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Sample records for ahr ligand binding

  1. Access Path to the Ligand Binding Pocket May Play a Role in Xenobiotics Selection by AhR

    PubMed Central

    Szöllősi, Dániel; Erdei, Áron; Gyimesi, Gergely; Magyar, Csaba; Hegedűs, Tamás

    2016-01-01

    Understanding of multidrug binding at the atomic level would facilitate drug design and strategies to modulate drug metabolism, including drug transport, oxidation, and conjugation. Therefore we explored the mechanism of promiscuous binding of small molecules by studying the ligand binding domain, the PAS-B domain of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). Because of the low sequence identities of PAS domains to be used for homology modeling, structural features of the widely employed HIF-2α and a more recent suitable template, CLOCK were compared. These structures were used to build AhR PAS-B homology models. We performed molecular dynamics simulations to characterize dynamic properties of the PAS-B domain and the generated conformational ensembles were employed in in silico docking. In order to understand structural and ligand binding features we compared the stability and dynamics of the promiscuous AhR PAS-B to other PAS domains exhibiting specific interactions or no ligand binding function. Our exhaustive in silico binding studies, in which we dock a wide spectrum of ligand molecules to the conformational ensembles, suggest that ligand specificity and selection may be determined not only by the PAS-B domain itself, but also by other parts of AhR and its protein interacting partners. We propose that ligand binding pocket and access channels leading to the pocket play equally important roles in discrimination of endogenous molecules and xenobiotics. PMID:26727491

  2. In vitro and in silico evaluation of transactivation potencies of avian AHR1 and AHR2 by endogenous ligands: Implications for the physiological role of avian AHR2.

    PubMed

    Kim, In-Sung; Hwang, Ji-Hee; Hirano, Masashi; Iwata, Hisato; Kim, Eun-Young

    2016-09-01

    Aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) is well conserved from invertebrates to vertebrates, and it mediates the toxic effects of exogenous ligands, including dioxins. Recent studies reported that AHRs activated by endogenous ligands play critical roles in mammalian physiological homeostasis. Avian species possess at least two AHR isoforms (AHR1 and AHR2), which exhibit species- and isoform-specific transactivation potencies to exogenous ligands, whereas mammals possess a single AHR. To delineate the profiles and roles of endogenous ligands for avian AHR isoforms, we investigated in vitro transactivation potencies of avian AHRs (AHR1 and AHR2 from the jungle crow, Corvus macrorhynchos; common cormorant, Phalacrocorax carbo; and black-footed albatross, Phoebastria nigripes) treated with the endogenous tryptophan metabolites 6-formylindolo [3,2-b] carbazole (FICZ), l-kynurenine (l-Kyn), kynurenic acid (KYNA), and indoxyl sulfate (IS). Furthermore, we analyzed the binding mode of these ligands to each avian AHR isoform by in silico docking simulations. The EC50 of FICZ (0.009-0.032nM) was similar regardless of the species or isoform of AHR. The estimated in silico binding mode of FICZ to AHRs was well conserved in both isoforms. The transactivation potencies of avian AHRs to other tryptophan metabolites were 10(5)-10(7) fold lower than those for FICZ, and EC50 values varied in a species- and isoform-specific manner. This was consistent with poor conservation of the binding mode of l-Kyn, KYNA, and IS predicted in in silico docking simulations. Our results suggest that in avian species, FICZ is the most potent endogenous AHR ligand, and that AHR1 and AHR2 are physiologically functional. PMID:27060260

  3. Non-dioxin-like AhR ligands in a mouse peanut allergy model.

    PubMed

    Schulz, Veronica J; Smit, Joost J; Huijgen, Veerle; Bol-Schoenmakers, Marianne; van Roest, Manon; Kruijssen, Laura J W; Fiechter, Daniëlle; Hassing, Ine; Bleumink, Rob; Safe, Stephen; van Duursen, Majorie B M; van den Berg, Martin; Pieters, Raymond H H

    2012-07-01

    Recently, we have shown that AhR activation by 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) suppresses sensitization to peanut at least in part by inducing a functional shift toward CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) T cells. Next to TCDD, numerous other AhR ligands have been described. In this study, we investigated the effect of three structurally different non-dioxin-like AhR ligands, e.g., 6-formylindolo[3,2-b]carbazole (FICZ), β-naphthoflavone (β-NF), and 6-methyl-1,3,8-trichlorodibenzofuran (6-MCDF), on peanut sensitization. Female C57BL/6 mice were sensitized by administering peanut extract (PE) by gavage in the presence of cholera toxin. Before and during peanut sensitization, mice were treated with FICZ, β-NF, or 6-MCDF. AhR gene transcription in duodenum and liver was investigated on day 5, even as the effect of these AhR ligands on CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) T(reg) cells in spleen and mesenteric lymph nodes (MLNs). Mice treated with TCDD were included as a positive control. Furthermore, the murine reporter cell line H1G1.1c3 (CAFLUX) was used to investigate the possible role of metabolism of TCDD, FICZ, β-NF, and 6-MCDF on AhR activation in vitro. TCDD, but not FICZ, β-NF, and 6-MCDF, suppressed sensitization to peanut (measured by PE-specific IgE, IgG1, IgG2a and PE-induced interleukin (IL)-5, IL-10, IL-13, IL-17a, IL-22, and interferon-γ). In addition, FICZ, β-NF, and 6-MCDF treatments less effectively induced AhR gene transcription (measured by gene expression of AhR, AhRR, CYP1A1, CYP1A2, CYP1B1) compared with TCDD-treated mice. Furthermore, FICZ, β-NF and 6-MCDF did not increase the percentage of CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) T(reg) cells in spleen and mesenteric lymph nodes compared with PE-sensitized mice, in contrast to TCDD. Inhibition of metabolism in vitro increased AhR activation. Together, these data shows that TCDD, but not FICZ, β-NF, and 6-MCDF suppresses sensitization to peanut. Differences in metabolism, AhR binding and subsequent gene transcription might

  4. The Q-rich/PST domain of the AHR regulates both ligand-induced nuclear transport and nucleocytoplasmic shuttling

    PubMed Central

    Tkachenko, Anna; Henkler, Frank; Brinkmann, Joep; Sowada, Juliane; Genkinger, Doris; Kern, Christian; Tralau, Tewes; Luch, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) shuttles continuously between cytoplasm and nucleus, unless ligand-binding triggers association with the AHR nuclear translocator (ARNT) and subsequent binding to cognate DNA motifs. We have now identified Val 647 as mandatory residue for export from the nucleus and AHR-function. This residue prevents inactivation of the receptor as a consequence of nuclear sequestration via constitutive import. Concomitantly mutants lacking this residue are exclusively localised in the nucleus. Although ligands accelerate nuclear import transiently, stable nuclear transition depends on a motif adjacent to Val 647 that comprises residues 650–661. Together, this defined region within the Q-rich domain regulates intracellular trafficking of the AHR in context of both nucleocytoplasmic shuttling and receptor activation. Nuclear export therefore depends on the previously characterised N-terminal NES and the newly identified motif that includes V647. Nucleocytoplasmic distribution of full-length human AHR is further affected by a section of the PST domain that shows sequence similarities with nuclear export signals. In concert, these motifs maintain a predominant cytoplasmic compartmentalisation, receptive for ligand binding. PMID:27535013

  5. The Q-rich/PST domain of the AHR regulates both ligand-induced nuclear transport and nucleocytoplasmic shuttling.

    PubMed

    Tkachenko, Anna; Henkler, Frank; Brinkmann, Joep; Sowada, Juliane; Genkinger, Doris; Kern, Christian; Tralau, Tewes; Luch, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) shuttles continuously between cytoplasm and nucleus, unless ligand-binding triggers association with the AHR nuclear translocator (ARNT) and subsequent binding to cognate DNA motifs. We have now identified Val 647 as mandatory residue for export from the nucleus and AHR-function. This residue prevents inactivation of the receptor as a consequence of nuclear sequestration via constitutive import. Concomitantly mutants lacking this residue are exclusively localised in the nucleus. Although ligands accelerate nuclear import transiently, stable nuclear transition depends on a motif adjacent to Val 647 that comprises residues 650-661. Together, this defined region within the Q-rich domain regulates intracellular trafficking of the AHR in context of both nucleocytoplasmic shuttling and receptor activation. Nuclear export therefore depends on the previously characterised N-terminal NES and the newly identified motif that includes V647. Nucleocytoplasmic distribution of full-length human AHR is further affected by a section of the PST domain that shows sequence similarities with nuclear export signals. In concert, these motifs maintain a predominant cytoplasmic compartmentalisation, receptive for ligand binding. PMID:27535013

  6. Use of natural AhR ligands as potential therapeutic modalities against inflammatory disorders

    PubMed Central

    Busbee, Philip B; Rouse, Michael; Nagarkatti, Mitzi; Nagarkatti, Prakash S

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this review is to discuss research involving ligands for the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) and their role in immunomodulation. While activation of the AhR is well known for its ability to regulate the biochemical and toxic effects of environmental chemicals, more recently an exciting discovery has been made indicating that AhR ligation can also regulate T-cell differentiation, specifically through activation of Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) and downregulation of the proinflammatory Th17 cells. Such findings have opened new avenues of research on the possibility of targeting the AhR to treat inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. Specifically, this review will discuss the current research involving natural and dietary AhR ligands. In addition, evidence indicating the potential use of these ligands in regulating inflammation in various diseases will be highlighted. The importance of the AhR in immunological processes can be illustrated by expression of this receptor on a majority of immune cell types. In addition, AhR signaling pathways have been reported to influence a number of genes responsible for mediating inflammation and other immune responses. As interest in the AhR and its ligands increases, it seems prudent to consolidate current research on the contributions of these ligands to immune regulation during the course of inflammatory diseases. PMID:23731446

  7. In silico predictive studies of mAHR congener binding using homology modelling and molecular docking.

    PubMed

    Panda, Roshni; Cleave, A Suneetha Susan; Suresh, P K

    2014-09-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) is one of the principal xenobiotic, nuclear receptor that is responsible for the early events involved in the transcription of a complex set of genes comprising the CYP450 gene family. In the present computational study, homology modelling and molecular docking were carried out with the objective of predicting the relationship between the binding efficiency and the lipophilicity of different polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners and the AHR in silico. Homology model of the murine AHR was constructed by several automated servers and assessed by PROCHECK, ERRAT, VERIFY3D and WHAT IF. The resulting model of the AHR by MODWEB was used to carry out molecular docking of 36 PCB congeners using PatchDock server. The lipophilicity of the congeners was predicted using the XLOGP3 tool. The results suggest that the lipophilicity influences binding energy scores and is positively correlated with the same. Score and Log P were correlated with r = +0.506 at p = 0.01 level. In addition, the number of chlorine (Cl) atoms and Log P were highly correlated with r = +0.900 at p = 0.01 level. The number of Cl atoms and scores also showed a moderate positive correlation of r = +0.481 at p = 0.01 level. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study employing PatchDock in the docking of AHR to the environmentally deleterious congeners and attempting to correlate structural features of the AHR with its biochemical properties with regards to PCBs. The result of this study are consistent with those of other computational studies reported in the previous literature that suggests that a combination of docking, scoring and ranking organic pollutants could be a possible predictive tool for investigating ligand-mediated toxicity, for their subsequent validation using wet lab-based studies.

  8. Persistent Binding of Ligands to the Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Bohonowych, Jessica E.; Denison, Michael S.

    2010-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor that mediates many of the biological and toxic effects of halogenated aromatic hydrocarbons (HAHs), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and other structurally diverse ligands. While HAHs are several orders of magnitude more potent in producing AhR-dependent biochemical effects than PAHs or other AhR agonists, only the HAHs have been observed to produce AhR-dependent toxicity in vivo. Here we have characterized the dissociation of a prototypical HAH ligand ([3H] 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin [TCDD]) and PAH-like ligand ([3H] β-naphthoflavone [βNF]) from the guinea pig, hamster, mouse, and rat hepatic cytosolic AhR in order to elucidate the relationship between the apparent ligand-binding affinities and the divergent potency of these chemicals. Both compounds dissociated very slowly from the AhR with the amount of specific binding remaining at 96 h ranging from 53% to 70% for [3H]TCDD and 26% to 85% for [3H] βNF, depending upon the species examined. The rate of ligand dissociation was unaffected by protein concentration or incubation temperature. Preincubation of cytosol with 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzofuran, carbaryl, or primaquine, prior to the addition of [3H]TCDD, shifted the apparent IC50 of these compounds as competitive AhR ligands by ∼10- to 50-fold. Our results support the need for reassessment of previous AhR ligand-binding affinity calculations and competitive binding analysis since these measurements are not carried out at equilibrium binding conditions. Our studies suggest that AhR binding affinity/occupancy has little effect on the observed differences in the persistence of gene expression by HAHs and PAHs. PMID:17431010

  9. Pityriazepin and other potent AhR ligands isolated from Malassezia furfur yeast

    PubMed Central

    Mexia, Nikitia; Gaitanis, George; Velegraki, Aristea; Soshilov, Anatoly; Denison, Michael S.; Magiatis, Prokopios

    2015-01-01

    Malassezia furfur yeast strains isolated from diseased human skin preferentially biosynthesize indole alkaloids which can be detected in human skin and are highly potent activators of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) and AhR-dependent gene expression. Chemical analysis of an EtOAc extract of a M. furfur strain obtained from diseased human skin and grown on L-tryptophan agar revealed several known AhR active tryptophan metabolites along with a previously unidentified compound, pityriazepin. While its structure resembled that of the known alkaloid pityriacitrin, the comprised pyridine ring had been transformed into an azepinone. The indoloazepinone scaffold of pityriazepin is extremely rare in nature and has only been reported once previously. Pityriazepin, like the other isolated compounds, was found to be a potent activator of the AhR-dependent reporter gene assays in recombinant cell lines derived from four different species, although significant species differences in relative potency was observed. The ability of pityriazepin to competitively bind to the AhR and directly stimulate AhR DNA binding classified it as a new naturally-occurring potent AhR agonist. Malassezia furfur produces an expanded collection of extremely potent naturally occurring AhR agonists, which produce their biological effects in a species-specific manner.1 PMID:25721496

  10. A Structural Switch between Agonist and Antagonist Bound Conformations for a Ligand-Optimized Model of the Human Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Ligand Binding Domain

    PubMed Central

    Perkins, Arden; Phillips, Jessica L.; Kerkvliet, Nancy I.; Tanguay, Robert L.; Perdew, Gary H.; Kolluri, Siva K.; Bisson, William H.

    2014-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor that regulates the expression of a diverse group of genes. Exogenous AHR ligands include the environmental contaminant 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), which is a potent agonist, and the synthetic AHR antagonist N-2-(1H-indol-3yl)ethyl)-9-isopropyl-2-(5-methylpyridin-3-yl)-9H-purin-6-amine (GNF351). As no experimentally determined structure of the ligand binding domain exists, homology models have been utilized for virtual ligand screening (VLS) to search for novel ligands. Here, we have developed an “agonist-optimized” homology model of the human AHR ligand binding domain, and this model aided in the discovery of two human AHR agonists by VLS. In addition, we performed molecular dynamics simulations of an agonist TCDD-bound and antagonist GNF351-bound version of this model in order to gain insights into the mechanics of the AHR ligand-binding pocket. These simulations identified residues 307–329 as a flexible segment of the AHR ligand pocket that adopts discrete conformations upon agonist or antagonist binding. This flexible segment of the AHR may act as a structural switch that determines the agonist or antagonist activity of a given AHR ligand. PMID:25329374

  11. A novel AhR ligand, 2AI, protects the retina from environmental stress

    PubMed Central

    Gutierrez, Mark A.; Davis, Sonnet S.; Rosko, Andrew; Nguyen, Steven M.; Mitchell, Kylie P.; Mateen, Samiha; Neves, Joana; Garcia, Thelma Y.; Mooney, Shaun; Perdew, Gary H.; Hubbard, Troy D.; Lamba, Deepak A.; Ramanathan, Arvind

    2016-01-01

    Various retinal degenerative diseases including dry and neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD), retinitis pigmentosa, and diabetic retinopathy are associated with the degeneration of the retinal pigmented epithelial (RPE) layer of the retina. This consequently results in the death of rod and cone photoreceptors that they support, structurally and functionally leading to legal or complete blindness. Therefore, developing therapeutic strategies to preserve cellular homeostasis in the RPE would be a favorable asset in the clinic. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a conserved, environmental ligand-dependent, per ARNT-sim (PAS) domain containing bHLH transcription factor that mediates adaptive response to stress via its downstream transcriptional targets. Using in silico, in vitro and in vivo assays, we identified 2,2′-aminophenyl indole (2AI) as a potent synthetic ligand of AhR that protects RPE cells in vitro from lipid peroxidation cytotoxicity mediated by 4-hydroxynonenal (4HNE) as well as the retina in vivo from light-damage. Additionally, metabolic characterization of this molecule by LC-MS suggests that 2AI alters the lipid metabolism of RPE cells, enhancing the intracellular levels of palmitoleic acid. Finally, we show that, as a downstream effector of 2AI-mediated AhR activation, palmitoleic acid protects RPE cells from 4HNE-mediated stress, and light mediated retinal degeneration in mice. PMID:27364765

  12. Measured and predicted affinities of binding and relative potencies to activate the AhR of PAHs and their alkylated analogues.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sangwoo; Shin, Woong-Hee; Hong, Seongjin; Kang, Habyeong; Jung, Dawoon; Yim, Un Hyuk; Shim, Won Joon; Khim, Jong Seong; Seok, Chaok; Giesy, John P; Choi, Kyungho

    2015-11-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and their alkylated forms are important components of crude oil. Both groups of PAHs have been reported to cause dioxin-like responses, mediated by aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). Thus, characterization of binding affinity to the AhR of unsubstituted or alkylated PAHs is important to understand the toxicological consequences of oil contamination on ecosystems. We investigated the potencies of major PAHs of crude oil, e.g., chrysene, phenanthrene and dibenzothiophene, and their alkylated forms (n=17) to upregulate expression of AhR-mediated processes by use of the H4IIE-luc transactivation bioassay. In addition, molecular descriptors of different AhR activation potencies among PAHs were investigated by use of computational molecular docking models. Based on responses of the H4IIE-luc in vitro assay, it was shown that potencies of PAHs were determined by alkylation in addition to the number and conformation of rings. Potencies of AhR-mediated processes were generally greater when a chrysene group was substituted, especially in 1-methyl-chrysene. Significant negative correlations were observed between the in vitro dioxin-like potency measured in H4IIE-luc cells and the binding distance estimated from the in silico modeling. The difference in relative potency for AhR activation observed among PAHs and their alkylated forms could be explained by differences among binding distances in the ligand binding domain of the AhR caused by alkylation. The docking model developed in the present study may have utility in predicting risks of environmental contaminants of which toxicities are mediated by AhR binding.

  13. Mixed-ligand copper(II) complexes activate aryl hydrocarbon receptor AhR and induce CYP1A genes expression in human hepatocytes and human cell lines.

    PubMed

    Kubešová, Kateřina; Dořičáková, Aneta; Trávníček, Zdeněk; Dvořák, Zdeněk

    2016-07-25

    The effects of four copper(II) mixed-ligand complexes [Cu(qui1)(L)]NO3·H2O (1-3) and [Cu(qui2)(phen)]NO3 (4), where qui1=2-phenyl-3-hydroxy-4(1H)-quinolinone, Hqui2=2-(4-amino-3,5-dichlorophenyl)-N-propyl-3-hydroxy-4(1H)-quinolinone-7-carboxamide, L=1,10-phenanthroline (phen) (1), 5-methyl-1,10-phenanthroline (mphen) (2), bathophenanthroline (bphen) (3), on transcriptional activities of steroid receptors, nuclear receptors and xenoreceptors have been studied. The complexes (1-4) did not influence basal or ligand-inducible activities of glucocorticoid receptor, androgen receptor, thyroid receptor, pregnane X receptor and vitamin D receptor, as revealed by gene reporter assays. The complexes 1 and 2 dose-dependently induced luciferase activity in stable gene reporter AZ-AhR cell line, and this induction was reverted by resveratrol, indicating involvement of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) in the process. The complexes 1, 2 and 3 induced CYP1A1 mRNA in LS180 cells and CYP1A1/CYP1A2 in human hepatocytes through AhR. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay EMSA showed that the complexes 1 and 2 transformed AhR in its DNA-binding form. Collectively, we demonstrate that the complexes 1 and 2 activate AhR and induce AhR-dependent genes in human hepatocytes and cancer cell lines. In conclusion, the data presented here might be of toxicological importance, regarding the multiple roles of AhR in human physiology and pathophysiology. PMID:27180721

  14. Comparative Analysis of Homology Models of the Ah Receptor Ligand Binding Domain: Verification of Structure-Function Predictions by Site-Directed Mutagenesis of a Non-Functional AHR†

    PubMed Central

    Fraccalvieri, Domenico; Soshilov, Anatoly A.; Karchner, Sibel I.; Franks, Diana G.; Pandini, Alessandro; Bonati, Laura; Hahn, Mark E.; Denison, Michael S.

    2013-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) is a ligand-dependent transcription factor that mediates the biological and toxic effects of a wide variety of structurally diverse chemicals, including the toxic environmental contaminant 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). While significant interspecies differences in AHR ligand binding specificity, selectivity and response have been observed, the structural determinants responsible have not been determined and homology models of the AHR ligand-binding domain (LBD) are available for only a few species. Here we describe the development and comparative analysis of homology models of the LBD of sixteen AHRs from twelve mammalian and nonmammalian species and identify the specific residues contained within their ligand binding cavities. The ligand-binding cavity of the fish AHR exhibits differences from mammalian and avian AHRs, suggesting a slightly different TCDD binding mode. Comparison of the internal cavity in the LBD model of zebrafish (zf) AHR2, which binds TCDD with high affinity, to that of zfAHR1a, which does not bind TCDD, revealed that the latter has a dramatically shortened binding cavity due to the side chains of three residues (Tyr296, Thr386, His388) that reduce the internal space available to TCDD. Mutagenesis of two of these residues in zfAhR1a to those present in zfAHR2 (Y296H, T386A) restored the ability of zfAHR1a to bind TCDD and to exhibit TCDD-dependent binding to DNA. These results demonstrate the importance of these two amino acids and highlight the predictive potential of comparative analysis of homology models from diverse species. The availability of these AHR LBD homology models will facilitate in depth comparative studies of AHR ligand binding and ligand-dependent AHR activation and provide a novel avenue to examine species specific differences in AHR responsiveness. PMID:23286227

  15. INSIGHTS FROM AHR AND ARNT GENE KNOCKOUT STUDIES REGARDING RESPONSES TO TCDD AND REGULATION OF NORMAL EMBRYONIC DEVELOPMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) and the AhR nuclear translocator (ARNT) are members of the Per-ARNT-Sim (PAS) family of proteins. The AhR binds members of the chemical family that includes dioxins, furans and coplanar polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). A ligand-AhR-ARNT comp...

  16. Designing ligands to bind proteins.

    PubMed

    Whitesides, George M; Krishnamurthy, Vijay M

    2005-11-01

    The ability to design drugs (so-called 'rational drug design') has been one of the long-term objectives of chemistry for 50 years. It is an exceptionally difficult problem, and many of its parts lie outside the expertise of chemistry. The much more limited problem - how to design tight-binding ligands (rational ligand design) - would seem to be one that chemistry could solve, but has also proved remarkably recalcitrant. The question is 'Why is it so difficult?' and the answer is 'We still don't entirely know'. This perspective discusses some of the technical issues - potential functions, protein plasticity, enthalpy/entropy compensation, and others - that contribute, and suggests areas where fundamental understanding of protein-ligand interactions falls short of what is needed. It surveys recent technological developments (in particular, isothermal titration calorimetry) that will, hopefully, make now the time for serious progress in this area. It concludes with the calorimetric examination of the association of a series of systematically varied ligands with a model protein. The counterintuitive thermodynamic results observed serve to illustrate that, even in relatively simple systems, understanding protein-ligand association is challenging.

  17. Ultraviolet light converts propranolol, a nonselective β-blocker and potential lupus-inducing drug, into a proinflammatory AhR ligand.

    PubMed

    Dorgham, Karim; Amoura, Zahir; Parizot, Christophe; Arnaud, Laurent; Frances, Camille; Pionneau, Cédric; Devilliers, Hervé; Pinto, Sandra; Zoorob, Rima; Miyara, Makoto; Larsen, Martin; Yssel, Hans; Gorochov, Guy; Mathian, Alexis

    2015-11-01

    UV light and some medications are known to trigger lupus erythematosus (LE). A common mechanism underlying the immunopathologic effect, resulting from exposure to these two seemingly unrelated factors, remains unknown. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) plays a key role in the regulation of IL-22 production in humans and can be activated by both xenobiotics and naturally occurring photoproducts. A significant expansion of Th17 and Th22 cells was observed in the peripheral blood of active systemic LE (SLE) patients, compared to inactive patients and controls. We also show that propranolol, a potential lupus-inducing drug, induced stronger AhR activation in PBMCs of SLE patients than in those of controls. AhR agonist activity of propranolol was enhanced by UV light exposure. MS analysis of irradiated propranolol revealed the generation of a proinflammatory photoproduct. This compound behaves like the prototypic AhR ligand 6-formylindolo[3,2-b]carbazole, a cutaneous UV light-induced tryptophan metabolite, both promoting IL-22, IL-8, and CCL2 secretion by T-cells and macrophages. Finally, LE patients exhibit signs of cutaneous AhR activation that correlate with lesional expression of the same proinflammatory cytokines, suggesting a role for photometabolites in the induction of skin inflammation. The AhR might therefore represent a target for therapeutic intervention in LE. PMID:26354876

  18. Ultraviolet light converts propranolol, a nonselective β-blocker and potential lupus-inducing drug, into a proinflammatory AhR ligand.

    PubMed

    Dorgham, Karim; Amoura, Zahir; Parizot, Christophe; Arnaud, Laurent; Frances, Camille; Pionneau, Cédric; Devilliers, Hervé; Pinto, Sandra; Zoorob, Rima; Miyara, Makoto; Larsen, Martin; Yssel, Hans; Gorochov, Guy; Mathian, Alexis

    2015-11-01

    UV light and some medications are known to trigger lupus erythematosus (LE). A common mechanism underlying the immunopathologic effect, resulting from exposure to these two seemingly unrelated factors, remains unknown. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) plays a key role in the regulation of IL-22 production in humans and can be activated by both xenobiotics and naturally occurring photoproducts. A significant expansion of Th17 and Th22 cells was observed in the peripheral blood of active systemic LE (SLE) patients, compared to inactive patients and controls. We also show that propranolol, a potential lupus-inducing drug, induced stronger AhR activation in PBMCs of SLE patients than in those of controls. AhR agonist activity of propranolol was enhanced by UV light exposure. MS analysis of irradiated propranolol revealed the generation of a proinflammatory photoproduct. This compound behaves like the prototypic AhR ligand 6-formylindolo[3,2-b]carbazole, a cutaneous UV light-induced tryptophan metabolite, both promoting IL-22, IL-8, and CCL2 secretion by T-cells and macrophages. Finally, LE patients exhibit signs of cutaneous AhR activation that correlate with lesional expression of the same proinflammatory cytokines, suggesting a role for photometabolites in the induction of skin inflammation. The AhR might therefore represent a target for therapeutic intervention in LE.

  19. TCDD and a putative endogenous AhR ligand, ITE, elicit the same immediate changes in gene expression in mouse lung fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Henry, Ellen C; Welle, Stephen L; Gasiewicz, Thomas A

    2010-03-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), a ligand-dependent transcription factor, mediates toxicity of several classes of xenobiotics and also has important physiological roles in differentiation, reproduction, and immunity, although the endogenous ligand(s) mediating these functions is/are as yet unidentified. One candidate endogenous ligand, 2-(1'H-indolo-3'-carbonyl)-thiazole-4-carboxylic acid methyl ester (ITE), is a potent AhR agonist in vitro, activates the murine AhR in vivo, but does not induce toxicity. We hypothesized that ITE and the toxic ligand, 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), may modify transcription of different sets of genes to account for their different toxicity. To test this hypothesis, primary mouse lung fibroblasts were exposed to 0.5muM ITE, 0.2nM TCDD, or vehicle for 4 h, and total gene expression was evaluated using microarrays. After this short-term and low-dose treatment, several hundred genes were changed significantly, and the response to ITE and TCDD was remarkably similar, both qualitatively and quantitatively. Induced gene sets included the expected battery of AhR-dependent xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes, as well as several sets that reflect the inflammatory role of lung fibroblasts. Real time quantitative RT-qPCR assay of several selected genes confirmed these microarray data and further suggested that there may be kinetic differences in expression between ligands. These data suggest that ITE and TCDD elicit an analogous change in AhR conformation such that the initial transcription response is the same. Furthermore, if the difference in toxicity between TCDD and ITE is mediated by differences in gene expression, then it is likely that secondary changes enabled by the persistent TCDD, but not by the shorter lived ITE, are responsible.

  20. Differences in activation of aryl hydrocarbon receptors of white sturgeon relative to lake sturgeon are predicted by identities of key amino acids in the ligand binding domain.

    PubMed

    Doering, Jon A; Farmahin, Reza; Wiseman, Steve; Beitel, Shawn C; Kennedy, Sean W; Giesy, John P; Hecker, Markus

    2015-04-01

    Dioxin-like compounds (DLCs) are pollutants of global environmental concern. DLCs elicit their adverse outcomes through activation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). However, there is limited understanding of the mechanisms that result in differences in sensitivity to DLCs among different species of fishes. Understanding these mechanisms is critical for protection of the diversity of fishes exposed to DLCs, including endangered species. This study investigated specific mechanisms that drive responses of two endangered fishes, white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) and lake sturgeon (Acipenser fulvescens) to DLCs. It determined whether differences in sensitivity to activation of AhRs (AhR1 and AhR2) can be predicted based on identities of key amino acids in the ligand binding domain (LBD). White sturgeon were 3- to 30-fold more sensitive than lake sturgeon to exposure to 5 different DLCs based on activation of AhR2. There were no differences in sensitivity between white sturgeon and lake sturgeon based on activation of AhR1. Adverse outcomes as a result of exposure to DLCs have been shown to be mediated through activation of AhR2, but not AhR1, in all fishes studied to date. This indicates that white sturgeon are likely to have greater sensitivity in vivo relative to lake sturgeon. Homology modeling and in silico mutagenesis suggests that differences in sensitivity to activation of AhR2 result from differences in key amino acids at position 388 in the LBD of AhR2 of white sturgeon (Ala-388) and lake sturgeon (Thr-388). This indicates that identities of key amino acids in the LBD of AhR2 could be predictive of both in vitro activation by DLCs and in vivo sensitivity to DLCs in these, and potentially other, fishes.

  1. In silico analysis of the interaction of avian aryl hydrocarbon receptors and dioxins to decipher isoform-, ligand-, and species-specific activations.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Masashi; Hwang, Ji-Hee; Park, Hae-Jeong; Bak, Su-Min; Iwata, Hisato; Kim, Eun-Young

    2015-03-17

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) mediates toxic responses to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) and other dioxin-like compounds (DLCs). Avian species possess multiple AHR isoforms (AHR1, AHR1β, and AHR2) that exhibit species- and isoform-specific responses to ligands. To account for the ligand preference in terms of the structural features of avian AHRs, we generated in silico homology models of the ligand-binding domain of avian AHRs based on holo human HIF-2α (PDB entry 3H7W ). Molecular docking simulations of TCDD and other DLCs with avian AHR1s and AHR2s using ASEDock indicated that the interaction energy increased with the number of substituted chlorine atoms in congeners, supporting AHR transactivation potencies and World Health Organization TCDD toxic equivalency factors of congeners. The potential interaction energies of an endogenous AHR ligand, 6-formylindolo [3,2-b] carbazole (FICZ) to avian AHRs were lower than those of TCDD, which was supported by a greater potency of FICZ for in vitro AHR-mediated transactivation than TCDD. The molecular dynamics simulation revealed that mean square displacements in Ile324 and Ser380 of TCDD-bound AHR1 of the chicken, the most sensitive species to TCDD, were smaller than those in other avian AHR1s, suggesting that the dynamic stability of these amino acid residues contribute to TCDD preference. For avian AHR2, the corresponding residues (Val/Ser or Val/Ala type) were not responsible for differential TCDD sensitivity. Application of the three-dimensional reference interaction site model showed that the stabilization of TCDD binding to avian AHRs may be due to the solvation effect depending on the characteristics of two amino acids corresponding to Ile324 and Ser380 in chicken AHR1. This study demonstrates that in silico simulations of AHRs and ligands could be used to predict isoform-, ligand-, and species-specific interactions.

  2. Identification and expression of aryl hydrocarbon receptors (AhR1 and AhR2) provide insight in an evolutionary context regarding sensitivity of white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) to dioxin-like compounds.

    PubMed

    Doering, Jon A; Wiseman, Steve; Beitel, Shawn C; Giesy, John P; Hecker, Markus

    2014-05-01

    Sturgeons are ancient fishes, which are endangered in many parts of the world. Due to their benthic nature and longevity, sturgeon are at great risk of exposure to bioaccumulative contaminants such as dioxin-like compounds (DLCs). Despite their endangered status, little research has been conducted to characterize the relative sensitivity of sturgeons to DLCs. Proper assessment of risk of DLCs posed to these fishes therefore, requires a better understanding of this sensitivity and the factors that are driving it. Adverse effects associated with exposure to DLCs are mediated by the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). This study identified and characterized two distinct AhRs, AhR1 and AhR2, in white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) for the first time as a first step in studying the relative sensitivities of sturgeons to DLCs. Furthermore, tissue-specific expression of both AhRs under basal conditions and in response to exposure to the model DLC, β-naphthoflavone (βNF), was determined. The sequence of amino acids of AhR1 of white sturgeon had greater similarity to AhRs of tetrapods, including amphibians, birds, and mammals, than to AhR1s of other fishes. The sequence of amino acids in the ligand binding domain of the AhR1 had greater than 80% similarity to AhRs known to bind DLCs and was less similar to AhRs not known to bind DLCs. AhR2 of white sturgeon had greatest similarity to AhR2 of other fishes. Profiles of expression of AhR1 and AhR2 in white sturgeon were distinct from those known in other fishes and appear more similar to profiles observed in birds. Expressions of both AhR1 and AhR2 of white sturgeon were greatest in liver and heart, which are target organs for DLCs. Furthermore, abundances of transcripts of AhR1 and AhR2 in all tissues from white sturgeon were greater than controls (up to 35-fold) following exposure to βNF. Based upon both AhRs having similar abundances of transcript in target organs of DLC toxicity, both AhRs being up-regulated following

  3. Identification and expression of aryl hydrocarbon receptors (AhR1 and AhR2) provide insight in an evolutionary context regarding sensitivity of white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) to dioxin-like compounds.

    PubMed

    Doering, Jon A; Wiseman, Steve; Beitel, Shawn C; Giesy, John P; Hecker, Markus

    2014-05-01

    Sturgeons are ancient fishes, which are endangered in many parts of the world. Due to their benthic nature and longevity, sturgeon are at great risk of exposure to bioaccumulative contaminants such as dioxin-like compounds (DLCs). Despite their endangered status, little research has been conducted to characterize the relative sensitivity of sturgeons to DLCs. Proper assessment of risk of DLCs posed to these fishes therefore, requires a better understanding of this sensitivity and the factors that are driving it. Adverse effects associated with exposure to DLCs are mediated by the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). This study identified and characterized two distinct AhRs, AhR1 and AhR2, in white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) for the first time as a first step in studying the relative sensitivities of sturgeons to DLCs. Furthermore, tissue-specific expression of both AhRs under basal conditions and in response to exposure to the model DLC, β-naphthoflavone (βNF), was determined. The sequence of amino acids of AhR1 of white sturgeon had greater similarity to AhRs of tetrapods, including amphibians, birds, and mammals, than to AhR1s of other fishes. The sequence of amino acids in the ligand binding domain of the AhR1 had greater than 80% similarity to AhRs known to bind DLCs and was less similar to AhRs not known to bind DLCs. AhR2 of white sturgeon had greatest similarity to AhR2 of other fishes. Profiles of expression of AhR1 and AhR2 in white sturgeon were distinct from those known in other fishes and appear more similar to profiles observed in birds. Expressions of both AhR1 and AhR2 of white sturgeon were greatest in liver and heart, which are target organs for DLCs. Furthermore, abundances of transcripts of AhR1 and AhR2 in all tissues from white sturgeon were greater than controls (up to 35-fold) following exposure to βNF. Based upon both AhRs having similar abundances of transcript in target organs of DLC toxicity, both AhRs being up-regulated following

  4. Time, the Forgotten Dimension of Ligand Binding Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corzo, Javier

    2006-01-01

    Ligand binding is generally explained in terms of the equilibrium constant K[subscript d] for the protein-ligand complex dissociation. However, both theoretical considerations and experimental data point to the life span of the protein-ligand complex as an important, but generally overlooked, aspect of ligand binding by macromolecules. Short-lived…

  5. Landscape of protein-small ligand binding modes.

    PubMed

    Kasahara, Kota; Kinoshita, Kengo

    2016-09-01

    Elucidating the mechanisms of specific small-molecule (ligand) recognition by proteins is a long-standing conundrum. While the structures of these molecules, proteins and ligands, have been extensively studied, protein-ligand interactions, or binding modes, have not been comprehensively analyzed. Although methods for assessing similarities of binding site structures have been extensively developed, the methods for the computational treatment of binding modes have not been well established. Here, we developed a computational method for encoding the information about binding modes as graphs, and assessing their similarities. An all-against-all comparison of 20,040 protein-ligand complexes provided the landscape of the protein-ligand binding modes and its relationships with protein- and chemical spaces. While similar proteins in the same SCOP Family tend to bind relatively similar ligands with similar binding modes, the correlation between ligand and binding similarities was not very high (R(2)  = 0.443). We found many pairs with novel relationships, in which two evolutionally distant proteins recognize dissimilar ligands by similar binding modes (757,474 pairs out of 200,790,780 pairs were categorized into this relationship, in our dataset). In addition, there were an abundance of pairs of homologous proteins binding to similar ligands with different binding modes (68,217 pairs). Our results showed that many interesting relationships between protein-ligand complexes are still hidden in the structure database, and our new method for assessing binding mode similarities is effective to find them. PMID:27327045

  6. Landscape of protein-small ligand binding modes.

    PubMed

    Kasahara, Kota; Kinoshita, Kengo

    2016-09-01

    Elucidating the mechanisms of specific small-molecule (ligand) recognition by proteins is a long-standing conundrum. While the structures of these molecules, proteins and ligands, have been extensively studied, protein-ligand interactions, or binding modes, have not been comprehensively analyzed. Although methods for assessing similarities of binding site structures have been extensively developed, the methods for the computational treatment of binding modes have not been well established. Here, we developed a computational method for encoding the information about binding modes as graphs, and assessing their similarities. An all-against-all comparison of 20,040 protein-ligand complexes provided the landscape of the protein-ligand binding modes and its relationships with protein- and chemical spaces. While similar proteins in the same SCOP Family tend to bind relatively similar ligands with similar binding modes, the correlation between ligand and binding similarities was not very high (R(2)  = 0.443). We found many pairs with novel relationships, in which two evolutionally distant proteins recognize dissimilar ligands by similar binding modes (757,474 pairs out of 200,790,780 pairs were categorized into this relationship, in our dataset). In addition, there were an abundance of pairs of homologous proteins binding to similar ligands with different binding modes (68,217 pairs). Our results showed that many interesting relationships between protein-ligand complexes are still hidden in the structure database, and our new method for assessing binding mode similarities is effective to find them.

  7. Structural insight into PPARgamma ligands binding.

    PubMed

    Farce, A; Renault, N; Chavatte, P

    2009-01-01

    Peroxisome Proliferator Activated Receptors (PPARs) are a family of three related nuclear receptors first cloned in 1990. Their involvement in glucidic and lipidic homeostasis quickly made them an attractive target for the treatment of metabolic syndrome, the most prevalent mortality factor in developed countries. They therefore attracted much synthetic efforts, more particularly PPARgamma. Supported by a large number of crystallographic studies, data derived from these compounds lead to a fairly clear view of the agonist binding mode into the Ligand Binding Domain (LBD). Nearly all the compounds conform to a three-module structure, with a binder group involved in a series of hydrogen bonds in front of the ligand-dependent Activation Function (AF2), a linker mostly arranged around a phenoxyethyl and an effector end occupying the large cavity of the binding site. Following the marketing of the glitazones and the observation of the hepatotoxicity of troglitazone, variations in the binder led to the glitazars, and then pharmacomodulations have been undertaken on the two other modules, leading to a large family of highly related chemical structures. Some compounds, while still adhering to the three-module structure, diverge from the mainstream, such as the phthalates. Curiously, these plasticizers were known to elicit biological effects that led to the discovery of PPARs but were not actively studied as PPARs agonists. As the biological effects of PPARs became clearer, new compounds were also found to exert at least a part of their actions by the activation of PPARgamma. PMID:19442144

  8. The dynamics of ligands binding to proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callender, Robert

    2001-03-01

    The static structures of many proteins have been solved, and this has revealed much about how they function. On the other hand, although the importance of atomic motion to how proteins function has been conjectured for several decades, the characterization of protein dynamics on multiple time scales is scant. This is because of severe experimental and theoretical difficulties, particularly characterizing the nanosecond to millisecond time scales. Recently, several new techniques have been introduced that make it possible to initiate chemical reactions on fast time scales. We have applied advanced laser induced temperature jump relaxation spectroscopy with nanosecond resolution to examine the binding kinetics of ligands to several enzymes. The observed kinetics take place over multiple time scales. The results reveal the dynamical nature of the binding process and show that there are substantial populations of many structures that are in a constant dynamic equilibrium in some cases. Some of these structures lie quite far from the static structure defined in crystallographic studies, which suggest that the conventional thermodynamical picture of binding (an equilibrium between ligand free in solution and bound) is far off the mark. Moreover, the results suggest that the dynamics can certainly play a crucial role in kinetic control of protein function as in, for example, affecting the rates of enzymatic catalysis. This work is a collaborative project with Hong Deng and Nick Zhadin, also at Albert Einstein. Work supported by the NSF and NIH.

  9. Rosetta and the Design of Ligand Binding Sites.

    PubMed

    Moretti, Rocco; Bender, Brian J; Allison, Brittany; Meiler, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Proteins that bind small molecules (ligands) can be used as biosensors, signal modulators, and sequestering agents. When naturally occurring proteins for a particular target ligand are not available, artificial proteins can be computationally designed. We present a protocol based on RosettaLigand to redesign an existing protein pocket to bind a target ligand. Starting with a protein structure and the structure of the ligand, Rosetta can optimize both the placement of the ligand in the pocket and the identity and conformation of the surrounding sidechains, yielding proteins that bind the target compound.

  10. Rosetta and the Design of Ligand Binding Sites.

    PubMed

    Moretti, Rocco; Bender, Brian J; Allison, Brittany; Meiler, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Proteins that bind small molecules (ligands) can be used as biosensors, signal modulators, and sequestering agents. When naturally occurring proteins for a particular target ligand are not available, artificial proteins can be computationally designed. We present a protocol based on RosettaLigand to redesign an existing protein pocket to bind a target ligand. Starting with a protein structure and the structure of the ligand, Rosetta can optimize both the placement of the ligand in the pocket and the identity and conformation of the surrounding sidechains, yielding proteins that bind the target compound. PMID:27094285

  11. Ligand Binding to Macromolecules: Allosteric and Sequential Models of Cooperativity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hess, V. L.; Szabo, Attila

    1979-01-01

    A simple model is described for the binding of ligands to macromolecules. The model is applied to the cooperative binding by hemoglobin and aspartate transcarbamylase. The sequential and allosteric models of cooperative binding are considered. (BB)

  12. Affinity Regulates Spatial Range of EGF Receptor Autocrine Ligand Binding

    SciTech Connect

    Dewitt, Ann; Iida, Tomoko; Lam, Ho-Yan; Hill, Virginia; Wiley, H S.; Lauffenburger, Douglas A.

    2002-08-08

    Proper spatial localization of EGFR signaling activated by autocrine ligands represents a critical factor in embryonic development as well as tissue organization and function, and ligand/receptor binding affinity is among the molecular and cellular properties suggested to play a role in governing this localization. The authors employ a computational model to predict how receptor-binding affinity affects local capture of autocrine ligand vis-a-vis escape to distal regions, and provide experimental test by constructing cell lines expressing EGFR along with either wild-type EGF or a low-affinity mutant, EGF{sup L47M}. The model predicts local capture of a lower affinity autocrine ligand to be less efficient when the ligand production rate is small relative to receptor appearance rate. The experimental data confirm this prediction, demonstrating that cells can use ligand/receptor binding affinity to regulate ligand spatial distribution when autocrine ligand production is limiting for receptor signaling.

  13. Enhancement of hypoxia-induced gene expression in fish liver by the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) ligand, benzo[a]pyrene (BaP).

    PubMed

    Yu, Richard Man Kit; Ng, Patrick Kwok Shing; Tan, Tianfeng; Chu, Daniel Ling Ho; Wu, Rudolf Shiu Sun; Kong, Richard Yuen Chong

    2008-11-21

    Fish in polluted coastal habitats commonly suffer simultaneous exposure to both hypoxia and xenobiotics. Although the adaptive molecular responses to each stress have been described, little is known about the interaction between the signaling pathways mediating these responses. Previous studies in mammalian hepatoma cell lines have shown that hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)- and/or aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR)-activated gene expression is suppressed following co-exposure to hypoxia and the hallmark AhR ligand 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). However, whether similar crosstalk exists in the non-tumor liver tissues of fish and whether other non-TCDD ligands also play the same inhibitory role in this crosstalk remain unknown. Here, the in vivo hepatic mRNA expression profiles of multiple hypoxia- and AhR-responsive genes (later gene expression=mRNA expression of the gene) were examined in the orange-spotted grouper (Epinephelus coioides) upon single and combined exposures to hypoxia and benzo[a]pyrene (BaP). Combined exposure enhanced hypoxia-induced gene expression but did not significantly alter BaP-induced gene expression. Protein carbonyl content was markedly elevated in fish subjected to combined exposure, indicating accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Application of diethyldithiocarbamate (DDC) to hypoxia-treated grouper liver explants similarly exaggerated hypoxia-induced gene expression as in the combined stress tissues in vivo. These observations suggest that ROS derived from the combined hypoxia and BaP stress have a role in enhancing hypoxia-induced gene expression.

  14. Time, the forgotten dimension of ligand binding teaching.

    PubMed

    Corzo, Javier

    2006-11-01

    Ligand binding is generally explained in terms of the equilibrium constant K(d) for the protein-ligand complex dissociation. However, both theoretical considerations and experimental data point to the life span of the protein-ligand complex as an important, but generally overlooked, aspect of ligand binding by macromolecules. Short-lived protein-ligand complexes may be unable to trigger further biological processes as signal transduction or internalization if such processes are relatively slow with respect to dissociation of the complex that initiated them. Protein-ligand complex life span depends on the first-order rate constant for the dissociation of the complex, K(off) , but this constant and its implications are generally not treated in textbooks. This report presents a brief discussion and some examples useful for teaching the importance of time in ligand binding by macromolecules in the context of a general biochemistry course.

  15. Plasmon resonance enhanced mechanical detection of ligand binding

    SciTech Connect

    Ariyaratne, Amila; Zocchi, Giovanni

    2015-01-05

    Small molecule binding to the active site of enzymes typically modifies the mechanical stiffness of the enzyme. We exploit this effect, in a setup which combines nano-mechanics and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) enhanced optics, for the label free detection of ligand binding to an enzyme. The large dynamic range of the signal allows to easily obtain binding curves for small ligands, in contrast to traditional SPR methods which rely on small changes in index of refraction. Enzyme mechanics, assessed by nano-rheology, thus emerges as an alternative to electronic and spin resonances, assessed by traditional spectroscopies, for detecting ligand binding.

  16. Paramagnetic Ligand Tagging To Identify Protein Binding Sites

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Transient biomolecular interactions are the cornerstones of the cellular machinery. The identification of the binding sites for low affinity molecular encounters is essential for the development of high affinity pharmaceuticals from weakly binding leads but is hindered by the lack of robust methodologies for characterization of weakly binding complexes. We introduce a paramagnetic ligand tagging approach that enables localization of low affinity protein–ligand binding clefts by detection and analysis of intermolecular protein NMR pseudocontact shifts, which are invoked by the covalent attachment of a paramagnetic lanthanoid chelating tag to the ligand of interest. The methodology is corroborated by identification of the low millimolar volatile anesthetic interaction site of the calcium sensor protein calmodulin. It presents an efficient route to binding site localization for low affinity complexes and is applicable to rapid screening of protein–ligand systems with varying binding affinity. PMID:26289584

  17. Protoglobin: structure and ligand-binding properties.

    PubMed

    Pesce, Alessandra; Bolognesi, Martino; Nardini, Marco

    2013-01-01

    Protoglobin is the first globin identified in Archaea; its biological role is still unknown, although it can bind O2, CO and NO reversibly in vitro. The X-ray structure of Methanosarcina acetivorans protoglobin revealed several peculiar structural features. Its tertiary structure can be considered as an expanded version of the canonical globin fold, characterised by the presence of a pre-A helix (named Z) and a 20-residue N-terminal extension. Other unusual trends are a large distortion of the haem moiety, and its complete burial in the protein matrix due to the extended CE and FG loops and the 20-residue N-terminal loop. Access of diatomic ligands to the haem has been proposed to be granted by two tunnels, which are mainly defined by helices B/G (tunnel 1) and B/E (tunnel 2), and whose spatial orientation and topology give rise to an almost orthogonal two-tunnel system unprecedented in other globins. At a quaternary level, protoglobin forms a tight dimer, mostly based on the inter-molecular four-helix bundle built by the G- and H-helices, similar to that found in globin-coupled sensor proteins, which share with protoglobin a common phylogenetic origin. Such unique structural properties, together with an unusually low O2 dissociation rate and a selectivity ratio for O2/CO binding that favours O2 ligation, make protoglobin a peculiar case for gaining insight into structure to function relationships within the globin superfamily. While recent structural and biochemical data have given answers to important questions, the functional issue is still unclear and it is expected to represent the major focus of future investigations. PMID:24054795

  18. Architectural repertoire of ligand-binding pockets on protein surfaces.

    PubMed

    Weisel, Martin; Kriegl, Jan M; Schneider, Gisbert

    2010-03-01

    Knowledge of the three-dimensional structure of ligand binding sites in proteins provides valuable information for computer-assisted drug design. We present a method for the automated extraction and classification of ligand binding site topologies, in which protein surface cavities are represented as branched frameworks. The procedure employs a growing neural gas approach for pocket topology assignment and pocket framework generation. We assessed the structural diversity of 623 known ligand binding site topologies based on framework cluster analysis. At a resolution of 5 A only 23 structurally distinct topology groups were formed; this suggests an overall limited structural diversity of ligand-accommodating protein cavities. Higher resolution allowed for identification of protein-family specific pocket features. Pocket frameworks highlight potentially preferred modes of ligand-receptor interactions and will help facilitate the identification of druggable subpockets suitable for ligand affinity and selectivity optimization. PMID:20069621

  19. Strong Ligand-Protein Interactions Derived from Diffuse Ligand Interactions with Loose Binding Sites.

    PubMed

    Marsh, Lorraine

    2015-01-01

    Many systems in biology rely on binding of ligands to target proteins in a single high-affinity conformation with a favorable ΔG. Alternatively, interactions of ligands with protein regions that allow diffuse binding, distributed over multiple sites and conformations, can exhibit favorable ΔG because of their higher entropy. Diffuse binding may be biologically important for multidrug transporters and carrier proteins. A fine-grained computational method for numerical integration of total binding ΔG arising from diffuse regional interaction of a ligand in multiple conformations using a Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) approach is presented. This method yields a metric that quantifies the influence on overall ligand affinity of ligand binding to multiple, distinct sites within a protein binding region. This metric is essentially a measure of dispersion in equilibrium ligand binding and depends on both the number of potential sites of interaction and the distribution of their individual predicted affinities. Analysis of test cases indicates that, for some ligand/protein pairs involving transporters and carrier proteins, diffuse binding contributes greatly to total affinity, whereas in other cases the influence is modest. This approach may be useful for studying situations where "nonspecific" interactions contribute to biological function. PMID:26064949

  20. Strong Ligand-Protein Interactions Derived from Diffuse Ligand Interactions with Loose Binding Sites

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Many systems in biology rely on binding of ligands to target proteins in a single high-affinity conformation with a favorable ΔG. Alternatively, interactions of ligands with protein regions that allow diffuse binding, distributed over multiple sites and conformations, can exhibit favorable ΔG because of their higher entropy. Diffuse binding may be biologically important for multidrug transporters and carrier proteins. A fine-grained computational method for numerical integration of total binding ΔG arising from diffuse regional interaction of a ligand in multiple conformations using a Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) approach is presented. This method yields a metric that quantifies the influence on overall ligand affinity of ligand binding to multiple, distinct sites within a protein binding region. This metric is essentially a measure of dispersion in equilibrium ligand binding and depends on both the number of potential sites of interaction and the distribution of their individual predicted affinities. Analysis of test cases indicates that, for some ligand/protein pairs involving transporters and carrier proteins, diffuse binding contributes greatly to total affinity, whereas in other cases the influence is modest. This approach may be useful for studying situations where “nonspecific” interactions contribute to biological function. PMID:26064949

  1. Multivalent Ligand-Receptor Binding on Supported Lipid Bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Hyunsook; Robison, Aaron D.; Cremer, Paul S.

    2009-01-01

    Fluid supported lipid bilayers provide an excellent platform for studying multivalent protein-ligand interactions because the two-dimensional fluidity of the membrane allows for lateral rearrangement of ligands in order to optimize binding. Our laboratory has combined supported lipid bilayer-coated microfluidic platforms with total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM) to obtain equilibrium dissociation constant (KD) data for these systems. This high throughput, on-chip approach provides highly accurate thermodynamic information about multivalent binding events while requiring only very small sample volumes. Herein, we review some of the most salient findings from these studies. In particular, increasing ligand density on the membrane surface can provide a modest enhancement or attenuation of ligand-receptor binding depending upon whether the surface ligands interact strongly with each other. Such effects, however, lead to little more than one order of magnitude change in the apparent KD values. On the other hand, the lipophilicity and presentation of lipid bilayer-conjugated ligands can have a much greater impact. Indeed, changing the way a particular ligand is conjugated to the membrane can alter the apparent KD value by at least three orders of magnitude. Such a result speaks strongly to the role of ligand availability for multivalent ligand-receptor binding. PMID:19508894

  2. Exchange Kinetics of a Hydrophobic Ligand Binding Protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaughn, Jeff; Stone, Martin

    2002-03-01

    Conformational fluctuations of proteins are thought to be important for determining the functional roles in biological activity. In some cases, the rates of these conformational changes may be directly correlated to, for example, the rates of catalysis or ligand binding. We are studying the role of conformational fluctuations in the binding of small volatile hydrophobic pheromones by the mouse major urinary proteins (MUPs). Communication among mice occurs, in part, with the MUP-1 protein. This urinary protein binds pheromones as a way to increase the longevity of the pheromone in an extracellular environment. Of interest is that the crystal structure of MUP-1 with a pheromone ligand shows the ligand to be completely occluded from the solvent with no obvious pathway to enter or exit. This suggests that conformational exchange of the protein may be required for ligand binding and release to occur. We hypothesize that the rate of conformational exchange may be a limiting factor determining the rate of ligand association and dissociation. By careful measurement of the on- and off-rates of ligand binding and the rates of conformational changes of the protein, a more defined picture of the interplay between protein structure and function can be obtained. To this end, heteronuclear saturation transfer, ^15N-exchange and ^15N dynamics experiments have been employed to probe the kinetics of ligand binding to MUP-1.

  3. Affinity screening using competitive binding with fluorine-19 hyperpolarized ligands.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yaewon; Hilty, Christian

    2015-04-13

    Fluorine-19 NMR and hyperpolarization form a powerful combination for drug screening. Under a competitive equilibrium with a selected fluorinated reporter ligand, the dissociation constant (K(D)) of other ligands of interest is measurable using a single-scan Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) experiment, without the need for a titration. This method is demonstrated by characterizing the binding of three ligands with different affinities for the serine protease trypsin. Monte Carlo simulations show that the highest accuracy is obtained when about one-half of the bound reporter ligand is displaced in the binding competition. Such conditions can be achieved over a wide range of affinities, allowing for rapid screening of non-fluorinated compounds when a single fluorinated ligand for the binding pocket of interest is known.

  4. Ligand binding by the tandem glycine riboswitch depends on aptamer dimerization but not double ligand occupancy

    PubMed Central

    Ruff, Karen M.

    2014-01-01

    The glycine riboswitch predominantly exists as a tandem structure, with two adjacent, homologous ligand-binding domains (aptamers), followed by a single expression platform. The recent identification of a leader helix, the inclusion of which eliminates cooperativity between the aptamers, has reopened the debate over the purpose of the tandem structure of the glycine riboswitch. An equilibrium dialysis-based assay was combined with binding-site mutations to monitor glycine binding in each ligand-binding site independently to understand the role of each aptamer in glycine binding and riboswitch tertiary interactions. A series of mutations disrupting the dimer interface was used to probe how dimerization impacts ligand binding by the tandem glycine riboswitch. While the wild-type tandem riboswitch binds two glycine equivalents, one for each aptamer, both individual aptamers are capable of binding glycine when the other aptamer is unoccupied. Intriguingly, glycine binding by aptamer-1 is more sensitive to dimerization than glycine binding by aptamer-2 in the context of the tandem riboswitch. However, monomeric aptamer-2 shows dramatically weakened glycine-binding affinity. In addition, dimerization of the two aptamers in trans is dependent on glycine binding in at least one aptamer. We propose a revised model for tandem riboswitch function that is consistent with these results, wherein ligand binding in aptamer-1 is linked to aptamer dimerization and stabilizes the P1 stem of aptamer-2, which controls the expression platform. PMID:25246650

  5. Time-dynamic imaging of individual cell ligand binding kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross, David; Chung, Johnson

    1997-05-01

    Ligand-binding assays are commonly applied to large numbers of cells in culture; the binding parameters derived from such assays reflect the ensemble average behavior of many cells. Equilibrium binding assays of epidermal growth factor (EGF) binding to the EGF receptor (EGFR) indicate that the EGFR exhibits two affinity states for EGF, one low affinity with Kd about 10 nM and one high affinity with Kd < 1 nM. Bulk binding studies cannot determined if such multiple ligand binding classes are due to cell population heterogeneity or are due to heterogeneity at the individual cell level. Here is described a technique based on single cell imaging of fluorescein-EGF (f-EGF) binding to individual human epidermoid carcinoma A431 cells that demonstrates that both classes of EGFR are found on all A431 cells, that the time course of f-EGF binding to individual cells shows two kinetic on-rates and two off-rates, that cell-to-cell heterogeneity of EGF binding is significant and that ligand binding kinetics vary across an individual cell. Contributions of cell autofluorescence photobleaching and f- EGF photobleaching in the measurement of fluorescent ligand binding are shown to be significant.

  6. A general framework improving teaching ligand binding to a macromolecule.

    PubMed

    Haiech, Jacques; Gendrault, Yves; Kilhoffer, Marie-Claude; Ranjeva, Raoul; Madec, Morgan; Lallement, Christophe

    2014-10-01

    The interaction of a ligand with a macromolecule has been modeled following different theories. The tenants of the induced fit model consider that upon ligand binding, the protein-ligand complex undergoes a conformational change. In contrast, the allosteric model assumes that only one among different coexisting conformers of a given protein is suitable to bind the ligand optimally. In the present paper, we propose a general framework to model the binding of ligands to a macromolecule. Such framework built on the binding polynomial allows opening new ways to teach in a unified manner ligand binding, enzymology and receptor binding in pharmacology. Moreover, we have developed simple software that allows building the binding polynomial from the schematic description of the biological system under study. Taking calmodulin as a canonical example, we show here that the proposed tool allows the easy retrieval of previously experimental and computational reports. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Calcium Signaling in Health and Disease. Guest Editors: Geert Bultynck, Jacques Haiech, Claus W. Heizmann, Joachim Krebs, and Marc Moreau.

  7. Ligand clouds around protein clouds: a scenario of ligand binding with intrinsically disordered proteins.

    PubMed

    Jin, Fan; Yu, Chen; Lai, Luhua; Liu, Zhirong

    2013-01-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) were found to be widely associated with human diseases and may serve as potential drug design targets. However, drug design targeting IDPs is still in the very early stages. Progress in drug design is usually achieved using experimental screening; however, the structural disorder of IDPs makes it difficult to characterize their interaction with ligands using experiments alone. To better understand the structure of IDPs and their interactions with small molecule ligands, we performed extensive simulations on the c-Myc₃₇₀₋₄₀₉ peptide and its binding to a reported small molecule inhibitor, ligand 10074-A4. We found that the conformational space of the apo c-Myc₃₇₀₋₄₀₉ peptide was rather dispersed and that the conformations of the peptide were stabilized mainly by charge interactions and hydrogen bonds. Under the binding of the ligand, c-Myc₃₇₀₋₄₀₉ remained disordered. The ligand was found to bind to c-Myc₃₇₀₋₄₀₉ at different sites along the chain and behaved like a 'ligand cloud'. In contrast to ligand binding to more rigid target proteins that usually results in a dominant bound structure, ligand binding to IDPs may better be described as ligand clouds around protein clouds. Nevertheless, the binding of the ligand and a non-ligand to the c-Myc₃₇₀₋₄₀₉ target could be clearly distinguished. The present study provides insights that will help improve rational drug design that targets IDPs.

  8. Identification of Soft Matter Binding Peptide Ligands Using Phage Display.

    PubMed

    Günay, Kemal Arda; Klok, Harm-Anton

    2015-10-21

    Phage display is a powerful tool for the selection of highly affine, short peptide ligands. While originally primarily used for the identification of ligands to proteins, the scope of this technique has significantly expanded over the past two decades. Phage display nowadays is also increasingly applied to identify ligands that selectively bind with high affinity to a broad range of other substrates including natural and biological polymers as well as a variety of low-molecular-weight organic molecules. Such peptides are of interest for various reasons. The ability to selectively and with high affinity bind to the substrate of interest allows the conjugation or immobilization of, e.g., nanoparticles or biomolecules, or generally, facilitates interactions at materials interfaces. On the other hand, presentation of peptide ligands that selectively bind to low-molecular-weight organic materials is of interest for the development of sensor surfaces. The aim of this article is to highlight the opportunities provided by phage display for the identification of peptide ligands that bind to synthetic or natural polymer substrates or to small organic molecules. The article will first provide an overview of the different peptide ligands that have been identified by phage display that bind to these "soft matter" targets. The second part of the article will discuss the different characterization techniques that allow the determination of the affinity of the identified ligands to the respective substrates. PMID:26275106

  9. Regulation of zebrafish CYP3A65 transcription by AHR2

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Chin-Teng; Chung, Hsin-Yu; Su, Hsiao-Ting; Tseng, Hua-Pin; Tzou, Wen-Shyong; Hu, Chin-Hwa

    2013-07-15

    CYP3A proteins are the most abundant CYPs in the liver and intestines, and they play a pivotal role in drug metabolism. In mammals, CYP3A genes are induced by various xenobiotics through processes mediated by PXR. We previously identified zebrafish CYP3A65 as a CYP3A ortholog that is constitutively expressed in gastrointestinal tissues, and is upregulated by treatment with dexamethasone, rifampicin or tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). However, the underlying mechanism of TCDD-mediated CYP3A65 transcription is unclear. Here we generated two transgenic zebrafish, Tg(CYP3A65S:EGFP) and Tg(CYP3A65L:EGFP), which contain 2.1 and 5.4 kb 5′ flanking sequences, respectively, of the CYP3A65 gene upstream of EGFP. Both transgenic lines express EGFP in larval gastrointestinal tissues in a pattern similar to that of the endogenous CYP3A65 gene. Moreover, EGFP expression can be significantly induced by TCDD exposure during the larval stage. In addition, EGFP expression can be stimulated by kynurenine, a putative AHR ligand produced during tryptophan metabolism. AHRE elements in the upstream regulatory region of the CYP3A65 gene are indispensible for basal and TCDD-induced transcription. Furthermore, the AHR2 DNA and ligand-binding domains are required to mediate effective CYP3A65 transcription. AHRE sequences are present in the promoters of many teleost CYP3 genes, but not of mammalian CYP3 genes, suggesting that AHR/AHR2-mediated transcription is likely a common regulatory mechanism for teleost CYP3 genes. It may also reflect the different environments that terrestrial and aquatic organisms encounter. - Highlights: • Tg(CYP3A65:EGFP) and CYP3A65 exhibits identical expression pattern. • CYP3A65 can be significantly induced by TCDD or kynurenine. • The AHRE elements are required to mediate CYP3A65 transcription. • The AHR2 DNA and ligand-binding domains are required for CYP3A65 transcription. • AHRE elements are present in many teleost CYP3 genes, but not in

  10. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) transcription factor regulates megakaryocytic polyploidization

    PubMed Central

    Lindsey, Stephan; T. Papoutsakis, Eleftherios

    2012-01-01

    Summary We propose that the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) is a novel transcriptional regulator of megakaryopoietic polyploidization. Functional evidence was obtained that AHR impacts in vivo megakaryocytic differentiation and maturation; compared to wild-type mice, AHR-null mice had lower platelet counts, fewer numbers of newly synthesized platelets, increased bleeding times and lower-ploidy megakaryocytes (Mks). AHR mRNA increased 3·6-fold during ex vivo megakaryocytic differentiation, but reduced or remained constant during parallel isogenic granulocytic or erythroid differentiation. We interrogated the role of AHR in megakaryopoiesis using a validated Mk model of megakaryopoiesis, the human megakaryoblastic leukaemia CHRF cell line. Upon CHRF Mk differentiation, AHR mRNA and protein levels increased, AHR protein shifted from the cytoplasm to the nucleus and AHR binding to its consensus DNA binding sequence increased. Protein and mRNA levels of the AHR transcriptional target HES1 also increased. Mk differentiation of CHRF cells where AHR or HES1 was knocked-down using RNAi resulted in lower ploidy distributions and cells that were incapable of reaching ploidy classes ≥16n. AHR knockdown also resulted in increased DNA synthesis of lower ploidy cells, without impacting apoptosis. Together, these data support a role for AHR in Mk polyploidization and in vivo platelet function, and warrant further detailed investigations. PMID:21226706

  11. Essential role of conformational selection in ligand binding

    PubMed Central

    Vogt, Austin D.; Pozzi, Nicola; Chen, Zhiwei; Di Cera, Enrico

    2013-01-01

    Two competing and mutually exclusive mechanisms of ligand recognition – conformational selection and induced fit - have dominated our interpretation of ligand binding in biological macromolecules for almost six decades. Conformational selection posits the pre-existence of multiple conformations of the macromolecule from which the ligand selects the optimal one. Induced fit, on the other hand, postulates the existence of conformational rearrangements of the original conformation into an optimal one that is induced by binding of the ligand. In the former case, conformational transitions precede the binding event; in the latter, conformational changes follow the binding step. Kineticists have used a facile criterion to distinguish between the two mechanisms based on the dependence of the rate of relaxation to equilibrium, kobs, on the ligand concentration, [L]. A value of kobs decreasing hyperbolically with [L] is seen as diagnostic of conformational selection, while a value of kobs increasing hyperbolically with [L] is considered diagnostic of induced fit. However, this simple conclusion is only valid in the rather unrealistic assumption of conformational transitions being much slower than binding and dissociation events. In general, induced fit only produces values of kobs that increase with [L] but conformational selection is more versatile and is associated with values of kobs that increase, decrease with or are independent of [L]. The richer repertoire of kinetic properties of conformational selection applies to kinetic mechanisms with single or multiple saturable relaxations and explains the behavior of nearly all experimental systems reported in the literature thus far. Conformational selection is always sufficient and often necessary to account for the relaxation kinetics of ligand binding to a biological macromolecule and is therefore an essential component of any binding mechanism. On the other hand, induced fit is never necessary and only sufficient in a

  12. Complementary PLS and KNN algorithms for improved 3D-QSDAR consensus modeling of AhR binding

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Multiple validation techniques (Y-scrambling, complete training/test set randomization, determination of the dependence of R2test on the number of randomization cycles, etc.) aimed to improve the reliability of the modeling process were utilized and their effect on the statistical parameters of the models was evaluated. A consensus partial least squares (PLS)-similarity based k-nearest neighbors (KNN) model utilizing 3D-SDAR (three dimensional spectral data-activity relationship) fingerprint descriptors for prediction of the log(1/EC50) values of a dataset of 94 aryl hydrocarbon receptor binders was developed. This consensus model was constructed from a PLS model utilizing 10 ppm x 10 ppm x 0.5 Å bins and 7 latent variables (R2test of 0.617), and a KNN model using 2 ppm x 2 ppm x 0.5 Å bins and 6 neighbors (R2test of 0.622). Compared to individual models, improvement in predictive performance of approximately 10.5% (R2test of 0.685) was observed. Further experiments indicated that this improvement is likely an outcome of the complementarity of the information contained in 3D-SDAR matrices of different granularity. For similarly sized data sets of Aryl hydrocarbon (AhR) binders the consensus KNN and PLS models compare favorably to earlier reports. The ability of 3D-QSDAR (three dimensional quantitative spectral data-activity relationship) to provide structural interpretation was illustrated by a projection of the most frequently occurring bins on the standard coordinate space, thus allowing identification of structural features related to toxicity. PMID:24257141

  13. Analyzing Ligand Depletion in a Saturation Equilibrium Binding Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Claro, Enrique

    2006-01-01

    I present a proposal for a laboratory practice to generate and analyze data from a saturation equilibrium binding experiment addressed to advanced undergraduate students. [[superscript 3]H]Quinuclidinyl benzilate is a nonselective muscarinic ligand with very high affinity and very low nonspecific binding to brain membranes, which contain a high…

  14. Exploration of dimensions of estrogen potency: parsing ligand binding and coactivator binding affinities.

    PubMed

    Jeyakumar, M; Carlson, Kathryn E; Gunther, Jillian R; Katzenellenbogen, John A

    2011-04-15

    The estrogen receptors, ERα and ERβ, are ligand-regulated transcription factors that control gene expression programs in target tissues. The molecular events underlying estrogen action involve minimally two steps, hormone binding to the ER ligand-binding domain followed by coactivator recruitment to the ER·ligand complex; this ligand·receptor·coactivator triple complex then alters gene expression. Conceptually, the potency of an estrogen in activating a cellular response should reflect the affinities that characterize both steps involved in the assembly of the active ligand·receptor·coactivator complex. Thus, to better understand the molecular basis of estrogen potency, we developed a completely in vitro system (using radiometric and time-resolved FRET assays) to quantify independently three parameters: (a) the affinity of ligand binding to ER, (b) the affinity of coactivator binding to the ER·ligand complex, and (c) the potency of ligand recruitment of coactivator. We used this system to characterize the binding and potency of 12 estrogens with both ERα and ERβ. Some ligands showed good correlations between ligand binding affinity, coactivator binding affinity, and coactivator recruitment potency with both ERs, whereas others showed correlations with only one ER subtype or displayed discordant coactivator recruitment potencies. When ligands with low receptor binding affinity but high coactivator recruitment potencies to ERβ were evaluated in cell-based assays, elevation of cellular coactivator levels significantly and selectively improved their potency. Collectively, our results indicate that some low affinity estrogens may elicit greater cellular responses in those target cells that express higher levels of specific coactivators capable of binding to their ER complexes with high affinity. PMID:21321128

  15. Calculation of Mg(+)-ligand relative binding energies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Partridge, Harry; Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    The calculated relative binding energies of 16 organic molecules to Mg(+) are compared with experimental results where available. The geometries of the ligands and the Mg(+)-ligand complexes arc optimized at the self-consistent field level using a 6-31G* basis set. The Mg(+) binding energies are evaluated using second-order perturbation theory and basis sets of triple-sigma quality augmented with two sets of polarization functions. This level of theory is calibrated against higher levels of theory for selected systems. The computed binding energies are accurate to about 2 kcal/mol.

  16. Topological Analyses of Protein-Ligand Binding: a Network Approach.

    PubMed

    Costanzi, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Proteins can be conveniently represented as networks of interacting residues, thus allowing the study of several network parameters that can shed light onto several of their structural and functional aspects. With respect to the binding of ligands, which are central for the function of many proteins, network analysis may constitute a possible route to assist the identification of binding sites. As the bulk of this review illustrates, this has generally been easier for enzymes than for non-enzyme proteins, perhaps due to the different topological nature of the binding sites of the former over those of the latter. The article also illustrates how network representations of binding sites can be used to search PDB structures in order to identify proteins that bind similar molecules and, lastly, how codifying proteins as networks can assist the analysis of the conformational changes consequent to ligand binding.

  17. Limited proteolysis for assaying ligand binding affinities of nuclear receptors.

    PubMed

    Benkoussa, M; Nominé, B; Mouchon, A; Lefebvre, B; Bernardon, J M; Formstecher, P; Lefebvre, P

    1997-01-01

    The binding of natural or synthetic ligands to nuclear receptors is the triggering event leading to gene transcription activation or repression. Ligand binding to the ligand binding domain of these receptors induces conformational changes that are evidenced by an increased resistance of this domain to proteases. In vitro labeled receptors were incubated with various synthetic or natural agonists or antagonists and submitted to trypsin digestion. Proteolysis products were separated by SDS-PAGE and quantified. The amount of trypsin-resistant fragments was proportional to receptor occupancy by the ligand, and allowed the determination of dissociation constants (kDa). Using the wild-type or mutated human retinoic acid receptor alpha as a model, kDa values determined by classical competition binding assays using tritiated ligands are in agreement with those measured by the proteolytic assay. This method was successfully extended to human retinoic X receptor alpha, glucocorticoid receptor, and progesterone receptor, thus providing a basis for a new, faster assay to determine simultaneously the affinity and conformation of receptors when bound to a given ligand.

  18. Critical ligand binding reagent preparation/selection: when specificity depends on reagents.

    PubMed

    Rup, Bonita; O'Hara, Denise

    2007-05-11

    Throughout the life cycle of biopharmaceutical products, bioanalytical support is provided using ligand binding assays to measure the drug product for pharmacokinetic, pharmacodynamic, and immunogenicity studies. The specificity and selectivity of these ligand binding assays are highly dependent on the ligand binding reagents. Thus the selection, characterization, and management processes for ligand binding reagents are crucial to successful assay development and application. This report describes process considerations for selection and characterization of ligand binding reagents that are integral parts of the different phases of assay development. Changes in expression, purification, modification, and storage of the ligand binding reagents may have a profound effect on the ligand binding assay performance. Thus long-term management of the critical ligand binding assay reagents is addressed including suggested characterization criteria that allow ligand binding reagents to be used in as consistent a manner as possible. Examples of challenges related to the selection, modification, and characterization of ligand binding reagents are included.

