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Sample records for ahlers phys rev

  1. Erratum: Binary neutron stars with arbitrary spins in numerical relativity [Phys. Rev. D 92, 124012 (2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tacik, Nick; Foucart, Francois; Pfeiffer, Harald P.; Haas, Roland; Ossokine, Serguei; Kaplan, Jeff; Muhlberger, Curran; Duez, Matt D.; Kidder, Lawrence E.; Scheel, Mark A.; Szilágyi, Béla

    2016-08-01

    The code used in [Phys. Rev. D 92, 124012 (2015)] erroneously computed the enthalpy at the center of the neutron stars. Upon correcting this error, density oscillations in evolutions of rotating neutron stars are significantly reduced (from ˜20 % to ˜0.5 % ). Furthermore, it is possible to construct neutron stars with faster rotation rates.

  2. Comment on ``Quantum key distribution without alternative measurements'' [Phys. Rev. A 61, 052312 (2000)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yong-Sheng; Li, Chuan-Feng; Guo, Guang-Can

    2001-03-01

    In a recent paper [A. Cabello, Phys. Rev. A 61, 052312 (2000)], a quantum key distribution protocol based on entanglement swapping was proposed. However, in this Comment, it is shown that this protocol is insecure if Eve uses a special strategy to attack.

  3. Erratum: Studying the precision of ray tracing techniques with Szekeres models [Phys. Rev. D 92, 023532 (2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koksbang, S. M.; Hannestad, S.

    2015-09-01

    This erratum serves to give corrections of two errors made in Koksbang and Hannestad [Phys. Rev. D, 92, 023532 (2015)]. One error consists of having used the expression for the Doppler convergence for a flat background to study the convergence on curved backgrounds. The other error which was made, is a typo in the numerical code used to study the convergence in onion models with curved backgrounds. After correcting this typo, the results of Sec. VI A in Koksbang and Hannestad [Phys. Rev. D, 92, 023532 (2015)] were recomputed. Contrary to the original results, the new results show that the ray-tracing scheme studied in Koksbang and Hannestad [Phys. Rev. D, 92, 023532 (2015)] can reproduce the exact results in LTB onion models very well. The corrections and new results are described more elaborately below.

  4. Erratum: Diffusive quantum criticality in three-dimensional disordered Dirac semimetals [Phys. Rev. B 90, 241112(R) (2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Bitan; Das Sarma, S.

    2016-03-01

    We correct erroneous conclusions from our previous article [Phys. Rev. B 90, 241112(R) (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevB.90.241112] regarding the values of various critical exponents, calculated to two-loop order. Furthermore, from a three-loop renormalization group flow equation, we argue, that ɛ -expansion near two spatial dimensions, with ɛ =d -2 , may not be reliable to address the critical properties of the disorder-driven Dirac semimetal-metal quantum phase transition in d =3 .

  5. Comment on "Diffusion of n-type dopants in germanium" [Appl. Phys. Rev. 1, 011301 (2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowern, N. E. B.; Simdyankin, S.; Goss, J. P.; Napolitani, E.; De Salvador, D.; Bruno, E.; Mirabella, S.; Ahn, C.; Bennett, N. S.

    2015-09-01

    The authors of the above paper call into question recent evidence on the properties of self-interstitials, I, in Ge [Cowern et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 155501 (2013)]. We show that this judgment stems from invalid model assumptions during analysis of data on B marker-layer diffusion during proton irradiation, and that a corrected analysis fully supports the reported evidence. As previously stated, I-mediated self-diffusion in Ge exhibits two distinct regimes of temperature, T: high-T, dominated by amorphous-like mono-interstitial clusters—i-morphs—with self-diffusion entropy ≈30 k, and low-T, where transport is dominated by simple self-interstitials. In a transitional range centered on 475 °C both mechanisms contribute. The experimental I migration energy of 1.84 ± 0.26 eV reported by the Münster group based on measurements of self-diffusion during irradiation at 550 °C < T < 680 °C further establishes our proposed i-morph mechanism.

  6. Reply to 'Comment on 'All quantum observables in a hidden-variable model must commute simultaneously'' [Phys. Rev. A 73, 066101 (2006)

    SciTech Connect

    Malley, J. D.; Fine, A.

    2006-06-15

    Nagata [Phys. Rev. A 73, 066101 (2006)] questions whether a general no-go theorem of Malley [Phys. Rev. A 69, 022118 (2004)] applies to local hidden variables and outlines a 'counterexample.' In fact this is not a counterexample at all, but in seeing why it fails we clarify the significance of Malley's result and its relation to other no-go theorems.

  7. Response to "Comment on `Diffusion of n-type dopants in germanium' " [Appl. Phys. Rev. 2, 036101 (2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bracht, H.; Südkamp, T.; Radek, M.; Chroneos, A.

    2015-09-01

    In this reply to the comment of Cowern et al., we demonstrate on the basis of full numerical simulations of radiation enhanced dopant diffusion via the kick-out mechanism that the g/λ analysis fails to consistently describe boron (B) diffusion in germanium (Ge) under irradiation. Cowern et al. missed to perform a consistency check with results for the diffusivity DI of Ge interstitials (I) determined from Ge self-diffusion under irradiation. Data deduced for DI from the exponential B profile reported by Cowern et al. deviate several orders of magnitude from the self-diffusion study. This clearly disproves the validity of the kick-out mechanism to control radiation enhanced B diffusion in Ge. Exponential B profiles like those established in Ge under irradiation are also reported for silicon by Venezia et al. [Phys. Rev. B 69, 125215 (2004)]. The characteristic shape is not described by the kick-out mechanism but rather explained qualitatively by the complex formation and dissolution of defect clusters. Modeling of B diffusion in Ge under irradiation performed by Schneider et al. [Phys. Rev. B 87, 115202 (2013)] is fully consistent with self-diffusion under irradiation. This constraint led us to conclude that the characteristic B profiles are additionally affected by the formation of immobile B clusters. Although a direct microscopic proof of B cluster formation is still lacking, the report of Venezia et al. on B clustering in Si during irradiation with similar exponential B profiles also supports our interpretation of B diffusion in Ge under irradiation.

  8. Comment on “Diffusion of n-type dopants in germanium” [Appl. Phys. Rev. 1, 011301 (2014)

    SciTech Connect

    Cowern, N. E. B. Simdyankin, S.; Goss, J. P.; Napolitani, E.; De Salvador, D.; Bruno, E.; Mirabella, S.; Ahn, C.; Bennett, N. S.

    2015-09-15

    The authors of the above paper call into question recent evidence on the properties of self-interstitials, I, in Ge [Cowern et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 155501 (2013)]. We show that this judgment stems from invalid model assumptions during analysis of data on B marker-layer diffusion during proton irradiation, and that a corrected analysis fully supports the reported evidence. As previously stated, I-mediated self-diffusion in Ge exhibits two distinct regimes of temperature, T: high-T, dominated by amorphous-like mono-interstitial clusters—i-morphs—with self-diffusion entropy ≈30 k, and low-T, where transport is dominated by simple self-interstitials. In a transitional range centered on 475 °C both mechanisms contribute. The experimental I migration energy of 1.84 ± 0.26 eV reported by the Münster group based on measurements of self-diffusion during irradiation at 550 °C < T < 680 °C further establishes our proposed i-morph mechanism.

  9. Comment on 'Turbulent equipartition theory of toroidal momentum pinch' [Phys. Plasmas 15, 055902 (2008)

    SciTech Connect

    Peeters, A. G.; Angioni, C.; Strintzi, D.

    2009-03-15

    The comment addresses questions raised on the derivation of the momentum pinch velocity due to the Coriolis drift effect [A. G. Peeters et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 265003 (2007)]. These concern the definition of the gradient, and the scaling with the density gradient length. It will be shown that the turbulent equipartition mechanism is included within the derivation using the Coriolis drift, with the density gradient scaling being the consequence of drift terms not considered in [T. S. Hahm et al., Phys. Plasmas 15, 055902 (2008)]. Finally the accuracy of the analytic models is assessed through a comparison with the full gyrokinetic solution.

  10. Summary of PhysPAG Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nousek, John A.

    2014-01-01

    The Physics of the Cosmos Program Analysis Group (PhysPAG) is responsible for solicitiing and coordinating community input for the development and execution of NASA's Physics of the Cosmos (PCOS) program. In this session I will report on the activity of the PhysPAG, and solicit community involvement in the process of defining PCOS objectives, planning SMD architecture, and prioritizing PCOS activities. I will also report on the activities of the PhysPAG Executive Committee, which include the chairs of the Science Analysis Groups/ Science Interest Groups which fall under the PhysPAG sphere of interest. Time at the end of the presentation willl be reserved for questions and discussion from the community.

  11. Summary of PhysPAG Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritz, Steven M.

    2013-01-01

    The Physics of the Cosmos (PCOS) Program Analysis Group (PhysPAG) provides an important interface between the scientific community and NASA in matters related to PCOS objectives, and also provides opportunities for community discussions. An Executive Committee facilitates the work of several subgroups, including an Inflation Probe Science Analysis Group (IPSAG), an X-ray group (XRSAG) , a gamma-ray,group (GRSAG), a gravitational wave group (GWSAG), and a cosmic-ray group (CRSAG). In addition to identifying opportunities and issues, these groups also help articulate technology needs. Membership in all the SAGs is completely open, with information and newsletter signups available on the PhysPAG pages at the PCOS program website. The PhysPAG reports to the Astrophysics Subcommittee of the NASA Advisory Council. A summary of PhysPAG activities will be given, along with time for questions and discussion.

  12. Corrected Article: Wormholes in Einstein-Born-Infeld theory [Phys. Rev. D 80, 104033 (2009)

    SciTech Connect

    Richarte, Martin G.; Simeone, Claudio

    2010-05-15

    Spherically symmetric thin-shell wormholes are studied within the framework of Einstein-Born-Infeld theory. We analyze the exotic matter content, and find that for certain values of the Born-Infeld parameter the amount of exotic matter on the shell can be reduced in relation with the Maxwell case. We also examine the mechanical stability of the wormhole configurations under radial perturbations preserving the spherical symmetry.

  13. Publisher's Note: Non-Markovian dynamics of a qubit [Phys. Rev. A 73, 012111 (2006)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maniscalco, Sabrina; Petruccione, Franceso

    2006-02-01

    This paper was published online on 24 January 2006 with an incorrect electronic address in the first author’s byline footnote. The electronic address for the first author should read “sabrina.maniscalco@utu.fi.” The byline footnote has been corrected as of 26 January 2006. The byline footnote is correct in the printed version of the journal.

  14. Publisher's Note: Non-Markovian dynamics of a qubit [Phys. Rev. A 73, 012111 (2006)

    SciTech Connect

    Maniscalco, Sabrina; Petruccione, Franceso

    2006-02-15

    This paper was published online on 24 January 2006 with an incorrect electronic address in the first author's byline footnote. The electronic address for the first author should read 'sabrina.maniscalco at utu.fi'. The byline footnote has been corrected as of 26 January 2006. The byline footnote is correct in the printed version of the journal.

  15. Erratum: Radiative strength functions in Dy163,164 [Phys. Rev. C 81, 024325 (2010)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyhus, H. T.; Siem, S.; Guttormsen, M.; Larsen, A. C.; Bürger, A.; Syed, N. U. H.; Tveten, G. M.; Voinov, A.

    2010-08-01

    The nuclei 163,164Dy have been investigated using the Oslo method on data from the pick-up reaction 164Dy(3He,alpha gamma)163Dy and the inelastic scattering 164Dy(3He,3He' gamma)164Dy, respectively. The radiative strength functions for both nuclei have been extracted, and a small resonance centered around Eg ?3 MeV is observed in both cases. The parameters of this so-called pygmy M1 resonance (the scissors mode) are compared to previous results on 160,161,162Dy using the Oslo method, and to data on 163Dy measured by the Prague group using the two-step cascade method. In particular, the integrated reduced transition probability B(M1) of the pygmy resonance is compared with neighboring dysprosium isotopes. We also observe an enhanced strength in the region above gamma energy around 5 MeV in 164Dy. Possible origins of this feature are discussed.

  16. Comment on ``On the role of dissipation on the Casimir-Polder potential between molecules in dielectric media'' [J. Chem. Phys. 133, 164501 (2010)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalvit, D. A. R.; Milonni, P. W.

    2011-07-01

    J. J. Rodriguez and A. Salam [J. Chem. Phys. 133, 164501 (2010)], 10.1063/1.3495954 find discrepancies between their calculation and a previously published one [S. Spagnolo, D. A. R. Dalvit, and P. W. Milonni, Phys. Rev. A 75, 052117 (2007)], 10.1103/PhysRevA.75.052117 for the van der Waals interaction of two guest molecules in a host dielectric medium. We trace these discrepancies to what we regard as fundamental errors in the calculation by Rodriguez and Salam.

  17. Summary of PhysPAG Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritz, Steven M.

    2012-01-01

    The Physics of the Cosmos (PCOS) Program Analysis Group (PhysPAG) provides an important interface between the scientific community and NASA in matters related to PCOS objectives. An Executive Committee facilitates the work of several subgroups, including a Technology Science Analysis Group and an Inflation Probe Science Analysis Group. Work is also starting in areas of X-ray, gamma-ray, and gravitational wave astrophysics. The PAG reports to the Astrophysics Subcommittee of the NASA Advisory Council. A summary of PhysPAG activities will be given, along with time for questions and discussion.

  18. Comment on ``Unified explanation of the anomalous dynamic properties of highly asymmetric polymer blends'' [J. Chem. Phys. 138, 054903 (2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colmenero, J.

    2013-05-01

    In a recent paper by Ngai and Capaccioli ["Unified explanation of the anomalous dynamic properties of highly asymmetric polymer blends," J. Chem. Phys. 138, 054903 (2013), 10.1063/1.4789585] the authors claimed that the so-called coupling model (CM) provides a unified explanation of all dynamical anomalies that have been reported for dynamically asymmetric blends over last ten years. Approximately half of the paper is devoted to chain-dynamic properties involving un-entangled polymers. According to the authors, the application of the CM to these results is based on the existence of a crossover at a time tc ≈ 1-2 ns of the magnitudes describing chain-dynamics. Ngai and Capaccioli claimed that the existence of such a crossover is supported by the neutron scattering and MD-simulation results, corresponding to the blend poly(methyl methacrylate)/poly(ethylene oxide), by Niedzwiedz et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 168301 (2007), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.98.168301] and Brodeck et al. [Macromolecules 43, 3036 (2010), 10.1021/ma902820a], respectively. Being one of the authors of these two papers, I will demonstrate here that there is no evidence supporting such a crossover in the data reported in these papers.

  19. Comment on 'Power loss in open cavity diodes and a modified Child-Langmuir law' [Phys. Plasmas 12, 093102 (2005)

    SciTech Connect

    Swanekamp, S. B.; Ottinger, P. F.

    2007-09-15

    In this Comment, it is shown that no modification of the Child-Langmuir law [Phys. Rev.32, 492 (1911); Phys. Rev. 2, 450 (1913)] is necessary to treat the space-charge-limited flow from a diode with an open boundary as reported in Phys. Plasmas 12, 093102 (2005). The open boundary condition in their simulations can be represented by a voltage source and a resistor whose value is the vacuum-wave impedance of the opening. The diode can be represented as a variable resistor whose value depends on the voltage drop across the diode (as measured by the line integral of E across the diode gap). This is a simple voltage-divider circuit whose analysis shows that the real diode voltage drops as the vacuum-wave impedance increases. Furthermore, it is shown that in equilibrium, the voltage drop between the anode and cathode is independent of the path chosen for the line integral of the electric field so that E=-{nabla}{phi} is valid. In this case, the equations of electrostatics are applicable. This clearly demonstrates that the electric field is electrostatic and static fields DO NOT RADIATE. It is shown that the diode voltage drops as the vacuum wave impedance increases and the current drops according to the Child-Langmuir law. Therefore, the observed drop in circuit current can be explained by a real drop in voltage across the diode and not an effective drop as claimed by the authors.

  20. Publisher's Note: Kelvin-Helmholtz versus Hall magnetoshear instability in astrophysical flows [Phys. Rev. E 89, 053105 (2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez, Daniel O.; Bejarano, Cecilia; Mininni, Pablo D.

    2014-06-01

    We study the stability of shear flows in a fully ionized plasma. Kelvin-Helmholtz is a well known, macroscopic and ideal shear-driven instability. In sufficiently low density plasmas, also the microscopic Hall magneto-shear instability can take place. We performed three-dimensional simulations of the Hall-MHD equations where these two instabilities are present, and carried out a comparative study. We find that when the shear flow is so intense that its vorticity surpasses the ion-cyclotron frequency of the plasma, the Hall magneto-shear instability is not only non-negligible, but it actually displays growth rates larger than those of the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability.

  1. Erratum: Measurement of Branching Fractions and Mass Spectra of B→Kππγ [Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 211804 (2007)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pompili, A.; Chen, J. C.; Qi, N. D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y. S.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B.; Abrams, G. S.; Battaglia, M.; Breon, A. B.; Brown, D. N.; Button-Shafer, J.; Cahn, R. N.; Charles, E.; Day, C. T.; Gill, M. S.; Gritsan, A. V.; Groysman, Y.; Jacobsen, R. G.; Kadel, R. W.; Kadyk, J.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Kukartsev, G.; Lynch, G.; Mir, L. M.; Oddone, P. J.; Orimoto, T. J.; Pripstein, M.; Roe, N. A.; Ronan, M. T.; Wenzel, W. A.; Barrett, M.; Ford, K. E.; Harrison, T. J.; Hart, A. J.; Hawkes, C. M.; Morgan, S. E.; Watson, A. T.; Fritsch, M.; Goetzen, K.; Held, T.; Koch, H.; Lewandowski, B.; Pelizaeus, M.; Peters, K.; Schroeder, T.; Steinke, M.; Boyd, J. T.; Burke, J. P.; Chevalier, N.; Cottingham, W. N.; Kelly, M. P.; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T.; Fulsom, B. G.; Hearty, C.; Knecht, N. S.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; Khan, A.; Kyberd, P.; Saleem, M.; Teodorescu, L.; Blinov, A. E.; Blinov, V. E.; Bukin, A. D.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Golubev, V. B.; Kravchenko, E. A.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Solodov, E. P.; Yushkov, A. N.; Best, D.; Bondioli, M.; Bruinsma, M.; Chao, M.; Eschrich, I.; Kirkby, D.; Lankford, A. J.; Mandelkern, M.; Mommsen, R. K.; Roethel, W.; Stoker, D. P.; Buchanan, C.; Hartfiel, B. L.; Foulkes, S. D.; Gary, J. W.; Long, O.; Shen, B. C.; Wang, K.; Zhang, L.; Del Re, D.; Hadavand, H. K.; Hill, E. J.; Macfarlane, D. B.; Paar, H. P.; Rahatlou, S.; Sharma, V.; Berryhill, J. W.; Campagnari, C.; Cunha, A.; Dahmes, B.; Hong, T. M.; Mazur, M. A.; Richman, J. D.; Verkerke, W.; Beck, T. W.; Eisner, A. M.; Flacco, C. J.; Heusch, C. A.; Kroseberg, J.; Lockman, W. S.; Nesom, G.; Schalk, T.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Spradlin, P.; Williams, D. C.; Wilson, M. G.; Albert, J.; Chen, E.; Dubois-Felsmann, G. P.; Dvoretskii, A.; Hitlin, D. G.; Narsky, I.; Piatenko, T.; Porter, F. C.; Ryd, A.; Samuel, A.; Andreassen, R.; Jayatilleke, S.; Mancinelli, G.; Meadows, B. T.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Blanc, F.; Bloom, P.; Chen, S.; Ford, W. T.; Nauenberg, U.; Olivas, A.; Rankin, P.; Ruddick, W. O.; Smith, J. G.; Ulmer, K. A.; Wagner, S. R.; Zhang, J.; Chen, A.; Eckhart, E. A.; Soffer, A.; Toki, W. H.; Wilson, R. J.; Zeng, Q.; Altenburg, D.; Feltresi, E.; Hauke, A.; Spaan, B.; Brandt, T.; Brose, J.; Dickopp, M.; Klose, V.; Lacker, H. M.; Nogowski, R.; Otto, S.; Petzold, A.; Schott, G.; Schubert, J.; Schubert, K. R.; Schwierz, R.; Sundermann, J. E.; Bernard, D.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Grenier, P.; Schrenk, S.; Thiebaux, Ch.; Vasileiadis, G.; Verderi, M.; Bard, D. J.; Clark, P. J.; Gradl, W.; Muheim, F.; Playfer, S.; Xie, Y.; Andreotti, M.; Azzolini, V.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Cibinetto, G.; Luppi, E.; Negrini, M.; Piemontese, L.; Anulli, F.; Baldini-Ferroli, R.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Finocchiaro, G.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Zallo, A.; Buzzo, A.; Capra, R.; Contri, R.; Vetere, M. Lo; Macri, M.; Monge, M. R.; Passaggio, S.; Patrignani, C.; Robutti, E.; Santroni, A.; Tosi, S.; Bailey, S.; Brandenburg, G.; Chaisanguanthum, K. S.; Morii, M.; Won, E.; Wu, J.; Dubitzky, R. S.; Langenegger, U.; Marks, J.; Schenk, S.; Uwer, U.; Bhimji, W.; Bowerman, D. A.; Dauncey, P. D.; Egede, U.; Flack, R. L.; Gaillard, J. R.; Morton, G. W.; Nash, J. A.; Nikolich, M. B.; Taylor, G. P.; Vazquez, W. P.; Charles, M. J.; Mader, W. F.; Mallik, U.; Mohapata, A. K.; Cochran, J.; Crawley, H. B.; Eyges, V.; Meyer, W. T.; Prell, S.; Rosenberg, E. I.; Rubin, A. E.; Yi, J.; Arnaud, N.; Davier, M.; Giroux, X.; Grosdidier, G.; Hocker, A.; Diberder, F. Le; Lepeltier, V.; Lutz, A. M.; Oyanguren, A.; Petersen, T. C.; Pierini, M.; Plaszcynski, S.; Rodier, S.; Roudeau, P.; Schune, M. H.; Stocchi, A.; Wormser, G.; Cheng, C. H.; Lange, D. J.; Simani, M. C.; Wright, D. M.; Bevan, A. J.; Chavez, C. A.; Coleman, J. P.; Forster, I. J.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Gamet, R.; George, K. A.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Parry, R. J.; Payne, D. J.; Schofield, K. C.; Touramanis, C.; Cormack, C. M.; Lodovico, F. Di; Sacco, R.; Brown, C. L.; Cowan, G.; Flaecher, H. U.; Green, M. G.; Hopkins, D. A.; Jackson, P. S.; McMahon, T. R.; Ricciardi, S.; Salvatore, F.; Brown, D.; Davis, C. L.; Allison, J.; Barlow, N. R.; Barlow, R. J.; Hodgkinson, M. C.; Lafferty, G. D.; Naisbit, M. T.; Williams, J. C.; Chen, C.; Farbin, A.; Hulsbergen, W. D.; Jawahery, A.; Kovalskyi, D.; Lae, C. K.; Lillard, V.; Roberts, D. A.; Simi, G.; Blaylock, G.; Dallapiccola, C.; Hertzbach, S. S.; Kofler, R.; Koptchev, V. B.; Li, X.; Moore, T. B.; Saremi, S.; Staengle, H.; Willocq, S.; Cowan, R.; Koeneke, K.; Sciolla, G.; Sekula, S. J.; Spitznagel, M.; Taylor, F.; Yamamoto, R. K.; Kim, H.; Patel, P. M.; Robertson, S. H.; Lazzaro, A.; Lombardo, V.; Palombo, F.; Bauer, J. M.; Cremaldi, L.; Eschenburg, V.; Godang, R.; Kroeger, R.; Reidy, J.; Sanders, D. A.; Summers, D. J.; Zhao, H. W.; Brunet, S.; Cote, D.; Taras, P.; Viaud, B.; Nicholson, H.; Cavallo, N.; Nardo, G. De; Fabozzi, F.; Gatto, C.; Lista, L.; Monorchio, D.; Paolucci, P.; Piccolo, D.; Sciacca, C.; Baak, M.; Bulten, H.; Raven, G.; Snoek, H. L.; Wilden, L.; Jessop, C. P.; Losecco, J. M.; Allmendinger, T.; Benelli, G.; Gan, K. K.; Honscheid, K.; Hufnagel, D.; Jackson, P. D.; Kagan, H.; Kass, R.; Pulliam, T.; Rahimi, A. M.; Ter-Antonyan, R.; Wong, Q. K.; Brau, J.; Frey, R.; Igonkina, O.; Lu, M.; Potter, C. T.; Sinev, N. B.; Strom, D.; Strube, J.; Torrence, E.; Dorigo, A.; Galeazzi, F.; Margoni, M.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Voci, C.; Benayoun, M.; Briand, H.; Chauveau, J.; David, P.; Buono, L. Del; de La Vaissiere, Ch.; Hamon, O.; John, M. J. J.; Leruste, Ph.; Malcles, J.; Ocariz, J.; Roos, L.; Therin, G.; Behera, P. K.; Gladney, L.; Guo, Q. H.; Panetta, J.; Biasini, M.; Covarelli, R.; Pacetti, S.; Pioppi, M.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Bucci, F.; Calderini, G.; Carpinelli, M.; Cenci, R.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Marchiori, G.; Morganti, M.; Neri, N.; Paoloni, E.; Rama, M.; Rizzo, G.; Walsh, J.; Haire, M.; Judd, D.; Wagoner, D. E.; Biesiada, J.; Danielson, N.; Elmer, P.; Lau, Y. P.; Lu, C.; Olsen, J.; Smith, A. J. S.; Telnov, A. V.; Bellini, F.; Cavoto, G.; D'Orazio, A.; Marco, E. Di; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Gaspero, M.; Gioi, L. Li; Mazzoni, M. A.; Morganti, S.; Piredda, G.; Polci, F.; Tehrani, F. Safai; Voena, C.; Schroder, H.; Wagner, G.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; Groot, N. De; Franek, B.; Gopal, G. P.; Olaiya, E. O.; Wilson, F. F.; Aleksan, R.; Emery, S.; Gaidot, A.; Ganzhur, S. F.; Giraud, P.-F.; Graziani, G.; de Monchenault, G. Hamel; Kozanecki, W.; Legendre, M.; London, G. W.; Mayer, B.; Vasseur, G.; Yeche, Ch.; Zito, M.; Purohit, M. V.; Weidemann, W.; Wilson, J. R.; Yumiceva, F. X.; Abe, T.; Allen, M. T.; Aston, D.; Bartoldus, R.; Berger, N.; Boyarski, A. M.; Buchmueller, O. L.; Claus, R.; Convery, M. R.; Cristinziani, M.; Dingfelder, J. C.; Dong, D.; Dorfan, J.; Dujmic, D.; Dunwoodie, W.; Fan, S.; Field, R. C.; Glanzman, T.; Gowdy, S. J.; Hadig, T.; Halyo, V.; Hast, C.; Hryn'Ova, T.; Innes, W. R.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kim, P.; Kocian, M. L.; Leith, D. W. G. S.; Libby, J.; Luitz, S.; Luth, V.; Lynch, H. L.; Marsiske, H.; Messner, R.; Muller, D. R.; O'Grady, C. P.; Ozcan, V. E.; Perazzo, A.; Perl, M.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Roodman, A.; Salnikov, A. A.; Schindler, R. H.; Schwiening, J.; Snyder, A.; Stelzer, J.; Su, D.; Sullivan, M. K.; Suzuki, K.; Swain, S.; Thompson, J. M.; Va'Vra, J.; Weaver, M.; Weinstein, A. J. R.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Wittgen, M.; Wright, D. H.; Yarritu, A. K.; Yi, K.; Young, C. C.; Burchat, P. R.; Edwards, A. J.; Majewski, S. A.; Petersen, B. A.; Roat, C.; Ahmed, M.; Ahmed, S.; Alam, M. S.; Ernst, J. A.; Saeed, M. A.; Wappler, F. R.; Zain, S. B.; Bugg, W.; Krishnamurthy, M.; Spanier, S. M.; Eckmann, R.; Ritchie, J. L.; Satpathy, A.; Schwitters, R. F.; Izen, J. M.; Kitayama, I.; Lou, X. C.; Ye, S.; Bianchi, F.; Bona, M.; Gallo, F.; Gamba, D.; Bomben, M.; Bosisio, L.; Cartaro, C.; Cossutti, F.; Ricca, G. Della; Dittongo, S.; Grancagnolo, S.; Lanceri, L.; Vitale, L.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Pavini, R. S.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bhuyan, B.; Brown, C. M.; Fortin, D.; Hamano, K.; Kowalewski, R.; Roney, J. M.; Sobie, R. J.; Back, J. J.; Harrison, P. F.; Latham, T. E.; Mohanty, G. B.; Band, H. R.; Chen, X.; Cheng, B.; Dasu, S.; Datta, M.; Eichenbaum, A. M.; Flood, K. T.; Hollar, J. J.; Johnson, J. R.; Kutter, P. E.; Li, H.; Liu, R.; Mellado, B.; Mihalyi, A.; Pan, Y.; Prepost, R.; Tan, P.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J. H.; Wu, S. L.; Yu, Z.; Neal, H.

    2008-05-01

    We present a measurement of the partial branching fractions and mass spectra of the exclusive radiative penguin processes B -> K pi pi gamma in the range m_Kpipi < 1.8 GeV/c^2. We reconstruct four final states: K+ pi- pi+ gamma, K+ pi- pi0 gamma, Ks pi- pi+ gamma, and Ks pi+ pi- gamma, where Ks -> pi+ pi-. Using 232 million e+ e- -> B Bbar events recorded by the BaBar experiment at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy storage ring, we measure the branching fractions BR(B+ -> K+ pi- pi+ gamma) = (2.95 +- 0.13 (stat.) +- 0.20 (syst.)) x 10^-5, BR(B0 -> K+ pi- pi0 gamma) = (4.07 +- 0.22 (stat.) +- 0.31 (syst.)) x 10^-5, BR(B0 -> K0 pi+ pi- gamma) = (1.85 +- 0.21 (stat.) +- 0.12 (syst.)) x 10^-5, and BR(B+ -> K0 pi+ pi0 gamma) = (4.56 +- 0.42 (stat.) +- 0.31 (syst.)) x 10^-5.

  2. Stable complex formation between HIV Rev and the nucleosome assembly protein, NAP1, affects Rev function

    SciTech Connect

    Cochrane, Alan; Murley, Laura Lea; Gao Mian; Wong, Raymond; Clayton, Kiera; Brufatto, Nicole; Canadien, Veronica; Mamelak, Daniel; Chen, Tricia; Richards, Dawn; Zeghouf, Mahel; Greenblatt, Jack; Burks, Christian; Frappier, Lori

    2009-05-25

    The Rev protein of HIV-1 is essential for HIV-1 proliferation due to its role in exporting viral RNA from the nucleus. We used a modified version of tandem affinity purification (TAP) tagging to identify proteins interacting with HIV-1 Rev in human cells and discovered a prominent interaction between Rev and nucleosome assembly protein 1 (Nap1). This interaction was also observed by specific retention of Nap1 from human cell lysates on a Rev affinity column. Nap1 was found to bind Rev through the Rev arginine-rich domain and altered the oligomerization state of Rev in vitro. Overexpression of Nap1 stimulated the ability of Rev to export RNA, reduced the nucleolar localization of Rev, and affected Rev nuclear import rates. The results suggest that Nap-1 may influence Rev function by increasing the availability of Rev.

  3. The new PhysTEC program at Boston University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, Juliet; Duffy, Andrew

    2011-11-01

    The Boston University Physics Department was recently awarded a three-year grant from the Physics Teacher Education Coalition (PhysTEC). PhysTEC's main aims are to improve the education of future physics teachers, and to increase the number of qualified physics teachers in the school system. Although there have been over 20 PhysTEC-funded sites across the country, BU is the first PhysTEC site in New England. Our goals with this poster are to raise awareness about PhysTEC, and to talk about what we are doing and what we plan to do at BU with our PhysTEC funding. A key part of the PhysTEC program is the teacher-in-residence (TIR), an experienced physics teacher who comes to campus for a year to promote physics teaching as a profession and to lend their experience to education-related efforts. Our first TIR is Juliet Jenkins. The poster will discuss Ms. Jenkins' role in the Department of Physics and in the School of Education as we move forward with new efforts to promote teaching, including a Learning Assistant program, a pilot studio section of one of our introductory physics courses, and a new education course that allows undergraduate students to observe teachers in the classroom.

  4. Keynote Address: Rev. Mark Massa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Massa, Mark S.

    2011-01-01

    Rev. Mark S. Massa, S.J., is the dean and professor of Church history at the School of Theology and Ministry at Boston College. He was invited to give a keynote to begin the third Catholic Higher Education Collaborative Conference (CHEC), cosponsored by Boston College and Fordham University. Fr. Massa's address posed critical questions about…

  5. MAC-bridging for multi-PHYs communication in BAN.

    PubMed

    Ullah, Sana; Khan, Pervez; Ullah, Niamat; Kwak, Kyung Sup

    2010-01-01

    Body Area Network (BAN) is a collection of low-power, miniaturised, and intelligent sensor nodes that are used for unobtrusive and ambulatory health monitoring of a patient without any additional constraints. These nodes operate on different frequency bands or Multiple Physical Layers (Multi-PHYs). Additionally, some BAN applications demand a logical connection between different nodes working on different Multi-PHYs. In this paper, the idea of controlling Multi-PHYs using one MAC protocol is introduced. Unlike existing procedures where different nodes working on different channels are connected at the link layer bridging/switching, the proposed procedure called bridging logically connects them at the MAC layer. In other words, the bridge is used to relay or filter packets between different PHYs in the same BAN. Numerical approximations are presented to analyze the stochastic behaviour of the bridges, all of them having Multi-PHYs interfaces. The MICS and the ISM bands are regarded as PHY1 and PHY2, respectively. The performance results are presented for PHY2 (given that data is already received from PHY1) in terms of probability of successful transmission, number of failed requests, power consumption, and delay. Simulations are conducted to validate the analytical results. It can be seen that the deployment of multiple bridges along with the corresponding nodes allows Multi-PHYs communication with high transmission probability, low power consumption, and tolerable delay. PMID:22163447

  6. Measuring cooperative Rev protein-protein interactions on Rev responsive RNA by fluorescence resonance energy transfer

    PubMed Central

    Vercruysse, Thomas; Pawar, Sonalika; De Borggraeve, Wim; Pardon, Els; Pavlakis, George N; Pannecouque, Christophe; Steyaert, Jan; Balzarini, Jan

    2011-01-01

    The export of viral RNA from the nucleus to the cytoplasm of the cellular host is a crucial step in the life cycle of HIV-1 that is mediated by the viral Rev protein. One aspect of the Rev function, its multimerization, is still unexplored as a target for antiviral therapy. This is partly due to the lack of a fast and solid system to measure Rev multimerization. We have developed a high throughput in vitro Rev multimerization assay based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) in which real-time Rev-Rev interactions can be measured both in the absence and the presence of Rev specific RRE RNA. Well-characterized Rev multimerization deficient mutants showed reduced FRET as well as unlabeled Rev molecules were able to inhibit the FRET signal demonstrating the specificity of the assay. Upon multimerization along RRE RNA the FRET signal significantly increased but dropped again at equimolar Rev/RRE ratios suggesting that in this condition most Rev molecules are bound as monomers to the RRE. Furthermore, using this assay, we demonstrate that a previously selected llama heavy-chain only antibody was shown to not only prevent the development of Rev multimers but also disassemble the already formed complexes confirming the dynamic nature of the Rev-Rev interactions. The in vitro FRET based multimerization assay facilitates the further study of the basic mechanism of cooperative Rev multimerization along the RRE and is also widely applicable to study the assembly of other functional complexes involving protein homo-multimerization or cooperative protein-protein interactions on RNA or DNA. PMID:21358282

  7. Optimized Chemical Probes for REV-ERBα

    PubMed Central

    Trump, Ryan P.; Bresciani, Stefano; Cooper, Anthony W. J.; Tellam, James P.; Wojno, Justyna; Blaikley, John; Orband-Miller, Lisa A.; Kashatus, Jennifer A.; Dawson, Helen C.; Loudon, Andrew; Ray, David; Grant, Daniel; Farrow, Stuart N.; Willson, Timothy M.; Tomkinson, Nicholas C. O.

    2015-01-01

    REV-ERBα has emerged as an important target for regulation of circadian rhythm and its associated physiology. Herein, we report on the optimization of a series of REV-ERBα agonists based on GSK4112 (1) for potency, selectivity, and bioavailability. Potent REV-ERBα agonists 4, 10, 16, and 23 are detailed for their ability to suppress BMAL and IL-6 expression from human cells while also demonstrating excellent selectivity over LXRα. Amine 4 demonstrated in vivo bioavailability after either IV or oral dosing. PMID:23656296

  8. Comments on ``The Euclidean gravitational action as black hole entropy, singularities, and space-time voids'' [J. Math. Phys. 49, 042501 (2008)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitra, Abhas

    2009-04-01

    We point out that the space-time void inferred by Castro [J. Math. Phys. 49, 042501 (2008)] results from his choice of a discontinuous radial gauge. Further since the integration constant α0=2M0 (G =c=1) occurring in the vacuum Hilbert/Schwarzschild solution of a neutral "point mass" is zero [Arnowitt et al., in Gravitation: An Introduction to Current Research, edited by L. Witten (Wiley, New York, 1962), Chap. 7, p. 227; also Phys. Rev. Lett. 4, 375 (1960). A. Mitra, Adv. Space Res. 38, 2917 (2006); Proceedings of the XIth Marcel-Grossmann Conference on General Relativity (World Scientific, Singapore, 2008), Vol. 3, p. 1968], Castro's gauge reduces to the well behaved and physical Hilbert gauge. Physically this means that true Hilbert/Schwarzschild black holes have unique gravitational mass M =0. Accordingly, the unphysical space-time void inferred by Castro is actually nonexistent.

  9. The Structure of HIV-1 Rev Filaments Suggests a Bilateral Model for Rev-RRE Assembly.

    PubMed

    DiMattia, Michael A; Watts, Norman R; Cheng, Naiqian; Huang, Rick; Heymann, J Bernard; Grimes, Jonathan M; Wingfield, Paul T; Stuart, David I; Steven, Alasdair C

    2016-07-01

    HIV-1 Rev protein mediates the nuclear export of viral RNA genomes. To do so, Rev oligomerizes cooperatively onto an RNA motif, the Rev response element (RRE), forming a complex that engages with the host nuclear export machinery. To better understand Rev oligomerization, we determined four crystal structures of Rev N-terminal domain dimers, which show that they can pivot about their dyad axis, giving crossing angles of 90° to 140°. In parallel, we performed cryoelectron microscopy of helical Rev filaments. Filaments vary from 11 to 15 nm in width, reflecting variations in dimer crossing angle. These structures contain additional density, indicating that C-terminal domains become partially ordered in the context of filaments. This conformational variability may be exploited in the assembly of RRE/Rev complexes. Our data also revealed a third interface between Revs, which offers an explanation for how the arrangement of Rev subunits adapts to the "A"-shaped architecture of the RRE in export-active complexes. PMID:27265851

  10. PREFACE: Prospects in Neutrino Physics 2013 - NuPhys2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2015-04-01

    The first "Prospects in Neutrino Physics 2013 - NuPhys2013" conference was held at the Institute of Physics, IoP, London, 19-20 December 2013 and was attended by about 130 delegates from institutions worldwide. Lunch and coffee breaks allowed discussions among delegates and speakers to take place in an informal setting. This conference is unique in discussing the worldwide strategy to address unresolved issues in neutrino physics, and shape the future directions of particle physics. We discussed the current status and focussed especially on the prospects of future experiments, their performance and physics reach. It is particularly timely due to the recent measurements in neutrino physics and planned worldwide experiments. The following topics were addressed: • Theory and Phenomenology Perspectives • Future Long and Short Baseline Neutrino Oscillation Experiments • Reactor neutrino and flux • Neutrinoless double beta decays • Solar, atmospheric, supernova neutrinos • Neutrino cosmology in which both the phenomenological and experimental aspects were equally addressed. World-leading experts in the different neutrino areas were invited to give review talks. To encourage and facilitate the participation of early-career researchers and PhD students, a poster session formed a key aspect of this meeting. The conference was organized by Francesca Di Lodovico and Silvia Pascoli. It was sponsored by the IoP through their Topic Research Meeting Grant, and also supported by Durham IPPP, ERC-207282, FP7 invisibles project, Queen Mary University of London.

  11. The Bovine Immunodeficiency Virus Rev Protein: Identification of a Novel Nuclear Import Pathway and Nuclear Export Signal among Retroviral Rev/Rev-Like Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Gomez Corredor, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    The Rev protein is essential for the replication of lentiviruses. Rev is a shuttling protein that transports unspliced and partially spliced lentiviral RNAs from the nucleus to the cytoplasm via the nucleopore. To transport these RNAs, the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Rev uses the karyopherin β family importin β and CRM1 proteins that interact with the Rev nuclear localization signal (NLS) and nuclear exportation signal (NES), respectively. Recently, we reported the presence of new types of bipartite NLS and nucleolar localization signal (NoLS) in the bovine immunodeficiency virus (BIV) Rev protein. Here we report the characterization of the nuclear import and export pathways of BIV Rev. By using an in vitro nuclear import assay, we showed that BIV Rev is transported into the nucleus by a cytosolic and energy-dependent importin α/β classical pathway. Results from glutathione S-transferase (GST) pulldown assays that showed the binding of BIV Rev with importins α3 and α5 were in agreement with those from the nuclear import assay. We also identified a leptomycin B-sensitive NES in BIV Rev, which indicates that the protein is exported via CRM1 like HIV-1 Rev. Mutagenesis experiments showed that the BIV Rev NES maps between amino acids 109 to 121 of the protein. Remarkably, the BIV Rev NES was found to be of the cyclic AMP (cAMP)-dependent protein kinase inhibitor (PKI) type instead of the HIV-1 Rev type. In summary, our data showed that the nuclear import mechanism of BIV Rev is novel among Rev proteins characterized so far in lentiviruses. PMID:22379104

  12. Physics of the Cosmos Program Analysis Group (PhysPAG) Report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nousek, John A.

    2015-01-01

    The Physics of the Cosmos Program Analysis Group (PhysPAG) serves as a forum for soliciting and coordinating input and analysis from the scientific community in support of the PCOS program objectives. I will outline the activities of the PhysPAG over the past year, since the last meeting during the AAS meeting in National Harbor, and mention the activities of the PhysPAG related Scientific Interest Groups.

  13. High-pressure phase transitions of ScPO4 and YPO4 - Published - Phys. Rev. B: Condens. Matter, 80, 184114 (2009).

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, F. X.; Wang, J. W.; Lang, M.; Zhang, J. M.; Ewing, Rodney C.; Boatner, Lynn A

    2009-01-01

    ScPO4 and YPO4 with the tetragonal zircon-structure were studied at room temperature and pressures up to ~50 GPa. Pressure-induced phase transitions to the sheelite structure occur at 30 GPa for ScPO4 and 16.3 GPa for YPO4, respectively. In addition to the scheelite-type high-pressure phase, an intermediate phase with the monoclinic monazite-type structure formed during the phase transition process of YPO4. The high-pressure phases of ScPO4 and YPO4 are not quenchable on pressure release. The pressure dependence of the total energy of the different phases was calculated using density functional method, and the results confirm the experimentally observed phase relations under pressure. Structural parameters and compressibility of each phase were determined by refinement of the x-ray diffraction patterns. The high-pressure phase of ScPO4 has a very large bulk modulus (376(8) GPa).

  14. Publisher's Note: State-projective scheme for generating pair coherent states in traveling-wave optical fields [Phys. Rev. A 84, 023810 (2011)

    SciTech Connect

    Gerry, Christopher C.; Mimih, Jihane; Birrittella, Richard

    2011-08-15

    This paper was published online on 9 August 2011 with a duplication of Fig. 4 in place of Fig. 1. Figure 1 has been correctly replaced as of 22 August 2011. Figure 1 is correct in the printed version of the journal.

  15. Corrected Article: Measure of the impact of future dark energy experiments based on discriminating power among quintessence models [Phys. Rev. D 78, 043528 (2008)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnard, Michael; Abrahamse, Augusta; Albrecht, Andreas; Bozek, Brandon; Yashar, Mark

    2009-12-01

    We evaluate the ability of future data sets to discriminate among different quintessence dark energy models. This approach gives an alternative (and complementary) measure for assessing the impact of future experiments, as compared with the large body of literature that compares experiments in abstract parameter spaces (such as the well-known w0-wa parameters) and more recent work that evaluates the constraining power of experiments on individual parameter spaces of specific quintessence models. We use the Dark Energy Task Force (DETF) models of future data sets and compare the discriminative power of experiments designated by the DETF as stages 2, 3, and 4 (denoting increasing capabilities). Our work reveals a minimal increase in discriminating power when comparing stage 3 to stage 2, but a very striking increase in discriminating power when going to stage 4 (including the possibility of completely eliminating some quintessence models). We also see evidence that even modest improvements over DETF stage 4 (which many believe are realistic) could result in even more dramatic discriminating power among quintessence dark energy models. We develop and demonstrate the technique of using the independently measured modes of the equation of state (derived from principle component analysis) as a common parameter space in which to compare the different quintessence models, and we argue that this technique is a powerful one. We use the pseudo-Nambu-Goldstone boson, exponential, Albrecht-Skordis, and inverse tracker (or inverse power law) quintessence models for this work. One of our main results is that the goal of discriminating among these models sets a concrete measure on the capabilities of future dark energy experiments. Experiments have to be somewhat better than DETF stage 4 simulated experiments to fully meet this goal.

  16. Corrected Article: Measure of the impact of future dark energy experiments based on discriminating power among quintessence models [Phys. Rev. D 78, 043528 (2008)

    SciTech Connect

    Barnard, Michael; Abrahamse, Augusta; Albrecht, Andreas; Bozek, Brandon; Yashar, Mark

    2009-12-15

    We evaluate the ability of future data sets to discriminate among different quintessence dark energy models. This approach gives an alternative (and complementary) measure for assessing the impact of future experiments, as compared with the large body of literature that compares experiments in abstract parameter spaces (such as the well-known w{sub 0}-w{sub a} parameters) and more recent work that evaluates the constraining power of experiments on individual parameter spaces of specific quintessence models. We use the Dark Energy Task Force (DETF) models of future data sets and compare the discriminative power of experiments designated by the DETF as stages 2, 3, and 4 (denoting increasing capabilities). Our work reveals a minimal increase in discriminating power when comparing stage 3 to stage 2, but a very striking increase in discriminating power when going to stage 4 (including the possibility of completely eliminating some quintessence models). We also see evidence that even modest improvements over DETF stage 4 (which many believe are realistic) could result in even more dramatic discriminating power among quintessence dark energy models. We develop and demonstrate the technique of using the independently measured modes of the equation of state (derived from principle component analysis) as a common parameter space in which to compare the different quintessence models, and we argue that this technique is a powerful one. We use the pseudo-Nambu-Goldstone boson, exponential, Albrecht-Skordis, and inverse tracker (or inverse power law) quintessence models for this work. One of our main results is that the goal of discriminating among these models sets a concrete measure on the capabilities of future dark energy experiments. Experiments have to be somewhat better than DETF stage 4 simulated experiments to fully meet this goal.

  17. Erratum: Evidence of b-jet quenching in PbPb collisions at sNN=2.76TeV [Phys. Rev. Lett. 113 , 132301 (2014)

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Chatrchyan, S.

    2015-07-10

    In our Letter, there was a component of the statistical uncertainty from the simulated PbPb Monte Carlo samples. This uncertainty was not propagated to all of the results. Figures 3 and 4 have been updated to reflect this source of uncertainty. In this case, the statistical uncertainties remain smaller than the systematic uncertainties in all cases such that the conclusions of the Letter are unaltered.

  18. Erratum: Measurement of the n-p elastic scattering angular distribution at E{sub n}=10 MeV [Phys. Rev. C 65, 014004 (2001)

    SciTech Connect

    Boukharouba, N.; Bateman, F. B.; Carlson, A. D.; Wasson, O. A.; Brient, C. E.; Grimes, S. M.; Massey, T. N.; Haight, R. C.

    2010-09-15

    The reported data are given for the mean angles measured rather than for the central angles. The data are normalized to the most recent Evaluated Nuclear Data File evaluated angle-integrated elastic-scattering cross section and refitted with a Legendre polynomial expansion.

  19. Publisher's Note: Level structure 18Ne and its importance in the 14O(α,p)17F reaction rate [Phys. Rev. C 86, 025801(2012)

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Almaraz-Calderon, S.; Tan, W. P.; Aprahamian, A.; Bucher, B.; Roberts, A.; Wiescher, M.; Brune, C. R.; Massey, T. N.; Ozkan, N.; Guray, R. T.; et al

    2012-08-10

    The level structure of 18Ne above the α-decay threshold has been studied using the 16O(3He,n) reaction. A coincidence measurement of neutrons and charged particles decaying from populated states in 18Ne has been made. Decay branching ratios were measured for six resonances and used to calculate the 14O(α,p)17F reaction rate which is a measure of one of two breakout paths from the Hot CNO cycle. As a result, the new experimental information combined with previous experimental and theoretical information, provides a more accurate calculation of the reaction rate.

  20. Preface: phys. stat. sol. (a) 202/12

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumann, Wolfgang; Stutzmann, Martin; Hildebrandt, Stefan

    2005-09-01

    The present special issue contains a collection of Original Papers dedicated to Professor Johannes Heydenreich on the occasion of his 75th birthday.Johannes Heydenreich, born on 20 June 1930 in Plauen/Vogtland near Dresden, studied physics at the Pädagogische Hochschule Potsdam, where he obtained his first academic degree Dipl. Phys. in 1958. He received his doctoral degree at the Martin Luther University in Halle in 1961 and the Habilitation degree in 1969. Already during his studies in Potsdam, he showed an interest in electron microscopy due to the influence of his teacher and supervisor Prof. Picht, one of the pioneers in electron optics. His interests were strengthened when Johannes Heydenreich did the experimental work for his Diploma degree at the Institute for Experimental Physics of the University of Halle, where he met Prof. Heinz Bethge for the first time. This was the beginning of a fruitful and longstanding collaboration. In 1962 Johannes Heydenreich joined the team of the later Institute for Solid State Physics and Electron Microscopy of the Academy of Sciences of the GDR, in Halle, for which the basis was laid by Prof. Bethge in 1960.Heydenreich has been working as Assistant Director for many years and played a decisive role in introducing and organising the various techniques of electron microscopy in the institute.The research activities of Prof. Heydenreich covered a broad spectrum over the years. At the beginning of his career he made significant contributions in the field of electron mirror microscopy. After that, his main interests were focused on transmission electron microscopy, ranging from diffraction contrast analysis of crystal defects to high-resolution electron microscopy and image processing. His favourite field was studies of defect-induced phenomena in advanced materials. The so-called Bethge-Heydenreich, the book Electron Microscopy in Solid State Physics, published at first in a German edition in 1982 and later in a revised

  1. A nucleolar localizing Rev binding element inhibits HIV replication

    PubMed Central

    Michienzi, Alessandro; De Angelis, Fernanda G; Bozzoni, Irene; Rossi, John J

    2006-01-01

    The Rev protein of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) facilitates the nuclear export of intron containing viral mRNAs allowing formation of infectious virions. Rev traffics through the nucleolus and shuttles between the nucleus and cytoplasm. Rev multimerization and interaction with the export protein CRM1 takes place in the nucleolus. To test the importance of Rev nucleolar trafficking in the HIV-1 replication cycle, we created a nucleolar localizing Rev Response Element (RRE) decoy and tested this for its anti-HIV activity. The RRE decoy provided marked inhibition of HIV-1 replication in both the CEM T-cell line and in primary CD34+ derived monocytes. These results demonstrate that titration of Rev in the nucleolus impairs HIV-1 replication and supports a functional role for Rev trafficking in this sub-cellular compartment. PMID:16712721

  2. Suppression of atherosclerosis by synthetic REV-ERB agonist

    SciTech Connect

    Sitaula, Sadichha; Billon, Cyrielle; Kamenecka, Theodore M.; Solt, Laura A.; Burris, Thomas P.

    2015-05-08

    The nuclear receptors for heme, REV-ERBα and REV-ERBβ, play important roles in the regulation of metabolism and inflammation. Recently it was demonstrated that reduced REV-ERBα expression in hematopoetic cells in LDL receptor null mice led to increased atherosclerosis. We sought to determine if synthetic REV-ERB agonists that we have developed might have the ability to suppress atherosclerosis in this model. A previously characterized synthetic REV-ERB agonist, SR9009, was used to determine if activation of REV-ERB activity would affect atherosclerosis in LDL receptor deficient mice. Atherosclerotic plaque size was significantly reduced (p < 0.05) in mice administered SR9009 (100 mg/kg) for seven weeks compared to control mice (n = 10 per group). SR9009 treatment of bone marrow-derived mouse macrophages (BMDM) reduced the polarization of BMDMs to proinflammatory M1 macrophage while increasing the polarization of BMDMs to anti-inflammatory M2 macrophages. Our results suggest that pharmacological targeting of REV-ERBs may be a viable therapeutic option for treatment of atherosclerosis. - Highlights: • Synthetic REV-ERB agonist treatment reduced atherosclerosis in a mouse model. • Pharmacological activation of REV-ERB decreased M1 macrophage polarization. • Pharmacological activation of REV-ERB increased M2 macrophage polarization.

  3. Comment on “A study of vertical and in-plane electron mobility due to interface roughness scattering at low temperature in InAs-GaSb superlattices” [J. Appl. Phys. 114, 053712 (2013)

    SciTech Connect

    Szmulowicz, F.

    2014-04-14

    The purpose of this comment is to point out that the paper by Safa, Asgari, and Faraone [J. Appl. Phys. 114, 053712 (2013)] (SAF) on electronic transport in superlattices contains a number of errors in physics and execution. By dealing with a finite number of periods and forcing the wave function to be zero at the upper and lower boundaries of the superlattice stack, SAF have turned the system into a quantum well for which the momentum along the growth axis is not a good quantum number, so that the bands in the growth direction are flat and the corresponding carrier velocities and vertical mobilities are zero. A number of other errors allow the authors to get nonzero results and to reach conclusions that qualitatively mirror those of Szmulowicz, Haugan, Elhamri, and Brown [Phys. Rev. B 84, 155307 (2011)].

  4. Response to 'Comment on 'Undamped electrostatic plasma waves''[Phys. Plasmas 20, 034701 (2013)

    SciTech Connect

    Valentini, F.; Perrone, D.; Veltri, P.; Califano, F.; Pegoraro, F.; Morrison, P. J.; O'Neil, T. M.

    2013-03-15

    Numerical and experimental evidence is given for the occurrence of the plateau states and concomitant corner modes proposed in Valentini et al.[Phys. Plasmas 19, 092103 (2012)]. It is argued that these states provide a better description of reality for small amplitude off-dispersion disturbances than the conventional Bernstein-Greene-Kruskal or cnoidal states such as those proposed in Schamel [Phys. Plasmas 20, 034701 (2013)].

  5. Comment on 'Nonlinear gyrokinetic theory with polarization drift' [Phys. Plasmas 17, 082304 (2010)

    SciTech Connect

    Leerink, S.; Parra, F. I.; Heikkinen, J. A.

    2010-12-15

    In this comment, we show that by using the discrete particle distribution function the changes of the phase-space volume of gyrocenter coordinates due to the fluctuating ExB velocity do not explicitly appear in the Poisson equation and the [Sosenko et al., Phys. Scr. 64, 264 (2001)] result is recovered. It is demonstrated that there is no contradiction between the work presented by Sosenko et al. and the work presented by [Wang et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 082304 (2010)].

  6. Response to ``Comment on `Undamped electrostatic plasma waves''' [Phys. Plasmas 20, 034701 (2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valentini, F.; Perrone, D.; Califano, F.; Pegoraro, F.; Veltri, P.; Morrison, P. J.; O'Neil, T. M.

    2013-03-01

    Numerical and experimental evidence is given for the occurrence of the plateau states and concomitant corner modes proposed in Valentini et al. [Phys. Plasmas 19, 092103 (2012)]. It is argued that these states provide a better description of reality for small amplitude off-dispersion disturbances than the conventional Bernstein-Greene-Kruskal or cnoidal states such as those proposed in Schamel [Phys. Plasmas 20, 034701 (2013)].

  7. RNA-directed remodeling of the HIV-1 protein Rev orchestrates assembly of the Rev–Rev response element complex

    PubMed Central

    Jayaraman, Bhargavi; Crosby, David C; Homer, Christina; Ribeiro, Isabel; Mavor, David; Frankel, Alan D

    2014-01-01

    The HIV-1 protein Rev controls a critical step in viral replication by mediating the nuclear export of unspliced and singly-spliced viral mRNAs. Multiple Rev subunits assemble on the Rev Response Element (RRE), a structured region present in these RNAs, and direct their export through the Crm1 pathway. Rev-RRE assembly occurs via several Rev oligomerization and RNA-binding steps, but how these steps are coordinated to form an export–competent complex is unclear. Here, we report the first crystal structure of a Rev dimer-RRE complex, revealing a dramatic rearrangement of the Rev-dimer upon RRE binding through re-packing of its hydrophobic protein–protein interface. Rev-RNA recognition relies on sequence-specific contacts at the well-characterized IIB site and local RNA architecture at the second site. The structure supports a model in which the RRE utilizes the inherent plasticity of Rev subunit interfaces to guide the formation of a functional complex. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04120.001 PMID:25486594

  8. e-Phys: a suite of intracellular neurophysiology programs integrating COM (component object model) technologies.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Quoc-Thang; Miledi, Ricardo

    2003-09-30

    Current computer programs for intracellular recordings often lack advanced data management, are usually incompatible with other applications and are also difficult to adapt to new experiments. We have addressed these shortcomings in e-Phys, a suite of electrophysiology applications for intracellular recordings. The programs in e-Phys use Component Object Model (COM) technologies available in the Microsoft Windows operating system to provide enhanced data storage, increased interoperability between e-Phys and other COM-aware applications, and easy customization of data acquisition and analysis thanks to a script-based integrated programming environment. Data files are extensible, hierarchically organized and integrated in the Windows shell by using the Structured Storage technology. Data transfers to and from other programs are facilitated by implementing the ActiveX Automation standard and distributed COM (DCOM). ActiveX Scripting allows experimenters to write their own event-driven acquisition and analysis programs in the VBScript language from within e-Phys. Scripts can reuse components available from other programs on other machines to create distributed meta-applications. This paper describes the main features of e-Phys and how this package was used to determine the effect of the atypical antipsychotic drug clozapine on synaptic transmission at the neuromuscular junction. PMID:12948545

  9. Analysis of the influence of subcellular localization of the HIV Rev protein on Rev-dependent gene expression by multi-fluorescence live-cell imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Wolff, Horst; Hadian, Kamyar; Ziegler, Manja; Weierich, Claudia; Kramer-Hammerle, Susanne; Kleinschmidt, Andrea; Erfle, Volker; Brack-Werner, Ruth . E-mail: brack@gsf.de

    2006-02-15

    The human immunodeficiency virus Rev protein is a post-transcriptional activator of HIV gene expression. Rev is a nucleocytoplasmic shuttle protein that displays characteristic nuclear/nucleolar subcellular localization in various cell lines. Cytoplasmic localization of Rev occurs under various conditions disrupting Rev function. The goal of this study was to investigate the relationship between localization of Rev and its functional activity in living cells. A triple-fluorescent imaging assay, called AQ-FIND, was established for automatic quantitative evaluation of nucleocytoplasmic distribution of fluorescently tagged proteins. This assay was used to screen 500 rev genes generated by error-prone PCR for Rev mutants with different localization phenotypes. Activities of the Rev mutants were determined with a second quantitative, dual-fluorescent reporter assay. In HeLa cells, the majority of nuclear Rev mutants had activities similar to wild-type Rev. The activities of Rev mutants with abnormal cytoplasmic localization ranged from moderately impaired to nonfunctional. There was no linear correlation between subcellular distribution and levels of Rev activity. In astrocytes, nuclear Rev mutants showed similar impaired activities as the cytoplasmic wild-type Rev. Our data suggest that steady-state subcellular localization is not a primary regulator of Rev activity but may change as a secondary consequence of altered Rev function. The methodologies described here have potential for studying the significance of subcellular localization for functions of other regulatory factors.

  10. Biallelic inactivation of REV7 is associated with Fanconi anemia.

    PubMed

    Bluteau, Dominique; Masliah-Planchon, Julien; Clairmont, Connor; Rousseau, Alix; Ceccaldi, Raphael; Dubois d'Enghien, Catherine; Bluteau, Olivier; Cuccuini, Wendy; Gachet, Stéphanie; Peffault de Latour, Régis; Leblanc, Thierry; Socié, Gérard; Baruchel, André; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; D'Andrea, Alan D; Soulier, Jean

    2016-09-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a recessive genetic disease characterized by congenital abnormalities, chromosome instability, progressive bone marrow failure (BMF), and a strong predisposition to cancer. Twenty FA genes have been identified, and the FANC proteins they encode cooperate in a common pathway that regulates DNA crosslink repair and replication fork stability. We identified a child with severe BMF who harbored biallelic inactivating mutations of the translesion DNA synthesis (TLS) gene REV7 (also known as MAD2L2), which encodes the mutant REV7 protein REV7-V85E. Patient-derived cells demonstrated an extended FA phenotype, which included increased chromosome breaks and G2/M accumulation upon exposure to DNA crosslinking agents, γH2AX and 53BP1 foci accumulation, and enhanced p53/p21 activation relative to cells derived from healthy patients. Expression of WT REV7 restored normal cellular and functional phenotypes in the patient's cells, and CRISPR/Cas9 inactivation of REV7 in a non-FA human cell line produced an FA phenotype. Finally, silencing Rev7 in primary hematopoietic cells impaired progenitor function, suggesting that the DNA repair defect underlies the development of BMF in FA. Taken together, our genetic and functional analyses identified REV7 as a previously undescribed FA gene, which we term FANCV. PMID:27500492

  11. Suppression of atherosclerosis by synthetic REV-ERB agonist.

    PubMed

    Sitaula, Sadichha; Billon, Cyrielle; Kamenecka, Theodore M; Solt, Laura A; Burris, Thomas P

    2015-05-01

    The nuclear receptors for heme, REV-ERBα and REV-ERBβ, play important roles in the regulation of metabolism and inflammation. Recently it was demonstrated that reduced REV-ERBα expression in hematopoetic cells in LDL receptor null mice led to increased atherosclerosis. We sought to determine if synthetic REV-ERB agonists that we have developed might have the ability to suppress atherosclerosis in this model. A previously characterized synthetic REV-ERB agonist, SR9009, was used to determine if activation of REV-ERB activity would affect atherosclerosis in LDL receptor deficient mice. Atherosclerotic plaque size was significantly reduced (p < 0.05) in mice administered SR9009 (100 mg/kg) for seven weeks compared to control mice (n = 10 per group). SR9009 treatment of bone marrow-derived mouse macrophages (BMDM) reduced the polarization of BMDMs to proinflammatory M1 macrophage while increasing the polarization of BMDMs to anti-inflammatory M2 macrophages. Our results suggest that pharmacological targeting of REV-ERBs may be a viable therapeutic option for treatment of atherosclerosis. PMID:25800870

  12. REV-ERB and ROR nuclear receptors as drug targets

    PubMed Central

    Kojetin, Douglas J.; Burris, Thomas P.

    2016-01-01

    The nuclear receptors REV-ERB (consisting of REV-ERBα and REV-ERBβ) and retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptors (RORs; consisting of RORα, RORβ and RORγ) are involved in many physiological processes, including regulation of metabolism, development and immunity as well as the circadian rhythm. The recent characterization of endogenous ligands for these former orphan nuclear receptors has stimulated the development of synthetic ligands and opened up the possibility of targeting these receptors to treat several diseases, including diabetes, atherosclerosis, autoimmunity and cancer. This Review focuses on the latest developments in ROR and REV-ERB pharmacology indicating that these nuclear receptors are druggable targets and that ligands targeting these receptors may be useful in the treatment of several disorders. PMID:24577401

  13. Rayleigh-Bénard convection with rotation at small Prandtl numbers.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahlers, Guenter

    2000-03-01

    The Prandtl-number range from 0.16 to 0.7 is not accessible in ordinary fluids, but can be reached in mixtures of two gases with different masses.(J. Liu and G. Ahlers, Phys. Rev. E) 55, 6950 (1997). From theory one expects a great diversity of interesting bifurcation phenomena in this range when the sample is rotated about a vertical axis. (See, e.g. T. Clune and E. Knobloch, Phys. Rev. E 47), 2536 (1993). These phenomena include super- and sub-critical bifurcations to spatio-temporal chaos, a line of tricritical bifurcations, a codimension-two line, and a supercritical Hopf bifurcation to standing waves. This talk will briefly review these predictions, and then present relevant new experimental and theoretical results. The results include the unexpected observation of square patterns near onset,(K.M.S. Bajaj, J. Liu, B. Naberhuis, and G. Ahlers, Phys. Rev. Lett.) 81, 806 (1998). the determination of a point on the predicted tricritical line, a hysteresis-free subcritical bifurcation, and a novel state of bursting convection in the subcritical region. In spite of a thorough search, the experiment could not detect the predicted Hopf bifurcation.

  14. Chemistry Teacher Education Coalition: Extending the PhysTEC Model to Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirchhoff, Mary

    2012-02-01

    The American Association of Employment in Education reports that chemistry, like physics, faces ``some shortage'' of educators. Inspired by the success of the Physics Teacher Education Coalition (PhysTEC), the American Chemical Society (ACS) is developing the Chemistry Teacher Education Coalition (CTEC) to actively engage chemistry departments in the preparation of future chemistry teachers. Engaging chemistry departments in teacher preparation would increase the number and diversity of well-prepared high school chemistry teachers while catalyzing cultural change within chemistry departments. Many features of PhysTEC, such as a grant competition to create model teacher preparation programs and regular conferences, are directly applicable to chemistry. This presentation will provide an overview of ACS efforts to launch a successful CTEC initiative.

  15. Comment on ``Hydrophobic effects on partial molar volume'' [J. Chem. Phys. 122, 094509 (2005)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graziano, Giuseppe

    2005-10-01

    It is pointed out that the results obtained by Imai and Hirata [ J. Chem. Phys.122, 094509 (2005)] for the partial molar volume of benzene in a detailed model of water and in a hypothetical nonpolar water model should be interpreted with care. By turning off the electrostatic interactions among water molecules, keeping fixed the molar volume and so the liquid number density, in order to produce the hypothetical nonpolar water without H bonds, the size of water molecules increases from about 2.8 to about 3.2Å. This fact is due to the bunching-up effect of H bonds. The consequences of this fact are clarified by means of calculations performed using the analytical expression of the partial molar volume derived by Lee [J. Phys. Chem.87, 112 (1983)] from the scaled particle theory equation of state for hard-sphere mixtures.

  16. Improving Science Teacher Preparation through the APS PhysTEC and NSF Noyce Programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Tasha; Tyler, Micheal; van Duzor, Andrea; Sabella, Mel

    2013-03-01

    Central to the recruitment of students into science teaching at a school like CSU, is a focus on the professional nature of teaching. The purpose of this focus is twofold: it serves to change student perceptions about teaching and it prepares students to become teachers who value continued professional development and value the science education research literature. The Noyce and PhysTEC programs at CSU place the professional nature of teaching front and center by involving students in education research projects, paid internships, attendance at conferences, and participation in a new Teacher Immersion Institute and a Science Education Journal Reading Class. This poster will focus on specific components of our teacher preparation program that were developed through these two programs. In addition we will describe how these new components provide students with diverse experiences in the teaching of science to students in the urban school district. Supported by the NSF Noyce Program (0833251) and the APS PhysTEC Program.

  17. Using the PhysX engine for Physics-based Virtual Surgery with Force Feedback

    PubMed Central

    Maciel, Anderson; Halic, Tansel; Lu, Zhonghua; Nedel, Luciana P.; De, Suvranu

    2010-01-01

    Background The development of modern surgical simulators is highly challenging as they must support complex simulation environments. The demand for higher realism in such simulators has driven researchers to adopt physics-based models which are computationally very demanding. This poses a major problem since real time interactions must permit graphical updates of 30 Hz and a much higher rate of 1 kHz for force feedback (haptics). Recently several physics engines have been developed which offer multi-physics simulation capabilities including rigid and deformable bodies, cloth and fluids. While such physics engines provide unique opportunities for the development of surgical simulators, their higher latencies, compared to what is necessary for real time graphics and haptics, offer significant barriers to their use in interactive simulation environments. Methods In this work, we propose solutions to this problem and demonstrate how a multimodal surgical simulation environment may be developed based on NVIDIA’s PhysX physics library. Hence, models that are undergoing relatively low frequency updates in PhysX can exist in an environment that demands much higher frequency updates for haptics. We use a collision handling layer to interface between the physical response provided by PhysX and the haptic rendering device to provide both real time tissue response and force feedback. Results Our simulator integrates a bimanual haptic interface for force-feedback and per-pixel shaders for graphics realism in real time. To demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach, we present the simulation of the Laparoscopic Adjustable Gastric Banding (LAGB) procedure as a case study. Conclusions To develop complex and realistic surgical trainers with realistic organ geometries and tissue properties demands stable physics-based deformation methods which are not always compatible with the interaction level required for such trainers. We have shown that combining different modeling

  18. Comment on 'General nonlocality in quantum fields'[J. Math. Phys. 49, 033513 (2008)

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Haijun

    2010-05-15

    In a recent paper [H.-J. Wang, J. Math. Phys. 49, 033513 (2008)] a complex-geometry model was proposed to interpret the interaction of electromagnetism and the interaction between quarks while the nonlocal effects are involved. In that theoretical frame, from the metric matrix one can obtain a determinant-form condition to describe qualitatively the typical characteristics for the aforementioned interactions. In this comment we attempt to extend this kind of qualitative description to weak interaction by finding out an appropriate metric tensor for it.

  19. Comment on ``Quasirelativistic theory equivalent to fully relativistic theory'' [J. Chem. Phys. 123, 241102 (2005)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filatov, Michael

    2006-09-01

    The connection between the exact quasirelativistic approach developed in the title reference [W. Kutzelnigg and W. Liu, J. Chem. Phys. 123, 241102 (2005)] and the method of elimination of the small component in matrix form developed previously by Dyall is explicitly worked out. An equation that links Hermitian and non-Hermitian formulations of the exact quasirelativistic theory is derived. Besides establishing a kinship between the existing formulations, the proposed equation can be employed for the derivation of new formulations of the exact quasirelativistic theory.

