones) Gabriel et al., 1989 sp. nov. nom. rev. comb. nov.; X. campestris pv malvacearum (ex smith 1901) Dye 1978 as X. smithii subsp. smithii nov. comb. nov. nom. nov.; X. campestris pv. alfalfae (ex Riker and Jones, 1935) dye 1978 as X. alfalfae subsp. alfalfae (ex Riker et al., 1935) sp. nov. nom. rev.; and "var. fuscans" of X. campestris pv. phaseoli (ex Smith, 1987) Dye 1978 as X. fuscans subsp. fuscans sp. nov.

    PubMed

    Schaad, Norman W; Postnikova, Elena; Lacy, George H; Sechler, Aaron; Agarkova, Irina; Stromberg, Paul E; Stromberg, Verlyn K; Vidaver, Anne K

    2005-08-01

    , respectively, Xanthomonas smithii subsp. citri (ex Hasse, 1915) sp. nov. nom. rev. comb. nov., Xanthomonas fuscans subsp. aurantifolii (ex Gabriel et al., 1989) sp. nov. nom. rev. comb. nov., and Xanthomonas alfalfae subsp. citrumelo (ex Riker and Jones) Gabriel et al., 1989 nov. rev. comb. nov. Furthermore, based on the analysis of 40 strains of 19 other xanthomonads, we propose to reclassify X. campestris pv. malvacearum (ex Smith, 1901) Dye 1978 as X. smithii subsp. smithii sp. nov. comb. nov. nom. nov.; X. campestris pv. alfalfae (ex Riker and Jones) Dye 1978 as X. alfalfae subsp. alfalfae (ex Riker et al., 1935) sp. nov. nov. rev.; and "var. fuscans" (ex Burkholder 1930) of X. campestris pv. phaseoli (ex Smith, 1897) as X. fuscans subsp. fuscans sp. nov.

  17. Two new species of Esthemopsis C. Felder & R. Felder, 1865 (Lepidoptera: Riodinidae: Symmachiini) from southeastern and northeastern Brazil, with taxonomic comments on Esthemopsis teras (Stichel, 1910) stat. rev. and Esthemopsis pallida Lathy, 1932 stat. nov.

    PubMed

    Silva Dias, Fernando Maia; Dolibaina, Diego Rodrigo; Mielke, Olaf Hermann Hendrik; Casagrande, Mirna Martins

    2014-03-27

    Two new species of Esthemopsis C. Felder & R. Felder, 1865 from southeastern and northeastern Brazil are described, Esthemopsis sateri sp. nov. and Esthemopsis diamantina sp. nov., and revised and new combinations are proposed for Esthemopsis teras (Stichel, 1910) stat. rev. and Esthemopsis pallida Lathy, 1932 stat. nov., respectively. Lectotypes are designated for Lepricornis teras Stichel, 1910 and Esthemopsis caerulea pallida Lathy, 1932. The habitus of male and female specimens of the species discussed are illustrated; male head and labial palpus pictures, male and female genitalia illustrations are provided.

  18. MMW radar enhanced vision systems: the Helicopter Autonomous Landing System (HALS) and Radar-Enhanced Vision System (REVS) are rotary and fixed wing enhanced flight vision systems that enable safe flight operations in degraded visual environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, Jack; Schneider, John; Cariani, Pete

    2013-05-01

    Sierra Nevada Corporation (SNC) has developed rotary and fixed wing millimeter wave radar enhanced vision systems. The Helicopter Autonomous Landing System (HALS) is a rotary-wing enhanced vision system that enables multi-ship landing, takeoff, and enroute flight in Degraded Visual Environments (DVE). HALS has been successfully flight tested in a variety of scenarios, from brown-out DVE landings, to enroute flight over mountainous terrain, to wire/cable detection during low-level flight. The Radar Enhanced Vision Systems (REVS) is a fixed-wing Enhanced Flight Vision System (EFVS) undergoing prototype development testing. Both systems are based on a fast-scanning, threedimensional 94 GHz radar that produces real-time terrain and obstacle imagery. The radar imagery is fused with synthetic imagery of the surrounding terrain to form a long-range, wide field-of-view display. A symbology overlay is added to provide aircraft state information and, for HALS, approach and landing command guidance cuing. The combination of see-through imagery and symbology provides the key information a pilot needs to perform safe flight operations in DVE conditions. This paper discusses the HALS and REVS systems and technology, presents imagery, and summarizes the recent flight test results.

  19. A recombinant subunit vaccine based on the insertion of 27 amino acids from Omp31 to the N-terminus of BLS induced a similar degree of protection against B. ovis than Rev.1 vaccination.

    PubMed

    Cassataro, Juliana; Pasquevich, Karina A; Estein, Silvia M; Laplagne, Diego A; Velikovsky, Carlos A; de la Barrera, Silvia; Bowden, Raúl; Fossati, Carlos A; Giambartolomei, Guillermo H; Goldbaum, Fernando A

    2007-05-30

    The development of an effective subunit vaccine against brucellosis is a research area of intense interest. The enzyme lumazine synthase from Brucella spp. (BLS) is highly immunogenic, presumably due to its decameric arrangement and remarkable stability. In this work we decided to develop a chimera with the scaffold protein BLS decorated with 10 copies of a known protective epitope derived from an outer membrane protein of 31kDa (Omp31) from Brucella spp. Vaccination of BALB/c mice with the chimera as a recombinant protein (rBLSOmp31) provided the best protection level against Brucella ovis, which was higher than the given by the co-delivery of both recombinant proteins (rBLS + rOmp31) and similar than the control vaccine Brucella melitensis strain Rev.1. Moreover rBLSOmp31 induced protection against Brucella melitensis but to a lesser degree than Rev.1. The chimera induced a strong humoral response against the inserted peptide. It also induced peptide- and BLS-specific T helper 1 and cytotoxic T responses. In conclusion, our results indicate that BLSOmp31 could be a useful candidate for the development of subunit vaccines against brucellosis since it elicits humoral, T helper and cytotoxic immune responses and protection against smooth and rough species of Brucella.

  20. Spintronics: A Spin-Based Electronics Vision for the Future

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-11-01

    19. C . T. Chen et al., Phys. Rev. B 48, 642 (1993). 20. D. Spanke et al., Phys. Rev. B 58, 5201 (1998). 21. S. S. P. Parkin et al., J. Appl. Phys. 85...Celotta, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 61, 2501 (1990). 29. J. Barnes , L. Mei, B. M. Lairson, F. B. Dunning, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 70, 246 (1999). 30. D. L. Abraham, H...Science 290, 492 (2000). 47. B. C . Choi, M. Belov, W. K. Hiebert, G. E. Ballentine, M. R. Freeman, Phys. Rev. Lett. 86, 728 (2001). 48. T. M

  1. Translesion Synthesis of the N(2)-2'-Deoxyguanosine Adduct of the Dietary Mutagen IQ in Human Cells: Error-Free Replication by DNA Polymerase κ and Mutagenic Bypass by DNA Polymerases η, ζ, and Rev1.

    PubMed

    Bose, Arindam; Millsap, Amy D; DeLeon, Arnie; Rizzo, Carmelo J; Basu, Ashis K

    2016-09-19

    Translesion synthesis (TLS) of the N(2)-2'-deoxyguanosine (dG-N(2)-IQ) adduct of the carcinogen 2-amino-3-methylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoline (IQ) was investigated in human embryonic kidney 293T cells by replicating plasmid constructs in which the adduct was individually placed at each guanine (G1, G2, or G3) of the NarI sequence (5'-CG1G2CG3CC-3'). TLS efficiency was 38%, 29%, and 25% for the dG-N(2)-IQ located at G1, G2, and G3, respectively, which suggests that dG-N(2)-IQ is bypassed more efficiently by one or more DNA polymerases at G1 than at either G2 or G3. TLS efficiency was decreased 8-35% in cells with knockdown of pol η, pol κ, pol ι, pol ζ, or Rev1. Up to 75% reduction in TLS occurred when pol η, pol ζ, and Rev1 were simultaneously knocked down, suggesting that these three polymerases play important roles in dG-N(2)-IQ bypass. Mutation frequencies (MFs) of dG-N(2)-IQ at G1, G2, and G3 were 23%, 17%, and 11%, respectively, exhibiting a completely reverse trend of the previously reported MF of the C8-dG adduct of IQ (dG-C8-IQ), which is most mutagenic at G3 ( ( 2015 ) Nucleic Acids Res. 43 , 8340 - 8351 ). The major type of mutation induced by dG-N(2)-IQ was targeted G → T, as was reported for dG-C8-IQ. In each site, knockdown of pol κ resulted in an increase in MF, whereas MF was reduced when pol η, pol ι, pol ζ, or Rev1 was knocked down. The reduction in MF was most pronounced when pol η, pol ζ, and Rev1 were simultaneously knocked down and especially when the adduct was located at G3, where MF was reduced by 90%. We conclude that pol κ predominantly performs error-free TLS of the dG-N(2)-IQ adduct, whereas pols η, pol ζ, and Rev1 cooperatively carry out the error-prone TLS. However, in vitro experiments using yeast pol ζ and κ showed that the former was inefficient in full-length primer extension on dG-N(2)-IQ templates, whereas the latter was efficient in both error-free and error-prone extensions. We believe that the observed differences

  2. Development of a Discharge Pumped 13 nm Laser for Metrology of Projection Lithography Optics at the Manufacture-Site

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-05-31

    tute ~Nauka, Moscow, 1998!, Vol. 13 ~in Russian!. @18# L. M. Biberman, Sov . Phys . JETP 17 416 ~1947!; T. Holstein, Phys . Rev. 72, 1212 ~1947!; 83 1159...Tomasel, O.D. Cortazar, D. Hartshorn, J.L.A. Chilla,, Phys . Rev. Lett ., 73, 2192, 1994; J.J. Rocca, D.P.Clark, J.L.A. Chilla, and V.N. Shlyaptsev, Phys ...Rev. Lett . 77, 1476-1479, (1996). 2. F.G. Tomasel, J.J.Rocca, V.N. Shlyaptsev, and C.D. Macchietto, Phys . Rev. A 55, 1437-1440 (1997). 3. M. Frati

  3. Zero-Prandtl-number convection with slow rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maity, Priyanka; Kumar, Krishna

    2014-10-01

    We present the results of our investigations of the primary instability and the flow patterns near onset in zero-Prandtl-number Rayleigh-Bénard convection with uniform rotation about a vertical axis. The investigations are carried out using direct numerical simulations of the hydrodynamic equations with stress-free horizontal boundaries in rectangular boxes of size (2π/kx) × (2π/ky) × 1 for different values of the ratio η = kx/ky. The primary instability is found to depend on η and Ta. Wavy rolls are observed at the primary instability for smaller values of η (1/√{3} ≤ η ≤ 2 except at η = 1) and for smaller values of Ta. We observed Küppers-Lortz (KL) type patterns at the primary instability for η = 1/√{3} and Ta ≥ 40. The fluid patterns are found to exhibit the phenomenon of bursting, as observed in experiments [K. M. S. Bajaj, G. Ahlers, and W. Pesch, "Rayleigh-Bénard convection with rotation at small Prandtl numbers," Phys. Rev. E 65, 056309 (2002)]. Periodic wavy rolls are observed at onset for smaller values of Ta, while KL-type patterns are observed for Ta ≥ 100 for η =√{3}. In case of η = 2, wavy rolls are observed for smaller values of Ta and KL-type patterns are observed for 25 ≤ Ta ≤ 575. Quasi-periodically varying patterns are observed in the oscillatory regime (Ta > 575). The behavior is quite different at η = 1. A time dependent competition between two sets of mutually perpendicular rolls is observed at onset for all values of Ta in this case. Fluid patterns are found to burst periodically as well as chaotically in time. It involved a homoclinic bifurcation. We have also made a couple of low-dimensional models to investigate bifurcations for η = 1, which is used to investigate the sequence of bifurcations.

  4. Hamiltonian theory of the FQHE edge: Collective modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Hoang; Joglekar, Yogesh; Murthy, Ganpathy

    2003-03-01

    We study the collective modes of the fractional quantum Hall edge states using the Hamiltonian formalism [1]. While most theoretical approaches start with an effective bosonic theory [2] in which all fermions are integrated out (an exception is the approach based on Chern-Simons theory [3]), the Hamiltonian theory treats the composite fermions as fully interacting. We obtain the gapless edge-modes using a conserving approximation which respects the constraints [4]. The implications of our study to the tunneling experiments into the edge of a fractional quantum Hall system [5] are discussed. [1] R.Shankar and G.Murthy, Phys.Rev.Lett. 79, 4437 (1997). [2] X.-G.Wen, Phys.Rev.Lett. 64, 2206 (1990); D.-H.Lee and X.-G.Wen, cond-mat/9809160; A.Lopez and E.Fradkin, Phys.Rev.B 59, 15323 (1999); U. Zulicke and A.H.MacDonald, Phys.Rev.B 60, 1837 (1999); V.J.Goldman and E.V.Tsiper, Phys.Rev.Lett. 86, 5841 (2001); S.S.Mandal and J.K.Jain, Phys.Rev.Lett. 89, 096801 (2002). [3] L.S.Levitov, A.V.Shytov, and B.I.Halperin, Phys. Rev. B 64, 075322 (2001). [4] N. Read, Phys.Rev.B 58, 16262 (1998); G. Murthy, Phys.Rev.B 64, 195310 (2001). [5] A.M.Chang et.al., Phys.Rev.Lett. 86, 143 (2000).

  5. Defect Characterization in Quartz and Related Materials.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-06-01

    calculations in the effective medium approximation by Derrida , et al. 14 give dz13 however, this ’technique frequently does not give trustworthy estimates of...Alexander, R. Orbach, and K.W. Yu, Phys. Rev. B 22, 4588 (1984)1 B. Derrida , R. Orbach, and K.W. Yu, Phys. Rev. B 22, 6645 (1984). 15. T. Kushida, PhYs

  6. Time-Resolved Electronic Relaxation Processes in Self-Organized Quantum Dots

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-05-16

    Colocci, A. Bosacchi, P. Frigeri , and S. Franchi, Appl. Phys. Lett. 69, 3354 (1996). 8. P. Battacharya, K. K. Kamath, J. Singh, D. Klotzkin, J...Sercel, Phys. Rev. B 56, 13314 (1997). 23. S. Sanguinetti, M. Henini, M. Grassi Alessi, M. Capizzi, P. Frigeri , and S. Franchi, Phys. Rev. B 60, 8276

  7. Comment on ‘Time-resolved resonant photoionization of He using a time-dependent Feshbach method with ultrashort laser pulses’

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolaides, C. A.; Komninos, Y.; Mercouris, Th

    2014-07-01

    We compare the contents of the recent paper by Granados-Castro and Sanz-Vicario (2013 J.Phys. B 46 055601) to our previously published work on the same problem (Mercouris, Komninos and Nicolaides 2007 Phys. Rev. A 75 013407; 2013 Phys. Rev. A 87 069905(E)).

  8. Laser-Stimulated Molecular Dynamics and Rate Processes.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-11-01

    Phys. Rev. A 22, 614 (1980). 46. N. M . Kroll and K. M . Watson, Phys. Rev. A 5, 1883 (1972). 47. B. K. Deka, P. E . Dyer, D. J. James and S. A. Ramsden ...Phys. 68, 134 (1978). 38. J. C. Bellum and T. F. George, J. Chem. Phys. 70, 5059 (1979). 39. A. Weingartshofer, J. K. Holmes, G. Caudle, E . M ...Clarke and H. KrUger, Phys. Rev. Lett. 39, 269 (1977). 40 J. M . Yuan and T. F.. George, J. Chem. Phys. 70, 990 (1979). 41. A. E . Orel and W. H. Miller, J

  9. Preface: phys. stat. sol. (c) 1/9

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leitch, Andrew; Botha, Reinhardt

    2004-08-01

    The Conference on Photo-responsive Materials took place at the Kariega Game Reserve in the Eastern Cape, South Africa from 25-29 February 2004. More than 60 delegates from 12 different countries participated in the four-day event.The purpose of the conference was to bring together scientists working on various aspects of photo-responsive materials, so as to stimulate this important field of solid state physics in Southern Africa. As may be seen from the list of papers appearing in these proceedings, there was much interest in copper indium diselenide as a thin film material for photovoltaic applications. Also worth mentioning were the valuable contributions on ZnO, GaN and other materials that are currently attracting attention worldwide.The conference program allowed sufficient time for interaction and exchanging of views. Being in a game reserve in the heart of the beautiful Eastern Cape, delegates were also taken on game drives and had the opportunity of taking a river cruise up the Kariega River to view the majestic fish eagle.The members of the academic program committee were: Vivian Alberts (Rand Afrikaans University), Danie Auret (University of Pretoria), Darrell Comins (University of the Witwatersrand), and Reinhardt Botha and Andrew Leitch (University of Port E All papers appearing in these proceedings underwent a strict reviewing process separate from the conference. We express our appreciation to the referees for their diligence in this important task. The conference was organized by the Department of Physics at the University of Port Elizabeth, under the auspices of the Condensed Matter Physics and Materials Science (CMPMS) subgroup of the South African Institute of Physics. It was sponsored by EMF Limited (UK), Sensors Unlimited Inc. (USA), and Carl Zeiss (Pty) Ltd. Special thanks must go to Dr Eunete van Wyk for her professional assistance in the preparation of these proceedings.

  10. Preface: phys. stat. sol. (b) 242/9

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez, Maria

    2005-07-01

    The XVII Latin American Symposium on Solid State Physics took place in the conference rooms of the Convent San Francisco de Asis, in the heart of the Old Havana. The sixteen previous editions were organized in eight different countries; the last two were in Colombia (Cartagena, 1999) and Venezuela (Merida, 2002). After eighteen years the meeting came back to Havana in 2004.The program topics included: Surfaces and interfaces analysis; Spintronics; Magnetism; Materials and energy; Ab-initio methods, simulations and modeling in solids; Nanophysics, nanomaterials and nanotechnology; New materials, properties and applications; Preparation of materials, thin films and characterization; High temperature superconductivity; Techniques of structural analysis in solids. The program included 6 plenary talks, 13 invited talks, 58 oral presentations (in eight sessions) and 200 poster contributions (in four poster sessions).The meeting attracted more than 200 participants from 14 countries. The physica status solidi Young Researcher Award sponsored by Wiley-VCH was conferred at the meeting. This prize was divided between two participants: Clara Calderón (Study of electrical transport properties of ZnO thin films used as front contact of solar cells) from Colombia and Aim?? Pelaiz Barranco (AC behavior in lanthanum modified PZT ferroelectric ceramics) from Cuba. Special Mentions went to Val??rie Halté (Femtosec-ond dynamics of transmission of gold arrays of sub-wavelength holes) from France, Erick Larramendi Cancio (Cd desorption induced by Zn exposure during atomic layer epitaxy of CdxZn1-xTe) and Julio Cesar Rimada Herrera (Quantum and conversion efficiency calculation of AlGaAs/GaAs multiple quantum well solar cells) from Cuba.Nanostructures and in general low dimensional physics related to different systems was a very hot topic during the meeting. Some talks and presentations were devoted to optoelectronic materials and devices. Characterization of solids by different structural and optical techniques together with modeling and simulations were also important subjects of the symposium.The XVIII Symposium will be held in Mexico in 2006.The editors wish to thank all the participants who contributed to the success of the meeting and hope that it helped to develop close links between researchers and institutions of Latin America.

