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Sample records for ahr target gene

  1. TCDD dysregulation of 13 AHR-target genes in rat liver.

    PubMed

    Watson, John D; Prokopec, Stephenie D; Smith, Ashley B; Okey, Allan B; Pohjanvirta, Raimo; Boutros, Paul C

    2014-02-01

    Despite several decades of research, the complete mechanism by which 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) and other xenobiotic agonists of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) cause toxicity remains unclear. While it has been shown that the AHR is required for all major manifestations of toxicity, the specific downstream changes involved in the development of toxic phenotypes remain unknown. Here we examine a panel of 13 genes that are AHR-regulated in many species and tissues. We profiled their hepatic mRNA abundances in two rat strains with very different sensitivities to TCDD: the TCDD-sensitive Long-Evans (Turku/AB; L-E) and the TCDD-resistant Han/Wistar (Kuopio; H/W). We evaluated doses ranging from 0 to 3000μg/kg at 19h after TCDD exposure and time points ranging from 1.5 to 384h after exposure to 100μg/kg TCDD. Twelve of 13 genes responded to TCDD in at least one strain, and seven of these showed statistically significant inter-strain differences in the time course analysis (Aldh3a1, Cyp1a2, Cyp1b1, Cyp2a1, Fmo1, Nfe2l2 and Nqo1). Cyp2s1 did not respond to TCDD in either rat strain. Five genes exhibited biphasic responses to TCDD insult (Ahrr, Aldh3a1, Cyp1b1, Nfe2l2 and Nqo1), suggesting a secondary event, such as association with additional transcriptional modulators. Of the 12 genes that responded to TCDD during the dose-response analysis, none had an ED50 equivalent to that of Cyp1a1, the most sensitive gene in this study, while nine genes responded to doses at least 10-100 fold higher, in at least one strain (Ahrr (L-E), Aldh3a1 (both), Cyp1a2 (both), Cyp1b1 (both), Cyp2a1 (L-E), Inmt (both), Nfe2l2 (L-E), Nqo1 (L-E) and Tiparp (both)). These data shed new light on the association of the AHR target genes with TCDD toxicity, and in particular the seven genes exhibiting strain-specific differences represent strong candidate mediators of Type-II toxicities. PMID:24355419

  2. TCDD dysregulation of 13 AHR-target genes in rat liver

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, John D.; Prokopec, Stephenie D.; Smith, Ashley B.; Okey, Allan B.; Pohjanvirta, Raimo; Boutros, Paul C.

    2014-02-01

    Despite several decades of research, the complete mechanism by which 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) and other xenobiotic agonists of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) cause toxicity remains unclear. While it has been shown that the AHR is required for all major manifestations of toxicity, the specific downstream changes involved in the development of toxic phenotypes remain unknown. Here we examine a panel of 13 genes that are AHR-regulated in many species and tissues. We profiled their hepatic mRNA abundances in two rat strains with very different sensitivities to TCDD: the TCDD-sensitive Long–Evans (Turku/AB; L–E) and the TCDD-resistant Han/Wistar (Kuopio; H/W). We evaluated doses ranging from 0 to 3000 μg/kg at 19 h after TCDD exposure and time points ranging from 1.5 to 384 h after exposure to 100 μg/kg TCDD. Twelve of 13 genes responded to TCDD in at least one strain, and seven of these showed statistically significant inter-strain differences in the time course analysis (Aldh3a1, Cyp1a2, Cyp1b1, Cyp2a1, Fmo1, Nfe2l2 and Nqo1). Cyp2s1 did not respond to TCDD in either rat strain. Five genes exhibited biphasic responses to TCDD insult (Ahrr, Aldh3a1, Cyp1b1, Nfe2l2 and Nqo1), suggesting a secondary event, such as association with additional transcriptional modulators. Of the 12 genes that responded to TCDD during the dose–response analysis, none had an ED{sub 50} equivalent to that of Cyp1a1, the most sensitive gene in this study, while nine genes responded to doses at least 10–100 fold higher, in at least one strain (Ahrr (L–E), Aldh3a1 (both), Cyp1a2 (both), Cyp1b1 (both), Cyp2a1 (L–E), Inmt (both), Nfe2l2 (L–E), Nqo1 (L–E) and Tiparp (both)). These data shed new light on the association of the AHR target genes with TCDD toxicity, and in particular the seven genes exhibiting strain-specific differences represent strong candidate mediators of Type-II toxicities. - Highlights: • NanoString measured hepatic mRNA molecules

  3. Fibroblast growth factor (Fgf) 21 is a novel target gene of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR).

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xingguo; Vispute, Saurabh G; Liu, Jie; Cheng, Christine; Kharitonenkov, Alexei; Klaassen, Curtis D

    2014-07-01

    The toxic effects of dioxins, such as 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), mainly through activation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) are well documented. Fibroblast growth factor (Fgf) 21 plays critical roles in metabolic adaptation to fasting by increasing lipid oxidation and ketogenesis in the liver. The present study was performed to determine whether activation of the AhR induces Fgf21 expression. In mouse liver, TCDD increased Fgf21 mRNA in both dose- and time-dependent manners. In addition, TCDD markedly increased Fgf21 mRNA expression in cultured mouse and human hepatocytes. Moreover, TCDD increased mRNA (in liver) and protein levels (in both liver and serum) of Fgf21 in wild-type mice, but not in AhR-null mice. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays showed that TCDD increased AhR protein binding to the Fgf21 promoter (-105/+1 base pair). Fgf21-null mice administered 200μg/kg of TCDD died within 20days, whereas wild-type mice receiving the same treatment were still alive at one month after administration. This indicates that TCDD-induced Fgf21 expression protects against TCDD toxicity. Diethylhexylphthalate (DEHP) pretreatment attenuated TCDD-induced Fgf21 expression in mouse liver and white adipose tissue, which may explain a previous report that DEHP pretreatment decreases TCDD-induced wasting. In conclusion, Fgf21 appears to be a target gene of AhR-signaling pathway in mouse and human liver. PMID:24769090

  4. Fibroblast growth factor (Fgf) 21 is a novel target gene of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR)

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Xingguo; Vispute, Saurabh G.; Liu, Jie; Cheng, Christine; Kharitonenkov, Alexei; Klaassen, Curtis D.

    2014-07-01

    The toxic effects of dioxins, such as 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), mainly through activation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) are well documented. Fibroblast growth factor (Fgf) 21 plays critical roles in metabolic adaptation to fasting by increasing lipid oxidation and ketogenesis in the liver. The present study was performed to determine whether activation of the AhR induces Fgf21 expression. In mouse liver, TCDD increased Fgf21 mRNA in both dose- and time-dependent manners. In addition, TCDD markedly increased Fgf21 mRNA expression in cultured mouse and human hepatocytes. Moreover, TCDD increased mRNA (in liver) and protein levels (in both liver and serum) of Fgf21 in wild-type mice, but not in AhR-null mice. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays showed that TCDD increased AhR protein binding to the Fgf21 promoter (− 105/+ 1 base pair). Fgf21-null mice administered 200 μg/kg of TCDD died within 20 days, whereas wild-type mice receiving the same treatment were still alive at one month after administration. This indicates that TCDD-induced Fgf21 expression protects against TCDD toxicity. Diethylhexylphthalate (DEHP) pretreatment attenuated TCDD-induced Fgf21 expression in mouse liver and white adipose tissue, which may explain a previous report that DEHP pretreatment decreases TCDD-induced wasting. In conclusion, Fgf21 appears to be a target gene of AhR-signaling pathway in mouse and human liver. - Highlights: • TCDD induced Fgf21 expression at both mRNA and protein levels. • Fgf21 induction by TCDD is AhR-dependent. • DEHP attenuated TCDD-induced Fgf21 expression.

  5. Screening a mouse liver gene expression compendium identifies modulators of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR).

    PubMed

    Oshida, Keiyu; Vasani, Naresh; Thomas, Russell S; Applegate, Dawn; Gonzalez, Frank J; Aleksunes, Lauren M; Klaassen, Curtis D; Corton, J Christopher

    2015-10-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor that mediates the biological and toxic effects of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), dioxin-like compounds (DLC) as well as some drugs and endogenous tryptophan metabolites. Short-term activation of AhR can lead to hepatocellular steatosis, and chronic activation can lead to liver cancer in mice and rats. Analytical approaches were developed to identify biosets in a genomic database in which AhR activity was altered. A set of 63 genes was identified (the AhR gene expression biomarker) that was dependent on AhR for regulation after exposure to TCDD or benzo[a]pyrene and includes the known AhR targets Cyp1a1 and Cyp1b1. A fold-change rank-based test (Running Fisher's test; p-value ≤ 10(-4)) was used to evaluate the similarity between the AhR biomarker and a test set of 37 and 41 biosets positive or negative, respectively for AhR activation. The test resulted in a balanced accuracy of 95%. The rank-based test was used to identify factors that activate or suppress AhR in an annotated mouse liver/mouse primary hepatocyte gene expression database of ∼ 1850 comparisons. In addition to the expected activation of AhR by TCDD and DLC, AhR was activated by AP20189 and phenformin. AhR was suppressed by phenobarbital and 1,4-Bis[2-(3,5-dichloropyridyloxy)] benzene (TCPOBOP) in a constitutive activated receptor (CAR)-dependent manner and pregnenolone-16α-carbonitrile in a pregnane X receptor (PXR)-dependent manner. Inactivation of individual genes in nullizygous models led to AhR activation (Pxr, Ghrhr, Taf10) or suppression (Ahr, Ilst6st, Hnf1a). This study describes a novel screening strategy for identifying factors in mouse liver that perturb AhR in a gene expression compendium. PMID:26215100

  6. Deficiency in Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor (AHR) Expression throughout Aging Alters Gene Expression Profiles in Murine Long-Term Hematopoietic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, John A.; Singh, Kameshwar P.; Unnisa, Zeenath; Welle, Stephen L.; Gasiewicz, Thomas A.

    2015-01-01

    Dysregulation of hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) signaling can contribute to the development of diseases of the blood system. Lack of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) has been associated with alterations in gene expression related to HSC function and the subsequent development of a myeloproliferative disorder in aging female mice. We sorted the most primitive population of HSCs with the highest stem cell potential (Long-term, or LT-HSCs) from 18-month-old AhR-null-allele (AhR-KO) and WT mice and analyzed gene expression using microarray to determine alterations in gene expression and cell signaling networks in HSCs that could potentially contribute to the aging phenotype of AhR-KO mice. Comparisons with previous array data from 8-week old mice indicated that aging alone is sufficient to alter gene expression. In addition, a significant number of gene expression differences were observed in aged LT-HSCs that are dependent on both aging and lack of AhR. Pathway analysis of these genes revealed networks related to hematopoietic stem cell activity or function. qPCR was used to confirm the differential expression of a subset of these genes, focusing on genes that may represent novel AhR targets due to the presence of a putative AhR binding site in their upstream regulatory region. We verified differential expression of PDGF-D, Smo, Wdfy1, Zbtb37 and Zfp382. Pathway analysis of this subset of genes revealed overlap between cellular functions of the novel AhR targets and AhR itself. Lentiviral-mediated knockdown of AhR in lineage-negative hematopoietic cells was sufficient to induce changes in all five of the candidate AhR targets identified. Taken together, these data suggest a role for AhR in HSC functional regulation, and identify novel HSC AhR target genes that may contribute to the phenotypes observed in AhR-KO mice. PMID:26208102

  7. Disruption of period gene expression alters the inductive effects of dioxin on the AhR signaling pathway in the mouse liver

    SciTech Connect

    Qu Xiaoyu; Metz, Richard P.; Porter, Weston W.; Cassone, Vincent M.; Earnest, David J.

    2009-02-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) and AhR nuclear translocator (ARNT) are transcription factors that express Per-Arnt-Sim (PAS) DNA-binding motifs and mediate the metabolism of drugs and environmental toxins in the liver. Because these transcription factors interact with other PAS genes in molecular feedback loops forming the mammalian circadian clockworks, we determined whether targeted disruption or siRNA inhibition of Per1 and Per2 expression alters toxin-mediated regulation of the AhR signaling pathway in the mouse liver and Hepa1c1c7 hepatoma cells in vitro. Treatment with the prototypical Ahr ligand, 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), had inductive effects on the primary targets of AhR signaling, Cyp1A1 and Cyp1B1, in the liver of all animals, but genotype-based differences were evident such that the toxin-mediated induction of Cyp1A1 expression was significantly greater (2-fold) in mice with targeted disruption of Per1 (Per1{sup ldc} and Per1{sup ldc}/Per2{sup ldc}). In vitro experiments yielded similar results demonstrating that siRNA inhibition of Per1 significantly increases the TCDD-induced expression of Cyp1A1 and Cyp1B1 in Hepa1c1c7 cells. Per2 inhibition in siRNA-infected Hepa1c1c7 cells had the opposite effect and significantly decreased both the induction of these p450 genes as well as AhR and Arnt expression in response to TCDD treatment. These findings suggest that Per1 may play a distinctive role in modulating AhR-regulated responses to TCDD in the liver.

  8. Genetic and pharmacological analysis identifies a physiological role for the AHR in epidermal differentiation

    PubMed Central

    van den Bogaard, Ellen; Podolsky, Michael; Smits, Jos; Cui, Xiao; John, Christian; Gowda, Krishne; Desai, Dhimant; Amin, Shantu; Schalkwijk, Joost; Perdew, Gary H.

    2015-01-01

    Stimulation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) by xenobiotics is known to affect epidermal differentiation and skin barrier formation. The physiological role of endogenous AHR signaling in keratinocyte differentiation is not known. We used murine and human skin models to address the hypothesis that AHR activation is required for normal keratinocyte differentiation. Using transcriptome analysis of Ahr-/- and Ahr+/+ murine keratinocytes, we found significant enrichment of differentially expressed genes linked to epidermal differentiation. Primary Ahr-/- keratinocytes showed a significant reduction in terminal differentiation gene and protein expression, similar to Ahr+/+ keratinocytes treated with AHR antagonists GNF351 and CH223191, or the selective AHR modulator (SAhRM), SGA360. In vitro keratinocyte differentiation led to increased AHR levels and subsequent nuclear translocation, followed by induced CYP1A1 gene expression. Monolayer cultured primary human keratinocytes treated with AHR antagonists also showed an impaired terminal differentiation program. Inactivation of AHR activity during human skin equivalent development severely impaired epidermal stratification, terminal differentiation protein expression and stratum corneum formation. As disturbed epidermal differentiation is a main feature of many skin diseases, pharmacological agents targeting AHR signaling or future identification of endogenous keratinocyte-derived AHR ligands should be considered as potential new drugs in dermatology. PMID:25602157

  9. Preferential induction of the AhR gene battery in HepaRG cells after a single or repeated exposure to heterocyclic aromatic amines

    SciTech Connect

    Dumont, Julie Josse, Rozenn Lambert, Carine Antherieu, Sebastien Laurent, Veronique Loyer, Pascal Robin, Marie-Anne Guillouzo, Andre

    2010-11-15

    2-Amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP) and 2-amino-3,8-dimethylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline (MeIQx) are two of the most common heterocyclic aromatic amines (HAA) produced during cooking of meat, fish and poultry. Both HAA produce different tumor profiles in rodents and are suspected to be carcinogenic in humans. In order to better understand the molecular basis of HAA toxicity, we have analyzed gene expression profiles in the metabolically competent human HepaRG cells using pangenomic oligonucleotide microarrays, after either a single (24-h) or a repeated (28-day) exposure to 10 {mu}M PhIP or MeIQx. The most responsive genes to both HAA were downstream targets of the arylhydrocarbon receptor (AhR): CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 after both time points and CYP1B1 and ALDH3A1 after 28 days. Accordingly, CYP1A1/1A2 induction in HAA-treated HepaRG cells was prevented by chemical inhibition or small interference RNA-mediated down-regulation of the AhR. Consistently, HAA induced activity of the CYP1A1 promoter, which contains a consensus AhR-related xenobiotic-responsive element (XRE). In addition, several other genes exhibited both time-dependent and compound-specific expression changes with, however, a smaller magnitude than previously reported for the prototypical AhR target genes. These changes concerned genes mainly related to cell growth and proliferation, apoptosis, and cancer. In conclusion, these results identify the AhR gene battery as the preferential target of PhIP and MeIQx in HepaRG cells and further support the hypothesis that intake of HAA in diet might increase human cancer risk.

  10. Role of zebrafish cytochrome P450 CYP1C genes in the reduced mesencephalic vein blood flow caused by activation of AHR2

    SciTech Connect

    Kubota, Akira; Stegeman, John J.; Woodin, Bruce R.; Iwanaga, Toshihiko; Harano, Ryo; Peterson, Richard E.; Hiraga, Takeo; Teraoka, Hiroki

    2011-06-15

    2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) causes various signs of toxicity in early life stages of vertebrates through activation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR). We previously reported a sensitive and useful endpoint of TCDD developmental toxicity in zebrafish, namely a decrease in blood flow in the dorsal midbrain, but downstream genes involved in the effect are not known. The present study addressed the role of zebrafish cytochrome P450 1C (CYP1C) genes in association with a decrease in mesencephalic vein (MsV) blood flow. The CYP1C subfamily was recently discovered in fish and includes the paralogues CYP1C1 and CYP1C2, both of which are induced via AHR2 in zebrafish embryos. We used morpholino antisense oligonucleotides (MO or morpholino) to block initiation of translation of the target genes. TCDD-induced mRNA expression of CYP1Cs and a decrease in MsV blood flow were both blocked by gene knockdown of AHR2. Gene knockdown of CYP1C1 by two different morpholinos and CYP1C2 by two different morpholinos, but not by their 5 nucleotide-mismatch controls, was effective in blocking reduced MsV blood flow caused by TCDD. The same CYP1C-MOs prevented reduction of blood flow in the MsV caused by {beta}-naphthoflavone (BNF), representing another class of AHR agonists. Whole-mount in situ hybridization revealed that mRNA expression of CYP1C1 and CYP1C2 was induced by TCDD most strongly in branchiogenic primordia and pectoral fin buds. In situ hybridization using head transverse sections showed that TCDD increased the expression of both CYP1Cs in endothelial cells of blood vessels, including the MsV. These results indicate a potential role of CYP1C1 and CYP1C2 in the local circulation failure induced by AHR2 activation in the dorsal midbrain of the zebrafish embryo. - Research Highlights: > We examine the roles of zebrafish CYP1C1 and CYP1C2 in TCDD developmental toxicity. > TCDD induces mRNA expression of both CYP1Cs in the mesencephalic vein. > Knockdown of each

  11. Analysis of the AHR gene proximal promoter GGGGC-repeat polymorphism in lung, breast, and colon cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Spink, Barbara C.; Bloom, Michael S.; Wu, Susan; Sell, Stewart; Schneider, Erasmus; Ding, Xinxin; Spink, David C.

    2015-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) regulates expression of numerous genes, including those of the CYP1 gene family. With the goal of determining factors that control AHR gene expression, our studies are focused on the role of the short tandem repeat polymorphism, (GGGGC){sub n}, located in the proximal promoter of the human AHR gene. When luciferase constructs containing varying GGGGC repeats were transfected into cancer cell lines derived from the lung, colon, and breast, the number of GGGGC repeats affected AHR promoter activity. The number of GGGGC repeats was determined in DNA from 327 humans and from 38 samples representing 5 species of non-human primates. In chimpanzees and 3 species of macaques, only (GGGGC){sub 2} alleles were observed; however, in western gorilla, (GGGGC){sub n} alleles with n = 2, 4, 5, 6, 7, and 8 were identified. In all human populations examined, the frequency of (GGGGC){sub n} was n = 4 > 5 ≫ 2, 6. When frequencies of the (GGGGC){sub n} alleles in DNA from patients with lung, colon, or breast cancer were evaluated, the occurrence of (GGGGC){sub 2} was found to be 8-fold more frequent among lung cancer patients in comparison with its incidence in the general population, as represented by New York State neonates. Analysis of matched tumor and non-tumor DNA samples from the same individuals provided no evidence of microsatellite instability. These studies indicate that the (GGGGC){sub n} short tandem repeats are inherited, and that the (GGGGC){sub 2} allele in the AHR proximal promoter region should be further investigated with regard to its potential association with lung cancer susceptibility. - Highlights: • The AHR proximal promoter contains a polymorphism, (GGGGC){sub n}, where n = 4 > 5 ≫ 2, 6 • Matched tumor and non-tumor DNA did not show (GGGGC){sub n} microsatellite instability • AHR promoter activity of a construct with (GGGGC){sub 2} was lower than that of (GGGGC){sub 4} • The frequency of (GGGGC){sub 2} in lung

  12. Integration of Genome-Wide Computation DRE Search, AhR ChIP-chip and Gene Expression Analyses of TCDD-Elicited Responses in the Mouse Liver

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor (TF) that mediates responses to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). Integration of TCDD-induced genome-wide AhR enrichment, differential gene expression and computational dioxin response element (DRE) analyses further elucidate the hepatic AhR regulatory network. Results Global ChIP-chip and gene expression analyses were performed on hepatic tissue from immature ovariectomized mice orally gavaged with 30 μg/kg TCDD. ChIP-chip analysis identified 14,446 and 974 AhR enriched regions (1% false discovery rate) at 2 and 24 hrs, respectively. Enrichment density was greatest in the proximal promoter, and more specifically, within ± 1.5 kb of a transcriptional start site (TSS). AhR enrichment also occurred distal to a TSS (e.g. intergenic DNA and 3' UTR), extending the potential gene expression regulatory roles of the AhR. Although TF binding site analyses identified over-represented DRE sequences within enriched regions, approximately 50% of all AhR enriched regions lacked a DRE core (5'-GCGTG-3'). Microarray analysis identified 1,896 number of TCDD-responsive genes (|fold change| ≥ 1.5, P1(t) > 0.999). Integrating this gene expression data with our ChIP-chip and DRE analyses only identified 625 differentially expressed genes that involved an AhR interaction at a DRE. Functional annotation analysis of differentially regulated genes associated with AhR enrichment identified overrepresented processes related to fatty acid and lipid metabolism and transport, and xenobiotic metabolism, which are consistent with TCDD-elicited steatosis in the mouse liver. Conclusions Details of the AhR regulatory network have been expanded to include AhR-DNA interactions within intragenic and intergenic genomic regions. Moreover, the AhR can interact with DNA independent of a DRE core suggesting there are alternative mechanisms of AhR-mediated gene regulation. PMID:21762485

  13. Targeted mutagenesis of aryl hydrocarbon receptor 2a and 2b genes in Atlantic killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus).

    PubMed

    Aluru, Neelakanteswar; Karchner, Sibel I; Franks, Diana G; Nacci, Diane; Champlin, Denise; Hahn, Mark E

    2015-01-01

    Understanding molecular mechanisms of toxicity is facilitated by experimental manipulations, such as disruption of function by gene targeting, that are especially challenging in non-standard model species with limited genomic resources. While loss-of-function approaches have included gene knock-down using morpholino-modified oligonucleotides and random mutagenesis using mutagens or retroviruses, more recent approaches include targeted mutagenesis using zinc finger nuclease (ZFN), transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALENs) and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-Cas9 technology. These latter methods provide more accessible opportunities to explore gene function in non-traditional model species. To facilitate evaluation of toxic mechanisms for important categories of aryl hydrocarbon pollutants, whose actions are known to be receptor mediated, we used ZFN and CRISPR-Cas9 approaches to generate aryl hydrocarbon receptor 2a (AHR2a) and AHR2b gene mutations in Atlantic killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus) embryos. This killifish is a particularly valuable non-traditional model, with multiple paralogs of AHR whose functions are not well characterized. In addition, some populations of this species have evolved resistance to toxicants such as halogenated aromatic hydrocarbons. AHR-null killifish will be valuable for characterizing the role of the individual AHR paralogs in evolved resistance, as well as in normal development. We first used five-finger ZFNs targeting exons 1 and 3 of AHR2a. Subsequently, CRISPR-Cas9 guide RNAs were designed to target regions in exon 2 and 3 of AHR2a and AHR2b. We successfully induced frameshift mutations in AHR2a exon 3 with ZFN and CRISPR-Cas9 guide RNAs, with mutation frequencies of 10% and 16%, respectively. In AHR2b, mutations were induced using CRISPR-Cas9 guide RNAs targeting sites in both exon 2 (17%) and exon 3 (63%). We screened AHR2b exon 2 CRISPR-Cas9-injected embryos for off-target

  14. Targeted mutagenesis of aryl hydrocarbon receptor 2a and 2b genes in Atlantic killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus)

    PubMed Central

    Aluru, Neelakanteswar; Karchner, Sibel I.; Franks, Diana G.; Nacci, Diane; Champlin, Denise; Hahn, Mark E.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding molecular mechanisms of toxicity is facilitated by experimental manipulations, such as disruption of function by gene targeting, that are especially challenging in non-standard model species with limited genomic resources. While loss-of-function approaches have included gene knock-down using morpholino-modified oligonucleotides and random mutagenesis using mutagens or retroviruses, more recent approaches include targeted mutagenesis using zinc finger nuclease (ZFN), transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALENs) and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-Cas9 technology. These latter methods provide more accessible opportunities to explore gene function in non-traditional model species. To facilitate evaluations of toxic mechanisms for important categories of aryl hydrocarbon pollutants, whose actions are known to be receptor mediated, we used ZFN and CRISPR-Cas9 approaches to generate aryl hydrocarbon receptor 2a (AHR2a) and AHR2b gene mutations in Atlantic killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus) embryos. This killifish is a particularly valuble non-traditional model for this study, with multiple paralogs of AHR whose functions are not well characterized. In addition, some populations of this species have evolved resistance to toxicants such as halogenated aromatic hydrocarbons. AHR-null killifish will be valuable for characterizing the role of the individual AHR paralogs in evolved resistance, as well as in normal development. We first used five-finger ZFNs targeting exons 1 and 3 of AHR2a. Subsequently, CRISPR-Cas9 guide RNAs were designed to target regions in exon 2 and 3 of AHR2a and AHR2b. We successfully induced frameshift mutations in AHR2a exon 3 with ZFN and CRISPR-Cas9 guide RNAs, with mutation frequencies of 10% and 16%, respectively. In AHR2b, mutations were induced using CRISPR-Cas9 guide RNAs targeting sites in both exon 2 (17%) and exon 3 (63%). We screened AHR2b exon 2 CRISPR-Cas9-injected embryos for

  15. Promoter analysis of TCDD-inducible genes in a thymic epithelial cell line indicates the potential for cell-specific transcription factor crosstalk in the AhR response

    SciTech Connect

    Frericks, Markus; Burgoon, Lyle D.; Zacharewski, Timothy R.; Esser, Charlotte

    2008-10-15

    Activation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR{sup 1}) by 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) elicits severe immunosuppression accompanied by thymic atrophy. Previous evidence suggests that TCDD targets both thymocytes and thymic epithelial cells. The AhR induces cell-specific changes in gene transcription via binding to the dioxin response element DRE; however, the underlying specificity-mechanisms, in particular with regard to the role of promoter element context, and possible transcription factor crosstalk remain poorly understood. Global gene expression in the cortical thymic epithelial cell line ET at 2, 4, and 6 h following 5 nM TCDD exposure resulted in differential regulation of 201 genes. JASPAR and TRANSFAC mapped the statistically over-represented promoter elements in the regulated genes to specific transcription factor binding sites, suggesting a regulatory role in AhR signaling. Over-represented elements included the xenobiotic response element XRE, NF{kappa}B-Rel, HRE, PPAR{gamma}, GR, PAX-4 and estrogen receptor binding sites. Co-treatment experiments with TCDD and CoCl{sub 2}, to induce hypoxia, or TCDD and 17-{beta}-estradiol (E2) indicated crosstalk between AhR and Hif or ER, in agreement with other experimental models. The computational identification of TFBS and the demonstration of interaction confirm their interactions with AhR signaling and suggest that the other over-represented elements may also be important in the immunosuppressive effects elicited by TCDD. In conclusion, we demonstrated the importance of promoter element cooperation in the shaping of a cell-specific AhR response. Our findings regarding the transcriptional changes in cortical epithelial cells are congruent with the well-known thymotoxic TCDD-phenotype, and useful in new hypothesis generation of the role of cortical TECs in TCDD toxicity.

  16. INSIGHTS FROM AHR AND ARNT GENE KNOCKOUT STUDIES REGARDING RESPONSES TO TCDD AND REGULATION OF NORMAL EMBRYONIC DEVELOPMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) and the AhR nuclear translocator (ARNT) are members of the Per-ARNT-Sim (PAS) family of proteins. The AhR binds members of the chemical family that includes dioxins, furans and coplanar polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). A ligand-AhR-ARNT comp...

  17. A constitutive active MAPK/ERK pathway due to BRAFV600E positively regulates AHR pathway in PTC.

    PubMed

    Occhi, Gianluca; Barollo, Susi; Regazzo, Daniela; Bertazza, Loris; Galuppini, Francesca; Guzzardo, Vincenza; Jaffrain-Rea, Marie Lise; Vianello, Federica; Ciato, Denis; Ceccato, Filippo; Watutantrige-Fernando, Sara; Bisognin, Andrea; Bortoluzzi, Stefania; Pennelli, Gianmaria; Boscaro, Marco; Scaroni, Carla; Mian, Caterina

    2015-10-13

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor mediating the toxicity and tumor-promoting properties of dioxin. AHR has been reported to be overexpressed and constitutively active in a variety of solid tumors, but few data are currently available concerning its role in thyroid cancer. In this study we quantitatively explored a series of 51 paired-normal and papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) tissues for AHR-related genes. We identified an increased AHR expression/activity in PTC, independently from its nuclear dimerization partner and repressor but strictly related to a constitutive active MAPK/ERK pathway. The AHR up-regulation followed by an increased expression of AHR target genes was confirmed by a meta-analysis of published microarray data, suggesting a ligand-independent active AHR pathway in PTC. In-vitro studies using a PTC-derived cell line (BCPAP) and HEK293 cells showed that BRAFV600E may directly modulate AHR localization, induce AHR expression and activity in an exogenous ligand-independent manner. The AHR pathway might represent a potential novel therapeutic target for PTC in the clinical practice. PMID:26392334

  18. Polybrominated diphenyl ethers and arylhydrocarbon receptor agonists: Different toxicity and target gene expression.

    PubMed

    Wahl, M; Guenther, R; Yang, L; Bergman, A; Straehle, U; Strack, S; Weiss, C

    2010-10-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) accumulate in the environment and in humans. PBDEs are developmental neurotoxicants, disturb the endocrine system and induce tumors in rodents. However, underlying mechanisms of PBDE toxicity are still insufficiently understood. Some reports demonstrated activation but also inhibition of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) by PBDEs based on expression of its target gene cyp1A1. In the present study, we used different PBDE congeners (BDE47, 99, 153 and 209) and analyzed their effects on AhR signaling in various cell lines and zebrafish embryos. Furthermore, we performed microarray experiments in rat hepatoma cells to compare changes in gene expression induced by either BDE47 or the AhR agonist 2,3,7,8-tetrabromo-dibenzofuran (TBDF). PBDEs did not activate but rather inhibited AhR signaling and specifically induced malformations in zebrafish embryos, which differ from those provoked by AhR agonists. Furthermore, BDE47 and TBDF differentially regulated global gene expression in hepatoma cells. Hence, PBDEs and AhR agonists trigger different toxicity and target gene expression. Several novel target genes of BDE47 and TBDF were identified and verified by RT-PCR. TBDF induced expression of the transcriptional regulators Sim2 and RevErbbeta whereas BDE47 specifically deregulated expression of two subunits of the cytochrome c oxidase complex, cox6a2 and cox4i2, which might be linked to its toxicity. PMID:20566336

  19. Zinc finger transcription factor Slug is a novel target gene of aryl hydrocarbon receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Ikuta, Togo; Kawajiri, Kaname . E-mail: kawajiri@cancer-c.pref.saitama.jp

    2006-11-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor. We previously showed that AhR localizes predominantly in the cytoplasm under high cell densities of a keratinocytes cell line, HaCaT, but accumulates in the nucleus at low cell densities. In the current report, we show that the Slug, which is a member of the snail/slug family of zinc finger transcriptional repressors critical for induction of epithelial-mesenchymal transitions (EMT), is activated transcriptionally in accordance with nuclear accumulation of AhR. By reporter assay of the promoter of the Slug gene, gel shift and chromatin immunoprecipitation analyses showed AhR directly binds to xenobiotic responsive element 5 at - 0.7 kb of the gene. AhR-targeted gene silencing by small interfering RNA duplexes led to the abolishment of not only CYP1A1 but also Slug induction by 3-methycholanthrene. The Slug was co-localized to the AhR at the wound margins of HaCaT cells, where apparent nuclear distribution of AhR and Slug was observed. The induced Slug was associated with reduction of an epithelial marker of cytokeratin-18 and with an increase in the mesenchymal marker, fibronectin. Taken together, these findings suggest that AhR participated in Slug induction, which, in turn, regulates cellular physiology including cell adhesion and migration.

  20. AHR2 knockdown prevents PAH-mediated cardiac toxicity and XRE- and ARE-associated gene induction in zebrafish (Danio rerio)

    SciTech Connect

    Van Tiem, Lindsey A.; Di Giulio, Richard T.

    2011-08-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are ubiquitous environmental contaminants often present in aquatic systems as complex mixtures. Embryonic fish are sensitive to the developmental toxicity of some PAHs, but the exact mechanisms involved in this toxicity are still unknown. This study explored the role of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) in the oxidative stress response of zebrafish to the embryotoxicity of select PAHs. Embryos were exposed to two PAHs, benzo[k]fluoranthene (BkF; a strong AHR agonist) and fluoranthene (FL; a cytochrome P4501A (CYP1A) inhibitor), alone and in combination. CYP1A, CYP1B1, CYP1C1, and redox-responsive genes glutathione s-transferase pi 2 (GSTp2), glutathione peroxidase 1 (GPx1), the glutamate-cysteine ligase catalytic subunit (GCLc), MnSOD and CuZnSOD mRNA expression was examined. CYP1 activity was measured via an in vivo ethoxyresorufin-O-deethlyase (EROD) activity assay, and the area of the pericardium was measured as an index of cardiotoxicity. BkF or FL alone caused no deformities whereas BkF + FL resulted in extreme pericardial effusion. BkF induced CYP activity above controls and co-exposure with FL inhibited this activity. BkF induced expression of all three CYPs, GSTp2, and GCLc. BkF + FL caused greater than additive induction of the three CYPs, GSTp2, GPx1, and GCLc but had no effect on MnSOD or CuZnSOD. AHR2 knockdown protected against the cardiac deformities caused by BkF + FL and significantly inhibited the induction of the CYPs, GSTp2, GPx1, and GCLc after BkF + FL compared to non-injected controls. These results further show the protective role of AHR2 knockdown against cardiotoxic PAHs and the role of AHR2 as a mediator of redox-responsive gene induction. - Research Highlights: > Co-exposure of the PAHs BkF and FL causes cardiotoxicity in zebrafish. > BkF and FL co-exposure upregulates certain XRE- and ARE-associated genes. > AHR2 knockdown prevents the deformities caused by BkF and FL co-exposure. > AHR2

  1. Mixed-ligand copper(II) complexes activate aryl hydrocarbon receptor AhR and induce CYP1A genes expression in human hepatocytes and human cell lines.

    PubMed

    Kubešová, Kateřina; Dořičáková, Aneta; Trávníček, Zdeněk; Dvořák, Zdeněk

    2016-07-25

    The effects of four copper(II) mixed-ligand complexes [Cu(qui1)(L)]NO3·H2O (1-3) and [Cu(qui2)(phen)]NO3 (4), where qui1=2-phenyl-3-hydroxy-4(1H)-quinolinone, Hqui2=2-(4-amino-3,5-dichlorophenyl)-N-propyl-3-hydroxy-4(1H)-quinolinone-7-carboxamide, L=1,10-phenanthroline (phen) (1), 5-methyl-1,10-phenanthroline (mphen) (2), bathophenanthroline (bphen) (3), on transcriptional activities of steroid receptors, nuclear receptors and xenoreceptors have been studied. The complexes (1-4) did not influence basal or ligand-inducible activities of glucocorticoid receptor, androgen receptor, thyroid receptor, pregnane X receptor and vitamin D receptor, as revealed by gene reporter assays. The complexes 1 and 2 dose-dependently induced luciferase activity in stable gene reporter AZ-AhR cell line, and this induction was reverted by resveratrol, indicating involvement of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) in the process. The complexes 1, 2 and 3 induced CYP1A1 mRNA in LS180 cells and CYP1A1/CYP1A2 in human hepatocytes through AhR. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay EMSA showed that the complexes 1 and 2 transformed AhR in its DNA-binding form. Collectively, we demonstrate that the complexes 1 and 2 activate AhR and induce AhR-dependent genes in human hepatocytes and cancer cell lines. In conclusion, the data presented here might be of toxicological importance, regarding the multiple roles of AhR in human physiology and pathophysiology. PMID:27180721

  2. Use of natural AhR ligands as potential therapeutic modalities against inflammatory disorders.

    PubMed

    Busbee, Philip B; Rouse, Michael; Nagarkatti, Mitzi; Nagarkatti, Prakash S

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this review is to discuss research involving ligands for the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) and their role in immunomodulation. While activation of the AhR is well known for its ability to regulate the biochemical and toxic effects of environmental chemicals, more recently an exciting discovery has been made indicating that AhR ligation can also regulate T-cell differentiation, specifically through activation of Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs) and downregulation of the proinflammatory Th17 cells. Such findings have opened new avenues of research on the possibility of targeting the AhR to treat inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. Specifically, this review will discuss the current research involving natural and dietary AhR ligands. In addition, evidence indicating the potential use of these ligands in regulating inflammation in various diseases will be highlighted. The importance of the AhR in immunological processes can be illustrated by expression of this receptor on a majority of immune cell types. In addition, AhR signaling pathways have been reported to influence a number of genes responsible for mediating inflammation and other immune responses. As interest in the AhR and its ligands increases, it seems prudent to consolidate current research on the contributions of these ligands to immune regulation during the course of inflammatory diseases. PMID:23731446

  3. Use of natural AhR ligands as potential therapeutic modalities against inflammatory disorders

    PubMed Central

    Busbee, Philip B; Rouse, Michael; Nagarkatti, Mitzi; Nagarkatti, Prakash S

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this review is to discuss research involving ligands for the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) and their role in immunomodulation. While activation of the AhR is well known for its ability to regulate the biochemical and toxic effects of environmental chemicals, more recently an exciting discovery has been made indicating that AhR ligation can also regulate T-cell differentiation, specifically through activation of Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) and downregulation of the proinflammatory Th17 cells. Such findings have opened new avenues of research on the possibility of targeting the AhR to treat inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. Specifically, this review will discuss the current research involving natural and dietary AhR ligands. In addition, evidence indicating the potential use of these ligands in regulating inflammation in various diseases will be highlighted. The importance of the AhR in immunological processes can be illustrated by expression of this receptor on a majority of immune cell types. In addition, AhR signaling pathways have been reported to influence a number of genes responsible for mediating inflammation and other immune responses. As interest in the AhR and its ligands increases, it seems prudent to consolidate current research on the contributions of these ligands to immune regulation during the course of inflammatory diseases. PMID:23731446

  4. AHR2 knockdown prevents PAH-mediated cardiac toxicity and XRE- and ARE-associated gene induction in zebrafish (Danio rerio)

    PubMed Central

    Van Tiem, Lindsey A.; Di Giulio, Richard T.

    2011-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are ubiquitous environmental contaminants often present in aquatic systems as complex mixtures. Embryonic fish are sensitive to the developmental toxicity of some PAHs, but the exact mechanisms involved in this toxicity are still unknown. This study explored the role of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) in the oxidative stress response of zebrafish to the embryotoxicity of select PAHs. Embryos were exposed to two PAHs, benzo[k]fluoranthene (BkF; a strong AHR agonist) and fluoranthene (FL; a cytochrome P4501A (CYP1A) inhibitor), alone and in combination. CYP1A, CYP1B1, CYP1C1, and redox-responsive genes glutathione s-transferase pi 2 (GSTp2), glutathione peroxidase 1 (GPx1), the glutamate-cysteine ligase catalytic subunit (GCLc), MnSOD and CuZnSOD mRNA expression was examined. CYP1 activity was measured via an in vivo ethoxyresorufin-O-deethlyase (EROD) activity assay, and the area of the pericardium was measured as an index of cardiotoxicity. BkF or FL alone caused no deformities whereas BkF + FL resulted in extreme pericardial effusion. BkF induced CYP activity above controls and co-exposure with FL inhibited this activity. BkF induced expression of all three CYPs, GSTp2, and GCLc. BkF + FL caused greater than additive induction of the three CYPs, GSTp2, GPx1, and GCLc but had no effect on MnSOD or CuZnSOD. AHR2 knockdown protected against the cardiac deformities caused by BkF + FL and significantly inhibited the induction of the CYPs, GSTp2, GPx1 and GCLc after BkF + FL compared to non-injected controls. These results further show the protective role of AHR2 knockdown against cardiotoxic PAHs and the role of AHR2 as a mediator of redox-responsive gene induction. PMID:21600235

  5. TCDD and a Putative Endogenous AhR Ligand, ITE, Elicit the Same Immediate Changes in Gene Expression in Mouse Lung Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Ellen C.; Welle, Stephen L.; Gasiewicz, Thomas A.

    2010-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), a ligand-dependent transcription factor, mediates toxicity of several classes of xenobiotics and also has important physiological roles in differentiation, reproduction, and immunity, although the endogenous ligand(s) mediating these functions is/are as yet unidentified. One candidate endogenous ligand, 2-(1′H-indolo-3′-carbonyl)-thiazole-4-carboxylic acid methyl ester (ITE), is a potent AhR agonist in vitro, activates the murine AhR in vivo, but does not induce toxicity. We hypothesized that ITE and the toxic ligand, 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), may modify transcription of different sets of genes to account for their different toxicity. To test this hypothesis, primary mouse lung fibroblasts were exposed to 0.5μM ITE, 0.2nM TCDD, or vehicle for 4 h, and total gene expression was evaluated using microarrays. After this short-term and low-dose treatment, several hundred genes were changed significantly, and the response to ITE and TCDD was remarkably similar, both qualitatively and quantitatively. Induced gene sets included the expected battery of AhR-dependent xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes, as well as several sets that reflect the inflammatory role of lung fibroblasts. Real time quantitative RT-qPCR assay of several selected genes confirmed these microarray data and further suggested that there may be kinetic differences in expression between ligands. These data suggest that ITE and TCDD elicit an analogous change in AhR conformation such that the initial transcription response is the same. Furthermore, if the difference in toxicity between TCDD and ITE is mediated by differences in gene expression, then it is likely that secondary changes enabled by the persistent TCDD, but not by the shorter lived ITE, are responsible. PMID:19933214

  6. Ahr2-dependence of PCB126 effects on the swim bladder in relation to expression of CYP1 and cox-2 genes in developing zebrafish

    SciTech Connect

    Jönsson, Maria E.; Kubota, Akira; Timme-Laragy, Alicia R.; Woodin, Bruce; Stegeman, John J.

    2012-12-01

    The teleost swim bladder is assumed a homolog of the tetrapod lung. Both swim bladder and lung are developmental targets of persistent aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) agonists; in zebrafish (Danio rerio) the swim bladder fails to inflate with exposure to 3,3′,4,4′,5-pentachlorobiphenyl (PCB126). The mechanism for this effect is unknown, but studies have suggested roles of cytochrome P450 1 (CYP1) and cyclooxygenase 2 (Cox-2) in some Ahr-mediated developmental effects in zebrafish. We determined relationships between swim bladder inflation and CYP1 and Cox-2 mRNA expression in PCB126-exposed zebrafish embryos. We also examined effects on β-catenin dependent transcription, histological effects, and Ahr2 dependence of the effect of PCB126 on swim bladder using morpholinos targeting ahr2. One-day-old embryos were exposed to waterborne PCB126 or carrier (DMSO) for 24 h and then held in clean water until day 4, a normal time for swim bladder inflation. The effects of PCB126 were concentration-dependent with EC{sub 50} values of 1.4 to 2.0 nM for induction of the CYP1s, 3.7 and 5.1 nM (or higher) for cox-2a and cox-2b induction, and 2.5 nM for inhibition of swim bladder inflation. Histological defects included a compaction of the developing bladder. Ahr2-morpholino treatment rescued the effect of PCB126 (5 nM) on swim bladder inflation and blocked induction of CYP1A, cox-2a, and cox-2b. With 2 nM PCB126 approximately 30% of eleutheroembryos failed to inflate the swim bladder, but there was no difference in CYP1 or cox-2 mRNA expression between those embryos and embryos showing inflated swim bladder. Our results indicate that PCB126 blocks swim bladder inflation via an Ahr2-mediated mechanism. This mechanism seems independent of CYP1 or cox-2 mRNA induction but may involve abnormal development of swim bladder cells. -- Highlights: ► PCB126 caused cellular changes in the developing swim bladder. ► Swim bladder inflation was not related to expression of CYP1 or cox

  7. New CYP1 genes in the frog Xenopus (Silurana) tropicalis: Induction patterns and effects of AHR agonists during development

    PubMed Central

    Jönsson, Maria E.; Berg, Cecilia; Goldstone, Jared V.; Stegeman, John J.

    2010-01-01

    The Xenopus tropicalis genome shows a single gene in each of the four cytochrome P450 1 (CYP1) subfamilies that occur in vertebrates, designated as CYP1A, CYP1B1, CYP1C1, and CYP1D1. We cloned the cDNAs of these genes and examined their expression in untreated tadpoles and in tadpoles exposed to waterborne aryl hydrocarbon receptor agonists, 3,3',4,4',5-pentachlorobiphenyl (PCB126), β-naphthoflavone (βNF), or indigo. We also examined the effects of PCB126 on expression of genes involved in stress response, cell proliferation, thyroid homeostasis, and prostaglandin synthesis. PCB126 induced CYP1A, CYP1B1, and CYP1C1 but had little effect on CYP1D1 (77-, 1.7-, 4.6- and 1.4-fold induction versus the control, respectively). βNF induced CYP1A and CYP1C1 (26- and 2.5-fold), while, under conditions used, indigo tended to induce only CYP1A (1.9-fold). The extent of CYP1 induction by PCB126 and βNF was positively correlated to the number of putative dioxin response elements 0–20 kb upstream of the start codons. No morphological effect was observed in tadpoles exposed to 1 nM-10 µM PCB126 at two days post-fertilization (dpf) and screened 20 days later. However, in 14-dpf tadpoles a slight up-regulation of the genes for PCNA, transthyretin, HSC70, Cu-Zn SOD, and Cox-2 was observed two days after exposure to 1 µM PCB126. This study of the full suite of CYP1 genes in an amphibian species reveals gene- and AHR agonist-specific differences in response, as well as a much lower sensitivity to CYP1 induction and short-term toxicity by PCB126 compared with in fish larvae. The single genes in each CYP1 subfamily may make X. tropicalis a useful model for mechanistic studies of CYP1 functions. PMID:20965207

  8. New CYP1 genes in the frog Xenopus (Silurana) tropicalis: Induction patterns and effects of AHR agonists during development

    SciTech Connect

    Joensson, Maria E.; Berg, Cecilia; Goldstone, Jared V.; Stegeman, John J.

    2011-01-15

    The Xenopus tropicalis genome shows a single gene in each of the four cytochrome P450 1 (CYP1) subfamilies that occur in vertebrates, designated as CYP1A, CYP1B1, CYP1C1, and CYP1D1. We cloned the cDNAs of these genes and examined their expression in untreated tadpoles and in tadpoles exposed to waterborne aryl hydrocarbon receptor agonists, 3,3',4,4',5-pentachlorobiphenyl (PCB126), {beta}-naphthoflavone ({beta}NF), or indigo. We also examined the effects of PCB126 on expression of genes involved in stress response, cell proliferation, thyroid homeostasis, and prostaglandin synthesis. PCB126 induced CYP1A, CYP1B1, and CYP1C1 but had little effect on CYP1D1 (77-, 1.7-, 4.6- and 1.4-fold induction versus the control, respectively). {beta}NF induced CYP1A and CYP1C1 (26- and 2.5-fold), while, under conditions used, indigo tended to induce only CYP1A (1.9-fold). The extent of CYP1 induction by PCB126 and {beta}NF was positively correlated to the number of putative dioxin response elements 0-20 kb upstream of the start codons. No morphological effect was observed in tadpoles exposed to 1 nM-10 {mu}M PCB126 at two days post-fertilization (dpf) and screened 20 days later. However, in 14-dpf tadpoles a slight up-regulation of the genes for PCNA, transthyretin, HSC70, Cu-Zn SOD, and Cox-2 was observed two days after exposure to 1 {mu}M PCB126. This study of the full suite of CYP1 genes in an amphibian species reveals gene- and AHR agonist-specific differences in response, as well as a much lower sensitivity to CYP1 induction and short-term toxicity by PCB126 compared with in fish larvae. The single genes in each CYP1 subfamily may make X. tropicalis a useful model for mechanistic studies of CYP1 functions.

  9. Genetic variation at aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) loci in populations of Atlantic killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus) inhabiting polluted and reference habitats

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The non-migratory killifish Fundulus heteroclitus inhabits clean and polluted environments interspersed throughout its range along the Atlantic coast of North America. Several populations of this species have successfully adapted to environments contaminated with toxic aromatic hydrocarbon pollutants such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Previous studies suggest that the mechanism of resistance to these and other “dioxin-like compounds” (DLCs) may involve reduced signaling through the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) pathway. Here we investigated gene diversity and evidence for positive selection at three AHR-related loci (AHR1, AHR2, AHRR) in F. heteroclitus by comparing alleles from seven locations ranging over 600 km along the northeastern US, including extremely polluted and reference estuaries, with a focus on New Bedford Harbor (MA, USA), a PCB Superfund site, and nearby reference sites. Results We identified 98 single nucleotide polymorphisms within three AHR-related loci among all populations, including synonymous and nonsynonymous substitutions. Haplotype distributions were spatially segregated and F-statistics suggested strong population genetic structure at these loci, consistent with previous studies showing strong population genetic structure at other F. heteroclitus loci. Genetic diversity at these three loci was not significantly different in contaminated sites as compared to reference sites. However, for AHR2 the New Bedford Harbor population had significant FST values in comparison to the nearest reference populations. Tests for positive selection revealed ten nonsynonymous polymorphisms in AHR1 and four in AHR2. Four nonsynonymous SNPs in AHR1 and three in AHR2 showed large differences in base frequency between New Bedford Harbor and its reference site. Tests for isolation-by-distance revealed evidence for non-neutral change at the AHR2 locus. Conclusion Together, these data suggest that F. heteroclitus populations in reference

  10. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) transcription factor regulates megakaryocytic polyploidization

    PubMed Central

    Lindsey, Stephan; T. Papoutsakis, Eleftherios

    2012-01-01

    Summary We propose that the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) is a novel transcriptional regulator of megakaryopoietic polyploidization. Functional evidence was obtained that AHR impacts in vivo megakaryocytic differentiation and maturation; compared to wild-type mice, AHR-null mice had lower platelet counts, fewer numbers of newly synthesized platelets, increased bleeding times and lower-ploidy megakaryocytes (Mks). AHR mRNA increased 3·6-fold during ex vivo megakaryocytic differentiation, but reduced or remained constant during parallel isogenic granulocytic or erythroid differentiation. We interrogated the role of AHR in megakaryopoiesis using a validated Mk model of megakaryopoiesis, the human megakaryoblastic leukaemia CHRF cell line. Upon CHRF Mk differentiation, AHR mRNA and protein levels increased, AHR protein shifted from the cytoplasm to the nucleus and AHR binding to its consensus DNA binding sequence increased. Protein and mRNA levels of the AHR transcriptional target HES1 also increased. Mk differentiation of CHRF cells where AHR or HES1 was knocked-down using RNAi resulted in lower ploidy distributions and cells that were incapable of reaching ploidy classes ≥16n. AHR knockdown also resulted in increased DNA synthesis of lower ploidy cells, without impacting apoptosis. Together, these data support a role for AHR in Mk polyploidization and in vivo platelet function, and warrant further detailed investigations. PMID:21226706

  11. Cytochrome P4501A induction in avian hepatocyte cultures exposed to polychlorinated biphenyls: Comparisons with AHR1-mediated reporter gene activity and in ovo toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Manning, Gillian E.; Mundy, Lukas J.; Crump, Doug; Jones, Stephanie P.; Chiu, Suzanne; Klein, Jeff; Konstantinov, Alex; Potter, Dave; Kennedy, Sean W.

    2013-01-01

    Avian-specific toxic equivalency factors (TEFs) were developed by the World Health Organization to simplify environmental risk assessments of dioxin-like compounds (DLCs), but TEFs do not account for differences in the toxic and biochemical potencies of DLCs among species of birds. Such variability may be due to differences in species sensitivity to individual DLCs. The sensitivity of avian species to DLCs was recently associated with the identity of amino acids 324 and 380 in the aryl hydrocarbon receptor 1 (AHR1) ligand binding domain. A luciferase reporter gene (LRG) assay, measuring AHR1-mediated induction of a cytochrome P450 1A5 (CYP1A5) reporter gene, in combination with a species' AHR1 ligand binding domain sequence, were also shown to predict avian species sensitivity to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and PCB relative potency in a given species. The goals of the present study were to (1) characterize the concentration-dependent effects of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin and PCBs 126, 77, 105 and 118 on induction of ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase (EROD) activity and CYP1A4/5 mRNA in chicken, ring-necked pheasant and Japanese quail embryo hepatocytes and (2) compare these in vitro results to those previously generated by the LRG assay and in ovo toxicity studies. EROD activity and CYP1A4/5 mRNA expression data support and complement the findings of the LRG assay. CYP1A enzyme activity and mRNA expression were significantly correlated both with luciferase activity and in ovo toxicity induced by PCBs. Relative potency values were generally similar between the LRG and EROD assays and indicate that the relative potency of some PCBs may differ among species. -- Highlights: ► The chicken isn't the most sensitive species to CYP1A induction by PCB 105 and 118. ► The relative potency of PCBs differs between avian species. ► EROD activity was correlated with luciferase activity from the LRG assay. ► EROD activity was a better predictor of toxicity than CYP

  12. Toxic effects of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) in developing red seabream (Pagrus major) embryo: an association of morphological deformities with AHR1, AHR2 and CYP1A expressions.

    PubMed

    Yamauchi, Masanobu; Kim, Eun-Young; Iwata, Hisato; Shima, Yasuhiro; Tanabe, Shinsuke

    2006-11-16

    The toxicity of dioxins such as 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) is mainly mediated by the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR), which regulates the multiple target genes including cytochrome P4501A (CYP1A). In general, bony fishes, which possess at least two distinct AHRs are one of the most sensitive vertebrates to TCDD in early life stage. However, the physiological and toxicological roles of piscine multiple AHRs are not fully understood, especially in marine fish. To understand which AHR is responsible for TCDD toxicity in a marine fish species, we characterized the early life stage toxicity related to the expression of AHRs and CYP1A in red seabream (Pagrus major). The embryos at 10h post-fertilization (hpf) were treated with 0-100 microg/L TCDD for 80 min waterborne exposure. TCDD dose-dependently elicited developmental toxicities including mortality, yolk sac edema, retarded body growth, spinal deformity, reduced heart rate, shortened snout, underdeveloped fin, heart, and lower jaw. Intriguingly, hemorrhage and pericardium edema, typical TCDD developmental defects noticed in other fish species, were not found in red seabream until test termination. The EC(egg)50s for yolk sac edema, underdeveloped fin, and spinal deformity were 170, 240, and 340 pg/g, respectively. The LC(egg)50 was 360 pg/g embryo, indicating that this species is one of the most sensitive fishes to TCDD toxicity. The expression levels of rsAHR1, rsAHR2 and CYP1A mRNAs were also determined in different developmental stages. The rsAHR2 mRNA expression dose-dependently increased following TCDD exposure, while rsAHR1 mRNA level was not altered. Level of rsAHR2 mRNA measured by two-step real-time PCR was 30 times higher than rsAHR1 in embryos treated with the highest dose. Temporal patterns of rsAHR2 and CYP1A mRNAs were similar in TCDD-treated embryos, representing a significant positive correlation between rsAHR2 and CYP1A mRNA levels, but not between rsAHR1 and CYP1A. In comparison of

  13. Differential effects of mercury, lead and copper on the constitutive and inducible expression of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR)-regulated genes in cultured hepatoma Hepa 1c1c7 cells.

    PubMed

    Korashy, Hesham M; El-Kadi, Ayman O S

    2004-09-01

    Both simultaneous and sequential exposure to heavy metals and aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR)-ligands potentially occur in human populations, yet there have been relatively few studies of combined effects of heavy metals and AHR-ligands on AHR-regulated genes. To investigate the effects of heavy metals on AHR-regulated genes; cytochrome P450 1a1 (cyp1a1), NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase (QOR) and glutathione S-transferase Ya (GST Ya), murine hepatoma Hepa 1c1c7 cells were incubated with increasing concentrations of Hg2+ (2.5-10 microM), Pb2+ (10-100 microM), and Cu2+ (1-100 microM) alone or with the AHR-ligand, 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (0.1 nM), 3-methylcholanthrene (0.25 microM), beta-naphthoflavone (10 microM), or benzo[a]pyrene (1 microM). The results clearly showed that metals alone did not significantly alter the cyp1a1 activity and protein levels but increased its mRNA expression, whereas a significant reduction in AHR ligand-mediated induction of cyp1a1 activity was observed by all metals. The decrease in cyp1a1 activity was associated with an increase, no change, or decrease in cyp1a1 mRNA and protein levels by Hg2+, Pb2+ and Cu2+ respectively, suggesting pre- and post-transcription mechanisms are involved. With respect to QOR, the activity and mRNA levels were increased by all metals in the absence or presence of an AHR-ligand, with the exception of Cu2+ which significantly decreased the induction of QOR. Differently, GST Ya activity was significantly increased by Cu2+ and Pb2+ and inhibited by Hg2+, while its mRNA was increased by Hg2+ and Pb2+ and decreased by Cu2+. All metals significantly increased the expression of heme oxygenase-1, which coincided with the changes in the phase I and phase II enzyme activities. These results demonstrate that heavy metals differentially modulate the constitutive and the inducible expression of AHR-regulated genes. PMID:15297030

  14. Coordinated Regulation of Hepatic Phase I and II Drug-Metabolizing Genes and Transporters using AhR-, CAR-, PXR-, PPARα-, and Nrf2-Null Mice

    PubMed Central

    Aleksunes, Lauren M.

    2012-01-01

    The transcription factors aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), constitutive androstane receptor (CAR), pregnane X receptor (PXR), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα), and nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) regulate genes encoding drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters in livers of mice after chemical activation. However, the specificity of their transcriptional regulation has not been determined systematically in vivo. The purpose of this study was to identify genes encoding drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters altered by chemical activators in a transcription factor-dependent manner using wild-type and transcription factor-null mice. Chemical activators were administered intraperitoneally to mice once daily for 4 days. Livers were collected 24 h after the final dose, and total RNA was isolated for mRNA quantification of cytochromes P450, NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductase 1 (Nqo1), aldehyde dehydrogenases (Aldhs), glutathione transferases (Gsts), sulfotransferases (Sults), UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (Ugts), organic anion-transporting polypeptides (Oatps), and multidrug resistance-associated proteins (Mrps). Pharmacological activation of each transcription factor leads to mRNA induction of drug metabolic and transport genes in livers of male and female wild-type mice, but no change in null mice: AhR (Cyp1a2, Nqo1, Aldh7a1, Ugt1a1, Ugt1a6, Ugt1a9, Ugt2b35, Sult5a1, Gstm3, and Mrp4), CAR (Cyp2b10, Aldh1a1, Aldh1a7, Ugt1a1, Ugt2b34, Sult1e1, Sult3a1, Sult5a1, Papps2, Gstt1, Gsta1, Gsta4, Gstm1–4, and Mrp2–4), PXR (Cyp3a11, Ugt1a1, Ugt1a5, Ugt1a9, Gsta1, Gstm1–m3, Oatp1a4, and Mrp3), PPARα (Cyp4a14, Aldh1a1, mGst3, Gstm4, and Mrp4), and Nrf2 (Nqo1, Aldh1a1, Gsta1, Gsta4, Gstm1–m4, mGst3, and Mrp3–4). Taken together, these data reveal transcription factor specificity and overlap in regulating hepatic drug disposition genes by chemical activators. Coordinated regulation of phase I, phase II, and transport genes by

  15. Constitutive IDO expression in human cancer is sustained by an autocrine signaling loop involving IL-6, STAT3 and the AHR.

    PubMed

    Litzenburger, Ulrike M; Opitz, Christiane A; Sahm, Felix; Rauschenbach, Katharina J; Trump, Saskia; Winter, Marcus; Ott, Martina; Ochs, Katharina; Lutz, Christian; Liu, Xiangdong; Anastasov, Natasa; Lehmann, Irina; Höfer, Thomas; von Deimling, Andreas; Wick, Wolfgang; Platten, Michael

    2014-02-28

    Indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) inhibitors have entered clinical trials based on their ability to restore anti-tumor immunity in preclinical studies. However, the mechanisms leading to constitutive expression of IDO in human tumors are largely unknown. Here we analyzed the pathways mediating constitutive IDO expression in human cancer. IDO-positive tumor cells and tissues showed basal phosphorylation and acetylation of STAT3 as evidenced by western blotting and immunoprecipitation. Inhibition of IL-6 or STAT3 using siRNA and/or pharmacological inhibitors reduced IDO mRNA and protein expression as well as kynurenine formation. In turn, IDO enzymatic activity activated the AHR as shown by the induction of AHR target genes. IDO-mediated AHR activation induced IL-6 expression, while inhibition or knockdown of the AHR reduced IL-6 expression. IDO activity thus sustains its own expression via an autocrine AHR-IL-6-STAT3 signaling loop. Inhibition of the AHR-IL-6-STAT3 signaling loop restored T-cell proliferation in mixed leukocyte reactions performed in the presence of IDO-expressing human cancer cells. Identification of the IDO-AHR-IL-6-STAT3 signaling loop maintaining IDO expression in human cancers reveals novel therapeutic targets for the inhibition of this core pathway promoting immunosuppression of human cancers. The relevance of the IDO-AHR-IL-6-STAT3 transcriptional circuit is underscored by the finding that high expression of its members IDO, STAT3 and the AHR target gene CYP1B1 is associated with reduced relapse-free survival in lung cancer patients. PMID:24657910

  16. EGCG protects endothelial cells against PCB 126-induced inflammation through inhibition of AhR and induction of Nrf2-regulated genes

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Sung Gu; Han, Seong-Su; Toborek, Michal; Hennig, Bernhard

    2012-06-01

    Tea flavonoids such as epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) protect against vascular diseases such as atherosclerosis via their antioxidant and anti-inflammatory functions. Persistent and widespread environmental pollutants, including polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB), can induce oxidative stress and inflammation in vascular endothelial cells. Even though PCBs are no longer produced, they are still detected in human blood and tissues and thus considered a risk for vascular dysfunction. We hypothesized that EGCG can protect endothelial cells against PCB-induced cell damage via its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. To test this hypothesis, primary vascular endothelial cells were pretreated with EGCG, followed by exposure to the coplanar PCB 126. Exposure to PCB 126 significantly increased cytochrome P450 1A1 (Cyp1A1) mRNA and protein expression and superoxide production, events which were significantly attenuated following pretreatment with EGCG. Similarly, EGCG also reduced DNA binding of NF-κB and downstream expression of inflammatory markers such as monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) and vascular cell adhesion protein-1 (VCAM-1) after PCB exposure. Furthermore, EGCG decreased endogenous or base-line levels of Cyp1A1, MCP-1 and VCAM-1 in endothelial cells. Most of all, treatment of EGCG upregulated expression of NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)-controlled antioxidant genes, including glutathione S transferase (GST) and NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1), in a dose-dependent manner. In contrast, silencing of Nrf2 increased Cyp1A1, MCP-1 and VCAM-1 and decreased GST and NQO1 expression, respectively. These data suggest that EGCG can inhibit AhR regulated genes and induce Nrf2-regulated antioxidant enzymes, thus providing protection against PCB-induced inflammatory responses in endothelial cells. -- Highlights: ► PCBs cause endothelial inflammation and subsequent atherosclerosis. ► Nutrition can modulate toxicity by environmental pollutants. ► We

  17. Identification of aryl hydrocarbon receptor binding targets in mouse hepatic tissue treated with 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin

    SciTech Connect

    Lo, Raymond; Celius, Trine; Forgacs, Agnes L.; Dere, Edward; MacPherson, Laura; Harper, Patricia; Zacharewski, Timothy; Matthews, Jason

    2011-11-15

    Genome-wide, promoter-focused ChIP-chip analysis of hepatic aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) binding sites was conducted in 8-week old female C57BL/6 treated with 30 {mu}g/kg/body weight 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) for 2 h and 24 h. These studies identified 1642 and 508 AHR-bound regions at 2 h and 24 h, respectively. A total of 430 AHR-bound regions were common between the two time points, corresponding to 403 unique genes. Comparison with previous AHR ChIP-chip studies in mouse hepatoma cells revealed that only 62 of the putative target genes overlapped with the 2 h AHR-bound regions in vivo. Transcription factor binding site analysis revealed an over-representation of aryl hydrocarbon response elements (AHREs) in AHR-bound regions with 53% (2 h) and 68% (24 h) of them containing at least one AHRE. In addition to AHREs, E2f-Myc activator motifs previously implicated in AHR function, as well as a number of other motifs, including Sp1, nuclear receptor subfamily 2 factor, and early growth response factor motifs were also identified. Expression microarray studies identified 133 unique genes differentially regulated after 4 h treatment with TCDD. Of which, 39 were identified as AHR-bound genes at 2 h. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis on the 39 AHR-bound TCDD responsive genes identified potential perturbation in biological processes such as lipid metabolism, drug metabolism, and endocrine system development as a result of TCDD-mediated AHR activation. Our findings identify direct AHR target genes in vivo, highlight in vitro and in vivo differences in AHR signaling and show that AHR recruitment does not necessarily result in changes in target gene expression. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ChIP-chip analysis of hepatic AHR binding after 2 h and 24 h of TCDD. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We identified 1642 and 508 AHR-bound regions at 2 h and 24 h. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 430 regions were common to both time points and highly enriched with

  18. Association of polymorphisms in AhR, CYP1A1, GSTM1, and GSTT1 genes with levels of DNA damage in peripheral blood lymphocytes among coke-oven workers

    SciTech Connect

    Yongwen Chen; Yun Bai; Jing Yuan; Weihong Chen; Jianya Sun; Hong Wang; Huashan Liang; Liang Guo; Xiaobo Yang; Hao Tan; Yougong Su; Qingyi Wei; Tangchun Wu

    2006-09-15

    Accumulating evidence has shown that both DNA damage caused by the metabolites of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and genetic polymorphisms in PAH-metabolic genes contribute to individual susceptibility to PAH-induced carcinogenesis. However, the functional relevance of genetic polymorphisms in PAH-metabolic genes in exposed individuals is still unclear. In this study of 240 coke-oven workers (the exposed group) and 123 non-coke-oven workers (the control group), we genotyped for polymorphisms in the AhR, CYP1A1, GSTM1, and GSTT1 genes by PCR methods, and determined the levels of DNA damage in peripheral blood lymphocytes using the alkaline comet assay. It was found that the ln-transformed Olive tail moment (Olive TM) values in the exposed group were significantly higher than those in the control group. Furthermore, in the exposed group, the Olive TM values in subjects with the AhR Lys{sup 554} variant genotype were higher than those with the AhR Arg{sup 554}/Arg{sup 554} genotype. Similarly, the Olive TM values in the non-coke-oven workers with the CYP1A1 MspI CC + CT genotype were lower than the values of those with the CYP1A1 MspI TT genotype. However, these differences were not evident for GSTM1 and GSTT1. These results suggested that the polymorphism of AhR might modulate the effects of PAHs in the exposed group; however, the underlying molecular mechanisms by which this polymorphism may have affected the levels of PAH-induced DNA damage warrant further investigation.

  19. Gene targeting with retroviral vectors

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, J.; Bernstein, A. )

    1989-04-01

    The authors have designed and constructed integration-defective retroviral vectors to explore their potential for gene targeting in mammalian cells. Two nonoverlapping deletion mutants of the bacterial neomycin resistance (neo) gene were used to detect homologous recombination events between viral and chromosomal sequences. Stable neo gene correction events were selected at a frequency of approximately 1 G418/sup r/ cell per 3 x 10/sup 6/ infected cells. Analysis of the functional neo gene in independent targeted cell clones indicated that unintegrated retroviral linear DNA recombined with the target by gene conversion for variable distances into regions of nonhomology. In addition, transient neo gene correction events which were associated with the complete loss of the chromosomal target sequences were observed. These results demonstrated that retroviral vectors can recombine with homologous chromosomal sequences in rodent and human cells.

  20. Differential Proteomics Analysis Reveals a Role for E2F2 in the Regulation of the Ahr Pathway in T Lymphocytes§

    PubMed Central

    Azkargorta, Mikel; Fullaondo, Asier; Laresgoiti, Usua; Aloria, Kerman; Infante, Arantza; Arizmendi, Jesus M.; Zubiaga, Ana M.

    2010-01-01

    E2F transcription factors (E2F1-8) are best known for their role in cell proliferation, although it is clear that they regulate many other biological processes through the transcriptional modulation of distinct target genes. However, the specific set of genes regulated by each E2F remains to be characterized. To gain insight into the molecular pathways regulated by E2F2, we have analyzed the proteome of antigen receptor–activated T cells lacking E2F2. We report that loss of E2F2 results in a deregulated Aryl-hydrocarbon-receptor pathway. Proliferating E2F2−/− T lymphocytes expressed significantly higher levels of Aip, Ahr, and Arnt relative to wild-type (WT)1 controls. The mechanism for increased levels of Aip appears straightforward, involving direct regulation of the Aip gene promoter by E2F2. Although the Ahr and Arnt promoters also bind E2F2, their regulation appears to be more complex. Nevertheless, exposure to the environmental xenobiotic 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), a well-known exogenous ligand of the Ahr pathway, led to overexpression of the Ahr target gene Cyp1a1, and to increased sensitivity to TCDD-triggered apoptosis in E2F2−/− T cells compared with WT controls. These results suggest that E2F2 modulates cellular sensitivity to xenobiotic signals through the negative regulation of the Ahr pathway. PMID:20573986

  1. Biological effects of 6-formylindolo[3,2-b]carbazole (FICZ) in vivo are enhanced by loss of CYP1A function in an Ahr2-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Wincent, Emma; Kubota, Akira; Timme-Laragy, Alicia; Jönsson, Maria E; Hahn, Mark E; Stegeman, John J

    2016-06-15

    6-Formylindolo[3,2-b]carbazole (FICZ) is a potent aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) agonist that is efficiently metabolized by AHR-regulated cytochrome P4501 enzymes. FICZ is a proposed physiological AHR ligand that induces its own degradation as part of a regulatory negative feedback loop. In vitro studies in cells show that CYP1 inhibition in the presence of FICZ results in enhanced AHR activation, suggesting that FICZ accumulates in the cell when its metabolism is blocked. We used zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos to investigate the in vivo effects of FICZ when CYP1A is knocked down or inhibited. Embryos were injected with morpholino antisense oligonucleotides targeting CYP1A (CYP1A-MO), Ahr2, or a combination of both. FICZ exposure of non-injected embryos or embryos injected with control morpholino had little effect. In CYP1A-MO-injected embryos, however, FICZ dramatically increased mortality, incidence and severity of pericardial edema and circulation failure, reduced hatching frequency, blocked swim bladder inflation, and strongly potentiated expression of Ahr2-regulated genes. These effects were substantially reduced in embryos with a combined knockdown of Ahr2 and CYP1A, indicating that the toxicity was mediated at least partly by Ahr2. Co-exposure to the CYP1 inhibitor alpha-naphthoflavone (αNF) and FICZ had similar effects as the combination of CYP1A-MO and FICZ. HPLC analysis of FICZ-exposed embryos showed increased levels of FICZ after concomitant CYP1A-MO injection or αNF co-exposure. Together, these results show that a functioning CYP1/AHR feedback loop is crucial for regulation of AHR signaling by a potential physiological ligand in vivo and further highlights the role of CYP1 enzymes in regulating biological effects of FICZ. PMID:27112072

  2. Molecular and functional characterization of a novel aryl hydrocarbon receptor isoform, AHR1β, in the chicken (Gallus gallus).

    PubMed

    Lee, Jin-Seon; Iwabuchi, Kohei; Nomaru, Koji; Nagahama, Nobumasa; Kim, Eun-Young; Iwata, Hisato

    2013-12-01

    Dioxins including 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) cause toxic effects through activation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR)-mediated signaling pathway. Our previous studies have investigated the function of 2 AHR isoforms (AHR1 and AHR2) in avian species and identified a third AHR in the chicken (Gallus gallus) genome. Knowledge of multiple avian AHRs is indispensable to understand molecular mechanisms of AHR-mediated toxic effects and establish risk assessment framework for environmental AHR ligands in avian species. In this study, we successfully isolated a third novel AHR1-like cDNA from chicken and designated it as chicken AHR1 beta (ckAHR1β). The mRNA expression of ckAHR1β was primarily detected in the liver, and the hepatic protein expression was confirmed by Western blotting. Although mRNA expression of ckAHR1β was not altered by in ovo TCDD exposure, ckAHR1β exhibited specific binding to [(3)H]TCDD, TCDD-dependent nuclear translocation, and interaction with xenobiotic responsive elements (XREs) and AHR nuclear translocators (ARNTs). In vitro XRE-driven reporter gene assays revealed ckAHR1β-mediated transactivation of TCDD in a dose-dependent manner, showing a 10-fold reduced sensitivity (high EC50) compared with that mediated by ckAHR1. The mutation of Val(371) to Ser(371) in the ligand-binding domain of ckAHR1β shifted the TCDD-EC50 toward the value observed in ckAHR1, indicating the critical roles of the amino acid in sensitivity. Furthermore, ckAHR1β-mediated transactivation of TCDD was enhanced by 17β-estradiol (E2)-activated chicken estrogen receptor α (ckERα), suggesting a positive cross talk between ckERα and ckAHR1β signaling pathway. Both TCDD-induced and its enhanced activities by E2 were suppressed by the ckAHR repressor in a manner similar to ckAHR1. Collectively, our findings discover the role of ckAHR1β in dioxin toxicity and give an insight into the evolutionary history of the AHR signaling pathway. PMID:23997109

  3. ROLE OF THE ARYL HYDROCARBON RECEPTOR (AHR) IN LUNG INFLAMMATION1

    PubMed Central

    Beamer, Celine A.; Shepherd, David M.

    2013-01-01

    Millions of individuals worldwide are afflicted with acute and chronic respiratory diseases, causing temporary and permanent disabilities and even death. Oftentimes, these diseases occur as a result of altered immune responses. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), a ligand-activated transcription factor, acts as a regulator of mucosal barrier function and may influence immune responsiveness in the lungs through changes in gene expression, cell-cell adhesion, mucin production, and cytokine expression. This review updates the basic immunobiology of the AhR signaling pathway with regards to inflammatory lung diseases such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder, and silicosis following data in rodent models and humans. Finally, we address the therapeutic potential of targeting the in regulating inflammation during acute and chronic respiratory diseases. PMID:23963493

  4. Search for Basonuclin Target Genes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Junwen; Zhang, Shengliang; Schultz, Richard M.; Tseng, Hung

    2006-01-01

    Basonuclin (Bnc 1) is a transcription factor that has an unusual ability to interact with promoters of both RNA polymerases I and II. The action of basonuclin is mediated through three pairs of evolutionarily conserved zinc fingers, which produce three DNase I footprints on the promoters of rDNA and the basonuclin gene. Using these DNase footprints, we built a computational model for the basonuclin DNA-binding module, which was used to identify in silico potential RNA polymerase II target genes in the human and mouse promoter databases. The target genes of basonuclin show that it regulates the expression of proteins involved in chromatin structure, transcription/DNA-binding, ion-channels, adhesion/cell-cell junction, signal transduction and intracellular transport. Our results suggest that basonuclin, like MYC, may coordinate transcriptional activities among the three RNA polymerases. But basonuclin regulates a distinctive set of pathways, which differ from that regulated by MYC. PMID:16919236

  5. Targeted gene flow for conservation.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Ella; Phillips, Ben L

    2016-04-01

    Anthropogenic threats often impose strong selection on affected populations, causing rapid evolutionary responses. Unfortunately, these adaptive responses are rarely harnessed for conservation. We suggest that conservation managers pay close attention to adaptive processes and geographic variation, with an eye to using them for conservation goals. Translocating pre-adapted individuals into recipient populations is currently considered a potentially important management tool in the face of climate change. Targeted gene flow, which involves moving individuals with favorable traits to areas where these traits would have a conservation benefit, could have a much broader application in conservation. Across a species' range there may be long-standing geographic variation in traits or variation may have rapidly developed in response to a threatening process. Targeted gene flow could be used to promote natural resistance to threats to increase species resilience. We suggest that targeted gene flow is a currently underappreciated strategy in conservation that has applications ranging from the management of invasive species and their impacts to controlling the impact and virulence of pathogens. PMID:26332195

  6. Behavioral Rhythmicity of Mice Lacking AhR and Attenuation of Light-induced Phase Shift by 2,3,7,8-Tetracholordibenzo-p-dioxin

    PubMed Central

    Mukai, Motoko; Lin, Tien-Min; Peterson, Richard E.; Cooke, Paul S.; Tischkau, Shelley A.