  20. Intermolecular masking of the HIV-1 Rev NLS by the cellular protein HIC: Novel insights into the regulation of Rev nuclear import

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The HIV-1 regulatory protein Rev, which is essential for viral replication, mediates the nuclear export of unspliced viral transcripts. Rev nuclear function requires active nucleocytoplasmic shuttling, and Rev nuclear import is mediated by the recognition of its Nuclear Localisation Signal (NLS) by multiple import factors, which include transportin and importin β. However, it remains unclear which nuclear import pathway(s) predominate in vivo, and the cellular environment that modulates Rev nucleocytoplasmic shuttling remains to be characterised. Results In our study, we have identified the cellular protein HIC (Human I-mfa domain-Containing protein) as a novel interactor of HIV-1 Rev. We demonstrate that HIC selectively interferes with Rev NLS interaction with importin β and impedes its nuclear import and function, but does not affect Rev nuclear import mediated by transportin. Hence, the molecular determinants mediating Rev-NLS recognition by importin β and transportin appear to be distinct. Furthermore, we have employed HIC and M9 M, a peptide specifically designed to inhibit the transportin-mediated nuclear import pathway, to characterise Rev nuclear import pathways within different cellular environments. Remarkably, we could show that in 293T, HeLa, COS7, Jurkat, U937, THP-1 and CEM cells, Rev nuclear import is cell type specific and alternatively mediated by transportin or importin β, in a mutually exclusive fashion. Conclusions Rev cytoplasmic sequestration by HIC may represent a novel mechanism for the control of Rev function. These studies highlight that the multivalent nature of the Rev NLS for different import receptors enables Rev to adapt its nuclear trafficking strategy. PMID:21401918

  1. Comment on ``Undamped electrostatic plasma waves'' [Phys. Plasmas 19, 092103 (2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schamel, Hans

    2013-03-01

    The relevance of linear "corner modes" for the description of coherent electrostatic structures, as proposed by Valentini et al. [Phys. Plasmas 19, 092103 (2012)], is questioned. Coherency in their on-dispersion simulation is instead found to be caused by particle trapping in agreement with Schamel's nonlinear wave model [Phys. Plasmas 19, 020501 (2012)]. The revealed small amplitude structures are hence of cnoidal electron hole type exhibiting vortices in phase space. They are ruled by trapping nonlinearity rather than by linearity or quasi-linear effects, as commonly assumed. Arguments are presented, which give preference to these cnoidal hole modes over Bernstein-Greene-Kruskal modes. To fully account for a realistic theoretical scenario, however, at least four ingredients are mandatory. Several corrections of the conventional body of thought about the proper kinetic wave description are proposed. They may prove useful for the general acceptance of this "new" nonlinear wave concept concerning structure formation, updating several prevailing concepts such as the general validity of a linear wave Ansatz for small amplitudes, as assumed in their paper. It is conjectured that this nonlinear trapping model can be generalized to the vortex structures of similar type found in the more general setting of driven turbulence of magnetized plasmas. They appear as eddies in both, the phase and the position spaces, embedded intermittently on the Debye length scale.

  2. Comment on: ``The hindered rotor density-of-states interpolation function'' [J. Chem. Phys. 106, 6675 (1997)] and ``The hindered rotor density- of-states'' [J. Chem. Phys. 108, 2314 (1998)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClurg, Richard B.

    1999-10-01

    There has been some confusion regarding the various approximations for the hindered rotor partition function and its associated thermodynamic functions and density of states. This comment seeks to clarify the situation by comparing and contrasting the various functions, particularly with regard to the consistent use of reference energies. Only the tabular data of Pitzer and Gwinn [J. Chem. Phys. 10, 428 (1942)] and our analytic function [J. Chem. Phys. 106, 6675 (1997)] have consistent reference energies. The main contribution of our publication is the set of simple, asymptotically correct expressions for the thermodynamic functions. There are similar, but different approximations to the density of states given by Knyazev and co-workers [J. Phys. Chem. A 102, 3916 (1998)] and by me [J. Chem. Phys. 108, 1748 (1998)].

  3. Rev-RRE Functional Activity Differs Substantially Among Primary HIV-1 Isolates.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Patrick E; Tebit, Denis M; Rekosh, David; Hammarskjold, Marie-Louise

    2016-09-01

    The HIV-1 replication cycle requires the nucleocytoplasmic export of intron-containing viral RNAs, a process that is ordinarily restricted. HIV overcomes this by means of the viral Rev protein, which binds to an RNA secondary structure called the Rev response element (RRE) present in all unspliced or incompletely spliced viral RNA transcripts. The resulting mRNP complex is exported through interaction with cellular factors. The Rev-RRE binding interaction is increasingly understood to display remarkable structural plasticity, but little is known about how Rev-RRE sequence differences affect functional activity. To study this issue, we utilized a lentiviral vector assay in which vector titer is dependent on the activity of selected Rev-RRE pairs. We found that Rev-RRE functional activity varies significantly (up to 24-fold) between naturally occurring viral isolates. The activity differences of the Rev-RRE cognate pairs track closely with Rev, but not with RRE activity. This variation in Rev activity is not correlated with differences in Rev steady state protein levels. These data suggest that Rev sequence differences drive substantial variation in Rev-RRE functional activity between patients. Such variation may play a role in viral adaptation to different immune milieus within and between patients and may be significant in the establishment of latency. The identification of differences in Rev-RRE functional activity in naturally occurring isolates may also permit more efficient production of lentiviral vectors. PMID:27147495

  4. Erratum to “Comment on “Geometry effect on the magnetic ordering of geometrically frustrated rectangular and triangular magnets” [Phys. Lett. A 375 (13) (2011) 1548]” [Phys. Lett. A 375 (27) (2011) 2680-2681

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nascimento, F. S.; Mól, L. A. S.; Pereira, A. R.; Moura-Melo, W. A.

    2012-10-01

    In a recent comment [Phys. Lett. A 375 (2011) 2680] some of us argued that a misleading evaluation of dipolar interactions in spin ice systems studied by Li et al. [Phys. Lett. A 375 (2011) 1548], does not lead to the ground-state transitions that they observed. However, a bug found in our computational code showed that there is indeed the predicted transitions even for a proper evaluation of dipolar interactions.

  5. Comment on "Effects of damping solitary wave in a viscosity bounded plasma" [Phys. Plasmas 21, 022118 (2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Uday Narayan; Chatterjee, Prasanta; Roychoudhury, Rajkumar

    2015-07-01

    Recently Gun Li et al. discussed "Effects of damping solitary wave in a viscosity bounded plasma" [Phys. Plasmas 21, 022118 (2014)]. The paper contains some serious errors which have been pointed out in this Comment.

  6. Comment on “Effects of damping solitary wave in a viscosity bounded plasma” [Phys. Plasmas 21, 022118 (2014)

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Uday Narayan Chatterjee, Prasanta; Roychoudhury, Rajkumar

    2015-07-15

    Recently Gun Li et al. discussed “Effects of damping solitary wave in a viscosity bounded plasma” [Phys. Plasmas 21, 022118 (2014)]. The paper contains some serious errors which have been pointed out in this Comment.

  7. User Instructions for the Systems Assessment Capability, Rev. 1, Computer Codes Volume 3: Utility Codes

    SciTech Connect

    Eslinger, Paul W.; Aaberg, Rosanne L.; Lopresti, Charles A.; Miley, Terri B.; Nichols, William E.; Strenge, Dennis L.

    2004-09-14

    This document contains detailed user instructions for a suite of utility codes developed for Rev. 1 of the Systems Assessment Capability. The suite of computer codes for Rev. 1 of Systems Assessment Capability performs many functions.

  8. Comment on 'Mathematical and physical aspects of Kappa velocity distribution' [Phys. Plasmas 14, 110702 (2007)

    SciTech Connect

    Hellberg, M. A.; Mace, R. L.; Baluku, T. K.; Kourakis, I.; Saini, N. S.

    2009-09-15

    A recent paper [L.-N. Hau and W.-Z. Fu, Phys. Plasmas 14, 110702 (2007)] deals with certain mathematical and physical properties of the kappa distribution. We comment on the authors' use of a form of distribution function that is different from the 'standard' form of the kappa distribution, and hence their results, inter alia for an expansion of the distribution function and for the associated number density in an electrostatic potential, do not fully reflect the dependence on {kappa} that would be associated with the conventional kappa distribution. We note that their definition of the kappa distribution function is also different from a modified distribution based on the notion of nonextensive entropy.

  9. Comment on ``Mathematical and physical aspects of Kappa velocity distribution'' [Phys. Plasmas 14, 110702 (2007)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellberg, M. A.; Mace, R. L.; Baluku, T. K.; Kourakis, I.; Saini, N. S.

    2009-09-01

    A recent paper [L.-N. Hau and W.-Z. Fu, Phys. Plasmas 14, 110702 (2007)] deals with certain mathematical and physical properties of the kappa distribution. We comment on the authors' use of a form of distribution function that is different from the "standard" form of the kappa distribution, and hence their results, inter alia for an expansion of the distribution function and for the associated number density in an electrostatic potential, do not fully reflect the dependence on κ that would be associated with the conventional kappa distribution. We note that their definition of the kappa distribution function is also different from a modified distribution based on the notion of nonextensive entropy.

  10. Structural Basis of Rev1-mediated Assembly of a Quaternary Vertebrate Translesion Polymerase Complex Consisting of Rev1, Heterodimeric Polymerase (Pol) ζ, and Pol κ*

    PubMed Central

    Wojtaszek, Jessica; Lee, Chul-Jin; D'Souza, Sanjay; Minesinger, Brenda; Kim, Hyungjin; D'Andrea, Alan D.; Walker, Graham C.; Zhou, Pei

    2012-01-01

    DNA synthesis across lesions during genomic replication requires concerted actions of specialized DNA polymerases in a potentially mutagenic process known as translesion synthesis. Current models suggest that translesion synthesis in mammalian cells is achieved in two sequential steps, with a Y-family DNA polymerase (κ, η, ι, or Rev1) inserting a nucleotide opposite the lesion and with the heterodimeric B-family polymerase ζ, consisting of the catalytic Rev3 subunit and the accessory Rev7 subunit, replacing the insertion polymerase to carry out primer extension past the lesion. Effective translesion synthesis in vertebrates requires the scaffolding function of the C-terminal domain (CTD) of Rev1 that interacts with the Rev1-interacting region of polymerases κ, η, and ι and with the Rev7 subunit of polymerase ζ. We report the purification and structure determination of a quaternary translesion polymerase complex consisting of the Rev1 CTD, the heterodimeric Pol ζ complex, and the Pol κ Rev1-interacting region. Yeast two-hybrid assays were employed to identify important interface residues of the translesion polymerase complex. The structural elucidation of such a quaternary translesion polymerase complex encompassing both insertion and extension polymerases bridged by the Rev1 CTD provides the first molecular explanation of the essential scaffolding function of Rev1 and highlights the Rev1 CTD as a promising target for developing novel cancer therapeutics to suppress translesion synthesis. Our studies support the notion that vertebrate insertion and extension polymerases could structurally cooperate within a megatranslesion polymerase complex (translesionsome) nucleated by Rev1 to achieve efficient lesion bypass without incurring an additional switching mechanism. PMID:22859295

  11. Single-molecule studies reveal that DEAD box protein DDX1 promotes oligomerization of HIV-1 Rev on the Rev response element.

    PubMed

    Robertson-Anderson, Rae M; Wang, Jun; Edgcomb, Stephen P; Carmel, Andrew B; Williamson, James R; Millar, David P

    2011-07-29

    Oligomeric assembly of Rev on the Rev response element (RRE) is essential for the nuclear export of unspliced and singly spliced human immunodeficiency virus type 1 viral mRNA transcripts. Several host factors, including the human DEAD box protein DDX1, are also known to be required for efficient Rev function. In this study, spontaneous assembly and dissociation of individual Rev-RRE complexes in the presence or absence of DDX1 were observed in real time via single-molecule total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy. Binding of up to eight fluorescently labeled Rev monomers to a single RRE molecule was visualized, and the event frequencies and corresponding binding and dissociation rates for the different Rev-RRE stoichiometries were determined. The presence of DDX1 eliminated a second kinetic phase present during the initial Rev binding step, attributed to nonproductive nucleation events, resulting in increased occurrence of higher-order Rev-RRE stoichiometries. This effect was further enhanced upon the addition of a non-hydrolyzable ATP analog (adenylyl-imidophosphate), whereas ADP had no effect beyond that of DDX1 alone. Notably, the first three Rev monomer binding events were accelerated in the presence of DDX1 and adenylyl-imidophosphate, while the dissociation rates remained unchanged. Measurements performed across a range of DDX1 concentrations suggest that DDX1 targets Rev rather than the RRE to promote oligomeric assembly. Moreover, DDX1 is able to restore the oligomerization activity of a Rev mutant that is otherwise unable to assemble on the RRE beyond a monomeric complex. Taken together, these results suggest that DDX1 acts as a cellular cofactor by promoting oligomerization of Rev on the RRE. PMID:21763499

  12. PREFACE: International Symposium "Nanoscience and Quantum Physics 2011" (nanoPHYS'11)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Susumu; Tanaka, Hidekazu; Nakamura, Takashi; Nakamura, Masaaki

    2011-07-01

    Quantum physics has developed modern views of nature for more than a century. In addition to this traditional role, quantum physics has acquired new significance in the 21st century as the field responsible for driving and supporting nanoscience research, which will have even greater importance in the future because nanoscience will be the academic foundation for new technologies. The Department of Physics, Tokyo Institute of Technology, are now conducting a "Nanoscience and Quantum Physics" project (Physics G-COE project) supported by the Global Center of Excellence Program of the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology of Japan (MEXT) in order to promote research and education in these important academic fields. The International Symposium on Nanoscience and Quantum Physics, held in Tokyo, Japan, 26-28 January 2011 (nanoPHYS'11) was organized by the Physics G-COE project of the Tokyo Institute of Technology to provide an international forum for the open exchange of topical information and for stimulating discussion on novel concepts and future prospects of nanoscience and quantum physics. There were a total of 118 papers including 34 invited papers. This nanoPHYS'11 is the fourth symposium of this kind organized by the Tokyo Institute of Technology. Topics focused on in the symposium included: Category 1: Novel nanostructure (Nanowires, Nanotubes, Spin-related structure, etc) Category 2: Novel transport and electronic properties (Graphene, Topological insulators, Coherent control, etc) Category 3: Electronic and optical properties of nanostructure Category 4: Fundamental physics and new concept in quantum physics Category 5: Quantum Physics - Quantum information Category 6: Quantum Physics - Nuclear and Hadron Physics Category 7: Quantum Physics - Astrophysics, etc All the papers submitted to this issue have been reviewed under a stringent refereeing process, according to the normal rules of this Journal. The editors are grateful to all the

  13. Inhibition of the HIV Rev transactivator : a new target for therapeutic intervention.

    PubMed

    Heguy, A

    1997-01-01

    The viral transactivator Rev is essential for HIV replication, since it allows the nuclear export of unspliced and partially spliced viral mRNAs that encode the structural proteins. Rev is an RNA binding protein that interacts with a highly structured RNA element, the RRE, found within the envelope sequences. This viral protein also interacts with cellular proteins, termed nucleoporins, and acts as an adaptor between the viral mRNAs and the cellular nuclear export machinery. Both interactions are specific, and required for Rev function. Because of its crucial role in the HIV replication cycle, and its novel mechanism of action, Rev represents an ideal target for therapeutic intervention. This review describes the efforts towards Rev inhibition. Gene therapy approaches, including the expression of trans-dominant mutants and RNA decoys, as well as antisense therapies and small molecule inhibitors of Rev-RRE binding or Rev interaction with the cellular machinery will be discussed PMID:9206979

  14. PyDecay/GraphPhys: A Unified Language and Storage System for Particle Decay Process Descriptions

    SciTech Connect

    Dunietz, Jesse N.; /MIT /SLAC

    2011-06-22

    To ease the tasks of Monte Carlo (MC) simulation and event reconstruction (i.e. inferring particle-decay events from experimental data) for long-term BaBar data preservation and analysis, the following software components have been designed: a language ('GraphPhys') for specifying decay processes, common to both simulation and data analysis, allowing arbitrary parameters on particles, decays, and entire processes; an automated visualization tool to show graphically what decays have been specified; and a searchable database storage mechanism for decay specifications. Unlike HepML, a proposed XML standard for HEP metadata, the specification language is designed not for data interchange between computer systems, but rather for direct manipulation by human beings as well as computers. The components are interoperable: the information parsed from files in the specification language can easily be rendered as an image by the visualization package, and conversion between decay representations was implemented. Several proof-of-concept command-line tools were built based on this framework. Applications include building easier and more efficient interfaces to existing analysis tools for current projects (e.g. BaBar/BESII), providing a framework for analyses in future experimental settings (e.g. LHC/SuperB), and outreach programs that involve giving students access to BaBar data and analysis tools to give them a hands-on feel for scientific analysis.

  15. Comment on ``The application of the thermodynamic perturbation theory to study the hydrophobic hydration'' [J. Chem. Phys. 139, 024101 (2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graziano, Giuseppe

    2013-09-01

    It is shown that the behaviour of the hydration thermodynamic functions obtained in the 3D Mercedes-Benz model of water by Mohoric et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 139, 024101 (2013)] is not qualitatively correct with respect to experimental data for a solute whose diameter is 1.5-fold larger than that of a water molecule. It is also pointed out that the failure is due to the fact that the used 3D Mercedes-Benz model of water [A. Bizjak, T. Urbic, V. Vlachy, and K. A. Dill, J. Chem. Phys. 131, 194504 (2009)] does not reproduce in a quantitatively correct manner the peculiar temperature dependence of water density.

  16. Targeted cleavage of HIV RRE RNA by Rev-coupled transition metal chelates.

    PubMed

    Joyner, Jeff C; Cowan, J A

    2011-06-29

    A series of compounds that target reactive metal chelates to the HIV-1 Rev response element (RRE) mRNA have been synthesized. Dissociation constants and chemical reactivity toward HIV RRE RNA have been determined and evaluated in terms of reduction potential, coordination unsaturation, and overall charge associated with the metal-chelate-Rev complex. Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA), diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA), and 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA) were linked to a lysine side chain of a Rev-derived peptide by either EDC/NHS or isothiocyanate coupling. The resulting chelate-Rev (EDTA-Rev, DTPA-Rev, NTA-Rev, and DOTA-Rev) conjugates were used to form coordination complexes with Fe(2+), Co(2+), Ni(2+), and Cu(2+) such that the arginine-rich Rev peptide could mediate localization of the metal chelates to the Rev peptide's high-affinity mRNA binding partner, RRE stem loop IIB. Metal complexes of the extended peptides GGH-Rev and KGHK-Rev, which also contain N-terminal peptidic chelators (ATCUN motifs), were studied for comparison. A fluorescence titration assay revealed high-affinity RRE RNA binding by all 22 metal-chelate-Rev species, with K(D) values ranging from ~0.2 to 16 nM, indicating little to no loss of RNA affinity due to the coupling of the metal chelates to the Rev peptide. Dissociation constants for binding at a previously unobserved low-affinity site are also reported. Rates of RNA modification by each metal-chelate-Rev species were determined and varied from ~0.28 to 4.9 nM/min but were optimal for Cu(2+)-NTA-Rev. Metal-chelate reduction potentials were determined and varied from -228 to +1111 mV vs NHE under similar solution conditions, allowing direct comparison of reactivity with redox thermodynamics. Optimal activity was observed when the reduction potential for the metal center was poised between those of the two principal co-reagents for metal-promoted formation of

  17. Erratum: Evolution of precipitate morphology during heat treatment and its implications for the superconductivity in KxFe1.6+ySe2 single crystals [Phys. Rev. B 86 , 144507 (2012)

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Liu, Y.; Xing, Q.; Dennis, K. W.; McCallum, R. W.; Lograsso, T. A.

    2015-08-14

    In this article, we study the relationship between precipitate morphology and superconductivity in KxFe1.6+ySe2 single crystals grown by self-flux method. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) measurements revealed that the superconducting phase forms a network in the samples quenched above iron vacancy order-disorder transition temperature Ts, whereas it aggregates into micrometer-sized rectangular bars and aligns as disconnected chains in the furnace-cooled samples.

  18. Erratum: Measurement of azimuthal asymmetries in inclusive production of hadron pairs in e⁺e⁻ annihilation at √s=10.58 GeV [Phys. Rev. D 78, 032011 (2008)

    SciTech Connect

    Seidl, R.; Grosse Perdekamp, M.; Ogawa, A.; Adachi, I.; Aihara, H.; Bahinipati, S.; Bakich, A. M.; Bartel, W.; Bitenc, U.; Bondar, A.; Bozek, A.; Bračko, M.; Brodzicka, J.; Browder, T. E.; Chao, Y.; Chen, A.; Cheon, B. G.; Chistov, R.; Cho, I.-S.; Choi, Y.; Dalseno, J.; Dash, M.; Drutskoy, A.; Eidelman, S.; Gabyshev, N.; Golob, B.; Ha, H.; Hayasaka, K.; Hayashii, H.; Hazumi, M.; Heffernan, D.; Hoshi, Y.; Hou, W.-S.; Hyun, H. J.; Ishikawa, A.; Iwasaki, Y.; Kah, D. H.; Kaji, H.; Kawai, H.; Kawasaki, T.; Kim, H. J.; Kim, H. O.; Kim, Y. I.; Kim, Y. J.; Križan, P.; Kumar, R.; Kwon, Y.-J.; Kyeong, S.-H.; Lange, J. S.; Lee, J. S.; Lee, M. J.; Lesiak, T.; Li, J.; Limosani, A.; Liu, C.; Liventsev, D.; Mandl, F.; McOnie, S.; Medvedeva, T.; Miyabayashi, K.; Miyake, H.; Miyata, H.; Miyazaki, Y.; Mizuk, R.; Moloney, G. R.; Nakano, E.; Nakazawa, H.; Nishida, S.; Nitoh, O.; Ogawa, S.; Ohshima, T.; Okuno, S.; Pakhlov, P.; Pakhlova, G.; Palka, H.; Park, C. W.; Park, H.; Park, H. K.; Peak, L. S.; Piilonen, L. E.; Sahoo, H.; Sakai, Y.; Schneider, O.; Sekiya, A.; Senyo, K.; Sevior, M. E.; Shapkin, M.; Shen, C. P.; Shiu, J.-G.; Singh, J. B.; Stanič, S.; Starič, M.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Tanaka, M.; Teramoto, Y.; Tikhomirov, I.; Uehara, S.; Uglov, T.; Unno, Y.; Uno, S.; Urquijo, P.; Usov, Y.; Varner, G.; Vervink, K.; Wang, C. H.; Wang, P.; Wang, X. L.; Watanabe, Y.; Wedd, R.; Won, E.; Yabsley, B. D.; Yamashita, Y.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhilich, V.; Zivko, T.; Zupanc, A.; Zyukova, O.

    2012-08-09

    In the original article, it was found in Monte Carlo simulations that the reconstructed A₀ results are roughly consistent with the generated asymmetries, while the A₁₂ results systematically underestimate the generated asymmetries. This underestimation can be attributed to the difference between the reconstructed thrust axis and the original quark-antiquark axis. The corresponding correction factors are 1.6 ± 0.04 for the A₁₂ results and 1.11 ± 0.05 for the A₀ results. Because of a flaw in the original analysis program, these correction factors were not applied to the AUC-type asymmetries in Table V as well as in some figures. In addition, a small mistake in the error propagation in the charm correction resulted in slightly underestimated statistical uncertainties. These omissions affect all but the charm asymmetry results. The correct central values are therefore given in Tables IV and V of this Erratum. The systematic uncertainties of the original publication remain unchanged.

  19. Erratum: Measurement of azimuthal asymmetries in inclusive production of hadron pairs in e⁺e⁻ annihilation at √s=10.58 GeV [Phys. Rev. D 78, 032011 (2008)

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Seidl, R.; Grosse Perdekamp, M.; Ogawa, A.; Adachi, I.; Aihara, H.; Bahinipati, S.; Bakich, A. M.; Bartel, W.; Bitenc, U.; Bondar, A.; et al

    2012-08-09

    In the original article, it was found in Monte Carlo simulations that the reconstructed A₀ results are roughly consistent with the generated asymmetries, while the A₁₂ results systematically underestimate the generated asymmetries. This underestimation can be attributed to the difference between the reconstructed thrust axis and the original quark-antiquark axis. The corresponding correction factors are 1.6 ± 0.04 for the A₁₂ results and 1.11 ± 0.05 for the A₀ results. Because of a flaw in the original analysis program, these correction factors were not applied to the AUC-type asymmetries in Table V as well as in some figures. In addition,more » a small mistake in the error propagation in the charm correction resulted in slightly underestimated statistical uncertainties. These omissions affect all but the charm asymmetry results. The correct central values are therefore given in Tables IV and V of this Erratum. The systematic uncertainties of the original publication remain unchanged.« less

  20. The Nuclear Receptor Rev-erbα Controls Circadian Thermogenic Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Gerhart-Hines, Zachary; Everett, Logan J.; Loro, Emanuele; Briggs, Erika R.; Bugge, Anne; Hou, Catherine; Ferrara, Christine; Seale, Patrick; Pryma, Daniel A.; Khurana, Tejvir S.; Lazar, Mitchell A.

    2013-01-01

    Circadian oscillation of body temperature is a basic, evolutionary-conserved feature of mammalian biology1. Additionally, homeostatic pathways allow organisms to protect their core temperatures in response to cold exposure2. However, the mechanism responsible for coordinating daily body temperature rhythm and adaptability to environmental challenges is unknown. Here we show that the nuclear receptor Rev-erbα, a powerful transcriptional repressor, links circadian and thermogenic networks through the regulation of brown adipose tissue (BAT) function. Mice exposed to cold fare dramatically better at 5 AM (Zeitgeber time 22) when Rev-erbα is barely expressed than at 5 PM (ZT10) when Rev-erbα is abundant. Deletion of Rev-erbα markedly improves cold tolerance at 5 PM, indicating that overcoming Rev-erbα-dependent repression is a fundamental feature of the thermogenic response to cold. Physiological induction of uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1) by cold temperatures is preceded by rapid down-regulation of Rev-erbα in BAT. Rev-erbα represses UCP1 in a brown adipose cell-autonomous manner and BAT UCP1 levels are high in Rev-erbα-null mice even at thermoneutrality. Genetic loss of Rev-erbα also abolishes normal rhythms of body temperature and BAT activity. Thus, Rev-erbα acts as a thermogenic focal point required for establishing and maintaining body temperature rhythm in a manner that is adaptable to environmental demands. PMID:24162845

  1. The nuclear receptor Rev-erbα controls circadian thermogenic plasticity.

    PubMed

    Gerhart-Hines, Zachary; Feng, Dan; Emmett, Matthew J; Everett, Logan J; Loro, Emanuele; Briggs, Erika R; Bugge, Anne; Hou, Catherine; Ferrara, Christine; Seale, Patrick; Pryma, Daniel A; Khurana, Tejvir S; Lazar, Mitchell A

    2013-11-21

    Circadian oscillation of body temperature is a basic, evolutionarily conserved feature of mammalian biology. In addition, homeostatic pathways allow organisms to protect their core temperatures in response to cold exposure. However, the mechanism responsible for coordinating daily body temperature rhythm and adaptability to environmental challenges is unknown. Here we show that the nuclear receptor Rev-erbα (also known as Nr1d1), a powerful transcriptional repressor, links circadian and thermogenic networks through the regulation of brown adipose tissue (BAT) function. Mice exposed to cold fare considerably better at 05:00 (Zeitgeber time 22) when Rev-erbα is barely expressed than at 17:00 (Zeitgeber time 10) when Rev-erbα is abundant. Deletion of Rev-erbα markedly improves cold tolerance at 17:00, indicating that overcoming Rev-erbα-dependent repression is a fundamental feature of the thermogenic response to cold. Physiological induction of uncoupling protein 1 (Ucp1) by cold temperatures is preceded by rapid downregulation of Rev-erbα in BAT. Rev-erbα represses Ucp1 in a brown-adipose-cell-autonomous manner and BAT Ucp1 levels are high in Rev-erbα-null mice, even at thermoneutrality. Genetic loss of Rev-erbα also abolishes normal rhythms of body temperature and BAT activity. Thus, Rev-erbα acts as a thermogenic focal point required for establishing and maintaining body temperature rhythm in a manner that is adaptable to environmental demands. PMID:24162845

  2. REV3L modulates cisplatin sensitivity of non-small cell lung cancer H1299 cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenjie; Sheng, Wenjiong; Yu, Chenxiao; Cao, Jianping; Zhou, Jundong; Wu, Jinchang; Zhang, Huojun; Zhang, Shuyu

    2015-09-01

    Lung cancer remains the leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) accounts for approximately 80-85% of all cases of lung cancer. Cisplatin plays a significant role in the management of human lung cancer. Translesion DNA synthesis (TLS) is involved in DNA damage repair. DNA polymerase ζ (Pol ζ) is able to mediate the DNA replication bypass of DNA damage, which is suggested to be involved in chemoresistance. REV3L is the catalytic subunit of Pol ζ. Due to its critical role in translesion DNA synthesis, whether REV3L modulates cisplatin response in NSCLC cells remains unknown. In this study, REV3L overexpression and silencing H1299 cell lines were established. The reports showed that cisplatin induced the expression of REV3L by recruiting Sp1 to its promoter. Similar results were obtained when the ability of the cells to express luciferase from a platinated plasmid was measured. Co-transfection of the reporter with the REV3L overexpression vector or REV3L plus REV7L significantly enhanced the reporter activity. Nuclear condensation and fragmentation of shRNA-REV3L H1299 cells were more pronounced than shRNA-NC H1299 cells after cisplatin exposure, indicating that REV3L overexpression abolished cisplatin-induced DNA damage. Moreover, a forced expression of REV3L conferred the resistance of H1299 cells to cisplatin, whereas the knockdown of REV3L sensitized cisplatin efficacy in H1299 cells. Taken together, we demonstrated that inhibition of REV3L sensitized lung cancer H1299 cells to cisplatin treatment. Thus, REV3L may be a novel target for the chemotherapy of NSCLC. PMID:26165320

  3. Fluctuations below a stationary supercritical bifurcation to electroconvection in a nematic liquid crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Xin-Liang; Ahlers, Guenter

    2003-03-01

    We report measurements of thermally driven fluctuations near the onset of electroconvection in a nematic liquid crystal (NLC). The cell (from E.H.C Co, Ltd Japan) had a nominal spacing of 25 μm and planar alignment. It was filled with the NLC Merck phase IV (N4). The NLC was doped with 0.1% by weight of tetra butylammonium bromide(TBAB) and the conductivity was near 9 × 10-7 (Ω m)-1 at 30^oC. The system was driven by an alternating voltage of frequency 25 Hz and amplitude V. The initial bifurcation to electroconvection was supercritical and yielded oblique stationary rolls. For small but negative ɛ ≡ V^2/V_c^2 - 1 the mean-square amplitude of the fluctuations was proportional to |ɛ|^-γ with γ larger than the value γ_LT = 1/2 given by linear theory (LT). This result differs from the one obtained earlier (M.A. Scherer ,G. Ahlers, F. Hörner, and I. Rehberg, Phys. Rev. Lett. 85), 3754 (2000); M.A. Scherer and G. Ahlers, Phys. Rev. E 65, 051101 (2002) for the NLC 5CB, which undergoes a supercritical Hopf bifurcation to oblique rolls and which yields γ ˜= 0.25 < γ_LT . We conclude that the two systems belong to different universality classes.

  4. Surgery for malposition of the great arteries: the REV procedure.

    PubMed

    Di Carlo, Duccio; Lecompte, Yves; Tomasco, Biagio; Cohen, Laurence; Vouhé, Pascal

    2009-01-01

    The REV procedure was introduced in 1980 to treat transposition of the great arteries with ventricular septal defect (VSD) and pulmonary stenosis and malpositions similar to transposition of the great arteries (TGA). It aims at overcoming the drawbacks and limitations of the classic Rastelli operation, such as subaortic stenosis, late ventricular deterioration, arrhythmias and sudden death. In particular, the resection of the infundibular septum allows for the placement of a straighter, smaller ventricular patch, bulging much less in the right ventricular cavity. The extensive mobilization of the main pulmonary branches permits a direct connection with the right ventricular incision, thus avoiding the need for an extracardiac conduit. The procedure was performed in 205 patients as of December 2003 with 12% hospital mortality. Patients for whom the Rastelli operation would have been contraindicated, were accepted for REV repair. Late results show a clear improvement over those reported with the Rastelli operation in terms of overall survival (85% at 25-year follow-up interval) and prevalence of reoperation for right ventricular obstruction. Obstruction of the left ventricle-to-aorta tunnel is exceedingly rare. This operation should be considered the gold standard when new surgical options are considered for this complex form of transpositions/malpositions of the great arteries. PMID:24412824

  5. Comments on ''theory of dissipative density-gradient-driven turbulence in the tokamak edge'' (Phys. Fluids 28, 1419 (1985))

    SciTech Connect

    Krommes, J.A.

    1985-11-01

    The author critiques the model of tokamak edge turbulence by P.W. Terry and P.H. Diamond (Phys. Fluids 28, 1419, 1985). The critique includes a discussion of the physical basis, consistency and quantitative accuracy of the Terry-Diamond model. 19 refs. (WRF)

  6. Erratum: “Hamiltonian magnetohydrodynamics: Lagrangian, Eulerian, and dynamically accessible stability—Theory” [Phys. Plasmas 20, 092104 (2013)

    SciTech Connect

    Andreussi, T.; Morrison, P. J.; Pegoraro, F.

    2015-03-15

    An algebraic mistake in the rendering of the Energy Casimir stability condition for a symmetric magnetohydrodynamics plasma configuration with flows made in the article Andreussi et al. “Hamiltonian magnetohydrodynamics: Lagrangian, Eulerian, and dynamically accessible stability—Theory,” Phys. Plasmas 20, 092104 (2013) is corrected.

  7. Comment on ``A proposal for in vitro/GFR molecular erythema action spectrum'' [J. Appl. Phys. 104, 034701 (2008)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Björn, Lars Olof; de Gruijl, Frank R.; Diffey, Brian; Norval, Mary

    2009-06-01

    The recent article by de Souza, Lorenzini and Rizzatti [J. A. V. de Souza, F. Lorenzini, and M. R. Rizatti, J. Appl. Phys. 104, 034701 (2008)] in this journal needs corrections and clarifications on several points. The model used by them is not suitable for the study of erythema.

  8. Comment on "A new approach to optimum design in thermoelectric cooling systems" [J. Appl. Phys. 80, 5494 (1996)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jincan; Schouten, Jan A.

    1997-12-01

    It is pointed out that there are some errors existing in a recent investigation in this journal [M. Yamanishi, J. Appl. Phys. 80, 5494 (1996)]. The correct results are given so that one can better understand the performance of real thermoelectric cooler systems.

  9. Comment on "Replica-exchange-with-tunneling for fast exploration of protein landscapes" [J. Chem. Phys. 143, 224102 (2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakuraba, Shun

    2016-08-01

    In "Replica-exchange-with-tunneling for fast exploration of protein landscapes" [F. Yaşar et al., J. Chem. Phys. 143, 224102 (2015)], a novel sampling algorithm called "Replica Exchange with Tunneling" was proposed. However, due to its violation of the detailed balance, the algorithm fails to sample from the correct canonical ensemble.

  10. Response to 'Comment on 'Nonlinear properties of small amplitude dust ion acoustic solitary waves'' [Phys. Plasmas 15, 104703 (2008)

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, M. R.; Sarkar, S.; Khan, Manoranjan; Ghosh, Samiran

    2008-10-15

    The objections are not justified. It should have been noted that ion charge number z{sub i}=1 throughout the referred paper [Ghosh et al., Phys. Plasmas 7, 3594 (2000)]. There is no inconsistency in the formulation of the referred paper as explained in the text.

  11. Dosimetric characterization of model Cs-1 Rev2 cesium-131 brachytherapy source in water phantoms and human tissues with MCNP5 Monte Carlo simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Jianhua; Zhang Hualin

    2008-04-15

    A recently developed alternative brachytherapy seed, Cs-1 Rev2 cesium-131, has begun to be used in clinical practice. The dosimetric characteristics of this source in various media, particularly in human tissues, have not been fully evaluated. The aim of this study was to calculate the dosimetric parameters for the Cs-1 Rev2 cesium-131 seed following the recommendations of the AAPM TG-43U1 report [Rivard et al., Med. Phys. 31, 633-674 (2004)] for new sources in brachytherapy applications. Dose rate constants, radial dose functions, and anisotropy functions of the source in water, Virtual Water, and relevant human soft tissues were calculated using MCNP5 Monte Carlo simulations following the TG-43U1 formalism. The results yielded dose rate constants of 1.048, 1.024, 1.041, and 1.044 cGy h{sup -1} U{sup -1} in water, Virtual Water, muscle, and prostate tissue, respectively. The conversion factor for this new source between water and Virtual Water was 1.02, between muscle and water was 1.006, and between prostate and water was 1.004. The authors' calculation of anisotropy functions in a Virtual Water phantom agreed closely with Murphy's measurements [Murphy et al., Med. Phys. 31, 1529-1538 (2004)]. Our calculations of the radial dose function in water and Virtual Water have good agreement with those in previous experimental and Monte Carlo studies. The TG-43U1 parameters for clinical applications in water, muscle, and prostate tissue are presented in this work.

  12. Novel Function of Rev-erbα in Promoting Brown Adipogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Deokhwa; Chatterjee, Somik; Yin, Hongshan; Liu, Ruya; Lee, Jeongkyung; Yechoor, Vijay K.; Ma, Ke

    2015-01-01

    Brown adipose tissue is a major thermogenic organ that plays a key role in maintenance of body temperature and whole-body energy homeostasis. Rev-erbα, a ligand-dependent nuclear receptor and transcription repressor of the molecular clock, has been implicated in the regulation of adipogenesis. However, whether Rev-erbα participates in brown fat formation is not known. Here we show that Rev-erbα is a key regulator of brown adipose tissue development by promoting brown adipogenesis. Genetic ablation of Rev-erbα in mice severely impairs embryonic and neonatal brown fat formation accompanied by loss of brown identity. This defect is due to a cell-autonomous function of Rev-erbα in brown adipocyte lineage commitment and terminal differentiation, as demonstrated by genetic loss- and gain-of-function studies in mesenchymal precursors and brown preadipocytes. Moreover, pharmacological activation of Rev-erbα activity promotes, whereas its inhibition suppresses brown adipocyte differentiation. Mechanistic investigations reveal that Rev-erbα represses key components of the TGF-β cascade, an inhibitory pathway of brown fat development. Collectively, our findings delineate a novel role of Rev-erbα in driving brown adipocyte development, and provide experimental evidence that pharmacological interventions of Rev-erbα may offer new avenues for the treatment of obesity and related metabolic disorders. PMID:26058812

  13. Identification of the first small-molecule inhibitor of the REV7 DNA repair protein interaction.

    PubMed

    Actis, Marcelo L; Ambaye, Nigus D; Evison, Benjamin J; Shao, Youming; Vanarotti, Murugendra; Inoue, Akira; McDonald, Ezelle T; Kikuchi, Sotaro; Heath, Richard; Hara, Kodai; Hashimoto, Hiroshi; Fujii, Naoaki

    2016-09-15

    DNA interstrand crosslink (ICL) repair (ICLR) has been implicated in the resistance of cancer cells to ICL-inducing chemotherapeutic agents. Despite the clinical significance of ICL-inducing chemotherapy, few studies have focused on developing small-molecule inhibitors for ICLR. The mammalian DNA polymerase ζ, which comprises the catalytic subunit REV3L and the non-catalytic subunit REV7, is essential for ICLR. To identify small-molecule compounds that are mechanistically capable of inhibiting ICLR by targeting REV7, high-throughput screening and structure-activity relationship (SAR) analysis were performed. Compound 1 was identified as an inhibitor of the interaction of REV7 with the REV7-binding sequence of REV3L. Compound 7 (an optimized analog of compound 1) bound directly to REV7 in nuclear magnetic resonance analyses, and inhibited the reactivation of a reporter plasmid containing an ICL in between the promoter and reporter regions. The normalized clonogenic survival of HeLa cells treated with cisplatin and compound 7 was lower than that for cells treated with cisplatin only. These findings indicate that a small-molecule inhibitor of the REV7/REV3L interaction can chemosensitize cells by inhibiting ICLR. PMID:27448776

  14. Comment on ``Equation of state of aluminum nitride and its shock response'' [J. Appl. Phys. 76, 4077 (1994)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenberg, Z.; Brar, N. S.

    1995-11-01

    A recent article by Dandekar, Abbate, and Frankel [J. Appl. Phys. 76, 4077 (1994)] reviews existing data on high-pressure properties of aluminum nitride (AlN) in an effort to build an equation of state for this material. A rather large portion of that article is devoted to the shear strength of AlN and, in particular, to our data of 1991 with longitudinal and lateral stress gauges [Z. Rosenberg, N. S. Brar, and S. J. Bless, J. Appl. Phys. 70, 167 (1991)]. Since our highest data point has an error of 1 GPa, much of the discussion and conclusions of Dandekar and co-workers are not relevant once this error in data reduction is corrected. We also discuss the relevance of our shear strength data for various issues, such as the phase transformation of AlN at 20 GPa and the general shape of Hugoniot curves for brittle solids.

  15. Comment on “Maxwell's equations and electromagnetic Lagrangian density in fractional form” [J. Math. Phys. 53, 033505 (2012)

    SciTech Connect

    Rabei, Eqab M.; Al-Jamel, A.; Widyan, H.; Baleanu, D.

    2014-03-15

    In a recent paper, Jaradat et al. [J. Math. Phys. 53, 033505 (2012)] have presented the fractional form of the electromagnetic Lagrangian density within the Riemann-Liouville fractional derivative. They claimed that the Agrawal procedure [O. P. Agrawal, J. Math. Anal. Appl. 272, 368 (2002)] is used to obtain Maxwell's equations in the fractional form, and the Hamilton's equations of motion together with the conserved quantities obtained from fractional Noether's theorem are reported. In this comment, we draw the attention that there are some serious steps of the procedure used in their work are not applicable even though their final results are correct. Their work should have been done based on a formulation as reported by Baleanu and Muslih [Phys. Scr. 72, 119 (2005)].

  16. Comment on ``Model of saturated lithium ammonia as a single-component liquid metal'' [J. Chem. Phys. 124, 074702 (2006)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuev, Gennady N.; Quémerais, Pascal

    2008-01-01

    We demonstrate in this Comment that the theory of simple metals applied to the saturated Li -NH3 solution in the titled paper [U. Pinsook and S. Hannongbua, J. Chem. Phys.124, 074702 (2006)] should account for the peculiarities of the solution, namely, the high solvent polarizability and different energy scales for ion-ion and electron-electron interactions. Calculations not taking into account these peculiarities contradict the experimental phase diagram of the Li -NH3 solution.

  17. Comments on ``Gazeau-Klauder coherent states for trigonometric Rosen-Morse potential'' [J. Math. Phys. 49, 022104 (2008)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fakhri, H.; Dehghani, A.

    2008-05-01

    In a recently published paper in this journal [A. Cheaghlou and O. Faizy, J. Math. Phys. 49, 022104 (2008)], the authors introduce the Gazeau-Klauder coherent states for the trigonometric Rosen-Morse potential as an infinite superposition of the wavefunctions. It is shown that their proposed measure to realize the resolution of the identity condition is not positive definite. Consequently, the claimed coherencies for the trigonometric Rosen-Morse wavefunctions cannot actually exist.

  18. Corrigendum to “Robust limits on Lorentz violation from gamma-ray bursts” [Astropart. Phys. 25 (2006) 402

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, John; Mavromatos, N. E.; Nanopoulos, D. V.; Sakharov, A. S.; Sarkisyan, E. K. G.

    2008-03-01

    We correct the fitting formula used [J.R. Ellis, N.E. Mavromatos, D.V. Nanopoulos, A.S. Sakharov, E.K.G. Sarkisyan, Astropart. Phys. 25 (2006) 402. Available from: arxiv:] to obtain a robust limit on a violation of Lorentz invariance that depends linearly on the photon energy. The correction leads to a slight increase of the limit on the scale of the violation, to M > 1.4 ×1016GeV .

  19. Comment on "Non-thermal mechanism of weak microwave fields influence on neurons" [J. Appl. Phys. 114, 104701 (2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pekker, M.; Shneider, M. N.

    2016-02-01

    This comment is directly related to previously published work [M. N. Shneider and M. Pekker, J. Appl. Phys. 114, 104701 (2013)], in which we outlined the effect of a non-thermal mechanism of microwave radiation on the activity of neural tissue. In this note, we provide more realistic estimates of the longitudinal sound velocity in the lipid membranes and the corresponding estimates of the microwave resonance frequencies.

  20. Pharmacological and Genetic Modulation of REV-ERB Activity and Expression Affects Orexigenic Gene Expression.

    PubMed

    Amador, Ariadna; Wang, Yongjun; Banerjee, Subhashis; Kameneka, Theodore M; Solt, Laura A; Burris, Thomas P

    2016-01-01

    The nuclear receptors REV-ERBα and REV-ERBβ are transcription factors that play pivotal roles in the regulation of the circadian rhythm and various metabolic processes. The circadian rhythm is an endogenous mechanism, which generates entrainable biological changes that follow a 24-hour period. It regulates a number of physiological processes, including sleep/wakeful cycles and feeding behaviors. We recently demonstrated that REV-ERB-specific small molecules affect sleep and anxiety. The orexinergic system also plays a significant role in mammalian physiology and behavior, including the regulation of sleep and food intake. Importantly, orexin genes are expressed in a circadian manner. Given these overlaps in function and circadian expression, we wanted to determine whether the REV-ERBs might regulate orexin. We found that acute in vivo modulation of REV-ERB activity, with the REV-ERB-specific synthetic ligand SR9009, affects the circadian expression of orexinergic genes in mice. Long term dosing with SR9009 also suppresses orexinergic gene expression in mice. Finally, REV-ERBβ-deficient mice present with increased orexinergic transcripts. These data suggest that the REV-ERBs may be involved in the repression of orexinergic gene expression. PMID:26963516

  1. Protective efficacy of a recombinant BAC clone of Marek's disease virus containing REV-LTR

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Insertion of reticuloendotheliosis virus (REV) long-terminal repeat (LTR) into a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clone of a very virulent strain of Marek’s disease (MD) virus (MDV), Md5 (Kim et al, 2011) rendered the resultant recombinant virus termed rMd5 REV-LTR BAC fully attenuated at passa...

  2. Rev-erb-α modulates skeletal muscle oxidative capacity by regulating mitochondrial biogenesis and autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Woldt, Estelle; Sebti, Yasmine; Solt, Laura A.; Duhem, Christian; Lancel, Steve; Eeckhoute, Jérôme; Hesselink, Matthijs K.C.; Paquet, Charlotte; Delhaye, Stéphane; Shin, Youseung; Kamenecka, Theodore M.; Schaart, Gert; Lefebvre, Philippe; Nevière, Rémi; Burris, Thomas P.; Schrauwen, Patrick; Staels, Bart; Duez, Hélène

    2013-01-01

    The nuclear receptor Rev-erb-α modulates hepatic lipid and glucose metabolism, adipogenesis and the inflammatory response in macrophages. We show here that Rev-erb-α is highly expressed in oxidative skeletal muscle and plays a role in mitochondrial biogenesis and oxidative function, in gain- and loss-of function studies. Rev-erb-α-deficiency in skeletal muscle leads to reduced mitochondrial content and oxidative function, resulting in compromised exercise capacity. This phenotype was recapitulated in isolated fibers and in muscle cells upon Rev-erbα knock-down, while Rev-erb-α over-expression increased the number of mitochondria with improved respiratory capacity. Rev-erb-α-deficiency resulted in deactivation of the Stk11–Ampk–Sirt1–Ppargc1-α signaling pathway, whereas autophagy was up-regulated, resulting in both impaired mitochondrial biogenesis and increased clearance. Muscle over-expression or pharmacological activation of Rev-erb-α increased respiration and exercise capacity. This study identifies Rev-erb-α as a pharmacological target which improves muscle oxidative function by modulating gene networks controlling mitochondrial number and function. PMID:23852339

  3. Pharmacological and Genetic Modulation of REV-ERB Activity and Expression Affects Orexigenic Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Amador, Ariadna; Wang, Yongjun; Banerjee, Subhashis; Kameneka, Theodore M.; Solt, Laura A.; Burris, Thomas P.

    2016-01-01

    The nuclear receptors REV-ERBα and REV-ERBβ are transcription factors that play pivotal roles in the regulation of the circadian rhythm and various metabolic processes. The circadian rhythm is an endogenous mechanism, which generates entrainable biological changes that follow a 24-hour period. It regulates a number of physiological processes, including sleep/wakeful cycles and feeding behaviors. We recently demonstrated that REV-ERB-specific small molecules affect sleep and anxiety. The orexinergic system also plays a significant role in mammalian physiology and behavior, including the regulation of sleep and food intake. Importantly, orexin genes are expressed in a circadian manner. Given these overlaps in function and circadian expression, we wanted to determine whether the REV-ERBs might regulate orexin. We found that acute in vivo modulation of REV-ERB activity, with the REV-ERB-specific synthetic ligand SR9009, affects the circadian expression of orexinergic genes in mice. Long term dosing with SR9009 also suppresses orexinergic gene expression in mice. Finally, REV-ERBβ-deficient mice present with increased orexinergic transcripts. These data suggest that the REV-ERBs may be involved in the repression of orexinergic gene expression. PMID:26963516

  4. Prenylcoumarin with Rev-export inhibitory activity from Cnidii Monnieris Fructus.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Satoru; Fujitani, Toshiaki; Kaneko, Masafumi; Murakami, Nobutoshi

    2010-06-15

    By use of the fission yeast expressing the model fusion protein comprised of GST, SV40 T antigen NLS, GFP, and Rev-NES in the bioassay, the prenylcoumarin osthol (1) was disclosed as the new Rev-export inhibitor from the MeOH extract of Cnidii Monnieris Fructus. Furthermore, 1 was also found to inhibit export the genuine Rev in HeLa cells by indirect fluorescent antibody technique. By the competitive experiment using the biotinylated probe 3, osthol (1) was revealed to inhibit nuclear export of Rev through a NES non-antagonistic mode. Structure-activity relationship analysis of several analogs of 1 clarified that both prenyl side chain and double bond adjacent to the lactone carbonyl residue play an important role in the Rev-export inhibitory potency of 1. PMID:20493693

  5. HIV-1 pre-mRNA commitment to Rev mediated export through PSF and Matrin 3

    SciTech Connect

    Kula, Anna; Gharu, Lavina; Marcello, Alessandro

    2013-01-20

    Human immunodeficiency virus gene expression and replication are regulated at several levels. Incompletely spliced viral RNAs and full-length genomic RNA contain the RRE element and are bound by the viral trans-acting protein Rev to be transported out of the nucleus. Previously we found that the nuclear matrix protein MATR3 was a cofactor of Rev-mediated RNA export. Here we show that the pleiotropic protein PSF binds viral RNA and is associated with MATR3. PSF is involved in the maintenance of a pool of RNA available for Rev activity. However, while Rev and PSF bind the viral pre-mRNA at the site of viral transcription, MATR3 interacts at a subsequent step. We propose that PSF and MATR3 define a novel pathway for RRE-containing HIV-1 RNAs that is hijacked by the viral Rev protein.

  6. RevBayes: Bayesian Phylogenetic Inference Using Graphical Models and an Interactive Model-Specification Language

    PubMed Central

    Höhna, Sebastian; Landis, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Programs for Bayesian inference of phylogeny currently implement a unique and fixed suite of models. Consequently, users of these software packages are simultaneously forced to use a number of programs for a given study, while also lacking the freedom to explore models that have not been implemented by the developers of those programs. We developed a new open-source software package, RevBayes, to address these problems. RevBayes is entirely based on probabilistic graphical models, a powerful generic framework for specifying and analyzing statistical models. Phylogenetic-graphical models can be specified interactively in RevBayes, piece by piece, using a new succinct and intuitive language called Rev. Rev is similar to the R language and the BUGS model-specification language, and should be easy to learn for most users. The strength of RevBayes is the simplicity with which one can design, specify, and implement new and complex models. Fortunately, this tremendous flexibility does not come at the cost of slower computation; as we demonstrate, RevBayes outperforms competing software for several standard analyses. Compared with other programs, RevBayes has fewer black-box elements. Users need to explicitly specify each part of the model and analysis. Although this explicitness may initially be unfamiliar, we are convinced that this transparency will improve understanding of phylogenetic models in our field. Moreover, it will motivate the search for improvements to existing methods by brazenly exposing the model choices that we make to critical scrutiny. RevBayes is freely available at http://www.RevBayes.com. [Bayesian inference; Graphical models; MCMC; statistical phylogenetics.] PMID:27235697

  7. RevBayes: Bayesian Phylogenetic Inference Using Graphical Models and an Interactive Model-Specification Language.

    PubMed

    Höhna, Sebastian; Landis, Michael J; Heath, Tracy A; Boussau, Bastien; Lartillot, Nicolas; Moore, Brian R; Huelsenbeck, John P; Ronquist, Fredrik

    2016-07-01

    Programs for Bayesian inference of phylogeny currently implement a unique and fixed suite of models. Consequently, users of these software packages are simultaneously forced to use a number of programs for a given study, while also lacking the freedom to explore models that have not been implemented by the developers of those programs. We developed a new open-source software package, RevBayes, to address these problems. RevBayes is entirely based on probabilistic graphical models, a powerful generic framework for specifying and analyzing statistical models. Phylogenetic-graphical models can be specified interactively in RevBayes, piece by piece, using a new succinct and intuitive language called Rev. Rev is similar to the R language and the BUGS model-specification language, and should be easy to learn for most users. The strength of RevBayes is the simplicity with which one can design, specify, and implement new and complex models. Fortunately, this tremendous flexibility does not come at the cost of slower computation; as we demonstrate, RevBayes outperforms competing software for several standard analyses. Compared with other programs, RevBayes has fewer black-box elements. Users need to explicitly specify each part of the model and analysis. Although this explicitness may initially be unfamiliar, we are convinced that this transparency will improve understanding of phylogenetic models in our field. Moreover, it will motivate the search for improvements to existing methods by brazenly exposing the model choices that we make to critical scrutiny. RevBayes is freely available at http://www.RevBayes.com [Bayesian inference; Graphical models; MCMC; statistical phylogenetics.]. PMID:27235697

  8. Structure of REV-ERBβ Ligand-binding Domain Bound to a Porphyrin Antagonist*

    PubMed Central

    Matta-Camacho, Edna; Banerjee, Subhashis; Hughes, Travis S.; Solt, Laura A.; Wang, Yongjun; Burris, Thomas P.; Kojetin, Douglas J.

    2014-01-01

    REV-ERBα and REV-ERBβ are members of the nuclear receptor (NR) superfamily of ligand-regulated transcription factors that play important roles in the regulation of circadian physiology, metabolism, and immune function. Although the REV-ERBs were originally characterized as orphan receptors, recent studies have demonstrated that they function as receptors for heme. Here, we demonstrate that cobalt protoporphyrin IX (CoPP) and zinc protoporphyrin IX (ZnPP) are ligands that bind directly to the REV-ERBs. However, instead of mimicking the agonist action of heme, CoPP and ZnPP function as antagonists of REV-ERB function. This was unexpected because the only distinction between these ligands is the metal ion that is coordinated. To understand the structural basis by which REV-ERBβ can differentiate between a porphyrin agonist and antagonist, we characterized the interaction between REV-ERBβ with heme, CoPP, and ZnPP using biochemical and structural approaches, including x-ray crystallography and NMR. The crystal structure of CoPP-bound REV-ERBβ indicates only minor conformational changes induced by CoPP compared with heme, including the porphyrin ring of CoPP, which adopts a planar conformation as opposed to the puckered conformation observed in the heme-bound REV-ERBβ crystal structure. Thus, subtle changes in the porphyrin metal center and ring conformation may influence the agonist versus antagonist action of porphyrins and when considered with other studies suggest that gas binding to the iron metal center heme may drive alterations in REV-ERB activity. PMID:24872411

  9. The orphan receptor Rev-erbα gene is a target of the circadian clock pacemaker

    PubMed Central

    Triqueneaux, Gérard; Thenot, Sandrine; Kakizawa, Tomoko; Antoch, Marina P; Safi, Rachid; Takahashi, Joseph S; Delaunay, Franck; Laudet, Vincent

    2013-01-01

    Rev-erbα is a ubiquitously expressed orphan nuclear receptor which functions as a constitutive transcriptional repressor and is expressed in vertebrates according to a robust circadian rhythm. We report here that two Rev-erbα mRNA isoforms, namely Rev-erbα1 and Rev-erbα2, are generated through alternative promoter usage and that both show a circadian expression pattern in an in vitro system using serum-shocked fibroblasts. Both promoter regions P1 (Rev-erbα1) and P2 (Rev-erbα2) contain several E-box DNA sequences, which function as response elements for the core circadian-clock components: CLOCK and BMAL1. The CLOCK–BMAL1 heterodimer stimulates the activity of both P1 and P2 promoters in transient transfection assay by 3–6-fold. This activation was inhibited by the overexpression of CRY1, a component of the negative limb of the circadian transcriptional loop. Critical E-box elements were mapped within both promoters. This regulation is conserved in vertebrates since we found that the CLOCK–BMAL1 heterodimer also regulates the zebrafish Rev-erbα gene. In line with these data Rev-erbα circadian expression was strongly impaired in the livers of Clock mutant mice and in the pineal glands of zebrafish embryos treated with Clock and Bmal1 antisense oligonucleotides. Together these data demonstrate that CLOCK is a critical regulator of Rev-erbα circadian gene expression in evolutionarily distant vertebrates and suggest a role for Rev-erbα in the circadian clock output. PMID:15591021

  10. Rev-erb beta regulates the Srebp-1c promoter and mRNA expression in skeletal muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ramakrishnan, Sathiya N.; Lau, Patrick; Crowther, Lisa M.; Cleasby, Mark E.; Millard, Susan; Leong, Gary M.; Cooney, Gregory J.; Muscat, George E.O.

    2009-10-30

    The nuclear hormone receptor, Rev-erb beta operates as a transcriptional silencer. We previously demonstrated that exogenous expression of Rev-erb{beta}{Delta}E in skeletal muscle cells increased Srebp-1c mRNA expression. We validated these in vitro observations by injection of an expression vector driving Rev-erb{beta}{Delta}E expression into mouse tibialis muscle that resulted in increased Srebp-1c mRNA expression. Paradoxically, Rev-erb{beta} siRNA expression in skeletal muscle cells repressed Srebp-1c expression, and indicated that Rev-erb{beta} expression was necessary for Srebp-1c expression. ChIP analysis demonstrated that Rev-erb{beta} was recruited to the Srebp-1c promoter. Moreover, Rev-erb{beta} trans-activated the Srebp-1c promoter, in contrast, Rev-erb{beta} efficiently repressed the Rev-erb{alpha} promoter, a previously characterized target gene. Finally, treatment with the Rev-erb agonist (hemin) (i) increased the trans-activation of the Srebp-1c promoter by Rev-erb{beta}; and (ii) increased Rev-erb{beta} and Srebp-1c mRNA expression. These data suggest that Rev-erb{beta} has the potential to activate gene expression, and is a positive regulator of Srebp-1c, a regulator of lipogenesis.

  11. Tamavidin 2-REV: an engineered tamavidin with reversible biotin-binding capability.

    PubMed

    Takakura, Yoshimitsu; Sofuku, Kozue; Tsunashima, Masako

    2013-03-10

    A biotin-binding protein with reversible biotin-binding capability is of great technical value in the affinity purification of biotinylated biomolecules. Although several proteins, chemically or genetically modified from avidin or streptavidin, with reversible biotin-binding have been reported, they have been problematic in one way or another. Tamavidin 2 is a fungal protein similar to avidin and streptavidin in biotin-binding. Here, a mutein, tamavidin 2-REV, was engineered from tamavidin 2 by replacing the serine at position 36 (S36) with alanine. S36 is thought to form a hydrogen bond with biotin in tamavidin 2/biotin complexes and two hydrogen bonds with V38 within the protein. Tamavidin 2-REV bound to biotin-agarose and was eluted with excess free biotin at a neutral pH. In addition, the model substrate biotinylated bovine serum albumin was efficiently purified from a crude extract from Escherichia coli by means of single-step affinity chromatography with tamavidin 2-REV-immobilized resin. Tamavidin 2-REV thus demonstrated reversible biotin-binding capability. The Kd value of tamavidin 2-REV to biotin was 2.8-4.4×10(-7)M.Tamavidin 2-REV retained other convenient characteristics of tamavidin 2, such as high-level expression in E. coli, resistance to proteases, and a neutral isoelectric point, demonstrating that tamavidin 2-REV is a powerful tool for the purification of biotinylated biomolecules. PMID:23333918

  12. Lack of Rev7 function results in development of tubulostromal adenomas in mouse ovary.

    PubMed

    Abbasi, Abdolrahim; Khalaj, Maryam; Akiyama, Kouyou; Mukai, Yoshiyuki; Matsumoto, Hirokazu; Acosta, Tomas J; Said, Neveen; Yoshida, Midori; Kunieda, Tetsuo

    2015-09-01

    Rev7 is a subunit of Polζ, one of the translesion DNA synthesis (TLS) polymerases involved in DNA damage repair. We recently found that Rev7 is also essential for germ cell development in mouse. In the present study, we found the development of ovarian tumors in Rev7 mutant mouse, suggesting the involvement of TLS deficiency in the etiology of ovarian tumor. The Rev7 mutant mice showed complete lack of oocytes and follicles in the ovary. The lack of follicles causes a significant increase of gonadotropin level and an increase in the proliferation of ovarian cells. As a result, the weight of the ovaries of Rev7 mutant mice increased with age and they developed tubulostromal adenomas. However, the remarkable overgrowth of ovaries occurred after gonadotropin level decreases at older ages, suggesting gonadotropin-independent progression of the ovarian tumors. In addition, the Rev7 mutant fibroblasts and ovarian cells showed significant accumulation of DNA damage. These findings suggest that not only increased gonadotropin levels but also lack of DNA damage repair function could be responsible for the development of ovarian tumors in the Rev7 mutant mouse. PMID:26004212

  13. 75 FR 10524 - NUREG-0654/FEMA-REP-1, Rev. 1, Supplement 3, Guidance for Protective Action Recommendations for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-08

    ... COMMISSION NUREG-0654/FEMA-REP-1, Rev. 1, Supplement 3, Guidance for Protective Action Recommendations for... document entitled: ``NUREG-0654/FEMA-REP-1, Rev. 1, Supplement 3, Guidance for Protective Action...-4737, or by e-mail to pdr.resource@nrc.gov . NUREG-0654/FEMA-REP-1, Rev. 1, Supplement 3,...

  14. FANCD2 and REV1 cooperate in the protection of nascent DNA strands in response to replication stress

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yeran; Liu, Zhenbo; Wang, Fengli; Temviriyanukul, Piya; Ma, Xiaolu; Tu, Yingfeng; Lv, Lingna; Lin, Yu-Fen; Huang, Min; Zhang, Ting; Pei, Huadong; Chen, Benjamin P.C.; Jansen, Jacob G.; de Wind, Niels; Fischhaber, Paula L.; Friedberg, Errol C.; Tang, Tie-Shan; Guo, Caixia

    2015-01-01

    REV1 is a eukaryotic member of the Y-family of DNA polymerases involved in translesion DNA synthesis and genome mutagenesis. Recently, REV1 is also found to function in homologous recombination. However, it remains unclear how REV1 is recruited to the sites where homologous recombination is processed. Here, we report that loss of mammalian REV1 results in a specific defect in replication-associated gene conversion. We found that REV1 is targeted to laser-induced DNA damage stripes in a manner dependent on its ubiquitin-binding motifs, on RAD18, and on monoubiquitinated FANCD2 (FANCD2-mUb) that associates with REV1. Expression of a FANCD2-Ub chimeric protein in RAD18-depleted cells enhances REV1 assembly at laser-damaged sites, suggesting that FANCD2-mUb functions downstream of RAD18 to recruit REV1 to DNA breaks. Consistent with this suggestion we found that REV1 and FANCD2 are epistatic with respect to sensitivity to the double-strand break-inducer camptothecin. REV1 enrichment at DNA damage stripes also partially depends on BRCA1 and BRCA2, components of the FANCD2/BRCA supercomplex. Intriguingly, analogous to FANCD2-mUb and BRCA1/BRCA2, REV1 plays an unexpected role in protecting nascent replication tracts from degradation by stabilizing RAD51 filaments. Collectively these data suggest that REV1 plays multiple roles at stalled replication forks in response to replication stress. PMID:26187992

  15. FANCD2 and REV1 cooperate in the protection of nascent DNA strands in response to replication stress.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yeran; Liu, Zhenbo; Wang, Fengli; Temviriyanukul, Piya; Ma, Xiaolu; Tu, Yingfeng; Lv, Lingna; Lin, Yu-Fen; Huang, Min; Zhang, Ting; Pei, Huadong; Chen, Benjamin P C; Jansen, Jacob G; de Wind, Niels; Fischhaber, Paula L; Friedberg, Errol C; Tang, Tie-Shan; Guo, Caixia

    2015-09-30

    REV1 is a eukaryotic member of the Y-family of DNA polymerases involved in translesion DNA synthesis and genome mutagenesis. Recently, REV1 is also found to function in homologous recombination. However, it remains unclear how REV1 is recruited to the sites where homologous recombination is processed. Here, we report that loss of mammalian REV1 results in a specific defect in replication-associated gene conversion. We found that REV1 is targeted to laser-induced DNA damage stripes in a manner dependent on its ubiquitin-binding motifs, on RAD18, and on monoubiquitinated FANCD2 (FANCD2-mUb) that associates with REV1. Expression of a FANCD2-Ub chimeric protein in RAD18-depleted cells enhances REV1 assembly at laser-damaged sites, suggesting that FANCD2-mUb functions downstream of RAD18 to recruit REV1 to DNA breaks. Consistent with this suggestion we found that REV1 and FANCD2 are epistatic with respect to sensitivity to the double-strand break-inducer camptothecin. REV1 enrichment at DNA damage stripes also partially depends on BRCA1 and BRCA2, components of the FANCD2/BRCA supercomplex. Intriguingly, analogous to FANCD2-mUb and BRCA1/BRCA2, REV1 plays an unexpected role in protecting nascent replication tracts from degradation by stabilizing RAD51 filaments. Collectively these data suggest that REV1 plays multiple roles at stalled replication forks in response to replication stress. PMID:26187992

  16. Comment on ``Free energy simulations of single and double ion occupancy in gramicidin A'' [J. Chem. Phys. 126, 105103 (2007)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roux, Benoît; Andersen, Olaf S.; Allen, Toby W.

    2008-06-01

    In a recent article published by Bastug and Kuyucak [J. Chem. Phys.126, 105103 (2007)] investigated the microscopic factors affecting double ion occupancy in the gramicidin channel. The analysis relied largely on the one-dimensional potential of mean force of ions along the axis of the channel (the so-called free energy profile of the ion along the channel axis), as well as on the calculation of the equilibrium association constant of the ions in the channel binding sites. It is the purpose of this communication to clarify this issue.

  17. Comment on ``Experimental observation of carbon dioxide reduction in exhaust gas from hydrocarbon fuel burning'' [Phys. Plasmas 16, 114502 (2009)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byun, Youngchul; Shin, Dong Nam

    2010-01-01

    The following comments are intended to clarify whether it is possible to convert CO2 into C+O2 by supplying just one-twentieth of energy required thermodynamically, only under the condition that the negative high voltage of dc is applied to the gas stream perpendicularly, in a recent article by Uhm and Kim [H. S. Uhm and C. H. Kim, Phys. Plasmas 16, 114502 (2009)]. Of particular concern is the disobedience of the first and second laws of thermodynamics together with the indistinct measurement of experimental data.

  18. Comment on "Surface electromagnetic wave equations in a warm magnetized quantum plasma" [Phys. Plasmas 21, 072114 (2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moradi, Afshin

    2016-07-01

    In a recent article [C. Li et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 072114 (2014)], Li et al. studied the propagation of surface waves on a magnetized quantum plasma half-space in the Voigt configuration (in this case, the magnetic field is parallel to the surface but is perpendicular to the direction of propagation). Here, we present a fresh look at the problem and obtain a new form of dispersion relation of surface waves of the system. We find that our new dispersion relation does not agree with the result obtained by Li et al.

  19. Comment on 'Dynamics of an electron driven by relativistically intense laser radiation' [Phys. Plasmas 15, 023104 (2008)

    SciTech Connect

    Tian Youwei; Bao Gang; Zheng Ying; Yang Jianping; Yu Wei; Wang Xin

    2010-06-15

    Galkin et al. [Phys. Plasmas 15, 023104 (2008)] presented the comparison of the electron dynamics in the cases of the linear and circular polarizations of the optical fields. They assume that the longitudinal component of the laser field can be neglected in the case of longitudinal displacement less than the Rayleigh range. In this comment, we point out that the longitudinal component must be considered for the minimum spot size less than 10 times wavelength for linearly polarized laser pulse and for the minimum spot size less than 15 times wavelength for circularly polarized laser pulse.

  20. Comment on ``Dynamics of glass-forming liquids. XIII. Microwave heating in slow motion'' [J. Chem. Phys. 130, 194509 (2009)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johari, G. P.

    2012-07-01

    Critical reading of the dielectric method and data in the paper [W. Huang and R. Richert, J. Chem. Phys. 130, 194509 (2009)], 10.1063/1.3139519 showed that (i) the large inter-electrode area of the Teflon spacer used in the dielectric cell affected the spectral data and (ii) the measured Δɛ of propylene carbonate after making the spacer area correction is 1.8-times the known value, indicating errors from unknown sources. This puts into question their support for the dynamic heterogeneity view, and their inference on the magnitude of configurational heat capacity.

  1. Comment on "Frequency-domain stimulated and spontaneous light emission signals at molecular junctions" [J. Chem. Phys. 141, 074107 (2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galperin, Michael; Ratner, Mark A.; Nitzan, Abraham

    2015-04-01

    We discuss the derivation of the optical response in molecular junctions presented by U. Harbola et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 141, 074107 (2014)], which questions some terms in the theory of Raman scattering in molecular junctions developed in our earlier publications. We show that the terms considered in our theory represent the correct contribution to calculated Raman scattering and are in fact identical to those considered by Harbola et al. We also indicate drawbacks of the presented approach in treating the quantum transport part of the problem.

  2. Comment on 'Experimental observation of carbon dioxide reduction in exhaust gas from hydrocarbon fuel burning' [Phys. Plasmas 16, 114502 (2009)

    SciTech Connect

    Byun, Youngchul; Shin, Dong Nam

    2010-01-15

    The following comments are intended to clarify whether it is possible to convert CO{sub 2} into C+O{sub 2} by supplying just one-twentieth of energy required thermodynamically, only under the condition that the negative high voltage of dc is applied to the gas stream perpendicularly, in a recent article by Uhm and Kim [H. S. Uhm and C. H. Kim, Phys. Plasmas 16, 114502 (2009)]. Of particular concern is the disobedience of the first and second laws of thermodynamics together with the indistinct measurement of experimental data.

  3. Comment on "Size-efficient metamaterial absorber at low frequencies: Design, fabrication, and characterization" [J. Appl. Phys. 117, 243105 (2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lulu; Liu, Shaobin; Zhang, HaiFeng; Kong, Xiangkun; Yang, Hua; Ding, Guowen; Xu, Ce; Wang, Lingling; Shi, Wei

    2016-06-01

    In a recent article, Khuyen et al. [J. Appl. Phys. 117, 243105 (2015)] proposed a metamaterial perfect absorber (MPA) with a self-asymmetric structure and claimed that it could produce dual-band "perfect absorption." In this report, we demonstrate that the self-asymmetric structure is not a true MPA. The cross-polarization reflection, which is induced by coupling between the induced magnetic field and the incident electric field, is ignored in calculation of absorptivity of that structure. The real absorption rate of this structure is below 60%, which indicates that the structure cannot be called a perfect absorber.

  4. MT3D: a 3 dimensional magnetotelluric modeling program (user's guide and documentation for Rev. 1)

    SciTech Connect

    Nutter, C.; Wannamaker, P.E.

    1980-11-01

    MT3D.REV1 is a non-interactive computer program written in FORTRAN to do 3-dimensional magnetotelluric modeling. A 3-D volume integral equation has been adapted to simulate the MT response of a 3D body in the earth. An integro-difference scheme has been incorporated to increase the accuracy. This is a user's guide for MT3D.REV1 on the University of Utah Research Institute's (UURI) PRIME 400 computer operating under PRIMOS IV, Rev. 17.