  11. Preface: phys. stat. sol. (b) 242/2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szopa, Marek; Mierzejewski, Marcin; Lisowski, Mariusz

    2005-02-01

    This issue contains the Proceedings of the 28th International Conference of Theoretical Physics, ICTP2004 - Electron Correlations in Nano- and Macrosystems, which was held in Ustro, Poland, from 2-7 September 2004. ICTP2004 followed the series of conferences organized by the Institute of Physics of the University of Silesia in Katowice, devoted biannually to the physics of condensed matter.The main objective of the Conference was to bring together specialists working on the physics of electron correlations in nano- and macro-regimes, with the intention of enhancing their mutual understanding and cooperation. The Conference was an international forum for the presentation and discussion of novel scientific ideas and experimental results. The programme of the conference consisted of 25 invited lectures, 11 contributed lectures and 27 papers presented during poster session. The contributions were devoted to problems related to the following subjects: Transport in low dimensional systems Carbon nanotubes and fullerenes Non Fermi liquid systems Superconductivity and Magnetism Quantum phase transitions New materials in magnetoelectronics Among the participants were 88 scientists from 10 countries and 3 continents. The invited talks were presented by distinguished physicists: Hélène Bouchiat, Liviu Chibotaru, Ulrich Eckern, Klaus Ensslin, Jim Freericks, Raymond Frésard, Peter Hänggi, Heike Herper, Carsten Honerkamp, Helmut Keiter, Stefan Krompiewski, Tadeusz Lulek, Kazumi Maki, Nina Markovi, Roman Micnas, Volker Meden, Andrzej M. Ole, Thomas Pruschke, Marek Przybylski, Ken-ichi Sasaki, Uri Sivan, Józef Spaek, Frank Steglich, Michael Thorwart and Roland Zeyher. The Organizing Committee would like to express our gratitude to the International Scientific Committee and to all the speakers and contributors for their talks and posters. Special thanks are addressed to all the participants for their valuable discussions and stimulating atmosphere of the meeting. We express our thanks to the referees. Their work improved significantly the quality of papers presented in this issue. We are also indebted to the editorial staff of physica status solidi for their help. Our cooperation was smooth and efficient. Last but not least, we thank all the sponsors of the conference (see list).

  12. Preface: phys. stat. sol. (b) 241/10

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demkov, Alex; Gilmer, David; Liang, Yong; Fonseca, Leonardo; Liu, Chun-Li

    2004-08-01

    The following 15 papers were presented at the 5th Motorola Workshop on Computational Materials and Electronics held 13-14 November 2003 in Austin, Texas, USA . Not every talk given at the workshop is represented with a paper in this selection; however, the reader should be able to come up with a general picture and the scope of the workshop.Traditionally, the Motorola Workshop on Computational Materials and Electronics has covered materials theory, nano-device physics and semiconductor processing. The main focus of the 2003 Workshop was Alternative Gate Dielectrics for CMOS Technology. This year we again expanded the scope of the Workshop to include experiment, in addition to the computational materials, quantum transport, and molecular electronics. The participants came from fifteen US and one European university, four National Laboratories, International SEMATECH, and Motorola's Semiconductor and Corporate research organizations. The Workshop illustrates our continuing commitment to longer-term research, and to the research community. We hope you will enjoy the reading.

  13. Preface: phys. stat. sol (a) 203/9

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duewski, P.; Bristowe, P.; Maurice, J.-L.; Komninou, P.

    2006-07-01

    This special issue contains a selection of papers that were presented at a symposium on Interfacial Processes and Properties of Advanced Materials (IPAM05) held at the E-MRS Fall Meeting, Warsaw, Poland on 5-7 September 2005. The symposium was conceived and inspired by the success of its predecessor (IPAM04) held at the University of Caen, France in June 2004.The symposium attracted over sixty contributions and was organized around five areas: Interfaces and dislocations in compound semiconductors, Gate oxide interfaces, Interfaces and defects in electroceramics, Metal-metal interfaces and interfacial modeling, and Interfaces in nano-structured and amorphous thin-film systems. The focus was on the influence of buried interfaces on the functionality of various electronic and opto-electronic devices such as lasers, ferroelectric memories, CMOS and magnetic disks. Therefore the materials addressed at the symposium included compound semiconductors (e.g. GaN, CdTe, ZnO), perovskites (e.g. SrTiO3), dielectrics (e.g. HfO2, SiO2, Al2O3), and metals (e.g. Fe/V superlattices). The aim of the symposium was to bring together leading interface experts, both experimental and theoretical, to explore the connection between interfacial properties (atomic and electronic structure, segregation, diffusion, kinetics) and materials performance in a device application. Papers were presented that described the use of a variety of sophisticated experimental techniques to explore the interfacial properties including HRTEM, X-ray high-resolution diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, STM, AFM, PL spectroscopy, SIMS and electrical and magnetic measurements. The theoretical work included applications of density functional theory, atomistic simulations, dislocation theory and finite element modeling. The program stimulated many exciting and productive discussions between experimentalists and theorists. The ultimate objective was to improve our knowledge of the role of interfaces on the properties of current and emerging device materials. It is hoped that these proceedings represent a step towards that goal and will encourage further conferences in this area in the future.The organisers gratefully acknowledge funding from the US Office of Naval Research Global (ONRG) Conference Support Program. They also would like to thank E-MRS for their administrative support and the Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences and the Warsaw University of Technology for hosting the symposium.

  14. Preface: phys. stat. sol. (b) 242/13

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esser, Norbert; Zahn, Dietrich R. T.

    2005-11-01

    Wolfgang Richter celebrated his 65th birthday on 2 January 2005. On such an occasion, usually marking retirement, achievements and breakthroughs in research are reviewed. But Wolfgang Richter is not retiring: he has accepted an offer of a professorship at the University Rome II Tor Vergata. As he explained to us with his famous smile, he plans to concentrate his future efforts even more on his true love in science - the optical diagnostics of interfaces.Wolfgang Richter has been working in the field of optical spectroscopy of solids since his PhD studies at the University of Cologne. Having finished his PhD in 1969 in the field of infrared spectroscopy he decided to reduce the probed volume by increasing the energy of probing photons: Raman spectroscopy! During his postdoctoral and Habilitation periods (1970-1979) at Pennsylvania State University, Max-Planck-Institut für Festkörperforschung, and RWTH Aachen, he pursued his interest in resonance Raman spectroscopy on semiconductors.In 1979 he received his first appointment as full professor at the University of Ulm. He returned to RWTH Aachen in 1981 and discovered his true destiny: semiconductor interfaces. At that time in the Department of Semiconductor Technology, metal-organic vapour phase epitaxy (MOVPE) was under development as a new technique for growing semiconductor layers. The underlying processes in MOVPE were known to be complex and very difficult to analyse with available experimental techniques, due to the unfriendly, reactive gas phase environment. Optical diagnostics turned out to be the key to a better understanding of MOVPE processes. Wolfgang Richter moved from RWTH Aachen to TU Berlin at the end of 1988 and began building a strong research group concentrating on interface analysis from two complementary sides: on the one hand, tracking MOVPE growth processes online by in situ optics and, on the other hand, advancing the fundamental understanding of optical spectra of interfaces by relating the optical response to atomic structures. Combining both aspects has finally led to considerable progress in surface and interface optics, as well as in vapour phase epitaxy and, moreover, the in situ optical tools developed are nowadays available as standard options in commercial MOVPE machines.The advances largely concerned the development of reflectance anisotropy spectroscopy and spectroscopic ellipsometry as in situ optical tools. However, considerable progress in Raman spectroscopy was also made: analysis of surfaces, ultrathin layers down to a single monolayer or even sub-monolayer coverages, and sub-wavelength spatial resolution were demonstrated in recent years. Current challenges concern, in particular, organic materials, molecule-solid interfaces and bio-interfaces, which will help in the development of many new applications and devices. Interfaces will play a crucial role in many of these developments and optical spectroscopy offers promising capabilities for analysing such interfaces. Wolfgang Richter and his group at University of Rome II Tor Vergata are sure to be active in this emerging field for a long time to come.Based on a symposium on Optical Spectroscopy of Interfaces at the Spring Meeting of the German Physical Society in Berlin 2005, we have asked former and present colleagues of Wolfgang Richter to contribute to this special issue of physica status solidi (b) on Advanced Optical Diagnostics of Surfaces, Nanostructures and Ultrathin Films. We think that the collection of 26 papers gives an excellent overview on recent achievements and future developments in the field of linear optics. In addition to a number of Original Papers on experimental work and some Review Articles, the issue includes examples of the current approaches of computational theory to solid state optics and interface optics. We hope that this issue will stimulate the expansion of the growing field of optical analysis of interfaces, nanostructures and ultrathin layers into new areas of basic and applied science. After the success in characterising inorganic materials, it is surely time that the potential of optical spectroscopy techniques for probing thin films and interfaces of composite (organic-inorganic) materials was considered.5 October 2005

  15. Editorial: phys. stat. sol. (a) 201/5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stutzmann, Martin

    2004-04-01

    Physica status solidi was founded in 1961 by a number of eminent solid state physicists as an attempt to overcome the iron curtain, which then separated East and West, at least in the field of science. Since that time our world has changed quite a bit, and so have the boundary conditions of science publishing. However, one thing has not changed: then as now, the general policy and development of a respectable scientific journal should be determined by a board of independent scientists, who volunteer to assume responsibility for the scientific content of the journal, to assure a fair and critical peer review process for all submitted manuscripts, and, in cases of conflict, to finally decide which papers will be published and which will not.As a matter of fact, an international Board of Editors which consists of scientists coming from different countries and continents, with a good reputation in their respective community, and without any conflict of interest with the Publisher of the journal is, in my opinion, these days more important than ever. As our daily scientific work becomes increasingly specialized, but at the same time also increasingly interdisciplinary, we are more and more forced to trust the quality and reliability of published scientific results in the literature, without really having a chance to come to an independent opinion on our own. This is one of the reasons why the many recent cases of plagiarism, scientific misconduct, or outright fraud have caused such a high level of public awareness. It is quite clear that without a serious peer review there would be an even larger number of such cases in the literature, and that without the responsible action taken by concerned Journal Editors, many of the revealed cases probably would have remained under the carpet.It is, therefore, a particular pleasure for me to introduce to you on the following pages the current Editorial Board of physica status solidi (a) in the form of a brief curriculum vitae, a photograph, and an e-mail address (in case you want to contact our Editors directly!). Of course, since 1961 the Editorial Board of our journal has undergone many changes and will continue to do so, but we always have attempted to maintain a good balance between the different areas of solid state physics, between theory and experiment, and between different countries. And although nothing is perfect, I hope that you will find at least one or two board members, who are known to you through their contributions to the literature in solid state physics.For me, this is the perfect occasion to thank all Members of the Editorial Board, past and present, for their advice, continuing support, and dedication! Vielen herzlichen Dank!

  16. Editorial: phys. stat. sol. (b) 241/5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stutzmann, Martin

    2004-04-01

    Physica status solidi was founded in 1961 by a number of eminent solid state physicists as an attempt to overcome the iron curtain, which then separated East and West, at least in the field of science. Since that time our world has changed quite a bit, and so have the boundary conditions of science publishing. However, one thing has not changed: then as now, the general policy and development of a respectable scientific journal should be determined by a board of independent scientists, who volunteer to assume responsibility for the scientific content of the journal, to assure a fair and critical peer review process for all submitted manuscripts, and, in cases of conflict, to finally decide which papers will be published and which will not.As a matter of fact, an international Board of Editors which consists of scientists coming from different countries and continents, with a good reputation in their respective community, and without any conflict of interest with the Publisher of the journal is, in my opinion, these days more important than ever. As our daily scientific work becomes increasingly specialized, but at the same time also increasingly interdisciplinary, we are more and more forced to trust the quality and reliability of published scientific results in the literature, without really having a chance to come to an independent opinion on our own. This is one of the reasons why the many recent cases of plagiarism, scientific misconduct, or outright fraud have caused such a high level of public awareness. It is quite clear that without a serious peer review there would be an even larger number of such cases in the literature, and that without the responsible action taken by concerned Journal Editors, many of the revealed cases probably would have remained under the carpet.It is, therefore, a particular pleasure for me to introduce to you on the following pages the current Editorial Board of physica status solidi (b) in the form of a brief curriculum vitae, a photograph, and an e-mail address (in case you want to contact our Editors directly!). Of course, since 1961 the Editorial Board of our journal has undergone many changes and will continue to do so, but we always have attempted to maintain a good balance between the different areas of solid state physics, between theory and experiment, and between different countries. And although nothing is perfect, I hope that you will find at least one or two board members, who are known to you through their contributions to the literature in solid state physics.For me, this is the perfect occasion to thank all Members of the Editorial Board, past and present, for their advice, continuing support, and dedication! Vielen herzlichen Dank!

  17. Preface: phys. stat. sol. (a) 203/4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kittler, Martin; Yang, Deren

    2006-03-01

    This issue of physica status solidi (a) contains the majority of papers presented at the 2nd Sino-German Symposium The Silicon Age which was held at the Lindner Hotel Cottbus, Germany, 19-24 September 2005. This meeting followed the 1st Symposium Progress in Silicon Materials held in June 2002 in Hangzhou, P.R. China. 8 Chinese and 14 German scientists from universities, research institutes and industry were invited to present their views about different aspects of silicon.There was a continuous progress in silicon materials development during the last 40-50 years, driven by the need of the IC industry for better and larger monocrystalline silicon wafers. Moreover, low-cost crystalline silicon now dominates the world's production of solar cells in the photovoltaics industry. Furthermore, there are intensive research activities worldwide for on-chip integration of Si-based photonics in CMOS technology. In addition, new areas being connected with silicon are starting to appear, namely Si-based biochips and nanoelectronics. Silicon, one can reasonably argue, is already the most investigated of all materials. However, there is still a need for continuation of research and development regarding numerous aspects of Si and also SiGe, including related technologies, advanced diagnostics or the role of crystal defects, which are the working fields of many laboratories all over the world. This was also shown by the presentations at the symposium and can be found in the contributions contained in this issue.The organizers would like to thank the participants for their high level contributions and discussions during the symposium. This intensive and open communication allowed the participants to create synergies between the different fields of silicon research and also to build up relationships for cooperation between Chinese and German research groups.Finally, we would like to thank the Sino-German Science Center for the financial support of the symposium.

  18. Preface: phys. stat. sol. (c) 1/7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheikhrouhou, Abdelwaheb

    2004-05-01

    The Third International Conference on Magnetic and Superconducting Materials (MSM03) belongs to a series of conferences, held biannually, aiming at providing a forum to the scientists in the magnetic and superconducting materials areas over the world.The first conference of the series (MSM99) was held in Iran with the proceedings published by World Scientific in 2000, and the second conference (MSM01) was held in Jordan with the proceedings published in Physica B 321 (2002).MSM03 was organized by the Materials Physics Laboratory, Sfax University (Laboratoire de Physique des Matériaux de la Faculté des Sciences de Sfax), with many domestic and international supporting institutions. It was held in Monastir (Tunisia), 1-4 September 2003, with over 150 participants and keynote lecturers attending from the following countries: Algeria, Austria, China, Czech Republic, Egypt, France, Germany, Hungary, Iran, Italy, Japan, Jordan, Morocco, Netherlands, Pakistan, Poland, Russia, Spain, Sudan, Sultanate of Oman, Taiwan, Tunisia, United Kingdom and United States of America.Altogether, about 170 papers on a variety of subjects relevant to the topic of the conference were presented, out of which 42 were keynote lectures. The submissions were peer-reviewed, and ultimately 115 articles were selected for publication in this journal. However, it must be noted that 13 of 39 keynote speakers did not submit their manuscripts for publication. Invited and other speakers were distinguished members of the international scientific community who are interested in pure sciences and materials research, and involved in the fabrication, characterization and investigation of the physical properties of magnetic and superconducting materials. High-caliber scientists attended the conference contributing to its success and the event resulted in new international relationships in research and cooperation. The Chairman of the Organizing Committee was Professor Abdelwaheb Cheikhrouhou, Materials Physics Laboratory, Sciences Faculty of Sfax (Tunisia) and the Co-Chairmen were Professor Sami Mahmood, Dean of Sciences at Yarmouk University (Jordan) and Professor Mohamed Akhavan from the Sharif University of Technology (Iran). The four-day conference consisted of several oral and poster sessions, followed by social programs in the evenings. The success of the event could be measured during the closing session on the last day, when several delegates emphasized the high-quality science that had been evident at the conference. A post conference three-day tour to the south of Tunisia (Matmata, Douz City: the gate of desert and the mountains oasis: Tamerza, Mides and Chebika) was also arranged. The conference was generously sponsored by: - The Tunisian Ministry of High Education, Scientific Research and Technology - The Tunisian Secretary of State for Scientific Research and Technology - The Tunisian National Office of Tourism - The Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP) - French Institute for Cooperation in Tunisia - Tunisian-Italian Scientific Partnership - British Gas - Tunisian Society for Electricity and Gas - Imex Olive Oil -Confiserie TRIKI Le Moulin The next MSM conference in 2005 will be held in Morocco.

  19. 75 FR 23729 - Orders Finding that the (1) Phys,1

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-04

    ... subject contracts are SPDCs. NGX stated that the subject contracts lack sufficient liquidity to perform a... to meet the material price reference, price linkage and material liquidity criteria for SPDC determination. Similarly, the 7a Index contracts lack sufficient liquidity to perform a significant...

  20. Preface: phys. stat. sol. (b) 241/9

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morawetz, Klaus

    2004-07-01

    Modelling and Simulation in Molecular Systems, Mesoscopic Structures, and Material Science was the title of a workshop held at the University of Technology in Chemnitz from 21 to 23 April 2004. This workshop coincided with the 50th birthday of Michael Schreiber. Therefore, the idea to publish a special issue is supported by two good reasons. First, a topical collection is appropriate for giving an overview about a field and to initiate further studies. This is one intention of the present issue. Second, the birthday is a suitable occasion for reflecting on the status of the different fields where Michael Schreiber has been active himself. Motivated by the characteristic name of the workshop (MS4), which expresses the broad range of his activities, the contributions are grouped into three main chapters: Disorder and Interaction, Phase Transitions and Criticality, and Transport Properties.The first part starts with the currently intensively discussed topic of composite Fermions in the paper by B. Kramer et al. This method of rewriting correlations as new quasiparticles has amongst other things the merit of explaining such exciting phenomena as the fractional quantum Hall effect. The methodological questions of Ward identities, causality, and conservation laws are the focus of the systematic investiga-tion in the second article by V. Janis et al. which concentrates on the problem of disorder and configura-tional averaging. The interplay between disorder and correlation is treated in the third contribution by C. Schuster et al., where different theoretical methods are tested on the problem of Friedel oscillations within the one-dimensional Heisenberg and Hubbard model. In the next contribution, M. Berciu et al. focus on localization as one consequence of disorder. The localized and extended electronic states are treated, together with the magnetic degrees of freedom, like spin waves. One of the astonishing consequence of localiza-tion is the observation of resonant Rayleigh backscattering. This is investigated by random matrix theory in the next article by E. Runge et al. and extended to exciton transitions in semiconductor nanostructures. In order to characterize localization, A. Eilmes et al. consider the two-dimensional Anderson model in the following article with special focus on the critical exponents for the localization length. The chapter on disorder ends with a contribution by A. Aldea et al. where the disorder effects are investigated in twodimensional systems with perpendicular magnetic fields such that the interplay between Landau levels and localized states can be considered.The second chapter in the collection is devoted to critical phenomena and phase transitions. It starts with an overview of the most prominent example of critical phenomena, high-Tc superconductivity. A. Sherman presents a review on magnetic and spectral properties of cuprate perovskites within t - J models. The long-range hopping problem and the extraction of critical exponents are the topic of the contribution by E. Cuevas, who calculated the level spacing distribution as well as the correlation dimen-sion in the strong coupling limit. The critical points and the thermodynamics of quenched spatial disordered systems are then treated by T. Vojta et al. Here it is shown that different parts of a system might undergo phase transitions controlled by different parameter values. Different microstructures are important when phenomena like the growth of crystals are considered. Consequently the latter problem is treated in the next contribution by H. Emmrich et al., who develop an analytical solution and compare it to simulations in order to provide insights into the universality of diffusion-limited crystal growth. That the applications of critical phenomena are quite versatile is demonstrated in a short paper by J. Stäring et al. who show how statistical methods can be employed to optimize networks of wireless communication. This chapter on critical phenomena ends with a methodological investigation by U. Grimm. This concerns the often applied random matrix theory, and a method to calculate the level spacing distribution by using coupled differential equations.The third chapter is devoted to transport. It starts with an article about conductance fluctuations by M. Ortuno et al. These quantum fluctuations are considered in localized systems which is directly related to the topics in the first chapter. M. Schröder et al. present in the next article a method to propagate wave functions by approximating them by multi-dimensional wave packets. In contrast to variational methods, this method is based on stochastic calculus. In the case where only a few electrons are transferred, as in the reaction of donor-acceptor complexes and molecular wires, a unified description is presented in the contribution by V. May et al. The transfer rate and the stationary current are calculated and their depend-ence on the length of the molecular system is shown. The method of Green's functions based on local orbitals is used in the next article by M. Albrecht et al. to calculate molecular charge transport. This results into a Landauer theory for the calculation of the transmission coefficient. The special role of elec-tron-electron interaction in the transport properties of disordered wires is considered by H. Mori et al. Here the interplay of interaction and disorder is investigated and the different roles of interaction for the localization phenomena are discussed. We close this chapter on transport by an investigation of electronic transport through nanoparticle arrays. The self-assembled nanoparticle structures are considered within the contri-bution by K. Nicolic whose structures represent very promising nanoelectronic devices.The broad-range approaches and applications selected in these three chapters demonstrate the exciting interplay between structure, disorder, and correlations and suggest the kind of future developments which are to be expected within this field. Finally, in the name of all authors and workshop participants: Happy birthday to Michael Schreiber and all best wishes for exciting future scientific activities!