    2008-01-01

    Transcription factors belonging to the Per/Arnt/Sim (PAS) domain family are highly conserved and many are involved in circadian rhythm regulation. One member of this family, aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), is an orphan receptor whose physiological role is unknown. Recent findings have led to the hypothesis that AhR has a role in circadian rhythm, which is the focus of the present investigation. First, time-of-day dependent mRNA expression of AhR and its signaling target, cytochrome p4501A1 (Cyp1a1) was determined in C57BL/6J mice by quantitative RT-PCR. Circadian expression of AhR and Cyp1a1 was observed both in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) and liver. Next, the circadian phenotype of mice lacking AhR (AhRKO) was investigated using behavioral monitoring. Intact AhRKO mice had robust circadian rhythmicity with a similar tau under constant conditions compared to wild-type mice, but a significant difference in tau was observed between genotypes in ovariectomized female mice. Time to re-entrainment following 6-h advances or delays of the light/dark cycle was not significantly different between genotypes. However, mice exposed to the AhR agonist 2,3,7,8-tetracholorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD, 1 μg/kg BW) displayed decreased phase shifts in response to light and had altered expression of Per1 and Bmal1. These results suggest that chronic activation of AhR may affect the ability of the circadian timekeeping system to adjust to alterations in environmental lighting by affecting canonical clock genes. Further studies are necessary to decipher the mechanism of how AhR agonists could disrupt light-induced phase shifts. If AhR does have a role in circadian rhythm, it may share redundant roles with other PAS domain proteins and/or the role of AhR may not be exhibited in the behavioral activity rhythm, but could be important elsewhere in the peripheral circadian system. PMID:18487412

  7. Down regulation of hepatic PPARalpha function by AhR ligand.

    PubMed

    Shaban, Zein; El-Shazly, Samir; Abdelhady, Shawky; Fattouh, Ibrahim; Muzandu, Kaampwe; Ishizuka, Mayumi; Kimura, Kazuhiro; Kazusaka, Akio; Fujita, Shoichi

    2004-11-01

    Aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor that mediates a spectrum of toxic and biological effects of 2,3,7,8-tetrachloro dibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) and related compounds. Peroxisome proliferator activated receptor alpha (PPARalpha) is a nuclear receptor involved in the maintenance of lipid and glucose homeostasis. In this study we hypothesized that one of the possible mechanisms for the effect of TCDD and its related chemicals on fat metabolism could be through down regulation of PPARalpha functions. We treated Wistar rats with an AhR ligand, Sudan III (S.III), and/or PPARalpha ligand, Clofibric Acid (CA), for 3 days. We analysed the expression of one of the PPARalpha-target gene products, CYP4A protein and its mRNA. We also tested HepG2 cells with the afore-mentioned treatments and evaluated their effects on PPARalpha and RXRalpha protein. Treatment of Wistar rats with S.III was found to down regulates CYP4A protein expression and reduced its induction with CA. It also decreased mRNA expressions of CYP4A1, CYP4A2, CYP4A3 and PPARalpha. In HepG2 cells, PPARalpha and RXRalpha protein expression was decreased by S.III treatment in a dose dependent manner. Our results suggest that AhR has an inhibitory effect on PPARalpha function and a new pathway by which AhR ligands could disturb lipid metabolism. PMID:15585952

  8. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor-mediated disruption of vitellogenin synthesis in the fish liver: Cross-talk between AHR- and ERα-signalling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Bemanian, Vahid; Male, Rune; Goksøyr, Anders

    2004-01-01

    Background In the fish liver, the synthesis of egg yolk protein precursor vitellogenin (VTG) is under control of the estrogen receptor alpha (ERα). Environmental contaminants such as 2,3,7,8-tetrachloro-dibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) are suspected to have antiestrogenic effects. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) is the initial cellular target for TCDD and related compounds. The AHR is a ligand-activated transcription factor that stimulates the expression of the genes encoding xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes, such as cytochrome P450 1A (CYP1A). In this study, the effects of activation of AHR on the hepatic expression of VTG and ERα genes, in primary cultured salmon hepatocytes, have been investigated. Results The expression of the genes encoding VTG and ERα were strongly induced by 17β-estradiol (E2). However, the expression of VTG was disrupted by exposure of the cells to TCDD while CYP1A expression was enhanced. The effect of TCDD on VTG and CYP1A expression was annulled by the AHR-inhibitor α-naphthoflavone. Furthermore, exposure of the cells to TCDD abolished E2-induced accumulation of ERα mRNA. The AHR-mediated inhibitory effects on the expression of the VTG and ERα genes may occur at transcriptional and/or post-transcriptional levels. Nuclear run-off experiments revealed that simultaneous exposure of the cells to E2 and TCDD strongly inhibited the initiation of transcription of the VTG and ERα genes. In addition, inhibition of RNA synthesis by actinomycin D treatment showed that post-transcriptional levels of VTG and ERα mRNAs were not significantly altered upon treatment of the cells with TCDD. These results suggested that activation of AHR may inhibit the transactivation capacity of the ERα. Further, electrophoretic mobility shift assays using nuclear extracts prepared from cells treated for one or two hours with E2, alone or in mixture with TCDD, showed a strong reduction in the DNA binding activities upon TCDD treatment. These results also suggested

  9. Genome-wide RNAi high-throughput screen identifies proteins necessary for the AHR-dependent induction of CYP1A1 by 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin.

    PubMed

    Solaimani, Parrisa; Damoiseaux, Robert; Hankinson, Oliver

    2013-11-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) has a plethora of physiological roles, and upon dysregulation, carcinogenesis can occur. One target gene of AHR encodes the xenobiotic and drug-metabolizing enzyme CYP1A1, which is inducible by the environmental contaminant 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) via the AHR. An siRNA library targeted against over 5600 gene candidates in the druggable genome was used to transfect mouse Hepa-1 cells, which were then treated with TCDD, and subsequently assayed for CYP1A1-dependent ethoxyresorufin-o-deethylase (EROD) activity. Following redundant siRNA activity (RSA) statistical analysis, we identified 93 hits that reduced EROD activity with a p value ≤ .005 and substantiated 39 of these as positive hits in a secondary screening using endoribonuclease-prepared siRNAs (esiRNAs). Twelve of the corresponding gene products were subsequently confirmed to be necessary for the induction of CYP1A1 messenger RNA by TCDD. None of the candidates were deficient in aryl hydrocarbon nuclear translocator expression. However 6 gene products including UBE2i, RAB40C, CRYGD, DCTN4, RBM5, and RAD50 are required for the expression of AHR as well as for induction of CYP1A1. We also found 2 gene products, ARMC8 and TCF20, to be required for the induction of CYP1A1, but our data are ambiguous as to whether they are required for the expression of AHR. In contrast, SIN3A, PDC, TMEM5, and CD9 are not required for AHR expression but are required for the induction of CYP1A1, implicating a direct role in Cyp1a1 transcription. Our methods, although applied to Cyp1a1, could be modified for identifying proteins that regulate other inducible genes. PMID:23997114

  10. Genome-Wide RNAi High-Throughput Screen Identifies Proteins Necessary for the AHR-Dependent Induction of CYP1A1 by 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin

    PubMed Central

    Hankinson, Oliver

    2013-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) has a plethora of physiological roles, and upon dysregulation, carcinogenesis can occur. One target gene of AHR encodes the xenobiotic and drug-metabolizing enzyme CYP1A1, which is inducible by the environmental contaminant 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) via the AHR. An siRNA library targeted against over 5600 gene candidates in the druggable genome was used to transfect mouse Hepa-1 cells, which were then treated with TCDD, and subsequently assayed for CYP1A1-dependent ethoxyresorufin-o-deethylase (EROD) activity. Following redundant siRNA activity (RSA) statistical analysis, we identified 93 hits that reduced EROD activity with a p value ≤ .005 and substantiated 39 of these as positive hits in a secondary screening using endoribonuclease-prepared siRNAs (esiRNAs). Twelve of the corresponding gene products were subsequently confirmed to be necessary for the induction of CYP1A1 messenger RNA by TCDD. None of the candidates were deficient in aryl hydrocarbon nuclear translocator expression. However 6 gene products including UBE2i, RAB40C, CRYGD, DCTN4, RBM5, and RAD50 are required for the expression of AHR as well as for induction of CYP1A1. We also found 2 gene products, ARMC8 and TCF20, to be required for the induction of CYP1A1, but our data are ambiguous as to whether they are required for the expression of AHR. In contrast, SIN3A, PDC, TMEM5, and CD9 are not required for AHR expression but are required for the induction of CYP1A1, implicating a direct role in Cyp1a1 transcription. Our methods, although applied to Cyp1a1, could be modified for identifying proteins that regulate other inducible genes. PMID:23997114

  11. Aminoflavone, a ligand of the Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor (AhR), inhibits HIF-1α expression in an AhR-independent fashion

    PubMed Central

    Terzuoli, Erika; Puppo, Maura; Rapisarda, Annamaria; Uranchimeg, Badarch; Cao, Liang; Burger, Angelika M.; Ziche, Marina; Melillo, Giovanni

    2010-01-01

    Aminoflavone (AF), the active component of a novel anticancer agent (AFP464) in phase I clinical trials, is a ligand of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). AhR dimerizes with HIF-1β/ARNT, which is shared with HIF-1α, a transcription factor critical for the response of cells to oxygen deprivation. To address whether pharmacological activation of the AhR pathway might be a potential mechanism for inhibition of HIF-1, we tested the effects of AF on HIF-1 expression. AF inhibited HIF-1α transcriptional activity and protein accumulation in MCF-7 cells. However, inhibition of HIF-1α by AF was independent from a functional AhR pathway. Indeed, AF inhibited HIF-1α expression in AhR100 cells, in which the AhR pathway is functionally impaired, yet did not induce cytotoxicity, providing evidence that these effects are mediated by distinct signaling pathways. Moreover, AF was inactive in MDA-MB-231 cells, yet inhibited HIF-1α in MDA-MB-231 cells transfected with the SULT1A1 gene. AF inhibited HIF-1α mRNA expression by approximately 50%. Notably, actinomycin-D completely abrogated the ability of AF to down-regulate HIF-1α mRNA, indicating that active transcription was required for the inhibition of HIF-1α expression. Finally, AF inhibited HIF-1α protein accumulation and the expression of HIF-1-target genes in MCF-7 xenografts. These results demonstrate that AF inhibits HIF-1α in an AhR-independent fashion and they unveil additional activities of AF that may be relevant for its further clinical development. PMID:20736373

  12. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) mediates resistance to apoptosis induced in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Bekki, Kanae; Vogel, Helena; Li, Wen; Ito, Tomohiro; Sweeney, Colleen; Haarmann-Stemmann, Thomas; Matsumura, Fumio; Vogel, Christoph F A

    2015-05-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is well known as a ligand binding transcription factor regulating various biological effects. Previously we have shown that long-term exposure to estrogen in breast cancer cells caused not only down regulation of estrogen receptor (ER) but also overexpression of AhR. The AhR interacts with several cell signaling pathways associated with induction of tyrosine kinases, cytokines and growth factors which may support the survival roles of AhR escaping from apoptosis elicited by a variety of apoptosis inducing agents in breast cancer. In this study, we studied the anti-apoptotic role of AhR in different breast cancer cells when apoptosis was induced by exposure to UV light and chemotherapeutic agents. Activation of AhR by 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) in AhR overexpressing breast cancer cells effectively suppressed the apoptotic response induced by UV-irradiation, doxorubicin, lapatinib and paclitaxel. The anti-apoptotic response of TCDD was uniformly antagonized by the treatment with 3'methoxy-4'nitroflavone (MNF), a specific antagonist of AhR. TCDD's survival action of apoptosis was accompanied with the induction of well-known inflammatory genes, such as cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and NF-κB subunit RelB. Moreover, TCDD increased the activity of the immunosuppressive enzyme indoleamine 2, 3-dioxygenase (IDO), which metabolizes tryptophan to kynurenine (Kyn) and mediates tumor immunity. Kyn also acts as an AhR ligand like TCDD, and kyn induced an anti-apoptotic response in breast cancer cells. Accordingly, our present study suggests that AhR plays a pivotal role in the development of breast cancer via the suppression of apoptosis, and provides an idea that the use of AhR antagonists with chemotherapeutic agents may effectively synergize the elimination of breast cancer cells. PMID:25987214

  13. Identification and expression of aryl hydrocarbon receptors (AhR1 and AhR2) provide insight in an evolutionary context regarding sensitivity of white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) to dioxin-like compounds.

    PubMed

    Doering, Jon A; Wiseman, Steve; Beitel, Shawn C; Giesy, John P; Hecker, Markus

    2014-05-01

    Sturgeons are ancient fishes, which are endangered in many parts of the world. Due to their benthic nature and longevity, sturgeon are at great risk of exposure to bioaccumulative contaminants such as dioxin-like compounds (DLCs). Despite their endangered status, little research has been conducted to characterize the relative sensitivity of sturgeons to DLCs. Proper assessment of risk of DLCs posed to these fishes therefore, requires a better understanding of this sensitivity and the factors that are driving it. Adverse effects associated with exposure to DLCs are mediated by the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). This study identified and characterized two distinct AhRs, AhR1 and AhR2, in white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) for the first time as a first step in studying the relative sensitivities of sturgeons to DLCs. Furthermore, tissue-specific expression of both AhRs under basal conditions and in response to exposure to the model DLC, β-naphthoflavone (βNF), was determined. The sequence of amino acids of AhR1 of white sturgeon had greater similarity to AhRs of tetrapods, including amphibians, birds, and mammals, than to AhR1s of other fishes. The sequence of amino acids in the ligand binding domain of the AhR1 had greater than 80% similarity to AhRs known to bind DLCs and was less similar to AhRs not known to bind DLCs. AhR2 of white sturgeon had greatest similarity to AhR2 of other fishes. Profiles of expression of AhR1 and AhR2 in white sturgeon were distinct from those known in other fishes and appear more similar to profiles observed in birds. Expressions of both AhR1 and AhR2 of white sturgeon were greatest in liver and heart, which are target organs for DLCs. Furthermore, abundances of transcripts of AhR1 and AhR2 in all tissues from white sturgeon were greater than controls (up to 35-fold) following exposure to βNF. Based upon both AhRs having similar abundances of transcript in target organs of DLC toxicity, both AhRs being up-regulated following

  14. Combination effects of AHR agonists and Wnt/β-catenin modulators in zebrafish embryos: Implications for physiological and toxicological AHR functions

    SciTech Connect

    Wincent, Emma; Stegeman, John J.; Jönsson, Maria E.

    2015-04-15

    Wnt/β-catenin signaling regulates essential biological functions and acts in developmental toxicity of some chemicals. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) is well-known to mediate developmental toxicity of persistent dioxin-like compounds (DLCs). Recent studies indicate a crosstalk between β-catenin and the AHR in some tissues. However the nature of this crosstalk in embryos is poorly known. We observed that zebrafish embryos exposed to the β-catenin inhibitor XAV939 display effects phenocopying those of the dioxin-like 3,3′,4,4′,5-pentachlorobiphenyl (PCB126). This led us to investigate the AHR interaction with β-catenin during development and ask whether developmental toxicity of DLCs involves antagonism of β-catenin signaling. We examined phenotypes and transcriptional responses in zebrafish embryos exposed to XAV939 or to a β-catenin activator, 1-azakenpaullone, alone or with AHR agonists, either PCB126 or 6-formylindolo[3,2-b]carbazole (FICZ). Alone 1-azakenpaullone and XAV939 both were embryo-toxic, and we found that in the presence of FICZ, the toxicity of 1-azakenpaullone decreased while the toxicity of XAV939 increased. This rescue of 1-azakenpaullone effects occurred in the time window of Ahr2-mediated toxicity and was reversed by morpholino-oligonucleotide knockdown of Ahr2. Regarding PCB126, addition of either 1-azakenpaullone or XAV939 led to lower mortality than with PCB126 alone but surviving embryos showed severe edemas. 1-Azakenpaullone induced transcription of β-catenin-associated genes, while PCB126 and FICZ blocked this induction. The data indicate a stage-dependent antagonism of β-catenin by Ahr2 in zebrafish embryos. We propose that the AHR has a physiological role in regulating β-catenin during development, and that this is one point of intersection linking toxicological and physiological AHR-governed processes.

  15. The drug target genes show higher evolutionary conservation than non-target genes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Panpan; Luan, Meiwei; Zhu, Hongjie; Liu, Guiyou; Zhang, Mingming; Lv, Hongchao; Duan, Lian; Shang, Zhenwei; Li, Jin; Jiang, Yongshuai; Zhang, Ruijie

    2016-01-01

    Although evidence indicates that drug target genes share some common evolutionary features, there have been few studies analyzing evolutionary features of drug targets from an overall level. Therefore, we conducted an analysis which aimed to investigate the evolutionary characteristics of drug target genes. We compared the evolutionary conservation between human drug target genes and non-target genes by combining both the evolutionary features and network topological properties in human protein-protein interaction network. The evolution rate, conservation score and the percentage of orthologous genes of 21 species were included in our study. Meanwhile, four topological features including the average shortest path length, betweenness centrality, clustering coefficient and degree were considered for comparison analysis. Then we got four results as following: compared with non-drug target genes, 1) drug target genes had lower evolutionary rates; 2) drug target genes had higher conservation scores; 3) drug target genes had higher percentages of orthologous genes and 4) drug target genes had a tighter network structure including higher degrees, betweenness centrality, clustering coefficients and lower average shortest path lengths. These results demonstrate that drug target genes are more evolutionarily conserved than non-drug target genes. We hope that our study will provide valuable information for other researchers who are interested in evolutionary conservation of drug targets. PMID:26716901

  16. Targeted Gene Therapies: Tools, Applications, Optimization

    PubMed Central

    Humbert, Olivier; Davis, Luther; Maizels, Nancy

    2012-01-01

    Many devastating human diseases are caused by mutations in a single gene that prevent a somatic cell from carrying out its essential functions, or by genetic changes acquired as a result of infectious disease or in the course of cell transformation. Targeted gene therapies have emerged as potential strategies for treatment of such diseases. These therapies depend upon rare-cutting endonucleases to cleave at specific sites in or near disease genes. Targeted gene correction provides a template for homology-directed repair, enabling the cell's own repair pathways to erase the mutation and replace it with the correct sequence. Targeted gene disruption ablates the disease gene, disabling its function. Gene targeting can also promote other kinds of genome engineering, including mutation, insertion, or gene deletion. Targeted gene therapies present significant advantages compared to approaches to gene therapy that depend upon delivery of stably expressing transgenes. Recent progress has been fueled by advances in nuclease discovery and design, and by new strategies that maximize efficiency of targeting and minimize off-target damage. Future progress will build on deeper mechanistic understanding of critical factors and pathways. PMID:22530743

  17. Problem-Solving Test: Targeted Gene Disruption

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szeberenyi, Jozsef

    2008-01-01

    Mutational inactivation of a specific gene is the most powerful technique to analyze the biological function of the gene. This approach has been used for a long time in viruses, bacteria, yeast, and fruit fly, but looked quite hopeless in more complex organisms. Targeted inactivation of specific genes (also known as knock-out mutation) in mice is…

  18. Targeted polymeric nanoparticles for cancer gene therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jayoung; Wilson, David R.; Zamboni, Camila G.; Green, Jordan J.

    2015-01-01

    In this article, advances in designing polymeric nanoparticles for targeted cancer gene therapy are reviewed. Characterization and evaluation of biomaterials, targeting ligands, and transcriptional elements are each discussed. Advances in biomaterials have driven improvements to nanoparticle stability and tissue targeting, conjugation of ligands to the surface of polymeric nanoparticles enable binding to specific cancer cells, and the design of transcriptional elements has enabled selective DNA expression specific to the cancer cells. Together, these features have improved the performance of polymeric nanoparticles as targeted non-viral gene delivery vectors to treat cancer. As polymeric nanoparticles can be designed to be biodegradable, non-toxic, and to have reduced immunogenicity and tumorigenicity compared to viral platforms, they have significant potential for clinical use. Results of polymeric gene therapy in clinical trials and future directions for the engineering of nanoparticle systems for targeted cancer gene therapy are also presented. PMID:26061296

  19. Seed Targeted Gene Confinement Strategies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The genetic improvement of plants using biotechnology is now centrally important to agriculture, food security, and the biofuels industry. It is also important to the continued health of the environment as the need for food (on existing arable land) and renewable energy becomes critical. New genes c...

  20. AHR-11797: a novel benzodiazepine antagonist

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, D.N.; Kilpatrick, B.F.; Hannaman, P.K.

    1986-03-01

    AHR-11797(5,6-dihydro-6-methyl-1-phenyl-/sup 3/H-pyrrolo(3,2,1-ij)quinazolin-3-one) displaced /sup 3/H-flunitrazepam (IC/sub 50/ = 82 nM) and /sup 3/H-Ro 15-1877 (IC/sub 50/ = 104 nM) from rat brain synaptosomes. AHR-11797 did not protect mice from seizures induced by maximal electroshock or subcutaneous Metrazol (scMET), nor did it induce seizures in doses up to the lethal dose. However, at 31.6 mg/kg, IP, it significantly increased the anticonvulsant ED/sub 50/ of chlordiazepoxide (CDPX) from 1.9 to 31.6 mg/kg, IP. With 56.7 mg/kg, IP, of AHR-11797, CDPX was inactive in doses up to 100 mg/kg, IP. AHR-11797 did not significantly increase punished responding in the Geller and Seifter conflict procedure, but it did attenuate the effects of diazepam. Although the compound is without anticonvulsant or anxiolytic activity, it did have muscle relaxant properties. AHR-11797 blocked morphine-induced Straub tail in mice (ED/sub 50/ = 31 mg/kg, IP) and it selectively suppressed the polysnaptic linguomandibular reflex in barbiturate-anesthetized cats. The apparent muscle relaxant activity of AHR-11797 suggests that different receptor sites are involved for muscle relaxant vs. anxiolytic/anticonvulsant activities of the benzodiazepines.

  1. AhR signalling and dioxin toxicity.

    PubMed

    Sorg, Olivier

    2014-10-15

    Dioxins are a family of molecules associated to several industrial accidents such as Ludwigshafen in 1953 or Seveso in 1976, to the Agent Orange used during the war of Vietnam, and more recently to the poisoning of the former president of Ukraine, Victor Yushchenko. These persistent organic pollutants are by-products of industrial activity and bind to an intracellular receptor, AhR, with a high potency. In humans, exposure to dioxins, in particular 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) induces a cutaneous syndrome known as chloracne, consisting in the development of many small skin lesions (hamartoma), lasting for 2-5 years. Although TCDD has been classified by the WHO as a human carcinogen, its carcinogenic potential to humans is not clearly demonstrated. It was first believed that AhR activation accounted for most, if not all, biological properties of dioxins. However, certain AhR agonists found in vegetables do not induce chloracne, and other chemicals, in particular certain therapeutic agents, may induce a chloracne-like syndrome without activating AhR. It is time to rethink the mechanism of dioxin toxicity and analyse in more details the biological events following exposure to these compounds and other AhR agonists, some of which have a very different chemical structure than TCDD. In particular various food-containing AhR agonists are non-toxic and may on the contrary have beneficial properties to human health. PMID:24239782

  2. Pityriazepin and other potent AhR ligands isolated from Malassezia furfur yeast.

    PubMed

    Mexia, Nikitia; Gaitanis, Georgios; Velegraki, Aristea; Soshilov, Anatoly; Denison, Michael S; Magiatis, Prokopios

    2015-04-01

    Malassezia furfur yeast strains isolated from diseased human skin preferentially biosynthesize indole alkaloids which can be detected in the human skin and are highly potent activators of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) and AhR-dependent gene expression. Chemical analysis of an EtOAc extract of a M. furfur strain obtained from diseased human skin and grown on l-tryptophan agar revealed several known AhR active tryptophan metabolites along with a previously unidentified compound, pityriazepin. While its structure resembled that of the known alkaloid pityriacitrin, the comprised pyridine ring had been transformed into an azepinone. The indoloazepinone scaffold of pityriazepin is extremely rare in nature and has only been reported once previously. Pityriazepin, like the other isolated compounds, was found to be a potent activator of the AhR-dependent reporter gene assay in recombinant cell lines derived from four different species, although significant species differences in relative potency were observed. The ability of pityriazepin to competitively bind to the AhR and directly stimulate AhR DNA binding classified it as a new naturally-occurring potent AhR agonist. M. furfur produces an expanded collection of extremely potent naturally occurring AhR agonists, which produce their biological effects in a species-specific manner. PMID:25721496

  3. Pityriazepin and other potent AhR ligands isolated from Malassezia furfur yeast

    PubMed Central

    Mexia, Nikitia; Gaitanis, George; Velegraki, Aristea; Soshilov, Anatoly; Denison, Michael S.; Magiatis, Prokopios

    2015-01-01

    Malassezia furfur yeast strains isolated from diseased human skin preferentially biosynthesize indole alkaloids which can be detected in human skin and are highly potent activators of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) and AhR-dependent gene expression. Chemical analysis of an EtOAc extract of a M. furfur strain obtained from diseased human skin and grown on L-tryptophan agar revealed several known AhR active tryptophan metabolites along with a previously unidentified compound, pityriazepin. While its structure resembled that of the known alkaloid pityriacitrin, the comprised pyridine ring had been transformed into an azepinone. The indoloazepinone scaffold of pityriazepin is extremely rare in nature and has only been reported once previously. Pityriazepin, like the other isolated compounds, was found to be a potent activator of the AhR-dependent reporter gene assays in recombinant cell lines derived from four different species, although significant species differences in relative potency was observed. The ability of pityriazepin to competitively bind to the AhR and directly stimulate AhR DNA binding classified it as a new naturally-occurring potent AhR agonist. Malassezia furfur produces an expanded collection of extremely potent naturally occurring AhR agonists, which produce their biological effects in a species-specific manner.1 PMID:25721496

  4. Gene Targeting in Mice: a Review

    PubMed Central

    Bouabe, Hicham; Okkenhaug, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Summary The ability to introduce DNA sequences (e.g. genes) of interest into the germline genome has rendered the mouse a powerful and indispensable experimental model in fundamental and medical research. The DNA sequences can be integrated into the genome randomly or into a specific locus by homologous recombination, in order to: (i) delete or insert mutations into genes of interest to determine their function, (ii) introduce human genes into the genome of mice to generate animal models enabling study of human-specific genes and diseases, e.g. mice susceptible to infections by human-specific pathogens of interest, (iii) introduce individual genes or genomes of pathogens (such as viruses) in order to examine the contributions of such genes to the pathogenesis of the parent pathogens, (iv) and last but not least introduce reporter genes that allow monitoring in vivo or ex vivo the expression of genes of interest. Furthermore, the use of recombination systems, such as Cre/loxP or FRT/FLP, enables conditional induction or suppression of gene expression of interest in a restricted period of mouse’s lifetime, in a particular cell type, or in a specific tissue. In this review, we will give an updated summary of the gene targeting technology and discuss some important considerations in the design of gene-targeted mice. PMID:23996268

  5. In vitro and in silico evaluation of transactivation potencies of avian AHR1 and AHR2 by endogenous ligands: Implications for the physiological role of avian AHR2.

    PubMed

    Kim, In-Sung; Hwang, Ji-Hee; Hirano, Masashi; Iwata, Hisato; Kim, Eun-Young

    2016-09-01

    Aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) is well conserved from invertebrates to vertebrates, and it mediates the toxic effects of exogenous ligands, including dioxins. Recent studies reported that AHRs activated by endogenous ligands play critical roles in mammalian physiological homeostasis. Avian species possess at least two AHR isoforms (AHR1 and AHR2), which exhibit species- and isoform-specific transactivation potencies to exogenous ligands, whereas mammals possess a single AHR. To delineate the profiles and roles of endogenous ligands for avian AHR isoforms, we investigated in vitro transactivation potencies of avian AHRs (AHR1 and AHR2 from the jungle crow, Corvus macrorhynchos; common cormorant, Phalacrocorax carbo; and black-footed albatross, Phoebastria nigripes) treated with the endogenous tryptophan metabolites 6-formylindolo [3,2-b] carbazole (FICZ), l-kynurenine (l-Kyn), kynurenic acid (KYNA), and indoxyl sulfate (IS). Furthermore, we analyzed the binding mode of these ligands to each avian AHR isoform by in silico docking simulations. The EC50 of FICZ (0.009-0.032nM) was similar regardless of the species or isoform of AHR. The estimated in silico binding mode of FICZ to AHRs was well conserved in both isoforms. The transactivation potencies of avian AHRs to other tryptophan metabolites were 10(5)-10(7) fold lower than those for FICZ, and EC50 values varied in a species- and isoform-specific manner. This was consistent with poor conservation of the binding mode of l-Kyn, KYNA, and IS predicted in in silico docking simulations. Our results suggest that in avian species, FICZ is the most potent endogenous AHR ligand, and that AHR1 and AHR2 are physiologically functional. PMID:27060260

  6. Regulation of zebrafish CYP3A65 transcription by AHR2

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Chin-Teng; Chung, Hsin-Yu; Su, Hsiao-Ting; Tseng, Hua-Pin; Tzou, Wen-Shyong; Hu, Chin-Hwa

    2013-07-15

    CYP3A proteins are the most abundant CYPs in the liver and intestines, and they play a pivotal role in drug metabolism. In mammals, CYP3A genes are induced by various xenobiotics through processes mediated by PXR. We previously identified zebrafish CYP3A65 as a CYP3A ortholog that is constitutively expressed in gastrointestinal tissues, and is upregulated by treatment with dexamethasone, rifampicin or tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). However, the underlying mechanism of TCDD-mediated CYP3A65 transcription is unclear. Here we generated two transgenic zebrafish, Tg(CYP3A65S:EGFP) and Tg(CYP3A65L:EGFP), which contain 2.1 and 5.4 kb 5′ flanking sequences, respectively, of the CYP3A65 gene upstream of EGFP. Both transgenic lines express EGFP in larval gastrointestinal tissues in a pattern similar to that of the endogenous CYP3A65 gene. Moreover, EGFP expression can be significantly induced by TCDD exposure during the larval stage. In addition, EGFP expression can be stimulated by kynurenine, a putative AHR ligand produced during tryptophan metabolism. AHRE elements in the upstream regulatory region of the CYP3A65 gene are indispensible for basal and TCDD-induced transcription. Furthermore, the AHR2 DNA and ligand-binding domains are required to mediate effective CYP3A65 transcription. AHRE sequences are present in the promoters of many teleost CYP3 genes, but not of mammalian CYP3 genes, suggesting that AHR/AHR2-mediated transcription is likely a common regulatory mechanism for teleost CYP3 genes. It may also reflect the different environments that terrestrial and aquatic organisms encounter. - Highlights: • Tg(CYP3A65:EGFP) and CYP3A65 exhibits identical expression pattern. • CYP3A65 can be significantly induced by TCDD or kynurenine. • The AHRE elements are required to mediate CYP3A65 transcription. • The AHR2 DNA and ligand-binding domains are required for CYP3A65 transcription. • AHRE elements are present in many teleost CYP3 genes, but not in

  7. Gene Therapy and Targeted Toxins for Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Maria G.; Candolfi, Marianela; Kroeger, Kurt; King, Gwendalyn D.; Curtin, James F.; Yagiz, Kader; Mineharu, Yohei; Assi, Hikmat; Wibowo, Mia; Muhammad, AKM Ghulam; Foulad, David; Puntel, Mariana; Lowenstein, Pedro R.

    2011-01-01

    The most common primary brain tumor in adults is glioblastoma. These tumors are highly invasive and aggressive with a mean survival time of nine to twelve months from diagnosis to death. Current treatment modalities are unable to significantly prolong survival in patients diagnosed with glioblastoma. As such, glioma is an attractive target for developing novel therapeutic approaches utilizing gene therapy. This review will examine the available preclinical models for glioma including xenographs, syngeneic and genetic models. Several promising therapeutic targets are currently being pursued in pre-clinical investigations. These targets will be reviewed by mechanism of action, i.e., conditional cytotoxic, targeted toxins, oncolytic viruses, tumor suppressors/oncogenes, and immune stimulatory approaches. Preclinical gene therapy paradigms aim to determine which strategies will provide rapid tumor regression and long-term protection from recurrence. While a wide range of potential targets are being investigated preclinically, only the most efficacious are further transitioned into clinical trial paradigms. Clinical trials reported to date are summarized including results from conditionally cytotoxic, targeted toxins, oncolytic viruses and oncogene targeting approaches. Clinical trial results have not been as robust as preclinical models predicted; this could be due to the limitations of the GBM models employed. Once this is addressed, and we develop effective gene therapies in models that better replicate the clinical scenario, gene therapy will provide a powerful approach to treat and manage brain tumors. PMID:21453286

  8. Gene Therapy and Targeted Toxins for Glioma

    PubMed Central

    King, Gwendalyn D.; Curtin, James F.; Candolfi, Marianela; Kroeger, Kurt; Lowenstein, Pedro R.; Castro, Maria G.

    2006-01-01

    The most common primary brain tumor in adults is glioblastoma. These tumors are highly invasive and aggressive with a mean survival time of nine to twelve months from diagnosis to death. Current treatment modalities are unable to significantly prolong survival in patients diagnosed with glioblastoma. As such, glioma is an attractive target for developing novel therapeutic approaches utilizing gene therapy. This review will examine the available preclinical models for glioma including xenographs, syngeneic and genetic models. Several promising therapeutic targets are currently being pursued in pre-clinical investigations. These targets will be reviewed by mechanism of action, i.e., conditional cytotoxic, targeted toxins, oncolytic viruses, tumor suppressors/oncogenes, and immune stimulatory approaches. Preclinical gene therapy paradigms aim to determine which strategies will provide rapid tumor regression and long-term protection from recurrence. While a wide range of potential targets are being investigated preclinically, only the most efficacious are further transitioned into clinical trial paradigms. Clinical trials reported to date are summarized including results from conditionally cytotoxic, targeted toxins, oncolytic viruses and oncogene targeting approaches. Clinical trial results have not been as robust as preclinical models predicted, this could be due to the limitations of the GBM models employed. Once this is addressed, and we develop effective gene therapies in models that better replicate the clinical scenario, gene therapy will provide a powerful approach to treat and manage brain tumors. PMID:16457645

  9. Species-Specific Differential AhR Expression Protects Human Neural Progenitor Cells against Developmental Neurotoxicity of PAHs

    PubMed Central

    Gassmann, Kathrin; Abel, Josef; Bothe, Hanno; Haarmann-Stemmann, Thomas; Merk, Hans F.; Quasthoff, Kim N.; Rockel, Thomas Dino; Schreiber, Timm; Fritsche, Ellen

    2010-01-01

    Background Because of their lipophilicity, persistent organic pollutants (POPs) cross the human placenta, possibly affecting central nervous system development. Most POPs are known aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) ligands and activators of AhR signaling. Therefore, AhR activation has been suggested to cause developmental neurotoxicity (DNT). Objective We studied the effects of AhR ligands on basic processes of brain development in two comparative in vitro systems to determine whether AhR-activation is the underlying mechanism for reported DNT of POPs in humans. Methods We employed neurosphere cultures based on human neural progenitor cells (hNPCs) and wild-type and AhR-deficient mouse NPCs (mNPCs) and studied the effects of different AhR agonists [3-methylcholanthrene (3-MC), benzo(a)pyrene [B(a)P], and 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD)] and an antagonist [3′-methoxy-4′-nitroflavone (MNF)] on neurosphere development. Moreover, we analyzed expression of AhR and genes involved in AhR signaling. Results In contrast to wild-type mNPCs, hNPCs and AhR-deficient mNPCs were insensitive to AhR agonism or antagonism. Although AhR modulation attenuated wild-type mNPC proliferation and migration, hNPCs and AhR-deficient mNPCs remained unaffected. Results also suggest that species-specific differences resulted from nonfunctional AhR signaling in hNPCs. Conclusion Our findings suggest that in contrast to wild-type mNPCs, hNPCs were protected against polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon–induced DNT because of an absence of AhR. This difference may contribute to species-specific differences in sensitivity to POPs. PMID:20570779

  10. Progesterone, as well as 17β-estradiol, is important for regulating AHR battery homoeostasis in the rat uterus.

    PubMed

    Rataj, Felicitas; Möller, Frank Josef; Jähne, Maria; Hönscheid, Pia; Zierau, Oliver; Vollmer, Günter; Kretzschmar, Georg

    2015-03-01

    Several studies indicate that the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR), which plays an important role in mediating the toxicity of many industrial chemicals, plays an important role in the physiology of female reproductive tract organs. This makes it likely that the AHR and additional components of the AHR signalling pathway are under the control of female sex steroids. In a previous study, we could already demonstrate the regulation of many members of the AHR battery by 17β-estradiol (E2) in the uterus of rats. In this study, we addressed the potential role of progesterone (P4) in this context. In a comparative approach using ovariectomized rats which were treated for 3 days with either vehicle control, E2, progesterone (P4) or the combination of both hormones in addition to sham-operated animals, we could demonstrate that in addition to E2, P4 is also an important factor in regulating AHR signalling in the rat uterus. P4 has effects similar to E2 on uterine Ahr, Arnt and Arnt2 mRNA levels, resulting in a downregulation of these genes, while the E2-mediated downregulation of key AHR response genes Cyp1a1, Gsta2 and Ugt1 is completely antagonized by P4. As with E2, P4 leads to an increase in uterine AHR levels, especially in the endometrial epithelium despite the decrease in corresponding mRNA levels. This indicates a complex gene-specific regulatory network involving E2, P4 and possibly AHR itself to maintain all components of the AHR signalling cascade at the required levels during all stages of the oestrous cycle and pregnancy. PMID:24777823

  11. Ultrasound-Targeted Retroviral Gene Delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Sarah L.; Rahim, Ahad A.; Bush, Nigel L.; Bamber, Jeffrey C.; Porter, Colin D.

    2007-05-01

    This study demonstrates the ability of focused ultrasound to target retroviral gene delivery. Key to our experiments was the use of non-infectious virus particles lacking the envelope protein required for receptor-mediated entry. The novelty of our approach is that spatial control at a distance is exerted upon viral delivery by subsequent exposure to ultrasound, leading to stable gene delivery. The technology is ideally suited to controlling gene delivery in vivo following systemic vector administration. Our data provide a solution to the critical issue of obtaining tissue specificity with retroviral vectors and impart stability of expression to ultrasound-mediated gene delivery.

  12. Estrogen receptor α can selectively repress dioxin receptor-mediated gene expression by targeting DNA methylation.

    PubMed

    Marques, Maud; Laflamme, Liette; Gaudreau, Luc

    2013-09-01

    Selective inhibitory crosstalk has been known to occur within the signaling pathways of the dioxin (AhR) and estrogen (ERα) receptors. More specifically, ERα represses a cytochrome P450-encoding gene (CYP1A1) that converts cellular estradiol into a metabolite that inhibits the cell cycle, while it has no effect on a P450-encoding gene (CYP1B1) that converts estrodiol into a genotoxic product. Here we show that ERα represses CYP1A1 by targeting the Dnmt3B DNA methyltransferase and concomitant DNA methylation of the promoter. We also find that histone H2A.Z can positively contribute to CYP1A1 gene expression, and its presence at that gene is inversely correlated with DNA methylation. Taken together, our results provide a framework for how ERα can repress transcription, and how that impinges on the production of an enzyme that generates genotoxic estradiol metabolites, and potential breast cancer progression. Finally, our results reveal a new mechanism for how H2A.Z can positively influence gene expression, which is by potentially competing with DNA methylation events in breast cancer cells. PMID:23828038

  13. Estrogen receptor α can selectively repress dioxin receptor-mediated gene expression by targeting DNA methylation

    PubMed Central

    Marques, Maud; Laflamme, Liette; Gaudreau, Luc

    2013-01-01

    Selective inhibitory crosstalk has been known to occur within the signaling pathways of the dioxin (AhR) and estrogen (ERα) receptors. More specifically, ERα represses a cytochrome P450-encoding gene (CYP1A1) that converts cellular estradiol into a metabolite that inhibits the cell cycle, while it has no effect on a P450-encoding gene (CYP1B1) that converts estrodiol into a genotoxic product. Here we show that ERα represses CYP1A1 by targeting the Dnmt3B DNA methyltransferase and concomitant DNA methylation of the promoter. We also find that histone H2A.Z can positively contribute to CYP1A1 gene expression, and its presence at that gene is inversely correlated with DNA methylation. Taken together, our results provide a framework for how ERα can repress transcription, and how that impinges on the production of an enzyme that generates genotoxic estradiol metabolites, and potential breast cancer progression. Finally, our results reveal a new mechanism for how H2A.Z can positively influence gene expression, which is by potentially competing with DNA methylation events in breast cancer cells. PMID:23828038

  14. Progress in gene targeting and gene therapy for retinitis pigmentosa

    SciTech Connect

    Farrar, G.J.; Humphries, M.M.; Erven, A.

    1994-09-01

    Previously, we localized disease genes involved in retinitis pigmentosa (RP), an inherited retinal degeneration, close to the rhodopsin and peripherin genes on 3q and 6p. Subsequently, we and others identified mutations in these genes in RP patients. Currently animal models for human retinopathies are being generated using gene targeting by homologous recombination in embryonic stem (ES) cells. Genomic clones for retinal genes including rhodopsin and peripherin have been obtained from a phage library carrying mouse DNA isogenic with the ES cell line (CC1.2). The peripherin clone has been sequenced to establish the genomic structure of the mouse gene. Targeting vectors for rhodopsin and peripherin including a neomycin cassette for positive selection and thymidine kinase genes enabling selection against random intergrants are under construction. Progress in vector construction will be presented. Simultaneously we are developing systems for delivery of gene therapies to retinal tissues utilizing replication-deficient adenovirus (Ad5). Efficacy of infection subsequent to various methods of intraocular injection and with varying viral titers is being assayed using an adenovirus construct containing a CMV promoter LacZ fusion as reporter and the range of tissues infected and the level of duration of LacZ expression monitored. Viral constructs with the LacZ reporter gene under the control of retinal specific promoters such as rhodopsin and IRBP cloned into pXCJL.1 are under construction. An update on developments in photoreceptor cell-directed expression of virally delivered genes will be presented.

  15. Regulation of zebrafish CYP3A65 transcription by AHR2.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chin-Teng; Chung, Hsin-Yu; Su, Hsiao-Ting; Tseng, Hua-Pin; Tzou, Wen-Shyong; Hu, Chin-Hwa

    2013-07-15

    CYP3A proteins are the most abundant CYPs in the liver and intestines, and they play a pivotal role in drug metabolism. In mammals, CYP3A genes are induced by various xenobiotics through processes mediated by PXR. We previously identified zebrafish CYP3A65 as a CYP3A ortholog that is constitutively expressed in gastrointestinal tissues, and is upregulated by treatment with dexamethasone, rifampicin or tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). However, the underlying mechanism of TCDD-mediated CYP3A65 transcription is unclear. Here we generated two transgenic zebrafish, Tg(CYP3A65S:EGFP) and Tg(CYP3A65L:EGFP), which contain 2.1 and 5.4 kb 5' flanking sequences, respectively, of the CYP3A65 gene upstream of EGFP. Both transgenic lines express EGFP in larval gastrointestinal tissues in a pattern similar to that of the endogenous CYP3A65 gene. Moreover, EGFP expression can be significantly induced by TCDD exposure during the larval stage. In addition, EGFP expression can be stimulated by kynurenine, a putative AHR ligand produced during tryptophan metabolism. AHRE elements in the upstream regulatory region of the CYP3A65 gene are indispensible for basal and TCDD-induced transcription. Furthermore, the AHR2 DNA and ligand-binding domains are required to mediate effective CYP3A65 transcription. AHRE sequences are present in the promoters of many teleost CYP3 genes, but not of mammalian CYP3 genes, suggesting that AHR/AHR2-mediated transcription is likely a common regulatory mechanism for teleost CYP3 genes. It may also reflect the different environments that terrestrial and aquatic organisms encounter. PMID:23624173

  16. Improved Gene Targeting through Cell Cycle Synchronization

    PubMed Central

    Tsakraklides, Vasiliki; Brevnova, Elena; Stephanopoulos, Gregory; Shaw, A. Joe

    2015-01-01

    Gene targeting is a challenge in organisms where non-homologous end-joining is the predominant form of recombination. We show that cell division cycle synchronization can be applied to significantly increase the rate of homologous recombination during transformation. Using hydroxyurea-mediated cell cycle arrest, we obtained improved gene targeting rates in Yarrowia lipolytica, Arxula adeninivorans, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Kluyveromyces lactis and Pichia pastoris demonstrating the broad applicability of the method. Hydroxyurea treatment enriches for S-phase cells that are active in homologous recombination and enables previously unattainable genomic modifications. PMID:26192309

  17. Gene targeting in primary human trophoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Rosario, Fredrick J; Sadovsky, Yoel; Jansson, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Studies in primary human trophoblasts provide critical insights into placental function in normal and complicated pregnancies. Mechanistic studies in these cells require experimental tools to modulate gene expression. Lipid-based methods to transfect primary trophoblasts are fairly simple to use and allow for the efficient delivery of nucleic acids, but potential toxic effects limit these methods. Viral vectors are versatile transfection tools of native trophoblastic or foreign cDNAs, providing high transfection efficiency, low toxicity and stable DNA integration into the trophoblast genome. RNA interference (RNAi), using small interfering RNA (siRNA) or microRNA, constitutes a powerful approach to silence trophoblast genes. However, off-target effects, such as regulation of unintended complementary transcripts, inflammatory responses and saturation of the endogenous RNAi machinery, are significant concerns. Strategies to minimize off-target effects include using multiple individual siRNAs, elimination of pro-inflammatory sequences in the siRNA construct and chemical modification of a nucleotide in the guide strand or of the ribose moiety. Tools for efficient gene targeting in primary human trophoblasts are currently available, albeit not yet extensively validated. These methods are critical for exploring the function of human trophoblast genes and may provide a foundation for the future application of gene therapy that targets placental trophoblasts. PMID:22831880

  18. Targeted gene repair – in the arena

    PubMed Central

    Kmiec, Eric B.

    2003-01-01

    The development of targeted gene repair is under way and, despite some setbacks, shows promise as an alternative form of gene therapy. This approach uses synthetic DNA molecules to activate and direct the cell’s inherent DNA repair systems to correct inborn errors. The progress of this technique and its therapeutic potential are discussed in relation to the treatment of genetic diseases. PMID:12952907

  19. Targeting Herpetic Keratitis by Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Elbadawy, Hossein Mostafa; Gailledrat, Marine; Desseaux, Carole; Ponzin, Diego; Ferrari, Stefano

    2012-01-01

    Ocular gene therapy is rapidly becoming a reality. By November 2012, approximately 28 clinical trials were approved to assess novel gene therapy agents. Viral infections such as herpetic keratitis caused by herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) can cause serious complications that may lead to blindness. Recurrence of the disease is likely and cornea transplantation, therefore, might not be the ideal therapeutic solution. This paper will focus on the current situation of ocular gene therapy research against herpetic keratitis, including the use of viral and nonviral vectors, routes of delivery of therapeutic genes, new techniques, and key research strategies. Whereas the correction of inherited diseases was the initial goal of the field of gene therapy, here we discuss transgene expression, gene replacement, silencing, or clipping. Gene therapy of herpetic keratitis previously reported in the literature is screened emphasizing candidate gene therapy targets. Commonly adopted strategies are discussed to assess the relative advantages of the protective therapy using antiviral drugs and the common gene therapy against long-term HSV-1 ocular infections signs, inflammation and neovascularization. Successful gene therapy can provide innovative physiological and pharmaceutical solutions against herpetic keratitis. PMID:23326647

  20. AHR2 mediates cardiac teratogenesis of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and PCB-126 in Atlantic killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus)

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Bryan W.; Matson, Cole W.; Jung, Dawoon; Di Giulio, Richard T.

    2010-01-01

    Exposure of developing fish to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and halogenated aromatic hydrocarbons (HAHs) results in a suite of defects including cardiac malformation, pericardial and yolk sac edema, craniofacial defects, and hemorrhaging. Several populations of Atlantic killifish or mummichog (Fundulus heteroclitus) on the Atlantic coast of the United States are resistant to the developmental and acute toxicity caused by PAHs and HAHs; this has made Fundulus a valuable model for studying aryl hydrocarbon sensitivity and adaptation. In order to further increase the utility of Fundulus, better understanding of the components of the molecular pathways governing aryl hydrocarbon response in Fundulus is required. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) is known to mediate many of the toxic responses to PAHs and HAHs. A single AHR has been identified in mammals, but Fundulus has two AHRs and their relative roles are not clear. In the current study, translation-blocking and splice-junction morpholino gene knockdown was used to determine the roles of AHR1 and AHR2 in mediating cardiac teratogenesis induced by β-naphthoflavone (BNF), benzo[k]fluoranthene (BkF), and 3, 3′, 4, 4′, 5-pentachlorobiphenyl (PCB-126). Here we report that AHR2 and not AHR1 knockdown resulted in rescue of teratogenicity induced by BNF, BkF, and PCB-126. These data demonstrate that AHR2 is the primary mediator of cardiac teratogenesis caused by multiple aryl hydrocarbons in Fundulus and suggest that suppression of the AHR pathway through modulation of AHR2 is a plausible mechanism for PAH resistance in adapted fish. Additionally, this is the first reported use of splice-junction morpholinos in Fundulus. PMID:20605646

  1. Efficient ectopic gene expression targeting chick mesoderm.

    PubMed

    Oberg, Kerby C; Pira, Charmaine U; Revelli, Jean-Pierre; Ratz, Beate; Aguilar-Cordova, Estuardo; Eichele, Gregor

    2002-07-01

    The chick model has been instrumental in illuminating genes that regulate early vertebrate development and pattern formation. Targeted ectopic gene expression is critical to dissect further the complicated gene interactions that are involved. In an effort to develop a consistent method to ectopically introduce and focally express genes in chick mesoderm, we evaluated and optimized several gene delivery methods, including implantation of 293 cells laden with viral vectors, direct adenoviral injection, and electroporation (EP). We targeted the mesoderm of chick wing buds between stages 19 and 21 (Hamburger and Hamilton stages) and used beta-galactosidase and green fluorescent protein (GFP) to document gene transfer. Expression constructs using the cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoter, the beta-actin promoter, and vectors with an internal ribosomal entry sequence linked to GFP (IRES-GFP) were also compared. After gene transfer, we monitored expression for up to 3 days. The functionality of ectopic expression was demonstrated with constructs containing the coding sequences for Shh, a secreted signaling protein, or Hoxb-8, a transcription factor, both of which can induce digit duplication when ectopically expressed in anterior limb mesoderm. We identified several factors that enhance mesodermal gene transfer. First, the use of a vector with the beta-actin promoter coupled to the 69% fragment of the bovine papilloma virus yielded superior mesodermal expression both by markers and functional results when compared with several CMV-driven vectors. Second, we found the use of mineral oil to be an important adjuvant for EP and direct viral injection to localize and contain vector within the mesoderm at the injection site. Lastly, although ectopic expression could be achieved with all three methods, we favored EP confined to the mesoderm with insulated microelectrodes (confined microelectroporation- CMEP), because vector construction is rapid, the method is efficient, and results

  2. Targeted gene silencing to induce permanent sterility.

    PubMed

    Dissen, G A; Lomniczi, A; Boudreau, R L; Chen, Y H; Davidson, B L; Ojeda, S R

    2012-08-01

    A non-surgical method to induce sterility would be a useful tool to control feral populations of animals. Our laboratories have experience with approaches aimed at targeting brain cells in vivo with vehicles that deliver a payload of either inhibitory RNAs or genes intended to correct cellular dysfunction. A combination/modification of these methods may provide a useful framework for the design of approaches that can be used to sterilize cats and dogs. For this approach to succeed, it has to meet several conditions: it needs to target a gene essential for fertility. It must involve a method that can selectively silence the gene of interest. It also needs to deliver the silencing agent via a minimally invasive method. Finally, the silencing effect needs to be sustained for many years, so that expansion of the targeted population can be effectively prevented. In this article, we discuss this subject and provide a succinct account of our previous experience with: (i) molecular reagents able to disrupt reproductive cyclicity when delivered to regions of the brain involved in the control of reproduction and (ii) molecular reagents able to ameliorate neuronal disease when delivered systemically using a novel approach of gene therapy. PMID:22827375

  3. Gene Therapy Targeting Glaucoma: Where Are We?

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xuyang; Rasmussen, Carol A.; Gabelt, B’Ann T.; Brandt, Curtis R.; Kaufman, Paul L.

    2010-01-01

    In a chronic disease such as glaucoma, a therapy that provides a long lasting local effect, with minimal systemic side effects, while circumventing the issue of patient compliance, is very attractive. The field of gene therapy is growing rapidly and ocular applications are expanding. Our understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of glaucoma is leading to greater specificity in ocular tissue targeting. Improvements in gene delivery techniques, refinement of vector construction methods, and development of better animal models combine to bring this potential therapy closer to reality. PMID:19539835

  4. An altered hydrotropic response (ahr1) mutant of Arabidopsis recovers root hydrotropism with cytokinin

    PubMed Central

    Saucedo, Manuel; Ponce, Georgina; Campos, María Eugenia; Eapen, Delfeena; García, Edith; Luján, Rosario; Sánchez, Yoloxóchitl; Cassab, Gladys I.

    2012-01-01

    Roots are highly plastic and can acclimate to heterogeneous and stressful conditions. However, there is little knowledge of the effect of moisture gradients on the mechanisms controlling root growth orientation and branching, and how this mechanism may help plants to avoid drought responses. The aim of this study was to isolate mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana with altered hydrotropic responses. Here, altered hydrotropic response 1 (ahr1), a semi-dominant allele segregating as a single gene mutation, was characterized. ahr1 directed the growth of its primary root towards the source of higher water availability and developed an extensive root system over time. This phenotype was intensified in the presence of abscisic acid and was not observed if ahr1 seedlings were grown in a water stress medium without a water potential gradient. In normal growth conditions, primary root growth and root branching of ahr1 were indistinguishable from those of the wild type (wt). The altered hydrotropic growth of ahr1 roots was confirmed when the water-rich source was placed at an angle of 45° from the gravity vector. In this system, roots of ahr1 seedlings grew downward and did not display hydrotropism; however, in the presence of cytokinins, they exhibited hydrotropism like those of the wt, indicating that cytokinins play a critical role in root hydrotropism. The ahr1 mutant represents a valuable genetic resource for the study of the effects of cytokinins in the differential growth of hydrotropism and control of lateral root formation during the hydrotropic response. PMID:22442413

  5. Time-dependent transcriptomic and biochemical responses of 6-formylindolo[3,2-b]carbazole (FICZ) and 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) are explained by AHR activation time.

    PubMed

    Farmahin, Reza; Crump, Doug; O'Brien, Jason M; Jones, Stephanie P; Kennedy, Sean W

    2016-09-01

    6-Formylindolo[3,2-b]carbazole (FICZ) and 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) are ligands of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) and bind to the AHR with high affinity. Until recently, TCDD was considered to be the most potent AHR agonist, but several recent studies indicate that FICZ binds with greater affinity to the AHR than TCDD. To advance our understanding of the similarities and differences of the effects of FICZ and TCDD exposure in chicken embryo hepatocyte (CEH) cultures, we compared relative expression changes of 27 dioxin-responsive genes by the use of a chicken PCR array, porphyrin accumulation and ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD) activity at different time points. In addition, an egg injection study was performed to assess the effects of FICZ on the developing chicken embryo. The results of the current study showed: (1) mean EROD-derived relative potency values for FICZ compared to TCDD changed as a function of time (i.e. 9, 0.004, 0.0008 and 0.00008 at 3, 8, 24, and 48h, respectively) in CEH cultures; (2) FICZ exposure did not result in porphyrin accumulation in CEH cultures; (3) concordance between gene expression profiles for FICZ and TCDD was time- and concentration-dependent, and (4) no mortality or morphological abnormalities were observed in chicken embryos injected with 0.87ng FICZ/g egg into the air cell. The results presented herein suggest that while FICZ and TCDD share similar molecular targets, transient versus sustained AHR activation by FICZ and TCDD result in differential transcriptomic responses. Moreover, rapid metabolism of FICZ in hepatocytes resulted in a significant decrease in the induction of EROD activity. PMID:27301797

  6. In silico predictive studies of mAHR congener binding using homology modelling and molecular docking.

    PubMed

    Panda, Roshni; Cleave, A Suneetha Susan; Suresh, P K

    2014-09-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) is one of the principal xenobiotic, nuclear receptor that is responsible for the early events involved in the transcription of a complex set of genes comprising the CYP450 gene family. In the present computational study, homology modelling and molecular docking were carried out with the objective of predicting the relationship between the binding efficiency and the lipophilicity of different polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners and the AHR in silico. Homology model of the murine AHR was constructed by several automated servers and assessed by PROCHECK, ERRAT, VERIFY3D and WHAT IF. The resulting model of the AHR by MODWEB was used to carry out molecular docking of 36 PCB congeners using PatchDock server. The lipophilicity of the congeners was predicted using the XLOGP3 tool. The results suggest that the lipophilicity influences binding energy scores and is positively correlated with the same. Score and Log P were correlated with r = +0.506 at p = 0.01 level. In addition, the number of chlorine (Cl) atoms and Log P were highly correlated with r = +0.900 at p = 0.01 level. The number of Cl atoms and scores also showed a moderate positive correlation of r = +0.481 at p = 0.01 level. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study employing PatchDock in the docking of AHR to the environmentally deleterious congeners and attempting to correlate structural features of the AHR with its biochemical properties with regards to PCBs. The result of this study are consistent with those of other computational studies reported in the previous literature that suggests that a combination of docking, scoring and ranking organic pollutants could be a possible predictive tool for investigating ligand-mediated toxicity, for their subsequent validation using wet lab-based studies. PMID:23081860

  7. Exposure to Diesel Exhaust Particle Extracts (DEPe) Impairs Some Polarization Markers and Functions of Human Macrophages through Activation of AhR and Nrf2

    PubMed Central

    Jaguin, Marie; Fardel, Olivier; Lecureur, Valérie

    2015-01-01

    Macrophages (MΦ), well-known to play an important role in immune response, also respond to environmental toxic chemicals such as diesel exhaust particles (DEP). Potential effects of DEPs towards MΦ polarization, a key hall-mark of MΦ physiology, remain however poorly documented. This study was therefore designed to evaluate the effects of a reference DEP extract (DEPe) on human MΦ polarization. Human blood monocytes-derived MΦ were incubated with IFNγ+LPS or IL-4 to obtain M1 and M2 subtypes, respectively; a 24 h exposure of polarizing MΦ to 10 μg/ml DEPe was found to impair expression of some macrophagic M1 and M2 markers, without however overall inhibition of M1 and M2 polarization processes. Notably, DEPe treatment increased the secretion of the M1 marker IL-8 and the M2 marker IL-10 in both MΦ subtypes, whereas it reduced lipopolysaccharide-induced IL-6 and IL-12p40 secretion in M1 MΦ. In M2 MΦ, DEPe exposure led to a reduction of CD200R expression and of CCL17, CCL18 and CCL22 secretion, associated with a lower chemotaxis of CCR4-positive cells. DEPe activated the Nrf2 and AhR pathways and induced expression of their reference target genes such as Hmox-1 and cytochrome P-4501B1 in M1 and M2 MΦ. Nrf2 or AhR silencing through RNA interference prevented DEPe-related down-regulation of IL-6. AhR silencing also inhibited the down-secretion of IL-12p40 and CCL18 in M1- and M2-DEPe-exposed MΦ, respectively. DEPs are therefore likely to alter expression of some M1 and M2 markers in an AhR- and Nrf2-dependent manner; such regulations may contribute to deleterious immune effects of atmospheric DEP. PMID:25710172

  8. A Highly Efficient Gene-Targeting System for Aspergillus parasiticus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gene targeting via homologous recombination is often used to elucidate gene function. For filamentous fungi, the majority of transforming DNA integrates ectopically. Deletion of Aspergillus parasiticus ku70, a gene of the non-homologous end-joining pathway, drastically increased the gene targeting...

  9. Short DNA sequences inserted for gene targeting can accidentally interfere with off-target gene expression.

    PubMed

    Meier, Ingo D; Bernreuther, Christian; Tilling, Thomas; Neidhardt, John; Wong, Yong Wee; Schulze, Christian; Streichert, Thomas; Schachner, Melitta

    2010-06-01

    Targeting of genes in mice, a key approach to study development and disease, often leaves a neo cassette, loxP, or FRT sites inserted in the mouse genome. Insertion of neo can influence the expression of neighboring genes, but similar effects have not been reported for loxP sites. We therefore performed microarray analyses of mice in which the Ncam or the Tnr gene were targeted either by insertion of neo or loxP/FRT sites. In the case of Ncam, neo, but not loxP/FRT insertion, led to a 2-fold reduction in mRNA levels of 3 genes located at distances between 0.2 and 3.1 Mb from the target. In contrast, after introduction of loxP/FRT sites into introns of Tnr, we observed a 2.5- to 4-fold reduction in the transcript level of the Gas5 gene, 1.1 Mb away from Tnr, most probably due to disruption of a conserved regulatory element in Tnr. Insertion of short DNA sequences such as loxP/FRT can thus influence off-target mRNA levels if these sites are accidentally placed into regulatory elements. Our results imply that conditional knockout mice should be analyzed for genomic positional side effects that may influence the animals' phenotypes. PMID:20110269

  10. Rapid targeted gene disruption in Bacillus anthracis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Anthrax is a zoonotic disease recognized to affect herbivores since Biblical times and has the widest range of susceptible host species of any known pathogen. The ease with which the bacterium can be weaponized and its recent deliberate use as an agent of terror, have highlighted the importance of gaining a deeper understanding and effective countermeasures for this important pathogen. High quality sequence data has opened the possibility of systematic dissection of how genes distributed on both the bacterial chromosome and associated plasmids have made it such a successful pathogen. However, low transformation efficiency and relatively few genetic tools for chromosomal manipulation have hampered full interrogation of its genome. Results Group II introns have been developed into an efficient tool for site-specific gene inactivation in several organisms. We have adapted group II intron targeting technology for application in Bacillus anthracis and generated vectors that permit gene inactivation through group II intron insertion. The vectors developed permit screening for the desired insertion through PCR or direct selection of intron insertions using a selection scheme that activates a kanamycin resistance marker upon successful intron insertion. Conclusions The design and vector construction described here provides a useful tool for high throughput experimental interrogation of the Bacillus anthracis genome and will benefit efforts to develop improved vaccines and therapeutics. PMID:24047152

  11. Immunological Relevance of the Coevolution of IDO1 and AHR

    PubMed Central

    Jaronen, Merja; Quintana, Francisco J.

    2014-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor initially identified because of its role in controlling the cellular response to environmental molecules. More recently, AHR has been shown to play a crucial role in controlling innate and adaptive immune responses through several mechanisms, one of which is the regulation of tryptophan metabolism. Indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) and tryptophan-2,3-dioxygenase (TDO) are considered rate-limiting enzymes in the tryptophan catabolism and play important roles in the regulation of the immunity. Moreover, AHR and IDO/TDO are closely interconnected: AHR regulates IDO and TDO expression, and kynurenine produced by IDO/TDO is an AHR agonist. In this review, we propose to examine the relationship between AHR and IDO/TDO and its relevance for the regulation of the immune response in health and disease. PMID:25368620

  12. Spatiotemporal gene expression targeting with the TARGET and gene-switch systems in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    McGuire, Sean E; Mao, Zhengmei; Davis, Ronald L

    2004-02-17

    Targeted gene expression has become a standard technique for the study of biological questions in Drosophila. Until recently, transgene expression could be targeted in the dimension of either time or space, but not both. Several new systems have recently been developed to direct transgene expression simultaneously in both time and space. We describe here two such systems that we developed in our laboratory. The first system provides a general method for temporal and regional gene expression targeting (TARGET) with the conventional GAL4-upstream activator sequence (UAS) system and a temperature-sensitive GAL80 molecule, which represses GAL4 transcriptional activity at permissive temperatures. The second system, termed Gene-Switch, is based on a GAL4-progesterone receptor chimera that is hormone-inducible. We have used both systems for simultaneous spatial and temporal rescue of memory dysfunction in the rutabaga (rut) memory mutant of Drosophila. In this protocol, we provide guidelines for the use of these two novel systems, which should have general utility in studying Drosophila biology and in using the fly as a model for human disease. PMID:14970377

  13. Targeted gene knockout in chickens mediated by TALENs.

    PubMed

    Park, Tae Sub; Lee, Hong Jo; Kim, Ki Hyun; Kim, Jin-Soo; Han, Jae Yong

    2014-09-01

    Genetically modified animals are used for industrial applications as well as scientific research, and studies on these animals contribute to a better understanding of biological mechanisms. Gene targeting techniques have been developed to edit specific gene loci in the genome, but the conventional strategy of homologous recombination with a gene-targeted vector has low efficiency and many technical complications. Here, we generated specific gene knockout chickens through the use of transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN)-mediated gene targeting. In this study, we accomplished targeted knockout of the ovalbumin (OV) gene in the chicken primordial germ cells, and OV gene mutant offspring were generated through test-cross analysis. TALENs successfully induced nucleotide deletion mutations of ORF shifts, resulting in loss of chicken OV gene function. Our results demonstrate that the TALEN technique used in the chicken primordial germ cell line is a powerful strategy to create specific genome-edited chickens safely for practical applications. PMID:25139993

  14. Targeted gene knockout in chickens mediated by TALENs

    PubMed Central

    Park, Tae Sub; Lee, Hong Jo; Kim, Ki Hyun; Kim, Jin-Soo; Han, Jae Yong

    2014-01-01

    Genetically modified animals are used for industrial applications as well as scientific research, and studies on these animals contribute to a better understanding of biological mechanisms. Gene targeting techniques have been developed to edit specific gene loci in the genome, but the conventional strategy of homologous recombination with a gene-targeted vector has low efficiency and many technical complications. Here, we generated specific gene knockout chickens through the use of transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN)-mediated gene targeting. In this study, we accomplished targeted knockout of the ovalbumin (OV) gene in the chicken primordial germ cells, and OV gene mutant offspring were generated through test-cross analysis. TALENs successfully induced nucleotide deletion mutations of ORF shifts, resulting in loss of chicken OV gene function. Our results demonstrate that the TALEN technique used in the chicken primordial germ cell line is a powerful strategy to create specific genome-edited chickens safely for practical applications. PMID:25139993

  15. TOXICITY OF AHR AGONISTS TO FISH EARLY LIFE STAGES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fish early life stages are exceptionally sensitive to the lethal toxicity of chemicals that act as arylhydrocarbon receptor (AhR) agonists. Toxicity characterizations based on 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin, generally the most potent AhR agonist, support the toxicity equiva...

  16. AHR signaling in prostate growth, morphogenesis, and disease

    PubMed Central

    Vezina, Chad M.; Lin, Tien-Min; Peterson, Richard E.

    2010-01-01

    Most evidence of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) signaling in prostate growth, morphogenesis, and disease stems from research using 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) to pharmacologically activate the AHR at various stages of development. This review discusses effects of TCDD on prostate morphogenesis and highlights interactions between AHR and other signaling pathways during normal and aberrant prostate growth. Although AHR signaling modulates estrogen and androgen signaling in other tissues, crosstalk between these steroid hormone receptors and AHR signaling cannot account for actions of TCDD on prostate morphogenesis. Instead, the AHR appears to act within a cooperative framework of developmental signals to regulate timing and patterning of prostate growth. Inappropriate activation of AHR signaling as a result of early life TCDD exposure disrupts the balance of these signals, impairs prostate morphogenesis, and has an imprinting effect on the developing prostate that predisposes to prostate disease in adulthood. Mechanisms of AHR signaling in prostate growth and disease are only beginning to be unraveled and recent studies have revealed its interactions with WNT5A, retinoic acid, fibroblast growth factor 10, and vascular endothelial growth factor signaling pathways. PMID:18977204

  17. The AhR Ligand, TCDD, Regulates Androgen Receptor Activity Differently in Androgen-Sensitive versus Castration-Resistant Human Prostate Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Ghotbaddini, Maryam; Powell, Joann B

    2015-07-01

    The reported biological effects of TCDD include induction of drug metabolizing enzymes, wasting syndrome and tumor promotion. TCDD elicits most of its effects through binding the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). TCDD induced degradation of AhR has been widely reported and requires ubiquitination of the protein. The rapid depletion of AhR following TCDD activation serves as a mechanism to modulate AhR mediated gene induction. In addition to inducing AhR degradation, TCDD has been reported to induce degradation of hormone receptors. The studies reported here, evaluate the effect of TCDD exposure on androgen receptor (AR) expression and activity in androgen-sensitive LNCaP and castration-resistant C4-2 prostate cancer cells. Our results show that TCDD exposure does not induce AhR or AR degradation in C4-2 cells. However, both AhR and AR are degraded in LNCaP cells following TCDD exposure. In addition, TCDD enhances AR phosphorylation and induces expression of AR responsive genes in LNCaP cells. Our data reveals that TCDD effect on AR expression and activity differs in androgen-sensitive and castration-resistant prostate cancer cell models. PMID:26154658

  18. The AhR Ligand, TCDD, Regulates Androgen Receptor Activity Differently in Androgen-Sensitive versus Castration-Resistant Human Prostate Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ghotbaddini, Maryam; Powell, Joann B.

    2015-01-01

    The reported biological effects of TCDD include induction of drug metabolizing enzymes, wasting syndrome and tumor promotion. TCDD elicits most of its effects through binding the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). TCDD induced degradation of AhR has been widely reported and requires ubiquitination of the protein. The rapid depletion of AhR following TCDD activation serves as a mechanism to modulate AhR mediated gene induction. In addition to inducing AhR degradation, TCDD has been reported to induce degradation of hormone receptors. The studies reported here, evaluate the effect of TCDD exposure on androgen receptor (AR) expression and activity in androgen-sensitive LNCaP and castration-resistant C4-2 prostate cancer cells. Our results show that TCDD exposure does not induce AhR or AR degradation in C4-2 cells. However, both AhR and AR are degraded in LNCaP cells following TCDD exposure. In addition, TCDD enhances AR phosphorylation and induces expression of AR responsive genes in LNCaP cells. Our data reveals that TCDD effect on AR expression and activity differs in androgen-sensitive and castration-resistant prostate cancer cell models. PMID:26154658

  19. Aryl hydrocarbon receptor-mediated induction of the cytosolic phospholipase A(2)alpha gene by 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin in mouse hepatoma Hepa-1c1c7 cells.

    PubMed

    Kinehara, Masaki; Fukuda, Itsuko; Yoshida, Ken-ichi; Ashida, Hitoshi

    2009-10-01

    Upon binding to ligands such as 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), an aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is activated to form a heterodimer with an aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator (Arnt). This complex binds to DNA. It has been shown that the AhR bonds to a DNA sequence called the dioxin response element (DRE), which controls the expression of battery genes. It is reported that TCDD releases arachidonic acid from membrane phospholipids via activation of phospholipase A(2)s (PLA(2)s) in various cell types. Recently, we demonstrated that the TCDD-activated AhR binds to the second intron of the Pla2g4a gene, which encodes cytosolic phospholipase A(2)alpha (cPLA(2)alpha), in mouse hepatoma Hepa-1c1c7 cells. This result suggests that Pla2g4a appears to be a target gene of the AhR. In the present study, we investigated whether the transcriptional regulation of Pla2g4a is dependent on the AhR in Hepa-1c1c7 cells. Treatment of the cells with TCDD increased mRNA expression of Pla2g4a and enzymatic activity of PLA(2,) while this increased expression was not observed in AhR-defective c12 cells. After transient transfection of an Ahr gene-expressing plasmid into the c12 cells, expression of Pla2g4a was increased by TCDD. These results indicate that Pla2g4a may be a novel target gene of the AhR, and its transcriptional induction is mediated through binding of the AhR to the second intron of Pla2g4a, although this target site does not have a typical DRE sequence. PMID:19716514

  20. Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor (AhR) Regulates Silica-Induced Inflammation But Not Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Beamer, Celine A.; Seaver, Benjamin P.; Shepherd, David M.

    2012-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), a ligand-activated transcription factor, is responsible for mediating a variety of pharmacological and toxicological effects caused by halogenated aromatic hydrocarbons such as 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). However, recent evidence has revealed that the AhR also has numerous physiological roles aside from xenobiotic metabolism, including regulation of immune and inflammatory signaling as well as normal development and homeostasis of several organs. To investigate the role of the AhR in crystalline silica (SiO2)–induced inflammation and fibrosis, C57Bl/6 and AhR−/− mice were exposed to SiO2 or vehicle. Similarly, C57Bl/6 mice were exposed to SiO2 and TCDD either simultaneously or sequentially to assess whether AhR activation alters inflammation and fibrosis. SiO2-induced acute lung inflammation was more severe in AhR−/− mice; however, the fibrotic response of AhR−/− mice was attenuated compared with C57Bl/6 mice. In a model of chronic SiO2 exposure, AhR activation by TCDD in C57Bl/6 mice resulted in reduced inflammation; however, the fibrotic response was not affected. Bone marrow–derived macrophages (BMM) from AhR−/− mice also produced higher levels of cytokines and chemokines in response to SiO2. Analysis of gene expression revealed that BMM derived from AhR−/− mice exhibit increased levels of pro-interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, and Bcl-2, yet decreased levels of signal transducers and activators of transcription (STAT)2, STAT5a, and serpin B2 (Pai-2) in response to SiO2. PMID:22273745

  1. A TDO2-AhR signaling axis facilitates anoikis resistance and metastasis in triple-negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    D'Amato, Nicholas C; Rogers, Thomas J; Gordon, Michael A; Greene, Lisa I; Cochrane, Dawn R; Spoelstra, Nicole S; Nemkov, Travis G; D'Alessandro, Angelo; Hansen, Kirk C; Richer, Jennifer K

    2015-11-01

    The ability of a cancer cell to develop resistance to anoikis, a programmed cell death process triggered by substratum detachment, is a critical step in the metastatic cascade. Triple-negative breast cancers (TNBC) exhibit higher rates of metastasis after diagnosis, relative to estrogen-positive breast cancers, but while TNBC cells are relatively more resistant to anoikis, the mechanisms involved are unclear. Through gene expression and metabolomic profiling of TNBC cells in forced suspension culture, we identified a molecular pathway critical for anchorage-independent cell survival. TNBC cells in suspension upregulated multiple genes in the kynurenine pathway of tryptophan catabolism, including the enzyme tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase (TDO2), in an NF-κB-dependent manner. Kynurenine production mediated by TDO2 in TNBC cells was sufficient to activate aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), an endogenous kynurenine receptor. Notably, pharmacologic inhibition or genetic attenuation of TDO2 or AhR increased cellular sensitivity to anoikis, and also reduced proliferation, migration, and invasion of TNBC cells. In vivo, TDO2 inhibitor-treated TNBC cells inhibited colonization of the lung, suggesting that TDO2 enhanced metastatic capacity. In clinical specimens of TNBC, elevated expression of TDO2 was associated with increased disease grade, estrogen receptor-negative status, and shorter overall survival. Our results define an NF-κB-regulated signaling axis that promotes anoikis resistance, suggest functional connections with inflammatory modulation by the kynurenine pathway, and highlight TDO2 as an attractive target for treatment of this aggressive breast cancer subtype. PMID:26363006

  2. Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Activation by Dioxin Targets Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxykinase (PEPCK) for ADP-ribosylation via 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD)-inducible Poly(ADP-ribose) Polymerase (TiPARP)*

    PubMed Central

    Diani-Moore, Silvia; Zhang, Sheng; Ram, Payal; Rifkind, Arleen B.