  19. The chlorinated AHR ligand 3,3′,4,4′,5-pentachlorobiphenyl (PCB126) promotes reactive oxygen species (ROS) production during embryonic development in the killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Arzuaga, Xabier; Wassenberg, Deena; Giulio, Richard D.; Elskus, Adria

    2006-01-01

    Exposure to dioxin-like chemicals that activate the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) can result in increased cellular and tissue production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Little is known of these effects during early fish development. We used the fish model, Fundulus heteroclitus, to determine if the AHR ligand and pro-oxidant 3,3′,4,4′,5-pentachlorobiphenyl (PCB126) can increase ROS production during killifish development, and to test a novel method for measuring ROS non-invasively in a living organism. The superoxide-sensitive fluorescent dye, dihydroethidium (DHE), was used to detect in ovo ROS production microscopically in developing killifish exposed to PCB126 or vehicle. Both in ovo CYP1A activity (ethoxyresorufin-o-deethylase, EROD) and in ovo ROS were induced by PCB126. In ovo CYP1A activity was inducible by PCB126 concentrations as low as 0.003 nM, with maximal induction occurring at 0.3 nM PCB126. These PCB126 concentrations also significantly increased in ovo ROS production in embryonic liver, ROS being detectable as early as 5 days post-fertilization. These data demonstrate that the pro-oxidant and CYP1A inducer, PCB126, increases both CYP1A activity and ROS production in developing killifish embryos. The superoxide detection assay (SoDA) described in this paper provides a semi-quantitative, easily measured, early indicator of altered ROS production that can be used in conjunction with simultaneous in ovo measurements of CYP1A activity and embryo development to explore functional relationships among biochemical, physiological and developmental responses to AHR ligands.

  20. Characterisation of iron binding ligands in seawater by reverse titration.

    PubMed

    Hawkes, Jeffrey A; Gledhill, Martha; Connelly, Douglas P; Achterberg, Eric P

    2013-03-01

    Here we demonstrate the use of reverse titration - competitive ligand exchange-adsorptive cathodic stripping voltammetry (RT-CLE-ACSV) for the analysis of iron (Fe) binding ligands in seawater. In contrast to the forward titration, which examines excess ligands in solution, RT-CLE-ACSV examines the existing Fe-ligand complexes by increasing the concentration of added (electroactive) ligand (1-nitroso-2-naphthol) and analysis of the proportion of Fe bound to the added ligand. The data manipulation allows the accurate characterisation of ligands at equal or lower concentrations than Fe in seawater, and disregards electrochemically inert dissolved Fe such as some colloidal phases. The method is thus superior to the forward titration in environments with high Fe and low ligand concentrations or high concentrations of inert Fe. We validated the technique using the siderophore ligand ferrioxamine B, and observed a stability constant [Formula: see text] of 0.74-4.37×10(21) mol(-1), in agreement with previous results. We also successfully analysed samples from coastal waters and a deep ocean hydrothermal plume. Samples from these environments could not be analysed with confidence using the forward titration, highlighting the effectiveness of the RT-CLE-ACSV technique in waters with high concentrations of inert Fe.

  1. Highly selective ligand binding by Methylophilus methylotrophus cytochrome c''.

    PubMed

    Quintas, Pedro O; Catarino, Teresa; Todorovic, Smilja; Turner, David L

    2011-06-28

    Cytochrome c'' (cyt c'') from Methylophilus methylotrophus is unusual insofar as the heme has two axial histidine ligands in the oxidized form but one is detached when the protein is reduced. Despite cyt c'' having an axial site available for binding small ligands, we show here that only NO binds readily to the ferrous cyt c''. Binding of CO, as well as CN(-), on the other hand requires considerable structural reorganization, or reduction of the disulfide bridge close to the heme. Standard free energies for the binding of NO and CO reveal high selectivity of the ferrous cyt c'' for NO, indicating its putative physiological role. In this work, we characterize in detail the kinetics of NO binding and the structural features of the Fe(2+)-NO adduct by stopped-flow and resonance Raman spectroscopy, respectively.

  2. Ligand Binding Thermodynamics in Drug Discovery: Still a Hot Tip?

    PubMed

    Geschwindner, Stefan; Ulander, Johan; Johansson, Patrik

    2015-08-27

    The use of ligand binding thermodynamics has been proposed as a potential success factor to accelerate drug discovery. However, despite the intuitive appeal of optimizing binding enthalpy, a number of factors complicate routine use of thermodynamic data. On a macroscopic level, a range of experimental parameters including temperature and buffer choice significantly influence the observed thermodynamic signatures. On a microscopic level, solute effects, structural flexibility, and cooperativity lead to nonlinear changes in enthalpy. This multifactorial character hides essential enthalpy contributions of intermolecular contacts, making them experimentally nonobservable. In this perspective, we present three case studies, reflect on some key factors affecting thermodynamic signatures, and investigate their relation to the hydrophobic effect, enthalpy-entropy compensation, lipophilic ligand efficiency, and promiscuity. The studies highlight that enthalpy and entropy cannot be used as direct end points but can together with calculations increase our understanding of ligand binding and identify interesting outliers that do not behave as expected.

  3. VEGFR-2 conformational switch in response to ligand binding

    PubMed Central

    Sarabipour, Sarvenaz; Ballmer-Hofer, Kurt; Hristova, Kalina

    2016-01-01

    VEGFR-2 is the primary regulator of angiogenesis, the development of new blood vessels from pre-existing ones. VEGFR-2 has been hypothesized to be monomeric in the absence of bound ligand, and to undergo dimerization and activation only upon ligand binding. Using quantitative FRET and biochemical analysis, we show that VEGFR-2 forms dimers also in the absence of ligand when expressed at physiological levels, and that these dimers are phosphorylated. Ligand binding leads to a change in the TM domain conformation, resulting in increased kinase domain phosphorylation. Inter-receptor contacts within the extracellular and TM domains are critical for the establishment of the unliganded dimer structure, and for the transition to the ligand-bound active conformation. We further show that the pathogenic C482R VEGFR-2 mutant, linked to infantile hemangioma, promotes ligand-independent signaling by mimicking the structure of the ligand-bound wild-type VEGFR-2 dimer. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13876.001 PMID:27052508

  4. Relation between the change in DNA elasticity on ligand binding and the binding energetics.

    PubMed

    Kostjukov, Viktor V; Evstigneev, Maxim P

    2012-09-01

    The widespread use of tweezers for measurement of ligand-DNA binding parameters is based on the McGhee-von Hippel treatment of the DNA contour and persistence length as a function of concentration. The McGhee-von Hippel approach contains the basic assumption that the binding constant K is independent of the number of already bound ligands. However, the change in elasticity of DNA on binding affects the entropic part of the Gibbs free energy and, hence, the K value in a concentration-dependent manner, making the whole approach inconsistent. In the present work we show that the energetic effect of DNA stiffening on noncovalent binding of small ligands is negligible with respect to the net energy of reaction, whereas the DNA stiffening on binding of large ligands must always be considered in each particular case.

  5. Relation between the change in DNA elasticity on ligand binding and the binding energetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostjukov, Viktor V.; Evstigneev, Maxim P.

    2012-09-01

    The widespread use of tweezers for measurement of ligand-DNA binding parameters is based on the McGhee-von Hippel treatment of the DNA contour and persistence length as a function of concentration. The McGhee-von Hippel approach contains the basic assumption that the binding constant K is independent of the number of already bound ligands. However, the change in elasticity of DNA on binding affects the entropic part of the Gibbs free energy and, hence, the K value in a concentration-dependent manner, making the whole approach inconsistent. In the present work we show that the energetic effect of DNA stiffening on noncovalent binding of small ligands is negligible with respect to the net energy of reaction, whereas the DNA stiffening on binding of large ligands must always be considered in each particular case.

  6. Divergent Ah Receptor Ligand Selectivity during Hominin Evolution.

    PubMed

    Hubbard, Troy D; Murray, Iain A; Bisson, William H; Sullivan, Alexis P; Sebastian, Aswathy; Perry, George H; Jablonski, Nina G; Perdew, Gary H

    2016-10-01

    We have identified a fixed nonsynonymous sequence difference between humans (Val381; derived variant) and Neandertals (Ala381; ancestral variant) in the ligand-binding domain of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) gene. In an exome sequence analysis of four Neandertal and Denisovan individuals compared with nine modern humans, there are only 90 total nucleotide sites genome-wide for which archaic hominins are fixed for the ancestral nonsynonymous variant and the modern humans are fixed for the derived variant. Of those sites, only 27, including Val381 in the AHR, also have no reported variability in the human dbSNP database, further suggesting that this highly conserved functional variant is a rare event. Functional analysis of the amino acid variant Ala381 within the AHR carried by Neandertals and nonhuman primates indicate enhanced polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) binding, DNA binding capacity, and AHR mediated transcriptional activity compared with the human AHR. Also relative to human AHR, the Neandertal AHR exhibited 150-1000 times greater sensitivity to induction of Cyp1a1 and Cyp1b1 expression by PAHs (e.g., benzo(a)pyrene). The resulting CYP1A1/CYP1B1 enzymes are responsible for PAH first pass metabolism, which can result in the generation of toxic intermediates and perhaps AHR-associated toxicities. In contrast, the human AHR retains the ancestral sensitivity observed in primates to nontoxic endogenous AHR ligands (e.g., indole, indoxyl sulfate). Our findings reveal that a functionally significant change in the AHR occurred uniquely in humans, relative to other primates, that would attenuate the response to many environmental pollutants, including chemicals present in smoke from fire use during cooking. PMID:27486223

  7. Divergent Ah Receptor Ligand Selectivity during Hominin Evolution.

    PubMed

    Hubbard, Troy D; Murray, Iain A; Bisson, William H; Sullivan, Alexis P; Sebastian, Aswathy; Perry, George H; Jablonski, Nina G; Perdew, Gary H

    2016-10-01

    We have identified a fixed nonsynonymous sequence difference between humans (Val381; derived variant) and Neandertals (Ala381; ancestral variant) in the ligand-binding domain of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) gene. In an exome sequence analysis of four Neandertal and Denisovan individuals compared with nine modern humans, there are only 90 total nucleotide sites genome-wide for which archaic hominins are fixed for the ancestral nonsynonymous variant and the modern humans are fixed for the derived variant. Of those sites, only 27, including Val381 in the AHR, also have no reported variability in the human dbSNP database, further suggesting that this highly conserved functional variant is a rare event. Functional analysis of the amino acid variant Ala381 within the AHR carried by Neandertals and nonhuman primates indicate enhanced polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) binding, DNA binding capacity, and AHR mediated transcriptional activity compared with the human AHR. Also relative to human AHR, the Neandertal AHR exhibited 150-1000 times greater sensitivity to induction of Cyp1a1 and Cyp1b1 expression by PAHs (e.g., benzo(a)pyrene). The resulting CYP1A1/CYP1B1 enzymes are responsible for PAH first pass metabolism, which can result in the generation of toxic intermediates and perhaps AHR-associated toxicities. In contrast, the human AHR retains the ancestral sensitivity observed in primates to nontoxic endogenous AHR ligands (e.g., indole, indoxyl sulfate). Our findings reveal that a functionally significant change in the AHR occurred uniquely in humans, relative to other primates, that would attenuate the response to many environmental pollutants, including chemicals present in smoke from fire use during cooking.

  8. Molecular modulators of benzodiazepine receptor ligand binding

    SciTech Connect

    Villar, H.O.; Loew, G.H. )

    1989-01-01

    Ten derivatives of {beta}-carbolines with known affinities to the GABA{sub A}/BDZ (benzodiazepine) receptor were studied using the Am 1 and MNDO/H Semiempirical techniques to identify and characterize molecular modulators of receptor recognition. Steric, lipophilic, and electrostatic properties of these compounds were calculated and examined for their possible role in recognition. Particular attention was paid to the regions around the two most favorable proton-accepting sites, the ON and the substituent at the C{sub 3} position, already implicated in recognition, as well as to the acidic N9H group that could be a proton donating center. To probe further the role of these three ligand sites in receptor interactions, a model of the receptor using three methanol molecules was made and optimum interactions of these three sites with them characterized. The results indicate some similarity in the shape of these ligands, which could reflect a steric requirement. The receptor affinity appears to be modulated to some extent by the ratio of lipophilic to hydrophilic surface, the negative potential at the {beta}N, provided there is also one at the C{sub 3} substituent confirming the importance of two accepting sites in recognition. The acidic N9H does not appear to be a modulator of affinity or does it form a stable H-bond with methanol as acceptor. The two proton donating molecules do form such a stable complex, and both are needed for high affinity.

  9. Structural Basis of Cooperative Ligand Binding by the Glycine Riboswitch

    SciTech Connect

    E Butler; J Wang; Y Xiong; S Strobel

    2011-12-31

    The glycine riboswitch regulates gene expression through the cooperative recognition of its amino acid ligand by a tandem pair of aptamers. A 3.6 {angstrom} crystal structure of the tandem riboswitch from the glycine permease operon of Fusobacterium nucleatum reveals the glycine binding sites and an extensive network of interactions, largely mediated by asymmetric A-minor contacts, that serve to communicate ligand binding status between the aptamers. These interactions provide a structural basis for how the glycine riboswitch cooperatively regulates gene expression.

  10. Identification of the Ah-receptor structural determinants for ligand preferences.

    PubMed

    Xing, Yongna; Nukaya, Manabu; Satyshur, Kenneth A; Jiang, Li; Stanevich, Vitali; Korkmaz, Elif Nihal; Burdette, Lisa; Kennedy, Gregory D; Cui, Qiang; Bradfield, Christopher A

    2012-09-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) is a transcription factor that responds to diverse ligands and plays a critical role in toxicology, immune function, and cardiovascular physiology. The structural basis of the AHR for ligand promiscuity and preferences is critical for understanding AHR function. Based on the structure of a closely related protein HIF2α, we modeled the AHR ligand binding domain (LBD) bound to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) and benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) and identified residues that control ligand preferences by shape and H-bond potential. Mutations to these residues, particularly Q377 and G298, resulted in robust and opposite changes in the potency of TCDD and BaP and up to a 20-fold change in the ratio of TCDD/BaP efficacy. The model also revealed a flexible "belt" structure; molecular dynamic (MD) simulation suggested that the "belt" and several other structural elements in the AHR-LBD are more flexible than HIF2α and likely contribute to ligand promiscuity. Molecular docking of TCDD congeners to a model of human AHR-LBD ranks their binding affinity similar to experimental ranking of their toxicity. Our study reveals key structural basis for prediction of toxicity and understanding the AHR signaling through diverse ligands. PMID:22659362

  11. Fluorescent ligands to investigate GPCR binding properties and oligomerization.

    PubMed

    Cottet, Martin; Faklaris, Orestis; Falco, Amadine; Trinquet, Eric; Pin, Jean-Philippe; Mouillac, Bernard; Durroux, Thierry

    2013-02-01

    Fluorescent ligands for GPCRs (G-protein-coupled receptors) have been synthesized for a long time but their use was usually restricted to receptor localization in the cell by fluorescent imaging microscopy. During the last two decades, the emergence of new fluorescence-based strategies and the concomitant development of fluorescent measurement apparatus have dramatically widened the use of fluorescent ligands. Among the various strategies, TR (time-resolved)-FRET (fluorescence resonance energy transfer) approaches exhibit an interesting potential to study GPCR interactions with various partners. We have derived various sets of ligands that target different GPCRs with fluorophores, which are compatible with TR-FRET strategies. Fluorescent ligands labelled either with a fluorescent donor (such as europium or terbium cryptate) or with a fluorescent acceptor (such as fluorescein, dy647 or Alexa Fluor® 647), for example, kept high affinities for their cognate receptors. These ligands turn out to be interesting tools to develop FRET-based binding assays. We also used these fluorescent ligands to analyse GPCR oligomerization by measuring FRET between ligands bound to receptor dimers. In contrast with FRET strategies, on the basis of receptor labelling, the ligand-based approach we developed is fully compatible with the study of wild-type receptors and therefore with receptors expressed in native tissues. Therefore, by using fluorescent analogues of oxytocin, we demonstrated the existence of oxytocin receptor dimers in the mammary gland of lactating rats.

  12. Novel peptide ligand with high binding capacity for antibody purification.

    PubMed

    Lund, Line Naomi; Gustavsson, Per-Erik; Michael, Roice; Lindgren, Johan; Nørskov-Lauritsen, Leif; Lund, Martin; Houen, Gunnar; Staby, Arne; St Hilaire, Phaedria M

    2012-02-17

    Small synthetic ligands for protein purification have become increasingly interesting with the growing need for cheap chromatographic materials for protein purification and especially for the purification of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). Today, Protein A-based chromatographic resins are the most commonly used capture step in mAb down stream processing; however, the use of Protein A chromatography is less attractive due to toxic ligand leakage as well as high cost. Whether used as an alternative to the Protein A chromatographic media or as a subsequent polishing step, small synthetic peptide ligands have an advantage over biological ligands; they are cheaper to produce, ligand leakage by enzymatic degradation is either eliminated or significantly reduced, and they can in general better withstand cleaning in place (CIP) conditions such as 0.1M NaOH. Here, we present a novel synthetic peptide ligand for purification of human IgG. Immobilized on WorkBeads, an agarose-based base matrix from Bio-Works, the ligand has a dynamic binding capacity of up to 48 mg/mL and purifies IgG from harvest cell culture fluid with purities and recovery of >93%. The binding affinity is ∼10⁵ M⁻¹ and the interaction is favorable and entropy-driven with an enthalpy penalty. Our results show that the binding of the Fc fragment of IgG is mediated by hydrophobic interactions and that elution at low pH is most likely due to electrostatic repulsion. Furthermore, we have separated aggregated IgG from non-aggregated IgG, indicating that the ligand could be used both as a primary purification step of IgG as well as a subsequent polishing step.

  13. Evidence for chemoreceptors with bimodular ligand-binding regions harboring two signal-binding sites

    PubMed Central

    Pineda-Molina, Estela; Reyes-Darias, José-Antonio; Lacal, Jesús; Ramos, Juan L.; García-Ruiz, Juan Manuel; Gavira, Jose A.; Krell, Tino

    2012-01-01

    Chemoreceptor-based signaling is a central mechanism in bacterial signal transduction. Receptors are classified according to the size of their ligand-binding region. The well-studied cluster I proteins have a 100- to 150-residue ligand-binding region that contains a single site for chemoattractant recognition. Cluster II receptors, which contain a 220- to 300-residue ligand-binding region and which are almost as abundant as cluster I receptors, remain largely uncharacterized. Here, we report high-resolution structures of the ligand-binding region of the cluster II McpS chemotaxis receptor (McpS-LBR) of Pseudomonas putida KT2440 in complex with different chemoattractants. The structure of McpS-LBR represents a small-molecule binding domain composed of two modules, each able to bind different signal molecules. Malate and succinate were found to bind to the membrane-proximal module, whereas acetate binds to the membrane-distal module. A structural alignment of the two modules revealed that the ligand-binding sites could be superimposed and that amino acids involved in ligand recognition are conserved in both binding sites. Ligand binding to both modules was shown to trigger chemotactic responses. Further analysis showed that McpS-like receptors were found in different classes of proteobacteria, indicating that this mode of response to different carbon sources may be universally distributed. The physiological relevance of the McpS architecture may lie in its capacity to respond with high sensitivity to the preferred carbon sources malate and succinate and, at the same time, mediate lower sensitivity responses to the less preferred but very abundant carbon source acetate. PMID:23112148

  14. Anisotropic energy flow and allosteric ligand binding in albumin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guifeng; Magana, Donny; Dyer, R. Brian

    2014-01-01

    Allosteric interactions in proteins generally involve propagation of local structural changes through the protein to a remote site. Anisotropic energy transport is thought to couple the remote sites, but the nature of this process is poorly understood. Here, we report the relationship between energy flow through the structure of bovine serum albumin and allosteric interactions between remote ligand binding sites of the protein. Ultrafast infrared spectroscopy is used to probe the flow of energy through the protein backbone following excitation of a heater dye, a metalloporphyrin or malachite green, bound to different binding sites in the protein. We observe ballistic and anisotropic energy flow through the protein structure following input of thermal energy into the flexible ligand binding sites, without local heating of the rigid helix bundles that connect these sites. This efficient energy transport mechanism enables the allosteric propagation of binding energy through the connecting helix structures.

  15. Cloud computing for protein-ligand binding site comparison.

    PubMed

    Hung, Che-Lun; Hua, Guan-Jie

    2013-01-01

    The proteome-wide analysis of protein-ligand binding sites and their interactions with ligands is important in structure-based drug design and in understanding ligand cross reactivity and toxicity. The well-known and commonly used software, SMAP, has been designed for 3D ligand binding site comparison and similarity searching of a structural proteome. SMAP can also predict drug side effects and reassign existing drugs to new indications. However, the computing scale of SMAP is limited. We have developed a high availability, high performance system that expands the comparison scale of SMAP. This cloud computing service, called Cloud-PLBS, combines the SMAP and Hadoop frameworks and is deployed on a virtual cloud computing platform. To handle the vast amount of experimental data on protein-ligand binding site pairs, Cloud-PLBS exploits the MapReduce paradigm as a management and parallelizing tool. Cloud-PLBS provides a web portal and scalability through which biologists can address a wide range of computer-intensive questions in biology and drug discovery. PMID:23762824

  16. Cloud computing for protein-ligand binding site comparison.

    PubMed

    Hung, Che-Lun; Hua, Guan-Jie

    2013-01-01

    The proteome-wide analysis of protein-ligand binding sites and their interactions with ligands is important in structure-based drug design and in understanding ligand cross reactivity and toxicity. The well-known and commonly used software, SMAP, has been designed for 3D ligand binding site comparison and similarity searching of a structural proteome. SMAP can also predict drug side effects and reassign existing drugs to new indications. However, the computing scale of SMAP is limited. We have developed a high availability, high performance system that expands the comparison scale of SMAP. This cloud computing service, called Cloud-PLBS, combines the SMAP and Hadoop frameworks and is deployed on a virtual cloud computing platform. To handle the vast amount of experimental data on protein-ligand binding site pairs, Cloud-PLBS exploits the MapReduce paradigm as a management and parallelizing tool. Cloud-PLBS provides a web portal and scalability through which biologists can address a wide range of computer-intensive questions in biology and drug discovery.

  17. RXR function requires binding to an endogenous terpenoid ligand

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The issue of whether the nuclear receptor RXR must bind to an endogenous, nanomolar affinity ligand in order to perform its natural function is still unsettled (1). On the basis of our previous studies establishing that the Drosophilamelanogaster ortholog of the retinoid X receptor ("ultraspiracle,"...

  18. Ligand recognition by influenza virus. The binding of bivalent sialosides.

    PubMed

    Glick, G D; Toogood, P L; Wiley, D C; Skehel, J J; Knowles, J R

    1991-12-15

    Infection by influenza virus is initiated by a cellular adhesion event that is mediated by the viral protein, hemagglutinin, which is exposed on the surface of the virion. Hemagglutinin recognizes and binds to cell surface sialic acid residues. Although each individual ligand binding interaction is weak, the high affinity of influenza virus for cells that bear sialic acid residues is thought to result from a multivalent attachment process involving many similar recognition events. To evaluate such binding we have synthesized three series of compounds, each containing two sialic acid residues separated by spacers of different length, and have tested them as ligands for influenza hemagglutinin. No increased binding to the bromelain-released hemagglutinin ectodomain was seen for any of the bivalent compounds as determined by 1H NMR titration. In contrast, however, a spacer length between sialic acid residues of approximately 55 A sharply increases the binding of these bidentate species to whole virus as determined by hemagglutination inhibition assays. The most effective compound containing glycines in the linking chain displayed 100-fold increased affinity for whole virus over the paradigm monovalent ligand, Neu5Ac alpha 2Me.

  19. AhR signalling and dioxin toxicity.

    PubMed

    Sorg, Olivier

    2014-10-15

    Dioxins are a family of molecules associated to several industrial accidents such as Ludwigshafen in 1953 or Seveso in 1976, to the Agent Orange used during the war of Vietnam, and more recently to the poisoning of the former president of Ukraine, Victor Yushchenko. These persistent organic pollutants are by-products of industrial activity and bind to an intracellular receptor, AhR, with a high potency. In humans, exposure to dioxins, in particular 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) induces a cutaneous syndrome known as chloracne, consisting in the development of many small skin lesions (hamartoma), lasting for 2-5 years. Although TCDD has been classified by the WHO as a human carcinogen, its carcinogenic potential to humans is not clearly demonstrated. It was first believed that AhR activation accounted for most, if not all, biological properties of dioxins. However, certain AhR agonists found in vegetables do not induce chloracne, and other chemicals, in particular certain therapeutic agents, may induce a chloracne-like syndrome without activating AhR. It is time to rethink the mechanism of dioxin toxicity and analyse in more details the biological events following exposure to these compounds and other AhR agonists, some of which have a very different chemical structure than TCDD. In particular various food-containing AhR agonists are non-toxic and may on the contrary have beneficial properties to human health. PMID:24239782

  20. Improving Binding Affinity and Selectivity of Computationally Designed Ligand-Binding Proteins Using Experiments.

    PubMed

    Tinberg, Christine E; Khare, Sagar D

    2016-01-01

    The ability to de novo design proteins that can bind small molecules has wide implications for synthetic biology and medicine. Combining computational protein design with the high-throughput screening of mutagenic libraries of computationally designed proteins is emerging as a general approach for creating binding proteins with programmable binding modes, affinities, and selectivities. The computational step enables the creation of a binding site in a protein that otherwise does not (measurably) bind the intended ligand, and targeted mutagenic screening allows for validation and refinement of the computational model as well as provides orders-of-magnitude increases in the binding affinity. Deep sequencing of mutagenic libraries can provide insights into the mutagenic binding landscape and enable further affinity improvements. Moreover, in such a combined computational-experimental approach where the binding mode is preprogrammed and iteratively refined, selectivity can be achieved (and modulated) by the placement of specified amino acid side chain groups around the ligand in defined orientations. Here, we describe the experimental aspects of a combined computational-experimental approach for designing-using the software suite Rosetta-proteins that bind a small molecule of choice and engineering, using fluorescence-activated cell sorting and high-throughput yeast surface display, high affinity and ligand selectivity. We illustrated the utility of this approach by performing the design of a selective digoxigenin (DIG)-binding protein that, after affinity maturation, binds DIG with picomolar affinity and high selectivity over structurally related steroids. PMID:27094290

  1. Solvent fluctuations in hydrophobic cavity–ligand binding kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Setny, Piotr; Baron, Riccardo; Michael Kekenes-Huskey, Peter; McCammon, J. Andrew; Dzubiella, Joachim

    2013-01-01

    Water plays a crucial part in virtually all protein–ligand binding processes in and out of equilibrium. Here, we investigate the role of water in the binding kinetics of a ligand to a prototypical hydrophobic pocket by explicit-water molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and implicit diffusional approaches. The concave pocket in the unbound state exhibits wet/dry hydration oscillations whose magnitude and time scale are significantly amplified by the approaching ligand. In turn, the ligand’s stochastic motion intimately couples to the slow hydration fluctuations, leading to a sixfold-enhanced friction in the vicinity of the pocket entrance. The increased friction considerably decelerates association in the otherwise barrierless system, indicating the importance of molecular-scale hydrodynamic effects in cavity–ligand binding arising due to capillary fluctuations. We derive and analyze the diffusivity profile and show that the mean first passage time distribution from the MD simulation can be accurately reproduced by a standard Brownian dynamics simulation if the appropriate position-dependent friction profile is included. However, long-time decays in the water–ligand (random) force autocorrelation demonstrate violation of the Markovian assumption, challenging standard diffusive approaches for rate prediction. Remarkably, the static friction profile derived from the force correlations strongly resembles the profile derived on the Markovian assumption apart from a simple shift in space, which can be rationalized by a time–space retardation in the ligand’s downhill dynamics toward the pocket. The observed spatiotemporal hydrodynamic coupling may be of biological importance providing the time needed for conformational receptor–ligand adjustments, typical of the induced-fit paradigm. PMID:23297241

  2. Ligand electronic properties modulate tau filament binding site density

    PubMed Central

    Cisek, Katryna; Jensen, Jordan R.; Honson, Nicolette S.; Schafer, Kelsey N.; Cooper, Grace L.; Kuret, Jeff

    2012-01-01

    Small molecules that bind tau-bearing neurofibrillary lesions are being sought for premortem diagnosis, staging, and treatment of Alzheimer’s disease and other tauopathic neurodegenerative diseases. The utility of these agents will depend on both their binding affinity and binding site density (Bmax). Previously we identified polarizability as a descriptor of protein aggregate binding affinity. To examine its contribution to binding site density, we investigated the ability of two closely related benzothiazole derivatives ((E)-2-[[4-(dimethylamino)phenyl]azo]-6-methoxybenzothiazole) and ((E)-2-[2-[4-(dimethylamino)phenyl]ethenyl]-6-methoxybenzothiazole)) that differed in polarizability to displace probes of high (Thioflavin S) and low (radiolabeled (E,E)-1-iodo-2,5-bis(3-hydroxycarbonyl-4-methoxy)styrylbenzene; IMSB) density sites. Consistent with their site densities, Thioflavin S completely displaced radiolabeled IMSB, but IMSB was incapable of displacing Thioflavin S. Although both benzothiazoles displaced the low Bmax IMSB probe, only the highly polarizable analog displaced near saturating concentrations of the Thioflavin S probe. Quantum calculations showed that high polarizability reflected extensive pi-electron delocalization fostered by the presence of electron donating and accepting groups. These data suggest that electron delocalization promotes ligand binding at a subset of sites on tau aggregates that are present at high density, and that optimizing this aspect of ligand structure can yield tau-directed agents with superior diagnostic and therapeutic performance. PMID:23072817

  3. ProBiS-ligands: a web server for prediction of ligands by examination of protein binding sites

    PubMed Central

    Konc, Janez; Janežič, Dušanka

    2014-01-01

    The ProBiS-ligands web server predicts binding of ligands to a protein structure. Starting with a protein structure or binding site, ProBiS-ligands first identifies template proteins in the Protein Data Bank that share similar binding sites. Based on the superimpositions of the query protein and the similar binding sites found, the server then transposes the ligand structures from those sites to the query protein. Such ligand prediction supports many activities, e.g. drug repurposing. The ProBiS-ligands web server, an extension of the ProBiS web server, is open and free to all users at http://probis.cmm.ki.si/ligands. PMID:24861616

  4. Teratogenic impact of dioxin-activated AHR in laboratory animals

    EPA Science Inventory

    AHR and ARNT are expressed in mouse and human palatal shelves and in the urinary tract of the mouse fetus. AHR expression, translocation to the nucleus, binding to DRE, and activation are required for mediation of TCDD-induction of CP and HN. Although the human palate requires a ...

  5. Genetic and pharmacological analysis identifies a physiological role for the AHR in epidermal differentiation

    PubMed Central

    van den Bogaard, Ellen; Podolsky, Michael; Smits, Jos; Cui, Xiao; John, Christian; Gowda, Krishne; Desai, Dhimant; Amin, Shantu; Schalkwijk, Joost; Perdew, Gary H.

    2015-01-01

    Stimulation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) by xenobiotics is known to affect epidermal differentiation and skin barrier formation. The physiological role of endogenous AHR signaling in keratinocyte differentiation is not known. We used murine and human skin models to address the hypothesis that AHR activation is required for normal keratinocyte differentiation. Using transcriptome analysis of Ahr-/- and Ahr+/+ murine keratinocytes, we found significant enrichment of differentially expressed genes linked to epidermal differentiation. Primary Ahr-/- keratinocytes showed a significant reduction in terminal differentiation gene and protein expression, similar to Ahr+/+ keratinocytes treated with AHR antagonists GNF351 and CH223191, or the selective AHR modulator (SAhRM), SGA360. In vitro keratinocyte differentiation led to increased AHR levels and subsequent nuclear translocation, followed by induced CYP1A1 gene expression. Monolayer cultured primary human keratinocytes treated with AHR antagonists also showed an impaired terminal differentiation program. Inactivation of AHR activity during human skin equivalent development severely impaired epidermal stratification, terminal differentiation protein expression and stratum corneum formation. As disturbed epidermal differentiation is a main feature of many skin diseases, pharmacological agents targeting AHR signaling or future identification of endogenous keratinocyte-derived AHR ligands should be considered as potential new drugs in dermatology. PMID:25602157

  6. Does the ligand-biopolymer equilibrium binding constant depend on the number of bound ligands?

    PubMed

    Beshnova, Daria A; Lantushenko, Anastasia O; Evstigneev, Maxim P

    2010-11-01

    Conventional methods, such as Scatchard or McGhee-von Hippel analyses, used to treat ligand-biopolymer interactions, indirectly make the assumption that the microscopic binding constant is independent of the number of ligands, i, already bound to the biopolymer. Recent results on the aggregation of aromatic molecules (Beshnova et al., J Chem Phys 2009, 130, 165105) indicated that the equilibrium constant of self-association depends intrinsically on the number of molecules in an aggregate due to loss of translational and rotational degrees of freedom on formation of the complex. The influence of these factors on the equilibrium binding constant for ligand-biopolymer complexation was analyzed in this work. It was shown that under the conditions of binding of "small" molecules, these factors can effectively be ignored and, hence, do not provide any hidden systematic error in such widely-used approaches, such as the Scatchard or McGhee-von Hippel methods for analyzing ligand-biopolymer complexation. © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers 93: 932-935, 2010.

  7. Recent improvements to Binding MOAD: a resource for protein–ligand binding affinities and structures

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Aqeel; Smith, Richard D.; Clark, Jordan J.; Dunbar, James B.; Carlson, Heather A.

    2015-01-01

    For over 10 years, Binding MOAD (Mother of All Databases; http://www.BindingMOAD.org) has been one of the largest resources for high-quality protein–ligand complexes and associated binding affinity data. Binding MOAD has grown at the rate of 1994 complexes per year, on average. Currently, it contains 23 269 complexes and 8156 binding affinities. Our annual updates curate the data using a semi-automated literature search of the references cited within the PDB file, and we have recently upgraded our website and added new features and functionalities to better serve Binding MOAD users. In order to eliminate the legacy application server of the old platform and to accommodate new changes, the website has been completely rewritten in the LAMP (Linux, Apache, MySQL and PHP) environment. The improved user interface incorporates current third-party plugins for better visualization of protein and ligand molecules, and it provides features like sorting, filtering and filtered downloads. In addition to the field-based searching, Binding MOAD now can be searched by structural queries based on the ligand. In order to remove redundancy, Binding MOAD records are clustered in different families based on 90% sequence identity. The new Binding MOAD, with the upgraded platform, features and functionalities, is now equipped to better serve its users. PMID:25378330

  8. Organic solvents identify specific ligand binding sites on protein surfaces.

    PubMed

    Liepinsh, E; Otting, G

    1997-03-01

    Enzymes frequently recognize substrates and pharmaceutical drugs through specific binding interactions in deep pockets on the protein surface. We show how the specificity-determining substrate binding site of hen egg-white lysozyme (HEWL) can be readily identified in aqueous solution by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy using small organic solvent molecules as detection probes. Exchange of magnetization between the 1H nuclei of the protein and the ligands through dipole-dipole interactions is observed which allows the modeling of their position and orientation at the binding site. Combined with site-specific binding constants measured by titration experiments with different organic solvents, the method can provide important information for rational drug design. In addition, the lifetime of nonspecific interactions of HEWL with organic solvents is shown to be in the sub-nanosecond time range. PMID:9062927

  9. Coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations of protein-ligand binding.

    PubMed

    Negami, Tatsuki; Shimizu, Kentaro; Terada, Tohru

    2014-09-30

    Coarse-grained molecular dynamics (CGMD) simulations with the MARTINI force field were performed to reproduce the protein-ligand binding processes. We chose two protein-ligand systems, the levansucrase-sugar (glucose or sucrose), and LinB-1,2-dichloroethane systems, as target systems that differ in terms of the size and shape of the ligand-binding pocket and the physicochemical properties of the pocket and the ligand. Spatial distributions of the Coarse-grained (CG) ligand molecules revealed potential ligand-binding sites on the protein surfaces other than the real ligand-binding sites. The ligands bound most strongly to the real ligand-binding sites. The binding and unbinding rate constants obtained from the CGMD simulation of the levansucrase-sucrose system were approximately 10 times greater than the experimental values; this is mainly due to faster diffusion of the CG ligand in the CG water model. We could obtain dissociation constants close to the experimental values for both systems. Analysis of the ligand fluxes demonstrated that the CG ligand molecules entered the ligand-binding pockets through specific pathways. The ligands tended to move through grooves on the protein surface. Thus, the CGMD simulations produced reasonable results for the two different systems overall and are useful for studying the protein-ligand binding processes.

  10. PSCDB: a database for protein structural change upon ligand binding.

    PubMed

    Amemiya, Takayuki; Koike, Ryotaro; Kidera, Akinori; Ota, Motonori

    2012-01-01

    Proteins are flexible molecules that undergo structural changes to function. The Protein Data Bank contains multiple entries for identical proteins determined under different conditions, e.g. with and without a ligand molecule, which provides important information for understanding the structural changes related to protein functions. We gathered 839 protein structural pairs of ligand-free and ligand-bound states from monomeric or homo-dimeric proteins, and constructed the Protein Structural Change DataBase (PSCDB). In the database, we focused on whether the motions were coupled with ligand binding. As a result, the protein structural changes were classified into seven classes, i.e. coupled domain motion (59 structural changes), independent domain motion (70), coupled local motion (125), independent local motion (135), burying ligand motion (104), no significant motion (311) and other type motion (35). PSCDB provides lists of each class. On each entry page, users can view detailed information about the motion, accompanied by a morphing animation of the structural changes. PSCDB is available at http://idp1.force.cs.is.nagoya-u.ac.jp/pscdb/. PMID:22080505

  11. Blind prediction of charged ligand binding affinities in a model binding site

    PubMed Central

    Rocklin, Gabriel J.; Boyce, Sarah E.; Fischer, Marcus; Fish, Inbar; Mobley, David L.; Shoichet, Brian K.; Dill, Ken A.

    2013-01-01

    Predicting absolute protein-ligand binding affinities remains a frontier challenge in ligand discovery and design. This becomes more difficult when ionic interactions are involved, because of the large opposing solvation and electrostatic attraction energies. In a blind test, we examined whether alchemical free energy calculations could predict binding affinities of 14 charged and 5 neutral compounds previously untested as ligands for a cavity binding site in Cytochrome C Peroxidase. In this simplified site, polar and cationic ligands compete with solvent to interact with a buried aspartate. Predictions were tested by calorimetry, spectroscopy, and crystallography. Of the 15 compounds predicted to bind, 13 were experimentally confirmed, while four compounds were false negative predictions. Predictions had an RMSE of 1.95 kcal/mol to the experimental affinities, and predicted poses had an average RMSD of 1.7 Å to the crystallographic poses. This test serves as a benchmark for these thermodynamically rigorous calculations at predicting binding affinities for charged compounds, and gives insights into the existing sources of error, which are primarily electrostatic interactions inside proteins. Our experiments also provide a useful set of ionic binding affinities in a simplified system for testing new affinity prediction methods. PMID:23896298

  12. Prediction of ligand-binding sites of proteins by molecular docking calculation for a random ligand library.

    PubMed

    Fukunishi, Yoshifumi; Nakamura, Haruki

    2011-01-01

    A new approach to predicting the ligand-binding sites of proteins was developed, using protein-ligand docking computation. In this method, many compounds in a random library are docked onto the whole protein surface. We assumed that the true ligand-binding site would exhibit stronger affinity to the compounds in the random library than the other sites, even if the random library did not include the ligand corresponding to the true binding site. We also assumed that the affinity of the true ligand-binding site would be correlated to the docking scores of the compounds in the random library, if the ligand-binding site was correctly predicted. We call this method the molecular-docking binding-site finding (MolSite) method. The MolSite method was applied to 89 known protein-ligand complex structures extracted from the Protein Data Bank, and it predicted the correct binding sites with about 80-99% accuracy, when only the single top-ranked site was adopted. In addition, the average docking score was weakly correlated to the experimental protein-ligand binding free energy, with a correlation coefficient of 0.44.

  13. Allosteric Ligand Binding and Anisotropic Energy Flow in Albumin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyer, Brian

    2014-03-01

    Protein allostery usually involves propagation of local structural changes through the protein to a remote site. Coupling of structural changes at remote sites is thought to occur through anisotropic energy transport, but the nature of this process is poorly understood. We have studied the relationship between allosteric interactions of remote ligand binding sites of the protein and energy flow through the structure of bovine serum albumin (BSA). We applied ultrafast infrared spectroscopy to probe the flow of energy through the protein backbone following excitation of a heater dye, a metalloporphyrin or malachite green, bound to different binding sites in the protein. We observe ballistic flow through the protein structure following input of thermal energy into the flexible ligand binding sites. We also observe anisotropic heat flow through the structure, without local heating of the rigid helix bundles that connect these sites. We will discuss the implications of this efficient energy transport mechanism with regard to the allosteric propagation of binding energy through the connecting helix structures.

  14. Sequence and in vitro function of chicken, ring-necked pheasant, and Japanese quail AHR1 predict in vivo sensitivity to dioxins.

    PubMed

    Farmahin, Reza; Wu, Dongmei; Crump, Doug; Hervé, Jessica C; Jones, Stephanie P; Hahn, Mark E; Karchner, Sibel I; Giesy, John P; Bursian, Steven J; Zwiernik, Matthew J; Kennedy, Sean W

    2012-03-01

    There are large differences in sensitivity to the toxic and biochemical effects of dioxins and dioxin-like compounds (DLCs) among vertebrates. Previously, we demonstrated that the difference in sensitivity between domestic chicken (Gallus gallus domesticus) and common tern (Sterna hirundo) to aryl hydrocarbon receptor 1 (AHR1)-dependent changes in gene expression following exposure to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) is based upon the identities of the amino acids at two sites within the ligand binding domain of AHR1 (chicken--highly sensitive; Ile324_Ser380 vs common tern--250-fold less sensitive than chicken; Val325_Ala381). Here, we tested the hypotheses that (i) the sensitivity of other avian species to TCDD, 2,3,4,7,8-pentachlorodibenzofuran (PeCDF), and 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzofuran (TCDF) is also determined by the amino acids at sites that are equivalent to sites 324 and 380 in chicken, and (ii) Ile324_Ala380 and Val324_Ser380 genotypes confer intermediate sensitivity to DLCs in birds. We compared ligand-induced transactivation function of full-length AHR1s from chicken, common tern, ring-necked pheasant (Phasianus colchicus; Ile324_Ala380) and Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica; Val324_Ala380), and three Japanese quail AHR1 mutants. The results support our hypothesis that avian species can be grouped into three general classes of sensitivity to DLCs. Both AHR1 genotype and in vitro transactivation assays predict in vivo sensitivity. Contrary to the assumption that TCDD is the most potent DLC, PeCDF was more potent than TCDD at activating Japanese quail (13- to 26-fold) and common tern (23- to 30-fold) AHR1. Our results support and expand previous in vitro and in vivo work that demonstrated ligand-dependent species differences in AHR1 affinity. The findings and methods will be of use for DLC risk assessments.

  15. Proteus and the Design of Ligand Binding Sites.

    PubMed

    Polydorides, Savvas; Michael, Eleni; Mignon, David; Druart, Karen; Archontis, Georgios; Simonson, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    This chapter describes the organization and use of Proteus, a multitool computational suite for the optimization of protein and ligand conformations and sequences, and the calculation of pK α shifts and relative binding affinities. The software offers the use of several molecular mechanics force fields and solvent models, including two generalized Born variants, and a large range of scoring functions, which can combine protein stability, ligand affinity, and ligand specificity terms, for positive and negative design. We present in detail the steps for structure preparation, system setup, construction of the interaction energy matrix, protein sequence and structure optimizations, pK α calculations, and ligand titration calculations. We discuss illustrative examples, including the chemical/structural optimization of a complex between the MHC class II protein HLA-DQ8 and the vinculin epitope, and the chemical optimization of the compstatin analog Ac-Val4Trp/His9Ala, which regulates the function of protein C3 of the complement system. PMID:27094287

  16. A determination of Mg(+)-ligand binding energies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Partridge, Harry

    1991-01-01

    Theoretical calculations employing large basis sets and including correlation are carried out for Mg(+) with methanol, water, and formaldehyde. For Mg(+) with ethanol and acetaldehyde, the trends in the binding energies are studied at the self-consistent-field level. The predictions for the binding energy of Mg(+) to methanol and water of 41 + or - 5 and 36 + or - 5 kcal/mol, respectively, are much less than the experimental upper bounds, of 61 + or - 5 and 60 + or - 5 kcal mol, determined by using photodissociation techniques. The theoretical results are inconsistent with the onset of Mg(+) production observed in the photodissociation experiments, as the smallest absorptions are calculated at about 80 kcal/mol for both Mg(+)-CH3OH and Mg(+)-H2O, and these transitions are to bound excited states. The binding energy for Mg(+) with formaldehyde is predicted to be similar to Mg(+)-H2O. The relative binding energies are in reasonable agreement with experiment. The binding energy of a second water molecule to Mg(+) is predicted to be similar to the first. This suggests that the reduced reaction rate observed for the second ligand is not a consequence of a significantly smaller binding energy, at least for the smaller ligards such as those considered in this work.

  17. Induction of human UGT1A1 by bilirubin through AhR dependent pathway.

    PubMed

    Togawa, Hiroshi; Shinkai, Shigeko; Mizutani, Takaharu

    2008-12-01

    UDP-glucuronosyltransferase1A1 (UGT1A1) plays a key role to conjugate bilirubin and preventing jaundice, but there is no report showing the induction of human UGT1A1 (UGT1A1) by bilirubin. In this report, we show findings of the induction of the reporter gene (-3475/+14) of UGT1A1 in HepG2 cells by bilirubin at 50 microM, 100 microM, with human aryl hydrocarbon receptor (hAhR). We confirmed that induction of the reporter gene by bilirubin is dependent on the position of the xenobiotic responsive element (XRE) (-3328/-3319) of UGT1A1, because the XRE deletion UGT1A1 gene did not respond to stimulation by a complex of bilirubin and hAhR. alpha-Naphthoflavone (alpha-NF) of a typical AhR antagonist at 50 microM inhibited induction by bilirubin, suggesting that bilirubin stimulates through binding with hAhR. Meanwhile, bilirubin itself did not stimulate the induction of AhR, because we detected no-elevation of the mRNA level of AhR by RT-PCR. These results indicate that the induction of UGT1A1 by bilirubin-AhR did not depend on the elevation of AhR but on ligand binding. From this result, we considered that high bilirubin in neonates must induce the elevation of UGT1A1 after birth to prevent jaundice, and bilirubin in adults also regulates the level of UGT1A1. This is the first report showing direct induction of UGT1A1 by a bilirubin through AhR pathway. PMID:19356098

  18. Sensitive NMR Approach for Determining the Binding Mode of Tightly Binding Ligand Molecules to Protein Targets.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wan-Na; Nitsche, Christoph; Pilla, Kala Bharath; Graham, Bim; Huber, Thomas; Klein, Christian D; Otting, Gottfried

    2016-04-01

    Structure-guided drug design relies on detailed structural knowledge of protein-ligand complexes, but crystallization of cocomplexes is not always possible. Here we present a sensitive nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) approach to determine the binding mode of tightly binding lead compounds in complex with difficult target proteins. In contrast to established NMR methods, it does not depend on rapid exchange between bound and free ligand or on stable isotope labeling, relying instead on a tert-butyl group as a chemical label. tert-Butyl groups are found in numerous protein ligands and deliver an exceptionally narrow and tall (1)H NMR signal. We show that a tert-butyl group also produces outstandingly intense intra- and intermolecular NOESY cross-peaks. These enable measurements of pseudocontact shifts generated by lanthanide tags attached to the protein, which in turn allows positioning of the ligand on the protein. Once the ligand has been located, assignments of intermolecular NOEs become possible even without prior resonance assignments of protein side chains. The approach is demonstrated with the dengue virus NS2B-NS3 protease in complex with a high-affinity ligand containing a tert-butyl group. PMID:26974502

  19. Ligand-binding study of Anopheles gambiae chemosensory proteins.

    PubMed

    Iovinella, Immacolata; Bozza, Francesco; Caputo, Beniamino; Della Torre, Alessandra; Pelosi, Paolo

    2013-06-01

    Chemosensory proteins (CSPs) are a class of small proteins expressed only in arthropods and endowed with heterogeneous functions. Some of them are involved in chemical communications, others in development or other physiological roles. The numbers of CSPs in different species of insects range from 4 in Drosophila to at least 70 in locusts, whereas in other arthropods such as crustaceans and millipedes, only 2-3 very similar sequences have been reported in each species. We have expressed, in a bacterial system, 5 of the 8 CSPs predicted by the genome of the malaria mosquito Anopheles gambiae, 4 identified at the protein level (SAP1, SAP2, SAP3, and CSP3) and a fifth annotated as part of this work, obtaining the proteins with high yields and in their soluble forms. Purified CSPs have been used to study their ligand-binding properties, both using competitive binding assays and quenching of intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence, in order to get insights into their physiological functions. The agreement between the 2 sets of data supports the assumptions that the ligands, including the fluorescent reporter, bind within the core of the proteins. Their different affinities toward a set of pure chemicals suggest specific roles in chemical communication.

  20. Exploring Hydrophobic Binding Surfaces Using Comfa and Flexible Hydrophobic Ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thakkar, Shraddha; Sanchez, Rosa. I.; Bhuveneswaran, Chidambaram; Compadre, Cesar M.

    2011-06-01

    Cysteine proteinases are a very important group of enzymes involved in a variety of physiological and pathological processes including cancer metastasis and rheumatoid arthritis. In this investigation we used 3D-Quantitative Structure Activity Relationships (3D-QSAR) techniques to model the binding of a variety of substrates to two cysteine proteinases, papain, and cathepsin B. The analysis was performed using Comparative Molecular Field Analysis (CoMFA). The molecules were constructed using standard bond angles and lengths, minimized and aligned. Charges were calculated using the PM3 method in MOPAC. The CoMFA models derived for the binding of the studied substrates to the two proteinases were compared with the expected results from the experimental X-ray crystal structures of the same proteinases. The results showed the value of CoMFA modeling of flexible hydrophobic ligands to analyze ligand binding to protein receptors, and could also serve as the basis to design specific inhibitors of cysteine proteinases with potential therapeutic value.

  1. Characterizing low affinity epibatidine binding to α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors with ligand depletion and nonspecific binding

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Along with high affinity binding of epibatidine (Kd1≈10 pM) to α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR), low affinity binding of epibatidine (Kd2≈1-10 nM) to an independent binding site has been reported. Studying this low affinity binding is important because it might contribute understanding about the structure and synthesis of α4β2 nAChR. The binding behavior of epibatidine and α4β2 AChR raises a question about interpreting binding data from two independent sites with ligand depletion and nonspecific binding, both of which can affect equilibrium binding of [3H]epibatidine and α4β2 nAChR. If modeled incorrectly, ligand depletion and nonspecific binding lead to inaccurate estimates of binding constants. Fitting total equilibrium binding as a function of total ligand accurately characterizes a single site with ligand depletion and nonspecific binding. The goal of this study was to determine whether this approach is sufficient with two independent high and low affinity sites. Results Computer simulations of binding revealed complexities beyond fitting total binding for characterizing the second, low affinity site of α4β2 nAChR. First, distinguishing low-affinity specific binding from nonspecific binding was a potential problem with saturation data. Varying the maximum concentration of [3H]epibatidine, simultaneously fitting independently measured nonspecific binding, and varying α4β2 nAChR concentration were effective remedies. Second, ligand depletion helped identify the low affinity site when nonspecific binding was significant in saturation or competition data, contrary to a common belief that ligand depletion always is detrimental. Third, measuring nonspecific binding without α4β2 nAChR distinguished better between nonspecific binding and low-affinity specific binding under some circumstances of competitive binding than did presuming nonspecific binding to be residual [3H]epibatidine binding after adding a large concentration of

  2. Mono-Substituted Isopropylated Triaryl Phosphate, a Major Component of Firemaster 550, is an AHR Agonist that Exhibits AHR-Independent Cardiotoxicity in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Gerlach, Cory V.; Das, Siba R.; Volz, David C.; Bisson, William H.; Kolluri, Siva K.; Tanguay, Robert L.

    2014-01-01

    Firemaster 550 (FM550) is an additive flame retardant mixture used within polyurethane foam and is increasingly found in house dust and the environment due to leaching. Despite the widespread use of FM550, very few studies have investigated the potential toxicity of its ingredients during early vertebrate development. In the current study, we sought to specifically investigate mono-substituted isopropylated triaryl phosphate (mITP), a component comprising approximately 32% of FM550, which has been shown to cause cardiotoxicity during zebrafish embryogenesis. Previous research showed that developmental defects are rescued using an aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) antagonist (CH223191), suggesting that mITP-induced toxicity was AHR-dependent. As zebrafish have three known AHR isoforms, we used a functional AHR2 knockout line along with AHR1A-and AHR1B-specific morpholinos to determine which AHR isoform, if any, mediates mITP-induced cardiotoxicity. As in silico structural homology modeling predicted that mITP may bind favorably to both AHR2 and AHR1B isoforms, we evaluated AHR involvement in vivo by measuring CYP1A mRNA and protein expression following exposure to mITP in the presence or absence of CH223191 or AHR-specific morpholinos. Based on these studies, we found that mITP interacts with both AHR2 and AHR1B isoforms to induce CYP1A expression. However, while CH223191 blocked mITP-induced CYP1A induction and cardiotoxicity, knockdown of all three AHR isoforms failed to block mITP-induced cardiotoxicity in the absence of detectable CYP1A induction. Overall, these results suggest that, while mITP is an AHR agonist, mITP causes AHR-independent cardiotoxicity through a pathway that is also antagonized by CH223191. PMID:24865613

  3. Farnesyl Diphosphate Synthase Inhibitors With Unique Ligand-Binding Geometries

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Farnesyl diphosphate synthase (FPPS) is an important drug target for bone resorption, cancer, and some infectious diseases. Here, we report five new structures including two having unique bound ligand geometries. The diamidine inhibitor 7 binds to human FPPS close to the homoallylic (S2) and allosteric (S3) sites and extends into a new site, here called S4. With the bisphosphonate inhibitor 8, two molecules bind to Trypanosoma brucei FPPS, one molecule in the allylic site (S1) and the other close to S2, the first observation of two bisphosphonate molecules bound to FPPS. We also report the structures of apo-FPPS from T. brucei, together with two more bisphosphonate-bound structures (2,9), for purposes of comparison. The diamidine structure is of particular interest because 7 could represent a new lead for lipophilic FPPS inhibitors, while 8 has low micromolar activity against T. brucei, the causative agent of human African trypanosomiasis. PMID:25815158

  4. Mechanism and thermodynamics of ligand binding to auxin amidohydrolase.

    PubMed

    Simunovic, Mijo; Zagrovic, Bojan; Tomić, Sanja

    2011-01-01

    BrILL2 is catalytically the most efficient auxin amidohydrolase from Brassica rapa, playing a key role in auxin metabolism by catalyzing its release from amino acid conjugates. Auxins, with the most abundant representative indole-acetic acid ([1H-indol-3-yl]-acetic acid, IAA), are a group of plant hormones that in very small concentrations regulate ubiquitin-mediated degradation of transcription regulators. Kinetic studies on BrILL2 showed that it hydrolyzes alanine conjugates of IAA and of its larger analogues, indole-propionic acid (3-[1H-indol-3-yl]-propionic acid, IPA) and indole-butyric acid (4-[1H-indol-3-yl]-butyric acid, IBA). Structurally, BrILL2 belongs to the largest known family of metallopeptidases (M20) that share a recognizable 3D structure, characterized by two perpendicular domains. Its members have been implicated in numerous biochemical processes and have been found across all species sequenced to date. Here, molecular dynamics simulations were carried out to study structural and thermodynamic properties of ligand binding to BrILL2. A conformational change was captured in multiple copies of 10 ns long simulations, described by a rigid body movement of the two domains, and its associated key interactions between residues were examined. For the three substrates, complexes in two possible binding modes were recreated, along with a single binding mode for the putative substrate tryptophanyl-alanine (Trp-Ala), which were subsequently simulated in multiple copies of 10 ns long simulations. Thermodynamic calculations were used to assess their binding affinities and explain the selectivity toward the longer ligands. Based on the results, a possible route for the reaction is proposed.

  5. MODELING THE BINDING OF THE METABOLITES OF SOME POLYCYCLIC AROMTIC HYDROCARBONS TO THE LIGAND BINDING DOMAIN OF THE ESTROGEN RECEPTOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    Modeling the binding of the metabolites of some Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons to the ligand binding domain of the estrogen receptor
    James Rabinowitz, Stephen Little, Katrina Brown, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Research Triangle Park, NC; Un...

  6. Binding site structure of one LRP-RAP complex: implications for a common ligand-receptor binding motif.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Gitte A; Andersen, Olav M; Bonvin, Alexandre M J J; Bjerrum-Bohr, Ida; Etzerodt, Michael; Thøgersen, Hans C; O'Shea, Charlotte; Poulsen, Flemming M; Kragelund, Birthe B

    2006-09-29

    The low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP) interacts with more than 30 ligands of different sizes and structures that can all be replaced by the receptor-associated protein (RAP). The double module of complement type repeats, CR56, of LRP binds many ligands including all three domains of RAP and alpha2-macroglobulin, which promotes the catabolism of the Abeta-peptide implicated in Alzheimer's disease. To understand the receptor-ligand cross-talk, the NMR structure of CR56 has been solved and ligand binding experiments with RAP domain 1 (RAPd1) have been performed. From chemical shift perturbations of both binding partners upon complex formation, a HADDOCK model of the complex between CR56 and RAPd1 has been obtained. The binding residues are similar to a common binding motif suggested from alpha2-macroglobulin binding studies and provide evidence for an understanding of their mutual cross-competition pattern. The present structural results convey a simultaneous description of both binding partners of an LRP-ligand complex and open a route to a broader understanding of the binding specificity of the LRP receptor, which may involve a general four-residue receptor-ligand recognition motif common to all LRP ligands. The present result may be beneficial in the design of antagonists of ligand binding to the LDL receptor family, and especially of drugs for treatment of Alzheimer's disease.

  7. Study on effects of molecular crowding on G-quadruplex-ligand binding and ligand-mediated telomerase inhibition.

    PubMed

    Yaku, Hidenobu; Murashima, Takashi; Tateishi-Karimata, Hisae; Nakano, Shu-ichi; Miyoshi, Daisuke; Sugimoto, Naoki

    2013-11-01

    The telomere G-quadruplex-binding and telomerase-inhibiting capacity of two cationic (TMPyP4 and PIPER) and two anionic (phthalocyanine and Hemin) G-quadruplex-ligands were examined under conditions of molecular crowding (MC). Osmotic experiments showed that binding of the anionic ligands, which bind to G-quadruplex DNA via π-π stacking interactions, caused some water molecules to be released from the G-quadruplex/ligand complex; in contrast, a substantial number of water molecules were taken up upon electrostatic binding of the cationic ligands to G-quadruplex DNA. These behaviors of water molecules maintained or reduced the binding affinity of the anionic and the cationic ligands, respectively, under MC conditions. Consequently, the anionic ligands (phthalocyanine and Hemin) robustly inhibited telomerase activity even with MC; in contrast, the inhibition of telomerase caused by cationic TMPyP4 was drastically reduced by MC. These results allow us to conclude that the binding of G-quadruplex-ligands to G-quadruplex via non-electrostatic interactions is preferable for telomerase inhibition under physiological conditions.

  8. Study on effects of molecular crowding on G-quadruplex-ligand binding and ligand-mediated telomerase inhibition.

    PubMed

    Yaku, Hidenobu; Murashima, Takashi; Tateishi-Karimata, Hisae; Nakano, Shu-ichi; Miyoshi, Daisuke; Sugimoto, Naoki

    2013-11-01

    The telomere G-quadruplex-binding and telomerase-inhibiting capacity of two cationic (TMPyP4 and PIPER) and two anionic (phthalocyanine and Hemin) G-quadruplex-ligands were examined under conditions of molecular crowding (MC). Osmotic experiments showed that binding of the anionic ligands, which bind to G-quadruplex DNA via π-π stacking interactions, caused some water molecules to be released from the G-quadruplex/ligand complex; in contrast, a substantial number of water molecules were taken up upon electrostatic binding of the cationic ligands to G-quadruplex DNA. These behaviors of water molecules maintained or reduced the binding affinity of the anionic and the cationic ligands, respectively, under MC conditions. Consequently, the anionic ligands (phthalocyanine and Hemin) robustly inhibited telomerase activity even with MC; in contrast, the inhibition of telomerase caused by cationic TMPyP4 was drastically reduced by MC. These results allow us to conclude that the binding of G-quadruplex-ligands to G-quadruplex via non-electrostatic interactions is preferable for telomerase inhibition under physiological conditions. PMID:23562626

  9. Protein-ligand binding affinity by nonequilibrium free energy methods.

    PubMed

    Cossins, Benjamin P; Foucher, Sebastien; Edge, Colin M; Essex, Jonathan W

    2008-11-27

    Nonequilibrium (NE) free energy methods are embarrassingly parallel and may be very conveniently run on desktop computers using distributed computing software. In recent years there has been a proliferation of NE methods, but these approaches have barely, if at all, been used in the context of calculating protein-ligand binding free energies. In a recent study by these authors, different combinations of NE methods with various test systems were compared and protocols identified which yielded results as accurate as replica exchange thermodynamic integration (RETI). The NE approaches, however, lend themselves to extensive parallelization through the use of distributed computing. Here the best performing of those NE protocols, a replica exchange method using Bennett's acceptance ratio as the free energy estimator (RENE), is applied to two sets of congeneric inhibitors bound to neuraminidase and cyclooxygenase-2. These protein-ligand systems were originally studied with RETI, giving results to which NE and RENE simulations are compared. These NE calculations were carried out on a large, highly distributed group of low-performance desktop computers which are part of a Condor pool. RENE was found to produce results of a predictive quality at least as good as RETI in less than half the wall clock time. However, non-RE NE results were found to be far less predictive. In addition, the RENE method successfully identified a localized region of rapidly changing free energy gradients without the need for prior investigation. These results suggest that the RENE protocol is appropriate for use in the context of predicting protein-ligand binding free energies and that it can offer advantages over conventional, equilibrium approaches. PMID:18973369

  10. A Natural Mutation in Helix 5 of the Ligand Binding Domain of Glucocorticoid Receptor Enhances Receptor-Ligand Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Reyer, Henry; Ponsuksili, Siriluck; Kanitz, Ellen; Pöhland, Ralf; Wimmers, Klaus; Murani, Eduard

    2016-01-01

    The glucocorticoid receptor (GR) is a central player in the neuroendocrine stress response; it mediates feedback regulation of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and physiological actions of glucocorticoids in the periphery. Despite intensive investigations of GR in the context of receptor-ligand interaction, only recently the first naturally occurring gain-of-function substitution, Ala610Val, of the ligand binding domain was identified in mammals. We showed that this mutation underlies a major quantitative trait locus for HPA axis activity in pigs, reducing cortisol production by about 40–50 percent. To unravel the molecular mechanisms behind this gain of function, receptor-ligand interactions were evaluated in silico, in vitro and in vivo. In accordance with previously observed phenotypic effects, the mutant Val610 GR showed significantly increased activation in response to glucocorticoid and non-glucocorticoid steroids, and, as revealed by GR-binding studies in vitro and in pituitary glands, enhanced ligand binding. Concordantly, the protein structure prediction depicted reduced binding distances between the receptor and ligand, and altered interactions in the ligand binding pocket. Consequently, the Ala610Val substitution opens up new structural information for the design of potent GR ligands and to examine effects of the enhanced GR responsiveness to glucocorticoids on the entire organism. PMID:27736993

  11. Ligand Binding and Substrate Discrimination by UDP-Galactopyranose Mutase

    SciTech Connect

    Gruber, Todd D.; Borrok, M. Jack; Westler, William M.; Forest, Katrina T.; Kiessling, Laura L.

    2009-07-31

    Galactofuranose (Galf) residues are present in cell wall glycoconjugates of numerous pathogenic microbes. Uridine 5{prime}-diphosphate (UDP) Galf, the biosynthetic precursor of Galf-containing glycoconjugates, is produced from UDP-galactopyranose (UDP-Galp) by the flavoenzyme UDP-galactopyranose mutase (UGM). The gene encoding UGM (glf) is essential for the viability of pathogens, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and this finding underscores the need to understand how UGM functions. Considerable effort has been devoted to elucidating the catalytic mechanism of UGM, but progress has been hindered by a lack of structural data for an enzyme-substrate complex. Such data could reveal not only substrate binding interactions but how UGM can act preferentially on two very different substrates, UDP-Galp and UDP-Galf, yet avoid other structurally related UDP sugars present in the cell. Herein, we describe the first structure of a UGM-ligand complex, which provides insight into the catalytic mechanism and molecular basis for substrate selectivity. The structure of UGM from Klebsiella pneumoniae bound to the substrate analog UDP-glucose (UDP-Glc) was solved by X-ray crystallographic methods and refined to 2.5 {angstrom} resolution. The ligand is proximal to the cofactor, a finding that is consistent with a proposed mechanism in which the reduced flavin engages in covalent catalysis. Despite this proximity, the glucose ring of the substrate analog is positioned such that it disfavors covalent catalysis. This orientation is consistent with data indicating that UDP-Glc is not a substrate for UGM. The relative binding orientations of UDP-Galp and UDP-Glc were compared using saturation transfer difference NMR. The results indicate that the uridine moiety occupies a similar location in both ligand complexes, and this relevant binding mode is defined by our structural data. In contrast, the orientations of the glucose and galactose sugar moieties differ. To understand the

  12. Ligand deconstruction: Why some fragment binding positions are conserved and others are not.

    PubMed

    Kozakov, Dima; Hall, David R; Jehle, Stefan; Jehle, Sefan; Luo, Lingqi; Ochiana, Stefan O; Jones, Elizabeth V; Pollastri, Michael; Allen, Karen N; Whitty, Adrian; Vajda, Sandor

    2015-05-19

    Fragment-based drug discovery (FBDD) relies on the premise that the fragment binding mode will be conserved on subsequent expansion to a larger ligand. However, no general condition has been established to explain when fragment binding modes will be conserved. We show that a remarkably simple condition can be developed in terms of how fragments coincide with binding energy hot spots--regions of the protein where interactions with a ligand contribute substantial binding free energy--the locations of which can easily be determined computationally. Because a substantial fraction of the free energy of ligand binding comes from interacting with the residues in the energetically most important hot spot, a ligand moiety that sufficiently overlaps with this region will retain its location even when other parts of the ligand are removed. This hypothesis is supported by eight case studies. The condition helps identify whether a protein is suitable for FBDD, predicts the size of fragments required for screening, and determines whether a fragment hit can be extended into a higher affinity ligand. Our results show that ligand binding sites can usefully be thought of in terms of an anchor site, which is the top-ranked hot spot and dominates the free energy of binding, surrounded by a number of weaker satellite sites that confer improved affinity and selectivity for a particular ligand and that it is the intrinsic binding potential of the protein surface that determines whether it can serve as a robust binding site for a suitably optimized ligand. PMID:25918377

  13. Unspecific Cooperative Ligand Binding to One-Dimensional Lattice-like Macromolecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velazquez-Campoy, Adrian

    2006-08-01

    Unspecific ligand binding to one-dimensional lattice-like macromolecules, a common event in nature (e.g. ligand/protein binding to DNA and certain carbohydrates), presents distinctive features when compared to specific ligand binding to macromolecules. McGhee and von Hippel developed a mathematical formalism in the form of the Scatchard representation. This article presents the application of the theory for unspecific cooperative ligand binding to linear lattice-like macromolecules in isothermal titration calorimetry following an exact and accurate method, without the limitations and deficiencies of the Scatchard formalism.

  14. Ligand deconstruction: Why some fragment binding positions are conserved and others are not

    PubMed Central

    Kozakov, Dima; Hall, David R.; Jehle, Stefan; Luo, Lingqi; Ochiana, Stefan O.; Jones, Elizabeth V.; Pollastri, Michael; Allen, Karen N.; Whitty, Adrian; Vajda, Sandor

    2015-01-01

    Fragment-based drug discovery (FBDD) relies on the premise that the fragment binding mode will be conserved on subsequent expansion to a larger ligand. However, no general condition has been established to explain when fragment binding modes will be conserved. We show that a remarkably simple condition can be developed in terms of how fragments coincide with binding energy hot spots—regions of the protein where interactions with a ligand contribute substantial binding free energy—the locations of which can easily be determined computationally. Because a substantial fraction of the free energy of ligand binding comes from interacting with the residues in the energetically most important hot spot, a ligand moiety that sufficiently overlaps with this region will retain its location even when other parts of the ligand are removed. This hypothesis is supported by eight case studies. The condition helps identify whether a protein is suitable for FBDD, predicts the size of fragments required for screening, and determines whether a fragment hit can be extended into a higher affinity ligand. Our results show that ligand binding sites can usefully be thought of in terms of an anchor site, which is the top-ranked hot spot and dominates the free energy of binding, surrounded by a number of weaker satellite sites that confer improved affinity and selectivity for a particular ligand and that it is the intrinsic binding potential of the protein surface that determines whether it can serve as a robust binding site for a suitably optimized ligand. PMID:25918377

  15. Ligand-binding assays for cyanobacterial neurotoxins targeting cholinergic receptors.

    PubMed

    Aráoz, Rómulo; Vilariño, Natalia; Botana, Luis M; Molgó, Jordi

    2010-07-01

    Toxic cyanobacterial blooms are a threat to public health because of the capacity of some cyanobacterial species to produce potent hepatotoxins and neurotoxins. Cyanobacterial neurotoxins are involved in the rapid death of wild and domestic animals by targeting voltage gated sodium channels and cholinergic synapses, including the neuromuscular junction. Anatoxin-a and its methylene homologue homoanatoxin-a are potent agonists of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. Since the structural determination of anatoxin-a, several mass spectrometry-based methods have been developed for detection of anatoxin-a and, later, homoanatoxin-a. Mass spectrometry-based techniques provide accuracy, precision, selectivity, sensitivity, reproducibility, adequate limit of detection, and structural and quantitative information for analyses of cyanobacterial anatoxins from cultured and environmental cyanobacterial samples. However, these physicochemical techniques will only detect known toxins for which toxin standards are commercially available, and they require highly specialized laboratory personnel and expensive equipment. Receptor-based assays are functional methods that are based on the mechanism of action of a class of toxins and are thus, suitable tools for survey of freshwater reservoirs for cyanobacterial anatoxins. The competition between cyanobacterial anatoxins and a labelled ligand for binding to nicotinic acetylcholine receptors is measured radioactively or non-radioactively providing high-throughput screening formats for routine detection of this class of neurotoxins. The mouse bioassay is the method of choice for marine toxin monitoring, but has to be replaced by fully validated functional methods. In this paper we review the ligand-binding assays developed for detection of cyanobacterial and algal neurotoxins targeting the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and for high-throughput screening of novel nicotinic agents.

  16. Integration of Genome-Wide Computation DRE Search, AhR ChIP-chip and Gene Expression Analyses of TCDD-Elicited Responses in the Mouse Liver

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor (TF) that mediates responses to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). Integration of TCDD-induced genome-wide AhR enrichment, differential gene expression and computational dioxin response element (DRE) analyses further elucidate the hepatic AhR regulatory network. Results Global ChIP-chip and gene expression analyses were performed on hepatic tissue from immature ovariectomized mice orally gavaged with 30 μg/kg TCDD. ChIP-chip analysis identified 14,446 and 974 AhR enriched regions (1% false discovery rate) at 2 and 24 hrs, respectively. Enrichment density was greatest in the proximal promoter, and more specifically, within ± 1.5 kb of a transcriptional start site (TSS). AhR enrichment also occurred distal to a TSS (e.g. intergenic DNA and 3' UTR), extending the potential gene expression regulatory roles of the AhR. Although TF binding site analyses identified over-represented DRE sequences within enriched regions, approximately 50% of all AhR enriched regions lacked a DRE core (5'-GCGTG-3'). Microarray analysis identified 1,896 number of TCDD-responsive genes (|fold change| ≥ 1.5, P1(t) > 0.999). Integrating this gene expression data with our ChIP-chip and DRE analyses only identified 625 differentially expressed genes that involved an AhR interaction at a DRE. Functional annotation analysis of differentially regulated genes associated with AhR enrichment identified overrepresented processes related to fatty acid and lipid metabolism and transport, and xenobiotic metabolism, which are consistent with TCDD-elicited steatosis in the mouse liver. Conclusions Details of the AhR regulatory network have been expanded to include AhR-DNA interactions within intragenic and intergenic genomic regions. Moreover, the AhR can interact with DNA independent of a DRE core suggesting there are alternative mechanisms of AhR-mediated gene regulation. PMID:21762485

  17. Enthalpy/entropy compensation effects from cavity desolvation underpin broad ligand binding selectivity for rat odorant binding protein 3.

    PubMed

    Portman, Katherine L; Long, Jed; Carr, Stephen; Briand, Loïc; Winzor, Donald J; Searle, Mark S; Scott, David J

    2014-04-15

    Evolution has produced proteins with exquisite ligand binding specificity, and manipulating this effect has been the basis for much of modern rational drug design. However, there are general classes of proteins with broader ligand selectivity linked to function, the origin of which is poorly understood. The odorant binding proteins (OBPs) sequester volatile molecules for transportation to the olfactory receptors. Rat OBP3, which we characterize by X-ray crystallography and NMR, binds a homologous series of aliphatic γ-lactones within its aromatic-rich hydrophobic pocket with remarkably little variation in affinity but extensive enthalpy/entropy compensation effects. We show that the binding energetics are modulated by two desolvation processes with quite different thermodynamic signatures. Ligand desolvation follows the classical hydrophobic effect; however, cavity desolvation is consistent with the liberation of "high energy" water molecules back into bulk solvent with a strong, but compensated, enthalpic contribution, which together underpin the origins of broad ligand binding selectivity.