  5. PhysBinder: Improving the prediction of transcription factor binding sites by flexible inclusion of biophysical properties.

    PubMed

    Broos, Stefan; Soete, Arne; Hooghe, Bart; Moran, Raymond; van Roy, Frans; De Bleser, Pieter

    2013-07-01

    The most important mechanism in the regulation of transcription is the binding of a transcription factor (TF) to a DNA sequence called the TF binding site (TFBS). Most binding sites are short and degenerate, which makes predictions based on their primary sequence alone somewhat unreliable. We present a new web tool that implements a flexible and extensible algorithm for predicting TFBS. The algorithm makes use of both direct (the sequence) and several indirect readout features of protein-DNA complexes (biophysical properties such as bendability or the solvent-excluded surface of the DNA). This algorithm significantly outperforms state-of-the-art approaches for in silico identification of TFBS. Users can submit FASTA sequences for analysis in the PhysBinder integrative algorithm and choose from >60 different TF-binding models. The results of this analysis can be used to plan and steer wet-lab experiments. The PhysBinder web tool is freely available at http://bioit.dmbr.ugent.be/physbinder/index.php. PMID:23620286

  6. Comment on ``Study of dielectric relaxations of anhydrous trehalose and maltose glasses'' [J. Chem. Phys. 134, 014508 (2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaminski, K.; Wlodarczyk, P.; Paluch, M.

    2011-10-01

    Very recently Kwon et al. [H.-J. Kwon, J.-A. Seo, H. K. Kim, and Y. H. Hwang, J. Chem. Phys. 134, 014508 (2011)] published an article on the study of dielectric relaxation in trehalose and maltose glasses. They carried out broadband dielectric measurements at very wide range of temperatures covering supercooled liquid as well as glassy state of both saccharides. It is worth to mention that authors have also applied a new method for obtaining anhydrous glasses of trehalose and maltose that enables avoiding their caramelization. Four relaxation processes were identified in dielectric spectra of both saccharides. The slower one was identified as structural relaxation process the next one, not observed by the others, was assigned as Johari-Goldstein (JG) β-relaxation, while the last two secondary modes were of the same nature as found by Kaminski et al. [K. Kaminski, E. Kaminska, P. Wlodarczyk, S. Pawlus, D. Kimla, A. Kasprzycka, M. Paluch, J. Ziolo, W. Szeja, and K. L. Ngai, J. Phys. Chem. B 112, 12816 (2008)]. In this comment we show that the authors mistakenly assigned the slowest relaxation process as structural mode of disaccharides. We have proven that this relaxation process is an effect of formation of thin layer of air or water between plate of capacitor and sample. The same effect can be observed if plates of capacitor are oxidized. Thus, we concluded that their slowest mode is connected to the dc conduction process while their β JG process is primary relaxation of trehalose and maltose.

  7. Comment on “Stationary self-focusing of Gaussian laser beam in relativistic thermal quantum plasma” [Phys. Plasmas 20, 072703 (2013)

    SciTech Connect

    Habibi, M.; Ghamari, F.

    2014-06-15

    Patil and Takale in their recent article [Phys. Plasmas 20, 072703 (2013)], by evaluating the quantum dielectric response in thermal quantum plasma, have modeled the relativistic self-focusing of Gaussian laser beam in a plasma. We have found that there are some important shortcomings and fundamental mistakes in Patil and Takale [Phys. Plasmas 20, 072703 (2013)] that we give a brief description about them and refer readers to important misconception about the use of the Fermi temperature in quantum plasmas, appearing in Patil and Takale [Phys. Plasmas 20, 072703 (2013)].

  8. Pharmacological Targeting the REV-ERBs in Sleep/Wake Regulation.

    PubMed

    Amador, Ariadna; Huitron-Resendiz, Salvador; Roberts, Amanda J; Kamenecka, Theodore M; Solt, Laura A; Burris, Thomas P

    2016-01-01

    The circadian clock maintains appropriate timing for a wide range of behaviors and physiological processes. Circadian behaviors such as sleep and wakefulness are intrinsically dependent on the precise oscillation of the endogenous molecular machinery that regulates the circadian clock. The identical core clock machinery regulates myriad endocrine and metabolic functions providing a link between sleep and metabolic health. The REV-ERBs (REV-ERBα and REV-ERBβ) are nuclear receptors that are key regulators of the molecular clock and have been successfully targeted using small molecule ligands. Recent studies in mice suggest that REV-ERB-specific synthetic agonists modulate metabolic activity as well as alter sleep architecture, inducing wakefulness during the light period. Therefore, these small molecules represent unique tools to extensively study REV-ERB regulation of sleep and wakefulness. In these studies, our aim was to further investigate the therapeutic potential of targeting the REV-ERBs for regulation of sleep by characterizing efficacy, and optimal dosing time of the REV-ERB agonist SR9009 using electroencephalographic (EEG) recordings. Applying different experimental paradigms in mice, our studies establish that SR9009 does not lose efficacy when administered more than once a day, nor does tolerance develop when administered once a day over a three-day dosing regimen. Moreover, through use of a time response paradigm, we determined that although there is an optimal time for administration of SR9009 in terms of maximal efficacy, there is a 12-hour window in which SR9009 elicited a response. Our studies indicate that the REV-ERBs are potential therapeutic targets for treating sleep problems as those encountered as a consequence of shift work or jet lag. PMID:27603791

  9. Nullbasic, a potent anti-HIV tat mutant, induces CRM1-dependent disruption of HIV rev trafficking.

    PubMed

    Lin, Min-Hsuan; Sivakumaran, Haran; Apolloni, Ann; Wei, Ting; Jans, David A; Harrich, David

    2012-01-01

    Nullbasic, a mutant of the HIV-1 Tat protein, has anti-HIV-1 activity through mechanisms that include inhibition of Rev function and redistribution of the HIV-1 Rev protein from the nucleolus to the nucleoplasm and cytoplasm. Here we investigate the mechanism of this effect for the first time, establishing that redistribution of Rev by Nullbasic is not due to direct interaction between the two proteins. Rather, Nullbasic affects subcellular localization of cellular proteins that regulate Rev trafficking. In particular, Nullbasic induced redistribution of exportin 1 (CRM1), nucleophosmin (B23) and nucleolin (C23) from the nucleolus to the nucleus when Rev was coexpressed, but never in its absence. Inhibition of the Rev:CRM1 interaction by leptomycin B or a non-interacting RevM10 mutant completely blocked redistribution of Rev by Nullbasic. Finally, Nullbasic did not inhibit importin β- or transportin 1-mediated nuclear import, suggesting that cytoplasmic accumulation of Rev was due to increased export by CRM1. Overall, our data support the conclusion that CRM1-dependent subcellular redistribution of Rev from the nucleolus by Nullbasic is not through general perturbation of either nuclear import or export. Rather, Nullbasic appears to interact with and disrupt specific components of a Rev trafficking complex required for its nucleocytoplasmic shuttling and, in particular, its nucleolar accumulation. PMID:23251541

  10. Overexpression of the Circadian Clock Gene Rev-erbα Affects Murine Bone Mesenchymal Stem Cell Proliferation and Osteogenesis

    PubMed Central

    He, Yao; Lin, Fuwei; Chen, Yaqun; Tan, Zhen; Bai, Ding

    2015-01-01

    Bone mesenchymal stem cell (BMSC) age-related changes include decreased osteogenesis and increased adipogenesis. Rev-erbα and the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway were known to play important roles in BMSC aging. In this study, we have aimed to elucidate whether Rev-erbα and Wnt/β-catenin signaling interact during BMSC proliferation and osteogenesis. Our results showed that Rev-erbα expression gradually dropped during BMSC osteogenesis, and overexpression of Rev-erbα in BMSCs inhibited cell proliferation and osteogenesis. The inhibition of cell proliferation induced by Rev-erbα overexpression was partially reversed when Wnt/β-catenin signaling was activated. These results suggested that Rev-erbα could promote BMSC aging and may be the negative regulator during the late stage of osteogenesis. The clock gene Rev-erbα and Wnt/β-catenin signaling interact in the regulation of cell proliferation. PMID:25539035

  11. Rev-erbα in the brain is essential for circadian food entrainment.

    PubMed

    Delezie, Julien; Dumont, Stéphanie; Sandu, Cristina; Reibel, Sophie; Pevet, Paul; Challet, Etienne

    2016-01-01

    Foraging is costly in terms of time and energy. An endogenous food-entrainable system allows anticipation of predictable changes of food resources in nature. Yet the molecular mechanism that controls food anticipation in mammals remains elusive. Here we report that deletion of the clock component Rev-erbα impairs food entrainment in mice. Rev-erbα global knockout (GKO) mice subjected to restricted feeding showed reduced elevations of locomotor activity and body temperature prior to mealtime, regardless of the lighting conditions. The failure to properly anticipate food arrival was accompanied by a lack of phase-adjustment to mealtime of the clock protein PERIOD2 in the cerebellum, and by diminished expression of phosphorylated ERK 1/2 (p-ERK) during mealtime in the mediobasal hypothalamus and cerebellum. Furthermore, brain-specific knockout (BKO) mice for Rev-erbα display a defective suprachiasmatic clock, as evidenced by blunted daily activity under a light-dark cycle, altered free-running rhythm in constant darkness and impaired clock gene expression. Notably, brain deletion of Rev-erbα totally prevented food-anticipatory behaviour and thermogenesis. In response to restricted feeding, brain deletion of Rev-erbα impaired changes in clock gene expression in the hippocampus and cerebellum, but not in the liver. Our findings indicate that Rev-erbα is required for neural network-based prediction of food availability. PMID:27380954

  12. Rev-erbα in the brain is essential for circadian food entrainment

    PubMed Central

    Delezie, Julien; Dumont, Stéphanie; Sandu, Cristina; Reibel, Sophie; Pevet, Paul; Challet, Etienne

    2016-01-01

    Foraging is costly in terms of time and energy. An endogenous food-entrainable system allows anticipation of predictable changes of food resources in nature. Yet the molecular mechanism that controls food anticipation in mammals remains elusive. Here we report that deletion of the clock component Rev-erbα impairs food entrainment in mice. Rev-erbα global knockout (GKO) mice subjected to restricted feeding showed reduced elevations of locomotor activity and body temperature prior to mealtime, regardless of the lighting conditions. The failure to properly anticipate food arrival was accompanied by a lack of phase-adjustment to mealtime of the clock protein PERIOD2 in the cerebellum, and by diminished expression of phosphorylated ERK 1/2 (p-ERK) during mealtime in the mediobasal hypothalamus and cerebellum. Furthermore, brain-specific knockout (BKO) mice for Rev-erbα display a defective suprachiasmatic clock, as evidenced by blunted daily activity under a light-dark cycle, altered free-running rhythm in constant darkness and impaired clock gene expression. Notably, brain deletion of Rev-erbα totally prevented food-anticipatory behaviour and thermogenesis. In response to restricted feeding, brain deletion of Rev-erbα impaired changes in clock gene expression in the hippocampus and cerebellum, but not in the liver. Our findings indicate that Rev-erbα is required for neural network-based prediction of food availability. PMID:27380954

  13. Ubiquitin ligase Siah2 regulates RevErbα degradation and the mammalian circadian clock

    PubMed Central

    DeBruyne, Jason P.; Baggs, Julie E.; Sato, Trey K.; Hogenesch, John B.

    2015-01-01

    Regulated degradation of proteins by the proteasome is often critical to their function in dynamic cellular pathways. The molecular clock underlying mammalian circadian rhythms relies on the rhythmic expression and degradation of its core components. However, because the tools available for identifying the mechanisms underlying the degradation of a specific protein are limited, the mechanisms regulating clock protein degradation are only beginning to be elucidated. Here we describe a cell-based functional screening approach designed to quickly identify the ubiquitin E3 ligases that induce the degradation of potentially any protein of interest. We screened the nuclear hormone receptor RevErbα (Nr1d1), a key constituent of the mammalian circadian clock, for E3 ligases that regulate its stability and found Seven in absentia2 (Siah2) to be a key regulator of RevErbα stability. Previously implicated in hypoxia signaling, Siah2 overexpression destabilizes RevErbα/β, and siRNA depletion of Siah2 stabilizes endogenous RevErbα. Moreover, Siah2 depletion delays circadian degradation of RevErbα and lengthens period length. These results demonstrate the utility of functional screening approaches for identifying regulators of protein stability and reveal Siah2 as a previously unidentified circadian clockwork regulator that mediates circadian RevErbα turnover. PMID:26392558

  14. Discrete Functions of Nuclear Receptor Rev-erbα Couple Metabolism to the Clock

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuxiang; Fang, Bin; Emmett, Matthew J.; Damle, Manashree; Sun, Zheng; Feng, Dan; Armour, Sean M.; Remsberg, Jarrett R.; Jager, Jennifer; Soccio, Raymond E.; Steger, David J.; Lazar, Mitchell A.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Circadian and metabolic physiology are intricately intertwined, as illustrated by Rev-erbα, a transcription factor (TF) that functions both as a core repressive component of the cell autonomous clock and as a regulator of metabolic genes. Here we show that Rev-erbα modulates the clock and metabolism by different genomic mechanisms. Clock control requires Rev-erbα to bind directly to the genome at its cognate sites, where it competes with activating ROR TFs. By contrast, Rev-erbα regulates metabolic genes primarily by recruiting the HDAC3 corepressor to sites to which it is tethered by cell type-specific transcription factors. Thus, direct competition between Rev-erbα and ROR TFs provides a universal mechanism for self-sustained control of molecular clock across all tissues, whereas Rev-erbα utilizes lineage-determining factors to convey a tissue-specific epigenomic rhythm that regulates metabolism tailored to the specific need of that tissue. PMID:26044300

  15. Dual inhibition of REV-ERBβ and autophagy as a novel pharmacological approach to induce cytotoxicity in cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    De Mei, C; Ercolani, L; Parodi, C; Veronesi, M; Vecchio, C Lo; Bottegoni, G; Torrente, E; Scarpelli, R; Marotta, R; Ruffili, R; Mattioli, M; Reggiani, A; Wade, M; Grimaldi, B

    2015-01-01

    REV-ERBα and REV-ERBβ nuclear receptors regulate several physiological processes, including circadian rhythm and metabolism. A previous study reported the REV-ERBα gene to be co-overexpressed with ERBB2 in breast cancer cell lines. Surprisingly, we found that several tumor types, including a number of breast cancer cell lines, predominantly express the REV-ERBβ variant. This pattern was independent of ERBB2 and ER status, and opposite to that of non-cancer mammary epithelial HMEC cells, in which REV-ERBα was the major variant. Consistent with this molecular profile, REV-ERB target genes in both circadian and metabolic pathways were derepressed upon silencing of REV-ERBβ, but not REV-ERBα. Strikingly, we found that REV-ERBβ is a determinant of sensitivity to chloroquine, a clinically relevant lysosomotropic agent that suppresses autophagy. The cytoprotective function of REV-ERBβ appears to operate downstream of autophagy blockade. Through compound screening, we identified ARN5187, a novel lysosomotropic REV-ERBβ ligand with a dual inhibitory activity toward REV-ERB-mediated transcriptional regulation and autophagy. Remarkably, although ARN5187 and chloroquine share similar lysosomotropic potency and have a similar effect on autophagy inhibition, ARN5187 is significantly more cytotoxic. Collectively, our results reveal that dual inhibition of REV-ERBβ and autophagy is an effective strategy for eliciting cytotoxicity in cancer cells. Furthermore, our discovery of a novel inhibitor compound of both REV-ERB and autophagy may provide a scaffold for the discovery of new multifunctional anticancer agents. PMID:25023698

  16. Comment on “Deterministic six states protocol for quantum communication” [Phys. Lett. A 358 (2006) 85

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Orany, Faisal A. A.

    2010-02-01

    In [J.S. Shaari, M. Lucamarini, M.R.B. Wahiddin, Phys. Lett. A 358 (2006) 85] the deterministic six states protocol (6DP) for quantum communication has been developed. This protocol is based on three mutually unbiased bases and four encoding operators. Information is transmitted between the users via two qubits from different bases. Three attacks have been studied; namely intercept-resend attack (IRA), double-CNOT attack (2CNOTA) and quantum man-in-the-middle attack. In this Letter, we show that the IRA and 2CNOTA are not properly addressed. For instance, we show that the probability of detecting Eve in the control mode of the IRA is 70% instead of 50% in the previous study. Moreover, in the 2CNOTA, Eve can only obtain 50% of the data not all of it as argued earlier.

  17. Comment on "Laser ablation of Cu and plume expansion into 1 atm ambient gas" [J. Appl. Phys. 97, 063305 (2005)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Autrique, D.; Alexiades, V.

    2014-04-01

    A hydrodynamic model used for the study of ns-laser ablation in an ambient environment [Z. Chen and A. Bogaerts, J. Appl. Phys. 97, 063305 (2005)] was investigated and compared with an in-house developed code. After a detailed analysis of the source code and the underlying theoretical framework, significant flaws were detected in the model. It was found that the respective model as well as the ones presented in some earlier and later manuscripts is not able to simulate the ablation process, i.e., target heating, material removal, breakdown, plasma formation, and plume expansion, self-consistently. The present findings indicate that their use should be discontinued when modeling the overall ablation process. Based on existing models in the literature, alternative theoretical pathways are proposed to facilitate future computational studies of ns-laser ablation.

  18. Comment on 'The diatomic dication CuZn{sup 2+} in the gas phase' [J. Chem. Phys. 135, 034306 (2011)

    SciTech Connect

    Fiser, Jiri; Diez, Reinaldo Pis; Franzreb, Klaus; Alonso, Julio A.

    2013-02-21

    In this Comment, the density functional theory (DFT) calculations carried out by Diez et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 135, 034306 (2011)] are revised within the framework of the coupled-cluster single double triple method. These more sophisticated calculations allow us to show that the {sup 2}{Sigma}{sup +} electronic ground state of CuZn{sup 2+}, characterized as the metastable ground state by DFT calculations, is a repulsive state instead. The {sup 2}{Delta} and {sup 2}{Pi} metastable states of CuZn{sup 2+}, on the other hand, should be responsible for the formation mechanism of the dication through the near-resonant electron transfer CuZn{sup +}+ Ar{sup +}{yields} CuZn{sup 2+}+ Ar reaction.

  19. Comment on ``On the tensile strength distribution of multiwalled carbon nanotubes'' [Appl. Phys. Lett. 87, 203106 (2005)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Chunsheng

    2008-05-01

    In a recent letter, Barber, Andrews, Schadler, and Wagner, Appl. Phys. Lett. 87, 203106 (2005). indicated that Weibull-Poisson statistics could accurately model the nanotube tensile strength data, and then concluded that the apparent strengthening mechanism in a multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is most likely caused by an enhanced interaction between the walls of the nanotube. In this comment, we show that their conclusion seems to be inconsistent with the assumption introduced in the data analysis by using a two-parameter Weibull distribution. Further statistical analysis provides a new explanation on the scattered strengths of MWCNTs. The effectiveness of Weibull-Poisson statistics at nanoscales is also discussed.

  20. Response to 'Comment on 'Pinch current limitation effect in plasma focus'' [Appl. Phys. Lett. 94, 076101 (2009)

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.; Saw, S. H.

    2009-02-16

    The main point of the comment [Appl. Phys. Lett. 94, 076101 (2009)] is that Eq. (2) and consequentially Eq. (3) of the commented paper [Appl. Phys. Lett. 92, 021503 (2008)] require correction. The alternative equation suggested in the comment is derived using Kirchhoff's voltage rule. The comment consider only the energy distribution in the inductive components and the resultant equation confirms a progressive lowering of the I{sub pinch}/I{sub peak} ratio as the static inductance L{sub 0} is reduced, lowering from 0.87 to 0.31 as L{sub 0} is reduced from 100 to 5 nH according to the revised formula corresponding to Eq. (3), compared to 0.63-0.25 according to Eq. (3). This progressive lowering of the ratio I{sub pinch}/I{sub peak} due to the inductive energy distribution is one of two factors responsible for the pinch current limitation. The other factor is the progressive reduction in the L-C interaction time compared to the current dip duration denoted by {delta}{sub cap} in Eq. (2). The comment does not deal with {delta}{sub cap} at all; hence, its conclusion based on inductive energy distribution only is not useful, since in the low L{sub 0} region when pinch current limitation begins to manifest, {delta}{sub cap} becomes more and more the dominant factor. In any case, the results of the paper do not depend on Eqs. (2) and (3), which are used in the paper only for illustrative purposes.

  1. Comment on "Study of dielectric relaxations of anhydrous trehalose and maltose glasses" [J. Chem. Phys. 134, 014508 (2011)].

    PubMed

    Kaminski, K; Wlodarczyk, P; Paluch, M

    2011-10-28

    Very recently Kwon et al. [H.-J. Kwon, J.-A. Seo, H. K. Kim, and Y. H. Hwang, J. Chem. Phys. 134, 014508 (2011)] published an article on the study of dielectric relaxation in trehalose and maltose glasses. They carried out broadband dielectric measurements at very wide range of temperatures covering supercooled liquid as well as glassy state of both saccharides. It is worth to mention that authors have also applied a new method for obtaining anhydrous glasses of trehalose and maltose that enables avoiding their caramelization. Four relaxation processes were identified in dielectric spectra of both saccharides. The slower one was identified as structural relaxation process the next one, not observed by the others, was assigned as Johari-Goldstein (JG) β-relaxation, while the last two secondary modes were of the same nature as found by Kaminski et al. [K. Kaminski, E. Kaminska, P. Wlodarczyk, S. Pawlus, D. Kimla, A. Kasprzycka, M. Paluch, J. Ziolo, W. Szeja, and K. L. Ngai, J. Phys. Chem. B 112, 12816 (2008)]. In this comment we show that the authors mistakenly assigned the slowest relaxation process as structural mode of disaccharides. We have proven that this relaxation process is an effect of formation of thin layer of air or water between plate of capacitor and sample. The same effect can be observed if plates of capacitor are oxidized. Thus, we concluded that their slowest mode is connected to the dc conduction process while their β JG process is primary relaxation of trehalose and maltose. PMID:22047271

  2. The vital role of polymerase ζ and REV1 in mutagenic, but not correct, DNA synthesis across benzo[a]pyrene-dG and recruitment of polymerase ζ by REV1 to replication-stalled site.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Keiji; Cho, Youngjin; Yang, In-Young; Akagi, Jun-ichi; Ohashi, Eiji; Tateishi, Satoshi; de Wind, Niels; Hanaoka, Fumio; Ohmori, Haruo; Moriya, Masaaki

    2012-03-16

    The DNA synthesis across DNA lesions, termed translesion synthesis (TLS), is a complex process influenced by various factors. To investigate this process in mammalian cells, we examined TLS across a benzo[a]pyrene dihydrodiol epoxide-derived dG adduct (BPDE-dG) using a plasmid bearing a single BPDE-dG and genetically engineered mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs). In wild-type MEFs, TLS was extremely miscoding (>90%) with G → T transversions being predominant. Knockout of the Rev1 gene decreased both the TLS efficiency and the miscoding frequency. Knockout of the Rev3L gene, coding for the catalytic subunit of pol ζ, caused even greater decreases in these two TLS parameters; almost all residual TLS were error-free. Thus, REV1 and pol ζ are critical to mutagenic, but not accurate, TLS across BPDE-dG. The introduction of human REV1 cDNA into Rev1(-/-) MEFs restored the mutagenic TLS, but a REV1 mutant lacking the C terminus did not. Yeast and mammalian three-hybrid assays revealed that the REV7 subunit of pol ζ mediated the interaction between REV3 and the REV1 C terminus. These results support the hypothesis that REV1 recruits pol ζ through the interaction with REV7. Our results also predict the existence of a minor REV1-independent pol ζ recruitment pathway. Finally, although mutagenic TLS across BPDE-dG largely depends on RAD18, experiments using Polk(-/-) Polh(-/-) Poli(-/-) triple-gene knockout MEFs unexpectedly revealed that another polymerase(s) could insert a nucleotide opposite BPDE-dG. This indicates that a non-Y family polymerase(s) can insert a nucleotide opposite BPDE-dG, but the subsequent extension from miscoding termini depends on REV1-polζ in a RAD18-dependent manner. PMID:22303021

  3. Nuclear export of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 nucleocytoplasmic shuttle protein Rev is mediated by its activation domain and is blocked by transdominant negative mutants.

    PubMed Central

    Szilvay, A M; Brokstad, K A; Kopperud, R; Haukenes, G; Kalland, K H

    1995-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 nucleocytoplasmic shuttle protein Rev moves repeatedly between the cytoplasm, a perinuclear zone, the nucleoli, and nucleoplasmic speckles. In this study, we demonstrated by both indirect immunofluorescence and Western immunoblot analysis that nuclear exit of Rev transdominant negative mutants was defective compared with that of wild-type Rev. The basic and activation domains of Rev signal import and export, respectively, of Rev across the nuclear membrane. In cotransfection experiments, mutants containing mutations of Rev inhibited the nuclear egress of wild-type Rev, thus revealing a novel transdominant negative phenotype. PMID:7745679

  4. Involvement of budding yeast Rad5 in translesion DNA synthesis through physical interaction with Rev1

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xin; Lin, Aiyang; Zhou, Cuiyan; Blackwell, Susan R.; Zhang, Yiran; Wang, Zihao; Feng, Qianqian; Guan, Ruifang; Hanna, Michelle D.; Chen, Zhucheng; Xiao, Wei

    2016-01-01

    DNA damage tolerance (DDT) is responsible for genomic stability and cell viability by bypassing the replication block. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae DDT employs two parallel branch pathways to bypass the DNA lesion, namely translesion DNA synthesis (TLS) and error-free lesion bypass, which are mediated by sequential modifications of PCNA. Rad5 has been placed in the error-free branch of DDT because it contains an E3 ligase domain required for PCNA polyubiquitination. Rad5 is a multi-functional protein and may also play a role in TLS, since it interacts with the TLS polymerase Rev1. In this study we mapped the Rev1-interaction domain in Rad5 to the amino acid resolution and demonstrated that Rad5 is indeed involved in TLS possibly through recruitment of Rev1. Genetic analyses show that the dual functions of Rad5 can be separated and reconstituted. Crystal structure analysis of the Rad5–Rev1 interaction reveals a consensus RFF motif in the Rad5 N-terminus that binds to a hydrophobic pocket within the C-terminal domain of Rev1 that is highly conserved in eukaryotes. This study indicates that Rad5 plays a critical role in pathway choice between TLS and error-free DDT. PMID:27001510

  5. Involvement of budding yeast Rad5 in translesion DNA synthesis through physical interaction with Rev1.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xin; Lin, Aiyang; Zhou, Cuiyan; Blackwell, Susan R; Zhang, Yiran; Wang, Zihao; Feng, Qianqian; Guan, Ruifang; Hanna, Michelle D; Chen, Zhucheng; Xiao, Wei

    2016-06-20

    DNA damage tolerance (DDT) is responsible for genomic stability and cell viability by bypassing the replication block. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae DDT employs two parallel branch pathways to bypass the DNA lesion, namely translesion DNA synthesis (TLS) and error-free lesion bypass, which are mediated by sequential modifications of PCNA. Rad5 has been placed in the error-free branch of DDT because it contains an E3 ligase domain required for PCNA polyubiquitination. Rad5 is a multi-functional protein and may also play a role in TLS, since it interacts with the TLS polymerase Rev1. In this study we mapped the Rev1-interaction domain in Rad5 to the amino acid resolution and demonstrated that Rad5 is indeed involved in TLS possibly through recruitment of Rev1. Genetic analyses show that the dual functions of Rad5 can be separated and reconstituted. Crystal structure analysis of the Rad5-Rev1 interaction reveals a consensus RFF motif in the Rad5 N-terminus that binds to a hydrophobic pocket within the C-terminal domain of Rev1 that is highly conserved in eukaryotes. This study indicates that Rad5 plays a critical role in pathway choice between TLS and error-free DDT. PMID:27001510

  6. Role of the clock gene Rev-erbα in metabolism and in the endocrine pancreas.

    PubMed

    Vieira, E; Merino, B; Quesada, I

    2015-09-01

    Several hormones are regulated by circadian rhythms to adjust the metabolism to the light/dark cycles and feeding/activity patterns throughout the day. Circadian rhythms are mainly governed by the central clock located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus but also by clocks present in peripheral organs, like the endocrine pancreas. Plasma glucose levels and the main pancreatic hormones insulin and glucagon also exhibit daily variations. Alterations in circadian rhythms are associated with metabolic disturbances and pathologies such as obesity and diabetes. The molecular components of central and peripheral clocks and their regulatory mechanisms are well established. Among the different clock genes, Rev-erbα is considered one of the key links between circadian rhythms and metabolism. Rev-erbα is a critical part of a negative feedback loop in the core circadian clock and modulates the clock oscillatory properties. In addition, Rev-erbα plays an important role in the regulation of lipid and glucose metabolism, thermogenesis, adipocyte and muscle differentiation as well as mitochondrial function. In the endocrine pancreas, Rev-erbα regulates insulin and glucagon secretion and pancreatic β-cell proliferation. In the present review, we discuss all these subjects and, particularly, the role of the clock gene Rev-erbα in the endocrine pancreas. PMID:26332975

  7. Structure of the Human Rev1-DNA-dNTP Ternary Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Swan, M.; Johnson, R; Prakash, L; Prakash, S; Aggarwal, A

    2009-01-01

    Y-family DNA polymerases have proven to be remarkably diverse in their functions and in strategies for replicating through DNA lesions. The structure of yeast Rev1 ternary complex has revealed the most radical replication strategy, where the polymerase itself dictates the identity of the incoming nucleotide, as well as the identity of the templating base. We show here that many of the key elements of this highly unusual strategy are conserved between yeast and human Rev1, including the eviction of template G from the DNA helix and the pairing of incoming deoxycytidine 5'-triphosphate with a surrogate arginine residue. We also show that the catalytic core of human Rev1 is uniquely augmented by two large inserts, I1 and I2, wherein I1 extends > 20 A away from the active site and may serve as a platform for protein-protein interactions specific for Rev1's role in translesion DNA synthesis in human cells, and I2 acts as a 'flap' on the hydrophobic pocket accommodating template G. We suggest that these novel structural features are important for providing human Rev1 greater latitude in promoting efficient and error-free translesion DNA synthesis through the diverse array of bulky and potentially carcinogenic N2-deoxyguanosine DNA adducts in human cells.

  8. A rev1-vpu polymorphism unique to HIV-1 subtype A and C strains impairs envelope glycoprotein expression from rev-vpu-env cassettes and reduces virion infectivity in pseudotyping assays

    SciTech Connect

    Kraus, Matthias H.; Parrish, Nicholas F.; Shaw, Katharina S.; Decker, Julie M.; Keele, Brandon F.; Salazar-Gonzalez, Jesus F.; Grayson, Truman; McPherson, David T.; Ping, Li-Hua; Anderson, Jeffrey A.; Swanstrom, Ronald; Williamson, Carolyn; Shaw, George M.; Hahn, Beatrice H.

    2010-02-20

    Functional studies of HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins (Envs) commonly include the generation of pseudoviruses, which are produced by co-transfection of rev-vpu-env cassettes with an env-deficient provirus. Here, we describe six Env constructs from transmitted/founder HIV-1 that were defective in the pseudotyping assay, although two produced infectious virions when expressed from their cognate proviruses. All of these constructs exhibited an unusual gene arrangement in which the first exon of rev (rev1) and vpu were in the same reading frame without an intervening stop codon. Disruption of the rev1-vpu fusion gene by frameshift mutation, stop codon, or abrogation of the rev initiation codon restored pseudovirion infectivity. Introduction of the fusion gene into wildtype Env cassettes severely compromised their function. The defect was not due to altered env and rev transcription or a dominant negative effect of the expressed fusion protein, but seemed to be caused by inefficient translation at the env initiation codon. Although the rev1-vpu polymorphism affects Env expression only in vitro, it can cause problems in studies requiring Env complementation, such as analyses of co-receptor usage and neutralization properties, since 3% of subtype A, 20% of subtype C and 5% of CRF01{sub A}/E viruses encode the fusion gene. A solution is to eliminate the rev initiation codon when amplifying rev-vpu-env cassettes since this increases Env expression irrespective of the presence of the polymorphism.

  9. The strength of the HIV-1 3' splice sites affects Rev function

    PubMed Central

    Kammler, Susanne; Otte, Marianne; Hauber, Ilona; Kjems, Jørgen; Hauber, Joachim; Schaal, Heiner

    2006-01-01

    Background The HIV-1 Rev protein is a key component in the early to late switch in HIV-1 splicing from early intronless (e.g. tat, rev) to late intron-containing Rev-dependent (e.g. gag, vif, env) transcripts. Previous results suggested that cis-acting sequences and inefficient 5' and 3' splice sites are a prerequisite for Rev function. However, we and other groups have shown that two of the HIV-1 5' splice sites, D1 and D4, are efficiently used in vitro and in vivo. Here, we focus on the efficiency of the HIV-1 3' splice sites taking into consideration to what extent their intrinsic efficiencies are modulated by their downstream cis-acting exonic sequences. Furthermore, we delineate their role in RNA stabilization and Rev function. Results In the presence of an efficient upstream 5' splice site the integrity of the 3' splice site is not essential for Rev function whereas an efficient 3' splice site impairs Rev function. The detrimental effect of a strong 3' splice site on the amount of Rev-dependent intron-containing HIV-1 glycoprotein coding (env) mRNA is not compensatable by weakening the strength of the upstream 5' splice site. Swapping the HIV-1 3' splice sites in an RRE-containing minigene, we found a 3' splice site usage which was variably dependent on the presence of the usual downstream exonic sequence. The most evident activation of 3' splice site usage by its usual downstream exonic sequence was observed for 3' splice site A1 which was turned from an intrinsic very weak 3' splice site into the most active 3' splice site, even abolishing Rev activity. Performing pull-down experiments with nuclear extracts of HeLa cells we identified a novel ASF/SF2-dependent exonic splicing enhancer (ESE) within HIV-1 exon 2 consisting of a heptameric sequence motif occurring twice (M1 and M2) within this short non-coding leader exon. Single point mutation of M1 within an infectious molecular clone is detrimental for HIV-1 exon 2 recognition without affecting Rev

  10. Coactivator-Dependent Oscillation of Chromatin Accessibility Dictates Circadian Gene Amplitude via REV-ERB Loading.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Bokai; Gates, Leah A; Stashi, Erin; Dasgupta, Subhamoy; Gonzales, Naomi; Dean, Adam; Dacso, Clifford C; York, Brian; O'Malley, Bert W

    2015-12-01

    A central mechanism for controlling circadian gene amplitude remains elusive. We present evidence for a "facilitated repression (FR)" model that functions as an amplitude rheostat for circadian gene oscillation. We demonstrate that ROR and/or BMAL1 promote global chromatin decondensation during the activation phase of the circadian cycle to actively facilitate REV-ERB loading for repression of circadian gene expression. Mechanistically, we found that SRC-2 dictates global circadian chromatin remodeling through spatial and temporal recruitment of PBAF members of the SWI/SNF complex to facilitate loading of REV-ERB in the hepatic genome. Mathematical modeling highlights how the FR model sustains proper circadian rhythm despite fluctuations of REV-ERB levels. Our study not only reveals a mechanism for active communication between the positive and negative limbs of the circadian transcriptional loop but also establishes the concept that clock transcription factor binding dynamics is perhaps a central tenet for fine-tuning circadian rhythm. PMID:26611104

  11. Innocuity and immune response to Brucella melitensis Rev.1 vaccine in camels (Camelus dromedarius).

    PubMed

    Benkirane, A; Idrissi, A H El; Doumbia, A; de Balogh, K

    2014-01-01

    A field trial was conducted in a camel brucellosis-free herd to evaluate antibody response to the Brucella melitensis Rev.1 vaccine in camels and assess shedding of the vaccine strain in milk. Twenty eight camels were divided into four groups according to their age and vaccination route. Groups A (n=3) and B (n=3) consisted of non-pregnant lactating female camels, vaccinated through subcutaneous and conjunctival routes, respectively. Groups C (n=10) consisted of 8-11 months old calves vaccinated through conjunctival route. The rest of the herd (n=12) composed of female and young camels were not vaccinated and were considered as the control group. Each animal from groups A, B and C was given the recommended dose of 2 × 10(9) colony forming units of Rev.1 vaccine irrespective of age or route of vaccination. Blood samples were collected from all the animals at the time of vaccination and at weekly, bi-weekly and monthly interval until 32 weeks post vaccination and from controls at weeks 8 and 24. The serological tests used were modified Rose Bengal Test, sero-agglutination test, and an indirect Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay. Milk samples were collected from all vaccinated female camels and tested for the presence of Rev.1 vaccine strain. Most vaccinated animals started to show an antibody response at week 2 and remained positive until week 16. By week 20 post-vaccination all animals in the three groups were tested negative for Brucella antibodies. Bacteriological analysis of milk samples did not allow any isolation of Brucella melitensis. All samples were found Brucella negative in PCR analysis. The results of this study indicate that the Rev.1 vaccine induces seroconversion in camels. Rev.1 vaccine strain is not excreted in the milk of camels. These findings are promising as to the safe use of the Rev.1 vaccine in camels. PMID:26623347

  12. Innocuity and immune response to Brucella melitensis Rev.1 vaccine in camels (Camelus dromedarius)

    PubMed Central

    Benkirane, A.; Idrissi, A.H. El; Doumbia, A.; de Balogh, K.

    2014-01-01

    A field trial was conducted in a camel brucellosis-free herd to evaluate antibody response to the Brucella melitensis Rev.1 vaccine in camels and assess shedding of the vaccine strain in milk. Twenty eight camels were divided into four groups according to their age and vaccination route. Groups A (n=3) and B (n=3) consisted of non-pregnant lactating female camels, vaccinated through subcutaneous and conjunctival routes, respectively. Groups C (n=10) consisted of 8-11 months old calves vaccinated through conjunctival route. The rest of the herd (n=12) composed of female and young camels were not vaccinated and were considered as the control group. Each animal from groups A, B and C was given the recommended dose of 2 × 109 colony forming units of Rev.1 vaccine irrespective of age or route of vaccination. Blood samples were collected from all the animals at the time of vaccination and at weekly, bi-weekly and monthly interval until 32 weeks post vaccination and from controls at weeks 8 and 24. The serological tests used were modified Rose Bengal Test, sero-agglutination test, and an indirect Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay. Milk samples were collected from all vaccinated female camels and tested for the presence of Rev.1 vaccine strain. Most vaccinated animals started to show an antibody response at week 2 and remained positive until week 16. By week 20 post-vaccination all animals in the three groups were tested negative for Brucella antibodies. Bacteriological analysis of milk samples did not allow any isolation of Brucella melitensis. All samples were found Brucella negative in PCR analysis. The results of this study indicate that the Rev.1 vaccine induces seroconversion in camels. Rev.1 vaccine strain is not excreted in the milk of camels. These findings are promising as to the safe use of the Rev.1 vaccine in camels. PMID:26623347

  13. Interaction between the Rev1 C-terminal Domain and the PolD3 Subunit of Polζ Suggests a Mechanism of Polymerase Exchange upon Rev1/Polζ-Dependent Translesion Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Pustovalova, Yulia; Magalhães, Mariana T. Q.; D’Souza, Sanjay; Rizzo, Alessandro A.; Korza, George; Walker, Graham C.; Korzhnev, Dmitry M.

    2016-01-01

    Translesion synthesis (TLS) is a mutagenic branch of cellular DNA damage tolerance that enables bypass replication over DNA lesions carried out by specialized low-fidelity DNA polymerases. The replicative bypass of most types of DNA damage is performed in a two-step process of Rev1/Polζ-dependent TLS. In the first step, a Y-family TLS enzyme, typically Polη, Polι or Polκ, inserts a nucleotide across DNA lesion. In the second step, a four-subunit B-family DNA polymerase Polζ (Rev3/Rev7/PolD2/PolD3 complex) extends the distorted DNA primer-template. The coordinated action of error-prone TLS enzymes is regulated through their interactions with the two scaffold proteins, the sliding clamp PCNA and the TLS polymerase Rev1. Rev1 interactions with all other TLS enzymes are mediated by its C-terminal domain (Rev1-CT), which can simultaneously bind the Rev7 subunit of Polζ and Rev1-interacting regions (RIRs) from Polη, Polι or Polκ. In this work, we identified a previously unknown RIR motif in the C-terminal part of PolD3 subunit of Polζ whose interaction with the Rev1-CT is among the tightest mediated by RIR motifs. Three-dimensional structure of the Rev1-CT/PolD3-RIR complex determined by NMR spectroscopy revealed a structural basis for the relatively high affinity of this interaction. The unexpected discovery of PolD3-RIR motif suggests a mechanism of 'inserter' to 'extender' DNA polymerase switch upon Rev1/Polζ-dependent TLS, in which the PolD3-RIR binding to the Rev1-CT (i) helps displace the 'inserter' Polη, Polι or Polκ from its complex with Rev1, and (ii) facilitates assembly of the four-subunit 'extender' Polζ through simultaneous interaction of Rev1-CT with Rev7 and PolD3 subunits. PMID:26982350

  14. Reply to: “Comment on: ‘How much security does Y-00 protocol provide us?’ ” [Phys. Lett. A 346 (2005) 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishioka, Tsuyoshi; Hasegawa, Toshio; Ishizuka, Hirokazu; Imafuku, Kentaro; Imai, Hideki

    2005-10-01

    In a recent paper titled “Comment on: ‘How much security does the Y-00 protocol provide us?’ ” [H.P. Yuen, P. Kumar, E. Corndorf, Phys. Lett. A 346 (2005) 1 6], the authors critically examine our idea [T. Nishioka, T. Hasegawa, H. Ishizuka, K. Imafuku, H. Imai, Phys. Lett. A 327 (2004) 28 32] that the Y-00 protocol is essentially as secure as classical stream ciphers. We clarify our idea in more detail than our previous paper and show that the Y-00 protocol can be considered as a classical non-random stream cipher, as was claimed in [T. Nishioka, T. Hasegawa, H. Ishizuka, K. Imafuku, H. Imai, Phys. Lett. A 327 (2004) 28 32]. We also provide an analysis on key generation with the improved Y-00 protocol, which is implemented with weak coherent states.

  15. Comment on 'Effects of magnetic field gradient on ion beam current in cylindrical Hall ion source' [J. Appl. Phys. 102, 123305 (2007)

    SciTech Connect

    Raitses, Y.; Smirnov, A.; Fisch, N. J.

    2008-09-15

    It is argued that the key difference in the cylindrical Hall thruster (CHT) as compared to the end-Hall ion source cannot be exclusively attributed to the magnetic field topology [Tang et al., J. Appl. Phys. 102, 123305 (2007)]. With a similar mirror-type topology, the CHT configuration provides the electric field with nearly equipotential magnetic field surfaces and a better suppression of the electron cross-field transport, as compared to both the end-Hall ion source and the cylindrical Hall ion source of [Tang et al., J. Appl. Phys. 102, 123305 (2007)].

  16. 78 FR 63568 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request for Rev. Proc. 2007-35

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-24

    ... Internal Revenue Service Proposed Collection; Comment Request for Rev. Proc. 2007-35 AGENCY: Internal...(c)(2)(A)). Currently, the IRS is soliciting comments concerning Revenue Procedure 2007-35...: Statistical Sampling for purposes of Section 199. OMB Number: 1545-2072. Revenue Procedure Number:...

  17. 75 FR 53738 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request for Rev. Proc. 2007-35

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-01

    ... Internal Revenue Service Proposed Collection; Comment Request for Rev. Proc. 2007-35 AGENCY: Internal... 2007-35, Statistical Sampling for purposes of Section 199. DATES: Written comments should be received... 199. OMB Number: 1545-2072. Revenue Procedure Number: RP-2007-35. Abstract: This revenue...

  18. REV7 counteracts DNA double-strand break resection and impacts PARP inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Guotai; Yuan, Jingsong; Mistrik, Martin; Bouwman, Peter; Bartkova, Jirina; Gogola, Ewa; Warmerdam, Daniël; Barazas, Marco; Jaspers, Janneke E.; Watanabe, Kenji; Pieterse, Mark; Kersbergen, Ariena; Sol, Wendy; Celie, Patrick H. N.; Schouten, Philip C.; van den Broek, Bram; Salman, Ahmed; Nieuwland, Marja; de Rink, Iris; de Ronde, Jorma; Jalink, Kees; Boulton, Simon J.; Chen, Junjie; van Gent, Dik C.; Bartek, Jiri; Jonkers, Jos; Borst, Piet; Rottenberg, Sven

    2015-01-01

    Summary Error-free repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) is achieved by homologous recombination (HR), and BRCA1 is an important factor for this repair pathway1. In the absence of BRCA1-mediated HR, administration of PARP inhibitors induces synthetic lethality of tumor cells of patients with breast or ovarian cancers2,3. Despite the benefit of this tailored therapy, drug resistance can occur by HR restoration4. Genetic reversion of BRCA1-inactivating mutations can be the underlying mechanism of drug resistance, but this does not explain resistance in all cases5. In particular, little is known about BRCA1-independent restoration of HR. Here, we show that loss of REV7 (also known as MAD2L2) re-establishes CtIP-dependent end resection of DSBs in BRCA1-deficient cells, leading to HR restoration and PARP inhibitor resistance, reversed by ATM kinase inhibition. REV7 is recruited to DSBs in a manner dependent on the H2AX-MDC1-RNF8-RNF168-53BP1 chromatin pathway, and appears to block HR and promote end joining in addition to its regulatory role in DNA damage tolerance6. Finally, we establish that REV7 blocks DSB resection to promote non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) during immunoglobulin class switch recombination. Our results reveal an unexpected critical function of REV7 downstream of 53BP1 in coordinating pathological DSB repair pathway choices in BRCA1-deficient cells. PMID:25799992

  19. Athabaskan Stories from Anvik. Rev. John W. Chapman's "Ten'a Texts and Tales."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapman, John W.; Kari, James, Ed.

    Sixteen Deg Hit'an (Ingalik) Athabaskan stories recorded by Rev. John W. Chapman during 1887-1905 in Anvik, Alaska, are presented. The stories are retranscribed with the help of current Deg Hit'an speakers, and are accompanied by both interlinear and free translations in English. The materials are intended to serve as reading material for students…

  20. Bioavailable inhibitors of HIV-1 RNA biogenesis identified through a Rev-based screen.

    PubMed

    Prado, Silvia; Beltrán, Manuela; Coiras, Mayte; Bedoya, Luis M; Alcamí, José; Gallego, José

    2016-05-01

    New antiretroviral agents with alternative mechanisms are needed to complement the combination therapies used to treat HIV-1 infections. Here we report the identification of bioavailable molecules that interfere with the gene expression processes of HIV-1. The compounds were detected by screening a small library of FDA-approved drugs with an assay based on measuring the displacement of Rev, and essential virus-encoded protein, from its high-affinity RNA binding site. The antiretroviral activity of two hits was based on interference with post-integration steps of the HIV-1 cycle. Both hits inhibited RRE-Rev complex formation in vitro, and blocked LTR-dependent gene expression and viral transcription in cellular assays. The best compound altered the splicing pattern of HIV-1 transcripts in a manner consistent with Rev inhibition. This mechanism of action is different from those used by current antiretroviral agents. The screening hits recognized the Rev binding site in the viral RNA, and the best compound did so with substantial selectivity, allowing the identification of a new RNA-binding scaffold. These results may be used for developing novel antiretroviral drugs. PMID:26896646

  1. Circadian Amplitude Regulation via FBXW7-Targeted REV-ERBα Degradation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xuan; Hirota, Tsuyoshi; Han, Xuemei; Cho, Han; Chong, Ling-Wa; Lamia, Katja; Liu, Sihao; Atkins, Annette R; Banayo, Ester; Liddle, Christopher; Yu, Ruth T; Yates, John R; Kay, Steve A; Downes, Michael; Evans, Ronald M

    2016-06-16

    Defects in circadian rhythm influence physiology and behavior with implications for the treatment of sleep disorders, metabolic disease, and cancer. Although core regulatory components of clock rhythmicity have been defined, insight into the mechanisms underpinning amplitude is limited. Here, we show that REV-ERBα, a core inhibitory component of clock transcription, is targeted for ubiquitination and subsequent degradation by the F-box protein FBXW7. By relieving REV-ERBα-dependent repression, FBXW7 provides an unrecognized mechanism for enhancing the amplitude of clock gene transcription. Cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (CDK1)-mediated phosphorylation of REV-ERBα is necessary for FBXW7 recognition. Moreover, targeted hepatic disruption of FBXW7 alters circadian expression of core clock genes and perturbs whole-body lipid and glucose levels. This CDK1-FBXW7 pathway controlling REV-ERBα repression defines an unexpected molecular mechanism for re-engaging the positive transcriptional arm of the clock, as well as a potential route to manipulate clock amplitude via small molecule CDK1 inhibition. PMID:27238018

  2. Anomalous dissipation near T{sub {lambda}} under a large heat flux

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, D.; Meyer, H.

    1998-01-01

    We report on thermal transport experiments in liquid {sup 4}He near T{sub {lambda}} using heat fluxes 8{le}Q{le}55{mu}W/cm{sup 2}. We have confirmed the presence of a region near the superfluid transition, reported by Liu and Ahlers [Phys. Rev. Lett {bold 76}, 1300 (1996)], in which thermal dissipation is anomalously small. The temperature transients for reaching a steady state upon entering this region from the superfluid side or cooling back into the superfluid have been studied, and are found to be quite different from each other; one possible explanation for this behavior is proposed which implies that the region of anomalous dissipation has a low thermal diffusivity. We discuss the location of this region in the phase diagram of liquid {sup 4}He. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  3. 75 FR 27840 - NUREG-0654/FEMA-REP-1, Rev. 1, Supplement 3, Guidance for Protective Action Recommendations for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-18

    ...: extension of comment period. SUMMARY: On March 8, 2010, (75 FR 10524), the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) published for public comment a document entitled: ``NUREG-0654/FEMA-REP-1, Rev. 1, Supplement 3... COMMISSION NUREG-0654/FEMA-REP-1, Rev. 1, Supplement 3, Guidance for Protective Action Recommendations...

  4. REV-ERB-ALPHA circadian gene variant associates with obesity in two independent populations: Mediterranean and North American

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Despite the solid connection between REV-ERB and obesity, the information about whether genetic variations at this locus may be associated with obesity traits is scarce. Therefore our objective was to study the association between REV-ERB-ALPHA1 rs2314339 and obesity in two independent populations. ...

  5. Borrelia burgdorferi RevA Significantly Affects Pathogenicity and Host Response in the Mouse Model of Lyme Disease

    PubMed Central

    Byram, Rebecca; Gaultney, Robert A.; Floden, Angela M.; Hellekson, Christopher; Stone, Brandee L.; Bowman, Amy; Stevenson, Brian; Johnson, Barbara J. B.

    2015-01-01

    The Lyme disease spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi, expresses RevA and numerous outer surface lipoproteins during mammalian infection. As an adhesin that promotes bacterial interaction with fibronectin, RevA is poised to interact with the extracellular matrix of the host. To further define the role(s) of RevA during mammalian infection, we created a mutant that is unable to produce RevA. The mutant was still infectious to mice, although it was significantly less well able to infect cardiac tissues. Complementation of the mutant with a wild-type revA gene restored heart infectivity to wild-type levels. Additionally, revA mutants led to increased evidence of arthritis, with increased fibrotic collagen deposition in tibiotarsal joints. The mutants also induced increased levels of the chemokine CCL2, a monocyte chemoattractant, in serum, and this increase was abolished in the complemented strain. Therefore, while revA is not absolutely essential for infection, deletion of revA had distinct effects on dissemination, arthritis severity, and host response. PMID:26150536

  6. A novel human immunodeficiency virus type 1 protein, tev, shares sequences with tat, env, and rev proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Benko, D M; Schwartz, S; Pavlakis, G N; Felber, B K

    1990-01-01

    We have characterized a novel 28-kilodalton protein, p28tev, detected in human immunodeficiency virus type 1-infected cells. tev is recognized by both tat and rev monospecific antibodies. tev is initiated at the tat AUG and contains the first exon of tat at its amino terminus, a small portion of env in the middle, and the second exon of rev at its carboxy terminus. A cDNA clone producing tev was cloned and expressed in human cells. Sequence analysis revealed that the tev mRNA is generated by splicing to a novel exon located in the env region. This identifies a fourth class of multiply spliced human immunodeficiency virus mRNAs, produced in infected and transfected cells. tev is regulated during the virus life cycle similarly to the other regulatory proteins, tat, rev, and nef, and displays both tat and rev activities in functional assays. Since tev contains important functional domains of tat and rev and is produced very early after transfection, it may be an important regulator in the initial phase of virus expression. Another rev-related protein, p18(6)Drev, containing env and rev sequences, was characterized and was found not to have detectable rev activity. Images PMID:2186172

  7. Relationship between circadian oscillations of Rev-erb{alpha} expression and intracellular levels of its ligand, heme

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, Pamela M.; Ying Ling; Burris, Thomas P.

    2008-04-18

    The nuclear hormone receptors, REV-ERB{alpha} [NR1D1] and REV-ERB{beta} [NR1D1], were recently demonstrated to be receptors for the porphyrin, heme. Heme regulates the ability of these receptors to repress transcription of their target genes via modulation of the affinity of the receptor's ligand binding domain for the corepressor, NCoR. The REV-ERBs function as critical components of the mammalian clock and their expression oscillates in a circadian manner. Here, we show that in NIH3T3 cells intracellular heme levels also oscillate in a circadian fashion. These data are the first to show the temporal relationship of intracellular heme levels to the expression of its receptor, Rev-erb{alpha}, and suggest that the rapid oscillations in heme levels may an important component regulating REV-ERB transcriptional activity.

  8. Comment on "In situ imaging of ultra-fast loss of nanostructure in nanoparticle aggregates" [J. Appl. Phys. 115, 084903 (2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levitas, Valery I.; Hwang, Yong Seok

    2016-02-01

    One of the conclusions of a recent article by Egan et al. [J. Appl. Phys. 115, 084903 (2014)] was that since the melt-dispersion mechanism (MDM) of the reaction of aluminum nanoparticles was not observed in their experiments, this mechanism is very unlikely. Our main point here is to demonstrate that, in fact, these experiments do not disprove the MDM.

  9. Comment on ``Barut-Girardello and Klauder-Perelomov coherent states for the Kravchuk functions'' [J. Math. Phys. 48, 112106 (2007)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fakhri, H.; Dehghani, A.

    2008-04-01

    We call attention to the misconstructions in a paper recently published in this journal [A. Chenaghlou and O. Faizy, J. Math. Phys. 48, 112106 (2007)]. It is shown that the constructed Barut-Girardello coherent states are problematic from the view points of the definition and the measure. The claimed coherencies for the Kravchuk functions cannot actually exist.

  10. Note: Derivation of two-photon circular dichroism—Addendum to “Two-photon circular dichroism” [J. Chem. Phys. 62, 1006 (1975)

    SciTech Connect

    Friese, Daniel H.

    2015-09-07

    This addendum shows the detailed derivation of the fundamental equations for two-photon circular dichroism which are given in a very condensed form in the original publication [I. Tinoco, J. Chem. Phys. 62, 1006 (1975)]. In addition, some minor errors are corrected and some of the derivations in the original publication are commented.

  11. Erratum to: “Weak corrections to gluon-induced top antitop hadro-production” [Phys. Lett. B 639 (2006) 513

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moretti, S.; Nolten, M. R.; Ross, D. A.

    2008-03-01

    This is an Erratum to a Letter of ours [S. Moretti, M.R. Nolten, D.A. Ross, Phys. Lett. B 639 (2006) 513]. After its publication, we have discovered a mistake in a numerical program that affects the results presented therein. We provide here the corrected version.

  12. A few remarks on the paper ``Necessary versus sufficient conditions for exact solubility of statistical models on lattices'' [J. Math. Phys. 27, 593 (1986)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutkin, Eugene

    1987-05-01

    Lochak and Maillard [J. Math. Phys. 27, 593 (1986)] claim that the Baxter condition, which was known to be sufficient for the commutativity of transfer matrices, is also necessary (under some additional technical assumptions). Although the claim is correct, the proof in that paper is false. In this paper the errors of Lochak and Maillard are pointed out and correct proofs are outlined.

  13. Comment on 'Wave functions for a Duffin-Kemmer-Petiau particle in a time-dependent potential' [J. Math. Phys. 48, 073515 (2007)

    SciTech Connect

    Castro, L. B.; Castro, A. S. de

    2010-03-15

    It is shown that the paper 'Wave functions for a Duffin-Kemmer-Petiau particle in a time-dependent potential' by Merad and Bensaid [J. Math. Phys. 48, 073515 (2007)] is not correct in using inadvertently a non-Hermitian Hamiltonian in a formalism that does require Hermitian Hamiltonians.

  14. Comment on ''Chaotic electron trajectories in an electromagnetic wiggler free-electron laser with ion-channel guiding'' [Phys. Plasmas 17, 093103 (2010)

    SciTech Connect

    Nasr, N.; Hasanbeigi, A.

    2011-05-15

    The chaotic electron dynamics in a free-electron laser with electromagnetic-wave wiggler and ion-channel has been recently reported by A. Taghavi et al.[Phys. Plasmas 17, 093103 (2010)]. We comment on the authors use of a set of initial condition that is not correct based on the dispersion relation and steady-state orbits.

  15. Comment on ``Note on the relation between thermophoresis and slow uniform flow problems for a rarefied gas'' [Phys. Fluids 21, 112001 (2009)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharipov, Felix

    2010-04-01

    This comment responds to the unjustified criticisms by Takata [Phys. Fluids 21, 112001 (2009)] to papers by Sharipov on the Onsager-Casimir reciprocal relations. It is shown that such relations obtained by Sharipov [Physica A 203, 437 (1994)], where the thermophoresis problem is not considered, are correct in the frame of assumptions made in the paper.

  16. Comment on ``Elastic wave propagation in a solid layer with laser-induced point defects'' [J. Appl. Phys. 110, 064906 (2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, P. A.

    2012-09-01

    Mirzade [J. Appl. Phys. 110, 064906 (2011)] developed a linear theory for the propagation of waves in an elastic solid with atomic point defects, and then sought time-harmonic solutions. It is shown that Mirzade's analysis is incomplete: substantial corrections are required.

  17. Response to ``Comment on `Slow Debye-type peak observed in the dielectric response of polyalcohols' '' [J. Chem. Phys. 134, 037101 (2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergman, R.; Jansson, H.; Swenson, J.

    2011-01-01

    In our recent article [R. Bergman et al., J. Chem. Phys. 132, 044504 (2010)] we investigated some polyalcohols, i.e., glycerol, xylitol, and sorbitol by dielectric spectroscopy. In the study, a low-frequency peak of Debye character that normally is hidden by the large low-frequency dispersion due to conductivity was revealed by analyzing the real part of the permittivity and by using a thin Teflon film to suppress the low-frequency dispersion. We agree with the comment by Paluch et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 134, 037101 (2011)] that the Teflon film setup will indeed create a peak due to the dc conductivity. However, due to the fact that the location of the peak was almost identical in measurement with and without Teflon, we unfortunately mainly showed the data measured with Teflon, despite that it could also be observed in the real part of the permittivity without using the Teflon setup, as shown in our original article [R. Bergman et al., J. Chem. Phys. 132, 044504 (2010)]. Here, we show that the low-frequency peak of Debye character can also be observed by subtracting the dc conductivity. Furthermore, we show that the modulus representation used in Paluch et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 134, 037101 (2011).] is also not suitable for detecting processes hidden by the conductivity.

  18. Rev-erbalpha2 mRNA encodes a stable protein with a potential role in circadian clock regulation.

    PubMed

    Rambaud, Juliette; Triqueneaux, Gérard; Masse, Ingrid; Staels, Bart; Laudet, Vincent; Benoit, Gérard

    2009-05-01

    Circadian rhythms are observed in nearly all aspects of physiology and behavior. In mammals, such biological rhythms are supported by a complex network of self-sustained transcriptional loops and posttranslational modifications, which regulate timely controlled production and degradation of critical factors on a 24-h basis. Among these factors, the orphan nuclear receptor rev-erbalpha plays an essential role by linking together positive and negative regulatory loops. As an essential part of the circadian core clock mechanism, REV-ERBalpha expression shows a precisely scheduled oscillation reflecting the tight control of its production and degradation. In previous studies, we identified two alternative transcripts encoding two protein variants referred to as REV-ERBalpha1 and -alpha2. Interestingly, recent work identified structural elements present only in REV-ERBalpha1 that controls its turnover and thereby influences circadian oscillations. In the present work, we comparatively analyze the two variants and show that REV-ERBalpha2 exhibits a half-life incompatible with a circadian function, suggesting that this variant exerts different biological functions. However, our comparative study clearly indicates undistinguishable DNA-binding properties and transcriptional repression activity as well as a similar regulation mechanism. The only consistent difference appears to be the relative expression level of the two transcripts, rev-erbalpha1 being one to 100 times more expressed than alpha2 depending on tissue and circadian time. Taking this finding into consideration, we reassessed REV-ERBalpha2 turnover and were able to show that this variant exhibits a reduced half-life when coexpressed with REV-ERBalpha1. We propose that the relative expression levels of the two REV-ERBalpha variants fine-tune the circadian period length by regulating REV-ERBalpha half-life. PMID:19228794

  19. Scaling of the Specific Heat of Bounded ^4He Films.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehta, S.; Gasparini, F. M.

    1998-03-01

    We report new measurements of the specific heat of a thick helium film confined between two silicon wafers(S. Mehta, W.Y. Yu, A. Petrou, J. Lipa, D. Bishop and F.M. Gasparini, Czechoslovak J. Phys. 46, 133(1996).). The latest data are for a 0.048μm thick film, which extend our earlier measurements on similar films(S. Mehta and F.M. Gasparini, Phys. Rev. Lett. 78, 2596(1997).) by a factor of 2. The latest experimental cell has the new oxide pattern, and has allowed us to make measurements into the superfluid region. When these data are analyzed to test predictions of correlation-length scaling(M.E. Fisher in Critical Phenomenon, Proc. 51^st) Enrico Fermi Summer School, Varenna, Italy, ed. M.S. Green (Academic Press, NY, 1971)., they collapse well onto the earlier data for ν=0.6705(L.S. Goldner and G. Ahlers, Phys. Rev. B45, 13129(1992).) both above and below T_λ. Some issues regarding scaling still remain near the heat capacity maximum. The experimental techniques used to obtain these data will also be discussed.

  20. A Naturally Occurring rev1-vpu Fusion Gene Does Not Confer a Fitness Advantage to HIV-1

    PubMed Central

    Langer, Simon M.; Hopfensperger, Kristina; Iyer, Shilpa S.; Kreider, Edward F.; Learn, Gerald H.; Lee, Lan-Hui; Hahn, Beatrice H.; Sauter, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Background Pandemic strains of HIV-1 (group M) encode a total of nine structural (gag, pol, env), regulatory (rev, tat) and accessory (vif, vpr, vpu, nef) genes. However, some subtype A and C viruses exhibit an unusual gene arrangement in which the first exon of rev (rev1) and the vpu gene are placed in the same open reading frame. Although this rev1-vpu gene fusion is present in a considerable fraction of HIV-1 strains, its functional significance is unknown. Results Examining infectious molecular clones (IMCs) of HIV-1 that encode the rev1-vpu polymorphism, we show that a fusion protein is expressed in infected cells. Due to the splicing pattern of viral mRNA, however, these same IMCs also express a regular Vpu protein, which is produced at much higher levels. To investigate the function of the fusion gene, we characterized isogenic IMC pairs differing only in their ability to express a Rev1-Vpu protein. Analysis in transfected HEK293T and infected CD4+ T cells showed that all of these viruses were equally active in known Vpu functions, such as down-modulation of CD4 or counteraction of tetherin. Furthermore, the polymorphism did not affect Vpu-mediated inhibition of NF-кB activation or Rev-dependent nuclear export of incompletely spliced viral mRNAs. There was also no evidence for enhanced replication of Rev1-Vpu expressing viruses in primary PBMCs or ex vivo infected human lymphoid tissues. Finally, the frequency of HIV-1 quasispecies members that encoded a rev1-vpu fusion gene did not change in HIV-1 infected individuals over time. Conclusions Expression of a rev1-vpu fusion gene does not affect regular Rev and Vpu functions or alter HIV-1 replication in primary target cells. Since there is no evidence for increased replication fitness of rev1-vpu encoding viruses, this polymorphism likely emerged in the context of other mutations within and/or outside the rev1-vpu intergenic region, and may have a neutral phenotype. PMID:26554585

  1. Mutational analysis of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Rev transactivator: essential residues near the amino terminus.

    PubMed Central

    Hope, T J; McDonald, D; Huang, X J; Low, J; Parslow, T G

    1990-01-01

    The expression of certain mRNAs from human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is controlled by the viral transactivator Rev, a nucleolar protein that binds a cis-acting element in these mRNAs. Rev is encoded by two viral exons that specify amino acids 1 to 26 and 27 to 116, respectively. Earlier studies have mapped essential regions of the protein that are encoded in the second exon. By further mutational analysis of Rev, we have now identified a novel locus encoded by the first exon that also is essential for transactivation in vivo. Defined by mutations at residues 14 to 20, this locus coincides with a cluster of positively charged and nonpolar amino acids that is conserved in Rev proteins of all known primate immunodeficiency viruses. Rev proteins that contained mutations at this site were defective in both nuclear localization and transactivation and did not function as trans-dominant inhibitors of wild-type Rev. Fusion of these mutants to a heterologous nuclear protein complemented the defect in localization but did not restore biological activity. Our findings suggest that this N-terminal locus may play a direct role in transactivation, perhaps contributing to essential protein-protein interactions or forming part of the RNA-binding domain of Rev. Images PMID:2120472

  2. Rev-erbα and the circadian transcriptional regulation of metabolism.

    PubMed

    Gerhart-Hines, Z; Lazar, M A

    2015-09-01

    The circadian clock orchestrates the co-ordinated rhythmicity of numerous metabolic pathways to anticipate daily and seasonal changes in energy demand. This vital physiological function is controlled by a set of individual clock components that are present in each cell of the body, and regulate each other as well as clock output genes. A key factor is the nuclear receptor, Rev-erbα, a transcriptional repressor which functions not only as a clock component but also as a modulator of metabolic programming in an array of tissues. This review explores the role of Rev-erbα in mediating this crosstalk between circadian rhythm and tissue-specific biological networks and its relevance to organismal physiology. PMID:26332963

  3. The REV-ERBs and RORs: molecular links between circadian rhythms and lipid homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Solt, Laura A; Kojetin, Douglas J; Burris, Thomas P

    2011-01-01

    Research efforts spanning the past two decades have established a clear link between nuclear receptor function, regulation of the circadian clock and lipid homeostasis. As such, this family of receptors represents an important area of research. Recent advances in the field have identified two nuclear receptor subfamilies, the REV-ERBs and the ‘retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptors’ (RORs), as critical regulators of the circadian clock with significant roles in lipid homeostasis. In this review, the latest information garnered from cutting-edge research on these two nuclear receptor subfamilies will be discussed. Through direct targeting of the REV-ERBs and RORs with synthetic ligands, generation of novel tools aimed at characterizing their function in vivo have been developed, which may lead to novel therapeutics for the treatment of metabolic disorders. PMID:21526899

  4. Haloarcula marismortui (Volcani) sp. nov., nom. rev., an extremely halophilic bacterium from the Dead Sea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oren, A.; Ginzburg, M.; Ginzburg, B. Z.; Hochstein, L. I.; Volcani, B. E.

    1990-01-01

    An extremely halophilic red archaebacterium isolated from the Dead Sea (Ginzburg et al., J. Gen. Physiol. 55: 187-207, 1970) belongs to the genus Haloarcula and differs sufficiently from the previously described species of the genus to be designated a new species; we propose the name Haloarcula marismortui (Volcani) sp. nov., nom. rev. because of the close resemblance of this organism to "Halobacterium marismortui," which was first described by Volcani in 1940. The type strain is strain ATCC 43049.

  5. Biophysical Characterization of Nucleophosmin Interactions with Human Immunodeficiency Virus Rev and Herpes Simplex Virus US11

    PubMed Central

    Nouri, Kazem; Moll, Jens M.; Milroy, Lech-Gustav; Hain, Anika; Dvorsky, Radovan; Amin, Ehsan; Lenders, Michael; Nagel-Steger, Luitgard; Howe, Sebastian; Smits, Sander H. J.; Hengel, Hartmut; Schmitt, Lutz; Münk, Carsten; Brunsveld, Luc; Ahmadian, Mohammad R.

    2015-01-01

    Nucleophosmin (NPM1, also known as B23, numatrin or NO38) is a pentameric RNA-binding protein with RNA and protein chaperon functions. NPM1 has increasingly emerged as a potential cellular factor that directly associates with viral proteins; however, the significance of these interactions in each case is still not clear. In this study, we have investigated the physical interaction of NPM1 with both human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Rev and Herpes Simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) US11, two functionally homologous proteins. Both viral proteins show, in mechanistically different modes, high affinity for a binding site on the N-terminal oligomerization domain of NPM1. Rev, additionally, exhibits low-affinity for the central histone-binding domain of NPM1. We also showed that the proapoptotic cyclic peptide CIGB-300 specifically binds to NPM1 oligomerization domain and blocks its association with Rev and US11. Moreover, HIV-1 virus production was significantly reduced in the cells treated with CIGB-300. Results of this study suggest that targeting NPM1 may represent a useful approach for antiviral intervention. PMID:26624888

  6. Comment on “General rotating quantum vortex filaments in the low-temperature Svistunov model of the local induction approximation” [Phys. Fluids 26, 065105 (2014)

    SciTech Connect

    Hietala, Niklas Hänninen, Risto

    2014-11-15

    Van Gorder considers a formulation of the local induction approximation, which allows the vortex to move in the direction of the reference axis [“General rotating quantum vortex filaments in the low-temperature Svistunov model of the local induction approximation,” Phys. Fluids 26, 065105 (2014)]. However, in his analytical and numerical study he does not use it. A mistake in the torsion of a helical vortex is also corrected.

  7. Response to “Comment on ‘Stationary self-focusing of Gaussian laser beam in relativistic thermal quantum plasma’” [Phys. Plasmas 21, 064701 (2014)

    SciTech Connect

    Patil, S. D.; Takale, M. V.

    2014-06-15

    Habibi and Ghamari have presented a Comment on our paper [Phys. Plasmas 20, 072703 (2013)] by examining quantum dielectric response in thermal quantum plasma. They have modeled the relativistic self-focusing of Gaussian laser beam in cold and warm quantum plasmas and reported that self-focusing length does not change in both situations. In this response, we have reached the following important conclusions about the comment itself.

  8. Comment on ``Scattering length for fermionic alkali atoms". by S. Gautam and D. Angom, Eur. Phys. J. D 56, 173-179 (2010)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouerdane, H.; Jamieson, M. J.

    2010-04-01

    We suggest that Gautam and Angom [Eur. Phys. J. D 56, 173 (2010)] underestimated the influence of the van der Waals dispersion forces at long range on their calculated low energy scattering parameters and we provide numerical evidence in support. We also provide a simple proof of the relation between s-wave and p-wave scattering parameters and we comment briefly on the semiclassical formula derived by these authors.

  9. Potent Inhibition of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Replication by an Intracellular Anti-Rev Single-Chain Antibody

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Lingxun; Bagasra, Omar; Laughlin, Mark A.; Oakes, Joseph W.; Pomerantz, Roger J.

