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Sample records for ahs maneuver definition

  1. Manned maneuvering unit mission definition study. Volume 1: MMU applications analysis and performance requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Applications of Manned Maneuvering Units (MMU'S) to the space shuttle program are identified and described. The applications analyses included studies of the shuttle orbiter, orbiter subsystems, and both Sortie and Automated Payloads. Based on practicable MMU applications, general performance and control requirements for shuttle supporting maneuvering units are defined and compared to units evaluated on Skylab. The results of the MMU applications analyses and the general MMU performance and control requirements are presented. To describe a versatile utility-type maneuvering unit, conceptual designs of MMU support subsystems and ancillary equipment were prepared. Concepts for attaching and securing the MMU crewman to various vehicles, structure configurations, and rescue systems were developed. Concepts for ancillary provisions are reported.

  2. Manned maneuvering unit mission definition study. Volume 2: Appendices to the MMU applications analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Information used in identifying representative Manned Maneuvering Unit (MMU) from the many Automated and Sortie Payloads and orbiter subsystems is presented. Representative missions were selected to represent typical MMU applications across all payloads and orbiter subsystems. Data analysis sheets are provided with other applicable information. Calculations used in defining MMU general performance and control requirements to satisfy eleven space missions are included.

  3. A proposed definition for a pitch attitude target for the microburst escape maneuver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bray, Richard S.

    1990-01-01

    The Windshear Training Aid promulgated by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) defines the practical recovery maneuver following a microburst encounter as application of maximum thrust accompanied by rotation to an aircraft-specific target pitch attitude. In search of a simple method of determining this target, appropriate to a variety of aircraft types, a computer simulation was used to explore the suitability of a pitch target equal in numerical value to that of the angle of attack associated with stall warning. For the configurations and critical microburst shears simulated, this pitch target was demonstrated to be close to optimum.

  4. Terra Maneuvers

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-03-12

    ... 00:00:15 2013/044/14:05:24 Drag Makeup Maneuver #71 69991 002 ... 00:00:30 2012/032/14:55:00 Drag Makeup Maneuver #65 64486 229 ... 00:00:30 2012/096/15:00:00 Drag Makeup Maneuver #66 65418 229 ...

  5. Maneuver Automation Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uffelman, Hal; Goodson, Troy; Pellegrin, Michael; Stavert, Lynn; Burk, Thomas; Beach, David; Signorelli, Joel; Jones, Jeremy; Hahn, Yungsun; Attiyah, Ahlam; Illsley, Jeannette

    2009-01-01

    The Maneuver Automation Software (MAS) automates the process of generating commands for maneuvers to keep the spacecraft of the Cassini-Huygens mission on a predetermined prime mission trajectory. Before MAS became available, a team of approximately 10 members had to work about two weeks to design, test, and implement each maneuver in a process that involved running many maneuver-related application programs and then serially handing off data products to other parts of the team. MAS enables a three-member team to design, test, and implement a maneuver in about one-half hour after Navigation has process-tracking data. MAS accepts more than 60 parameters and 22 files as input directly from users. MAS consists of Practical Extraction and Reporting Language (PERL) scripts that link, sequence, and execute the maneuver- related application programs: "Pushing a single button" on a graphical user interface causes MAS to run navigation programs that design a maneuver; programs that create sequences of commands to execute the maneuver on the spacecraft; and a program that generates predictions about maneuver performance and generates reports and other files that enable users to quickly review and verify the maneuver design. MAS can also generate presentation materials, initiate electronic command request forms, and archive all data products for future reference.

  6. Rotor noise in maneuvering flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hsuan-Nien

    The objective of this research is to understand the physics of rotor noise in the maneuvering flight. To achieve this objective, an integrated noise prediction system is constructed, namely GenHel-MFW-PSU-WOPWOP. This noise prediction system includes a flight simulation code, a high fidelity free vortex-wake code, and a rotor acoustic prediction code. By using this noise prediction system, rotor maneuver noise characteristics are identified. Unlike periodic rotor noise, a longer duration is required to describe rotor maneuver noise. The variation of helicopter motion, blade motion and blade airloads are all influencing the noise prediction results in both noise level and directivity in the maneuvering flight. In this research, two types of rotor maneuver noise are identified, steady maneuver noise and transient maneuver noise. In the steady maneuver, rotor noise corresponds to a steady maneuver condition, which has nearly steady properties in flight dynamics and aerodynamics. Transient maneuver noise is the result of the transition between two steady maneuvers. In a transient maneuver, the helicopter experiences fluctuations in airload and helicopter angular rates, which lead to excess rotor noise. Even though the transient maneuver only exists for a fairly short period of time, the corresponding transient maneuver noise could be significant when compared to steady maneuver noise. The blade tip vortices also present complex behaviors in the transient maneuver condition. With stronger vortex circulation strength and the potential for vortex bundling, blade vortex-interaction (BVI) noise may increase significantly during a transient maneuver. In this research, it is shown that even with small pilot controls, significant BVI noise can be generated during a transient flight condition. Finally, through this research, the importance of transient maneuver noise is demonstrated and recognized.

  7. Orbital Maneuvering system design evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, C.; Humphries, C.

    1985-01-01

    Preliminary design considerations and changes made in the baseline space shuttle orbital maneuvering system (OMS) to reduce cost and weight are detailed. The definition of initial subsystem requirements, trade studies, and design approaches are considered. Design features of the engine, its injector, combustion chamber, nozzle extension and bipropellant valve are illustrated and discussed. The current OMS consists of two identical pods that use nitrogen tetroxide (NTO) and monomethylhydrazine (MMH) propellants to provide 1000 ft/sec of delta velocity for a payload of 65,000 pounds. Major systems are pressurant gas storage and control, propellant storage supply and quantity measurement, and the rocket engine, which includes a bipropellant valve, an injector/thrust chamber, and a nozzle. The subsystem provides orbit insertion, circularization, and on orbit and deorbit capability for the shuttle orbiter.

  8. Instantaneous Observability of Tightly Coupled SINS/GPS during Maneuvers.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Junxiang; Yu, Fei; Lan, Haiyu; Dong, Qianhui

    2016-01-01

    The tightly coupled strapdown inertial navigation system (SINS)/global position system (GPS) has been widely used. The system observability determines whether the system state can be estimated by a filter efficiently or not. In this paper, the observability analysis of a two-channel and a three-channel tightly coupled SINS/GPS are performed, respectively, during arbitrary translational maneuvers and angle maneuvers, where the translational maneuver and angle maneuver are modeled. A novel instantaneous observability matrix (IOM) based on a reconstructed psi-angle model is proposed to make the theoretical analysis simpler, which starts from the observability definition directly. Based on the IOM, a series of theoretical analysis are performed. Analysis results show that almost all kinds of translational maneuver and angle maneuver can make a three-channel system instantaneously observable, but there is no one translational maneuver or angle maneuver can make a two-channel system instantaneously observable. The system's performance is investigated when the system is not instantaneously observable. A series of simulation studies based on EKF are performed to confirm the analytic conclusions. PMID:27240369

  9. Instantaneous Observability of Tightly Coupled SINS/GPS during Maneuvers

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Junxiang; Yu, Fei; Lan, Haiyu; Dong, Qianhui

    2016-01-01

    The tightly coupled strapdown inertial navigation system (SINS)/global position system (GPS) has been widely used. The system observability determines whether the system state can be estimated by a filter efficiently or not. In this paper, the observability analysis of a two-channel and a three-channel tightly coupled SINS/GPS are performed, respectively, during arbitrary translational maneuvers and angle maneuvers, where the translational maneuver and angle maneuver are modeled. A novel instantaneous observability matrix (IOM) based on a reconstructed psi-angle model is proposed to make the theoretical analysis simpler, which starts from the observability definition directly. Based on the IOM, a series of theoretical analysis are performed. Analysis results show that almost all kinds of translational maneuver and angle maneuver can make a three-channel system instantaneously observable, but there is no one translational maneuver or angle maneuver can make a two-channel system instantaneously observable. The system’s performance is investigated when the system is not instantaneously observable. A series of simulation studies based on EKF are performed to confirm the analytic conclusions. PMID:27240369

  10. AH Her Observing Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waagen, Elizabeth O.

    2013-05-01

    Dr. Juan Echevarria (Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México) and colleagues request AAVSO assistance in a campaign on the Z Cam-type cataclysmic variable AH Her being carried out 2013 May 29 - June 18. They will be making photometric and spectroscopic observations of AH Her using the 2.1m and 0.84m telescopes at San Pedro Martir Observatory (SPM). Their goal is to carry out a radial velocity study of the system components using modern detectors; no study of AH Her has been made since the one by Horne, Wade, and Szkody in 1980-1981 (1986MNRAS.219..791H). Photometry and spectroscopy are requested. AH Her, for decades a reasonably "regular" Z Cam system, began exhibiting significantly anomalous behavior in ~2007. Since then it has experienced brief periods of fairly typical behavior interspersed with more anomalous intervals, including some unprecedented behavior. Most recently, it has returned to a more normal pattern of outbursts shape-wise but it is not back to its normal amplitude or frequency. AAVSO data will be essential for correlation in order to determine the precise time(s) of minimum occurring during the campaign. Finder charts with sequences may be created using the AAVSO Variable Star Plotter (http://www.aavso.org/vsp). Observations should be submitted to the AAVSO International Database. See full Alert Notice for more details.

  11. Automatic Pilot For Flight-Test Maneuvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duke, Eugene L.; Jones, Frank P.; Roncoli, Ralph B.

    1992-01-01

    Autopilot replaces pilot during automatic maneuvers. Pilot, based on ground, flies aircraft to required altitude, then turns control over to autopilot. Increases quality of maneuvers significantly beyond that attainable through remote manual control by pilot on ground. Also increases quality of maneuvers because it performs maneuvers faster than pilot could and because it does not have to repeat poorly executed maneuvers.

  12. Support and maneuvering device

    DOEpatents

    Wood, Richard L.

    1988-01-01

    A support and maneuvering device includes an elongated flexible inflatable enclosure having a fixed end and a movable end. The movable end is collapsible toward the fixed end to a contracted position when the enclosure is in a noninflated condition. Upon inflation, the movable end is movable away from the fixed end to an extended position. The movable end includes means for mounting an article such as a solar reflector thereon. The device also includes a plurality of position controlling means disposed about the movable end to effect adjusting movement of portions thereof by predetermined amounts and for controlling an angle at which the article disposed at the movable end is oriented. The plurality of position controlling means limits a suitable number degrees of freedom of the movable end for transmitting a steering motion thereto and for controlling the position thereof.

  13. Support and maneuvering device

    DOEpatents

    Wood, R.L.

    1987-03-23

    A support and maneuvering device includes an elongated flexible inflatable enclosure having a fixed end and a movable end. The movable end is collapsible toward the fixed end to a contracted position when the enclosure is in a noninflated condition. Upon inflation, the movable end is movable away from the fixed end to an extended position. The movable end includes means for mounting an article such as a solar reflector thereon. The device also includes a plurality of position controlling means disposed about the movable end to effect adjusting movement of portions thereof by predetermined amounts and for controlling an angle at which the article disposed at the movable end is oriented. The plurality of position controlling means limits a suitable number degrees of freedom of the movable end for transmitting a steering motion thereto and for controlling the position thereof. 9 figs.

  14. Aircraft agility maneuvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cliff, Eugene M.; Thompson, Brian G.

    1992-01-01

    A new dynamic model for aircraft motions is presented. This model can be viewed as intermediate between a point-mass model, in which the body attitude angles are control-like, and a rigid-body model, in which the body-attitude angles evolve according to Newton's Laws. Specifically, consideration is given to the case of symmetric flight, and a model is constructed in which the body roll-rate and the body pitch-rate are the controls. In terms of this body-rate model a minimum-time heading change maneuver is formulated. When the bounds on the body-rates are large the results are similar to the point-mass model in that the model can very quickly change the applied forces and produce an acceleration to turn the vehicle. With finite bounds on these rates, the forces change in a smooth way. This leads to a measurable effect of agility.

  15. An Independent and Coordinated Criterion for Kinematic Aircraft Maneuvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narkawicz, Anthony J.; Munoz, Cesar A.; Hagen, George

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes a mathematical definition of an aircraft-separation criterion for kinematic-based horizontal maneuvers. It has been formally proved that kinematic maneu- vers that satisfy the new criterion are independent and coordinated for repulsiveness, i.e., the distance at closest point of approach increases whether one or both aircraft maneuver according to the criterion. The proposed criterion is currently used in NASA's Airborne Coordinated Resolution and Detection (ACCoRD) set of tools for the design and analysis of separation assurance systems.

  16. 14 CFR 25.1507 - Maneuvering speed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Maneuvering speed. 25.1507 Section 25.1507....1507 Maneuvering speed. The maneuvering speed must be established so that it does not exceed the design maneuvering speed V A determined under § 25.335(c)....

  17. 14 CFR 25.1507 - Maneuvering speed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Maneuvering speed. 25.1507 Section 25.1507....1507 Maneuvering speed. The maneuvering speed must be established so that it does not exceed the design maneuvering speed V A determined under § 25.335(c)....

  18. 14 CFR 25.1507 - Maneuvering speed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Maneuvering speed. 25.1507 Section 25.1507....1507 Maneuvering speed. The maneuvering speed must be established so that it does not exceed the design maneuvering speed V A determined under § 25.335(c)....

  19. 14 CFR 25.1507 - Maneuvering speed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Maneuvering speed. 25.1507 Section 25.1507....1507 Maneuvering speed. The maneuvering speed must be established so that it does not exceed the design maneuvering speed V A determined under § 25.335(c)....

  20. 14 CFR 25.1507 - Maneuvering speed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Maneuvering speed. 25.1507 Section 25.1507....1507 Maneuvering speed. The maneuvering speed must be established so that it does not exceed the design maneuvering speed V A determined under § 25.335(c)....

  1. STS-134: Rendezvous Pitch Maneuver

    NASA Video Gallery

    On May 18, 2011, space shuttle Endeavour performed the Rendezvous Pitch Maneuver, or "backflip." With Commander Mark Kelly at the helm, Endeavour rotated 360 degrees backward to enable Internationa...

  2. STS-135: Rendezvous Pitch Maneuver

    NASA Video Gallery

    On July 10, 2011, space shuttle Atlantis performed the nine-minute Rendezvous Pitch Maneuver, or “backflip.” With Commander Chris Ferguson at the helm, Atlantis rotated 360 degrees backward to ...

  3. ARTEMIS Maneuvers into Lunar Orbit

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation visualizes the maneuvers required to move the ARTEMIS spacecraft from their kidney-shaped paths on each side of the moon to orbiting the moon. It took one and a half years, over 90 o...

  4. STS-133: Rendezvous Pitch Maneuver

    NASA Video Gallery

    At 1:15 p.m. EST Saturday, space shuttle Discovery began the nine-minute Rendezvous Pitch Maneuver, or "backflip." With Commander Steve Lindsey at the helm, Discovery rotated 360 degrees backward t...

  5. A Modified Delphi Study to Define "Ah Ha" Moments in Education Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pilcher, Jobeth

    2015-01-01

    Ah ha moments are often mentioned in education literature. These moments are suggested to be a powerful aspect of learning, yet limited research is present regarding this topic. Ah ha learning moments have also not been defined in the education literature, resulting in the likelihood that each educator and learner may have differing definitions.…

  6. Software for Autonomous Spacecraft Maneuvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bristow, John; Folta, Dave; Hawkins, Al; Dell, Greg

    2004-01-01

    The AutoCon computer programs facilitate and accelerate the planning and execution of orbital control maneuvers of spacecraft while analyzing and resolving mission constraints. AutoCon-F is executed aboard spacecraft, enabling the spacecraft to plan and execute maneuvers autonomously; AutoCon-G is designed for use on the ground. The AutoCon programs utilize advanced techniques of artificial intelligence, including those of fuzzy logic and natural-language scripting, to resolve multiple conflicting constraints and automatically plan maneuvers. These programs can be used to satisfy requirements for missions that involve orbits around the Earth, the Moon, or any planet, and are especially useful for missions in which there are requirements for frequent maneuvers and for resolution of complex conflicting constraints. During operations, the software targets new trajectories, places and sizes maneuvers, and controls spacecraft burns. AutoCon-G provides a userfriendly graphical interface, and can be used effectively by an analyst with minimal training. AutoCon-F reduces latency and supports multiple-spacecraft and formation-flying missions. The AutoCon architecture supports distributive processing, which can be critical for formation- control missions. AutoCon is completely object-oriented and can easily be enhanced by adding new objects and events. AutoCon-F was flight demonstrated onboard GSFC's EO-1 spacecraft flying in formation with Landsat-7.

  7. Dynamics of Voluntary Cough Maneuvers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naire, Shailesh

    2008-11-01

    Voluntary cough maneuvers are characterized by transient peak expiratory flows (PEF) exceeding the maximum expiratory flow-volume (MEFV) curve. In some cases, these flows can be well in excess of the MEFV, generally referred to as supramaximal flows. Understanding the flow-structure interaction involved in these maneuvers is the main goal of this work. We present a simple theoretical model for investigating the dynamics of voluntary cough and forced expiratory maneuvers. The core modeling idea is based on a 1-D model of high Reynolds number flow through flexible-walled tubes. The model incorporates key ingredients involved in these maneuvers: the expiratory effort generated by the abdominal and expiratory muscles, the glottis and the flexibility and compliance of the lung airways. Variations in these allow investigation of the expiratory flows generated by a variety of single cough maneuvers. The model successfully reproduces PEF which is shown to depend on the cough generation protocol, the glottis reopening time and the compliance of the airways. The particular highlight is in simulating supramaximal PEF for very compliant tubes. The flow-structure interaction mechanisms behind these are discussed. The wave speed theory of flow limitation is used to characterize the PEF. Existing hypotheses of the origin of PEF, from cough and forced expiration experiments, are also tested using this model.

  8. 33 CFR 84.23 - Maneuvering light.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Maneuvering light. 84.23 Section... RULES ANNEX I: POSITIONING AND TECHNICAL DETAILS OF LIGHTS AND SHAPES § 84.23 Maneuvering light. Notwithstanding the provisions of § 84.03(f), the maneuvering light described in Rule 34(b) shall be...

  9. 33 CFR 84.23 - Maneuvering light.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Maneuvering light. 84.23 Section... RULES ANNEX I: POSITIONING AND TECHNICAL DETAILS OF LIGHTS AND SHAPES § 84.23 Maneuvering light. Notwithstanding the provisions of § 84.03(f), the maneuvering light described in Rule 34(b) shall be...

  10. 33 CFR 84.23 - Maneuvering light.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Maneuvering light. 84.23 Section... RULES ANNEX I: POSITIONING AND TECHNICAL DETAILS OF LIGHTS AND SHAPES § 84.23 Maneuvering light. Notwithstanding the provisions of § 84.03(f), the maneuvering light described in Rule 34(b) shall be...

  11. 33 CFR 84.23 - Maneuvering light.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Maneuvering light. 84.23 Section... RULES ANNEX I: POSITIONING AND TECHNICAL DETAILS OF LIGHTS AND SHAPES § 84.23 Maneuvering light. Notwithstanding the provisions of § 84.03(f), the maneuvering light described in Rule 34(b) shall be...

  12. 33 CFR 84.23 - Maneuvering light.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Maneuvering light. 84.23 Section... RULES ANNEX I: POSITIONING AND TECHNICAL DETAILS OF LIGHTS AND SHAPES § 84.23 Maneuvering light. Notwithstanding the provisions of § 84.03(f), the maneuvering light described in Rule 34(b) shall be...

  13. Development of Skylab experiment T020 employing a foot controlled maneuvering unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hewes, D. E.; Glover, K. E.

    1972-01-01

    A review of the plans and preparations is presented for Skylab experiment T020, entitled Foot-Controlled Maneuvering Unit (FCMU). The FCMU is an experimental system intended to explore the use of simple astronaut maneuvering devices in the zero-gravity environment of space. This review also includes discussions of the FCMU concept and experiment hardware systems, as well as supporting experiment definition and development research studies conducted with the aid of zero-gravity simulators.

  14. Manned maneuvering unit latching mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allton, C. S.

    1980-01-01

    The astronaut/Manned Maneuvering Unit interface, which presented a challenging set of requirements for a latching mechanism, is described. A spring loaded cam segment with variable ratio pulley release actuator was developed to meet the requirements. To preclude jamming of the mechanism, special precautions were taken such as spring loaded bearing points and careful selection of materials to resist cold welding. The mechanism successfully passed a number of tests which partially simulated orbital conditions.

  15. Maneuver Optimization through Simulated Annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vries, W.

    2011-09-01

    We developed an efficient method for satellite maneuver optimization. It is based on a Monte Carlo (MC) approach in combination with Simulated Annealing. The former component enables us to consider all imaginable trajectories possible given the current satellite position and its available thrust, while the latter approach ensures that we reliably find the best global optimization solution. Furthermore, this optimization setup is eminently scalable. It runs efficiently on the current multi-core generation of desktop computers, but is equally at home on massively parallel high performance computers (HPC). The baseline method for desktops uses a modified two-body propagator that includes the lunar gravitational force, and corrects for nodal and apsidal precession. For the HPC environment, on the other hand, we can include all the necessary components for a full force-model propagation: higher gravitational moments, atmospheric drag, solar radiation pressure, etc. A typical optimization scenario involves an initial orbit and a destination orbit / trajectory, a time period under consideration, and an available amount of thrust. After selecting a particular optimization (e.g., least amount of fuel, shortest maneuver), the program will determine when and in what direction to burn by what amount. Since we are considering all possible trajectories, we are not constrained to any particular transfer method (e.g., Hohmann transfers). Indeed, in some cases gravitational slingshots around the Earth turn out to be the best result. The paper will describe our approach in detail, its complement of optimizations for single- and multi-burn sequences, and some in-depth examples. In particular, we highlight an example where it is used to analyze a sequence of maneuvers after the fact, as well as showcase its utility as a planning and analysis tool for future maneuvers.

  16. Simulation studies for wells AH-4bis/AH-17 and AH-18, Ahuachapan Geothermal Field

    SciTech Connect

    Monterrosa, Manuel Ernesto

    1996-01-24

    Well AH-4bis, at the Ahuachapan Geothermal Field is planned to be drilled on the same pad as the former AH-4. A simulation study was carried out for two casing dameters 13 5/8 and 9 5/8” in order to estimate its production and to know its economic feasibility. The simulation results indcate a high probability of production in the range of 7 Mwe, equivalent to 120 kg/s total mass flow rate, 1250 kJ/kg at 6 bar-a for the new well AH-4bis. Well AH- 17 is good producer, during 1991 after ten years of production, the well was shut-in due to silica scaling problems. A wellbore simulation was carried out in order to predict the new production conditions after the work-over, mainly to estimate the water flow rate in order to reduce the silica scaling. The results indicate a very low water flow rate. The match between the simulated and measured production curves after the work-over was successful. The well AH-18 is located at the southern part of the actual bore field. CEL is planning to expand the borefield at this area and it is neccessary to estimate the possible production condtions at that zone. The results indicate a high probabilty of production at that area. The power potential is estimated at 3.5 Mwe per well at WHP 6 bar-a and the wells will not require induction.

  17. The maneuver search and the maneuver search trajectory framework of search heavy torpedo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Wenjin; Zhang, Jingyuan; Li, Jitao

    2016-01-01

    With the development of technology capability of submarine launching heavy torpedo and the demand of intellectualized combat, the paper raises the concept of torpedo maneuver search and analyses maneuver search opportunity. It is necessary to realize the long range heavy torpedo's maneuver search that heavy torpedo's maneuver search can cover the target's location error which results from launching platform's position precision and the target's intentional maneuver when the torpedo is launched. The technology framework of the heavy torpedo's maneuver search trajectory is set up.

  18. Orbit trim maneuver design and implementation for the 1975 Mars Viking Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hintz, G. R.; Farless, D. L.; Adams, M. J.

    1978-01-01

    The Viking Mission included the insertion of two unmanned spacecraft into orbit about Mars and the deployment of a soft-lander from each. A description is presented of the adaptive design and implementation of the spacecraft propulsive maneuvers as these flights progressed, taking into account also the inflight results for the orbital phase of the primary Viking mission. The design process included the selection of target parameters and the minimization of both propellant usage and the effects of execution errors, while complying with mission and operational constraints. All maneuvers performed to trim the spacecraft orbits are considered. Attention is given to navigation requirements, geometry definitions and terminology, maneuver mechanization and constraints, and maneuver capability.