  1. Preface: phys. stat. sol. (c) 1/6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavokin, Alexey

    2004-04-01

    This volume contains some of the papers presented at the Third International Conference on Physics of Light-Matter Coupling in Nanostructures (PLMCN3) which took place in Acireale, Sicily, from 1 to 4 October 2003. This meeting was fourth in the series started by PLMCN (St. Nectaire, 2000) and continued by PLMCN1 (Rome, 2001) and PLMCN2 (Rithymnon, 2002). All four conferences had the same format (about 70 participants), similar subject scope (interface between fundamental physics of light-matter coupling phenomena and applied research on new semiconductor materials and low-dimensional structures), and the proceedings of all of them have been published in physica status solidi.During these four years, a huge progress has been achieved in the understanding of exciton-polariton effects in microcavities. From the discovery of stimulated scattering of polaritons in 1999 to the first experimental reports of polariton Bose condensation and lasing, attention to this rapidly developing research area has been increased drastically. It is clear now that realization of a new generation of opto-electronic devices, referred to as polariton devices, is a realistic task for the coming decade. To achieve this target, much work has to be done both in fundamental research on dynamics of exciton-polaritons in microcavities and experimental realization of high-quality microcavities presumably based on wide-band gap semiconductors like GaN, ZnO, ZnSe, suitable for the observation of strong exciton-light coupling at room temperature. Forty nine research teams from twelve European countries have created a Polariton Consortium aimed at integration of the European research effort towards fabrication of polariton devices. PLMCN3 was not only an international conference devoted, in particular, to the research on polariton devices, but also the first scientific meeting of this community.The PLMCN meetings since the very first one have been sponsored by the US Army European Research Office (ERO). This time, with the initiative of Jim Harvey from ERO, a special session has been organized on the devices of 21st century, where a number of intriguing ideas have been proposed on new light sources, polariton lasers, and quantum memory elements based on microcavities. A special prize for the most crazy but realizable idea has been won by Misha Portnoi (Exeter) for the concept of a white diode based on a microcavity.Each PLMCN meeting brings participants from new countries. This time, the traditionally strong participation from Japan, Russia, the European Union and the USA has been enforced by a representative delegation from Israel and two speakers from Mexico. We are looking forward for new-comers from other countries not yet involved in the PLMCN community, to join us for the next meeting to be held in St. Petersburg on 29 June-3 July 2004. Sergey Ivanov from the A. F. Ioffe Institute chairs the local Organizing Committee of this future conference. We are going to keep a unique informal and creative atmosphere being characteristic of the PLMCN meetings. We invite all those who wish to know more about light-matter coupling in solids or to present any new interesting results in this area and at the same time to enjoy the beautiful city of St. Petersburg, to contact Sergey Ivanov (ivan@beam.ioffe.rssi.ru) or myself (kavokin@lasmea.univ-bpclermont.fr). We are looking forward to welcoming you in St. Petersburg!

  2. Preface: phys. stat. sol. (a) 201/11

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goovaerts, Etienne; Nistor, Sergiu V.

    2004-09-01

    We are glad to introduce in this issue of physica status solidi (a) a series of papers which were presented at the international workshop on Defects and Impurities in Crystalline Boron Nitride Compounds, held in Diepenbeek-Hasselt, Belgium, on 20-21 February 2004. Because of the strong scientific connections, this workshop was jointly organised with the 9th International Workshop on Surface and Bulk Defects in CVD Diamond Films (18-20 February 2004) and this led to the joint publication of the contributions in the present issue. For several years boron nitride, and in particular cubic boron nitride, is back in the centre of materials research activities because of new potential applications as a wide band gap semiconductor for electronics and opto-electronics in extreme conditions. However, important efforts are needed to understand the role of defects and impurities in controlling its semiconducting properties and growth processes in order to realise these promises. An international group of researchers (30 participants from 12 countries: Belarus, Belgium, Czech Republic, Germany, Italy, Japan, Latvia, Romania, Russia, Sweden, Ukraine, USA; among which 8 invited) has gathered to discuss the present status of research on the following topics: Impurities and morphology, Synthesis and microstructure, Optical and electrical properties, and Point defects characterisation. Contributions were presented on boron nitride single crystals, on p-n junctions formed with this material, but also on crystalline powders, thin films and B-C-N nanotubes. Among the characterisation methods which have been discussed, we mention optical spectroscopy (absorption, luminescence, Raman), multifrequency electron spin resonance, high resolution and analytical electron microscopy and analytical micro ion beam techniques.This workshop was organised as a final activity of the Flemish-Romanian scientific and technological cooperation project Defects in diamond-like materials of the B/C/N system, involving from the Flemish side both the Experimental Condensed Matter Physics Laboratory at the Physics Department of the University of Antwerp and the Materials Physics Division at the Institute for Materials Research of the Limburgs Universitair Centrum, and from the Romanian side the Microstructure of Defects in Solids Laboratory of the National Institute for Materials Physics in Magurele-Bucuresti.We gratefully acknowledge the financial support of the Flemish and Romanian governments through the above mentioned international bilateral project, as well as the organisational support of all three home institutions along the duration of the whole project.We also wish to personally thank Miloš Nesládek and Ken Haenen for the invaluable and continuous assistance in the practical organisation of this workshop.

  3. Preface: phys. stat. sol. (a) 201/5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avelino Pasa, André

    2004-04-01

    This issue contains scientific contributions to the 4th German/Brazilian Workshop on Applied Surface Science. The workshop was held in Germany at the beautiful Castle Ringberg conference site of the Max Planck Society, located 60 km from Munich, from 21-26 September 2003. The meeting was attended by about 50 participants, with 21 invited talks and 18 contributed presentations (8 oral and 10 posters) on relevant topics of surface science.As in previous meetings (1995 in Portobello, RJ, Brazil, 1998 in Döllnsee, Berlin, Germany, and 2001 in Itapema, SC, Brazil), a significant number of important questions in surface science were covered from both the theoretical and the experimental point of view. In the field of materials science, emphasis was given to the description of the structural, physical and chemical properties of nanostructures and films of inorganic (metals, alloys and oxides) and organic (polymers and biological molecules) materials.A substantial part of the success of the meeting can be attributed to the relaxed atmosphere at the castle, near the lake Tegernsee, where excellent scientific presentations were mixed with intense discussions among both senior and younger researchers. The event also led to the development of new and ongoing collaborations between partners from Brazil and Germany.The organizers of the Workshop, Israel J. R. Baumvol (Porto Alegre, Brazil), Hajo Freund (Berlin, Germany), Wolfgang H. P. Losch (Natal, Brazil), Horst Niehus (Berlin, Germany), André A. Pasa (Florianópolis, Brazil) and Eberhard Umbach (Würzburg, Germany), are greatly indebted to the following organizations for financial support: Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG), Fritz-Haber-Institut Berlin (FHI), Fundação Coordenação de Aperfeiçoamento de Pessoal de Nível Superior (CAPES), Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina (UFSC) and the specially created intergovernmental agreement between CAPES and DFG to promote such meetings.

  4. Editorial: phys. stat. sol. (b) 243/1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stutzmann, Martin

    2006-01-01

    Dear Colleagues and Friends,on behalf of the Publishers, the Editorial Office, and the Editors of physica status solidi we wish you all the best for the coming year 2006! It is our sincere hope that your personal and professional experience with our journal has been a positive one and that you will continue to choose physica status solidi for the publication of your scientific findings in solid state physics also in the future.In doing so, you will be in increasingly good company! As a matter of fact, 2005 has been a year of exceptional growth in the number of manuscripts submitted to physica status solidi . Thus, the number of Original Papers which have reached our Editorial Office in Berlin has increased by as much as 30% compared to the long term average over the last ten years. For the Rapid Research Letter section, the corresponding increase has been even more impressive: more than +100% just in the last two years. We view this development as a confirmation of our longstanding efforts to ensure a timely publication service of high scientific quality. One relevant indicator for the high scientific standards expected from articles which are submitted for publication in physica status solidi is the average acceptance rate, which currently is less than 40%. This rate has continuously decreased from a value of about 60% ten years ago and bears witness to our efforts to strive for quality rather than quantity.Also, physica status solidi has been able to continue its long tradition as a truly international journal, despite of the strong competition in an established field such as solid state physics. In 2005, submitted papers have originated almost equally from the Americas, Europe, and Asia, with a clearly growing contribution from China, India, and Japan. We are actively working together with our international Editorial Boards and the Regional Editors to maintain a reasonable balance among papers from different parts of the world. The increasing international visibility of physica status solidi is impressively documented by the ever rising numbers of article downloads via the internet: on the average, each of the 2000 articles published annually in physica status solidi is presently accessed about 100 times via the www.Finally, let me mention some other recent developments, which are not so directly visible from the outside. Thus, a new all electronic publishing system has become operative in our Berlin Editorial Office in 2005, which allows a more efficient and timely handling of manuscripts from submission to publication (www.manuscriptXpress.com) and is particularly valuable for the editing of conference proceedings (conferences.wiley-vch.de). In addition, the functionality of the journal within the Wiley InterScience website has been enhanced by new features such as Citation Tracking. Together with the ongoing digitization of all physica status solidi issues since the 1960s, which is expected to be complete in 2006, this makes the physica status solidi homepage at Wiley InterScience a very valuable tool for literature search in solid state physics, past and present. Try it out at www.interscience.wiley.com!All of us from physica status solidi would like to convey to you our very best wishes for good health and success in the coming year 2006!

  5. Editorial: phys. stat. sol. (c) 3/1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stutzmann, Martin

    2006-01-01

    Dear Colleagues and Friends,on behalf of the Publishers, the Editorial Office, and the Editors of physica status solidi we wish you all the best for the coming year 2006! It is our sincere hope that your personal and professional experience with our journal has been a positive one and that you will continue to choose physica status solidi for the publication of your scientific findings in solid state physics also in the future.In doing so, you will be in increasingly good company! As a matter of fact, 2005 has been a year of exceptional growth in the number of manuscripts submitted to physica status solidi . Thus, the number of Original Papers which have reached our Editorial Office in Berlin has increased by as much as 30% compared to the long term average over the last ten years. For the Rapid Research Letter section, the corresponding increase has been even more impressive: more than +100% just in the last two years. We view this development as a confirmation of our longstanding efforts to ensure a timely publication service of high scientific quality. One relevant indicator for the high scientific standards expected from articles which are submitted for publication in physica status solidi is the average acceptance rate, which currently is less than 40%. This rate has continuously decreased from a value of about 60% ten years ago and bears witness to our efforts to strive for quality rather than quantity.Also, physica status solidi has been able to continue its long tradition as a truly international journal, despite of the strong competition in an established field such as solid state physics. In 2005, submitted papers have originated almost equally from the Americas, Europe, and Asia, with a clearly growing contribution from China, India, and Japan. We are actively working together with our international Editorial Boards and the Regional Editors to maintain a reasonable balance among papers from different parts of the world. The increasing international visibility of physica status solidi is impressively documented by the ever rising numbers of article downloads via the internet: on the average, each of the 2000 articles published annually in physica status solidi is presently accessed about 100 times via the www. Finally, let me mention some other recent developments, which are not so directly visible from the outside. Thus, a new all electronic publishing system has become operative in our Berlin Editorial Office in 2005, which allows a more efficient and timely handling of manuscripts from submission to publication (www.manuscriptXpress.com) and is particularly valuable for the editing of conference proceedings (conferences.wiley-vch.de). In addition, the functionality of the journal within the Wiley InterScience website has been enhanced by new features such as Citation Tracking. Together with the ongoing digitization of all physica status solidi issues since the 1960s, which is expected to be complete in 2006, this makes the physica status solidi homepage at Wiley InterScience a very valuable tool for literature search in solid state physics, past and present. Try it out at www.interscience.wiley.com! All of us from physica status solidi would like to convey to you our very best wishes for good health and success in the coming year 2006!

  6. Editorial: phys. stat. sol. (a) 203/1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stutzmann, Martin

    2006-01-01

    Dear Colleagues and Friends,on behalf of the Publishers, the Editorial Office, and the Editors of physica status solidi we wish you all the best for the coming year 2006! It is our sincere hope that your personal and professional experience with our journal has been a positive one and that you will continue to choose physica status solidi for the publication of your scientific findings in solid state physics also in the future.In doing so, you will be in increasingly good company! As a matter of fact, 2005 has been a year of exceptional growth in the number of manuscripts submitted to physica status solidi. Thus, the number of Original Papers which have reached our Editorial Office in Berlin has increased by as much as 30% compared to the long term average over the last ten years. For the Rapid Research Letter section, the corresponding increase has been even more impressive: more than +100% just in the last two years. We view this development as a confirmation of our longstanding efforts to ensure a timely publication service of high scientific quality. One relevant indicator for the high scientific standards expected from articles which are submitted for publication in physica status solidi is the average acceptance rate, which currently is less than 40%. This rate has continuously decreased from a value of about 60% ten years ago and bears witness to our efforts to strive for quality rather than quantity.Also, physica status solidi has been able to continue its long tradition as a truly international journal, despite of the strong competition in an established field such as solid state physics. In 2005, submitted papers have originated almost equally from the Americas, Europe, and Asia, with a clearly growing contribution from China, India, and Japan. We are actively working together with our international Editorial Boards and the Regional Editors to maintain a reasonable balance among papers from different parts of the world. The increasing international visibility of physica status solidi is impressively documented by the ever rising numbers of article downloads via the internet: on the average, each of the 2000 articles published annually in physica status solidi is presently accessed about 100 times via the www.Finally, let me mention some other recent developments, which are not so directly visible from the outside. Thus, a new all electronic publishing system has become operative in our Berlin Editorial Office in 2005, which allows a more efficient and timely handling of manuscripts from submission to publication (www.manuscriptXpress.com) and is particularly valuable for the editing of conference proceedings (conferences.wiley-vch.de). In addition, the functionality of the journal within the Wiley InterScience website has been enhanced by new features such as Citation Tracking. Together with the ongoing digitization of all physica status solidi issues since the 1960s, which is expected to be complete in 2006, this makes the physica status solidi homepage at Wiley InterScience a very valuable tool for literature search in solid state physics, past and present. Try it out at www.interscience.wiley.com!All of us from physica status solidi would like to convey to you our very best wishes for good health and success in the coming year 2006!

  7. Dedication: phys. stat. sol. (a) 202/15

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albrecht, Martin

    2005-12-01

    The papers in this issue are dedicated to Professor Horst Paul Strunk on the occasion of his 65th birthday and his retirement from active teaching. This volume honours a scientist who has made a lasting impact on the field in electron microscopic characterisation of growth and relaxation phenomena in epitaxial growth of semiconductors. Born in The Hague, The Netherlands, on 13 June 1940, he studied physics in Stuttgart where he received his degree in Physics in 1968. He joined the group of Prof. Seeger at the Max-Planck-Institut für Metallforschung and defended his Ph.D. on defects in NaCl at Stuttgart University in 1973. He spent one year at Cornell University as a visiting Professor before joining Technische Universität Hamburg-Harburg in 1983. There he created the Zentralbereich Elektronenmikroskopie and was a professor for materials analytics from 1983 till 1989. In 1989 he changed to the University of Erlangen-Nürnberg, where he established the Verbundlabor für hochauflösende Elektronenmikroskopie and directed the Lehrstuhl Mikrocharakterisierung at the Institut für Werkstoffwissenschaften of the same university. He spent two research periods at the Universities of Rennes in France and Campinas in Brazil. Together with his colleague Prof. Jürgen Werner he created the series of conferences on polycrystalline semiconductors POLYSE which he has been supervising together with Jürgen Werner since 1990.The research activities of Horst P. Strunk are focused on microstructure of materials and their relation to macroscopic physical properties. Main topics are dislocations, their formation and interaction mechanisms, strain relaxation as well as fundamental mechanisms of epitaxial growth. The spectrum of materials covers a wide range starting from metals over ionic crystals, e.g. NaCl to elemental and compound semiconductors. From the beginning, the main tool of study has been the transmission electron microscope. However, Horst P. Strunk recognised that a thorough understanding of materials problems would require the combined use of structural characterisation, advanced spectroscopy and modelling. Therefore he complemented electron microscopic approaches by optical methods e.g. Raman spectroscopy and cathodoluminescence. Modelling of strain states by finite elements and of defect structures by ab-initio calculations became an important topic especially in the last years. It is characteristic for the scientific approach of Horst Strunk that methodological developments were not an end in itself but linked to problems in solid state physics and materials sciences. Among the scientific works of Strunk, a few examples should be highlighted which mark important stages in his scientific career. Pioneering work has been done on the influence of dislocations in homoepitaxial growth of Si and GaAs in collaboration with Elisabeth Bauser in Stuttgart. Strunk correlated growth spirals on the surface to dislocations that caused these step sources. Studying the dislocation structure of heteroepitaxial Ge/GaAs layers, Strunk discovered that a new dislocation multiplication source works which, later known as Hagen-Strunk source, had a strong impact on understanding of relaxation processes by dislocations in heteroepitaxial semiconductor systems. Work on electrical and structural properties of grain boundaries in silicon was performed together with Jürgen Werner. This was the starting point of a long lasting research on photovoltaic materials that accompanies Strunk till today. Fundamental studies on heteroepitaxial growth were performed in the system SiGe grown from solution. In this context, finite elements were established for the first time in the study of nanostructured materials. In the last years correlated studies on structural and optical properties on III-nitride heterostructures were done by cathodoluminescence in the transmission electron microscope. The impact of Horst P. Strunk's work is evident from the fact that his lab became part of collaborative international projects based on the unique facilities at the Verbundlabor für Hochauflösende Elektronenmikroskopie and the profound knowledge in the field of crystal growth and solid state physics present in his group. The articles in this issue contain original research results contributed by his friends, collaborators and former students. They are a testimony of the lasting impact of Horst P. Strunk's work and they express the authors' gratefulness for benefiting from his work. This volume gives us a unique opportunity to say thank you to Horst P. Strunk and to wish him a new period in his life that should continue to be scientifically as fruitful as up to now but less affected by the burden of administrative work than during the last years.