    1994-05-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) has a complex life cycle, which has made it a difficult target for conventional therapeutic modalities. A single-chain antibody moiety, directed against the HIV-1 regulatory protein Rev, which rescues unspliced viral RNA from the nucleus of infected cells, has now been developed. This anti-Rev single-chain construct (SFv) consists of both light and heavy chain variable regions of an anti-Rev monoclonal antibody, which, when expressed intracellularly within human cells, potently inhibits HIV-1 replication. This intracellular SFv molecule is demonstrated to specifically antagonize Rev function. Thus, intracellular SFv expression, against a retroviral regulatory protein, may be useful as a gene therapeutic approach to combat HIV-1 infections.

  10. WBN-1 Cycle 10 TPBAR Tritium Release, Deduced From Analysis of RCS Data TTP-1-3046-00, Rev 0

    SciTech Connect

    Shaver, Mark W.; Niehus, Mark T.; Love, Edward F.

    2012-02-19

    This document contains the calculation of the TPBAR tritium release from the Mark 9.2 design TPBARs irradiated in WBN cycle 10. The calculation utilizes the generalized cycle analysis methodology given in TTP-1-3045 Rev. 0.

  11. HIV-1 Rev protein specifies the viral RNA export pathway by suppressing TAP/NXF1 recruitment.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Ichiro; Mabuchi, Naoto; Ohno, Mutsuhito

    2014-06-01

    Nuclear RNA export pathways in eukaryotes are often linked to the fate of a given RNA. Therefore, the choice of export pathway should be well-controlled to avoid an unfavorable effect on gene expression. Although some RNAs could be exported by more than one pathway, little is known about how the choice is regulated. This issue is highlighted when the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Rev protein induces the export of singly spliced and unspliced HIV-1 transcripts. How these RNAs are exported is not well understood because such transcripts should have the possibility of utilizing CRM1-dependent export via Rev or cellular TAP/NXF1-dependent export via the transcription/export (TREX) complex, or both. Here we found that Rev suppressed TAP/NXF1-dependent export of model RNA substrates that recapitulated viral transcripts. In this effect, Rev interacted with the cap-binding complex and inhibited the recruitment of the TREX complex. Thus, Rev controls the identity of the factor occupying the cap-proximal region that determines the RNA export pathway. This ribonucleoprotein remodeling activity of Rev may favor viral gene expression. PMID:24753416

  12. Interaction of the HIV-1 Rev cofactor eukaryotic initiation factor 5A with ribosomal protein L5

    PubMed Central

    Schatz, Octavian; Oft, Martin; Dascher, Christiane; Schebesta, Michael; Rosorius, Olaf; Jaksche, Herbert; Dobrovnik, Marika; Bevec, Dorian; Hauber, Joachim

    1998-01-01

    It has previously been shown that interaction of eukaryotic initiation factor 5A (eIF-5A) with the Rev trans-activator protein of HIV-1 mediates the transport of unspliced or incompletely spliced viral mRNAs across the nuclear envelope. Consequently, mutants of eIF-5A block Rev function and thereby replication of HIV-1 in trans, indicating that eIF-5A is a crucial protein that connects the viral Rev regulator with cellular RNA transport systems. Here we show that the ribosomal protein L5, which is the central protein component of the 5S rRNA export system, is a cellular interaction partner of eIF-5A. Functional studies demonstrate that overexpression of L5 protein significantly enhances Rev activity. Furthermore, Rev nuclear export activity is inhibited in human somatic cells by antibodies that recognize eIF-5A or L5. Our data suggest that the Rev export pathway shares components of a cellular transport system involved in the intracellular trafficking of polymerase III (5S rRNA) transcripts. PMID:9465063

  13. Creating a Community Coalition to Prevent Childhood Obesity in Yakima County, Washington: Rev It Up! 2008

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Jessica; Bindler, Ruth C.; Miller, Kris

    2012-01-01

    Background One-third of the US population is obese, and childhood obesity has tripled since the late 1970s. Childhood obesity is a significant health issue requiring interventions on individual, interpersonal, community, organizational, and policy levels. Community coalitions offer successful strategies for engaging community partners with health improvement goals. Community Context In 2008, Yakima County, an agricultural community in eastern Washington, was ranked the eighth fattest city in the United States. Recognizing the obesity problem, the Yakima Health District (YHD) established 2 objectives: to decrease rates of childhood obesity in Yakima County and to recruit and establish a community coalition of key stakeholders and experts to help address the problem. Methods The YHD spearheaded a movement to create a community coalition. The coalition applied for and received state and federal grants. In September 2008, the YHD held the first recruitment event for Rev It Up!, its community-based effort to address the obesity problem in Yakima. YHD invited the Washington State Department of Health to advise the coalition-building and action-planning process. Outcome The community coalition achieved 5 of 7 objectives, including developing a common vision, creating an advisory committee, and conducting a community inventory, prioritization process, and action plan. However, unexpected public health challenges in the YHD delayed coalition efforts. Interpretation Creating the Rev It Up! coalition met a community need and engaged community partners. Some potential partners were dissuaded by the 6-month period required to establish the coalition. Rev It Up! continues as a community effort to reduce rates of obesity in Yakima County. PMID:22765932

  14. Comment on “Generalized dispersion relation for electron Bernstein waves in a non-Maxwellian magnetized anisotropic plasma” [Phys. Plasmas 17, 102114 (2010)

    SciTech Connect

    Sharifi, M. Parvazian, A.

    2015-02-15

    In a recent paper [Deeba et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 102114 (2010)], a generalized dielectric constant for the electron Bernstein waves using non-Maxwellian distribution functions was derived in a collisionless, uniform magnetized plasma. Using the Neumann series expansion for the products of Bessel functions, Deeba, Ahmad, and Murtaza derived the dispersion relations for both kappa and the generalized (r, q) distributions in a straightforward manner. However, their results are questionable, since the Neumann series expansion for the products of Bessel functions is valid for small argument, while for perpendicular propagation, it is necessary to evaluate special integrands for small as well as large arguments.

  15. Comment on “Two-dimensional positive column structure in a discharge tube with radius discontinuity” [Phys. Plasmas 21, 113503 (2014)

    SciTech Connect

    Demidova, M. V.; Kudryavtsev, A. A.; Kurlyandskaya, I. P.; Saifutdinov, A. I.; Stepanova, O. M.

    2015-09-15

    Zobnin et al. have published a paper [Phys. Plasmas, 21, 113503 (2014)] on a topic of discharge physics in the presence of a sharp change in cylindrical discharge geometry. In the comment it is pointed out that for untrapped electrons a full kinetic equation, which includes dependences on spatial coordinates and energies, has to be used for the electron velocity distribution function determination. It is also unclear what probe theories Zobnin et al. have used in their paper for the calculation of electron current to the discharge tube wall.

  16. Comment on the article ``Solitary waves and double layers in an ultra-relativistic degenerate dusty electron-positron-ion plasma'' [Phys. Plasmas 19, 033705 (2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbari-Moghanjoughi, M.

    2012-06-01

    More recently, Roy et al. [Phys. Plasmas 19, 033705 (2012)] have investigated the occurrence of nonlinear solitary and double-layers in an ultrarelativistic dusty electron-positron-ion degenerate plasma using a Sagdeev potential method. They have considered a full parametric examination on Mach-number criteria for existence of such nonlinear excitations using the specific degeneracy limits of Chandrasekhar equation of state (EoS) for Fermi-Dirac plasmas. In this comment, we point-out a misleading extension of polytropic EoS to study the Fermi-Dirac relativistically degenerate plasmas.

  17. Comment on ``The two dimensional motion of a particle in an inverse square potential: Classical and quantum aspects'' [J. Math. Phys. 54, 053509 (2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bietenholz, Wolfgang; Chryssomalakos, Chryssomalis; Salgado, Marcelo

    2015-10-01

    We comment on a fatal flaw in the analysis contained in the work of Martínez-y-Romero et al., [J. Math. Phys. 54, 053509 (2013)], which concerns the motion of a point particle in an inverse square potential, and show that most conclusions reached there are wrong. In particular, the manifestly senseless claim that, in the attractive potential case, no bounded orbits exist for negative energies, is traced to a sign error. Several more mistakes, both in the classical and the quantum cases, are pointed out.

  18. Comment on “Frequency-domain stimulated and spontaneous light emission signals at molecular junctions” [J. Chem. Phys. 141, 074107 (2014)

    SciTech Connect

    Galperin, Michael; Ratner, Mark A.; Nitzan, Abraham

    2015-04-07

    We discuss the derivation of the optical response in molecular junctions presented by U. Harbola et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 141, 074107 (2014)], which questions some terms in the theory of Raman scattering in molecular junctions developed in our earlier publications. We show that the terms considered in our theory represent the correct contribution to calculated Raman scattering and are in fact identical to those considered by Harbola et al. We also indicate drawbacks of the presented approach in treating the quantum transport part of the problem.

  19. Comment on: ‘How much security does Y-00 protocol provide us?’ [Phys. Lett. A 327 (2004) 28

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuen, Horace P.; Kumar, Prem; Corndorf, Eric; Nair, Ranjith

    2005-10-01

    It is claimed by T. Nishioka et al. in [T. Nishioka, T. Hasegawa, H. Ishiziuka, K. Imafuku, H. Imai, Phys. Lett. A 327 (2004) 28 32] that the security of Y-00 is equivalent to that of a classical stream cipher. In this Letter it is shown that the claim is false in either the use of Y-00 for direct encryption or key generation, in all the parameter ranges it is supposed to operate including those of the experiments reported thus far. The security of Y-00 type protocols is clarified.

  20. Comment on “Competition between coherent emission and broadband spontaneous emission in the quantum free electron laser” [Phys. Plasmas 20, 033106 (2013)

    SciTech Connect

    Petrillo, V.; Rossi, A. R.; Serafini, L.

    2013-12-15

    We point out that in the equation for the electron distribution evolution during Thomson/Compton or undulator radiation used in the paper: “Competition between coherent emission and broadband spontaneous emission in the quantum free electron laser” by G. R. M. Robb and R. Bonifacio [Phys. Plasmas 20, 033106 (2013)], the weight function should be the distribution of the number of emitted photons and not the photon energy distribution. Nevertheless, the considerations expressed in this comment do not alter the conclusions drawn in the paper in object.

  1. Comment on “Geometry effect on the magnetic ordering of geometrically frustrated rectangular and triangular magnets” [Phys. Lett. A 375 (13) (2011) 1548

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mól, L. A. S.; Pereira, A. R.; Moura-Melo, W. A.

    2011-07-01

    In a recent letter Li et al. [Phys. Lett. A 375 (2011) 1548] have investigated some geometric effects on the ordering of artificial spin ice materials. They have argued that the system ground-state undergoes a transition when the lattice spacing in one direction is sufficiently larger than in the other. Their results were obtained by evaluating the dipolar interactions using a restrict set of spin pairs. In this comment we show that by taking into account all the dipolar interactions among the spins no ground-state transition is observed.

  2. Comment on the article 'Solitary waves and double layers in an ultra-relativistic degenerate dusty electron-positron-ion plasma'[Phys. Plasmas 19, 033705 (2012)

    SciTech Connect

    Akbari-Moghanjoughi, M.

    2012-06-15

    More recently, Roy et al.[Phys. Plasmas 19, 033705 (2012)] have investigated the occurrence of nonlinear solitary and double-layers in an ultrarelativistic dusty electron-positron-ion degenerate plasma using a Sagdeev potential method. They have considered a full parametric examination on Mach-number criteria for existence of such nonlinear excitations using the specific degeneracy limits of Chandrasekhar equation of state (EoS) for Fermi-Dirac plasmas. In this comment, we point-out a misleading extension of polytropic EoS to study the Fermi-Dirac relativistically degenerate plasmas.

  3. Comment on “A Quantum Network System of QSS-QDC Using χ-Type Entangled States" [Chin. Phys. Lett. 29 (2012) 050303

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhi-Hao; Chen, Han-Wu; Liu, Wen-Jie; Xu, Juan

    2013-03-01

    Two quantum secret sharing (QSS) protocols in a multiuser quantum direct communication (QDC) network system were put forward by Hong et al. [Chin. Phys. Lett. 29 (2012) 050303]. However, we find that either agent (Bob or Charlie) alone can obtain half the information about the sender's secret without collaboration with the other, which does not satisfy the security requirement of QSS. Moreover, the secret message sent by Alice in the second protocol can be eavesdropped on or its communication can be disturbed by the builder of quantum channels (Trent).

  4. Comment on “Shape transition of unstrained flattest single-walled carbon nanotubes under pressure” [J. Appl. Phys. 115, 044512 (2014)

    SciTech Connect

    Vassilev, Vassil M. Djondjorov, Peter A.; Mladenov, Ivaïlo M.

    2015-05-21

    Recently, Mu et al. [J. Appl. Phys. 115, 044512 (2014)] have developed an analytic approach to describe some special shapes of a single-wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) under hydrostatic pressure. These authors have found approximate analytic expressions for the parametric equations of the tube cross section profile and its curvature at the convex-to-concave transition pressure using a shell-like 2D continuum model describing the shapes of such nanotubes. In this comment, we provide additional insight into this problem taking into account the exact analytic representation of the shapes that a SWCNT attains when subjected to hydrostatic pressure according to the very same continuum model.

  5. Comment on “The two dimensional motion of a particle in an inverse square potential: Classical and quantum aspects” [J. Math. Phys. 54, 053509 (2013)

    SciTech Connect

    Bietenholz, Wolfgang Chryssomalakos, Chryssomalis Salgado, Marcelo

    2015-10-15

    We comment on a fatal flaw in the analysis contained in the work of Martínez-y-Romero et al., [J. Math. Phys. 54, 053509 (2013)], which concerns the motion of a point particle in an inverse square potential, and show that most conclusions reached there are wrong. In particular, the manifestly senseless claim that, in the attractive potential case, no bounded orbits exist for negative energies, is traced to a sign error. Several more mistakes, both in the classical and the quantum cases, are pointed out.

  6. Comment on "Propagation of a TE surface mode in a relativistic electron beam-quantum plasma system" [Phys. Lett. A 376 (2012) 169

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moradi, Afshin

    2016-07-01

    In a recent paper Abdel Aziz [Phys. Lett. A 376 (2012) 169] obtained the dispersion properties of TE surface modes propagating at the interface between a magnetized quantum plasma and vacuum in the Faraday configuration, where these TE surface waves are excited during the interaction of relativistic electron beam with magnetized quantum plasma. The present Comment points out that in the Faraday configuration the surface waves acquire both TM and TE components due to the cyclotron motion of electrons. Therefore, the TE surface waves cannot propagate on surface of the present system and the general dispersion relations for surface waves, derived by Abdel Aziz are incorrect.

  7. Determinants of G quadruplex-induced epigenetic instability in REV1-deficient cells

    PubMed Central

    Schiavone, Davide; Guilbaud, Guillaume; Murat, Pierre; Papadopoulou, Charikleia; Sarkies, Peter; Prioleau, Marie-Noëlle; Balasubramanian, Shankar; Sale, Julian E

    2014-01-01

    REV1-deficient chicken DT40 cells are compromised in replicating G quadruplex (G4)-forming DNA. This results in localised, stochastic loss of parental chromatin marks and changes in gene expression. We previously proposed that this epigenetic instability arises from G4-induced replication fork stalls disrupting the accurate propagation of chromatin structure through replication. Here, we test this model by showing that a single G4 motif is responsible for the epigenetic instability of the BU-1 locus in REV1-deficient cells, despite its location 3.5 kb from the transcription start site (TSS). The effect of the G4 is dependent on it residing on the leading strand template, but is independent of its in vitro thermal stability. Moving the motif to more than 4 kb from the TSS stabilises expression of the gene. However, loss of histone modifications (H3K4me3 and H3K9/14ac) around the transcription start site correlates with the position of the G4 motif, expression being lost only when the promoter is affected. This supports the idea that processive replication is required to maintain the histone modification pattern and full transcription of this model locus. PMID:25190518

  8. Comment on 'Continuum modes in rotating plasmas: General equations and continuous spectra for large aspect ratio tokamaks'[Phys. Plasmas 18, 092103 (2011)

    SciTech Connect

    Goedbloed, J. P.

    2012-06-15

    It is shown that some of the main results of the recent paper by Lakhin and Ilgisonis [Phys. Plasmas 18, 092103 (2011)], viz. the derivation of the equations for the continuous spectra of poloidally and toroidally rotating plasmas and their special solution for large aspect ratio tokamaks with large parallel flows were obtained before by Goedbloed, Belieen, van der Holst, and Keppens [Phys. Plasmas 11, 28 (2004)]. A further rearrangement of the system of equations for the coupled Alfven and slow continuous spectra clearly exhibits: (a) coupling through a single tangential derivative, which is a generalization of the geodesic curvature; (b) the 'transonic' transitions of the equilibrium, which need to be carefully examined in order to avoid entering hyperbolic flow regimes where the stability formalism breaks down. A critical discussion is devoted to the implications of this failure, which is generally missed in the tokamak literature, possibly as a result of the wide-spread use of the sonic Mach number of gas dynamics, which is an irrelevant and misleading parameter in 'transonic' magnetohydrodynamics. Once this obstacle in understanding is removed, further application of the theory of trans-slow Alfven continuum instabilities to both tokamaks, with possible implications for the L-H transition, and astrophysical objects like 'fat' accretion disks, with a possible new route to magnetohydrodynamic turbulence, becomes feasible.

  9. Development of a real-time quantitative RT-PCR to detect REV contamination in live vaccine.

    PubMed

    Luan, Huaibiao; Wang, Yixin; Li, Yang; Cui, Zhizhong; Chang, Shuang; Zhao, Peng

    2016-09-01

    Based on the published Avian reticuloendotheliosis virus (REV) whole genome sequence, primers and TaqMan probes were designed and synthesized, and the TaqMan probe fluorescence real-time quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) method for detecting the REV pol gene was established by optimizing the reaction conditions. Sensitivity analysis showed that the qRT-PCR method had a sensitivity that was 1,000-fold higher than conventional PCR. Additionally, no amplification signals were obtained when we attempted to detect DNA or cDNA of ALV-A/B/J, MDV, CIAV, IBDV, ARV, NDV, AIV, or other viruses, suggesting a high specificity for our method. Various titers of REV were artificially "spiked" into the FPV and MDV vaccines to simulate REV contamination in attenuated vaccines to validate this qRT-PCR method. Our findings indicated that this qRT-PCR method could detect REV contamination at a dose of 1 TCID50/1,000 feathers, which was 10,000-fold more sensitive than the regular RT-PCR detection (10(4) TCID50/1000 feathers). PMID:27122388

  10. Restriction of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 production in a human astrocytoma cell line is associated with a cellular block in Rev function.

    PubMed Central

    Neumann, M; Felber, B K; Kleinschmidt, A; Froese, B; Erfle, V; Pavlakis, G N; Brack-Werner, R

    1995-01-01

    Chronically human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) strain IIIB-infected human TH4-7-5 astrocytoma cells show low-level virus production. Cocultivation of TH4-7-5 cells with myelomonocytic cells led to active virus production in these target cells after a lag period, indicating cell-determined restriction of virus replication in the glial cells. HIV-1 transcript patterns of TH4-7-5 cells contained only a small proportion of Rev-dependent mRNA species, mimicking a Rev-negative phenotype despite the presence of rev mRNAs and protein. Sequencing of the single provirus integrated in TH4-7-5 cells demonstrated that the rev gene and the Rev-responsive element are intact. These results suggested inhibited function of the Rev-regulatory unit in these astrocytoma cells. Transfection of TH4-7-5 cells with a Rev expression plasmid resulted in weak or no induction of proviral p24gag antigen levels compared with the dramatic increase observed in Rev-permissive HeLa cells. Immunofluorescence analysis of TH4-7-5 cells transfected with a rev-expressing plasmid revealed prominent cytoplasmic and nuclear-nucleolar localization of Rev, in contrast to the predominant nuclear-nucleolar localization pattern of Rev in HeLa cells. We conclude that restriction of virus production in TH4-7-5 cells is at least partially due to a block in Rev-dependent posttranscriptional regulation of HIV expression. PMID:7884864

  11. Deletion of the GI-2 integrase and the wbkA flanking transposase improves the stability of Brucella melitensis Rev 1 vaccine

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Brucella melitensis Rev 1 is the best vaccine available for the prophylaxis of small ruminant brucellosis and, indirectly, for reducing human brucellosis. However, Rev 1 shows anomalously high rates of spontaneous dissociation from smooth (S) to rough (R) bacteria, the latter being inefficacious as vaccines. This S-R instability results from the loss of the O-polysaccharide. To overcome this problem, we investigated whether some recently described mechanisms promoting mutations in O-polysaccharide genes were involved in Rev 1 S-R dissociation. We found that a proportion of Rev 1 R mutants result from genome rearrangements affecting the wbo O-polysaccharide loci of genomic island GI-2 and the wbkA O-polysaccharide glycosyltransferase gene of the wbk region. Accordingly, we mutated the GI-2 int gene and the wbk IS transposase involved in those arrangements, and found that these Rev 1 mutants maintained the S phenotype and showed lower dissociation levels. Combining these two mutations resulted in a strain (Rev 2) displaying a 95% decrease in dissociation with respect to parental Rev 1 under conditions promoting dissociation. Rev 2 did not differ from Rev 1 in the characteristics used in Rev 1 typing (growth rate, colonial size, reactivity with O-polysaccharide antibodies, phage, dye and antibiotic susceptibility). Moreover, Rev 2 and Rev 1 showed similar attenuation and afforded similar protection in the mouse model of brucellosis vaccines. We conclude that mutations targeting genes and DNA sequences involved in spontaneous O-polysaccharide loss enhance the stability of a critical vaccine phenotype and complement the empirical stabilization precautions taken during S Brucella vaccine production. PMID:24176078

  12. HNF6 and Rev-erbα integrate hepatic lipid metabolism by overlapping and distinct transcriptional mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuxiang; Fang, Bin; Damle, Manashree; Guan, Dongyin; Li, Zhenghui; Kim, Yong Hoon; Gannon, Maureen; Lazar, Mitchell A

    2016-07-15

    Hepatocyte nuclear factor 6 (HNF6) is required for liver development, but its role in adult liver metabolism is not known. Here we show that deletion of HNF6 in livers of adult C57Bl/6 mice leads to hepatic steatosis in mice fed normal laboratory chow. Although HNF6 is known mainly as a transcriptional activator, hepatic loss of HNF6 up-regulated many lipogenic genes bound directly by HNF6. Many of these genes are targets of the circadian nuclear receptor Rev-erbα, and binding of Rev-erbα at these sites was lost when HNF6 was ablated in the liver. While HNF6 and Rev-erbα coordinately regulate hepatic lipid metabolism, each factor also affects additional gene sets independently. These findings highlight a novel mechanism of transcriptional repression by HNF6 and demonstrate how overlapping and distinct mechanisms of transcription factor function contribute to the integrated physiology of the liver. PMID:27445394

  13. The Protein Level of Rev1, a TLS Polymerase in Fission Yeast, Is Strictly Regulated during the Cell Cycle and after DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Uchiyama, Masashi; Terunuma, Junko; Hanaoka, Fumio

    2015-01-01

    Translesion DNA synthesis provides an alternative DNA replication mechanism when template DNA is damaged. In fission yeast, Eso1 (polη), Kpa1/DinB (polκ), Rev1, and Polζ (a complex of Rev3 and Rev7) have been identified as translesion synthesis polymerases. The enzymatic characteristics and protein-protein interactions of these polymerases have been intensively characterized; however, how these proteins are regulated during the cell cycle remains unclear. Therefore, we examined the cell cycle oscillation of translesion polymerases. Interestingly, the protein levels of Rev1 peaked during G1 phase and then decreased dramatically at the entry of S phase; this regulation was dependent on the proteasome. Temperature-sensitive proteasome mutants, such as mts2-U31 and mts3-U32, stabilized Rev1 protein when the temperature was shifted to the restrictive condition. In addition, deletion of pop1 or pop2, subunits of SCF ubiquitin ligase complexes, upregulated Rev1 protein levels. Besides these effects during the cell cycle, we also observed upregulation of Rev1 protein upon DNA damage. This upregulation was abolished when rad3, a checkpoint protein, was deleted or when the Rev1 promoter was replaced with a constitutive promoter. From these results, we hypothesize that translesion DNA synthesis is strictly controlled through Rev1 protein levels in order to avoid unwanted mutagenesis. PMID:26147350

  14. Metabolism and apoptotic properties of elevated ceramide in HT29rev cells.

    PubMed Central

    Veldman, R J; Klappe, K; Hoekstra, D; Kok, J W

    1998-01-01

    Ceramide (Cer) has been implicated in the regulation of apoptosis. In this study, we elevated cellular Cer levels in human colon-carcinoma (HT29(rev)) cells by incubating the cells in the presence of bacterial sphingomyelinase (bSMase) or, alternatively, in the presence of C2-Cer, a short-chain analogue of the sphingolipid. bSMase treatment did not induce apoptosis in these cells, as revealed by a lack of both DNA fragmentation and cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase. In contrast, apoptosis did occur upon addition of C2-Cer. These findings led us to study whether differences in the metabolic fate of the excess of Cer, as generated by both treatments, contributed to the observed difference in apoptosis-inducing capacity. C2-Cer was rapidly taken up by HT29(rev) cells and accumulated due to the absence of substantial metabolic conversion. Upon addition of bSMase, hydrolysis of sphingomyelin resulted in a reduction of that pool to 20% compared with control values, accompanied by a multi-fold increase in Cer level. In spite of the continuous presence of active bSMase, the Cer increase turned out to be transient. Cer levels reached their maximum 1-2 h after addition of bSMase, followed by a significant decrease. Excessive Cer was mainly turned over via cerebrosides into complex glycolipids, including gangliosides. In the presence of glucosylceramide synthase- and/or ceramidase inhibitors, this conversion was significantly blocked and bSMase-generated Cer accumulated in the cells. However, even under these conditions apoptosis did not occur. In conclusion, the inability of bSMase to induce apoptosis of HT29(rev) cells does not appear to be due to rapid metabolic conversion of excessive Cer. Since apoptosis is induced upon addition of C2-Cer, we therefore propose that the intracellular target involved in the propagation of the apoptotic signal is reached by C2-Cer, but not by bSMase-generated Cer. PMID:9531498

  15. Temperature inducible β-sheet structure in the transactivation domains of retroviral regulatory proteins of the Rev family

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thumb, Werner; Graf, Christine; Parslow, Tristram; Schneider, Rainer; Auer, Manfred

    1999-11-01

    The interaction of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) regulatory protein Rev with cellular cofactors is crucial for the viral life cycle. The HIV-1 Rev transactivation domain is functionally interchangeable with analog regions of Rev proteins of other retroviruses suggesting common folding patterns. In order to obtain experimental evidence for similar structural features mediating protein-protein contacts we investigated activation domain peptides from HIV-1, HIV-2, VISNA virus, feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) and equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) by CD spectroscopy, secondary structure prediction and sequence analysis. Although different in polarity and hydrophobicity, all peptides showed a similar behavior with respect to solution conformation, concentration dependence and variations in ionic strength and pH. Temperature studies revealed an unusual induction of β-structure with rising temperatures in all activation domain peptides. The high stability of β-structure in this region was demonstrated in three different peptides of the activation domain of HIV-1 Rev in solutions containing 40% hexafluoropropanol, a reagent usually known to induce α-helix into amino acid sequences. Sequence alignments revealed similarities between the polar effector domains from FIV and EIAV and the leucine rich (hydrophobic) effector domains found in HIV-1, HIV-2 and VISNA. Studies on activation domain peptides of two dominant negative HIV-1 Rev mutants, M10 and M32, pointed towards different reasons for the biological behavior. Whereas the peptide containing the M10 mutation (L 78E 79→D 78L 79) showed wild-type structure, the M32 mutant peptide (L 78L 81L 83→A 78A 81A 83) revealed a different protein fold to be the reason for the disturbed binding to cellular cofactors. From our data, we conclude, that the activation domain of Rev proteins from different viral origins adopt a similar fold and that a β-structural element is involved in binding to a

  16. IPINV: a two-dimensional dipole-dipole resistivity modeling and inversion program. User's guide and documentation for Rev. 1

    SciTech Connect

    Tripp, A.C.; Killpack, T.J.

    1981-01-01

    IPINV.REV1 is a batch program that is capable of inverting resistivity data to two-dimensional models for a dipole-dipole array. The forward problem is computed using a transmission surface analogy. IPINV.REV1 is capable of inverting resistivity data to two-dimensional models of arbitrary complexity. The two-dimensional forward modeling routine is based on the transmission surface analogy (Madden, 1972). The inversion algorithm is a linearized least-squares technique. Step-size stabilization is provided by either the Box-Kanemaesu (1972) method or by using a Marquardt step. The program uses log derivatives to increase the rate of convergence.

  17. Comment on ``MEMS-based high speed scanning probe microscopy'' [Rev. Sci. Instrum. 81, 043702 (2010)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degertekin, F. Levent; Torun, Hamdi

    2010-11-01

    In a recent article, Disseldorp et al. [Rev. Sci. Instrum. 81, 043702 (2010)] present a micromachined z-scanner for scanning probe microscopy (SPM). The scanner comprises a micromachined electrostatically actuated membrane anchored to its substrate with crab-leg flexures. This structure is used as a fast actuator specifically for atomic force microscope and scanning tunneling microscope. The authors present topographic images acquired using the scanner in this paper and elsewhere [F. C. Tabak et al., Ultramicroscopy 110, 599 (2010)]. Although the work is clearly described, it does not appear to be placed in proper context. For example, the authors claim that previous work on microelectromechanical systems SPM has not been focused on high-speed imaging with feedback, which is not supported by the existing literature. In addition, similar actuator structures, albeit slightly larger scale, have been designed and used for SPM applications. Here, we would like comment briefly on the existing literature to clarify the significance of the work.

  18. Safeguards Summary Event List (SSEL), January 1, 1990--December 31, 1996, Vol. 2, Rev. 5

    SciTech Connect

    1997-07-01

    The Safeguards Summary Event List (SSEL), Vol. 2, Rev. 5, provides brief summaries of several hundred safeguards-related events involving nuclear material or facilities regulated by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) which occurred and were reported from January 1, 1990, through December 31, 1996. Because of public interest, the Miscellaneous category includes a few events which involve either source material, byproduct material, or natural uranium which are exempt from safeguards requirements. Events are described under the categories of Bomb-related, Intrusion, Missing and/or Allegedly Stolen, Transportation-related, Tampering/Vandalism, Arson, Firearms, Radiological Sabotage, Nonradiological Sabotage, and Miscellaneous. The information contained in the event descriptions is derived primarily from official NRC reporting channels.

  19. Comment on "Existence domains of slow and fast ion-acoustic solitons in two-ion space plasmas" [Phys. Plasmas 22, 032313 (2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olivier, C. P.; Maharaj, S. K.; Bharuthram, R.

    2016-06-01

    In a series of papers by Maharaj et al., including "Existence domains of slow and fast ion-acoustic solitons in two-ion space plasmas" [Phys. Plasmas 22, 032313 (2015)], incorrect expressions for the Sagdeev potential are presented. In this paper, we provide the correct expression of the Sagdeev potential. The correct expression was used to generate the numerical results for the above-mentioned series of papers, so that all results and conclusions are correct, despite the wrong Sagdeev potential expressions printed in the papers. The correct expression of the Sagdeev potential presented here is a very useful generic expression in the sense that a single expression can be used to study nonlinear structures associated with any acoustic mode, despite the fact that the supersonic and subsonic species would vary if solitons associated with different linear modes are studied.

  20. Response to “Comment on ‘Twin symmetry texture of energetically condensed niobium thin films on sapphire substrate’ ” [J. Appl. Phys. 112, 016101 (2012)

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zhao, X.; Philips, L.; Reece, C. E.; Seo, Kang; Krishnan, M.; Valderrama, E.

    2012-07-01

    Welander is correct about the misidentified crystal-directions in the top-view sapphire lattice (Fig. 4 [Zhao et al., J. Appl. Phys. 110, 033523 (2011)]). He is also correct about the misorientation of the pole figures in Fig. 4. In Fig. 1 of this response, we have corrected these errors. Perhaps because of these errors, Welander misconstrued our discussion of the Nbcrystal growth as claiming a new 3D registry. That was not our intention. Rather, we wished to highlight the role of energetic condensation that drives low-defect crystal growth by a combination of non-equilibrium sub-plantation that disturbs the substrate lattice and thermalmore » annealing that annihilates defects and promotes large-grain crystal growth.« less

  1. Comment on “Rethinking first-principles electron transport theories with projection operators: The problems caused by partitioning the basis set” [J. Chem. Phys. 139, 114104 (2013)

    SciTech Connect

    Brandbyge, Mads

    2014-05-07

    In a recent paper Reuter and Harrison [J. Chem. Phys. 139, 114104 (2013)] question the widely used mean-field electron transport theories, which employ nonorthogonal localized basis sets. They claim these can violate an “implicit decoupling assumption,” leading to wrong results for the current, different from what would be obtained by using an orthogonal basis, and dividing surfaces defined in real-space. We argue that this assumption is not required to be fulfilled to get exact results. We show how the current/transmission calculated by the standard Greens function method is independent of whether or not the chosen basis set is nonorthogonal, and that the current for a given basis set is consistent with divisions in real space. The ambiguity known from charge population analysis for nonorthogonal bases does not carry over to calculations of charge flux.

  2. Comment on: ``Disentangling density and temperature effects in the viscous slowing down of glass forming liquids'' [J. Chem. Phys. 120, 6135 (2004)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roland, C. M.; Casalini, R.

    2004-12-01

    Recently, Tarjus et al. [G. Tarjus, D. Kivelson, S. Mossa, and C. Alba-Simionesco, J. Chem. Phys. 120, 6135 (2004)] concluded from a review of data for a variety of glass formers that the supercooled dynamics are almost invariably dominated by temperature T, rather than by density ρ. By including additional published data into such a compilation, we show that for van der Waals molecular liquids, the dynamics near Tg are in fact governed as much by density as by temperature. Moreover, relaxation times measured at various temperatures and pressures can be superimposed by plotting as a function ργ/T. This scaling form can arise from an assumed inverse power law for the intermolecular repulsive potential, with γ a material constant.

  3. Breaking with Traditional Phys Ed.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegel, Dorothy

    1978-01-01

    Project ACTIVE (All Children Totally Involved Exercising) is an individualized physical education program which started in Oakhurst, New Jersey, and has spread nationally. An exercise program is tailored to each participant's personal needs, determined by medical examination and fitness tests. Nutrition instruction may be combined with the…

  4. Erratum: Evidence of b-jet quenching in PbPb collisions at sNN=2.76TeV [Phys. Rev. Lett. 113 , 132301 (2014)

    SciTech Connect

    Chatrchyan, S.

    2015-07-10

    In our Letter, there was a component of the statistical uncertainty from the simulated PbPb Monte Carlo samples. This uncertainty was not propagated to all of the results. Figures 3 and 4 have been updated to reflect this source of uncertainty. In this case, the statistical uncertainties remain smaller than the systematic uncertainties in all cases such that the conclusions of the Letter are unaltered.

  5. 78 FR 63964 - Request for Comments on Draft NIST Interagency Report (NISTIR) 7628 Rev. 1, Guidelines for Smart...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-25

    ... Register on October 9, 2009 (74 FR 52183) soliciting comments on the working draft. NIST issued a second Request for Comments on April 13, 2010 (75 FR 18819), which also included a summary disposition of... (NISTIR) 7628 Rev. 1, Guidelines for Smart Grid Cyber Security AGENCY: National Institute of Standards...

  6. The HIV-1 Rev response element (RRE) adopts alternative conformations that promote different rates of virus replication

    PubMed Central

    Sherpa, Chringma; Rausch, Jason W.; Le Grice, Stuart F.J.; Hammarskjold, Marie-Louise; Rekosh, David

    2015-01-01

    The HIV Rev protein forms a complex with a 351 nucleotide sequence present in unspliced and incompletely spliced human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) mRNAs, the Rev response element (RRE), to recruit the cellular nuclear export receptor Crm1 and Ran-GTP. This complex facilitates nucleo-cytoplasmic export of these mRNAs. The precise secondary structure of the HIV-1 RRE has been controversial, since studies have reported alternative structures comprising either four or five stem-loops. The published structures differ only in regions that lie outside of the primary Rev binding site. Using in-gel SHAPE, we have now determined that the wt NL4-3 RRE exists as a mixture of both structures. To assess functional differences between these RRE ‘conformers’, we created conformationally locked mutants by site-directed mutagenesis. Using subgenomic reporters, as well as HIV replication assays, we demonstrate that the five stem-loop form of the RRE promotes greater functional Rev/RRE activity compared to the four stem-loop counterpart. PMID:25855816

  7. 75 FR 32493 - NUREG-0654/FEMA-REP-, Rev. 1, Supplement 3, Guidance for Protective Action Recommendations for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-08

    ... Preparedness Program Manual and Supplement 4 to NUREG-0654/FEMA-REP-1, Rev.1 (74 FR 23198 published on May 18... comments, see the ``Announcement of Issuance for Public Comment, Availability'' (at 75 FR 10524, on March 8... of availability, titled ``Announcement of Issuance for Public Comment, Availability'' (75 FR...

  8. 78 FR 27971 - Determination That REV-EYES (Dapiprazole Hydrochloride Ophthalmic Solution), 0.5%, Was Not...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-13

    ... include what is now section 505(j)(7) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (21 U.S.C. 355(j)(7... approval of the drug's NDA or ANDA for reasons of safety or effectiveness or if FDA determines that the... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Determination That REV-EYES (Dapiprazole...

  9. Transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of HIV-1 gene expression: role of cellular factors for Tat and Rev.

    PubMed

    Nekhai, Sergei; Jeang, Kuan-Teh

    2006-12-01

    The emergence of drug-resistant HIV-1 strains presents a challenge for the design of new therapy. Targeting host cell factors that regulate HIV-1 replication might be one way to overcome the propensity for HIV-1 to mutate in order to develop resistance to antivirals. This article reviews the interplay between viral proteins Tat and Rev and their cellular cofactors in the transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of HIV-1 gene expression. HIV-1 Tat regulates viral transcription by recruiting cellular factors to the HIV promoter. Tat interacts with protein kinase complexes Cdk9/cyclin T1 and Cdk2/cyclin E; acetyltransferases p300/CBP, p300/CBP-associated factor and hGCN5; protein phosphatases and other factors. HIV-1 Rev regulates post-transcriptional processing of viral mRNAs. Rev primarily functions to export unspliced and partially spliced viral RNAs from the nucleus into the cytoplasm. For this activity, Rev cooperates with cellular transport protein CRM1 and RNA helicases DDX1 and DDX3, amongst others. PMID:17661632

  10. Public Data Set: Erratum: "Multi-point, high-speed passive ion velocity distribution diagnostic on the Pegasus Toroidal Experiment" [Rev. Sci. Instrum. 83, 10D516 (2012)

    DOE Data Explorer

    Burke, Marcus G. [University of Wisconsin-Madison] (ORCID:0000000176193724); Fonck, Raymond J. [University of Wisconsin-Madison] (ORCID:0000000294386762); Bongard, Michael W. [University of Wisconsin-Madison] (ORCID:0000000231609746); Schlossberg, David J. [University of Wisconsin-Madison] (ORCID:0000000287139448); Winz, Gregory R. [University of Wisconsin-Madison] (ORCID:0000000177627184)

    2016-07-18

    This data set contains openly-documented, machine readable digital research data corresponding to figures published in M.G. Burke et al., 'Erratum: "Multi-point, high-speed passive ion velocity distribution diagnostic on the Pegasus Toroidal Experiment" [Rev. Sci. Instrum. 83, 10D516 (2012)],' Rev. Sci. Instrum. 87, 079902 (2016).

  11. Rev1 promotes replication through UV lesions in conjunction with DNA polymerases η, ι, and κ but not DNA polymerase ζ

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Jung-Hoon; Park, Jeseong; Conde, Juan; Wakamiya, Maki; Prakash, Louise; Prakash, Satya

    2015-01-01

    Translesion synthesis (TLS) DNA polymerases (Pols) promote replication through DNA lesions; however, little is known about the protein factors that affect their function in human cells. In yeast, Rev1 plays a noncatalytic role as an indispensable component of Polζ, and Polζ together with Rev1 mediates a highly mutagenic mode of TLS. However, how Rev1 functions in TLS and mutagenesis in human cells has remained unclear. Here we determined the role of Rev1 in TLS opposite UV lesions in human and mouse fibroblasts and showed that Rev1 is indispensable for TLS mediated by Polη, Polι, and Polκ but is not required for TLS by Polζ. In contrast to its role in mutagenic TLS in yeast, Rev1 promotes predominantly error-free TLS opposite UV lesions in humans. The identification of Rev1 as an indispensable scaffolding component for Polη, Polι, and Polκ, which function in TLS in highly specialized ways opposite a diverse array of DNA lesions and act in a predominantly error-free manner, implicates a crucial role for Rev1 in the maintenance of genome stability in humans. PMID:26680302

  12. Rev1 promotes replication through UV lesions in conjunction with DNA polymerases η, ι, and κ but not DNA polymerase ζ.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Jung-Hoon; Park, Jeseong; Conde, Juan; Wakamiya, Maki; Prakash, Louise; Prakash, Satya

    2015-12-15

    Translesion synthesis (TLS) DNA polymerases (Pols) promote replication through DNA lesions; however, little is known about the protein factors that affect their function in human cells. In yeast, Rev1 plays a noncatalytic role as an indispensable component of Polζ, and Polζ together with Rev1 mediates a highly mutagenic mode of TLS. However, how Rev1 functions in TLS and mutagenesis in human cells has remained unclear. Here we determined the role of Rev1 in TLS opposite UV lesions in human and mouse fibroblasts and showed that Rev1 is indispensable for TLS mediated by Polη, Polι, and Polκ but is not required for TLS by Polζ. In contrast to its role in mutagenic TLS in yeast, Rev1 promotes predominantly error-free TLS opposite UV lesions in humans. The identification of Rev1 as an indispensable scaffolding component for Polη, Polι, and Polκ, which function in TLS in highly specialized ways opposite a diverse array of DNA lesions and act in a predominantly error-free manner, implicates a crucial role for Rev1 in the maintenance of genome stability in humans. PMID:26680302

  13. REV3, a Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene whose function is required for induced mutagenesis, is predicted to encode a nonessential DNA polymerase.

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, A; Christensen, R B; Alley, J; Beck, A K; Bernstine, E G; Lemontt, J F; Lawrence, C W

    1989-01-01

    We have cloned the REV3 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae by complementation of the rev3 defect in UV-induced mutagenesis. The nucleotide sequence of this gene encodes a predicted protein of Mr 172,956 showing significant sequence similarity to Epstein-Barr virus DNA polymerase and to other members of a class of DNA polymerases including human DNA polymerase alpha and yeast DNA polymerase I. REV3 protein shows less sequence identity, and presumably a more distant evolutionary relationship, to the latter two enzymes than they do to each other. Haploids carrying a complete deletion of REV3 are viable. We suggest that induced mutagenesis in S. cerevisiae depends on a specialized DNA polymerase that is not required for other replicative processes. REV3 is located 2.8 centimorgans from CDC60, on chromosome XVI. Images PMID:2676986

  14. Comment on "Magnetic geometry and physics of advanced divertors: The X-divertor and the snowflake" [Phys. Plasmas 20, 102507 (2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryutov, D. D.; Cohen, R. H.; Rognlien, T. D.; Soukhanovskii, V. A.; Umansky, M. V.

    2014-05-01

    In the recently published paper "Magnetic geometry and physics of advanced divertors: The X-divertor and the snowflake" [Phys. Plasmas 20, 102507 (2013)], the authors raise interesting and important issues concerning divertor physics and design. However, the paper contains significant errors: (a) The conceptual framework used in it for the evaluation of divertor "quality" is reduced to the assessment of the magnetic field structure in the outer Scrape-Off Layer. This framework is incorrect because processes affecting the pedestal, the private flux region and all of the divertor legs (four, in the case of a snowflake) are an inseparable part of divertor operation. (b) The concept of the divertor index focuses on only one feature of the magnetic field structure and can be quite misleading when applied to divertor design. (c) The suggestion to rename the divertor configurations experimentally realized on NSTX (National Spherical Torus Experiment) and DIII-D (Doublet III-D) from snowflakes to X-divertors is not justified: it is not based on comparison of these configurations with the prototypical X-divertor, and it ignores the fact that the NSTX and DIII-D poloidal magnetic field geometries fit very well into the snowflake "two-null" prescription.

  15. Response to Comment on '#28;Twin Symmetry Texture of Energetically Condensed 2 Niobium Thin Films on Sapphire Substrate' #29; [J. Appl. Phys. 110, 033523(2011)

    SciTech Connect

    Xin Zhao, Charles Reece, Phillips Larry, Mahadevan Krishnan, Kang Seo

    2012-07-01

    Welander commented that in our article [J. Appl. Phys. 110, 033523(2011)] , Zhao et al claim to have found a new three-dimensional (3D) relationship for niobium-on-sapphire epitaxy”. Welander might have misunderstood the purpose of our article, which was to show that energetic condensation of Nb on sapphire drives crystal growth that is quite distinct from the type of epitaxy encountered in lower energy deposition. Welander is correct about the misidentified crystal-directions in the top-view sapphire lattice (Fig.4[ref.1]). He is also correct about the misorientation of the pole figures in Fig4[ref.1]. In Fig.1 of this response, we have corrected these errors. Perhaps because of these errors, Welander misconstrued our discussion of the Nb crystal growth as claiming a new 3D registry. That was not our intention. Rather, we wished to highlight the role of energetic condensation that drives low-defect crystal growth by a combination of non-equilibrium sub-plantation that disturbs the substrate lattice and thermal annealing that annihilates defects and promotes large-grain crystal growth.

  16. Comment on “Magnetic geometry and physics of advanced divertors: The X-divertor and the snowflake” [Phys. Plasmas 20, 102507 (2013)

    SciTech Connect

    Ryutov, D. D. Cohen, R. H.; Rognlien, T. D.; Soukhanovskii, V. A.; Umansky, M. V.

    2014-05-15

    In the recently published paper “Magnetic geometry and physics of advanced divertors: The X-divertor and the snowflake” [Phys. Plasmas 20, 102507 (2013)], the authors raise interesting and important issues concerning divertor physics and design. However, the paper contains significant errors: (a) The conceptual framework used in it for the evaluation of divertor “quality” is reduced to the assessment of the magnetic field structure in the outer Scrape-Off Layer. This framework is incorrect because processes affecting the pedestal, the private flux region and all of the divertor legs (four, in the case of a snowflake) are an inseparable part of divertor operation. (b) The concept of the divertor index focuses on only one feature of the magnetic field structure and can be quite misleading when applied to divertor design. (c) The suggestion to rename the divertor configurations experimentally realized on NSTX (National Spherical Torus Experiment) and DIII-D (Doublet III-D) from snowflakes to X-divertors is not justified: it is not based on comparison of these configurations with the prototypical X-divertor, and it ignores the fact that the NSTX and DIII-D poloidal magnetic field geometries fit very well into the snowflake “two-null” prescription.

  17. Comment on "Application of the extended Lie group analysis to the Hopf functional formulation of the Burgers equation" [J. Math. Phys. 54, 072901 (2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frewer, Michael; Khujadze, George; Foysi, Holger

    2016-03-01

    The quest to find new statistical symmetries in the theory of turbulence is an ongoing research endeavor which is still in its beginning and exploratory stage. In our comment we show that the recently performed study of Wacławczyk and Oberlack [J. Math. Phys. 54, 072901 (2013)] failed to present such new statistical symmetries. Despite their existence within a functional Fourier space of the statistical Burgers equation, they all can be reduced to the classical and well-known symmetries of the underlying deterministic Burgers equation itself, except for one symmetry, but which, as we will demonstrate, is only a mathematical artefact without any physical meaning. Moreover, we show that the proposed connection between the translation invariance of the multi-point moments and a symmetry transformation associated to a certain invariant solution of the inviscid functional Burgers equation is invalid. In general, their study constructs and discusses new particular solutions of the functional Burgers equation without referring them to the well-established general solution. Finally, we also see a shortcoming in the presented methodology as being too restricted to construct a complete set of Lie point symmetries for functional equations. In particular, for the considered Burgers equation essential symmetries are not captured.

  18. Comment on "A model for phosphate glass topology considering the modifying ion sub-network" [J. Chem. Phys. 140, 154501 (2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidebottom, David L.

    2015-03-01

    In a recent paper, Hermansen, Mauro, and Yue [J. Chem. Phys. 140, 154501 (2014)] applied the temperature-dependent constraint theory to model both the glass transition temperature, Tg, and fragility, m, of a series of binary alkali phosphate glasses of the form (R2O)x (P2 O 5) 1 - x , where R represents an alkali species. Key to their success seems to be the retention of linear constraints between the alkali ion (R+) and the non-bridging oxygens near Tg, which allows the model to mimic a supposed minimum for both Tg(x) and m(x) located near x = 0.2. However, the authors have overlooked several recent studies that clearly show there is no minimum in m(x). We argue that the retention of the alkali ion constraints at these temperatures is unjustified and question whether the model calculations can be revised to meet the actual experimental data. We also discuss alternative interpretations for the fragility based on two-state thermodynamics that can accurately account for its compositional dependence.

  19. Comment on “A model for phosphate glass topology considering the modifying ion sub-network” [J. Chem. Phys. 140, 154501 (2014)

    SciTech Connect

    Sidebottom, David L.

    2015-03-14

    In a recent paper, Hermansen, Mauro, and Yue [J. Chem. Phys. 140, 154501 (2014)] applied the temperature-dependent constraint theory to model both the glass transition temperature, T{sub g}, and fragility, m, of a series of binary alkali phosphate glasses of the form (R{sub 2}O){sub x}(P{sub 2}O{sub 5}){sub 1−x}, where R represents an alkali species. Key to their success seems to be the retention of linear constraints between the alkali ion (R{sup +}) and the non-bridging oxygens near T{sub g}, which allows the model to mimic a supposed minimum for both T{sub g}(x) and m(x) located near x = 0.2. However, the authors have overlooked several recent studies that clearly show there is no minimum in m(x). We argue that the retention of the alkali ion constraints at these temperatures is unjustified and question whether the model calculations can be revised to meet the actual experimental data. We also discuss alternative interpretations for the fragility based on two-state thermodynamics that can accurately account for its compositional dependence.

  20. Analysis of long distance wakes of Horns Rev I using actuator disc approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eriksson, O.; Mikkelsen, R.; Hansen, K. S.; Nilsson, K.; Ivanell, S.

    2014-12-01

    The wake recovery behind the Horns Rev wind farm is analysed to investigate the applicability of Large Eddy Simulations (LES) in combination with an actuator disc method (ACD) for farm to farm interaction studies. Periodic boundary conditions on the lateral boundaries are used to model the wind farm (as infinitely wide), using only two columns of turbines. The meteorological conditions of the site are taken into account by introducing wind shear and pre-generated synthetic turbulence to the simulation domain using body forces. Simulations are carried out to study the power production and the velocity deficit in the farm wake. The results are compared to the actual power production as well as to wind measurements at 2 km and 6 km behind the wind farm. The simulated power production inside the farm shows an overall good correlation with the real production, but is slightly overpredicted in the most downstream rows. The simulations overpredict the wake recovery, namely the wind velocity, at long distances behind the farm. Further studies are needed before the presented method can be applied for the simulation of long distance wakes. Suggested parameters to be studied are the development of the turbulence downstream in the domain and the impact of the grid resolution.

  1. Dynamical mechanism of Bmal 1 / Rev- erbα loop in circadian clock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ying; Liu, Zengrong

    2015-07-01

    In mammals, the circadian clock is driven by multiple integrated transcriptional feedback loops involving three kinds of central clock-controlled elements (CCEs): E-boxes, D-boxes and ROR-elements. With the aid of CCEs, the concentrations of the active proteins are approximated by the delayed concentrations of mRNAs, which simplifies the circadian system drastically. The regulatory loop composed by BMAL1 and REV-ERB- α plays important roles in circadian clock. With delay differential equations, we gave a mathematical model of this loop and investigated its dynamical mechanisms. Specially, we theoretically provided the sufficient conditions for sustained oscillation of the loop with Hopf bifurcation theory. The total of delays determines the emergence of oscillators, which explains the crucial roles of delays in circadian clock revealed by biological experiments. Numerically, we studied the amplitude and period against the variations of delays and the degradation rates. The different sensitivities of amplitude and period on these factors provide ideas to adjust the amplitude or period of circadian oscillators.

  2. Efficient expression of the human papillomavirus type 16 L1 protein in epithelial cells by using Rev and the Rev-responsive element of human immunodeficiency virus or the cis-acting transactivation element of simian retrovirus type 1.

    PubMed Central

    Tan, W; Felber, B K; Zolotukhin, A S; Pavlakis, G N; Schwartz, S

    1995-01-01

    Production of the human papillomavirus (HPV) late gene products L1 and L2 is limited to terminally differentiated keratinocytes. Here, we demonstrate that mRNA encoding the HPV-16 L1 capsid protein contains cis-acting RNA elements that inhibit expression at the posttranscriptional level. While cytoplasmic L1 mRNA is detectable in transfected HeLa cells, L1 protein is not produced. We have identified at least one major inhibitory element that is located within the L1 open reading frame, whereas another negative element had been reported to lie in the 3'-untranslated region of L1. The presence of these elements may explain the lack of HPV late gene expression in undifferentiated epithelial cells. Efficient production of HPV-16 L1 could be achieved with posttranscriptional regulatory elements of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 or simian retrovirus type 1. L1 protein was expressed in the presence of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Rev from hybrid mRNAs containing the RNA binding site for Rev (Rev-responsive element). In addition, we have achieved efficient expression of L1 from hybrid mRNAs containing a cis-acting transactivation element from simian retrovirus type 1. Our data show that HPV-16 L1 protein production is regulated posttranscriptionally. This regulated expression may allow virus production in terminally differentiated epithelial cells and is probably a conserved and important mechanism for HPV expression. PMID:7637007

  3. Final Report - Sulfate Solubility in RPP-WTP HLW Glasses, VSL-06R6780-1, Rev. 0

    SciTech Connect

    Kruger, Albert A.; Pegg, I. L.; Feng, A.; Gan, H.; Kot, W. K.

    2013-12-03

    This report describes the results of work and testing specified by Test Specifications 24590-HLW-TSP-RT-01-006 Rev 1, Test Plans VSL-02T7800-1 Rev 1 and Test Exceptions 24590-HLW-TEF-RT-05-00007. The work and any associated testing followed established quality assurance requirements and were conducted as authorized. The descriptions provided in this report are an accurate account of both the conduct of the work and the data collected. Results required by the Test Plans are reported. Also reported are any unusual or anomalous occurrences that are different from the starting hypotheses. The test results and this report have been reviewed and verified.

  4. Reply to "Comment on `Generalized exclusion processes: Transport coefficients' "

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arita, Chikashi; Krapivsky, P. L.; Mallick, Kirone

    2016-07-01

    We reply to the Comment of Becker, Nelissen, Cleuren, Partoens, and Van den Broeck [Phys. Rev. E 93, 046101 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevE.93.046101] on our article [Arita, Krapivsky, and Mallick, Phys. Rev. E 90, 052108 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevE.90.052108] about the transport properties of a class of generalized exclusion processes.

  5. Structure-Function Analyses of Cytochrome P450revI Involved in Reveromycin A Biosynthesis and Evaluation of the Biological Activity of Its Substrate, Reveromycin T*

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Shunji; Nagano, Shingo; Nogawa, Toshihiko; Kanoh, Naoki; Uramoto, Masakazu; Kawatani, Makoto; Shimizu, Takeshi; Miyazawa, Takeshi; Shiro, Yoshitsugu; Osada, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    Numerous cytochrome P450s are involved in secondary metabolite biosynthesis. The biosynthetic gene cluster for reveromycin A (RM-A), which is a promising lead compound with anti-osteoclastic activity, also includes a P450 gene, revI. To understand the roles of P450revI, we comprehensively characterized the enzyme by genetic, kinetic, and structural studies. The revI gene disruptants (ΔrevI) resulted in accumulation of reveromycin T (RM-T), and revI gene complementation restored RM-A production, indicating that the physiological substrate of P450revI is RM-T. Indeed, the purified P450revI catalyzed the C18-hydroxylation of RM-T more efficiently than the other RM derivatives tested. Moreover, the 1.4 Å resolution co-crystal structure of P450revI with RM-T revealed that the substrate binds the enzyme with a folded compact conformation for C18-hydroxylation. To address the structure-enzyme activity relationship, site-directed mutagenesis was performed in P450revI. R190A and R81A mutations, which abolished salt bridge formation with C1 and C24 carboxyl groups of RM-T, respectively, resulted in significant loss of enzyme activity. The interaction between Arg190 and the C1 carboxyl group of RM-T elucidated why P450revI was unable to catalyze both RM-T 1-methyl ester and RM-T 1-ethyl ester. Moreover, the accumulation of RM-T in ΔrevI mutants enabled us to characterize its biological activity. Our results show that RM-T had stronger anticancer activity and isoleucyl-tRNA synthetase inhibition than RM-A. However, RM-T showed much less anti-osteoclastic activity than RM-A, indicating that hemisuccinate moiety is important for the activity. Structure-based P450revI engineering for novel hydroxylation and subsequent hemisuccinylation will help facilitate the development of RM derivatives with anti-osteoclast activity. PMID:25258320

  6. Nuclear receptor REV-ERBα mediates circadian sensitivity to mortality in murine vesicular stomatitis virus-induced encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Gagnidze, Khatuna; Hajdarovic, Kaitlyn H; Moskalenko, Marina; Karatsoreos, Ilia N; McEwen, Bruce S; Bulloch, Karen

    2016-05-17

    Certain components and functions of the immune system, most notably cytokine production and immune cell migration, are under circadian regulation. Such regulation suggests that circadian rhythms may have an effect on disease onset, progression, and resolution. In the vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV)-induced encephalitis model, the replication, caudal penetration, and survivability of intranasally applied VSV depends on both innate and adaptive immune mechanisms. In the current study, we investigated the effect of circadian time of infection on the progression and outcome of VSV-induced encephalitis and demonstrated a significant decrease in the survival rate in mice infected at the start of the rest cycle, zeitgeber time 0 (ZT0). The lower survival rate in these mice was associated with higher levels of circulating chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 (CCL2), a greater number of peripherally derived immune cells accumulating in the olfactory bulb (OB), and increased production of proinflammatory cytokines, indicating an immune-mediated pathology. We also found that the acrophase of molecular circadian clock component REV-ERBα mRNA expression in the OB coincides with the start of the active cycle, ZT12, when VSV infection results in a more favorable outcome. This result led us to hypothesize that REV-ERBα may mediate the circadian effect on survival following VSV infection. Blocking REV-ERBα activity before VSV administration resulted in a significant increase in the expression of CCL2 and decreased survival in mice infected at the start of the active cycle. These data demonstrate that REV-ERBα-mediated inhibition of CCL2 expression during viral-induced encephalitis may have a protective effect. PMID:27143721

  7. The roles of REV3 and RAD57 in double-strand-break-repair-induced mutagenesis of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Rattray, Alison J; Shafer, Brenda K; McGill, Carolyn B; Strathern, Jeffrey N

    2002-01-01

    The DNA synthesis associated with recombinational repair of chromosomal double-strand breaks (DSBs) has a lower fidelity than normal replicative DNA synthesis. Here, we use an inverted-repeat substrate to monitor the fidelity of repair of a site-specific DSB. DSB induction made by the HO endonuclease stimulates recombination >5000-fold and is associated with a >1000-fold increase in mutagenesis of an adjacent gene. We demonstrate that most break-repair-induced mutations (BRIMs) are point mutations and have a higher proportion of frameshifts than do spontaneous mutations of the same substrate. Although the REV3 translesion DNA polymerase is not required for recombination, it introduces approximately 75% of the BRIMs and approximately 90% of the base substitution mutations. Recombinational repair of the DSB is strongly dependent upon genes of the RAD52 epistasis group; however, the residual recombinants present in rad57 mutants are associated with a 5- to 20-fold increase in BRIMs. The spectrum of mutations in rad57 mutants is similar to that seen in the wild-type strain and is similarly affected by REV3. We also find that REV3 is required for the repair of MMS-induced lesions when recombinational repair is compromised. Our data suggest that Rad55p/Rad57p help limit the generation of substrates that require pol zeta during recombination. PMID:12454056

  8. WELLOG: computer software system for analyzing and plotting well log data (a user's guide to WELLOG. REV2)

    SciTech Connect

    Atwood, J.W.; Killpack, T.J.; Glenn, W.E.; Nutter, C.

    1980-11-01

    WELLOG is a software system that has been developed to plot digitized well log data in a manner suitable for analysis. Multiple logs can be plotted side by side for correlation analysis, and up to three logs can be plotted on a cross plot. Data entry, editing, and modification functions are also provided by the program. Digitizing is accomplished by a TEKTRONIX 4954 (on-line) digitizing tablet, and plotting is done on a TEKTRONIX 4014 graphics terminal, a STATOS 42 electrostatic plotter, or a CALCOMP pen plotter using a device independent plotting system. This program (WELLOG.REV2) is not as system-dependent as the former version (WELLOG.REV1). The user must supply a program to digitize the data and supply subroutines to interface the program with file manipulation and plotting routines of their system. One major improvement is the use of an on-line digitizing system whereby the program accesses disk files rather than reading the data from tape. In REV2 the merge file has been automated such that the file is initialized automatically upon creation and also delete protected. The randomly spaced data capabilities have been greatly improved allowing the averaging and cross plotting of the data. Routines have been added which allow all of the cross plots excepting the Z-plot to be printed on a line printer. Dresser Atlas' A-K plot has also been added. The program is almost completely self-contained needing only a few interfacing and system subroutines.

  9. Exome sequencing reveals recurrent REV3L mutations in cisplatin-resistant squamous cell carcinoma of head and neck

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Kie Kyon; Jang, Kang Won; Kim, Sangwoo; Kim, Han Sang; Kim, Sung-Moo; Kwon, Hyeong Ju; Kim, Hye Ryun; Yun, Hwan Jung; Ahn, Myung Ju; Park, Keon Uk; Ramnarayanan, Kalpana; McPherson, John R.; Zhang, Shenli; Rhee, Je-Keun; Vettore, André L.; Das, Kakoli; Ishimoto, Takatsugu; Kim, Joo Hang; Koh, Yoon Woo; Kim, Se Hun; Choi, Eun Chang; Teh, Bin Tean; Rozen, Steven G.; Kim, Tae-Min; Tan, Patrick; Cho, Byoung Chul

    2016-01-01

    Dacomitinib, an irreversible pan-HER inhibitor, had shown modest clinical activity in squamous cell carcinoma of head and neck (SCCHN) patients. Therefore, validated predictive biomarkers are required to identify patients most likely to benefit from this therapeutic option. To characterize the genetic landscape of cisplatin-treated SCCHN genomes and identify potential predictive biomarkers for dacomitinib sensitivity, we performed whole exome sequencing on 18 cisplatin-resistant metastatic SCCHN tumors and their matched germline DNA. Platinum-based chemotherapy elevated the mutation rates of SCCHN compared to chemotherapy-naïve SCCHNs. Cisplatin-treated SCCHN genomes uniquely exhibited a novel mutational signature characterized by C:G to A:T transversions at CCR sequence contexts that may have arisen due to error-prone translesional synthesis. Somatic mutations in REV3L, the gene encoding the catalytic subunit of DNA polymerase ζ involved in translesional synthesis, are significantly enriched in a subset of patients who derived extended clinical benefit to dacomitinib (P = 0.04). Functional assays showed that loss-of-function of REV3L dramatically enhanced the sensitivity of SCCHN cells to dacomitinib by the loss of both translesion synthesis and homologous recombination pathways. Our data suggest that the ‘platinum’ mutational signature and inactivation of REV3L may inform treatment options in patients of recurrent SCCHN. PMID:26790612

  10. Re(V) and Re(III) complexes with sal2phen and triphenylphosphine: rearrangement, oxidation and reduction.

    PubMed

    Lane, Stephanie Renee; Sisay, Nebiat; Carney, Brett; Dannoon, Shorouk; Williams, Stephen; Engelbrecht, Hendrik Petrus; Barnes, Charles Leslie; Jurisson, Silvia Sabine

    2011-01-01

    Reactions of Re(V), tetradentate Schiff base complexes with tertiary phosphines have previously yielded both rearranged Re(V) and reduced Re(III) complexes. To further understand this chemistry, the rigid diiminediphenol (N(2)O(2)) Schiff base ligand sal(2)phen (N,N'-o-phenylenebis(salicylaldimine)) was reacted with (n-Bu(4)N)[ReOCl(4)] to yield trans-[ReOCl(sal(2)phen)] (1). On reaction with triphenylphosphine (PPh(3)), a rearranged Re(V) product cis-[ReO(PPh(3))(sal(2)phen*)]PF(6) (2), in which one of the imines was reduced to an amine during the reaction, and the reduced Re(III) products trans-[ReCl(PPh(3))(sal(2)phen)] (4) and trans-[Re(PPh(3))(2)(sal(2)phen)](+) (5) were isolated. Reaction of sal(2)phen with [ReCl(3)(PPh(3))(2)(CH(3)CN)] resulted in the isolation of [ReCl(2)(PPh(3))(2)(salphen)] (3). The compounds were characterized using standard spectroscopic methods, elemental analyses and single crystal X-ray crystallography. PMID:21079821

  11. Re(V) and Re(III) Complexes with Sal2phen and Triphenylphosphine: Rearrangement, Oxidation and Reduction

    PubMed Central

    Lane, Stephanie Renee; Sisay, Nebiat; Carney, Brett; Dannoon, Shorouk; Williams, Stephen; Engelbrecht, Hendrik Petrus; Barnes, Charles Leslie; Jurisson, Silvia Sabine

    2010-01-01

    Reactions of ReV, tetradentate Schiff base complexes with tertiary phosphines have previously yielded both rearranged ReV and reduced ReIII complexes. To further understand this chemistry, the rigid diiminediphenol (N2O2) Schiff base ligand sal2phen (N,N’-o-phenylenebis(salicylaldimine)) was reacted with (n-Bu4N)[ReOCl4] to yield trans-[ReOCl(sal2phen)] (1). On reaction with triphenylphosphine (PPh3), a rearranged ReV product cis-[ReO(PPh3)(sal2phen*)]PF6 (2), in which one of the imines was reduced to an amine during the reaction, and the reduced ReIII products trans-[ReCl(PPh3)(sal2phen)] (4) and trans- [Re(PPh3)2(sal2phen)]+ (5) were isolated. Reaction of sal2phen with [ReCl3(PPh3)2(CH3CN)] resulted in the isolation of [ReCl2(PPh3)2(salphen)] (3). The compounds were characterized using standard spectroscopic methods, elemental analyses and single crystal X-ray crystallography. PMID:21079821

  12. Epitopes of human immunodeficiency virus regulatory proteins tat, nef, and rev are expressed in normal human tissue.

    PubMed Central

    Parmentier, H. K.; van Wichen, D. F.; Meyling, F. H.; Goudsmit, J.; Schuurman, H. J.

    1992-01-01

    The expression of regulatory proteins tat, rev, and nef of human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) and tat of HIV-2 was studied in frozen sections of lymph nodes from HIV-1-infected individuals, and various tissues from uninfected persons. In HIV-1-positive lymph nodes, monoclonal antibodies to HIV-1-tat stained solitary cells in the germinal centers and interfollicular zones, and vascular endothelium. Staining by an anti-nef monoclonal antibody was restricted to follicular dendritic cells, whereas anti-rev antibody bound to fibriohistiocytes and high endothelial venules. The antibodies used labeled several cell types in tissues from uninfected individuals. Anti-HIV-1-tat antibodies labeled blood vessels and Hassall's corpuscles in skin and thymus; goblet cells in intestinal tissue and trachea; neural cells in brain and spinal cord; and zymogen-producing cells in pancreas. Anti-rev antibody stained high endothelial venules, Hassall's corpuscles and histiocytes. One anti-nef antibody solely stained follicular dendritic cells in spleen, tonsil, lymph node and Peyer's patches, whereas two other anti-nef antibodies bound to astrocytes, solitary cells in the interfollicular zones of lymph nodes, and skin cells. The current results hamper the immunohistochemical study for pathogenetic and diagnostic use of HIV regulatory protein expression in infected tissue specimens or cells. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:1279980

  13. Electronic spectra of oxocomplexes of Re(V) with thiolato ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gancheff, Jorge S.; Denis, Pablo A.; Hahn, F. Ekkehardt

    2010-08-01

    The electronic spectra of monooxo complexes of rhenium(V) with 1,2-benzenedithiolato (bdt 2-), 3,4-toluenenedithiolato (tdt 2-), maleonitriledithiolato (mnt 2-), and 1,2-dithiooxalato (dto 2-) ligands were investigated at the TD-DFT level employing several functionals and basis sets. The most important transitions are due to ligand-to-metal charge transfer (LMCT) with some minor contribution of ligand-to-metal-ligand charge transfer (LMLCT). However, for [ReO(dto) 2] - this statement does not hold because the transitions are due to metal-ligand-to-metal-ligand charge transfer (MLMLCT). This observation arises from the presence of the oxalate groups. These substituents increase the flexibility of this complex with respect to the complexes containing bdt 2-, mnt 2- and tdt 2-. In these complexes, the C-C backbone imposes a rigid geometry, which leads to the occupied rhenium-orbitals lying energetically below the sulfur-based orbitals. For the complexes [ReO(bdt) 2] -, [ReO(mnt) 2] - and [ReO(tdt) 2] -, the HOMO is a sulfur-based out-of-plane molecular orbital. However, the HOMO of [ReO(dto) 2] - shows a high contribution of the rhenium dx2- y2 and in-plane sulfur-centered orbitals. The comparison of the results obtained with several functionals clearly point to the PBE1PBE/LANL2DZ method as the best TD-DFT method to investigate the electronic spectra of monooxo complexes of Re(V) with thiolato ligands. The results obtained with larger basis sets suggest that the agreement between experiment and theory was due to an error cancellation between basis set incompleteness and deficiencies in the DFT methods.

  14. Dinuclear triple-stranded complexes of ReV with bis(benzene-o-dithiolato) ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gancheff, Jorge S.; Hahn, F. Ekkehardt

    2012-12-01

    The reaction of K2ReCl6 with 1,2-bis(2,3-dimercaptobenzamido)ethane (H4-1), and 1,2-bis(2,3-dimercaptobenzamido)benzene (H4-2) in the presence of Na2CO3 in methanol affords dinuclear complexes of ReV. Experimental evidence supports the presence of self-assembled complexes with two {Re(S2C6H3)3} units connected in a triple-stranded fashion. Density Functional Theory (DFT) studies on geometry and electronic properties were conducted employing the hybrid B3LYP and PBE1PBE functionals. The helical (ΔΔ and ΛΛ) and meso-helical (ΔΛ) isomers were considered. For the helicate complexes included in this study, differences in the stability of the isomers were observed originating in different steric and strain interactions between the three ligand strands. The geometries at the minimum exhibit a distorted trigonal-prismatic coordination environment at the metal centers. Natural bond orbitals (NBO) analysis indicates the presence of Re-S bonds which are strongly polarized toward the non-metal. Time-Dependent DFT (TD-DFT) calculations were performed for a further understanding of the optical spectra. The calculations show the occupied 5d orbitals of the rhenium lying beneath occupied sulfur-based MOs. The general features of the electronic spectra in the visible region are reasonably reproduced by the calculations. The analysis of molecular orbitals also allows the assignment of the origin for all experimentally detected absorption bands. In the high-energy region of the spectrum the absorptions are attributed to ligand-to-metal-ligand charge transfer (LMLCT), in which sulfur-based orbitals and unoccupied orbitals at the rhenium atom and the benzene-o-dithiolato groups are involved. Also in the blue region, shoulders originating from LMLCT are observed.