  19. Direct lateral maneuvers in hawkmoths.

    PubMed

    Greeter, Jeremy S M; Hedrick, Tyson L

    2016-01-01

    We used videography to investigate direct lateral maneuvers, i.e. 'sideslips', of the hawkmoth Manduca sexta. M. sexta sideslip by rolling their entire body and wings to reorient their net force vector. During sideslip they increase net aerodynamic force by flapping with greater amplitude, (in both wing elevation and sweep), allowing them to continue to support body weight while rolled. To execute the roll maneuver we observed in sideslips, they use an asymmetric wing stroke; increasing the pitch of the roll-contralateral wing pair, while decreasing that of the roll-ipsilateral pair. They also increase the wing sweep amplitude of, and decrease the elevation amplitude of, the contralateral wing pair relative to the ipsilateral pair. The roll maneuver unfolds in a stairstep manner, with orientation changing more during downstroke than upstroke. This is due to smaller upstroke wing pitch angle asymmetries as well as increased upstroke flapping counter-torque from left-right differences in global reference frame wing velocity about the moth's roll axis. Rolls are also opposed by stabilizing aerodynamic moments from lateral motion, such that rightward roll velocity will be opposed by rightward motion. Computational modeling using blade-element approaches confirm the plausibility of a causal linkage between the previously mentioned wing kinematics and roll/sideslip. Model results also predict high degrees of axial and lateral damping. On the time scale of whole and half wing strokes, left-right wing pair asymmetries directly relate to the first, but not second, derivative of roll. Collectively, these results strongly support a roll-based sideslip with a high degree of roll damping in M. sexta. PMID:26740573

  20. Direct lateral maneuvers in hawkmoths

    PubMed Central

    Greeter, Jeremy S. M.; Hedrick, Tyson L.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT We used videography to investigate direct lateral maneuvers, i.e. ‘sideslips’, of the hawkmoth Manduca sexta. M. sexta sideslip by rolling their entire body and wings to reorient their net force vector. During sideslip they increase net aerodynamic force by flapping with greater amplitude, (in both wing elevation and sweep), allowing them to continue to support body weight while rolled. To execute the roll maneuver we observed in sideslips, they use an asymmetric wing stroke; increasing the pitch of the roll-contralateral wing pair, while decreasing that of the roll-ipsilateral pair. They also increase the wing sweep amplitude of, and decrease the elevation amplitude of, the contralateral wing pair relative to the ipsilateral pair. The roll maneuver unfolds in a stairstep manner, with orientation changing more during downstroke than upstroke. This is due to smaller upstroke wing pitch angle asymmetries as well as increased upstroke flapping counter-torque from left-right differences in global reference frame wing velocity about the moth's roll axis. Rolls are also opposed by stabilizing aerodynamic moments from lateral motion, such that rightward roll velocity will be opposed by rightward motion. Computational modeling using blade-element approaches confirm the plausibility of a causal linkage between the previously mentioned wing kinematics and roll/sideslip. Model results also predict high degrees of axial and lateral damping. On the time scale of whole and half wing strokes, left-right wing pair asymmetries directly relate to the first, but not second, derivative of roll. Collectively, these results strongly support a roll-based sideslip with a high degree of roll damping in M. sexta. PMID:26740573

  1. Direct lateral maneuvers in hawkmoths.

    PubMed

    Greeter, Jeremy S M; Hedrick, Tyson L

    2016-01-01

    We used videography to investigate direct lateral maneuvers, i.e. 'sideslips', of the hawkmoth Manduca sexta. M. sexta sideslip by rolling their entire body and wings to reorient their net force vector. During sideslip they increase net aerodynamic force by flapping with greater amplitude, (in both wing elevation and sweep), allowing them to continue to support body weight while rolled. To execute the roll maneuver we observed in sideslips, they use an asymmetric wing stroke; increasing the pitch of the roll-contralateral wing pair, while decreasing that of the roll-ipsilateral pair. They also increase the wing sweep amplitude of, and decrease the elevation amplitude of, the contralateral wing pair relative to the ipsilateral pair. The roll maneuver unfolds in a stairstep manner, with orientation changing more during downstroke than upstroke. This is due to smaller upstroke wing pitch angle asymmetries as well as increased upstroke flapping counter-torque from left-right differences in global reference frame wing velocity about the moth's roll axis. Rolls are also opposed by stabilizing aerodynamic moments from lateral motion, such that rightward roll velocity will be opposed by rightward motion. Computational modeling using blade-element approaches confirm the plausibility of a causal linkage between the previously mentioned wing kinematics and roll/sideslip. Model results also predict high degrees of axial and lateral damping. On the time scale of whole and half wing strokes, left-right wing pair asymmetries directly relate to the first, but not second, derivative of roll. Collectively, these results strongly support a roll-based sideslip with a high degree of roll damping in M. sexta.

  2. Orbital maneuvers and space rendezvous

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butikov, Eugene I.

    2015-12-01

    Several possibilities of launching a space vehicle from the orbital station are considered and compared. Orbital maneuvers discussed in the paper can be useful in designing a trajectory for a specific space mission. The relative motion of orbiting bodies is investigated on examples of spacecraft rendezvous with the space station that stays in a circular orbit around the Earth. An elementary approach is illustrated by an accompanying simulation computer program and supported by a mathematical treatment based on fundamental laws of physics and conservation laws. Material is appropriate for engineers and other personnel involved in space exploration, undergraduate and graduate students studying classical physics and orbital mechanics.

  3. Optical gradient force assist maneuver.

    PubMed

    Artusio-Glimpse, Alexandra B; Wirth, Jacob H; Swartzlander, Grover A

    2016-09-01

    We describe an energy transfer process whereby a moving particle loses (or gains) kinetic energy upon interacting with the moving optical potential of a swept beam of light. This approach is akin to a gravitational assist maneuver for interplanetary satellite propulsion. Special consideration is given to the stopping condition. For analytical convenience, we examine the Rayleigh scattering regime, providing examples at small and large scattering angles. A 5% uncertainty in the initial particle speed and position has negligible effect on the slowing/speeding ability when the beam size is much larger than the particle. PMID:27607993

  4. Optimal Electrodynamic Tether Phasing Maneuvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bitzer, Matthew S.; Hall, Christopher D.

    2007-01-01

    We study the minimum-time orbit phasing maneuver problem for a constant-current electrodynamic tether (EDT). The EDT is assumed to be a point mass and the electromagnetic forces acting on the tether are always perpendicular to the local magnetic field. After deriving and non-dimensionalizing the equations of motion, the only input parameters become current and the phase angle. Solution examples, including initial Lagrange costates, time of flight, thrust plots, and thrust angle profiles, are given for a wide range of current magnitudes and phase angles. The two-dimensional cases presented use a non-tilted magnetic dipole model, and the solutions are compared to existing literature. We are able to compare similar trajectories for a constant thrust phasing maneuver and we find that the time of flight is longer for the constant thrust case with similar initial thrust values and phase angles. Full three-dimensional solutions, which use a titled magnetic dipole model, are also analyzed for orbits with small inclinations.

  5. Cassini-Huygens maneuver automation for navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodson, Troy; Attiyah, Amy; Buffington, Brent; Hahn, Yungsun; Pojman, Joan; Stavert, Bob; Strange, Nathan; Stumpf, Paul; Wagner, Sean; Wolff, Peter; Wong, Mau

    2006-01-01

    Many times during the Cassini-Huygens mission to Saturn, propulsive maneuvers must be spaced so closely together that there isn't enough time or workforce to execute the maneuver-related software manually, one subsystem at a time. Automation is required. Automating the maneuver design process has involved close cooperation between teams. We present the contribution from the Navigation system. In scope, this includes trajectory propagation and search, generation of ephemerides, general tasks such as email notification and file transfer, and presentation materials. The software has been used to help understand maneuver optimization results, Huygens probe delivery statistics, and Saturn ring-plane crossing geometry. The Maneuver Automation Software (MAS), developed for the Cassini-Huygens program enables frequent maneuvers by handling mundane tasks such as creation of deliverable files, file delivery, generation and transmission of email announcements, generation of presentation material and other supporting documentation. By hand, these tasks took up hours, if not days, of work for each maneuver. Automated, these tasks may be completed in under an hour. During the cruise trajectory the spacing of maneuvers was such that development of a maneuver design could span about a month, involving several other processes in addition to that described, above. Often, about the last five days of this process covered the generation of a final design using an updated orbit-determination estimate. To support the tour trajectory, the orbit determination data cut-off of five days before the maneuver needed to be reduced to approximately one day and the whole maneuver development process needed to be reduced to less than a week..

  6. 14 CFR 23.423 - Maneuvering loads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Balancing Surfaces § 23.423 Maneuvering loads. Each horizontal surface and its supporting structure, and the...-down pitching conditions is the sum of the balancing loads at V and the specified value of the normal... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Maneuvering loads. 23.423 Section...

  7. 14 CFR 23.423 - Maneuvering loads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Balancing Surfaces § 23.423 Maneuvering loads. Each horizontal surface and its supporting structure, and the...-down pitching conditions is the sum of the balancing loads at V and the specified value of the normal... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Maneuvering loads. 23.423 Section...

  8. 46 CFR 109.564 - Maneuvering characteristics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Maneuvering characteristics. 109.564 Section 109.564 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) A-MOBILE OFFSHORE DRILLING UNITS OPERATIONS Miscellaneous § 109.564 Maneuvering characteristics. (a) The master or person in charge of...

  9. 46 CFR 109.564 - Maneuvering characteristics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Maneuvering characteristics. 109.564 Section 109.564 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) A-MOBILE OFFSHORE DRILLING UNITS OPERATIONS Miscellaneous § 109.564 Maneuvering characteristics. (a) The master or person in charge of...

  10. 46 CFR 109.564 - Maneuvering characteristics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Maneuvering characteristics. 109.564 Section 109.564 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) A-MOBILE OFFSHORE DRILLING UNITS OPERATIONS Miscellaneous § 109.564 Maneuvering characteristics. (a) The master or person in charge of...

  11. 46 CFR 109.564 - Maneuvering characteristics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Maneuvering characteristics. 109.564 Section 109.564 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) A-MOBILE OFFSHORE DRILLING UNITS OPERATIONS Miscellaneous § 109.564 Maneuvering characteristics. (a) The master or person in charge of...

  12. 46 CFR 109.564 - Maneuvering characteristics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Maneuvering characteristics. 109.564 Section 109.564 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) A-MOBILE OFFSHORE DRILLING UNITS OPERATIONS Miscellaneous § 109.564 Maneuvering characteristics. (a) The master or person in charge of...

  13. Paradoxical responses to pacing maneuvers differentiating atrioventricular node reentrant tachycardia and junctional tachycardia.

    PubMed

    Tokuda, Michifumi; Yamane, Teiichi; Matsuo, Seiichiro; Tokutake, Kenichi; Yokoyama, Kenichi; Hioki, Mika; Narui, Ryohsuke; Tanigawa, Shin-Ichi; Yamashita, Seigo; Inada, Keiichi; Yoshimura, Michihiro

    2016-02-01

    A 40-year-old female presented at our hospital because of heart palpitations. During an electrophysiological study, atrioventricular (AV) conduction showed dual AV nodal physiology. Three types of supraventricular tachycardia (SVT) were induced. The initiation of SVT was reproducibility dependent on a critical A-H interval prolongation. An early premature atrial contraction during SVT repeatedly advanced the immediate His potential with termination of the tachycardia, indicating AV node reentrant tachycardia (AVNRT). However, after atrial overdrive pacing during SVT without termination of the tachycardia, the first return electrogram resulted in an AHHA response, consistent with junctional tachycardia. The mechanism of paradoxical responses to pacing maneuvers differentiating AVNRT and junctional tachycardia was discussed.

  14. Tactical Maneuvering Using Immunized Sequence Selection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaneshige, John; KrishnaKumar, K.; Shung, Felix

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes a tactical maneuvering system that uses an artificial immune system based approach for selecting maneuver sequences. This approach combines the problem solving abilities of genetic algorithms with the memory retention characteristics of an immune system. Of significant importance here is the fact that the tactical maneuvering system can make time-critical decisions to accomplish near-term objectives within a dynamic environment. These objectives can be received from a human operator, autonomous executive, or various flight planning specialists. Simulation tests were performed using a high performance military aircraft model. Results demonstrate the potential of using immunized sequence selection in order to accomplish tactical maneuvering objectives ranging from flying to a location while avoiding unforeseen obstacles, to performing relative positioning in support of air combat maneuvering.

  15. Atmospheric maneuvering during Martian entry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tauber, Michael E.; Bowles, Jeffrey V.; Yang, Lily

    A comparative-advantages study is made of two different Martian atmospheric entry maneuvers, on the basis of calculation results for the case of a vehicle with a maximum L/D ratio of 2.3. Entries from a highly elliptical Martian orbit at 5 km/sec are more difficult than those from a lower altitude and speed orbit at 3.5 km/sec, due to their more stringent guidance requirements. Efforts to reduce the deceleration for the higher speed entry by lift-modulation achieved a 40-percent reduction, but at the cost of a 50-percent decrease in lateral range. The lower-speed entry's gliding trajectory is noted to encounter a far more benign atmospheric environment.

  16. Energy Index For Aircraft Maneuvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chidester, Thomas R. (Inventor); Lynch, Robert E. (Inventor); Lawrence, Robert E. (Inventor); Amidan, Brett G. (Inventor); Ferryman, Thomas A. (Inventor); Drew, Douglas A. (Inventor); Ainsworth, Robert J. (Inventor); Prothero, Gary L. (Inventor); Romanowski, Tomothy P. (Inventor); Bloch, Laurent (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    Method and system for analyzing, separately or in combination, kinetic energy and potential energy and/or their time derivatives, measured or estimated or computed, for an aircraft in approach phase or in takeoff phase, to determine if the aircraft is or will be put in an anomalous configuration in order to join a stable approach path or takeoff path. A 3 reference value of kinetic energy andor potential energy (or time derivatives thereof) is provided, and a comparison index .for the estimated energy and reference energy is computed and compared with a normal range of index values for a corresponding aircraft maneuver. If the computed energy index lies outside the normal index range, this phase of the aircraft is identified as anomalous, non-normal or potentially unstable.

  17. Manned maneuvering unit: User's guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lenda, J. A.

    1978-01-01

    The space shuttle will provide an opportunity to extend and enhance the crew's inherent capabilities in orbit by allowing them to operate effectively outside of their spacecraft by means of extravehicular activity. For this role, the shuttle crew will have a new, easier to don and operate space suit with integral life support system, and a self-contained propulsive backpack. The backpack, called the manned maneuvering unit, will allow the crew to operate beyond the confines of the Shuttle cargo bay and fly to any part of their own spacecraft or to nearby free-flying payloads or structure. This independent mobility will be used to support a wide variety of activities including free-space transfer of cargo and personnel, inspection and monitoring of orbital operations, and construction and assembly of large structures in orbit.

  18. Multi-Maneuver Clohessy-Wiltshire Targeting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dannemiller, David P.

    2011-01-01

    Orbital rendezvous involves execution of a sequence of maneuvers by a chaser vehicle to bring the chaser to a desired state relative to a target vehicle while meeting intermediate and final relative constraints. Intermediate and final relative constraints are necessary to meet a multitude of requirements such as to control approach direction, ensure relative position is adequate for operation of space-to-space communication systems and relative sensors, provide fail-safe trajectory features, and provide contingency hold points. The effect of maneuvers on constraints is often coupled, so the maneuvers must be solved for as a set. For example, maneuvers that affect orbital energy change both the chaser's height and downrange position relative to the target vehicle. Rendezvous designers use experience and rules-of-thumb to design a sequence of maneuvers and constraints. A non-iterative method is presented for targeting a rendezvous scenario that includes a sequence of maneuvers and relative constraints. This method is referred to as Multi-Maneuver Clohessy-Wiltshire Targeting (MM_CW_TGT). When a single maneuver is targeted to a single relative position, the classic CW targeting solution is obtained. The MM_CW_TGT method involves manipulation of the CW state transition matrix to form a linear system. As a starting point for forming the algorithm, the effects of a series of impulsive maneuvers on the state are derived. Simple and moderately complex examples are used to demonstrate the pattern of the resulting linear system. The general form of the pattern results in an algorithm for formation of the linear system. The resulting linear system relates the effect of maneuver components and initial conditions on relative constraints specified by the rendezvous designer. Solution of the linear system includes the straight-forward inverse of a square matrix. Inversion of the square matrix is assured if the designer poses a controllable scenario - a scenario where the the

  19. RESULTS FROM THE AHS PESTICIDE EXPOSURE STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Agricultural Health Study/Pesticide Exposure Study (AHS/PES) measured exposures resulting from agricultural use of 2,4-D and chlorpyrifos for a subset of applicators in the AHS cohort. Through on-farm measurements and observations, data collected in the exposure study will...

  20. Cassini Solstice Mission Maneuver Experience: Year One

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, Sean V.; Arrieta, Juan; Ballard, Christopher G.; Hahn, Yungsun; Stumpf, Paul W.; Valerino, Powtawche N.

    2011-01-01

    The Cassini-Huygens spacecraft began its four-year Prime Mission to study Saturn's system in July 2004. Two tour extensions followed: a two-year Equinox Mission beginning in July 2008 and a seven-year Solstice Mission starting in September 2010. This paper highlights Cassini maneuver activities from June 2010 through June 2011, covering the transition from the Equinox to Solstice Mission. This interval included 38 scheduled maneuvers, nine targeted Titan flybys, three targeted Enceladus flybys, and one close Rhea flyby. In addition, beyond the demanding nominal navigation schedule, numerous unforeseen challenges further complicated maneuver operations. These challenges will be discussed in detail.

  1. 14 CFR 23.337 - Limit maneuvering load factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Limit maneuvering load factors. 23.337... Flight Loads § 23.337 Limit maneuvering load factors. (a) The positive limit maneuvering load factor n... airplanes; or (3) 6.0 for acrobatic category airplanes. (b) The negative limit maneuvering load factor...

  2. 14 CFR 29.337 - Limit maneuvering load factor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Limit maneuvering load factor. 29.337... Limit maneuvering load factor. The rotorcraft must be designed for— (a) A limit maneuvering load factor... load factor not less than 2.0 and any negative limit maneuvering load factor of not less than −0.5...

  3. 14 CFR 27.337 - Limit maneuvering load factor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Limit maneuvering load factor. 27.337... Limit maneuvering load factor. The rotorcraft must be designed for— (a) A limit maneuvering load factor... load factor not less than 2.0 and any negative limit maneuvering load factor of not less than −0.5...

  4. Trick maneuvers in cervical dystonia: investigation of movement- and touch-related changes in polymyographic activity.

    PubMed

    Wissel, J; Müller, J; Ebersbach, G; Poewe, W

    1999-11-01

    Antagonistic gestures or trick maneuvers are well-known clinical features to reduce or abolish dystonic posturing in cervical dystonia (CD). The maneuvers typically consist of a finger touch to the facial skin but their physiology remains unknown. To determine the temporal profile of geste maneuver performance, 25 patients with idiopathic CD were studied by means of polymyography of six cervical muscles prior to any botulinum toxin treatment. Two piezoelectric elements fixed to a fingertip of the hand involved in the trick maneuver and to the facial target region, respectively, were used to relate the essential points of the trick maneuver time course (start of geste-arm movement, facial contact, end of contact, end of movement) to changes in polymyographic activity. Thirteen patients (52%) showed marked reductions of electromyographic (EMG) activity (> or =50% in at least one muscle) during arm movement, definitely prior to contact between fingers and facial target area; in the remaining 12 patients (48%), geste-related EMG effects were confined to facial-finger contact. These results might indicate different physiological mechanisms in clinically indistinguishable antagonistic gestures.

  5. Cassini's Maneuver Automation Software (MAS) Process: How to Successfully Command 200 Navigation Maneuvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Genevie Velarde; Mohr, David; Kirby, Charles E.

    2008-01-01

    To keep Cassini on its complex trajectory, more than 200 orbit trim maneuvers (OTMs) have been planned from July 2004 to July 2010. With only a few days between many of these OTMs, the operations process of planning and executing the necessary commands had to be automated. The resulting Maneuver Automation Software (MAS) process minimizes the workforce required for, and maximizes the efficiency of, the maneuver design and uplink activities. The MAS process is a well-organized and logically constructed interface between Cassini's Navigation (NAV), Spacecraft Operations (SCO), and Ground Software teams. Upon delivery of an orbit determination (OD) from NAV, the MAS process can generate a maneuver design and all related uplink and verification products within 30 minutes. To date, all 112 OTMs executed by the Cassini spacecraft have been successful. MAS was even used to successfully design and execute a maneuver while the spacecraft was in safe mode.

  6. AhR signalling and dioxin toxicity.

    PubMed

    Sorg, Olivier

    2014-10-15

    Dioxins are a family of molecules associated to several industrial accidents such as Ludwigshafen in 1953 or Seveso in 1976, to the Agent Orange used during the war of Vietnam, and more recently to the poisoning of the former president of Ukraine, Victor Yushchenko. These persistent organic pollutants are by-products of industrial activity and bind to an intracellular receptor, AhR, with a high potency. In humans, exposure to dioxins, in particular 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) induces a cutaneous syndrome known as chloracne, consisting in the development of many small skin lesions (hamartoma), lasting for 2-5 years. Although TCDD has been classified by the WHO as a human carcinogen, its carcinogenic potential to humans is not clearly demonstrated. It was first believed that AhR activation accounted for most, if not all, biological properties of dioxins. However, certain AhR agonists found in vegetables do not induce chloracne, and other chemicals, in particular certain therapeutic agents, may induce a chloracne-like syndrome without activating AhR. It is time to rethink the mechanism of dioxin toxicity and analyse in more details the biological events following exposure to these compounds and other AhR agonists, some of which have a very different chemical structure than TCDD. In particular various food-containing AhR agonists are non-toxic and may on the contrary have beneficial properties to human health. PMID:24239782

  7. Partitioning kinetic energy during freewheeling wheelchair maneuvers.

    PubMed

    Medola, Fausto O; Dao, Phuc V; Caspall, Jayme J; Sprigle, Stephen

    2014-03-01

    This paper describes a systematic method to partition the kinetic energy (KE) of a free-wheeling wheelchair. An ultralightweight rigid frame wheelchair was instrumented with two axle-mounted encoders and data acquisition equipment to accurately measure the velocity of the drive wheels. A mathematical model was created combining physical specifications and geometry of the wheelchair and its components. Two able-bodied subjects propelled the wheelchair over four courses that involved straight and turning maneuvers at differing speeds. The KE of the wheelchair was divided into three components: translational, rotational, and turning energy. This technique was sensitive to the changing contributions of the three energy components across maneuvers. Translational energy represented the major component of total KE in all maneuvers except a zero radius turn in which turning energy was dominant. Both translational and rotational energies are directly related to wheelchair speed. Partitioning KE offers a useful means of investigating the dynamics of a moving wheelchair. The described technique permits analysis of KE imparted to the wheelchair during maneuvers involving changes in speed and direction, which are most representative of mobility in everyday life. This technique can be used to study the effort required to maneuver different types and configurations of wheelchairs.

  8. Life testing of secondary silver-zinc cells for the orbiting maneuvering vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brewer, Jeffrey C.; Doreswamy, Rajiv; Jackson, Lorna G.

    1990-01-01

    Over the past 5 years, extensive testing has been performed at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) on a variety of secondary (rechargeable) silver-zinc (Ag-Zn) cells for the Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle (OMV). The first tests performed were to determine the feasibility of using such a cell in a long-life (18-month), low-Earth-orbit (LEO) application. Results from these tests were promising, so testing continued with a 250-Ah cell that was specifically designed for this type of application. Once again, results from the tests were promising. Following a review of the data from these previous tests, slight modifications to the 250-Ah design were necessary to alleviate problem areas. Currently, MSFC is testing a 350-Ah design that has incorporated these changes and is the baseline design for the OMV. This test began in mid-November, 1989, and will be complete in the spring of 1991, barring any substantial offline time. A report is presented on the preliminary results from the first few months of this test and they are compared to results obtained in previous tests done at MFSC.

  9. Dawn Statistical Maneuver Design for Vesta Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parcher, Daniel W.; Whiffen, Gregory J.

    2011-01-01

    In July of 2011 the Dawn spacecraft is scheduled to begin orbital operations at Vesta, a large main-belt asteroid. Dawn is a NASA Discovery mission that uses solar-electric low-thrust ion propulsion for both interplanetary cruise and orbital operations. Navigating between the Dawn project's four targeted science orbits at Vesta requires a plan that accounts for uncertainties not only in thrust execution, orbit determination, and other spacecraft forces, but also large uncertainties in characteristics of Vesta - such as the asteroid's gravity field and pole orientation. Accommodating these uncertainties requires strategic use of low-thrust maneuvers reserved for statistical trajectory corrections. This paper describes the placement and evaluation of low-thrust statistical maneuvers during two key phases of the Vesta mission along with a discussion of the tools, constraints, and methods used to plan those maneuvers.