  18. Disulfide bridge regulates ligand-binding site selectivity in liver bile acid-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Cogliati, Clelia; Tomaselli, Simona; Assfalg, Michael; Pedò, Massimo; Ferranti, Pasquale; Zetta, Lucia; Molinari, Henriette; Ragona, Laura

    2009-10-01

    Bile acid-binding proteins (BABPs) are cytosolic lipid chaperones that play central roles in driving bile flow, as well as in the adaptation to various pathological conditions, contributing to the maintenance of bile acid homeostasis and functional distribution within the cell. Understanding the mode of binding of bile acids with their cytoplasmic transporters is a key issue in providing a model for the mechanism of their transfer from the cytoplasm to the nucleus, for delivery to nuclear receptors. A number of factors have been shown to modulate bile salt selectivity, stoichiometry, and affinity of binding to BABPs, e.g. chemistry of the ligand, protein plasticity and, possibly, the formation of disulfide bridges. Here, the effects of the presence of a naturally occurring disulfide bridge on liver BABP ligand-binding properties and backbone dynamics have been investigated by NMR. Interestingly, the disulfide bridge does not modify the protein-binding stoichiometry, but has a key role in modulating recognition at both sites, inducing site selectivity for glycocholic and glycochenodeoxycholic acid. Protein conformational changes following the introduction of a disulfide bridge are small and located around the inner binding site, whereas significant changes in backbone motions are observed for several residues distributed over the entire protein, both in the apo form and in the holo form. Site selectivity appears, therefore, to be dependent on protein mobility rather than being governed by steric factors. The detected properties further establish a parallelism with the behaviour of human ileal BABP, substantiating the proposal that BABPs have parallel functions in hepatocytes and enterocytes. PMID:19754879

  19. Disulfide bridge regulates ligand-binding site selectivity in liver bile acid-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Cogliati, Clelia; Tomaselli, Simona; Assfalg, Michael; Pedò, Massimo; Ferranti, Pasquale; Zetta, Lucia; Molinari, Henriette; Ragona, Laura

    2009-10-01

    Bile acid-binding proteins (BABPs) are cytosolic lipid chaperones that play central roles in driving bile flow, as well as in the adaptation to various pathological conditions, contributing to the maintenance of bile acid homeostasis and functional distribution within the cell. Understanding the mode of binding of bile acids with their cytoplasmic transporters is a key issue in providing a model for the mechanism of their transfer from the cytoplasm to the nucleus, for delivery to nuclear receptors. A number of factors have been shown to modulate bile salt selectivity, stoichiometry, and affinity of binding to BABPs, e.g. chemistry of the ligand, protein plasticity and, possibly, the formation of disulfide bridges. Here, the effects of the presence of a naturally occurring disulfide bridge on liver BABP ligand-binding properties and backbone dynamics have been investigated by NMR. Interestingly, the disulfide bridge does not modify the protein-binding stoichiometry, but has a key role in modulating recognition at both sites, inducing site selectivity for glycocholic and glycochenodeoxycholic acid. Protein conformational changes following the introduction of a disulfide bridge are small and located around the inner binding site, whereas significant changes in backbone motions are observed for several residues distributed over the entire protein, both in the apo form and in the holo form. Site selectivity appears, therefore, to be dependent on protein mobility rather than being governed by steric factors. The detected properties further establish a parallelism with the behaviour of human ileal BABP, substantiating the proposal that BABPs have parallel functions in hepatocytes and enterocytes.

  20. Computational Exploration of a Protein Receptor Binding Space with Student Proposed Peptide Ligands

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Matthew D.; Phillips, Paul; Turner, Matthew W.; Katz, Michael; Lew, Sarah; Bradburn, Sarah; Andersen, Tim; McDougal, Owen M.

    2016-01-01

    Computational molecular docking is a fast and effective "in silico" method for the analysis of binding between a protein receptor model and a ligand. The visualization and manipulation of protein to ligand binding in three-dimensional space represents a powerful tool in the biochemistry curriculum to enhance student learning. The…

  1. Spatial analysis and quantification of the thermodynamic driving forces in protein-ligand binding: binding site variability.

    PubMed

    Raman, E Prabhu; MacKerell, Alexander D

    2015-02-25

    The thermodynamic driving forces behind small molecule-protein binding are still not well-understood, including the variability of those forces associated with different types of ligands in different binding pockets. To better understand these phenomena we calculate spatially resolved thermodynamic contributions of the different molecular degrees of freedom for the binding of propane and methanol to multiple pockets on the proteins Factor Xa and p38 MAP kinase. Binding thermodynamics are computed using a statistical thermodynamics based end-point method applied on a canonical ensemble comprising the protein-ligand complexes and the corresponding free states in an explicit solvent environment. Energetic and entropic contributions of water and ligand degrees of freedom computed from the configurational ensemble provide an unprecedented level of detail into the mechanisms of binding. Direct protein-ligand interaction energies play a significant role in both nonpolar and polar binding, which is comparable to water reorganization energy. Loss of interactions with water upon binding strongly compensates these contributions leading to relatively small binding enthalpies. For both solutes, the entropy of water reorganization is found to favor binding in agreement with the classical view of the "hydrophobic effect". Depending on the specifics of the binding pocket, both energy-entropy compensation and reinforcement mechanisms are observed. It is notable to have the ability to visualize the spatial distribution of the thermodynamic contributions to binding at atomic resolution showing significant differences in the thermodynamic contributions of water to the binding of propane versus methanol. PMID:25625202

  2. How to deal with multiple binding poses in alchemical relative protein-ligand binding free energy calculations.

    PubMed

    Kaus, Joseph W; Harder, Edward; Lin, Teng; Abel, Robert; McCammon, J Andrew; Wang, Lingle

    2015-06-01

    Recent advances in improved force fields and sampling methods have made it possible for the accurate calculation of protein–ligand binding free energies. Alchemical free energy perturbation (FEP) using an explicit solvent model is one of the most rigorous methods to calculate relative binding free energies. However, for cases where there are high energy barriers separating the relevant conformations that are important for ligand binding, the calculated free energy may depend on the initial conformation used in the simulation due to the lack of complete sampling of all the important regions in phase space. This is particularly true for ligands with multiple possible binding modes separated by high energy barriers, making it difficult to sample all relevant binding modes even with modern enhanced sampling methods. In this paper, we apply a previously developed method that provides a corrected binding free energy for ligands with multiple binding modes by combining the free energy results from multiple alchemical FEP calculations starting from all enumerated poses, and the results are compared with Glide docking and MM-GBSA calculations. From these calculations, the dominant ligand binding mode can also be predicted. We apply this method to a series of ligands that bind to c-Jun N-terminal kinase-1 (JNK1) and obtain improved free energy results. The dominant ligand binding modes predicted by this method agree with the available crystallography, while both Glide docking and MM-GBSA calculations incorrectly predict the binding modes for some ligands. The method also helps separate the force field error from the ligand sampling error, such that deviations in the predicted binding free energy from the experimental values likely indicate possible inaccuracies in the force field. An error in the force field for a subset of the ligands studied was identified using this method, and improved free energy results were obtained by correcting the partial charges assigned to the

  3. Bioluminescent Ligand-Receptor Binding Assays for Protein or Peptide Hormones.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ya-Li; Guo, Zhan-Yun

    2016-01-01

    Bioluminescence has been widely used in biomedical research due to its high sensitivity, low background, and broad linear range. In recent studies, we applied bioluminescence to ligand-receptor binding assays for some protein or peptide hormones based on a newly developed small monomeric Nanoluciferase (NanoLuc) reporter that has the so far brightest bioluminescence. The conventional ligand-receptor binding assays rely on radioligands that have drawbacks, such as radioactive hazards and short shelf lives. In contrast, the novel bioluminescent binding assays use the NanoLuc-based protein or peptide tracers that are safe, stable, and ultrasensitive. Thus, the novel bioluminescent ligand-receptor binding assay would be applied to more and more protein or peptide hormones for ligand-receptor interaction studies in future. In the present article, we provided detailed protocols for setting up the novel bioluminescent ligand-receptor binding assays using two representative protein hormones as examples. PMID:27424896

  4. Uncoupling the Structure-Activity Relationships of β2 Adrenergic Receptor Ligands from Membrane Binding.

    PubMed

    Dickson, Callum J; Hornak, Viktor; Velez-Vega, Camilo; McKay, Daniel J J; Reilly, John; Sandham, David A; Shaw, Duncan; Fairhurst, Robin A; Charlton, Steven J; Sykes, David A; Pearlstein, Robert A; Duca, Jose S

    2016-06-23

    Ligand binding to membrane proteins may be significantly influenced by the interaction of ligands with the membrane. In particular, the microscopic ligand concentration within the membrane surface solvation layer may exceed that in bulk solvent, resulting in overestimation of the intrinsic protein-ligand binding contribution to the apparent/measured affinity. Using published binding data for a set of small molecules with the β2 adrenergic receptor, we demonstrate that deconvolution of membrane and protein binding contributions allows for improved structure-activity relationship analysis and structure-based drug design. Molecular dynamics simulations of ligand bound membrane protein complexes were used to validate binding poses, allowing analysis of key interactions and binding site solvation to develop structure-activity relationships of β2 ligand binding. The resulting relationships are consistent with intrinsic binding affinity (corrected for membrane interaction). The successful structure-based design of ligands targeting membrane proteins may require an assessment of membrane affinity to uncouple protein binding from membrane interactions. PMID:27239696

  5. A tandem regression-outlier analysis of a ligand cellular system for key structural modifications around ligand binding

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background A tandem technique of hard equipment is often used for the chemical analysis of a single cell to first isolate and then detect the wanted identities. The first part is the separation of wanted chemicals from the bulk of a cell; the second part is the actual detection of the important identities. To identify the key structural modifications around ligand binding, the present study aims to develop a counterpart of tandem technique for cheminformatics. A statistical regression and its outliers act as a computational technique for separation. Results A PPARγ (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma) agonist cellular system was subjected to such an investigation. Results show that this tandem regression-outlier analysis, or the prioritization of the context equations tagged with features of the outliers, is an effective regression technique of cheminformatics to detect key structural modifications, as well as their tendency of impact to ligand binding. Conclusions The key structural modifications around ligand binding are effectively extracted or characterized out of cellular reactions. This is because molecular binding is the paramount factor in such ligand cellular system and key structural modifications around ligand binding are expected to create outliers. Therefore, such outliers can be captured by this tandem regression-outlier analysis. PMID:23627990

  6. Multipurpose ligand, DAKLI (Dynorphin A-analogue Kappa LIgand), with high affinity and selectivity for dynorphin (. kappa. opioid) binding sites

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, A.; Nestor, J.J. Jr.; Naidu, A.; Newman, S.R. )

    1988-10-01

    The authors describe a synthetic ligand, DALKI (Dynorphin A-analogue Kappa LIgand), related to the opioid peptide dynorphin A. A single reactive amino group at the extended carboxyl terminus permits various reporter groups to be attached, such as {sup 125}I-labeled Bolton-Hunter reagent, fluorescein isothiocyanate, or biotin. These derivatives have high affinity and selectivity for the dynorphin ({kappa} opioid) receptor. An incidental finding is that untreated guinea pig brain membranes have saturable avidin binding sites.

  7. Appropriate calibration curve fitting in ligand binding assays.

    PubMed

    Findlay, John W A; Dillard, Robert F

    2007-06-29

    Calibration curves for ligand binding assays are generally characterized by a nonlinear relationship between the mean response and the analyte concentration. Typically, the response exhibits a sigmoidal relationship with concentration. The currently accepted reference model for these calibration curves is the 4-parameter logistic (4-PL) model, which optimizes accuracy and precision over the maximum usable calibration range. Incorporation of weighting into the model requires additional effort but generally results in improved calibration curve performance. For calibration curves with some asymmetry, introduction of a fifth parameter (5-PL) may further improve the goodness of fit of the experimental data to the algorithm. Alternative models should be used with caution and with knowledge of the accuracy and precision performance of the model across the entire calibration range, but particularly at upper and lower analyte concentration areas, where the 4- and 5-PL algorithms generally outperform alternative models. Several assay design parameters, such as placement of calibrator concentrations across the selected range and assay layout on multiwell plates, should be considered, to enable optimal application of the 4- or 5-PL model. The fit of the experimental data to the model should be evaluated by assessment of agreement of nominal and model-predicted data for calibrators.

  8. Quantitative Analysis of Multivalent Ligand Presentation on Gold Glyconanoparticles and Their Effects on Protein Binding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xin; Ramström, Olof; Yan, Mingdi

    2010-03-01

    Bio-functionalized nanomaterials, which combine functions of biological ligands and unique properties of nano-sized building blocks, have exhibited increased potential applications in biosensing, therapeutics, and diagnostics. Glyconanoparitcles carrying a monolayer of carbohydrate ligands on nanoparticles provide an excellent platform for sensitive protein recognitions. Using Au nanoparticles as the scaffold, multivalent interactions between glycan ligands and proteins have been demonstrated. However, quantitative analysis especially the binding affinity of the resulting glyconanoparticles is challenging to determine. Here we present a new characterization technique, based on fluorescent competition binding assays, for measuring dissociation constants for glyconanoparticles-protein interactions. Au nanoparticles coupled with a series of un-derivatized carbohydrates were prepared by a photocoupling chemistry. Dramatic binding affinity enhancement was observed due to the high ligand density on nanoparticles, which was highly relevant to ligand display, controlled by the linker type, chain length, ligand size and density.

  9. Water networks contribute to enthalpy/entropy compensation in protein-ligand binding.

    PubMed

    Breiten, Benjamin; Lockett, Matthew R; Sherman, Woody; Fujita, Shuji; Al-Sayah, Mohammad; Lange, Heiko; Bowers, Carleen M; Heroux, Annie; Krilov, Goran; Whitesides, George M

    2013-10-16

    The mechanism (or mechanisms) of enthalpy-entropy (H/S) compensation in protein-ligand binding remains controversial, and there are still no predictive models (theoretical or experimental) in which hypotheses of ligand binding can be readily tested. Here we describe a particularly well-defined system of protein and ligands--human carbonic anhydrase (HCA) and a series of benzothiazole sulfonamide ligands with different patterns of fluorination--that we use to define enthalpy/entropy (H/S) compensation in this system thermodynamically and structurally. The binding affinities of these ligands (with the exception of one ligand, in which the deviation is understood) to HCA are, despite differences in fluorination pattern, indistinguishable; they nonetheless reflect significant and compensating changes in enthalpy and entropy of binding. Analysis reveals that differences in the structure and thermodynamic properties of the waters surrounding the bound ligands are an important contributor to the observed H/S compensation. These results support the hypothesis that the molecules of water filling the active site of a protein, and surrounding the ligand, are as important as the contact interactions between the protein and the ligand for biomolecular recognition, and in determining the thermodynamics of binding.

  10. DNA-Based Nanostructures: Changes of Mechanical Properties of DNA upon Ligand Binding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nechipurenko, Yury; Grokhovsky, Sergey; Gursky, Georgy; Nechipurenko, Dmitry; Polozov, Robert

    The formation of DNA-based nanostructures involves the binding of different kinds of ligands to DNA as well as the interaction of DNA molecules with each other. Complex formation between ligand and DNA can alter physicochemical properties of the DNA molecule. In the present work, the accessibility of DNA-ligand complexes to cleavage by DNase I are considered, and the exact algorithms for analysis of diagrams of DNase I footprinting for ligand-DNA complexes are obtained. Changes of mechanical properties of the DNA upon ligand binding are also demonstrated by the cleavage patterns generated upon ultrasound irradiation of cis-platin-DNA complexes. Propagation of the mechanical perturbations along DNA in the presence of bound ligands is considered in terms of a string model with a heterogeneity corresponding to the position of a bound ligand on DNA. This model can reproduce qualitatively the cleavage patterns obtained upon ultrasound irradiation of cis-platin-DNA complexes.

  11. Ligand binding cooperativity: Bioisosteric replacement of CO with SO2 among thrombin inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Said, Ahmed M; Hangauer, David G

    2016-08-15

    Ligand-protein binding is a complex process that involves the formation of number of non-covalent interactions, e.g. H-bonds and hydrophobic interactions, between the ligand and the protein host. Upon binding, ligand functional groups can act synergistically (positive cooperativity) to improve the overall ligand binding affinity beyond what would be expected from their individual contributions. In this study, using thrombin as a protein model system, we evaluated the effect of the bioisosteric replacement of a carbonyl functionality with a sulphonyl functionality on positive cooperativity between their H-bonds with thrombin and hydrophobic binding in the adjacent S3 pocket. The positive cooperativity observed was greatly reduced when replacing the carbonyl group with a sulphonyl group. Evaluating how bioisosteric replacements affect cooperativity is important for making better informed ligand optimization SAR decisions. PMID:27445170

  12. Potential ligand-binding residues in rat olfactory receptors identified by correlated mutation analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singer, M. S.; Oliveira, L.; Vriend, G.; Shepherd, G. M.

    1995-01-01

    A family of G-protein-coupled receptors is believed to mediate the recognition of odor molecules. In order to identify potential ligand-binding residues, we have applied correlated mutation analysis to receptor sequences from the rat. This method identifies pairs of sequence positions where residues remain conserved or mutate in tandem, thereby suggesting structural or functional importance. The analysis supported molecular modeling studies in suggesting several residues in positions that were consistent with ligand-binding function. Two of these positions, dominated by histidine residues, may play important roles in ligand binding and could confer broad specificity to mammalian odor receptors. The presence of positive (overdominant) selection at some of the identified positions provides additional evidence for roles in ligand binding. Higher-order groups of correlated residues were also observed. Each group may interact with an individual ligand determinant, and combinations of these groups may provide a multi-dimensional mechanism for receptor diversity.

  13. Identifying ligand binding sites and poses using GPU-accelerated Hamiltonian replica exchange molecular dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kai; Yang, Yanzhi; Chodera, John D.; Shirts, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    We present a method to identify small molecule ligand binding sites and orientations to a given protein crystal structure using GPU-accelerated Hamiltonian replica exchange molecular dynamics simulations. The Hamiltonians used vary from the physical end state of protein interacting with the ligand to a unphysical end state where the ligand does not interact with the protein. As replicas explore the space of Hamiltonians interpolating between these states the ligand can rapidly escape local minima and explore potential binding sites. Geometric restraints keep the ligands within the protein volume, and a potential energy pathway designed to increase phase space overlap between intermediates ensures good mixing. Because of the rigorous statistical mechanical nature of the Hamiltonian exchange framework, we can also extract binding free energy estimates at all putative binding sites, which agree well with free energies computed from occupation probabilities. We present results of this methodology on the T4 lysozyme L99A model system with four ligands, including one non-binder as a control. We find that our methodology identifies the crystallographic binding sites consistently and accurately for the small number of ligands considered here and gives free energies consistent with experiment. We are also able to analyze the contribution of individual binding sites on the overall binding affinity. Our methodology points to near term potential applications in early-stage drug discovery. PMID:24297454

  14. Inhibition of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor prevents Western diet-induced obesity. Model for AHR activation by kynurenine via oxidized-LDL, TLR2/4, TGFβ, and IDO1.

    PubMed

    Moyer, Benjamin J; Rojas, Itzel Y; Kerley-Hamilton, Joanna S; Hazlett, Haley F; Nemani, Krishnamurthy V; Trask, Heidi W; West, Rachel J; Lupien, Leslie E; Collins, Alan J; Ringelberg, Carol S; Gimi, Barjor; Kinlaw, William B; Tomlinson, Craig R

    2016-06-01

    Obesity is an increasingly urgent global problem, yet, little is known about its causes and less is known how obesity can be effectively treated. We showed previously that the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) plays a role in the regulation of body mass in mice fed Western diet. The AHR is a ligand-activated nuclear receptor that regulates genes involved in a number of biological pathways, including xenobiotic metabolism and T cell polarization. This study was an investigation into whether inhibition of the AHR prevents Western diet-based obesity. Male C57Bl/6J mice were fed control and Western diets with and without the AHR antagonist α-naphthoflavone or CH-223191, and a mouse hepatocyte cell line was used to delineate relevant cellular pathways. Studies are presented showing that the AHR antagonists α-naphthoflavone and CH-223191 significantly reduce obesity and adiposity and ameliorates liver steatosis in male C57Bl/6J mice fed a Western diet. Mice deficient in the tryptophan metabolizing enzyme indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase 1 (IDO1) were also resistant to obesity. Using an AHR-directed, luciferase-expressing mouse hepatocyte cell line, we show that the transforming growth factor β1 (TGFβ1) signaling pathway via PI3K and NF-κB and the toll-like receptor 2/4 (TLR2/4) signaling pathway stimulated by oxidized low-density lipoproteins via NF-κB, each induce luciferase expression; however, TLR2/4 signaling was significantly reduced by inhibition of IDO1. At physiological levels, kynurenine but not kynurenic acid (both tryptophan metabolites and known AHR agonists) activated AHR-directed luciferase expression. We propose a hepatocyte-based model, in which kynurenine production is increased by enhanced IDO1 activity stimulated by TGFβ1 and TLR2/4 signaling, via PI3K and NF-κB, to perpetuate a cycle of AHR activation to cause obesity; and inhibition of the AHR, in turn, blocks the cycle's output to prevent obesity. The AHR with its broad ligand binding specificity

  15. Detection of persistent organic pollutants binding modes with androgen receptor ligand binding domain by docking and molecular dynamics

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Persistent organic pollutants (POPs) are persistent in the environment after release from industrial compounds, combustion productions or pesticides. The exposure of POPs has been related to various reproductive disturbances, such as reduced semen quality, testicular cancer, and imbalanced sex ratio. Among POPs, dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (4,4’-DDE) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are the most widespread and well-studied compounds. Recent studies have revealed that 4,4’-DDE is an antagonist of androgen receptor (AR). However, the mechanism of the inhibition remains elusive. CB-153 is the most common congener of PCBs, while the action of CB-153 on AR is still under debate. Results Molecular docking and molecular dynamics (MD) approaches have been employed to study binding modes and inhibition mechanism of 4,4’-DDE and CB-153 against AR ligand binding domain (LBD). Several potential binding sites have been detected and analyzed. One possible binding site is the same binding site of AR natural ligand androgen 5α-dihydrotestosterone (DHT). Another one is on the ligand-dependent transcriptional activation function (AF2) region, which is crucial for the co-activators recruitment. Besides, a novel possible binding site was observed for POPs with low binding free energy with the receptor. Detailed interactions between ligands and the receptor have been represented. The disrupting mechanism of POPs against AR has also been discussed. Conclusions POPs disrupt the function of AR through binding to three possible biding sites on AR/LBD. One of them shares the same binding site of natural ligand of AR. Another one is on AF2 region. The third one is in a cleft near N-terminal of the receptor. Significantly, values of binding free energy of POPs with AR/LBD are comparable to that of natural ligand androgen DHT. PMID:24053684

  16. Influence of length and flexibility of spacers on the binding affinity of divalent ligands.

    PubMed

    Liese, Susanne; Netz, Roland R

    2015-01-01

    We present a quantitative model for the binding of divalent ligand-receptor systems. We study the influence of length and flexibility of the spacers on the overall binding affinity and derive general rules for the optimal ligand design. To this end, we first compare different polymeric models and determine the probability to simultaneously bind to two neighboring receptor binding pockets. In a second step the binding affinity of divalent ligands in terms of the IC50 value is derived. We find that a divalent ligand has the potential to bind more efficiently than its monovalent counterpart only, if the monovalent dissociation constant is lower than a critical value. This critical monovalent dissociation constant depends on the ligand-spacer length and flexibility as well as on the size of the receptor. Regarding the optimal ligand-spacer length and flexibility, we find that the average spacer length should be equal or slightly smaller than the distance between the receptor binding pockets and that the end-to-end spacer length fluctuations should be in the same range as the size of a receptor binding pocket.

  17. Identification of ligands that target the HCV-E2 binding site on CD81.

    PubMed

    Olaby, Reem Al; Azzazy, Hassan M; Harris, Rodney; Chromy, Brett; Vielmetter, Jost; Balhorn, Rod

    2013-04-01

    Hepatitis C is a global health problem. While many drug companies have active R&D efforts to develop new drugs for treating Hepatitis C virus (HCV), most target the viral enzymes. The HCV glycoprotein E2 has been shown to play an essential role in hepatocyte invasion by binding to CD81 and other cell surface receptors. This paper describes the use of AutoDock to identify ligand binding sites on the large extracellular loop of the open conformation of CD81 and to perform virtual screening runs to identify sets of small molecule ligands predicted to bind to two of these sites. The best sites selected by AutoLigand were located in regions identified by mutational studies to be the site of E2 binding. Thirty-six ligands predicted by AutoDock to bind to these sites were subsequently tested experimentally to determine if they bound to CD81-LEL. Binding assays conducted using surface Plasmon resonance revealed that 26 out of 36 (72 %) of the ligands bound in vitro to the recombinant CD81-LEL protein. Competition experiments performed using dual polarization interferometry showed that one of the ligands predicted to bind to the large cleft between the C and D helices was also effective in blocking E2 binding to CD81-LEL.

  18. Dewetting-Controlled Binding of Ligands to Hydrophobic Pockets

    PubMed Central

    Setny, P.; Wang, Z.; Cheng, L.-T.; Li, B.; McCammon, J. A.; Dzubiella, J.

    2010-01-01

    We report on a combined atomistic molecular dynamics simulation and implicit solvent analysis of a generic hydrophobic pocket-ligand (host-guest) system. The approaching ligand induces complex wetting-dewetting transitions in the weakly solvated pocket. The transitions lead to bimodal solvent fluctuations which govern magnitude and range of the pocket-ligand attraction. A recently developed implicit water model, based on the minimization of a geometric functional, captures the sensitive aqueous interface response to the concave-convex pocket-ligand configuration semiquantitatively. PMID:19905832

  19. Copper binding ligands: production by marine plankton and characterization by ESI-MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orians, K.; Ross, A.; Lawrence, M.; Ikonomou, M.

    2003-04-01

    Organic complexation affects the bioavailability and distribution of copper in the surface ocean. The cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 was cultured in the lab and subjected to near-toxic Cu concentrations. Strong Cu-binding ligands were produced under these conditions, as found for other species of Synechococcus. The copper-binding ligand produced had a log K'cond. (log conditional stability constant) of 12.2, similar to the natural ligands found in the surface ocean. The amount of ligand produced was proportional to the amount of copper present. Isolation and concentration of these compounds for characterization by electrospray mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) provides information about the structure of the organic ligands and their metal-ion complexes. Using model ligands, we'll show that ligands can be characterized by ESI-MS and that the location of the copper binding site can be determined in complex molecules. We'll also present results of copper-complexing ligands extracted from the coastal waters of British Columbia. Ligand concentrations are higher at low salinity and in surface waters, indicating that these ligands are produced in surface waters and/or delivered to the region via the Fraser River. Analysis of the extracts with highest UV absorbance identified two Cu2+ ligands of molecular weight 259 and 264. The mass and isotopic distributions are consistent with dipeptides and tripeptides containing two metal-binding amino groups. This result is consistent with the findings of other studies attempting to characterize Cu2+ ligands in seawater. The structure of the identified ligand is similar to that of rhodotorulic acid (a microbial siderophore), glutathione, and phytochelatins, indicating that small peptides and related compounds can act as strong, specific metal chelators in natural waters

  20. Naturally-Occurring Marine Brominated Indoles are Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Ligands/Agonists

    PubMed Central

    DeGroot, Danica E.; Franks, Diana G.; Higa, Tatsuo; Tanaka, Junichi; Hahn, Mark E.; Denison, Michael S.

    2015-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a ligand-dependent transcription factor that mediates the toxic and biological effects of structurally diverse chemicals, including the environmental contaminant 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). As part of a larger effort to identify the full spectrum of chemicals that can bind to and activate the AhR, we have examined the ability of several naturally-occurring marine-derived brominated indoles and brominated (methylthio)indoles (collectively referred to as “brominated indoles”) to bind to the AhR and stimulate AhR-dependent gene expression. Incubation of mouse, rat and guinea pig recombinant cell lines containing a stably transfected AhR-responsive luciferase reporter gene with eight brominated indoles revealed that all compounds stimulated luciferase reporter gene activity, although some species-specific differences were observed. All compounds induced significantly more luciferase activity when incubated with cells for 4 h as compared to 24 h, demonstrating that these compounds are transient activators of the AhR signaling pathway. Three of the brominated indoles induced CYP1A1 mRNA in human HepG2 cells in vitro and Cyp1a mRNA in zebrafish embryos in vivo. The identification of the brominated indoles as direct ligands and activators/agonists of the AhR was confirmed by their ability to compete with [3H]TCDD for binding to the AhR and to stimulate AhR transformation and DNA binding in vitro. Taken together, these marine-derived brominated indoles are members of a new class of naturally-occurring AhR agonists. PMID:26001051

  1. Computational protocol for predicting the binding affinities of zinc containing metalloprotein-ligand complexes.

    PubMed

    Jain, Tarun; Jayaram, B

    2007-06-01

    Zinc is one of the most important metal ions found in proteins performing specific functions associated with life processes. Coordination geometry of the zinc ion in the active site of the metalloprotein-ligand complexes poses a challenge in determining ligand binding affinities accurately in structure-based drug design. We report here an all atom force field based computational protocol for estimating rapidly the binding affinities of zinc containing metalloprotein-ligand complexes, considering electrostatics, van der Waals, hydrophobicity, and loss in conformational entropy of protein side chains upon ligand binding along with a nonbonded approach to model the interactions of the zinc ion with all the other atoms of the complex. We examined the sensitivity of the binding affinity predictions to the choice of Lennard-Jones parameters, partial atomic charges, and dielectric treatments adopted for system preparation and scoring. The highest correlation obtained was R2 = 0.77 (r = 0.88) for the predicted binding affinity against the experiment on a heterogenous dataset of 90 zinc containing metalloprotein-ligand complexes consisting of five unique protein targets. Model validation and parameter analysis studies underscore the robustness and predictive ability of the scoring function. The high correlation obtained suggests the potential applicability of the methodology in designing novel ligands for zinc-metalloproteins. The scoring function has been web enabled for free access at www.scfbio-iitd.res.in/software/drugdesign/bapplz.jsp as BAPPL-Z server (Binding Affinity Prediction of Protein-Ligand complexes containing Zinc metal ions).

  2. Fringe-mediated extension of O-linked fucose in the ligand-binding region of Notch1 increases binding to mammalian Notch ligands.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Paul; Takeuchi, Hideyuki; Sheppard, Devon; Chillakuri, Chandramouli; Lea, Susan M; Haltiwanger, Robert S; Handford, Penny A

    2014-05-20

    The Notch signaling pathway is essential for many aspects of development, cell fate determination, and tissue homeostasis. Notch signaling can be modulated by posttranslational modifications to the Notch receptor, which are known to alter both ligand binding and receptor activation. We have modified the ligand-binding region (EGF domains 11-13) of human Notch1 (hN1) with O-fucose and O-glucose glycans and shown by flow cytometry and surface plasmon resonance that the Fringe-catalyzed addition of GlcNAc to the O-fucose at T466 in EGF12 substantially increases binding to Jagged1 and Delta-like 1 (DLL1) ligands. We have subsequently determined the crystal structures of EGF domains 11-13 of hN1 modified with either the O-fucose monosaccharide or the GlcNAc-fucose disaccharide at T466 of EGF12 and observed no change in backbone structure for each variant. Collectively, these data demonstrate a role for GlcNAc in modulating the ligand-binding site in hN1 EGF12, resulting in an increased affinity of this region for ligands Jagged1 and DLL1. We propose that this finding explains the Fringe-catalyzed enhancement of Notch-Delta signaling observed in flies and humans, but suggest that the inhibitory effect of Fringe on Jagged/Serrate mediated signaling involves other regions of Notch.

  3. A constitutive active MAPK/ERK pathway due to BRAFV600E positively regulates AHR pathway in PTC

    PubMed Central

    Regazzo, Daniela; Bertazza, Loris; Galuppini, Francesca; Guzzardo, Vincenza; Jaffrain-Rea, Marie Lise; Vianello, Federica; Ciato, Denis; Ceccato, Filippo; Watutantrige-Fernando, Sara; Bisognin, Andrea; Bortoluzzi, Stefania; Pennelli, Gianmaria; Boscaro, Marco; Scaroni, Carla; Mian, Caterina

    2015-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor mediating the toxicity and tumor-promoting properties of dioxin. AHR has been reported to be overexpressed and constitutively active in a variety of solid tumors, but few data are currently available concerning its role in thyroid cancer. In this study we quantitatively explored a series of 51 paired-normal and papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) tissues for AHR-related genes. We identified an increased AHR expression/activity in PTC, independently from its nuclear dimerization partner and repressor but strictly related to a constitutive active MAPK/ERK pathway. The AHR up-regulation followed by an increased expression of AHR target genes was confirmed by a meta-analysis of published microarray data, suggesting a ligand-independent active AHR pathway in PTC. In-vitro studies using a PTC-derived cell line (BCPAP) and HEK293 cells showed that BRAFV600E may directly modulate AHR localization, induce AHR expression and activity in an exogenous ligand-independent manner. The AHR pathway might represent a potential novel therapeutic target for PTC in the clinical practice. PMID:26392334

  4. A computational study of ligand binding affinities in iron(III) porphine and protoporphyrin IX complexes.

    PubMed

    Durrant, Marcus C

    2014-07-01

    The search for novel anti-malarial drugs that can disrupt biomineralization of ferriprotoporphyrin IX to haemozoin requires an understanding of the fundamental chemistry of the porphyrin's iron(iii) centre at the water-lipid interface. Towards this end, the binding affinities for a diverse set of 31 small ligands with iron(iii) porphine have been calculated using density functional theory, in the gas phase and also with implicit solvent corrections for both water and n-octanol. In addition, the binding of hydroxide, chloride, acetate, methylamine and water to ferriprotoporphyrin IX has been studied, and very similar trends are observed for the smaller and larger models. Anionic ligands generally give stronger binding than neutral ones; the strongest binding is observed for RO(-) and OH(-) ligands, whilst acetate binds relatively weakly among the anions studied. Electron-rich nitrogen donors tend to bind more strongly than electron-deficient ones, and the weakest binding is found for neutral O and S donors such as oxazole and thiophene. In all cases, ligand binding is stronger in n-octanol than in water, and the differences in binding energies for the two solvents are greater for ionic ligands than for neutrals. Finally, dimerization of ferriprotoporphyrin IX by means of iron(iii)-carboxylate bond formation has been modelled. The results are discussed in terms of haemozoin crystal growth and its disruption by known anti-malarial drugs.

  5. Common Internal Allosteric Network Links Anesthetic Binding Sites in a Pentameric Ligand-Gated Ion Channel

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, Thomas T.

    2016-01-01

    General anesthetics bind reversibly to ion channels, modifying their global conformational distributions, but the underlying atomic mechanisms are not completely known. We examine this issue by way of the model protein Gloeobacter violaceous ligand-gated ion channel (GLIC) using computational molecular dynamics, with a coarse-grained model to enhance sampling. We find that in flooding simulations, both propofol and a generic particle localize to the crystallographic transmembrane anesthetic binding region, and that propofol also localizes to an extracellular region shared with the crystallographic ketamine binding site. Subsequent simulations to probe these binding modes in greater detail demonstrate that ligand binding induces structural asymmetry in GLIC. Consequently, we employ residue interaction correlation analysis to describe the internal allosteric network underlying the coupling of ligand and distant effector sites necessary for conformational change. Overall, the results suggest that the same allosteric network may underlie the actions of various anesthetics, regardless of binding site. PMID:27403526

  6. Common Internal Allosteric Network Links Anesthetic Binding Sites in a Pentameric Ligand-Gated Ion Channel.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Thomas T; Mincer, Joshua S

    2016-01-01

    General anesthetics bind reversibly to ion channels, modifying their global conformational distributions, but the underlying atomic mechanisms are not completely known. We examine this issue by way of the model protein Gloeobacter violaceous ligand-gated ion channel (GLIC) using computational molecular dynamics, with a coarse-grained model to enhance sampling. We find that in flooding simulations, both propofol and a generic particle localize to the crystallographic transmembrane anesthetic binding region, and that propofol also localizes to an extracellular region shared with the crystallographic ketamine binding site. Subsequent simulations to probe these binding modes in greater detail demonstrate that ligand binding induces structural asymmetry in GLIC. Consequently, we employ residue interaction correlation analysis to describe the internal allosteric network underlying the coupling of ligand and distant effector sites necessary for conformational change. Overall, the results suggest that the same allosteric network may underlie the actions of various anesthetics, regardless of binding site. PMID:27403526

  7. Binding of flexible and constrained ligands to the Grb2 SH2 domain: structural effects of ligand preorganization

    SciTech Connect

    Clements, John H.; DeLorbe, John E.; Benfield, Aaron P.; Martin, Stephen F.

    2010-10-01

    Structures of the Grb2 SH2 domain complexed with a series of flexible and constrained replacements of the phosphotyrosine residue in tripeptides derived from Ac-pYXN (where X = V, I, E and Q) were compared to determine what, if any, structural differences arise as a result of ligand preorganization. Structures of the Grb2 SH2 domain complexed with a series of pseudopeptides containing flexible (benzyl succinate) and constrained (aryl cyclopropanedicarboxylate) replacements of the phosphotyrosine (pY) residue in tripeptides derived from Ac-pYXN-NH{sub 2} (where X = V, I, E and Q) were elucidated by X-ray crystallography. Complexes of flexible/constrained pairs having the same pY + 1 amino acid were analyzed in order to ascertain what structural differences might be attributed to constraining the phosphotyrosine replacement. In this context, a given structural dissimilarity between complexes was considered to be significant if it was greater than the corresponding difference in complexes coexisting within the same asymmetric unit. The backbone atoms of the domain generally adopt a similar conformation and orientation relative to the ligands in the complexes of each flexible/constrained pair, although there are some significant differences in the relative orientations of several loop regions, most notably in the BC loop that forms part of the binding pocket for the phosphate group in the tyrosine replacements. These variations are greater in the set of complexes of constrained ligands than in the set of complexes of flexible ligands. The constrained ligands make more direct polar contacts to the domain than their flexible counterparts, whereas the more flexible ligand of each pair makes more single-water-mediated contacts to the domain; there was no correlation between the total number of protein–ligand contacts and whether the phosphotyrosine replacement of the ligand was preorganized. The observed differences in hydrophobic interactions between the complexes of

  8. Salt effects on polyelectrolyte-ligand binding: comparison of Poisson-Boltzmann, and limiting law/counterion binding models.

    PubMed

    Sharp, K A; Friedman, R A; Misra, V; Hecht, J; Honig, B

    1995-08-01

    The theory for salt dependence of the free energy, entropy, and enthalpy of a polyelectrolyte in the PB (PB) model is extended to treat the nonspecific salt dependence of polyelectrolyte-ligand binding reactions. The salt dependence of the binding constant (K) is given by the difference in osmotic pressure terms between the reactants and products. For simple 1-1 salts it is shown that this treatment is equivalent to the general preferential interaction model for the salt dependence of binding [C. Anderson and M. Record (1993) Journal of Physical Chemistry, Vol. 97, pp. 7116-7126]. The salt dependence, entropy, and enthalpy are compared for the PB model and one specific form of the preferential interaction coefficient model that uses counterion condensation/limiting law (LL) behavior. The PB and LL models are applied to three ligand-polyelectrolyte systems with the same net ligand charge: a model sphere-cylinder binding reaction, a drug-DNA binding reaction, and a protein-DNA binding reaction. For the small ligands both the PB and limiting law models give (In K vs. In[salt]) slopes close in magnitude to the net ligand charge. However, the enthalpy/entropy breakdown of the salt dependence is quite different. In the PB model there are considerable contributions from electrostatic enthalpy and dielectric (water reorientation) entropy, compared to the predominant ion cratic (release) entropy in the limiting law model. The relative contributions of these three terms in the PB model depends on the ligand: For the protein, ion release entropy is the smallest contribution to the salt dependence of binding. The effect of three approximations made in the LL model is examined: These approximations are (1) the ligand behaves ideally, (2) the preferential interaction coefficient of the polyelectrolyte is unchanged upon ligand binding, and (3) the polyelectrolyte preferential interaction coefficient is given by the limiting law/counterion-condensation value. Analysis of the PB

  9. Use of NMR saturation transfer difference spectroscopy to study ligand binding to membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Venkitakrishnan, Rani Parvathy; Benard, Outhiriaradjou; Max, Marianna; Markley, John L; Assadi-Porter, Fariba M

    2012-01-01

    Detection of weak ligand binding to membrane-spanning proteins, such as receptor proteins at low physiological concentrations, poses serious experimental challenges. Saturation transfer difference nuclear magnetic resonance (STD-NMR) spectroscopy offers an excellent way to surmount these problems. As the name suggests, magnetization transferred from the receptor to its bound ligand is measured by directly observing NMR signals from the ligand itself. Low-power irradiation is applied to a (1)H NMR spectral region containing protein signals but no ligand signals. This irradiation spreads quickly throughout the membrane protein by the process of spin diffusion and saturates all protein (1)H NMR signals. (1)H NMR signals from a ligand bound transiently to the membrane protein become saturated and, upon dissociation, serve to decrease the intensity of the (1)H NMR signals measured from the pool of free ligand. The experiment is repeated with the irradiation pulse placed outside the spectral region of protein and ligand, a condition that does not lead to saturation transfer to the ligand. The two resulting spectra are subtracted to yield the difference spectrum. As an illustration of the methodology, we review here STD-NMR experiments designed to investigate binding of ligands to the human sweet taste receptor, a member of the large family of G-protein-coupled receptors. Sweetener molecules bind to the sweet receptor with low affinity but high specificity and lead to a variety of physiological responses.

  10. Reevaluation of ANS binding to human and bovine serum albumins: key role of equilibrium microdialysis in ligand - receptor binding characterization.

    PubMed

    Kuznetsova, Irina M; Sulatskaya, Anna I; Povarova, Olga I; Turoverov, Konstantin K

    2012-01-01

    In this work we return to the problem of the determination of ligand-receptor binding stoichiometry and binding constants. In many cases the ligand is a fluorescent dye which has low fluorescence quantum yield in free state but forms highly fluorescent complex with target receptor. That is why many researchers use dye fluorescence for determination of its binding parameters with receptor, but they leave out of account that fluorescence intensity is proportional to the part of the light absorbed by the solution rather than to the concentration of bound dye. We showed how ligand-receptor binding parameters can be determined by spectrophotometry of the solutions prepared by equilibrium microdialysis. We determined the binding parameters of ANS - human serum albumin (HSA) and ANS - bovine serum albumin (BSA) interaction, absorption spectra, concentration and molar extinction coefficient, as well as fluorescence quantum yield of the bound dye. It was found that HSA and BSA have two binding modes with significantly different affinity to ANS. Correct determination of the binding parameters of ligand-receptor interaction is important for fundamental investigations and practical aspects of molecule medicine and pharmaceutics. The data obtained for albumins are important in connection with their role as drugs transporters.

  11. On the interaction of luminol with human serum albumin: Nature and thermodynamics of ligand binding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moyon, N. Shaemningwar; Mitra, Sivaprasad

    2010-09-01

    The mechanism and thermodynamic parameters for the binding of luminol (LH 2) with human serum albumin was explored by steady state and picosecond time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy. It was shown that out of two possible LH 2 conformers present is solution, only one is accessible for binding with HSA. The thermodynamic parameters like enthalpy (Δ H) and entropy (Δ S) change corresponding to the ligand binding process were also estimated by performing the experiment at different temperatures. The ligand replacement experiment with bilirubin confirms that LH 2 binds into the sub-domain IIA of the protein.

  12. TIM-4 structures identify a Metal Ion-dependent Ligand Binding Site where phosphatidylserine binds

    PubMed Central

    Santiago, Cesar; Ballesteros, Angela; Martinez-Muñoz, Laura; Mellado, Mario; Kaplan, Gerardo G.; Freeman, Gordon J.; Casasnovas, José M.

    2008-01-01

    The T-cell immunoglobulin and mucin domain (TIM) proteins are important regulators of T cell responses. They have been linked to autoimmunity and cancer. Structures of the murine TIM-4 identified a Metal Ion-dependent Ligand Binding Site (MILIBS) in the immunoglobulin (Ig) domain of the TIM family. The characteristic CC’ loop of the TIM domain and the hydrophobic FG loop shaped a narrow cavity where acidic compounds penetrate and coordinate to a metal ion bound to conserved residues in the TIM proteins. The structure of phosphatidylserine bound to the Ig domain showed that the hydrophilic head penetrates into the MILIBS and coordinates with the metal ion, while the aromatic residues on the tip of the FG loop interacted with the fatty acid chains and could insert into the lipid bilayer. Our results also revealed a significant role of the MILIBS in trafficking of TIM-1 to the cell surface. PMID:18083575

  13. Influence of length and flexibility of spacers on the binding affinity of divalent ligands

    PubMed Central

    Liese, Susanne

    2015-01-01

    Summary We present a quantitative model for the binding of divalent ligand–receptor systems. We study the influence of length and flexibility of the spacers on the overall binding affinity and derive general rules for the optimal ligand design. To this end, we first compare different polymeric models and determine the probability to simultaneously bind to two neighboring receptor binding pockets. In a second step the binding affinity of divalent ligands in terms of the IC50 value is derived. We find that a divalent ligand has the potential to bind more efficiently than its monovalent counterpart only, if the monovalent dissociation constant is lower than a critical value. This critical monovalent dissociation constant depends on the ligand-spacer length and flexibility as well as on the size of the receptor. Regarding the optimal ligand-spacer length and flexibility, we find that the average spacer length should be equal or slightly smaller than the distance between the receptor binding pockets and that the end-to-end spacer length fluctuations should be in the same range as the size of a receptor binding pocket. PMID:26124882

  14. Multifunctionality and mechanism of ligand binding in a mosquito antiinflammatory protein

    SciTech Connect

    Calvo, Eric; Mans, Ben J.; Ribeiro, José M.C.; Andersen, John F.

    2009-04-07

    The mosquito D7 salivary proteins are encoded by a multigene family related to the arthropod odorant-binding protein (OBP) superfamily. Forms having either one or two OBP domains are found in mosquito saliva. Four single-domain and one two-domain D7 proteins from Anopheles gambiae and Aedes aegypti (AeD7), respectively, were shown to bind biogenic amines with high affinity and with a stoichiometry of one ligand per protein molecule. Sequence comparisons indicated that only the C-terminal domain of AeD7 is homologous to the single-domain proteins from A. gambiae, suggesting that the N-terminal domain may bind a different class of ligands. Here, we describe the 3D structure of AeD7 and examine the ligand-binding characteristics of the N- and C-terminal domains. Isothermal titration calorimetry and ligand complex crystal structures show that the N-terminal domain binds cysteinyl leukotrienes (cysLTs) with high affinities (50-60 nM) whereas the C-terminal domain binds biogenic amines. The lipid chain of the cysLT binds in a hydrophobic pocket of the N-terminal domain, whereas binding of norepinephrine leads to an ordering of the C-terminal portion of the C-terminal domain into an alpha-helix that, along with rotations of Arg-176 and Glu-268 side chains, acts to bury the bound ligand.

  15. Cationic Gold Clusters Ligated with Differently Substituted Phosphines: Effect of Substitution on Ligand Reactivity and Binding

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Grant E.; Olivares, Astrid M.; Hill, David E.; Laskin, Julia

    2015-01-01

    We present a systematic study of the effect of the number of methyl (Me) and cyclohexyl (Cy) functional groups in monodentate phosphine ligands on the solution-phase synthesis of ligated sub-nanometer gold clusters and their gas-phase fragmentation pathways. Small mixed ligand cationic gold clusters were synthesized using ligand exchange reactions between pre-formed triphenylphosphine ligated (PPh3) gold clusters and monodentate Me- and Cy-substituted ligands in solution and characterized using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) and collision-induced dissociation (CID) experiments. Under the same experimental conditions, larger gold-PPh3 clusters undergo efficient exchange of unsubstituted PPh3 ligands for singly Me- and Cy-substituted PPh2Me and PPh2Cy ligands. The efficiency of ligand exchange decreases with an increasing number of Me or Cy groups in the substituted phosphine ligands. CID experiments performed for a series of ligand-exchanged gold clusters indicate that loss of a neutral Me-substituted ligand is preferred over loss of a neutral PPh¬3 ligand while the opposite trend is observed for Cy-substituted ligands. The branching ratio of the competing ligand loss channels is strongly correlated with the electron donating ability of the phosphorous lone pair as determined by the relative proton affinity of the ligand. The results indicate that the relative ligand binding energies increase in the order PMe3 < PPhMe2 < PPh2Me < PPh3< PPh2Cy < PPhCy2< PCy3. Furthermore, the difference in relative ligand binding energies increases with the number of substituted PPh3-mMem or PPh3-mCym ligands (L) exchanged onto each cluster. This study provides the first experimental determination of the relative binding energies of ligated gold clusters containing differently substituted monophosphine ligands, which are important to controlling their synthesis and reactivity in solution. The results also indicate that ligand substitution is an important

  16. Binding of flexible and constrained ligands to the Grb2 SH2 domain: structural effects of ligand preorganization

    PubMed Central

    Clements, John H.; DeLorbe, John E.; Benfield, Aaron P.; Martin, Stephen F.

    2010-01-01

    Structures of the Grb2 SH2 domain complexed with a series of pseudopeptides containing flexible (benzyl succinate) and constrained (aryl cyclopropanedicarboxylate) replacements of the phosphotyrosine (pY) residue in tripeptides derived from Ac-pYXN-NH2 (where X = V, I, E and Q) were elucidated by X-ray crystallography. Complexes of flexible/constrained pairs having the same pY + 1 amino acid were analyzed in order to ascertain what structural differences might be attributed to constraining the phosphotyrosine replacement. In this context, a given structural dissimilarity between complexes was considered to be significant if it was greater than the corresponding difference in complexes coexisting within the same asymmetric unit. The backbone atoms of the domain generally adopt a similar conformation and orientation relative to the ligands in the complexes of each flexible/constrained pair, although there are some significant differences in the relative orientations of several loop regions, most notably in the BC loop that forms part of the binding pocket for the phosphate group in the tyrosine replacements. These variations are greater in the set of complexes of constrained ligands than in the set of complexes of flexible ligands. The constrained ligands make more direct polar contacts to the domain than their flexible counterparts, whereas the more flexible ligand of each pair makes more single-water-mediated contacts to the domain; there was no correlation between the total number of protein–ligand contacts and whether the phosphotyrosine replacement of the ligand was preorganized. The observed differences in hydrophobic interactions between the complexes of each flexible/constrained ligand pair were generally similar to those observed upon comparing such contacts in coexisting complexes. The average adjusted B factors of the backbone atoms of the domain and loop regions are significantly greater in the complexes of constrained ligands than in the complexes of

  17. Elucidation of Nonadditive Effects in Protein-Ligand Binding Energies: Thrombin as a Case Study.

    PubMed

    Calabrò, Gaetano; Woods, Christopher J; Powlesland, Francis; Mey, Antonia S J S; Mulholland, Adrian J; Michel, Julien

    2016-06-23

    Accurate predictions of free energies of binding of ligands to proteins are challenging partly because of the nonadditivity of protein-ligand interactions; i.e., the free energy of binding is the sum of numerous enthalpic and entropic contributions that cannot be separated into functional group contributions. In principle, molecular simulations methodologies that compute free energies of binding do capture nonadditivity of protein-ligand interactions, but efficient protocols are necessary to compute well-converged free energies of binding that clearly resolve nonadditive effects. To this end, an efficient GPU-accelerated implementation of alchemical free energy calculations has been developed and applied to two congeneric series of ligands of the enzyme thrombin. The results show that accurate binding affinities are computed across the two congeneric series and positive coupling between nonpolar R(1) substituents and a X = NH3(+) substituent is reproduced, albeit with a weaker trend than experimentally observed. By contrast, a docking methodology completely fails to capture nonadditive effects. Further analysis shows that the nonadditive effects are partly due to variations in the strength of a hydrogen-bond between the X = NH3(+) ligands family and thrombin residue Gly216. However, other partially compensating interactions occur across the entire binding site, and no single interaction dictates the magnitude of the nonadditive effects for all the analyzed protein-ligand complexes. PMID:27248478

  18. Principles of Ligand Binding within a Completely Buried Cavity in HIF2[alpha] PAS-B

    SciTech Connect

    Key, Jason; Scheuermann, Thomas H.; Anderson, Peter C.; Daggett, Valerie; Gardner, Kevin H.

    2010-04-19

    Hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs) are heterodimeric transcription factors responsible for the metazoan hypoxia response and promote tumor growth, metastasis, and resistance to cancer treatment. The C-terminal Per-ARNT-Sim (PAS) domain of HIF2{alpha} (HIF2{alpha} PAS-B) contains a preformed solvent-inaccessible cavity that binds artificial ligands that allosterically perturb the formation of the HIF heterodimer. To better understand how small molecules bind within this domain, we examined the structures and equilibrium and transition-state thermodynamics of HIF2{alpha} PAS-B with several artificial ligands using isothermal titration calorimetry, NMR exchange spectroscopy, and X-ray crystallography. Rapid association rates reveal that ligand binding is not dependent upon a slow conformational change in the protein to permit ligand access, despite the closed conformation observed in the NMR and crystal structures. Compensating enthalpic and entropic contributions to the thermodynamic barrier for ligand binding suggest a binding-competent transition state characterized by increased structural disorder. Finally, molecular dynamics simulations reveal conversion between open and closed conformations of the protein and pathways of ligand entry into the binding pocket.

  19. Ligand-induced conformational changes in a thermophilic ribose-binding protein

    SciTech Connect

    Cuneo, Matthew J.; Beese, Lorena S.; Hellinga, Homme W.

    2009-05-21

    Members of the periplasmic binding protein (PBP) superfamily are involved in transport and signaling processes in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Biological responses are typically mediated by ligand-induced conformational changes in which the binding event is coupled to a hinge-bending motion that brings together two domains in a closed form. In all PBP-mediated biological processes, downstream partners recognize the closed form of the protein. This motion has also been exploited in protein engineering experiments to construct biosensors that transduce ligand binding to a variety of physical signals. Understanding the mechanistic details of PBP conformational changes, both global (hinge bending, twisting, shear movements) and local (rotamer changes, backbone motion), therefore is not only important for understanding their biological function but also for protein engineering experiments. Here we present biochemical characterization and crystal structure determination of the periplasmic ribose-binding protein (RBP) from the hyperthermophile Thermotoga maritima in its ribose-bound and unliganded state. The T. maritima RBP (tmRBP) has 39% sequence identity and is considerably more resistant to thermal denaturation (appTm value is 108 C) than the mesophilic Escherichia coli homolog (ecRBP) (appTm value is 56 C). Polar ligand interactions and ligand-induced global conformational changes are conserved among ecRBP and tmRBP; however local structural rearrangements involving side-chain motions in the ligand-binding site are not conserved. Although the large-scale ligand-induced changes are mediated through similar regions, and are produced by similar backbone movements in tmRBP and ecRBP, the small-scale ligand-induced structural rearrangements differentiate the mesophile and thermophile. This suggests there are mechanistic differences in the manner by which these two proteins bind their ligands and are an example of how two structurally similar proteins utilize different

  20. Protein conformational plasticity and complex ligand-binding kinetics explored by atomistic simulations and Markov models

    PubMed Central

    Plattner, Nuria; Noé, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the structural mechanisms of protein–ligand binding and their dependence on protein sequence and conformation is of fundamental importance for biomedical research. Here we investigate the interplay of conformational change and ligand-binding kinetics for the serine protease Trypsin and its competitive inhibitor Benzamidine with an extensive set of 150 μs molecular dynamics simulation data, analysed using a Markov state model. Seven metastable conformations with different binding pocket structures are found that interconvert at timescales of tens of microseconds. These conformations differ in their substrate-binding affinities and binding/dissociation rates. For each metastable state, corresponding solved structures of Trypsin mutants or similar serine proteases are contained in the protein data bank. Thus, our wild-type simulations explore a space of conformations that can be individually stabilized by adding ligands or making suitable changes in protein sequence. These findings provide direct evidence of conformational plasticity in receptors. PMID:26134632

  1. Calculation of cooperativity and equilibrium constants of ligands binding to G-quadruplex DNA in solution.

    PubMed

    Kudrev, A G

    2013-11-15

    Equilibrium model of a ligand binding with DNA oligomer has been considered as a process of small molecule adsorption onto a lattice of multiple binding sites. An experimental example has been used to verify the assertion that during saturation of the macromolecule by a ligand should expect effect of cooperativity due to changes in DNA conformation or the mutual influence between bound ligands. Such phenomenon cannot be entirely described by the classical stepwise complex formation model. To evaluate a ligand binding affinity and cooperativity of ligand-oligomer complex formation the statistical approach has been proposed. This new computational approach used to re-examine previously studded ligand binding towards DNA quadruplexes targets with multiple binding sites. The intrinsic equilibrium constants K1-3 of the mesotetrakis-(N-methyl-4-pyridyl)-porphyrin (TMPyP4) binding with the [d(T4G4)]4 and with the [AG3(T2AG3)3] quadruplexes and the correction for the mutual influence between bound ligands (cooperativity parameters ω) was determined from the Job plots based upon the nonlinear least-squares fitting procedure. The re-examination of experimental curves reveals that the equilibrium is affected by the positive cooperative (ω>1) binding of the TMPyP4 ligand with tetramolecular [d(T4G4)]4. However for an intramolecular antiparallel-parallel hybrid structure [AG3(T2AG3)3] the weak anti-cooperativity of TMPyP4 accommodation (ω<1) onto two from three nonidentical sites was detected. PMID:24148442

  2. Binding kinetics of membrane-anchored receptors and ligands: Molecular dynamics simulations and theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Jinglei; Xu, Guang-Kui; Lipowsky, Reinhard; Weikl, Thomas R.

    2015-12-01

    The adhesion of biological membranes is mediated by the binding of membrane-anchored receptor and ligand proteins. Central questions are how the binding kinetics of these proteins is affected by the membranes and by the membrane anchoring of the proteins. In this article, we (i) present detailed data for the binding of membrane-anchored proteins from coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations and (ii) provide a theory that describes how the binding kinetics depends on the average separation and thermal roughness of the adhering membranes and on the anchoring, lengths, and length variations of the proteins. An important element of our theory is the tilt of bound receptor-ligand complexes and transition-state complexes relative to the membrane normals. This tilt results from an interplay of the anchoring energy and rotational entropy of the complexes and facilitates the formation of receptor-ligand bonds at membrane separations smaller than the preferred separation for binding. In our simulations, we have considered both lipid-anchored and transmembrane receptor and ligand proteins. We find that the binding equilibrium constant and binding on-rate constant of lipid-anchored proteins are considerably smaller than the binding constant and on-rate constant of rigid transmembrane proteins with identical binding domains.

  3. Exploration of Gated Ligand Binding Recognizes an Allosteric Site for Blocking FABP4-Protein Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yan; Li, Xiang; Dong, Zigang

    2015-01-01

    Fatty acid binding protein 4 (FABP4), reversibly binding to fatty acids and other lipids with high affinities, is a potential target for treatment of cancers. The binding site of FABP4 is buried in an interior cavity and thereby ligand binding/unbinding is coupled with opening/closing of FABP4. It is a difficult task both experimentally and computationally to illuminate the entry or exit pathway, especially with the conformational gating. In this report we combine extensive computer simulations, clustering analysis, and Markov state model to investigate the binding mechanism of FABP4 and troglitazone. Our simulations capture spontaneous binding and unbinding events as well as the conformational transition of FABP4 between the open and closed states. An allosteric binding site on the protein surface is recognized for development of novel FABP4 inhibitors. The binding affinity is calculated and compared with the experimental value. The kinetic analysis suggests that ligand residence on the protein surface may delay the binding process. Overall, our results provide a comprehensive picture of ligand diffusion on the protein surface, ligand migration into the buried cavity, and the conformational change of FABP4 at an atomic level. PMID:26580122

  4. Binding kinetics of membrane-anchored receptors and ligands: Molecular dynamics simulations and theory.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jinglei; Xu, Guang-Kui; Lipowsky, Reinhard; Weikl, Thomas R

    2015-12-28

    The adhesion of biological membranes is mediated by the binding of membrane-anchored receptor and ligand proteins. Central questions are how the binding kinetics of these proteins is affected by the membranes and by the membrane anchoring of the proteins. In this article, we (i) present detailed data for the binding of membrane-anchored proteins from coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations and (ii) provide a theory that describes how the binding kinetics depends on the average separation and thermal roughness of the adhering membranes and on the anchoring, lengths, and length variations of the proteins. An important element of our theory is the tilt of bound receptor-ligand complexes and transition-state complexes relative to the membrane normals. This tilt results from an interplay of the anchoring energy and rotational entropy of the complexes and facilitates the formation of receptor-ligand bonds at membrane separations smaller than the preferred separation for binding. In our simulations, we have considered both lipid-anchored and transmembrane receptor and ligand proteins. We find that the binding equilibrium constant and binding on-rate constant of lipid-anchored proteins are considerably smaller than the binding constant and on-rate constant of rigid transmembrane proteins with identical binding domains.

  5. NMR studies reveal the role of biomembranes in modulating ligand binding and release by intracellular bile acid binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Pedò, Massimo; Löhr, Frank; D'Onofrio, Mariapina; Assfalg, Michael; Dötsch, Volker; Molinari, Henriette

    2009-12-18

    Bile acid molecules are transferred vectorially between basolateral and apical membranes of hepatocytes and enterocytes in the context of the enterohepatic circulation, a process regulating whole body lipid homeostasis. This work addresses the role of the cytosolic lipid binding proteins in the intracellular transfer of bile acids between different membrane compartments. We present nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) data describing the ternary system composed of the bile acid binding protein, bile acids, and membrane mimetic systems, such as anionic liposomes. This work provides evidence that the investigated liver bile acid binding protein undergoes association with the anionic membrane and binding-induced partial unfolding. The addition of the physiological ligand to the protein-liposome mixture is capable of modulating this interaction, shifting the equilibrium towards the free folded holo protein. An ensemble of NMR titration experiments, based on nitrogen-15 protein and ligand observation, confirm that the membrane and the ligand establish competing binding equilibria, modulating the cytoplasmic permeability of bile acids. These results support a mechanism of ligand binding and release controlled by the onset of a bile salt concentration gradient within the polarized cell. The location of a specific protein region interacting with liposomes is highlighted. PMID:19836400

  6. NMR studies reveal the role of biomembranes in modulating ligand binding and release by intracellular bile acid binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Pedò, Massimo; Löhr, Frank; D'Onofrio, Mariapina; Assfalg, Michael; Dötsch, Volker; Molinari, Henriette

    2009-12-18

    Bile acid molecules are transferred vectorially between basolateral and apical membranes of hepatocytes and enterocytes in the context of the enterohepatic circulation, a process regulating whole body lipid homeostasis. This work addresses the role of the cytosolic lipid binding proteins in the intracellular transfer of bile acids between different membrane compartments. We present nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) data describing the ternary system composed of the bile acid binding protein, bile acids, and membrane mimetic systems, such as anionic liposomes. This work provides evidence that the investigated liver bile acid binding protein undergoes association with the anionic membrane and binding-induced partial unfolding. The addition of the physiological ligand to the protein-liposome mixture is capable of modulating this interaction, shifting the equilibrium towards the free folded holo protein. An ensemble of NMR titration experiments, based on nitrogen-15 protein and ligand observation, confirm that the membrane and the ligand establish competing binding equilibria, modulating the cytoplasmic permeability of bile acids. These results support a mechanism of ligand binding and release controlled by the onset of a bile salt concentration gradient within the polarized cell. The location of a specific protein region interacting with liposomes is highlighted.

  7. Thermodynamics of binding of di- and tetrasubstituted naphthalene diimide ligands to DNA G-quadruplex.

    PubMed

    Prato, Gary; Silvent, Samantha; Saka, Sammy; Lamberto, Massimiliano; Kosenkov, Dmytro

    2015-02-26

    Naphthalene diimide ligands have the potential to stabilize human telomeric G-quadruplex DNA via noncovalent interactions. Stabilization of G-quadruplex high order structures has become an important strategy to develop novel anticancer therapeutics. In this study four naphthalene diimide based ligands were analyzed in order to elucidate the principal factors determining contributions to G-quadruplex-ligand binding. Three possible modes of binding and their respective Gibbs free energies for two naphthalene diimide based di-N-alkylpyridinium substituted ligands have been determined using a molecular docking technique and compared to experimental results. The structures obtained from the molecular docking calculations, were analyzed using the ab initio based fragment molecular orbital (FMO) method in order to determine the major enthalpic contributions to the binding and types of interactions between the ligand and specific residues of the G-quadruplex. A computational methodology for the efficient and inexpensive ligand optimization as compared to fully ab initio methods based on the estimation of binding affinities of the naphthalene diimide derived ligands to G-quadruplex is proposed.

  8. Thermodynamics of binding of di- and tetrasubstituted naphthalene diimide ligands to DNA G-quadruplex.

    PubMed

    Prato, Gary; Silvent, Samantha; Saka, Sammy; Lamberto, Massimiliano; Kosenkov, Dmytro

    2015-02-26

    Naphthalene diimide ligands have the potential to stabilize human telomeric G-quadruplex DNA via noncovalent interactions. Stabilization of G-quadruplex high order structures has become an important strategy to develop novel anticancer therapeutics. In this study four naphthalene diimide based ligands were analyzed in order to elucidate the principal factors determining contributions to G-quadruplex-ligand binding. Three possible modes of binding and their respective Gibbs free energies for two naphthalene diimide based di-N-alkylpyridinium substituted ligands have been determined using a molecular docking technique and compared to experimental results. The structures obtained from the molecular docking calculations, were analyzed using the ab initio based fragment molecular orbital (FMO) method in order to determine the major enthalpic contributions to the binding and types of interactions between the ligand and specific residues of the G-quadruplex. A computational methodology for the efficient and inexpensive ligand optimization as compared to fully ab initio methods based on the estimation of binding affinities of the naphthalene diimide derived ligands to G-quadruplex is proposed. PMID:25635929

  9. Cloud computing approaches for prediction of ligand binding poses and pathways.

    PubMed

    Lawrenz, Morgan; Shukla, Diwakar; Pande, Vijay S

    2015-01-22

    We describe an innovative protocol for ab initio prediction of ligand crystallographic binding poses and highly effective analysis of large datasets generated for protein-ligand dynamics. We include a procedure for setup and performance of distributed molecular dynamics simulations on cloud computing architectures, a model for efficient analysis of simulation data, and a metric for evaluation of model convergence. We give accurate binding pose predictions for five ligands ranging in affinity from 7 nM to > 200 μM for the immunophilin protein FKBP12, for expedited results in cases where experimental structures are difficult to produce. Our approach goes beyond single, low energy ligand poses to give quantitative kinetic information that can inform protein engineering and ligand design.

  10. Internalization and Trafficking of Cell Surface Proteoglycans and Proteoglycan-Binding Ligands

    PubMed Central

    Payne, Christine K.; Jones, Sara A.; Chen, Chen; Zhuang, Xiaowei

    2009-01-01

    Using multi-color live cell imaging in combination with biochemical assays we have investigated an endocytic pathway mediated by cell surface proteoglycans, primary receptors for many cationic ligands. We have characterized this pathway for a variety of proteoglycan-binding ligands including cationic polymers, lipids, and polypeptides. Following clathrin- and caveolin-independent, but flotillin- and dynamin-dependent internalization, proteoglycan-bound ligands associate with flotillin-1-positive vesicles and are efficiently trafficked to late endosomes. The route to late endosomes differs considerably from that following clathrin-mediated endocytosis. The proteoglycan-dependent pathway to late endosomes does not require microtubule-dependent transport or PI(3)K-dependent sorting from early endosomes. The pathway taken by these ligands is identical to that taken by an antibody against heparan sulfate proteoglycans, suggesting this mechanism may be used generally by cell surface proteoglycans and proteoglycan-binding ligands without secondary receptors. PMID:17394486

  11. Quantitative assessment of the interplay between DNA elasticity and cooperative binding of ligands.

    PubMed

    Siman, L; Carrasco, I S S; da Silva, J K L; de Oliveira, M C; Rocha, M S; Mesquita, O N

    2012-12-14

    Binding of ligands to DNA can be studied by measuring the change of the persistence length of the complex formed, in single-molecule assays. We propose a methodology for persistence length data analysis based on a quenched disorder statistical model and describing the binding isotherm by a Hill-type equation. We obtain an expression for the effective persistence length as a function of the total ligand concentration, which we apply to our data of the DNA-cationic β-cyclodextrin and to the DNA-HU protein data available in the literature, determining the values of the local persistence lengths, the dissociation constant, and the degree of cooperativity for each set of data. In both cases the persistence length behaves nonmonotonically as a function of ligand concentration and based on the results obtained we discuss some physical aspects of the interplay between DNA elasticity and cooperative binding of ligands.

  12. Imaging G protein–coupled receptors while quantifying their ligand-binding free-energy landscape

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Cheng; Spoerri, Patrizia M; Coughlin, Shaun R; Kobilka, Brian K; Müller, Daniel J

    2016-01-01

    Imaging native membrane receptors and testing how they interact with ligands is of fundamental interest in the life sciences but has proven remarkably difficult to accomplish. Here, we introduce an approach that uses force-distance curve–based atomic force microscopy to simultaneously image single native G protein–coupled receptors in membranes and quantify their dynamic binding strength to native and synthetic ligands. We measured kinetic and thermodynamic parameters for individual protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR1) molecules in the absence and presence of antagonists, and these measurements enabled us to describe PAR1’s ligand-binding free-energy landscape with high accuracy. Our nanoscopic method opens an avenue to directly image and characterize ligand binding of native membrane receptors. PMID:26167642

  13. Large-scale molecular dynamics simulation: Effect of polarization on thrombin-ligand binding energy.

    PubMed

    Duan, Li L; Feng, Guo Q; Zhang, Qing G

    2016-01-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations lasting 500 ns were performed in explicit water to investigate the effect of polarization on the binding of ligands to human α-thrombin based on the standard nonpolarizable AMBER force field and the quantum-derived polarized protein-specific charge (PPC). The PPC includes the electronic polarization effect of the thrombin-ligand complex, which is absent in the standard force field. A detailed analysis and comparison of the results of the MD simulation with experimental data provided strong evidence that intra-protein, protein-ligand hydrogen bonds and the root-mean-square deviation of backbone atoms were significantly stabilized through electronic polarization. Specifically, two critical hydrogen bonds between thrombin and the ligand were broken at approximately 190 ns when AMBER force field was used and the number of intra-protein backbone hydrogen bonds was higher under PPC than under AMBER. The thrombin-ligand binding energy was computed using the molecular mechanics Poisson-Boltzmann surface area (MM/PBSA) method, and the results were consistent with the experimental value obtained using PPC. Because hydrogen bonds were unstable, it was failed to predict the binding affinity under the AMBER force field. Furthermore, the results of the present study revealed that differences in the binding free energy between AMBER and PPC almost comes from the electrostatic interaction. Thus, this study provides evidence that protein polarization is critical to accurately describe protein-ligand binding. PMID:27507430

  14. Large-scale molecular dynamics simulation: Effect of polarization on thrombin-ligand binding energy

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Li L.; Feng, Guo Q.; Zhang, Qing G.

    2016-01-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations lasting 500 ns were performed in explicit water to investigate the effect of polarization on the binding of ligands to human α-thrombin based on the standard nonpolarizable AMBER force field and the quantum-derived polarized protein-specific charge (PPC). The PPC includes the electronic polarization effect of the thrombin-ligand complex, which is absent in the standard force field. A detailed analysis and comparison of the results of the MD simulation with experimental data provided strong evidence that intra-protein, protein-ligand hydrogen bonds and the root-mean-square deviation of backbone atoms were significantly stabilized through electronic polarization. Specifically, two critical hydrogen bonds between thrombin and the ligand were broken at approximately 190 ns when AMBER force field was used and the number of intra-protein backbone hydrogen bonds was higher under PPC than under AMBER. The thrombin-ligand binding energy was computed using the molecular mechanics Poisson-Boltzmann surface area (MM/PBSA) method, and the results were consistent with the experimental value obtained using PPC. Because hydrogen bonds were unstable, it was failed to predict the binding affinity under the AMBER force field. Furthermore, the results of the present study revealed that differences in the binding free energy between AMBER and PPC almost comes from the electrostatic interaction. Thus, this study provides evidence that protein polarization is critical to accurately describe protein-ligand binding. PMID:27507430

  15. Ligand-Binding Pocket Bridges DNA-Binding and Dimerization Domains of the Urate-Responsive MarR Homologue MftR from Burkholderia thailandensis

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Members of the multiple antibiotic resistance regulator (MarR) family often regulate gene activity by responding to a specific ligand. In the absence of ligand, most MarR proteins function as repressors, while ligand binding causes attenuated DNA binding and therefore increased gene expression. Previously, we have shown that urate is a ligand for MftR (major facilitator transport regulator), which is encoded by the soil bacterium Burkholderia thailandensis. We show here that both mftR and the divergently oriented gene mftP encoding a major facilitator transport protein are upregulated in the presence of urate. MftR binds two cognate sites in the mftR-mftP intergenic region with equivalent affinity and sensitivity to urate. Mutagenesis of four conserved residues previously reported to be involved in urate binding to Deinococcus radiodurans HucR and Rhizobium radiobacter PecS significantly reduced protein stability and DNA binding affinity but not ligand binding. These data suggest that residues equivalent to those implicated in ligand binding to HucR and PecS serve structural roles and that MftR relies on distinct residues for ligand binding. MftR exhibits a two-step melting transition suggesting independent unfolding of the dimerization and DNA-binding regions; urate binding or mutations in the predicted ligand-binding sites result in one-step unfolding transitions. We suggest that MftR binds the ligand in a cleft between the DNA-binding lobes and the dimer interface but that the mechanism of ligand-mediated attenuation of DNA binding differs from that proposed for other urate-responsive MarR homologues. Since DNA binding by MftR is attenuated at 37 °C, our data also suggest that MftR responds to both ligand and a thermal upshift by attenuated DNA binding and upregulation of the genes under its control. PMID:24955985

  16. Disruption of period gene expression alters the inductive effects of dioxin on the AhR signaling pathway in the mouse liver

    SciTech Connect

    Qu Xiaoyu; Metz, Richard P.; Porter, Weston W.; Cassone, Vincent M.; Earnest, David J.