    2013-01-01

    Effects of the environmental toxin and carcinogen 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD, dioxin) include a wasting syndrome associated with decreased gluconeogenesis. TCDD is a potent activator of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR), a ligand activated transcription factor. The relationship between gene activation by the AHR and TCDD toxicities is not well understood. We recently identified a pathway by which the AHR target gene TiPARP (TCDD-inducible poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase) contributes to TCDD suppression of transcription of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK), a key regulator of gluconeogenesis, by consuming NAD+ and decreasing Sirtuin 1 activation of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1α (PGC1α), a transcriptional activator of PEPCK. We report here that TCDD-induced TiPARP also targets PEPCK for ADP-ribosylation. Both cytosolic and mitochondrial forms of PEPCK were found to undergo ADP-ribosylation. Unexpectedly, AHR suppression also enhanced ADP-ribosylation and did so by a poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-independent mechanism. This report 1) identifies ADP-ribosylation as a new posttranslational modification for PEPCK, 2) describes a pathway by which transcriptional induction of TiPARP by the AHR can lead to a downstream posttranslational change in a TCDD target protein (PEPCK), and 3) reveals that the AHR exerts complex, previously unidentified modulatory effects on ADP-ribosylation. PMID:23770670

  3. Enriching CRISPR-Cas9 targeted cells by co-targeting the HPRT gene.

    PubMed

    Liao, Shuren; Tammaro, Margaret; Yan, Hong

    2015-11-16

    The CRISPR-Cas9 system uses guide RNAs to direct the Cas9 endonuclease to cleave target sequences. It can, in theory, target essentially any sequence in a genome, but the efficiency of the predicted guide RNAs varies dramatically. If no targeted cells are obtained, it is also difficult to know why the experiment fails. We have developed a transient transfection based method to enrich successfully targeted cells by co-targeting the hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) gene. Cells are transfected with two guide RNAs that target respectively HPRT and the gene of interest. HPRT targeted cells are selected by resistance to 6-thioguanine (6-TG) and then examined for potential alterations to the gene targeted by the co-transfected guide RNA. Alterations of many genes, such as AAVS1, Exo1 and Trex1, are highly enriched in the 6-TG resistant cells. This method works in both HCT116 cells and U2OS cells and can easily be scaled up to process multiple guide RNAs. When co-targeting fails, it is straightforward to determine whether the target gene is essential or the guide RNA is ineffective. HPRT co-targeting thus provides a simple, efficient and scalable way to enrich gene targeting events and to identify the cause of failure. PMID:26130722

  4. AhR sensing of bacterial pigments regulates antibacterial defence.

    PubMed

    Moura-Alves, Pedro; Faé, Kellen; Houthuys, Erica; Dorhoi, Anca; Kreuchwig, Annika; Furkert, Jens; Barison, Nicola; Diehl, Anne; Munder, Antje; Constant, Patricia; Skrahina, Tatsiana; Guhlich-Bornhof, Ute; Klemm, Marion; Koehler, Anne-Britta; Bandermann, Silke; Goosmann, Christian; Mollenkopf, Hans-Joachim; Hurwitz, Robert; Brinkmann, Volker; Fillatreau, Simon; Daffe, Mamadou; Tümmler, Burkhard; Kolbe, Michael; Oschkinat, Hartmut; Krause, Gerd; Kaufmann, Stefan H E

    2014-08-28

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a highly conserved ligand-dependent transcription factor that senses environmental toxins and endogenous ligands, thereby inducing detoxifying enzymes and modulating immune cell differentiation and responses. We hypothesized that AhR evolved to sense not only environmental pollutants but also microbial insults. We characterized bacterial pigmented virulence factors, namely the phenazines from Pseudomonas aeruginosa and the naphthoquinone phthiocol from Mycobacterium tuberculosis, as ligands of AhR. Upon ligand binding, AhR activation leads to virulence factor degradation and regulated cytokine and chemokine production. The relevance of AhR to host defence is underlined by heightened susceptibility of AhR-deficient mice to both P. aeruginosa and M. tuberculosis. Thus, we demonstrate that AhR senses distinct bacterial virulence factors and controls antibacterial responses, supporting a previously unidentified role for AhR as an intracellular pattern recognition receptor, and identify bacterial pigments as a new class of pathogen-associated molecular patterns. PMID:25119038

  5. Genome Editing of the CYP1A1 Locus in iPSCs as a Platform to Map AHR Expression throughout Human Development

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Brenden W.; Stanford, Elizabeth A.; Sherr, David H.; Murphy, George J.

    2016-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) is a ligand activated transcription factor that increases the expression of detoxifying enzymes upon ligand stimulation. Recent studies now suggest that novel endogenous roles of the AHR exist throughout development. In an effort to create an optimized model system for the study of AHR signaling in several cellular lineages, we have employed a CRISPR/CAS9 genome editing strategy in induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) to incorporate a reporter cassette at the transcription start site of one of its canonical targets, cytochrome P450 1A1 (CYP1A1). This cell line faithfully reports on CYP1A1 expression, with luciferase levels as its functional readout, when treated with an endogenous AHR ligand (FICZ) at escalating doses. iPSC-derived fibroblast-like cells respond to acute exposure to environmental and endogenous AHR ligands, and iPSC-derived hepatocytes increase CYP1A1 in a similar manner to primary hepatocytes. This cell line is an important innovation that can be used to map AHR activity in discrete cellular subsets throughout developmental ontogeny. As further endogenous ligands are proposed, this line can be used to screen for safety and efficacy and can report on the ability of small molecules to regulate critical cellular processes by modulating the activity of the AHR. PMID:27148368

  6. Expression of aryl hydrocarbon receptor 1 (AHR1), AHR1 nuclear translocator 1 (ARNT1) and CYP1 family monooxygenase mRNAs and their activity in chicken ovarian follicles following in vitro exposure to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD).

    PubMed

    Antos, Piotr A; Błachuta, Małgorzata; Hrabia, Anna; Grzegorzewska, Agnieszka K; Sechman, Andrzej

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to determine the effect of TCDD and luteinizing hormone (LH) on mRNA expression of aryl hydrocarbon receptor 1 (AHR1), AHR1 nuclear translocator 1 (ARNT1), and the CYP1 family monooxygenases (CYP1A4, CYP1A5, CYP1B1), and to assess the basal and TCDD-induced activity of these enzymes in chicken ovarian follicles. White (WF) and yellowish (YF) prehierarchical follicles and fragments of the theca (TL) and granulosa (GL) layers of the 3 largest preovulatory follicles (F3-F1) were exposed to TCDD (10nM), ovine LH (oLH; 10ng/mL) or a combination of TCDD (10nM) and oLH (10ng/mL), and increasing doses of TCDD (0.01-100nM). AHR1 and ARNT1 mRNA transcripts were found in all examined follicles. The effect of TCDD and oLH on AHR1 and ARNT1 mRNA expression depended on the maturational state of the follicle. CYP1A4 was predominantly expressed in the GL of the F3-F1 follicles; in comparison with the WF, a higher level of CYP1A5 mRNA was found both in the GL and TL of F3-F1 follicles. Alternatively, the highest level of CYP1B1 mRNA was noticed in the WF follicles. In different developmental stages of the follicle TCDD and oLH induced a different CYP1 isoform. TCDD increased EROD and MROD activities in all the investigated ovarian follicles. In conclusion, AHR1 and ARNT1 mRNA expression indicate that the chicken ovary is a target tissue for dioxin and dioxin-like compounds. The expression of CYP1-family genes and TCDD-inducible EROD and MROD activities in ovarian follicles suggest the possibility of xenobiotic detoxification in the chicken ovary. PMID:26043675

  7. NK cells contribute to persistent airway inflammation and AHR during the later stage of RSV infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Long, Xiaoru; Xie, Jun; Zhao, Keting; Li, Wei; Tang, Wei; Chen, Sisi; Zang, Na; Ren, Luo; Deng, Yu; Xie, Xiaohong; Wang, Lijia; Fu, Zhou; Liu, Enmei

    2016-10-01

    RSV can lead to persistent airway inflammation and AHR and is intimately associated with childhood recurrent wheezing and asthma, but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. There are high numbers of NK cells in the lung, which not only play important roles in the acute stage of RSV infection, but also are pivotal in regulating the pathogenesis of asthma. Therefore, in this study, we assumed that NK cells might contribute to persistent airway disease during the later stage of RSV infection. Mice were killed at serial time points after RSV infection to collect samples. Leukocytes in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were counted, lung histopathology was examined, and airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) was measured by whole-body plethysmography. Cytokines were detected by ELISA, and NK cells were determined by flow cytometry. Rabbit anti-mouse asialo-GM-1 antibodies and resveratrol were used to deplete or suppress NK cells. Inflammatory cells in BALF, lung tissue damage and AHR were persistent for 60 days post-RSV infection. Type 2 cytokines and NK cells were significantly increased during the later stage of infection. When NK cells were decreased by the antibodies or resveratrol, type 2 cytokines, the persistent airway inflammation and AHR were all markedly reduced. NK cells can contribute to the RSV-associated persistent airway inflammation and AHR at least partially by promoting type 2 cytokines. Therefore, therapeutic targeting of NK cells may provide a novel approach to alleviating the recurrent wheezing subsequent to RSV infection. PMID:27329138

  8. Transcriptional targeting of tumor endothelial cells for gene therapy

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Zhihong; Nör, Jacques E.

    2009-01-01

    It is well known that angiogenesis plays a critical role in the pathobiology of tumors. Recent clinical trials have shown that inhibition of angiogenesis can be an effective therapeutic strategy for patients with cancer. However, one of the outstanding issues in anti-angiogenic treatment for cancer is the development of toxicities related to off-target effects of drugs. Transcriptional targeting of tumor endothelial cells involves the use of specific promoters for selective expression of therapeutic genes in the endothelial cells lining the blood vessels of tumors. Recently, several genes that are expressed specifically in tumor-associated endothelial cells have been identified and characterized. These discoveries have enhanced the prospectus of transcriptionaly targeting tumor endothelial cells for cancer gene therapy. In this manuscript, we review the promoters, vectors, and therapeutic genes that have been used for transcriptional targeting of tumor endothelial cells, and discuss the prospects of such approaches for cancer gene therapy. PMID:19393703

  9. Homologous gene targeting in Caenorhabditis elegans by biolistic transformation

    PubMed Central

    Berezikov, Eugene; Bargmann, Cornelia I.; Plasterk, Ronald H. A.

    2004-01-01

    Targeted homologous recombination is a powerful approach for genome manipulation that is widely used for gene alteration and knockouts in mouse and yeast. In Caenorhabditis elegans, several methods of target-selected mutagenesis have been implemented but none of them provides the opportunity of introducing exact predefined changes into the genome. Although anecdotal cases of homologous gene targeting in C.elegans have been reported, no practical technique of gene targeting has been developed so far. In this work we demonstrate that transformation of C.elegans by microparticle bombardment (biolistic transformation) can result in homologous recombination between introduced DNA and the chromosomal locus. We describe a scaled up version of biolistic transformation that can be used as a method for homologous gene targeting in the worm. PMID:14982959

  10. Benzo[ghi]perylene activates the AHR pathway to exert biological effects on the NL-20 human bronchial cell line.

    PubMed

    Zaragoza-Ojeda, Montserrat; Eguía-Aguilar, Pilar; Perezpeña-Díazconti, Mario; Arenas-Huertero, Francisco

    2016-08-10

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) are produced by incomplete combustion of organic material. In the Mexico City atmosphere, the most abundant PAH is benzo[ghi]perylene (BghiP), a gasoline combustion marker. At present, there are no reports of the effects of BghiP on human bronchial cells, so the aim of the study was to evaluate the effects in vitro of BghiP on the NL-20 cell line. Results showed that BghiP induced the formation of small vesicles throughout the cytoplasm, with absence of nuclear fragmentation. At 48h exposition, damage in cell membrane increased significantly at 1.24μg/mL of BghiP (p<0.05). Immunocytochemistry revealed that BghiP provokes nuclear translocation of AhR receptor, which indicates that this compound can induce transcription of genes via receptor binding (AhR pathway activation). BghiP induced a two-fold increase (p<0.05) in the expression of AhR and CYP4B1 (a lung-specific pathway effector). In the presence of the receptor antagonist CH-223191, the loss of viability, the nuclear translocation and the overexpression of genes decreased, though this did not prevent the formation of vesicles. BghiP induced oxidative stress and in presence of the receptor antagonist this increased significantly. In conclusion, BghiP can activate the overexpression of AhR and CYP4B1, and the effects are abated by the AhR receptor antagonist. This is the first report to prove that BghiP utilizes the AhR pathway to exert its toxic effects on the NL-20 human bronchial cell line . PMID:27234499

  11. Gene-targeting pharmaceuticals for single-gene disorders.

    PubMed

    Beaudet, Arthur L; Meng, Linyan

    2016-04-15

    The concept of orphan drugs for treatment of orphan genetic diseases is perceived enthusiastically at present, and this is leading to research investment on the part of governments, disease-specific foundations and industry. This review attempts to survey the potential to use traditional pharmaceuticals as opposed to biopharmaceuticals to treat single-gene disorders. The available strategies include the use of antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) to alter splicing or knock-down expression of a transcript, siRNAs to knock-down gene expression and drugs for nonsense mutation read-through. There is an approved drug for biallelic knock-down of the APOB gene as treatment for familial hypercholesterolemia. Both ASOs and siRNAs are being explored to knock-down the transthyretin gene to prevent the related form of amyloidosis. The use of ASOs to alter gene-splicing to treat spinal muscular atrophy is in phase 3 clinical trials. Work is progressing on the use of ASOs to activate the normally silent paternal copy of the imprinted UBE3A gene in neurons as a treatment for Angelman syndrome. A gene-activation or gene-specific ramp-up strategy would be generally helpful if such could be developed. There is exciting theoretical potential for converting biopharmaceutical strategies such gene correction and CRISPR-Cas9 editing to a synthetic pharmaceutical approach. PMID:26628634

  12. Simulator for SUPO, a Benchmark Aqueous Homogeneous Reactor (AHR)

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, Steven Karl; Determan, John C.

    2015-10-14

    A simulator has been developed for SUPO (Super Power) an aqueous homogeneous reactor (AHR) that operated at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) from 1951 to 1974. During that period SUPO accumulated approximately 600,000 kWh of operation. It is considered the benchmark for steady-state operation of an AHR. The SUPO simulator was developed using the process that resulted in a simulator for an accelerator-driven subcritical system, which has been previously reported.

  13. Transcriptionally targeted gene therapy to detect and treat cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Lily; Johnson, Mai; Sato, Makoto

    2010-01-01

    The greatest challenge in cancer treatment is to achieve the highest levels of specificity and efficacy. Cancer gene therapy could be designed specifically to express therapeutic genes to induce cancer cell destruction. Cancer-specific promoters are useful tools to accomplish targeted expression; however, high levels of gene expression are needed to achieve therapeutic efficacy. Incorporating an imaging reporter gene in tandem with the therapeutic gene will allow tangible proof of principle that gene expression occurs at the correct location and at a sufficient level. Gene-based imaging can advance cancer detection and diagnosis. By combining the cancer-targeted imaging and therapeutic strategies, the exciting prospect of a ‘one-two punch’ to find hidden, disseminated cancer cells and destroy them simultaneously can potentially be realized. PMID:14557054

  14. The Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Complex and the Control of Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Beischlag, Timothy V.; Morales, J. Luis; Hollingshead, Brett D.; Perdew, Gary H.

    2008-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor that controls the expression of a diverse set of genes. The toxicity of the potent AhR ligand 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin is almost exclusively mediated through this receptor. However, the key alterations in gene expression that mediate toxicity are poorly understood. It has been established through characterization of AhR-null mice that the AhR has a required physiological function, yet how endogenous mediators regulate this orphan receptor remains to be established. A picture as to how the AhR/ARNT heterodimer actually mediates gene transcription is starting to emerge. The AhR/ARNT complex can alter transcription both by binding to its cognate response element and through tethering to other transcription factors. In addition, many of the coregulatory proteins necessary for AhR-mediated transcription have been identified. Cross talk between the estrogen receptor and the AhR at the promoter of target genes appears to be an important mode of regulation. Inflammatory signaling pathways and the AhR also appear to be another important site of cross talk at the level of transcription. A major focus of this review is to highlight experimental efforts to characterize nonclassical mechanisms of AhR-mediated modulation of gene transcription. PMID:18540824

  15. Promoterless gene targeting without nucleases ameliorates haemophilia B in mice.

    PubMed

    Barzel, A; Paulk, N K; Shi, Y; Huang, Y; Chu, K; Zhang, F; Valdmanis, P N; Spector, L P; Porteus, M H; Gaensler, K M; Kay, M A

    2015-01-15

    Site-specific gene addition can allow stable transgene expression for gene therapy. When possible, this is preferred over the use of promiscuously integrating vectors, which are sometimes associated with clonal expansion and oncogenesis. Site-specific endonucleases that can induce high rates of targeted genome editing are finding increasing applications in biological discovery and gene therapy. However, two safety concerns persist: endonuclease-associated adverse effects, both on-target and off-target; and oncogene activation caused by promoter integration, even without nucleases. Here we perform recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV)-mediated promoterless gene targeting without nucleases and demonstrate amelioration of the bleeding diathesis in haemophilia B mice. In particular, we target a promoterless human coagulation factor IX (F9) gene to the liver-expressed mouse albumin (Alb) locus. F9 is targeted, along with a preceding 2A-peptide coding sequence, to be integrated just upstream to the Alb stop codon. While F9 is fused to Alb at the DNA and RNA levels, two separate proteins are synthesized by way of ribosomal skipping. Thus, F9 expression is linked to robust hepatic albumin expression without disrupting it. We injected an AAV8-F9 vector into neonatal and adult mice and achieved on-target integration into ∼0.5% of the albumin alleles in hepatocytes. We established that F9 was produced only from on-target integration, and ribosomal skipping was highly efficient. Stable F9 plasma levels at 7-20% of normal were obtained, and treated F9-deficient mice had normal coagulation times. In conclusion, transgene integration as a 2A-fusion to a highly expressed endogenous gene may obviate the requirement for nucleases and/or vector-borne promoters. This method may allow for safe and efficacious gene targeting in both infants and adults by greatly diminishing off-target effects while still providing therapeutic levels of expression from integration. PMID:25363772

  16. AAV-mediated gene targeting methods for human cells

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Iram F; Hirata, Roli K; Russell, David W

    2013-01-01

    Gene targeting with adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors has been demonstrated in multiple human cell types, with targeting frequencies ranging from 10−5 to 10−2 per infected cell. these targeting frequencies are 1–4 logs higher than those obtained by conventional transfection or electroporation approaches. a wide variety of different types of mutations can be introduced into chromosomal loci with high fidelity and without genotoxicity. Here we provide a detailed protocol for gene targeting in human cells with AAV vectors. We describe methods for vector design, stock preparation and titration. optimized transduction protocols are provided for human pluripotent stem cells, mesenchymal stem cells, fibroblasts and transformed cell lines, as well as a method for identifying targeted clones by southern blots. this protocol (from vector design through a single round of targeting and screening) can be completed in ~10 weeks; each subsequent round of targeting and screening should take an additional 7 weeks. PMID:21455185

  17. Self-targeting by CRISPR: gene regulation or autoimmunity?

    PubMed Central

    Stern, Adi; Keren, Leeat; Wurtzel, Omri; Amitai, Gil; Sorek, Rotem

    2010-01-01

    CRISPR/Cas is a recently discovered prokaryotic immune system, which is based on small RNAs (“spacers”) that restrict phage and plasmid infection. It has been hypothesized that CRISPRs can also regulate self gene expression by utilizing spacers that target self genes. By analyzing CRISPRs from 330 organisms we found that one in every 250 spacers is self targeting, and that such self-targeting occurs in 18% of all CRISPR-bearing organisms. However, complete lack of conservation across species, combined with abundance of degraded repeats near self-targeting spacers, suggests that self-targeting is a consequence of autoimmunity rather than gene regulation. We propose that accidental incorporation of self nucleic-acids by CRISPR can incur an autoimmune fitness cost, which may explain the abundance of degraded CRISPR systems across prokaryotes. PMID:20598393

  18. Cell Targeting in Anti-Cancer Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lila, Mohd Azmi Mohd; Siew, John Shia Kwong; Zakaria, Hayati; Saad, Suria Mohd; Ni, Lim Shen; Abdullah, Jafri Malin

    2004-01-01

    Gene therapy is a promising approach towards cancer treatment. The main aim of the therapy is to destroy cancer cells, usually by apoptotic mechanisms, and preserving others. However, its application has been hindered by many factors including poor cellular uptake, non-specific cell targeting and undesirable interferences with other genes or gene products. A variety of strategies exist to improve cellular uptake efficiency of gene-based therapies. This paper highlights advancements in gene therapy research and its application in relation to anti-cancer treatment. PMID:22977356

  19. AhR activation underlies the CYP1A autoinduction by A-998679 in rats

    PubMed Central

    Liguori, Michael J.; Lee, Chih-Hung; Liu, Hong; Ciurlionis, Rita; Ditewig, Amy C.; Doktor, Stella; Andracki, Mark E.; Gagne, Gerard D.; Waring, Jeffrey F.; Marsh, Kennan C.; Gopalakrishnan, Murali; Blomme, Eric A. G.; Yang, Yi

    2012-01-01

    Xenobiotic-mediated induction of cytochrome P450 (CYP) drug metabolizing enzymes (DMEs) is frequently encountered in drug discovery and can influence disposition, pharmacokinetic, and toxicity profiles. The CYP1A subfamily of DMEs plays a central role in the biotransformation of several drugs and environmental chemicals. Autoinduction of drugs through CYP3A enzymes is a common mechanism for their enhanced clearance. However, autoinduction via CYP1A is encountered less frequently. In this report, an experimental compound, A-998679 [3-(5-pyridin-3-yl-1,2,4-oxadiazol-3-yl) benzonitrile], was shown to enhance its own clearance via induction of Cyp1a1 and Cyp1a2. Rats were dosed for 5 days with 30, 100, and 200 mg/kg/day A-998679. During the dosing period, the compound's plasma AUC decreased at 30 mg/kg (95%) and 100 mg/kg (80%). Gene expression analysis and immunohistochemistry of the livers showed a large increase in the mRNA and protein levels of Cyp1a, which was involved in the biotransformation of A-998679. Induction of CYP1A was confirmed in primary rat, human, and dog hepatocytes. The compound also weakly inhibited CYP1A2 in human liver microsomes. A-998679 activated the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) in a luciferase gene reporter assay in HepG2 cells, upregulated expression of genes associated with AhR activation in rat liver and enhanced nuclear migration of AhR in HepG2 cells. Collectively these results demonstrate that A-998679 is an AhR activator that induces Cyp1a1 and Cyp1a2 expression, resulting in an autoinduction phenomenon. The unique properties of A-998679, along with its novel structure distinct from classical polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), may warrant its further evaluation as a tool compound for use in studies involving AhR biology and CYP1A-related mechanisms of drug metabolism and toxicity. PMID:23112805

  20. Chromatin looping as a target for altering erythroid gene expression.

    PubMed

    Krivega, Ivan; Dean, Ann

    2016-03-01

    The β-hemoglobinopathies are the most common monogenic disorders in humans, with symptoms arising after birth when the fetal γ-globin genes are silenced and the adult β-globin gene is activated. There is a growing appreciation that genome organization and the folding of chromosomes are key determinants of gene transcription. Underlying this function is the activity of transcriptional enhancers that increase the transcription of target genes over long linear distances. To accomplish this, enhancers engage in close physical contact with target promoters through chromosome folding or looping that is orchestrated by protein complexes that bind to both sites and stabilize their interaction. We find that enhancer activity can be redirected with concomitant changes in gene transcription. Both targeting the β-globin locus control region (LCR) to the γ-globin gene in adult erythroid cells by tethering and epigenetic unmasking of a silenced γ-globin gene lead to increased frequency of LCR/γ-globin contacts and reduced LCR/β-globin contacts. The outcome of these manipulations is robust, pancellular γ-globin transcription activation with a concomitant reduction in β-globin transcription. These examples show that chromosome looping may be considered a therapeutic target for gene activation in β-thalassemia and sickle cell disease. PMID:26918894

  1. A Flexible Approach for Highly Multiplexed Candidate Gene Targeted Resequencing

    PubMed Central

    Natsoulis, Georges; Bell, John M.; Xu, Hua; Buenrostro, Jason D.; Ordonez, Heather; Grimes, Susan; Newburger, Daniel; Jensen, Michael; Zahn, Jacob M.; Zhang, Nancy; Ji, Hanlee P.

    2011-01-01

    We have developed an integrated strategy for targeted resequencing and analysis of gene subsets from the human exome for variants. Our capture technology is geared towards resequencing gene subsets substantially larger than can be done efficiently with simplex or multiplex PCR but smaller in scale than exome sequencing. We describe all the steps from the initial capture assay to single nucleotide variant (SNV) discovery. The capture methodology uses in-solution 80-mer oligonucleotides. To provide optimal flexibility in choosing human gene targets, we designed an in silico set of oligonucleotides, the Human OligoExome, that covers the gene exons annotated by the Consensus Coding Sequencing Project (CCDS). This resource is openly available as an Internet accessible database where one can download capture oligonucleotides sequences for any CCDS gene and design custom capture assays. Using this resource, we demonstrated the flexibility of this assay by custom designing capture assays ranging from 10 to over 100 gene targets with total capture sizes from over 100 Kilobases to nearly one Megabase. We established a method to reduce capture variability and incorporated indexing schemes to increase sample throughput. Our approach has multiple applications that include but are not limited to population targeted resequencing studies of specific gene subsets, validation of variants discovered in whole genome sequencing surveys and possible diagnostic analysis of disease gene subsets. We also present a cost analysis demonstrating its cost-effectiveness for large population studies. PMID:21738606

  2. Source-Related Effects of Wastewater on Transcription Factor (AhR, CAR and PXR)-Mediated Induction of Gene Expression in Cultured Rat Hepatocytes and Their Association with the Prevalence of Antimicrobial-Resistant Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Guruge, Keerthi S; Yamanaka, Noriko; Sonobe, Miyuki; Fujizono, Wataru; Yoshioka, Miyako; Akiba, Masato; Yamamoto, Takehisa; Joshua, Derrick I; Balakrishna, Keshava; Yamashita, Nobuyoshi; Kannan, Kurunthachalam; Tsutsui, Toshiyuki

    2015-01-01

    Extracts of wastewater collected from 4 sewage treatment plants (STPs) receiving effluents from different sources in South India were investigated for their levels of transcription factor-mediated gene induction in primary cultured rat hepatocytes. In addition, the relation between gene induction levels and the prevalence of antimicrobial-resistant Escherichia coli (E. coli) in wastewater was examined. STP-3, which treats only hospital wastewater, exhibited significantly greater induction potency of all 6 drug metabolizing cytochrome P450 (CYP) genes examined, CYP1A1, 1A2, 1B1, 2B15, 3A1, and 3A2, whereas the wastewater at STP-1, which exclusively receives domestic sewage, showed significantly diminished levels of induction of 3 CYP genes when compared to the levels of CYP induction at STP-2, which receives mixed wastewater. Samples collected during the monsoon season showed a significantly altered gene induction capacity compared to that of samples from the pre-monsoon period. The data suggest that the toxicity of wastewater in STPs was not significantly diminished during the treatment process. The chemical-gene interaction data predicted that a vast number of chemicals present in the wastewater would stimulate the genes studied in the rat hepatocytes. The multivariable logistic regression analysis demonstrated that the prevalence of isolates resistant to cefotaxime, imipenem and streptomycin was significantly correlated with the levels of induction of at least three CYP-isozymes in STP wastewater. In addition, the resistance of isolates in treatment plants was not altered by the treatment steps, whereas the sampling season did have an impact on the resistance to specific antimicrobials. The identification of receptor-mediated gene regulation capacities offers important data not limited to the (synergistic) physiological role of chemicals in biological systems but may provide new insight into the link between the effects of known/unknown drugs and prevalence of

  3. Source-Related Effects of Wastewater on Transcription Factor (AhR, CAR and PXR)-Mediated Induction of Gene Expression in Cultured Rat Hepatocytes and Their Association with the Prevalence of Antimicrobial-Resistant Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Guruge, Keerthi S.; Yamanaka, Noriko; Sonobe, Miyuki; Fujizono, Wataru; Yoshioka, Miyako; Akiba, Masato; Yamamoto, Takehisa; Joshua, Derrick I.; Balakrishna, Keshava; Yamashita, Nobuyoshi; Kannan, Kurunthachalam; Tsutsui, Toshiyuki

    2015-01-01

    Extracts of wastewater collected from 4 sewage treatment plants (STPs) receiving effluents from different sources in South India were investigated for their levels of transcription factor-mediated gene induction in primary cultured rat hepatocytes. In addition, the relation between gene induction levels and the prevalence of antimicrobial-resistant Escherichia coli (E. coli) in wastewater was examined. STP-3, which treats only hospital wastewater, exhibited significantly greater induction potency of all 6 drug metabolizing cytochrome P450 (CYP) genes examined, CYP1A1, 1A2, 1B1, 2B15, 3A1, and 3A2, whereas the wastewater at STP-1, which exclusively receives domestic sewage, showed significantly diminished levels of induction of 3 CYP genes when compared to the levels of CYP induction at STP-2, which receives mixed wastewater. Samples collected during the monsoon season showed a significantly altered gene induction capacity compared to that of samples from the pre-monsoon period. The data suggest that the toxicity of wastewater in STPs was not significantly diminished during the treatment process. The chemical-gene interaction data predicted that a vast number of chemicals present in the wastewater would stimulate the genes studied in the rat hepatocytes. The multivariable logistic regression analysis demonstrated that the prevalence of isolates resistant to cefotaxime, imipenem and streptomycin was significantly correlated with the levels of induction of at least three CYP-isozymes in STP wastewater. In addition, the resistance of isolates in treatment plants was not altered by the treatment steps, whereas the sampling season did have an impact on the resistance to specific antimicrobials. The identification of receptor-mediated gene regulation capacities offers important data not limited to the (synergistic) physiological role of chemicals in biological systems but may provide new insight into the link between the effects of known/unknown drugs and prevalence of

  4. A novel AhR ligand, 2AI, protects the retina from environmental stress

    PubMed Central

    Gutierrez, Mark A.; Davis, Sonnet S.; Rosko, Andrew; Nguyen, Steven M.; Mitchell, Kylie P.; Mateen, Samiha; Neves, Joana; Garcia, Thelma Y.; Mooney, Shaun; Perdew, Gary H.; Hubbard, Troy D.; Lamba, Deepak A.; Ramanathan, Arvind

    2016-01-01

    Various retinal degenerative diseases including dry and neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD), retinitis pigmentosa, and diabetic retinopathy are associated with the degeneration of the retinal pigmented epithelial (RPE) layer of the retina. This consequently results in the death of rod and cone photoreceptors that they support, structurally and functionally leading to legal or complete blindness. Therefore, developing therapeutic strategies to preserve cellular homeostasis in the RPE would be a favorable asset in the clinic. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a conserved, environmental ligand-dependent, per ARNT-sim (PAS) domain containing bHLH transcription factor that mediates adaptive response to stress via its downstream transcriptional targets. Using in silico, in vitro and in vivo assays, we identified 2,2′-aminophenyl indole (2AI) as a potent synthetic ligand of AhR that protects RPE cells in vitro from lipid peroxidation cytotoxicity mediated by 4-hydroxynonenal (4HNE) as well as the retina in vivo from light-damage. Additionally, metabolic characterization of this molecule by LC-MS suggests that 2AI alters the lipid metabolism of RPE cells, enhancing the intracellular levels of palmitoleic acid. Finally, we show that, as a downstream effector of 2AI-mediated AhR activation, palmitoleic acid protects RPE cells from 4HNE-mediated stress, and light mediated retinal degeneration in mice. PMID:27364765

  5. A novel AhR ligand, 2AI, protects the retina from environmental stress.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez, Mark A; Davis, Sonnet S; Rosko, Andrew; Nguyen, Steven M; Mitchell, Kylie P; Mateen, Samiha; Neves, Joana; Garcia, Thelma Y; Mooney, Shaun; Perdew, Gary H; Hubbard, Troy D; Lamba, Deepak A; Ramanathan, Arvind

    2016-01-01

    Various retinal degenerative diseases including dry and neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD), retinitis pigmentosa, and diabetic retinopathy are associated with the degeneration of the retinal pigmented epithelial (RPE) layer of the retina. This consequently results in the death of rod and cone photoreceptors that they support, structurally and functionally leading to legal or complete blindness. Therefore, developing therapeutic strategies to preserve cellular homeostasis in the RPE would be a favorable asset in the clinic. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a conserved, environmental ligand-dependent, per ARNT-sim (PAS) domain containing bHLH transcription factor that mediates adaptive response to stress via its downstream transcriptional targets. Using in silico, in vitro and in vivo assays, we identified 2,2'-aminophenyl indole (2AI) as a potent synthetic ligand of AhR that protects RPE cells in vitro from lipid peroxidation cytotoxicity mediated by 4-hydroxynonenal (4HNE) as well as the retina in vivo from light-damage. Additionally, metabolic characterization of this molecule by LC-MS suggests that 2AI alters the lipid metabolism of RPE cells, enhancing the intracellular levels of palmitoleic acid. Finally, we show that, as a downstream effector of 2AI-mediated AhR activation, palmitoleic acid protects RPE cells from 4HNE-mediated stress, and light mediated retinal degeneration in mice. PMID:27364765

  6. Chimeric DNA methyltransferases target DNA methylation to specific DNA sequences and repress expression of target genes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Fuyang; Papworth, Monika; Minczuk, Michal; Rohde, Christian; Zhang, Yingying; Ragozin, Sergei; Jeltsch, Albert

    2007-01-01

    Gene silencing by targeted DNA methylation has potential applications in basic research and therapy. To establish targeted methylation in human cell lines, the catalytic domains (CDs) of mouse Dnmt3a and Dnmt3b DNA methyltransferases (MTases) were fused to different DNA binding domains (DBD) of GAL4 and an engineered Cys2His2 zinc finger domain. We demonstrated that (i) Dense DNA methylation can be targeted to specific regions in gene promoters using chimeric DNA MTases. (ii) Site-specific methylation leads to repression of genes controlled by various cellular or viral promoters. (iii) Mutations affecting any of the DBD, MTase or target DNA sequences reduce targeted methylation and gene silencing. (iv) Targeted DNA methylation is effective in repressing Herpes Simplex Virus type 1 (HSV-1) infection in cell culture with the viral titer reduced by at least 18-fold in the presence of an MTase fused to an engineered zinc finger DBD, which binds a single site in the promoter of HSV-1 gene IE175k. In short, we show here that it is possible to direct DNA MTase activity to predetermined sites in DNA, achieve targeted gene silencing in mammalian cell lines and interfere with HSV-1 propagation. PMID:17151075

  7. Drug target prioritization by perturbed gene expression and network information

    PubMed Central

    Isik, Zerrin; Baldow, Christoph; Cannistraci, Carlo Vittorio; Schroeder, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Drugs bind to their target proteins, which interact with downstream effectors and ultimately perturb the transcriptome of a cancer cell. These perturbations reveal information about their source, i.e., drugs’ targets. Here, we investigate whether these perturbations and protein interaction networks can uncover drug targets and key pathways. We performed the first systematic analysis of over 500 drugs from the Connectivity Map. First, we show that the gene expression of drug targets is usually not significantly affected by the drug perturbation. Hence, expression changes after drug treatment on their own are not sufficient to identify drug targets. However, ranking of candidate drug targets by network topological measures prioritizes the targets. We introduce a novel measure, local radiality, which combines perturbed genes and functional interaction network information. The new measure outperforms other methods in target prioritization and proposes cancer-specific pathways from drugs to affected genes for the first time. Local radiality identifies more diverse targets with fewer neighbors and possibly less side effects. PMID:26615774

  8. Identification of p53-target genes in Danio rerio

    PubMed Central

    Mandriani, Barbara; Castellana, Stefano; Rinaldi, Carmela; Manzoni, Marta; Venuto, Santina; Rodriguez-Aznar, Eva; Galceran, Juan; Nieto, M. Angela; Borsani, Giuseppe; Monti, Eugenio; Mazza, Tommaso; Merla, Giuseppe; Micale, Lucia

    2016-01-01

    To orchestrate the genomic response to cellular stress signals, p53 recognizes and binds to DNA containing specific and well-characterized p53-responsive elements (REs). Differences in RE sequences can strongly affect the p53 transactivation capacity and occur even between closely related species. Therefore, the identification and characterization of a species-specific p53 Binding sistes (BS) consensus sequence and of the associated target genes may help to provide new insights into the evolution of the p53 regulatory networks across different species. Although p53 functions were studied in a wide range of species, little is known about the p53-mediated transcriptional signature in Danio rerio. Here, we designed and biochemically validated a computational approach to identify novel p53 target genes in Danio rerio genome. Screening all the Danio rerio genome by pattern-matching-based analysis, we found p53 RE-like patterns proximal to 979 annotated Danio rerio genes. Prioritization analysis identified a subset of 134 candidate pattern-related genes, 31 of which have been investigated in further biochemical assays. Our study identified runx1, axin1, traf4a, hspa8, col4a5, necab2, and dnajc9 genes as novel direct p53 targets and 12 additional p53-controlled genes in Danio rerio genome. The proposed combinatorial approach resulted to be highly sensitive and robust for identifying new p53 target genes also in additional animal species. PMID:27581768

  9. Identification of p53-target genes in Danio rerio.

    PubMed

    Mandriani, Barbara; Castellana, Stefano; Rinaldi, Carmela; Manzoni, Marta; Venuto, Santina; Rodriguez-Aznar, Eva; Galceran, Juan; Nieto, M Angela; Borsani, Giuseppe; Monti, Eugenio; Mazza, Tommaso; Merla, Giuseppe; Micale, Lucia

    2016-01-01

    To orchestrate the genomic response to cellular stress signals, p53 recognizes and binds to DNA containing specific and well-characterized p53-responsive elements (REs). Differences in RE sequences can strongly affect the p53 transactivation capacity and occur even between closely related species. Therefore, the identification and characterization of a species-specific p53 Binding sistes (BS) consensus sequence and of the associated target genes may help to provide new insights into the evolution of the p53 regulatory networks across different species. Although p53 functions were studied in a wide range of species, little is known about the p53-mediated transcriptional signature in Danio rerio. Here, we designed and biochemically validated a computational approach to identify novel p53 target genes in Danio rerio genome. Screening all the Danio rerio genome by pattern-matching-based analysis, we found p53 RE-like patterns proximal to 979 annotated Danio rerio genes. Prioritization analysis identified a subset of 134 candidate pattern-related genes, 31 of which have been investigated in further biochemical assays. Our study identified runx1, axin1, traf4a, hspa8, col4a5, necab2, and dnajc9 genes as novel direct p53 targets and 12 additional p53-controlled genes in Danio rerio genome. The proposed combinatorial approach resulted to be highly sensitive and robust for identifying new p53 target genes also in additional animal species. PMID:27581768

  10. Nanoparticle-based targeted gene therapy for lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hung-Yen; Mohammed, Kamal A; Nasreen, Najmunnisa

    2016-01-01

    Despite striking insights on lung cancer progression, and cutting-edge therapeutic approaches the survival of patients with lung cancer, remains poor. In recent years, targeted gene therapy with nanoparticles is one of the most rapidly evolving and extensive areas of research for lung cancer. The major goal of targeted gene therapy is to bring forward a safe and efficient treatment to cancer patients via specifically targeting and deterring cancer cells in the body. To achieve high therapeutic efficacy of gene delivery, various carriers have been engineered and developed to provide protection to the genetic materials and efficient delivery to targeted cancer cells. Nanoparticles play an important role in the area of drug delivery and have been widely applied in cancer treatments for the purposes of controlled release and cancer cell targeting. Nanoparticles composed of artificial polymers, proteins, polysaccharides and lipids have been developed for the delivery of therapeutic deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) or ribonucleic acid (RNA) sequences to target cancer. In addition, the effectiveness of cancer targeting has been enhanced by surface modification or conjugation with biomolecules on the surface of nanoparticles. In this review article we provide an overview on the latest developments in nanoparticle-based targeted gene therapy for lung cancers. Firstly, we outline the conventional therapies and discuss strategies for targeted gene therapy using nanoparticles. Secondly, we provide the most representative and recent researches in lung cancers including malignant pleural mesothelioma, mainly focusing on the application of Polymeric, Lipid-based, and Metal-based nanoparticles. Finally, we discuss current achievements and future challenges. PMID:27294004

  11. Nanoparticle-based targeted gene therapy for lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hung-Yen; Mohammed, Kamal A; Nasreen, Najmunnisa

    2016-01-01

    Despite striking insights on lung cancer progression, and cutting-edge therapeutic approaches the survival of patients with lung cancer, remains poor. In recent years, targeted gene therapy with nanoparticles is one of the most rapidly evolving and extensive areas of research for lung cancer. The major goal of targeted gene therapy is to bring forward a safe and efficient treatment to cancer patients via specifically targeting and deterring cancer cells in the body. To achieve high therapeutic efficacy of gene delivery, various carriers have been engineered and developed to provide protection to the genetic materials and efficient delivery to targeted cancer cells. Nanoparticles play an important role in the area of drug delivery and have been widely applied in cancer treatments for the purposes of controlled release and cancer cell targeting. Nanoparticles composed of artificial polymers, proteins, polysaccharides and lipids have been developed for the delivery of therapeutic deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) or ribonucleic acid (RNA) sequences to target cancer. In addition, the effectiveness of cancer targeting has been enhanced by surface modification or conjugation with biomolecules on the surface of nanoparticles. In this review article we provide an overview on the latest developments in nanoparticle-based targeted gene therapy for lung cancers. Firstly, we outline the conventional therapies and discuss strategies for targeted gene therapy using nanoparticles. Secondly, we provide the most representative and recent researches in lung cancers including malignant pleural mesothelioma, mainly focusing on the application of Polymeric, Lipid-based, and Metal-based nanoparticles. Finally, we discuss current achievements and future challenges. PMID:27294004

  12. Gene-Environment Interactions Target Mitogen-activated Protein 3 Kinase 1 (MAP3K1) Signaling in Eyelid Morphogenesis*

    PubMed Central

    Mongan, Maureen; Meng, Qinghang; Wang, Jingjing; Kao, Winston W.-Y.; Puga, Alvaro; Xia, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Gene-environment interactions determine the biological outcomes through mechanisms that are poorly understood. Mouse embryonic eyelid closure is a well defined model to study the genetic control of developmental programs. Using this model, we investigated how exposure to dioxin-like environmental pollutants modifies the genetic risk of developmental abnormalities. Our studies reveal that mitogen-activated protein 3 kinase 1 (MAP3K1) signaling is a focal point of gene-environment cross-talk. Dioxin exposure, acting through the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR), blocked eyelid closure in genetic mutants in which MAP3K1 signaling was attenuated but did not disturb this developmental program in either wild type or mutant mice with attenuated epidermal growth factor receptor or WNT signaling. Exposure also markedly inhibited c-Jun phosphorylation in Map3k1+/− embryonic eyelid epithelium, suggesting that dioxin-induced AHR pathways can synergize with gene mutations to inhibit MAP3K1 signaling. Our studies uncover a novel mechanism through which the dioxin-AHR axis interacts with the MAP3K1 signaling pathways during fetal development and provide strong empirical evidence that specific gene alterations can increase the risk of developmental abnormalities driven by environmental pollutant exposure. PMID:26109068

  13. Gene-Environment Interactions Target Mitogen-activated Protein 3 Kinase 1 (MAP3K1) Signaling in Eyelid Morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Mongan, Maureen; Meng, Qinghang; Wang, Jingjing; Kao, Winston W-Y; Puga, Alvaro; Xia, Ying

    2015-08-01

    Gene-environment interactions determine the biological outcomes through mechanisms that are poorly understood. Mouse embryonic eyelid closure is a well defined model to study the genetic control of developmental programs. Using this model, we investigated how exposure to dioxin-like environmental pollutants modifies the genetic risk of developmental abnormalities. Our studies reveal that mitogen-activated protein 3 kinase 1 (MAP3K1) signaling is a focal point of gene-environment cross-talk. Dioxin exposure, acting through the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR), blocked eyelid closure in genetic mutants in which MAP3K1 signaling was attenuated but did not disturb this developmental program in either wild type or mutant mice with attenuated epidermal growth factor receptor or WNT signaling. Exposure also markedly inhibited c-Jun phosphorylation in Map3k1(+/-) embryonic eyelid epithelium, suggesting that dioxin-induced AHR pathways can synergize with gene mutations to inhibit MAP3K1 signaling. Our studies uncover a novel mechanism through which the dioxin-AHR axis interacts with the MAP3K1 signaling pathways during fetal development and provide strong empirical evidence that specific gene alterations can increase the risk of developmental abnormalities driven by environmental pollutant exposure. PMID:26109068

  14. Single molecule targeted sequencing for cancer gene mutation detection.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yan; Deng, Liwei; Yan, Qin; Gao, Yongqian; Wu, Zengding; Cai, Jinsen; Ji, Daorui; Li, Gailing; Wu, Ping; Jin, Huan; Zhao, Luyang; Liu, Song; Ge, Liangjin; Deem, Michael W; He, Jiankui

    2016-01-01

    With the rapid decline in cost of sequencing, it is now affordable to examine multiple genes in a single disease-targeted clinical test using next generation sequencing. Current targeted sequencing methods require a separate step of targeted capture enrichment during sample preparation before sequencing. Although there are fast sample preparation methods available in market, the library preparation process is still relatively complicated for physicians to use routinely. Here, we introduced an amplification-free Single Molecule Targeted Sequencing (SMTS) technology, which combined targeted capture and sequencing in one step. We demonstrated that this technology can detect low-frequency mutations using artificially synthesized DNA sample. SMTS has several potential advantages, including simple sample preparation thus no biases and errors are introduced by PCR reaction. SMTS has the potential to be an easy and quick sequencing technology for clinical diagnosis such as cancer gene mutation detection, infectious disease detection, inherited condition screening and noninvasive prenatal diagnosis. PMID:27193446

  15. Single molecule targeted sequencing for cancer gene mutation detection

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yan; Deng, Liwei; Yan, Qin; Gao, Yongqian; Wu, Zengding; Cai, Jinsen; Ji, Daorui; Li, Gailing; Wu, Ping; Jin, Huan; Zhao, Luyang; Liu, Song; Ge, Liangjin; Deem, Michael W.; He, Jiankui

    2016-01-01

    With the rapid decline in cost of sequencing, it is now affordable to examine multiple genes in a single disease-targeted clinical test using next generation sequencing. Current targeted sequencing methods require a separate step of targeted capture enrichment during sample preparation before sequencing. Although there are fast sample preparation methods available in market, the library preparation process is still relatively complicated for physicians to use routinely. Here, we introduced an amplification-free Single Molecule Targeted Sequencing (SMTS) technology, which combined targeted capture and sequencing in one step. We demonstrated that this technology can detect low-frequency mutations using artificially synthesized DNA sample. SMTS has several potential advantages, including simple sample preparation thus no biases and errors are introduced by PCR reaction. SMTS has the potential to be an easy and quick sequencing technology for clinical diagnosis such as cancer gene mutation detection, infectious disease detection, inherited condition screening and noninvasive prenatal diagnosis. PMID:27193446

  16. Ultraviolet light converts propranolol, a nonselective β-blocker and potential lupus-inducing drug, into a proinflammatory AhR ligand.

    PubMed

    Dorgham, Karim; Amoura, Zahir; Parizot, Christophe; Arnaud, Laurent; Frances, Camille; Pionneau, Cédric; Devilliers, Hervé; Pinto, Sandra; Zoorob, Rima; Miyara, Makoto; Larsen, Martin; Yssel, Hans; Gorochov, Guy; Mathian, Alexis

    2015-11-01

    UV light and some medications are known to trigger lupus erythematosus (LE). A common mechanism underlying the immunopathologic effect, resulting from exposure to these two seemingly unrelated factors, remains unknown. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) plays a key role in the regulation of IL-22 production in humans and can be activated by both xenobiotics and naturally occurring photoproducts. A significant expansion of Th17 and Th22 cells was observed in the peripheral blood of active systemic LE (SLE) patients, compared to inactive patients and controls. We also show that propranolol, a potential lupus-inducing drug, induced stronger AhR activation in PBMCs of SLE patients than in those of controls. AhR agonist activity of propranolol was enhanced by UV light exposure. MS analysis of irradiated propranolol revealed the generation of a proinflammatory photoproduct. This compound behaves like the prototypic AhR ligand 6-formylindolo[3,2-b]carbazole, a cutaneous UV light-induced tryptophan metabolite, both promoting IL-22, IL-8, and CCL2 secretion by T-cells and macrophages. Finally, LE patients exhibit signs of cutaneous AhR activation that correlate with lesional expression of the same proinflammatory cytokines, suggesting a role for photometabolites in the induction of skin inflammation. The AhR might therefore represent a target for therapeutic intervention in LE. PMID:26354876

  17. Targeted gene therapy and cell reprogramming in Fanconi anemia

    PubMed Central

    Rio, Paula; Baños, Rocio; Lombardo, Angelo; Quintana-Bustamante, Oscar; Alvarez, Lara; Garate, Zita; Genovese, Pietro; Almarza, Elena; Valeri, Antonio; Díez, Begoña; Navarro, Susana; Torres, Yaima; Trujillo, Juan P; Murillas, Rodolfo; Segovia, Jose C; Samper, Enrique; Surralles, Jordi; Gregory, Philip D; Holmes, Michael C; Naldini, Luigi; Bueren, Juan A

    2014-01-01

    Gene targeting is progressively becoming a realistic therapeutic alternative in clinics. It is unknown, however, whether this technology will be suitable for the treatment of DNA repair deficiency syndromes such as Fanconi anemia (FA), with defects in homology-directed DNA repair. In this study, we used zinc finger nucleases and integrase-defective lentiviral vectors to demonstrate for the first time that FANCA can be efficiently and specifically targeted into the AAVS1 safe harbor locus in fibroblasts from FA-A patients. Strikingly, up to 40% of FA fibroblasts showed gene targeting 42 days after gene editing. Given the low number of hematopoietic precursors in the bone marrow of FA patients, gene-edited FA fibroblasts were then reprogrammed and re-differentiated toward the hematopoietic lineage. Analyses of gene-edited FA-iPSCs confirmed the specific integration of FANCA in the AAVS1 locus in all tested clones. Moreover, the hematopoietic differentiation of these iPSCs efficiently generated disease-free hematopoietic progenitors. Taken together, our results demonstrate for the first time the feasibility of correcting the phenotype of a DNA repair deficiency syndrome using gene-targeting and cell reprogramming strategies. PMID:24859981

  18. Differential sensitivities of transcription factor target genes underlie cell type-specific gene expression profiles

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Kirby D.; Kim, Shin-Il; Bresnick, Emery H.

    2006-01-01

    Changes in transcription factor levels and activities dictate developmental fate. Such a change might affect the full ensemble of target genes for a factor or only uniquely sensitive targets. We investigated the relationship among activity of the hematopoietic transcription factor GATA-1, chromatin occupancy, and target gene sensitivity. Graded activation of GATA-1 in GATA-1-null cells revealed high-, intermediate-, and low-sensitivity targets. GATA-1 activity requirements for occupancy and transcription often correlated. A GATA-1 amino-terminal deletion mutant severely deregulated the low-sensitivity gene Tac-2. Thus, cells expressing different levels of a cell type-specific activator can have qualitatively distinct target gene expression patterns, and factor mutations preferentially deregulate low-sensitivity genes. Unlike other target genes, GATA-1-mediated Tac-2 regulation was bimodal, with activation followed by repression, and the coregulator Friend of GATA-1 (FOG-1) selectively mediated repression. A GATA-1 mutant defective in FOG-1 binding occupied a Tac-2 regulatory region at levels higher than wild-type GATA-1, whereas FOG-1 facilitated chromatin occupancy at a distinct target site. These results indicate that FOG-1 is a determinant of GATA factor target gene sensitivity by either facilitating or opposing chromatin occupancy. PMID:17043224

  19. Zebrafish Cardiotoxicity: The Effects of CYP1A Inhibition and AHR2 Knockdown Following Exposure to Weak Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Agonists

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Bryan William; Van Tiem Garner, Lindsey; Di Giulio, Richard Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor that mediates many of the toxic effects of dioxin-like compounds (DLCs) and some polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Strong AHR agonists, such as certain polychlorinated biphenyls and 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), cause severe cardiac teratogenesis in fish embryos. Moderately strong AHR agonists, such as benzo[a]pyrene and β-naphthoflavone, have been shown to cause similar cardiotoxic effects when coupled with a cytochrome P450 1A (CYP1A) inhibitor, such as fluoranthene (FL). We sought to determine if weak AHR agonists, when combined with a CYP1A inhibitor (FL) or CYP1A morpholino gene knockdown, are capable of causing cardiac deformities similar to moderately strong AHR agonists (Wassenberg and Di Giulio 2004; Wassenberg and Di Giulio 2004; Billiard, Timme-Laragy et al. 2006; Van Tiem and Di Giulio 2011). The weak AHR agonists included the following: carbaryl, phenanthrene, 2-methylindole, 3-methylindole, indigo, and indirubin. The results showed a complex pattern of cardiotoxic response to weak agonist inhibitor exposure and morpholino-knockdown. Danio rerio (zebrafish) embryos were first exposed to weak AHR agonists at equimolar concentrations. The agonists were assessed for their relative potency as inducers of CYP1 enzyme activity, measured by the ethoxyresorufin-o-deethylase (EROD) assay, and cardiac deformities. Carbaryl, 2-methylindole, and 3-methylindole induced the highest CYP1A activity in zebrafish. Experiments were then conducted to determine the individual cardiotoxicity of each compound. Next, zebrafish were co-exposed to each agonist (at concentrations below those determined to be cardiotoxic) and FL in combination to assess if CYP1A inhibition could induce cardiac deformities. Carbaryl, 2-methylindole, 3-methylindole, and phenanthrene significantly increased pericardial edema relative to controls when combined with FL. To further evaluate the

  20. Transcriptional targets of the schizophrenia risk gene MIR137

    PubMed Central

    Collins, A L; Kim, Y; Bloom, R J; Kelada, S N; Sethupathy, P; Sullivan, P F

    2014-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have strongly implicated MIR137 (the gene encoding the microRNA miR-137) in schizophrenia. A parsimonious hypothesis is that a pathway regulated by miR-137 is important in the etiology of schizophrenia. Full evaluation of this hypothesis requires more definitive knowledge about biological targets of miR-137, which is currently lacking. Our goals were to expand knowledge of the biology of miR-137 by identifying its empirical targets, and to test whether the resulting lists of direct and indirect targets were enriched for genes and pathways involved in risk for schizophrenia. We overexpressed miR-137 in a human neural stem cell line and analyzed gene expression changes at 24 and 48 h using RNA sequencing. Following miR-137 overexpression, 202 and 428 genes were differentially expressed after 24 and 48 h. Genes differentially expressed at 24 h were enriched for transcription factors and cell cycle genes, and differential expression at 48 h affected a wider variety of pathways. Pathways implicated in schizophrenia were upregulated in the 48 h findings (major histocompatibility complex, synapses, FMRP interacting RNAs and calcium channels). Critically, differentially expressed genes at 48 h were enriched for smaller association P-values in the largest published schizophrenia GWAS. This work provides empirical support for a role of miR-137 in the etiology of schizophrenia. PMID:24984191

  1. Gene Body Methylation can alter Gene Expression and is a Therapeutic Target in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiaojing; Han, Han; De Carvalho, Daniel D.; Lay, Fides D.; Jones, Peter A.; Liang, Gangning

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY DNA methylation in promoters is well known to silence genes and is the presumed therapeutic target of methylation inhibitors. Gene body methylation is positively correlated with expression yet its function is unknown. We show that 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine treatment not only reactivates genes but decreases the over-expression of genes, many of which are involved in metabolic processes regulated by c-MYC. Down-regulation is caused by DNA demethylation of the gene bodies and restoration of high levels of expression requires remethylation by DNMT3B. Gene body methylation may therefore be an unexpected therapeutic target for DNA methylation inhibitors, resulting in the normalization of gene over-expression induced during carcinogenesis. Our results provide direct evidence for a causal relationship between gene body methylation and transcription. PMID:25263941

  2. Targeting of AID-mediated sequence diversification to immunoglobulin genes.

    PubMed

    Kothapalli, Naga Rama; Fugmann, Sebastian D

    2011-04-01

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) is a key enzyme for antibody-mediated immune responses. Antibodies are encoded by the immunoglobulin genes and AID acts as a transcription-dependent DNA mutator on these genes to improve antibody affinity and effector functions. An emerging theme in field is that many transcribed genes are potential targets of AID, presenting an obvious danger to genomic integrity. Thus there are mechanisms in place to ensure that mutagenic outcomes of AID activity are specifically restricted to the immunoglobulin loci. Cis-regulatory targeting elements mediate this effect and their mode of action is probably a combination of immunoglobulin gene specific activation of AID and a perversion of faithful DNA repair towards error-prone outcomes. PMID:21295456

  3. Targeting of AID-mediated sequence diversification to immunoglobulin genes

    PubMed Central

    Kothapalli, Naga Rama; Fugmann, Sebastian D.

    2011-01-01

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) is a key enzyme for antibody-mediated immune responses. Antibodies are encoded by the immunoglobulin genes and AID acts as a transcription-dependent DNA mutator on these genes to improve antibody affinity and effector functions. An emerging theme in field is that many transcribed genes are potential targets of AID, presenting an obvious danger to genomic integrity. Thus there are mechanisms in place to ensure that mutagenic outcomes of AID activity are specifically restricted to the immunoglobulin loci. Cis-regulatory targeting elements mediate this effect and their mode of action is likely a combination of immunoglobulin gene specific activation of AID and a perversion of faithful DNA repair towards error-prone outcomes. PMID:21295456

  4. Core Promoter Functions in the Regulation of Gene Expression of Drosophila Dorsal Target Genes*

    PubMed Central

    Zehavi, Yonathan; Kuznetsov, Olga; Ovadia-Shochat, Avital; Juven-Gershon, Tamar

    2014-01-01

    Developmental processes are highly dependent on transcriptional regulation by RNA polymerase II. The RNA polymerase II core promoter is the ultimate target of a multitude of transcription factors that control transcription initiation. Core promoters consist of core promoter motifs, e.g. the initiator, TATA box, and the downstream core promoter element (DPE), which confer specific properties to the core promoter. Here, we explored the importance of core promoter functions in the dorsal-ventral developmental gene regulatory network. This network includes multiple genes that are activated by different nuclear concentrations of Dorsal, an NFκB homolog transcription factor, along the dorsal-ventral axis. We show that over two-thirds of Dorsal target genes contain DPE sequence motifs, which is significantly higher than the proportion of DPE-containing promoters in Drosophila genes. We demonstrate that multiple Dorsal target genes are evolutionarily conserved and functionally dependent on the DPE. Furthermore, we have analyzed the activation of key Dorsal target genes by Dorsal, as well as by another Rel family transcription factor, Relish, and the dependence of their activation on the DPE motif. Using hybrid enhancer-promoter constructs in Drosophila cells and embryo extracts, we have demonstrated that the core promoter composition is an important determinant of transcriptional activity of Dorsal target genes. Taken together, our results provide evidence for the importance of core promoter composition in the regulation of Dorsal target genes. PMID:24634215

  5. AhR ligand Aminoflavone inhibits α6-integrin expression and breast cancer sphere-initiating capacity.

    PubMed

    Brantley, Eileen; Callero, Mariana A; Berardi, Damian E; Campbell, Petreena; Rowland, Leah; Zylstra, Dain; Amis, Louisa; Yee, Michael; Simian, Marina; Todaro, Laura; Loaiza-Perez, Andrea I; Soto, Ubaldo

    2016-06-28

    Traditional chemotherapies debulk tumors but fail to produce long-term clinical remissions due to their inability to eradicate tumor-initiating cells (TICs). This necessitates therapy with activity against the TIC niche. Αlpha6-integrin (α6-integrin) promotes TIC growth. In contrast, aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) signaling activation impedes the formation of mammospheres (clusters of cells enriched for TICs). We investigated the ability of AhR agonist Aminoflavone (AF) and AF pro-drug (AFP464) to disrupt mammospheres derived from breast cancer cells and a M05 mammary mouse model of breast cancer respectively. We further examined the capacity of AF and AFP464 to exhibit anticancer activity and modulate the expression of 'stemness' genes including α6-integrin using immunofluorescence, flow cytometry and qRT-PCR analysis. AF disrupted mammospheres and prevented secondary mammosphere formation. In contrast, AF did not disrupt mammospheres derived from AhR ligand-unresponsive MCF-7 cells. AFP464 treatment suppressed M05 tumor growth and disrupted corresponding mammospheres. AF and AFP464 reduced the expression and percentage of cells that stained for 'stemness' markers including α6-integrin in vitro and in vivo respectively. These data suggest AFP464 thwarts bulk breast tumor and TIC growth via AhR agonist-mediated α6-integrin inhibition. PMID:26996297

  6. Expression of PAX8 Target Genes in Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Rosignolo, Francesca; Sponziello, Marialuisa; Durante, Cosimo; Puppin, Cinzia; Mio, Catia; Baldan, Federica; Di Loreto, Carla; Russo, Diego; Filetti, Sebastiano; Damante, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    PAX8 is a thyroid-specific transcription factor whose expression is dysregulated in thyroid cancer. A recent study using a conditional knock-out mouse model identified 58 putative PAX8 target genes. In the present study, we evaluated the expression of 11 of these genes in normal and tumoral thyroid tissues from patients with papillary thyroid cancer (PTC). ATP1B1, GPC3, KCNIP3, and PRLR transcript levels in tumor tissues were significantly lower in PTCs than in NT, whereas LCN2, LGALS1 and SCD1 expression was upregulated in PTC compared with NT. Principal component analysis of the expression of the most markedly dysregulated PAX8 target genes was able to discriminate between PTC and NT. Immunohistochemistry was used to assess levels of proteins encoded by the two most dyregulated PAX8 target genes, LCN2 and GPC3. Interestingly, GPC3 was detectable in all of the NT samples but none of the PTC samples. Collectively, these findings point to significant PTC-associated dysregulation of several PAX8 target genes, supporting the notion that PAX8-regulated molecular cascades play important roles during thyroid tumorigenesis. PMID:27249794

  7. Expression of PAX8 Target Genes in Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Rosignolo, Francesca; Sponziello, Marialuisa; Durante, Cosimo; Puppin, Cinzia; Mio, Catia; Baldan, Federica; Di Loreto, Carla; Russo, Diego; Filetti, Sebastiano; Damante, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    PAX8 is a thyroid-specific transcription factor whose expression is dysregulated in thyroid cancer. A recent study using a conditional knock-out mouse model identified 58 putative PAX8 target genes. In the present study, we evaluated the expression of 11 of these genes in normal and tumoral thyroid tissues from patients with papillary thyroid cancer (PTC). ATP1B1, GPC3, KCNIP3, and PRLR transcript levels in tumor tissues were significantly lower in PTCs than in NT, whereas LCN2, LGALS1 and SCD1 expression was upregulated in PTC compared with NT. Principal component analysis of the expression of the most markedly dysregulated PAX8 target genes was able to discriminate between PTC and NT. Immunohistochemistry was used to assess levels of proteins encoded by the two most dyregulated PAX8 target genes, LCN2 and GPC3. Interestingly, GPC3 was detectable in all of the NT samples but none of the PTC samples. Collectively, these findings point to significant PTC-associated dysregulation of several PAX8 target genes, supporting the notion that PAX8-regulated molecular cascades play important roles during thyroid tumorigenesis. PMID:27249794

  8. Expression of Phosphocitrate-Targeted Genes in Osteoarthritis Menisci

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yubo; Mauerhan, David R.; Steuerwald, Nury M.; Ingram, Jane; Kneisl, Jeffrey S.; Hanley, Edward N.

    2014-01-01

    Phosphocitrate (PC) inhibited calcium crystal-associated osteoarthritis (OA) in Hartley guinea pigs. However, the molecular mechanisms remain elusive. This study sought to determine PC targeted genes and the expression of select PC targeted genes in OA menisci to test hypothesis that PC exerts its disease modifying activity in part by reversing abnormal expressions of genes involved in OA. We found that PC downregulated the expression of numerous genes classified in immune response, inflammatory response, and angiogenesis, including chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 5, Fc fragment of IgG, low affinity IIIb receptor (FCGR3B), and leukocyte immunoglobulin-like receptor, subfamily B member 3 (LILRB3). In contrast, PC upregulated the expression of many genes classified in skeletal development, including collagen type II alpha1, fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3), and SRY- (sex determining region Y-) box 9 (SOX-9). Immunohistochemical examinations revealed higher levels of FCGR3B and LILRB3 and lower level of SOX-9 in OA menisci. These findings indicate that OA is a disease associated with immune system activation and decreased expression of SOX-9 gene in OA menisci. PC exerts its disease modifying activity on OA, at least in part, by targeting immune system activation and the production of extracellular matrix and selecting chondroprotective proteins. PMID:25525593

  9. Non-targeted effects of virus-induced gene silencing vectors on host endogenous gene expression.

    PubMed

    Oláh, Enikő; Pesti, Réka; Taller, Dénes; Havelda, Zoltán; Várallyay, Éva

    2016-09-01

    Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) uses recombinant viruses to study gene function; however, the effect of the virus vector itself on the gene expression of the host is not always considered. In our work, we investigated non-targeted gene expression changes of the host in order to see how often these changes appear. Effects of various VIGS vector infections were analysed by monitoring gene expression levels of housekeeping genes by Northern blot analysis in four different hosts. We found that non-targeted changes happens very often. More importantly, these non-targeted effects can cause drastic changes in the gene-expression pattern of host genes that are usually used as references in these studies. We have also found that in a tobacco rattle virus (TRV)-based VIGS, the presence of foreign sequences in the cloning site of the vector can also have a non-targeted effect, and even the use of an internal control can lead to unpredicted changes. Our results show that although VIGS is a very powerful technique, the VIGS vector, as a pathogen of the host, can cause unwanted changes in its gene-expression pattern, highlighting the importance of careful selection of both the genes to be tested and those to be used as references in the planned experiments. PMID:27283101

  10. Cloning, characterization and targeting of the mouse HEXA gene

    SciTech Connect

    Wakamatsu, N.; Trasler, J.M.; Gravel, R.A.

    1994-09-01

    The HEXA gene, encoding the {alpha} subunit of {beta}-hexosaminidase A, is essential for the metabolism of ganglioside G{sub M2}, and defects in this gene cause Tay-Sachs disease in humans. To elucidate the role of the gene in the nervous system of the mouse and to establish a mouse model of Tay-Sachs disease, we have cloned and characterized the HEXA gene and targeted a disruption of the gene in mouse ES cells. The mouse HEXA gene spans {approximately}26 kb and consists of 14 exons, similar to the human gene. A heterogeneous transcription initiation site was identified 21-42 bp 5{prime} of the initiator ATG, with two of the sites fitting the consensus CTCA (A = start) as seen for some weak initiator systems. Promoter analysis showed that the first 150 bp 5{prime} of the ATG contained 85% of promoter activity observed in constructs containing up to 1050 bp of 5{prime} sequence. The active region contained a sequence matching that of the adenovirus major late promoter upstream element factor. A survey of mouse tissues showed that the highest mRNA levels were in (max to min): testis (5.5 x brain cortex), adrenal, epididymis, heart, brain, lung, kidney, and liver (0.3 x brain cortex). A 12 kb BstI/SalI fragment containing nine exons was disrupted with the insertion of the bacterial neo{sup r} gene in exon 11 and was targeted into 129/Sv ES cells by homologous recombination. Nine of 153 G418 resistant clones were correctly targeted as confirmed by Southern blotting. The heterozygous ES cells were microinjected into mouse blastocysts and implanted into pseudo-pregnant mice. Nine male chimeric mice, showing that 40-95% chimerism for the 129/Sv agouti coat color marker, are being bred in an effort to generate germline transmission of the disrupted HEXA gene.

  11. Fungal virulence genes as targets for antifungal chemotherapy.

    PubMed Central

    Perfect, J R

    1996-01-01

    Fungal virulence genes have now met the age of molecular pathogenesis. The definition of virulence genes needs to be broad so that it encompasses the focus on molecular antifungal targets and vaccine epitopes. However, in the broad but simple definition of a virulence gene, there will be many complex genetic and host interactions which investigators will need to carefully define. Nevertheless, with the increasing numbers of serious fungal infections produced by old and newly reported organisms, the paucity of present antifungal drugs, and the likelihood of increasing drug resistance, the need for investigations into understanding fungal virulence at the molecular level has never been more important. PMID:8807043

  12. Gene mutations and molecularly targeted therapies in acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Hatzimichael, Eleftheria; Georgiou, Georgios; Benetatos, Leonidas; Briasoulis, Evangelos

    2013-01-01

    Acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) can progress quickly and without treatment can become fatal in a short period of time. However, over the last 30 years fine-tuning of therapeutics have increased the rates of remission and cure. Cytogenetics and mutational gene profiling, combined with the option of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation offered in selected patients have further optimized AML treatment on a risk stratification basis in younger adults. However there is still an unmet medical need for effective therapies in AML since disease relapses in almost half of adult patients becoming refractory to salvage therapy. Improvements in the understanding of molecular biology of cancer and identification of recurrent mutations in AML provide opportunities to develop targeted therapies and improve the clinical outcome. In the spectrum of identified gene mutations, primarily targetable lesions are gain of function mutations of tyrosine kinases FLT3, JAK2 and cKIT for which specific, dual and multi-targeted small molecule inhibitors have been developed. A number of targeted compounds such as sorafenib, quizartinib, lestaurtinib, midostaurin, pacritinib, PLX3397 and CCT137690 are in clinical development. For loss-of-function gene mutations, which are mostly biomarkers of favorable prognosis, combined therapeutic approaches can maximize the therapeutic efficacy of conventional therapy. Apart from mutated gene products, proteins aberrantly overexpressed in AML appear to be clinically significant therapeutic targets. Such a molecule for which targeted inhibitors are currently in clinical development is PLK1. We review characteristic gene mutations, discuss their biological functions and clinical significance and present small molecule compounds in clinical development, which are expected to have a role in treating AML subtypes with characteristic molecular alterations. PMID:23358589

  13. Homologous recombination is required for AAV-mediated gene targeting

    PubMed Central

    Vasileva, Ana; Linden, R. Michael; Jessberger, Rolf

    2006-01-01

    High frequencies of gene targeting can be achieved by infection of mammalian cells with recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vectors [D. W. Russell and R. K. Hirata (1998) Nature Genet., 18, 325–330; D. W. Russell and R. K. Hirata (2000) J. Virol., 74, 4612–4620; R. Hirata et al. (2002) Nat. Biotechnol., 20, 735–738], but the mechanism of targeting is unclear and random integration often occurs in parallel. We assessed the role of specific DNA repair and recombination pathways in rAAV gene targeting by measuring correction of a mutated enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) gene in cells where homologous recombination (HR) or non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) had been suppressed by RNAi. EGFP-negative cells were transduced with rAAV vectors carrying a different inactivating deletion in the EGFP, and in parallel with rAAV vectors carrying red fluorescent protein (RFP). Expression of RFP accounted for viral transduction efficiency and long-term random integration. Approximately 0.02% of the infected GFP-negative cells were stably converted to GFP positive cells. Silencing of the essential NHEJ component DNA-PK had no significant effect on the frequency of targeting at any time point examined. Silencing of the SNF2/SWI2 family members RAD54L or RAD54B, which are important for HR, reduced the rate of stable rAAV gene targeting ∼5-fold. Further, partial silencing of the Rad51 paralogue XRCC3 completely abolished stable long-term EGFP expression. These results show that rAAV gene targeting requires the Rad51/Rad54 pathway of HR. PMID:16822856

  14. Correction of human. beta. sup S -globin gene by gene targeting

    SciTech Connect

    Shesely, E.G.; Hyungsuk Kim; Shehee, W.R.; Smithies, O. ); Papayannopoulou, T. ); Popovich, B.W. )

    1991-05-15

    As a step toward using gene targeting for gene therapy, the authors have corrected a human {beta}{sup S}-globin gene to the normal {beta}{sup A} allele by homologous recombination in the mouse-human hybrid cell line BSM. BSM is derived from a mouse erythroleukemia cell line and carries a single human chromosome 11 with the {beta}{sup S}-globin allele. A {beta}{sup A}-globin targeting construct containing a unique oligomer and a neomycin-resistance gene was electroporated into the BSM cells, which were then placed under G418 selection. Then 126 resulting pools containing a total {approx}29,000 G418-resistant clones were screened by PCR for the presence of a targeted recombinant: 3 positive pools were identified. A targeted clone was isolated by replating one of the positive pools into smaller pools and rescreening by PCR, followed by dilution cloning. Southern blot analysis demonstrated that the isolated clone had been targeted as planned. The correction of the {beta}{sup S} allele to {beta}{sup A} was confirmed both by allele-specific PCR and by allele-specific antibodies. Expression studies comparing the uninduced and induced RNA levels in unmodified BSM cells and in the targeted clone showed no significant alteration in the ability of the targeted clone to undergo induction, despite the potentially disrupting presence of a transcriptionally active neomycin gene 5{prime} to the human {beta}{sup A}-globin gene. Thus gene targeting can correct a {beta}{sup S} allele to {beta}{sup A}, and the use of a selectable helper gene need not significantly interfere with the induction of the corrected gene.

  15. Chlorotoxin labeled magnetic nanovectors for targeted gene delivery to glioma.

    PubMed

    Kievit, Forrest M; Veiseh, Omid; Fang, Chen; Bhattarai, Narayan; Lee, Donghoon; Ellenbogen, Richard G; Zhang, Miqin

    2010-08-24

    Glioma accounts for 80% of brain tumors and currently remains one of the most lethal forms of cancers. Gene therapy could potentially improve the dismal prognosis of patients with glioma, but this treatment modality has not yet reached the bedside from the laboratory due to the lack of safe and effective gene delivery vehicles. In this study we investigate targeted gene delivery to C6 glioma cells in a xenograft mouse model using chlorotoxin (CTX) labeled nanoparticles. The developed nanovector consists of an iron oxide nanoparticle core, coated with a copolymer of chitosan, polyethylene glycol (PEG), and polyethylenimine (PEI). Green fluorescent protein (GFP) encoding DNA was bound to these nanoparticles, and CTX was then attached using a short PEG linker. Nanoparticles without CTX were also prepared as a control. Mice bearing C6 xenograft tumors were injected intravenously with the DNA-bound nanoparticles. Nanoparticle accumulation in the tumor site was monitored using magnetic resonance imaging and analyzed by histology, and GFP gene expression was monitored through Xenogen IVIS fluorescence imaging and confocal fluorescence microscopy. Interestingly, the CTX did not affect the accumulation of nanoparticles at the tumor site but specifically enhanced their uptake into cancer cells as evidenced by higher gene expression. These results indicate that this targeted gene delivery system may potentially improve treatment outcome of gene therapy for glioma and other deadly cancers. PMID:20731441

  16. Chlorotoxin Labeled Magnetic Nanovectors for Targeted Gene Delivery to Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Kievit, Forrest M.; Veiseh, Omid; Fang, Chen; Bhattarai, Narayan; Lee, Donghoon; Ellenbogen, Richard G.; Zhang, Miqin

    2010-01-01

    Glioma accounts for 80% of brain tumors, and currently remains one of the most lethal forms of cancers. Gene therapy could potentially improve the dismal prognosis of patients with glioma, but this treatment modality has not yet reached the bedside from the laboratory due to the lack of safe and effective gene delivery vehicles. In this study we investigate targeted gene delivery to C6 glioma cells in a xenograft mouse model using chlorotoxin (CTX) labeled nanoparticles. The developed nanovector consists of an iron oxide nanoparticle core, coated with a copolymer of chitosan, polyethylene glycol (PEG) and polyethylenimine (PEI). Green fluorescent protein (GFP) encoding DNA was bound to these nanoparticles, and CTX was then attached using a short PEG linker. Nanoparticles without CTX were also prepared as a control. Mice bearing C6 xenograft tumors were injected intravenously with the DNA bound nanoparticles. Nanoparticle accumulation in the tumor site was monitored using magnetic resonance imaging and analyzed by histology, and GFP gene expression was monitored through Xenogen IVIS fluorescence imaging and confocal fluorescence microscopy. Interestingly, the CTX did not affect the accumulation of nanoparticles at the tumor site, but specifically enhanced their uptake into cancer cells as evidenced by higher gene expression. These results indicate that this targeted gene delivery system may potentially improve treatment outcome of gene therapy for glioma and other deadly cancers. PMID:20731441

  17. Rescuing the Failing Heart by Targeted Gene Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Kawase, Yoshiaki; Ladage, Dennis; Hajjar, Roger J.