  10. Cassini Maneuver Experience: Ending the Equinox Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ballard, Christopher G.; Arrieta, Juan; Hahn, Yungsun; Stumpf, Paul W.; Wagner, Sean V.; Williams, Powtawche N.

    2010-01-01

    The Cassini-Huygens spacecraft was launched in 1997 on a mission to observe Saturn and its many moons. After a seven-year interplanetary cruise, it entered a Saturnian orbit for a four-year Prime Mission in 2004 and began a two-year Equinox Mission in 2008. It has been approved for another seven-year mission, the Solstice Mission, starting in October 2010. This paper highlights significant maneuver activities performed from July 2009 to June 2010. We present results for the 45 maneuvers during this time. The successful navigation of the Cassini orbiter can be attributed in part to the accurate maneuver performance, which has greatly exceeded pre-launch expectations.

  11. An algorithm for targeting finite burn maneuvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barbieri, R. W.; Wyatt, G. H.

    1972-01-01

    An algorithm was developed to solve the following problem: given the characteristics of the engine to be used to make a finite burn maneuver and given the desired orbit, when must the engine be ignited and what must be the orientation of the thrust vector so as to obtain the desired orbit? The desired orbit is characterized by classical elements and functions of these elements whereas the control parameters are characterized by the time to initiate the maneuver and three direction cosines which locate the thrust vector. The algorithm was built with a Monte Carlo capability whereby samples are taken from the distribution of errors associated with the estimate of the state and from the distribution of errors associated with the engine to be used to make the maneuver.

  12. Maneuver and buffet characteristics of fighter aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, E. J.; Mckinney, L. W.; Carmichael, J. G.

    1973-01-01

    Recent research efforts in the improvement of the maneuverability of fighter aircraft in the high-subsonic and transonic speed range are reviewed with emphasis on the factors affecting aerodynamic boundaries, such as maximum obtainable lift, buffet onset, pitchup, wing rock, and nose slice. The investigations were made using a general research configuration which encompassed a systematic matrix of wing-design parameters. These results illustrated the sensitivity of section and planform geometry to a selected design point. The incorporation of variable-geometry wing devices in the form of flaps or leading-edge slats was shown to provide controlled flow over a wide range of flight conditions and substantial improvements in maneuver capabilities. Additional studies indicated that the blending of a highly swept maneuver strake with an efficient, moderately swept wing offers a promising approach for improving maneuver characteristics at high angles of attack without excessive penalties in structural weight.

  13. Maneuver and buffet characteristics of fighter aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, E. J.; Mckinney, L. W.; Carmichael, J. G.

    1972-01-01

    The high subsonic and transonic characteristics of fighter aircraft and the factors affecting aerodynamic boundaries, such as maximum obtainable lift, buffet onset, pitchup, wing rock, and nose slice are discussed. Investigations were made using a general research configuration which encompassed a systematic matrix of wing design parameters. These results emphasized the sensitivity to section and planform geometry at the selected design point. The incorporation of variable-wing-geometry devices in the form of leading-edge slats or flaps was shown in a number of flight and wind-tunnel studies to provide controlled flow over a wide range of flight conditions and substantial improvements in maneuver capabilities. Additional studies indicated that the blending of a highly swept maneuver strake with an efficient moderately swept wing offers a promising approach for improving maneuver characteristics at high angles of attack without excessive penalties in structural weight.

  14. Maneuvering and control of flexible space robots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meirovitch, Leonard; Lim, Seungchul

    1994-01-01

    This paper is concerned with a flexible space robot capable of maneuvering payloads. The robot is assumed to consist of two hinge-connected flexible arms and a rigid end-effector holding a payload; the robot is mounted on a rigid platform floating in space. The equations of motion are nonlinear and of high order. Based on the assumption that the maneuvering motions are one order of magnitude larger than the elastic vibrations, a perturbation approach permits design of controls for the two types of motion separately. The rigid-body maneuvering is carried out open loop, but the elastic motions are controlled closed loop, by means of discrete-time linear quadratic regulator theory with prescribed degree of stability. A numerical example demonstrates the approach. In the example, the controls derived by the perturbation approach are applied to the original nonlinear system and errors are found to be relatively small.

  15. Close approach maneuvers around an oblate planet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, G. M. C.; Prado, A. F. B. A.; Sanchez, D. M.

    2015-10-01

    There are many applications of the close approach maneuvers in astronautics, and several missions used this technique in the last decades. In the present work, those close approach maneuvers are revisited, but now considering that the spacecraft passes around an oblate planet. This fact changes the distribution of mass of the planet, increasing the mass in the region of the equator, so increasing the gravitational forces in the equatorial plane. Since the present study is limited to planar trajectories, there is an increase in the variation of energy given by the maneuver. The planet Jupiter is used as the body for the close approach, but the value of J2 is varied in a large range to simulate situations of other celestial bodies that have larger oblateness, but the same mass ratio. This is particularly true in recent discovered exoplanets, and this first study can help the study of the dynamics around those bodies.

  16. Cassini Solstice Mission Maneuver Experience: Year Two

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arrieta, Juan; Ballard, Christopher G.; Hahn, Yungsun

    2012-01-01

    The Cassini Spacecraft was launched in October 1997 on a mission to observe Saturn and its moons; it entered orbit around Saturn in July 2004 for a nominal four-year Prime Mission, later augmented by two extensions: the Equinox Mission, from July 2008 through September 2010, and the Solstice Mission, from October 2010 through September 2017. This paper provides an overview of the maneuver activities from August 2011 through June 2012 which include the design of 38 Orbit Trim Maneuvers--OTM-288 through OTM-326-- for attaining 14 natural satellite encounters: seven with Titan, six with Enceladus, and one with Dione.

  17. Mars Science Laboratory Cruise Propulsion Maneuvering Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, Raymond S.; Mizukami, Masahi; Barber, Todd J.

    2013-01-01

    Mars Science Laboratory "Curiosity" is NASA's most recent mission to Mars, launched in November 2011, and landed in August 2012. It is a subcompact car-sized nuclear powered rover designed for a long duration mission, with an extensive suite of science instruments. Entry, descent and landing used a unique "skycrane" concept. This report describes the propulsive maneuvering operations during cruise from Earth to Mars, to control attitudes and to target the vehicle for entry. The propulsion subsystem, mission operations, and flight performance are discussed. All trajectory control maneuvers were well within accuracy requirements, and all turns and spin corrections were nominal.

  18. Laparoscopic Pringle maneuver: how we do it?

    PubMed Central

    Lhuaire, Martin; Memeo, Riccardo; Pessaux, Patrick; Kianmanesh, Reza; Sommacale, Daniele

    2016-01-01

    Laparoscopic liver resection (LLR) is technically possible with new devices which allow a relatively bloodless liver parenchymal transection. Despite, the main concern remains intraoperative hemorrhage. Currently, perioperative excessive blood loss during LLR is difficult to control with necessity of laparotomy conversion. Moreover, major blood loss requires transfusion and increases postoperative morbidity and mortality. When in-flow is limited by the hepatic pedicle clamping, it reduces intraoperative blood loss. The Pringle maneuver, first described in 1908, is the simplest method of inflow occlusion and currently can be achieved during LLR. The purpose of this note was to describe two different modalities of Pringle maneuver used by two different teams during LLR. PMID:27500146

  19. VIEW OF MANEUVER BOAT No. 2 AND CHANOINE WICKETS FROM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF MANEUVER BOAT No. 2 AND CHANOINE WICKETS FROM DAM GATE STRUCTURE. MANEUVER BOAT No. 2 IN BACKGROUND. LOOKING WEST NORTHWEST. - Illinois Waterway, Peoria Lock and Dam, 1071 Wesley Road, Creve Coeur, Tazewell County, IL

  20. Maneuver Warfare revisited: a plea for balance

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, M,R.

    1986-04-01

    This paper is a plea for balance in the current pursuit of understanding of the concept and the teaching of Maneuver Warfare. It specifically addresses the need for a more-complete analysis of some of the more-common historical examples commonly offered as examples of the supremecy of Maneuver Warfare. The paper in no way disagrees with the desirability of conducting the kinds of operations associated with the ill-defined concepts offered by advocates of Maneuver Warfare but suggests that the desirable results of historical battles may be too readily ascribed to the dynamic, offensive actions of the victorious side. Secondly, the paper points out the lack of utility and applicability of some common buzzwords being used in today's Army. Specifically assailed is the concept of turning within a decision cycle. The paper describes the reasons that this commonly used phrase has little applicability to ground warfare. Finally, the paper mentions the tendency for the Maneuver Warfare camp to cloud discussion of doctrine in a kind of intellectualism and elitism that has no use in forming the necessary consensus demanded by doctrine.

  1. 75 FR 49815 - Maneuvering Speed Limitation Statement

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-16

    ... (NPRM), Notice No. 09-10, published in the Federal Register on September 4, 2009 (74 FR 45777). In the.../fr/index.html . You can also get a copy by sending a request to the Federal Aviation Administration... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 25 RIN 2120-AJ21 Maneuvering Speed Limitation Statement...

  2. 14 CFR 23.423 - Maneuvering loads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    .../sec2) Nose-up pitching 1.0 +39nm÷V×(nm−1.5) Nose-down pitching nm −39nm÷V×(nm−1.5) where— (1) nm... exceeding the limit maneuvering load factor. The total horizontal surface load for both nose-up and...

  3. 14 CFR 23.423 - Maneuvering loads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    .../sec2) Nose-up pitching 1.0 +39nm÷V×(nm−1.5) Nose-down pitching nm −39nm÷V×(nm−1.5) where— (1) nm... exceeding the limit maneuvering load factor. The total horizontal surface load for both nose-up and...

  4. 14 CFR 23.423 - Maneuvering loads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    .../sec2) Nose-up pitching 1.0 +39nm÷V×(nm−1.5) Nose-down pitching nm −39nm÷V×(nm−1.5) where— (1) nm... exceeding the limit maneuvering load factor. The total horizontal surface load for both nose-up and...

  5. 32 CFR 644.137 - Maneuver agreements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... with the exercise objectives and the force elements which participate. The Corps participates in the...), and United States Army Forces, Readiness Command (USCINCARRED) on acquisition of maneuver rights for... camp sites, field hospital sites and supply dumps), and buildings needed for warehouses, ordnance...

  6. Optimizing interplanetary trajectories with deep space maneuvers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navagh, John

    1993-09-01

    Analysis of interplanetary trajectories is a crucial area for both manned and unmanned missions of the Space Exploration Initiative. A deep space maneuver (DSM) can improve a trajectory in much the same way as a planetary swingby. However, instead of using a gravitational field to alter the trajectory, the on-board propulsion system of the spacecraft is used when the vehicle is not near a planet. The purpose is to develop an algorithm to determine where and when to use deep space maneuvers to reduce the cost of a trajectory. The approach taken to solve this problem uses primer vector theory in combination with a non-linear optimizing program to minimize Delta(V). A set of necessary conditions on the primer vector is shown to indicate whether a deep space maneuver will be beneficial. Deep space maneuvers are applied to a round trip mission to Mars to determine their effect on the launch opportunities. Other studies which were performed include cycler trajectories and Mars mission abort scenarios. It was found that the software developed was able to locate quickly DSM's which lower the total Delta(V) on these trajectories.

  7. Hybrid guidance for maneuvering flight vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, Dehai

    1992-02-01

    This article puts forward one type of guidance option related to the maneuver programming of reentering flight vehicles. The option in question makes use of a radiation sensing system, precisely determining the location of the starting point of the reentering flight vehicle. Use is also made of strap-on type inertial guidance systems to control the impact points of flight vehicles. Maneuvering flight is an important direction in the development of the technology of strategic flight vehicles. It is possible to use it in sudden defense, adding programming, raising precision, and recovery. Maneuvering flight tests are capable of giving complete checks in all such areas as flight vehicle propulsion systems, materials structure, heat resistance systems, stability, guidance circuits, and attitude control systems. It is capable of carrying out experiments on different technological levels. Options which are relatively simple and easy to carry out are to make the reentering flight vehicle, within the longitudinal plane, fly maneuvers according to preset programs. Going through precise inertial guidance or celestial-inertial guidance systems, guidance is carried out on the flight vehicle in the main power stage, with controls and corrections to the free section flight orbital plane, such that the trajectory is capable of entering into the predicted reentry corridor. As far as initial flight tests are concerned, it is possible to make use of inertial guidance systems which already exist, relaxing the requirements for launch plane controls and lateral impact point deviations.

  8. 46 CFR 131.990 - Maneuvering characteristics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OFFSHORE SUPPLY VESSELS OPERATIONS... condition of loading, assuming the following: (1) Calm weather—wind 10 knots or less, calm sea. (2) No... maneuvering information is based, are varied: (i) Calm weather—wind 10 knots or less, calm sea. (ii)...

  9. Premission and postmission simulation studies of the foot-controlled maneuvering unit for Skylab experiment T-020. [astronaut maneuvering equipment - space environment simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hewes, D. E.; Glover, K. E.

    1975-01-01

    A Skylab experiment was conducted to study the maneuvering capabilities of astronauts using a relatively simple self-locomotive device, referred to as the foot-controlled maneuvering unit, and to evaluate the effectiveness of ground-based facilities simulating the operation of this device in weightless conditions of space. Some of the special considerations given in the definition and development of the experiment as related to the two ground-based simulators are reviewed. These simulators were used to train the test subjects and to obtain baseline data which could be used for comparison with the in-flight tests that were performed inside the Skylab orbital workshop. The results of both premission and postmission tests are discussed, and subjective comparisons of the in-flight and ground-based test conditions are presented.

  10. 23 CFR 660.517 - Maneuver area roads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Maneuver area roads. 660.517 Section 660.517 Highways... PROGRAMS (DIRECT FEDERAL) Defense Access Roads § 660.517 Maneuver area roads. (a) Claims by a highway agency for costs incurred to restore, to their former condition, roads damaged by maneuvers involving...

  11. 23 CFR 660.517 - Maneuver area roads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Maneuver area roads. 660.517 Section 660.517 Highways... PROGRAMS (DIRECT FEDERAL) Defense Access Roads § 660.517 Maneuver area roads. (a) Claims by a highway agency for costs incurred to restore, to their former condition, roads damaged by maneuvers involving...

  12. 23 CFR 660.517 - Maneuver area roads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Maneuver area roads. 660.517 Section 660.517 Highways... PROGRAMS (DIRECT FEDERAL) Defense Access Roads § 660.517 Maneuver area roads. (a) Claims by a highway agency for costs incurred to restore, to their former condition, roads damaged by maneuvers involving...

  13. 23 CFR 660.517 - Maneuver area roads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Maneuver area roads. 660.517 Section 660.517 Highways... PROGRAMS (DIRECT FEDERAL) Defense Access Roads § 660.517 Maneuver area roads. (a) Claims by a highway agency for costs incurred to restore, to their former condition, roads damaged by maneuvers involving...

  14. 23 CFR 660.517 - Maneuver area roads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Maneuver area roads. 660.517 Section 660.517 Highways... PROGRAMS (DIRECT FEDERAL) Defense Access Roads § 660.517 Maneuver area roads. (a) Claims by a highway agency for costs incurred to restore, to their former condition, roads damaged by maneuvers involving...

  15. 14 CFR 23.1507 - Operating maneuvering speed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Operating maneuvering speed. 23.1507... Limitations and Information § 23.1507 Operating maneuvering speed. The maximum operating maneuvering speed, VO, must be established as an operating limitation. VO is a selected speed that is not greater than...

  16. 14 CFR 23.1507 - Operating maneuvering speed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Operating maneuvering speed. 23.1507... Limitations and Information § 23.1507 Operating maneuvering speed. The maximum operating maneuvering speed, VO, must be established as an operating limitation. VO is a selected speed that is not greater than...

  17. 14 CFR 23.1507 - Operating maneuvering speed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Operating maneuvering speed. 23.1507... Limitations and Information § 23.1507 Operating maneuvering speed. The maximum operating maneuvering speed, VO, must be established as an operating limitation. VO is a selected speed that is not greater than...

  18. 14 CFR 23.1507 - Operating maneuvering speed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Operating maneuvering speed. 23.1507... Limitations and Information § 23.1507 Operating maneuvering speed. The maximum operating maneuvering speed, VO, must be established as an operating limitation. VO is a selected speed that is not greater than...

  19. 14 CFR 23.1507 - Operating maneuvering speed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Operating maneuvering speed. 23.1507... Limitations and Information § 23.1507 Operating maneuvering speed. The maximum operating maneuvering speed, VO, must be established as an operating limitation. VO is a selected speed that is not greater than...

  20. 14 CFR 23.1567 - Flight maneuver placard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Flight maneuver placard. 23.1567 Section 23... Information Markings and Placards § 23.1567 Flight maneuver placard. (a) For normal category airplanes, there... the approved acrobatic maneuvers and the recommended entry airspeed for each. If inverted...

  1. 14 CFR 25.333 - Flight maneuvering envelope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Flight maneuvering envelope. 25.333 Section... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Structure Flight Maneuver and Gust Conditions § 25.333 Flight maneuvering envelope. (a) General. The strength requirements must be met at each combination...

  2. 14 CFR 23.337 - Limit maneuvering load factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Limit maneuvering load factors. 23.337... Flight Loads § 23.337 Limit maneuvering load factors. (a) The positive limit maneuvering load factor n... not be less than— (1) 0.4 times the positive load factor for the normal utility and...

  3. 14 CFR 25.1531 - Maneuvering flight load factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Maneuvering flight load factors. 25.1531... Operating Limitations § 25.1531 Maneuvering flight load factors. Load factor limitations, not exceeding the positive limit load factors determined from the maneuvering diagram in § 25.333(b), must be established....

  4. 14 CFR 25.337 - Limit maneuvering load factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Limit maneuvering load factors. 25.337... Conditions § 25.337 Limit maneuvering load factors. (a) Except where limited by maximum (static) lift... maneuvering load factors prescribed in this section. Pitching velocities appropriate to the corresponding...

  5. A feedback linearization approach to orbital maneuvers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sanguk

    New methods for obtaining optimal orbital maneuvers of a space vehicle in total velocity change are described and applied. The elegance of Lambert's Theorem is combined with feedback linearization and linear optimal control to obtain solutions to nonlinear orbital maneuver problems. In particular, geocentric orbital maneuvers with finite-thrust acceleration are studied. The full nonlinear equations of motion are transformed exactly into a controllable linear set in Brunovsky canonical form by using feedback linearization and choosing the position vector as the fully observable output vector. These equations are used to pose a linear optimal tracking problem with a solution to the Lambert's impulsive-thrust two-point boundary-value problem as the reference orbit. The same procedure is used to force the space vehicle to follow a linear analytical solution to the continuous low-thrust orbital maneuver problem between neighboring orbits. Limits on thrust magnitudes are enforced by adjusting the weights on the states in the performance index, which is chosen to be the sum of integrals of the square sum of new control variables and the square sum of state variable errors from the reference trajectory. For comparison purpose, the feedback linearized equations are used to obtain a simple closed-form solution to an orbital maneuver problem without the use of a reference trajectory. In this case, the performance index was chosen as the integral of the square sum of new control variables only. Three different examples, coplanar rendezvous between neighboring orbits, large coplanar orbit transfer, and non-coplanar orbit transfer, are used to show the advantages of using the new methods introduced in this dissertation. The minimum-eccentricity orbit, Hohmann transfer orbit, and minimum energy orbit were used in turn as the reference trajectories. The principal problems encountered in using the new methods are the choices of the proper reference trajectory, a suitable time

  6. Novel vagal maneuver technique for termination of supraventricular tachycardias.

    PubMed

    Un, Haluk; Dogan, Mehmet; Uz, Omer; Isilak, Zafer; Uzun, Mehmet

    2016-01-01

    Hemodynamically unstable patients with supraventricular tachycardias (SVTs) should be treated with electrical cardioversion. If the patient is stable, acute termination of tachycardia can be achieved by vagal maneuvers or medical therapy. The Valsalva maneuver, carotid massage, and ice to the face are the most common vagal maneuvers. In our experience with patients, we observed that vagal stimulation increases with lying backward. Our suggested maneuver is based on quickly lying backward, from a seated position. Then, a short and powerful vagal stimulation occurs. Thus, SVT episodes can be terminated. Here we present our experience of a new maneuver for terminating SVT, with cases.

  7. Sonic boom focal zones due to tactical aircraft maneuvers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plotkin, Kenneth J.

    1990-10-01

    A study has been conducted of the focal zone 'superbooms' associated with tactical maneuvers of military supersonic aircraft. Focal zone footprints were computed for 21 tactical maneuvers: two for the SR-71 and 19 for fighters engaged in air combat maneuver (ACM) training. These footprints provide quantitative results which may be used for environmental planning. A key finding of this study is that focus factors and footprint areas for high-g fighter maneuvers are substantially smaller than those for gentle maneuvers associated with larger aircraft.

  8. Vibration Characteristics of Squeeze Film Damper during Maneuver Flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Siji; Liao, Mingfu; Li, Wei

    2015-05-01

    The rotor systems of an aero engine will endure additional centrifugal force and gyroscopic moment during maneuver flight. A maneuver fly mechanical simulator is designed and experimental investigations on dynamics of squeeze film damper (SFD) under the different additional centrifugal force and gyroscopic moment are carried out. The results show that the maneuver flight weaken effectiveness of the SFD, the additional centrifugal force and gyroscopic moment caused by maneuver flight will change film damping, film stiffness. And the influence of maneuver flight can be effective relieved by increasing the film clearance.

  9. Maneuver tracking using an adaptive Gaussian sum technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stubberud, Stephen C.; Kramer, Kathleen A.

    2005-03-01

    The best method to track through a maneuver is to know the motion model of the maneuvering target. Unfortunately, a priori knowledge of the maneuver is not usually known. If the motion model of the maneuver can be estimated quickly from the measurements then the resulting track estimate will be better than the a priori static model. An adaptive function approximation technique to improve the motion model while tracking is analyzed for its potential to track through various maneuvers. The basic function approximation technique is that of a Gaussian sum. The Gaussian sum approximates the function which represents the error between the initial static model and the actual model of the maneuver. The parameters of the Gaussian sum are identified on-line using a Kalman filter identification scheme. This scheme, used in conjunction with a Kalman filter tracker, creates a coupled technique that can improve the motion model quickly. This adaptive Gaussian sum approach to maneuver tracking has its performance analyzed for three maneuvers. These maneuvers include a maneuvering ballistic target, a target going through an s-curve, and real target with a multiple racetrack flight path. The results of these test cases demonstrate the capabilities of this approach to track maneuvering targets.

  10. Dynamic Tow Maneuver Orbital Launch Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rutan, Elbert L. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    An orbital launch system and its method of operation use a maneuver to improve the launch condition of a booster rocket and payload. A towed launch aircraft, to which the booster rocket is mounted, is towed to a predetermined elevation and airspeed. The towed launch aircraft begins the maneuver by increasing its lift, thereby increasing the flight path angle, which increases the tension on the towline connecting the towed launch aircraft to a towing aircraft. The increased tension accelerates the towed launch aircraft and booster rocket, while decreasing the speed (and thus the kinetic energy) of the towing aircraft, while increasing kinetic energy of the towed launch aircraft and booster rocket by transferring energy from the towing aircraft. The potential energy of the towed launch aircraft and booster rocket is also increased, due to the increased lift. The booster rocket is released and ignited, completing the launch.

  11. Rendezvous radar for the orbital maneuvering vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Locke, John W.; Olds, Keith A.; Quaid, Thomas

    1991-01-01

    The Rendezvous Radar Set (RRS) was designed at Motorola's Strategic Electronics Division in Chandler, Arizona, to be a key subsystem aboard NASA's Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle (OMV). The unmanned OMV, which was under development at TRW's Federal Systems Division in Redondo Beach, California, was designed to supplement the Shuttle's satellite delivery, retrieval, and maneuvering activities. The RRS was to be used to locate and then provide the OMV with vectoring information to the target satellite (or Shuttle or Space Station) to aid the OMV in making a minimum fuel consumption approach and rendezvous. The OMV development program was halted by NASA in 1990 just as parts were being ordered for the RRS engineering model. The paper presented describes the RRS design and then discusses new technologies, either under development or planned for development at Motorola, that can be applied to radar or alternative sensor solutions for the Automated Rendezvous and Capture problem.