    2009-02-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) and AhR nuclear translocator (ARNT) are transcription factors that express Per-Arnt-Sim (PAS) DNA-binding motifs and mediate the metabolism of drugs and environmental toxins in the liver. Because these transcription factors interact with other PAS genes in molecular feedback loops forming the mammalian circadian clockworks, we determined whether targeted disruption or siRNA inhibition of Per1 and Per2 expression alters toxin-mediated regulation of the AhR signaling pathway in the mouse liver and Hepa1c1c7 hepatoma cells in vitro. Treatment with the prototypical Ahr ligand, 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), had inductive effects on the primary targets of AhR signaling, Cyp1A1 and Cyp1B1, in the liver of all animals, but genotype-based differences were evident such that the toxin-mediated induction of Cyp1A1 expression was significantly greater (2-fold) in mice with targeted disruption of Per1 (Per1{sup ldc} and Per1{sup ldc}/Per2{sup ldc}). In vitro experiments yielded similar results demonstrating that siRNA inhibition of Per1 significantly increases the TCDD-induced expression of Cyp1A1 and Cyp1B1 in Hepa1c1c7 cells. Per2 inhibition in siRNA-infected Hepa1c1c7 cells had the opposite effect and significantly decreased both the induction of these p450 genes as well as AhR and Arnt expression in response to TCDD treatment. These findings suggest that Per1 may play a distinctive role in modulating AhR-regulated responses to TCDD in the liver.

  17. Development of a protein-ligand-binding site prediction method based on interaction energy and sequence conservation.

    PubMed

    Tsujikawa, Hiroto; Sato, Kenta; Wei, Cao; Saad, Gul; Sumikoshi, Kazuya; Nakamura, Shugo; Terada, Tohru; Shimizu, Kentaro

    2016-09-01

    We present a new method for predicting protein-ligand-binding sites based on protein three-dimensional structure and amino acid conservation. This method involves calculation of the van der Waals interaction energy between a protein and many probes placed on the protein surface and subsequent clustering of the probes with low interaction energies to identify the most energetically favorable locus. In addition, it uses amino acid conservation among homologous proteins. Ligand-binding sites were predicted by combining the interaction energy and the amino acid conservation score. The performance of our prediction method was evaluated using a non-redundant dataset of 348 ligand-bound and ligand-unbound protein structure pairs, constructed by filtering entries in a ligand-binding site structure database, LigASite. Ligand-bound structure prediction (bound prediction) indicated that 74.0 % of predicted ligand-binding sites overlapped with real ligand-binding sites by over 25 % of their volume. Ligand-unbound structure prediction (unbound prediction) indicated that 73.9 % of predicted ligand-binding residues overlapped with real ligand-binding residues. The amino acid conservation score improved the average prediction accuracy by 17.0 and 17.6 points for the bound and unbound predictions, respectively. These results demonstrate the effectiveness of the combined use of the interaction energy and amino acid conservation in the ligand-binding site prediction. PMID:27400687

  18. Doubling the Size of the Glucocorticoid Receptor Ligand Binding Pocket by Deacylcortivazol

    SciTech Connect

    Suino-Powell, Kelly; Xu, Yong; Zhang, Chenghai; Tao, Yong-guang; Tolbert, W. David; Simons, Jr., S. Stoney; Xu, H. Eric

    2010-03-08

    A common feature of nuclear receptor ligand binding domains (LBD) is a helical sandwich fold that nests a ligand binding pocket within the bottom half of the domain. Here we report that the ligand pocket of glucocorticoid receptor (GR) can be continuously extended into the top half of the LBD by binding to deacylcortivazol (DAC), an extremely potent glucocorticoid. It has been puzzling for decades why DAC, which contains a phenylpyrazole replacement at the conserved 3-ketone of steroid hormones that are normally required for activation of their cognate receptors, is a potent GR activator. The crystal structure of the GR LBD bound to DAC and the fourth LXXLL motif of steroid receptor coactivator 1 reveals that the GR ligand binding pocket is expanded to a size of 1,070 {angstrom}{sup 3}, effectively doubling the size of the GR dexamethasone-binding pocket of 540 {angstrom}{sup 3} and yet leaving the structure of the coactivator binding site intact. DAC occupies only {approx}50% of the space of the pocket but makes intricate interactions with the receptor around the phenylpyrazole group that accounts for the high-affinity binding of DAC. The dramatic expansion of the DAC-binding pocket thus highlights the conformational adaptability of GR to ligand binding. The new structure also allows docking of various nonsteroidal ligands that cannot be fitted into the previous structures, thus providing a new rational template for drug discovery of steroidal and nonsteroidal glucocorticoids that can be specifically designed to reach the unoccupied space of the expanded pocket.

  19. The unique extracellular disulfide loop of the glycine receptor is a principal ligand binding element.

    PubMed Central

    Rajendra, S; Vandenberg, R J; Pierce, K D; Cunningham, A M; French, P W; Barry, P H; Schofield, P R

    1995-01-01

    A loop structure, formed by the putative disulfide bridging of Cys198 and Cys209, is a principal element of the ligand binding site in the glycine receptor (GlyR). Disruption of the loop's tertiary structure by Ser mutations of these Cys residues either prevented receptor assembly on the cell surface, or created receptors unable to be activated by agonists or to bind the competitive antagonist, strychnine. Mutation of residues Lys200, Tyr202 and Thr204 within this loop reduced agonist binding and channel activation sensitivities by up to 55-, 520- and 190-fold, respectively, without altering maximal current sizes, and mutations of Lys200 and Tyr202 abolished strychnine binding to the receptor. Removal of the hydroxyl moiety from Tyr202 by mutation to Phe profoundly reduced agonist sensitivity, whilst removal of the benzene ring abolished strychnine binding, thus demonstrating that Tyr202 is crucial for both agonist and antagonist binding to the GlyR. Tyr202 also influences receptor assembly on the cell surface, with only large chain substitutions (Phe, Leu and Arg, but not Thr, Ser and Ala) forming functional receptors. Our data demonstrate the presence of a second ligand binding site in the GlyR, consistent with the three-loop model of ligand binding to the ligand-gated ion channel superfamily. Images PMID:7621814

  20. Differential utilization of binding loop flexibility in T cell receptor ligand selection and cross-reactivity

    PubMed Central

    Ayres, Cory M.; Scott, Daniel R.; Corcelli, Steven A.; Baker, Brian M.

    2016-01-01

    Complementarity determining region (CDR) loop flexibility has been suggested to play an important role in the selection and binding of ligands by T cell receptors (TCRs) of the cellular immune system. However, questions remain regarding the role of loop motion in TCR binding, and crystallographic structures have raised questions about the extent to which generalizations can be made. Here we studied the flexibility of two structurally well characterized αβ TCRs, A6 and DMF5. We found that the two receptors utilize loop motion very differently in ligand binding and cross-reactivity. While the loops of A6 move rapidly in an uncorrelated fashion, those of DMF5 are substantially less mobile. Accordingly, the mechanisms of binding and cross-reactivity are very different between the two TCRs: whereas A6 relies on conformational selection to select and bind different ligands, DMF5 uses a more rigid, permissive architecture with greater reliance on slower motions or induced-fit. In addition to binding site flexibility, we also explored whether ligand-binding resulted in common dynamical changes in A6 and DMF5 that could contribute to TCR triggering. Although binding-linked motional changes propagated throughout both receptors, no common features were observed, suggesting that changes in nanosecond-level TCR structural dynamics do not contribute to T cell signaling. PMID:27118724

  1. Differentiation between ligand trapping into intact cells and binding on muscarinic receptors.

    PubMed

    Gossuin, A; Maloteaux, J M; Trouet, A; Laduron, P

    1984-05-22

    Binding properties of [3H] dexetimide , L-quinuclidinyl[phenyl-4-3H] benzilate and [3H]methylscopolamine were compared with intact 108 CC 15 cells and membrane preparations of those. The ability of the three ligands to label specifically muscarinic receptors on membrane fractions was quite similar. By contrast, when performed with intact cells, [3H] dexetimide and L-quinuclidinyl [phenyl-4-3H]benzilate revealed higher nonspecific binding which was prevented by methylamine, suggesting a trapping of the ligands within the cells presumably in the lysosomes. To the contrary, such nonspecific 'binding' or trapping was not detectable when [3H]methylscopolamine was used as ligand, a fact which makes this ligand particularly appropriate for labelling cell surface muscarinic receptors. It is concluded that more caution is needed in binding studies when performed with intact cells; indeed, besides specific binding on receptor sites, [3H]ligand can be entrapped within the cell and can even sometimes give the illusion of specific binding. The use of lysosomal agents which do not interfere with specific receptors on membrane preparations should allow one, in most cases, to discard the possibility of a trapping phenomenon in intact cells. PMID:6722181

  2. Ligand-apomyoglobin interactions. Configurational adaptability of the haem-binding site.

    PubMed Central

    Lind, K E; Moller, J V

    1976-01-01

    1. The interaction of the haem-binding region of apomyoglobin with different ligands was examined by ultrafiltration, equilibrium dialysis and spectrophotometry, to study unspecific features of protein-ligand interactions such as they occur in, for example, serum albumin binding. 2. Apomyoglobin, in contrast with metmyoglobin, binds at pH 7, with a high affinity, one molecule of Bromophenol Blue, bilirubin and protoporphyrin IX, two molecules of n-dodecanoate and n-decyl sulphate and four molecules of n-dodecyl sulphate and n-tetradecyl sulphate. 3. The number of high-affinity sites and/or association constants for the alkyl sulphates are enhanced by an increase of hydrocarbon length, indicating hydrophobic interactions with the protein. 4. Measurements of the temperature-dependence of the association constants of the high-affinity sites imply that the binding processes are largely entropy-driven. 5. Binding studies in the presence of two ligands show that bilirubin plus Bromophenol Blue and dodecanoate plus Bromophenol Blue can be simultaneously bound by apomyoglobin, but with decreased affinities. By contrast, the apomyoglobin-protoporphyrin IX complex does not react with Bromophenol Blue. 6. Optical-rotatory-dispersion measurements show that the laevorotation of apomyoglobin is increased towards that of metmyglobin in the presence of haemin and protoporphyrin IX. Small changes in the optical-rotatory-dispersion spectrum of apomyoglobin are observed in the presence of the other ligands. 7. It is concluded that the binding sites on apomyoglobin probably do not pre-exist but appear to be moulded from predominantly non-polar amino acid residues by reaction with hydrophobic ligands. 8. Comparison with data in the literature indicates that apomyoglobin on a weight basis has a larger hydrophobic area avaialble for binding of ligands than has human serum albumin. On the other hand, the association constants of serum for the ligands used in this study are generally

  3. Metal ligand-binding specificities of the tyrosinase-related proteins.

    PubMed

    Furumura, M; Solano, F; Matsunaga, N; Sakai, C; Spritz, R A; Hearing, V J

    1998-01-26

    The production of pigment in mammalian melanocytes requires the interaction of at least 3 melanogenic enzymes, which regulate the type and amount of melanins produced. All 3 known enzymes belong to the TRP gene family and share many common structural features, including two metal binding domains thought to be important to their catalytic functions. This study used radiolabeled metal ligand binding with autoradiography as well as reconstitution protocols to analyze the binding of metal cations to these enzymes. The results demonstrate that all 3 enzymes are capable of binding divalent metal cations; copper is bound to tyrosinase but not to TRP1 or TRP2. TRP2 requires zinc as its metal ligand, and small amounts of iron bound to TRP2; TRP1 did not bind copper, zinc or iron. Clearly, the specific binding of different metals by the TRPs is responsible for their distinct catalytic functions in melanogenesis. PMID:9464259

  4. The rhizotoxicity of metal cations is related to their strength of binding to hard ligands.

    PubMed

    Kopittke, Peter M; Menzies, Neal W; Wang, Peng; McKenna, Brigid A; Wehr, J Bernhard; Lombi, Enzo; Kinraide, Thomas B; Blamey, F Pax C

    2014-02-01

    Mechanisms whereby metal cations are toxic to plant roots remain largely unknown. Aluminum, for example, has been recognized as rhizotoxic for approximately 100 yr, but there is no consensus on its mode of action. The authors contend that the primary mechanism of rhizotoxicity of many metal cations is nonspecific and that the magnitude of toxic effects is positively related to the strength with which they bind to hard ligands, especially carboxylate ligands of the cell-wall pectic matrix. Specifically, the authors propose that metal cations have a common toxic mechanism through inhibiting the controlled relaxation of the cell wall as required for elongation. Metal cations such as Al(3+) and Hg(2+), which bind strongly to hard ligands, are toxic at relatively low concentrations because they bind strongly to the walls of cells in the rhizodermis and outer cortex of the root elongation zone with little movement into the inner tissues. In contrast, metal cations such as Ca(2+), Na(+), Mn(2+), and Zn(2+) , which bind weakly to hard ligands, bind only weakly to the cell wall and move farther into the root cylinder. Only at high concentrations is their weak binding sufficient to inhibit the relaxation of the cell wall. Finally, different mechanisms would explain why certain metal cations (for example, Tl(+), Ag(+), Cs(+), and Cu(2+)) are sometimes more toxic than expected through binding to hard ligands. The data presented in the present study demonstrate the importance of strength of binding to hard ligands in influencing a range of important physiological processes within roots through nonspecific mechanisms.

  5. Molecular dynamics simulation of ligand dissociation from liver fatty acid binding protein.

    PubMed

    Long, Dong; Mu, Yuguang; Yang, Daiwen

    2009-06-30

    The mechanisms of how ligands enter and leave the binding cavity of fatty acid binding proteins (FABPs) have been a puzzling question over decades. Liver fatty acid binding protein (LFABP) is a unique family member which accommodates two molecules of fatty acids in its cavity and exhibits the capability of interacting with a variety of ligands with different chemical structures and properties. Investigating the ligand dissociation processes of LFABP is thus a quite interesting topic, which however is rather difficult for both experimental approaches and ordinary simulation strategies. In the current study, random expulsion molecular dynamics simulation, which accelerates ligand motions for rapid dissociation, was used to explore the potential egress routes of ligands from LFABP. The results showed that the previously hypothesized "portal region" could be readily used for the dissociation of ligands at both the low affinity site and the high affinity site. Besides, one alternative portal was shown to be highly favorable for ligand egress from the high affinity site and be related to the unique structural feature of LFABP. This result lends strong support to the hypothesis from the previous NMR exchange studies, which in turn indicates an important role for this alternative portal. Another less favored potential portal located near the N-terminal end was also identified. Identification of the dissociation pathways will allow further mechanistic understanding of fatty acid uptake and release by computational and/or experimental techniques.

  6. Automatic generation of bioinformatics tools for predicting protein–ligand binding sites

    PubMed Central

    Banno, Masaki; Ueki, Kokoro; Saad, Gul; Shimizu, Kentaro

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: Predictive tools that model protein–ligand binding on demand are needed to promote ligand research in an innovative drug-design environment. However, it takes considerable time and effort to develop predictive tools that can be applied to individual ligands. An automated production pipeline that can rapidly and efficiently develop user-friendly protein–ligand binding predictive tools would be useful. Results: We developed a system for automatically generating protein–ligand binding predictions. Implementation of this system in a pipeline of Semantic Web technique-based web tools will allow users to specify a ligand and receive the tool within 0.5–1 day. We demonstrated high prediction accuracy for three machine learning algorithms and eight ligands. Availability and implementation: The source code and web application are freely available for download at http://utprot.net. They are implemented in Python and supported on Linux. Contact: shimizu@bi.a.u-tokyo.ac.jp Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:26545824

  7. Thermodynamics of ligand binding to histone deacetylase like amidohydrolase from Bordetella/Alcaligenes.

    PubMed

    Meyners, Christian; Baud, Matthias G J; Fuchter, Matthew J; Meyer-Almes, Franz-Josef

    2014-03-01

    Thermodynamic studies on ligand-protein binding have become increasingly important in the process of drug design. In combination with structural data and molecular dynamics simulations, thermodynamic studies provide relevant information about the mode of interaction between compounds and their target proteins and therefore build a sound basis for further drug optimization. Using the example of histone deacetylases (HDACs), particularly the histone deacetylase like amidohydrolase (HDAH) from Bordetella/Alcaligenes, a novel sensitive competitive fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based binding assay was developed and the thermodynamics of interaction of both fluorescent ligands and inhibitors to histone deacetylase like amidohydrolase were investigated. The assay consumes only small amounts of valuable target proteins and is suitable for fast kinetic and mechanistic studies as well as high throughput screening applications. Binding affinity increased with increasing length of aliphatic spacers (n = 4-7) between the hydroxamate moiety and the dansyl head group of ligand probes. Van't Hoff plots revealed an optimum in enthalpy contribution to the free energy of binding for the dansyl-ligand with hexyl spacer. The selectivity in the series of dansyl-ligands against human class I HDAC1 but not class II HDACs 4 and 6 increased with the ratio of ΔH(0)/ΔG(0). The data clearly emphasize the importance of thermodynamic signatures as useful general guidance for the optimization of ligands or rational drug design.

  8. The good, the bad and the dubious: VHELIBS, a validation helper for ligands and binding sites

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Many Protein Data Bank (PDB) users assume that the deposited structural models are of high quality but forget that these models are derived from the interpretation of experimental data. The accuracy of atom coordinates is not homogeneous between models or throughout the same model. To avoid basing a research project on a flawed model, we present a tool for assessing the quality of ligands and binding sites in crystallographic models from the PDB. Results The Validation HElper for LIgands and Binding Sites (VHELIBS) is software that aims to ease the validation of binding site and ligand coordinates for non-crystallographers (i.e., users with little or no crystallography knowledge). Using a convenient graphical user interface, it allows one to check how ligand and binding site coordinates fit to the electron density map. VHELIBS can use models from either the PDB or the PDB_REDO databank of re-refined and re-built crystallographic models. The user can specify threshold values for a series of properties related to the fit of coordinates to electron density (Real Space R, Real Space Correlation Coefficient and average occupancy are used by default). VHELIBS will automatically classify residues and ligands as Good, Dubious or Bad based on the specified limits. The user is also able to visually check the quality of the fit of residues and ligands to the electron density map and reclassify them if needed. Conclusions VHELIBS allows inexperienced users to examine the binding site and the ligand coordinates in relation to the experimental data. This is an important step to evaluate models for their fitness for drug discovery purposes such as structure-based pharmacophore development and protein-ligand docking experiments. PMID:23895374

  9. NMR studies of DNA oligomers and their interactions with minor groove binding ligands

    SciTech Connect

    Fagan, P A

    1996-05-01

    The cationic peptide ligands distamycin and netropsin bind noncovalently to the minor groove of DNA. The binding site, orientation, stoichiometry, and qualitative affinity of distamycin binding to several short DNA oligomers were investigated by NMR spectroscopy. The oligomers studied contain A,T-rich or I,C-rich binding sites, where I = 2-desaminodeoxyguanosine. I{center_dot}C base pairs are functional analogs of A{center_dot}T base pairs in the minor groove. The different behaviors exhibited by distamycin and netropsin binding to various DNA sequences suggested that these ligands are sensitive probes of DNA structure. For sites of five or more base pairs, distamycin can form 1:1 or 2:1 ligand:DNA complexes. Cooperativity in distamycin binding is low in sites such as AAAAA which has narrow minor grooves, and is higher in sites with wider minor grooves such as ATATAT. The distamycin binding and base pair opening lifetimes of I,C-containing DNA oligomers suggest that the I,C minor groove is structurally different from the A,T minor groove. Molecules which direct chemistry to a specific DNA sequence could be used as antiviral compounds, diagnostic probes, or molecular biology tools. The author studied two ligands in which reactive groups were tethered to a distamycin to increase the sequence specificity of the reactive agent.

  10. Ligand Binding and Structural Changes Associated with Allostery in Yeast NAD+-specific Isocitrate Dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Lee, McAlister-Henn

    2011-01-01

    Yeast NAD+-specific isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) is an octameric enzyme composed of four each of regulatory IDH1 and catalytic IDH2 subunits that share 42% sequence identity. IDH2 contains catalytic isocitrate/Mg2+ and NAD+ binding sites whereas IDH1 contains homologous binding sites, respectively, for cooperative binding of isocitrate and for allosteric binding of AMP. Ligand binding is highly ordered in vitro, and IDH exhibits the unusual property of half-site binding for all ligands. The structures of IDH solved in the absence or presence of ligands have shown: (a) a heterodimer to be the basic structural/functional unit of the enzyme, (b) the organization of heterodimers to form tetramer and octamer structures, (c) structural differences that may underlie cooperative and allosteric regulatory mechanisms, and (d) the possibility for formation of a disulfide bond that could reduce catalytic activity. In vivo analyses of mutant enzymes have elucidated the physiological importance of catalytic activity and allosteric regulation of this tricarboxylic acid cycle enzyme. Other studies have established the importance of a disulfide bond in regulation of IDH activity in vivo, as well as contributions of this bond to the property of half-site ligand binding exhibited by the wild-type enzyme. PMID:22008468

  11. Quantification of the Effects of Ionic Strength, Viscosity, and Hydrophobicity on Protein–Ligand Binding Affinity

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In order to quantify the interactions between molecules of biological interest, the determination of the dissociation constant (Kd) is essential. Estimation of the binding affinity in this way is routinely performed in “favorable” conditions for macromolecules. Crucial data for ligand–protein binding elucidation is mainly derived from techniques (e.g., macromolecular crystallography) that require the addition of high concentration of salts and/or other additives. In this study we have evaluated the effect of temperature, ionic strength, viscosity, and hydrophobicity on the Kd of three previously characterized protein–ligand systems, based on variation in their binding sites, in order to provide insight into how these often overlooked unconventional circumstances impact binding affinity. Our conclusions are as follows: (1) increasing solvent viscosity in general is detrimental to ligand binding, (2) moderate increases in temperature have marginal effects on the dissociation constant, and (3) the degree of hydrophobicity of the ligand and the binding site determines the extent of the influence of cosolvents and salt concentration on ligand binding affinity. PMID:25147617

  12. In silico Identification and Characterization of Protein-Ligand Binding Sites.

    PubMed

    Roche, Daniel Barry; McGuffin, Liam James

    2016-01-01

    Protein-ligand binding site prediction methods aim to predict, from amino acid sequence, protein-ligand interactions, putative ligands, and ligand binding site residues using either sequence information, structural information, or a combination of both. In silico characterization of protein-ligand interactions has become extremely important to help determine a protein's functionality, as in vivo-based functional elucidation is unable to keep pace with the current growth of sequence databases. Additionally, in vitro biochemical functional elucidation is time-consuming, costly, and may not be feasible for large-scale analysis, such as drug discovery. Thus, in silico prediction of protein-ligand interactions must be utilized to aid in functional elucidation. Here, we briefly discuss protein function prediction, prediction of protein-ligand interactions, the Critical Assessment of Techniques for Protein Structure Prediction (CASP) and the Continuous Automated EvaluatiOn (CAMEO) competitions, along with their role in shaping the field. We also discuss, in detail, our cutting-edge web-server method, FunFOLD for the structurally informed prediction of protein-ligand interactions. Furthermore, we provide a step-by-step guide on using the FunFOLD web server and FunFOLD3 downloadable application, along with some real world examples, where the FunFOLD methods have been used to aid functional elucidation. PMID:27094282

  13. Dye-labeled benzodiazepines: development of small ligands for receptor binding studies using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hegener, Oliver; Jordan, Randolf; Häberlein, Hanns

    2004-07-01

    To investigate benzodiazepine receptor binding studies by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS), the four fluorophores fluorescein, tetramethylrhodamine, Oregon Green 488, and Alexa 532 were coupled to the benzodiazepine Ro 07-1986/602 (Ro). Binding assays to polyclonal antibodies to benzodiazepines and at the native benzodiazepine receptor on the membrane of rat hippocampal neurons were established to examine the dye-labeled ligands for their benzodiazepine character and their binding behavior. Both the fluorescein and the Oregon Green488 moiety led to a loss of the benzodiazepine receptor binding of the corresponding Ro derivatives. Antibody recognition and interactions to the receptor were observed for the tetramethylrhodamine derivative (K(D) = 96.0 +/- 9.5 nM) but with a high amount of nonspecific binding at the cell membrane of about 50%. In saturation experiments a K(D) value of 97.2 +/- 8.5 nM was found for the Alexa Fluor 532 derivative-antibody interaction. Investigation of the binding of this ligand to the benzodiazepine receptor in FCS cell measurements led to confirmation of high specific binding behavior with a K(D) value of 9.9 +/- 1.9 nM. A nonspecific binding of <10% was observed after coincubation with 1 microM of midazolam. The different properties of the labeled benzodiazepine derivatives and the requirements of the fluorophore in small dye-labeled ligands in FCS binding studies, at the membrane of living cells, are discussed.

  14. Thermodynamic fingerprints of ligand binding to human telomeric G-quadruplexes.

    PubMed

    Bončina, Matjaž; Podlipnik, Črtomir; Piantanida, Ivo; Eilmes, Julita; Teulade-Fichou, Marie-Paule; Vesnaver, Gorazd; Lah, Jurij

    2015-12-01

    Thermodynamic studies of ligand binding to human telomere (ht) DNA quadruplexes, as a rule, neglect the involvement of various ht-DNA conformations in the binding process. Therefore, the thermodynamic driving forces and the mechanisms of ht-DNA G-quadruplex-ligand recognition remain poorly understood. In this work we characterize thermodynamically and structurally binding of netropsin (Net), dibenzotetraaza[14]annulene derivatives (DP77, DP78), cationic porphyrin (TMPyP4) and two bisquinolinium ligands (Phen-DC3, 360A-Br) to the ht-DNA fragment (Tel22) AGGG(TTAGGG)3 using isothermal titration calorimetry, CD and fluorescence spectroscopy, gel electrophoresis and molecular modeling. By global thermodynamic analysis of experimental data we show that the driving forces characterized by contributions of specific interactions, changes in solvation and conformation differ significantly for binding of ligands with low quadruplex selectivity over duplexes (Net, DP77, DP78, TMPyP4; KTel22 ≈ ligands (Phen-DC3, 360A-Br; KTel22 > KdsDNA). These contributions are in accordance with the observed structural features (changes) and suggest that upon binding Net, DP77, DP78 and TMPyP4 select hybrid-1 and/or hybrid-2 conformation while Phen-DC3 and 360A-Br induce the transition of hybrid-1 and hybrid-2 to the structure with characteristics of antiparallel or hybrid-3 type conformation.

  15. Identification of ligand-binding pockets in proteins using residue preference methods.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Zhijun; Wang, Xicheng

    2009-01-01

    Identification of ligand-binding pockets in proteins is pivotal to protein function definition and drug discovery. In this study, we focus on determining the binding pockets in proteins for potential ligands without any a priori knowledge. Three methods based upon residue preference concept are proposed to predict ligand-binding pockets, where we deal with three types of residue preference (residue based, atom based and atom-contact-pair based preference), respectively. Two test sets were chosen to examine the proposed methods. Two different identification rules (named Top1 and Top2) are used to detect ligand-binding pockets. The results show that the atom-contact-pair method has good accuracy and high efficiency, better than the other two methods. By means of preference analysis for amino acids and atom-contact-pairs, we find that Gly and atom-contact-pairs on aromatic residues appear at ligand-binding pockets more frequently. The former favors pocket flexibility, and the latter shows that aggregate hydrophobic surface may play an important role in complex formation.

  16. Identification of ligand-binding pockets in proteins using residue preference methods.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Zhijun; Wang, Xicheng

    2009-01-01

    Identification of ligand-binding pockets in proteins is pivotal to protein function definition and drug discovery. In this study, we focus on determining the binding pockets in proteins for potential ligands without any a priori knowledge. Three methods based upon residue preference concept are proposed to predict ligand-binding pockets, where we deal with three types of residue preference (residue based, atom based and atom-contact-pair based preference), respectively. Two test sets were chosen to examine the proposed methods. Two different identification rules (named Top1 and Top2) are used to detect ligand-binding pockets. The results show that the atom-contact-pair method has good accuracy and high efficiency, better than the other two methods. By means of preference analysis for amino acids and atom-contact-pairs, we find that Gly and atom-contact-pairs on aromatic residues appear at ligand-binding pockets more frequently. The former favors pocket flexibility, and the latter shows that aggregate hydrophobic surface may play an important role in complex formation. PMID:19689426

  17. Mass spectrometry-based ligand binding assays on adenosine A1 and A2A receptors.

    PubMed

    Massink, A; Holzheimer, M; Hölscher, A; Louvel, J; Guo, D; Spijksma, G; Hankemeier, T; IJzerman, A P

    2015-12-01

    Conventional methods to measure ligand-receptor binding parameters typically require radiolabeled ligands as probes. Despite the robustness of radioligand binding assays, they carry inherent disadvantages in terms of safety precautions, expensive synthesis, special lab requirements, and waste disposal. Mass spectrometry (MS) is a method that can selectively detect ligands without the need of a label. The sensitivity of MS equipment increases progressively, and currently, it is possible to detect low ligand quantities that are usually found in ligand binding assays. We developed a label-free MS ligand binding (MS binding) assay on the adenosine A(1) and A(2A) receptors (A(1)AR and A(2A)AR), which are well-characterized members of the class A G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) family. Radioligand binding assays for both receptors are well established, and ample data is available to compare and evaluate the performance of an MS binding assay. 1,3-Dipropyl-8-cyclopentyl-xanthine (DPCPX) and 4-(2-((7-amino-2-(furan-2-yl)-[1,2,4]triazolo[1,5-a]-[1,3,5]triazin-5-yl)amino)ethyl)phenol (ZM-241,385) are high-affinity ligands selective for the A(1)AR and A(2A)AR, respectively. To proof the feasibility of MS binding on the A(1)AR and A(2A)AR, we first developed an MS detection method for unlabeled DPCPX and ZM-241,385. To serve as internal standards, both compounds were also deuterium-labeled. Subsequently, we investigated whether the two unlabeled compounds could substitute for their radiolabeled counterparts as marker ligands in binding experiments, including saturation, displacement, dissociation, and competition association assays. Furthermore, we investigated the accuracy of these assays if the use of internal standards was excluded. The results demonstrate the feasibility of the MS binding assay, even in the absence of a deuterium-labeled internal standard, and provide great promise for the further development of label-free assays based on MS for other GPCRs. PMID

  18. Quantitative Determination of DNA-Ligand Binding Using Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Healy, Eamonn F.

    2007-01-01

    The effective use of fluorescence spectroscopy for determining the binding of the intercalcating agent crhidium bromide to DNA is being described. The analysis used simple measurement techniques and hence can be easily adopted by the students for a better understanding.

  19. The ligand binding site of the synaptosomal choline transporter: a provisional model based on inhibition studies.

    PubMed

    Roberts, E; Tamaru, M

    1992-05-01

    A topographic model of the ligand binding site of the choline transporter was deduced from inhibition studies with the help of CPK molecular models. It is posited that there are two identical or closely similar hydrophilic anionic sites separated from each other by an hinged, essentially planar but conformationally flexible cationic hydrophobic domain. Subsequently to attachment of external choline to either one of the anionic sites, both sites cooperate in enveloping the ligand by a Venus fly-trap mechanism. This leads to rapid configurational changes by which the closed-liganded form of the transporter opens up to the interior to release the bound choline. Intracellular K+, a ligand for the choline-binding site, is proposed to be counter-transported by a reversal of the above mechanism.

  20. Structural determinants of ligand binding selectivity between the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors

    PubMed Central

    Xu, H. Eric; Lambert, Millard H.; Montana, Valerie G.; Plunket, Kelli D.; Moore, Linda B.; Collins, Jon L.; Oplinger, Jeffery A.; Kliewer, Steven A.; Gampe, Robert T.; McKee, David D.; Moore, John T.; Willson, Timothy M.

    2001-01-01

    The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are transcriptional regulators of glucose, lipid, and cholesterol metabolism. We report the x-ray crystal structure of the ligand binding domain of PPARα (NR1C1) as a complex with the agonist ligand GW409544 and a coactivator motif from the steroid receptor coactivator 1. Through comparison of the crystal structures of the ligand binding domains of the three human PPARs, we have identified molecular determinants of subtype selectivity. A single amino acid, which is tyrosine in PPARα and histidine in PPARγ, imparts subtype selectivity for both thiazolidinedione and nonthiazolidinedione ligands. The availability of high-resolution cocrystal structures of the three PPAR subtypes will aid the design of drugs for the treatments of metabolic and cardiovascular diseases. PMID:11698662

  1. Ligand binding pocket of the human somatostatin receptor 5: mutational analysis of the extracellular domains.

    PubMed

    Greenwood, M T; Hukovic, N; Kumar, U; Panetta, R; Hjorth, S A; Srikant, C B; Patel, Y C

    1997-11-01

    The ligand binding domain of G protein-coupled receptors for peptide ligands consists of a pocket formed by extracellular and transmembrane domain (TM) residues. In the case of somatostatin (SRIF), however, previous studies have suggested that the binding cavity of the octapeptide analog SMS201-995 (SMS) is lined by residues in TMs III-VII. The additional involvement of the extracellular domains for binding SMS or the natural SRIF ligands (SRIF-14, SRIF-28) has not been clarified. Using a cassette construct cDNA for the human somatostatin 5 receptor (sst5R), we systematically examined the role of exofacial structures in ligand binding by creating a series of mutants in which the extracellular portions have been altered by conservative segment exchange (CSE) mutagenesis for the extracellular loops (ECLs) and by deletion (for the NH2-terminal segment) or truncation analysis (ECL3). CHO-K1 cells were stably transfected with wild type or mutant human sst5R constructs, and agonist binding was assessed using membrane binding assays with 125I-LTT SRIF-28 ligand. Deletion of the NH2 terminus or CSE mutagenesis of ECL1 and ECL3 produced minor 2-8-fold decreases in affinity for SRIF-14, SRIF-28, and SMS ligands. Truncation of ECL3 to mimic the size of this loop in sst1R and sst4R (the two subtypes that do not bind SMS) did not interfere with the binding of SMS, SRIF-14, or SRIF-28. In contrast, both ECL2 mutants failed to bind 125I-LTT SRIF-28. Immunocytochemical analysis of nonpermeabilized cells with a human sst5R antibody revealed that the mutant receptors were targeted to the plasma membrane. Labeled SMS (125I-Tyr3 SMS) also failed to bind to the mutant ECL2 receptors. These results suggest a potential contribution of ECL2 (in addition to the previously identified residues in TMs III-VII) to the SRIF ligand binding pocket.

  2. Microarray analysis of the AHR system: Tissue-specific flexibility in signal and target genes

    SciTech Connect

    Frericks, Markus; Meissner, Marc; Esser, Charlotte . E-mail: chesser@uni-duesseldorf.de

    2007-05-01

    Data mining published microarray experiments require that expression profiles are directly comparable. We performed linear global normalization on the data of 1967 Affymetrix U74av2 microarrays, i.e. the transcriptomes of > 100 murine tissues or cell types. The mathematical transformation effectively nullifies inter-experimental or inter-laboratory differences between microarrays. The correctness of expression values was validated by quantitative RT-PCR. Using the database we analyze components of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) signaling pathway in various tissues. We identified lineage and differentiation specific variant expression of AHR, ARNT, and HIF1{alpha} in the T-cell lineage and high expression of CYP1A1 in immature B cells and dendritic cells. Performing co-expression analysis we found unorthodox expression of the AHR in the absence of ARNT, particularly in stem cell populations, and can reject the hypothesis that ARNT2 takes over and is highly expressed when ARNT expression is low or absent. Furthermore the AHR shows no co-expression with any other transcript present on the chip. Analysis of differential gene expression under 308 conditions revealed 53 conditions under which the AHR is regulated, numerous conditions under which an intrinsic AHR action is modified as well as conditions activating the AHR even in the absence of known AHR ligands. Thus meta-analysis of published expression profiles is a powerful tool to gain novel insights into known and unknown systems.

  3. Identification of Ligand Binding Sites of Proteins Using the Gaussian Network Model

    PubMed Central

    Tuzmen, Ceren; Erman, Burak

    2011-01-01

    The nonlocal nature of the protein-ligand binding problem is investigated via the Gaussian Network Model with which the residues lying along interaction pathways in a protein and the residues at the binding site are predicted. The predictions of the binding site residues are verified by using several benchmark systems where the topology of the unbound protein and the bound protein-ligand complex are known. Predictions are made on the unbound protein. Agreement of results with the bound complexes indicates that the information for binding resides in the unbound protein. Cliques that consist of three or more residues that are far apart along the primary structure but are in contact in the folded structure are shown to be important determinants of the binding problem. Comparison with known structures shows that the predictive capability of the method is significant. PMID:21283550

  4. Evaluation of ligand-binding affinity using polynomial empirical scoring functions.

    PubMed

    de Azevedo, Walter Filgueira; Dias, Raquel

    2008-10-15

    Assessing protein-ligand interaction is of great importance for virtual screening initiatives in order to discover new drugs. The present work describes a set of empirical scoring functions to assess the binding affinity, involving terms for intermolecular hydrogen bonds and contact surface. The results show that our methodology works better to predict protein-ligand affinity when compared with XSCORE, a popular empirical scoring function.

  5. "DAKLI": a multipurpose ligand with high affinity and selectivity for dynorphin (kappa opioid) binding sites.

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, A; Nestor, J J; Naidu, A; Newman, S R

    1988-01-01

    We describe a synthetic ligand, "DAKLI" (Dynorphin A-analogue Kappa LIgand), related to the opioid peptide dynorphin A. A single reactive amino group at the extended carboxyl terminus permits various reporter groups to be attached, such as 125I-labeled Bolton-Hunter reagent, fluorescein isothiocyanate, or biotin. These derivatives have high affinity and selectivity for the dynorphin (kappa opioid) receptor. An incidental finding is that untreated guinea pig brain membranes have saturable avidin binding sites. PMID:2902630

  6. Detecting Local Ligand-Binding Site Similarity in Non-Homologous Proteins by Surface Patch Comparison

    PubMed Central

    Sael, Lee; Kihara, Daisuke

    2012-01-01

    Functional elucidation of proteins is one of the essential tasks in biology. Function of a protein, specifically, small ligand molecules that bind to a protein, can be predicted by finding similar local surface regions in binding sites of known proteins. Here, we developed an alignment free local surface comparison method for predicting a ligand molecule which binds to a query protein. The algorithm, named Patch-Surfer, represents a binding pocket as a combination of segmented surface patches, each of which is characterized by its geometrical shape, the electrostatic potential, the hydrophobicity, and the concaveness. Representing a pocket by a set of patches is effective to absorb difference of global pocket shape while capturing local similarity of pockets. The shape and the physicochemical properties of surface patches are represented using the 3D Zernike descriptor, which is a series expansion of mathematical 3D function. Two pockets are compared using a modified weighted bipartite matching algorithm, which matches similar patches from the two pockets. Patch-Surfer was benchmarked on three datasets, which consist in total of 390 proteins that bind to one of 21 ligands. Patch-Surfer showed superior performance to existing methods including a global pocket comparison method, Pocket-Surfer, which we have previously introduced. Particularly, as intended, the accuracy showed large improvement for flexible ligand molecules, which bind to pockets in different conformations. PMID:22275074

  7. Mass spectrometry-based monitoring of millisecond protein-ligand binding dynamics using an automated microfluidic platform.

    PubMed

    Cong, Yongzheng; Katipamula, Shanta; Trader, Cameron D; Orton, Daniel J; Geng, Tao; Baker, Erin S; Kelly, Ryan T

    2016-04-26

    Characterizing protein-ligand binding dynamics is crucial for understanding protein function and for developing new therapeutic agents. We present a novel microfluidic platform that features rapid mixing of protein and ligand solutions, variable incubation times, and an integrated electrospray ionization source for mass spectrometry-based monitoring of protein-ligand binding dynamics. This platform offers many advantages, including solution-based binding, label-free detection, automated operation, rapid mixing, and low sample consumption. PMID:27009517

  8. myo-inositol and D-ribose ligand discrimination in an ABC periplasmic binding protein.

    PubMed

    Herrou, Julien; Crosson, Sean

    2013-05-01

    The periplasmic binding protein (PBP) IbpA mediates the uptake of myo-inositol by the IatP-IatA ATP-binding cassette transmembrane transporter. We report a crystal structure of Caulobacter crescentus IbpA bound to myo-inositol at 1.45 Å resolution. This constitutes the first structure of a PBP bound to inositol. IbpA adopts a type I PBP fold consisting of two α-β lobes that surround a central hinge. A pocket positioned between the lobes contains the myo-inositol ligand, which binds with submicromolar affinity (0.76 ± 0.08 μM). IbpA is homologous to ribose-binding proteins and binds D-ribose with low affinity (50.8 ± 3.4 μM). On the basis of IbpA and ribose-binding protein structures, we have designed variants of IbpA with inverted binding specificity for myo-inositol and D-ribose. Five mutations in the ligand-binding pocket are sufficient to increase the affinity of IbpA for D-ribose by 10-fold while completely abolishing binding to myo-inositol. Replacement of ibpA with these mutant alleles unable to bind myo-inositol abolishes C. crescentus growth in medium containing myo-inositol as the sole carbon source. Neither deletion of ibpA nor replacement of ibpA with the high-affinity ribose binding allele affected C. crescentus growth on D-ribose as a carbon source, providing evidence that the IatP-IatA transporter is specific for myo-inositol. This study outlines the evolutionary relationship between ribose- and inositol-binding proteins and provides insight into the molecular basis upon which these two related, but functionally distinct, classes of periplasmic proteins specifically bind carbohydrate ligands.

  9. Classification of Beta-Lactamases and Penicillin Binding Proteins Using Ligand-Centric Network Models

    PubMed Central

    Öztürk, Hakime; Ozkirimli, Elif; Özgür, Arzucan

    2015-01-01

    β-lactamase mediated antibiotic resistance is an important health issue and the discovery of new β-lactam type antibiotics or β-lactamase inhibitors is an area of intense research. Today, there are about a thousand β-lactamases due to the evolutionary pressure exerted by these ligands. While β-lactamases hydrolyse the β-lactam ring of antibiotics, rendering them ineffective, Penicillin-Binding Proteins (PBPs), which share high structural similarity with β-lactamases, also confer antibiotic resistance to their host organism by acquiring mutations that allow them to continue their participation in cell wall biosynthesis. In this paper, we propose a novel approach to include ligand sharing information for classifying and clustering β-lactamases and PBPs in an effort to elucidate the ligand induced evolution of these β-lactam binding proteins. We first present a detailed summary of the β-lactamase and PBP families in the Protein Data Bank, as well as the compounds they bind to. Then, we build two different types of networks in which the proteins are represented as nodes, and two proteins are connected by an edge with a weight that depends on the number of shared identical or similar ligands. These models are analyzed under three different edge weight settings, namely unweighted, weighted, and normalized weighted. A detailed comparison of these six networks showed that the use of ligand sharing information to cluster proteins resulted in modules comprising proteins with not only sequence similarity but also functional similarity. Consideration of ligand similarity highlighted some interactions that were not detected in the identical ligand network. Analysing the β-lactamases and PBPs using ligand-centric network models enabled the identification of novel relationships, suggesting that these models can be used to examine other protein families to obtain information on their ligand induced evolutionary paths. PMID:25689853

  10. Binding affinity prediction for protein-ligand complexes based on β contacts and B factor.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qian; Kwoh, Chee Keong; Li, Jinyan

    2013-11-25

    Accurate determination of protein-ligand binding affinity is a fundamental problem in biochemistry useful for many applications including drug design and protein-ligand docking. A number of scoring functions have been proposed for the prediction of protein-ligand binding affinity. However, accurate prediction is still a challenging problem because poor performance is often seen in the evaluation under the leave-one-cluster-out cross-validation (LCOCV). We introduce a new scoring function named B2BScore to improve the prediction performance. B2BScore integrates two physicochemical properties for protein-ligand binding affinity prediction. One is the property of β contacts. A β contact between two atoms requires no other atoms to interrupt the atomic contact and assumes that the two atoms should have enough direct contact area. The other is the property of B factor to capture the atomic mobility in the dynamic protein-ligand binding process. Tested on the PDBBind2009 data set, B2BScore shows superior prediction performance to existing methods on independent test data as well as under the LCOCV evaluation framework. In particular, B2BScore achieves a significant LCOCV improvement across 26 protein clusters-a big increase of the averaged Pearson's correlation coefficients from 0.418 to 0.518 and a significant decrease of standard deviation of the coefficients from 0.352 to 0.196. We also identified several important and intuitive contact descriptors of protein-ligand binding through the random forest learning in B2BScore. Some of these descriptors are closely related to contacts between carbon atoms without covalent-bond oxygen/nitrogen, preferred contacts of metal ions, interfacial backbone atoms from proteins, or π rings. Some others are negative descriptors relating to those contacts with nitrogen atoms without covalent-bond hydrogens or nonpreferred contacts of metal ions. These descriptors can be directly used to guide protein-ligand docking.

  11. Deciphering Dimerization Modes of PAS Domains: Computational and Experimental Analyses of the AhR:ARNT Complex Reveal New Insights Into the Mechanisms of AhR Transformation

    PubMed Central

    Corrada, Dario; Soshilov, Anatoly A.; Denison, Michael S.

    2016-01-01

    The Aryl hydrocarbon Receptor (AhR) is a transcription factor that mediates the biochemical response to xenobiotics and the toxic effects of a number of environmental contaminants, including dioxins. Recently, endogenous regulatory roles for the AhR in normal physiology and development have also been reported, thus extending the interest in understanding its molecular mechanisms of activation. Since dimerization with the AhR Nuclear Translocator (ARNT) protein, occurring through the Helix-Loop-Helix (HLH) and PER-ARNT-SIM (PAS) domains, is needed to convert the AhR into its transcriptionally active form, deciphering the AhR:ARNT dimerization mode would provide insights into the mechanisms of AhR transformation. Here we present homology models of the murine AhR:ARNT PAS domain dimer developed using recently available X-ray structures of other bHLH-PAS protein dimers. Due to the different reciprocal orientation and interaction surfaces in the different template dimers, two alternative models were developed for both the PAS-A and PAS-B dimers and they were characterized by combining a number of computational evaluations. Both well-established hot spot prediction methods and new approaches to analyze individual residue and residue-pairwise contributions to the MM-GBSA binding free energies were adopted to predict residues critical for dimer stabilization. On this basis, a mutagenesis strategy for both the murine AhR and ARNT proteins was designed and ligand-dependent DNA binding ability of the AhR:ARNT heterodimer mutants was evaluated. While functional analysis disfavored the HIF2α:ARNT heterodimer-based PAS-B model, most mutants derived from the CLOCK:BMAL1-based AhR:ARNT dimer models of both the PAS-A and the PAS-B dramatically decreased the levels of DNA binding, suggesting this latter model as the most suitable for describing AhR:ARNT dimerization. These novel results open new research directions focused at elucidating basic molecular mechanisms underlying the

  12. Development of a quantitative fluorescence-based ligand-binding assay

    PubMed Central

    Breen, Conor J.; Raverdeau, Mathilde; Voorheis, H. Paul

    2016-01-01

    A major goal of biology is to develop a quantitative ligand-binding assay that does not involve the use of radioactivity. Existing fluorescence-based assays have a serious drawback due to fluorescence quenching that accompanies the binding of fluorescently-labeled ligands to their receptors. This limitation of existing fluorescence-based assays prevents the number of cellular receptors under investigation from being accurately measured. We have developed a method where FITC-labeled proteins bound to a cell surface are proteolyzed extensively to eliminate fluorescence quenching and then the fluorescence of the resulting sample is compared to that of a known concentration of the proteolyzed FITC-protein employed. This step enables the number of cellular receptors to be measured quantitatively. We expect that this method will provide researchers with a viable alternative to the use of radioactivity in ligand binding assays. PMID:27161290

  13. A model for the study of ligand binding to the ribosomal RNA helix h44

    SciTech Connect

    Dibrov, Sergey M.; Parsons, Jerod; Hermann, Thomas

    2010-09-02

    Oligonucleotide models of ribosomal RNA domains are powerful tools to study the binding and molecular recognition of antibiotics that interfere with bacterial translation. Techniques such as selective chemical modification, fluorescence labeling and mutations are cumbersome for the whole ribosome but readily applicable to model RNAs, which are readily crystallized and often give rise to higher resolution crystal structures suitable for detailed analysis of ligand-RNA interactions. Here, we have investigated the HX RNA construct which contains two adjacent ligand binding regions of helix h44 in 16S ribosomal RNA. High-resolution crystal structure analysis confirmed that the HX RNA is a faithful structural model of the ribosomal target. Solution studies showed that HX RNA carrying a fluorescent 2-aminopurine modification provides a model system that can be used to monitor ligand binding to both the ribosomal decoding site and, through an indirect effect, the hygromycin B interaction region.

  14. Mixed ligand copper(II) dicarboxylate complexes: the role of co-ligand hydrophobicity in DNA binding, double-strand DNA cleavage, protein binding and cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Loganathan, Rangasamy; Ramakrishnan, Sethu; Ganeshpandian, Mani; Bhuvanesh, Nattamai S P; Palaniandavar, Mallayan; Riyasdeen, Anvarbatcha; Akbarsha, Mohamad Abdulkadhar

    2015-06-14

    A few water soluble mixed ligand copper(ii) complexes of the type [Cu(bimda)(diimine)] , where bimda is N-benzyliminodiacetic acid and diimine is 2,2'-bipyridine (bpy, ) or 1,10-phenanthroline (phen, ) or 5,6-dimethyl-1,10-phenanthroline (5,6-dmp, ) or 3,4,7,8-tetramethyl-1,10-phenanthroline (3,4,7,8-tmp, ) and dipyrido[3,2-d: 2',3'-f]quinoxaline (dpq, ), have been successfully isolated and characterized by elemental analysis and other spectral techniques. The coordination geometry around copper(ii) in is described as distorted square based pyramidal while that in is described as square pyramidal. Absorption spectral titrations and competitive DNA binding studies reveal that the intrinsic DNA binding affinity of the complexes depends upon the diimine co-ligand, dpq () > 3,4,7,8-tmp () > 5,6-dmp () > phen () > bpy (). The phen and dpq co-ligands are involved in the π-stacking interaction with DNA base pairs while the 3,4,7,8-tmp/5,6-dmp and bpy co-ligands are involved in respectively hydrophobic and surface mode of binding with DNA. The small enhancement in the relative viscosity of DNA upon binding to supports the DNA binding modes proposed. Interestingly, and are selective in exhibiting a positive induced CD band (ICD) upon binding to DNA suggesting that they induce B to A conformational change. In contrast, and show CD responses which reveal their involvement in strong DNA binding. The complexes are unique in displaying prominent double-strand DNA cleavage while effects only single-strand DNA cleavage, and their ability to cleave DNA in the absence of an activator varies as > > > > . Also, all the complexes exhibit oxidative double-strand DNA cleavage activity in the presence of ascorbic acid, which varies as > > > > . The ability of the complexes to bind and cleave the protein BSA varies in the order > > > > . Interestingly, and cleave the protein non-specifically in the presence of H2O2 as an activator suggesting that they can act also as chemical proteases

  15. Mixed ligand copper(II) dicarboxylate complexes: the role of co-ligand hydrophobicity in DNA binding, double-strand DNA cleavage, protein binding and cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Loganathan, Rangasamy; Ramakrishnan, Sethu; Ganeshpandian, Mani; Bhuvanesh, Nattamai S P; Palaniandavar, Mallayan; Riyasdeen, Anvarbatcha; Akbarsha, Mohamad Abdulkadhar

    2015-06-14

    A few water soluble mixed ligand copper(ii) complexes of the type [Cu(bimda)(diimine)] , where bimda is N-benzyliminodiacetic acid and diimine is 2,2'-bipyridine (bpy, ) or 1,10-phenanthroline (phen, ) or 5,6-dimethyl-1,10-phenanthroline (5,6-dmp, ) or 3,4,7,8-tetramethyl-1,10-phenanthroline (3,4,7,8-tmp, ) and dipyrido[3,2-d: 2',3'-f]quinoxaline (dpq, ), have been successfully isolated and characterized by elemental analysis and other spectral techniques. The coordination geometry around copper(ii) in is described as distorted square based pyramidal while that in is described as square pyramidal. Absorption spectral titrations and competitive DNA binding studies reveal that the intrinsic DNA binding affinity of the complexes depends upon the diimine co-ligand, dpq () > 3,4,7,8-tmp () > 5,6-dmp () > phen () > bpy (). The phen and dpq co-ligands are involved in the π-stacking interaction with DNA base pairs while the 3,4,7,8-tmp/5,6-dmp and bpy co-ligands are involved in respectively hydrophobic and surface mode of binding with DNA. The small enhancement in the relative viscosity of DNA upon binding to supports the DNA binding modes proposed. Interestingly, and are selective in exhibiting a positive induced CD band (ICD) upon binding to DNA suggesting that they induce B to A conformational change. In contrast, and show CD responses which reveal their involvement in strong DNA binding. The complexes are unique in displaying prominent double-strand DNA cleavage while effects only single-strand DNA cleavage, and their ability to cleave DNA in the absence of an activator varies as > > > > . Also, all the complexes exhibit oxidative double-strand DNA cleavage activity in the presence of ascorbic acid, which varies as > > > > . The ability of the complexes to bind and cleave the protein BSA varies in the order > > > > . Interestingly, and cleave the protein non-specifically in the presence of H2O2 as an activator suggesting that they can act also as chemical proteases

  16. Computational exploration of a protein receptor binding space with student proposed peptide ligands.

    PubMed

    King, Matthew D; Phillips, Paul; Turner, Matthew W; Katz, Michael; Lew, Sarah; Bradburn, Sarah; Andersen, Tim; McDougal, Owen M

    2016-01-01

    Computational molecular docking is a fast and effective in silico method for the analysis of binding between a protein receptor model and a ligand. The visualization and manipulation of protein to ligand binding in three-dimensional space represents a powerful tool in the biochemistry curriculum to enhance student learning. The DockoMatic tutorial described herein provides a framework by which instructors can guide students through a drug screening exercise. Using receptor models derived from readily available protein crystal structures, docking programs have the ability to predict ligand binding properties, such as preferential binding orientations and binding affinities. The use of computational studies can significantly enhance complimentary wet chemical experimentation by providing insight into the important molecular interactions within the system of interest, as well as guide the design of new candidate ligands based on observed binding motifs and energetics. In this laboratory tutorial, the graphical user interface, DockoMatic, facilitates docking job submissions to the docking engine, AutoDock 4.2. The purpose of this exercise is to successfully dock a 17-amino acid peptide, α-conotoxin TxIA, to the acetylcholine binding protein from Aplysia californica-AChBP to determine the most stable binding configuration. Each student will then propose two specific amino acid substitutions of α-conotoxin TxIA to enhance peptide binding affinity, create the mutant in DockoMatic, and perform docking calculations to compare their results with the class. Students will also compare intermolecular forces, binding energy, and geometric orientation of their prepared analog to their initial α-conotoxin TxIA docking results.

  17. Computational exploration of a protein receptor binding space with student proposed peptide ligands.

    PubMed

    King, Matthew D; Phillips, Paul; Turner, Matthew W; Katz, Michael; Lew, Sarah; Bradburn, Sarah; Andersen, Tim; McDougal, Owen M

    2016-01-01

    Computational molecular docking is a fast and effective in silico method for the analysis of binding between a protein receptor model and a ligand. The visualization and manipulation of protein to ligand binding in three-dimensional space represents a powerful tool in the biochemistry curriculum to enhance student learning. The DockoMatic tutorial described herein provides a framework by which instructors can guide students through a drug screening exercise. Using receptor models derived from readily available protein crystal structures, docking programs have the ability to predict ligand binding properties, such as preferential binding orientations and binding affinities. The use of computational studies can significantly enhance complimentary wet chemical experimentation by providing insight into the important molecular interactions within the system of interest, as well as guide the design of new candidate ligands based on observed binding motifs and energetics. In this laboratory tutorial, the graphical user interface, DockoMatic, facilitates docking job submissions to the docking engine, AutoDock 4.2. The purpose of this exercise is to successfully dock a 17-amino acid peptide, α-conotoxin TxIA, to the acetylcholine binding protein from Aplysia californica-AChBP to determine the most stable binding configuration. Each student will then propose two specific amino acid substitutions of α-conotoxin TxIA to enhance peptide binding affinity, create the mutant in DockoMatic, and perform docking calculations to compare their results with the class. Students will also compare intermolecular forces, binding energy, and geometric orientation of their prepared analog to their initial α-conotoxin TxIA docking results. PMID:26537635

  18. Ligands Binding and Molecular Simulation: the Potential Investigation of a Biosensor Based on an Insect Odorant Binding Protein

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Xin; Zhang, Yanbo; Wang, Peidan; Qi, Jiangwei; Hu, Meiying; Zhong, Guohua

    2015-01-01

    Based on mimicking biological olfaction, biosensors have been applied for the detection of various ligands in complex environment, which could represent one of the most promising research fields. In this study, the basic characters of one insect odorant binding protein (OBP) as a biosensor were explored. To explore the molecular recognition process, the tertiary structure of the protein was modeled and the protein-ligand interactions with 1,536,550 chemicals were investigated by the molecular docking. The availability of large amount of recombinant SlitOBP1 overcame the difficulty to obtain biological sensing material. After obtained the purified recombinant protein, the result of fluorescence binding assays proved the candidate protein has good affinities with the majority of the tested chemicals. With the aid of simulation docking, the key conserved amino acids within the binding site were identified and then mutated to alanine. After mutation, the protein-ligand binding characteristics were recorded, and the competitive binding assays were carried out to provide experimental verification. The detailed information on its structure and affinities investigated in this study could allow the design of specific mutants with desired characteristics, which provides a solid base for tailoring OBP for biosensor and provides a role model for screening the other elements in olfactory system for different applications. PMID:25552932

  19. Ligands binding and molecular simulation: the potential investigation of a biosensor based on an insect odorant binding protein.

    PubMed

    Yi, Xin; Zhang, Yanbo; Wang, Peidan; Qi, Jiangwei; Hu, Meiying; Zhong, Guohua

    2015-01-01

    Based on mimicking biological olfaction, biosensors have been applied for the detection of various ligands in complex environment, which could represent one of the most promising research fields. In this study, the basic characters of one insect odorant binding protein (OBP) as a biosensor were explored. To explore the molecular recognition process, the tertiary structure of the protein was modeled and the protein-ligand interactions with 1,536,550 chemicals were investigated by the molecular docking. The availability of large amount of recombinant SlitOBP1 overcame the difficulty to obtain biological sensing material. After obtained the purified recombinant protein, the result of fluorescence binding assays proved the candidate protein has good affinities with the majority of the tested chemicals. With the aid of simulation docking, the key conserved amino acids within the binding site were identified and then mutated to alanine. After mutation, the protein-ligand binding characteristics were recorded, and the competitive binding assays were carried out to provide experimental verification. The detailed information on its structure and affinities investigated in this study could allow the design of specific mutants with desired characteristics, which provides a solid base for tailoring OBP for biosensor and provides a role model for screening the other elements in olfactory system for different applications. PMID:25552932

  20. Identification of a novel family of carbohydrate-binding modules with broad ligand specificity

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Cheng-Jie; Feng, Yu-Liang; Cao, Qi-Long; Huang, Ming-Yue; Feng, Jia-Xun

    2016-01-01

    Most enzymes that act on carbohydrates include non-catalytic carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs) that recognize and target carbohydrates. CBMs bring their appended catalytic modules into close proximity with the target substrate and increase the hydrolytic rate of enzymes acting on insoluble substrates. We previously identified a novel CBM (CBMC5614-1) at the C-terminus of endoglucanase C5614-1 from an uncultured microorganism present in buffalo rumen. In the present study, that the functional region of CBMC5614-1 involved in ligand binding was localized to 134 amino acids. Two representative homologs of CBMC5614-1, sharing the same ligand binding profile, targeted a range of β-linked polysaccharides that adopt very different conformations. Targeted substrates included soluble and insoluble cellulose, β-1,3/1,4-mixed linked glucans, xylan, and mannan. Mutagenesis revealed that three conserved aromatic residues (Trp-380, Tyr-411, and Trp-423) play an important role in ligand recognition and targeting. These results suggest that CBMC5614-1 and its homologs form a novel CBM family (CBM72) with a broad ligand-binding specificity. CBM72 members can provide new insight into CBM-ligand interactions and may have potential in protein engineering and biocatalysis. PMID:26765840

  1. Evaluating the binding efficiency of pheromone binding protein with its natural ligand using molecular docking and fluorescence analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilayaraja, Renganathan; Rajkumar, Ramalingam; Rajesh, Durairaj; Muralidharan, Arumugam Ramachandran; Padmanabhan, Parasuraman; Archunan, Govindaraju

    2014-06-01

    Chemosignals play a crucial role in social and sexual communication among inter- and intra-species. Chemical cues are bound with protein that is present in the pheromones irrespective of sex are commonly called as pheromone binding protein (PBP). In rats, the pheromone compounds are bound with low molecular lipocalin protein α2u-globulin (α2u). We reported farnesol is a natural endogenous ligand (compound) present in rat preputial gland as a bound volatile compound. In the present study, an attempt has been made through computational method to evaluating the binding efficiency of α2u with the natural ligand (farnesol) and standard fluorescent molecule (2-naphthol). The docking analysis revealed that the binding energy of farnesol and 2-naphthol was almost equal and likely to share some binding pocket of protein. Further, to extrapolate the results generated through computational approach, the α2u protein was purified and subjected to fluorescence titration and binding assay. The results showed that the farnesol is replaced by 2-naphthol with high hydrophobicity of TYR120 in binding sites of α2u providing an acceptable dissociation constant indicating the binding efficiency of α2u. The obtained results are in corroboration with the data made through computational approach.

  2. Evaluating the binding efficiency of pheromone binding protein with its natural ligand using molecular docking and fluorescence analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ilayaraja, Renganathan; Rajkumar, Ramalingam; Rajesh, Durairaj; Muralidharan, Arumugam Ramachandran; Padmanabhan, Parasuraman; Archunan, Govindaraju

    2014-01-01

    Chemosignals play a crucial role in social and sexual communication among inter- and intra-species. Chemical cues are bound with protein that is present in the pheromones irrespective of sex are commonly called as pheromone binding protein (PBP). In rats, the pheromone compounds are bound with low molecular lipocalin protein α2u-globulin (α2u). We reported farnesol is a natural endogenous ligand (compound) present in rat preputial gland as a bound volatile compound. In the present study, an attempt has been made through computational method to evaluating the binding efficiency of α2u with the natural ligand (farnesol) and standard fluorescent molecule (2-naphthol). The docking analysis revealed that the binding energy of farnesol and 2-naphthol was almost equal and likely to share some binding pocket of protein. Further, to extrapolate the results generated through computational approach, the α2u protein was purified and subjected to fluorescence titration and binding assay. The results showed that the farnesol is replaced by 2-naphthol with high hydrophobicity of TYR120 in binding sites of α2u providing an acceptable dissociation constant indicating the binding efficiency of α2u. The obtained results are in corroboration with the data made through computational approach. PMID:24903953

  3. Anatomy of protein pockets and cavities: measurement of binding site geometry and implications for ligand design.

    PubMed Central

    Liang, J.; Edelsbrunner, H.; Woodward, C.

    1998-01-01

    Identification and size characterization of surface pockets and occluded cavities are initial steps in protein structure-based ligand design. A new program, CAST, for automatically locating and measuring protein pockets and cavities, is based on precise computational geometry methods, including alpha shape and discrete flow theory. CAST identifies and measures pockets and pocket mouth openings, as well as cavities. The program specifies the atoms lining pockets, pocket openings, and buried cavities; the volume and area of pockets and cavities; and the area and circumference of mouth openings. CAST analysis of over 100 proteins has been carried out; proteins examined include a set of 51 monomeric enzyme-ligand structures, several elastase-inhibitor complexes, the FK506 binding protein, 30 HIV-1 protease-inhibitor complexes, and a number of small and large protein inhibitors. Medium-sized globular proteins typically have 10-20 pockets/cavities. Most often, binding sites are pockets with 1-2 mouth openings; much less frequently they are cavities. Ligand binding pockets vary widely in size, most within the range 10(2)-10(3)A3. Statistical analysis reveals that the number of pockets and cavities is correlated with protein size, but there is no correlation between the size of the protein and the size of binding sites. Most frequently, the largest pocket/cavity is the active site, but there are a number of instructive exceptions. Ligand volume and binding site volume are somewhat correlated when binding site volume is < or =700 A3, but the ligand seldom occupies the entire site. Auxiliary pockets near the active site have been suggested as additional binding surface for designed ligands (Mattos C et al., 1994, Nat Struct Biol 1:55-58). Analysis of elastase-inhibitor complexes suggests that CAST can identify ancillary pockets suitable for recruitment in ligand design strategies. Analysis of the FK506 binding protein, and of compounds developed in SAR by NMR (Shuker SB et

  4. Does the tissue concentration in receptor binding studies change the affinity of the labelled ligand?

    PubMed

    Ensing, K; De Zeeuw, R A

    1984-12-14

    When the tissue concentration in a radioreceptor assay for anticholinergic drugs was varied in order to obtain optimum conditions, and the receptor concentration Cr and the equilibrium dissociation constant KD were determined by Scatchard analysis, the KD increased with increasing tissue concentrations. This phenomenon was considered as an artefact caused by non-specific binding of the labelled ligand to constituents of the receptor preparation which were not completely retained on the glass-fibre filters used for the separation of bound and free fraction of radio-labelled ligand. The increase in KD in these experiments could be described with a mathematical model of the binding experiments. PMID:6514542

  5. Chelate effects in sulfate binding by amide/urea-based ligands.

    PubMed

    Jia, Chuandong; Wang, Qi-Qiang; Begum, Rowshan Ara; Day, Victor W; Bowman-James, Kristin

    2015-07-01

    The influence of chelate and mini-chelate effects on sulfate binding was explored for six amide-, amide/amine-, urea-, and urea/amine-based ligands. Two of the urea-based hosts were selective for SO4(2-) in water-mixed DMSO-d6 systems. Results indicated that the mini-chelate effect provided by a single urea group with two NH binding sites appears to provide enhanced binding over two amide groups. Furthermore, additional urea binding sites incorporated into the host framework appeared to overcome to some extent competing hydration effects with increasing water content.

  6. The FTMap family of web servers for determining and characterizing ligand binding hot spots of proteins

    PubMed Central

    Kozakov, Dima; Grove, Laurie E.; Hall, David R.; Bohnuud, Tanggis; Mottarella, Scott; Luo, Lingqi; Xia, Bing; Beglov, Dmitri; Vajda, Sandor

    2016-01-01

    FTMap is a computational mapping server that identifies binding hot spots of macromolecules, i.e., regions of the surface with major contributions to the ligand binding free energy. To use FTMap, users submit a protein, DNA, or RNA structure in PDB format. FTMap samples billions of positions of small organic molecules used as probes and scores the probe poses using a detailed energy expression. Regions that bind clusters of multiple probe types identify the binding hot spots, in good agreement with experimental data. FTMap serves as basis for other servers, namely FTSite to predict ligand binding sites, FTFlex to account for side chain flexibility, FTMap/param to parameterize additional probes, and FTDyn to map ensembles of protein structures. Applications include determining druggability of proteins, identifying ligand moieties that are most important for binding, finding the most bound-like conformation in ensembles of unliganded protein structures, and providing input for fragment based drug design. FTMap is more accurate than classical mapping methods such as GRID and MCSS, and is much faster than the more recent approaches to protein mapping based on mixed molecular dynamics. Using 16 probe molecules, the FTMap server finds the hot spots of an average size protein in less than an hour. Since FTFlex performs mapping for all low energy conformers of side chains in the binding site, its completion time is proportionately longer. PMID:25855957

  7. Benzodiazepine binding studies on living cells: application of small ligands for fluorescence correlation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hegener, Oliver; Jordan, Randolf; Häberlein, Hanns

    2002-11-01

    We demonstrate the applicability of fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) for receptor binding studies using low molecular weight ligands on the membranes of living nerve cells. The binding of the benzodiazepine Ro 7-1986/602 (N-des-diethyl-fluorazepam), labeled with the fluorophore Alexa 532, to the benzodiazepine receptor was analyzed quantitatively at the membrane of single rat hippocampal neurons. The values obtained for the dissociation constant Kd = (9.9 +/- 1.9) nm and the rate constant for ligand-receptor dissociation kdisS = (1.28 +/- 0.08) x 10(-3) s(-1) show that there is a specific and high affinity interaction between the dye-labeled ligand (Ro-Alexa) and the receptor site. The binding was saturated at approx. 100 nM and displacement of 10 nM Ro-Alexa, with a 1,000-fold excess of midazolam, showed a non-specific binding of 7-10%. Additionally, two populations of the benzodiazepine receptor that differed in their lateral mobility were detected in the membrane of rat neurons. The diffusion coefficients for these two populations [D(bound1) = (1.32 +/- 0.26) microm2/s; D(bound2) = (2.63 +/- 0.63) x 10(-2) microm2/s] are related to binding sites, which shows a mono-exponential decay in a time-dependent dissociation of the ligand-receptor complex.

  8. Ligand binding to the PDZ domains of postsynaptic density protein 95.

    PubMed

    Toto, Angelo; Pedersen, Søren W; Karlsson, O Andreas; Moran, Griffin E; Andersson, Eva; Chi, Celestine N; Strømgaard, Kristian; Gianni, Stefano; Jemth, Per

    2016-05-01

    Cellular scaffolding and signalling is generally governed by multidomain proteins, where each domain has a particular function. Postsynaptic density protein 95 (PSD-95) is involved in synapse formation and is a typical example of such a multidomain protein. Protein-protein interactions of PSD-95 are well studied and include the following three protein ligands: (i)N-methyl-d-aspartate-type ionotropic glutamate receptor subunit GluN2B, (ii) neuronal nitric oxide synthase and (iii) cysteine-rich protein (CRIPT), all of which bind to one or more of the three PDZ domains in PSD-95. While interactions for individual PDZ domains of PSD-95 have been well studied, less is known about the influence of neighbouring domains on the function of the respective individual domain. We therefore performed a systematic study on the ligand-binding kinetics of PSD-95 using constructs of different size for PSD-95 and its ligands. Regarding the canonical peptide-binding pocket and relatively short peptides (up to 15-mer), the PDZ domains in PSD-95 by and large work as individual binding modules. However, in agreement with previous studies, residues outside of the canonical binding pocket modulate the affinity of the ligands. In particular, the dissociation of the 101 amino acid CRIPT from PSD-95 is slowed down at least 10-fold for full-length PSD-95 when compared with the individual PDZ3 domain. PMID:26941280

  9. Nonlinearly Additive Forces in Multivalent Ligand Binding to a Single Protein Revealed with Force Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ratto, T V; Rudd, R E; Langry, K C; Balhorn, R L; McElfresh, M W

    2005-07-15

    We present evidence of multivalent interactions between a single protein molecule and multiple carbohydrates at a pH where the protein can bind four ligands. The evidence is based not only on measurements of the force required to rupture the bonds formed between ConcanavalinA (ConA) and {alpha}-D-mannose, but also on an analysis of the polymer-extension force curves to infer the polymer architecture that binds the protein to the cantilever and the ligands to the substrate. We find that although the rupture forces for multiple carbohydrate connections to a single protein are larger than the rupture force for a single connection, they do not scale additively with increasing number. Specifically, the most common rupture forces are approximately 46, 66, and 85 pN, which we argue corresponds to 1, 2, and 3 ligands being pulled simultaneously from a single protein as corroborated by an analysis of the linkage architecture. As in our previous work polymer tethers allow us to discriminate between specific and non-specific binding. We analyze the binding configuration (i.e. serial versus parallel connections) through fitting the polymer stretching data with modified Worm-Like Chain (WLC) models that predict how the effective stiffness of the tethers is affected by multiple connections. This analysis establishes that the forces we measure are due to single proteins interacting with multiple ligands, the first force spectroscopy study that establishes single-molecule multivalent binding unambiguously.

  10. Inhibition of RNA Polymerase II Transcription in Human Cells by Synthetic DNA-Binding Ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickinson, Liliane A.; Gulizia, Richard J.; Trauger, John W.; Baird, Eldon E.; Mosier, Donald E.; Gottesfeld, Joel M.; Dervan, Peter B.

    1998-10-01

    Sequence-specific DNA-binding small molecules that can permeate human cells potentially could regulate transcription of specific genes. Multiple cellular DNA-binding transcription factors are required by HIV type 1 for RNA synthesis. Two pyrrole--imidazole polyamides were designed to bind DNA sequences immediately adjacent to binding sites for the transcription factors Ets-1, lymphoid-enhancer binding factor 1, and TATA-box binding protein. These synthetic ligands specifically inhibit DNA-binding of each transcription factor and HIV type 1 transcription in cell-free assays. When used in combination, the polyamides inhibit virus replication by >99% in isolated human peripheral blood lymphocytes, with no detectable cell toxicity. The ability of small molecules to target predetermined DNA sequences located with RNA polymerase II promoters suggests a general approach for regulation of gene expression, as well as a mechanism for the inhibition of viral replication.

  11. Dioxin-Dependent and Dioxin-Independent Gene Batteries: Comparison of Liver and Kidney in AHR-Null Mice

    PubMed Central

    Boutros, Paul C.; Bielefeld, Kirsten A.; Pohjanvirta, Raimo; Harper, Patricia A.

    2009-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) is a widely expressed ligand-dependent transcription factor that mediates cellular responses to dioxins and other planar aromatic hydrocarbons. Ahr-null mice are refractory to the toxic effects of dioxin exposure. Although some mechanistic aspects of AHR activity are well understood, the tissue specificity of AHR effects remains unclear, both during development and following administration of exogenous ligands. To address the latter issue, we defined and compared transcriptional responses to dioxin exposure in the liver and kidney of wild-type and Ahr-null adult C57BL/6J mice treated with either 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin or corn-oil vehicle. In both tissues, essentially all effects of dioxin on hepatic mRNA levels were mediated by the AHR. Although 297 genes were altered by dioxin exposure in the liver, only 17 were changed in the kidney, including a number of well-established AHR target genes. Ahr genotype had a large effect in both tissues, profoundly remodeling both the renal and hepatic transcriptomes. Surprisingly, a large number of genes were affected by Ahr genotype in both tissues, suggesting the presence of a basal AHR gene battery. Alterations of the renal transcriptome in Ahr-null animals were associated with perturbation of specific functional pathways and enrichment of specific DNA motifs. Our results demonstrate the importance of intertissue comparisons, highlight the basal role of the AHR in liver and kidney, and support a role in development or normal physiology. PMID:19759094

  12. Directed evolution of estrogen receptor proteins with altered ligand-binding specificities.

    PubMed

    Islam, Kazi Mohammed Didarul; Dilcher, Meik; Thurow, Corinna; Vock, Carsten; Krimmelbein, Ilga Kristine; Tietze, Lutz Friedjan; Gonzalez, Victor; Zhao, Huimin; Gatz, Christiane

    2009-01-01

    Transcriptional activators that respond to ligands with no cellular targets are powerful tools that can confer regulated expression of a transgene in almost all biological systems. In this study, we altered the ligand-binding specificity of the human estrogen receptor alpha (hER alpha) so that it would recognize a non-steroidal synthetic compound with structural similarities to the phytoestrogen resveratrol. For this purpose, we performed iterative rounds of site-specific saturation mutagenesis of a fixed set of ligand-contacting residues and subsequent random mutagenesis of the entire ligand-binding domain. Selection of the receptor mutants and quantification of the interaction were carried out by exploiting a yeast two-hybrid system that reports the ligand-dependent interaction between hER alpha and steroid receptor coactivator-1 (SRC-1). The screen was performed with a synthetic ligand (CV3320) that promoted growth of the reporter yeast strain to half maximal levels at a concentration of 3.7 microM. The optimized receptor mutant (L384F/L387M/Y537S) showed a 67-fold increased activity to the synthetic ligand CV3320 (half maximal yeast growth at 0.055 microM) and a 10-fold decreased activity to 17beta-estradiol (E2; half maximal yeast growth at 4 nM). The novel receptor-ligand pair partially fulfills the requirements for a specific 'gene switch' as it responds to concentrations of the synthetic ligand which do not activate the wildtype receptor. Due to its residual responsiveness to E2 at concentrations (4 nM) that might occur in vivo, further improvements have to be performed to render the system applicable in organisms with endogenous E2 synthesis.