    2011-01-01

    Congestive heart failure is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the US. While progress in conventional treatments is making steady and incremental gains to reduce heart failure mortality, there is a critical need to explore new therapeutic approaches. Gene therapy was initially applied in the clinical setting for inherited monogenic disorders. It is now apparent that gene therapy has broader potential that also includes acquired polygenic diseases, such as congestive heart failure. Recent advances in understanding of the molecular basis of myocardial dysfunction, together with the evolution of increasingly efficient gene transfer technology, has placed heart failure within reach of gene-based therapy. Furthermore, the recent successful and safe completion of a phase 2 trial targeting the sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase pump (SERCA2a) along with the start of more recent phase 1 trials usher a new era for gene therapy for the treatment of heart failure. PMID:21371634

  18. Essential genes as antimicrobial targets and cornerstones of synthetic biology.

    PubMed

    Juhas, Mario; Eberl, Leo; Church, George M

    2012-11-01

    Essential genes are absolutely required for the survival of any living entity. Investigation of essential genes is therefore expected to advance tremendously our understanding of the universal principles of life. Determination of a minimal set of essential genes needed to sustain life also plays an important role in the emerging field of synthetic biology, whose goals include creation of a stringently controlled minimal cell with predesigned phenotypic traits. In addition, due to their indispensability for survival of bacteria, genes encoding essential cellular functions have great potential in medicine as promising targets for the development of novel antimicrobials. Here, we review recent advances in the investigation of essential genes, with emphasis on the practical applications in medicine and synthetic biology. PMID:22951051

  19. Bacteriophages and medical oncology: targeted gene therapy of cancer.

    PubMed

    Bakhshinejad, Babak; Karimi, Marzieh; Sadeghizadeh, Majid

    2014-08-01

    Targeted gene therapy of cancer is of paramount importance in medical oncology. Bacteriophages, viruses that specifically infect bacterial cells, offer a variety of potential applications in biomedicine. Their genetic flexibility to go under a variety of surface modifications serves as a basis for phage display methodology. These surface manipulations allow bacteriophages to be exploited for targeted delivery of therapeutic genes. Moreover, the excellent safety profile of these viruses paves the way for their potential use as cancer gene therapy platforms. The merge of phage display and combinatorial technology has led to the emergence of phage libraries turning phage display into a high throughput technology. Random peptide libraries, as one of the most frequently used phage libraries, provide a rich source of clinically useful peptide ligands. Peptides are known as a promising category of pharmaceutical agents in medical oncology that present advantages such as inexpensive synthesis, efficient tissue penetration and the lack of immunogenicity. Phage peptide libraries can be screened, through biopanning, against various targets including cancer cells and tissues that results in obtaining cancer-homing ligands. Cancer-specific peptides isolated from phage libraries show huge promise to be utilized for targeting of various gene therapy vectors towards malignant cells. Beyond doubt, bacteriophages will play a more impressive role in the future of medical oncology. PMID:25012686

  20. Target gene delivery from targeting ligand conjugated chitosan-PEI copolymer for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Nam, Joung-Pyo; Nah, Jae-Woon

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we designed a novel carrier which was having low cytotoxicity, site-specific target function, and high transfection efficiency using low molecular weight water soluble O-carboxymethyl chitosan (OCMCh), branched low molecular weight poly(ethyleneimine) (bPEI), and targeting ligand (epitope type, HER-2/neu). OCMCh/bPEI/targeting ligand, HPOCP copolymer, and targeting ligand-modified polyamphoteric polymer, and were prepared by chemical reaction and characterized by (1)H NMR and FT-IR. The binding affinity, protecting efficiency, and releasing ability of gene/HPOCP polyplex were confirmed by gel retardation assay. The pDNA(pEGFP)/HPOCP polyplexes showed high gene transfection efficiency in HCT 119 cell. In addition, siRNA/HPOCP polyplexes formed spherical shape and have particle sizes from 100 to 300nm. The siRNA/HPOCP polyplexes have lower cytotoxicity than PEI in the all of siRNA concentrations ranging from 0 to 2μg/μL in HEK 293 cells. The cell viability of siRNA/HPOCP polyplexes was performed in SK-Br3 cells with VEGF siRNA or BCL2 siRNA. In addition, confocal laser-scanning microscopy and flow cytometry assay were performed for cellular localization and cellular uptake efficiency of siRNA/HPOCP polyplexes. The results of the present study demonstrate that HPOCP copolymer is a good candidate as gene delivery carriers for gene delivery system or gene therapy. PMID:26453863

  1. Epigenetic Editing: targeted rewriting of epigenetic marks to modulate expression of selected target genes

    PubMed Central

    de Groote, Marloes L.; Verschure, Pernette J.; Rots, Marianne G.

    2012-01-01

    Despite significant advances made in epigenetic research in recent decades, many questions remain unresolved, especially concerning cause and consequence of epigenetic marks with respect to gene expression modulation (GEM). Technologies allowing the targeting of epigenetic enzymes to predetermined DNA sequences are uniquely suited to answer such questions and could provide potent (bio)medical tools. Toward the goal of gene-specific GEM by overwriting epigenetic marks (Epigenetic Editing, EGE), instructive epigenetic marks need to be identified and their writers/erasers should then be fused to gene-specific DNA binding domains. The appropriate epigenetic mark(s) to change in order to efficiently modulate gene expression might have to be validated for any given chromatin context and should be (mitotically) stable. Various insights in such issues have been obtained by sequence-specific targeting of epigenetic enzymes, as is presented in this review. Features of such studies provide critical aspects for further improving EGE. An example of this is the direct effect of the edited mark versus the indirect effect of recruited secondary proteins by targeting epigenetic enzymes (or their domains). Proof-of-concept of expression modulation of an endogenous target gene is emerging from the few EGE studies reported. Apart from its promise in correcting disease-associated epi-mutations, EGE represents a powerful tool to address fundamental epigenetic questions. PMID:23002135

  2. Targeted gene delivery via N-acetylglucosamine receptor mediated endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Singh, Bijay; Maharjan, Sushila; Kim, You-Kyoung; Jiang, Tai; Islam, Mohammad Ariful; Kang, Sang-Kee; Cho, Myung-Haing; Choi, Yun-Jaie; Cho, Chong-Su

    2014-11-01

    Receptor-mediated endocytosis is a promising approach of gene delivery into the target cells via receptor-ligand interaction. Vimentins at the cell surface are recently known to bind N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) residue, therefore, the cell surfaces of vimentin-expressing cells could be targeted by using the GlcNAc residue as a specific ligand for receptor-mediated gene delivery. Here, we have developed polymeric gene delivery vectors, based on poly(ethylene oxide)(PEO) and poly(aspartamide), namely poly[(aspartamide)(diethylenetriamine)]-b-[PEO-(GlcNAc)] (PADPG) and poly[(aspartamide)(diethylenetriamine)]-b-[PEO] (PADP) to elucidate the efficiency of GlcNAc ligand for gene delivery through receptor mediated endocytosis. To determine the efficiency of these polymeric vectors for specific gene delivery, the DNA condensation ability of PADPG and PADP and the subsequent formation of polymeric nanoparticles were confirmed by gel retardation assay and transmission electron microscopy respectively. Both PADPG and PADP had lower cytotoxicity than polyethylenimine 25 K (PEI 25 K). However, their transfection efficiency was comparatively lower than PEI 25 K due to hydrophilic property of PEO in the vectors. To observe the stability of polymeric nanoparticles, the transfection of PADPG and PADP was carried out in the presence of serum. Favorably, the interfering effect of serum on the transfection efficiency of PADPG and PADP was also very low. Finally, when the cell specificity of these polymeric vectors was investigated, PADPG had high gene transfection in vimentin-expressing cells than vimentin-deficiency cells. The high transfection efficiency of PADPG was attributed to the GlcNAc in the polymeric vector which interact specifically with vimentin in the cells for the receptor-mediated endocytosis. The competitive inhibition assay further proved the receptor-mediated endocytosis of PADPG. Thus, this study demonstrates that conjugation of GlcNAc is an effective and rational

  3. Genes Frequently Coexpressed with Hoxc8 Provide Insight into the Discovery of Target Genes.

    PubMed

    Kalyani, Ruthala; Lee, Ji-Yeon; Min, Hyehyun; Yoon, Heejei; Kim, Myoung Hee

    2016-05-31

    Identifying Hoxc8 target genes is at the crux of understanding the Hoxc8-mediated regulatory networks underlying its roles during development. However, identification of these genes remains difficult due to intrinsic factors of Hoxc8, such as low DNA binding specificity, context-dependent regulation, and unknown cofactors. Therefore, as an alternative, the present study attempted to test whether the roles of Hoxc8 could be inferred by simply analyzing genes frequently coexpressed with Hoxc8, and whether these genes include putative target genes. Using archived gene expression datasets in which Hoxc8 was differentially expressed, we identified a total of 567 genes that were positively coexpressed with Hoxc8 in at least four out of eight datasets. Among these, 23 genes were coexpressed in six datasets. Gene sets associated with extracellular matrix and cell adhesion were most significantly enriched, followed by gene sets for skeletal system development, morphogenesis, cell motility, and transcriptional regulation. In particular, transcriptional regulators, including paralogs of Hoxc8, known Hox co-factors, and transcriptional remodeling factors were enriched. We randomly selected Adam19, Ptpn13, Prkd1, Tgfbi, and Aldh1a3, and validated their coexpression in mouse embryonic tissues and cell lines following TGF-β2 treatment or ectopic Hoxc8 expression. Except for Aldh1a3, all genes showed concordant expression with that of Hoxc8, suggesting that the coexpressed genes might include direct or indirect target genes. Collectively, we suggest that the coexpressed genes provide a resource for constructing Hoxc8-mediated regulatory networks. PMID:27025388

  4. Genes Frequently Coexpressed with Hoxc8 Provide Insight into the Discovery of Target Genes

    PubMed Central

    Kalyani, Ruthala; Lee, Ji-Yeon; Min, Hyehyun; Yoon, Heejei; Kim, Myoung Hee

    2016-01-01

    Identifying Hoxc8 target genes is at the crux of understanding the Hoxc8-mediated regulatory networks underlying its roles during development. However, identification of these genes remains difficult due to intrinsic factors of Hoxc8, such as low DNA binding specificity, context-dependent regulation, and unknown cofactors. Therefore, as an alternative, the present study attempted to test whether the roles of Hoxc8 could be inferred by simply analyzing genes frequently coexpressed with Hoxc8, and whether these genes include putative target genes. Using archived gene expression datasets in which Hoxc8 was differentially expressed, we identified a total of 567 genes that were positively coexpressed with Hoxc8 in at least four out of eight datasets. Among these, 23 genes were coexpressed in six datasets. Gene sets associated with extracellular matrix and cell adhesion were most significantly enriched, followed by gene sets for skeletal system development, morphogenesis, cell motility, and transcriptional regulation. In particular, transcriptional regulators, including paralogs of Hoxc8, known Hox co-factors, and transcriptional remodeling factors were enriched. We randomly selected Adam19, Ptpn13, Prkd1, Tgfbi, and Aldh1a3, and validated their coexpression in mouse embryonic tissues and cell lines following TGF-β2 treatment or ectopic Hoxc8 expression. Except for Aldh1a3, all genes showed concordant expression with that of Hoxc8, suggesting that the coexpressed genes might include direct or indirect target genes. Collectively, we suggest that the coexpressed genes provide a resource for constructing Hoxc8-mediated regulatory networks. PMID:27025388

  5. Sequence and in vitro function of chicken, ring-necked pheasant, and Japanese quail AHR1 predict in vivo sensitivity to dioxins.

    PubMed

    Farmahin, Reza; Wu, Dongmei; Crump, Doug; Hervé, Jessica C; Jones, Stephanie P; Hahn, Mark E; Karchner, Sibel I; Giesy, John P; Bursian, Steven J; Zwiernik, Matthew J; Kennedy, Sean W

    2012-03-01

    There are large differences in sensitivity to the toxic and biochemical effects of dioxins and dioxin-like compounds (DLCs) among vertebrates. Previously, we demonstrated that the difference in sensitivity between domestic chicken (Gallus gallus domesticus) and common tern (Sterna hirundo) to aryl hydrocarbon receptor 1 (AHR1)-dependent changes in gene expression following exposure to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) is based upon the identities of the amino acids at two sites within the ligand binding domain of AHR1 (chicken--highly sensitive; Ile324_Ser380 vs common tern--250-fold less sensitive than chicken; Val325_Ala381). Here, we tested the hypotheses that (i) the sensitivity of other avian species to TCDD, 2,3,4,7,8-pentachlorodibenzofuran (PeCDF), and 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzofuran (TCDF) is also determined by the amino acids at sites that are equivalent to sites 324 and 380 in chicken, and (ii) Ile324_Ala380 and Val324_Ser380 genotypes confer intermediate sensitivity to DLCs in birds. We compared ligand-induced transactivation function of full-length AHR1s from chicken, common tern, ring-necked pheasant (Phasianus colchicus; Ile324_Ala380) and Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica; Val324_Ala380), and three Japanese quail AHR1 mutants. The results support our hypothesis that avian species can be grouped into three general classes of sensitivity to DLCs. Both AHR1 genotype and in vitro transactivation assays predict in vivo sensitivity. Contrary to the assumption that TCDD is the most potent DLC, PeCDF was more potent than TCDD at activating Japanese quail (13- to 26-fold) and common tern (23- to 30-fold) AHR1. Our results support and expand previous in vitro and in vivo work that demonstrated ligand-dependent species differences in AHR1 affinity. The findings and methods will be of use for DLC risk assessments. PMID:22296185

  6. Alteration of Caenorhabditis elegans gene expression by targeted transformation.

    PubMed Central

    Broverman, S; MacMorris, M; Blumenthal, T

    1993-01-01

    We have produced strains carrying a synthetic fusion of parts of two vitellogenin genes, vit-2 and vit-6, integrated into the Caenorhabditis elegans genome. In most of the 63 transformant strains, the plasmid sequences are integrated at random locations in the genome. However, in two strains the transgene integrated by homologous recombination into the endogenous vit-2 gene. In both cases the reciprocal exchange between the chromosome and the injected circular plasmid containing a promoter deletion led to switching of the plasmid-borne promoter and the endogenous promoter, with a reduction in vit-2 expression. Thus in nematodes, transforming DNA can integrate by homologous recombination to result in partial inactivation of the chromosomal locus. The simplicity of the event and its reasonably high frequency suggest that gene targeting by homologous recombination should be considered as a method for directed inactivation of C. elegans genes. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8506273

  7. Alteration of Caenorhabditis elegans gene expression by targeted transformation.

    PubMed

    Broverman, S; MacMorris, M; Blumenthal, T

    1993-05-15

    We have produced strains carrying a synthetic fusion of parts of two vitellogenin genes, vit-2 and vit-6, integrated into the Caenorhabditis elegans genome. In most of the 63 transformant strains, the plasmid sequences are integrated at random locations in the genome. However, in two strains the transgene integrated by homologous recombination into the endogenous vit-2 gene. In both cases the reciprocal exchange between the chromosome and the injected circular plasmid containing a promoter deletion led to switching of the plasmid-borne promoter and the endogenous promoter, with a reduction in vit-2 expression. Thus in nematodes, transforming DNA can integrate by homologous recombination to result in partial inactivation of the chromosomal locus. The simplicity of the event and its reasonably high frequency suggest that gene targeting by homologous recombination should be considered as a method for directed inactivation of C. elegans genes. PMID:8506273

  8. Imprinted genes as potential genetic and epigenetic toxicologic targets.

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, S K; Jirtle, R L

    2000-01-01

    Genomic imprinting is an epigenetic phenomenon in eutherian mammals that results in the differential expression of the paternally and maternally inherited alleles of a gene. Imprinted genes are necessary for normal mammalian development. This requirement has been proposed to have evolved because of an interparental genetic battle for the utilization of maternal resources during gestation and postnatally. The nonrandom requisite for monoallelic expression of a subset of genes has also resulted in the formation of susceptibility loci for neurobehavioral disorders, developmental disorders, and cancer. Since imprinting involves both cytosine methylation within CpG islands and changes in chromatin structure, imprinted genes are potential targets for dysregulation by epigenetic toxicants that modify DNA methylation and histone acetylation. PMID:10698719

  9. Gene Targeting of Mouse Tardbp Negatively Affects Masp2 Expression

    PubMed Central

    Dib, Samar; Xiao, Shangxi; Miletic, Denise; Robertson, Janice

    2014-01-01

    Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) is a devastating adult onset neurodegenerative disease affecting both upper and lower motor neurons. TDP-43, encoded by the TARDBP gene, was identified as a component of motor neuron cytoplasmic inclusions in both familial and sporadic ALS and has become a pathological signature of the disease. TDP-43 is a nuclear protein involved in RNA metabolism, however in ALS, TDP-43 is mislocalized to the cytoplasm of affected motor neurons, suggesting that disease might be caused by TDP-43 loss of function. To investigate this hypothesis, we attempted to generate a mouse conditional knockout of the Tardbp gene using the classical Cre-loxP technology. Even though heterozygote mice for the targeted allele were successfully generated, we were unable to obtain homozygotes. Here we show that although the targeting vector was specifically designed to not overlap with Tardbp adjacent genes, the homologous recombination event affected the expression of a downstream gene, Masp2. This may explain the inability to obtain homozygote mice with targeted Tardbp. PMID:24740308

  10. All-optical regulation of gene expression in targeted cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yisen; He, Hao; Li, Shiyang; Liu, Dayong; Lan, Bei; Hu, Minglie; Cao, Youjia; Wang, Chingyue

    2014-06-01

    Controllable gene expression is always a challenge and of great significance to biomedical research and clinical applications. Recently, various approaches based on extra-engineered light-sensitive proteins have been developed to provide optogenetic actuators for gene expression. Complicated biomedical techniques including exogenous genes engineering, transfection, and material delivery are needed. Here we present an all-optical method to regulate gene expression in targeted cells. Intrinsic or exogenous genes can be activated by a Ca2+-sensitive transcription factor nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) driven by a short flash of femtosecond-laser irradiation. When applied to mesenchymal stem cells, expression of a differentiation regulator Osterix can be activated by this method to potentially induce differentiation of them. A laser-induced ``Ca2+-comb'' (LiCCo) by multi-time laser exposure is further developed to enhance gene expression efficiency. This noninvasive method hence provides an encouraging advance of gene expression regulation, with promising potential of applying in cell biology and stem-cell science.

  11. Evaluation of drug-targetable genes by defining modes of abnormality in gene expression.

    PubMed

    Park, Junseong; Lee, Jungsul; Choi, Chulhee

    2015-01-01

    In the post-genomic era, many researchers have taken a systematic approach to identifying abnormal genes associated with various diseases. However, the gold standard has not been established, and most of these abnormalities are difficult to be rehabilitated in real clinical settings. In addition to identifying abnormal genes, for a practical purpose, it is necessary to investigate abnormality diversity. In this context, this study is aimed to demonstrate simply restorable genes as useful drug targets. We devised the concept of "drug targetability" to evaluate several different modes of abnormal genes by predicting events after drug treatment. As a representative example, we applied our method to breast cancer. Computationally, PTPRF, PRKAR2B, MAP4K3, and RICTOR were calculated as highly drug-targetable genes for breast cancer. After knockdown of these top-ranked genes (i.e., high drug targetability) using siRNA, our predictions were validated by cell death and migration assays. Moreover, inhibition of RICTOR or PTPRF was expected to prolong lifespan of breast cancer patients according to patient information annotated in microarray data. We anticipate that our method can be widely applied to elaborate selection of novel drug targets, and, ultimately, to improve the efficacy of disease treatment. PMID:26336805

  12. Essential gene identification and drug target prioritization in Aspergillus fumigatus.

    PubMed

    Hu, Wenqi; Sillaots, Susan; Lemieux, Sebastien; Davison, John; Kauffman, Sarah; Breton, Anouk; Linteau, Annie; Xin, Chunlin; Bowman, Joel; Becker, Jeff; Jiang, Bo; Roemer, Terry

    2007-03-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus is the most prevalent airborne filamentous fungal pathogen in humans, causing severe and often fatal invasive infections in immunocompromised patients. Currently available antifungal drugs to treat invasive aspergillosis have limited modes of action, and few are safe and effective. To identify and prioritize antifungal drug targets, we have developed a conditional promoter replacement (CPR) strategy using the nitrogen-regulated A. fumigatus NiiA promoter (pNiiA). The gene essentiality for 35 A. fumigatus genes was directly demonstrated by this pNiiA-CPR strategy from a set of 54 genes representing broad biological functions whose orthologs are confirmed to be essential for growth in Candida albicans and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Extending this approach, we show that the ERG11 gene family (ERG11A and ERG11B) is essential in A. fumigatus despite neither member being essential individually. In addition, we demonstrate the pNiiA-CPR strategy is suitable for in vivo phenotypic analyses, as a number of conditional mutants, including an ERG11 double mutant (erg11BDelta, pNiiA-ERG11A), failed to establish a terminal infection in an immunocompromised mouse model of systemic aspergillosis. Collectively, the pNiiA-CPR strategy enables a rapid and reliable means to directly identify, phenotypically characterize, and facilitate target-based whole cell assays to screen A. fumigatus essential genes for cognate antifungal inhibitors. PMID:17352532

  13. RFMirTarget: Predicting Human MicroRNA Target Genes with a Random Forest Classifier

    PubMed Central

    Mendoza, Mariana R.; da Fonseca, Guilherme C.; Loss-Morais, Guilherme; Alves, Ronnie; Margis, Rogerio; Bazzan, Ana L. C.

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs are key regulators of eukaryotic gene expression whose fundamental role has already been identified in many cell pathways. The correct identification of miRNAs targets is still a major challenge in bioinformatics and has motivated the development of several computational methods to overcome inherent limitations of experimental analysis. Indeed, the best results reported so far in terms of specificity and sensitivity are associated to machine learning-based methods for microRNA-target prediction. Following this trend, in the current paper we discuss and explore a microRNA-target prediction method based on a random forest classifier, namely RFMirTarget. Despite its well-known robustness regarding general classifying tasks, to the best of our knowledge, random forest have not been deeply explored for the specific context of predicting microRNAs targets. Our framework first analyzes alignments between candidate microRNA-target pairs and extracts a set of structural, thermodynamics, alignment, seed and position-based features, upon which classification is performed. Experiments have shown that RFMirTarget outperforms several well-known classifiers with statistical significance, and that its performance is not impaired by the class imbalance problem or features correlation. Moreover, comparing it against other algorithms for microRNA target prediction using independent test data sets from TarBase and starBase, we observe a very promising performance, with higher sensitivity in relation to other methods. Finally, tests performed with RFMirTarget show the benefits of feature selection even for a classifier with embedded feature importance analysis, and the consistency between relevant features identified and important biological properties for effective microRNA-target gene alignment. PMID:23922946

  14. Identification of novel Notch target genes in T cell leukaemia

    PubMed Central

    Chadwick, Nicholas; Zeef, Leo; Portillo, Virginia; Fennessy, Carl; Warrander, Fiona; Hoyle, Sarah; Buckle, Anne-Marie

    2009-01-01

    Background Dysregulated Notch signalling is believed to play an important role in the development and maintenance of T cell leukaemia. At a cellular level, Notch signalling promotes proliferation and inhibits apoptosis of T cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (T-ALL) cells. In this study we aimed to identify novel transcriptional targets of Notch signalling in the T-ALL cell line, Jurkat. Results RNA was prepared from Jurkat cells retrovirally transduced with an empty vector (GFP-alone) or vectors containing constitutively active forms of Notch (N1ΔE or N3ΔE), and used for Affymetrix microarray analysis. A subset of genes found to be regulated by Notch was chosen for real-time PCR validation and in some cases, validation at the protein level, using several Notch-transduced T-ALL and non-T-ALL leukaemic cell lines. As expected, several known transcriptional target of Notch, such as HES1 and Deltex, were found to be overexpressed in Notch-transduced cells, however, many novel transcriptional targets of Notch signalling were identified using this approach. These included the T cell costimulatory molecule CD28, the anti-apoptotic protein GIMAP5, and inhibitor of DNA binding 1 (1D1). Conclusion The identification of such downstream Notch target genes provides insights into the mechanisms of Notch function in T cell leukaemia, and may help identify novel therapeutic targets in this disease. PMID:19508709

  15. Inferring gene targets of drugs and chemical compounds from gene expression profiles

    PubMed Central

    Noh, Heeju; Gunawan, Rudiyanto

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: Finding genes which are directly perturbed or targeted by drugs is of great interest and importance in drug discovery. Several network filtering methods have been created to predict the gene targets of drugs from gene expression data based on an ordinary differential equation model of the gene regulatory network (GRN). A critical step in these methods involves inferring the GRN from the expression data, which is a very challenging problem on its own. In addition, existing network filtering methods require computationally intensive parameter tuning or expression data from experiments with known genetic perturbations or both. Results: We developed a method called DeltaNet for the identification of drug targets from gene expression data. Here, the gene target predictions were directly inferred from the data without a separate step of GRN inference. DeltaNet formulation led to solving an underdetermined linear regression problem, for which we employed least angle regression (DeltaNet-LAR) or LASSO regularization (DeltaNet-LASSO). The predictions using DeltaNet for expression data of Escherichia coli, yeast, fruit fly and human were significantly more accurate than those using network filtering methods, namely mode of action by network identification (MNI) and sparse simultaneous equation model (SSEM). Furthermore, DeltaNet using LAR did not require any parameter tuning and could provide computational speed-up over existing methods. Conclusion: DeltaNet is a robust and numerically efficient tool for identifying gene perturbations from gene expression data. Importantly, the method requires little to no expert supervision, while providing accurate gene target predictions. Availability and implementation: DeltaNet is available on http://www.cabsel.ethz.ch/tools/DeltaNet. Contact: rudi.gunawan@chem.ethz.ch Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:27153589

  16. Khellin and Visnagin Differentially Modulate AHR Signaling and Downstream CYP1A Activity in Human Liver Cells

    PubMed Central

    Proksch, Peter; Abel, Josef; Dvorak, Zdenek; Haarmann-Stemmann, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Khellin and visnagin are two furanochromones that can be frequently found in ethnomedical formulations in Asia and the Middle East. Both compounds possess anti-inflammatory and analgesic properties, therefore modern medicine uses these compounds or structurally related derivatives for treatment of vitiligo, bronchial asthma and renal colics. Despite their frequent usage, the potential toxic properties of visnagin and khellin are not well characterized up-to-now. Many natural compounds modulate the expression and activity of cytochrome P450 1A1 (CYP1A1), which is well-known to bioactivate pro-carcinogens. The expression of this enzyme is controlled by the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR), a ligand-activated transcription factor and regulator of drug metabolism. Here, we investigated the influence of both furanochromones on AHR signaling in human HepG2 hepatocarcinoma cells and primary human hepatocytes. Both compounds transactivated xenobiotic response element (XRE)-driven reporter gene activity in a dose-dependent manner and induced CYP1A1 transcription in HepG2 cells and primary hepatocytes. The latter was abolished in presence of a specific AHR antagonist. CYP1A enzyme activity assays done in HepG2 cells and primary hepatocytes revealed an inhibition of enzyme activity by both furanochromones, which may become relevant regarding the metabolism of xenobiotics and co-administered therapeutic drugs. The observed induction of several other members of the AHR gene battery, whose gene products are involved in regulation of cell growth, differentiation and migration, indicates that a further toxicological characterization of visnagin and khelllin is urgently required in order to minimize potential drug-drug interactions and other toxic side-effects that may occur during therapeutic usage of these furanochromones. PMID:24069365

  17. Identification of key target genes and pathways in laryngeal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Feng; Du, Jintao; Liu, Jun; Wen, Bei

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to screen the key genes associated with laryngeal carcinoma and to investigate the molecular mechanism of laryngeal carcinoma progression. The gene expression profile of GSE10935 [Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) accession number], including 12 specimens from laryngeal papillomas and 12 specimens from normal laryngeal epithelia controls, was downloaded from the GEO database. Differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were screened in laryngeal papillomas compared with normal controls using Limma package in R language, followed by Gene Ontology (GO) enrichment analysis and pathway enrichment analysis. Furthermore, the protein-protein interaction (PPI) network of DEGs was constructed using Cytoscape software and modules were analyzed using MCODE plugin from the PPI network. Furthermore, significant biological pathway regions (sub-pathway) were identified by using iSubpathwayMiner analysis. A total of 67 DEGs were identified, including 27 up-regulated genes and 40 down-regulated genes and they were involved in different GO terms and pathways. PPI network analysis revealed that Ras association (RalGDS/AF-6) domain family member 1 (RASSF1) was a hub protein. The sub-pathway analysis identified 9 significantly enriched sub-pathways, including glycolysis/gluconeogenesis and nitrogen metabolism. Genes such as phosphoglycerate kinase 1 (PGK1), carbonic anhydrase II (CA2), and carbonic anhydrase XII (CA12) whose node degrees were >10 were identified in the disease risk sub-pathway. Genes in the sub-pathway, such as RASSF1, PGK1, CA2 and CA12 were presumed to serve critical roles in laryngeal carcinoma. The present study identified DEGs and their sub-pathways in the disease, which may serve as potential targets for treatment of laryngeal carcinoma. PMID:27446427

  18. Targeted gene knockout by direct delivery of ZFN proteins

    PubMed Central

    Gaj, Thomas; Guo, Jing; Kato, Yoshio; Sirk, Shannon J.; Barbas, Carlos F.

    2012-01-01

    Zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs) are versatile reagents that have redefined genome engineering. Realizing the full potential of this technology requires the development of safe and effective methods for delivering ZFNs into cells. We demonstrate the intrinsic cell-penetrating capabilities of the standard ZFN architecture and show that direct delivery of ZFNs as proteins leads to efficient endogenous gene disruption in a variety of mammalian cell types with minimal off-target effects. PMID:22751204

  19. Targeted disruption of the Lowe syndrome gene (OCRL-1)

    SciTech Connect

    Jaenne, P.A.; Olivos, I.; Grinberg, A.

    1994-09-01

    The oculocerebrorenal syndrome of Lowe (OCRL) is a rare X-linked disease characterized by congenital cataract formation, mental retardation and renal tubular dysfunction (Fanconi syndrome). The gene for OCRL (OCRL-1) has recently been identified through positional cloning techniques and is highly homologous to a previously reported gene encoding a 75 kDa inositol polyphosphate-5-phosphatase. Thus OCRL might be caused by an alteration in inositol metabolism. In order to further investigate the role of OCRL-1 in Lowe`s syndrome, we decided to use targeted disruption to create mice lacking a functional OCRL-1 protein. The murine homologue of OCRL-1 (Ocrl-1) was cloned from a 129Sv genomic library. Two targeting vectors were created from the 3{prime}-end of the gene by fusing a neomycin resistance gene (PGK-Neo) into two exons. The first vector employed a classic positive negative selection scheme whereas the second vector included a polyadenylation trap. The vectors were electroporated into CCE or J1 ES cells and recombinants were screened by Southern blotting. Targeted cells were obtained at a frequency of 1/50 (for CCE) and 1/16 (for J1 using the polyadenylation trap). Using antibodies made to an OCRL-1 fusion protein, we could demonstrate a lack of Ocrl-1 protein product in the targeted ES cell lines. Therefore, we had created a null allele at the Ocrl-1 locus. The targeted ES clones were injected into 3.5 dpc C57B1/6 blastocysts and chimeric mice were obtained. Male chimeras have been made from five targeted cell lines. The males were mated with C57B1/6 females and germline transmission has been obtained from males derived from two of the five cell lines (one from CCE and one from J1 targeted ES cells). Preliminary analysis of male Ocrl-1{sup {minus}} mice suggests the presence of a proximal renal tubular dysfunction but the absence of detectable cataracts. We are presently continuing our phenotypic analyses.

  20. Small interfering RNAs targeting the rabies virus nucleoprotein gene.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yu-Jiao; Zhao, Ping-Sen; Zhang, Tao; Wang, Hua-Lei; Liang, Hong-Ru; Zhao, Li-Li; Wu, Hong-Xia; Wang, Tie-Cheng; Yang, Song-Tao; Xia, Xian-Zhu

    2012-10-01

    Rabies virus (RABV) infection continues to be a global threat to human and animal health, yet no curative therapy has been developed. RNA interference (RNAi) therapy, which silences expression of specific target genes, represents a promising approach for treating viral infections in mammalian hosts. We designed six small interfering (si)RNAs (N473, N580, N783, N796, N799 and N1227) that target the conserved region of the RABV challenge virus standard (CVS)-11 strain nucleoprotein (N) gene. Using a plasmid-based transient expression model, we demonstrated that N796, N580 and N799 were capable of significantly inhibiting viral replication in vitro and in vivo. These three siRNAs effectively suppressed RABV expression in infected baby hamster kidney-21 (BHK-21) cells, as evidenced by direct immunofluorescence assay, viral titer measurements, real-time PCR, and Western blotting. In addition, liposome-mediated siRNA expression plasmid delivery to RABV-infected mice significantly increased survival, compared to a non-liposome-mediated delivery method. Collectively, our results showed that the three siRNAs, N796, N580 and N799, targeting the N gene could potently inhibit RABV CVS-11 reproduction. These siRNAs have the potential to be developed into new and effective prophylactic anti-RABV drugs. PMID:22884777

  1. Treating psoriasis by targeting its susceptibility gene Rel.

    PubMed

    Fan, Tingting; Wang, Shaowen; Yu, Linjiang; Yi, Huqiang; Liu, Ruiling; Geng, Wenwen; Wan, Xiaochun; Ma, Yifan; Cai, Lintao; Chen, Youhai H; Ruan, Qingguo

    2016-04-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the skin. Accumulating evidence indicates that the Rel gene, a member of the NF-κB family, is a risk factor for the disease. We sought to investigate whether psoriasis can be prevented by directly targeting the Rel gene transcript, i.e., the c-Rel mRNA. Using chemically-modified c-Rel specific siRNA (siRel) and poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly(l-lysine)-b-poly(l-leucine) (PEG-PLL-PLLeu) micelles, we successfully knocked down the expression of c-Rel, and showed that the expression of cytokine IL-23, a direct target of c-Rel that can drive the development of IL-17-producing T cells, was markedly inhibited. More importantly, treating mice with siRel not only prevented but also ameliorated imiquimod (IMQ)-induced psoriasis. Mechanistic studies showed that siRel treatment down-regulated the expression of multiple inflammatory cytokines. Taken together, these results indicate that the susceptibility gene Rel can be targeted to treat and prevent psoriasis. PMID:26993753

  2. Target Gene Abundance Contributes to the Efficiency of siRNA-Mediated Gene Silencing

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Sun Woo; Jiang, Yuanyuan; Kim, Soyoun; Li, Chiang J.

    2014-01-01

    The gene-silencing activity of a small interfering RNA (siRNA) is determined by various factors. Considering that RNA interference (RNAi) is an unparalleled technology in both basic research and therapeutic applications, thorough understanding of the factors determining RNAi activity is critical. This report presents observations that siRNAs targeting KRT7 show cell-line-dependent activity, which correlates with the expression level of KRT7 mRNA. By modulating the target mRNA level, it was confirmed that highly expressed genes are more susceptible to siRNA-mediated gene silencing. Finally, several genes that show different expression levels in a cell-line dependent manner were tested, which verified the expression-level-dependent siRNA activities. These results strongly suggest that the abundance of target mRNA is a critical factor that determines the efficiency of the siRNA-mediated gene silencing in a given cellular context. This report should provide practical guidelines for designing RNAi experiments and for selecting targetable genes in RNAi therapeutics studies. PMID:24527979

  3. Salivary epithelial cells: an unassuming target site for gene therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Perez, Paola; Rowzee, Anne M.; Zheng, Changyu; Adriaansen, Janik; Baum, Bruce J.

    2010-01-01

    Salivary glands are classical exocrine glands whose external secretions result in the production of saliva. However, in addition to the secretion of exocrine proteins, salivary epithelial cells are also capable of secreting proteins internally, into the bloodstream. This brief review examines the potential for using salivary epithelial cells as a target site for in situ gene transfer, with an ultimate goal of producing therapeutic proteins for treating both systemic and upper gastrointestinal tract disorders. The review discusses the protein secretory pathways reported to be present in salivary epithelial cells, the viral gene transfer vectors shown useful for transducing these cells, model transgenic secretory proteins examined, and some clinical conditions that might benefit from such salivary gland gene transfer. PMID:20219693

  4. Regulatory network of microRNAs, target genes, transcription factors and host genes in endometrial cancer.

    PubMed

    Xue, Lu-Chen; Xu, Zhi-Wen; Wang, Kun-Hao; Wang, Ning; Zhang, Xiao-Xu; Wang, Shang

    2015-01-01

    Genes and microRNAs (miRNAs) have important roles in human oncology. However, most of the biological factors are reported in disperse form which makes it hard to discover the pathology. In this study, genes and miRNAs involved in human endometrial cancer(EC) were collected and formed into regulatory networks following their interactive relations, including miRNAs targeting genes, transcription factors (TFs) regulating miRNAs and miRNAs included in their host genes. Networks are constructed hierarchically at three levels: differentially expressed, related and global. Among the three, the differentially expressed network is the most important and fundamental network that contains the key genes and miRNAs in EC. The target genes, TFs and miRNAs are differentially expressed in EC so that any mutation in them may impact on EC development. Some key pathways in networks were highlighted to analyze how they interactively influence other factors and carcinogenesis. Upstream and downstream pathways of the differentially expressed genes and miRNAs were compared and analyzed. The purpose of this study was to partially reveal the deep regulatory mechanisms in EC using a new method that combines comprehensive genes and miRNAs together with their relationships. It may contribute to cancer prevention and gene therapy of EC. PMID:25684474

  5. Tumor targeting and microenvironment-responsive nanoparticles for gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shixian; Shao, Kun; Kuang, Yuyang; Liu, Yang; Li, Jianfeng; An, Sai; Guo, Yubo; Ma, Haojun; He, Xi; Jiang, Chen

    2013-07-01

    A tumor targeting nanoparticle system has been successfully developed to response to the lowered tumor extracellular pH (pHe) and upregulated matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP2) in the tumor microenvironment. The nanoparticles are modified with activatable cell-penetrating peptide (designated as dtACPP) that's dual-triggered by the lowered pHe and MMP2. In dtACPP, the internalization function of cell-penetrating peptide (CPP) is quenched by a pH-sensitive masking peptide, linking by a MMP2 substrate. The masking peptide is negatively charged to quench the cationic CPP well after systemic administration. Hence, dtACPP-modified nanoparticles possesses passive tumor targetability via the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect. Once reaching the tumor microenvironment, the pre-existing attraction would be eliminated due to the lowered pHe, accompanying the linker cleaved by MMP2, dtACPP would be activated to expose CPP to drive the nanoparticles' internalization into the intratumoral cells. The studies of plasmid DNA loading, toxicity assessment, cellular uptake, tumor targeting delivery, and gene transfection demonstrate that dtACPP-modified nanoparticle system is a potential candidate for tumor targeting gene delivery. PMID:23562171

  6. Identification of gene targets against dormant phase Mycobacterium tuberculosis infections

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Dennis J; Brown, James R

    2007-01-01

    Background Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of tuberculosis (TB), infects approximately 2 billion people worldwide and is the leading cause of mortality due to infectious disease. Current TB therapy involves a regimen of four antibiotics taken over a six month period. Patient compliance, cost of drugs and increasing incidence of drug resistant M. tuberculosis strains have added urgency to the development of novel TB therapies. Eradication of TB is affected by the ability of the bacterium to survive up to decades in a dormant state primarily in hypoxic granulomas in the lung and to cause recurrent infections. Methods The availability of M. tuberculosis genome-wide DNA microarrays has lead to the publication of several gene expression studies under simulated dormancy conditions. However, no single model best replicates the conditions of human pathogenicity. In order to identify novel TB drug targets, we performed a meta-analysis of multiple published datasets from gene expression DNA microarray experiments that modeled infection leading to and including the dormant state, along with data from genome-wide insertional mutagenesis that examined gene essentiality. Results Based on the analysis of these data sets following normalization, several genome wide trends were identified and used to guide the selection of targets for therapeutic development. The trends included the significant up-regulation of genes controlled by devR, down-regulation of protein and ATP synthesis, and the adaptation of two-carbon metabolism to the hypoxic and nutrient limited environment of the granuloma. Promising targets for drug discovery were several regulatory elements (devR/devS, relA, mprAB), enzymes involved in redox balance and respiration, sulfur transport and fixation, pantothenate, isoprene, and NAD biosynthesis. The advantages and liabilities of each target are discussed in the context of enzymology, bacterial pathways, target tractability, and drug development

  7. MicroRNAs and Their Target Genes in Gingival Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Stoecklin-Wasmer, C.; Guarnieri, P.; Celenti, R.; Demmer, R.T.; Kebschull, M.; Papapanou, P.N.

    2012-01-01

    To gain insights into the in vivo function of miRNAs in the context of periodontitis, we examined the occurrence of miRNAs in healthy and diseased gingival tissues and validated their in silico-predicted targets through mRNA profiling using whole-genome microarrays in the same specimens. Eighty-six individuals with periodontitis contributed 198 gingival papillae: 158 ‘diseased’ (bleeding-on-probing, PD > 4 mm, and AL ≥ 3 mm) and 40 ‘healthy’ (no bleeding, PD ≤ 4 mm, and AL ≤ 2 mm). Expression of 1,205 miRNAs was assessed by microarrays, followed by selected confirmation by quantitative RT-PCR. Predicted miRNA targets were identified and tested for enrichment by Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA). Enriched gene sets were grouped in functional categories by DAVID and Ingenuity Pathway Analysis. One hundred fifty-nine miRNAs were significantly differentially expressed between healthy and diseased gingiva. Four miRNAs (hsa-miR-451, hsa-miR-223, hsa-miR-486-5p, hsa-miR-3917) were significantly overexpressed, and 7 (hsa-miR-1246, hsa-miR-1260, hsa-miR-141, hsa-miR-1260b, hsa-miR-203, hsa-miR-210, hsa-miR-205*) were underexpressed by > 2-fold in diseased vs. healthy gingiva. GSEA and additional filtering identified 60 enriched miRNA gene sets with target genes involved in immune/inflammatory responses and tissue homeostasis. This is the first study that concurrently examined miRNA and mRNA expression in gingival tissues and will inform mechanistic experimentation to dissect the role of miRNAs in periodontal tissue homeostasis and pathology. PMID:22879578

  8. Targeted disruption of the NIT8 gene in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, J A; Lefebvre, P A

    1995-01-01

    We have used homologous recombination to disrupt the nuclear gene NIT8 in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. This is the first report of targeted gene disruption of an endogenous locus in C. reinhardtii and only the second for a photosynthetic eukaryote. NIT8 encodes a protein necessary for nitrate and nitrite assimilation by C. reinhardtii. A disruption vector was constructed by placing the CRY1-1 selectable marker gene, which confers emetine resistance, within the NIT8 coding region. nit8 mutants are unable to grow on nitrate as their sole nitrogen source (Nit-) and are resistant to killing by chlorate. One of 2,000 transformants obtained after selection on emetine-chlorate medium contained a homologous insertion of five copies of the disruption plasmid into the NIT8 gene, producing an emetine-resistant, chlorate-resistant Nit- phenotype. The mutant phenotype was rescued by the wild-type NIT8 gene upon transformation. Seven other mutations at the nit8 locus, presumably resulting from homologous recombination with the disruption plasmid, were identified but were shown to be accompanied by deletions of the surrounding genomic region. PMID:7565729

  9. Phytochemicals targeting genes relevant for type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Anuradha, Carani Venkatraman

    2013-06-01

    Nutrigenomic approaches based on ethnopharmacology and phytotherapy concepts have revealed that type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) may be susceptible to dietary intervention. Interaction between bioactive food components and the genome may influence cell processes and modulate the onset and progression of the disease. T2DM, characterized by insulin resistance and beta cell dysfunction, is one of the leading causes of death and disability. Despite the great advances that have been made in the understanding and management of this complex, multifactorial disease, T2DM has become a worldwide epidemic in the 21st century. Population and family studies have revealed a strong genetic component of T2DM, and a number of candidate genes have been identified in humans. Variations in the gene sequences such as single nucleotide polymorphisms, explain the individual differences in traits like disease susceptibility and response to treatment. A clear understanding of how nutrients affect the expression of genes should facilitate the development of individualized intervention and, eventually, treatment strategies for T2DM. Review of the literature identified many phytochemicals/extracts from traditional medicinal plants that can target diabetogenic genes. This review focuses on the genetic aspects of T2DM, nutrient modification of genes relevant for diabetes, and future prospects of nutritional therapy of T2DM. PMID:23745945

  10. [Driver gene mutation and targeted therapy of lung cancer].

    PubMed

    Mitsudomi, Tetsuya

    2013-03-01

    Although cancers may have many genetic alterations, there are only a few mutations actually associated with essential traits of cancer cells such as cell proliferation or evasion from apoptosis. Because cancer cells are "addicted" to these "drive genes" , pharmacologic inhibition of these gene function is highly effective. Epidermal growth factor receptor(EGFR)-tyrosine kinase inhibitor(TKI)(such as gefitinib or erlotinib)treatment of lung cancer harboring EGFR gene mutation is one of the prototypes of such therapies. Several clinical trials clearly demonstrated that progression-free survival of patients treated with EGFR-TKI is significantly longer than that of those treated by conventional platinum doublet chemotherapy. EGFR-TKI therapy dramatically changed the paradigm of lung cancer treatment. Furthermore, in 2012, crizotinib was approved for lung cancer treatment with anaplastic lymphoma kinase(ALK)gene translocation. Targeted therapies for lung cancers "addicted" to other driver gene mutations including ROS1, RET or HER2 are also under development. Through these personalized approaches, lung cancer is changing from an acute fatal disease to a more chronic disease, and eventually we might be able to cure it. PMID:23507588

  11. IRF1 marks activated genes in SLE and can induce target gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhe; Shi, Lihua; Song, Li; Ephrem, Elshaddai; Petri, Michelle; Sullivan, Kathleen E.

    2014-01-01

    Objective IRF1 both mediates responses to type I interferons and the induction of interferons. It has been implicated in murine lupus models as a critical mediator of inflammation. A previous study of chromatin modifications in SLE patient monocytes implicated IRF1 as associated with increased histone acetylation in SLE patients. This study directly investigated IRF1 binding sites on chromatin using ChIP-seq. Methods Nine female SLE patients and seven female controls were examined. Monocytes were purified from peripheral blood and subjected to library preparation using a validated antibody to IRF1. The effect of IRF1 on target gene expression was confirmed using an overexpression system in cell lines and co-immunoprecipitation was used to define protein interactions. Results IRF1 binding around transcribed regions was increased in SLE patient monocytes but histone modifications at potential IRF1 binding sites without detectable IRF1 binding were also increased. IRF1 overexpression was sufficient to drive transcription of target genes. IRF1 overexpression was also able to alter histone modifications at a focus set of target genes and the use of an IRF1 inhibitor decreased both expression and histone modifications at target genes. IRF1 was found to interact with a select set of histone modifying enzymes and other transcription factors. Conclusions IRF1 is an important signaling protein in the interferon pathway. IRF1 not only activates gene expression as a transcription factor but may perpetuate disease by leading to a dysregulated epigenome. PMID:25418955

  12. Quantitative determination of target gene with electrical sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xuzhi; Li, Qiufen; Jin, Xianshi; Jiang, Cheng; Lu, Yong; Tavallaie, Roya; Gooding, J. Justin

    2015-07-01

    Integrating loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) with capacitively coupled contactless conductivity detection (C4D), we have developed an electrical sensor for the simultaneous amplification and detection of specific sequence DNA. Using the O26-wzy gene as a model, the amount of initial target gene could be determined via the threshold time obtained by monitoring the progression of the LAMP reaction in real time. Using the optimal conditions, a detection limit of 12.5 copy/μL can be obtained within 30 min. Monitoring the LAMP reaction by C4D has not only all the advantages that existing electrochemical methods have, but also additional attractive features including being completely free of carryover contamination risk, high simplicity and extremely low cost. These benefits all arise from the fact that the electrodes are separated from the reaction solution, that is C4D is a contactless method. Hence in proof of principle, the new strategy promises a robust, simple, cost-effective and sensitive method for quantitative determination of a target gene, that is applicable either to specialized labs or at point-of-care.

  13. Induction of hepatocellular carcinoma by in vivo gene targeting

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Pei-Rong; Xu, Mei; Toffanin, Sara; Li, Yi; Llovet, Josep M.; Russell, David W.

    2012-01-01

    The distinct phenotypic and prognostic subclasses of human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) are difficult to reproduce in animal experiments. Here we have used in vivo gene targeting to insert an enhancer-promoter element at an imprinted chromosome 12 locus in mice, thereby converting ∼1 in 20,000 normal hepatocytes into a focus of HCC with a single genetic modification. A 300-kb chromosomal domain containing multiple mRNAs, snoRNAs, and microRNAs was activated surrounding the integration site. An identical domain was activated at the syntenic locus in a specific molecular subclass of spontaneous human HCCs with a similar histological phenotype, which was associated with partial loss of DNA methylation. These findings demonstrate the accuracy of in vivo gene targeting in modeling human cancer and suggest future applications in studying various tumors in diverse animal species. In addition, similar insertion events produced by randomly integrating vectors could be a concern for liver-directed human gene therapy. PMID:22733778

  14. Sgs1 and Exo1 suppress targeted chromosome duplication during ends-in and ends-out gene targeting.

    PubMed

    Štafa, Anamarija; Miklenić, Marina; Zunar, Bojan; Lisnić, Berislav; Symington, Lorraine S; Svetec, Ivan-Krešimir

    2014-10-01

    Gene targeting is extremely efficient in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. It is performed by transformation with a linear, non-replicative DNA fragment carrying a selectable marker and containing ends homologous to the particular locus in a genome. However, even in S. cerevisiae, transformation can result in unwanted (aberrant) integration events, the frequency and spectra of which are quite different for ends-out and ends-in transformation assays. It has been observed that gene replacement (ends-out gene targeting) can result in illegitimate integration, integration of the transforming DNA fragment next to the target sequence and duplication of a targeted chromosome. By contrast, plasmid integration (ends-in gene targeting) is often associated with multiple targeted integration events but illegitimate integration is extremely rare and a targeted chromosome duplication has not been reported. Here we systematically investigated the influence of design of the ends-out assay on the success of targeted genetic modification. We have determined transformation efficiency, fidelity of gene targeting and spectra of all aberrant events in several ends-out gene targeting assays designed to insert, delete or replace a particular sequence in the targeted region of the yeast genome. Furthermore, we have demonstrated for the first time that targeted chromosome duplications occur even during ends-in gene targeting. Most importantly, the whole chromosome duplication is POL32 dependent pointing to break-induced replication (BIR) as the underlying mechanism. Moreover, the occurrence of duplication of the targeted chromosome was strikingly increased in the exo1Δ sgs1Δ double mutant but not in the respective single mutants demonstrating that the Exo1 and Sgs1 proteins independently suppress whole chromosome duplication during gene targeting. PMID:25089886

  15. Development of a successive targeting liposome with multi-ligand for efficient targeting gene delivery

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Kun; Shen, Haijun; Shen, Song; Xie, Men; Mao, Chuanbin; Qiu, Liyan; Jin, Yi

    2012-01-01

    Background A successful gene delivery system needs to breakthrough several barriers to allow efficient transgenic expression. In the present study, successive targeting liposomes (STL) were constructed by integrating various targeting groups into a nanoparticle to address this issue. Methods Polyethylenimine (PEI) 1800-triamcinolone acetonide (TA) with nuclear targeting capability was synthesized by a two-step reaction. Lactobionic acid was connected with cholesterol to obtain a compound of [(2-lactoylamido) ethylamino]formic acid cholesterol ester (CHEDLA) with hepatocyte-targeting capability. The liposome was modified with PEI 1800-TA and CHEDLA to prepare successive targeting liposome (STL). Its physicochemical properties and transfection efficiency were investigated both in vitro and in vivo. Results The diameter of STL was approximately 100 nm with 20 mV of potential. The confocal microscopy observation and potential assay verified that lipid bilayer of STL was decorated with PEI 1800-TA. Cytotoxicity of STL was significantly lower than that of PEI 1800-TA and PEI 25K. The transfection efficiency of 10% CHEDLA STL in HepG2 cells was the higher than of the latter two with serum. Its transfection efficiency was greatly reduced with excessive free galactose, indicating that STL was absorbed via galactose receptor-mediated endocytosis. The in vivo study in mice showed that 10% CHEDLA STL had better transgenic expression in liver than the other carriers. Conclusions STL with multi-ligand was able to overcome the various barriers to target nucleus and special cells and present distinctive transgenic expression. Therefore, it has a great potential for gene therapy as a nonviral carrier. PMID:21574214

  16. Targeted genes and interacting proteins of hypoxia inducible factor-1

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wei; Shen, Shao-Ming; Zhao, Xu-Yun; Chen, Guo-Qiang

    2012-01-01

    Heterodimeric transcription factor hypoxia inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) functions as a master regulator of oxygen homeostasis in almost all nucleated mammalian cells. The fundamental process adapted to cellular oxygen alteration largely depends on the refined regulation on its alpha subunit, HIF-1α. Recent studies have unraveled expanding and critical roles of HIF-1α, involving in a multitude of developmental, physiological, and pathophysiological processes. This review will focus on the current knowledge of HIF-1α-targeting genes and its interacting proteins, as well as the concomitant functional relationships between them. PMID:22773957

  17. Gene Profiling of Mta1 Identifies Novel Gene Targets and Functions

    PubMed Central

    Eswaran, Jeyanthy; Kumar, Rakesh

    2011-01-01

    Background Metastasis-associated protein 1 (MTA1), a master dual co-regulatory protein is found to be an integral part of NuRD (Nucleosome Remodeling and Histone Deacetylation) complex, which has indispensable transcriptional regulatory functions via histone deacetylation and chromatin remodeling. Emerging literature establishes MTA1 to be a valid DNA-damage responsive protein with a significant role in maintaining the optimum DNA-repair activity in mammalian cells exposed to genotoxic stress. This DNA-damage responsive function of MTA1 was reported to be a P53-dependent and independent function. Here, we investigate the influence of P53 on gene regulation function of Mta1 to identify novel gene targets and functions of Mta1. Methods Gene expression analysis was performed on five different mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) samples (i) the Mta1 wild type, (ii) Mta1 knock out (iii) Mta1 knock out in which Mta1 was reintroduced (iv) P53 knock out (v) P53 knock out in which Mta1 was over expressed using Affymetrix Mouse Exon 1.0 ST arrays. Further Hierarchical Clustering, Gene Ontology analysis with GO terms satisfying corrected p-value<0.1, and the Ingenuity Pathway Analysis were performed. Finally, RT-qPCR was carried out on selective candidate genes. Significance/Conclusion This study represents a complete genome wide screen for possible target genes of a coregulator, Mta1. The comparative gene profiling of Mta1 wild type, Mta1 knockout and Mta1 re-expression in the Mta1 knockout conditions define “bona fide” Mta1 target genes. Further extensive analyses of the data highlights the influence of P53 on Mta1 gene regulation. In the presence of P53 majority of the genes regulated by Mta1 are related to inflammatory and anti-microbial responses whereas in the absence of P53 the predominant target genes are involved in cancer signaling. Thus, the presented data emphasizes the known functions of Mta1 and serves as a rich resource which could help us identify novel Mta

  18. Targeting human melanoma neoantigens by T cell receptor gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Leisegang, Matthias; Kammertoens, Thomas; Uckert, Wolfgang; Blankenstein, Thomas

    2016-03-01

    In successful cancer immunotherapy, T cell responses appear to be directed toward neoantigens created by somatic mutations; however, direct evidence that neoantigen-specific T cells cause regression of established cancer is lacking. Here, we generated T cells expressing a mutation-specific transgenic T cell receptor (TCR) to target different immunogenic mutations in cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4) that naturally occur in human melanoma. Two mutant CDK4 isoforms (R24C, R24L) similarly stimulated T cell responses in vitro and were analyzed as therapeutic targets for TCR gene therapy. In a syngeneic HLA-A2-transgenic mouse model of large established tumors, we found that both mutations differed dramatically as targets for TCR-modified T cells in vivo. While T cells expanded efficiently and produced IFN-γ in response to R24L, R24C failed to induce an effective antitumor response. Such differences in neoantigen quality might explain why cancer immunotherapy induces tumor regression in some individuals, while others do not respond, despite similar mutational load. We confirmed the validity of the in vivo model by showing that the melan-A-specific (MART-1-specific) TCR DMF5 induces rejection of tumors expressing analog, but not native, MART-1 epitopes. The described model allows identification of those neoantigens in human cancer that serve as suitable T cell targets and may help to predict clinical efficacy. PMID:26808500

  19. Modularly assembled designer TAL effector nucleases for targeted gene knockout and gene replacement in eukaryotes

    SciTech Connect

    Li, T; Huang, S; Zhao, XF; Wright, DA; Carpenter, S; Spalding, MH; Weeks, DP; Yang, B

    2011-08-08

    Recent studies indicate that the DNA recognition domain of transcription activator-like (TAL) effectors can be combined with the nuclease domain of FokI restriction enzyme to produce TAL effector nucleases (TALENs) that, in pairs, bind adjacent DNA target sites and produce double-strand breaks between the target sequences, stimulating non-homologous end-joining and homologous recombination. Here, we exploit the four prevalent TAL repeats and their DNA recognition cipher to develop a 'modular assembly' method for rapid production of designer TALENs (dTALENs) that recognize unique DNA sequence up to 23 bases in any gene. We have used this approach to engineer 10 dTALENs to target specific loci in native yeast chromosomal genes. All dTALENs produced high rates of site-specific gene disruptions and created strains with expected mutant phenotypes. Moreover, dTALENs stimulated high rates (up to 34%) of gene replacement by homologous recombination. Finally, dTALENs caused no detectable cytotoxicity and minimal levels of undesired genetic mutations in the treated yeast strains. These studies expand the realm of verified TALEN activity from cultured human cells to an intact eukaryotic organism and suggest that low-cost, highly dependable dTALENs can assume a significant role for gene modifications of value in human and animal health, agriculture and industry.

  20. [Targeted modification of CCR5 gene in rabbits by TALEN].

    PubMed

    Tang, Chengcheng; Zhang, Quanjun; Li, Xiaoping; Fan, Nana; Yang, Yi; Quan, Longquan; Lai, Liangxue

    2014-04-01

    The lack of suitable animal model for HIV-1 infection has become a bottleneck for the development of AIDS vaccines and drugs. Wild-type rabbits can be infected by HIV-1 persistently and HIV-1 can be efficiently replicated resulting in syncytia in rabbit cell line co-expressing human CD4 and CCR5.Therefore, a rabbit highly expressing human CD4 and CCR5 may be an ideal animal model for AIDS disease study. In the present report, by using the efficient gene targeting technology, transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN), we explored the feasibility of generating a HIV-1 model by knocking in human CD4 and CCR5 into rabbit genome. First we constructed two TALEN vectors targeting rabbit CCR5 gene and a vector with homologous arms. TALEN mRNAs and donor DNA were then co-injected into fertilized oocytes. After 3?5 days, 24 embryos were collected and used to conduct mutation analysis with PCR and sequencing. All the 24 embryos were detected with CCR5 knockouts and 5 were human CD4 and CCR5 knockins. Our results laid a foundation for establishing a new animal model for the study of AIDS. PMID:24846981

  1. Gene Targeting to the Uteroplacental Circulation of Pregnant Guinea Pigs.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Vedanta; Ofir, Keren; Swanson, Anna; Kloczko, Ewa; Boyd, Michael; Barker, Hannah; Avdic-Belltheus, Adnan; Martin, John; Zachary, Ian; Peebles, Donald; David, Anna L

    2016-08-01

    Our study aimed to target adenoviral gene therapy to the uteroplacental circulation of pregnant guinea pigs in order to develop a novel therapy for fetal growth restriction. Four methods of delivery of an adenovirus encoding β-galactosidase (Ad.LacZ) were evaluated: intravascular injection using phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) into (1) uterine artery (UtA) or (2) internal iliac artery or external administration in (3) PBS or (4) pluronic F-127 gel (Sigma Aldrich). Postmortem examination was performed 4 to 7 days after gene transfer. Tissue transduction was assessed by X-gal histochemistry and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. External vascular application of the adenovirus vector in combination with pluronic gel had 91.7% success rate in terms of administration (85% maternal survival) and gave the best results for maternal/fetal survival and local transduction efficiency without any spread to maternal or fetal tissues. This study suggests an optimal method of gene delivery to the UtAs of a small rodent for preclinical studies. PMID:26865541

  2. Tackling centrosome biology through gene targeting in chicken B cells.

    PubMed

    Chavali, Pavithra L; Gergely, Fanni

    2015-01-01

    The centrosome proteome comprises hundreds of proteins whose function at the organelle and in the cellular context is unknown. Loss-of-function studies present a powerful tool to probe the roles of these individual constituents and hence improve our insight into key questions of centrosome biology such as how centrosomes are built, how they duplicate, and which cellular processes they partake in. In cultured cells ribonucleic acid (RNA) interference remains the most widely used method to achieve protein depletion, but due to the remarkable stability of many centrosome components depletion is often incomplete. In such instances genome editing provides a viable alternative. The exceptionally high homologous recombination rate of chicken DT40 cells makes this lymphocytic cell line ideal for genetic manipulation. Here we describe methods for the design and generation of knockouts and in situ tagging of genes in these cells. Furthermore, we report an optimized technique that allows isolation of centrosomes from DT40 cells for use in in vitro functional assays and proteomic analysis. Gene editing by CRISPR-Cas9 technology is fast replacing RNA interference as a method of choice for loss-of-function studies, but the combination of the fast cell cycle, the robustness in culture and ease of gene targeting, will continue to make DT40 cells a useful model system for studies of vertebrate protein function. PMID:26175435

  3. Targeted Gene Therapy of Cancer: Second Amendment toward Holistic Therapy.

    PubMed

    Barar, Jaleh; Omidi, Yadollah

    2013-01-01

    It seems solid tumors are developing smart organs with specialized cells creating specified bio-territory, the so called "tumor microenvironment (TME)", in which there is reciprocal crosstalk among cancer cells, immune system cells and stromal cells. TME as an intricate milieu also consists of cancer stem cells (CSCs) that can resist against chemotherapies. In solid tumors, metabolism and vascularization appears to be aberrant and tumor interstitial fluid (TIF) functions as physiologic barrier. Thus, chemotherapy, immunotherapy and gene therapy often fail to provide cogent clinical outcomes. It looms that it is the time to accept the fact that initiation of cancer could be generation of another form of life that involves a cluster of thousands of genes, while we have failed to observe all aspects of it. Hence, the current treatment modalities need to be re-visited to cover all key aspects of disease using combination therapy based on the condition of patients. Perhaps personalized cluster of genes need to be simultaneously targeted. PMID:23878787

  4. Cardiac myocyte-specific AHR activation phenocopies TCDD-induced toxicity in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Lanham, Kevin A; Plavicki, Jessica; Peterson, Richard E; Heideman, Warren

    2014-09-01

    Exposure of zebrafish embryos to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) activates the zebrafish aryl hydrocarbon receptor 2 (AHR) to produce developmental and cardiovascular toxicity. AHR is found in the heart; however, AHR activation by TCDD is not confined to the heart and occurs throughout the organism. In order to understand the cause of cardiotoxicity, we constructed a constitutively active AHR (caAHR) based on the zebrafish AHR2 and expressed it specifically in cardiomyocytes. We show that AHR activation within the cardiomyocytes can account for the heart failure induced by TCDD. Expression of the caAHR within the heart produced cardiac malformations, loss of circulation, and pericardial edema. The heart-specific activation of AHR reproduced several other well-characterized endpoints of TCDD toxicity outside of the cardiovascular system, including defects in swim bladder and craniofacial development. This work identifies a single cellular site of TCDD action, the myocardial cell, that can account for the severe cardiovascular collapse observed following early life stage exposure to TCDD, and contributes to other forms of toxicity. PMID:25037585

  5. Cardiac Myocyte-Specific AHR Activation Phenocopies TCDD-Induced Toxicity in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Lanham, Kevin A.; Plavicki, Jessica; Peterson, Richard E.; Heideman, Warren

    2014-01-01

    Exposure of zebrafish embryos to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) activates the zebrafish aryl hydrocarbon receptor 2 (AHR) to produce developmental and cardiovascular toxicity. AHR is found in the heart; however, AHR activation by TCDD is not confined to the heart and occurs throughout the organism. In order to understand the cause of cardiotoxicity, we constructed a constitutively active AHR (caAHR) based on the zebrafish AHR2 and expressed it specifically in cardiomyocytes. We show that AHR activation within the cardiomyocytes can account for the heart failure induced by TCDD. Expression of the caAHR within the heart produced cardiac malformations, loss of circulation, and pericardial edema. The heart-specific activation of AHR reproduced several other well-characterized endpoints of TCDD toxicity outside of the cardiovascular system, including defects in swim bladder and craniofacial development. This work identifies a single cellular site of TCDD action, the myocardial cell, that can account for the severe cardiovascular collapse observed following early life stage exposure to TCDD, and contributes to other forms of toxicity. PMID:25037585

  6. Inhibition of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor prevents Western diet-induced obesity. Model for AHR activation by kynurenine via oxidized-LDL, TLR2/4, TGFβ, and IDO1.

    PubMed

    Moyer, Benjamin J; Rojas, Itzel Y; Kerley-Hamilton, Joanna S; Hazlett, Haley F; Nemani, Krishnamurthy V; Trask, Heidi W; West, Rachel J; Lupien, Leslie E; Collins, Alan J; Ringelberg, Carol S; Gimi, Barjor; Kinlaw, William B; Tomlinson, Craig R

    2016-06-01

    Obesity is an increasingly urgent global problem, yet, little is known about its causes and less is known how obesity can be effectively treated. We showed previously that the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) plays a role in the regulation of body mass in mice fed Western diet. The AHR is a ligand-activated nuclear receptor that regulates genes involved in a number of biological pathways, including xenobiotic metabolism and T cell polarization. This study was an investigation into whether inhibition of the AHR prevents Western diet-based obesity. Male C57Bl/6J mice were fed control and Western diets with and without the AHR antagonist α-naphthoflavone or CH-223191, and a mouse hepatocyte cell line was used to delineate relevant cellular pathways. Studies are presented showing that the AHR antagonists α-naphthoflavone and CH-223191 significantly reduce obesity and adiposity and ameliorates liver steatosis in male C57Bl/6J mice fed a Western diet. Mice deficient in the tryptophan metabolizing enzyme indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase 1 (IDO1) were also resistant to obesity. Using an AHR-directed, luciferase-expressing mouse hepatocyte cell line, we show that the transforming growth factor β1 (TGFβ1) signaling pathway via PI3K and NF-κB and the toll-like receptor 2/4 (TLR2/4) signaling pathway stimulated by oxidized low-density lipoproteins via NF-κB, each induce luciferase expression; however, TLR2/4 signaling was significantly reduced by inhibition of IDO1. At physiological levels, kynurenine but not kynurenic acid (both tryptophan metabolites and known AHR agonists) activated AHR-directed luciferase expression. We propose a hepatocyte-based model, in which kynurenine production is increased by enhanced IDO1 activity stimulated by TGFβ1 and TLR2/4 signaling, via PI3K and NF-κB, to perpetuate a cycle of AHR activation to cause obesity; and inhibition of the AHR, in turn, blocks the cycle's output to prevent obesity. The AHR with its broad ligand binding specificity

  7. Strategies on the nuclear-targeted delivery of genes

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Jing; Fan, Ying; Li, Yuanke; Huang, Leaf

    2016-01-01

    To improve the nuclear-targeted delivery of non-viral vectors, extensive effort has been carried out on the development of smart vectors which could overcome multiple barriers. The nuclear envelope presents a major barrier to transgene delivery. Viruses are capable of crossing the nuclear envelope to efficiently deliver their genome into the nucleus through the specialized protein components. However, non-viral vectors are preferred over viral ones because of the safety concerns associated with the latter. Non-viral delivery systems have been designed to include various types of components to enable nuclear translocation at the periphery of the nucleus. This review summarizes the progress of research regarding nuclear transport mechanisms. “Smart” non-viral vectors that have been modified by peptides and other small molecules are able to facilitate the nuclear translocation and enhance the efficacy of gene expression. The resulting technology may also enhance delivery of other macromolecules to the nucleus. PMID:23964565

  8. Targeted disruption of the mouse Lipoma Preferred Partner gene

    SciTech Connect

    Vervenne, Hilke B.V.K.; Crombez, Koen R.M.O.; Delvaux, Els L.; Janssens, Veerle; Ven, Wim J.M. van de Petit, Marleen M.R.

    2009-02-06

    LPP (Lipoma Preferred Partner) is a zyxin-related cell adhesion protein that is involved in the regulation of cell migration. We generated mice with a targeted disruption of the Lpp gene and analysed the importance of Lpp for embryonic development and adult functions. Aberrant Mendelian inheritance in heterozygous crosses suggested partial embryonic lethality of Lpp{sup -/-} females. Fertility of Lpp{sup -/-} males was proven to be normal, however, females from Lpp{sup -/-} x Lpp{sup -/-} crosses produced a strongly reduced number of offspring, probably due to a combination of female embryonic lethality and aberrant pregnancies. Apart from these developmental and reproductive abnormalities, Lpp{sup -/-} mice that were born reached adulthood without displaying any additional macroscopic defects. On the other hand, Lpp{sup -/-} mouse embryonic fibroblasts exhibited reduced migration capacity, reduced viability, and reduced expression of some Lpp interaction partners. Finally, we discovered a short nuclear form of Lpp, expressed mainly in testis via an alternative promoter.

  9. Preparation and characterization of magnetic gene vectors for targeting gene delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, S. W.; Liu, G.; Hong, R. Y.; Li, H. Z.; Li, Y. G.; Wei, D. G.

    2012-10-01

    The PEI-CMD-MNPs were successfully prepared by the surface modification of magnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles with carboxymethyl dextran (CMD) and polyethyleneimine (PEI). The PEI-CMD-MNPs polyplexes exhibited a typical superparamagnetic behavior and were well stable over the entire range of pH and NaCl concentration. These PEI-CMD-MNPs were used as magnetic gene vectors for targeting gene delivery. The prepared MNPs at different surface modification stages were characterized using Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), field emissions canning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) and dynamic laser light scattering (DLS) analysis. The magnetic properties were studied by vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). To evaluate the performance of the magnetic nanoparticles as gene transfer vector, the PEI-CMD-MNPs were used to delivery green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene into BHK21 cells. The expression of GFP gene was detected by fluorescence microscope. DNA-PEI-CMD-MNPs polyplexes absorbed by the cells were also monitored by Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The transfection efficiency and gene expression efficiency of that transfected with a magnet were much higher than that of standard transfection.

  10. Deletion of the DNA Ligase IV Gene in Candida glabrata Significantly Increases Gene-Targeting Efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Cen, Yuke; Fiori, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    Candida glabrata is reported as the second most prevalent human opportunistic fungal pathogen in the United States. Over the last decades, its incidence increased, whereas that of Candida albicans decreased slightly. One of the main reasons for this shift is attributed to the inherent tolerance of C. glabrata toward the commonly used azole antifungal drugs. Despite a close phylogenetic distance to Saccharomyces cerevisiae, homologous recombination works with poor efficiency in C. glabrata compared to baker's yeast, in fact limiting targeted genetic alterations of the pathogen's genome. It has been shown that nonhomologous DNA end joining is dominant over specific gene targeting in C. glabrata. To improve the homologous recombination efficiency, we have generated a strain in which the LIG4 gene has been deleted, which resulted in a significant increase in correct gene targeting. The very specific function of Lig4 in mediating nonhomologous end joining is the reason for the absence of clear side effects, some of which affect the ku80 mutant, another mutant with reduced nonhomologous end joining. We also generated a LIG4 reintegration cassette. Our results show that the lig4 mutant strain may be a valuable tool for the C. glabrata research community. PMID:26048009

  11. Efficient Gene Transfer and Targeted Mutagenesis in Fusobacterium nucleatum

    PubMed Central

    Haake, Susan Kinder; Yoder, Sean; Gerardo, Sharon Hunt

    2006-01-01

    Fusobacterium nucleatum is a Gram-negative anaerobe important in dental biofilm ecology and infectious diseases with significant societal impact. The lack of efficient genetic systems has hampered molecular analyses in this microorganism. We previously reported construction of a shuttle plasmid, pHS17, using the native fusobacterial plasmid pFN1 and an erythromycin resistance cassette. However, the host range of pHS17 was restricted to F. nucleatum, ATCC 10953 and the transformation efficiency was limited. This study was undertaken to improve genetic systems for molecular analysis in F. nucleatum. We identified a second F. nucleatum strain, ATCC 23726, which is transformed with improved efficiency compared to ATCC 10953. Two novel second generation pFN1-based shuttle plasmids, pHS23 and pHS30, were developed and enable transformation of ATCC 23726 at 6.2 x 104 and 1.5 x 106 transformants/microgram of plasmid DNA, respectively. The transformation efficiency of pHS30, which harbors a catP gene conferring resistance to chloramphenicol, was more than 1,000-fold greater than that of pHS17. The improved transformation efficiency facilitated disruption of the chromosomal rnr gene using a suicide plasmid pHS19, the first demonstration of targeted mutagenesis in F. nucleatum. These results provide significant advances in the development of systems for molecular analysis in F. nucleatum. PMID:16115683

  12. A modular gene targeting system for sequential transgene stacking in plants.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sandeep; AlAbed, Diaa; Worden, Andrew; Novak, Stephen; Wu, Huixia; Ausmus, Carla; Beck, Margaret; Robinson, Heather; Minnicks, Tatyana; Hemingway, Daren; Lee, Ryan; Skaggs, Nicole; Wang, Lizhen; Marri, Pradeep; Gupta, Manju

    2015-08-10

    A modular, selection-based method was developed for site-specific integration of transgenes into a genomic locus to create multigene stacks. High-frequency gene targeting was obtained using zinc finger nuclease (ZFN)-mediated double-strand break (DSB) formation at a pre-defined target genomic location using a unique intron directly downstream of a promoter driving a selectable marker gene to facilitate homology between target and donor sequences. In this system, only insertion into the target locus leads to a functional selectable marker, and regeneration from random insertions of the promoterless donor construct are reduced on selection media. A new stack of transgenes can potentially be loaded with each successive cycle of gene targeting by exchanging the selectable marker gene using the intron homology. This system was tested in maize using the pat selectable marker gene, whereby up to 30% of the plants regenerated on Bialaphos-containing medium were observed to have the donor construct integrated into the target locus. Unlike previous gene targeting methods that utilize defective or partial genes for selecting targeted events, the present method exchanges fully functional genes with every cycle of targeting, thereby allowing the recycling of selectable marker genes, hypothetically for multiple generations of gene targeting. PMID:25913173

  13. Evaluation of the Enterococcus faecalis Biofilm-Associated Virulence Factors AhrC and Eep in Rat Foreign Body Osteomyelitis and In Vitro Biofilm-Associated Antimicrobial Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Kristi L.; Vergidis, Paschalis; Brinkman, Cassandra L.; Greenwood Quaintance, Kerryl E.; Barnes, Aaron M. T.; Mandrekar, Jayawant N.; Schlievert, Patrick M.; Dunny, Gary M.; Patel, Robin

    2015-01-01

    Enterococcus faecalis can cause healthcare-associated biofilm infections, including those of orthopedic devices. Treatment of enterococcal prosthetic joint infection is difficult, in part, due to biofilm-associated antimicrobial resistance. We previously showed that the E. faecalis OG1RF genes ahrC and eep are in vitro biofilm determinants and virulence factors in animal models of endocarditis and catheter-associated urinary tract infection. In this study, we evaluated the role of these genes in a rat acute foreign body osteomyelitis model and in in vitro biofilm-associated antimicrobial resistance. Osteomyelitis was established for one week following the implantation of stainless steel orthopedic wires inoculated with E. faecalis strains OG1RF, ΩahrC, and ∆eep into the proximal tibiae of rats. The median bacterial loads recovered from bones and wires did not differ significantly between the strains at multiple inoculum concentrations. We hypothesize that factors present at the infection site that affect biofilm formation, such as the presence or absence of shear force, may account for the differences in attenuation in the various animal models we have used to study the ΩahrC and ∆eep strains. No differences among the three strains were observed in the planktonic and biofilm antimicrobial susceptibilities to ampicillin, vancomycin, daptomycin, linezolid, and tetracycline. These findings suggest that neither ahrC nor eep directly contribute to E. faecalis biofilm-associated antimicrobial resistance. Notably, the experimental evidence that the biofilm attachment mutant ΩahrC displays biofilm-associated antimicrobial resistance suggests that surface colonization alone is sufficient for E. faecalis cells to acquire the biofilm antimicrobial resistance phenotype. PMID:26076451

  14. Evaluation of the Enterococcus faecalis Biofilm-Associated Virulence Factors AhrC and Eep in Rat Foreign Body Osteomyelitis and In Vitro Biofilm-Associated Antimicrobial Resistance.