  8. Preface: phys. stat. sol. (a) 203/12

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackman, Richard B.; Nesládek, Milo; Haenen, Ken

    2006-09-01

    The 30 papers gathered in this issue of physica status solidi (a) give a thorough overview over different topics that were presented during the 11th edition of the International Workshop on Surface and Bulk Defects in CVD Diamond Films (SBDD), which took place from 22 to 24 February 2006, at the Hasselt University in Diepenbeek-Hasselt, Belgium. Since its start more than 10 years ago, the SBDD Workshop has grown into a well-established, yearly early bird meeting place, addressing new emerging science related to the progress in the CVD diamond field. The 10 invited lectures, 29 contributed oral presentations and 26 posters were presented in several sessions during an intense two and a half day long meeting.The number of participants reached 115 this year with participants coming from fifteen countries: Austria, Belgium, Czech Republic, France, Germany, Israel, Italy, Japan, Mexico, Poland, Russia, Singapore, Slovak Republic, Sweden, UK, and USA. The mixture of young and established scientists, including a great proportion of students, made this meeting a hot spot of lively discussions on a wide range of scientific subjects, not only during the meeting itself, but also at several occasions throughout many social events offered by the hospitality of the city of Hasselt.It stands for itself that the workshop would not have been possible without the support of many people and institutions. For financial aid we are especially indebted to the Scientific Research Community Surface Modification of Materials of the F.W.O.-Vlaanderen (Belgium), whose incessant support plays an important role in keeping this meeting going. We also thank the Hasselt University for offering the lecture hall and infrastructure facilities and Seki Technotron Corp. for sponsoring the poster reception and their presence with a table top exhibit. Finally we highly appreciate the active approach of the editorial staff of physica status solidi in this conference and would like to thank most notably Stefan Hildebrandt, Ron Schulz-Rheinländer, Christoph Lellig, and Julia Hübner, for their excellent and patient work, bringing the number of successfully published proceedings of SBDD in pss (a) up to 8 already!To finish, we would all like to invite you to the 12th edition of the SBDD series, newly renamed as Hasselt Diamond Workshop, to be held at its established location of Diepenbeek-Hasselt. We look forward meeting you again at SBDD XII in 2007:Hasselt Diamond Workshop - SBDD XII28 February-2 March 2007Hasselt University, Diepenbeek-Hasselt, Belgiumhttp://www.imo.uhasselt.be/SBDD2007London, Paris, Hasselt, August 2006

  9. Preface: phys. stat. sol. (a) 201/11

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergonzo, Philippe; Haenen, Ken; Nebel, Christoph; Nesládek, Milo; Vanek, Milan

    2004-09-01

    The present issue of physica status solidi (a) contains a collection of 24 papers presented at the 9th International Workshop on Surface and Bulk Defects in CVD Diamond Films held in Diepen- beek-Hasselt, Belgium, 18-20 February 2004. The concept of this workshop originated in 1996 with the idea of bringing together scientists who are active and innovative in the field of electronic and optical properties of thin film diamond. Since then, this meeting have grown up to a regular conference devoted to new issues in CVD diamond research and related to diamond as a material for electronics and nanobioelectronics. This year the programme was spread over two and a half days, including 8 invited lectures from a total of 39 talks, and a poster session featuring 15 posters. In addition we were able to connect this meeting with a workshop on Defects and Impurities in Crystalline Boron Nitride Compounds, scientifically organized from the University of Antwerp and leading finally to a joint meeting lasting four days. The papers from the BN workshop are joining this proceeding issue on pages 2559-2598.At SBDD IX, topics ranged from homo- and heteroepitaxial growth, doping, hydrogen induced surface conductivity, defects and their characterization, to devices including bio-sensing applications. As usual, very intense and lively discussions took place among participants, from young students to established scientists, after talks, during breaks and in the evenings while enjoying the hospitality of the Limburgs Universitair Centrum and especially the city of Hasselt. The number of participants reached a record breaking 96 this year, with participants coming from fifteen different countries (Australia, Austria, Belgium, Czech Republic, France, Germany, Israel, Italy, Japan, Mexico, Romania, Russia, Sweden, UK, USA). This yearly increasing number indicates that this workshop is continuing to be very attractive to a large scientific community, as it summarizes the up-to-date research on diamond as a wide band gap semiconductor.The workshop would have not been possible without the support of many people and institutions. For financial aid we are especially indebted to the Scientific Research Community Surface Modification of Materials of the F. W. O.-Vlaanderen (Belgium) and its continuous support since starting this workshop 9 years ago. We also thank the Limburgs Universitair Centrum for offering the lecture hall and infrastructure facilities. Finally we highly appreciate the active approach of the editorial staff of physica status solidi in this conference and would like to thank most notably Stefan Hildebrandt and Katharina Fröhlich, for their excellent and patient work, making this already the sixth successfully published proceedings of SBDD in pss (a).To finish, we would all like to invite you for the 10th anniversary of the SBDD series in February 2005 in Diepenbeek-Hasselt and we look forward to seeing you at:Surface and Bulk Defects in CVD Diamond Films, X23-25 February 2005Limburgs Universitair Centrum, Diepenbeek - Hasselt, Belgiumhttp://www.imo.luc.ac.be/SBDD2005

  10. Preface: phys. stat. sol. (a) 202/11

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergonzo, Philippe; Nesládek, Milo

    2005-09-01

    The present issue of physica status solidi (a) contains a collection of 31 papers presented at the 10th International Workshop on Surface and Bulk Defects in CVD Diamond Films held in Diepenbeek-Hasselt, Belgium, 23-25 February 2005. The 10th anniversary of the meeting proved the success of the concept, which originated in 1996 with the idea of bringing together scientists who are active and innovative in the field of electronic and optical properties of thin film diamond. This year the programme contained 9 invited oral talks, 14 contributed oral talks and 34 posters. 103 Participants from 14 countries (Austria, Belgium, Czech Republic, Finland, France, Germany, Japan, Mexico, Poland, Slovak Republic, Sweden, Switzerland, UK, USA) took part in the meeting. The meeting was traditionally directed towards topics ranging from defects and their characterization as well as electrical transport in CVD diamond towards modern diamond thin film devices including bio-sensing applications. Also, diamond homoepitaxial and heteroepitaxial growth, doping, hydrogen induced surface conductivity and several other topics including defects in boron nitride materials were addressed. Intense and lively discussions were as usual part of this meeting to which the hospitality of the city of Hasselt contributed greatly.The workshop would have not been possible without the support of many people and institutions. We also acknowledge the financial support of the Scientific Research Community of the F.W.O.-Vlaanderen (Belgium) and the University of Hasselt. We also thank the editorial staff of physica status solidi, most notably Stefan Hildebrandt, for their excellent and patient work. Finally, we would like to thank Ken Haenen, whose skills for the successful organization are gratefully acknowledged.August 2005

  11. Preface: phys. stat. sol. (b) 243/5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artacho, Emilio; Beck, Thomas L.; Hernández, Eduardo

    Between 20 and 24 June 2005 the Centre Européen de Calcul Atomique et Moléculaire - or CECAM, as it is more widely known - hosted a workshop entitled State-of-the-art, developments and perspectives of real-space electronic structure methods in condensed-matter and chemical physics, organized with the support of CECAM itself and the ?k network. The workshop was attended by some forty participants coming from fifteen countries, and about thirty presentations were given. The workshop provided a lively forum for the discussion of recent methodological developments in electronic structure calculations, ranging from linear-scaling methods, mesh techniques, time-dependent density functional methods, and a long etcetera, which had been our ultimate objective when undertaking its organization.The first-principles simulation of solids, liquids and complex matter in general has jumped in the last few years from the relatively confined niches in condensed matter and materials physics and in quantum chemistry, to cover most of the sciences, including nano, bio, geo, environmental sciences and engineering. This effect has been propitiated by the ability of simulation techniques to deal with an ever larger degree of complexity. Although this is partially to be attributed to the steady increase in computer power, the main factor behind this change has been the coming of age of the main theoretical framework for most of the simulations performed today, together with an extremely active development of the basic algorithms for its computer implementation. It is this latter aspect that is the topic of this special issue of physica status solidi.There is a relentless effort in the scientific community seeking to achieve not only higher accuracy, but also more efficient, cost-effective and if possible simpler computational methods in electronic structure calculations [1]. From the early 1990s onwards there has been a keen interest in the computational condensed matter and chemical physics communities in methods that had the potential to overcome the unfavourable scaling of the computational cost with the system size, implicit in the momentum-space formalism familiar to solid-state physicists and the quantum chemistry approaches more common in chemical physics and physical chemistry. This interest was sparkled by the famous paper in which Weitao Yang [2] introduced the Divide and Conquer method. Soon afterwards several practical schemes aiming to achieve linear-scaling calculations, by exploiting what Walter Kohn called most aptly the near-sightedness of quantum mechanics [3], were proposed and explored (for a review on linear-scaling methods, see [4]). This search for novel, more efficient and better scaling algorithms proved to be fruitful in more than one way. Not only was it the start of several packages which are well-known today (such as Siesta, Conquest, etc.), but it also leads to new ways of representing electronic states and orbitals, such as grids [5, 6], wavelets [7], finite elements, etc. Also, the drive to exploit near-sightedness attracted computational solid state physicists to the type of atomic-like basis functions traditionally used in the quantum chemistry community. At the same time computational chemists learnt about plane waves and density functional theory, and thus a fruitful dialogue was started between two communities that hitherto had not had much contact.Another interesting development that has begun to take place over the last decade or so is the convergence of several branches of science, notably physics, chemistry and biology, at the nanoscale. Experimentalists in all these different fields are now performing highly sophisticated measurements on systems of nanometer size, the kind of systems that us theoreticians can address with our computational methods, and this convergence of experiment and theory at this scale has also been very fruitful, particularly in the fields of electronic transport and STM image simulation. It is now quite common to find papers at the cutting edge of nanoscience and nanotechnology co-authored by experimentalists and theorists, and it can only be expected that this fruitful interplay between theory and experiment will increase in the future.It was considerations such as these that moved us to propose to CECAM and ?k the celebration of a workshop devoted to the discussion of recent developments in electronic structure techniques, a proposal that was enthusiastically received, not just by CECAM and ?k, but also by our invited speakers and participants. Interest in novel electronic structure methods is now as high as ever, and we are therefore very happy that physica status solidi has given us the opportunity to devote a special issue to the topics covered in the workshop. This special issue of physica status solidi gathers invited contributions from several attendants to the workshop, contributions that are representative of the range of topics and issues discussed then, including progress in linear scaling methods, electronic transport, simulation of STM images, time-dependent DFT methods, etc. It rests for us to thank all the contributors to this special issue for their efforts, CECAM and ?k for funding the workshop, physica status solidi for agreeing to devote this special issue to the workshop, and last but not least Emmanuelle and Emilie, the CECAM secretaries, for their invaluable practical help in putting this workshop together

  12. Reply to the comment on `Pople versus Dunning basis-sets for group IA metal hydrides and some other second row hydrides: The case against a De Facto standard' by R.A. Klein and M.A. Zottola [Chem. Phys. Lett. 419 (2006) 254--258

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, Roger A.; Zottola, Mark A.

    2006-10-01

    In their Comment on our recent Letter [R.A. Klein, M.A. Zottola, Chem. Phys. Lett. 419 (2006) 254-258], Feller and Peterson point out that density functional theory combined with the Pople triple split-valence basis-set 6-311++G(2d,p), does indeed perform well in comparison to second-order perturbation and coupled cluster theory in combination with correlation-consistent basis-sets for the prediction of bond lengths and harmonic frequencies but does not provide acceptable accuracy for dissociation energies. MPW1PW91/6-311++G(2d,p) is, therefore, highly suitable and computationally efficient for generating starting structures for subsequent single-point (SP) calculations at higher and more computationally expensive levels of theory.

  13. Particle path through a nested Mach-Zehnder interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffiths, Robert B.

    2016-09-01

    Possible paths of a photon passing through a nested Mach-Zehnder interferometer on its way to a detector are analyzed using the consistent histories formulation of quantum mechanics, and confirmed using a set of weak measurements (but not weak values). The results disagree with an analysis by Vaidman [Phys. Rev. A 87, 052104 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevA.87.052104], and agree with a conclusion reached by Li et al. [Phys. Rev. A 88, 046102 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevA.88.046102]. However, the analysis casts serious doubt on the claim of Salih et al. (whose authorship includes Li et al.) [Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 170502 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.110.170502] to have constructed a protocol for counterfactual communication: a channel which can transmit information even though it contains a negligible number of photons.

  14. Relativistic Chiral Kinetic Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephanov, Mikhail

    2016-12-01

    This very brief review of the recent progress in chiral kinetic theory is based on the results of Refs. [J.-Y. Chen, D. T. Son, M. A. Stephanov, H.-U. Yee, Y. Yin, Lorentz Invariance in Chiral Kinetic Theory, Phys. Rev. Lett. 113 (18) (2014) 182302. doi:10.1103/PhysRevLett.113.182302; J.-Y. Chen, D. T. Son, M. A. Stephanov, Collisions in Chiral Kinetic Theory, Phys. Rev. Lett. 115 (2) (2015) 021601. doi: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.115.021601; M. A. Stephanov, H.-U. Yee, The no-drag frame for anomalous chiral fluid, Phys. Rev. Lett. 116 (12) (2016) 122302. doi: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.116.122302].

  15. Wigner function and Schroedinger equation in phase-space representation

    SciTech Connect

    Chruscinski, Dariusz; Mlodawski, Krzysztof

    2005-05-15

    We discuss a family of quasidistributions (s-ordered Wigner functions of Agarwal and Wolf [Phys. Rev. D 2, 2161 (1970); Phys. Rev. D 2, 2187 (1970); Phys. Rev. D 2, 2206 (1970)]) and its connection to the so-called phase space representation of the Schroedinger equation. It turns out that although Wigner functions satisfy the Schroedinger equation in phase space, they have a completely different interpretation.

  16. Potent, Persistent Induction and Modulation of Cellular Immune Responses in Rhesus Macaques Primed with Ad5hr-Simian Immunodeficiency Virus (SIV) env/rev, gag, and/or nef Vaccines and Boosted with SIV gp120

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, L. Jean; Malkevitch, Nina; Pinczewski, Joel; Venzon, David; Lou, Yuanmei; Peng, Bo; Munch, Cindy; Leonard, Melissa; Richardson, Ersell; Aldrich, Kristine; Kalyanaraman, V. S.; Pavlakis, George N.; Robert-Guroff, Marjorie

    2003-01-01

    Immunity elicited by multicomponent vaccines delivered by replication-competent Ad5hr-simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) recombinants was systematically investigated. Rhesus macaques were immunized mucosally at weeks 0 and 12 with Ad5hr-SIVsmH4 env/rev, with or without Ad5hr-SIVmac239 gag or Ad5hr-SIVmac239 nef, or with all three recombinants. The total Ad5hr dosage was comparably adjusted among all animals with empty Ad5hr-ΔE3 vector. The macaques were boosted with SIV gp120 in monophosphoryl A-stable emulsion adjuvant at 24 and 36 weeks. Controls received Ad5hr-ΔE3 vector or adjuvant only. By ELISPOT analysis, all four SIV gene products elicited potent cellular immune responses that persisted 42 weeks post-initial immunization. Unexpectedly, modulation of this cellular immune response was observed among macaques receiving one, two, or three Ad5hr-SIV recombinants. Env responses were significantly enhanced throughout the immunization period in macaques immunized with Ad5hr-SIV env/rev plus Ad5hr-SIV gag and tended to be higher in macaques that also received Ad5hr-SIV nef. Macaques primed with all three recombinants displayed significant down-modulation in numbers of gamma interferon (IFN-γ)-secreting cells specific for SIV Nef, and the Env- and Gag-specific responses were also diminished. Modulation of antibody responses was not observed. Down-modulation was seen only during the period of Ad5hr-recombinant priming, not during subunit boosting, although SIV-specific IFN-γ-secreting cells persisted. The effect was not attributable to Ad5hr replication differences among immunization groups. Vaccine delivery via replication-competent live vectors, which can persistently infect new cells and continuously present low-level antigen, may be advantageous in overcoming competition among complex immunogens for immune recognition. Effects of current multicomponent vaccines on individual immune responses should be evaluated with regard to future vaccine design. PMID

  17. Reply to "Comment on `Locomotion of a microorganism in weakly viscoelastic liquids' "

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Corato, M.; Greco, F.; Maffettone, P. L.

    2016-11-01

    In the present reply we show that the comments casting doubts on the results of our recent paper [M. De Corato et al., Phys. Rev. E 92, 053008 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevE.92.053008] are based on a misinterpretation of the second-order fluid constitutive equation. Nevertheless, we show that, by considering alternative constitutive equations for the viscoelastic stress, we recover, to first-order in the Deborah number, the same results already obtained by De Corato et al. [Phys. Rev. E 92, 053008 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevE.92.053008], thus dissipating any possible doubt about their validity.

  18. Multiplicity-dependent and nonbinomial efficiency corrections for particle number cumulants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bzdak, Adam; Holzmann, Romain; Koch, Volker

    2016-12-01

    In this article we extend previous work on efficiency corrections for cumulant measurements [Bzdak and Koch, Phys. Rev. C 86, 044904 (2012), 10.1103/PhysRevC.86.044904; Phys. Rev. C 91, 027901 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevC.91.027901]. We will discuss the limitations of the methods presented in these papers. Specifically we will consider multiplicity dependent efficiencies as well as nonbinomial efficiency distributions. We will discuss the most simple and straightforward methods to implement those corrections.

  19. Raman-Controlled Quantum Dots for Quantum Computing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-11-30

    Phys. Rev. Lett. 80, 2245 s1998d. 17 M . B . Plenio , S. F. Huelga, A. Beige, and P. L. Knight, Phys. Rev. A 59, 2468 s1999d. 18 X.-L. Feng, Z.- M . Zhang, X...Gupta et al., Phys. Rev. B 59, R10421 (1999). [19] J. Javanainen, Europhys. Lett. 17, 407 (1992); G. C. Hegerfeldt and M . B . Plenio , Phys. Rev. A 46...atoms are Ge,1 m eV and a,1 meV, which means that SGC will not be observed in such a system. B . Entanglement and SGC of atomic hyperfine states In

  20. Experimental Signature of Programmable Quantum Annealing (Author’s Manuscript)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-28

    approaching its Gibbs dis - tribution value. This would not be the case if ps were governed by the spectrum of HIsing. In Fig. 6 we com- pare a numerical...Science 292, 472 (2001). [12] S. Boixo and R. D. Somma , Phys. Rev. A 81, 032308 (2010), URL http://link.aps.org/doi/10.1103/PhysRevA.81.032308. [13] D...Rev. Lett. 99, 070502 (2007), URL http://link.aps.org/doi/10.1103/PhysRevLett.99.070502 . [15] R. D. Somma , S. Boixo, H. Barnum, and E. Knill, Phys

  1. Differential cross sections of double photoionization of lithium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kheifets, A. S.; Fursa, D. V.; Bray, I.; Colgan, J.; Pindzola, M. S.

    2010-08-01

    We extend our previous application of the convergent close-coupling (CCC) and time-dependent close-coupling (TDCC) methods [Phys. Rev. A10.1103/PhysRevA.81.023418 81, 023418 (2010)] to describe energy and angular resolved double photoionization (DPI) of lithium at arbitrary energy sharing. By doing so, we are able to evaluate the recoil ion momentum distribution of DPI of Li and make a comparison with recent measurements of Zhu [Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.103.103008 103, 103008 (2009)].

  2. Optical Excitation Effects on Spin-Noise Spectroscopy in Semiconductors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-04-01

    London) 431, 49 (2004). 2B. Mihaila, S. A. Crooker, D. G. Rickel, K. B. Blagoev, P. B. Littlewood , and D. L. Smith, Phys. Rev. A 74, 043819 (2006). 3M...Hübner, and M. Oestreich, Phys. Rev. B 81, 121202(R) (2010). 7G. M. Müller, M. Römer, D. Schuh, W . Wegscheider, J. Hübner, and M. Oestreich, Phys. Rev...13M. Römer, H. Bernien, G. Müller, D. Schuh, J. Hübner, and M. Oestreich, Phys. Rev. B 81, 075216 (2010). 14M. F. Riedel, P. Böhi, Y. Li, T. W

  3. Reply to "Comment on "Benefits of completing homework for students with different aptitudes in an introductory electricity and magnetism course""

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kontur, F. J.; de La Harpe, K.; Terry, N. B.