  13. Synthesis and binding profile of haloperidol-based bivalent ligands targeting dopamine D(2)-like receptors.

    PubMed

    Salama, Ismail; Löber, Stefan; Hübner, Harald; Gmeiner, Peter

    2014-08-15

    Homodimers of dopamine D2-like receptors are suggested to be of particular importance in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia and, thus, serve as promising targets for the discovery of atypical antipsychotics. This study describes the development of a series of novel bivalent molecules with a pharmacophore derived from the dopamine receptor antagonist haloperidol. These dimers were investigated in comparison to their monomeric analogues for their D2long, D2short, D3, and D4 receptor binding and the ability to bridge two neighboring receptor protomers. Radioligand binding studies provided diagnostic insights when Hill slopes close to two for the bivalent ligand 13 incorporating 22 spacer atoms and a comparative analysis with monovalent control ligands indicated a bivalent binding mode with a simultaneous occupancy of two neighboring binding sites. PMID:25047579

  14. Structure and ligand-binding mechanism of a cysteinyl leukotriene-binding protein from a blood-feeding disease vector

    PubMed Central

    Jablonka, Willy; Pham, Van; Nardone, Glenn; Gittis, Apostolos; Silva-Cardoso, Lívia; Atella, Georgia C.; Ribeiro, José M.C.; Andersen, John F.

    2016-01-01

    Blood-feeding disease vectors mitigate the negative effects of hemostasis and inflammation through the binding of small-molecule agonists of these processes by salivary proteins. In this study, a lipocalin protein family member (LTBP1) from the saliva of Rhodnius prolixus, a vector of the pathogen Trypanosoma cruzi, is shown to sequester cysteinyl leukotrienes during feeding to inhibit immediate inflammatory responses. Calorimetric binding experiments showed that LTBP1 binds leukotrienes C4 (LTC4) and D4 (LTD4) and E4 (LTE4) but not biogenic amines, adenosine diphosphate or other eicosanoid compounds. Crystal structures of ligand-free LTBP1 and its complexes with LTC4 and LTD4 reveal a conformational change during binding that brings Tyr 114 into close contact with the ligand. LTC4 is cleaved in the complex leaving free glutathione, and a C20 fatty acid. Chromatographic analysis of bound ligands showed only intact LTC4, suggesting that cleavage could be radiation-mediated. PMID:27124118

  15. Effect of hydrostatic pressure on ligand binding to hemoglobin.

    PubMed

    Carey, F G; Knowles, F; Gibson, Q H

    1977-06-25

    Increase in hydrostatic pressure to 1000 atm increased the affinity of human and menhaden (Brevoortia tyrannus) hemoglobins for oxygen. With necessary assumptions about the form of the equilibrium curve, and after correction for changes in pH and volume due to pressure, the increase in affinity is about 2-fold for both hemoglobins. At pH 6.5, Hill's n for menhaden hemoglobin is near 1, and it is believed to remain in the T state, whereas human hemoglobin undergoes a T to R transition. This suggests that the R-T equilibrium is not disturbed by pressure. In direct experiments the binding of a fluorescent effector (8 hydroxy-1,3,6-pyrene (trisulfonic acid) to deoxyhemoglobin was not changed by pressure. The binding of n-butylisocyanide to hemoglobin and to myoglobin is also greater at high pressures, similarly suggesting that the R-T transition is not involved in the pressure effect. PMID:16924

  16. Characterization of Aluminum-Binding Ligands in Pisolithus tinctorius

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCauley, R. L.; Cumming, J.

    2009-12-01

    Highly abundant in soil, Al is found in non-toxic forms under neutral pH conditions. However, when the pH of the soil decreases, the presence of cationic Al increases, creating a toxic environment for plants and fungi. Certain plants and their ectomycorrhizal symbiotic fungi have higher tolerance for Al in the soil and surrounding media. A particular fungus, Pisolithus tinctorius, has been found to produce Al-binding pigments which chelate and detoxify cationic Al in the environment. The objectives of this study are to 1) determine the resistance of different ectomycorrhizal fungi species to Al, 2) characterize the production of Al binding compounds by fungi, and 3) quantify Al partitioning between free and bound forms in the environment. Pisolithus tinctorius, Amanita muscaria, Lacaria bicolor, and Rhizopogon rubescens were grown under varying Al concentration in vitro (0 and 200 µM for all species; 0, 100, 200, and 400 µM for P. tinctorius). Biomass was measured and media was analyzed for Al speciation and organic acid profiles post experiment. The Al-binding exudates of P. tinctorius were isolated using immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) and further separated with reverse phase HPLC (UV). All fungi were resistant to Al at the concentrations tested. Pisolithus was found to have a significantly higher mass than other ectomycorrhizae studied. Organic Al levels were found to increase with an increase in Al treatment for P. tinctorius. These techniques revealed at least eleven compounds active in the Al-binding IMAC fraction with seven peaks having brown pigmentation. These compounds may assist in Al detoxification by P. tinctorius.

  17. Protein Unfolding Coupled to Ligand Binding: Differential Scanning Calorimetry Simulation Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soledad Celej, María; Fidelio, Gerardo Daniel; Dassie, Sergio Alberto

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this work is to present the physicochemical basis underlying the changes in protein thermostability upon ligand binding. The article is addressed to advanced undergraduate and postgraduate chemistry students with an interest in protein biophysics. In addition, this article provides a useful tool for both learning and teaching biophysics because it links fundamental concepts: thermodynamics, chemical equilibrium, and protein stability. The influence of protein ligand interactions on thermally-induced protein denaturation was monitored by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The changes in DSC output (thermogram) emerge by linking binding equilibrium with reversible protein unfolding thermodynamics. We derive the formalism for the description of protein unfolding in the presence of ligand that can bind to a single site on either native, unfolded, or both protein states. In addition to a rigorous mathematical description of the involved equilibria, the model provides the general formulation for simulating thermograms and calculating the changes in protein species during heating. First, we describe ligand interaction and emphasize the relationship between protein stability parameters and redistribution of species in equilibrium. After that, we describe the origin of bimodal thermograms, and finally, the effect on thermogram shape of protein concentration at constant ligand/protein mole ratio.

  18. G Protein-Coupled Receptor Heteromerization: A Role in Allosteric Modulation of Ligand BindingS⃞

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Ivone; IJzerman, Adriaan P.; Ye, Kai; Maillet, Emeline L.

    2011-01-01

    It is becoming increasingly recognized that G protein-coupled receptors physically interact. These interactions may provide a mechanism for allosteric modulation of receptor function. In this study, we examined this possibility by using an established model system of a receptor heteromer consisting of μ and δ opioid receptors. We examined the effect of a number of μ receptor ligands on the binding equilibrium and association and dissociation kinetics of a radiolabeled δ receptor agonist, [3H]deltorphin II. We also examined the effect of δ receptor ligands on the binding equilibrium and association and dissociation kinetics of a radiolabeled μ receptor agonist, [3H][d-Ala2,N-Me-Phe4,Gly5-ol]-enkephalin ([3H]DAMGO). We show that μ receptor ligands are capable of allosterically enhancing δ receptor radioligand binding and vice versa. Thus, there is strong positive cooperativity between the two receptor units with remarkable consequences for ligand pharmacology. We find that the data can be simulated by adapting an allosteric receptor model previously developed for small molecules, suggesting that the ligand-occupied protomers function as allosteric modulators of the partner receptor's activity. PMID:21415307

  19. Protein:Ligand binding free energies: A stringent test for computational protein design.

    PubMed

    Druart, Karen; Palmai, Zoltan; Omarjee, Eyaz; Simonson, Thomas

    2016-02-01

    A computational protein design method is extended to allow Monte Carlo simulations where two ligands are titrated into a protein binding pocket, yielding binding free energy differences. These provide a stringent test of the physical model, including the energy surface and sidechain rotamer definition. As a test, we consider tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase (TyrRS), which has been extensively redesigned experimentally. We consider its specificity for its substrate l-tyrosine (l-Tyr), compared to the analogs d-Tyr, p-acetyl-, and p-azido-phenylalanine (ac-Phe, az-Phe). We simulate l- and d-Tyr binding to TyrRS and six mutants, and compare the structures and binding free energies to a more rigorous "MD/GBSA" procedure: molecular dynamics with explicit solvent for structures and a Generalized Born + Surface Area model for binding free energies. Next, we consider l-Tyr, ac- and az-Phe binding to six other TyrRS variants. The titration results are sensitive to the precise rotamer definition, which involves a short energy minimization for each sidechain pair to help relax bad contacts induced by the discrete rotamer set. However, when designed mutant structures are rescored with a standard GBSA energy model, results agree well with the more rigorous MD/GBSA. As a third test, we redesign three amino acid positions in the substrate coordination sphere, with either l-Tyr or d-Tyr as the ligand. For two, we obtain good agreement with experiment, recovering the wildtype residue when l-Tyr is the ligand and a d-Tyr specific mutant when d-Tyr is the ligand. For the third, we recover His with either ligand, instead of wildtype Gln.

  20. Dopaminergic receptor-ligand binding assays based on molecularly imprinted polymers on quartz crystal microbalance sensors.

    PubMed

    Naklua, Wanpen; Suedee, Roongnapa; Lieberzeit, Peter A

    2016-07-15

    Molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) have been successfully applied as selective materials for assessing the binding activity of agonist and antagonist of dopamine D1 receptor (D1R) by using quartz crystal microbalance (QCM). In this study, D1R derived from rat hypothalamus was used as a template and thus self-organized on stamps. Those were pressed into an oligomer film consisting of acrylic acid: N-vinylpyrrolidone: N,N'-(1,2-dihydroxyethylene) bis-acrylamide in a ratio of 2:3:12 spin coated onto a dual electrode QCM. Such we obtained one D1R-MIP-QCM electrode, whereas the other electrode carried the non-imprinted control polymer (NIP) that had remained untreated. Successful imprinting of D1R was confirmed by AFM. The polymer can re-incorporate D1R leading to frequency responses of 100-1200Hz in a concentration range of 5.9-47.2µM. In a further step such frequency changes proved inherently useful for examining the binding properties of test ligands to D1R. The resulting mass-sensitive measurements revealed Kd of dopamine∙HCl, haloperidol, and (+)-SCH23390 at 0.874, 25.6, and 0.004nM, respectively. These results correlate well with the values determined in radio ligand binding assays. Our experiments revealed that D1R-MIP sensors are useful for estimating the strength of ligand binding to the active single site. Therefore, we have developed a biomimetic surface imprinting strategy for QCM studies of D1R-ligand binding and presented a new method to ligand binding assay for D1R. PMID:26926593

  1. Nucleotide binding database NBDB--a collection of sequence motifs with specific protein-ligand interactions.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Zejun; Goncearenco, Alexander; Berezovsky, Igor N

    2016-01-01

    NBDB database describes protein motifs, elementary functional loops (EFLs) that are involved in binding of nucleotide-containing ligands and other biologically relevant cofactors/coenzymes, including ATP, AMP, ATP, GMP, GDP, GTP, CTP, PAP, PPS, FMN, FAD(H), NAD(H), NADP, cAMP, cGMP, c-di-AMP and c-di-GMP, ThPP, THD, F-420, ACO, CoA, PLP and SAM. The database is freely available online at http://nbdb.bii.a-star.edu.sg. In total, NBDB contains data on 249 motifs that work in interactions with 24 ligands. Sequence profiles of EFL motifs were derived de novo from nonredundant Uniprot proteome sequences. Conserved amino acid residues in the profiles interact specifically with distinct chemical parts of nucleotide-containing ligands, such as nitrogenous bases, phosphate groups, ribose, nicotinamide, and flavin moieties. Each EFL profile in the database is characterized by a pattern of corresponding ligand-protein interactions found in crystallized ligand-protein complexes. NBDB database helps to explore the determinants of nucleotide and cofactor binding in different protein folds and families. NBDB can also detect fragments that match to profiles of particular EFLs in the protein sequence provided by user. Comprehensive information on sequence, structures, and interactions of EFLs with ligands provides a foundation for experimental and computational efforts on design of required protein functions.

  2. Nucleotide binding database NBDB--a collection of sequence motifs with specific protein-ligand interactions.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Zejun; Goncearenco, Alexander; Berezovsky, Igor N

    2016-01-01

    NBDB database describes protein motifs, elementary functional loops (EFLs) that are involved in binding of nucleotide-containing ligands and other biologically relevant cofactors/coenzymes, including ATP, AMP, ATP, GMP, GDP, GTP, CTP, PAP, PPS, FMN, FAD(H), NAD(H), NADP, cAMP, cGMP, c-di-AMP and c-di-GMP, ThPP, THD, F-420, ACO, CoA, PLP and SAM. The database is freely available online at http://nbdb.bii.a-star.edu.sg. In total, NBDB contains data on 249 motifs that work in interactions with 24 ligands. Sequence profiles of EFL motifs were derived de novo from nonredundant Uniprot proteome sequences. Conserved amino acid residues in the profiles interact specifically with distinct chemical parts of nucleotide-containing ligands, such as nitrogenous bases, phosphate groups, ribose, nicotinamide, and flavin moieties. Each EFL profile in the database is characterized by a pattern of corresponding ligand-protein interactions found in crystallized ligand-protein complexes. NBDB database helps to explore the determinants of nucleotide and cofactor binding in different protein folds and families. NBDB can also detect fragments that match to profiles of particular EFLs in the protein sequence provided by user. Comprehensive information on sequence, structures, and interactions of EFLs with ligands provides a foundation for experimental and computational efforts on design of required protein functions. PMID:26507856

  3. Observation of long-range tertiary interactions during ligand binding by the TPP riboswitch aptamer

    PubMed Central

    Duesterberg, Van K; Fischer-Hwang, Irena T; Perez, Christian F; Hogan, Daniel W; Block, Steven M

    2015-01-01

    The thiamine pyrophosphate (TPP) riboswitch is a cis-regulatory element in mRNA that modifies gene expression in response to TPP concentration. Its specificity is dependent upon conformational changes that take place within its aptamer domain. Here, the role of tertiary interactions in ligand binding was studied at the single-molecule level by combined force spectroscopy and Förster resonance energy transfer (smFRET), using an optical trap equipped for simultaneous smFRET. The ‘Force-FRET’ approach directly probes secondary and tertiary structural changes during folding, including events associated with binding. Concurrent transitions observed in smFRET signals and RNA extension revealed differences in helix-arm orientation between two previously-identified ligand-binding states that had been undetectable by spectroscopy alone. Our results show that the weaker binding state is able to bind to TPP, but is unable to form a tertiary docking interaction that completes the binding process. Long-range tertiary interactions stabilize global riboswitch structure and confer increased ligand specificity. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12362.001 PMID:26709838

  4. In silico identification of anthropogenic chemicals as ligands of zebrafish sex hormone binding globulin

    SciTech Connect

    Thorsteinson, Nels; Ban, Fuqiang; Santos-Filho, Osvaldo; Tabaei, Seyed M.H.; Miguel-Queralt, Solange; Underhill, Caroline; Cherkasov, Artem Hammond, Geoffrey L.

    2009-01-01

    Anthropogenic compounds with the capacity to interact with the steroid-binding site of sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) pose health risks to humans and other vertebrates including fish. Building on studies of human SHBG, we have applied in silico drug discovery methods to identify potential binders for SHBG in zebrafish (Danio rerio) as a model aquatic organism. Computational methods, including; homology modeling, molecular dynamics simulations, virtual screening, and 3D QSAR analysis, successfully identified 6 non-steroidal substances from the ZINC chemical database that bind to zebrafish SHBG (zfSHBG) with low-micromolar to nanomolar affinities, as determined by a competitive ligand-binding assay. We also screened 80,000 commercial substances listed by the European Chemicals Bureau and Environment Canada, and 6 non-steroidal hits from this in silico screen were tested experimentally for zfSHBG binding. All 6 of these compounds displaced the [{sup 3}H]5{alpha}-dihydrotestosterone used as labeled ligand in the zfSHBG screening assay when tested at a 33 {mu}M concentration, and 3 of them (hexestrol, 4-tert-octylcatechol, and dihydrobenzo(a)pyren-7(8H)-one) bind to zfSHBG in the micromolar range. The study demonstrates the feasibility of large-scale in silico screening of anthropogenic compounds that may disrupt or highjack functionally important protein:ligand interactions. Such studies could increase the awareness of hazards posed by existing commercial chemicals at relatively low cost.

  5. Effects of Developmental Activation of the AhR on CD4+ T-Cell Responses to Influenza Virus Infection in Adult Mice

    PubMed Central

    Boule, Lisbeth A.; Winans, Bethany

    2014-01-01

    Background: Epidemiological and animal studies indicate that maternal exposure to pollutants that bind the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) correlates with poorer ability to combat respiratory infection and lower antibody levels in the offspring. These observations point to an impact on CD4+ T cells. Yet, the consequence of developmental exposure to AhR ligands on the activation and differentiation of CD4+ T cells has not been directly examined. Objectives: Our goal was to determine whether maternal exposure to an AhR ligand directly alters CD4+ T cell differentiation and function later in life. Methods: C57BL/6 mice were exposed to a prototypical AhR ligand, 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), in utero and via suckling. We then measured CD4+ T-cell activation and differentiation into distinct effector populations in adult offspring that were infected with influenza A virus (IAV). Reciprocal adoptive transfers were used to define whether modifications in CD4+ T-cell responses resulted from direct effects of developmental TCDD exposure on CD4+ T cells. Results: Developmental exposure skewed CD4+ T-cell responses to IAV infection. We observed fewer virus-specific, activated CD4+ T cells and a reduced frequency of conventional CD4+ effector-cell subsets. However, there was an increase in regulatory CD4+ T cells. Direct effects of AhR activation on CD4+ T cells resulted in impaired differentiation into conventional effector subsets; this defect was transferred to mice that had not been developmentally exposed to TCDD. Conclusions: Maternal exposure to TCDD resulted in durable changes in the responsive capacity and differentiation of CD4+ T cells in adult C57BL/6 mice. Citation: Boule LA, Winans B, Lawrence BP. 2014. Effects of developmental activation of the AhR on CD4+ T-cell responses to influenza virus infection in adult mice. Environ Health Perspect 122:1201–1208; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1408110 PMID:25051576

  6. Adaptive ligand binding by the purine riboswitch in the recognition of guanine and adenine analogs

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, Sunny D.; Reyes, Francis E.; Edwards, Andrea L.; Batey, Robert T.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Purine riboswitches discriminate between guanine and adenine by at least 10,000-fold based on the identity of a single pyrimidine (Y74) that forms a Watson-Crick base pair with the ligand. To understand how this high degree of specificity for closely related compounds is achieved through simple pairing, we investigated their interaction with purine analogs with varying functional groups at the 2- and 6-positions that have the potential to alter interactions with Y74. Using a combination of crystallographic and calorimetric approaches, we find that binding these purines is often facilitated by either small structural changes in the RNA or tautomeric changes in the ligand. This work also reveals that, along with base pairing, conformational restriction of Y74 significantly contributes to nucleobase selectivity. These results reveal that compounds that exploit the inherent local flexibility within riboswitch binding pockets can alter their ligand specificity. PMID:19523903

  7. The Added Value of Assessing Ligand-Receptor Binding Kinetics in Drug Discovery.

    PubMed

    Guo, Dong; Heitman, Laura H; IJzerman, Adriaan P

    2016-09-01

    In the past decade drug research community has started to appreciate the indispensable role of ligand-receptor binding kinetics (BK) in drug discovery. Next to the classical equilibrium-based drug evaluation process with affinity and potency values as outcomes, kinetic investigation of the ligand-receptor interaction can aid compound triage in the hit-to-lead campaign and provide additional information to understand the molecular mechanism of drug action. Translational models incorporating BK are emerging as well, which represent powerful tools for the prediction of in vivo effects. In this viewpoint we will summarize some recent findings and discuss and emphasize the added value of ligand-receptor binding kinetics in drug research. PMID:27660682

  8. Calculations of distance distributions and probabilities of binding by ligands between parallel plane membranes comprising receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plante, Ianik; Devroye, Luc; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2014-03-01

    Cell communication through biochemical signaling pathways is a key determinant of tissue responses to radiation. Several molecules, such as the transforming growth factor β (TGFβ), are implicated in radiation-induced signaling between cells. Brownian Dynamics (BD) algorithms have recently been used to simulate the interaction of ligands with receptors and to elucidate signal transduction and autocrine loops in ligand-receptors systems. In this paper, we discuss the simulation of particle diffusion and binding kinetics in a space bounded by two parallel plane membranes, using an exact algorithm to sample the propagator (Green’s function) of a particle located between 2 membranes. We also show that the simulation results are independent of the number of time steps used, in accordance with time discretization equations. These simulations could be used to simulate the motion and binding of ligand molecules in a cell culture, and possibly in neuronal synapses.

  9. A New Approach to Explore the Binding Space of Polysaccharide-Based Ligands: Selectin Antagonists

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The discovery of molecules that interfere with the binding of a ligand to a receptor remains a topic of great interest in medicinal chemistry. Herein, we report that a monosaccharide unit of a polysaccharide ligand can be replaced advantageously by a conformationally locked acyclic molecular entity. A cyclic component of the selectin ligand Sialyl Lewisx, GlcNAc, is replaced by an acyclic tether, tartaric esters, which link two saccharide units. The conformational bias of this acyclic tether originates from the minimization of intramolecular dipole–dipole interaction and the gauche effect. The evaluation of the binding of these derivatives to P-selectin was measured by surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy. The results obtained in our pilot study suggest that the discovery of tunable tethers could facilitate the exploration of the carbohydrate recognition domain of various receptors. PMID:24900426

  10. Comparison of the kinetics of different Markov models for ligand binding under varying conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Martini, Johannes W. R.; Habeck, Michael

    2015-03-07

    We recently derived a Markov model for macromolecular ligand binding dynamics from few physical assumptions and showed that its stationary distribution is the grand canonical ensemble [J. W. R. Martini, M. Habeck, and M. Schlather, J. Math. Chem. 52, 665 (2014)]. The transition probabilities of the proposed Markov process define a particular Glauber dynamics and have some similarity to the Metropolis-Hastings algorithm. Here, we illustrate that this model is the stochastic analog of (pseudo) rate equations and the corresponding system of differential equations. Moreover, it can be viewed as a limiting case of general stochastic simulations of chemical kinetics. Thus, the model links stochastic and deterministic approaches as well as kinetics and equilibrium described by the grand canonical ensemble. We demonstrate that the family of transition matrices of our model, parameterized by temperature and ligand activity, generates ligand binding kinetics that respond to changes in these parameters in a qualitatively similar way as experimentally observed kinetics. In contrast, neither the Metropolis-Hastings algorithm nor the Glauber heat bath reflects changes in the external conditions correctly. Both converge rapidly to the stationary distribution, which is advantageous when the major interest is in the equilibrium state, but fail to describe the kinetics of ligand binding realistically. To simulate cellular processes that involve the reversible stochastic binding of multiple factors, our pseudo rate equation model should therefore be preferred to the Metropolis-Hastings algorithm and the Glauber heat bath, if the stationary distribution is not of only interest.

  11. An Experiment Illustrating the Change in Ligand p"K"[subscript a] upon Protein Binding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chenprakhon, Pirom; Panijpan, Bhinyo; Chaiyen, Pimchai

    2012-01-01

    The modulation of ligand p"K"[subscript a] due to its surrounding environment is a crucial feature that controls many biological phenomena. For example, the shift in the p"K"[subscript a] of substrates or catalytic residues at enzyme active sites upon substrate binding often triggers and controls enzymatic reactions. In this work, we developed an…

  12. Estimation of Ligand-Receptor Binding Affinity from Fluctuation of Their Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwamoto, Koji; Ode, Hirotaka; Ohta, Masami; Misu, Takashi; Hata, Masayuki; Neya, Saburo; Hoshino, Tyuji

    2005-10-01

    It is necessary for the understanding of protein interactions or in silico drug designs to accurately estimate ligand-receptor affinity. The energy calculation based on the electrostatic force, van der Waals force, and solvation effect is a direct method of computing the magnitude of the interaction between ligand and receptor. By this conventional method, however, it is difficult to estimate a slight difference in binding affinity with sufficient accuracy. We propose a novel concept for the evaluation of binding affinity between a ligand and its receptor by functionalizing the fluctuation at the ligand-receptor interface. This method enables an adequate estimation with a high accuracy compared with the conventional energetic approach. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) protease and its inhibitor are used to explain how binding affinity is extracted from the fluctuation in interfacial energy, and a combination of an antigen and its antibody is examined to demonstrate the compatibility between the estimation from the interfacial fluctuation and the experimentally measured binding energy.

  13. STARD6 on steroids: solution structure, multiple timescale backbone dynamics and ligand binding mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Létourneau, Danny; Bédard, Mikaël; Cabana, Jérôme; Lefebvre, Andrée; LeHoux, Jean-Guy; Lavigne, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    START domain proteins are conserved α/β helix-grip fold that play a role in the non-vesicular and intracellular transport of lipids and sterols. The mechanism and conformational changes permitting the entry of the ligand into their buried binding sites is not well understood. Moreover, their functions and the identification of cognate ligands is still an active area of research. Here, we report the solution structure of STARD6 and the characterization of its backbone dynamics on multiple time-scales through 15N spin-relaxation and amide exchange studies. We reveal for the first time the presence of concerted fluctuations in the Ω1 loop and the C-terminal helix on the microsecond-millisecond time-scale that allows for the opening of the binding site and ligand entry. We also report that STARD6 binds specifically testosterone. Our work represents a milestone for the study of ligand binding mechanism by other START domains and the elucidation of the biological function of STARD6. PMID:27340016

  14. Protein Unfolding Coupled to Ligand Binding: Differential Scanning Calorimetry Simulation Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Celej, Maria Soledad; Fidelio, Gerardo Daniel; Dassie, Sergio Alberto

    2005-01-01

    A comprehensive theoretical description of thermal protein unfolding coupled to ligand binding is presented. The thermodynamic concepts are independent of the method used to monitor protein unfolding but a differential scanning calorimetry is being used as a tool for examining the unfolding process.

  15. Identifying and quantifying two ligand-binding sites while imaging native human membrane receptors by AFM

    PubMed Central

    Pfreundschuh, Moritz; Alsteens, David; Wieneke, Ralph; Zhang, Cheng; Coughlin, Shaun R.; Tampé, Robert; Kobilka, Brian K.; Müller, Daniel J.

    2015-01-01

    A current challenge in life sciences is to image cell membrane receptors while characterizing their specific interactions with various ligands. Addressing this issue has been hampered by the lack of suitable nanoscopic methods. Here we address this challenge and introduce multifunctional high-resolution atomic force microscopy (AFM) to image human protease-activated receptors (PAR1) in the functionally important lipid membrane and to simultaneously localize and quantify their binding to two different ligands. Therefore, we introduce the surface chemistry to bifunctionalize AFM tips with the native receptor-activating peptide and a tris-N-nitrilotriacetic acid (tris-NTA) group binding to a His10-tag engineered to PAR1. We further introduce ways to discern between the binding of both ligands to different receptor sites while imaging native PAR1s. Surface chemistry and nanoscopic method are applicable to a range of biological systems in vitro and in vivo and to concurrently detect and localize multiple ligand-binding sites at single receptor resolution. PMID:26561004

  16. Binding of angiogenesis inhibitor kringle 5 to its specific ligands by frontal affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Bian, Liujiao; Li, Qian; Ji, Xu

    2015-07-01

    The interactions between angiogenesis inhibitor Kringle 5 and its five specific ligands were investigated by frontal affinity chromatography in combination with fluorescence spectra and site-directed molecular docking. The binding constants of trans-4-(aminomethyl) cyclohexane carboxylic acid (AMCHA), epsilon-aminocaproic acid (EACA), benzylamine, 7-aminoheptanoic acid (7-AHA) and L-lysine to Kringle 5 were 19.0×10(3), 7.97×10(3), 6.45×10(3), 6.07×10(3) and 4.04×10(3) L/mol, respectively. The five ligands bound to Kringle 5 on the lysine binding site in equimolar amounts, which was pushed mainly by hydrogen bond and Van der Waals force. This binding affinity was believed to be dependent on the functional group and flexible feature in ligands. This study will provide an important insight into the binding mechanism of angiogenesis inhibitor Kringle 5 to its specific ligands. PMID:25981289

  17. From ligands to binding motifs and beyond; the enhanced versatility of nanocrystal surfaces.

    PubMed

    De Roo, J; De Keukeleere, K; Hens, Z; Van Driessche, I

    2016-09-14

    Surface chemistry bridges the gap between nanocrystal synthesis and their applications. In this respect, the discovery of complex ligand binding motifs on semiconductor quantum dots and metal oxide nanocrystals opens a gateway to new areas of research. The implications are far-reaching, from catalytic model systems to the performance of solar cells. PMID:27461488

  18. How to Illustrate Ligand-Protein Binding in a Class Experiment: An Elementary Fluorescent Assay.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marty, Alain; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Describes an experiment (taking approximately five hours) which illustrates the binding of a small molecule to a protein. By using an appropriate fluorescent ligand and a given protein, the fluorescent probe technique is applied to measure the number of bonding sites, and number of site classes, and their association constants. (JN)

  19. Identifying and quantifying two ligand-binding sites while imaging native human membrane receptors by AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfreundschuh, Moritz; Alsteens, David; Wieneke, Ralph; Zhang, Cheng; Coughlin, Shaun R.; Tampé, Robert; Kobilka, Brian K.; Müller, Daniel J.

    2015-11-01

    A current challenge in life sciences is to image cell membrane receptors while characterizing their specific interactions with various ligands. Addressing this issue has been hampered by the lack of suitable nanoscopic methods. Here we address this challenge and introduce multifunctional high-resolution atomic force microscopy (AFM) to image human protease-activated receptors (PAR1) in the functionally important lipid membrane and to simultaneously localize and quantify their binding to two different ligands. Therefore, we introduce the surface chemistry to bifunctionalize AFM tips with the native receptor-activating peptide and a tris-N-nitrilotriacetic acid (tris-NTA) group binding to a His10-tag engineered to PAR1. We further introduce ways to discern between the binding of both ligands to different receptor sites while imaging native PAR1s. Surface chemistry and nanoscopic method are applicable to a range of biological systems in vitro and in vivo and to concurrently detect and localize multiple ligand-binding sites at single receptor resolution.

  20. In vitro selection of novel RNA ligands that bind human cytomegalovirus and block viral infection.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, J; Jiang, H; Liu, F

    2000-01-01

    Ribonuclease-resistant RNA molecules that bind to infectious human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) were isolated in vitro from a pool of randomized sequences after 16 cycles of selection and amplification. The two ligands (L13 and L19) characterized exhibited high HCMV-binding affinity in vitro and effectively inhibited viral infection in tissue culture. Their antiviral activity was also specific as they only reacted with two different strains of HCMV but not with the related herpes simplex virus 1 and human cells. These two ligands appeared to function as antivirals by blocking viral entry. Ultraviolet (UV) crosslinking studies suggested that L13 and L19 bind to HCMV essential glycoproteins B and H, respectively. Thus, RNA ligands that bind to different surface antigens of HCMV can be simultaneously isolated by the selection procedure. Our study demonstrates the feasibility of using these RNA ligands as a research tool to identify viral proteins required for infectivity and as an antiviral agent to block viral infection. PMID:10786848

  1. Selectivity in ligand binding to uranyl compounds: A synthetic, structural, thermodynamic and computational study

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, John

    2015-01-21

    The uranyl cation (UO₂²⁺) is the most abundant form of uranium on the planet. It is estimated that 4.5 billion tons of uranium in this form exist in sea water. The ability to bind and extract the uranyl cation from aqueous solution while separating it from other elements would provide a limitless source of nuclear fuel. A large body of research concerns the selective recognition and extraction of uranyl. A stable molecule, the cation has a linear O=U=O geometry. The short U-O bonds (1.78 Å) arise from the combination of uranium 5f/6d and oxygen 2p orbitals. Due to the oxygen moieties being multiply bonded, these sites were not thought to be basic enough for Lewis acidic coordination to be a viable approach to sequestration. The goal of this research is thus to broaden the coordination chemistry of the uranyl ion by studying new ligand systems via synthetic, structural, thermodynamic and computational methods. It is anticipated that this fundamental science will find use beyond actinide separation technologies in areas such as nuclear waste remediation and nuclear materials. The focus of this study is to synthesize uranyl complexes incorporating amidinate and guanidinate ligands. Both synthetic and computational methods are used to investigate novel equatorial ligand coordination and how this affects the basicity of the oxo ligands. Such an understanding will later apply to designing ligands incorporating functionalities that can bind uranyl both equatorially and axially for highly selective sequestration. Efficient and durable chromatography supports for lanthanide separation will be generated by (1) identifying robust peptoid-based ligands capable of binding different lanthanides with variable affinities, and (2) developing practical synthetic methods for the attachment of these ligands to Dowex ion exchange resins.

  2. Ligand Binding Ensembles Determine Graded Agonist Efficacies at a G Protein-coupled Receptor.

    PubMed

    Bock, Andreas; Bermudez, Marcel; Krebs, Fabian; Matera, Carlo; Chirinda, Brian; Sydow, Dominique; Dallanoce, Clelia; Holzgrabe, Ulrike; De Amici, Marco; Lohse, Martin J; Wolber, Gerhard; Mohr, Klaus

    2016-07-29

    G protein-coupled receptors constitute the largest family of membrane receptors and modulate almost every physiological process in humans. Binding of agonists to G protein-coupled receptors induces a shift from inactive to active receptor conformations. Biophysical studies of the dynamic equilibrium of receptors suggest that a portion of receptors can remain in inactive states even in the presence of saturating concentrations of agonist and G protein mimetic. However, the molecular details of agonist-bound inactive receptors are poorly understood. Here we use the model of bitopic orthosteric/allosteric (i.e. dualsteric) agonists for muscarinic M2 receptors to demonstrate the existence and function of such inactive agonist·receptor complexes on a molecular level. Using all-atom molecular dynamics simulations, dynophores (i.e. a combination of static three-dimensional pharmacophores and molecular dynamics-based conformational sampling), ligand design, and receptor mutagenesis, we show that inactive agonist·receptor complexes can result from agonist binding to the allosteric vestibule alone, whereas the dualsteric binding mode produces active receptors. Each agonist forms a distinct ligand binding ensemble, and different agonist efficacies depend on the fraction of purely allosteric (i.e. inactive) versus dualsteric (i.e. active) binding modes. We propose that this concept may explain why agonist·receptor complexes can be inactive and that adopting multiple binding modes may be generalized also to small agonists where binding modes will be only subtly different and confined to only one binding site.

  3. Ligand Binding Ensembles Determine Graded Agonist Efficacies at a G Protein-coupled Receptor.

    PubMed

    Bock, Andreas; Bermudez, Marcel; Krebs, Fabian; Matera, Carlo; Chirinda, Brian; Sydow, Dominique; Dallanoce, Clelia; Holzgrabe, Ulrike; De Amici, Marco; Lohse, Martin J; Wolber, Gerhard; Mohr, Klaus

    2016-07-29

    G protein-coupled receptors constitute the largest family of membrane receptors and modulate almost every physiological process in humans. Binding of agonists to G protein-coupled receptors induces a shift from inactive to active receptor conformations. Biophysical studies of the dynamic equilibrium of receptors suggest that a portion of receptors can remain in inactive states even in the presence of saturating concentrations of agonist and G protein mimetic. However, the molecular details of agonist-bound inactive receptors are poorly understood. Here we use the model of bitopic orthosteric/allosteric (i.e. dualsteric) agonists for muscarinic M2 receptors to demonstrate the existence and function of such inactive agonist·receptor complexes on a molecular level. Using all-atom molecular dynamics simulations, dynophores (i.e. a combination of static three-dimensional pharmacophores and molecular dynamics-based conformational sampling), ligand design, and receptor mutagenesis, we show that inactive agonist·receptor complexes can result from agonist binding to the allosteric vestibule alone, whereas the dualsteric binding mode produces active receptors. Each agonist forms a distinct ligand binding ensemble, and different agonist efficacies depend on the fraction of purely allosteric (i.e. inactive) versus dualsteric (i.e. active) binding modes. We propose that this concept may explain why agonist·receptor complexes can be inactive and that adopting multiple binding modes may be generalized also to small agonists where binding modes will be only subtly different and confined to only one binding site. PMID:27298318

  4. A rapid method for estimating the binding of ligands to ELISA microwells.

    PubMed

    Steinitz, M; Baraz, L

    2000-04-21

    This report presents a rapid and simple assay for estimating to what extent the surface of ELISA microwells is coated by a ligand of choice such as, for example, proteins, peptides, hormones, polysaccharides and nucleic acids. The method also provides a practical approach for defining the conditions required for optimal coating, such as ligand concentration, coating buffer, temperature and duration of coating and also for evaluating the efficiency of the reagents used to saturate the ELISA microwells. The important advantage of this procedure is that, in contrast to conventional ELISA procedure, the detection of the microwell-adhered ligand is not achieved by using an antibody. It is therefore the solution of choice when, as is often the case, no primary specific antibody is available. The test consists of three steps: first the ligand is allowed to adsorb to the microwells. Second, alkaline phosphatase is added to bind to any residual microwell surface not occupied by the ligand. Finally, substrate is added and the resulting color reaction is measured. Light absorbancy is inversely correlated with the level of ligand adherence. The results obtained by this method match those of direct ligand quantitation, as evaluated by a regular ELISA procedure. PMID:10758244

  5. Structure and ligand binding of the extended Tudor domain of D. melanogaster Tudor-SN.

    PubMed

    Friberg, Anders; Corsini, Lorenzo; Mourão, André; Sattler, Michael

    2009-04-10

    The Tudor-SN protein (p100, SND1) has been implicated in a variety of cellular processes, such as transcription, processing of edited double-stranded RNA, and splicing regulation. Molecular details of these functions are not yet understood. Tudor domains have previously been shown to bind methylated ligands, such as methylated lysines and arginines. It has been suggested that the role of Tudor-SN in splicing may involve binding to such methylated ligands or to the methylated 5' cap of spliceosomal snRNAs. Here, we report the crystal structure of the extended Tudor domain of Tudor-SN from Drosophila melanogaster to a resolution of 2.1 A. NMR secondary chemical shifts, relaxation data, and residual dipolar couplings indicate that the solution and crystal structures are similar. Binding of various ligands was investigated by NMR. Binding sites and affinities were characterized by chemical shift perturbations. We show that the aromatic cage of the Tudor domain specifically binds a peptide containing symmetrically dimethylated arginines (sDMA) with micromolar affinity, while the same peptide comprising nonmethylated arginines does not show significant chemical shift perturbations. Tudor-SN preferentially recognizes sDMA over asymmetrically dimethylated arginine (aDMA). In contrast, two 5' cap analogues with different methylation patterns, as well as mono-, di-, and trimethyllysines, show no binding. Our data demonstrate that the Tudor domain of Tudor-SN specifically recognizes sDMA-containing ligands. The aromatic cage of Tudor-SN is very similar to the one in the Tudor domain of the survival of motor neuron protein, which also recognizes sDMA peptides, indicating a conserved binding motif for this methylation mark. Recognition of sDMA in the C-terminal tails of spliceosomal Sm proteins suggests how Tudor-SN may interact with small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particles during the regulation of splicing. PMID:19232356

  6. Theoretical treatment of helix-coil transition of complexes DNA with two different ligands having different binding parameters.

    PubMed

    Karapetian, Armen T; Grigoryan, Zareh A; Mamasakhlisov, Yevgeni Sh; Minasyants, Mikayel V; Vardevanyan, Poghos O

    2016-01-01

    The melting transition of DNA-ligand complexes, allowing for two binding mechanisms to different DNA conformations is treated theoretically. The obtained results express the behavior of the experimentally measurable quantities, degree of denaturation, and concentrations of bound ligands on the temperature. The range of binding parameters is obtained, where denaturation curves become multiphasic. The possible application to the nanocomposites crystallization is discussed.

  7. A search for site-filling ligands in the Mcg Bence-Jones dimer: crystal binding studies of fluorescent compounds.

    PubMed

    Edmundson, A B; Ely, K R; Herron, J N

    1984-07-01

    In trigonal crystals grown in 1.9 M ammonium sulfate buffered at pH 6.2, the Mcg light-chain (Bence-Jones) dimer has a highly aromatic binding cavity accessible to a wide range of hydrophobic and aromatic ligands. A search was made for site-filling ligands by diffusing compounds into the crystals and determining their locations, orientations and relative occupancies by difference Fourier analysis at 2.7-A resolution. 1-Anilinonaphthalene-8-sulfonate, a small ligand in comparison with the rest of the series, initially occupied a site in the main binding cavity. With time, however, this ligand changed its position to the deep binding pocket beyond the floor of the main cavity. The original binding site remained vacant, despite the presence of a large excess of ligand in the soaking solution. Ligands increasing in size from fluorescein to bis(N-methyl)acridine (lucigenin) to dimers of carboxytetramethylrhodamine were found to bind with stringent stereospecificity in the main cavity, but the mode of binding was different in each case. The dimer of the 6-isomer of carboxytetramethylrhodamine, in which the two carboxyl groups are in para positions on the phenyl moiety, proved to be an effective site-filling ligand. The differences in the binding properties of dimers of 5- and 6-carboxytetramethylrhodamine led to an explanation for isomeric discrimination in the binding site. There were extensive conformational changes in the binding cavity to accommodate the ligands, particularly 6-carboxytetramethylrhodamine. The second and third hypervariable loops proved very flexible, and moved in ways to expand the binding site. The side chains of key tyrosine and phenylalanine residues in the site were also highly mobile. Their orientations adjusted to optimize complementarity with the ligands. These conformational adjustments are consistent with the tenets of a limited neo-instructive theory of ligand binding.

  8. Binding kinetics differentiates functional antagonism of orexin-2 receptor ligands

    PubMed Central

    Mould, R; Brown, J; Marshall, FH; Langmead, CJ

    2014-01-01

    Orexin receptor antagonism represents a novel approach for the treatment of insomnia that directly targets sleep/wake regulation. Several such compounds have entered into clinical development, including the dual orexin receptor antagonists, suvorexant and almorexant. In this study, we have used equilibrium and kinetic binding studies with the orexin-2 (OX2) selective antagonist radioligand, [3H]-EMPA, to profile several orexin receptor antagonists. Furthermore, selected compounds were studied in cell-based assays of inositol phosphate accumulation and ERK-1/2 phosphorylation in CHO cells stably expressing the OX2 receptor that employ different agonist incubation times (30 and 5 min, respectively). EMPA, suvorexant, almorexant and TCS-OX-29 all bind to the OX2 receptor with moderate to high affinity (pKI values ≥ 7.5), whereas the primarily OX1 selective antagonists SB-334867 and SB-408124 displayed low affinity (pKI values ca. 6). Competition kinetic analysis showed that the compounds displayed a range of dissociation rates from very fast (TCS-OX2-29, koff = 0.22 min−1) to very slow (almorexant, koff = 0.005 min−1). Notably, there was a clear correlation between association rate and affinity. In the cell-based assays, fast-offset antagonists EMPA and TCS-OX2-29 displayed surmountable antagonism of orexin-A agonist activity. However, both suvorexant and particularly almorexant cause concentration-dependent depression in the maximal orexin-A response, a profile that is more evident with a shorter agonist incubation time. Analysis according to a hemi-equilibrium model suggests that antagonist dissociation is slower in a cellular system than in membrane binding; under these conditions, almorexant effectively acts as a pseudo-irreversible antagonist. Linked ArticlesThis article is part of a themed section on Orexin Receptors. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2014.171.issue-2 PMID:23692283

  9. First Principles-Based Calculations of Free Energy of Binding: Application to Ligand Binding in a Self-Assembling Superstructure.

    PubMed

    Fox, Stephen; Wallnoefer, Hannes G; Fox, Thomas; Tautermann, Christofer S; Skylaris, Chris-Kriton

    2011-04-12

    The accurate prediction of ligand binding affinities to a protein remains a desirable goal of computational biochemistry. Many available methods use molecular mechanics (MM) to describe the system, however, MM force fields cannot fully describe the complex interactions involved in binding, specifically electron transfer and polarization. First principles approaches can fully account for these interactions, and with the development of linear-scaling first principles programs, it is now viable to apply first principles calculations to systems containing tens of thousands of atoms. In this paper, a quantum mechanical Poisson-Boltzmann surface area approach is applied to a model of a protein-ligand binding cavity, the "tennis ball" dimer. Results obtained from this approach demonstrate considerable improvement over conventional molecular mechanics Poisson-Boltzmann surface area due to the more accurate description of the interactions in the system. For the first principles calculations in this study, the linear-scaling density functional theory program ONETEP is used, allowing the approach to be applied to receptor-ligand complexes of pharmaceutical interest that typically include thousands of atoms.

  10. Misuse of thermodynamics in the interpretation of isothermal titration calorimetry data for ligand binding to proteins.

    PubMed

    Pethica, Brian A

    2015-03-01

    Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) has given a mass of data on the binding of small molecules to proteins and other biopolymers, with particular interest in drug binding to proteins chosen as therapeutic indicators. Interpretation of the enthalpy data usually follows an unsound protocol that uses thermodynamic relations in circumstances where they do not apply. Errors of interpretation include incomplete definitions of ligand binding and equilibrium constants and neglect of the non-ideality of the solutions under study, leading to unreliable estimates of standard free energies and entropies of binding. The mass of reported thermodynamic functions for ligand binding to proteins estimated from ITC enthalpies alone is consequently of uncertain thermodynamic significance and utility. ITC and related experiments to test the protocol assumptions are indicated. A thermodynamic procedure avoiding equilibrium constants or other reaction models and not requiring protein activities is given. The discussion draws attention to the fundamental but neglected relation between the thermodynamic activity and bioactivity of drugs and to the generally unknown thermodynamic status of ligand solutions, which for drugs relates directly to effective therapeutic dosimetry.

  11. Predicting protein ligand binding sites by combining evolutionary sequence conservation and 3D structure.

    PubMed

    Capra, John A; Laskowski, Roman A; Thornton, Janet M; Singh, Mona; Funkhouser, Thomas A

    2009-12-01

    Identifying a protein's functional sites is an important step towards characterizing its molecular function. Numerous structure- and sequence-based methods have been developed for this problem. Here we introduce ConCavity, a small molecule binding site prediction algorithm that integrates evolutionary sequence conservation estimates with structure-based methods for identifying protein surface cavities. In large-scale testing on a diverse set of single- and multi-chain protein structures, we show that ConCavity substantially outperforms existing methods for identifying both 3D ligand binding pockets and individual ligand binding residues. As part of our testing, we perform one of the first direct comparisons of conservation-based and structure-based methods. We find that the two approaches provide largely complementary information, which can be combined to improve upon either approach alone. We also demonstrate that ConCavity has state-of-the-art performance in predicting catalytic sites and drug binding pockets. Overall, the algorithms and analysis presented here significantly improve our ability to identify ligand binding sites and further advance our understanding of the relationship between evolutionary sequence conservation and structural and functional attributes of proteins. Data, source code, and prediction visualizations are available on the ConCavity web site (http://compbio.cs.princeton.edu/concavity/).

  12. Two disparate ligand binding sites in the human P2Y1 receptor

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Dandan; Gao, Zhan-Guo; Zhang, Kaihua; Kiselev, Evgeny; Crane, Steven; Wang, Jiang; Paoletta, Silvia; Yi, Cuiying; Ma, Limin; Zhang, Wenru; Han, Gye Won; Liu, Hong; Cherezov, Vadim; Katritch, Vsevolod; Jiang, Hualiang; Stevens, Raymond C.; Jacobson, Kenneth A.; Zhao, Qiang; Wu, Beili

    2015-01-01

    In response to adenosine 5′-diphosphate, the P2Y1 receptor (P2Y1R) facilitates platelet aggregation, and thus serves as an important antithrombotic drug target. Here we report the crystal structures of the human P2Y1R in complex with a nucleotide antagonist MRS2500 at 2.7Å resolution, and with a non-nucleotide antagonist BPTU at 2.2Å resolution. The structures reveal two distinct ligand binding sites, providing atomic details of P2Y1R’s unique ligand binding modes. MRS2500 recognizes a binding site within the seven transmembrane bundle of P2Y1R, which, however, is different in shape and location from the nucleotide binding site in previously determined P2Y12R structure. BPTU binds to an allosteric pocket on the external receptor interface with the lipid bilayer, making it the first structurally characterized selective G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) ligand located entirely outside of the helical bundle. These high-resolution insights into P2Y1R should enable discovery of new orthosteric and allosteric antithrombotic drugs with reduced adverse effects. PMID:25822790

  13. Ligand binding affinities of arctigenin and its demethylated metabolites to estrogen receptor alpha.

    PubMed

    Jin, Jong-Sik; Lee, Jong-Hyun; Hattori, Masao

    2013-01-01

    Phytoestrogens are defined as plant-derived compounds with estrogen-like activities according to their chemical structures and activities. Plant lignans are generally categorized as phytoestrogens. It was reported that (-)-arctigenin, the aglycone of arctiin, was demethylated to (-)-dihydroxyenterolactone (DHENL) by Eubacterium (E.) sp. ARC-2. Through stepwise demethylation, E. sp. ARC-2 produced six intermediates, three mono-desmethylarctigenins and three di-desmethylarctigenins. In the present study, ligand binding affinities of (-)-arctigenin and its seven metabolites, including DHENL, were investigated for an estrogen receptor alpha, and found that demethylated metabolites had stronger binding affinities than (-)-arctigenin using a ligand binding screen assay method. The IC(50) value of (2R,3R)-2-(4-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzyl)-3-(3,4-dihydroxybenzyl)-butyrolactone was 7.9 × 10⁻⁴ M.

  14. A model for the study of ligand binding to the ribosomal RNA helix h44

    PubMed Central

    Dibrov, Sergey M.; Parsons, Jerod; Hermann, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Oligonucleotide models of ribosomal RNA domains are powerful tools to study the binding and molecular recognition of antibiotics that interfere with bacterial translation. Techniques such as selective chemical modification, fluorescence labeling and mutations are cumbersome for the whole ribosome but readily applicable to model RNAs, which are readily crystallized and often give rise to higher resolution crystal structures suitable for detailed analysis of ligand–RNA interactions. Here, we have investigated the HX RNA construct which contains two adjacent ligand binding regions of helix h44 in 16S ribosomal RNA. High-resolution crystal structure analysis confirmed that the HX RNA is a faithful structural model of the ribosomal target. Solution studies showed that HX RNA carrying a fluorescent 2-aminopurine modification provides a model system that can be used to monitor ligand binding to both the ribosomal decoding site and, through an indirect effect, the hygromycin B interaction region. PMID:20215440

  15. Terahertz underdamped vibrational motion governs protein-ligand binding in solution.

    PubMed

    Turton, David A; Senn, Hans Martin; Harwood, Thomas; Lapthorn, Adrian J; Ellis, Elizabeth M; Wynne, Klaas

    2014-06-03

    Low-frequency collective vibrational modes in proteins have been proposed as being responsible for efficiently directing biochemical reactions and biological energy transport. However, evidence of the existence of delocalized vibrational modes is scarce and proof of their involvement in biological function absent. Here we apply extremely sensitive femtosecond optical Kerr-effect spectroscopy to study the depolarized Raman spectra of lysozyme and its complex with the inhibitor triacetylchitotriose in solution. Underdamped delocalized vibrational modes in the terahertz frequency domain are identified and shown to blue-shift and strengthen upon inhibitor binding. This demonstrates that the ligand-binding coordinate in proteins is underdamped and not simply solvent-controlled as previously assumed. The presence of such underdamped delocalized modes in proteins may have significant implications for the understanding of the efficiency of ligand binding and protein-molecule interactions, and has wider implications for biochemical reactivity and biological function.

  16. Ligand binding affinities of arctigenin and its demethylated metabolites to estrogen receptor alpha.

    PubMed

    Jin, Jong-Sik; Lee, Jong-Hyun; Hattori, Masao

    2013-01-01

    Phytoestrogens are defined as plant-derived compounds with estrogen-like activities according to their chemical structures and activities. Plant lignans are generally categorized as phytoestrogens. It was reported that (-)-arctigenin, the aglycone of arctiin, was demethylated to (-)-dihydroxyenterolactone (DHENL) by Eubacterium (E.) sp. ARC-2. Through stepwise demethylation, E. sp. ARC-2 produced six intermediates, three mono-desmethylarctigenins and three di-desmethylarctigenins. In the present study, ligand binding affinities of (-)-arctigenin and its seven metabolites, including DHENL, were investigated for an estrogen receptor alpha, and found that demethylated metabolites had stronger binding affinities than (-)-arctigenin using a ligand binding screen assay method. The IC(50) value of (2R,3R)-2-(4-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzyl)-3-(3,4-dihydroxybenzyl)-butyrolactone was 7.9 × 10⁻⁴ M. PMID:23325100

  17. Nonlinear scoring functions for similarity-based ligand docking and binding affinity prediction.

    PubMed

    Brylinski, Michal

    2013-11-25

    A common strategy for virtual screening considers a systematic docking of a large library of organic compounds into the target sites in protein receptors with promising leads selected based on favorable intermolecular interactions. Despite a continuous progress in the modeling of protein-ligand interactions for pharmaceutical design, important challenges still remain, thus the development of novel techniques is required. In this communication, we describe eSimDock, a new approach to ligand docking and binding affinity prediction. eSimDock employs nonlinear machine learning-based scoring functions to improve the accuracy of ligand ranking and similarity-based binding pose prediction, and to increase the tolerance to structural imperfections in the target structures. In large-scale benchmarking using the Astex/CCDC data set, we show that 53.9% (67.9%) of the predicted ligand poses have RMSD of <2 Å (<3 Å). Moreover, using binding sites predicted by recently developed eFindSite, eSimDock models ligand binding poses with an RMSD of 4 Å for 50.0-39.7% of the complexes at the protein homology level limited to 80-40%. Simulations against non-native receptor structures, whose mean backbone rearrangements vary from 0.5 to 5.0 Å Cα-RMSD, show that the ratio of docking accuracy and the estimated upper bound is at a constant level of ∼0.65. Pearson correlation coefficient between experimental and predicted by eSimDock Ki values for a large data set of the crystal structures of protein-ligand complexes from BindingDB is 0.58, which decreases only to 0.46 when target structures distorted to 3.0 Å Cα-RMSD are used. Finally, two case studies demonstrate that eSimDock can be customized to specific applications as well. These encouraging results show that the performance of eSimDock is largely unaffected by the deformations of ligand binding regions, thus it represents a practical strategy for across-proteome virtual screening using protein models. eSimDock is freely

  18. Nonlinear scoring functions for similarity-based ligand docking and binding affinity prediction.

    PubMed

    Brylinski, Michal

    2013-11-25

    A common strategy for virtual screening considers a systematic docking of a large library of organic compounds into the target sites in protein receptors with promising leads selected based on favorable intermolecular interactions. Despite a continuous progress in the modeling of protein-ligand interactions for pharmaceutical design, important challenges still remain, thus the development of novel techniques is required. In this communication, we describe eSimDock, a new approach to ligand docking and binding affinity prediction. eSimDock employs nonlinear machine learning-based scoring functions to improve the accuracy of ligand ranking and similarity-based binding pose prediction, and to increase the tolerance to structural imperfections in the target structures. In large-scale benchmarking using the Astex/CCDC data set, we show that 53.9% (67.9%) of the predicted ligand poses have RMSD of <2 Å (<3 Å). Moreover, using binding sites predicted by recently developed eFindSite, eSimDock models ligand binding poses with an RMSD of 4 Å for 50.0-39.7% of the complexes at the protein homology level limited to 80-40%. Simulations against non-native receptor structures, whose mean backbone rearrangements vary from 0.5 to 5.0 Å Cα-RMSD, show that the ratio of docking accuracy and the estimated upper bound is at a constant level of ∼0.65. Pearson correlation coefficient between experimental and predicted by eSimDock Ki values for a large data set of the crystal structures of protein-ligand complexes from BindingDB is 0.58, which decreases only to 0.46 when target structures distorted to 3.0 Å Cα-RMSD are used. Finally, two case studies demonstrate that eSimDock can be customized to specific applications as well. These encouraging results show that the performance of eSimDock is largely unaffected by the deformations of ligand binding regions, thus it represents a practical strategy for across-proteome virtual screening using protein models. eSimDock is freely

  19. Analyzing ligand and small molecule binding activity of solubilized GPCRs using biosensor technology.

    PubMed

    Navratilova, Iva; Dioszegi, Marianna; Myszka, David G

    2006-08-01

    We used Biacore technology to measure directly the binding of natural ligands and small molecules to the chemokine receptors CXCR4 and CCR5. Both G protein-coupled receptors were solubilized from whole cell pellets and captured on antibody surfaces for analysis. Our solubilization conditions maintained high-affinity binding of chemokines SDF-1alpha and RANTES to CXCR4 and CCR5, respectively. Surface density- and buffer-dependent binding responses, along with binding data for a selective ligand (RCP-168), further validated the biosensor assay. In addition, we showed that it is possible to collect high-quality binding responses for the archetypal small molecule inhibitors JM-2987 and TAK-779. Finally, using our biosensor-based method, we characterized the kinetics of 19 novel small molecule inhibitors of CCR5 and showed that their affinities correlated with values determined for the membrane-associated receptor. Together, the chemokine and small molecule binding data provide evidence that the solubilized receptors maintain native binding properties. These solubilized receptor preparations could be useful reagents for biophysical studies as well as for structural analysis.

  20. Crystal Structures Reveal the Multi-Ligand Binding Mechanism of Staphylococcus aureus ClfB

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jiawei; Liu, Bao; Chen, Yeguang; Liu, Lei; Deng, Xuming; Yang, Maojun

    2012-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) pathogenesis is a complex process involving a diverse array of extracellular and cell wall components. ClfB, an MSCRAMM (Microbial Surface Components Recognizing Adhesive Matrix Molecules) family surface protein, described as a fibrinogen-binding clumping factor, is a key determinant of S. aureus nasal colonization, but the molecular basis for ClfB-ligand recognition remains unknown. In this study, we solved the crystal structures of apo-ClfB and its complexes with fibrinogen α (Fg α) and cytokeratin 10 (CK10) peptides. Structural comparison revealed a conserved glycine-serine-rich (GSR) ClfB binding motif (GSSGXGXXG) within the ligands, which was also found in other human proteins such as Engrailed protein, TCF20 and Dermokine proteins. Interaction between Dermokine and ClfB was confirmed by subsequent binding assays. The crystal structure of ClfB complexed with a 15-residue peptide derived from Dermokine revealed the same peptide binding mode of ClfB as identified in the crystal structures of ClfB-Fg α and ClfB-CK10. The results presented here highlight the multi-ligand binding property of ClfB, which is very distinct from other characterized MSCRAMMs to-date. The adherence of multiple peptides carrying the GSR motif into the same pocket in ClfB is reminiscent of MHC molecules. Our results provide a template for the identification of other molecules targeted by S. aureus during its colonization and infection. We propose that other MSCRAMMs like ClfA and SdrG also possess multi-ligand binding properties. PMID:22719251

  1. Crystal structures reveal the multi-ligand binding mechanism of Staphylococcus aureus ClfB.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Hua; Feng, Yue; Wang, Jiawei; Liu, Bao; Chen, Yeguang; Liu, Lei; Deng, Xuming; Yang, Maojun

    2012-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) pathogenesis is a complex process involving a diverse array of extracellular and cell wall components. ClfB, an MSCRAMM (Microbial Surface Components Recognizing Adhesive Matrix Molecules) family surface protein, described as a fibrinogen-binding clumping factor, is a key determinant of S. aureus nasal colonization, but the molecular basis for ClfB-ligand recognition remains unknown. In this study, we solved the crystal structures of apo-ClfB and its complexes with fibrinogen α (Fg α) and cytokeratin 10 (CK10) peptides. Structural comparison revealed a conserved glycine-serine-rich (GSR) ClfB binding motif (GSSGXGXXG) within the ligands, which was also found in other human proteins such as Engrailed protein, TCF20 and Dermokine proteins. Interaction between Dermokine and ClfB was confirmed by subsequent binding assays. The crystal structure of ClfB complexed with a 15-residue peptide derived from Dermokine revealed the same peptide binding mode of ClfB as identified in the crystal structures of ClfB-Fg α and ClfB-CK10. The results presented here highlight the multi-ligand binding property of ClfB, which is very distinct from other characterized MSCRAMMs to-date. The adherence of multiple peptides carrying the GSR motif into the same pocket in ClfB is reminiscent of MHC molecules. Our results provide a template for the identification of other molecules targeted by S. aureus during its colonization and infection. We propose that other MSCRAMMs like ClfA and SdrG also possess multi-ligand binding properties. PMID:22719251

  2. Copper, iron and the organic ligands that bind them - updates from San Francisco Bay and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buck, K. N.; Bundy, R.; Biller, D.; Bruland, K. W.; Barbeau, K.

    2015-12-01

    Building on more than 30 years of measurements in San Francisco Bay by Russ Flegal and others, the concentrations of dissolved manganese, iron, cobalt, nickel, copper, zinc, cadmium and lead were determined from a suite of water quality monitoring program stations in North, Central and South Bay using inductively coupled plasma- mass spectrometry following preconcentration on a Nobias-chelate PA1 resin. Given the importance of organic ligands in governing iron solubility and copper bioavailability in natural waters, the organic complexation of dissolved iron and copper in these samples was determined from multiple analytical windows applied to competitive ligand exchange- adsorptive cathodic stripping voltammetry. This study constitutes the first dataset of iron speciation in San Francisco Bay and expands upon prior work evaluating the potential for copper toxicity in this urbanized estuary. Recent advances in voltammetric techniques emerging from a Scientific Committee on Oceanic Research (SCOR) working group on metal-binding ligands in the marine environment, and insights gained from high-resolution ligand measurements from the U.S. GEOTRACES program, highlight how metal-binding ligands in San Francisco Bay compare with those of the coastal and open ocean.

  3. Expression and Purification of Functional Ligand-binding Domains of T1R3 Taste Receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Nie,Y.; Hobbs, J.; Vigues, S.; Olson, W.; Conn, G.; Munger, S.

    2006-01-01

    Chemosensory receptors, including odor, taste, and vomeronasal receptors, comprise the largest group of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) in the mammalian genome. However, little is known about the molecular determinants that are critical for the detection and discrimination of ligands by most of these receptors. This dearth of understanding is due in part to difficulties in preparing functional receptors suitable for biochemical and biophysical analyses. Here we describe in detail two strategies for the expression and purification of the ligand-binding domain of T1R taste receptors, which are constituents of the sweet and umami taste receptors. These class C GPCRs contain a large extracellular N-terminal domain (NTD) that is the site of interaction with most ligands and that is amenable to expression as a separate polypeptide in heterologous cells. The NTD of mouse T1R3 was expressed as two distinct fusion proteins in Escherichia coli and purified by column chromatography. Spectroscopic analysis of the purified NTD proteins shows them to be properly folded and capable of binding ligands. This methodology should not only facilitate the characterization of T1R ligand interactions but may also be useful for dissecting the function of other class C GPCRs such as the large family of orphan V2R vomeronasal receptors.

  4. Molecular Properties of Globin Channels and Pores: Role of Cholesterol in Ligand Binding and Movement.

    PubMed

    Morrill, Gene A; Kostellow, Adele B

    2016-01-01

    Globins contain one or more cavities that control or affect such functions as ligand movement and ligand binding. Here we report that the extended globin family [cytoglobin (Cygb); neuroglobin (Ngb); myoglobin (Mb); hemoglobin (Hb) subunits Hba(α); and Hbb(β)] contain either a transmembrane (TM) helix or pore-lining region as well as internal cavities. Protein motif/domain analyses indicate that Ngb and Hbb each contain 5 cholesterol- binding (CRAC/CARC) domains and 1 caveolin binding motif, whereas the Cygb dimer has 6 cholesterol-binding domains but lacks caveolin-binding motifs. Mb and Hba each exhibit 2 cholesterol-binding domains and also lack caveolin-binding motifs. The Hb αβ-tetramer contains 14 cholesterol-binding domains. Computer algorithms indicate that Cygb and Ngb cavities display multiple partitions and C-terminal pore-lining regions, whereas Mb has three major cavities plus a C-terminal pore-lining region. The Hb tetramer exhibits a large internal cavity but the subunits differ in that they contain a C-terminal TM helix (Hba) and pore-lining region (Hbb). The cavities include 43 of 190 Cygb residues, 38 of 151 of Ngb residues, 55 of 154 Mb residues, and 137 of 688 residues in the Hb tetramer. Each cavity complex includes 6 to 8 residues of the TM helix or pore-lining region and CRAC/CARC domains exist within all cavities. Erythrocyte Hb αβ-tetramers are largely cytosolic but also bind to a membrane anion exchange protein, "band 3," which contains a large internal cavity and 12 TM helices (5 being pore-lining regions). The Hba TM helix may be the erythrocyte membrane "band 3" attachment site. "Band 3" contributes 4 caveolin binding motifs and 10 CRAC/CARC domains. Cholesterol binding may create lipid-disordered phases that alter globin cavities and facilitate ligand movement, permitting ion channel formation and conformational changes that orchestrate anion and ligand (O2, CO2, NO) movement within the large internal cavities and channels of the

  5. Molecular Properties of Globin Channels and Pores: Role of Cholesterol in Ligand Binding and Movement

    PubMed Central

    Morrill, Gene A.; Kostellow, Adele B.

    2016-01-01

    Globins contain one or more cavities that control or affect such functions as ligand movement and ligand binding. Here we report that the extended globin family [cytoglobin (Cygb); neuroglobin (Ngb); myoglobin (Mb); hemoglobin (Hb) subunits Hba(α); and Hbb(β)] contain either a transmembrane (TM) helix or pore-lining region as well as internal cavities. Protein motif/domain analyses indicate that Ngb and Hbb each contain 5 cholesterol- binding (CRAC/CARC) domains and 1 caveolin binding motif, whereas the Cygb dimer has 6 cholesterol-binding domains but lacks caveolin-binding motifs. Mb and Hba each exhibit 2 cholesterol-binding domains and also lack caveolin-binding motifs. The Hb αβ-tetramer contains 14 cholesterol-binding domains. Computer algorithms indicate that Cygb and Ngb cavities display multiple partitions and C-terminal pore-lining regions, whereas Mb has three major cavities plus a C-terminal pore-lining region. The Hb tetramer exhibits a large internal cavity but the subunits differ in that they contain a C-terminal TM helix (Hba) and pore-lining region (Hbb). The cavities include 43 of 190 Cygb residues, 38 of 151 of Ngb residues, 55 of 154 Mb residues, and 137 of 688 residues in the Hb tetramer. Each cavity complex includes 6 to 8 residues of the TM helix or pore-lining region and CRAC/CARC domains exist within all cavities. Erythrocyte Hb αβ-tetramers are largely cytosolic but also bind to a membrane anion exchange protein, “band 3,” which contains a large internal cavity and 12 TM helices (5 being pore-lining regions). The Hba TM helix may be the erythrocyte membrane “band 3” attachment site. “Band 3” contributes 4 caveolin binding motifs and 10 CRAC/CARC domains. Cholesterol binding may create lipid-disordered phases that alter globin cavities and facilitate ligand movement, permitting ion channel formation and conformational changes that orchestrate anion and ligand (O2, CO2, NO) movement within the large internal cavities and

  6. Molecular Properties of Globin Channels and Pores: Role of Cholesterol in Ligand Binding and Movement

    PubMed Central

    Morrill, Gene A.; Kostellow, Adele B.

    2016-01-01

    Globins contain one or more cavities that control or affect such functions as ligand movement and ligand binding. Here we report that the extended globin family [cytoglobin (Cygb); neuroglobin (Ngb); myoglobin (Mb); hemoglobin (Hb) subunits Hba(α); and Hbb(β)] contain either a transmembrane (TM) helix or pore-lining region as well as internal cavities. Protein motif/domain analyses indicate that Ngb and Hbb each contain 5 cholesterol- binding (CRAC/CARC) domains and 1 caveolin binding motif, whereas the Cygb dimer has 6 cholesterol-binding domains but lacks caveolin-binding motifs. Mb and Hba each exhibit 2 cholesterol-binding domains and also lack caveolin-binding motifs. The Hb αβ-tetramer contains 14 cholesterol-binding domains. Computer algorithms indicate that Cygb and Ngb cavities display multiple partitions and C-terminal pore-lining regions, whereas Mb has three major cavities plus a C-terminal pore-lining region. The Hb tetramer exhibits a large internal cavity but the subunits differ in that they contain a C-terminal TM helix (Hba) and pore-lining region (Hbb). The cavities include 43 of 190 Cygb residues, 38 of 151 of Ngb residues, 55 of 154 Mb residues, and 137 of 688 residues in the Hb tetramer. Each cavity complex includes 6 to 8 residues of the TM helix or pore-lining region and CRAC/CARC domains exist within all cavities. Erythrocyte Hb αβ-tetramers are largely cytosolic but also bind to a membrane anion exchange protein, “band 3,” which contains a large internal cavity and 12 TM helices (5 being pore-lining regions). The Hba TM helix may be the erythrocyte membrane “band 3” attachment site. “Band 3” contributes 4 caveolin binding motifs and 10 CRAC/CARC domains. Cholesterol binding may create lipid-disordered phases that alter globin cavities and facilitate ligand movement, permitting ion channel formation and conformational changes that orchestrate anion and ligand (O2, CO2, NO) movement within the large internal cavities and

  7. Improving the LIE Method for Binding Free Energy Calculations of Protein-Ligand Complexes.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Williams E; Noskov, Sergei Yu; Valiente, Pedro A

    2015-09-28

    In this work, we introduced an improved linear interaction energy (LIE) method parameterization for computations of protein–ligand binding free energies. The protocol, coined LIE-D, builds on the linear relationship between the empirical coefficient γ in the standard LIE scheme and the D parameter, introduced in our work. The D-parameter encompasses the balance (difference) between electrostatic (polar) and van der Waals (nonpolar) energies in protein–ligand complexes. Leave-one-out cross-validation showed that LIE-D reproduced accurately the absolute binding free energies for our training set of protein–ligand complexes (<|error|> = 0.92 kcal/mol, SDerror = 0.66 kcal/mol, R(2) = 0.90, QLOO(2) = 0.89, and sPRESS(LOO) = 1.28 kcal/mol). We also demonstrated LIE-D robustness by predicting accurately the binding free energies for three different protein–ligand systems outside the training data set, where the electrostatic and van der Waals interaction energies were calculated with different force fields. PMID:26180998

  8. Understanding TRPV1 activation by ligands: Insights from the binding modes of capsaicin and resiniferatoxin

    PubMed Central

    Elokely, Khaled; Velisetty, Phanindra; Delemotte, Lucie; Palovcak, Eugene; Klein, Michael L.; Rohacs, Tibor; Carnevale, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    The transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily V member 1 (TRPV1) or vanilloid receptor 1 is a nonselective cation channel that is involved in the detection and transduction of nociceptive stimuli. Inflammation and nerve damage result in the up-regulation of TRPV1 transcription, and, therefore, modulators of TRPV1 channels are potentially useful in the treatment of inflammatory and neuropathic pain. Understanding the binding modes of known ligands would significantly contribute to the success of TRPV1 modulator drug design programs. The recent cryo-electron microscopy structure of TRPV1 only provides a coarse characterization of the location of capsaicin (CAPS) and resiniferatoxin (RTX). Herein, we use the information contained in the experimental electron density maps to accurately determine the binding mode of CAPS and RTX and experimentally validate the computational results by mutagenesis. On the basis of these results, we perform a detailed analysis of TRPV1–ligand interactions, characterizing the protein ligand contacts and the role of individual water molecules. Importantly, our results provide a rational explanation and suggestion of TRPV1 ligand modifications that should improve binding affinity. PMID:26719417

  9. Understanding TRPV1 activation by ligands: Insights from the binding modes of capsaicin and resiniferatoxin.

    PubMed

    Elokely, Khaled; Velisetty, Phanindra; Delemotte, Lucie; Palovcak, Eugene; Klein, Michael L; Rohacs, Tibor; Carnevale, Vincenzo

    2016-01-12

    The transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily V member 1 (TRPV1) or vanilloid receptor 1 is a nonselective cation channel that is involved in the detection and transduction of nociceptive stimuli. Inflammation and nerve damage result in the up-regulation of TRPV1 transcription, and, therefore, modulators of TRPV1 channels are potentially useful in the treatment of inflammatory and neuropathic pain. Understanding the binding modes of known ligands would significantly contribute to the success of TRPV1 modulator drug design programs. The recent cryo-electron microscopy structure of TRPV1 only provides a coarse characterization of the location of capsaicin (CAPS) and resiniferatoxin (RTX). Herein, we use the information contained in the experimental electron density maps to accurately determine the binding mode of CAPS and RTX and experimentally validate the computational results by mutagenesis. On the basis of these results, we perform a detailed analysis of TRPV1-ligand interactions, characterizing the protein ligand contacts and the role of individual water molecules. Importantly, our results provide a rational explanation and suggestion of TRPV1 ligand modifications that should improve binding affinity. PMID:26719417

  10. Improving the LIE Method for Binding Free Energy Calculations of Protein-Ligand Complexes.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Williams E; Noskov, Sergei Yu; Valiente, Pedro A

    2015-09-28

    In this work, we introduced an improved linear interaction energy (LIE) method parameterization for computations of protein–ligand binding free energies. The protocol, coined LIE-D, builds on the linear relationship between the empirical coefficient γ in the standard LIE scheme and the D parameter, introduced in our work. The D-parameter encompasses the balance (difference) between electrostatic (polar) and van der Waals (nonpolar) energies in protein–ligand complexes. Leave-one-out cross-validation showed that LIE-D reproduced accurately the absolute binding free energies for our training set of protein–ligand complexes (<|error|> = 0.92 kcal/mol, SDerror = 0.66 kcal/mol, R(2) = 0.90, QLOO(2) = 0.89, and sPRESS(LOO) = 1.28 kcal/mol). We also demonstrated LIE-D robustness by predicting accurately the binding free energies for three different protein–ligand systems outside the training data set, where the electrostatic and van der Waals interaction energies were calculated with different force fields.