  15. Tissue damage drives co-localization of NF-κB, Smad3, and Nrf2 to direct Rev-erb sensitive wound repair in mouse macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Eichenfield, Dawn Z; Troutman, Ty Dale; Link, Verena M; Lam, Michael T; Cho, Han; Gosselin, David; Spann, Nathanael J; Lesch, Hanna P; Tao, Jenhan; Muto, Jun; Gallo, Richard L; Evans, Ronald M; Glass, Christopher K

    2016-01-01

    Although macrophages can be polarized to distinct phenotypes in vitro with individual ligands, in vivo they encounter multiple signals that control their varied functions in homeostasis, immunity, and disease. Here, we identify roles of Rev-erb nuclear receptors in regulating responses of mouse macrophages to complex tissue damage signals and wound repair. Rather than reinforcing a specific program of macrophage polarization, Rev-erbs repress subsets of genes that are activated by TLR ligands, IL4, TGFβ, and damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPS). Unexpectedly, a complex damage signal promotes co-localization of NF-κB, Smad3, and Nrf2 at Rev-erb-sensitive enhancers and drives expression of genes characteristic of multiple polarization states in the same cells. Rev-erb-sensitive enhancers thereby integrate multiple damage-activated signaling pathways to promote a wound repair phenotype. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13024.001 PMID:27462873

  16. Scaling of the Specific Heat of Confined ^4He

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehta, S.; Gasparini, F. M.

    1997-03-01

    We report measurements of the specific heat of thick helium films confined between two silicon wafers. These films range in thickness from 0.107-0.692μm and possess a high degree of uniformity(S. Mehta, W.Y. Yu, A. Petrou, J. Lipa, D. Bishop and F.M. Gasparini, Czechoslovak J. Phys. 46, 133(1996).). When the data are analyzed to test predictions of correlation-length scaling(M.E. Fisher in Critical Phenomenon, Proc. 51^st) "Enrico Fermi" Summer School, Varenna, Italy, ed. M.S. Green (Academic Press, NY, 1971)., they collapse well for ν=0.6705(L.S. Goldner and G. Ahlers, Phys. Rev. B45, 13129(1992).) both above and below T_λ. We propose an empirical scaling function which has the correct asymptotic behavior. From this we obtain the surface specific heat. We also compare our results with theoretical calculations and earlier experiments. Work supported by NSF DMR9623831.

  17. Response to {open_quotes}Comment on {open_quote}Reversible work of formation of an embryo of a new phase within a uniform macroscopic mother phase{close_quote}thinsp{close_quotes} [J. Chem. Phys. {bold 111}, 3769 (1999)

    SciTech Connect

    Debenedetti, P.G.; Reiss, H.

    1999-08-01

    External constraints are necessary in order to calculate the energetics of embryo formation when the embryo is not a critical nucleus. The expression for the reversible work of formation obtained in by Debenedetti and Reiss [J. Chem. Phys. {bold 108}, 5498 (1998)] is rigorous and valid regardless of the relative densities of the embryo and mother phase. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  18. High energy neutrinos from astrophysical accelerators of cosmic ray nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anchordoqui, Luis A.; Hooper, Dan; Sarkar, Subir; Taylor, Andrew M.

    2008-02-01

    . Rev. Lett.6619912697(Erratum-ibid. 69 (1992) 2738)F.W.SteckerPhys. Rev. D722005107301A.AtoyanC.D.DermerPhys. Rev. Lett.872001221102L.A.AnchordoquiH.GoldbergF.HalzenT.J.WeilerPhys. Lett. B6002004202E.WaxmanJ.N.BahcallPhys. Rev. Lett.7819972292C.D.DermerA.AtoyanPhys. Rev. Lett.912003071102D.GuettaD.HooperJ.Alvarez-MunizF.HalzenE.ReuveniAstropart. Phys.202004429J.Alvarez-MunizF.HalzenD.W.HooperPhys. Rev. D622000093015A.LoebE.WaxmanJCAP06052006003S. Inoue, G. Sigl, F. Miniati, E. Armengaud, arXiv:astro-ph/0701167.E.WaxmanJ.N.BahcallPhys. Rev. D591999023002Phys. Rev. D642001023002K.MannheimR.J.ProtheroeJ.P.RachenPhys. Rev. D632001023003arXiv:astro-ph/9908031M.AhlersL.A.AnchordoquiH.GoldbergF.HalzenA.RingwaldT.J.WeilerPhys. Rev. D722005023001E.WaxmanAstrophys. J.4521995L1Note that the neutrino spectral shape can deviate from that for protons if the Feynman plateau is not flat in pseudo-rapidity space;L.AnchordoquiH.GoldbergC.NunezPhys. Rev. D712005065014This is in fact suggested by Tevatron data;F.AbeCDF CollaborationPhys. Rev. D4119902330J.G.LearnedS.PakvasaAstropart. Phys.31995267F.HalzenD.SaltzbergPhys. Rev. Lett.8119984305J.F.BeacomN.F.BellD.HooperS.PakvasaT.J.WeilerPhys. Rev. D682003093005(Erratum-ibid. D 72 (2005) 019901)L.A.AnchordoquiH.GoldbergF.HalzenT.J.WeilerPhys. Lett. B593200442L.A.AnchordoquiH.GoldbergF.HalzenT.J.WeilerPhys. Lett. B621200518A.M.HillasAnn. Rev. Astron. Astrophys.221984425For a general discussion on the acceleration time-scale in these sources see, e.g.,D.F.TorresL.A.AnchordoquiRep. Prog. Phys.6720041663M.C.BegelmanB.RudakM.SikoraAstrophys. J.362199038M.J.ChodorowskiA.A.ZdziarskiM.SikoraAstrophys. J.4001992181S.MichalowskiD.AndrewsJ.EickmeyerT.GentileN.MistryR.TalmanK.UenoPhys. Rev. Lett.391977737J.L.PugetF.W.SteckerJ.H.BredekampAstrophys. J.2051976638D.HooperS.SarkarA.M.TaylorAstropart. Phys.272007199The non-thermal energy release in GRBs is much smaller than that output by AGN.P.L.BiermannP.A.StrittmatterAstrophys. J.3221987643R.J.ProtheroeA.P.SzaboPhys

  19. A Rev-independent human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-based vector that exploits a codon-optimized HIV-1 gag-pol gene.

    PubMed

    Kotsopoulou, E; Kim, V N; Kingsman, A J; Kingsman, S M; Mitrophanous, K A

    2000-05-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) genome is AU rich, and this imparts a codon bias that is quite different from the one used by human genes. The codon usage is particularly marked for the gag, pol, and env genes. Interestingly, the expression of these genes is dependent on the presence of the Rev/Rev-responsive element (RRE) regulatory system, even in contexts other than the HIV genome. The Rev dependency has been explained in part by the presence of RNA instability sequences residing in these coding regions. The requirement for Rev also places a limitation on the development of HIV-based vectors, because of the requirement to provide an accessory factor. We have now synthesized a complete codon-optimized HIV-1 gag-pol gene. We show that expression levels are high and that expression is Rev independent. This effect is due to an increase in the amount of gag-pol mRNA. Provision of the RRE in cis did not lower protein or RNA levels or stimulate a Rev response. Furthermore we have used this synthetic gag-pol gene to produce HIV vectors that now lack all of the accessory proteins. These vectors should now be safer than murine leukemia virus-based vectors. PMID:10775623

  20. A Rev-Independent Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1)-Based Vector That Exploits a Codon-Optimized HIV-1 gag-pol Gene

    PubMed Central

    Kotsopoulou, Ekaterini; Kim, V. Narry; Kingsman, Alan J.; Kingsman, Susan M.; Mitrophanous, Kyriacos A.

    2000-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) genome is AU rich, and this imparts a codon bias that is quite different from the one used by human genes. The codon usage is particularly marked for the gag, pol, and env genes. Interestingly, the expression of these genes is dependent on the presence of the Rev/Rev-responsive element (RRE) regulatory system, even in contexts other than the HIV genome. The Rev dependency has been explained in part by the presence of RNA instability sequences residing in these coding regions. The requirement for Rev also places a limitation on the development of HIV-based vectors, because of the requirement to provide an accessory factor. We have now synthesized a complete codon-optimized HIV-1 gag-pol gene. We show that expression levels are high and that expression is Rev independent. This effect is due to an increase in the amount of gag-pol mRNA. Provision of the RRE in cis did not lower protein or RNA levels or stimulate a Rev response. Furthermore we have used this synthetic gag-pol gene to produce HIV vectors that now lack all of the accessory proteins. These vectors should now be safer than murine leukemia virus-based vectors. PMID:10775623

  1. Using in vitro selection to direct the covalent attachment of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Rev protein to high-affinity RNA ligands.

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, K B; Atkinson, B L; Willis, M C; Koch, T H; Gold, L

    1995-01-01

    We have used an in vitro selection procedure called crosslinking SELEX (SELEX = systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment) to identify RNA sequences that bind with high affinity and crosslink to the Rev protein from human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). A randomized RNA library substituted with the photoreactive chromophore 5-iodouracil was irradiated with monochromatic UV light in the presence of Rev. Those sequences with the ability to photocrosslink to Rev were partitioned from the rest of the RNA pool, amplified, and used for the next round of selection. Rounds of photocrosslinking selection were alternated with rounds of selection for RNA sequences with high affinity to Rev. This iterative, dual-selection method yielded RNA molecules with subnanomolar dissociation constants and high efficiency photocrosslinking to Rev. Some of the RNA molecules isolated by this procedure form a stable complex with Rev that is resistant to denaturing gel electrophoresis in the absence of UV irradiation. In vitro selection of nucleic acids by using modified nucleotides allows the isolation of nucleic acid molecules with potentially limitless chemical capacities to covalently attack a target molecule. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:8618873

  2. Production of HIV Particles Is Regulated by Altering Sub-Cellular Localization and Dynamics of Rev Induced by Double-Strand RNA Binding Protein

    PubMed Central

    Urcuqui-Inchima, Silvio; Patiño, Claudia; Zapata, Ximena; García, María Patricia; Arteaga, José; Chamot, Christophe; Kumar, Ajit; Hernandez-Verdun, Danièle

    2011-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 encoded Rev is essential for export from the nucleus to the cytoplasm, of unspliced and singly spliced transcripts coding for structural and nonstructural viral proteins. This process is spatially and temporally coordinated resulting from the interactions between cellular and viral proteins. Here we examined the effects of the sub-cellular localization and dynamics of Rev on the efficiency of nucleocytoplasmic transport of HIV-1 Gag transcripts and virus particle production. Using confocal microscopy and fluorescence recovery after bleaching (FRAP), we report that NF90ctv, a cellular protein involved in Rev function, alters both the sub-cellular localization and dynamics of Rev in vivo, which drastically affects the accumulation of the viral protein p24. The CRM1–dependent nuclear export of Gag mRNA linked to the Rev Response Element (RRE) is dependent on specific domains of the NF90ctv protein. Taken together, our results demonstrate that the appropriate intracellular localization and dynamics of Rev could regulate Gag assembly and HIV-1 replication. PMID:21364984

  3. The circadian gene Rev-erbα improves cellular bioenergetics and provides preconditioning for protection against oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Shaon; Yang, Guang; O'Donnell, John C; Hinson, Maurice D; McCormack, Shana E; Falk, Marni J; La, Ping; Robinson, Michael B; Williams, Monica L; Yohannes, Mekdes T; Polyak, Erzsebet; Nakamaru-Ogiso, Eiko; Dennery, Phyllis A

    2016-04-01

    Diurnal oscillations in the expression of antioxidant genes imply that protection against oxidative stress is circadian-gated. We hypothesized that stabilization of the core circadian gene Rev-erbα (Nr1d1) improves cellular bioenergetics and protects against nutrient deprivation and oxidative stress. Compared to WT, mouse lung fibroblasts (MLG) stably transfected with a degradation resistant Rev-erbα (Ser(55/59) to Asp; hence referred to as SD) had 40% higher protein content, 1.5-fold higher mitochondrial area (confocal microscopy), doubled oxidative phosphorylation by high-resolution respirometry (Oroboros) and were resistant to glucose deprivation for 24h. This resulted from a 4-fold reduction in mitophagy (L3CB co-localized with MitoTracker Red) versus WT. Although PGC1α protein expression was comparable between SD and WT MLG cells, the role of mitochondrial biogenesis in explaining increased mitochondrial mass in SD cells was less clear. Embryonic fibroblasts (MEF) from C57Bl/6-SD transgenic mice, had a 9-fold induction of FoxO1 mRNA and increased mRNA of downstream antioxidant targets heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), Mn superoxide dismutase and catalase (1.5, 2 fold and 2 fold respectively) versus WT. This allowed the SD cells to survive 1h incubation with 500 µM H2O2 as well as 24h of exposure to 95% O2 and remain attached whereas most WT cells did not. These observations establish a mechanistic link between the metabolic functions of Rev-erbα with mitochondrial homeostasis and protection against oxidative stress. PMID:26855417

  4. Soil hydraulic properties and REV study using X-ray microtomography and pore-scale modelling: saturated hydraulic conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerke, Kirill; Khirevich, Siarhei; Sizonenko, Timofey; Karsanina, Marina; Umarova, Aminat; Korost, Dmitry; Matthai, Stephan; Mallants, Dirk

    2016-04-01

    To verify pore-scale modelling approach for determination of soil saturated hydraulic conductivity properties we scanned three cylindrical soil samples taken from A, Ah and B horizons using X-ray microtomography method. Resulting 3D soil images with resolutions of 15.25-20.96 μm were segmented into pores and solids and their maximum inscribed cube subvolumes were used as input data for three major pore-scale modelling methods to simulate saturated flow - lattice-Boltzmann method, finite-difference solution of the Stokes problem, and pore-network model. Provided that imaging resolution is high enough to capture the backbone of effective porosity and the main conducting pores all three methods resulted in simulated soil permeabilities close to experimental values for Ah and B samples. The resolution of A sample was not enough for an accurate modelling and we concluded that this soil requires multi-scale imaging to cover all relevant heterogeneities. We demonstrate that popular SWV method to choose segmentation threshold resulted in oversegmentation and order of magnitude higher permeability values. Careful manual thresholding combined with local segmentation algorithm provided much more accurate results. Detailed analysis of water retention curves showed that air-filled porosity at relevant pressure stages cannot be used for verification of the segmentation results. Representativity analysis by simulating flow in increasing soil volume up to 2.8 cm3 revealed no representative elementary volume (REV) within Ah sample and non-uniqueness of REV for B sample. The latter was explained by soil structure non-stationarity. We further speculate that structures soil horizons can exhibit no REV at all. We discuss numerous advantages of coupled imaging and pore-scale modelling approach and show how it can become a successor of the conventional soil coring method to parametrize large scale continuum models.

  5. Stimulation of nuclear receptor REV-ERBs regulates tumor necrosis factor-induced expression of proinflammatory molecules in C6 astroglial cells.

    PubMed

    Morioka, Norimitsu; Tomori, Mizuki; Zhang, Fang Fang; Saeki, Munenori; Hisaoka-Nakashima, Kazue; Nakata, Yoshihiro

    2016-01-01

    Under physiological conditions, astrocytes maintain homeostasis in the CNS. Following inflammation and injury to the CNS, however, activated astrocytes produce neurotoxic molecules such as cytokines and chemokines, amplifying the initial molecular-cellular events evoked by inflammation and injury. Nuclear receptors REV-ERBα and REV-ERBβ (REV-ERBs) are crucial in the regulation of inflammation- and metabolism-related gene transcription. The current study sought to elucidate a role of REV-ERBs in rat C6 astroglial cells on the expression of inflammatory molecules following stimulation with the neuroinflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor (TNF). Stimulation of C6 cells with TNF (10 ng/ml) significantly increased the mRNA expression of CCL2, interleukin-6 (IL-6), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), and matrix metalloprotease (MMP)-9, but not fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and MMP-2. Treatment with either REV-ERB agonists GSK4112 or SR9009 significantly blocked TNF-induced upregulation of CCL2 mRNA and MMP-9 mRNA, but not IL-6 mRNA and iNOS mRNA expression. Furthermore, treatment with RGFP966, a selective histone deacetylase 3 (HDAC3) inhibitor, potently reversed the inhibitory effects of GSK4112 on TNF-induced expression of MMP-9 mRNA, but not CCL2 mRNA. Expression of Rev-erbs mRNA in C6 astroglial cells, primary cultured rat cortical and spinal astrocytes was confirmed by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Together, the findings demonstrate an anti-inflammatory effect, downregulating of MMP-9 and CCL2 transcription, of astroglial REV-ERBs activation through HDAC3-dependent and HDAC3-independent mechanisms. PMID:26616049

  6. Inhibitory activity of the equine infectious anemia virus major 5' splice site in the absence of Rev.

    PubMed Central

    Tan, W; Schalling, M; Zhao, C; Luukkonen, M; Nilsson, M; Fenyö, E M; Pavlakis, G N; Schwartz, S

    1996-01-01

    The major 5' splice site of equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) conforms to the consensus 5' splice site in eight consecutive positions and is located immediately upstream of the gag AUG. Our results show that the presence of this 5' splice site on the EIAV gag mRNA decreases Gag production 30- to 60-fold. This is caused by inefficient nuclear mRNA export and inefficient mRNA utilization. Inhibition could be overcome by providing human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Rev/Rev-responsive element, human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 Rex/Rex-responsive element, or simian retrovirus type 1 constitutive transport element. In addition, inhibition could be abolished by introducing single point mutations in the 5' splice site or by moving the 5' splice site away from its natural position immediately upstream of the gag AUG. This demonstrates that both maintenance of a perfect consensus 5' splice site and its proper location on the mRNA are important for inhibitory activity of the EIAV major 5' splice site. PMID:8648699

  7. A threading approach to protein structure prediction: Studies on TNF-like molecules, Rev proteins, and protein kinases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ihm, Yungok

    The main focus of this dissertation is the application of the threading approach to specific biological problems. The threading scheme developed in our group targets incorporating important structural features necessary for detecting structural similarity between the target sequence and the template structure. This enables us to use our threading method to solve problems for which sequence-based methods are not very much useful. We applied our threading method to predict the three-dimensional structures of lentivirus (EIAV, HIV-1, FIV, SIV) Rev proteins. Predicted structures of Rev proteins suggest that they share a structural similarity among themselves (four-helix bundle). Also, the threading approach has been utilized for screening for potential TNF-like molecules in Arabidopsis. The threading approach identified 35 potential TNF-like proteins in Arabidopsis, six of which are particularly interesting to be tested for the receptor kinase ligand activity. Threading method has also been used to identify potentially new protein kinases, which are not included in the protein kinase data base of C. elegans and Arabidopis. We identified eleven potentially new protein kinases and an additional protein worth investigating for protein kinase activity in C. elegans. Further, we identified ten potentially new protein kinases and additional four proteins worth investigating for the protein kinase activity in Arabidopsis.

  8. Response to “Comment on ‘General rotating quantum vortex filaments in the low-temperature Svistunov model of the local induction approximation’” [Phys. Fluids 26, 119101 (2014)

    SciTech Connect

    Van Gorder, Robert A.

    2014-11-15

    In R. A. Van Gorder, “General rotating quantum vortex filaments in the low-temperature Svistunov model of the local induction approximation,” Phys. Fluids 26, 065105 (2014) I discussed properties of generalized vortex filaments exhibiting purely rotational motion under the low-temperature Svistunov model of the local induction approximation. Such solutions are stationary in terms of translational motion. In the Comment [N. Hietala, “Comment on ‘General rotating quantum vortex filaments in the low-temperature Svistunov model of the local induction approximation’ [Phys. Fluids 26, 065105 (2014)],” Phys. Fluids 26, 119101 (2014)], the author criticizes my paper for not including translational motion (although it was clearly stated that the filament motion was assumed rotational). As it turns out, if one is interested in studying the geometric structure of solutions (which was the point of my paper), one obtains the needed qualitative results on the structure of such solutions by studying the purely rotational case. Nevertheless, in this Response I shall discuss the vortex filaments that have both rotational and translational motions. I then briefly discuss why one might want to study such generalized rotating filament solutions, in contrast to simple the standard helical or planar examples (which are really special cases). I also discuss how one can study the time evolution of filaments which exhibit more complicated dynamics than pure translation and rotation. Doing this, one can study non-stationary solutions which initially appear purely rotational and gradually display other dynamics as the filaments evolve.

  9. Differential Roles for DNA Polymerases Eta, Zeta, and REV1 in Lesion Bypass of Intrastrand versus Interstrand DNA Cross-Links▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Hicks, J. Kevin; Chute, Colleen L.; Paulsen, Michelle T.; Ragland, Ryan L.; Howlett, Niall G.; Guéranger, Quentin; Glover, Thomas W.; Canman, Christine E.

    2010-01-01

    Translesion DNA synthesis (TLS) is a process whereby specialized DNA polymerases are recruited to bypass DNA lesions that would otherwise stall high-fidelity polymerases. We provide evidence that TLS across cisplatin intrastrand cross-links is performed by multiple translesion DNA polymerases. First, we determined that PCNA monoubiquitination by RAD18 is necessary for efficient bypass of cisplatin adducts by the TLS polymerases eta (Polη), REV1, and zeta (Polζ) based on the observations that depletion of these proteins individually leads to decreased cell survival, cell cycle arrest in S phase, and activation of the DNA damage response. Second, we showed that in addition to PCNA monoubiquitination by RAD18, the Fanconi anemia core complex is also important for recruitment of REV1 to stalled replication forks in cisplatin treated cells. Third, we present evidence that REV1 and Polζ are uniquely associated with protection against cisplatin and mitomycin C-induced chromosomal aberrations, and both are necessary for the timely resolution of DNA double-strand breaks associated with repair of DNA interstrand cross-links. Together, our findings indicate that REV1 and Polζ facilitate repair of interstrand cross-links independently of PCNA monoubiquitination and Polη, whereas RAD18 plus Polη, REV1, and Polζ are all necessary for replicative bypass of cisplatin intrastrand DNA cross-links. PMID:20028736

  10. Live Attenuated Rev-Independent Nef¯SIV Enhances Acquisition of Heterologous SIVsmE660 in Acutely Vaccinated Rhesus Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Byrareddy, Siddappa N.; Ayash-Rashkovsky, Mila; Kramer, Victor G.; Lee, Sandra J.; Correll, Mick; Novembre, Francis J.; Villinger, Francois; Johnson, Welkin E.; von Gegerfelt, Agneta; Felber, Barbara K.; Ruprecht, Ruth M.

    2013-01-01

    Background Rhesus macaques (RMs) inoculated with live-attenuated Rev-Independent Nef¯ simian immunodeficiency virus (Rev-Ind Nef¯SIV) as adults or neonates controlled viremia to undetectable levels and showed no signs of immunodeficiency over 6-8 years of follow-up. We tested the capacity of this live-attenuated virus to protect RMs against pathogenic, heterologous SIVsmE660 challenges. Methodology/Principal Findings Three groups of four RM were inoculated with Rev-Ind Nef¯SIV and compared. Group 1 was inoculated 8 years prior and again 15 months before low dose intrarectal challenges with SIVsmE660. Group 2 animals were inoculated with Rev-Ind Nef¯SIV at 15 months and Group 3 at 2 weeks prior to the SIVsmE660 challenges, respectively. Group 4 served as unvaccinated controls. All RMs underwent repeated weekly low-dose intrarectal challenges with SIVsmE660. Surprisingly, all RMs with acute live-attenuated virus infection (Group 3) became superinfected with the challenge virus, in contrast to the two other vaccine groups (Groups 1 and 2) (P=0.006 for each) and controls (Group 4) (P=0.022). Gene expression analysis showed significant upregulation of innate immune response-related chemokines and their receptors, most notably CCR5 in Group 3 animals during acute infection with Rev-Ind Nef¯SIV. Conclusions/Significance We conclude that although Rev-Ind Nef¯SIV remained apathogenic, acute replication of the vaccine strain was not protective but associated with increased acquisition of heterologous mucosal SIVsmE660 challenges. PMID:24098702

  11. Mathematical model of the Tat-Rev regulation of HIV-1 replication in an activated cell predicts the existence of oscillatory dynamics in the synthesis of viral components

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The life cycle of human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) makes possible the realization of regulatory strategies that can lead to complex dynamical behavior of the system. We analyze the strategy which is based on two feedback mechanisms, one mediating a positive regulation of the virus replication by Tat protein via the antitermination of the genomic RNAs transcription on TAR (transactivation responsive) element of the proviral DNA and the second mechanism providing a negative regulation of the splicing of the full-length (9 kb) RNAs and incompletely spliced (4 kb) RNAs via their transport from the nucleus to the cytoplasm. Although the existence of these two regulatory feedback loops has been considered in other mathematical models, none of them examined the conditions for the emergence of complex oscillatory patterns in the intracellular dynamics of viral components. Results We developed a mechanistic mathematical model for the Tat-Rev mediated regulation of HIV-1 replication, which considers the activation of proviral DNA transcription, the Tat-specific antitermination of transcription on TAR-element, resulting in the synthesis of the full-length 9 kb RNA, the splicing of the 9 kb RNA down to the 4 kb RNA and the 4 kb RNA to 2 kb RNA, the transport of 2 kb mRNAs from the nucleus to the cytoplasm by the intracellular mechanisms, the multiple binding of the Rev protein to RRE (Rev Response Element) sites on 9 kb and 4 kb RNA resulting in their export to the cytoplasm and the synthesis of Tat and Rev proteins in the cytoplasm followed by their transport into the nucleus. The degradation of all viral proteins and RNAs both in the cytoplasm and the nucleus is described. The model parameters values were derived from the published literature data. The model was used to examine the dynamics of the synthesis of the viral proteins Tat and Rev, the mRNAs under the intracellular conditions specific for activated HIV-1 infected macrophages. In addition, we

  12. Effects of Twelve Germline Missense Variations on DNA Lesion and G-Quadruplex Bypass Activities of Human DNA Polymerase REV1.

    PubMed

    Yeom, Mina; Kim, In-Hyeok; Kim, Jae-Kwon; Kang, KyeongJin; Eoff, Robert L; Guengerich, F Peter; Choi, Jeong-Yun

    2016-03-21

    The Y-family DNA polymerase REV1 is involved in replicative bypass of damaged DNA and G-quadruplex (G4) DNA. In addition to a scaffolding role in the replicative bypass, REV1 acts in a catalytic role as a deoxycytidyl transferase opposite some replication stall sites, e.g., apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) sites, N(2)-guanyl lesions, and G4 sites. We characterized the biochemical properties of 12 reported germline missense variants of human REV1, including the N373S variant associated with high risk of cervical cancer, using the recombinant REV1 (residues 330-833) proteins and DNA templates containing a G, AP site, N(2)-CH2(2-naphthyl)G (N(2)-NaphG), or G4. In steady-state kinetic analyses, the F427L, R434Q, M656V, D700N, R704Q, and P831L variants displayed 2- to 8-fold decreases in kcat/Km for dCTP insertion opposite all four templates, compared to that of wild-type, while the N373S, M407L, and N497S showed 2- to 3-fold increases with all four and the former three or two templates, respectively. The F427L, R434Q, M656V, and R704Q variants also had 2- to 3-fold lower binding affinities to DNA substrates containing G, an AP site, and/or N(2)-NaphG than wild-type. Distinctively, the N373S variant had a 3-fold higher binding affinity to G4 DNA than the wild-type, as well as a 2-fold higher catalytic activity opposite the first tetrad G, suggesting a facilitating effect of this variation on replication of G4 DNA sequences in certain human papillomavirus genomes. Our results suggest that the catalytic function of REV1 is moderately or slightly altered by at least nine genetic variations, and the G4 DNA processing function of REV1 is slightly enhanced by the N373S variation, which might provide the possibility that certain germline missense REV1 variations affect the individual susceptibility to carcinogenesis by modifying the capability of REV1 for replicative bypass past DNA lesions and G4 motifs derived from chemical and viral carcinogens. PMID:26914252

  13. Amchitka Mud Pit Sites 2006 Post-Closure Monitoring and Inspection Report, Amchitka Island, Alaska, Rev. No.: 0

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, Patrick

    2006-09-01

    In 2001, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA/NSO) remediated six areas associated with Amchitka mud pit release sites located on Amchitka Island, Alaska. This included the construction of seven closure caps. To ensure the integrity and effectiveness of remedial action, the mud pit sites are to be inspected every five years as part of DOE's long-term monitoring and surveillance program. In August of 2006, the closure caps were inspected in accordance with the ''Post-Closure Monitoring and Inspection Plan for Amchitka Island Mud Pit Release Sites'' (Rev. 0, November 2005). This post-closure monitoring report provides the 2006 cap inspection results.

  14. X-33 (Rev-F) Aeroheating Results of Test 6770 in NASA Langley 20-Inch Mach 6 Air Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berry, Scott A.; Horvath, Thomas J.; Kowalkowski, Matthew K.; Liechty, Derek S.

    1999-01-01

    Aeroheating characteristics of the X-33 Rev-F configuration have been experimentally examined in the Langley 20-Inch Mach 6 Air Tunnel (Test 6770). Global surface heat transfer distributions, surface streamline patterns, and shock shapes were measured on a 0.013-scale model at Mach 6 in air. Parametric variations include angles-of-attack of 20-deg, 30-deg, and 40-deg; Reynolds numbers based on model length of 0.9 to 4.9 million; and body-flap deflections of 10-deg and 20-deg. The effects of discrete roughness elements on boundary layer transition, which included trip height, size, and location, both on and off the windward centerline, were investigated. This document is intended to serve as a quick release of preliminary data to the X-33 program; analysis is limited to observations of the experimental trends in order to expedite dissemination.

  15. Response to “Comment on ‘Rethinking first-principles electron transport theories with projection operators: The problems caused by partitioning the basis set’” [J. Chem. Phys. 140, 177103 (2014)

    SciTech Connect

    Reuter, Matthew G.; Harrison, Robert J.

    2014-05-07

    The thesis of Brandbyge's comment [J. Chem. Phys. 140, 177103 (2014)] is that our operator decoupling condition is immaterial to transport theories, and it appeals to discussions of nonorthogonal basis sets in transport calculations in its arguments. We maintain that the operator condition is to be preferred over the usual matrix conditions and subsequently detail problems in the existing approaches. From this operator perspective, we conclude that nonorthogonal projectors cannot be used and that the projectors must be selected to satisfy the operator decoupling condition. Because these conclusions pertain to operators, the choice of basis set is not germane.

  16. Cofactor Requirements for Nuclear Export of Rev Response Element (Rre)–And Constitutive Transport Element (Cte)–Containing Retroviral Rnas

    PubMed Central

    Hofmann, Wilma; Reichart, Beate; Ewald, Andrea; Müller, Eleonora; Schmitt, Iris; Stauber, Roland H.; Lottspeich, Friedrich; Jockusch, Brigitte M.; Scheer, Ulrich; Hauber, Joachim; Dabauvalle, Marie-Christine

    2001-01-01

    Nuclear export of proteins containing leucine-rich nuclear export signals (NESs) is mediated by the export receptor CRM1/exportin1. However, additional protein factors interacting with leucine-rich NESs have been described. Here, we investigate human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Rev-mediated nuclear export and Mason-Pfizer monkey virus (MPMV) constitutive transport element (CTE)–mediated nuclear export in microinjected Xenopus laevis oocytes. We show that eukaryotic initiation factor 5A (eIF-5A) is essential for Rev and Rev-mediated viral RNA export, but not for nuclear export of CTE RNA. In vitro binding studies demonstrate that eIF-5A is required for efficient interaction of Rev–NES with CRM1/exportin1 and that eIF-5A interacts with the nucleoporins CAN/nup214, nup153, nup98, and nup62. Quite unexpectedly, nuclear actin was also identified as an eIF-5A binding protein. We show that actin is associated with the nucleoplasmic filaments of nuclear pore complexes and is critically involved in export processes. Finally, actin- and energy-dependent nuclear export of HIV-1 Rev is reconstituted by using a novel in vitro egg extract system. In summary, our data provide evidence that actin plays an important functional role in nuclear export not only of retroviral RNAs but also of host proteins such as protein kinase inhibitor (PKI). PMID:11238447

  17. Erratum: “Multi-point, high-speed passive ion velocity distribution diagnostic on the Pegasus Toroidal Experiment” [Rev. Sci. Instrum. 83, 10D516 (2012)

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Burke, Marcus G.; Fonck, Raymond J.; Bongard, Michael W.; Schlossberg, David J.; Winz, Gregory R.

    2016-07-18

    This article corrects an error in M.G. Burke et al., 'Multi-point, high-speed passive ion velocity distribution diagnostic on the Pegasus Toroidal Experiment,' Rev. Sci. Instrum. 83, 10D516 (2012) pertaining to ion temperature. The conclusions of this paper are not altered by the revised ion temperature measurements.

  18. 77 FR 4573 - Maritime Security Directive 104-6 (Rev 6); Guidelines for U.S. Vessels Operating in High Risk Waters

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-30

    ...The Coast Guard announces the release of Maritime Security (MARSEC) Directive 104-6 (Rev 6). This Directive only applies to U.S.- flagged vessels subject to the Maritime Transportation Security Act (MTSA) on international voyages through or in designated high risk waters, and provides additional counter-piracy guidance and mandatory measures for these vessels operating in these areas where......

  19. Comparative Analysis of in vivo Interactions Between Rev1 Protein and Other Y-Family DNA Polymerases in Animals and Yeasts

    PubMed Central

    Kosarek, J. Nicole; Woodruff, Rachel V.; Rivera-Begeman, Amanda; Guo, Caixia; D’Souza, Sanjay; Koonin, Eugene V.; Walker, Graham C.; Friedberg, Errol C.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Eukaryotes are endowed with multiple specialized DNA polymerases, some (if not all) of which are believed to play important roles in the tolerance of base damage during DNA replication. Among these DNA polymerases, Rev1 protein (a deoxycytidyl transferase) from vertebrates interacts with several other specialized polymerases via a highly conserved C-terminal region. The present studies assessed whether these interactions are retained in more experimentally tractable model systems, including yeasts, flies, and the nematode C. elegans. We observed a physical interaction between Rev1 protein and other Y-family polymerases in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. However, despite the fact that the C-terminal region of Drosophila and yeast Rev1 are conserved from vertebrates to a similar extent, such interactions were not observed in S. cerevisiae or S. pombe. With respect to regions in specialized DNA polymerases that are required for interaction with Rev1, we find predicted disorder to be an underlying structural commonality. The results of this study suggest that special consideration should be exercised when making mechanistic extrapolations regarding translesion DNA synthesis from one eukaryotic system to another. PMID:18242152

  20. Numerical modelling of the flow in the resin infusion process on the REV scale: A feasibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jabbari, M.; Jambhekar, V. A.; Gersborg, A. R.; Spangenberg, J.; Hattel, J. H.; Helmig, R.

    2016-06-01

    The resin infusion process (RIP) has developed as a low cost method for manufacturing large fibre reinforced plastic parts. However, the process still presents some challenges to industry with regards to reliability and repeatability, resulting in expensive and inefficient trial and error development. In this paper, we show the implementation of 2D numerical models for the RIP using the open source simulator DuMuX. The idea of this study is to present a model which accounts for the interfacial forces coming from the capillary pressure on the so-called representative elementary volume (REV) scale. The model is described in detail and three different test cases — a constant and a tensorial permeability as well as a preform/Balsa domain — are investigated. The results show that the developed model is very applicable for the RIP for manufacturing of composite parts. The idea behind this study is to test the developed model for later use in a real application, in which the preform medium has numerous layers with different material properties.

  1. Comment on "Effective thermal conductivity of metal and non-metal particulate composites with interfacial thermal resistance at high volume fraction of nano to macro-sized spheres" [J. Appl. Phys. 117, 055104 (2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Rajinder

    2015-06-01

    In a recent article, Faroughi and Huber [J. Appl. Phys. 117, 055104 (2015)] propose two theoretical models to compute the effective thermal conductivity of metal and dielectric spherical particle reinforced composites with interfacial thermal resistance. The models are based on the differential effective medium (DEM) theory. The authors have failed to cite and discuss the paper of Pal [Mater. Sci. Eng., A 498, 135-141 (2008)] where similar models have been derived using the same approach (DEM theory). Furthermore, the models proposed by Faroughi and Huber are seriously flawed in that the "excluded volume effect" is taken into account two times, instead of once, in their derivations. Last but not least, there are typos in their models.

  2. Comment on: Ab initio calculations of B2 type RHg (R = Ce,Pr,Eu and Gd) intermetallic compounds. Eur. Phys. J. B 87, 268 (2014), DOI: 10.1140/epjb/e2014-50521-6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daoud, Salah

    2016-02-01

    In a recent article by Devi et al. [Eur. Phys. J. B 87, 268 (2014)], the structural, electronic, elastic and some thermal properties of B2 type RHg (R = Ce, Pr, Eu and Gd) intermetallic compounds have been studied by ab initio calculations. After the study of their article I found that there are some mistakes in predicted crystal density, longitudinal, transverse and average elastic wave velocities, and Debye temperature data. The crystal density has been found multiplied per 4. Also the longitudinal, transverse and average elastic wave velocities and Debye temperature are different from my reexamined values (all results represented by Devi et al. have been found divided per 2). Although these small mistakes do not influence their conclusion, it is better to correct them. In the present work, I reexamined all data again by using the right formulas, based on the lattice parameters and the elastic constants obtained in the work of Devi et al.

  3. Comment on “Motion of a helical vortex filament in superfluid {sup 4}He under the extrinsic form of the local induction approximation” [Phys. Fluids 25, 085101 (2013)

    SciTech Connect

    Hietala, Niklas Hänninen, Risto

    2014-01-15

    We comment on the paper by Van Gorder [“Motion of a helical vortex filament in superfluid {sup 4}He under the extrinsic form of the local induction approximation,” Phys. Fluids 25, 085101 (2013)]. We point out that the flow of the normal fluid component parallel to the vortex will often lead into the Donnelly–Glaberson instability, which will cause the amplification of the Kelvin wave. We explain why the comparison to local nonlinear equation is unreasonable, and remark that neglecting the motion in the x-direction is not reasonable for a Kelvin wave with an arbitrary wavelength and amplitude. The correct equations in the general case are also derived.

  4. Response to ``Comment on `Spectra and energy levels of Er3+(4f11) in NaBi(WO4)2' '' [J. Appl. Phys. 96, 4656 (2004)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruber, John B.

    2004-10-01

    We present a reply to the preceding comment made by C. Cascales and C. Zaldo concerning an analysis of the "Spectra and energy levels of Er3+(4f11) in NaBi(WO4)2" [J. Appl. Phys. 94, 7128 (2003)] by J. B. Gruber, Department of Physics, San José State University, San Jose, CA 95192-0106; D. K. Sardar, C. C. Russell III, and R. M. Yow, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Texas at San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas 78249-0063, B. Zandi, ARL/Adelph Laboratory Center, 2800 Powder Mill Road, Adelphi, Maryland 20783-1197; and E. P. Kokanyan, Institute for Physical Research, Armenian National Academy of Sciences, Ashtarak, Armenia 378410.

  5. Response to 'Comment on 'Resonant dissociative electron transfer of the presolvated electron to CCl{sub 4} in liquid: Direct observation and lifetime of the CCl{sub 4}*{sup -} transition state' [J. Chem. Phys. 129, 027101 (2008)]'

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C.-R.; Drew, K.; Luo, T.; Lu, M.-J.; Lu, Q.-B.

    2008-07-14

    In our recent paper [J. Chem. Phys.128, 041102 (2008)], we reported a femtosecond time-resolved laser spectroscopic study of the electron transfer reaction of CCl{sub 4} in liquid ethanol. Our results provide direct evidence of the resonant dissociative electron transfer (RDET) of the presolvated electron to CCl{sub 4}, and indicate that RDET can be an efficient process in an aqueous environment. In a recent Comment, the author argues that the relevance of diethanolamine (DEA) induced destruction of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) in the polar stratosphere as a possible pathway for chemical ozone destruction should not be a motivation for further studies of DEA on CFC molecules, as no correlation is observed between polar chemical ozone loss and cosmic ray activity. Here, we show that this claim is misleading: it is made by using inconclusive and ambiguous data while ignoring pronounced and well-documented data.

  6. Comment on ``Multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock energy levels and radiative rates for Br-like tungsten'' by S. Aggarwal, A.K.S. Jha, and M. Mohan [Can. J. Phys. 91, 394 (2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aggarwal, Kanti M.; Keenan, Francis P.

    2014-06-01

    We report calculations of energy levels and oscillator strengths for transitions in W XL, undertaken with the general-purpose relativistic atomic structure package ({\\sc grasp}) and flexible atomic code ({\\sc fac}). Comparisons are made with existing results and the accuracy of the data is assessed. Discrepancies with the most recent results of S. Aggarwal et al. [Can. J. Phys. {\\bf 91} (2013) 394] are up to 0.4 Ryd and up to two orders of magnitude for energy levels and oscillator strengths, respectively. Discrepancies for lifetimes are even larger, up to four orders of magnitude for some levels. Our energy levels are estimated to be accurate to better than 0.5% (i.e. 0.2 Ryd), whereas results for oscillator strengths and lifetimes should be accurate to better than 20%.

  7. PHYS-MA-TECH. An Integrated Partnership.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scarborough, Jule Dee

    This document contains 45 integrated physics, mathematics, and technology curriculum modules developed by teachers at 5 Illinois schools. An introduction discusses the collaborative project, in which teams of one mathematics, physics, and technology teacher from each school developed innovative instructional delivery models that enabled the three…

  8. Final Report - DuraMelter 100 Tests to Support LAW Glass Formulation Correlation Development, VSL-06R6480-1, Rev. 0

    SciTech Connect

    Kruger, Albert A.; Muller, I. S.; Gong, W.; Pegg, I. L.; Matlack, K. S.

    2013-12-03

    This report describes the results of work and testing specified by Test Specifications 24590-LAW-TSP-RT-04-004, Rev. 0, Test Plans VSL-05T5480-1, Rev. 0 and Text Exceptions 24590-LAW-TEF-RT-05-00002. The work and any associated testing followed established quality assurance requirements and was conducted as authorized. The descriptions provided in this test report are an accurate account of both the conduct of the work and the data collected. Results required by the Test Plan are reported. Also reported are any unusual or anomalous occurences that are different from the starting hypotheses. The test results and this report have been reviewed and verified.

  9. Use of mass vaccination with a reduced dose of REV 1 vaccine for Brucella melitensis control in a population of small ruminants.

    PubMed

    Scharp, D W; al Khalaf, S A; al Muhanna, M W; Cheema, R A; Godana, W

    1999-06-01

    Mass vaccination with reduced dose 1/50 Rev 1 strain live vaccine (1-2 10(9) colony forming units), administered subcutaneously, over a four and a half year period reduced the prevalence of Brucella melitensis in Kuwait's small ruminant population from 5.8% in 1993 to 2.02% in 1997. Serological test results using the Rose Bengal Plate Test, Rivanol Agglutination Test and Complement Fixation showed no evidence of persistence of positive serology in animals nine or more months after vaccination. Questionnaires and post-vaccination flock inspections found that the effects on gestation (abortions) were minimal--and not proven to be due to the vaccine. The conclusion from these findings is that mass vaccination with reduced dose Rev 1 administered by the subcutaneous route is a practical field strategy for control of Brucella melitensis. PMID:10445249

  10. Brucella suis S2, brucella melitensis Rev. 1 and Brucella abortus S19 living vaccines: residual virulence and immunity induced against three Brucella species challenge strains in mice.

    PubMed

    Bosseray, N; Plommet, M

    1990-10-01

    Live attenuated Brucella suis S2 vaccine was compared to living vaccines B. abortus S19 and B. melitensis Rev. 1 in mice. Residual virulence was estimated by ability to multiply and persist in spleen and lymph nodes. Immunogenicity was estimated by spleen counts of control and vaccinated mice challenged either with the reference B. abortus 544 strain or with virulent B. melitensis H38 and B. suis 1330 strains. S2 vaccine had lower residual virulence; expressed as 50% recovery time, persistence was 4.3 weeks, compared to 7.1 and 9.0 weeks for S19 and Rev. 1 vaccines. Immunity induced by the three vaccines was similar 45 days after vaccination. At 150 days, immunity by S19 and Rev.1 was still similar against the three challenge strains. In contrast, immunity induced by S2 had declined against the B. melitensis strain. Thus, a recall vaccination may be required for vaccination of sheep to confer a long-lasting immunity. PMID:2123586

  11. Comparison of the efficacy of Brucella suis strain 2 and Brucella melitensis Rev. 1 live vaccines against a Brucella melitensis experimental infection in pregnant ewes.

    PubMed

    Verger, J M; Grayon, M; Zundel, E; Lechopier, P; Olivier-Bernardin, V

    1995-02-01

    The comparative efficacy of Brucella suis strain 2 (S2) and Brucella melitensis strain Rev. 1 (Rev. 1) live vaccines in protecting sheep against B. melitensis infection was evaluated by clinical and bacteriological examination of ewes vaccinated conjunctivally with a dose of 1 x 10(9) c.f.u. when 4 months old and then challenged with 5 x 10(7) c.f.u. of the B. melitensis virulent strain 53H38 (H38) at the middle of the first or second pregnancy following vaccination. Animals were considered to be protected when no abortion, no excretion of the challenge strain and no infection at slaughter occurred. The percentages of protection in Rev. 1-vaccinated groups challenged during either first (80%) or second (62%) pregnancy were significantly different (p < 0.001 and p < 0.05, respectively) compared with those of the relevant unvaccinated control groups. In contrast no significant difference in protection was found between the S2-vaccinated and control groups. PMID:7625115

  12. SCDAP/RELAP5 Modeling of Movement of Melted Material through Porous Debris in Lower Head (Rev. 2)

    SciTech Connect

    Siefken, Larry James

    1999-10-01

    A model is described for the movement of melted metallic material through a ceramic porous debris bed. The model is designed for the analysis of severe accidents in LWRs, wherein melted core plate material may slump onto the top of a porous bed of relocated core material supported by the lower head. The permeation of the melted core plate material into the porous debris bed influences the heatup of the debris bed and the heatup of the lower head supporting the debris. A model for mass transport of melted metallic material is applied that includes terms for viscosity and turbulence but neglects inertial and capillary terms because of their small value relative to gravity and viscous terms in the momentum equation. The relative permeability and passability of the porous debris are calculated as functions of debris porosity, particle size, and effective saturation. An iterative numerical solution is used to solve the set of nonlinear equations for mass transport. The effective thermal conductivity of the debris is calculated as a function of porosity, particle size, and saturation. The model integrates the equations for mass transport with a model for the two-dimensional conduction of heat through porous debris. The integrated model has been implemented into the SCDAP/RELAP5 code for the analysis of the integrity of LWR lower heads during severe accidents. The results of the model indicate that melted core plate material my permeate in about 120 s to the bottom of a 1 m deep hot porous debris bed supported by the lower head. The presence of the relocated core plate material at the bottom of the debris bed decreases the thermal resistance of the interface between the debris bed and the lower head. This report is a revision of the report with the identifier of INEEL/EXT-98-01178 REV 1, entitled "SCDAP/RELAP5 Modeling of Movement of Melted Material Through Porous Debris in Lower Head."

  13. Making mission possible. A response to Rev. Richard A. McCormick's article on the preservation of Catholic hospitals.

    PubMed

    O'Rourke, K D

    1995-01-01

    In "The Catholic Hospital Today: Mission Impossible?" (Origins, March 16, 1995, pp. 648-653), Rev. Richard A. McCormick, SJ, STD, questions whether Catholic hospitals can continue their missions in a society with so many factors and influences that seem to oppose efforts to perpetuate the healing ministry of Christ. As Fr. McCormick states, the matrix of good medicine is centered on the good of the individual. But too often, the patient has been considered an individual isolated from others. The rights of families, people who belong to the same insurance program, and the society funding much of healthcare must also be considered. Fr. McCormick points out that an obstacle to the healing mission arises because healthcare is often treated as a business instead of a service. If not-for-profit healthcare facilities come to exist for the well-being of the shareholders, as do for-profit healthcare facilities, then a perversion of values results. This should lead us to renounce for-profit healthcare and the behavior that some Catholic health organizations have borrowed from the for-profit sector. In addition, Fr. McCormick calls attention to our society's denial of death and tendency to call on medicine to cure personal, social, or economic problems. This denial-of-death phenomenon helps us realize the need for the mission of Catholic hospitals. Continuing the mission of Catholic hospitals will require the attention of all involved in them-physicians, trustees, nurses, administrators, and ancillary personnel. These healthcare providers must not be distracted from the mission by joint ventures and economic issues. PMID:10144226

  14. Rev Your Engines!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blanchard, Margaret; Sharp, Jennifer; Grable, Lisa

    2009-01-01

    As part of the "Car Lab Project," students constructed rubber band cars, raced them, and worked through a number of automotive activities. The students engaged in this project certainly had fun, but they also used high-tech gear such as motion sensors and graphing calculators to gather data on the distance and time cars traveled and to generate…

  15. TRACKED VEHICLE Rev 75

    SciTech Connect

    Raby, Eric Y.

    2007-05-08

    Revision 75 of the Tracked Vehicle software is a soft real-time simulation of a differentially steered, tracked mobile robot, which, because of the track flippers, resembles the iRobot PackBot (http://www.irobot.com/). Open source libraries are used for the physics engine (http://www.ode.org/), the display and user interface (http://www.mathies.com/cpw/), and the program command line and configuration file parameters (http://www.boost.org/). The simulation can be controlled by a USB joystick or the keyboard. The configuration file contains demonstration model parameters of no particular vehicle. This simulation can be used as a starting point for those doing tracked vehicle simulations. This simulation software is essentially a research tool which can be modified and adapted for certain types of tracked vehicle research. An open source license allows an individual researchers to tailor the code to their specific research needs.

  16. TRACKED VEHICLE Rev 75

    2007-05-08

    Revision 75 of the Tracked Vehicle software is a soft real-time simulation of a differentially steered, tracked mobile robot, which, because of the track flippers, resembles the iRobot PackBot (http://www.irobot.com/). Open source libraries are used for the physics engine (http://www.ode.org/), the display and user interface (http://www.mathies.com/cpw/), and the program command line and configuration file parameters (http://www.boost.org/). The simulation can be controlled by a USB joystick or the keyboard. The configuration file contains demonstration model parametersmore » of no particular vehicle. This simulation can be used as a starting point for those doing tracked vehicle simulations. This simulation software is essentially a research tool which can be modified and adapted for certain types of tracked vehicle research. An open source license allows an individual researchers to tailor the code to their specific research needs.« less

  17. Reply to ``Comment on `Witnessed entanglement and the geometric measure of quantum discord' ''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debarba, Tiago; Maciel, Thiago O.; Vianna, Reinaldo O.

    2013-04-01

    We show that the mistakes pointed out by Rana and Parashar [Phys. Rev. A1050-294710.1103/PhysRevA.87.016301 87, 016301 (2013)] do not invalidate the main conclusion of our work [Phys. Rev. APLRAAN1050-294710.1103/PhysRevA.86.024302 86, 024302 (2012)]. We show that the errors affected only a particular application of our general results, and present the correction.

  18. Note on the scale evolution of the Efremov-Teryaev-Qiu-Sterman function TF(x,x)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schäfer, Andreas; Zhou, Jian

    2012-06-01

    We reexamine the scale dependence of the Efremov-Teryaev-Qiu-Sterman twist-3 matrix element that has been studied already by the four different groups with conflicting results [Z.-B. Kang and J.-W. Qiu, Phys. Rev. DPRVDAQ1550-7998 79, 016003 (2009)10.1103/PhysRevD.79.016003; J. Zhou, F. Yuan, and Z.-T. Liang, Phys. Rev. DPRVDAQ1550-7998 79, 114022 (2009)10.1103/PhysRevD.79.114022; W. Vogelsang and F. Yuan, Phys. Rev. DPRVDAQ1550-7998 79, 094010 (2009)10.1103/PhysRevD.79.094010; and V. M. Braun, A. N. Manashov, and B. Pirnay, Phys. Rev. DPRVDAQ1550-7998 80, 114002 (2009)10.1103/PhysRevD.80.114002]. We find that we can in fact reproduce the results of V. M. Braun, A. N. Manashov, and B. Pirnay, Phys. Rev. DPRVDAQ1550-7998 80, 114002 (2009)10.1103/PhysRevD.80.114002 with the methods of J. Zhou, F. Yuan, and Z.-T. Liang, Phys. Rev. DPRVDAQ1550-7998 79, 114022 (2009)10.1103/PhysRevD.79.114022 when we treat some subtleties with greater care, thus easing the mentioned conflict.

  19. Comment on: Measurement of the force exerted on the surface of an object immersed in a plasma. Eur. Phys. J. D 69: 91 (2015), DOI: 10.1140/epjd/e2015-50743-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czarnetzki, Uwe; Tsankov, Tsanko V.

    2015-10-01

    Surfaces exposed to a plasma experience a certain pressure that pushes them away from the volume. This effect has been investigated experimentally in a recent article by Thomas Trottenberg, Thomas Richter, and Holger Kersten from Kiel University/Germany [Eur. Phys. J. D 69, 91 (2015)]. The experimental results are impressive and have actually drawn the attention of the community to an interesting question which so far has been largely ignored. In addition to their experimental results the Kiel group proposes also a rough concept in order to explain their findings which provides certainly a basic qualitative understanding of the physical processes involved. However, on a closer inspection the picture developed so far is not entirely satisfying and the problem seems to require a more fundamental approach. This comment shows that the effect of the wall pressure can be described exactly using only analytical methods. The physical situation is analyzed by three different approaches. First, the simple case of only one spatial dimension is presented in detail. Second, the case of spherical symmetry is analyzed by some simplifying assumptions in order to investigate the effect of higher dimensionality. Third, a formal derivation for arbitrary geometry is given. This general result includes the one-dimensional case but does not allow a convenient connection between the pressures at the wall and in the center. Finally, the results are summarized and some conclusions are drawn.

  20. Model for roughening and ripple instability due to ion-induced mass redistribution [Addendum to H. Hofsäss, Appl. Phys. A 114 (2014) 401, "Surface instability and pattern formation by ion-induced erosion and mass redistribution"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofsäss, Hans

    2015-05-01

    Carter and Vishnyakov introduced a model (CV model) to describe roughening and ripple instability due to ion-induced mass redistribution. This model is based on the assumption that the irradiated surface layer on a static solid substrate is described by a viscous incompressible thin film bound to the substrate by a "no slip" and "no transport" kinematic boundary condition, i.e. similar to a thin film of viscous paint. However, this boundary condition is incomplete for a layer under ion irradiation. The boundary condition must allow exchange of atoms between the substrate and the irradiated film, so that the thickness of the film is always determined by the size of the collision cascade, independent of the evolution of the surface height profile. In addition, the film thickness depends on the local ion incidence angle, which leads to a time dependence of the film thickness at a given position. The equation of motion of the surface and interface profiles for these boundary conditions is introduced, and a new curvature-dependent coefficient is found which is absent in the CV model. This curvature coefficient depends on the angular derivative of the layer thickness and the atomic drift velocity at the film surface induced by recoil events. Such a stabilizing curvature coefficient was introduced in Appl. Phys. A 114 (2014) 401 and is most pronounced at intermediate angles.

  1. Response to 'Comment on 'Three-dimensional numerical investigation of electron transport with rotating spoke in a cylindrical anode layer Hall plasma accelerator''[Phys. Plasmas 20, 014701 (2013)

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, D. L.; Qiu, X. M.; Geng, S. F.; Chu, Paul K.

    2013-01-15

    The numerical simulation described in our paper [D. L. Tang et al., Phys. Plasmas 19, 073519 (2012)] shows a rotating dense plasma structure, which is the critical characteristic of the rotating spoke. The simulated rotating spoke has a frequency of 12.5 MHz with a rotational speed of {approx}1.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 6} m/s on the surface of the anode. Accompanied by the almost uniform azimuthal ion distribution, the non-axisymmetric electron distribution introduces two azimuthal electric fields with opposite directions. The azimuthal electric fields have the same rotational frequency and speed together with the rotating spoke. The azimuthal electric fields excite the axial electron drift upstream and downstream due to the additional E{sub {theta}} x B field and then the axial shear flow is generated. The axial local charge separation induced by the axial shear electron flow may be compensated by the azimuthal electron transport, finally resulting in the azimuthal electric field rotation and electron transport with the rotating spoke.

  2. Comment on “Magnetic field mediated low-temperature resistivity upturn in electron-doped La{sub 1−x}Hf{sub x}MnO{sub 3} manganite oxides” [J. Appl. Phys. 112, 123710 (2012)

    SciTech Connect

    Rozenberg, E.

    2014-01-21

    In a recent paper, Guo et al. [J. Appl. Phys. 112, 123710 (2012)] reported on characteristic features of the temperature (T) and magnetic field (H) dependences of electrical resistivity (ρ) in polycrystalline La{sub 1−x}Hf{sub x}MnO{sub 3} (x = 0.2 and 0.3) manganites. In particular, shallow minima were observed at some T{sub min} below 100 K on ρ(T) curves. Application of an external H ≤ 5 T leads first to a decrease in the T{sub min} value, while this value increases notably at H > 0.75 T. The authors attributed this complex behavior to competitive electron-electron interaction and Kondo-like spin dependent scattering of carriers. It is shown in the comment that such interpretation is very questionable due to the fundamental inapplicability of this approach for analysis of low-T conductivity in polycrystalline manganites. It seems that the most likely reason for the appearance of the low temperature minima on ρ(T) curves and their evolution upon field application is the well known grain boundary effects in magnetically and structurally inhomogeneous samples.

  3. In Vitro Bypass of the Major Malondialdehyde- and Base Propenal-Derived DNA Adduct by Human Y-family DNA Polymerases κ, ι, and Rev1†

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    3-(2′-Deoxy-β-d-erythro-pentofuranosyl)pyrimido-[1,2-a]purin-10(3H)-one (M1dG) is the major adduct derived from the reaction of DNA with the lipid peroxidation product malondialdehyde and the DNA peroxidation product base propenal. M1dG is mutagenic in Escherichia coli and mammalian cells, inducing base-pair substitutions (M1dG → A and M1dG → T) and frameshift mutations. Y-family polymerases may contribute to the mutations induced by M1dG in vivo. Previous reports described the bypass of M1dG by DNA polymerases η and Dpo4. The present experiments were conducted to evaluate bypass of M1dG by the human Y-family DNA polymerases κ, ι, and Rev1. M1dG was incorporated into template-primers containing either dC or dT residues 5′ to the adduct, and the template-primers were subjected to in vitro replication by the individual DNA polymerases. Steady-state kinetic analysis of single nucleotide incorporation indicates that dCMP is most frequently inserted by hPol κ opposite the adduct in both sequence contexts, followed by dTMP and dGMP. dCMP and dTMP were most frequently inserted by hPol ι, and only dCMP was inserted by Rev1. hPol κ extended template-primers in the order M1dG:dC > M1dG:dG > M1dG:dT ∼ M1dG:dA, but neither hPol ι nor Rev1 extended M1dG-containing template-primers. Liquid chromatography−mass spectrometry analysis of the products of hPol κ-catalyzed extension verified this preference in the 3′-GXC-5′ template sequence but revealed the generation of a series of complex products in which dAMP is incorporated opposite M1dG in the 3′-GXT-5′ template sequence. The results indicate that DNA hPol κ or the combined action of hPol ι or Rev1 and hPol κ bypass M1dG residues in DNA and generate products that are consistent with some of the mutations induced by M1dG in mammalian cells. PMID:20726503

  4. In vitro bypass of the major malondialdehyde- and base propenal-derived DNA adduct by human Y-family DNA polymerases κ, ι, and Rev1.

    PubMed

    Maddukuri, Leena; Eoff, Robert L; Choi, Jeong-Yun; Rizzo, Carmelo J; Guengerich, F Peter; Marnett, Lawrence J

    2010-09-28

    3-(2'-Deoxy-β-d-erythro-pentofuranosyl)pyrimido-[1,2-a]purin-10(3H)-one (M(1)dG) is the major adduct derived from the reaction of DNA with the lipid peroxidation product malondialdehyde and the DNA peroxidation product base propenal. M(1)dG is mutagenic in Escherichia coli and mammalian cells, inducing base-pair substitutions (M(1)dG → A and M(1)dG → T) and frameshift mutations. Y-family polymerases may contribute to the mutations induced by M(1)dG in vivo. Previous reports described the bypass of M(1)dG by DNA polymerases η and Dpo4. The present experiments were conducted to evaluate bypass of M(1)dG by the human Y-family DNA polymerases κ, ι, and Rev1. M(1)dG was incorporated into template-primers containing either dC or dT residues 5' to the adduct, and the template-primers were subjected to in vitro replication by the individual DNA polymerases. Steady-state kinetic analysis of single nucleotide incorporation indicates that dCMP is most frequently inserted by hPol κ opposite the adduct in both sequence contexts, followed by dTMP and dGMP. dCMP and dTMP were most frequently inserted by hPol ι, and only dCMP was inserted by Rev1. hPol κ extended template-primers in the order M(1)dG:dC > M(1)dG:dG > M(1)dG:dT ∼ M(1)dG:dA, but neither hPol ι nor Rev1 extended M(1)dG-containing template-primers. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of the products of hPol κ-catalyzed extension verified this preference in the 3'-GXC-5' template sequence but revealed the generation of a series of complex products in which dAMP is incorporated opposite M(1)dG in the 3'-GXT-5' template sequence. The results indicate that DNA hPol κ or the combined action of hPol ι or Rev1 and hPol κ bypass M(1)dG residues in DNA and generate products that are consistent with some of the mutations induced by M(1)dG in mammalian cells. PMID:20726503

  5. A Bidirectional SF2/ASF- and SRp40-Dependent Splicing Enhancer Regulates Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 rev, env, vpu, and nef Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Caputi, Massimo; Freund, Marcel; Kammler, Susanne; Asang, Corinna; Schaal, Heiner

    2004-01-01

    The integrated human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) genome is transcribed in a single pre-mRNA that is alternatively spliced into more than 40 mRNAs. We characterized a novel bidirectional exonic splicing enhancer (ESE) that regulates the expression of the HIV-1 env, vpu, rev, and nef mRNAs. The ESE is localized downstream of the vpu-, env-, and nef-specific 3′ splice site no. 5. SF2/ASF and SRp40 activate the ESE and are required for efficient 3′ splice site usage and binding of the U1 snRNP to the downstream 5′ splice site no. 4. U1 snRNP binding to the 5′ splice site no. 4 is required for splicing of the rev and nef mRNAs and to increase expression of the partially spliced env mRNA. Finally, our results indicate that this ESE is necessary for the recruitment of the U1 snRNP to the 5′ splice site no. 4, even when the 5′ splice site and the U1 snRNA have been mutated to obtain a perfect complementary match. The ESE characterized here is highly conserved in most viral subtypes. PMID:15163745

  6. A novel hepatitis B virus (HBV) genetic element with Rev response element-like properties that is essential for expression of HBV gene products.

    PubMed Central

    Huang, J; Liang, T J

    1993-01-01

    Many viruses possess complex mechanisms involving multiple gene products and cis-regulatory elements in order to achieve a fine control of their gene expression at both transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels. Hepatitis B virus (HBV) and retroviruses share many structural and functional similarities. In this study, by genetic and biochemical analyses, we have demonstrated the existence of a novel genetic element within the HBV genome which is essential for high-level expression of viral gene products. This element is located 3' to the envelope coding region. We have shown that this genetic element is cis acting at the posttranscriptional level and that its function is exerted at the level of RNA processing as part of transcribed sequences. This RNA element is also functional in the context of a heterologous gene. Similar to the function of Rev-Rev response element interaction of human immunodeficiency virus type 1, this element appears to inhibit the splicing process and facilitate the transport and utilization of HBV transcripts. Images PMID:8246965

  7. Integration of the nuclear receptor REV-ERBα linked with circadian oscillators in the expressions of Alas1, Ppargc1a, and Il6 genes in rat granulosa cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Huatao; Isayama, Keishiro; Kumazawa, Makoto; Zhao, Lijia; Yamauchi, Nobuhiko; Shigeyoshi, Yasufumi; Hashimoto, Seiichi; Hattori, Masa-aki

    2015-01-01

    The nuclear receptor REV-ERBα links circadian rhythms and numerous physiological processes, but its physiological role in ovaries remains largely unknown. The aim of this study was to determine the potential role of REV-ERBα in the regulation of the transcription of its putative target genes in granulosa cells (GCs) prepared from Per2-destablized luciferase (dLuc) reporter gene transgenic rats. Alas1, Ppargc1a, and Il6 were chosen as representatives for genes analysis. A real-time monitoring system of Per2 promoter activity was performed to detect Per2-dLuc circadian oscillations. Two agonists (GSK4112, heme) and an antagonist (SR8278) of REV-ERBα as well as Rev-erbα siRNA knockdown were used to identify its target genes. Clear Per2-dLuc circadian oscillations were generated in matured GCs after synchronization with GSK4112 or SR8278. GSK4112 treatment lengthened and SR8278 treatment shortened the period of circadian oscillations in matured GCs stimulated with or without luteinizing hormone (LH). GSK4112 showed an inhibitory effect on the amplitude of circadian oscillations and caused an arrhythmic expression of canonical clock genes. SR8278 also had a subtle effect on their daily expression profiles, but the treatment resulted only in the arrhythmic expression of Rev-erbα. These findings indicate the functional biological activity of REV-ERBα in response to its ligands. Its natural ligand heme further elongated the period of circadian oscillations and alleviated their amplitudes in GCs cultured with LH. Heme treatment also repressed the expressions of clock genes, Alas1, Il6, and Ppargc1a. Rev-erbα knockdown up-regulated these transcript levels. Collectively, these data extend the recent finding to rat GCs and demonstrate that REV-ERBα represses the expressions of Alas1, Ppargc1a, and Il6, providing novel insights into the physiological significance of REV-ERBα in ovarian circadian oscillators. PMID:26102301

  8. The Rev protein of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 counteracts the effect of an AU-rich negative element in the human papillomavirus type 1 late 3' untranslated region.

    PubMed Central

    Tan, W; Schwartz, S

    1995-01-01

    We have identified a sequence in the late 3' untranslated region of human papillomavirus type 1 mRNAs that acts posttranscriptionally to repress gene expression. Deletion analysis localized the inhibitory element to an AU-rich sequence between nucleotides 6958 and 6984 on the human papillomavirus type 1 genome. This sequence inhibits gene expression in an orientation-dependent manner. Upon transfection of eucaryotic cells with plasmids containing this sequence, approximately 4-fold-lower cytoplasmic mRNA levels and 64- to 128-fold-lower protein levels were produced compared with those produced by plasmids lacking the inhibitory sequence. Interestingly, providing the constitutive transport element of simian retrovirus type 1 in sense orientation counteracted inhibition exerted by the human papillomavirus type 1 sequence. Inhibition could also be overcome by the presence of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Rev protein in trans and its target sequence, the Rev-responsive element, in cis. Rev is a nuclear protein and acts by promoting nuclear export of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 mRNAs encoding structural proteins. Our results are consistent with a model for human papillomavirus type 1 late-gene expression in which mRNAs containing human papillomavirus type 1 inhibitory sequences enter a nonproductive route in the nucleus, resulting in inefficient mRNA utilization. Rev directs mRNA containing inhibitory sequences to a productive route by interacting with the Rev-responsive element. PMID:7707519

  9. Nuclear receptors Homo sapiens Rev-erbβ and Drosophila melanogaster E75 are thiolate-ligated heme proteins, which undergo redox-mediated ligand switching and bind CO and NO

    PubMed Central

    Marvin, Katherine A.; Reinking, Jeffrey L.; Lee, Andrea J.; Pardee, Keith M.; Krause, Henry M.; Burstyn, Judith N.

    2009-01-01

    Nuclear receptors E75, which regulates development in D. melanogaster, and Rev-erbβ, which regulates circadian rhythm in humans, bind heme within their ligand binding domains (LBD). The heme-bound ligand binding domains of E75 and Rev-erbβ were studied using electronic absorption, MCD, resonance Raman and EPR spectroscopies. Both proteins undergo redox-dependent ligand switching and CO- and NO-induced ligand displacement. In the Fe(III) oxidation state, the nuclear receptor hemes are low-spin and 6-coordinate with cysteine(thiolate) as one of the two axial heme ligands. The sixth ligand is a neutral donor, presumably histidine. When the heme is reduced to the Fe(II) oxidation state, the cysteine(thiolate) is replaced by a different neutral donor ligand, whose identity is not known. CO binds to the Fe(II) heme in both E75(LBD) and Rev-erbβ(LBD) opposite a sixth neutral ligand, plausibly the same histidine that served as the sixth ligand in the Fe(III) state. NO binds to the heme of both proteins; however, the NO-heme is 5-coordinate in E75 and 6-coordinate in Rev-erbβ. These nuclear receptors exhibit coordination characteristics that are similar to other known redox and gas sensors, suggesting that E75 and Rev-erbβ may function in heme-, redox- or gas-regulated control of cellular function. PMID:19405475

  10. News Report: The career paths of physics graduates Education: Network day to hold workshops for teaching ideas Experiments: PhysHOME brings innovators together Meeting: Physics Education Networks collaborate at WCPE Workshop: World experts in physics education meet Training: Something for everyone at SPEED 2012 Conference: Sun, cocktails and physics create a buzz at WCPE Students: The physics paralympian 2012 Forthcoming events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2012-09-01

    Report: The career paths of physics graduates Education: Network day to hold workshops for teaching ideas Experiments: PhysHOME brings innovators together Meeting: Physics Education Networks collaborate at WCPE Workshop: World experts in physics education meet Training: Something for everyone at SPEED 2012 Conference: Sun, cocktails and physics create a buzz at WCPE Students: The physics paralympian 2012 Forthcoming events

  11. PhysDoc: A Distributed Network of Physics Institutions: Collecting, Indexing, and Searching High Quality Documents by Using Harvest; The Dublin Core Metadata Initiative: Mission, Current Activities, and Future Directions; Information Services for Higher Education: A New Competitive Space; Intellectual Property Conservancies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Severiens, Thomas; Hohlfeld, Michael; Zimmermann, Kerstin; Hilf, Eberhard R.; von Ossietzky, Carl; Weibel, Stuart L.; Koch, Traugott; Hughes, Carol Ann; Bearman, David

    2000-01-01

    Includes four articles that discuss a variety to topics, including a distributed network of physics institutions documents called PhysDocs which harvests information from the local Web-servers of professional physics institutions; the Dublin Core metadata initiative; information services for higher education in a competitive environment; and…

  12. MT2D: an interactive two-dimensional magnetotelluric and line source modeling program (user's guide and documentation for Rev. 3)

    SciTech Connect

    Nutter, C.

    1981-04-01

    MT2D.REV3 is the latest revision of a 2-dimensional, finite-element, interactive MT-line source modeling program. The original program was a batch-mode program developed by John Stodt. An interactive program was developed based on Stodt's program for a UNIVAC 1108. The program uses linear interpolation of the unknown field over triangular sub-domains of the region where a solution is sought in conjunction with the Galerkin technique to derive a system of linear equations which approximate the governing partial differential equation. The solution of this linear system of equations gives the approximate field values at the nodes of the discretized domain. MT2D has an interactive data management system for data manipulation and display built around the finite-element program.