  12. The Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle - A new capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arcilesi, Charles J.; Holliman, Charles T.

    1988-01-01

    NASA's Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle (OMV) is a reusable remotely-controlled spacecraft for support of orbiting platforms through such functions as satellite delivery, satellite retrieval, satellite reboost, controlled satellite deorbit, satellite inspection, and subsatellite missions. The OMV will be a critical component of the Space Station program's operational scenario; it will be able to operate either from the Space Shuttle Orbiter or the Space Station, and can also be space-based. The maiden flight of the first OMV is projected for 1993.

  13. Hydrodynamics of maneuvering bodies: LDRD final report

    SciTech Connect

    Kempka, S.N.; Strickland, J.H.

    1994-01-01

    The objective of the ``Hydrodynamics of Maneuvering Bodies`` LDRD project was to develop a Lagrangian, vorticity-based numerical simulation of the fluid dynamics associated with a maneuvering submarine. Three major tasks were completed. First, a vortex model to simulate the wake behind a maneuvering submarine was completed, assuming the flow to be inviscid and of constant density. Several simulations were performed for a dive maneuver, each requiring less than 20 cpu seconds on a workstation. The technical details of the model and the simulations are described in a separate document, but are reviewed herein. Second, a gridless method to simulate diffusion processes was developed that has significant advantages over previous Lagrangian diffusion models. In this model, viscous diffusion of vorticity is represented by moving vortices at a diffusion velocity, and expanding the vortices as specified by the kinematics for a compressible velocity field. This work has also been documented previously, and is only reviewed herein. The third major task completed was the development of a vortex model to describe inviscid internal wave phenomena, and is the focus of this document. Internal wave phenomena in the stratified ocean can affect an evolving wake, and thus must be considered for naval applications. The vortex model for internal wave phenomena includes a new formulation for the generation of vorticity due to fluid density variations, and a vortex adoption algorithm that allows solutions to be carried to much longer times than previous investigations. Since many practical problems require long-time solutions, this new adoption algorithm is a significant step toward making vortex methods applicable to practical problems. Several simulations are described and compared with previous results to validate and show the advantages of the new model. An overview of this project is also included.

  14. Hydrodynamics of maneuvering bodies: LDRD Final Report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kempka, S. N.; Strickland, J. H.

    1994-01-01

    The objective of the 'Hydrodynamics of Maneuvering Bodies' LDRD project was to develop a Lagrangian, vorticity-based numerical simulation of the fluid dynamics associated with a maneuvering submarine. Three major tasks were completed. First, a vortex model to simulate the wake behind a maneuvering submarine was completed, assuming the flow to be inviscid and of constant density. Several simulations were performed for a dive maneuver, each requiring less than 20 cpu seconds on a workstation. The technical details of the model and the simulations are described in a separate document, but are reviewed herein. Second, a gridless method to simulate diffusion processes was developed that has significant advantages over previous Lagrangian diffusion models. In this model, viscous diffusion of vorticity is represented by moving vortices at a diffusion velocity, and expanding the vortices as specified by the kinematics for a compressible velocity field. This work was also documented previously and is only reviewed herein. The third major task completed was the development of a vortex model to describe inviscid internal wave phenomena and is the focus of this document. Internal wave phenomena in the stratified ocean can affect an evolving wake and thus, must be considered for naval applications. The vortex model for internal wave phenomena includes a new formulation for the generation of vorticity due to fluid density variations and a vortex adoption algorithm that allows solutions to be carried to much longer times than previous investigations. Since many practical problems require long-time solutions, this new adoption algorithm is a significant step toward making vortex methods applicable to practical problems. Several simulations are described and compared with previous results to validate and show the advantages of the new model. An overview of this project is also included.

  15. Identifying tacit strategies in aircraft maneuvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Charles M.; Heidorn, P. B.

    1991-01-01

    Two machine-learning methods are presently used to characterize the avoidance strategies used by skilled pilots in simulated aircraft encounters, and a general framework for the characterization of the strategic components of skilled behavior via qualitative representation of situations and responses is presented. Descriptions of pilot maneuvers that were 'conceptually equivalent' were ascertained by a concept-learning algorithm in conjunction with a classifier system that employed a generic algorithm; satisficing and 'buggy' strategies were thereby revealed.

  16. A wing concept for supersonic maneuvering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, W. H.

    1983-01-01

    A theoretical and experimental program in which a wing concept for supersonic maneuvering was developed and then demonstrated experimentally in a series of wind tunnel tests is described. For the typical fighter wing, the problem of obtaining efficient lift at supersonic maneuvering C sub 's occurs due to development of a strong crossflow shock, and boundary layer separation. A natural means of achieving efficient supersonic maneuvering is based on controlling the non-linear inviscid crossflow on the wing in a manner analogous to the supercritical aerodynamic methods developed for transonic speeds. The application of supercritical aerodynamics to supersonic speeds is carried out using Supercritical Conical Camber (SC3). This report provides an aerodynamic analysis of the effort, with emphasis on wing design using non-linear aerodynamics. The substantial experimental data base is described in three separate wind tunnel reports, while two of the computer programs used in the work are also described in a separate report. Based on the development program it appears that a controlled supercritical crossflow can be obtained reliably on fighter-type wing planforms, with an associated drag due to lift reduction of about 20% projected using this concept.

  17. Identification of aerodynamic models for maneuvering aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chin, Suei; Lan, C. Edward

    1990-01-01

    Due to the requirement of increased performance and maneuverability, the flight envelope of a modern fighter is frequently extended to the high angle-of-attack regime. Vehicles maneuvering in this regime are subjected to nonlinear aerodynamic loads. The nonlinearities are due mainly to three-dimensional separated flow and concentrated vortex flow that occur at large angles of attack. Accurate prediction of these nonlinear airloads is of great importance in the analysis of a vehicle's flight motion and in the design of its flight control system. A satisfactory evaluation of the performance envelope of the aircraft may require a large number of coupled computations, one for each change in initial conditions. To avoid the disadvantage of solving the coupled flow-field equations and aircraft's motion equations, an alternate approach is to use a mathematical modeling to describe the steady and unsteady aerodynamics for the aircraft equations of motion. Aerodynamic forces and moments acting on a rapidly maneuvering aircraft are, in general, nonlinear functions of motion variables, their time rate of change, and the history of maneuvering. A numerical method was developed to analyze the nonlinear and time-dependent aerodynamic response to establish the generalized indicial function in terms of motion variables and their time rates of change.

  18. Aerodynamic Flow Control of a Maneuvering Airfoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brzozowski, Daniel P.; Culp, John; Glezer, Ari

    2010-11-01

    The unsteady aerodynamic forces and moments on a maneuvering, free-moving airfoil are varied in wind tunnel experiments by controlling vorticity generation/accumulation near the surface using hybrid synthetic jet actuators. The dynamic characteristics of the airfoil that is mounted on a 2-DOF traverse are controlled using position and attitude feedback loops that are actuated by servo motors. Bi-directional changes in the pitching moment are induced using controllable trapped vorticity concentrations on the suction and pressure surfaces near the trailing edge. The dynamic coupling between the actuation and the time-dependent flow field is characterized using simultaneous force and velocity measurements that are taken phase-locked to the commanded actuation waveform. The time scales associated with the actuation process is determined from PIV measurements of vorticity flux downstream of the trailing edge. Circulation time history shows that the entire flow over the airfoil readjusts within about 1.5 TCONV, which is about two orders of magnitude shorter than the characteristic time associated with the controlled maneuver of the wind tunnel model. This illustrates that flow-control actuation can be typically effected on time scales commensurate with the flow's convective time scale, and that the maneuver response is only limited by the inertia of the platform. Supported by AFSOR.

  19. Development and Evaluation of a Performance Modeling Flight Test Approach Based on Quasi Steady-State Maneuvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yechout, T. R.; Braman, K. B.

    1984-01-01

    The development, implementation and flight test evaluation of a performance modeling technique which required a limited amount of quasisteady state flight test data to predict the overall one g performance characteristics of an aircraft. The concept definition phase of the program include development of: (1) the relationship for defining aerodynamic characteristics from quasi steady state maneuvers; (2) a simplified in flight thrust and airflow prediction technique; (3) a flight test maneuvering sequence which efficiently provided definition of baseline aerodynamic and engine characteristics including power effects on lift and drag; and (4) the algorithms necessary for cruise and flight trajectory predictions. Implementation of the concept include design of the overall flight test data flow, definition of instrumentation system and ground test requirements, development and verification of all applicable software and consolidation of the overall requirements in a flight test plan.

  20. 12 CFR Appendixes A-H to Subpart A... - Appendixes A-H to Subpart A of Part 702

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Appendixes A-H to Subpart A of Part 702 A Appendixes A-H to Subpart A of Part 702 Banks and Banking NATIONAL CREDIT UNION ADMINISTRATION REGULATIONS AFFECTING CREDIT UNIONS PROMPT CORRECTIVE ACTION Net Worth Classification Pt. 702, Apps. Appendixes A-H...

  1. 12 CFR Appendixes A-H to Subpart A... - Appendixes A-H to Subpart A of Part 702

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Appendixes A-H to Subpart A of Part 702 A Appendixes A-H to Subpart A of Part 702 Banks and Banking NATIONAL CREDIT UNION ADMINISTRATION REGULATIONS AFFECTING CREDIT UNIONS PROMPT CORRECTIVE ACTION Net Worth Classification Pt. 702, Apps. Appendixes A-H...

  2. 12 CFR Appendixes A-H to Subpart A... - Appendixes A-H to Subpart A of Part 702

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Appendixes A-H to Subpart A of Part 702 A Appendixes A-H to Subpart A of Part 702 Banks and Banking NATIONAL CREDIT UNION ADMINISTRATION REGULATIONS AFFECTING CREDIT UNIONS PROMPT CORRECTIVE ACTION Net Worth Classification Pt. 702, Apps. Appendixes A-H...

  3. 12 CFR Appendixes A-H to Subpart A... - Appendixes A-H to Subpart A of Part 702

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Appendixes A-H to Subpart A of Part 702 A Appendixes A-H to Subpart A of Part 702 Banks and Banking NATIONAL CREDIT UNION ADMINISTRATION REGULATIONS AFFECTING CREDIT UNIONS PROMPT CORRECTIVE ACTION Net Worth Classification Pt. 702, Apps. Appendixes A-H...

  4. 12 CFR Appendixes A-H to Subpart A... - Appendixes A-H to Subpart A of Part 702

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Appendixes A-H to Subpart A of Part 702 A Appendixes A-H to Subpart A of Part 702 Banks and Banking NATIONAL CREDIT UNION ADMINISTRATION REGULATIONS AFFECTING CREDIT UNIONS PROMPT CORRECTIVE ACTION Net Worth Classification Pt. 702, Apps. Appendixes A-H...

  5. Subcycle analysis for ICESat's repeat groundtrack orbits and application to phasing maneuvers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pie, Nadège; Schutz, Bob E.

    2008-09-01

    The concept of repeat groundtrack orbit subcycles is presented in a general definition. The subcycles of ICESat's 91-day repeat groundtrack orbit and their track offsets are mapped out on a chart of subcycles, which are used to decompose the repeat cycle into three main subcycles. The influence of the synchronicity parameters of the repeat groundtrack orbit is discussed using the Bezout equation. In a second part, a fuel efficient maneuver, called phasing maneuver, which enables the repositioning of the ICESat satellite into a different part of its repeat cycle is presented. A correlation between the properties of the transition orbit used to accomplish this phasing and the properties of ICESat subcycles are described. Results from on-orbit experience are given.

  6. Venous return curves obtained from graded series of valsalva maneuvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mastenbrook, S. M., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    The effects were studied of a graded series of valsalva-like maneuvers on the venous return, which was measured transcutaneously in the jugular vein of an anesthetized dog, with the animal serving as its own control. At each of five different levels of central venous pressure, the airway pressure which just stopped venous return during each series of maneuvers was determined. It was found that this end-point airway pressure is not a good estimator of the animal's resting central venous pressure prior to the simulated valsalva maneuver. It was further found that the measured change in right atrial pressure during a valsalva maneuver is less than the change in airway pressure during the same maneuver, instead of being equal, as had been expected. Relative venous return curves were constructed from the data obtained during the graded series of valsalva maneuvers.

  7. Slew maneuvers of Spacecraft Control Laboratory Experiment (SCOLE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kakad, Yogendra P.

    1992-01-01

    This is the final report on the dynamics and control of slew maneuvers of the Spacecraft Control Laboratory Experiment (SCOLE) test facility. The report documents the basic dynamical equation derivations for an arbitrary large angle slew maneuver as well as the basic decentralized slew maneuver control algorithm. The set of dynamical equations incorporate rigid body slew maneuver and three dimensional vibrations of the complete assembly comprising the rigid shuttle, the flexible beam, and the reflector with an offset mass. The analysis also includes kinematic nonlinearities of the entire assembly during the maneuver and the dynamics of the interactions between the rigid shuttle and the flexible appendage. The equations are simplified and evaluated numerically to include the first ten flexible modes to yield a model for designing control systems to perform slew maneuvers. The control problem incorporates the nonlinear dynamical equations and is expressed in terms of a two point boundary value problem.

  8. Adaptive formation flying maneuvers for multiple relative orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saunders, Marc

    In order to extend and preserve the mission of an earth orbiting satellite it is imperative that the on board maneuvers do not waste propulsion but maneuver the spacecraft optimally. The challenge for ground stations is to plan maneuvers for spacecraft that will achieve a desired orbit while minimizing fuel costs. Increasing this challenge is the addition of specific keep-out zones (constraints on the spacecraft). For example, a low-earth orbiter (LEO) may need to maintain a specific orbit plane for a sun-synchronous imaging mission but it now has to contend with opposing debris. Computing a maneuver to avoid the debris could have consequences to the mission constraints and cause undesired affects to the desired orbit. The purpose of this research is to develop some techniques that can aid in finding some optimal maneuvers (or maneuvers that use the least amount of energy) and will maintain mission requirements while preserving constraints. Two different models will be developed that can minimize energy used in the maneuvers. The first model is a linear set of impulsive maneuvers derived from the Clohessy-Wilshire Equations. This model can be used as a targeting equation for targeting a specific relative orbit that also minimizes the total energy among a series of maneuvers. The second method is a nonlinear model using a Lyapunov Function in a feedback control loop; where the position of a spacecraft relative to a target orbit is minimized and the reference motion can be used to create keep-out zones.

  9. Artificial immune system approach for air combat maneuvering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneshige, John; Krishnakumar, Kalmanje

    2007-04-01

    Since future air combat missions will involve both manned and unmanned aircraft, the primary motivation for this research is to enable unmanned aircraft with intelligent maneuvering capabilities. During air combat maneuvering, pilots use their knowledge and experience of maneuvering strategies and tactics to determine the best course of action. As a result, we try to capture these aspects using an artificial immune system approach. The biological immune system protects the body against intruders by recognizing and destroying harmful cells or molecules. It can be thought of as a robust adaptive system that is capable of dealing with an enormous variety of disturbances and uncertainties. However, another critical aspect of the immune system is that it can remember how previous encounters were successfully defeated. As a result, it can respond faster to similar encounters in the future. This paper describes how an artificial immune system is used to select and construct air combat maneuvers. These maneuvers are composed of autopilot mode and target commands, which represent the low-level building blocks of the parameterized system. The resulting command sequences are sent to a tactical autopilot system, which has been enhanced with additional modes and an aggressiveness factor for enabling high performance maneuvers. Just as vaccinations train the biological immune system how to combat intruders, training sets are used to teach the maneuvering system how to respond to different enemy aircraft situations. Simulation results are presented, which demonstrate the potential of using immunized maneuver selection for the purposes of air combat maneuvering.

  10. Ride quality of terminal-area flight maneuvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoonover, W. E., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    Complex terminal-area flight maneuvers being considered for airline operations may not be acceptable to passengers. To provide technology in this area, a series of flight experiments was conducted by NASA using the U. S. Air Force Total In-Flight Simulator (TIFS) aircraft to obtain subjective responses of a significant number of passenger test subjects to closely controlled and repeatable flight maneuvers. Regression analysis of the data produced a mathematical model which closely predicts mean passenger ride-comfort rating as a function of the rms six-degree-of-freedom aircraft motions during the maneuver. This ride-comfort model was exercised to examine various synthesized flight maneuvers.

  11. Coordination Logic for Repulsive Resolution Maneuvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narkawicz, Anthony J.; Munoz, Cesar A.; Dutle, Aaron M.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents an algorithm for determining the direction an aircraft should maneuver in the event of a potential conflict with another aircraft. The algorithm is implicitly coordinated, meaning that with perfectly reliable computations and information, it will in- dependently provide directional information that is guaranteed to be coordinated without any additional information exchange or direct communication. The logic is inspired by the logic of TCAS II, the airborne system designed to reduce the risk of mid-air collisions between aircraft. TCAS II provides pilots with only vertical resolution advice, while the proposed algorithm, using a similar logic, provides implicitly coordinated vertical and horizontal directional advice.

  12. Large planar maneuvers for articulated flexible manipulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Jen-Kuang; Yang, Li-Farn

    1988-01-01

    An articulated flexible manipulator carried on a translational cart is maneuvered by an active controller to perform certain position control tasks. The nonlinear dynamics of the articulated flexible manipulator are derived and a transformation matrix is formulated to localize the nonlinearities within the inertia matrix. Then a feedback linearization scheme is introduced to linearize the dynamic equations for controller design. Through a pole placement technique, a robust controller design is obtained by properly assigning a set of closed-loop desired eigenvalues to meet performance requirements. Numerical simulations for the articulated flexible manipulators are given to demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed position control algorithms.

  13. Maneuver strategies for multi-planet missions.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dwivedi, N. P.

    1972-01-01

    This paper compares a number of maneuver strategies for five multi-planet missions, including the single planet strategy of nulling the aim-plane and flight-time errors at the immediate target. Significant differences were found among the strategies in the amount of corrective propellant required and the residual miss at each target. In general, nulling or minimization of the residual miss at the next target was found to be superior to that at the immediate target, when error growth is not nulled early. The best strategy corrects aim-plane and flight-time errors at the next target.

  14. Maneuvering technology for advanced fighter aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, Michael G.; Harris, Scott H.; Byers, Richard H.

    1992-01-01

    The need for increased maneuverability has its genesis from the first aerial combat engagement when two adversaries entangled themselves in a deadly aerial dance trying to gain the advantage over the other. It has only been in the past two decades that technologies have been investigated to increase aircraft control at maneuver attitudes that are typically dominated by highly separated flows. These separated flow regions are aggravated by advanced fighter aircraft shapes required to defeat an electronic enemy. This paper discusses passive and active devices that can be used to enhance the maneuverability of advanced fighter aircraft through vortex flow control, boundary layer control, and innovative flow manipulation.

  15. 42 CFR 37.91 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... SPECIFICATIONS FOR MEDICAL EXAMINATIONS OF COAL MINERS Spirometry Examinations § 37.91 Definitions. Definitions... spirometry examinations. FET means forced expiratory time, which is the time from the beginning of exhalation... means peak expiratory flow, which is the maximal airflow during a forced expiratory maneuver....

  16. The manned maneuvering unit flight controller arm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Falkner, K. E.

    1983-01-01

    The Manned Maneuvering Unit (MMU) and its support equipment provide an extravehicular astronaut mobility, and the ability to work outside the confines of the Shuttle Orbiter payload bay. The MMU design requirements are based on the highly successful Skylab M-509 maneuvering unit. Design of the MMU was started as an R&D effort in April 1975 and Flight Hardware design was started in August 1979 to support a possible requirement for in-space inspection and repair of Orbiter thermal protection tiles. Subsequently, the qualification test and production activities were slowed, and the current projected earliest first flight is now STS-11 in January, 1984. The MMU propulsion subsystem provides complete redundancy with two identical "system". Each system contains a high pressure gaseous nitrogen tank, an isolation valve, a regulator, and twelve 1.7 lbf (7.5 N) thrusters. The thrusters are packaged to provide the crew member six-degree-of-freedom control in response to commands from translational and rotational hand controllers. This paper discusses the MMU control arm requirements, design, and developmental history.

  17. General and Specific Strategies Used to Facilitate Locomotor Maneuvers

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Mengnan; Matsubara, Jesse H.; Gordon, Keith E.

    2015-01-01

    People make anticipatory changes in gait patterns prior to initiating a rapid change of direction. How they prepare will change based on their knowledge of the maneuver. To investigate specific and general strategies used to facilitate locomotor maneuvers, we manipulated subjects’ ability to anticipate the direction of an upcoming lateral “lane-change” maneuver. To examine specific anticipatory adjustments, we observed the four steps immediately preceding a maneuver that subjects were instructed to perform at a known time in a known direction. We hypothesized that to facilitate a specific change of direction, subjects would proactively decrease margin of stability in the future direction of travel. Our results support this hypothesis: subjects significantly decreased lateral margin of stability by 69% on the side ipsilateral to the maneuver during only the step immediately preceding the maneuver. This gait adaptation may have improved energetic efficiency and simplified the control of the maneuver. To examine general anticipatory adjustments, we observed the two steps immediately preceding the instant when subjects received information about the direction of the maneuver. When the maneuver direction was unknown, we hypothesized that subjects would make general anticipatory adjustments that would improve their ability to actively initiate a maneuver in multiple directions. This second hypothesis was partially supported as subjects increased step width and stance phase hip flexion during these anticipatory steps. These modifications may have improved subjects’ ability to generate forces in multiple directions and maintain equilibrium during the onset and execution of the rapid maneuver. However, adapting these general anticipatory strategies likely incurred an additional energetic cost. PMID:26167931

  18. Ah receptor ligands in tobacco smoke.

    PubMed

    Löfroth, G; Rannug, A

    1988-08-01

    Tar particulates from cigarette smoke contain compounds with affinity for the Ah receptor. The sidestream activity is larger than that of the mainstream with a ratio of about 5. The compounds causing the affinity appear in the neutral fraction after chemical fractionation excluding basic and acidic components as major contributors to the affinity. The affinity cannot be explained by benzo[a]pyrene and other polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons but it might be caused by 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) and related compounds and by oxidized tryptophan derivatives.

  19. Maneuver of juvenile chinook salmon during feeding in streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Jifeng

    2010-11-01

    Before they head to the ocean, juvenile chinook salmon O. tshawytscha habitat in freshwater rivers and feed on small invertebrates drifting in streams. During drift-feeding, these fish hold fairly steady positions in the flow facing upstream, and maneuver to intercept drifting prey as it passes. They have a large arsenal of maneuver modes, which presumably enable them to maximize prey encounter while keeping energy expense low. Moreover, because these fish often gather in schools, they utilize their maneuvers so that they do not invade others' territories. In this study, we measured three-dimensional motion of juvenile chinook salmon in situ during feeding. The kinematics of some of the widely-used maneuvers, including slow lateral motion, sharp U-shaped turn and fast S-shaped turn, were analyzed. A computational model based on ideal fluid theory was developed to estimate the dynamics of these maneuvers. Energetics of the maneuvers was evaluated, together with effects on prey encounter, in order to compare and explain the choices of maneuvers in different situations. The effects of neighbors in a fish school on individual maneuvers were also studied.

  20. 14 CFR 23.155 - Elevator control force in maneuvers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... needed to achieve the positive limit maneuvering load factor may not be less than: (1) For wheel controls... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Elevator control force in maneuvers. 23.155... AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES...

  1. 14 CFR 23.155 - Elevator control force in maneuvers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... needed to achieve the positive limit maneuvering load factor may not be less than: (1) For wheel controls... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Elevator control force in maneuvers. 23.155... AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES...

  2. 14 CFR 23.155 - Elevator control force in maneuvers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... needed to achieve the positive limit maneuvering load factor may not be less than: (1) For wheel controls... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Elevator control force in maneuvers. 23.155... AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES...

  3. 14 CFR 25.1531 - Maneuvering flight load factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Maneuvering flight load factors. 25.1531 Section 25.1531 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... positive limit load factors determined from the maneuvering diagram in § 25.333(b), must be established....

  4. 14 CFR 25.1531 - Maneuvering flight load factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Maneuvering flight load factors. 25.1531 Section 25.1531 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... positive limit load factors determined from the maneuvering diagram in § 25.333(b), must be established....

  5. 14 CFR 25.331 - Symmetric maneuvering conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...) Maneuvering balanced conditions. Assuming the airplane to be in equilibrium with zero pitching acceleration... cockpit pitch control is suddenly moved to obtain extreme nose up pitching acceleration. In defining the... subsequent to the time when normal acceleration at the c.g. exceeds the positive limit maneuvering...

