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Sample records for ahr repressor ahrr

  1. Transgenic Overexpression of Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Repressor (AhRR) and AhR-Mediated Induction of CYP1A1, Cytokines, and Acute Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Vogel, Christoph F.A.; Chang, W.L. William; Kado, Sarah; McCulloh, Kelly; Vogel, Helena; Wu, Dalei; Haarmann-Stemmann, Thomas; Yang, GuoXiang; Leung, Patrick S.C.; Matsumura, Fumio; Gershwin, M. Eric

    2016-01-01

    Background: The aryl hydrocarbon receptor repressor (AhRR) is known to repress aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) signaling, but very little is known regarding the role of the AhRR in vivo. Objective: This study tested the role of AhRR in vivo in AhRR overexpressing mice on molecular and toxic end points mediated through a prototypical AhR ligand. Methods: We generated AhRR-transgenic mice (AhRR Tg) based on the genetic background of C57BL/6J wild type (wt) mice. We tested the effect of the prototypical AhR ligand 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) on the expression of cytochrome P450 (CYP)1A1 and cytokines in various tissues of mice. We next analyzed the infiltration of immune cells in adipose tissue of mice after treatment with TCDD using flow cytometry. Results: AhRR Tg mice express significantly higher levels of AhRR compared to wt mice. Activation of AhR by TCDD caused a significant increase of the inflammatory cytokines Interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6 and IL-10, and CXCL chemokines in white epididymal adipose tissue from both wt and AhRR Tg mice. However, the expression of IL-1β, CXCL2 and CXCL3 were significantly lower in AhRR Tg versus wt mice following TCDD treatment. Exposure to TCDD caused a rapid accumulation of neutrophils and macrophages in white adipose tissue of wt and AhRR Tg mice. Furthermore we found that male AhRR Tg mice were protected from high-dose TCDD-induced lethality associated with a reduced inflammatory response and liver damage as indicated by lower levels of TCDD-induced alanine aminotransferase and hepatic triglycerides. Females from both wt and AhRR Tg mice were less sensitive than male mice to acute toxicity induced by TCDD. Conclusion: In conclusion, the current study identifies AhRR as a previously uncharacterized regulator of specific inflammatory cytokines, which may protect from acute toxicity induced by TCDD. Citation: Vogel CF, Chang WL, Kado S, McCulloh K, Vogel H, Wu D, Haarmann-Stemmann T, Yang GX, Leung PS, Matsumura F

  2. Balancing intestinal and systemic inflammation through cell type-specific expression of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor repressor

    PubMed Central

    Brandstätter, Olga; Schanz, Oliver; Vorac, Julia; König, Jessica; Mori, Tetsushi; Maruyama, Toru; Korkowski, Markus; Haarmann-Stemmann, Thomas; von Smolinski, Dorthe; Schultze, Joachim L.; Abel, Josef; Esser, Charlotte; Takeyama, Haruko; Weighardt, Heike; Förster, Irmgard

    2016-01-01

    As a sensor of polyaromatic chemicals the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) exerts an important role in immune regulation besides its requirement for xenobiotic metabolism. Transcriptional activation of AhR target genes is counterregulated by the AhR repressor (AhRR) but the exact function of the AhRR in vivo is currently unknown. We here show that the AhRR is predominantly expressed in immune cells of the skin and intestine, different from other AhR target genes. Whereas AhRR antagonizes the anti-inflammatory function of the AhR in the context of systemic endotoxin shock, AhR and AhRR act in concert to dampen intestinal inflammation. Specifically, AhRR contributes to the maintenance of colonic intraepithelial lymphocytes and prevents excessive IL-1β production and Th17/Tc17 differentiation. In contrast, the AhRR enhances IFN-γ-production by effector T cells in the inflamed gut. Our findings highlight the physiologic importance of cell-type specific balancing of AhR/AhRR expression in response to microbial, nutritional and other environmental stimuli. PMID:27184933

  3. Balancing intestinal and systemic inflammation through cell type-specific expression of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor repressor.

    PubMed

    Brandstätter, Olga; Schanz, Oliver; Vorac, Julia; König, Jessica; Mori, Tetsushi; Maruyama, Toru; Korkowski, Markus; Haarmann-Stemmann, Thomas; von Smolinski, Dorthe; Schultze, Joachim L; Abel, Josef; Esser, Charlotte; Takeyama, Haruko; Weighardt, Heike; Förster, Irmgard

    2016-05-17

    As a sensor of polyaromatic chemicals the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) exerts an important role in immune regulation besides its requirement for xenobiotic metabolism. Transcriptional activation of AhR target genes is counterregulated by the AhR repressor (AhRR) but the exact function of the AhRR in vivo is currently unknown. We here show that the AhRR is predominantly expressed in immune cells of the skin and intestine, different from other AhR target genes. Whereas AhRR antagonizes the anti-inflammatory function of the AhR in the context of systemic endotoxin shock, AhR and AhRR act in concert to dampen intestinal inflammation. Specifically, AhRR contributes to the maintenance of colonic intraepithelial lymphocytes and prevents excessive IL-1β production and Th17/Tc17 differentiation. In contrast, the AhRR enhances IFN-γ-production by effector T cells in the inflamed gut. Our findings highlight the physiologic importance of cell-type specific balancing of AhR/AhRR expression in response to microbial, nutritional and other environmental stimuli.

  4. Balancing intestinal and systemic inflammation through cell type-specific expression of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor repressor.

    PubMed

    Brandstätter, Olga; Schanz, Oliver; Vorac, Julia; König, Jessica; Mori, Tetsushi; Maruyama, Toru; Korkowski, Markus; Haarmann-Stemmann, Thomas; von Smolinski, Dorthe; Schultze, Joachim L; Abel, Josef; Esser, Charlotte; Takeyama, Haruko; Weighardt, Heike; Förster, Irmgard

    2016-01-01

    As a sensor of polyaromatic chemicals the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) exerts an important role in immune regulation besides its requirement for xenobiotic metabolism. Transcriptional activation of AhR target genes is counterregulated by the AhR repressor (AhRR) but the exact function of the AhRR in vivo is currently unknown. We here show that the AhRR is predominantly expressed in immune cells of the skin and intestine, different from other AhR target genes. Whereas AhRR antagonizes the anti-inflammatory function of the AhR in the context of systemic endotoxin shock, AhR and AhRR act in concert to dampen intestinal inflammation. Specifically, AhRR contributes to the maintenance of colonic intraepithelial lymphocytes and prevents excessive IL-1β production and Th17/Tc17 differentiation. In contrast, the AhRR enhances IFN-γ-production by effector T cells in the inflamed gut. Our findings highlight the physiologic importance of cell-type specific balancing of AhR/AhRR expression in response to microbial, nutritional and other environmental stimuli. PMID:27184933

  5. Knockdown of a Zebrafish Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Repressor (AHRRa) Affects Expression of Genes Related to Photoreceptor Development and Hematopoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Aluru, Neelakanteswar; Jenny, Matthew J.; Hahn, Mark E.

    2014-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor repressor (AHRR) is a transcriptional repressor of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) and hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) and is regulated by an AHR-dependent mechanism. Zebrafish (Danio rerio) possess two AHRR paralogs; AHRRa regulates constitutive AHR signaling during development, whereas AHRRb regulates polyaromatic hydrocarbon-induced gene expression. However, little is known about the endogenous roles and targets of AHRRs. The objective of this study was to elucidate the role of AHRRs during zebrafish development using a loss-of-function approach followed by gene expression analysis. Zebrafish embryos were microinjected with morpholino oligonucleotides against AHRRa or AHRRb to knockdown AHRR protein expression. At 72 h postfertilization (hpf), microarray analysis revealed that the expression of 279 and 116 genes was altered by knockdown of AHRRa and AHRRb, respectively. In AHRRa-morphant embryos, 97 genes were up-regulated and 182 genes were down-regulated. Among the down-regulated genes were several related to photoreceptor function, including cone-specific genes such as several opsins (opn1sw1, opn1sw2, opn1mw1, and opn1lw2), phosphodiesterases (pde6H and pde6C), retinol binding protein (rbp4l), phosducin, and arrestins. Down-regulation was confirmed by RT-PCR and with samples from an independent experiment. The four genes tested (opn1sw1, pde6H, pde6C, and arr3b) were not inducible by 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin. AHRRa knockdown also caused up-regulation of embryonic hemoglobin (hbbe3), suggesting a role for AHRR in regulating hematopoiesis. Knockdown of AHRRb caused up-regulation of 31 genes and down-regulation of 85 genes, without enrichment for any specific biological process. Overall, these results suggest that AHRRs may have important roles in development, in addition to their roles in regulating xenobiotic signaling. PMID:24675095

  6. DNA Methylation of the Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Repressor Associations with Cigarette Smoking and Subclinical Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Lindsay M.; Wan, Ma; Ding, Jingzhong; Taylor, Jackson R.; Mstat, Kurt Lohman; Su, Dan; Bennett, Brian D.; Porter, Devin K.; Gimple, Ryan; Pittman, Gary S.; Wang, Xuting; Howard, Timothy D.; Siscovick, David; Psaty, Bruce M.; Shea, Steven; Burke, Gregory L.; Jacobs, David R.; Rich, Stephen S.; Hixson, James E.; Stein, James H.; Stunnenberg, Hendrik; Barr, R. Graham; Kaufman, Joel D.; Post, Wendy S.; Hoeschele, Ina; Herrington, David M.; Bell, Douglas A.; Liu, Yongmei

    2015-01-01

    Background Tobacco smoke contains numerous agonists of the aryl-hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) pathway, and activation of the AhR pathway was shown to promote atherosclerosis in mice. Intriguingly, cigarette smoking is most strongly and robustly associated with DNA modifications to an AhR pathway gene, the aryl-hydrocarbon receptor repressor (AHRR). We hypothesized that altered AHRR methylation in monocytes, a cell type sensitive to cigarette smoking and involved in atherogenesis, may be a part of the biological link between cigarette smoking and atherosclerosis. Methods and Results DNA methylation profiles of AHRR in monocytes (542 CpG sites ± 150kb of AHRR, using Illumina 450K array) were integrated with smoking habits and ultrasound-measured carotid plaque scores from 1,256 participants of the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA). Methylation of cg05575921 significantly associated (p = 6.1×10−134) with smoking status (current vs. never). Novel associations between cg05575921 methylation and carotid plaque scores (p = 3.1×10−10) were identified, which remained significant in current and former smokers even after adjusting for self-reported smoking habits, urinary cotinine, and well-known CVD risk factors. This association replicated in an independent cohort using hepatic DNA (n = 141). Functionally, cg05575921 was located in a predicted gene expression regulatory element (enhancer), and had methylation correlated with AHRR mRNA profiles (p = 1.4×10−17) obtained from RNA sequencing conducted on a subset (n = 373) of the samples. Conclusions These findings suggest AHRR methylation may be functionally related to AHRR expression in monocytes, and represents a potential biomarker of subclinical atherosclerosis in smokers. PMID:26307030

  7. Genetic association of aromatic hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) and cytochrome P450, family 1, subfamily A, polypeptide 1 (CYP1A1) polymorphisms with dioxin blood concentrations among pregnant Japanese women.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Sumitaka; Sata, Fumihiro; Sasaki, Seiko; Ban, Susumu; Miyashita, Chihiro; Okada, Emiko; Limpar, Mariko; Yoshioka, Eiji; Kajiwara, Jumboku; Todaka, Takashi; Saijo, Yasuaki; Kishi, Reiko

    2013-06-01

    Dioxins are metabolized by cytochrome P450, family 1 (CYP1) via the aromatic hydrocarbon receptor (AHR). We determined whether different blood dioxin concentrations are associated with polymorphisms in AHR (dbSNP ID: rs2066853), AHR repressor (AHRR; rs2292596), CYP1 subfamily A polypeptide 1 (CYP1A1; rs4646903 and rs1048963), CYP1 subfamily A polypeptide 2 (CYP1A2; rs762551), and CYP1 subfamily B polypeptide 1 (CYP1B1; rs1056836) in pregnant Japanese women. These six polymorphisms were detected in 421 healthy pregnant Japanese women. Differences in dioxin exposure concentrations in maternal blood among the genotypes were investigated. Comparisons among the GG, GA, and AA genotypes of AHR showed a significant difference (genotype model: P=0.016 for the mono-ortho polychlorinated biphenyl concentrations and toxicity equivalence quantities [TEQs]). Second, we found a significant association with the dominant genotype model ([TT+TC] vs. CC: P=0.048 for the polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxin TEQs; P=0.035 for polychlorinated dibenzofuran TEQs) of CYP1A1 (rs4646903). No significant differences were found among blood dioxin concentrations and polymorphisms in AHRR, CYP1A1 (rs1048963), CYP1A2, and CYP1B1. Thus, polymorphisms in AHR and CYP1A1 (rs4646903) were associated with maternal dioxin concentrations. However, differences in blood dioxin concentrations were relatively low. PMID:23528250

  8. Association of micropenis with Pro185Ala polymorphism of the gene for aryl hydrocarbon receptor repressor involved in dioxin signaling.

    PubMed

    Soneda, Shun; Fukami, Maki; Fujimoto, Masatoshi; Hasegawa, Tomonobu; Koitabashi, Yasushi; Ogata, Tsutomu

    2005-02-01

    The prevalence of undermasculinized external genitalia has increased in several countries including Japan, and this phenomenon has primarily been ascribed to the deleterious effects of environmental endocrine disruptors such as dioxins. To examine a possible role of the genetic susceptibility to dioxins in the development of micropenis (MP), we studied the Arg554Lys polymorphism of the gene for aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) and the Pro185Ala polymorphism of the gene for aryl hydrocarbon receptor repressor (AHRR), in 73 boys with MP (34 boys with mild MP from -2.1 to -2.5 SD and 39 boys with severe MP below -2.5 SD) and 80 control males (50 boys and 30 fertile adult males). The allele and genotype frequencies of the AHR polymorphism were comparable between the two groups of males, but those of the AHRR polymorphism were significantly different, with the Pro allele and the Pro/Pro genotype being more frequent in boys with MP than in control males (P-value: 0.0029 for the allele frequency and 0.011 for the genotype frequency). In addition, both polymorphisms were comparable in the allele and genotype frequencies between boys with mild MP and those with severe MP and between control boys and control fertile adult males. The results suggest that the AHRR Pro185Ala polymorphism may constitute a susceptibility locus for the development of MP in response to dioxins.

  9. Demethylation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor repressor as a biomarker for nascent smokers.

    PubMed

    Philibert, Robert A; Beach, Steven R H; Brody, Gene H

    2012-11-01

    Epigenetic modifications to peripheral white blood cell DNA occur in response to a wide variety of exposures. In prior work, we and others have shown that broad changes in DNA methylation, particularly at the aryl hydrocarbon receptor repressor (AHRR) locus, occur in samples from subjects with long histories of smoking. However, given the large number of epigenetic changes that occur in response to prolonged smoking, the primacy of the response at AHRR and the sensitivity of these changes to low levels of smoking are not known. Therefore, we examined the association of smoking to genome lymphocyte DNA methylation status in a representative sample of 399 African American youths living in the rural South that includes 72 subjects with less than one half-pack year of exposure. Consistent with our prior findings, we found a stepwise effect of smoking on DNA methylation among youth with relatively brief exposure histories at a CpG residue in AHRR (cg05575921) (FDR corrected p values; 3 × 10 (-7) and 0.09 in the male and female samples, respectively) that was identified in previous studies and at which the effects of smoking were significant, even in those subjects with less than one half pack year exposure. We conclude that AHRR demethylation at cg05575921 in peripheral cells may serve as an early, sensitive biomarker for even low levels of exposure to tobacco smoke, providing a non-self-report alternative for nascent exposure to tobacco smoke. We also suggest that the AHRR/AHR pathway may be functional in the response of peripheral white blood cells to tobacco smoke exposure.

  10. Synergistic induction of AHR regulated genes in developmental toxicity from co-exposure to two model PAHs in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Timme-Laragy, Alicia. R.; Cockman, Crystal. J.; Matson, Cole. W.; Di Giulio, Richard. T.

    2007-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are pollutants created by the incomplete combustion of carbon, and are increasing in the environment largely due to the burning of fossil fuels. PAHs occur as complex mixtures, and some combinations have been shown to cause synergistic developmental toxicity in fish embryos, characterized by pericardial edema and craniofacial malformations. Previous studies have indicated that in the zebrafish model, this toxicity is mediated by the aryl hydrocarbon receptor 2 (AHR2), and enhanced by inhibition of CYP1A activity. In this study, we further examined this interaction of the model PAH and AHR agonist β-naphthoflavone (BNF) with and without the AHR partial agonist/antagonist and CYP1A inhibitor α-naphthoflavone (ANF) to determine 1) whether ANF was acting as an AHR antagonist, 2) what alterations BNF and ANF both alone and in combination had on mRNA expression of the AHR regulated genes cytochrome P450 (cyp) 1a, 1b1, and 1c1, and the AHR repressor (ahrr2) prior to vs. during deformity onset, and 3) compare CYP1A enzyme activity with mRNA induction. Zebrafish embryos were exposed from 24–48 or 24–96 hpf to BNF, 1–100 μg/L, ANF, 1–150 μg/L, a BNF+ANF co-exposure (1 μg/L + 100 μg/L), or a DMSO solvent control. RNA was extracted and examined by quantitative real time PCR. Both BNF and ANF each individually resulted in a dose dependent increase CYP1A, CYP1B1, CYP1C1, and AHRR2 mRNA, confirming their activities as AHR agonists. In the BNF+ANF co-exposures prior to deformity onset, expression of these genes was synergistic, and expression levels of the AHR regulated genes resembled the higher doses of BNF alone. Gene induction during deformities was also significantly increased in the co-exposure, but to a lesser magnitude than prior to deformity onset. EROD measurements of CYP1A activity showed ANF inhibited activity induction by BNF in the co-exposure group; this finding is not predicted by mRNA expression, which is

  11. Wood Smoke Enhances Cigarette Smoke–Induced Inflammation by Inducing the Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Repressor in Airway Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Awji, Elias G.; Chand, Hitendra; Bruse, Shannon; Smith, Kevin R.; Colby, Jennifer K.; Mebratu, Yohannes; Levy, Bruce D.

    2015-01-01

    Our previous studies showed that cigarette smokers who are exposed to wood smoke (WS) are at an increased risk for chronic bronchitis and reduced lung function. The present study was undertaken to determine the mechanisms for WS-induced adverse effects. We studied the effect of WS exposure using four cohorts of mice. C57Bl/6 mice were exposed for 4 or 12 weeks to filtered air, to 10 mg/m3 WS for 2 h/d, to 250 mg/m3 cigarette smoke (CS) for 6 h/d, or to CS followed by WS (CW). Inflammation was absent in the filtered air and WS groups, but enhanced by twofold in the bronchoalveolar lavage of the CW compared with CS group as measured by neutrophil numbers and levels of the neutrophil chemoattractant, keratinocyte-derived chemokine. The levels of the anti-inflammatory lipoxin, lipoxin A4, were reduced by threefold along with cyclo-oxygenase (COX)-2 and microsomal prostaglandin E synthase (mPGES)-1 in airway epithelial cells and PGE2 levels in the bronchoalveolar lavage of CW compared with CS mice. We replicated, in primary human airway epithelial cells, the changes observed in mice. Immunoprecipitations showed that WS blocked the interaction of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) with AHR nuclear transporter to reduce expression of COX-2 and mPGES-1 by increasing expression of AHR repressor (AHRR). Collectively, these studies show that exposure to low concentrations of WS enhanced CS-induced inflammation by inducing AHRR expression to suppress AHR, COX-2, and mPGES-1 expression, and levels of PGE2 and lipoxin A4. Therefore, AHRR is a potential therapeutic target for WS-associated exacerbations of CS-induced inflammation. PMID:25137396

  12. Dioxin Exposure Blocks Lactation through a Direct Effect on Mammary Epithelial Cells Mediated by the Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Repressor

    PubMed Central

    Basham, Kaitlin J.; Leonard, Christopher J.; Kieffer, Collin; Shelton, Dawne N.; McDowell, Maria E.; Bhonde, Vasudev R.; Looper, Ryan E.; Welm, Bryan E.

    2015-01-01

    In mammals, lactation is a rich source of nutrients and antibodies for newborn animals. However, millions of mothers each year experience an inability to breastfeed. Exposure to several environmental toxicants, including 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), has been strongly implicated in impaired mammary differentiation and lactation. TCDD and related polyhalogenated aromatic hydrocarbons are widespread industrial pollutants that activate the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR). Despite many epidemiological and animal studies, the molecular mechanism through which AHR signaling blocks lactation remains unclear. We employed in vitro models of mammary differentiation to recapitulate lactogenesis in the presence of toxicants. We demonstrate AHR agonists directly block milk production in isolated mammary epithelial cells. Moreover, we define a novel role for the aryl hydrocarbon receptor repressor (AHRR) in mediating this response. Our mechanistic studies suggest AHRR is sufficient to block transcription of the milk gene β-casein. As TCDD is a prevalent environmental pollutant that affects women worldwide, our results have important public health implications for newborn nutrition. PMID:25265996

  13. Postnatal stability, tissue, and time specific effects of AHRR methylation change in response to maternal smoking in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Novakovic, Boris; Ryan, Joanne; Pereira, Natalie; Boughton, Berin; Craig, Jeffrey M; Saffery, Richard

    2014-03-01

    The intrauterine environment has the potential to "program" the developing fetus in a way that can be potentially deleterious to later health. While in utero environmental/stochastic factors are known to influence DNA methylation profile at birth, it has been difficult to assign specific examples of epigenetic variation to specific environmental exposures. Recently, several studies have linked exposure to smoking with DNA methylation change in the aryl hydrocarbon receptor repressor (AHRR) gene in blood. This includes hypomethylation of AHRR in neonatal blood in response to maternal smoking in pregnancy. The role of AHRR as a negative regulator of pathways involved in pleiotropic responses to environmental contaminants raises the possibility that smoking-induced hypomethylation is an adaptive response to an adverse in utero environmental exposure. However, the tissue specificity of the response to maternal smoking, and the stability of the methylation changes early in life remain to be determined. In this study we analyzed AHRR methylation in three cell types-cord blood mononuclear cells (CBMCs), buccal epithelium, and placenta tissue-from newborn twins of mothers who smoked throughout pregnancy and matched controls. Further, we explored the postnatal stability of this change at 18 months. Our results confirm the previous association between maternal smoking and AHRR methylation in neonatal blood. In addition, this study expands the region of AHRR methylation altered in response to maternal smoking during pregnancy and reveals the tissue-specific nature of epigenetic responses to environmental exposures in utero. Further, the evidence for postnatal stability of smoking-induced epigenetic change supports a role for epigenetics as a mediator of long-term effects of specific in utero exposures in humans. Longitudinal analysis of further specific exposures in larger cohorts is required to examine the extent of this phenomenon in humans.

  14. In vitro re-expression of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (Ahr) in cultured Ahr-deficient mouse antral follicles partially restores the phenotype to that of cultured wild-type mouse follicles

    PubMed Central

    Ziv-Gal, A; Gao, L.; Karman, B.N.; Flaws, J.A.

    2014-01-01

    Background The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) mediates the toxic effects of various endocrine disrupting chemicals. In female mice, global deletion of the Ahr (AhrKO) results in slow growth of ovarian antral follicles. No studies, however, have examined whether injection of the Ahr restores the phenotypes of cultured AhrKO ovarian antral follicles to wild-type levels. Methods We developed a system to construct a recombinant adenovirus containing the Ahr to re-express the Ahr in AhrKO granulosa cells and whole antral follicles. We then compared follicle growth and levels of factors in the AHR signaling pathway (Ahr, Ahrr, Cyp1a1, and Cyp1b1) in wild-type, AhrKO, and Ahr re-expressed follicles. Further, we compared the response to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) in wild-type, AhrKO, and Ahr re-expressed follicles. Results AdAhr injection into AhrKO follicles partially restored their growth pattern to wild-type levels. Further, Ahr re-expressed follicles had significantly higher levels of Ahr, Ahrr, Cyp1a1, and Cyp1b1 compared to wild-type follicles. Upon TCDD treatment, only Cyp1a1 levels were significantly higher in Ahr re-expressed follicles compared to the levels in wild-type follicles. Conclusion Our system of re-expression of the Ahr partially restores follicle growth and transcript levels of factors in the AHR signaling pathway to wild-type levels. PMID:25500125

  15. Reversion of AHRR Demethylation Is a Quantitative Biomarker of Smoking Cessation

    PubMed Central

    Philibert, Robert; Hollenbeck, Nancy; Andersen, Eleanor; McElroy, Shyheme; Wilson, Scott; Vercande, Kyra; Beach, Steven R. H.; Osborn, Terry; Gerrard, Meg; Gibbons, Frederick X.; Wang, Kai

    2016-01-01

    Smoking is the largest preventable cause of morbidity and mortality in the world. Although there are effective pharmacologic and behavioral treatments for smoking cessation, our inability to objectively quantify smokers’ progress in decreasing smoking has been a barrier to both clinical and research efforts. In prior work, we and others have shown that DNA methylation at cg05575921, a CpG residue in the aryl hydrocarbon receptor repressor (AHRR), can be used to determine smoking status and infer cigarette consumption history. In this study, we serially assessed self-report and existing objective markers of cigarette consumption in 35 subjects undergoing smoking cessation therapy, then quantified DNA methylation at cg05575921 at study entry and three subsequent time points. Five subjects who reported serum cotinine and exhaled carbon monoxide verified smoking abstinence for the 3 months prior to study exit averaged a 5.9% increase in DNA methylation at cg05575921 (p < 0.004) over the 6-month study. Although the other 30 subjects did not achieve smoking cessation at the 6-month time point, their self-reported reduction of cigarette consumption (mean = 6 cigarettes/day) was associated with a 2.8% increase DNA methylation at cg05575921 (p < 0.05). Finally, a survey of subjects as they exited the study demonstrated strong support for the clinical use of epigenetic biomarkers. We conclude that AHRR methylation status is a quantifiable biomarker for progress in smoking cessation that could have substantial impact on both smoking cessation treatment and research. PMID:27092088

  16. Smoking, Methylation at AHRR, and Recidivism Risk in a Community Correction Sample of Individuals at High Risk for Recidivism.

    PubMed

    Gunter, Tracy D; Philibert, Robert A

    2015-10-01

    Individuals supervised by community correction programs have a high rate of tobacco use and high frequency of tobacco dependence. As compared with supervisees without tobacco dependence, probationers and parolees with tobacco dependence were more likely to abuse other substances and report poorer health. In this sample of 374 predominantly felon and repeat offenders, at high risk for recidivism, over 95% of subjects smoked or used other tobacco products, 87% were actively smoking at the time of interview, and 70% met criteria for lifetime tobacco dependence. Seventy-four percent had DNA demethylation, defined as methylation less than 83%, at the aryl hydrocarbon receptor repressor (AHRR) residue interrogated by cg0557592 at the time of interview. Seventy-eight percent exhibited four-year recidivism. Demethylation was associated with four-year recidivism in women, but not men. These findings suggest that methylation at cg05575921 serves as a semi-quantitative measure of both recent use and lifetime burden, that community correction populations continue to smoke at high risk, that measurement of methylation may add to the identification of female offenders at risk for recidivism, and that treatments to assist in cessation efforts are desperately needed.

  17. Genetic variation at aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) loci in populations of Atlantic killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus) inhabiting polluted and reference habitats

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The non-migratory killifish Fundulus heteroclitus inhabits clean and polluted environments interspersed throughout its range along the Atlantic coast of North America. Several populations of this species have successfully adapted to environments contaminated with toxic aromatic hydrocarbon pollutants such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Previous studies suggest that the mechanism of resistance to these and other “dioxin-like compounds” (DLCs) may involve reduced signaling through the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) pathway. Here we investigated gene diversity and evidence for positive selection at three AHR-related loci (AHR1, AHR2, AHRR) in F. heteroclitus by comparing alleles from seven locations ranging over 600 km along the northeastern US, including extremely polluted and reference estuaries, with a focus on New Bedford Harbor (MA, USA), a PCB Superfund site, and nearby reference sites. Results We identified 98 single nucleotide polymorphisms within three AHR-related loci among all populations, including synonymous and nonsynonymous substitutions. Haplotype distributions were spatially segregated and F-statistics suggested strong population genetic structure at these loci, consistent with previous studies showing strong population genetic structure at other F. heteroclitus loci. Genetic diversity at these three loci was not significantly different in contaminated sites as compared to reference sites. However, for AHR2 the New Bedford Harbor population had significant FST values in comparison to the nearest reference populations. Tests for positive selection revealed ten nonsynonymous polymorphisms in AHR1 and four in AHR2. Four nonsynonymous SNPs in AHR1 and three in AHR2 showed large differences in base frequency between New Bedford Harbor and its reference site. Tests for isolation-by-distance revealed evidence for non-neutral change at the AHR2 locus. Conclusion Together, these data suggest that F. heteroclitus populations in reference

  18. Non-dioxin-like AhR ligands in a mouse peanut allergy model.

    PubMed

    Schulz, Veronica J; Smit, Joost J; Huijgen, Veerle; Bol-Schoenmakers, Marianne; van Roest, Manon; Kruijssen, Laura J W; Fiechter, Daniëlle; Hassing, Ine; Bleumink, Rob; Safe, Stephen; van Duursen, Majorie B M; van den Berg, Martin; Pieters, Raymond H H

    2012-07-01

    Recently, we have shown that AhR activation by 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) suppresses sensitization to peanut at least in part by inducing a functional shift toward CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) T cells. Next to TCDD, numerous other AhR ligands have been described. In this study, we investigated the effect of three structurally different non-dioxin-like AhR ligands, e.g., 6-formylindolo[3,2-b]carbazole (FICZ), β-naphthoflavone (β-NF), and 6-methyl-1,3,8-trichlorodibenzofuran (6-MCDF), on peanut sensitization. Female C57BL/6 mice were sensitized by administering peanut extract (PE) by gavage in the presence of cholera toxin. Before and during peanut sensitization, mice were treated with FICZ, β-NF, or 6-MCDF. AhR gene transcription in duodenum and liver was investigated on day 5, even as the effect of these AhR ligands on CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) T(reg) cells in spleen and mesenteric lymph nodes (MLNs). Mice treated with TCDD were included as a positive control. Furthermore, the murine reporter cell line H1G1.1c3 (CAFLUX) was used to investigate the possible role of metabolism of TCDD, FICZ, β-NF, and 6-MCDF on AhR activation in vitro. TCDD, but not FICZ, β-NF, and 6-MCDF, suppressed sensitization to peanut (measured by PE-specific IgE, IgG1, IgG2a and PE-induced interleukin (IL)-5, IL-10, IL-13, IL-17a, IL-22, and interferon-γ). In addition, FICZ, β-NF, and 6-MCDF treatments less effectively induced AhR gene transcription (measured by gene expression of AhR, AhRR, CYP1A1, CYP1A2, CYP1B1) compared with TCDD-treated mice. Furthermore, FICZ, β-NF and 6-MCDF did not increase the percentage of CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) T(reg) cells in spleen and mesenteric lymph nodes compared with PE-sensitized mice, in contrast to TCDD. Inhibition of metabolism in vitro increased AhR activation. Together, these data shows that TCDD, but not FICZ, β-NF, and 6-MCDF suppresses sensitization to peanut. Differences in metabolism, AhR binding and subsequent gene transcription might

  19. A constitutive active MAPK/ERK pathway due to BRAFV600E positively regulates AHR pathway in PTC

    PubMed Central

    Regazzo, Daniela; Bertazza, Loris; Galuppini, Francesca; Guzzardo, Vincenza; Jaffrain-Rea, Marie Lise; Vianello, Federica; Ciato, Denis; Ceccato, Filippo; Watutantrige-Fernando, Sara; Bisognin, Andrea; Bortoluzzi, Stefania; Pennelli, Gianmaria; Boscaro, Marco; Scaroni, Carla; Mian, Caterina

    2015-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor mediating the toxicity and tumor-promoting properties of dioxin. AHR has been reported to be overexpressed and constitutively active in a variety of solid tumors, but few data are currently available concerning its role in thyroid cancer. In this study we quantitatively explored a series of 51 paired-normal and papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) tissues for AHR-related genes. We identified an increased AHR expression/activity in PTC, independently from its nuclear dimerization partner and repressor but strictly related to a constitutive active MAPK/ERK pathway. The AHR up-regulation followed by an increased expression of AHR target genes was confirmed by a meta-analysis of published microarray data, suggesting a ligand-independent active AHR pathway in PTC. In-vitro studies using a PTC-derived cell line (BCPAP) and HEK293 cells showed that BRAFV600E may directly modulate AHR localization, induce AHR expression and activity in an exogenous ligand-independent manner. The AHR pathway might represent a potential novel therapeutic target for PTC in the clinical practice. PMID:26392334

  20. TCDD dysregulation of 13 AHR-target genes in rat liver

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, John D.; Prokopec, Stephenie D.; Smith, Ashley B.; Okey, Allan B.; Pohjanvirta, Raimo; Boutros, Paul C.

    2014-02-01

    Despite several decades of research, the complete mechanism by which 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) and other xenobiotic agonists of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) cause toxicity remains unclear. While it has been shown that the AHR is required for all major manifestations of toxicity, the specific downstream changes involved in the development of toxic phenotypes remain unknown. Here we examine a panel of 13 genes that are AHR-regulated in many species and tissues. We profiled their hepatic mRNA abundances in two rat strains with very different sensitivities to TCDD: the TCDD-sensitive Long–Evans (Turku/AB; L–E) and the TCDD-resistant Han/Wistar (Kuopio; H/W). We evaluated doses ranging from 0 to 3000 μg/kg at 19 h after TCDD exposure and time points ranging from 1.5 to 384 h after exposure to 100 μg/kg TCDD. Twelve of 13 genes responded to TCDD in at least one strain, and seven of these showed statistically significant inter-strain differences in the time course analysis (Aldh3a1, Cyp1a2, Cyp1b1, Cyp2a1, Fmo1, Nfe2l2 and Nqo1). Cyp2s1 did not respond to TCDD in either rat strain. Five genes exhibited biphasic responses to TCDD insult (Ahrr, Aldh3a1, Cyp1b1, Nfe2l2 and Nqo1), suggesting a secondary event, such as association with additional transcriptional modulators. Of the 12 genes that responded to TCDD during the dose–response analysis, none had an ED{sub 50} equivalent to that of Cyp1a1, the most sensitive gene in this study, while nine genes responded to doses at least 10–100 fold higher, in at least one strain (Ahrr (L–E), Aldh3a1 (both), Cyp1a2 (both), Cyp1b1 (both), Cyp2a1 (L–E), Inmt (both), Nfe2l2 (L–E), Nqo1 (L–E) and Tiparp (both)). These data shed new light on the association of the AHR target genes with TCDD toxicity, and in particular the seven genes exhibiting strain-specific differences represent strong candidate mediators of Type-II toxicities. - Highlights: • NanoString measured hepatic mRNA molecules

  1. The lac repressor.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Mitchell

    2005-06-01

    Few proteins have had such a strong impact on a field as the lac repressor has had in Molecular Biology. Over 40 years ago, Jacob and Monod [Genetic regulatory mechanisms in the synthesis of proteins, J. Mol. Biol. 3 (1961) 318] proposed a model for gene regulation, which survives essentially unchanged in contemporary textbooks. It is a cogent depiction of how a set of 'structural' genes may be coordinately transcribed in response to environmental conditions and regulates metabolic events in the cell. In bacteria, the genes required for lactose utilization are negatively regulated when a repressor molecule binds to an upstream cis activated operator. The repressor and its operator together form a genetic switch, the lac operon. The switch functions when inducer molecules alter the conformation of the repressor in a specific manner. In the presence of a particular metabolite, the repressor undergoes a conformational change that reduces its affinity for the operator. The structures of the lac repressor and its complexes with operator DNA and effector molecules have provided a physical platform for visualizing at the molecular level the different conformations the repressor and the molecular basis for the switch. The structures of lac repressor, bound to its operator and inducer, have also been invaluable for interpreting a plethora of biochemical and genetic data. PMID:15950160

  2. AHR-11797: a novel benzodiazepine antagonist

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, D.N.; Kilpatrick, B.F.; Hannaman, P.K.

    1986-03-01

    AHR-11797(5,6-dihydro-6-methyl-1-phenyl-/sup 3/H-pyrrolo(3,2,1-ij)quinazolin-3-one) displaced /sup 3/H-flunitrazepam (IC/sub 50/ = 82 nM) and /sup 3/H-Ro 15-1877 (IC/sub 50/ = 104 nM) from rat brain synaptosomes. AHR-11797 did not protect mice from seizures induced by maximal electroshock or subcutaneous Metrazol (scMET), nor did it induce seizures in doses up to the lethal dose. However, at 31.6 mg/kg, IP, it significantly increased the anticonvulsant ED/sub 50/ of chlordiazepoxide (CDPX) from 1.9 to 31.6 mg/kg, IP. With 56.7 mg/kg, IP, of AHR-11797, CDPX was inactive in doses up to 100 mg/kg, IP. AHR-11797 did not significantly increase punished responding in the Geller and Seifter conflict procedure, but it did attenuate the effects of diazepam. Although the compound is without anticonvulsant or anxiolytic activity, it did have muscle relaxant properties. AHR-11797 blocked morphine-induced Straub tail in mice (ED/sub 50/ = 31 mg/kg, IP) and it selectively suppressed the polysnaptic linguomandibular reflex in barbiturate-anesthetized cats. The apparent muscle relaxant activity of AHR-11797 suggests that different receptor sites are involved for muscle relaxant vs. anxiolytic/anticonvulsant activities of the benzodiazepines.

  3. AhR signalling and dioxin toxicity.

    PubMed

    Sorg, Olivier

    2014-10-15

    Dioxins are a family of molecules associated to several industrial accidents such as Ludwigshafen in 1953 or Seveso in 1976, to the Agent Orange used during the war of Vietnam, and more recently to the poisoning of the former president of Ukraine, Victor Yushchenko. These persistent organic pollutants are by-products of industrial activity and bind to an intracellular receptor, AhR, with a high potency. In humans, exposure to dioxins, in particular 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) induces a cutaneous syndrome known as chloracne, consisting in the development of many small skin lesions (hamartoma), lasting for 2-5 years. Although TCDD has been classified by the WHO as a human carcinogen, its carcinogenic potential to humans is not clearly demonstrated. It was first believed that AhR activation accounted for most, if not all, biological properties of dioxins. However, certain AhR agonists found in vegetables do not induce chloracne, and other chemicals, in particular certain therapeutic agents, may induce a chloracne-like syndrome without activating AhR. It is time to rethink the mechanism of dioxin toxicity and analyse in more details the biological events following exposure to these compounds and other AhR agonists, some of which have a very different chemical structure than TCDD. In particular various food-containing AhR agonists are non-toxic and may on the contrary have beneficial properties to human health. PMID:24239782

  4. In vitro and in silico evaluation of transactivation potencies of avian AHR1 and AHR2 by endogenous ligands: Implications for the physiological role of avian AHR2.

    PubMed

    Kim, In-Sung; Hwang, Ji-Hee; Hirano, Masashi; Iwata, Hisato; Kim, Eun-Young

    2016-09-01

    Aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) is well conserved from invertebrates to vertebrates, and it mediates the toxic effects of exogenous ligands, including dioxins. Recent studies reported that AHRs activated by endogenous ligands play critical roles in mammalian physiological homeostasis. Avian species possess at least two AHR isoforms (AHR1 and AHR2), which exhibit species- and isoform-specific transactivation potencies to exogenous ligands, whereas mammals possess a single AHR. To delineate the profiles and roles of endogenous ligands for avian AHR isoforms, we investigated in vitro transactivation potencies of avian AHRs (AHR1 and AHR2 from the jungle crow, Corvus macrorhynchos; common cormorant, Phalacrocorax carbo; and black-footed albatross, Phoebastria nigripes) treated with the endogenous tryptophan metabolites 6-formylindolo [3,2-b] carbazole (FICZ), l-kynurenine (l-Kyn), kynurenic acid (KYNA), and indoxyl sulfate (IS). Furthermore, we analyzed the binding mode of these ligands to each avian AHR isoform by in silico docking simulations. The EC50 of FICZ (0.009-0.032nM) was similar regardless of the species or isoform of AHR. The estimated in silico binding mode of FICZ to AHRs was well conserved in both isoforms. The transactivation potencies of avian AHRs to other tryptophan metabolites were 10(5)-10(7) fold lower than those for FICZ, and EC50 values varied in a species- and isoform-specific manner. This was consistent with poor conservation of the binding mode of l-Kyn, KYNA, and IS predicted in in silico docking simulations. Our results suggest that in avian species, FICZ is the most potent endogenous AHR ligand, and that AHR1 and AHR2 are physiologically functional. PMID:27060260

  5. Gene fusions AHRR-NCOA2, NCOA2-ETV4, ETV4-AHRR, P4HA2-TBCK, and TBCK-P4HA2 resulting from the translocations t(5;8;17)(p15;q13;q21) and t(4;5)(q24;q31) in a soft tissue angiofibroma

    PubMed Central

    Panagopoulos, Ioannis; Gorunova, Ludmila; Viset, Trond; Heim, Sverre

    2016-01-01

    We present an angiofibroma of soft tissue with the karyotype 46,XY,t(4;5)(q24;q31),t(5;8;17)(p15;q13;q21) [8]/46,XY,t(1;14)(p31;q32)[2]/46,XY[3]. RNA-sequencing showed that the t(4;5)(q24;q31) resulted in recombination of the genes TBCK on 4q24 and P4HA2 on 5q31.1 with generation of an in-frame TBCK-P4HA2 and the reciprocal but out-of-frame P4HA2-TBCK fusion transcripts. The putative TBCK-P4HA2 protein would contain the kinase, the rhodanese-like domain, and the Tre-2/Bub2/Cdc16 (TBC) domains of TBCK together with the P4HA2 protein which is a component of the prolyl 4-hydroxylase. The t(5;8;17)(p15;q13;q21) three-way chromosomal translocation targeted AHRR (on 5p15), NCOA2 (on 8q13), and ETV4 (on 17q21) generating the in-frame fusions AHRR-NCOA2 and NCOA2-ETV4 as well as an out-of-frame ETV4-AHRR transcript. In the AHRR-NCOA2 protein, the C-terminal part of AHRR is replaced by the C-terminal part of NCOA2 which contains two activation domains. The NCOA2-ETV4 protein would contain the helix-loop-helix, PAS_9 and PAS_11, CITED domains, the SRC-1 domain of NCOA2 and the ETS DNA-binding domain of ETV4. No fusion gene corresponding to t(1;14)(p31;q32) was found. Our findings indicate that, in spite of the recurrence of AHRR-NCOA2 in angiofibroma of soft tissue, additional genetic events (or fusion genes) might be required for the development of this tumor. PMID:27633981

  6. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) transcription factor regulates megakaryocytic polyploidization

    PubMed Central

    Lindsey, Stephan; T. Papoutsakis, Eleftherios

    2012-01-01

    Summary We propose that the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) is a novel transcriptional regulator of megakaryopoietic polyploidization. Functional evidence was obtained that AHR impacts in vivo megakaryocytic differentiation and maturation; compared to wild-type mice, AHR-null mice had lower platelet counts, fewer numbers of newly synthesized platelets, increased bleeding times and lower-ploidy megakaryocytes (Mks). AHR mRNA increased 3·6-fold during ex vivo megakaryocytic differentiation, but reduced or remained constant during parallel isogenic granulocytic or erythroid differentiation. We interrogated the role of AHR in megakaryopoiesis using a validated Mk model of megakaryopoiesis, the human megakaryoblastic leukaemia CHRF cell line. Upon CHRF Mk differentiation, AHR mRNA and protein levels increased, AHR protein shifted from the cytoplasm to the nucleus and AHR binding to its consensus DNA binding sequence increased. Protein and mRNA levels of the AHR transcriptional target HES1 also increased. Mk differentiation of CHRF cells where AHR or HES1 was knocked-down using RNAi resulted in lower ploidy distributions and cells that were incapable of reaching ploidy classes ≥16n. AHR knockdown also resulted in increased DNA synthesis of lower ploidy cells, without impacting apoptosis. Together, these data support a role for AHR in Mk polyploidization and in vivo platelet function, and warrant further detailed investigations. PMID:21226706

  7. Genetic polymorphisms in the aryl hydrocarbon receptor–signaling pathway and sleep disturbances in middle-aged women

    PubMed Central

    Ziv-Gal, Ayelet; Flaws, Jodi A.; Mahoney, Megan M.; Miller, Susan R.; Zacur, Howard A.; Gallicchio, Lisa

    2013-01-01

    Objective We aimed to determine if selected genetic polymorphisms in the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR)–signaling pathway and circadian locomotor output cycles kaput (CLOCK) are associated with insomnia and early awakening in middle-aged women. Methods Women aged 45 to 54 years (n=639) were recruited into a middle-aged health study and agreed to complete questionnaires and donate blood samples. Questionnaires were used to assess sleep outcomes. Blood samples were processed for genotyping the selected polymorphisms: AHR (rs2066853), AHR repressor (AHRR) (rs2292596), aryl hydrocarbon nuclear translocator (ARNT) (rs2228099), and circadian locomotor output cycles kaput (CLOCK) (rs1801260). Data were analyzed using multivariable logistic regression. Results Women heterozygous for the AHRR alleles (GC) had decreased odds of insomnia compared to women homozygous for the AHRR_C allele (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 0.69; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.49–0.96). Women with at least one of the AHRR_G or CLOCK_C alleles had significantly decreased odds of insomnia compared to women homozygous for the AHRR_C and CLOCK_T alleles (aOR, 0.64; 95% CI, 0.43–0.96). Additionally, women homozygous for the AHRR_G and CLOCK_C alleles had significantly decreased odds of insomnia compared to women homozygous for the AHRR_C and CLOCK_T alleles (aOR, 0.56; 95% CI, 0.35–0.89). None of the selected single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) or combinations of SNPs were significantly associated with early awakening. Conclusions Selected genetic polymorphisms in the AHR-signaling pathway (i.e., AHRR) and CLOCK may play a role in decreasing the risk for experiencing insomnia during the menopausal transition. PMID:23768840

  8. Teratogenic impact of dioxin-activated AHR in laboratory animals

    EPA Science Inventory

    AHR and ARNT are expressed in mouse and human palatal shelves and in the urinary tract of the mouse fetus. AHR expression, translocation to the nucleus, binding to DRE, and activation are required for mediation of TCDD-induction of CP and HN. Although the human palate requires a ...

  9. AHR signaling in prostate growth, morphogenesis, and disease

    PubMed Central

    Vezina, Chad M.; Lin, Tien-Min; Peterson, Richard E.

    2010-01-01

    Most evidence of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) signaling in prostate growth, morphogenesis, and disease stems from research using 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) to pharmacologically activate the AHR at various stages of development. This review discusses effects of TCDD on prostate morphogenesis and highlights interactions between AHR and other signaling pathways during normal and aberrant prostate growth. Although AHR signaling modulates estrogen and androgen signaling in other tissues, crosstalk between these steroid hormone receptors and AHR signaling cannot account for actions of TCDD on prostate morphogenesis. Instead, the AHR appears to act within a cooperative framework of developmental signals to regulate timing and patterning of prostate growth. Inappropriate activation of AHR signaling as a result of early life TCDD exposure disrupts the balance of these signals, impairs prostate morphogenesis, and has an imprinting effect on the developing prostate that predisposes to prostate disease in adulthood. Mechanisms of AHR signaling in prostate growth and disease are only beginning to be unraveled and recent studies have revealed its interactions with WNT5A, retinoic acid, fibroblast growth factor 10, and vascular endothelial growth factor signaling pathways. PMID:18977204

  10. TOXICITY OF AHR AGONISTS TO FISH EARLY LIFE STAGES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fish early life stages are exceptionally sensitive to the lethal toxicity of chemicals that act as arylhydrocarbon receptor (AhR) agonists. Toxicity characterizations based on 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin, generally the most potent AhR agonist, support the toxicity equiva...

  11. A tale of two repressors.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Mitchell

    2011-05-27

    Few proteins have had such a strong impact on a field, as the lac repressor and λ repressor have had in Molecular Biology in bacteria. The genes required for lactose utilization are negatively regulated; the lac repressor binds to an upstream operator blocking the transcription of the enzymes necessary for lactose utilization. A similar switch regulates the virus life cycle; λ repressor binds to an operator site and blocks transcription of the phage genes necessary for lytic development. It is now 50 years since Jacob and Monod first proposed a model for gene regulation, which survives essentially unchanged in contemporary textbooks. Jacob, F. & Monod, J. (1961). Genetic regulatory mechanisms in the synthesis of proteins. J. Mol. Biol. 3, 318-356. This model provides a cogent depiction of how a set of genes can be coordinately transcribed in response to environmental conditions and regulates metabolic events in the cell. A historical perspective that illustrates the role these two repressor molecules played and their contribution to our understanding of gene regulation is presented. PMID:21392509

  12. Simulator for SUPO, a Benchmark Aqueous Homogeneous Reactor (AHR)

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, Steven Karl; Determan, John C.

    2015-10-14

    A simulator has been developed for SUPO (Super Power) an aqueous homogeneous reactor (AHR) that operated at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) from 1951 to 1974. During that period SUPO accumulated approximately 600,000 kWh of operation. It is considered the benchmark for steady-state operation of an AHR. The SUPO simulator was developed using the process that resulted in a simulator for an accelerator-driven subcritical system, which has been previously reported.

  13. Mono-Substituted Isopropylated Triaryl Phosphate, a Major Component of Firemaster 550, is an AHR Agonist that Exhibits AHR-Independent Cardiotoxicity in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Gerlach, Cory V.; Das, Siba R.; Volz, David C.; Bisson, William H.; Kolluri, Siva K.; Tanguay, Robert L.

    2014-01-01

    Firemaster 550 (FM550) is an additive flame retardant mixture used within polyurethane foam and is increasingly found in house dust and the environment due to leaching. Despite the widespread use of FM550, very few studies have investigated the potential toxicity of its ingredients during early vertebrate development. In the current study, we sought to specifically investigate mono-substituted isopropylated triaryl phosphate (mITP), a component comprising approximately 32% of FM550, which has been shown to cause cardiotoxicity during zebrafish embryogenesis. Previous research showed that developmental defects are rescued using an aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) antagonist (CH223191), suggesting that mITP-induced toxicity was AHR-dependent. As zebrafish have three known AHR isoforms, we used a functional AHR2 knockout line along with AHR1A-and AHR1B-specific morpholinos to determine which AHR isoform, if any, mediates mITP-induced cardiotoxicity. As in silico structural homology modeling predicted that mITP may bind favorably to both AHR2 and AHR1B isoforms, we evaluated AHR involvement in vivo by measuring CYP1A mRNA and protein expression following exposure to mITP in the presence or absence of CH223191 or AHR-specific morpholinos. Based on these studies, we found that mITP interacts with both AHR2 and AHR1B isoforms to induce CYP1A expression. However, while CH223191 blocked mITP-induced CYP1A induction and cardiotoxicity, knockdown of all three AHR isoforms failed to block mITP-induced cardiotoxicity in the absence of detectable CYP1A induction. Overall, these results suggest that, while mITP is an AHR agonist, mITP causes AHR-independent cardiotoxicity through a pathway that is also antagonized by CH223191. PMID:24865613

  14. Aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR)-active pharmaceuticals are selective AHR modulators in MDA-MB-468 and BT474 breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Jin, Un-Ho; Lee, Syng-ook; Safe, Stephen

    2012-11-01

    Leflunomide, flutamide, nimodipine, mexiletine, sulindac, tranilast, 4-hydroxytamoxifen, and omeprazole are pharmaceuticals previously characterized as aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) agonists in various cell lines and animal models. In this study, the eight AHR-active pharmaceuticals were investigated in highly aggressive aryl hydrocarbon (Ah)-responsive BT474 and MDA-MB-468 breast cancer cell lines, and their effects on AHR protein, CYP1A1 (protein and mRNA), CYP1B1 (mRNA), and cell migration were determined. 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) was used as a positive control. The AHR agonist activities of the pharmaceuticals depended on structure, response, and cell context. Most compounds induced one or more AHR-mediated responses in BT474 cells, whereas in Ah-responsive MDA-MB-468 cells effects of the AHR-active pharmaceuticals were highly variable. 4-Hydroxytamoxifen, mexiletine, and tranilast did not induce CYP1A1 in MDA-MB-468 cells; moreover, in combination with TCDD, mexiletine was a potent AHR antagonist, tranilast was a partial antagonist, and 4-hydroxytamoxifen also exhibited some AHR antagonist activity. Omeprazole and, to a lesser extent, sulindac and leflunomide were full and partial AHR agonists, respectively, in both breast cancer cell lines. These data indicate that the AHR-active pharmaceuticals are selective AHR modulators, and applications of these drugs for targeting the AHR must be confirmed by studies using the most relevant cell context. PMID:22879383

  15. AHR-5850: a potent anti-inflammatory compound.

    PubMed

    Sancilio, L F; Reese, D L; Cheung, S; Alphin, R S

    1977-03-01

    AHR-5850 is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory compound possessing antipyretic and analgesic properties. AHR-5850 was 16.4 and 22.8 times more potent than phenylbutazone in suppressing acute (Evans blue-carrageenan pleural effusion) and chronic (adjuvant-induced arthritis) inflammation, respectively. The analgesic activity of AHR 5850 was 43 times that of acetylsalicylic acid in the Randall-Selitto assay, and 156 and 56.3 times more potent than phenylbutazone in the acetylcholine-induced abdominal constriction in mice and in the bradykinin-induced nociceptive response in dogs, respectively. Single-dose studies showed that AHR-5850 produced less gastric irritation than acetylsalicylic acid when applied topically to the exposed gastric mucosa of cats or when administered orally to rats and dogs. Upon subchronic oral administration to rats, the therapeutic ratio of AHR-5850 was twice that of phenylbutazone. This was based on the ratio of its potency relative to phenylbutazone in producing intestinal lesions to its anti-inflammatory potency relative to phenylbutazone in the adjuvant-induced arthritis.

  16. Genetic and pharmacological analysis identifies a physiological role for the AHR in epidermal differentiation

    PubMed Central

    van den Bogaard, Ellen; Podolsky, Michael; Smits, Jos; Cui, Xiao; John, Christian; Gowda, Krishne; Desai, Dhimant; Amin, Shantu; Schalkwijk, Joost; Perdew, Gary H.

    2015-01-01

    Stimulation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) by xenobiotics is known to affect epidermal differentiation and skin barrier formation. The physiological role of endogenous AHR signaling in keratinocyte differentiation is not known. We used murine and human skin models to address the hypothesis that AHR activation is required for normal keratinocyte differentiation. Using transcriptome analysis of Ahr-/- and Ahr+/+ murine keratinocytes, we found significant enrichment of differentially expressed genes linked to epidermal differentiation. Primary Ahr-/- keratinocytes showed a significant reduction in terminal differentiation gene and protein expression, similar to Ahr+/+ keratinocytes treated with AHR antagonists GNF351 and CH223191, or the selective AHR modulator (SAhRM), SGA360. In vitro keratinocyte differentiation led to increased AHR levels and subsequent nuclear translocation, followed by induced CYP1A1 gene expression. Monolayer cultured primary human keratinocytes treated with AHR antagonists also showed an impaired terminal differentiation program. Inactivation of AHR activity during human skin equivalent development severely impaired epidermal stratification, terminal differentiation protein expression and stratum corneum formation. As disturbed epidermal differentiation is a main feature of many skin diseases, pharmacological agents targeting AHR signaling or future identification of endogenous keratinocyte-derived AHR ligands should be considered as potential new drugs in dermatology. PMID:25602157

  17. Radiation abolishes inducer binding to lactose repressor.

    PubMed

    Gillard, Nathalie; Spotheim-Maurizot, Mélanie; Charlier, Michel

    2005-04-01

    The lactose operon functions under the control of the repressor-operator system. Binding of the repressor to the operator prevents the expression of the structural genes. This interaction can be destroyed by the binding of an inducer to the repressor. If ionizing radiations damage the partners, a dramatic dysfunction of the regulation system may be expected. We showed previously that gamma irradiation hinders repressor-operator binding through protein damage. Here we show that irradiation of the repressor abolishes the binding of the gratuitous inducer isopropyl-1-beta-D-thiogalactoside (IPTG) to the repressor. The observed lack of release of the repressor from the complex results from the loss of the ability of the inducer to bind to the repressor due to the destruction of the IPTG binding site. Fluorescence measurements show that both tryptophan residues located in or near the IPTG binding site are damaged. Since tryptophan damage is strongly correlated with the loss of IPTG binding ability, we conclude that it plays a critical role in the effect. A model was built that takes into account the kinetic analysis of damage production and the observed protection of its binding site by IPTG. This model satisfactorily accounts for the experimental results and allows us to understand the radiation-induced effects. PMID:15799700

  18. AHR promoter variant modulates its transcription and downstream effectors by allele-specific AHR-SP1 interaction functioning as a genetic marker for vitiligo.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaowen; Li, Kai; Liu, Ling; Shi, Qiong; Song, Pu; Jian, Zhe; Guo, Sen; Wang, Gang; Li, Chunying; Gao, Tianwen

    2015-09-15

    Vitiligo is an acquired depigmentation disorder largely caused by defective melanocyte- or autoimmunity-induced melanocyte destruction. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) is essential for melanocyte homeostasis and immune process, and abnormal AHR was observed in vitiligo. We previously identified the T allele of AHR -129C > T variant as a protective factor against vitiligo. However, biological characterization underlying such effects is not fully certain, further validation by mechanistic research is warranted and was conducted in the present study. We showed that -129T allele promoted AHR transcriptional activity through facilitating its interaction with SP1 transcription factor (SP1) compared with -129C allele. We subsequently found reduced peripheral AHR and SP1 transcript expressions in vitiligo and a negative correlation of AHR level with disease duration. We also investigated AHR-related cytokines and observed increased serum TNF-α concentration and diminished serum levels of IL-10 and TGF-β1 in vitiligo. Further genetic analysis showed that -129T carriers possessed higher levels of AHR and IL-10 than -129C carriers. Therefore, our study indicates that the modulation of AHR transcription by a promoter variant has a profound influence on vitiligo, not only advancing our understanding on AHR function but also providing novel insight into the pathogenesis of degenerative or autoimmune diseases including vitiligo.

  19. AHR promoter variant modulates its transcription and downstream effectors by allele-specific AHR-SP1 interaction functioning as a genetic marker for vitiligo

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaowen; Li, Kai; Liu, Ling; Shi, Qiong; Song, Pu; Jian, Zhe; Guo, Sen; Wang, Gang; Li, Chunying; Gao, Tianwen

    2015-01-01

    Vitiligo is an acquired depigmentation disorder largely caused by defective melanocyte- or autoimmunity-induced melanocyte destruction. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) is essential for melanocyte homeostasis and immune process, and abnormal AHR was observed in vitiligo. We previously identified the T allele of AHR −129C > T variant as a protective factor against vitiligo. However, biological characterization underlying such effects is not fully certain, further validation by mechanistic research is warranted and was conducted in the present study. We showed that −129T allele promoted AHR transcriptional activity through facilitating its interaction with SP1 transcription factor (SP1) compared with −129C allele. We subsequently found reduced peripheral AHR and SP1 transcript expressions in vitiligo and a negative correlation of AHR level with disease duration. We also investigated AHR-related cytokines and observed increased serum TNF-α concentration and diminished serum levels of IL-10 and TGF-β1 in vitiligo. Further genetic analysis showed that -129T carriers possessed higher levels of AHR and IL-10 than −129C carriers. Therefore, our study indicates that the modulation of AHR transcription by a promoter variant has a profound influence on vitiligo, not only advancing our understanding on AHR function but also providing novel insight into the pathogenesis of degenerative or autoimmune diseases including vitiligo. PMID:26370050

  20. Cardiac Myocyte-Specific AHR Activation Phenocopies TCDD-Induced Toxicity in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Lanham, Kevin A.; Plavicki, Jessica; Peterson, Richard E.; Heideman, Warren

    2014-01-01

    Exposure of zebrafish embryos to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) activates the zebrafish aryl hydrocarbon receptor 2 (AHR) to produce developmental and cardiovascular toxicity. AHR is found in the heart; however, AHR activation by TCDD is not confined to the heart and occurs throughout the organism. In order to understand the cause of cardiotoxicity, we constructed a constitutively active AHR (caAHR) based on the zebrafish AHR2 and expressed it specifically in cardiomyocytes. We show that AHR activation within the cardiomyocytes can account for the heart failure induced by TCDD. Expression of the caAHR within the heart produced cardiac malformations, loss of circulation, and pericardial edema. The heart-specific activation of AHR reproduced several other well-characterized endpoints of TCDD toxicity outside of the cardiovascular system, including defects in swim bladder and craniofacial development. This work identifies a single cellular site of TCDD action, the myocardial cell, that can account for the severe cardiovascular collapse observed following early life stage exposure to TCDD, and contributes to other forms of toxicity. PMID:25037585

  1. Combination effects of AHR agonists and Wnt/β-catenin modulators in zebrafish embryos: Implications for physiological and toxicological AHR functions

    SciTech Connect

    Wincent, Emma; Stegeman, John J.; Jönsson, Maria E.

    2015-04-15

    Wnt/β-catenin signaling regulates essential biological functions and acts in developmental toxicity of some chemicals. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) is well-known to mediate developmental toxicity of persistent dioxin-like compounds (DLCs). Recent studies indicate a crosstalk between β-catenin and the AHR in some tissues. However the nature of this crosstalk in embryos is poorly known. We observed that zebrafish embryos exposed to the β-catenin inhibitor XAV939 display effects phenocopying those of the dioxin-like 3,3′,4,4′,5-pentachlorobiphenyl (PCB126). This led us to investigate the AHR interaction with β-catenin during development and ask whether developmental toxicity of DLCs involves antagonism of β-catenin signaling. We examined phenotypes and transcriptional responses in zebrafish embryos exposed to XAV939 or to a β-catenin activator, 1-azakenpaullone, alone or with AHR agonists, either PCB126 or 6-formylindolo[3,2-b]carbazole (FICZ). Alone 1-azakenpaullone and XAV939 both were embryo-toxic, and we found that in the presence of FICZ, the toxicity of 1-azakenpaullone decreased while the toxicity of XAV939 increased. This rescue of 1-azakenpaullone effects occurred in the time window of Ahr2-mediated toxicity and was reversed by morpholino-oligonucleotide knockdown of Ahr2. Regarding PCB126, addition of either 1-azakenpaullone or XAV939 led to lower mortality than with PCB126 alone but surviving embryos showed severe edemas. 1-Azakenpaullone induced transcription of β-catenin-associated genes, while PCB126 and FICZ blocked this induction. The data indicate a stage-dependent antagonism of β-catenin by Ahr2 in zebrafish embryos. We propose that the AHR has a physiological role in regulating β-catenin during development, and that this is one point of intersection linking toxicological and physiological AHR-governed processes.

  2. Combination effects of AHR agonists and Wnt/β-catenin modulators in zebrafish embryos: implications for physiological and toxicological AHR functions

    PubMed Central

    Wincent, Emma; Stegeman, John J.; Jönsson, Maria E.

    2016-01-01

    Wnt/β-catenin signaling regulates essential biological functions and acts in developmental toxicity of some chemicals. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) is well-known to mediate developmental toxicity of persistent dioxin-like compounds (DLCs). Recent studies indicate a crosstalk between β-catenin and the AHR in some tissues. However the nature of this crosstalk in embryos is poorly known. We observed that zebrafish embryos exposed to the β-catenin inhibitor XAV939 display effects phenocopying those of the dioxin-like 3,3′,4,4′,5-pentachlorobiphenyl (PCB126). This led us to investigate AHR interaction with β-catenin during development and ask whether developmental toxicity of DLCs involves antagonism of β-catenin signaling. We examined phenotypes and transcriptional responses in zebrafish embryos exposed to XAV939 or to a β-catenin activator, 1-azakenpaullone, alone or with AHR agonists, either PCB126 or 6-formylindolo[3,2-b]carbazole (FICZ). Alone 1-azakenpaullone and XAV939 both were embryo-toxic, and we found that in presence of FICZ, the toxicity of 1-azakenpaullone decreased while the toxicity of XAV939 increased. This rescue of 1-azakenpaullone effects occurred in the time window of Ahr2-mediated toxicity and was reversed by morpholine-oligonucleotide knockdown of Ahr2. Regarding PCB126, addition of either 1-azakenpaullone or XAV939 led to lower mortality than with PCB126 alone but surviving embryos showed severe edemas. 1-Azakenpaullone induced transcription of β-catenin-associated genes, while PCB126 and FICZ blocked this induction. The data indicate a stage-dependent antagonism of β-catenin by Ahr2 in zebrafish embryos. We propose that the AHR has a physiological role in regulating β-catenin during development, and that this is one point of intersection linking toxicological and physiological AHR-governed processes. PMID:25711857

  3. Transcriptional co-repressors and memory storage

    PubMed Central

    Schoch, Hannah; Abel, Ted

    2014-01-01

    Epigenetic modifications are a central mechanism for regulating chromatin structure and gene expression in the brain. A wide array of histone- and DNA-modifying enzymes have been identified as critical regulators of neuronal function, memory formation, and as causative agents in neurodevelopmental and neuropsychiatric disorders. Chromatin modifying enzymes are frequently incorporated into large multi-protein co-activator and co-repressor complexes, where the activity of multiple enzymes is both spatially and temporally coordinated. In this review, we discuss negative regulation of gene expression by corepressor complexes, and the role of co-repressors and their binding partners in neuronal function, memory, and disease. PMID:24440532

  4. TCDD and omeprazole prime platelets through the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) non-genomic pathway.

    PubMed

    Pombo, Mónica; Lamé, Michael W; Walker, Naomi J; Huynh, Danh H; Tablin, Fern

    2015-05-19

    The role of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) in hemostasis has recently gained increased attention. Here, we demonstrate, by qRT-PCR and western blot, that human platelets express both AhR mRNA and AhR protein. AhR protein levels increase in a dose dependent manner when incubated with either 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) or omeprazole. Treatment of platelets with puromycin blocks increased AhR protein synthesis in the presence of AhR activators. Additionally, treatment of platelets with either activator results in phosphorylation of p38MAPK and cPLA2, two key signaling molecules in platelet activation pathways. Using the AhR competitive inhibitors alpha naphthoflavone and CH-223191, we show that phosphorylation of p38MAPK is AhR dependent. Further, inhibition of p38MAPK blocks downstream cPLA2 phosphorylation induced by TCDD or omeprazole. Treatment with AhR activators results in platelet priming, as demonstrated by increased platelet aggregation, which is inhibited by AhR antagonists. Our data support a model of the platelet AhR non-genomic pathway in which treatment with AhR activators results in increased expression of the AhR, phosphorylation of p38MAPK and cPLA2, leading to platelet priming in response to agonist. PMID:25797602

  5. Use of natural AhR ligands as potential therapeutic modalities against inflammatory disorders

    PubMed Central

    Busbee, Philip B; Rouse, Michael; Nagarkatti, Mitzi; Nagarkatti, Prakash S

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this review is to discuss research involving ligands for the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) and their role in immunomodulation. While activation of the AhR is well known for its ability to regulate the biochemical and toxic effects of environmental chemicals, more recently an exciting discovery has been made indicating that AhR ligation can also regulate T-cell differentiation, specifically through activation of Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) and downregulation of the proinflammatory Th17 cells. Such findings have opened new avenues of research on the possibility of targeting the AhR to treat inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. Specifically, this review will discuss the current research involving natural and dietary AhR ligands. In addition, evidence indicating the potential use of these ligands in regulating inflammation in various diseases will be highlighted. The importance of the AhR in immunological processes can be illustrated by expression of this receptor on a majority of immune cell types. In addition, AhR signaling pathways have been reported to influence a number of genes responsible for mediating inflammation and other immune responses. As interest in the AhR and its ligands increases, it seems prudent to consolidate current research on the contributions of these ligands to immune regulation during the course of inflammatory diseases. PMID:23731446

  6. 75 FR 49550 - Fifth Meeting: RTCA Special Committee 219: Attitude and Heading Reference System (AHRS)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-13

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Fifth Meeting: RTCA Special Committee 219: Attitude and Heading Reference...: Notice of RTCA Special Committee 219: Attitude and Heading Reference System (AHRS). SUMMARY: The FAA is... Heading Reference System (AHRS). DATES: The meeting will be held September 14-16, 2010 from 9 a.m. to 5...

  7. Microarray analysis of the AHR system: Tissue-specific flexibility in signal and target genes

    SciTech Connect

    Frericks, Markus; Meissner, Marc; Esser, Charlotte . E-mail: chesser@uni-duesseldorf.de

    2007-05-01

    Data mining published microarray experiments require that expression profiles are directly comparable. We performed linear global normalization on the data of 1967 Affymetrix U74av2 microarrays, i.e. the transcriptomes of > 100 murine tissues or cell types. The mathematical transformation effectively nullifies inter-experimental or inter-laboratory differences between microarrays. The correctness of expression values was validated by quantitative RT-PCR. Using the database we analyze components of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) signaling pathway in various tissues. We identified lineage and differentiation specific variant expression of AHR, ARNT, and HIF1{alpha} in the T-cell lineage and high expression of CYP1A1 in immature B cells and dendritic cells. Performing co-expression analysis we found unorthodox expression of the AHR in the absence of ARNT, particularly in stem cell populations, and can reject the hypothesis that ARNT2 takes over and is highly expressed when ARNT expression is low or absent. Furthermore the AHR shows no co-expression with any other transcript present on the chip. Analysis of differential gene expression under 308 conditions revealed 53 conditions under which the AHR is regulated, numerous conditions under which an intrinsic AHR action is modified as well as conditions activating the AHR even in the absence of known AHR ligands. Thus meta-analysis of published expression profiles is a powerful tool to gain novel insights into known and unknown systems.

  8. Natural repressors of P-induced hybrid dysgenesis in Drosophila melanogaster: a model for repressor evolution.

    PubMed

    Corish, P; Black, D M; Featherston, D W; Merriam, J; Dover, G A

    1996-04-01

    Type I repressors control P element transposition and comprise full length elements and elements with small 3' deletions in the final exon. Using a sensitive assay for measuring the strength of repression of P element transposition in somatic and germline tissues, we have isolated and characterized a naturally occurring type I repressor element from a Q population of Drosophila melanogaster. We demonstrate that the almost complete repression of transposition in this population is a mixture of KP elements with intermediate levels of repression, and the strong contribution of a single 2.6 kb P element deletion derivative, which we call SR (Strong Repressor). A deletion in the final intron of SR allows for the constitutive production of a putative 75 kDa repressor protein in germline tissues in addition to the production of the 66 kDa repressor in the soma, which would result in a biparental mode of inheritance of repression. Based on the four observed classes of natural Q populations, we propose a model in which populations containing SR-like elements, capable of producing strong type I repressor constitutively, have a selective advantage over populations which rely either on maternally transmitted P cytotype or on KP-induced weak levels of repression. Such populations may subsequently spread and constitute an evolutionary stable strategy for the repression of hybrid dysgenesis in Drosophila melanogaster. PMID:8801184

  9. Natural repressors of P-induced hybrid dysgenesis in Drosophila melanogaster: a model for repressor evolution.

    PubMed

    Corish, P; Black, D M; Featherston, D W; Merriam, J; Dover, G A

    1996-04-01

    Type I repressors control P element transposition and comprise full length elements and elements with small 3' deletions in the final exon. Using a sensitive assay for measuring the strength of repression of P element transposition in somatic and germline tissues, we have isolated and characterized a naturally occurring type I repressor element from a Q population of Drosophila melanogaster. We demonstrate that the almost complete repression of transposition in this population is a mixture of KP elements with intermediate levels of repression, and the strong contribution of a single 2.6 kb P element deletion derivative, which we call SR (Strong Repressor). A deletion in the final intron of SR allows for the constitutive production of a putative 75 kDa repressor protein in germline tissues in addition to the production of the 66 kDa repressor in the soma, which would result in a biparental mode of inheritance of repression. Based on the four observed classes of natural Q populations, we propose a model in which populations containing SR-like elements, capable of producing strong type I repressor constitutively, have a selective advantage over populations which rely either on maternally transmitted P cytotype or on KP-induced weak levels of repression. Such populations may subsequently spread and constitute an evolutionary stable strategy for the repression of hybrid dysgenesis in Drosophila melanogaster.

  10. Accurate Orientation Estimation Using AHRS under Conditions of Magnetic Distortion

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Nagesh; Bleakley, Chris

    2014-01-01

    Low cost, compact attitude heading reference systems (AHRS) are now being used to track human body movements in indoor environments by estimation of the 3D orientation of body segments. In many of these systems, heading estimation is achieved by monitoring the strength of the Earth's magnetic field. However, the Earth's magnetic field can be locally distorted due to the proximity of ferrous and/or magnetic objects. Herein, we propose a novel method for accurate 3D orientation estimation using an AHRS, comprised of an accelerometer, gyroscope and magnetometer, under conditions of magnetic field distortion. The system performs online detection and compensation for magnetic disturbances, due to, for example, the presence of ferrous objects. The magnetic distortions are detected by exploiting variations in magnetic dip angle, relative to the gravity vector, and in magnetic strength. We investigate and show the advantages of using both magnetic strength and magnetic dip angle for detecting the presence of magnetic distortions. The correction method is based on a particle filter, which performs the correction using an adaptive cost function and by adapting the variance during particle resampling, so as to place more emphasis on the results of dead reckoning of the gyroscope measurements and less on the magnetometer readings. The proposed method was tested in an indoor environment in the presence of various magnetic distortions and under various accelerations (up to 3 g). In the experiments, the proposed algorithm achieves <2° static peak-to-peak error and <5° dynamic peak-to-peak error, significantly outperforming previous methods. PMID:25347584

  11. INSIGHTS FROM AHR AND ARNT GENE KNOCKOUT STUDIES REGARDING RESPONSES TO TCDD AND REGULATION OF NORMAL EMBRYONIC DEVELOPMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) and the AhR nuclear translocator (ARNT) are members of the Per-ARNT-Sim (PAS) family of proteins. The AhR binds members of the chemical family that includes dioxins, furans and coplanar polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). A ligand-AhR-ARNT comp...

  12. Neisseria Prophage Repressor Implicated in Gonococcal Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Daou, Nadine; Yu, Chunxiao; Mcclure, Ryan; Gudino, Cynthia; Reed, George W.

    2013-01-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae, the causative agent of the sexually transmitted disease gonorrhea, can infect and colonize multiple mucosal sites in both men and women. The ability to cope with different environmental conditions requires tight regulation of gene expression. In this study, we identified and characterized a gonococcal transcriptional regulatory protein (Neisseria phage repressor [Npr]) that was previously annotated as a putative gonococcal phage repressor protein. Npr was found to repress transcription of NGNG_00460 to NGNG_00463 (NGNG_00460-00463), an operon present within the phage locus NgoΦ4. Npr binding sites within the NGNG_00460-00463 promoter region were found to overlap the −10 and −35 promoter motifs. A gonococcal npr mutant demonstrated increased adherence to and invasion of human endocervical epithelial cells compared to a wild-type gonococcal strain. Likewise, the gonococcal npr mutant exhibited enhanced colonization in a gonococcal mouse model of mucosal infection. Analysis of the gonococcal npr mutant using RNA sequence (RNA-seq) analysis demonstrated that the Npr regulon is limited to the operon present within the phage locus. Collectively, our studies have defined a new gonococcal phage repressor protein that controls the transcription of genes implicated in gonococcal pathogenesis. PMID:23876804

  13. Identification and expression of aryl hydrocarbon receptors (AhR1 and AhR2) provide insight in an evolutionary context regarding sensitivity of white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) to dioxin-like compounds.

    PubMed

    Doering, Jon A; Wiseman, Steve; Beitel, Shawn C; Giesy, John P; Hecker, Markus

    2014-05-01

    Sturgeons are ancient fishes, which are endangered in many parts of the world. Due to their benthic nature and longevity, sturgeon are at great risk of exposure to bioaccumulative contaminants such as dioxin-like compounds (DLCs). Despite their endangered status, little research has been conducted to characterize the relative sensitivity of sturgeons to DLCs. Proper assessment of risk of DLCs posed to these fishes therefore, requires a better understanding of this sensitivity and the factors that are driving it. Adverse effects associated with exposure to DLCs are mediated by the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). This study identified and characterized two distinct AhRs, AhR1 and AhR2, in white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) for the first time as a first step in studying the relative sensitivities of sturgeons to DLCs. Furthermore, tissue-specific expression of both AhRs under basal conditions and in response to exposure to the model DLC, β-naphthoflavone (βNF), was determined. The sequence of amino acids of AhR1 of white sturgeon had greater similarity to AhRs of tetrapods, including amphibians, birds, and mammals, than to AhR1s of other fishes. The sequence of amino acids in the ligand binding domain of the AhR1 had greater than 80% similarity to AhRs known to bind DLCs and was less similar to AhRs not known to bind DLCs. AhR2 of white sturgeon had greatest similarity to AhR2 of other fishes. Profiles of expression of AhR1 and AhR2 in white sturgeon were distinct from those known in other fishes and appear more similar to profiles observed in birds. Expressions of both AhR1 and AhR2 of white sturgeon were greatest in liver and heart, which are target organs for DLCs. Furthermore, abundances of transcripts of AhR1 and AhR2 in all tissues from white sturgeon were greater than controls (up to 35-fold) following exposure to βNF. Based upon both AhRs having similar abundances of transcript in target organs of DLC toxicity, both AhRs being up-regulated following

  14. Identification and expression of aryl hydrocarbon receptors (AhR1 and AhR2) provide insight in an evolutionary context regarding sensitivity of white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) to dioxin-like compounds.

    PubMed

    Doering, Jon A; Wiseman, Steve; Beitel, Shawn C; Giesy, John P; Hecker, Markus

    2014-05-01

    Sturgeons are ancient fishes, which are endangered in many parts of the world. Due to their benthic nature and longevity, sturgeon are at great risk of exposure to bioaccumulative contaminants such as dioxin-like compounds (DLCs). Despite their endangered status, little research has been conducted to characterize the relative sensitivity of sturgeons to DLCs. Proper assessment of risk of DLCs posed to these fishes therefore, requires a better understanding of this sensitivity and the factors that are driving it. Adverse effects associated with exposure to DLCs are mediated by the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). This study identified and characterized two distinct AhRs, AhR1 and AhR2, in white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) for the first time as a first step in studying the relative sensitivities of sturgeons to DLCs. Furthermore, tissue-specific expression of both AhRs under basal conditions and in response to exposure to the model DLC, β-naphthoflavone (βNF), was determined. The sequence of amino acids of AhR1 of white sturgeon had greater similarity to AhRs of tetrapods, including amphibians, birds, and mammals, than to AhR1s of other fishes. The sequence of amino acids in the ligand binding domain of the AhR1 had greater than 80% similarity to AhRs known to bind DLCs and was less similar to AhRs not known to bind DLCs. AhR2 of white sturgeon had greatest similarity to AhR2 of other fishes. Profiles of expression of AhR1 and AhR2 in white sturgeon were distinct from those known in other fishes and appear more similar to profiles observed in birds. Expressions of both AhR1 and AhR2 of white sturgeon were greatest in liver and heart, which are target organs for DLCs. Furthermore, abundances of transcripts of AhR1 and AhR2 in all tissues from white sturgeon were greater than controls (up to 35-fold) following exposure to βNF. Based upon both AhRs having similar abundances of transcript in target organs of DLC toxicity, both AhRs being up-regulated following

  15. Pityriazepin and other potent AhR ligands isolated from Malassezia furfur yeast

    PubMed Central

    Mexia, Nikitia; Gaitanis, George; Velegraki, Aristea; Soshilov, Anatoly; Denison, Michael S.; Magiatis, Prokopios

    2015-01-01

    Malassezia furfur yeast strains isolated from diseased human skin preferentially biosynthesize indole alkaloids which can be detected in human skin and are highly potent activators of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) and AhR-dependent gene expression. Chemical analysis of an EtOAc extract of a M. furfur strain obtained from diseased human skin and grown on L-tryptophan agar revealed several known AhR active tryptophan metabolites along with a previously unidentified compound, pityriazepin. While its structure resembled that of the known alkaloid pityriacitrin, the comprised pyridine ring had been transformed into an azepinone. The indoloazepinone scaffold of pityriazepin is extremely rare in nature and has only been reported once previously. Pityriazepin, like the other isolated compounds, was found to be a potent activator of the AhR-dependent reporter gene assays in recombinant cell lines derived from four different species, although significant species differences in relative potency was observed. The ability of pityriazepin to competitively bind to the AhR and directly stimulate AhR DNA binding classified it as a new naturally-occurring potent AhR agonist. Malassezia furfur produces an expanded collection of extremely potent naturally occurring AhR agonists, which produce their biological effects in a species-specific manner.1 PMID:25721496

  16. Characterization testing of a 40 Ahr bipolar nickel hydrogen battery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brewer, Jeffrey C.; Manzo, Michelle A.; Gahn, Randall F.

    1989-01-01

    In a continuing effort to develop NiH2 bipolar technology to a point where it can be used efficiently in space flight, testing of a second 40 Ahr, 10-cell bipolar battery has begun. This battery has undergone extensive characterization testing to determine the effects of such operating parameters as charge and discharge rates, temperature, and pressure. The fundamental design of this actively cooled bipolar battery is the same as the first battery. Most of the individual components, however, are from different manufacturers. Different testing procedures as well as certain unique battery characteristics make it difficult to directly compare the two sets of results. In general, the performance of this battery throughout characterization produced expected results. The main differences seen between the first and second batteries occurred during the high-rate discharge portion of the test matrix. The first battery also had poor high-rate discharge results, although better than those of the second battery. Minor changes were made to the battery frame design used for the first battery in an attempt to allow better gas access to the reaction sites for the second build and hopefully improve performance. The changes, however, did not improve the performance of the second battery and could have possibly contributed to the poorer performance that was observed. There are other component differences that could have contributed to the poorer performance of the second battery. The H2 electrode in the second battery was constructed with a Goretex backing which could have limited the high-rate current flow. The gas screen in the second battery had a larger mesh which again could have limited the high-rate current flow. Small scale 2 x 2 batteries are being tested to evaluate the effects of the component variations.

  17. Decoding transcriptional repressor complexes in the adult central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Megumi; Monteggia, Lisa M

    2014-05-01

    Cells maintain precise gene expression by balancing transcriptional activation and repression. While much work has focused on elucidating transcriptional activation in the central nervous system (CNS), little is known about transcriptional repression. One means to repress gene expression is to initiate binding of transcription factors to DNA, which then recruit co-repressors as well as other accessory proteins, forming a multi-protein repressor complex. These multi-protein repressor complexes include histone modifying enzymes that trigger processes such as histone acetylation, methylation, and ubiquitylation, altering chromatin structures to impact gene expression. Within these complexes transcriptional repressor proteins per se do not exhibit enzymatic reactions to remodel chromatin structure, whereas histone modifying enzymes lack intrinsic DNA binding activity but have an ability to process post-translational modifications on histones. Thus, the mutual association between transcriptional repressors and histone modifying enzymes is essential to sculpt chromatin to favor transcriptional repression and down regulate gene expression. Additionally, co-repressors are integral components in the context of gene repression as they bridge the association of transcriptional repressors and histone modifying enzymes. In this review, we will discuss the roles of some of the major components of these repressor complex in the CNS as well as their cellular functions that may underlie fundamental behavior in animals.

  18. An altered hydrotropic response (ahr1) mutant of Arabidopsis recovers root hydrotropism with cytokinin

    PubMed Central

    Saucedo, Manuel; Ponce, Georgina; Campos, María Eugenia; Eapen, Delfeena; García, Edith; Luján, Rosario; Sánchez, Yoloxóchitl; Cassab, Gladys I.