    2016-12-01

    We reply to Rieger, Reinsberg, and Wieman's forgoing Comment [Phys. Rev. Phys. Educ. Res., Comment on "Benefits of completing homework for students with different aptitudes in an introductory electricity and magnetism course" 12, 028001 (2016)].

  4. Reply to "Comment on "Benefits of Completing Homework for Students with Different Aptitudes in an Introductory Electricity and Magnetism Course""

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kontur, F. J.; de La Harpe, K.; Terry, N. B.

    2016-01-01

    We reply to Rieger, Reinsberg, and Wieman's forgoing Comment [Phys. Rev. Phys. Educ. Res., Comment on "Benefits of completing homework for students with different aptitudes in an introductory electricity and magnetism course" 12, 028001 (2016)].

  5. Comment on ``Adiabatic quantum computation with a one-dimensional projector Hamiltonian''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kay, Alastair

    2013-10-01

    The partial adiabatic search algorithm was introduced in Tulsi's paper [Phys. Rev. APLRAAN1050-294710.1103/PhysRevA.80.052328 80, 052328 (2009)] as a modification of the usual adiabatic algorithm for a quantum search with the idea that most of the interesting computation only happens over a very short range of the adiabatic path. By focusing on that restricted range, one can potentially gain an advantage by reducing the control requirements on the system, enabling a uniform rate of evolution. In this Comment, we point out an oversight in Tulsi's paper [Phys. Rev. APLRAAN1050-294710.1103/PhysRevA.80.052328 80, 052328 (2009)] that invalidates its proof. However, the argument can be corrected, and the calculations in Tulsi's paper [Phys. Rev. APLRAAN1050-294710.1103/PhysRevA.80.052328 80, 052328 (2009)] are then sufficient to show that the scheme still works. Nevertheless, subsequent works [Phys. Rev. APLRAAN1050-294710.1103/PhysRevA.82.034304 82, 034304 (2010), Chin. Phys. BCPBHAJ1674-105610.1088/1674-1056/20/4/040309 20, 040309 (2011), Chin. Phys. BCPBHAJ1674-105610.1088/1674-1056/21/1/010306 21, 010306 (2012), AASRI Procedia 1, 5862 (2012), and Quantum Inf. Process.10.1007/s11128-013-0557-1 12, 2689 (2013)] cannot all be recovered in the same way.

  6. The circadian clock regulates autophagy directly through the nuclear hormone receptor Nr1d1/Rev-erbα and indirectly via Cebpb/(C/ebpβ) in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Guodong; Zhang, Fanmiao; Ye, Qiang; Wang, Han

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Autophagy is a highly conserved intracellular degradation system, and recently was shown to display circadian rhythms in mice. The mechanisms underlying circadian regulation of autophagy, however, are still unclear. Here, we observed that numbers of autophagosomes and autolysosomes exhibit daily rhythms in the zebrafish liver, and cebpb/(c/ebpβ) and various autophagy genes are rhythmically expressed in zebrafish larvae but significantly upregulated in per1b and TALEN-generated nr1d1/rev-erbα mutant fish, indicating that both Per1b and Nr1d1 play critical roles in autophagy rhythms. Luciferase reporter and ChIP assays show that the circadian clock directly regulates autophagy genes through Nr1d1, and also regulates transcription of cebpb through Per1b. We also found that fasting leads to altered expression of both circadian clock genes and autophagy genes in zebrafish adult peripheral organs. Further, transcriptome analysis reveals multiple functions of Nr1d1 in zebrafish. Taken together, these findings provide evidence for how the circadian clock regulates autophagy, imply that nutritional signaling affects both circadian regulation and autophagy activities in peripheral organs, and shed light on how circadian gene mutations act through autophagy to contribute to common metabolic diseases such as obesity. PMID:27171500

  7. Spectroscopic Constants for Selected Homonuclear Diatomic Molecules. Volume 1. A through I

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-02-16

    8 (34. 7) All Systems, F . W. Loomis and P. Kusch, Phys . Rev . 46, 292-301 (34. 8 ) Absorption...6, 203- 8 (36.10) 740Ü-7230Ä Bands, Possibly RbCs, P. Kusch, Phys . Rev . 49, 218-22 (36.11) C, D*-X Systems, P. Kusch and F . W...Griffing, J. Chem. Phys . 30, 128 i-91 (64. 4) G. Verhaegen, F . E. Stafford, and J. Drowart, J. Chem. Phys . 40, 1622- 8 (67.

  8. Quantum and Quasi-Classical Studies of the O(3P) + HCl yields OH + Cl(2P) Reaction Using Benchmark Potential Surfaces (PREPRINT)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-07-25

    F. J. Aoiz , L. Benares, J. F. Castillo, M. Menendez, and J. E. Verdasco, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 1,1149 (1999). 15. T. Xie, J. M. Bowman, K. A...Phys. 81, 4352 (1984). 24. M. Kneba and J. Wolfrum, Ann. Rev. Phys. Chem. 31, 47 (1980). 25. L. Banares, F. J. Aoiz , P. Honvault, B. Bussery-Honvault

  9. Comment on ‘Time delays in molecular photoionization’

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baykusheva, Denitsa; Wörner, Hans Jakob

    2017-04-01

    In a recent article by Hockett et al (2016 J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 49 095602), time delays arising in the context of molecular single-photon ionization are investigated from a theoretical point of view. We argue that one of the central equations given in this article is incorrect and present a reformulation that is consistent with the established treatment of angle-dependent scattering delays (Eisenbud 1948 PhD Thesis Princeton University; Wigner 1955 Phys. Rev. 98 145–7 Smith 1960 Phys. Rev. 118 349–6 Nussenzveig 1972 Phys. Rev. D 6 1534–42).

  10. Detection of Excited States by Laser-Induced Fluorescence and Analysis of Energy Transfer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-07-01

    1986). 11. W. Lichten, Phys. Rev. 12_0, 848 (1960); G. Herzberg , Science of Light, 16, 14 (1967). 12. G.E. Johnson, Phys. Rev. A 5, 1026 (1972); B...Appl. Optics, 41, 357 (1982); T.A. Barr and W.B. McKnight, Appl. Phys. Lett. 41, 114 (1982); I. Dabrowski and C. Herzberg , Acta Phys. Hung. 55, 219...anI alternate notation see G. Herzberg , Spectra of Diatomic Molecules (Van Nostrand, New York, 1939), p. 239. 52 24. S. Chung and C.C. Lin, Phys. Rev

  11. Theoretical Investigation of Point Defects of Mercury Cadmium Telluride.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-11-01

    Phys .- JETP 43(2), 305 (1976). 41 . M. H. Cohen, and V. Heine, Phys . Rev. 122, 1821 (1961). 42 . B. J. Austin, V. Heind, and L...450 (1958). -12-77 57. E. M. Gershenzon, G. N. Gol’tsman, and A. P. Mel’nikov, Sov . Phys .- JETP Lett . 14, 185 (1971). 58. M. A. Gilleo, P. J. Bailey... Phys . Rev. Lett . 41 (13), 892 (1978). 15. J. Bernholc, N. 0. Lipari, and S. T. Pantelides, Phys . Rev. Lett . 41 (13), 895 (1978)

  12. Origin of the Inner Ring in Photoluminescence Patterns of Quantum Well Excitons

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-03-15

    855. [3] Hagn M., Zrenner A., Böhm G. and Weimann G., Appl. Phys. Lett., 67 (1995) 232. [4] Negoita V., Snoke D. W . and Eberl K., Phys. Rev. B, 60...418 (2002) 751. [7] Vörös Z., Balili R., Snoke D. W ., Pfeiffer L. and West K., Phys. Rev. Lett., 94 (2005) 226401. [8] Butov L. V., J. Phys...L., Littlewood P. B. and Haug H., Phys. Rev. B, 59 (1999) 5032. [12] Ivanov A. L., Europhys. Lett., 59 (2002) 586. [13] Butov L. V., Zrenner A

  13. Bacillus thiaminolyticus sp. nov., nom. rev.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, L K

    1990-07-01

    The name "Bacillus thiaminolyticus" Kuno 1951 was not included on the Approved Lists of Bacterial Names and has lost standing in bacteriological nomenclature. The genetic homogeneity of "Bacillus thiaminolyticus" was assessed by determining guanine-plus-cytosine contents by the buoyant density method and by measuring DNA relatedness by using spectrophotometric reassociation procedures. Of the 26 strains which I studied, 24 had guanine-plus-cytosine contents in the range from 52 to 54 mol%. The consistently high DNA relatedness values of 60 to 100% of these 24 strains to the type strain indicated that the "B. thiaminolyticus" group is genetically homogeneous. Low DNA relatedness values of 20 to 31% showed that "B. thiaminolyticus" is genetically unrelated to Bacillus alvei, "Bacillus aneurinolyticus," "Bacillus apiarius," Bacillus larvae, Bacillus laterosporus, Bacillus macerans, and Bacillus stearothermophilus. In general, the "B. thiaminolyticus" group was highly homogeneous for 49 phenotypic characteristics and clearly distinguishable from B. alvei, with which it was allegedly synonymous. On the basis of these findings, revival of the name Bacillus thiaminolyticus is proposed.

  14. 2014 SRNL LDRD Annual Report, Rev. 0

    SciTech Connect

    Mcwhorter, S.

    2015-03-15

    Laboratory Directed Research and Development is a congressionally authorized program that provides the ‘innovation inspiration’ from which many of the Laboratory’s multi-discipline advancements are made in both science and engineering technology. The program is the backbone for insuring that scientific, technical and engineering capabilities can meet current and future needs. It is an important tool in reducing the probability of technological surprise by allowing laboratory technical staff room to innovate and keep abreast of scientific breakthroughs. Drawing from the synergism among the EM and NNSA missions, and work from other federal agencies ensures that LDRD is the key element in maintaining the vitality of SRNL’s technical programs. The LDRD program aims to position the Laboratory for new business in clean energy, national security, nuclear materials management and environmental stewardship by leveraging the unique capabilities of the Laboratory to yield foundational scientific research in core business areas, while aligning with SRS strategic initiatives and maintaining a vision for ultimate DOE applications.

  15. Watching the World Rev its Heat Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Absorption of solar energy heats up our planet's surface and the atmosphere and makes life for us possible. But the energy cannot stay bound up in the Earth's environment forever. If it did then the Earth would be as hot as the Sun. Instead, as the surface and the atmosphere warm, they emit thermal longwave radiation, some of which escapes into space and allows the Earth to cool. This false-color image of the Earth was produced on September 30, 2001, by the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) instrument flying aboard NASA's Terra spacecraft. The image shows where more or less heat, in the form of longwave radiation, is emanating from the top of Earth's atmosphere. As one can see in the image, the thermal radiation leaving the oceans is fairly uniform. The blue swaths across the central Pacific represent thick clouds, the tops of which are so high they are among the coldest places on Earth. In the American Southwest, which can be seen in the upper righthand corner of the globe, there is often little cloud cover to block outgoing radiation and relatively little water to absorb solar energy. Consequently, the amount of outgoing radiation in the American Southwest exceeds that of the oceans. Also, that region was experiencing an extreme heatwave when these data were acquired. Recently, NASA researchers discovered that incoming solar radiation and outgoing thermal radiation increased in the tropics from the 1980s to the 1990s. (Click to read the press release.) They believe that the reason for the unexpected increase has to do with an apparent change in circulation patterns around the globe, which effectively reduced the amount of water vapor and cloud cover in the upper reaches of the atmosphere. Without the clouds, more sunlight was allowed to enter the tropical zones and more thermal energy was allowed to leave. The findings may have big implications for climate change and future global warming. 'This suggests that the tropical heat engine increased its speed,' observes Dr. Bruce Wielicki, of NASA Langley Research Center. 'It's as if the heat engine in the tropics has become less efficient, using more fuel in the 1990s than in the 1980s.' Image courtesy Barbara Summey, NASA Goddard Visualization Analysis Lab, based upon data processed by Takmeng Wong, CERES Science Team, NASA Langley Research Center

  16. The World Revs its Heat Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Absorption of solar energy heats up our planet's surface and atmosphere making life for us possible. But the energy carnot stay bound up in the Earth's environment forever. If it did, the Earth would be as hot as the sun. Instead, as the surface and atmosphere warm, they emit thermal long wave radiation, some of which escapes into space and allows the Earth to cool. This false color image of the Earth was produced by the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) instrument flying aboard NASA's Terra spacecraft. The image shows where more or less heat, in the form of long-wave radiation, is emanating from the top of the Earth's atmosphere. As one can see in the image, the thermal radiation leaving the oceans is fairly uniform. The blue swaths represent thick clouds, the tops of which are so high they are among the coldest places on Earth. In the American Southwest, which can be seen in the upper right hand corner of the globe, there is often little cloud cover to block outgoing radiation and relatively little water to absorb solar energy making the amount of outgoing radiation in this area exceeding that of the oceans. Recently, NASA researchers discovered that incoming solar radiation and outgoing thermal radiation increased in the tropics from the 1980s to the 1990s. They believe the unexpected change has to do with apparent change in circulation patterns around the globe, which effectively reduce the amount of water vapor and cloud cover in the upper reaches of the atmosphere. Without the clouds, more sunlight was allowed to enter the tropical zones and more thermal energy was allowed to leave. The findings may have big implications for climate change and future global warming. (Image courtesy NASA Goddard)

  17. Volatile Components from Packing Matrials, Rev. 2

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R. A.

    2006-03-01

    An outgassing study was conducted on five packing materials, comprising two experiments. These materials comprised 277-4 borated concrete, Borobond4 concrete, polyethylene bags, silica-filled silicone rubber seals, and silicone foam padding. The purpose was measure the volume of gases which diffuse from packaging materials when sealed in containers. Two heating profiles were used to study the offgassing quantities in a set of accelerated aging tests. It was determined that the concretes contain a large quantity of water. The plastic materials hold much less moisture, with the silicone materials even consuming water, possibly due to the presence of silica filler. Polyethylene tends to degrade as the temperature is elevated and the foam stiffens.

  18. The First Reactor, 40th Anniversary (rev.)

    SciTech Connect

    Allardice, Corbin; Trapnell, Edward R; Fermi, Enrico; Fermi, Laura; Williams, Robert C

    1982-12-01

    This booklet, an updated version of the original booklet describing the first nuclear reactor, was written in honor of the 40th anniversary of the first reactor or "pile". It is based on firsthand accounts told to Corbin Allardice and Edward R. Trapnell, and includes recollections of Enrico and Laura Fermi.

  19. ACTE Annual Convention Revs up Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Techniques: Connecting Education and Careers (J1), 2009

    2009-01-01

    This article highlights the annual Association for Career and Technical Education (ACTE) Convention held at Charlotte, North Carolina. It was the first time that the premiere professional development event for career and technical educators had come to Charlotte and the city did not disappoint. In fact, Charlotte proved to be the perfect place for…

  20. MTADS Data Analysis System Migration(Rev)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-02-14

    sensor Towed Arra Detection System NMEA National Marine Electronics Association PPS Pulse Per Second RS232 Electronic Industries Alliance Recommended...latency, conventional time stamping of RS232 data is not precise and can inject 100’s of milliseconds of additional delays. Thus, simply time stamping...DAQ computer system trigger 100 TTL pulse TriggerDevice.trig Generated and logged by the data acquisition computer – initiates the magnetometer

  1. Stimulus Law Revs up Research on Energy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Basken, Paul

    2009-01-01

    When President Obama dreams out loud, as he did in a speech last week, of a future when solar panels are as "cheap as paint" and buildings produce their own energy, researchers like the physicist Yang Yang are dreaming right along with him. Mr. Yang's laboratory is among hundreds at colleges around the country that stand to benefit from a new…

  2. ICDP Complex Groundwater Monitoring Plan REV 5

    SciTech Connect

    Cahn, L. S.

    2007-08-09

    This Groundwater Monitoring Plan, along with the Quality Assurance Project Plan for Waste Area Groups 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 10, and Removal Actions, constitutes the sampling and analysis plan for groundwater and perched water monitoring at the Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility (ICDF). A detection monitoring system was installed in the Snake River Plan Aquifer to comply with substantive requirements of "Releases from Solid Waste Management Units" of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. This detection monitoring wells constructed in the Snake River Plain Aquifer.

  3. Instructor Revs Up Ailing Motorcycle Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevenson, Roy

    2011-01-01

    Bob Monroig smiles every day on his way to work at Lake Washington Technical College (LWTC), high atop a hill overlooking the affluent Seattle suburb of Kirkland, Washington. He's created his own job within a job, where he's the Harley-Davidson University program coordinator and tenured faculty in the Motorcycle, Marine, & Power Equipment…

  4. Analyses par diffraction de rayons X sur des revêtements barrières thermiques réalisés par un procédé hybride plasma-laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antou, G.; Hlawka, F.; Montavon, G.; Bach, M.; Cornet, A.; Coddet, C.

    2004-11-01

    Les revêtements barrières thermiques (BTs) constitués de zircone yttriée partiellement stabilisée (ZrO{2} + 7% en masse d'Y{2}O{3}) et d'une sous-couche métallique (MCrAlY où M représente une combinaison de nickel et de cobalt) sont extrêmement utilisés afin d'améliorer les performances des composants des parties chaudes des turbines à gaz. La projection plasma sous atmosphère ambiante et l'irradiation laser in situ (au moyen d'un laser à diodes) sont associés ici afin de modifier les caractéristiques structurales des BTs. Les phases présentes au sein de la BT ont un rôle important. Des analyses par diffraction de rayons X ont été menées pour étudier les changements de phase possibles après traitement laser. Aucun changement de phase n'a été remarqué : la phase tétragonale métastable (t') demeure la phase prépondérante aussi bien pour les dépôts projetés que les dépôts post-traités au laser et refondus in situ. La formation de cette phase semble être liée à la solidification et au refroidissement rapide découlant de la projection plasma ainsi que de la refusion laser. Ce résultat est prometteur, car :

  5. Improved Protection of Rhesus Macaques against Intrarectal Simian Immunodeficiency Virus SIVmac251 Challenge by a Replication-Competent Ad5hr-SIVenv/rev and Ad5hr-SIVgag Recombinant Priming/gp120 Boosting Regimen

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jun; Pinczewski, Joel; Gómez-Román, Victor R.; Venzon, David; Kalyanaraman, V. S.; Markham, Phillip D.; Aldrich, Kristine; Moake, Matthew; Montefiori, David C.; Lou, Yuanmei; Pavlakis, George N.; Robert-Guroff, Marjorie

    2003-01-01

    In this study we investigated the ability of a replication-competent Ad5hr-SIVenv/rev and Ad5hr-SIVgag recombinant priming/gp120 boosting regimen to induce protective immunity in rhesus macaques against pathogenic simian immunodeficiency virusmac251. Immunization of macaques by two sequential administrations of the same recombinants by the same route resulted in boosting and persistence of SIV-specific cellular immune responses for 42 weeks past the initial immunization. Anti-SIV gp120 immunoglobulin G (IgG) and IgA antibodies were induced in secretory fluids, and all macaques exhibited serum neutralizing antibody activity. After intrarectal SIVmac251 challenge, all of the macaques became infected. However, relative protection, as assessed by statistically significant lower SIV viral loads in plasma at both acute infection and set point, was observed in 8 out of 12 immunized non-Mamu-A∗01 animals. Elevated mean cellular immune responses to Gag and Env, neutralizing antibody activity, and IgG and IgA binding antibody levels were observed in the eight protected macaques. Statistically significant correlations with protective outcome were observed for cellular immune responses to SIV Env and Gag and for SIV gp120-specific IgG antibodies in nasal and vaginal fluids. Two macaques that exhibited the greatest and most persistent viremia control also exhibited strong CD8+ T-cell antiviral activity. The results suggest that a spectrum of immune responses may be necessary for adequate control of viral replication and disease progression and highlight a potential role for nonneutralizing antibodies at mucosal sites. PMID:12857905

  6. Cooperative Effects and Intrinsic Optical Bistability in Collections of Atoms

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-11-01

    Sov . Phys . JETP 38, 1100 (1974). 17. Il.J. Carmichael and D.F. Walls, J. Phys . B: Atom. Molec. Phys ...268 ( 1985 ). 8. D.A.B. Miller, A.G. Gossard and W. Wiegmann, Optics Lett . 9. 162 (1984). 9. F. Hennenberger and fl. Rossmann, Phys . Stat. Solidi B121...Hollberg, 3. Yurke, J.C. Mertz and J.F. Valey, Phys . Rev. Lett . 55, 2409 ( 1985 ). 28. L.A. Wu, H.J. Kimble, J.L. Hall and H. Wu, Phys . Rev. Lett .