  13. FANC Pathway Promotes UV-Induced Stalled Replication Forks Recovery by Acting Both Upstream and Downstream Polη and Rev1

    PubMed Central

    Renaud, Emilie; Rosselli, Filippo

    2013-01-01

    To cope with ultraviolet C (UVC)-stalled replication forks and restart DNA synthesis, cells either undergo DNA translesion synthesis (TLS) by specialised DNA polymerases or tolerate the lesions using homologous recombination (HR)-based mechanisms. To gain insight into how cells manage UVC-induced stalled replication forks, we analysed the molecular crosstalk between the TLS DNA polymerases Polη and Rev1, the double-strand break repair (DSB)-associated protein MDC1 and the FANC pathway. We describe three novel functional interactions that occur in response to UVC-induced DNA lesions. First, Polη and Rev1, whose optimal expression and/or relocalisation depend on the FANC core complex, act upstream of FANCD2 and are required for the proper relocalisation of monoubiquitinylated FANCD2 (Ub-FANCD2) to subnuclear foci. Second, during S-phase, Ub-FANCD2 and MDC1 relocalise to UVC-damaged nuclear areas or foci simultaneously but independently of each other. Third, Ub-FANCD2 and MDC1 are independently required for optimal BRCA1 relocalisation. While RPA32 phosphorylation (p-RPA32) and RPA foci formation were reduced in parallel with increasing levels of H2AX phosphorylation and MDC1 foci in UVC-irradiated FANC pathway-depleted cells, MDC1 depletion was associated with increased UVC-induced Ub-FANCD2 and FANCD2 foci as well as p-RPA32 levels and p-RPA32 foci. On the basis of the previous observations, we propose that the FANC pathway participates in the rescue of UVC-stalled replication forks in association with TLS by maintaining the integrity of ssDNA regions and by preserving genome stability and preventing the formation of DSBs, the resolution of which would require the intervention of MDC1. PMID:23365640

  14. Supplement to the paper "Quadratic Sagnac effect — the influence of the gravitational potential of the Coriolis force on the phase difference between the arms of a rotating Michelson interferometer (an explanation of D C Miller's experimental results, 1921 - 1926)" (Usp. Fiz. Nauk 185 431 (2015) [Phys. Usp. 58 398 (2015)])

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malykin, G. B.; Pozdnyakova, V. I.

    2015-08-01

    The paper "Quadratic Sagnac effect — the influence of the gravitational potential of the Coriolis force on the phase difference between the arms of a rotating Michelson interferometer (an explanation of D C Miller's experimental results, 1921 - 1926)" (Usp. Fiz. Nauk 185 431 (2015) [Phys. Usp. 58 398 (2015)]) is amended and supplemented with information concerning earlier work on the influence of rotation on Michelson - Morley's nonzero results.

  15. Interferon-induced HERC5 is evolving under positive selection and inhibits HIV-1 particle production by a novel mechanism targeting Rev/RRE-dependent RNA nuclear export

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Type I interferon (IFN) inhibits virus replication by activating multiple antiviral mechanisms and pathways. It has long been recognized that type I IFNs can potently block HIV-1 replication in vitro; as such, HIV-1 has been used as a system to identify and characterize IFN-induced antiviral proteins responsible for this block. IFN-induced HERC5 contains an amino-terminal Regulator of Chromosome Condensation 1 (RCC1)-like domain and a carboxyl-terminal Homologous to the E6-AP Carboxyl Terminus (HECT) domain. HERC5 is the main cellular E3 ligase that conjugates the IFN-induced protein ISG15 to proteins. This E3 ligase activity was previously shown to inhibit the replication of evolutionarily diverse viruses, including HIV-1. The contribution of the RCC1-like domain to the antiviral activity of HERC5 was previously unknown. Results In this study, we showed that HERC5 inhibits HIV-1 particle production by a second distinct mechanism that targets the nuclear export of Rev/RRE-dependent RNA. Unexpectedly, the E3 ligase activity of HERC5 was not required for this inhibition. Instead, this activity required the amino-terminal RCC1-like domain of HERC5. Inhibition correlated with a reduction in intracellular RanGTP protein levels and/or the ability of RanGTP to interact with RanBP1. Inhibition also correlated with altered subcellular localization of HIV-1 Rev. In addition, we demonstrated that positive evolutionary selection is operating on HERC5. We identified a region in the RCC1-like domain that exhibits an exceptionally high probability of having evolved under positive selection and showed that this region is required for HERC5-mediated inhibition of nuclear export. Conclusions We have identified a second distinct mechanism by which HERC5 inhibits HIV-1 replication and demonstrate that HERC5 is evolving under strong positive selection. Together, our findings contribute to a growing body of evidence suggesting that HERC5 is a novel host restriction factor

  16. [Genetically modified crops: promises and good intentions are not enough (refutation to Espinoza et aL 2004, Rev. Biol. Trop. 52 (3): 727-732)].

    PubMed

    García, Jaime E G

    2007-06-01

    The arguments presented by Espinoza et al. in their paper "Relationship of genetically modified crops with the environment and health of the Costa Rican human population" published in this journal (Rev. Biol. Trop. 52: 727-732, 2004) are questioned and refuted. The arguments are confronted with evidence offered by scientists and national and international independent organizations around the world (e.g. World Health Organization, Consumers International, Physicians and Scientists for Responsible Application of Science and Technology, International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources, the Council of the University of Costa Rica, and the Independent Science Panel) showing the current uncertainty and limitations of science in this area, as well as those of proposed and applied biosafety approaches. Environment, biodiversity and food security are so important and basic matters, that there is need of serious testing, particularly when promises seem to be based on environmentally dangerous ideas promoted half a century ago by the so called "green revolution". Debate should continue, based on a holistic analysis of facts and with ethical reasoning, avoiding emotional positions that can confuse virtual reality with reality. PMID:19069750

  17. Comment on the conductivity exponent in continuum percolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machta, J.

    1988-05-01

    The field theory introduced by Lubensky and Tremblay [Phys. Rev. B 34, 3408 (1986)] for continuum percolation is reanalyzed. Dynamical exponents are found which agree with those found by Straley [J. Phys. C 15, 2343 (1982)] and Machta et al. [Phys. Rev. B 33, 4818 (1986)] using a nodes-links-blobs approach.

  18. Identification of a compensatory mutant (lpg2-REV) of Leishmania major able to survive as amastigotes within macrophages without LPG2-dependent glycoconjugates and its significance to virulence and immunization strategies.

    PubMed

    Späth, Gerald F; Lye, Lon-Fye; Segawa, Hiroaki; Turco, Salvatore J; Beverley, Stephen M

    2004-06-01

    Different Leishmania species rely to different extents on abundant glycoconjugates, such as lipophosphoglycan (LPG) and related molecules, in mammalian infections. Previously, we showed that Leishmania major deletion mutants lacking the Golgi GDP-mannose transporter LPG2, which is required for assembly of the dominant phosphoglycan (PG) repeats of LPG, were unable to survive in macrophages. These lpg2- mutants, however, retained the ability to generate asymptomatic, persistent infections in mice. In contrast, Ilg and colleagues showed that Leishmania mexicana LPG2 mutants retained virulence for mice. Here we identified a partial revertant population of the L. major lpg2- mutants (designated lpg2(-)REV) that had regained the ability to replicate in macrophages and induce disease pathology through a compensatory change. Like the lpg2 parent, the lpg2(-)REV revertant was unable to synthesize LPG2-dependent PGs in the promastigote stage and thus remained highly attenuated in the ability to induce infection. However, after considerable delay lpg2(-)REV revertant-infected mice exhibited lesions, and amastigotes isolated from these lesions were able to replicate within macrophages despite the fact that they were unable to synthesize PGs. Thus, in some respects, the lpg2(-)REV amastigotes resemble L. mexicana amastigotes. Future studies of the gene(s) responsible may shed light on the mechanisms employed by L. major to survive in the absence of LPG2-dependent glycoconjugates and may also improve the potential of the lpg2- L. major line to serve as a live parasite vaccine by overcoming its tendency to revert toward virulence. PMID:15155672

  19. Erratum: Evolution of precipitate morphology during heat treatment and its implications for the superconductivity in KxFe1.6+ySe2 single crystals [Phys. Rev. B 86 , 144507 (2012)

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Y.; Xing, Q.; Dennis, K. W.; McCallum, R. W.; Lograsso, T. A.

    2015-08-14

    In this article, we study the relationship between precipitate morphology and superconductivity in KxFe1.6+ySe2 single crystals grown by self-flux method. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) measurements revealed that the superconducting phase forms a network in the samples quenched above iron vacancy order-disorder transition temperature Ts, whereas it aggregates into micrometer-sized rectangular bars and aligns as disconnected chains in the furnace-cooled samples.

  20. Marinoscillum gen. nov., a member of the family 'Flexibacteraceae', with Marinoscillum pacificum sp. nov. from a marine sponge and Marinoscillum furvescens nom. rev., comb. nov.

    PubMed

    Seo, Hyun-Seok; Kwon, Kae Kyoung; Yang, Sung-Hyun; Lee, Hee-Soon; Bae, Seung Seob; Lee, Jung-Hyun; Kim, Sang-Jin

    2009-05-01

    A novel strain, designated MRN461(T), was isolated from a marine sponge in Micronesia. The 16S rRNA gene sequence of the isolate showed 95.6 % similarity with that of 'Microscilla furvescens' IFO (now NBRC) 15994. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the isolate and 'Microscilla furvescens' IFO 15994 formed a distinct phyletic line within the family 'Flexibacteraceae'. Cells of strain MRN461(T) were Gram-negative, long filamentous rods, motile by gliding. Growth was observed at 15-40 degrees C (optimum, 33 degrees C), at pH 5.0-9.5 (optimum, pH 7.5) and in the presence of 0.5-7.0 % sea salts (optimum, 2.5 %). The major isoprenoid quinone was MK-7. The dominant fatty acids were summed feature 3 (comprising iso-C(15 : 0) 2-OH and/or C(16 : 1)omega7c; 34.8 %), C(16 : 1)omega5c (21.6 %) and iso-C(16 : 1) (19.8 %). The DNA G+C content was 41.5 mol%. On the basis of evidence from our polyphasic taxonomic study, strain MRN461(T) is classified within a novel genus and species in the family 'Flexibacteraceae', for which the name Marinoscillum pacificum gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of Marinoscillum pacificum is strain MRN461(T) (=KCCM 42325(T) =JCM 14064(T)). The misclassified species '[Microscilla] furvescens' is transferred to the new genus as Marinoscillum furvescens (ex Lewin 1969) nom. rev., comb. nov., with LMG 13023(T) (=DSM 4134(T) =ATCC 23129(T) =NBRC 15994(T)) as the type strain. PMID:19406820

  1. Modifier Genes as Therapeutics: The Nuclear Hormone Receptor Rev Erb Alpha (Nr1d1) Rescues Nr2e3 Associated Retinal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Nelly M.; Yuan, Yang; Leehy, Barrett D.; Baid, Rinku; Kompella, Uday; DeAngelis, Margaret M.; Escher, Pascal; Haider, Neena B.

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear hormone receptors play a major role in many important biological processes. Most nuclear hormone receptors are ubiquitously expressed and regulate processes such as metabolism, circadian function, and development. They function in these processes to maintain homeostasis through modulation of transcriptional gene networks. In this study we evaluate the effectiveness of a nuclear hormone receptor gene to modulate retinal degeneration and restore the integrity of the retina. Currently, there are no effective treatment options for retinal degenerative diseases leading to progressive and irreversible blindness. In this study we demonstrate that the nuclear hormone receptor gene Nr1d1 (Rev-Erbα) rescues Nr2e3-associated retinal degeneration in the rd7 mouse, which lacks a functional Nr2e3 gene. Mutations in human NR2E3 are associated with several retinal degenerations including enhanced S cone syndrome and retinitis pigmentosa. The rd7 mouse, lacking Nr2e3, exhibits an increase in S cones and slow, progressive retinal degeneration. A traditional genetic mapping approach previously identified candidate modifier loci. Here, we demonstrate that in vivo delivery of the candidate modifier gene, Nr1d1 rescues Nr2e3 associated retinal degeneration. We observed clinical, histological, functional, and molecular restoration of the rd7 retina. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the mechanism of rescue at the molecular and functional level is through the re-regulation of key genes within the Nr2e3-directed transcriptional network. Together, these findings reveal the potency of nuclear receptors as modulators of disease and specifically of NR1D1 as a novel therapeutic for retinal degenerations. PMID:24498227

  2. Cerasicoccus maritimus sp. nov. and Cerasicoccus frondis sp. nov., two peptidoglycan-less marine verrucomicrobial species, and description of Verrucomicrobia phyl. nov., nom. rev.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Jaewoo; Matsuo, Yoshihide; Matsuda, Satoru; Kasai, Hiroaki; Yokota, Akira

    2010-06-01

    Three Gram-negative, pale-pink-pigmented, spherical, chemoheterotrophic bacteria were isolated from seawater and a dystrophic leaf in the Republic of Palau. Phylogenetic analyses based on 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that the novel isolates YM31-114(T), YM31-066(T) and YM31-067 shared approximately 97-100% sequence similarity with members of the genus Cerasicoccus of the family Puniceicoccaceae within the phylum 'Verrucomicrobia.' The hybridization values for DNA-DNA relatedness between the novel isolates and Cerasicoccus arenae YM26-026(T) were less than 70%, which is accepted as a phylogenetic definition of a species. beta-Lactam antibiotic susceptibility test and amino acid analysis of cell-wall hydrolysates revealed that the novel isolates did not contain muramic acid or diaminopimelic acid in their cell walls, suggesting that these strains lack peptidoglycan. The DNA G+C contents of the three strains were 55-56 mol%; MK-7 was the major menaquinone. The presence of C14:0 and C18:1omega9c as the major cellular fatty acids supported the identification of the novel isolates as members of the genus Cerasicoccus. On the basis of polyphasic taxonomic evidence, it was concluded that these strains should be classified as representing two novel, separate species in the genus Cerasicoccus within the phylum 'Verrucomicrobia,' for which the names Cerasicoccus maritimus sp. nov. (type strain YM31-114(T)=MBIC24844(T)) and Cerasicoccus frondis sp. nov. (type strain YM31-066(T)=MBIC24796(T)) are proposed. Proposal for designation of the Verrucomicrobia phyl. nov., nom. rev. is also presented. PMID:20647678

  3. Inhibition of HIV-1 gene expression by novel macrophage-tropic DNA enzymes targeted to cleave HIV-1 TAT/Rev RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Unwalla, H; Banerjea, A C

    2001-01-01

    Many regions of the HIV-1 genome have been targeted in earlier studies by RNA-cleaving DNA enzymes possessing the 10-23 catalytic motif, and efficient inhibition of HIV-1 gene expression was reported. All these studies employed charged synthetic lipids to introduce the catalytic DNA into the mammalian cells, which severely limits its practical application and usefulness in vivo. Taking advantage of the ability of G residues to interact directly with the scavenger receptors on the macrophages, we synthesized a DNA enzyme 5970 that contained 10 G residues at the 3' end. With the aim of improving the intracellular stability of the DNA enzyme 5970, we added two short stretches of stem-loop structures that were 12 bases long on either side of the DNA enzyme 5970. DNA enzyme 5970 without the poly-G tracts cleaved the synthetic RNA of HIV-1 TAT/Rev, two important regulatory proteins of HIV, very efficiently in a sequence-specific manner. Addition of 10 G residues at the 3' end of the DNA enzyme affected the cleavage efficiency only marginally whereas the same DNA enzyme with stem-loop structures on either end was significantly less efficient. The DNA enzyme with the poly-G tract at its 3' end was taken up specifically by a human macrophage-specific cell line directly in the absence of Lipofectin and was also able to inhibit HIV-1 gene expression in a transient-expression system as well as when challenged with the virus. The potential applications of these novel macrophage-tropic DNA enzymes are discussed. PMID:11415445

  4. ARAM-CI Rev. 1

    2008-07-30

    ARAM-CI provides the basic RAM framework process for conducting a security risk analysis (risk assessment and risk management) for different critical infrastructures. The user works through a step-by-step process which includes screening, facility characterization, identification of potential targets, detemine consequences, identify and characterize threat, conduct a vulnerability assessment, and detemining a relative risk. The ARAM-CI tool also allows the user address risk reduction measrues by developing upgrade packages and considering possible impacts.

  5. WIPP WAC REV. 5 applicability

    SciTech Connect

    Bisping, R.L.; Kelley, C.R.

    1996-08-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is preparing for disposal operations at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in 1998. WIPP is a deep geological repository designed for the safe and efficient disposal of transuranic (TRU) wastes. The Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) for WIPP were initially developed by a DOE steering committee in 1980. Revision 5 reflects the latest negotiations and permit requirements from the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the State of New Mexico Environment Department (NMED), and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The regulatory requirements are combined with the requirements derived from the WIPP safety analysis performed for disposal operations and the original criteria established for safe waste handling operations. The WIPP WAC provides a comprehensive overview of the requirements and basis for developing waste acceptance criteria to meet today`s rules and regulations for transportation and disposal of TRU wastes. The authors believe that it is a comprehensive criteria and a guidance manual for generator/storage sites who must characterize and certify TRU waste for disposal at WIPP. It also provides valuable insight to future projects that may develop their own waste acceptance criteria. The WIPP WAC presents the requirements from the following sources: 1) Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Permit Application; 2) Land Disposal No-migration Variance Petition; 3) 40 CFR 191 Draft Compliance Certification Application; 4) Certificate of Compliance (C of C) from the NRC for a Type B shipping container; 5) Federal Land Withdrawal Act for WIPP; WIPP Safety Analysis Report; 7) WIPP System Design Descriptions (SDDs). The WIPP WAC combines operations and nuclear safety requirements with transportation and hazardous waste regulatory requirements to provide a comprehensive set of criteria and requirements that ensure the safe disposal of TRU waste.

  6. Project Execution Plan, Rev. 3

    SciTech Connect

    IT Corporation, Las Vegas

    2002-08-01

    This plan addresses project activities encompassed by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office, Environmental Restoration Division and conforms to the requirements contained in the Life-Cycle Asset Management, DOE Order 430.1A; The Joint Program Office Policy on Project Management in Support of DOE Order 430.1; Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets, DOE Order 413.3; the Project Execution and Engineering Management Planning Guide, GPG-FM-010; and other applicable Good Practice Guides; and the FY 2001 Integrated Planning, Accountability, and Budgeting System Policy Guidance. The plan also reflects the milestone philosophies of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, as agreed to by the State of Nevada, the DOE, and the U.S. Department of Defense; and traditional project management philosophies such as the development of life-cycle costs, schedules, and work scope; identification o f roles and responsibilities; and baseline management and controls.

  7. Spin resonance strength of a localized rf magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S. Y.

    2006-07-01

    Spin-resonance strength produced by a localized rf field has been a focus of recent publications [V. S. Morozov , Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 7, 024002 (2004).PRABFM1098-440210.1103/PhysRevSTAB.7.024002; M. A. Leonova (to be published).; T. Roser, in Handbook of Accelerator Physics and Engineering, edited by A. W. Chao and M. Tigner (World Scientific, Singapore, 1999), p. 151.; M. Bai, W. W. MacKay, and T. Roser, Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 8, 099001 (2005).PRABFM1098-440210.1103/PhysRevSTAB.8.099001; V. S. Morozov , Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 8, 099002 (2005).PRABFM1098-440210.1103/PhysRevSTAB.8.099002]. This paper discusses the debated factor of 2, and provides a formula to calculate the component enhanced by the induced betatron motion.

  8. Reply to "Comment on `Device-independent entanglement-based Bennett 1992 protocol' "

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallone, Giuseppe; Di Giuseppe, Giovanni; Mataloni, Paolo; Villoresi, Paolo; Lucamarini, Marco

    2016-06-01

    Our paper [Phys. Rev. A 86, 032325 (2012), 10.1103/PhysRevA.86.032325], setting forth a previously unknown connection between the Bennett 1992 protocol and a Bell inequality, has recently received a Comment [Phys. Rev. A 93, 066303 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevA.93.066303] about a possible flaw in its potential device-independent (DI) implementation. We point the authors of the Comment to prior works showing that what they assume to be specific to our protocol's DI implementation is actually a standard assumption in DI quantum key distribution. Therefore there is no need to revise any of the conclusions drawn in Lucamarini et al. [Phys. Rev. A 86, 032325 (2012), 10.1103/PhysRevA.86.032325].

  9. A Janus splicing regulatory element modulates HIV-1 tat and rev mRNA production by coordination of hnRNP A1 cooperative binding.

    PubMed

    Marchand, Virginie; Méreau, Agnès; Jacquenet, Sandrine; Thomas, Denise; Mougin, Annie; Gattoni, Renata; Stévenin, James; Branlant, Christiane

    2002-11-01

    Retroviral protein production depends upon alternative splicing of the viral transcript. The HIV-1 acceptor site A7 is required for tat and rev mRNA production. Production of the Tat transcriptional activator is highly controlled because of its apoptotic properties. Two silencer elements (ESS3 and ISS) and two enhancer elements (ESE2 and ESE3/(GAA)3) were previously identified at site A7. hnRNP A1 binds ISS and ESS3 and is involved in the inhibitory process, ASF/SF2 activates site A7 utilisation. Here, by using chemical and enzymatic probes we established the 2D structure of the HIV-1(BRU) RNA region containing site A7 and identified the RNA segments protected in nuclear extract and by purified hnRNP A1. ISS, ESE3/(GAA)3 and ESS3 are located in three distinct stem-loop structures (SLS1, 2 and 3). As expected, hnRNP A1 binds sites 1, 2 and 3 of ISS and ESS3b, and oligomerises on the polypurine sequence upstream of ESS3b. In addition, we discovered an unidentified hnRNP A1 binding site (AUAGAA), that overlaps ESE3/(GAA)3. On the basis of competition experiments, hnRNP A1 has a stronger affinity for this site than for ESS3b. By insertion of (GAA)3 alone or preceded by the AUA trinucleotide in a foreign context, the AUAGAA sequence was found to modulate strongly the (GAA)3 splicing enhancer activity. Cross-linking experiments on these heterologous RNAs and the SLS2-SLS3 HIV-1 RNA region, in nuclear extract and with recombinant proteins, showed that binding of hnRNP A1 to AUA(GAA)3 strongly competes the association of ASF/SF2 with (GAA)3. In addition, disruption of AUA(GAA)3 demonstrated a key role of this sequence in hnRNP A1 cooperative binding to the ISS and ESS3b inhibitors and hnRNP A1 oligomerisation on the polypurine sequence. Thus, depending on the cellular context ([ASF/SF2]/[hnRNP A1] ratio), AUA(GAA)3 will activate or repress site A7 utilisation and can thus be considered as a Janus splicing regulator. PMID:12419255

  10. Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 552: Area 12 Muckpile and Ponds, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0 with Errata Sheet

    SciTech Connect

    Laura Pastor

    2005-09-01

    This Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD)/Closure Report (CR) has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 552, Area 12 Muckpile and Ponds, Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nevada. The corrective actions proposed in this document are in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (FFACO) that was agreed to by the State of Nevada, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and the U.S. Department of Defense (FFACO, 1996). The NTS is approximately 65 miles (mi) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada (Figure 1-1). Corrective Action Unit 552 is comprised of the corrective action site (CAS) that is shown on Figure 1-2 and listed below: 12-23-05, Ponds. The ponds were originally constructed to catch runoff from the muckpile. As the muckpile continued to be extended to the north and to the east, it became impossible to ensure that all of the runoff from the muckpile was funneled into the pond. Some of the runoff from the muckpile continues to be caught in the upper pond, but portions of the muckpile have eroded, diverting much of the runoff away from the ponds. Regarding the other ponds, there is no evidence that any of the overflow ponds ever received runoff from overflow of the upper pond. The muckpile was removed from CAU 552 because an active leachfield exists within the muckpile and there are current activities at G-Tunnel. A detailed discussion of the history of this CAU is presented in the ''Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) for Corrective Action Unit 552: Area 12 Muckpile and Ponds, Nevada Test Site, Nevada'', Rev. 1 (NNSA/NSO, 2005). Corrective Action Unit 552, Area 12 Muckpile and Ponds, consists of one site located in the southern portion of Area 12. Corrective Action Site 12-23-05 consists of dry ponds adjacent to the G-Tunnel muckpile. The ponds were used to contain effluent from the G-Tunnel. The purpose of this CADD/CR is to provide justification for the closure of CAU 552 with no further corrective action. This justification is based on

  11. Wigner function and Schroedinger equation in phase-space representation

    SciTech Connect

    Chruscinski, Dariusz; Mlodawski, Krzysztof

    2005-05-15

    We discuss a family of quasidistributions (s-ordered Wigner functions of Agarwal and Wolf [Phys. Rev. D 2, 2161 (1970); Phys. Rev. D 2, 2187 (1970); Phys. Rev. D 2, 2206 (1970)]) and its connection to the so-called phase space representation of the Schroedinger equation. It turns out that although Wigner functions satisfy the Schroedinger equation in phase space, they have a completely different interpretation.

  12. Determination of the 3He+α→7Be asymptotic normalization coefficients, the nuclear vertex constants, and their application for the extrapolation of the 3He(α,γ)7Be astrophysical S factors to the solar energy region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tursunmahatov, Q. I.; Yarmukhamedov, R.

    2012-04-01

    A new analysis of the modern astrophysical S factors for the direct-capture 3He(α,γ)7Be reaction, precisely measured in recent works [B.S. Nara Singh , Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.93.262503 93, 262503 (2004); D. Bemmerer , Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.97.122502 97, 122502 (2006);F. Confortola , Phys. Rev. CPRVCAN0556-281310.1103/PhysRevC.75.065803 75, 065803 (2007), Gy. Gyürky , Phys. Rev. CPRVCAN0556-281310.1103/PhysRevC.75.035805 75, 035805 (2007), T. A. D. Brown , Phys. Rev. CPRVCAN0556-281310.1103/PhysRevC.76.055801 76, 055801 (2007), and A. Di Leva, , Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.102.232502 102, 232502 (2009)], has been carried out within the modified two-body potential approach. New estimates are obtained for the “indirectly determined” values of the asymptotic normalization constants and the respective nuclear vertex constants for 3He+α→7Be(g.s.) and 3He+α→7Be(0.429 MeV) as well as the astrophysical S factors S34(E) at E≤90 keV, including E=0. The values of asymptotic normalization constants have been used to obtain the values of the ratio of the α-particle spectroscopic factors for the mirror (7Li7Be) pair.

  13. Exotic quantum critical point on the surface of three-dimensional topological insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bi, Zhen; You, Yi-Zhuang; Xu, Cenke

    2016-07-01

    In the last few years a lot of exotic and anomalous topological phases were constructed by proliferating the vortexlike topological defects on the surface of the 3 d topological insulator (TI) [Fidkowski et al., Phys. Rev. X 3, 041016 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevX.3.041016; Chen et al., Phys. Rev. B 89, 165132 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevB.89.165132; Bonderson et al., J. Stat. Mech. (2013) P09016, 10.1088/1742-5468/2013/09/P09016; Wang et al., Phys. Rev. B 88, 115137 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevB.88.115137; Metlitski et al., Phys. Rev. B 92, 125111 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevB.92.125111]. In this work, rather than considering topological phases at the boundary, we will study quantum critical points driven by vortexlike topological defects. In general, we will discuss a (2 +1 )d quantum phase transition described by the following field theory: L =ψ ¯γμ(∂μ-i aμ) ψ +| (∂μ-i k aμ) ϕ| 2+r|ϕ | 2+g |ϕ| 4 , with tuning parameter r , arbitrary integer k , Dirac fermion ψ , and complex scalar bosonic field ϕ , which both couple to the same (2 +1 )d dynamical noncompact U(1) gauge field aμ. The physical meaning of these quantities/fields will be explained in the text. Making use of the new duality formalism developed in [Metlitski et al., Phys. Rev. B 93, 245151 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevB.93.245151; Wang et al., Phys. Rev. X 5, 041031 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevX.5.041031; Wang et al., Phys. Rev. B 93, 085110 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevB.93.085110; D. T. Son, Phys. Rev. X 5, 031027 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevX.5.031027], we demonstrate that this quantum critical point has a quasi-self-dual nature. And at this quantum critical point, various universal quantities such as the electrical conductivity and scaling dimension of gauge-invariant operators, can be calculated systematically through a 1 /k2 expansion, based on the observation that the limit k →+∞ corresponds to an ordinary 3 d X Y transition.

  14. Evolution of the Antisense Overlap between Genes for Thyroid Hormone Receptor and Rev-erbα and Characterization of an Exonic G-Rich Element That Regulates Splicing of TRα2 mRNA

    PubMed Central

    Munroe, Stephen H.; Morales, Christopher H.; Duyck, Tessa H.; Waters, Paul D.

    2015-01-01

    The α-thyroid hormone receptor gene (TRα) codes for two functionally distinct proteins: TRα1, the α-thyroid hormone receptor; and TRα2, a non-hormone-binding variant. The final exon of TRα2 mRNA overlaps the 3’ end of Rev-erbα mRNA, which encodes another nuclear receptor on the opposite strand of DNA. To understand the evolution of this antisense overlap, we sequenced these genes and mRNAs in the platypus Orthorhynchus anatinus. Despite its strong homology with other mammals, the platypus TRα/Rev-erbα locus lacks elements essential for expression of TRα2. Comparative analysis suggests that alternative splicing of TRα2 mRNA expression evolved in a stepwise fashion before the divergence of eutherian and marsupial mammals. A short G-rich element (G30) located downstream of the alternative 3’splice site of TRα2 mRNA and antisense to the 3’UTR of Rev-erbα plays an important role in regulating TRα2 splicing. G30 is tightly conserved in eutherian mammals, but is absent in marsupials and monotremes. Systematic deletions and substitutions within G30 have dramatically different effects on TRα2 splicing, leading to either its inhibition or its enhancement. Mutations that disrupt one or more clusters of G residues enhance splicing two- to three-fold. These results suggest the G30 sequence can adopt a highly structured conformation, possibly a G-quadruplex, and that it is part of a complex splicing regulatory element which exerts both positive and negative effects on TRα2 expression. Since mutations that strongly enhance splicing in vivo have no effect on splicing in vitro, it is likely that the regulatory role of G30 is mediated through linkage of transcription and splicing. PMID:26368571

  15. Evolution of the Antisense Overlap between Genes for Thyroid Hormone Receptor and Rev-erbα and Characterization of an Exonic G-Rich Element That Regulates Splicing of TRα2 mRNA.

    PubMed

    Munroe, Stephen H; Morales, Christopher H; Duyck, Tessa H; Waters, Paul D

    2015-01-01

    The α-thyroid hormone receptor gene (TRα) codes for two functionally distinct proteins: TRα1, the α-thyroid hormone receptor; and TRα2, a non-hormone-binding variant. The final exon of TRα2 mRNA overlaps the 3' end of Rev-erbα mRNA, which encodes another nuclear receptor on the opposite strand of DNA. To understand the evolution of this antisense overlap, we sequenced these genes and mRNAs in the platypus Orthorhynchus anatinus. Despite its strong homology with other mammals, the platypus TRα/Rev-erbα locus lacks elements essential for expression of TRα2. Comparative analysis suggests that alternative splicing of TRα2 mRNA expression evolved in a stepwise fashion before the divergence of eutherian and marsupial mammals. A short G-rich element (G30) located downstream of the alternative 3'splice site of TRα2 mRNA and antisense to the 3'UTR of Rev-erbα plays an important role in regulating TRα2 splicing. G30 is tightly conserved in eutherian mammals, but is absent in marsupials and monotremes. Systematic deletions and substitutions within G30 have dramatically different effects on TRα2 splicing, leading to either its inhibition or its enhancement. Mutations that disrupt one or more clusters of G residues enhance splicing two- to three-fold. These results suggest the G30 sequence can adopt a highly structured conformation, possibly a G-quadruplex, and that it is part of a complex splicing regulatory element which exerts both positive and negative effects on TRα2 expression. Since mutations that strongly enhance splicing in vivo have no effect on splicing in vitro, it is likely that the regulatory role of G30 is mediated through linkage of transcription and splicing. PMID:26368571

  16. Identification of protein partners of the human immunodeficiency virus 1 tat/rev exon 3 leads to the discovery of a new HIV-1 splicing regulator, protein hnRNP K.

    PubMed

    Marchand, Virginie; Santerre, Maryline; Aigueperse, Christelle; Fouillen, Laetitia; Saliou, Jean-Michel; Van Dorsselaer, Alain; Sanglier-Cianférani, Sarah; Branlant, Christiane; Motorin, Yuri

    2011-01-01

    HIV-1 pre-mRNA splicing depends upon 4 donor and 8 acceptor sites, which are used in combination to produce more than 40 different mRNAs. The acceptor site A7 plays an essential role for tat and rev mRNA production. The SLS2-A7 stem-loop structure containing site A7 was also proposed to modulate HIV-1 RNA export by the Rev protein. To further characterize nuclear factors involved in these processes, we purified RNP complexes formed by incubation of SLS2-A7 RNA transcripts in HeLa cell nuclear extracts by affinity chromatography and identified 33 associated proteins by nanoLC-MS/MS. By UV cross-linking, immunoselection and EMSA, we showed that, in addition to the well-known hnRNP A1 inhibitor of site A7, nucleolin, hnRNP H and hnRNP K interact directly with SLS2-A7 RNA. Nucleolin binds to a cluster of successive canonical NRE motifs in SLS2-A7 RNA, which is unique in HIV-1 RNA. Proteins hnRNP A1 and hnRNP K bind synergistically to SLS2-A7 RNA and both have a negative effect on site A7 activity. By the use of a plasmid expressing a truncated version of HIV-1 RNA, we showed a strong effect of the overexpression of hnRNP K in HeLa cells on HIV-1 alternative splicing. As a consequence, production of the Nef protein was strongly reduced. Interestingly also, many proteins identified in our proteomic analysis are known to modulate either the Rev activity or other mechanisms required for HIV-1 multiplication and several of them seem to be recruited by hnRNP K, suggesting that hnRNP K plays an important role for HIV-1 biology. PMID:21368586

  17. Comment on ``Adiabatic quantum computation with a one-dimensional projector Hamiltonian''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kay, Alastair

    2013-10-01

    The partial adiabatic search algorithm was introduced in Tulsi's paper [Phys. Rev. APLRAAN1050-294710.1103/PhysRevA.80.052328 80, 052328 (2009)] as a modification of the usual adiabatic algorithm for a quantum search with the idea that most of the interesting computation only happens over a very short range of the adiabatic path. By focusing on that restricted range, one can potentially gain an advantage by reducing the control requirements on the system, enabling a uniform rate of evolution. In this Comment, we point out an oversight in Tulsi's paper [Phys. Rev. APLRAAN1050-294710.1103/PhysRevA.80.052328 80, 052328 (2009)] that invalidates its proof. However, the argument can be corrected, and the calculations in Tulsi's paper [Phys. Rev. APLRAAN1050-294710.1103/PhysRevA.80.052328 80, 052328 (2009)] are then sufficient to show that the scheme still works. Nevertheless, subsequent works [Phys. Rev. APLRAAN1050-294710.1103/PhysRevA.82.034304 82, 034304 (2010), Chin. Phys. BCPBHAJ1674-105610.1088/1674-1056/20/4/040309 20, 040309 (2011), Chin. Phys. BCPBHAJ1674-105610.1088/1674-1056/21/1/010306 21, 010306 (2012), AASRI Procedia 1, 5862 (2012), and Quantum Inf. Process.10.1007/s11128-013-0557-1 12, 2689 (2013)] cannot all be recovered in the same way.

  18. Preface: phys. stat. sol. (a) 202/7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollak, Fred H.; Misiewicz, Jan; Sitarek, Piotr

    2005-05-01

    We have recently observed a growing interest in using the powerful technique of optical modulation spectroscopy. These applications are related mostly to the characterization of low dimensional semiconductor structures and devices based on them.The International Workshop on Modulation Spectroscopy of Semiconductor Structures (MS3) at the beginning of July 2004 gathered in Wrocaw (in the southwest part of Poland) almost 40 participants, half of them from abroad. The 8 invited and 16 contributed talks were presented by the leaders of research teams from the USA, Japan, Taiwan, Canada, Germany, France, the Netherlands, Sweden, Ireland, Russia, Lithuania and Poland. Part of the MS3 workshop was held at the Laboratory of Advanced Optical Spectroscopy, Institute of Physics, Wrocaw University of Technology, where discussions on technical matter of the modulation spectroscopy were carried out in a relaxing atmosphere over a cup of coffee.The topics of the MS3 workshop included: advantages of photoreflectance, electroreflectance, contactless electroreflectance, thermoreflectance, differential reflectance and wavelength-modulated surface photovoltage spectroscopy. The applications of the above methods to investigate transistor, diode and laser structures including VCSELs, low dimensional structures of both wings of the spectrum, i.e. wide band gap materials like GaN, AlGaN, ZnO and low band gap materials such as GaInN(Sb)As, InAs, InSb, and FeSi2 were demonstrated.It is our great pleasure to publish the most interesting of the MS3 workshop presentations in this issue of physica status solidi (a).The organizers acknowledge Wrocaw University of Technology, the Center of Exellence CEPHONA from the Institute of Electron Technology in Warsaw and the Polish Committee for Scientific Research for financial support of the workshop.

  19. Preface: phys. stat. sol. (c) 1/7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheikhrouhou, Abdelwaheb

    2004-05-01

    The Third International Conference on Magnetic and Superconducting Materials (MSM03) belongs to a series of conferences, held biannually, aiming at providing a forum to the scientists in the magnetic and superconducting materials areas over the world.The first conference of the series (MSM99) was held in Iran with the proceedings published by World Scientific in 2000, and the second conference (MSM01) was held in Jordan with the proceedings published in Physica B 321 (2002).MSM03 was organized by the Materials Physics Laboratory, Sfax University (Laboratoire de Physique des Matériaux de la Faculté des Sciences de Sfax), with many domestic and international supporting institutions. It was held in Monastir (Tunisia), 1-4 September 2003, with over 150 participants and keynote lecturers attending from the following countries: Algeria, Austria, China, Czech Republic, Egypt, France, Germany, Hungary, Iran, Italy, Japan, Jordan, Morocco, Netherlands, Pakistan, Poland, Russia, Spain, Sudan, Sultanate of Oman, Taiwan, Tunisia, United Kingdom and United States of America.Altogether, about 170 papers on a variety of subjects relevant to the topic of the conference were presented, out of which 42 were keynote lectures. The submissions were peer-reviewed, and ultimately 115 articles were selected for publication in this journal. However, it must be noted that 13 of 39 keynote speakers did not submit their manuscripts for publication. Invited and other speakers were distinguished members of the international scientific community who are interested in pure sciences and materials research, and involved in the fabrication, characterization and investigation of the physical properties of magnetic and superconducting materials. High-caliber scientists attended the conference contributing to its success and the event resulted in new international relationships in research and cooperation. The Chairman of the Organizing Committee was Professor Abdelwaheb Cheikhrouhou, Materials Physics Laboratory, Sciences Faculty of Sfax (Tunisia) and the Co-Chairmen were Professor Sami Mahmood, Dean of Sciences at Yarmouk University (Jordan) and Professor Mohamed Akhavan from the Sharif University of Technology (Iran). The four-day conference consisted of several oral and poster sessions, followed by social programs in the evenings. The success of the event could be measured during the closing session on the last day, when several delegates emphasized the high-quality science that had been evident at the conference. A post conference three-day tour to the south of Tunisia (Matmata, Douz City: the gate of desert and the mountains oasis: Tamerza, Mides and Chebika) was also arranged. The conference was generously sponsored by: - The Tunisian Ministry of High Education, Scientific Research and Technology - The Tunisian Secretary of State for Scientific Research and Technology - The Tunisian National Office of Tourism - The Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP) - French Institute for Cooperation in Tunisia - Tunisian-Italian Scientific Partnership - British Gas - Tunisian Society for Electricity and Gas - Imex Olive Oil -Confiserie TRIKI Le Moulin The next MSM conference in 2005 will be held in Morocco.

  20. Preface: phys. stat. sol. (c) 1/9

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leitch, Andrew; Botha, Reinhardt

    2004-08-01

    The Conference on Photo-responsive Materials took place at the Kariega Game Reserve in the Eastern Cape, South Africa from 25-29 February 2004. More than 60 delegates from 12 different countries participated in the four-day event.The purpose of the conference was to bring together scientists working on various aspects of photo-responsive materials, so as to stimulate this important field of solid state physics in Southern Africa. As may be seen from the list of papers appearing in these proceedings, there was much interest in copper indium diselenide as a thin film material for photovoltaic applications. Also worth mentioning were the valuable contributions on ZnO, GaN and other materials that are currently attracting attention worldwide.The conference program allowed sufficient time for interaction and exchanging of views. Being in a game reserve in the heart of the beautiful Eastern Cape, delegates were also taken on game drives and had the opportunity of taking a river cruise up the Kariega River to view the majestic fish eagle.The members of the academic program committee were: Vivian Alberts (Rand Afrikaans University), Danie Auret (University of Pretoria), Darrell Comins (University of the Witwatersrand), and Reinhardt Botha and Andrew Leitch (University of Port E All papers appearing in these proceedings underwent a strict reviewing process separate from the conference. We express our appreciation to the referees for their diligence in this important task. The conference was organized by the Department of Physics at the University of Port Elizabeth, under the auspices of the Condensed Matter Physics and Materials Science (CMPMS) subgroup of the South African Institute of Physics. It was sponsored by EMF Limited (UK), Sensors Unlimited Inc. (USA), and Carl Zeiss (Pty) Ltd. Special thanks must go to Dr Eunete van Wyk for her professional assistance in the preparation of these proceedings.

  1. Preface: phys. stat. sol. (b) 241/9

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morawetz, Klaus

    2004-07-01

    Modelling and Simulation in Molecular Systems, Mesoscopic Structures, and Material Science was the title of a workshop held at the University of Technology in Chemnitz from 21 to 23 April 2004. This workshop coincided with the 50th birthday of Michael Schreiber. Therefore, the idea to publish a special issue is supported by two good reasons. First, a topical collection is appropriate for giving an overview about a field and to initiate further studies. This is one intention of the present issue. Second, the birthday is a suitable occasion for reflecting on the status of the different fields where Michael Schreiber has been active himself. Motivated by the characteristic name of the workshop (MS4), which expresses the broad range of his activities, the contributions are grouped into three main chapters: Disorder and Interaction, Phase Transitions and Criticality, and Transport Properties.The first part starts with the currently intensively discussed topic of composite Fermions in the paper by B. Kramer et al. This method of rewriting correlations as new quasiparticles has amongst other things the merit of explaining such exciting phenomena as the fractional quantum Hall effect. The methodological questions of Ward identities, causality, and conservation laws are the focus of the systematic investiga-tion in the second article by V. Janis et al. which concentrates on the problem of disorder and configura-tional averaging. The interplay between disorder and correlation is treated in the third contribution by C. Schuster et al., where different theoretical methods are tested on the problem of Friedel oscillations within the one-dimensional Heisenberg and Hubbard model. In the next contribution, M. Berciu et al. focus on localization as one consequence of disorder. The localized and extended electronic states are treated, together with the magnetic degrees of freedom, like spin waves. One of the astonishing consequence of localiza-tion is the observation of resonant Rayleigh backscattering. This is investigated by random matrix theory in the next article by E. Runge et al. and extended to exciton transitions in semiconductor nanostructures. In order to characterize localization, A. Eilmes et al. consider the two-dimensional Anderson model in the following article with special focus on the critical exponents for the localization length. The chapter on disorder ends with a contribution by A. Aldea et al. where the disorder effects are investigated in twodimensional systems with perpendicular magnetic fields such that the interplay between Landau levels and localized states can be considered.The second chapter in the collection is devoted to critical phenomena and phase transitions. It starts with an overview of the most prominent example of critical phenomena, high-Tc superconductivity. A. Sherman presents a review on magnetic and spectral properties of cuprate perovskites within t - J models. The long-range hopping problem and the extraction of critical exponents are the topic of the contribution by E. Cuevas, who calculated the level spacing distribution as well as the correlation dimen-sion in the strong coupling limit. The critical points and the thermodynamics of quenched spatial disordered systems are then treated by T. Vojta et al. Here it is shown that different parts of a system might undergo phase transitions controlled by different parameter values. Different microstructures are important when phenomena like the growth of crystals are considered. Consequently the latter problem is treated in the next contribution by H. Emmrich et al., who develop an analytical solution and compare it to simulations in order to provide insights into the universality of diffusion-limited crystal growth. That the applications of critical phenomena are quite versatile is demonstrated in a short paper by J. Stäring et al. who show how statistical methods can be employed to optimize networks of wireless communication. This chapter on critical phenomena ends with a methodological investigation by U. Grimm. This concerns the often applied random matrix theory, and a method to calculate the level spacing distribution by using coupled differential equations.The third chapter is devoted to transport. It starts with an article about conductance fluctuations by M. Ortuno et al. These quantum fluctuations are considered in localized systems which is directly related to the topics in the first chapter. M. Schröder et al. present in the next article a method to propagate wave functions by approximating them by multi-dimensional wave packets. In contrast to variational methods, this method is based on stochastic calculus. In the case where only a few electrons are transferred, as in the reaction of donor-acceptor complexes and molecular wires, a unified description is presented in the contribution by V. May et al. The transfer rate and the stationary current are calculated and their depend-ence on the length of the molecular system is shown. The method of Green's functions based on local orbitals is used in the next article by M. Albrecht et al. to calculate molecular charge transport. This results into a Landauer theory for the calculation of the transmission coefficient. The special role of elec-tron-electron interaction in the transport properties of disordered wires is considered by H. Mori et al. Here the interplay of interaction and disorder is investigated and the different roles of interaction for the localization phenomena are discussed. We close this chapter on transport by an investigation of electronic transport through nanoparticle arrays. The self-assembled nanoparticle structures are considered within the contri-bution by K. Nicolic whose structures represent very promising nanoelectronic devices.The broad-range approaches and applications selected in these three chapters demonstrate the exciting interplay between structure, disorder, and correlations and suggest the kind of future developments which are to be expected within this field. Finally, in the name of all authors and workshop participants: Happy birthday to Michael Schreiber and all best wishes for exciting future scientific activities!

  2. Preface: phys. stat. sol. (c) 1/6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavokin, Alexey

    2004-04-01

    This volume contains some of the papers presented at the Third International Conference on Physics of Light-Matter Coupling in Nanostructures (PLMCN3) which took place in Acireale, Sicily, from 1 to 4 October 2003. This meeting was fourth in the series started by PLMCN (St. Nectaire, 2000) and continued by PLMCN1 (Rome, 2001) and PLMCN2 (Rithymnon, 2002). All four conferences had the same format (about 70 participants), similar subject scope (interface between fundamental physics of light-matter coupling phenomena and applied research on new semiconductor materials and low-dimensional structures), and the proceedings of all of them have been published in physica status solidi.During these four years, a huge progress has been achieved in the understanding of exciton-polariton effects in microcavities. From the discovery of stimulated scattering of polaritons in 1999 to the first experimental reports of polariton Bose condensation and lasing, attention to this rapidly developing research area has been increased drastically. It is clear now that realization of a new generation of opto-electronic devices, referred to as polariton devices, is a realistic task for the coming decade. To achieve this target, much work has to be done both in fundamental research on dynamics of exciton-polaritons in microcavities and experimental realization of high-quality microcavities presumably based on wide-band gap semiconductors like GaN, ZnO, ZnSe, suitable for the observation of strong exciton-light coupling at room temperature. Forty nine research teams from twelve European countries have created a Polariton Consortium aimed at integration of the European research effort towards fabrication of polariton devices. PLMCN3 was not only an international conference devoted, in particular, to the research on polariton devices, but also the first scientific meeting of this community.The PLMCN meetings since the very first one have been sponsored by the US Army European Research Office (ERO). This time, with the initiative of Jim Harvey from ERO, a special session has been organized on the devices of 21st century, where a number of intriguing ideas have been proposed on new light sources, polariton lasers, and quantum memory elements based on microcavities. A special prize for the most crazy but realizable idea has been won by Misha Portnoi (Exeter) for the concept of a white diode based on a microcavity.Each PLMCN meeting brings participants from new countries. This time, the traditionally strong participation from Japan, Russia, the European Union and the USA has been enforced by a representative delegation from Israel and two speakers from Mexico. We are looking forward for new-comers from other countries not yet involved in the PLMCN community, to join us for the next meeting to be held in St. Petersburg on 29 June-3 July 2004. Sergey Ivanov from the A. F. Ioffe Institute chairs the local Organizing Committee of this future conference. We are going to keep a unique informal and creative atmosphere being characteristic of the PLMCN meetings. We invite all those who wish to know more about light-matter coupling in solids or to present any new interesting results in this area and at the same time to enjoy the beautiful city of St. Petersburg, to contact Sergey Ivanov (ivan@beam.ioffe.rssi.ru) or myself (kavokin@lasmea.univ-bpclermont.fr). We are looking forward to welcoming you in St. Petersburg!

  3. Preface: phys. stat. sol. (b) 242/1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ginzburg, V. L.; Maksimov, E. G.

    2005-01-01

    We have accepted with great pleasure the suggestion of the Guest Editor Miodrag Kuli to write a short preface to the special issue of this journal, which is devoted to the role played by electron-phonon interaction (EPI) in high-temperature superconductors (HTSC). From the very beginning, it was absolutely clear to us that there is no metal in which the EPI could be ignored, and high-temperature superconducting compounds cannot be an exception in this respect. We expressed this opinion, in particular, in our early Review Article [1] and in the talk [2] given at the Grenoble M2S HTSC Conference in 1994. We would like to emphasize that we were not in isolation. There have been many other researchers, some authors of this issue among them, who have also considered the EPI as an essential part of the physics of high-temperature superconductors. However, a large part of researchers in the field, including a few famous scientists, have considered the EPI to be irrelevant to high-temperature superconductivity. Up to now, we do not understand the scientific basis for such an opinion. Moreover, that point of view has never been shared by some other famous scientists; in this respect mention should be made of J. Friedel and A. A. Abrikosov.Turning back to physics, we would like to point out some features of high-temperature superconducting cuprates, which should lead to the existence of a strong EPI in these materials. First of all, it is the proximity of these compounds, even in the optimally doped case, to the layered ionic crystals. This fact has been emphasized in our early publications as well as in many papers by other authors, and it is discussed in detail in the Review Article by C. Falter published in this issue. There are other approaches to the HTSC compounds, which allow to consider that a strong EPI exists. They are also based on some peculiarities in the crystalline and chemical structure of these compounds, in particular, on their multiphase nanoscale structure. This point is discussed by J. Phillips in this issue.There are also many experimental indications in favor of the existence of a strong EPI in the HTSC cuprates. For example, the behavior of the electron relaxation, the peculiarities of the phonon spectra, the interaction of the Josephson current with phonons, and the electron mass renormalization. All these phenomena have been discussed in the recent Review Articles [3, 4]. Currently, additional evidence was provided which has thrown new light on the role played by the EPI in HTSC systems. These are the ARPES experiments conducted by the Stanford group, which have given an unambiguous proof of the electron mass renormalization due to the EPI. A Review Article of this group by T. Cuk et al. is also presented in this issue. We should also mention the contribution of L. Pintschovius who presented new interesting results on the electron-phonon coupling effects observed by means of inelastic neutron scattering.A comprehensive discussion of a major part of the electron-phonon coupling effects presented in the Review Articles [1, 3] has been based on the traditional approach of the Eliashberg type. Up to now, we consider this approach to be quite suitable for pursuing a number of goals, mainly for describing properties of the normal state. Nevertheless, we do not disclaim the importance of more detailed investigations of the EPI, which take into account the strong anisotropy, the interplay between electron-phonon and electron-electron interaction, and the non-adiabatic effects. Four Review Articles in this issue, by Schneider, by Rösch, Han, Gunnarsson and Crespi, by Kuli and Dolgov, and by Cappelluti and Pietronero are devoted to different aspects of these problems.To conclude, we would like to emphasize that the main problem related to the mechanism of superconductivity in the HTSC cuprates is the interplay between the strong EPI and the electron exchange and correlation. Unfortunately, previous work did not crack this problem and much effort should be made in the future. We hope that the publication of this issue will aid to attract the attention of many researchers to the investigation of unsolved problems of the EPI in HTSC systems.

  4. Editorial: phys. stat. sol. (c) 3/1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stutzmann, Martin

    2006-01-01

    Dear Colleagues and Friends,on behalf of the Publishers, the Editorial Office, and the Editors of physica status solidi we wish you all the best for the coming year 2006! It is our sincere hope that your personal and professional experience with our journal has been a positive one and that you will continue to choose physica status solidi for the publication of your scientific findings in solid state physics also in the future.In doing so, you will be in increasingly good company! As a matter of fact, 2005 has been a year of exceptional growth in the number of manuscripts submitted to physica status solidi . Thus, the number of Original Papers which have reached our Editorial Office in Berlin has increased by as much as 30% compared to the long term average over the last ten years. For the Rapid Research Letter section, the corresponding increase has been even more impressive: more than +100% just in the last two years. We view this development as a confirmation of our longstanding efforts to ensure a timely publication service of high scientific quality. One relevant indicator for the high scientific standards expected from articles which are submitted for publication in physica status solidi is the average acceptance rate, which currently is less than 40%. This rate has continuously decreased from a value of about 60% ten years ago and bears witness to our efforts to strive for quality rather than quantity.Also, physica status solidi has been able to continue its long tradition as a truly international journal, despite of the strong competition in an established field such as solid state physics. In 2005, submitted papers have originated almost equally from the Americas, Europe, and Asia, with a clearly growing contribution from China, India, and Japan. We are actively working together with our international Editorial Boards and the Regional Editors to maintain a reasonable balance among papers from different parts of the world. The increasing international visibility of physica status solidi is impressively documented by the ever rising numbers of article downloads via the internet: on the average, each of the 2000 articles published annually in physica status solidi is presently accessed about 100 times via the www. Finally, let me mention some other recent developments, which are not so directly visible from the outside. Thus, a new all electronic publishing system has become operative in our Berlin Editorial Office in 2005, which allows a more efficient and timely handling of manuscripts from submission to publication (www.manuscriptXpress.com) and is particularly valuable for the editing of conference proceedings (conferences.wiley-vch.de). In addition, the functionality of the journal within the Wiley InterScience website has been enhanced by new features such as Citation Tracking. Together with the ongoing digitization of all physica status solidi issues since the 1960s, which is expected to be complete in 2006, this makes the physica status solidi homepage at Wiley InterScience a very valuable tool for literature search in solid state physics, past and present. Try it out at www.interscience.wiley.com! All of us from physica status solidi would like to convey to you our very best wishes for good health and success in the coming year 2006!

  5. Editorial: phys. stat. sol. (a) 203/1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stutzmann, Martin

    2006-01-01

    Dear Colleagues and Friends,on behalf of the Publishers, the Editorial Office, and the Editors of physica status solidi we wish you all the best for the coming year 2006! It is our sincere hope that your personal and professional experience with our journal has been a positive one and that you will continue to choose physica status solidi for the publication of your scientific findings in solid state physics also in the future.In doing so, you will be in increasingly good company! As a matter of fact, 2005 has been a year of exceptional growth in the number of manuscripts submitted to physica status solidi. Thus, the number of Original Papers which have reached our Editorial Office in Berlin has increased by as much as 30% compared to the long term average over the last ten years. For the Rapid Research Letter section, the corresponding increase has been even more impressive: more than +100% just in the last two years. We view this development as a confirmation of our longstanding efforts to ensure a timely publication service of high scientific quality. One relevant indicator for the high scientific standards expected from articles which are submitted for publication in physica status solidi is the average acceptance rate, which currently is less than 40%. This rate has continuously decreased from a value of about 60% ten years ago and bears witness to our efforts to strive for quality rather than quantity.Also, physica status solidi has been able to continue its long tradition as a truly international journal, despite of the strong competition in an established field such as solid state physics. In 2005, submitted papers have originated almost equally from the Americas, Europe, and Asia, with a clearly growing contribution from China, India, and Japan. We are actively working together with our international Editorial Boards and the Regional Editors to maintain a reasonable balance among papers from different parts of the world. The increasing international visibility of physica status solidi is impressively documented by the ever rising numbers of article downloads via the internet: on the average, each of the 2000 articles published annually in physica status solidi is presently accessed about 100 times via the www.Finally, let me mention some other recent developments, which are not so directly visible from the outside. Thus, a new all electronic publishing system has become operative in our Berlin Editorial Office in 2005, which allows a more efficient and timely handling of manuscripts from submission to publication (www.manuscriptXpress.com) and is particularly valuable for the editing of conference proceedings (conferences.wiley-vch.de). In addition, the functionality of the journal within the Wiley InterScience website has been enhanced by new features such as Citation Tracking. Together with the ongoing digitization of all physica status solidi issues since the 1960s, which is expected to be complete in 2006, this makes the physica status solidi homepage at Wiley InterScience a very valuable tool for literature search in solid state physics, past and present. Try it out at www.interscience.wiley.com!All of us from physica status solidi would like to convey to you our very best wishes for good health and success in the coming year 2006!

  6. Editorial: phys. stat. sol. (b) 243/1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stutzmann, Martin

    2006-01-01

    Dear Colleagues and Friends,on behalf of the Publishers, the Editorial Office, and the Editors of physica status solidi we wish you all the best for the coming year 2006! It is our sincere hope that your personal and professional experience with our journal has been a positive one and that you will continue to choose physica status solidi for the publication of your scientific findings in solid state physics also in the future.In doing so, you will be in increasingly good company! As a matter of fact, 2005 has been a year of exceptional growth in the number of manuscripts submitted to physica status solidi . Thus, the number of Original Papers which have reached our Editorial Office in Berlin has increased by as much as 30% compared to the long term average over the last ten years. For the Rapid Research Letter section, the corresponding increase has been even more impressive: more than +100% just in the last two years. We view this development as a confirmation of our longstanding efforts to ensure a timely publication service of high scientific quality. One relevant indicator for the high scientific standards expected from articles which are submitted for publication in physica status solidi is the average acceptance rate, which currently is less than 40%. This rate has continuously decreased from a value of about 60% ten years ago and bears witness to our efforts to strive for quality rather than quantity.Also, physica status solidi has been able to continue its long tradition as a truly international journal, despite of the strong competition in an established field such as solid state physics. In 2005, submitted papers have originated almost equally from the Americas, Europe, and Asia, with a clearly growing contribution from China, India, and Japan. We are actively working together with our international Editorial Boards and the Regional Editors to maintain a reasonable balance among papers from different parts of the world. The increasing international visibility of physica status solidi is impressively documented by the ever rising numbers of article downloads via the internet: on the average, each of the 2000 articles published annually in physica status solidi is presently accessed about 100 times via the www.Finally, let me mention some other recent developments, which are not so directly visible from the outside. Thus, a new all electronic publishing system has become operative in our Berlin Editorial Office in 2005, which allows a more efficient and timely handling of manuscripts from submission to publication (www.manuscriptXpress.com) and is particularly valuable for the editing of conference proceedings (conferences.wiley-vch.de). In addition, the functionality of the journal within the Wiley InterScience website has been enhanced by new features such as Citation Tracking. Together with the ongoing digitization of all physica status solidi issues since the 1960s, which is expected to be complete in 2006, this makes the physica status solidi homepage at Wiley InterScience a very valuable tool for literature search in solid state physics, past and present. Try it out at www.interscience.wiley.com!All of us from physica status solidi would like to convey to you our very best wishes for good health and success in the coming year 2006!

  7. Preface: phys. stat. sol. (a) 201/11

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergonzo, Philippe; Haenen, Ken; Nebel, Christoph; Nesládek, Milo; Vanek, Milan

    2004-09-01

    The present issue of physica status solidi (a) contains a collection of 24 papers presented at the 9th International Workshop on Surface and Bulk Defects in CVD Diamond Films held in Diepen- beek-Hasselt, Belgium, 18-20 February 2004. The concept of this workshop originated in 1996 with the idea of bringing together scientists who are active and innovative in the field of electronic and optical properties of thin film diamond. Since then, this meeting have grown up to a regular conference devoted to new issues in CVD diamond research and related to diamond as a material for electronics and nanobioelectronics. This year the programme was spread over two and a half days, including 8 invited lectures from a total of 39 talks, and a poster session featuring 15 posters. In addition we were able to connect this meeting with a workshop on Defects and Impurities in Crystalline Boron Nitride Compounds, scientifically organized from the University of Antwerp and leading finally to a joint meeting lasting four days. The papers from the BN workshop are joining this proceeding issue on pages 2559-2598.At SBDD IX, topics ranged from homo- and heteroepitaxial growth, doping, hydrogen induced surface conductivity, defects and their characterization, to devices including bio-sensing applications. As usual, very intense and lively discussions took place among participants, from young students to established scientists, after talks, during breaks and in the evenings while enjoying the hospitality of the Limburgs Universitair Centrum and especially the city of Hasselt. The number of participants reached a record breaking 96 this year, with participants coming from fifteen different countries (Australia, Austria, Belgium, Czech Republic, France, Germany, Israel, Italy, Japan, Mexico, Romania, Russia, Sweden, UK, USA). This yearly increasing number indicates that this workshop is continuing to be very attractive to a large scientific community, as it summarizes the up-to-date research on diamond as a wide band gap semiconductor.The workshop would have not been possible without the support of many people and institutions. For financial aid we are especially indebted to the Scientific Research Community Surface Modification of Materials of the F. W. O.-Vlaanderen (Belgium) and its continuous support since starting this workshop 9 years ago. We also thank the Limburgs Universitair Centrum for offering the lecture hall and infrastructure facilities. Finally we highly appreciate the active approach of the editorial staff of physica status solidi in this conference and would like to thank most notably Stefan Hildebrandt and Katharina Fröhlich, for their excellent and patient work, making this already the sixth successfully published proceedings of SBDD in pss (a).To finish, we would all like to invite you for the 10th anniversary of the SBDD series in February 2005 in Diepenbeek-Hasselt and we look forward to seeing you at:Surface and Bulk Defects in CVD Diamond Films, X23-25 February 2005Limburgs Universitair Centrum, Diepenbeek - Hasselt, Belgiumhttp://www.imo.luc.ac.be/SBDD2005

  8. Preface: phys. stat. sol. (a) 203/12

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackman, Richard B.; Nesládek, Milo; Haenen, Ken

    2006-09-01

    The 30 papers gathered in this issue of physica status solidi (a) give a thorough overview over different topics that were presented during the 11th edition of the International Workshop on Surface and Bulk Defects in CVD Diamond Films (SBDD), which took place from 22 to 24 February 2006, at the Hasselt University in Diepenbeek-Hasselt, Belgium. Since its start more than 10 years ago, the SBDD Workshop has grown into a well-established, yearly early bird meeting place, addressing new emerging science related to the progress in the CVD diamond field. The 10 invited lectures, 29 contributed oral presentations and 26 posters were presented in several sessions during an intense two and a half day long meeting.The number of participants reached 115 this year with participants coming from fifteen countries: Austria, Belgium, Czech Republic, France, Germany, Israel, Italy, Japan, Mexico, Poland, Russia, Singapore, Slovak Republic, Sweden, UK, and USA. The mixture of young and established scientists, including a great proportion of students, made this meeting a hot spot of lively discussions on a wide range of scientific subjects, not only during the meeting itself, but also at several occasions throughout many social events offered by the hospitality of the city of Hasselt.It stands for itself that the workshop would not have been possible without the support of many people and institutions. For financial aid we are especially indebted to the Scientific Research Community Surface Modification of Materials of the F.W.O.-Vlaanderen (Belgium), whose incessant support plays an important role in keeping this meeting going. We also thank the Hasselt University for offering the lecture hall and infrastructure facilities and Seki Technotron Corp. for sponsoring the poster reception and their presence with a table top exhibit. Finally we highly appreciate the active approach of the editorial staff of physica status solidi in this conference and would like to thank most notably Stefan Hildebrandt, Ron Schulz-Rheinländer, Christoph Lellig, and Julia Hübner, for their excellent and patient work, bringing the number of successfully published proceedings of SBDD in pss (a) up to 8 already!To finish, we would all like to invite you to the 12th edition of the SBDD series, newly renamed as Hasselt Diamond Workshop, to be held at its established location of Diepenbeek-Hasselt. We look forward meeting you again at SBDD XII in 2007:Hasselt Diamond Workshop - SBDD XII28 February-2 March 2007Hasselt University, Diepenbeek-Hasselt, Belgiumhttp://www.imo.uhasselt.be/SBDD2007London, Paris, Hasselt, August 2006

  9. Preface: phys. stat. sol. (c) 1/10

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suh, Eun-Kyung; Yoon, Euijoon; Lee, Hyung Jae

    2004-09-01

    The Fifth International Symposium on Blue Laser and Light Emitting Diodes (ISBLLED-2004) was held in Gyeongju, Korea from 15-19 March 2004. Gyeongju, the ancient capital of the thousand-year Silla kingdom (57 B.C. to 935 A.D.) provided additional pleasure to the participants as an exceptional open-air museum with antique treasures scattered all around the city.During the last decade we have witnessed remarkable developments in wide-gap semiconductors and light emitting devices in the spectral range from the visible to deep UV. The purpose of the Symposium was to provide a forum for intensive discussion on the issues and main progress especially in optoelectronic devices, material growth and characterization, and quantum structures of wide bandgap semiconductors. A total of 243 papers including 220 contributed and 23 invited ones were presented and discussed by 487 participants from 17 countries world-wide. Among them, 154 manuscripts were submitted and reviewed by the usual evaluation process of physica status solidi. Some were rejected or withdrawn, and finally 139 papers are published in the special issues of physica status solidi (a), (b), and (c). We gratefully acknowledge the referees for their careful review. The papers are grouped into 7 categories. The subheadings and the number of papers in each are as follows: Optoelectronic devices, 43; Growth and characterization, 45; Nano and quantum structures, 21; Contacts, 8; Zinc oxide, 9; Indium nitride and indium rich InGaN, 6; Others, 7. The special session of the Symposium, The LED Highlight, designed partially to meet the challenging targets of the technology, i.e., energy savings and clean environment preservation, drew much attention and is edited as a special coloured section in this issue.The next symposium is scheduled for Montpellier, France, in 2006. We wish the organizers of that symposium the best of luck and hope to see all of the ISBLLED-2004 participants again at ISBLLED-2006.ISBLLED-2004 was sponsored by The Research Society for the Wide-gap Semiconductors, Korean Physical Society, Office of Naval Research, Korea Science and Engineering Foundation, Korea Research Foundation, Korea Association for Photonics Industry Development, Asian Office of Aerospace Research and Development, and Korea Photonics Technology Institute. We would like to thank Ms. E. S. Hwang for her devotion to the preparation and the Proceedings of the symposium including the manuscript handling for publication.

  10. Preface: phys. stat. sol. (a) 201/8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Sung-Chul

    2004-06-01

    The KMS/SOMMA Meeting 2003 was held 3-6 December 2003 at Spapia Hotel, Daejeon, Korea. It was the 5th SOMMA (International Symposium on Magnetic Materials and Applications) organized by ReCAMM (Research Center for Advanced Magnetic Materials) of Chungnam National University. Since 2002, the Korean Magnetics Society (KMS) winter conference has been jointly held with SOMMA. This was the second time to have a KMS/SOMMA joint meeting. The main objective of the meeting was to provide an international forum to discuss up-to-date results on magnetism and magnetic materials. The conference brought together 360 participants from 12 countries. Sessions of the meeting were: Theory and Fundamentals, Magnetic Random Access Memory, Spintronics, Information Storage, Nanostructured Materials, Sensors, and Interdisciplinary. In these seven sessions, 325 papers were presented including 66 oral and 259 poster presentations. Since the symposium was held in Korea, this enabled a large number of Asian scientists to attend: 239 from Korea, 41 from Japan, 7 from Taiwan, and 5 from China.The conference program had 25 invited and plenary speakers. They were Y. Ando (Tohoku U.), M. Inoue (Toyohashi U. Tech), H. Kubota (Tohoku U.), K. Mohri (Nagoya U.), M. Sahashi, M. Takahashi, K. Takanashi, M. Tsunoda (Tohoku U.), and H. Yoda (Toshiba) from Japan; A. J. Freeman (Northwestern U.), A. T. Hanbicki (NRL), F. B. Humphrey (Boston U.), and S. Sun (IBM) from the USA; J. D. Boeck (IMEC, Belgium), B. Dieny (CEA, France), N. Garcia (CSIS, Spain), G. Reiss (Bielefeld U., Germany), T. Stobiecki (U. M. & M. Krakow, Poland), and M. Wolfram (Singulus Tech, Germany) from Europe; C. G. Kim, D. J. Kim (CNU), T. W. Kim (SAIT), S. H. Lim (KIST), Sung-Chul Shin (KAIST), and Yoon Hee Chung (POSTEC) from Korea.For the first time, the SOMMA Proceedings appear in physica status solidi. The Editors hope that the Proceedings could provide chances for deeper and wider understanding of the presentations as well as for enhanced relationship between all participants. We deeply appreciate the help of the editorial staff of physica status solidi for their efficient and kind help during the paper preparations and publications.Finally, we would like to take this opportunity to thank all members of the Advisory Committee, Organizing Committee, referees, and KMS staff for their effort before, during, and after the meeting.

  11. Preface: phys. stat. sol. (b) 241/7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Sung-Chul

    2004-06-01

    The KMS/SOMMA Meeting 2003 was held 3-6 December 2003 at Spapia Hotel, Daejeon, Korea. It was the 5th SOMMA (International Symposium on Magnetic Materials and Applications) organized by ReCAMM (Research Center for Advanced Magnetic Materials) of Chungnam National University. Since 2002, the Korean Magnetics Society (KMS) winter conference has been jointly held with SOMMA. This was the second time to have a KMS/SOMMA joint meeting.The main objective of the meeting was to provide an international forum to discuss up-to-date results on magnetism and magnetic materials. The conference brought together 360 participants from 12 countries. Sessions of the meeting were: Theory and Fundamentals, Magnetic Random Access Memory, Spintronics, Information Storage, Nanostructured Materials, Sensors, and Interdisciplinary. In these seven sessions, 325 papers were presented including 66 oral and 259 poster presentations. Since the symposium was held in Korea, this enabled a large number of Asian scientists to attend: 239 from Korea, 41 from Japan, 7 from Taiwan, and 5 from China.The conference program had 25 invited and plenary speakers. They were Y. Ando (Tohoku U.), M. Inoue (Toyohashi U. Tech), H. Kubota (Tohoku U.), K. Mohri (Nagoya U.), M. Sahashi, M. Takahashi, K. Takanashi, M. Tsunoda (Tohoku U.), and H. Yoda (Toshiba) from Japan; A. J. Freeman (Northwestern U.), A. T. Hanbicki (NRL), F. B. Humphrey (Boston U.), and S. Sun (IBM) from the USA; J. D. Boeck (IMEC, Belgium), B. Dieny (CEA, France), N. Garcia (CSIS, Spain), G. Reiss (Bielefeld U., Germany), T. Stobiecki (U. M. & M. Krakow, Poland), and M. Wolfram (Singulus Tech, Germany) from Europe; C. G. Kim, D. J. Kim (CNU), T. W. Kim (SAIT), S. H. Lim (KIST), Sung-Chul Shin (KAIST), and Yoon Hee Chung (POSTEC) from Korea.For the first time, the SOMMA Proceedings appear in physica status solidi. The Editors hope that the Proceedings could provide chances for deeper and wider understanding of the presentations as well as for enhanced relationship between all participants. We deeply appreciate the help of the editorial staff of physica status solidi for their efficient and kind help during the paper preparations and publications.Finally, we would like to take this opportunity to thank all members of the Advisory Committee, Organizing Committee, referees, and KMS staff for their effort before, during, and after the meeting.

  12. Preface: phys. stat. sol. (b) 242/13

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esser, Norbert; Zahn, Dietrich R. T.