    2012-01-01

    Roots are highly plastic and can acclimate to heterogeneous and stressful conditions. However, there is little knowledge of the effect of moisture gradients on the mechanisms controlling root growth orientation and branching, and how this mechanism may help plants to avoid drought responses. The aim of this study was to isolate mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana with altered hydrotropic responses. Here, altered hydrotropic response 1 (ahr1), a semi-dominant allele segregating as a single gene mutation, was characterized. ahr1 directed the growth of its primary root towards the source of higher water availability and developed an extensive root system over time. This phenotype was intensified in the presence of abscisic acid and was not observed if ahr1 seedlings were grown in a water stress medium without a water potential gradient. In normal growth conditions, primary root growth and root branching of ahr1 were indistinguishable from those of the wild type (wt). The altered hydrotropic growth of ahr1 roots was confirmed when the water-rich source was placed at an angle of 45° from the gravity vector. In this system, roots of ahr1 seedlings grew downward and did not display hydrotropism; however, in the presence of cytokinins, they exhibited hydrotropism like those of the wt, indicating that cytokinins play a critical role in root hydrotropism. The ahr1 mutant represents a valuable genetic resource for the study of the effects of cytokinins in the differential growth of hydrotropism and control of lateral root formation during the hydrotropic response. PMID:22442413

  19. AHR2-Mediated Transcriptomic Responses Underlying the Synergistic Cardiac Developmental Toxicity of PAHs

    PubMed Central

    Jayasundara, Nishad; Van Tiem Garner, Lindsey; Meyer, Joel N.; Erwin, Kyle N.; Di Giulio, Richard T.

    2015-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) induce developmental defects including cardiac deformities in fish. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) mediates the toxicity of some PAHs. Exposure to a simple PAH mixture during embryo development consisting of an AHR agonist (benzo(a)pyrene-BaP) with fluoranthene (FL), an inhibitor of cytochrome p450 1(CYP1)—a gene induced by AHR activation—results in cardiac deformities. Exposure to BaP or FL alone at similar concentrations alters heart rates, but does not induce morphological deformities. Furthermore, AHR2 knockdown prevents the toxicity of BaP + FL mixture. Here, we used a zebrafish microarray analysis to identify heart-specific transcriptomic changes during early development that might underlie cardiotoxicity of BaP + FL. We used AHR2 morphant embryos to determine the role of this receptor in mediating toxicity. Control and knockdown embryos at 36 h post-fertilization were exposed to DMSO, 100 μg/l BaP, 500 μg/l FL, or 100 μg/l BaP + 500 μg/l FL, and heart tissues for RNA were extracted at 2, 6, 12, and 18 h-post-exposure (hpe), prior to the appearance of cardiac deformities. Data show AHR2-dependent BaP + FL effects on expression of genes involved in protein biosynthesis and neuronal development in addition to signaling molecules and their associated molecular pathways. Ca2+-cycling and muscle contraction genes were the most significantly differentially expressed category of transcripts when comparing BaP + FL-treated AHR2 morphant and control embryos. These differences were most prominent at 2 and 6 hpe. Therefore, we postulate that BaP + FL may affect cellular Ca2+ levels and subsequently cardiac muscle function, potentially underlying BaP + FL cardiotoxicity. PMID:25412620

  20. A tale of two repressors – a historical perspective

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Mitchell

    2011-01-01

    Few proteins have had such a strong impact on a field as the lac repressor and λ repressor have had in Molecular Biology In bacteria, the genes required for lactose utilization are negatively regulated; the lac repressor binds to an upstream operator blocking transcription of the enzymes necessary for lactose utilization. A similar switch regulates the virus life cycle; λ repressor binds to an operator site and blocks transcription of the phage genes necessary for lytic development. It is now 50 years since Jacob and Monod first proposed a model for gene regulation, which survives essentially unchanged in contemporary textbooks1. This model provides a cogent depiction of how a set of genes can be coordinately transcribed in response to environmental conditions and regulates metabolic events in the cell. A historical perspective is presented that illustrates the role these two repressor molecules played and their contribution to our understanding of gene regulation. PMID:21392509

  1. Dioxin-Dependent and Dioxin-Independent Gene Batteries: Comparison of Liver and Kidney in AHR-Null Mice

    PubMed Central

    Boutros, Paul C.; Bielefeld, Kirsten A.; Pohjanvirta, Raimo; Harper, Patricia A.

    2009-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) is a widely expressed ligand-dependent transcription factor that mediates cellular responses to dioxins and other planar aromatic hydrocarbons. Ahr-null mice are refractory to the toxic effects of dioxin exposure. Although some mechanistic aspects of AHR activity are well understood, the tissue specificity of AHR effects remains unclear, both during development and following administration of exogenous ligands. To address the latter issue, we defined and compared transcriptional responses to dioxin exposure in the liver and kidney of wild-type and Ahr-null adult C57BL/6J mice treated with either 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin or corn-oil vehicle. In both tissues, essentially all effects of dioxin on hepatic mRNA levels were mediated by the AHR. Although 297 genes were altered by dioxin exposure in the liver, only 17 were changed in the kidney, including a number of well-established AHR target genes. Ahr genotype had a large effect in both tissues, profoundly remodeling both the renal and hepatic transcriptomes. Surprisingly, a large number of genes were affected by Ahr genotype in both tissues, suggesting the presence of a basal AHR gene battery. Alterations of the renal transcriptome in Ahr-null animals were associated with perturbation of specific functional pathways and enrichment of specific DNA motifs. Our results demonstrate the importance of intertissue comparisons, highlight the basal role of the AHR in liver and kidney, and support a role in development or normal physiology. PMID:19759094

  2. Regulation of zebrafish CYP3A65 transcription by AHR2

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Chin-Teng; Chung, Hsin-Yu; Su, Hsiao-Ting; Tseng, Hua-Pin; Tzou, Wen-Shyong; Hu, Chin-Hwa

    2013-07-15

    CYP3A proteins are the most abundant CYPs in the liver and intestines, and they play a pivotal role in drug metabolism. In mammals, CYP3A genes are induced by various xenobiotics through processes mediated by PXR. We previously identified zebrafish CYP3A65 as a CYP3A ortholog that is constitutively expressed in gastrointestinal tissues, and is upregulated by treatment with dexamethasone, rifampicin or tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). However, the underlying mechanism of TCDD-mediated CYP3A65 transcription is unclear. Here we generated two transgenic zebrafish, Tg(CYP3A65S:EGFP) and Tg(CYP3A65L:EGFP), which contain 2.1 and 5.4 kb 5′ flanking sequences, respectively, of the CYP3A65 gene upstream of EGFP. Both transgenic lines express EGFP in larval gastrointestinal tissues in a pattern similar to that of the endogenous CYP3A65 gene. Moreover, EGFP expression can be significantly induced by TCDD exposure during the larval stage. In addition, EGFP expression can be stimulated by kynurenine, a putative AHR ligand produced during tryptophan metabolism. AHRE elements in the upstream regulatory region of the CYP3A65 gene are indispensible for basal and TCDD-induced transcription. Furthermore, the AHR2 DNA and ligand-binding domains are required to mediate effective CYP3A65 transcription. AHRE sequences are present in the promoters of many teleost CYP3 genes, but not of mammalian CYP3 genes, suggesting that AHR/AHR2-mediated transcription is likely a common regulatory mechanism for teleost CYP3 genes. It may also reflect the different environments that terrestrial and aquatic organisms encounter. - Highlights: • Tg(CYP3A65:EGFP) and CYP3A65 exhibits identical expression pattern. • CYP3A65 can be significantly induced by TCDD or kynurenine. • The AHRE elements are required to mediate CYP3A65 transcription. • The AHR2 DNA and ligand-binding domains are required for CYP3A65 transcription. • AHRE elements are present in many teleost CYP3 genes, but not in

  3. The circadian clock circuitry and the AHR signaling pathway in physiology and pathology.

    PubMed

    Anderson, George; Beischlag, Timothy V; Vinciguerra, Manlio; Mazzoccoli, Gianluigi

    2013-05-15

    Life forms populating the Earth must face environmental challenges to assure individual and species survival. The strategies predisposed to maintain organismal homeostasis and grant selective advantage rely on anticipatory phenomena facing periodic modifications, and compensatory phenomena facing unpredictable changes. Biological processes bringing about these responses are respectively driven by the circadian timing system, a complex of biological oscillators entrained to the environmental light/dark cycle, and by regulatory and metabolic networks that precisely direct the body's adjustments to variations of external conditions and internal milieu. A critical role in organismal homeostatic functions is played by the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) complex, which senses environmental and endogenous compounds, influences metabolic responses controlling phase I/II gene expression, and modulates vital phenomena such as development, inflammation and adaptive immunity. A physiological cross-talk between circadian and AHR signaling pathways has been evidenced. The alteration of AHR signaling pathway deriving from genetic damage with polymorphisms or mutations, or produced by exogenous or endogenous AHR activation, and chronodisruption caused by mismatch between the body's internal clock and geophysical time/social schedules, are capable of triggering pathological mechanisms involved in metabolic, immune-related and neoplastic diseases. On the other hand, the molecular components of the circadian clock circuitry and AHR signaling pathway may represent useful tools for preventive interventions and valuable targets of therapeutic approaches.

  4. Different regulation of aryl hydrocarbon receptor-regulated genes in response to dioxin in undifferentiated and neuronally differentiated human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells.

    PubMed

    Imran, Saima; Ferretti, Patrizia; Vrzal, Radim

    2015-01-01

    Some environmental pollutants derived from industrial processes have been suggested to be responsible for neurological impairment in children, especially in heavily polluted areas. Since these compounds are usually activators of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), it would be important to better understand the molecular pathways downstream of AhR leading to neural deficits. To this purpose, appropriate in vitro human neural model is much needed. Here we have investigated whether undifferentiated and neuronally differentiated human neuroblastoma cells, SH-SY5Y cells, can provide a suitable model for monitoring AhR activity induced by environmental pollutants, focusing on 2,3,7,8-tetrachlordibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), a known activator of AhR. Further characterization of differentiated SH-SY5Y showed an increase in AhRR (aryl hydrocarbon receptor repressor), no change in ARNT1 (AhR nuclear translocator 1), and a decrease in ARNT2 expression with differentiation; in contrast, AhR was undetectable in both undifferentiated and differentiated cells. Nonetheless, treatment of parental as well as differentiated SH-SY5Y cells with TCDD resulted in the induction of AhR-regulated genes, CYP1A1 and CYP1B1; AhRR expression was also affected, but to a much smaller extent. These results indicate that undifferentiated SH-SY5Y are less sensitive to TCDD than neuronally differentiated ones, suggesting a higher resistance of the undifferentiated tumor cells to toxic insults. They also suggest that TCDD in these cells may not act via direct activation of AhR that is undetectable in SH-SY5Y as well as in differentiated neurons. Hence, these cells do not provide an appropriate model for studying ligand-mediated activation of AhR.

  5. AhR expression and polymorphisms are associated with risk of coronary arterial disease in Chinese population

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Shian; Shui, Xiaorong; He, Yuan; Xue, Yiqiang; Li, Jianwen; Li, Guoming; Lei, Wei; Chen, Can

    2015-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) mediates the control of environmental toxicity, and modulates the development and pathogenesis of the cardiovascular system. However, little is known about the role of AhR in coronary arterial disease (CAD) susceptibility. We therefore conducted a case-control study in a Chinese population, and assessed the potential association between AhR variants and CAD susceptibility. Compared with the controls, circulating AhR expression was found to be significantly increased in patients with CAD and its subtypes including ST-segment and non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction, and stable and unstable angina pectoris. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis to evaluate the effect of AhR on CAD progression showed it to be a potent biomarker for CAD. Genotype frequencies of AhR rs2066853 differed significantly between CAD and control subjects, while smoking and hyperlipidemia markedly promoted CAD risk relative to the AhR polymorphism. Moreover, a significant difference in AhR variant distribution was observed between the four CAD subtypes with different severities. The expression level and functional polymorphisms of circulating AhR may affect the susceptibility and progression of CAD in Chinese populations. This provides a novel view of the etiology and epidemiology of CAD, and will contribute to the diagnosis and therapy of this severe disease. PMID:25620626

  6. Structural Analysis of Iac Repressor Bound to Allosteric Effectors

    SciTech Connect

    Daber,R.; Stayrook, S.; Rosenberg, A.; Lewis, M.

    2007-01-01

    The lac operon is a model system for understanding how effector molecules regulate transcription and are necessary for allosteric transitions. The crystal structures of the lac repressor bound to inducer and anti-inducer molecules provide a model for how these small molecules can modulate repressor function. The structures of the apo repressor and the repressor bound to effector molecules are compared in atomic detail. All effectors examined here bind to the repressor in the same location and are anchored to the repressor through hydrogen bonds to several hydroxyl groups of the sugar ring. Inducer molecules form a more extensive hydrogen-bonding network compared to anti-inducers and neutral effector molecules. The structures of these effector molecules suggest that the O6 hydroxyl on the galactoside is essential for establishing a water-mediated hydrogen bonding network that bridges the N-terminal and C-terminal sub-domains. The altered hydrogen bonding can account in part for the different structural conformations of the repressor, and is vital for the allosteric transition.

  7. In silico predictive studies of mAHR congener binding using homology modelling and molecular docking.

    PubMed

    Panda, Roshni; Cleave, A Suneetha Susan; Suresh, P K

    2014-09-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) is one of the principal xenobiotic, nuclear receptor that is responsible for the early events involved in the transcription of a complex set of genes comprising the CYP450 gene family. In the present computational study, homology modelling and molecular docking were carried out with the objective of predicting the relationship between the binding efficiency and the lipophilicity of different polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners and the AHR in silico. Homology model of the murine AHR was constructed by several automated servers and assessed by PROCHECK, ERRAT, VERIFY3D and WHAT IF. The resulting model of the AHR by MODWEB was used to carry out molecular docking of 36 PCB congeners using PatchDock server. The lipophilicity of the congeners was predicted using the XLOGP3 tool. The results suggest that the lipophilicity influences binding energy scores and is positively correlated with the same. Score and Log P were correlated with r = +0.506 at p = 0.01 level. In addition, the number of chlorine (Cl) atoms and Log P were highly correlated with r = +0.900 at p = 0.01 level. The number of Cl atoms and scores also showed a moderate positive correlation of r = +0.481 at p = 0.01 level. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study employing PatchDock in the docking of AHR to the environmentally deleterious congeners and attempting to correlate structural features of the AHR with its biochemical properties with regards to PCBs. The result of this study are consistent with those of other computational studies reported in the previous literature that suggests that a combination of docking, scoring and ranking organic pollutants could be a possible predictive tool for investigating ligand-mediated toxicity, for their subsequent validation using wet lab-based studies.

  8. Toxic effects of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) in developing red seabream (Pagrus major) embryo: an association of morphological deformities with AHR1, AHR2 and CYP1A expressions.

    PubMed

    Yamauchi, Masanobu; Kim, Eun-Young; Iwata, Hisato; Shima, Yasuhiro; Tanabe, Shinsuke

    2006-11-16

    The toxicity of dioxins such as 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) is mainly mediated by the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR), which regulates the multiple target genes including cytochrome P4501A (CYP1A). In general, bony fishes, which possess at least two distinct AHRs are one of the most sensitive vertebrates to TCDD in early life stage. However, the physiological and toxicological roles of piscine multiple AHRs are not fully understood, especially in marine fish. To understand which AHR is responsible for TCDD toxicity in a marine fish species, we characterized the early life stage toxicity related to the expression of AHRs and CYP1A in red seabream (Pagrus major). The embryos at 10h post-fertilization (hpf) were treated with 0-100 microg/L TCDD for 80 min waterborne exposure. TCDD dose-dependently elicited developmental toxicities including mortality, yolk sac edema, retarded body growth, spinal deformity, reduced heart rate, shortened snout, underdeveloped fin, heart, and lower jaw. Intriguingly, hemorrhage and pericardium edema, typical TCDD developmental defects noticed in other fish species, were not found in red seabream until test termination. The EC(egg)50s for yolk sac edema, underdeveloped fin, and spinal deformity were 170, 240, and 340 pg/g, respectively. The LC(egg)50 was 360 pg/g embryo, indicating that this species is one of the most sensitive fishes to TCDD toxicity. The expression levels of rsAHR1, rsAHR2 and CYP1A mRNAs were also determined in different developmental stages. The rsAHR2 mRNA expression dose-dependently increased following TCDD exposure, while rsAHR1 mRNA level was not altered. Level of rsAHR2 mRNA measured by two-step real-time PCR was 30 times higher than rsAHR1 in embryos treated with the highest dose. Temporal patterns of rsAHR2 and CYP1A mRNAs were similar in TCDD-treated embryos, representing a significant positive correlation between rsAHR2 and CYP1A mRNA levels, but not between rsAHR1 and CYP1A. In comparison of

  9. Mechanism of promoter repression by Lac repressor-DNA loops.

    PubMed

    Becker, Nicole A; Peters, Justin P; Maher, L James; Lionberger, Troy A

    2013-01-01

    The Escherichia coli lactose (lac) operon encodes the first genetic switch to be discovered, and lac remains a paradigm for studying negative and positive control of gene expression. Negative control is believed to involve competition of RNA polymerase and Lac repressor for overlapping binding sites. Contributions to the local Lac repressor concentration come from free repressor and repressor delivered to the operator from remote auxiliary operators by DNA looping. Long-standing questions persist concerning the actual role of DNA looping in the mechanism of promoter repression. Here, we use experiments in living bacteria to resolve four of these questions. We show that the distance dependence of repression enhancement is comparable for upstream and downstream auxiliary operators, confirming the hypothesis that repressor concentration increase is the principal mechanism of repression loops. We find that as few as four turns of DNA can be constrained in a stable loop by Lac repressor. We show that RNA polymerase is not trapped at repressed promoters. Finally, we show that constraining a promoter in a tight DNA loop is sufficient for repression even when promoter and operator do not overlap. PMID:23143103

  10. Progesterone, as well as 17β-estradiol, is important for regulating AHR battery homoeostasis in the rat uterus.

    PubMed

    Rataj, Felicitas; Möller, Frank Josef; Jähne, Maria; Hönscheid, Pia; Zierau, Oliver; Vollmer, Günter; Kretzschmar, Georg

    2015-03-01

    Several studies indicate that the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR), which plays an important role in mediating the toxicity of many industrial chemicals, plays an important role in the physiology of female reproductive tract organs. This makes it likely that the AHR and additional components of the AHR signalling pathway are under the control of female sex steroids. In a previous study, we could already demonstrate the regulation of many members of the AHR battery by 17β-estradiol (E2) in the uterus of rats. In this study, we addressed the potential role of progesterone (P4) in this context. In a comparative approach using ovariectomized rats which were treated for 3 days with either vehicle control, E2, progesterone (P4) or the combination of both hormones in addition to sham-operated animals, we could demonstrate that in addition to E2, P4 is also an important factor in regulating AHR signalling in the rat uterus. P4 has effects similar to E2 on uterine Ahr, Arnt and Arnt2 mRNA levels, resulting in a downregulation of these genes, while the E2-mediated downregulation of key AHR response genes Cyp1a1, Gsta2 and Ugt1 is completely antagonized by P4. As with E2, P4 leads to an increase in uterine AHR levels, especially in the endometrial epithelium despite the decrease in corresponding mRNA levels. This indicates a complex gene-specific regulatory network involving E2, P4 and possibly AHR itself to maintain all components of the AHR signalling cascade at the required levels during all stages of the oestrous cycle and pregnancy.

  11. Metabolic control of type 1 regulatory (Tr1) cell differentiation by AHR and HIF1-α

    PubMed Central

    Mascanfroni, Ivan D.; Takenaka, Maisa C.; Yeste, Ada; Patel, Bonny; Wu, Yan; Kenison, Jessica E.; Siddiqui, Shafiuddin; Basso, Alexandre S.; Otterbein, Leo E.; Pardoll, Drew M.; Pan, Fan; Priel, Avner; Clish, Clary B.; Robson, Simon C.; Quintana, Francisco J.

    2015-01-01

    Our understanding of the pathways that regulate lymphocyte metabolism, as well as the effects of metabolism and its products on the immune response, is still limited. We report that a metabolic program controlled by the transcription factors hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF1-α) and aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) supports the differentiation of type 1 regulatory (Tr1) cells. HIF1-α controls the early metabolic reprograming of Tr1 cells. At later time points, AHR promotes HIF1-α degradation and takes control of Tr1 cell metabolism. Extracellular adenosine triphosphate (eATP) and hypoxia, linked to inflammation, trigger AHR inactivation by HIF1-α and inhibit Tr1 cell differentiation. Conversely, CD39 promotes Tr1 cell differentiation by depleting eATP. CD39 also contributes to Tr1 suppressive activity by generating adenosine in cooperation with CD73 expressed by responder T cells and antigen presenting cells. These results suggest that HIF1-α and AHR integrate immunological, metabolic and environmental signals to regulate the immune response. PMID:26005855

  12. 76 FR 80447 - Eighth Meeting: RTCA Special Committee 219: Attitude and Heading Reference Systems (AHRS)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-23

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Eighth Meeting: RTCA Special Committee 219: Attitude and Heading Reference...). ACTION: Notice of RTCA Special Committee 219: Attitude and Heading Reference Systems (AHRS). SUMMARY: The FAA is issuing this notice to advise the public of the eighth meeting of RTCA Special Committee...

  13. EXPRESSION OF AHR AND ARNT MRNA IN CULTURED HUMAN ENDOMETRIAL EXPLANTS EXPOSED TO TCDD

    EPA Science Inventory

    Expression of AhR and ARNT mRNA in cultured human endometrial explants exposed to TCDD.

    Pitt JA, Feng L, Abbott BD, Schmid J, Batt RE, Costich TG, Koury ST, Bofinger DP.

    Curriculum in Toxicology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA.

    Endom...

  14. Autoradiographic localization of aromatic hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) in rhesus monkey ovary.

    PubMed

    Baldridge, Monika G; Hutz, Reinhold J

    2007-06-01

    2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) is the most toxic congener of a large class of manmade pollutants that persist in the environment. TCDD exerts its toxic effects, in part, by binding to its receptor known as the aromatic hydrocarbon receptor (AHR). TCDD is estrogen modulatory and in some systems its receptor associates directly with estrogen receptors via co-activator molecules. TCDD inhibits steroid synthesis in human ovarian granulosa cells and AHR is found in these cells. We have previously shown that AHR is found in whole rhesus monkey ovary, but have yet to establish its location. In the present study, we set out to show that radiolabeled TCDD binds to monkey ovarian follicles and that this binding is receptor mediated. Ovaries from Macaca mulatta were sectioned on a cryostat at 10 micro m; and sections were incubated with either control vehicle, (3)H-TCDD, or (3)H-TCDD plus alpha-naphthoflavone (ANF), a known receptor-blocking agent. Here, we show for the first time specific binding of TCDD to the granulosa cells of antral follicles and other regions of the rhesus monkey ovary. Our data indicate a 60-fold increase in binding with (3)H-TCDD over that of control, and that this binding is reduced to the levels seen in controls with the addition of the competitive antagonist ANF. These findings support the hypothesis that TCDD directly affects primate ovarian function via the AHR.

  15. Intersection of AHR and Wnt Signaling in Development, Health, and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Andrew J.; Branam, Amanda M.; Peterson, Richard E.

    2014-01-01

    The AHR (aryl hydrocarbon receptor) and Wnt (wingless-related MMTV integration site) signaling pathways have been conserved throughout evolution. Appropriately regulated signaling through each pathway is necessary for normal development and health, while dysregulation can lead to developmental defects and disease. Though both pathways have been vigorously studied, there is relatively little research exploring the possibility of crosstalk between these pathways. In this review, we provide a brief background on (1) the roles of both AHR and Wnt signaling in development and disease, and (2) the molecular mechanisms that characterize activation of each pathway. We also discuss the need for careful and complete experimental evaluation of each pathway and describe existing research that explores the intersection of AHR and Wnt signaling. Lastly, to illustrate in detail the intersection of AHR and Wnt signaling, we summarize our recent findings which show that 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD)-induced disruption of Wnt signaling impairs fetal prostate development. PMID:25286307

  16. Functional and phenotypic effects of AhR activation in inflammatory dendritic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Bankoti, Jaishree; Rase, Ben; Simones, Tom; Shepherd, David M.

    2010-07-15

    Aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) activation by 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) induces immune suppression. Dendritic cells (DCs) are key antigen presenting cells governing T cell activation and differentiation. However, the consequences of AhR activation in DCs are not fully defined. We hypothesized that AhR activation alters DC differentiation and generates dysfunctional DCs. To test this hypothesis, inflammatory bone marrow-derived DCs (BMDCs) from C57Bl/6 mice were generated in the presence of vehicle or TCDD. TCDD decreased CD11c expression but increased MHC class II, CD86 and CD25 expression on the BMDCs. The effects of TCDD were strictly AhR-dependent but not exclusively DRE-mediated. Similar effects were observed with two natural AhR ligands, 6-formylindolo[3,2-b]carbazole (FICZ) and 2-(1H-Indol-3-ylcarbonyl)-4-thiazolecarboxylic acid (ITE). TCDD increased LPS- and CpG-induced IL-6 and TNF-{alpha} production by BMDCs but decreased their NO production. TCDD decreased CpG-induced IL-12p70 production by BMDCs but did not affect their secretion of IL-10. TCDD downregulated LPS- and CpG-induced NF-kB p65 levels and induced a trend towards upregulation of RelB levels in the BMDCs. AhR activation by TCDD modulated BMDC uptake of both soluble and particulate antigens. Induction of indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) and TGF-{beta}3 has been implicated in the generation of regulatory T cells following AhR activation. TCDD increased IDO1, IDO2 and TGF-{beta}3 mRNA levels in BMDCs as compared to vehicle. Despite the induction of regulatory mediators, TCDD-treated BMDCs failed to suppress antigen-specific T cell activation. Thus, AhR activation can directly alter the differentiation and innate functions of inflammatory DCs without affecting their ability to successfully interact with T cells.

  17. AHR2 morpholino knockdown reduces the toxicity of total particulate matter to zebrafish embryos.

    PubMed

    Massarsky, Andrey; Bone, Audrey J; Dong, Wu; Hinton, David E; Prasad, G L; Di Giulio, Richard T

    2016-10-15

    The zebrafish embryo has been proposed as a 'bridge model' to study the effects of cigarette smoke on early development. Previous studies showed that exposure to total particulate matter (TPM) led to adverse effects in developing zebrafish, and suggested that the antioxidant and aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) pathways play important roles. This study investigated the roles of these two pathways in mediating TPM toxicity. The study consisted of four experiments. In experiment I, zebrafish embryos were exposed from 6h post fertilization (hpf) until 96hpf to TPM0.5 and TPM1.0 (corresponding to 0.5 and 1.0μg/mL equi-nicotine units) in the presence or absence of an antioxidant (N-acetyl cysteine/NAC) or a pro-oxidant (buthionine sulfoximine/BSO). In experiment II, TPM exposures were performed in embryos that were microinjected with nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), AHR2, cytochrome P450 1A (CYP1A), or CYP1B1 morpholinos, and deformities were assessed. In experiment III, embryos were exposed to TPM, and embryos/larvae were collected at 24, 48, 72, and 96hpf to assess several genes associated with the antioxidant and AHR pathways. Lastly, experiment IV assessed the activity and protein levels of CYP1A and CYP1B1 after exposure to TPM. We demonstrate that the incidence of TPM-induced deformities was generally not affected by NAC/BSO treatments or Nrf2 knockdown. In contrast, AHR2 knockdown reduced, while CYP1A or CYP1B1 knockdowns elevated the incidence of some deformities. Moreover, as shown by gene expression the AHR pathway, but not the antioxidant pathway, was induced in response to TPM exposure, providing further evidence for its importance in mediating TPM toxicity.

  18. AHR2 morpholino knockdown reduces the toxicity of total particulate matter to zebrafish embryos.

    PubMed

    Massarsky, Andrey; Bone, Audrey J; Dong, Wu; Hinton, David E; Prasad, G L; Di Giulio, Richard T

    2016-10-15

    The zebrafish embryo has been proposed as a 'bridge model' to study the effects of cigarette smoke on early development. Previous studies showed that exposure to total particulate matter (TPM) led to adverse effects in developing zebrafish, and suggested that the antioxidant and aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) pathways play important roles. This study investigated the roles of these two pathways in mediating TPM toxicity. The study consisted of four experiments. In experiment I, zebrafish embryos were exposed from 6h post fertilization (hpf) until 96hpf to TPM0.5 and TPM1.0 (corresponding to 0.5 and 1.0μg/mL equi-nicotine units) in the presence or absence of an antioxidant (N-acetyl cysteine/NAC) or a pro-oxidant (buthionine sulfoximine/BSO). In experiment II, TPM exposures were performed in embryos that were microinjected with nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), AHR2, cytochrome P450 1A (CYP1A), or CYP1B1 morpholinos, and deformities were assessed. In experiment III, embryos were exposed to TPM, and embryos/larvae were collected at 24, 48, 72, and 96hpf to assess several genes associated with the antioxidant and AHR pathways. Lastly, experiment IV assessed the activity and protein levels of CYP1A and CYP1B1 after exposure to TPM. We demonstrate that the incidence of TPM-induced deformities was generally not affected by NAC/BSO treatments or Nrf2 knockdown. In contrast, AHR2 knockdown reduced, while CYP1A or CYP1B1 knockdowns elevated the incidence of some deformities. Moreover, as shown by gene expression the AHR pathway, but not the antioxidant pathway, was induced in response to TPM exposure, providing further evidence for its importance in mediating TPM toxicity. PMID:27576004

  19. Induction of human UGT1A1 by bilirubin through AhR dependent pathway.

    PubMed

    Togawa, Hiroshi; Shinkai, Shigeko; Mizutani, Takaharu

    2008-12-01

    UDP-glucuronosyltransferase1A1 (UGT1A1) plays a key role to conjugate bilirubin and preventing jaundice, but there is no report showing the induction of human UGT1A1 (UGT1A1) by bilirubin. In this report, we show findings of the induction of the reporter gene (-3475/+14) of UGT1A1 in HepG2 cells by bilirubin at 50 microM, 100 microM, with human aryl hydrocarbon receptor (hAhR). We confirmed that induction of the reporter gene by bilirubin is dependent on the position of the xenobiotic responsive element (XRE) (-3328/-3319) of UGT1A1, because the XRE deletion UGT1A1 gene did not respond to stimulation by a complex of bilirubin and hAhR. alpha-Naphthoflavone (alpha-NF) of a typical AhR antagonist at 50 microM inhibited induction by bilirubin, suggesting that bilirubin stimulates through binding with hAhR. Meanwhile, bilirubin itself did not stimulate the induction of AhR, because we detected no-elevation of the mRNA level of AhR by RT-PCR. These results indicate that the induction of UGT1A1 by bilirubin-AhR did not depend on the elevation of AhR but on ligand binding. From this result, we considered that high bilirubin in neonates must induce the elevation of UGT1A1 after birth to prevent jaundice, and bilirubin in adults also regulates the level of UGT1A1. This is the first report showing direct induction of UGT1A1 by a bilirubin through AhR pathway. PMID:19356098

  20. Alternative in vitro approach for assessing AHR-mediated CYP1A induction by dioxins in wild cormorant (Phalacrocorax carbo) population.

    PubMed

    Thuruthippallil, Leena Mol; Kubota, Akira; Kim, Eun-Young; Iwata, Hisato

    2013-06-18

    Our line of papers revealed that the common (great) cormorant (Phalacrocorax carbo) possesses two isoforms of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (ccAHR1 and ccAHR2). This paper addresses in vitro tests of the ccAHR signaling pathways to solve two questions: (1) whether there are functional differences in the two ccAHR isoforms, and (2) whether a molecular perturbation, cytochrome P450 1A (ccCYP1A) induction, in the population-level can be predicted from the in vitro tests. The transactivation potencies mediated by ccAHR1 and ccAHR2 were measured in COS-7 cells treated with 15 selected dioxins and related compounds (DRCs), where ccAHR1 or ccAHR2 expression plasmid and ccCYP1A5 promoter/enhancer-linked luciferase reporter plasmid were transfected. For congeners that exhibited dose-dependent luciferase activities, 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) relative potencies (REPs) and induction equivalency factors (IEFs) were estimated. ccAHR1-IEF profile was similar to WHO avian TCDD toxic equivalency factor (TEF) profile except for dioxin-like polychlorinated biphenyls that showed lower IEFs in ccAHR1-driven reporter assay. ccAHR2-IEF profile was different from WHO TEFs and ccAHR1-IEFs. Notably, 2,3,4,7,8-PeCDF was more potent than TCDD for ccAHR2-mediated response. Using ccAHR1- and ccAHR2-IEFs and hepatic DRC concentrations in the Lake Biwa cormorant population, total TCDD induction equivalents (IEQs) were calculated for each ccAHR-mediated response. Nonlinear regression analyses provided significant sigmoidal relationships of ccAHR1- and ccAHR2-derived IEQs with hepatic ccCYP1A5 mRNA levels, supporting the results of in vitro ccAHR-mediated TCDD dose-response curves. Collectively, our in vitro AHR reporter assay potentially could be an alternative to molecular epidemiology of the species of concern regarding CYP1A induction by AHR ligands. PMID:23676118

  1. Ion effects on the lac repressor--operator equilibrium.

    PubMed

    Barkley, M D; Lewis, P A; Sullivan, G E

    1981-06-23

    The effects of ions on the interaction of lac repressor protein and operator DNA have been studied by the membrane filter technique. The equilibrium association constant was determined as a function of monovalent and divalent cation concentrations, anions, and pH. The binding of repressor and operator is extremely sensitive to the ionic environment. The dependence of the observed equilibrium constant on salt concentration is analyzed according to the binding theory of Record et al. [Record, M. T., Jr., Lohman, T. M., & deHaseth, P. L. (1976) J. Mol. Biol. 107, 145]. The number of ionic interactions in repressor--operator complex is deduced from the slopes of the linear log-log plots. About 11 ionic interactions are formed between repressor and DNA phosphates at pH 7.4 and about 9 ionic interactions at pH 8.0, in reasonable agreement with previous estimates. A favorable nonelectrostatic binding free energy of about 9-12 kcal/mol is estimated from the extrapolated equilibrium constants at the 1 M standard state. The values are in good accord with recent results for the salt-independent binding of repressor core and operator DNA. The effects of pH on the repressor--operator interaction are small, and probably result from titration of functional groups in the DNA-binding site of the protein. For monovalent salts, the equilibrium constant is slightly dependent on cation type and highly dependent on anion type. At constant salt concentration, the equilibrium constant decreases about 10000-fold in the order CH3CO2- greater than or equal to F- greater than Cl- greater than Br- greater than NO3- greater than SCN- greater than I-. The wide range of accessible equilibrium constants provides a useful tool for in vitro studies of the repressor--operator interaction.

  2. The immune phenotype of AhR null mouse mutants: not a simple mirror of xenobiotic receptor over-activation.

    PubMed

    Esser, Charlotte

    2009-02-15

    Intrinsic and induced cell differentiation and the cellular response to endogenous and exogenous signals are hallmarks of the immune system. Specific and common signalling cascades ensure a highly flexible and adapted response. Increasing evidence suggests that gene modulation by the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), a ligand-activated transcription factor, is an important part of these processes. For decades the AhR has been studied mainly for its toxic effects after artificial activation by man-made chemical pollutants such as dioxins. These studies gave important, albeit to some extent skewed, evidence for a mechanistic link between the AhR and the immune system. AhR null mutants and other mutants of the AhR signalling pathway have been generated and used to analyse the physiological function of the AhR, including for the developing and antigen-responding immune system. In this review I look at the natural immunological function(s) of the AhR.

  3. DDE and PCB 153 independently induce aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Gaspar-Ramírez, Octavio; Pérez-Vázquez, Francisco J; Salgado-Bustamante, Mariana; González-Amaro, Roberto; Hernandez-Castro, Berenice; Pérez-Maldonado, Ivan N

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that compounds inducing pro-inflammatory cytokines enhance AhR expression. The aim of this study was 2-fold: (1) to determine if two pro-inflammatory compounds, dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (DDE) and 2,2',4,4',5,5'-hexa-chlorobiphenyl (PCB 153), independently affect AhR gene expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC); and (2) if affected, to determine whether the mechanism involved was due to AhR activation or to a pro-inflammatory effect of the chemicals. PBMC isolated from healthy individuals were incubated in the presence of DDE (10 µg/ml) and PCB 153 (20 ng/ml) over time and AhR and CYP1A1 expression was assessed with a real-time PCR technique. The results indicated there was over-expression of the AhR mRNA in PBMC when the cells were treated with DDE and PCB 153. No changes in expression levels of CYP1A1 mRNA were found. Importantly, when the cells were exposed to DDE and PCB 153 in the presence of an antagonist of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, the over-expression of AhR was abolished; as expected, the expression of CYP1A1 was unaffected. In conclusion, these studies demonstrated for the first time an increment of AhR expression "in vitro" in PBMC treated with two pro-inflammatory environmental pollutants, DDE and PCB153. Moreover, the over-expression of AhR was dependent of TNFα induced by DDE and PCB 153 and was independent of AhR activation.

  4. Binding Specificities of the Telomere Phage ϕKO2 Prophage Repressor CB and Lytic Repressor Cro

    PubMed Central

    Hammerl, Jens Andre; Jäckel, Claudia; Lanka, Erich; Roschanski, Nicole; Hertwig, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Temperate bacteriophages possess a genetic switch which regulates the lytic and lysogenic cycle. The genomes of the temperate telomere phages N15, PY54, and ϕKO2 harbor a primary immunity region (immB) comprising genes for the prophage repressor (cI or cB), the lytic repressor (cro) and a putative antiterminator (q). The roles of these products are thought to be similar to those of the lambda proteins CI (CI prophage repressor), Cro (Cro repressor), and Q (antiterminator Q), respectively. Moreover, the gene order and the location of several operator sites in the prototype telomere phage N15 and in ϕKO2 are reminiscent of lambda-like phages. We determined binding sites of the ϕKO2 prophage repressor CB and lytic repressor Cro on the ϕKO2 genome in detail by electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) studies. Unexpectedly, ϕKO2 CB and Cro revealed different binding specificities. CB was bound to three OR operators in the intergenic region between cB and cro, two OL operators between cB and the replication gene repA and even to operators of N15. Cro bound exclusively to the 16 bp operator site OR3 upstream of the ϕKO2 prophage repressor gene. The ϕKO2 genes cB and cro are regulated by several strong promoters overlapping with the OR operators. The data suggest that Cro represses cB transcription but not its own synthesis, as already reported for PY54 Cro. Thus, not only PY54, but also phage ϕKO2 possesses a genetic switch that diverges significantly from the switch of lambda-like phages. PMID:27527206

  5. Binding Specificities of the Telomere Phage ϕKO2 Prophage Repressor CB and Lytic Repressor Cro.

    PubMed

    Hammerl, Jens Andre; Jäckel, Claudia; Lanka, Erich; Roschanski, Nicole; Hertwig, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Temperate bacteriophages possess a genetic switch which regulates the lytic and lysogenic cycle. The genomes of the temperate telomere phages N15, PY54, and ϕKO2 harbor a primary immunity region (immB) comprising genes for the prophage repressor (cI or cB), the lytic repressor (cro) and a putative antiterminator (q). The roles of these products are thought to be similar to those of the lambda proteins CI (CI prophage repressor), Cro (Cro repressor), and Q (antiterminator Q), respectively. Moreover, the gene order and the location of several operator sites in the prototype telomere phage N15 and in ϕKO2 are reminiscent of lambda-like phages. We determined binding sites of the ϕKO2 prophage repressor CB and lytic repressor Cro on the ϕKO2 genome in detail by electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) studies. Unexpectedly, ϕKO2 CB and Cro revealed different binding specificities. CB was bound to three OR operators in the intergenic region between cB and cro, two OL operators between cB and the replication gene repA and even to operators of N15. Cro bound exclusively to the 16 bp operator site OR3 upstream of the ϕKO2 prophage repressor gene. The ϕKO2 genes cB and cro are regulated by several strong promoters overlapping with the OR operators. The data suggest that Cro represses cB transcription but not its own synthesis, as already reported for PY54 Cro. Thus, not only PY54, but also phage ϕKO2 possesses a genetic switch that diverges significantly from the switch of lambda-like phages. PMID:27527206

  6. Binding Specificities of the Telomere Phage ϕKO2 Prophage Repressor CB and Lytic Repressor Cro.

    PubMed

    Hammerl, Jens Andre; Jäckel, Claudia; Lanka, Erich; Roschanski, Nicole; Hertwig, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Temperate bacteriophages possess a genetic switch which regulates the lytic and lysogenic cycle. The genomes of the temperate telomere phages N15, PY54, and ϕKO2 harbor a primary immunity region (immB) comprising genes for the prophage repressor (cI or cB), the lytic repressor (cro) and a putative antiterminator (q). The roles of these products are thought to be similar to those of the lambda proteins CI (CI prophage repressor), Cro (Cro repressor), and Q (antiterminator Q), respectively. Moreover, the gene order and the location of several operator sites in the prototype telomere phage N15 and in ϕKO2 are reminiscent of lambda-like phages. We determined binding sites of the ϕKO2 prophage repressor CB and lytic repressor Cro on the ϕKO2 genome in detail by electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) studies. Unexpectedly, ϕKO2 CB and Cro revealed different binding specificities. CB was bound to three OR operators in the intergenic region between cB and cro, two OL operators between cB and the replication gene repA and even to operators of N15. Cro bound exclusively to the 16 bp operator site OR3 upstream of the ϕKO2 prophage repressor gene. The ϕKO2 genes cB and cro are regulated by several strong promoters overlapping with the OR operators. The data suggest that Cro represses cB transcription but not its own synthesis, as already reported for PY54 Cro. Thus, not only PY54, but also phage ϕKO2 possesses a genetic switch that diverges significantly from the switch of lambda-like phages.

  7. Repressor-mediated tissue-specific gene expression in plants

    DOEpatents

    Meagher, Richard B.; Balish, Rebecca S.; Tehryung, Kim; McKinney, Elizabeth C.

    2009-02-17

    Plant tissue specific gene expression by way of repressor-operator complexes, has enabled outcomes including, without limitation, male sterility and engineered plants having root-specific gene expression of relevant proteins to clean environmental pollutants from soil and water. A mercury hyperaccumulation strategy requires that mercuric ion reductase coding sequence is strongly expressed. The actin promoter vector, A2pot, engineered to contain bacterial lac operator sequences, directed strong expression in all plant vegetative organs and tissues. In contrast, the expression from the A2pot construct was restricted primarily to root tissues when a modified bacterial repressor (LacIn) was coexpressed from the light-regulated rubisco small subunit promoter in above-ground tissues. Also provided are analogous repressor operator complexes for selective expression in other plant tissues, for example, to produce male sterile plants.

  8. Characterization testing of a 40 AHR bipolar nickel-hydrogen battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brewer, Jeffrey C.; Manzo, Michelle A.; Gemeiner, Russel P.

    1989-12-01

    Extensive characterization testing has been done on a second 40 amp-hour (Ahr), 10-cell bipolar nickel-hydrogen (Ni-H2) battery to study the effects of such operating parameters as charge and discharge rates, temperature, and pressure, on capacity, Ahr and watt-hour (Whr) efficiencies, end-of-charge (EOC) and mid-point discharge voltages. Testing to date has produced many interesting results, with the battery performing well throughout all of the test matrix except during the high-rate (5C and 10C) discharges, where poorer than expected results were observed. The exact cause of this poor performance is, as yet, unknown. Small scale 2 x 2 inch battery tests are to be used in studying this problem. Low earth orbit (LEO) cycle life testing at a 40 percent depth of discharge (DOD) and 10 C is scheduled to follow the characterization testing.

  9. Characterization testing of a 40 AHR bipolar nickel-hydrogen battery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brewer, Jeffrey C.; Manzo, Michelle A.; Gemeiner, Russel P.

    1989-01-01

    Extensive characterization testing has been done on a second 40 amp-hour (Ahr), 10-cell bipolar nickel-hydrogen (Ni-H2) battery to study the effects of such operating parameters as charge and discharge rates, temperature, and pressure, on capacity, Ahr and watt-hour (Whr) efficiencies, end-of-charge (EOC) and mid-point discharge voltages. Testing to date has produced many interesting results, with the battery performing well throughout all of the test matrix except during the high-rate (5C and 10C) discharges, where poorer than expected results were observed. The exact cause of this poor performance is, as yet, unknown. Small scale 2 x 2 inch battery tests are to be used in studying this problem. Low earth orbit (LEO) cycle life testing at a 40 percent depth of discharge (DOD) and 10 C is scheduled to follow the characterization testing.

  10. An Unusual Phage Repressor Encoded by Mycobacteriophage BPs.

    PubMed

    Villanueva, Valerie M; Oldfield, Lauren M; Hatfull, Graham F

    2015-01-01

    Temperate bacteriophages express transcription repressors that maintain lysogeny by down-regulating lytic promoters and confer superinfection immunity. Repressor regulation is critical to the outcome of infection-lysogenic or lytic growth-as well as prophage induction into lytic replication. Mycobacteriophage BPs and its relatives use an unusual integration-dependent immunity system in which the phage attachment site (attP) is located within the repressor gene (33) such that site-specific integration leads to synthesis of a prophage-encoded product (gp33103) that is 33 residues shorter at its C-terminus than the virally-encoded protein (gp33136). However, the shorter form of the repressor (gp33103) is stable and active in repression of the early lytic promoter PR, whereas the longer virally-encoded form (gp33136) is inactive due to targeted degradation via a C-terminal ssrA-like tag. We show here that both forms of the repressor bind similarly to the 33-34 intergenic regulatory region, and that BPs gp33103 is a tetramer in solution. The BPs gp33103 repressor binds to five regulatory regions spanning the BPs genome, and regulates four promoters including the early lytic promoter, PR. BPs gp33103 has a complex pattern of DNA recognition in which a full operator binding site contains two half sites separated by a variable spacer, and BPs gp33103 induces a DNA bend at the full operator site but not a half site. The operator site structure is unusual in that one half site corresponds to a 12 bp palindrome identified previously, but the other half site is a highly variable variant of the palindrome. PMID:26332854

  11. A novel AhR ligand, 2AI, protects the retina from environmental stress

    PubMed Central

    Gutierrez, Mark A.; Davis, Sonnet S.; Rosko, Andrew; Nguyen, Steven M.; Mitchell, Kylie P.; Mateen, Samiha; Neves, Joana; Garcia, Thelma Y.; Mooney, Shaun; Perdew, Gary H.; Hubbard, Troy D.; Lamba, Deepak A.; Ramanathan, Arvind

    2016-01-01

    Various retinal degenerative diseases including dry and neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD), retinitis pigmentosa, and diabetic retinopathy are associated with the degeneration of the retinal pigmented epithelial (RPE) layer of the retina. This consequently results in the death of rod and cone photoreceptors that they support, structurally and functionally leading to legal or complete blindness. Therefore, developing therapeutic strategies to preserve cellular homeostasis in the RPE would be a favorable asset in the clinic. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a conserved, environmental ligand-dependent, per ARNT-sim (PAS) domain containing bHLH transcription factor that mediates adaptive response to stress via its downstream transcriptional targets. Using in silico, in vitro and in vivo assays, we identified 2,2′-aminophenyl indole (2AI) as a potent synthetic ligand of AhR that protects RPE cells in vitro from lipid peroxidation cytotoxicity mediated by 4-hydroxynonenal (4HNE) as well as the retina in vivo from light-damage. Additionally, metabolic characterization of this molecule by LC-MS suggests that 2AI alters the lipid metabolism of RPE cells, enhancing the intracellular levels of palmitoleic acid. Finally, we show that, as a downstream effector of 2AI-mediated AhR activation, palmitoleic acid protects RPE cells from 4HNE-mediated stress, and light mediated retinal degeneration in mice. PMID:27364765

  12. An Assessment of Technical and Production Risks of Candidate Low-Cost Attitude/Heading Reference Systems(AHRS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuchnovicz, Daniel; Burgess, Malcolm; Hammers, William

    1999-01-01

    This report provides an assessment of technical and production risks of candidate low-cost attitude/heading reference systems (AHRS) for use in the Advanced General Aviation Transport Experiments (AGATE) airplanes. A low-cost AHRS is a key component of modem "glass cockpit" flight displays for General Aviation (GA) aircraft. The technical capabilities of several candidate low-cost AHRS were examined and described along with the technical issues involved with using all solid-state components for attitude measurement. An economic model was developed which describes the expected profit, rate of return, and volume requirements for the manufacture of low-cost AHRS for GA aircraft in the 2000 to 2020 time frame. The model is the result of interviews with GA airframe manufacturers, avionics manufacturers and historical analysis of avionics of similar complexity. The model shows that a manufacturer will break even after three years of AHRS production, realizing an 18 percent rate of return (23 percent profit) on an investment of $3.5M over the 20 year period. A start-up production estimate showed costs of $6-12M for a new company to build and certify an AHRS from scratch, considered to be a high-risk proposition, versus $0.25-0.75M for an experienced avionics manufacturer to manufacture a design under license, a low-risk proposition.

  13. AhR activation underlies the CYP1A autoinduction by A-998679 in rats

    PubMed Central

    Liguori, Michael J.; Lee, Chih-Hung; Liu, Hong; Ciurlionis, Rita; Ditewig, Amy C.; Doktor, Stella; Andracki, Mark E.; Gagne, Gerard D.; Waring, Jeffrey F.; Marsh, Kennan C.; Gopalakrishnan, Murali; Blomme, Eric A. G.; Yang, Yi

    2012-01-01

    Xenobiotic-mediated induction of cytochrome P450 (CYP) drug metabolizing enzymes (DMEs) is frequently encountered in drug discovery and can influence disposition, pharmacokinetic, and toxicity profiles. The CYP1A subfamily of DMEs plays a central role in the biotransformation of several drugs and environmental chemicals. Autoinduction of drugs through CYP3A enzymes is a common mechanism for their enhanced clearance. However, autoinduction via CYP1A is encountered less frequently. In this report, an experimental compound, A-998679 [3-(5-pyridin-3-yl-1,2,4-oxadiazol-3-yl) benzonitrile], was shown to enhance its own clearance via induction of Cyp1a1 and Cyp1a2. Rats were dosed for 5 days with 30, 100, and 200 mg/kg/day A-998679. During the dosing period, the compound's plasma AUC decreased at 30 mg/kg (95%) and 100 mg/kg (80%). Gene expression analysis and immunohistochemistry of the livers showed a large increase in the mRNA and protein levels of Cyp1a, which was involved in the biotransformation of A-998679. Induction of CYP1A was confirmed in primary rat, human, and dog hepatocytes. The compound also weakly inhibited CYP1A2 in human liver microsomes. A-998679 activated the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) in a luciferase gene reporter assay in HepG2 cells, upregulated expression of genes associated with AhR activation in rat liver and enhanced nuclear migration of AhR in HepG2 cells. Collectively these results demonstrate that A-998679 is an AhR activator that induces Cyp1a1 and Cyp1a2 expression, resulting in an autoinduction phenomenon. The unique properties of A-998679, along with its novel structure distinct from classical polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), may warrant its further evaluation as a tool compound for use in studies involving AhR biology and CYP1A-related mechanisms of drug metabolism and toxicity. PMID:23112805

  14. Functionality of aryl hydrocarbon receptors (AhR1 and AhR2) of white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) and implications for the risk assessment of dioxin-like compounds.

    PubMed

    Doering, Jon A; Farmahin, Reza; Wiseman, Steve; Kennedy, Sean W; Giesy, John P; Hecker, Markus

    2014-07-15

    Worldwide, populations of sturgeons are endangered, and it is hypothesized that anthropogenic chemicals, including dioxin-like compounds (DLCs), might be contributing to the observed declines in populations. DLCs elicit their toxic action through activation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), which is believed to regulate most, if not all, adverse effects associated with exposure to these chemicals. Currently, risk assessment of DLCs in fishes uses toxic equivalency factors (TEFs) developed for the World Health Organization (WHO) that are based on studies of embryo-lethality with salmonids. However, there is a lack of knowledge of the sensitivity of sturgeons to DLCs, and it is uncertain whether TEFs developed by the WHO are protective of these fishes. Sturgeons are evolutionarily distinct from salmonids, and the AhRs of sturgeons differ from those of salmonids. Therefore, this study investigated the sensitivity of white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) to DLCs in vitro via the use of luciferase reporter gene assays using COS-7 cells transfected with AhR1 or AhR2 of white sturgeon. Specifically, activation and relative potencies (RePs) of 2,3,7,8-tetrachloro-dibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), 2,3,4,7,8-pentachloro-dibenzofuran, 2,3,7,8-tetrachloro-dibenzofuran, 3,3',4,4',5-pentachlorobiphenyl, 3,3',4,4'-tetrachlorobiphenyl, and 2,3,3',4,4'-pentachlorobiphenyl were determined for each AhR. It was demonstrated that white sturgeon expresses AhR1s and AhR2s that are both activated by DLCs with EC50 values for 2,3,7,8-TCDD that are lower than those of any other AhR of vertebrates tested to date. Both AhRs of white sturgeon had RePs for polychlorinated dibenzofurans more similar to TEFs for birds, while RePs for polychlorinated biphenyls were most similar to TEFs for fishes. Measured concentrations of select DLCs in tissues of white sturgeon from British Columbia, Canada, were used to calculate toxic equivalents (TEQs) by use of TEFs for fishes used by the WHO and TCDD

  15. NINJA connects the co-repressor TOPLESS to jasmonate signalling

    PubMed Central

    Pauwels, Laurens; Barbero, Gemma Fernández; Geerinck, Jan; Tilleman, Sofie; Grunewald, Wim; Pérez, Amparo Cuellar; Chico, José Manuel; Bossche, Robin Vanden; Sewell, Jared; Gil, Eduardo; García-Casado, Gloria; Witters, Erwin; Inzé, Dirk; Long, Jeff A.; De Jaeger, Geert; Solano, Roberto; Goossens, Alain

    2010-01-01

    Jasmonoyl-isoleucine (JA-Ile) is a plant hormone that regulates a broad array of plant defence and developmental processes1–5. JA-Ile-responsive gene expression is regulated by the transcriptional activator MYC2 that interacts physically with the jasmonate ZIM-domain (JAZ) repressor proteins. Upon JA-Ile perception, JAZ proteins are degraded and JA-Ile-dependent gene expression is activated6,7. The molecular mechanisms by which JAZ proteins repress gene expression remain unknown. Here we show that the JAZ proteins recruit the Groucho/Tup1-type co-repressor TOPLESS (TPL)8 and TPL-related proteins (TPRs) through a previously uncharacterized adaptor protein, designated Novel INteractor of JAZ (NINJA). NINJA acts as a transcriptional repressor of which the activity is mediated by a functional TPL-binding EAR repression motif. Accordingly, both NINJA and TPL proteins function as negative regulators of jasmonate responses. Our results point to TPL proteins as general co-repressors that affect multiple signalling pathways through the interaction with specific adaptor proteins. This new insight reveals how stress- and growth-related signalling cascades use common molecular mechanisms to regulate gene expression in plants. PMID:20360743

  16. Does the repressor coping style predict lower posttraumatic stress symptoms?

    PubMed

    McNally, Richard J; Hatch, John P; Cedillos, Elizabeth M; Luethcke, Cynthia A; Baker, Monty T; Peterson, Alan L; Litz, Brett T

    2011-07-01

    We tested whether a continuous measure of repressor coping style predicted lower posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms in 122 health care professionals serving in Operation Iraqi Freedom. Zero-order correlational analyses indicated that predeployment repressor coping scores negatively predicted postdeployment PTSD symptoms, r(s) = -0.29, p = 0.001, whereas predeployment Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale (CD-RISC) scores did not predict postdeployment PTSD symptoms, r(s) = -0.13, p = 0.14. However, predeployment trait anxiety was chiefly responsible for the association between repressor coping and PTSD symptom severity, r(s) = 0.38, p = 0.001. Four percent of the subjects qualified for a probable PTSD diagnosis. Although service members with relatively higher PTSD scores had lower repressor coping scores than did the other subjects, their level of predeployment anxiety was chiefly responsible for this relationship. Knowing someone's predeployment level of trait anxiety permits better prediction of PTSD symptoms among trauma-exposed service members than does knowing his or her level of repressive coping. PMID:22128715

  17. Optimized expression and purification of biophysical quantities of Lac repressor and Lac repressor regulatory domain.

    PubMed

    Stetz, Matthew A; Carter, Marie V; Wand, A Joshua

    2016-07-01

    The recombinant production of Lac repressor (LacI) in Escherichia coli is complicated by its ubiquitous use as a regulatory element in commercially-available expression vectors and host strains. While LacI-regulated expression systems are often used to produce recombinant LacI, the product can be heterogeneous and unsuitable for some studies. Alternative approaches include using unregulated vectors which typically suffer from low yield or vectors with promoters induced by metabolically active sugars which can dilute isotope labels necessary for certain biophysical studies. Here, an optimized expression system and isolation protocol for producing various constructs of LacI is introduced which eliminates these complications. The expression vector is an adaptation of the pASK backbone wherein expression of the lacI gene is regulated by an anhydrotetracyline inducible tetA promoter and the host strain lacks the lacI gene. Typical yields in highly deuterated minimal medium are nearly 2-fold greater than those previously reported. Notably, the new expression system is also able to produce the isolated regulatory domain of LacI without co-expression of the full-length protein and without any defects in cell viability, eliminating the inconvenient requirement for strict monitoring of cell densities during pre-culturing. Typical yields in highly deuterated minimal medium are significantly greater than those previously reported. Characterization by solution NMR shows that LacI constructs produced using this expression system are highly homogenous and functionally active. PMID:27064119

  18. An evolutionary link between sporulation and prophage induction in the structure of a repressor:anti-repressor complex.

    PubMed

    Lewis, R J; Brannigan, J A; Offen, W A; Smith, I; Wilkinson, A J

    1998-11-13

    Spore formation is an extreme response of some bacteria to adversity. In Bacillus subtilis the proteins of the sin, sporulation inhibition, region form a component of an elaborate molecular circuitry that regulates the commitment to sporulation. SinR is a tetrameric repressor protein that binds to the promoters of genes essential for entry into sporulation and prevents their transcription. This repression is overcome through the activity of SinI, which disrupts the SinR tetramer through the formation of a SinI-SinR heterodimer. The interactions governing this curious quaternary transition are revealed in the crystal structure of the SinI-SinR complex. The most striking, and unexpected, finding is that the tertiary structure of the DNA-binding domain of SinR is identical with that of the corresponding domains of the repressor proteins, CI and Cro, of bacteriophage 434 that regulate lysis/lysogeny. This structural similarity greatly exceeds that between SinR and any bacterial protein or between the 434 repressor proteins and their homologues in the closely related bacteriophage lambda. The close evolutionary relationship implied by the structures of SinR and the 434 repressors provokes both comparison of their functions and a speculative consideration of the intriguing possibility of an evolutionary link between the two adaptive responses, sporulation and prophage induction.

  19. Effects of scorched food leachates with or without activated charcoal pretreatment on AhR activation in cultured cells.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Satoshi; Morita, Koji; Kinoshita, Makoto; Fujimori, Shin; Ishikawa, Toshio

    2015-12-01

    Aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a transcription factor activated by xenobiotics, including dioxins and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Although AhR is also activated by some dietary constituents, it has not been completely clarified in what circumstances AhR ligands are ingested in our daily life. Because PAHs are formed by the incomplete combustion of organic materials, we hypothesized that scorched foods might contain and leach out AhR ligands sufficient to stimulate AhR in vitro. To test this hypothesis, scorched foods (bread, cheese, etc.) were mixed vigorously with water, and the supernatants were retrieved as samples. The samples were added to HepG2 cells stably expressing an AhR-responsive reporter gene. Also, expression of CYP1A1, an endogenous AhR-responsive gene, was analyzed by RT-PCR in different cell lines treated with the samples. We further tested whether pretreatment of the samples with activated charcoal would alter their AhR-stimulating activity. All the supernatant samples tested induced AhR-dependent reporter gene activity and CYP1A1 mRNA expression. In some samples, these inductions were inhibited by pretreatment with activated charcoal. Our findings indicate that scorched food leachates stimulate AhR in cultured cells and that activated charcoal adsorbs the AhR-stimulating substances in some leachates. Thus, people who habitually eat scorched foods are exposed to AhR ligands on a regular basis. Further studies are needed to elucidate whether burnt foods actually exert biological effects on our health.

  20. Effects of scorched food leachates with or without activated charcoal pretreatment on AhR activation in cultured cells.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Satoshi; Morita, Koji; Kinoshita, Makoto; Fujimori, Shin; Ishikawa, Toshio

    2015-12-01

    Aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a transcription factor activated by xenobiotics, including dioxins and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Although AhR is also activated by some dietary constituents, it has not been completely clarified in what circumstances AhR ligands are ingested in our daily life. Because PAHs are formed by the incomplete combustion of organic materials, we hypothesized that scorched foods might contain and leach out AhR ligands sufficient to stimulate AhR in vitro. To test this hypothesis, scorched foods (bread, cheese, etc.) were mixed vigorously with water, and the supernatants were retrieved as samples. The samples were added to HepG2 cells stably expressing an AhR-responsive reporter gene. Also, expression of CYP1A1, an endogenous AhR-responsive gene, was analyzed by RT-PCR in different cell lines treated with the samples. We further tested whether pretreatment of the samples with activated charcoal would alter their AhR-stimulating activity. All the supernatant samples tested induced AhR-dependent reporter gene activity and CYP1A1 mRNA expression. In some samples, these inductions were inhibited by pretreatment with activated charcoal. Our findings indicate that scorched food leachates stimulate AhR in cultured cells and that activated charcoal adsorbs the AhR-stimulating substances in some leachates. Thus, people who habitually eat scorched foods are exposed to AhR ligands on a regular basis. Further studies are needed to elucidate whether burnt foods actually exert biological effects on our health. PMID:26558458

  1. Interactions between Escherichia coli RNA polymerase and lambda repressor. Mutations in PRM affect repression of PR.

    PubMed

    Hwang, J J; Gussin, G N

    1988-04-20

    The rightward operator, OR, of bacteriophage lambda is part of a complex regulatory region that includes PRM, the promoter for repressor synthesis by a prophage, the rightward early promoter PR, and three repressor-binding sites, OR1, OR2 and OR3. By binding to OR2, repressor blocks transcription from PR and simultaneously stimulates the formation of open complexes between RNA polymerase and PRM. In this letter, we describe a test of the hypothesis that the interaction between RNA polymerase bound at PRM and repressor bound at OR2 increases the apparent affinity of repressor for OR. One implication of this hypothesis is that the amount of repressor required for repression of PR should be inversely correlated with PRM promoter strength. This is indeed the case. The amount of repressor required for 50% repression of PR is decreased by prmup-1, an "up" mutation of PRM, and is increased by prm- mutations. An unexpected finding is that in addition to their effect on the apparent affinity of repressor for OR, mutations in the -35 region of PRM alter the shape of repressor-titration curves. We propose that these mutations alter the interaction between RNA polymerase bound at PRM and repressor bound at OR2 in such a way that cooperativity in the binding of repressor to OR1 and OR2 is also disrupted.

  2. Crystal Structure of the Lactose Operon Repressor and Its Complexes with DNA and Inducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Mitchell; Chang, Geoffrey; Horton, Nancy C.; Kercher, Michele A.; Pace, Helen C.; Schumacher, Maria A.; Brennan, Richard G.; Lu, Ponzy

    1996-03-01

    The lac operon of Escherichia coli is the paradigm for gene regulation. Its key component is the lac repressor, a product of the lacI gene. The three-dimensional structures of the intact lac repressor, the lac repressor bound to the gratuitous inducer isopropyl-β-D-1-thiogalactoside (IPTG) and the lac repressor complexed with a 21-base pair symmetric operator DNA have been determined. These three structures show the conformation of the molecule in both the induced and repressed states and provide a framework for understanding a wealth of biochemical and genetic information. The DNA sequence of the lac operon has three lac repressor recognition sites in a stretch of 500 base pairs. The crystallographic structure of the complex with DNA suggests that the tetrameric repressor functions synergistically with catabolite gene activator protein (CAP) and participates in the quaternary formation of repression loops in which one tetrameric repressor interacts simultaneously with two sites on the genomic DNA.

  3. The Q-rich/PST domain of the AHR regulates both ligand-induced nuclear transport and nucleocytoplasmic shuttling

    PubMed Central

    Tkachenko, Anna; Henkler, Frank; Brinkmann, Joep; Sowada, Juliane; Genkinger, Doris; Kern, Christian; Tralau, Tewes; Luch, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) shuttles continuously between cytoplasm and nucleus, unless ligand-binding triggers association with the AHR nuclear translocator (ARNT) and subsequent binding to cognate DNA motifs. We have now identified Val 647 as mandatory residue for export from the nucleus and AHR-function. This residue prevents inactivation of the receptor as a consequence of nuclear sequestration via constitutive import. Concomitantly mutants lacking this residue are exclusively localised in the nucleus. Although ligands accelerate nuclear import transiently, stable nuclear transition depends on a motif adjacent to Val 647 that comprises residues 650–661. Together, this defined region within the Q-rich domain regulates intracellular trafficking of the AHR in context of both nucleocytoplasmic shuttling and receptor activation. Nuclear export therefore depends on the previously characterised N-terminal NES and the newly identified motif that includes V647. Nucleocytoplasmic distribution of full-length human AHR is further affected by a section of the PST domain that shows sequence similarities with nuclear export signals. In concert, these motifs maintain a predominant cytoplasmic compartmentalisation, receptive for ligand binding. PMID:27535013

  4. Arylhydrocarbon receptor (AhR) activation in airway epithelial cells induces MUC5AC via reactive oxygen species (ROS) production.

    PubMed

    Chiba, Takahito; Uchi, Hiroshi; Tsuji, Gaku; Gondo, Hisaki; Moroi, Yoichi; Furue, Masutaka

    2011-02-01

    The dioxins and dioxin-like compounds in cigarette smoke regulate various immunological responses via the arylhydrocarbon receptor (AhR). These environmental toxicants are known to cause bronchitis, asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and lung cancer. Recent studies have demonstrated that AhR activation upregulates the expression of mucin 5AC, oligomeric mucus/gel-forming (MUC5AC) in the airway epithelial cell line. However, the mechanism for the production of mucin has not been clarified. In this study, we investigated the role and pathway of AhR in airway epithelial cells by using selective agonists and antagonists. After stimulation with or without benzopyrene (B[a]P), an AhR agonist, MUC5AC expression was measured by real-time RT-PCR. The mechanism of AhR-induced MUC5AC expression in airway epithelial cells was studied in terms of the production of cytokine and reactive oxygen species (ROS). Treatment with B[a]P increased ROS generation in NCI-H₂₉₂ cells. Furthermore, B[a]P-induced MUC5AC upregulation and mucin production were inhibited by AhR siRNA or the use of an antioxidative agent. These results suggest that the AhR-induced increase of mucin production is partially mediated by ROS generation. An antioxidant therapy approach may help to cure AhR-induced mucus hypersecretory diseases. PMID:20709182

  5. The Q-rich/PST domain of the AHR regulates both ligand-induced nuclear transport and nucleocytoplasmic shuttling.

    PubMed

    Tkachenko, Anna; Henkler, Frank; Brinkmann, Joep; Sowada, Juliane; Genkinger, Doris; Kern, Christian; Tralau, Tewes; Luch, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) shuttles continuously between cytoplasm and nucleus, unless ligand-binding triggers association with the AHR nuclear translocator (ARNT) and subsequent binding to cognate DNA motifs. We have now identified Val 647 as mandatory residue for export from the nucleus and AHR-function. This residue prevents inactivation of the receptor as a consequence of nuclear sequestration via constitutive import. Concomitantly mutants lacking this residue are exclusively localised in the nucleus. Although ligands accelerate nuclear import transiently, stable nuclear transition depends on a motif adjacent to Val 647 that comprises residues 650-661. Together, this defined region within the Q-rich domain regulates intracellular trafficking of the AHR in context of both nucleocytoplasmic shuttling and receptor activation. Nuclear export therefore depends on the previously characterised N-terminal NES and the newly identified motif that includes V647. Nucleocytoplasmic distribution of full-length human AHR is further affected by a section of the PST domain that shows sequence similarities with nuclear export signals. In concert, these motifs maintain a predominant cytoplasmic compartmentalisation, receptive for ligand binding. PMID:27535013

  6. Chemical modification of arginine residues in the lactose repressor

    SciTech Connect

    Whitson, P.A.; Matthews, K.S.

    1987-10-06

    The lactose repressor protein was chemically modified with 2,3-butanedione and phenylglyoxal. Arginine reaction was quantitated by either amino aced analysis or incorporation of /sup 14/C-labeled phenylglyoxal. Inducer binding activity was unaffected by the modification of arginine residues, while both operator and nonspecific DNA binding activities were diminished, although to differing degrees. The correlation of the decrease in DNA binding activities with the modification of approx. 1-2 equiv of arginine per monomer suggests increased reactivity of a functionally essential residue(s). For both reagents, operator DNA binding activity was protected by the presence of calf thymus DNA, and the extent of reaction with phenylglyoxal was simultaneously diminished. This protection presumably results from steric restriction of reagent access to an arginine(s) that is (are) essential for DNA binding interactions. These experiments suggest that there is (are) an essential reactive arginine(s) critical for repressor binding to DNA.

  7. Engineering a root-specific, repressor-operator gene complex.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tehryung; Balish, Rebecca S; Heaton, Andrew C P; McKinney, Elizabeth C; Dhankher, Om Parkash; Meagher, Richard B

    2005-11-01

    Strong, tissue-specific and genetically regulated expression systems are essential tools in plant biotechnology. An expression system tool called a 'repressor-operator gene complex' (ROC) has diverse applications in plant biotechnology fields including phytoremediation, disease resistance, plant nutrition, food safety, and hybrid seed production. To test this concept, we assembled a root-specific ROC using a strategy that could be used to construct almost any gene expression pattern. When a modified E. coli lac repressor with a nuclear localization signal was expressed from a rubisco small subunit expression vector, S1pt::lacIn, LacIn protein was localized to the nuclei of leaf and stem cells, but not to root cells. A LacIn repressible Arabidopsis actin expression vector A2pot was assembled containing upstream bacterial lacO operator sequences, and it was tested for organ and tissue specificity using beta-glucuronidase (GUS) and mercuric ion reductase (merA) gene reporters. Strong GUS enzyme expression was restricted to root tissues of A2pot::GUS/S1pt::lacIn ROC plants, while GUS activity was high in all vegetative tissues of plants lacking the repressor. Repression of shoot GUS expression exceeded 99.9% with no evidence of root repression, among a large percentage of doubly transformed plants. Similarly, MerA was strongly expressed in the roots, but not the shoots of A2pot::merA/S1pt::lacIn plants, while MerA levels remained high in both shoots and roots of plants lacking repressor. Plants with MerA expression restricted to roots were approximately as tolerant to ionic mercury as plants constitutively expressing MerA in roots and shoots. The superiority of this ROC over the previously described root-specific tobacco RB7 promoter is demonstrated.

  8. Genomic Mining of Prokaryotic Repressors for Orthogonal Logic Gates

    PubMed Central

    Stanton, Brynne C.; Nielsen, Alec A.K.; Tamsir, Alvin; Clancy, Kevin; Peterson, Todd; Voigt, Christopher A.

    2014-01-01

    Genetic circuits perform computational operations based on interactions between freely diffusing molecules within a cell. When transcription factors are combined to build a circuit, unintended interactions can disrupt its function. Here, we apply “part mining” to build a library of 73 TetR-family repressors gleaned from prokaryotic genomes. The operators of a subset were determined using an in vitro method and this information was used to build synthetic promoters. The promoters and repressors were screened for cross-reactions. Of these, 16 were identified that both strongly repress their cognate promoter (5- to 207-fold) and do not interact with other promoters. Each repressor:promoter pair was converted to a NOT gate and characterized. Used as a set of 16 NOR gates, there are >1054 circuits that could be built by changing the pattern of input and output promoters. This represents a large set of compatible gates that can be used to construct user-defined circuits. PMID:24316737

  9. Identification of the Bacillus subtilis pur operon repressor.

    PubMed

    Weng, M; Nagy, P L; Zalkin, H

    1995-08-01

    Transcription of the Bacillus subtilis pur operon is repressed in response to a signal of excess adenine. We have purified the repressor protein and have identified, cloned, and overexpressed the purR regulatory gene that controls transcription initiation of the operon. B. subtilis purR encodes a 62-kDa homodimer that binds to the pur operon control region. The PurR binding site which overlaps the promoter encompasses approximately 110 bp. The protein-DNA interaction is inhibited by 5-phosphoribosyl 1-pyrophosphate. A mutation that deletes the repressor binding site or one that disrupts purR abolishes binding activity in vitro and repression of transcription in vivo in response to the excess adenine signal. These results lead to a model in which an excess-adenine signal is transmitted to PurR via the 5-phosphoribosyl 1-pyrophosphate pool. In addition, purR is autoregulated. There is no structural or mechanistic similarity between the B. subtilis and Escherichia coli purine repressors.

  10. Interaction of Bacillus subtilis purine repressor with DNA.

    PubMed

    Shin, B S; Stein, A; Zalkin, H

    1997-12-01

    A purine repressor (PurR) mediates adenine nucleotide-dependent regulation of transcription initiation of the Bacillus subtilis pur operon. This repressor has been purified for the first time, and binding to control site DNA was characterized. PurR binds in vitro to four operons. Apparent Kd values for binding were 7 nM for the pur operon, 8 nM for purA, 13 nM for purR, and 44 nM for the pyr operon. In each case, DNase I footprints exhibited a pattern of protected and hypersensitive sites that extended over more than 60 bp. A GAAC-N24-GTTC sequence in the pur operon was necessary but not sufficient for the PurR-DNA interaction. However, this motif, which is conserved in the four binding sites, was not required for binding of PurR to purA. Thus, the common DNA recognition element for binding of PurR to the four operons is not known. Multiple PurR-pur operon DNA complexes having a binding stoichiometry that was either approximately two or six repressor molecules per DNA fragment were detected. The results of a torsional constraint experiment suggest that control site DNA forms one right-handed turn around PurR.

  11. A genetic biosensor for identification of transcriptional repressors of target promoters

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Weishan; Li, Xiao; Li, Yue; Li, Shanshan; Fan, Keqiang; Yang, Keqian

    2015-01-01

    Transcriptional repressors provide widespread biological significance in the regulation of gene expression. However, in prokaryotes, it is particularly difficult to find transcriptional repressors that recognize specific target promoters on genome-scale. To address this need, a genetic biosensor for identifying repressors of target promoters was developed in Escherichia coli from a de novo designed genetic circuit. This circuit can convert the negative input of repressors into positive output of reporters, thereby facilitating the selection and identification of repressors. After evaluating the sensitivity and bias, the biosensor was used to identify the repressors of scbA and aco promoters (PscbA and Paco), which control the transcription of signalling molecule synthase genes in Streptomyces coelicolor and Streptomyces avermitilis, respectively. Two previously unknown repressors of PscbA were identified from a library of TetR family regulators in S. coelicolor, and three novel repressors of Paco were identified from a genomic library of S. avermitilis. Further in vivo and in vitro experiments confirmed that these newly identified repressors attenuated the transcription of their target promoters by direct binding. Overall, the genetic biosensor developed here presents an innovative and powerful strategy that could be applied for identifying genome-wide unknown repressors of promoters in bacteria. PMID:26510468

  12. Benzo[ghi]perylene activates the AHR pathway to exert biological effects on the NL-20 human bronchial cell line.

    PubMed

    Zaragoza-Ojeda, Montserrat; Eguía-Aguilar, Pilar; Perezpeña-Díazconti, Mario; Arenas-Huertero, Francisco

    2016-08-10

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) are produced by incomplete combustion of organic material. In the Mexico City atmosphere, the most abundant PAH is benzo[ghi]perylene (BghiP), a gasoline combustion marker. At present, there are no reports of the effects of BghiP on human bronchial cells, so the aim of the study was to evaluate the effects in vitro of BghiP on the NL-20 cell line. Results showed that BghiP induced the formation of small vesicles throughout the cytoplasm, with absence of nuclear fragmentation. At 48h exposition, damage in cell membrane increased significantly at 1.24μg/mL of BghiP (p<0.05). Immunocytochemistry revealed that BghiP provokes nuclear translocation of AhR receptor, which indicates that this compound can induce transcription of genes via receptor binding (AhR pathway activation). BghiP induced a two-fold increase (p<0.05) in the expression of AhR and CYP4B1 (a lung-specific pathway effector). In the presence of the receptor antagonist CH-223191, the loss of viability, the nuclear translocation and the overexpression of genes decreased, though this did not prevent the formation of vesicles. BghiP induced oxidative stress and in presence of the receptor antagonist this increased significantly. In conclusion, BghiP can activate the overexpression of AhR and CYP4B1, and the effects are abated by the AhR receptor antagonist. This is the first report to prove that BghiP utilizes the AhR pathway to exert its toxic effects on the NL-20 human bronchial cell line . PMID:27234499

  13. Inhibition of AHR transcription by NF1C is affected by a single-nucleotide polymorphism, and is involved in suppression of human uterine endometrial cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, D; Takao, T; Tsunematsu, R; Morokuma, S; Fukushima, K; Kobayashi, H; Saito, T; Furue, M; Wake, N; Asanoma, K

    2013-10-10

    Involvement of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) in carcinogenesis has been suggested in many studies. Upregulation of AHR has been reported in some cancer species, and an association between single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of AHR and cancer risk or cancer development has also been reported. This evidence suggests the involvement of some specific SNPs in AHR transcriptional regulation in the process of carcinogenesis or cancer development, but there have been no studies to elucidate the mechanism involved. In this study, we identified the transcription factor Nuclear Factor 1-C (NF1C) as a candidate to regulate AHR transcription in a polymorphism-dependent manner. SNP rs10249788 was included in a consensus binding site for NF1C. Our results suggested that NF1C preferred the C allele to the T allele at rs10249788 for binding. Forced expression of NF1C suppressed the activity of the AHR promoter with C at rs10249788 stronger than that with T. Moreover, expression analysis of human uterine endometrial cancer (HEC) specimens showed greater upregulation of AHR and downregulation of NF1C than those of normal endometrium specimens. Sequence analysis showed HEC patients at advanced stages tended to possess T/T alleles more frequently than healthy women. We also demonstrated that NF1C suppressed proliferation, motility and invasion of HEC cells. This function was at least partially mediated by AHR. This study is the first to report that a polymorphism on the AHR regulatory region affected transcriptional regulation of the AHR gene in vitro. Because NF1C is a tumor suppressor, our new insights into AHR deregulation and its polymorphisms could reveal novel mechanisms of genetic susceptibility to cancer.

  14. Inhibition of constitutive aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) signaling attenuates androgen independent signaling and growth in (C4-2) prostate cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Cindy; Richmond, Oliver; Aaron, LaTayia; Powell, Joann B.

    2013-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor is a member of the basic-helix-loop-helix family of transcription factors. AhR mediates the biochemical and toxic effects of a number of polyaromatic hydrocarbons such as 2,3,7,8,-tetrachloro-dibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). AhR is widely known for regulating the transcription of drug metabolizing enzymes involved in the xenobiotic metabolism of carcinogens and therapeutic agents, such as cytochrome P450-1B1 (CYP1B1). Additionally, AhR has also been reported to interact with multiple signaling pathways during prostate development. Here we investigate the effect of sustained AhR signaling on androgen receptor function in prostate cancer cells. Immunoblot analysis shows that AhR expression is increased in androgen independent (C4-2) prostate cancer cells when compared to androgen sensitive (LNCaP) cells. RT-PCR studies revealed constitutive AhR signaling in C4-2 cells without the ligand induced activation required in LNCaP cells. A reduction of AhR activity by short RNA mediated silencing in C4-2 cells reduced expression of both AhR and androgen responsive genes. The decrease in androgen responsive genes correlates to a decrease in phosphorylated androgen receptor and androgen receptor expression in the nucleus. Furthermore, the forced decrease in AhR expression resulted in a 50% decline in the growth rate of C4-2 cells. These data indicates that AhR is required to maintain hormone independent signaling and growth by the androgen receptor in C4-2 cells. Collectively, these data provide evidence of a direct role for AhR in androgen independent signaling and provides insight into the molecular mechanisms responsible for sustained androgen receptor signaling in hormone refractory prostate cancer. PMID:23266674

  15. Expression of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor pathway and cyclooxygenase-2 in dog tumors.

    PubMed

    Giantin, M; Vascellari, M; Lopparelli, R M; Ariani, P; Vercelli, A; Morello, E M; Cristofori, P; Granato, A; Buracco, P; Mutinelli, F; Dacasto, M

    2013-02-01

    In humans, the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) gene battery constitutes a set of contaminant-responsive genes, which have been recently shown to be involved in the regulation of several patho-physiological conditions, including tumorigenesis. As the domestic dog represents a valuable animal model in comparative oncology, mRNA levels of cytochromes P450 1A1, 1A2 and 1B1 (CYP1A1, 1A2 and 1B1), AHR, AHR nuclear translocator (ARNT), AHR repressor (AHRR, whose partial sequence was here obtained) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX2) were measured in dog control tissues (liver, skin, mammary gland and bone), in 47 mast cell tumors (MCTs), 32 mammary tumors (MTs), 5 osteosarcoma (OSA) and related surgical margins. Target genes were constitutively expressed in the dog, confirming the available human data. Furthermore, their pattern of expression in tumor biopsies was comparable to that already described in a variety of human cancers; in particular, both AHR and COX2 genes were up-regulated and positively correlated, while CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 mRNAs were generally poorly expressed. This work demonstrated for the first time that target mRNAs are expressed in neoplastic tissues of dogs, thereby increasing the knowledge about dog cancer biology and confirming this species as an useful animal model for comparative studies on human oncology.

  16. Tight-binding repressors of the lac operon: selection system and in vitro analysis.

    PubMed

    Pfahl, M

    1979-01-01

    The isolation and characterization of altered repressors of the lac operon which have an increased affinity for an operator should give useful clues about the molecular basis for the very tight and specific interaction between repressor and operator. A selection system has been devised which allows the isolation of such repressor mutants. This system selects for mutant repressors which can overcome lac operator-constitutive (Oc) mutations. By using in vivo assays, 24 candidates were obtained which, compared with wild type, have an increased trans effect of their repressor on one or several Oc operators. Three of these candidates have been investigated in vitro; the affinity of their repressor for inducer was unchanged, whereas the affinity for wild-type operator was increased 15-, 86-, and 262-fold, respectively. PMID:104955

  17. A Mutant Ahr Allele Protects the Embryonic Kidney from Hydrocarbon-Induced Deficits in Fetal Programming

    PubMed Central

    Nanez, Adrian

    2011-01-01

    Background: The use of experimental model systems has expedited the elucidation of pathogenetic mechanisms of renal developmental disease in humans and the identification of genes that orchestrate developmental programming during nephrogenesis. Objectives: We conducted studies to evaluate the role of AHR polymorphisms in the disruption of renal developmental programming by benzo(a)pyrene (BaP). Methods: We used metanephric cultures of C57BL/6J (C57) mice expressing the Ahrb-1 allele and B6.D2N-Ahrd/J (D2N) mice expressing a mutant allele deficient in ligand binding (Ahrd) to investigate molecular mechanisms of renal development. Deficits in fetal programming were evaluated in the offspring of pregnant mice treated with BaP during nephrogenesis. Results: Hydrocarbon challenge of metanephri from C57 mice altered Wilms’ tumor suppressor gene (Wt1) mRNA splice variant ratios and reduced mRNAs of the Wt1 transcriptional targets syndecan-1 (Sdc1) paired box gene 2 (Pax2), epidermal growth factor receptor (Egfr), and retinoic acid receptor, alpha (Rarα). These changes correlated with down-regulation of effectors of differentiation [secreted frizzled-related sequence protein 1 (Sfrp1), insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (Igf1r), wingless-related MMTV-integration site 4 (Wnt4), Lim homeobox protein 1 (Lhx1), E-cadherin]. In contrast, metanephri from D2N mice were spared hydrocarbon-induced changes in Wt1 splice variant ratios and deficits of differentiation. We observed similar patterns of dysmorphogenesis and progressive loss of renal function at postnatal weeks 7 and 52 in the offspring of pregnant C57 but not D2N mice gavaged with 0.1 or 0.5 mg/kg BaP on gestation days 10–13. Conclusions: These findings support a functional link between AHR and WT1 in the regulation of renal morphogenesis and raise important questions about the contribution of human AHR polymorphisms to the fetal origins of adult-onset kidney disease. PMID:21803694

  18. Characterization of AhR agonists reveals antagonistic activity in European herring gull (Larus argentatus) eggs.

    PubMed

    Muusse, Martine; Christensen, Guttorm; Gomes, Tânia; Kočan, Anton; Langford, Katherine; Tollefsen, Knut Erik; Vaňková, Lenka; Thomas, Kevin V

    2015-05-01

    European herring gull (Larus argentatus) eggs from two Norwegian islands, Musvær in the south east and Reiaren in Northern Norway, were screened for dioxins, furans, and dioxin-like and selected non-dioxin-like polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and subjected to non-target analysis to try to identify the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) agonists, responsible for elevated levels measured using the dioxin responsive chemically activated luciferase expression (DR-CALUX) assay. Eggs from Musvær contained chemically calculated toxic equivalent (WHO TEQ) levels of between 109 and 483 pg TEQ/g lw, and between 82 and 337 pg TEQ/g lw was determined in eggs from Reiaren. In particular PCB126 contributed highly to the total TEQ (69-82%). In 19 of the 23 samples the calculated WHO TEQ was higher than the TEQCALUX. Using CALUX specific relative effect potencies (REPs), the levels were lower at between 77 and 292 pg/g lw in eggs from Musvær and between 55 and 223 pg/g lw in eggs from Reiaren, which was higher than the TEQCALUX in 16 of the 23 samples. However, the means of the REP values and the TEQCALUX were not significantly different. This suggests the presence of compounds that can elicit antagonist effects, with a low binding affinity to the AhR. Non-target analysis identified the presence of hexachlorobenzene (HCB) (quantified at 9.6-185 pg/g lw) but neither this compound nor high concentrations of PCB126 and non-dioxin-like PCBs could explain the differences between the calculated TEQ or REP values and the TEQCALUX. Even though, for most AhR agonists, the sensitivity of herring gulls is not known, the reported levels can be considered to represent a risk for biological effects in the developing embryo, compared to LC50 values in chicken embryos. For human consumers of herring gull eggs, these eggs contain TEQ levels up to four times higher than the maximum tolerable weekly intake.