  7. Reply to 'Comment on 'Quantum linear Boltzmann equation with finite intercollision time''

    SciTech Connect

    Diosi, Lajos

    2010-09-15

    Hornberger and Vacchini [Phys. Rev. A 82, 036101 (2010)] claim that the specific collisional momentum decoherence, pointed out in my recent work [Phys. Rev. A 80, 064104 (2009)], is already described by their theory. However, I have performed a calculation whereby I disprove the authors' claim and refute their conclusion that my recent work had no advantage over theirs.

  8. Comment on ``Magic Numbers in Exotic Nuclei and Spin-Isospin Properties of the NN Interaction''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuker, A. P.

    2003-10-01

    A Comment on the Letter by

    Takaharu Otsuka et al., Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-9007 87, 082502 (2001)10.1103/PhysRevLett.87.082502
    . The authors of the Letter offer a Reply.

  9. Photon Antibunching in the Fluorescence of a Single Dye Molecule Trapped in a Solid

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-06-08

    Properties of Solids , S. Nudelman and S. S. Mitra, eds. (Plenum, New York, 1969), p. 607. 1O. K. K. Rebane, Impurity Spectra of Solids (Plenum, New York...Phys. Rev. Lett. 62, 2535-2538 (1989). 8. M. Orrit and J. Bernard, Phys. Rev. Lett. 65, 2716-2719 (1990). 9. R. If. Silsbee, Ch. 21 of Optical

  10. Low-Energy Positron-Matter Interactions Using Trap-Based Beams

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-06-24

    Gilbert, J. P. Sullivan, J. P. Marler , L. D. Barnes, P. Schmidt, S. J. Buckman,’ and C. M. Surko Department of Physics, University of California, San...Phys. Rev. Lett. 82, 5032-5035 (1999). [15] Sullivan, J. P., Marler , J. P., Gilbert, S. J., et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 87, 073201-4 (2001). [16] Gilbert

  11. Comment on ``Cluster Formation of Transmembrane Proteins Due to Hydrophobic Mismatching''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Meyer, Frédérick; Smit, Berend

    2009-05-01

    A Comment on the Letter by Ulrich Schmidt, Gernot Guigas, and Matthias Weiss, Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-9007 101, 128104 (2008)10.1103/PhysRevLett.101.128104. The authors of the Letter offer a Reply.

  12. Analyzing and Improving Image Quality in Reflective Ghost Imaging

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-02-01

    imaging." Phys. Rev. A 79, 023833 (2009). [7] R . E . Meyers , K. S. Deacon. and Y. Shih, "Ghost-imaging experiment by measuring reflected photons," Phys...Rev. A 77, 041801 (2008). [8] R . E . Meyers and K. S. Deacon, "Quantum ghost imaging experiments at ARL," Proc. SPIE 7815. 781501 (2010). [9] J. H

  13. Comment on ``Subgraph centrality in complex networks''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevanović, Dragan

    2013-08-01

    We disprove a conjecture of Estrada and Rodríguez-Velázquez [Phys. Rev. EPLEEE81539-375510.1103/PhysRevE.71.056103 71, 056103 (2005)] that if a graph has identical subgraph centrality for all nodes, then the closeness and betweenness centralities are also identical for all nodes.

  14. Reply to "Comment on `Quantum Raychaudhuri equation'"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Saurya

    2017-03-01

    The preceding Comment claims that the paper "Quantum Raychaudhuri equation" by S. Das, [Phys. Rev. D 89, 084068 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevD.89.084068] has "problematic points" with regards to its derivation and implications. We show below that the above claim is incorrect, and that there are no problems with the results of Das's paper or its implications.

  15. Relaxation of Fermionic Excitations in a Strongly Attractive Fermi Gas in an Optical Lattice

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-27

    energy physics of the repulsive Hubbard model reduces to an antiferro- magnetic Heisenberg model which exhibits a canted anti- ferromagnetic (CAFM...Oka, P. Werner , and H. Aoki, Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 236401 (2011); M. Eckstein and P. Werner , Phys. Rev. B 84, 035122 (2011); A. L. Chudnovskiy, D.M

  16. Synthetic frequency protocol for Ramsey spectroscopy of clock transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yudin, V. I.; Taichenachev, A. V.; Basalaev, M. Yu.; Zanon-Willette, T.

    2016-11-01

    We develop a universal method to significantly suppress probe-induced shifts in any type of atomic clock using Ramsey spectroscopy. Our approach is based on the adaptation of the synthetic frequency concept [V. I. Yudin et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 030801 (2011), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.107.030801] (previously developed for blackbody radiation shift suppression) to Ramsey spectroscopy with the use of interrogations with different dark time intervals. The most significant suppression of the shift is obtained in combination with the so-called hyper-Ramsey spectroscopy technique [V. I. Yudin et al., Phys. Rev. A 82, 011804(R) (2010), 10.1103/PhysRevA.82.011804]. In this case, the probe-induced frequency shifts can be suppressed considerably from metrologically significant levels to below a fractional level of 10-18 for practically any optical atomic clocks. The main advantage of our method in comparison with other hyper-Ramsey approaches [R. Hobson et al., Phys. Rev. A 93, 010501(R) (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevA.93.010501; T. Zanon-Willette et al., Phys. Rev. A 93, 042506 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevA.93.042506] derives from its much greater efficiency and robustness in the presence of decoherence.

  17. Reply to ``Comment on `Collective effects and trapping states by a quantum-trajectory treatment of micromaser dynamics' ''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casagrande, F.; Castelli, F.; Lulli, A.

    2003-02-01

    In the preceding Comment [Phys. Rev. A 67, 027801 (2003)] Johnson and Schieve raise doubts on the validity of a result obtained in our treatment of collective atomic effects in micromaser dynamics [Phys. Rev. A 60, 1582 (1999)]. We fully confirm the validity of our results, showing that the conclusions derived from their analysis are not relevant.

  18. Comment on ``Avalanches and Non-Gaussian Fluctuations of the Global Velocity of Imbibition Fronts''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pruessner, Gunnar

    2010-07-01

    A Comment on the Letter by Ramon Planet, Stéphane Santucci, and Jordi Ortín, Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-9007 102, 094502 (2009)10.1103/PhysRevLett.102.094502. The authors of the Letter offer a Reply.

  19. Comment on ``Ordering of Small Particles in One-Dimensional Coherent Structures by Time-Periodic Flows''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhlmann, Hendrik C.; Muldoon, Frank H.

    2012-06-01

    A Comment on the Letter by D. O. Pushkin, D. E. Melnikov, and V. M. Shevtsova Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-9007 106, 234501 (2011)10.1103/PhysRevLett.106.234501. The authors of the Letter offer a Reply.

  20. Quadratic Hadamard Memories 1: Adaptive Stochastic Content-Addressable Memory

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-12-01

    learning mechanisms", Phys. Rev. A34, 4217 (1986). [4] I. Kanter and H. Sompolinsky , "Associative recall of memory without errors", Phys. Rev, A35...Acad. Sei. USA 79, 2554 (1982). [2] D. J. Aalt, H. Gutfreund, and H, Sompolinski , "Informa- tion storage in neural networks with low levels of activity

  1. Quadratic Hadamard Memories II. Adaptive Stochastic Content. Addressable Memory

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-07-01

    Dreyfus, "Collective computational properties of neural networks: New learning mechanisms", Phys. Rev. A34, 4217 (1986) 5] 1. Kanter and H. Sompolinski ... Sompolinsky , "Information storage in neural networks with low levels of activity", Phys. Rev. A35, 2293 (1987) [4] L. Personnaz, I. Guyon, and G

  2. Comment on ``Relative locality and the soccer ball problem''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossenfelder, S.

    2013-07-01

    It is explained why the argument by Amelino-Camelia et al. [Phys. Rev. D 84, 087702 (2011)PRVDAQ1550-799810.1103/PhysRevD.84.087702] does not answer the question how to describe multiparticle states in models with a deformed Lorentz symmetry in momentum space.

  3. Comment on ``Attractive forces between ions in quantum plasmas: Failure of linearized quantum hydrodynamics''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, P. K.; Eliasson, B.; Akbari-Moghanjoughi, M.

    2013-03-01

    In a recent paper, Bonitz, Pehlke, and Schoof [Phys. Rev. E10.1103/PhysRevE.87.033105 87, 033105 (2013)], hereafter referred to as BPS, have raised some points against the Shukla-Eliasson attractive potential [P. K. Shukla and B. Eliasson, Phys. Rev. Lett.0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.108.165007 108, 165007 (2012); P. K. Shukla and B. Eliasson, Phys. Rev. Lett.0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.108.219902 108, 219902(E) (2012); P. K. Shukla and B. Eliasson, Phys. Rev. Lett.10.1103/PhysRevLett.109.019901 109, 019901(E) (2012)], hereafter referred to as SEAP, around a stationary test charge in a quantum plasma. Our objective here is to discuss the insufficiency of the BPS reasoning concerning the applicability of the linearized quantum hydrodynamic theory, as well as to point out the shortcomings in BPS’s arguments and to suggest how to salvage BPS’s density functional theory and simulations, which have failed to produce results that correctly match with that of Shukla and Eliasson.

  4. Non-Abelian effects in a quadrupole system rotating around two axes

    SciTech Connect

    Zwanziger, J.W.; Koenig, M.; Pines, A. Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, CA )

    1990-09-01

    The {sup 35}Cl nuclear quadrupole resonance spectrum of a single crystal of sodium chlorate (R. Tycko, Phys. Rev. Lett. 58, 2281 (1987)) rotating about two axes reflects a non-Abelian gauge potential. This gauge potential is an example of Wilczek and Zee's (Phys. Rev. Lett. 52, 2111 (1984)) generalization of Berry's phase to the adiabatic transport of degenerate states.

  5. The Surface Structure, Scattering Losses and Schottky Barrier Model of III-V Compound Semiconductors.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-12-21

    30. S. M. Sze, in : PHYSICS OF SEMICONDUCTOR, (2nd Edition, John Willey & Sons, Inc. 1981). 31. A. R. Lubinsky, B. W. Lee, and P. Mark, Phys. Rev...R. J. Meyer, A. Paton, P. Mark, A. Kahn, E. So and J. L. Yeh, J. Vac Sci Technol. 16, 1252 (1979). 4 59. J. Bardeen , Phys; Rev. 71, 717 (1947).. 5

  6. Efficient progressive readout of a register of qubits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tilloy, Antoine

    2016-05-01

    Recently, a series of papers by Combes et al. [J. Combes, H. M. Wiseman, and K. Jacobs, Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 160503 (2008), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.100.160503; J. Combes, H. M. Wiseman, and A. J. Scott, Phys. Rev. A 81, 020301(R) (2010), 10.1103/PhysRevA.81.020301; J. Combes and H. M. Wiseman, Phys. Rev. X 1, 011012 (2011), 10.1103/PhysRevX.1.011012; J. Combes, A. Denney, and H. M. Wiseman, Phys. Rev. A 91, 022305 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevA.91.022305] has shown that it is possible to greatly improve the measurement rate of a register of qubits for given detector resources by means of a clever feedback control scheme. However, this speedup came at an exponential cost in terms of complexity and memory use. In this paper, I propose a simple efficient algorithm—exponentially more frugal in memory and less complex to implement—which is asymptotically as fast. I use extensively the implicit classicality of the situation to provide a slightly more straightforward interpretation of the results. I compute the speedup rates exactly in the case of the proposed model and in the case of the open-loop scheme of Combes et al. and prove that they indeed provide the same asymptotic speedup.

  7. Forbidden Electron Attachment in O2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-12-01

    1969). se R. J. Celotta it Ail,, Phys. Rev. A 6, 631 (1972). T . F. O’Malley, Phys. Rev. 153, 59 (1967). = S. F. Wang , M. 3. W. Boness, and G. J. Schulz...Department pennsylvania State University Rochester, New York 14627 University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 Dr. Roald Hoffmann Dr. . Rubloff Department of

  8. Electron Transport, Chemistry and Optical Emissions in the Auroral E-Layer.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-01-01

    and ionization rates for monoenergetic and energy dis- tributed sources with various pitch angle dependences. Walt et al. (1967) were the first to...Phys. Rev. A], 834 (1970). Borst, W.L., Phys. Rev. A5, 648 (1972). Davidson, B., Neutron Transport Theory, Oxford Press, London (1957). Donahue, T.M

  9. Construction of three-qubit genuine entanglement with bipartite positive partial transposes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, Kil-Chan; Kye, Seung-Hyeok

    2016-03-01

    We construct triqubit genuinely entangled states which have positive partial transposes (PPTs) with respect to the bipartition of systems. These examples disprove a conjecture [Novo, Moroder, and Gühne, Phys. Rev A 88, 012305 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevA.88.012305] which claims that PPT mixtures are necessary and sufficient for the biseparability of three qubits.

  10. Continuous Quantum Measurement of a Qubit State

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-06-23

    Rev. Lett. 79, 3740 (1997). [7] M . B . Plenio and P. L. Knight, Rev. Mod. Phys. 70, 101 (1998). [8] V. V. Danilov, K. K. Likharev and A. B . Zorin...Computing 1.0 , I , , I , , , , , 7= 0.117 P11 0.5 0.0 Imp 12 hA12/SIH - 0.1 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 t/( b /H) Fig. 1. Gradual purification of the qubit density...Physics of Nanostructures. References [1] A. N. Korotkov, Phys. Rev. B 60, 5737 (1999). [2] S. A. Gurvitz, Phys. Rev. B 56, 15215 (1997). [3] E. Buks

  11. Photoluminescent Response of Palladium-Cadmium Sulfide and Palladium-Graded Cadmium Sulfoselenide Schottky Diodes to Molecular Hydrogen.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-26

    assistance - and helpful discussions. 8 Re ferences 1. Hollingsworth, R. E.; Sites, J. R. 3. Appi . Phys. 1982, 53, 5357 and references therein. 2. Hobson...W. S.; Ellis, A. B. J. Ap. Phys. 1983, 54, 5956 and references therein. 3. Mettler, K. Appi . Phys. 1977, 12, 75. 4. Stephens, R. B. Phys. Rev.. B...1984, 29, 3283. 5. Steele, M. C.; Maclver, B. A. Appi . Phys. Lett. 1976, 28, 687. 6. Yamamoto, N.; Tonomura, S.; Matsuoka-, T.; Tsubomura, H. Surf. Sci

  12. International Journal of Quantum Chemistry. Quantum Chemistry Symposium Number 26: Proceedings of the International Symposium on Atomic, Molecular, and Condensed Matter Theory and Computational Methods Held in St. Augustine, Florida on 14-21 March 1992

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-02-01

    Viinikka, Phys . Rev . A 15, 1486 (1977). I 01 L. S. Cederbaum, W. Domcke. J. Schirmer. W. Von Niessen. G. It. F . Diercksen. and W. P. Kraemer, J. (hem. Phys ...Csanak, and H. S. Taylor. Adv. At. Mol. Phvs. 7,287 (1971). f231 F , J. Dyson. Phys . Rev . 75,436 (1949): 75. 1736 (1949). [24] J_ C. Inkson. Man y-Body...161 ( 1982)- f [19] H. Monkhorst, Int. J. Quantum (hem.. Quantumn Chem. S% np, 11, 421 (1977): E. Dalgaard and H. J. Monkhorst. Phys . Rev . A28, 1217

  13. Finite-temperature properties of nonmagnetic transition metals: Comparison of the performance of constraint-based semilocal and nonlocal functionals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gharaee, Leili; Erhart, Paul; Hyldgaard, Per

    2017-02-01

    We assess the performance of nonempirical, truly nonlocal, and semilocal functionals with regard to structural and thermal properties of 3 d ,4 d , and 5 d nonmagnetic transition metals. We focus on constraint- based functionals and consider the consistent-exchange van der Waals density-functional version vdW-DF-cx [Phys. Rev. B 89, 035412 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevB.89.035412], the semilocal PBE functional [Phys. Rev. Lett. 77, 3865 (1996), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.77.3865], and the PBEsol functional [Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 136406 (2008), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.100.136406], as well as the AM05 metafunctional [Phys. Rev. B 72, 085108 (2005), 10.1103/PhysRevB.72.085108]. Using the quasiharmonic approximation, the structural parameters, elastic response, and thermal expansion at finite temperatures are computed and compared to experimental data. We also compute cohesive energies explicitly including zero-point vibrations. It is shown that overall vdW-DF-cx provides an accurate description of thermal properties and retains a level of transferability and accuracy that is comparable to or better than some of the best constraint-based semilocal functionals. Especially, with regard to the cohesive energies, the consistent inclusion of spin-polarization effects in the atoms turns out to be crucial, and it is important to use the rigorous spin-vdW-DF-cx formulation [Phys. Rev. Lett. 115, 136402 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.115.136402]. This demonstrates that vdW-DF-cx has general-purpose character and can be used to study systems that have both sparse and dense electron distributions.

  14. Comment on "Critical point scaling of Ising spin glasses in a magnetic field"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Temesvári, T.

    2016-11-01

    In a section of a recent paper [Phys. Rev. B 91, 104432 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevB.91.104432], the authors discuss some of the arguments in the paper by Parisi and Temesvári [Nucl. Phys. B 858, 293 (2012), 10.1016/j.nuclphysb.2012.01.014]. In this Comment, it is shown how these arguments are misinterpreted and the existence of the Almeida-Thouless transition in the upper critical dimension six reasserted.