    2005-11-01

    Wolfgang Richter celebrated his 65th birthday on 2 January 2005. On such an occasion, usually marking retirement, achievements and breakthroughs in research are reviewed. But Wolfgang Richter is not retiring: he has accepted an offer of a professorship at the University Rome II Tor Vergata. As he explained to us with his famous smile, he plans to concentrate his future efforts even more on his true love in science - the optical diagnostics of interfaces.Wolfgang Richter has been working in the field of optical spectroscopy of solids since his PhD studies at the University of Cologne. Having finished his PhD in 1969 in the field of infrared spectroscopy he decided to reduce the probed volume by increasing the energy of probing photons: Raman spectroscopy! During his postdoctoral and Habilitation periods (1970-1979) at Pennsylvania State University, Max-Planck-Institut für Festkörperforschung, and RWTH Aachen, he pursued his interest in resonance Raman spectroscopy on semiconductors.In 1979 he received his first appointment as full professor at the University of Ulm. He returned to RWTH Aachen in 1981 and discovered his true destiny: semiconductor interfaces. At that time in the Department of Semiconductor Technology, metal-organic vapour phase epitaxy (MOVPE) was under development as a new technique for growing semiconductor layers. The underlying processes in MOVPE were known to be complex and very difficult to analyse with available experimental techniques, due to the unfriendly, reactive gas phase environment. Optical diagnostics turned out to be the key to a better understanding of MOVPE processes. Wolfgang Richter moved from RWTH Aachen to TU Berlin at the end of 1988 and began building a strong research group concentrating on interface analysis from two complementary sides: on the one hand, tracking MOVPE growth processes online by in situ optics and, on the other hand, advancing the fundamental understanding of optical spectra of interfaces by relating the optical response to atomic structures. Combining both aspects has finally led to considerable progress in surface and interface optics, as well as in vapour phase epitaxy and, moreover, the in situ optical tools developed are nowadays available as standard options in commercial MOVPE machines.The advances largely concerned the development of reflectance anisotropy spectroscopy and spectroscopic ellipsometry as in situ optical tools. However, considerable progress in Raman spectroscopy was also made: analysis of surfaces, ultrathin layers down to a single monolayer or even sub-monolayer coverages, and sub-wavelength spatial resolution were demonstrated in recent years. Current challenges concern, in particular, organic materials, molecule-solid interfaces and bio-interfaces, which will help in the development of many new applications and devices. Interfaces will play a crucial role in many of these developments and optical spectroscopy offers promising capabilities for analysing such interfaces. Wolfgang Richter and his group at University of Rome II Tor Vergata are sure to be active in this emerging field for a long time to come.Based on a symposium on Optical Spectroscopy of Interfaces at the Spring Meeting of the German Physical Society in Berlin 2005, we have asked former and present colleagues of Wolfgang Richter to contribute to this special issue of physica status solidi (b) on Advanced Optical Diagnostics of Surfaces, Nanostructures and Ultrathin Films. We think that the collection of 26 papers gives an excellent overview on recent achievements and future developments in the field of linear optics. In addition to a number of Original Papers on experimental work and some Review Articles, the issue includes examples of the current approaches of computational theory to solid state optics and interface optics. We hope that this issue will stimulate the expansion of the growing field of optical analysis of interfaces, nanostructures and ultrathin layers into new areas of basic and applied science. After the success in characterising inorganic materials, it is

  13. Dedication: phys. stat. sol. (a) 202/15

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albrecht, Martin

    2005-12-01

    The papers in this issue are dedicated to Professor Horst Paul Strunk on the occasion of his 65th birthday and his retirement from active teaching. This volume honours a scientist who has made a lasting impact on the field in electron microscopic characterisation of growth and relaxation phenomena in epitaxial growth of semiconductors. Born in The Hague, The Netherlands, on 13 June 1940, he studied physics in Stuttgart where he received his degree in Physics in 1968. He joined the group of Prof. Seeger at the Max-Planck-Institut für Metallforschung and defended his Ph.D. on defects in NaCl at Stuttgart University in 1973. He spent one year at Cornell University as a visiting Professor before joining Technische Universität Hamburg-Harburg in 1983. There he created the Zentralbereich Elektronenmikroskopie and was a professor for materials analytics from 1983 till 1989. In 1989 he changed to the University of Erlangen-Nürnberg, where he established the Verbundlabor für hochauflösende Elektronenmikroskopie and directed the Lehrstuhl Mikrocharakterisierung at the Institut für Werkstoffwissenschaften of the same university. He spent two research periods at the Universities of Rennes in France and Campinas in Brazil. Together with his colleague Prof. Jürgen Werner he created the series of conferences on polycrystalline semiconductors POLYSE which he has been supervising together with Jürgen Werner since 1990.The research activities of Horst P. Strunk are focused on microstructure of materials and their relation to macroscopic physical properties. Main topics are dislocations, their formation and interaction mechanisms, strain relaxation as well as fundamental mechanisms of epitaxial growth. The spectrum of materials covers a wide range starting from metals over ionic crystals, e.g. NaCl to elemental and compound semiconductors. From the beginning, the main tool of study has been the transmission electron microscope. However, Horst P. Strunk recognised that a thorough understanding of materials problems would require the combined use of structural characterisation, advanced spectroscopy and modelling. Therefore he complemented electron microscopic approaches by optical methods e.g. Raman spectroscopy and cathodoluminescence. Modelling of strain states by finite elements and of defect structures by ab-initio calculations became an important topic especially in the last years. It is characteristic for the scientific approach of Horst Strunk that methodological developments were not an end in itself but linked to problems in solid state physics and materials sciences. Among the scientific works of Strunk, a few examples should be highlighted which mark important stages in his scientific career. Pioneering work has been done on the influence of dislocations in homoepitaxial growth of Si and GaAs in collaboration with Elisabeth Bauser in Stuttgart. Strunk correlated growth spirals on the surface to dislocations that caused these step sources. Studying the dislocation structure of heteroepitaxial Ge/GaAs layers, Strunk discovered that a new dislocation multiplication source works which, later known as Hagen-Strunk source, had a strong impact on understanding of relaxation processes by dislocations in heteroepitaxial semiconductor systems. Work on electrical and structural properties of grain boundaries in silicon was performed together with Jürgen Werner. This was the starting point of a long lasting research on photovoltaic materials that accompanies Strunk till today. Fundamental studies on heteroepitaxial growth were performed in the system SiGe grown from solution. In this context, finite elements were established for the first time in the study of nanostructured materials. In the last years correlated studies on structural and optical properties on III-nitride heterostructures were done by cathodoluminescence in the transmission electron microscope. The impact of Horst P. Strunk's work is evident from the fact that his lab became part of collaborative international projects based on the unique facilities at the Verbundlabor für Hochauflösende Elektronenmikroskopie and the profound knowledge in the field of crystal growth and solid state physics present in his group. The articles in this issue contain original research results contributed by his friends, collaborators and former students. They are a testimony of the lasting impact of Horst P. Strunk's work and they express the authors' gratefulness for benefiting from his work. This volume gives us a unique opportunity to say thank you to Horst P. Strunk and to wish him a new period in his life that should continue to be scientifically as fruitful as up to now but less affected by the burden of administrative work than during the last years.

  14. Preface: phys. stat. sol. (b) 243/5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artacho, Emilio; Beck, Thomas L.; Hernández, Eduardo

    Between 20 and 24 June 2005 the Centre Européen de Calcul Atomique et Moléculaire - or CECAM, as it is more widely known - hosted a workshop entitled State-of-the-art, developments and perspectives of real-space electronic structure methods in condensed-matter and chemical physics, organized with the support of CECAM itself and the ?k network. The workshop was attended by some forty participants coming from fifteen countries, and about thirty presentations were given. The workshop provided a lively forum for the discussion of recent methodological developments in electronic structure calculations, ranging from linear-scaling methods, mesh techniques, time-dependent density functional methods, and a long etcetera, which had been our ultimate objective when undertaking its organization.The first-principles simulation of solids, liquids and complex matter in general has jumped in the last few years from the relatively confined niches in condensed matter and materials physics and in quantum chemistry, to cover most of the sciences, including nano, bio, geo, environmental sciences and engineering. This effect has been propitiated by the ability of simulation techniques to deal with an ever larger degree of complexity. Although this is partially to be attributed to the steady increase in computer power, the main factor behind this change has been the coming of age of the main theoretical framework for most of the simulations performed today, together with an extremely active development of the basic algorithms for its computer implementation. It is this latter aspect that is the topic of this special issue of physica status solidi.There is a relentless effort in the scientific community seeking to achieve not only higher accuracy, but also more efficient, cost-effective and if possible simpler computational methods in electronic structure calculations [1]. From the early 1990s onwards there has been a keen interest in the computational condensed matter and chemical physics communities in methods that had the potential to overcome the unfavourable scaling of the computational cost with the system size, implicit in the momentum-space formalism familiar to solid-state physicists and the quantum chemistry approaches more common in chemical physics and physical chemistry. This interest was sparkled by the famous paper in which Weitao Yang [2] introduced the Divide and Conquer method. Soon afterwards several practical schemes aiming to achieve linear-scaling calculations, by exploiting what Walter Kohn called most aptly the near-sightedness of quantum mechanics [3], were proposed and explored (for a review on linear-scaling methods, see [4]). This search for novel, more efficient and better scaling algorithms proved to be fruitful in more than one way. Not only was it the start of several packages which are well-known today (such as Siesta, Conquest, etc.), but it also leads to new ways of representing electronic states and orbitals, such as grids [5, 6], wavelets [7], finite elements, etc. Also, the drive to exploit near-sightedness attracted computational solid state physicists to the type of atomic-like basis functions traditionally used in the quantum chemistry community. At the same time computational chemists learnt about plane waves and density functional theory, and thus a fruitful dialogue was started between two communities that hitherto had not had much contact.Another interesting development that has begun to take place over the last decade or so is the convergence of several branches of science, notably physics, chemistry and biology, at the nanoscale. Experimentalists in all these different fields are now performing highly sophisticated measurements on systems of nanometer size, the kind of systems that us theoreticians can address with our computational methods, and this convergence of experiment and theory at this scale has also been very fruitful, particularly in the fields of electronic transport and STM image simulation. It is now quite common to find papers at the cutting edge of nanoscience and nanotechnology co-authored by experimentalists and theorists, and it can only be expected that this fruitful interplay between theory and experiment will increase in the future.It was considerations such as these that moved us to propose to CECAM and ?k the celebration of a workshop devoted to the discussion of recent developments in electronic structure techniques, a proposal that was enthusiastically received, not just by CECAM and ?k, but also by our invited speakers and participants. Interest in novel electronic structure methods is now as high as ever, and we are therefore very happy that physica status solidi has given us the opportunity to devote a special issue to the topics covered in the workshop. This special issue of physica status solidi gathers invited contributions from several attendants to the workshop, contributions that are representative of the range of topics and issues discussed then, including progress in linear scaling methods, electronic transport, simulation of STM images, time-dependent DFT methods, etc. It rests for us to thank all the contributors to this special issue for their efforts, CECAM and ?k for funding the workshop, physica status solidi for agreeing to devote this special issue to the workshop, and last but not least Emmanuelle and Emilie, the CECAM secretaries, for their invaluable practical help in putting this workshop together

  15. Preface: phys. stat. sol. (a) 203/4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kittler, Martin; Yang, Deren

    2006-03-01

    This issue of physica status solidi (a) contains the majority of papers presented at the 2nd Sino-German Symposium The Silicon Age which was held at the Lindner Hotel Cottbus, Germany, 19-24 September 2005. This meeting followed the 1st Symposium Progress in Silicon Materials held in June 2002 in Hangzhou, P.R. China. 8 Chinese and 14 German scientists from universities, research institutes and industry were invited to present their views about different aspects of silicon.There was a continuous progress in silicon materials development during the last 40-50 years, driven by the need of the IC industry for better and larger monocrystalline silicon wafers. Moreover, low-cost crystalline silicon now dominates the world's production of solar cells in the photovoltaics industry. Furthermore, there are intensive research activities worldwide for on-chip integration of Si-based photonics in CMOS technology. In addition, new areas being connected with silicon are starting to appear, namely Si-based biochips and nanoelectronics. Silicon, one can reasonably argue, is already the most investigated of all materials. However, there is still a need for continuation of research and development regarding numerous aspects of Si and also SiGe, including related technologies, advanced diagnostics or the role of crystal defects, which are the working fields of many laboratories all over the world. This was also shown by the presentations at the symposium and can be found in the contributions contained in this issue.The organizers would like to thank the participants for their high level contributions and discussions during the symposium. This intensive and open communication allowed the participants to create synergies between the different fields of silicon research and also to build up relationships for cooperation between Chinese and German research groups.Finally, we would like to thank the Sino-German Science Center for the financial support of the symposium.

  16. Preface: phys. stat. sol. (b) 242/9

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez, Maria

    2005-07-01

    The XVII Latin American Symposium on Solid State Physics took place in the conference rooms of the Convent San Francisco de Asis, in the heart of the Old Havana. The sixteen previous editions were organized in eight different countries; the last two were in Colombia (Cartagena, 1999) and Venezuela (Merida, 2002). After eighteen years the meeting came back to Havana in 2004.The program topics included: Surfaces and interfaces analysis; Spintronics; Magnetism; Materials and energy; Ab-initio methods, simulations and modeling in solids; Nanophysics, nanomaterials and nanotechnology; New materials, properties and applications; Preparation of materials, thin films and characterization; High temperature superconductivity; Techniques of structural analysis in solids. The program included 6 plenary talks, 13 invited talks, 58 oral presentations (in eight sessions) and 200 poster contributions (in four poster sessions).The meeting attracted more than 200 participants from 14 countries. The physica status solidi Young Researcher Award sponsored by Wiley-VCH was conferred at the meeting. This prize was divided between two participants: Clara Calderón (Study of electrical transport properties of ZnO thin films used as front contact of solar cells) from Colombia and Aim?? Pelaiz Barranco (AC behavior in lanthanum modified PZT ferroelectric ceramics) from Cuba. Special Mentions went to Val??rie Halté (Femtosec-ond dynamics of transmission of gold arrays of sub-wavelength holes) from France, Erick Larramendi Cancio (Cd desorption induced by Zn exposure during atomic layer epitaxy of CdxZn1-xTe) and Julio Cesar Rimada Herrera (Quantum and conversion efficiency calculation of AlGaAs/GaAs multiple quantum well solar cells) from Cuba.Nanostructures and in general low dimensional physics related to different systems was a very hot topic during the meeting. Some talks and presentations were devoted to optoelectronic materials and devices. Characterization of solids by different structural and optical techniques together with modeling and simulations were also important subjects of the symposium.The XVIII Symposium will be held in Mexico in 2006.The editors wish to thank all the participants who contributed to the success of the meeting and hope that it helped to develop close links between researchers and institutions of Latin America.

  17. 75 FR 23729 - Orders Finding that the (1) Phys,1

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-04

    ....3(c) promulgated thereunder. \\10\\ 74 FR 53724 (October 20, 2009). DATES: Effective Date: April 28... determined closing, settlement or other daily price of another contract. \\13\\ 74 FR 12178 (Mar. 23, 2009...., 2d Sess. 978, 986 (Conference Committee Report). See also 73 FR 75888, 75894 (Dec. 12, 2008)....

  18. Schools in Most States Skimp on Phys Ed, Study Finds

    MedlinePlus

    ... news is that school districts, under a recent law, will be able to get federal funding to improve their programs, the report said. SOURCE: Voices for Healthy Kids, news release, April 8, 2016 HealthDay Copyright (c) 2016 HealthDay . All rights reserved. News stories ...

  19. Qualification of the Savannah River National Laboratories Coulometer, Model SRNL-Rev. 2 (Serial # SRNL-003 Coulometer) for use in Process 3401a, Plutonium Assay by Controlled Coulometer

    SciTech Connect

    Tandon, Lav; Colletti, Lisa M.; Drake, Lawrence R.; Lujan, Elmer J. W.; Garduno, Katherine

    2012-08-22

    This report discusses the process used to prove in the SRNL-Rev.2 coulometer for isotopic data analysis used in the special plutonium material project. In May of 2012, the PAR 173 coulometer system that had been the workhorse of the Plutonium Assay team since the early 1970s became inoperable. A new coulometer system had been purchased from Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and installed in August of 2011. Due to funding issues the new system was not qualified at that time. Following the failure of the PAR 173, it became necessary to qualify the new system for use in Process 3401a, Plutonium Assay by Controlled Coulometry. A qualification plan similar to what is described in PQR -141a was followed. Experiments were performed to establish a statistical summary of the performance of the new system by monitoring the repetitive analysis of quality control sample, PEOL, and the assay of plutonium metals obtained from the Plutonium Exchange Program. The data for the experiments was acquired using work instructions ANC125 and ANC195. Figure 1 shows approximately 2 years of data for the PEOL material obtained using the PAR 173. The required acceptance criteria for the sample are that it returns the correct value for the quality control material of 88.00% within 2 sigma (95% Confidence Interval). It also must meet daily precision standards that are set from the historical data analysis of decades of data. The 2 sigma value that is currently used is 0.146 % as evaluated by the Statistical Science Group, CCS-6. The average value of the PEOL quality control material run in 10 separate days on the SRNL-03 coulometer is 87.98% with a relative standard deviation of 0.04 at the 95% Confidence interval. The date of data acquisition is between 5/23/2012 to 8/1/2012. The control samples are run every day experiments using the coulometer are carried out. It is also used to prove an instrument is in statistical control before any experiments are undertaken. The total number of

  20. Comment on ``Photoelectron spectroscopic studies of polyatomic molecules: Theory for spin polarization''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherepkov, N. A.; Kuznetsov, V. V.

    1991-08-01

    The relation between the theory developed recently by Chandra [Phys. Rev. A 40, 752 (1989)] and our theory, derived previously [N. A. Cherepkov, J. Phys. B 16, 1543 (1983); 14, 2165 (1981); Adv. At. Mol. Phys. 19, 395 (1983); N. A. Cherepkov and V. V. Kuznetsov, Z. Phys. D 7, 271 (1987)], is established.

  1. MMW radar enhanced vision systems: the Helicopter Autonomous Landing System (HALS) and Radar-Enhanced Vision System (REVS) are rotary and fixed wing enhanced flight vision systems that enable safe flight operations in degraded visual environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, Jack; Schneider, John; Cariani, Pete

    2013-05-01

    Sierra Nevada Corporation (SNC) has developed rotary and fixed wing millimeter wave radar enhanced vision systems. The Helicopter Autonomous Landing System (HALS) is a rotary-wing enhanced vision system that enables multi-ship landing, takeoff, and enroute flight in Degraded Visual Environments (DVE). HALS has been successfully flight tested in a variety of scenarios, from brown-out DVE landings, to enroute flight over mountainous terrain, to wire/cable detection during low-level flight. The Radar Enhanced Vision Systems (REVS) is a fixed-wing Enhanced Flight Vision System (EFVS) undergoing prototype development testing. Both systems are based on a fast-scanning, threedimensional 94 GHz radar that produces real-time terrain and obstacle imagery. The radar imagery is fused with synthetic imagery of the surrounding terrain to form a long-range, wide field-of-view display. A symbology overlay is added to provide aircraft state information and, for HALS, approach and landing command guidance cuing. The combination of see-through imagery and symbology provides the key information a pilot needs to perform safe flight operations in DVE conditions. This paper discusses the HALS and REVS systems and technology, presents imagery, and summarizes the recent flight test results.

  2. Tevatron electron lenses: Design and operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiltsev, Vladimir; Bishofberger, Kip; Kamerdzhiev, Vsevolod; Kozub, Sergei; Kufer, Matthew; Kuznetsov, Gennady; Martinez, Alexander; Olson, Marvin; Pfeffer, Howard; Saewert, Greg; Scarpine, Vic; Seryi, Andrey; Solyak, Nikolai; Sytnik, Veniamin; Tiunov, Mikhail; Tkachenko, Leonid; Wildman, David; Wolff, Daniel; Zhang, Xiao-Long

    2008-10-01

    The beam-beam effects have been the dominating sources of beam loss and lifetime limitations in the Tevatron proton-antiproton collider [V. Shiltsev , Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 8, 101001 (2005)PRABFM1098-440210.1103/PhysRevSTAB.8.101001]. Electron lenses were originally proposed for compensation of electromagnetic long-range and head-on beam-beam interactions of proton and antiproton beams [V. Shiltsev , Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 2, 071001 (1999).PRABFM1098-440210.1103/PhysRevSTAB.2.071001]. Results of successful employment of two electron lenses built and installed in the Tevatron are reported by Shiltsev et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 244801 (2007)PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.99.244801; New J. Phys. 10, 043042 (2008)NJOPFM1367-263010.1088/1367-2630/10/4/043042] and by Zhang et al. [X.-L. Zhang , Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 11, 051002 (2008)PRABFM1098-440210.1103/PhysRevSTAB.11.051002]. In this paper we present design features of the Tevatron electron lenses (TELs), discuss the generation of electron beams, describe different modes of operation, and outline the technical parameters of various subsystems.

  3. Transcriptional repression by the orphan steroid receptor RVR/Rev-erb beta is dependent on the signature motif and helix 5 in the E region: functional evidence for a biological role of RVR in myogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Burke, L; Downes, M; Carozzi, A; Giguère, V; Muscat, G E

    1996-01-01

    RVR/Rev-erb beta/BD73 is an orphan steroid receptor that has no known ligand in the "classical' sense. RVR binds as a monomer to an element which consists of an A/T-rich sequence upstream of the consensus hexameric half-site. However, RVR does not activate transcription and blocks transactivation of this element by ROR/RZR. The mechanism of RVR action remains obscure, hence we used the GAL4 hybrid system to identify and characterize an active transcriptional silencer in the ligand binding domain (LBD) of RVR. Rigorous deletion and mutational analysis demonstrated that this repressor domain is encoded by amino acids 416-449 of RVR. Furthermore, we demonstrated that efficient repression is dependent on the so-called LBD-specific signature motif, (F/W)AKxxxxFxxLxxxDQxxLL (which spans loop3-4 and helix 4) and helix 5 (H5; identified in the crystal structures of the steroid receptor LBDs). Although RVR is expressed in many adult tissues, including skeletal muscle, and during embryogenesis, its physiological function in differentiation and mammalian development remains unknown. Since other 'orphans', e.g. COUP-TF II and Rev-erbA alpha, have been demonstrated to regulate muscle and adipocyte differentiation, we investigated the expression and functional role of RVR during mouse myogenesis. In C2C12 myogenic cells, RVR mRNA was detected in proliferating myoblasts and was suppressed when the cells were induced to differentiate into post-mitotic, multinucleated myotubes by serum withdrawal. This decrease in RVR mRNA correlated with the appearance of muscle-specific markers (e.g. myogenin mRNA). RVR 'loss of function' studies by constitutive over-expression of a dominant negative RVR delta E resulted in increased levels of p21Cip1/Waf1 and myogenin mRNAs after serum withdrawal. Time course studies indicated that expression of RVR delta E mRNA results in the precocious induction and accumulation of myogenin and p21 mRNAs after serum withdrawal. In addition, we demonstrated

  4. Construction of three-qubit genuine entanglement with bipartite positive partial transposes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, Kil-Chan; Kye, Seung-Hyeok

    2016-03-01

    We construct triqubit genuinely entangled states which have positive partial transposes (PPTs) with respect to the bipartition of systems. These examples disprove a conjecture [Novo, Moroder, and Gühne, Phys. Rev A 88, 012305 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevA.88.012305] which claims that PPT mixtures are necessary and sufficient for the biseparability of three qubits.

  5. Comment on 'Full quantum reconstruction of vortex states'

    SciTech Connect

    Bizarro, Joao P. S.

    2010-01-15

    It is pointed out that the bona fide Wigner distribution recently introduced [Phys. Rev. A 78, 060101(R) (2008)] is in fact the rotational Wigner function earlier derived and thoroughly studied [Phys. Rev. A 49, 3255 (1994); 71, 069901(E) (2005)], so the latter remains indeed the natural phase-space representation for the rotation-angle and angular-momentum pair.

  6. Comment on ``Sodium Pyroxene NaTiSi2O6: Possible Haldane Spin-1 Chain System''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Streltsov, S. V.; Popova, O. A.; Khomskii, D. I.

    2006-06-01

    A Comment on the Letter by Zoran S. Popović, Zeljko V. Šlijivančanin, and Filip R. Vukajlović, Phys. Rev. Lett. 93, 036401 (2004).PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.93.036401. The authors of the Letter offer a Reply.

  7. Comment on ``Relative locality and the soccer ball problem''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossenfelder, S.

    2013-07-01

    It is explained why the argument by Amelino-Camelia et al. [Phys. Rev. D 84, 087702 (2011)PRVDAQ1550-799810.1103/PhysRevD.84.087702] does not answer the question how to describe multiparticle states in models with a deformed Lorentz symmetry in momentum space.

  8. Comment on ``Relativistic effects on the spin entanglement of two massive Dirac particles''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caban, Paweł; Rembieliński, Jakub

    2012-12-01

    The paper of Choi [Phys. Rev. APLRAAN1050-294710.1103/PhysRevA.84.012334 84, 012334 (2011)] discusses the use of the Foldy-Wouthuysen mean-spin operator in the theory of relativistic quantum information. However, the paper contains some incorrect statements and misunderstandings.

  9. Walsh, Da Silva, and Wei Reply

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, A.; Da Silva, J. L. F.; Wei, S. H.

    2009-04-17

    This is a reply to Stefano Sanvito and Chaitanya Das Pemmaraju's, Comment on Theoretical Description of Carrier Mediated Magnetism in Cobalt Doped ZnO, Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 159701 (2009); and the original article is Theoretical Description of Carrier Mediated Magnetism in Cobalt Doped ZnO, Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 256401 (2008).

  10. Reply to ``Comment on `Spectroscopic factors for bound s-wave states derived from neutron scattering lengths' ''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohr, P.; Herndl, H.; Oberhummer, H.; Staudt, G.

    1997-12-01

    In a recent comment Barker [Phys. Rev. C 56, 3423 (1997), the preceding paper] criticized our procedure for the extraction of spectroscopic factors from neutron scattering lengths [Phys. Rev. C 55, 1591 (1997)]. In this reply we compare the R-matrix analysis by Barker to our potential model calculation, and we discuss the applicability of both models for the extraction of spectroscopic factors.

  11. Comment on ``Reduced coherence in double-slit diffraction of neutrons''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanz, A. S.; Borondo, F.

    2008-05-01

    With the present Comment, we would like to clarify several aspects and some claims recently stated by Tumulka, Viale, and Zanghì [Phys. Rev. A 75, 055602 (2007)] in connection with a work published by Sanz, Borondo, and Bastiaans [Phys. Rev. A 71, 042103 (2005)].

  12. Strong monogamy of quantum entanglement for multiqubit W -class states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jeong San

    2014-12-01

    We provide strong evidence for the strong monogamy inequality of multiqubit entanglement recently proposed [B. Regula et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 110501 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.113.110501]. We consider a large class of multiqubit generalized W -class states and analytically show that the strong monogamy inequality of multiqubit entanglement is saturated by this class of states.

  13. Comment on ``Low-Dimensional Models for Vertically Falling Viscous Films''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruyer-Quil, Christian; Manneville, Paul

    2004-11-01

    A Comment on the Letter by Mohan K. R. Panga and Vemuri Balakotaiah,

    Phys. Rev. Lett. 90, 154501 (2003)PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.90.154501
    . The authors of the Letter offer a Reply.

  14. Efficient progressive readout of a register of qubits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tilloy, Antoine

    2016-05-01

    Recently, a series of papers by Combes et al. [J. Combes, H. M. Wiseman, and K. Jacobs, Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 160503 (2008), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.100.160503; J. Combes, H. M. Wiseman, and A. J. Scott, Phys. Rev. A 81, 020301(R) (2010), 10.1103/PhysRevA.81.020301; J. Combes and H. M. Wiseman, Phys. Rev. X 1, 011012 (2011), 10.1103/PhysRevX.1.011012; J. Combes, A. Denney, and H. M. Wiseman, Phys. Rev. A 91, 022305 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevA.91.022305] has shown that it is possible to greatly improve the measurement rate of a register of qubits for given detector resources by means of a clever feedback control scheme. However, this speedup came at an exponential cost in terms of complexity and memory use. In this paper, I propose a simple efficient algorithm—exponentially more frugal in memory and less complex to implement—which is asymptotically as fast. I use extensively the implicit classicality of the situation to provide a slightly more straightforward interpretation of the results. I compute the speedup rates exactly in the case of the proposed model and in the case of the open-loop scheme of Combes et al. and prove that they indeed provide the same asymptotic speedup.

  15. One-dimensional model of a liquid metal in the effective-medium approximation in the random limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasbun, Javier E.

    1989-08-01

    In this paper it is shown that the effective-medium approximation (EMA) of Roth [Phys. Rev. B 9, 2476 (1974)] corresponds to the approximation No. 5 of Klauder [Ann. Phys. 14, 43 (1961)] in the random limit for the one-dimensional delta-function model of a liquid metal. The random EMA results are compared with the exact results obtained by Frisch and Lloyd [Phys. Rev. 120, 1175 (1960)] for this model.

  16. The circadian clock regulates autophagy directly through the nuclear hormone receptor Nr1d1/Rev-erbα and indirectly via Cebpb/(C/ebpβ) in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Huang, Guodong; Zhang, Fanmiao; Ye, Qiang; Wang, Han

    2016-08-01

    Autophagy is a highly conserved intracellular degradation system, and recently was shown to display circadian rhythms in mice. The mechanisms underlying circadian regulation of autophagy, however, are still unclear. Here, we observed that numbers of autophagosomes and autolysosomes exhibit daily rhythms in the zebrafish liver, and cebpb/(c/ebpβ) and various autophagy genes are rhythmically expressed in zebrafish larvae but significantly upregulated in per1b and TALEN-generated nr1d1/rev-erbα mutant fish, indicating that both Per1b and Nr1d1 play critical roles in autophagy rhythms. Luciferase reporter and ChIP assays show that the circadian clock directly regulates autophagy genes through Nr1d1, and also regulates transcription of cebpb through Per1b. We also found that fasting leads to altered expression of both circadian clock genes and autophagy genes in zebrafish adult peripheral organs. Further, transcriptome analysis reveals multiple functions of Nr1d1 in zebrafish. Taken together, these findings provide evidence for how the circadian clock regulates autophagy, imply that nutritional signaling affects both circadian regulation and autophagy activities in peripheral organs, and shed light on how circadian gene mutations act through autophagy to contribute to common metabolic diseases such as obesity. PMID:27171500

  17. The circadian clock regulates autophagy directly through the nuclear hormone receptor Nr1d1/Rev-erbα and indirectly via Cebpb/(C/ebpβ) in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Guodong; Zhang, Fanmiao; Ye, Qiang; Wang, Han

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Autophagy is a highly conserved intracellular degradation system, and recently was shown to display circadian rhythms in mice. The mechanisms underlying circadian regulation of autophagy, however, are still unclear. Here, we observed that numbers of autophagosomes and autolysosomes exhibit daily rhythms in the zebrafish liver, and cebpb/(c/ebpβ) and various autophagy genes are rhythmically expressed in zebrafish larvae but significantly upregulated in per1b and TALEN-generated nr1d1/rev-erbα mutant fish, indicating that both Per1b and Nr1d1 play critical roles in autophagy rhythms. Luciferase reporter and ChIP assays show that the circadian clock directly regulates autophagy genes through Nr1d1, and also regulates transcription of cebpb through Per1b. We also found that fasting leads to altered expression of both circadian clock genes and autophagy genes in zebrafish adult peripheral organs. Further, transcriptome analysis reveals multiple functions of Nr1d1 in zebrafish. Taken together, these findings provide evidence for how the circadian clock regulates autophagy, imply that nutritional signaling affects both circadian regulation and autophagy activities in peripheral organs, and shed light on how circadian gene mutations act through autophagy to contribute to common metabolic diseases such as obesity. PMID:27171500

  18. Kinetic and High-Pressure Mechanistic Investigation of the Aqua Substitution in the Trans-Aquaoxotetracyano Complexes of Re(V) and Tc(V): Some Implications for Nuclear Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Botha, J. Mattheus; Roodt, Andreas

    2008-01-01

    A kinetic study of the aqua substitution in the [TcO(OH2)(CN)4]− complex by different thiourea ligands (TU = thiourea, NMTU = N-methyl thiourea, NNDMTU = N, N′-dimethylthiourea) yielded second-order formation rate constants (25°C) as follows [NNDMTU, NMTU, TU, respectively]: kf = 11.5 ± 0.1, 11.38 ± 0.04, and 7.4 ± 0.1 M−1s−1, with activation parameters: Δ H#kf : 55 ± 2, 42 ± 3, 35 ± 5 kJ mol−1; ΔS#kf : − 40 ± 8, − 84 ± 11, − 110 ± 17 J K−1mol−1. A subsequent high-pressure investigation of the aqua substitution in the [ReO(OH2)(CN)4]− and [TcO(OH2)(CN)4]− complexes by selected entering ligands yielded ΔV#kf values as follows: Re(V): −1.7 ± 0.3(NCS−), −22.1 ± 0.9 (TU) and for Tc(V): −3.5 ± 0.3(NCS−), −14 ± 1 (NNDMTU), and −6.0 ± 0.5 (TU) cm3mol −1, respectively. These results point to an interchange associative mechanism for the negative NCS− as entering group but even a pure associative mechanism for the neutral thiourea ligands. PMID:18464928

  19. Reclassification of Lactobacillus casei subsp. casei ATCC 393 and Lactobacillus rhamnosus ATCC 15820 as Lactobacillus zeae nom. rev., designation of ATCC 334 as the neotype of L. casei subsp. casei, and rejection of the name Lactobacillus paracasei.

    PubMed

    Dicks, L M; Du Plessis, E M; Dellaglio, F; Lauer, E

    1996-01-01

    The type strain of Lactobacillus casei subsp. casei (ATCC 393) exhibits low levels of DNA homology with other strains of L. casei subsp. casei (8 to 46%) and strains of Lactobacillus paracasei (30 to 50%), but exhibits a level of DNA similarity of 80% with Lactobacillus rhamnosus ATCC 15820, the original type strain of "Lactobacterium zeae" Kuznetsov 1959. Strains ATCC 393T (T = type strain) and ATCC 15820T are members of one protein profile cluster that is separate from the other Lactobacillus spp. The randomly amplified polymorphic DNA PCR profile of strain ATCC 393T is also different from the profiles obtained for the other species. L. casei ATCC 334T is genetically closely related to L. casei subsp. casei strains (71 to 97%) and L. paracasei strains (71 to 91%), is a member of the same protein profile cluster as these organisms, and shares several DNA amplicons with L. paracasei strains. On the basis of these results, we propose that L. casei subsp. casei ATCC 393T and L. rhamnosus ATCC 15820 should be reclassified as members of Lactobacillus zeae nom. rev. (type strain, ATCC 15820), that strain ATCC 334 should be designated the neotype strain of L. casei subsp. casei, and that the name L. paracasei should be rejected. PMID:8573516

  20. Relativistically induced transparency acceleration of light ions by an ultrashort laser pulse interacting with a heavy-ion-plasma density gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahai, Aakash A.; Tsung, Frank S.; Tableman, Adam R.; Mori, Warren B.; Katsouleas, Thomas C.

    2013-10-01

    The relativistically induced transparency acceleration (RITA) scheme of proton and ion acceleration using laser-plasma interactions is introduced, modeled, and compared to the existing schemes. Protons are accelerated with femtosecond relativistic pulses to produce quasimonoenergetic bunches with controllable peak energy. The RITA scheme works by a relativistic laser inducing transparency [Akhiezer and Polovin, Zh. Eksp. Teor. Fiz 30, 915 (1956); Kaw and Dawson, Phys. FluidsPFLDAS0031-917110.1063/1.1692942 13, 472 (1970); Max and Perkins, Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.27.1342 27, 1342 (1971)] to densities higher than the cold-electron critical density, while the background heavy ions are stationary. The rising laser pulse creates a traveling acceleration structure at the relativistic critical density by ponderomotively [Lindl and Kaw, Phys. FluidsPFLDAS0031-917110.1063/1.1693437 14, 371 (1971); Silva , Phys. Rev. E1063-651X10.1103/PhysRevE.59.2273 59, 2273 (1999)] driving a local electron density inflation, creating an electron snowplow and a co-propagating electrostatic potential. The snowplow advances with a velocity determined by the rate of the rise of the laser's intensity envelope and the heavy-ion-plasma density gradient scale length. The rising laser is incrementally rendered transparent to higher densities such that the relativistic-electron plasma frequency is resonant with the laser frequency. In the snowplow frame, trace density protons reflect off the electrostatic potential and get snowplowed, while the heavier background ions are relatively unperturbed. Quasimonoenergetic bunches of velocity equal to twice the snowplow velocity can be obtained and tuned by controlling the snowplow velocity using laser-plasma parameters. An analytical model for the proton energy as a function of laser intensity, rise time, and plasma density gradient is developed and compared to 1D and 2D PIC OSIRIS [Fonseca , Lect. Note Comput. Sci.9783

  1. Quantum-Critical Dynamics of the Skyrmion Lattice.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Andrew G.

    2002-03-01

    Slightly away from exact filling of the lowest Landau level, the quantum Hall ferromagnet contains a finite density of magnetic vortices or Skyrmions[1,2]. These Skyrmions are expected to form a square lattice[3], the low energy excitations of which (translation/phonon modes and rotation/breathing modes) lead to dramatically enhanced nuclear relaxation[4,5]. Upon changing the filling fraction, the rotational modes undergo a quantum phase transition where zero-point fluctuations destroy the orientational order of the Skyrmions[4,6]. I will discuss the effect of this quantum critical point upon nuclear spin relaxation[7]. [1]S. L. Sondhi et al., Phys. Rev. B47, 16419 (1993). [2]S. E. Barrett et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 74, 5112 (1995), A. Schmeller et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 75, 4290 (1995). [3]L. Brey et al, Phys. Rev. Lett. 75, 2562 (1995). [4]R. Côté et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 78, 4825 (1997). [5]R. Tycko et al., Science 268, 1460 (1995). [6]Yu V. Nazarov and A. V. Khaetskii, Phys. Rev. Lett. 80, 576 (1998). [7]A. G. Green, Phys. Rev. B61, R16 299 (2000).

  2. Volatile Components from Packing Matrials, Rev. 2

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R. A.

    2006-03-01

    An outgassing study was conducted on five packing materials, comprising two experiments. These materials comprised 277-4 borated concrete, Borobond4 concrete, polyethylene bags, silica-filled silicone rubber seals, and silicone foam padding. The purpose was measure the volume of gases which diffuse from packaging materials when sealed in containers. Two heating profiles were used to study the offgassing quantities in a set of accelerated aging tests. It was determined that the concretes contain a large quantity of water. The plastic materials hold much less moisture, with the silicone materials even consuming water, possibly due to the presence of silica filler. Polyethylene tends to degrade as the temperature is elevated and the foam stiffens.

  3. ICDP Complex Groundwater Monitoring Plan REV 5

    SciTech Connect

    Cahn, L. S.

    2007-08-09

    This Groundwater Monitoring Plan, along with the Quality Assurance Project Plan for Waste Area Groups 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 10, and Removal Actions, constitutes the sampling and analysis plan for groundwater and perched water monitoring at the Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility (ICDF). A detection monitoring system was installed in the Snake River Plan Aquifer to comply with substantive requirements of "Releases from Solid Waste Management Units" of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. This detection monitoring wells constructed in the Snake River Plain Aquifer.

  4. The World Revs its Heat Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Absorption of solar energy heats up our planet's surface and atmosphere making life for us possible. But the energy carnot stay bound up in the Earth's environment forever. If it did, the Earth would be as hot as the sun. Instead, as the surface and atmosphere warm, they emit thermal long wave radiation, some of which escapes into space and allows the Earth to cool. This false color image of the Earth was produced by the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) instrument flying aboard NASA's Terra spacecraft. The image shows where more or less heat, in the form of long-wave radiation, is emanating from the top of the Earth's atmosphere. As one can see in the image, the thermal radiation leaving the oceans is fairly uniform. The blue swaths represent thick clouds, the tops of which are so high they are among the coldest places on Earth. In the American Southwest, which can be seen in the upper right hand corner of the globe, there is often little cloud cover to block outgoing radiation and relatively little water to absorb solar energy making the amount of outgoing radiation in this area exceeding that of the oceans. Recently, NASA researchers discovered that incoming solar radiation and outgoing thermal radiation increased in the tropics from the 1980s to the 1990s. They believe the unexpected change has to do with apparent change in circulation patterns around the globe, which effectively reduce the amount of water vapor and cloud cover in the upper reaches of the atmosphere. Without the clouds, more sunlight was allowed to enter the tropical zones and more thermal energy was allowed to leave. The findings may have big implications for climate change and future global warming. (Image courtesy NASA Goddard)

  5. Watching the World Rev its Heat Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Absorption of solar energy heats up our planet's surface and the atmosphere and makes life for us possible. But the energy cannot stay bound up in the Earth's environment forever. If it did then the Earth would be as hot as the Sun. Instead, as the surface and the atmosphere warm, they emit thermal longwave radiation, some of which escapes into space and allows the Earth to cool. This false-color image of the Earth was produced on September 30, 2001, by the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) instrument flying aboard NASA's Terra spacecraft. The image shows where more or less heat, in the form of longwave radiation, is emanating from the top of Earth's atmosphere. As one can see in the image, the thermal radiation leaving the oceans is fairly uniform. The blue swaths across the central Pacific represent thick clouds, the tops of which are so high they are among the coldest places on Earth. In the American Southwest, which can be seen in the upper righthand corner of the globe, there is often little cloud cover to block outgoing radiation and relatively little water to absorb solar energy. Consequently, the amount of outgoing radiation in the American Southwest exceeds that of the oceans. Also, that region was experiencing an extreme heatwave when these data were acquired. Recently, NASA researchers discovered that incoming solar radiation and outgoing thermal radiation increased in the tropics from the 1980s to the 1990s. (Click to read the press release.) They believe that the reason for the unexpected increase has to do with an apparent change in circulation patterns around the globe, which effectively reduced the amount of water vapor and cloud cover in the upper reaches of the atmosphere. Without the clouds, more sunlight was allowed to enter the tropical zones and more thermal energy was allowed to leave. The findings may have big implications for climate change and future global warming. 'This suggests that the tropical heat engine increased its speed,' observes Dr. Bruce Wielicki, of NASA Langley Research Center. 'It's as if the heat engine in the tropics has become less efficient, using more fuel in the 1990s than in the 1980s.' Image courtesy Barbara Summey, NASA Goddard Visualization Analysis Lab, based upon data processed by Takmeng Wong, CERES Science Team, NASA Langley Research Center

  6. Chandra High Resolution Camera (HRC). Rev. 59

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murray, Stephen

    2004-01-01

    This monthly report discusses management and general status, mission support and operations, and science activities. A technical memorandum entitled "Failure Analysis of HRC Flight Relay" is included with the report.

  7. ACTE Annual Convention Revs up Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Techniques: Connecting Education and Careers (J1), 2009

    2009-01-01

    This article highlights the annual Association for Career and Technical Education (ACTE) Convention held at Charlotte, North Carolina. It was the first time that the premiere professional development event for career and technical educators had come to Charlotte and the city did not disappoint. In fact, Charlotte proved to be the perfect place for…

  8. Stimulus Law Revs up Research on Energy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Basken, Paul

    2009-01-01

    When President Obama dreams out loud, as he did in a speech last week, of a future when solar panels are as "cheap as paint" and buildings produce their own energy, researchers like the physicist Yang Yang are dreaming right along with him. Mr. Yang's laboratory is among hundreds at colleges around the country that stand to benefit from a new…

  9. Geomorphology: Rain revs the crustal conveyor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willenbring, Jane K.

    2015-06-01

    It is intuitive, but evidence that high levels of precipitation increase erosion rates has been elusive. The ages of exposed porphyry copper deposits reveal that rocks emplaced at depth travel to the surface faster where precipitation rates are high.

  10. Instructor Revs Up Ailing Motorcycle Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevenson, Roy

    2011-01-01

    Bob Monroig smiles every day on his way to work at Lake Washington Technical College (LWTC), high atop a hill overlooking the affluent Seattle suburb of Kirkland, Washington. He's created his own job within a job, where he's the Harley-Davidson University program coordinator and tenured faculty in the Motorcycle, Marine, & Power Equipment Service…

  11. The First Reactor, 40th Anniversary (rev.)

    SciTech Connect

    Allardice, Corbin; Trapnell, Edward R; Fermi, Enrico; Fermi, Laura; Williams, Robert C

    1982-12-01

    This booklet, an updated version of the original booklet describing the first nuclear reactor, was written in honor of the 40th anniversary of the first reactor or "pile". It is based on firsthand accounts told to Corbin Allardice and Edward R. Trapnell, and includes recollections of Enrico and Laura Fermi.

  12. Analytic expressions of quantum correlations in qutrit Werner states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Biaoliang; Liu, Yimin; Chen, Jianlan; Liu, Xiansong; Zhang, Zhanjun

    2013-07-01

    Quantum correlations in qutrit Werner states are extensively investigated with five popular methods, namely, original quantum discord (OQD) (Ollivier and Zurek in Phys Rev Lett 88:017901, 2001), measurement-induced disturbance (MID) (Luo in Phys Rev A 77:022301, 2008), ameliorated MID (AMID) (Girolami et al. in J Phys A Math Theor 44:352002, 2011), relative entropy (RE) (Modi et al. in Phys Rev Lett 104:080501, 2010) and geometric discord (GD) (Dakić et al. in Phys Rev Lett 105:190502, 2010). Two different analytic expressions of quantum correlations are derived. Quantum correlations captured by the former four methods are same and bigger than those obtained via the GD method. Nonetheless, they all qualitatively characterize quantum correlations in the concerned states. Moreover, as same as the qubit case, there exist quantum correlations in separable qutrit Werner states, too.

  13. The Long-Range Model of High-L Rydberg Fine Structure: A Critical Comparison with Experimental Data..

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snow, Erica L.; Wright, Laura E.; Lundeen, Stephen R.

    2006-05-01

    A simple view of the fine structure of non-penetrating Rydberg levels, suggested over 70 years ago [1], was refined to treat the fine structure of helium, lithium [2], and other atoms with S-state ion cores [3]. In this view the ion polarizabilities determine the fine structure pattern. Current experimental techniques provide access to highly excited high-L states in He [4], Li [5], Mg, SiIII [6], and Ba[7], and a test of the long-range model is possible with the availability of independent theoretical calculations. A critical comparison of the data treated with the long-range model will be made to the a-priori calculations of the ionic polarizabilities. [1] Joseph E. Mayer and Maria Goeppert Mayer, Phys. Rev. 43 605 (1933). [2] Richard J. Drachman and A. K. Bhatia, Phys. Rev. A 51 2926 (1995). [3] C. Laughlin, J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 28 2787 (1995). [4] G. D. Stevens and S. R. Lundeen, Comments on At. and Mol. Phys., Comments on Mod. Phys. 1,D 207 (2000). [5] C. H. Storry, N. E. Rothery, and E. A. Hessels, Phys. Rev. A 55 128 (1997). [6] R. A. Komara et. al., J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 38 S87 (2005). [7] E.L. Snow, et. al. Phys. Rev. A 71, 022510 (2005)

  14. Ab initio quantum Monte Carlo simulations of the uniform electron gas without fixed nodes: The unpolarized case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dornheim, T.; Groth, S.; Schoof, T.; Hann, C.; Bonitz, M.

    2016-05-01

    In a recent publication [S. Groth et al., Phys. Rev. B 93, 085102 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevB.93.085102], we have shown that the combination of two complementary quantum Monte Carlo approaches, namely configuration path integral Monte Carlo [T. Schoof et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 115, 130402 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.115.130402] and permutation blocking path integral Monte Carlo [T. Dornheim et al., New J. Phys. 17, 073017 (2015), 10.1088/1367-2630/17/7/073017], allows for the accurate computation of thermodynamic properties of the spin-polarized uniform electron gas over a wide range of temperatures and densities without the fixed-node approximation. In the present work, we extend this concept to the unpolarized case, which requires nontrivial enhancements that we describe in detail. We compare our simulation results with recent restricted path integral Monte Carlo data [E. W. Brown et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 146405 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.110.146405] for different energy contributions and pair distribution functions and find, for the exchange correlation energy, overall better agreement than for the spin-polarized case, while the separate kinetic and potential contributions substantially deviate.

  15. Usefulness of entanglement-assisted quantum metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Zixin; Macchiavello, Chiara; Maccone, Lorenzo

    2016-07-01

    Entanglement-assisted quantum communication employs preshared entanglement between sender and receiver as a resource. We apply the same framework to quantum metrology, introducing shared entanglement between the probe and the ancilla in the preparation stage and allowing entangling operations at the measurement stage, i.e., using some entangled ancillary system that does not interact with the system to be sampled. This is known to be useless in the noiseless case, but was recently shown to be useful in the presence of noise [R. Demkowicz-Dobrzanski and L. Maccone, Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 250801 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.113.250801; W. Dür, M. Skotiniotis, F. Fröwis, and B. Kraus, Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 080801 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.112.080801; E. M. Kessler, I. Lovchinsky, A. O. Sushkov, and M. D. Lukin, Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 150802 (2014);, 10.1103/PhysRevLett.112.150802 R. Demkowicz-Dobrzański and J. Kolodynski, New J. Phys. 15, 073043 (2013), 10.1088/1367-2630/15/7/073043]. Here we detail how and when it can be of use. For example, surprisingly it is useful when two channels are randomly alternated, for both of which ancillas do not help (depolarizing). We show that it is useful for all levels of noise for many noise models and propose a simple optical experiment to test these results.

  16. B80 and B101-103 clusters: Remarkable stability of the core-shell structures established by validated density functionalsa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Fengyu; Jin, Peng; Jiang, De-en; Wang, Lu; Zhang, Shengbai B.; Zhao, Jijun; Chen, Zhongfang

    2012-02-01

    Prompted by the very recent claim that the volleyball-shaped B80 fullerene [X. Wang, Phys. Rev. B 82, 153409 (2010), 10.1103/PhysRevB.82.153409] is lower in energy than the B80 buckyball [N. G. Szwacki, A. Sadrzadeh, and B. I. Yakobson, Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 166804 (2007), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.98.166804] and core-shell structure [J. Zhao, L. Wang, F. Li, and Z. Chen, J. Phys. Chem. A 114, 9969 (2010), 10.1021/jp1018873], and inspired by the most recent finding of another core-shell isomer as the lowest energy B80 isomer [S. De, A. Willand, M. Amsler, P. Pochet, L. Genovese, and S. Goedecher, Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 225502 (2011), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.106.225502], we carefully evaluated the performance of the density functional methods in the energetics of boron clusters and confirmed that the core-shell construction (stuffed fullerene) is thermodynamically the most favorable structural pattern for B80. Our global minimum search showed that both B101 and B103 also prefer a core-shell structure and that B103 can reach the complete core-shell configuration. We called for great attention to the theoretical community when using density functionals to investigate boron-related nanomaterials.

  17. Resonant-state-expansion Born approximation with a correct eigen-mode normalisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doost, M. B.

    2016-08-01

    The Born approximation (Born 1926 Z. Phys. 38 802) is a fundamental result in physics, it allows the calculation of weak scattering via the Fourier transform of the scattering potential. As was done by previous authors (Ge et al 2014 New J. Phys. 16 113048) the Born approximation is extended by including in the formula the resonant-states (RSs) of the scatterer. However in this study unlike previous studies the included eigen-modes are correctly normalised with dramatic positive consequences for the accuracy of the method. The normalisation of RSs used in the previous RS expansion Born approximation or resonant-state expansion (RSE) Born approximation made in Ge et al (2014 New J. Phys. 16 113048) has been shown to be numerically unstable in Muljarov et al (2014 arXiv:1409.6877) and by analytics here. The RSs of the system can be calculated using my recently discovered RSE perturbation theory for dispersive electrodynamic scatterers (Muljarov et al 2010 Europhys. Lett. 92 50010; Doost et al 2012 Phys. Rev. A 85 023835; Doost et al 2013 Phys. Rev. A 87 043827; Armitage et al 2014 Phys. Rev. A 89; Doost et al 2014 Phys. Rev. A 90 013834) and normalised correctly to appear in spectral Green's functions and hence the RSE Born approximation via the flux-volume normalisation which I recently rigorously derived in Armitage et al (2014 Phys. Rev. A 89), Doost et al (2014 Phys. Rev. A 90 013834), Doost (2016 Phys. Rev. A 93 023835). In the case of effectively one-dimensional systems I find a RSE Born approximation alternative to the scattering matrix method.

  18. Comment on ``Systematic approach to generate near-perfect periodic continuous random network models: Application to amorphous Si3N4''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mousseau, Normand

    1997-12-01

    Ouyang and Ching [Phys. Rev. B 54, R15 594 (1996)] have recently proposed a very elegant algorithm for building amorphous networks. Their algorithm, though, leaves strong remnants of cubic symmetry and cannot provide satisfactory amorphous models.

  19. Three-tangle of the nine classes of four-qubit states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osterloh, Andreas

    2016-07-01

    I calculate the mixed three-tangle τ3[ρ ] for the reduced density matrices of the four-qubit representant states found in Phys. Rev. A 65, 052112 (2002), 10.1103/PhysRevA.65.052112. In most of the cases, the convex roof is obtained, except for one class, where I provide with an upper bound, which is assumed to be very close to the convex roof. I compare with results published in Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 110501 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.113.110501. Since the method applied there usually results in higher values for the upper bound, in certain cases it can be understood that the convex roof is obtained exactly, namely, when the zero-polytope where τ3 vanishes shrinks to a single point.

  20. Calculating work in weakly driven quantum master equations: Backward and forward equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Fei

    2016-01-01

    I present a technical report indicating that the two methods used for calculating characteristic functions for the work distribution in weakly driven quantum master equations are equivalent. One involves applying the notion of quantum jump trajectory [Phys. Rev. E 89, 042122 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevE.89.042122], while the other is based on two energy measurements on the combined system and reservoir [Silaev et al., Phys. Rev. E 90, 022103 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevE.90.022103]. These represent backward and forward methods, respectively, which adopt a very similar approach to that of the Kolmogorov backward and forward equations used in classical stochastic theory. The microscopic basis for the former method is also clarified. In addition, a previously unnoticed equality related to the heat is also revealed.

  1. Diffractive dissociation including Pomeron loops in zero transverse dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoshi, Arif I.; Xiao, Bo-Wen

    2007-03-01

    We have recently studied the QCD pomeron loop evolution equations in zero transverse dimensions [Phys. Rev. D 73, 094014 (2006)PRVDAQ0556-282110.1103/PhysRevD.73.094014]. Using the techniques developed in [Phys. Rev. D 73, 094014 (2006)PRVDAQ0556-282110.1103/PhysRevD.73.094014] together with the AGK cutting rules, we present a calculation of single, double and central diffractive cross sections (for large diffractive masses and large rapidity gaps) in zero transverse dimensions in which all dominant pomeron loop graphs are consistently summed. We find that the diffractive cross sections unitarise at large energies and that they are suppressed by powers of αs. Our calculation is expected to expose some of the diffractive physics in hadron-hadron collisions at high energy.

  2. Reply to "Comment on `Acoustical observation of bubble oscillations induced by bubble popping' "

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Junqi

    2015-03-01

    We reported on the sound pressure generated by aqueous foam bursts in our paper [Ding et al., Phys. Rev. E 75, 041601 (2007), 10.1103/PhysRevE.75.041601]. Blanc et al., [Phys. Rev. E 91, 036401 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevE.91.036401] found that sound from one of three mechanisms of bubble burst (the prepopping) actually results from an acausal artifact of the signal processing performed by their acquisition system which lies outside of its prescribed working frequency range. We examined the same hardware used in our paper and found that the frequency range is not the cause of the artifact. The prepopping sound was a result from a built-in finite impulse response filter of analog-to-digital converters in the Brüel & Kjær data acquisition system.

  3. Reply to ``Comment on `Why quantum mechanics cannot be formulated as a Markov process' ''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillespie, Daniel T.

    1997-10-01

    It is argued that the stochastic model of a quantum-mechanical two-state oscillator discussed in the preceding Comment by Hardy et al. [Phys. Rev. A 56, 3301 (1997)] does not constitute a valid classical stochastic process.

  4. Devil's staircases and continued fractions in Josephson junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukrinov, Yu. M.; Medvedeva, S. Yu.; Botha, A. E.; Kolahchi, M. R.; Irie, A.

    2013-12-01

    Detailed numerical simulations of the IV characteristics of a Josephson junction under external electromagnetic radiation show the devil's staircase within different bias current intervals. We have found that the observed steps form very precisely continued fractions. Increase of the amplitude of the radiation shifts the devil's staircase to higher Shapiro steps. An algorithm for the appearance and detection of subharmonics with increasing radiation amplitude is proposed. We demonstrate that the subharmonic steps registered in the well-known experiments by Dayem and Wiegand [Phys. Rev. 155, 419 (1967), 10.1103/PhysRev.155.419] and Clarke [Phys. Rev. B 4, 2963 (1971), 10.1103/PhysRevB.4.2963] also form continued fractions.

  5. Comment on {open_quotes}Confirmation of the Sigma Meson{close_quote}{close_quote}

    SciTech Connect

    Harada, M.; Sannino, F.; Schechter, J.; Sannino, F.

    1997-02-01

    A Comment on the Letter by Nils A. Tornqvist and Matts Roos, Phys.Rev.Lett.{bold 76}, 1575 (1996). The authors of the Letter offer a Reply. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  6. Comment on {open_quote}{open_quote}Confirmation of the Sigma Meson{close_quote}{close_quote}

    SciTech Connect

    Isgur, N.; Speth, J.

    1996-09-01

    A Comment on the Letter by Nils A. T{umlt o}rnqvist and Matts Roos, Phys. Rev. Lett. {bold 76}, 1575 (1996). The authors of the Letter offer a Reply. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  7. Reply to "Comment on `Thermodynamics of quantum crystalline membranes' "

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amorim, B.; Roldán, R.; Cappelluti, E.; Guinea, F.; Fasolino, A.; Katsnelson, M. I.

    2014-11-01

    We reply to the preceding Comment by Kats and Lebedev [Phys. Rev. B 90, 176301 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevB.90.176301] about our paper [Phys. Rev. B 89, 224307 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevB.89.224307]. Kats and Lebedev criticize the validity of our calculation with the use of a Debye momentum as an ultraviolet regulator of the theory and the obtention of a k2 term for the self-energy of out-of-plane modes. The arguments presented by Kats and Lebedev ignore basic facts about the theory of crystalline membranes. We address and counter argue the criticisms presented about our paper.

  8. Completeness of classical φ4 theory on two-dimensional lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karimipour, Vahid; Zarei, Mohammad Hossein

    2012-03-01

    We formulate a quantum formalism for the statistical mechanical models of discretized field theories on lattices and then show that the discrete version of φ4 theory on 2D square lattice is complete in the sense that the partition function of any other discretized scalar field theory on an arbitrary lattice with arbitrary interactions can be realized as a special case of the partition function of this model. To achieve this, we extend the recently proposed quantum formalism for the Ising model [M. Van den Nest, W. Dur, and H. J. Briegel, Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.98.117207 98, 117207 (2007)] and its completeness property [M. Van den Nest, W. Dur, and H. J. Briegel, Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.100.110501 100, 110501 (2008)] to the continuous variable case.

  9. Formation of molecules in an expanding Bose-Einstein condensate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yurovsky, Vladimir; Ben-Reuven, Abraham

    2004-05-01

    A mean field theory [1] is extended to an inhomogeneous case of expanding hybrid atom-molecule Bose-Einstein condensates. This theory is applied to the recent MPI experiments [2] on ^87Rb demonstrating the formation of ultracold molecules due to Feshbach resonance. The subsequent dissociation of the molecules is treated using a non-mean-field parametric approximation [3]. The latter method is also used in determining optimal conditions for the formation of molecular BEC. [1] V. A. Yurovsky, A. Ben-Reuven, P. S. Julienne and C. J. Williams, Phys. Rev. A 60, R765 (1999); Phys. Rev. A 62, 043605 (2000). [2] S. Dürr, T. Volz, A. Marte, and G. Rempe, Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 020406 (2004). [3] V. A. Yurovsky and A. Ben-Reuven, Phys. Rev. A 67, 043611 (2003).

  10. Sum-of-squares decompositions for a family of Clauser-Horne-Shimony-Holt-like inequalities and their application to self-testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bamps, Cédric; Pironio, Stefano

    2015-05-01

    We introduce two families of sum-of-squares (SOS) decompositions for the Bell operators associated with the tilted Clauser-Horne-Shimony-Holt (CHSH) expressions introduced in Acín et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 100402 (2012), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.108.100402]. These SOS decompositions provide tight upper bounds on the maximal quantum value of these Bell expressions. Moreover, they establish algebraic relations that are necessarily satisfied by any quantum state and observables yielding the optimal quantum value. These algebraic relations are then used to show that the tilted CHSH expressions provide robust self-tests for any partially entangled two-qubit state. This application to self-testing follows closely the approach of Yang and Navascués [Phys. Rev. A 87, 050102(R) (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevA.87.050102], where we identify and correct two nontrivial flaws.

  11. Hosing instability in the blow-out regime for plasma-wakefield acceleration.

    PubMed

    Huang, C; Lu, W; Zhou, M; Clayton, C E; Joshi, C; Mori, W B; Muggli, P; Deng, S; Oz, E; Katsouleas, T; Hogan, M J; Blumenfeld, I; Decker, F J; Ischebeck, R; Iverson, R H; Kirby, N A; Walz, D

    2007-12-21

    The electron hosing instability in the blow-out regime of plasma-wakefield acceleration is investigated using a linear perturbation theory about the electron blow-out trajectory in Lu et al. [in Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 165002 (2006)10.1103/PhysRevLett.96.165002]. The growth of the instability is found to be affected by the beam parameters unlike in the standard theory Whittum et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 67, 991 (1991)10.1103/PhysRevLett.67.991] which is strictly valid for preformed channels. Particle-in-cell simulations agree with this new theory, which predicts less hosing growth than found by the hosing theory of Whittum et al. PMID:18233526

  12. Scaling properties of planar discrete Poisson-Voronoi tessellations with von Neumann neighborhoods constructed according to the nucleation and growth mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korobov, A.

    2014-03-01

    In contrast to the conventional continual case, discrete Poisson-Voronoi tessellations resulting from the growth to impingement of random nuclei differ from tessellations constructed from the nearest tile loci. Previously studied tessellations were based directly on the notion of locus [A. Korobov, Phys. Rev. E 79, 031607 (2009), 10.1103/PhysRevE.79.031607; A. Korobov, Phys. Rev. E 87, 014401 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevE.87.014401]. This paper presents results for tessellations constructed by the growth of random nuclei. Their boundaries have a different structure and scaling properties are comparably more robust. One more scalable characteristic may be introduced for them, the perimeter distribution function, which is well approximated by the normal distribution function with the unit mean and the standard deviation equal to 0.25.

  13. Nonlocality of orthogonal product basis quantum states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhi-Chao; Gao, Fei; Tian, Guo-Jing; Cao, Tian-Qing; Wen, Qiao-Yan

    2014-08-01

    In this paper, we mainly study the local indistinguishability of mutually orthogonal product basis quantum states in the high-dimensional quantum systems. In the Hilbert space of 3⊗3, Walgate and Hardy [Phys. Rev. Lett. 89, 147901 (2002), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.89.147901] presented a very simple proof for nonlocality of nine orthogonal product basis quantum states which are given by Bennett et al. [Phys. Rev. A 59, 1070 (1999), 10.1103/PhysRevA.59.1070]. In the quantum system of d⊗d, where d is odd, we construct d2 orthogonal product basis quantum states and prove these states are locally indistinguishable. Then we are able to construct some locally indistinguishable product basis quantum states in the multipartite systems. All these results reveal the phenomenon of "nonlocality without entanglement."

  14. Comment on ``Electron Mass Operator in a Strong Magnetic Field and Dynamical Chiral Symmetry Breaking''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gusynin, V. P.; Miransky, V. A.; Shovkovy, I. A.

    2003-02-01

    A Comment on the Letter by A. V. Kuznetsov and N. V. Mikheev,

    Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-9007 89, 011601 (2002).
    The authors of the Letter offer a Reply.

  15. Numerical assessment of post-prior equivalence for inclusive breakup reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Jin; Moro, Antonio M.

    2015-12-01

    We address the problem of the post-prior equivalence in inclusive breakup reactions induced by weakly bound nuclei. The problem is studied within the distorted-wave Born approximation (DWBA) model of Ichimura, Austern, and Vincent [Phys. Rev. C 32, 431 (1985), 10.1103/PhysRevC.32.431]. The post and prior formulas obtained in this model are briefly recalled and applied to several breakup reactions induced by deuterons and 6Li projectiles, to test their actual numerical equivalence. The different contributions of the prior-form formula are also discussed. A critical comparison with the prior-form DWBA model of Udagawa and Tamura [Phys. Rev. C 24, 1348 (1981), 10.1103/PhysRevC.24.1348] is also provided.

  16. Comment on "Berry phase mechanism for optical gyrotropy in stripe-ordered cuprates"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakravarty, Sudip

    2014-02-01

    I comment on two recent papers on the Kerr effect as evidence of gyrotropic order in cuprates, and I suggest that the arguments may not be sound. The difficulty is that, in practically all cases, the wave vector kz perpendicular to the copper-oxygen plane is not a good quantum number. This appears to be problematic for Orenstein and Moore [Phys. Rev. B 87, 165110 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevB.87.165110], whereas, in Hosur et al. [Phys. Rev. B 87, 115116 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevB.87.115116], the symmetry arguments may turn out to be robust, but the microscopic picture is wanting. Thus, the Kerr effect in cuprates remains a puzzle as there is little doubt that the arguments presented against time-reversal symmetry breaking appear to be rather strong on experimental grounds in both of these papers.

  17. Entanglement under the renormalization-group transformations on quantum states and in quantum phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Tzu-Chieh

    2010-06-01

    We consider quantum states under the renormalization-group (RG) transformations introduced by Verstraete [Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.94.140601 94, 140601 (2005)] and propose a quantification of entanglement under such RGs (via the geometric measure of entanglement). We examine the resulting entanglement under RG transformations for the ground states of “matrix-product-state” Hamiltonians constructed by Wolf [Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.97.110403 97, 110403 (2006)] that possess quantum phase transitions. We find that near critical points, the ground-state entanglement exhibits singular behavior. The singular behavior within finite steps of the RG obeys a scaling hypothesis and reveals the correlation length exponent. However, under the infinite steps of RG transformation, the singular behavior is rendered different and is universal only when there is an underlying conformal-field-theory description of the critical point.

  18. Attosecond delay of xenon 4 d photoionization at the giant resonance and Cooper minimum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magrakvelidze, Maia; Madjet, Mohamed El-Amine; Chakraborty, Himadri S.

    2016-07-01

    A Kohn-Sham time-dependent local-density-functional scheme is utilized to predict attosecond time delays of xenon 4 d photoionization that involves the 4 d giant dipole resonance and Cooper minimum. The fundamental effect of electron correlations to uniquely determine the delay at both regions is demonstrated. In particular, for the giant dipole resonance, the delay underpins strong collective effect, emulating the recent prediction at C60 giant plasmon resonance [T. Barillot et al., Phys. Rev. A 91, 033413 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevA.91.033413]. For the Cooper minimum, a qualitative similarity with a photorecombination experiment near argon 3 p minimum [S. B. Schoun et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 153001 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.112.153001] is found. The result should encourage attosecond measurements of Xe 4 d photoemission.

  19. Ionic and electronic transport properties in dense plasmas by orbital-free density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sjostrom, Travis; Daligault, Jérôme

    2015-12-01

    We validate the application of our recent orbital-free density functional theory (DFT) approach [Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 155006 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.113.155006;] for the calculation of ionic and electronic transport properties of dense plasmas. To this end, we calculate the self-diffusion coefficient, the viscosity coefficient, the electrical and thermal conductivities, and the reflectivity coefficient of hydrogen and aluminum plasmas. Very good agreement is found with orbital-based Kohn-Sham DFT calculations at lower temperatures. Because the computational costs of the method do not increase with temperature, we can produce results at much higher temperatures than is accessible by the Kohn-Sham method. Our results for warm dense aluminum at solid density are inconsistent with the recent experimental results reported by Sperling et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 115, 115001 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.115.115001].

  20. Comment on ``Gravity as a zero-point-fluctuation force''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlip, S.

    1993-04-01

    A paper by H. Puthoff [Phys. Rev. A 39, 2333 (1989)], which claims to derive Newtonian gravity from stochastic electrodynamics, contains a serious computational error. When the calculation is corrected, the resulting force is shown to be nongravitational and negligible.

  1. Comment on ``Spectroscopic factors for bound s-wave states derived from neutron scattering lengths''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barker, F. C.

    1997-12-01

    The procedure proposed by Mohr et al. [Phys. Rev. C 55, 1591 (1997)] for extracting the spectroscopic factor for a bound s-wave neutron state from the scattering length appears to be of doubtful validity and accuracy.

  2. Reanalysis of Rosenbluth measurements of the proton form factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gramolin, A. V.; Nikolenko, D. M.

    2016-05-01

    We present a reanalysis of the data from Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) experiments E140 [R. C. Walker et al., Phys. Rev. D 49, 5671 (1994), 10.1103/PhysRevD.49.5671] and NE11 [L. Andivahis et al., Phys. Rev. D 50, 5491 (1994), 10.1103/PhysRevD.50.5491] on elastic electron-proton scattering. This work is motivated by recent progress in calculating the corresponding radiative corrections and by the apparent discrepancy between the Rosenbluth and polarization transfer measurements of the proton electromagnetic form factors. New, corrected values for the scattering cross sections are presented, as well as a new form factor fit in the Q2 range from 1 to 8.83 GeV2. We also provide a complete set of revised formulas to account for radiative corrections in single-arm measurements of unpolarized elastic electron-proton scattering.

  3. Reply to ``Comment on `Ramsey spectroscopy, matter-wave interferometry, and the microwave-lensing frequency shift' ''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibble, Kurt

    2015-06-01

    The Comment by Jefferts et al. [Phys. Rev. A 91, 067601 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevA.91.067601] discusses the microwave-lensing frequency shift's possible dependence on the initial wave-packet size and two effects of wall interactions, the frequency shifts that they produce, and the nature of how dressed states are clipped by apertures. I identify conceptual errors in their criticisms, some of which are related to fundamental problems in their lensing treatment [Ashby et al., Phys. Rev. A 91, 033624 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevA.91.033624] for the NIST-F1 and NIST-F2 atomic clocks [K. Gibble, arXiv:1505.00691]. Aside from typesetting errors that they note, the criticisms in the Comment are shown to be incorrect.

  4. Comment on "Lattice vibrations in the Frenkel-Kontorova model. I. Phonon dispersion, number density, and energy"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novaco, Anthony D.

    2015-11-01

    A recent publication [Q. Meng, L. Wu, D. O. Welch, and Y. Zhu, Phys. Rev. B 91, 224305 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevB.91.224305] examines the quantum normal modes of the Frenkel-Kontorova chain. The authors compare their results to those of an older work [A. D. Novaco, Phys. Rev. B 22, 1645 (1980), 10.1103/PhysRevB.22.1645], attributing the differences to limitations in the numerical analysis of that 1980 paper. We show here that it is not numerical limitations that cause the differences between the two papers, and we argue that the cause of these differences resides with the approaches used in the modeling.

  5. Violation of Bell inequality based on S4 symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolonek-Lasoń, Katarzyna

    2016-08-01

    In two recent papers [Phys. Rev. A 90, 062121 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevA.90.062121 and Phys. Rev. A, 91, 052110 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevA.91.052110] an interesting method of analyzing the violation of Bell inequalities has been proposed which is based on the theory of finite group representations. Here we apply this method to more complicated examples of S4 symmetry. We show how the Bell inequality can be related to the symmetries of regular tetrahedron. By choosing the orbits of three-dimensional representations of S4 determined by the geometry of tetrahedron we find that the Bell inequality under consideration is violated in quantum theory. The corresponding nonlocal game is analyzed.