  19. The AhR is involved in the regulation of LoVo cell proliferation through cell cycle-associated proteins.

    PubMed

    Yin, Jiuheng; Sheng, Baifa; Han, Bin; Pu, Aimin; Yang, Kunqiu; Li, Ping; Wang, Qimeng; Xiao, Weidong; Yang, Hua

    2016-05-01

    Some ingredients in foods can activate the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) and arrest cell proliferation. In this study, we hypothesized that 6-formylindolo [3, 2-b] carbazole (FICZ) arrests the cell cycle in LoVo cells (a colon cancer line) through the AhR. The AhR agonist FICZ and the AhR antagonist CH223191 were used to treat LoVo cells. Real-time PCR and Western blot analyses were performed to detect the expression of the AhR, CYP1A1, CDK4, cyclinD1, cyclin E, CDK2, P27, and pRb. The distribution and activation of the AhR were detected with immunofluorescence. A 3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2-H-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay and flow cytometric analysis were performed to measure cell viability, cell cycle stage, and apoptosis. Our results show that FICZ inhibited LoVo cell proliferation by inducing G1 cell cycle arrest but had no effect on epithelial apoptosis. Further analysis found that FICZ downregulated cyclinD1 and upregulated p27 expression to arrest Rb phosphorylation. The downregulation of cyclinD1 and upregulation of p27 were abolished by co-treatment with CH223191. We conclude that the AhR, when activated by FICZ (an endogenous AhR ligand), can arrest the cell cycle and block LoVo cell proliferation.

  20. Dioxin induces Ahr-dependent robust DNA demethylation of the Cyp1a1 promoter via Tdg in the mouse liver

    PubMed Central

    Amenya, Hesbon Z.; Tohyama, Chiharu; Ohsako, Seiichiroh

    2016-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (Ahr) is a highly conserved nuclear receptor that plays an important role in the manifestation of toxicity induced by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. As a xenobiotic sensor, Ahr is involved in chemical biotransformation through activation of drug metabolizing enzymes. The activated Ahr cooperates with coactivator complexes to induce epigenetic modifications at target genes. Thus, it is conceivable that 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), a potent Ahr ligand, may elicit robust epigenetic changes in vivo at the Ahr target gene cytochrome P450 1a1 (Cyp1a1). A single dose of TCDD administered to adult mice induced Ahr-dependent CpG hypomethylation, changes in histone modifications, and thymine DNA glycosylase (Tdg) recruitment at the Cyp1a1 promoter in the liver within 24 hrs. These epigenetic changes persisted until 40 days post-TCDD treatment and there was Cyp1a1 mRNA hyperinduction upon repeat administration of TCDD at this time-point. Our demethylation assay using siRNA knockdown and an in vitro methylated plasmid showed that Ahr, Tdg, and the ten-eleven translocation methyldioxygenases Tet2 and Tet3 are required for the TCDD-induced DNA demethylation. These results provide novel evidence of Ahr-driven active DNA demethylation and epigenetic memory. The epigenetic alterations influence response to subsequent chemical exposure and imply an adaptive mechanism to xenobiotic stress. PMID:27713569

  1. Dioxin induces Ahr-dependent robust DNA demethylation of the Cyp1a1 promoter via Tdg in the mouse liver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amenya, Hesbon Z.; Tohyama, Chiharu; Ohsako, Seiichiroh

    2016-10-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (Ahr) is a highly conserved nuclear receptor that plays an important role in the manifestation of toxicity induced by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. As a xenobiotic sensor, Ahr is involved in chemical biotransformation through activation of drug metabolizing enzymes. The activated Ahr cooperates with coactivator complexes to induce epigenetic modifications at target genes. Thus, it is conceivable that 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), a potent Ahr ligand, may elicit robust epigenetic changes in vivo at the Ahr target gene cytochrome P450 1a1 (Cyp1a1). A single dose of TCDD administered to adult mice induced Ahr-dependent CpG hypomethylation, changes in histone modifications, and thymine DNA glycosylase (Tdg) recruitment at the Cyp1a1 promoter in the liver within 24 hrs. These epigenetic changes persisted until 40 days post-TCDD treatment and there was Cyp1a1 mRNA hyperinduction upon repeat administration of TCDD at this time-point. Our demethylation assay using siRNA knockdown and an in vitro methylated plasmid showed that Ahr, Tdg, and the ten-eleven translocation methyldioxygenases Tet2 and Tet3 are required for the TCDD-induced DNA demethylation. These results provide novel evidence of Ahr-driven active DNA demethylation and epigenetic memory. The epigenetic alterations influence response to subsequent chemical exposure and imply an adaptive mechanism to xenobiotic stress.

  2. Radiation-induced tetramer-to-dimer transition of Escherichia coli lactose repressor

    SciTech Connect

    Goffinont, S.; Davidkova, M.

    2009-08-21

    The wild type lactose repressor of Escherichia coli is a tetrameric protein formed by two identical dimers. They are associated via a C-terminal 4-helix bundle (called tetramerization domain) whose stability is ensured by the interaction of leucine zipper motifs. Upon in vitro {gamma}-irradiation the repressor losses its ability to bind the operator DNA sequence due to damage of its DNA-binding domains. Using an engineered dimeric repressor for comparison, we show here that irradiation induces also the change of repressor oligomerisation state from tetramer to dimer. The splitting of the tetramer into dimers can result from the oxidation of the leucine residues of the tetramerization domain.

  3. Improved calibration of IMU biases in analytic coarse alignment for AHRS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Jiazhen; Lei, Chaohua; Li, Baoguo; Wen, Ting

    2016-07-01

    An improved method for the inertial measurement unit (IMU) calibration of coarse alignment for the low-accuracy attitude heading reference system (AHRS) is proposed in this paper. The sensitivities of the Euler angles with respect to the inertial sensor biases are studied based on the analytic coarse alignment principle, and the errors of earth rotation rate and local gravity in the body frame caused by initial attitude error are analyzed. Then, an improved analytic coarse alignment algorithm with accelerometer and gyro bias calibration in an arbitrary three-position is proposed. Simulation and experiment results show that the novel method can calibrate accelerometer and gyro biases, reduce Euler angle attitude error, and improve navigation precision in practical applications. Moreover, this method can be applied to other low-accuracy inertial navigation systems.

  4. Access Path to the Ligand Binding Pocket May Play a Role in Xenobiotics Selection by AhR

    PubMed Central

    Szöllősi, Dániel; Erdei, Áron; Gyimesi, Gergely; Magyar, Csaba; Hegedűs, Tamás

    2016-01-01

    Understanding of multidrug binding at the atomic level would facilitate drug design and strategies to modulate drug metabolism, including drug transport, oxidation, and conjugation. Therefore we explored the mechanism of promiscuous binding of small molecules by studying the ligand binding domain, the PAS-B domain of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). Because of the low sequence identities of PAS domains to be used for homology modeling, structural features of the widely employed HIF-2α and a more recent suitable template, CLOCK were compared. These structures were used to build AhR PAS-B homology models. We performed molecular dynamics simulations to characterize dynamic properties of the PAS-B domain and the generated conformational ensembles were employed in in silico docking. In order to understand structural and ligand binding features we compared the stability and dynamics of the promiscuous AhR PAS-B to other PAS domains exhibiting specific interactions or no ligand binding function. Our exhaustive in silico binding studies, in which we dock a wide spectrum of ligand molecules to the conformational ensembles, suggest that ligand specificity and selection may be determined not only by the PAS-B domain itself, but also by other parts of AhR and its protein interacting partners. We propose that ligand binding pocket and access channels leading to the pocket play equally important roles in discrimination of endogenous molecules and xenobiotics. PMID:26727491

  5. Solitons and collapse in the λ-repressor protein.

    PubMed

    Krokhotin, Andrey; Lundgren, Martin; Niemi, Antti J

    2012-08-01

    The enterobacteria lambda phage is a paradigm temperate bacteriophage. Its lysogenic and lytic life cycles echo competition between the DNA binding λ-repressor (CI) and CRO proteins. Here we scrutinize the structure, stability, and folding pathways of the λ-repressor protein, which controls the transition from the lysogenic to the lytic state. We first investigate the supersecondary helix-loop helix composition of its backbone. We use a discrete Frenet framing to resolve the backbone spectrum in terms of bond and torsion angles. Instead of four, there appears to be seven individual loops. We model the putative loops using an explicit soliton Ansatz. It is based on the standard soliton profile of the continuum nonlinear Schrödinger equation. The accuracy of the Ansatz far exceeds the B-factor fluctuation distance accuracy of the experimentally determined protein configuration. We then investigate the folding pathways and dynamics of the λ-repressor protein. We introduce a coarse-grained energy function to model the backbone in terms of the C(α) atoms and the side chains in terms of the relative orientation of the C(β) atoms. We describe the folding dynamics in terms of relaxation dynamics and find that the folded configuration can be reached from a very generic initial configuration. We conclude that folding is dominated by the temporal ordering of soliton formation. In particular, the third soliton should appear before the first and second. Otherwise, the DNA binding turn does not acquire its correct structure. We confirm the stability of the folded configuration by repeated heating and cooling simulations. PMID:23005801

  6. Solitons and collapse in the λ-repressor protein.

    PubMed

    Krokhotin, Andrey; Lundgren, Martin; Niemi, Antti J

    2012-08-01

    The enterobacteria lambda phage is a paradigm temperate bacteriophage. Its lysogenic and lytic life cycles echo competition between the DNA binding λ-repressor (CI) and CRO proteins. Here we scrutinize the structure, stability, and folding pathways of the λ-repressor protein, which controls the transition from the lysogenic to the lytic state. We first investigate the supersecondary helix-loop helix composition of its backbone. We use a discrete Frenet framing to resolve the backbone spectrum in terms of bond and torsion angles. Instead of four, there appears to be seven individual loops. We model the putative loops using an explicit soliton Ansatz. It is based on the standard soliton profile of the continuum nonlinear Schrödinger equation. The accuracy of the Ansatz far exceeds the B-factor fluctuation distance accuracy of the experimentally determined protein configuration. We then investigate the folding pathways and dynamics of the λ-repressor protein. We introduce a coarse-grained energy function to model the backbone in terms of the C(α) atoms and the side chains in terms of the relative orientation of the C(β) atoms. We describe the folding dynamics in terms of relaxation dynamics and find that the folded configuration can be reached from a very generic initial configuration. We conclude that folding is dominated by the temporal ordering of soliton formation. In particular, the third soliton should appear before the first and second. Otherwise, the DNA binding turn does not acquire its correct structure. We confirm the stability of the folded configuration by repeated heating and cooling simulations.

  7. Solitons and collapse in the λ-repressor protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krokhotin, Andrey; Lundgren, Martin; Niemi, Antti J.

    2012-08-01

    The enterobacteria lambda phage is a paradigm temperate bacteriophage. Its lysogenic and lytic life cycles echo competition between the DNA binding λ-repressor (CI) and CRO proteins. Here we scrutinize the structure, stability, and folding pathways of the λ-repressor protein, which controls the transition from the lysogenic to the lytic state. We first investigate the supersecondary helix-loop helix composition of its backbone. We use a discrete Frenet framing to resolve the backbone spectrum in terms of bond and torsion angles. Instead of four, there appears to be seven individual loops. We model the putative loops using an explicit soliton Ansatz. It is based on the standard soliton profile of the continuum nonlinear Schrödinger equation. The accuracy of the Ansatz far exceeds the B-factor fluctuation distance accuracy of the experimentally determined protein configuration. We then investigate the folding pathways and dynamics of the λ-repressor protein. We introduce a coarse-grained energy function to model the backbone in terms of the Cα atoms and the side chains in terms of the relative orientation of the Cβ atoms. We describe the folding dynamics in terms of relaxation dynamics and find that the folded configuration can be reached from a very generic initial configuration. We conclude that folding is dominated by the temporal ordering of soliton formation. In particular, the third soliton should appear before the first and second. Otherwise, the DNA binding turn does not acquire its correct structure. We confirm the stability of the folded configuration by repeated heating and cooling simulations.

  8. Analysis of the AHR gene proximal promoter GGGGC-repeat polymorphism in lung, breast, and colon cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Spink, Barbara C.; Bloom, Michael S.; Wu, Susan; Sell, Stewart; Schneider, Erasmus; Ding, Xinxin; Spink, David C.

    2015-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) regulates expression of numerous genes, including those of the CYP1 gene family. With the goal of determining factors that control AHR gene expression, our studies are focused on the role of the short tandem repeat polymorphism, (GGGGC){sub n}, located in the proximal promoter of the human AHR gene. When luciferase constructs containing varying GGGGC repeats were transfected into cancer cell lines derived from the lung, colon, and breast, the number of GGGGC repeats affected AHR promoter activity. The number of GGGGC repeats was determined in DNA from 327 humans and from 38 samples representing 5 species of non-human primates. In chimpanzees and 3 species of macaques, only (GGGGC){sub 2} alleles were observed; however, in western gorilla, (GGGGC){sub n} alleles with n = 2, 4, 5, 6, 7, and 8 were identified. In all human populations examined, the frequency of (GGGGC){sub n} was n = 4 > 5 ≫ 2, 6. When frequencies of the (GGGGC){sub n} alleles in DNA from patients with lung, colon, or breast cancer were evaluated, the occurrence of (GGGGC){sub 2} was found to be 8-fold more frequent among lung cancer patients in comparison with its incidence in the general population, as represented by New York State neonates. Analysis of matched tumor and non-tumor DNA samples from the same individuals provided no evidence of microsatellite instability. These studies indicate that the (GGGGC){sub n} short tandem repeats are inherited, and that the (GGGGC){sub 2} allele in the AHR proximal promoter region should be further investigated with regard to its potential association with lung cancer susceptibility. - Highlights: • The AHR proximal promoter contains a polymorphism, (GGGGC){sub n}, where n = 4 > 5 ≫ 2, 6 • Matched tumor and non-tumor DNA did not show (GGGGC){sub n} microsatellite instability • AHR promoter activity of a construct with (GGGGC){sub 2} was lower than that of (GGGGC){sub 4} • The frequency of (GGGGC){sub 2} in lung

  9. Transcriptional regulation of repressor synthesis in mycobacteriophage L5.

    PubMed

    Nesbit, C E; Levin, M E; Donnelly-Wu, M K; Hatfull, G F

    1995-09-01

    Mycobacteriophage L5 is a temperate phage of the mycobacteria that forms stable lysogens in Mycobacterium smegmatis. Lysogeny is maintained by the putative repressor, the gene 71 product, which also mediates immunity to superinfection. We show here that there are three promoters located upstream of gene 71 which are active in an L5 lysogen but which do not require any phage-encoded proteins. In early lytic growth, gene 71 is also transcribed from a promoter, Pleft, located at the right end of the genome and which appears to be a target of gp71 regulation. A model is given for the regulation of L5 life cycles. PMID:8594325

  10. The Effects of Chronic Lifelong Activation of the AHR Pathway by Industrial Chemical Pollutants on Female Human Reproduction

    PubMed Central

    Vacca, Margherita; Nardelli, Claudia; Castegna, Alessandra; Arnesano, Fabio; Carella, Nicola; Depalo, Raffaella

    2016-01-01

    Environmental chemicals, such as heavy metals, affect female reproductive function. A biological sensor of the signals of many toxic chemical compounds seems to be the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR). Previous studies demonstrated the environmental of heavy metals in Taranto city (Italy), an area that has been influenced by anthropogenic factors such as industrial activities and waste treatments since 1986. However, the impact of these elements on female fertility in this geographic area has never been analyzed. Thus, in the present study, we evaluated the AHR pathway, sex steroid receptor pattern and apoptotic process in granulosa cells (GCs) retrieved from 30 women, born and living in Taranto, and 30 women who are living in non-contaminated areas (control group), who were undergoing in vitro fertilization (IVF) protocol. In follicular fluids (FFs) of both groups the toxic and essential heavy metals, such as chromiun (Cr), Manganese (Mn), iron (Fe), cobalt (Co), nickel (Ni), copper (Cu), zinc (Zn), cadmium (Cd) and lead (Pb), were also analyzed. Higher levels of Cr, Fe, Zn and Pb were found in the FFs of the women from Taranto as compared to the control group, as were the levels of AHR and AHR-dependent cytochrome P450 1A1 and 1B1; while CYP19A1 expression was decreased. The anti-apoptotic process found in the GCs of women fromTaranto was associated with the highest levels of progesterone receptor membrane component 1 (PGRMC1), a novel progesterone receptor, the expression of which is subjected to AHR activated by its highest affinity ligands (e.g., dioxins) or indirectly by other environmental pollutants, such as heavy metals. In conclusion, decreased production of estradiol and decreased number of retrieved mature oocytes found in women from Taranto could be due to chronic exposure to heavy metals, in particular to Cr and Pb. PMID:27008165

  11. Analysis of the AHR gene proximal promoter GGGGC-repeat polymorphism in lung, breast, and colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Spink, Barbara C; Bloom, Michael S; Wu, Susan; Sell, Stewart; Schneider, Erasmus; Ding, Xinxin; Spink, David C

    2015-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) regulates expression of numerous genes, including those of the CYP1 gene family. With the goal of determining factors that control AHR gene expression, our studies are focused on the role of the short tandem repeat polymorphism, (GGGGC)n, located in the proximal promoter of the human AHR gene. When luciferase constructs containing varying GGGGC repeats were transfected into cancer cell lines derived from the lung, colon, and breast, the number of GGGGC repeats affected AHR promoter activity. The number of GGGGC repeats was determined in DNA from 327 humans and from 38 samples representing 5 species of non-human primates. In chimpanzees and 3 species of macaques, only (GGGGC)2 alleles were observed; however, in western gorilla, (GGGGC)n alleles with n=2, 4, 5, 6, 7, and 8 were identified. In all human populations examined, the frequency of (GGGGC)n was n=4>5≫2, 6. When frequencies of the (GGGGC)n alleles in DNA from patients with lung, colon, or breast cancer were evaluated, the occurrence of (GGGGC)2 was found to be 8-fold more frequent among lung cancer patients in comparison with its incidence in the general population, as represented by New York State neonates. Analysis of matched tumor and non-tumor DNA samples from the same individuals provided no evidence of microsatellite instability. These studies indicate that the (GGGGC)n short tandem repeats are inherited, and that the (GGGGC)2 allele in the AHR proximal promoter region should be further investigated with regard to its potential association with lung cancer susceptibility.

  12. Novel repressor regulates insulin sensitivity through interaction with Foxo1

    PubMed Central

    Nakae, Jun; Cao, Yongheng; Hakuno, Fumihiko; Takemori, Hiroshi; Kawano, Yoshinaga; Sekioka, Risa; Abe, Takaya; Kiyonari, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Toshiya; Sakai, Juro; Takahashi, Shin-Ichiro; Itoh, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    Forkhead box-containing protein o (Foxo) 1 is a key transcription factor in insulin and glucose metabolism. We identified a Foxo1-CoRepressor (FCoR) protein in mouse adipose tissue that inhibits Foxo1's activity by enhancing acetylation via impairment of the interaction between Foxo1 and the deacetylase Sirt1 and via direct acetylation. FCoR is phosphorylated at Threonine 93 by catalytic subunit of protein kinase A and is translocated into nucleus, making it possible to bind to Foxo1 in both cytosol and nucleus. Knockdown of FCoR in 3T3-F442A cells enhanced expression of Foxo target and inhibited adipocyte differentiation. Overexpression of FCoR in white adipose tissue decreased expression of Foxo-target genes and adipocyte size and increased insulin sensitivity in Leprdb/db mice and in mice fed a high-fat diet. In contrast, Fcor knockout mice were lean, glucose intolerant, and had decreased insulin sensitivity that was accompanied by increased expression levels of Foxo-target genes and enlarged adipocytes. Taken together, these data suggest that FCoR is a novel repressor that regulates insulin sensitivity and energy metabolism in adipose tissue by acting to fine-tune Foxo1 activity. PMID:22510882

  13. Activators and repressors: A balancing act for X-inactivation.

    PubMed

    Goodrich, Leeanne; Panning, Barbara; Leung, Karen Nicole

    2016-08-01

    In early female embryos X-chromosome inactivation occurs concomitant with up regulation of the non-coding RNA, Xist, on the future inactive X-chromosome. Up regulation of Xist and coating of the future inactive X is sufficient to induce silencing. Therefore unlocking the mechanisms of X-chromosome inactivation requires thorough understanding of the transcriptional regulators, both activators and repressors, which control Xist. Mouse pluripotent embryonic stem cells, which have two active X chromosomes, provide a tractable ex vivo model system for studying X-chromosome inactivation, since this process is triggered by differentiation signals in these cultured cells. Yet there are significant discrepancies found between ex vivo analyses in mouse embryonic stem cells and in vivo studies of early embryos. In this review we elaborate on potential models of how Xist is up regulated on a single X chromosome in female cells and how ex vivo and in vivo analyses enlighten our understanding of the activators and repressors that control this non-coding RNA gene.

  14. Activators and repressors: A balancing act for X-inactivation.

    PubMed

    Goodrich, Leeanne; Panning, Barbara; Leung, Karen Nicole

    2016-08-01

    In early female embryos X-chromosome inactivation occurs concomitant with up regulation of the non-coding RNA, Xist, on the future inactive X-chromosome. Up regulation of Xist and coating of the future inactive X is sufficient to induce silencing. Therefore unlocking the mechanisms of X-chromosome inactivation requires thorough understanding of the transcriptional regulators, both activators and repressors, which control Xist. Mouse pluripotent embryonic stem cells, which have two active X chromosomes, provide a tractable ex vivo model system for studying X-chromosome inactivation, since this process is triggered by differentiation signals in these cultured cells. Yet there are significant discrepancies found between ex vivo analyses in mouse embryonic stem cells and in vivo studies of early embryos. In this review we elaborate on potential models of how Xist is up regulated on a single X chromosome in female cells and how ex vivo and in vivo analyses enlighten our understanding of the activators and repressors that control this non-coding RNA gene. PMID:27223409

  15. Genome Editing of the CYP1A1 Locus in iPSCs as a Platform to Map AHR Expression throughout Human Development

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Brenden W.; Stanford, Elizabeth A.; Sherr, David H.; Murphy, George J.

    2016-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) is a ligand activated transcription factor that increases the expression of detoxifying enzymes upon ligand stimulation. Recent studies now suggest that novel endogenous roles of the AHR exist throughout development. In an effort to create an optimized model system for the study of AHR signaling in several cellular lineages, we have employed a CRISPR/CAS9 genome editing strategy in induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) to incorporate a reporter cassette at the transcription start site of one of its canonical targets, cytochrome P450 1A1 (CYP1A1). This cell line faithfully reports on CYP1A1 expression, with luciferase levels as its functional readout, when treated with an endogenous AHR ligand (FICZ) at escalating doses. iPSC-derived fibroblast-like cells respond to acute exposure to environmental and endogenous AHR ligands, and iPSC-derived hepatocytes increase CYP1A1 in a similar manner to primary hepatocytes. This cell line is an important innovation that can be used to map AHR activity in discrete cellular subsets throughout developmental ontogeny. As further endogenous ligands are proposed, this line can be used to screen for safety and efficacy and can report on the ability of small molecules to regulate critical cellular processes by modulating the activity of the AHR. PMID:27148368

  16. Constitutive IDO expression in human cancer is sustained by an autocrine signaling loop involving IL-6, STAT3 and the AHR.

    PubMed

    Litzenburger, Ulrike M; Opitz, Christiane A; Sahm, Felix; Rauschenbach, Katharina J; Trump, Saskia; Winter, Marcus; Ott, Martina; Ochs, Katharina; Lutz, Christian; Liu, Xiangdong; Anastasov, Natasa; Lehmann, Irina; Höfer, Thomas; von Deimling, Andreas; Wick, Wolfgang; Platten, Michael

    2014-02-28

    Indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) inhibitors have entered clinical trials based on their ability to restore anti-tumor immunity in preclinical studies. However, the mechanisms leading to constitutive expression of IDO in human tumors are largely unknown. Here we analyzed the pathways mediating constitutive IDO expression in human cancer. IDO-positive tumor cells and tissues showed basal phosphorylation and acetylation of STAT3 as evidenced by western blotting and immunoprecipitation. Inhibition of IL-6 or STAT3 using siRNA and/or pharmacological inhibitors reduced IDO mRNA and protein expression as well as kynurenine formation. In turn, IDO enzymatic activity activated the AHR as shown by the induction of AHR target genes. IDO-mediated AHR activation induced IL-6 expression, while inhibition or knockdown of the AHR reduced IL-6 expression. IDO activity thus sustains its own expression via an autocrine AHR-IL-6-STAT3 signaling loop. Inhibition of the AHR-IL-6-STAT3 signaling loop restored T-cell proliferation in mixed leukocyte reactions performed in the presence of IDO-expressing human cancer cells. Identification of the IDO-AHR-IL-6-STAT3 signaling loop maintaining IDO expression in human cancers reveals novel therapeutic targets for the inhibition of this core pathway promoting immunosuppression of human cancers. The relevance of the IDO-AHR-IL-6-STAT3 transcriptional circuit is underscored by the finding that high expression of its members IDO, STAT3 and the AHR target gene CYP1B1 is associated with reduced relapse-free survival in lung cancer patients.

  17. Molecular characterization of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) pathway in goldfish (Carassius auratus) exposure to TCDD: the mRNA and protein levels.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ming; Chang, Ziwei; Bae, Min-Ji; Oh, Seung Min; Chung, Kyu-Hyuck; Park, Jang-Su

    2013-08-01

    In bony fish or other aquatic vertebrates, the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) signaling pathway is initiated by exposure to polycyclic (or/and halogenated) aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs, such as 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin, TCDD), which subsequently induces the up-regulated expression of a series of related genes (such as cytochrome P4501A (CYP1A)). However, a lack of applicable protein reagents hinders our further understanding of the AhR signaling pathway, which focuses only on gene-based investigations. The goldfish (Carassius auratus) is an ideal model for a study of environmental pollution in whole-Asian fresh water. Here, three sensitive and specific polyclonal antisera against goldfish AhR1, AhR2, and CYP1A proteins were developed. These antisera not only bound the in-vitro synthesized target proteins, but recognized the real proteins expressed in goldfish tissues, with minimal cross-reactivity to non-specific proteins. Together with the analysis of semi-quantitative RT-PCR and polyclonal-antibody-based sandwich ELISA, we confirmed that goldfish AhRs differed in the expression (mRNA and protein levels) patterns among test tissues. Importantly, the relative abundance of each AhR mRNA levels from the different tissues showed no obvious consistency with their protein levels. After exposure to TCDD, goldfish AhR2 showed a more sensitivity than AhR1, and stimulated CYP1A expression directly, similar with the other reported fish models. Overall, development of these antibodies in this study will allow valuable and versatile investigations to further understand the AhR signaling pathway, and different expression (mRNA and protein) patterns represent the first step in determining the regulatory mechanisms underlying the TCDD-exposed aquatic environment.

  18. Ligand interactions with lactose repressor protein and the repressor-operator complex: the effects of ionization and oligomerization on binding.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Corey J; Zhan, Hongli; Swint-Kruse, Liskin; Matthews, Kathleen S

    2007-03-01

    Specific interactions between proteins and ligands that modify their functions are crucial in biology. Here, we examine sugars that bind the lactose repressor protein (LacI) and modify repressor affinity for operator DNA using isothermal titration calorimetry and equilibrium DNA binding experiments. High affinity binding of the commonly-used inducer isopropyl-beta,D-thiogalactoside is strongly driven by enthalpic forces, whereas inducer 2-phenylethyl-beta,D-galactoside has weaker affinity with low enthalpic contributions. Perturbing the dimer interface with either pH or oligomeric state shows that weak inducer binding is sensitive to changes in this distant region. Effects of the neutral compound o-nitrophenyl-beta,D-galactoside are sensitive to oligomerization, and at elevated pH this compound converts to an anti-inducer ligand with slightly enhanced enthalpic contributions to the binding energy. Anti-inducer o-nitrophenyl-beta,D-fucoside exhibits slightly enhanced affinity and increased enthalpic contributions at elevated pH. Collectively, these results both demonstrate the range of energetic consequences that occur with LacI binding to structurally-similar ligands and expand our insight into the link between effector binding and structural changes at the subunit interface. PMID:16860458

  19. REST is a hypoxia-responsive transcriptional repressor.

    PubMed

    Cavadas, Miguel A S; Mesnieres, Marion; Crifo, Bianca; Manresa, Mario C; Selfridge, Andrew C; Keogh, Ciara E; Fabian, Zsolt; Scholz, Carsten C; Nolan, Karen A; Rocha, Liliane M A; Tambuwala, Murtaza M; Brown, Stuart; Wdowicz, Anita; Corbett, Danielle; Murphy, Keith J; Godson, Catherine; Cummins, Eoin P; Taylor, Cormac T; Cheong, Alex

    2016-08-17

    Cellular exposure to hypoxia results in altered gene expression in a range of physiologic and pathophysiologic states. Discrete cohorts of genes can be either up- or down-regulated in response to hypoxia. While the Hypoxia-Inducible Factor (HIF) is the primary driver of hypoxia-induced adaptive gene expression, less is known about the signalling mechanisms regulating hypoxia-dependent gene repression. Using RNA-seq, we demonstrate that equivalent numbers of genes are induced and repressed in human embryonic kidney (HEK293) cells. We demonstrate that nuclear localization of the Repressor Element 1-Silencing Transcription factor (REST) is induced in hypoxia and that REST is responsible for regulating approximately 20% of the hypoxia-repressed genes. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation assays we demonstrate that REST-dependent gene repression is at least in part mediated by direct binding to the promoters of target genes. Based on these data, we propose that REST is a key mediator of gene repression in hypoxia.

  20. Purification and characterization of the diphtheria toxin repressor.

    PubMed Central

    Schmitt, M P; Twiddy, E M; Holmes, R K

    1992-01-01

    The diphtheria toxin repressor gene (dtxR) encodes a protein (DtxR) that regulates transcription of the diphtheria toxin gene (tox) by an iron-dependent mechanism. Cloned dtxR was expressed in Escherichia coli from the phage T7 gene 10 promoter, and DtxR was purified. Specific binding of DtxR to the tox+ operator was dependent on reduction of DtxR and the presence of ferrous ions. DtxR protected a sequence of approximately 30 nucleotide pairs, partially overlapping the tox promoter and containing a region of dyad symmetry, from digestion by DNase I. DtxR exhibited very little binding to the mutant tox-201 operator region and failed to bind to the promoter/operator region of the ferric uptake regulation (fur) gene of E. coli. Images PMID:1502169

  1. Tolerance of Arc repressor to multiple-alanine substitutions.

    PubMed

    Brown, B M; Sauer, R T

    1999-03-01

    Arc repressor mutants containing from three to 15 multiple-alanine substitutions have spectral properties expected for native Arc proteins, form heterodimers with wild-type Arc, denature cooperatively with Tms equal to or greater than wild type, and, in some cases, fold as much as 30-fold faster and unfold as much as 50-fold slower than wild type. Two of the mutants, containing a total of 14 different substitutions, also footprint operator DNA in vitro. The stability of some of the proteins with multiple-alanine mutations is significantly greater than that predicted from the sum of the single substitutions, suggesting that a subset of the wild-type residues in Arc may interact in an unfavorable fashion. Overall, these results show that almost half of the residues in Arc can be replaced by alanine en masse without compromising the ability of this small, homodimeric protein to fold into a stable, native-like structure. PMID:10051581

  2. The tryptophan repressor sequence is highly conserved among the Enterobacteriaceae.

    PubMed Central

    Arvidson, D N; Arvidson, C G; Lawson, C L; Miner, J; Adams, C; Youderian, P

    1994-01-01

    Tryptophan biosynthesis in Escherichia coli is regulated by the product of the trpR gene, the tryptophan (Trp) repressor. Trp aporepressor binds the corepressor, L-tryptophan, to form a holorepressor complex, which binds trp operator DNA tightly, and inhibits transcription of the tryptophan biosynthetic operon. The conservation of trp operator sequences among enteric Gram-negative bacteria suggests that trpR genes from other bacterial species can be cloned by complementation in E. coli. To clone trpR homologues, a deletion of the E. coli trpR gene, delta trpR504, was made on a plasmid by site-directed mutagenesis, then crossed onto the E. coli genome. Plasmid clones of the trpR genes of Enterobacter aerogenes and Enterobacter cloacae were isolated by complementation of the delta trpR504 allele, scored as the ability to repress beta-galactosidase synthesis from a prophage-borne trpE-lacZ gene fusion. The predicted amino acid sequences of four enteric TrpR proteins show differences, clustered on the backside of the folded repressor, opposite the DNA-binding helix-turn-helix substructures. These differences are predicted to have little effect on the interactions of the aporepressor with tryptophan, holorepressor with operator DNA, or tandemly bound holorepressor dimers with one another. Although there is some variation observed at the dimer interface, interactions predicted to stabilize the interface are conserved. The phylogenetic relationships revealed by the TrpR amino acid sequence alignment agree with the results of others. PMID:8208606

  3. TCDD promoted EMT of hFPECs via AhR, which involved the activation of EGFR/ERK signaling.

    PubMed

    Gao, Zhan; Bu, Yongjun; Liu, Xiaozhuan; Wang, Xugang; Zhang, Guofu; Wang, Erhui; Ding, Shibin; Liu, Yongfeng; Shi, Ruling; Li, Qiaoyun; Fu, Jianhong; Yu, Zengli

    2016-05-01

    One critical step of second palatal fusion is the newly formed medial epithelia seam (MES) disintegration, which involves apoptosis, epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT), and cell migration. Although the environmental toxicant 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) produces cleft palate at high rates, little is known about the effects of TCDD exposure on the fate of palatal epithelial cells. By using primary epithelial cells isolated from human fetal palatal shelves (hFPECs), we show that TCDD increased cell proliferation and EMT, as demonstrated by increased the epithelial markers (E-cadherin and cytokeratin14) and enhanced the mesenchymal markers (vimentin and fibronectin), but had no effect on cell migration and apoptosis. TCDD exposure led to a dose-dependent increase in Slug protein expression. Coimmunoprecipitation revealed that TCDD promoted AhR to form a protein complex with Slug. ChIP assay confirmed that TCDD exposure recruited AhR to the xenobiotic responsive element of Slug promoter. Knockdown of AhR by siRNA remarkably weakened TCDD-induced binding of AhR to the XRE promoter of slug, thereby suppressed TCDD-induced vimentin. Further experiment showed that TCDD stimulated EGFR phosphorylation did not influence the TGFβ3/Smad signaling; whereas TCDD increased phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and p38 with no effect on activation of JNK. By using varieties of inhibitors, we confirmed that TCDD promoted proliferation and EMT of hFPECs via activation of EGFR/ERK pathway. These data make a novel contribution to the molecular mechanism of cleft palate by TCDD. PMID:26971374

  4. Zebrafish Cardiotoxicity: The Effects of CYP1A Inhibition and AHR2 Knockdown Following Exposure to Weak Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Agonists

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Bryan William; Van Tiem Garner, Lindsey; Di Giulio, Richard Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor that mediates many of the toxic effects of dioxin-like compounds (DLCs) and some polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Strong AHR agonists, such as certain polychlorinated biphenyls and 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), cause severe cardiac teratogenesis in fish embryos. Moderately strong AHR agonists, such as benzo[a]pyrene and β-naphthoflavone, have been shown to cause similar cardiotoxic effects when coupled with a cytochrome P450 1A (CYP1A) inhibitor, such as fluoranthene (FL). We sought to determine if weak AHR agonists, when combined with a CYP1A inhibitor (FL) or CYP1A morpholino gene knockdown, are capable of causing cardiac deformities similar to moderately strong AHR agonists (Wassenberg and Di Giulio 2004; Wassenberg and Di Giulio 2004; Billiard, Timme-Laragy et al. 2006; Van Tiem and Di Giulio 2011). The weak AHR agonists included the following: carbaryl, phenanthrene, 2-methylindole, 3-methylindole, indigo, and indirubin. The results showed a complex pattern of cardiotoxic response to weak agonist inhibitor exposure and morpholino-knockdown. Danio rerio (zebrafish) embryos were first exposed to weak AHR agonists at equimolar concentrations. The agonists were assessed for their relative potency as inducers of CYP1 enzyme activity, measured by the ethoxyresorufin-o-deethylase (EROD) assay, and cardiac deformities. Carbaryl, 2-methylindole, and 3-methylindole induced the highest CYP1A activity in zebrafish. Experiments were then conducted to determine the individual cardiotoxicity of each compound. Next, zebrafish were co-exposed to each agonist (at concentrations below those determined to be cardiotoxic) and FL in combination to assess if CYP1A inhibition could induce cardiac deformities. Carbaryl, 2-methylindole, 3-methylindole, and phenanthrene significantly increased pericardial edema relative to controls when combined with FL. To further evaluate the

  5. Gene cloning and expression analysis of AhR and CYP4 from Pinctada martensii after exposed to pyrene.

    PubMed

    Du, Junqiao; Liao, Chenghong; Zhou, Hailong; Diao, Xiaoping; Li, Yuhu; Zheng, Pengfei; Wang, Fuqiang

    2015-10-01

    Pyrene, a typical polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon, is a common pollutant in the marine environment. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons initiate cellular detoxification in an exposed organism via the activation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). Subsequent metabolism of these xenobiotics is mainly by the cytochrome P450 enzymes of the phase I detoxification system. Full-length complementary DNA sequences from the pearl oyster Pinctada martensii (pm) encoding AhR and cytochrome P4 were cloned. The P. martensii AhR complementary DNA sequence constitutes an open reading frame that encodes for 848 amino acids. Sequence analysis indicated PmAhR showed high similarity with its homologues of other bivalve species. The cytochrome P(CYP)4 complementary DNA sequence of P. martensii constitutes an open reading frame that encodes for 489 amino acids. Quantitative real-time analysis detected both PmAhR and PmCYP4 messenger RNA expressions in the mantle, gill, hepatapancreas and adductor muscle of P. martensii exposed to pyrene. The highest transcript-band intensities of PmAhR and PmCYP4 were observed in the gill. Temporal expression of PmAhR and PmCYP4 messenger RNAs induction was observed in gills and increased between 3 and 5 days post exposure; then returned to control level. These results suggest that messenger RNAs of PmAhR and PmCYP4 in pearl oysters might be useful parameters for monitoring marine environment pyrene pollution.

  6. AhR signaling activation disrupts migration and dendritic growth of olfactory interneurons in the developing mouse

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Eiki; Ding, Yunjie; Tohyama, Chiharu

    2016-01-01

    Perinatal exposure to a low level of dioxin, a ubiquitous environmental pollutant, has been shown to induce abnormalities in learning and memory, emotion, and sociality in laboratory animals later in adulthood. However, how aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) signaling activation disrupts the higher brain function remains unclear. Therefore, we studied the possible effects of excessive activation of AhR signaling on neurodevelopmental processes, such as cellular migration and neurite growth, in mice. To this end, we transfected a constitutively active-AhR plasmid into stem cells in the lateral ventricle by in vivo electroporation on postnatal day 1. Transfection was found to induce tangential migration delay and morphological abnormalities in neuronal precursors in the rostral migratory stream at 6 days post-electroporation (dpe) as well as disrupt radial migration in the olfactory bulb and apical and basal dendritic growth of the olfactory interneurons in the granule cell layer at 13 and 20 dpe. These results suggest that the retarded development of interneurons by the excessive AhR signaling may at least in part explain the dioxin-induced abnormal behavioral alterations previously reported in laboratory animals. PMID:27197834

  7. Crystal structure of the lactose operon repressor and its complexes with DNA and inducer

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, M.; Chang, G.; Horton, N.C.

    1996-03-01

    The lac operon of Escherichia coli is the paradigm for gene regulation. Its key component is the lac repressor a product of the lacl gene. The three-dimensional structures of the intact lac repressor, the lac repressor bound to the gratuitous inducer isopropyl-B-D-1thiogalactoside (IPTG) and the lac repressor complexed with a 21 base pair symmetric operator DNA have been determined. These three structures show the conformation of the molecule in both the induced and the repressed states and provide a framework for understanding a wealth of biochemical and genetic information. The DNA sequence of the lac operon has three lac repressor recognition sites in stretch of 500 base pairs. The crystallographic structure of the complex with DNA suggests that the tetrameric repressor functions synergistically with catabolite gene activator protein (CAP) and participates in the quarternary formation of repression loops in which one tetrameric repressor interacts simultaneously with two sites in the genomic DNA. 76 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Integration of Genome-Wide Computation DRE Search, AhR ChIP-chip and Gene Expression Analyses of TCDD-Elicited Responses in the Mouse Liver

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor (TF) that mediates responses to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). Integration of TCDD-induced genome-wide AhR enrichment, differential gene expression and computational dioxin response element (DRE) analyses further elucidate the hepatic AhR regulatory network. Results Global ChIP-chip and gene expression analyses were performed on hepatic tissue from immature ovariectomized mice orally gavaged with 30 μg/kg TCDD. ChIP-chip analysis identified 14,446 and 974 AhR enriched regions (1% false discovery rate) at 2 and 24 hrs, respectively. Enrichment density was greatest in the proximal promoter, and more specifically, within ± 1.5 kb of a transcriptional start site (TSS). AhR enrichment also occurred distal to a TSS (e.g. intergenic DNA and 3' UTR), extending the potential gene expression regulatory roles of the AhR. Although TF binding site analyses identified over-represented DRE sequences within enriched regions, approximately 50% of all AhR enriched regions lacked a DRE core (5'-GCGTG-3'). Microarray analysis identified 1,896 number of TCDD-responsive genes (|fold change| ≥ 1.5, P1(t) > 0.999). Integrating this gene expression data with our ChIP-chip and DRE analyses only identified 625 differentially expressed genes that involved an AhR interaction at a DRE. Functional annotation analysis of differentially regulated genes associated with AhR enrichment identified overrepresented processes related to fatty acid and lipid metabolism and transport, and xenobiotic metabolism, which are consistent with TCDD-elicited steatosis in the mouse liver. Conclusions Details of the AhR regulatory network have been expanded to include AhR-DNA interactions within intragenic and intergenic genomic regions. Moreover, the AhR can interact with DNA independent of a DRE core suggesting there are alternative mechanisms of AhR-mediated gene regulation. PMID:21762485

  9. Characterizing the role of endothelin-1 in the progression of cardiac hypertrophy in aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) null mice

    SciTech Connect

    Lund, Amie K.; Goens, M. Beth; Nunez, Bethany A.; Walker, Mary K. . E-mail: mkwalker@unm.edu

    2006-04-15

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor characterized to play a role in detection and adaptation to environmental stimuli. Genetic deletion of AhR results in hypertension, and cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis, associated with elevated plasma angiotensin II (Ang II) and endothelin-1 (ET-1), thus AhR appears to contribute to cardiovascular homeostasis. In these studies, we tested the hypothesis that ET-1 mediates cardiovascular pathology in AhR null mice via ET{sub A} receptor activation. First, we determine the time courses of cardiac hypertrophy, and of plasma and tissue ET-1 expression in AhR wildtype and null mice. AhR null mice exhibited increases in heart-to-body weight ratio and age-related expression of cardiac hypertrophy markers, {beta}-myosin heavy chain ({beta}-MHC), and atrial natriuretic factor (ANF), which were significant at 2 months. Similarly, plasma and tissue ET-1 expression was significantly elevated at 2 months and increased further with age. Second, AhR null mice were treated with ET{sub A} receptor antagonist, BQ-123 (100 nmol/kg/day), for 7, 28, or 58 days and blood pressure, cardiac fibrosis, and cardiac hypertrophy assessed, respectively. BQ-123 for 7 days significantly reduced mean arterial pressure in conscious, catheterized mice. BQ-123 for 28 days significantly reduced the histological appearance of cardiac fibrosis. Treatment for 58 days significantly reduced cardiac mass, assessed by heart weight, echocardiography, and {beta}-MHC and ANF expression; and reduced cardiac fibrosis as determined by osteopontin and collagen I mRNA expression. These findings establish ET-1 and the ET{sub A} receptor as primary determinants of hypertension and cardiac pathology in AhR null mice.

  10. Ultraviolet light converts propranolol, a nonselective β-blocker and potential lupus-inducing drug, into a proinflammatory AhR ligand.

    PubMed

    Dorgham, Karim; Amoura, Zahir; Parizot, Christophe; Arnaud, Laurent; Frances, Camille; Pionneau, Cédric; Devilliers, Hervé; Pinto, Sandra; Zoorob, Rima; Miyara, Makoto; Larsen, Martin; Yssel, Hans; Gorochov, Guy; Mathian, Alexis

    2015-11-01

    UV light and some medications are known to trigger lupus erythematosus (LE). A common mechanism underlying the immunopathologic effect, resulting from exposure to these two seemingly unrelated factors, remains unknown. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) plays a key role in the regulation of IL-22 production in humans and can be activated by both xenobiotics and naturally occurring photoproducts. A significant expansion of Th17 and Th22 cells was observed in the peripheral blood of active systemic LE (SLE) patients, compared to inactive patients and controls. We also show that propranolol, a potential lupus-inducing drug, induced stronger AhR activation in PBMCs of SLE patients than in those of controls. AhR agonist activity of propranolol was enhanced by UV light exposure. MS analysis of irradiated propranolol revealed the generation of a proinflammatory photoproduct. This compound behaves like the prototypic AhR ligand 6-formylindolo[3,2-b]carbazole, a cutaneous UV light-induced tryptophan metabolite, both promoting IL-22, IL-8, and CCL2 secretion by T-cells and macrophages. Finally, LE patients exhibit signs of cutaneous AhR activation that correlate with lesional expression of the same proinflammatory cytokines, suggesting a role for photometabolites in the induction of skin inflammation. The AhR might therefore represent a target for therapeutic intervention in LE. PMID:26354876

  11. Ultraviolet light converts propranolol, a nonselective β-blocker and potential lupus-inducing drug, into a proinflammatory AhR ligand.

    PubMed

    Dorgham, Karim; Amoura, Zahir; Parizot, Christophe; Arnaud, Laurent; Frances, Camille; Pionneau, Cédric; Devilliers, Hervé; Pinto, Sandra; Zoorob, Rima; Miyara, Makoto; Larsen, Martin; Yssel, Hans; Gorochov, Guy; Mathian, Alexis

    2015-11-01

    UV light and some medications are known to trigger lupus erythematosus (LE). A common mechanism underlying the immunopathologic effect, resulting from exposure to these two seemingly unrelated factors, remains unknown. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) plays a key role in the regulation of IL-22 production in humans and can be activated by both xenobiotics and naturally occurring photoproducts. A significant expansion of Th17 and Th22 cells was observed in the peripheral blood of active systemic LE (SLE) patients, compared to inactive patients and controls. We also show that propranolol, a potential lupus-inducing drug, induced stronger AhR activation in PBMCs of SLE patients than in those of controls. AhR agonist activity of propranolol was enhanced by UV light exposure. MS analysis of irradiated propranolol revealed the generation of a proinflammatory photoproduct. This compound behaves like the prototypic AhR ligand 6-formylindolo[3,2-b]carbazole, a cutaneous UV light-induced tryptophan metabolite, both promoting IL-22, IL-8, and CCL2 secretion by T-cells and macrophages. Finally, LE patients exhibit signs of cutaneous AhR activation that correlate with lesional expression of the same proinflammatory cytokines, suggesting a role for photometabolites in the induction of skin inflammation. The AhR might therefore represent a target for therapeutic intervention in LE.

  12. Phenotype refinement strengthens the association of AHR and CYP1A1 genotype with caffeine consumption.

    PubMed

    McMahon, George; Taylor, Amy E; Davey Smith, George; Munafò, Marcus R

    2014-01-01

    Two genetic loci, one in the cytochrome P450 1A1 (CYP1A1) and 1A2 (CYP1A2) gene region (rs2472297) and one near the aryl-hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) gene (rs6968865), have been associated with habitual caffeine consumption. We sought to establish whether a more refined and comprehensive assessment of caffeine consumption would provide stronger evidence of association, and whether a combined allelic score comprising these two variants would further strengthen the association. We used data from between 4,460 and 7,520 women in the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children, a longitudinal birth cohort based in the United Kingdom. Self-report data on coffee, tea and cola consumption (including consumption of decaffeinated drinks) were available at multiple time points. Both genotypes were individually associated with total caffeine consumption, and with coffee and tea consumption. There was no association with cola consumption, possibly due to low levels of consumption in this sample. There was also no association with measures of decaffeinated drink consumption, indicating that the observed association is most likely mediated via caffeine. The association was strengthened when a combined allelic score was used, accounting for up to 1.28% of phenotypic variance. This was not associated with potential confounders of observational association. A combined allelic score accounts for sufficient phenotypic variance in caffeine consumption that this may be useful in Mendelian randomization studies. Future studies may therefore be able to use this combined allelic score to explore causal effects of habitual caffeine consumption on health outcomes. PMID:25075865

  13. Phenotype Refinement Strengthens the Association of AHR and CYP1A1 Genotype with Caffeine Consumption

    PubMed Central

    McMahon, George; Taylor, Amy E.; Davey Smith, George; Munafò, Marcus R.

    2014-01-01

    Two genetic loci, one in the cytochrome P450 1A1 (CYP1A1) and 1A2 (CYP1A2) gene region (rs2472297) and one near the aryl-hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) gene (rs6968865), have been associated with habitual caffeine consumption. We sought to establish whether a more refined and comprehensive assessment of caffeine consumption would provide stronger evidence of association, and whether a combined allelic score comprising these two variants would further strengthen the association. We used data from between 4,460 and 7,520 women in the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children, a longitudinal birth cohort based in the United Kingdom. Self-report data on coffee, tea and cola consumption (including consumption of decaffeinated drinks) were available at multiple time points. Both genotypes were individually associated with total caffeine consumption, and with coffee and tea consumption. There was no association with cola consumption, possibly due to low levels of consumption in this sample. There was also no association with measures of decaffeinated drink consumption, indicating that the observed association is most likely mediated via caffeine. The association was strengthened when a combined allelic score was used, accounting for up to 1.28% of phenotypic variance. This was not associated with potential confounders of observational association. A combined allelic score accounts for sufficient phenotypic variance in caffeine consumption that this may be useful in Mendelian randomization studies. Future studies may therefore be able to use this combined allelic score to explore causal effects of habitual caffeine consumption on health outcomes. PMID:25075865

  14. Behavioral Rhythmicity of Mice Lacking AhR and Attenuation of Light-induced Phase Shift by 2,3,7,8-Tetracholordibenzo-p-dioxin

    PubMed Central

    Mukai, Motoko; Lin, Tien-Min; Peterson, Richard E.; Cooke, Paul S.; Tischkau, Shelley A.

    2008-01-01

    Transcription factors belonging to the Per/Arnt/Sim (PAS) domain family are highly conserved and many are involved in circadian rhythm regulation. One member of this family, aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), is an orphan receptor whose physiological role is unknown. Recent findings have led to the hypothesis that AhR has a role in circadian rhythm, which is the focus of the present investigation. First, time-of-day dependent mRNA expression of AhR and its signaling target, cytochrome p4501A1 (Cyp1a1) was determined in C57BL/6J mice by quantitative RT-PCR. Circadian expression of AhR and Cyp1a1 was observed both in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) and liver. Next, the circadian phenotype of mice lacking AhR (AhRKO) was investigated using behavioral monitoring. Intact AhRKO mice had robust circadian rhythmicity with a similar tau under constant conditions compared to wild-type mice, but a significant difference in tau was observed between genotypes in ovariectomized female mice. Time to re-entrainment following 6-h advances or delays of the light/dark cycle was not significantly different between genotypes. However, mice exposed to the AhR agonist 2,3,7,8-tetracholorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD, 1 μg/kg BW) displayed decreased phase shifts in response to light and had altered expression of Per1 and Bmal1. These results suggest that chronic activation of AhR may affect the ability of the circadian timekeeping system to adjust to alterations in environmental lighting by affecting canonical clock genes. Further studies are necessary to decipher the mechanism of how AhR agonists could disrupt light-induced phase shifts. If AhR does have a role in circadian rhythm, it may share redundant roles with other PAS domain proteins and/or the role of AhR may not be exhibited in the behavioral activity rhythm, but could be important elsewhere in the peripheral circadian system. PMID:18487412

  15. Radiation-induced tetramer-to-dimer transition of Escherichia coli lactose repressor.

    PubMed

    Goffinont, S; Davidkova, M; Spotheim-Maurizot, M

    2009-08-21

    The wild type lactose repressor of Escherichia coli is a tetrameric protein formed by two identical dimers. They are associated via a C-terminal 4-helix bundle (called tetramerization domain) whose stability is ensured by the interaction of leucine zipper motifs. Upon in vitro gamma-irradiation the repressor losses its ability to bind the operator DNA sequence due to damage of its DNA-binding domains. Using an engineered dimeric repressor for comparison, we show here that irradiation induces also the change of repressor oligomerisation state from tetramer to dimer. The splitting of the tetramer into dimers can result from the oxidation of the leucine residues of the tetramerization domain. PMID:19520056

  16. Ni2+-based immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography of lactose operon repressor protein from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Velkov, Tony; Jones, Alun; Lim, Maria L R

    2008-01-01

    A two-step chromatographic sequence is described for the purification of native lactose operon repressor protein from Escherichia coli cells. The first step involves Ni(2+)-based immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography of the soluble cytoplasmic extract. This method provides superior speed, resolution and yield than the established phosphocellulose cation-exchange chromatographic procedure. Anion-exchange chromatography is used for further purification to >95% purity. The identity and purity of the lactose repressor protein were demonstrated using sodium dodecylsulphate polyacrylamide electrophoresis, crystallization, tryptic finger-printing mass spectrometry, and inducer binding assays. The purified lac repressor exhibited inducer sensitivity for operator DNA binding and undergoes a conformational change upon inducer binding. By all these extensive biochemical criteria, the purified protein behaves exactly as that described for the Escherichia coli lactose operon repressor. PMID:18800304

  17. Harnessing the master transcriptional repressor REST to reciprocally regulate neurogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Nesti, Edmund

    2015-01-01

    Neurogenesis begins in embryonic development and continues at a reduced rate into adulthood in vertebrate species, yet the signaling cascades regulating this process remain poorly understood. Plasma membrane-initiated signaling cascades regulate neurogenesis via downstream pathways including components of the transcriptional machinery. A nuclear factor that temporally regulates neurogenesis by repressing neuronal differentiation is the repressor element 1 (RE1) silencing transcription (REST) factor. We have recently discovered a regulatory site on REST that serves as a molecular switch for neuronal differentiation. Specifically, C-terminal domain small phosphatase 1, CTDSP1, present in non-neuronal cells, maintains REST activity by dephosphorylating this site. Reciprocally, extracellular signal-regulated kinase, ERK, activated by growth factor signaling in neural progenitors, and peptidylprolyl cis/trans isomerase Pin1, decrease REST activity through phosphorylation-dependent degradation. Our findings further resolve the mechanism for temporal regulation of REST and terminal neuronal differentiation. They also provide new potential therapeutic targets to enhance neuronal regeneration after injury. PMID:27535341

  18. Dynamic multidrug recognition by multidrug transcriptional repressor LmrR.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Koh; Tokunaga, Yuji; Imai, Misaki; Takahashi, Hideo; Shimada, Ichio

    2014-11-18

    LmrR is a multidrug transcriptional repressor that controls the expression of a major multidrug transporter, LmrCD, in Lactococcus lactis. However, the molecular mechanism by which LmrR binds to structurally unrelated compounds and is released from the promoter region remains largely unknown. Here, we structurally and dynamically characterized LmrR in the apo, compound-bound and promoter-bound states. The compound-binding site of LmrR exhibits ps-μs dynamics in the apo state, and compound ligation shifts the preexisting conformational equilibrium to varying extents to achieve multidrug recognition. Meanwhile, the compound binding induces redistribution of ps-ns dynamics to the allosteric sites, which entropically favors the high-affinity recognition. Furthermore, the reciprocal compound/promoter binding by LmrR is achieved by the incompatible conformational ensembles between the compound- and promoter-bound states. Collectively, the data show how LmrR can dynamically exert its functions through promiscuous multi-target interactions, in a manner that cannot be understood by a static structural view.

  19. Heat-Induced Fibrillation of BclXL Apoptotic Repressor

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, Vikas; Olenick, Max B.; Schuchardt, Brett J.; Mikles, David C.; Deegan, Brian J.; McDonald, Caleb B.; Seldeen, Kenneth L.; Kurouski, Dmitry; Faridi, Mohd Hafeez; Shareef, Mohammed M.; Gupta, Vineet; Lednev, Igor K.; Farooq, Amjad

    2013-01-01

    The BclXL apoptotic repressor bears the propensity to associate into megadalton oligomers in solution, particularly under acidic pH. Herein, using various biophysical methods, we analyze the effect of temperature on the oligomerization of BclXL. Our data show that BclXL undergoes irreversible aggregation and assembles into highly-ordered rope-like homogeneous fibrils with length in the order of mm and a diameter in the μm-range under elevated temperatures. Remarkably, the formation of such fibrils correlates with the decay of a largely α-helical fold into a predominantly β-sheet architecture of BclXL in a manner akin to the formation of amyloid fibrils. Further interrogation reveals that while BclXL fibrils formed under elevated temperatures show no observable affinity toward BH3 ligands, they appear to be optimally primed for insertion into cardiolipin bicelles. This salient observation strongly argues that BclXL fibrils likely represent an on-pathway intermediate for insertion into mitochondrial outer membrane during the onset of apoptosis. Collectively, our study sheds light on the propensity of BclXL to form amyloid-like fibrils with important consequences on its mechanism of action in gauging the apoptotic fate of cells in health and disease. PMID:23714425

  20. REST is a hypoxia-responsive transcriptional repressor.

    PubMed

    Cavadas, Miguel A S; Mesnieres, Marion; Crifo, Bianca; Manresa, Mario C; Selfridge, Andrew C; Keogh, Ciara E; Fabian, Zsolt; Scholz, Carsten C; Nolan, Karen A; Rocha, Liliane M A; Tambuwala, Murtaza M; Brown, Stuart; Wdowicz, Anita; Corbett, Danielle; Murphy, Keith J; Godson, Catherine; Cummins, Eoin P; Taylor, Cormac T; Cheong, Alex

    2016-01-01

    Cellular exposure to hypoxia results in altered gene expression in a range of physiologic and pathophysiologic states. Discrete cohorts of genes can be either up- or down-regulated in response to hypoxia. While the Hypoxia-Inducible Factor (HIF) is the primary driver of hypoxia-induced adaptive gene expression, less is known about the signalling mechanisms regulating hypoxia-dependent gene repression. Using RNA-seq, we demonstrate that equivalent numbers of genes are induced and repressed in human embryonic kidney (HEK293) cells. We demonstrate that nuclear localization of the Repressor Element 1-Silencing Transcription factor (REST) is induced in hypoxia and that REST is responsible for regulating approximately 20% of the hypoxia-repressed genes. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation assays we demonstrate that REST-dependent gene repression is at least in part mediated by direct binding to the promoters of target genes. Based on these data, we propose that REST is a key mediator of gene repression in hypoxia. PMID:27531581

  1. Heat-induced fibrillation of BclXL apoptotic repressor.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Vikas; Olenick, Max B; Schuchardt, Brett J; Mikles, David C; Deegan, Brian J; McDonald, Caleb B; Seldeen, Kenneth L; Kurouski, Dmitry; Faridi, Mohd Hafeez; Shareef, Mohammed M; Gupta, Vineet; Lednev, Igor K; Farooq, Amjad

    2013-09-01

    The BclXL apoptotic repressor bears the propensity to associate into megadalton oligomers in solution, particularly under acidic pH. Herein, using various biophysical methods, we analyze the effect of temperature on the oligomerization of BclXL. Our data show that BclXL undergoes irreversible aggregation and assembles into highly-ordered rope-like homogeneous fibrils with length in the order of mm and a diameter in the μm-range under elevated temperatures. Remarkably, the formation of such fibrils correlates with the decay of a largely α-helical fold into a predominantly β-sheet architecture of BclXL in a manner akin to the formation of amyloid fibrils. Further interrogation reveals that while BclXL fibrils formed under elevated temperatures show no observable affinity toward BH3 ligands, they appear to be optimally primed for insertion into cardiolipin bicelles. This salient observation strongly argues that BclXL fibrils likely represent an on-pathway intermediate for insertion into mitochondrial outer membrane during the onset of apoptosis. Collectively, our study sheds light on the propensity of BclXL to form amyloid-like fibrils with important consequences on its mechanism of action in gauging the apoptotic fate of cells in health and disease. PMID:23714425

  2. REST is a hypoxia-responsive transcriptional repressor

    PubMed Central

    Cavadas, Miguel A. S.; Mesnieres, Marion; Crifo, Bianca; Manresa, Mario C.; Selfridge, Andrew C.; Keogh, Ciara E.; Fabian, Zsolt; Scholz, Carsten C.; Nolan, Karen A.; Rocha, Liliane M. A.; Tambuwala, Murtaza M.; Brown, Stuart; Wdowicz, Anita; Corbett, Danielle; Murphy, Keith J.; Godson, Catherine; Cummins, Eoin P.; Taylor, Cormac T.; Cheong, Alex

    2016-01-01

    Cellular exposure to hypoxia results in altered gene expression in a range of physiologic and pathophysiologic states. Discrete cohorts of genes can be either up- or down-regulated in response to hypoxia. While the Hypoxia-Inducible Factor (HIF) is the primary driver of hypoxia-induced adaptive gene expression, less is known about the signalling mechanisms regulating hypoxia-dependent gene repression. Using RNA-seq, we demonstrate that equivalent numbers of genes are induced and repressed in human embryonic kidney (HEK293) cells. We demonstrate that nuclear localization of the Repressor Element 1-Silencing Transcription factor (REST) is induced in hypoxia and that REST is responsible for regulating approximately 20% of the hypoxia-repressed genes. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation assays we demonstrate that REST-dependent gene repression is at least in part mediated by direct binding to the promoters of target genes. Based on these data, we propose that REST is a key mediator of gene repression in hypoxia. PMID:27531581

  3. Sequence and in vitro function of chicken, ring-necked pheasant, and Japanese quail AHR1 predict in vivo sensitivity to dioxins.

    PubMed

    Farmahin, Reza; Wu, Dongmei; Crump, Doug; Hervé, Jessica C; Jones, Stephanie P; Hahn, Mark E; Karchner, Sibel I; Giesy, John P; Bursian, Steven J; Zwiernik, Matthew J; Kennedy, Sean W

    2012-03-01

    There are large differences in sensitivity to the toxic and biochemical effects of dioxins and dioxin-like compounds (DLCs) among vertebrates. Previously, we demonstrated that the difference in sensitivity between domestic chicken (Gallus gallus domesticus) and common tern (Sterna hirundo) to aryl hydrocarbon receptor 1 (AHR1)-dependent changes in gene expression following exposure to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) is based upon the identities of the amino acids at two sites within the ligand binding domain of AHR1 (chicken--highly sensitive; Ile324_Ser380 vs common tern--250-fold less sensitive than chicken; Val325_Ala381). Here, we tested the hypotheses that (i) the sensitivity of other avian species to TCDD, 2,3,4,7,8-pentachlorodibenzofuran (PeCDF), and 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzofuran (TCDF) is also determined by the amino acids at sites that are equivalent to sites 324 and 380 in chicken, and (ii) Ile324_Ala380 and Val324_Ser380 genotypes confer intermediate sensitivity to DLCs in birds. We compared ligand-induced transactivation function of full-length AHR1s from chicken, common tern, ring-necked pheasant (Phasianus colchicus; Ile324_Ala380) and Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica; Val324_Ala380), and three Japanese quail AHR1 mutants. The results support our hypothesis that avian species can be grouped into three general classes of sensitivity to DLCs. Both AHR1 genotype and in vitro transactivation assays predict in vivo sensitivity. Contrary to the assumption that TCDD is the most potent DLC, PeCDF was more potent than TCDD at activating Japanese quail (13- to 26-fold) and common tern (23- to 30-fold) AHR1. Our results support and expand previous in vitro and in vivo work that demonstrated ligand-dependent species differences in AHR1 affinity. The findings and methods will be of use for DLC risk assessments.

  4. Fibroblast growth factor (Fgf) 21 is a novel target gene of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR).

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xingguo; Vispute, Saurabh G; Liu, Jie; Cheng, Christine; Kharitonenkov, Alexei; Klaassen, Curtis D

    2014-07-01

    The toxic effects of dioxins, such as 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), mainly through activation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) are well documented. Fibroblast growth factor (Fgf) 21 plays critical roles in metabolic adaptation to fasting by increasing lipid oxidation and ketogenesis in the liver. The present study was performed to determine whether activation of the AhR induces Fgf21 expression. In mouse liver, TCDD increased Fgf21 mRNA in both dose- and time-dependent manners. In addition, TCDD markedly increased Fgf21 mRNA expression in cultured mouse and human hepatocytes. Moreover, TCDD increased mRNA (in liver) and protein levels (in both liver and serum) of Fgf21 in wild-type mice, but not in AhR-null mice. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays showed that TCDD increased AhR protein binding to the Fgf21 promoter (-105/+1 base pair). Fgf21-null mice administered 200μg/kg of TCDD died within 20days, whereas wild-type mice receiving the same treatment were still alive at one month after administration. This indicates that TCDD-induced Fgf21 expression protects against TCDD toxicity. Diethylhexylphthalate (DEHP) pretreatment attenuated TCDD-induced Fgf21 expression in mouse liver and white adipose tissue, which may explain a previous report that DEHP pretreatment decreases TCDD-induced wasting. In conclusion, Fgf21 appears to be a target gene of AhR-signaling pathway in mouse and human liver.

  5. Fibroblast growth factor (Fgf) 21 is a novel target gene of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR)

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Xingguo; Vispute, Saurabh G.; Liu, Jie; Cheng, Christine; Kharitonenkov, Alexei; Klaassen, Curtis D.

    2014-07-01

    The toxic effects of dioxins, such as 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), mainly through activation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) are well documented. Fibroblast growth factor (Fgf) 21 plays critical roles in metabolic adaptation to fasting by increasing lipid oxidation and ketogenesis in the liver. The present study was performed to determine whether activation of the AhR induces Fgf21 expression. In mouse liver, TCDD increased Fgf21 mRNA in both dose- and time-dependent manners. In addition, TCDD markedly increased Fgf21 mRNA expression in cultured mouse and human hepatocytes. Moreover, TCDD increased mRNA (in liver) and protein levels (in both liver and serum) of Fgf21 in wild-type mice, but not in AhR-null mice. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays showed that TCDD increased AhR protein binding to the Fgf21 promoter (− 105/+ 1 base pair). Fgf21-null mice administered 200 μg/kg of TCDD died within 20 days, whereas wild-type mice receiving the same treatment were still alive at one month after administration. This indicates that TCDD-induced Fgf21 expression protects against TCDD toxicity. Diethylhexylphthalate (DEHP) pretreatment attenuated TCDD-induced Fgf21 expression in mouse liver and white adipose tissue, which may explain a previous report that DEHP pretreatment decreases TCDD-induced wasting. In conclusion, Fgf21 appears to be a target gene of AhR-signaling pathway in mouse and human liver. - Highlights: • TCDD induced Fgf21 expression at both mRNA and protein levels. • Fgf21 induction by TCDD is AhR-dependent. • DEHP attenuated TCDD-induced Fgf21 expression.

  6. Fibroblast growth factor (Fgf) 21 is a novel target gene of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR).

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xingguo; Vispute, Saurabh G; Liu, Jie; Cheng, Christine; Kharitonenkov, Alexei; Klaassen, Curtis D

    2014-07-01

    The toxic effects of dioxins, such as 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), mainly through activation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) are well documented. Fibroblast growth factor (Fgf) 21 plays critical roles in metabolic adaptation to fasting by increasing lipid oxidation and ketogenesis in the liver. The present study was performed to determine whether activation of the AhR induces Fgf21 expression. In mouse liver, TCDD increased Fgf21 mRNA in both dose- and time-dependent manners. In addition, TCDD markedly increased Fgf21 mRNA expression in cultured mouse and human hepatocytes. Moreover, TCDD increased mRNA (in liver) and protein levels (in both liver and serum) of Fgf21 in wild-type mice, but not in AhR-null mice. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays showed that TCDD increased AhR protein binding to the Fgf21 promoter (-105/+1 base pair). Fgf21-null mice administered 200μg/kg of TCDD died within 20days, whereas wild-type mice receiving the same treatment were still alive at one month after administration. This indicates that TCDD-induced Fgf21 expression protects against TCDD toxicity. Diethylhexylphthalate (DEHP) pretreatment attenuated TCDD-induced Fgf21 expression in mouse liver and white adipose tissue, which may explain a previous report that DEHP pretreatment decreases TCDD-induced wasting. In conclusion, Fgf21 appears to be a target gene of AhR-signaling pathway in mouse and human liver. PMID:24769090

  7. TBLR1 regulates the expression of nuclear hormone receptor co-repressors

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xin-Min; Chang, Qing; Zeng, Lin; Gu, Judy; Brown, Stuart; Basch, Ross S

    2006-01-01

    Background Transcription is regulated by a complex interaction of activators and repressors. The effectors of repression are large multimeric complexes which contain both the repressor proteins that bind to transcription factors and a number of co-repressors that actually mediate transcriptional silencing either by inhibiting the basal transcription machinery or by recruiting chromatin-modifying enzymes. Results TBLR1 [GenBank: NM024665] is a co-repressor of nuclear hormone transcription factors. A single highly conserved gene encodes a small family of protein molecules. Different isoforms are produced by differential exon utilization. Although the ORF of the predominant form contains only 1545 bp, the human gene occupies ~200 kb of genomic DNA on chromosome 3q and contains 16 exons. The genomic sequence overlaps with the putative DC42 [GenBank: NM030921] locus. The murine homologue is structurally similar and is also located on Chromosome 3. TBLR1 is closely related (79% homology at the mRNA level) to TBL1X and TBL1Y, which are located on Chromosomes X and Y. The expression of TBLR1 overlaps but is distinct from that of TBL1. An alternatively spliced form of TBLR1 has been demonstrated in human material and it too has an unique pattern of expression. TBLR1 and the homologous genes interact with proteins that regulate the nuclear hormone receptor family of transcription factors. In resting cells TBLR1 is primarily cytoplasmic but after perturbation the protein translocates to the nucleus. TBLR1 co-precipitates with SMRT, a co-repressor of nuclear hormone receptors, and co-precipitates in complexes immunoprecipitated by antiserum to HDAC3. Cells engineered to over express either TBLR1 or N- and C-terminal deletion variants, have elevated levels of endogenous N-CoR. Co-transfection of TBLR1 and SMRT results in increased expression of SMRT. This co-repressor undergoes ubiquitin-mediated degradation and we suggest that the stabilization of the co-repressors by TBLR1

  8. Frameshift mutations in the bacteriophage Mu repressor gene can confer a trans-dominant virulent phenotype to the phage.

    PubMed Central

    Geuskens, V; Vogel, J L; Grimaud, R; Desmet, L; Higgins, N P; Toussaint, A

    1991-01-01

    Virulent mutations in the bacteriophage Mu repressor gene were isolated and characterized. Recombination and DNA sequence analysis have revealed that virulence is due to unusual frameshift mutations which change several C-terminal amino acids. The vir mutations are in the same repressor region as the sts amber mutations which, by eliminating several C-terminal amino acids, suppress thermosensitivity of repressor binding to the operators by its N-terminal domain (J. L. Vogel, N. P. Higgins, L. Desmet, V. Geuskens, and A. Toussaint, unpublished data). Vir repressors bind Mu operators very poorly. Thus the Mu repressor C terminus, either by itself or in conjunction with other phage or host proteins, tunes the DNA-binding properties at the repressor N terminus. Images FIG. 3 FIG. 4 FIG. 5 PMID:1833383

  9. SLUG is a Direct Transcriptional Repressor of PTEN Tumor Suppressor

    PubMed Central

    Uygur, Berna; Abramo, Katrina; Leikina, Evgenia; Vary, Calvin; Liaw, Lucy; Wu, Wen-Shu

    2015-01-01

    BACGORUND PTEN/AKT signaling plays a key role in prostate cancer development and maintenance of prostate cancer stem cells. How other oncogenes or tumor suppressors interact with this pathway remain to be elucidated. SLUG is an zinc finger transcription factor of the Snail superfamily, and it promotes cancer metastasis and determines the mammary stem cell state. METHODS SLUG was overexpressed in cells by retroviral vector and knockdown of SLUG and PTEN was mediated by shRNAs-expressing lentiviruses. Expression level of SLUG and PTEN was examined by Western blot, RT-PCR, and qPCR analyses. PTEN promoter activity was measured by luciferase reporter assay. ChIP assay was used to measure the binding between SLUG and the PTEN promoter in vivo. RESULT We showed that overexpression of SLUG decreased expression of PTEN tumor repressor in prostate cancer cell lines 22RV1 and DU145; conversely, knockdown of SLUG expression elevated PTEN expresson at both protein and RNA level in these cells. We demonstrated that SLUG overexpression inhibits PTEN promoter activity through the proximal promoter region in prostate cancer cells. By ChIP assay, we confirmed that SLUG directly binds to the PTEN promoter region covering the E-box sites. We also showed that Slug deficiency leads to an increased expression of PTEN in mouse embryo fibroblasts and prostate tissues. Importantly, we found that overexpression of SLUG increases drug resistance of DU145 prostate cancer cell line and knockdown of SLUG by shRNA sensitizes DU145 cell line to chemotherapeutic drugs. We further demonstrated that PTEN knockdown converts drug sensitivity of DU145 cells expressing SLUG shRNA to anticancer drugs. CONCLUSION We provide compelling evidence showing that PTEN is a direct functional target of SLUG. Our findings offer new insight in the regulation of the PTEN/AKT pathway and provide a molecular basis for potential targeted therapies of prostate cancer PMID:25728608

  10. Alanine screening mutagenesis establishes the critical inactivating damage of irradiated E. coli lactose repressor.

    PubMed

    Goffinont, Stephane; Villette, Sandrine; Spotheim-Maurizot, Melanie

    2012-06-01

    The function of the E. coli lactose operon requires the binding of lactose repressor to operator DNA. We have previously shown that γ rradiation destabilizes the repressor-operator complex because the repressor loses its DNA-binding ability. It was suggested that the observed oxidation of the four tyrosines (Y7, Y12, Y17, Y47) and the concomitant structural changes of the irradiated DNA-binding domains (headpieces) could be responsible for the inactivation. To pinpoint the tyrosine whose oxidation has the strongest effect, four headpieces containing the product of tyrosine oxidation, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA), were simulated by molecular dynamics. We have observed that replacing Y47 by DOPA triggers the largest change of structure and stability of the headpiece and have concluded that Y47 oxidation is the greatest contributor to the decrease of repressor binding to DNA. To experimentally verify this conclusion, we applied the alanine screening mutagenesis approach. Tetrameric mutated repressors bearing an alanine instead of each one of the tyrosines were prepared and their binding to operator DNA was checked. Their binding ability is quite similar to that of the wild-type repressor, except for the Y47A mutant whose binding is strongly reduced. Circular dichroism determinations revealed small reductions of the proportion of α helices and of the melting temperature for Y7A, Y12A and Y17A headpieces, but much larger ones were revealed for Y47A headpiece. These results established the critical role of Y47 oxidation in modifying the structure and stability of the headpiece, and in reduction of the binding ability of the whole lactose repressor. PMID:22551504

  11. Allosteric inhibition of a zinc-sensing transcriptional repressor: Insights into the arsenic repressor (ArsR) family

    PubMed Central

    Campanello, Gregory C.; Ma, Zhen; Grossoehme, Nicholas E.; Guerra, Alfredo J.; Ward, Brian P.; DiMarchi, Richard D.; Ye, Yuzhen; Dann, Charles E.; Giedroc, David P.

    2013-01-01

    The molecular basis of allosteric regulation remains a subject of intense interest. Staphylococcus aureus CzrA is a member of the ubiquitous arsenic repressor (ArsR) family of bacterial homodimeric metal sensing proteins, and has emerged as a model system for understanding allosteric regulation of operator DNA binding by transition metal ions. Using unnatural amino acid substitution and a standard linkage analysis, we show that a His97’ NHε2•••O=C-His67 quaternary structural hydrogen bond is an energetically significant contributor to the magnitude of the allosteric coupling free energy, ΔGc. A “cavity” introduced just beneath this hydrogen bond in V66A/L68V CzrA results in a dramatic loss of regulation by Zn(II) despite adopting a wild-type global structure and Zn(II) binding and DNA binding affinities only minimally affected from wild-type. The energetics of Zn(II) binding and heterotropic coupling free energies (ΔHc, −TΔSc) of the double mutant are also radically altered and suggest that increased internal dynamics leads to poorer allosteric negative regulation in V66A/L68V CzrA. A statistical coupling analysis of 3000 ArsR proteins reveals a sector that links the DNA-binding determinants and the α5 Zn(II) sensing sites through V66/L68 in CzrA. We propose that distinct regulatory sites uniquely characteristic of individual ArsR proteins results from evolution of distinct connectivities to this sector, each capable of driving the same biological outcome, transcriptional derepression. PMID:23353829

  12. Comparing native and irradiated E. coli lactose repressor-operator complex by molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Aci-Sèche, Samia; Garnier, Norbert; Goffinont, Stéphane; Genest, Daniel; Spotheim-Maurizot, Mélanie; Genest, Monique

    2010-09-01

    The function of the E. coli lactose operon requires the binding of the tetrameric repressor protein to the operator DNA. We have previously shown that gamma-irradiation destabilises the repressor-operator complex because the repressor gradually loses its DNA-binding ability (Radiat Res 170:604-612, 2008). It was suggested that the observed oxidation of tyrosine residues and the concomitant structural changes of irradiated headpieces (DNA-binding domains of repressor monomers) could be responsible for the inactivation. To unravel the mechanisms that lead to repressor-operator complex destabilisation when tyrosine oxidation occurs, we have compared by molecular dynamic simulations two complexes: (1) the native complex formed by two headpieces and the operator DNA, and (2) the damaged complex, in which all tyrosines are replaced by their oxidation product 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA). On a 20 ns time scale, MD results show effects consistent with complex destabilisation: increased flexibility, increased DNA bending, modification of the hydrogen bond network, and decrease of the positive electrostatic potential at the protein surface and of the global energy of DNA-protein interactions. PMID:20349312

  13. Crystal Structure of the lamda Repressor and a Model for Pairwise Cooperative Operator Binding

    SciTech Connect

    Stayrook,S.; Jaru-Ampornpan, P.; Ni, J.; Hochschild, A.; Lewis, M.

    2008-01-01

    Bacteriophage {lambda} has for many years been a model system for understanding mechanisms of gene regulation1. A 'genetic switch' enables the phage to transition from lysogenic growth to lytic development when triggered by specific environmental conditions. The key component of the switch is the cI repressor, which binds to two sets of three operator sites on the chromosome that are separated by about 2,400 base pairs (bp)2, 3. A hallmark of the system is the pairwise cooperativity of repressor binding4. In the absence of detailed structural information, it has been difficult to understand fully how repressor molecules establish the cooperativity complex. Here we present the X-ray crystal structure of the intact cI repressor dimer bound to a DNA operator site. The structure of the repressor, determined by multiple isomorphous replacement methods, reveals an unusual overall architecture that allows it to adopt a conformation that appears to facilitate pairwise cooperative binding to adjacent operator sites.

  14. Timing is everything in plant development. The central role of floral repressors.

    PubMed

    Jarillo, Jose A; Piñeiro, Manuel

    2011-10-01

    Progress in understanding the molecular basis of flowering time control has revealed that floral repressors play a central role in modulating the floral transition and are essential to prevent the precocious onset of flowering. A number of cellular processes including chromatin remodeling, selective protein degradation, and transcriptional regulation mediated by transcription factors are involved in repressing the initiation of flowering. Floral repressors interact at different levels with floral inductive pathways and prevent the premature onset of flowering that could impact negatively on the reproductive success of plants. Despite recent advances, further studies will be needed to understand how the interactions between floral repressors and the regulatory networks involved in the control of flowering time have evolved in different species. Recent data suggest that a diversity of regulatory proteins act as central floral repressors in different plants, and even in those species where regulatory modules are conserved new elements that modulate the function of these pathways have been recruited to mediate specific adaptive responses. The development of genomic tools and predictive models that can integrate large datasets related to the flowering behavior of plant species will facilitate the characterization of the repressor mechanisms underlying flowering responses, a trait with implications in the yield of crop species. In a scenario of global climate change, an in depth understanding of these gene circuits will be essential for the development of crop varieties with improved yield.

  15. Measured and predicted affinities of binding and relative potencies to activate the AhR of PAHs and their alkylated analogues.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sangwoo; Shin, Woong-Hee; Hong, Seongjin; Kang, Habyeong; Jung, Dawoon; Yim, Un Hyuk; Shim, Won Joon; Khim, Jong Seong; Seok, Chaok; Giesy, John P; Choi, Kyungho

    2015-11-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and their alkylated forms are important components of crude oil. Both groups of PAHs have been reported to cause dioxin-like responses, mediated by aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). Thus, characterization of binding affinity to the AhR of unsubstituted or alkylated PAHs is important to understand the toxicological consequences of oil contamination on ecosystems. We investigated the potencies of major PAHs of crude oil, e.g., chrysene, phenanthrene and dibenzothiophene, and their alkylated forms (n=17) to upregulate expression of AhR-mediated processes by use of the H4IIE-luc transactivation bioassay. In addition, molecular descriptors of different AhR activation potencies among PAHs were investigated by use of computational molecular docking models. Based on responses of the H4IIE-luc in vitro assay, it was shown that potencies of PAHs were determined by alkylation in addition to the number and conformation of rings. Potencies of AhR-mediated processes were generally greater when a chrysene group was substituted, especially in 1-methyl-chrysene. Significant negative correlations were observed between the in vitro dioxin-like potency measured in H4IIE-luc cells and the binding distance estimated from the in silico modeling. The difference in relative potency for AhR activation observed among PAHs and their alkylated forms could be explained by differences among binding distances in the ligand binding domain of the AhR caused by alkylation. The docking model developed in the present study may have utility in predicting risks of environmental contaminants of which toxicities are mediated by AhR binding.

  16. Effects of 4-nitrophenol on expression of the ER-α and AhR signaling pathway-associated genes in the small intestine of rats.

    PubMed

    Tang, Juan; Song, Meiyan; Watanabe, Gen; Nagaoka, Kentaro; Rui, Xiaoli; Li, ChunMei

    2016-09-01

    4-Nitrophenol (PNP) is a persistent organic pollutant that was proven to be an environmental endocrine disruptor. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of the estrogen receptor-α (ER-α) and aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) signaling pathway in regulating the damage response to PNP in the small intestine of rats. Wistar-Imamichi male rats (21 d) were randomly divided into two groups: the control group and PNP group. Each group had three processes that were gavaged with PNP or vehicle daily: single dose (1 d), repeated dose (3 consecutive days) (3 d), and repeated dose with recovery (3 consecutive days and 3 recovery days) (6 d). The weight of the body, the related viscera, and small intestine were examined. Histological parameters of the small intestine and the quantity of mucus proteins secreted by small goblet cells were determined using HE staining and PAS staining. The mRNA expression of AhR, ER-α, CYP1A1, and GST was measured by real-time qPCR. In addition, we also analyzed the AhR, ER-α, and CYP1A1 expression in the small intestine by immunohistochemical staining. The small intestines histologically changed in the PNP-treated rat and the expression of AhR, CYP1A1, and GST was increased. While ER-α was significantly decreased in the small intestine, simultaneously, when rats were exposed to a longer PNP treatment, the damages disappeared. Our results demonstrate that PNP has an effect on the expression of AhR signaling pathway genes, AhR, CYP1A1, and GST, and ER-α in the rat small intestine.