    PubMed

    Frank, Kristi L; Vergidis, Paschalis; Brinkman, Cassandra L; Greenwood Quaintance, Kerryl E; Barnes, Aaron M T; Mandrekar, Jayawant N; Schlievert, Patrick M; Dunny, Gary M; Patel, Robin

    2015-01-01

    Enterococcus faecalis can cause healthcare-associated biofilm infections, including those of orthopedic devices. Treatment of enterococcal prosthetic joint infection is difficult, in part, due to biofilm-associated antimicrobial resistance. We previously showed that the E. faecalis OG1RF genes ahrC and eep are in vitro biofilm determinants and virulence factors in animal models of endocarditis and catheter-associated urinary tract infection. In this study, we evaluated the role of these genes in a rat acute foreign body osteomyelitis model and in in vitro biofilm-associated antimicrobial resistance. Osteomyelitis was established for one week following the implantation of stainless steel orthopedic wires inoculated with E. faecalis strains OG1RF, ΩahrC, and ∆eep into the proximal tibiae of rats. The median bacterial loads recovered from bones and wires did not differ significantly between the strains at multiple inoculum concentrations. We hypothesize that factors present at the infection site that affect biofilm formation, such as the presence or absence of shear force, may account for the differences in attenuation in the various animal models we have used to study the ΩahrC and ∆eep strains. No differences among the three strains were observed in the planktonic and biofilm antimicrobial susceptibilities to ampicillin, vancomycin, daptomycin, linezolid, and tetracycline. These findings suggest that neither ahrC nor eep directly contribute to E. faecalis biofilm-associated antimicrobial resistance. Notably, the experimental evidence that the biofilm attachment mutant ΩahrC displays biofilm-associated antimicrobial resistance suggests that surface colonization alone is sufficient for E. faecalis cells to acquire the biofilm antimicrobial resistance phenotype. PMID:26076451

  15. Reduction of Nfia gene expression and subsequent target genes by binge alcohol in the fetal brain.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Chanchal; Park, Ji Hyun; Lee, Hyung Tae; Seo, Hyemyung; Chung, Il Yup; Choi, Ihn Geun; Jung, Kyoung Hwa; Chai, Young Gyu

    2015-06-26

    The objective of the present study was to investigate the changes in gene expression in the fetal brain (forebrain and hippocampus) caused by maternal binge alcohol consumption. Pregnant C57BL/6J mice were treated intragastrically with distilled phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) or ethanol (2.9 g/kg) from embryonic day (ED) 8-12. Microarray analysis revealed that a significant number of genes were altered at ED 18 in the developing brain. Specifically, in hippocampus, nuclear factor one alpha (Nfia) and three N-methyl-D-aspartate (Nmda) receptors (Nmdar1, Nmdar2b, and Nmdar2d) were down-regulated. The transcription factor Nfia controls gliogenesis, cell proliferation and Nmda-induced neuronal survival by regulating the expression of target genes. Some of the Nfia-target gene (Aldh1a, Folh1, Gjb6, Fgf1, Neurod1, Sept4, and Ntsr2) expressions were also altered as expected. These results suggest that the altered expression of Nfia and Nmda receptors may be associated with the etiology of fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS). The data presented in this report will contribute to the understanding of the molecular mechanisms associated with the effects of alcohol in FASD individuals. PMID:25982323

  16. Identification of microRNA-regulated gene networks by expression analysis of target genes.

    PubMed

    Gennarino, Vincenzo Alessandro; D'Angelo, Giovanni; Dharmalingam, Gopuraja; Fernandez, Serena; Russolillo, Giorgio; Sanges, Remo; Mutarelli, Margherita; Belcastro, Vincenzo; Ballabio, Andrea; Verde, Pasquale; Sardiello, Marco; Banfi, Sandro

    2012-06-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) and transcription factors control eukaryotic cell proliferation, differentiation, and metabolism through their specific gene regulatory networks. However, differently from transcription factors, our understanding of the processes regulated by miRNAs is currently limited. Here, we introduce gene network analysis as a new means for gaining insight into miRNA biology. A systematic analysis of all human miRNAs based on Co-expression Meta-analysis of miRNA Targets (CoMeTa) assigns high-resolution biological functions to miRNAs and provides a comprehensive, genome-scale analysis of human miRNA regulatory networks. Moreover, gene cotargeting analyses show that miRNAs synergistically regulate cohorts of genes that participate in similar processes. We experimentally validate the CoMeTa procedure through focusing on three poorly characterized miRNAs, miR-519d/190/340, which CoMeTa predicts to be associated with the TGFβ pathway. Using lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells as a model system, we show that miR-519d and miR-190 inhibit, while miR-340 enhances TGFβ signaling and its effects on cell proliferation, morphology, and scattering. Based on these findings, we formalize and propose co-expression analysis as a general paradigm for second-generation procedures to recognize bona fide targets and infer biological roles and network communities of miRNAs. PMID:22345618

  17. Identification of microRNA-regulated gene networks by expression analysis of target genes

    PubMed Central

    Gennarino, Vincenzo Alessandro; D'Angelo, Giovanni; Dharmalingam, Gopuraja; Fernandez, Serena; Russolillo, Giorgio; Sanges, Remo; Mutarelli, Margherita; Belcastro, Vincenzo; Ballabio, Andrea; Verde, Pasquale; Sardiello, Marco; Banfi, Sandro

    2012-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) and transcription factors control eukaryotic cell proliferation, differentiation, and metabolism through their specific gene regulatory networks. However, differently from transcription factors, our understanding of the processes regulated by miRNAs is currently limited. Here, we introduce gene network analysis as a new means for gaining insight into miRNA biology. A systematic analysis of all human miRNAs based on Co-expression Meta-analysis of miRNA Targets (CoMeTa) assigns high-resolution biological functions to miRNAs and provides a comprehensive, genome-scale analysis of human miRNA regulatory networks. Moreover, gene cotargeting analyses show that miRNAs synergistically regulate cohorts of genes that participate in similar processes. We experimentally validate the CoMeTa procedure through focusing on three poorly characterized miRNAs, miR-519d/190/340, which CoMeTa predicts to be associated with the TGFβ pathway. Using lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells as a model system, we show that miR-519d and miR-190 inhibit, while miR-340 enhances TGFβ signaling and its effects on cell proliferation, morphology, and scattering. Based on these findings, we formalize and propose co-expression analysis as a general paradigm for second-generation procedures to recognize bona fide targets and infer biological roles and network communities of miRNAs. PMID:22345618

  18. Id-1 gene and gene products as therapeutic targets for treatment of breast cancer and other types of carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Desprez, Pierre-Yves; Campisi, Judith

    2014-08-19

    A method for treatment of breast cancer and other types of cancer. The method comprises targeting and modulating Id-1 gene expression, if any, for the Id-1 gene, or gene products in breast or other epithelial cancers in a patient by delivering products that modulate Id-1 gene expression. When expressed, Id-1 gene is a prognostic indicator that cancer cells are invasive and metastatic.

  19. TCDD and omeprazole prime platelets through the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) non-genomic pathway.

    PubMed

    Pombo, Mónica; Lamé, Michael W; Walker, Naomi J; Huynh, Danh H; Tablin, Fern

    2015-05-19

    The role of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) in hemostasis has recently gained increased attention. Here, we demonstrate, by qRT-PCR and western blot, that human platelets express both AhR mRNA and AhR protein. AhR protein levels increase in a dose dependent manner when incubated with either 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) or omeprazole. Treatment of platelets with puromycin blocks increased AhR protein synthesis in the presence of AhR activators. Additionally, treatment of platelets with either activator results in phosphorylation of p38MAPK and cPLA2, two key signaling molecules in platelet activation pathways. Using the AhR competitive inhibitors alpha naphthoflavone and CH-223191, we show that phosphorylation of p38MAPK is AhR dependent. Further, inhibition of p38MAPK blocks downstream cPLA2 phosphorylation induced by TCDD or omeprazole. Treatment with AhR activators results in platelet priming, as demonstrated by increased platelet aggregation, which is inhibited by AhR antagonists. Our data support a model of the platelet AhR non-genomic pathway in which treatment with AhR activators results in increased expression of the AhR, phosphorylation of p38MAPK and cPLA2, leading to platelet priming in response to agonist. PMID:25797602

  20. 76 FR 80447 - Eighth Meeting: RTCA Special Committee 219: Attitude and Heading Reference Systems (AHRS)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-23

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Eighth Meeting: RTCA Special Committee 219: Attitude and Heading Reference...). ACTION: Notice of RTCA Special Committee 219: Attitude and Heading Reference Systems (AHRS). SUMMARY: The...: Attitude and Heading Reference Systems (AHRS). DATES: The meeting will be held January 24-26, 2012, from...

  1. 75 FR 49550 - Fifth Meeting: RTCA Special Committee 219: Attitude and Heading Reference System (AHRS)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-13

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Fifth Meeting: RTCA Special Committee 219: Attitude and Heading Reference...: Notice of RTCA Special Committee 219: Attitude and Heading Reference System (AHRS). SUMMARY: The FAA is... Heading Reference System (AHRS). DATES: The meeting will be held September 14-16, 2010 from 9 a.m. to 5...

  2. Musashi-2 attenuates AHR signalling to expand human haematopoietic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Rentas, Stefan; Holzapfel, Nicholas T; Belew, Muluken S; Pratt, Gabriel A; Voisin, Veronique; Wilhelm, Brian T; Bader, Gary D; Yeo, Gene W; Hope, Kristin J

    2016-04-28

    Umbilical cord blood-derived haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are essential for many life-saving regenerative therapies. However, despite their advantages for transplantation, their clinical use is restricted because HSCs in cord blood are found only in small numbers. Small molecules that enhance haematopoietic stem and progenitor cell (HSPC) expansion in culture have been identified, but in many cases their mechanisms of action or the nature of the pathways they impinge on are poorly understood. A greater understanding of the molecular circuitry that underpins the self-renewal of human HSCs will facilitate the development of targeted strategies that expand HSCs for regenerative therapies. Whereas transcription factor networks have been shown to influence the self-renewal and lineage decisions of human HSCs, the post-transcriptional mechanisms that guide HSC fate have not been closely investigated. Here we show that overexpression of the RNA-binding protein Musashi-2 (MSI2) induces multiple pro-self-renewal phenotypes, including a 17-fold increase in short-term repopulating cells and a net 23-fold ex vivo expansion of long-term repopulating HSCs. By performing a global analysis of MSI2-RNA interactions, we show that MSI2 directly attenuates aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) signalling through post-transcriptional downregulation of canonical AHR pathway components in cord blood HSPCs. Our study gives mechanistic insight into RNA networks controlled by RNA-binding proteins that underlie self-renewal and provides evidence that manipulating such networks ex vivo can enhance the regenerative potential of human HSCs. PMID:27121842

  3. A model of gene-gene and gene-environment interactions and its implications for targeting environmental interventions by genotype

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Helen M

    2006-01-01

    Background The potential public health benefits of targeting environmental interventions by genotype depend on the environmental and genetic contributions to the variance of common diseases, and the magnitude of any gene-environment interaction. In the absence of prior knowledge of all risk factors, twin, family and environmental data may help to define the potential limits of these benefits in a given population. However, a general methodology to analyze twin data is required because of the potential importance of gene-gene interactions (epistasis), gene-environment interactions, and conditions that break the 'equal environments' assumption for monozygotic and dizygotic twins. Method A new model for gene-gene and gene-environment interactions is developed that abandons the assumptions of the classical twin study, including Fisher's (1918) assumption that genes act as risk factors for common traits in a manner necessarily dominated by an additive polygenic term. Provided there are no confounders, the model can be used to implement a top-down approach to quantifying the potential utility of genetic prediction and prevention, using twin, family and environmental data. The results describe a solution space for each disease or trait, which may or may not include the classical twin study result. Each point in the solution space corresponds to a different model of genotypic risk and gene-environment interaction. Conclusion The results show that the potential for reducing the incidence of common diseases using environmental interventions targeted by genotype may be limited, except in special cases. The model also confirms that the importance of an individual's genotype in determining their risk of complex diseases tends to be exaggerated by the classical twin studies method, owing to the 'equal environments' assumption and the assumption of no gene-environment interaction. In addition, if phenotypes are genetically robust, because of epistasis, a largely environmental

  4. Potential protective mechanisms of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) signaling in benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Vatsal; Vezina, Chad M

    2011-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) is an evolutionarily conserved ligand activated transcription factor best known for its role in mediating toxic responses to dioxin-like environmental contaminants. However, AHR signaling has also emerged as an active participant in processes of normal development and disease progression. Here, we review the role of AHR signaling in prostate development and disease processes, with a particular emphasis on benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Inappropriate AHR activation has recently been associated with a decreased risk of symptomatic BPH in humans and has been shown to impair prostate development and disrupt endocrine signaling in rodents. We highlight known physiological responses to AHR activation in prostate and other tissues and discuss potential mechanisms by which it may act in adult human prostate to protect against symptomatic BPH. PMID:21684673

  5. Accurate Orientation Estimation Using AHRS under Conditions of Magnetic Distortion

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Nagesh; Bleakley, Chris

    2014-01-01

    Low cost, compact attitude heading reference systems (AHRS) are now being used to track human body movements in indoor environments by estimation of the 3D orientation of body segments. In many of these systems, heading estimation is achieved by monitoring the strength of the Earth's magnetic field. However, the Earth's magnetic field can be locally distorted due to the proximity of ferrous and/or magnetic objects. Herein, we propose a novel method for accurate 3D orientation estimation using an AHRS, comprised of an accelerometer, gyroscope and magnetometer, under conditions of magnetic field distortion. The system performs online detection and compensation for magnetic disturbances, due to, for example, the presence of ferrous objects. The magnetic distortions are detected by exploiting variations in magnetic dip angle, relative to the gravity vector, and in magnetic strength. We investigate and show the advantages of using both magnetic strength and magnetic dip angle for detecting the presence of magnetic distortions. The correction method is based on a particle filter, which performs the correction using an adaptive cost function and by adapting the variance during particle resampling, so as to place more emphasis on the results of dead reckoning of the gyroscope measurements and less on the magnetometer readings. The proposed method was tested in an indoor environment in the presence of various magnetic distortions and under various accelerations (up to 3 g). In the experiments, the proposed algorithm achieves <2° static peak-to-peak error and <5° dynamic peak-to-peak error, significantly outperforming previous methods. PMID:25347584

  6. Using PCR to Target Misconceptions about Gene Expression †

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Leslie K.; Newman, Dina L.

    2013-01-01

    We present a PCR-based laboratory exercise that can be used with first- or second-year biology students to help overcome common misconceptions about gene expression. Biology students typically do not have a clear understanding of the difference between genes (DNA) and gene expression (mRNA/protein) and often believe that genes exist in an organism or cell only when they are expressed. This laboratory exercise allows students to carry out a PCR-based experiment designed to challenge their misunderstanding of the difference between genes and gene expression. Students first transform E. coli with an inducible GFP gene containing plasmid and observe induced and un-induced colonies. The following exercise creates cognitive dissonance when actual PCR results contradict their initial (incorrect) predictions of the presence of the GFP gene in transformed cells. Field testing of this laboratory exercise resulted in learning gains on both knowledge and application questions on concepts related to genes and gene expression. PMID:23858358

  7. Network analysis of microRNAs, transcription factors, target genes and host genes in nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    WANG, HAO; XU, ZHIWEN; MA, MENGYAO; WANG, NING; WANG, KUNHAO

    2016-01-01

    Numerous studies on the morbidity of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) have identified several genes, microRNAs (miRNAs or miRs) and transcription factors (TFs) that influence the pathogenesis of NPC. However, summarizing all the regulatory networks involved in NPC is challenging. In the present study, the genes, miRNAs and TFs involved in NPC were considered as the nodes of the so-called regulatory network, and the associations between them were investigated. To clearly represent these associations, three regulatory networks were built seperately, namely, the differentially expressed network, the associated network and the global network. The differentially expressed network is the most important one of these three networks, since its nodes are differentially expressed genes whose mutations may lead to the development of NPC. Therefore, by modifying the aberrant expression of those genes that are differentially expressed in this network, their dysregulation may be corrected and the tumorigenesis of NPC may thus be prevented. Analysis of the aforementioned three networks highlighted the importance of certain pathways, such as self-adaptation pathways, in the development of NPC. For example, cyclin D1 (CCND1) was observed to regulate Homo sapiens-miR-20a, which in turn targeted CCND1. The present study conducted a systematic analysis of the pathogenesis of NPC through the three aforementioned regulatory networks, and provided a theoretical model for biologists. Future studies are required to evaluate the influence of the highlighted pathways in NPC. PMID:27313701

  8. Gene targeting, genome editing: from Dolly to editors.

    PubMed

    Tan, Wenfang; Proudfoot, Chris; Lillico, Simon G; Whitelaw, C Bruce A

    2016-06-01

    One of the most powerful strategies to investigate biology we have as scientists, is the ability to transfer genetic material in a controlled and deliberate manner between organisms. When applied to livestock, applications worthy of commercial venture can be devised. Although initial methods used to generate transgenic livestock resulted in random transgene insertion, the development of SCNT technology enabled homologous recombination gene targeting strategies to be used in livestock. Much has been accomplished using this approach. However, now we have the ability to change a specific base in the genome without leaving any other DNA mark, with no need for a transgene. With the advent of the genome editors this is now possible and like other significant technological leaps, the result is an even greater diversity of possible applications. Indeed, in merely 5 years, these 'molecular scissors' have enabled the production of more than 300 differently edited pigs, cattle, sheep and goats. The advent of genome editors has brought genetic engineering of livestock to a position where industry, the public and politicians are all eager to see real use of genetically engineered livestock to address societal needs. Since the first transgenic livestock reported just over three decades ago the field of livestock biotechnology has come a long way-but the most exciting period is just starting. PMID:26847670

  9. Response to Nodal morphogen gradient is determined by the kinetics of target gene induction

    PubMed Central

    Dubrulle, Julien; Jordan, Benjamin M; Akhmetova, Laila; Farrell, Jeffrey A; Kim, Seok-Hyung; Solnica-Krezel, Lilianna; Schier, Alexander F

    2015-01-01

    Morphogen gradients expose cells to different signal concentrations and induce target genes with different ranges of expression. To determine how the Nodal morphogen gradient induces distinct gene expression patterns during zebrafish embryogenesis, we measured the activation dynamics of the signal transducer Smad2 and the expression kinetics of long- and short-range target genes. We found that threshold models based on ligand concentration are insufficient to predict the response of target genes. Instead, morphogen interpretation is shaped by the kinetics of target gene induction: the higher the rate of transcription and the earlier the onset of induction, the greater the spatial range of expression. Thus, the timing and magnitude of target gene expression can be used to modulate the range of expression and diversify the response to morphogen gradients. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.05042.001 PMID:25869585

  10. Reiterated Targeting Peptides on the Nanoparticle Surface Significantly Promote Targeted Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Gene Delivery to Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dong-Dong; Yang, Mingying; Zhu, Ye; Mao, Chuanbin

    2015-12-14

    Nonviral gene delivery vectors hold great promise for gene therapy due to the safety concerns with viral vectors. However, the application of nonviral vectors is hindered by their low transfection efficiency. Herein, in order to tackle this challenge, we developed a nonviral vector integrating lipids, sleeping beauty transposon system and 8-mer stem cell targeting peptides for safe and efficient gene delivery to hard-to-transfect mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). The 8-mer MSC-targeting peptides, when synthetically reiterated in three folds and chemically presented on the surface, significantly promoted the resultant lipid-based nanoparticles (LBNs) to deliver VEGF gene into MSCs with a high transfection efficiency (∼52%) and long-lasting gene expression (for longer than 170 h) when compared to nonreiterated peptides. However, the reiterated stem cell targeting peptides do not enable the highly efficient gene transfer to other control cells. This work suggests that the surface presentation of the reiterated stem cell-targeting peptides on the nonviral vectors is a promising method for improving the efficiency of cell-specific nonviral gene transfection in stem cells. PMID:26588028

  11. Magnetic nanoparticles for targeted therapeutic gene delivery and magnetic-inducing heating on hepatoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Chenyan; An, Yanli; Zhang, Jia; Li, Hongbo; Zhang, Hao; Wang, Ling; Zhang, Dongsheng

    2014-08-01

    Gene therapy holds great promise for treating cancers, but their clinical applications are being hampered due to uncontrolled gene delivery and expression. To develop a targeted, safe and efficient tumor therapy system, we constructed a tissue-specific suicide gene delivery system by using magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) as carriers for the combination of gene therapy and hyperthermia on hepatoma. The suicide gene was hepatoma-targeted and hypoxia-enhanced, and the MNPs possessed the ability to elevate temperature to the effective range for tumor hyperthermia as imposed on an alternating magnetic field (AMF). The tumoricidal effects of targeted gene therapy associated with hyperthermia were evaluated in vitro and in vivo. The experiment demonstrated that hyperthermia combined with a targeted gene therapy system proffer an effective tool for tumor therapy with high selectivity and the synergistic effect of hepatoma suppression.

  12. A protocol for construction of gene targeting vectors and generation of homologous recombinant ES cells

    PubMed Central

    Bouabe, Hicham; Okkenhaug, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Summary The completion of human and mouse genome sequencing has confronted us with huge amount of data sequences that certainly need decades and many generations of scientists to be reasonably interpreted and assigned to physiological functions, and subsequently fruitfully translated into medical application. A means to assess the function of genes provides gene targeting in mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells that enables to introduce site-specific modifications in the mouse genome, and analyze their physiological consequences. Gene targeting enables almost any type of genetic modifications of interest, ranging from gene insertion (e.g. insertion of human-specific genes or reporter genes), gene disruption, point mutations, short and long range deletions, inversions. Site-specific modification into the genome of ES cells can be reached by homologous recombination using targeting vectors. Here, we describe a protocol to generate targeting constructs and homologous recombinant ES cells. PMID:23996269

  13. Transcriptome Analysis of Targeted Mouse Mutations Reveals the Topography of Local Changes in Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Adkisson, Michael; Nava, A. J.; Kirov, Julia V.; Cipollone, Andreanna; Willis, Brandon; Rapp, Jared; de Jong, Pieter J.; Lloyd, Kent C.

    2016-01-01

    The unintended consequences of gene targeting in mouse models have not been thoroughly studied and a more systematic analysis is needed to understand the frequency and characteristics of off-target effects. Using RNA-seq, we evaluated targeted and neighboring gene expression in tissues from 44 homozygous mutants compared with C57BL/6N control mice. Two allele types were evaluated: 15 targeted trap mutations (TRAP); and 29 deletion alleles (DEL), usually a deletion between the translational start and the 3’ UTR. Both targeting strategies insert a bacterial beta-galactosidase reporter (LacZ) and a neomycin resistance selection cassette. Evaluating transcription of genes in +/- 500 kb of flanking DNA around the targeted gene, we found up-regulated genes more frequently around DEL compared with TRAP alleles, however the frequency of alleles with local down-regulated genes flanking DEL and TRAP targets was similar. Down-regulated genes around both DEL and TRAP targets were found at a higher frequency than expected from a genome-wide survey. However, only around DEL targets were up-regulated genes found with a significantly higher frequency compared with genome-wide sampling. Transcriptome analysis confirms targeting in 97% of DEL alleles, but in only 47% of TRAP alleles probably due to non-functional splice variants, and some splicing around the gene trap. Local effects on gene expression are likely due to a number of factors including compensatory regulation, loss or disruption of intragenic regulatory elements, the exogenous promoter in the neo selection cassette, removal of insulating DNA in the DEL mutants, and local silencing due to disruption of normal chromatin organization or presence of exogenous DNA. An understanding of local position effects is important for understanding and interpreting any phenotype attributed to targeted gene mutations, or to spontaneous indels. PMID:26839965

  14. The licorice flavonoid isoliquiritigenin reduces DNA-binding activity of AhR in MCF-7 cells.

    PubMed

    Wong, Tsz Yan; Lin, Shu-mei; Poon, Ching Ho; Leung, Lai K

    2014-09-25

    Licorice is derived from the rhizomes of Glycyrrhiza glabra. It has been used for confectioneries or culinary purposes. The rhizomes contain many flavonoidal compounds that have been shown to be biologically active. In the present study, effect of the licorice flavonoid isoliquiritigenin (ILN) on polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-induced XRE transactivation and the downstream expression were investigated in MCF-7 cells. The environmental toxicant PAHs are pro-carcinogens and are biotransformed into their ultimate genotoxic structures by cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1 enzymes. Reporter gene assay revealed that ILN reduced XRE transactivation triggered by 7,12-dimethylbenz[α]anthracene (DMBA) or 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzodioxin (TCDD). Our EMSA results also demonstrated that the flavonoid diminished DMBA-induced XRE binding. The reduced transactivation could be the result of a decreased amount of AhR translocating from cytosol to nucleus as shown in Western analysis. Quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay demonstrated that expressions of genes with XRE-containing promoters, including CYP1A1, 1A2, and 1B1, followed the same pattern of XRE transactivation. The present study illustrated that ILN might downregulate PAH-induced expressions through antagonizing AhR translocation. PMID:25110319

  15. A gene locus for targeted ectopic gene integration in Zymoseptoria tritici.

    PubMed

    Kilaru, S; Schuster, M; Latz, M; Das Gupta, S; Steinberg, N; Fones, H; Gurr, S J; Talbot, N J; Steinberg, G

    2015-06-01

    Understanding the cellular organization and biology of fungal pathogens requires accurate methods for genomic integration of mutant alleles or fluorescent fusion-protein constructs. In Zymoseptoria tritici, this can be achieved by integrating of plasmid DNA randomly into the genome of this wheat pathogen. However, untargeted ectopic integration carries the risk of unwanted side effects, such as altered gene expression, due to targeting regulatory elements, or gene disruption following integration into protein-coding regions of the genome. Here, we establish the succinate dehydrogenase (sdi1) locus as a single "soft-landing" site for targeted ectopic integration of genetic constructs by using a carboxin-resistant sdi1(R) allele, carrying the point-mutation H267L. We use various green and red fluorescent fusion constructs and show that 97% of all transformants integrate correctly into the sdi1 locus as single copies. We also demonstrate that such integration does not affect the pathogenicity of Z. tritici, and thus the sdi1 locus is a useful tool for virulence analysis in genetically modified Z. tritici strains. Furthermore, we have developed a vector which facilitates yeast recombination cloning and thus allows assembly of multiple overlapping DNA fragments in a single cloning step for high throughput vector and strain generation. PMID:26092798

  16. A Genome-Wide Map of AAV-Mediated Human Gene Targeting

    PubMed Central

    Deyle, David R.; Hansen, R. Scott; Cornea, Anda M.; Li, Li B.; Burt, Amber A.; Alexander, Ian E.; Sandstrom, Richard S.; Stamatoyannopoulos, John A.; Wei, Chia-Lin; Russell, David W.

    2014-01-01

    To determine which genomic features promote homologous recombination, we created a genome-wide map of gene targeting sites. An adeno-associated virus vector was used to target identical loci introduced as transcriptionally active retroviral vector proviruses. A comparison of ~2,000 targeted and untargeted sites showed that targeting occurred throughout the human genome and was not influenced by the presence of nearby CpG islands, sequence repeats, or DNase I hypersensitive sites. Targeted sites were preferentially found within transcription units, especially when the target loci were transcribed in the opposite orientation to their surrounding chromosomal genes. The impact of DNA replication was determined by mapping replication forks, which revealed a preference for recombination at target loci transcribed towards an incoming fork. Our results constitute the first genome-wide screen of gene targeting in mammalian cells, and they demonstrate a strong recombinogenic effect of colliding polymerases. PMID:25282150

  17. Comparison of quantitative PCR assays for Escherichia coli targeting ribosomal RNA and single copy genes

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aims: Compare specificity and sensitivity of quantitative PCR (qPCR) assays targeting single and multi-copy gene regions of Escherichia coli. Methods and Results: A previously reported assay targeting the uidA gene (uidA405) was used as the basis for comparing the taxono...

  18. Targeted Mutagenesis, Precise Gene Editing, and Site-Specific Gene Insertion in Maize Using Cas9 and Guide RNA.

    PubMed

    Svitashev, Sergei; Young, Joshua K; Schwartz, Christine; Gao, Huirong; Falco, S Carl; Cigan, A Mark

    2015-10-01

    Targeted mutagenesis, editing of endogenous maize (Zea mays) genes, and site-specific insertion of a trait gene using clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-associated (Cas)-guide RNA technology are reported in maize. DNA vectors expressing maize codon-optimized Streptococcus pyogenes Cas9 endonuclease and single guide RNAs were cointroduced with or without DNA repair templates into maize immature embryos by biolistic transformation targeting five different genomic regions: upstream of the liguleless1 (LIG1) gene, male fertility genes (Ms26 and Ms45), and acetolactate synthase (ALS) genes (ALS1 and ALS2). Mutations were subsequently identified at all sites targeted, and plants containing biallelic multiplex mutations at LIG1, Ms26, and Ms45 were recovered. Biolistic delivery of guide RNAs (as RNA molecules) directly into immature embryo cells containing preintegrated Cas9 also resulted in targeted mutations. Editing the ALS2 gene using either single-stranded oligonucleotides or double-stranded DNA vectors as repair templates yielded chlorsulfuron-resistant plants. Double-strand breaks generated by RNA-guided Cas9 endonuclease also stimulated insertion of a trait gene at a site near LIG1 by homology-directed repair. Progeny showed expected Mendelian segregation of mutations, edits, and targeted gene insertions. The examples reported in this study demonstrate the utility of Cas9-guide RNA technology as a plant genome editing tool to enhance plant breeding and crop research needed to meet growing agriculture demands of the future. PMID:26269544

  19. Identification of the human ApoAV gene as a novel ROR{alpha} target gene

    SciTech Connect

    Lind, Ulrika; Nilsson, Tina; McPheat, Jane; Stroemstedt, Per-Erik; Bamberg, Krister; Balendran, Clare; Kang, Daiwu . E-mail: Daiwu.Kang@astrazeneca.com

    2005-04-29

    Retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptor-{alpha} (ROR{alpha}) (NR1F1) is an orphan nuclear receptor with a potential role in metabolism. Previous studies have shown that ROR{alpha} regulates transcription of the murine Apolipoprotein AI gene and human Apolipoprotein CIII genes. In the present study, we present evidence that ROR{alpha} also induces transcription of the human Apolipoprotein AV gene, a recently identified apolipoprotein associated with triglyceride levels. Adenovirus-mediated overexpression of ROR{alpha} increased the endogenous expression of ApoAV in HepG2 cells and ROR{alpha} also enhanced the activity of an ApoAV promoter construct in transiently transfected HepG2 cells. Deletion and mutation studies identified three AGGTCA motifs in the ApoAV promoter that mediate ROR{alpha} transactivation, one of which overlaps with a previously identified binding site for PPAR{alpha}. Together, these results suggest a novel mechanism whereby ROR{alpha} modulates lipid metabolism and implies ROR{alpha} as a potential target for the treatment of dyslipidemia and atherosclerosis.

  20. Applications of CRISPR/Cas9 technology for targeted mutagenesis, gene replacement and stacking of genes in higher plants.

    PubMed

    Luo, Ming; Gilbert, Brian; Ayliffe, Michael

    2016-07-01

    Mutagenesis continues to play an essential role for understanding plant gene function and, in some instances, provides an opportunity for plant improvement. The development of gene editing technologies such as TALENs and zinc fingers has revolutionised the targeted mutation specificity that can now be achieved. The CRISPR/Cas9 system is the most recent addition to gene editing technologies and arguably the simplest requiring only two components; a small guide RNA molecule (sgRNA) and Cas9 endonuclease protein which complex to recognise and cleave a specific 20 bp target site present in a genome. Target specificity is determined by complementary base pairing between the sgRNA and target site sequence enabling highly specific, targeted mutation to be readily engineered. Upon target site cleavage, error-prone endogenous repair mechanisms produce small insertion/deletions at the target site usually resulting in loss of gene function. CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing has been rapidly adopted in plants and successfully undertaken in numerous species including major crop species. Its applications are not restricted to mutagenesis and target site cleavage can be exploited to promote sequence insertion or replacement by recombination. The multiple applications of this technology in plants are described. PMID:27146973

  1. Targeted gene knockout in mammalian cells by using engineered zinc-finger nucleases

    PubMed Central

    Santiago, Yolanda; Chan, Edmond; Liu, Pei-Qi; Orlando, Salvatore; Zhang, Lin; Urnov, Fyodor D.; Holmes, Michael C.; Guschin, Dmitry; Waite, Adam; Miller, Jeffrey C.; Rebar, Edward J.; Gregory, Philip D.; Klug, Aaron; Collingwood, Trevor N.

    2008-01-01

    Gene knockout is the most powerful tool for determining gene function or permanently modifying the phenotypic characteristics of a cell. Existing methods for gene disruption are limited by their efficiency, time to completion, and/or the potential for confounding off-target effects. Here, we demonstrate a rapid single-step approach to targeted gene knockout in mammalian cells, using engineered zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs). ZFNs can be designed to target a chosen locus with high specificity. Upon transient expression of these nucleases the target gene is first cleaved by the ZFNs and then repaired by a natural—but imperfect—DNA repair process, nonhomologous end joining. This often results in the generation of mutant (null) alleles. As proof of concept for this approach we designed ZFNs to target the dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) gene in a Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell line. We observed biallelic gene disruption at frequencies >1%, thus obviating the need for selection markers. Three new genetically distinct DHFR−/− cell lines were generated. Each new line exhibited growth and functional properties consistent with the specific knockout of the DHFR gene. Importantly, target gene disruption is complete within 2–3 days of transient ZFN delivery, thus enabling the isolation of the resultant DHFR−/− cell lines within 1 month. These data demonstrate further the utility of ZFNs for rapid mammalian cell line engineering and establish a new method for gene knockout with application to reverse genetics, functional genomics, drug discovery, and therapeutic recombinant protein production. PMID:18359850

  2. Seamless Genome Editing in Rice via Gene Targeting and Precise Marker Elimination.

    PubMed

    Nishizawa-Yokoi, Ayako; Saika, Hiroaki; Toki, Seiichi

    2016-01-01

    Positive-negative selection using hygromycin phosphotransferase (hpt) and diphtheria toxin A-fragment (DT-A) as positive and negative selection markers, respectively, allows enrichment of cells harboring target genes modified via gene targeting (GT). We have developed a successful GT system employing positive-negative selection and subsequent precise marker excision via the piggyBac transposon derived from the cabbage looper moth to introduce desired modifications into target genes in the rice genome. This approach could be applied to the precision genome editing of almost all endogenous genes throughout the genome, at least in rice. PMID:27557691

  3. Network and pathway analysis of microRNAs, transcription factors, target genes and host genes in human glioma

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, YING; ZHAO, SHISHUN; XU, ZHIWEN

    2016-01-01

    To date, there has been rapid development with regard to gene and microRNA (miR/miRNA) research in gliomas. However, the regulatory mechanisms of the associated genes and miRNAs remain unclear. In the present study, the genes, miRNAs and transcription factors (TFs) were considered as elements in the regulatory network, and focus was placed on the associations between TFs and miRNAs, miRNAs and target genes, and miRNAs and host genes. In order to show the regulatory correlation clearly, all the elements were investigated and three regulatory networks, namely the differentially-expressed, related and global networks, were constructed. Certain important pathways were highlighted, with analysis of the similarities and differences among the networks. Next, the upstream and downstream elements of differentially-expressed genes, miRNAs and predicted TFs were listed. The most notable aspect of the present study was the three levels of network, particularly the differentially-expressed network, since the differentially-expressed associations that these networks provide appear at the initial stages of cancers such as glioma. If the states of the differentially-expressed associations can be adjusted to the normal state via alterations in regulatory associations, which were also recorded in the study networks and tables, it is likely that cancer can be regulated or even avoided. In the present study, the differentially-expressed network illuminated the pathogenesis of glioma; for example, a TF can regulate one or more miRNAs, and a target gene can be targeted by one or more miRNAs. Therefore, the host genes and target genes, the host genes and TFs, and the target genes and TFs indirectly affect each other through miRNAs. The association also exists between TFs and TFs, target genes and target genes, and host genes and host genes. The present study also demonstrated self-adaption associations and circle-regulations. The related network further described the regulatory mechanism

  4. Cas9-Assisted Targeting of CHromosome segments CATCH enables one-step targeted cloning of large gene clusters

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Wenjun; Zhao, Xuejin; Gabrieli, Tslil; Lou, Chunbo; Ebenstein, Yuval; Zhu, Ting F.

    2015-01-01

    The cloning of long DNA segments, especially those containing large gene clusters, is of particular importance to synthetic and chemical biology efforts for engineering organisms. While cloning has been a defining tool in molecular biology, the cloning of long genome segments has been challenging. Here we describe a technique that allows the targeted cloning of near-arbitrary, long bacterial genomic sequences of up to 100 kb to be accomplished in a single step. The target genome segment is excised from bacterial chromosomes in vitro by the RNA-guided Cas9 nuclease at two designated loci, and ligated to the cloning vector by Gibson assembly. This technique can be an effective molecular tool for the targeted cloning of large gene clusters that are often expensive to synthesize by gene synthesis or difficult to obtain directly by traditional PCR and restriction-enzyme-based methods. PMID:26323354

  5. Applications of Gene Targeting Technology to Mental Retardation and Developmental Disability Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pimenta, Aurea F.; Levitt, Pat

    2005-01-01

    The human and mouse genome projects elucidated the sequence and position map of innumerous genes expressed in the central nervous system (CNS), advancing our ability to manipulate these sequences and create models to investigate regulation of gene expression and function. In this article, we reviewed gene targeting methodologies with emphasis on…

  6. An integrated database of genes responsive to the Myc oncogenic transcription factor: identification of direct genomic targets

    PubMed Central

    Zeller, Karen I; Jegga, Anil G; Aronow, Bruce J; O'Donnell, Kathryn A; Dang, Chi V

    2003-01-01

    We report a database of genes responsive to the Myc oncogenic transcription factor. The database Myc Target Gene prioritizes candidate target genes according to experimental evidence and clusters responsive genes into functional groups. We coupled the prioritization of target genes with phylogenetic sequence comparisons to predict c-Myc target binding sites, which are in turn validated by chromatin immunoprecipitation assays. This database is essential for the understanding of the genetic regulatory networks underlying the genesis of cancers. PMID:14519204

  7. p53 Pulses Diversify Target Gene Expression Dynamics in an mRNA Half-Life-Dependent Manner and Delineate Co-regulated Target Gene Subnetworks.

    PubMed

    Porter, Joshua R; Fisher, Brian E; Batchelor, Eric

    2016-04-27

    The transcription factor p53 responds to DNA double-strand breaks by increasing in concentration in a series of pulses of fixed amplitude, duration, and period. How p53 pulses influence the dynamics of p53 target gene expression is not understood. Here, we show that, in bulk cell populations, patterns of p53 target gene expression cluster into groups with stereotyped temporal behaviors, including pulsing and rising dynamics. These behaviors correlate statistically with the mRNA decay rates of target genes: short mRNA half-lives produce pulses of gene expression. This relationship can be recapitulated by mathematical models of p53-dependent gene expression in single cells and cell populations. Single-cell transcriptional profiling demonstrates that expression of a subset of p53 target genes is coordinated across time within single cells; p53 pulsing attenuates this coordination. These results help delineate how p53 orchestrates the complex DNA damage response and give insight into the function of pulsatile signaling pathways. PMID:27135539

  8. Targeted approach to identify genetic loci associated with evolved dioxin tolerance in Atlantic Killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The most toxic aromatic hydrocarbon pollutants are categorized as dioxin-like compounds (DLCs) to which extreme tolerance has evolved independently and contemporaneously in (at least) four populations of Atlantic killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus). Surprisingly, the magnitude and phenotype of DLC tolerance is similar among these killifish populations that have adapted to varied, but highly aromatic hydrocarbon-contaminated urban/industrialized estuaries of the US Atlantic coast. Multiple tolerant and neighboring sensitive killifish populations were compared with the expectation that genetic loci associated with DLC tolerance would be revealed. Results Since the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) pathway partly or fully mediates DLC toxicity in vertebrates, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from 42 genes associated with the AHR pathway were identified to serve as targeted markers. Wild fish (N = 36/37) from four highly tolerant killifish populations and four nearby sensitive populations were genotyped using 59 SNP markers. Similar to other killifish population genetic analyses, strong genetic differentiation among populations was detected, consistent with isolation by distance models. When DLC-sensitive populations were pooled and compared to pooled DLC-tolerant populations, multi-locus analyses did not distinguish the two groups. However, pairwise comparisons of nearby tolerant and sensitive populations revealed high differentiation among sensitive and tolerant populations at these specific loci: AHR 1 and 2, cathepsin Z, the cytochrome P450s (CYP1A and 3A30), and the NADH dehydrogenase subunits. In addition, significant shifts in minor allele frequency were observed at AHR2 and CYP1A loci across most sensitive/tolerant pairs, but only AHR2 exhibited shifts in the same direction across all pairs. Conclusions The observed differences in allelic composition at the AHR2 and CYP1A SNP loci were identified as significant among paired sensitive

  9. MicroRNA target prediction by expression analysis of host genes.

    PubMed

    Gennarino, Vincenzo Alessandro; Sardiello, Marco; Avellino, Raffaella; Meola, Nicola; Maselli, Vincenza; Anand, Santosh; Cutillo, Luisa; Ballabio, Andrea; Banfi, Sandro

    2009-03-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small noncoding RNAs that control gene expression by inducing RNA cleavage or translational inhibition. Most human miRNAs are intragenic and are transcribed as part of their hosting transcription units. We hypothesized that the expression profiles of miRNA host genes and of their targets are inversely correlated and devised a novel procedure, HOCTAR (host gene oppositely correlated targets), which ranks predicted miRNA target genes based on their anti-correlated expression behavior relative to their respective miRNA host genes. HOCTAR is the first tool for systematic miRNA target prediction that utilizes the same set of microarray experiments to monitor the expression of both miRNAs (through their host genes) and candidate targets. We applied the procedure to 178 human intragenic miRNAs and found that it performs better than currently available prediction softwares in pinpointing previously validated miRNA targets. The high-scoring HOCTAR predicted targets were enriched in Gene Ontology categories, which were consistent with previously published data, as in the case of miR-106b and miR-93. By means of overexpression and loss-of-function assays, we also demonstrated that HOCTAR is efficient in predicting novel miRNA targets and we identified, by microarray and qRT-PCR procedures, 34 and 28 novel targets for miR-26b and miR-98, respectively. Overall, we believe that the use of HOCTAR significantly reduces the number of candidate miRNA targets to be tested compared to the procedures based solely on target sequence recognition. Finally, our data further confirm that miRNAs have a significant impact on the mRNA levels of most of their targets. PMID:19088304

  10. Transcription alterations of microRNAs, cytochrome P4501A1 and 3A65, and AhR and PXR in the liver of zebrafish exposed to crude microcystins.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoyu; Ma, Junguo; Fang, Qian; Li, Yuanyuan

    2013-10-01

    MicroRNAs are small non-coding regulatory RNAs that not only control diverse cellular processes but also regulate gene expression induced by environmental chemicals. However, little is known about the role of microRNAs in liver response of fish to the exposure of cyanobacterial hepatotoxin microcystins (MCs). In the present study, the transcription levels of 4 miRNAs (dre-miR-21, dre-miR-122, dre-miR-27b, and dre-miR-148), cytochromes P450s CYP1A1 and CYP3A65, and their receptors, aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR, for CYP1A1) and pregnane X receptor (PXR, for CYP3A65), in the liver of zebrafish were evaluated after 24 h of 50, 200, or 800 μg/L of crude MCs exposure by using the quantitative real-time PCR method. The results showed that MCs-exposure elevated the transcription levels of dre-miR-21 and dre-miR-27b while down-regulated the expressions of dre-miR-122 and dre-miR-148. However, CYP1A1 transcription remained unchanged while mRNA levels of AhRR1 and AhR2 were significantly higher than that of control. Furthermore, the expressions of CYP3A65 and its receptor PXR were up-regulated by MCs-exposure at higher concentrations (200, or 800 μg/L of crude MCs). Therefore we suggest that CYP3A65 and PXR may be involved in the metabolization and detoxification of MCs in zebrafish, which may be regulated by dre-miR-27b. This work might be beneficial for the discovery of new potential diagnostic biomarker and drug target for hepatosis caused by MC. PMID:23851223

  11. Impact of AhR, CYP1A1 and GSTM1 genetic polymorphisms on TP53 R273G mutations in individuals exposed to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Gao, Meili; Li, Yongfei; Xue, Xiaochang; Long, Jiangang; Chen, Lan; Shah, Walayat; Kong, Yu

    2014-01-01

    This study was to undertaken to investigate the impacts of AhR, CYP1A1, GSTM1 genetic polymorphisms on the R273G mutation in exon 8 of the tumor suppressor p53 gene (TP53) among polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) exposed to coke-oven workers. One hundred thirteen workers exposed to PAH and 82 control workers were recruited. We genotyped for polymorphisms in the AhR, CYP1A1, GSTM1, and TP53 R273G mutation in blood by PCR methods, and determined the levels of 1-hydroxypyrene as PAH exposure marker in urine using the high pressure liquid chromatography assay. We found that the distribution of alcohol users and the urinary excretion of 1-OHP in the exposed workers were significantly higher than that of the control workers (p=0.004, p<0.001, respectively). Significant differences were observed in the p53 genotype distributions of smoking subjects (p=0.01, 95%CI: 1.23-6.01) and PAH exposure (p=0.008, 95%CI: 1.24-4.48), respectively. Further, significant differences were observed in the p53 exon 8 mutations for the genetic polymorphisms of Lys/Arg for AhR (p=0.02, 95%CI: 0.70-15.86), Val/Val for CYP1A1 (p=0.04, 95%CI: 0.98-19.09) and null for GSTM1 (p=0.02, 95%CI: 1.19-6.26), respectively. Our findings indicated that polymorphisms of PAH metabolic genes, such as AhR, CYP1A1, GSTM1 polymorphisms may interact with p53 genetic variants and may contribute to PAH related cancers. PMID:24761888

  12. Dissecting Human Gene Functions Regulating Islet Development With Targeted Gene Transduction

    PubMed Central

    Pauerstein, Philip T.; Sugiyama, Takuya; Stanley, Susan E.; McLean, Graeme W.; Wang, Jing; Martín, Martín G.

    2015-01-01

    During pancreas development, endocrine precursors and their progeny differentiate, migrate, and cluster to form nascent islets. The transcription factor Neurogenin 3 (Neurog3) is required for islet development in mice, but its role in these dynamic morphogenetic steps has been inferred from fixed tissues. Moreover, little is known about the molecular genetic functions of NEUROG3 in human islet development. We developed methods for gene transduction by viral microinjection in the epithelium of cultured Neurog3-null mutant fetal pancreas, permitting genetic complementation in a developmentally relevant context. In addition, we developed methods for quantitative assessment of live-cell phenotypes in single developing islet cells. Delivery of wild-type NEUROG3 rescued islet differentiation, morphogenesis, and live cell deformation, whereas the patient-derived NEUROG3R107S allele partially restored indicators of islet development. NEUROG3P39X, a previously unreported patient allele, failed to restore islet differentiation or morphogenesis and was indistinguishable from negative controls, suggesting that it is a null mutation. Our systems also permitted genetic suppression analysis and revealed that targets of NEUROG3, including NEUROD1 and RFX6, can partially restore islet development in Neurog3-null mutant mouse pancreata. Thus, advances described here permitted unprecedented assessment of gene functions in regulating crucial dynamic aspects of islet development in the fetal pancreas. PMID:25901096

  13. PPARgene: A Database of Experimentally Verified and Computationally Predicted PPAR Target Genes.

    PubMed

    Fang, Li; Zhang, Man; Li, Yanhui; Liu, Yan; Cui, Qinghua; Wang, Nanping

    2016-01-01

    The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are ligand-activated transcription factors of the nuclear receptor superfamily. Upon ligand binding, PPARs activate target gene transcription and regulate a variety of important physiological processes such as lipid metabolism, inflammation, and wound healing. Here, we describe the first database of PPAR target genes, PPARgene. Among the 225 experimentally verified PPAR target genes, 83 are for PPARα, 83 are for PPARβ/δ, and 104 are for PPARγ. Detailed information including tissue types, species, and reference PubMed IDs was also provided. In addition, we developed a machine learning method to predict novel PPAR target genes by integrating in silico PPAR-responsive element (PPRE) analysis with high throughput gene expression data. Fivefold cross validation showed that the performance of this prediction method was significantly improved compared to the in silico PPRE analysis method. The prediction tool is also implemented in the PPARgene database. PMID:27148361

  14. PPARgene: A Database of Experimentally Verified and Computationally Predicted PPAR Target Genes

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Li; Zhang, Man; Li, Yanhui; Liu, Yan; Cui, Qinghua; Wang, Nanping

    2016-01-01

    The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are ligand-activated transcription factors of the nuclear receptor superfamily. Upon ligand binding, PPARs activate target gene transcription and regulate a variety of important physiological processes such as lipid metabolism, inflammation, and wound healing. Here, we describe the first database of PPAR target genes, PPARgene. Among the 225 experimentally verified PPAR target genes, 83 are for PPARα, 83 are for PPARβ/δ, and 104 are for PPARγ. Detailed information including tissue types, species, and reference PubMed IDs was also provided. In addition, we developed a machine learning method to predict novel PPAR target genes by integrating in silico PPAR-responsive element (PPRE) analysis with high throughput gene expression data. Fivefold cross validation showed that the performance of this prediction method was significantly improved compared to the in silico PPRE analysis method. The prediction tool is also implemented in the PPARgene database. PMID:27148361

  15. Identification of target genes of synovial sarcoma-associated fusion oncoprotein using human pluripotent stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hayakawa, Kazuo; Ikeya, Makoto; Fukuta, Makoto; Woltjen, Knut; Tamaki, Sakura; Takahara, Naoko; Kato, Tomohisa; Sato, Shingo; Otsuka, Takanobu; Toguchida, Junya

    2013-03-22

    Highlights: ► We tried to identify targets of synovial sarcoma (SS)-associated SYT–SSX fusion gene. ► We established pluripotent stem cell (PSC) lines with inducible SYT–SSX gene. ► SYT–SSX responsive genes were identified by the induction of SYT–SSX in PSC. ► SS-related genes were selected from database by in silico analyses. ► 51 genes were finally identified among SS-related genes as targets of SYT–SSX in PSC. -- Abstract: Synovial sarcoma (SS) is a malignant soft tissue tumor harboring chromosomal translocation t(X; 18)(p11.2; q11.2), which produces SS-specific fusion gene, SYT–SSX. Although precise function of SYT–SSX remains to be investigated, accumulating evidences suggest its role in gene regulation via epigenetic mechanisms, and the product of SYT–SSX target genes may serve as biomarkers of SS. Lack of knowledge about the cell-of-origin of SS, however, has placed obstacle in the way of target identification. Here we report a novel approach to identify SYT–SSX2 target genes using human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) containing a doxycycline-inducible SYT–SSX2 gene. SYT–SSX2 was efficiently induced both at mRNA and protein levels within three hours after doxycycline administration, while no morphological change of hPSCs was observed until 24 h. Serial microarray analyses identified genes of which the expression level changed more than twofold within 24 h. Surprisingly, the majority (297/312, 95.2%) were up-regulated genes and a result inconsistent with the current concept of SYT–SSX as a transcriptional repressor. Comparing these genes with SS-related genes which were selected by a series of in silico analyses, 49 and 2 genes were finally identified as candidates of up- and down-regulated target of SYT–SSX, respectively. Association of these genes with SYT–SSX in SS cells was confirmed by knockdown experiments. Expression profiles of SS-related genes in hPSCs and human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) were strikingly

  16. Multiple transcription factor binding sites predict AID targeting in non-immunoglobulin genes

    PubMed Central

    Duke, Jamie L.; Liu, Man; Yaari, Gur; Khalil, Ashraf M.; Tomayko, Mary M.; Shlomchik, Mark J.; Schatz, David G.; Kleinstein, Steven H.

    2013-01-01

    Aberrant targeting of the enzyme Activation Induced Cytidine Deaminase (AID) results in the accumulation of somatic mutations in approximately 25% of expressed genes in germinal center B cells. Observations in Ung−/− Msh2−/− mice suggest that many other genes efficiently repair AID-induced lesions, so that up to 45% of genes may actually be targeted by AID. It is important to understand the mechanisms that recruit AID to certain genes, as this mis-targeting represents an important risk for genome instability. We hypothesize that several mechanisms will combine to target AID to each locus. In order to resolve which mechanisms affect AID targeting, we analyze 7.3Mb of sequence data, along with the regulatory context, from 83 genes in Ung−/− Msh2−/− mice to identify common properties of AID targets. This analysis identifies the involvement of three transcription factor binding sites (E-box motifs, along with YY1 and C/EBP-beta binding sites) that may work together to recruit AID. Based on previous knowledge and these newly discovered features, a classification tree model was built to predict genome-wide AID targeting. Using this predictive model we were able to identify a set of 101 high-interest genes that are likely targets of AID. PMID:23514741

  17. Estrogenic and AhR activities in dissolved phase and suspended solids from wastewater treatment plants.

    PubMed

    Dagnino, Sonia; Gomez, Elena; Picot, Bernadette; Cavaillès, Vincent; Casellas, Claude; Balaguer, Patrick; Fenet, Hélène

    2010-05-15

    The distribution of estrogen receptor (ERalpha) and Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor (AhR) activities between the dissolved phase and suspended solids were investigated during wastewater treatment. Three wastewater treatment plants with different treatment technologies (waste stabilization ponds (WSPs), trickling filters (TFs) and activated sludge supplemented with a biofilter system (ASB)) were sampled. Estrogenic and AhR activities were detected in both phases in influents and effluents. Estrogenic and AhR activities in wastewater influents ranged from 41.8 to 79 ng/L E(2) Eq. and from 37.9 to 115.5 ng/L TCDD Eq. in the dissolved phase and from 5.5 to 88.6 ng/g E(2) Eq. and from 15 to 700 ng/g TCDD Eq. in the suspended solids. For both activities, WSP showed greater or similar removal efficiency than ASB and both were much more efficient than TF which had the lowest removal efficiency. Moreover, our data indicate that the efficiency of removal of ER and AhR activities from the suspended solid phase was mainly due to removal of suspended solids. Indeed, ER and AhR activities were detected in the effluent suspended solid phase indicating that suspended solids, which are usually not considered in these types of studies, contribute to environmental contamination by endocrine disrupting compounds and should therefore be routinely assessed for a better estimation of the ER and AhR activities released in the environment. PMID:20303573

  18. Gene replacements and insertions in rice by intron targeting using CRISPR-Cas9.

    PubMed

    Li, Jun; Meng, Xiangbing; Zong, Yuan; Chen, Kunling; Zhang, Huawei; Liu, Jinxing; Li, Jiayang; Gao, Caixia

    2016-01-01

    Sequence-specific nucleases have been exploited to create targeted gene knockouts in various plants(1), but replacing a fragment and even obtaining gene insertions at specific loci in plant genomes remain a serious challenge. Here, we report efficient intron-mediated site-specific gene replacement and insertion approaches that generate mutations using the non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) pathway using the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-CRISPR-associated protein 9 (Cas9) system. Using a pair of single guide RNAs (sgRNAs) targeting adjacent introns and a donor DNA template including the same pair of sgRNA sites, we achieved gene replacements in the rice endogenous gene 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS) at a frequency of 2.0%. We also obtained targeted gene insertions at a frequency of 2.2% using a sgRNA targeting one intron and a donor DNA template including the same sgRNA site. Rice plants harbouring the OsEPSPS gene with the intended substitutions were glyphosate-resistant. Furthermore, the site-specific gene replacements and insertions were faithfully transmitted to the next generation. These newly developed approaches can be generally used to replace targeted gene fragments and to insert exogenous DNA sequences into specific genomic sites in rice and other plants. PMID:27618611

  19. Double replacement gene targeting for the production of a series of mouse strains with different prion protein gene alterations

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, R.C.; Redhead, N.J.; Selfridge, J.

    1995-09-01

    We have developed a double replacement gene targeting strategy which enables the production of a series of mouse strains bearing different subtle alterations to endogenous genes. This is a two-step process in which a region of the gene of interest is first replaced with a selectable marker to produce an inactivated allele, which is then re-targeted with a second vector to reconstruct the inactivated allele, concomitantly introducing an engineered mutation. Five independent embryonic stem cell lines have been produced bearing different targeted alterations to the prion protein gene, including one which raises the level of expression. We have constructed mice bearing the codon 101 proline to leucine substitution linked to the human familial prion disease, Gerstmann-Straussler-Scheinker syndrome. We anticipate that this procedure will have applications to the study of human inherited diseases and the development of therapies. 43 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Insertion and Deletion Mismatches Distant from the Target Position Improve Gene Correction with a Tailed Duplex.

    PubMed

    Kamiya, Hiroyuki; Nishigaki, Natsuki; Ikeda, Akihiro; Yukawa, Seiya; Morita, Yukiko; Nakatsu, Yoshimichi; Tsuzuki, Teruhisa; Harashima, Hideyoshi

    2016-07-01

    A 5'-tailed duplex (TD) DNA corrects a base-substitution mutation. In this study, the effects of insertion and deletion (indel) mismatches distant from the target position on the gene correction were examined. Three target plasmid DNAs with and without indel mismatches ∼330 bases distant from the correction target position were prepared, and introduced into HeLa cells together with the TD. The indel mismatches improved the gene correction efficiency and specificity without sequence conversions at the indel mismatch site. These results suggested that the gene correction efficiency and specificity are increased when an appropriate second mismatch is introduced into the TD fragment. PMID:27253876

  1. Characterization testing of a 40 Ahr bipolar nickel hydrogen battery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brewer, Jeffrey C.; Manzo, Michelle A.; Gahn, Randall F.

    1989-01-01

    In a continuing effort to develop NiH2 bipolar technology to a point where it can be used efficiently in space flight, testing of a second 40 Ahr, 10-cell bipolar battery has begun. This battery has undergone extensive characterization testing to determine the effects of such operating parameters as charge and discharge rates, temperature, and pressure. The fundamental design of this actively cooled bipolar battery is the same as the first battery. Most of the individual components, however, are from different manufacturers. Different testing procedures as well as certain unique battery characteristics make it difficult to directly compare the two sets of results. In general, the performance of this battery throughout characterization produced expected results. The main differences seen between the first and second batteries occurred during the high-rate discharge portion of the test matrix. The first battery also had poor high-rate discharge results, although better than those of the second battery. Minor changes were made to the battery frame design used for the first battery in an attempt to allow better gas access to the reaction sites for the second build and hopefully improve performance. The changes, however, did not improve the performance of the second battery and could have possibly contributed to the poorer performance that was observed. There are other component differences that could have contributed to the poorer performance of the second battery. The H2 electrode in the second battery was constructed with a Goretex backing which could have limited the high-rate current flow. The gas screen in the second battery had a larger mesh which again could have limited the high-rate current flow. Small scale 2 x 2 batteries are being tested to evaluate the effects of the component variations.

  2. Targeted Antiangiogenesis Gene Therapy Using Targeted Cationic Microbubbles Conjugated with CD105 Antibody Compared with Untargeted Cationic and Neutral Microbubbles

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yu; Gu, Haitao; Xu, Yan; Li, Fan; Kuang, Shaojing; Wang, Zhigang; Zhou, Xiyuan; Ma, Huafeng; Li, Pan; Zheng, Yuanyi; Ran, Haitao; Jian, Jia; Zhao, Yajing; Song, Weixiang; Wang, Qiushi; Wang, Dong

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to develop targeted cationic microbubbles conjugated with a CD105 antibody (CMB105) for use in targeted vascular endothelial cell gene therapy and ultrasound imaging. We compared the results with untargeted cationic microbubbles (CMB) and neutral microbubbles (NMB). Methods CMB105 were prepared and compared with untargeted CMB and NMB. First, the microbubbles were characterized in terms of size, zeta-potential, antibody binding ability and plasmid DNA loading capacity. A tumor model of subcutaneous breast cancer in nude mice was used for our experiments. The ability of different types of microbubbles to target HUVECs in vitro and tumor neovascularization in vivo was measured. The endostatin gene was selected for its outstanding antiangiogenesis effect. For in vitro experiments, the transfection efficiency and cell cycle were analyzed using flow cytometry, and the transcription and expression of endostatin were measured by qPCR and Western blotting, respectively. Vascular tube cavity formation and tumor cell invasion were used to evaluate the antiangiogenesis gene therapy efficiency in vitro. Tumors were exposed to ultrasound irradiation with different types of microbubbles, and the gene therapy effects were investigated by detecting apoptosis induction and changes in tumor volume. Results CMB105 and CMB differed significantly from NMB in terms of zeta-potential, and the DNA loading capacities were 16.76±1.75 μg, 18.21±1.22 μg, and 0.48±0.04 μg per 5×108 microbubbles, respectively. The charge coupling of plasmid DNA to CMB105 was not affected by the presence of the CD105 antibody. Both CMB105 and CMB could target to HUVECs in vitro, whereas only CMB105 could target to tumor neovascularization in vivo. In in vitro experiments, the transfection efficiency of CMB105 was 24.7-fold higher than the transfection efficiency of NMB and 1.47-fold higher than the transfection efficiency of CMB (P<0.05). With ultrasound-targeted microbubble

  3. Network analysis of microRNAs, transcription factors, target genes and host genes in human anaplastic astrocytoma

    PubMed Central

    XUE, LUCHEN; XU, ZHIWEN; WANG, KUNHAO; WANG, NING; ZHANG, XIAOXU; WANG, SHANG

    2016-01-01

    Numerous studies have investigated the roles played by various genes and microRNAs (miRNAs) in neoplasms, including anaplastic astrocytoma (AA). However, the specific regulatory mechanisms involving these genes and miRNAs remain unclear. In the present study, associated biological factors (miRNAs, transcription factors, target genes and host genes) from existing studies of human AA were combined methodically through the interactions between genes and miRNAs, as opposed to studying one or several. Three regulatory networks, including abnormally expressed, related and global networks were constructed with the aim of identifying significant gene and miRNA pathways. Each network is composed of three associations between miRNAs targeted at genes, transcription factors (TFs) regulating miRNAs and miRNAs located on their host genes. Among these, the abnormally expressed network, which involves the pathways of previously identified abnormally expressed genes and miRNAs, partially indicated the regulatory mechanism underlying AA. The network contains numerous abnormal regulation associations when AA emerges. By modifying the abnormally expressed network factors to a normal expression pattern, the faulty regulation may be corrected and tumorigenesis of AA may be prevented. Certain specific pathways are highlighted in AA, for example PTEN which is targeted by miR-21 and miR-106b, regulates miR-25 which in turn targets TP53. PTEN and miR-21 have been observed to form feedback loops. Furthermore, by comparing and analyzing the pathway predecessors and successors of abnormally expressed genes and miRNAs in three networks, similarities and differences of regulatory pathways may be identified and proposed. In summary, the present study aids in elucidating the occurrence, mechanism, prevention and treatment of AA. These results may aid further investigation into therapeutic approaches for this disease. PMID:27347075

  4. Osa-containing Brahma chromatin remodeling complexes are required for the repression of Wingless target genes

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Russell T.; Treisman, Jessica E.

    2000-01-01

    The Wingless signaling pathway directs many developmental processes in Drosophila by regulating the expression of specific downstream target genes. We report here that the product of the trithorax group gene osa is required to repress such genes in the absence of the Wingless signal. The Wingless-regulated genes nubbin, Distal-less, and decapentaplegic and a minimal enhancer from the Ultrabithorax gene are misexpressed in osa mutants and repressed by ectopic Osa. Osa-mediated repression occurs downstream of the up-regulation of Armadillo but is sensitive both to the relative levels of activating Armadillo/Pangolin and repressing Groucho/Pangolin complexes present and to the responsiveness of the promoter to Wingless. Osa functions as a component of the Brahma chromatin-remodeling complex; other components of this complex are likewise required to repress Wingless target genes. These results suggest that altering the conformation of chromatin is an important mechanism by which Wingless signaling activates gene expression. PMID:11124806

  5. Seed-based systematic discovery of specific transcription factor target genes.

    PubMed

    Mrowka, Ralf; Blüthgen, Nils; Fähling, Michael

    2008-06-01

    Reliable prediction of specific transcription factor target genes is a major challenge in systems biology and functional genomics. Current sequence-based methods yield many false predictions, due to the short and degenerated DNA-binding motifs. Here, we describe a new systematic genome-wide approach, the seed-distribution-distance method, that searches large-scale genome-wide expression data for genes that are similarly expressed as known targets. This method is used to identify genes that are likely targets, allowing sequence-based methods to focus on a subset of genes, giving rise to fewer false-positive predictions. We show by cross-validation that this method is robust in recovering specific target genes. Furthermore, this method identifies genes with typical functions and binding motifs of the seed. The method is illustrated by predicting novel targets of the transcription factor nuclear factor kappaB (NF-kappaB). Among the new targets is optineurin, which plays a key role in the pathogenesis of acquired blindness caused by adult-onset primary open-angle glaucoma. We show experimentally that the optineurin gene and other predicted genes are targets of NF-kappaB. Thus, our data provide a missing link in the signalling of NF-kappaB and the damping function of optineurin in signalling feedback of NF-kappaB. We present a robust and reliable method to enhance the genome-wide prediction of specific transcription factor target genes that exploits the vast amount of expression information available in public databases today. PMID:18485006

  6. Targeted gene conversion induced by triplex-directed psoralen interstrand crosslinks in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yaobin; Nairn, Rodney S; Vasquez, Karen M

    2009-10-01

    Correction of a defective gene is a promising approach for both basic research and clinical gene therapy. However, the absence of site-specific targeting and the low efficiency of homologous recombination in human cells present barriers to successful gene targeting. In an effort to overcome these barriers, we utilized triplex-forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) conjugated to a DNA interstrand crosslinking (ICL) agent, psoralen (pTFO-ICLs), to improve the gene targeting efficiency at a specific site in DNA. Gene targeting events were monitored by the correction of a deletion on a recipient plasmid with the homologous sequence from a donor plasmid in human cells. The mechanism underlying this event is stimulation of homologous recombination by the pTFO-ICL. We found that pTFO-ICLs are efficient in inducing targeted gene conversion (GC) events in human cells. The deletion size in the recipient plasmid influenced both the recombination frequency and spectrum of recombinants; i.e. plasmids with smaller deletions had a higher frequency and proportion of GC events. The polarity of the pTFO-ICL also had a prominent effect on recombination. Our results suggest that pTFO-ICL induced intermolecular recombination provides an efficient method for targeted gene correction in mammalian cells. PMID:19726585

  7. Stable gene replacement in barley by targeted double-strand break induction

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Koichi; Breier, Ulrike; Hensel, Götz; Kumlehn, Jochen; Schubert, Ingo; Reiss, Bernd

    2016-01-01

    Gene targeting is becoming an important tool for precision genome engineering in plants. During gene replacement, a variant of gene targeting, transformed DNA integrates into the genome by homologous recombination (HR) to replace resident sequences. We have analysed gene targeting in barley (Hordeum vulgare) using a model system based on double-strand break (DSB) induction by the meganuclease I-SceI and a transgenic, artificial target locus. In the plants we obtained, the donor construct was inserted at the target locus by homology-directed DNA integration in at least two transformants obtained in a single experiment and was stably inherited as a single Mendelian trait. Both events were produced by one-sided integration. Our data suggest that gene replacement can be achieved in barley with a frequency suitable for routine application. The use of a codon-optimized nuclease and co-transfer of the nuclease gene together with the donor construct are probably the components important for efficient gene targeting. Such an approach, employing the recently developed synthetic nucleases/nickases that allow DSB induction at almost any sequence of a genome of interest, sets the stage for precision genome engineering as a routine tool even for important crops such as barley. PMID:26712824

  8. Gene Targeting Using Homologous Recombination in Embryonic Stem Cells: The Future for Behavior Genetics?

    PubMed Central

    Gerlai, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Gene targeting with homologous recombination in embryonic stem cells created a revolution in the analysis of the function of genes in behavioral brain research. The technology allowed unprecedented precision with which one could manipulate genes and study the effect of this manipulation on the central nervous system. With gene targeting, the uncertainty inherent in psychopharmacology regarding whether a particular compound would act only through a specific target was removed. Thus, gene targeting became highly popular. However, with this popularity came the realization that like other methods, gene targeting also suffered from some technical and principal problems. For example, two decades ago, issues about compensatory changes and about genetic linkage were raised. Since then, the technology developed, and its utility has been better delineated. This review will discuss the pros and cons of the technique along with these advancements from the perspective of the neuroscientist user. It will also compare and contrast methods that may represent novel alternatives to the homologous recombination based gene targeting approach, including the TALEN and the CRISPR/Cas9 systems. The goal of the review is not to provide detailed recipes, but to attempt to present a short summary of these approaches a behavioral geneticist or neuroscientist may consider for the analysis of brain function and behavior. PMID:27148349

  9. New Approaches for Cancer Treatment: Antitumor Drugs Based on Gene-Targeted Nucleic Acids

    PubMed Central

    Patutina, O.A.; Mironova, N.L.; Vlassov, V.V.