  6. 14 CFR 25.331 - Symmetric maneuvering conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...) Maneuvering balanced conditions. Assuming the airplane to be in equilibrium with zero pitching acceleration... cockpit pitch control is suddenly moved to obtain extreme nose up pitching acceleration. In defining the... subsequent to the time when normal acceleration at the c.g. exceeds the positive limit maneuvering...

  7. 14 CFR 25.331 - Symmetric maneuvering conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...) Maneuvering balanced conditions. Assuming the airplane to be in equilibrium with zero pitching acceleration... cockpit pitch control is suddenly moved to obtain extreme nose up pitching acceleration. In defining the... subsequent to the time when normal acceleration at the c.g. exceeds the positive limit maneuvering...

  8. 14 CFR 25.331 - Symmetric maneuvering conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...) Maneuvering balanced conditions. Assuming the airplane to be in equilibrium with zero pitching acceleration... cockpit pitch control is suddenly moved to obtain extreme nose up pitching acceleration. In defining the... subsequent to the time when normal acceleration at the c.g. exceeds the positive limit maneuvering...

  9. 14 CFR 25.331 - Symmetric maneuvering conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...) Maneuvering balanced conditions. Assuming the airplane to be in equilibrium with zero pitching acceleration... cockpit pitch control is suddenly moved to obtain extreme nose up pitching acceleration. In defining the... subsequent to the time when normal acceleration at the c.g. exceeds the positive limit maneuvering...

  10. Newspapers and newspaper ink contain agonists for the ah receptor.

    PubMed

    Bohonowych, Jessica E S; Zhao, Bin; Timme-Laragy, Alicia; Jung, Dawoon; Di Giulio, Richard T; Denison, Michael S

    2008-04-01

    Ligand-dependent activation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) pathway leads to a diverse array of biological and toxicological effects. The best-studied ligands for the AhR include polycyclic and halogenated aromatic hydrocarbons, the most potent of which is 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). However, as new AhR ligands are identified and characterized, their structural and physiochemical diversity continues to expand. Our identification of AhR agonists in crude extracts from diverse materials raises questions as to the magnitude and extent of human exposure to AhR ligands through normal daily activities. We have found that solvent extracts of newspapers from countries around the world stimulate the AhR signaling pathway. AhR agonist activity was observed for dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), ethanol, and water extracts of printed newspaper, unprinted virgin paper, and black printing ink, where activation of luciferase reporter gene expression was transient, suggesting that the AhR active chemical(s) was metabolically labile. DMSO and ethanol extracts also stimulated AhR transformation and DNA binding, and also competed with [(3)H]TCDD for binding to the AhR. In addition, DMSO extracts of printed newspaper induced cytochrome P450 1A associated 7-ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase activity in zebrafish embryos in vivo. Although the responsible bioactive chemical(s) remain to be identified, our results demonstrate that newspapers and printing ink contain relatively potent metabolically labile agonists of the AhR. Given the large amount of recycling and reprocessing of newspapers throughout the world, release of these easily extractable AhR agonists into the environment should be examined and their potential effects on aquatic organisms assessed. PMID:18203687

  11. Planar reorientation maneuvers of space multibody systems using internal controls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reyhanoglu, Mahmut; Mcclamroch, N. H.

    1992-01-01

    In this paper a reorientation maneuvering strategy for an interconnection of planar rigid bodies in space is developed. It is assumed that there are no exogeneous torques, and torques generated by joint motors are used as means of control so that the total angular momentum of the multibody system is a constant, assumed to be zero in this paper. The maneuver strategy uses the nonintegrability of the expression for the angular momentum. We demonstrate that large-angle maneuvers can be designed to achieve an arbitrary reorientation of the multibody system with respect to an inertial frame. The theoretical background for carrying out the required maneuvers is briefly summarized. Specifications and computer simulations of a specific reorientation maneuver, and the corresponding control strategies, are described.

  12. Optimization of Maneuver Execution for Landsat-7 Routine Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, E. Lucien, Jr.; Bauer, Frank H. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Multiple mission constraints were satisfied during a lengthy, strategic ascent phase. Once routine operations begin, the ongoing concern of maintaining mission requirements becomes an immediate priority. The Landsat-7 mission has tight longitude control box and Earth imaging that requires sub-satellite descending nodal equator crossing times to occur in a narrow 30minute range fifteen (15) times daily. Operationally, spacecraft maneuvers must'be executed properly to maintain mission requirements. The paper will discuss the importance of optimizing the altitude raising and plane change maneuvers, amidst known constraints, to satisfy requirements throughout mission lifetime. Emphasis will be placed not only on maneuver size and frequency but also on changes in orbital elements that impact maneuver execution decisions. Any associated trade-off arising from operations contingencies will be discussed as well. Results of actual altitude and plane change maneuvers are presented to clarify actions taken.

  13. Performance Evaluation of Evasion Maneuvers for Parallel Approach Collision Avoidance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winder, Lee F.; Kuchar, James K.; Waller, Marvin (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Current plans for independent instrument approaches to closely spaced parallel runways call for an automated pilot alerting system to ensure separation of aircraft in the case of a "blunder," or unexpected deviation from the a normal approach path. Resolution advisories by this system would require the pilot of an endangered aircraft to perform a trained evasion maneuver. The potential performance of two evasion maneuvers, referred to as the "turn-climb" and "climb-only," was estimated using an experimental NASA alerting logic (AILS) and a computer simulation of relative trajectory scenarios between two aircraft. One aircraft was equipped with the NASA alerting system, and maneuvered accordingly. Observation of the rates of different types of alerting failure allowed judgement of evasion maneuver performance. System Operating Characteristic (SOC) curves were used to assess the benefit of alerting with each maneuver.

  14. AH Leo and the Blazhko Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, J.; Gay, P. L.

    2004-12-01

    We obtained 563 V-Band observations of AH Leo between January 27 and May 12, 2004. All observations were obtained with a 12-inch Schmidt-Cassegrain located on the island of Saipan, in the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands. We show that AH Leo is a type RRab RR Lyrae star with a minimum magnitude of V=14.658 magnitudes, a maximum amplitude of 0.989 magnitudes and a minimum amplitude of perhaps just 0.4 magnitudes. Its primary period is 0.4662609 days. Our observations also confirm the presence of the Blazhko effect, which had previously been detected by Smith and Gay (private communication) in 1993 and 1994. We estimate the Blazhko period to be roughly 20-days, however poor phase coverage at maximum light makes exact determination impossible. We also note that the bump during minimum, which is common in many RR Lyraes, varied throughout the Blazhko cycle, demonstrating amplitudes between 0 and 0.15 magnitudes. We would like to thank Sarah Maddison and Swinburne Astronomy Online for supporting this project

  15. Testing Update on 20 and 25-Ah Lithium Ion Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruce, Gregg C.; Mardikian, Pamella; Edwards, Sherri; Bugga, Kumar; Chin, Keith; Smart, Marshall; Surampudi, Subbarao

    2003-01-01

    Eagle-Picher Energy Products has worked on lithium ion batteries for approximately 8 years. During that period EPEPC developed and delivered several cell sizes on a program funded by the USAF and Canadian DND. Designs are wound cylindrical cells from 7 to 40-Ah. Most cells delivered were approximately 25-Ah due to requirements of Mars missions. Several iterations of cells were manufactured and delivered for evaluation. The first design was 20-Ah, Design I, and the second was a 25-Ah, Design II.

  16. Maneuver Classification for Aircraft Fault Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oza, Nikunj C.; Tumer, Irem Y.; Tumer, Kagan; Huff, Edward M.

    2003-01-01

    Automated fault detection is an increasingly important problem in aircraft maintenance and operation. Standard methods of fault detection assume the availability of either data produced during all possible faulty operation modes or a clearly-defined means to determine whether the data provide a reasonable match to known examples of proper operation. In the domain of fault detection in aircraft, identifying all possible faulty and proper operating modes is clearly impossible. We envision a system for online fault detection in aircraft, one part of which is a classifier that predicts the maneuver being performed by the aircraft as a function of vibration data and other available data. To develop such a system, we use flight data collected under a controlled test environment, subject to many sources of variability. We explain where our classifier fits into the envisioned fault detection system as well as experiments showing the promise of this classification subsystem.

  17. Analysis of ship maneuvering data from simulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frette, V.; Kleppe, G.; Christensen, K.

    2011-03-01

    We analyze complex manuevering histories of ships obtained from training sessions on bridge simulators. Advanced ships are used in fields like offshore oil exploration: dive support vessels, supply vessels, anchor handling vessels, tugs, cable layers, and multi-purpose vessels. Due to high demands from the operations carried out, these ships need to have very high maneuverability. This is achieved through a propulsion system with several thrusters, water jets, and rudders in addition to standard propellers. For some operations, like subsea maintenance, it is crucial that the ship accurately keeps a fixed position. Therefore, bridge systems usually incorporate equipment for Dynamic Positioning (DP). DP is a method to keep ships and semi submersible rigs in a fixed position using the propulsion systems instead of anchors. It may also be used for sailing a vessel from one position to another along a predefined route. Like an autopilot on an airplane, DP may operate without human involvement. The method relies on accurate determination of position from external reference systems like GPS, as well as a continuously adjusted mathematical model of the ship and external forces from wind, waves and currents. In a specific simulator exercise for offshore crews, a ship is to be taken up to an installation consisting of three nearby oil platforms connected by bridges (Frigg field, North Sea), where a subsea inspection is to be carried out. Due to the many degrees of freedom during maneuvering, including partly or full use of DP, the chosen routes vary significantly. In this poster we report preliminary results on representations of the complex maneuvering histories; representations that allow comparison between crew groups, and, possibly, sorting of the different strategic choices behind.

  18. X-31 in flight - Mongoose Maneuver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Two X-31 Enhanced Fighter Maneuverability (EFM) demonstrators were flown at the Rockwell International facility, Palmdale, California, and the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to obtain data that may apply to the design of highly-maneuverable next-generation fighters. The program had its first flight on October 11, 1990, in Palmdale; it ended in June 1995. The X-31 program demonstrated the value of thrust vectoring (directing engine exhaust flow) coupled with advanced flight control systems, to provide controlled flight during close-in air combat at very high angles of attack. The result of this increased maneuverability is an aircraft with a significant advantage over conventional fighters. 'Angle-of-attack' (alpha) is an engineering term to describe the angle of an aircraft body and wings relative to its actual flight path. During maneuvers, pilots often fly at extreme angles of attack -- with the nose pitched up while the aircraft continues in its original direction. This can lead to loss of control and result in the loss of the aircraft, pilot or both. Three thrust-vectoring paddles made of graphite epoxy mounted on the exhaust nozzle of the X-31 aircraft directed the exhaust flow to provide control in pitch (up and down) and yaw (right and left) to improve control. The paddles can sustain heat of up to 1,500 degrees centigrade for extended periods of time. In addition the X-31 aircraft were configured with movable forward canards and fixed aft strakes. The canards were small wing-like structures set on the wing line between the nose and the leading edge of the wing. The strakes were set on the same line between the trailing edge of the wing and the engine exhaust. Both supplied additional control in tight maneuvering situations. The X-31 research program produced technical data at high angles of attack. This information is giving engineers and aircraft designers a better understanding of aerodynamics, effectiveness of flight controls

  19. Dynamics of spacecraft control laboratory experiment (SCOLE) slew maneuvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kakad, Y. P.

    1987-01-01

    This is the first of two reports on the dynamics and control of slewing maneuvers of the NASA Spacecraft Control Laboratory Experiment (SCOLE). In this report, the dynamics of slewing maneuvers of SCOLE are developed in terms of an arbitrary maneuver about any given axis. The set of dynamical equations incorporate rigid-body slew maneuver and three-dimensional vibrations of the complete assembly comprising the rigid shuttle, the flexible beam, and the reflector with an offset mass. The analysis also includes kinematic nonlinearities of the entire assembly during the maneuver and the dynamics of the interaction between the rigid shuttle and the flexible appendage. The final set of dynamical equations obtained for slewing maneuvers is highly nonlinear and coupled in terms of the flexible modes and the rigid-body modes. The equations are further simplified and evaluated numerically to include the first ten flexible modes and the SCOLE data to yield a model for designing control systems to perform slew maneuvers.

  20. Performance of AEA 80 Ah Battery under GEO Profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russel, N.; Curzon, D.; Ng, K.; Lee, L.; Rao, G.

    2004-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation is divided into the following sections: 1) AEA Geosynchronous Earth Orbit (GEO) Life Testing; 2) AEA/Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) 20 Ah Battery; 3) AEA/GSFC 80 Ah Battery; 4) Solar Dynamic Observatory (SDO) Life Test; 5) Test Results; 6) Correlation; 7) Conclusions.

  1. Maneuver Design for the Juno Mission: Inner Cruise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pavlak, Thomas A.; Frauenholz, Raymond B.; Bordi, John J.; Kangas, Julie A.; Helfrich, Clifford E.

    2014-01-01

    The Juno spacecraft launched in August 2011 and, following a successful Earth flyby in October 2013, is on course for a nominal orbit insertion at Jupiter in July 2016. This paper examines the design and execution of deterministic and statistical trajectory correction maneuvers during the first approximately 27 months of post-launch operations that defined the "Inner Cruise" phase of the Juno mission. Topics of emphasis include the two deep space maneuvers, Earth flyby altitude biasing strategy, and the sequence of trajectory correction maneuvers executed in the weeks prior to the successful Earth gravity assist.

  2. Cassini-Huygens Maneuver Experience: Ending the Prime Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodson, Troy D.; Ballard, Christopher G.; Gist, Emily M.; Hahn, Yungsun; Stumpf, Paul W.; Wagner, Sean V.; Williams, Powtawche N.

    2008-01-01

    The Cassini-Huygens spacecraft was launched in 1997 on a mission to observe Saturn and its many moons. After a seven-year cruise, it entered a Saturnian orbit for a four-year, prime mission. This paper highlights significant maneuver activities performed during the last year of the prime mission. Specifically, results of 42 recent maneuvers are presented. Many maneuvers have been skipped, saving fuel and flight team effort. The system has performed more accurately than the pre-launch expectations and requirements. This is in large part why the Cassini-Huygens spacecraft has been navigated with tremendous success during the prime mission.

  3. Object Correlation and Maneuver Detection Using Optimal Control Performance Metrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holzinger, M.; Scheeres, D.

    2010-09-01

    Object correlation and maneuver detection are persistent problems in space surveillance and space object catalog maintenance. This paper demonstrates the utility of using quadratic trajectory control cost, an analog to the trajectory L2-norm in control, as a distance metric with which to both correlate object tracks and detect maneuvers using Uncorrelated Tracks (UCTs), real-time sensor measurement residuals, and prior state uncertainty. State and measurement uncertainty are incorporated into the computation, and distributions of optimal control usage are computed. Both UCT correlation as well as maneuver detection are demonstrated in several scenarios Potential avenues for future research and contributions are summarized.

  4. Helicopter Pilot Performance for Discrete-maneuver Flight Tasks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heffley, R. K.; Bourne, S. M.; Hindson, W. S.

    1984-01-01

    This paper describes a current study of several basic helicopter flight maneuvers. The data base consists of in-flight measurements from instrumented helicopters using experienced pilots. The analysis technique is simple enough to apply without automatic data processing, and the results can be used to build quantitative matah models of the flight task and some aspects of the pilot control strategy. In addition to describing the performance measurement technqiue, some results are presented which define the aggressiveness and amplitude of maneuvering for several lateral maneuvers including turns and sidesteps.

  5. Early Mission Maneuver Operations for the Deep Space Climate Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Craig; Case, Sara; Reagoso, John

    2015-01-01

    DSCOVR Lissajous Orbit sized such that orbit track never extends beyond 15 degrees from Earth-Sun line (as seen from Earth). Requiring delta-V maneuvers, control orbit to obey a Solar Exclusion Zone (SEZ) cone of half-angle 4 degrees about the Earth-Sun line. Spacecraft should never be less than 4 degrees from solar center as seen from Earth. Following Lissajous Orbit Insertion (LOI), DSCOVR should be in an opening phase that just skirts the 4-degree SEZ. Maximizes time to the point where a closing Lissajous will require avoidance maneuvers to keep it out of the SEZ. Station keeping maneuvers should take no more than 15 minutes

  6. Constellation Mission Operation Working Group: ESMO Maneuver Planning Process Review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moyer, Eric

    2015-01-01

    The Earth Science Mission Operation (ESMO) Project created an Independent Review Board to review our Conjunction Risk evaluation process and Maneuver Planning Process to identify improvements that safely manages mission conjunction risks, maintains ground track science requirements, and minimizes overall hours expended on High Interest Events (HIE). The Review Board is evaluating the current maneuver process which requires support by multiple groups. In the past year, there have been several changes to the processes although many prior and new concerns exist. This presentation will discuss maneuver process reviews and Board comments, ESMO assessment and path foward, ESMO future plans, recent changes and concerns.

  7. Wakes of Maneuvering Bodies in Stratified Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voropayev, S. I.; Fernando, H. J.

    2007-05-01

    We present the results of experimental/theoretical studies on large momentum eddies generated in late wakes of unsteady moving self-propelled bodies in stratified fluids. The experiments were conducted with scaled submarine model at high Reynolds numbers (50,000), corresponding to the fully turbulent flow regime. Dye visualization and PIV were used for flow diagnostics. When a self-propelled body makes a maneuver, e.g. accelerates, it imparts net momentum on the surrounding fluid. We show that in a stratified fluid this leads to impulsive momentum wakes with large, long-lived coherent vortices in the late flows, which may be used as a signature for identification of submarine wakes in oceanic thermocline. First, we consider dynamics and properties of such wakes in a linearly stratified fluid and present a model that permits to predict the main flow characteristics. Second, we consider wakes in a two layer stratified fluid (analog of the upper ocean) and show that such wakes may penetrate to the water surface; we present a model for this phenomenon and propose criteria for the penetration of wake signatures to the water surface in terms of main governing parameters (signature contrast versus confinement number). Finally, we consider the evolution of such momentum wake eddies in the field of decaying background turbulence, which mimics the oceanic thermocline, and show that for the flow configuration studied the contrast number remains sufficiently large and detectable wake imprints survive for a long period of time. Some pertinent estimates for submarines cruising in the upper ocean are also given. For more details see [1-3]. This study was supported by grant from the Office of Naval Research. 1. Voropayev S.I., Fernando H.J.S., Smirnov S.A. & Morrison R.J. 2006. On surface signatures generated by submersed momentum sources. Phys. Fluids, under revision. 2. Voropayev S.I., Fernando H.J.S. & Morrison R.J. 2006. Dipolar eddies in a stratified turbulent flow. J. Fluid

  8. Induction of AhR-Mediated Gene Transcription by Coffee

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Toshio; Takahashi, Satoshi; Morita, Koji; Okinaga, Hiroko; Teramoto, Tamio

    2014-01-01

    Background Aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is classically known to be activated by xenobiotics such as dioxins and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Although it has been reported that PAHs are contained in roasted coffee beans, in general coffee beverages are not considered to be AhR activators. We tested whether exposure to coffee would activate AhR in cultured cells. Methods HepG2 cells stably expressing an AhR-responsive reporter gene were treated with coffee samples. Also, expression of CYP1A1, an endogenous AhR-responsive gene, was quantitated by RT-PCR and Western blotting in HepG2, Caco-2, and MCF-7 cells, after treatment with coffee. In order to obtain sensitive and reproducible results, all the experiments were performed with the cells placed in either phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) or pure serum, instead of routinely-used culture medium, whose intrinsic AhR-stimulating activity turned out to be so strong as to interfere with the analyses. Results All the coffee samples tested robustly stimulated AhR-mediated transcription in the reporter gene assays. Of note, to what extent coffee and other AhR agonists activated AhR was different, depending on whether the experiments were done in PBS or serum. CYP1A1 mRNA was induced by coffee, in HepG2, Caco-2, and MCF-7 cells placed in either PBS or serum. CYP1A1 protein expression, which was not detected in these cells incubated in PBS, was also increased by coffee in cells placed in serum. Conclusions By using culture medium-free experimental settings, we have shown that coffee is a strong AhR activator. Our observation may help elucidate as-yet-unrecognized effects of coffee on human health. PMID:25007155

  9. The Impact of Maneuver Failures on the EOS Afternoon Constellation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demarest, Peter

    2002-01-01

    The first four satellites, Aqua, CloudSat, Calipso, and Parasol, in NASA's EOS Afternoon constellation will fly in similar orbits within 4 minutes of each other. This study was undertaken to examine the effect of one or more missions failing to perform a scheduled orbit maintenance maneuver. Tools were developed to rapidly calculate the initial orbital elements for the satellites that established the formation. Baseline maneuver strategies were implemented to maintain the desired spacing of the satellites. Maneuver failures were examined and close approach opportunities were identified. It was found that close-approaches between CloudSat and Calipso could occur in less than one day after a missed maneuver if close coordination between the missions is not achieved.

  10. Deterministic optimal maneuver strategy for multi-target missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dwivedi, N. P.

    1975-01-01

    This paper presents an optimal strategy for making impulsive correction to a multi-target trajectory by a single maneuver. The concept of an optimal maneuver time is introduced. The choice of suitable weighting functions is explored to enable one to properly translate the subjective desire of mission success into an objective cost function whose minimization yields the optimal strategy. It is shown that a number of strategies previously formulated are derivable from one general expression. A number of other interesting properties of the optimal strategy are described. Numerical results are presented for a typical two-target mission. It is shown that the strategy formulated is optimal. For some perturbations, there exists an optimal maneuver time different from the time of initiation of the perturbation. That is, the physical properties of the trajectory can be exploited to select the optimal time of making a corrective maneuver.

  11. Investigation of Dynamic Flight Maneuvers With an Iced Tailplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanZante, Judith Foss; Ratvasky, Thomas P.

    1999-01-01

    A detailed analysis of two of the dynamic maneuvers, the pushover and elevator doublet, from the NASA/FAA Tailplane Icing Program are discussed. For this series of flight tests, artificial ice shapes were attached to the leading edge of the horizontal stabilizer of the NASA Lewis Research Center icing aircraft, a DHC-6 Twin Otter. The purpose of these tests was to learn more about ice-contaminated tailplane stall (ICTS), the known cause of 16 accidents resulting in 139 fatalities. The pushover has been employed by the FAA, JAA and Transport Canada for tailplane icing certification. This research analyzes the pushover and reports on the maneuver performance degradation due to ice shape severity and flap deflection. A repeatability analysis suggests tolerances for meeting the required targets of the maneuver. A second maneuver, the elevator doublet, is also studied.

  12. Rendezvous radar for the orbital maneuvering vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Locke, John W.; Olds, Keith; Parks, Howard

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes the development of the Rendezvous Radar Set (RRS) for the Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle (OMV) for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The RRS was to be used to locate, and then provide vectoring information to, target satellites (or Shuttle or Space Station) to aid the OMV in making a minimum-fuel-consumption approach and rendezvous. The RRS design is that of an X-Band, all solid-state, monopulse tracking, frequency hopping, pulse-Doppler radar system. The development of the radar was terminated when the OMV prime contract to TRW was terminated by NASA. At the time of the termination, the development was in the circuit design stage. The system design was virtually completed, the PDR had been held. The RRS design was based on Motorola's experiences, both in the design and production of radar systems for the US Army and in the design and production of hi-rel communications systems for NASA space programs. Experience in these fields was combined with the latest digital signal processor and micro-processor technology to design a light-weight, low-power, spaceborne radar. The antenna and antenna positioner (gimbals) technology developed for the RRS is now being used in the satellite-to-satellite communication link design for Motorola's Iridium telecommunications system.

  13. Augmentation of maneuver performance by spanwise blowing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, G. E.; Campbell, J. F.

    1977-01-01

    A generalized wind tunnel model was tested to investigate new component concepts utilizing spanwise blowing to provide improved maneuver characteristics for advanced fighter aircraft. Primary emphasis was placed on high angle of attack performance, stability, and control at subsonic speeds. Spanwise blowing on a 44 deg swept trapezoidal wing resulted in leading edge vortex enhancement with subsequent large vortex-induced lift increments and drag polar improvements at the higher angles of attack. Small deflections of a leading edge flap delayed these lift and drag benefits to higher angles of attack. In addition, blowing was more effective at higher Mach numbers. Spanwise blowing in conjunction with a deflected trailing edge flap resulted in lift and drag benefits that exceeded the summation of the effects of each high lift device acting alone. Asymmetric blowing was an effective lateral control device at the higher angles of attack. Spanwise blowing on the wing reduced horizontal tail loading and improved the lateral-directional stability characteristics of a wing-horizontal tail-vertical tail configuration.