  17. Combined chemical and toxicological long-term monitoring for AhR agonists with SPMD-based virtual organisms in drinking water Danjiangkou Reservoir, China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jingxian; Song, Guoqiang; Li, Aimin; Henkelmann, Bernhard; Pfister, Gerd; Tong, Anthony Z; Schramm, Karl-Werner

    2014-08-01

    SPMD-based virtual organisms (VOs) were employed for time-integrating, long-term sampling combined biological and chemical analyses for exposure assessment of hydrophobic organic pollutants (HOPs) in a drinking water reservoir, China. The SPMDs were deployed at four and five sites in the Danjiangkou (DJK) reservoir over two periods of 26 and 31 d to sequester the hydrophobic contaminants in water. The chosen bioassay response for the extracts of the SPMDs, the induction of 7-ethoxyresorufin-o-deethylase (EROD) was assayed using a rat hepatoma cell line (H4IIE). The known aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) agonists PAHs and PCBs were analyzed by HRGC/HRMS instrument. The cause-effect relationship between the observed AhR activities and chemical concentrations of detected AhR agonists was examined. The results show that the extracts from the SPMD samples could induce AhR activity significantly, whereas the chemically derived 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) equivalent (TEQcal) was not correlated with the bioassay-derived TCDD equivalent (TEQbio). The known AhR agonists could only account for 2-10% of the observed AhR responses among which the contribution of PCBs could almost be neglected. Unidentified AhR-active compounds represented a greater proportion of the TCDD equivalent (TCDD-EQ) in SPMD samples from DJK. Based on the first assessment, the VO followed by the combination of chemical and biological analyses emerges as a resource efficient water monitoring device in ecotoxicological assessment for toxicologically relevant compounds which are readily available for uptake by resident aquatic biota in drinking water resources. PMID:24548649

  18. Disruption of period gene expression alters the inductive effects of dioxin on the AhR signaling pathway in the mouse liver

    SciTech Connect

    Qu Xiaoyu; Metz, Richard P.; Porter, Weston W.; Cassone, Vincent M.; Earnest, David J.

    2009-02-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) and AhR nuclear translocator (ARNT) are transcription factors that express Per-Arnt-Sim (PAS) DNA-binding motifs and mediate the metabolism of drugs and environmental toxins in the liver. Because these transcription factors interact with other PAS genes in molecular feedback loops forming the mammalian circadian clockworks, we determined whether targeted disruption or siRNA inhibition of Per1 and Per2 expression alters toxin-mediated regulation of the AhR signaling pathway in the mouse liver and Hepa1c1c7 hepatoma cells in vitro. Treatment with the prototypical Ahr ligand, 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), had inductive effects on the primary targets of AhR signaling, Cyp1A1 and Cyp1B1, in the liver of all animals, but genotype-based differences were evident such that the toxin-mediated induction of Cyp1A1 expression was significantly greater (2-fold) in mice with targeted disruption of Per1 (Per1{sup ldc} and Per1{sup ldc}/Per2{sup ldc}). In vitro experiments yielded similar results demonstrating that siRNA inhibition of Per1 significantly increases the TCDD-induced expression of Cyp1A1 and Cyp1B1 in Hepa1c1c7 cells. Per2 inhibition in siRNA-infected Hepa1c1c7 cells had the opposite effect and significantly decreased both the induction of these p450 genes as well as AhR and Arnt expression in response to TCDD treatment. These findings suggest that Per1 may play a distinctive role in modulating AhR-regulated responses to TCDD in the liver.

  19. Combined chemical and toxicological long-term monitoring for AhR agonists with SPMD-based virtual organisms in drinking water Danjiangkou Reservoir, China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jingxian; Song, Guoqiang; Li, Aimin; Henkelmann, Bernhard; Pfister, Gerd; Tong, Anthony Z; Schramm, Karl-Werner

    2014-08-01

    SPMD-based virtual organisms (VOs) were employed for time-integrating, long-term sampling combined biological and chemical analyses for exposure assessment of hydrophobic organic pollutants (HOPs) in a drinking water reservoir, China. The SPMDs were deployed at four and five sites in the Danjiangkou (DJK) reservoir over two periods of 26 and 31 d to sequester the hydrophobic contaminants in water. The chosen bioassay response for the extracts of the SPMDs, the induction of 7-ethoxyresorufin-o-deethylase (EROD) was assayed using a rat hepatoma cell line (H4IIE). The known aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) agonists PAHs and PCBs were analyzed by HRGC/HRMS instrument. The cause-effect relationship between the observed AhR activities and chemical concentrations of detected AhR agonists was examined. The results show that the extracts from the SPMD samples could induce AhR activity significantly, whereas the chemically derived 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) equivalent (TEQcal) was not correlated with the bioassay-derived TCDD equivalent (TEQbio). The known AhR agonists could only account for 2-10% of the observed AhR responses among which the contribution of PCBs could almost be neglected. Unidentified AhR-active compounds represented a greater proportion of the TCDD equivalent (TCDD-EQ) in SPMD samples from DJK. Based on the first assessment, the VO followed by the combination of chemical and biological analyses emerges as a resource efficient water monitoring device in ecotoxicological assessment for toxicologically relevant compounds which are readily available for uptake by resident aquatic biota in drinking water resources.

  20. Baicalein induces G1 arrest in oral cancer cells by enhancing the degradation of cyclin D1 and activating AhR to decrease Rb phosphorylation

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Ya-Hsin; Li, Lih-Ann; Lin, Pinpin; Cheng, Li-Chuan; Hung, Chein-Hui; Chang, Nai Wen; Lin, Chingju

    2012-09-15

    Baicalein is a flavonoid, known to have anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer effects. As an aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) ligand, baicalein at high concentrations blocks AhR-mediated dioxin toxicity. Because AhR had been reported to play a role in regulating the cell cycle, we suspected that the anti-cancer effect of baicalein is associated with AhR. This study investigated the molecular mechanism involved in the anti-cancer effect of baicalein in oral cancer cells HSC-3, including whether such effect would be AhR-mediated. Results revealed that baicalein inhibited cell proliferation and increased AhR activity in a dose-dependent manner. Cell cycle was arrested at the G1 phase and the expression of CDK4, cyclin D1, and phosphorylated retinoblastoma (pRb) was decreased. When the AhR was suppressed by siRNA, the reduction of pRb was partially reversed, accompanied by a decrease of cell population at G1 phase and an increase at S phase, while the reduction of cyclin D1 and CDK4 did not change. This finding suggests that the baicalein activation of AhR is indeed associated with the reduction of pRb, but is independent of the reduction of cyclin D1 and CDK4. When cells were pre-treated with LiCl, the inhibitor of GSK-3β, the decrease of cyclin D1 was blocked and the reduction of pRb was recovered. The data indicates that in HSC-3 the reduction of pRb is both mediated by baicalein through activation of AhR and facilitation of cyclin D1 degradation, which causes cell cycle arrest at the G1 phase, and results in the inhibition of cell proliferation. -- Highlights: ► Baicalein causes the G1 phase arrest by decreasing Rb phosphorylation. ► Baicalein modulates AhR-mediated cell proliferation. ► Both AhR activation and cyclin D1 degradation results in hypophosphorylation of Rb. ► Baicalein facilitates cyclin D1 degradation by signalling the GSK-3β pathway.

  1. In Utero and Lactational Exposure to PCBs in Mice: Adult Offspring Show Altered Learning and Memory Depending on Cyp1a2 and Ahr Genotypes

    PubMed Central

    Curran, Christine P.; Genter, Mary Beth; Patel, Krishna V.; Schaefer, Tori L.; Skelton, Matthew R.; Williams, Michael T.; Vorhees, Charles V.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Both coplanar and noncoplanar polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) exhibit neurotoxic effects in animal studies, but individual congeners do not always produce the same effects as PCB mixtures. Humans genetically have > 60-fold differences in hepatic cytochrome P450 1A2 (CYP1A2)-uninduced basal levels and > 12-fold variability in aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR)affinity; because CYP1A2 is known to sequester coplanar PCBs and because AHR ligands include coplanar PCBs, both genotypes can affect PCB response. Objectives: We aimed to develop a mouse paradigm with extremes in Cyp1a2 and Ahr genotypes to explore genetic susceptibility to PCB-induced developmental neurotoxicity using an environmentally relevant mixture of PCBs. Methods: We developed a mixture of eight PCBs to simulate human exposures based on their reported concentrations in human tissue, breast milk, and food supply. We previously characterized specific differences in PCB congener pharmacokinetics and toxicity, comparing high-affinity–AHR Cyp1a2 wild-type [Ahrb1_Cyp1a2(+/+)], poor-affinity–AHR Cyp1a2 wild-type [Ahrd_Cyp1a2(+/+)], and high-affinity–AHR Cyp1a2 knockout [Ahrb1_Cyp1a2(–/–)] mouse lines [Curran CP, Vorhees CV, Williams MT, Genter MB, Miller ML, Nebert DW. 2011. In utero and lactational exposure to a complex mixture of polychlorinated biphenyls: toxicity in pups dependent on the Cyp1a2 and Ahr genotypes. Toxicol Sci 119:189–208]. Dams received a mixture of three coplanar and five noncoplanar PCBs on gestational day 10.5 and postnatal day (PND) 5. In the present study we conducted behavioral phenotyping of exposed offspring at PND60, examining multiple measures of learning, memory, and other behaviors. Results: We observed the most significant deficits in response to PCB treatment in Ahrb1_Cyp1a2(–/–) mice, including impaired novel object recognition and increased failure rate in the Morris water maze. However, all PCB-treated genotypes showed significant differences on

  2. Silencing of miR-124 induces neuroblastoma SK-N-SH cell differentiation, cell cycle arrest and apoptosis through promoting AHR.

    PubMed

    Huang, Tsui-Chin; Chang, Hsin-Yi; Chen, Cheng-Yu; Wu, Pei-Yi; Lee, Hsinyu; Liao, Yung-Feng; Hsu, Wen-Ming; Huang, Hsuan-Cheng; Juan, Hsueh-Fen

    2011-11-16

    Neuroblastoma is the most common extracranial solid tumor in children. We investigate whether miR-124, the abundant neuronal miRNA, plays a pivotal role in neuroblastoma. Knockdown of miR-124 promotes neuroblastoma SK-N-SH cell differentiation, cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Further miR-124 is predicted to target aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) which may promote neuroblastoma cell differentiation. We validate that miR-124 may suppress the expression of AHR by targeting its 3'-UTR. These results suggest that miR-124 could serve as a potential therapeutic target of neuroblastoma.

  3. The TetR Family of Transcriptional Repressors

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Juan L.; Martínez-Bueno, Manuel; Molina-Henares, Antonio J.; Terán, Wilson; Watanabe, Kazuya; Zhang, Xiaodong; Gallegos, María Trinidad; Brennan, Richard; Tobes, Raquel

    2005-01-01

    We have developed a general profile for the proteins of the TetR family of repressors. The stretch that best defines the profile of this family is made up of 47 amino acid residues that correspond to the helix-turn-helix DNA binding motif and adjacent regions in the three-dimensional structures of TetR, QacR, CprB, and EthR, four family members for which the function and three-dimensional structure are known. We have detected a set of 2,353 nonredundant proteins belonging to this family by screening genome and protein databases with the TetR profile. Proteins of the TetR family have been found in 115 genera of gram-positive, α-, β-, and γ-proteobacteria, cyanobacteria, and archaea. The set of genes they regulate is known for 85 out of the 2,353 members of the family. These proteins are involved in the transcriptional control of multidrug efflux pumps, pathways for the biosynthesis of antibiotics, response to osmotic stress and toxic chemicals, control of catabolic pathways, differentiation processes, and pathogenicity. The regulatory network in which the family member is involved can be simple, as in TetR (i.e., TetR bound to the target operator represses tetA transcription and is released in the presence of tetracycline), or more complex, involving a series of regulatory cascades in which either the expression of the TetR family member is modulated by another regulator or the TetR family member triggers a cell response to react to environmental insults. Based on what has been learned from the cocrystals of TetR and QacR with their target operators and from their three-dimensional structures in the absence and in the presence of ligands, and based on multialignment analyses of the conserved stretch of 47 amino acids in the 2,353 TetR family members, two groups of residues have been identified. One group includes highly conserved positions involved in the proper orientation of the helix-turn-helix motif and hence seems to play a structural role. The other set of

  4. Interconvertible lac repressor-DNA loops revealed by single-molecule experiments.

    PubMed

    Wong, Oi Kwan; Guthold, Martin; Erie, Dorothy A; Gelles, Jeff

    2008-09-30

    At many promoters, transcription is regulated by simultaneous binding of a protein to multiple sites on DNA, but the structures and dynamics of such transcription factor-mediated DNA loops are poorly understood. We directly examined in vitro loop formation mediated by Escherichia coli lactose repressor using single-molecule structural and kinetics methods. Small ( approximately 150 bp) loops form quickly and stably, even with out-of-phase operator spacings. Unexpectedly, repeated spontaneous transitions between two distinct loop structures were observed in individual protein-DNA complexes. The results imply a dynamic equilibrium between a novel loop structure with the repressor in its crystallographic "V" conformation and a second structure with a more extended linear repressor conformation that substantially lessens the DNA bending strain. The ability to switch between different loop structures may help to explain how robust transcription regulation is maintained even though the mechanical work required to form a loop may change substantially with metabolic conditions. PMID:18828671

  5. Site-specific DNA-affinity chromatography of the lac repressor.

    PubMed Central

    Herrick, G

    1980-01-01

    To test the feasibility of site-specific DNA-affinity chromatography, E. coli lac repressor was bound to an operator-containing DNA column, and in parallel to a non-operator DNA column. Salt gradient elution shows: 1) elution from non-operator DNA was near 250mM KCl or NaCl; interpretation of this result suggests the usefulness of the procedure for studying salt-dependence of DNA-protein affinities; 2) elution from operator-containing DNA was delayed (average elution = 1000mM salt), demonstrating a feasibility of site-specific DNA-affinity chromatography, if one provides a sufficiently favorable ratio of specific to non-specific DNA binding sites; 3) repressor eluted from operator-containing DNA over a very broad salt range, which may represent chromatography-generated repressor heterogeneity. PMID:7001362

  6. Calorimetric analysis of lambda cI repressor binding to DNA operator sites.

    PubMed

    Merabet, E; Ackers, G K

    1995-07-11

    Enthalpies and heat capacities were determined by isothermal titration calorimetry for bacteriophage lambda cI repressor binding to DNA containing various combinations of the three operator sites OR1, OR2, and OR3 (each comprising a consensus half-site and a specific nonconsensus half-site). Differential scanning calorimetry was employed to evaluate the effects of specific DNA binding on thermal melting of the N-terminal and C-terminal repressor domains. Principal findings of this study are as follows: (1) Binding of repressor to each of the DNA operators is dominated by a large negative enthalpy, in agreement with earlier van't Hoff analyses of quantitative footprint titration data [Koblan & Ackers (1992) Biochemistry 31, 57-65]. The calorimetric data also revealed negative heat capacities for cI binding that are of comparable magnitude with many other systems [Spolar & Record (1994) Science 263, 777-784]. However, this feature in combination with the large negative values of binding enthalpies leads to an enthalpic dominance throughout the physiological temperature range. The resulting thermodynamic profile is opposite to the entropically dominated binding observed for many systems, including lambda cro repressor which binds to the same sites as cI and also employs a helix-turn-helix binding domain [Takeda et al. (1992) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 89, 8180-8184]. It is suggested that these thermodynamic differences may arise from interactions of the cI repressor's N-terminal "arm" with the DNA. (2) Repressor monomers do not bind significantly to DNA containing either a consensus half-site or a nonconsensus half-site. Binding affinity to the double-consensus operator is much weaker than to any of the natural full-site operators. The same was found with other combinations of half-sites. A mutant repressor (PT158) which is severely defective in dimerization [Burz et al. (1994) Biochemistry 33, 8399-8405] was also found to bind only full-site operators and showed

  7. DNA sequence dependent and independent conformational changes in multipartite operator recognition by lambda-repressor.

    PubMed

    Deb, S; Bandyopadhyay, S; Roy, S

    2000-03-28

    Binding of regulatory proteins to multipartite DNA binding sites often occurs with protein-protein interaction, resulting in cooperative binding. The operators of bacteriophage lambda have several pairs of repressor binding sites (O(R)1-O(R)2, O(R)2-O(R)3, O(L)1-O(L)2, and O(L)2-O(L)3) separated by a variable number of base pairs, and thus, bacteriophage lambda is a model system for studying multipartite operator recognition by DNA-binding proteins. Near-UV circular dichroism spectra show that the DNA is distorted in O(R)1-O(R)2 and O(L)2-O(L)3 but much less so in O(R)2-O(R)3. Upon titration of lambda-repressor with single-operator sites O(R)1, O(R)2, and O(R)3, it was observed that the tryptophan fluorescence quenches to different degrees, suggesting different conformations of the protein in the three DNA-protein complexes. Acrylamide quenching of tryptophan fluorescence of lambda-repressor bound to these single operators also shows different Stern-Volmer constants, supporting the above conclusions. Titration of lambda-repressor with oligonucleotides containing pairs of operator sites also causes different degrees of fluorescence quenching. In particular, fluorescence quenching induced by O(R)1-O(R)2 binding is less than the quenching induced by either of the single operators alone, suggesting additional conformational changes upon establishment of protein-protein contact. Stern-Volmer constants obtained from acrylamide quenching of tryptophan fluorescence of lambda-repressor bound cooperatively to pairs of operator sites are different from those of the single-operator-site-bound repressors. For example, O(R)2-O(R)3-bound repressor has significantly higher acrylamide quenchable components than either of the O(R)2- or O(R)3-bound proteins, again suggesting additional conformational changes upon establishment of protein-protein contact. We conclude that the strategy of recognition of multipartite operator by lambda-repressor is complex and varied, involving

  8. Biological effects of 6-formylindolo[3,2-b]carbazole (FICZ) in vivo are enhanced by loss of CYP1A function in an Ahr2-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Wincent, Emma; Kubota, Akira; Timme-Laragy, Alicia; Jönsson, Maria E; Hahn, Mark E; Stegeman, John J

    2016-06-15

    6-Formylindolo[3,2-b]carbazole (FICZ) is a potent aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) agonist that is efficiently metabolized by AHR-regulated cytochrome P4501 enzymes. FICZ is a proposed physiological AHR ligand that induces its own degradation as part of a regulatory negative feedback loop. In vitro studies in cells show that CYP1 inhibition in the presence of FICZ results in enhanced AHR activation, suggesting that FICZ accumulates in the cell when its metabolism is blocked. We used zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos to investigate the in vivo effects of FICZ when CYP1A is knocked down or inhibited. Embryos were injected with morpholino antisense oligonucleotides targeting CYP1A (CYP1A-MO), Ahr2, or a combination of both. FICZ exposure of non-injected embryos or embryos injected with control morpholino had little effect. In CYP1A-MO-injected embryos, however, FICZ dramatically increased mortality, incidence and severity of pericardial edema and circulation failure, reduced hatching frequency, blocked swim bladder inflation, and strongly potentiated expression of Ahr2-regulated genes. These effects were substantially reduced in embryos with a combined knockdown of Ahr2 and CYP1A, indicating that the toxicity was mediated at least partly by Ahr2. Co-exposure to the CYP1 inhibitor alpha-naphthoflavone (αNF) and FICZ had similar effects as the combination of CYP1A-MO and FICZ. HPLC analysis of FICZ-exposed embryos showed increased levels of FICZ after concomitant CYP1A-MO injection or αNF co-exposure. Together, these results show that a functioning CYP1/AHR feedback loop is crucial for regulation of AHR signaling by a potential physiological ligand in vivo and further highlights the role of CYP1 enzymes in regulating biological effects of FICZ.

  9. Aromatic hydrocarbons upregulate glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and induce changes in actin cytoskeleton. Role of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR).

    PubMed

    Reyes-Hernández, O D; Mejía-García, A; Sánchez-Ocampo, E M; Castro-Muñozledo, F; Hernández-Muñoz, R; Elizondo, G

    2009-12-21

    Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) is a multifunctional enzyme involved in several cellular functions including glycolysis, membrane transport, microtubule assembly, DNA replication and repair, nuclear RNA export, apoptosis, and the detection of nitric oxide stress. Therefore, modifications in the regulatory ability and function of GAPDH may alter cellular homeostasis. We report here that 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) and beta-naphthoflavone, which are well-known ligands for the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), increase GAPDH mRNA levels in vivo and in vitro, respectively. These compounds fail to induce GAPDH transcription in an AhR-null mouse model, suggesting that the increase in GAPDH level is dependent upon AhR activation. To analyse the consequences of AhR ligands on GAPDH function, mice were treated with TCDD and the level of liver activity of GAPDH was determined. The results showed that TCDD treatment increased GAPDH activity. On the other hand, treatment of Hepa-1 cells with beta-naphthoflavone leads to an increase in microfilament density when compared to untreated cultures. Collectively, these results suggest that AhR ligands, such as polycyclic hydrocarbons, can modify GAPDH expression and, therefore, have the potential to alter the multiple functions of this enzyme.

  10. USE OF THE TEQ MODEL FOR ASSESSING AHR MEDIATED TOXICITY RISKS TO POPULATIONS OF LAKE TROUT AND OTHER SPECIES IN LAKE ONTARIO

    EPA Science Inventory

    The toxicity equivalence (TEQ) model for assessing aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) mediated toxicity risks associated with polyhalogenated aromatic chemicals structurally similar to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) has been applied to human health risks for more than 15...

  11. Effects of artificial sweeteners on the AhR- and GR-dependent CYP1A1 expression in primary human hepatocytes and human cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kamenickova, Alzbeta; Pecova, Michaela; Bachleda, Petr; Dvorak, Zdenek

    2013-12-01

    Food constituents may cause a phenomenon of food-drug interactions. In the current study, we examined the effects of artificial sweeteners (aspartame, acesulfame, cyclamate, saccharin) on the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) and glucocorticoid receptor (GR)-dependent expression of CYP1A1 in human hepatocytes, hepatic HepG2 and intestinal LS174T cancer cell lines. Sweeteners were tested in concentrations up to those occurring in non-alcoholic beverages. Basal and ligand-inducible AhR- and GR-dependent reporter gene activation in stably transfected HepG2 and HeLa cells, respectively, were not affected by either of the sweeteners tested after 24h of incubation. The expression of CYP1A1 mRNA and protein in primary cultures of human hepatocytes and in LS174T and HepG2 cells was not induced by any of the tested sweeteners. Overall, aspartame, acesulfame, saccharin and cyclamate had no effects on CYP1A1 expression and transcriptional activities of AhR and GR. These data imply the safety of artificial sweeteners in terms of interference with AhR, GR and CYP1A1.

  12. Deciphering Dimerization Modes of PAS Domains: Computational and Experimental Analyses of the AhR:ARNT Complex Reveal New Insights Into the Mechanisms of AhR Transformation

    PubMed Central

    Corrada, Dario; Soshilov, Anatoly A.; Denison, Michael S.

    2016-01-01

    The Aryl hydrocarbon Receptor (AhR) is a transcription factor that mediates the biochemical response to xenobiotics and the toxic effects of a number of environmental contaminants, including dioxins. Recently, endogenous regulatory roles for the AhR in normal physiology and development have also been reported, thus extending the interest in understanding its molecular mechanisms of activation. Since dimerization with the AhR Nuclear Translocator (ARNT) protein, occurring through the Helix-Loop-Helix (HLH) and PER-ARNT-SIM (PAS) domains, is needed to convert the AhR into its transcriptionally active form, deciphering the AhR:ARNT dimerization mode would provide insights into the mechanisms of AhR transformation. Here we present homology models of the murine AhR:ARNT PAS domain dimer developed using recently available X-ray structures of other bHLH-PAS protein dimers. Due to the different reciprocal orientation and interaction surfaces in the different template dimers, two alternative models were developed for both the PAS-A and PAS-B dimers and they were characterized by combining a number of computational evaluations. Both well-established hot spot prediction methods and new approaches to analyze individual residue and residue-pairwise contributions to the MM-GBSA binding free energies were adopted to predict residues critical for dimer stabilization. On this basis, a mutagenesis strategy for both the murine AhR and ARNT proteins was designed and ligand-dependent DNA binding ability of the AhR:ARNT heterodimer mutants was evaluated. While functional analysis disfavored the HIF2α:ARNT heterodimer-based PAS-B model, most mutants derived from the CLOCK:BMAL1-based AhR:ARNT dimer models of both the PAS-A and the PAS-B dramatically decreased the levels of DNA binding, suggesting this latter model as the most suitable for describing AhR:ARNT dimerization. These novel results open new research directions focused at elucidating basic molecular mechanisms underlying the

  13. AHR2 knockdown prevents PAH-mediated cardiac toxicity and XRE- and ARE-associated gene induction in zebrafish (Danio rerio)

    SciTech Connect

    Van Tiem, Lindsey A.; Di Giulio, Richard T.

    2011-08-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are ubiquitous environmental contaminants often present in aquatic systems as complex mixtures. Embryonic fish are sensitive to the developmental toxicity of some PAHs, but the exact mechanisms involved in this toxicity are still unknown. This study explored the role of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) in the oxidative stress response of zebrafish to the embryotoxicity of select PAHs. Embryos were exposed to two PAHs, benzo[k]fluoranthene (BkF; a strong AHR agonist) and fluoranthene (FL; a cytochrome P4501A (CYP1A) inhibitor), alone and in combination. CYP1A, CYP1B1, CYP1C1, and redox-responsive genes glutathione s-transferase pi 2 (GSTp2), glutathione peroxidase 1 (GPx1), the glutamate-cysteine ligase catalytic subunit (GCLc), MnSOD and CuZnSOD mRNA expression was examined. CYP1 activity was measured via an in vivo ethoxyresorufin-O-deethlyase (EROD) activity assay, and the area of the pericardium was measured as an index of cardiotoxicity. BkF or FL alone caused no deformities whereas BkF + FL resulted in extreme pericardial effusion. BkF induced CYP activity above controls and co-exposure with FL inhibited this activity. BkF induced expression of all three CYPs, GSTp2, and GCLc. BkF + FL caused greater than additive induction of the three CYPs, GSTp2, GPx1, and GCLc but had no effect on MnSOD or CuZnSOD. AHR2 knockdown protected against the cardiac deformities caused by BkF + FL and significantly inhibited the induction of the CYPs, GSTp2, GPx1, and GCLc after BkF + FL compared to non-injected controls. These results further show the protective role of AHR2 knockdown against cardiotoxic PAHs and the role of AHR2 as a mediator of redox-responsive gene induction. - Research Highlights: > Co-exposure of the PAHs BkF and FL causes cardiotoxicity in zebrafish. > BkF and FL co-exposure upregulates certain XRE- and ARE-associated genes. > AHR2 knockdown prevents the deformities caused by BkF and FL co-exposure. > AHR2

  14. Ahr2-dependence of PCB126 effects on the swim bladder in relation to expression of CYP1 and cox-2 genes in developing zebrafish

    SciTech Connect

    Jönsson, Maria E.; Kubota, Akira; Timme-Laragy, Alicia R.; Woodin, Bruce; Stegeman, John J.

    2012-12-01

    The teleost swim bladder is assumed a homolog of the tetrapod lung. Both swim bladder and lung are developmental targets of persistent aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) agonists; in zebrafish (Danio rerio) the swim bladder fails to inflate with exposure to 3,3′,4,4′,5-pentachlorobiphenyl (PCB126). The mechanism for this effect is unknown, but studies have suggested roles of cytochrome P450 1 (CYP1) and cyclooxygenase 2 (Cox-2) in some Ahr-mediated developmental effects in zebrafish. We determined relationships between swim bladder inflation and CYP1 and Cox-2 mRNA expression in PCB126-exposed zebrafish embryos. We also examined effects on β-catenin dependent transcription, histological effects, and Ahr2 dependence of the effect of PCB126 on swim bladder using morpholinos targeting ahr2. One-day-old embryos were exposed to waterborne PCB126 or carrier (DMSO) for 24 h and then held in clean water until day 4, a normal time for swim bladder inflation. The effects of PCB126 were concentration-dependent with EC{sub 50} values of 1.4 to 2.0 nM for induction of the CYP1s, 3.7 and 5.1 nM (or higher) for cox-2a and cox-2b induction, and 2.5 nM for inhibition of swim bladder inflation. Histological defects included a compaction of the developing bladder. Ahr2-morpholino treatment rescued the effect of PCB126 (5 nM) on swim bladder inflation and blocked induction of CYP1A, cox-2a, and cox-2b. With 2 nM PCB126 approximately 30% of eleutheroembryos failed to inflate the swim bladder, but there was no difference in CYP1 or cox-2 mRNA expression between those embryos and embryos showing inflated swim bladder. Our results indicate that PCB126 blocks swim bladder inflation via an Ahr2-mediated mechanism. This mechanism seems independent of CYP1 or cox-2 mRNA induction but may involve abnormal development of swim bladder cells. -- Highlights: ► PCB126 caused cellular changes in the developing swim bladder. ► Swim bladder inflation was not related to expression of CYP1 or cox

  15. Evaluation of the Enterococcus faecalis Biofilm-Associated Virulence Factors AhrC and Eep in Rat Foreign Body Osteomyelitis and In Vitro Biofilm-Associated Antimicrobial Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Kristi L.; Vergidis, Paschalis; Brinkman, Cassandra L.; Greenwood Quaintance, Kerryl E.; Barnes, Aaron M. T.; Mandrekar, Jayawant N.; Schlievert, Patrick M.; Dunny, Gary M.; Patel, Robin

    2015-01-01

    Enterococcus faecalis can cause healthcare-associated biofilm infections, including those of orthopedic devices. Treatment of enterococcal prosthetic joint infection is difficult, in part, due to biofilm-associated antimicrobial resistance. We previously showed that the E. faecalis OG1RF genes ahrC and eep are in vitro biofilm determinants and virulence factors in animal models of endocarditis and catheter-associated urinary tract infection. In this study, we evaluated the role of these genes in a rat acute foreign body osteomyelitis model and in in vitro biofilm-associated antimicrobial resistance. Osteomyelitis was established for one week following the implantation of stainless steel orthopedic wires inoculated with E. faecalis strains OG1RF, ΩahrC, and ∆eep into the proximal tibiae of rats. The median bacterial loads recovered from bones and wires did not differ significantly between the strains at multiple inoculum concentrations. We hypothesize that factors present at the infection site that affect biofilm formation, such as the presence or absence of shear force, may account for the differences in attenuation in the various animal models we have used to study the ΩahrC and ∆eep strains. No differences among the three strains were observed in the planktonic and biofilm antimicrobial susceptibilities to ampicillin, vancomycin, daptomycin, linezolid, and tetracycline. These findings suggest that neither ahrC nor eep directly contribute to E. faecalis biofilm-associated antimicrobial resistance. Notably, the experimental evidence that the biofilm attachment mutant ΩahrC displays biofilm-associated antimicrobial resistance suggests that surface colonization alone is sufficient for E. faecalis cells to acquire the biofilm antimicrobial resistance phenotype. PMID:26076451

  16. In Utero and Lactational Exposure to a Complex Mixture of Polychlorinated Biphenyls: Toxicity in Pups Dependent on the Cyp1a2 and Ahr Genotypes

    PubMed Central

    Curran, Christine P.; Vorhees, Charles V.; Williams, Michael T.; Genter, Mary Beth; Miller, Marian L.; Nebert, Daniel W.

    2011-01-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are persistent toxic pollutants occurring as complex mixtures in the environment. Humans are known genetically to have > 60-fold differences in hepatic cytochrome P450 1A2 (CYP1A2) levels and > 12-fold differences in aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) affinity, both of which could affect PCB pharmacokinetics. Thus, we compared Ahrb1_Cyp1a2(+/+) high-affinity AHR wild-type, Ahrd_Cyp1a2(+/+) poor affinity AHR wild-type, Ahrb1_Cyp1a2(−/−) knockout, and Ahrd_Cyp1a2(−/−) knockout mouse lines. We chose a mixture of three coplanar and five noncoplanar PCBs to reproduce that seen in human tissues, breast milk, and the food supply. The mixture was given by gavage to the mother on gestational day 10.5 (GD10.5) and postnatal day 5 (PND5); tissues were collected from pups and mothers at GD11.5, GD18.5, PND6, PND13, and PND28. Ahrb1_Cyp1a2(−/−) pups showed lower weight at birth and slower rate of growth postnatally. Absence of CYP1A2 resulted in significant splenic atrophy at PND13 and PND28. Presence of high-affinity AHR enhanced thymic atrophy and liver hypertrophy in the pups. Concentrations of each congener were analyzed at all time points: maximal noncoplanar congener levels in maternal tissues were observed from GD18 until PND6, whereas the highest levels in pups were found between PND6 and PND28. Coplanar PCB concentrations were generally higher in Ahrd-containing pup tissues; these findings are consistent with earlier studies demonstrating the crucial importance of AHR-mediated inducible CYP1 in the gastrointestinal tract as a means of detoxication of oral planar polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. PMID:20961953

  17. Evaluation of the Enterococcus faecalis Biofilm-Associated Virulence Factors AhrC and Eep in Rat Foreign Body Osteomyelitis and In Vitro Biofilm-Associated Antimicrobial Resistance.

    PubMed

    Frank, Kristi L; Vergidis, Paschalis; Brinkman, Cassandra L; Greenwood Quaintance, Kerryl E; Barnes, Aaron M T; Mandrekar, Jayawant N; Schlievert, Patrick M; Dunny, Gary M; Patel, Robin

    2015-01-01

    Enterococcus faecalis can cause healthcare-associated biofilm infections, including those of orthopedic devices. Treatment of enterococcal prosthetic joint infection is difficult, in part, due to biofilm-associated antimicrobial resistance. We previously showed that the E. faecalis OG1RF genes ahrC and eep are in vitro biofilm determinants and virulence factors in animal models of endocarditis and catheter-associated urinary tract infection. In this study, we evaluated the role of these genes in a rat acute foreign body osteomyelitis model and in in vitro biofilm-associated antimicrobial resistance. Osteomyelitis was established for one week following the implantation of stainless steel orthopedic wires inoculated with E. faecalis strains OG1RF, ΩahrC, and ∆eep into the proximal tibiae of rats. The median bacterial loads recovered from bones and wires did not differ significantly between the strains at multiple inoculum concentrations. We hypothesize that factors present at the infection site that affect biofilm formation, such as the presence or absence of shear force, may account for the differences in attenuation in the various animal models we have used to study the ΩahrC and ∆eep strains. No differences among the three strains were observed in the planktonic and biofilm antimicrobial susceptibilities to ampicillin, vancomycin, daptomycin, linezolid, and tetracycline. These findings suggest that neither ahrC nor eep directly contribute to E. faecalis biofilm-associated antimicrobial resistance. Notably, the experimental evidence that the biofilm attachment mutant ΩahrC displays biofilm-associated antimicrobial resistance suggests that surface colonization alone is sufficient for E. faecalis cells to acquire the biofilm antimicrobial resistance phenotype.

  18. Mixed-ligand copper(II) complexes activate aryl hydrocarbon receptor AhR and induce CYP1A genes expression in human hepatocytes and human cell lines.

    PubMed

    Kubešová, Kateřina; Dořičáková, Aneta; Trávníček, Zdeněk; Dvořák, Zdeněk

    2016-07-25

    The effects of four copper(II) mixed-ligand complexes [Cu(qui1)(L)]NO3·H2O (1-3) and [Cu(qui2)(phen)]NO3 (4), where qui1=2-phenyl-3-hydroxy-4(1H)-quinolinone, Hqui2=2-(4-amino-3,5-dichlorophenyl)-N-propyl-3-hydroxy-4(1H)-quinolinone-7-carboxamide, L=1,10-phenanthroline (phen) (1), 5-methyl-1,10-phenanthroline (mphen) (2), bathophenanthroline (bphen) (3), on transcriptional activities of steroid receptors, nuclear receptors and xenoreceptors have been studied. The complexes (1-4) did not influence basal or ligand-inducible activities of glucocorticoid receptor, androgen receptor, thyroid receptor, pregnane X receptor and vitamin D receptor, as revealed by gene reporter assays. The complexes 1 and 2 dose-dependently induced luciferase activity in stable gene reporter AZ-AhR cell line, and this induction was reverted by resveratrol, indicating involvement of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) in the process. The complexes 1, 2 and 3 induced CYP1A1 mRNA in LS180 cells and CYP1A1/CYP1A2 in human hepatocytes through AhR. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay EMSA showed that the complexes 1 and 2 transformed AhR in its DNA-binding form. Collectively, we demonstrate that the complexes 1 and 2 activate AhR and induce AhR-dependent genes in human hepatocytes and cancer cell lines. In conclusion, the data presented here might be of toxicological importance, regarding the multiple roles of AhR in human physiology and pathophysiology. PMID:27180721

  19. Evidence-Based Structural Model of the Staphylococcal Repressor Protein: Separation of Functions into Different Domains

    PubMed Central

    Nyíri, Kinga; Kőhegyi, Bianka; Micsonai, András; Kardos, József; Vertessy, Beata G.

    2015-01-01

    Horizontal transfer of mobile genetic elements within Staphylococci is of high biomedical significance as such elements are frequently responsible for virulence and toxic effects. Staphylococcus-encoded repressor proteins regulate the replication of these mobile genetic elements that are located within the so-called pathogenicity islands. Here, we report structural and functional characterization of one such repressor protein, namely the Stl protein encoded by the pathogenicity island SaPIbov1. We create a 3D structural model and based on this prediction, we investigate the different functionalities of truncated and point mutant constructs. Results suggest that a helix-turn-helix motif governs the interaction of the Stl protein with its cognate DNA site: point mutations within this motif drastically decrease DNA-binding ability, whereas the interaction with the Stl-binding partner protein dUTPase is unperturbed by these point mutations. The 3D model also suggested the potential independent folding of a carboxy-terminal domain. This suggestion was fully verified by independent experiments revealing that the carboxy-terminal domain does not bind to DNA but is still capable of binding to and inhibiting dUTPase. A general model is proposed, which suggests that among the several structurally different repressor superfamilies Stl-like Staphylococcal repressor proteins belong to the helix-turn-helix transcription factor group and the HTH motif is suggested to reside within N-terminal segment. PMID:26414067

  20. Loss of floral repressor function adapts rice to higher latitudes in Europe

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Ariza, Jorge; Galbiati, Francesca; Goretti, Daniela; Brambilla, Vittoria; Shrestha, Roshi; Pappolla, Andrea; Courtois, Brigitte; Fornara, Fabio

    2015-01-01

    The capacity to discriminate variations in day length allows plants to align flowering with the most favourable season of the year. This capacity has been altered by artificial selection when cultivated varieties became adapted to environments different from those of initial domestication. Rice flowering is promoted by short days when HEADING DATE 1 (Hd1) and EARLY HEADING DATE 1 (Ehd1) induce the expression of florigenic proteins encoded by HEADING DATE 3a (Hd3a) and RICE FLOWERING LOCUS T 1 (RFT1). Repressors of flowering antagonize such induction under long days, maintaining vegetative growth and delaying flowering. To what extent artificial selection of long day repressor loci has contributed to expand rice cultivation to Europe is currently unclear. This study demonstrates that European varieties activate both Hd3a and RFT1 expression regardless of day length and their induction is caused by loss-of-function mutations at major long day floral repressors. However, their contribution to flowering time control varies between locations. Pyramiding of mutations is frequently observed in European germplasm, but single mutations are sufficient to adapt rice to flower at higher latitudes. Expression of Ehd1 is increased in varieties showing reduced or null Hd1 expression under natural long days, as well as in single hd1 mutants in isogenic backgrounds. These data indicate that loss of repressor genes has been a key strategy to expand rice cultivation to Europe, and that Ehd1 is a central node integrating floral repressive signals. PMID:25732533

  1. Radiation-induced oxidative damage to the DNA-binding domain of the lactose repressor.

    PubMed

    Gillard, Nathalie; Goffinont, Stephane; Buré, Corinne; Davidkova, Marie; Maurizot, Jean-Claude; Cadene, Martine; Spotheim-Maurizot, Melanie

    2007-05-01

    Understanding the cellular effects of radiation-induced oxidation requires the unravelling of key molecular events, particularly damage to proteins with important cellular functions. The Escherichia coli lactose operon is a classical model of gene regulation systems. Its functional mechanism involves the specific binding of a protein, the repressor, to a specific DNA sequence, the operator. We have shown previously that upon irradiation with gamma-rays in solution, the repressor loses its ability to bind the operator. Water radiolysis generates hydroxyl radicals (OH* radicals) which attack the protein. Damage of the repressor DNA-binding domain, called the headpiece, is most likely to be responsible of this loss of function. Using CD, fluorescence spectroscopy and a combination of proteolytic cleavage with MS, we have examined the state of the irradiated headpiece. CD measurements revealed a dose-dependent conformational change involving metastable intermediate states. Fluorescence measurements showed a gradual degradation of tyrosine residues. MS was used to count the number of oxidations in different regions of the headpiece and to narrow down the parts of the sequence bearing oxidized residues. By calculating the relative probabilities of reaction of each amino acid with OH. radicals, we can predict the most probable oxidation targets. By comparing the experimental results with the predictions we conclude that Tyr7, Tyr12, Tyr17, Met42 and Tyr47 are the most likely hotspots of oxidation. The loss of repressor function is thus correlated with chemical modifications and conformational changes of the headpiece. PMID:17263689

  2. Weak operator binding enhances simulated Lac repressor-mediated DNA looping.

    PubMed

    Colasanti, Andrew V; Grosner, Michael A; Perez, Pamela J; Clauvelin, Nicolas; Lu, Xiang-Jun; Olson, Wilma K

    2013-12-01

    The 50th anniversary of Biopolymers coincides closely with the like celebration of the discovery of the Escherichia coli (lac) lactose operon, a classic genetic system long used to illustrate the influence of biomolecular structure on function. The looping of DNA induced by the binding of the Lac repressor protein to sequentially distant operator sites on DNA continues to serve as a paradigm for understanding long-range genomic communication. Advances in analyses of DNA structures and in incorporation of proteins in computer simulations of DNA looping allow us to address long-standing questions about the role of protein-mediated DNA loop formation in transcriptional control. Here we report insights gained from studies of the sequence-dependent contributions of the natural lac operators to Lac repressor-mediated DNA looping. Novel superposition of the ensembles of protein-bound operator structures derived from NMR measurements reveals variations in DNA folding missed in conventional structural alignments. The changes in folding affect the predicted ease with which the repressor induces loop formation and the ways that DNA closes between the protein headpieces. The peeling of the auxiliary operators away from the repressor enhances the formation of loops with the 92-bp wildtype spacing and hints of a structural reason behind their weak binding. PMID:23818216

  3. In vitro transcription accurately predicts lac repressor phenotype in vivo in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    A multitude of studies have looked at the in vivo and in vitro behavior of the lac repressor binding to DNA and effector molecules in order to study transcriptional repression, however these studies are not always reconcilable. Here we use in vitro transcription to directly mimic the in vivo system in order to build a self consistent set of experiments to directly compare in vivo and in vitro genetic repression. A thermodynamic model of the lac repressor binding to operator DNA and effector is used to link DNA occupancy to either normalized in vitro mRNA product or normalized in vivo fluorescence of a regulated gene, YFP. An accurate measurement of repressor, DNA and effector concentrations were made both in vivo and in vitro allowing for direct modeling of the entire thermodynamic equilibrium. In vivo repression profiles are accurately predicted from the given in vitro parameters when molecular crowding is considered. Interestingly, our measured repressor–operator DNA affinity differs significantly from previous in vitro measurements. The literature values are unable to replicate in vivo binding data. We therefore conclude that the repressor-DNA affinity is much weaker than previously thought. This finding would suggest that in vitro techniques that are specifically designed to mimic the in vivo process may be necessary to replicate the native system. PMID:25097824

  4. Radiation-induced oxidative damage to the DNA-binding domain of the lactose repressor

    PubMed Central

    Gillard, Nathalie; Goffinont, Stephane; Buré, Corinne; Davidkova, Marie; Maurizot, Jean-Claude; Cadene, Martine; Spotheim-Maurizot, Melanie

    2007-01-01

    Understanding the cellular effects of radiation-induced oxidation requires the unravelling of key molecular events, particularly damage to proteins with important cellular functions. The Escherichia coli lactose operon is a classical model of gene regulation systems. Its functional mechanism involves the specific binding of a protein, the repressor, to a specific DNA sequence, the operator. We have shown previously that upon irradiation with γ-rays in solution, the repressor loses its ability to bind the operator. Water radiolysis generates hydroxyl radicals (OH· radicals) which attack the protein. Damage of the repressor DNA-binding domain, called the headpiece, is most likely to be responsible of this loss of function. Using CD, fluorescence spectroscopy and a combination of proteolytic cleavage with MS, we have examined the state of the irradiated headpiece. CD measurements revealed a dose-dependent conformational change involving metastable intermediate states. Fluorescence measurements showed a gradual degradation of tyrosine residues. MS was used to count the number of oxidations in different regions of the headpiece and to narrow down the parts of the sequence bearing oxidized residues. By calculating the relative probabilities of reaction of each amino acid with OH· radicals, we can predict the most probable oxidation targets. By comparing the experimental results with the predictions we conclude that Tyr7, Tyr12, Tyr17, Met42 and Tyr47 are the most likely hotspots of oxidation. The loss of repressor function is thus correlated with chemical modifications and conformational changes of the headpiece. PMID:17263689

  5. Dynamical behavior of the activator-repressor circuit model under random fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jae Kwan; Cinar, Ali; Duan, Jinqiao

    2011-04-01

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate possible impact of uncertainty on dynamical evolution of an activator-repressor circuit model, for some gene regulatory networks. Escape probability and mean residence time are computed in order to gain insights on the role played by random fluctuations. Some changes or bifurcations in mean residence time are also observed when key model parameters vary.

  6. Effects of Task Familiarity on Stress Responses of Repressors and Sensitizers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pagano, Don F.

    1973-01-01

    R.S. Lazarus's theory of coping was used to investigate appraisal and reappraisal of threat in repressors and sensitizers. Two indexes of stress, self-report ratings of affect and palmar skin conductance, were measured prior to performance on a reaction time task, after one-third of the task was completed and after two-thirds of the task was…

  7. Noncanonical DNA-binding mode of repressor and its disassembly by antirepressor

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Minsik; Kim, Hee Jung; Son, Sang Hyeon; Yoon, Hye Jin; Lim, Youngbin; Lee, Jong Woo; Seok, Yeong-Jae; Jin, Kyeong Sik; Yu, Yeon Gyu; Kim, Seong Keun; Ryu, Sangryeol; Lee, Hyung Ho

    2016-01-01

    DNA-binding repressors are involved in transcriptional repression in many organisms. Disabling a repressor is a crucial step in activating expression of desired genes. Thus, several mechanisms have been identified for the removal of a stably bound repressor (Rep) from the operator. Here, we describe an uncharacterized mechanism of noncanonical DNA binding and induction by a Rep from the temperate Salmonella phage SPC32H; this mechanism was revealed using the crystal structures of homotetrameric Rep (92–198) and a hetero-octameric complex between the Rep and its antirepressor (Ant). The canonical method of inactivating a repressor is through the competitive binding of the antirepressor to the operator-binding site of the repressor; however, these studies revealed several noncanonical features. First, Ant does not compete for the DNA-binding region of Rep. Instead, the tetrameric Ant binds to the C-terminal domains of two asymmetric Rep dimers. Simultaneously, Ant facilitates the binding of the Rep N-terminal domains to Ant, resulting in the release of two Rep dimers from the bound DNA. Second, the dimer pairs of the N-terminal DNA-binding domains originate from different dimers of a Rep tetramer (trans model). This situation is different from that of other canonical Reps, in which two N-terminal DNA-binding domains from the same dimeric unit form a dimer upon DNA binding (cis model). On the basis of these observations, we propose a noncanonical model for the reversible inactivation of a Rep by an Ant. PMID:27099293

  8. Ahr2-dependence of PCB126 effects on the swim bladder in relation to expression of CYP1 and cox-2 genes in developing zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Jönsson, Maria E; Kubota, Akira; Timme-Laragy, Alicia R; Woodin, Bruce; Stegeman, John J

    2012-12-01

    The teleost swim bladder is assumed a homolog of the tetrapod lung. Both swim bladder and lung are developmental targets of persistent aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR(2)) agonists; in zebrafish (Danio rerio) the swim bladder fails to inflate with exposure to 3,3',4,4',5-pentachlorobiphenyl (PCB126). The mechanism for this effect is unknown, but studies have suggested roles of cytochrome P450 1 (CYP1) and cyclooxygenase 2 (Cox-2) in some Ahr-mediated developmental effects in zebrafish. We determined relationships between swim bladder inflation and CYP1 and Cox-2 mRNA expression in PCB126-exposed zebrafish embryos. We also examined effects on β-catenin dependent transcription, histological effects, and Ahr2 dependence of the effect of PCB126 on swim bladder using morpholinos targeting ahr2. One-day-old embryos were exposed to waterborne PCB126 or carrier (DMSO) for 24h and then held in clean water until day 4, a normal time for swim bladder inflation. The effects of PCB126 were concentration-dependent with EC(50) values of 1.4 to 2.0 nM for induction of the CYP1s, 3.7 and 5.1 nM (or higher) for cox-2a and cox-2b induction, and 2.5 nM for inhibition of swim bladder inflation. Histological defects included a compaction of the developing bladder. Ahr2-morpholino treatment rescued the effect of PCB126 (5 nM) on swim bladder inflation and blocked induction of CYP1A, cox-2a, and cox-2b. With 2nM PCB126 approximately 30% of eleutheroembryos(3) failed to inflate the swim bladder, but there was no difference in CYP1 or cox-2 mRNA expression between those embryos and embryos showing inflated swim bladder. Our results indicate that PCB126 blocks swim bladder inflation via an Ahr2-mediated mechanism. This mechanism seems independent of CYP1 or cox-2 mRNA induction but may involve abnormal development of swim bladder cells.

  9. Effects of Developmental Activation of the AhR on CD4+ T-Cell Responses to Influenza Virus Infection in Adult Mice

    PubMed Central

    Boule, Lisbeth A.; Winans, Bethany

    2014-01-01

    Background: Epidemiological and animal studies indicate that maternal exposure to pollutants that bind the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) correlates with poorer ability to combat respiratory infection and lower antibody levels in the offspring. These observations point to an impact on CD4+ T cells. Yet, the consequence of developmental exposure to AhR ligands on the activation and differentiation of CD4+ T cells has not been directly examined. Objectives: Our goal was to determine whether maternal exposure to an AhR ligand directly alters CD4+ T cell differentiation and function later in life. Methods: C57BL/6 mice were exposed to a prototypical AhR ligand, 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), in utero and via suckling. We then measured CD4+ T-cell activation and differentiation into distinct effector populations in adult offspring that were infected with influenza A virus (IAV). Reciprocal adoptive transfers were used to define whether modifications in CD4+ T-cell responses resulted from direct effects of developmental TCDD exposure on CD4+ T cells. Results: Developmental exposure skewed CD4+ T-cell responses to IAV infection. We observed fewer virus-specific, activated CD4+ T cells and a reduced frequency of conventional CD4+ effector-cell subsets. However, there was an increase in regulatory CD4+ T cells. Direct effects of AhR activation on CD4+ T cells resulted in impaired differentiation into conventional effector subsets; this defect was transferred to mice that had not been developmentally exposed to TCDD. Conclusions: Maternal exposure to TCDD resulted in durable changes in the responsive capacity and differentiation of CD4+ T cells in adult C57BL/6 mice. Citation: Boule LA, Winans B, Lawrence BP. 2014. Effects of developmental activation of the AhR on CD4+ T-cell responses to influenza virus infection in adult mice. Environ Health Perspect 122:1201–1208; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1408110 PMID:25051576

  10. Situational Discrimination in Repressor-type and Sensitizer-type Approval Seekers and the Birth Order by Subject Sex Interaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Becker, Gilbert

    1970-01-01

    Five experiments are reported. One conclusion in that repressor-type high need-for-approval subjects made the discrimination and permitted less favorable self-description, but sensitizer-type high need-for-approval subjects did not. (DB)

  11. ARA67/PAT1 Functions as a Repressor To Suppress Androgen Receptor Transactivation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yanqing; Yang, Yue; Yeh, Shuyuan; Chang, Chawnshang

    2004-01-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) may recruit multiple coregulators for proper or optimal transactivation. Here we report the identification and characterization of ARA67/PAT1 as an AR coregulator from a prostate cDNA library. ARA67/PAT1 was screened out as an AR N terminus interacting protein. Interaction mapping shows that the cooperation of multiple domains within ARA67/PAT1 may be required for the maximal interaction with AR. ARA67/PAT1 functions as a repressor with better suppressive effects on AR compared to glucocorticoid receptor and estrogen receptor. Further mechanism dissection reveals that the interrupted AR cytoplasmic-nuclear shuttling may play a major role in ARA67/PAT1 mediated suppression on AR. Together, these results suggest that ARA67/PAT1 may function as a novel repressor that can modulate AR function in prostate cancer. PMID:14729952

  12. The DNA replication and damage checkpoint pathways induce transcription by inhibition of the Crt1 repressor.

    PubMed

    Huang, M; Zhou, Z; Elledge, S J

    1998-09-01

    We have identified the yeast CRT1 gene as an effector of the DNA damage and replication checkpoint pathway. CRT1 encodes a DNA-binding protein that recruits the general repressors Ssn6 and Tup1 to the promoters of damage-inducible genes. Derepression of the Crt1 regulon suppresses the lethality of mec1 and rad53 null alleles and is essential for cell viability during replicative stress. In response to DNA damage and replication blocks, Crt1 becomes hyperphosphorylated and no longer binds DNA, resulting in transcriptional induction. CRT1 is autoregulated and is itself induced by DNA damage, indicating the existence of a negative feedback pathway that facilitates return to the repressed state after elimination of damage. The inhibition of an autoregulatory repressor in response to DNA damage is a strategy conserved throughout prokaryotic and eukaryotic evolution.

  13. The lactose repressor system: paradigms for regulation, allosteric behavior and protein folding.

    PubMed

    Wilson, C J; Zhan, H; Swint-Kruse, L; Matthews, K S

    2007-01-01

    In 1961, Jacob and Monod proposed the operon model for gene regulation based on metabolism of lactose in Escherichia coli. This proposal was followed by an explication of allosteric behavior by Monod and colleagues. The operon model rationally depicted how genetic mechanisms can control metabolic events in response to environmental stimuli via coordinated transcription of a set of genes with related function (e.g. metabolism of lactose). The allosteric response found in the lactose repressor and many other proteins has been extended to a variety of cellular signaling pathways in all organisms. These two models have shaped our view of modern molecular biology and captivated the attention of a surprisingly broad range of scientists. More recently, the lactose repressor monomer was used as a model system for experimental and theoretical explorations of protein folding mechanisms. Thus, the lac system continues to advance our molecular understanding of genetic control and the relationship between sequence, structure and function. PMID:17103112

  14. The non-JAZ TIFY protein TIFY8 from Arabidopsis thaliana is a transcriptional repressor.

    PubMed

    Cuéllar Pérez, Amparo; Nagels Durand, Astrid; Vanden Bossche, Robin; De Clercq, Rebecca; Persiau, Geert; Van Wees, Saskia C M; Pieterse, Corné M J; Gevaert, Kris; De Jaeger, Geert; Goossens, Alain; Pauwels, Laurens

    2014-01-01

    Jasmonate (JA) signalling is mediated by the JASMONATE-ZIM DOMAIN (JAZ) repressor proteins, which are degraded upon JA perception to release downstream responses. The ZIM protein domain is characteristic of the larger TIFY protein family. It is currently unknown if the atypical member TIFY8 is involved in JA signalling. Here we show that the TIFY8 ZIM domain is functional and mediated interaction with PEAPOD proteins and NINJA. TIFY8 interacted with TOPLESS through NINJA and accordingly acted as a transcriptional repressor. TIFY8 expression was inversely correlated with JAZ expression during development and after infection with Pseudomonas syringae. Nevertheless, transgenic lines with altered TIFY8 expression did not show changes in JA sensitivity. Despite the functional ZIM domain, no interaction with JAZ proteins could be found. In contrast, TIFY8 was found in protein complexes involved in regulation of dephosphorylation, deubiquitination and O-linked N-acetylglucosamine modification suggesting an important role in nuclear signal transduction.

  15. Arabidopsis transcriptional repressor VAL1 triggers Polycomb silencing at FLC during vernalization.

    PubMed

    Qüesta, Julia I; Song, Jie; Geraldo, Nuno; An, Hailong; Dean, Caroline

    2016-07-29

    The determinants that specify the genomic targets of Polycomb silencing complexes are still unclear. Polycomb silencing of Arabidopsis FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC) accelerates flowering and involves a cold-dependent epigenetic switch. Here we identify a single point mutation at an intragenic nucleation site within FLC that prevents this epigenetic switch from taking place. The mutation blocks nucleation of plant homeodomain-Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PHD-PRC2) and indicates a role for the transcriptional repressor VAL1 in the silencing mechanism. VAL1 localizes to the nucleation region in vivo, promoting histone deacetylation and FLC transcriptional silencing, and interacts with components of the conserved apoptosis- and splicing-associated protein (ASAP) complex. Sequence-specific targeting of transcriptional repressors thus recruits the machinery for PHD-PRC2 nucleation and epigenetic silencing.

  16. The Non-JAZ TIFY Protein TIFY8 from Arabidopsis thaliana Is a Transcriptional Repressor

    PubMed Central

    Cuéllar Pérez, Amparo; Nagels Durand, Astrid; Vanden Bossche, Robin; De Clercq, Rebecca; Persiau, Geert; Van Wees, Saskia C. M.; Pieterse, Corné M. J.; Gevaert, Kris; De Jaeger, Geert; Goossens, Alain; Pauwels, Laurens

    2014-01-01

    Jasmonate (JA) signalling is mediated by the JASMONATE-ZIM DOMAIN (JAZ) repressor proteins, which are degraded upon JA perception to release downstream responses. The ZIM protein domain is characteristic of the larger TIFY protein family. It is currently unknown if the atypical member TIFY8 is involved in JA signalling. Here we show that the TIFY8 ZIM domain is functional and mediated interaction with PEAPOD proteins and NINJA. TIFY8 interacted with TOPLESS through NINJA and accordingly acted as a transcriptional repressor. TIFY8 expression was inversely correlated with JAZ expression during development and after infection with Pseudomonas syringae. Nevertheless, transgenic lines with altered TIFY8 expression did not show changes in JA sensitivity. Despite the functional ZIM domain, no interaction with JAZ proteins could be found. In contrast, TIFY8 was found in protein complexes involved in regulation of dephosphorylation, deubiquitination and O-linked N-acetylglucosamine modification suggesting an important role in nuclear signal transduction. PMID:24416306

  17. cAMP inducibility of transcriptional repressor ICER in developing and mature human T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Bodor, J; Spetz, A L; Strominger, J L; Habener, J F

    1996-04-16

    Stimulation of the cAMP-dependent signaling pathway exerts an inhibitory effect on the proliferation and effector functions of T cells. The ability of T cells to form high intracellular levels of cAMP is acquired during development in the human thymus and is retained by the majority of mature peripheral T lymphocytes. Here we show that elevated cAMP levels in T cells correlate with the expression of the potent transcriptional repressor ICER (inducible cAMP early repressor) previously described in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. Further, in transcriptional assays in vivo, ICER inhibits calcineurin-mediated expression of the interleukin 2 promoter as well as Tax-mediated transactivation of the human T-lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I) promoter. Thus, the induction of ICER in T cells may play an important role in the cAMP-induced quiescence and the persistent latency of HTLV-I.

  18. [Spatial structure of cro-repressor in a solution. II. Effect of ionized groups].

    PubMed

    Kurochkin, A V; Kirpichnikov, M P

    1986-01-01

    The technique of 1H NMR spectroscopy and absorption UV spectroscopy were used to study the ionization of the tyrosine phenol cycles and the effect of ionizable groups on the chemical shifts of signals from protons in the side chains of several amino acid residues. The microenvironment of these residues was established by analysing the titration curves. The mutual orientation of two functionally important adjacent alpha-helical protein regions was determined in solution. The signals from methionine residues belonging to different regions of the secondary structure were assigned in the NMR spectrum. The results indicate that the spatial structure of the repressor is similar in solution an in the crystal. They confirm the model proposed for the cro repressor interaction with DNA and based on the data of X-ray diffraction analysis.

  19. Purification and characterization of nucleolin and its identification as a transcription repressor.

    PubMed Central

    Yang, T H; Tsai, W H; Lee, Y M; Lei, H Y; Lai, M Y; Chen, D S; Yeh, N H; Lee, S C

    1994-01-01

    Expression of the acute-phase response genes, such as that for alpha-1 acid glycoprotein (AGP), involves both positive and negative transcription factors. A positive transcription factor, AGP/EBP, and a negative transcription factor, factor B, have been identified as the two most important factors responsible for the induction of the AGP gene. In this paper we report the purification, characterization, and identification of a B-motif-binding factor from the mouse hepatoma cell line 129p. The purified factor has been identified as nucleolin by amino acid sequence analysis. Biochemical and functional studies further established that nucleolin is a transcription repressor for regulation of AGP and possibly other acute-phase response genes. Thus, in addition to the many known functions of nucleolin, such as rRNA transcription, processing, ribosome biogenesis, and the shuttling of proteins between the cytoplasmic and nuclear compartments, it may also function as a transcriptional repressor. Images PMID:8065340

  20. Arabidopsis transcriptional repressor VAL1 triggers Polycomb silencing at FLC during vernalization.

    PubMed

    Qüesta, Julia I; Song, Jie; Geraldo, Nuno; An, Hailong; Dean, Caroline

    2016-07-29

    The determinants that specify the genomic targets of Polycomb silencing complexes are still unclear. Polycomb silencing of Arabidopsis FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC) accelerates flowering and involves a cold-dependent epigenetic switch. Here we identify a single point mutation at an intragenic nucleation site within FLC that prevents this epigenetic switch from taking place. The mutation blocks nucleation of plant homeodomain-Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PHD-PRC2) and indicates a role for the transcriptional repressor VAL1 in the silencing mechanism. VAL1 localizes to the nucleation region in vivo, promoting histone deacetylation and FLC transcriptional silencing, and interacts with components of the conserved apoptosis- and splicing-associated protein (ASAP) complex. Sequence-specific targeting of transcriptional repressors thus recruits the machinery for PHD-PRC2 nucleation and epigenetic silencing. PMID:27471304

  1. Ethylene regulates arabidopsis development via the modulation of DELLA protein growth repressor function.

    PubMed

    Achard, Patrick; Vriezen, Wim H; Van Der Straeten, Dominique; Harberd, Nicholas P

    2003-12-01

    Phytohormones regulate plant development via a poorly understood signal response network. Here, we show that the phytohormone ethylene regulates plant development at least in part via alteration of the properties of DELLA protein nuclear growth repressors, a family of proteins first identified as gibberellin (GA) signaling components. This conclusion is based on the following experimental observations. First, ethylene inhibited Arabidopsis root growth in a DELLA-dependent manner. Second, ethylene delayed the GA-induced disappearance of the DELLA protein repressor of ga1-3 from root cell nuclei via a constitutive triple response-dependent signaling pathway. Third, the ethylene-promoted "apical hook" structure of etiolated seedling hypocotyls was dependent on the relief of DELLA-mediated growth restraint. Ethylene, auxin, and GA responses now can be attributed to effects on DELLA function, suggesting that DELLA plays a key integrative role in the phytohormone signal response network.

  2. LSD1 co-repressor Rcor2 orchestrates neurogenesis in the developing mouse brain

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yixuan; Wu, Qian; Yang, Peng; Wang, Chenfei; Liu, Jing; Ding, Wenyu; Liu, Wensu; Bai, Ye; Yang, Yuanyuan; Wang, Hong; Gao, Shaorong; Wang, Xiaoqun

    2016-01-01

    Epigenetic regulatory complexes play key roles in the modulation of transcriptional regulation underlying neural stem cell (NSC) proliferation and progeny specification. How specific cofactors guide histone demethylase LSD1/KDM1A complex to regulate distinct NSC-related gene activation and repression in cortical neurogenesis remains unclear. Here we demonstrate that Rcor2, a co-repressor of LSD1, is mainly expressed in the central nervous system (CNS) and plays a key role in epigenetic regulation of cortical development. Depletion of Rcor2 results in reduced NPC proliferation, neuron population, neocortex thickness and brain size. We find that Rcor2 directly targets Dlx2 and Shh, and represses their expressions in developing neocortex. In addition, inhibition of Shh signals rescues the neurogenesis defects caused by Rcor2 depletion both in vivo and in vitro. Hence, our findings suggest that co-repressor Rcor2 is critical for cortical development by repressing Shh signalling pathway in dorsal telencephalon. PMID:26795843

  3. A System of Repressor Gradients Spatially Organizes the Boundaries of “Morphogen-dependent” Target Genes

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hongtao; Xu, Zhe; Mei, Constance; Yu, Danyang; Small, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    Summary The homeodomain (HD) protein Bicoid (Bcd) is thought to function as a gradient morphogen that positions boundaries of target genes via threshold-dependent activation mechanisms. Here we analyze 66 Bcd-dependent regulatory elements, and show that their boundaries are positioned primarily by repressive gradients that antagonize Bcd-mediated activation. A major repressor is the pair-rule protein Runt, which is expressed in an opposing gradient, and is necessary and sufficient for limiting Bcd-dependent activation. Evidence is presented that Runt functions with the maternal repressor Capicua and the gap protein Kruppel as the principal components of a repression system that correctly orders boundaries throughout the anterior half of the embryo. These results put conceptual limits on the Bcd morphogen hypothesis, and demonstrate how the Bcd gradient functions within the gene network that patterns the embryo. PMID:22541432

  4. Preferential induction of the AhR gene battery in HepaRG cells after a single or repeated exposure to heterocyclic aromatic amines

    SciTech Connect

    Dumont, Julie Josse, Rozenn Lambert, Carine Antherieu, Sebastien Laurent, Veronique Loyer, Pascal Robin, Marie-Anne Guillouzo, Andre

    2010-11-15

    2-Amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP) and 2-amino-3,8-dimethylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline (MeIQx) are two of the most common heterocyclic aromatic amines (HAA) produced during cooking of meat, fish and poultry. Both HAA produce different tumor profiles in rodents and are suspected to be carcinogenic in humans. In order to better understand the molecular basis of HAA toxicity, we have analyzed gene expression profiles in the metabolically competent human HepaRG cells using pangenomic oligonucleotide microarrays, after either a single (24-h) or a repeated (28-day) exposure to 10 {mu}M PhIP or MeIQx. The most responsive genes to both HAA were downstream targets of the arylhydrocarbon receptor (AhR): CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 after both time points and CYP1B1 and ALDH3A1 after 28 days. Accordingly, CYP1A1/1A2 induction in HAA-treated HepaRG cells was prevented by chemical inhibition or small interference RNA-mediated down-regulation of the AhR. Consistently, HAA induced activity of the CYP1A1 promoter, which contains a consensus AhR-related xenobiotic-responsive element (XRE). In addition, several other genes exhibited both time-dependent and compound-specific expression changes with, however, a smaller magnitude than previously reported for the prototypical AhR target genes. These changes concerned genes mainly related to cell growth and proliferation, apoptosis, and cancer. In conclusion, these results identify the AhR gene battery as the preferential target of PhIP and MeIQx in HepaRG cells and further support the hypothesis that intake of HAA in diet might increase human cancer risk.

  5. AHR Over-Expression in Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma: Clinical and Molecular Assessments in a Series of Italian Acromegalic Patients with a Long-Term Follow-Up

    PubMed Central

    Mian, Caterina; Ceccato, Filippo; Barollo, Susi; Watutantrige-Fernando, Sara; Albiger, Nora; Regazzo, Daniela; de Lazzari, Paola; Pennelli, Gianmaria; Rotondi, Sandra; Nacamulli, Davide; Pelizzo, Maria Rosa; Jaffrain-Rea, Marie-Lise; Grimaldi, Franco; Occhi, Gianluca; Scaroni, Carla

    2014-01-01

    Aim Acromegaly reportedly carries an increased risk of malignant and benign thyroid tumors, with a prevalence of thyroid cancer of around 3–7%. Germline mutations in the aryl-hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) interacting protein (AIP) have been identified in familial forms of acromegaly. The molecular and endocrine relationships between follicular thyroid growth and GH-secreting pituitary adenoma have yet to be fully established. Our aim was to study the prevalence of differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) in acromegaly, focusing on the role of genetic events responsible for the onset of thyroid cancer. Methods Germline mutations in the AIP gene were assessed in all patients; BRAF and H-N-K RAS status was analyzed by direct sequencing in thyroid specimens, while immunohistochemistry was used to analyze the protein expression of AIP and AHR. A set of PTCs unrelated to acromegaly was also studied. Results 12 DTCs (10 papillary and 2 follicular carcinomas) were identified in a cohort of 113 acromegalic patients. No differences in GH/IGF-1 levels or disease activity emerged between patients with and without DTC, but the former were older and more often female. BRAF V600E was found in 70% of the papillary thyroid cancers; there were no RAS mutations. AIP protein expression was similar in neoplastic and normal cells, while AHR protein was expressed more in PTCs carrying BRAF mutations than in normal tissue, irrespective of acromegaly status. Conclusions The prevalence of DTC in acromegaly is around 11% and endocrinologists should bear this in mind, especially when examining elderly female patients with uninodular goiter. The DTC risk does not seem to correlate with GH/IGF-1 levels, while it may be associated with BRAF mutations and AHR over-expression. Genetic or epigenetic events probably play a part in promoting thyroid carcinoma. PMID:25019383

  6. Exposure to Diesel Exhaust Particle Extracts (DEPe) Impairs Some Polarization Markers and Functions of Human Macrophages through Activation of AhR and Nrf2

    PubMed Central

    Jaguin, Marie; Fardel, Olivier; Lecureur, Valérie

    2015-01-01

    Macrophages (MΦ), well-known to play an important role in immune response, also respond to environmental toxic chemicals such as diesel exhaust particles (DEP). Potential effects of DEPs towards MΦ polarization, a key hall-mark of MΦ physiology, remain however poorly documented. This study was therefore designed to evaluate the effects of a reference DEP extract (DEPe) on human MΦ polarization. Human blood monocytes-derived MΦ were incubated with IFNγ+LPS or IL-4 to obtain M1 and M2 subtypes, respectively; a 24 h exposure of polarizing MΦ to 10 μg/ml DEPe was found to impair expression of some macrophagic M1 and M2 markers, without however overall inhibition of M1 and M2 polarization processes. Notably, DEPe treatment increased the secretion of the M1 marker IL-8 and the M2 marker IL-10 in both MΦ subtypes, whereas it reduced lipopolysaccharide-induced IL-6 and IL-12p40 secretion in M1 MΦ. In M2 MΦ, DEPe exposure led to a reduction of CD200R expression and of CCL17, CCL18 and CCL22 secretion, associated with a lower chemotaxis of CCR4-positive cells. DEPe activated the Nrf2 and AhR pathways and induced expression of their reference target genes such as Hmox-1 and cytochrome P-4501B1 in M1 and M2 MΦ. Nrf2 or AhR silencing through RNA interference prevented DEPe-related down-regulation of IL-6. AhR silencing also inhibited the down-secretion of IL-12p40 and CCL18 in M1- and M2-DEPe-exposed MΦ, respectively. DEPs are therefore likely to alter expression of some M1 and M2 markers in an AhR- and Nrf2-dependent manner; such regulations may contribute to deleterious immune effects of atmospheric DEP. PMID:25710172

  7. TCDD and a putative endogenous AhR ligand, ITE, elicit the same immediate changes in gene expression in mouse lung fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Henry, Ellen C; Welle, Stephen L; Gasiewicz, Thomas A

    2010-03-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), a ligand-dependent transcription factor, mediates toxicity of several classes of xenobiotics and also has important physiological roles in differentiation, reproduction, and immunity, although the endogenous ligand(s) mediating these functions is/are as yet unidentified. One candidate endogenous ligand, 2-(1'H-indolo-3'-carbonyl)-thiazole-4-carboxylic acid methyl ester (ITE), is a potent AhR agonist in vitro, activates the murine AhR in vivo, but does not induce toxicity. We hypothesized that ITE and the toxic ligand, 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), may modify transcription of different sets of genes to account for their different toxicity. To test this hypothesis, primary mouse lung fibroblasts were exposed to 0.5muM ITE, 0.2nM TCDD, or vehicle for 4 h, and total gene expression was evaluated using microarrays. After this short-term and low-dose treatment, several hundred genes were changed significantly, and the response to ITE and TCDD was remarkably similar, both qualitatively and quantitatively. Induced gene sets included the expected battery of AhR-dependent xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes, as well as several sets that reflect the inflammatory role of lung fibroblasts. Real time quantitative RT-qPCR assay of several selected genes confirmed these microarray data and further suggested that there may be kinetic differences in expression between ligands. These data suggest that ITE and TCDD elicit an analogous change in AhR conformation such that the initial transcription response is the same. Furthermore, if the difference in toxicity between TCDD and ITE is mediated by differences in gene expression, then it is likely that secondary changes enabled by the persistent TCDD, but not by the shorter lived ITE, are responsible.

  8. Histone deacetylase inhibitor trichostatin A enhances myogenesis by coordinating muscle regulatory factors and myogenic repressors

    SciTech Connect

    Hagiwara, Hiroki; Saito, Fumiaki; Masaki, Toshihiro; Ikeda, Miki; Nakamura-Ohkuma, Ayami; Shimizu, Teruo; Matsumura, Kiichiro

    2011-11-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We investigated the effect of TSA, one of most potent HDACIs, on myogenesis using the C2C12 skeletal muscle cell line. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TSA enhances the expression of myosin heavy chain without affecting DAPC expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TSA enhances the expression of the early MRFs, Myf5 and MEF2, and suppresses the late MRF, myogenin, after 24 h treatment. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TSA enhances the expression of the myogenic repressors, Ids, which inhibit myogenic differentiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TSA promotes myogenesis by coordinating the expression of MRFs and myogenic repressors. -- Abstract: Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACIs) are known to promote skeletal muscle formation. However, their mechanisms that include effects on the expression of major muscle components such as the dystrophin-associated proteins complex (DAPC) or myogenic regulatory factors (MRFs) remain unknown. In this study, we investigated the effects of HDACIs on skeletal muscle formation using the C2C12 cell culture system. C2C12 myoblasts were exposed to trichostatin A (TSA), one of the most potent HDACIs, and differentiation was subsequently induced. We found that TSA enhances the expression of myosin heavy chain without affecting DAPC expression. In addition, TSA increases the expression of the early MRFs, Myf5 and MEF2, whereas it suppresses the expression of the late MRF, myogenin. Interestingly, TSA also enhances the expression of Id1, Id2, and Id3 (Ids). Ids are myogenic repressors that inhibit myogenic differentiation. These findings suggest that TSA promotes gene expression in proliferation and suppresses it in the differentiation stage of muscle formation. Taken together, our data demonstrate that TSA enhances myogenesis by coordinating the expression of MRFs and myogenic repressors.

  9. The qa repressor gene of Neurospora crassa: wild-type and mutant nucleotide sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Huiet, L; Giles, N H

    1986-01-01

    The qa-1S gene, one of two regulatory genes in the qa gene cluster of Neurospora crassa, encodes the qa repressor. The qa-1S gene together with the qa-1F gene, which encodes the qa activator protein, control the expression of all seven qa genes, including those encoding the inducible enzymes responsible for the utilization of quinic acid as a carbon source. The nucleotide sequence of the qa-1S gene and its flanking regions has been determined. The deduced coding sequence for the qa-1S protein encodes 918 amino acids with a calculated molecular weight of 100,650 and is interrupted by a single 66-base-pair intervening sequence. Both constitutive and noninducible mutants occur in the qa-1S gene and two different mutations of each type have been cloned and sequenced. All four mutations occur within the predicted coding region of the qa-1S gene. This result strongly supports the hypothesis that the qa-1S gene encodes a repressor. All four mutations are located within codons for the last 300 amino acids of the qa-1S protein. The mutations in three of the mutants involve amino acid substitutions, while the fourth mutant, which has a constitutive phenotype, contains a frameshift mutation. The two constitutive mutations occur in the most distal region of the gene, possibly implicating the COOH-terminal region of the qa repressor in binding to its target. The two noninducible mutations occur in a region proximal to the constitutive mutations, possibly implicating this region of the qa repressor in binding the inducer. Images PMID:3010294

  10. T396I Mutation of Mouse Sufu Reduces the Stability and Activity of Gli3 Repressor

    PubMed Central

    Makino, Shigeru; Zhulyn, Olena; Mo, Rong; Puviindran, Vijitha; Zhang, Xiaoyun; Murata, Takuya; Fukumura, Ryutaro; Ishitsuka, Yuichi; Kotaki, Hayato; Matsumaru, Daisuke; Ishii, Shunsuke; Hui, Chi-Chung; Gondo, Yoichi

    2015-01-01

    Hedgehog signaling is primarily transduced by two transcription factors: Gli2, which mainly acts as a full-length activator, and Gli3, which tends to be proteolytically processed from a full-length form (Gli3FL) to an N-terminal repressor (Gli3REP). Recent studies using a Sufu knockout mouse have indicated that Sufu is involved in regulating Gli2 and Gli3 activator and repressor activity at multiple steps of the signaling cascade; however, the mechanism of specific Gli2 and Gli3 regulation remains to be elucidated. In this study, we established an allelic series of ENU-induced mouse strains. Analysis of one of the missense alleles, SufuT396I, showed that Thr396 residue of Sufu played a key role in regulation of Gli3 activity. SufuT396I/T396I embryos exhibited severe polydactyly, which is indicative of compromised Gli3 activity. Concomitantly, significant quantitative reductions of unprocessed Gli3 (Gli3FL) and processed Gli3 (Gli3REP) were observed in vivo as well as in vitro. Genetic experiments showed that patterning defects in the limb buds of SufuT396I/T396I were rescued by a constitutive Gli3REP allele (Gli3∆699), strongly suggesting that SufuT396I reduced the truncated Gli3 repressor. In contrast, SufuT396I qualitatively exhibited no mutational effects on Gli2 regulation. Taken together, the results of this study show that the Thr396 residue of Sufu is specifically required for regulation of Gli3 but not Gli2. This implies a novel Sufu-mediated mechanism in which Gli2 activator and Gli3 repressor are differentially regulated. PMID:25760946

  11. Energy transfer in lactose repressor protein modified with N-[[(iodoacetyl)amino]ethyl]-5-naphthylamine-1-sulfonate.

    PubMed

    Gardner, J A; Matthews, K S

    1991-03-12

    Energy transfer between the two tryptophan residues in the lactose repressor protein and the fluorescent moiety of the cysteine-specific reagent N-[[(iodoacetyl)amino]ethyl]-5-naphthylamine-1-sulfonate (1,5-IAEDANS) has been examined. Modification of repressor with this compound did not affect operator or inducer binding. 1,5-IAEDANS reacted primarily with Cys140 in wild-type repressor [Schneider et al. (1984) Biochemistry 23, 2221]; in the presence of inducer, modification at Cys107 increased, while reaction at Cys140 remained unchanged. Energy transfer between tryptophans and the AEDANS moiety(ies) in wild-type lac repressor occurred with an efficiency of 6.7 +/- 1.9% in the absence and 7.8 +/- 1.6% in the presence of inducer. The distance between the Trp donor(s) and the acceptor in wild-type repressor was calculated to be in the range approximately 35 A under both conditions. The similarity in efficiency despite large differences in the amount of acceptor attached to Cys107 when inducer is bound indicates that the AEDANS group at position 107 does not participate significantly in energy transfer and that the label at position 140 acts as the primary acceptor group. The similarity of energy-transfer efficiency (7.1 +/- 3.8%) observed for 1,5-IAEDANS-modified monomeric mutant repressor (Y282D) indicates that the transfer is primarily intrasubunit in the native tetramer. Measurements using two mutant repressors (each with a single tryptophan and modified with 1,5-IAEDANS) demonstrated that both tryptophans can serve as donor in the energy-transfer process. The W201Y repressor (containing Trp220) exhibited a transfer efficiency lower than wild type (5.6 +/- 2.4%), corresponding to a slightly larger distance between the donor-acceptor pair in this mutant.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. Cleavage of a putative metal permease in Chlamydia trachomatis yields an iron-dependent transcriptional repressor.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Christopher C; Nicod, Sophie S; Malcolm, Denise S; Grieshaber, Scott S; Carabeo, Rey A

    2012-06-26

    The regulation of iron homeostasis is essential for most organisms, because iron is required for a variety of conserved biochemical processes, yet can be toxic at high concentrations. Upon experiencing iron starvation in vitro, the obligate intracellular human pathogen Chlamydia trachomatis exhibits elevated expression of a putative iron-transport system encoded by the ytg operon. The third component of the ytg operon, CT069 (YtgCR), encodes a protein with two distinct domains: a membrane-anchored metal ion permease and a diphtheria toxin repressor (DtxR)-like transcriptional repressor. In this report, we demonstrate that the C-terminal domain of CT069 (YtgR) serves as an iron-dependent autorepressor of the ytg operon. Moreover, the nascent full-length metal permease-transcriptional repressor protein was processed during the course of infection, and heterologously when expressed in Escherichia coli. The products produced by heterologous cleavage in E. coli were functional in the repression of a reporter gene downstream of a putative YtgR operator. We report a bona fide mechanism of iron-dependent regulation of transcription in Chlamydia. Moreover, the unusual membrane permease-DNA-binding polypeptide fusion configuration was found in several bacteria. Therefore, the DNA-binding capability and liberation of the YtgR domain from a membrane-anchored permease in C. trachomatis could represent a previously uncharacterized mechanism for prokaryotic regulation of iron-homeostasis.

  13. Gene model 129 (Gm129) encodes a novel transcriptional repressor that modulates circadian gene expression.

    PubMed

    Annayev, Yunus; Adar, Sheera; Chiou, Yi-Ying; Lieb, Jason D; Sancar, Aziz; Ye, Rui

    2014-02-21

    The mammalian circadian clock is a molecular oscillator composed of a feedback loop that involves transcriptional activators CLOCK and BMAL1, and repressors Cryptochrome (CRY) and Period (PER). Here we show that a direct CLOCK·BMAL1 target gene, Gm129, is a novel regulator of the feedback loop. ChIP analysis revealed that the CLOCK·BMAL1·CRY1 complex strongly occupies the promoter region of Gm129. Both mRNA and protein levels of GM129 exhibit high amplitude circadian oscillations in mouse liver, and Gm129 gene encodes a nuclear-localized protein that directly interacts with BMAL1 and represses CLOCK·BMAL1 activity. In vitro and in vivo protein-DNA interaction results demonstrate that, like CRY1, GM129 functions as a repressor by binding to the CLOCK·BMAL1 complex on DNA. Although Gm129(-/-) or Cry1(-/-) Gm129(-/-) mice retain a robust circadian rhythm, the peaks of Nr1d1 and Dbp mRNAs in liver exhibit a significant phase delay compared with control. Our results suggest that, in addition to CRYs and PERs, the GM129 protein contributes to the transcriptional feedback loop by modulating CLOCK·BMAL1 activity as a transcriptional repressor.