    2009-01-01

    Currently, the main way to fight cancer is still chemotherapy. This method of treatment is at the height of its capacity, so, setting aside the need for further improvements in traditional treatments for neoplasia, it is vital to develop now approaches toward treating malignant tumors. This paper reviews innovational experimental approaches to treating malignant malformations based on the use of gene-targeted drugs, such as antisense oligonucleotides (asON), small interfering RNA (siRNA), ribozymes, and DNAzymes, which can all inhibit oncogene expression. The target genes for these drugs are thoroughly characterized, and the main results from pre-clinical and first-step clinical trials of these drugs are presented. It is shown that the gene-targeted oligonucleotides show considerable variations in their effect on tumor tissue, depending on the target gene in question. The effects range from slowing and stopping the proliferation of tumor cells to suppressing their invasive capabilities. Despite their similarity, not all the antisense drugs targeting the same region of the mRNA of the target-gene were equally effective. The result is determined by the combination of the drug type used and the region of the target-gene mRNA that it complements. PMID:22649602

  10. Target genes regulated by transcription factor E2F1 in small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, Zun-Ling; Jiao, Fei; Ma, Ying; Yue, Zhen; Kong, Li-Jun

    2016-06-25

    Previously, we have reported that transcription factor E2F1 expression is up-regulated in approximately 95% of small cell lung cancer tissue samples and closely associated with invasion and metastasis, but few studies have investigated specific target genes regulated by E2F1 in this disease. The aim of this study was to clarify the target genes controlled by E2F1 in the small cell lung cancer cell line H1688. The results of chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing (ChIP-seq) showed that total 5 326 potential target genes were identified, in which 4 700 were structural genes and 626 long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs). Gene Ontology (GO) and enrichment map analysis results indicated that these target genes were associated with three main functions: (1) cell cycle regulation, (2) chromatin and histone modification, and (3) protein transport. MEME4.7.0 software was used to identify the E2F1 binding DNA motif, and six motifs were discovered for coding genes and lncRNAs. These results clarify the target genes of E2F1, and provide the experimental basis for further exploring the roles of E2F1 in tumorigenesis, development, invasion and metastasis, recurrence, and drug resistance in small cell lung cancer. PMID:27350200

  11. Characterization and target genes of nine human PRD-like homeobox domain genes expressed exclusively in early embryos

    PubMed Central

    Madissoon, Elo; Jouhilahti, Eeva-Mari; Vesterlund, Liselotte; Töhönen, Virpi; Krjutškov, Kaarel; Petropoulous, Sophie; Einarsdottir, Elisabet; Linnarsson, Sten; Lanner, Fredrik; Månsson, Robert; Hovatta, Outi; Bürglin, Thomas R.; Katayama, Shintaro; Kere, Juha

    2016-01-01

    PAIRED (PRD)-like homeobox genes belong to a class of predicted transcription factor genes. Several of these PRD-like homeobox genes have been predicted in silico from genomic sequence but until recently had no evidence of transcript expression. We found recently that nine PRD-like homeobox genes, ARGFX, CPHX1, CPHX2, DPRX, DUXA, DUXB, NOBOX, TPRX1 and TPRX2, were expressed in human preimplantation embryos. In the current study we characterized these PRD-like homeobox genes in depth and studied their functions as transcription factors. We cloned multiple transcript variants from human embryos and showed that the expression of these genes is specific to embryos and pluripotent stem cells. Overexpression of the genes in human embryonic stem cells confirmed their roles as transcription factors as either activators (CPHX1, CPHX2, ARGFX) or repressors (DPRX, DUXA, TPRX2) with distinct targets that could be explained by the amino acid sequence in homeodomain. Some PRD-like homeodomain transcription factors had high concordance of target genes and showed enrichment for both developmentally important gene sets and a 36 bp DNA recognition motif implicated in Embryo Genome Activation (EGA). Our data implicate a role for these previously uncharacterized PRD-like homeodomain proteins in the regulation of human embryo genome activation and preimplantation embryo development. PMID:27412763

  12. PTTG: an important target gene for ovarian cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Panguluri, Siva Kumar; Yeakel, Casey; Kakar, Sham S

    2008-01-01

    Pituitary tumor transforming gene (PTTG), also known as securin is an important gene involved in many biological functions including inhibition of sister chromatid separation, DNA repair, organ development, and expression and secretion of angiogenic and metastatic factors. Proliferating cancer cells and most tumors express high levels of PTTG. Overexpression of PTTG in vitro induces cellular transformation and development of tumors in nude mice. The PTTG expression levels have been correlated with tumor progression, invasion, and metastasis. Recent studies show that down regulation of PTTG in tumor cell lines and tumors in vivo results in suppression of tumor growth, suggesting its important role in tumorigenesis. In this review, we focus on PTTG structure, sub-cellular distribution, cellular functions, and role in tumor progression with suggestions on possible exploration of this gene for cancer therapy. PMID:19014669

  13. A SYSTEMATIC ASSESSMENT OF LINKING GENE EXPRESSION WITH GENETIC VARIANTS FOR PRIORITIZING CANDIDATE TARGETS

    PubMed Central

    FAN-MINOGUE, HUA; CHEN, BIN; SIKORA-WOHLFELD, WERONIKA; SIROTA, MARINA; BUTTE, ATUL J

    2014-01-01

    Gene expression and disease-associated variants are often used to prioritize candidate genes for target validation. However, the success of these gene features alone or in combination in the discovery of therapeutic targets is uncertain. Here we evaluated the effectiveness of the differential expression (DE), the disease-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and the combination of the two in recovering and predicting known therapeutic targets across 56 human diseases. We demonstrate that the performance of each feature varies across diseases and generally the features have more recovery power than predictive power. The combination of the two features, however, has significantly higher predictive power than each feature alone. Our study provides a systematic evaluation of two common gene features, DE and SNPs, for prioritization of candidate targets and identified an improved predictive power of coupling these two features. PMID:25592598

  14. Gene-targeted metagenomic analysis of glucan-branching enzyme gene profiles among human and animal fecal microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sunghee; Cantarel, Brandi; Henrissat, Bernard; Gevers, Dirk; Birren, Bruce W; Huttenhower, Curtis; Ko, GwangPyo

    2014-01-01

    Glycoside hydrolases (GHs), the enzymes that breakdown complex carbohydrates, are a highly diversified class of key enzymes associated with the gut microbiota and its metabolic functions. To learn more about the diversity of GHs and their potential role in a variety of gut microbiomes, we used a combination of 16S, metagenomic and targeted amplicon sequencing data to study one of these enzyme families in detail. Specifically, we employed a functional gene-targeted metagenomic approach to the 1-4-α-glucan-branching enzyme (gBE) gene in the gut microbiomes of four host species (human, chicken, cow and pig). The characteristics of operational taxonomic units (OTUs) and operational glucan-branching units (OGBUs) were distinctive in each of hosts. Human and pig were most similar in OTUs profiles while maintaining distinct OGBU profiles. Interestingly, the phylogenetic profiles identified from 16S and gBE gene sequences differed, suggesting the presence of different gBE genes in the same OTU across different vertebrate hosts. Our data suggest that gene-targeted metagenomic analysis is useful for an in-depth understanding of the diversity of a particular gene of interest. Specific carbohydrate metabolic genes appear to be carried by distinct OTUs in different individual hosts and among different vertebrate species' microbiomes, the characteristics of which differ according to host genetic background and/or diet. PMID:24108330

  15. Improvement of a gene targeting system for genetic manipulation in Penicillium digitatum.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qian; Zhu, Cong-yi; Wang, Ming-shang; Sun, Xue-peng; Li, Hong-ye

    2014-02-01

    Penicillium digitatum is the most important pathogen of postharvest citrus. Gene targeting can be done in P. digitatum using homologous recombination via Agrobacterium tumefaciens mediated transformation (ATMT), but the frequencies are often very low. In the present study, we replaced the Ku80 homolog (a gene of the non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) pathway) with the hygromycin resistance cassette (hph) by ATMT. No significant change in vegetative growth, conidiation, or pathogenicity was observed in Ku80-deficient strain (ΔPdKu80) of P. digitatum. However, using ΔPdKu80 as a targeting strain, the gene-targeting frequencies for both genes PdbrlA and PdmpkA were significantly increased. These results suggest that Ku80 plays an important role in homologous integration and the created ΔPdKu80 strain would be a good candidate for rapid gene function analysis in P. digitatum. PMID:24510704

  16. Targeted RNA Sequencing Assay to Characterize Gene Expression and Genomic Alterations.

    PubMed

    Martin, Dorrelyn P; Miya, Jharna; Reeser, Julie W; Roychowdhury, Sameek

    2016-01-01

    RNA sequencing (RNAseq) is a versatile method that can be utilized to detect and characterize gene expression, mutations, gene fusions, and noncoding RNAs. Standard RNAseq requires 30 - 100 million sequencing reads and can include multiple RNA products such as mRNA and noncoding RNAs. We demonstrate how targeted RNAseq (capture) permits a focused study on selected RNA products using a desktop sequencer. RNAseq capture can characterize unannotated, low, or transiently expressed transcripts that may otherwise be missed using traditional RNAseq methods. Here we describe the extraction of RNA from cell lines, ribosomal RNA depletion, cDNA synthesis, preparation of barcoded libraries, hybridization and capture of targeted transcripts and multiplex sequencing on a desktop sequencer. We also outline the computational analysis pipeline, which includes quality control assessment, alignment, fusion detection, gene expression quantification and identification of single nucleotide variants. This assay allows for targeted transcript sequencing to characterize gene expression, gene fusions, and mutations. PMID:27585245

  17. Targeting the oncogenic Met receptor by antibodies and gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Vigna, E; Comoglio, P M

    2015-04-01

    The receptor for hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), a tyrosine kinase encoded by the Met oncogene, has a crucial role in cancer growth, invasion and metastasis. It is a validated therapeutic target for 'personalized' treatment of a number of malignancies. Therapeutic tools prompting selective, robust and highly effective Met inhibition potentially represent a major step in the battle against cancer. Antibodies targeting either Met or its ligand HGF, although challenging, demonstrate to be endowed with promising features. Here we briefly review and discuss the state of the art in the field. PMID:24882574

  18. Predicting associations between microRNAs and target genes in breast cancer by bioinformatics analyses

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Tianying; Zhang, Xing; Wang, Yonggang; Yu, Xiucui

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is the leading type of cancer among females. However, the association between microRNAs (miRNAs) and target genes in breast tumorigenesis is poorly studied. The original data set GSE26659 was downloaded from the Gene Expression Omnibus, and then the differentially expressed miRNAs among 77 breast cancer patients and 17 controls were identified using the Limma package in R software. Furthermore, breast cancer-related differentially expressed miRNAs were selected from a human miRNA disease database and their target genes were selected from five miRNA databases. Then, functional analysis was performed for the target genes followed by construction of a miRNA-target gene network. A total of 34 differentially expressed miRNAs were identified, including 13 breast cancer-related miRNAs. Moreover, the target genes of the 13 miRNAs were significantly enriched in regulation of transcription (P=7.43E-09) and pathways related to cancer (P=3.33E-11). Finally, eight upregulated miRNAs (including hsa-miR-425) and five downregulated miRNAs (including hsa-miR-143, hsa-miR-145 and hsa-miR-125b) were identified in the miRNA-target gene network. In conclusion, using bioinformatics approaches, we demonstrate that the changes in regulation of transcription and cancer pathways may play significant roles in the process of breast cancerogenesis. Differentially expressed miRNAs and their target genes may be new targets for breast cancer therapy. PMID:27446395

  19. A functional variomics tool for discovering drug resistance genes and drug targets

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Zhiwei; Chen, Kaifu; Zhang, Jianhuai; Li, Yongxiang; Wang, Hui; Cui, Dandan; Tang, Jiangwu; Liu, Yong; Shi, Xiaomin; Li, Wei; Liu, Dan; Chen, Rui; Sucgang, Richard S.; Pan, Xuewen

    2013-01-01

    Comprehensive discovery of genetic mechanisms of drug resistance and identification of in vivo drug targets represent significant challenges. Here we present a functional variomics technology in the model organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This tool analyzes numerous genetic variants and effectively tackles both problems simultaneously. Using this tool, we discovered almost all genes that, due to mutations or modest overexpression, confer resistance to rapamycin, cycloheximide, and amphotericin B. Most significant among the resistance genes were drug targets, including multiple targets of a given drug. With amphotericin B, we discovered the highly conserved membrane protein Pmp3 as a potent resistance factor and a possible novel target. Widespread application of this tool should allow rapid identification of conserved resistance mechanisms and targets of many more compounds. New genes and alleles that confer resistance to other stresses can also be discovered. Similar tools in other systems such as human cell lines will also be useful. PMID:23416056

  20. Gene targeting in embryonic stem cells, II: conditional technologies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genome modification via transgenesis has allowed researchers to link genotype and phenotype as an alternative approach to the characterization of random mutations through evolution. The synergy of technologies from the fields of embryonic stem (ES) cells, gene knockouts, and protein-mediated recombi...

  1. New roles of SHOX as regulator of target genes.

    PubMed

    Rappold, G A; Durand, C; Decker, E; Marchini, A; Schneider, K U

    2012-05-01

    The homeobox gene SHOX encodes a transcription factor which is important for normal limb development. Approximately 5 to 10% of short patients exhibit a mutation or deletion in either the SHOX gene or its downstream enhancer regions. In humans, SHOX deficiency has been associated with various short stature syndromes as well as non-syndromic idiopathic short stature. A common feature of these syndromes is disproportionate short stature with a particular shortening of the forearms and lower legs. Madelung deformity, cubitus valgus, high-arched palate and muscular hypertrophy also differed markedly between patients with or without SHOX gene defects. A clinical trial in patients with SHOX deficiency and Turner syndrome demonstrated highly significant growth hormone-stimulated increases in height velocity and height SDS in both groups. Employing microarray analyses and cell culture experiments, a strong effect of SHOX on the expression of the natriuretic peptide BNP and the fibroblast growth factor receptor gene FGFR3 could be demonstrated. We found that BNP was positively regulated, while Fgfr3 was negatively regulated by SHOX. A regulation that occurs mainly in the mesomelic segments, a region where SHOX is known to be strongly expressed, offers a possible explanation for the phenotypes seen in patients with FGFR3 (e.g. achondroplasia) and SHOX defects (e.g. Léri-Weill dyschondrosteosis). PMID:22946287

  2. Cell targeted gene delivery system based on modified pectin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Citrus pectin modified with various amine groups have been studied for its potential as a novel non-viral gene delivery carrier. The modified cationic pectin was able to condense DNA and mediate transfection in a cell type specific manner. The modified pectin seems to be a promising carrier, attra...

  3. The AhR agonist VAF347 augments retinoic acid-induced differentiation in leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Ibabao, Christopher N; Bunaciu, Rodica P; Schaefer, Deanna M W; Yen, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    In binary cell-fate decisions, driving one lineage and suppressing the other are conjoined. We have previously reported that aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) promotes retinoic acid (RA)-induced granulocytic differentiation of lineage bipotent HL-60 myeloblastic leukemia cells. VAF347, an AhR agonist, impairs the development of CD14(+)CD11b(+) monocytes from granulo-monocytic (GM) stage precursors. We thus hypothesized that VAF347 propels RA-induced granulocytic differentiation and impairs D3-induced monocytic differentiation of HL-60 cells. Our results show that VAF347 enhanced RA-induced cell cycle arrest, CD11b integrin expression and neutrophil respiratory burst. Granulocytic differentiation is known to be driven by MAPK signaling events regulated by Fgr and Lyn Src-family kinases, the CD38 cell membrane receptor, the Vav1 GEF, the c-Cbl adaptor, as well as AhR, all of which are embodied in a putative signalsome. We found that the VAF347 AhR ligand regulates the signalsome. VAF347 augments RA-induced expression of AhR, Lyn, Vav1, and c-Cbl as well as p47(phox). Several interactions of partners in the signalsome appear to be enhanced: Fgr interaction with c-Cbl, CD38, and with pS259c-Raf and AhR interaction with c-Cbl and Lyn. Thus, we report that, while VAF347 impedes monocytic differentiation induced by 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3, VAF347 promotes RA-induced differentiation. This effect seems to involve but not to be limited to Lyn, Vav1, c-Cbl, AhR, and Fgr. PMID:25941627

  4. Gene Regulatory Mechanisms Underlying the Spatial and Temporal Regulation of Target-Dependent Gene Expression in Drosophila Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Ridyard, Marc S.; Lian, Tianshun; Keatings, Kathleen; Allan, Douglas W.

    2015-01-01

    Neuronal differentiation often requires target-derived signals from the cells they innervate. These signals typically activate neural subtype-specific genes, but the gene regulatory mechanisms remain largely unknown. Highly restricted expression of the FMRFa neuropeptide in Drosophila Tv4 neurons requires target-derived BMP signaling and a transcription factor code that includes Apterous. Using integrase transgenesis of enhancer reporters, we functionally dissected the Tv4-enhancer of FMRFa within its native cellular context. We identified two essential but discrete cis-elements, a BMP-response element (BMP-RE) that binds BMP-activated pMad, and a homeodomain-response element (HD-RE) that binds Apterous. These cis-elements have low activity and must be combined for Tv4-enhancer activity. Such combinatorial activity is often a mechanism for restricting expression to the intersection of cis-element spatiotemporal activities. However, concatemers of the HD-RE and BMP-RE cis-elements were found to independently generate the same spatiotemporal expression as the Tv4-enhancer. Thus, the Tv4-enhancer atypically combines two low-activity cis-elements that confer the same output from distinct inputs. The activation of target-dependent genes is assumed to 'wait' for target contact. We tested this directly, and unexpectedly found that premature BMP activity could not induce early FMRFa expression; also, we show that the BMP-insensitive HD-RE cis-element is activated at the time of target contact. This led us to uncover a role for the nuclear receptor, seven up (svp), as a repressor of FMRFa induction prior to target contact. Svp is normally downregulated immediately prior to target contact, and we found that maintaining Svp expression prevents cis-element activation, whereas reducing svp gene dosage prematurely activates cis-element activity. We conclude that the target-dependent FMRFa gene is repressed prior to target contact, and that target-derived BMP signaling directly

  5. Targetfinder.org: a resource for systematic discovery of transcription factor target genes

    PubMed Central

    Kiełbasa, Szymon M.; Blüthgen, Nils; Fähling, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Targetfinder.org (http://targetfinder.org/) provides a web-based resource for finding genes that show a similar expression pattern to a group of user-selected genes. It is based on a large-scale gene expression compendium (>1200 experiments, >13 000 genes). The primary application of Targetfinder.org is to expand a list of known transcription factor targets by new candidate target genes. The user submits a group of genes (the ‘seed’), and as a result the web site provides a list of other genes ranked by similarity of their expression to the expression of the seed genes. Additionally, the web site provides information on a recovery/cross-validation test to check for consistency of the provided seed and the quality of the ranking. Furthermore, the web site allows to analyse affinities of a selected transcription factor to the promoter regions of the top-ranked genes in order to select the best new candidate target genes for further experimental analysis. PMID:20460454

  6. Data on AHR-dependent changes in the mitochondrial proteome in response to ,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Hye Jin; Dornbos, Peter; LaPres, John J

    2016-09-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor that is the principal regulator of a cell׳s response to many polyaromatic hydrocarbons, such as 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). To gain a better understanding of the impact of TCDD on the mitochondrial proteome, a stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC)-based proteomic analysis was performed. We used two mouse hepatoma cell lines that differ in AHR expression levels, hepa1c1c7 (AHR-expressing) and hepac12 (AHR-deficient). The cell lines were exposed to TCDD (10 nM) for 72 h; each treatment was assayed in triplicate and were analyzed as separate runs on the mass-spectrometer. Mitochondria were then isolated and mitochondrial proteins were separated by SDS-PAGE and subject to mass spectrometry. The data presented were collected from four independent SILAC experiments. Within each experiment, three isotopes were employed to compare protein ratios via mass-spectrometry: (1) light l-arginine/l-lysine HCl (Arg0, Lys0), (2) medium (15)N4-l-arginin/(13)C6l-lysine HCl (Arg4, Lys6), and (3) heavy (13)C6 (15)N4l-arginine/(13)C6 (15)N2l-lysine HCl (Arg10, Lys8). The raw data includes approximately 2500 annotated proteins. The datasets provided by this study can be a reference to other toxicologists investigating TCDD-induced mitochondrial dysfunction. The data presented here are associated with the research article, "Mitochondrial-targeted Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor and the Impact of 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-Dioxin on Cellular Respiration and the Mitochondrial Proteome" (Hwang et al. (2016) [1]). PMID:27331086

  7. Identification of Multiple Cryptococcal Fungicidal Drug Targets by Combined Gene Dosing and Drug Affinity Responsive Target Stability Screening

    PubMed Central

    Park, Yoon-Dong; Sun, Wei; Salas, Antonio; Antia, Avan; Carvajal, Cindy; Wang, Amy; Xu, Xin; Meng, Zhaojin; Zhou, Ming; Tawa, Gregory J.; Dehdashti, Jean; Zheng, Wei; Henderson, Christina M.; Zelazny, Adrian M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cryptococcus neoformans is a pathogenic fungus that is responsible for up to half a million cases of meningitis globally, especially in immunocompromised individuals. Common fungistatic drugs, such as fluconazole, are less toxic for patients but have low efficacy for initial therapy of the disease. Effective therapy against the disease is provided by the fungicidal drug amphotericin B; however, due to its high toxicity and the difficulty in administering its intravenous formulation, it is imperative to find new therapies targeting the fungus. The antiparasitic drug bithionol has been recently identified as having potent fungicidal activity. In this study, we used a combined gene dosing and drug affinity responsive target stability (GD-DARTS) screen as well as protein modeling to identify a common drug binding site of bithionol within multiple NAD-dependent dehydrogenase drug targets. This combination genetic and proteomic method thus provides a powerful method for identifying novel fungicidal drug targets for further development. PMID:27486194

  8. NIH tools facilitate matching cancer drugs with gene targets

    Cancer.gov

    A new study details how a suite of web-based tools provides the research community with greatly improved capacity to compare data derived from large collections of genomic information against thousands of drugs. By comparing drugs and genetic targets, re

  9. Reporter Gene Silencing in Targeted Mouse Mutants Is Associated with Promoter CpG Island Methylation

    PubMed Central

    Kirov, Julia V.; Adkisson, Michael; Nava, A. J.; Cipollone, Andreana; Willis, Brandon; Engelhard, Eric K.; Lloyd, K. C. Kent; de Jong, Pieter; West, David B.

    2015-01-01

    Targeted mutations in mouse disrupt local chromatin structure and may lead to unanticipated local effects. We evaluated targeted gene promoter silencing in a group of six mutants carrying the tm1a Knockout Mouse Project allele containing both a LacZ reporter gene driven by the native promoter and a neo selection cassette. Messenger RNA levels of the reporter gene and targeted gene were assessed by qRT-PCR, and methylation of the promoter CpG islands and LacZ coding sequence were evaluated by sequencing of bisulfite-treated DNA. Mutants were stratified by LacZ staining into presumed Silenced and Expressed reporter genes. Silenced mutants had reduced relative quantities LacZ mRNA and greater CpG Island methylation compared with the Expressed mutant group. Within the silenced group, LacZ coding sequence methylation was significantly and positively correlated with CpG Island methylation, while promoter CpG methylation was only weakly correlated with LacZ gene mRNA. The results support the conclusion that there is promoter silencing in a subset of mutants carrying the tm1a allele. The features of targeted genes which promote local silencing when targeted remain unknown. PMID:26275310

  10. Reporter Gene Silencing in Targeted Mouse Mutants Is Associated with Promoter CpG Island Methylation.

    PubMed

    Kirov, Julia V; Adkisson, Michael; Nava, A J; Cipollone, Andreana; Willis, Brandon; Engelhard, Eric K; Lloyd, K C Kent; de Jong, Pieter; West, David B

    2015-01-01

    Targeted mutations in mouse disrupt local chromatin structure and may lead to unanticipated local effects. We evaluated targeted gene promoter silencing in a group of six mutants carrying the tm1a Knockout Mouse Project allele containing both a LacZ reporter gene driven by the native promoter and a neo selection cassette. Messenger RNA levels of the reporter gene and targeted gene were assessed by qRT-PCR, and methylation of the promoter CpG islands and LacZ coding sequence were evaluated by sequencing of bisulfite-treated DNA. Mutants were stratified by LacZ staining into presumed Silenced and Expressed reporter genes. Silenced mutants had reduced relative quantities LacZ mRNA and greater CpG Island methylation compared with the Expressed mutant group. Within the silenced group, LacZ coding sequence methylation was significantly and positively correlated with CpG Island methylation, while promoter CpG methylation was only weakly correlated with LacZ gene mRNA. The results support the conclusion that there is promoter silencing in a subset of mutants carrying the tm1a allele. The features of targeted genes which promote local silencing when targeted remain unknown. PMID:26275310

  11. Expression-independent gene trap vectors for random and targeted mutagenesis in embryonic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Tsakiridis, Anestis; Tzouanacou, Elena; Rahman, Afifah; Colby, Douglas; Axton, Richard; Chambers, Ian; Wilson, Valerie; Forrester, Lesley; Brickman, Joshua M.

    2009-01-01

    Promoterless gene trap vectors have been widely used for high-efficiency gene targeting and random mutagenesis in embryonic stem (ES) cells. Unfortunately, such vectors are only effective for genes expressed in ES cells and this has prompted the development of expression-independent vectors. These polyadenylation (poly A) trap vectors employ a splice donor to capture an endogenous gene's polyadenylation sequence and provide transcript stability. However, the spectrum of mutations generated by these vectors appears largely restricted to the last intron of target loci due to nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) making them unsuitable for gene targeting applications. Here, we present novel poly A trap vectors that overcome the effect of NMD and also employ RNA instability sequences to improve splicing efficiency. The set of random insertions generated with these vectors show a significantly reduced insertional bias and the vectors can be targeted directly to a 5′ intron. We also show that this relative positional independence is linked to the human β-actin promoter and is most likely a result of its transcriptional activity in ES cells. Taken together our data indicate that these vectors are an effective tool for insertional mutagenesis that can be used for either gene trapping or gene targeting. PMID:19692586

  12. siRNA Design Software for a Target Gene-Specific RNA Interference

    PubMed Central

    Naito, Yuki; Ui-Tei, Kumiko

    2012-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a mechanism through which small interfering RNA (siRNA) induces sequence-specific posttranscriptional gene silencing. RNAi is commonly recognized as a powerful tool not only for functional genomics but also for therapeutic applications. Twenty-one-nucleotide-long siRNA suppresses the expression of the intended gene whose transcript possesses perfect complementarity to the siRNA guide strand. Hence, its silencing effect has been assumed to be extremely specific. However, accumulated evidences revealed that siRNA could downregulate unintended genes with partial complementarities mainly to the seven-nucleotide seed region of siRNA. This phenomenon is referred to as off-target effect. We have revealed that the capability to induce off-target effect is strongly correlated to the thermodynamic stability in siRNA seed-target duplex. For understanding accurate target gene function and successful therapeutic application, it may be critical to select a target gene-specific siRNA with minimized off-target effect. Here we present our siRNA design software for a target-specific RNAi. In addition, we also introduce the software programs open to the public for designing functional siRNAs. PMID:22701467

  13. siRNA Design Software for a Target Gene-Specific RNA Interference.

    PubMed

    Naito, Yuki; Ui-Tei, Kumiko

    2012-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a mechanism through which small interfering RNA (siRNA) induces sequence-specific posttranscriptional gene silencing. RNAi is commonly recognized as a powerful tool not only for functional genomics but also for therapeutic applications. Twenty-one-nucleotide-long siRNA suppresses the expression of the intended gene whose transcript possesses perfect complementarity to the siRNA guide strand. Hence, its silencing effect has been assumed to be extremely specific. However, accumulated evidences revealed that siRNA could downregulate unintended genes with partial complementarities mainly to the seven-nucleotide seed region of siRNA. This phenomenon is referred to as off-target effect. We have revealed that the capability to induce off-target effect is strongly correlated to the thermodynamic stability in siRNA seed-target duplex. For understanding accurate target gene function and successful therapeutic application, it may be critical to select a target gene-specific siRNA with minimized off-target effect. Here we present our siRNA design software for a target-specific RNAi. In addition, we also introduce the software programs open to the public for designing functional siRNAs. PMID:22701467

  14. Clofibrate causes an upregulation of PPAR-{alpha} target genes but does not alter expression of SREBP target genes in liver and adipose tissue of pigs.

    PubMed

    Luci, Sebastian; Giemsa, Beatrice; Kluge, Holger; Eder, Klaus

    2007-07-01

    This study investigated the effect of clofibrate treatment on expression of target genes of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-alpha and various genes of the lipid metabolism in liver and adipose tissue of pigs. An experiment with 18 pigs was performed in which pigs were fed either a control diet or the same diet supplemented with 5 g clofibrate/kg for 28 days. Pigs treated with clofibrate had heavier livers, moderately increased mRNA concentrations of various PPAR-alpha target genes in liver and adipose tissue, a higher concentration of 3-hydroxybutyrate, and markedly lower concentrations of triglycerides and cholesterol in plasma and lipoproteins than control pigs (P < 0.05). mRNA concentrations of sterol regulatory element-binding proteins (SREBP)-1 and -2, insulin-induced genes (Insig)-1 and Insig-2, and the SREBP target genes acetyl-CoA carboxylase, 3-methyl-3-hydroxyglutaryl-CoA reductase, and low-density lipoprotein receptor in liver and adipose tissue and mRNA concentrations of apolipoproteins A-I, A-II, and C-III in the liver were not different between both groups of pigs. In conclusion, this study shows that clofibrate treatment activates PPAR-alpha in liver and adipose tissue and has a strong hypotriglyceridemic and hypocholesterolemic effect in pigs. The finding that mRNA concentrations of some proteins responsible for the hypolipidemic action of fibrates in humans were not altered suggests that there were certain differences in the mode of action compared with humans. It is also shown that PPAR-alpha activation by clofibrate does not affect hepatic expression of SREBP target genes involved in synthesis of triglycerides and cholesterol homeostasis in liver and adipose tissue of pigs. PMID:17363680

  15. Gene Dosage Analysis in a Clinical Environment: Gene-Targeted Microarrays as the Platform-of-Choice

    PubMed Central

    Marquis-Nicholson, Renate; Prosser, Debra; Love, Jennifer M.; Love, Donald R.

    2013-01-01

    The role of gene deletion and duplication in the aetiology of disease has become increasingly evident over the last decade. In addition to the classical deletion/duplication disorders diagnosed using molecular techniques, such as Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy and Charcot-Marie-Tooth Neuropathy Type 1A, the significance of partial or whole gene deletions in the pathogenesis of a large number single-gene disorders is becoming more apparent. A variety of dosage analysis methods are available to the diagnostic laboratory but the widespread application of many of these techniques is limited by the expense of the kits/reagents and restrictive targeting to a particular gene or portion of a gene. These limitations are particularly important in the context of a small diagnostic laboratory with modest sample throughput. We have developed a gene-targeted, custom-designed comparative genomic hybridisation (CGH) array that allows twelve clinical samples to be interrogated simultaneously for exonic deletions/duplications within any gene (or panel of genes) on the array. We report here on the use of the array in the analysis of a series of clinical samples processed by our laboratory over a twelve-month period. The array has proven itself to be robust, flexible and highly suited to the diagnostic environment.

  16. Finding Quantitative Trait Loci Genes with Collaborative Targeted Maximum Likelihood Learning.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Rose, Sherri; van der Laan, Mark J

    2011-07-01

    Quantitative trait loci mapping is focused on identifying the positions and effect of genes underlying an an observed trait. We present a collaborative targeted maximum likelihood estimator in a semi-parametric model using a newly proposed 2-part super learning algorithm to find quantitative trait loci genes in listeria data. Results are compared to the parametric composite interval mapping approach. PMID:21572586

  17. Finding Quantitative Trait Loci Genes with Collaborative Targeted Maximum Likelihood Learning

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hui; Rose, Sherri; van der Laan, Mark J.

    2010-01-01

    Quantitative trait loci mapping is focused on identifying the positions and effect of genes underlying an an observed trait. We present a collaborative targeted maximum likelihood estimator in a semi-parametric model using a newly proposed 2-part super learning algorithm to find quantitative trait loci genes in listeria data. Results are compared to the parametric composite interval mapping approach. PMID:21572586

  18. A Novel PCR Assay for Listeria welshimeri Targeting Transcriptional Regulator Gene lwe1801

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Transcriptional regulator genes encode a group of specialized molecules that play essential roles in microbial responses to changing external conditions. These genes have been shown to possess species or group specificity and are useful as detection targets for diagnostic application. The present st...

  19. Demystifying the secret mission of enhancers: linking distal regulatory elements to target genes

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Lijing; Berman, Benjamin P.; Farnham, Peggy J.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Enhancers are short regulatory sequences bound by sequence-specific transcription factors and play a major role in the spatiotemporal specificity of gene expression patterns in development and disease. While it is now possible to identify enhancer regions genomewide in both cultured cells and primary tissues using epigenomic approaches, it has been more challenging to develop methods to understand the function of individual enhancers because enhancers are located far from the gene(s) that they regulate. However, it is essential to identify target genes of enhancers not only so that we can understand the role of enhancers in disease but also because this information will assist in the development of future therapeutic options. After reviewing models of enhancer function, we discuss recent methods for identifying target genes of enhancers. First, we describe chromatin structure-based approaches for directly mapping interactions between enhancers and promoters. Second, we describe the use of correlation-based approaches to link enhancer state with the activity of nearby promoters and/or gene expression. Third, we describe how to test the function of specific enhancers experimentally by perturbing enhancer–target relationships using high-throughput reporter assays and genome editing. Finally, we conclude by discussing as yet unanswered questions concerning how enhancers function, how target genes can be identified, and how to distinguish direct from indirect changes in gene expression mediated by individual enhancers. PMID:26446758

  20. Phenotype refinement strengthens the association of AHR and CYP1A1 genotype with caffeine consumption.

    PubMed

    McMahon, George; Taylor, Amy E; Davey Smith, George; Munafò, Marcus R

    2014-01-01

    Two genetic loci, one in the cytochrome P450 1A1 (CYP1A1) and 1A2 (CYP1A2) gene region (rs2472297) and one near the aryl-hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) gene (rs6968865), have been associated with habitual caffeine consumption. We sought to establish whether a more refined and comprehensive assessment of caffeine consumption would provide stronger evidence of association, and whether a combined allelic score comprising these two variants would further strengthen the association. We used data from between 4,460 and 7,520 women in the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children, a longitudinal birth cohort based in the United Kingdom. Self-report data on coffee, tea and cola consumption (including consumption of decaffeinated drinks) were available at multiple time points. Both genotypes were individually associated with total caffeine consumption, and with coffee and tea consumption. There was no association with cola consumption, possibly due to low levels of consumption in this sample. There was also no association with measures of decaffeinated drink consumption, indicating that the observed association is most likely mediated via caffeine. The association was strengthened when a combined allelic score was used, accounting for up to 1.28% of phenotypic variance. This was not associated with potential confounders of observational association. A combined allelic score accounts for sufficient phenotypic variance in caffeine consumption that this may be useful in Mendelian randomization studies. Future studies may therefore be able to use this combined allelic score to explore causal effects of habitual caffeine consumption on health outcomes. PMID:25075865

  1. Non-coplanar polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are direct agonists for the human pregnane-X receptor and constitutive androstane receptor, and activate target gene expression in a tissue-specific manner

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Salman, Fadheela; Plant, Nick

    2012-08-15

    The polychlorinated biphenyl group possesses high environmental persistence, leading to bioaccumulation and a number of adverse effects in mammals. Whilst coplanar PCBs elicit their toxic effects through agonism of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor; however, non-coplanar PCBs are not ligands for AhR, but may be ligands for members of the nuclear receptor family of proteins. To better understand the biological actions of non-coplanar PCBs, we have undertaken a systematic analysis of their ability to activate PXR and CAR-mediated effects. Cells were exposed to a range of non-coplanar PCBs (99, 138, 153, 180 and 194), or the coplanar PCB77: Direct activation of PXR and CAR was measured using a mammalian receptor activation assay in human liver cells, with rifampicin and CITCO used as positive controls ligands for PXR and CAR, respectively; activation of target gene expression was examined using reporter gene plasmids for CYP3A4 and MDR1 transfected into liver, intestine and lung cell lines. Several of the non-coplanar PCBs directly activated PXR and CAR, whilst the coplanar PCB77 did not. Non-coplanar PCBs were also able to activate PXR/CAR target gene expression in a substitution- and tissue-specific manner. Non-coplanar PCBs act as direct activators for the nuclear receptors PXR and CAR, and are able to elicit transcriptional activation of target genes in a substitution- and tissue-dependent manner. Chronic activation of PXR/CAR is linked to adverse effects and must be included in any risk assessment of PCBs. -- Highlights: ► Several Non-coplanar PCBs are able to directly activate both PXR and CAR in vitro. ► PCB153 is the most potent direct activator of PXR and CAR nuclear receptors. ► Non-coplanar PCB activation of CYP3A4/MDR1 reporter genes is structure-dependent. ► Non-coplanar PCB activate CYP3A4/MDR1 reporter genes in a tissue-dependent. ► PCB153 is the most potent activator of PXR/CAR target gene in all tissues.

  2. Application of an Efficient Gene Targeting System Linking Secondary Metabolites to their Biosynthetic Genes in Aspergillus terreus

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Chun-Jun; Knox, Benjamin P.; Sanchez, James F.; Chiang, Yi-Ming; Bruno, Kenneth S.; Wang, Clay C.

    2013-07-19

    Nonribosomal peptides (NRPs) are natural products biosynthesized by NRP synthetases. A kusA-, pyrG- mutant strain of Aspergillusterreus NIH 2624 was developed that greatly facilitated the gene targeting efficiency in this organism. Application of this tool allowed us to link four major types of NRP related secondary metabolites to their responsible genes in A. terreus. In addition, an NRP related melanin synthetase was also identified in this species.

  3. Analysis of Gene Targeting & Nonhomologous End-joining. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Haber, J. E.

    2002-11-30

    Overall, we identified a number of new proteins that participate in nonhomologous end-joining and also in telomere addition to the ends of broken chromosomes. We showed that NHEJ is severely reduced in cells expressing both yeast mating-type genes and then went on to identify the NEJ1 gene that was under this control. We showed the epistasis relations among a set of mutations that impair telomere addition and we showed that there are in fact two pathways to repair broken chromosomes in the absence of telomerase. We characterized the DNA damage checkpoint pathway in response to a single broken chromosome and characterized especially the adaptation of cells arrested by an unrepaired DSB. We demonstrated that the DNA damage response is nuclear-limited. We showed adaptation defects for Tid1and Srs2 proteins and showed that Srs2 was also recovery-defective, even when DNA was repaired.

  4. Silent assassin: oncogenic ras directs epigenetic inactivation of target genes.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xiaodong

    2008-01-01

    Oncogenic transformation is associated with genetic changes and epigenetic alterations. A study now shows that oncogenic Ras uses a complex and elaborate epigenetic silencing program to specifically repress the expression of multiple unrelated cancer-suppressing genes through a common pathway. These results suggest that cancer-related epigenetic modifications may arise through a specific and instructive mechanism and that genetic changes and epigenetic alterations are intimately connected and contribute to tumorigenesis cooperatively. PMID:18385037

  5. Recent developments in focused library design: targeting gene-families.

    PubMed

    Miller, Jennifer L

    2006-01-01

    For many years, the most frequently optimized qualities of a screening library, or corporate compound collection, were size and diversity. Maximizing the number of diverse hits is the fundamental goal of such strategies. The ostensible justification that "bigger is better" is based on the large, estimated size of small-molecule space and the hypothesis that the notoriously low hit rates from high-throughput screening (HTS) could be overcome by brute force: i.e. by screening more compounds. Published, detailed studies about the success (or failure) of the brute-force strategy are rare, but it is well-known that it did not fulfill expectations. As a result, published reports in recent years have increasingly described methods for designing, selecting or synthesizing gene family-focused or -biased libraries. Moreover, many of the larger compound suppliers now sell such libraries, reflecting the growing interest in them from both the pharmaceutical and biotechnology markets. The trend towards gene family-focused libraries marks the emergence of a different hypothesis about how to increase HTS hit rates and also reflects an increasingly pragmatic focus on the management of screening libraries. An important, underlying assumption in this trend is that a high-quality, general-purpose screening library of manageable size is neither realizable nor desirable. Whether a biasing strategy based on a specific gene family will do a better job of meeting both the scientific and business needs of the drug discovery enterprise still remains to be seen, but it is certainly an active area of current research. This review focuses on the "who, what, why, when, and how" of the design of gene family-focused libraries. Particular attention is given to reports that discuss not only the techniques used, but also any results obtained. PMID:16454755

  6. Rebalancing gene haploinsufficiency in vivo by targeting chromatin.

    PubMed

    Fulcoli, Filomena Gabriella; Franzese, Monica; Liu, Xiangyang; Zhang, Zhen; Angelini, Claudia; Baldini, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Congenital heart disease (CHD) affects eight out of 1,000 live births and is a major social and health-care burden. A common genetic cause of CHD is the 22q11.2 deletion, which is the basis of the homonymous deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS), also known as DiGeorge syndrome. Most of its clinical spectrum is caused by haploinsufficiency of Tbx1, a gene encoding a T-box transcription factor. Here we show that Tbx1 positively regulates monomethylation of histone 3 lysine 4 (H3K4me1) through interaction with and recruitment of histone methyltransferases. Treatment of cells with tranylcypromine (TCP), an inhibitor of histone demethylases, rebalances the loss of H3K4me1 and rescues the expression of approximately one-third of the genes dysregulated by Tbx1 suppression. In Tbx1 mouse mutants, TCP treatment ameliorates substantially the cardiovascular phenotype. These data suggest that epigenetic drugs may represent a potential therapeutic strategy for rescue of gene haploinsufficiency phenotypes, including structural defects. PMID:27256596

  7. Rebalancing gene haploinsufficiency in vivo by targeting chromatin

    PubMed Central

    Fulcoli, Filomena Gabriella; Franzese, Monica; Liu, Xiangyang; Zhang, Zhen; Angelini, Claudia; Baldini, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Congenital heart disease (CHD) affects eight out of 1,000 live births and is a major social and health-care burden. A common genetic cause of CHD is the 22q11.2 deletion, which is the basis of the homonymous deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS), also known as DiGeorge syndrome. Most of its clinical spectrum is caused by haploinsufficiency of Tbx1, a gene encoding a T-box transcription factor. Here we show that Tbx1 positively regulates monomethylation of histone 3 lysine 4 (H3K4me1) through interaction with and recruitment of histone methyltransferases. Treatment of cells with tranylcypromine (TCP), an inhibitor of histone demethylases, rebalances the loss of H3K4me1 and rescues the expression of approximately one-third of the genes dysregulated by Tbx1 suppression. In Tbx1 mouse mutants, TCP treatment ameliorates substantially the cardiovascular phenotype. These data suggest that epigenetic drugs may represent a potential therapeutic strategy for rescue of gene haploinsufficiency phenotypes, including structural defects. PMID:27256596

  8. Transcriptional Targeting in the Airway Using Novel Gene Regulatory Elements

    PubMed Central

    Burnight, Erin R.; Wang, Guoshun; McCray, Paul B.

    2012-01-01

    The delivery of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) to airway epithelia is a goal of many gene therapy strategies to treat cystic fibrosis. Because the native regulatory elements of the CFTR are not well characterized, the development of vectors with heterologous promoters of varying strengths and specificity would aid in our selection of optimal reagents for the appropriate expression of the vector-delivered CFTR gene. Here we contrasted the performance of several novel gene-regulatory elements. Based on airway expression analysis, we selected putative regulatory elements from BPIFA1 and WDR65 to investigate. In addition, we selected a human CFTR promoter region (∼ 2 kb upstream of the human CFTR transcription start site) to study. Using feline immunodeficiency virus vectors containing the candidate elements driving firefly luciferase, we transduced murine nasal epithelia in vivo. Luciferase expression persisted for 30 weeks, which was the duration of the experiment. Furthermore, when the nasal epithelium was ablated using the detergent polidocanol, the mice showed a transient loss of luciferase expression that returned 2 weeks after administration, suggesting that our vectors transduced a progenitor cell population. Importantly, the hWDR65 element drove sufficient CFTR expression to correct the anion transport defect in CFTR-null epithelia. These results will guide the development of optimal vectors for sufficient, sustained CFTR expression in airway epithelia. PMID:22447971

  9. Low-dose dioxins alter gene expression related to cholesterol biosynthesis, lipogenesis, and glucose metabolism through the aryl hydrocarbon receptor-mediated pathway in mouse liver

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, Shoko; Shirakawa, Hitoshi Tomita, Shuhei; Ohsaki, Yusuke; Haketa, Keiichi; Tooi, Osamu; Santo, Noriaki; Tohkin, Masahiro; Furukawa, Yuji; Gonzalez, Frank J.; Komai, Michio

    2008-05-15

    2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) is a common environmental contaminant. TCDD binds and activates the transcription factor aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR), leading to adverse biological responses via the alteration of the expression of various AHR target genes. Although small amounts of TCDD are consumed via contaminated daily foodstuffs and environmental exposures, the effects of low-dose TCDD on gene expression in animal tissues have not been clarified, while a number of genes affected by high-dose TCDD were reported. In this study, we comprehensively analyzed gene expression profiles in livers of C57BL/6N mice that were orally administered relatively low doses of TCDD (5, 50, or 500 ng/kg body weight (bw) day{sup -1}) for 18 days. The hepatic TCDD concentrations, measured by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, were 1.2, 17, and 1063 pg toxicity equivalent quantity (TEQ)/g, respectively. The mRNA level of the cytochrome P450 CYP1A1 was significantly increased by treatment with only TCDD 500 ng/kg bw day{sup -1}. DNA microarray and quantitative RT-PCR analyses revealed changes in the expression of genes involved in the circadian rhythm, cholesterol biosynthesis, fatty acid synthesis, and glucose metabolism in the liver with at all doses of TCDD employed. However, repression of expression of genes involved in energy metabolism was not observed in the livers of Ahr-null mice that were administered the same dose of TCDD. These results indicate that changes in gene expression by TCDD are mediated by AHR and that exposure to low-dose TCDD could affect energy metabolism via alterations of gene expression.

  10. The Evolving Role of the Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor (AHR) in the Normophysiology of Hematopoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Lindsey, Stephan; Papoutsakis, Eleftherios T.

    2012-01-01

    In addition to its role as a toxicological signal mediator, the Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor (AHR) is also a transcription factor known to regulate cellular responses to oxidative stress and inflammation through transcriptional regulation of molecules involved in the signaling of nucear factor-erythroid 2-related factor-2 (Nrf2), p53 (TRP53), retinoblastoma (RB1), and NFκB. Recent research suggests that AHR activation of these signaling pathways may provide the molecular basis for understanding AHR’s evolving role in endogenous developmental functions during hematopoietic stem-cell maintenance and differentiation. Recent developments into the hematopoietic roles for AHR are reviewed, aiming to reconcile divergent findings as to the endogenous function of AHR in hematopoiesis. Potential mechanistic explanations for AHR’s involvement in hematopoietic differentiation are discussed, focusing on its known role as a cell cycle mediator and its interactions with Hypoxia-inducible transcription factor-1 alpha (HIF1-α). Understanding the physiological mechanisms of AHR activation and signaling have far reaching implications ranging from explaining the action of various toxicological agents to providing novel ways to expand stem cell populations ex vivo for use in transplant therapies. PMID:22628113

  11. Tryptamine serves as a proligand of the AhR transcriptional pathway whose activation is dependent of monoamine oxidases.

    PubMed

    Vikström Bergander, Linda; Cai, Wen; Klocke, Bernward; Seifert, Martin; Pongratz, Ingemar

    2012-09-01

    The function of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) in mediating the biological effect to environmental pollutants is well established. However, accumulated evidence indicates a wide range of physiological and pathological functions mediated by the AhR, suggesting the existence of endogenous AhR ligand(s). The nature of an AhR ligand remain elusive; however, it is known that the AhR is activated by several compounds, such as 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin or the tryptophan photoproduct 6-formylindolo[3,2-b]carbazole. In this study, we show that physiological concentrations of tryptamine (TA) lead to induction of cytochrome P4501A1 transcription through an AhR-dependent mechanism. In addition, we show that activation of the AhR by TA requires a functional monoamino oxidase system, suggesting that TA acts as an AhR proligand possibly by converting to a high-affinity AhR ligand. Taken together, we show a possible mechanism, through which AhR signaling is activated by endogenous conversion of TA involving monoamine oxidases. PMID:22865928

  12. Multi-kilobase homozygous targeted gene replacement in human induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Byrne, Susan M; Ortiz, Luis; Mali, Prashant; Aach, John; Church, George M

    2015-02-18

    Sequence-specific nucleases such as TALEN and the CRISPR/Cas9 system have so far been used to disrupt, correct or insert transgenes at precise locations in mammalian genomes. We demonstrate efficient 'knock-in' targeted replacement of multi-kilobase genes in human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC). Using a model system replacing endogenous human genes with their mouse counterpart, we performed a comprehensive study of targeting vector design parameters for homologous recombination. A 2.7 kilobase (kb) homozygous gene replacement was achieved in up to 11% of iPSC without selection. The optimal homology arm length was around 2 kb, with homology length being especially critical on the arm not adjacent to the cut site. Homologous sequence inside the cut sites was detrimental to targeting efficiency, consistent with a synthesis-dependent strand annealing (SDSA) mechanism. Using two nuclease sites, we observed a high degree of gene excisions and inversions, which sometimes occurred more frequently than indel mutations. While homozygous deletions of 86 kb were achieved with up to 8% frequency, deletion frequencies were not solely a function of nuclease activity and deletion size. Our results analyzing the optimal parameters for targeting vector design will inform future gene targeting efforts involving multi-kilobase gene segments, particularly in human iPSC. PMID:25414332

  13. Identification, Detection, and Enumeration of Human Bifidobacterium Species by PCR Targeting the Transaldolase Gene

    PubMed Central

    Requena, Teresa; Burton, Jeremy; Matsuki, Takahiro; Munro, Karen; Simon, Mary Alice; Tanaka, Ryuichiro; Watanabe, Koichi; Tannock, Gerald W.

    2002-01-01

    Methods that enabled the identification, detection, and enumeration of Bifidobacterium species by PCR targeting the transaldolase gene were tested. Bifidobacterial species isolated from the feces of human adults and babies were identified by PCR amplification of a 301-bp transaldolase gene sequence and comparison of the relative migrations of the DNA fragments in denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). Two subtypes of Bifidobacterium longum, five subtypes of Bifidobacterium adolescentis, and two subtypes of Bifidobacterium pseudocatenulatum could be differentiated using PCR-DGGE. Bifidobacterium angulatum and B. catenulatum type cultures could not be differentiated from each other. Bifidobacterial species were also detected directly in fecal samples by this combination of PCR and DGGE. The number of species detected was less than that detected by PCR using species-specific primers targeting 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA). Real-time quantitative PCR targeting a 110-bp transaldolase gene sequence was used to enumerate bifidobacteria in fecal samples. Real-time quantitative PCR measurements of bifidobacteria in fecal samples from adults correlated well with results obtained by culture when either a 16S rDNA sequence or the transaldolase gene sequence was targeted. In the case of samples from infants, 16S rDNA-targeted PCR was superior to PCR targeting the transaldolase gene for the quantification of bifidobacterial populations. PMID:11976117

  14. Evidence for Tissue-Specific JAK/STAT Target Genes in Drosophila Optic Lobe Development

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hongbin; Chen, Xi; He, Teng; Zhou, Yanna; Luo, Hong

    2013-01-01

    The evolutionarily conserved JAK/STAT pathway plays important roles in development and disease processes in humans. Although the signaling process has been well established, we know relatively little about what the relevant target genes are that mediate JAK/STAT activation during development. Here, we have used genome-wide microarrays to identify JAK/STAT targets in the optic lobes of the Drosophila brain and identified 47 genes that are positively regulated by JAK/STAT. About two-thirds of the genes encode proteins that have orthologs in humans. The STAT targets in the optic lobe appear to be different from the targets identified in other tissues, suggesting that JAK/STAT signaling may regulate different target genes in a tissue-specific manner. Functional analysis of Nop56, a cell-autonomous STAT target, revealed an essential role for this gene in the growth and proliferation of neuroepithelial stem cells in the optic lobe and an inhibitory role in lamina neurogenesis. PMID:24077308

  15. SLC7A5 act as a potential leukemic transformation target gene in myelodysplastic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yan; Song, Jing; Chen, Bobin; Xu, Xiaoping; Lin, Guowei

    2016-01-01

    Objective Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are a heterogenous group of clonal hematopoietic stem cell disorders characterized by increased risk of leukemic transformation. This study identifies microRNAs(miRNA) and miRNA targets that might represent leukemic transformation markers for MDS. Methods Based on our previously established nested case-control study cohort of MDS patients, we chose paired patients to undergo Angilent 8 × 15K human miRNA microarrays. Target prediction analysis was administrated using targetscan 5.1 software. We further investigated the function of target gene in MDS cell line using siRNA method, including cell proliferation, cell apoptosis, cell cycle and electron microscope. Results Finally we screened a subset of 7 miRNAs to be significantly differentially expressed between the case (at the end of follow up with leukemic transformation) and control group (at the end of follow up without leukemic transformation). Target prediction analysis revealed SLC7A5 was the common target gene of these 7 miRNAs. Further study on the function of SLC7A5 gene in SKM-1 cell line showed that downregulation of SLC7A5 inhibited SKM-1 cells proliferation, increased apoptosis and caused cell cycle arrest in the G0/G1 stage. Conclusion Our data indicate that SLC7A5 gene may act as a potential leukemic transformation target gene in MDS. PMID:26657287

  16. Establishing targeted carp TLR22 gene disruption via homologous recombination using CRISPR/Cas9.

    PubMed

    Chakrapani, Vemulawada; Patra, Swagat Kumar; Panda, Rudra Prasanna; Rasal, Kiran Dashrath; Jayasankar, Pallipuram; Barman, Hirak Kumar

    2016-08-01

    Recent advances in gene editing techniques have not been exploited in farmed fishes. We established a gene targeting technique, using the CRISPR/Cas9 system in Labeo rohita, a farmed carp (known as rohu). We demonstrated that donor DNA was integrated via homologous recombination (HR) at the site of targeted double-stranded nicks created by CRISPR/Cas9 nuclease. This resulted in the successful disruption of rohu Toll-like receptor 22 (TLR22) gene, involved in innate immunity and exclusively present in teleost fishes and amphibians. The null mutant, thus, generated lacked TLR22 mRNA expression. Altogether, this is the first evidence that the CRISPR/Cas9 system is a highly efficient tool for targeted gene disruption via HR in teleosts for generating model large-bodied farmed fishes. PMID:27079451

  17. Gene targeting: technical confounds and potential solutions in behavioral brain research.

    PubMed

    Gerlai, R

    2001-11-01

    Gene targeting allows one to create null mutations in mice and to analyze how the mutant organism responds to the lack of a single gene product. This has facilitated the molecular dissection of such complex characteristics as mammalian brain function and behavior, including learning, memory, aggression, and maternal behavior to mention a few. However, the interpretation of the phenotypical changes that arise in null mutant mice has been questioned. The possibility that genes other than the targeted one may contribute to phenotypical alterations has been raised and the importance of compensatory mechanisms has been brought to attention. This review focuses on recent advances in the literature that illustrate the caveats associated with gene targeting and also presents an overview of potential solutions for the discussed problems. PMID:11682088

  18. Spatiotemporal regulation of GLI target genes in the mammalian limb bud.

    PubMed

    Lewandowski, Jordan P; Du, Fang; Zhang, Shilu; Powell, Marian B; Falkenstein, Kristin N; Ji, Hongkai; Vokes, Steven A

    2015-10-01

    GLI proteins convert Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling into a transcriptional output in a tissue-specific fashion. The Shh pathway has been extensively studied in the limb bud, where it helps regulate growth through a SHH-FGF feedback loop. However, the transcriptional response is still poorly understood. We addressed this by determining the gene expression patterns of approximately 200 candidate GLI-target genes and identified three discrete SHH-responsive expression domains. GLI-target genes expressed in the three domains are predominately regulated by derepression of GLI3 but have different temporal requirements for SHH. The GLI binding regions associated with these genes harbor both distinct and common DNA motifs. Given the potential for interaction between the SHH and FGF pathways, we also measured the response of GLI-target genes to inhibition of FGF signaling and found the majority were either unaffected or upregulated. These results provide the first characterization of the spatiotemporal response of a large group of GLI-target genes and lay the foundation for a systems-level understanding of the gene regulatory networks underlying SHH-mediated limb patterning. PMID:26238476

  19. Correlated gene expression and target specificity demonstrate excitatory projection neuron diversity.

    PubMed

    Sorensen, Staci A; Bernard, Amy; Menon, Vilas; Royall, Joshua J; Glattfelder, Katie J; Desta, Tsega; Hirokawa, Karla; Mortrud, Marty; Miller, Jeremy A; Zeng, Hongkui; Hohmann, John G; Jones, Allan R; Lein, Ed S

    2015-02-01

    The neocortex contains diverse populations of excitatory neurons segregated by layer and further definable by their specific cortical and subcortical projection targets. The current study describes a systematic approach to identify molecular correlates of specific projection neuron classes in mouse primary somatosensory cortex (S1), using a combination of in situ hybridization (ISH) data mining, marker gene colocalization, and combined retrograde labeling with ISH for layer-specific marker genes. First, we identified a large set of genes with specificity for each cortical layer, and that display heterogeneous patterns within those layers. Using these genes as markers, we find extensive evidence for the covariation of gene expression and projection target specificity in layer 2/3, 5, and 6, with individual genes labeling neurons projecting to specific subsets of target structures. The combination of gene expression and target specificity imply a great diversity of projection neuron classes that is similar to or greater than that of GABAergic interneurons. The covariance of these 2 phenotypic modalities suggests that these classes are both discrete and genetically specified. PMID:24014670

  20. Manipulating the in vivo immune response by targeted gene knockdown

    PubMed Central

    Lieberman, Judy

    2015-01-01

    Aptamers, nucleic acids selected for high affinity binding to proteins, can be used to activate or antagonize immune mediators or receptors in a location and cell-type specific manner and to enhance antigen presentation. They can also be linked to other molecules (other aptamers, siRNAs or miRNAs, proteins, toxins) to produce multifunctional compounds for targeted immune modulation in vivo. Aptamer-siRNA chimeras (AsiCs) that induce efficient cell-specific knockdown in immune cells in vitro and in vivo can be used as an immunological research tool or potentially as an immunomodulating therapeutic. PMID:26149459

  1. Manipulating the in vivo immune response by targeted gene knockdown.

    PubMed

    Lieberman, Judy

    2015-08-01

    Aptamers, nucleic acids selected for high affinity binding to proteins, can be used to activate or antagonize immune mediators or receptors in a location and cell-type specific manner and to enhance antigen presentation. They can also be linked to other molecules (other aptamers, siRNAs or miRNAs, proteins, toxins) to produce multifunctional compounds for targeted immune modulation in vivo. Aptamer-siRNA chimeras (AsiCs) that induce efficient cell-specific knockdown in immune cells in vitro and in vivo can be used as an immunological research tool or potentially as an immunomodulating therapeutic. PMID:26149459

  2. Focal DNA Copy Number Changes in Neuroblastoma Target MYCN Regulated Genes

    PubMed Central

    Mestdagh, Pieter; Menten, Björn; Lefever, Steve; Pattyn, Filip; De Brouwer, Sara; Sante, Tom; Schulte, Johannes Hubertus; Schramm, Alexander; Van Roy, Nadine; Van Maerken, Tom; Noguera, Rosa; Combaret, Valérie; Devalck, Christine; Westermann, Frank; Laureys, Geneviève; Eggert, Angelika; Vandesompele, Jo; De Preter, Katleen; Speleman, Frank

    2013-01-01

    Neuroblastoma is an embryonic tumor arising from immature sympathetic nervous system cells. Recurrent genomic alterations include MYCN and ALK amplification as well as recurrent patterns of gains and losses of whole or large partial chromosome segments. A recent whole genome sequencing effort yielded no frequently recurring mutations in genes other than those affecting ALK. However, the study further stresses the importance of DNA copy number alterations in this disease, in particular for genes implicated in neuritogenesis. Here we provide additional evidence for the importance of focal DNA copy number gains and losses, which are predominantly observed in MYCN amplified tumors. A focal 5 kb gain encompassing the MYCN regulated miR-17∼92 cluster as sole gene was detected in a neuroblastoma cell line and further analyses of the array CGH data set demonstrated enrichment for other MYCN target genes in focal gains and amplifications. Next we applied an integrated genomics analysis to prioritize MYCN down regulated genes mediated by MYCN driven miRNAs within regions of focal heterozygous or homozygous deletion. We identified RGS5, a negative regulator of G-protein signaling implicated in vascular normalization, invasion and metastasis, targeted by a focal homozygous deletion, as a new MYCN target gene, down regulated through MYCN activated miRNAs. In addition, we expand the miR-17∼92 regulatory network controlling TGFß signaling in neuroblastoma with the ring finger protein 11 encoding gene RNF11, which was previously shown to be targeted by the miR-17∼92 member miR-19b. Taken together, our data indicate that focal DNA copy number imbalances in neuroblastoma (1) target genes that are implicated in MYCN signaling, possibly selected to reinforce MYCN oncogene addiction and (2) serve as a resource for identifying new molecular targets for treatment. PMID:23308108

  3. Targeted Editing of Myostatin Gene in Sheep by Transcription Activator-like Effector Nucleases.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xinxia; Ni, Wei; Chen, Chuangfu; Sai, Wujiafu; Qiao, Jun; Sheng, Jingliang; Zhang, Hui; Li, Guozhong; Wang, Dawei; Hu, Shengwei

    2016-03-01

    Myostatin (MSTN) is a secreted growth factor expressed in skeletal muscle and adipose tissue that negatively regulates skeletal muscle mass. Gene knockout of MSTN can result in increasing muscle mass in sheep. The objectives were to investigate whether myostatin gene can be edited in sheep by transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) in tandem with single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides (ssODNs). We designed a pair of TALENs to target a highly conserved sequence in the coding region of the sheep MSTN gene. The activity of the TALENs was verified by using luciferase single-strand annealing reporter assay in HEK 293T cell line. Co-transfection of TALENs and ssODNs oligonucleotides induced precise gene editing of myostatin gene in sheep primary fibroblasts. MSTN gene-edited cells were successfully used as nuclear donors for generating cloned embryos. TALENs combined with ssDNA oligonucleotides provide a useful approach for precise gene modification in livestock animals. PMID:26950874

  4. Targeted Editing of Myostatin Gene in Sheep by Transcription Activator-like Effector Nucleases

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xinxia; Ni, Wei; Chen, Chuangfu; Sai, Wujiafu; Qiao, Jun; Sheng, Jingliang; Zhang, Hui; Li, Guozhong; Wang, Dawei; Hu, Shengwei

    2016-01-01

    Myostatin (MSTN) is a secreted growth factor expressed in skeletal muscle and adipose tissue that negatively regulates skeletal muscle mass. Gene knockout of MSTN can result in increasing muscle mass in sheep. The objectives were to investigate whether myostatin gene can be edited in sheep by transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) in tandem with single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides (ssODNs). We designed a pair of TALENs to target a highly conserved sequence in the coding region of the sheep MSTN gene. The activity of the TALENs was verified by using luciferase single-strand annealing reporter assay in HEK 293T cell line. Co-transfection of TALENs and ssODNs oligonucleotides induced precise gene editing of myostatin gene in sheep primary fibroblasts. MSTN gene-edited cells were successfully used as nuclear donors for generating cloned embryos. TALENs combined with ssDNA oligonucleotides provide a useful approach for precise gene modification in livestock animals. PMID:26950874

  5. Infrared laser-induced gene expression in targeted single cells of Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Motoshi; Toyoda, Naoya; Shimojou, Masaki; Takagi, Shin

    2013-05-01

    Since the dawn of transgenic technology some 40 years ago, biologists have sought ways to manipulate, at their discretion, the expression of particular genes of interest in living organisms. The infrared laser-evoked gene operator (IR-LEGO) is a recently developed system for inducing gene expression in living organisms in a targeted fashion. It exploits the highly efficient capacity of an infrared laser for heating cells, to provide a high level of gene expression driven by heat-inducible promoters. By irradiating living specimens with a laser under a microscope, heat shock responses can be induced in individual cells, thereby inducing a particular gene, under the control of a heat shock promoter, in specifically targeted cells. In this review we first summarize previous attempts to drive transgene expression in organisms by using heat shock promoters, and then introduce the basic principle of the IR-LEGO system, and its applications. PMID:23614811

  6. Genes and epigenetic processes as prospective pain targets

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Chronic pain affects approximately one in five adults, resulting in a greatly reduced quality of life and a higher risk of developing co-morbidities such as depression. Available treatments often provide inadequate pain relief, but it is hoped that through deeper understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying chronic pain states we can discover new and improved therapies. Although genetic research has flourished over the past decade and has identified many key genes in pain processing, the budding field of epigenetics promises to provide new insights and a more dynamic view of pain regulation. This review gives an overview of basic mechanisms and current therapies to treat pain, and discusses the clinical and preclinical evidence for the contribution of genetic and epigenetic factors, with a focus on how this knowledge can affect drug development. PMID:23409739

  7. Conditional Gene Targeting in Mouse High Endothelial Venules

    PubMed Central

    Kawashima, Hiroto; Hirakawa, Jotaro; Tobisawa, Yuki; Fukuda, Minoru; Saga, Yumiko

    2009-01-01

    High endothelial venules (HEVs) are specialized blood vessels of secondary lymphoid organs composed of endothelial cells with a characteristic cuboidal morphology. Lymphocytes selectively adhere to and migrate across HEVs to initiate immune responses. In this study, we established a novel transgenic mouse line expressing Cre recombinase under the transcriptional control of the gene encoding HEV-expressed sulfotransferase, N-acetylglucosamine-6-O-sulfotransferase 2 (GlcNAc6ST-2), using bacterial artificial chromosome recombineering. Crossing these transgenic mice with the ROSA26 reporter strain, which expresses lacZ following Cre-mediated recombination, and staining the resulting progeny with 5-bromo-4-chloro-5-indolyl-β-D-galactoside indicated that Cre recombinase was specifically expressed in mAb MECA79-reactive HEVs in secondary lymphoid organs but not in any other blood vessels of the transgenic mice. The expression of Cre recombinase correlated with a developmental switch, from immature, mAb MECA367-reactive HEVs to mature, mAb MECA79-reactive HEVs in neonatal lymph nodes. In addition to the HEVs, Cre recombinase was also strongly expressed in the colonic villi, which recapitulated the intrinsic expression of GlcNAc6ST-2 as confirmed in GlcNAc6ST-2GFP/GFP knock-in mice and by RT-PCR. Furthermore, treatment with an antimicrobial agent revealed that the colonic expression of Cre recombinase in the transgenic mice was regulated by commensal bacteria in the colon. In addition, Cre recombinase was expressed in a small subset of cells in the brain, testis, stomach, small intestine, and lung. In view of the restricted expression of Cre recombinase, this transgenic mouse line should be useful for elucidating tissue-specific gene functions using the Cre/loxP system. PMID:19380794

  8. Targeting New Candidate Genes by Small Molecules Approaching Neurodegenerative Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Hueng-Chuen; Chi, Ching-Shiang; Cheng, Shin-Nan; Lee, Hsiu-Fen; Tsai, Jeng-Dau; Lin, Shinn-Zong; Harn, Horng-Jyh

    2015-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases (NDs) are among the most feared of the disorders that afflict humankind for the lack of specific diagnostic tests and effective treatments. Understanding the molecular, cellular, biochemical changes of NDs may hold therapeutic promise against debilitating central nerve system (CNS) disorders. In the present review, we summarized the clinical presentations and biology backgrounds of NDs, including Parkinson’s disease (PD), Huntington’s disease (HD), and Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and explored the role of molecular mechanisms, including dys-regulation of epigenetic control mechanisms, Ataxia-telangiectasia-mutated protein kinase (ATM), and neuroinflammation in the pathogenesis of NDs. Targeting these mechanisms may hold therapeutic promise against these devastating diseases. PMID:26712747

  9. Precision genome editing in plants via gene targeting and piggyBac-mediated marker excision

    PubMed Central

    Nishizawa-Yokoi, Ayako; Endo, Masaki; Ohtsuki, Namie; Saika, Hiroaki; Toki, Seiichi

    2015-01-01

    Precise genome engineering via homologous recombination (HR)-mediated gene targeting (GT) has become an essential tool in molecular breeding as well as in basic plant science. As HR-mediated GT is an extremely rare event, positive–negative selection has been used extensively in flowering plants to isolate cells in which GT has occurred. In order to utilize GT as a methodology for precision mutagenesis, the positive selectable marker gene should be completely eliminated from the GT locus. Here, we introduce targeted point mutations conferring resistance to herbicide into the rice acetolactate synthase (ALS) gene via GT with subsequent marker excision by piggyBac transposition. Almost all regenerated plants expressing piggyBac transposase contained exclusively targeted point mutations without concomitant re-integration of the transposon, resulting in these progeny showing a herbicide bispyribac sodium (BS)-tolerant phenotype. This approach was also applied successfully to the editing of a microRNA targeting site in the rice cleistogamy 1 gene. Therefore, our approach provides a general strategy for the targeted modification of endogenous genes in plants. PMID:25284193

  10. Highly efficient CRISPR/Cas9-mediated targeted mutagenesis of multiple genes in Populus.

    PubMed

    Tingting, Liu; Di, Fan; Lingyu, Ran; Yuanzhong, Jiang; Rui, Liu; Keming, Luo

    2015-10-01

    The typeⅡCRISPR/Cas9 system (Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats /CRISPR-associated 9) has been widely used in bacteria, yeast, animals and plants as a targeted genome editing technique. In previous work, we have successfully knocked out the endogenous phytoene dehydrogenase (PDS) gene in Populus tomentosa Carr. using this system. To study the effect of target design on the efficiency of CRISPR/Cas9-mediated gene knockout in Populus, we analyzed the efficiency of mutagenesis using different single-guide RNA (sgRNA) that target PDS DNA sequence. We found that mismatches between the sgRNA and the target DNA resulted in decreased efficiency of mutagenesis and even failed mutagenesis. Moreover, complementarity between the 3' end nucleotide of sgRNA and target DNA is especially crucial for efficient mutagenesis. Further sequencing analysis showed that two PDS homologs in Populus, PtPDS1 and PtPDS2, could be knocked out simultaneously using this system with 86.4% and 50% efficiency, respectively. These results indicated the possibility of introducing mutations in two or more endogenous genes efficiently and obtaining multi-mutant strains of Populus using this system. We have indeed generated several knockout mutants of transcription factors and structural genes in Populus, which establishes a foundation for future studies of gene function and genetic improvement of Populus. PMID:26496757

  11. Highly efficient transient gene expression and gene targeting in primate embryonic stem cells with helper-dependent adenoviral vectors

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Keiichiro; Mitsui, Kaoru; Aizawa, Emi; Hasegawa, Kouichi; Kawase, Eihachiro; Yamagishi, Toshiyuki; Shimizu, Yoshihiko; Suemori, Hirofumi; Nakatsuji, Norio; Mitani, Kohnosuke

    2008-01-01

    Human embryonic stem (hES) cells are regarded as a potentially unlimited source of cellular materials for regenerative medicine. For biological studies and clinical applications using primate ES cells, the development of a general strategy to obtain efficient gene delivery and genetic manipulation, especially gene targeting via homologous recombination (HR), would be of paramount importance. However, unlike mouse ES (mES) cells, efficient strategies for transient gene delivery and HR in hES cells have not been established. Here, we report that helper-dependent adenoviral vectors (HDAdVs) were able to transfer genes in hES and cynomolgus monkey (Macaca fasicularis) ES (cES) cells efficiently. Without losing the undifferentiated state of the ES cells, transient gene transfer efficiency was ≈100%. Using HDAdVs with homology arms, approximately one out of 10 chromosomal integrations of the vector was via HR, whereas the rate was only ≈1% with other gene delivery methods. Furthermore, in combination with negative selection, ≈45% of chromosomal integrations of the vector were targeted integrations, indicating that HDAdVs would be a powerful tool for genetic manipulation in hES cells and potentially in other types of human stem cells, such as induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. PMID:18768795

  12. Genome-wide discovery of Pax7 target genes during development.

    PubMed

    White, Robert B; Ziman, Melanie R

    2008-03-14

    Pax7 plays critical roles in development of brain, spinal cord, neural crest, and skeletal muscle. As a sequence-specific DNA-binding transcription factor, any direct functional role played by Pax7 during development is mediated through target gene selection. Thus, we have sought to identify genes targeted by Pax7 during embryonic development using an unbiased chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) cloning assay to isolate cis-regulatory regions bound by Pax7 in vivo. Sequencing and genomic localization of a library of chromatin-DNA fragments bound by Pax7 has identified 34 candidate Pax7 target genes, with occupancy of a selection confirmed with independent chromatin enrichment tests (ChIP-PCR). To assess the capacity of Pax7 to regulate transcription from these loci, we have cloned alternate transcripts of Pax7 (differing significantly in their DNA binding domain) into expression vectors and transfected cultured cells with these constructs, then analyzed target gene expression levels using RT-PCR. We show that Pax7 directly occupies sites within genes encoding transcription factors Gbx1 and Eya4, the neurogenic cytokine receptor ciliary neurotrophic factor receptor, the neuronal potassium channel Kcnk2, and the signal transduction kinase Camk1d in vivo and regulates the transcriptional state of these genes in cultured cells. This analysis gives us greater insight into the direct functional role played by Pax7 during embryonic development. PMID:18198279

  13. A ligand-mediated nanovector for targeted gene delivery and transfection in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Veiseh, Omid; Kievit, Forrest M; Gunn, Jonathan W; Ratner, Buddy D; Zhang, Miqin

    2009-02-01

    As conventional cancer therapies struggle with toxicity issues and irregular remedial efficacy, the preparation of novel gene therapy vectors could offer clinicians the tools for addressing the genetic errors of diseased tissue. The transfer of gene therapy to the clinic has proven difficult due to safety, target specificity, and transfection efficiency concerns. Polyethylenimine (PEI) nanoparticles have been identified as promising gene carriers that induce gene transfection with high efficiency. However, the inherent toxicity of the material and non-selective delivery are the major concerns in applying these particles clinically. Here, a non-viral nanovector has been developed by PEGylation of DNA-complexing PEI in nanoparticles functionalized with an Alexa Fluor 647 near infrared fluorophore, and the chlorotoxin (CTX) peptide which binds specifically to many forms of cancer. With this nanovector, the potential toxicity to healthy cells is minimized by both the reduction of the toxicity of PEI with the biocompatible copolymer and the targeted delivery of the nanovector to cancer cells, as evaluated by viability studies. The nanovector demonstrated high levels of targeting specificity and gene transfection efficiency with both C6 glioma and DAOY medulloblastoma tumor cells. Significantly, with the CTX as the targeting ligand, the nanovector may serve as a widely applicable gene delivery system for a broad array of cancer types. PMID:18990439

  14. Yeast-based assay identifies novel Shh/Gli target genes in vertebrate development

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The increasing number of developmental events and molecular mechanisms associated with the Hedgehog (Hh) pathway from Drosophila to vertebrates, suggest that gene regulation is crucial for diverse cellular responses, including target genes not yet described. Although several high-throughput, genome-wide approaches have yielded information at the genomic, transcriptional and proteomic levels, the specificity of Gli binding sites related to direct target gene activation still remain elusive. This study aims to identify novel putative targets of Gli transcription factors through a protein-DNA binding assay using yeast, and validating a subset of targets both in-vitro and in-vivo. Testing in different Hh/Gli gain- and loss-of-function scenarios we here identified known (e.g., ptc1) and novel Hh-regulated genes in zebrafish embryos. Results The combined yeast-based screening and MEME/MAST analysis were able to predict Gli transcription factor binding sites, and position mapping of these sequences upstream or in the first intron of promoters served to identify new putative target genes of Gli regulation. These candidates were validated by qPCR in combination with either the pharmacological Hh/Gli antagonist cyc or the agonist pur in Hh-responsive C3H10T1/2 cells. We also used small-hairpin RNAs against Gli proteins to evaluate targets and confirm specific Gli regulation their expression. Taking advantage of mutants that have been identified affecting different components of the Hh/Gli signaling system in the zebrafish model, we further analyzed specific novel candidates. Studying Hh function with pharmacological inhibition or activation complemented these genetic loss-of-function approaches. We provide evidence that in zebrafish embryos, Hh signaling regulates sfrp2, neo1, and c-myc expression in-vivo. Conclusion A recently described yeast-based screening allowed us to identify new Hh/Gli target genes, functionally important in different contexts of vertebrate

  15. Tumor-targeted inhibition by a novel strategy - mimoretrovirus expressing siRNA targeting the Pokemon gene.

    PubMed

    Tian, Zhiqiang; Wang, Huaizhi; Jia, Zhengcai; Shi, Jinglei; Tang, Jun; Mao, Liwei; Liu, Hongli; Deng, Yijing; He, Yangdong; Ruan, Zhihua; Li, Jintao; Wu, Yuzhang; Ni, Bing

    2010-12-01

    Pokemon gene has crucial but versatile functions in cell differentiation, proliferation and tumorigenesis. It is a master regulator of the ARF-HDM2-p53 and Rb-E2F pathways. The facts that the expression of Pokemon is essential for tumor formation and many kinds of tumors over-express the Pokemon gene make it an attractive target for therapeutic intervention for cancer treatment. In this study, we used an RNAi strategy to silence the Pokemon gene in a cervical cancer model. To address the issues involving tumor specific delivery and durable expression of siRNA, we applied the Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) peptide ligand and polylysine (K(18)) fusion peptide to encapsulate a recombinant retrovirus plasmid expressing a siRNA targeting the Pokemon gene and produced the 'mimoretrovirus'. At charge ratio 2.0 of fusion peptide/plasmid, the mimoretrovirus formed stable and homogenous nanoparticles, and provided complete DNase I protection and complete gel retardation. This nanoparticle inhibited SiHa cell proliferation and invasion, while it promoted SiHa cell apoptosis. The binding of the nanoparticle to SiHa cells was mediated via the RGD-integrin α(v)β(3) interaction, as evidenced by the finding that unconjugated RGD peptide inhibited this binding significantly. This tumor-targeting mimoretrovirus exhibited excellent anti-tumor capacity in vivo in a nude mouse model. Moreover, the mimoretrovirus inhibited tumor growth with a much higher efficiency than recombinant retrovirus expressing siRNA or the K(18)/P4 nanoparticle lacking the RGD peptide. Results suggest that the RNAi/RGD-based mimoretrovirus developed in this study represents a novel anti-tumor strategy that may be applicable to most research involving cancer therapy and, thus, has promising potential as a cervical cancer treatment. PMID:20879980

  16. Identification of novel regulatory factor X (RFX) target genes by comparative genomics in Drosophila species

    PubMed Central

    Laurençon, Anne; Dubruille, Raphaëlle; Efimenko, Evgeni; Grenier, Guillaume; Bissett, Ryan; Cortier, Elisabeth; Rolland, Vivien; Swoboda, Peter; Durand, Bénédicte

    2007-01-01

    Background Regulatory factor X (RFX) transcription factors play a key role in ciliary assembly in nematode, Drosophila and mouse. Using the tremendous advantages of comparative genomics in closely related species, we identified novel genes regulated by dRFX in Drosophila. Results We first demonstrate that a subset of known ciliary genes in Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila are regulated by dRFX and have a conserved RFX binding site (X-box) in their promoters in two highly divergent Drosophila species. We then designed an X-box consensus sequence and carried out a genome wide computer screen to identify novel genes under RFX control. We found 412 genes that share a conserved X-box upstream of the ATG in both species, with 83 genes presenting a more restricted consensus. We analyzed 25 of these 83 genes, 16 of which are indeed RFX target genes. Two of them have never been described as involved in ciliogenesis. In addition, reporter construct expression analysis revealed that three of the identified genes encode proteins specifically localized in ciliated endings of Drosophila sensory neurons. Conclusion Our X-box search strategy led to the identification of novel RFX target genes in Drosophila that are involved in sensory ciliogenesis. We also established a highly valuable Drosophila cilia and basal body dataset. These results demonstrate the accuracy of the X-box screen and will be useful for the identification of candidate genes for human ciliopathies, as several human homologs of RFX target genes are known to be involved in diseases, such as Bardet-Biedl syndrome. PMID:17875208

  17. Enhancing potency of siRNA targeting fusion genes by optimization outside of target sequence.

    PubMed

    Gavrilov, Kseniya; Seo, Young-Eun; Tietjen, Gregory T; Cui, Jiajia; Cheng, Christopher J; Saltzman, W Mark