  14. An Immunized Aircraft Maneuver Selection System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karr, Charles L.

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this project, as stated in the original proposal, was to develop an immunized aircraft maneuver selection (IAMS) system. The IAMS system was to be composed of computational and informational building blocks that resemble structures in natural immune systems. The ultimate goal of the project was to develop a software package that could be flight tested on aircraft models. This report describes the work performed in the first year of what was to have been a two year project. This report also describes efforts that would have been made in the final year to have completed the project, had it been continued for the final year. After introductory material is provided in Section 2, the end-of-year-one status of the effort is discussed in Section 3. The remainder of the report provides an accounting of first year efforts. Section 4 provides background information on natural immune systems while Section 5 describes a generic ar&itecture developed for use in the IAMS. Section 6 describes the application of the architecture to a system identification problem. Finally, Section 7 describes steps necessary for completing the project.

  15. Improvements to the adaptive maneuvering logic program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burgin, George H.

    1986-01-01

    The Adaptive Maneuvering Logic (AML) computer program simulates close-in, one-on-one air-to-air combat between two fighter aircraft. Three important improvements are described. First, the previously available versions of AML were examined for their suitability as a baseline program. The selected program was then revised to eliminate some programming bugs which were uncovered over the years. A listing of this baseline program is included. Second, the equations governing the motion of the aircraft were completely revised. This resulted in a model with substantially higher fidelity than the original equations of motion provided. It also completely eliminated the over-the-top problem, which occurred in the older versions when the AML-driven aircraft attempted a vertical or near vertical loop. Third, the requirements for a versatile generic, yet realistic, aircraft model were studied and implemented in the program. The report contains detailed tables which make the generic aircraft to be either a modern, high performance aircraft, an older high performance aircraft, or a previous generation jet fighter.

  16. Astronaut Alan Bean flies the Astronaut Maneuvering Equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Astronaut Alan L. Bean, Skylab 3 commander, flies the M509 Astronaut Maneuvering Equipment in the foreward dome area of the Orbital Workshop (OWS) on the space station cluster in Earth orbit. Bean is strapped in to the back-mounted, hand-controlled Automatically Stabilized Maneuvering Unit (ASMU). This ASMU exerperiment is being done in shirt sleeves. The dome area where the experiment is conducted is about 22 feet in diameter and 19 feet from top to bottom.

  17. Astronaut Alan Bean flies the Astronaut Maneuvering Equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Astronaut Alan L. Bean, Skylab 3 commander, flies the M509 Astronaut Maneuvering Equipment in the forward dome area of the Orbital Workshop (OWS) on the space station cluster in Earth orbit. Bean is strapped in to the back-mounted, hand-controlled Automatically Stabilized Maneuvering Unit (ASMU). This ASMU exerperiment is being done in shirt sleeves. The dome area where the experiment is conducted is about 22 feet in diameter and 19 feet from top to bottom.

  18. Spontaneous splenic rupture during Pringle maneuver in liver surgery.

    PubMed

    van Buijtenen, Jesse M; Lamme, Bas; Hesselink, Erik J

    2010-06-27

    During liver resection clamping of the hepato-duodenal ligament (the Pringle maneuver) is performed to reduce intraoperative blood-loss. During this maneuver acute portal hypertension may lead to spontaneous splenic rupture requiring rapid splenectomy in order to control blood loss. We present 2 case of patients with hemorrhage from the spleen during clamping for liver surgery. A review of the literature with an emphasis on the pathophysiology of splenic hemorrhage is presented. PMID:21161004

  19. Operational Experiences in Planning and Reconstructing Aqua Inclination Maneuvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rand, David; Reilly, Jacqueline; Schiff, Conrad

    2004-01-01

    As the lead satellite in NASA's growing Earth Observing System (EOS) PM constellation, it is increasingly critical that Aqua maintain its various orbit requirements. The two of interest for this paper are maintaining an orbit inclination that provides for a consistent mean local time and a semi-major Axis (SMA) that allows for ground track repeatability. Maneuvers to adjust the orbit inclination involve several flight dynamics constraints and complexities which make planning such maneuvers challenging. In particular, coupling between the orbital and attitude degrees of freedom lead to changes in SMA when changes in inclination are effected. A long term mission mean local time trend analysis was performed in order to determine the size and placement of the required inclination maneuvers. Following this analysis, detailed modeling of each burn and its Various segments was performed to determine its effects on the immediate orbit state. Data gathered from an inclination slew test of the spacecraft and first inclination maneuver uncovered discrepancies in the modeling method that were investigated and resolved. The new modeling techniques were applied and validated during the second spacecraft inclination maneuver. These improvements should position Aqua to successfully complete a series of inclination maneuvers in the fall of 2004. The following paper presents the events and results related

  20. Maneuver Design and Calibration for the Genesis Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Kenneth E.; Hong, Philip E.; Zietz, Richard P.; Han, Don

    2000-01-01

    Genesis is the fifth mission selected as part of NASA's Discovery Program. The objective of Genesis is to collect solar wind samples for a period of approximately two years while in a halo orbit about the Earth-Sun L I point. At the end of this period, the samples are to be returned to a specific recovery point on the Earth for subsequent analysis. This goal has never been attempted before and presents a formidable challenge in terms of mission design and operations, particularly planning and execution of propulsive maneuvers. To achieve a level of cost-effectiveness consistent with a Discovery-class mission, the Genesis spacecraft design was adapted to the maximum extent possible from designs used on earlier missions, such as Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) and Stardust, another sample collection mission. The spacecraft design for Genesis is shown. Spin stabilization was chosen for attitude control, in lieu of three-axis stabilization, with neither reaction wheels nor accelerometers included. This precludes closed-loop control of propulsive maneuvers and implies that any attitude changes, including spin changes and precessions, will behave like translational propulsive maneuvers and affect the spacecraft trajectory. Moreover, to minimize contamination risk to the samples collected, all thrusters were placed on the side opposite the sample collection canister. The orientation and characteristics of thrusters are indicated. For large maneuvers (>2.5 m/s), two 5 lbf thrusters will be used for delta v, with precession to the burn attitude, followed by spin-up from 1.6 to 10 rpm before the burn and spin down to 1.6 rpm afterwards, then precession back to the original spin attitude. For small maneuvers (<2.5 m/s), no spin change is needed and four 0.2 lbf thrusters are used for Av. Single or double 360 deg. precession changes are required whenever the desired delta v falls inside the two-way turn circle (about 0.4 m/s) based on the mass properties, spin rate and lever arm

  1. Maintaining Aura's Orbit Requirements Under New Maneuver Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Megan; Petersen, Jeremy D.

    2014-01-01

    The Earth Observing System (EOS) Afternoon Constellation consists of five member missions (GCOM-W1, Aqua, CALIPSO, CloudSat, and Aura), each of which maintain a frozen, sun-synchronous orbit with a 16-day repeating ground track that follows the Worldwide Reference System-2 (WRS-2). Under nominal science operations for Aura, the propulsion system is oriented such that the resultant thrust vector is aligned 13.493 degrees away from the velocity vector along the yaw axis. When performing orbit maintenance maneuvers, the spacecraft performs a yaw slew to align the thrust vector in the appropriate direction. A new Drag Make Up (DMU) maneuver operations scheme has been implemented for Aura alleviating the need for the 13.493 degree yaw slew. The focus of this investigation is to assess the impact that no-slew DMU maneuver operations will have on Auras Mean Local Time (MLT) which drives the required along track separation between Aura and the constellation members, as well as Auras frozen orbit properties, eccentricity and argument of perigee. Seven maneuver strategies were analyzed to determine the best operational approach. A mirror pole strategy, with maneuvers alternating at the North and South poles, was implemented operationally to minimize impact to the MLT. Additional analysis determined that the mirror pole strategy could be further modified to include frozen orbit maneuvers and thus maintain both MLT and the frozen orbit properties under no-slew operations

  2. IMAM algorithm for tracking maneuvering targets in clutter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, Gregory A.

    1996-05-01

    Target tracking in clutter is difficult because there can be several contact-to-track associations for a given track update. The nearest neighbor approach is traditionally used but probabilistic methods, such as probabilistic data association (PDA), have since proved more capable. Tracks are also lost during maneuvers and the interacting multiple model (IMM) algorithm has been demonstrated to be effective at tracking maneuvering targets by responding to different target modes. By combining the IMM and PDA, the resulting algorithm responds to target maneuvers and is effective in clutter. The interacting multiple bias model (IMBM) algorithm is also an effective technique when tracking maneuvering targets but considers the target acceleration a system bias. The bias is estimated in an IMM algorithm framework and then used to compensate a constant velocity filter estimate. The integrated PDA filter will be incorporated into the IMBM algorithm and applied to tracking maneuvering targets in clutter. A performance comparison of IMM and IMBM techniques for tracking maneuvering targets in clutter will also be presented.

  3. Optimal diving maneuver strategy considering guidance accuracy for hypersonic vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jianwen; Liu, Luhua; Tang, Guojian; Bao, Weimin

    2014-11-01

    An optimal maneuver strategy considering terminal guidance accuracy for hypersonic vehicle in dive phase is investigated in this paper. First, it derives the complete three-dimensional nonlinear coupled motion equation without any approximations based on diving relative motion relationship directly, and converts it into linear decoupled state space equation with the same relative degree by feedback linearization. Second, the diving guidance law is designed based on the decoupled equation to meet the terminal impact point and falling angle constraints. In order to further improve the interception capability, it constructs maneuver control model through adding maneuver control item to the guidance law. Then, an integrated performance index consisting of maximum line-of-sight angle rate and minimum energy consumption is designed, and optimal control is employed to obtain optimal maneuver strategy when the encounter time is determined and undetermined, respectively. Furthermore, the performance index and suboptimal strategy are reconstructed to deal with the control capability constraint and the serous influence on terminal guidance accuracy caused by maneuvering flight. Finally, the approach is tested using the Common Aero Vehicle-H model. Simulation results demonstrate that the proposed strategy can achieve high precision guidance and effective maneuver at the same time, and the indices are also optimized.

  4. Automated maneuver planning using a fuzzy logic algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conway, D.; Sperling, R.; Folta, D.; Richon, K.; Defazio, R.

    1994-01-01

    Spacecraft orbital control requires intensive interaction between the analyst and the system used to model the spacecraft trajectory. For orbits with right mission constraints and a large number of maneuvers, this interaction is difficult or expensive to accomplish in a timely manner. Some automation of maneuver planning can reduce these difficulties for maneuver-intensive missions. One approach to this automation is to use fuzzy logic in the control mechanism. Such a prototype system currently under development is discussed. The Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission (TRMM) is one of several missions that could benefit from automated maneuver planning. TRMM is scheduled for launch in August 1997. The spacecraft is to be maintained in a 350-km circular orbit throughout the 3-year lifetime of the mission, with very small variations in this orbit allowed. Since solar maximum will occur as early as 1999, the solar activity during the TRMM mission will be increasing. The increasing solar activity will result in orbital maneuvers being performed as often as every other day. The results of automated maneuver planning for the TRMM mission will be presented to demonstrate the prototype of the fuzzy logic tool.

  5. Cerebral hemodynamics during graded Valsalva maneuvers

    PubMed Central

    Perry, Blake G.; Cotter, James D.; Mejuto, Gaizka; Mündel, Toby; Lucas, Samuel J. E.

    2014-01-01

    The Valsalva maneuver (VM) produces large and abrupt changes in mean arterial pressure (MAP) that challenge cerebral blood flow and oxygenation. We examined the effect of VM intensity on middle cerebral artery blood velocity (MCAv) and cortical oxygenation responses during (phases I–III) and following (phase IV) a VM. Healthy participants (n = 20 mean ± SD: 27 ± 7 years) completed 30 and 90% of their maximal VM mouth pressure for 10 s (order randomized) whilst standing. Beat-to-beat MCAv, cerebral oxygenation (NIRS) and MAP across the different phases of the VM are reported as the difference from standing baseline. There were significant interaction (phase * intensity) effects for MCAv, total oxygenation index (TOI) and MAP (all P < 0.01). MCAv decreased during phases II and III (P < 0.01), with the greatest decrease during phase III (−5 ± 8 and −19 ± 15 cm·s−1 for 30 and 90% VM, respectively). This pattern was also evident in TOI (phase III: −1 ± 1 and −5 ± 4%, both P < 0.05). Phase IV increased MCAv (22 ± 15 and 34 ± 23 cm·s−1), MAP (15 ± 14 and 24 ± 17 mm Hg) and TOI (5 ± 6 and 7 ± 5%) relative to baseline (all P < 0.05). Cerebral autoregulation, indexed, as the %MCAv/%MAP ratio, showed a phase effect only (P < 0.001), with the least regulation during phase IV (2.4 ± 3.0 and 3.2 ± 2.9). These data illustrate that an intense VM profoundly affects cerebral hemodynamics, with a reactive hyperemia occurring during phase IV following modest ischemia during phases II and III. PMID:25309449

  6. An Overview of Suomi NPP VIIRS Calibration Maneuvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, James J.; Xiong, Xiaoxiong; Barnes, Robert A.; Patt, Frederick S.; Sun, Junqiang; Chiang, Kwofu

    2012-01-01

    The first Visible Infrared Imager Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) instrument was successfully launched on-board the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (SNPP) spacecraft on October 28, 2011. Suomi NPP VIIRS observations are made in 22 spectral bands, from the visible (VIS) to the long-wave infrared (LWIR), and are used to produce 22 Environmental Data Records (EDRs) with a broad range of scientific applications. The quality of these VIIRS EDRs strongly depends on the quality of its calibrated and geo-located Sensor Date Records (SDRs). Built with a strong heritage to the NASA's EOS MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument, the VIIRS is calibrated on-orbit using a similar set of on-board calibrators (OBC), including a solar diffuser (SD) and solar diffuser stability monitor (SDSM) system for the reflective solar bands (RSB) and a blackbody (BB) for the thermal emissive bands (TEB). On-orbit maneuvers of the SNPP spacecraft provide additional calibration and characterization data from the VIIRS instrument which cannot be obtained pre-launch and are required to produce the highest quality SDRs. These include multi-orbit yaw maneuvers for the characterization of SD and SDSM screen transmission, quasi-monthly roll maneuvers to acquire lunar observations to track sensor degradation in the visible through shortwave infrared, and a driven pitch-over maneuver to acquire multiple scans of deep space to determine TEB response versus scan angle (RVS). This paper pro-vides an overview of these three SNPP calibration maneuvers. Discussions are focused on their potential calibration and science benefits, pre-launch planning activities, and on-orbit scheduling and implementation strategies. Results from calibration maneuvers performed during the Intensive Calibration and Validation (ICV) period for the VIIRS sensor are illustrated. Also presented in this paper are lessons learned regarding the implementation of calibration spacecraft maneuvers on follow

  7. AH-1S communication switch integration program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haworth, Loran; Szoboszlay, Zoltan; Shively, Robert; Bick, Frank J.

    1989-01-01

    The C-6533/ARC communication system as installed on the test AH-1E Cobra helicopter was modified to allow discrete radio selection of all aircraft radios at the cyclic radio/intercommunication system switch. The current Cobra-fleet use of the C-6533 system is cumbersome, particularly during low-altitude operations. Operationally, the current system C-6533 configuration and design requires the pilot to estimate when he can safely remove his hand from an active flight control to select radios during low-altitude flight. The pilot must then physically remove his hand from the flight control, look inside the cockpit to select and verify the radio selection and then effect the selected radio transmission by activating the radio/ICS switch on the cyclic. This condition is potentially hazardous, especially during low-level flight at night in degraded weather. To improve pilot performance, communications effectiveness, and safety, manprint principles were utilized in the selection of a design modification. The modified C-6533 design was kept as basic as possible for potential Cobra-fleet modification. The communications system was modified and the design was subsequently flight-tested by the U.S. Army Aeroflightdynamics Directorate and NASA at the NASA Ames Research Center, Mountain View, California. The design modification enables the Cobra pilot to maintain hands-on flight controls while selecting radios during nap-of-the-Earth (NOE) flight without looking inside the cockpit which resulted in reduced pilot workload ratings, better pilot handling quality ratings and increased flight safety for the NOE flight environment.

  8. Orbital maneuvers around irregular shaped bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venditti, Flaviane; Rocco, E. M.; Almeida Prado, A. B.

    2013-05-01

    Abstract (2,250 Maximum Characters): In the solar system there are many small bodies called asteroids. The large majority of these bodies are located in the asteroid belt, between the orbits of the planets Mars and Jupiter. The Near- Earth Objects, or NEOs, are objects with perihelion below 1.3AU, which include comets and asteroids. The NEOs are considered to have orbits passing close to the Earth’s orbit and, in the case of asteroids, are called Near-Earth Asteroids (NEAs). Among the NEAs there are bodies considered potentially hazardous asteroids (PHAs), whose minimum orbit intersection distance with Earth is 0.05AU and that have absolute magnitude (H) of 22, which would mean an asteroid of at least 110-240 meters, depending on its albedo. One of the major characteristic of the asteroids is the irregular shape, causing the dynamics of orbits around these bodies to be different from a spherical shaped one. The fact that an object is not spherical generates a perturbation on the gravitational field. The disturbing force can be determined considering the shape of the specific body. A satellite orbiting this body would suffer the effects of this perturbation, but knowing the disturbing force, it’s possible to correct and control the orbit according to the desired mission. The polyhedron method is a traditional way to model an asteroid by dividing the object into smaller parts. The data used on this work are composed by a combination of triangular faces. The total disturbing force is a sum of the force on each piece of the model. Therefore, after the simulations are obtained, it’s possible to apply the desired corrections of the perturbation using continuous low thrust in closed loop, making it possible to perform maneuvers near these bodies. One of the important applications of the study shown above is in the ASTER mission, that is under study by INPE and several other Brazilian academic institutions, which goal is to send a spacecraft to an asteroid and then

  9. Using Mean Orbit Period in Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter Maneuver Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, Min-Kun J.; Menon, Premkumar R.; Wagner, Sean V.; Williams, Jessica L.

    2014-01-01

    Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) has provided communication relays for a number of Mars spacecraft. In 2016 MRO is expected to support a relay for NASA's Interior Exploration using Seismic Investigations, Geodesy and Heat Transport (InSight) spacecraft. In addition, support may be needed by another mission, ESA's ExoMars EDL Demonstrator Module's (EDM), only 21 days after the InSight coverage. The close proximity of these two events presents a unique challenge to a conventional orbit synchronization maneuver where one deterministic maneuver is executed prior to each relay. Since the two events are close together and the difference in required phasing between InSight and EDM may be up to half an orbit (yielding a large execution error), the downtrack timing error can increase rapidly at the EDM encounter. Thus, a new maneuver strategy that does not require a deterministic maneuver in-between the two events (with only a small statistical cleanup) is proposed in the paper. This proposed strategy rests heavily on the stability of the mean orbital period. The ability to search and set the specified mean period is fundamental in the proposed maneuver design as well as in understanding the scope of the problem. The proposed strategy is explained and its result is used to understand and solve the problem in the flight operations environment.

  10. Investigation of piloting aids for manual control of hypersonic maneuvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raney, David L.; Phillips, Michael R.; Person, Lee H., Jr.

    1995-01-01

    An investigation of piloting aids designed to provide precise maneuver control for an air-breathing hypersonic vehicle is described. Stringent constraints and nonintuitive high-speed flight effects associated with maneuvering in the hypersonic regime raise the question of whether manual control of such a vehicle should even be considered. The objectives of this research were to determine the extent of manual control that is desirable for a vehicle maneuvering in this regime and to identify the form of aids that must be supplied to the pilot to make such control feasible. A piloted real-time motion-based simulation of a hypersonic vehicle concept was used for this study, and the investigation focused on a single representative cruise turn maneuver. Piloting aids, which consisted of an auto throttle, throttle director, autopilot, flight director, and two head-up display configurations, were developed and evaluated. Two longitudinal control response types consisting of a rate-command/attitude-hold system and a load factor-rate/load-factor-hold system were also compared. The complete set of piloting aids, which consisted of the autothrottle, throttle director, and flight director, improved the average Cooper-Harper flying qualities ratings from 8 to 2.6, even though identical inner-loop stability and control augmentation was provided in all cases. The flight director was determined to be the most critical of these aids, and the cruise turn maneuver was unachievable to adequate performance specifications in the absence of this flight director.

  11. Rotational maneuver of ferromagnetic nanowires for cell manipulation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yi; Zeng, Hansong

    2009-09-01

    1-D magnetic nanowires provide a powerful tool for investigating biological systems because such nanomaterials possess unique magnetic properties, which allow effective manipulation of cellular and subcellular objects. In this study, we report the rotational maneuver of ferromagnetic nanowires and their applications in cell manipulation. The rotational maneuver is studied under two different suspension conditions. The rotation of nanowires in the fluid is analyzed using Stokes flow assumption. Experimental results show that when the nanowires develop contacts with the bottom surfaces, the rotational maneuver under a modest external magnetic field can generate rapid lateral motion. The floating nanowires, on the other hand, do not exhibit substantial lateral displacements. Cell manipulation using skeletal myoblasts C2C12 shows that living cells can be manipulated efficiently on the bottom surface by the rotational maneuver of the attached nanowires. We also demonstrate the use of rotational maneuver of nanowires for creating 3-D nanowire clusters and multicellular clusters. This study is expected to add to the knowledge of nanowire-based cell manipulation and contribute to a full spectrum of control strategies for efficient use of nanowires for micro-total-analysis. It may also facilitate mechanobiological studies at cellular level, and provide useful insights for development of 3-D in vivo-like multicellular models for various applications in tissue engineering.

  12. Maneuver Planning for Conjunction Risk Mitigation with Ground-track Control Requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKinley, David

    2008-01-01

    The planning of conjunction Risk Mitigation Maneuvers (RMM) in the presence of ground-track control requirements is analyzed. Past RMM planning efforts on the Aqua, Aura, and Terra spacecraft have demonstrated that only small maneuvers are available when ground-track control requirements are maintained. Assuming small maneuvers, analytical expressions for the effect of a given maneuver on conjunction geometry are derived. The analytical expressions are used to generate a large trade space for initial RMM design. This trade space represents a significant improvement in initial maneuver planning over existing methods that employ high fidelity maneuver models and propagation.

  13. On spacecraft maneuvers control subject to propellant engine modes.

    PubMed

    Mazinan, A H

    2015-09-01

    The paper attempts to address a new control approach to spacecraft maneuvers based upon the modes of propellant engine. A realization of control strategy is now presented in engine on mode (high thrusts as well as further low thrusts), which is related to small angle maneuvers and engine off mode (specified low thrusts), which is also related to large angle maneuvers. There is currently a coarse-fine tuning in engine on mode. It is shown that the process of handling the angular velocities are finalized via rate feedback system in engine modes, where the angular rotations are controlled through quaternion based control (QBCL)strategy in engine off mode and these ones are also controlled through an optimum PID (OPIDH) strategy in engine on mode.

  14. A Maneuvering Flight Noise Model for Helicopter Mission Planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenwood, Eric; Rau, Robert; May, Benjamin; Hobbs, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    A new model for estimating the noise radiation during maneuvering flight is developed in this paper. The model applies the Quasi-Static Acoustic Mapping (Q-SAM) method to a database of acoustic spheres generated using the Fundamental Rotorcraft Acoustics Modeling from Experiments (FRAME) technique. A method is developed to generate a realistic flight trajectory from a limited set of waypoints and is used to calculate the quasi-static operating condition and corresponding acoustic sphere for the vehicle throughout the maneuver. By using a previously computed database of acoustic spheres, the acoustic impact of proposed helicopter operations can be rapidly predicted for use in mission-planning. The resulting FRAME-QS model is applied to near-horizon noise measurements collected for the Bell 430 helicopter undergoing transient pitch up and roll maneuvers, with good agreement between the measured data and the FRAME-QS model.

  15. Attitude-Control Algorithm for Minimizing Maneuver Execution Errors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acikmese, Behcet

    2008-01-01

    A G-RAC attitude-control algorithm is used to minimize maneuver execution error in a spacecraft with a flexible appendage when said spacecraft must induce translational momentum by firing (in open loop) large thrusters along a desired direction for a given period of time. The controller is dynamic with two integrators and requires measurement of only the angular position and velocity of the spacecraft. The global stability of the closed-loop system is guaranteed without having access to the states describing the dynamics of the appendage and with severe saturation in the available torque. Spacecraft apply open-loop thruster firings to induce a desired translational momentum with an extended appendage. This control algorithm will assist this maneuver by stabilizing the attitude dynamics around a desired orientation, and consequently minimize the maneuver execution errors.