  14. Phosphorylation of trihelix transcriptional repressor ASR3 by MAP KINASE4 negatively regulates Arabidopsis immunity.

    PubMed

    Li, Bo; Jiang, Shan; Yu, Xiao; Cheng, Cheng; Chen, Sixue; Cheng, Yanbing; Yuan, Joshua S; Jiang, Daohong; He, Ping; Shan, Libo

    2015-03-01

    Proper control of immune-related gene expression is crucial for the host to launch an effective defense response. Perception of microbe-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs) induces rapid and profound transcriptional reprogramming via unclear mechanisms. Here, we show that ASR3 (ARABIDOPSIS SH4-RELATED3) functions as a transcriptional repressor and plays a negative role in regulating pattern-triggered immunity (PTI) in Arabidopsis thaliana. ASR3 belongs to a plant-specific trihelix transcription factor family for which functional studies are lacking. MAMP treatments induce rapid phosphorylation of ASR3 at threonine 189 via MPK4, a mitogen-activated protein kinase that negatively regulates PTI responses downstream of multiple MAMP receptors. ASR3 possesses transcriptional repressor activity via its ERF-associated amphiphilic repression motifs and negatively regulates a large subset of flg22-induced genes. Phosphorylation of ASR3 by MPK4 enhances its DNA binding activity to suppress gene expression. Importantly, the asr3 mutant shows enhanced disease resistance to virulent bacterial pathogen infection, whereas transgenic plants overexpressing the wild-type or phospho-mimetic form of ASR3 exhibit compromised PTI responses. Our studies reveal a function of the trihelix transcription factors in plant innate immunity and provide evidence that ASR3 functions as a transcriptional repressor regulated by MAMP-activated MPK4 to fine-tune plant immune gene expression.

  15. The chromatin remodeling factor CHD5 is a transcriptional repressor of WEE1.

    PubMed

    Quan, Jinhua; Adelmant, Guillaume; Marto, Jarrod A; Look, A Thomas; Yusufzai, Timur

    2014-01-01

    Loss of the chromatin remodeling ATPase CHD5 has been linked to the progression of neuroblastoma tumors, yet the underlying mechanisms behind the tumor suppressor role of CHD5 are unknown. In this study, we purified the human CHD5 complex and found that CHD5 is a component of the full NuRD transcriptional repressor complex, which also contains methyl-CpG binding proteins and histone deacetylases. The CHD5/NuRD complex appears mutually exclusive with the related CHD4/NuRD complex as overexpression of CHD5 results in loss of the CHD4 protein in cells. Following a search for genes that are regulated by CHD5 in neuroblastoma cells, we found that CHD5 binds to and represses the G2/M checkpoint gene WEE1. Reintroduction of CHD5 into neuroblastoma cells represses WEE1 expression, demonstrating that CHD5 can function as a repressor in cells. A catalytically inactive mutant version of CHD5 is able to associate with a NuRD cofactor but fails to repress transcription. Our study shows that CHD5 is a NuRD-associated transcriptional repressor and identifies WEE1 as one of the CHD5-regulated genes that may link CHD5 to tumor suppression.

  16. Cu(I)-mediated Allosteric Switching in a Copper-sensing Operon Repressor (CsoR)*

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Feng-Ming James; Coyne, H. Jerome; Cubillas, Ciro; Vinuesa, Pablo; Fang, Xianyang; Ma, Zhen; Ma, Dejian; Helmann, John D.; García-de los Santos, Alejandro; Wang, Yun-Xing; Dann, Charles E.; Giedroc, David P.

    2014-01-01

    The copper-sensing operon repressor (CsoR) is representative of a major Cu(I)-sensing family of bacterial metalloregulatory proteins that has evolved to prevent cytoplasmic copper toxicity. It is unknown how Cu(I) binding to tetrameric CsoRs mediates transcriptional derepression of copper resistance genes. A phylogenetic analysis of 227 DUF156 protein members, including biochemically or structurally characterized CsoR/RcnR repressors, reveals that Geobacillus thermodenitrificans (Gt) CsoR characterized here is representative of CsoRs from pathogenic bacilli Listeria monocytogenes and Bacillus anthracis. The 2.56 Å structure of Cu(I)-bound Gt CsoR reveals that Cu(I) binding induces a kink in the α2-helix between two conserved copper-ligating residues and folds an N-terminal tail (residues 12–19) over the Cu(I) binding site. NMR studies of Gt CsoR reveal that this tail is flexible in the apo-state with these dynamics quenched upon Cu(I) binding. Small angle x-ray scattering experiments on an N-terminally truncated Gt CsoR (Δ2–10) reveal that the Cu(I)-bound tetramer is hydrodynamically more compact than is the apo-state. The implications of these findings for the allosteric mechanisms of other CsoR/RcnR repressors are discussed. PMID:24831014

  17. A chimeric NST repressor has the potential to improve glucose productivity from plant cell walls.

    PubMed

    Iwase, Akira; Hideno, Akihiro; Watanabe, Keiji; Mitsuda, Nobutaka; Ohme-Takagi, Masaru

    2009-07-15

    Bioethanol might be produced more economically and with less ecological impact (with reduced exploitation of food crops) if we could increase the production of glucose from the cellulosic materials in plant cell walls. However, plant cell walls are relatively resistant to enzymatic and physicochemical hydrolysis and, therefore, it is necessary to develop methods for reducing such resistance. Changes in plant cell wall materials, by genetic engineering, that render them more easily hydrolyzable to glucose might be a valuable approach to this problem. We showed previously that, in Arabidopsis, NAC secondary wall thickening-promoting factor1 (NST1) and NST3 are key regulators of secondary wall formation. We report here that transgenic Arabidopsis plants that expressed a chimeric repressor derived from NST1 produced cell wall materials that were twice as susceptible to both enzymatic and physicochemical hydrolysis as those from wild-type plants. The yields of glucose from both fresh and dry biomass were increased in the chimeric repressor lines. Use of the NST1 chimeric repressor might enhance production of glucose from plant cell walls, by changing the nature of the cell walls themselves.

  18. DWARF 53 acts as a repressor of strigolactone signalling in rice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Liang; Liu, Xue; Xiong, Guosheng; Liu, Huihui; Chen, Fulu; Wang, Lei; Meng, Xiangbing; Liu, Guifu; Yu, Hong; Yuan, Yundong; Yi, Wei; Zhao, Lihua; Ma, Honglei; He, Yuanzheng; Wu, Zhongshan; Melcher, Karsten; Qian, Qian; Xu, H. Eric; Wang, Yonghong; Li, Jiayang

    2013-12-01

    Strigolactones (SLs) are a group of newly identified plant hormones that control plant shoot branching. SL signalling requires the hormone-dependent interaction of DWARF 14 (D14), a probable candidate SL receptor, with DWARF 3 (D3), an F-box component of the Skp-Cullin-F-box (SCF) E3 ubiquitin ligase complex. Here we report the characterization of a dominant SL-insensitive rice (Oryza sativa) mutant dwarf 53 (d53) and the cloning of D53, which encodes a substrate of the SCFD3 ubiquitination complex and functions as a repressor of SL signalling. Treatments with GR24, a synthetic SL analogue, cause D53 degradation via the proteasome in a manner that requires D14 and the SCFD3 ubiquitin ligase, whereas the dominant form of D53 is resistant to SL-mediated degradation. Moreover, D53 can interact with transcriptional co-repressors known as TOPLESS-RELATED PROTEINS. Our results suggest a model of SL signalling that involves SL-dependent degradation of the D53 repressor mediated by the D14-D3 complex.

  19. Repressing a repressor: gibberellin-induced rapid reduction of the RGA protein in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Silverstone, A L; Jung, H S; Dill, A; Kawaide, H; Kamiya, Y; Sun, T P

    2001-07-01

    RGA (for repressor of ga1-3) and SPINDLY (SPY) are likely repressors of gibberellin (GA) signaling in Arabidopsis because the recessive rga and spy mutations partially suppressed the phenotype of the GA-deficient mutant ga1-3. We found that neither rga nor spy altered the GA levels in the wild-type or the ga1-3 background. However, expression of the GA biosynthetic gene GA4 was reduced 26% by the rga mutation, suggesting that partial derepression of the GA response pathway by rga resulted in the feedback inhibition of GA4 expression. The green fluorescent protein (GFP)-RGA fusion protein was localized to nuclei in transgenic Arabidopsis. This result supports the predicted function of RGA as a transcriptional regulator based on sequence analysis. Confocal microscopy and immunoblot analyses demonstrated that the levels of both the GFP-RGA fusion protein and endogenous RGA were reduced rapidly by GA treatment. Therefore, the GA signal appears to derepress the GA signaling pathway by degrading the repressor protein RGA. The effect of rga on GA4 gene expression and the effect of GA on RGA protein level allow us to identify part of the mechanism by which GA homeostasis is achieved.

  20. Control of developmentally primed erythroid genes by combinatorial co-repressor actions

    PubMed Central

    Stadhouders, Ralph; Cico, Alba; Stephen, Tharshana; Thongjuea, Supat; Kolovos, Petros; Baymaz, H. Irem; Yu, Xiao; Demmers, Jeroen; Bezstarosti, Karel; Maas, Alex; Barroca, Vilma; Kockx, Christel; Ozgur, Zeliha; van Ijcken, Wilfred; Arcangeli, Marie-Laure; Andrieu-Soler, Charlotte; Lenhard, Boris; Grosveld, Frank; Soler, Eric

    2015-01-01

    How transcription factors (TFs) cooperate within large protein complexes to allow rapid modulation of gene expression during development is still largely unknown. Here we show that the key haematopoietic LIM-domain-binding protein-1 (LDB1) TF complex contains several activator and repressor components that together maintain an erythroid-specific gene expression programme primed for rapid activation until differentiation is induced. A combination of proteomics, functional genomics and in vivo studies presented here identifies known and novel co-repressors, most notably the ETO2 and IRF2BP2 proteins, involved in maintaining this primed state. The ETO2–IRF2BP2 axis, interacting with the NCOR1/SMRT co-repressor complex, suppresses the expression of the vast majority of archetypical erythroid genes and pathways until its decommissioning at the onset of terminal erythroid differentiation. Our experiments demonstrate that multimeric regulatory complexes feature a dynamic interplay between activating and repressing components that determines lineage-specific gene expression and cellular differentiation. PMID:26593974

  1. Control of developmentally primed erythroid genes by combinatorial co-repressor actions.

    PubMed

    Stadhouders, Ralph; Cico, Alba; Stephen, Tharshana; Thongjuea, Supat; Kolovos, Petros; Baymaz, H Irem; Yu, Xiao; Demmers, Jeroen; Bezstarosti, Karel; Maas, Alex; Barroca, Vilma; Kockx, Christel; Ozgur, Zeliha; van Ijcken, Wilfred; Arcangeli, Marie-Laure; Andrieu-Soler, Charlotte; Lenhard, Boris; Grosveld, Frank; Soler, Eric

    2015-01-01

    How transcription factors (TFs) cooperate within large protein complexes to allow rapid modulation of gene expression during development is still largely unknown. Here we show that the key haematopoietic LIM-domain-binding protein-1 (LDB1) TF complex contains several activator and repressor components that together maintain an erythroid-specific gene expression programme primed for rapid activation until differentiation is induced. A combination of proteomics, functional genomics and in vivo studies presented here identifies known and novel co-repressors, most notably the ETO2 and IRF2BP2 proteins, involved in maintaining this primed state. The ETO2-IRF2BP2 axis, interacting with the NCOR1/SMRT co-repressor complex, suppresses the expression of the vast majority of archetypical erythroid genes and pathways until its decommissioning at the onset of terminal erythroid differentiation. Our experiments demonstrate that multimeric regulatory complexes feature a dynamic interplay between activating and repressing components that determines lineage-specific gene expression and cellular differentiation. PMID:26593974

  2. Accurate genetic switch in Escherichia coli: novel mechanism of regulation by co-repressor.

    PubMed

    Tabaka, Marcin; Cybulski, Olgierd; Hołyst, Robert

    2008-04-01

    Understanding a biological module involves recognition of its structure and the dynamics of its principal components. In this report we present an analysis of the dynamics of the repression module within the regulation of the trp operon in Escherichia coli. We combine biochemical data for reaction rate constants for the trp repressor binding to trp operator and in vivo data of a number of tryptophan repressors (TrpRs) that bind to the operator. The model of repression presented in this report greatly differs from previous mathematical models. One, two or three TrpRs can bind to the operator and repress the transcription. Moreover, reaction rates for detachment of TrpRs from the operator strongly depend on tryptophan (Trp) concentration, since Trp can also bind to the repressor-operator complex and stabilize it. From the mathematical modeling and analysis of reaction rates and equilibrium constants emerges a high-quality, accurate and effective module of trp repression. This genetic switch responds accurately to fast consumption of Trp from the interior of a cell. It switches with minimal dispersion when the concentration of Trp drops below a thousand molecules per cell. PMID:18313075

  3. Contextual interactions determine whether the Drosophila homeodomain protein, Vnd, acts as a repressor or activator

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Zhongxin; Syu, Li-Jyun; Mellerick, Dervla M.

    2005-01-01

    At the molecular level, members of the NKx2.2 family of transcription factors establish neural compartment boundaries by repressing the expression of homeobox genes specific for adjacent domains [Muhr et al. (2001) Cell, 104, 861–873; Weiss et al. (1998) Genes Dev., 12, 3591–3602]. The Drosophila homologue, vnd, interacts genetically with the high-mobility group protein, Dichaete, in a manner suggesting co-operative activation [Zhao and Skeath (2002) Development, 129, 1165–1174]. However, evidence for direct interactions and transcriptional activation is lacking. Here, we present molecular evidence for the interaction of Vnd and Dichaete that leads to the activation of target gene expression. Two-hybrid interaction assays indicate that Dichaete binds the Vnd homeodomain, and additional Vnd sequences stabilize this interaction. In addition, Vnd has two activation domains that are typically masked in the intact protein. Whether vnd can activate or repress transcription is context-dependent. Full-length Vnd, when expressed as a Gal4 fusion protein, acts as a repressor containing multiple repression domains. A divergent domain in the N-terminus, not found in vertebrate Vnd-like proteins, causes the strongest repression. The co-repressor, Groucho, enhances Vnd repression, and these two proteins physically interact. The data presented indicate that the activation and repression domains of Vnd are complex, and whether Vnd functions as a transcriptional repressor or activator depends on both intra- and inter-molecular interactions. PMID:15640442

  4. The Chromatin Remodeling Factor CHD5 Is a Transcriptional Repressor of WEE1

    PubMed Central

    Quan, Jinhua; Adelmant, Guillaume; Marto, Jarrod A.; Look, A. Thomas; Yusufzai, Timur

    2014-01-01

    Loss of the chromatin remodeling ATPase CHD5 has been linked to the progression of neuroblastoma tumors, yet the underlying mechanisms behind the tumor suppressor role of CHD5 are unknown. In this study, we purified the human CHD5 complex and found that CHD5 is a component of the full NuRD transcriptional repressor complex, which also contains methyl-CpG binding proteins and histone deacetylases. The CHD5/NuRD complex appears mutually exclusive with the related CHD4/NuRD complex as overexpression of CHD5 results in loss of the CHD4 protein in cells. Following a search for genes that are regulated by CHD5 in neuroblastoma cells, we found that CHD5 binds to and represses the G2/M checkpoint gene WEE1. Reintroduction of CHD5 into neuroblastoma cells represses WEE1 expression, demonstrating that CHD5 can function as a repressor in cells. A catalytically inactive mutant version of CHD5 is able to associate with a NuRD cofactor but fails to repress transcription. Our study shows that CHD5 is a NuRD-associated transcriptional repressor and identifies WEE1 as one of the CHD5-regulated genes that may link CHD5 to tumor suppression. PMID:25247294

  5. Structures of ω repressors bound to direct and inverted DNA repeats explain modulation of transcription

    PubMed Central

    Weihofen, Wilhelm Andreas; Cicek, Aslan; Pratto, Florencia; Alonso, Juan Carlos; Saenger, Wolfram

    2006-01-01

    Repressor ω regulates transcription of genes required for copy number control, accurate segregation and stable maintenance of inc18 plasmids hosted by Gram-positive bacteria. ω belongs to homodimeric ribbon-helix-helix (RHH2) repressors typified by a central, antiparallel β-sheet for DNA major groove binding. Homodimeric ω2 binds cooperatively to promotors with 7 to 10 consecutive non-palindromic DNA heptad repeats (5′-A/TATCACA/T-3′, symbolized by →) in palindromic inverted, converging (→←) or diverging (←→) orientation and also, unique to ω2 and contrasting other RHH2 repressors, to non-palindromic direct (→→) repeats. Here we investigate with crystal structures how ω2 binds specifically to heptads in minimal operators with (→→) and (→←) repeats. Since the pseudo-2-fold axis relating the monomers in ω2 passes the central C–G base pair of each heptad with ∼0.3 Å downstream offset, the separation between the pseudo-2-fold axes is exactly 7 bp in (→→), ∼0.6 Å shorter in (→←) but would be ∼0.6 Å longer in (←→). These variations grade interactions between adjacent ω2 and explain modulations in cooperative binding affinity of ω2 to operators with different heptad orientations. PMID:16528102

  6. Co-repressor activity of scaffold attachment factor B1 requires sumoylation

    SciTech Connect

    Garee, Jason P.; Meyer, Rene; Oesterreich, Steffi

    2011-05-20

    Highlights: {yields} SAFB1 is sumoylated to two lysine residues K231 and K294. {yields} SAFB1 sumoylation is regulated by PIAS1 and SENP1. {yields} Sumoylation of SAFB1 regulates its transcriptional repressor activity. {yields} Mutation of sumoylation sites leads to decreased SAFB1 binding to HDAC3. -- Abstract: Sumoylation is an emerging modification associated with a variety of cellular processes including the regulation of transcriptional activities of nuclear receptors and their coregulators. As SUMO modifications are often associated with transcriptional repression, we examined if sumoylation was involved in modulation of the transcriptional repressive activity of scaffold attachment factor B1. Here we show that SAFB1 is modified by both the SUMO1 and SUMO2/3 family of proteins, on lysine's K231 and K294. Further, we demonstrate that SAFB1 can interact with PIAS1, a SUMO E3 ligase which mediates SAFB1 sumoylation. Additionally, SENP1 was identified as the enzyme desumoylating SAFB1. Mutation of the SAFB1 sumoylation sites lead to a loss of transcriptional repression, at least in part due to decreased interaction with HDAC3, a known transcriptional repressor and SAFB1 binding partner. In summary, the transcriptional repressor SAFB1 is modified by both SUMO1 and SUMO2/3, and this modification is necessary for its full repressive activity.

  7. Inhibition of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor prevents Western diet-induced obesity. Model for AHR activation by kynurenine via oxidized-LDL, TLR2/4, TGFβ, and IDO1.

    PubMed

    Moyer, Benjamin J; Rojas, Itzel Y; Kerley-Hamilton, Joanna S; Hazlett, Haley F; Nemani, Krishnamurthy V; Trask, Heidi W; West, Rachel J; Lupien, Leslie E; Collins, Alan J; Ringelberg, Carol S; Gimi, Barjor; Kinlaw, William B; Tomlinson, Craig R

    2016-06-01

    Obesity is an increasingly urgent global problem, yet, little is known about its causes and less is known how obesity can be effectively treated. We showed previously that the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) plays a role in the regulation of body mass in mice fed Western diet. The AHR is a ligand-activated nuclear receptor that regulates genes involved in a number of biological pathways, including xenobiotic metabolism and T cell polarization. This study was an investigation into whether inhibition of the AHR prevents Western diet-based obesity. Male C57Bl/6J mice were fed control and Western diets with and without the AHR antagonist α-naphthoflavone or CH-223191, and a mouse hepatocyte cell line was used to delineate relevant cellular pathways. Studies are presented showing that the AHR antagonists α-naphthoflavone and CH-223191 significantly reduce obesity and adiposity and ameliorates liver steatosis in male C57Bl/6J mice fed a Western diet. Mice deficient in the tryptophan metabolizing enzyme indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase 1 (IDO1) were also resistant to obesity. Using an AHR-directed, luciferase-expressing mouse hepatocyte cell line, we show that the transforming growth factor β1 (TGFβ1) signaling pathway via PI3K and NF-κB and the toll-like receptor 2/4 (TLR2/4) signaling pathway stimulated by oxidized low-density lipoproteins via NF-κB, each induce luciferase expression; however, TLR2/4 signaling was significantly reduced by inhibition of IDO1. At physiological levels, kynurenine but not kynurenic acid (both tryptophan metabolites and known AHR agonists) activated AHR-directed luciferase expression. We propose a hepatocyte-based model, in which kynurenine production is increased by enhanced IDO1 activity stimulated by TGFβ1 and TLR2/4 signaling, via PI3K and NF-κB, to perpetuate a cycle of AHR activation to cause obesity; and inhibition of the AHR, in turn, blocks the cycle's output to prevent obesity. The AHR with its broad ligand binding specificity

  8. Characterization of the interaction of the glp repressor of Escherichia coli K-12 with single and tandem glp operator variants.

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, N; Oh, W; Trybul, D; Thrasher, K S; Kingsbury, T J; Larson, T J

    1994-01-01

    The glp operons of Escherichia coli are negatively controlled by the glp repressor. Comparison of the repressor-binding affinities for consensus and altered consensus operators in vivo showed that all base substitutions at positions 3, 4, 5, and 8 from the center of the palindromic operator caused a striking decrease in repressor binding. Substitutions at other positions had a severe to no effect on repressor binding, depending on the base substitution. The results obtained indicate that the repressor binds with highest affinity to operators with the half-site WATKYTCGWW, where W is A or T, K is G or T, and Y is C or T. Strong cooperative binding of the repressor to tandem operators was demonstrated in vivo. Cooperativity was maximal when two 20-bp operators were directly repeated or when 2 bp separated the two operators. Cooperativity decreased with the deletion of 2 bp or the addition of 4 bp between the individual operators. Cooperativity was eliminated with a 6-bp insertion between the operators. PMID:8157609

  9. Atropine-resistant effects of the muscarinic agonists McN-A-343 and AHR 602 on cardiac performance and the release of noradrenaline from sympathetic nerves of the perfused rabbit heart

    PubMed Central

    Fozard, J.R.; Muscholl, E.

    1974-01-01

    1 The effects of 4-(m-chlorophenylcarbamoyloxy)-2-butynyltrimethylammonium chloride (McN-A-343) and N-benzyl-3-pyrrolidyl acetate methobromide (AHR 602) on cardiac performance and noradrenaline release from terminal sympathetic fibres were measured in isolated perfused hearts of rabbits. 2 In the presence of sufficient atropine to block muscarinic receptors, high concentrations of McN-A-343 and AHR 602 caused no cardiac stimulation and there was no increase in the resting output of noradrenaline into the perfusates. 3 McN-A-343 and AHR 602 increased both the mechanical responses and the transmitter overflow evoked by electrical stimulation of the sympathetic nerves (SNS) but inhibited both parameters during perfusion with 1,1-dimethyl-4-phenylpiperazinium (DMPP). The effects were atropine-resistant and qualitatively similar to those seen with cocaine. Hexamethonium inhibited DMPP, but affected neither SNS per se nor the facilitatory effects of McN-A-343 and AHR 602 on SNS. 4 McN-A-343, cocaine and desipramine (but not AHR 602 or hexamethonium) blocked the net cardiac noradrenaline uptake and increased the positive chronotropic effect of noradrenaline. 5 Prior perfusion with concentrations of cocaine and desipramine sufficient to block uptake reduced or abolished the facilitatory effects of both McN-A-343 and AHR 602 on SNS. 6 Cocaine, McN-A-343 and AHR 602 displayed local anaesthetic properties on the guinea-pig wheal and frog nerve plexus tests, and their relative potencies in this respect were similar to those for inhibition of DMPP-evoked transmitter overflow. Hexamethonium did not produce local anaesthesia. 7 The results indicate that the facilitated release of noradrenaline after SNS and the inhibition of release after DMPP produced by McN-A-343 and AHR 602 are the result of their combined local anaesthetic action and inhibition of amine uptake. PMID:4447857

  10. Escherichia coli gene purR encoding a repressor protein for purine nucleotide synthesis. Cloning, nucleotide sequence, and interaction with the purF operator.

    PubMed

    Rolfes, R J; Zalkin, H

    1988-12-25

    The Escherichia coli gene purR, encoding a repressor protein, was cloned by complementation of a purR mutation. Gene purR on a multicopy plasmid repressed expression of purF and purF-lacZ and reduced the growth rate of host cells by limiting the rate of de novo purine nucleotide synthesis. The level of a 1.3-kilobase purR mRNA was higher in cells grown with excess adenine, suggesting that synthesis of the repressor may be regulated. The chromosomal locus of purR was mapped to coordinate 1755-kb on the E. coli restriction map (Kohara, Y., Akiyama, K., and Isono, K. (1987) Cell 50, 495-508). Pur repressor bound specifically to purF operator DNA as determined by gel retardation and DNase I footprinting assays. The amino acid sequence of Pur repressor was derived from the nucleotide sequence. Pur repressor subunit contains 341 amino acids and has a calculated Mr of 38,179. Pur repressor is 31-35% identical with the galR and cytR repressors and 26% identical with the lacI repressor. These four repressors are likely homologous. Amino acid sequence similarity is greatest in an amino-terminal region presumed to contain a DNA-binding domain. A similarity is also noted in the operator sites for these repressors.

  11. Role of zebrafish cytochrome P450 CYP1C genes in the reduced mesencephalic vein blood flow caused by activation of AHR2

    SciTech Connect

    Kubota, Akira; Stegeman, John J.; Woodin, Bruce R.; Iwanaga, Toshihiko; Harano, Ryo; Peterson, Richard E.; Hiraga, Takeo; Teraoka, Hiroki

    2011-06-15

    2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) causes various signs of toxicity in early life stages of vertebrates through activation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR). We previously reported a sensitive and useful endpoint of TCDD developmental toxicity in zebrafish, namely a decrease in blood flow in the dorsal midbrain, but downstream genes involved in the effect are not known. The present study addressed the role of zebrafish cytochrome P450 1C (CYP1C) genes in association with a decrease in mesencephalic vein (MsV) blood flow. The CYP1C subfamily was recently discovered in fish and includes the paralogues CYP1C1 and CYP1C2, both of which are induced via AHR2 in zebrafish embryos. We used morpholino antisense oligonucleotides (MO or morpholino) to block initiation of translation of the target genes. TCDD-induced mRNA expression of CYP1Cs and a decrease in MsV blood flow were both blocked by gene knockdown of AHR2. Gene knockdown of CYP1C1 by two different morpholinos and CYP1C2 by two different morpholinos, but not by their 5 nucleotide-mismatch controls, was effective in blocking reduced MsV blood flow caused by TCDD. The same CYP1C-MOs prevented reduction of blood flow in the MsV caused by {beta}-naphthoflavone (BNF), representing another class of AHR agonists. Whole-mount in situ hybridization revealed that mRNA expression of CYP1C1 and CYP1C2 was induced by TCDD most strongly in branchiogenic primordia and pectoral fin buds. In situ hybridization using head transverse sections showed that TCDD increased the expression of both CYP1Cs in endothelial cells of blood vessels, including the MsV. These results indicate a potential role of CYP1C1 and CYP1C2 in the local circulation failure induced by AHR2 activation in the dorsal midbrain of the zebrafish embryo. - Research Highlights: > We examine the roles of zebrafish CYP1C1 and CYP1C2 in TCDD developmental toxicity. > TCDD induces mRNA expression of both CYP1Cs in the mesencephalic vein. > Knockdown of each

  12. Regulation of Ahr signaling by Nrf2 during development: Effects of Nrf2a deficiency on PCB126 embryotoxicity in zebrafish (Danio rerio)

    PubMed Central

    Rousseau, Michelle E.; Sant, Karilyn E.; Borden, Linnea R.; Franks, Diana G.; Hahn, Mark E.; Timme-Laragy, Alicia R.

    2015-01-01

    The embryotoxicity of co-planar PCBs is regulated by the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (Ahr), and has been reported to involve oxidative stress. Ahr participates in crosstalk with another transcription factor, Nfe2l2, or Nrf2. Nrf2 binds to antioxidant response elements to regulate the adaptive response to oxidative stress. To explore aspects of the crosstalk between Nrf2 and Ahr and its impact on development, we used zebrafish (Danio rerio) with a mutated DNA binding domain in Nrf2a (nrf2afh318/fh318), rendering these embryos more sensitive to oxidative stress. Embryos were exposed to 2 nM or 5 nM PCB126 at 24 hours post fertilization (prim-5 stage of pharyngula) and examined for gene expression and morphology at 4 days post fertilization (dpf; protruding –mouth stage). Nrf2a mutant eleutheroembryos were more sensitive to PCB126 toxicity at 4 dpf, and in the absence of treatment also displayed some subtle developmental differences from wildtype embryos, including delayed inflation of the swim bladder and smaller yolk sacs. We used qPCR to measure changes in expression of the nrf gene family, keap1a, keap1b, the ahr gene family, and known target genes. cyp1a induction by PCB126 was enhanced in the Nrf2a mutants (156-fold in wildtypes vs. 228-fold in mutants exposed to 5 nM). Decreased expression of heme oxygenase (decycling) 1 (hmox1) in the Nrf2a mutants was accompanied by increased nrf2b expression. Target genes of Nrf2a and AhR2, NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (nqo1) and glutathione S-transferase, alpha-like (gsta1), showed a 2-5-fold increase in expression in the Nrf2a mutants as compared to wildtype. This study elucidates the interaction between two important transcription factor pathways in the developmental toxicity of co-planar PCBs. PMID:26325326

  13. Aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) inducers and estrogen receptor (ER) activities in surface sediments of Three Gorges Reservoir, China evaluated with in vitro cell bioassays.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jingxian; Bovee, Toine F H; Bi, Yonghong; Bernhöft, Silke; Schramm, Karl-Werner

    2014-02-01

    Two types of biological tests were employed for monitoring the toxicological profile of sediment cores in the Three Gorges Reservoir (TGR), China. In the present study, sediments collected in June 2010 from TGR were analyzed for estrogen receptor (ER)- and aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR)-mediated activities. The estrogenic activity was assessed using a rapid yeast estrogen bioassay, based on the expression of a green fluorescent reporter protein. Weak anti-estrogenic activity was detected in sediments from an area close to the dam of the reservoir, and weak estrogenic activities ranging from 0.3 to 1 ng 17β-estradiol (E2) equivalents (EQ) g(-1) dry weight sediment (dw) were detected in sediments from the Wanzhou to Guojiaba areas. In the upstream areas Wanzhou and Wushan, sediments demonstrated additive effects in co-administration of 1 nM E2 in the yeast test system, while sediments from the downstream Badong and Guojiaba areas showed estrogenic activities which seemed to be more than additive (synergistic activity). There was an increasing tendency in estrogenic activity from upstream of TGR to downstream, while this tendency terminated and converted into anti-estrogenic activity in the area close to the dam. The AhR activity was detected employing rat hepatoma cell line (H4IIE). EROD activities were found homogenously distributed in sediments in TGR ranging from 200 to 311 pg 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) EQ g(-1) dw for total AhR agonists and from 45 to 76 pg TCDD EQ g(-1) dw for more persistent AhR agonists. The known AhR agonists polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon, polychlorinated biphenyl, and PCDD/F only explained up to 8 % of the more persistent AhR agonist activity in the samples, which suggests that unidentified AhR-active compounds represented a great proportion of the TCDD EQ in sediments from TGR. These findings of estrogenic potential and dioxin-like activity in TGR sediments provide possible weight-of-evidence of potential

  14. Aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) inducers and estrogen receptor (ER) activities in surface sediments of Three Gorges Reservoir, China evaluated with in vitro cell bioassays.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jingxian; Bovee, Toine F H; Bi, Yonghong; Bernhöft, Silke; Schramm, Karl-Werner

    2014-02-01

    Two types of biological tests were employed for monitoring the toxicological profile of sediment cores in the Three Gorges Reservoir (TGR), China. In the present study, sediments collected in June 2010 from TGR were analyzed for estrogen receptor (ER)- and aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR)-mediated activities. The estrogenic activity was assessed using a rapid yeast estrogen bioassay, based on the expression of a green fluorescent reporter protein. Weak anti-estrogenic activity was detected in sediments from an area close to the dam of the reservoir, and weak estrogenic activities ranging from 0.3 to 1 ng 17β-estradiol (E2) equivalents (EQ) g(-1) dry weight sediment (dw) were detected in sediments from the Wanzhou to Guojiaba areas. In the upstream areas Wanzhou and Wushan, sediments demonstrated additive effects in co-administration of 1 nM E2 in the yeast test system, while sediments from the downstream Badong and Guojiaba areas showed estrogenic activities which seemed to be more than additive (synergistic activity). There was an increasing tendency in estrogenic activity from upstream of TGR to downstream, while this tendency terminated and converted into anti-estrogenic activity in the area close to the dam. The AhR activity was detected employing rat hepatoma cell line (H4IIE). EROD activities were found homogenously distributed in sediments in TGR ranging from 200 to 311 pg 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) EQ g(-1) dw for total AhR agonists and from 45 to 76 pg TCDD EQ g(-1) dw for more persistent AhR agonists. The known AhR agonists polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon, polychlorinated biphenyl, and PCDD/F only explained up to 8 % of the more persistent AhR agonist activity in the samples, which suggests that unidentified AhR-active compounds represented a great proportion of the TCDD EQ in sediments from TGR. These findings of estrogenic potential and dioxin-like activity in TGR sediments provide possible weight-of-evidence of potential

  15. PFOS elicits transcriptional responses of the ER, AHR and PPAR pathways in Oryzias melastigma in a stage-specific manner.

    PubMed

    Fang, Chao; Wu, Xinlong; Huang, Qiansheng; Liao, Yanyan; Liu, Liangpo; Qiu, Ling; Shen, Heqing; Dong, Sijun

    2012-01-15

    Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) is widely distributed in seawater. However, the effects of PFOS on important receptors involved in the toxicity of POPs have not been fully defined, especially for the embryonic stages of marine fish. In this study, we examined the transcriptional responses and PFOS accumulation in the marine medaka embryos at the early and late developmental stages of 4 and 10 dpf upon PFOS exposure (1, 4, and 16mg/L). PFOS accumulated in the embryos, and the embryonic burdens of PFOS at 10 dpf were markedly higher than those at 4 dpf. Moreover, thirteen genes involved in three important POPs-related receptor pathways, including ER, AHR and PPAR, were cloned and investigated. The mRNA expression levels of ERα and ERγ were not significantly altered, but the estrogenic marker genes were downregulated upon PFOS exposure at 4 dpf. Conversely, ERs and related marker genes all were significantly upregulated at 10 dpf. The expressions of ARNT and cyp1a were both upregulated at 4 dpf, while no obvious changes were detected at 10 dpf. The expressions of cyp19a and cyp19b were regulated by PFOS in a stage-specific manner. PFOS produced different effects on three isoforms of PPAR. PPARα and PPARβ were first inhibited at 4 dpf and were induced at 10 dpf. PFOS did not elicit a change in PPARγ expression at either stage. In conclusion, this study showed that PFOS has an estrogenic activity and endocrine-disruptive properties. Meanwhile, PFOS could elicit transcriptional responses on POPs-related pathways in a stage-specific manner.

  16. Complementary PLS and KNN algorithms for improved 3D-QSDAR consensus modeling of AhR binding

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Multiple validation techniques (Y-scrambling, complete training/test set randomization, determination of the dependence of R2test on the number of randomization cycles, etc.) aimed to improve the reliability of the modeling process were utilized and their effect on the statistical parameters of the models was evaluated. A consensus partial least squares (PLS)-similarity based k-nearest neighbors (KNN) model utilizing 3D-SDAR (three dimensional spectral data-activity relationship) fingerprint descriptors for prediction of the log(1/EC50) values of a dataset of 94 aryl hydrocarbon receptor binders was developed. This consensus model was constructed from a PLS model utilizing 10 ppm x 10 ppm x 0.5 Å bins and 7 latent variables (R2test of 0.617), and a KNN model using 2 ppm x 2 ppm x 0.5 Å bins and 6 neighbors (R2test of 0.622). Compared to individual models, improvement in predictive performance of approximately 10.5% (R2test of 0.685) was observed. Further experiments indicated that this improvement is likely an outcome of the complementarity of the information contained in 3D-SDAR matrices of different granularity. For similarly sized data sets of Aryl hydrocarbon (AhR) binders the consensus KNN and PLS models compare favorably to earlier reports. The ability of 3D-QSDAR (three dimensional quantitative spectral data-activity relationship) to provide structural interpretation was illustrated by a projection of the most frequently occurring bins on the standard coordinate space, thus allowing identification of structural features related to toxicity. PMID:24257141

  17. Change of function of the wheat stress-responsive transcriptional repressor TaRAP2.1L by repressor motif modification.

    PubMed

    Amalraj, Amritha; Luang, Sukanya; Kumar, Manoj Yadav; Sornaraj, Pradeep; Eini, Omid; Kovalchuk, Nataliya; Bazanova, Natalia; Li, Yuan; Yang, Nannan; Eliby, Serik; Langridge, Peter; Hrmova, Maria; Lopato, Sergiy

    2016-02-01

    Plants respond to abiotic stresses by changes in gene regulation, including stress-inducible expression of transcriptional activators and repressors. One of the best characterized families of drought-related transcription factors are dehydration-responsive element binding (DREB) proteins, known as C-repeat binding factors (CBF). The wheat DREB/CBF gene TaRAP2.1L was isolated from drought-affected tissues using a dehydration-responsive element (DRE) as bait in a yeast one-hybrid screen. TaRAP2.1L is induced by elevated abscisic acid, drought and cold. A C-terminal ethylene responsive factor-associated amphiphilic repression (EAR) motif, known to be responsible for active repression of target genes, was identified in the TaRAP2.1L protein. It was found that TaRAP2.1L has a unique selectivity of DNA-binding, which differs from that of DREB activators. This binding selectivity remains unchanged in a TaRAP2.1L variant with an inactivated EAR motif (TaRAP2.1Lmut). To study the role of the TaRAP2.1L repressor activity associated with the EAR motif in planta, transgenic wheat overexpressing native or mutated TaRAP2.1L was generated. Overexpression of TaRAP2.1L under constitutive and stress-inducible promoters in transgenic wheat and barley led to dwarfism and decreased frost tolerance. By contrast, constitutive overexpression of the TaRAP2.1Lmut gene had little or no negative influence on wheat development or grain yield. Transgenic lines with the TaRAP2.1Lmut transgene had an enhanced ability to survive frost and drought. The improved stress tolerance is attributed to up-regulation of several stress-related genes known to be downstream genes of DREB/CBF activators.

  18. The N-terminal domain of the repressor of Staphylococcus aureus phage Φ11 possesses an unusual dimerization ability and DNA binding affinity.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Anindya; Mandal, Sukhendu; Sau, Subrata

    2014-01-01

    Bacteriophage Φ11 uses Staphylococcus aureus as its host and, like lambdoid phages, harbors three homologous operators in between its two divergently oriented repressor genes. None of the repressors of Φ11, however, showed binding to all three operators, even at high concentrations. To understand why the DNA binding mechanism of Φ11 repressors does not match that of lambdoid phage repressors, we studied the N-terminal domain of the Φ11 lysogenic repressor, as it harbors a putative helix-turn-helix motif. Our data revealed that the secondary and tertiary structures of the N-terminal domain were different from those of the full-length repressor. Nonetheless, the N-terminal domain was able to dimerize and bind to the operators similar to the intact repressor. In addition, the operator base specificity, binding stoichiometry, and binding mechanism of this domain were nearly identical to those of the whole repressor. The binding affinities of the repressor and its N-terminal domain were reduced to a similar extent when the temperature was increased to 42°C. Both proteins also adequately dislodged a RNA polymerase from a Φ11 DNA fragment carrying two operators and a promoter. Unlike the intact repressor, the binding of the N-terminal domain to two adjacent operator sites was not cooperative in nature. Taken together, we suggest that the dimerization and DNA binding abilities of the N-terminal domain of the Φ11 repressor are distinct from those of the DNA binding domains of other phage repressors. PMID:24747758

  19. The N-Terminal Domain of the Repressor of Staphylococcus aureus Phage Φ11 Possesses an Unusual Dimerization Ability and DNA Binding Affinity

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Anindya; Mandal, Sukhendu; Sau, Subrata

    2014-01-01

    Bacteriophage Φ11 uses Staphylococcus aureus as its host and, like lambdoid phages, harbors three homologous operators in between its two divergently oriented repressor genes. None of the repressors of Φ11, however, showed binding to all three operators, even at high concentrations. To understand why the DNA binding mechanism of Φ11 repressors does not match that of lambdoid phage repressors, we studied the N-terminal domain of the Φ11 lysogenic repressor, as it harbors a putative helix-turn-helix motif. Our data revealed that the secondary and tertiary structures of the N-terminal domain were different from those of the full-length repressor. Nonetheless, the N-terminal domain was able to dimerize and bind to the operators similar to the intact repressor. In addition, the operator base specificity, binding stoichiometry, and binding mechanism of this domain were nearly identical to those of the whole repressor. The binding affinities of the repressor and its N-terminal domain were reduced to a similar extent when the temperature was increased to 42°C. Both proteins also adequately dislodged a RNA polymerase from a Φ11 DNA fragment carrying two operators and a promoter. Unlike the intact repressor, the binding of the N-terminal domain to two adjacent operator sites was not cooperative in nature. Taken together, we suggest that the dimerization and DNA binding abilities of the N-terminal domain of the Φ11 repressor are distinct from those of the DNA binding domains of other phage repressors. PMID:24747758

  20. A nitrate-inducible GARP family gene encodes an auto-repressible transcriptional repressor in rice.

    PubMed

    Sawaki, Naoya; Tsujimoto, Ryoma; Shigyo, Mikao; Konishi, Mineko; Toki, Seiichi; Fujiwara, Toru; Yanagisawa, Shuichi

    2013-04-01

    Nitrogen is the most important macronutrient in plants and its supply induces responses in gene expression, metabolism and developmental processes. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the nitrogen responses remain poorly understood. Here we show that the supply of nitrate but not ammonium immediately induces the expression of a transcriptional repressor gene in rice, designated NIGT1 (Nitrate-Inducible, GARP-type Transcriptional Repressor 1). The results of DNA-binding site selection experiments and electrophoretic mobility shift assays indicated that NIGT1 binds to DNA containing either of two consensus sequences, GAATC or GAATATTC. In transient reporter assays, NIGT1 was found to repress transcription from the promoters containing the identified NIGT1-binding sequences in vivo. Furthermore, NIGT1 repressed the activity of its own promoter, suggesting an autorepression mechanism. Consistently, nitrate-induced NIGT1 expression was found to be down-regulated after a transient peak during nitrate treatment, and the nitrate-induced expression of NIGT1 decreased in transgenic rice plants in which this gene was constitutively overexpressed. Furthermore, the chlorophyll content that could be a marker of nitrogen utilization was found to be decreased in NIGT1 overexpressors of rice grown with nitrate medium but not with ammonium medium. Thus, we propose NIGT1 as a nitrate-inducible and autorepressible transcriptional repressor that may play a role in the nitrogen response in rice. Taken together with the fact that the NIGT1-binding sites are conserved in promoter sequences of Arabidopsis NIGT1 homologs, our findings imply the presence of a time-dependent complex system for nitrate-responsive transcriptional regulation that is conserved in both monocots and dicots.

  1. Structural Basis for the Differential Regulation of DNA by the Methionine Repressor MetJ

    SciTech Connect

    Augustus, Anne; Reardon, Patrick; Heller, William T; Spicer, Leonard D.

    2006-01-01

    The Met regulon in Escherichia coli encodes several proteins responsible for the biosynthesis of methionine. Regulation of the expression of most of these proteins is governed by the methionine repressor protein MetJ and its co-repressor, the methionine derivative S-adenosylmethionine. Genes controlled by MetJ contain from two to five sequential copies of a homologous 8-bp sequence called the metbox. A crystal structure for one of the complexes, the repressor tetramer bound to two metboxes, has been reported (Somers, W. S., and S. E. Phillips (1992) Nature 359, 387-393), but little structural work on the larger assemblies has been done presumably because of the difficulties in crystallization and the variability in the number and sequences of metboxes for the various genes. Small angle neutron scattering was used to study complexes of MetJ and S-adenosylmethionine with double-stranded DNA containing two, three, and five metboxes. Our results demonstrate that the crystal structure of the two-metbox complex is not the native solution conformation of the complex. Instead, the system adopts a less compact conformation in which there is decreased interaction between the adjacent MetJ dimers. Models built of the higher order complexes from the scattering data show that the three-metbox complex is organized much like the two-metbox complex. However, the five-metbox complex differs significantly from the smaller complexes, providing much closer packing of the adjacent MetJ dimers and allowing additional contacts not available in the crystal structure. The results suggest that there is a structural basis for the differences observed in the regulatory effectiveness of MetJ for the various genes of the Met regulon.

  2. Structure of the MecI repressor from Staphylococcus aureus in complex with the cognate DNA operator of mec

    SciTech Connect

    Safo, Martin K.; Ko, Tzu-Ping; Musayev, Faik N.; Zhao, Qixun; Archer, Gordon L.

    2006-04-01

    The up-and-down binding of dimeric MecI to mecA dyad DNA may account for the cooperative effect of the repressor. The dimeric repressor MecI regulates the mecA gene that encodes the penicillin-binding protein PBP-2a in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). MecI is similar to BlaI, the repressor for the blaZ gene of β-lactamase. MecI and BlaI can bind to both operator DNA sequences. The crystal structure of MecI in complex with the 32 base-pair cognate DNA of mec was determined to 3.8 Å resolution. MecI is a homodimer and each monomer consists of a compact N-terminal winged-helix domain, which binds to DNA, and a loosely packed C-terminal helical domain, which intertwines with its counter-monomer. The crystal contains horizontal layers of virtual DNA double helices extending in three directions, which are separated by perpendicular DNA segments. Each DNA segment is bound to two MecI dimers. Similar to the BlaI–mec complex, but unlike the MecI–bla complex, the MecI repressors bind to both sides of the mec DNA dyad that contains four conserved sequences of TACA/TGTA. The results confirm the up-and-down binding to the mec operator, which may account for cooperative effect of the repressor.

  3. Mechanism of action of a repressor of dioxin-dependent induction of Cyp1a1 gene transcription.

    PubMed Central

    Watson, A J; Weir-Brown, K I; Bannister, R M; Chu, F F; Reisz-Porszasz, S; Fujii-Kuriyama, Y; Sogawa, K; Hankinson, O

    1992-01-01

    A dominant mutant of Hepa-1 cells, c31, expresses a repressor that prevents 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD)-dependent stimulation of Cyp1a1 transcription. The repressor acts via the xenobiotic-responsive elements (XREs), which are the DNA-binding sites for the aryl hydrocarbon (Ah) receptor-TCDD complex during transcriptional activation of the gene. High-salt nuclear extracts prepared from c31 cells grown with TCDD contained normal levels of the Ah receptor which bound the XRE with normal affinity, as judged by in vitro gel mobility shift assays. Furthermore, extracts prepared from these cells, grown either with or without TCDD, contained no novel XRE-binding proteins compared with extracts from wild-type Hepa-1 cells. However, in vivo genomic footprinting demonstrated that TCDD treatment leads to binding of the Ah receptor to the XREs in Hepa-1 but not mutant cells. This finding suggests that the repressor associates with the Ah receptor to prevent its binding to the XREs and that high-salt treatment either causes dissociation of the receptor/repressor complex or fails to extract the repressor from nuclei. The results underscore the importance of using both in vivo and in vitro assays for analyzing DNA-protein interactions. Images PMID:1314949

  4. BZR1 is a transcriptional repressor with dual roles in brassinosteroid homeostasis and growth responses

    PubMed Central

    He, Jun-Xian; Gendron, Joshua M.; Sun, Yu; Gampala, Srinivas S. L.; Gendron, Nathan; Sun, Catherine Qing; Wang, Zhi-Yong

    2010-01-01

    Brassinosteroid (BR) homeostasis and signaling are crucial for normal growth and development of plants. BR signaling through cell-surface receptor kinases and intracellular components leads to dephosphorylation and accumulation of the nuclear protein BZR1. How BR signaling regulates gene expression, however, remains unknown. Here we show that BZR1 is a transcriptional repressor that has a previously unknown DNA binding domain and binds directly to the promoters of feedback-regulated BR biosynthetic genes. Microarray analyses identified additional potential targets of BZR1 and illustrated, together with physiological studies, that BZR1 coordinates BR homeostasis and signaling by playing dual roles in regulating BR biosynthesis and downstream growth responses. PMID:15681342

  5. Genomic organization and promoter analysis of a transcriptional repressor gene from Fenneropenaeus chinensis.

    PubMed

    Lai, Xiaofang; Shen, Shanrui; Gao, Huan; Yan, Binlun

    2015-02-01

    In this study, we cloned and sequenced genomic sequences from a Fenneropenaeus chinensis transcriptional repressor gene, FcTR. The FcTR gene is 2,671 bp in length and has four exons and three introns. The 873 bp promoter contains several transcription factor binding sites, including a TATA box and a cyclic AMP-responsive element. Promoter deletion analysis using a luciferase reporter gene identified regulatory elements. Challenge with white spot syndrome virus increased expression from the promoter-deletion constructs. These results suggest that FcTR might play an important role in the shrimp immune response.

  6. Adrenergic signals direct rhythmic expression of transcriptional repressor CREM in the pineal gland.

    PubMed

    Stehle, J H; Foulkes, N S; Molina, C A; Simonneaux, V; Pévet, P; Sassone-Corsi, P

    1993-09-23

    Transcription factor CREM appears to play a key physiological and developmental role within the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. This axis is modulated by the pineal hormone melatonin, whose production is in turn driven by the endogenous clock. There is striking circadian fluctuation of a novel CREM isoform, ICER, which is expressed at high levels during the night. ICER is generated from an alternative, intronic promoter and functions as a powerful repressor of cyclic AMP-induced transcription. Rhythmic adrenergic signals originated by the clock direct ICER expression by stimulation of the cAMP signal transduction pathway.

  7. Assessment of energetic costs of AhR activation by β-naphthoflavone in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) hepatocytes using metabolic flux analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Nault, Rance; Abdul-Fattah, Hiba; Mironov, Gleb G.; Berezovski, Maxim V.; Moon, Thomas W.

    2013-08-15

    Exposure to environmental contaminants such as activators of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) leads to the induction of defense and detoxification mechanisms. While these mechanisms allow organisms to metabolize and excrete at least some of these environmental contaminants, it has been proposed that these mechanisms lead to significant energetic challenges. This study tests the hypothesis that activation of the AhR by the model agonist β-naphthoflavone (βNF) results in increased energetic costs in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) hepatocytes. To address this hypothesis, we employed traditional biochemical approaches to examine energy allocation and metabolism including the adenylate energy charge (AEC), protein synthesis rates, Na{sup +}/K{sup +}-ATPase activity, and enzyme activities. Moreover, we have used for the first time in a fish cell preparation, metabolic flux analysis (MFA) an in silico approach for the estimation of intracellular metabolic fluxes. Exposure of trout hepatocytes to 1 μM βNF for 48 h did not alter hepatocyte AEC, protein synthesis, or Na{sup +}/K{sup +}-ATPase activity but did lead to sparing of glycogen reserves and changes in activities of alanine aminotransferase and citrate synthase suggesting altered metabolism. Conversely, MFA did not identify altered metabolic fluxes, although we do show that the dynamic metabolism of isolated trout hepatocytes poses a significant challenge for this type of approach which should be considered in future studies. - Highlights: • Energetic costs of AhR activation by βNF was examined in rainbow trout hepatocytes. • Metabolic flux analysis was performed on a fish cell preparation for the first time. • Exposure to βNF led to sparing of glycogen reserves and altered enzyme activities. • Adenylate energy charge was maintained despite temporal changes in metabolism.

  8. Selective Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Modulator 3,3'-Diindolylmethane Impairs AhR and ARNT Signaling and Protects Mouse Neuronal Cells Against Hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Rzemieniec, J; Litwa, E; Wnuk, A; Lason, W; Krzeptowski, W; Kajta, M

    2016-10-01

    The neuroprotective potential of 3,3'-diindolylmethane (DIM), which is a selective aryl hydrocarbon receptor modulator, has recently been shown in cellular and animal models of Parkinson's disease and lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammation. However, there are no data concerning the protective capacity and mechanisms of DIM action in neuronal cells exposed to hypoxia. The aim of the present study was to investigate the neuroprotective potential of DIM against the hypoxia-induced damage in mouse hippocampal cells in primary cultures, with a particular focus on DIM interactions with the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), its nuclear translocator ARNT, and estrogen receptor β (ERβ). In the present study, 18 h of hypoxia induced apoptotic processes, in terms of the mitochondrial membrane potential, activation of caspase-3, and fragmentation of cell nuclei. These effects were accompanied by substantial lactate dehydrogenase release and neuronal cell death. The results of the present study demonstrated strong neuroprotective and anti-apoptotic actions of DIM in hippocampal cells exposed to hypoxia. In addition, DIM decreased the Ahr and Arnt mRNA expression and stimulated Erβ mRNA expression level. DIM-induced mRNA alterations were mirrored by changes in protein levels, except for ERβ, as detected by ELISA, Western blotting, and immunofluorescence labeling. We also demonstrated that DIM decreased the expression of AhR-regulated CYP1A1. Using specific siRNAs, we provided evidence that impairment of AhR and ARNT, but not ERβ plays a key role in the neuroprotective action of DIM against hypoxia-induced cell damage. This study may have implication for identifying new agents that could protect neurons against hypoxia by targeting AhR/ARNT signaling. PMID:26476840

  9. New CYP1 genes in the frog Xenopus (Silurana) tropicalis: Induction patterns and effects of AHR agonists during development

    SciTech Connect

    Joensson, Maria E.; Berg, Cecilia; Goldstone, Jared V.; Stegeman, John J.

    2011-01-15

    The Xenopus tropicalis genome shows a single gene in each of the four cytochrome P450 1 (CYP1) subfamilies that occur in vertebrates, designated as CYP1A, CYP1B1, CYP1C1, and CYP1D1. We cloned the cDNAs of these genes and examined their expression in untreated tadpoles and in tadpoles exposed to waterborne aryl hydrocarbon receptor agonists, 3,3',4,4',5-pentachlorobiphenyl (PCB126), {beta}-naphthoflavone ({beta}NF), or indigo. We also examined the effects of PCB126 on expression of genes involved in stress response, cell proliferation, thyroid homeostasis, and prostaglandin synthesis. PCB126 induced CYP1A, CYP1B1, and CYP1C1 but had little effect on CYP1D1 (77-, 1.7-, 4.6- and 1.4-fold induction versus the control, respectively). {beta}NF induced CYP1A and CYP1C1 (26- and 2.5-fold), while, under conditions used, indigo tended to induce only CYP1A (1.9-fold). The extent of CYP1 induction by PCB126 and {beta}NF was positively correlated to the number of putative dioxin response elements 0-20 kb upstream of the start codons. No morphological effect was observed in tadpoles exposed to 1 nM-10 {mu}M PCB126 at two days post-fertilization (dpf) and screened 20 days later. However, in 14-dpf tadpoles a slight up-regulation of the genes for PCNA, transthyretin, HSC70, Cu-Zn SOD, and Cox-2 was observed two days after exposure to 1 {mu}M PCB126. This study of the full suite of CYP1 genes in an amphibian species reveals gene- and AHR agonist-specific differences in response, as well as a much lower sensitivity to CYP1 induction and short-term toxicity by PCB126 compared with in fish larvae. The single genes in each CYP1 subfamily may make X. tropicalis a useful model for mechanistic studies of CYP1 functions.

  10. ITE and TCDD differentially regulate the vascular remodeling of rat placenta via the activation of AhR.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yanming; Chen, Xiao; Zhou, Qian; He, Qizhi; Kang, Jiuhong; Zheng, Jing; Wang, Kai; Duan, Tao

    2014-01-01

    Vascular remodeling in the placenta is essential for normal fetal development. The previous studies have demonstrated that in utero exposure to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD, an environmental toxicant) induces the intrauterine fetal death in many species via the activation of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). In the current study, we compared the effects of 2-(1'H-indole-3'-carbonyl)-thiazole-4-carboxylic acid methyl ester (ITE) and TCDD on the vascular remodeling of rat placentas. Pregnant rats on gestational day (GD) 15 were randomly assigned into 5 groups, and were exposed to a single dose of 1.6 and 8.0 mg/kg body weight (bw) ITE, 1.6 and 8.0 µg/kg bw TCDD, or an equivalent volume of the vehicle, respectively. The dams were sacrificed on GD20 and the placental tissues were gathered. The intrauterine fetal death was observed only in 8.0 µg/kg bw TCDD-exposed group and no significant difference was seen in either the placental weight or the fetal weight among all these groups. The immunohistochemical and histological analyses revealed that as compared with the vehicle-control, TCDD, but not ITE, suppressed the placental vascular remodeling, including reduced the ratio of the placental labyrinth zone to the basal zone thickness (at least 0.71 fold of control), inhibited the maternal sinusoids dilation and thickened the trophoblastic septa. However, no marked difference was observed in the density of fetal capillaries in the labyrinth zone among these groups, although significant differences were detected in the expression of angiogenic growth factors between ITE and TCDD-exposed groups, especially Angiopoietin-2 (Ang-2), Endoglin, Interferon-γ (IFN-γ) and placenta growth factor (PIGF). These results suggest ITE and TCDD differentially regulate the vascular remodeling of rat placentas, as well as the expression of angiogenic factors and their receptors, which in turn may alter the blood flow in the late gestation and partially resulted in

  11. Activation of estrogen receptor signaling by the dioxin-like aryl hydrocarbon receptor agonist, 3,3',4,4',5-Pentachlorobiphenyl (PCB126) in salmon in vitro system

    SciTech Connect

    Mortensen, Anne Skjetne; Arukwe, Augustine

    2008-03-01

    Available toxicological evidence indicates that environmental contaminants with strong affinity to the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) have anti-estrogenic properties in both mammalian and non-mammalian in vivo and in vitro studies. The primary objective of the present study was to investigate the interactions between the AhR and estrogen receptor (ER) in salmon in vitro system. Two separate experiments were performed and gene expression patterns were analyzed using real-time PCR, while protein analysis was done by immunoblotting. Firstly, salmon primary hepatocytes were exposed to the dioxin-like PCB126 at 1, 10 and 50 pM and ER agonist nonylphenol (NP) at 5 and 10 {mu}M, singly or in combination. Our data showed increased levels of ER-mediated gene expression (vitellogenin: Vtg, zona radiata protein: Zr-protein, ER{alpha}, ER{beta} and vigilin) as well as increased cellular ER{alpha} protein levels after treatment with NP and PCB126, singly or in combination. PCB126 treatment alone produced, as expected, increased transcription of AhR nuclear translocator (Arnt), CYP1A1 and AhR repressor (AhRR) mRNA, and these responses were reduced in the presence of NP concentrations. PCB126 exposure alone did not produce significant effect on AhR2{alpha} mRNA but increased (at 1 and 50 pM) and decreased (at 10 pM) AhR2{beta} mRNA below control level. For AhR2{delta} and AhR2{gamma} isotypes, PCB126 (at 1 pM) produced significant decreases (total inhibition for AhR2{gamma}) of mRNA levels but was indifferent at 10 and 50 pM, compared to control. NP exposure alone produced concentration-dependent significant decrease of AhR2{beta} mRNA. In contrast, while 5 {mu}M NP produced an indifferent effect on AhR2{delta} and AhR2{gamma}, 10 {mu}M NP produced significant decrease (total inhibition for AhR2{gamma}) and the presence of NP produced apparent PCB126 concentration-specific modulation of all AhR isotypes. A second experiment was performed to evaluate the involvement of ER

  12. Structure of wild-type and mutant repressors and of the control region of the rbt operon of Klebsiella aerogenes.

    PubMed

    Wu, J; Anderton-Loviny, T; Smith, C A; Hartley, B S

    1985-05-01

    Pentitol metabolism in Klebsiella aerogenes is encoded by continuous ribitol (rbt) and D-arabitol (dal) operons transcribed in bipolar fashion and sandwiched between long stretches of homologous DNA. The operons are separated by a central control region (2.2 kb) which encodes both the repressors and all the control sequences. The rbt repressor (270 amino acids) shows homology to the Escherichia coli lac repressor and other DNA-binding proteins. It is transcribed from the strand opposite the rbt operon and the intervening control region (254-bp) contains features which reflect the complex regulation. A rbt-constitutive mutant strain used in previous studies of experimental enzyme evolution encodes a truncated rbt-peptide of 133 residues due to a frameshift mutation. PMID:3891331

  13. Prophage repression as a model for the study of gene regulation. I. Titration of the lambda repressor.

    PubMed

    Wiesmeyer, H

    1966-01-01

    Wiesmeyer, Herbert (Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tenn.). Prophage repression as a model for the study of gene regulation. I. Titration of the lambda repressor. J. Bacteriol. 91:89-94. 1966.-The concentration of lambda repressor molecules within a lambda lysogenic cell was estimated from the multiplicity of superinfecting homologous phage necessary to permit replication and release of plaque-forming units. A multiplicity of 20 superinfecting phage was found sufficient to permit replication to occur in the normal lambda lysogen. The phage released after lysis of the superinfected lysogen was composed of both prophage and superinfecting phage types. Superinfection of the lysogen at lower multiplicities resulted in the lysis of only a small percentage of infected cells and is thought to represent a possible heterogeneity of repressor concentration in the lysogenic population. Viability of the superinfecting particle was found to be unnecessary for titration of the repressor. The repressor concentration in three lysogens of the nonultraviolet-inducible mutant of lambda, lambda(ind-), was found to be greater than 20 regardless of the host bacterium. However, the number of cells yielding phage after superinfection was found to vary with the particular host. The specificity of the lambda repressor was shown to be limited to homologous phage, as determined following heterologous superinfection experiments with phages T6r, 82c, 434c, 434hy, and 424. In all instances except that of superinfection with phage 434hy, only heterologous phage replication occurred. Superinfection by phage 434hy resulted in the release of both prophage and superinfecting phage types. The latter type represented approximately 80% of the total phage released.

  14. Proton-linked contributions to site-specific interactions of lambda cI repressor and OR.

    PubMed

    Senear, D F; Ackers, G K

    1990-07-17

    The effects of proton activity on the site-specific interactions of cI repressors with operator sites OR were studied by using DNase I footprint titration. Individual-site binding isotherms were obtained for the binding of repressor to each site of wild-type OR and of mutant operators in which binding to some sites is eliminated. The Gibbs energies for binding and for cooperativity (in every operator configuration) were determined at each pH (range 5-8). The proton-linked effects clearly account for a significant fraction of the difference in affinities for the three operator sites. The most dramatic effects on the repressor-operator binding interactions are at acid pH, and therefore do not involve the basic groups in the repressor N-terminal arm known to contact the DNA. Also, the proton-linked effects are different at the three operator sites as indicated by significantly different derivative relationships, partial derivative of ln k versus partial derivative of ln aH = net proton absorption (delta nu bar(H)). These results implicate ionizable repressor groups which may not contact the DNA and conformational differences between the three repressor-operator site complexes as being important components to the mechanism of site specificity. The extensive data base generated by these studies was also used to reevaluate the traditional models used to describe cooperativity in this system. The results confirm the lack of significant cooperative interaction between OR1 and OR3 at all conditions. However, the data for some experimental conditions are clearly inconsistent with the (selection) rule, that cooperative interaction between OR2 and OR3 is eliminated by ligation at OR1.

  15. Regulated expression of a repressor protein: FadR activates iclR.

    PubMed

    Gui, L; Sunnarborg, A; LaPorte, D C

    1996-08-01

    The control of the glyoxylate bypass operon (aceBAK) of Escherichia coli is mediated by two regulatory proteins, IclMR and FadR. IclMR is a repressor protein which has previously been shown to bind to a site which overlaps the aceBAK promoter. FAR is a repressor/activator protein which participates in control of the genes of fatty acid metabolism. A sequence just upstream of the iclR promoter bears a striking resemblance to FadR binding sites found in the fatty acid metabolic genes. The in vitro binding specificity of FadR, determined by oligonucleotide selection, was in good agreement with the sequences of these sites. The ability of FadR to bind to the site associated with iclR was demonstrated by gel shift and DNase I footprint analyses. Disruption of FadR or inactivation of the FadR binding site of iclR decreased the expression of an iclR::lacZ operon fusion, indicating that FadR activates the expression of iclR. It has been reported that disruption of fadR increases the expression of aceBAK. We observed a similar increase when we inactivated the FadR binding site of an iclR+ allele. This result suggests that FadR regulates aceBAK indirectly by altering the expression of IclR. PMID:8755903

  16. Crystal Structure of the Arginine Repressor Protein in Complex With the DNA Operator From Mycobacterium Tuberculosis

    SciTech Connect

    Cherney, L.T.; Cherney, M.M.; Garen, C.R.; Lu, G.J.; James, M.N.G.

    2009-05-12

    The Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) gene product encoded by open reading frame Rv1657 is an arginine repressor (ArgR). All genes involved in the L-arginine (hereafter arginine) biosynthetic pathway are essential for optimal growth of the Mtb pathogen, thus making MtbArgR a potential target for drug design. The C-terminal domains of arginine repressors (CArgR) participate in oligomerization and arginine binding. Several crystal forms of CArgR from Mtb (MtbCArgR) have been obtained. The X-ray crystal structures of MtbCArgR were determined at 1.85 {angstrom} resolution with bound arginine and at 2.15 {angstrom} resolution in the unliganded form. These structures show that six molecules of MtbCArgR are arranged into a hexamer having approximate 32 point symmetry that is formed from two trimers. The trimers rotate relative to each other by about 11{sup o} upon binding arginine. All residues in MtbCArgR deemed to be important for hexamer formation and for arginine binding have been identified from the experimentally determined structures presented. The hexamer contains six regular sites in which the arginine molecules have one common binding mode and three sites in which the arginine molecules have two overlapping binding modes. The latter sites only bind the ligand at high (200 mM) arginine concentrations.

  17. Functional and Structural Analysis of HrcA Repressor Protein from Caulobacter crescentus

    PubMed Central

    Susin, Michelle F.; Perez, Humberto R.; Baldini, Regina L.; Gomes, Suely L.

    2004-01-01

    A large number of bacteria regulate chaperone gene expression during heat shock by the HrcA-CIRCE system, in which the DNA element called CIRCE serves as binding site for the repressor protein HrcA under nonstress conditions. In Caulobacter crescentus, the groESL operon presents a dual type of control. Heat shock induction is controlled by a σ32-dependent promoter and the HrcA-CIRCE system plays a role in regulation of groESL expression under physiological temperatures. To study the activity of HrcA in vitro, we purified a histidine-tagged version of the protein, and specific binding to the CIRCE element was obtained by gel shift assays. The amount of retarded DNA increased significantly in the presence of GroES/GroEL, suggesting that the GroE chaperonin machine modulates HrcA activity. Further evidence of this modulation was obtained using lacZ transcription fusions with the groESL regulatory region in C. crescentus cells, producing different amounts of GroES/GroEL. In addition, we identified the putative DNA-binding domain of HrcA through extensive protein sequence comparison and constructed various HrcA mutant proteins containing single amino acid substitutions in or near this region. In vitro and in vivo experiments with these mutated proteins indicated several amino acids important for repressor activity. PMID:15466027

  18. Cross-regulation between an alternative splicing activator and a transcription repressor controls neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Raj, Bushra; O'Hanlon, Dave; Vessey, John P; Pan, Qun; Ray, Debashish; Buckley, Noel J; Miller, Freda D; Blencowe, Benjamin J

    2011-09-01

    Neurogenesis requires the concerted action of numerous genes that are regulated at multiple levels. However, how different layers of gene regulation are coordinated to promote neurogenesis is not well understood. We show that the neural-specific Ser/Arg repeat-related protein of 100 kDa (nSR100/SRRM4) negatively regulates REST (NRSF), a transcriptional repressor of genes required for neurogenesis. nSR100 directly promotes alternative splicing of REST transcripts to produce a REST isoform (REST4) with greatly reduced repressive activity, thereby activating expression of REST targets in neural cells. Conversely, REST directly represses nSR100 in nonneural cells to prevent the activation of neural-specific splicing events. Consistent with a critical role for nSR100 in the inhibition of REST activity, blocking nSR100 expression in the developing mouse brain impairs neurogenesis. Our results thus reveal a fundamental role for direct regulatory interactions between a splicing activator and transcription repressor in the control of the multilayered regulatory programs required for neurogenesis. PMID:21884984

  19. Variations in the Fast Folding Rates of the λ-Repressor: A Hybrid Molecular Dynamics Study

    PubMed Central

    Pogorelov, Taras V.; Luthey-Schulten, Zaida

    2004-01-01

    The ability to predict the effects of mutations on protein folding rates and mechanisms would greatly facilitate folding studies. Using a realistic full atom potential coupled with a G\\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} \\begin{equation*}{\\mathrm{{\\bar {o}}}}\\end{equation*}\\end{document}-like potential biased to the native state structure, we have investigated the effects of point mutations on the folding rates of a small single domain protein. The hybrid potential provides a detailed level of description of the folding mechanism that we correlate to features of the folding energy landscapes of fast and slow mutants of an 80-residue-long fragment of the λ-repressor. Our computational reconstruction of the folding events is compared to the recent experimental results of W. Y. Yang and M. Gruebele (see companion article) and T. G. Oas and co-workers on the λ-repressor, and helps to clarify the differences observed in the folding mechanisms of the various mutants. PMID:15240458

  20. Kinetic and thermodynamic studies of purine repressor binding to corepressor and operator DNA.

    PubMed

    Xu, H; Moraitis, M; Reedstrom, R J; Matthews, K S

    1998-04-10

    The kinetic and thermodynamic parameters for purine repressor (PurR)-operator and PurR-guanine binding were determined using fluorescence spectroscopy and nitrocellulose filter binding. Operator binding affinity was increased by the presence of guanine as demonstrated previously (Choi, K. Y., Lu, F., and Zalkin, H. (1994) J. Biol. Chem. 269, 24066-24072; Rolfes, R. J., and Zalkin, H. (1990) J. Bacteriol. 172, 5637-5642), and conversely guanine binding affinity was increased by the presence of operator. Guanine enhanced operator affinity by increasing the association rate constant and decreasing the dissociation rate constant for binding. Operator had minimal effect on the association rate constant for guanine binding; however, this DNA decreased the dissociation rate constant for corepressor by approximately 10-fold. Despite significant sequence and structural similarity between PurR and LacI proteins, PurR binds to its corepressor ligand with a lower association rate constant than LacI binds to its inducer ligand. However, the rate constant for PurR-guanine binding to operator is approximately 3-fold higher than for LacI binding to its cognate operator under the same solution conditions. The distinct metabolic roles of the enzymes under regulation by these two repressor proteins provide a rationale for the observed functional differences.

  1. High-Resolution Specificity from DNA Sequencing Highlights Alternative Modes of Lac Repressor Binding

    PubMed Central

    Zuo, Zheng; Stormo, Gary D.

    2014-01-01

    Knowing the specificity of transcription factors is critical to understanding regulatory networks in cells. The lac repressor–operator system has been studied for many years, but not with high-throughput methods capable of determining specificity comprehensively. Details of its binding interaction and its selection of an asymmetric binding site have been controversial. We employed a new method to accurately determine relative binding affinities to thousands of sequences simultaneously, requiring only sequencing of bound and unbound fractions. An analysis of 2560 different DNA sequence variants, including both base changes and variations in operator length, provides a detailed view of lac repressor sequence specificity. We find that the protein can bind with nearly equal affinities to operators of three different lengths, but the sequence preference changes depending on the length, demonstrating alternative modes of interaction between the protein and DNA. The wild-type operator has an odd length, causing the two monomers to bind in alternative modes, making the asymmetric operator the preferred binding site. We tested two other members of the LacI/GalR protein family and find that neither can bind with high affinity to sites with alternative lengths or shows evidence of alternative binding modes. A further comparison with known and predicted motifs suggests that the lac repressor may be unique in this ability and that this may contribute to its selection. PMID:25209146

  2. DAX1 suppresses FXR transactivity as a novel co-repressor

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Jin; Lu, Yan; Liu, Ruya; Xiong, Xuelian; Zhang, Zhijian; Zhang, Xianfeng; Ning, Guang; Li, Xiaoying

    2011-09-09

    Highlights: {yields} DAX1 is co-localized with FXR and interacts with FXR. {yields} DAX1 acts as a negative regulator of FXR. {yields} Three LXXLL motifs in the N-terminus of DAX1 were required. {yields} DAX1 suppresses FXR transactivation by competing with co-activators. -- Abstract: Bile acid receptor FXR (farnesoid X receptor) is a key regulator of hepatic bile acid, glucose and lipid homeostasis through regulation of numerous genes involved in the process of bile acid, triglyceride and glucose metabolism. DAX1 (dosage-sensitive sex reversal adrenal hypoplasia congenital critical region on X chromosome, gene 1) is an atypical member of the nuclear receptor family due to lack of classical DNA-binding domains and acts primarily as a co-repressor of many nuclear receptors. Here, we demonstrated that DAX1 is co-localized with FXR in the nucleus and acted as a negative regulator of FXR through a physical interaction with FXR. Our study showed that over-expression of DAX1 down-regulated the expression of FXR target genes, whereas knockdown of DAX1 led to their up-regulation. Furthermore, three LXXLL motifs in the N-terminus of DAX1 were required for the full repression of FXR transactivation. In addition, our study characterized that DAX1 suppresses FXR transactivation via competing with co-activators such as SRC-1 and PGC-1{alpha}. In conclusion, DAX1 acts as a co-repressor to negatively modulate FXR transactivity.

  3. A Transcriptional Repressor ZBTB1 Promotes Chromatin Remodeling and Translesion DNA Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyungjin; Dejsuphong, Donniphat; Adelmant, Guillaume; Ceccaldi, Raphael; Yang, Kailin; Marto, Jarrod A.; D’Andrea, Alan D.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Timely DNA replication across damaged DNA is critical for maintaining genomic integrity. Translesion DNA synthesis (TLS) allows bypass of DNA lesions using error-prone TLS polymerases. The E3 ligase RAD18 is necessary for PCNA monoubiquitination and TLS polymerase recruitment; however, the regulatory steps upstream of RAD18 activation are less understood. Here, we show that the UBZ4 domain-containing transcriptional repressor ZBTB1 is a critical upstream regulator of TLS. The UBZ4 motif is required for PCNA monoubiquitination and survival after UV damage. ZBTB1 associates with KAP-1, a transcriptional repressor whose phosphorylation relaxes chromatin after DNA damage. ZBTB1 depletion impairs formation of phospho-KAP-1 at UV damage sites and reduces RAD18 recruitment. Furthermore, phosphorylation of KAP-1 is necessary for efficient PCNA modification. We propose that ZBTB1 is required for PCNA monoubiquitination, by localizing phospho-KAP-1 to chromatin and enhancing RAD18 accessibility. Collectively, our study implicates a new ubiquitin-binding protein in orchestrating chromatin remodeling during DNA repair. PMID:24657165

  4. FLC, a repressor of flowering, is regulated by genes in different inductive pathways.

    PubMed

    Rouse, Dean T; Sheldon, Candice C; Bagnall, David J; Peacock, W James; Dennis, Elizabeth S

    2002-01-01

    The MADS-box protein encoded by FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC) is a repressor of flowering. Loci in the autonomous flowering pathway control FLC levels. We show the epistatic groupings of autonomous pathway mutants fca/fy and fve/fpa, based on their effects on flowering time, are consistent with their effects on FLC transcript and protein levels. We demonstrate that synergistic increases in FLC mRNA and protein expression occur in response to interactions between the autonomous pathway mutants fca and fpa and mutants in other pathways (fe, ft, fha) that do not regulate FLC when present as single mutants. These changes in FLC levels provide the molecular basis of the interactions previously shown in genetic analyses. The interactions between genes of multiple pathways emphasize the central position of FLC in the control of floral initiation. FLC protein levels match those of its mRNA for a range of genetic, developmental and environmental variables, indicating that control of FLC is at the level of transcription or transcript stability. The autonomous and photoperiod pathways also interact at the level of SOC1. FLC acts as a repressor of SOC1, and SOC1 levels are low when FLC levels are high. In C24 plants which have moderately high FLC levels, flowering occurs without a decrease in FLC level, but the SOC1 level does increase. Thus SOC1 levels can be upregulated through the activities of other pathways, despite the repression by FLC.

  5. A hypomorphic mutation in the Gfi1 transcriptional repressor results in a novel form of neutropenia.

    PubMed

    Ordoñez-Rueda, Diana; Jönsson, Friederike; Mancardi, David A; Zhao, Weidong; Malzac, Aurélie; Liang, Yinming; Bertosio, Elodie; Grenot, Pierre; Blanquet, Véronique; Sabrautzki, Sybille; de Angelis, Martin Hrabě; Méresse, Stéphane; Duprez, Estelle; Bruhns, Pierre; Malissen, Bernard; Malissen, Marie

    2012-09-01

    Using N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea-induced mutagenesis, we established a mouse model with a novel form of neutropenia resulting from a point mutation in the transcriptional repressor Growth Factor Independence 1 (Gfi1). These mice, called Genista, had normal viability and no weight loss, in contrast to mice expressing null alleles of the Gfi1 gene. Furthermore, the Genista mutation had a very limited impact on lymphopoiesis or on T- and B-cell function. Within the bone marrow (BM), the Genista mutation resulted in a slight increase of monopoiesis and in a block of terminal granulopoiesis. This block occurred just after the metamyelocytic stage and resulted in the generation of small numbers of atypical CD11b(+) Ly-6G(int) neutrophils, the nuclear morphology of which resembled that of mature WT neutrophils. Unexpectedly, once released from the BM, these atypical neutrophils contributed to induce mild forms of autoantibody-induced arthritis and of immune complex-mediated lung alveolitis. They additionally failed to provide resistance to acute bacterial infection. Our study demonstrates that a hypomorphic mutation in the Gfi1 transcriptional repressor results in a novel form of neutropenia characterized by a split pattern of functional responses, reflecting the distinct thresholds required for eliciting neutrophil-mediated inflammatory and anti-infectious responses.

  6. The protein kinase Akt1 regulates the interferon response through phosphorylation of the transcriptional repressor EMSY.

    PubMed

    Ezell, Scott A; Polytarchou, Christos; Hatziapostolou, Maria; Guo, Ailan; Sanidas, Ioannis; Bihani, Teeru; Comb, Michael J; Sourvinos, George; Tsichlis, Philip N

    2012-03-01

    The protein kinases Akt1, Akt2, and Akt3 possess nonredundant signaling properties, few of which have been investigated. Here, we present evidence for an Akt1-dependent pathway that controls interferon (IFN)-regulated gene expression and antiviral immunity. The target of this pathway is EMSY, an oncogenic interacting partner of BRCA2 that functions as a transcriptional repressor. Overexpression of EMSY in hTERT-immortalized mammary epithelial cells, and in breast and ovarian carcinoma cell lines, represses IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs) in a BRCA2-dependent manner, whereas its knockdown has the opposite effect. EMSY binds to the promoters of ISGs, suggesting that EMSY functions as a direct transcriptional repressor. Akt1, but not Akt2, phosphorylates EMSY at Ser209, relieving EMSY-mediated ISG repression. The Akt1/EMSY/ISG pathway is activated by both viral infection and IFN, and it inhibits the replication of HSV-1 and vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV). Collectively, these data define an Akt1-dependent pathway that contributes to the full activation of ISGs by relieving their repression by EMSY and BRCA2.

  7. Transcriptional repressor ZBTB1 promotes chromatin remodeling and translesion DNA synthesis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyungjin; Dejsuphong, Donniphat; Adelmant, Guillaume; Ceccaldi, Raphael; Yang, Kailin; Marto, Jarrod A; D'Andrea, Alan D

    2014-04-10

    Timely DNA replication across damaged DNA is critical for maintaining genomic integrity. Translesion DNA synthesis (TLS) allows bypass of DNA lesions using error-prone TLS polymerases. The E3 ligase RAD18 is necessary for proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) monoubiquitination and TLS polymerase recruitment; however, the regulatory steps upstream of RAD18 activation are less understood. Here, we show that the UBZ4 domain-containing transcriptional repressor ZBTB1 is a critical upstream regulator of TLS. The UBZ4 motif is required for PCNA monoubiquitination and survival after UV damage. ZBTB1 associates with KAP-1, a transcriptional repressor whose phosphorylation relaxes chromatin after DNA damage. ZBTB1 depletion impairs formation of phospho-KAP-1 at UV damage sites and reduces RAD18 recruitment. Furthermore, phosphorylation of KAP-1 is necessary for efficient PCNA modification. We propose that ZBTB1 is required for localizing phospho-KAP-1 to chromatin and enhancing RAD18 accessibility. Collectively, our study implicates a ubiquitin-binding protein in orchestrating chromatin remodeling during DNA repair.

  8. Regulation of Cardiac Gene Expression by KLF15, a Repressor of Myocardin Activity*

    PubMed Central

    Leenders, Joost J.; Wijnen, Wino J.; Hiller, Monika; van der Made, Ingeborg; Lentink, Viola; van Leeuwen, Rick E. W.; Herias, Veronica; Pokharel, Saraswati; Heymans, Stephane; de Windt, Leon J.; Høydal, Morten A.; Pinto, Yigal M.; Creemers, Esther E.

    2010-01-01

    Pathological forms of left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) often progress to heart failure. Specific transcription factors have been identified that activate the gene program to induce pathological forms of LVH. It is likely that apart from activating transcriptional inducers of LVH, constitutive transcriptional repressors need to be removed during the development of cardiac hypertrophy. Here, we report that the constitutive presence of Krüppel-like factor 15 (KLF15) is lost in pathological hypertrophy and that this loss precedes progression toward heart failure. We show that transforming growth factor-β-mediated activation of p38 MAPK is necessary and sufficient to decrease KLF15 expression. We further show that KLF15 robustly inhibits myocardin, a potent transcriptional activator. Loss of KLF15 during pathological LVH relieves the inhibitory effects on myocardin and stimulates the expression of serum response factor target genes, such as atrial natriuretic factor. This uncovers a novel mechanism where activated p38 MAPK decreases KLF15, an important constitutive transcriptional repressor whose removal seems a vital step to allow the induction of pathological LVH. PMID:20566642

  9. Control of transcription of gal repressor and isorepressor genes in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Weickert, M J; Adhya, S

    1993-01-01

    Two regulatory proteins, Gal repressor and isorepressor, control the expression of the gal and mgl operons in Escherichia coli. The transcription start sites for galR and galS, the genes for the repressor and isorepressor, were determined by primer extension of in vivo transcripts. Study of the promoter-lacZ gene fusions introduced into the chromosome indicated that galS expression was elevated in cells in which the normal galS gene was interrupted, but not in cells in which the galR gene was deleted. When both genes were disrupted, galS expression was further elevated. Expression from the galS promoter was stimulated by the addition of D-fucose, repressed by glucose, and dependent on cyclic AMP receptor protein (CRP). Expression of a similar gene fusion of the galR promoter to lacZ was unregulated. Both galR and galS genes contain two potential operator sites (OE and OI) and a CRP-binding site. The arrangement of OE, OI, and the CRP-binding site in the galS gene is analogous to the arrangement in the gal and mgl promoters, but the arrangement in galR is atypical. The increased concentration of the isorepressor when inducer is present may facilitate early shutoff of the isorepressor-regulated genes of the gal regulon when inducer (substrate) concentration falls. Images PMID:8416900

  10. Multiple photomorphogenic repressors work in concert to regulate Arabidopsis seedling development

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Jie; Terzaghi, William; Deng, Xing Wang; Chen, Haodong

    2015-01-01

    Light is both a source of energy and a critically important environmental signal for plant development. Through decades of research, 2 groups of photomorphogenic repressors have been identified. The first group is CONSTITUTIVE PHOTOMORPHOGENIC/DE-ETIOLATED/FUSCA (COP/DET/FUS), which were first identified by genetic screening and then by purification of protein complexes. Another group is the Phytochrome-Interacting Factors (PIFs), which were identified by yeast 2-hybrid screens using phyB as bait. How so many factors work together to repress photomorphogenesis has long been an interesting question. Previously, we demonstrated that CULLIN4 (CUL4) works as a core factor connecting the COP1-SPA complexes, the COP9 signalosome (CSN), and the COP10-DDB1-DET1 (CDD) complex. Recently, we showed that DET1 represses photomorphogenesis through positively regulating the abundance of PIF proteins in the dark. Dr. Huq and his colleagues reported that PIFs may enhance the function of COP1-SPA complexes to promote the degradation of HY5, and thus they synergistically repress photomorphogenesis in the dark. Though much work still needs to be done, these recent breakthroughs shed light on the regulatory relationships among these multiple photomorphogenic repressors. PMID:25853593

  11. Diethyl pyrocarbonate reaction with the lactose repressor protein affects both inducer and DNA binding

    SciTech Connect

    Sams, C.F.; Matthews, K.S.