  11. Understanding TRPV1 activation by ligands: Insights from the binding modes of capsaicin and resiniferatoxin.

    PubMed

    Elokely, Khaled; Velisetty, Phanindra; Delemotte, Lucie; Palovcak, Eugene; Klein, Michael L; Rohacs, Tibor; Carnevale, Vincenzo

    2016-01-12

    The transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily V member 1 (TRPV1) or vanilloid receptor 1 is a nonselective cation channel that is involved in the detection and transduction of nociceptive stimuli. Inflammation and nerve damage result in the up-regulation of TRPV1 transcription, and, therefore, modulators of TRPV1 channels are potentially useful in the treatment of inflammatory and neuropathic pain. Understanding the binding modes of known ligands would significantly contribute to the success of TRPV1 modulator drug design programs. The recent cryo-electron microscopy structure of TRPV1 only provides a coarse characterization of the location of capsaicin (CAPS) and resiniferatoxin (RTX). Herein, we use the information contained in the experimental electron density maps to accurately determine the binding mode of CAPS and RTX and experimentally validate the computational results by mutagenesis. On the basis of these results, we perform a detailed analysis of TRPV1-ligand interactions, characterizing the protein ligand contacts and the role of individual water molecules. Importantly, our results provide a rational explanation and suggestion of TRPV1 ligand modifications that should improve binding affinity.

  12. Evolutionary diversification of retinoic acid receptor ligand-binding pocket structure by molecular tinkering

    PubMed Central

    Gutierrez-Mazariegos, Juliana; Nadendla, Eswar Kumar; Studer, Romain A.; Alvarez, Susana; de Lera, Angel R.; Kuraku, Shigehiro; Bourguet, William; Laudet, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    Whole genome duplications (WGDs) have been classically associated with the origin of evolutionary novelties and the so-called duplication–degeneration–complementation model describes the possible fates of genes after duplication. However, how sequence divergence effectively allows functional changes between gene duplicates is still unclear. In the vertebrate lineage, two rounds of WGDs took place, giving rise to paralogous gene copies observed for many gene families. For the retinoic acid receptors (RARs), for example, which are members of the nuclear hormone receptor (NR) superfamily, a unique ancestral gene has been duplicated resulting in three vertebrate paralogues: RARα, RARβ and RARγ. It has previously been shown that this single ancestral RAR was neofunctionalized to give rise to a larger substrate specificity range in the RARs of extant jawed vertebrates (also called gnathostomes). To understand RAR diversification, the members of the cyclostomes (lamprey and hagfish), jawless vertebrates representing the extant sister group of gnathostomes, provide an intermediate situation and thus allow the characterization of the evolutionary steps that shaped RAR ligand-binding properties following the WGDs. In this study, we assessed the ligand-binding specificity of cyclostome RARs and found that their ligand-binding pockets resemble those of gnathostome RARα and RARβ. In contrast, none of the cyclostome receptors studied showed any RARγ-like specificity. Together, our results suggest that cyclostome RARs cover only a portion of the specificity repertoire of the ancestral gnathostome RARs and indicate that the establishment of ligand-binding specificity was a stepwise event. This iterative process thus provides a rare example for the diversification of receptor–ligand interactions of NRs following WGDs. PMID:27069642

  13. A Mollusk Retinoic Acid Receptor (RAR) Ortholog Sheds Light on the Evolution of Ligand Binding

    PubMed Central

    Gutierrez-Mazariegos, Juliana; Nadendla, Eswar Kumar; Lima, Daniela; Pierzchalski, Keely; Jones, Jace W.; Kane, Maureen; Nishikawa, Jun-Ichi; Hiromori, Youhei; Nakanishi, Tsuyoshi; Santos, Miguel M.; Castro, L. Filipe C.; Bourguet, William

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear receptors are transcription factors that regulate networks of target genes in response to small molecules. There is a strong bias in our knowledge of these receptors because they were mainly characterized in classical model organisms, mostly vertebrates. Therefore, the evolutionary origins of specific ligand-receptor couples still remain elusive. Here we present the identification and characterization of a retinoic acid receptor (RAR) from the mollusk Nucella lapillus (NlRAR). We show that this receptor specifically binds to DNA response elements organized in direct repeats as a heterodimer with retinoid X receptor. Surprisingly, we also find that NlRAR does not bind all-trans retinoic acid or any other retinoid we tested. Furthermore, NlRAR is unable to activate the transcription of reporter genes in response to stimulation by retinoids and to recruit coactivators in the presence of these compounds. Three-dimensional modeling of the ligand-binding domain of NlRAR reveals an overall structure that is similar to vertebrate RARs. However, in the ligand-binding pocket (LBP) of the mollusk receptor, the alteration of several residues interacting with the ligand has apparently led to an overall decrease in the strength of the interaction with the ligand. Accordingly, mutations of NlRAR at key positions within the LBP generate receptors that are responsive to retinoids. Altogether our data suggest that, in mollusks, RAR has lost its affinity for all-trans retinoic acid, highlighting the evolutionary plasticity of its LBP. When put in an evolutionary context, our results reveal new structural and functional features of nuclear receptors validated by millions of years of evolution that were impossible to reveal in model organisms. PMID:25116705

  14. Electrostatic coupling to pH-titrating sites as a source of cooperativity in protein-ligand binding.

    PubMed Central

    Spassov, V.; Bashford, D.

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes an alternative mechanism for the cooperative binding of charged ligands to proteins. The ligand-binding sites are electrostatically coupled to protein side chains that can undergo protonation and deprotonation. The binding of one ligand alters the protein's protonation equilibrium in a manner that makes the the binding of the second ligand more favorable. This mechanism requires no conformational change to produce a cooperative effect, although it is not exclusive of conformational change. We present a theoretical description of the mechanism, and calculations on three kinds of systems: A model system containing one protonation site and two ligand-binding sites; a model system containing two protonation sites and two ligand-binding sites; and calbindin D9k, which contains two Ca2+-binding sites and 30 protonation sites. For the one-protonation-site model, it is shown that the influence of the protonation site can only be cooperative. The competition of this effect with the anticooperative effect of ligand-ligand repulsion is studied in detail. For the two-protonation site model, the effect can be either cooperative or, in special cases, anticooperative. For calbindin D9k, the calculations predict that six protonation sites in or near the ligand-binding sites make a cooperative contribution that approximately cancels the anticooperative effect of Ca2+-Ca2+ repulsion, accounting for more than half of the total cooperative effect that is needed to overcome repulsion and produce the net cooperativity observed experimentally. We argue that cooperative mechanisms of the kind described here are likely when there is more than one ligand-binding site in a protein domain. PMID:9761483

  15. Variable ligand- and receptor-binding hot spots in key strains of influenza neuraminidase

    PubMed Central

    Votapka, Lane; Demir, Özlem; Swift, Robert V; Walker, Ross C; Amaro, Rommie E

    2012-01-01

    Influenza A continues to be a major public health concern due to its ability to cause epidemic and pandemic disease outbreaks in humans. Computational investigations of structural dynamics of the major influenza glycoproteins, especially the neuraminidase (NA) enzyme, are able to provide key insights beyond what is currently accessible with standard experimental techniques. In particular, all-atom molecular dynamics simulations reveal the varying degrees of flexibility for such enzymes. Here we present an analysis of the relative flexibility of the ligand- and receptor-binding area of three key strains of influenza A: highly pathogenic H5N1, the 2009 pandemic H1N1, and a human N2 strain. Through computational solvent mapping, we investigate the various ligand- and receptor-binding “hot spots” that exist on the surface of NA which interacts with both sialic acid receptors on the host cells and antiviral drugs. This analysis suggests that the variable cavities found in the different strains and their corresponding capacities to bind ligand functional groups may play an important role in the ability of NA to form competent reaction encounter complexes with other species of interest, including antiviral drugs, sialic acid receptors on the host cell surface, and the hemagglutinin protein. Such considerations may be especially useful for the prediction of how such complexes form and with what binding capacity. PMID:22872804

  16. Computational design of an endo-1,4-[beta]-xylanase ligand binding site

    SciTech Connect

    Morin, Andrew; Kaufmann, Kristian W.; Fortenberry, Carie; Harp, Joel M.; Mizoue, Laura S.; Meiler, Jens

    2012-09-05

    The field of computational protein design has experienced important recent success. However, the de novo computational design of high-affinity protein-ligand interfaces is still largely an open challenge. Using the Rosetta program, we attempted the in silico design of a high-affinity protein interface to a small peptide ligand. We chose the thermophilic endo-1,4-{beta}-xylanase from Nonomuraea flexuosa as the protein scaffold on which to perform our designs. Over the course of the study, 12 proteins derived from this scaffold were produced and assayed for binding to the target ligand. Unfortunately, none of the designed proteins displayed evidence of high-affinity binding. Structural characterization of four designed proteins revealed that although the predicted structure of the protein model was highly accurate, this structural accuracy did not translate into accurate prediction of binding affinity. Crystallographic analyses indicate that the lack of binding affinity is possibly due to unaccounted for protein dynamics in the 'thumb' region of our design scaffold intrinsic to the family 11 {beta}-xylanase fold. Further computational analysis revealed two specific, single amino acid substitutions responsible for an observed change in backbone conformation, and decreased dynamic stability of the catalytic cleft. These findings offer new insight into the dynamic and structural determinants of the {beta}-xylanase proteins.

  17. Monitoring Solution Structures of Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor β/δ upon Ligand Binding.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Rico; Tänzler, Dirk; Ihling, Christian H; Sinz, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) have been intensively studied as drug targets to treat type 2 diabetes, lipid disorders, and metabolic syndrome. This study is part of our ongoing efforts to map conformational changes in PPARs in solution by a combination of chemical cross-linking and mass spectrometry (MS). To our best knowledge, we performed the first studies addressing solution structures of full-length PPAR-β/δ. We monitored the conformations of the ligand-binding domain (LBD) as well as full-length PPAR-β/δ upon binding of two agonists. (Photo-) cross-linking relied on (i) a variety of externally introduced amine- and carboxyl-reactive linkers and (ii) the incorporation of the photo-reactive amino acid p-benzoylphenylalanine (Bpa) into PPAR-β/δ by genetic engineering. The distances derived from cross-linking experiments allowed us to monitor conformational changes in PPAR-β/δ upon ligand binding. The cross-linking/MS approach proved highly advantageous to study nuclear receptors, such as PPARs, and revealed the interplay between DBD (DNA-binding domain) and LDB in PPAR-β/δ. Our results indicate the stabilization of a specific conformation through ligand binding in PPAR-β/δ LBD as well as full-length PPAR-β/δ. Moreover, our results suggest a close distance between the N- and C-terminal regions of full-length PPAR-β/δ in the presence of GW1516. Chemical cross-linking/MS allowed us gaining detailed insights into conformational changes that are induced in PPARs when activating ligands are present. Thus, cross-linking/MS should be added to the arsenal of structural methods available for studying nuclear receptors.

  18. Monitoring Solution Structures of Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor β/δ upon Ligand Binding.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Rico; Tänzler, Dirk; Ihling, Christian H; Sinz, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) have been intensively studied as drug targets to treat type 2 diabetes, lipid disorders, and metabolic syndrome. This study is part of our ongoing efforts to map conformational changes in PPARs in solution by a combination of chemical cross-linking and mass spectrometry (MS). To our best knowledge, we performed the first studies addressing solution structures of full-length PPAR-β/δ. We monitored the conformations of the ligand-binding domain (LBD) as well as full-length PPAR-β/δ upon binding of two agonists. (Photo-) cross-linking relied on (i) a variety of externally introduced amine- and carboxyl-reactive linkers and (ii) the incorporation of the photo-reactive amino acid p-benzoylphenylalanine (Bpa) into PPAR-β/δ by genetic engineering. The distances derived from cross-linking experiments allowed us to monitor conformational changes in PPAR-β/δ upon ligand binding. The cross-linking/MS approach proved highly advantageous to study nuclear receptors, such as PPARs, and revealed the interplay between DBD (DNA-binding domain) and LDB in PPAR-β/δ. Our results indicate the stabilization of a specific conformation through ligand binding in PPAR-β/δ LBD as well as full-length PPAR-β/δ. Moreover, our results suggest a close distance between the N- and C-terminal regions of full-length PPAR-β/δ in the presence of GW1516. Chemical cross-linking/MS allowed us gaining detailed insights into conformational changes that are induced in PPARs when activating ligands are present. Thus, cross-linking/MS should be added to the arsenal of structural methods available for studying nuclear receptors. PMID:26992147

  19. Monitoring Solution Structures of Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor β/δ upon Ligand Binding

    PubMed Central

    Schwarz, Rico; Tänzler, Dirk; Ihling, Christian H.; Sinz, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) have been intensively studied as drug targets to treat type 2 diabetes, lipid disorders, and metabolic syndrome. This study is part of our ongoing efforts to map conformational changes in PPARs in solution by a combination of chemical cross-linking and mass spectrometry (MS). To our best knowledge, we performed the first studies addressing solution structures of full-length PPAR-β/δ. We monitored the conformations of the ligand-binding domain (LBD) as well as full-length PPAR-β/δ upon binding of two agonists. (Photo-) cross-linking relied on (i) a variety of externally introduced amine- and carboxyl-reactive linkers and (ii) the incorporation of the photo-reactive amino acid p-benzoylphenylalanine (Bpa) into PPAR-β/δ by genetic engineering. The distances derived from cross-linking experiments allowed us to monitor conformational changes in PPAR-β/δ upon ligand binding. The cross-linking/MS approach proved highly advantageous to study nuclear receptors, such as PPARs, and revealed the interplay between DBD (DNA-binding domain) and LDB in PPAR-β/δ. Our results indicate the stabilization of a specific conformation through ligand binding in PPAR-β/δ LBD as well as full-length PPAR-β/δ. Moreover, our results suggest a close distance between the N- and C-terminal regions of full-length PPAR-β/δ in the presence of GW1516. Chemical cross-linking/MS allowed us gaining detailed insights into conformational changes that are induced in PPARs when activating ligands are present. Thus, cross-linking/MS should be added to the arsenal of structural methods available for studying nuclear receptors. PMID:26992147

  20. Investigation of Ligand Binding to the Multidrug Resistance Protein EmrE by Isothermal Titration Calorimetry

    PubMed Central

    Sikora, Curtis W.; Turner, Raymond J.

    2005-01-01

    Escherichia coli multidrug resistance protein E (EmrE) is an integral membrane protein spanning the inner membrane of Escherichia coli that is responsible for this organism's resistance to a variety of lipophilic cations such as quaternary ammonium compounds (QACs) and interchelating dyes. EmrE is a 12-kDa protein of four transmembrane helices considered to be functional as a multimer. It is an efflux transporter that can bind and transport cytoplasmic QACs into the periplasm using the energy of the proton gradient across the inner membrane. Isothermal titration calorimetry provides information about the stoichiometry and thermodynamic properties of protein-ligand interactions, and can be used to monitor the binding of QACs to EmrE in different membrane mimetic environments. In this study the ligand binding to EmrE solubilized in dodecyl maltoside, sodium dodecyl sulfate and reconstituted into small unilamellar vesicles is examined by isothermal titration calorimetry. The binding stoichiometry of EmrE to drug was found to be 1:1, demonstrating that oligomerization of EmrE is not necessary for binding to drug. The binding of EmrE to drug was observed with the dissociation constant (KD) in the micromolar range for each of the drugs in any of the membrane mimetic environments. Thermodynamic properties demonstrated this interaction to be enthalpy-driven with similar enthalpies of 8–12 kcal/mol for each of the drugs in any of the membrane mimetics. PMID:15501941

  1. Investigation of ligand binding to the multidrug resistance protein EmrE by isothermal titration calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Sikora, Curtis W; Turner, Raymond J

    2005-01-01

    Escherichia coli multidrug resistance protein E (EmrE) is an integral membrane protein spanning the inner membrane of Escherichia coli that is responsible for this organism's resistance to a variety of lipophilic cations such as quaternary ammonium compounds (QACs) and interchelating dyes. EmrE is a 12-kDa protein of four transmembrane helices considered to be functional as a multimer. It is an efflux transporter that can bind and transport cytoplasmic QACs into the periplasm using the energy of the proton gradient across the inner membrane. Isothermal titration calorimetry provides information about the stoichiometry and thermodynamic properties of protein-ligand interactions, and can be used to monitor the binding of QACs to EmrE in different membrane mimetic environments. In this study the ligand binding to EmrE solubilized in dodecyl maltoside, sodium dodecyl sulfate and reconstituted into small unilamellar vesicles is examined by isothermal titration calorimetry. The binding stoichiometry of EmrE to drug was found to be 1:1, demonstrating that oligomerization of EmrE is not necessary for binding to drug. The binding of EmrE to drug was observed with the dissociation constant (K(D)) in the micromolar range for each of the drugs in any of the membrane mimetic environments. Thermodynamic properties demonstrated this interaction to be enthalpy-driven with similar enthalpies of 8-12 kcal/mol for each of the drugs in any of the membrane mimetics.

  2. A Prediction Method of Binding Free Energy of Protein and Ligand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Kun; Wang, Xicheng

    2010-05-01

    Predicting the binding free energy is an important problem in bimolecular simulation. Such prediction would be great benefit in understanding protein functions, and may be useful for computational prediction of ligand binding strengths, e.g., in discovering pharmaceutical drugs. Free energy perturbation (FEP)/thermodynamics integration (TI) is a classical method to explicitly predict free energy. However, this method need plenty of time to collect datum, and that attempts to deal with some simple systems and small changes of molecular structures. Another one for estimating ligand binding affinities is linear interaction energy (LIE) method. This method employs averages of interaction potential energy terms from molecular dynamics simulations or other thermal conformational sampling techniques. Incorporation of systematic deviations from electrostatic linear response, derived from free energy perturbation studies, into the absolute binding free energy expression significantly enhances the accuracy of the approach. However, it also is time-consuming work. In this paper, a new prediction method based on steered molecular dynamics (SMD) with direction optimization is developed to compute binding free energy. Jarzynski's equality is used to derive the PMF or free-energy. The results for two numerical examples are presented, showing that the method has good accuracy and efficiency. The novel method can also simulate whole binding proceeding and give some important structural information about development of new drugs.

  3. Ligand binding and proton exchange dynamics in site-specific mutants of human myoglobin

    SciTech Connect

    Lambright, D.G.

    1992-01-01

    Site specific mutagenesis was used to make substitutions of four residues in the distal heme pocket of human myoglobin: Val68, His64, Lys45, and Asp60. Strongly diffracting crystals of the conservative mutation K45R in the met aquo form were grown in the trigonal space group P3[sub 2]21 and the X-ray crystal structure determined at 1.6 [angstrom] resolution. The overall structure is similar to that of sperm whale met aquo myoglobin. Several of the mutant proteins were characterized by 2-D NMR spectroscopy. The NMR data suggest the structural changes are localized to the region of the mutation. The dynamics of ligand binding to myoglobin mutants were studied by transient absorption spectroscopy following photolysis of the CO complexes. Transient absorption kinetics and spectra on the ns to ms timescale were measured in aqueous solution from 280 K to 310 K and in 75% glycerol: water from 250 K to 310 K. Two significant basis spectra were obtained from singular value decomposition of the matrix of time dependent spectra. The information was used to obtain approximations for the extent of ligand rebinding and the kinetics of conformational relaxation. Except for K45R, substitutions at Lys45 or Asp60 produce changes in the kinetics for ligand rebinding. Replacement of Lys45 with Arg increases the rate of ligand rebinding from the protein matrix by a factor of 2, but does not alter the rates for ligand escape or entry into the protein or the dynamics of the conformational relaxation. Substitutions at His64 and Val68 influence the kinetics of ligand rebinding and the dynamics of conformational relaxation. The results do not support the hypothesis that ligand migration between the heme pocket and solvent is determined solely by fluctuations of Arg45 and His64 between open and closed conformations of the heme pocket but can be rationalized if ligand diffusion through the protein matrix involves multiple competing pathways.

  4. Unraveling the Conformational Landscape of Ligand Binding to Glucose/Galactose-Binding Protein by Paramagnetic NMR and MD Simulations.

    PubMed

    Unione, Luca; Ortega, Gabriel; Mallagaray, Alvaro; Corzana, Francisco; Pérez-Castells, Javier; Canales, Angeles; Jiménez-Barbero, Jesús; Millet, Oscar

    2016-08-19

    Protein dynamics related to function can nowadays be structurally well characterized (i.e., instances obtained by high resolution structures), but they are still ill-defined energetically, and the energy landscapes are only accessible computationally. This is the case for glucose-galactose binding protein (GGBP), where the crystal structures of the apo and holo states provide structural information for the domain rearrangement upon ligand binding, while the time scale and the energetic determinants for such concerted dynamics have been so far elusive. Here, we use GGBP as a paradigm to define a functional conformational landscape, both structurally and energetically, by using an innovative combination of paramagnetic NMR experiments and MD simulations. Anisotropic NMR parameters induced by self-alignment of paramagnetic metal ions was used to characterize the ensemble of conformations adopted by the protein in solution while the rate of interconversion between conformations was elucidated by long molecular dynamics simulation on two states of GGBP, the closed-liganded (holo_cl) and open-unloaded (apo_op) states. Our results demonstrate that, in its apo state, the protein coexists between open-like (68%) and closed-like (32%) conformations, with an exchange rate around 25 ns. Despite such conformational heterogeneity, the presence of the ligand is the ultimate driving force to unbalance the equilibrium toward the holo_cl form, in a mechanism largely governed by a conformational selection mechanism. PMID:27219646

  5. Alternative in vitro approach for assessing AHR-mediated CYP1A induction by dioxins in wild cormorant (Phalacrocorax carbo) population.

    PubMed

    Thuruthippallil, Leena Mol; Kubota, Akira; Kim, Eun-Young; Iwata, Hisato

    2013-06-18

    Our line of papers revealed that the common (great) cormorant (Phalacrocorax carbo) possesses two isoforms of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (ccAHR1 and ccAHR2). This paper addresses in vitro tests of the ccAHR signaling pathways to solve two questions: (1) whether there are functional differences in the two ccAHR isoforms, and (2) whether a molecular perturbation, cytochrome P450 1A (ccCYP1A) induction, in the population-level can be predicted from the in vitro tests. The transactivation potencies mediated by ccAHR1 and ccAHR2 were measured in COS-7 cells treated with 15 selected dioxins and related compounds (DRCs), where ccAHR1 or ccAHR2 expression plasmid and ccCYP1A5 promoter/enhancer-linked luciferase reporter plasmid were transfected. For congeners that exhibited dose-dependent luciferase activities, 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) relative potencies (REPs) and induction equivalency factors (IEFs) were estimated. ccAHR1-IEF profile was similar to WHO avian TCDD toxic equivalency factor (TEF) profile except for dioxin-like polychlorinated biphenyls that showed lower IEFs in ccAHR1-driven reporter assay. ccAHR2-IEF profile was different from WHO TEFs and ccAHR1-IEFs. Notably, 2,3,4,7,8-PeCDF was more potent than TCDD for ccAHR2-mediated response. Using ccAHR1- and ccAHR2-IEFs and hepatic DRC concentrations in the Lake Biwa cormorant population, total TCDD induction equivalents (IEQs) were calculated for each ccAHR-mediated response. Nonlinear regression analyses provided significant sigmoidal relationships of ccAHR1- and ccAHR2-derived IEQs with hepatic ccCYP1A5 mRNA levels, supporting the results of in vitro ccAHR-mediated TCDD dose-response curves. Collectively, our in vitro AHR reporter assay potentially could be an alternative to molecular epidemiology of the species of concern regarding CYP1A induction by AHR ligands. PMID:23676118

  6. Mixed-ligand copper(ii) Schiff base complexes: the role of the co-ligand in DNA binding, DNA cleavage, protein binding and cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Lian, Wen-Jing; Wang, Xin-Tian; Xie, Cheng-Zhi; Tian, He; Song, Xue-Qing; Pan, He-Ting; Qiao, Xin; Xu, Jing-Yuan

    2016-05-31

    Four novel mononuclear Schiff base copper(ii) complexes, namely, [Cu(L)(OAc)]·H2O (), [Cu(HL)(C2O4)(EtOH)]·EtOH (), [Cu(L)(Bza)] () and [Cu(L)(Sal)] () (HL = 1-(((2-((2-hydroxypropyl)amino)ethyl)imino)methyl)naphthalene-2-ol), Bza = benzoic acid, Sal = salicylic acid), were synthesized and characterized by X-ray crystallography, elemental analysis and infrared spectroscopy. Single-crystal diffraction analysis revealed that all the complexes were mononuclear molecules, in which the Schiff base ligand exhibited different coordination modes and conformations. The N-HO and O-HO inter- and intramolecular hydrogen bonding interactions linked these molecules into multidimensional networks. Their interactions with calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) were investigated by UV-visible and fluorescence spectrometry, as well as by viscosity measurements. The magnitude of the Kapp values of the four complexes was 10(5), indicating a moderate intercalative binding mode between the complexes and DNA. Electrophoresis results showed that all these complexes induced double strand breaks of pUC19 plasmid DNA in the presence of H2O2 through an oxidative pathway. In addition, the fluorescence spectrum of human serum albumin (HSA) with the complexes suggested that the quenching mechanism of HSA by the complexes was a static process. Moreover, the antiproliferative activity of the four complexes against HeLa (human cervical carcinoma) and HepG-2 (human liver hepatocellular carcinoma) cells evaluated by colorimetric cell proliferation assay and clonogenic assay revealed that all four complexes had improved cytotoxicity against cancer cells. Inspiringly, complex , with salicylic acid as the auxiliary ligand, displayed a stronger anticancer activity, suggesting that a synergistic effect of the Schiff base complex and the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug may be involved in the cell killing process. The biological features of mixed-ligand copper(ii) Schiff base complexes and how acetic auxiliary

  7. Generating new ligand-binding RNAs by affinity maturation and disintegration of allosteric ribozymes.

    PubMed Central

    Soukup, G A; DeRose, E C; Koizumi, M; Breaker, R R

    2001-01-01

    Allosteric ribozymes are engineered RNAs that operate as molecular switches whose rates of catalytic activity are modulated by the binding of specific effector molecules. New RNA molecular switches can be created by using "allosteric selection," a molecular engineering process that combines modular rational design and in vitro evolution strategies. In this report, we describe the characterization of 3',5'-cyclic nucleotide monophosphate (cNMP)-dependent hammerhead ribozymes that were created using allosteric selection (Koizumi et al., Nat Struct Biol, 1999, 6:1062-1071). Artificial phylogeny data generated by random mutagenesis and reselection of existing cGMP-, cCMP-, and cAMP-dependent ribozymes indicate that each is comprised of distinct effector-binding and catalytic domains. In addition, patterns of nucleotide covariation and direct mutational analysis both support distinct secondary-structure organizations for the effector-binding domains. Guided by these structural models, we were able to disintegrate each allosteric ribozyme into separate ligand-binding and catalytic modules. Examinations of the independent effector-binding domains reveal that each retains its corresponding cNMP-binding function. These results validate the use of allosteric selection and modular engineering as a means of simultaneously generating new nucleic acid structures that selectively bind ligands. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the binding affinity of an allosteric ribozyme can be improved through random mutagenesis and allosteric selection under conditions that favor tighter binding. This "affinity maturation" effect is expected to be a valuable attribute of allosteric selection as future endeavors seek to apply engineered allosteric ribozymes as biosensor components and as controllable genetic switches. PMID:11345431

  8. A microscopic insight from conformational thermodynamics to functional ligand binding in proteins.

    PubMed

    Sikdar, Samapan; Chakrabarti, J; Ghosh, Mahua

    2014-12-01

    We show that the thermodynamics of metal ion-induced conformational changes aid to understand the functions of protein complexes. This is illustrated in the case of a metalloprotein, alpha-lactalbumin (aLA), a divalent metal ion binding protein. We use the histograms of dihedral angles of the protein, generated from all-atom molecular dynamics simulations, to calculate conformational thermodynamics. The thermodynamically destabilized and disordered residues in different conformational states of a protein are proposed to serve as binding sites for ligands. This is tested for β-1,4-galactosyltransferase (β4GalT) binding to the Ca(2+)-aLA complex, in which the binding residues are known. Among the binding residues, the C-terminal residues like aspartate (D) 116, glutamine (Q) 117, tryptophan (W) 118 and leucine (L) 119 are destabilized and disordered and can dock β4GalT onto Ca(2+)-aLA. No such thermodynamically favourable binding residues can be identified in the case of the Mg(2+)-aLA complex. We apply similar analysis to oleic acid binding and predict that the Ca(2+)-aLA complex can bind to oleic acid through the basic histidine (H) 32 of the A2 helix and the hydrophobic residues, namely, isoleucine (I) 59, W60 and I95, of the interfacial cleft. However, the number of destabilized and disordered residues in Mg(2+)-aLA are few, and hence, the oleic acid binding to Mg(2+)-bound aLA is less stable than that to the Ca(2+)-aLA complex. Our analysis can be generalized to understand the functionality of other ligand bound proteins.

  9. Docking and DFT studies on ligand binding to Quercetin 2,3-dioxygenase.

    PubMed

    Malkhasian, Aramice Y S; Howlin, Brendan J

    2016-11-01

    Simple molecular docking calculations on quercetin, kojic acid and diethylcarbamatodithoic acid using the software package MOE are shown to be close to the geometries reported in the X-ray crystal structures of the protein co-crystallized with the respective ligands. Furthermore, DFT optimization of the docked conformations is shown to reproduce the essential features of previous studies on quercetin, showing that docking can be used to provide good starting structures for mechanistic study. The flavone ligand, lacking the hydroxyl group of the quercetin is shown by docking to be unable to approach closely the copper atom, indicating the necessity of the presence of the hydroxyl group and providing a prediction of the likely binding environment of this ligand.

  10. Peptides identify multiple hotspots within the ligand binding domain of the TNF receptor 2

    PubMed Central

    Hsiao, Ku-chuan; Brissette, Renee E; Wang, Pinger; Fletcher, Paul W; Rodriguez, Vanessa; Lennick, Michael; Blume, Arthur J; Goldstein, Neil I

    2003-01-01

    Background Hotspots are defined as the minimal functional domains involved in protein:protein interactions and sufficient to induce a biological response. Results Here we describe the use of complex and high diversity phage display libraries to isolate peptides (called Hotspot Ligands or HSPLs) which sub-divide the ligand binding domain of the tumor necrosis factor receptor 2 (TNFR2; p75) into multiple hotspots. We have shown that these libraries could generate HSPLs which not only subdivide hotspots on protein and non-protein targets but act as agonists or antagonists. Using this approach, we generated peptides which were specific for human TNFR2, could be competed by the natural ligands, TNFα and TNFβ and induced an unexpected biological response in a TNFR2-specific manner. Conclusions To our knowledge, this is the first report describing the dissection of the TNFR2 into biologically active hotspots with the concomitant identification of a novel and unexpected biological activity. PMID:12646066

  11. High throughput screening of ligand binding to macromolecules using high resolution powder diffraction

    DOEpatents

    Von Dreele, Robert B.; D'Amico, Kevin

    2006-10-31

    A process is provided for the high throughput screening of binding of ligands to macromolecules using high resolution powder diffraction data including producing a first sample slurry of a selected polycrystalline macromolecule material and a solvent, producing a second sample slurry of a selected polycrystalline macromolecule material, one or more ligands and the solvent, obtaining a high resolution powder diffraction pattern on each of said first sample slurry and the second sample slurry, and, comparing the high resolution powder diffraction pattern of the first sample slurry and the high resolution powder diffraction pattern of the second sample slurry whereby a difference in the high resolution powder diffraction patterns of the first sample slurry and the second sample slurry provides a positive indication for the formation of a complex between the selected polycrystalline macromolecule material and at least one of the one or more ligands.

  12. Mac-2 binding protein is a novel E-selectin ligand expressed by breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Shirure, Venktesh S; Reynolds, Nathan M; Burdick, Monica M

    2012-01-01

    Hematogenous metastasis involves the adhesion of circulating tumor cells to vascular endothelium of the secondary site. We hypothesized that breast cancer cell adhesion is mediated by interaction of endothelial E-selectin with its glycoprotein counter-receptor(s) expressed on breast cancer cells. At a hematogenous wall shear rate, ZR-75-1 breast cancer cells specifically adhered to E-selectin expressing human umbilical vein endothelial cells when tested in parallel plate flow chamber adhesion assays. Consistent with their E-selectin ligand activity, ZR-75-1 cells expressed flow cytometrically detectable epitopes of HECA-452 mAb, which recognizes high efficiency E-selectin ligands typified by sialofucosylated moieties. Multiple E-selectin reactive proteins expressed by ZR-75-1 cells were revealed by immunoprecipitation with E-selectin chimera (E-Ig chimera) followed by Western blotting. Mass spectrometry analysis of the 72 kDa protein, which exhibited the most prominent E-selectin ligand activity, corresponded to Mac-2 binding protein (Mac-2BP), a heretofore unidentified E-selectin ligand. Immunoprecipitated Mac-2BP expressed sialofucosylated epitopes and possessed E-selectin ligand activity when tested by Western blot analysis using HECA-452 mAb and E-Ig chimera, respectively, demonstrating that Mac-2BP is a novel high efficiency E-selectin ligand. Furthermore, silencing the expression of Mac-2BP from ZR-75-1 cells by shRNA markedly reduced their adhesion to E-selectin expressing cells under physiological flow conditions, confirming the functional E-selectin ligand activity of Mac-2BP on intact cells. In addition to ZR-75-1 cells, several other E-selectin ligand positive breast cancer cell lines expressed Mac-2BP as detected by Western blot and flow cytometry, suggesting that Mac-2BP may be an E-selectin ligand in a variety of breast cancer types. Further, invasive breast carcinoma tissue showed co-localized expression of Mac-2BP and HECA-452 antigens by

  13. Structural basis for the ligand-binding specificity of fatty acid-binding proteins (pFABP4 and pFABP5) in gentoo penguin.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chang Woo; Kim, Jung Eun; Do, Hackwon; Kim, Ryeo-Ok; Lee, Sung Gu; Park, Hyun Ho; Chang, Jeong Ho; Yim, Joung Han; Park, Hyun; Kim, Il-Chan; Lee, Jun Hyuck

    2015-09-11

    Fatty acid-binding proteins (FABPs) are involved in transporting hydrophobic fatty acids between various aqueous compartments of the cell by directly binding ligands inside their β-barrel cavities. Here, we report the crystal structures of ligand-unbound pFABP4, linoleate-bound pFABP4, and palmitate-bound pFABP5, obtained from gentoo penguin (Pygoscelis papua), at a resolution of 2.1 Å, 2.2 Å, and 2.3 Å, respectively. The pFABP4 and pFABP5 proteins have a canonical β-barrel structure with two short α-helices that form a cap region and fatty acid ligand binding sites in the hydrophobic cavity within the β-barrel structure. Linoleate-bound pFABP4 and palmitate-bound pFABP5 possess different ligand-binding modes and a unique ligand-binding pocket due to several sequence dissimilarities (A76/L78, T30/M32, underlining indicates pFABP4 residues) between the two proteins. Structural comparison revealed significantly different conformational changes in the β3-β4 loop region (residues 57-62) as well as the flipped Phe60 residue of pFABP5 than that in pFABP4 (the corresponding residue is Phe58). A ligand-binding study using fluorophore displacement assays shows that pFABP4 has a relatively strong affinity for linoleate as compared to pFABP5. In contrast, pFABP5 exhibits higher affinity for palmitate than that for pFABP4. In conclusion, our high-resolution structures and ligand-binding studies provide useful insights into the ligand-binding preferences of pFABPs based on key protein-ligand interactions.

  14. Binding constants of membrane-anchored receptors and ligands depend strongly on the nanoscale roughness of membranes.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jinglei; Lipowsky, Reinhard; Weikl, Thomas R

    2013-09-17

    Cell adhesion and the adhesion of vesicles to the membranes of cells or organelles are pivotal for immune responses, tissue formation, and cell signaling. The adhesion processes depend sensitively on the binding constant of the membrane-anchored receptor and ligand proteins that mediate adhesion, but this constant is difficult to measure in experiments. We have investigated the binding of membrane-anchored receptor and ligand proteins with molecular dynamics simulations. We find that the binding constant of the anchored proteins strongly decreases with the membrane roughness caused by thermally excited membrane shape fluctuations on nanoscales. We present a theory that explains the roughness dependence of the binding constant for the anchored proteins from membrane confinement and that relates this constant to the binding constant of soluble proteins without membrane anchors. Because the binding constant of soluble proteins is readily accessible in experiments, our results provide a useful route to compute the binding constant of membrane-anchored receptor and ligand proteins.

  15. Probing the mechanism of ligand recognition in family 29 carbohydrate-binding modules.

    PubMed

    Flint, James; Bolam, David N; Nurizzo, Didier; Taylor, Edward J; Williamson, Michael P; Walters, Christopher; Davies, Gideon J; Gilbert, Harry J

    2005-06-24

    The recycling of photosynthetically fixed carbon, by the action of microbial plant cell wall hydrolases, is integral to one of the major geochemical cycles and is of considerable industrial importance. Non-catalytic carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs) play a key role in this degradative process by targeting hydrolytic enzymes to their cognate substrate within the complex milieu of polysaccharides that comprise the plant cell wall. Family 29 CBMs have, thus far, only been found in an extracellular multienzyme plant cell wall-degrading complex from the anaerobic fungus Piromyces equi, where they exist as a CBM29-1:CBM29-2 tandem. Here we present both the structure of the CBM29-1 partner, at 1.5 A resolution, and examine the importance of hydrophobic stacking interactions as well as direct and solvent-mediated hydrogen bonds in the binding of CBM29-2 to different polysaccharides. CBM29 domains display unusual binding properties, exhibiting specificity for both beta-manno- and beta-gluco-configured ligands such as mannan, cellulose, and glucomannan. Mutagenesis reveals that "stacking" of tryptophan residues in the n and n+2 subsites plays a critical role in ligand binding, whereas the loss of tyrosine-mediated stacking in the n+4 subsite reduces, but does not abrogate, polysaccharide recognition. Direct hydrogen bonds to ligand, such as those provided by Arg-112 and Glu-78, play a pivotal role in the interaction with both mannan and cellulose, whereas removal of water-mediated interactions has comparatively little effect on carbohydrate binding. The interactions of CBM29-2 with the O2 of glucose or mannose contribute little to binding affinity, explaining why this CBM displays dual gluco/manno specificity. PMID:15784618

  16. Importance of Many-Body Effects in the Kernel of Hemoglobin for Ligand Binding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Cédric; O'Regan, David D.; Hine, Nicholas D. M.; Littlewood, Peter B.; Kotliar, Gabriel; Payne, Mike C.

    2013-03-01

    We propose a mechanism for binding of diatomic ligands to heme based on a dynamical orbital selection process. This scenario may be described as bonding determined by local valence fluctuations. We support this model using linear-scaling first-principles calculations, in combination with dynamical mean-field theory, applied to heme, the kernel of the hemoglobin metalloprotein central to human respiration. We find that variations in Hund’s exchange coupling induce a reduction of the iron 3d density, with a concomitant increase of valence fluctuations. We discuss the comparison between our computed optical absorption spectra and experimental data, our picture accounting for the observation of optical transitions in the infrared regime, and how the Hund’s coupling reduces, by a factor of 5, the strong imbalance in the binding energies of heme with CO and O2 ligands.

  17. Automate it: ligand-binding assay productivity in a discovery bioanalytical setting.

    PubMed

    Leung, Sheldon S; Dreher, Elizabeth A

    2013-07-01

    In multiple industries, including the biopharmaceutical industry, automation is synonymous with increased productivity. Environments with high-throughput needs commonly employ automation for efficiency. However, in a discovery bioanalytical ligand-binding assay laboratory setting where the focus is not necessarily on sample analysis throughput, but instead on assay development and characterization, is automation applicable? Can automation enhance productivity when tasks are more customized than routine? In this Perspective we review the different categories of automation with ligand-binding assays with these questions in mind. In considering whether automation technology has progressed far enough to result in a positive return in investment in the discovery setting, the resource investment required to operate in this space was contrasted with the gain in productivity. In our opinion, technology advancements in automated technology platforms, and especially personal automation, have allowed these categories to strike the right balance for investment in the discovery laboratory setting.

  18. Ligand-binding domains of nuclear receptors facilitate tight control of split CRISPR activity

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Duy P.; Miyaoka, Yuichiro; Gilbert, Luke A.; Mayerl, Steven J.; Lee, Brian H.; Weissman, Jonathan S.; Conklin, Bruce R.; Wells, James A.

    2016-01-01

    Cas9-based RNA-guided nuclease (RGN) has emerged to be a versatile method for genome editing due to the ease of construction of RGN reagents to target specific genomic sequences. The ability to control the activity of Cas9 with a high temporal resolution will facilitate tight regulation of genome editing processes for studying the dynamics of transcriptional regulation or epigenetic modifications in complex biological systems. Here we show that fusing ligand-binding domains of nuclear receptors to split Cas9 protein fragments can provide chemical control over split Cas9 activity. The method has allowed us to control Cas9 activity in a tunable manner with no significant background, which has been challenging for other inducible Cas9 constructs. We anticipate that our design will provide opportunities through the use of different ligand-binding domains to enable multiplexed genome regulation of endogenous genes in distinct loci through simultaneous chemical regulation of orthogonal Cas9 variants. PMID:27363581

  19. Nucleotide binding database NBDB – a collection of sequence motifs with specific protein-ligand interactions

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Zejun; Goncearenco, Alexander; Berezovsky, Igor N.

    2016-01-01

    NBDB database describes protein motifs, elementary functional loops (EFLs) that are involved in binding of nucleotide-containing ligands and other biologically relevant cofactors/coenzymes, including ATP, AMP, ATP, GMP, GDP, GTP, CTP, PAP, PPS, FMN, FAD(H), NAD(H), NADP, cAMP, cGMP, c-di-AMP and c-di-GMP, ThPP, THD, F-420, ACO, CoA, PLP and SAM. The database is freely available online at http://nbdb.bii.a-star.edu.sg. In total, NBDB contains data on 249 motifs that work in interactions with 24 ligands. Sequence profiles of EFL motifs were derived de novo from nonredundant Uniprot proteome sequences. Conserved amino acid residues in the profiles interact specifically with distinct chemical parts of nucleotide-containing ligands, such as nitrogenous bases, phosphate groups, ribose, nicotinamide, and flavin moieties. Each EFL profile in the database is characterized by a pattern of corresponding ligand–protein interactions found in crystallized ligand–protein complexes. NBDB database helps to explore the determinants of nucleotide and cofactor binding in different protein folds and families. NBDB can also detect fragments that match to profiles of particular EFLs in the protein sequence provided by user. Comprehensive information on sequence, structures, and interactions of EFLs with ligands provides a foundation for experimental and computational efforts on design of required protein functions. PMID:26507856

  20. Anthrax toxin lethal factor domain 3 is highly mobile and responsive to ligand binding

    PubMed Central

    Maize, Kimberly M.; Kurbanov, Elbek K.; De La Mora-Rey, Teresa; Geders, Todd W.; Hwang, Dong-Jin; Walters, Michael A.; Johnson, Rodney L.; Amin, Elizabeth A.; Finzel, Barry C.

    2014-01-01

    The secreted anthrax toxin consists of three components: the protective antigen (PA), edema factor (EF) and lethal factor (LF). LF, a zinc metalloproteinase, compromises the host immune system primarily by targeting mitogen-activated protein kinase kinases in macrophages. Peptide substrates and small-molecule inhibitors bind LF in the space between domains 3 and 4 of the hydrolase. Domain 3 is attached on a hinge to domain 2 via residues Ile300 and Pro385, and can move through an angular arc of greater than 35° in response to the binding of different ligands. Here, multiple LF structures including five new complexes with co-crystallized inhibitors are compared and three frequently populated LF conformational states termed ‘bioactive’, ‘open’ and ‘tight’ are identified. The bioactive position is observed with large substrate peptides and leaves all peptide-recognition subsites open and accessible. The tight state is seen in unliganded and small-molecule complex structures. In this state, domain 3 is clamped over certain substrate subsites, blocking access. The open position appears to be an intermediate state between these extremes and is observed owing to steric constraints imposed by specific bound ligands. The tight conformation may be the lowest-energy conformation among the reported structures, as it is the position observed with no bound ligand, while the open and bioactive conformations are likely to be ligand-induced. PMID:25372673

  1. Exhaustive comparison and classification of ligand-binding surfaces in proteins

    PubMed Central

    Murakami, Yoichi; Kinoshita, Kengo; Kinjo, Akira R; Nakamura, Haruki

    2013-01-01

    Many proteins function by interacting with other small molecules (ligands). Identification of ligand-binding sites (LBS) in proteins can therefore help to infer their molecular functions. A comprehensive comparison among local structures of LBSs was previously performed, in order to understand their relationships and to classify their structural motifs. However, similar exhaustive comparison among local surfaces of LBSs (patches) has never been performed, due to computational complexity. To enhance our understanding of LBSs, it is worth performing such comparisons among patches and classifying them based on similarities of their surface configurations and electrostatic potentials. In this study, we first developed a rapid method to compare two patches. We then clustered patches corresponding to the same PDB chemical component identifier for a ligand, and selected a representative patch from each cluster. We subsequently exhaustively as compared the representative patches and clustered them using similarity score, PatSim. Finally, the resultant PatSim scores were compared with similarities of atomic structures of the LBSs and those of the ligand-binding protein sequences and functions. Consequently, we classified the patches into ∼2000 well-characterized clusters. We found that about 63% of these clusters are used in identical protein folds, although about 25% of the clusters are conserved in distantly related proteins and even in proteins with cross-fold similarity. Furthermore, we showed that patches with higher PatSim score have potential to be involved in similar biological processes. PMID:23934772

  2. Regulation of neurexin 1beta tertiary structure and ligand binding through alternative splicing.

    PubMed

    Shen, Kaiser C; Kuczynska, Dorota A; Wu, Irene J; Murray, Beverly H; Sheckler, Lauren R; Rudenko, Gabby

    2008-03-01

    Neurexins and neuroligins play an essential role in synapse function, and their alterations are linked to autistic spectrum disorder. Interactions between neurexins and neuroligins regulate inhibitory and excitatory synaptogenesis in vitro through a "splice-insert signaling code." In particular, neurexin 1beta carrying an alternative splice insert at site SS#4 interacts with neuroligin 2 (found predominantly at inhibitory synapses) but much less so with other neuroligins (those carrying an insert at site B and prevalent at excitatory synapses). The structure of neurexin 1beta+SS#4 reveals dramatic rearrangements to the "hypervariable surface," the binding site for neuroligins. The splice insert protrudes as a long helix into space, triggers conversion of loop beta10-beta11 into a helix rearranging the binding site for neuroligins, and rearranges the Ca(2+)-binding site required for ligand binding, increasing its affinity. Our structures reveal the mechanism by which neurexin 1beta isoforms acquire neuroligin splice isoform selectivity.

  3. Peptide Ligand Structure and I-Aq Binding Avidity Influence T Cell Signaling Pathway Utilization

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Linda K; Cullins, David L; Park, Jeoung-Eun; Yi, Ae-Kyung; Brand, David D; Rosloniec, Edward F; Stuart, John M; Kang, Andrew H

    2015-01-01

    Factors that drive T cells to signal through differing pathways remain unclear. We have shown that an altered peptide ligand (A9) activates T cells to utilize an alternate signaling pathway which is dependent upon FcRγ and Syk. However, it remains unknown whether the affinity of peptide binding to MHC drives this selection. To answer this question we developed a panel of peptides designed so that amino acids interacting with the p6 and p9 predicted MHC binding pockets were altered. Analogs were tested for binding to I-Aq using a competitive binding assay and selected analogs were administered to arthritic mice. Using the collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) model, arthritis severity was correlated with T cell cytokine production and molecular T cell signaling responses. We establish that reduced affinity of interaction with the MHC correlates with T cell signaling through the alternative pathway, leading ultimately to secretion of suppressive cytokine and attenuation of arthritis. PMID:25982319

  4. Regulation of protein-ligand binding affinity by hydrogen bond pairing.

    PubMed

    Chen, Deliang; Oezguen, Numan; Urvil, Petri; Ferguson, Colin; Dann, Sara M; Savidge, Tor C

    2016-03-01

    Hydrogen (H)-bonds potentiate diverse cellular functions by facilitating molecular interactions. The mechanism and the extent to which H-bonds regulate molecular interactions are a largely unresolved problem in biology because the H-bonding process continuously competes with bulk water. This interference may significantly alter our understanding of molecular function, for example, in the elucidation of the origin of enzymatic catalytic power. We advance this concept by showing that H-bonds regulate molecular interactions via a hitherto unappreciated donor-acceptor pairing mechanism that minimizes competition with water. On the basis of theoretical and experimental correlations between H-bond pairings and their effects on ligand binding affinity, we demonstrate that H-bonds enhance receptor-ligand interactions when both the donor and acceptor have either significantly stronger or significantly weaker H-bonding capabilities than the hydrogen and oxygen atoms in water. By contrast, mixed strong-weak H-bond pairings decrease ligand binding affinity due to interference with bulk water, offering mechanistic insight into why indiscriminate strengthening of receptor-ligand H-bonds correlates poorly with experimental binding affinity. Further support for the H-bond pairing principle is provided by the discovery and optimization of lead compounds targeting dietary melamine and Clostridium difficile toxins, which are not realized by traditional drug design methods. Synergistic H-bond pairings have therefore evolved in the natural design of high-affinity binding and provide a new conceptual framework to evaluate the H-bonding process in biological systems. Our findings may also guide wider applications of competing H-bond pairings in lead compound design and in determining the origin of enzymatic catalytic power. PMID:27051863

  5. Regulation of protein-ligand binding affinity by hydrogen bond pairing

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Deliang; Oezguen, Numan; Urvil, Petri; Ferguson, Colin; Dann, Sara M.; Savidge, Tor C.

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen (H)-bonds potentiate diverse cellular functions by facilitating molecular interactions. The mechanism and the extent to which H-bonds regulate molecular interactions are a largely unresolved problem in biology because the H-bonding process continuously competes with bulk water. This interference may significantly alter our understanding of molecular function, for example, in the elucidation of the origin of enzymatic catalytic power. We advance this concept by showing that H-bonds regulate molecular interactions via a hitherto unappreciated donor-acceptor pairing mechanism that minimizes competition with water. On the basis of theoretical and experimental correlations between H-bond pairings and their effects on ligand binding affinity, we demonstrate that H-bonds enhance receptor-ligand interactions when both the donor and acceptor have either significantly stronger or significantly weaker H-bonding capabilities than the hydrogen and oxygen atoms in water. By contrast, mixed strong-weak H-bond pairings decrease ligand binding affinity due to interference with bulk water, offering mechanistic insight into why indiscriminate strengthening of receptor-ligand H-bonds correlates poorly with experimental binding affinity. Further support for the H-bond pairing principle is provided by the discovery and optimization of lead compounds targeting dietary melamine and Clostridium difficile toxins, which are not realized by traditional drug design methods. Synergistic H-bond pairings have therefore evolved in the natural design of high-affinity binding and provide a new conceptual framework to evaluate the H-bonding process in biological systems. Our findings may also guide wider applications of competing H-bond pairings in lead compound design and in determining the origin of enzymatic catalytic power. PMID:27051863

  6. Crystal structures of Bbp from Staphylococcus aureus reveal the ligand binding mechanism with Fibrinogen α.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xinyue; Wu, Meng; Zhuo, Wei; Gu, Jinke; Zhang, Sensen; Ge, Jingpeng; Yang, Maojun

    2015-10-01

    Bone sialoprotein-binding protein (Bbp), a MSCRAMMs (Microbial Surface Components Recognizing Adhesive Matrix Molecules) family protein expressed on the surface of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus), mediates adherence to fibrinogen α (Fg α), a component in the extracellular matrix of the host cell and is important for infection and pathogenesis. In this study, we solved the crystal structures of apo-Bbp(273-598) and Bbp(273-598)-Fg α(561-575) complex at a resolution of 2.03 Å and 1.45 Å, respectively. Apo-Bbp(273-598) contained the ligand binding region N2 and N3 domains, both of which followed a DE variant IgG fold characterized by an additional D1 strand in N2 domain and D1' and D2' strands in N3 domain. The peptide mapped to the Fg α(561-575) bond to Bbp(273-598) on the open groove between the N2 and N3 domains. Strikingly, the disordered C-terminus in the apo-form reorganized into a highly-ordered loop and a β-strand G'' covering the ligand upon ligand binding. Bbp(Ala298-Gly301) in the N2 domain of the Bbp(273-598)-Fg α(561-575) complex, which is a loop in the apo-form, formed a short α-helix to interact tightly with the peptide. In addition, Bbp(Ser547-Gln561) in the N3 domain moved toward the binding groove to make contact directly with the peptide, while Bbp(Asp338-Gly355) and Bbp(Thr365-Tyr387) in N2 domain shifted their configurations to stabilize the reorganized C-terminus mainly through strong hydrogen bonds. Altogether, our results revealed the molecular basis for Bbp-ligand interaction and advanced our understanding of S. aureus infection process. PMID:26349459

  7. Benzene Probes in Molecular Dynamics Simulations Reveal Novel Binding Sites for Ligand Design.

    PubMed

    Tan, Yaw Sing; Reeks, Judith; Brown, Christopher J; Thean, Dawn; Ferrer Gago, Fernando Jose; Yuen, Tsz Ying; Goh, Eunice Tze Leng; Lee, Xue Er Cheryl; Jennings, Claire E; Joseph, Thomas L; Lakshminarayanan, Rajamani; Lane, David P; Noble, Martin E M; Verma, Chandra S

    2016-09-01

    Protein flexibility poses a major challenge in binding site identification. Several computational pocket detection methods that utilize small-molecule probes in molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have been developed to address this issue. Although they have proven hugely successful at reproducing experimental structural data, their ability to predict new binding sites that are yet to be identified and characterized has not been demonstrated. Here, we report the use of benzenes as probe molecules in ligand-mapping MD (LMMD) simulations to predict the existence of two novel binding sites on the surface of the oncoprotein MDM2. One of them was serendipitously confirmed by biophysical assays and X-ray crystallography to be important for the binding of a new family of hydrocarbon stapled peptides that were specifically designed to target the other putative site. These results highlight the predictive power of LMMD and suggest that predictions derived from LMMD simulations can serve as a reliable basis for the identification of novel ligand binding sites in structure-based drug design. PMID:27532490

  8. Competitive interactions of ligands and macromolecular crowders with maltose binding protein.

    PubMed

    Miklos, Andrew C; Sumpter, Matthew; Zhou, Huan-Xiang

    2013-01-01

    Cellular signaling involves a cascade of recognition events occurring in a complex environment with high concentrations of proteins, polysaccharides, and other macromolecules. The influence of macromolecular crowders on protein binding affinity through hard-core repulsion is well studied, and possible contributions of protein-crowder soft attraction have been implicated recently. Here we present direct evidence for weak association of maltose binding protein (MBP) with a polysaccharide crowder Ficoll, and that this association effectively competes with the binding of the natural ligand, maltose. Titration data over wide ranges of maltose and Ficoll concentrations fit well with a three-state competitive binding model. Broadening of MBP (1)H-(15)N TROSY spectra by the addition of Ficoll indicates weak protein-crowder association, and subsequent recovery of sharp NMR peaks upon addition of maltose indicates that the interactions of the crowder and the ligand with MBP are competitive. We hypothesize that, in the Escherichia coli periplasm, the competitive interactions of polysaccharides and maltose with MBP could allow MBP to shuttle between the peptidoglycan attached to the outer membrane and the ATP-binding cassette transporter in the inner membrane.

  9. Ligand Binding to the Androgen Receptor Induces Conformational Changes That Regulate Phosphatase Interactions▿

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chun-Song; Xin, Hong-Wu; Kelley, Joshua B.; Spencer, Adam; Brautigan, David L.; Paschal, Bryce M.

    2007-01-01

    We describe a mechanism for protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) targeting to the androgen receptor (AR) and provide insight into the more general issue of kinase and phosphatase interactions with AR. Simian virus 40 (SV40) small t antigen (ST) binding to N-terminal HEAT repeats in the PP2A A subunit induces structural changes transduced to C-terminal HEAT repeats. This enables the C-terminal HEAT repeats in the PP2A A subunit, including HEAT repeat 13, to discriminate between androgen- and androgen antagonist-induced AR conformations. The PP2A-AR interaction was used to show that an AR mutant in prostate cancer cells (T877A) is activated by multiple ligands without acquiring the same conformation as that induced by androgen. The correlation between androgen binding to AR and increased phosphorylation of the activation function 1 (AF-1) region implies that changes in AR conformation or chaperone composition are causal to kinase access to phosphorylation sites. However, AF-1 phosphorylation sites are kinase accessible prior to androgen binding. This suggests that androgens can enhance the phosphorylation state of AR either by negatively regulating the ability of the ligand-binding domain to bind phosphatases or by inducing an AR conformation that is resistant to phosphatase action. SV40 ST subverts this mechanism by promoting the direct transfer of PP2A onto androgen-bound AR, resulting in multisite dephosphorylation. PMID:17325038

  10. Competition between transferrin and the serum ligands citrate and phosphate for the binding of aluminum.

    PubMed

    Harris, Wesley R; Wang, Zhepeng; Hamada, Yahia Z

    2003-05-19

    A key issue regarding the speciation of Al(3+) in serum is how well the ligands citric acid and phosphate can compete with the iron transport protein serum transferrin for the aluminum. Previous studies have attempted to measure binding constants for each ligand separately, but experimental problems make it very difficult to obtain stability constants with the accuracy required to make a meaningful comparison between these ligands. In this study, effective binding constants for Al-citrate and Al-phosphate at pH 7.4 have been determined using difference UV spectroscopy to monitor the direct competition between these ligands and transferrin. The analysis of this competition equilibrium also includes the binding of citrate and phosphate as anions to apotransferrin. The effective binding constants are 10(11.59) for the 1:1 Al-citrate complexes and 10(14.90) for the 1:2 Al-citrate complexes. The effective binding constant for the 1:2 Al-phosphate complex is 10(12.02). No 1:1 Al-phosphate complex was detected. Speciation calculations based on these effective binding constants indicate that, at serum concentrations of citrate and phosphate, citrate will be the primary low-molecular-mass ligand for aluminum. Formal stability constants for the Al-citrate system have also been determined by potentiometric methods. This equilibrium system is quite complex, and information from both electrospray mass spectrometry and difference UV experiments has been used to select the best model for fitting the potentiometric data. The mass spectra contain peaks that have been assigned to complexes having aluminum:citrate stoichiometries of 1:1, 1:2, 2:2, 2:3, and 3:3. The difference UV results were used to determine the stability constant for Al(H(-1)cta)-, which was then used in the least-squares fitting of the potentiometric data to determine stability constants for Al(Hcta)+, Al(cta), Al(cta)2(3-), Al(H(-1)cta)(cta)(4-), Al2(H(-1)cta)2(2-), and Al3(H(-1)cta)3(OH)(4-).

  11. Ligand binding-dependent functions of the lipocalin NLaz: an in vivo study in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Mario; Ganfornina, Maria D; Correnti, Colin; Strong, Roland K; Sanchez, Diego

    2014-04-01

    Lipocalins are small extracellular proteins mostly described as lipid carriers. The Drosophila lipocalin NLaz (neural Lazarillo) modulates the IIS pathway and regulates longevity, stress resistance, and behavior. Here, we test whether a native hydrophobic pocket structure is required for NLaz to perform its functions. We use a point mutation altering the binding pocket (NLaz(L130R)) and control mutations outside NLaz binding pocket. Tryptophan fluorescence titration reveals that NLaz(L130R) loses its ability to bind ergosterol and the pheromone 7(z)-tricosene but retains retinoic acid binding. Using site-directed transgenesis in Drosophila, we test the functionality of the ligand binding-altered lipocalin at the organism level. NLaz-dependent life span reduction, oxidative stress and starvation sensitivity, aging markers accumulation, and deficient courtship are rescued by overexpression of NLaz(WT), but not of NLaz(L130R). Transcriptional responses to aging and oxidative stress show a large set of age-responsive genes dependent on the integrity of NLaz binding pocket. Inhibition of IIS activity and modulation of oxidative stress and infection-responsive genes are binding pocket-dependent processes. Control of energy metabolites on starvation appears to be, however, insensitive to the modification of the NLaz binding pocket. PMID:24361577

  12. Ligand binding-dependent functions of the lipocalin NLaz: an in vivo study in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Mario; Ganfornina, Maria D; Correnti, Colin; Strong, Roland K; Sanchez, Diego

    2014-04-01

    Lipocalins are small extracellular proteins mostly described as lipid carriers. The Drosophila lipocalin NLaz (neural Lazarillo) modulates the IIS pathway and regulates longevity, stress resistance, and behavior. Here, we test whether a native hydrophobic pocket structure is required for NLaz to perform its functions. We use a point mutation altering the binding pocket (NLaz(L130R)) and control mutations outside NLaz binding pocket. Tryptophan fluorescence titration reveals that NLaz(L130R) loses its ability to bind ergosterol and the pheromone 7(z)-tricosene but retains retinoic acid binding. Using site-directed transgenesis in Drosophila, we test the functionality of the ligand binding-altered lipocalin at the organism level. NLaz-dependent life span reduction, oxidative stress and starvation sensitivity, aging markers accumulation, and deficient courtship are rescued by overexpression of NLaz(WT), but not of NLaz(L130R). Transcriptional responses to aging and oxidative stress show a large set of age-responsive genes dependent on the integrity of NLaz binding pocket. Inhibition of IIS activity and modulation of oxidative stress and infection-responsive genes are binding pocket-dependent processes. Control of energy metabolites on starvation appears to be, however, insensitive to the modification of the NLaz binding pocket.

  13. The Quantum Nature of Drug-Receptor Interactions: Deuteration Changes Binding Affinities for Histamine Receptor Ligands

    PubMed Central

    Repič, Matej; Zakšek, Maja; Kotnik, Kristina; Fijan, Estera; Mavri, Janez

    2016-01-01

    In this article we report a combined experimental and computational study concerning the effects of deuteration on the binding of histamine and two other histaminergic agonists to 3H-tiotidine-labeled histamine H2 receptor in neonatal rat astrocytes. Binding affinities were measured by displacing radiolabeled tiotidine from H2 receptor binding sites present on cultured neonatal rat astrocytes. Quantum-chemical calculations were performed by employing the empirical quantization of nuclear motion within a cluster model of the receptor binding site extracted from the homology model of the entire H2 receptor. Structure of H2 receptor built by homology modelling is attached in the supporting information (S1 Table) Experiments clearly demonstrate that deuteration affects the binding by increasing the affinity for histamine and reducing it for 2-methylhistamine, while basically leaving it unchanged for 4-methylhistamine. Ab initio quantum-chemical calculations on the cluster system extracted from the homology H2 model along with the implicit quantization of the acidic N–H and O–H bonds demonstrate that these changes in the binding can be rationalized by the altered strength of the hydrogen bonding upon deuteration known as the Ubbelohde effect. Our computational analysis also reveals a new mechanism of histamine binding, which underlines an important role of Tyr250 residue. The present work is, to our best knowledge, the first study of nuclear quantum effects on ligand receptor binding. The ligand H/D substitution is relevant for therapy in the context of perdeuterated and thus more stable drugs that are expected to enter therapeutic practice in the near future. Moreover, presented approach may contribute towards understanding receptor activation, while a distant goal remains in silico discrimination between agonists and antagonists based on the receptor structure. PMID:27159606

  14. The Quantum Nature of Drug-Receptor Interactions: Deuteration Changes Binding Affinities for Histamine Receptor Ligands.

    PubMed

    Kržan, Mojca; Vianello, Robert; Maršavelski, Aleksandra; Repič, Matej; Zakšek, Maja; Kotnik, Kristina; Fijan, Estera; Mavri, Janez

    2016-01-01

    In this article we report a combined experimental and computational study concerning the effects of deuteration on the binding of histamine and two other histaminergic agonists to 3H-tiotidine-labeled histamine H2 receptor in neonatal rat astrocytes. Binding affinities were measured by displacing radiolabeled tiotidine from H2 receptor binding sites present on cultured neonatal rat astrocytes. Quantum-chemical calculations were performed by employing the empirical quantization of nuclear motion within a cluster model of the receptor binding site extracted from the homology model of the entire H2 receptor. Structure of H2 receptor built by homology modelling is attached in the supporting information (S1 Table) Experiments clearly demonstrate that deuteration affects the binding by increasing the affinity for histamine and reducing it for 2-methylhistamine, while basically leaving it unchanged for 4-methylhistamine. Ab initio quantum-chemical calculations on the cluster system extracted from the homology H2 model along with the implicit quantization of the acidic N-H and O-H bonds demonstrate that these changes in the binding can be rationalized by the altered strength of the hydrogen bonding upon deuteration known as the Ubbelohde effect. Our computational analysis also reveals a new mechanism of histamine binding, which underlines an important role of Tyr250 residue. The present work is, to our best knowledge, the first study of nuclear quantum effects on ligand receptor binding. The ligand H/D substitution is relevant for therapy in the context of perdeuterated and thus more stable drugs that are expected to enter therapeutic practice in the near future. Moreover, presented approach may contribute towards understanding receptor activation, while a distant goal remains in silico discrimination between agonists and antagonists based on the receptor structure. PMID:27159606

  15. An ELISA Based Binding and Competition Method to Rapidly Determine Ligand-receptor Interactions.

    PubMed

    Syedbasha, Mohameedyaseen; Linnik, Janina; Santer, Deanna; O'Shea, Daire; Barakat, Khaled; Joyce, Michael; Khanna, Nina; Tyrrell, D Lorne; Houghton, Michael; Egli, Adrian

    2016-01-01

    A comprehensive understanding of signaling pathways requires detailed knowledge regarding ligand-receptor interaction. This article describes two fast and reliable point-by-point protocols of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) for the investigation of ligand-receptor interactions: the direct ligand-receptor interaction assay (LRA) and the competition LRA. As a case study, the ELISA based analysis of the interaction between different lambda interferons (IFNLs) and the alpha subunit of their receptor (IL28RA) is presented: the direct LRA is used for the determination of dissociation constants (KD values) between receptor and IFN ligands, and the competition LRA for the determination of the inhibitory capacity of an oligopeptide, which was designed to compete with the IFNLs at their receptor binding site. Analytical steps to estimate KD and half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) values are described. Finally, the discussion highlights advantages and disadvantages of the presented method and how the results enable a better molecular understanding of ligand-receptor interactions.

  16. Determining force dependence of two-dimensional receptor-ligand binding affinity by centrifugation.

    PubMed Central

    Piper, J W; Swerlick, R A; Zhu, C

    1998-01-01

    Analyses of receptor-ligand interactions are important to the understanding of cellular adhesion. Traditional methods of measuring the three-dimensional (3D) dissociation constant (Kd) require at least one of the molecular species in solution and hence cannot be directly applied to the case of cell adhesion. We describe a novel method of measuring 2D binding characteristics of receptors and ligands that are attached to surfaces and whose bonds are subjected to forces. The method utilizes a common centrifugation assay to quantify adhesion. A model for the experiment has been formulated, solved exactly, and tested carefully. The model is stochastically based and couples the bond force to the binding affinity. The method was applied to examine tumor cell adherence to recombinant E-selectin. Satisfactory agreement was found between predictions and data. The estimated zero-force 2D Kd for E-selectin/carbohydrate ligand binding was approximately 5 x 10(3) microm(-2), and the bond interaction range was subangstrom. Our results also suggest that the number of bonds mediating adhesion was small (<5). PMID:9449350

  17. Relationships of ligand binding, redox properties, and protonation in Coprinus cinereus peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Ciaccio, Chiara; Rosati, Antonella; De Sanctis, Giampiero; Sinibaldi, Federica; Marini, Stefano; Santucci, Roberto; Ascenzi, Paolo; Welinder, Karen G; Coletta, Massimo

    2003-05-23

    The pH dependence of the redox potentials and kinetics for CO association and dissociation was determined between pH 3.0 and 13.0 at 25 degrees C for the wild-type Coprinus cinereus fungal peroxidase and for a site-directed mutant in which Asp245, which is H-bonded to N delta of the imidazole of the proximal His183, was substituted with Asn. The determination of these functional properties allowed this information to be merged in a self-consistent fashion and to formulate for the first time a complete scheme employing the minimum number of groups required to describe the whole proton-linked behavior of both redox and ligand binding properties. The overall pH dependence can be accounted for by four redox- and ligand-linked groups. The proximal H-bond, which is strictly conserved in all peroxidases, will still be present in the site-specific mutant, but will no longer have an ionic character, and this event will bring about an alteration of redox equilibria and CO binding kinetics, envisaging a relevant role played by this H-bond also in modulating redox properties and ligand binding equilibria.

  18. Predicting Ligand Binding Sites on Protein Surfaces by 3-Dimensional Probability Density Distributions of Interacting Atoms

    PubMed Central

    Jian, Jhih-Wei; Elumalai, Pavadai; Pitti, Thejkiran; Wu, Chih Yuan; Tsai, Keng-Chang; Chang, Jeng-Yih; Peng, Hung-Pin; Yang, An-Suei

    2016-01-01

    Predicting ligand binding sites (LBSs) on protein structures, which are obtained either from experimental or computational methods, is a useful first step in functional annotation or structure-based drug design for the protein structures. In this work, the structure-based machine learning algorithm ISMBLab-LIG was developed to predict LBSs on protein surfaces with input attributes derived from the three-dimensional probability density maps of interacting atoms, which were reconstructed on the query protein surfaces and were relatively insensitive to local conformational variations of the tentative ligand binding sites. The prediction accuracy of the ISMBLab-LIG predictors is comparable to that of the best LBS predictors benchmarked on several well-established testing datasets. More importantly, the ISMBLab-LIG algorithm has substantial tolerance to the prediction uncertainties of computationally derived protein structure models. As such, the method is particularly useful for predicting LBSs not only on experimental protein structures without known LBS templates in the database but also on computationally predicted model protein structures with structural uncertainties in the tentative ligand binding sites. PMID:27513851

  19. Proteins and Their Interacting Partners: An Introduction to Protein–Ligand Binding Site Prediction Methods

    PubMed Central

    Roche, Daniel Barry; Brackenridge, Danielle Allison; McGuffin, Liam James

    2015-01-01

    Elucidating the biological and biochemical roles of proteins, and subsequently determining their interacting partners, can be difficult and time consuming using in vitro and/or in vivo methods, and consequently the majority of newly sequenced proteins will have unknown structures and functions. However, in silico methods for predicting protein–ligand binding sites and protein biochemical functions offer an alternative practical solution. The characterisation of protein–ligand binding sites is essential for investigating new functional roles, which can impact the major biological research spheres of health, food, and energy security. In this review we discuss the role in silico methods play in 3D modelling of protein–ligand binding sites, along with their role in predicting biochemical functionality. In addition, we describe in detail some of the key alternative in silico prediction approaches that are available, as well as discussing the Critical Assessment of Techniques for Protein Structure Prediction (CASP) and the Continuous Automated Model EvaluatiOn (CAMEO) projects, and their impact on developments in the field. Furthermore, we discuss the importance of protein function prediction methods for tackling 21st century problems. PMID:26694353

  20. Allosteric modulation of ligand binding to [3H](+)pentazocine-defined sigma recognition sites by phenytoin.

    PubMed

    DeHaven-Hudkins, D L; Ford-Rice, F Y; Allen, J T; Hudkins, R L

    1993-01-01

    The allosteric modulation of sigma recognition sites by phenytoin (diphenylhydantoin) has been demonstrated by the ability of phenytoin to stimulate binding of various [3H] sigma ligands, as well as to slow dissociation from sigma sites and to shift sigma sites from a low- to a high-affinity state. Phenytoin stimulated the binding of the sigma 1- selective ligand [3H](+)pentazocine in a dose-dependent manner. Stimulation of binding at a final concentration of 250 microM phenytoin was associated with a decrease in the KD. The affinities of the sigma reference compounds caramiphen, dextromethorphan, dextrophan, (+)3-PPP and (+)SKF-10,047 were three- to eight-fold higher, while the affinities of benzetimide, BMY-14802, carbetapentane, DTG and haloperidol were unchanged in the presence of 250 microM phenytoin. The relative sensitivity of sigma compounds to allosteric modulation by phenytoin is not a property of all sigma ligands, and may provide an in vitro basis for distinguishing actions of sigma compounds and predicting sigma effects in vivo. PMID:8515681

  1. Proteins and Their Interacting Partners: An Introduction to Protein-Ligand Binding Site Prediction Methods.

    PubMed

    Roche, Daniel Barry; Brackenridge, Danielle Allison; McGuffin, Liam James

    2015-12-15

    Elucidating the biological and biochemical roles of proteins, and subsequently determining their interacting partners, can be difficult and time consuming using in vitro and/or in vivo methods, and consequently the majority of newly sequenced proteins will have unknown structures and functions. However, in silico methods for predicting protein-ligand binding sites and protein biochemical functions offer an alternative practical solution. The characterisation of protein-ligand binding sites is essential for investigating new functional roles, which can impact the major biological research spheres of health, food, and energy security. In this review we discuss the role in silico methods play in 3D modelling of protein-ligand binding sites, along with their role in predicting biochemical functionality. In addition, we describe in detail some of the key alternative in silico prediction approaches that are available, as well as discussing the Critical Assessment of Techniques for Protein Structure Prediction (CASP) and the Continuous Automated Model EvaluatiOn (CAMEO) projects, and their impact on developments in the field. Furthermore, we discuss the importance of protein function prediction methods for tackling 21st century problems.