    2015-12-01

    Canonical siRNA design algorithms have become remarkably effective at predicting favorable binding regions within a target mRNA, but in some cases (e.g., a fusion junction site) region choice is restricted. In these instances, alternative approaches are necessary to obtain a highly potent silencing molecule. Here we focus on strategies for rational optimization of two siRNAs that target the junction sites of fusion oncogenes BCR-ABL and TMPRSS2-ERG. We demonstrate that modifying the termini of these siRNAs with a terminal G-U wobble pair or a carefully selected pair of terminal asymmetry-enhancing mismatches can result in an increase in potency at low doses. Importantly, we observed that improvements in silencing at the mRNA level do not necessarily translate to reductions in protein level and/or cell death. Decline in protein level is also heavily influenced by targeted protein half-life, and delivery vehicle toxicity can confound measures of cell death due to silencing. Therefore, for BCR-ABL, which has a long protein half-life that is difficult to overcome using siRNA, we also developed a nontoxic transfection vector: poly(lactic-coglycolic acid) nanoparticles that release siRNA over many days. We show that this system can achieve effective killing of leukemic cells. These findings provide insights into the implications of siRNA sequence for potency and suggest strategies for the design of more effective therapeutic siRNA molecules. Furthermore, this work points to the importance of integrating studies of siRNA design and delivery, while heeding and addressing potential limitations such as restricted targetable mRNA regions, long protein half-lives, and nonspecific toxicities. PMID:26627251

  18. Enhancing potency of siRNA targeting fusion genes by optimization outside of target sequence

    PubMed Central

    Gavrilov, Kseniya; Seo, Young-Eun; Tietjen, Gregory T.; Cui, Jiajia; Cheng, Christopher J.; Saltzman, W. Mark

    2015-01-01

    Canonical siRNA design algorithms have become remarkably effective at predicting favorable binding regions within a target mRNA, but in some cases (e.g., a fusion junction site) region choice is restricted. In these instances, alternative approaches are necessary to obtain a highly potent silencing molecule. Here we focus on strategies for rational optimization of two siRNAs that target the junction sites of fusion oncogenes BCR-ABL and TMPRSS2-ERG. We demonstrate that modifying the termini of these siRNAs with a terminal G-U wobble pair or a carefully selected pair of terminal asymmetry-enhancing mismatches can result in an increase in potency at low doses. Importantly, we observed that improvements in silencing at the mRNA level do not necessarily translate to reductions in protein level and/or cell death. Decline in protein level is also heavily influenced by targeted protein half-life, and delivery vehicle toxicity can confound measures of cell death due to silencing. Therefore, for BCR-ABL, which has a long protein half-life that is difficult to overcome using siRNA, we also developed a nontoxic transfection vector: poly(lactic-coglycolic acid) nanoparticles that release siRNA over many days. We show that this system can achieve effective killing of leukemic cells. These findings provide insights into the implications of siRNA sequence for potency and suggest strategies for the design of more effective therapeutic siRNA molecules. Furthermore, this work points to the importance of integrating studies of siRNA design and delivery, while heeding and addressing potential limitations such as restricted targetable mRNA regions, long protein half-lives, and nonspecific toxicities. PMID:26627251

  19. Reprogramming of the ERRα and ERα target gene landscape triggers tamoxifen resistance in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Thewes, Verena; Simon, Ronald; Schroeter, Petra; Schlotter, Magdalena; Anzeneder, Tobias; Büttner, Reinhard; Benes, Vladimir; Sauter, Guido; Burwinkel, Barbara; Nicholson, Robert I; Sinn, Hans-Peter; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Deuschle, Ulrich; Zapatka, Marc; Heck, Stefanie; Lichter, Peter

    2015-02-15

    Endocrine treatment regimens for breast cancer that target the estrogen receptor-α (ERα) are effective, but acquired resistance remains a limiting drawback. One mechanism of acquired resistance that has been hypothesized is functional substitution of the orphan receptor estrogen-related receptor-α (ERRα) for ERα. To examine this hypothesis, we analyzed ERRα and ERα in recurrent tamoxifen-resistant breast tumors and conducted a genome-wide target gene profiling analysis of MCF-7 breast cancer cell populations that were sensitive or resistant to tamoxifen treatment. This analysis uncovered a global redirection in the target genes controlled by ERα, ERRα, and their coactivator AIB1, defining a novel set of target genes in tamoxifen-resistant cells. Beyond differences in the ERα and ERRα target gene repertoires, both factors were engaged in similar pathobiologic processes relevant to acquired resistance. Functional analyses confirmed a requirement for ERRα in tamoxifen- and fulvestrant-resistant MCF-7 cells, with pharmacologic inhibition of ERRα sufficient to partly restore sensitivity to antiestrogens. In clinical specimens (n = 1041), increased expression of ERRα was associated with enhanced proliferation and aggressive disease parameters, including increased levels of p53 in ERα-positive cases. In addition, increased ERRα expression was linked to reduced overall survival in independent tamoxifen-treated patient cohorts. Taken together, our results suggest that ERα and ERRα cooperate to promote endocrine resistance, and they provide a rationale for the exploration of ERRα as a candidate drug target to treat endocrine-resistant breast cancer. PMID:25643697

  20. An Encapsulation of Gene Signatures for Hepatocellular Carcinoma, MicroRNA-132 Predicted Target Genes and the Corresponding Overlaps

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Gang; Ren, Fanghui; Liang, Haiwei; Dang, Yiwu; Rong, Minhua

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Previous studies have demonstrated that microRNA-132 plays a vital part in and is actively associated with several cancers, with its tumor-suppressive role in hepatocellular carcinoma confirmed. The current study employed multiple bioinformatics techniques to establish gene signatures for hepatocellular carcinoma, microRNA-132 predicted target genes and the corresponding overlaps. Methods Various assays were performed to explore the role and cellular functions of miR-132 in HCC and a successive panel of tasks was completed, including NLP analysis, miR-132 target genes prediction, comprehensive analyses (gene ontology analysis, pathway analysis, network analysis and connectivity analysis), and analytical integration. Later, HCC-related and miR-132-related potential targets, pathways, networks and highlighted hub genes were revealed as well as those of the overlapped section. Results MiR-132 was effective in both impeding cell growth and boosting apoptosis in HCC cell lines. A total of fifty-nine genes were obtained from the analytical integration, which were considered to be both HCC- and miR-132-related. Moreover, four specific pathways were unveiled in the network analysis of the overlaps, i.e. adherens junction, VEGF signaling pathway, neurotrophin signaling pathway, and MAPK signaling pathway. Conclusions The tumor-suppressive role of miR-132 in HCC has been further confirmed by in vitro experiments. Gene signatures in the study identified the potential molecular mechanisms of HCC, miR-132 and their established associations, which might be effective for diagnosis, individualized treatments and prognosis of HCC patients. However, combined detections of miR-132 with other bio-indicators in clinical practice and further in vitro experiments are needed. PMID:27467251

  1. AhR activation by 6-formylindolo[3,2-b]carbazole and 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin inhibit the development of mouse intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Joo-Hung; Choi, Ah-Jeong; Kim, Soo-Ji; Cheong, Seon-Woo; Jeong, So-Yeon

    2016-04-01

    The intestinal epithelium plays a central role in immune homeostasis in the intestine. AhR, a ligand-activated transcription factor, plays an important role in diverse physiological processes. The intestines are exposed to various exogenous and endogenous AhR ligands. Thus, AhR may regulate the intestinal homeostasis, directly acting on the development of intestinal epithelial cells (IEC). In this study, we demonstrated that 6-formylindolo[3,2-b]carbazole (FICZ) and 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) inhibited the in vitro development of mouse intestinal organoids. The number of Paneth cells in the small intestine and the depth of crypts of the small and large intestines were reduced in mice administrated with FICZ. Immunohistochemical and flow cytometric assays revealed that AhR was highly expressed in Lgr5(+) stem cells. FICZ inhibited Wnt signaling lowering the level of β-catenin protein. Gene expression analyses demonstrated that FICZ increased expression of Lgr5, Math1, BMP4, and Indian Hedgehog while inhibiting that of Lgr4. PMID:26950395

  2. Toxicogenomic analysis of exposure to TCDD, PCB126 and PCB153: identification of genomic biomarkers of exposure to AhR ligands

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Two year cancer bioassays conducted by the National Toxicology Program have shown chronic exposure to dioxin-like compounds (DLCs) to lead to the development of both neoplastic and non-neoplastic lesions in the hepatic tissue of female Sprague Dawley rats. Most, if not all, of the hepatotoxic effects induced by DLC's are believed to involve the binding and activation of the transcription factor, the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). Toxicogenomics was implemented to identify genomic responses that may be contributing to the development of hepatotoxicity in rats. Results Through comparative analysis of time-course microarray data, unique hepatic gene expression signatures were identified for the DLCs, 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) (100 ng/kg/day) and 3,3',4,4',5-pentachlorobiphenyl (PCB126) (1000 ng/kg/day) and the non-DLC 2,2',4,4',5,5',-hexachlorobiphenyl (PCB153) (1000 μg/kg/day). A common time independent signature of 41 AhR genomic biomarkers was identified which exhibited at least a 2-fold change in expression following subchronic (13-wk) and chronic (52-wk) p.o. exposure to TCDD and PCB126, but not the non DLC, PCB153. Real time qPCR analysis validated that 30 of these genes also exhibited at least a 2-fold change in hepatic expression at 24 hr following a single exposure to TCDD (5 μg/kg, po). Phenotypic anchoring was conducted which identified forty-six genes that were differently expressed both following chronic p.o. exposure to DLCs and in previously reported studies of cholangiocarcinoma or hepatocellular adenoma. Conclusions Together these analyses provide a comprehensive description of the genomic responses which occur in rat hepatic tissue with exposure to AhR ligands and will help to isolate those genomic responses which are contributing to the hepatotoxicity observed with exposure to DLCs. In addition, the time independent gene expression signature of the AhR ligands may assist in identifying other agents with the potential

  3. Microbial population index and community structure in saline-alkaline soil using gene targeted metagenomics.

    PubMed

    Keshri, Jitendra; Mishra, Avinash; Jha, Bhavanath

    2013-03-30

    Population indices of bacteria and archaea were investigated from saline-alkaline soil and a possible microbe-environment pattern was established using gene targeted metagenomics. Clone libraries were constructed using 16S rRNA and functional gene(s) involved in carbon fixation (cbbL), nitrogen fixation (nifH), ammonia oxidation (amoA) and sulfur metabolism (apsA). Molecular phylogeny revealed the dominance of Actinobacteria, Firmicutes and Proteobacteria along with archaeal members of Halobacteraceae. The library consisted of novel bacterial (20%) and archaeal (38%) genera showing ≤95% similarity to previously retrieved sequences. Phylogenetic analysis indicated ability of inhabitant to survive in stress condition. The 16S rRNA gene libraries contained novel gene sequences and were distantly homologous with cultured bacteria. Functional gene libraries were found unique and most of the clones were distantly related to Proteobacteria, while clones of nifH gene library also showed homology with Cyanobacteria and Firmicutes. Quantitative real-time PCR exhibited that bacterial abundance was two orders of magnitude higher than archaeal. The gene(s) quantification indicated the size of the functional guilds harboring relevant key genes. The study provides insights on microbial ecology and different metabolic interactions occurring in saline-alkaline soil, possessing phylogenetically diverse groups of bacteria and archaea, which may be explored further for gene cataloging and metabolic profiling. PMID:23083746

  4. Amplification of Distant Estrogen Response Elements Deregulates Target Genes Associated with Tamoxifen Resistance in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Pei-Yin; Hsu, Hang-Kai; Lan, Xun; Juan, Liran; Yan, Pearlly S.; Labanowska, Jadwiga; Heerema, Nyla; Hsiao, Tzu-Hung; Chiu, Yu-Chiao; Chen, Yidong; Liu, Yunlong; Li, Lang; Li, Rong; Thompson, Ian M.; Nephew, Kenneth P.; Sharp, Zelton D.; Kirma, Nameer B.; Jin, Victor X.; Huang, Tim H.-M.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY A causal role of gene amplification in tumorigenesis is well-known, while amplification of DNA regulatory elements as an oncogenic driver remains unclear. In this study, we integrated next-generation sequencing approaches to map distant estrogen response elements (DEREs) that remotely control transcription of target genes through chromatin proximity. Two densely mapped DERE regions located on chromosomes 17q23 and 20q13 were frequently amplified in ERα-positive luminal breast cancer. These aberrantly amplified DEREs deregulated target gene expression potentially linked to cancer development and tamoxifen resistance. Progressive accumulation of DERE copies was observed in normal breast progenitor cells chronically exposed to estrogenic chemicals. These findings may extend to other DNA regulatory elements, the amplification of which can profoundly alter target transcriptome during tumorigenesis. PMID:23948299

  5. In vivo gene targeting of IL-3 into immature hematopoietic cells through CD117 receptor mediated antibody gene delivery

    PubMed Central

    Chapel, Alain; Deas, Olivier; Bensidhoum, Morad; François, Sabine; Mouiseddine, Moubarak; Poncet, Pascal; Dürrbach, Antoine; Aigueperse, Jocelyne; Gourmelon, Patrick; Gorin, Norbert C; Hirsch, François; Thierry, Dominique

    2004-01-01

    Background Targeted gene transfection remains a crucial issue to permit the real development of genetic therapy. As such, in vivo targeted transfection of specific subsets of hematopoietic stem cells might help to sustain hematopoietic recovery from bone marrow aplasia by providing local production of growth factors. Methods Balb/C mice were injected intravenously, with an anti-mouse c-kit (CD117) monoclonal antibody chemically coupled to a human IL-3 gene-containing plasmid DNA. Mice were sacrificed for tissue analyses at various days after injection of the conjugates. Results By ELISA, the production of human IL-3 was evidenced in the sera of animals 5 days after treatment. Cytofluorometric analysis after in vivo transfection of a reporter gene eGFP demonstrated transfection of CD117+/Sca1+ hematopoietic immature cells. By PCR analysis of genomic DNA and RNA using primer specific pIL3 sequences, presence and expression of the human IL-3-transgene were detected in the bone marrow up to 10 days in transfected mice but not in control animals. Conclusions These data clearly indicate that antibody-mediated endocytosis gene transfer allows the expression of the IL-3 transgene into hematopoietic immature cells, in vivo. While availability of marketed recombinant growth factors is restricted, this targeting strategy should permit delivery of therapeutic genes to tissues of interest through systemic delivery. In particular, the ability to specifically target growth factor expression into repopulating hematopoietic stem cells may create new opportunities for the treatment of primary or radiation-induced marrow failures. PMID:15509303

  6. Significant impact of miRNA–target gene networks on genetics of human complex traits

    PubMed Central

    Okada, Yukinori; Muramatsu, Tomoki; Suita, Naomasa; Kanai, Masahiro; Kawakami, Eiryo; Iotchkova, Valentina; Soranzo, Nicole; Inazawa, Johji; Tanaka, Toshihiro

    2016-01-01

    The impact of microRNA (miRNA) on the genetics of human complex traits, especially in the context of miRNA-target gene networks, has not been fully assessed. Here, we developed a novel analytical method, MIGWAS, to comprehensively evaluate enrichment of genome-wide association study (GWAS) signals in miRNA–target gene networks. We applied the method to the GWAS results of the 18 human complex traits from >1.75 million subjects, and identified significant enrichment in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), kidney function, and adult height (P < 0.05/18 = 0.0028, most significant enrichment in RA with P = 1.7 × 10−4). Interestingly, these results were consistent with current literature-based knowledge of the traits on miRNA obtained through the NCBI PubMed database search (adjusted P = 0.024). Our method provided a list of miRNA and target gene pairs with excess genetic association signals, part of which included drug target genes. We identified a miRNA (miR-4728-5p) that downregulates PADI2, a novel RA risk gene considered as a promising therapeutic target (rs761426, adjusted P = 2.3 × 10−9). Our study indicated the significant impact of miRNA–target gene networks on the genetics of human complex traits, and provided resources which should contribute to drug discovery and nucleic acid medicine. PMID:26927695

  7. Significant impact of miRNA-target gene networks on genetics of human complex traits.

    PubMed

    Okada, Yukinori; Muramatsu, Tomoki; Suita, Naomasa; Kanai, Masahiro; Kawakami, Eiryo; Iotchkova, Valentina; Soranzo, Nicole; Inazawa, Johji; Tanaka, Toshihiro

    2016-01-01

    The impact of microRNA (miRNA) on the genetics of human complex traits, especially in the context of miRNA-target gene networks, has not been fully assessed. Here, we developed a novel analytical method, MIGWAS, to comprehensively evaluate enrichment of genome-wide association study (GWAS) signals in miRNA-target gene networks. We applied the method to the GWAS results of the 18 human complex traits from >1.75 million subjects, and identified significant enrichment in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), kidney function, and adult height (P < 0.05/18 = 0.0028, most significant enrichment in RA with P = 1.7 × 10(-4)). Interestingly, these results were consistent with current literature-based knowledge of the traits on miRNA obtained through the NCBI PubMed database search (adjusted P = 0.024). Our method provided a list of miRNA and target gene pairs with excess genetic association signals, part of which included drug target genes. We identified a miRNA (miR-4728-5p) that downregulates PADI2, a novel RA risk gene considered as a promising therapeutic target (rs761426, adjusted P = 2.3 × 10(-9)). Our study indicated the significant impact of miRNA-target gene networks on the genetics of human complex traits, and provided resources which should contribute to drug discovery and nucleic acid medicine. PMID:26927695

  8. Development of a Targeted Gene-Delivery System Using Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Chung-Jen; Chang, Chih-Hsiang; Chao, Yun-Peng; Kao, Ming-Ching

    2016-01-01

    A gene-delivery system based on microbes is useful for development of targeted gene therapy of non-phagocytic cancer cells. Here, the feasibility of the delivery system is illustrated by targeted delivery of a transgene (i.e., eukaryotic GFP) by Escherichia coli to HER2/neu-positive cancer cells. An E. coli strain was engineered with surface display of the anti-HER2/neu affibody. To release the gene cargo, a programmed lysis system based on phage ϕX174 gene E was introduced into the E. coli strain. As a result, 3 % of HER2/neu-positive cells that were infected with engineered E. coli were able to express the GFP. PMID:26846805

  9. Modeling disease mutations by gene targeting in one-cell mouse embryos

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Melanie; Ortiz, Oskar; Hrabé de Angelis, Martin; Wurst, Wolfgang; Kühn, Ralf

    2012-01-01

    Gene targeting by zinc-finger nucleases in one-cell embryos provides an expedite mutagenesis approach in mice, rats, and rabbits. This technology has been recently used to create knockout and knockin mutants through the deletion or insertion of nucleotides. Here we apply zinc-finger nucleases in one-cell mouse embryos to generate disease-related mutants harboring single nucleotide or codon replacements. Using a gene-targeting vector or a synthetic oligodesoxynucleotide as template for homologous recombination, we introduced missense and silent mutations into the Rab38 gene, encoding a small GTPase that regulates intracellular vesicle trafficking. These results demonstrate the feasibility of seamless gene editing in one-cell embryos to create genetic disease models and establish synthetic oligodesoxynucleotides as a simplified mutagenesis tool. PMID:22660928

  10. Integrative Analysis of CRISPR/Cas9 Target Sites in the Human HBB Gene.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yumei; Zhu, Detu; Zhang, Zhizhuo; Chen, Yaoyong; Sun, Xiaofang

    2015-01-01

    Recently, the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) system has emerged as a powerful customizable artificial nuclease to facilitate precise genetic correction for tissue regeneration and isogenic disease modeling. However, previous studies reported substantial off-target activities of CRISPR system in human cells, and the enormous putative off-target sites are labor-intensive to be validated experimentally, thus motivating bioinformatics methods for rational design of CRISPR system and prediction of its potential off-target effects. Here, we describe an integrative analytical process to identify specific CRISPR target sites in the human β-globin gene (HBB) and predict their off-target effects. Our method includes off-target analysis in both coding and noncoding regions, which was neglected by previous studies. It was found that the CRISPR target sites in the introns have fewer off-target sites in the coding regions than those in the exons. Remarkably, target sites containing certain transcriptional factor motif have enriched binding sites of relevant transcriptional factor in their off-target sets. We also found that the intron sites have fewer SNPs, which leads to less variation of CRISPR efficiency in different individuals during clinical applications. Our studies provide a standard analytical procedure to select specific CRISPR targets for genetic correction. PMID:25918715

  11. Integrative Analysis of CRISPR/Cas9 Target Sites in the Human HBB Gene

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Yumei; Zhang, Zhizhuo; Chen, Yaoyong; Sun, Xiaofang

    2015-01-01

    Recently, the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) system has emerged as a powerful customizable artificial nuclease to facilitate precise genetic correction for tissue regeneration and isogenic disease modeling. However, previous studies reported substantial off-target activities of CRISPR system in human cells, and the enormous putative off-target sites are labor-intensive to be validated experimentally, thus motivating bioinformatics methods for rational design of CRISPR system and prediction of its potential off-target effects. Here, we describe an integrative analytical process to identify specific CRISPR target sites in the human β-globin gene (HBB) and predict their off-target effects. Our method includes off-target analysis in both coding and noncoding regions, which was neglected by previous studies. It was found that the CRISPR target sites in the introns have fewer off-target sites in the coding regions than those in the exons. Remarkably, target sites containing certain transcriptional factor motif have enriched binding sites of relevant transcriptional factor in their off-target sets. We also found that the intron sites have fewer SNPs, which leads to less variation of CRISPR efficiency in different individuals during clinical applications. Our studies provide a standard analytical procedure to select specific CRISPR targets for genetic correction. PMID:25918715

  12. Regulation, overexpression, and target gene identification of Potato Homeobox 15 (POTH15) - a class-I KNOX gene in potato.

    PubMed

    Mahajan, Ameya S; Kondhare, Kirtikumar R; Rajabhoj, Mohit P; Kumar, Amit; Ghate, Tejashree; Ravindran, Nevedha; Habib, Farhat; Siddappa, Sundaresha; Banerjee, Anjan K

    2016-07-01

    Potato Homeobox 15 (POTH15) is a KNOX-I (Knotted1-like homeobox) family gene in potato that is orthologous to Shoot Meristemless (STM) in Arabidopsis. Despite numerous reports on KNOX genes from different species, studies in potato are limited. Here, we describe photoperiodic regulation of POTH15, its overexpression phenotype, and identification of its potential targets in potato (Solanum tuberosum ssp. andigena). qRT-PCR analysis showed a higher abundance of POTH15 mRNA in shoot tips and stolons under tuber-inducing short-day conditions. POTH15 promoter activity was detected in apical and axillary meristems, stolon tips, tuber eyes, and meristems of tuber sprouts, indicating its role in meristem maintenance and leaf development. POTH15 overexpression altered multiple morphological traits including leaf and stem development, leaflet number, and number of nodes and branches. In particular, the rachis of the leaf was completely reduced and leaves appeared as a bouquet of leaflets. Comparative transcriptomic analysis of 35S::GUS and two POTH15 overexpression lines identified more than 6000 differentially expressed genes, including 2014 common genes between the two overexpression lines. Functional analysis of these genes revealed their involvement in responses to hormones, biotic/abiotic stresses, transcription regulation, and signal transduction. qRT-PCR of selected candidate target genes validated their differential expression in both overexpression lines. Out of 200 randomly chosen POTH15 targets, 173 were found to have at least one tandem TGAC core motif, characteristic of KNOX interaction, within 3.0kb in the upstream sequence of the transcription start site. Overall, this study provides insights to the role of POTH15 in controlling diverse developmental processes in potato. PMID:27217546

  13. Nanoghosts as a Novel Natural Nonviral Gene Delivery Platform Safely Targeting Multiple Cancers.

    PubMed

    Kaneti, Limor; Bronshtein, Tomer; Malkah Dayan, Natali; Kovregina, Inna; Letko Khait, Nitzan; Lupu-Haber, Yael; Fliman, Miguel; Schoen, Beth W; Kaneti, Galoz; Machluf, Marcelle

    2016-03-01

    Nanoghosts derived from mesenchymal stem cells and retaining their unique surface-associated tumor-targeting capabilities were redesigned as a selective and safe universal nonviral gene-therapy platform. pDNA-loaded nanoghosts efficiently targeted and transfected diverse cancer cells, in vitro and in vivo, in subcutaneous and metastatic orthotopic tumor models, leading to no adverse effects. Nanoghosts loaded with pDNA encoding for a cancer-toxic gene inhibited the growth of metastatic orthotopic lung cancer and subcutaneous prostate cancer models and dramatically prolonged the animals' survival. PMID:26901695

  14. Identification of novel target genes specifically activated by deregulated E2F in human normal fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Kitamura, Hodaka; Ozono, Eiko; Iwanaga, Ritsuko; Bradford, Andrew P; Okuno, Junko; Shimizu, Emi; Kurayoshi, Kenta; Kugawa, Kazuyuki; Toh, Hiroyuki; Ohtani, Kiyoshi

    2015-09-01

    The transcription factor E2F is the principal target of the tumor suppressor pRB. E2F plays crucial roles not only in cell proliferation by activating growth-related genes but also in tumor suppression by activating pro-apoptotic and growth-suppressive genes. We previously reported that, in human normal fibroblasts, the tumor suppressor genes ARF, p27(Kip1) and TAp73 are activated by deregulated E2F activity induced by forced inactivation of pRB, but not by physiological E2F activity induced by growth stimulation. In contrast, growth-related E2F targets are activated by both E2F activities, underscoring the roles of deregulated E2F in tumor suppression in the context of dysfunctional pRB. In this study, to further understand the roles of deregulated E2F, we explored new targets that are specifically activated by deregulated E2F using DNA microarray. The analysis identified nine novel targets (BIM, RASSF1, PPP1R13B, JMY, MOAP1, RBM38, ABTB1, RBBP4 and RBBP7), many of which are involved in the p53 and RB tumor suppressor pathways. Among these genes, the BIM gene was shown to be activated via atypical E2F-responsive promoter elements and to contribute to E2F1-mediated apoptosis. Our results underscore crucial roles of deregulated E2F in growth suppression to counteract loss of pRB function. PMID:26201719

  15. Meta-analysis of primary target genes of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors

    PubMed Central

    Heinäniemi, Merja; Uski, J Oskari; Degenhardt, Tatjana; Carlberg, Carsten

    2007-01-01

    Background Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are known for their critical role in the development of diseases, such as obesity, cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes and cancer. Here, an in silico screening method is presented, which incorporates experiment- and informatics-derived evidence, such as DNA-binding data of PPAR subtypes to a panel of PPAR response elements (PPREs), PPRE location relative to the transcription start site (TSS) and PPRE conservation across multiple species, for more reliable prediction of PPREs. Results In vitro binding and in vivo functionality evidence agrees with in silico predictions, validating the approach. The experimental analysis of 30 putative PPREs in eight validated PPAR target genes indicates that each gene contains at least one functional, strong PPRE that occurs without positional bias relative to the TSS. An extended analysis of the cross-species conservation of PPREs reveals limited conservation of PPRE patterns, although PPAR target genes typically contain strong or multiple medium strength PPREs. Human chromosome 19 was screened using this method, with validation of six novel PPAR target genes. Conclusion An in silico screening approach is presented, which allows increased sensitivity of PPAR binding site and target gene detection. PMID:17650321

  16. The chromatin remodelling factor Brg-1 interacts with β-catenin to promote target gene activation

    PubMed Central

    Barker, Nick; Hurlstone, Adam; Musisi, Hannah; Miles, Antony; Bienz, Mariann; Clevers, Hans

    2001-01-01

    Wnt-induced formation of nuclear Tcf–β-catenin complexes promotes transcriptional activation of target genes involved in cell fate decisions. Inappropriate expression of Tcf target genes resulting from mutational activation of this pathway is also implicated in tumorigenesis. The C-terminus of β-catenin is indispensable for the transactivation function, which probably reflects the presence of binding sites for essential transcriptional coactivators such as p300/CBP. However, the precise mechanism of transactivation remains unclear. Here we demonstrate an interaction between β-catenin and Brg-1, a component of mammalian SWI/SNF and Rsc chromatin-remodelling complexes. A functional consequence of reintroduction of Brg-1 into Brg-1-deficient cells is enhanced activity of a Tcf-responsive reporter gene. Consistent with this, stable expression of inactive forms of Brg-1 in colon carcinoma cell lines specifically inhibits expression of endogenous Tcf target genes. In addition, we observe genetic interactions between the Brg-1 and β-catenin homologues in flies. We conclude that β-catenin recruits Brg-1 to Tcf target gene promoters, facilitating chromatin remodelling as a prerequisite for transcriptional activation. PMID:11532957

  17. Conserved miR164-targeted NAC genes negatively regulate drought resistance in rice

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Kabin; Xiong, Lizhong

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs constitute a large group of endogenous small RNAs of ~22 nt that emerge as vital regulators, mainly by targeting mRNAs for post-transcriptional repression. Previous studies have revealed that the miR164 family in Arabidopsis is comprised of three members which guide the cleavage of the mRNAs of five NAC genes to modulate developmental processes. However, the functions of the miR164-targeted NAC genes in crops are poorly deciphered. In this study, the conserved features of six miR164-targeted NAC genes (OMTN1–OMTN6) in rice are described, and evidence is provided that four of them confer a negative regulatory role in drought resistance. OMTN proteins have the characteristics of typical NAC transcriptional factors. The miR164 recognition sites of the OMTN genes are highly conserved in rice germplasms. Deletion of the recognition sites impaired the transactivation activity, indicating that the conserved recognition sites play a crucial role in maintaining the function of the OMTN proteins. The OMTN genes were responsive to abiotic stresses, and showed diverse spatio-temporal expression patterns in rice. Overexpression of OMTN2, OMTN3, OMTN4, and OMTN6 in rice led to negative effects on drought resistance at the reproductive stage. The expression of numerous genes related to stress response, development, and metabolism was altered in OMTN2-, OMTN3-, OMTN4-, and OMTN6-overexpressing plants. Most of the up-regulated genes in the OMTN-overexpressing plants were down-regulated by drought stress. The results suggest that the conserved miR164-targeted NAC genes may be negative regulators of drought tolerance in rice, in addition to their reported roles in development. PMID:24604734

  18. Targeting DNA with triplex-forming oligonucleotides to modify gene sequence.

    PubMed

    Simon, Philippe; Cannata, Fabio; Concordet, Jean-Paul; Giovannangeli, Carine

    2008-08-01

    Molecules that interact with DNA in a sequence-specific manner are attractive tools for manipulating gene sequence and expression. For example, triplex-forming oligonucleotides (TFOs), which bind to oligopyrimidine.oligopurine sequences via Hoogsteen hydrogen bonds, have been used to inhibit gene expression at the DNA level as well as to induce targeted mutagenesis in model systems. Recent advances in using oligonucleotides and analogs to target DNA in a sequence-specific manner will be discussed. In particular, chemical modification of TFOs has been used to improve binding to chromosomal target sequences in living cells. Various oligonucleotide analogs have also been found to expand the range of sequences amenable to manipulation, including so-called "Zorro" locked nucleic acids (LNAs) and pseudo-complementary peptide nucleic acids (pcPNAs). Finally, we will examine the potential of TFOs for directing targeted gene sequence modification and propose that synthetic nucleases, based on conjugation of sequence-specific DNA ligands to DNA damaging molecules, are a promising alternative to protein-based endonucleases for targeted gene sequence modification. PMID:18460344

  19. Improved methods of AAV-mediated gene targeting for human cell lines using ribosome-skipping 2A peptide

    PubMed Central

    Karnan, Sivasundaram; Ota, Akinobu; Konishi, Yuko; Wahiduzzaman, Md; Hosokawa, Yoshitaka; Konishi, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    The adeno-associated virus (AAV)-based targeting vector has been one of the tools commonly used for genome modification in human cell lines. It allows for relatively efficient gene targeting associated with 1–4-log higher ratios of homologous-to-random integration of targeting vectors (H/R ratios) than plasmid-based targeting vectors, without actively introducing DNA double-strand breaks. In this study, we sought to improve the efficiency of AAV-mediated gene targeting by introducing a 2A-based promoter-trap system into targeting constructs. We generated three distinct AAV-based targeting vectors carrying 2A for promoter trapping, each targeting a GFP-based reporter module incorporated into the genome, PIGA exon 6 or PIGA intron 5. The absolute gene targeting efficiencies and H/R ratios attained using these vectors were assessed in multiple human cell lines and compared with those attained using targeting vectors carrying internal ribosome entry site (IRES) for promoter trapping. We found that the use of 2A for promoter trapping increased absolute gene targeting efficiencies by 3.4–28-fold and H/R ratios by 2–5-fold compared to values obtained with IRES. In CRISPR-Cas9-assisted gene targeting using plasmid-based targeting vectors, the use of 2A did not enhance the H/R ratios but did upregulate the absolute gene targeting efficiencies compared to the use of IRES. PMID:26657635

  20. Targeted gene correction using psoralen, chlorambucil and camptothecin conjugates of triplex forming peptide nucleic acid (PNA)

    PubMed Central

    Birkedal, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    Gene correction activation effects of a small series of triplex forming peptide nucleic acid (PNA) covalently conjugated to the DNA interacting ligands psoralen, chlorambucil and camptothecin targeted proximal to a stop codon mutation in an EGFP reporter gene were studied. A 15-mer homopyrimidine PNA conjugated to the topoisomerase I inhibitor camptothecin was found to increase the frequency of repair domain mediated gene correctional events of the EGFP reporter in an in vitro HeLa cell nuclear extract assay, whereas PNA psoralen or chlorambucil conjugates both of which form covalent and also interstrand crosslinked adducts with dsDNA dramatically decreased the frequency of targeted repair/correction. The PNA conjugates were also studied in mammalian cell lines upon transfection of PNA bound EGFP reporter vector and scoring repair of the EGFP gene by FACS analysis of functional EGFP expression. Consistent with the extract experiments, treatment with adduct forming PNA conjugates (psoralen and chlorambucil) resulted in a decrease in background correction frequencies in transiently transfected cells, whereas unmodified PNA or the PNA-camptothecin conjugate had little or no effect. These results suggest that simple triplex forming PNAs have little effect on proximal gene correctional events whereas PNA conjugates capable of forming DNA adducts and interstrand crosslinks are strong inhibitors. Most interestingly the PNA conjugated to the topoisomerase inhibitor, camptothecin enhanced repair in nuclear extract. Thus the effects and use of camptothecin conjugates in gene targeted repair merit further studies. PMID:21686249

  1. Gene targets of mouse miR-709: regulation of distinct pools

    PubMed Central

    Surendran, Sneha; Jideonwo, Victoria N.; Merchun, Chris; Ahn, Miwon; Murray, John; Ryan, Jennifer; Dunn, Kenneth W.; Kota, Janaiah; Morral, Núria

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNA (miRNA) are short non-coding RNA molecules that regulate multiple cellular processes, including development, cell differentiation, proliferation and death. Nevertheless, little is known on whether miRNA control the same gene networks in different tissues. miR-709 is an abundant miRNA expressed ubiquitously. Through transcriptome analysis, we have identified targets of miR-709 in hepatocytes. miR-709 represses genes implicated in cytoskeleton organization, extracellular matrix attachment, and fatty acid metabolism. Remarkably, none of the previously identified targets in non-hepatic tissues are silenced by miR-709 in hepatocytes, even though several of these genes are abundantly expressed in liver. In addition, miR-709 is upregulated in hepatocellular carcinoma, suggesting it participates in the genetic reprogramming that takes place during cell division, when cytoskeleton remodeling requires substantial changes in gene expression. In summary, the present study shows that miR-709 does not repress the same pool of genes in separate cell types. These results underscore the need for validating gene targets in every tissue a miRNA is expressed. PMID:26743462

  2. Targeted disruption of Ataxia-telangiectasia mutated gene in miniature pigs by somatic cell nuclear transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Young June; Ahn, Kwang Sung; Kim, Minjeong; Kim, Min Ju; Park, Sang-Min; Ryu, Junghyun; Ahn, Jin Seop; Heo, Soon Young; Kang, Jee Hyun; Choi, You Jung; Choi, Seong-Jun; Shim, Hosup

    2014-10-03

    Highlights: • ATM gene-targeted pigs were produced by somatic cell nuclear transfer. • A novel large animal model for ataxia telangiectasia was developed. • The new model may provide an alternative to the mouse model. - Abstract: Ataxia telangiectasia (A-T) is a recessive autosomal disorder associated with pleiotropic phenotypes, including progressive cerebellar degeneration, gonad atrophy, and growth retardation. Even though A-T is known to be caused by the mutations in the Ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) gene, the correlation between abnormal cellular physiology caused by ATM mutations and the multiple symptoms of A-T disease has not been clearly determined. None of the existing ATM mouse models properly reflects the extent to which neurological degeneration occurs in human. In an attempt to provide a large animal model for A-T, we produced gene-targeted pigs with mutations in the ATM gene by somatic cell nuclear transfer. The disrupted allele in the ATM gene of cloned piglets was confirmed via PCR and Southern blot analysis. The ATM gene-targeted pigs generated in the present study may provide an alternative to the current mouse model for the study of mechanisms underlying A-T disorder and for the development of new therapies.

  3. Targeted gene transfer into rat facial muscles by nanosecond pulsed laser-induced stress waves.

    PubMed

    Kurita, Akihiro; Matsunobu, Takeshi; Satoh, Yasushi; Ando, Takahiro; Sato, Shunichi; Obara, Minoru; Shiotani, Akihiro

    2011-09-01

    We investigate the feasibility of using nanosecond pulsed laser-induced stress waves (LISWs) for gene transfer into rat facial muscles. LISWs are generated by irradiating a black natural rubber disk placed on the target tissue with nanosecond pulsed laser light from the second harmonics (532 nm) of a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser, which is widely used in head and neck surgery and proven to be safe. After injection of plasmid deoxyribose nucleic acid (DNA) coding for Lac Z into rat facial muscles, pulsed laser is used to irradiate the laser target on the skin surface without incision or exposure of muscles. Lac Z expression is detected by X-gal staining of excised rat facial skin and muscles. Strong Lac Z expression is observed seven days after gene transfer, and sustained for up to 14 days. Gene transfer is achieved in facial muscles several millimeters deep from the surface. Gene expression is localized to the tissue exposed to LISWs. No tissue damage from LISWs is observed. LISW is a promising nonviral target gene transfer method because of its high spatial controllability, easy applicability, and minimal invasiveness. Gene transfer using LISW to produce therapeutic proteins such as growth factors could be used to treat nerve injury and paralysis. PMID:21950944

  4. Targeted gene transfer into rat facial muscles by nanosecond pulsed laser-induced stress waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurita, Akihiro; Matsunobu, Takeshi; Satoh, Yasushi; Ando, Takahiro; Sato, Shunichi; Obara, Minoru; Shiotani, Akihiro

    2011-09-01

    We investigate the feasibility of using nanosecond pulsed laser-induced stress waves (LISWs) for gene transfer into rat facial muscles. LISWs are generated by irradiating a black natural rubber disk placed on the target tissue with nanosecond pulsed laser light from the second harmonics (532 nm) of a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser, which is widely used in head and neck surgery and proven to be safe. After injection of plasmid deoxyribose nucleic acid (DNA) coding for Lac Z into rat facial muscles, pulsed laser is used to irradiate the laser target on the skin surface without incision or exposure of muscles. Lac Z expression is detected by X-gal staining of excised rat facial skin and muscles. Strong Lac Z expression is observed seven days after gene transfer, and sustained for up to 14 days. Gene transfer is achieved in facial muscles several millimeters deep from the surface. Gene expression is localized to the tissue exposed to LISWs. No tissue damage from LISWs is observed. LISW is a promising nonviral target gene transfer method because of its high spatial controllability, easy applicability, and minimal invasiveness. Gene transfer using LISW to produce therapeutic proteins such as growth factors could be used to treat nerve injury and paralysis.

  5. Vesicular stomatitis virus matrix protein inhibits host cell-directed transcription of target genes in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Black, B L; Lyles, D S

    1992-01-01

    Infection by vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) results in a rapid inhibition of host cell transcription and translation. To determine whether the viral matrix (M) protein was involved in this inhibition of host cell gene expression, an M protein expression vector was cotransfected with a target gene vector, encoding the target gene, encoding chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT). Expression of M protein caused a decrease in CAT activity in a gene dosage-dependent manner, and inhibition was apparent by 12 h posttransfection. The inhibitory effect of M protein was quite potent. The level of M protein required for a 10-fold inhibition of CAT activity was less than 1% of the level of M protein produced during the sixth hour of VSV infection. Northern (RNA) analysis of cotransfected cells showed that expression of M protein caused a reduction in the steady-state level of the vector-encoded mRNAs. Expression of both CAT and M mRNAs was reduced in cells cotransfected with a plasmid encoding M protein, indicating that expression of small amounts of M protein from plasmid DNA inhibits further expression of both M and CAT mRNAs. Nuclear runoff transcription analysis demonstrated that expression of M protein inhibited transcription of the target genes. This is the first report of a viral gene product which is capable of inhibiting transcription in vivo in the absence of any other viral component. Images PMID:1318397

  6. A pilot study of gene testing of genetic bone dysplasia using targeted next-generation sequencing.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huiwen; Yang, Rui; Wang, Yu; Ye, Jun; Han, Lianshu; Qiu, Wenjuan; Gu, Xuefan

    2015-12-01

    Molecular diagnosis of genetic bone dysplasia is challenging for non-expert. A targeted next-generation sequencing technology was applied to identify the underlying molecular mechanism of bone dysplasia and evaluate the contribution of these genes to patients with bone dysplasia encountered in pediatric endocrinology. A group of unrelated patients (n=82), characterized by short stature, dysmorphology and X-ray abnormalities, of which mucopolysacharidoses, GM1 gangliosidosis, mucolipidosis type II/III and achondroplasia owing to FGFR3 G380R mutation had been excluded, were recruited in this study. Probes were designed to 61 genes selected according to the nosology and classification of genetic skeletal disorders of 2010 by Illumina's online DesignStudio software. DNA was hybridized with probes and then a library was established following the standard Illumina protocols. Amplicon library was sequenced on a MiSeq sequencing system and the data were analyzed by MiSeq Reporter. Mutations of 13 different genes were found in 44 of the 82 patients (54%). Mutations of COL2A1 gene and PHEX gene were found in nine patients, respectively (9/44=20%), followed by COMP gene in 8 (18%), TRPV4 gene in 4 (9%), FBN1 gene in 4 (9%), COL1A1 gene in 3 (6%) and COL11A1, TRAPPC2, MATN3, ARSE, TRPS1, SMARCAL1, ENPP1 gene mutations in one patient each (2% each). In conclusion, mutations of COL2A1, PHEX and COMP gene are common for short stature due to bone dysplasia in outpatient clinics in pediatric endocrinology. Targeted next-generation sequencing is an efficient way to identify the underlying molecular mechanism of genetic bone dysplasia. PMID:26377240

  7. Analysis of plausible downstream target genes of Hoxc8 in F9 teratocarcinoma cells. Putative downstream target genes of Hoxc8.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Yunjeong; Ko, Jeong Heon; Byung-Gyu, Kim; Kim, Myoung Hee; Kim, Byungkyu

    2003-09-01

    Although Hox genes are known to mediate developmental decisions involved in pattern formation during embryogenesis, it is still not well understood what Hox regulates. In order to analyze Hoxc8 downstream target genes, a stable cell line overexpressing Hoxc8 was established using F9 murine teratocarcinoma cells, proteom samples were analyzed by 2-DE, and compared with controls. The protein spots having differences more than 4 fold in intensity were selected, analyzed by MALDI-TOF, and grouped in terms of putative function; cytoskeleton and motility (vimentin, gamma-actin, tropomyosin, and tubulin beta-5 chain); folding, modification and degradation of protein (GRP78, proteasome subunit alpha type 5, 26S proteasome regulatory subunit p27 protein, and PDIR); metabolism (ATP synthase beta subunit, Pgam1, and CAII); transcription/translation factors and general nucleic acid binding proteins (RbAp46, PCNA, eEF-1-beta, and nucleophosmin). Although it may not be significant, 50% of the genes were located on chromosomes 2 and 3, suggesting the possibility of a non-random distribution of Hox downstream genes. Almost 50% of the genes analyzed showed some relation with Hox protein directly or indirectly; i.e., tubulin beta 5, EF-1 beta and PCNA have been reported to contain putative Hox binding regulatory sites and genes like vimentin, pgam1 and nucleophosmin to be regulated by RA, a potent modulator of Hox expression. These results altogether imply that proteom analysis could be a possible tool for the analysis of the potent Hox realizator genes, which provides a new insight into the function of Hox on pattern formation during embryogenesis. PMID:12974468

  8. Metabolic control of type 1 regulatory (Tr1) cell differentiation by AHR and HIF1-α

    PubMed Central

    Mascanfroni, Ivan D.; Takenaka, Maisa C.; Yeste, Ada; Patel, Bonny; Wu, Yan; Kenison, Jessica E.; Siddiqui, Shafiuddin; Basso, Alexandre S.; Otterbein, Leo E.; Pardoll, Drew M.; Pan, Fan; Priel, Avner; Clish, Clary B.; Robson, Simon C.; Quintana, Francisco J.

    2015-01-01

    Our understanding of the pathways that regulate lymphocyte metabolism, as well as the effects of metabolism and its products on the immune response, is still limited. We report that a metabolic program controlled by the transcription factors hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF1-α) and aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) supports the differentiation of type 1 regulatory (Tr1) cells. HIF1-α controls the early metabolic reprograming of Tr1 cells. At later time points, AHR promotes HIF1-α degradation and takes control of Tr1 cell metabolism. Extracellular adenosine triphosphate (eATP) and hypoxia, linked to inflammation, trigger AHR inactivation by HIF1-α and inhibit Tr1 cell differentiation. Conversely, CD39 promotes Tr1 cell differentiation by depleting eATP. CD39 also contributes to Tr1 suppressive activity by generating adenosine in cooperation with CD73 expressed by responder T cells and antigen presenting cells. These results suggest that HIF1-α and AHR integrate immunological, metabolic and environmental signals to regulate the immune response. PMID:26005855

  9. EXPRESSION OF AHR AND ARNT MRNA IN CULTURED HUMAN ENDOMETRIAL EXPLANTS EXPOSED TO TCDD

    EPA Science Inventory

    Expression of AhR and ARNT mRNA in cultured human endometrial explants exposed to TCDD.

    Pitt JA, Feng L, Abbott BD, Schmid J, Batt RE, Costich TG, Koury ST, Bofinger DP.

    Curriculum in Toxicology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA.

    Endom...

  10. PKA-chromatin association at stress responsive target genes from Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Baccarini, Leticia; Martínez-Montañés, Fernando; Rossi, Silvia; Proft, Markus; Portela, Paula

    2015-11-01

    Gene expression regulation by intracellular stimulus-activated protein kinases is essential for cell adaptation to environmental changes. There are three PKA catalytic subunits in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: Tpk1, Tpk2, and Tpk3 and one regulatory subunit: Bcy1. Previously, it has been demonstrated that Tpk1 and Tpk2 are associated with coding regions and promoters of target genes in a carbon source and oxidative stress dependent manner. Here we studied five genes, ALD6, SED1, HSP42, RPS29B, and RPL1B whose expression is regulated by saline stress. We found that PKA catalytic and regulatory subunits are associated with both coding regions and promoters of the analyzed genes in a stress dependent manner. Tpk1 and Tpk2 recruitment was completely abolished in catalytic inactive mutants. BCY1 deletion changed the binding kinetic to chromatin of each Tpk isoform and this strain displayed a deregulated gene expression in response to osmotic stress. In addition, yeast mutants with high PKA activity exhibit sustained association to target genes of chromatin-remodeling complexes such as Snf2-catalytic subunit of the SWI/SNF complex and Arp8-component of INO80 complex, leading to upregulation of gene expression during osmotic stress. Tpk1 accumulation in the nucleus was stimulated upon osmotic stress, while the nuclear localization of Tpk2 and Bcy1 showed no change. We found that each PKA subunit is transported into the nucleus by a different β-karyopherin pathway. Moreover, β-karyopherin mutant strains abolished the chromatin association of Tpk1 or Tpk2, suggesting that nuclear localization of PKA catalytic subunits is required for its association to target genes and properly gene expression. PMID:26403272

  11. Transcriptome analysis of a barley breeding program examines gene expression diversity and reveals target genes for malting quality improvement

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Advanced cycle breeding utilizes crosses among elite lines and is a successful method to develop new inbreds. However, it results in a reduction in genetic diversity within the breeding population. The development of malting barley varieties requires the adherence to a narrow malting quality profile and thus the use of advanced cycle breeding strategies. Although attention has been focused on diversity in gene expression and its association with genetic diversity, there are no studies performed in a single breeding program examining the implications that consecutive cycles of breeding have on gene expression variation and identifying the variability still available for future improvement. Results Fifteen lines representing the historically important six-rowed malting barley breeding program of the University of Minnesota were genotyped with 1,524 SNPs, phenotypically examined for six malting quality traits, and analyzed for transcript accumulation during germination using the Barley1 GeneChip array. Significant correlation was detected between genetic and transcript-level variation. We observed a reduction in both genetic and gene expression diversity through the breeding process, although the expression of many genes have not been fixed. A high number of quality-related genes whose expression was fixed during the breeding process was identified, indicating that much of the diversity reduction was associated with the improvement of the complex phenotype "malting quality", the main goal of the University of Minnesota breeding program. We also identified 49 differentially expressed genes between the most recent lines of the program that were correlated with one or more of the six primary malting quality traits. These genes constitute potential targets for the improvement of malting quality within the breeding program. Conclusions The present study shows the repercussion of advanced cycle breeding on gene expression diversity within an important barley

  12. Histidine-rich stabilized polyplexes for cMet-directed tumor-targeted gene transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kos, Petra; Lächelt, Ulrich; Herrmann, Annika; Mickler, Frauke Martina; Döblinger, Markus; He, Dongsheng; Krhač Levačić, Ana; Morys, Stephan; Bräuchle, Christoph; Wagner, Ernst

    2015-03-01

    Overexpression of the hepatocyte growth factor receptor/c-Met proto oncogene on the surface of a variety of tumor cells gives an opportunity to specifically target cancerous tissues. Herein, we report the first use of c-Met as receptor for non-viral tumor-targeted gene delivery. Sequence-defined oligomers comprising the c-Met binding peptide ligand cMBP2 for targeting, a monodisperse polyethylene glycol (PEG) for polyplex surface shielding, and various cationic (oligoethanamino) amide cores containing terminal cysteines for redox-sensitive polyplex stabilization, were assembled by solid-phase supported syntheses. The resulting oligomers exhibited a greatly enhanced cellular uptake and gene transfer over non-targeted control sequences, confirming the efficacy and target-specificity of the formed polyplexes. Implementation of endosomal escape-promoting histidines in the cationic core was required for gene expression without additional endosomolytic agent. The histidine-enriched polyplexes demonstrated stability in serum as well as receptor-specific gene transfer in vivo upon intratumoral injection. The co-formulation with an analogous PEG-free cationic oligomer led to a further compaction of pDNA polyplexes with an obvious change of shape as demonstrated by transmission electron microscopy. Such compaction was critically required for efficient intravenous gene delivery which resulted in greatly enhanced, cMBP2 ligand-dependent gene expression in the distant tumor.Overexpression of the hepatocyte growth factor receptor/c-Met proto oncogene on the surface of a variety of tumor cells gives an opportunity to specifically target cancerous tissues. Herein, we report the first use of c-Met as receptor for non-viral tumor-targeted gene delivery. Sequence-defined oligomers comprising the c-Met binding peptide ligand cMBP2 for targeting, a monodisperse polyethylene glycol (PEG) for polyplex surface shielding, and various cationic (oligoethanamino) amide cores containing

  13. Drug2Gene: an exhaustive resource to explore effectively the drug-target relation network

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Information about drug-target relations is at the heart of drug discovery. There are now dozens of databases providing drug-target interaction data with varying scope, and focus. Therefore, and due to the large chemical space, the overlap of the different data sets is surprisingly small. As searching through these sources manually is cumbersome, time-consuming and error-prone, integrating all the data is highly desirable. Despite a few attempts, integration has been hampered by the diversity of descriptions of compounds, and by the fact that the reported activity values, coming from different data sets, are not always directly comparable due to usage of different metrics or data formats. Description We have built Drug2Gene, a knowledge base, which combines the compound/drug-gene/protein information from 19 publicly available databases. A key feature is our rigorous unification and standardization process which makes the data truly comparable on a large scale, allowing for the first time effective data mining in such a large knowledge corpus. As of version 3.2, Drug2Gene contains 4,372,290 unified relations between compounds and their targets most of which include reported bioactivity data. We extend this set with putative (i.e. homology-inferred) relations where sufficient sequence homology between proteins suggests they may bind to similar compounds. Drug2Gene provides powerful search functionalities, very flexible export procedures, and a user-friendly web interface. Conclusions Drug2Gene v3.2 has become a mature and comprehensive knowledge base providing unified, standardized drug-target related information gathered from publicly available data sources. It can be used to integrate proprietary data sets with publicly available data sets. Its main goal is to be a ‘one-stop shop’ to identify tool compounds targeting a given gene product or for finding all known targets of a drug. Drug2Gene with its integrated data set of public compound-target

  14. Construction of a mouse model of factor VIII deficiency by gene targeting

    SciTech Connect

    Bi, L.; Lawler, A.; Gearhart, J.

    1994-09-01

    To develop a small animal model of hemophilia A for gene therapy experiments, we set out to construct a mouse model for factor VIII deficiency by gene targeting. First, we screened a mouse liver cDNA library using a human FVIII cDNA probe. We cloned a 2.6 Kb partial mouse factor VIII cDNA which extends from 800 base pairs of the 3{prime} end of exon 14 to the 5{prime} end of exon 26. A mouse genomic library made from strain 129 was then screened to obtain genomic fragments covering the exons desired for homologous recombination. Two genomic clones were obtained, and one covering exon 15 through 22 was used for gene targeting. To make gene targeting constructs, a 5.8 Kb genomic DNA fragment covering exons 15 to 19 of the mouse FVIII gene was subcloned, and the neo expression cassette was inserted into exons 16 and 17 separately by different strategies. These two constructs were named MFVIIIC-16 and MFVIIIC-17. The constructs were linearized and transfected into strain 129 mouse ES cells by electroporation. Factor VIII gene-knockout ES cell lines were selected by G-418 and screened by genomic Southern blots. Eight exon 16 targeted cell lines and five exon 17 targeted cell lines were obtained. Three cell lines from each construct were injected into blastocysts and surgically transferred into foster mothers. Multiple chimeric mice with 70-90% hair color derived from the ES-cell genotype were seen with both constructs. Germ line transmission of the ES-cell genotype has been obtained for the MFVIIIC-16 construct, and multiple hemophilia A carrier females have been identified. Factor VIII-deficient males will be conceived soon.

  15. The yeast Hot1 transcription factor is critical for activating a single target gene, STL1

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Chen; Tesker, Masha; Engelberg, David

    2015-01-01

    Transcription factors are commonly activated by signal transduction cascades and induce expression of many genes. They therefore play critical roles in determining the cell's fate. The yeast Hog1 MAP kinase pathway is believed to control the transcription of hundreds of genes via several transcription factors. To identify the bona fide target genes of Hog1, we inducibly expressed the spontaneously active variant Hog1D170A+F318L in cells lacking the Hog1 activator Pbs2. This system allowed monitoring the effects of Hog1 by itself. Expression of Hog1D170A+F318L in pbs2∆ cells imposed induction of just 105 and suppression of only 26 transcripts by at least twofold. We looked for the Hog1-responsive element within the promoter of the most highly induced gene, STL1 (88-fold). A novel Hog1 responsive element (HoRE) was identified and shown to be the direct target of the transcription factor Hot1. Unexpectedly, we could not find this HoRE in any other yeast promoter. In addition, the only gene whose expression was abolished in hot1∆ cells was STL1. Thus Hot1 is essential for transcription of just one gene, STL1. Hot1 may represent a class of transcription factors that are essential for transcription of a very few genes or even just one. PMID:25904326

  16. Analysis of the siRNA-Mediated Gene Silencing Process Targeting Three Homologous Genes Controlling Soybean Seed Oil Quality

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Sha; Yin, Xiaoyan; Spollen, William; Zhang, Ning; Xu, Dong; Schoelz, James; Bilyeu, Kristin; Zhang, Zhanyuan J.

    2015-01-01

    In the past decade, RNA silencing has gained significant attention because of its success in genomic scale research and also in the genetic improvement of crop plants. However, little is known about the molecular basis of siRNA processing in association with its target transcript. To reveal this process for improving hpRNA-mediated gene silencing in crop plants, the soybean GmFAD3 gene family was chosen as a test model. We analyzed RNAi mutant soybean lines in which three members of the GmFAD3 gene family were silenced. The silencing levels of FAD3A, FAD3B and FAD3C were correlated with the degrees of sequence homology between the inverted repeat of hpRNA and the GmFAD3 transcripts in the RNAi lines. Strikingly, transgenes in two of the three RNAi lines were heavily methylated, leading to a dramatic reduction of hpRNA-derived siRNAs. Small RNAs corresponding to the loop portion of the hairpin transcript were detected while much lower levels of siRNAs were found outside of the target region. siRNAs generated from the 318-bp inverted repeat were found to be diced much more frequently at stem sequences close to the loop and associated with the inferred cleavage sites on the target transcripts, manifesting “hot spots”. The top candidate hpRNA-derived siRNA share certain sequence features with mature miRNA. This is the first comprehensive and detailed study revealing the siRNA-mediated gene silencing mechanism in crop plants using gene family GmFAD3 as a test model. PMID:26061033

  17. Mining Predicted Essential Genes of Brugia malayi for Nematode Drug Targets

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sanjay; Chaudhary, Kshitiz; Foster, Jeremy M.; Novelli, Jacopo F.; Zhang, Yinhua; Wang, Shiliang; Spiro, David; Ghedin, Elodie; Carlow, Clotilde K. S.

    2007-01-01

    We report results from the first genome-wide application of a rational drug target selection methodology to a metazoan pathogen genome, the completed draft sequence of Brugia malayi, a parasitic nematode responsible for human lymphatic filariasis. More than 1.5 billion people worldwide are at risk of contracting lymphatic filariasis and onchocerciasis, a related filarial disease. Drug treatments for filariasis have not changed significantly in over 20 years, and with the risk of resistance rising, there is an urgent need for the development of new anti-filarial drug therapies. The recent publication of the draft genomic sequence for B. malayi enables a genome-wide search for new drug targets. However, there is no functional genomics data in B. malayi to guide the selection of potential drug targets. To circumvent this problem, we have utilized the free-living model nematode Caenorhabditis elegans as a surrogate for B. malayi. Sequence comparisons between the two genomes allow us to map C. elegans orthologs to B. malayi genes. Using these orthology mappings and by incorporating the extensive genomic and functional genomic data, including genome-wide RNAi screens, that already exist for C. elegans, we identify potentially essential genes in B. malayi. Further incorporation of human host genome sequence data and a custom algorithm for prioritization enables us to collect and rank nearly 600 drug target candidates. Previously identified potential drug targets cluster near the top of our prioritized list, lending credibility to our methodology. Over-represented Gene Ontology terms, predicted InterPro domains, and RNAi phenotypes of C. elegans orthologs associated with the potential target pool are identified. By virtue of the selection procedure, the potential B. malayi drug targets highlight components of key processes in nematode biology such as central metabolism, molting and regulation of gene expression. PMID:18000556

  18. Targeted Chromosomal Translocations and Essential Gene Knockout Using CRISPR/Cas9 Technology in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiangyang; Li, Mu; Feng, Xuezhu; Guang, Shouhong

    2015-12-01

    Many genes play essential roles in development and fertility; their disruption leads to growth arrest or sterility. Genetic balancers have been widely used to study essential genes in many organisms. However, it is technically challenging and laborious to generate and maintain the loss-of-function mutations of essential genes. The CRISPR/Cas9 technology has been successfully applied for gene editing and chromosome engineering. Here, we have developed a method to induce chromosomal translocations and produce genetic balancers using the CRISPR/Cas9 technology and have applied this approach to edit essential genes in Caenorhabditis elegans. The co-injection of dual small guide RNA targeting genes on different chromosomes resulted in reciprocal translocation between nonhomologous chromosomes. These animals with chromosomal translocations were subsequently crossed with animals that contain normal sets of chromosomes. The F1 progeny were subjected to a second round of Cas9-mediated gene editing. Through this method, we successfully produced nematode strains with specified chromosomal translocations and generated a number of loss-of-function alleles of two essential genes (csr-1 and mes-6). Therefore, our method provides an easy and efficient approach to generate and maintain loss-of-function alleles of essential genes with detailed genetic background information. PMID:26482793

  19. Driver Gene Mutations in Stools of Colorectal Carcinoma Patients Detected by Targeted Next-Generation Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Armengol, Gemma; Sarhadi, Virinder K; Ghanbari, Reza; Doghaei-Moghaddam, Masoud; Ansari, Reza; Sotoudeh, Masoud; Puolakkainen, Pauli; Kokkola, Arto; Malekzadeh, Reza; Knuutila, Sakari

    2016-07-01

    Detection of driver gene mutations in stool DNA represents a promising noninvasive approach for screening colorectal cancer (CRC). Amplicon-based next-generation sequencing (NGS) is a good option to study mutations in many cancer genes simultaneously and from a low amount of DNA. Our aim was to assess the feasibility of identifying mutations in 22 cancer driver genes with Ion Torrent technology in stool DNA from a series of 65 CRC patients. The assay was successful in 80% of stool DNA samples. NGS results showed 83 mutations in cancer driver genes, 29 hotspot and 54 novel mutations. One to five genes were mutated in 75% of cases. TP53, KRAS, FBXW7, and SMAD4 were the top mutated genes, consistent with previous studies. Of samples with mutations, 54% presented concomitant mutations in different genes. Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway genes were mutated in 70% of samples, with 58% having alterations in KRAS, NRAS, or BRAF. Because mutations in these genes can compromise the efficacy of epidermal growth factor receptor blockade in CRC patients, identifying mutations that confer resistance to some targeted treatments may be useful to guide therapeutic decisions. In conclusion, the data presented herein show that NGS procedures on stool DNA represent a promising tool to detect genetic mutations that could be used in the future for diagnosis, monitoring, or treating CRC. PMID:27155048

  20. The down regulation of target genes by photo activated DNA nanoscissors.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Tsung-Lin; Shieh, Dar-Bin; Yeh, Chen-Sheng; Tzeng, Yonhua; Htet, Khant; Chuang, Kao-Shu; Hwu, Jih Ru; Su, Wu-Chou

    2010-09-01

    An artificial, targeted, light-activated nanoscissor (ATLANS) was developed for precision photonic cleavage of DNA at selectable target sequences. The ATLANS is comprised of nanoparticle core and a monolayer of hydrazone-modified triplex-forming oligonucleotides (TFOs), which recognize and capture the targeted DNA duplex. Upon photo-illumination (lambda = 460 nm), the attached hydrazone scissor specifically cleaves the targeted DNA at a pre-designed nucleotide pair. Electrophoretic mobility shift and co-precipitation assays revealed sequence-specific binding with the short-fragment and long-form plasmid DNA of both TFO and TFO-nanoparticle probes. Upon photo-illumination, ATLANS introduced a precise double-stranded break 12bp downstream the TFO binding sequence and down-regulated the target gene in HeLa cell system. Gold nanoparticles multiplexed the cutting efficiency and potential for simultaneous manipulation of multiple targets, as well as protected DNA from non-specific photo-damage. This photon-mediated DNA manipulation technology will facilitate high spatial and temporal precision in simultaneous silencing at the genome level, and advanced simultaneous manipulation of multiple targeted genes. PMID:20605206

  1. Generation of TALE nickase-mediated gene-targeted cows expressing human serum albumin in mammary glands

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Yan; Wang, Yongsheng; Liu, Jun; Cui, Chenchen; Wu, Yongyan; Lan, Hui; Chen, Qi; Liu, Xu; Quan, Fusheng; Guo, Zekun; Zhang, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Targeting exogenous genes at milk protein loci via gene-targeting technology is an ideal strategy for producing large quantities of pharmaceutical proteins. Transcription- activator-like effector (TALE) nucleases (TALENs) are an efficient genome-editing tool. However, the off-target effects may lead to unintended gene mutations. In this study, we constructed TALENs and TALE nickases directed against exon 2 of the bovine β-lactoglobulin (BLG) locus. The nickases can induce a site-specific DNA single-strand break, without inducing double-strand break and nonhomologous end joining mediated gene mutation, and lower cell apoptosis rate than TALENs. After co-transfecting the bovine fetal fibroblasts with human serum albumin (HSA) gene-targeting vector and TALE nickase expression vectors, approximately 4.8% (40/835) of the cell clones contained HSA at BLG locus. Unexpectedly, one homozygous gene-targeted cell clone (1/835, 0.1%) was obtained by targeting both alleles of BLG in a single round of transfection. The recombinant protein mimicking the endogenous BLG was highly expressed and correctly folded in the mammary glands of the targeted cows, and the expression level of HSA was significantly increased in the homozygous targeted cows. Results suggested that the combination of TALE nickase-mediated gene targeting and somatic cell nuclear transfer is a feasible and safe approach in producing gene-targeted livestock. PMID:26853907

  2. Generation of TALE nickase-mediated gene-targeted cows expressing human serum albumin in mammary glands.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yan; Wang, Yongsheng; Liu, Jun; Cui, Chenchen; Wu, Yongyan; Lan, Hui; Chen, Qi; Liu, Xu; Quan, Fusheng; Guo, Zekun; Zhang, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Targeting exogenous genes at milk protein loci via gene-targeting technology is an ideal strategy for producing large quantities of pharmaceutical proteins. Transcription-activator-like effector (TALE) nucleases (TALENs) are an efficient genome-editing tool. However, the off-target effects may lead to unintended gene mutations. In this study, we constructed TALENs and TALE nickases directed against exon 2 of the bovine β-lactoglobulin (BLG) locus. The nickases can induce a site-specific DNA single-strand break, without inducing double-strand break and nonhomologous end joining mediated gene mutation, and lower cell apoptosis rate than TALENs. After co-transfecting the bovine fetal fibroblasts with human serum albumin (HSA) gene-targeting vector and TALE nickase expression vectors, approximately 4.8% (40/835) of the cell clones contained HSA at BLG locus. Unexpectedly, one homozygous gene-targeted cell clone (1/835, 0.1%) was obtained by targeting both alleles of BLG in a single round of transfection. The recombinant protein mimicking the endogenous BLG was highly expressed and correctly folded in the mammary glands of the targeted cows, and the expression level of HSA was significantly increased in the homozygous targeted cows. Results suggested that the combination of TALE nickase-mediated gene targeting and somatic cell nuclear transfer is a feasible and safe approach in producing gene-targeted livestock. PMID:26853907

  3. PK11195-chitosan-graft-polyethylenimine-modified SPION as a mitochondria-targeting gene carrier.

    PubMed

    Kim, You-Kyoung; Zhang, Mei; Lu, Jin-Jian; Xu, Fengguo; Chen, Bao-An; Xing, Lei; Jiang, Hu-Lin

    2016-06-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle (SPION) holds great potential as a gene delivery system due to its unique properties, such as good biocompatibility and non-invasive targeting ability. In this study, we modified SPION with chitosan-graft-PEI (CHI-g-PEI) and PK11195, to fabricate a mitochondria-targeting gene carrier, PK-CP-SPION. PK-CP-SPION manifested prominent physicochemical properties for magnetic guided gene delivery, and it could effectively condense and protect DNA at proper weight ratios. The in vitro cytotoxicity of PK-CP-SPIONs was mild. Under an external magnetic field, the transfection efficiency of PK-CP-SPIONs was comparable to PEI 25 K with shorter transfection time. PK11195 facilitated the specific accumulation of PK-CP-SPIONs in mitochondria, leading to the leakage of cytochrome c, the dissipation of mitochondrial membrane potential and subsequently the activation of mitochondria apoptosis pathway. These results indicated that with further development, PK-CP-SPIONs could serve as a multifunctional nanoplatform for magnetic targeting gene delivery and mitochondria-targeting therapy, leading enhanced therapeutic effect towards tumor cells. PMID:26390926

  4. Trastuzumab-targeted gene delivery to Her2-overexpressing breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Mann, K; Kullberg, M

    2016-07-01

    We describe a novel gene delivery system that specifically targets human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (Her2)-overexpressing breast cancer cells. The targeting complexes consist of a PEGylated polylysine core that is bound to DNA molecules coding for either green fluorescent protein or shrimp luciferase. The complex is disulfide linked to the monoclonal antibody trastuzumab and to a pore-forming protein, Listeriolysin O (LLO). Trastuzumab is responsible for specific targeting of Her2 receptors and uptake of the gene delivery complex into endosomes of recipient cells, whereas LLO ensures that the DNA molecules are capable of transit from the endosomes into the cytoplasm. Omission of either trastuzumab or LLO from the nanocomplexes results in minimal gene product in targeted cells. Treatment of isogeneic MCF7 and MCF7/Her18 cell lines, differing only in number of Her2 receptors, with the complete gene delivery system results in a 30-fold greater expression of luciferase activity in the Her2-overexpressing MCF7/Her18 cells. Our nanocomplexes are small (150-250 nm), stable to storage, nontoxic and generic in make-up such that any plasmid DNA or antibody specific for cell-surface receptors can be coupled to the PEGylated polylysine core. PMID:27199219

  5. Problem-Solving Test: Conditional Gene Targeting Using the Cre/loxP Recombination System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szeberényi, József

    2013-01-01

    Terms to be familiar with before you start to solve the test: gene targeting, knock-out mutation, bacteriophage, complementary base-pairing, homologous recombination, deletion, transgenic organisms, promoter, polyadenylation element, transgene, DNA replication, RNA polymerase, Shine-Dalgarno sequence, restriction endonuclease, polymerase chain…

  6. In silico identification of gene amplification targets based on analysis of production and growth coupling.

    PubMed

    Jian, Xingxing; Zhou, Shengguo; Zhang, Cheng; Hua, Qiang

    2016-07-01

    Genome-scale metabolic models (GEMs) can be utilized to better understand the genotype-phenotype relationship in microbial metabolism. Manipulation strategies based on analysis of metabolic flux distributions using constraint-based methods have been validated to be effective for designing strains. Herein, we first investigated the coupled relationship of growth and production, and subsequently proposed an algorithm, called analysis of production and growth coupling (APGC), to identify amplification targets for improving production of the desired metabolite. The logical transformation of the genome-scale metabolic models (LTM) could enable a gene-level prediction, that is, direct gene targets would be determined through APGC. This algorithm was successfully employed to simulate heterogeneous biosynthesis of the antioxidant lycopene in Escherichia coli, and target genes for the improvement of lycopene production were identified. These identified gene targets were unambiguous and were closely related to the supply of essential precursors and cofactors for lycopene production, and most of these have been validated as effective in enhancing the yield of lycopene. PMID:27157785

  7. Targeted heritable mutation and gene conversion by Cas9-CRISPR in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Katic, Iskra; Großhans, Helge

    2013-11-01

    We have achieved targeted heritable genome modification in Caenorhabditis elegans by injecting mRNA of the nuclease Cas9 and Cas9 guide RNAs. This system rapidly creates precise genomic changes, including knockouts and transgene-instructed gene conversion. PMID:23979578

  8. Trastuzumab-targeted gene delivery to Her2-overexpressing breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Mann, K; Kullberg, M

    2016-01-01

    We describe a novel gene delivery system that specifically targets human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (Her2)-overexpressing breast cancer cells. The targeting complexes consist of a PEGylated polylysine core that is bound to DNA molecules coding for either green fluorescent protein or shrimp luciferase. The complex is disulfide linked to the monoclonal antibody trastuzumab and to a pore-forming protein, Listeriolysin O (LLO). Trastuzumab is responsible for specific targeting of Her2 receptors and uptake of the gene delivery complex into endosomes of recipient cells, whereas LLO ensures that the DNA molecules are capable of transit from the endosomes into the cytoplasm. Omission of either trastuzumab or LLO from the nanocomplexes results in minimal gene product in targeted cells. Treatment of isogeneic MCF7 and MCF7/Her18 cell lines, differing only in number of Her2 receptors, with the complete gene delivery system results in a 30-fold greater expression of luciferase activity in the Her2-overexpressing MCF7/Her18 cells. Our nanocomplexes are small (150–250 nm), stable to storage, nontoxic and generic in make-up such that any plasmid DNA or antibody specific for cell-surface receptors can be coupled to the PEGylated polylysine core. PMID:27199219

  9. Targeting Calcium Signaling Induces Epigenetic Reactivation of Tumor Suppressor Genes in Cancer.

    PubMed

    Raynal, Noël J-M; Lee, Justin T; Wang, Youjun; Beaudry, Annie; Madireddi, Priyanka; Garriga, Judith; Malouf, Gabriel G; Dumont, Sarah; Dettman, Elisha J; Gharibyan, Vazganush; Ahmed, Saira; Chung, Woonbok; Childers, Wayne E; Abou-Gharbia, Magid; Henry, Ryan A; Andrews, Andrew J; Jelinek, Jaroslav; Cui, Ying; Baylin, Stephen B; Gill, Donald L; Issa, Jean-Pierre J

    2016-03-15

    Targeting epigenetic pathways is a promising approach for cancer therapy. Here, we report on the unexpected finding that targeting calcium signaling can reverse epigenetic silencing of tumor suppressor genes (TSG). In a screen for drugs that reactivate silenced gene expression in colon cancer cells, we found three classical epigenetic targeted drugs (DNA methylation and histone deacetylase inhibitors) and 11 other drugs that induced methylated and silenced CpG island promoters driving a reporter gene (GFP) as well as endogenous TSGs in multiple cancer cell lines. These newly identified drugs, most prominently cardiac glycosides, did not change DNA methylation locally or histone modifications globally. Instead, all 11 drugs altered calcium signaling and triggered calcium-calmodulin kinase (CamK) activity, leading to MeCP2 nuclear exclusion. Blocking CamK activity abolished gene reactivation and cancer cell killing by these drugs, showing that triggering calcium fluxes is an essential component of their epigenetic mechanism of action. Our data identify calcium signaling as a new pathway that can be targeted to reactivate TSGs in cancer. Cancer Res; 76(6); 1494-505. ©2015 AACR. PMID:26719529

  10. Gene expression profiling in spleens of deoxynivalenol-exposed mice: immediate early genes as primary targets.

    PubMed

    Kinser, Shawn; Jia, Qunshan; Li, Maioxing; Laughter, Ashley; Cornwell, Paul; Corton, J Christopher; Pestka, James

    2004-09-24

    Exposure to the trichothecene mycotoxin deoxynivalenol (DON) alters immune functions in vitro and in vivo. To gain further insight into DON's immunotoxic effects, microarrays were used to determine how acute exposure to this mycotoxin modulates gene expression profiles in murine spleen. B6C3F1 mice were treated orally with 25mg/kg body weight DON, and 2h later spleens were collected for macroarray analysis. Following normalization using a local linear regression model, expression of 116 out of 1176 genes was significantly altered compared to average expression levels in all treatment groups. When genes were arranged into an ontology tree to facilitate comparison of expression profiles between treatment groups, DON was found primarily to modulate genes associated with immunity, inflammation, and chemotaxis. Real-time polymerase chain reaction was used to confirm modulation for selected genes. DON was found to induce the cytokines interleukin (IL)-1alpha, IL-1beta, IL-6 and IL-11. In analogous fashion, DON upregulated expression of the chemokines macrophage inhibitory protein-2 (MIP-2), cytokine-induced chemoattractant protein-1 (CINC-1), monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1, MCP-3, and cytokine-responsive gene-2 (CRG-2). c-Fos, Fra-, c-Jun, and JunB, components of the activator protein-1 (AP-1) transcription factor complex, were induced by DON as well as another transcription factor, NR4A1. Four hydrolases were found to be upregulated by DON, including mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase 1 (MKP1), catalytic subunit beta isoform (CnAbeta), protein tyrosine phosphatase receptor type J (Ptprj), and protein tyrosine phosphatase nonreceptor type 8 (Ptpn8), whereas three other hydrolases, microsomal epoxide hydrolase (Eph) 1, histidine triad nucleotide binding protein (Hint), and proteosome subunit beta type 8 (Psmb8) were significantly decreased by the toxin. Finally, cysteine-rich protein 61 (CRP61) and heat-shock protein 40 (Hsp40), genes associated with

  11. Colorimetric detection of gene transcript by target-induced three-way junction formation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuchu; Liu, Weiwei; Yin, Binbin; Yu, Pan; Duan, Xiuzhi; Liao, Zhaoping; Liu, Chunhua; Sang, Yiwen; Zhang, Gong; Chen, Yuhua; Tao, Zhihua

    2016-09-01

    Gene transcript often varies by alternative splicing, which plays different biological role that results in diversity of gene expression. Therefore, a simple and accurate identification of targeted transcript variant is of prime importance to achieve a precise molecular diagnosis. In this work, we presented a three-way junction based system where two split G-quadruplex forming sequences were coupled into two probes. Only upon the introduction of target gene transcript that offering a specific recognizable splicing site did the two probes assembled into three way junction conformation in a devised process, thus providing a functional G-quadruplex conformation that greatly enhanced hemin peroxidation. A notable resolution for gene splicing site detection was achieved. The detection limitation by colorimetric assay was 0.063μM, and this system has been proved to discriminate even in a single base false level around splicing site (about 3 times of single mismatched analyte to gain an equal signal by perfect analyte ). Furthermore, recoveries of 78.1%, 88.1%, 104.6% were obtained with 0.75μM, 0.25μM, 0.083μM of target, respectively, showing a capacity to further exploit a simple equipped device for gene transcript detection. PMID:27343570

  12. Improving lysine production by Corynebacterium glutamicum through DNA microarray-based identification of novel target genes.