    1988-04-05

    Modification of the lactose repressor protein of Escherichia coli with diethyl pyrocarbonate (DPC) results in decreased inducer binding as well as operator and nonspecific DNA binding. Spectrophotometric measurements indicated a maximum of three histidines per subunit was modified, and quantitation of lysine residues with trinitrobenzenesulfonate revealed the modification of one lysine residue. The loss of DNA binding, both operator and nonspecific, was correlated with histidine modification; removal of the carbethoxy groups from the histidines by hydroxylamine was accompanied by significant recovery of DNA binding function. The presence of inducing sugars during the DPC reaction had no effect on histidine modification or the loss of DNA binding activity. In contrast, inducer binding was not recovered upon reversal of the histidine modification. However, the presence of inducer during reaction protected lysine from reaction and also prevented the decrease in inducer binding; these results indicate that reaction of the lysine residue(s) may correlate to the loss of sugar binding activity. Since no difference in incorporation of radiolabeled carbethoxy was observed following reaction with diethyl pyrocarbonate in the presence or absence of inducer, the reagent appears to function as a catalyst in the modification of the lysine. The formation of an amide bond between the affected lysine and a nearby carboxylic acid moiety provides a possible mechanism for the activity loss. Reaction of the isolated NH2-terminal domain resulted in loss of DNA binding with modification of the single histidine at position 29. Results from the modification of core domain paralleled observations with intact repressor.

  12. Cell cycle-related transformation of the E2F4-p130 repressor complex

    SciTech Connect

    Popov, Boris . E-mail: popov_478@hotmail.com; Chang, L.-S.; Serikov, Vladimir

    2005-10-28

    During G0 phase the p130, member of the pRb tumor suppressor protein family, forms a repressor complex with E2F4 which is inactivated in G1/S by hyperphosphorylation of the p130. The role of p130 after G1/S remains poorly investigated. We found that in nuclear extracts of T98G cells, the p130-E2F4-DNA (pp-E2F4) complex does not dissociate at G1/S transition, but instead reverts to the p130-E2F4-cyclin E/A-cdk2 (cyc/cdk-pp-E2F4) complex, which is detected in S and G2/M phases of the cell cycle. Hyperphosphorylation of the p130 at G1/S transition is associated with a decrease of its total amount; however, this protein is still detected during the rest of the cell cycle, and it is increasingly hyperphosphorylated in the cytosol, but continuously dephosphorylated in the nucleus. Both nuclear and cytosol cell fractions in T98G cells contain a hyperphosphorylated form of p130 in complex with E2F4 at S and G2/M cell cycle phases. In contrast to T98G cells, transformation of the p130 containing cyc/cdk-pp-E2F4 complex into the p130-pp-E2F4 repressor does not occur in HeLa cells under growth restriction conditions.

  13. Antiproliferation activity of a small molecule repressor of liver receptor homolog 1.

    PubMed

    Corzo, Cesar A; Mari, Yelenis; Chang, Mi Ra; Khan, Tanya; Kuruvilla, Dana; Nuhant, Philippe; Kumar, Naresh; West, Graham M; Duckett, Derek R; Roush, William R; Griffin, Patrick R

    2015-02-01

    The orphan nuclear receptor liver receptor homolog 1 (LRH-1; NR5A2) is a potent regulator of cholesterol metabolism and bile acid homeostasis. Recently, LRH-1 has been shown to play an important role in intestinal inflammation and in the progression of estrogen receptor positive and negative breast cancers and pancreatic cancer. Structural studies have revealed that LRH-1 can bind phospholipids and the dietary phospholipid dilauroylphosphatidylcholine activates LRH-1 activity in rodents. Here we characterize the activity of a novel synthetic nonphospholipid small molecule repressor of LRH-1, SR1848 (6-[4-(3-chlorophenyl)piperazin-1-yl]-3-cyclohexyl-1H-pyrimidine-2,4-dione). In cotransfection studies, SR1848 reduced LRH-1-dependent expression of a reporter gene and in cells that endogenously express LRH-1 dose dependently reduced the expression of cyclin-D1 and -E1, resulting in inhibition of cell proliferation. The cellular effects of SR1848 treatment are recapitulated after transfection of cells with small-interfering RNA targeting LRH-1. Immunocytochemistry analysis shows that SR1848 induces rapid translocation of nuclear LRH-1 to the cytoplasm. Combined, these results suggest that SR1848 is a functional repressor of LRH-1 that impacts expression of genes involved in proliferation in LRH-1-expressing cancers. Thus, SR1848 represents a novel chemical scaffold for the development of therapies targeting malignancies driven by LRH-1.

  14. Antiproliferation Activity of a Small Molecule Repressor of Liver Receptor Homolog 1

    PubMed Central

    Corzo, Cesar A.; Mari, Yelenis; Chang, Mi Ra; Khan, Tanya; Kuruvilla, Dana; Nuhant, Philippe; Kumar, Naresh; West, Graham M.; Duckett, Derek R.; Roush, William R.

    2015-01-01

    The orphan nuclear receptor liver receptor homolog 1 (LRH-1; NR5A2) is a potent regulator of cholesterol metabolism and bile acid homeostasis. Recently, LRH-1 has been shown to play an important role in intestinal inflammation and in the progression of estrogen receptor positive and negative breast cancers and pancreatic cancer. Structural studies have revealed that LRH-1 can bind phospholipids and the dietary phospholipid dilauroylphosphatidylcholine activates LRH-1 activity in rodents. Here we characterize the activity of a novel synthetic nonphospholipid small molecule repressor of LRH-1, SR1848 (6-[4-(3-chlorophenyl)piperazin-1-yl]-3-cyclohexyl-1H-pyrimidine-2,4-dione). In cotransfection studies, SR1848 reduced LRH-1-dependent expression of a reporter gene and in cells that endogenously express LRH-1 dose dependently reduced the expression of cyclin-D1 and -E1, resulting in inhibition of cell proliferation. The cellular effects of SR1848 treatment are recapitulated after transfection of cells with small-interfering RNA targeting LRH-1. Immunocytochemistry analysis shows that SR1848 induces rapid translocation of nuclear LRH-1 to the cytoplasm. Combined, these results suggest that SR1848 is a functional repressor of LRH-1 that impacts expression of genes involved in proliferation in LRH-1–expressing cancers. Thus, SR1848 represents a novel chemical scaffold for the development of therapies targeting malignancies driven by LRH-1. PMID:25473120

  15. Subspecialization of R2R3-MYB Repressors for Anthocyanin and Proanthocyanidin Regulation in Forage Legumes

    PubMed Central

    Albert, Nick W.

    2015-01-01

    The synthesis of anthocyanin pigments and proanthocyanidins (condensed tannins) is regulated by MYB-bHLH-WDR (MBW) transcription factor complexes in all angiosperms studied to date. Tr-MYB133 and Tr-MYB134 were isolated from Trifolium repens and encode R2R3-MYBs that antagonize the activity of MBW activation complexes. These two genes are conserved in other legume species, and form two sub-clades within the larger anthocyanin/proanthocyanidin clade of MYB repressors. However, unlike petunia and Arabidopsis, these R2R3-MYB repressors do not prevent ectopic accumulation of anthocyanins or proanthocyanidins. Instead, they are expressed when anthocyanins or proanthocyanidins are being synthesized, and provide feedback regulation to MBW complexes. This feedback occurs because Tr-MYB133 and Tr-MYB134 are themselves regulated by MBW complexes. Tr-MYB133 is regulated by MBW complexes containing anthocyanin-related R2R3-MYB proteins (Tr-RED LEAF), while Tr-MYB134 is regulated by complexes containing the proanthocyanidin R2R3-MYBs (Tr-MYB14). Other features of the MBW gene regulation networks are also conserved within legumes, including the ability for the anthocyanin MBW complexes to activate the expression of the AN1/TT8 clade bHLH factor. The regulation of Tr-MYB133 and Tr-MYB134 by distinct, pathway-specific MBW complexes has resulted in subspecialization for controlling anthocyanin or proanthocyanidin synthesis. PMID:26779194

  16. Multi-petal cyclamen flowers produced by AGAMOUS chimeric repressor expression

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Yuri; Oshima, Yoshimi; Yamamura, Tomomichi; Sugiyama, Masao; Mitsuda, Nobutaka; Ohtsubo, Norihiro; Ohme-Takagi, Masaru; Terakawa, Teruhiko

    2013-01-01

    Cyclamen persicum (cyclamen) is a commercially valuable, winter-blooming perennial plant. We cloned two cyclamen orthologues of AGAMOUS (AG), CpAG1 and CpAG2, which are mainly expressed in the stamen and carpel, respectively. Cyclamen flowers have 5 petals, but expression of a chimeric repressor of CpAG1 (CpAG1-SRDX) caused stamens to convert into petals, resulting in a flower with 10 petals. By contrast, CpAG2-SRDX only caused incomplete formation of stamens and carpels. Expression in Arabidopsis thaliana showed similar effects on flower organ specification. Simultaneous expression of CpAG1-SRDX and CpAG2-SRDX in cyclamen induced rose-like, multi-petal flowers, a potentially valuable trait in commercial ornamental varieties. Expression of CpAG2-SRDX in a cyclamen mutant lacking expression of CpAG1 more effectively produced multi-petal flowers. Here, we controlled the number of petals in cyclamen by simple genetic engineering with a chimeric repressor. This strategy may be applicable useful for other ornamental plants with two distinct AG orthologues. PMID:24026510

  17. Safety mechanism assisted by the repressor of tetracycline (SMART) vaccinia virus vectors for vaccines and therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Grigg, Patricia; Titong, Allison; Jones, Leslie A; Yilma, Tilahun D; Verardi, Paulo H

    2013-09-17

    Replication-competent viruses, such as Vaccinia virus (VACV), are powerful tools for the development of oncolytic viral therapies and elicit superior immune responses when used as vaccine and immunotherapeutic vectors. However, severe complications from uncontrolled viral replication can occur, particularly in immunocompromised individuals or in those with other predisposing conditions. VACVs constitutively expressing interferon-γ (IFN-γ) replicate in cell culture indistinguishably from control viruses; however, they replicate in vivo to low or undetectable levels, and are rapidly cleared even in immunodeficient animals. In an effort to develop safe and highly effective replication-competent VACV vectors, we established a system to inducibly express IFN-γ. Our SMART (safety mechanism assisted by the repressor of tetracycline) vectors are designed to express the tetracycline repressor under a constitutive VACV promoter and IFN-γ under engineered tetracycline-inducible promoters. Immunodeficient SCID mice inoculated with VACVs not expressing IFN-γ demonstrated severe weight loss, whereas those given VACVs expressing IFN-γ under constitutive VACV promoters showed no signs of infection. Most importantly, mice inoculated with a VACV expressing the IFN-γ gene under an inducible promoter remained healthy in the presence of doxycycline, but exhibited severe weight loss in the absence of doxycycline. In this study, we developed a safety mechanism for VACV based on the conditional expression of IFN-γ under a tightly controlled tetracycline-inducible VACV promoter for use in vaccines and oncolytic cancer therapies.

  18. Myeloid Translocation Gene-16 Co-Repressor Promotes Degradation of Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Parveen; Gullberg, Urban; Olsson, Inge; Ajore, Ram

    2015-01-01

    The myeloid translocation gene 16 (MTG16) co-repressor down regulates expression of multiple glycolytic genes, which are targets of the hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF1) heterodimer transcription factor that is composed of oxygen-regulated labile HIF1α and stable HIF1β subunits. For this reason, we investigated whether MTG16 might regulate HIF1 negatively contributing to inhibition of glycolysis and stimulation of mitochondrial respiration. A doxycycline Tet-On system was used to control levels of MTG16 in B-lymphoblastic Raji cells. Results from co-association studies revealed MTG16 to interact with HIF1α. The co-association required intact N-terminal MTG16 residues including Nervy Homology Region 1 (NHR1). Furthermore, electrophoretic mobility shift assays demonstrated an association of MTG16 with hypoxia response elements (HREs) in PFKFB3, PFKFB4 and PDK1 promoters in-vitro. Results from chromatin immunoprecipitation assays revealed co-occupancy of these and other glycolytic gene promoters by HIF1α, HIF1β and MTG16 in agreement with possible involvement of these proteins in regulation of glycolytic target genes. In addition, MTG16 interacted with prolyl hydroxylase D2 and promoted ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation of HIF1α. Our findings broaden the area of MTG co-repressor functions and reveal MTG16 to be part of a protein complex that controls the levels of HIF1α. PMID:25974097

  19. miRNAs control insulin content in pancreatic β-cells via downregulation of transcriptional repressors

    PubMed Central

    Melkman-Zehavi, Tal; Oren, Roni; Kredo-Russo, Sharon; Shapira, Tirosh; Mandelbaum, Amitai D; Rivkin, Natalia; Nir, Tomer; Lennox, Kim A; Behlke, Mark A; Dor, Yuval; Hornstein, Eran

    2011-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) were shown to be important for pancreas development, yet their roles in differentiated β-cells remain unclear. Here, we show that miRNA inactivation in β-cells of adult mice results in a striking diabetic phenotype. While islet architecture is intact and differentiation markers are maintained, Dicer1-deficient β-cells show a dramatic decrease in insulin content and insulin mRNA. As a consequence of the change in insulin content, the animals become diabetic. We provide evidence for involvement of a set of miRNAs in regulating insulin synthesis. The specific knockdown of miR-24, miR-26, miR-182 or miR-148 in cultured β-cells or in isolated primary islets downregulates insulin promoter activity and insulin mRNA levels. Further, miRNA-dependent regulation of insulin expression is associated with upregulation of transcriptional repressors, including Bhlhe22 and Sox6. Thus, miRNAs in the adult pancreas act in a new network that reinforces insulin expression by reducing the expression of insulin transcriptional repressors. PMID:21285947

  20. Genome-wide RNAi high-throughput screen identifies proteins necessary for the AHR-dependent induction of CYP1A1 by 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin.

    PubMed

    Solaimani, Parrisa; Damoiseaux, Robert; Hankinson, Oliver

    2013-11-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) has a plethora of physiological roles, and upon dysregulation, carcinogenesis can occur. One target gene of AHR encodes the xenobiotic and drug-metabolizing enzyme CYP1A1, which is inducible by the environmental contaminant 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) via the AHR. An siRNA library targeted against over 5600 gene candidates in the druggable genome was used to transfect mouse Hepa-1 cells, which were then treated with TCDD, and subsequently assayed for CYP1A1-dependent ethoxyresorufin-o-deethylase (EROD) activity. Following redundant siRNA activity (RSA) statistical analysis, we identified 93 hits that reduced EROD activity with a p value ≤ .005 and substantiated 39 of these as positive hits in a secondary screening using endoribonuclease-prepared siRNAs (esiRNAs). Twelve of the corresponding gene products were subsequently confirmed to be necessary for the induction of CYP1A1 messenger RNA by TCDD. None of the candidates were deficient in aryl hydrocarbon nuclear translocator expression. However 6 gene products including UBE2i, RAB40C, CRYGD, DCTN4, RBM5, and RAD50 are required for the expression of AHR as well as for induction of CYP1A1. We also found 2 gene products, ARMC8 and TCF20, to be required for the induction of CYP1A1, but our data are ambiguous as to whether they are required for the expression of AHR. In contrast, SIN3A, PDC, TMEM5, and CD9 are not required for AHR expression but are required for the induction of CYP1A1, implicating a direct role in Cyp1a1 transcription. Our methods, although applied to Cyp1a1, could be modified for identifying proteins that regulate other inducible genes. PMID:23997114

  1. Genome-Wide RNAi High-Throughput Screen Identifies Proteins Necessary for the AHR-Dependent Induction of CYP1A1 by 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin

    PubMed Central

    Hankinson, Oliver

    2013-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) has a plethora of physiological roles, and upon dysregulation, carcinogenesis can occur. One target gene of AHR encodes the xenobiotic and drug-metabolizing enzyme CYP1A1, which is inducible by the environmental contaminant 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) via the AHR. An siRNA library targeted against over 5600 gene candidates in the druggable genome was used to transfect mouse Hepa-1 cells, which were then treated with TCDD, and subsequently assayed for CYP1A1-dependent ethoxyresorufin-o-deethylase (EROD) activity. Following redundant siRNA activity (RSA) statistical analysis, we identified 93 hits that reduced EROD activity with a p value ≤ .005 and substantiated 39 of these as positive hits in a secondary screening using endoribonuclease-prepared siRNAs (esiRNAs). Twelve of the corresponding gene products were subsequently confirmed to be necessary for the induction of CYP1A1 messenger RNA by TCDD. None of the candidates were deficient in aryl hydrocarbon nuclear translocator expression. However 6 gene products including UBE2i, RAB40C, CRYGD, DCTN4, RBM5, and RAD50 are required for the expression of AHR as well as for induction of CYP1A1. We also found 2 gene products, ARMC8 and TCF20, to be required for the induction of CYP1A1, but our data are ambiguous as to whether they are required for the expression of AHR. In contrast, SIN3A, PDC, TMEM5, and CD9 are not required for AHR expression but are required for the induction of CYP1A1, implicating a direct role in Cyp1a1 transcription. Our methods, although applied to Cyp1a1, could be modified for identifying proteins that regulate other inducible genes. PMID:23997114

  2. Water-mediated contacts in the trp-repressor operator complex recognition process.

    PubMed

    Wibowo, Fajar R; Rauch, Christine; Trieb, Michael; Wellenzohn, Bernd; Liedl, Klaus R

    2004-04-15

    Water-mediated contacts are known as an important recognition tool in trp-repressor operator systems. One of these contacts involves two conserved base pairs (G(6).C(-6) and A(5). T(-5)) and three amino acids (Lys 72, Ile 79, and Ala 80). To investigate the nature of these contacts, we analyzed the X-ray structure (PDB code: 1TRO) of the trp-repressor operator complex by means of molecular dynamics simulations. This X-ray structure contains two dimers that exhibit structural differences. From these two different starting structures, two 10 ns molecular dynamics simulations have been performed. Both of our simulations show an increase of water molecules in the major groove at one side of the dimer, while the other side remains unchanged compared to the X-ray structure. Though the maximum residence time of the concerned water molecules decreases with an increase of solvent at the interface, these water molecules continue to play an important role in mediating DNA-protein contacts. This is shown by new stable amino acids-DNA distances and a long water residence time compared to free DNA simulation. To maintain stability of the new contacts, the preferential water binding site on O6(G6) is extended. This extension agrees with mutation experiment data on A5 and G6, which shows different relative affinity due to mutation on these bases [A. Joachimiak, T. E. Haran, P. B. Sigler, EMBO Journal 1994, Vol. 13, No. (2) pp. 367-372]. Due to the rearrangements in the system, the phosphate of the base G6 is able to interconvert to the B(II) substate, which is not observed on the other half side of the complex. The decrease of the number of hydrogen bonds between protein and DNA backbone could be the initial step of the dissociation process of the complex, or in other words an intermediate complex conformation of the association process. Thus, we surmise that these features show the importance of water-mediated contacts in the trp-repressor operator recognition process. PMID

  3. Structure of the Mecl Repressor from Staphylococcus aureus in Complex with the Cognate DNA Operator of mec

    SciTech Connect

    Safo,M.; Ko, T.; Musayev, F.; Zhao, Q.; Wang, A.; Archer, G.

    2006-01-01

    The dimeric repressor MecI regulates the mecA gene that encodes the penicillin-binding protein PBP-2a in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). MecI is similar to BlaI, the repressor for the blaZ gene of {beta}-lactamase. MecI and BlaI can bind to both operator DNA sequences. The crystal structure of MecI in complex with the 32 base-pair cognate DNA of mec was determined to 3.8 Angstroms resolution. MecI is a homodimer and each monomer consists of a compact N-terminal winged-helix domain, which binds to DNA, and a loosely packed C-terminal helical domain, which intertwines with its counter-monomer. The crystal contains horizontal layers of virtual DNA double helices extending in three directions, which are separated by perpendicular DNA segments. Each DNA segment is bound to two MecI dimers. Similar to the BlaI-mec complex, but unlike the MecI-bla complex, the MecI repressors bind to both sides of the mec DNA dyad that contains four conserved sequences of TACA/TGTA. The results confirm the up-and-down binding to the mec operator, which may account for cooperative effect of the repressor.

  4. Cooperative non-specific DNA binding by octamerizing lambda cI repressors: a site-specific thermodynamic analysis.

    PubMed

    Pray, T R; Burz, D S; Ackers, G K

    1998-10-01

    Relationships between dimerization and site-specific binding have been characterized previously for wild-type and mutant cI repressors at the right operator (OR) of bacteriophage lambda DNA. However, the roles of higher-order oligomers (tetramers and octamers) that are also formed from these cI molecules have remained elusive. In this study, a clear correlation has been established between repressor oligomerization and non-specific DNA-binding activity. A modification of the quantitative DNase I footprint titration technique has been used to evaluate the degree of saturation of non-specific, OR-flanking lambda DNA by cI repressor oligomers. With the exception of one mutant, only those repressors capable of octamerizing were found to exhibit non-specific DNA-binding activity. The non-specific interaction was accurately modeled using either a one-dimensional, univalent, site-specific Ising lattice approximation, or a more traditional, multivalent lattice approach. It was found that non-specific DNA-binding by repressor oligomers is highly cooperative and energetically independent from site-specific binding at OR. Furthermore, the coupling free energy resolved for non-specific binding was similar to that of site-specific binding for each repressor, suggesting that similar structural elements may mediate the cooperative component of both binding processes. It is proposed that the state of assembly of the repressor molecule modulates its relative affinity for specific and non-specific DNA sequences. These specificities are allosterically regulated by the transmission of assembly-state information from the C-terminal domain, which mediates self-association and cooperativity, to the N-terminal domain, which primarily mediates DNA-binding. While dimers have a high affinity for their cognate sites within OR, tetramers and octamers may preferentially recognize non-specific DNA sequences. The concepts and findings developed in this study may facilitate quantitative

  5. Plastic downregulation of the transcriptional repressor BCL6 during maturation of human dendritic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Pantano, Serafino . E-mail: serafino.pantano@unil.ch; Jarrossay, David; Saccani, Simona; Bosisio, Daniela; Natoli, Gioacchino

    2006-05-01

    Dendritic cell (DC) maturation links peripheral events initiated by the encounter with pathogens to the activation and expansion of antigen-specific T lymphocytes in secondary lymphoid organs. Here, we describe an as yet unrecognized modulator of human DC maturation, the transcriptional repressor BCL6. We found that both myeloid and plasmacytoid DCs constitutively express BCL6, which is rapidly downregulated following maturation triggered by selected stimuli. Both in unstimulated and maturing DCs, control of BCL6 protein levels reflects the convergence of several mechanisms regulating BCL6 stability, mRNA transcription and nuclear export. By regulating the induction of several genes implicated in the immune response, including inflammatory cytokines, chemokines and survival genes, BCL6 may represent a pivotal modulator of the afferent branch of the immune response.

  6. Waking up Streptomyces secondary metabolism by constitutive expression of activators or genetic disruption of repressors.

    PubMed

    Aigle, Bertrand; Corre, Christophe

    2012-01-01

    Streptomycete bacteria are renowned as a prolific source of natural products with diverse biological activities. Production of these metabolites is often subject to transcriptional regulation: the biosynthetic genes remain silent until the required environmental and/or physiological signals occur. Consequently, in the laboratory environment, many gene clusters that direct the biosynthesis of natural products with clinical potential are not expressed or at very low level preventing the production/detection of the associated metabolite. Genetic engineering of streptomycetes can unleash the production of many new natural products. This chapter describes the overexpression of pathway-specific activators, the genetic disruption of pathway-specific repressors, and the main strategy used to identify and characterize new natural products from these engineered Streptomyces strains.

  7. Crosslinking of hemin to a specific site on the 90-kDa ferritin repressor protein

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Jihjing; Thach, R.E. ); Patino, M.M.; Gaffield, L.; Walden. W.E. ); Smith, A. )

    1991-07-15

    Incubation of a 90-kDa ferritin repressor protein (FRP) with small amounts of radiolabeled hemin resulted in the formation of a strong interaction between the two that was stable to SDS/PAGE. Of seven other proteins tested individually, only apohemopexin and bovine serum albumin showed similar crosslinking ability, albeit to a much lower extent. ({sup 14}C)Hemin specifically crosslinked to FRP in the presence of a 50-fold excess of total wheat germ proteins. Inclusion of catalase did not prevent the reaction of hemin with FRP, suggesting that H{sub 2}O{sub 2} is not involved. The subsequent addition of a stoichiometric amount of apohemopexin did not reverse the reaction. Exhaustive digestion of the complex with Staphylococcus aureus V8 protease produced a major labeled peptide of 17 kDa. These results show the existence of a highly specific, uniquely reactive hemin binding site on FRP.

  8. Drosophila arginine methyltransferase 1 (DART1) is an ecdysone receptor co-repressor

    SciTech Connect

    Kimura, Shuhei; Sawatsubashi, Shun; Ito, Saya; Kouzmenko, Alexander; Suzuki, Eriko; Zhao, Yue; Yamagata, Kaoru; Tanabe, Masahiko; Ueda, Takashi; Fujiyama, Sari; Murata, Takuya; Matsukawa, Hiroyuki; Takeyama, Ken-ichi; Yaegashi, Nobuo

    2008-07-11

    Histone arginine methylation is an epigenetic marker that regulates gene expression by defining the chromatin state. Arginine methyltransferases, therefore, serve as transcriptional co-regulators. However, unlike other transcriptional co-regulators, the physiological roles of arginine methyltransferases are poorly understood. Drosophila arginine methyltransferase 1 (DART1), the mammalian PRMT1 homologue, methylates the arginine residue of histone H4 (H4R3me2). Disruption of DART1 in Drosophila by imprecise P-element excision resulted in low viability during metamorphosis in the pupal stages. In the pupal stage, an ecdysone hormone signal is critical for developmental progression. DART1 interacted with the nuclear ecdysone receptor (EcR) in a ligand-dependent manner, and co-repressed EcR in intact flies. These findings suggest that DART1, a histone arginine methyltransferase, is a co-repressor of EcR that is indispensable for normal pupal development in the intact fly.

  9. The transcriptional repressor Hes1 attenuates inflammation by regulating transcription elongation.

    PubMed

    Shang, Yingli; Coppo, Maddalena; He, Teng; Ning, Fei; Yu, Li; Kang, Lan; Zhang, Bin; Ju, Chanyang; Qiao, Yu; Zhao, Baohong; Gessler, Manfred; Rogatsky, Inez; Hu, Xiaoyu

    2016-08-01

    Most of the known regulatory mechanisms that curb inflammatory gene expression target pre-transcription-initiation steps, and evidence for post-initiation regulation of inflammatory gene expression remains scarce. We found that the transcriptional repressor Hes1 suppressed production of CXCL1, a chemokine that is crucial for recruiting neutrophils. Hes1 negatively regulated neutrophil recruitment in vivo in a manner that was dependent on macrophage-produced CXCL1, and it attenuated the severity of inflammatory arthritis. Mechanistically, inhibition of Cxcl1 expression by Hes1 did not involve modification of transcription initiation. Instead, Hes1 inhibited signal-induced recruitment of the positive transcription-elongation complex P-TEFb and thereby prevented phosphorylation of RNA polymerase II at Ser2 and productive elongation. Thus, our results identify Hes1 as a homeostatic suppressor of inflammatory responses that exerts its suppressive function by regulating transcription elongation.

  10. MLX Is a Transcriptional Repressor of the Mammalian Golgi Stress Response.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Mai; Sasaki-Osugi, Kanae; Oku, Masaya; Sawaguchi, Shogo; Tanakura, Soichiro; Kawai, Yumeto; Wakabayashi, Sadao; Yoshida, Hiderou

    2016-07-30

    The Golgi stress response is a homeostatic mechanism that controls the capacity of the Golgi apparatus in accordance with cellular demands. When the capacity of the Golgi apparatus becomes insufficient (Golgi stress), transcription levels of Golgi-related genes encoding glycosylation enzymes, a Golgi structural protein, and components of vesicular transport are upregulated through a common cis-acting enhancer-the Golgi apparatus stress response element (GASE). Here, we identified the transcription factor MLX as a GASE-binding protein. MLX resides in the cytoplasm and does not bind to GASE in normal growth conditions, whereas MLX translocates into the nucleus and specifically binds to GASE in response to Golgi stress. Suppression of MLX expression increased transcriptional induction of target genes of the Golgi stress response, whereas overexpression of MLX reduced GASE-binding of TFE3 as well as transcriptional induction from GASE, suggesting that MLX is a transcriptional repressor of the mammalian Golgi stress response.

  11. FBI-1 functions as a novel AR co-repressor in prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Cui, Jiajun; Yang, Yutao; Zhang, Chuanfu; Hu, Pinliang; Kan, Wei; Bai, Xianhong; Liu, Xuelin; Song, Hongbin

    2011-03-01

    The pro-oncogene FBI-1, encoded by Zbtb7a, is a transcriptional repressor that belongs to the POK (POZ/BTB and Krüppel) protein family. In this study, we investigated a potential interaction between androgen receptor (AR) signaling and FBI-1 and demonstrated that overexpression of FBI-1 inhibited ligand-dependent AR activation. A protein-protein interaction was identified between FBI-1 and AR in a ligand-dependent manner. Furthermore, FBI-1, AR and SMRT formed a ternary complex and FBI-1 enhanced the recruitment of NCoR and SMRT to endogenous PSA upstream sequences. Our data also indicated that the FBI-1-mediated inhibition of AR transcriptional activity is partially dependent on HDAC. Interestingly, FBI-1 plays distinct roles in regulating LNCaP (androgen-dependent) and PC-3 cell (androgen-independent) proliferation.

  12. Translation Repressors, an RNA Helicase, and Developmental Cues Control RNP Phase Transitions during Early Development

    PubMed Central

    Hubstenberger, Arnaud; Noble, Scott L.; Cameron, Cristiana; Evans, Thomas C.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Like membranous organelles, large-scale coassembly of macromolecules can organize functions in cells. Ribonucleoproteins (RNPs) can form liquid or solid aggregates, but control and consequences of these RNP states in living, developing tissue are poorly understood. Here, we show that regulated RNP factor interactions drive transitions among diffuse, semiliquid, or solid states to modulate RNP sorting and exchange in the Caenorhabditis elegans oocyte cytoplasm. Translation repressors induce an intrinsic capacity of RNP components to coassemble into either large semiliquids or solid lattices, whereas a conserved RNA helicase prevents polymerization into nondynamic solids. Developmental cues dramatically alter both fluidity and sorting within large RNP assemblies, inducing a transition from RNP segregation in quiescent oocytes to dynamic exchange in the early embryo. Therefore, large-scale organization of gene expression extends to the cytoplasm, where regulation of supramolecular states imparts specific patterns of RNP dynamics. PMID:24176641

  13. Beta-Lactamase Repressor BlaI Modulates Staphylococcus aureus Cathelicidin Antimicrobial Peptide Resistance and Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Pence, Morgan A.; Haste, Nina M.; Meharena, Hiruy S.; Olson, Joshua; Gallo, Richard L.; Nizet, Victor; Kristian, Sascha A.

    2015-01-01

    BlaI is a repressor of BlaZ, the beta-lactamase responsible for penicillin resistance in Staphylococcus aureus. Through screening a transposon library in S. aureus Newman for susceptibility to cathelicidin antimicrobial peptide, we discovered BlaI as a novel cathelicidin resistance factor. Additionally, through integrational mutagenesis in S. aureus Newman and MRSA Sanger 252 strains, we confirmed the role of BlaI in resistance to human and murine cathelidicin and showed that it contributes to virulence in human whole blood and murine infection models. We further demonstrated that BlaI could be a target for innate immune-based antimicrobial therapies; by removing BlaI through subinhibitory concentrations of 6-aminopenicillanic acid, we were able to sensitize S. aureus to LL-37 killing. PMID:26305782

  14. Controlled transcriptional regulation in eukaryotes by a novel transcription factor derived from Escherichia coli purine repressor.

    PubMed

    Yeon, Eun-Hee; Noh, Ju-Young; Kim, Jong-Min; Lee, Min-Young; Yoon, Sarah; Park, Sang-Kyu; Choi, Kang-Yell; Kim, Kyung-Sup

    2004-06-25

    Unlike the DNA-binding domains (DBD) of most eukaryotic transcription factors, Escherichia coli LacI family transcription factors are unable to bind to specific target DNA sequences without a cofactor-binding domain. In the present study, we reconstructed a novel DBD designated as PurHG, which binds constitutively to a 16bp purine repressor operator, by fusion of the purine repressor (PurR) DBD (residues 1-57) and the GAL4 dimerization domain (DD, residues 42-148). Binding of PurHG to DNA requires the dimerization and a hinge helix of PurR DBD. When the PurHG was expressed as a fusion protein in a form of a transcription activator (PurAD) or an artificial nuclear receptor (PurAPR or PurAER) responding to ligand, such as RU486 or beta-estradiol, it could regulate the expression of the reporter genes in NIH3T3 cells. The prerequisite region of the GAL4 DD for DNA-binding was amino acid residues from 42 to 98 in the form of PurAD, while the amino acid residues from 42 to 75 were sufficient for ligand-dependent regulation in the form of PurAPR. These results suggest that the dimerization function of the progesterone ligand-binding domain could be substituted for region 76-98 of the GAL4 DD. In summary, the fusion of the PurR DBD and the GAL4 DD generates fully active DNA-binding protein, PurHG, in vitro and in vivo, and these results provide the direct evidence of structural predictions that the proximate positioning of PurR hinge helical regions is critical for DNA-binding.

  15. The purine repressor of Bacillus subtilis: a novel combination of domains adapted for transcription regulation.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Sangita C; Krahn, Joseph; Shin, Byung Sik; Tomchick, Diana R; Zalkin, Howard; Smith, Janet L

    2003-07-01

    The purine repressor from Bacillus subtilis, PurR, represses transcription from a number of genes with functions in the synthesis, transport, and metabolism of purines. The 2.2-A crystal structure of PurR reveals a two-domain protein organized as a dimer. The larger C-terminal domain belongs to the PRT structural family, in accord with a sequence motif for binding the inducer phosphoribosylpyrophosphate (PRPP). The PRT domain is fused to a smaller N-terminal domain that belongs to the winged-helix family of DNA binding proteins. A positively charged surface on the winged-helix domain likely binds specific DNA sequences in the recognition site. A second positively charged surface surrounds the PRPP site at the opposite end of the PurR dimer. Conserved amino acids in the sequences of PurR homologs in 21 gram-positive bacteria cluster on the proposed recognition surface of the winged-helix domain and around the PRPP binding site at the opposite end of the molecule, supporting a common function of DNA and PRPP binding for all of the proteins. The structure supports a binding mechanism in which extended regions of DNA interact with extensive protein surface. Unlike most PRT proteins, which are phosphoribosyltransferases (PRTases), PurR lacks catalytic activity. This is explained by a tyrosine side chain that blocks the site for a nucleophile cosubstrate in PRTases. Thus, B. subtilis has adapted an enzyme fold to serve as an effector-binding domain and has used it in a novel combination with the DNA-binding winged-helix domain as a repressor of purine genes.

  16. The Arabidopsis transcriptional repressor ERF9 participates in resistance against necrotrophic fungi.

    PubMed

    Maruyama, Yosuke; Yamoto, Natsuko; Suzuki, Yuya; Chiba, Yukako; Yamazaki, Ken-ichi; Sato, Takeo; Yamaguchi, Junji

    2013-12-01

    Complex plant defenses that include the hypersensitive response (HR) are mediated by plant hormones, such as salicylic acid (SA), jasmonic acid (JA) and ethylene. We previously isolated the Arabidopsis DEAR1 (DREB AND EAR MOTIF PROTEIN 1) regulator and showed that its overexpression DEAR1 (DEAR1ox) resulted in a dwarf phenotype and lesion-like cell death, accompanied by elevated expression of PR (PATHOGENESIS-RELATED) genes. Here, we show that transgenic Arabidopsis overexpressing DEAR1 (DEAR1ox) has enhanced resistance to the necrotrophic fungus Botrytis cinerea (B. cinerea). This result indicates that DEAR1 represses negative regulators of plant defense responses, including transcriptional repressors belonging to the ERF (ETHYLEN RESPONSE FACTOR) family. Knockout mutants of ERF9 (erf9), which were down-regulated in DEAR1ox plants, showed transcriptional promotion of PDF1.2 (PATHOGEN-INDUCIBLE PLANT DEFENSIN) genes, which serve as positive markers for the ethylene/jasmonic acid (JA) signaling pathway and provide enhanced resistance to B. cinerea. Biochemical assays demonstrated that the ERF9 in capable of binding to the GCC box, a cis-element contained in the promoters of the PDF1.2 gene that possesses trans-repression activity. Moreover, infection with B. cinerea resulted in the promotion of the PDF1.2 expression, coinciding with suppression of the ERF9 gene under the control of the DEAR1 gene. These results indicate that the transcriptional repressor ERF9 participates in plant defense mechanisms against necrotic fungi mediated by the DEAR1-dependent ethylene/JA signaling pathway.

  17. Oct-1 acts as a transcriptional repressor on the C-reactive protein promoter.

    PubMed

    Voleti, Bhavya; Hammond, David J; Thirumalai, Avinash; Agrawal, Alok

    2012-10-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP), a plasma protein of the innate immune system, is produced by hepatocytes. A critical regulatory region (-42 to -57) on the CRP promoter contains binding site for the IL-6-activated transcription factor C/EBPβ. The IL-1β-activated transcription factor NF-κB binds to a κB site located nearby (-63 to -74). The κB site overlaps an octamer motif (-59 to -66) which is the binding site for the constitutively active transcription factor Oct-1. Oct-1 is known to function both as a transcriptional repressor and as an activator depending upon the promoter context. Also, Oct-1 can regulate gene expression either by binding directly to the promoter or by interacting with other transcription factors bound to the promoter. The aim of this study was to investigate the functions of Oct-1 in regulating CRP expression. In luciferase transactivation assays, overexpressed Oct-1 inhibited (IL-6+IL-1β)-induced CRP expression in Hep3B cells. Deletion of the Oct-1 site from the promoter drastically reduced the cytokine response because the κB site was altered as a consequence of deleting the Oct-1 site. Surprisingly, overexpressed Oct-1 inhibited the residual (IL-6+IL-1β)-induced CRP expression through the promoter lacking the Oct-1 site. Similarly, deletion of the Oct-1 site reduced the induction of CRP expression in response to overexpressed C/EBPβ, and overexpressed Oct-1 inhibited C/EBPβ-induced CRP expression through the promoter lacking the Oct-1 site. We conclude that Oct-1 acts as a transcriptional repressor of CRP expression and it does so by occupying its cognate site on the promoter and also via other transcription factors by an as yet undefined mechanism.

  18. Bacterial Effector Activates Jasmonate Signaling by Directly Targeting JAZ Transcriptional Repressors

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Shushu; Yao, Jian; Ma, Ka-Wai; Zhou, Huanbin; Song, Jikui; He, Sheng Yang; Ma, Wenbo

    2013-01-01

    Gram-negative bacterial pathogens deliver a variety of virulence proteins through the type III secretion system (T3SS) directly into the host cytoplasm. These type III secreted effectors (T3SEs) play an essential role in bacterial infection, mainly by targeting host immunity. However, the molecular basis of their functionalities remains largely enigmatic. Here, we show that the Pseudomonas syringae T3SE HopZ1a, a member of the widely distributed YopJ effector family, directly interacts with jasmonate ZIM-domain (JAZ) proteins through the conserved Jas domain in plant hosts. JAZs are transcription repressors of jasmonate (JA)-responsive genes and major components of the jasmonate receptor complex. Upon interaction, JAZs can be acetylated by HopZ1a through a putative acetyltransferase activity. Importantly, P. syringae producing the wild-type, but not a catalytic mutant of HopZ1a, promotes the degradation of HopZ1-interacting JAZs and activates JA signaling during bacterial infection. Furthermore, HopZ1a could partially rescue the virulence defect of a P. syringae mutant that lacks the production of coronatine, a JA-mimicking phytotoxin produced by a few P. syringae strains. These results highlight a novel example by which a bacterial effector directly manipulates the core regulators of phytohormone signaling to facilitate infection. The targeting of JAZ repressors by both coronatine toxin and HopZ1 effector suggests that the JA receptor complex is potentially a major hub of host targets for bacterial pathogens. PMID:24204266

  19. Oligomeric properties and DNA binding specificities of repressor isoforms from the Streptomyces bacteriophage phiC31.

    PubMed

    Wilson, S E; Smith, M C

    1998-05-15

    Three protein isoforms (74, 54 and 42 kDa) are expressed from repressor gene c in the Streptomyces temperate bacteriophage phiC31. Because expression of the two smaller isoforms, 54 and 42 kDa, is sufficient for superinfection immunity, the interaction between these isoforms was studied. The native 42 kDa repressor (Nat42) and an N-terminally 6x histidine-tagged 54 kDa isoform (His54) were shown by co-purification on a Ni-NTA column to interact in Streptomyces lividans . In vitro three repressor preparations, containing Nat42, His54 and the native 54 and 42 kDa isoforms expressed together (Nat54&42), were subjected to chemical crosslinking and gel filtration analysis. Homo- and hetero-tetramers were observed. Previous work showed that the smallest isoform bound to 17 bp operators containing aconservedinvertedrepeat (CIR) and that the CIRs were located at 16 loci throughout the phiC31 genome. One of the CIRs (CIR6) is believed to be critical for regulating the lytic pathway. The DNA binding activities of the three repressor preparations were studied using fragments containing CIRs (CIR3-CIR6) from the essential early region as templates for DNase I footprinting. Whereas Nat42 bound to CIR6, poorly to CIR5 but undetectably to CIR3 or CIR4, the Nat54&42 preparation could bind to all CIRs tested, albeit poorly to CIR3 and CIR4. The His54 isoform bound all CIRs tested. Isoforms expressed from the phiC31 repressor gene, like those which are expressed from many eukaryotic transcription factor genes, apparently have different binding specificities.

  20. Cytochrome P4501A induction in avian hepatocyte cultures exposed to polychlorinated biphenyls: Comparisons with AHR1-mediated reporter gene activity and in ovo toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Manning, Gillian E.; Mundy, Lukas J.; Crump, Doug; Jones, Stephanie P.; Chiu, Suzanne; Klein, Jeff; Konstantinov, Alex; Potter, Dave; Kennedy, Sean W.

    2013-01-01

    Avian-specific toxic equivalency factors (TEFs) were developed by the World Health Organization to simplify environmental risk assessments of dioxin-like compounds (DLCs), but TEFs do not account for differences in the toxic and biochemical potencies of DLCs among species of birds. Such variability may be due to differences in species sensitivity to individual DLCs. The sensitivity of avian species to DLCs was recently associated with the identity of amino acids 324 and 380 in the aryl hydrocarbon receptor 1 (AHR1) ligand binding domain. A luciferase reporter gene (LRG) assay, measuring AHR1-mediated induction of a cytochrome P450 1A5 (CYP1A5) reporter gene, in combination with a species' AHR1 ligand binding domain sequence, were also shown to predict avian species sensitivity to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and PCB relative potency in a given species. The goals of the present study were to (1) characterize the concentration-dependent effects of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin and PCBs 126, 77, 105 and 118 on induction of ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase (EROD) activity and CYP1A4/5 mRNA in chicken, ring-necked pheasant and Japanese quail embryo hepatocytes and (2) compare these in vitro results to those previously generated by the LRG assay and in ovo toxicity studies. EROD activity and CYP1A4/5 mRNA expression data support and complement the findings of the LRG assay. CYP1A enzyme activity and mRNA expression were significantly correlated both with luciferase activity and in ovo toxicity induced by PCBs. Relative potency values were generally similar between the LRG and EROD assays and indicate that the relative potency of some PCBs may differ among species. -- Highlights: ► The chicken isn't the most sensitive species to CYP1A induction by PCB 105 and 118. ► The relative potency of PCBs differs between avian species. ► EROD activity was correlated with luciferase activity from the LRG assay. ► EROD activity was a better predictor of toxicity than CYP

  1. Tumorigenic effects of endocrine-disrupting chemicals are alleviated by licorice (Glycyrrhiza glabra) root extract through suppression of AhR expression in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Chu, Xiao Ting; de la Cruz, Joseph; Hwang, Seong Gu; Hong, Heeok

    2014-01-01

    Endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) have been reported to interfere with estrogen signaling. Exposure to these chemicals decreases the immune response and causes a wide range of diseases in animals and humans. Recently, many studies showed that licorice (Glycyrrhiza glabra) root extract (LRE) commonly called "gamcho" in Korea exhibits antioxidative, chemoprotective, and detoxifying properties. This study aimed to investigate the mechanism of action of LRE and to determine if and how LRE can alleviate the toxicity of EDCs. LRE was prepared by vacuum evaporation and freeze-drying after homogenization of licorice root powder that was soaked in 80% ethanol for 72 h. We used 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) as a representative EDC, which is known to induce tumors or cancers; MCF-7 breast cancer cells, used as a tumor model, were treated with TCDD and various concentrations of LRE (0, 50, 100, 200, 400 μg/mL) for 24, 48, and 72 h. As a result, TCDD stimulated MCF-7 cell proliferation, but LRE significantly inhibited TCDD-induced MCF-7 cell proliferation in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The expression of TCDD toxicity-related genes, i.e., aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), AhR nuclear translocator, and cytochrome P450 1A1, was also down-regulated by LRE in a dose-dependent manner. Analysis of cell cycle distribution after treatment of MCF-7 cells with TCDD showed that LRE inhibited the proliferation of MCF-7 cells via G2/M phase arrest. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analysis also revealed that LRE dose-dependently increased the expression of the tumor suppressor genes p53 and p27 and down-regulated the expression of cell cycle-related genes. These data suggest that LRE can mitigate the tumorigenic effects of TCDD in breast cancer cells by suppression of AhR expression and cell cycle arrest. Thus, LRE can be used as a potential toxicity-alleviating agent against EDC-mediated diseases.

  2. Trypanosoma cruzi trans-sialidase initiates an ROR-γt–AHR-independent program leading to IL-17 production by activated B cells

    PubMed Central

    Bermejo, Daniela A; Jackson, Shaun W; Gorosito-Serran, Melisa; Acosta-Rodriguez, Eva V; Amezcua-Vesely, Maria C; Sather, Blythe D; Singh, Akhilesh K.; Khim, Socheath; Mucci, Juan; Liggitt, Denny; Campetella, Oscar; Oukka, Mohamed; Gruppi, Adriana; Rawlings, David J

    2013-01-01

    We identified B cells as a major source for rapid, innate-like interleukin 17 (IL-17) production in vivo in response to Trypanosoma cruzi infection. IL-17+ B cells exhibited a plasmablast phenotype, outnumbered TH17 cells and were required for optimal response to this pathogen. Using both murine and human primary B cells, we demonstrate that exposure to parasite-derived trans-sialidase in vitro was sufficient to trigger modification of the cell surface mucin, CD45, leading to Btk-dependent signaling and IL-17A or IL-17F production via an ROR-γt and AHR-independent transcriptional program. Our combined data suggest that generation of IL-17+ B cells may be an unappreciated feature of innate immune responses required for pathogen control or IL-17-mediated autoimmunity. PMID:23563688

  3. Aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) activation during pregnancy, and in adult nulliparous mice, delays the subsequent development of DMBA-induced mammary tumors

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tao; Gavin, Heather M.; Arlt, Volker M.; Lawrence, B. Paige; Fenton, Suzanne E.; Medina, Daniel; Vorderstrasse, Beth A.

    2010-01-01

    TCDD (2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin), the prototypic ligand for the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), promotes tumor formation in some model systems. However with regard to breast cancer, epidemiological and animal studies are inconclusive as to whether exposure increases tumor incidence or may instead be protective. We have previously reported that mice exposed to TCDD during pregnancy have impaired differentiation of mammary tissue, including decreased branching and poor development of lobuloalveolar structures. Because normal pregnancy-induced mammary differentiation may protect against subsequent neoplastic transformation, we hypothesized that TCDD-treated mice would be more susceptible to chemical carcinogenesis after parturition. To test this, mice were treated with TCDD or vehicle during pregnancy. Four weeks later, DMBA (7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene) was administered to induce mammary tumor formation. Contrary to our hypothesis, TCDD-exposed parous mice showed a four-week delay in tumor formation relative to controls, and had a lower tumor incidence throughout the 27-week time course. The same results were obtained in nulliparous mice given TCDD and DMBA on the same schedule. We next addressed whether the delayed tumor incidence was a reflection of decreased tumor initiation, by testing the formation of DMBA-DNA adducts and preneoplastic lesions, induction of cytochrome P450s, and cell proliferation. None of these markers of tumor initiation differed between vehicle- and TCDD-treated animals. The expression of CXCL12 and CXCR4 was also measured to address their possible role in tumorigenesis. Taken together, our results suggest that AhR activation by TCDD slows the promotion of preneoplastic lesions to overt mammary tumors. PMID:20521247

  4. Repressor for the sn-glycerol 3-phosphate regulon of Escherichia coli K-12: primary structure and identification of the DNA-binding domain.

    PubMed

    Zeng, G; Ye, S; Larson, T J

    1996-12-01

    The nucleotide sequence of the glpEGR operon of Escherichia coli was determined. The translational reading frame at the beginning, middle, and end of each gene was verified. The glpE gene encodes an acidic, cytoplasmic protein of 108 amino acids with a molecular weight of 12,082. The glpG gene encodes a basic, cytoplasmic membrane-associated protein of 276 amino acids with a molecular weight of 31,278. The functions of GlpE and GlpG are unknown. The glpR gene encodes the repressor for the glycerol 3-phosphate regulon, a protein predicted to contain 252 amino acids with a calculated molecular weight of 28,048. The amino acid sequence of the glp repressor was similar to several repressors of carbohydrate catabolic systems, including those of the glucitol (GutR), fucose (FucR), and deoxyribonucleoside (DeoR) systems of E. coli, as well as those of the lactose (LacR) and inositol (IolR) systems of gram-positive bacteria and agrocinopine (AccR) system of Agrobacterium tumefaciens. These repressors constitute a family of related proteins, all of which contain approximately 250 amino acids, possess a helix-turn-helix DNA-binding motif near the amino terminus, and bind a sugar phosphate molecule as the inducing signal. The DNA recognition helix of the glp repressor and the nucleotide sequence of the glp operator were very similar to those of the deo system. The presumptive recognition helix of the glp repressor was changed by site-directed mutagenesis to match that of the deo repressor or, in a separate construct, to abolish DNA binding. Neither altered form of the glp repressor recognized the glp or deo operator, either in vivo or in vitro. However, both altered forms of the glp repressor were negatively dominant to the wild-type glp repressor, indicating that the inability to bind DNA with high affinity was due to alteration of the DNA-binding domain, not to an inability to oligomerize or instability of the altered repressors. For the first time, analysis of repressors

  5. AhR activation by 6-formylindolo[3,2-b]carbazole and 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin inhibit the development of mouse intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Joo-Hung; Choi, Ah-Jeong; Kim, Soo-Ji; Cheong, Seon-Woo; Jeong, So-Yeon

    2016-04-01

    The intestinal epithelium plays a central role in immune homeostasis in the intestine. AhR, a ligand-activated transcription factor, plays an important role in diverse physiological processes. The intestines are exposed to various exogenous and endogenous AhR ligands. Thus, AhR may regulate the intestinal homeostasis, directly acting on the development of intestinal epithelial cells (IEC). In this study, we demonstrated that 6-formylindolo[3,2-b]carbazole (FICZ) and 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) inhibited the in vitro development of mouse intestinal organoids. The number of Paneth cells in the small intestine and the depth of crypts of the small and large intestines were reduced in mice administrated with FICZ. Immunohistochemical and flow cytometric assays revealed that AhR was highly expressed in Lgr5(+) stem cells. FICZ inhibited Wnt signaling lowering the level of β-catenin protein. Gene expression analyses demonstrated that FICZ increased expression of Lgr5, Math1, BMP4, and Indian Hedgehog while inhibiting that of Lgr4. PMID:26950395

  6. AHR-related activities in a creosote-adapted population of adult atlantic killifish, Fundulus heteroclitus, two decades post-EPA superfund status at the Atlantic Wood Site, Portsmouth, VA USA.

    PubMed

    Wojdylo, Josephine V; Vogelbein, Wolfgang; Bain, Lisa J; Rice, Charles D

    2016-08-01

    Atlantic killifish, Fundulus heteroclitus, are adapted to creosote-based PAHs at the US EPA Superfund site known as Atlantic Wood (AW) on the southern branch of the Elizabeth River, VA USA. Subsequent to the discovery of the AW population in the early 1990s, these fish were shown to be recalcitrant to CYP1A induction by PAHs under experimental conditions, and even to the time of this study, killifish embryos collected from the AW site are resistant to developmental deformities typically associated with exposure to PAHs in reference fish. Historically, however, 90 +% of the adult killifish at this site have proliferative hepatic lesions including cancer of varying severity. Several PAHs at this site are known to be ligands for the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR). In this study, AHR-related activities in AW fish collected between 2011 and 2013 were re-examined nearly 2 decades after first discovery. This study shows that CYP1A mRNA expression is three-fold higher in intestines of AW killifish compared to a reference population. Using immunohistochemistry, CYP1A staining in intestines was uniformly positive compared to negative staining in reference fish. Livers of AW killifish were examined by IHC to show that CYP1A and AHR2 protein expression reflect lesions-specific patterns, probably representing differences in intrinsic cellular physiology of the spectrum of proliferative lesions comprising the hepatocarcinogenic process. We also found that COX2 mRNA expression levels were higher in AW fish livers compared to those in the reference population, suggesting a state of chronic inflammation. Overall, these findings suggest that adult AW fish are responsive to AHR signaling, and do express CYP1A and AHR2 proteins in intestines at a level above what was observed in the reference population. PMID:27262937

  7. Promoter analysis of TCDD-inducible genes in a thymic epithelial cell line indicates the potential for cell-specific transcription factor crosstalk in the AhR response

    SciTech Connect

    Frericks, Markus; Burgoon, Lyle D.; Zacharewski, Timothy R.; Esser, Charlotte

    2008-10-15

    Activation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR{sup 1}) by 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) elicits severe immunosuppression accompanied by thymic atrophy. Previous evidence suggests that TCDD targets both thymocytes and thymic epithelial cells. The AhR induces cell-specific changes in gene transcription via binding to the dioxin response element DRE; however, the underlying specificity-mechanisms, in particular with regard to the role of promoter element context, and possible transcription factor crosstalk remain poorly understood. Global gene expression in the cortical thymic epithelial cell line ET at 2, 4, and 6 h following 5 nM TCDD exposure resulted in differential regulation of 201 genes. JASPAR and TRANSFAC mapped the statistically over-represented promoter elements in the regulated genes to specific transcription factor binding sites, suggesting a regulatory role in AhR signaling. Over-represented elements included the xenobiotic response element XRE, NF{kappa}B-Rel, HRE, PPAR{gamma}, GR, PAX-4 and estrogen receptor binding sites. Co-treatment experiments with TCDD and CoCl{sub 2}, to induce hypoxia, or TCDD and 17-{beta}-estradiol (E2) indicated crosstalk between AhR and Hif or ER, in agreement with other experimental models. The computational identification of TFBS and the demonstration of interaction confirm their interactions with AhR signaling and suggest that the other over-represented elements may also be important in the immunosuppressive effects elicited by TCDD. In conclusion, we demonstrated the importance of promoter element cooperation in the shaping of a cell-specific AhR response. Our findings regarding the transcriptional changes in cortical epithelial cells are congruent with the well-known thymotoxic TCDD-phenotype, and useful in new hypothesis generation of the role of cortical TECs in TCDD toxicity.

  8. Mutations in the Bacillus subtilis purine repressor that perturb PRPP effector function in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Weng, M; Zalkin, H

    2000-07-01

    The Bacillus subtilis pur operon repressor (PurR) has a PRPP (5-phosphoribosyl 1-pyrophosphate) binding motif at residues 199-211. Two PurR PRPP binding region mutations (D203A and D204A) were constructed, and the effects on binding of repressor to the pur operon control site in vitro and on regulation of pur operon expression in vivo were investigated. PRPP significantly inhibited the binding of wild-type but not mutant PurR to pur operon control site DNA. In strains with the D203A and D204A mutations, pur operon expression in vivo was super-repressed by addition of adenine to the growth medium. These results support the role of PRPP in modulating the regulatory function of PurR in vivo. YabJ, the product of the distal gene in the bicistronic purR operon, is also required for PurR function in vivo.

  9. Repression and activation of transcription by Gal and Lac repressors: involvement of alpha subunit of RNA polymerase.

    PubMed Central

    Choy, H E; Park, S W; Aki, T; Parrack, P; Fujita, N; Ishihama, A; Adhya, S

    1995-01-01

    Gal or Lac repressor binding to an upstream DNA segment, in the absence of DNA looping, represses the P1 promoter located on the same face and activates the P2 promoter situated on the opposite face of the DNA helix in the gal operon. Both inhibition and stimulation of transcription requires the physical presence of the C-terminal domain of the alpha subunit of RNA polymerase although the latter is not required for transcription itself. We propose that Gal and Lac repressors inhibit or stimulate transcription initiation by disabling or stimulating RNA polymerase activity at a post-binding step by directly or indirectly altering the C-terminal alpha domain to an unfavorable state at P1 or a more favorable state at P2, respectively. Images PMID:7556095

  10. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of the CARD domain of apoptosis repressor with CARD (ARC).

    PubMed

    Kim, Seong Hyun; Park, Hyun Ho

    2015-01-01

    Apoptosis repressor with caspase-recruiting domain (ARC) is an apoptosis repressor that inhibits both intrinsic and extrinsic apoptosis signalling. Human ARC contains an N-terminal caspase-recruiting domain (CARD domain) and a C-terminal proline- and glutamic acid-rich (P/E-rich) domain. The CARD domain in ARC is the domain that is directly involved in inhibition of the extrinsic pathway. In this study, the N-terminal CARD domain of ARC was overexpressed, purified and crystallized. X-ray diffraction data were collected to a resolution of 2.1 Å and the crystals were found to belong to space group P6(1) or P65, with unit-cell parameters a=98.28, b=98.28, c=51.86 Å, α=90, β=90, γ=120°.

  11. Rett syndrome mutations abolish the interaction of MeCP2 with the NCoR/SMRT co-repressor.

    PubMed

    Lyst, Matthew J; Ekiert, Robert; Ebert, Daniel H; Merusi, Cara; Nowak, Jakub; Selfridge, Jim; Guy, Jacky; Kastan, Nathaniel R; Robinson, Nathaniel D; de Lima Alves, Flavia; Rappsilber, Juri; Greenberg, Michael E; Bird, Adrian

    2013-07-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a severe neurological disorder that is caused by mutations in the MECP2 gene. Many missense mutations causing RTT are clustered in the DNA-binding domain of MeCP2, suggesting that association with chromatin is critical for its function. We identified a second mutational cluster in a previously uncharacterized region of MeCP2. We found that RTT mutations in this region abolished the interaction between MeCP2 and the NCoR/SMRT co-repressor complexes. Mice bearing a common missense RTT mutation in this domain exhibited severe RTT-like phenotypes. Our data are compatible with the hypothesis that brain dysfunction in RTT is caused by a loss of the MeCP2 'bridge' between the NCoR/SMRT co-repressors and chromatin.

  12. TG-interacting factor 1 acts as a transcriptional repressor of sterol O-acyltransferase 2[S

    PubMed Central

    Pramfalk, Camilla; Melhuish, Tiffany A.; Wotton, David; Jiang, Zhao-Yan; Eriksson, Mats; Parini, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Acat2 [gene name: sterol O-acyltransferase 2 (SOAT2)] esterifies cholesterol in enterocytes and hepatocytes. This study aims to identify repressor elements in the human SOAT2 promoter and evaluate their in vivo relevance. We identified TG-interacting factor 1 (Tgif1) to function as an important repressor of SOAT2. Tgif1 could also block the induction of the SOAT2 promoter activity by hepatocyte nuclear factor 1α and 4α. Women have ∼30% higher hepatic TGIF1 mRNA compared with men. Depletion of Tgif1 in mice increased the hepatic Soat2 expression and resulted in higher hepatic lipid accumulation and plasma cholesterol levels. Tgif1 is a new player in human cholesterol metabolism. PMID:24478032

  13. Tracking of controlled Escherichia coli replication fork stalling and restart at repressor-bound DNA in vivo.

    PubMed

    Possoz, Christophe; Filipe, Sergio R; Grainge, Ian; Sherratt, David J

    2006-06-01

    We report an efficient, controllable, site-specific replication roadblock that blocks cell proliferation, but which can be rapidly and efficiently reversed, leading to recovery of viability. Escherichia coli replication forks of both polarities stalled in vivo within the first 500 bp of a 10 kb repressor-bound array of operator DNA-binding sites. Controlled release of repressor binding led to rapid restart of the blocked replication fork without the participation of homologous recombination. Cytological tracking of fork stalling and restart showed that the replisome-associated SSB protein remains associated with the blocked fork for extended periods and that duplication of the fluorescent foci associated with the blocked operator array occurs immediately after restart, thereby demonstrating a lack of sister cohesion in the region of the array. Roadblocks positioned near oriC or the dif site did not prevent replication and segregation of the rest of the chromosome.

  14. The Krüppel-associated box repressor domain can induce reversible heterochromatization of a mouse locus in vivo.

    PubMed

    Groner, Anna C; Tschopp, Patrick; Challet, Ludivine; Dietrich, Jens-Erik; Verp, Sonia; Offner, Sandra; Barde, Isabelle; Rodriguez, Ivan; Hiiragi, Takashi; Trono, Didier

    2012-07-20

    The study of chromatin and its regulators is key to understanding and manipulating transcription. We previously exploited the Krüppel-associated box (KRAB) transcriptional repressor domain, present in hundreds of vertebrate-specific zinc finger proteins, to assess the effect of its binding to gene bodies. These experiments revealed that the ectopic and doxycycline (dox)-controlled tet repressor KRAB fusion protein (tTRKRAB) can induce reversible and long-range silencing of cellular promoters. Here, we extend this system to in vivo applications and use tTRKRAB to achieve externally controllable repression of an endogenous mouse locus. We employed lentiviral-mediated transgenesis with promoterless TetO-containing gene traps to engineer a mouse line where the endogenous kinesin family member 2A (Kif2A) promoter drives a YFP reporter gene. When these mice were crossed to animals expressing the TetO-binding tTRKRAB repressor, this regulator was recruited to the Kif2A locus, and YFP expression was reduced. This effect was reversed when dox was given to embryos or adult mice, demonstrating that the cellular Kif2A promoter was only silenced upon repressor binding. Molecular analyses confirmed that tTRKRAB induced transcriptional repression through the spread of H3K9me3-containing heterochromatin, without DNA methylation of the trapped Kif2A promoter. Therefore, we demonstrate that targeting of tTRKRAB to a gene body in vivo results in reversible transcriptional repression through the spreading of facultative heterochromatin. This finding not only sheds light on KRAB-mediated transcriptional processes, but also suggests approaches for the externally controllable and reversible modulation of chromatin and transcription in vivo. PMID:22605343

  15. Comparison of operator-specific and nonspecific DNA binding of the lambda cI repressor: [KCl] and pH effects.

    PubMed

    Senear, D F; Batey, R

    1991-07-01

    The effects of proton and KCl activity on the nonspecific lambda cI repressor-DNA interactions and on the site-specific repressor-O(R) interactions were compared, in order to assess their roles in site specificity. The repressor-O(R) interactions were studied by using DNase I footprint titration. The Gibbs free energy changes for binding and for cooperativity were determined between 25 and 300 mM KCl, from individual-site isotherms for the binding of repressor to O(R) and to reduced-valency mutants. The proton-linked effects on repressor-O(R) interactions have been published [Senear, D. F., & Ackers, G. K. (1990) Biochemistry 29, 6568-6577; Senear, D. F., & Bolen, D. W. (1991) Methods Enzymol. (in press)]. Nonspecific binding was studied by using a nitrocellulose filter binding assay, which proved advantageous in this case, due to the relatively weak nonspecific binding, and precipitation of repressor-DNA complexes. Filter binding provided measurements at low binding density where precipitation did not occur. The data provide estimates of the Gibbs free energy changes for nonspecific, intrinsic binding, but not for cooperativity. The KCl concentration dependencies of the intrinsic binding constants indicate that ion release plays similar roles in distinguishing between the operators and in discriminating operator from nonoperator DNA. Binding to DNA is accompanied by net proton absorption. Near neutral pH, proton linkages to operator and nonoperator binding are the same. Differences at acid and at basic pH implicate the same ionizable repressor groups in distinguishing between the operators and in discriminating operator from nonoperator DNA. The results indicate similar overall modes of operator and nonoperator binding of repressor, but implicate indirect effects of DNA sequence as important contributors to sequence recognition.

  16. Expression and functions of the repressor element 1 (RE-1)-silencing transcription factor (REST) in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Lv, Hui; Pan, Guoqing; Zheng, Guopei; Wu, Xiaoying; Ren, Hongzheng; Liu, Ying; Wen, Jifang

    2010-07-01

    The repressor element 1 (RE-1)-silencing transcription factor (REST), also known as the neuron-restrictive silencer factor (NRSF) or repressor binding to the X2 box (XBR), REST/NRSF/XBR, is originally discovered as a transcriptional repressor of a large number of primarily terminal neuronal differentiation genes in non-neuronal cells and neural stem cells (NSCs). Recently, the tumor-suppressor function of REST is finally proved. However, the expression profile and function of REST in breast cancer are not very clear. In this study, the expression of REST was detected in breast cancer tissue by immunohistochemistry. The results showed that REST expression was significantly lower in breast cancer samples compared to normal and benign breast samples (P < 0.05). Furthermore, the shRNA approach was used to investigate the function of REST in human breast cancer cells. Knocking down REST expression by shRNA in the human breast cancer MCF-7 cells resulted in an increase in cell proliferation, suppression in apoptosis, and reduced sensitivity to anticancer drug with a concurrent significantly up-regulated expression of Bcl-2. These data implied a significant role of REST in breast cancer. The reduced expression of REST might contribute to the breast cancer pathogenesis. PMID:20564196

  17. Enhanced generation of myeloid lineages in hematopoietic differentiation from embryonic stem cells by silencing transcriptional repressor Twist-2.

    PubMed

    Sharabi, Andrew B; Lee, Sung-Hyung; Goodell, Margaret A; Huang, Xue F; Chen, Si-Yi

    2009-12-01

    The self-renewal and multilineage differentiation of embryonic stem cells (ESC) is largely governed by transcription factors or repressors. Extensive efforts have focused on elucidating critical factors that control the differentiation of specific cell lineages, for instance, myeloid lineages in hematopoietic development. In this study, we found that Twist-2, a basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor, plays a critical role in inhibiting the differentiation of ESC. Murine ES cells, in which Twist-2 expression is silenced by lentivirally delivered shRNA, exhibit an enhanced formation of primary embryoid bodies (EB) and enhanced differentiation into mesodermally derived hematopoietic colonies. Furthermore, Twist-2 silenced (LV-siTwist-2) ESC display significantly increased generation of myeloid lineages (Gr-1(+) and F4/80(+) cells) during in vitro hematopoietic differentiation. Treatment with the Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 ligand synergistically stimulates the generation of primary EB formation as well as of hematopoietic progenitors differentiated from LV-siTwist-2 ES cells. Thus, this study reveals the critical role of the transcriptional repressor Twist-2 in regulating the development of myeloid lineage in hematopoietic differentiation from ESC. This study also suggests a potential strategy for directional differentiation of ESC by inhibiting a transcriptional repressor.

  18. Ttk69 acts as a master repressor of enteroendocrine cell specification in Drosophila intestinal stem cell lineages.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chenhui; Guo, Xingting; Dou, Kun; Chen, Hongyan; Xi, Rongwen

    2015-10-01

    In adult Drosophila midgut, intestinal stem cells (ISCs) periodically produce progenitor cells that undergo a binary fate choice determined primarily by the levels of Notch activity that they receive, before terminally differentiating into enterocytes (ECs) or enteroendocrine (EE) cells. Here we identified Ttk69, a BTB domain-containing transcriptional repressor, as a master repressor of EE cell specification in the ISC lineages. Depletion of ttk69 in progenitor cells induced ISC proliferation and caused all committed progenitor cells to adopt EE fate, leading to the production of supernumerary EE cells in the intestinal epithelium. Conversely, forced expression of Ttk69 in progenitor cells was sufficient to prevent EE cell specification. The expression of Ttk69 was not regulated by Notch signaling, and forced activation of Notch, which is sufficient to induce EC specification of normal progenitor cells, failed to prevent EE cell specification of Ttk69-depleted progenitors. Loss of Ttk69 led to derepression of the acheate-scute complex (AS-C) genes scute and asense, which then induced prospero expression to promote EE cell specification. These studies suggest that Ttk69 functions in parallel with Notch signaling and acts as a master repressor of EE cell specification in Drosophila ISC lineages primarily by suppressing AS-C genes.

  19. Structural and dynamics studies of a truncated variant of CI repressor from bacteriophage TP901-1

    PubMed Central

    Rasmussen, Kim Krighaar; Frandsen, Kristian E. H.; Boeri Erba, Elisabetta; Pedersen, Margit; Varming, Anders K.; Hammer, Karin; Kilstrup, Mogens; Thulstrup, Peter W.; Blackledge, Martin; Jensen, Malene Ringkjøbing; Lo Leggio, Leila

    2016-01-01

    The CI repressor from the temperate bacteriophage TP901-1 consists of two folded domains, an N-terminal helix-turn-helix DNA-binding domain (NTD) and a C-terminal oligomerization domain (CTD), which we here suggest to be further divided into CTD1 and CTD2. Full-length CI is a hexameric protein, whereas a truncated version, CI∆58, forms dimers. We identify the dimerization region of CI∆58 as CTD1 and determine its secondary structure to be helical both within the context of CI∆58 and in isolation. To our knowledge this is the first time that a helical dimerization domain has been found in a phage repressor. We also precisely determine the length of the flexible linker connecting the NTD to the CTD. Using electrophoretic mobility shift assays and native mass spectrometry, we show that CI∆58 interacts with the OL operator site as one dimer bound to both half-sites, and with much higher affinity than the isolated NTD domain thus demonstrating cooperativity between the two DNA binding domains. Finally, using small angle X-ray scattering data and state-of-the-art ensemble selection techniques, we delineate the conformational space sampled by CI∆58 in solution, and we discuss the possible role that the dynamics play in CI-repressor function. PMID:27403839

  20. Cyclic AMP-dependent constitutive expression of gal operon: use of repressor titration to isolate operator mutations.

    PubMed Central

    Irani, M; Orosz, L; Busby, S; Taniguchi, T; Adhya, S

    1983-01-01

    When the gal operator region is present in a multicopy plasmid it binds to all ("titrates") the gal repressor and "induces" the chromosomal gal operon. To make operator mutations (Oa) with reduced affinity toward the repressor, plasmid DNA was irradiated with UV light and mutant derivatives were isolated that were unable to release the chromosomal gal genes from repression. Then with such an Oa plasmid operator revertants were isolated that had reacquired the ability to release repression. Both sets of mutations have been localized by DNA sequence analysis. When the Oa mutations were transferred from the plasmid to the chromosome by recombination these mutant operators were found to make gal expression constitutive (independent of repressor) but still dependent on cAMP, whereas the previously reported gal operator mutants (Oc) are constitutive both in the presence and in the absence of cAMP. The titration method of isolating mutants enables the isolation of strains with operator mutations that also affect normal promoter activity, and it provides an easy way to isolate revertants of operator mutations. Images PMID:6308647

  1. Regulation of RNA splicing by the methylation-dependent transcriptional repressor methyl-CpG binding protein 2

    PubMed Central

    Young, Juan I.; Hong, Eugene P.; Castle, John C.; Crespo-Barreto, Juan; Bowman, Aaron B.; Rose, Matthew F.; Kang, Dongcheul; Richman, Ron; Johnson, Jason M.; Berget, Susan; Zoghbi, Huda Y.

    2005-01-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a postnatal neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by the loss of acquired motor and language skills, autistic features, and unusual stereotyped movements. RTT is caused by mutations in the X-linked gene encoding methyl-CpG binding protein 2 (MeCP2). Mutations in MECP2 cause a variety of neurodevelopmental disorders including X-linked mental retardation, psychiatric disorders, and some cases of autism. Although MeCP2 was identified as a methylation-dependent transcriptional repressor, transcriptional profiling of RNAs from mice lacking MeCP2 did not reveal significant gene expression changes, suggesting that MeCP2 does not simply function as a global repressor. Changes in expression of a few genes have been observed, but these alterations do not explain the full spectrum of Rett-like phenotypes, raising the possibility that additional MeCP2 functions play a role in pathogenesis. In this study, we show that MeCP2 interacts with the RNA-binding protein Y box-binding protein 1 and regulates splicing of reporter minigenes. Importantly, we found aberrant alternative splicing patterns in a mouse model of RTT. Thus, we uncovered a previously uncharacterized function of MeCP2 that involves regulation of splicing, in addition to its role as a transcriptional repressor. PMID:16251272

  2. A Conserved Network of Transcriptional Activators and Repressors Regulates Anthocyanin Pigmentation in Eudicots[C][W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Albert, Nick W.; Davies, Kevin M.; Lewis, David H.; Zhang, Huaibi; Montefiori, Mirco; Brendolise, Cyril; Boase, Murray R.; Ngo, Hanh; Jameson, Paula E.; Schwinn, Kathy E.

    2014-01-01

    Plants require sophisticated regulatory mechanisms to ensure the degree of anthocyanin pigmentation is appropriate to myriad developmental and environmental signals. Central to this process are the activity of MYB-bHLH-WD repeat (MBW) complexes that regulate the transcription of anthocyanin genes. In this study, the gene regulatory network that regulates anthocyanin synthesis in petunia (Petunia hybrida) has been characterized. Genetic and molecular evidence show that the R2R3-MYB, MYB27, is an anthocyanin repressor that functions as part of the MBW complex and represses transcription through its C-terminal EAR motif. MYB27 targets both the anthocyanin pathway genes and basic-helix-loop-helix (bHLH) ANTHOCYANIN1 (AN1), itself an essential component of the MBW activation complex for pigmentation. Other features of the regulatory network identified include inhibition of AN1 activity by the competitive R3-MYB repressor MYBx and the activation of AN1, MYB27, and MYBx by the MBW activation complex, providing for both reinforcement and feedback regulation. We also demonstrate the intercellular movement of the WDR protein (AN11) and R3-repressor (MYBx), which may facilitate anthocyanin pigment pattern formation. The fundamental features of this regulatory network in the Asterid model of petunia are similar to those in the Rosid model of Arabidopsis thaliana and are thus likely to be widespread in the Eudicots. PMID:24642943

  3. Repressor and activator protein accelerates hepatic ischemia reperfusion injury by promoting neutrophil inflammatory response

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chang Xian; Lo, Chung Mau; Lian, Qizhou; Ng, Kevin Tak-Pan; Liu, Xiao Bing; Ma, Yuen Yuen; Qi, Xiang; Yeung, Oscar Wai Ho; Tergaonkar, Vinay; Yang, Xin Xiang; Liu, Hui; Liu, Jiang; Shao, Yan; Man, Kwan

    2016-01-01

    Repressor and activator protein (Rap1) directly regulates nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) dependent signaling, which contributes to hepatic IRI. We here intended to investigate the effect of Rap1 in hepatic ischemia reperfusion injury (IRI) and to explore the underlying mechanisms. The association of Rap1 expression with hepatic inflammatory response were investigated in both human and rat liver transplantation. The effect of Rap1 in hepatic IRI was studied in Rap1 knockout mice IRI model in vivo and primary cells in vitro. Our results showed that over expression of Rap1 was associated with severe liver graft inflammatory response, especially in living donor liver transplantation. The results were also validated in rat liver transplantation model. In mice hepatic IRI model, the knockout of Rap1 reduced hepatic damage and hepatic inflammatory response. In primary cells, the knockout of Rap1 suppressed neutrophils migration activity and adhesion in response to liver sinusoidal endothelial cells through down-regulating neutrophils F-Actin expression and CXCL2/CXCR2 pathway. In addition, the knockout of Rap1 also decreased production of pro-inflammatory cytokines/chemokines in primary neutrophils and neutrophils-induced hepatocyte damage. In conclusion, Rap1 may induce hepatic IRI through promoting neutrophils inflammatory response. Rap1 may be the potential therapeutic target of attenuating hepatic IRI. PMID:27050284

  4. Cytotype regulation of P transposable elements in Drosophila melanogaster: repressor polypeptides or piRNAs?

    PubMed

    Jensen, Philip A; Stuart, Jeremy R; Goodpaster, Michael P; Goodman, Joseph W; Simmons, Michael J

    2008-08-01

    The telomeric P elements TP5 and TP6 are associated with the P cytotype, a maternally inherited condition that represses P-element-induced hybrid dysgenesis in the Drosophila germ line. To see if cytotype repression by TP5 and TP6 might be mediated by the polypeptides they could encode, hobo transgenes carrying these elements were tested for expression of mRNA in the female germ line and for repression of hybrid dysgenesis. The TP5 and TP6 transgenes expressed more germ-line mRNA than the native telomeric P elements, but they were decidedly inferior to the native elements in their ability to repress hybrid dysgenesis. These paradoxical results are inconsistent with the repressor polypeptide model of cytotype. An alternative model based on the destruction of P transposase mRNA by Piwi-interacting (pi) RNAs was supported by finding reduced P mRNA levels in flies that carried the native telomeric P elements, which are inserted in a known major piRNA locus. PMID:18579507

  5. The transcription factor p53: Not a repressor, solely an activator

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Martin; Steiner, Lydia; Engeland, Kurt

    2014-01-01

    The predominant function of the tumor suppressor p53 is transcriptional regulation. It is generally accepted that p53-dependent transcriptional activation occurs by binding to a specific recognition site in promoters of target genes. Additionally, several models for p53-dependent transcriptional repression have been postulated. Here, we evaluate these models based on a computational meta-analysis of genome-wide data. Surprisingly, several major models of p53-dependent gene regulation are implausible. Meta-analysis of large-scale data is unable to confirm reports on directly repressed p53 target genes and falsifies models of direct repression. This notion is supported by experimental re-analysis of representative genes reported as directly repressed by p53. Therefore, p53 is not a direct repressor of transcription, but solely activates its target genes. Moreover, models based on interference of p53 with activating transcription factors as well as models based on the function of ncRNAs are also not supported by the meta-analysis. As an alternative to models of direct repression, the meta-analysis leads to the conclusion that p53 represses transcription indirectly by activation of the p53-p21-DREAM/RB pathway. PMID:25486564

  6. Inhibition of Snail Family Transcriptional Repressor 2 (SNAI2) Enhances Multidrug Resistance of Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Rong-Jie; Lv, Ya-Ping; Jin, Wei; Meng, Chao; Chen, Guo-Qiang; Huang, Lei

    2016-01-01

    China accounts for almost half of the total number of liver cancer cases and deaths worldwide, and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the most primary liver cancer. Snail family transcriptional repressor 2 (SNAI2) is known as an epithelial to mesenchymal transition-inducing transcription factor that drives neoplastic epithelial cells into mesenchymal phenotype. However, the roles of endogenous SNAI2 remain controversial in different types of malignant tumors. Herein, we surprisingly identify that anchorage-independent growth, including the formation of tumor sphere and soft agar colony, is significantly increased when SNAI2 expression is inhibited by shRNAs in HCC cells. Suppression of SNAI2 suffices to up-regulate several cancer stem genes. Although unrelated to the metastatic ability, SNAI2 inhibition does increase the efflux of Hoechst 33342 and enhance multidrug resistance in vitro and in vivo. In agreement with this data, we demonstrate for the first time that decreasing SNAI2 level can transcriptionally upregulate several ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter genes such as ABCB1. Moreover, ABC transporters’ inhibitor verapamil can rescue the multidrug resistance induced by SNAI2 inhibition. Our results implicate that SNAI2 behaves as a tumor suppressor by inhibiting multidrug resistance via suppressing ABC transporter genes in HCC cells. PMID:27760172

  7. Sulfur deficiency–induced repressor proteins optimize glucosinolate biosynthesis in plants

    PubMed Central

    Aarabi, Fayezeh; Kusajima, Miyuki; Tohge, Takayuki; Konishi, Tomokazu; Gigolashvili, Tamara; Takamune, Makiko; Sasazaki, Yoko; Watanabe, Mutsumi; Nakashita, Hideo; Fernie, Alisdair R.; Saito, Kazuki; Takahashi, Hideki; Hubberten, Hans-Michael; Hoefgen, Rainer; Maruyama-Nakashita, Akiko

    2016-01-01

    Glucosinolates (GSLs) in the plant order of the Brassicales are sulfur-rich secondary metabolites that harbor antipathogenic and antiherbivory plant-protective functions and have medicinal properties, such as carcinopreventive and antibiotic activities. Plants repress GSL biosynthesis upon sulfur deficiency (−S); hence, field performance and medicinal quality are impaired by inadequate sulfate supply. The molecular mechanism that links –S to GSL biosynthesis has remained understudied. We report here the identification of the –S marker genes sulfur deficiency induced 1 (SDI1) and SDI2 acting as major repressors controlling GSL biosynthesis in Arabidopsis under –S condition. SDI1 and SDI2 expression negatively correlated with GSL biosynthesis in both transcript and metabolite levels. Principal components analysis of transcriptome data indicated that SDI1 regulates aliphatic GSL biosynthesis as part of –S response. SDI1 was localized to the nucleus and interacted with MYB28, a major transcription factor that promotes aliphatic GSL biosynthesis, in both yeast and plant cells. SDI1 inhibited the transcription of aliphatic GSL biosynthetic genes by maintaining the DNA binding composition in the form of an SDI1-MYB28 complex, leading to down-regulation of GSL biosynthesis and prioritization of sulfate usage for primary metabolites under sulfur-deprived conditions. PMID:27730214

  8. Morpholino antisense oligonucleotides targeting intronic repressor Element1 improve phenotype in SMA mouse models

    PubMed Central

    Osman, Erkan Y.; Miller, Madeline R.; Robbins, Kate L.; Lombardi, Abby M.; Atkinson, Arleigh K.; Brehm, Amanda J.; Lorson, Christian L.

    2014-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a neurodegenerative disease caused by the loss of Survival Motor Neuron-1 (SMN1). In all SMA patients, a nearly identical copy gene called SMN2 is present, which produces low levels of functional protein owing to an alternative splicing event. To prevent exon-skipping, we have targeted an intronic repressor, Element1 (E1), located upstream of SMN2 exon 7 using Morpholino-based antisense oligonucleotides (E1MO-ASOs). A single intracerebroventricular injection in the relatively severe mouse model of SMA (SMNΔ7 mouse model) elicited a robust induction of SMN protein, and mean life span was extended from an average survival of 13 to 54 days following a single dose, consistent with large weight gains and a correction of the neuronal pathology. Additionally, E1MO-ASO treatment in an intermediate SMA mouse (SMNRT mouse model) significantly extended life span by ∼700% and weight gain was comparable with the unaffected animals. While a number of experimental therapeutics have targeted the ISS-N1 element of SMN2 pre-mRNA, the development of E1 ASOs provides a new molecular target for SMA therapeutics that dramatically extends survival in two important pre-clinical models of disease. PMID:24781211

  9. The transcriptional repressor EUO regulates both subsets of Chlamydia late genes.

    PubMed

    Rosario, Christopher J; Hanson, Brett R; Tan, Ming

    2014-11-01

    The pathogenic bacterium Chlamydia replicates in a eukaryotic host cell via a developmental cycle marked by temporal waves of gene expression. We have previously shown that late genes transcribed by the major chlamydial RNA polymerase, σ(66) RNA polymerase, are regulated by a transcriptional repressor EUO. We now report that EUO also represses promoters for a second subset of late genes that are transcribed by an alternative polymerase called σ(28) RNA polymerase. EUO bound in the vicinity of six σ(28) -dependent promoters and inhibited transcription of each promoter. We used a mutational analysis to demonstrate that the EUO binding site functions as an operator that is necessary and sufficient for EUO-mediated repression of σ(28) -dependent transcription. We also verified specific binding of EUO to σ(66) -dependent and σ(28) -dependent promoters with a DNA immunoprecipitation assay. These findings support a model in which EUO represses expression of both σ(66) -dependent and σ(28) -dependent late genes. We thus propose that EUO is the master regulator of late gene expression in the chlamydial developmental cycle.