  2. A novel mechanism of ligand binding and release in the odorant binding protein 20 from the malaria mosquito Anopheles gambiae

    PubMed Central

    Ziemba, Brian P; Murphy, Emma J; Edlin, Hannah T; Jones, David N M

    2013-01-01

    Anopheles gambiae mosquitoes that transmit malaria are attracted to humans by the odor molecules that emanate from skin and sweat. Odorant binding proteins (OBPs) are the first component of the olfactory apparatus to interact with odorant molecules, and so present potential targets for preventing transmission of malaria by disrupting the normal olfactory responses of the insect. AgamOBP20 is one of a limited subset of OBPs that it is preferentially expressed in female mosquitoes and its expression is regulated by blood feeding and by the day/night light cycles that correlate with blood-feeding behavior. Analysis of AgamOBP20 in solution reveals that the apo-protein exhibits significant conformational heterogeneity but the binding of odorant molecules results in a significant conformational change, which is accompanied by a reduction in the conformational flexibility present in the protein. Crystal structures of the free and bound states reveal a novel pathway for entrance and exit of odorant molecules into the central-binding pocket, and that the conformational changes associated with ligand binding are a result of rigid body domain motions in α-helices 1, 4, and 5, which act as lids to the binding pocket. These structures provide new insights into the specific residues involved in the conformational adaptation to different odorants and have important implications in the selection and development of reagents targeted at disrupting normal OBP function. PMID:23081820

  3. Structure-Based Analysis of the Ligand-Binding Mechanism for DhelOBP21, a C-minus Odorant Binding Protein, from Dastarcus helophoroides (Fairmaire; Coleoptera: Bothrideridae)

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dong-Zhen; Yu, Guang-Qiang; Yi, Shan-Cheng; Zhang, Yinan; Kong, De-Xin; Wang, Man-Qun

    2015-01-01

    Odorant binding proteins (OBPs) transport hydrophobic odor molecules across the sensillar lymph to trigger a neuronal response. Herein, the Minus-C OBP (DhelOBP21) was characterized from Dastarcus helophoroides, the most important natural parasitic enemy insect that targets Monochamus alternatus. Homology modeling and molecular docking were conducted on the interaction between DhelOBP21 and 17 volatile molecules (including volatiles from pine bark, the larva of M. alternatus, and the faeces of the larva). The predicted three-dimensional structure showed only two disulfide bridges and a hydrophobic binding cavity with a short C-terminus. Ligand-binding experiments using N-phenylnaphthylamine (1-NPN) as a fluorescent probe showed that DhelOBP21 exhibited better binding affinities against those ligands with a molecular volume between 100 and 125 ų compared with ligands with a molecular volume between 160 and 185 ų. Molecules that are too big or too small are not conducive for binding. We mutated the amino acid residues of the binding cavity to increase either hydrophobicity or hydrophilia. Ligand-binding experiments and cyber molecular docking assays indicated that hydrophobic interactions are more significant than hydrogen-bonding interactions. Although hydrogen-bond interactions could be predicted for some binding complexes, the hydrophobic interactions had more influence on binding following hydrophobic changes that affected the cavity. The orientation of ligands affects binding by influencing hydrophobic interactions. The binding process is controlled by multiple factors. This study provides a basis to explore the ligand-binding mechanisms of Minus-C OBP. PMID:26435694

  4. Structure-Based Analysis of the Ligand-Binding Mechanism for DhelOBP21, a C-minus Odorant Binding Protein, from Dastarcus helophoroides (Fairmaire; Coleoptera: Bothrideridae).

    PubMed

    Li, Dong-Zhen; Yu, Guang-Qiang; Yi, Shan-Cheng; Zhang, Yinan; Kong, De-Xin; Wang, Man-Qun

    2015-01-01

    Odorant binding proteins (OBPs) transport hydrophobic odor molecules across the sensillar lymph to trigger a neuronal response. Herein, the Minus-C OBP (DhelOBP21) was characterized from Dastarcus helophoroides, the most important natural parasitic enemy insect that targets Monochamus alternatus. Homology modeling and molecular docking were conducted on the interaction between DhelOBP21 and 17 volatile molecules (including volatiles from pine bark, the larva of M. alternatus, and the faeces of the larva). The predicted three-dimensional structure showed only two disulfide bridges and a hydrophobic binding cavity with a short C-terminus. Ligand-binding experiments using N-phenylnaphthylamine (1-NPN) as a fluorescent probe showed that DhelOBP21 exhibited better binding affinities against those ligands with a molecular volume between 100 and 125 Å(³) compared with ligands with a molecular volume between 160 and 185 Å(³). Molecules that are too big or too small are not conducive for binding. We mutated the amino acid residues of the binding cavity to increase either hydrophobicity or hydrophilia. Ligand-binding experiments and cyber molecular docking assays indicated that hydrophobic interactions are more significant than hydrogen-bonding interactions. Although hydrogen-bond interactions could be predicted for some binding complexes, the hydrophobic interactions had more influence on binding following hydrophobic changes that affected the cavity. The orientation of ligands affects binding by influencing hydrophobic interactions. The binding process is controlled by multiple factors. This study provides a basis to explore the ligand-binding mechanisms of Minus-C OBP. PMID:26435694

  5. Cooperative and noncooperative binding of protein ligands to nucleic acid lattices: experimental approaches to the determination of thermodynamic parameters.

    PubMed

    Kowalczykowski, S C; Paul, L S; Lonberg, N; Newport, J W; McSwiggen, J A; von Hippel, P H

    1986-03-25

    Many biologically important proteins bind nonspecifically, and often cooperatively, to single-or double-stranded nucleic acid lattices in discharging their physiological functions. This binding can generally be described in thermodynamic terms by three parameters: n, the binding site size; K, the intrinsic binding constant; omega, the binding cooperativity parameter. The experimental determination of these parameters often appears to be straightforward but can be fraught with conceptual and methodological difficulties that may not be readily apparent. In this paper we describe and analyze a number of approaches that can be used to measure these protein-nucleic acid interaction parameters and illustrate these methods with experiments on the binding of T4-coded gene 32 (single-stranded DNA binding) protein to various nucleic acid lattices. We consider the following procedures: (i) the titration of a fixed amount of lattice (nucleic acid) with added ligand (protein); (ii) the titration of a fixed amount of ligand with added lattice; (iii) the determination of ligand binding affinities at very low levels of lattice saturation; (iv) the analysis of ligand cluster size distribution on the lattice; (v) the analysis of ligand binding to lattices of finite length. The applicability and limitations of each approach are considered and discussed, and potential pitfalls are explicitly pointed out.

  6. Insights on Structural Characteristics and Ligand Binding Mechanisms of CDK2

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yan; Zhang, Jingxiao; Gao, Weimin; Zhang, Lilei; Pan, Yanqiu; Zhang, Shuwei; Wang, Yonghua

    2015-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2) is a crucial regulator of the eukaryotic cell cycle. However it is well established that monomeric CDK2 lacks regulatory activity, which needs to be aroused by its positive regulators, cyclins E and A, or be phosphorylated on the catalytic segment. Interestingly, these activation steps bring some dynamic changes on the 3D-structure of the kinase, especially the activation segment. Until now, in the monomeric CDK2 structure, three binding sites have been reported, including the adenosine triphosphate (ATP) binding site (Site I) and two non-competitive binding sites (Site II and III). In addition, when the kinase is subjected to the cyclin binding process, the resulting structural changes give rise to a variation of the ATP binding site, thus generating an allosteric binding site (Site IV). All the four sites are demonstrated as being targeted by corresponding inhibitors, as is illustrated by the allosteric binding one which is targeted by inhibitor ANS (fluorophore 8-anilino-1-naphthalene sulfonate). In the present work, the binding mechanisms and their fluctuations during the activation process attract our attention. Therefore, we carry out corresponding studies on the structural characterization of CDK2, which are expected to facilitate the understanding of the molecular mechanisms of kinase proteins. Besides, the binding mechanisms of CDK2 with its relevant inhibitors, as well as the changes of binding mechanisms following conformational variations of CDK2, are summarized and compared. The summary of the conformational characteristics and ligand binding mechanisms of CDK2 in the present work will improve our understanding of the molecular mechanisms regulating the bioactivities of CDK2. PMID:25918937

  7. Computational Analysis of the Ligand Binding Site of the Extracellular ATP Receptor, DORN1

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Yangrong; Cho, Sung-Hwan; Xu, Dong; Stacey, Gary

    2016-01-01

    DORN1 (also known as P2K1) is a plant receptor for extracellular ATP, which belongs to a large gene family of legume-type (L-type) lectin receptor kinases. Extracellular ATP binds to DORN1 with strong affinity through its lectin domain, and the binding triggers a variety of intracellular activities in response to biotic and abiotic stresses. However, information on the tertiary structure of the ligand binding site of DORN1is lacking, which hampers efforts to fully elucidate the mechanism of receptor action. Available data of the crystal structures from more than 50 L-type lectins enable us to perform an in silico study of molecular interaction between DORN1 and ATP. In this study, we employed a computational approach to develop a tertiary structure model of the DORN1 lectin domain. A blind docking analysis demonstrated that ATP binds to a cavity made by four loops (defined as loops A B, C and D) of the DORN1 lectin domain with high affinity. In silico target docking of ATP to the DORN1 binding site predicted interaction with 12 residues, located on the four loops, via hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interactions. The ATP binding pocket is structurally similar in location to the carbohydrate binding pocket of the canonical L-type lectins. However, four of the residues predicted to interact with ATP are not conserved between DORN1 and the other carbohydrate-binding lectins, suggesting that diversifying selection acting on these key residues may have led to the ATP binding activity of DORN1. The in silico model was validated by in vitro ATP binding assays using the purified extracellular lectin domain of wild-type DORN1, as well as mutated DORN1 lacking key ATP binding residues. PMID:27583834

  8. Computational Analysis of the Ligand Binding Site of the Extracellular ATP Receptor, DORN1.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Cuong The; Tanaka, Kiwamu; Cao, Yangrong; Cho, Sung-Hwan; Xu, Dong; Stacey, Gary

    2016-01-01

    DORN1 (also known as P2K1) is a plant receptor for extracellular ATP, which belongs to a large gene family of legume-type (L-type) lectin receptor kinases. Extracellular ATP binds to DORN1 with strong affinity through its lectin domain, and the binding triggers a variety of intracellular activities in response to biotic and abiotic stresses. However, information on the tertiary structure of the ligand binding site of DORN1is lacking, which hampers efforts to fully elucidate the mechanism of receptor action. Available data of the crystal structures from more than 50 L-type lectins enable us to perform an in silico study of molecular interaction between DORN1 and ATP. In this study, we employed a computational approach to develop a tertiary structure model of the DORN1 lectin domain. A blind docking analysis demonstrated that ATP binds to a cavity made by four loops (defined as loops A B, C and D) of the DORN1 lectin domain with high affinity. In silico target docking of ATP to the DORN1 binding site predicted interaction with 12 residues, located on the four loops, via hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interactions. The ATP binding pocket is structurally similar in location to the carbohydrate binding pocket of the canonical L-type lectins. However, four of the residues predicted to interact with ATP are not conserved between DORN1 and the other carbohydrate-binding lectins, suggesting that diversifying selection acting on these key residues may have led to the ATP binding activity of DORN1. The in silico model was validated by in vitro ATP binding assays using the purified extracellular lectin domain of wild-type DORN1, as well as mutated DORN1 lacking key ATP binding residues. PMID:27583834

  9. Computational Analysis of the Ligand Binding Site of the Extracellular ATP Receptor, DORN1.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Cuong The; Tanaka, Kiwamu; Cao, Yangrong; Cho, Sung-Hwan; Xu, Dong; Stacey, Gary

    2016-01-01

    DORN1 (also known as P2K1) is a plant receptor for extracellular ATP, which belongs to a large gene family of legume-type (L-type) lectin receptor kinases. Extracellular ATP binds to DORN1 with strong affinity through its lectin domain, and the binding triggers a variety of intracellular activities in response to biotic and abiotic stresses. However, information on the tertiary structure of the ligand binding site of DORN1is lacking, which hampers efforts to fully elucidate the mechanism of receptor action. Available data of the crystal structures from more than 50 L-type lectins enable us to perform an in silico study of molecular interaction between DORN1 and ATP. In this study, we employed a computational approach to develop a tertiary structure model of the DORN1 lectin domain. A blind docking analysis demonstrated that ATP binds to a cavity made by four loops (defined as loops A B, C and D) of the DORN1 lectin domain with high affinity. In silico target docking of ATP to the DORN1 binding site predicted interaction with 12 residues, located on the four loops, via hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interactions. The ATP binding pocket is structurally similar in location to the carbohydrate binding pocket of the canonical L-type lectins. However, four of the residues predicted to interact with ATP are not conserved between DORN1 and the other carbohydrate-binding lectins, suggesting that diversifying selection acting on these key residues may have led to the ATP binding activity of DORN1. The in silico model was validated by in vitro ATP binding assays using the purified extracellular lectin domain of wild-type DORN1, as well as mutated DORN1 lacking key ATP binding residues.

  10. Reduction of glucocorticoid receptor ligand binding by the 11-beta hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 2 inhibitor, Thiram.

    PubMed

    Garbrecht, Mark R; Krozowski, Zygmunt S; Snyder, Jeanne M; Schmidt, Thomas J

    2006-10-01

    Endogenous and synthetic glucocorticoids (GCs), such as cortisol and dexamethasone (Dex), modulate airway inflammation, regulate the production of surfactant by lung epithelial cells, and influence fetal lung maturation. The 11-beta hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 2 (HSD2) enzyme catalyzes the oxidation of bioactive cortisol and Dex to their 11-keto metabolites. Thiram (tetramethylthiuram disulfide) specifically inhibits HSD2 activity by oxidizing cysteine residues located in the cofactor binding domain of the enzyme. During studies performed to define a potential role for HSD2 in modulating GC action in human lung epithelial cells, we observed that exposure of intact human lung epithelial cells (NCI-H441) to 50 microM Thiram significantly attenuated the down-stream effects of Dex (100 nM) on the expression of two GC-sensitive genes, pulmonary surfactant proteins A and B. This observation appeared to be inconsistent with simple inhibition of HSD2 activity. Although Thiram inhibited HSD2 oxidase activity in a dose-dependent manner without affecting HSD2 protein expression, Thiram also reduced specific binding of [3H]-Dex to the glucocorticoid receptor (GR). Pre-treatment of cells with 1 mM dithiothreitol (DTT), a thiol-reducing agent, completely blocked the inhibitory effect of Thiram on ligand binding. These results are suggestive that Thiram may alter the ligand-binding domain of the GR by oxidizing critical thiol-containing amino acid residues. Taken collectively, these data demonstrate that attenuated down-stream GC signaling, via decreased binding of ligand to the GR, is a novel cellular effect of Thiram exposure in human lung epithelial cells.

  11. Energetic Coupling between Ligand Binding and Dimerization in Escherichia coli Phosphoglycerate Mutase.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Nathan W; Monroe, Lyman K; Kihara, Daisuke; Park, Chiwook

    2016-03-29

    Energetic coupling of two molecular events in a protein molecule is ubiquitous in biochemical reactions mediated by proteins, such as catalysis and signal transduction. Here, we investigate energetic coupling between ligand binding and folding of a dimer using a model system that shows three-state equilibrium unfolding of an exceptional quality. The homodimeric Escherichia coli cofactor-dependent phosphoglycerate mutase (dPGM) was found to be stabilized by ATP in a proteome-wide screen, although dPGM does not require or utilize ATP for enzymatic function. We investigated the effect of ATP on the thermodynamic stability of dPGM using equilibrium unfolding. We found that, in the absence of ATP, dPGM populates a partially unfolded, monomeric intermediate during equilibrium unfolding. However, addition of 1.0 mM ATP drastically reduces the population of the intermediate by selectively stabilizing the native dimer. Using a computational ligand docking method, we predicted ATP binds to the active site of the enzyme using the triphosphate group. By performing equilibrium unfolding and isothermal titration calorimetry with active-site variants of dPGM, we confirmed that active-site residues are involved in ATP binding. Our findings show that ATP promotes dimerization of the protein by binding to the active site, which is distal from the dimer interface. This cooperativity suggests an energetic coupling between the active site and the dimer interface. We also propose a structural link to explain how ligand binding to the active site is energetically coupled with dimerization.

  12. Energetic Coupling between Ligand Binding and Dimerization in E. coli Phosphoglycerate Mutase

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, Nathan W.; Monroe, Lyman K.; Kihara, Daisuke; Park, Chiwook

    2016-01-01

    Energetic coupling of two molecular events in a protein molecule is ubiquitous in biochemical reactions mediated by proteins, such as catalysis and signal transduction. Here, we investigate energetic coupling between ligand binding and folding of a dimer using a model system that shows three-state equilibrium unfolding in an exceptional quality. The homodimeric E. coli cofactor-dependent phosphoglycerate mutase (dPGM) was found to be stabilized by ATP in a proteome-wide screen, although dPGM does not require or utilize ATP for enzymatic function. We investigated the effect of ATP on the thermodynamic stability of dPGM using equilibrium unfolding. In the absence of ATP, dPGM populates a partially unfolded, monomeric intermediate during equilibrium unfolding. However, addition of 1.0 mM ATP drastically reduces the population of the intermediate by selectively stabilizing the native dimer. Using a computational ligand docking method, we predicted ATP binds to the active site of the enzyme using the triphosphate group. By performing equilibrium unfolding and isothermal titration calorimetry with active-site variants of dPGM, we confirmed that active-site residues are involved in ATP binding. Our findings show that ATP promotes dimerization of the protein by binding to the active site, which is distal from the dimer interface. This cooperativity suggests an energetic coupling between the active-site and the dimer interface. We also propose a structural link to explain how ligand binding to the active site is energetically coupled with dimerization. PMID:26919584

  13. Rational design of a protein that binds integrin αvβ3 outside the ligand binding site

    PubMed Central

    Turaga, Ravi Chakra; Yin, Lu; Yang, Jenny J.; Lee, Hsiauwei; Ivanov, Ivaylo; Yan, Chunli; Yang, Hua; Grossniklaus, Hans E.; Wang, Siming; Ma, Cheng; Sun, Li; Liu, Zhi-Ren

    2016-01-01

    Integrin αvβ3 expression is altered in various diseases and has been proposed as a drug target. Here we use a rational design approach to develop a therapeutic protein, which we call ProAgio, that binds to integrin αvβ3 outside the classical ligand-binding site. We show ProAgio induces apoptosis of integrin αvβ3-expressing cells by recruiting and activating caspase 8 to the cytoplasmic domain of integrin αvβ3. ProAgio also has anti-angiogenic activity and strongly inhibits growth of tumour xenografts, but does not affect the established vasculature. Toxicity analyses demonstrate that ProAgio is not toxic to mice. Our study reports a new integrin-targeting agent with a unique mechanism of action, and provides a template for the development of integrin-targeting therapeutics. PMID:27241473

  14. Rational design of a protein that binds integrin αvβ3 outside the ligand binding site.

    PubMed

    Turaga, Ravi Chakra; Yin, Lu; Yang, Jenny J; Lee, Hsiauwei; Ivanov, Ivaylo; Yan, Chunli; Yang, Hua; Grossniklaus, Hans E; Wang, Siming; Ma, Cheng; Sun, Li; Liu, Zhi-Ren

    2016-05-31

    Integrin αvβ3 expression is altered in various diseases and has been proposed as a drug target. Here we use a rational design approach to develop a therapeutic protein, which we call ProAgio, that binds to integrin αvβ3 outside the classical ligand-binding site. We show ProAgio induces apoptosis of integrin αvβ3-expressing cells by recruiting and activating caspase 8 to the cytoplasmic domain of integrin αvβ3. ProAgio also has anti-angiogenic activity and strongly inhibits growth of tumour xenografts, but does not affect the established vasculature. Toxicity analyses demonstrate that ProAgio is not toxic to mice. Our study reports a new integrin-targeting agent with a unique mechanism of action, and provides a template for the development of integrin-targeting therapeutics.

  15. Interaction Entropy: A New Paradigm for Highly Efficient and Reliable Computation of Protein-Ligand Binding Free Energy.

    PubMed

    Duan, Lili; Liu, Xiao; Zhang, John Z H

    2016-05-01

    Efficient and reliable calculation of protein-ligand binding free energy is a grand challenge in computational biology and is of critical importance in drug design and many other molecular recognition problems. The main challenge lies in the calculation of entropic contribution to protein-ligand binding or interaction systems. In this report, we present a new interaction entropy method which is theoretically rigorous, computationally efficient, and numerically reliable for calculating entropic contribution to free energy in protein-ligand binding and other interaction processes. Drastically different from the widely employed but extremely expensive normal mode method for calculating entropy change in protein-ligand binding, the new method calculates the entropic component (interaction entropy or -TΔS) of the binding free energy directly from molecular dynamics simulation without any extra computational cost. Extensive study of over a dozen randomly selected protein-ligand binding systems demonstrated that this interaction entropy method is both computationally efficient and numerically reliable and is vastly superior to the standard normal mode approach. This interaction entropy paradigm introduces a novel and intuitive conceptual understanding of the entropic effect in protein-ligand binding and other general interaction systems as well as a practical method for highly efficient calculation of this effect.

  16. Interaction Entropy: A New Paradigm for Highly Efficient and Reliable Computation of Protein-Ligand Binding Free Energy.

    PubMed

    Duan, Lili; Liu, Xiao; Zhang, John Z H

    2016-05-01

    Efficient and reliable calculation of protein-ligand binding free energy is a grand challenge in computational biology and is of critical importance in drug design and many other molecular recognition problems. The main challenge lies in the calculation of entropic contribution to protein-ligand binding or interaction systems. In this report, we present a new interaction entropy method which is theoretically rigorous, computationally efficient, and numerically reliable for calculating entropic contribution to free energy in protein-ligand binding and other interaction processes. Drastically different from the widely employed but extremely expensive normal mode method for calculating entropy change in protein-ligand binding, the new method calculates the entropic component (interaction entropy or -TΔS) of the binding free energy directly from molecular dynamics simulation without any extra computational cost. Extensive study of over a dozen randomly selected protein-ligand binding systems demonstrated that this interaction entropy method is both computationally efficient and numerically reliable and is vastly superior to the standard normal mode approach. This interaction entropy paradigm introduces a novel and intuitive conceptual understanding of the entropic effect in protein-ligand binding and other general interaction systems as well as a practical method for highly efficient calculation of this effect. PMID:27058988

  17. Characterization of Kinetic Binding Properties of Unlabeled Ligands via a Preincubation Endpoint Binding Approach.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Yuji; Ogawa, Kazumasa; Nakayama, Masaharu

    2016-08-01

    The dissociation rates of unlabeled drugs have been well studied by kinetic binding analyses. Since kinetic assays are laborious, we developed a simple method to determine the kinetic binding parameters of unlabeled competitors by a preincubation endpoint assay. The probe binding after preincubation of a competitor can be described by a single equation as a function of time. Simulations using the equation revealed the degree of IC50 change induced by preincubation of a competitor depended on the dissociation rate koff of the competitor but not on the association rate kon To validate the model, an in vitro binding assay was performed using a smoothened receptor (SMO) and [(3)H]TAK-441, a SMO antagonist. The equilibrium dissociation constants (KI) and koff of SMO antagonists determined by globally fitting the model to the concentration-response curves obtained with and without 24 h preincubation correlated well with those determined by other methods. This approach could be useful for early-stage optimization of drug candidates by enabling determination of binding kinetics in a high-throughput manner because it does not require kinetic measurements, an intermediate washout step during the reaction, or prior determination of competitors' KI values. PMID:27270099

  18. Tritium NMR spectroscopy of ligand binding to maltose-binding protein

    SciTech Connect

    Gehring, K.; Williams, P.G.; Pelton, J.G.; Morimoto, H.; Wemmer, D.E. )

    1991-06-04

    Tritium-labeled {alpha}- and {beta}-maltodextrins have been used to study their complexes with maltose-binding protein (MBP), a 40-kDa bacterial protein. Five substrates, from maltose to maltohexaose, were labeled at their reducing ends and their binding studied. Tritium NMR specctroscopy of the labeled sugars showed large upfield chamical shift changes upon binding and strong anomeric specficity. At 10{degrees}C, MBP bound {alpha}-maltose with 2.7 {plus minus} 0.5-fold higher affinity than {beta}-maltose, and, for longer maltodextrins, the ratio of affinities was even larger. The maximum chemical shift change was 2.2 ppm, suggesting that the reducing end of bound {alpha}-maltodextrin makes close contact with an aromatic residue in the MBP-binding site. Experiments with maltotriose (and longer maltodextrins) also revealed the presence of two bound {beta}-maltotriose resonances in rapid exchange. The authors interpret these two resonances as arising from two distinct sugar-protein complexes. In one complex, the {beta}-maltodextrin is bound by its reducing end, and, in the other complex, the {beta}-maltodextrin is bound by the middle glucose residue(s). This interpretation also suggests how MBP is able to bind both linear and circular maltodextrins.

  19. Observation of multiple, identical binding sites in the exchange of carboxylic acid ligands with CdS nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin; Nichols, Valerie M; Zhou, Dapeng; Lim, Cynthia; Pau, George Shu Heng; Bardeen, Christopher J; Tang, Ming L

    2014-06-11

    We study ligand exchange between the carboxylic acid group and 5.0 nm oleic-acid capped CdS nanocrystals (NCs) using fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). This is the first measurement of the initial binding events between cadmium chalcogenide NCs and carboxylic acid groups. The binding behavior can be described as an interaction between a ligand with single binding group and a substrate with multiple, identical binding sites. Assuming Poissonian binding statistics, our model fits both steady-state and time-resolved photoluminescence (SSPL and TRPL, respectively) data well. A modified Langmuir isotherm reveals that a CdS nanoparticle has an average of 3.0 new carboxylic acid ligands and binding constant, Ka, of 3.4 × 10(5) M(-1).

  20. Inversion of axial coordination in myoglobin to create a "proximal" ligand binding pocket.

    PubMed

    Uno, Tadayuki; Sakamoto, Rikiharu; Tomisugi, Yoshikazu; Ishikawa, Yoshinobu; Wilkinson, Anthony J

    2003-09-01

    A ligand binding pocket has been created on the proximal side of the heme in porcine myoglobin by site-directed mutagenesis. Our starting point was the H64V/V68H double mutant which has been shown to have bis-histidine (His68 and His93) heme coordination [Dou, Y., Admiraal, S. J., Ikeda-Saito, M., Krzywda, S., Wilkinson, A. J., Li, T., Olson, J. S., Prince, R. C., Pickering, I. J., George, G. N. (1995) J. Biol. Chem. 270, 15993-16001]. The replacement of the proximal His93 ligand by noncoordinating Ala (H64V/V68H/H93A) or Gly (H64V/V68H/H93G) residues resulted unexpectedly in a six-coordinate low-spin species in both ferric and ferrous states. To test the hypothesis that the sixth coordinating ligand in the triple mutants was the imidazole of His97, this residue was mutated to Phe, in the quadruple mutants, H64V/V68H/H93A/H97F and H64V/V68H/H93G/H97F. The ferric quadruple mutants show a clear water/hydroxide alkaline transition and high cyanide and CO affinities, characteristics similar to those of wild-type myoglobin. The nu(Fe-CO) and nu(C-O) stretching frequencies in the ferrous-CO state of the quadruple mutants indicate that the "proximal" ligand binding heme pocket is less polar than the distal pocket in the wild-type protein. Thus, we conclude that the proximal heme pocket in the quadruple mutants has a similar affinity for exogenous ligands to the distal pocket of wild-type myoglobin but that the two pockets have different polarities. The quadruple mutants open up new approaches for developing heme chemistry on the myoglobin scaffold.

  1. Biochemical characterization and ligand binding properties of neuroglobin, a novel member of the globin family.

    PubMed

    Dewilde, S; Kiger, L; Burmester, T; Hankeln, T; Baudin-Creuza, V; Aerts, T; Marden, M C; Caubergs, R; Moens, L

    2001-10-19

    Neuroglobin is a recently discovered member of the globin superfamily that is suggested to enhance the O(2) supply of the vertebrate brain. Spectral measurements with human and mouse recombinant neuroglobin provide evidence for a hexacoordinated deoxy ferrous (Fe(2+)) form, indicating a His-Fe(2+)-His binding scheme. O(2) or CO can displace the endogenous protein ligand, which is identified as the distal histidine by mutagenesis. The ferric (Fe(3+)) form of neuroglobin is also hexacoordinated with the protein ligand E7-His and does not exhibit pH dependence. Flash photolysis studies show a high recombination rate (k(on)) and a slow dissociation rate (k(off)) for both O(2) and CO, indicating a high intrinsic affinity for these ligands. However, because the rate-limiting step in ligand combination with the deoxy hexacoordinated form involves the dissociation of the protein ligand, O(2) and CO binding is suggested to be slow in vivo. Because of this competition, the observed O(2) affinity of recombinant human neuroglobin is average (1 torr at 37 degrees C). Neuroglobin has a high autoxidation rate, resulting in an oxidation at 37 degrees C by air within a few minutes. The oxidation/reduction potential of mouse neuroglobin (E'(o) = -129 mV) lies within the physiological range. Under natural conditions, recombinant mouse neuroglobin occurs as a monomer with disulfide-dependent formation of dimers. The biochemical and kinetic characteristics are discussed in view of the possible functions of neuroglobin in the vertebrate brain. PMID:11473128

  2. An energetically beneficial leader-linker interaction abolishes ligand-binding cooperativity in glycine riboswitches.

    PubMed

    Sherman, Eileen M; Esquiaqui, Jackie; Elsayed, Galal; Ye, Jing-Dong

    2012-03-01

    Comprised of two aptamers connected by a short nucleotide linker, the glycine riboswitch was the first example of naturally occurring RNA elements reported to bind small organic molecules cooperatively. Earlier works have shown binding of glycine to the second aptamer allows tertiary interactions to be made between the two aptamers, which facilitates binding of a separate glycine molecule to the first aptamer, leading to glycine-binding cooperativity. Prompted by a distinctive protection pattern in the linker region of a minimal glycine riboswitch construct, we have identified a highly conserved (>90%) leader-linker duplex involving leader nucleotides upstream of the previously reported consensus glycine riboswitch sequences. In >50% of the glycine riboswitches, the leader-linker interaction forms a kink-turn motif. Characterization of three glycine ribsowitches showed that the leader-linker interaction improved the glycine-binding affinities by 4.5- to 86-fold. In-line probing and native gel assays with two aptamers in trans suggested synergistic action between glycine-binding and interaptamer interaction during global folding of the glycine riboswitch. Mutational analysis showed that there appeared to be no ligand-binding cooperativity in the glycine riboswitch when the leader-linker interaction is present, and the previously measured cooperativity is simply an artifact of a truncated construct missing the leader sequence.

  3. Molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo simulations for protein–ligand binding and inhibitor design☆

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Daniel J.; Tirado-Rives, Julian; Jorgensen, William L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Non-nucleoside inhibitors of HIV reverse transcriptase are an important component of treatment against HIV infection. Novel inhibitors are sought that increase potency against variants that contain the Tyr181Cys mutation. Methods Molecular dynamics based free energy perturbation simulations have been run to study factors that contribute to protein–ligand binding, and the results are compared with those from previous Monte Carlo based simulations and activity data. Results Predictions of protein–ligand binding modes are very consistent for the two simulation methods, which are attributed to the use of an enhanced sampling protocol. The Tyr181Cys binding pocket supports large, hydrophobic substituents, which is in good agreement with experiment. Conclusions Although some discrepancies exist between the results of the two simulation methods and experiment, free energy perturbation simulations can be used to rapidly test small molecules for gains in binding affinity. General significance Free energy perturbation methods show promise in providing fast, reliable and accurate data that can be used to complement experiment in lead optimization projects. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled “Recent developments of molecular dynamics”. PMID:25196360

  4. Interaction with membrane lipids and heme ligand binding properties of Escherichia coli flavohemoglobin.

    PubMed

    Bonamore, Alessandra; Farina, Anna; Gattoni, Maurizio; Schininà, M Eugenia; Bellelli, Andrea; Boffi, Alberto

    2003-05-20

    Escherichia coli flavohemoglobin has been shown to be able to bind specifically unsaturated and/or cyclopropanated fatty acids with very high affinity. Unsaturated or cyclopropanated fatty acid binding results in a modification of the visible absorption spectrum of the ferric heme, corresponding to a transition from a pentacoordinated (typical of the ligand free protein) to a hexacoordinated, high spin, heme iron. In contrast, no detectable interaction has been observed with saturated fatty acid, saturated phospholipids, linear, cyclic, and aromatic hydrocarbons pointing out that the protein recognizes specifically double bonds in cis conformation within the hydrocarbon chain of the fatty acid molecule. Accordingly, as demonstrated in gel filtration experiments, flavohemoglobin is able to bind liposomes obtained from lipid extracts of E. coli membranes and eventually abstract phospholipids containing cis double bonds and/or cyclopropane rings along the acyl chains. The presence of a protein bound lipid strongly affects the thermodynamic and kinetic properties of imidazole binding to the ferric protein and brings about significant modifications in the reactivity of the ferrous protein with oxygen and carbon monoxide. The effect of the bound lipid has been accounted for by a reaction scheme that involves the presence of two sites for the lipid/ligand recognition, namely, the heme iron and a non-heme site located in a loop region above the heme pocket. PMID:12741837

  5. Endogenous and exogenous ligands of aryl hydrocarbon receptor: current state of art.

    PubMed

    Stejskalova, Lucie; Dvorak, Zdenek; Pavek, Petr

    2011-02-01

    Aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is an important transcriptional regulator of drug metabolizing enzymes that dominantly controls the expression of cytochrome P450 CYP1 family genes and some phase II enzymes. AhR also has many endogenous functions including cell cycle control, immune response, and cell differentiation. In addition, AhR is well-known to be involved in chemically-induced carcinogenesis. AhR is activated by a variety of endogenous and exogenous ligands. While exogenous activation of AhR has deleterious effects on human organism, sustained activation of AhR by endogenous ligands is indispensable for proper cell functions. Therefore, the effects of exogenous and endogenous ligands on AhR resemble the Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde story. The aim of the current paper is to summarize and update the knowledge on exogenous and endogenous AhR ligands. PMID:21395538

  6. Metal-ligand binding affinity vs reactivity: qualitative studies in Rh(I)-catalyzed asymmetric ring-opening reactions.

    PubMed

    Tsui, Gavin Chit; Dougan, Patrick; Lautens, Mark

    2013-06-01

    Rh(I)-catalyzed asymmetric ring opening (ARO) of oxabenzonorbornadiene is used as a model system to qualitatively study reactions involving multiple metal-ligand interactions. The key feature of this approach is the use of product ee as an indicator to quickly gain important information such as the relative ligand binding affinity and relative reactivity of catalysts.

  7. Investigation of the Copper Binding Site and the Role of Histidine as a Ligand in Riboflavin Binding Protein

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Sheila R.; Bencze, Krisztina Z.; Russ, Kristen A.; Wasiukanis, Kristen; Benore-Parsons, Marilee; Stemmler, Timothy L.

    2008-01-01

    Riboflavin Binding Protein (RBP) binds copper in a 1:1 molar ratio, forming a distinct well-ordered type II site. The nature of this site has been examined using X-ray absorption and pulsed electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopies, revealing a four coordinate oxygen/nitrogen rich environment. On the basis of analysis of the Cambridge Structural Database, the average protein bound copper-ligand bond length of 1.96 Å, obtained by extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS), is consistent with four coordinate Cu(I) and Cu(II) models that utilize mixed oxygen and nitrogen ligand distributions. These data suggest a Cu–O3N coordination state for copper bound to RBP. While pulsed EPR studies including hyperfine sublevel correlation spectroscopy and electron nuclear double resonance show clear spectroscopic evidence for a histidine bound to the copper, inclusion of a histidine in the EXAFS simulation did not lead to any significant improvement in the fit. PMID:18593109

  8. Solid-State NMR Characterization of Mixed Phosphonic Acid Ligand Binding and Organization on Silica Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Davidowski, Stephen K; Holland, Gregory P

    2016-04-01

    As ligand functionalization of nanomaterials becomes more complex, methods to characterize the organization of multiple ligands on surfaces is required. In an effort to further the understanding of ligand-surface interactions, a combination of multinuclear ((1)H, (29)Si, (31)P) and multidimensional solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques was utilized to characterize the phosphonic acid functionalization of fumed silica nanoparticles using methylphosphonic acid (MPA) and phenylphosphonic acid (PPA). (1)H → (29)Si cross-polarization (CP)-magic angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR was used to selectively detect silicon atoms near hydrogen atoms (primarily surface species); these results indicate that geminal silanols are preferentially depleted during the functionalization with phosphonic acids. (1)H → (31)P CP-MAS solid-state NMR measurements on the functionalized silica nanoparticles show three distinct resonances shifted upfield (lower ppm) and broadened compared to the resonances of the crystalline ligands. Quantitative (31)P MAS solid-state NMR measurements indicate that ligands favor a monodentate binding mode. When fumed silica nanoparticles were functionalized with an equal molar ratio of MPA and PPA, the MPA bound the nanoparticle surface preferentially. Cross-peaks apparent in the 2D (1)H exchange spectroscopy (EXSY) NMR measurements of the multiligand sample at short mixing times indicate that the MPA and PPA are spatially close (≤5 Å) on the surface of the nanostructure. Furthermore, (1)H-(1)H double quantum-single quantum (DQ-SQ) back-to-back (BABA) 2D NMR spectra further confirmed that MPA and PPA are strongly dipolar coupled with observation of DQ intermolecular contacts between the ligands. DQ experimental buildup curves and simulations indicate that the average distance between MPA and PPA is no further than 4.2 ± 0.2 Å. PMID:26914738

  9. Computational design of enzyme-ligand binding using a combined energy function and deterministic sequence optimization algorithm.

    PubMed

    Tian, Ye; Huang, Xiaoqiang; Zhu, Yushan

    2015-08-01

    Enzyme amino-acid sequences at ligand-binding interfaces are evolutionarily optimized for reactions, and the natural conformation of an enzyme-ligand complex must have a low free energy relative to alternative conformations in native-like or non-native sequences. Based on this assumption, a combined energy function was developed for enzyme design and then evaluated by recapitulating native enzyme sequences at ligand-binding interfaces for 10 enzyme-ligand complexes. In this energy function, the electrostatic interaction between polar or charged atoms at buried interfaces is described by an explicitly orientation-dependent hydrogen-bonding potential and a pairwise-decomposable generalized Born model based on the general side chain in the protein design framework. The energy function is augmented with a pairwise surface-area based hydrophobic contribution for nonpolar atom burial. Using this function, on average, 78% of the amino acids at ligand-binding sites were predicted correctly in the minimum-energy sequences, whereas 84% were predicted correctly in the most-similar sequences, which were selected from the top 20 sequences for each enzyme-ligand complex. Hydrogen bonds at the enzyme-ligand binding interfaces in the 10 complexes were usually recovered with the correct geometries. The binding energies calculated using the combined energy function helped to discriminate the active sequences from a pool of alternative sequences that were generated by repeatedly solving a series of mixed-integer linear programming problems for sequence selection with increasing integer cuts.

  10. Magnetic levitation as a platform for competitive protein-ligand binding assays.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, Nathan D; Soh, Siowling; Mirica, Katherine A; Whitesides, George M

    2012-07-17

    This paper describes a method based on magnetic levitation (MagLev) that is capable of indirectly measuring the binding of unlabeled ligands to unlabeled protein. We demonstrate this method by measuring the affinity of unlabeled bovine carbonic anhydrase (BCA) for a variety of ligands (most of which are benzene sulfonamide derivatives). This method utilizes porous gel beads that are functionalized with a common aryl sulfonamide ligand. The beads are incubated with BCA and allowed to reach an equilibrium state in which the majority of the immobilized ligands are bound to BCA. Since the beads are less dense than the protein, protein binding to the bead increases the overall density of the bead. This change in density can be monitored using MagLev. Transferring the beads to a solution containing no protein creates a situation where net protein efflux from the bead is thermodynamically favorable. The rate at which protein leaves the bead for the solution can be calculated from the rate at which the levitation height of the bead changes. If another small molecule ligand of BCA is dissolved in the solution, the rate of protein efflux is accelerated significantly. This paper develops a reaction-diffusion (RD) model to explain both this observation, and the physical-organic chemistry that underlies it. Using this model, we calculate the dissociation constants of several unlabeled ligands from BCA, using plots of levitation height versus time. Notably, although this method requires no electricity, and only a single piece of inexpensive equipment, it can measure accurately the binding of unlabeled proteins to small molecules over a wide range of dissociation constants (K(d) values within the range from ~10 nM to 100 μM are measured easily). Assays performed using this method generally can be completed within a relatively short time period (20 min-2 h). A deficiency of this system is that it is not, in its present form, applicable to proteins with molecular weight greater

  11. Allosteric binding site in a Cys-loop receptor ligand-binding domain unveiled in the crystal structure of ELIC in complex with chlorpromazine

    PubMed Central

    Nys, Mieke; Wijckmans, Eveline; Farinha, Ana; Yoluk, Özge; Andersson, Magnus; Brams, Marijke; Spurny, Radovan; Peigneur, Steve; Tytgat, Jan; Lindahl, Erik; Ulens, Chris

    2016-01-01

    Pentameric ligand-gated ion channels or Cys-loop receptors are responsible for fast inhibitory or excitatory synaptic transmission. The antipsychotic compound chlorpromazine is a widely used tool to probe the ion channel pore of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor, which is a prototypical Cys-loop receptor. In this study, we determine the molecular determinants of chlorpromazine binding in the Erwinia ligand-gated ion channel (ELIC). We report the X-ray crystal structures of ELIC in complex with chlorpromazine or its brominated derivative bromopromazine. Unexpectedly, we do not find a chlorpromazine molecule in the channel pore of ELIC, but behind the β8–β9 loop in the extracellular ligand-binding domain. The β8–β9 loop is localized downstream from the neurotransmitter binding site and plays an important role in coupling of ligand binding to channel opening. In combination with electrophysiological recordings from ELIC cysteine mutants and a thiol-reactive derivative of chlorpromazine, we demonstrate that chlorpromazine binding at the β8–β9 loop is responsible for receptor inhibition. We further use molecular-dynamics simulations to support the X-ray data and mutagenesis experiments. Together, these data unveil an allosteric binding site in the extracellular ligand-binding domain of ELIC. Our results extend on previous observations and further substantiate our understanding of a multisite model for allosteric modulation of Cys-loop receptors. PMID:27791038

  12. Predictive binding geometry of ligands to DNA minor groove: isohelicity and hydrogen-bonding pattern.

    PubMed

    Stockert, Juan C

    2014-01-01

    The interaction of drugs and dyes with nucleic acids, particularly when binding to DNA minor groove occurs, has increasing importance in biomedical sciences. This is due to the resulting biological activity and to the possibility of recognizing AT and GC base pairs. In such cases, DNA binding can be predicted if appropriate helical and hydrogen-bonding parameters are deduced from DNA models, and a simplified geometrical rule in the form of a stencil is then applied on computer-drawn molecules of interest. Relevant structure parameter values for minor groove binders are the length (4.6 < L < 5.4 Å) and angle (152 < σ < 156.5°) between three consecutive units, measured at the level of hydrogen donor or acceptor groups. Application of the stencil shows that predictive methods can aid in the design of new compounds, by checking the possible binding of isohelical sequence-specific ligands along the DNA minor groove. PMID:24162975

  13. Echinococcus granulosus antigen B: a Hydrophobic Ligand Binding Protein at the host-parasite interface.

    PubMed

    Silva-Álvarez, Valeria; Folle, Ana Maite; Ramos, Ana Lía; Zamarreño, Fernando; Costabel, Marcelo D; García-Zepeda, Eduardo; Salinas, Gustavo; Córsico, Betina; Ferreira, Ana María

    2015-02-01

    Lipids are mainly solubilized by various families of lipid binding proteins which participate in their transport between tissues as well as cell compartments. Among these families, Hydrophobic Ligand Binding Proteins (HLBPs) deserve special consideration since they comprise intracellular and extracellular members, are able to bind a variety of fatty acids, retinoids and some sterols, and are present exclusively in cestodes. Since these parasites have lost catabolic and biosynthetic pathways for fatty acids and cholesterol, HLBPs are likely relevant for lipid uptake and transportation between parasite and host cells. Echinococcus granulosus antigen B (EgAgB) is a lipoprotein belonging to the HLBP family, which is very abundant in the larval stage of this parasite. Herein, we review the literature on EgAgB composition, structural organization and biological properties, and propose an integrated scenario in which this parasite HLBP contributes to adaptation to mammalian hosts by meeting both metabolic and immunomodulatory parasite demands.

  14. Human and Mouse CD137 Have Predominantly Different Binding CRDs to Their Respective Ligands

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Ling; Zhao, Yanlin; Wang, Xiaojue; Dai, Min; Hellström, Karl Erik; Hellström, Ingegerd; Zhang, Hongtao

    2014-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) to CD137 (a.k.a. 4-1BB) have anti-tumor efficacy in several animal models and have entered clinical trials in patients with advanced cancer. Importantly, anti-CD137 mAbs can also ameliorate autoimmunity in preclinical models. As an approach to better understand the action of agonistic and antagonistic anti-CD137 mAbs we have mapped the binding region of the CD137 ligand (CD137L) to human and mouse CD137. By investigating the binding of CD137L to cysteine rich domain II (CRDII )and CRDIII of CD137, we found that the binding interface was limited and differed between the two species in that mouse CD137L mainly combined with CRDII and human CD137L mainly combined with CRDIII. PMID:24466035

  15. AutoDockFR: Advances in Protein-Ligand Docking with Explicitly Specified Binding Site Flexibility

    PubMed Central

    Ravindranath, Pradeep Anand; Forli, Stefano; Goodsell, David S.; Olson, Arthur J.; Sanner, Michel F.

    2015-01-01

    Automated docking of drug-like molecules into receptors is an essential tool in structure-based drug design. While modeling receptor flexibility is important for correctly predicting ligand binding, it still remains challenging. This work focuses on an approach in which receptor flexibility is modeled by explicitly specifying a set of receptor side-chains a-priori. The challenges of this approach include the: 1) exponential growth of the search space, demanding more efficient search methods; and 2) increased number of false positives, calling for scoring functions tailored for flexible receptor docking. We present AutoDockFR–AutoDock for Flexible Receptors (ADFR), a new docking engine based on the AutoDock4 scoring function, which addresses the aforementioned challenges with a new Genetic Algorithm (GA) and customized scoring function. We validate ADFR using the Astex Diverse Set, demonstrating an increase in efficiency and reliability of its GA over the one implemented in AutoDock4. We demonstrate greatly increased success rates when cross-docking ligands into apo receptors that require side-chain conformational changes for ligand binding. These cross-docking experiments are based on two datasets: 1) SEQ17 –a receptor diversity set containing 17 pairs of apo-holo structures; and 2) CDK2 –a ligand diversity set composed of one CDK2 apo structure and 52 known bound inhibitors. We show that, when cross-docking ligands into the apo conformation of the receptors with up to 14 flexible side-chains, ADFR reports more correctly cross-docked ligands than AutoDock Vina on both datasets with solutions found for 70.6% vs. 35.3% systems on SEQ17, and 76.9% vs. 61.5% on CDK2. ADFR also outperforms AutoDock Vina in number of top ranking solutions on both datasets. Furthermore, we show that correctly docked CDK2 complexes re-create on average 79.8% of all pairwise atomic interactions between the ligand and moving receptor atoms in the holo complexes. Finally, we show that

  16. AutoDockFR: Advances in Protein-Ligand Docking with Explicitly Specified Binding Site Flexibility.

    PubMed

    Ravindranath, Pradeep Anand; Forli, Stefano; Goodsell, David S; Olson, Arthur J; Sanner, Michel F

    2015-12-01

    Automated docking of drug-like molecules into receptors is an essential tool in structure-based drug design. While modeling receptor flexibility is important for correctly predicting ligand binding, it still remains challenging. This work focuses on an approach in which receptor flexibility is modeled by explicitly specifying a set of receptor side-chains a-priori. The challenges of this approach include the: 1) exponential growth of the search space, demanding more efficient search methods; and 2) increased number of false positives, calling for scoring functions tailored for flexible receptor docking. We present AutoDockFR-AutoDock for Flexible Receptors (ADFR), a new docking engine based on the AutoDock4 scoring function, which addresses the aforementioned challenges with a new Genetic Algorithm (GA) and customized scoring function. We validate ADFR using the Astex Diverse Set, demonstrating an increase in efficiency and reliability of its GA over the one implemented in AutoDock4. We demonstrate greatly increased success rates when cross-docking ligands into apo receptors that require side-chain conformational changes for ligand binding. These cross-docking experiments are based on two datasets: 1) SEQ17 -a receptor diversity set containing 17 pairs of apo-holo structures; and 2) CDK2 -a ligand diversity set composed of one CDK2 apo structure and 52 known bound inhibitors. We show that, when cross-docking ligands into the apo conformation of the receptors with up to 14 flexible side-chains, ADFR reports more correctly cross-docked ligands than AutoDock Vina on both datasets with solutions found for 70.6% vs. 35.3% systems on SEQ17, and 76.9% vs. 61.5% on CDK2. ADFR also outperforms AutoDock Vina in number of top ranking solutions on both datasets. Furthermore, we show that correctly docked CDK2 complexes re-create on average 79.8% of all pairwise atomic interactions between the ligand and moving receptor atoms in the holo complexes. Finally, we show that down

  17. Selectivity of odorant-binding proteins from the southern house mosquito tested against physiologically relevant ligands.

    PubMed

    Yin, Jiao; Choo, Young-Moo; Duan, Hongxia; Leal, Walter S

    2015-01-01

    As opposed to humans, insects rely heavily on an acute olfactory system for survival and reproduction. Two major types of olfactory proteins, namely, odorant-binding proteins (OBPs) and odorant receptors (ORs), may contribute to the selectivity and sensitivity of the insects' olfactory system. Here, we aimed at addressing the question whether OBPs highly enriched in the antennae of the southern house mosquito, Culex quinquefasciatus, contribute at least in part to the selective reception of physiologically relevant compounds. Using a fluorescence reporter and a panel of 34 compounds, including oviposition attractants, human-derived attractants, and repellents, we measured binding affinities of CquiOBP1, CquiOBP2, and CquiOBP5. Based on dissociation constants, we surmised that CquiOBP2 is a carrier for the oviposition attractant skatole, whereas CquiOBP1 and CquiOBP5 might transport the oviposition pheromone MOP, a human-derived attractant nonanal, and the insect repellent picardin. Binding of these three ligands to CquiOBP1 was further analyzed by examining the influence of pH on apparent affinity as well as by docking these three ligands into CquiOBP1. Our findings suggest that CquiOBP1 might discriminate MOP from nonanal/picaridin on the basis of the midpoint transition of a pH-dependence conformational change, and that MOP is better accommodated in the binding cavity than the other two ligands. These findings, along with previous experimental evidence suggesting that CquiOBP1 does not detect nonanal in vivo, suggest that OBP selectivity may not be clearly manifested in their dissociation constants. PMID:25774136

  18. Selectivity of odorant-binding proteins from the southern house mosquito tested against physiologically relevant ligands

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Jiao; Choo, Young-Moo; Duan, Hongxia; Leal, Walter S.

    2015-01-01

    As opposed to humans, insects rely heavily on an acute olfactory system for survival and reproduction. Two major types of olfactory proteins, namely, odorant-binding proteins (OBPs) and odorant receptors (ORs), may contribute to the selectivity and sensitivity of the insects' olfactory system. Here, we aimed at addressing the question whether OBPs highly enriched in the antennae of the southern house mosquito, Culex quinquefasciatus, contribute at least in part to the selective reception of physiologically relevant compounds. Using a fluorescence reporter and a panel of 34 compounds, including oviposition attractants, human-derived attractants, and repellents, we measured binding affinities of CquiOBP1, CquiOBP2, and CquiOBP5. Based on dissociation constants, we surmised that CquiOBP2 is a carrier for the oviposition attractant skatole, whereas CquiOBP1 and CquiOBP5 might transport the oviposition pheromone MOP, a human-derived attractant nonanal, and the insect repellent picardin. Binding of these three ligands to CquiOBP1 was further analyzed by examining the influence of pH on apparent affinity as well as by docking these three ligands into CquiOBP1. Our findings suggest that CquiOBP1 might discriminate MOP from nonanal/picaridin on the basis of the midpoint transition of a pH-dependence conformational change, and that MOP is better accommodated in the binding cavity than the other two ligands. These findings, along with previous experimental evidence suggesting that CquiOBP1 does not detect nonanal in vivo, suggest that OBP selectivity may not be clearly manifested in their dissociation constants. PMID:25774136

  19. Protein Structural Memory Influences Ligand Binding Mode(s) and Unbinding Rates.

    PubMed

    Xu, Min; Caflisch, Amedeo; Hamm, Peter

    2016-03-01

    The binding of small molecules (e.g., natural ligands, metabolites, and drugs) to proteins governs most biochemical pathways and physiological processes. Here, we use molecular dynamics to investigate the unbinding of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) from two distinct states of a small rotamase enzyme, the FK506-binding protein (FKBP). These states correspond to the FKBP protein relaxed with and without DMSO in the active site. Since the time scale of ligand unbinding (2-20 ns) is faster than protein relaxation (100 ns), a novel methodology is introduced to relax the protein without having to introduce an artificial constraint. The simulation results show that the unbinding time is an order of magnitude longer for dissociation from the DMSO-bound state (holo-relaxed). That is, the actual rate of unbinding depends on the state of the protein, with the protein having a long-lived memory. The rate thus depends on the concentration of the ligand as the apo and holo states reflect low and high concentrations of DMSO, respectively. Moreover, there are multiple binding modes in the apo-relaxed state, while a single binding mode dominates the holo-relaxed state in which DMSO acts as hydrogen bond acceptor from the backbone NH of Ile56, as in the crystal structure of the DMSO/FKBP complex. The solvent relaxes very fast (∼1 ns) close to the NH of Ile56 and with the same time scale of the protein far away from the active site. These results have implications for high-throughput docking, which makes use of a rigid structure of the protein target.

  20. Measuring two-dimensional receptor-ligand binding kinetics by micropipette.

    PubMed

    Chesla, S E; Selvaraj, P; Zhu, C

    1998-09-01

    We report a novel method for measuring forward and reverse kinetic rate constants, kf0 and kr0, for the binding of individual receptors and ligands anchored to apposing surfaces in cell adhesion. Not only does the method examine adhesion between a single pair of cells; it also probes predominantly a single receptor-ligand bond. The idea is to quantify the dependence of adhesion probability on contact duration and densities of the receptors and ligands. The experiment was an extension of existing micropipette protocols. The analysis was based on analytical solutions to the probabilistic formulation of kinetics for small systems. This method was applied to examine the interaction between Fc gamma receptor IIIA (CD16A) expressed on Chinese hamster ovary cell transfectants and immunoglobulin G (IgG) of either human or rabbit origin coated on human erythrocytes, which were found to follow a monovalent biomolecular binding mechanism. The measured rate constants are Ackf0 = (2.6 +/- 0.32) x 10(-7) micron 4 s-1 and kr0 = (0.37 +/- 0.055) s-1 for the CD16A-hIgG interaction and Ackf0 = (5.7 +/- 0.31) X 10(-7) micron 4 s-1 and kr0 = (0.20 +/- 0.042) s-1 for the CD16A-rIgG interaction, respectively, where Ac is the contact area, estimated to be a few percent of 3 micron 2.

  1. Minimal encounter time and separation determine ligand-receptor binding in cell adhesion.

    PubMed

    Robert, Philippe; Nicolas, Alice; Aranda-Espinoza, Said; Bongrand, Pierre; Limozin, Laurent

    2011-06-01

    The binding properties of biomolecules play a crucial role in many biological phenomena, especially cell adhesion. Whereas the attachment kinetics of soluble proteins is considered well known, complex behavior arises when protein molecules are bound to the cell membrane. We probe the hidden kinetics of ligand-receptor bond formation using single-molecule flow chamber assays and Brownian dynamics simulations. We show that, consistent with our recently proposed hypothesis, association requires a minimum duration of contact between the reactive species. In our experiments, ICAM-1 anchored on a flat substrate binds to anti-ICAM-1 coated onto flowing microbeads. The interaction potential between bead and substrate is measured by microinterferometry and is used as an ingredient to simulate bead movement. Our simulation calculates the duration of ligand-receptor contacts imposed by the bead movement. We quantitatively predict the reduction of adhesion probability measured for shorter tether length of the ligand or if a repulsive hyaluronan layer is added onto the surface. To account for our results, we propose that bond formation may occur in our system by crossing of a diffusive plateau in the energy landscape, on the timescale of 5 ms and an energy barrier of 5 k(B)T, before reaching the first detectable bound state. Our results show how to relate cell-scale behavior to the combined information of molecular reactivity and biomolecule submicron-scale environment.

  2. Highly Dynamic Ligand Binding and Light Absorption Coefficient of Cesium Lead Bromide Perovskite Nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    De Roo, Jonathan; Ibáñez, Maria; Geiregat, Pieter; Nedelcu, Georgian; Walravens, Willem; Maes, Jorick; Martins, Jose C; Van Driessche, Isabel; Kovalenko, Maksym V; Hens, Zeger

    2016-02-23

    Lead halide perovskite materials have attracted significant attention in the context of photovoltaics and other optoelectronic applications, and recently, research efforts have been directed to nanostructured lead halide perovskites. Collodial nanocrystals (NCs) of cesium lead halides (CsPbX3, X = Cl, Br, I) exhibit bright photoluminescence, with emission tunable over the entire visible spectral region. However, previous studies on CsPbX3 NCs did not address key aspects of their chemistry and photophysics such as surface chemistry and quantitative light absorption. Here, we elaborate on the synthesis of CsPbBr3 NCs and their surface chemistry. In addition, the intrinsic absorption coefficient was determined experimentally by combining elemental analysis with accurate optical absorption measurements. (1)H solution nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy was used to characterize sample purity, elucidate the surface chemistry, and evaluate the influence of purification methods on the surface composition. We find that ligand binding to the NC surface is highly dynamic, and therefore, ligands are easily lost during the isolation and purification procedures. However, when a small amount of both oleic acid and oleylamine is added, the NCs can be purified, maintaining optical, colloidal, and material integrity. In addition, we find that a high amine content in the ligand shell increases the quantum yield due to the improved binding of the carboxylic acid.

  3. Binding conformation and kinetics of two pheromone-binding proteins from the Gypsy moth Lymantria dispar with biological and nonbiological ligands.

    PubMed

    Gong, Yongmei; Tang, Hao; Bohne, Cornelia; Plettner, Erika

    2010-02-01

    Pheromone-binding proteins (PBPs) in insects can bind various substances and selectively deliver the message of a signal molecule to the downstream components of the olfactory system. This can be achieved either through a ligand-specific conformational change of the C-terminal peptide of the PBP or by selectively binding/releasing the ligand. PBP may also act as a scavenger to protect the sensory neurons from saturating at high ligand doses. We have compared two PBPs from the gypsy moth (PBP1 and PBP2) and their truncated forms (TPBPs), which lack the C-terminal peptide, in this study. Stopped-flow kinetics with N-phenyl-1-naphthylamine (NPN) have revealed a diffusion-controlled collisional step, between PBP and NPN, after which the NPN relocates into a hydrophobic environment. This work supports the hypothesis that binding between PBPs and ligands occurs stepwise. With the method of tryptophan fluorescence quenching, we have shown different local conformational changes around Trp 37, induced by different ligands, manifested in changes of both the steric and electronic environment around the residue. Importantly, we have noticed a significant difference in the changes induced by the biological ligand (the pheromone) and nonbiological ligands. Therefore, we hypothesize that PBP may serve a different function in each kinetic step, displaying a unique P.L conformation.

  4. The complex regulatory function of the ligand-binding domain of the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor.

    PubMed

    Devogelaere, Benoit; Verbert, Leen; Parys, Jan B; Missiaen, Ludwig; De Smedt, Humbert

    2008-01-01

    The inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP(3)) receptor (IP(3)R) can be divided in three functionally distinct regions: a ligand-binding domain, a modulatory domain and a channel domain. Numerous regulatory mechanisms including inter- and intra-molecular protein-protein interactions and phosphorylation events act via these domains to regulate the function of the IP(3)R. Regulation at the level of the ligand-binding domain primarily affects the affinity for IP(3). The extent of IP(3)-induced Ca(2+) release (IICR) is, however, not only determined by the affinity for IP(3) but also by the effectiveness of the coupling between ligand binding and channel opening. As a result, regulation as well as malfunction of IICR may be affected by both steps in the activation mechanism. The 3D structures of the two subdomains of the ligand-binding domain have recently been determined by X-ray diffraction analysis. This allows a more detailed molecular explanation of the regulatory events situated at the ligand-binding domain of the IP(3)R. In this review, we will focus on recent structural and functional data on the ligand-binding domain that have extended and clarified the view on the molecular mechanisms of IP(3)R regulation.

  5. Ligand-interaction kinetics of the pheromone- binding protein from the gypsy moth, L. dispar: insights into the mechanism of binding and release.

    PubMed

    Gong, Yongmei; Pace, Tamara C S; Castillo, Carlos; Bohne, Cornelia; O'Neill, Melanie A; Plettner, Erika

    2009-02-27

    The pheromone-binding proteins (PBPs), which exist at a high concentration in the sensillum lymph surrounding olfactory neurons, are proposed to be important in pheromone detection and discrimination in insects. Here, we present a systematic study of PBP-ligand interaction kinetics. We find that PBP2, from the gypsy moth, Lymantria dispar, associates and dissociates slowly with its biofunctional ligands, (+)- and (-)-disparlure. Tryptophan anisotropy measurements detect PBP multimers in solution as well as an increase in the multimeric state of the protein upon long exposure to ligand. We propose a kinetic model that includes monomer/multimer equilibria and a two-step binding process: (1) external binding of the pheromone assisted by the C terminus of PBP2, and (2) slow embedding of the pheromone into the internal pocket. This experimentally derived model sheds light on the potential biological function and mechanism of PBPs as ligand scavengers.

  6. Genome Editing of the CYP1A1 Locus in iPSCs as a Platform to Map AHR Expression throughout Human Development

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Brenden W.; Stanford, Elizabeth A.; Sherr, David H.; Murphy, George J.

    2016-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) is a ligand activated transcription factor that increases the expression of detoxifying enzymes upon ligand stimulation. Recent studies now suggest that novel endogenous roles of the AHR exist throughout development. In an effort to create an optimized model system for the study of AHR signaling in several cellular lineages, we have employed a CRISPR/CAS9 genome editing strategy in induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) to incorporate a reporter cassette at the transcription start site of one of its canonical targets, cytochrome P450 1A1 (CYP1A1). This cell line faithfully reports on CYP1A1 expression, with luciferase levels as its functional readout, when treated with an endogenous AHR ligand (FICZ) at escalating doses. iPSC-derived fibroblast-like cells respond to acute exposure to environmental and endogenous AHR ligands, and iPSC-derived hepatocytes increase CYP1A1 in a similar manner to primary hepatocytes. This cell line is an important innovation that can be used to map AHR activity in discrete cellular subsets throughout developmental ontogeny. As further endogenous ligands are proposed, this line can be used to screen for safety and efficacy and can report on the ability of small molecules to regulate critical cellular processes by modulating the activity of the AHR. PMID:27148368

  7. Modulating protein activity using tethered ligands with mutually exclusive binding sites

    PubMed Central

    Schena, Alberto; Griss, Rudolf; Johnsson, Kai

    2015-01-01

    The possibility to design proteins whose activities can be switched on and off by unrelated effector molecules would enable applications in various research areas, ranging from biosensing to synthetic biology. We describe here a general method to modulate the activity of a protein in response to the concentration of a specific effector. The approach is based on synthetic ligands that possess two mutually exclusive binding sites, one for the protein of interest and one for the effector. Tethering such a ligand to the protein of interest results in an intramolecular ligand–protein interaction that can be disrupted through the presence of the effector. Specifically, we introduce a luciferase controlled by another protein, a human carbonic anhydrase whose activity can be controlled by proteins or small molecules in vitro and on living cells, and novel fluorescent and bioluminescent biosensors. PMID:26198003

  8. Motifs for molecular recognition exploiting hydrophobic enclosure in protein–ligand binding

    PubMed Central

    Young, Tom; Abel, Robert; Kim, Byungchan; Berne, Bruce J.; Friesner, Richard A.

    2007-01-01

    The thermodynamic properties and phase behavior of water in confined regions can vary significantly from that observed in the bulk. This is particularly true for systems in which the confinement is on the molecular-length scale. In this study, we use molecular dynamics simulations and a powerful solvent analysis technique based on inhomogenous solvation theory to investigate the properties of water molecules that solvate the confined regions of protein active sites. Our simulations and analysis indicate that the solvation of protein active sites that are characterized by hydrophobic enclosure and correlated hydrogen bonds induce atypical entropic and enthalpic penalties of hydration. These penalties apparently stabilize the protein–ligand complex with respect to the independently solvated ligand and protein, which leads to enhanced binding affinities. Our analysis elucidates several challenging cases, including the super affinity of the streptavidin–biotin system. PMID:17204562

  9. Modulation of integrin antagonist signaling by ligand binding of the heparin-binding domain of vitronectin to the alphaVbeta3 integrin.

    PubMed

    Maile, Laura A; Aday, Ariel W; Busby, Walker H; Sanghani, Ravi; Veluvolu, Umadevi; Clemmons, David R

    2008-10-01

    The interaction between the arginine glycine and aspartic acid motif (RGD) of integrin ligands such as vitronectin and the integrin receptor alphaVbeta3 in mediating cell attachment has been well described. Similarly, the ability of disintegrins, small RGD containing peptides, to inhibit cell attachment and other cellular processes has also been studied extensively. Recently, we characterized a second site of interaction between vitronectin and its integrin partner. We determined that amino acids within the heparin-binding domain of vitronectin bind to a cysteine loop (C-loop) region of beta3 and that this interaction is required for the positive effects of alphaVbeta3 ligand occupancy on IGF-I signaling in smooth muscle cells. In this study we examine the signaling events activated following ligand binding of disintegrins to the alphaVbeta3 and the ability of these signals to be regulated by binding of the heparin-binding domain of vitronectin. We demonstrate that disintegrin ligand binding activates a series of events including the sequential activation of the tyrosine kinases c-Src and Syk. This leads to the activation of calpain and the cleavage of the beta3 cytoplasmic tail. Addition of vitronectin or a peptide homologous to the heparin-binding domain inhibited activation of this pathway. Our results suggest that the signaling events that occur following ligand binding to the alphaVbeta3 integrin reflects a balance between the effects mediated through the RGD binding site interaction and the effects mediated by the heparin binding site interaction and that for intact vitronectin the effect of the heparin-binding domain predominates.

  10. Classification and comparison of ligand-binding sites derived from grid-mapped knowledge-based potentials.

    PubMed

    Hoppe, Christian; Steinbeck, Christoph; Wohlfahrt, Gerd

    2006-03-01

    We describe the application of knowledge-based potentials implemented in the MOE program to compare the ligand-binding sites of several proteins. The binding probabilities for a polar and a hydrophobic probe are calculated on a grid to allow easy comparison of binding sites of superimposed related proteins. The method is fast and simple enough to simultaneously use structural information of multiple proteins of a target family. The method can be used to rapidly cluster proteins into subfamilies according to the similarity of hydrophobic and polar fields of their ligand-binding sites. Regions of the binding site which are common within a protein family can be identified and analysed for the design of family-targeted libraries or those which differ for improvement of ligand selectivity. The field-based hierarchical clustering is demonstrated for three protein families: the ligand-binding domains of nuclear receptors, the ATP-binding sites of protein kinases and the substrate binding sites of proteases. More detailed comparisons are presented for serine proteases of the chymotrypsin family, for the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor subfamily of nuclear receptors and for progesterone and androgen receptor. The results are in good accordance with structure-based analysis and highlight important differences of the binding sites, which have been also described in the literature.

  11. Measuring Binding Affinity of Protein-Ligand Interaction Using Spectrophotometry: Binding of Neutral Red to Riboflavin-Binding Protein

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chenprakhon, Pirom; Sucharitakul, Jeerus; Panijpan, Bhinyo; Chaiyen, Pimchai

    2010-01-01

    The dissociation constant, K[subscript d], of the binding of riboflavin-binding protein (RP) with neutral red (NR) can be determined by titrating RP to a fixed concentration of NR. Upon adding RP to the NR solution, the maximum absorption peak of NR shifts to 545 nm from 450 nm for the free NR. The change of the absorption can be used to determine…

  12. Characterisation of Conformational and Ligand Binding Properties of Membrane Proteins Using Synchrotron Radiation Circular Dichroism (SRCD).

    PubMed

    Hussain, Rohanah; Siligardi, Giuliano

    2016-01-01

    Membrane proteins are notoriously difficult to crystallise for use in X-ray crystallographic structural determination, or too complex for NMR structural studies. Circular dichroism (CD) is a fast and relatively easy spectroscopic technique to study protein conformational behaviour in solution. The advantage of synchrotron radiation circular dichroism (SRCD) measured with synchrotron beamlines compared to the CD from benchtop instruments is the extended spectral far-UV region that increases the accuracy of secondary structure estimations, in particular under high ionic strength conditions. Membrane proteins are often available in small quantities, and for this SRCD measured at the Diamond B23 beamline has successfully facilitated molecular recognition studies. This was done by probing the local tertiary structure of aromatic amino acid residues upon addition of chiral or non-chiral ligands using long pathlength cells (1-5 cm) of small volume capacity (70 μl-350 μl). In this chapter we describe the use of SRCD to qualitatively and quantitatively screen ligand binding interactions (exemplified by Sbma, Ace1 and FsrC proteins); to distinguish between functionally similar drugs that exhibit different mechanisms of action towards membrane proteins (exemplified by FsrC); and to identify suitable detergent conditions to observe membrane protein-ligand interactions using stabilised proteins (exemplified by inositol transporters) as well as the stability of membrane proteins (exemplified by GalP, Ace1). The importance of the in solution characterisation of the conformational behaviour and ligand binding properties of proteins in both far- andnear-UV regions and the use of high-throughput CD (HT-CD) using 96- and 384-well multiplates to study the folding effects in various protein crystallisation buffers are also discussed. PMID:27553234

  13. Protein stability induced by ligand binding correlates with changes in protein flexibility

    PubMed Central

    Celej, María Soledad; Montich, Guillermo G.; Fidelio, Gerardo D.

    2003-01-01

    The interaction between ligands and proteins usually induces changes in protein thermal stability with modifications in the midpoint denaturation temperature, enthalpy of unfolding, and heat capacity. These modifications are due to the coupling of unfolding with binding equilibrium. Furthermore, they can be attained by changes in protein structure and conformational flexibility induced by ligand interaction. To study these effects we have used bovine serum albumin (BSA) interacting with three different anilinonaphthalene sulfonate derivatives (ANS). These ligands have different effects on protein stability, conformation, and dynamics. Protein stability was studied by differential scanning calorimetry and fluorescence spectroscopy, whereas conformational changes were detected by circular dichroism and infrared spectroscopy including kinetics of hydrogen/deuterium exchange. The order of calorimetric midpoint of denaturation was: 1,8-ANS-BSA > 2,6-ANS-BSA > free BSA >> (nondetected) bis-ANS-BSA. Both 1,8-ANS and 2,6-ANS did not substantially modify the secondary structure of BSA, whereas bis-ANS induced a distorted α-helix conformation with an increase of disordered structure. Protein flexibility followed the order: 1,8-ANS-BSA < 2,6-ANS-BSA < free BSA << bis-ANS-BSA, indicating a clear correlation between stability and conformational flexibility. The structure induced by an excess of bis-ANS to BSA is compatible with a molten globule-like state. Within the context of the binding landscape model, we have distinguished five conformers (identified by subscript): BSA1,8-ANS, BSA2,6-ANS, BSAfree, BSAbis-ANS, and BSAunfolded among the large number of possible states of the conformational dynamic ensemble. The relative population of each distinguishable conformer depends on the type and concentration of ligand and the temperature of the system. PMID:12824495

  14. Characterization of a Ligand Binding Site in the Human Transient Receptor Potential Ankyrin 1 Pore

    PubMed Central

    Klement, Göran; Eisele, Lina; Malinowsky, David; Nolting, Andreas; Svensson, Mats; Terp, Gitte; Weigelt, Dirk; Dabrowski, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The pharmacology and regulation of Transient Receptor Potential Ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) ion channel activity is intricate due to the physiological function as an integrator of multiple chemical, mechanical, and temperature stimuli as well as differences in species pharmacology. In this study, we describe and compare the current inhibition efficacy of human TRPA1 on three different TRPA1 antagonists. We used a homology model of TRPA1 based on Kv1.2 to select pore vestibule residues available for interaction with ligands entering the vestibule. Site-directed mutation constructs were expressed in Xenopus oocytes and their functionality and pharmacology assessed to support and improve our homology model. Based on the functional pharmacology results we propose an antagonist-binding site in the vestibule of the TRPA1 ion channel. We use the results to describe the proposed intravestibular ligand-binding site in TRPA1 in detail. Based on the single site substitutions, we designed a human TRPA1 receptor by substituting several residues in the vestibule and adjacent regions from the rat receptor to address and explain observed species pharmacology differences. In parallel, the lack of effect on HC-030031 inhibition by the vestibule substitutions suggests that this molecule interacts with TRPA1 via a binding site not situated in the vestibule. PMID:23442958

  15. Characterization of a ligand binding site in the human transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 pore.

    PubMed

    Klement, Göran; Eisele, Lina; Malinowsky, David; Nolting, Andreas; Svensson, Mats; Terp, Gitte; Weigelt, Dirk; Dabrowski, Michael

    2013-02-19

    The pharmacology and regulation of Transient Receptor Potential Ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) ion channel activity is intricate due to the physiological function as an integrator of multiple chemical, mechanical, and temperature stimuli as well as differences in species pharmacology. In this study, we describe and compare the current inhibition efficacy of human TRPA1 on three different TRPA1 antagonists. We used a homology model of TRPA1 based on Kv1.2 to select pore vestibule residues available for interaction with ligands entering the vestibule. Site-directed mutation constructs were expressed in Xenopus oocytes and their functionality and pharmacology assessed to support and improve our homology model. Based on the functional pharmacology results we propose an antagonist-binding site in the vestibule of the TRPA1 ion channel. We use the results to describe the proposed intravestibular ligand-binding site in TRPA1 in detail. Based on the single site substitutions, we designed a human TRPA1 receptor by substituting several residues in the vestibule and adjacent regions from the rat receptor to address and explain observed species pharmacology differences. In parallel, the lack of effect on HC-030031 inhibition by the vestibule substitutions suggests that this molecule interacts with TRPA1 via a binding site not situated in the vestibule.