  16. On spacecraft maneuvers control subject to propellant engine modes.

    PubMed

    Mazinan, A H

    2015-09-01

    The paper attempts to address a new control approach to spacecraft maneuvers based upon the modes of propellant engine. A realization of control strategy is now presented in engine on mode (high thrusts as well as further low thrusts), which is related to small angle maneuvers and engine off mode (specified low thrusts), which is also related to large angle maneuvers. There is currently a coarse-fine tuning in engine on mode. It is shown that the process of handling the angular velocities are finalized via rate feedback system in engine modes, where the angular rotations are controlled through quaternion based control (QBCL)strategy in engine off mode and these ones are also controlled through an optimum PID (OPIDH) strategy in engine on mode. PMID:26117285

  17. Severe turbulence and maneuvering from airline flight records

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wingrove, R. C.; Basch, R. E., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    Digital flight records from reported clear-air turbulence incidents are used to determine winds, to determine maneuver G loads, and to analyze control problems. Severe turbulence is found downwind of mountains and thunderstorms associated with vortices in atmospheric waves. It is also found in strong updrafts above thunderstorm buildups that are not detected by onboard weather radar. An important finding is that there are large maneuvering loads in over half of the reported clear-air turbulence incidents. Maneuvering loads are determined through an analysis of the short-term variations in elevator deflection and aircraft pitch angle. For altitude control in mountain waves the results indicate that small pitch angle changes with proper timing are sufficient to counter the vertical winds. For airspeed control in strong mountain waves, however, there is neither the available thrust nor the quickness in engine response necessary to counter the large and rapid variations in horizontal wind.

  18. Operational Challenges In TDRS Post-Maneuver Orbit Determination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laing, Jason; Myers, Jessica; Ward, Douglas; Lamb, Rivers

    2015-01-01

    The GSFC Flight Dynamics Facility (FDF) is responsible for daily and post maneuver orbit determination for the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS). The most stringent requirement for this orbit determination is 75 meters total position accuracy (3-sigma) predicted over one day for Terra's onboard navigation system. To maintain an accurate solution onboard Terra, a solution is generated and provided by the FDF Four hours after a TDRS maneuver. A number of factors present challenges to this support, such as maneuver prediction uncertainty and potentially unreliable tracking from User satellities. Reliable support is provided by comparing an extended Kalman Filter (estimated using ODTK) against a Batch Least Squares system (estimated using GTDS).

  19. Orbital maneuver optimization using time-explicit power series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorne, James D.

    2011-05-01

    Orbital maneuver transfer time optimization is traditionally accomplished using direct numerical sampling to find the mission design with the lowest delta-v requirements. The availability of explicit time series solutions to the Lambert orbit determination problem allows for the total delta-v of a series of orbital maneuvers to be expressed as an algebraic function of only the individual transfer times. The delta-v function is then minimized for a series of maneuvers by finding the optimal transfer times for each orbital arc. Results are shown for the classical example of the Hohmann transfer, a noncoplanar transfer as well as an interplanetary fly-by mission to the asteroids Pallas and Juno.

  20. [Study on anti +Gx respiratory maneuver and its training method].

    PubMed

    Xue, Yue-ying; You, Guang-xing; Wu, Bin; Liu, Xing-hua; Lu, Sheng-qiang; Xie, Bao-sheng

    2002-12-01

    Objective. To study the anti +Gx respiratory maneuver and its training method. Method. Seven young male subjects undertook the anti +Gx respiratory maneuver training. Their +Gx tolerances were examined on human centrifuge before and after training. The change of respiratory type, breath rate, electrocardiogram, heart rate, arterial oxygen saturation (SaO2), subjective symptom and vision were real-time monitored during the +Gx tolerance examination. Result. Compared with pre-training, the +Gx tolerance increased after training (P<0.05). Dyspnea and chest pain disappeared or obviously lightened and the magnitude of decrease of SaO2 decreased significantly (P<0.05). Conclusion. The above results suggested that the anti +Gx respiratory maneuver can effectively eliminate or alleviate dyspnea and chest pain induced by +Gx stress and increase human +Gx tolerance.

  1. A prescription for the Epley maneuver: www.youtube.com?

    PubMed Central

    Burke, James F.; Skolarus, Lesli E.; Callaghan, Brian C.; Fife, Terry D.; Baloh, Robert W.; Fendrick, A. Mark

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Video-sharing Web sites are being used for information about common conditions including dizziness. The Epley maneuver (EM) is a simple and effective treatment for benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) of the posterior canal. However, the maneuver is underused in routine care. In this study, we aimed to describe and analyze the available information about the EM on youtube.com. Methods: A YouTube search was performed on August 31, 2011, for videos that demonstrated the entire EM. Detailed data were abstracted from each video and corresponding Web site. Videos were rated on the accuracy of the maneuver by 2 authors, with differences resolved by adjudication. Comments posted by viewers were assessed for themes regarding video use. Results: Of the 3,319 videos identified, 33 demonstrated the EM. The total number of hits for all videos was 2,755,607. The video with the most hits (802,471) was produced by the American Academy of Neurology. Five of the videos accounted for 85% of all the hits. The maneuver demonstration was rated as accurate in 64% (21) of the videos. Themes derived from the 424 posted comments included patients self-treating with the maneuver after reviewing the videos, and providers using the videos as a prescribed treatment or for educational purposes. Conclusion: Accurate video demonstration of the Epley maneuver is available and widely viewed on YouTube. Video-sharing media may be an important way to disseminate effective interventions such as the EM. The impact of video Web sites on outcomes and costs of care is not known and warrants future study. PMID:22826542

  2. Maneuver Acoustic Flight Test of the Bell 430 Helicopter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watts, Michael E.; Snider, Royce; Greenwood, Eric; Baden, Joel

    2012-01-01

    A cooperative flight test by NASA, Bell Helicopter and the U.S. Army to characterize the steady state acoustics and measure the maneuver noise of a Bell Helicopter 430 aircraft was accomplished. The test occurred during June/July, 2011 at Eglin Air Force Base, Florida. This test gathered a total of 410 data points over 10 test days and compiled an extensive data base of dynamic maneuver measurements. Three microphone configurations with up to 31 microphones in each configuration were used to acquire acoustic data. Aircraft data included DGPS, aircraft state and rotor state information. This paper provides an overview of the test.

  3. Astronaut Alan Bean flies the Astronaut Maneuvering Equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Astronaut Alan L. Bean, Skylab 3 commander, flies the M509 Astronaut Maneuvering Equipment in the foreward dome area of the Orbital Workshop (OWS) on the space station cluster in Earth orbit. Bean is strapped in to the back-mounted, hand-controlled Automatically Stabilized Maneuvering Unit (ASMU). He is wearing a pressure suit for this run of the M509 experiment, but other ASMU tests are done in shirt sleeves. The dome area where the experiment is conducted is about 22 feet in diameter and 19 feet from top to bottom.

  4. Active Control of Solar Array Dynamics During Spacecraft Maneuvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, Brant A.; Woo, Nelson; Kraft, Thomas G.; Blandino, Joseph R.

    2016-01-01

    Recent NASA mission plans require spacecraft to undergo potentially significant maneuvers (or dynamic loading events) with large solar arrays deployed. Therefore there is an increased need to understand and possibly control the nonlinear dynamics in the spacecraft system during such maneuvers. The development of a nonlinear controller is described. The utility of using a nonlinear controller to reduce forces and motion in a solar array wing during a loading event is demonstrated. The result is dramatic reductions in system forces and motion during a 10 second loading event. A motion curve derived from the simulation with the closed loop controller is used to obtain similar benefits with a simpler motion control approach.

  5. Evaluation of an expert system for fault detection, isolation, and recovery in the manned maneuvering unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rushby, John; Crow, Judith

    1990-01-01

    The authors explore issues in the specification, verification, and validation of artificial intelligence (AI) based software, using a prototype fault detection, isolation and recovery (FDIR) system for the Manned Maneuvering Unit (MMU). They use this system as a vehicle for exploring issues in the semantics of C-Language Integrated Production System (CLIPS)-style rule-based languages, the verification of properties relating to safety and reliability, and the static and dynamic analysis of knowledge based systems. This analysis reveals errors and shortcomings in the MMU FDIR system and raises a number of issues concerning software engineering in CLIPs. The authors came to realize that the MMU FDIR system does not conform to conventional definitions of AI software, despite the fact that it was intended and indeed presented as an AI system. The authors discuss this apparent disparity and related questions such as the role of AI techniques in space and aircraft operations and the suitability of CLIPS for critical applications.

  6. Ah receptor mediated suppression of the antibody response in mice is primarily dependent on the Ah phenotype of lymphoid tissue.

    PubMed

    Silkworth, J B; Antrim, L A; Sack, G

    1986-12-01

    Halogenated aromatic hydrocarbons act through the aromatic hydrocarbon (Ah) receptor in mice to produce a series of toxic effects of the immune system. The receptor protein is a product of the Ah gene locus. Ah responsive (Ahb/Ahb) mice express a high affinity receptor in both lymphoid and nonlymphoid tissues whereas nonresponsive Ahd/Ahd mice express a poor affinity receptor. To determine the role of the Ah receptor of lymphoid tissue relative to that of nonlymphoid tissue in the induction of immune impairment, bone marrow was used to reconstitute lethally irradiated mice of the same or opposite Ah phenotype. All mice were given 3,3',4,4'-tetrachlorobiphenyl (35 and 350 mumol/kg) ip 2 days before immunization with sheep erythrocytes (SRBC). The immune response to this T dependent antigen and organ weights were determined 5 or 7 days later in normal or chimeric mice, respectively. Monoclonal Lyt 1.1 and Lyt 1.2 antibodies were used to establish the origin of the cells which repopulated the chimeric thymuses. The immune responses of both BALB/cBy (Ahb/Ahb) and the BALB/cBy X DBA/2 hybrid, CByD2F1 (Ahb/Ahd), were significantly suppressed but DBA/2 mice were unaffected. The immune responses of chimeric BALB/cBy----BALB/cBy and BALB/cBy----DBA/2 (donor----recipient) mice were also significantly suppressed and thymic atrophy was observed in both cases. The serum anti-SRBC antibody titers of DBA/2----BALB/cBy chimeras were also significantly decreased although not to the same extent as in BALB/cBy----DBA/2 mice. Chimeric DBA/2----DBA/2 mice were not affected. These results indicate that the sensitivity to Ah receptor mediated suppression of the antibody response is primarily determined by the Ah phenotype of the lymphoid tissue.

  7. Reducing Formation-Keeping Maneuver Costs for Formation Flying Satellites in Low-Earth Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, Nicholas

    2001-01-01

    Several techniques are used to synthesize the formation-keeping control law for a three-satellite formation in low-earth orbit. The objective is to minimize maneuver cost and position tracking error. Initial reductions are found for a one-satellite case by tuning the state-weighting matrix within the linear-quadratic-Gaussian framework. Further savings come from adjusting the maneuver interval. Scenarios examined include cases with and without process noise. These results are then applied to a three-satellite formation. For both the one-satellite and three-satellite cases, increasing the maneuver interval yields a decrease in maneuver cost and an increase in position tracking error. A maneuver interval of 8-10 minutes provides a good trade-off between maneuver cost and position tracking error. An analysis of the closed-loop poles with respect to varying maneuver intervals explains the effectiveness of the chosen maneuver interval.

  8. Control of Spacecraft Control Laboratory Experiment (SCOLE) slew maneuvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kakad, Y. P.

    1987-01-01

    This is the second report of a set of two reports on the dynamics and control of slewing maneuvers of NASA Spacecraft Control Laboratory Experiment (SCOLE). The control problem of slewing maneuvers of SCOLE is developed in terms of an arbitrary maneuver about any given axis. The control system is developed for the combined problem of rigid-body slew maneuver and vibration suppression of flexible appendage. The control problem is formulated by incorporating the nonlinear equations derived in the previous report and is expressed in terms of a two-point boundary value problem utilizing a quadratic type of performance index. The two-point boundary value problem is solved as a hierarchical control problem with the overall system being split in terms of two subsystems, namely the slewing of the entire assembly and the vibration suppression of the flexible antenna. The coupling variables between the two dynamical subsystems are identified and these two subsystems for control purposes are treated independently in parallel at the first level. Then the state-space trajectory of the combined problem is optimized at the second level.

  9. Maneuvering and stability performance of a robotic tuna.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Jamie M; Chhabra, Narender K

    2002-02-01

    The Draper Laboratory Vorticity Control Unmanned Undersea Vehicle (VCUUV) is the first mission-scale, autonomous underwater vehicle that uses vorticity control propulsion and maneuvering. Built as a research platform with which to study the energetics and maneuvering performance of fish-swimming propulsion, the VCUUV is a self-contained free swimming research vehicle which follows the morphology and kinematics of a yellowfin tuna. The forward half of the vehicle is comprised of a rigid hull which houses batteries, electronics, ballast and hydraulic power unit. The aft section is a freely flooded articulated robot tail which is terminated with a lunate caudal fin. Utilizing experimentally optimized body and tail kinematics from the MIT RoboTuna, the VCUUV has demonstrated stable steady swimming speeds up to 1.2 m/sec and aggressive maneuvering trajectories with turning rates up to 75 degrees per second. This paper summarizes the vehicle maneuvering and stability performance observed in field trials and compares the results to predicted performance using theoretical and empirical techniques.

  10. 14 CFR 23.1567 - Flight maneuver placard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... clear view of the pilot stating: “No acrobatic maneuvers, including spins, approved.” (b) For utility...); and (2) For those airplanes that do not meet the spin requirements for acrobatic category airplanes, an additional placard in clear view of the pilot stating: “Spins Prohibited.” (c) For...

  11. Enhanced Pseudo-Waypoint Guidance for Spacecraft Maneuvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carson, John; Acikmese, behcet

    2008-01-01

    An enhanced version of the scheme reported in "Pseudo-Waypoint Guidance for Proximity Spacecraft Maneuvers" (NPO-42753), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 31, No. 6 (June 2007), page 73 was developed. To recapitulate: the scheme provides algorithms for guidance and control (G&C) of a spacecraft maneuvering near a small astronomical body. The open-loop guidance problem is solved in advance or in real time by use of the pseudo-waypoint generation (PWG) method. Feedback control is implemented to track PWG trajectories, in a manner that enables updating of G&C in a model-predictive manner. The scheme includes silent periods following each thruster firing. The original version of the scheme provides for a fire-first, followed-by-silence sequence, which is disadvantageous in that the silence after final firing precludes reduction of any remaining velocity error -- an unacceptable result in the case of a maneuver for which a specific final velocity is required. In the enhanced version, the scheme is augmented with a fire-second technique, so that the final velocity can be established with a much higher precision because both the guidance and feedback firing can be performed and ceased at the final maneuver time.

  12. Pseudo-Waypoint Guidance for Proximity Spacecraft Maneuvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acikmese, Ahmet; Carson, John M., III

    2007-01-01

    A paper describes algorithms for guidance and control (G&C) of a spacecraft maneuvering near a planet, moon, asteroid, comet, or other small astronomical body. The algorithms were developed following a model-predictive-control approach along with a convexification of the governing dynamical equations, control constraints, and trajectory and state constraints.

  13. Skill Development for Maneuvering on the Information Highway.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mosley, Barbra; Edwards, Gloria

    To help students learn to navigate the information superhighway, a 2-hour pilot program with 10 hours of guided access time was developed to test a method for teaching the basics of maneuvering the superhighway and extracting information once located. This pilot was designed as a two-part instructional session. The first instructional session…

  14. Detail view of a starboard Orbiter Maneuvering and Reaction Control ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail view of a starboard Orbiter Maneuvering and Reaction Control Systems pod, removed from the orbiter and in it's carrier/transport vehicle at Kennedy Space Center. - Space Transportation System, Orbiter Discovery (OV-103), Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, 2101 NASA Parkway, Houston, Harris County, TX

  15. 14 CFR 27.337 - Limit maneuvering load factor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Limit maneuvering load factor. 27.337 Section 27.337 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... ranging from a positive limit of 3.5 to a negative limit of −1.0; or (b) Any positive limit...

  16. 14 CFR 29.337 - Limit maneuvering load factor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Limit maneuvering load factor. 29.337 Section 29.337 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... ranging from a positive limit of 3.5 to a negative limit of −1.0; or (b) Any positive limit...

  17. Transient Structured Distance as a Maneuver in Marital Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greene, Bernard L.; And Others

    1973-01-01

    Experience with 73 cases has shown the value of Transient Structured Distance as a maneuver in marriage therapy. While the TSD is a radical form of intervention with risks of anxiety reactions, homosexual panic, or divorce, it has proved effective with difficult forms of acute or chronic marital disharmony. (Author)

  18. 33 CFR 157.450 - Maneuvering and vessel status information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... information. 157.450 Section 157.450 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... CARRYING OIL IN BULK Interim Measures for Certain Tank Vessels Without Double Hulls Carrying Petroleum Oils § 157.450 Maneuvering and vessel status information. A tankship owner, master, or operator shall...

  19. Vibration suppression of fixed-time jib crane maneuvers

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, G.G.; Petterson, B.; Dohrmann, C.R.; Robinett, R.D.

    1995-02-01

    A jib crane consists of a pendulum-like end line attached to a rotatable jib. Within this general category of cranes there exist devices with multiple degrees of freedom including variable load-line length and variable jib length. These cranes are commonly used for construction and transportation applications. Point-to-point payload maneuvers using jib cranes are performed so as not to excite the spherical pendulum modes of their cable and payload assemblies. Typically, these pendulum modes, although time-varying, exhibit low frequencies. The resulting maneuvers are therefore performed slowly, contributing to high construction and transportation costs. The crane considered here consists of a spherical pendulum attached to a rigid jib. The other end of the jib is attached to a direct drive motor for generating rotational motion. A general approach is presented for determining the open-loop trajectories for the jib rotation for accomplishing fixed-time, point-to-point, residual oscillation free, symmetric maneuvers. These residual oscillation free trajectories purposely excite the pendulum modes in such a way that at the end of the maneuver the oscillatory degrees of freedom are quiescent. Simulation results are presented with experimental verification.

  20. LOCK, DOG HOUSE, CONTROL STATION, DAM GATE, MANEUVER BOAT No. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    LOCK, DOG HOUSE, CONTROL STATION, DAM GATE, MANEUVER BOAT No. 1, AND DAM. NOTE LOWER LOCK GATE IN FOREGROUND. LOOKING NORTH NORTHEAST. - Illinois Waterway, La Grange Lock and Dam, 3/4 mile south of Country 795N at Illinois River, Versailles, Brown County, IL

  1. EOS Terra Terra Constellation Exit/Future Maneuver Plans Update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mantziaras, Dimitrios

    2016-01-01

    This EOS Terra Constellation Exit/Future Maneuver Plans Update presentation will discuss brief history of Terra EOM work; lifetime fuel estimates; baseline vs. proposed plan origin; resultant exit orbit; baseline vs. proposed exit plan; long term orbit altitude; revised lifetime proposal and fallback options.

  2. Normative data on phases of the Valsalva maneuver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denq, J. C.; O'Brien, P. C.; Low, P. A.

    1998-01-01

    The phases of the Valsalva maneuver have well-known pathophysiology, and are used in the evaluation of adrenergic function. Because scant normative data is available, we have evaluated normative data for the Valsalva maneuver in control subjects. The patient, supine, performed the Valsalva maneuver maintaining an expiratory pressure of 40 mm Hg for 15 seconds. We reviewed 188 Valsalva maneuver recordings of normal control subjects, and recordings were excluded if two reproducible recordings were not obtained, or if expiratory pressure was <30 mm Hg or < 10 seconds. One hundred and three recordings were acceptable for analysis; 47 female and 56 male subjects, age in years (mean +/- SD) was 52.2+/-17.3 and 44.8+/-17.3, respectively. The association of expiratory pressure with age (P < 0.001) and gender ( P < 0.001) was complex, expressed as a parabola in both men and women, but resulted in phases I and III that were not significantly different. An increase in age resulted in a progressively more negative phase II_E (P < 0.05) and attenuation of phase II_L (P < 0.01). An increase in supine blood pressure resulted in a significantly more negative phase II_E (P < 0.001) and a lower phase IV. Phase IV is unaffected by age and gender.

  3. Hohmann-Hohmann and Hohmann-Phasing Cooperative Rendezvous Maneuvers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, Atri; Tsiotras, Panagiotis

    2009-01-01

    We consider the problem of cooperative rendezvous between two satellites in circular orbits, given a fixed time for the rendezvous to be completed, and assuming a circular rendezvous orbit. We investigate two types of cooperative maneuvers for which analytical solutions can be obtained. One is the case of two Hohmann transfers, henceforth referred to as HHCM, while the other, henceforth referred to as HPCM, is the case of a Hohmann transfer and a phasing maneuver. For the latter case we derive conditions on the phasing angle that make a HPCM rendezvous cheaper than a cooperative rendezvous on an orbit that is different than either the original orbits of the two participating satellites. It is shown that minimizing the fuel expenditure is equivalent to minimizing a weighted sum of the Δ Vs of the two orbital transfers, the weights being determined by the mass and engine characteristics of the satellites. Our results show that, if the time of rendezvous allows for a Hohmann transfer between the orbits of the satellites, the optimal rendezvous is either a noncooperative Hohmann transfer or a Hohmann-phasing cooperative maneuver. In both of these cases, the maneuver costs are determined analytically. A numerical example verifies these observations. Finally, we demonstrate the utility of this study for Peer-to-Peer (P2P) refueling of satellites residing in two different circular orbits.

  4. NOAA 26.5 Ah LEO characterization test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrow, G. W.

    1986-01-01

    The General Electric (GE) 26.5 Ah NOAA-G flight nickel-cadmium cells were obtained from RCA-Astro Electronics to undergo performance characterization testing at the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). This lot of cells was manufactured with passivated positive plate, to control nickel structure attack duing active material impregnation, and less electrolyte than normal (less than 3cc/Ah). The cells were tested in a parametric low Earth orbit (LEO) cycling regime that was previously used to test and characterize standard 50 Ah cells. Life cycle testing at the Naval Weapons Support Center (NWSC), in Crane, followed. The results of the test showed nominal performance in comparison with previous test data on the standard 50. Life cycle testing in the NOAA orbital regime is continuing at NWSC.

  5. Transgenic Overexpression of Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Repressor (AhRR) and AhR-Mediated Induction of CYP1A1, Cytokines, and Acute Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Vogel, Christoph F.A.; Chang, W.L. William; Kado, Sarah; McCulloh, Kelly; Vogel, Helena; Wu, Dalei; Haarmann-Stemmann, Thomas; Yang, GuoXiang; Leung, Patrick S.C.; Matsumura, Fumio; Gershwin, M. Eric

    2016-01-01

    Background: The aryl hydrocarbon receptor repressor (AhRR) is known to repress aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) signaling, but very little is known regarding the role of the AhRR in vivo. Objective: This study tested the role of AhRR in vivo in AhRR overexpressing mice on molecular and toxic end points mediated through a prototypical AhR ligand. Methods: We generated AhRR-transgenic mice (AhRR Tg) based on the genetic background of C57BL/6J wild type (wt) mice. We tested the effect of the prototypical AhR ligand 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) on the expression of cytochrome P450 (CYP)1A1 and cytokines in various tissues of mice. We next analyzed the infiltration of immune cells in adipose tissue of mice after treatment with TCDD using flow cytometry. Results: AhRR Tg mice express significantly higher levels of AhRR compared to wt mice. Activation of AhR by TCDD caused a significant increase of the inflammatory cytokines Interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6 and IL-10, and CXCL chemokines in white epididymal adipose tissue from both wt and AhRR Tg mice. However, the expression of IL-1β, CXCL2 and CXCL3 were significantly lower in AhRR Tg versus wt mice following TCDD treatment. Exposure to TCDD caused a rapid accumulation of neutrophils and macrophages in white adipose tissue of wt and AhRR Tg mice. Furthermore we found that male AhRR Tg mice were protected from high-dose TCDD-induced lethality associated with a reduced inflammatory response and liver damage as indicated by lower levels of TCDD-induced alanine aminotransferase and hepatic triglycerides. Females from both wt and AhRR Tg mice were less sensitive than male mice to acute toxicity induced by TCDD. Conclusion: In conclusion, the current study identifies AhRR as a previously uncharacterized regulator of specific inflammatory cytokines, which may protect from acute toxicity induced by TCDD. Citation: Vogel CF, Chang WL, Kado S, McCulloh K, Vogel H, Wu D, Haarmann-Stemmann T, Yang GX, Leung PS, Matsumura F

  6. Orbit determination across unknown maneuvers using the essential Thrust-Fourier-Coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Hyun Chul; Scheeres, Daniel J.