    PubMed

    Sindelar, Georg; Wendisch, Volker F

    2007-09-01

    For the biotechnological production of L: -lysine, mainly strains of Corynebacterium glutamicum are used, which have been obtained by classical mutagenesis and screening or selection or by metabolic engineering. Gene targets for the amplification and deregulation of the lysine biosynthesis pathway, for the improvement of carbon precursor supply and of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (reduced form) (NADPH) regeneration, are known. To identify novel target genes to improve lysine production, the transcriptomes of the classically obtained lysine producing strain MH20-22B and several other C. glutamicum strains were compared. As lysine production by the classically obtained strain, which possesses feedback-resistant aspartokinase and is leucine auxotrophic, exceeds that of a genetically defined leucine auxotrophic wild-type derivative possessing feedback-resistant aspartokinase, additional traits beneficial for lysine production are present. NCgl0855, putatively encoding a methyltransferase, and the amtA-ocd-soxA operon, encoding an ammonium uptake system, a putative ornithine cyclodeaminase and an uncharacterized enzyme, were among the genes showing increased expression in the classically obtained strain irrespective of the presence of feedback-resistant aspartokinase. Lysine production could be improved by about 40% through overexpression of NCgl0855 or the amtA-ocd-soxA operon. Thus, novel target genes for the improvement of lysine production could be identified in a discovery-driven approach based on global gene expression analysis. PMID:17364200

  13. High-efficiency and heritable gene targeting in mouse by transcription activator-like effector nucleases

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Zhongwei; Liu, Meizhen; Chen, Zhaohua; Shao, Yanjiao; Pan, Hongjie; Wei, Gaigai; Yu, Chao; Zhang, Long; Li, Xia; Wang, Ping; Fan, Heng-Yu; Du, Bing; Liu, Bin; Liu, Mingyao; Li, Dali

    2013-01-01

    Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) are a powerful new approach for targeted gene disruption in various animal models, but little is known about their activities in Mus musculus, the widely used mammalian model organism. Here, we report that direct injection of in vitro transcribed messenger RNA of TALEN pairs into mouse zygotes induced somatic mutations, which were stably passed to the next generation through germ-line transmission. With one TALEN pair constructed for each of 10 target genes, mutant F0 mice for each gene were obtained with the mutation rate ranged from 13 to 67% and an average of ∼40% of total healthy newborns with no significant differences between C57BL/6 and FVB/N genetic background. One TALEN pair with single mismatch to their intended target sequence in each side failed to yield any mutation. Furthermore, highly efficient germ-line transmission was obtained, as all the F0 founders tested transmitted the mutations to F1 mice. In addition, we also observed that one bi-allele mutant founder of Lepr gene, encoding Leptin receptor, had similar diabetic phenotype as db/db mouse. Together, our results suggest that TALENs are an effective genetic tool for rapid gene disruption with high efficiency and heritability in mouse with distinct genetic background. PMID:23630316

  14. Adeno-associated virus-targeted disruption of the CFTR gene in cloned ferrets.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xingshen; Yan, Ziying; Yi, Yaling; Li, Ziyi; Lei, Diana; Rogers, Christopher S; Chen, Juan; Zhang, Yulong; Welsh, Michael J; Leno, Gregory H; Engelhardt, John F

    2008-04-01

    Somatic cell gene targeting combined with nuclear transfer cloning presents tremendous potential for the creation of new, large-animal models of human diseases. Mouse disease models often fail to reproduce human phenotypes, underscoring the need for the generation and study of alternative disease models. Mice deficient for CFTR have been poor models for cystic fibrosis (CF), lacking many aspects of human CF lung disease. In this study, we describe the production of a CFTR gene-deficient model in the domestic ferret using recombinant adeno-associated virus-mediated gene targeting in fibroblasts, followed by nuclear transfer cloning. As part of this approach, we developed a somatic cell rejuvenation protocol using serial nuclear transfer to produce live CFTR-deficient clones from senescent gene-targeted fibroblasts. We transferred 472 reconstructed embryos into 11 recipient jills and obtained 8 healthy male ferret clones heterozygous for a disruption in exon 10 of the CFTR gene. To our knowledge, this study represents the first description of genetically engineered ferrets and describes an approach that may be of substantial utility in modeling not only CF, but also other genetic diseases. PMID:18324338

  15. Identification of candidate target genes for human peripheral arterial disease using weighted gene co‑expression network analysis.

    PubMed

    Yin, De-Xin; Zhao, Hao-Min; Sun, Da-Jun; Yao, Jian; Ding, Da-Yong

    2015-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to identify the potential treatment targets of peripheral arterial disease (PAD) and provide further insights into the underlying mechanism of PAD, based on a weighted gene co‑expression network analysis (WGCNA) method. The mRNA expression profiles (accession. no. GSE27034), which included 19 samples from patients with PAD and 18 samples from normal control individuals were extracted from the Gene Expression Omnibus database. Subsequently, the differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were obtained using the Limma package and the co‑expression network modules were screened using the WGCNA approach. In addition, the protein‑protein interaction network for the DEGs in the most significant module was constructed using Cytoscape software. Functional enrichment analyses of the DEGs in the most significant module were also performed using the Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) Orthology‑Based Annotation System, respectively. A total of 148 DEGs were identified in PAD, which were used to construct the WGCN, in which two modules (gray module and turquoise module) were identified, with the gray module exhibiting a higher gene significance (GS) value than the turquoise module. In addition, a co‑expression network was constructed for 60 DEGs in the gray module. The functional enrichment results showed that the DEGs in the gray module were enriched in five Gene Ontology terms and four KEGG pathways. For example, cyclin‑dependent kinase inhibitor 1A (CDKN1A), FBJ murine osteosarcoma viral oncogene homolog (FOS) and prostaglandin‑endoperoxide synthase 2 (PTGS2) were enriched in response to glucocorticoid stimulus. The results of the present study suggested that DEGs in the gray module, including CDKN1A, FOS and PTGS2, may be associated with the pathogenesis of PAD, by modulating the cell cycle, and may offer potential for use as candidate treatment

  16. Targeted adenovirus gene transfer to endothelial and smooth muscle cells by using bispecific antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Wickham, T J; Segal, D M; Roelvink, P W; Carrion, M E; Lizonova, A; Lee, G M; Kovesdi, I

    1996-01-01

    A major hurdle to adenovirus (Ad)-mediated gene transfer is that the target issue lacks sufficient levels of receptors to mediate vector attachment via its fiber coat protein. Endothelial and smooth muscle cells are primary targets in gene therapy approaches to prevent restenosis following angioplasty or to promote or inhibit angiogenesis. However, Ad poorly binds and transduces these cells because of their low or undetectable levels of functional Ad fiber receptor. The Ad-binding deficiency of these cells was overcome by targeting Ad binding to alpha v integrin receptors that are sufficiently expressed by these cells. In order to target alpha v integrins, a bispecific antibody (bsAb) that comprised a monoclonal Ab to the FLAG peptide epitope, DYKDDDDK, and a monoclonal Ab to alpha v integrins was constructed. In conjunction with the bsAb, a new vector, AdFLAG, which incorporated the FLAG peptide epitope into its penton base protein was constructed. Complexing AdFLAG with the bsAb increased the beta-glucuronidase transduction of human venule endothelial cells and human intestinal smooth muscle cells by seven- to ninefold compared with transduction by AdFLAG alone. The increased transduction efficiency was shown to occur through the specific interaction of the complex with alpha v integrins. These results demonstrate that bsAbs can be successfully used to target Ad to a specific cellular receptor and thereby increase the efficiency of gene transfer. PMID:8794324

  17. Analysis of Deregulated microRNAs and Their Target Genes in Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kupcinskas, Juozas; Link, Alexander; Kiudelis, Gediminas; Jonaitis, Laimas; Jarmalaite, Sonata; Kupcinskas, Limas; Malfertheiner, Peter; Skieceviciene, Jurgita

    2015-01-01

    Background MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are widely studied non-coding RNAs that modulate gene expression. MiRNAs are deregulated in different tumors including gastric cancer (GC) and have potential diagnostic and prognostic implications. The aim of our study was to determine miRNA profile in GC tissues, followed by evaluation of deregulated miRNAs in plasma of GC patients. Using available databases and bioinformatics methods we also aimed to evaluate potential target genes of confirmed differentially expressed miRNA and validate these findings in GC tissues. Methods The study included 51 GC patients and 51 controls. Initially, we screened miRNA expression profile in 13 tissue samples of GC and 12 normal gastric tissues with TaqMan low density array (TLDA). In the second stage, differentially expressed miRNAs were validated in a replication cohort using qRT-PCR in tissue and plasma samples. Subsequently, we analyzed potential target genes of deregulated miRNAs using bioinformatics approach, determined their expression in GC tissues and performed correlation analysis with targeting miRNAs. Results Profiling with TLDA revealed 15 deregulated miRNAs in GC tissues compared to normal gastric mucosa. Replication analysis confirmed that miR-148a-3p, miR-204-5p, miR-223-3p and miR-375 were consistently deregulated in GC tissues. Analysis of GC patients’ plasma samples showed significant down-regulation of miR-148a-3p, miR-375 and up-regulation of miR-223-3p compared to healthy subjects. Further, using bioinformatic tools we identified targets of replicated miRNAs and performed disease-associated gene enrichment analysis. Ultimately, we evaluated potential target gene BCL2 and DNMT3B expression by qRT-PCR in GC tissue, which correlated with targeting miRNA expression. Conclusions Our study revealed miRNA profile in GC tissues and showed that miR-148a-3p, miR-223-3p and miR-375 are deregulated in GC plasma samples, but these circulating miRNAs showed relatively weak diagnostic

  18. Recombinant adeno-associated virus targets passenger gene expression to cones in primate retina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancuso, Katherine; Hendrickson, Anita E.; Connor, Thomas B., Jr.; Mauck, Matthew C.; Kinsella, James J.; Hauswirth, William W.; Neitz, Jay; Neitz, Maureen

    2007-05-01

    Recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) is a promising vector for gene therapy of photoreceptor-based diseases. Previous studies have demonstrated that rAAV serotypes 2 and 5 can transduce both rod and cone photoreceptors in rodents and dogs, and it can target rods, but not cones in primates. Here we report that using a human cone-specific enhancer and promoter to regulate expression of a green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter gene in an rAAV-5 vector successfully targeted expression of the reporter gene to primate cones, and the time course of GFP expression was able to be monitored in a living animal using the RetCam II digital imaging system.

  19. A new strategy for gene targeting and functional proteomics using the DT40 cell line

    PubMed Central

    Orlowska, Kinga P.; Klosowska, Kamila; Szczesny, Roman J.; Cysewski, Dominik; Krawczyk, Pawel S.; Dziembowski, Andrzej

    2013-01-01

    DT40 cells derived from chicken B lymphocytes exhibit exceptionally high homologous recombination rates. Therefore, they can be used as a convenient tool and model for gene targeting experiments. However, lack of efficient cloning strategies, protein purification protocols and a well annotated protein database limits the utility of these cells for proteomic studies. Here we describe a fast and inexpensive experimental pipeline for protein localization, quantification and mass spectrometry–based interaction studies using DT40 cells. Our newly designed set of pQuant vectors and a sequence- and ligation-independent cloning (SLIC) strategy allow for simple and efficient generation of gene targeting constructs, facilitating homologous-recombination–based protein tagging on a multi-gene scale. We also report proof of principle results using the key proteins involved in RNA decay, namely EXOSC8, EXOSC9, CNOT7 and UPF1. PMID:23892402

  20. Targeting G-quadruplexes in gene promoters: a novel anticancer strategy?

    PubMed Central

    Balasubramanian, Shankar; Hurley, Laurence H.; Neidle, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    G-quadruplexes are four-stranded DNA structures that are over-represented in gene promoter regions and are viewed as emerging therapeutic targets in oncology, as transcriptional repression of oncogenes through stabilization of these structures could be a novel anticancer strategy. Many gene promoter G-quadruplexes have physicochemical properties and structural characteristics that might make them druggable, and their structural diversity suggests that a high degree of selectivity might be possible. Here, we describe the evidence for G-quadruplexes in gene promoters and discuss their potential as therapeutic targets, as well as progress in the development of strategies to harness this potential through intervention with small-molecule ligands. PMID:21455236

  1. Coactivation of GR and NFKB alters the repertoire of their binding sites and target genes

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Nagesha A.S.; McCalman, Melysia T.; Moulos, Panagiotis; Francoijs, Kees-Jan; Chatziioannou, Aristotelis; Kolisis, Fragiskos N.; Alexis, Michael N.; Mitsiou, Dimitra J.; Stunnenberg, Hendrik G.

    2011-01-01

    Glucocorticoid receptor (GR) exerts anti-inflammatory action in part by antagonizing proinflammatory transcription factors such as the nuclear factor kappa-b (NFKB). Here, we assess the crosstalk of activated GR and RELA (p65, major NFKB component) by global identification of their binding sites and target genes. We show that coactivation of GR and p65 alters the repertoire of regulated genes and results in their association with novel sites in a mutually dependent manner. These novel sites predominantly cluster with p65 target genes that are antagonized by activated GR and vice versa. Our data show that coactivation of GR and NFKB alters signaling pathways that are regulated by each factor separately and provide insight into the networks underlying the GR and NFKB crosstalk. PMID:21750107

  2. Targeting presequence acquisition after mitochondrial gene transfer to the nucleus occurs by duplication of existing targeting signals.

    PubMed Central

    Kadowaki, K; Kubo, N; Ozawa, K; Hirai, A

    1996-01-01

    We have cloned a gene for mitochondrial ribosomal protein S11 (RPS11), which is encoded in lower plants by the mitochondrial genome, in higher plants by the nuclear genome, demonstrating genetic information transfer from the mitochondrial genome to the nucleus during flowering plant evolution. The sequence s11-1 encodes an N-terminal extension as well as an organelle-derived RPS11 region. Surprisingly, the N-terminal region has high amino acid sequence similarity with the presequence of the beta-subunit of ATP synthase from plant mitochondria, suggesting a common lineage of the presequences. The deduced N-terminal region of s11-2, a second nuclear-encoded homolog of rps11, shows high sequence similarity with the putative presequence of cytochrome oxidase subunit Vb. The sharing of the N-terminal region together with its 5' flanking untranslated nucleotide sequence in different proteins strongly suggests an involvement of duplication/recombination for targeting signal acquisition after gene migration. A remnant of ancestral rps11 sequence, transcribed and subjected to RNA editing, is found in the mitochondrial genome, indicating that inactivation of mitochondrial rps11 gene expression was initiated at the translational level prior to termination of transcription. Images PMID:8978691

  3. Recent advances in dendrimer-based nanovectors for tumor-targeted drug and gene delivery

    PubMed Central

    Kesharwani, Prashant; Iyer, Arun K.

    2015-01-01

    Advances in the application of nanotechnology in medicine have given rise to multifunctional smart nanocarriers that can be engineered with tunable physicochemical characteristics to deliver one or more therapeutic agent(s) safely and selectively to cancer cells, including intracellular organelle-specific targeting. Dendrimers having properties resembling biomolecules, with well-defined 3D nanopolymeric architectures, are emerging as a highly attractive class of drug and gene delivery vector. The presence of numerous peripheral functional groups on hyperbranched dendrimers affords efficient conjugation of targeting ligands and biomarkers that can recognize and bind to receptors overexpressed on cancer cells for tumor-cell-specific delivery. The present review compiles the recent advances in dendrimer-mediated drug and gene delivery to tumors by passive and active targeting principles with illustrative examples. PMID:25555748

  4. Cooperation of six and eya in activation of their target genes through nuclear translocation of Eya.

    PubMed

    Ohto, H; Kamada, S; Tago, K; Tominaga, S I; Ozaki, H; Sato, S; Kawakami, K

    1999-10-01

    Drosophila sine oculis and eyes absent genes synergize in compound-eye formation. The murine homologues of these genes, Six and Eya, respectively, show overlapping expression patterns during development. We hypothesized that Six and Eya proteins cooperate to regulate their target genes. Cotransfection assays were performed with various combinations of Six and Eya to assess their effects on a potential natural target, myogenin promoter, and on a synthetic promoter, the thymidine kinase gene promoter fused to multimerized Six4 binding sites. A clear synergistic activation of these promoters was observed in certain combinations of Six and Eya. To investigate the molecular basis for the cooperation, we first examined the intracellular distribution of Six and Eya proteins in transfected COS7 cells. Coexpression of Six2, Six4, or Six5 induced nuclear translocation of Eya1, Eya2, and Eya3, which were otherwise distributed in the cytoplasm. In contrast, coexpression of Six3 did not result in nuclear localization of any Eya proteins. Six and Eya proteins were coimmunoprecipitated from nuclear extracts prepared from cotransfected COS7 cells and from rat liver. Six domain and homeodomain, two evolutionarily conserved domains among various Six proteins, were necessary and sufficient for the nuclear translocation of Eya. In contrast, the Eya domain, a conserved domain among Eya proteins, was not sufficient for the translocation. A specific interaction between the Six domain and homeodomain of Six4 and Eya2 was observed by yeast two-hybrid analysis. Our results suggest that transcription regulation of certain target genes by Six proteins requires cooperative interaction with Eya proteins: complex formation through direct interaction and nuclear translocation of Eya proteins. This implies that the synergistic action of Six and Eya is conserved in the mouse and is mediated through cooperative activation of their target genes. PMID:10490620

  5. Intronic miR-932 targets the coding region of its host gene, Drosophila neuroligin2.

    PubMed

    Qian, Jinjun; Tu, Renjun; Yuan, Liudi; Xie, Wei

    2016-06-10

    Despite great progress for two decades in microRNAs (miRNAs), the direct regulation of host gene by intragenic (mostly intronic) miRNA is conceptually plausible but evidence-limited. Here, we report that intronic miR-932 could target its host gene via binding with coding sequence (CDS) region rather than regular 3'UTR. The conserved miR-932 is embedded in the fourth intron of Drosophila neuroligin2 (dnlg2), which encodes a synaptic cell adhesion molecule, DNlg2. In silico analysis predicted two putative miR-932 target sites locate in the CDS region of dnlg2 instead of regular 3'-UTR miRNA binding sites. Employing luciferase reporter assay, we further proved that the miR-932 regulates expression of its host gene dnlg2 via the binding CDS region of dnlg2. Consistently, we observed miR-932 downregulated expression of dnlg2 in S2 cell, and the repression of dnlg2 by miR-932 at both protein and RNA level. Furthermore, we found CDS-located site1 is dominant for regulating expression of host dnlg2 by miR-932. In addition to providing thorough examination of one intronic miRNA targeting the CDS region of its host gene, our genome-wide analysis indicated that nearly half of fruitfly and human intronic miRNAs may target their own host gene at coding region. This study would be valuable in elucidating the regulation of intronic miRNA on host gene, and provide new information about the biological context of their genomic arrangements and functions. PMID:26844630

  6. Control and target gene selection for studies on UV-induced genotoxicity in whales

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite international success in reducing ozone-depleting emissions, ultraviolet radiation (UV) is not expected to decrease for several decades. Thus, it is pressing to implement tools that allow investigating the capacity of wildlife to respond to excessive UV, particularly species like cetaceans that lack anatomical or physiological protection. One approach is to examine epidermal expression of key genes involved in genotoxic stress response pathways. However, quantitation of mRNA transcripts requires previous standardization, with accurate selection of control and target genes. The latter is particularly important when working with environmental stressors such as UV that can activate numerous genes. Results Using 20 epidermal biopsies from blue, fin and sperm whale, we found that the genes encoding the ribosomal proteins L4 and S18 (RPL4 and RPS18) were the most suitable to use as controls, followed by the genes encoding phosphoglycerate kinase 1 (PGK1) and succinate dehydrogenase complex subunit A (SDHA). A careful analysis of the transcription pathways known to be activated by UV-exposure in humans and mice led us to select as target genes those encoding for i) heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) an indicator of general cell stress, ii) tumour suppressor protein P53 (P53), a transcription factor activated by UV and other cell stressors, and iii) KIN17 (KIN), a cell cycle protein known to be up-regulated following UV exposure. These genes were successfully amplified in the three species and quantitation of their mRNA transcripts was standardised using RPL4 and RPS18. Using a larger sample set of 60 whale skin biopsies, we found that the target gene with highest expression was HSP70 and that its levels of transcription were correlated with those of KIN and P53. Expression of HSP70 and P53 were both related to microscopic sunburn lesions recorded in the whales’ skin. Conclusion This article presents groundwork data essential for future qPCR-based studies

  7. A novel dual-targeted ultrasound contrast agent provides improvement of gene delivery efficiency in vitro.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jinfeng; Zeng, Xinxin; Liu, Yingying; Luo, Hui; Wei, Zhanghong; Liu, Huiyu; Zhou, Yuli; Zheng, Hairong; Zhou, Jie; Tan, Guanghong; Yan, Fei

    2016-07-01

    Ultrasound-targeted microbubble destruction (UTMD) has become a novel gene/drug delivery method in cancer therapeutic application. However, the gene transfection efficiency mediated by UTMD is still unsatisfactory. Here, we introduced iRGD/CCR2 dual-targeted cationic microbubbles (MBiRGD/CCR2) which was modified with PEI-600 and coated with iRGD peptides and anti-CCR-2 antibodies. It showed that MBiRGD/CCR2 had a 25.83 ± 1.57 mV surface zeta potential and good stability. The experiments in vitro showed MBiRGD/CCR2 had higher binding efficiency with both bEnd.3 cells and MCF-7 cells than that of iRGD or CCR2 single-targeted cationic microbubbles (MBiRGD or MBCCR2) (P < 0.05 for both). Agarose gel electrophoresis assay showed that MBiRGD/CCR2 can effectively load pGPU6/GFP/Neo-shAKT2 plasmid DNA. Compared with the plain MBs (MBcontrol) or single-targeted cationic MBs including MBiRGD and MBCCR2 (P < 0.05 for all), the dual-targeted cationic MBiRGD/CCR2 groups had higher gene transfection efficiency under US exposure. It showed that the dual-targeted cationic MBiRGD/CCR2 has a potential value to be used as an ultrasound imaging probe for ultrasound image-guided tumor gene therapy. PMID:26733178

  8. Efficient Immunoglobulin Gene Disruption and Targeted Replacement in Rabbit Using Zinc Finger Nucleases

    PubMed Central

    Offner, Sonja; Ros, Francesca; Lifke, Valeria; Zeitler, Bryan; Rottmann, Oswald; Vincent, Anna; Zhang, Lei; Jenkins, Shirin; Niersbach, Helmut; Kind, Alexander J.; Gregory, Philip D.; Schnieke, Angelika E.; Platzer, Josef

    2011-01-01

    Rabbits are widely used in biomedical research, yet techniques for their precise genetic modification are lacking. We demonstrate that zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) introduced into fertilized oocytes can inactivate a chosen gene by mutagenesis and also mediate precise homologous recombination with a DNA gene-targeting vector to achieve the first gene knockout and targeted sequence replacement in rabbits. Two ZFN pairs were designed that target the rabbit immunoglobulin M (IgM) locus within exons 1 and 2. ZFN mRNAs were microinjected into pronuclear stage fertilized oocytes. Founder animals carrying distinct mutated IgM alleles were identified and bred to produce offspring. Functional knockout of the immunoglobulin heavy chain locus was confirmed by serum IgM and IgG deficiency and lack of IgM+ and IgG+ B lymphocytes. We then tested whether ZFN expression would enable efficient targeted sequence replacement in rabbit oocytes. ZFN mRNA was co-injected with a linear DNA vector designed to replace exon 1 of the IgM locus with ∼1.9 kb of novel sequence. Double strand break induced targeted replacement occurred in up to 17% of embryos and in 18% of fetuses analyzed. Two major goals have been achieved. First, inactivation of the endogenous IgM locus, which is an essential step for the production of therapeutic human polyclonal antibodies in the rabbit. Second, establishing efficient targeted gene manipulation and homologous recombination in a refractory animal species. ZFN mediated genetic engineering in the rabbit and other mammals opens new avenues of experimentation in immunology and many other research fields. PMID:21695153

  9. An Oomycete CRN Effector Reprograms Expression of Plant HSP Genes by Targeting their Promoters.

    PubMed

    Song, Tianqiao; Ma, Zhenchuan; Shen, Danyu; Li, Qi; Li, Wanlin; Su, Liming; Ye, Tingyue; Zhang, Meixiang; Wang, Yuanchao; Dou, Daolong

    2015-12-01

    Oomycete pathogens produce a large number of CRN effectors to manipulate plant immune responses and promote infection. However, their functional mechanisms are largely unknown. Here, we identified a Phytophthora sojae CRN effector PsCRN108 which contains a putative DNA-binding helix-hairpin-helix (HhH) motif and acts in the plant cell nucleus. Silencing of the PsCRN108 gene reduced P. sojae virulence to soybean, while expression of the gene in Nicotiana benthamiana and Arabidopsis thaliana enhanced plant susceptibility to P. capsici. Moreover, PsCRN108 could inhibit expression of HSP genes in A. thaliana, N. benthamiana and soybean. Both the HhH motif and nuclear localization signal of this effector were required for its contribution to virulence and its suppression of HSP gene expression. Furthermore, we found that PsCRN108 targeted HSP promoters in an HSE- and HhH motif-dependent manner. PsCRN108 could inhibit the association of the HSE with the plant heat shock transcription factor AtHsfA1a, which initializes HSP gene expression in response to stress. Therefore, our data support a role for PsCRN108 as a nucleomodulin in down-regulating the expression of plant defense-related genes by directly targeting specific plant promoters. PMID:26714171

  10. Global Identification of EVI1 Target Genes in Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Xiaohui; Bi, Yingtao; Davuluri, Ramana; Xiao, Ying-Yi; Wilson, Michael; Owens, Kristina; Zhang, Yi; Perkins, Archibald

    2013-01-01

    The ecotropic virus integration site 1 (EVI1) transcription factor is associated with human myeloid malignancy of poor prognosis and is overexpressed in 8–10% of adult AML and strikingly up to 27% of pediatric MLL-rearranged leukemias. For the first time, we report comprehensive genomewide EVI1 binding and whole transcriptome gene deregulation in leukemic cells using a combination of ChIP-Seq and RNA-Seq expression profiling. We found disruption of terminal myeloid differentiation and cell cycle regulation to be prominent in EVI-induced leukemogenesis. Specifically, we identified EVI1 directly binds to and downregulates the master myeloid differentiation gene Cebpe and several of its downstream gene targets critical for terminal myeloid differentiation. We also found EVI1 binds to and downregulates Serpinb2 as well as numerous genes involved in the Jak-Stat signaling pathway. Finally, we identified decreased expression of several ATP-dependent P2X purinoreceptors genes involved in apoptosis mechanisms. These findings provide a foundation for future study of potential therapeutic gene targets for EVI1-induced leukemia. PMID:23826213

  11. Smooth Muscle Cell Genome Browser: Enabling the Identification of Novel Serum Response Factor Target Genes

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Moon Young; Park, Chanjae; Berent, Robyn M.; Park, Paul J.; Fuchs, Robert; Syn, Hannah; Chin, Albert; Townsend, Jared; Benson, Craig C.; Redelman, Doug; Shen, Tsai-wei; Park, Jong Kun; Miano, Joseph M.; Sanders, Kenton M.; Ro, Seungil

    2015-01-01

    Genome-scale expression data on the absolute numbers of gene isoforms offers essential clues in cellular functions and biological processes. Smooth muscle cells (SMCs) perform a unique contractile function through expression of specific genes controlled by serum response factor (SRF), a transcription factor that binds to DNA sites known as the CArG boxes. To identify SRF-regulated genes specifically expressed in SMCs, we isolated SMC populations from mouse small intestine and colon, obtained their transcriptomes, and constructed an interactive SMC genome and CArGome browser. To our knowledge, this is the first online resource that provides a comprehensive library of all genetic transcripts expressed in primary SMCs. The browser also serves as the first genome-wide map of SRF binding sites. The browser analysis revealed novel SMC-specific transcriptional variants and SRF target genes, which provided new and unique insights into the cellular and biological functions of the cells in gastrointestinal (GI) physiology. The SRF target genes in SMCs, which were discovered in silico, were confirmed by proteomic analysis of SMC-specific Srf knockout mice. Our genome browser offers a new perspective into the alternative expression of genes in the context of SRF binding sites in SMCs and provides a valuable reference for future functional studies. PMID:26241044

  12. An Oomycete CRN Effector Reprograms Expression of Plant HSP Genes by Targeting their Promoters

    PubMed Central

    Song, Tianqiao; Ma, Zhenchuan; Shen, Danyu; Li, Qi; Li, Wanlin; Su, Liming; Ye, Tingyue; Zhang, Meixiang; Wang, Yuanchao; Dou, Daolong

    2015-01-01

    Oomycete pathogens produce a large number of CRN effectors to manipulate plant immune responses and promote infection. However, their functional mechanisms are largely unknown. Here, we identified a Phytophthora sojae CRN effector PsCRN108 which contains a putative DNA-binding helix-hairpin-helix (HhH) motif and acts in the plant cell nucleus. Silencing of the PsCRN108 gene reduced P. sojae virulence to soybean, while expression of the gene in Nicotiana benthamiana and Arabidopsis thaliana enhanced plant susceptibility to P. capsici. Moreover, PsCRN108 could inhibit expression of HSP genes in A. thaliana, N. benthamiana and soybean. Both the HhH motif and nuclear localization signal of this effector were required for its contribution to virulence and its suppression of HSP gene expression. Furthermore, we found that PsCRN108 targeted HSP promoters in an HSE- and HhH motif-dependent manner. PsCRN108 could inhibit the association of the HSE with the plant heat shock transcription factor AtHsfA1a, which initializes HSP gene expression in response to stress. Therefore, our data support a role for PsCRN108 as a nucleomodulin in down-regulating the expression of plant defense-related genes by directly targeting specific plant promoters. PMID:26714171

  13. Targeting gene expression in the preimplantation mouse embryo using morpholino antisense oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Siddall, Laura S; Barcroft, Lisa C; Watson, Andrew J

    2002-12-01

    Morpholino antisense oligonucleotides act by blocking translation of their target gene products and are effective tools for down-regulating gene expression. The current study was conducted to define treatment conditions for the use of morpholino oligonucleotides (MOs) in mammalian preimplantation embryos, and to employ MOs to target genes and study gene function in the early embryo. For the first time, ethoxylated polyethylenimine (EPEI), Lipofectin or Lysolecithin delivery agents were employed in combination with a fluorescent control MO and an alpha-catenin specific MO, to down-regulate gene expression during murine preimplantation development. Experiments applied to both two- and eight-cell stage murine preimplantation embryos contrasted the efficacy of MO concentrations of 1, 2, 5, 10, and 20 microM and treatment delivery times of 3, 6, 24, and 48 hr. Continuous treatment of two-cell embryos with Lipofectin and 20 microM alpha-catenin MO for 48 hr resulted in a significant (P < 0.05) reduction in development to the blastocyst stage and was accompanied by a marked reduction in alpha-catenin protein. These results indicate that morpholino antisense oligonucleotides are effective tools for down-regulating gene expression during mammalian preimplantation development. PMID:12412042

  14. Diverse, Biologically Relevant, and Targetable Gene Rearrangements in Triple-Negative Breast Cancer and Other Malignancies.

    PubMed

    Shaver, Timothy M; Lehmann, Brian D; Beeler, J Scott; Li, Chung-I; Li, Zhu; Jin, Hailing; Stricker, Thomas P; Shyr, Yu; Pietenpol, Jennifer A

    2016-08-15

    Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) and other molecularly heterogeneous malignancies present a significant clinical challenge due to a lack of high-frequency "driver" alterations amenable to therapeutic intervention. These cancers often exhibit genomic instability, resulting in chromosomal rearrangements that affect the structure and expression of protein-coding genes. However, identification of these rearrangements remains technically challenging. Using a newly developed approach that quantitatively predicts gene rearrangements in tumor-derived genetic material, we identified and characterized a novel oncogenic fusion involving the MER proto-oncogene tyrosine kinase (MERTK) and discovered a clinical occurrence and cell line model of the targetable FGFR3-TACC3 fusion in TNBC. Expanding our analysis to other malignancies, we identified a diverse array of novel and known hybrid transcripts, including rearrangements between noncoding regions and clinically relevant genes such as ALK, CSF1R, and CD274/PD-L1 The over 1,000 genetic alterations we identified highlight the importance of considering noncoding gene rearrangement partners, and the targetable gene fusions identified in TNBC demonstrate the need to advance gene fusion detection for molecularly heterogeneous cancers. Cancer Res; 76(16); 4850-60. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27231203

  15. SUMOylation negatively modulates target gene occupancy of the KDM5B, a histone lysine demethylase.

    PubMed

    Bueno, Murilo T D; Richard, Stéphane

    2013-11-01

    The histone lysine demethylase KDM5B plays key roles in gene repression by demethylating trimethylated lysine 4 of histone H3 (H3K4me3), a modification commonly found at the promoter region of actively transcribed genes. KDM5B is known to regulate the expression of genes involved in cell cycle progression; however, little is known about the post-translational modifications that regulate KDM5B. Herein, we report that KDM5B is SUMOylated at lysine residues 242 and 278 and that the ectopic expression of the hPC2 SUMO E3 ligase enhances this SUMOylation. Interestingly, the levels of KDM5B and its SUMOylated forms are regulated during the cell cycle. KDM5B is modulated by RNF4, an E3 ubiquitin ligase that targets SUMO-modified proteins to proteasomal degradation. Digital gene expression analyses showed that cells expressing the SUMOylation-deficient KDM5B harbor repressed mRNA expression profiles of cell cycle and DNA repair genes. Chromatin immunoprecipitations confirmed some of these genes as KDM5B targets, as they displayed reduced H3K4me3 levels in cells ectopically expressing KDM5B. We propose that SUMOylation by hPC2 regulates the activity of KDM5B. PMID:23970103

  16. Identification of Genetic Causes of Inherited Peripheral Neuropathies by Targeted Gene Panel Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Nam, Soo Hyun; Hong, Young Bin; Hyun, Young Se; Nam, Da Eun; Kwak, Geon; Hwang, Sun Hee; Choi, Byung-Ok; Chung, Ki Wha

    2016-05-31

    Inherited peripheral neuropathies (IPN), which are a group of clinically and genetically heterogeneous peripheral nerve disorders including Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT), exhibit progressive degeneration of muscles in the extremities and loss of sensory function. Over 70 genes have been reported as genetic causatives and the number is still growing. We prepared a targeted gene panel for IPN diagnosis based on next generation sequencing (NGS). The gene panel was designed to detect mutations in 73 genes reported to be genetic causes of IPN or related peripheral neuropathies, and to detect duplication of the chromosome 17p12 region, the major genetic cause of CMT1A. We applied the gene panel to 115 samples from 63 non-CMT1A families, and isolated 15 pathogenic or likely-pathogenic mutations in eight genes from 25 patients (17 families). Of them, eight mutations were unreported variants. Of particular interest, this study revealed several very rare mutations in the SPTLC2, DCTN1, and MARS genes. In addition, the effectiveness of the detection of CMT1A was confirmed by comparing five 17p12-nonduplicated controls and 15 CMT1A cases. In conclusion, we developed a gene panel for one step genetic diagnosis of IPN. It seems that its time- and cost-effectiveness are superior to previous tiered-genetic diagnosis algorithms, and it could be applied as a genetic diagnostic system for inherited peripheral neuropathies. PMID:27025386

  17. Electrotransfer parameters as a tool for controlled and targeted gene expression in skin.

    PubMed

    Kos, Spela; Blagus, Tanja; Cemazar, Maja; Lampreht Tratar, Ursa; Stimac, Monika; Prosen, Lara; Dolinsek, Tanja; Kamensek, Urska; Kranjc, Simona; Steinstraesser, Lars; Vandermeulen, Gaëlle; Préat, Véronique; Sersa, Gregor

    2016-01-01

    Skin is an attractive target for gene electrotransfer. It consists of different cell types that can be transfected, leading to various responses to gene electrotransfer. We demonstrate that these responses could be controlled by selecting the appropriate electrotransfer parameters. Specifically, the application of low or high electric pulses, applied by multi-electrode array, provided the possibility to control the depth of the transfection in the skin, the duration and the level of gene expression, as well as the local or systemic distribution of the transgene. The influence of electric pulse type was first studied using a plasmid encoding a reporter gene (DsRed). Then, plasmids encoding therapeutic genes (IL-12, shRNA against endoglin, shRNA against melanoma cell adhesion molecule) were used, and their effects on wound healing and cutaneous B16F10 melanoma tumors were investigated. The high-voltage pulses resulted in gene expression that was restricted to superficial skin layers and induced a local response. In contrast, the low-voltage electric pulses promoted transfection into the deeper skin layers, resulting in prolonged gene expression and higher transgene production, possibly with systemic distribution. Therefore, in the translation into the clinics, it will be of the utmost importance to adjust the electrotransfer parameters for different therapeutic approaches and specific mode of action of the therapeutic gene. PMID:27574782

  18. Identification of Genetic Causes of Inherited Peripheral Neuropathies by Targeted Gene Panel Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Soo Hyun; Hong, Young Bin; Hyun, Young Se; Nam, Da Eun; Kwak, Geon; Hwang, Sun Hee; Choi, Byung-Ok; Chung, Ki Wha

    2016-01-01

    Inherited peripheral neuropathies (IPN), which are a group of clinically and genetically heterogeneous peripheral nerve disorders including Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT), exhibit progressive degeneration of muscles in the extremities and loss of sensory function. Over 70 genes have been reported as genetic causatives and the number is still growing. We prepared a targeted gene panel for IPN diagnosis based on next generation sequencing (NGS). The gene panel was designed to detect mutations in 73 genes reported to be genetic causes of IPN or related peripheral neuropathies, and to detect duplication of the chromosome 17p12 region, the major genetic cause of CMT1A. We applied the gene panel to 115 samples from 63 non-CMT1A families, and isolated 15 pathogenic or likely-pathogenic mutations in eight genes from 25 patients (17 families). Of them, eight mutations were unreported variants. Of particular interest, this study revealed several very rare mutations in the SPTLC2, DCTN1, and MARS genes. In addition, the effectiveness of the detection of CMT1A was confirmed by comparing five 17p12-nonduplicated controls and 15 CMT1A cases. In conclusion, we developed a gene panel for one step genetic diagnosis of IPN. It seems that its time- and cost-effectiveness are superior to previous tiered-genetic diagnosis algorithms, and it could be applied as a genetic diagnostic system for inherited peripheral neuropathies. PMID:27025386

  19. AhR modulates the IL-22-producing cell proliferation/recruitment in imiquimod-induced psoriasis mouse model.

    PubMed

    Cochez, Perrine M; Michiels, Camille; Hendrickx, Emilie; Van Belle, Astrid B; Lemaire, Muriel M; Dauguet, Nicolas; Warnier, Guy; de Heusch, Magali; Togbe, Dieudonnée; Ryffel, Bernhard; Coulie, Pierre G; Renauld, Jean-Christophe; Dumoutier, Laure

    2016-06-01

    IL-22 has a detrimental role in skin inflammatory processes, for example in psoriasis. As transcription factor, AhR controls the IL-22 production by several cell types (i.e. Th17 cells). Here, we analyzed the role of Ahr in IL-22 production by immune cells in the inflamed skin, using an imiquimod-induced psoriasis mouse model. Our results indicate that IL-22 is expressed in the ear of imiquimod-treated Ahr(-/-) mice but less than in wild-type mice. We then studied the role of AhR on three cell populations known to produce IL-22 in the skin: γδ T cells, Th17 cells, and ILC3, and a novel IL-22-producing cell type identified in this setting: CD4(-) CD8(-) TCRβ(+) T cells. We showed that AhR is required for IL-22 production by Th17, but not by the three other cell types, in the imiquimod-treated ears. Moreover, AhR has a role in the recruitment of γδ T cells, ILC3, and CD4(-) CD8(-) TCRβ(+) T cells into the inflamed skin or in their local proliferation. Taken together, AhR has a direct role in IL-22 production by Th17 cells in the mouse ear skin, but not by γδ T cells, CD4(-) CD8(-) TCRβ(+) T cells and ILCs. PMID:27000947

  20. Ultrasound-Mediated Vascular Gene Transfection by Cavitation of Endothelial-Targeted Cationic Microbubbles

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Aris; Belcik, Todd; Qi, Yue; Morgan, Terry K.; Champaneri, Shivam A.; Taylor, Sarah; Davidson, Brian P.; Zhao, Yan; Klibanov, Alexander L.; Kuliszewski, Michael A.; Leong-Poi, Howard; Ammi, Azzdine; Lindner, Jonathan R.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Ultrasound-mediated gene delivery can be amplified by acoustic disruption of microbubble carriers that undergo cavitation. We hypothesized that endothelial targeting of microbubbles bearing cDNA is feasible and, through optimizing proximity to the vessel wall, increases the efficacy of gene transfection. BACKGROUND Contrast ultrasound-mediated gene delivery is a promising approach for site-specific gene therapy, although there are concerns with the reproducibility of this technique and the safety when using high-power ultrasound. METHODS Cationic lipid-shelled decafluorobutane microbubbles bearing a targeting moiety were prepared and compared with nontargeted microbubbles. Microbubble targeting efficiency to endothelial adhesion molecules (P-selectin or intercellular adhesion molecule [ICAM]-1) was tested using in vitro flow chamber studies, intravital microscopy of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α)–stimulated murine cremaster muscle, and targeted contrast ultrasound imaging of P-selectin in a model of murine limb ischemia. Ultrasound-mediated transfection of luciferase reporter plasmid charge coupled to microbubbles in the post-ischemic hindlimb muscle was assessed by in vivo optical imaging. RESULTS Charge coupling of cDNA to the microbubble surface was not influenced by the presence of targeting ligand, and did not alter the cavitation properties of cationic microbubbles. In flow chamber studies, surface conjugation of cDNA did not affect attachment of targeted microbubbles at microvascular shear stresses (0.6 and 1.5 dyne/cm2). Attachment in vivo was also not affected by cDNA according to intravital microscopy observations of venular adhesion of ICAM-1–targeted microbubbles and by ultrasound molecular imaging of P-selectin–targeted microbubbles in the post-ischemic hindlimb in mice. Transfection at the site of high acoustic pressures (1.0 and 1.8 MPa) was similar for control and P-selectin–targeted microbubbles but was associated with

  1. Cell-Targeting Cationic Gene Delivery System Based on a Modular Design Rationale.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jia; Xu, Luming; Jin, Yang; Qi, Chao; Li, Qilin; Zhang, Yunti; Jiang, Xulin; Wang, Guobin; Wang, Zheng; Wang, Lin

    2016-06-01

    En route to target cells, a gene carrier faces multiple extra- and intracellular hurdles that would affect delivery efficacy. Although diverse strategies have been proposed to functionalize gene carriers for individually overcoming these barriers, it is challenging to generate a single multifunctional gene carrier capable of surmounting all these barriers. Aiming at this challenge, we have developed a supramolecular modular approach to fabricate a multifunctional cationic gene delivery system. It consists of two prefunctionalized modules: (1) a host module: a polymer (PCD-SS-PDMAEMA) composed of poly(β-cyclodextrin) backbone and disulfide-linked PDMAEMA arms, expectedly acting to compact DNA and release DNA upon cleavage of disulfide linkers in reductive microenvironment; and (2) a guest module: adamantyl and folate terminated PEG (Ad-PEG-FA), expectedly functioning to reduce nonspecific interactions, improve biocompatibility, and provide folate-mediated cellular targeting specificity. Through the host-guest interaction between β-cyclodextrin units of the "host" module and adamantyl groups of the "guest" module, the PCD-SS-PDMAEMA-1 (host) and Ad-PEG-FA (guest) self-assemble forming a supramolecular pseudocopolymer (PCD-SS-PDMAEMA-1/PEG-FA). Our comprehensive analyses demonstrate that the functions preassigned to the two building modules are well realized. The gene carrier effectively compacts DNA into stable nanosized polyplexes resistant to enzymatic digestion, triggers DNA release in reducing environment, possesses significantly improved hemocompatibility, and specifically targets folate-receptor positive cells. Most importantly, endowed with these predesigned functions, the PCD-SS-PDMAEMA-1/PEG-FA supramolecular gene carrier exhibits excellent transfection efficacy for both pDNA and siRNA. Thus, this work represents a proof-of-concept example showing the efficiency and convenience of an adaptable, modular approach for conferring multiple functions to a single

  2. Target genes discovery through copy number alteration analysis in human hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Gu, De-Leung; Chen, Yen-Hsieh; Shih, Jou-Ho; Lin, Chi-Hung; Jou, Yuh-Shan; Chen, Chian-Feng

    2013-12-21

    High-throughput short-read sequencing of exomes and whole cancer genomes in multiple human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cohorts confirmed previously identified frequently mutated somatic genes, such as TP53, CTNNB1 and AXIN1, and identified several novel genes with moderate mutation frequencies, including ARID1A, ARID2, MLL, MLL2, MLL3, MLL4, IRF2, ATM, CDKN2A, FGF19, PIK3CA, RPS6KA3, JAK1, KEAP1, NFE2L2, C16orf62, LEPR, RAC2, and IL6ST. Functional classification of these mutated genes suggested that alterations in pathways participating in chromatin remodeling, Wnt/β-catenin signaling, JAK/STAT signaling, and oxidative stress play critical roles in HCC tumorigenesis. Nevertheless, because there are few druggable genes used in HCC therapy, the identification of new therapeutic targets through integrated genomic approaches remains an important task. Because a large amount of HCC genomic data genotyped by high density single nucleotide polymorphism arrays is deposited in the public domain, copy number alteration (CNA) analyses of these arrays is a cost-effective way to reveal target genes through profiling of recurrent and overlapping amplicons, homozygous deletions and potentially unbalanced chromosomal translocations accumulated during HCC progression. Moreover, integration of CNAs with other high-throughput genomic data, such as aberrantly coding transcriptomes and non-coding gene expression in human HCC tissues and rodent HCC models, provides lines of evidence that can be used to facilitate the identification of novel HCC target genes with the potential of improving the survival of HCC patients. PMID:24379610

  3. Optical Imaging and Gene Therapy with Neuroblastoma-Targeting Polymeric Nanoparticles for Potential Theranostic Applications.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jangwook; Jeong, Eun Ju; Lee, Yeon Kyung; Kim, Kwangmeyung; Kwon, Ick Chan; Lee, Kuen Yong

    2016-03-01

    Recently, targeted delivery systems based on functionalized polymeric nanoparticles have attracted a great deal of attention in cancer diagnosis and therapy. Specifically, as neuroblastoma occurs in infancy and childhood, targeted delivery may be critical to reduce the side effects that can occur with conventional approaches, as well as to achieve precise diagnosis and efficient therapy. Thus, biocompatible poly(d,l-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLG) nanoparticles containing an imaging probe and therapeutic gene are prepared, followed by modification with rabies virus glycoprotein (RVG) peptide for neuroblastoma-targeting delivery. RVG peptide is a well-known neuronal targeting ligand and is chemically conjugated to PLG nanoparticles without changing their size or shape. RVG-modified nanoparticles are effective in specifically targeting neuroblastoma both in vitro and in vivo. RVG-modified nanoparticles loaded with a fluorescent probe are useful to detect the tumor site in a neuroblastoma-bearing mouse model, and those encapsulating a therapeutic gene cocktail (siMyc, siBcl-2, and siVEGF) significantly suppressed tumor growth in the mouse model. This approach to designing and tailoring of polymeric nanoparticles for targeted delivery may be useful in the development of multimodality systems for theranostic approaches. PMID:26573885

  4. Regulatory network analysis of transcription factors, microRNAs, target genes and host genes in human multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhuoyan; Xu, Zhiwen; Kunhao Wang, Kunhao Wang; Wang, Ning; Wang, Shang

    2015-11-01

    In recent years, molecular biologists have achieved great advance in micro RNA (miRNA) and gene investigation about the pathogenesis of multiple myeloma (MM). Existing research data of the transcription factors (TFs) and miRNAs is disperse and unorganized, which prevents researchers from investigating the mechanism and analyze regulatory pathways of MM systematically. In our research, regulatory interactions among miRNAs, TFs, host genes and target genes were imported to construct regulatory networks at three levels, including the abnormally expressed network and the related network as well as the global network. The abnormally expressed network was primary investigated cause it was an experimentally validated topological network, and it systematically explained the regulatory mechanism of MM. Its outstanding significance lies in that if we correct each abnormally expressed gene and miRNA to normal expression level by transcriptional control adjustment, thus the whole genetic expression network will return to normal state, and MM may not relapse. Additionally, analyses and comparisons to upstream as well as downstream of abnormally expressed miRNAs and genes in three networks highlighted some important regulators and key signaling pathways. For example, STAT3 and hsa-miR-125b, PIAS3 and hsa-miR-21 respectively formed self adaptation feedback regulations. The current research proposed a novel perspective to systematically explained the regulatory mechanism of MM and may contribute to further research and therapy of carcinomas. PMID:26687742

  5. Malformation of certain brain blood vessels caused by TCDD activation of Ahr2/Arnt1 signaling in developing zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Teraoka, Hiroki; Ogawa, Akira; Kubota, Akira; Stegeman, John J.; Peterson, Richard E.; Hiraga, Takeo

    2011-01-01

    2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) causes various signs of toxicity in early life stages of vertebrates through activation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR). The AHR also plays important roles in normal development in mice, and AHR-/- mice show abnormal development of vascular structures in various blood vessels. Our previous studies revealed that Ahr type 2 (Ahr2) activation by TCDD and β-naphthoflavone (BNF) caused a significant decrease in blood flow in the dorsal midbrain of zebrafish embryos. Here we report effects of TCDD exposure on the morphology of some blood vessels in the head of developing zebrafish. TCDD caused concentration-dependent anatomical rearrangements in the shape of the prosencephalic artery in zebrafish larvae. In contrast, no major vascular defects were recognized in the trunk and tail regions following exposure to TCDD at least at the concentrations used. Essentially, the same observations were also confirmed in BNF-exposed larvae. Knock-down of either Ahr2 or Ahr nuclear translocator type 1 (Arnt1) by morpholino oligonucleotides (MOs) protected larvae against abnormal shape of the prosencephalic artery caused by TCDD and BNF. On the other hand, knock-down of Ahr2 or Arnt1 in vehicle-exposed zebrafish larvae had no clear effect on morphology of the prosencephalic artery or trunk vessels. Ascorbic acid, an antioxidant, protected against the TCDD-induced decrease in blood flow through the prosencephalic artery, but not the abnormal morphological changes in the shape of this artery. These results indicate that activation of Ahr2/Arnt1 pathway by TCDD and BNF affects the shape of certain blood vessels in the brain of developing zebrafish. PMID:20554057

  6. A bioinformatics tool for linking gene expression profiling results with public databases of microRNA target predictions.

    PubMed

    Creighton, Chad J; Nagaraja, Ankur K; Hanash, Samir M; Matzuk, Martin M; Gunaratne, Preethi H

    2008-11-01

    MicroRNAs are short (approximately 22 nucleotides) noncoding RNAs that regulate the stability and translation of mRNA targets. A number of computational algorithms have been developed to help predict which microRNAs are likely to regulate which genes. Gene expression profiling of biological systems where microRNAs might be active can yield hundreds of differentially expressed genes. The commonly used public microRNA target prediction databases facilitate gene-by-gene searches. However, integration of microRNA-mRNA target predictions with gene expression data on a large scale using these databases is currently cumbersome and time consuming for many researchers. We have developed a desktop software application which, for a given target prediction database, retrieves all microRNA:mRNA functional pairs represented by an experimentally derived set of genes. Furthermore, for each microRNA, the software computes an enrichment statistic for overrepresentation of predicted targets within the gene set, which could help to implicate roles for specific microRNAs and microRNA-regulated genes in the system under study. Currently, the software supports searching of results from PicTar, TargetScan, and miRanda algorithms. In addition, the software can accept any user-defined set of gene-to-class associations for searching, which can include the results of other target prediction algorithms, as well as gene annotation or gene-to-pathway associations. A search (using our software) of genes transcriptionally regulated in vitro by estrogen in breast cancer uncovered numerous targeting associations for specific microRNAs-above what could be observed in randomly generated gene lists-suggesting a role for microRNAs in mediating the estrogen response. The software and Excel VBA source code are freely available at http://sigterms.sourceforge.net. PMID:18812437

  7. Selective Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Modulator 3,3'-Diindolylmethane Impairs AhR and ARNT Signaling and Protects Mouse Neuronal Cells Against Hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Rzemieniec, J; Litwa, E; Wnuk, A; Lason, W; Krzeptowski, W; Kajta, M

    2016-10-01

    The neuroprotective potential of 3,3'-diindolylmethane (DIM), which is a selective aryl hydrocarbon receptor modulator, has recently been shown in cellular and animal models of Parkinson's disease and lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammation. However, there are no data concerning the protective capacity and mechanisms of DIM action in neuronal cells exposed to hypoxia. The aim of the present study was to investigate the neuroprotective potential of DIM against the hypoxia-induced damage in mouse hippocampal cells in primary cultures, with a particular focus on DIM interactions with the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), its nuclear translocator ARNT, and estrogen receptor β (ERβ). In the present study, 18 h of hypoxia induced apoptotic processes, in terms of the mitochondrial membrane potential, activation of caspase-3, and fragmentation of cell nuclei. These effects were accompanied by substantial lactate dehydrogenase release and neuronal cell death. The results of the present study demonstrated strong neuroprotective and anti-apoptotic actions of DIM in hippocampal cells exposed to hypoxia. In addition, DIM decreased the Ahr and Arnt mRNA expression and stimulated Erβ mRNA expression level. DIM-induced mRNA alterations were mirrored by changes in protein levels, except for ERβ, as detected by ELISA, Western blotting, and immunofluorescence labeling. We also demonstrated that DIM decreased the expression of AhR-regulated CYP1A1. Using specific siRNAs, we provided evidence that impairment of AhR and ARNT, but not ERβ plays a key role in the neuroprotective action of DIM against hypoxia-induced cell damage. This study may have implication for identifying new agents that could protect neurons against hypoxia by targeting AhR/ARNT signaling. PMID:26476840

  8. Targeted and genome-scale methylomics reveals gene body signatures in human cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Ball, Madeleine Price; Li, Jin Billy; Gao, Yuan; Lee, Je-Hyuk; LeProust, Emily; Park, In-Hyun; Xie, Bin; Daley, George Q.; Church, George M.

    2012-01-01

    Cytosine methylation, an epigenetic modification of DNA, is a target of growing interest for developing high throughput profiling technologies. Here we introduce two new, complementary techniques for cytosine methylation profiling utilizing next generation sequencing technology: bisulfite padlock probes (BSPPs) and methyl sensitive cut counting (MSCC). In the first method, we designed a set of ~10,000 BSPPs distributed over the ENCODE pilot project regions to take advantage of existing expression and chromatin immunoprecipitation data. We observed a pattern of low promoter methylation coupled with high gene body methylation in highly expressed genes. Using the second method, MSCC, we gathered genome-scale data for 1.4 million HpaII sites and confirmed that gene body methylation in highly expressed genes is a consistent phenomenon over the entire genome. Our observations highlight the usefulness of techniques which are not inherently or intentionally biased in favor of only profiling particular subsets like CpG islands or promoter regions. PMID:19329998

  9. An update on targeted gene repair in mammalian cells: methods and mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Nanna M; Dalsgaard, Trine; Jakobsen, Maria; Nielsen, Roni R; Sørensen, Charlotte B; Bolund, Lars; Jensen, Thomas G

    2011-01-01

    Transfer of full-length genes including regulatory elements has been the preferred gene therapy strategy for clinical applications. However, with significant drawbacks emerging, targeted gene alteration (TGA) has recently become a promising alternative to this method. By means of TGA, endogenous DNA repair pathways of the cell are activated leading to specific genetic correction of single-base mutations in the genome. This strategy can be implemented using single-stranded oligodeoxyribonucleotides (ssODNs), small DNA fragments (SDFs), triplex-forming oligonucleotides (TFOs), adeno-associated virus vectors (AAVs) and zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs). Despite difficulties in the use of TGA, including lack of knowledge on the repair mechanisms stimulated by the individual methods, the field holds great promise for the future. The objective of this review is to summarize and evaluate the different methods that exist within this particular area of human gene therapy research. PMID:21284895

  10. An update on targeted gene repair in mammalian cells: methods and mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Transfer of full-length genes including regulatory elements has been the preferred gene therapy strategy for clinical applications. However, with significant drawbacks emerging, targeted gene alteration (TGA) has recently become a promising alternative to this method. By means of TGA, endogenous DNA repair pathways of the cell are activated leading to specific genetic correction of single-base mutations in the genome. This strategy can be implemented using single-stranded oligodeoxyribonucleotides (ssODNs), small DNA fragments (SDFs), triplex-forming oligonucleotides (TFOs), adeno-associated virus vectors (AAVs) and zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs). Despite difficulties in the use of TGA, including lack of knowledge on the repair mechanisms stimulated by the individual methods, the field holds great promise for the future. The objective of this review is to summarize and evaluate the different methods that exist within this particular area of human gene therapy research. PMID:21284895

  11. Targeting the urokinase plasminogen activator receptor enhances gene transfer to human airway epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Drapkin, Paola T.; O’Riordan, Catherine R.; Yi, Su Min; Chiorini, John A.; Cardella, Jonathan; Zabner, Joseph; Welsh, Michael J.

    2000-01-01

    Developing gene therapy for cystic fibrosis has been hindered by limited binding and endocytosis of vectors by human airway epithelia. Here we show that the apical membrane of airway epithelia express the urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR). Urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA), or a 7-residue peptide derived from this protein (u7-peptide), bound the receptor and stimulated apical endocytosis. Both ligands enhanced gene transfer by nonspecifically bound adenovirus and adeno-associated virus vectors and by a modified adenovirus vector that had been coupled to the u7-peptide. These data provide the first evidence that targeting an apical receptor can circumvent the two most important barriers to gene transfer in airway epithelia. Thus, the uPA/uPAR system may offer significant advantages for delivering genes and other pharmaceuticals to airway epithelia. PMID:10712430

  12. Targeting the urokinase plasminogen activator receptor enhances gene transfer to human airway epithelia.

    PubMed

    Drapkin, P T; O'Riordan, C R; Yi, S M; Chiorini, J A; Cardella, J; Zabner, J; Welsh, M J

    2000-03-01

    Developing gene therapy for cystic fibrosis has been hindered by limited binding and endocytosis of vectors by human airway epithelia. Here we show that the apical membrane of airway epithelia express the urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR). Urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA), or a 7-residue peptide derived from this protein (u7-peptide), bound the receptor and stimulated apical endocytosis. Both ligands enhanced gene transfer by nonspecifically bound adenovirus and adeno-associated virus vectors and by a modified adenovirus vector that had been coupled to the u7-peptide. These data provide the first evidence that targeting an apical receptor can circumvent the two most important barriers to gene transfer in airway epithelia. Thus, the uPA/uPAR system may offer significant advantages for delivering genes and other pharmaceuticals to airway epithelia. PMID:10712430

  13. Magnetic Microbubbles: Magnetically Targeted and Ultrasound-Triggered Vectors for Gene Delivery in Vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlaskou, Dialechti; Pradhan, Pallab; Bergemann, Christian; Klibanov, Alexander L.; Hensel, Karin; Schmitz, Georg; Plank, Christian; Mykhaylyk, Olga

    2010-12-01

    Based on the concept of magnetofection, we prepared lipid shell microbubbles loaded with highly positively charged iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles through electrostatic and matrix affinity interactions. These magnetic microbubbles showed strong ultrasound contrast. When the magnetic microbubbles were mixed with plasmid DNA encoding a reporter gene, gene delivery to HeLa cells was achieved only when ultrasound was applied. Gene transfer efficiency strongly depended on the application of a gradient magnetic field. Treatment of HeLa cells with the microbubbles and ultrasound resulted in strong concentration-dependent cytotoxic effects, whereas ultrasound alone, lipid microbubbles alone, magnetic nanoparticles or magnetic microbubbles alone did not significantly affect cell viability. These magnetic microbubbles could be used as magnetically targeted diagnostic agents for real-time ultrasound imaging or for cancer therapy, therapy of vascular thrombosis and gene therapy.

  14. Cancer-promoting and Inhibiting Effects of Dietary Compounds: Role of the Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor (AhR)

    PubMed Central

    Powell, Joann B.; Ghotbaddini, Maryam

    2014-01-01

    Polyaromatic hydrocarbons, heterocyclic aromatic amines and dioxin-like compounds are environmental carcinogens shown to initiate cancer in a number of tissue types including prostate and breast. These environmental carcinogens elicit their effects through interacting with the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), a ligand activated transcription factor. Naturally occurring compounds found in fruits and vegetables shown to have anti-carcinogenic effects also interact with the AhR. This review explores dietary and environmental exposure to chemical carcinogens and beneficial natural compounds whose effects are elicited by the AhR. PMID:25258701

  15. Identification of candidate target genes of pituitary adenomas based on the DNA microarray.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wei; Ma, Chun-Xiao; Xing, Ya-Zhou; Yan, Zhao-Yue

    2016-03-01

    The present study aimed to explore molecular mechanisms involved in pituitary adenomas (PAs) and to discover target genes for their treatment. The gene expression profile GSE4488 was downloaded from the Gene Expression Omnibus database. Differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified using the Limma package and analyzed by two‑dimensional hierarchical clustering. Gene ontology (GO) and pathway enrichment analyses were performed in order to investigate the functions of DEGs. Subsequently, the protein‑protein interaction (PPI) network was constructed using Cytoscape software. DEGs were then mapped to the connectivity map database to identify molecular agents associated with the underlying mechanisms of PAs. A total of 340 upregulated and 49 downregulated DEGs in PA samples compared with those in normal controls were identified. Hierarchical clustering analysis showed that DEGs were highly differentially expressed, indicating their aptness for distinguishing PA samples from normal controls. Significant gene ontology terms were positive regulation of immune system-associated processes for downregulated DEGs and skeletal system development for upregulated DEGs. Pathways significantly enriched by DEGs included extracellular matrix (ECM)‑receptor interaction, the Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway and neuroactive ligand‑receptor interaction. The PPI network was constructed with 117 nodes, 123 edges and CD44 and Gli2 as hub nodes. Furthermore, depudecin, a small molecule drug, was identified to be mechanistically associated with PA. The genes CD44 and Gli2 have important roles in the progression of PAs via ECM‑receptor interaction and the Hh signaling pathway and are therefore potential target genes of PA. In addition, depudecin may be a candidate drug for the treatment of PAs. PMID:26782791

  16. Discovery and assessment of conserved Pax6 target genes and enhancers

    PubMed Central

    Coutinho, Pedro; Pavlou, Sofia; Bhatia, Shipra; Chalmers, Kevin J.; Kleinjan, Dirk A.; van Heyningen, Veronica

    2011-01-01

    The characterization of transcriptional networks (TNs) is essential for understanding complex biological phenomena such as development, disease, and evolution. In this study, we have designed and implemented a procedure that combines in silico target screens with zebrafish and mouse validation, in order to identify cis-elements and genes directly regulated by Pax6. We chose Pax6 as the paradigm because of its crucial roles in organogenesis and human disease. We identified over 600 putative Pax6 binding sites and more than 200 predicted direct target genes, conserved in evolution from zebrafish to human and to mouse. This was accomplished using hidden Markov models (HMMs) generated from experimentally validated Pax6 binding sites. A small sample of genes, expressed in the neural lineage, was chosen from the predictions for RNA in situ validation using zebrafish and mouse models. Validation of DNA binding to some predicted cis-elements was also carried out using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) and zebrafish reporter transgenic studies. The results show that this combined procedure is a highly efficient tool to investigate the architecture of TNs and constitutes a useful complementary resource to ChIP and expression data sets because of its inherent spatiotemporal independence. We have identified several novel direct targets, including some putative disease genes, among them Foxp2; these will allow further dissection of Pax6 function in development and disease. PMID:21617155

  17. Searching for novel ATF4 target genes in human hepatoma cells by microarray analysis.

    PubMed

    Maruyama, Ryuto; Shimizu, Makoto; Ishijima, Tomoko; Nakai, Yuji; Inoue, Jun; Sato, Ryuichiro

    2016-06-01

    Activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4) is a transcription factor with an important biological activity. ATF4 is induced by various stresses, such as endoplasmic reticulum stress, through the phosphorylation of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2α. ATF4 is also involved in lipid metabolism. In the present study, we performed a microarray experiment to identify new ATF4 target genes, particularly those involved in lipid metabolism, and identified C12orf39, CSTA, and CALCB as novel ATF4 target genes. An amino acid response element (AARE) as an ATF4-binding site is present in the promoter regions of these genes. In a detailed analysis using luciferase assay, we showed that ATF4 activated C12orf39 promoter activity and that this activation was diminished by deletion or mutation of the AARE sequence in the promoter region. Our results suggest that C12orf39, CSTA, and CALCB are novel ATF4 target genes and that C12orf39 promoter activity is activated by ATF4 through AARE. PMID:26967115

  18. CRISPR/Cas9-mediated targeted gene mutagenesis in Spodoptera litura.

    PubMed

    Bi, Hong-Lun; Xu, Jun; Tan, An-Jiang; Huang, Yong-Ping

    2016-06-01

    Custom-designed nuclease technologies such as the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)-associated (Cas) system provide attractive genome editing tools for insect functional genetics. The targeted gene mutagenesis mediated by the CRISPR/Cas9 system has been achieved in several insect orders including Diptera, Lepidoptera and Coleoptera. However, little success has been reported in agricultural pests due to the lack of genomic information and embryonic microinjection techniques in these insect species. Here we report that the CRISPR/Cas9 system induced efficient gene mutagenesis in an important Lepidopteran pest Spodoptera litura. We targeted the S. litura Abdominal-A (Slabd-A) gene which is an important embryonic development gene and plays a significant role in determining the identities of the abdominal segments of insects. Direct injection of Cas9 messenger RNA and Slabd-A-specific single guide RNA (sgRNA) into S. litura embryos successfully induced the typical abd-A deficient phenotype, which shows anomalous segmentation and ectopic pigmentation during the larval stage. A polymerase chain reaction-based analysis revealed that the Cas9/sgRNA complex effectively induced a targeted mutagenesis in S. litura. These results demonstrate that the CRISPR/Cas9 system is a powerful tool for genome manipulation in Lepidopteran pests such as S. litura. PMID:27061764

  19. Adeno-associated virus–targeted disruption of the CFTR gene in cloned ferrets

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xingshen; Yan, Ziying; Yi, Yaling; Li, Ziyi; Lei, Diana; Rogers, Christopher S.; Chen, Juan; Zhang, Yulong; Welsh, Michael J.; Leno, Gregory H.; Engelhardt, John F.

    2008-01-01

    Somatic cell gene targeting combined with nuclear transfer cloning presents tremendous potential for the creation of new, large-animal models of human diseases. Mouse disease models often fail to reproduce human phenotypes, underscoring the need for the generation and study of alternative disease models. Mice deficient for CFTR have been poor models for cystic fibrosis (CF), lacking many aspects of human CF lung disease. In this study, we describe the production of a CFTR gene–deficient model in the domestic ferret using recombinant adeno-associated virus–mediated gene targeting in fibroblasts, followed by nuclear transfer cloning. As part of this approach, we developed a somatic cell rejuvenation protocol using serial nuclear transfer to produce live CFTR-deficient clones from senescent gene-targeted fibroblasts. We transferred 472 reconstructed embryos into 11 recipient jills and obtained 8 healthy male ferret clones heterozygous for a disruption in exon 10 of the CFTR gene. To our knowledge, this study represents the first description of genetically engineered ferrets and describes an approach that may be of substantial utility in modeling not only CF, but also other genetic diseases. PMID:18324338

  20. miR-128 and its target genes in tumorigenesis and metastasis

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Molin; Fu, Weiming; Wo, Lulu; Shu, Xiaohong; Liu, Fang; Li, Chuangang

    2013-12-10

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of endogenous, non-coding, 18–24 nucleotide length single-strand RNAs that could modulate gene expression at post-transcriptional level. Previous studies have shown that miR-128 enriched in the brain plays an important role in the development of nervous system and the maintenance of normal physical functions. Aberrant expression of miR-128 has been detected in many types of human tumors and its validated target genes are involved in cancer-related biological processes such as cell proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. In this review, we will summarize the roles of miR-128 and its target genes in tumorigenesis and metastasis. - Highlights: • Aberrant expression of miR-128 can be observed in many kinds of malignant tumors. • The molecular mechanisms regulating miR-128 expression are elucidated. • Roles of miR-128 and its target genes in tumorigenesis and metastasis are summarized.

  1. Zooplankton community analysis in the Changjiang River estuary by single-gene-targeted metagenomics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Fangping; Wang, Minxiao; Li, Chaolun; Sun, Song

    2014-07-01

    DNA barcoding provides accurate identification of zooplankton species through all life stages. Single-gene-targeted metagenomic analysis based on DNA barcode databases can facilitate longterm monitoring of zooplankton communities. With the help of the available zooplankton databases, the zooplankton community of the Changjiang (Yangtze) River estuary was studied using a single-gene-targeted metagenomic method to estimate the species richness of this community. A total of 856 mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase subunit 1 (cox1) gene sequences were determined. The environmental barcodes were clustered into 70 molecular operational taxonomic units (MOTUs). Forty-two MOTUs matched barcoded marine organisms with more than 90% similarity and were assigned to either the species (similarity>96%) or genus level (similarity<96%). Sibling species could also be distinguished. Many species that were overlooked by morphological methods were identified by molecular methods, especially gelatinous zooplankton and merozooplankton that were likely sampled at different life history phases. Zooplankton community structures differed significantly among all of the samples. The MOTU spatial distributions were influenced by the ecological habits of the corresponding species. In conclusion, single-gene-targeted metagenomic analysis is a useful tool for zooplankton studies, with which specimens from all life history stages can be identified quickly and effectively with a comprehensive database.

  2. Highly Improved Gene Targeting by Germline-Specific Cas9 Expression in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Kondo, Shu; Ueda, Ryu

    2013-01-01

    We report a simple yet extremely efficient platform for systematic gene targeting by the RNA-guided endonuclease Cas9 in Drosophila. The system comprises two transgenic strains: one expressing Cas9 protein from the germline-specific nanos promoter and the other ubiquitously expressing a custom guide RNA (gRNA) that targets a unique site in the genome. The two strains are crossed to form an active Cas9–gRNA complex specifically in germ cells, which cleaves and mutates the target site. We demonstrate rapid generation of mutants in seven neuropeptide and two microRNA genes in which no mutants have been described. Founder animals stably expressing Cas9–gRNA transmitted germline mutations to an average of 60% of their progeny, a dramatic improvement in efficiency over the previous methods based on transient Cas9 expression. Simultaneous cleavage of two sites by co-expression of two gRNAs efficiently induced internal deletion with frequencies of 4.3–23%. Our method is readily scalable to high-throughput gene targeting, thereby accelerating comprehensive functional annotation of the Drosophila genome. PMID:24002648

  3. One-step generation of triple gene-targeted pigs using CRISPR/Cas9 system

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xianlong; Cao, Chunwei; Huang, Jiaojiao; Yao, Jing; Hai, Tang; Zheng, Qiantao; Wang, Xiao; Zhang, Hongyong; Qin, Guosong; Cheng, Jinbo; Wang, Yanfang; Yuan, Zengqiang; Zhou, Qi; Wang, Hongmei; Zhao, Jianguo

    2016-01-01

    Pig shows multiple superior characteristics in anatomy, physiology, and genome that have made this species to be more suitable models for human diseases, especially for neurodegenerative diseases, because they have similar cerebral convolutions compared with human neocortex. Recently, CRISPR/Cas9 system shows enormous potential for engineering the pig genome. In this study, we expect to generate human Parkinson’s disease pig model using CRISPR/Cas9 system by simultaneously targeting three distinct genomic loci, parkin/DJ-1/PINK1, in Bama miniature pigs. By co-injection of Cas9 mRNA and multiplexing single guide RNAs (sgRNAs) targeting parkin, DJ-1, and PINK1 genes, respectively, into in vivo derived pronuclear embryos, we simultaneously targeted three distinct genomic loci. The gene modified piglets remain healthy and display normal behavior at the age of 10 months. In addition, despite the high number of sgRNAs were employed in the present study, our trio-based whole-genome sequencing analysis suggested that the incidence of off-target events is low. Our results demonstrate that the simplicity, efficiency, and power of the CRISPR/Cas9 system to allow for the modification of multiple genes in pigs and yield results of high medical value. PMID:26857844

  4. Automated design of hammerhead ribozymes and validation by targeting the PABPN1 gene transcript

    PubMed Central

    Kharma, Nawwaf; Varin, Luc; Abu-Baker, Aida; Ouellet, Jonathan; Najeh, Sabrine; Ehdaeivand, Mohammad-Reza; Belmonte, Gabriel; Ambri, Anas; Rouleau, Guy; Perreault, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    We present a new publicly accessible web-service, RiboSoft, which implements a comprehensive hammerhead ribozyme design procedure. It accepts as input a target sequence (and some design parameters) then generates a set of ranked hammerhead ribozymes, which target the input sequence. This paper describes the implemented procedure, which takes into consideration multiple objectives leading to a multi-objective ranking of the computer-generated ribozymes. Many ribozymes were assayed and validated, including four ribozymes targeting the transcript of a disease-causing gene (a mutant version of PABPN1). These four ribozymes were successfully tested in vitro and in vivo, for their ability to cleave the targeted transcript. The wet-lab positive results of the test are presented here demonstrating the real-world potential of both hammerhead ribozymes and RiboSoft. RiboSoft is freely available at the website http://ribosoft.fungalgenomics.ca/ribosoft/. PMID:26527730

  5. Multiplex gene editing via CRISPR/Cas9 exhibits desirable muscle hypertrophy without detectable off-target effects in sheep

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaolong; Niu, Yiyuan; Zhou, Jiankui; Yu, Honghao; Kou, Qifang; Lei, Anmin; Zhao, Xiaoe; Yan, Hailong; Cai, Bei; Shen, Qiaoyan; Zhou, Shiwei; Zhu, Haijing; Zhou, Guangxian; Niu, Wenzhi; Hua, Jinlian; Jiang, Yu; Huang, Xingxu; Ma, Baohua; Chen, Yulin

    2016-01-01

    The CRISPR/Cas9 system provides a flexible approach for genome engineering of genetic loci. Here, we successfully achieved precise gene targeting in sheep by co-injecting one-cell-stage embryos with Cas9 mRNA and RNA guides targeting three genes (MSTN, ASIP, and BCO2). We carefully examined the sgRNAs:Cas9-mediated targeting effects in injected embryos, somatic tissues, as well as gonads via cloning and sequencing. The targeting efficiencies in these three genes were within the range of 27–33% in generated lambs, and that of simultaneously targeting the three genes was 5.6%, which demonstrated that micro-injection of zygotes is an efficient approach for generating gene-modified sheep. Interestingly, we observed that disruption of the MSTN gene resulted in the desired muscle hypertrophy that is characterized by enlarged myofibers, thereby providing the first detailed evidence supporting that gene modifications had occurred at both the genetic and morphological levels. In addition, prescreening for the off-target effect of sgRNAs was performed on fibroblasts before microinjection, to ensure that no detectable off-target mutations from founder animals existed. Our findings suggested that the CRISPR/Cas9 method can be exploited as a powerful tool for livestock improvement by simultaneously targeting multiple genes that are responsible for economically significant traits. PMID:27562433

  6. Multiplex gene editing via CRISPR/Cas9 exhibits desirable muscle hypertrophy without detectable