  16. The Impact of a Ligand Binding on Strand Migration in the SAM-I Riboswitch

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wei; Kim, Joohyun; Jha, Shantenu; Aboul-ela, Fareed

    2013-01-01

    Riboswitches sense cellular concentrations of small molecules and use this information to adjust synthesis rates of related metabolites. Riboswitches include an aptamer domain to detect the ligand and an expression platform to control gene expression. Previous structural studies of riboswitches largely focused on aptamers, truncating the expression domain to suppress conformational switching. To link ligand/aptamer binding to conformational switching, we constructed models of an S-adenosyl methionine (SAM)-I riboswitch RNA segment incorporating elements of the expression platform, allowing formation of an antiterminator (AT) helix. Using Anton, a computer specially developed for long timescale Molecular Dynamics (MD), we simulated an extended (three microseconds) MD trajectory with SAM bound to a modeled riboswitch RNA segment. Remarkably, we observed a strand migration, converting three base pairs from an antiterminator (AT) helix, characteristic of the transcription ON state, to a P1 helix, characteristic of the OFF state. This conformational switching towards the OFF state is observed only in the presence of SAM. Among seven extended trajectories with three starting structures, the presence of SAM enhances the trend towards the OFF state for two out of three starting structures tested. Our simulation provides a visual demonstration of how a small molecule (<500 MW) binding to a limited surface can trigger a large scale conformational rearrangement in a 40 kDa RNA by perturbing the Free Energy Landscape. Such a mechanism can explain minimal requirements for SAM binding and transcription termination for SAM-I riboswitches previously reported experimentally. PMID:23704854

  17. Unique motifs and hydrophobic interactions shape the binding of modified DNA ligands to protein targets

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Douglas R.; Gelinas, Amy D.; Zhang, Chi; Rohloff, John C.; Carter, Jeffrey D.; O’Connell, Daniel; Waugh, Sheela M.; Wolk, Steven K.; Mayfield, Wesley S.; Burgin, Alex B.; Edwards, Thomas E.; Stewart, Lance J.; Gold, Larry; Janjic, Nebojsa; Jarvis, Thale C.

    2012-01-01

    Selection of aptamers from nucleic acid libraries by in vitro evolution represents a powerful method of identifying high-affinity ligands for a broad range of molecular targets. Nevertheless, a sizeable fraction of proteins remain difficult targets due to inherently limited chemical diversity of nucleic acids. We have exploited synthetic nucleotide modifications that confer protein-like diversity on a nucleic acid scaffold, resulting in a new generation of binding reagents called SOMAmers (Slow Off-rate Modified Aptamers). Here we report a unique crystal structure of a SOMAmer bound to its target, platelet-derived growth factor B (PDGF-BB). The SOMAmer folds into a compact structure and exhibits a hydrophobic binding surface that mimics the interface between PDGF-BB and its receptor, contrasting sharply with mainly polar interactions seen in traditional protein-binding aptamers. The modified nucleotides circumvent the intrinsic diversity constraints of natural nucleic acids, thereby greatly expanding the structural vocabulary of nucleic acid ligands and considerably broadening the range of accessible protein targets. PMID:23139410

  18. Identification of a Ligand Binding Pocket in LdtR from Liberibacter asiaticus.

    PubMed

    Pagliai, Fernando A; Gonzalez, Claudio F; Lorca, Graciela L

    2015-01-01

    LdtR is a transcriptional activator involved in the regulation of a putative L,D transpeptidase in Liberibacter asiaticus, an unculturable pathogen and one of the causative agents of Huanglongbing disease. Using small molecule screens we identified benzbromarone as an inhibitor of LdtR activity, which was confirmed using in vivo and in vitro assays. Based on these previous results, the objective of this work was to identify the LdtR ligand binding pocket and characterize its interactions with benzbromarone. A structural model of LdtR was constructed and the molecular interactions with the ligand were predicted using the SwissDock interface. Using site-directed mutagenesis, these residues were changed to alanine. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays, thermal denaturation, isothermal titration calorimetry experiments, and in vivo assays were used to identify residues T43, L61, and F64 in the Benz1 pocket of LdtR as the amino acids most likely involved in the binding to benzbromarone. These results provide new information on the binding mechanism of LdtR to a modulatory molecule and provide a blue print for the design of therapeutics for other members of the MarR family of transcriptional regulators involved in pathogenicity. PMID:26635775

  19. Predicting Allosteric Effects from Orthosteric Binding in Hsp90-Ligand Interactions: Implications for Fragment-Based Drug Design

    PubMed Central

    Larsson, Andreas; Nordlund, Paer; Jansson, Anna; Anand, Ganesh S.

    2016-01-01

    A key question in mapping dynamics of protein-ligand interactions is to distinguish changes at binding sites from those associated with long range conformational changes upon binding at distal sites. This assumes a greater challenge when considering the interactions of low affinity ligands (dissociation constants, KD, in the μM range or lower). Amide hydrogen deuterium Exchange mass spectrometry (HDXMS) is a robust method that can provide both structural insights and dynamics information on both high affinity and transient protein-ligand interactions. In this study, an application of HDXMS for probing the dynamics of low affinity ligands to proteins is described using the N-terminal ATPase domain of Hsp90. Comparison of Hsp90 dynamics between high affinity natural inhibitors (KD ~ nM) and fragment compounds reveal that HDXMS is highly sensitive in mapping the interactions of both high and low affinity ligands. HDXMS reports on changes that reflect both orthosteric effects and allosteric changes accompanying binding. Orthosteric sites can be identified by overlaying HDXMS onto structural information of protein-ligand complexes. Regions distal to orthosteric sites indicate long range conformational changes with implications for allostery. HDXMS, thus finds powerful utility as a high throughput method for compound library screening to identify binding sites and describe allostery with important implications for fragment-based ligand discovery (FBLD). PMID:27253209

  20. Trinuclear ruthenium clusters as bivalent electrochemical probes for ligand-receptor binding interactions.

    PubMed

    Feld, Daniel J; Hsu, Hsiao-Tieh; Eckermann, Amanda L; Meade, Thomas J

    2012-01-10

    Despite their popularity, electrochemical biosensors often suffer from low sensitivity. One possible approach to overcome low sensitivity in protein biosensors is to utilize multivalent ligand-receptor interactions. Controlling the spatial arrangement of ligands on surfaces is another crucial aspect of electrochemical biosensor design. We have synthesized and characterized five biotinylated trinuclear ruthenium clusters as potential new biosensor platforms: [Ru(3)O(OAc)(6)CO(4-BMP)(py)](0) (3), [Ru(3)O(OAc)(6)CO(4-BMP)(2)](0) (4), [Ru(3)O(OAc)(6)L(4-BMP)(py)](+) (8), [Ru(3)O(OAc)(6)L(4-BMP)(2)](+) (9), and [Ru(3)O(OAc)(6)L(py)(2)](+) (10) (OAc = acetate, 4-BMP = biotin aminomethylpyridine, py = pyridine, L = pyC16SH). HABA/avidin assays and isothermal titration calorimetry were used to evaluate the avidin binding properties of 3 and 4. The binding constants were found to range from (6.5-8.0) × 10(6) M(-1). Intermolecular protein binding of 4 in solution was determined by native gel electrophoresis. QM, MM, and MD calculations show the capability for the bivalent cluster, 4, to intramolecularly bind to avidin. Electrochemical measurements in solution of 3a and 4a show shifts in E(1/2) of -58 and -53 mV in the presence of avidin, respectively. Self-assembled monolayers formed with 8-10 were investigated as a model biosensor system. Diluent/cluster ratio and composition were found to have a significant effect on the ability of avidin to adequately bind to the cluster. Complexes 8 and 10 showed negligible changes in E(1/2), while complex 9 showed a shift in E(1/2) of -43 mV upon avidin addition. These results suggest that multivalent interactions can have a positive impact on the sensitivity of electrochemical protein biosensors.

  1. Multiscale generalized Born modeling of ligand binding energies for virtual database screening

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hao-Yang; Grinter, Sam Z.; Zou, Xiaoqin

    2009-01-01

    Generalized Born (GB) models are widely used to study the electrostatic energetics of solute molecules including proteins. Previous work demonstrates that GB models may produce satisfactory solvation energies if accurate effective Born radii are computed for all atoms. Our previous study showed that a GB model which reproduces the solvation energy may not necessarily be suitable for ligand binding calculations. In this work, we studied binding energetics using the exact GB model, in which Born radii are computed from the Poisson-Boltzmann (PB) equation. Our results showed that accurate Born radii lead to very good agreement between GB and PB in electrostatic calculations for ligand binding. However, recently developed GB models with high Born radii accuracy, when used in large database screening, may suffer from time constraints which make accurate, large-scale Born radii calculations impractical. We therefore present a multiscale GB approach in which atoms are divided into two groups. For atoms in the first group, those few atoms which are most likely to be critical to binding electrostatics, the Born radii are computed accurately at the sacrifice of speed. We propose two alternative approaches for atoms in the second group. The Born radii of these atoms may simply be computed by a fast GB method. Alternatively, the Born radii of these atoms may be computed accurately in the free state, then a variational form of a fast GB method may be used to compute the change in Born radii experienced by these atoms during binding. This strategy provides an accuracy advantage while still being fast enough for use in the virtual screening of large databases. PMID:19678651

  2. The serotonin transporter: Examination of the changes in transporter affinity induced by ligand binding

    SciTech Connect

    Humphreys, C.J.

    1989-01-01

    The plasmalemmal serotonin transporter uses transmembrane gradients of Na{sup +}, Cl{sup {minus}} and K{sup +} to accumulate serotonin within blood platelets. Transport is competitively inhibited by the antidepressant imipramine. Like serotonin transport, imipramine binding requires Na{sup +}. Unlike serotonin, however, imipramine does not appear to be transported. To gain insight into the mechanism of serotonin transport the author have analyzed the influences of Na{sup +} and Cl{sup {minus}}, the two ions cotransported with serotonin, on both serotonin transport and the interaction of imipramine and other antidepressant drugs with the plasmalemmal serotonin transporter of human platelets. Additionally, the author have synthesized, purified and characterized the binding of 2-iodoimipramine to the serotonin transporter. Finally, the author have conducted a preliminary study of the inhibition of serotonin transport and imipramine binding produced by dicyclohexylcarbodiimide. My results reveal many instances of positive heterotropic cooperativity in ligand binding to the serotonin transporter. Na{sup +} binding enhances the transporters affinity for imipramine and several other antidepressant drugs, and also increases the affinity for Cl{sup {minus}}. Cl{sup {minus}} enhances the transporters affinity for imipramine, as well as for Na{sup +}. At concentrations in the range of its K{sub M} for transport serotonin is a competitive inhibitor of imipramine binding. At much higher concentrations, however, serotonin also inhibits imipramines dissociation rate constant. This latter effect which is Na{sup +}-independent and species specific, is apparently produced by serotonin binding at a second, low affinity site on, or near, the transporter complex. Iodoimipramine competitively inhibit both ({sup 3}H)imipramine binding and ({sup 3}H)serotonin transport.

  3. Measuring binding of protein to gel-bound ligands using magnetic levitation.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, Nathan D; Mirica, Katherine A; Soh, Siowling; Phillips, Scott T; Taran, Olga; Mace, Charles R; Shevkoplyas, Sergey S; Whitesides, George M

    2012-03-28

    This paper describes the use of magnetic levitation (MagLev) to measure the association of proteins and ligands. The method starts with diamagnetic gel beads that are functionalized covalently with small molecules (putative ligands). Binding of protein to the ligands within the bead causes a change in the density of the bead. When these beads are suspended in a paramagnetic aqueous buffer and placed between the poles of two NbFeB magnets with like poles facing, the changes in the density of the bead on binding of protein result in changes in the levitation height of the bead that can be used to quantify the amount of protein bound. This paper uses a reaction-diffusion model to examine the physical principles that determine the values of rate and equilibrium constants measured by this system, using the well-defined model system of carbonic anhydrase and aryl sulfonamides. By tuning the experimental protocol, the method is capable of quantifying either the concentration of protein in a solution, or the binding affinities of a protein to several resin-bound small molecules simultaneously. Since this method requires no electricity and only a single piece of inexpensive equipment, it may find use in situations where portability and low cost are important, such as in bioanalysis in resource-limited settings, point-of-care diagnosis, veterinary medicine, and plant pathology. It still has several practical disadvantages. Most notably, the method requires relatively long assay times and cannot be applied to large proteins (>70 kDa), including antibodies. The design and synthesis of beads with improved characteristics (e.g., larger pore size) has the potential to resolve these problems. PMID:22364170

  4. The MM/PBSA and MM/GBSA methods to estimate ligand-binding affinities

    PubMed Central

    Genheden, Samuel; Ryde, Ulf

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The molecular mechanics energies combined with the Poisson–Boltzmann or generalized Born and surface area continuum solvation (MM/PBSA and MM/GBSA) methods are popular approaches to estimate the free energy of the binding of small ligands to biological macromolecules. They are typically based on molecular dynamics simulations of the receptor–ligand complex and are therefore intermediate in both accuracy and computational effort between empirical scoring and strict alchemical perturbation methods. They have been applied to a large number of systems with varying success. Areas covered: The authors review the use of MM/PBSA and MM/GBSA methods to calculate ligand-binding affinities, with an emphasis on calibration, testing and validation, as well as attempts to improve the methods, rather than on specific applications. Expert opinion: MM/PBSA and MM/GBSA are attractive approaches owing to their modular nature and that they do not require calculations on a training set. They have been used successfully to reproduce and rationalize experimental findings and to improve the results of virtual screening and docking. However, they contain several crude and questionable approximations, for example, the lack of conformational entropy and information about the number and free energy of water molecules in the binding site. Moreover, there are many variants of the method and their performance varies strongly with the tested system. Likewise, most attempts to ameliorate the methods with more accurate approaches, for example, quantum-mechanical calculations, polarizable force fields or improved solvation have deteriorated the results. PMID:25835573

  5. Measuring Binding of Protein to Gel-Bound Ligands Using Magnetic Levitation

    PubMed Central

    Shapiro, Nathan D.; Mirica, Katherine A.; Soh, Siowling; Phillips, Scott T.; Taran, Olga; Mace, Charles R.; Shevkoplyas, Sergey S.; Whitesides, George M.

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the use of magnetic levitation (MagLev) to measure the association of proteins and ligands. The method starts with diamagnetic gel beads that are functionalized covalently with small molecules (putative ligands). Binding of protein to the ligands within the bead causes a change in the density of the bead. When these beads are suspended in a paramagnetic aqueous buffer and placed between the poles of two NbFeB magnets with like poles facing, the changes in the density of the bead on binding of protein result in changes in the levitation height of the bead that can be used to quantify the amount of protein bound. This paper uses a reaction-diffusion model to examine the physical principles that determine the values of rate and equilibrium constants measured by this system, using the well-defined model system of carbonic anhydrase and aryl sulfonamides. By tuning the experimental protocol, the method is capable of quantifying either the concentration of protein in a solution, or the binding affinities of a protein to several resin-bound small molecules simultaneously. Since this method requires no electricity and only a single piece of inexpensive equipment, it may find use in situations where portability and low cost are important, such as in bioanalysis in resource-limited settings, point-of-care diagnosis, veterinary medicine, and plant pathology. It still has several practical disadvantages. Most notably, the method requires relatively long assay times and cannot be applied to large proteins (> 70 kDa), including antibodies. The design and synthesis of beads with improved characteristics (e.g., larger pore size) has the potential to resolve these problems. PMID:22364170

  6. Binding site and ligand flexibility revealed by high resolution crystal structures of GluK1 competitive antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Alushin, Gregory M.; Jane, David; Mayer, Mark L.

    2010-01-01

    The availability of crystal structures for the ligand binding domains of ionotropic glutamate receptors, combined with their key role in synaptic function in the normal and diseased brain, offers a unique selection of targets for pharmaceutical research compared to other drug targets for which the atomic structure of the ligand binding sites is not known. Currently only a few antagonist structures have been solved, and these reveal ligand specific conformational changes that hinder rational drug design. Here we report high resolution crystal structures for three kainate receptor GluK1 antagonist complexes which reveal new and unexpected modes of binding, highlighting the continued need for experimentally determined receptor-ligand complexes. PMID:20558186

  7. ProBiS-CHARMMing: Web Interface for Prediction and Optimization of Ligands in Protein Binding Sites.

    PubMed

    Konc, Janez; Miller, Benjamin T; Štular, Tanja; Lešnik, Samo; Woodcock, H Lee; Brooks, Bernard R; Janežič, Dušanka

    2015-11-23

    Proteins often exist only as apo structures (unligated) in the Protein Data Bank, with their corresponding holo structures (with ligands) unavailable. However, apoproteins may not represent the amino-acid residue arrangement upon ligand binding well, which is especially problematic for molecular docking. We developed the ProBiS-CHARMMing web interface by connecting the ProBiS ( http://probis.cmm.ki.si ) and CHARMMing ( http://www.charmming.org ) web servers into one functional unit that enables prediction of protein-ligand complexes and allows for their geometry optimization and interaction energy calculation. The ProBiS web server predicts ligands (small compounds, proteins, nucleic acids, and single-atom ligands) that may bind to a query protein. This is achieved by comparing its surface structure against a nonredundant database of protein structures and finding those that have binding sites similar to that of the query protein. Existing ligands found in the similar binding sites are then transposed to the query according to predictions from ProBiS. The CHARMMing web server enables, among other things, minimization and potential energy calculation for a wide variety of biomolecular systems, and it is used here to optimize the geometry of the predicted protein-ligand complex structures using the CHARMM force field and to calculate their interaction energies with the corresponding query proteins. We show how ProBiS-CHARMMing can be used to predict ligands and their poses for a particular binding site, and minimize the predicted protein-ligand complexes to obtain representations of holoproteins. The ProBiS-CHARMMing web interface is freely available for academic users at http://probis.nih.gov.

  8. Rational design and asymmetric synthesis of potent and neurotrophic ligands for FK506-binding proteins (FKBPs).

    PubMed

    Pomplun, Sebastian; Wang, Yansong; Kirschner, Alexander; Kozany, Christian; Bracher, Andreas; Hausch, Felix

    2015-01-01

    To create highly efficient inhibitors for FK506-binding proteins, a new asymmetric synthesis for pro-(S)-C(5) -branched [4.3.1] aza-amide bicycles was developed. The key step of the synthesis is an HF-driven N-acyliminium cyclization. Functionalization of the C(5)  moiety resulted in novel protein contacts with the psychiatric risk factor FKBP51, which led to a more than 280-fold enhancement in affinity. The most potent ligands facilitated the differentiation of N2a neuroblastoma cells with low nanomolar potency.

  9. Induced Long-Range Attractive Potentials of Human Serum Albumin by Ligand Binding

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, Takaaki; Komatsu, Teruyuki; Nakagawa, Akito; Tsuchida, Eishun

    2007-05-18

    Small-angle x-ray scattering and dielectric spectroscopy investigation on the solutions of recombinant human serum albumin and its heme hybrid revealed that heme incorporation induces a specific long-range attractive potential between protein molecules. This is evidenced by the enhanced forward intensity upon heme binding, despite no hindrance to rotatory Brownian motion, unbiased colloid osmotic pressure, and discontiguous nearest-neighbor distance, confirming monodispersity of the proteins. The heme-induced potential may play a trigger role in recognition of the ligand-filled human serum albumins in the circulatory system.

  10. Ligand binding to anti-cancer target CD44 investigated by molecular simulations.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Tin Trung; Tran, Duy Phuoc; Pham Dinh Quoc Huy; Hoang, Zung; Carloni, Paolo; Van Pham, Phuc; Nguyen, Chuong; Li, Mai Suan

    2016-07-01

    CD44 is a cell-surface glycoprotein and receptor for hyaluronan, one of the major components of the tumor extracellular matrix. There is evidence that the interaction between CD44 and hyaluronan promotes breast cancer metastasis. Recently, the molecule F-19848A was shown to inhibit hyaluronan binding to receptor CD44 in a cell-based assay. In this study, we investigated the mechanism and energetics of F-19848A binding to CD44 using molecular simulation. Using the molecular mechanics/Poisson Boltzmann surface area (MM-PBSA) method, we obtained the binding free energy and inhibition constant of the complex. The van der Waals (vdW) interaction and the extended portion of F-19848A play key roles in the binding affinity. We screened natural products from a traditional Chinese medicine database to search for CD44 inhibitors. From combining pharmaceutical requirements with docking and molecular dynamics simulations, we found ten compounds that are potentially better or equal to the F-19848A ligand at binding to CD44 receptor. Therefore, we have identified new candidates of CD44 inhibitors, based on molecular simulation, which may be effective small molecules for the therapy of breast cancer. PMID:27342250

  11. Structural Analysis of the Ligand-Binding Domain of the Aspartate Receptor Tar from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Mise, Takeshi

    2016-07-01

    The Escherichia coli cell-surface aspartate receptor Tar mediates bacterial chemotaxis toward an attractant, aspartate (Asp), and away from a repellent, Ni(2+). These signals are transmitted from the extracellular region of Tar to the cytoplasmic region via the transmembrane domain. The mechanism by which extracellular signals are transmitted into the cell through conformational changes in Tar is predicted to involve a piston displacement of one of the α4 helices of the homodimer. To understand the molecular mechanisms underlying the induction of Tar activity by an attractant, the three-dimensional structures of the E. coli Tar periplasmic domain with and without bound aspartate, Asp-Tar and apo-Tar, respectively, were determined. Of the two ligand-binding sites, only one site was occupied, and it clearly showed the electron density of an aspartate. The slight changes in conformation and the electrostatic surface potential around the aspartate-binding site were observed. In addition, the presence of an aspartate stabilized residues Phe-150' and Arg-73. A pistonlike displacement of helix α4b' was also induced by aspartate binding as predicted by the piston model. Taken together, these small changes might be related to the induction of Tar activity and might disturb binding of the second aspartate to the second binding site in E. coli. PMID:27292793

  12. AHR-11797: a novel benzodiazepine antagonist

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, D.N.; Kilpatrick, B.F.; Hannaman, P.K.

    1986-03-01

    AHR-11797(5,6-dihydro-6-methyl-1-phenyl-/sup 3/H-pyrrolo(3,2,1-ij)quinazolin-3-one) displaced /sup 3/H-flunitrazepam (IC/sub 50/ = 82 nM) and /sup 3/H-Ro 15-1877 (IC/sub 50/ = 104 nM) from rat brain synaptosomes. AHR-11797 did not protect mice from seizures induced by maximal electroshock or subcutaneous Metrazol (scMET), nor did it induce seizures in doses up to the lethal dose. However, at 31.6 mg/kg, IP, it significantly increased the anticonvulsant ED/sub 50/ of chlordiazepoxide (CDPX) from 1.9 to 31.6 mg/kg, IP. With 56.7 mg/kg, IP, of AHR-11797, CDPX was inactive in doses up to 100 mg/kg, IP. AHR-11797 did not significantly increase punished responding in the Geller and Seifter conflict procedure, but it did attenuate the effects of diazepam. Although the compound is without anticonvulsant or anxiolytic activity, it did have muscle relaxant properties. AHR-11797 blocked morphine-induced Straub tail in mice (ED/sub 50/ = 31 mg/kg, IP) and it selectively suppressed the polysnaptic linguomandibular reflex in barbiturate-anesthetized cats. The apparent muscle relaxant activity of AHR-11797 suggests that different receptor sites are involved for muscle relaxant vs. anxiolytic/anticonvulsant activities of the benzodiazepines.

  13. Computation of binding energies including their enthalpy and entropy components for protein-ligand complexes using support vector machines.

    PubMed

    Koppisetty, Chaitanya A K; Frank, Martin; Kemp, Graham J L; Nyholm, Per-Georg

    2013-10-28

    Computing binding energies of protein-ligand complexes including their enthalpy and entropy terms by means of computational methods is an appealing approach for selecting initial hits and for further optimization in early stages of drug discovery. Despite the importance, computational predictions of thermodynamic components have evaded attention and reasonable solutions. In this study, support vector machines are used for developing scoring functions to compute binding energies and their enthalpy and entropy components of protein-ligand complexes. The binding energies computed from our newly derived scoring functions have better Pearson's correlation coefficients with experimental data than previously reported scoring functions in benchmarks for protein-ligand complexes from the PDBBind database. The protein-ligand complexes with binding energies dominated by enthalpy or entropy term could be qualitatively classified by the newly derived scoring functions with high accuracy. Furthermore, it is found that the inclusion of comprehensive descriptors based on ligand properties in the scoring functions improved the accuracy of classification as well as the prediction of binding energies including their thermodynamic components. The prediction of binding energies including the enthalpy and entropy components using the support vector machine based scoring functions should be of value in the drug discovery process.

  14. Mechanism for attenuation of DNA binding by MarR family transcriptional regulators by small molecule ligands.

    PubMed

    Perera, Inoka C; Lee, Yong-Hwan; Wilkinson, Steven P; Grove, Anne

    2009-07-31

    Members of the multiple antibiotic resistance regulator (MarR) family control gene expression in a variety of metabolic processes in bacteria and archaea. Hypothetical uricase regulator (HucR), which belongs to the ligand-responsive branch of the MarR family, regulates uricase expression in Deinococcus radiodurans by binding a shared promoter region between uricase and HucR genes. We show here that HucR responds only to urate and, to a lesser extent, to xanthine by attenuated DNA binding, compared to other intermediates of purine degradation. Using molecular-dynamics-guided mutational analysis, we identified the ligand-binding site in HucR. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays and intrinsic Trp fluorescence have identified W20 from the N-terminal helix and R80 from helix 3, which serves as a scaffold for the DNA recognition helix, as being essential for ligand binding. Using structural data combined with in silico and in vitro analyses, we propose a mechanism for the attenuation of DNA binding in which a conformational change initiated by charge repulsion due to a bound ligand propagates to DNA recognition helices. This mechanism may apply generally to MarR homologs that bind anionic phenolic ligands. PMID:19501097

  15. Crystal structures of the ligand-binding region of uPARAP: effect of calcium ion binding.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Cai; Jürgensen, Henrik J; Engelholm, Lars H; Li, Rui; Liu, Min; Jiang, Longguang; Luo, Zhipu; Behrendt, Niels; Huang, Mingdong

    2016-08-01

    The proteins of the mannose receptor (MR) family share a common domain organization and have a broad range of biological functions. Urokinase plasminogen activator receptor-associated protein (uPARAP) (or Endo180) is a member of this family and plays an important role in extracellular matrix remodelling through interaction with its ligands, including collagens and urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR). We report the crystal structures of the first four domains of uPARAP (also named the ligand-binding region, LBR) at pH 7.4 in Ca(2+)-bound and Ca(2+)-free forms. The first domain (cysteine-rich or CysR domain) folds into a new and unique conformation different from the β-trefoil fold of typical CysR domains. The so-called long loop regions (LLRs) of the C-type lectin-like domain (CTLD) 1 and 2 (the third and fourth domain) mediate the direct contacts between these domains. These LLRs undergo a Ca(2+)-dependent conformational change, and this is likely to be the key structural determinant affecting the overall conformation of uPARAP. Our results provide a molecular mechanism to support the structural flexibility of uPARAP, and shed light on the structural flexibility of other members of the MR family. PMID:27247422

  16. Advances in free-energy-based simulations of protein folding and ligand binding.

    PubMed

    Perez, Alberto; Morrone, Joseph A; Simmerling, Carlos; Dill, Ken A

    2016-02-01

    Free-energy-based simulations are increasingly providing the narratives about the structures, dynamics and biological mechanisms that constitute the fabric of protein science. Here, we review two recent successes. It is becoming practical: first, to fold small proteins with free-energy methods without knowing substructures and second, to compute ligand-protein binding affinities, not just their binding poses. Over the past 40 years, the timescales that can be simulated by atomistic MD are doubling every 1.3 years--which is faster than Moore's law. Thus, these advances are not simply due to the availability of faster computers. Force fields, solvation models and simulation methodology have kept pace with computing advancements, and are now quite good. At the tip of the spear recently are GPU-based computing, improved fast-solvation methods, continued advances in force fields, and conformational sampling methods that harness external information. PMID:26773233

  17. Distortion of Flavin Geometry Is Linked to Ligand Binding in Cholesterol Oxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Lyubimov, A.Y.; Heard, K.; Tang, H.; Sampson, N.S.; Vrielink, A.

    2009-06-03

    Two high-resolution structures of a double mutant of bacterial cholesterol oxidase in the presence or absence of a ligand, glycerol, are presented, showing the trajectory of glycerol as it binds in a Michaelis complex-like position in the active site. A group of three aromatic residues forces the oxidized isoalloxazine moiety to bend along the N5-N10 axis as a response to the binding of glycerol in the active site. Movement of these aromatic residues is only observed in the glycerol-bound structure, indicating that some tuning of the FAD redox potential is caused by the formation of the Michaelis complex during regular catalysis. This structural study suggests a possible mechanism of substrate-assisted flavin activation, improves our understanding of the interplay between the enzyme, its flavin cofactor and its substrate, and is of use to the future design of effective cholesterol oxidase inhibitors.

  18. An integrated methodology for data processing in dynamic force spectroscopy of ligand-receptor binding.

    PubMed

    Odorico, M; Teulon, J-M; Berthoumieu, O; Chen, S-w W; Parot, P; Pellequer, J-L

    2007-10-01

    Dynamic force spectroscopy (DFS), using atomic force microscopy (AFM), is a powerful tool to study ligand-receptor binding. The interaction mode of two binding partners is investigated by exploring stochastic behaviors of bond rupture events. However, to define a rupture event from force-distance measurements is not conclusive or unique in literature. To reveal the influence of event identification methods, we have developed an efficient protocol to manage tremendous amount of data by implementing different choices of peak selection from the force-distance curve. This data processing software simplifies routinely experimental procedures such as cantilever spring constant and force-distance curve calibrations, statistical treatments of data, and analysis distributions of rupture events. In the present work, we took available experimental data from a complex between a chelate metal compound and a monoclonal antibody as a study system.

  19. Evolution of off-lattice model proteins under ligand binding constraints.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Erik D; Grishin, Nick V

    2016-08-01

    We investigate protein evolution using an off-lattice polymer model evolved to imitate the behavior of small enzymes. Model proteins evolve through mutations to nucleotide sequences (including insertions and deletions) and are selected to fold and maintain a specific binding site compatible with a model ligand. We show that this requirement is, in itself, sufficient to maintain an ordered folding domain, and we compare it to the requirement of folding an ordered (but otherwise unrestricted) domain. We measure rates of amino acid change as a function of local environment properties such as solvent exposure, packing density, and distance from the active site, as well as overall rates of sequence and structure change, both along and among model lineages in star phylogenies. The model recapitulates essentially all of the behavior found in protein phylogenetic analyses, and predicts that amino acid substitution rates vary linearly with distance from the binding site. PMID:27627338

  20. pMD-Membrane: A Method for Ligand Binding Site Identification in Membrane-Bound Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Gorfe, Alemayehu A.

    2015-01-01

    Probe-based or mixed solvent molecular dynamics simulation is a useful approach for the identification and characterization of druggable sites in drug targets. However, thus far the method has been applied only to soluble proteins. A major reason for this is the potential effect of the probe molecules on membrane structure. We have developed a technique to overcome this limitation that entails modification of force field parameters to reduce a few pairwise non-bonded interactions between selected atoms of the probe molecules and bilayer lipids. We used the resulting technique, termed pMD-membrane, to identify allosteric ligand binding sites on the G12D and G13D oncogenic mutants of the K-Ras protein bound to a negatively charged lipid bilayer. In addition, we show that differences in probe occupancy can be used to quantify changes in the accessibility of druggable sites due to conformational changes induced by membrane binding or mutation. PMID:26506102

  1. Advances in free-energy-based simulations of protein folding and ligand binding.

    PubMed

    Perez, Alberto; Morrone, Joseph A; Simmerling, Carlos; Dill, Ken A

    2016-02-01

    Free-energy-based simulations are increasingly providing the narratives about the structures, dynamics and biological mechanisms that constitute the fabric of protein science. Here, we review two recent successes. It is becoming practical: first, to fold small proteins with free-energy methods without knowing substructures and second, to compute ligand-protein binding affinities, not just their binding poses. Over the past 40 years, the timescales that can be simulated by atomistic MD are doubling every 1.3 years--which is faster than Moore's law. Thus, these advances are not simply due to the availability of faster computers. Force fields, solvation models and simulation methodology have kept pace with computing advancements, and are now quite good. At the tip of the spear recently are GPU-based computing, improved fast-solvation methods, continued advances in force fields, and conformational sampling methods that harness external information.

  2. Evolution of off-lattice model proteins under ligand binding constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Erik D.; Grishin, Nick V.

    2016-08-01

    We investigate protein evolution using an off-lattice polymer model evolved to imitate the behavior of small enzymes. Model proteins evolve through mutations to nucleotide sequences (including insertions and deletions) and are selected to fold and maintain a specific binding site compatible with a model ligand. We show that this requirement is, in itself, sufficient to maintain an ordered folding domain, and we compare it to the requirement of folding an ordered (but otherwise unrestricted) domain. We measure rates of amino acid change as a function of local environment properties such as solvent exposure, packing density, and distance from the active site, as well as overall rates of sequence and structure change, both along and among model lineages in star phylogenies. The model recapitulates essentially all of the behavior found in protein phylogenetic analyses, and predicts that amino acid substitution rates vary linearly with distance from the binding site.

  3. A Mutant Ahr Allele Protects the Embryonic Kidney from Hydrocarbon-Induced Deficits in Fetal Programming

    PubMed Central

    Nanez, Adrian

    2011-01-01

    Background: The use of experimental model systems has expedited the elucidation of pathogenetic mechanisms of renal developmental disease in humans and the identification of genes that orchestrate developmental programming during nephrogenesis. Objectives: We conducted studies to evaluate the role of AHR polymorphisms in the disruption of renal developmental programming by benzo(a)pyrene (BaP). Methods: We used metanephric cultures of C57BL/6J (C57) mice expressing the Ahrb-1 allele and B6.D2N-Ahrd/J (D2N) mice expressing a mutant allele deficient in ligand binding (Ahrd) to investigate molecular mechanisms of renal development. Deficits in fetal programming were evaluated in the offspring of pregnant mice treated with BaP during nephrogenesis. Results: Hydrocarbon challenge of metanephri from C57 mice altered Wilms’ tumor suppressor gene (Wt1) mRNA splice variant ratios and reduced mRNAs of the Wt1 transcriptional targets syndecan-1 (Sdc1) paired box gene 2 (Pax2), epidermal growth factor receptor (Egfr), and retinoic acid receptor, alpha (Rarα). These changes correlated with down-regulation of effectors of differentiation [secreted frizzled-related sequence protein 1 (Sfrp1), insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (Igf1r), wingless-related MMTV-integration site 4 (Wnt4), Lim homeobox protein 1 (Lhx1), E-cadherin]. In contrast, metanephri from D2N mice were spared hydrocarbon-induced changes in Wt1 splice variant ratios and deficits of differentiation. We observed similar patterns of dysmorphogenesis and progressive loss of renal function at postnatal weeks 7 and 52 in the offspring of pregnant C57 but not D2N mice gavaged with 0.1 or 0.5 mg/kg BaP on gestation days 10–13. Conclusions: These findings support a functional link between AHR and WT1 in the regulation of renal morphogenesis and raise important questions about the contribution of human AHR polymorphisms to the fetal origins of adult-onset kidney disease. PMID:21803694

  4. Spin-forbidden ligand binding to the ferrous-heme group: ab initio and DFT studies.

    PubMed

    Strickland, Nikki; Harvey, Jeremy N

    2007-02-01

    The potential energy surfaces (PESs) and associated energy barriers that characterize the spin-forbidden recombination reactions of the gas-phase ferrous deoxy-heme group with CO, NO, and H2O ligands have been calculated using density functional theory (DFT). The bond energy for binding of O2 has also been calculated. Extensive large basis set CCSD(T) calculations on two small models of the heme group have been used to calibrate the accuracy of different DFT functionals for treating these systems. Pure functionals are shown to overestimate the stability of the low-spin forms of the deoxy-heme model, and to overestimate the binding energy of H2O and CO, whereas hybrid functionals such as B3PW91 and B3LYP yield accurate results. Accordingly, the latter functionals have been used to explore the PESs for binding. CO binding is found to involve a significant barrier of ca. 3 kcal mol-1 due to the need to change from the deoxy-heme quintet ground state to the bound singlet state. Binding of water does not involve a barrier, but the resulting bond is weak and may be further weakened in the protein environment, which should explain why water binding is not usually observed in heme proteins such as myoglobin. NO binding involves a low barrier, which is consistent with observed rapid geminate recombination. The calculated bond energies are in good agreement with previous reported values and in fair agreement with experiment for CO and O2. The value for NO is significantly lower than the experimentally derived bond energy, suggesting that B3LYP is less accurate in this case.

  5. A New Method for Navigating Optimal Direction for Pulling Ligand from Binding Pocket: Application to Ranking Binding Affinity by Steered Molecular Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Vuong, Quan Van; Nguyen, Tin Trung; Li, Mai Suan

    2015-12-28

    In this paper we present a new method for finding the optimal path for pulling a ligand from the binding pocket using steered molecular dynamics (SMD). Scoring function is defined as the steric hindrance caused by a receptor to ligand movement. Then the optimal path corresponds to the minimum of this scoring function. We call the new method MSH (Minimal Steric Hindrance). Contrary to existing navigation methods, our approach takes into account the geometry of the ligand while other methods including CAVER only consider the ligand as a sphere with a given radius. Using three different target + receptor sets, we have shown that the rupture force Fmax and nonequilibrium work Wpull obtained based on the MSH method show a much higher correlation with experimental data on binding free energies compared to CAVER. Furthermore, Wpull was found to be a better indicator for binding affinity than Fmax. Thus, the new MSH method is a reliable tool for obtaining the best direction for ligand exiting from the binding site. Its combination with the standard SMD technique can provide reasonable results for ranking binding affinities using Wpull as a scoring function. PMID:26595261

  6. Direct detection of ligand binding to Sepharose-immobilised protein using saturation transfer double difference (STDD) NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Haselhorst, Thomas; Muenster-Kuehnel, Anja K.; Oschlies, Melanie; Tiralongo, Joe; Gerardy-Schahn, Rita; Itzstein, Mark von . E-mail: m.vonitzstein@griffith.edu.au

    2007-08-10

    We report an easy and direct application of 'Saturation Transfer Double Difference' (STDD) NMR spectroscopy to identify ligands that bind to a Sepharose-immobilised target protein. The model protein, cytidine 5'-monophosphate sialic acid (CMP-Sia) synthetase, was expressed as a Strep-Tag II fusion protein and immobilised on Strep-Tactin Sepharose. STD NMR experiments of the protein-enriched Sepharose matrix in the presence of a binding ligand (cytidine 5'-triphosphate, CTP) and a non-binding ligand ({alpha}/{beta}-glucose) clearly show that CTP binds to the immobilised enzyme, whereas glucose has no affinity. This approach has three major advantages: (a) only low quantities of protein are required, (b) no specialised NMR technology or the application of additional data analysis by non-routine methods is required, and (c) easy multiple use of the immobilised protein is available.

  7. Cyclic peptide ligand with high binding capacity for affinity purification of immunoglobulin G.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hyo Jin; Choe, Weonu; Min, Jeong-Ki; Lee, Young-Mi; Kim, B Moon; Chung, Sang J

    2016-09-30

    The rapidly increasing implementation of antibodies in therapeutic and diagnostic applications has necessitated the development of antibody production and purification technologies for both academic and industrial usage. Bacterial Protein A and Protein G are known to bind antibodies with high affinity and have facilitated the isolation and purification thereof. Recently, small peptide ligands (i.e. IgG Fc domain-binding peptides, FcBP) that specifically bind to the Fc-domain of antibodies were reported. In the present study we describe the development of a reusable high affinity column for antibody purification utilizing immobilized FcBP, comprising 13 amino acids residues, on a sepharose resin. In addition to FcBP, Cys to Ser substituted FcBP (FcBP-Ser), reduced FcBP (FcBP-Red), commercial Protein A and Protein G resins, packed into columns, were evaluated for antibody purification. All these columns except the FcBP-Ser one showed good binding capacity for a humanized IgG (trastuzumab) and a chimeric IgG (cetuximab). The column packed with FcBP-Red allowed antibody purification at a less acidic pH (pH 4.8) than was required for the other ligand affinity columns used in our experiments (i.e., pH 3.2 for Protein G and FcBP columns, and pH 3.5 for Protein A column, respectively). Utilizing the FcBP column, antibodies from swine human sera were isolated with a purity of 95%. Interestingly, the FcBP column could be easily regenerated and operated without loss of efficiency for up to 60 runs, the maximum number of runs performed in the present study.

  8. Roles of cell and microvillus deformation and receptor-ligand binding kinetics in cell rolling.

    PubMed

    Pawar, Parag; Jadhav, Sameer; Eggleton, Charles D; Konstantopoulos, Konstantinos

    2008-10-01

    Polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN) recruitment to sites of inflammation is initiated by selectin-mediated PMN tethering and rolling on activated endothelium under flow. Cell rolling is modulated by bulk cell deformation (mesoscale), microvillus deformability (microscale), and receptor-ligand binding kinetics (nanoscale). Selectin-ligand bonds exhibit a catch-slip bond behavior, and their dissociation is governed not only by the force but also by the force history. Whereas previous theoretical models have studied the significance of these three "length scales" in isolation, how their interplay affects cell rolling has yet to be resolved. We therefore developed a three-dimensional computational model that integrates the aforementioned length scales to delineate their relative contributions to PMN rolling. Our simulations predict that the catch-slip bond behavior and to a lesser extent bulk cell deformation are responsible for the shear threshold phenomenon. Cells bearing deformable rather than rigid microvilli roll slower only at high P-selectin site densities and elevated levels of shear (>or=400 s(-1)). The more compliant cells (membrane stiffness=1.2 dyn/cm) rolled slower than cells with a membrane stiffness of 3.0 dyn/cm at shear rates >50 s(-1). In summary, our model demonstrates that cell rolling over a ligand-coated surface is a highly coordinated process characterized by a complex interplay between forces acting on three distinct length scales.

  9. Assessment and acceleration of binding energy calculations for protein-ligand complexes by the fragment molecular orbital method.

    PubMed

    Otsuka, Takao; Okimoto, Noriaki; Taiji, Makoto

    2015-11-15

    In the field of drug discovery, it is important to accurately predict the binding affinities between target proteins and drug applicant molecules. Many of the computational methods available for evaluating binding affinities have adopted molecular mechanics-based force fields, although they cannot fully describe protein-ligand interactions. A noteworthy computational method in development involves large-scale electronic structure calculations. Fragment molecular orbital (FMO) method, which is one of such large-scale calculation techniques, is applied in this study for calculating the binding energies between proteins and ligands. By testing the effects of specific FMO calculation conditions (including fragmentation size, basis sets, electron correlation, exchange-correlation functionals, and solvation effects) on the binding energies of the FK506-binding protein and 10 ligand complex molecule, we have found that the standard FMO calculation condition, FMO2-MP2/6-31G(d), is suitable for evaluating the protein-ligand interactions. The correlation coefficient between the binding energies calculated with this FMO calculation condition and experimental values is determined to be R = 0.77. Based on these results, we also propose a practical scheme for predicting binding affinities by combining the FMO method with the quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) model. The results of this combined method can be directly compared with experimental binding affinities. The FMO and QSAR combined scheme shows a higher correlation with experimental data (R = 0.91). Furthermore, we propose an acceleration scheme for the binding energy calculations using a multilayer FMO method focusing on the protein-ligand interaction distance. Our acceleration scheme, which uses FMO2-HF/STO-3G:MP2/6-31G(d) at R(int) = 7.0 Å, reduces computational costs, while maintaining accuracy in the evaluation of binding energy.

  10. Tolerance to cadmium and cadmium-binding ligands in Great Salt Lake brine shrimp (Artemia salina)

    SciTech Connect

    Jayasekara, S.; Drown, D.B.; Sharma, R.P.

    1986-02-01

    Information on the accumulation of cadmium in cytosolic proteins of Great Lake brine shrimp (Artemia salina) was obtained from animals collected directly from the lake and also from animal hatched and maintained in three sublethal concentrations of cadmium (0.5, 2.0, 5.0 ppm) in saltwater aquaria. Brine shrimp growth under these conditions was monitored by measuring body lengths during a 7-day exposure period. Heat-stable, cadmium-binding ligands were isolated and identified by Sephadex G-75 chromatography and atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Cadmium was found to be equally distributed between high and low molecular weight proteins in animals collected from the lake and the 0.5 ppm cadmium group. There was also a slight growth stimulation noted in the 0.5-pm group. Higher cadmium incorporation was noted in low molecular weight fractions with increasing cadmium concentration in the exposure media. Low molecular weight fractions were also found to have high uv absorption characteristics at 250 nm and low absorption at 280 nm. Molecular weight of the cadmium-binding ligands was found to be 11,000 as estimated by the gel filtration method. De novo synthesis of this protein was increased as a function of cadmium concentration in the media. However, slow accumulation of cadmium in other protein fractions was also noticed in higher cadmium exposure groups, suggesting the existence of possible tolerance mechanisms in brine shrimp exposed to suspected acute cadmium concentrations.

  11. Spotted vesicles, striped micelles, and responsive Janus assemblies induced by ligand binding

    PubMed Central

    Christian, David A.; Tian, Aiwei; Ellenbroek, Wouter G.; Levental, Ilya; Rajagopal, Karthikan; Janmey, Paul A.; Liu, Andrea J.; Baumgart, Tobias; Discher, Dennis E.

    2009-01-01

    Selective binding of multivalent ligands within a mixture of polyvalent amphiphiles provides, in principle, a mechanism to drive domain formation in self-assemblies. Divalent cations are shown here to crossbridge polyanionic amphiphiles that thereby demix from neutral amphiphiles and form spots or rafts within vesicles as well as stripes within cylindrical micelles. Calcium and copper crossbridged domains of synthetic block copolymers or natural lipid (PIP2, phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate) possess tunable sizes, shapes, and/or spacings that can last for years. Lateral segregation in these ‘responsive Janus assemblies’ couples weakly to curvature and proves restricted within phase diagrams to narrow regimes of pH and cation concentration that are centered near the characteristic binding constants for polyacid interactions. Remixing at high pH is surprising, but a theory for Strong Lateral Segregation (SLS) shows that counterion entropy dominates electrostatic crossbridges, thus illustrating the insights gained into ligand induced pattern formation within self-assemblies. PMID:19734886

  12. Assaying the binding strength of G-quadruplex ligands using single-molecule TPM experiments.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shih-Wei; Chu, Jen-Fei; Tsai, Cheng-Ting; Fang, Hung-Chih; Chang, Ta-Chau; Li, Hung-Wen

    2013-05-15

    G-quadruplexes are stable secondary structures formed by Hoogsteen base pairing of guanine-rich single-stranded DNA sequences in the presence of monovalent cations (Na(+) or K(+)). Folded G-quadruplex (G4) structures in human telomeres have been proposed as a potential target for cancer therapy. In this study, we used single-molecule tethered particle motion (TPM) experiments to assay the binding strength of possible G4 ligands. We found that individual single-stranded DNA molecules containing the human telomeric sequence d[AGGG(TTAGGG)3] fluctuated between the folded and the unfolded states in a 10 mM Na(+) solution at 37 °C. The durations of folded and unfolded states were single-exponentially distributed, and in return the folding and unfolding rate constants were 1.68 ± 0.01 and 1.63 ± 0.03 (s(-1)), respectively. In the presence of G4 ligands, such as TMPyP4, DODCI, BMVC, and BMVPA, the unfolding rate constant decreased appreciably. In addition, combining the Cu(2+)-induced G4 unfolding and TPM assay, we showed that BMVC and TMPyP4 are better G4 stabilizers than DODCI. The capability of monitoring the fluctuation between the folded and the unfolded state of G4 DNA in real time allows the determination of both kinetic and thermodynamic parameters in a single measurement and offers a simple way to assay binding strength under various conditions.

  13. Ligand affinity chromatography, an indispensable method for the purification of soluble cytokine receptors and binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Novick, Daniela; Rubinstein, Menachem

    2012-01-01

    Ligand affinity chromatography separation is based on unique interaction between the target analyte and a ligand, which is coupled covalently to a resin. It is a simple, rapid, selective, and efficient purification procedure of proteins providing tens of thousands fold purification in one step. The biological activity of the isolated proteins is retained in most cases thus function is revealed concomitantly with the isolation. Prior to the completion of the genome project this method facilitated rapid and reliable cloning of the corresponding gene. Upon completion of this project, a partial protein sequence is enough for retrieving its complete mRNA and hence its complete protein sequence. This method is indispensable for the isolation of both expected (e.g. receptors) but mainly unexpected, unpredicted and very much surprising binding proteins. No other approach would yield the latter. This chapter provides examples for both the expected target proteins, isolated from rich sources of human proteins, as well as the unexpected binding proteins, found by serendipity. PMID:22131033

  14. Targeting a homogeneously glycosylated antibody Fc to bind cancer cells using a synthetic receptor ligand.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Junpeng; Chen, Rui; Pawlicki, Mark A; Tolbert, Thomas J

    2009-09-30

    The targeting of a glycosylated antibody Fc fragment to bind to cancer cells by site-selective incorporation of a synthetic ligand is described. Homogeneously glycosylated immunoglobulin G subclass 1 fragment crystallizable (IgG1 Fc) was produced by expression in a glycosylation-deficient yeast strain and subsequent treatment with mannosidase IA. A N-terminal cysteine was generated on the expressed IgG1 Fc by utilizing proteolytic processing enzymes in the yeast secretory pathway. A cyclic RGD peptide thioester 2 was synthesized and then site-selectively attached to the N-terminus of the IgG1 Fc glycoprotein using native chemical ligation. The resulting chemically modified antibody fragment, RGD-Man(5)-IgG1 Fc (5), retained biological activity similar to that of the free cyclic RGD peptide 1 when assayed for its ability to both promote and inhibit the adhesion of alpha(v)beta(3) integrin receptor-expressing WM-115 melanoma cells. In addition, fluorescent microscopy experiments were conducted using FITC-labeled 5 and confirmed binding of 5 to WM-115 melanoma cells. Site-selectively modified antibody fragments such as the one described here may be used to combine the beneficial properties of synthetic receptor ligands with antibody fragments to develop useful biochemical tools and improved therapeutics. The methods described here can also be used to produce glycoprotein fragments for the chemoenzymatic synthesis of homogeneous glycoproteins.

  15. Potential New Ligand Systems for Binding Uranyl Ions in Seawater Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, John

    2014-12-13

    Work began this quarter on a new project involving a combined computational and biosynthetic approach to selective recognition of uranyl ion in aqueous solution. This project exploits the results of computational studies to discover new ligand classes. Synthetic studies will follow to generate target systems for uranyl binding and determination of binding constants. The process will be iterative, with results from computation informing synthesis, and vice versa. The theme of the ligand classes to be examined initially will be biologically based. New phosphonate-containing α-amino acid N-carboxyanhydride (NCA) monomers were used recently to prepare well-defined phosphonate-containing poly-peptides and block copolypeptides. Our first approach is to utilize these phosphate- and phosphonate-containing NCAs for the coordination of uranyl. The work includes the laboratory-scale preparation of a series of NCAs and the full thermodynamic and spectroscopic characterization of the resulting uranyl complexes. We are also evaluating the sequestering activity in different physiological and environmental conditions of these copolymers as well as their biodegradability.

  16. Ligand-receptor binding revealed by the TNF family member TALL-1.

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Y. F.; Hong, X.; Kappler, J.; Jiang, L.; Zhang, R. G.; Xu, L. G.; Pan, C.-H.; Martin, W. E.; Murphy, R. C.; Shu, H.-B.; Dai, S. D.; Zhang, G. Y.; Biosciences Division; National Jewish Medical and Research Center; Howard Hughes Medical Inst.; Univ. of Colorado Health Science Center; Peking Univ.

    2003-05-01

    The tumour necrosis factor (TNF) ligand TALL-1 and its cognate receptors, BCMA, TACI and BAFF-R, were recently identified as members of the TNF superfamily, which are essential factors contributing to B-cell maturation. The functional, soluble fragment of TALL-1 (sTALL-1) forms a virus-like assembly for its proper function. Here we determine the crystal structures of sTALL-1 complexed with the extracellular domains of BCMA and BAFF-R at 2.6 and 2.5 {angstrom}, respectively. The single cysteine-rich domain of BCMA and BAFF-R both have saddle-like architectures, which sit on the horseback-like surface formed by four coil regions on each individual sTALL-1 monomer. Three novel structural modules, D2, X2 and N, were revealed from the current structures. Sequence alignments, structural modelling and mutagenesis revealed that one disulphide bridge in BAFF-R is critical for determining the binding specificity of the extracellular domain eBAFF-R to TALL-1 instead of APRIL, a closely related ligand of TALL-1, which was confirmed by binding experiments in vitro.

  17. Genetically Encoded Fragment-Based Discovery of Glycopeptide Ligands for Carbohydrate-Binding Proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, Simon; Lin, Edith; Kitov, Pavel I.; Tjhung, Katrina F.; Gerlits, Oksana O.; Deng, Lu; Kasper, Brian; Sood, Amika; Paschal, Beth M.; Zhang, Ping; Ling, Chang-Chun; Klassen, John S.; Noren, Christopher J.; Mahal, Lara K.; Woods, Robert J.; Coates, Leighton; Derda, Ratmir

    2015-04-10

    Here we describe an approach to accelerate the search for competitive inhibitors for carbohydrate-recognition domains (CRDs). Genetically encoded fragment-based-discovery (GE-FBD) uses selection of phagedisplayed glycopeptides to dock a glycan fragment at the CRD and guide selection of Synergistic peptide motifs adjacent to the CRD. Starting from concanavalin A (ConA), a mannose (Man)-binding protein, as a bait, we narrowed a library of 108 glycopeptides to 86 leads that share a consensus motif, Man-WYD. Validation of synthetic leads yielded Man-WYDLF that exhibited 40 50-fold enhancement in affinity over methyl α-D-mannopyranoside (MeMan). Lectin array Suggested specificity: Man-WYD derivative bound only to 3 out of 17 proteins-ConA, LcH, and PSA-that bind to Man. An X-ray structure of ConA.:Man-WYD proved that the trimannoside core and Man-WYD exhibit identical CRD docking; but their extra-CRD binding modes are significantly. different. Still, they have comparable affinity and selectivity for various Man-binding proteins. The intriguing observation provides new insight into functional mimicry :of carbohydrates by peptide ligands. GE-FBD may provide an alternative to rapidly search for competitive inhibitors for lectins.

  18. Regulation of Neurexin 1[beta] Tertiary Structure and Ligand Binding through Alternative Splicing

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Kaiser C.; Kuczynska, Dorota A.; Wu, Irene J.; Murray, Beverly H.; Sheckler, Lauren R.; Rudenko, Gabby

    2008-08-04

    Neurexins and neuroligins play an essential role in synapse function, and their alterations are linked to autistic spectrum disorder. Interactions between neurexins and neuroligins regulate inhibitory and excitatory synaptogenesis in vitro through a splice-insert signaling code. In particular, neurexin 1{beta} carrying an alternative splice insert at site SS{number_sign}4 interacts with neuroligin 2 (found predominantly at inhibitory synapses) but much less so with other neuroligins (those carrying an insert at site B and prevalent at excitatory synapses). The structure of neurexin 1{beta}+SS{number_sign}4 reveals dramatic rearrangements to the 'hypervariable surface', the binding site for neuroligins. The splice insert protrudes as a long helix into space, triggers conversion of loop {beta}10-{beta}11 into a helix rearranging the binding site for neuroligins, and rearranges the Ca{sup 2+}-binding site required for ligand binding, increasing its affinity. Our structures reveal the mechanism by which neurexin 1{beta} isoforms acquire neuroligin splice isoform selectivity.

  19. Genetically Encoded Fragment-Based Discovery of Glycopeptide Ligands for Carbohydrate-Binding Proteins

    DOE PAGES

    Ng, Simon; Lin, Edith; Kitov, Pavel I.; Tjhung, Katrina F.; Gerlits, Oksana O.; Deng, Lu; Kasper, Brian; Sood, Amika; Paschal, Beth M.; Zhang, Ping; et al

    2015-04-10

    Here we describe an approach to accelerate the search for competitive inhibitors for carbohydrate-recognition domains (CRDs). Genetically encoded fragment-based-discovery (GE-FBD) uses selection of phagedisplayed glycopeptides to dock a glycan fragment at the CRD and guide selection of Synergistic peptide motifs adjacent to the CRD. Starting from concanavalin A (ConA), a mannose (Man)-binding protein, as a bait, we narrowed a library of 108 glycopeptides to 86 leads that share a consensus motif, Man-WYD. Validation of synthetic leads yielded Man-WYDLF that exhibited 40 50-fold enhancement in affinity over methyl α-D-mannopyranoside (MeMan). Lectin array Suggested specificity: Man-WYD derivative bound only to 3 outmore » of 17 proteins-ConA, LcH, and PSA-that bind to Man. An X-ray structure of ConA.:Man-WYD proved that the trimannoside core and Man-WYD exhibit identical CRD docking; but their extra-CRD binding modes are significantly. different. Still, they have comparable affinity and selectivity for various Man-binding proteins. The intriguing observation provides new insight into functional mimicry :of carbohydrates by peptide ligands. GE-FBD may provide an alternative to rapidly search for competitive inhibitors for lectins.« less

  20. Crystal structures and ligand binding of PurM proteins from Thermus thermophilus and Geobacillus kaustophilus.

    PubMed

    Kanagawa, Mayumi; Baba, Seiki; Watanabe, Yuzo; Nakagawa, Noriko; Ebihara, Akio; Kuramitsu, Seiki; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Sampei, Gen-Ichi; Kawai, Gota

    2016-03-01

    Crystal structures of 5-aminoimidazole ribonucleotide (AIR) synthetase, also known as PurM, from Thermus thermophilus (Tt) and Geobacillus kaustophilus (Gk) were determined. For TtPurM, the maximum resolution was 2.2 Å and the space group was P21212 with four dimers in an asymmetric unit. For GkPurM, the maximum resolution was 2.2 Å and the space group was P21212 with one monomer in asymmetric unit. The biological unit is dimer for both TtPurM and GkPurM and the dimer structures were similar to previously determined structures of PurM in general. For TtPurM, ∼50 residues at the amino terminal were disordered in the crystal structure whereas, for GkPurM, the corresponding region covered the ATP-binding site forming an α helix in part, suggesting that the N-terminal region of PurM changes its conformation upon binding of ligands. FGAM binding site was predicted by the docking simulation followed by the MD simulation based on the SO4 (2-) binding site found in the crystal structure of TtPurM.

  1. Enhanced Active Targeting via Cooperative Binding of Ligands on Liposomes to Target Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Sugiyama, Tomoki; Asai, Tomohiro; Nedachi, Yuki Murase; Katanasaka, Yasufumi; Shimizu, Kosuke; Maeda, Noriyuki; Oku, Naoto

    2013-01-01

    To achieve effective active targeting in a drug delivery system, we previously developed dual-targeting (DT) liposomes decorated with both vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-1 (VEGFR-1)-targeted APRPG and CD13-targeted GNGRG peptide ligands for tumor neovessels, and observed the enhanced suppression of tumor growth in Colon26 NL-17 tumor-bearing mice by the treatment with the DT liposomes encapsulating doxorubicin. In this present study, we examined the binding characteristics of DT liposomes having a different couple of ligands, namely, APRPG and integrin αvβ3-targeted GRGDS peptides. These DT liposomes synergistically associated to stimulated human umbilical vein endothelial cells compared with single-targeting (ST) liposomes decorated with APRPG or GRGDS. The results of a surface plasmon resonance assay showed that ST liposomes modified with APRPG or GRGDS peptide selectively bound to immobilized VEGFR-1 or integrin αvβ3, respectively. DT liposomes showed a higher affinity for a mixture of VEGFR-1 and integrin αvβ3 compared with ST liposomes, suggesting the cooperative binding of these 2 kinds of ligand on the liposomal surface. In a biodistribution assay, the DT liposomes accumulated to a significantly greater extent in the tumors of Colon26 NL-17 tumor-bearing mice compared with other liposomes. Moreover, the intratumoral distribution of the liposomes examined by confocal microscopy suggested that the DT liposomes targeted not only angiogenic endothelial cells but also tumor cells due to GRGDS-decoration. These findings suggest that "dual-targeting" augmented the affinity of the liposomes for the target cells and would thus be useful for active-targeting drug delivery for cancer treatment. PMID:23840738

  2. Mixed ligand ruthenium(III) complexes of benzaldehyde 4-methyl-3-thiosemicarbazones with triphenylphosphine/triphenylarsine co-ligands: Synthesis, DNA binding, DNA cleavage, antioxidative and cytotoxic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sampath, K.; Sathiyaraj, S.; Raja, G.; Jayabalakrishnan, C.

    2013-08-01

    The new ruthenium(III) complexes with 4-methyl-3-thiosemicarbazone ligands, (E)-2-(2-chlorobenzylidene)-N-methylhydrazinecarbothioamide (HL1) and (E)-2-(2-nitrobenzylidene)-N-methylhydrazinecarbothioamide (HL2), were prepared and characterized by various physico-chemical and spectroscopic methods. The title compounds act as bidentate, monobasic chelating ligands with S and N as the donor sites and are preferably found in the thiol form in all the complexes studied. The molecular structure of HL1 and HL2 were determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction method. DNA binding of the ligands and complexes were investigated by absorption spectroscopy and IR spectroscopy. It reveals that the compounds bind to nitrogenous bases of DNA via intercalation. The oxidative cleavage of the complexes with CT-DNA inferred that the effects of cleavage are dose dependent. Antioxidant study of the ligands and complexes showed the significant antioxidant activity against DPPH radical. In addition, the in vitro cytotoxicity of the ligands and complexes against MCF-7 cell line was assayed which showed higher cytotoxic activity with the lower IC50 values indicating their efficiency in killing the cancer cells even at low concentrations.

  3. Autoradiographic localization of aromatic hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) in rhesus monkey ovary.

    PubMed

    Baldridge, Monika G; Hutz, Reinhold J

    2007-06-01

    2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) is the most toxic congener of a large class of manmade pollutants that persist in the environment. TCDD exerts its toxic effects, in part, by binding to its receptor known as the aromatic hydrocarbon receptor (AHR). TCDD is estrogen modulatory and in some systems its receptor associates directly with estrogen receptors via co-activator molecules. TCDD inhibits steroid synthesis in human ovarian granulosa cells and AHR is found in these cells. We have previously shown that AHR is found in whole rhesus monkey ovary, but have yet to establish its location. In the present study, we set out to show that radiolabeled TCDD binds to monkey ovarian follicles and that this binding is receptor mediated. Ovaries from Macaca mulatta were sectioned on a cryostat at 10 micro m; and sections were incubated with either control vehicle, (3)H-TCDD, or (3)H-TCDD plus alpha-naphthoflavone (ANF), a known receptor-blocking agent. Here, we show for the first time specific binding of TCDD to the granulosa cells of antral follicles and other regions of the rhesus monkey ovary. Our data indicate a 60-fold increase in binding with (3)H-TCDD over that of control, and that this binding is reduced to the levels seen in controls with the addition of the competitive antagonist ANF. These findings support the hypothesis that TCDD directly affects primate ovarian function via the AHR.

  4. Ligand Binding Enhances Millisecond Conformational Exchange in Xylanase B2 from Streptomyces lividans.

    PubMed

    Gagné, Donald; Narayanan, Chitra; Nguyen-Thi, Nhung; Roux, Louise D; Bernard, David N; Brunzelle, Joseph S; Couture, Jean-François; Agarwal, Pratul K; Doucet, Nicolas

    2016-08-01

    Xylanases catalyze the hydrolysis of xylan, an abundant carbon and energy source with important commercial ramifications. Despite tremendous efforts devoted to the catalytic improvement of xylanases, success remains limited because of our relatively poor understanding of their molecular properties. Previous reports suggested the potential role of atomic-scale residue dynamics in modulating the catalytic activity of GH11 xylanases; however, dynamics in these studies was probed on time scales orders of magnitude faster than the catalytic time frame. Here, we used nuclear magnetic resonance titration and relaxation dispersion experiments ((15)N-CPMG) in combination with X-ray crystallography and computational simulations to probe conformational motions occurring on the catalytically relevant millisecond time frame in xylanase B2 (XlnB2) and its catalytically impaired mutant E87A from Streptomyces lividans 66. Our results show distinct dynamical properties for the apo and ligand-bound states of the enzymes. The apo form of XlnB2 experiences conformational exchange for residues in the fingers and palm regions of the catalytic cleft, while the catalytically impaired E87A variant displays millisecond dynamics only in the fingers, demonstrating the long-range effect of the mutation on flexibility. Ligand binding induces enhanced conformational exchange of residues interacting with the ligand in the fingers and thumb loop regions, emphasizing the potential role of residue motions in the fingers and thumb loop regions for recognition, positioning, processivity, and/or stabilization of ligands in XlnB2. To the best of our knowledge, this work represents the first experimental characterization of millisecond dynamics in a GH11 xylanase family member. These results offer new insights into the potential role of conformational exchange in GH11 enzymes, providing essential dynamic information to help improve protein engineering and design applications. PMID:27387012

  5. Structural transitions in ion coordination driven by changes in competition for ligand binding

    PubMed Central

    Varma, Sameer; Rempe, Susan B.

    2009-01-01

    Transferring Na+ and K+ ions from their preferred coordination states in water to states having different coordination numbers incurs a free energy cost. In several examples in nature, however, these ions readily partition from aqueous-phase coordination states into spatial regions having much higher coordination numbers. Here we utilize statistical theory of solutions, quantum chemical simulations, classical mechanics simulations and structural informatics to understand this aspect of ion partitioning. Our studies lead to the identification of a specific role of the solvation environment in driving transitions in ion coordination structures. Although ion solvation in liquid media is an exergonic reaction overall, we find it is also associated with considerable free energy penalties for extracting ligands from their solvation environments to form coordinated ion complexes. Reducing these penalties increases the stabilities of higher-order coordinations and brings down the energetic cost to partition ions from water into over-coordinated binding sites in biomolecules. These penalties can be lowered via a reduction in direct favorable interactions of the coordinating ligands with all atoms other than the ions themselves. A significant reduction in these penalties can, in fact, also drive up ion coordination preferences. Similarly, an increase in these penalties can lower ion coordination preferences, akin to a Hofmeister effect. Since such structural transitions are effected by the properties of the solvation phase, we anticipate that they will also occur for other ions. The influence of other factors, including ligand density, ligand chemistry and temperature, on the stabilities of ion coordination structures are also explored. PMID:18954053

  6. Ligand Binding Enhances Millisecond Conformational Exchange in Xylanase B2 from Streptomyces lividans.

    PubMed

    Gagné, Donald; Narayanan, Chitra; Nguyen-Thi, Nhung; Roux, Louise D; Bernard, David N; Brunzelle, Joseph S; Couture, Jean-François; Agarwal, Pratul K; Doucet, Nicolas

    2016-08-01

    Xylanases catalyze the hydrolysis of xylan, an abundant carbon and energy source with important commercial ramifications. Despite tremendous efforts devoted to the catalytic improvement of xylanases, success remains limited because of our relatively poor understanding of their molecular properties. Previous reports suggested the potential role of atomic-scale residue dynamics in modulating the catalytic activity of GH11 xylanases; however, dynamics in these studies was probed on time scales orders of magnitude faster than the catalytic time frame. Here, we used nuclear magnetic resonance titration and relaxation dispersion experiments ((15)N-CPMG) in combination with X-ray crystallography and computational simulations to probe conformational motions occurring on the catalytically relevant millisecond time frame in xylanase B2 (XlnB2) and its catalytically impaired mutant E87A from Streptomyces lividans 66. Our results show distinct dynamical properties for the apo and ligand-bound states of the enzymes. The apo form of XlnB2 experiences conformational exchange for residues in the fingers and palm regions of the catalytic cleft, while the catalytically impaired E87A variant displays millisecond dynamics only in the fingers, demonstrating the long-range effect of the mutation on flexibility. Ligand binding induces enhanced conformational exchange of residues interacting with the ligand in the fingers and thumb loop regions, emphasizing the potential role of residue motions in the fingers and thumb loop regions for recognition, positioning, processivity, and/or stabilization of ligands in XlnB2. To the best of our knowledge, this work represents the first experimental characterization of millisecond dynamics in a GH11 xylanase family member. These results offer new insights into the potential role of conformational exchange in GH11 enzymes, providing essential dynamic information to help improve protein engineering and design applications.

  7. Structure and ligand-binding properties of the biogenic amine-binding protein from the saliva of a blood-feeding insect vector of Trypanosoma cruzi

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Xueqing; Chang, Bianca W.; Ribeiro, Jose M. C.; Andersen, John F.

    2013-01-01

    Biogenic amine-binding proteins mediate the anti-inflammatory and antihemostatic activities of blood-feeding insect saliva. The structure of the amine-binding protein from R. prolixus reveals the interaction of biogenic amine ligands with the protein. Proteins that bind small-molecule mediators of inflammation and hemostasis are essential for blood-feeding by arthropod vectors of infectious disease. In ticks and triatomine insects, the lipocalin protein family is greatly expanded and members have been shown to bind biogenic amines, eicosanoids and ADP. These compounds are potent mediators of platelet activation, inflammation and vascular tone. In this paper, the structure of the amine-binding protein (ABP) from Rhodnius prolixus, a vector of the trypanosome that causes Chagas disease, is described. ABP binds the biogenic amines serotonin and norepinephrine with high affinity. A complex with tryptamine shows the presence of a binding site for a single ligand molecule in the central cavity of the β-barrel structure. The cavity contains significant additional volume, suggesting that this protein may have evolved from the related nitrophorin proteins, which bind a much larger heme ligand in the central cavity.

  8. Peptide Ligands That Bind Selectively to Spores of Bacillus subtilis and Closely Related Species

    PubMed Central

    Knurr, Jordan; Benedek, Orsolya; Heslop, Jennifer; Vinson, Robert B.; Boydston, Jeremy A.; McAndrew, Joanne; Kearney, John F.; Turnbough, Charles L.

    2003-01-01

    As part of an effort to develop detectors for selected species of bacterial spores, we screened phage display peptide libraries for 7- and 12-mer peptides that bind tightly to spores of Bacillus subtilis. All of the peptides isolated contained the sequence Asn-His-Phe-Leu at the amino terminus and exhibited clear preferences for other amino acids, especially Pro, at positions 5 to 7. We demonstrated that the sequence Asn-His-Phe-Leu-Pro (but not Asn-His-Phe-Leu) was sufficient for tight spore binding. We observed equal 7-mer peptide binding to spores of B. subtilis and its most closely related species, Bacillus amyloliquefaciens, and slightly weaker binding to spores of the closely related species Bacillus globigii. These three species comprise one branch on the Bacillus phylogenetic tree. We did not detect peptide binding to spores of several Bacillus species located on adjacent and nearby branches of the phylogenetic tree nor to vegetative cells of B. subtilis. The sequence Asn-His-Phe-Leu-Pro was used to identify B. subtilis proteins that may employ this peptide for docking to the outer surface of the forespore during spore coat assembly and/or maturation. One such protein, SpsC, appears to be involved in the synthesis of polysaccharide on the spore coat. SpsC contains the Asn-His-Phe-Leu-Pro sequence at positions 6 to 10, and the first five residues of SpsC apparently must be removed to allow spore binding. Finally, we discuss the use of peptide ligands for bacterial detection and the use of short peptide sequences for targeting proteins during spore formation. PMID:14602648

  9. Specific interactions between lactose repressor protein and DNA affected by ligand binding: ab initio molecular orbital calculations.

    PubMed

    Ohyama, Tatsuya; Hayakawa, Masato; Nishikawa, Shin; Kurita, Noriyuki

    2011-06-01

    Transcription mechanisms of gene information from DNA to mRNA are essentially controlled by regulatory proteins such as a lactose repressor (LacR) protein and ligand molecules. Biochemical experiments elucidated that a ligand binding to LacR drastically changes the mechanism controlled by LacR, although the effect of ligand binding has not been clarified at atomic and electronic levels. We here investigated the effect of ligand binding on the specific interactions between LacR and operator DNA by the molecular simulations combined with classical molecular mechanics and ab initio fragment molecular orbital methods. The results indicate that the binding of anti-inducer ligand strengthens the interaction between LacR and DNA, which is consistent with the fact that the binding of anti-inducer enhances the repression of gene transcription by LacR. It was also elucidated that hydrating water molecules existing between LacR and DNA contribute to the specific interactions between LacR and DNA. PMID:21328406

  10. The immune phenotype of AhR null mouse mutants: not a simple mirror of xenobiotic receptor over-activation.

    PubMed

    Esser, Charlotte

    2009-02-15

    Intrinsic and induced cell differentiation and the cellular response to endogenous and exogenous signals are hallmarks of the immune system. Specific and common signalling cascades ensure a highly flexible and adapted response. Increasing evidence suggests that gene modulation by the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), a ligand-activated transcription factor, is an important part of these processes. For decades the AhR has been studied mainly for its toxic effects after artificial activation by man-made chemical pollutants such as dioxins. These studies gave important, albeit to some extent skewed, evidence for a mechanistic link between the AhR and the immune system. AhR null mutants and other mutants of the AhR signalling pathway have been generated and used to analyse the physiological function of the AhR, including for the developing and antigen-responding immune system. In this review I look at the natural immunological function(s) of the AhR.

  11. Molecular determinants of ligand binding modes in the histamine H(4) receptor: linking ligand-based three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship (3D-QSAR) models to in silico guided receptor mutagenesis studies.

    PubMed

    Istyastono, Enade P; Nijmeijer, Saskia; Lim, Herman D; van de Stolpe, Andrea; Roumen, Luc; Kooistra, Albert J; Vischer, Henry F; de Esch, Iwan J P; Leurs, Rob; de Graaf, Chris

    2011-12-01

    The histamine H(4) receptor (H(4)R) is a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) that plays an important role in inflammation. Similar to the homologous histamine H(3) receptor (H(3)R), two acidic residues in the H(4)R binding pocket, D(3.32) and E(5.46), act as essential hydrogen bond acceptors of positively ionizable hydrogen bond donors in H(4)R ligands. Given the symmetric distribution of these complementary pharmacophore features in H(4)R and its ligands, different alternative ligand binding mode hypotheses have been proposed. The current study focuses on the elucidation of the molecular determinants of H(4)R-ligand binding modes by combining (3D) quantitative structure-ac