  10. The transcriptional repressor ICER binds to multiple loci throughout the genome.

    PubMed

    Muñiz, Luis C; Molina, Carlos A

    2016-09-23

    The events culminating in ovulation are controlled by the cyclical actions of hormones such as Follical Stimulating Hormone (FSH) and Luteinizing Hormone (LH). The secondary messenger, cyclic AMP (cAMP) conveys the intracellular activity of these hormones. It is well established that a family of transcription factors facilitate cAMP mediated gene expression, yet it remains unknown how these factors directly affect ovulation. One of these factors, Inducible cAMP Early Repressor (ICER) has been implicated in the transcriptional regulation of cAMP inducible genes during folliculogenesis and ovulation. In order to better determine the role of ICER in ovarian function we have identified novel targets using a genome-wide approach. Using a modification of the chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay we directly cloned and sequenced the immunoprecipitated ICER-associated DNAs from an immortalized mouse granulose cell line (GRMO2). The analysis of the immunoprecipitated DNA fragments has revealed that ICER's binding to DNA has the following distribution; 16% within the promoter region, 31% within an intron, 14% were not within a gene, 6% were within 20 kb of a promoter and 3% were within the 3' end of genes.

  11. Mapping the binding interface of ERK and transcriptional repressor Capicua using photocrosslinking.

    PubMed

    Futran, Alan S; Kyin, Saw; Shvartsman, Stanislav Y; Link, A James

    2015-07-14

    Extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) coordinates cellular responses to a range of stimuli by phosphorylating its numerous substrates. One of these substrates, Capicua (Cic), is a transcriptional repressor that was first identified in Drosophila and has been implicated in a number of human diseases. Here we use a chemical biology approach to map the binding interface of ERK and Cic. The noncanonical amino acid p-azidophenylalanine (AzF) was introduced into the ERK-binding region of Drosophila Cic, and photocrosslinking and tandem mass spectrometry were used to pinpoint its binding site on ERK. We also identified the ERK-binding region of human Cic and showed that it binds to the same site on ERK despite lacking conservation with the Drosophila Cic binding region. Finally, we mapped the amino acids involved in human Cic binding to ERK using AzF-labeled ERK. These results reveal the molecular details of the ERK-Cic interaction and demonstrate that the photocrosslinking approach is complementary to existing methods for mapping kinase-substrate binding interfaces.

  12. The Transcriptional Repressor ZNF503/Zeppo2 Promotes Mammary Epithelial Cell Proliferation and Enhances Cell Invasion.

    PubMed

    Shahi, Payam; Slorach, Euan M; Wang, Chih-Yang; Chou, Jonathan; Lu, Angela; Ruderisch, Aline; Werb, Zena

    2015-02-01

    The NET (nocA, Nlz, elB, TLP-1) subfamily of zinc finger proteins is an important mediator during developmental processes. The evolutionary conserved zinc finger protein ZNF503/Zeppo2 (zinc finger elbow-related proline domain protein 2, Zpo2) plays critical roles during embryogenesis. We found that Zpo2 is expressed in adult tissue and examined its function. We found that ZPO2 is a nuclearly targeted transcriptional repressor that is expressed in mammary epithelial cells. Elevated Zpo2 levels increase mammary epithelial cell proliferation. Zpo2 promotes cellular invasion through down-regulation of E-cadherin and regulates the invasive phenotype in a RAC1-dependent manner. We detect elevated Zpo2 expression during breast cancer progression in a MMTV-PyMT transgenic mouse model. Tumor transplant experiments indicated that overexpression of Zpo2 in MMTV-PyMT mammary tumor cell lines enhances lung metastasis. Our findings suggest that Zpo2 plays a significant role in mammary gland homeostasis and that deregulation of Zpo2 may promote breast cancer development.

  13. MAFG is a transcriptional repressor of bile acid synthesis and metabolism.

    PubMed

    de Aguiar Vallim, Thomas Q; Tarling, Elizabeth J; Ahn, Hannah; Hagey, Lee R; Romanoski, Casey E; Lee, Richard G; Graham, Mark J; Motohashi, Hozumi; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Edwards, Peter A

    2015-02-01

    Specific bile acids are potent signaling molecules that modulate metabolic pathways affecting lipid, glucose and bile acid homeostasis, and the microbiota. Bile acids are synthesized from cholesterol in the liver, and the key enzymes involved in bile acid synthesis (Cyp7a1, Cyp8b1) are regulated transcriptionally by the nuclear receptor FXR. We have identified an FXR-regulated pathway upstream of a transcriptional repressor that controls multiple bile acid metabolism genes. We identify MafG as an FXR target gene and show that hepatic MAFG overexpression represses genes of the bile acid synthetic pathway and modifies the biliary bile acid composition. In contrast, loss-of-function studies using MafG(+/-) mice causes de-repression of the same genes with concordant changes in biliary bile acid levels. Finally, we identify functional MafG response elements in bile acid metabolism genes using ChIP-seq analysis. Our studies identify a molecular mechanism for the complex feedback regulation of bile acid synthesis controlled by FXR.

  14. NLRP7, Involved in Hydatidiform Molar Pregnancy (HYDM1), Interacts with the Transcriptional Repressor ZBTB16.

    PubMed

    Singer, Heike; Biswas, Arijit; Nuesgen, Nicole; Oldenburg, Johannes; El-Maarri, Osman

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in the maternal effect gene NLRP7 cause biparental hydatidiform mole (HYDM1). HYDM1 is characterized by abnormal growth of placenta and lack of proper embryonic development. The molar tissues are characterized by abnormal methylation patterns at differentially methylated regions (DMRs) of imprinted genes. It is not known whether this occurs before or after fertilization, but the high specificity of this defect to the maternal allele indicates a possible maternal germ line-specific effect. To better understand the unknown molecular mechanism leading to HYDM1, we performed a yeast two-hybrid screen against an ovarian library using NLRP7 as bait. We identified the transcriptional repressor ZBTB16 as an interacting protein of NLRP7 and verified this interaction in mammalian cells by immunoprecipitation and confocal microscopy. Native protein analysis detected NLRP7 and ZBTB16 in a 480kD protein complex and both proteins co-localize in the cytoplasm in juxtanuclear aggregates. HYDM1-causing mutations in NLRP7 did not show altered patterns of interaction with ZBTB16. Hence, the biological significance of the NLRP7-ZBTB16 interaction remains to be revealed. However, a clear effect of harvesting ZBTB16 to the cytoplasm when the NLRP7 protein is overexpressed may be linked to the pathology of the molar pregnancy disease.

  15. ZBTB20 is a sequence-specific transcriptional repressor of alpha-fetoprotein gene.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hai; Cao, Dongmei; Zhou, Luting; Zhang, Ye; Guo, Xiaoqin; Li, Hui; Chen, Yuxia; Spear, Brett T; Wu, Jia-Wei; Xie, Zhifang; Zhang, Weiping J

    2015-07-15

    Alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) represents a classical model system to study developmental gene regulation in mammalian cells. We previously reported that liver ZBTB20 is developmentally regulated and plays a central role in AFP postnatal repression. Here we show that ZBTB20 is a sequence-specific transcriptional repressor of AFP. By ELISA-based DNA-protein binding assay and conventional gel shift assay, we successfully identified a ZBTB20-binding site at -104/-86 of mouse AFP gene, flanked by two HNF1 sites and two C/EBP sites in the proximal promoter. Importantly, mutation of the core sequence in this site fully abolished its binding to ZBTB20 in vitro, as well as the repression of AFP promoter activity by ZBTB20. The unique ZBTB20 site was highly conserved in rat and human AFP genes, but absent in albumin genes. These help to explain the autonomous regulation of albumin and AFP genes in the liver after birth. Furthermore, we demonstrated that transcriptional repression of AFP gene by ZBTB20 was liver-specific. ZBTB20 was dispensable for AFP silencing in other tissues outside liver. Our data define a cognate ZBTB20 site in AFP promoter which mediates the postnatal repression of AFP gene in the liver.

  16. The transcriptional repressor BLIMP1 curbs host defenses by suppressing expression of the chemokine CCL8.

    PubMed

    Severa, Martina; Islam, Sabina A; Waggoner, Stephen N; Jiang, Zhaozhao; Kim, Nancy D; Ryan, Glennice; Kurt-Jones, Evelyn; Charo, Israel; Caffrey, Daniel R; Boyartchuk, Victor L; Luster, Andrew D; Fitzgerald, Katherine A

    2014-03-01

    The transcriptional repressor B lymphocyte-induced maturation protein 1 (BLIMP1) is a master regulator of B and T cell differentiation. To examine the role of BLIMP1 in innate immunity, we used a conditional knockout (CKO) of Blimp1 in myeloid cells and found that Blimp1 CKO mice were protected from lethal infection induced by Listeria monocytogenes. Transcriptome analysis of Blimp1 CKO macrophages identified the murine chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 8, CCL8, as a direct target of Blimp1-mediated transcriptional repression in these cells. BLIMP1-deficient macrophages expressed elevated levels of Ccl8, and consequently Blimp1 CKO mice had higher levels of circulating CCL8, resulting in increased neutrophils in the peripheral blood, promoting a more aggressive antibacterial response. Mice lacking the Ccl8 gene were more susceptible to L. monocytogenes infection than were wild-type mice. Although CCL8 failed to recruit neutrophils directly, it was chemotactic for γ/δ T cells, and CCL8-responsive γ/δ T cells were enriched for IL-17F. Finally, CCL8-mediated enhanced clearance of L. monocytogenes was dependent on γ/δ T cells. Collectively, these data reveal an important role for BLIMP1 in modulating host defenses by suppressing expression of the chemokine CCL8.

  17. The Mycobacterium tuberculosis transcriptional repressor EthR is negatively regulated by Serine/Threonine phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Leiba, Jade; Carrère-Kremer, Séverine; Blondiaux, Nicolas; Dimala, Martin Moune; Wohlkönig, Alexandre; Baulard, Alain; Kremer, Laurent; Molle, Virginie

    2014-04-18

    Recent efforts have underlined the role of Serine/Threonine Protein Kinases (STPKs) in growth, pathogenesis and cell wall metabolism in mycobacteria. Herein, we demonstrated that the Mycobacterium tuberculosis EthR, a transcriptional repressor that regulates the activation process of the antitubercular drug ethionamide (ETH) is a specific substrate of the mycobacterial kinase PknF. ETH is a prodrug that must undergo bioactivation by the monooxygenease EthA to exert its antimycobacterial activity and previous studies reported that EthR represses transcription of ethA by binding to the ethA-ethR intergenic region. Mass spectrometry analyses and site-directed mutagenesis identified a set of four phosphoacceptors, namely Thr2, Thr3, Ser4 and Ser7. This was further supported by the complete loss of PknF-dependent phosphorylation of a phosphoablative EthR mutant protein. Importantly, a phosphomimetic version of EthR, in which all phosphosites were replaced by Asp residues, exhibited markedly decreased DNA-binding activity compared with the wild-type protein. Together, these findings are the first demonstration of EthR phosphorylation and indicate that phosphorylation negatively affects its DNA-binding activity, which may impact ETH resistance levels in M. tb.

  18. Transcriptional Repressor DAXX Promotes Prostate Cancer Tumorigenicity via Suppression of Autophagy.

    PubMed

    Puto, Lorena A; Brognard, John; Hunter, Tony

    2015-06-19

    The DAXX transcriptional repressor was originally associated with apoptotic cell death. However, recent evidence that DAXX represses several tumor suppressor genes, including the DAPK1 and DAPK3 protein kinases, and is up-regulated in many cancers argues that a pro-survival role may predominate in a cancer context. Here, we report that DAXX has potent growth-enhancing effects on primary prostatic malignancy through inhibition of autophagy. Through stable gene knockdown and mouse subcutaneous xenograft studies, we demonstrate that DAXX promotes tumorigenicity of human ALVA-31 and PC3 prostate cancer (PCa) cells in vivo. Importantly, DAXX represses expression of essential autophagy modulators DAPK3 and ULK1 in vivo, revealing autophagy suppression as a mechanism through which DAXX promotes PCa tumorigenicity. Furthermore, DAXX knockdown increases autophagic flux in cultured PCa cells. Finally, interrogation of the Oncomine(TM) database suggests that DAXX overexpression is associated with malignant transformation in several human cancers, including prostate and pancreatic cancers. Thus, DAXX may represent a new cancer biomarker for the detection of aggressive disease, whose tissue-specific down-regulation can serve as an improved therapeutic modality. Our results establish DAXX as a pro-survival protein in PCa and reveal that, in the early stages of tumorigenesis, autophagy suppresses prostate tumor formation.

  19. A GntR-type transcriptional repressor controls sialic acid utilization in Bifidobacterium breve UCC2003.

    PubMed

    Egan, Muireann; O'Connell Motherway, Mary; van Sinderen, Douwe

    2015-02-01

    Bifidobacterium breve strains are numerically prevalent among the gut microbiota of healthy, breast-fed infants. The metabolism of sialic acid, a ubiquitous monosaccharide in the infant and adult gut, by B. breve UCC2003 is dependent on a large gene cluster, designated the nan/nag cluster. This study describes the transcriptional regulation of the nan/nag cluster and thus sialic acid metabolism in B. breve UCC2003. Insertion mutagenesis and transcriptome analysis revealed that the nan/nag cluster is regulated by a GntR family transcriptional repressor, designated NanR. Crude cell extract of Escherichia coli EC101 in which the nanR gene had been cloned and overexpressed was shown to bind to two promoter regions within this cluster, each of which containing an imperfect inverted repeat that is believed to act as the NanR operator sequence. Formation of the DNA-NanR complex is prevented in the presence of sialic acid, which we had previously shown to induce transcription of this gene cluster.

  20. Highly specific epigenome editing by CRISPR-Cas9 repressors for silencing of distal regulatory elements.

    PubMed

    Thakore, Pratiksha I; D'Ippolito, Anthony M; Song, Lingyun; Safi, Alexias; Shivakumar, Nishkala K; Kabadi, Ami M; Reddy, Timothy E; Crawford, Gregory E; Gersbach, Charles A

    2015-12-01

    Epigenome editing with the CRISPR (clustered, regularly interspaced, short palindromic repeats)-Cas9 platform is a promising technology for modulating gene expression to direct cell phenotype and to dissect the causal epigenetic mechanisms of gene regulation. Fusions of nuclease-inactive dCas9 to the Krüppel-associated box (KRAB) repressor (dCas9-KRAB) can silence target gene expression, but the genome-wide specificity and the extent of heterochromatin formation catalyzed by dCas9-KRAB are not known. We targeted dCas9-KRAB to the HS2 enhancer, a distal regulatory element that orchestrates the expression of multiple globin genes, and observed highly specific induction of H3K9 trimethylation (H3K9me3) at the enhancer and decreased chromatin accessibility of both the enhancer and its promoter targets. Targeted epigenetic modification of HS2 silenced the expression of multiple globin genes, with minimal off-target changes in global gene expression. These results demonstrate that repression mediated by dCas9-KRAB is sufficiently specific to disrupt the activity of individual enhancers via local modification of the epigenome.

  1. Tumor repressor protein 53 and steroid hormones provide a new paradigm for ovarian cancer metastases.

    PubMed

    Mullany, Lisa K; Liu, Zhilin; Wong, Kwong-Kwok; Deneke, Victoria; Ren, Yi Athena; Herron, Alan; Richards, JoAnne S

    2014-01-01

    The functional status of the tumor repressor protein (TP53 or TRP53) is a defining feature of ovarian cancer. Mutant or null alleles of TP53 are expressed in greater than 90% of all high-grade serous adenocarcinomas. Wild-type TP53 is elevated in low-grade serous adenocarcinomas in women and in our Pten;Kras;Amhr2-Cre mutant mouse model. Disruption of the Trp53 gene in this mouse model did not lead to high-grade ovarian cancer but did increase expression of estrogen receptor α (ESR1) and markedly enhanced the responsiveness of these cells to estrogen. Specifically, when Trp53-positive and Trp53 null mutant mice were treated with estradiol or vehicle, only the Trp53 null and Esr1-positive tumors respond vigorously to estradiol in vivo and exhibit features characteristic of high-grade type ovarian cancer: invasive growth into the ovarian stroma, rampant metastases to the peritoneal cavity, and nuclear atypia. Estrogen promoted and progesterone suppressed the growth of Trp53 null ovarian tumors and tumor cells injected ip, sc, or when grown in matrigel. Exposure of the Trp53 depleted cells to estrogen also has a profound impact on the tumor microenvironment and immune-related events. These results led to the new paradigm that TRP53 status is related to the susceptibility of transformed ovarian surface epithelial cells to estradiol-induced metastases and nuclear atypia via increased levels of estradiol receptor α.

  2. Myeloid Deletion of Nemo Causes Osteopetrosis in Mice Owing to Upregulation of Transcriptional Repressors

    PubMed Central

    Swarnkar, Gaurav; Shim, Kyuhwan; Nasir, Amjad M.; Seehra, Kuljeet; Chen, Hung-Po (Tim); Mbalaviele, Gabriel; Abu-Amer, Yousef

    2016-01-01

    The transcription factor NF-κB is central to numerous physiologic processes including bone development, and its activation is controlled by IKKγ (also called NEMO), the regulatory subunit of IKK complex. NEMO is X-linked, and mutations in this gene result in Incontinentia Pigmenti in human hemizygous females. In mice, global deficiency causes embryonic lethality. In addition, certain point mutations in the NEMO (IKBKG) human gene manifest skeletal defects implicating NEMO in the regulation of bone homeostasis. To specifically investigate such role, we conditionally deleted Nemo from osteoclast and myeloid progenitors. Morphometric, histologic, and molecular analyses demonstrate that myeloid NEMO deletion causes osteopetrosis in mice. Mechanistically, NEMO deficiency hampered activation of IKK complex in osteoclast precursors, causing arrest of osteoclastogenesis and apoptosis. Interestingly, inhibiting apoptosis by genetic ablation of TNFr1 significantly increased cell survival, but failed to rescue osteoclastogenesis or reverse osteopetrosis. Based on this observation, we analyzed the expression of different regulators of osteoclastogenesis and discovered that NEMO deletion leads to increased RBPJ expression, resulting in a decrease of Blimp1 expression. Consequently, expression of IRF8 and Bcl6 which are targets of Blimp1 and potent osteoclastogenic transcriptional repressors, is increased. Thus, NEMO governs survival and osteoclast differentiation programs through serial regulation of multiple transcription factors. PMID:27435916

  3. A testis cytoplasmic RNA-binding protein that has the properties of a translational repressor.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, K; Fajardo, M A; Braun, R E

    1996-01-01

    Translation of the mouse protamine 1 (Prm-1) mRNA is repressed for several days during male germ cell differentiation. With the hope of cloning genes that regulate the translational repression of Prm-1, we screened male germ cell cDNA expression libraries with the 3' untranslated region of the Prm-1 RNA. From this screen we obtained two independent clones that encode Prbp, a Prm-1 RNA-binding protein. Prbp contains two copies of a double-stranded-RNA-binding domain. In vitro, the protein binds to a portion of the Prm-1 3' untranslated region previously shown to be sufficient for translational repression in transgenic mice, as well as to poly(I). poly(C). Prbp protein is present in multiple forms in cytoplasmic extracts prepared from wild-type mouse testes and is absent from testes of germ cell-deficient mouse mutants, suggesting that Prbp is restricted to the germ cells of the testis. Immunocytochemical localization confirmed that Prbp is present in the cytoplasmic compartment of late-stage meiotic cells and haploid round spermatids. Recombinant Prbp protein inhibits the translation of multiple mRNAs in a wheat germ lysate, suggesting that Prbp acts to repress translation in round spermatids. While this protein lacks complete specificity for Prm-1-containing RNAs in vitro, the properties of Prbp are consistent with it acting as a general repressor of translation. PMID:8649414

  4. Ultrafast force-clamp spectroscopy to probe lac repressor-DNA interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monico, Carina; Capitanio, Marco; Belcastro, Gionata; Vanzi, Francesco; Pavone, Francesco S.

    2013-06-01

    We recently developed an ultrafast force-clamp laser trap capable to probe, under controlled force, bimolecular interactions with unprecedented temporal resolution. Here we present the technique in the framework of protein-DNA interactions, specifically on Lactose repressor protein (LacI). The high temporal resolution of the method reveals the kinetics of both short- and long-lived interactions of LacI along the DNA template (from ˜100 μs to tens of seconds), as well the dependence on force of such interaction kinetics. The two kinetically well-distinct populations of interactions observed clearly represent specific interactions with the operator sequences and a fast scanning of LacI along non-cognate DNA. These results demonstrate the effectiveness of the method to study the sequence-dependent affinity of DNA-binding proteins along the DNA and the effects of force on a wide range of interaction durations, including μs time scales not accessible to other single-molecule methods. This improvement in time resolution provides also important means of investigation on the long-puzzled mechanism of target search on DNA and possible protein conformational changes occurring upon target recognition.

  5. Recognition of AT-Rich DNA Binding Sites by the MogR Repressor

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Aimee; Higgins, Darren E.; Panne, Daniel

    2009-07-22

    The MogR transcriptional repressor of the intracellular pathogen Listeria monocytogenes recognizes AT-rich binding sites in promoters of flagellar genes to downregulate flagellar gene expression during infection. We describe here the 1.8 A resolution crystal structure of MogR bound to the recognition sequence 5' ATTTTTTAAAAAAAT 3' present within the flaA promoter region. Our structure shows that MogR binds as a dimer. Each half-site is recognized in the major groove by a helix-turn-helix motif and in the minor groove by a loop from the symmetry-related molecule, resulting in a 'crossover' binding mode. This oversampling through minor groove interactions is important for specificity. The MogR binding site has structural features of A-tract DNA and is bent by approximately 52 degrees away from the dimer. The structure explains how MogR achieves binding specificity in the AT-rich genome of L. monocytogenes and explains the evolutionary conservation of A-tract sequence elements within promoter regions of MogR-regulated flagellar genes.

  6. Loss of the RNA polymerase III repressor MAF1 confers obesity resistance

    PubMed Central

    Bonhoure, Nicolas; Byrnes, Ashlee; Moir, Robyn D.; Hodroj, Wassim; Preitner, Frédéric; Praz, Viviane; Marcelin, Genevieve; Chua, Streamson C.; Martinez-Lopez, Nuria; Singh, Rajat; Moullan, Norman; Auwerx, Johan; Willemin, Gilles; Shah, Hardik; Hartil, Kirsten; Vaitheesvaran, Bhavapriya; Kurland, Irwin

    2015-01-01

    MAF1 is a global repressor of RNA polymerase III transcription that regulates the expression of highly abundant noncoding RNAs in response to nutrient availability and cellular stress. Thus, MAF1 function is thought to be important for metabolic economy. Here we show that a whole-body knockout of Maf1 in mice confers resistance to diet-induced obesity and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease by reducing food intake and increasing metabolic inefficiency. Energy expenditure in Maf1−/− mice is increased by several mechanisms. Precursor tRNA synthesis was increased in multiple tissues without significant effects on mature tRNA levels, implying increased turnover in a futile tRNA cycle. Elevated futile cycling of hepatic lipids was also observed. Metabolite profiling of the liver and skeletal muscle revealed elevated levels of many amino acids and spermidine, which links the induction of autophagy in Maf1−/− mice with their extended life span. The increase in spermidine was accompanied by reduced levels of nicotinamide N-methyltransferase, which promotes polyamine synthesis, enables nicotinamide salvage to regenerate NAD+, and is associated with obesity resistance. Consistent with this, NAD+ levels were increased in muscle. The importance of MAF1 for metabolic economy reveals the potential for MAF1 modulators to protect against obesity and its harmful consequences. PMID:25934505

  7. Differential signal transduction via TrmB, a sugar sensing transcriptional repressor of Pyrococcus furiosus.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sung-Jae; Surma, Melanie; Seitz, Sabine; Hausner, Winfried; Thomm, Michael; Boos, Winfried

    2007-06-01

    TrmB is a transcriptional repressor of the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus serving at least two operons. TrmB represses genes encoding an ABC transporter for trehalose and maltose (the TM system) with trehalose and maltose as inducers. TrmB also represses genes encoding another ABC transporter for maltodextrins (the MD system) with maltotriose and sucrose as inducers. Here we report that glucose which was also bound by TrmB acted as a corepressor (causing stronger repression) for both the TM and the MD system. Binding of glucose by TrmB was increased in the presence of TM promoter DNA. Maltose which acted as inducer for the TM system acted as a corepressor for the MD system intensifying repression. We propose that the differential conformational changes of TrmB in response to binding the different sugars governs the ability of TrmB to interact with the promoter region and represents a simple mechanism for selecting the usage of one carbon source over the other, reminiscent of catabolite repression in bacteria.

  8. SPBP Is a Phosphoserine-Specific Repressor of Estrogen Receptor α

    PubMed Central

    Gburcik, Valentina; Bot, Nathalie; Maggiolini, Marcello; Picard, Didier

    2005-01-01

    Multiple signaling pathways stimulate the activity of estrogen receptor α (ERα) by direct phosphorylation within its N-terminal activation function 1 (AF1). How phosphorylation affects AF1 activity remains poorly understood. We performed a phage display screen for human proteins that are exclusively recruited to the phosphorylated form of AF1 and found the stromelysin-1 platelet-derived growth factor-responsive element-binding protein (SPBP). In a purified system, SPBP bound only the in vitro-phosphorylated form of the ERα AF1 or the phosphoserine mimic S118E, and the interaction domain could be mapped to a 42-amino-acid fragment of SPBP. In cells, SPBP preferentially interacted with liganded and phosphorylated ERα. Functionally, SPBP behaved as a repressor of activated ERα, which extends its previously demonstrated roles as a DNA binding transactivation factor and coactivator of other transcription factors. By targeting the phosphorylated form of AF1, SPBP may contribute to attenuating and fine-tuning ERα activity. A functional consequence is that SPBP inhibits the proliferation of ERα-dependent but not ERα-independent breast cancer cell lines, mirroring a reported negative correlation with the ERα status of breast tumors. PMID:15831449

  9. SPBP is a phosphoserine-specific repressor of estrogen receptor alpha.

    PubMed

    Gburcik, Valentina; Bot, Nathalie; Maggiolini, Marcello; Picard, Didier

    2005-05-01

    Multiple signaling pathways stimulate the activity of estrogen receptor alpha (ERalpha) by direct phosphorylation within its N-terminal activation function 1 (AF1). How phosphorylation affects AF1 activity remains poorly understood. We performed a phage display screen for human proteins that are exclusively recruited to the phosphorylated form of AF1 and found the stromelysin-1 platelet-derived growth factor-responsive element-binding protein (SPBP). In a purified system, SPBP bound only the in vitro-phosphorylated form of the ERalpha AF1 or the phosphoserine mimic S118E, and the interaction domain could be mapped to a 42-amino-acid fragment of SPBP. In cells, SPBP preferentially interacted with liganded and phosphorylated ERalpha. Functionally, SPBP behaved as a repressor of activated ERalpha, which extends its previously demonstrated roles as a DNA binding transactivation factor and coactivator of other transcription factors. By targeting the phosphorylated form of AF1, SPBP may contribute to attenuating and fine-tuning ERalpha activity. A functional consequence is that SPBP inhibits the proliferation of ERalpha-dependent but not ERalpha-independent breast cancer cell lines, mirroring a reported negative correlation with the ERalpha status of breast tumors. PMID:15831449

  10. Distinct structural features of Rex-family repressors to sense redox levels in anaerobes and aerobes.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yingying; Ko, Tzu-Ping; Sun, Hong; Huang, Chun-Hsiang; Pei, Jianjun; Qiu, Riyong; Wang, Andrew H-J; Wiegel, Juergen; Shao, Weilan; Guo, Rey-Ting

    2014-12-01

    The Rex-family repressors sense redox levels by alternative binding to NADH or NAD(+). Unlike other Rex proteins that regulate aerobic respiration, RSP controls ethanol fermentation in the obligate anaerobe Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus JW200(T). It is also found in other anaerobic microorganisms. Here we present the crystal structures of apo-RSP, RSP/NADH and RSP/NAD(+)/DNA, which are the first structures of Rex-family members from an obligate anaerobe. RSP functions as a homodimer. It assumes an open conformation when bound to the operator DNA and a closed conformation when not DNA-bound. The DNA binds to the N-terminal winged-helix domain and the dinucleotide, either reduced or oxidized, binds to the C-terminal Rossmann-fold domain. The two distinct orientations of nicotinamide ring, anti in NADH and syn in NAD(+), give rise to two sets of protein-ligand interactions. Consequently, NADH binding makes RSP into a closed conformation, which does not bind to DNA. Both the conserved residues and the DNA specificity of RSP show a number of variations from those of the aerobic Rex, reflecting different structural bases for redox-sensing by the anaerobic and aerobic Rex-family members. PMID:25463021

  11. A knockdown with smoke model reveals FHIT as a repressor of Heme oxygenase 1

    PubMed Central

    Boylston, Jennifer A; Brenner, Charles

    2014-01-01

    Fragile histidine triad (FHIT) gene deletions are among the earliest and most frequent events in carcinogenesis, particularly in carcinogen-exposed tissues. Though FHIT has been established as an authentic tumor suppressor, the mechanism underlying tumor suppression remains opaque. Most experiments designed to clarify FHIT function have analyzed the consequence of re-expressing FHIT in FHIT-negative cells. However, carcinogenesis occurs in cells that transition from FHIT-positive to FHIT-negative. To better understand cancer development, we induced FHIT loss in human bronchial epithelial cells with RNA interference. Because FHIT is a demonstrated target of carcinogens in cigarette smoke, we combined FHIT silencing with cigarette smoke extract (CSE) exposure and measured gene expression consequences by RNA microarray. The data indicate that FHIT loss enhances the expression of a set of oxidative stress response genes after exposure to CSE, including the cytoprotective enzyme heme oxygenase 1 (HMOX1) at the RNA and protein levels. Data are consistent with a mechanism in which Fhit protein is required for accumulation of the transcriptional repressor of HMOX1, Bach1 protein. We posit that by allowing superinduction of oxidative stress response genes, loss of FHIT creates a survival advantage that promotes carcinogenesis. PMID:25486479

  12. The Capicua repressor--a general sensor of RTK signaling in development and disease.

    PubMed

    Jiménez, Gerardo; Shvartsman, Stanislav Y; Paroush, Ze'ev

    2012-03-15

    Receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) signaling pathways control multiple cellular decisions in metazoans, often by regulating the expression of downstream genes. In Drosophila melanogaster and other systems, E-twenty-six (ETS) transcription factors are considered to be the predominant nuclear effectors of RTK pathways. Here, we highlight recent progress in identifying the HMG-box protein Capicua (CIC) as a key sensor of RTK signaling in both Drosophila and mammals. Several studies have shown that CIC functions as a repressor of RTK-responsive genes, keeping them silent in the absence of signaling. Following the activation of RTK signaling, CIC repression is relieved, and this allows the expression of the targeted gene in response to local or ubiquitous activators. This regulatory switch is essential for several RTK responses in Drosophila, from the determination of cell fate to cell proliferation. Furthermore, increasing evidence supports the notion that this mechanism is conserved in mammals, where CIC has been implicated in cancer and neurodegeneration. In addition to summarizing our current knowledge on CIC, we also discuss the implications of these findings for our understanding of RTK signaling specificity in different biological processes.

  13. Highly Specific Epigenome Editing by CRISPR/Cas9 Repressors for Silencing of Distal Regulatory Elements

    PubMed Central

    Thakore, Pratiksha I.; D’Ippolito, Anthony M; Song, Lingyun; Safi, Alexias; Shivakumar, Nishkala K.; Kabadi, Ami M.; Reddy, Timothy E.; Crawford, Gregory E.; Gersbach, Charles A.

    2015-01-01

    Epigenome editing with the CRISPR/Cas9 platform is a promising technology to modulate gene expression to direct cell phenotype and to dissect the causal epigenetic mechanisms of gene regulation. Fusions of the nuclease-inactive dCas9 to the KRAB repressor (dCas9-KRAB) can silence target gene expression, but the genome-wide specificity and the extent of heterochromatin formation catalyzed by dCas9-KRAB is not known. We targeted dCas9-KRAB to the HS2 enhancer, a distal regulatory element that orchestrates expression of multiple globin genes. Genome-wide analyses demonstrated that localization of dCas9-KRAB to HS2 specifically induced H3K9 tri-methylation (H3K9me3) at the enhancer and reduced the chromatin accessibility of both the enhancer and its promoter targets. Targeted epigenetic modification of HS2 silenced the expression of multiple globin genes, with minimal off-target changes in gene expression. These results demonstrate that repression mediated by dCas9-KRAB is sufficiently specific to disrupt the activity of individual enhancers via local modification of the epigenome. PMID:26501517

  14. A repressor-antirepressor pair links two loci controlling light-induced carotenogenesis in Myxococcus xanthus.

    PubMed

    López-Rubio, José Juan; Elías-Arnanz, Montserrat; Padmanabhan, S; Murillo, Francisco José

    2002-03-01

    The light-inducible carB operon encodes all but one of the structural genes for carotenogenesis in Myxococcus xanthus. It is transcriptionally controlled by two proteins expressed from two unlinked genetic loci: CarS from the light-inducible carQRS operon, and CarA from the light-independent carA operon. CarA represses transcription from the carB promoter (P(B)) in the dark, and CarS counteracts this on illumination. The CarA sequence revealed a helix-turn-helix DNA-binding motif of the type found in bacterial MerR transcriptional factors, whereas CarS contains no known DNA-binding motif. Here, we examine the molecular interplay between CarA and CarS. We demonstrate the following. (i) Whereas CarS exhibits no DNA binding in vitro, CarA binds specifically to a region encompassing P(B) to form at least two distinct complexes. (ii) A palindrome located between positions -46 and -63 relative to the transcription start point is essential but not sufficient for the formation of the two CarA-DNA complexes observed. (iii) CarS abrogates the specific DNA binding of CarA. CarA is therefore a repressor and CarS an antirepressor. (iv) CarS physically interacts with CarA; thus, the functional interaction between them is mediated by protein-protein interactions.

  15. Fur-type transcriptional repressors and metal homeostasis in the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002

    PubMed Central

    Ludwig, Marcus; Chua, Tiing Tiing; Chew, Chyue Yie; Bryant, Donald A.

    2015-01-01

    Metal homeostasis is a crucial cellular function for nearly all organisms. Some heavy metals (e.g., Fe, Zn, Co, Mo) are essential because they serve as cofactors for enzymes or metalloproteins, and chlorophototrophs such as cyanobacteria have an especially high demand for iron. At excessive levels, however, metals become toxic to cyanobacteria. Therefore, a tight control mechanism is essential for metal homeostasis. Metal homeostasis in microorganisms comprises two elements: metal acquisition from the environment and detoxification or excretion of excess metal ions. Different families of metal-sensing regulators exist in cyanobacteria and each addresses a more or less specific set of target genes. In this study the regulons of three Fur-type and two ArsR-SmtB-type regulators were investigated in a comparative approach in the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002. One Fur-type regulator controls genes for iron acquisition (Fur); one controls genes for zinc acquisition (Zur); and the third controls two genes involved in oxidative stress (Per). Compared to other well-investigated cyanobacterial strains, however, the set of target genes for each regulator is relatively small. Target genes for the two ArsR-SmtB transcriptional repressors (SmtB (SYNPCC7002_A2564) and SYNPCC7002_A0590) are involved in zinc homeostasis in addition to Zur. Their target genes, however, are less specific for zinc and point to roles in a broader heavy metal detoxification response. PMID:26582412

  16. KHDC1A, a Novel Translational Repressor, Induces Endoplasmic Reticulum-Dependent Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Congli; Liu, Jing; Wang, Chao

    2012-01-01

    RNA binding proteins are characterized as a new family of apoptosis inducers; however, the mechanism by which they induce apoptosis is poorly understood. KHDC1 family members were recently identified as K-homology (KH)-domain containing RNA binding proteins that are unique to eutherian mammals and highly expressed in oocytes. In this study, we report that the expression of KHDC1A induces caspase-3 dependent apoptosis and inhibits mRNA translation, and the translational repression is independent of apoptosis. We demonstrate that both the N-terminus and C-terminus of KHDC1A are required for its pro-apoptotic and translational repression activities. Furthermore, in the C-terminus of KHDC1A, a putative trans-membrane motif (TMM) is critical for these activities. In addition, the ectopically expressed KHDC1A is localized to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and changes the morphology of the ER. The inhibition of ER-specific caspase-12 successfully rescues KHDC1A-induced apoptosis, but not Fas-induced apoptosis. Taken together, we conclude that KHDC1A functions as a global translational repressor and induces apoptosis through an ER-dependent signaling pathway. PMID:22731819

  17. MAFG Is a Transcriptional Repressor of Bile Acid Synthesis and Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    de Aguiar Vallim, Thomas Q.; Tarling, Elizabeth J.; Ahn, Hannah; Hagey, Lee R.; Romanoski, Casey E.; Lee, Richard G.; Graham, Mark J.; Motohashi, Hozumi; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Edwards, Peter A.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Specific bile acids are potent signaling molecules that modulate metabolic pathways affecting lipid, glucose and bile acid homeostasis and the microbiota. Bile acids are synthesized from cholesterol in the liver, and the key enzymes involved in bile acid synthesis (Cyp7a1, Cyp8b1) are regulated transcriptionally by the nuclear receptor FXR. We have identified an FXR-regulated pathway upstream of a transcriptional repressor that controls multiple bile acid metabolism genes. We identify MafG as an FXR target gene and show that hepatic MAFG overexpression represses genes of the bile acid synthetic pathway, and modifies the biliary bile acid composition. In contrast, loss-of-function studies using MafG+/− mice causes de-repression of the same genes with concordant changes in biliary bile acid levels. Finally, we identify functional MafG response elements in bile acid metabolism genes using ChIP-Seq analysis. Our studies identify a molecular mechanism for the complex feedback regulation of bile acid synthesis controlled by FXR. PMID:25651182

  18. Acidic pH promotes oligomerization and membrane insertion of the BclXL apoptotic repressor.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Vikas; Kurouski, Dmitry; Olenick, Max B; McDonald, Caleb B; Mikles, David C; Deegan, Brian J; Seldeen, Kenneth L; Lednev, Igor K; Farooq, Amjad

    2012-12-01

    Solution pH is believed to serve as an intricate regulatory switch in the induction of apoptosis central to embryonic development and cellular homeostasis. Herein, using an array of biophysical techniques, we provide evidence that acidic pH promotes the assembly of BclXL apoptotic repressor into a megadalton oligomer with a plume-like appearance and harboring structural features characteristic of a molten globule. Strikingly, our data reveal that pH tightly modulates not only oligomerization but also ligand binding and membrane insertion of BclXL in a highly subtle manner. Thus, while oligomerization and the accompanying molten globular content of BclXL is least favorable at pH 6, both of these structural features become more pronounced under acidic and alkaline conditions. However, membrane insertion of BclXL appears to be predominantly favored under acidic conditions. In a remarkable contrast, while ligand binding to BclXL optimally occurs at pH 6, it is diminished by an order of magnitude at lower and higher pH. This reciprocal relationship between BclXL oligomerization and ligand binding lends new insights into how pH modulates functional versatility of a key apoptotic regulator and strongly argues that the molten globule may serve as an intermediate primed for membrane insertion in response to apoptotic cues. PMID:22960132

  19. Regulatable and Modulable Background Expression Control in Prokaryotic Synthetic Circuits by Auxiliary Repressor Binding Sites.

    PubMed

    Merulla, Davide; van der Meer, Jan Roelof

    2016-01-15

    Expression control in synthetic genetic circuitry, for example, for construction of sensitive biosensors, is hampered by the lack of DNA parts that maintain ultralow background yet achieve high output upon signal integration by the cells. Here, we demonstrate how placement of auxiliary transcription factor binding sites within a regulatable promoter context can yield an important gain in signal-to-noise output ratios from prokaryotic biosensor circuits. As a proof of principle, we use the arsenite-responsive ArsR repressor protein from Escherichia coli and its cognate operator. Additional ArsR operators placed downstream of its target promoter can act as a transcription roadblock in a distance-dependent manner and reduce background expression of downstream-placed reporter genes. We show that the transcription roadblock functions both in cognate and heterologous promoter contexts. Secondary ArsR operators placed upstream of their promoter can also improve signal-to-noise output while maintaining effector dependency. Importantly, background control can be released through the addition of micromolar concentrations of arsenite. The ArsR-operator system thus provides a flexible system for additional gene expression control, which, given the extreme sensitivity to micrograms per liter effector concentrations, could be applicable in more general contexts.

  20. The Mannitol Operon Repressor MTIR belongs to a new class of transcription regulators in bacteria.

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, K.; Borovilos, M.; Zhou, M; Horer, S; Clancy, S; Moy, S; Volkart, LL; Sassoon, J; Baumann, U; Joachimiak, A

    2009-12-25

    Many bacteria express phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent phosphotransferase systems (PTS). The mannitol-specific PTS catalyze the uptake and phosphorylation of d-mannitol. The uptake system comprises several genes encoded in the single operon. The expression of the mannitol operon is regulated by a proposed transcriptional factor, mannitol operon repressor (MtlR) that was first studied in Escherichia coli. Here we report the first crystal structures of MtlR from Vibrio parahemeolyticus (Vp-MtlR) and its homolog YggD protein from Shigella flexneri (Sf-YggD). MtlR and YggD belong to the same protein family (Pfam05068). Although Vp-MtlR and Sf-YggD share low sequence identity (22%), their overall structures are very similar, representing a novel all {alpha}-helical fold, and indicate similar function. However, their lack of any known DNA-binding structural motifs and their unfavorable electrostatic properties imply that MtlR/YggD are unlikely to bind a specific DNA operator directly as proposed earlier. This structural observation is further corroborated by in vitro DNA-binding studies of E. coli MtlR (Ec-MtlR), which detected no interaction of Ec-MtlR with the well characterized mannitol operator/promoter region. Therefore, MtlR/YggD belongs to a new class of transcription factors in bacteria that may regulate gene expression indirectly as a part of a larger transcriptional complex.

  1. Mutations in the TGF-β repressor SKI cause Shprintzen-Goldberg syndrome with aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Doyle, Alexander J; Doyle, Jefferson J; Bessling, Seneca L; Maragh, Samantha; Lindsay, Mark E; Schepers, Dorien; Gillis, Elisabeth; Mortier, Geert; Homfray, Tessa; Sauls, Kimberly; Norris, Russell A; Huso, Nicholas D; Leahy, Dan; Mohr, David W; Caulfield, Mark J; Scott, Alan F; Destrée, Anne; Hennekam, Raoul C; Arn, Pamela H; Curry, Cynthia J; Van Laer, Lut; McCallion, Andrew S; Loeys, Bart L; Dietz, Harry C

    2012-11-01

    Elevated transforming growth factor (TGF)-β signaling has been implicated in the pathogenesis of syndromic presentations of aortic aneurysm, including Marfan syndrome (MFS) and Loeys-Dietz syndrome (LDS). However, the location and character of many of the causal mutations in LDS intuitively imply diminished TGF-β signaling. Taken together, these data have engendered controversy regarding the specific role of TGF-β in disease pathogenesis. Shprintzen-Goldberg syndrome (SGS) has considerable phenotypic overlap with MFS and LDS, including aortic aneurysm. We identified causative variation in ten individuals with SGS in the proto-oncogene SKI, a known repressor of TGF-β activity. Cultured dermal fibroblasts from affected individuals showed enhanced activation of TGF-β signaling cascades and higher expression of TGF-β-responsive genes relative to control cells. Morpholino-induced silencing of SKI paralogs in zebrafish recapitulated abnormalities seen in humans with SGS. These data support the conclusions that increased TGF-β signaling is the mechanism underlying SGS and that high signaling contributes to multiple syndromic presentations of aortic aneurysm.

  2. Transcriptional repressor NIR interacts with the p53-inhibiting ubiquitin ligase MDM2

    PubMed Central

    Heyne, Kristina; Förster, Juliane; Schüle, Roland; Roemer, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    NIR (novel INHAT repressor) can bind to p53 at promoters and inhibit p53-mediated gene transactivation by blocking histone acetylation carried out by p300/CBP. Like NIR, the E3 ubiquitin ligase MDM2 can also bind and inhibit p53 at promoters. Here, we present data indicating that NIR, which shuttles between the nucleolus and nucleoplasm, not only binds to p53 but also directly to MDM2, in part via the central acidic and zinc finger domain of MDM2 that is also contacted by several other nucleolus-based MDM2/p53-regulating proteins. Like some of these, NIR was able to inhibit the ubiquitination of MDM2 and stabilize MDM2; however, unlike these nucleolus-based MDM2 regulators, NIR did not inhibit MDM2 to activate p53. Rather, NIR cooperated with MDM2 to repress p53-induced transactivation. This cooperative repression may at least in part involve p300/CBP. We show that NIR can block the acetylation of p53 and MDM2. Non-acetylated p53 has been documented previously to more readily associate with inhibitory MDM2. NIR may thus help to sustain the inhibitory p53:MDM2 complex, and we present evidence suggesting that all three proteins can indeed form a ternary complex. In sum, our findings suggest that NIR can support MDM2 to suppress p53 as a transcriptional activator. PMID:24413661

  3. Inducing a Site Specific Replication Blockage in E. coli Using a Fluorescent Repressor Operator System.

    PubMed

    Mettrick, Karla A; Lawrence, Nikki; Mason, Claire; Weaver, Georgia M; Corocher, Tayla-Ann; Grainge, Ian

    2016-01-01

    Obstacles present on DNA, including tightly-bound proteins and various lesions, can severely inhibit the progression of the cell's replication machinery. The stalling of a replisome can lead to its dissociation from the chromosome, either in part or its entirety, leading to the collapse of the replication fork. The recovery from this collapse is a necessity for the cell to accurately complete chromosomal duplication and subsequently divide. Therefore, when the collapse occurs, the cell has evolved diverse mechanisms that take place to restore the DNA fork and allow replication to be completed with high fidelity. Previously, these replication repair pathways in bacteria have been studied using UV damage, which has the disadvantage of not being localized to a known site. This manuscript describes a system utilizing a Fluorescence Repressor Operator System (FROS) to create a site-specific protein block that can induce the stalling and collapse of replication forks in Escherichia coli. Protocols detail how the status of replication can be visualized in single living cells using fluorescence microscopy and DNA replication intermediates can be analyzed by 2-dimensional agarose gel electrophoresis. Temperature sensitive mutants of replisome components (e.g. DnaBts) can be incorporated into the system to induce a synchronous collapse of the replication forks. Furthermore, the roles of the recombination proteins and helicases that are involved in these processes can be studied using genetic knockouts within this system. PMID:27583408

  4. Loss of the RNA polymerase III repressor MAF1 confers obesity resistance.

    PubMed

    Bonhoure, Nicolas; Byrnes, Ashlee; Moir, Robyn D; Hodroj, Wassim; Preitner, Frédéric; Praz, Viviane; Marcelin, Genevieve; Chua, Streamson C; Martinez-Lopez, Nuria; Singh, Rajat; Moullan, Norman; Auwerx, Johan; Willemin, Gilles; Shah, Hardik; Hartil, Kirsten; Vaitheesvaran, Bhavapriya; Kurland, Irwin; Hernandez, Nouria; Willis, Ian M

    2015-05-01

    MAF1 is a global repressor of RNA polymerase III transcription that regulates the expression of highly abundant noncoding RNAs in response to nutrient availability and cellular stress. Thus, MAF1 function is thought to be important for metabolic economy. Here we show that a whole-body knockout of Maf1 in mice confers resistance to diet-induced obesity and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease by reducing food intake and increasing metabolic inefficiency. Energy expenditure in Maf1(-/-) mice is increased by several mechanisms. Precursor tRNA synthesis was increased in multiple tissues without significant effects on mature tRNA levels, implying increased turnover in a futile tRNA cycle. Elevated futile cycling of hepatic lipids was also observed. Metabolite profiling of the liver and skeletal muscle revealed elevated levels of many amino acids and spermidine, which links the induction of autophagy in Maf1(-/-) mice with their extended life span. The increase in spermidine was accompanied by reduced levels of nicotinamide N-methyltransferase, which promotes polyamine synthesis, enables nicotinamide salvage to regenerate NAD(+), and is associated with obesity resistance. Consistent with this, NAD(+) levels were increased in muscle. The importance of MAF1 for metabolic economy reveals the potential for MAF1 modulators to protect against obesity and its harmful consequences. PMID:25934505

  5. Inhibition of Wilms tumor 1 transactivation by bone marrow zinc finger 2, a novel transcriptional repressor.

    PubMed

    Lee, Tae Ho; Lwu, Shelly; Kim, Jungho; Pelletier, Jerry

    2002-11-22

    The Wilms tumor suppressor gene, wt1, encodes a zinc finger transcription factor that has been implicated in the regulation of a number of genes. Protein-protein interactions are known to modulate the transcription regulatory functions of Wilms tumor (WT1) and have also implicated WT1 in splicing. In this report, we identify a novel WT1-interacting protein, bone marrow zinc finger 2 (BMZF2), by affinity chromatography utilizing immobilized WT1 protein. BMZF2 is a potential transcription factor with 18 zinc fingers. The BMZF2 mRNA is mainly expressed in fetal tissues, and the protein is predominantly nuclear. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments are consistent with an in vivo association between WT1 and BMZF2. Glutathione S-transferase pulldown assays and far Western blots revealed that zinc fingers VI-X (amino acids 231-370) are required for interaction with the zinc finger region of WT1. Functionally, BMZF2 inhibits transcriptional activation by WT1. Moreover, a chimeric protein generated by fusion of BMZF2 to the GAL4 DNA-binding domain significantly decreases promoter activity of a reporter containing GAL4 DNA-binding sites, suggesting the presence of an active repressor domain within BMZF2. Our results suggest that BMZF2 interferes with the transactivation potential of WT1. PMID:12239212

  6. Transcription repressor activity of spleen tyrosine kinase mediates breast tumor suppression

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lei; Devarajan, Eswaran; He, Jin; Reddy, Sekhar P.; Le Dai, Jia

    2005-01-01

    Spleen tyrosine kinase (SYK) is a candidate tumor suppressor gene in breast. Loss of SYK expression in breast tumors as a result of DNA hypermethylation promotes tumor cell proliferation and invasion and predicts shorter survival of breast cancer patients. We previously reported that, in addition to its well-known cytoplasmic localization, the full length Syk is also present in the nucleus, and that Syk nuclear translocation is a rate-limiting step to determine Syk tumor suppressor function. Here we show that the full-length form of Syk acts as a transcription repressor in the cell nucleus. Ectopic expression of Syk down-regulates the transcription of FRA1 and cyclin D1 oncogenes. This transcription repressing activity of Syk is associated with its binding to members of the histone deacetylase family. Syk interacts with transcription factor Sp1 at the Sp1 DNA-binding site in the FRA1 promoter to repress Sp1-activated FRA1 transcription. Thus, breast tumorigenesis and progression resulting from the loss of SYK are underscored by the de-repression of Sp1-mediated oncogene transcription. PMID:16288017

  7. Transcriptional repressor HipB regulates the multiple promoters in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chun-Yi; Awano, Naoki; Masuda, Hisako; Park, Jung-Ho; Inouye, Masayori

    2013-01-01

    HipB is a DNA-binding protein in Escherichia coli and negatively regulates its own promoter by binding to the palindromic sequences [TATCCN8GGATA (N represents any nucleotides)] on the hipBA promoter. For such sequences, bioinformatic analysis revealed that there are a total of 39 palindromic sequences (TATCCN(x)GGATA: N is any nucleotides and x is the number of nucleotides from 1 to 30) in the promoter regions of 33 genes on the E. coli genome. Notably, eutH and fadH have two and three TATCCN(x)GGATA palindromic sequences located in their promoters, respectively. Another significant finding was that a palindromic sequence was also identified in the promoter region of hipAB locus, known to be involved in the RelA-dependent persister cell formation in bacteria. Here, we demonstrated that HipB binds to the palindromic structures in the eutH, fadH, as well as the relA promoter regions and represses their expressions. We further demonstrated that HipA enhances the repression of the relA promoter activity by HipB. This effect was not observed with D291A HipA mutant which was previously shown to lack an ability to interact with HipB, indicating that HipA enhances the HipB's repressor activity through direct interaction with HipB.

  8. DNA sequence-dependent mechanics and protein-assisted bending in repressor-mediated loop formation

    PubMed Central

    Boedicker, James Q.; Garcia, Hernan G.; Johnson, Stephanie; Phillips, Rob

    2014-01-01

    As the chief informational molecule of life, DNA is subject to extensive physical manipulations. The energy required to deform double-helical DNA depends on sequence, and this mechanical code of DNA influences gene regulation, such as through nucleosome positioning. Here we examine the sequence-dependent flexibility of DNA in bacterial transcription factor-mediated looping, a context for which the role of sequence remains poorly understood. Using a suite of synthetic constructs repressed by the Lac repressor and two well-known sequences that show large flexibility differences in vitro, we make precise statistical mechanical predictions as to how DNA sequence influences loop formation and test these predictions using in vivo transcription and in vitro single-molecule assays. Surprisingly, sequence-dependent flexibility does not affect in vivo gene regulation. By theoretically and experimentally quantifying the relative contributions of sequence and the DNA-bending protein HU to DNA mechanical properties, we reveal that bending by HU dominates DNA mechanics and masks intrinsic sequence-dependent flexibility. Such a quantitative understanding of how mechanical regulatory information is encoded in the genome will be a key step towards a predictive understanding of gene regulation at single-base pair resolution. PMID:24231252

  9. The Brm-HDAC3-Erm repressor complex suppresses dedifferentiation in Drosophila type II neuroblast lineages

    PubMed Central

    Koe, Chwee Tat; Li, Song; Rossi, Fabrizio; Wong, Jack Jing Lin; Wang, Yan; Zhang, Zhizhuo; Chen, Keng; Aw, Sherry Shiying; Richardson, Helena E; Robson, Paul; Sung, Wing-Kin; Yu, Fengwei; Gonzalez, Cayetano; Wang, Hongyan

    2014-01-01

    The control of self-renewal and differentiation of neural stem and progenitor cells is a crucial issue in stem cell and cancer biology. Drosophila type II neuroblast lineages are prone to developing impaired neuroblast homeostasis if the limited self-renewing potential of intermediate neural progenitors (INPs) is unrestrained. Here, we demonstrate that Drosophila SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling Brahma (Brm) complex functions cooperatively with another chromatin remodeling factor, Histone deacetylase 3 (HDAC3) to suppress the formation of ectopic type II neuroblasts. We show that multiple components of the Brm complex and HDAC3 physically associate with Earmuff (Erm), a type II-specific transcription factor that prevents dedifferentiation of INPs into neuroblasts. Consistently, the predicted Erm-binding motif is present in most of known binding loci of Brm. Furthermore, brm and hdac3 genetically interact with erm to prevent type II neuroblast overgrowth. Thus, the Brm-HDAC3-Erm repressor complex suppresses dedifferentiation of INPs back into type II neuroblasts. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01906.001 PMID:24618901

  10. EGCG protects endothelial cells against PCB 126-induced inflammation through inhibition of AhR and induction of Nrf2-regulated genes

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Sung Gu; Han, Seong-Su; Toborek, Michal; Hennig, Bernhard

    2012-06-01

    Tea flavonoids such as epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) protect against vascular diseases such as atherosclerosis via their antioxidant and anti-inflammatory functions. Persistent and widespread environmental pollutants, including polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB), can induce oxidative stress and inflammation in vascular endothelial cells. Even though PCBs are no longer produced, they are still detected in human blood and tissues and thus considered a risk for vascular dysfunction. We hypothesized that EGCG can protect endothelial cells against PCB-induced cell damage via its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. To test this hypothesis, primary vascular endothelial cells were pretreated with EGCG, followed by exposure to the coplanar PCB 126. Exposure to PCB 126 significantly increased cytochrome P450 1A1 (Cyp1A1) mRNA and protein expression and superoxide production, events which were significantly attenuated following pretreatment with EGCG. Similarly, EGCG also reduced DNA binding of NF-κB and downstream expression of inflammatory markers such as monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) and vascular cell adhesion protein-1 (VCAM-1) after PCB exposure. Furthermore, EGCG decreased endogenous or base-line levels of Cyp1A1, MCP-1 and VCAM-1 in endothelial cells. Most of all, treatment of EGCG upregulated expression of NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)-controlled antioxidant genes, including glutathione S transferase (GST) and NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1), in a dose-dependent manner. In contrast, silencing of Nrf2 increased Cyp1A1, MCP-1 and VCAM-1 and decreased GST and NQO1 expression, respectively. These data suggest that EGCG can inhibit AhR regulated genes and induce Nrf2-regulated antioxidant enzymes, thus providing protection against PCB-induced inflammatory responses in endothelial cells. -- Highlights: ► PCBs cause endothelial inflammation and subsequent atherosclerosis. ► Nutrition can modulate toxicity by environmental pollutants. ► We

  11. The Transcription Repressor REST in Adult Neurons: Physiology, Pathology, and Diseases1,2,3

    PubMed Central

    Baldelli, Pietro

    2015-01-01

    Abstract REST [RE1-silencing transcription factor (also called neuron-restrictive silencer factor)] is known to repress thousands of possible target genes, many of which are neuron specific. To date, REST repression has been investigated mostly in stem cells and differentiating neurons. Current evidence demonstrates its importance in adult neurons as well. Low levels of REST, which are acquired during differentiation, govern the expression of specific neuronal phenotypes. REST-dependent genes encode important targets, including transcription factors, transmitter release proteins, voltage-dependent and receptor channels, and signaling proteins. Additional neuronal properties depend on miRNAs expressed reciprocally to REST and on specific splicing factors. In adult neurons, REST levels are not always low. Increases occur during aging in healthy humans. Moreover, extensive evidence demonstrates that prolonged stimulation with various agents induces REST increases, which are associated with the repression of neuron-specific genes with appropriate, intermediate REST binding affinity. Whether neuronal increases in REST are protective or detrimental remains a subject of debate. Examples of CA1 hippocampal neuron protection upon depolarization, and of neurodegeneration upon glutamate treatment and hypoxia have been reported. REST participation in psychiatric and neurological diseases has been shown, especially in Alzheimer’s disease and Huntington’s disease, as well as epilepsy. Distinct, complex roles of the repressor in these different diseases have emerged. In conclusion, REST is certainly very important in a large number of conditions. We suggest that the conflicting results reported for the role of REST in physiology, pathology, and disease depend on its complex, direct, and indirect actions on many gene targets and on the diverse approaches used during the investigations. PMID:26465007

  12. Flexibility in the inducer binding region is crucial for allostery in the Escherichia coli lactose repressor.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jia; Matthews, Kathleen S

    2009-06-01

    Lactose repressor protein (LacI) utilizes an allosteric mechanism to regulate transcription in Escherichia coli, and the transition between inducer- and operator-bound states has been simulated by targeted molecular dynamics (TMD). The side chains of amino acids 149 and 193 interact and were predicted by TMD simulation to play a critical role in the early stages of the LacI conformational change. D149 contacts IPTG directly, and variations at this site provide the opportunity to dissect its role in inducer binding and signal transduction. Single mutants at D149 or S193 exhibit a minimal change in operator binding, and alterations in inducer binding parallel changes in operator release, indicating normal allosteric response. The observation that the double mutant D149A/S193A exhibits wild-type properties excludes the requirement for inter-residue hydrogen bond formation in the allosteric response. The double mutant D149C/S193C purified from cell extracts shows decreased sensitivity to inducer binding while retaining wild-type binding affinities and kinetic constants for both operator and inducer. By manipulating cysteine oxidation, we show that the more reduced state of D149C/S193C responds to inducer more like the wild-type protein, whereas the more oxidized state displays diminished inducer sensitivity. These features of D149C/S193C indicate that the novel disulfide bond formed in this mutant impedes the allosteric transition, consistent with the role of this region predicted by TMD simulation. Together, these results establish the requirement for flexibility in the spatial relationship between D149 and S193 rather than a specific D149-S193 interaction in the LacI allosteric response to inducer. PMID:19368358

  13. Transcriptional repressor Tbx3 is required for the hormone-sensing cell lineage in mammary epithelium.

    PubMed

    Kunasegaran, Kamini; Ho, Victor; Chang, Ted H-T; De Silva, Duvini; Bakker, Martijn L; Christoffels, Vincent M; Pietersen, Alexandra M

    2014-01-01

    The transcriptional repressor Tbx3 is involved in lineage specification in several tissues during embryonic development. Germ-line mutations in the Tbx3 gene give rise to Ulnar-Mammary Syndrome (comprising reduced breast development) and Tbx3 is required for mammary epithelial cell identity in the embryo. Notably Tbx3 has been implicated in breast cancer, which develops in adult mammary epithelium, but the role of Tbx3 in distinct cell types of the adult mammary gland has not yet been characterized. Using a fluorescent reporter knock-in mouse, we show that in adult virgin mice Tbx3 is highly expressed in luminal cells that express hormone receptors, and not in luminal cells of the alveolar lineage (cells primed for milk production). Flow cytometry identified Tbx3 expression already in progenitor cells of the hormone-sensing lineage and co-immunofluorescence confirmed a strict correlation between estrogen receptor (ER) and Tbx3 expression in situ. Using in vivo reconstitution assays we demonstrate that Tbx3 is functionally relevant for this lineage because knockdown of Tbx3 in primary mammary epithelial cells prevented the formation of ER+ cells, but not luminal ER- or basal cells. Interestingly, genes that are repressed by Tbx3 in other cell types, such as E-cadherin, are not repressed in hormone-sensing cells, highlighting that transcriptional targets of Tbx3 are cell type specific. In summary, we provide the first analysis of Tbx3 expression in the adult mammary gland at a single cell level and show that Tbx3 is important for the generation of hormone-sensing cells.

  14. hnRNP I/PTB can antagonize the splicing repressor activity of SRp30c

    PubMed Central

    Paradis, Caroline; Cloutier, Philippe; Shkreta, Lulzim; Toutant, Johanne; Klarskov, Klaus; Chabot, Benoit

    2007-01-01

    The control of alternative pre-mRNA splicing often requires the participation of factors displaying synergistic or antagonistic activities. In the hnRNP A1 pre-mRNA, three elements promote the exclusion of alternative exon 7B, while a fourth intron element (CE9) represses splicing of exon 7B to the downstream exon. We have shown previously that the 5′ portion of the 38-nucleotide-long CE9 element is bound by SRp30c, and that this interaction is important for repression in vitro. To determine whether SRp30c alone can impose repression, we tested a high-affinity SRp30c binding site that we identified using the SELEX protocol. We find that multiple high-affinity SRp30c sites are required to replicate the level of repression obtained with CE9, and that both the 5′ and the 3′ portions of CE9 contribute to SRp30c binding. Performing RNA affinity chromatography with the complete CE9 element recovered hnRNP I/PTB. Surprisingly however, His-tagged PTB reduced the binding of SRp30c to CE9 in a nuclear extract, stimulated splicing to a downstream 3′ splice site, and relieved the CE9-mediated splicing repression in vitro. Our in vivo results are consistent with the notion that increasing PTB levels alleviates the repression imposed by CE9 to a downstream 3′ splice site. Thus, PTB can function as an anti-repressor molecule to counteract the splicing inhibitory activity of SRp30c. PMID:17548433

  15. Dissection of the PHO pathway in Schizosaccharomyces pombe using epistasis and the alternate repressor adenine.

    PubMed

    Estill, Molly; Kerwin-Iosue, Christine L; Wykoff, Dennis D

    2015-05-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, intracellular phosphate levels are maintained by the PHO pathway, activation of which is assayed by increased phosphatase activity. The PHO pathway of Schizosaccharomyces pombe upregulates phosphatase activity (encoded by pho1 (+)) during low extracellular phosphate levels, but the underlying mechanism is poorly understood. We utilized an alternate repressor of pho1 (+) expression (adenine supplementation) along with epistasis analysis to develop a model of how S. pombe PHO pathway components interact. Analyzing Pho1 activity in S. pombe PHO pathway deletion mutants during adenine starvation, we observed most mutants with a phosphatase defect in phosphate starvation also had a defect in adenine starvation. Pho7, a transcription factor in the PHO pathway, is necessary for an adenine starvation-mediated increase in Pho1 activity. Comparing adenine starvation to phosphate starvation, there are differences in the degree to which individual mutants regulate the two responses. Through epistasis studies, we identified two positive regulatory arms and one repressive arm of the PHO pathway. PKA activation is a positive regulator of Pho1 activity under both environmental conditions and is critical for transducing adenine concentrations in the cell. The synthesis of IP7 also appears critical for the induction of Pho1 activity during adenine starvation, but IP7 is not critical during phosphate starvation, which differs from S. cerevisiae. Finally, Csk1 is critical for repression of pho1 (+) expression during phosphate starvation. We believe all of these regulatory arms converge to increase transcription of pho1 (+) and some of the regulation acts through pho7 (+).

  16. JAZ Repressors: Potential Involvement in Nutrients Deficiency Response in Rice and Chickpea

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Ajit P.; Pandey, Bipin K.; Deveshwar, Priyanka; Narnoliya, Laxmi; Parida, Swarup K.; Giri, Jitender

    2015-01-01

    Jasmonates (JA) are well-known phytohormones which play important roles in plant development and defense against pathogens. Jasmonate ZIM domain (JAZ) proteins are plant-specific proteins and act as transcriptional repressors of JA-responsive genes. JA regulates both biotic and abiotic stress responses in plants; however, its role in nutrient deficiency responses is very elusive. Although, JA is well-known for root growth inhibition, little is known about behavior of JAZ genes in response to nutrient deficiencies, under which root architectural alteration is an important adaptation. Using protein sequence homology and a conserved-domains approach, here we identify 10 novel JAZ genes from the recently sequenced Chickpea genome, which is one of the most nutrient efficient crops. Both rice and chickpea JAZ genes express in tissue- and stimuli-specific manners. Many of which are preferentially expressed in root. Our analysis further showed differential expression of JAZ genes under macro (NPK) and micronutrients (Zn, Fe) deficiency in rice and chickpea roots. While both rice and chickpea JAZ genes showed a certain level of specificity toward type of nutrient deficiency, generally majority of them showed induction under K deficiency. Generally, JAZ genes showed an induction at early stages of stress and expression declined at later stages of macro-nutrient deficiency. Our results suggest that JAZ genes might play a role in early nutrient deficiency response both in monocot and dicot roots, and information generated here can be further used for understanding the possible roles of JA in root architectural alterations for nutrient deficiency adaptations. PMID:26617618

  17. SV40 early-to-late switch involves titration of cellular transcriptional repressors.

    PubMed

    Wiley, S R; Kraus, R J; Zuo, F; Murray, E E; Loritz, K; Mertz, J E

    1993-11-01

    We have purified factors from HeLa cell nuclear extracts that bind to the transcriptional initiation site of the SV40 major late promoter (SV40-MLP). The resulting fraction consists predominantly of three proteins, collectively called initiator-binding protein of SV40 (IBP-s) with electrophoretic mobilities of approximately 45-55 kD. Gel mobility-shift and DNase I-protection analyses indicate that each of these three proteins associates with high affinity to sequences located at the initiation site and 55 bp downstream of it. IBP-s-binding sites with lower affinities are located at +5 and +30. Addition of purified IBP-s to a cell-free transcription system represses transcription from the SV40-MLP, but not the SV40 early promoter. SV40 mutants lacking the two strongest IBP-s-binding sites (1) are not repressed by the addition of IBP-s in vitro, (2) overproduce late RNA (relative to wild-type SV40) at low, but not high, template copy number in vitro, and (3) exhibit increased levels of late RNA at early, but not late, times after transfection into CV-1 cells. Therefore, IBP-s is a cellular repressor of transcription of the SV40-MLP that may, in large part, be responsible for the replication-dependent component of the early-to-late shift in SV40 gene expression. Partial amino acid sequence data obtained from the approximately 55-kD component of IBP-s indicate that it is hERR1, an orphan member of the steroid-thyroid hormone receptor superfamily. These findings suggest simple molecular mechanisms by which hormones may modulate expression of viral late genes. We speculate that activation of expression of the late genes of other viruses may occur by similar mechanisms.

  18. Genes regulated by the Escherichia coli SOS repressor LexA exhibit heterogenous expression

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Phenotypic heterogeneity may ensure that a small fraction of a population survives environmental perturbations or may result in lysis in a subpopulation, to increase the survival of siblings. Genes involved in DNA repair and population dynamics play key roles in rapid responses to environmental conditions. In Escherichia coli the transcriptional repressor LexA controls a coordinated cellular response to DNA damage designated the SOS response. Expression of LexA regulated genes, e.g. colicin encoding genes, recA, lexA and umuDC, was examined utilizing transcription fusions with the promoterless gfp at the single cell level. Results The investigated LexA regulated genes exhibited heterogeneity, as only in a small fraction of the population more intense fluorescence was observed. Unlike recA and lexA, the pore forming and nuclease colicin activity genes as well as umuDC, exhibited no basal level activity. However, in a lexA defective strain high level expression of the gene fusions was observed in the large majority of the cells. All of the investigated genes were expressed in a recA defective strain, albeit at lower levels, revealing expression in the absence of a spontaneous SOS response. In addition, the simultaneous expression of cka, encoding the pore forming colicin K, and lexA, investigated at the single cell level revealed high level expression of only cka in rare individual cells. Conclusion LexA regulated genes exhibit phenotypic heterogeneity as high level expression is observed in only a small subpopulation of cells. Heterogenous expression is established primarily by stochastic factors and the binding affinity of LexA to SOS boxes. PMID:21070632

  19. The Viral E8^E2C Repressor Limits Productive Replication of Human Papillomavirus 16

    PubMed Central

    Straub, Elke; Dreer, Marcel; Fertey, Jasmin; Iftner, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Productive replication of human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) occurs only in differentiated keratinocyte cells. In addition to the viral E2 activator protein, HPV16 and related HPV types express transcripts coding for an E8^E2C fusion protein, which limits genome replication in undifferentiated keratinocytes. To address E8^E2C's role in productive replication of HPV16, stable keratinocyte cell lines containing wild-type (wt), E8^E2C knockout (E8−), or E8 KWK mutant (mt) genomes, in which conserved E8 residues were inactivated, were established. Copy numbers of E8− and E8 KWK mt genomes and amounts of early and late viral transcripts were greatly increased compared to those for the wt in undifferentiated keratinocytes, suggesting that HPV16 E8^E2C activities are highly dependent upon the E8 part. Upon differentiation in organotypic cultures, E8 mt genomes displayed higher early viral transcript levels, but no changes in cellular differentiation or virus-induced cellular DNA replication in suprabasal cells were observed. E8 mt genomes were amplified to higher copy numbers and showed increased L1 transcripts compared to wt genomes. Furthermore, the number of cells expressing the viral late protein E4 or L1 or amplifying viral genomes was greatly increased in E8 mt cell lines. In wild-type cells, E8^E2C transcript levels did not decrease by differentiation. Our data indicate that the E8^E2C repressor limits viral transcription and replication throughout the complete life cycle of HPV16. PMID:24198405

  20. Regulation of Pyrimidine Biosynthetic Gene Expression in Bacteria: Repression without Repressors

    PubMed Central

    Turnbough, Charles L.; Switzer, Robert L.

    2008-01-01

    Summary: DNA-binding repressor proteins that govern transcription initiation in response to end products generally regulate bacterial biosynthetic genes, but this is rarely true for the pyrimidine biosynthetic (pyr) genes. Instead, bacterial pyr gene regulation generally involves mechanisms that rely only on regulatory sequences embedded in the leader region of the operon, which cause premature transcription termination or translation inhibition in response to nucleotide signals. Studies with Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis pyr genes reveal a variety of regulatory mechanisms. Transcription attenuation via UTP-sensitive coupled transcription and translation regulates expression of the pyrBI and pyrE operons in enteric bacteria, whereas nucleotide effects on binding of the PyrR protein to pyr mRNA attenuation sites control pyr operon expression in most gram-positive bacteria. Nucleotide-sensitive reiterative transcription underlies regulation of other pyr genes. With the E. coli pyrBI, carAB, codBA, and upp-uraA operons, UTP-sensitive reiterative transcription within the initially transcribed region (ITR) leads to nonproductive transcription initiation. CTP-sensitive reiterative transcription in the pyrG ITRs of gram-positive bacteria, which involves the addition of G residues, results in the formation of an antiterminator RNA hairpin and suppression of transcription attenuation. Some mechanisms involve regulation of translation rather than transcription. Expression of the pyrC and pyrD operons of enteric bacteria is controlled by nucleotide-sensitive transcription start switching that produces transcripts with different potentials for translation. In Mycobacterium smegmatis and other bacteria, PyrR modulates translation of pyr genes by binding to their ribosome binding site. Evidence supporting these conclusions, generalizations for other bacteria, and prospects for future research are presented. PMID:18535147

  1. Differential Expression of Glucocorticoid Receptor Noncoding RNA Repressor Gas5 in Autoimmune and Inflammatory Diseases.

    PubMed

    Mayama, T; Marr, A K; Kino, T

    2016-08-01

    Glucocorticoids have strong regulatory actions on the immune system and act as potent therapeutic compounds for autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. We previously reported that the long noncoding RNA growth arrest-specific 5 (Gas5), which accumulates inside the cells in response to cellular starvation/growth arrest, functions as a potent repressor of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) through its RNA "glucocorticoid response element (GRE)". To evaluate potential roles of Gas5 in immune-related disorders, we examined Gas5 RNA levels in various autoimmune, inflammatory, and infectious diseases using the microarray data available in the Gene Expression Omnibus. We found that Gas5 levels were altered in whole blood or leukocytes of the patients with rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, multiple sclerosis, and sarcoidosis. Gas5 levels were also altered in infectious diseases, such as by the human immunodeficiency virus type-1 and influenza virus, and bacterial sepsis. In our experimental analysis using mice, Gas5 levels were kept at high basal levels and did not respond to fasting in immune organs, such as spleen and thymus, while its levels in metabolic organs, including liver, fat, and skeletal muscles, were low at baseline and were highly elevated upon this treatment, possibly through suppression of the mTOR pathway. These results suggest that Gas5 plays a role in the regulation of immune functions and pathogenesis/pathophysiology of autoimmune, inflammatory, and infectious diseases in part through modulation of the GR transcriptional activity via its decoy RNA "GRE". Changes in the Gas5 levels may also influence disease response to immunosuppressive glucocorticoid therapy. PMID:27214311

  2. Investigation of Changes in Tetracycline Repressor Binding upon Mutations in the Tetracycline Operator

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The tetracycline operon is an important gene network component, commonly used in synthetic biology applications because of its switch-like character. At the heart of this system is the highly specific interaction of the tet repressor protein (TetR) with its cognate DNA sequence (tetO). TetR binding on tetO practically stops expression of genes downstream of tetO by excluding RNA polymerase from binding the promoter and initiating transcription. Mutating the tetO sequence alters the strength of TetR–tetO binding and thus provides a tool to synthetic biologists to manipulate gene expression levels. We employ molecular dynamics (MD) simulations coupled with the free energy perturbation method to investigate the binding affinity of TetR to different tetO mutants. We also carry out in vivo tests in Escherichia coli for a series of promoters based on these mutants. We obtain reasonable agreement between experimental green fluorescent protein (GFP) repression levels and binding free energy differences computed from molecular simulations. In all cases, the wild-type tetO sequence yields the strongest TetR binding, which is observed both experimentally, in terms of GFP levels, and in simulation, in terms of free energy changes. Two of the four tetO mutants we tested yield relatively strong binding, whereas the other two mutants tend to be significantly weaker. The clustering and relative ranking of this subset of tetO mutants is generally consistent between our own experimental data, previous experiments with different systems and the free energy changes computed from our simulations. Overall, this work offers insights into an important synthetic biological system and demonstrates the potential, as well as limitations of molecular simulations to quantitatively explain biologically relevant behavior. PMID:25308994

  3. Investigation of Changes in Tetracycline Repressor Binding upon Mutations in the Tetracycline Operator.

    PubMed

    Bolintineanu, Dan S; Volzing, Katherine; Vivcharuk, Victor; Sayyed-Ahmad, Abdallah; Srivastava, Poonam; Kaznessis, Yiannis N

    2014-10-01

    The tetracycline operon is an important gene network component, commonly used in synthetic biology applications because of its switch-like character. At the heart of this system is the highly specific interaction of the tet repressor protein (TetR) with its cognate DNA sequence (tetO). TetR binding on tetO practically stops expression of genes downstream of tetO by excluding RNA polymerase from binding the promoter and initiating transcription. Mutating the tetO sequence alters the strength of TetR-tetO binding and thus provides a tool to synthetic biologists to manipulate gene expression levels. We employ molecular dynamics (MD) simulations coupled with the free energy perturbation method to investigate the binding affinity of TetR to different tetO mutants. We also carry out in vivo tests in Escherichia coli for a series of promoters based on these mutants. We obtain reasonable agreement between experimental green fluorescent protein (GFP) repression levels and binding free energy differences computed from molecular simulations. In all cases, the wild-type tetO sequence yields the strongest TetR binding, which is observed both experimentally, in terms of GFP levels, and in simulation, in terms of free energy changes. Two of the four tetO mutants we tested yield relatively strong binding, whereas the other two mutants tend to be significantly weaker. The clustering and relative ranking of this subset of tetO mutants is generally consistent between our own experimental data, previous experiments with different systems and the free energy changes computed from our simulations. Overall, this work offers insights into an important synthetic biological system and demonstrates the potential, as well as limitations of molecular simulations to quantitatively explain biologically relevant behavior.

  4. Transcriptional Repressor Tbx3 Is Required for the Hormone-Sensing Cell Lineage in Mammary Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Kunasegaran, Kamini; Ho, Victor; Chang, Ted H-. T.; De Silva, Duvini; Bakker, Martijn L.; Christoffels, Vincent M.; Pietersen, Alexandra M.

    2014-01-01

    The transcriptional repressor Tbx3 is involved in lineage specification in several tissues during embryonic development. Germ-line mutations in the Tbx3 gene give rise to Ulnar-Mammary Syndrome (comprising reduced breast development) and Tbx3 is required for mammary epithelial cell identity in the embryo. Notably Tbx3 has been implicated in breast cancer, which develops in adult mammary epithelium, but the role of Tbx3 in distinct cell types of the adult mammary gland has not yet been characterized. Using a fluorescent reporter knock-in mouse, we show that in adult virgin mice Tbx3 is highly expressed in luminal cells that express hormone receptors, and not in luminal cells of the alveolar lineage (cells primed for milk production). Flow cytometry identified Tbx3 expression already in progenitor cells of the hormone-sensing lineage and co-immunofluorescence confirmed a strict correlation between estrogen receptor (ER) and Tbx3 expression in situ. Using in vivo reconstitution assays we demonstrate that Tbx3 is functionally relevant for this lineage because knockdown of Tbx3 in primary mammary epithelial cells prevented the formation of ER+ cells, but not luminal ER- or basal cells. Interestingly, genes that are repressed by Tbx3 in other cell types, such as E-cadherin, are not repressed in hormone-sensing cells, highlighting that transcriptional targets of Tbx3 are cell type specific. In summary, we provide the first analysis of Tbx3 expression in the adult mammary gland at a single cell level and show that Tbx3 is important for the generation of hormone-sensing cells. PMID:25343378

  5. Plasticity in Repressor-DNA Interactions Neutralizes Loss of Symmetry in Bipartite Operators.

    PubMed

    Jain, Deepti; Narayanan, Naveen; Nair, Deepak T

    2016-01-15

    Transcription factor-DNA interactions are central to gene regulation. Many transcription factors regulate multiple target genes and can bind sequences that do not conform strictly to the consensus. To understand the structural mechanism utilized by the transcription regulators to bind diverse target sequences, we have employed the repressor AraR from Bacillus subtilis as a model system. AraR is known to bind to eight different operator sites in the bacterial genome. Although there are differences in the sequences of four of these operators, ORE1, ORX1, ORA1, and ORR3, the AraR-DNA binding domain (AraR-DBD) as well as full-length AraR unexpectedly binds to each of these sequences with similar affinities as measured by fluorescence anisotropy experiments. We have determined crystal structures of AraR-DBD in complex with two different natural operators ORE1 and ORX1 up to 2.07 and 1.97 Å resolution, respectively. These structures were compared with the previously reported structures of AraR-DBD bound to two other natural operators (ORA1 and ORR3). Interactions of two molecules of AraR-DBD with the symmetric operator, ORE1, are identical, but their interaction with the non-symmetric operator ORX1 results in breakdown of the symmetry in protein-DNA interactions. The novel interactions observed are accompanied by local conformational change in the DNA. ChIP-sequencing (ChIP-Seq) data on other transcription factors has shown that they can bind to diverse targets, and hence the plasticity exhibited by AraR may be a general phenomenon. The ability of transcription factors to form alternate interactions may be important for employment in new functions and evolution of novel regulatory circuits.

  6. The Translational Repressor 4E-BP1 Contributes to Diabetes-Induced Visual Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Miller, William P.; Mihailescu, Maria L.; Yang, Chen; Barber, Alistair J.; Kimball, Scot R.; Jefferson, Leonard S.; Dennis, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The translational repressor 4E-BP1 interacts with the mRNA cap-binding protein eIF4E and thereby promotes cap-independent translation of mRNAs encoding proteins that contribute to diabetic retinopathy. Interaction of 4E-BP1 with eIF4E is enhanced in the retina of diabetic rodents, at least in part, as a result of elevated 4E-BP1 protein expression. In the present study, we examined the role of 4E-BP1 in diabetes-induced visual dysfunction, as well as the mechanism whereby hyperglycemia promotes 4E-BP1 expression. Methods Nondiabetic and diabetic wild-type and 4E-BP1/2 knockout mice were evaluated for visual function using a virtual optomotor test (Optomotry). Retinas were harvested from nondiabetic and type 1 diabetic mice and analyzed for protein abundance and posttranslational modifications. Similar analyses were performed on cells in culture exposed to hyperglycemic conditions or an O-GlcNAcase inhibitor (Thiamet G [TMG]). Results Diabetes-induced visual dysfunction was delayed in mice deficient of 4E-BP1/2 as compared to controls. 4E-BP1 protein expression was enhanced by hyperglycemia in the retina of diabetic rodents and by hyperglycemic conditions in retinal cells in culture. A similar elevation in 4E-BP1 expression was observed with TMG. The rate of 4E-BP1 degradation was significantly prolonged by either hyperglycemic conditions or TMG. A PEST motif in the C-terminus of 4E-BP1 regulated polyubiquitination, turnover, and binding of an E3 ubiquitin ligase complex containing CUL3. Conclusions The findings support a model whereby elevated 4E-BP1 expression observed in the retina of diabetic rodents is the result of O-GlcNAcylation of 4E-BP1 within its PEST motif. PMID:26998719

  7. Molecular Binding Mechanism of TtgR Repressor to Antibiotics and Antimicrobials

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez-Escamilla, Ana Maria; Fernandez-Ballester, Gregorio; Morel, Bertrand; Casares-Atienza, Salvador; Ramos, Juan Luis

    2015-01-01

    A disturbing phenomenon in contemporary medicine is the prevalence of multidrug-resistant pathogenic bacteria. Efflux pumps contribute strongly to this antimicrobial drug resistance, which leads to the subsequent failure of clinical treatments. The TtgR protein of Pseudomonas putida is a HTH-type transcriptional repressor that controls expression of the TtgABC efflux pump, which is the main contributor to resistance against several antimicrobials and toxic compounds in this microbe. One of the main strategies to modulate the bacterial resistance is the rational modification of the ligand binding target site. We report the design and characterization of four mutants-TtgRS77A, TtgRE78A, TtgRN110A and TtgRH114A - at the active ligand binding site. The biophysical characterization of the mutants, in the presence and in the absence of different antimicrobials, revealed that TtgRN110A is the variant with highest thermal stability, under any of the experimental conditions tested. EMSA experiments also showed a different dissociation pattern from the operator for TtgRN110A, in the presence of several antimicrobials, making it a key residue in the TtgR protein repression mechanism of the TtgABC efflux pump. We found that TtgRE78A stability is the most affected upon effector binding. We also probe that one mutation at the C-terminal half of helix-α4, TtgRS77A, provokes a severe protein structure distortion, demonstrating the important role of this residue in the overall protein structure and on the ligand binding site. The data provide new information and deepen the understanding of the TtgR-effector binding mechanism and consequently the TtgABC efflux pump regulation mechanism in Pseudomonas putida. PMID:26422008

  8. Expression of genes for AhR and Nrf2 signal pathways in the retina of OXYS rats during the development of retinopathy and melatonin-induced changes in this process.