  15. Proceedings of the Organization of 1990 Meeting of International Neural Network Society Jointed with IEEE Held in Washington, DC on January 15 - 19, 1990. Volume 1. Theory Track Neural and cognitive Sciences Track

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-11-30

    Behavior (Wiley, New York, 1949). 4. L. Personnaz, I. Guyon, and G. Dreyfus, J. Physique Lett. 46, L359 (1985). 5. I. Kanter and H. Sompolinsky , Phys. Rev...A 35, 380 (1987). 6. A. Crisanti and H. Sompolinsky , Phys. Rev. A 36, 4922 (1987). 7. D. J. Amit, H. Gutfreund, and H. Sompolinsky , Ann. Phys. 173, 30...associative memory. Neural Networks, 2, in press D. J. Amit, H. Gutfreund and H. Sompolinsky , Storing infinite numbers of patterns in a spin glass model

  16. The Effects of Stoichiometry on the Mechanical Properties of Icosahedral Boron Carbide Under Loading

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-11-19

    failing to comply with a collection of information if it does not display a currently valid OMB control number. 1. REPORT DATE 19 NOV 2012 2. REPORT...32] with temperature and pressure controlled using algorithms due to Berendsen [33]. For each MD trajectory, atomic forces and stresses were computed...Phys. Rev. Lett. 77 3865 [29] Doll K 2009 Mol. Phys. 108 223 [30] Wang J and Yip S 1993 Phys. Rev. Lett. 71 4182 [31] Kimizuka H, Ogata S, Li J and

  17. Study of Infrared Atmospheric Emission.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-12-01

    Edward S. and Hajime Sakai, "The 5g Levels of Atomic Nitrogen," J. Phys. B: 14, L391 (1981) Sakai, Hajime, P. Hansen, M. Esplin, R Johansson, M. Peltola...Academic) Chang E S and Sakai H 1981 J. Phys. B: At. Mot. Pkys. 14 L391 -" 1982 to be published Deutsch C 1970 Phys. Rev. A 2 43-8 Edlin B 1964 Encyclopedia...Chang and H. Sakai, J. Phys. B 14, L391 (1981). G. Karl, B. hickel, J. D. Poll, and L. Wotniewicz, Phys. Rev. 6J. T. Hougen. The Calculatiot of

  18. Research Study on Near Millimeter Wave Orotrons.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-07-01

    10 (1967), 1414. 3. M. Danos , J. Appl. Phys. 26 (1955), 2. 18. S. J. Smith and E. M. Purcell, Phys. Rev. 4. H. Lashinsky,J.Appl. Phys.27(1956),631...92 ( 1953 ), 1069. 5. H.Mendlowitz and S. J. Glass, Phys. Rev.D 19. 1. M. Frank, IZVAN SSSR, Physics Series. 15 (1977),530. 6(1942), 3. 6. J. E. Walsh...Phys. 49 (1978), Group on Electron Devices (March 1964) 41. (in Japanese). 8. M. Danos , S. Geschwind, H. Lashinsky, and 22. K. Mizuno, S. Ono. and Y

  19. Entanglement of Polar Molecules in Pendular States (PREPRINT)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-02-28

    the Office of Naval Research and Hackerman Ad- vanced Research program for support at Texas A&M University. We thank David DeMille and Seth Lloyd for...Phys. 132, 121104 (2010) [33] B. Friedrich and D. Herschbach, Z. Phys. D 18, 153 (1991) [34] C. Ticknor and J. L. Bohm , Phys. Rev. A 72, 032717 (2005...J. L. Bohm , M. Cavagnero and C. Ticknor, New J. Physics 11, 055039 (2009) [35] J. A. Jones, PhysChemComm 11, 1 (2001) [36] H. K. Hughes, Phys. Rev

  20. IMACS 󈨟: Proceedings of the IMACS World Congress on Computation and Applied Mathematics (13th) Held in Dublin, Ireland on July 22-26, 1991. Volume 2. Computational Fluid Dynamics and Wave Propagation, Parallel Computing, Concurrent and Supercomputing, Computational Physics/Computational Chemistry and Evolutionary Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-01-01

    Rev . Lett.,.Y9. 132 (1982).ES IV is found almost at a point value of F . As F 8 . Chirikov.B.V., Phys . Rept., 52. 265 (1979). increases toward Fw...P., and JerOme, B. (1989). Phys . Rev . A S, . ,..40, 317. 6. Pieranski, P., JerOme, B., and Gabay, M. (1990). Mol. Cryst. -Lia. Cryst. 179, 285. f ... Phys . Lett. 141A, 412 (1989) 7. F . J. Romelras and E. Ott, Phys . Roy. 35A, 4404 (1987) 8 . T. Kapltaniak et al., J. Phys A, 23, (19qO) 9. H.S.

  1. Research Investigation Directed Toward Extending the Useful Range of the Electromagnetic Spectrum.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-03-31

    233 (1959). (23) R. J. Glauber , Phys. Rev. 131, 2766 (1963). (24) P. L. Kelley and W. H. Kleiner, Phys. Rev. 136, A316 (1964). (25) L. Mandel, Phys...Lambert, D. G. Parks-Smith, and J. L. Stretton, Proc. Roy . Soc. A282, 380 (1964). (7) U. Agam, M. Eyal, and F. R. Grabiner, Chem. Phys. Lett. 68, 35...1971. (5) G. Herzberg and J. W. C. Johns, Proc. Roy . Soc. A295, 107 (1966). (6) G. Closs, C. A. Hutchison, Jr., and B. E. Kohler, J. Chem. Phys. 44, 413

  2. Millimeter-Wave Acoustic Transducers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-04-01

    Phys . Rev. Lett . 54, 1810 ( 1985 ). 28. S.A. Akhmanov, V.V. Fadeev, R.V. Khokhlov, and O.N. Chunaev, Sov . Phys . JETP Lett . 6, 85...Acoust. Soc. Am. 66, 1801 (1979). 41 . F.P. Milliken, K.W. Schwartz and C.W. Smith, Phys . Rev. Lett . 48, 1204 (1982). 42 . T.E. Huber and H.J. Maris... Phys . Lett . 7, 264 (1965). 7. K.H. Yang, P.L. Richards, and Y.R. Shen, J. Appl. Phys . 44, 1417 (1973). 8. H.K. Wong, G.K. Wong and J.B.

  3. SDIO/IST Ultrashort Wavelength Laser: Novel Experimental Schemes for Observing the Mossbauer Effect in Long-Lived Nuclear Levels.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-07-01

    Sov . Phys . - JETP Lett . 39, 573 (1984). 32. G. V. Smirnov and A. I. Chumakov, Sov . Phys . JETP 62, 673 ( 1985 ). 33. G. V. Smirnov, Hyperfine...Perlow, and S. S. Hanna, Phys . Rev. Lett . 4, 181 (1960). 41 . F. J. Lynch, R. E. Holland, and M. Hamermesh, Phys . Rev. 120, 513 (1960). 42 . C. S. Wu, Y. K...Red. 9, 123 (1969). 8. E. P. Stepanov, A. N. Artem’ev, I. P. Perstnev, V. V. Sklyarevskii, and G. V. Smirnov, Sov . Phys

  4. FINAL REPORT MELTER TESTS WITH AZ-101 HLW SIMULANT USING A DURAMELTER 100 VITRIFICATION SYSTEM VSL-01R10N0-1 REV 1 2/25/02

    SciTech Connect

    KRUGER AA; MATLACK KS; KOT WK; PEGG IL

    2011-12-29

    heat transfer in rate attainment and the much greater role of wall effects in heat transfer when the melt pool is not agitated. The DM100 melter used for the present tests has a surface area of 0.108 m{sup 2}, which is approximately 5 times larger than that of the DM10 (0.021 m{sup 2}) and approximately 11 times smaller than that of the DM1000 (1.2 m{sup 2}) (the DM1000 has since been replaced by a pilot-scale prototypical HLW melter, designated the DM1200, which has the same surface area as the DM1000). Testing on smaller melters is the most economical method for obtaining data over a wide range of operating conditions (particularly at extremes) and for guiding the more expensive tests that are performed at pilot-scale. Thus, one objective of these tests was to determine whether the DM100 melters are sufficiently large to reproduce the un-bubbled melt rates observed at the DM1000 scale, or to determine the extent of any off-set. DM100-scale tests can then be used to screen feed chemistry variations that may serve to increase the un-bubbled production rates prior to confirmation at pilot scale. Finally, extensive characterization data obtained on simulated HLW melter feeds formed from various glass forming additives indicated that there may be advantages in terms of feed rheology and stability to the replacement of some of the hydroxides by carbonates. A further objective of the present tests was therefore to identify any deleterious processing effects of such a change before adopting the carbonate feed as the baseline. Data from the WVDP melter using acidified (nitrated) feeds, and without bubbling, showed productions rates that are higher than those observed with the alkaline RPP feeds at the VSL. Therefore, the effect of feed acidification on production rate also was investigated. This work was performed under Test Specification, 'TSP-W375-00-00019, Rev 0, 'HLW-DM10 and DM100 Melter Tests' dated November 13, 2000 and the corresponding Test Plan. It should be noted

  5. Scaling Theory Applied to Far Infrared Absorption by Metal-Insulator Composite Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-01-01

    Taylor and Francis, London, 1985), and references therein. 23. H1. J. Hlerrmann, B3. Derrida . and J. Vannimenus, Phys. Rev. B30, 41080 (1984). 24. B... Derrida . D. Stauffer, 11. J. Hlerrmann, and J. Vannimenus, J. Phys. (Paris) 44, L701 (1983). 25. D. WV. lleermann and D. Stauffer, Z. Phys. B44, 339 (1981

  6. Infrared and Electrical Properties of Amorphous Sputtered (LaxA1l-x)2O3 films

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-01-01

    Appl. Phys. Lett. 78, 1832 ~2001!. 10 I. Bunget and M. Popescu, Physics of Solid Dielectrics ~Elsevier, Amster- dam , 1984!, Chap. 6. 11 A. S. Barker...Thomsen, Phys. Rev. B 59, 4146 ~1999!. 13 M. L. Tuma ~private communication!. 14 G. Samara , J. Appl. Phys. 68, 4214 ~1990!. 15 O. Medenbach, D. Dettmar

  7. Magnetic Surfaces, Thin Films, and Multilayers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-01-01

    1976); K. Binder and D.P. Landau , Phys. Rev. B 13, 1140 (1976); R.B. Stinchcombe, J. Phys. C: Solid State Phys. 14, 397 (1981); M. Bander and D.L...MAGNETISM A. VE-GA , A. RUBIO -, L.C. BAIBAS, J. DORANTES-DAVILA , C. DEMANGEAT, A. MOKRANI 4 and H. DREYSSE , a Depto de Fisica Teorica , Universidad

  8. Mapping Nanoscale Absorption of Femtosecond Laser Pulses Using Plasma Explosion Imaging

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-08-06

    Libby, S. B.; et al. Observation and Control of Shock Waves in Indivi- dual Nanoplasmas . Phys. Rev. Lett. 2014, 112, 115004. 17. Zhang, X.; Smith, K. a...Laser Light. Phys. Plasmas 2005, 12, 056703. 24. Lezius, M.; Dobosz, S. Hot Nanoplasmas from Intense Laser Irradiation of Argon Clusters. J. Phys. B

  9. Experimental Evidence of Dipolar Interaction in Bilayer Nanocomposite Magnets

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-11-25

    105, 023912 (2009) 7. D.T. Margulies, M.E. Schabes , W.Mc. Chesney, E.E. Fullerton, Appl. Phys. Lett. 80, 91 (2002) 8. S.S.P. Parkin, D. Mauri, Phys. Rev. B 44, 7131 (1991) 9. S.T. Chui, J. Appl. Phys. 85, 4397 (1999)

  10. An Experimental and Theoretical Investigation of Optogalvanic Effects.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-12-01

    41 (1984). 21. R. Warren, Phys. Rev. 98, 1650 (1955). 22. B. N. Ganguly and A. Garscadden , Appl. Phys. Lett. 46, 540 (1985). 23. M. L. Zimmerman, M...Preppernau, and A. Garscadden , J. Appl. Phys. 61, 2778 (1987). 30. The pressure-broadening coefficient of 42.0±2.7 MHz/Torr at 292K for the 501 .6nm

  11. Relativistically induced transparency acceleration of light ions by an ultrashort laser pulse interacting with a heavy-ion-plasma density gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahai, Aakash A.; Tsung, Frank S.; Tableman, Adam R.; Mori, Warren B.; Katsouleas, Thomas C.

    2013-10-01

    The relativistically induced transparency acceleration (RITA) scheme of proton and ion acceleration using laser-plasma interactions is introduced, modeled, and compared to the existing schemes. Protons are accelerated with femtosecond relativistic pulses to produce quasimonoenergetic bunches with controllable peak energy. The RITA scheme works by a relativistic laser inducing transparency [Akhiezer and Polovin, Zh. Eksp. Teor. Fiz 30, 915 (1956); Kaw and Dawson, Phys. FluidsPFLDAS0031-917110.1063/1.1692942 13, 472 (1970); Max and Perkins, Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.27.1342 27, 1342 (1971)] to densities higher than the cold-electron critical density, while the background heavy ions are stationary. The rising laser pulse creates a traveling acceleration structure at the relativistic critical density by ponderomotively [Lindl and Kaw, Phys. FluidsPFLDAS0031-917110.1063/1.1693437 14, 371 (1971); Silva , Phys. Rev. E1063-651X10.1103/PhysRevE.59.2273 59, 2273 (1999)] driving a local electron density inflation, creating an electron snowplow and a co-propagating electrostatic potential. The snowplow advances with a velocity determined by the rate of the rise of the laser's intensity envelope and the heavy-ion-plasma density gradient scale length. The rising laser is incrementally rendered transparent to higher densities such that the relativistic-electron plasma frequency is resonant with the laser frequency. In the snowplow frame, trace density protons reflect off the electrostatic potential and get snowplowed, while the heavier background ions are relatively unperturbed. Quasimonoenergetic bunches of velocity equal to twice the snowplow velocity can be obtained and tuned by controlling the snowplow velocity using laser-plasma parameters. An analytical model for the proton energy as a function of laser intensity, rise time, and plasma density gradient is developed and compared to 1D and 2D PIC OSIRIS [Fonseca , Lect. Note Comput. Sci.9783

  12. Absolute differential cross sections for the elastic scattering of electrons from atomic hydrogen at low incident energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Kenneth; Leonard, Linda; Proctor, Stephanie; Childers, J. G.; Khakoo, Murtadha A.

    2003-05-01

    Absolute differential cross sections for electrons elastically scattered from atomic hydrogen have been measured at low incident energies. The measurements were facilitated by the moveable nozzle source recently developed in our lab. Data taken at the incident energies of 20 eV, 40 eV, and 100 eV, and spanning the angular range of 10^rc to 120^rc will be presented. The results will be compared to the earlier measurements of Williams(Joseph Callaway and J. F. Williams, Phys. Rev. A) 12, 2312 (1975), J. F. Williams, J. Phys. B 8, 2191 (1975) and Shyn(T. W. Shyn and S. Y. Cho, Phys. Rev. A) 40, 1315 (1989), T. W. Shyn and Alan Grafe, Phys. Rev. A 46, 2949 (1992), and the theoretical calculations of Bray(Igor Bray, Phys. Rev. A) 46, 6995 (1992). Funded by the National Science Foundation under Grant # NSF-RUI-PHY-0096808.

  13. Comment on "Calibration of (57)Fe Mössbauer constants by first principles" Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2016, 18, 10201-10206.

    PubMed

    Grandjean, Fernande; Long, Gary J

    2016-09-21

    The proportionality constant, α, between the observed isomer shifts and the calculated electron probability density at the iron nucleus has been reevaluated in terms of the correct experimental isomer shifts relative to α-iron and their corresponding accuracy, which should be considered in the linear regression fit yielding α. The iron-57 excited state nuclear quadrupole moment, Q, is not a "relative" value and its widely accepted experimental value is 0.16(1) × 10(-28) m(2) as also confirmed by nuclear model calculations.

  14. Nonlinear phenomena in Bose-Einstein condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, Lincoln D.

    2008-05-01

    We present a medley of results from the last three years on nonlinear phenomena in BECs [1]. These include exact dynamics of multi-component condensates in optical lattices [2], vortices and ring solitons [3], macroscopic quantum tunneling [4], nonlinear band theory [5], and a pulsed atomic soliton laser [6]. 1. Emergent Nonlinear Phenomena in Bose-Einstein Condensates: Theory and Experiment, ed. P. G. Kevrekidis, D. J. Frantzeskakis, and R. Carretero-Gonzalez (Springer-Verlag, 2008). 2. R. Mark Bradley, James E. Bernard, and L. D. Carr, e-print arXiv:0711.1896 (2007). 3. G. Herring, L. D. Carr, R. Carretero-Gonzalez, P. G. Kevrekidis, D. J. Frantzeskakis, Phys. Rev. A in press, e-print arXiv:0709.2193 (2007); L. D. Carr and C. W. Clark, Phys. Rev. A v. 74, p.043613 (2006); L. D. Carr and C. W. Clark, Phys. Rev. Lett. v. 97, p.010403 (2006). 4. L. D. Carr, M. J. Holland, and B. A. Malomed, J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys., v.38, p.3217 (2005) 5. B. T. Seaman, L. D. Carr, and M. J. Holland, Phys. Rev. A, v. 71, p.033622 (2005). 6. L. D. Carr and J. Brand, Phys. Rev. A, v.70, p.033607 (2004); L. D. Carr and J. Brand, Phys. Rev. Lett., v.92, p.040401 (2004).

  15. Ability of a low-dimensional model to predict geometry-dependent dynamics of large-scale coherent structures in turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Kunlun; Ji, Dandan; Brown, Eric

    2016-02-01

    We test the ability of a general low-dimensional model for turbulence to predict geometry-dependent dynamics of large-scale coherent structures, such as convection rolls. The model consists of stochastic ordinary differential equations, which are derived as a function of boundary geometry from the Navier-Stokes equations [Brown and Ahlers, Phys. Fluids 20, 075101 (2008), 10.1063/1.2919806; Phys. Fluids 20, 105105 (2008), 10.1063/1.2991432]. We test the model using Rayleigh-Bénard convection experiments in a cubic container. The model predicts a mode in which the alignment of a convection roll stochastically crosses a potential barrier to switch between diagonals. We observe this mode with a measured switching rate within 30% of the prediction.

  16. Implications of the Trapping-Desorption and Direct Inelastic Scattering Channels on Dicke-Narrowed Lineshapes.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-02-12

    8217. .- - - . . . - ’- - ". - . REFERENCES 1. C. H. Townes and A. L. Schawlow, Microwave Spectroscopy (Dover, New York, 1975), p. 374. 2. M. Danos and S...Geschwind, Phys. Rev. 91, 1159 ( 1953 ). 3. P.W. Zitzewitz and N. F. Ramsey, Phys. Rev. A 1, 51 (1971). 4. lf there is a non-zero variance in the average phase...shift per impact,then a weakly depolarizing surface will also produce some homogeneous line broadening. 5. R. H. Dicke, Phys. Rev. 89, 472 ( 1953 ). 6

  17. Search for Far Infrared Radiation from Optically Pumped Defect Modes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-11-13

    anisotropic nature of the material and the random orientation of the grains. In a recent Comment, Orenstein et al.,[26] proposed a simple model which explains...between the acoustic and optic phonon branches of the host crystal.[51,53] To account for this puzzling result Evans and Fitchen[53] noted that since parity... Orenstein , et al., Phys. Rev. B 36, 729 (1987); S. L. Herr, et al. Phys. Rev. B 36, 733 (1987); J. Orenstein et al., Phys. Rev. B 36, 8892 (1987); S

  18. Topological Insulators and Superconductors for Innovative Devices

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-20

    Ong , and R. J. Cava, Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 057001 (2010). [12] S. Sasaki, M. Kriener, K. Segawa, K. Yada, Y. Tanaka, M. Sato, and Y. Ando, Phys. Rev...Baumberger , C. R. A. Catlow , Adv. Mater. 2012 , 24 , 2154 . [ 7 ] D. X. Qu , Y. S. Hor , J. Xiong , R. J. Cava , N. P. Ong ...Xiong, R. J. Cava, and N. P. Ong , Science 329, 821 (2010). [6] Z. Ren, A.A. Taskin, S. Sasaki, K. Segawa, and Y. Ando, Phys. Rev. B 82, 241306(R

  19. Proceedings for the Alaska Meeting on Fundamental Optical Processes in Semiconductors (AMFOPS 󈧅) Held in Girdwood, Alaska on August 5-10, 2001

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    o . I (L MM ( La. M2 L I 478 8 i4 N 6 i:& e From Quantum Kinetics to the Carrier-Wave Regime Martin Wegener Institut fir Angewandte Physik...Steinbach, M.U. Wehner, M. Wegener , T. Marschner, and W. Stolz, Phys. Rev. Lett. 75, 2188 (1995). [2] M.U. Wehner, M.H. Ulm, D.S. Chemla, and M. Wegener ...Phys. Rev. Lett. 80, 1992 (1998). [3] W.A. Hhlgel, M.F. Heinrich, M. Wegener , Q.T. Vu, L. Bdnyai, and H. Haug, Phys. Rev. Lett. 83, 3313 (1999). [4

  20. Theoretical Study of Solid State Quantum Information Processing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-08-28

    odd effects of Heisenberg chains on long-range interaction and entanglement, Physical Review B, (10 2010): 140403. doi: 10.1103/PhysRevB.82.140403 08...interface-bound electrons in silicon: An effective mass study, Physical Review B, (10 2011): 0. doi: 10.1103/PhysRevB.84.155320 08/31/2012 18.00 Xuedong...Xuedong Hu. Effect of randomness on quantum data buses of Heisenberg spin chains, Physical Review B, (06 2012): 0. doi: 10.1103/PhysRevB.85.224418

  1. Overview of High-Temperature Superconductivity: Theory, Surfaces, Interfaces and Bulk Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-06-01

    superconductivity. The RVB theory has been amplified or modified in several ways [5,6,7], the details of which we won’t go into here. Rice and Wang [8] have...similar to those of RVB theory, but different from BCS theory. Rice and Wang , however, favor a phonon interaction which mediates the attraction between...36, 857. 7. Kotliar, G. Phys. Rev. B,1988, IZ, 3664. 8. Rice, M. J.; Wang , Y. R. Phys. Rev.-B, 1988, 37, 5893. 9. Coffey, L.; Cox, D. L. Phys. Rev

  2. ERDC MSRC Resource. High Performance Computing for the Warfighter. Spring 2006

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-01

    Metzner and D. Vollhardt, “Correlated Lattice Fermions in d=∞ Dimensions,” Phys. Rev. Lett. 62, 324 (1989). [2] A. Georges, G. Kotliar, W. Krauth , M...Simple model for semi- conductor-metal transitions: SmB6 and transition-metal oxides,” Phys. Rev. Lett. 22, 997 (1969). [6] V. Turkowski and J. K ...Freericks, “Nonlinear response of Bloch electrons in infinite dimensions,” Phys. Rev. B 71, 085104 (2005). [7] V. O. Turkowski and J. K . Freericks

  3. The Long-Range Model of High-L Rydberg Fine Structure: A Critical Comparison with Experimental Data..

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snow, Erica L.; Wright, Laura E.; Lundeen, Stephen R.