  6. Long-time dynamics of quantum chains: Transfer-matrix renormalization group and entanglement of the maximal eigenvector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yu-Kun; Chen, Pochung; Kao, Ying-Jer; Xiang, Tao

    2014-05-01

    By using a different quantum-to-classical mapping from the Trotter-Suzuki decomposition, we identify the entanglement structure of the maximal eigenvectors for the associated quantum transfer matrix. This observation provides a deeper insight into the problem of linear growth of the entanglement entropy in time evolution using conventional methods. Based on this observation, we propose a general method for arbitrary temperatures using the biorthonormal transfer-matrix renormalization group. Our method exhibits a competitive accuracy with a much cheaper computational cost in comparison with two recently proposed methods for long-time dynamics based on a folding algorithm [Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 240603 (2009), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.102.240603] and a modified time-dependent density-matrix renormalization group [Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 227206 (2012), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.108.227206].

  7. Hawking radiation and near horizon universality of chiral Virasoro algebra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Rabin; Gangopadhyay, Sunandan; Kulkarni, Shailesh

    2010-12-01

    We show that the diffeomorphism anomaly together with the trace anomaly reveal a chiral Virasoro algebra near the event horizon of a black hole. This algebra is the same irrespective of whether the anomaly is covariant or consistent, thereby manifesting its universal character and the fact that only the outgoing modes are relevant near the horizon. Our analysis therefore clarifies the role of the trace anomaly in the diffeomorphism anomaly approach [Robinson and Wilczek in Phys. Rev. Lett. 95:011303, 2005; Iso et al. in Phys. Rev. Lett. 96:151302, 2006; Banerjee and Kulkarni in Phys. Rev. D 77:024018, 2008; Gangopadhyay and Kulkarni in Phys. Rev. D 77:024038, 2008] to the Hawking radiation.

  8. Generalizing a unified model of dark matter, dark energy, and inflation with a noncanonical kinetic term

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de-Santiago, Josue; Cervantes-Cota, Jorge L.

    2011-03-01

    We study a unification model for dark energy, dark matter, and inflation with a single scalar field with noncanonical kinetic term. In this model, the kinetic term of the Lagrangian accounts for the dark matter and dark energy, and at early epochs, a quadratic potential accounts for slow roll inflation. The present work is an extension to the work by Bose and Majumdar [Phys. Rev. DPRVDAQ1550-7998 79, 103517 (2009).10.1103/PhysRevD.79.103517] with a more general kinetic term that was proposed by Chimento in Phys. Rev. DPRVDAQ0556-2821 69, 123517 (2004).10.1103/PhysRevD.69.123517 We demonstrate that the model is viable at the background and linear perturbation levels.

  9. Experimental demonstration of phase bistability in a broad-area optical oscillator with injected signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Lorente, R.; Esteban-Martín, A.; Roldán, E.; Staliunas, K.; de Valcárcel, G. J.; Silva, F.

    2015-11-01

    We demonstrate experimentally that a broad-area laserlike optical oscillator (a nondegenerate photorefractive oscillator) with structured injected signal displays two-phase patterns. The technique [de Valcárcel and Staliunas, Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 054101 (2010), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.105.054101] consists in spatially modulating the injection, so that its phase alternates periodically between two opposite values, i.e., differing by π .

  10. Comment on ``Use of the McQuarrie equation for the computation of shear viscosity via equilibrium molecular dynamics''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Michael P.; Brown, David; Masters, Andrew J.

    1994-03-01

    In a recent paper, Chialvo and Debenedetti [Phys. Rev. A 43, 4289 (1991)] consider single-particle and collective expressions due, respectively, to McQuarrie [Statistical Mechanics (Harper and Row, New York, 1976)] and Helfand [Phys. Rev. 119, 1 (1960)] for the calculation of shear viscosities in molecular-dynamics simulations. We point out an error in the discussion of origin independence in this paper, and show that the prescriptions set out in it are not related to the shear viscosity.

  11. Cryptanalysis of quantum secret sharing with d -level single particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Song; Guo, Gong-De; Xu, Yong-Zhen; Sun, Ying; Liu, Xiao-Fen

    2016-06-01

    In a recent paper [V. Karimipour and M. Asoudeh, Phys. Rev. A 92, 030301(R) (2015)], 10.1103/PhysRevA.92.030301, a multiparty quantum secret-sharing protocol based on d -level single particles was proposed. We discussed the security of this protocol and found that it is not secure for any one dishonest participant who can recover the secret without the aid of other participants.

  12. Convex polytopes and quantum separability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holik, F.; Plastino, A.

    2011-12-01

    We advance a perspective of the entanglement issue that appeals to the Schlienz-Mahler measure [Phys. Rev. APLRAAN1050-294710.1103/PhysRevA.52.4396 52, 4396 (1995)]. Related to it, we propose a criterium based on the consideration of convex subsets of quantum states. This criterium generalizes a property of product states to convex subsets (of the set of quantum states) that is able to uncover an interesting geometrical property of the separability property.

  13. Reply to "Comment on `Casimir force in the O (n →∞ ) model with free boundary conditions' "

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dantchev, Daniel; Bergknoff, Jonathan; Rudnick, Joseph

    2015-02-01

    The preceding Comment raises a few points concerning our paper [Phys. Rev. E 89, 042116 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevE.89.042116]. In this Reply we stress that although Diehl et al. [Europhys. Lett. 100, 10004 (2012), 10.1209/0295-5075/100/10004 and Phys. Rev. E 89, 062123 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevE.89.062123] use three different models to study the Casimir force for the O (n →∞ ) model with free boundary conditions we study a single model over the entire range of temperatures from above the bulk critical temperature Tc to absolute temperatures down to T =0 . The use of a single model renders more transparent the crossover from effects dominated by critical fluctuations in the vicinity of the bulk transition temperature to effects controlled by Goldstone modes at low temperatures. Contrary to the assertion in the Comment, we make no claim for the superiority of our model over any of those considered by Diehl et al. [Europhys. Lett. 100, 10004 (2012), 10.1209/0295-5075/100/10004 and Phys. Rev. E 89, 062123 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevE.89.062123]. We also present additional evidence supporting our conclusion in Dantchev et al. [Phys. Rev. E 89, 042116 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevE.89.042116] that the temperature range in which our low-temperature analytical expansion for the Casimir force increases as L grows and remains accurate for values of the ratio T /Tc that become closer and closer to unity, whereas T remains well outside of the critical region.

  14. Differential cross sections of double photoionization of lithium

    SciTech Connect

    Kheifets, A. S.; Fursa, D. V.; Bray, I.; Colgan, J.; Pindzola, M. S.

    2010-08-15

    We extend our previous application of the convergent close-coupling (CCC) and time-dependent close-coupling (TDCC) methods [Phys. Rev. A 81, 023418 (2010)] to describe energy and angular resolved double photoionization (DPI) of lithium at arbitrary energy sharing. By doing so, we are able to evaluate the recoil ion momentum distribution of DPI of Li and make a comparison with recent measurements of Zhu et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 103008 (2009)].

  15. Optimal waveform estimation for classical and quantum systems via time-symmetric smoothing. II. Applications to atomic magnetometry and Hardy's paradox

    SciTech Connect

    Tsang, Mankei

    2010-01-15

    The time-symmetric quantum smoothing theory [Tsang, Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 250403 (2009); Phys. Rev. A 80, 033840 (2009)] is extended to account for discrete jumps in the classical random process to be estimated, discrete variables in the quantum system, such as spin, angular momentum, and photon number, and Poisson measurements, such as photon counting. The extended theory is used to model atomic magnetometers and study Hardy's paradox in phase space.

  16. Finite-key-size security of the Phoenix-Barnett-Chefles 2000 quantum-key-distribution protocol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mafu, Mhlambululi; Garapo, Kevin; Petruccione, Francesco

    2014-09-01

    The postselection technique was introduced by Christandl, König, and Renner [Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 020504 (2009), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.102.020504] in order to simplify the security of quantum-key-distribution schemes. Here, we present how it can be applied to study the security of the Phoenix-Barnett-Chefles 2000 trine-state protocol, a symmetric version of the Bennett 1992 protocol.

  17. Note: Energy convexity and density matrices in molecular systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bochicchio, Roberto C.; Rial, Diego

    2012-12-01

    A novel appropriate definition for the density matrix for an interacting Coulombic driven atomic or molecular system with non-integer number of particles is given. Our approach leads to a direct derivation of the proposal reported by Perdew et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 49, 1691 (1982)], 10.1103/PhysRevLett.49.1691 and points out its suitability and perspective advances.

  18. Economical phase-covariant cloning with multiclones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wen-Hai; Ye, Liu

    2009-09-01

    This paper presents a very simple method to derive the explicit transformations of the optimal economical 1 to M phase-covariant cloning. The fidelity of clones reaches the theoretic bound [D'Ariano G M and Macchiavello C 2003 Phys. Rev. A 67 042306]. The derived transformations cover the previous contributions [Delgado Y, Lamata L et al., 2007 Phys. Rev. Lett. 98 150502] in which M must be odd.

  19. Reply to ``Comment on `Family of modified contracted Schrödinger equations' ''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alcoba, D. R.; Valdemoro, C.

    2009-01-01

    The preceding Comment by Yasuda [Phys. Rev. A 79, 016101 (2009)] on our earlier paper [Phys. Rev. A 64, 062105 (2001)] raises several objections about the modified contracted Schrödinger equations (MCSEs) to which we reply here. In his comment, Yasuda also questions the possibility of obtaining the exact solution of the fourth-order MCSE due to its indeterminacy. We maintain the opposite, at least from a theoretical point of view.

  20. Comment on ``Family of modified contracted Schrödinger equations''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasuda, Koji

    2009-01-01

    It is shown that the modified contracted Schrödinger equation (MCSE) proposed by Alcoba and Valdemoro [Phys. Rev. A 64, 062105 (2001)] is equivalent to the original CSE of lower-order [Phys. Rev. A 14, 41 (1976)]. In particular, MCSEs of the second, third, and fourth orders are reduced to CSEs of the first, first, and second orders, respectively. Thus these MCSEs are indeterminate as the corresponding CSEs.

  1. Comment on "Nonclassicality indicator for the real phase-space distribution functions"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenfack, Anatole

    2016-03-01

    We show in this Comment that the nonclassicality indicator proposed in Sadeghi et al. [Phys. Rev. A 82, 012102 (2010), 10.1103/PhysRevA.82.012102] is controversial. Defined in terms of the interferences displayed by the quasidistribution function of at least two superposition states, this indicator may logically lead to zero for any single quantum state irrespective to its nonclassicality, in contradiction with their results.

  2. Reply to "Comment on `Guided electromagnetic waves propagating in a plane dielectric waveguide with nonlinear permittivity' "

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, Yury G.; Valovik, Dmitry V.

    2015-11-01

    The preceding Comment contains statements that we feel are inaccurate and that lead one to think that the problem we study in Phys. Rev. A 91, 013840 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevA.91.013840 was solved long ago. However, we argue that our results are new and add to the understanding of the process of transverse electric wave propagation in a Kerr medium. In our Reply we contest the critical statements that are given in the Comment.

  3. Two-player quantum pseudotelepathy based on recent all-versus-nothing violations of local realism

    SciTech Connect

    Cabello, Adan

    2006-02-15

    We introduce two two-player quantum pseudotelepathy games based on two recently proposed all-versus-nothing (AVN) proofs of Bell's theorem [A. Cabello, Phys. Rev. Lett. 95, 210401 (2005); Phys. Rev. A 72, 050101(R) (2005)]. These games prove that Broadbent and Methot's claim that these AVN proofs do not rule out local-hidden-variable theories in which it is possible to exchange unlimited information inside the same light cone (quant-ph/0511047) is incorrect.

  4. Towards a gauge-equivalent magnetic structure of the nonlocal nonlinear Schrödinger equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gadzhimuradov, T. A.; Agalarov, A. M.

    2016-06-01

    It is shown that the nonlocal nonlinear Schrödinger equation recently proposed by Ablowitz and Musslimani [Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 064105 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.110.064105] is gauge equivalent to the unconventional system of coupled Landau-Lifshitz equations. The first integrals of motion and one-soliton solution of an obtained model are given. The physical and geometrical aspects of model and their effect on expected metamagnetic structures are studied.

  5. Comment on "Bit-string oblivious transfer based on quantum state computational distinguishability"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Guang Ping

    2015-10-01

    We show that in the protocol proposed in Phys. Rev. A 91, 042306 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevA.91.042306, a dishonest sender can always ensure with certainty that the receiver fails to get the secret message. Thus the security requirement of oblivious transfer is not met. This security problem also makes the protocol unsuitable for serving as a building block for 1-out-of-2 oblivious transfer.

  6. Quantum walks, deformed relativity and Hopf algebra symmetries.

    PubMed

    Bisio, Alessandro; D'Ariano, Giacomo Mauro; Perinotti, Paolo

    2016-05-28

    We show how the Weyl quantum walk derived from principles in D'Ariano & Perinotti (D'Ariano & Perinotti 2014Phys. Rev. A90, 062106. (doi:10.1103/PhysRevA.90.062106)), enjoying a nonlinear Lorentz symmetry of dynamics, allows one to introduce Hopf algebras for position and momentum of the emerging particle. We focus on two special models of Hopf algebras-the usual Poincaré and theκ-Poincaré algebras. PMID:27091171

  7. Study of Fracture in SiC by Parallel Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, A.; Omeltchenko, A.; Kalia, R. K.; Vashishta, P.

    1997-03-01

    Large scale molecular-dynamics simulations are performed on parallel architectures to investigate dynamic fracture in SiC. The simulations are based on an empirical bond-order potential proposed by Tersoff.(J. Tersoff, Phys. Rev. B 39), 5566(1989) (M. Tang and S. Yip, Phys. Rev. B 52), 15150(1995) Results will be presented for crack-front morphology, crack-tip speed, and the effect of strain rate on dynamic fracture.

  8. Comment on "Direct counterfactual transmission of a quantum state"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaidman, L.

    2016-06-01

    The protocol for counterfactual transmission of a qubit [Z.-H. Li et al., Phys. Rev. A 92, 052315 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevA.92.052315] relies on the counterfactuality of transmissions of bit 1 and of bit 0. Since counterfactuality of transmission of bit 0 is not established, the claim of counterfactuality of transmission of a quantum state is not established too.

  9. Hawking radiation from Garfinkle-Horowitz-Strominger and nonextremal D1-D5 black holes via covariant anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gangopadhyay, Sunandan; Kulkarni, Shailesh

    2008-01-01

    We apply the method of Banerjee and Kulkarni [R. Banerjee and S. Kulkarni, Phys. Rev. D 77, 024018 (2008).PRVDAQ0556-282110.1103/PhysRevD.77.024018] to provide a derivation of Hawking radiation from the Garfinkle-Horowitz-Strominger (stringy) black hole which falls in the class of the most general spherically symmetric black holes (-g≠1) and also the nonextremal D1-D5 black hole using only covariant gravitational anomalies.

  10. Comment on {open_quotes}Experimental Fusion Barrier Distributions Reflecting Projectile Octupole State Coupling to Prolate and Oblate Target Nuclei{close_quotes}

    SciTech Connect

    Dasso, C.H.; Dasso, C.H.; Fernandez-Niello, J.

    1997-05-01

    The authors comment on the Letter by J.D. Bierman et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 76, 1587(1996), and show the method by which they have been constructed is not the most appropriate. A Comment on the Letter by J.D. Bierman, {ital et al. }, Phys.Rev.Lett.{bold 76}, 1587 (1996). The authors of the Letter offer a Reply. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  11. Pair potentials for liquid sodium near freezing from electron theory and from inversion of the measured structure factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrot, F.; March, N. H.

    1990-04-01

    An effective pair potential for liquid sodium near freezing has been calculated from electron theory using the density-functional method. The main features of the potential extracted by Reatto, Levesque, and Weis [Phys. Rev. A 33, 3451 (1986)] by inverting the measured structure factor of Greenfield, Wellendorf, and Wiser [Phys. Rev. A 4, 1607 (1971)] are faithfully reflected by electron theory. To obtain precise agreement between the two methods will evidently require further progress in setting up nonlocal exchange and correlation functionals.

  12. Binggeli and Chelikowsky reply

    SciTech Connect

    Binggeli, N. ); Chelikowsky, J.R. )

    1993-10-18

    This is a response to a comment (Phys. Rev. Lett. 71, 2674 (1993)) on the authors' previous work titled Elastic Instability in Alpha[minus] Quartz under Pressure (Phys. Rev. Lett. 69, 2220 (1992)). The initiation mechanism for amorphous transition in alpha[minus]quartz under pressure being a soft optic phonon in the Brillouin zone boundary as suggested by the comment does not contradict the authors' early suggestion which is the transverse acoustic mode near the zone center. (AIP)

  13. FINAL REPORT MELTER TESTS WITH AZ-101 HLW SIMULANT USING A DURAMELTER 100 VITRIFICATION SYSTEM VSL-01R10N0-1 REV 1 2/25/02

    SciTech Connect

    KRUGER AA; MATLACK KS; KOT WK; PEGG IL

    2011-12-29

    heat transfer in rate attainment and the much greater role of wall effects in heat transfer when the melt pool is not agitated. The DM100 melter used for the present tests has a surface area of 0.108 m{sup 2}, which is approximately 5 times larger than that of the DM10 (0.021 m{sup 2}) and approximately 11 times smaller than that of the DM1000 (1.2 m{sup 2}) (the DM1000 has since been replaced by a pilot-scale prototypical HLW melter, designated the DM1200, which has the same surface area as the DM1000). Testing on smaller melters is the most economical method for obtaining data over a wide range of operating conditions (particularly at extremes) and for guiding the more expensive tests that are performed at pilot-scale. Thus, one objective of these tests was to determine whether the DM100 melters are sufficiently large to reproduce the un-bubbled melt rates observed at the DM1000 scale, or to determine the extent of any off-set. DM100-scale tests can then be used to screen feed chemistry variations that may serve to increase the un-bubbled production rates prior to confirmation at pilot scale. Finally, extensive characterization data obtained on simulated HLW melter feeds formed from various glass forming additives indicated that there may be advantages in terms of feed rheology and stability to the replacement of some of the hydroxides by carbonates. A further objective of the present tests was therefore to identify any deleterious processing effects of such a change before adopting the carbonate feed as the baseline. Data from the WVDP melter using acidified (nitrated) feeds, and without bubbling, showed productions rates that are higher than those observed with the alkaline RPP feeds at the VSL. Therefore, the effect of feed acidification on production rate also was investigated. This work was performed under Test Specification, 'TSP-W375-00-00019, Rev 0, 'HLW-DM10 and DM100 Melter Tests' dated November 13, 2000 and the corresponding Test Plan. It should be noted

  14. D-wave electron-H, -He+, and -Li2+ elastic scattering and photoabsorption in P states of two-electron systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatia, A. K.

    2014-06-01

    In previous papers [A. K. Bhatia, Phys. Rev. A 85, 052708 (2012);, 10.1103/PhysRevA.85.052708 A. K. Bhatia, Phys. Rev. A 86, 032709 (2012);, 10.1103/PhysRevA.86.032709 A. K. Bhatia, Phys. Rev. A 87, 042705 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevA.87.042705] electron-H, -He+, and -Li2+ P-wave scattering phase shifts were calculated using the variational polarized orbital theory. This method is now extended to the singlet and triplet D-wave scattering in the elastic region. The long-range correlations are included in the Schrödinger equation by using the method of polarized orbitals variationally. Phase shifts are compared to those obtained by other methods. The present calculation provides results which are rigorous lower bonds to the exact phase shifts. Using the presently calculated D-wave and previously calculated S-wave continuum functions, photoionization of singlet and triplet P states of He and Li+ are also calculated, along with the radiative recombination rate coefficients at various electron temperatures.

  15. Energy distribution and local fluctuations in strongly coupled open quantum systems: The extended resonant level model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochoa, Maicol A.; Bruch, Anton; Nitzan, Abraham

    2016-07-01

    We study the energy distribution in the extended resonant level model at equilibrium. Previous investigations [Phys. Rev. B 89, 161306 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevB.89.161306; Phys. Rev. B 93, 115318 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevB.93.115318] have found, for a resonant electronic level interacting with a thermal free-electron wide-band bath, that the expectation value for the energy of the interacting subsystem can be correctly calculated by considering a symmetric splitting of the interaction Hamiltonian between the subsystem and the bath. However, the general implications of this approach were questioned [Phys. Rev. B 92, 235440 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevB.92.235440]. Here, we show that, already at equilibrium, such splitting fails to describe the energy fluctuations, as measured here by the second and third central moments (namely, width and skewness) of the energy distribution. Furthermore, we find that when the wide-band approximation does not hold, no splitting of the system-bath interaction can describe the system thermodynamics. We conclude that in general no proper division subsystem of the Hamiltonian of the composite system can account for the energy distribution of the subsystem. This also implies that the thermodynamic effects due to local changes in the subsystem cannot in general be described by such splitting.

  16. Spin squeezing a cold molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, M.

    2015-12-01

    In this article we present a concrete proposal for spin squeezing the cold ground-state polar paramagnetic molecule OH, a system currently under fine control in the laboratory. In contrast to existing work, we consider a single, noninteracting molecule with angular momentum greater than 1 /2 . Starting from an experimentally relevant effective Hamiltonian, we identify an adiabatic regime where different combinations of static electric and magnetic fields can be used to realize the single-axis twisting Hamiltonian of Kitagawa and Ueda [M. Kitagawa and M. Ueda, Phys. Rev. A 47, 5138 (1993), 10.1103/PhysRevA.47.5138], the uniform field Hamiltonian proposed by Law et al. [C. K. Law, H. T. Ng, and P. T. Leung, Phys. Rev. A 63, 055601 (2001), 10.1103/PhysRevA.63.055601], and a model of field propagation in a Kerr medium considered by Agarwal and Puri [G. S. Agarwal and R. R. Puri, Phys. Rev. A 39, 2969 (1989), 10.1103/PhysRevA.39.2969]. We then consider the situation in which nonadiabatic effects are quite large and show that the effective Hamiltonian supports spin squeezing even in this case. We provide analytical expressions as well as numerical calculations, including optimization of field strengths and accounting for the effects of field misalignment. Our results have consequences for applications such as precision spectroscopy, techniques such as magnetometry, and stereochemical effects such as the orientation-to-alignment transition.

  17. Reply to "Comment on 'Origin of tilted-phase generation in systems of ellipsoidal molecules with dipolar interactions' "

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bose, Tushar Kanti; Saha, Jayashree

    2014-04-01

    In a recent article [T. K. Bose and J. Saha, Phys. Rev. E 86, 050701 (2012), 10.1103/PhysRevE.86.050701], we have presented the results of a Monte Carlo simulation study of the systems of dipolar Gay-Berne ellipsoids where two terminal antiparallel dipoles are placed symmetrically on the long axis of each ellipsoid, and the results revealed the combined contribution of dipolar separation and transverse orientations in controlling the tilt angle in the tilted hexatic smectic phase. The tilt angle changed from zero to a significant value, in the case of transverse dipoles, with a change in the dipolar separation. In the related comment, Madhusudana [preceding Comment, Phys. Rev. E 89, 046501 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevE.89.046501] has claimed that the physical origin of the molecular tilt in the significantly tilted phases found in the simulations is similar to that proposed by McMillan [Phys. Rev. A 8, 1921 (1973), 10.1103/PhysRevA.8.1921]. Here, we explain that the claim is not correct and make it clear that the two compared pictures are quite different. In the preceding Comment, Madhusudana has also suggested an alternative explanation for tilt generation in the simulations by criticizing the original one proposed by us. We argue here in support of the original explanation and clarify that his explanation does not follow the simulation results.

  18. How to upload a physical quantum state into correlation space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morimae, Tomoyuki

    2011-04-01

    In the framework of the computational tensor network [Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.98.220503 98, 220503 (2007)], the quantum computation is performed in a virtual linear space called the correlation space. It was recently shown [Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.103.050503 103, 050503 (2009)] that a state in a correlation space can be downloaded to the real physical space. In this paper, conversely, we study how to upload a state from a real physical space to the correlation space. After showing the impossibility of cloning a state between a real physical space and the correlation space, we propose a simple teleportation-like method of uploading. This method also enables the Gottesman-Chuang gate teleportation trick and entanglement swapping in the virtual-real hybrid setting. Furthermore, compared with the inverse of the downloading method by Cai [Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.103.050503 103, 050503 (2009)], which also works to upload, the proposed uploading method has several advantages.

  19. Weak measurement combined with quantum delayed-choice experiment and implementation in optomechanical system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Gang; Wang, Tao; Ye, Ming-Yong; Song, He-Shan

    2015-12-01

    Weak measurement [Y. Aharonov, D.Z. Albert, L. Vaidman, Phys. Rev. Lett. 60, 1351 (1988); C. Simon, E.S. Polzik, Phys. Rev. A 83, 040101(R) (2011)] combined with quantum delayed-choice experiment that use Controlled Hadamard gate instead of Hadamard gate in quantum networks give rise to a surprising amplification effect, i.e., counterintuitive negative amplification effect. We show that this effect is caused by the wave and particle behaviours of the system, and it can't be explained by a semiclassical wave theory [D. Suter, Phys. Rev. A 51, 45 (1995); J.C. Howell, D.J. Starling, P.B. Dixon, P.K. Vudyasetu, A.N. Jordan, Phys. Rev. A 81, 033813 (2010); N. Brunner, A. Acín, D. Collins, N. Gisin, V. Scarani, Phys. Rev. Lett. 91, 180402 (2003)] and by the statistical feature of preselection and postselection with disturbance [C. Ferrie, J. Combes, Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 120404 (2014)], due to the entanglement of the system and the ancilla in Controlled Hadamard gate. The generation mechanism with wave-particle duality in quantum mechanics lead us to a scheme for implementation of weak measurement in optomechanical system.

  20. Hydrodynamics of Leidenfrost droplets in one-component fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xinpeng; Qian, Tiezheng

    2013-04-01

    Using the dynamic van der Waals theory [Phys. Rev. E10.1103/PhysRevE.75.036304 75, 036304 (2007)], we numerically investigate the hydrodynamics of Leidenfrost droplets under gravity in two dimensions. Some recent theoretical predictions and experimental observations are confirmed in our simulations. A Leidenfrost droplet larger than a critical size is shown to be unstable and break up into smaller droplets due to the Rayleigh-Taylor instability of the bottom surface of the droplet. Our simulations demonstrate that an evaporating Leidenfrost droplet changes continuously from a puddle to a circular droplet, with the droplet shape controlled by its size in comparison with a few characteristic length scales. The geometry of the vapor layer under the droplet is found to mainly depend on the droplet size and is nearly independent of the substrate temperature, as reported in a recent experimental study [Phys. Rev. Lett.10.1103/PhysRevLett.109.074301 109, 074301 (2012)]. Finally, our simulations demonstrate that a Leidenfrost droplet smaller than a characteristic size takes off from the hot substrate because the levitating force due to evaporation can no longer be balanced by the weight of the droplet, as observed in a recent experimental study [Phys. Rev. Lett.10.1103/PhysRevLett.109.034501 109, 034501 (2012)].

  1. Homo- and heterometal complexes of oxido-metal ions with a triangular [V(V)O-MO-V(V)O] [M = V(IV) and Re(V)] core: reporting mixed-oxidation oxido-vanadium(V/IV/V) compounds with valence trapped structures.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Kisholoy; Maity, Manoranjan; Abtab, Sk Md Towsif; Majee, Mithun Chandra; Chaudhury, Muktimoy

    2013-08-19

    A new family of trinuclear homo- and heterometal complexes with a triangular [V(V)O-MO-V(V)O] (M = V(IV), 1 and 2; Re(V), 3] all-oxido-metal core have been synthesized following a single-pot protocol using compartmental Schiff-base ligands, N,N'-bis(3-hydroxysalicylidene)-diiminoalkanes/arene (H4L(1)-H4L(3)). The upper compartment of these ligands with N2O2 donor combination (Salen-type) contains either a V(IV) or a Re(V) center, while the lower compartment with O4 donor set accommodates two V(V) centers, stabilized by a terminal and a couple of bridging methoxido ligands. The compounds have been characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction analyses, which reveal octahedral geometry for all three metal centers in 1-3. Compound 1 crystallizes in a monoclinic space group P2(1)/c, while both 2 and 3 have more symmetric structures with orthorhombic space group Pnma that renders the vanadium(V) centers in these compounds exactly identical. In DMF solution, compound 1 displays an 8-line EPR at room temperature with and values of 1.972 and 86.61 × 10(-4) cm(-1), respectively. High-resolution X-ray photoelectron spectrum (XPS) of this compound shows a couple of bands at 515.14 and 522.14 eV due to vanadium 2p(3/2) and 2p(1/2) electrons in the oxidation states +5 and +4, respectively. All of these, together with bond valence sum (BVS) calculation, confirm the trapped-valence nature of mixed-oxidation in compounds 1 and 2. Electrochemically, compound 1 undergoes two one-electron oxidations at E(1/2) = 0.52 and 0.83 V vs Ag/AgCl reference. While the former is due to a metal-based V(IV/V) oxidation, the latter one at higher potential is most likely due to a ligand-based process involving one of the catecholate centers. A larger cavity size in the upper compartment of the ligand H4L(3) is spacious enough to accommodate Re(V) with larger size to generate a rare type of all-oxido heterotrimetallic compound (3) as established by X-ray crystallography. PMID:23898782

  2. Studies on Neotropical Phasmatodea XVI: Revision of Haplopodini Günther, 1953 (rev. stat.), with notes on the subfamily Cladomorphinae Bradley & Galil, 1977 and the descriptions of a new tribe, four new genera and nine new species (Phasmatodea: "Anareolatae": Phasmatidae: Cladomorphinae).

    PubMed

    Hennemann, Frank H; Conle, Oskar V; Perez-Gelabert, Daniel E

    2016-01-01

    The anareolate New World subfamily Cladomorphinae Bradley & Galil, 1977 is reviewed and keys to the six tribes currently included are presented; these are: Cladomorphini Bradley & Galil, 1977, Cladoxerini Karny, 1923, Cranidiini Günther, 1953, Pterinoxylini n. trib., Hesperophasmatini Bradley & Galil, 1977 and Haplopodini Günther, 1953 rev. stat.. New diagnoses are presented for all these tribes and possible relationships within Cladomorphinae are discusssed. Morphology of the genitalia and egg-structures indicate Cladomorphinae as presently treated to be polyphyletic. Two subordinate groups are recognized within present Cladomorphinae, which differ considerably in numerous morphological characters of the insects and eggs. The first group and here regarded as Cladomorphinae sensu stricto is formed by the mostly South American Cladomorphini + Cranidiini + Cladoxerini, while the second group is formed by the predominantly Caribbean Hesperophasmatini + Pterinoxylini n. trib. + Haplopodini.        Members of the first group (= Cladomorphini sensu stricto) share the dorsally carinate basitarsus in which the two dorsal carinae are melted with another, increasingly elongated gonapophyses VIII of females which are noticeably longer than gonapophyses IX and lamellate as well as strongly displaced medioventral carina of the profemora. Cranidiini + Cladomorphini share the strongly elongated and filiform gonapophyses VIII and presence of gonoplacs in the females, specialized poculum of males and presence of a median line in the eggs. Cranidiini differs from all other tribes of Cladomorphinae by the entirely unarmed legs of both sexes, distinctly broadened and leaf-like body and prominent longitudinal keel of the mesosternum of females, prominently enlarged poculum and spinulose phallus of males as well as the conspicuous narrowing of the posteromedian gap of the internal micropylar plate of the eggs and noticeably separated median line. Cladomorphini is characteristic

  3. Interpretation of the I-Regime and transport associated with relevant heavy particle modes

    SciTech Connect

    Coppi, B.; Zhou, T.

    2012-01-15

    The excitation of a novel kind of heavy particle [B. Coppi et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 17, 377 (1966); B. Coppi and T. Zhou, MIT(LNS) Report HEP 09/04, 2009, Cambridge, MA [Phys. Lett. A 375, 2916 (2011)

  4. Characterizing the Gender Gap in Introductory Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kost, Lauren E.; Pollock, Steven J.; Finkelstein, Noah D.

    2009-01-01

    Previous research [S. J. Pollock et al., Phys. Rev. ST Phys. Educ. Res. 3, 1 (2007)] showed that despite the use of interactive engagement techniques, the gap in performance between males and females on a conceptual learning survey persisted from pretest to post-test at the University of Colorado at Boulder. Such findings were counter to…

  5. A Charged Particle in a Magnetic Field: A Review of Two Formalisms of Coherent States and the Husimi Function

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herrera, D.; Valencia, A. M.; Pennini, F.; Curilef, S.

    2008-01-01

    In this work, we review two formalisms of coherent states for the case of a particle in a magnetic field. We focus our revision on both pioneering (Feldman and Kahn 1970 "Phys. Rev." B 1 4584) and recent (Kowalski and Rembielinski 2005 "J. Phys. A: Math. Gen." 38 8247) formulations of coherent states for this problem. We introduce a general…

  6. Comment on 'Quantum teleportation of an arbitrary two-qubit state and its relation to multipartite entanglement'

    SciTech Connect

    Deng Fuguo

    2005-09-15

    The multipartite state in the Rigolin's protocol [Phys. Rev. A 71, 032303 (2005)] for teleporting an arbitrary two-qubit state is just a product state of N Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen pairs in essence, not a genuine multipartite entangled state, and this protocol in principle is equivalent to the Yang-Guo protocol [Chin. Phys. Lett. 17, 162 (2000)].

  7. Bernstein-Greene-Kruskal waves in relativistic cold plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh Verma, Prabal; Sengupta, Sudip; Kaw, Predhiman

    2012-03-01

    We construct the longitudinal traveling wave solution [Akhiezer and Polovin, Sov. Phys. JETP 3, 696 (1956)] from the exact space and time dependent solution of relativistic cold electron fluid equations [Infeld and Rowlands, Phys. Rev. Lett. 62, 1122 (1989)]. Ions are assumed to be static. We also suggest an alternative derivation of the Akhiezer Polovin solution after making the standard traveling wave Ansatz.

  8. Gender Disparities in Second-Semester College Physics: The Incremental Effects of a "Smog of Bias"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kost-Smith, Lauren E.; Pollock, Steven J.; Finkelstein, Noah D.

    2010-01-01

    Our previous research [Kost et al., Phys. Rev. ST Phys. Educ. Res. 5, 010101 (2009)] examined gender differences in the first-semester, introductory physics class at the University of Colorado at Boulder. We found that: (1) there were gender differences in several aspects of the course, including conceptual survey performance, (2) these…

  9. Analogical Scaffolding and the Learning of Abstract Ideas in Physics: Empirical Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Podolefsky, Noah S.; Finkelstein, Noah D.

    2007-01-01

    Previously, we proposed a model of student reasoning which combines the roles of representation, analogy, and layering of meaning--analogical scaffolding [Podolefsky and Finkelstein, Phys. Rev. ST Phys. Educ. Res. 3, 010109 (2007)]. The present empirical studies build on this model to examine its utility and demonstrate the vital intertwining of…

  10. Physical fitness training in Subacute Stroke (PHYS-STROKE) - study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Given the rising number of strokes worldwide, and the large number of individuals left with disabilities after stroke, novel strategies to reduce disability, increase functions in the motor and the cognitive domains, and improve quality of life are of major importance. Physical activity is a promising intervention to address these challenges but, as yet, there is no study demonstrating definite outcomes. Our objective is to assess whether additional treatment in the form of physical fitness-based training for patients early after stroke will provide benefits in terms of functional outcomes, in particular gait speed and the Barthel Index (co-primary outcome measures) reflecting activities of daily living (ADL). We will gather secondary functional outcomes as well as mechanistic parameters in an exploratory approach. Methods/Design Our phase III randomised controlled trial will recruit 215 adults with moderate to severe limitations of walking and ADL 5 to 45 days after stroke onset. Participants will be stratified for the prognostic variables of “centre”, “age”, and “stroke severity”, and randomly assigned to one of two groups. The interventional group receives physical fitness training delivered as supported or unsupported treadmill training (cardiovascular active aerobic training; five times per week, over 4 weeks; each session 50 minutes; total of 20 additional physical fitness training sessions) in addition to standard rehabilitation treatment. The control intervention consists of relaxation sessions (non-cardiovascular active; five times per week week, over 4 weeks; each session 50 minutes) in addition to standard rehabilitation treatment. Co-primary efficacy endpoints will be gait speed (in m/s, 10 m walk) and the Barthel Index (100 points total) at 3 months post-stroke, compared to baseline measurements. Secondary outcomes include standard measures of quality of life, sleep and mood, cognition, arm function, maximal oxygen uptake, and cardiovascular risk factors including blood pressure, pulse, waist-to-hip ratio, markers of inflammation, immunity and the insulin-glucose pathway, lipid profile, and others. Discussion The goal of this endpoint-blinded, phase III randomised controlled trial is to provide evidence to guide post-stroke physical fitness-based rehabilitation programmes, and to elucidate the mechanisms underlying this intervention. Trial registration Registered in ClinicalTrials.gov with the Identifier NCT01953549. PMID:24491065

  11. Addendum to "Updating neutrino magnetic moment constraints" [Phys. Lett. B 753 (2016) 191-198

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cañas, B. C.; Miranda, O. G.; Parada, A.; Tórtola, M.; Valle, J. W. F.

    2016-06-01

    After the publication of this work we noticed that the uncertainties in the considered backgrounds in Borexino may affect our reported limit on the neutrino magnetic moment from Borexino data. Indeed, we have found that a more precise treatment of the uncertainties in the total normalization of these backgrounds results in a weaker sensitivity on the neutrino magnetic moment. This point will be hopefully improved in the near future thanks to the purification processes carried out in the second phase of the Borexino experiment. Meanwhile, however, we think it would be more reliable to adopt the bound on the neutrino magnetic moment reported by Borexino: μν < 5.4 ×10-11μB[1].

  12. Post PhysTEC at Arkansas, Graduation Numbers Stable, Student Enthusiasm High

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Gay

    2011-04-01

    At the University of Arkansas in Fayetteville, active learning in the content coursework has been key to the recruitment of MAJORS and TEACHERS. We have supported the process through the use of apprentice teachers, one learning assistant model. Master teachers have also aided in the recruitment, and true partnerships with local schools have allowed us to provide improved support to our graduates through the induction years. The topics of this talk will be how did we create these programs and how did we institutionalize them? Funded in part by the National Science Foundation

  13. Comment on ``Particle size distribution effects on sintering rates'' [J. Appl. Phys. 60, 383 (1986)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrett, T.

    1987-06-01

    A recent paper in the Journal of Applied Physics analyzed the dependence of sintering rate on power particle-size distribution to derive a basic relative rate constant for the process. The derivation involved rather cumbersome numerical quadratures of the lognormal functions concerned. This procedure is unnecessary, since an exact closed-form result, as given in this Comment, is easily obtained. Some fairly obvious incidental errors in the original presentation are also corrected. Several other lognormal distribution integrals, apparently unlisted in previous literature and which might prove similarly useful in connection with distribution problems, are also presented.

  14. The New Phys Ed.: Dodgeball Is Passe; Schools Are Teaching Lifelong Fitness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schachter, Ron

    2011-01-01

    A growing number of physical education teachers are introducing a new kind of P.E. in schools, emphasizing lifelong activities such as running, cycling, yoga, and skateboarding, in an attempt to make exercise more engaging--and lifelong--for elementary and middle school students. The new generation of P.E. classes is introducing youngsters to…

  15. Response to "Comment on `Effective thermal conductivity in thermoelectric materials'" [J. Appl. Phys. 113, 204904 (2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranowski, Lauryn L.; Jeffrey Snyder, G.; Toberer, Eric S.

    2014-03-01

    It is commonly claimed that achieving maximum power from a thermoelectric generator necessitates electrical load matching conditions instead of the operating condition derived for maximum generator efficiency. Here, we explain why the electrical load matching claim for maximum power in a design optimization is flawed and show that the load condition derived for maximum efficiency always produces more power. Finally, we consider a CPM generator, and prove that the electrical condition for maximum efficiency is indeed the electrical condition for maximum power, maximum power density, maximum power/cost of thermoelectric material, and maximum power/weight of thermoelectric material, when the leg length of the thermoelectric generator is a design variable.

  16. Sustainable and Scalable Reforms in Physics Education: Research studies from Colorado PhysTEC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finkelstein, Noah

    2006-03-01

    and STEVEN POLLOCK University of Colorado at Boulder -- While many practices developed within the physics education research community have been demonstrated as successful, they respond to calls and employ practices that echo efforts from the early part of the 20th Century. Are we bound to the same limited success as these precursors? We examine what it means to replicate proven reforms and to develop models for sustainable implementation of these reforms. As part of the Colorado Physics Teacher Education Coalition, we have implemented the Tutorials in Introductory Physics, which were developed by researchers at the University of Washington. We present research on the successful implementation of these reforms at the University of Colorado and begin to answer the questions: What does it mean to replicate an educational program? and How might these educational transformations be sustained? We present empirical data on the success of reforms and the fidelity of implementation as well as theoretical frames for analyzing these data. We also present a model (the Learning Assistant program) designed for sustaining these reforms and for increasing student interest and retention in teaching.

  17. Phase-field crystal approach for modeling the role of microstructure in multiferroic composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seymour, Matthew; Sanches, F.; Elder, Ken; Provatas, Nikolas

    2015-11-01

    This paper introduces a phase-field crystal (PFC) approach that couples the atomic-scale PFC density field to order parameters describing ferromagnetic and ferroelectric ordering, as well to a solute impurity field. This model extends the magnetic PFC model introduced by Faghihi et al. [N. Faghihi, Ph.D. Thesis, The University of Western Ontario, 2012; N. Faghihi, N. Provatas, K. R. Elder, M. Grant, and M. Karttunen, Phys. Rev. E 88, 032407 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevE.88.032407] to incorporate polarization and concentration fields, as well as anisotropic ordering of the magnetization and polarization fields as determined by the local crystalline orientation. Magnetoelectric coupling is incorporated through the elastic coupling. Analytic calculations for a body centered-cubic (BCC) system are presented to illustrate that the model reduces to the standard multiferroic phase-field models when only a single crystal is considered. Two special cases of the model are then studied, the first focusing on magnetocrystalline interactions in a system described by the two-point correlation function of the XPFC model developed by Greenwood et al. [M. Greenwood, N. Provatas, and J. Rottler, Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 045702 (2010), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.105.045702; M. Greenwood, J. Rottler, and N. Provatas, Phys. Rev. E 83, 031601 (2011), 10.1103/PhysRevE.83.031601], and the second focusing on electrocrystalline interactions in a system described by the original PFC kernel developed by Elder et al. K. R. Elder, M. Katakowski, M. Haataja, and M. Grant, Phys. Rev. Lett. 88, 245701 (2002), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.88.245701; K. R. Elder and M. Grant, Phys. Rev. E 70, 051605 (2004), 10.1103/PhysRevE.70.051605]. We examine the small deformation properties of these two realizations of the model . Numerical simulations are performed to illustrate how magnetocrystalline coupling can be exploited to design a preferential grain texture and how defects and grain boundaries influence the ferroelectric

  18. Quantum-key-distribution protocols without sifting that are resistant to photon-number-splitting attacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grazioso, Fabio; Grosshans, Frédéric

    2013-11-01

    We propose a family of sifting-less quantum-key-distribution protocols which use reverse reconciliation, and are based on weak coherent pulses (WCPs) polarized along m different directions. When m=4, the physical part of the protocol is identical to most experimental implementations of BB84 [Bennett and Brassard, in Proceedings of the IEEE International Conference on Computers, Systems, and Signal Processing (IEEE, New York, 1984)] and SARG04 [Scarani, Acín, Ribordy, and Gisin, Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.92.057901 92, 057901 (2004); Acín, Gisin, and Scarani, Phys. Rev. APLRAAN1050-294710.1103/PhysRevA.69.012309 69, 012309 (2004)] protocols and they differ only in classical communications and data processing. We compute their total key rate as a function of the channel transmission T, using general information theoretical arguments, and we show that they have a higher key rate than the more standard protocols, both for fixed and optimized average photon number of the WCPs. When no decoy-state protocols (DSPs) [Hwang, Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.91.057901 91, 057901 (2003); Lo, Ma, and Chen, Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.94.230504 94, 230504 (2005); Wang, Phys. Rev. APLRAAN1050-294710.1103/PhysRevA.72.012322 72, 012322 (2005)] are applied, the scaling of the key rate with transmission is improved from T2 for BB84 to T1+(1)/(m-2). If a DSP is applied, we show how the key rates scale linearly with T, with an improvement of the prefactor by 75.96% for m=4. High values of m allow one to asymptotically approach the key rate obtained with ideal single-photon pulses. The fact that the key rates of these sifting-less protocols are higher compared to those of the aforementioned more standard protocols show that the latter are not optimal, since they do not extract all the available secret keys from the experimental correlations.

  19. Estimation of the nuclear distortion in the Coulomb breakup of 6Li into α + d in the field of 208Pb ion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irgaziev, B. F.

    2014-04-01

    In this article the results of the evaluation of the contribution of nuclear disintegration, based on the basis of diffraction theory in the 208Pb(6Li, αd)208Pb Coulomb breakup at an energy of 156 MeV is presented. Comparison of the results of the calculation with the experimental data of Kiener et al. [Phys. Rev. C 44, 2195 (1991)] gives evidence for the dominance of the Coulomb dissociation mechanism and contribution of nuclear distortion, but essentially smaller than the value reported byHammache et al. [Phys. Rev. C 82, 065803 (2010)] and Sümmerer [Prog. Part. Nucl. Phys. 66, 298 (2011)].

  20. Energy Loss of Heavy Quarks in a QGP with a Running Coupling Constant Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gossiaux, P. B.; Aichelin, J.

    2009-11-01

    We show that the effective running coupling constant, α, and the effective regulator, κm˜D2, which we used recently to calculate the energy loss, dEdx, and the elliptic flow, v, of heavy quarks in an expanding quark gluon plasma plasma (QGP) [P. B. Gossiaux and J. Aichelin, Phys. Rev. C78, 014904 (2008), [arXiv:0802.2525], P. B. Gossiaux and J. Aichelin, J. Phys. G36 (2009) 064028, [arXiv:0901.2462], P. B. Gossiaux, R. Bierkandt and J. Aichelin, Phys. Rev. C79 (2009) 044906 [arXiv:0901.0946

  1. Shape profile of acoustic radiation-induced static displacement pulses in solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cantrell, John H.; Yost, William T.

    2010-07-01

    In a recent article Narasimha et al. [J. Appl. Phys. 105, 073506 (2009)] claim to show that the shape of static displacement pulses generated by ultrasonic tone-bursts in nondispersive solids is that of a growing trapezoid in the spatial domain that leads to a flat-topped pulse shape in the time domain for a fixed spatial position. Flaws in their theoretical arguments are corrected to show that their model actually predicts a right-triangular pulse shape for nondispersive monocrystals in both the spatial and time domains as originally reported by Yost and Cantrell [Phys. Rev. B 30, 3221 (1984)] and Cantrell et al. [Phys. Rev. B 35, 9780 (1987)].

  2. Thermoelectric cooler concepts and the limit for maximum cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seifert, W.; Pluschke, V.; Hinsche, N. F.

    2014-06-01

    The conventional analysis of a Peltier cooler approximates the material properties as independent of temperature using a constant properties model (CPM). Alternative concepts have been published by Bian and Shakouri (2006 Appl. Phys. Lett. 89 212101), Bian (et al 2007 Phys. Rev. B 75 245208) and Snyder et al (2012 Phys. Rev. B 86 045202). While Snyder's Thomson cooler concept results from a consideration of compatibility, the method of Bian et al focuses on the redistribution of heat. Thus, both approaches are based on different principles. In this paper we compare the new concepts to CPM and we reconsider the limit for maximum cooling. The results provide a new perspective on maximum cooling.

  3. Elongated shape isomers in the Ar36 nucleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cseh, József; Darai, Judit; Sciani, Wagner; Otani, Yul; Lépine-Szily, Alinka; Benjamim, Elisangela A.; Chamon, Luiz Carlos; Filho, Rubens Lichtenthäler

    2009-09-01

    A recent analysis of the C12+Mg24 scattering [W. Sciani , Phys. Rev. C 80, 034319 (2009)] suggests the existence of a hyperdeformed band in the Ar36 nucleus, completely in line with the predictions of α [W. D. M. Rae and A. C. Merchant, Phys. Lett. B279, 207 (1992)] and binary cluster calculations [J. Cseh , Phys. Rev. C 70, 034311 (2004)]. Here we review the structural understanding of the superdeformed and the hyperdeformed states of Ar36 and present new results on the shape isomers as well. Special attention is paid to the clusterization of these states, which indicates the appropriate reaction channels for their formation.

  4. Exact coupling threshold for structural transition reveals diversified behaviors in interconnected networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darabi Sahneh, Faryad; Scoglio, Caterina; Van Mieghem, Piet

    2015-10-01

    An interconnected network features a structural transition between two regimes [F. Radicchi and A. Arenas, Nat. Phys. 9, 717 (2013), 10.1038/nphys2761]: one where the network components are structurally distinguishable and one where the interconnected network functions as a whole. Our exact solution for the coupling threshold uncovers network topologies with unexpected behaviors. Specifically, we show conditions that superdiffusion, introduced by Gómez et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 028701 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.110.028701], can occur despite the network components functioning distinctly. Moreover, we find that components of certain interconnected network topologies are indistinguishable despite very weak coupling between them.

  5. Second order effects in RCI calculations of La^-, Ce^- and Lu^- electron affinities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Malley, Steven M.; Beck, Donald R.

    2000-06-01

    Recent improvements in the relativistic configuration interaction method have relied upon identifying problem configurations that exhibit losses of energy contribution between consecutive stages of the calculations. These losses occur due to the differential pulling away of the manifold of interest as it is more fully correlated. To recoup some of these losses we add second order effects by including excitations from the problem configurations which are also important first order contributors to the energies of the levels of interest. Three recent studies of the rare earths La^- (S. M. O'Malley and D. R. Beck, Phys. Rev. A 60), 2558 (1999), Ce^- (S. M. O'Malley and D. R. Beck, Phys. Rev. A, in press) and Lu^- (S. M. O'Malley and D. R. Beck, submitted to Phys. Rev. A) have indicated increases in electron affinities over previous estimates by Vosko et al. (S. H. Vosko, J. B. Lagowski, I. L. Mayer and J. A. Chevary, Phys. Rev. A 43), 6389 (1991) and S. H. Vosko and J. A. Chevary, J. Phys. B 26, 873 (1993) and our own group (K. Dinov, D. R. Beck, and D. Datta, Phys. Rev. A 50), 1144 (1994) on the order of 100 meV, primarily due to inclusion of this second order correlation.

  6. Persistence of Jahn-Teller Distortion up to the Insulator to Metal Transition in LaMnO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldini, Maria; Struzhkin, Viktor; Goncharov, Alex; Postorino, Paolo; Mao, Wendy

    2012-02-01

    High pressure, low temperature Raman measurements performed on LaMnO3 up to 34 GPa provide the first evidence for the persistence of the Jahn-Teller distortion over the entire stability range of the insulating phase. This result resolves the ongoing debate about the nature of the pressure driveninsulator to metal transition (IMT), demonstrating that LaMnO3 is not a classical Mott insulator. The formation of domains of distorted and regular octahedra, observed from 3 to 34 GPa, suggests that LaMnO3 becomes metallic when the fraction of undistorted octahedra domains increases beyond a critical threshold. In this scenario, it is interesting to consider whether or not the CMR effect may be induced in LaMnO3 by applying pressure. Preliminary results obtained performing high pressure resistivity measurements in a magnetic field will be reported. [4pt] [1] I. Loa, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 87, 125501 (2001). [0pt] [2] A.Y. Ramos et al., Phys. Rev. B 75, 052103(2007). [0pt] [3] A.Y. Ramos et al., J. Phys. Conf. Ser. 190, 012096 (2009). [0pt] [4] A. Yamasaki et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 166401 (2006). [0pt] [5]J. D. Fuhr et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 216402 (2008). [0pt] [6] M. Baldini et al., Phys. Rev. Letter 106, 066402 (2011).

  7. Improvements to laser wakefield accelerated electron beam stability, divergence, and energy spread using three-dimensional printed two-stage gas cell targets

    SciTech Connect

    Vargas, M.; Schumaker, W.; He, Z.-H.; Zhao, Z.; Behm, K.; Chvykov, V.; Hou, B.; Krushelnick, K.; Maksimchuk, A.; Yanovsky, V.; Thomas, A. G. R.

    2014-04-28

    High intensity, short pulse lasers can be used to accelerate electrons to ultra-relativistic energies via laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) [T. Tajima and J. M. Dawson, Phys. Rev. Lett. 43, 267 (1979)]. Recently, it was shown that separating the injection and acceleration processes into two distinct stages could prove beneficial in obtaining stable, high energy electron beams [Gonsalves et al., Nat. Phys. 7, 862 (2011); Liu et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 035001 (2011); Pollock et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 045001 (2011)]. Here, we use a stereolithography based 3D printer to produce two-stage gas targets for LWFA experiments on the HERCULES laser system at the University of Michigan. We demonstrate substantial improvements to the divergence, pointing stability, and energy spread of a laser wakefield accelerated electron beam compared with a single-stage gas cell or gas jet target.

  8. Improvements to laser wakefield accelerated electron beam stability, divergence, and energy spread using three-dimensional printed two-stage gas cell targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vargas, M.; Schumaker, W.; He, Z.-H.; Zhao, Z.; Behm, K.; Chvykov, V.; Hou, B.; Krushelnick, K.; Maksimchuk, A.; Yanovsky, V.; Thomas, A. G. R.

    2014-04-01

    High intensity, short pulse lasers can be used to accelerate electrons to ultra-relativistic energies via laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) [T. Tajima and J. M. Dawson, Phys. Rev. Lett. 43, 267 (1979)]. Recently, it was shown that separating the injection and acceleration processes into two distinct stages could prove beneficial in obtaining stable, high energy electron beams [Gonsalves et al., Nat. Phys. 7, 862 (2011); Liu et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 035001 (2011); Pollock et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 045001 (2011)]. Here, we use a stereolithography based 3D printer to produce two-stage gas targets for LWFA experiments on the HERCULES laser system at the University of Michigan. We demonstrate substantial improvements to the divergence, pointing stability, and energy spread of a laser wakefield accelerated electron beam compared with a single-stage gas cell or gas jet target.

  9. Questioning the observation of laser-assisted ionization in fast collisions of He(2 /sup 1,3/S) with He

    SciTech Connect

    Gillen, K.T.

    1989-02-15

    In four recent papers Pradel et al. (Phys. Rev. Lett. 54, 2600 (1985); Phys. Rev. A 35, 1062 (1987)) and Monchicourt et al. (Phys. Rev. A 33, 3515 (1986); Chem. Phys. Lett. 152, 336 (1988)) give arguments claiming the observation of laser-assisted ionization of the short-lived collision complex formed during collisions of He/sup */(2 /sup 1,3/S) with He. However, estimates of the relative sizes of the assisted and unassisted ion signals observed make it very unlikely that laser-assisted ionization has been observed in those experiments. Collisional excitation to higher He/sup */ states, followed by (single-photon) ionization of the excited states, seems a more likely explanation at all energies considered.

  10. Solar System tests in f (T ) gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrugia, Gabriel; Said, Jackson Levi; Ruggiero, Matteo Luca

    2016-05-01

    We investigate the four solar system tests of gravity—perihelion precession, light bending, Shapiro time delay, gravitational redshift—in f (T ) gravity. In particular, we investigate the solution derived by Ruggiero and Radicella53 , Phys. Rev. D 91, 104014 (2015). for a nondiagonal vierbein field for a polynomial f (T )=T +α Tn , where α is a constant and |n |≠1 . In this paper, we derive the solutions for each test, in which Weinberg's, Bodenner and Will's, Cattani et al., and Rindler and Ishak's methods are applied55 , Gravitation and Cosmology: Principles and Applications of the General Theory of Relativity (Wiley, New York, 1972); 56 Am. J. Phys. 71 (2003); 57 Phys. Rev. D 87, 047503 (2013); 58 Phys. Rev. D 76, 043006 (2007). We set a constraint on α for n =2 , 3 by using data available from literature.

  11. Physics Beyond the Standard Model from Molecular Hydrogen Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ubachs, Wim; Salumbides, Edcel John; Bagdonaite, Julija

    2015-06-01

    The spectrum of molecular hydrogen can be measured in the laboratory to very high precision using advanced laser and molecular beam techniques, as well as frequency-comb based calibration [1,2]. The quantum level structure of this smallest neutral molecule can now be calculated to very high precision, based on a very accurate (10-15 precision) Born-Oppenheimer potential [3] and including subtle non-adiabatic, relativistic and quantum electrodynamic effects [4]. Comparison between theory and experiment yields a test of QED, and in fact of the Standard Model of Physics, since the weak, strong and gravitational forces have a negligible effect. Even fifth forces beyond the Standard Model can be searched for [5]. Astronomical observation of molecular hydrogen spectra, using the largest telescopes on Earth and in space, may reveal possible variations of fundamental constants on a cosmological time scale [6]. A study has been performed at a 'look-back' time of 12.5 billion years [7]. In addition the possible dependence of a fundamental constant on a gravitational field has been investigated from observation of molecular hydrogen in the photospheres of white dwarfs [8]. The latter involves a test of the Einsteins equivalence principle. [1] E.J. Salumbides et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 143005 (2011). [2] G. Dickenson et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 193601 (2013). [3] K. Pachucki, Phys. Rev. A82, 032509 (2010). [4] J. Komasa et al., J. Chem. Theory Comp. 7, 3105 (2011). [5] E.J. Salumbides et al., Phys. Rev. D87, 112008 (2013). [6] F. van Weerdenburg et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 180802 (2011). [7] J. Badonaite et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 114, 071301 (2015). [8] J. Bagdonaite et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 123002 (2014).

  12. On the optimality of individual entangling-probe attacks against BB84 quantum key distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herbauts, I. M.; Bettelli, S.; Hã¼bel, H.; Peev, M.

    2008-02-01

    Some MIT researchers [Phys. Rev. A 75, 042327 (2007)] have recently claimed that their implementation of the Slutsky-Brandt attack [Phys. Rev. A 57, 2383 (1998); Phys. Rev. A 71, 042312 (2005)] to the BB84 quantum-key-distribution (QKD) protocol puts the security of this protocol “to the test” by simulating “the most powerful individual-photon attack” [Phys. Rev. A 73, 012315 (2006)]. A related unfortunate news feature by a scientific journal [G. Brumfiel, Quantum cryptography is hacked, News @ Nature (april 2007); Nature 447, 372 (2007)] has spurred some concern in the QKD community and among the general public by misinterpreting the implications of this work. The present article proves the existence of a stronger individual attack on QKD protocols with encrypted error correction, for which tight bounds are shown, and clarifies why the claims of the news feature incorrectly suggest a contradiction with the established “old-style” theory of BB84 individual attacks. The full implementation of a quantum cryptographic protocol includes a reconciliation and a privacy-amplification stage, whose choice alters in general both the maximum extractable secret and the optimal eavesdropping attack. The authors of [Phys. Rev. A 75, 042327 (2007)] are concerned only with the error-free part of the so-called sifted string, and do not consider faulty bits, which, in the version of their protocol, are discarded. When using the provably superior reconciliation approach of encrypted error correction (instead of error discard), the Slutsky-Brandt attack is no more optimal and does not “threaten” the security bound derived by Lütkenhaus [Phys. Rev. A 59, 3301 (1999)]. It is shown that the method of Slutsky and collaborators [Phys. Rev. A 57, 2383 (1998)] can be adapted to reconciliation with error correction, and that the optimal entangling probe can be explicitly found. Moreover, this attack fills Lütkenhaus bound, proving that it is tight (a fact which was not

  13. Applications of the hybrid theory to the scattering of electrons from He+ and Li2+ and resonances in these systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatia, A. K.

    2008-05-01

    The hybrid theory of electron-hydrogen elastic scattering [Phys. Rev. A 75, 032713 (2007)] is applied to the S -wave scattering of electrons from He+ and Li2+ . In this method, both short-range and long-range correlations are included in the Schrödinger equation at the same time. Phase shifts obtained in this calculation have rigorous lower bounds to the exact phase shifts and they are compared with those obtained using the Feshbach projection operator formalism [Phys. Rev. A 66, 064702 (2002)], the close-coupling approach [J. Phys. B 2, 44 (1969)], and the Harris-Nesbet method [J. Phys. B 35, 4475 (2002); J. Phys. B 36, 2291 (2003)]. The agreement among all the calculations is very good. These systems have doubly excited or Feshbach resonances embedded in the continuum. The resonance parameters for the lowest S1 resonances in He and Li+ are calculated and they are compared with the results obtained using the Feshbach projection operator formalism [Phys. Rev. A 11, 2018 (1975); Phys. Rev. A 15, 131 (1977)]. It is concluded that accurate resonance parameters can be obtained by the present method, which has the advantage of including corrections due to neighboring resonances and the continuum in which these resonances are embedded.

  14. Quantum radiation reaction force on a one-dimensional cavity with two relativistic moving mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves, Danilo T.; Granhen, Edney R.; Pires, Wagner P.

    2010-08-01

    We consider a real massless scalar field inside a cavity with two moving mirrors in a two-dimensional spacetime, satisfying the Dirichlet boundary condition at the instantaneous position of the boundaries, for arbitrary and relativistic laws of motion. Considering vacuum as the initial field state, we obtain formulas for the exact value of the energy density of the field and the quantum force acting on the boundaries, which extend results found in previous papers [D. T. Alves, E. R. Granhen, H. O. Silva, and M. G. Lima, Phys. Rev. DPRVDAQ1550-7998 81, 025016 (2010); 10.1103/PhysRevD.81.025016L. Li and B.-Z. Li, Phys. Lett. APYLAAG0375-9601 300, 27 (2002); 10.1016/S0375-9601(02)00674-6L. Li and B.-Z. Li, Chin. Phys. Lett.CPLEEU0256-307X 19, 1061 (2002); 10.1088/0256-307X/19/8/310L. Li and B.-Z. Li, Acta Phys. Sin.WLHPAR1000-3290 52, 2762 (2003); C. K. Cole and W. C. Schieve, Phys. Rev. A 64, 023813 (2001)PLRAAN1050-294710.1103/PhysRevA.64.023813]. For the particular cases of a cavity with just one moving boundary, nonrelativistic velocities, or in the limit of infinity length of the cavity (a single mirror), our results coincide with those found in the literature.

  15. Quantum cosmology: From hidden symmetries towards a new (supersymmetric) perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalalzadeh, S.; Rostami, T.; Moniz, P. V.

    2016-02-01

    We review pedagogically some of the basic essentials regarding recent results intertwining boundary conditions, the algebra of constraints and hidden symmetries in quantum cosmology. They were extensively published in Refs. [S. Jalalzadeh, S. M. M. Rasouli and P. V. Moniz, Phys. Rev. D 90 (2014) 023541, S. Jalalzadeh and P. V. Moniz, Phys. Rev. D 89 (2014), S. Jalalzadeh, T. Rostami and P. V. Moniz, Eur. Phys. J. C 75 (2015) 38, arXiv:gr-qc/1412.6439 and T. Rostami, S. Jalalzadeh and P. V. Moniz, Phys. Rev. D 92 (2015) 023526, arXiv:gr-qc/1507.04212], where complete discussions and full details can be found. More concretely, in Refs. [S. Jalalzadeh, S. M. M. Rasouli and P. V. Moniz, Phys. Rev. D 90 (2014) 023541, S. Jalalzadeh and P. V. Moniz, Phys. Rev. D 89 (2014) and S. Jalalzadeh, T. Rostami and P. V. Moniz, Eur. Phys. J. C 75 (2015) 38, arXiv:gr-qc/1412.6439] it has been shown that specific boundary conditions can be related to the algebra of Dirac observables. Moreover, a process afterwards associated to the algebra of existent hidden symmetries, from which the boundary conditions can be selected, was introduced. On the other hand, in Ref. [T. Rostami, S. Jalalzadeh and P. V. Moniz, Phys. Rev. D 92 (2015) 023526, arXiv:gr-qc/1507.04212] it was subsequently argued that some factor ordering choices can be extracted from the hidden symmetries structure of the minisuperspace model. In Refs. [S. Jalalzadeh, S. M. M. Rasouli and P. V. Moniz, Phys. Rev. D 90 (2014) 023541, S. Jalalzadeh and P. V. Moniz, Phys. Rev. D 89 (2014), S. Jalalzadeh, T. Rostami and P. V. Moniz, Eur. Phys. J. C 75 (2015) 38, arXiv:gr-qc/1412.6439 and T. Rostami, S. Jalalzadeh and P. V. Moniz, Phys. Rev. D 92 (2015) 023526, arXiv:gr-qc/1507.04212], we proceeded gradually towards less simple models, ranging from a FLRW model with a perfect fluid [S. Jalalzadeh, S. M. M. Rasouli and P. V. Moniz, Phys. Rev. D 90 (2014) 023541] up to a conformal scalar field content [T. Rostami, S. Jalalzadeh and

  16. Spin Hall effect for detection of spin-currents -- Realization of a Spin transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wunderlich, Joerg

    2012-02-01

    The realization of a viable semiconductor transistor and information processing devices based on the electron spin has fueled intense basic research of three key elements: injection, detection, and manipulation of spins in the semiconductor microchannel. The inverse spin Hall effect (iSHE) detection of spins manipulated by a gate electrode [1] has recently led to the experimental demonstration of a spin transistor device. [2] Here, the spin injection into a 2-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) was done optically in the depletion layer of a reverse biased pn-junction. [3] The iSHE detection is also used for electrical spin injection from a Fe electrode into a lateral GaAs channel combined with a simultaneous non-local spin valve measurement [4-10]. The spins in the channel are manipulated via the Hanle spin precession induced by an applied magnetic field and via a drift of electrons induced by an applied electric field. The output spin signal is suppressed or enhanced depending on the applied electrical bias rendering the device to a spin transitor different from the Datta Das concept. [11] [4pt] [1] S. Datta and B. Das, Appl. Phys. Lett. 56, 665 (1990). [0pt] [2] J. Wunderlich, et al., Science 330,1801 (2010). [0pt] [3] J. Wunderlich, et al., Nature Phys., 5, 675 (2009). [0pt] [4] X. Lou, Nature Phys. 3, 197 (2007). [0pt] [5] M. Ciorga, et al., Phys. Rev. B 79, 165321 (2009). [0pt] [6] C. Awo-Affouda, et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 94, 102511 (2009). [0pt] [7] M. K. Chan, et al., Phys. Rev. B 80, 161206(R) (2009). [0pt] [8] G. Salis, et al., Phys. Rev. B 80, 115332 (2009). [0pt] [9] G. Salis, et al., Phys. Rev. B 81, 205323 (2010). [0pt] [10] E. S. Garlid, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 156602 (2010). [0pt] [11] K. Olejnik, et al., submitted.

  17. Determination of QCD phase diagram from the imaginary chemical potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuji, Sakai; Kouji, Kashiwa; Hiroaki, Kouno; Masanobu, Yahiro

    2009-10-01

    Lattice QCD has the well-known sign problem at real chemical potential. An approach to circumvent the problem is the analytic continuation to real chemical potential from imaginary one. We propose a new analytic continuation by using the Polyakov-loop extended Nambu--Jona-Lasinio (PNJL) model. This work is published in our papers of Phys. Rev. D77, 051901 (2008), Phys. Rev. D78, 036001 (2008), Phys. Rev. D78 076007 (2008), Phys. Rev. D 79, 076008 (2009), Phys. Rev. D 79, 096001 (2009). This talk presents the latest result of these studies. The partition function of QCD has the Roberge-Weiss (RW) periodicity in the imaginary chemical potential region. We revealed that the PNJL model has the RW periodicity. Strength parameters of the vector-type four-quark and scalar-type eight- quark interactions are determined so as to reproduce lattice data on pseudocritical temperatures of the deconfinement and chiral phase transitions in the imaginary chemical potential region. The QCD phase diagram in the real chemical potential region is predicted by the PNJL model. The critical endpoint survives, even if the vector-type four-quark interaction is taken into account.

  18. Density profile of strongly correlated spherical Yukawa plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonitz, M.; Henning, C.; Ludwig, P.; Golubnychiy, V.; Baumgartner, H.; Piel, A.; Block, D.

    2006-10-01

    Recently the discovery of 3D-dust crystals [1] excited intensive experimental and theoretical activities [2-4]. Details of the shell structure of these crystals has been very well explained theoretically by a simple model involving an isotropic Yukawa-type pair repulsion and an external harmonic confinement potential [4]. On the other hand, it has remained an open question how the average radial density profile, looks like. We show that screening has a dramatic effect on the density profile, which we derive analytically for the ground state. Interestingly, the result applies not only to a continuous plasma distribution but also to simulation data for the Coulomb crystals exhibiting the above mentioned shell structure. Furthermore, excellent agreement between the continuum model and shell models is found [5]. [1] O. Arp, D. Block, A. Piel, and A. Melzer, Phys. Rev. Lett. 93, 165004 (2004). [2] H. Totsuji, C. Totsuji, T. Ogawa, and K. Tsuruta, Phys. Rev. E 71, 045401 (2005) [3] P. Ludwig, S. Kosse, and M. Bonitz, Phys. Rev. E 71, 046403 (2005) [4] M. Bonitz, D. Block, O. Arp, V. Golubnychiy, H. Baumgartner, P. Ludwig, A. Piel, and A. Filinov, Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 075001 (2006) [5] C. Henning, M. Bonitz, A. Piel, P. Ludwig, H. Baumgartner, V. Golubnichiy, and D. Block, submitted to Phys. Rev. E

  19. Lifetime Measurements of Trapped ^232Th^3+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Depalatis, Michael; Chapman, Michael

    2012-06-01

    In recent years, there has been considerable interest in the low lying nuclear isomer state of ^229Th which is only several eV above the nuclear ground state [1]. To date, several groups are taking a variety of approaches to finding and exciting this unique state [2], including the use of trapped Th^3+ ions. Despite this attention, few precise measurements have been made of atomic lifetimes. In this work we present experiments to measure the 6D3/2 and 6D5/2 states using laser cooled ^232Th^3+ confined in a linear Paul trap.[4pt] [1] E. Peik and Chr. Tamm, Europhys. Lett. 61, 181 (2003); V. V. Flambaum, Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 092502 (2006); B. R. Beck et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 142501 (2007).[0pt] [2] W. G. Rellergert et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 200802 (2010); S. G. Porsev et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 182501 (2010); C. J. Campbell et al., Phys. Rev. Let. 106, 223001 (2011).

  20. Theoretical Analysis of Neutron and X-ray Scattering Data on 3He

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krotscheck, E.; Panholzer, M.

    2011-04-01

    X-ray scattering experiments on bulk liquid 3He (Albergamo et al. in Phys. Rev. Lett. 99:205301, 2007; Schmets and Montfrooij in Phys. Rev. Lett. 100:239601, 2008; Albergamo et al. in Phys. Rev. Lett. 100:239602, 2008) have indicated the possibility of the existence of a sharp collective mode at large momentum transfers. We address this issue within a manifestly microscopic theory of excitations in a Fermi fluid that can be understood as proper generalization of the time-honored theory of Jackson, Feenberg, and Campbell (Jackson in Phys. Rev. A 8:1529, 1973; Feenberg in Theory of Quantum Fluids, 1969; Chang and Campbell in Phys. Rev. B 13:3779, 1976) of excitations in 4He. We show that both neutron and X-ray data can be well explained within a theory where the high momentum excitations lie in fact inside the particle-hole continuum. "Pair fluctuations" contribute a sharpening of the mode compared to the random phase approximation (RPA). When the theoretical results are convoluted with the experimental resolution, the agreement between theory and X-ray data is quite good.