    PubMed

    Perepechaeva, M L; Stefanova, N A; Grishanova, A Yu

    2014-08-01

    Modulation of oxidative stress is one of the experimental approaches to the therapy of age-related macular degeneration. Melatonin holds much promise in this respect. It was hypothesized that the efficiency of melatonin in age-related macular degeneration is associated with its ability to modulate gene expression for the AhR and Nrf2 signal pathways. Experiments were performed on premature aging OXYS rats, which serve as a reliable model of age-related macular degeneration in humans. We studied the effect of melatonin on gene mRNA for the AhR and Nrf2 signal pathways. Melatonin was shown to decrease the level of mRNA for AhR-dependent genes of CYP1A2 and CYP1B1 cytochromes in the retina, but had no effect on the content of mRNA for Nrf2-dependent genes in OXYS rats.

  9. Association of polymorphisms in AhR, CYP1A1, GSTM1, and GSTT1 genes with levels of DNA damage in peripheral blood lymphocytes among coke-oven workers

    SciTech Connect

    Yongwen Chen; Yun Bai; Jing Yuan; Weihong Chen; Jianya Sun; Hong Wang; Huashan Liang; Liang Guo; Xiaobo Yang; Hao Tan; Yougong Su; Qingyi Wei; Tangchun Wu

    2006-09-15

    Accumulating evidence has shown that both DNA damage caused by the metabolites of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and genetic polymorphisms in PAH-metabolic genes contribute to individual susceptibility to PAH-induced carcinogenesis. However, the functional relevance of genetic polymorphisms in PAH-metabolic genes in exposed individuals is still unclear. In this study of 240 coke-oven workers (the exposed group) and 123 non-coke-oven workers (the control group), we genotyped for polymorphisms in the AhR, CYP1A1, GSTM1, and GSTT1 genes by PCR methods, and determined the levels of DNA damage in peripheral blood lymphocytes using the alkaline comet assay. It was found that the ln-transformed Olive tail moment (Olive TM) values in the exposed group were significantly higher than those in the control group. Furthermore, in the exposed group, the Olive TM values in subjects with the AhR Lys{sup 554} variant genotype were higher than those with the AhR Arg{sup 554}/Arg{sup 554} genotype. Similarly, the Olive TM values in the non-coke-oven workers with the CYP1A1 MspI CC + CT genotype were lower than the values of those with the CYP1A1 MspI TT genotype. However, these differences were not evident for GSTM1 and GSTT1. These results suggested that the polymorphism of AhR might modulate the effects of PAHs in the exposed group; however, the underlying molecular mechanisms by which this polymorphism may have affected the levels of PAH-induced DNA damage warrant further investigation.

  10. Effects of 17alpha-ethynylestradiol on hormonal responses and xenobiotic biotransformation system of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar).

    PubMed

    Mortensen, Anne S; Arukwe, Augustine

    2007-11-30

    Pharmaceuticals are ubiquitous pollutants in the aquatic environment where their potential effects on non-target species like fish has only recently become subject of systematic investigations. In the present study, experiments were undertaken to examine the effects of a synthetic pharmaceutical endocrine disruptor, ethynylestradiol (EE2), given in water at 5 or 50 ng/L and sampled at days 0 (control), 3 and 7 after exposure, on hepatic phase I and II biotransformation and hormonal pathways of juvenile salmon using quantitative (real-time) polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), Vtg ELISA and 7-ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase (EROD) catalytic activity. Our data show that EE2 produced time- and concentration-specific modulation of estrogen receptor isoforms (ERalpha, ERbeta) and androgen receptor-beta (ARbeta). EE2 produced a concentration-specific induction of vitellogenin (Vtg) and zona radiata protein (Zr-protein) at day 3 after exposure. At day 7, Vtg and Zr-protein mRNA (and plasma Vtg protein) expression were significantly decreased in the group given 5 ng EE2/L, compared to dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) control group. In the xenobiotic biotransformation pathway, EE2 produced a significant increase of aryl hydrocarbon receptor-alpha (AhRalpha) at day 3 in the group given 5 ng EE2/L and AhRbeta was decreased at the same concentration at day 7. While CYP3A was not significantly affected by EE2 exposure, the CYP1A1, AhR nuclear translocator (Arnt) and AhR repressor (AhRR) mRNA showed an apparent EE2 concentration and time-dependent decrease. The expression of uridine diphosphoglucuronosyl transferase (UGT) and glutathione S-transferase class pi-like (GSTpi-like) mRNA were decreased after exposure to 50ng EE2/L at both day 3 and 7 after exposure. The effect of EE2 on the CYP1A1 gene expressions paralleled effect on EROD and AhRR mRNA, suggesting a direct role of EE2 in controlling cellular detoxification machinery. Interestingly, the carrier vehicle, DMSO produced significant

  11. Gata6-Dependent GLI3 Repressor Function is Essential in Anterior Limb Progenitor Cells for Proper Limb Development

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Shinichi; Akiyama, Ryutaro; Wong, Julia; Tahara, Naoyuki; Kawakami, Hiroko; Kawakami, Yasuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Gli3 is a major regulator of Hedgehog signaling during limb development. In the anterior mesenchyme, GLI3 is proteolytically processed into GLI3R, a truncated repressor form that inhibits Hedgehog signaling. Although numerous studies have identified mechanisms that regulate Gli3 function in vitro, it is not completely understood how Gli3 function is regulated in vivo. In this study, we show a novel mechanism of regulation of GLI3R activities in limb buds by Gata6, a member of the GATA transcription factor family. We show that conditional inactivation of Gata6 prior to limb outgrowth by the Tcre deleter causes preaxial polydactyly, the formation of an anterior extra digit, in hindlimbs. A recent study suggested that Gata6 represses Shh transcription in hindlimb buds. However, we found that ectopic Hedgehog signaling precedes ectopic Shh expression. In conjunction, we observed Gata6 and Gli3 genetically interact, and compound heterozygous mutants develop preaxial polydactyly without ectopic Shh expression, indicating an additional prior mechanism to prevent polydactyly. These results support the idea that Gata6 possesses dual roles during limb development: enhancement of Gli3 repressor function to repress Hedgehog signaling in the anterior limb bud, and negative regulation of Shh expression. Our in vitro and in vivo studies identified that GATA6 physically interacts with GLI3R to facilitate nuclear localization of GLI3R and repressor activities of GLI3R. Both the genetic and biochemical data elucidates a novel mechanism by Gata6 to regulate GLI3R activities in the anterior limb progenitor cells to prevent polydactyly and attain proper development of the mammalian autopod. PMID:27352137

  12. Escherichia coli purine repressor: key residues for the allosteric transition between active and inactive conformations and for interdomain signaling.

    PubMed

    Lu, F; Brennan, R G; Zalkin, H

    1998-11-10

    The Escherichia coli purine repressor, PurR, exists in an equilibrium between open and closed conformations. Binding of a corepressor, hypoxanthine or guanine, shifts the allosteric equilibrium in favor of the closed conformation and increases the operator DNA binding affinity by 40-fold compared to aporepressor. Glu70 and Trp147 PurR mutations were isolated which perturb the allosteric equilibrium. Three lines of evidence indicate that the allosteric equilibrium of E70A and W147A aporepressors was shifted toward the closed conformation. First, compared to wild-type PurR, these mutant repressors had a 10-30-fold higher corepressor binding affinity. Second, the mutant aporepressors bound to operator DNA with an affinity that is characteristic of the wild-type PurR holorepressor. Third, binding of guanine to wild-type PurR resulted in a near-UV circular dichroism spectral change at 297-305 nm that is attributed to the closed conformation. The circular dichroism spectrum of the E70A aporepressor at 297-305 nm was that expected for the closed conformation, and it was not appreciably altered by corepressor binding. Mutational analysis was used to identify an Arg115-Ser46' interdomain intersubunit hydrogen bond that is necessary for transmitting the allosteric transition in the corepressor binding domain to the DNA binding domain. R115A and S46G PurR mutants were defective in DNA binding in vitro and repressor function in vivo although corepressor binding was identical to the wild type. These results establish that the hydrogen bond between the side chain NH2 of Arg115 and the main chain CO of Ser46' plays a critical role in interdomain signaling.

  13. Lac Repressor Mediated DNA Looping: Monte Carlo Simulation of Constrained DNA Molecules Complemented with Current Experimental Results

    PubMed Central

    Biton, Yoav Y.; Kumar, Sandip; Dunlap, David; Swigon, David

    2014-01-01

    Tethered particle motion (TPM) experiments can be used to detect time-resolved loop formation in a single DNA molecule by measuring changes in the length of a DNA tether. Interpretation of such experiments is greatly aided by computer simulations of DNA looping which allow one to analyze the structure of the looped DNA and estimate DNA-protein binding constants specific for the loop formation process. We here present a new Monte Carlo scheme for accurate simulation of DNA configurations subject to geometric constraints and apply this method to Lac repressor mediated DNA looping, comparing the simulation results with new experimental data obtained by the TPM technique. Our simulations, taking into account the details of attachment of DNA ends and fluctuations of the looped subsegment of the DNA, reveal the origin of the double-peaked distribution of RMS values observed by TPM experiments by showing that the average RMS value for anti-parallel loop types is smaller than that of parallel loop types. The simulations also reveal that the looping probabilities for the anti-parallel loop types are significantly higher than those of the parallel loop types, even for loops of length 600 and 900 base pairs, and that the correct proportion between the heights of the peaks in the distribution can only be attained when loops with flexible Lac repressor conformation are taken into account. Comparison of the in silico and in vitro results yields estimates for the dissociation constants characterizing the binding affinity between O1 and Oid DNA operators and the dimeric arms of the Lac repressor. PMID:24800809

  14. Insight into a Physiological Role for the EC Night-Time Repressor in the Arabidopsis Circadian Clock.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Takeshi; Kitayama, Miki; Takayama, Chieko; Yamashino, Takafumi

    2015-09-01

    Life cycle adaptation to seasonal variation in photoperiod and temperature is a major determinant of ecological success of widespread domestication of Arabidopsis thaliana. The circadian clock plays a role in the underlying mechanism for adaptation. Nevertheless, the mechanism by which the circadian clock tracks seasonal changes in photoperiod and temperature is a longstanding subject of research in the field. We previously showed that a set of the target genes (i.e. GI, LNK1. PRR9 and PRR7) of the Evening Complex (EC) consisting of LUX-ELF3-ELF4 is synergistically induced in response to both warm-night and night-light signals. Here, we further show that the responses occur within a wide range of growth-compatible temperatures (16-28°C) in response to a small change in temperature (Δ4°C). A dim light pulse (<1 µmol m(-2) s(-1)) causes the enhanced effect on the transcription of EC targets. The night-light pulse antagonizes against a positive effect of the cool-night signal on the EC activity. The mechanism of double-checking external temperature and light signals through the EC nighttime repressor might enable plants to ignore (or tolerate) daily fluctuation of ambient temperature within a short time interval in their natural habitats. Taken together, the EC night-time repressor might play a physiological role in tracking seasonal variation in photoperiod and temperature by conservatively double-checking both the light and temperature conditions. Another EC target output gene PIF4 regulating plant morphologies is also regulated by both the temperature and light stimuli during the night. Hence, the EC night-time repressor is also implicated in a physiological output of the PIF4-mediated regulation of morphologies in response to seasonal variation in photoperiod and ambient temperature.

  15. Ectopic expression and knockdown of a zebrafish sox21 reveal its role as a transcriptional repressor in early development.

    PubMed

    Argenton, Francesco; Giudici, Simona; Deflorian, Gianluca; Cimbro, Simona; Cotelli, Franco; Beltrame, Monica

    2004-02-01

    Sox proteins are DNA-binding proteins belonging to the HMG box superfamily and they play key roles in animal embryonic development. Zebrafish Sox21a is part of group B Sox proteins and its chicken and mouse orthologs have been described as transcriptional repressor and activator, respectively, in two different target gene contexts. Zebrafish sox21a is present as a maternal transcript in the oocyte and is mainly expressed at the developing midbrain-hindbrain boundary from the onset of neurulation. In order to understand its role in vivo, we ectopically expressed sox21a by microinjection. Ectopic expression of full length sox21a leads to dorsalization of the embryos. A subset of the dorsalized embryos shows a partial axis splitting, and hence an ectopic neural tube, as an additional phenotype. At gastrulation, injected embryos show expansion of the expression domains of organizer-specific genes, such as chordin and goosecoid. Molecular markers used in somitogenesis highlight that sox21a-injected embryos have shortened AP axis, undulating axial structures, enlarged or even radialized paraxial territory. The developmental abnormalities caused by ectopic expression of sox21a are suggestive of defects in convergence-extension morphogenetic movements. Antisense morpholino oligonucleotides, designed to functionally knockdown sox21a, cause ventralization of the embryos. Moreover, gain-of-function experiments with chimeric constructs, where Sox21a DNA-binding domain is fused to a transcriptional activator (VP16) or repressor (EnR) domain, suggests that zebrafish Sox21a acts as a repressor in dorso-ventral patterning.

  16. Hexokinase 2 Is an Intracellular Glucose Sensor of Yeast Cells That Maintains the Structure and Activity of Mig1 Protein Repressor Complex.

    PubMed

    Vega, Montserrat; Riera, Alberto; Fernández-Cid, Alejandra; Herrero, Pilar; Moreno, Fernando

    2016-04-01

    Hexokinase 2 (Hxk2) fromSaccharomyces cerevisiaeis a bi-functional enzyme, being both a catalyst in the cytosol and an important regulator of the glucose repression signal in the nucleus. Despite considerable recent progress, little is known about the regulatory mechanism that controls nuclear Hxk2 association with theSUC2promoter chromatin and how this association is necessary forSUC2gene repression. Our data indicate that in theSUC2promoter context, Hxk2 functions through a variety of structurally unrelated factors, mainly the DNA-binding Mig1 and Mig2 repressors and the regulatory Snf1 and Reg1 factors. Hxk2 sustains the repressor complex architecture maintaining transcriptional repression at theSUC2gene. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation assays, we discovered that the Hxk2 in its open configuration, at low glucose conditions, leaves the repressor complex that induces its dissociation and promotesSUC2gene expression. In high glucose conditions, Hxk2 adopts a close conformation that promotes Hxk2 binding to the Mig1 protein and the reassembly of theSUC2repressor complex. Additional findings highlight the possibility that Hxk2 constitutes an intracellular glucose sensor that operates by changing its conformation in response to cytoplasmic glucose levels that regulate its interaction with Mig1 and thus its recruitment to the repressor complex of theSUC2promoter. Thus, our data indicate that Hxk2 is more intimately involved in gene regulation than previously thought.

  17. Hexokinase 2 Is an Intracellular Glucose Sensor of Yeast Cells That Maintains the Structure and Activity of Mig1 Protein Repressor Complex.

    PubMed

    Vega, Montserrat; Riera, Alberto; Fernández-Cid, Alejandra; Herrero, Pilar; Moreno, Fernando

    2016-04-01

    Hexokinase 2 (Hxk2) fromSaccharomyces cerevisiaeis a bi-functional enzyme, being both a catalyst in the cytosol and an important regulator of the glucose repression signal in the nucleus. Despite considerable recent progress, little is known about the regulatory mechanism that controls nuclear Hxk2 association with theSUC2promoter chromatin and how this association is necessary forSUC2gene repression. Our data indicate that in theSUC2promoter context, Hxk2 functions through a variety of structurally unrelated factors, mainly the DNA-binding Mig1 and Mig2 repressors and the regulatory Snf1 and Reg1 factors. Hxk2 sustains the repressor complex architecture maintaining transcriptional repression at theSUC2gene. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation assays, we discovered that the Hxk2 in its open configuration, at low glucose conditions, leaves the repressor complex that induces its dissociation and promotesSUC2gene expression. In high glucose conditions, Hxk2 adopts a close conformation that promotes Hxk2 binding to the Mig1 protein and the reassembly of theSUC2repressor complex. Additional findings highlight the possibility that Hxk2 constitutes an intracellular glucose sensor that operates by changing its conformation in response to cytoplasmic glucose levels that regulate its interaction with Mig1 and thus its recruitment to the repressor complex of theSUC2promoter. Thus, our data indicate that Hxk2 is more intimately involved in gene regulation than previously thought. PMID:26865637

  18. Identification of a cell-type-specific transcriptional repressor in the promoter region of the mouse hepatocyte growth factor gene.

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Y; Beedle, A B; Lin, L; Bell, A W; Zarnegar, R

    1994-01-01

    Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), a cytokine with multiple functions, exhibits cell-type-specific as well as cytokine- and steroid hormone-regulated expression. The HGF gene is known to be expressed predominately in mesenchymal but not in epithelial cells. In this study, we report the identification of a cell-type-specific transcriptional repressor in the promoter region of the mouse HGF gene, which is evidently responsible for the suppression of HGF expression in epithelial cells. Gel mobility shift assays and DNase I footprinting studies revealed that a 27-bp element (-16 to +11) around the transcription initiation site is responsible for the binding of a nuclear protein which is present in epithelial but not in mesenchymally derived cells. Further analysis of the binding activity of the DNA region with nuclear protein revealed that an approximately 19-bp sequence containing a unique palindromic structure (5'-AACCGACCGGTT-3') overlapped by a CAP box is essential for binding. Substitution of a single base (the contact site) within this region by site-directed mutagenesis resulted in total abrogation of the binding of the nuclear protein and a concomitant increase in the transcriptional activity of various lengths of HGF-chloramphenicol acetyltransferase fused genes when transfected into the epithelial cell line RL95-2 but not the mesenchymal cell line NIH 3T3. Southwestern (DNA-protein) analyses revealed that the nuclear protein which binds to this repressor element is a single polypeptide of approximately 70 kDa. Analysis of the nuclear extract prepared from regenerating mouse liver at various times after two-thirds partial hepatectomy by gel mobility shift assay revealed a substantial reduction (more than 75% within 3 h) in the binding of the repressor to its cognate binding site. Our results suggest that a cis-acting transcriptional repressor in the promoter region of the mouse HGF gene is involved in cell-type-specific regulation through binding to its cognate

  19. Structural consequences of two methyl additions in the E. coli trp repressor L-tryptophan binding pocket

    SciTech Connect

    Lawson, C.L.

    1995-12-01

    The flexibility and specificity of the L-tryptophan corepressor binding pocket of E coli trp repressor are being investigated by high-resolution crystallographic examination of aporepressor/corepressor analog complexes. While addition of a methyl group on the corepressor indole (5-methyl-tryptophan) results in a small but measurable shift in the position of that functional group introduction of a methyl group on a nearby residue in the binding pocket (Val 58 {yields} Ile) leaves the indole position of L-tryptophan essentially unchanged. Careful alignment of these structures with aporepressor/L-tryptophan/operator-DNA complexes reveal why 5-methyltryptophan is a better corepressor than L-tryptophan.

  20. Methylated pentavalent arsenic metabolites are bifunctional inducers, as they induce cytochrome P450 1A1 and NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase through AhR- and Nrf2-dependent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Anwar-Mohamed, Anwar; Elshenawy, Osama H; Soshilov, Anatoly A; Denison, Michael S; Chris Le, X; Klotz, Lars-Oliver; El-Kadi, Ayman O S

    2014-02-01

    Activation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) ultimately leads to the induction of the carcinogen-activating enzyme cytochrome P450 1A1 (CYP1A1), and activation of the nuclear factor-erythroid 2 p45-related factor 2 (Nrf2) in addition to the AhR pathway induces the expression of the NADP(H):quinone oxidoreductase (NQO1). Therefore, the aim of this study was to examine the effect of As(III) pentavalent metabolites, MMA(V), DMA(V), and TMA(V), on AhR and Nrf2 activation and on the expression of their prototypical downstream targets CYP1A1 and NQO1, respectively. Our results showed that treatment of HepG2 cells with MMA(V), DMA(V), or TMA(V) in the absence and presence of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin or sulforaphane significantly induced both CYP1A1 and NQO1 at the mRNA, protein, and catalytic activity levels. Furthermore, these metabolites increased the AhR-dependent XRE-driven and the Nrf2-dependent ARE-driven luciferase reporter activities, which coincided with increased nuclear accumulation of both transcription factors. However, none of these metabolites were shown to be AhR ligands. The induction of CYP1A1 by these metabolites seems to be ligand-independent, possibly through a decrease in HSP90 protein expression levels. The metabolites also increased ROS production, which was significantly higher than that produced by As(III). Upon knockdown of AhR and Nrf2 the MMA(V)-, DMA(V)-, and TMA(V)-mediated induction of both CYP1A1 and NQO1 proteins was significantly decreased. In conclusion, this study demonstrates for the first time that methylated pentavalent arsenic metabolites are bifunctional inducers, as they increase CYP1A1 by activating the AhR/XRE signaling pathway and they increase NQO1 by activating the Nrf2/ARE signaling pathway in addition to the AhR/XRE pathway.

  1. Probing the role of water in the tryptophan repressor-operator complex.

    PubMed

    Brown, M P; Grillo, A O; Boyer, M; Royer, C A

    1999-06-01

    The Escherichia coli tryptophan repressor protein (TR) represses the transcription of several genes in response to the concentration of tryptophan in the environment. In the co-crystal structure of TR bound to a DNA fragment containing its target very few direct contacts between TR and the DNA were observed. In contrast, a number of solvent mediated contacts were apparent. NMR solution structures, however, did not resolve any solvent mediated bonds at the complex interface. To probe for the role of water in TR operator recognition, the effect of osmolytes on the interactions between TR and a target oligonucleotide bearing the operator site was examined. In the absence of specific solvent mediated hydrogen bonding interactions between the protein and the DNA, increasing osmolyte concentration is expected to strongly stabilize the TR operator interaction due to the large amount of macromolecular surface area buried upon complexation. The results of our studies indicate that xylose did not alter the binding affinity significantly, while glycerol and PEG had a small stabilizing effect. A study of binding as a function of betaine concentration revealed that this osmolyte at low concentration results in a stabilization of the 1:1 TR/operator complex, but at higher concentrations leads to a switching between binding modes to favor tandem binding. Analysis of the effects of betaine on the 1:1 complex suggest that this osmolyte has about 78% of the expected effect. If one accepts the analysis in terms of the number of water molecules excluded upon complexation, these results suggest that about 75 water molecules remain at the interface of the 1:1 dimer/DNA complex. This value is consistent with the number of water molecules found at the interface in the crystallographically determined structure and supports the notion that interfacial waters play an important thermodynamic role in the specific complexation of one TR dimer with its target DNA. However, the complexity of the

  2. Conservation of the LexA repressor binding site in Deinococcus radiodurans.

    PubMed

    Khan, Feroz; Singh, S P; Mishra, B N

    2008-01-01

    The LexA protein is a transcriptional repressor of the bacterial SOS DNA repair system, which comprises a set of DNA repair and cellular survival genes that are induced in response to DNA damage. Its varied DNA binding motifs have been characterized and reported in the Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis, rhizobia family members, marine magnetotactic bacterium, Salmonella typhimurium and recently in Mycobacterium tuberculosis and this motifs information has been used in our theoretical analysis to detect its novel regulated genes in radio-resistant Deinococcus radiodurans genome. This bacterium showed presence of SOS-box like consensus sequence in the upstream sequences of 3166 genes with >60% motif score similarity percentage (MSSP) on both strands. Attempts to identify LexA-binding sites and the composition of the putative SOS regulon in D. radiodurans have been unsuccessful so far. To resolve the problem we performed theoretical analysis with modifications on reported data set of genes related to DNA repair (61 genes), stress response (145 genes) and some unusual predicted operons (21 clusters). Expression of some of the predicted SOS-box regulated operon members then was examined through the previously reported microarray data which confirm the expression of only single predicted operon i.e. DRB0143 (AAA superfamily NTPase related to 5-methylcytosine specific restriction enzyme subunit McrB) and DRB0144 (homolog of the McrC subunit of the McrBC restriction modification system). The methodology involved weight matrix construction through CONSENSUS algorithm using information of conserved upstream sequences of eight known genes including dinB, tagC, lexA, recA, uvrB, yneA of B. subtilis while lexA and recA of D. radiodurans through phylogenetic footprinting method and later detection of similar conserved SOS-box like LexA binding motifs through both RSAT & PoSSuMsearch programs. The resultant DNA consensus sequence had highly conserved 14 bp SOS-box like binding

  3. Enhancement of hypoxia-induced gene expression in fish liver by the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) ligand, benzo[a]pyrene (BaP).

    PubMed

    Yu, Richard Man Kit; Ng, Patrick Kwok Shing; Tan, Tianfeng; Chu, Daniel Ling Ho; Wu, Rudolf Shiu Sun; Kong, Richard Yuen Chong

    2008-11-21

    Fish in polluted coastal habitats commonly suffer simultaneous exposure to both hypoxia and xenobiotics. Although the adaptive molecular responses to each stress have been described, little is known about the interaction between the signaling pathways mediating these responses. Previous studies in mammalian hepatoma cell lines have shown that hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)- and/or aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR)-activated gene expression is suppressed following co-exposure to hypoxia and the hallmark AhR ligand 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). However, whether similar crosstalk exists in the non-tumor liver tissues of fish and whether other non-TCDD ligands also play the same inhibitory role in this crosstalk remain unknown. Here, the in vivo hepatic mRNA expression profiles of multiple hypoxia- and AhR-responsive genes (later gene expression=mRNA expression of the gene) were examined in the orange-spotted grouper (Epinephelus coioides) upon single and combined exposures to hypoxia and benzo[a]pyrene (BaP). Combined exposure enhanced hypoxia-induced gene expression but did not significantly alter BaP-induced gene expression. Protein carbonyl content was markedly elevated in fish subjected to combined exposure, indicating accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Application of diethyldithiocarbamate (DDC) to hypoxia-treated grouper liver explants similarly exaggerated hypoxia-induced gene expression as in the combined stress tissues in vivo. These observations suggest that ROS derived from the combined hypoxia and BaP stress have a role in enhancing hypoxia-induced gene expression.

  4. Resistance to teratogenesis by F1 and F2 embryos of PAH-adapted Fundulus heteroclitus is strongly inherited despite reduced recalcitrance of the AHR pathway

    PubMed Central

    Clark, B. W.; Bone, A. J.; Di Giulio, R. T.

    2014-01-01

    Atlantic killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus) inhabiting the Atlantic Wood Superfund site on the Elizabeth River (Portsmouth, VA, USA) are exposed to a complex mixture of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from former creosote operations, but are resistant to the acute toxicity and cardiac teratogenesis caused by PAHs. The resistance is associated with a dramatic recalcitrance to induction of cytochrome P450 (CYP1) metabolism enzymes following exposure to aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) agonists, along with an elevated antioxidant response and increased expression of several other xenobiotic metabolism and excretion enzymes. However, the heritability of the resistance in the absence of chemical stressors has been inconsistently demonstrated. Understanding the heritability of this resistance will help clarify the nature of population-level responses to chronic exposure to PAH mixtures and aid in identifying the important mechanistic components of resistance to aryl hydrocarbons. We compared the response of Atlantic Wood F1 and F2 embryos to benzo[k]fluoranthene (BkF), benzo[a]pyrene (BaP), 3,3’,4,4’,5-pentachlorobiphenyl (PCB-126), and a mixture of BkF and fluoranthene (Fl) to that of F1 embryos of reference site killifish. Resistance to cardiac teratogenesis and induction of CYP mRNA expression and CYP activity was determined. We found that both Atlantic Wood F1 and F2 embryos were highly resistance to cardiac teratogenesis. However, the resistance by Atlantic Wood F2 embryos to induction of CYP mRNA expression and enzyme activity was intermediate between that of Atlantic Wood F1 embryos and reference embryos. These results suggest that resistance to cardiac teratogenesis in Atlantic Wood fish is conferred by multiple factors, not all of which appear to be fully genetically heritable. PMID:24374617

  5. The Gfi-1 proto-oncoprotein contains a novel transcriptional repressor domain, SNAG, and inhibits G1 arrest induced by interleukin-2 withdrawal.

    PubMed Central

    Grimes, H L; Chan, T O; Zweidler-McKay, P A; Tong, B; Tsichlis, P N

    1996-01-01

    The Gfi-1 proto-oncogene is activated by provirus insertion in T-cell lymphoma lines selected for interleukin-2 (IL-2) independence in culture and in primary retrovirus-induced thymomas and encodes a nuclear, sequence-specific DNA-binding protein. Here we show that Gfi-1 is a position- and orientation-independent active transcriptional repressor, whose activity depends on a 20-amino-acid N-terminal repressor domain, coincident with a nuclear localization motif. The sequence of the Gfi-1 repressor domain is related to the sequence of the repressor domain of Gfi-1B, a Gfi-1-related protein, and to sequences at the N termini of the insulinoma-associated protein, IA-1, the homeobox protein Gsh-1, and the vertebrate but not the Drosophila members of the Snail-Slug protein family (Snail/Gfi-1, SNAG domain). Although not functionally characterized, these SNAG-related sequences are also likely to mediate transcriptional repression. Therefore, the Gfi-1 SNAG domain may be the prototype of a novel family of evolutionarily conserved repressor domains that operate in multiple cell lineages. Gfi-1 overexpression in IL-2-dependent T-cell lines allows the cells to escape from the G1 arrest induced by IL-2 withdrawal. Since a single point mutation in the SNAG domain (P2A) inhibits both the Gfi-1-mediated transcriptional repression and the G1 arrest induced by IL-2 starvation, we conclude that the latter depends on the repressor activity of the SNAG domain. Induction of Gfi-1 may therefore contribute to T-cell activation and tumor progression by repressing the expression of genes that inhibit cellular proliferation. PMID:8887656

  6. A Set of Activators and Repressors Control Peripheral Glucose Pathways in Pseudomonas putida To Yield a Common Central Intermediate▿

    PubMed Central

    del Castillo, Teresa; Duque, Estrella; Ramos, Juan L.

    2008-01-01

    Pseudomonas putida KT2440 channels glucose to the central Entner-Doudoroff intermediate 6-phosphogluconate through three convergent pathways. The genes for these convergent pathways are clustered in three independent regions on the host chromosome. A number of monocistronic units and operons coexist within each of these clusters, favoring coexpression of catabolic enzymes and transport systems. Expression of the three pathways is mediated by three transcriptional repressors, HexR, GnuR, and PtxS, and by a positive transcriptional regulator, GltR-2. In this study, we generated mutants in each of the regulators and carried out transcriptional assays using microarrays and transcriptional fusions. These studies revealed that HexR controls the genes that encode glucokinase/glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase that yield 6-phosphogluconate; the genes for the Entner-Doudoroff enzymes that yield glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate and pyruvate; and gap-1, which encodes glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase. GltR-2 is the transcriptional regulator that controls specific porins for the entry of glucose into the periplasmic space, as well as the gtsABCD operon for glucose transport through the inner membrane. GnuR is the repressor of gluconate transport and gluconokinase responsible for the conversion of gluconate into 6-phosphogluconate. PtxS, however, controls the enzymes for oxidation of gluconate to 2-ketogluconate, its transport and metabolism, and a set of genes unrelated to glucose metabolism. PMID:18245293

  7. O-GlcNAcylation of master growth repressor DELLA by SECRET AGENT modulates multiple signaling pathways in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Zentella, Rodolfo; Hu, Jianhong; Hsieh, Wen-Ping; Matsumoto, Peter A.; Dawdy, Andrew; Barnhill, Benjamin; Oldenhof, Harriëtte; Hartweck, Lynn M.; Maitra, Sushmit; Thomas, Stephen G.; Cockrell, Shelley; Boyce, Michael; Shabanowitz, Jeffrey; Hunt, Donald F.; Olszewski, Neil E.; Sun, Tai-ping

    2016-01-01

    The DELLA family of transcription regulators functions as master growth repressors in plants by inhibiting phytohormone gibberellin (GA) signaling in response to developmental and environmental cues. DELLAs also play a central role in mediating cross-talk between GA and other signaling pathways via antagonistic direct interactions with key transcription factors. However, how these crucial protein–protein interactions can be dynamically regulated during plant development remains unclear. Here, we show that DELLAs are modified by the O-linked N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc) transferase (OGT) SECRET AGENT (SEC) in Arabidopsis. O-GlcNAcylation of the DELLA protein REPRESSOR OF ga1-3 (RGA) inhibits RGA binding to four of its interactors—PHYTOCHROME-INTERACTING FACTOR3 (PIF3), PIF4, JASMONATE-ZIM DOMAIN1, and BRASSINAZOLE-RESISTANT1 (BZR1)—that are key regulators in light, jasmonate, and brassinosteroid signaling pathways, respectively. Consistent with this, the sec-null mutant displayed reduced responses to GA and brassinosteroid and showed decreased expression of several common target genes of DELLAs, BZR1, and PIFs. Our results reveal a direct role of OGT in repressing DELLA activity and indicate that O-GlcNAcylation of DELLAs provides a fine-tuning mechanism in coordinating multiple signaling activities during plant development. PMID:26773002

  8. Thermodynamic and alkylation interference analysis of the lac repressor-operator substituted with the analogue 7-deazaguanine.

    PubMed

    Zhang, X; Gottlieb, P A

    1993-10-26

    Guanine residues in the lac operator were substituted with the isosteric analogue of 7-deazaguanine. The observed equilibrium dissociation constants for lac repressor binding to substituted operators were measured in 10 mM Tris, 150 mM KCl, 0.1 mM EDTA, and 0.1 mM DTE, pH 7.6, at 25 degrees C, using either a standard equilibrium assay or a competition assay. Of the seven individual sites tested, only three significantly altered the complex affinity. Two of these sites are symmetrically related and are positioned in the major grooves that are known to interact directly with repressor, and the third site is located in the central core region of the operator. The alkylation interference assay, which identifies essential phosphate sites, was used to define the extent of perturbation on the protein-DNA complex by the modified nucleotide. Chemical footprinting data for the singly substituted operator done at a single concentration of protein reflected the alignment of sterically incompatible groups or disruption in the local conformation, but did not appear to alter general phosphate backbone interactions. Similar experiments with a doubly substituted operator revealed that the free energy of binding was an additive combination of each of the individual sites, and the alkylation interference data were similar to the singly substituted and wild-type operators. A constitutive mutant which also had a higher binding constant had a similar alkylation interference pattern. PMID:8218202

  9. The Banana Transcriptional Repressor MaDEAR1 Negatively Regulates Cell Wall-Modifying Genes Involved in Fruit Ripening.

    PubMed

    Fan, Zhong-Qi; Kuang, Jian-Fei; Fu, Chang-Chun; Shan, Wei; Han, Yan-Chao; Xiao, Yun-Yi; Ye, Yu-Jie; Lu, Wang-Jin; Lakshmanan, Prakash; Duan, Xue-Wu; Chen, Jian-Ye

    2016-01-01

    Ethylene plays an essential role in many biological processes including fruit ripening via modulation of ethylene signaling pathway. Ethylene Response Factors (ERFs) are key transcription factors (TFs) involved in ethylene perception and are divided into AP2, RAV, ERF, and DREB sub-families. Although a number of studies have implicated the involvement of DREB sub-family genes in stress responses, little is known about their roles in fruit ripening. In this study, we identified a DREB TF with a EAR motif, designated as MaDEAR1, which is a nucleus-localized transcriptional repressor. Expression analysis indicated that MaDEAR1 expression was repressed by ethylene, with reduced levels of histone H3 and H4 acetylation at its regulatory regions during fruit ripening. In addition, MaDEAR1 promoter activity was also suppressed in response to ethylene treatment. More importantly, MaDEAR1 directly binds to the DRE/CRT motifs in promoters of several cell wall-modifying genes including MaEXP1/3, MaPG1, MaXTH10, MaPL3, and MaPME3 associated with fruit softening during ripening and represses their activities. These data suggest that MaDEAR1 acts as a transcriptional repressor of cell wall-modifying genes, and may be negatively involved in ethylene-mediated ripening of banana fruit. Our findings provide new insights into the involvement of DREB TFs in the regulation of fruit ripening.

  10. Silencing the Transcriptional Repressor, ZCT1, Illustrates the Tight Regulation of Terpenoid Indole Alkaloid Biosynthesis in Catharanthus roseus Hairy Roots.

    PubMed

    Rizvi, Noreen F; Weaver, Jessica D; Cram, Erin J; Lee-Parsons, Carolyn W T

    2016-01-01

    The Catharanthus roseus plant is the source of many valuable terpenoid indole alkaloids (TIAs), including the anticancer compounds vinblastine and vincristine. Transcription factors (TFs) are promising metabolic engineering targets due to their ability to regulate multiple biosynthetic pathway genes. To increase TIA biosynthesis, we elicited the TIA transcriptional activators (ORCAs and other unidentified TFs) with the plant hormone, methyl jasmonate (MJ), while simultaneously silencing the expression of the transcriptional repressor ZCT1. To silence ZCT1, we developed transgenic hairy root cultures of C. roseus that expressed an estrogen-inducible Zct1 hairpin for activating RNA interference. The presence of 17β-estradiol (5μM) effectively depleted Zct1 in hairy root cultures elicited with MJ dosages that either optimize or inhibit TIA production (250 or 1000μM). However, silencing Zct1 was not sufficient to increase TIA production or the expression of the TIA biosynthetic genes (G10h, Tdc, and Str), illustrating the tight regulation of TIA biosynthesis. The repression of the TIA biosynthetic genes at the inhibitory MJ dosage does not appear to be solely regulated by ZCT1. For instance, while Zct1 and Zct2 levels decreased through activating the Zct1 hairpin, Zct3 levels remained elevated. Since ZCT repressors have redundant yet distinct functions, silencing all three ZCTs may be necessary to relieve their repression of alkaloid biosynthesis.

  11. The BRAF oncoprotein functions through the transcriptional repressor MAFG to mediate the CpG Island Methylator phenotype.

    PubMed

    Fang, Minggang; Ou, Jianhong; Hutchinson, Lloyd; Green, Michael R

    2014-09-18

    Most colorectal cancers (CRCs) containing activated BRAF (BRAF[V600E]) have a CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP) characterized by aberrant hypermethylation of many genes, including the mismatch repair gene MLH1. MLH1 silencing results in microsatellite instability and a hypermutable phenotype. Through an RNAi screen, here we identify the transcriptional repressor MAFG as the pivotal factor required for MLH1 silencing and CIMP in CRCs containing BRAF(V600E). In BRAF-positive human CRC cell lines and tumors, MAFG is bound at the promoters of MLH1 and other CIMP genes, and recruits a corepressor complex that includes its heterodimeric partner BACH1, the chromatin remodeling factor CHD8, and the DNA methyltransferase DNMT3B, resulting in hypermethylation and transcriptional silencing. BRAF(V600E) increases BRAF/MEK/ERK signaling resulting in phosphorylation and elevated levels of MAFG, which drives DNA binding. Analysis of transcriptionally silenced CIMP genes in KRAS-positive CRCs indicates that different oncoproteins direct the assembly of distinct repressor complexes on common promoters.

  12. Transcriptional repressor domain of MBD1 is intrinsically disordered and interacts with its binding partners in a selective manner.

    PubMed

    Hameed, Umar Farook Shahul; Lim, Jackwee; Zhang, Qian; Wasik, Mariusz A; Yang, Daiwen; Swaminathan, Kunchithapadam

    2014-05-09

    Methylation of DNA CpG sites is a major mechanism of epigenetic gene silencing and plays important roles in cell division, development and carcinogenesis. One of its regulators is the 64-residue C-terminal Transcriptional Repressor Domain (the TRD) of MBD1, which recruits several repressor proteins such as MCAF1, HDAC3 and MPG that are essential for the gene silencing. Using NMR spectroscopy, we have characterized the solution structure of the C-terminus of MBD1 (MBD1-c, residues D507 to Q605), which included the TRD (A529 to P592). Surprisingly, the MBD1-c is intrinsically disordered. Despite its lack of a tertiary folding, MBD1-c could still bind to different partner proteins in a selective manner. MPG and MCAF1Δ8 showed binding to both the N-terminal and C-terminal residues of MBD1-c but HDAC3 preferably bound to the C-terminal region. This study reveals how MBD1-c discriminates different binding partners, and thus, expands our understanding of the mechanisms of gene regulation by MBD1.

  13. Kcnip1 a Ca²⁺-dependent transcriptional repressor regulates the size of the neural plate in Xenopus.

    PubMed

    Néant, Isabelle; Mellström, Britt; Gonzalez, Paz; Naranjo, Jose R; Moreau, Marc; Leclerc, Catherine

    2015-09-01

    In amphibian embryos, our previous work has demonstrated that calcium transients occurring in the dorsal ectoderm at the onset of gastrulation are necessary and sufficient to engage the ectodermal cells into a neural fate by inducing neural specific genes. Some of these genes are direct targets of calcium. Here we search for a direct transcriptional mechanism by which calcium signals are acting. The only known mechanism responsible for a direct action of calcium on gene transcription involves an EF-hand Ca²⁺ binding protein which belongs to a group of four proteins (Kcnip1 to 4). Kcnip protein can act in a Ca²⁺-dependent manner as a transcriptional repressor by binding to a specific DNA sequence, the Downstream Regulatory Element (DRE) site. In Xenopus, among the four kcnips, we show that only kcnip1 is timely and spatially present in the presumptive neural territories and is able to bind DRE sites in a Ca²⁺-dependent manner. The loss of function of kcnip1 results in the expansion of the neural plate through an increased proliferation of neural progenitors. Later on, this leads to an impairment in the development of anterior neural structures. We propose that, in the embryo, at the onset of neurogenesis Kcnip1 is the Ca²⁺-dependent transcriptional repressor that controls the size of the neural plate. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: 13th European Symposium on Calcium.

  14. CD8 lineage-specific regulation of interleukin-7 receptor expression by the transcriptional repressor Gfi1.

    PubMed

    Ligons, Davinna L; Tuncer, Ceren; Linowes, Brett A; Akcay, Izzet Mehmet; Kurtulus, Sema; Deniz, Emre; Atasever Arslan, Belkis; Cevik, Safak Isil; Keller, Hilary R; Luckey, Megan A; Feigenbaum, Lionel; Möröy, Tarik; Ersahin, Tulin; Atalay, Rengul; Erman, Batu; Park, Jung-Hyun

    2012-10-01

    Interleukin-7 receptor α (IL-7Rα) is essential for T cell survival and differentiation. Glucocorticoids are potent enhancers of IL-7Rα expression with diverse roles in T cell biology. Here we identify the transcriptional repressor, growth factor independent-1 (Gfi1), as a novel intermediary in glucocorticoid-induced IL-7Rα up-regulation. We found Gfi1 to be a major inhibitory target of dexamethasone by microarray expression profiling of 3B4.15 T-hybridoma cells. Concordantly, retroviral transduction of Gfi1 significantly blunted IL-7Rα up-regulation by dexamethasone. To further assess the role of Gfi1 in vivo, we generated bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) transgenic mice, in which a modified Il7r locus expresses GFP to report Il7r gene transcription. By introducing this BAC reporter transgene into either Gfi1-deficient or Gfi1-transgenic mice, we document in vivo that IL-7Rα transcription is up-regulated in the absence of Gfi1 and down-regulated when Gfi1 is overexpressed. Strikingly, the in vivo regulatory role of Gfi1 was specific for CD8(+), and not CD4(+) T cells or immature thymocytes. These results identify Gfi1 as a specific transcriptional repressor of the Il7r gene in CD8 T lymphocytes in vivo.

  15. Coordinated control of senescence by lncRNA and a novel T-box3 co-repressor complex

    PubMed Central

    Kumar P, Pavan; Emechebe, Uchenna; Smith, Richard; Franklin, Sarah; Moore, Barry; Yandell, Mark; Lessnick, Stephen L; Moon, Anne M

    2014-01-01

    Cellular senescence is a crucial tumor suppressor mechanism. We discovered a CAPERα/TBX3 repressor complex required to prevent senescence in primary cells and mouse embryos. Critical, previously unknown roles for CAPERα in controlling cell proliferation are manifest in an obligatory interaction with TBX3 to regulate chromatin structure and repress transcription of CDKN2A-p16INK and the RB pathway. The IncRNA UCA1 is a direct target of CAPERα/TBX3 repression whose overexpression is sufficient to induce senescence. In proliferating cells, we found that hnRNPA1 binds and destabilizes CDKN2A-p16INK mRNA whereas during senescence, UCA1 sequesters hnRNPA1 and thus stabilizes CDKN2A-p16INK. Thus CAPERα/TBX3 and UCA1 constitute a coordinated, reinforcing mechanism to regulate both CDKN2A-p16INK transcription and mRNA stability. Dissociation of the CAPERα/TBX3 co-repressor during oncogenic stress activates UCA1, revealing a novel mechanism for oncogene-induced senescence. Our elucidation of CAPERα and UCA1 functions in vivo provides new insights into senescence induction, and the oncogenic and developmental properties of TBX3. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02805.001 PMID:24876127

  16. Single molecule analysis of DNA wrapping and looping by a circular 14mer wheel of the bacteriophage 186 CI repressor.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haowei; Dodd, Ian B; Dunlap, David D; Shearwin, Keith E; Finzi, Laura

    2013-06-01

    The lytic-lysogenic decision in bacteriophage 186 is governed by the 186 CI repressor protein in a unique way. The 186 CI is proposed to form a wheel-like oligomer that can mediate either wrapped or looped nucleoprotein complexes to provide the cooperative and competitive interactions needed for regulation. Although consistent with structural, biochemical and gene expression data, many aspects of this model are based on inference. Here, we use atomic force microscopy (AFM) to reveal the various predicted wrapped and looped species, and new ones, for CI regulation of lytic and lysogenic transcription. Automated AFM analysis showed CI particles of the predicted dimensions on the DNA, with CI multimerization favoured by DNA binding. Measurement of the length of the wrapped DNA segments indicated that CI may move on the DNA, wrapping or releasing DNA on either side of the wheel. Tethered particle motion experiments were consistent with wrapping and looping of DNA by CI in solution, where in contrast to λ repressor, the looped species were exceptionally stable. The CI regulatory system provides an intriguing comparison with that of nucleosomes, which share the ability to wrap and release similar sized segments of DNA. PMID:23620280

  17. A chimeric repressor of petunia PH4 R2R3-MYB family transcription factor generates margined flowers in torenia.

    PubMed

    Kasajima, Ichiro; Sasaki, Katsutomo

    2016-05-01

    The development of new phenotypes is key to the commercial development of the main floricultural species and cultivars. Important new phenotypes include features such as multiple-flowers, color variations, increased flower size, new petal shapes, variegation and distinctive petal margin colourations. Although their commercial use is not yet common, the transgenic technologies provide a potentially rapid means of generating interesting new phenotypes. In this report, we construct 5 vectors which we expected to change the color of the flower anthocyanins, from purple to blue, regulating vacuolar pH. When these constructs were transformed into purple torenia, we unexpectedly recovered some genotypes having slightly margined petals. These transgenic lines expressed a chimeric repressor of the petunia PhPH4 gene under the control of Cauliflower mosaic virus 35 S RNA promoter. PhPH4 is an R2R3-type MYB transcription factor. The transgenic lines lacked pigmentation in the petal margin cells both on the adaxial and abaxial surfaces. Expressions of Flavanone 3-hydroxylase (F3H), Flavonoid 3'-hydroxylase (F3'H) and Flavonoid 3'5'-hydroxylase (F3'5'H) genes were reduced in the margins of these transgenic lines, suggesting an inhibitory effect of PhPH4 repressor on anthocyanin synthesis. PMID:27089475

  18. Anaphase promoting complex–dependent degradation of transcriptional repressors Nrm1 and Yhp1 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Ostapenko, Denis; Solomon, Mark J.

    2011-01-01

    The anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C) is an essential ubiquitin ligase that targets cell cycle proteins for proteasome-mediated degradation in mitosis and G1. The APC regulates a number of cell cycle processes, including spindle assembly, mitotic exit, and cytokinesis, but the full range of its functions is still unknown. To better understand cellular pathways controlled by the APC, we performed a proteomic screen to identify additional APC substrates. We analyzed cell cycle–regulated proteins whose expression peaked during the period when other APC substrates were expressed. Subsequent analysis identified several proteins, including the transcriptional repressors Nrm1 and Yhp1, as authentic APC substrates. We found that APCCdh1 targeted Nrm1 and Yhp1 for degradation in early G1 through Destruction-box motifs and that the degradation of these repressors coincided with transcriptional activation of MBF and Mcm1 target genes, respectively. In addition, Nrm1 was stabilized by phosphorylation, most likely by the budding yeast cyclin–dependent protein kinase, Cdc28. We found that expression of stabilized forms of Nrm1 and Yhp1 resulted in reduced cell fitness, due at least in part to incomplete activation of G1-specific genes. Therefore, in addition to its known functions, APC-mediated targeting of Nrm1 and Yhp1 coordinates transcription of multiple genes in G1 with other cell cycle events. PMID:21562221

  19. Hepatic oxidative stress activates the Gadd45b gene via degradation of the transcriptional repressor STAT3

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jung-Hwan; Qu, Aijuan; Reddy, Janardan K.; Gao, Bin; Gonzalez, Frank J.

    2013-01-01

    Growth arrest and DNA damage-inducible beta (GADD45b) plays an important role in many intracellular events, such as cell cycle arrest, DNA repair, cell survival, apoptosis and senescence. However, its mechanism of transcriptional regulation remains unclear. In this study, the mechanism of proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα) ligand induction of the Gadd45b gene in mouse liver was investigated. Gadd45b mRNA was markedly induced by the PPARα agonist, Wy-14,643, in wild-type mice but not in Ppara-null mice. STAT3 was found to be a repressor of the Gadd45b gene through binding to upstream regulatory elements. The role of STAT3 in control of Gadd45b was confirmed using liver-specific Stat3-null mice. Wy-14,643 treatment stimulated STAT3 ubiquitination leading to activation of the Gadd45b gene as a result of loss of Gadd45b repression by STAT3. STAT3 degradation was induced by forced overexpression of the PPARα target gene-encoded enzyme ACOX1, that produces increased H2O2 as a by product of fatty acid β-oxidation. H2O2 also stimulated expression of Gadd45b in cultured cells. These studies revealed that PPARα indirectly induces the Gadd45b gene in liver through promoting degradation of the repressor STAT3 as a result of elevated oxidative stress. PMID:23939942

  20. A novel strategy to analyze L-tryptophan through allosteric Trp repressor based on rolling circle amplification.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Guojie; Hu, Tianyu; Li, Jun; Wei, Hua; Shang, Hong; Guan, Yifu

    2015-09-15

    Rolling circle amplification (RCA) has been considered as a powerful tool for nucleic acids detection. Here, a novel repressor-RCA-based method for L-tryptophan (L-Trp) detection was developed. This method utilizes the specific interaction between the RCA circular template and the Trp repressor protein (TrpR) involved in trp operon of Escherichia coli (E. coli). In the absence of L-Trp, the TrpR protein could not bind to the RCA template, and the RCA process can be continued. When L-Trp is present, the activated TrpR will bind to the operon sequence on the RCA template and inhibit the RCA reaction. Thus, the concentration of L-Trp is correlated directly with the fluorescent RCA signals. We succeeded in detecting L-Trp in a single step in simple homogeneous reaction system. The detection limit was estimated to be 0.77 μM (S/N=3) with good linearity. The method can unambiguously distinguish L-Trp from other 19 standard amino acids and L-Trp analogs. This strategy is also promising for detecting many small molecules such as other amino acids and carbohydrates.

  1. O-GlcNAcylation of master growth repressor DELLA by SECRET AGENT modulates multiple signaling pathways in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Zentella, Rodolfo; Hu, Jianhong; Hsieh, Wen-Ping; Matsumoto, Peter A; Dawdy, Andrew; Barnhill, Benjamin; Oldenhof, Harriëtte; Hartweck, Lynn M; Maitra, Sushmit; Thomas, Stephen G; Cockrell, Shelley; Boyce, Michael; Shabanowitz, Jeffrey; Hunt, Donald F; Olszewski, Neil E; Sun, Tai-Ping

    2016-01-15

    The DELLA family of transcription regulators functions as master growth repressors in plants by inhibiting phytohormone gibberellin (GA) signaling in response to developmental and environmental cues. DELLAs also play a central role in mediating cross-talk between GA and other signaling pathways via antagonistic direct interactions with key transcription factors. However, how these crucial protein-protein interactions can be dynamically regulated during plant development remains unclear. Here, we show that DELLAs are modified by the O-linked N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc) transferase (OGT) SECRET AGENT (SEC) in Arabidopsis. O-GlcNAcylation of the DELLA protein REPRESSOR OF ga1-3 (RGA) inhibits RGA binding to four of its interactors-PHYTOCHROME-INTERACTING FACTOR3 (PIF3), PIF4, JASMONATE-ZIM DOMAIN1, and BRASSINAZOLE-RESISTANT1 (BZR1)-that are key regulators in light, jasmonate, and brassinosteroid signaling pathways, respectively. Consistent with this, the sec-null mutant displayed reduced responses to GA and brassinosteroid and showed decreased expression of several common target genes of DELLAs, BZR1, and PIFs. Our results reveal a direct role of OGT in repressing DELLA activity and indicate that O-GlcNAcylation of DELLAs provides a fine-tuning mechanism in coordinating multiple signaling activities during plant development.

  2. The CsoR-like sulfurtransferase repressor (CstR) is a persulfide sensor in Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Luebke, Justin L; Shen, Jiangchuan; Bruce, Kevin E; Kehl-Fie, Thomas E; Peng, Hui; Skaar, Eric P; Giedroc, David P

    2014-12-01

    How cells regulate the bioavailability of utilizable sulfur while mitigating the effects of hydrogen sulfide toxicity is poorly understood. CstR [Copper-sensing operon repressor (CsoR)-like sulfurtransferase repressor] represses the expression of the cst operon encoding a putative sulfide oxidation system in Staphylococcus aureus. Here, we show that the cst operon is strongly and transiently induced by cellular sulfide stress in an acute phase and specific response and that cst-encoded genes are necessary to mitigate the effects of sulfide toxicity. Growth defects are most pronounced when S. aureus is cultured in chemically defined media with thiosulfate (TS) as a sole sulfur source, but are also apparent when cystine is used or in rich media. Under TS growth conditions, cells fail to grow as a result of either unregulated expression of the cst operon in a ΔcstR strain or transformation with a non-inducible C31A/C60A CstR that blocks cst induction. This suggests that the cst operon contributes to cellular sulfide homeostasis. Tandem high-resolution mass spectrometry reveals derivatization of CstR by both inorganic tetrasulfide and an organic persulfide, glutathione persulfide, to yield a mixture of Cys31-Cys60' interprotomer cross-links, including di-, tri- and tetrasulfide bonds, which allosterically inhibit cst operator DNA binding by CstR.

  3. Oligogalacturonide-auxin antagonism does not require posttranscriptional gene silencing or stabilization of auxin response repressors in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Savatin, Daniel V; Ferrari, Simone; Sicilia, Francesca; De Lorenzo, Giulia

    2011-11-01

    α-1-4-Linked oligogalacturonides (OGs) derived from plant cell walls are a class of damage-associated molecular patterns and well-known elicitors of the plant immune response. Early transcript changes induced by OGs largely overlap those induced by flg22, a peptide derived from bacterial flagellin, a well-characterized microbe-associated molecular pattern, although responses diverge over time. OGs also regulate growth and development of plant cells and organs, due to an auxin-antagonistic activity. The molecular basis of this antagonism is still unknown. Here we show that, in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), OGs inhibit adventitious root formation induced by auxin in leaf explants as well as the expression of several auxin-responsive genes. Genetic, biochemical, and pharmacological experiments indicate that inhibition of auxin responses by OGs does not require ethylene, jasmonic acid, and salicylic acid signaling and is independent of RESPIRATORY BURST OXIDASE HOMOLOGUE D-mediated reactive oxygen species production. Free indole-3-acetic acid levels are not noticeably altered by OGs. Notably, OG- as well as flg22-auxin antagonism does not involve any of the following mechanisms: (1) stabilization of auxin-response repressors; (2) decreased levels of auxin receptor transcripts through the action of microRNAs. Our results suggest that OGs and flg22 antagonize auxin responses independently of Aux/Indole-3-Acetic Acid repressor stabilization and of posttranscriptional gene silencing.

  4. Structure and Function of the Su(H)-Hairless Repressor Complex, the Major Antagonist of Notch Signaling in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Torella, Rubben; Preiss, Anette; Maier, Dieter; Kovall, Rhett A.

    2016-01-01

    Notch is a conserved signaling pathway that specifies cell fates in metazoans. Receptor-ligand interactions induce changes in gene expression, which is regulated by the transcription factor CBF1/Su(H)/Lag-1 (CSL). CSL interacts with coregulators to repress and activate transcription from Notch target genes. While the molecular details of the activator complex are relatively well understood, the structure-function of CSL-mediated repressor complexes is poorly defined. In Drosophila, the antagonist Hairless directly binds Su(H) (the fly CSL ortholog) to repress transcription from Notch targets. Here, we determine the X-ray structure of the Su(H)-Hairless complex bound to DNA. Hairless binding produces a large conformational change in Su(H) by interacting with residues in the hydrophobic core of Su(H), illustrating the structural plasticity of CSL molecules to interact with different binding partners. Based on the structure, we designed mutants in Hairless and Su(H) that affect binding, but do not affect formation of the activator complex. These mutants were validated in vitro by isothermal titration calorimetry and yeast two- and three-hybrid assays. Moreover, these mutants allowed us to solely characterize the repressor function of Su(H) in vivo. PMID:27404588

  5. Silencing the Transcriptional Repressor, ZCT1, Illustrates the Tight Regulation of Terpenoid Indole Alkaloid Biosynthesis in Catharanthus roseus Hairy Roots

    PubMed Central

    Rizvi, Noreen F.; Weaver, Jessica D.; Cram, Erin J.; Lee-Parsons, Carolyn W. T.

    2016-01-01

    The Catharanthus roseus plant is the source of many valuable terpenoid indole alkaloids (TIAs), including the anticancer compounds vinblastine and vincristine. Transcription factors (TFs) are promising metabolic engineering targets due to their ability to regulate multiple biosynthetic pathway genes. To increase TIA biosynthesis, we elicited the TIA transcriptional activators (ORCAs and other unidentified TFs) with the plant hormone, methyl jasmonate (MJ), while simultaneously silencing the expression of the transcriptional repressor ZCT1. To silence ZCT1, we developed transgenic hairy root cultures of C. roseus that expressed an estrogen-inducible Zct1 hairpin for activating RNA interference. The presence of 17β-estradiol (5μM) effectively depleted Zct1 in hairy root cultures elicited with MJ dosages that either optimize or inhibit TIA production (250 or 1000μM). However, silencing Zct1 was not sufficient to increase TIA production or the expression of the TIA biosynthetic genes (G10h, Tdc, and Str), illustrating the tight regulation of TIA biosynthesis. The repression of the TIA biosynthetic genes at the inhibitory MJ dosage does not appear to be solely regulated by ZCT1. For instance, while Zct1 and Zct2 levels decreased through activating the Zct1 hairpin, Zct3 levels remained elevated. Since ZCT repressors have redundant yet distinct functions, silencing all three ZCTs may be necessary to relieve their repression of alkaloid biosynthesis. PMID:27467510

  6. Structure of the effector-binding domain of the arabinose repressor AraR from Bacillus subtilis

    SciTech Connect

    Procházková, Kateřina; Čermáková, Kateřina; Pachl, Petr; Sieglová, Irena; Fábry, Milan; Otwinowski, Zbyszek; Řezáčová, Pavlína

    2012-02-01

    The crystal structure of the effector-binding domain of the transcriptional repressor AraR from B. subtilis in complex with the effector molecule (l-arabinose) was determined at 2.2 Å resolution. A detailed analysis of the crystal identified a dimer organization that is distinctive from that of other members of the GalR/LacI family. In Bacillus subtilis, the arabinose repressor AraR negatively controls the expression of genes in the metabolic pathway of arabinose-containing polysaccharides. The protein is composed of two domains of different phylogenetic origin and function: an N-terminal DNA-binding domain belonging to the GntR family and a C-terminal effector-binding domain that shows similarity to members of the GalR/LacI family. The crystal structure of the C-terminal effector-binding domain of AraR in complex with the effector l-arabinose has been determined at 2.2 Å resolution. The l-arabinose binding affinity was characterized by isothermal titration calorimetry and differential scanning fluorimetry; the K{sub d} value was 8.4 ± 0.4 µM. The effect of l-arabinose on the protein oligomeric state was investigated in solution and detailed analysis of the crystal identified a dimer organization which is distinctive from that of other members of the GalR/LacI family.

  7. A novel strategy to analyze L-tryptophan through allosteric Trp repressor based on rolling circle amplification.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Guojie; Hu, Tianyu; Li, Jun; Wei, Hua; Shang, Hong; Guan, Yifu

    2015-09-15

    Rolling circle amplification (RCA) has been considered as a powerful tool for nucleic acids detection. Here, a novel repressor-RCA-based method for L-tryptophan (L-Trp) detection was developed. This method utilizes the specific interaction between the RCA circular template and the Trp repressor protein (TrpR) involved in trp operon of Escherichia coli (E. coli). In the absence of L-Trp, the TrpR protein could not bind to the RCA template, and the RCA process can be continued. When L-Trp is present, the activated TrpR will bind to the operon sequence on the RCA template and inhibit the RCA reaction. Thus, the concentration of L-Trp is correlated directly with the fluorescent RCA signals. We succeeded in detecting L-Trp in a single step in simple homogeneous reaction system. The detection limit was estimated to be 0.77 μM (S/N=3) with good linearity. The method can unambiguously distinguish L-Trp from other 19 standard amino acids and L-Trp analogs. This strategy is also promising for detecting many small molecules such as other amino acids and carbohydrates. PMID:25889351

  8. The CsoR-like sulfurtransferase repressor (CstR) is a persulfide sensor in Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Luebke, Justin L; Shen, Jiangchuan; Bruce, Kevin E; Kehl-Fie, Thomas E; Peng, Hui; Skaar, Eric P; Giedroc, David P

    2014-12-01

    How cells regulate the bioavailability of utilizable sulfur while mitigating the effects of hydrogen sulfide toxicity is poorly understood. CstR [Copper-sensing operon repressor (CsoR)-like sulfurtransferase repressor] represses the expression of the cst operon encoding a putative sulfide oxidation system in Staphylococcus aureus. Here, we show that the cst operon is strongly and transiently induced by cellular sulfide stress in an acute phase and specific response and that cst-encoded genes are necessary to mitigate the effects of sulfide toxicity. Growth defects are most pronounced when S. aureus is cultured in chemically defined media with thiosulfate (TS) as a sole sulfur source, but are also apparent when cystine is used or in rich media. Under TS growth conditions, cells fail to grow as a result of either unregulated expression of the cst operon in a ΔcstR strain or transformation with a non-inducible C31A/C60A CstR that blocks cst induction. This suggests that the cst operon contributes to cellular sulfide homeostasis. Tandem high-resolution mass spectrometry reveals derivatization of CstR by both inorganic tetrasulfide and an organic persulfide, glutathione persulfide, to yield a mixture of Cys31-Cys60' interprotomer cross-links, including di-, tri- and tetrasulfide bonds, which allosterically inhibit cst operator DNA binding by CstR. PMID:25318663

  9. The Banana Transcriptional Repressor MaDEAR1 Negatively Regulates Cell Wall-Modifying Genes Involved in Fruit Ripening.

    PubMed

    Fan, Zhong-Qi; Kuang, Jian-Fei; Fu, Chang-Chun; Shan, Wei; Han, Yan-Chao; Xiao, Yun-Yi; Ye, Yu-Jie; Lu, Wang-Jin; Lakshmanan, Prakash; Duan, Xue-Wu; Chen, Jian-Ye

    2016-01-01

    Ethylene plays an essential role in many biological processes including fruit ripening via modulation of ethylene signaling pathway. Ethylene Response Factors (ERFs) are key transcription factors (TFs) involved in ethylene perception and are divided into AP2, RAV, ERF, and DREB sub-families. Although a number of studies have implicated the involvement of DREB sub-family genes in stress responses, little is known about their roles in fruit ripening. In this study, we identified a DREB TF with a EAR motif, designated as MaDEAR1, which is a nucleus-localized transcriptional repressor. Expression analysis indicated that MaDEAR1 expression was repressed by ethylene, with reduced levels of histone H3 and H4 acetylation at its regulatory regions during fruit ripening. In addition, MaDEAR1 promoter activity was also suppressed in response to ethylene treatment. More importantly, MaDEAR1 directly binds to the DRE/CRT motifs in promoters of several cell wall-modifying genes including MaEXP1/3, MaPG1, MaXTH10, MaPL3, and MaPME3 associated with fruit softening during ripening and represses their activities. These data suggest that MaDEAR1 acts as a transcriptional repressor of cell wall-modifying genes, and may be negatively involved in ethylene-mediated ripening of banana fruit. Our findings provide new insights into the involvement of DREB TFs in the regulation of fruit ripening. PMID:27462342

  10. Keeping things quiet: Roles of NuRD and Sin3 co-repressor complexes during mammalian development

    PubMed Central

    McDonel, Patrick; Costello, Ita; Hendrich, Brian

    2010-01-01

    Gene inactivation studies of mammalian histone and DNA-modifying proteins have demonstrated a role for many such proteins in embryonic development. Post-implantation embryonic lethality implies a role for epigenetic factors in differentiation and in development of specific lineages or tissues. However a handful of chromatin-modifying enzymes have been found to be required in pre- or peri-implantation embryos. This is significant as implantation is the time when inner cell mass cells of the blastocyst exit pluripotency and begin to commit to form the various lineages that will eventually form the adult animal. These observations indicate a critical role for chromatin-modifying proteins in the earliest lineage decisions of mammalian development, and/or in the formation of the first embryonic cell types. Recent work has shown that the two major class I histone deacetylase-containing co-repressor complexes, the NuRD and Sin3 complexes, are both required at peri-implantation stages of mouse development, demonstrating the importance of histone deacetylation in cell fate decisions. Over the past 10 years both genetic and biochemical studies have revealed surprisingly divergent roles for these two co-repressors in mammalian cells. In this review we will summarise the evidence that the two major class I histone deacetylase complexes in mammalian cells, the NuRD and Sin3 complexes, play important roles in distinct aspects of embryonic development. PMID:18775506

  11. The Banana Transcriptional Repressor MaDEAR1 Negatively Regulates Cell Wall-Modifying Genes Involved in Fruit Ripening

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Zhong-qi; Kuang, Jian-fei; Fu, Chang-chun; Shan, Wei; Han, Yan-chao; Xiao, Yun-yi; Ye, Yu-jie; Lu, Wang-jin; Lakshmanan, Prakash; Duan, Xue-wu; Chen, Jian-ye

    2016-01-01

    Ethylene plays an essential role in many biological processes including fruit ripening via modulation of ethylene signaling pathway. Ethylene Response Factors (ERFs) are key transcription factors (TFs) involved in ethylene perception and are divided into AP2, RAV, ERF, and DREB sub-families. Although a number of studies have implicated the involvement of DREB sub-family genes in stress responses, little is known about their roles in fruit ripening. In this study, we identified a DREB TF with a EAR motif, designated as MaDEAR1, which is a nucleus-localized transcriptional repressor. Expression analysis indicated that MaDEAR1 expression was repressed by ethylene, with reduced levels of histone H3 and H4 acetylation at its regulatory regions during fruit ripening. In addition, MaDEAR1 promoter activity was also suppressed in response to ethylene treatment. More importantly, MaDEAR1 directly binds to the DRE/CRT motifs in promoters of several cell wall-modifying genes including MaEXP1/3, MaPG1, MaXTH10, MaPL3, and MaPME3 associated with fruit softening during ripening and represses their activities. These data suggest that MaDEAR1 acts as a transcriptional repressor of cell wall-modifying genes, and may be negatively involved in ethylene-mediated ripening of banana fruit. Our findings provide new insights into the involvement of DREB TFs in the regulation of fruit ripening. PMID:27462342

  12. FHL2 interacts with and acts as a functional repressor of Id2 in human neuroblastoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Han, Weidong; Wu, Zhiqiang; Zhao, Yali; Meng, Yuanguang; Si, Yiling; Yang, Jie; Fu, Xiaobing; Yu, Li

    2009-01-01

    Inhibitor of differentiation 2 (Id2) is a natural inhibitor of the basic helix–loop–helix transcription factors. Although Id2 is well known to prevent differentiation and promote cell-cycle progression and tumorigenesis, the molecular events that regulate Id2 activity remain to be investigated. Here, we identified that Four-and-a-half LIM-only protein 2 (FHL2) is a novel functional repressor of Id2. Moreover, we demonstrated that FHL2 can directly interact with all members of the Id family (Id1–4) via an N-terminal loop–helix structure conserved in Id proteins. FHL2 antagonizes the inhibitory effect of Id proteins on basic helix–loop–helix protein E47-mediated transcription, which was abrogated by the deletion mutation of Ids that disrupted their interaction with FHL2. We also showed a competitive nature between FHL2 and E47 for binding Id2, whereby FHL2 prevents the formation of the Id2–E47 heterodimer, thus releasing E47 to DNA and restoring its transcriptional activity. FHL2 expression was remarkably up-regulated during retinoic acid-induced differentiation of neuroblastoma cells, during which the expression of Id2 was opposite to that. Ectopic FHL2 expression in neuroblastoma cells markedly reduces the transcriptional and cell-cycle promoting functions of Id2. Altogether, these results indicate that FHL2 is an important repressor of the oncogenic activity of Id2 in neuroblastoma cells. PMID:19417068

  13. Silencing the Transcriptional Repressor, ZCT1, Illustrates the Tight Regulation of Terpenoid Indole Alkaloid Biosynthesis in Catharanthus roseus Hairy Roots.

    PubMed

    Rizvi, Noreen F; Weaver, Jessica D; Cram, Erin J; Lee-Parsons, Carolyn W T

    2016-01-01

    The Catharanthus roseus plant is the source of many valuable terpenoid indole alkaloids (TIAs), including the anticancer compounds vinblastine and vincristine. Transcription factors (TFs) are promising metabolic engineering targets due to their ability to regulate multiple biosynthetic pathway genes. To increase TIA biosynthesis, we elicited the TIA transcriptional activators (ORCAs and other unidentified TFs) with the plant hormone, methyl jasmonate (MJ), while simultaneously silencing the expression of the transcriptional repressor ZCT1. To silence ZCT1, we developed transgenic hairy root cultures of C. roseus that expressed an estrogen-inducible Zct1 hairpin for activating RNA interference. The presence of 17β-estradiol (5μM) effectively depleted Zct1 in hairy root cultures elicited with MJ dosages that either optimize or inhibit TIA production (250 or 1000μM). However, silencing Zct1 was not sufficient to increase TIA production or the expression of the TIA biosynthetic genes (G10h, Tdc, and Str), illustrating the tight regulation of TIA biosynthesis. The repression of the TIA biosynthetic genes at the inhibitory MJ dosage does not appear to be solely regulated by ZCT1. For instance, while Zct1 and Zct2 levels decreased through activating the Zct1 hairpin, Zct3 levels remained elevated. Since ZCT repressors have redundant yet distinct functions, silencing all three ZCTs may be necessary to relieve their repression of alkaloid biosynthesis. PMID:27467510

  14. A SNAIL1-SMAD3/4 transcriptional repressor complex promotes TGF-β mediated epithelial-mesenchymal transition

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, Theresa; Neve, Etienne P. A.; Johnson, Jill R.; Kukalev, Alexander; Rojo, Federico; Albanell, Joan; Pietras, Kristian; Virtanen, Ismo; Philipson, Lennart; Leopold, Philip L.; Crystal, Ronald G.; de Herreros, Antonio Garcia; Moustakas, Aristidis; Pettersson, Ralf F.; Fuxe, Jonas

    2013-01-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transitions (EMT) are essential for organogenesis and triggered in carcinoma progression into an invasive state1. Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) cooperates with signalling pathways, such as Ras and Wnt, to induce EMT2-5, but the molecular mechanisms are not clear. Here, we report that SMAD3 and SMAD4 interact and form a complex with SNAIL1, a transcriptional repressor and promoter of EMT6, 7. The SNAIL1-SMAD3/4 complex was targeted to the gene promoters of CAR, a tight junction protein, and E-cadherin during TGF-β-driven EMT in breast epithelial cells. SNAIL1 and SMAD3/4 acted as co-repressors of CAR, occludin, claudin-3 and E-cadherin promoters in transfected cells. Conversely, co-silencing of SNAIL1 and SMAD4 by siRNA inhibited the repression of CAR and occludin during EMT. Moreover, loss of CAR and E-cadherin correlated with nuclear co-expression of SNAIL1 and SMAD3/4 in a mouse model of breast carcinoma and at the invasive fronts of human breast cancer. We propose that activation of a SNAIL1-SMAD3/4 transcriptional complex represents a novel mechanism of gene repression during EMT. PMID:19597490

  15. Studies on gene control regions X. The effect of specific adenine-thymine transversions on the lac repressor-lac operator interaction.

    PubMed Central

    Sista, H S; Loder, R T; Caruthers, M H

    1979-01-01

    Chemical and enzymatic methods were used to synthesize a transition (AT to GC) and a transversion (AT to TA) at a lac operator site known to interact with lac repressor through the thymine 5 methyl group. These operators also contained a poly(dA) . poly(dT) tail 8 to 12 base pairs in length at one end. Results suggest that the steric constraints of lac repressor relative to the position of the 5 methyl group are quite critical. For example a seven fold reduction in stability was observed for the transversion. Results also suggest that the operator spans at least 21 base pairs. Images PMID:379824

  16. Ion concentration and temperature dependence of DNA binding: comparison of PurR and LacI repressor proteins.

    PubMed

    Moraitis, M I; Xu, H; Matthews, K S

    2001-07-10

    Purine repressor (PurR) binding to specific DNA is enhanced by complexing with purines, whereas lactose repressor (LacI) binding is diminished by interaction with inducer sugars despite 30% identity in their protein sequences and highly homologous tertiary structures. Nonetheless, in switching from low- to high-affinity DNA binding, these proteins undergo a similar structural change in which the hinge region connecting the DNA and effector binding domains folds into an alpha-helix and contacts the DNA minor groove. The differences in response to effector for these proteins should be manifest in the polyelectrolyte effect which arises from cations displaced from DNA by interaction with positively charged side chains on a protein and is quantitated by measurement of DNA binding affinity as a function of ion concentration. Consistent with structural data for these proteins, high-affinity operator DNA binding by the PurR-purine complex involved approximately 15 ion pairs, a value significantly greater than that for the corresponding state of LacI (approximately 6 ion pairs). For both proteins, however, conversion to the low-affinity state results in a decrease of approximately 2-fold in the number of cations released per dimeric DNA binding site. Heat capacity changes (DeltaC(p)) that accompany DNA binding, derived from buried apolar surface area, coupled folding, and restriction of motional freedom of polar groups in the interface, also reflect the differences between these homologous repressor proteins. DNA binding of the PurR-guanine complex is accompanied by a DeltaC(p) (-2.8 kcal mol(-1) K(-1)) more negative than that observed previously for LacI (-0.9 to -1.5 kcal mol(-1) K(-1)), suggesting that more extensive protein folding and/or enhanced structural rigidity may occur upon DNA binding for PurR compared to DNA binding for LacI. The differences between these proteins illustrate plasticity of function despite high-level sequence and structural homology and

  17. Arabidopsis Ovate Family Proteins, a Novel Transcriptional Repressor Family, Control Multiple Aspects of Plant Growth and Development

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Shucai; Chang, Ying; Guo, Jianjun; Zeng, Qingning; Ellis, Brian; Chen, Jay

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Arabidopsis genome contains 18 genes that are predicted to encode Ovate Family Proteins (AtOFPs), a protein family characterized by a conserved OVATE domain, an approximately 70-amino acid domain that was originally found in tomato OVATE protein. Among AtOFP family members, AtOFP1 has been shown to suppress cell elongation, in part, by suppressing the expression of AtGA20ox1, AtOFP4 has been shown to regulate secondary cell wall formation by interact with KNOTTED1-LIKE HOMEODOMAIN PROTEIN 7 (KNAT7), and AtOFP5 has been shown to regulate the activity of a BEL1-LIKEHOMEODOMAIN 1(BLH1)-KNAT3 complex during early embryo sac development, but little is known about the function of other AtOFPs. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We demonstrated here that AtOFP proteins could function as effective transcriptional repressors in the Arabidopsis protoplast transient expression system. The analysis of loss-of-function alleles of AtOFPs suggested AtOFP genes may have overlapping function in regulating plant growth and development, because none of the single mutants identified, including T-DNA insertion mutants in AtOFP1, AtOFP4, AtOFP8, AtOFP10, AtOFP15 and AtOFP16, displayed any apparent morphological defects. Further, Atofp1 Atofp4 and Atofp15 Atofp16 double mutants still did not differ significantly from wild-type. On the other hand, plants overexpressing AtOFP genes displayed a number of abnormal phenotypes, which could be categorized into three distinct classes, suggesting that AtOFP genes may also have diverse functions in regulating plant growth and development. Further analysis suggested that AtOFP1 regulates cotyledon development in a postembryonic manner, and global transcript profiling revealed that it suppress the expression of many other genes. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results showed that AtOFPs function as transcriptional repressors and they regulate multiple aspects of plant growth and development. These results provided the first overview of a

  18. The chlorinated AHR ligand 3,3′,4,4′,5-pentachlorobiphenyl (PCB126) promotes reactive oxygen species (ROS) production during embryonic development in the killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Arzuaga, Xabier; Wassenberg, Deena; Giulio, Richard D.; Elskus, Adria

    2006-01-01

    Exposure to dioxin-like chemicals that activate the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) can result in increased cellular and tissue production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Little is known of these effects during early fish development. We used the fish model, Fundulus heteroclitus, to determine if the AHR ligand and pro-oxidant 3,3′,4,4′,5-pentachlorobiphenyl (PCB126) can increase ROS production during killifish development, and to test a novel method for measuring ROS non-invasively in a living organism. The superoxide-sensitive fluorescent dye, dihydroethidium (DHE), was used to detect in ovo ROS production microscopically in developing killifish exposed to PCB126 or vehicle. Both in ovo CYP1A activity (ethoxyresorufin-o-deethylase, EROD) and in ovo ROS were induced by PCB126. In ovo CYP1A activity was inducible by PCB126 concentrations as low as 0.003 nM, with maximal induction occurring at 0.3 nM PCB126. These PCB126 concentrations also significantly increased in ovo ROS production in embryonic liver, ROS being detectable as early as 5 days post-fertilization. These data demonstrate that the pro-oxidant and CYP1A inducer, PCB126, increases both CYP1A activity and ROS production in developing killifish embryos. The superoxide detection assay (SoDA) described in this paper provides a semi-quantitative, easily measured, early indicator of altered ROS production that can be used in conjunction with simultaneous in ovo measurements of CYP1A activity and embryo development to explore functional relationships among biochemical, physiological and developmental responses to AHR ligands.

  19. Prenatal 3,3',4,4',5-pentachlorobiphenyl exposure modulates induction of rat hepatic CYP 1A1, 1B1, and AhR by 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene

    SciTech Connect

    Wakui, Shin . E-mail: wakui@azabu-u.ac.jp; Yokoo, Kiyofumi; Takahashi, Hiroyuki; Muto, Tomoko; Suzuki, Yoshihiko; Kanai, Yoshikatsu; Hano, Hiroshi; Furusato, Masakuni; Endou, Hitoshi

    2006-02-01

    We previously reported the finding that prenatal exposure to a relatively low dose of PCB126 increases the rate of DMBA-induced rat mammary carcinoma, while a high dose decreased it. One of the most important factors determining the sensitivity to mammary carcinogenesis is the metabolic stage at administration of the carcinogenic agent. DMBA is a procarcinogen that recruits the host metabolism to yield its ultimate carcinogenic form, and CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 (CYP1) conduct this metabolism. We investigated the hepatic expression of CYP1 and AhR following oral administration of DMBA (100 mg/kg b.w.) (i.g.) to 50-day-old female Sprague-Dawley rats whose dams had been treated (i.g.) with 2.5 ng, 250 ng, 7.5 {mu}g of PCB126/kg or the vehicle on days 13 to 19 post-conception. Real-time quantitative RT-PCR analysis revealed that the prenatal exposure to a relatively low dose of PCB126 (the 250 ng group) prolonged the higher expression of CYP1A1, CYP1B1, and AhR mRNA, while prenatal exposure to a high dose of PCB126 (the 7.5 {mu}g group) prolonged the higher expression of CYP1A1 and AhR mRNA. Western blotting and immunohistochemical analyses were consistent with mRNAs changes. Because DMBA oxidation produces a highly mutagenic metabolite and is finally catalyzed by CYP1B1, a relatively low PCB126 dose might produce the biological character to potentially increase the risk of DMBA-induced mammary carcinoma.

  20. Regulation of Escherichia coli purA by purine repressor, one component of a dual control mechanism.

    PubMed

    He, B; Zalkin, H

    1994-02-01

    Escherichia coli purA encodes adenylosuccinate synthetase, one of two enzymes required for synthesis of AMP from IMP. purA is subject to two- to threefold regulation by purR and about twofold regulation by a purR-independent mechanism. The 5'-flanking region of purA confers purR-dependent transcriptional regulation of purA but not the purR-independent regulation. Two operator sites in the 5'-flanking region which bind purine repressor in vitro and are required for in vivo regulation were identified. The purR-independent regulation may be posttranscriptional. It is now established that all transcription units involved in de novo synthesis of purine nucleotides, nine pur operons, as well as purR itself and guaBA, are subject to purR control.

  1. An NRSF/REST-like repressor downstream of Ebi/SMRTER/Su(H) regulates eye development in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Tsuda, Leo; Kaido, Masako; Lim, Young-Mi; Kato, Kagayaki; Aigaki, Toshiro; Hayashi, Shigeo

    2006-01-01

    The corepressor complex that includes Ebi and SMRTER is a target of epidermal growth factor (EGF) and Notch signaling pathways and regulates Delta (Dl)-mediated induction of support cells adjacent to photoreceptor neurons of the Drosophila eye. We describe a mechanism by which the Ebi/SMRTER corepressor complex maintains Dl expression. We identified a gene, charlatan (chn), which encodes a C2H2-type zinc-finger protein resembling human neuronal restricted silencing factor/repressor element RE-1 silencing transcription factor (NRSF/REST). The Ebi/SMRTER corepressor complex represses chn transcription by competing with the activation complex that includes the Notch intracellular domain (NICD). Chn represses Dl expression and is critical for the initiation of eye development. Thus, under EGF signaling, double negative regulation mediated by the Ebi/SMRTER corepressor complex and an NRSF/REST-like factor, Chn, maintains inductive activity in developing photoreceptor cells by promoting Dl expression. PMID:16763555

  2. The transcriptional repressor Blimp1 is expressed in rare luminal progenitors and is essential for mammary gland development.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Mohammed I; Elias, Salah; Mould, Arne W; Bikoff, Elizabeth K; Robertson, Elizabeth J

    2016-05-15

    Mammary gland morphogenesis depends on a tight balance between cell proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis, to create a defined functional hierarchy within the epithelia. The limited availability of stem cell/progenitor markers has made it challenging to decipher lineage relationships. Here, we identify a rare subset of luminal progenitors that express the zinc finger transcriptional repressor Blimp1, and demonstrate that this subset of highly clonogenic luminal progenitors is required for mammary gland development. Conditional inactivation experiments using K14-Cre and WAPi-Cre deleter strains revealed essential functions at multiple developmental stages. Thus, Blimp1 regulates proliferation, apoptosis and alveolar cell maturation during puberty and pregnancy. Loss of Blimp1 disrupts epithelial architecture and lumen formation both in vivo and in three-dimensional (3D) primary cell cultures. Collectively, these results demonstrate that Blimp1 is required to maintain a highly proliferative luminal subset necessary for mammary gland development and homeostasis.

  3. The trigger enzyme PepA (aminopeptidase A) of Escherichia coli, a transcriptional repressor that generates positive supercoiling.

    PubMed

    Nguyen Le Minh, Phu; Nadal, Marc; Charlier, Daniel

    2016-06-01

    Escherichia coli aminopeptidase A (PepA) is a trigger enzyme endowed with catalytic activity and DNA-binding properties prominent in transcriptional regulation and site-specific DNA recombination. The current work demonstrates that PepA is a repressor in its own right, capable of specifically inhibiting transcription initiation at promoter P1 of the carAB operon, encoding carbamoylphosphate synthase. Furthermore, in vitro topology studies performed with DNA minicircles demonstrate that PepA binding constrains a single positive supercoil in the carP1 control region. Such a topological event is understood to constitute an impediment to transcription initiation and may serve as a mechanism to regulate gene expression.