    2006-05-01

    A simple view of the fine structure of non-penetrating Rydberg levels, suggested over 70 years ago [1], was refined to treat the fine structure of helium, lithium [2], and other atoms with S-state ion cores [3]. In this view the ion polarizabilities determine the fine structure pattern. Current experimental techniques provide access to highly excited high-L states in He [4], Li [5], Mg, SiIII [6], and Ba[7], and a test of the long-range model is possible with the availability of independent theoretical calculations. A critical comparison of the data treated with the long-range model will be made to the a-priori calculations of the ionic polarizabilities. [1] Joseph E. Mayer and Maria Goeppert Mayer, Phys. Rev. 43 605 (1933). [2] Richard J. Drachman and A. K. Bhatia, Phys. Rev. A 51 2926 (1995). [3] C. Laughlin, J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 28 2787 (1995). [4] G. D. Stevens and S. R. Lundeen, Comments on At. and Mol. Phys., Comments on Mod. Phys. 1,D 207 (2000). [5] C. H. Storry, N. E. Rothery, and E. A. Hessels, Phys. Rev. A 55 128 (1997). [6] R. A. Komara et. al., J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 38 S87 (2005). [7] E.L. Snow, et. al. Phys. Rev. A 71, 022510 (2005)

  4. Electron Acoustic Waves and the Search for a Truly Self-Consistent Large-Amplitude Plasma Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, Tudor; Afeyan, Bedros

    2003-10-01

    We examine some theoretical nonlinear Vlasov work invoked in connection with recent laser-plasma experiments [1] on Electron Acoustic Waves and their stimulated scatter (SEAS). Earlier work discussed [2-5] is then related to more recent theory [6] used to interpret [1]. All this [2-6] is then related the recent Vlasov-Poisson findings of Afeyan et al. [7] on Kinetic Electrostatic Electron Nonlinear (KEEN) waves. (Part of this work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy under grant number DE-FG03-NA00059.) [1] D.S. Montgomery et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 87, 155001 (2001), Phys. Plasmas 9, 2311(2002). [2] I.B. Bernstein et al., Phys.Rev. 108, 546 (1957). [3] W.P. Allis, paper no. 3 pp. 21-42, in In Honor of Philip M. Morse, ed. H. Feshbach and K. Ingard, MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, (1969). (Source for V.B. Krapchev and A.K. Ram, Phys. Rev. A, 22, 1229 (1980)). [4] H. Schamel, Phys. Scr. 20, 336 (1979), Phys. Rep. 140, 161 (1986), Phys. Plasmas 7, 4831 (2000). [5] J.P. Holloway and J.J. Dorning, Phys. Lett. A 138, 279 (1989) and Phys. Rev. A 44, 3856 (1991). [6] H. A. Rose and D. A. Russell, Phys. Plasmas 8, 4784 (2001). [7] B. B. Afeyan et al., "Optical Mixing Generated Kinetic Electrostatic Electron Nonlinear (KEEN) Waves", manuscript in preparation and poster at this conference.

  5. Piezoelectric and Electrostrictive Materials for Transducers Applications. Volume 3

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-01-31

    Lyon. P. Fleury. J. Negron. and H. Carter. Phys. lev. B 36. 240 equilibrium. (1987). 𔃺U. Hochi, P. Kofel, and M . Maglione . Phys. Rev. B 32 4546...1987). 13, 3576(1976). 26U. Hochli, P. Kole], and M . Maglione , Phys. Rev. B 32, 4546 31E. Courtens, T. Rosenbaum, S. Nagler, and P. Horn, Phys. (1985...PENNSTATE V THE MATERIALS RESEARCH LABORATORY UNIVERSITY PARK, PA 92 6 01 158 92-14489 REPORT DOCUJMENTATION PAGE. eOSM m - I. WIORT SICUNIY CLAW� 1b

  6. Optoelectronics Generation and Detection of Intense Terahertz Electromagnetic Pulses.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    been shown to be [31] I(a 3’(o)). _ 1 [1+ (21cc/(ood) sin y - sin2 Y 1 6 )0=0- 2ito 1- n27cc/o).d) -s (15) The analytical evaluation of the integral in...Rink, Phys. Rev. Lett. 59, 1018 (1987). [13] E. Yablonovitch, J.P. Heritage, D.E. Aspnes, and Y . Yafet, Phys. Rev. Lett. 63, 976 (1989); Y . Yafet, E... Chamoun , Appl. Phys. Lett. 53, 2254 (1988). [18] A. E. Iverson, G. M. Wysin, D. L. Smith, and A. Redondo, Appl. Phys. Lett. 52, 2148 (1988). T.F

  7. Generalized Wannier functions: A comparison of molecular electric dipole polarizabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Regan, David D.; Payne, Mike C.; Mostofi, Arash A.

    2012-05-01

    Localized Wannier functions provide an efficient and intuitive means by which to compute dielectric properties from first principles. They are most commonly constructed in a post-processing step, following total-energy minimization. Nonorthogonal generalized Wannier functions (NGWFs) [Skylaris , Phys. Rev. BPRBMDO1098-012110.1103/PhysRevB.66.035119 66, 035119 (2002); Skylaris , J. Chem. Phys.JCPSA60021-960610.1063/1.1839852 122, 084119 (2005)] may also be optimized in situ, in the process of solving for the ground-state density. We explore the relationship between NGWFs and orthonormal, maximally localized Wannier functions (MLWFs) [Marzari and Vanderbilt, Phys. Rev. BPRBMDO1098-012110.1103/PhysRevB.56.12847 56, 12847 (1997); Souza, Marzari, and Vanderbilt, Phys. Rev. BPRBMDO1098-012110.1103/PhysRevB.65.035109 65, 035109 (2001)], demonstrating that NGWFs may be used to compute electric dipole polarizabilities efficiently, with no necessity for post-processing optimization, and with an accuracy comparable to MLWFs.

  8. Composite Fermion Theory for the Fractional Quantum Hall Wigner Crystal State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narevich, Romanas; Murthy, Ganpathy; Fertig, Herbert

    2000-03-01

    The low filling fraction Quantum Hall Effect is reexamined using the recent hamiltonian composite fermion theory developed by Shankar and Murthy [SM] (R. Shankar and G. Murthy, Phys. Rev. Lett. 79), 4437, (1997); G. Murthy and R. Shankar, Chapter 4 of "Composite Fermions", O. Heinonen, Ed. (World Scientific, Teaneck, NJ, 1998).. Previous studies have either concentrated on Wigner crystal states of electrons in the Hartree-Fock approximation (D. Yoshioka and H. Fukuyama, J. Phys. Soc. Japan 47), 394 (1979); D. Yoshioka and P. A. Lee, Phys. Rev. B 27, 4986 (1983); A. H. MacDonald, Phys. Rev. B 30, 4392 (1984); R. Cote and A. H. MacDonald, Phys. Rev. B 44, 8759 (1991). or studied correlated crystal states numerically (P. K. Lam and S. M. Girvin, Phys. Rev. B 30), 473 (1984); H. Yi and H. A. Fertig, Phys. Rev. B, 58, 4019 (1998).. Using the new SM approach we study the correlated states as Hartree-Fock states of composite fermions, which is known to work reasonably well for translationally invariant composite fermion states. We present the calculation of the gaps for the stable states that we found as well as the dispersion relations of the collective modes.

  9. Reynolds number effects on the single-mode Richtmyer-Meshkov instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walchli, B.; Thornber, B.

    2017-01-01

    The Reynolds number effects on the nonlinear growth rates of the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability are investigated using two-dimensional numerical simulations. A decrease in Reynolds number gives an increased time to reach nonlinear saturation, with Reynolds number effects only significant in the range Re<256 . Within this range there is a sharp change in instability properties. The bubble and spike amplitudes move towards equal size at lower Reynolds numbers and the bubble velocities decay faster than predicted by Sohn's model [S.-I. Sohn, Phys. Rev. E 80, 055302 (2009), 10.1103/PhysRevE.80.055302]. Predicted amplitudes show reasonable agreement with the existing theory of Carles and Popinet [P. Carles and S. Popinet, Phys. Fluids Lett. 13, 1833 (2001), 10.1063/1.1377863; Eur. J. Mech. B 21, 511 (2002), 10.1016/S0997-7546(02)01199-8] and Mikaelian [K. O. Mikaelian, Phys. Rev. E 47, 375 (1993), 10.1103/PhysRevE.47.375; K. O. Mikaelian, Phys. Rev. E 87, 031003 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevE.87.031003], with the former being the closest match to the current computations.

  10. A New Max-Min Variational, Semi-Definite Programming Based, Quantization Procedure.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Handy, Carlos

    2007-10-01

    A new variational quantization procedure is developed exploiting the moment problem based analysis underlying the Eigenvalue Moment Method (EMM) developed by Handy, Bessis, and co-workers [1-5]. The EMM procedure is the first to exploit Semidefinite Programming (SDP) analysis in solving quantum problems, and has played a pivotal role in defining new computational tools for tackling non-Hermitian problems such as those concerning PT-invariant (and symmetry breaking) systems [6] and Regge pole calculations for atomic-molecular scattering [7]. It offers a more rigorous (fool-proof) framework than other methods, including those based on a Hill determinant approach. By extension, these same properties are enjoyed by the new Max-Min variational procedure. We offer some illustrative examples which underscore important convexity properties of the underlying ``volcano-function'' [4,5]. [1] C. R. Handy and D. Bessis, Phys. Rev. Lett. 55, 931 (1985). [2] C. R. Handy, D. Bessis, T. D. Morley, Phys. Rev. A 37, 4557 (1988). [3] C. R. Handy, D. Bessis, G. Sigismondi, T. D. Morley, Phys. Rev. Lett. 60, 253 (1988). [4] C. R. Handy, K . Appiah, D. Bessis, Phys. Rev. A 50, 988 (1994). [5] C. R. Handy, Phys. Rev. A 52, 3468 (1995). [6] C. R. Handy, J. Phys. A 34, 5065 (2001). [7] C. R. Handy, C. J. Tymczak, A. Z. Msezane, Phys. Rev. A 66, 050701 (R) (2002).

  11. B80 and B101-103 clusters: Remarkable stability of the core-shell structures established by validated density functionalsa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Fengyu; Jin, Peng; Jiang, De-en; Wang, Lu; Zhang, Shengbai B.; Zhao, Jijun; Chen, Zhongfang

    2012-02-01

    Prompted by the very recent claim that the volleyball-shaped B80 fullerene [X. Wang, Phys. Rev. B 82, 153409 (2010), 10.1103/PhysRevB.82.153409] is lower in energy than the B80 buckyball [N. G. Szwacki, A. Sadrzadeh, and B. I. Yakobson, Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 166804 (2007), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.98.166804] and core-shell structure [J. Zhao, L. Wang, F. Li, and Z. Chen, J. Phys. Chem. A 114, 9969 (2010), 10.1021/jp1018873], and inspired by the most recent finding of another core-shell isomer as the lowest energy B80 isomer [S. De, A. Willand, M. Amsler, P. Pochet, L. Genovese, and S. Goedecher, Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 225502 (2011), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.106.225502], we carefully evaluated the performance of the density functional methods in the energetics of boron clusters and confirmed that the core-shell construction (stuffed fullerene) is thermodynamically the most favorable structural pattern for B80. Our global minimum search showed that both B101 and B103 also prefer a core-shell structure and that B103 can reach the complete core-shell configuration. We called for great attention to the theoretical community when using density functionals to investigate boron-related nanomaterials.

  12. Resonant-state-expansion Born approximation with a correct eigen-mode normalisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doost, M. B.

    2016-08-01

    The Born approximation (Born 1926 Z. Phys. 38 802) is a fundamental result in physics, it allows the calculation of weak scattering via the Fourier transform of the scattering potential. As was done by previous authors (Ge et al 2014 New J. Phys. 16 113048) the Born approximation is extended by including in the formula the resonant-states (RSs) of the scatterer. However in this study unlike previous studies the included eigen-modes are correctly normalised with dramatic positive consequences for the accuracy of the method. The normalisation of RSs used in the previous RS expansion Born approximation or resonant-state expansion (RSE) Born approximation made in Ge et al (2014 New J. Phys. 16 113048) has been shown to be numerically unstable in Muljarov et al (2014 arXiv:1409.6877) and by analytics here. The RSs of the system can be calculated using my recently discovered RSE perturbation theory for dispersive electrodynamic scatterers (Muljarov et al 2010 Europhys. Lett. 92 50010; Doost et al 2012 Phys. Rev. A 85 023835; Doost et al 2013 Phys. Rev. A 87 043827; Armitage et al 2014 Phys. Rev. A 89; Doost et al 2014 Phys. Rev. A 90 013834) and normalised correctly to appear in spectral Green's functions and hence the RSE Born approximation via the flux-volume normalisation which I recently rigorously derived in Armitage et al (2014 Phys. Rev. A 89), Doost et al (2014 Phys. Rev. A 90 013834), Doost (2016 Phys. Rev. A 93 023835). In the case of effectively one-dimensional systems I find a RSE Born approximation alternative to the scattering matrix method.

  13. Comment on {open_quote}{open_quote}In-plane lattice reconstruction of Cu(001){close_quote}{close_quote}

    SciTech Connect

    Baddorf, A.P.; Swan, A.K.; Wendelken, J.F.

    1996-05-01

    A Comment on the Letter by S. M{umlt u}ller {ital et} {ital al}., Phys. Rev. Lett. {bold 75}, 2959 (1995). The authors of the Letter offer a Reply. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  14. Comment on {open_quote}{open_quote}In-plane lattice reconstruction of Cu(100){close_quote}{close_quote}

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, I.K.; Moritz, W.; Jona, F.; Van Hove, M.A. |||

    1996-05-01

    A Comment on the Letter by S. M{umlt u}ller {ital et} {ital al}., Phys. Rev. Lett. {bold 75}, 2959 (1995). The authors of the Letter offer a reply. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  15. Optical neutrality: invisibility without cloaking.

    PubMed

    Hodges, Reed; Dean, Cleon; Durach, Maxim

    2017-02-15

    We show that it is possible to design an invisible wavelength-sized metal-dielectric metamaterial object without evoking cloaking. Our approach is an extension of the neutral inclusion concept by Zhou and Hu [Phys. Rev. E74, 026607 (2006)PLEEE81063-651X10.1103/PhysRevE.74.026607] to Mie scatterers. We demonstrate that an increase of metal fraction in the metamaterial leads to a transition from dielectric-like to metal-like scattering, which proceeds through invisibility or optical neutrality of the scatterer. Formally this is due to cancellation of multiple scattering orders, similarly to plasmonic cloaking introduced by Alù and Engheta [Phys. Rev. E72, 016623 (2005)PLEEE81063-651X10.1103/PhysRevE.72.016623], but without introduction of the separation of the scatterer into cloak and hidden regions.

  16. Noise induces rare events in granular media.

    PubMed

    Khain, Evgeniy; Sander, Leonard M

    2016-09-01

    The granular Leidenfrost effect [B. Meerson, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 91, 024301 (2003)PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.91.024301; P. Eshuis et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 95, 258001 (2005)PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.95.258001] is the levitation of a mass of granular matter when a wall below the grains is vibrated, giving rise to a hot granular gas below the cluster. We find by simulation that for a range of parameters the system is bistable: the levitated cluster can occasionally break and give rise to two clusters and a hot granular gas above and below. We use techniques from the theory of rare events to compute the mean transition time for breaking to occur. This requires the introduction of a two-component reaction coordinate.

  17. Reply to "Comment on 'Locomotion of a microorganism in weakly viscoelastic liquids' ".

    PubMed

    De Corato, M; Greco, F; Maffettone, P L

    2016-11-01

    In the present reply we show that the comments casting doubts on the results of our recent paper [M. De Corato et al., Phys. Rev. E 92, 053008 (2015)PLEEE81539-375510.1103/PhysRevE.92.053008] are based on a misinterpretation of the second-order fluid constitutive equation. Nevertheless, we show that, by considering alternative constitutive equations for the viscoelastic stress, we recover, to first-order in the Deborah number, the same results already obtained by De Corato et al. [Phys. Rev. E 92, 053008 (2015)PLEEE81539-375510.1103/PhysRevE.92.053008], thus dissipating any possible doubt about their validity.

  18. Comment on "Lattice vibrations in the Frenkel-Kontorova model. I. Phonon dispersion, number density, and energy"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novaco, Anthony D.

    2015-11-01

    A recent publication [Q. Meng, L. Wu, D. O. Welch, and Y. Zhu, Phys. Rev. B 91, 224305 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevB.91.224305] examines the quantum normal modes of the Frenkel-Kontorova chain. The authors compare their results to those of an older work [A. D. Novaco, Phys. Rev. B 22, 1645 (1980), 10.1103/PhysRevB.22.1645], attributing the differences to limitations in the numerical analysis of that 1980 paper. We show here that it is not numerical limitations that cause the differences between the two papers, and we argue that the cause of these differences resides with the approaches used in the modeling.

  19. Reply to "Comment on 'Critical wind speed at which trees break' ".

    PubMed

    Virot, E; Ponomarenko, A; Dehandschoewercker, É; Quéré, D; Clanet, C

    2016-12-01

    In the preceding comment [A. Albrecht et al., Phys. Rev. E 94, 067001 (2016)10.1103/PhysRevE.94.067001], Albrecht et al. argue that important biomechanical ingredients are missing in our model about the wind speed at which trees break [Phys. Rev. E 93, 023001 (2016)10.1103/PhysRevE.93.023001]. Here we wish to emphasize that our model is an idealization, which primarily aims at evidencing the dominant ingredients of the problem. Since it captures both observed trends and orders of magnitude, we believe that the essential parameters in tree breakage have been identified, a useful step to make further progress and more detailed descriptions.

  20. Violation of Bell inequality based on S4 symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolonek-Lasoń, Katarzyna

    2016-08-01

    In two recent papers [Phys. Rev. A 90, 062121 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevA.90.062121 and Phys. Rev. A, 91, 052110 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevA.91.052110] an interesting method of analyzing the violation of Bell inequalities has been proposed which is based on the theory of finite group representations. Here we apply this method to more complicated examples of S4 symmetry. We show how the Bell inequality can be related to the symmetries of regular tetrahedron. By choosing the orbits of three-dimensional representations of S4 determined by the geometry of tetrahedron we find that the Bell inequality under consideration is violated in quantum theory. The corresponding nonlocal game is analyzed.