    2016-01-01

    Any maneuver performed by a satellite transitioning between two arbitrary orbital states can be represented as an equivalent maneuver involving Thrust-Fourier-Coefficients (TFCs). With a selected TFC set as a basis, a thrust acceleration can be constructed to interpolate two unconnected states across an unknown maneuver. This representation technique with TFCs enables us to facilitate the analytical propagation of uncertainties of the satellite state. This approach allows for the usage of existing pre-maneuver orbit estimation to compute the orbit solution after the unknown maneuver. In this paper, we applied this approach to orbit determination (OD) problems across unknown maneuvers by appending different combinations of TFCs to the state vector in the batch filter. The aim is to investigate how different maneuver representations with different TFC sets affect the OD solution across unknown maneuvers. Simulation results show that each TFC set provides different representations of the unknown perturbing acceleration, which yields varying magnitudes of delta velocity for a given maneuver. However, OD solutions across unknown maneuvers using different TFC sets display equivalent performance over the post-maneuver arc as long as those TFC sets are capable of generating the apparent secular motion caused by a given unknown maneuver.

  7. Maneuvering hydrodynamics of fish and small underwater vehicles.

    PubMed

    Bandyopadhyay, Promode R

    2002-02-01

    The understanding of fish maneuvering and its application to underwater rigid bodies are considered. The goal is to gain insight into stealth. The recent progress made in NUWC is reviewed. Fish morphology suggests that control fins for maneuverability have unique scalar relationships irrespective of their speed type. Maneuvering experiments are carried out with fish that are fast yet maneuverable. The gap in maneuverability between fish and small underwater vehicles is quantified. The hydrodynamics of a dorsal fin based brisk maneuvering device and a dual flapping foil device, as applied to rigid cylindrical bodies, are described. The role of pectoral wings in maneuvering and station keeping near surface waves is discussed. A pendulum model of dolphin swimming is presented to show that body length and tail flapping frequency are related. For nearly neutrally buoyant bodies, Froude number and maneuverability are related. Analysis of measurements indicates that the Strouhal number of dolphins is a constant. The mechanism of discrete and deterministic vortex shedding from oscillating control surfaces has the property of large amplitude unsteady forcing and an exquisite phase dependence, which makes it inherently amenable to active control for precision maneuvering. Theoretical control studies are carried out to demonstrate the feasibility of maneuverability of biologically inspired bodies under surface waves. The application of fish hydrodynamics to the silencing of propulsors is considered. Two strategies for the reduction of radiated noise are developed. The effects of a reduction of rotational rate are modeled. The active cambering of blades made of digitally programmable artificial muscles, and their thrust enhancement, are demonstrated. Next, wake momentum filling is carried out by artificial muscles at the trailing edge of a stator blade of an upstream stator propulsor, and articulating them like a fish tail. A reduction of radiated noise, called blade tonals

  8. Design and Performance Data for 81 Ah FNC Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, F.; Anderman, Menahem

    1997-01-01

    Design and performance data for 81 Ah FNC cells are given. The conclusions are: that a sealed Ni-Cd cells are not limited to 50 Ah with the FNC design; energy densities of 40 Wh/kg in a conservative high Cd, high electrolyte design have been demonstrated; uniform ATP data and LEO cycling performance is being demonstrated; internal cell pressures remain low under all conditions; and no conditioning is necessary under any LEO profile; accelerated LEO cycling exhibits performance well beyond traditional space Ni-Cd cells.

  9. 77 FR 2680 - Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement; Definition of Cost or Pricing Data

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-19

    ... text addressing the definition of cost or pricing data. The DFARS changes are necessary to ensure... definition of cost or pricing data, published at 75 FR 53135 on August 30, 2010. II. Executive Orders 12866... RIN 0750-AH49 Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement; Definition of Cost or Pricing...

  10. A geostationary longitude acquisition planning algorithm. [for maneuver planning of geosynchronous satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petruzzo, C. J.; Bryant, W. C., Jr.; Nickerson, K. G.

    1977-01-01

    The paper is concerned with the phase of the geosynchronous mission termed station acquisition, which involves the maneuvering of a spacecraft to its geostationary longitude by means of the spacecraft propulsion system. An algorithm which assists in maneuver planning is described, and examples of its use are presented. The algorithm can be applied when sequences of more than three maneuvers are to be expected. While, in general, three maneuvers are sufficient to achieve the desired end conditions when orbital mechanics are the only consideration, operational considerations may add constraints resulting in an increased number of maneuvers required.

  11. CCD Photometric Study and Period Investigation of AH Tauri

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Fu-Yuan; Xiao, Ting-Yu; Yu, Yun-Xia

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, we present new CCD photometric observations of AH Tauri in the R band observed in 2006 at the Yunnan Observatory. Two new times of light minima were derived from these observations. We modeled the light curves using the 2003 version of the Wilson-Devinney program. The results show that the variations of the light curves can be expained by a cool spot on the primary star. The fill-out factor is about 6.6%, indicating that AH Tauri is a shallow-contact system. The mass ratio was determined to be about 0.505. In addition, the orbital period variations of AH Tauri were investigated based on all of the photoelectric and CCD light minimum times, including our two new data. It was found that the orbital period exhibits a possible periodic variation with a period of {P}{mod}=54.62\\(+/- 0.20) years and a secular period decrease of {dP}/{dt}=-(1.823+/- 0.215)× {10}-7 {days} {{yr}}-1. Since AH Tauri is an overcontact solar-like system, we discuss three mechanisms of the mass transfer, the light-time effect of the third body, and magnetic activity responsible for the orbital period changes.

  12. PESTICIDE TRADE NAMES AND THEIR ACTIVE INGREDIENTS IN THE AHS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The detailed information on the use of specific pesticides is a major strength of exposure assessment conducted for the Agricultural Health Study (AHS). During the enrollment interviews, a check list was used to collect information on the frequency and duration of use for 28 p...

  13. Does dragonfly's abdomen flexion help with fast turning maneuvers?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Geng; Li, Chengyu; Dong, Haibo; Flow Simulation Research Group Team

    2013-11-01

    Dragonflies are able to achieve fast turning maneuvers during take-off flights. Both asymmetric wing flapping and abdomen flexion have been observed during the fast turning. It's widely thought that the asymmetric wing beats are responsible of producing the aerodynamic moment needed for the body rotation. However, the dynamic effect of the abdomen flexion is not clear yet. In this study, an integrated experimental and computational approach is used to study the underlying dynamic effect of dragonfly abdomen flexion. It's found that dragonfly abdomen tended to bend towards the same side as the body reorienting to. Quantitative analysis have shown that during take-off turning maneuver the abdomen flexion can modulate the arm of force by changing the position of the center of mass relative to the thorax. As a result, roll and yaw moments produced by the wing flapping can be enhanced. This work is supported by NSF CBET-1313217. This work is supported by NSF CBET-1313217.

  14. Visual display aid for orbital maneuvering - Design considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grunwald, Arthur J.; Ellis, Stephen R.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes the development of an interactive proximity operations planning system that allows on-site planning of fuel-efficient multiburn maneuvers in a potential multispacecraft environment. Although this display system most directly assists planning by providing visual feedback to aid visualization of the trajectories and constraints, its most significant features include: (1) the use of an 'inverse dynamics' algorithm that removes control nonlinearities facing the operator, and (2) a trajectory planning technique that separates, through a 'geometric spreadsheet', the normally coupled complex problems of planning orbital maneuvers and allows solution by an iterative sequence of simple independent actions. The visual feedback of trajectory shapes and operational constraints, provided by user-transparent and continuously active background computations, allows the operator to make fast, iterative design changes that rapidly converge to fuel-efficient solutions. The planning tool provides an example of operator-assisted optimization of nonlinear cost functions.

  15. Heterogeneous Multiple Sensors Joint Tracking of Maneuvering Target in Clutter

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Panlong; Li, Xingxiu; Kong, Jianshou; Liu, Jiale

    2015-01-01

    To solve the problem of tracking maneuvering airborne targets in the presence of clutter, an improved interacting multiple model probability data association algorithm (IMMPDA-MDCM) using radar/IR sensors fusion is proposed. Under the architecture of the proposed algorithm, the radar/IR centralized fusion tracking scheme of IMMPDA-MDCM is designed to guarantee the observability of the target state. The interacting multiple model (IMM) deals with the model switching. The modified debiased converted measurement (MDCM) filter accounts for non-linearity in the dynamic system models, and reduces the effect of measurement noise on the covariance effectively. The probability data association (PDA) handles data association and measurement uncertainties in clutter. The simulation results show that the proposed algorithm can improve the tracking precision for maneuvering target in clutters, and has higher tracking precision than the traditional IMMPDA based on EKF and IMMPDA based on DCM algorithm. PMID:26193279

  16. Guidance law against maneuvering targets with intercept angle constraint.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Shaofeng; Wang, Weihong; Liu, Xiaodong; Wang, Sen; Chen, Zengqiang

    2014-07-01

    This study explores the guidance law against maneuvering targets with the intercept angle constraint. The limitation of the traditional guidance law, which simply treats the unknown target acceleration as zero, has been analyzed. To reduce this limitation, a linear extended state observer is constructed to estimate the acceleration of the maneuvering target to enhance the tracking performance of the desired intercept angle. Furthermore, a nonsingular terminal sliding mode control scheme is adopted to design the sliding surface, which is able to avoid the singularity in the terminal phase of guidance. Simulation results have demonstrated that the proposed guidance law outperforms the traditional guidance law in the sense that more accurate intercept angle can be achieved.

  17. Thermally-Constrained Fuel-Optimal ISS Maneuvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatt, Sagar; Svecz, Andrew; Alaniz, Abran; Jang, Jiann-Woei; Nguyen, Louis; Spanos, Pol

    2015-01-01

    Optimal Propellant Maneuvers (OPMs) are now being used to rotate the International Space Station (ISS) and have saved hundreds of kilograms of propellant over the last two years. The savings are achieved by commanding the ISS to follow a pre-planned attitude trajectory optimized to take advantage of environmental torques. The trajectory is obtained by solving an optimal control problem. Prior to use on orbit, OPM trajectories are screened to ensure a static sun vector (SSV) does not occur during the maneuver. The SSV is an indicator that the ISS hardware temperatures may exceed thermal limits, causing damage to the components. In this paper, thermally-constrained fuel-optimal trajectories are presented that avoid an SSV and can be used throughout the year while still reducing propellant consumption significantly.

  18. Broken-Plane Maneuver Applications for Earth to Mars Trajectories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abilleira, Fernando

    2007-01-01

    Optimization techniques are critical when investigating Earth to Mars trajectories since they have the potential of reducing the total (delta)V of a mission. A deep space maneuver (DSM) executed during the cruise may improve a trajectory by reducing the total mission V. Nonetheless, DSMs not only may improve trajectory performance (from an energetic point of view) but also open up new families of trajectories that would satisfy very specific mission requirements not achievable with ballistic trajectories. In the following pages, various specific examples showing the potential advantages of the usage of broken plane maneuvers will be introduced. These examples correspond to possible scenarios for Earth to Mars trajectories during the next decade (2010-2020).

  19. Optimal Variable-Structure Control Tracking of Spacecraft Maneuvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crassidis, John L.; Vadali, Srinivas R.; Markley, F. Landis

    1999-01-01

    An optimal control approach using variable-structure (sliding-mode) tracking for large angle spacecraft maneuvers is presented. The approach expands upon a previously derived regulation result using a quaternion parameterization for the kinematic equations of motion. This parameterization is used since it is free of singularities. The main contribution of this paper is the utilization of a simple term in the control law that produces a maneuver to the reference attitude trajectory in the shortest distance. Also, a multiplicative error quaternion between the desired and actual attitude is used to derive the control law. Sliding-mode switching surfaces are derived using an optimal-control analysis. Control laws are given using either external torque commands or reaction wheel commands. Global asymptotic stability is shown for both cases using a Lyapunov analysis. Simulation results are shown which use the new control strategy to stabilize the motion of the Microwave Anisotropy Probe spacecraft.

  20. Single step optimization of manipulator maneuvers with variable structure control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, N.; Dwyer, T. A. W., III

    1987-01-01

    One step ahead optimization has been recently proposed for spacecraft attitude maneuvers as well as for robot manipulator maneuvers. Such a technique yields a discrete time control algorithm implementable as a sequence of state-dependent, quadratic programming problems for acceleration optimization. Its sensitivity to model accuracy, for the required inversion of the system dynamics, is shown in this paper to be alleviated by a fast variable structure control correction, acting between the sampling intervals of the slow one step ahead discrete time acceleration command generation algorithm. The slow and fast looping concept chosen follows that recently proposed for optimal aiming strategies with variable structure control. Accelerations required by the VSC correction are reserved during the slow one step ahead command generation so that the ability to overshoot the sliding surface is guaranteed.

  1. Design and analysis of a supersonic penetration/maneuvering fighter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Child, R. D.

    1975-01-01

    The design of three candidate air combat fighters which would cruise effectively at freestream Mach numbers of 1.6, 2.0, and 2.5 while maintaining good transonic maneuvering capability, is considered. These fighters were designed to deliver aerodynamically controlled dogfight missiles at the design Mach numbers. Studies performed by Rockwell International in May 1974 and guidance from NASA determined the shape and size of these missiles. The principle objective of this study is the aerodynamic design of the vehicles; however, configurations are sized to have realistic structures, mass properties, and propulsion systems. The results of this study show that air combat fighters in the 15,000 to 23,000 pound class would cruise supersonically on dry power and still maintain good transonic maneuvering performance.

  2. Time efficient spacecraft maneuver using constrained torque distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Xibin; Yue, Chengfei; Liu, Ming; Wu, Baolin

    2016-06-01

    This paper investigates the time efficient maneuver of rigid satellites with inertia uncertainty and bounded external disturbance. A redundant cluster of four reaction wheels is used to control the spacecraft. To make full use of the controllability and avoid frequent unload for reaction wheels, a maximum output torque and maximum angular momentum constrained torque distribution method is developed. Based on this distribution approach, the maximum allowable acceleration and velocity of the satellite are optimized during the maneuvering. A novel braking curve is designed on the basis of the optimization strategy of the control torque distribution. A quaternion-based sliding mode control law is proposed to render the state to track the braking curve strictly. The designed controller provides smooth control torque, time efficiency and high control precision. Finally, practical numerical examples are illustrated to show the effectiveness of the developed torque distribution strategy and control methodology.

  3. Dynamic wake distortion model for helicopter maneuvering flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jinggen

    A new rotor dynamic wake distortion model, which can be used to account for the rotor transient wake distortion effect on inflow across the rotor disk during helicopter maneuvering and transitional flight in both hover and forward flight conditions, is developed. The dynamic growths of the induced inflow perturbation across rotor disk during different transient maneuvers, such as a step pitch or roll rate, a step climb rate and a step change of advance ratio are investigated by using a dynamic vortex tube analysis. Based on the vortex tube results, a rotor dynamic wake distortion model, which is expressed in terms of a set of ordinary differential equations, with rotor longitudinal and lateral wake curvatures, wake skew and wake spacing as states, is developed. Also, both the Pitt-Peters dynamic inflow model and the Peters-He finite state inflow model for axial or forward flight are augmented to account for rotor dynamic wake distortion effect during helicopter maneuvering flight. To model the aerodynamic interaction among main rotor, tail rotor and empennage caused by rotor wake curvature effect during helicopter maneuvering flight, a reduced order model based on a vortex tube analysis is developed. Both the augmented Pitt-Peters dynamic inflow model and the augmented Peters-He finite state inflow model, combined with the developed dynamic wake distortion model, together with the interaction model are implemented in a generic helicopter simulation program of UH-60 Black Hawk helicopter and the simulated vehicle control responses in both time domain and frequency domain are compared with flight test data of a UH-60 Black Hawk helicopter in both hover and low speed forward flight conditions.

  4. Differential Evolution Optimization for Targeting Spacecraft Maneuver Plans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mattern, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Previous analysis identified specific orbital parameters as being safer for conjunction avoidance for the TDRS fleet. With TDRS-9 being considered an at-risk spacecraft, a potential conjunction concern was raised should TDRS-9 fail while at a longitude of 12W. This document summarizes the analysis performed to identify if these specific orbital parameters could be targeted using the remaining drift-termination maneuvers for the relocation of TDRS-9 from 41W longitude to 12W longitude.

  5. Efficient Reorientation Maneuvers for Spacecraft with Multiple Articulated Payloads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcclamroch, N. Harris

    1993-01-01

    A final report is provided which describes the research program during the period 3 Mar. 1992 to 3 Jun. 1993. A summary of the technical research questions that were studied and of the main results that were obtained is given. The specific outcomes of the research program, including both educational impacts as well as research publications, are listed. The research is concerned with efficient reorientation maneuvers for spacecraft with multiple articulated payloads.

  6. 14 CFR 25.337 - Limit maneuvering load factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... factor n for any speed up to Vn may not be less than 2.1+24,000/ (W +10,000) except that n may not be less than 2.5 and need not be greater than 3.8—where W is the design maximum takeoff weight. (c) The negative limit maneuvering load factor— (1) May not be less than −1.0 at speeds up to V C; and (2)...

  7. 14 CFR 25.337 - Limit maneuvering load factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... factor n for any speed up to Vn may not be less than 2.1+24,000/ (W +10,000) except that n may not be less than 2.5 and need not be greater than 3.8—where W is the design maximum takeoff weight. (c) The negative limit maneuvering load factor— (1) May not be less than −1.0 at speeds up to V C; and (2)...

  8. A Summary of the Pioneer 10 Maneuver Strategy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frauenholz, R. B.; Ball, J. E.

    1972-01-01

    The Pioneer Project placed a number of interesting and precise requirements on the navigation of the Pioneer 10 spacecraft flyby mission to Jupiter during 1972-1973. To satisfy these requirements the Pioneer navigation team employed a number of versatile computer programs to evaluate the strategies and maneuver sequences required to execute midcourse corrections. The Pioneer 10 mission objectives and the midcourse strategies used to satisfy these objectives are summarized.

  9. Stability and control of maneuvering high-performance aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stengel, R. F.; Berry, P. W.

    1977-01-01

    The stability and control of a high-performance aircraft was analyzed, and a design methodology for a departure prevention stability augmentation system (DPSAS) was developed. A general linear aircraft model was derived which includes maneuvering flight effects and trim calculation procedures for investigating highly dynamic trajectories. The stability and control analysis systematically explored the effects of flight condition and angular motion, as well as the stability of typical air combat trajectories. The effects of configuration variation also were examined.

  10. Flow Modulation and Force Control in Insect Fast Maneuver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chengyu; Dong, Haibo; Zhang, Wen; Gai, Kuo

    2012-11-01

    In this work, an integrated study combining high-speed photogrammetry and direct numerical simulation (DNS) is used to study free flying insects in fast maneuver. Quantitative measurement has shown the significant differences between quad-winged flyers such as dragonfly and damselfly and two-winged flyers such as cicada. Comparisons of unsteady 3D vortex formation and associated aerodynamic force production reveal the different mechanisms used by insects in fast turn. This work is supported by NSF CBET-1055949.

  11. Risk of Guillain–Barré syndrome following pandemic influenza A(H1N1) 2009 vaccination in Germany†

    PubMed Central

    Prestel, Jürgen; Volkers, Peter; Mentzer, Dirk; Lehmann, Helmar C; Hartung, Hans-Peter; Keller-Stanislawski, Brigitte

    2014-01-01

    Purpose A prospective, epidemiologic study was conducted to assess whether the 2009 pandemic influenza A(H1N1) vaccination in Germany almost exclusively using an AS03-adjuvanted vaccine (Pandemrix) impacts the risk of Guillain–Barré syndrome (GBS) and its variant Fisher syndrome (FS). Methods Potential cases of GBS/FS were reported by 351 participating hospitals throughout Germany. The self-controlled case series methodology was applied to all GBS/FS cases fulfilling the Brighton Collaboration (BC) case definition (levels 1–3 of diagnostic certainty) with symptom onset between 1 November 2009 and 30 September 2010 reported until end of December 2010. Results Out of 676 GBS/FS reports, in 30 cases, GBS/FS (BC levels 1–3) occurred within 150 days following influenza A(H1N1) vaccination. The relative incidence of GBS/FS within the primary risk period (days 5–42 post-vaccination) compared with the control period (days 43–150 post-vaccination) was 4.65 (95%CI [2.17, 9.98]). Similar results were found when stratifying for infections within 3 weeks prior to onset of GBS/FS and when excluding cases with additional seasonal influenza vaccination. The overall result of temporally adjusted analyses supported the primary finding of an increased relative incidence of GBS/FS following influenza A(H1N1) vaccination. Conclusions The results indicate an increased risk of GBS/FS in temporal association with pandemic influenza A(H1N1) vaccination in Germany. © 2014 The Authors. Pharmacoepidemiology and Drug Safety published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:24817531

  12. Optimal scheduling of multispacecraft refueling based on cooperative maneuver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Bingxiao; Zhao, Yong; Dutta, Atri; Yu, Jing; Chen, Xiaoqian

    2015-06-01

    The scheduling of multispacecraft refueling based on cooperative maneuver in a circular orbit is studied in this paper. In the proposed scheme, both of the single service vehicle (SSV) and the target satellite (TS) perform the orbital transfer to complete the rendezvous at the service places. When a TS is refueled by the SSV, it returns to its original working slot to continue its normal function. In this way, the SSV refuels the TS one by one. A MINLP model for the mission is first built, then a two-level hybrid optimization approach is proposed for determining the strategy, and the optimal solution is successfully obtained by using an algorithm which is a combination of Multi-island Genetic Algorithm and Sequential Quadratic Programming. Results show the cooperative strategy can save around 27.31% in fuel, compared with the non-cooperative strategy in which only the SSV would maneuver in the example considered. Three conclusions can be drawn based on the numerical simulations for the evenly distributed constellations. Firstly, in the cooperative strategy one of the service positions is the initial location of the SSV, other service positions are also target slots, i.e. not all targets need to maneuver, and there may be more than one TS serviced in a given service position. Secondly, the efficiency gains for the cooperative strategy are higher for larger transferred fuel mass. Thirdly, the cooperative strategy is less efficient for targets with larger spacecraft mass.

  13. Alveolar recruitment maneuvers: are your patients missing out?

    PubMed

    Hartland, Benjamin L; Newell, Timothy J; Damico, Nicole

    2014-08-01

    Awake, spontaneously breathing humans sigh on average 9 to 10 times per hour. The sigh is a normal homeostatic reflex proposed to maintain pulmonary compliance and decrease the formation of atelectasis by recruiting collapsed alveoli. The induction and maintenance of anesthesia with muscle paralysis and a fixed tidal volume abolish the sigh. Without periodic sighs, patients are left susceptible to atelectasis and its negative sequelae. The prevalence of atelectasis has been estimated to be as high as 100% in patients undergoing general anesthesia. A strong correlation between atelectasis and postoperative pulmonary complications has been demonstrated. Postoperative pulmonary complications lengthen hospital stays and increase healthcare costs. Alveolar recruitment maneuvers, which make up one component of open lung ventilation, have been described as vital capacity breaths, double tidal volume breaths, and sigh breaths. These simple maneuvers result in a sustained increase in airway pressure that serves to recruit collapsed alveoli and improve arterial oxygenation. This article examines the literature regarding the application of alveolar recruitment maneuvers in the perioperative setting. The format is a series of clinically oriented questions posed to help the reader translate available evidence into practice.

  14. Control integration concept for hypersonic cruise-turn maneuvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raney, David L.; Lallman, Frederick J.

    1992-01-01

    Piloting difficulties associated with conducting aircraft maneuvers in hypersonic flight are caused in part by the nonintuitive nature of the aircraft response and the stringent constraints anticipated on allowable angle of attack and dynamic pressure variations. An approach is documented that provides precise, coordinated maneuver control during excursions from a hypersonic cruise flight path and the necessary flight condition constraints. The approach is to achieve specified guidance commands by resolving altitude and cross range errors into a load factor and bank angle command by using a coordinate transformation that acts as an interface between outer and inner loop flight controls. This interface, referred to as a 'resolver', applies constraints on angle of attack and dynamic pressure perturbations while prioritizing altitude regulation over cross range. An unpiloted test simulation, in which the resolver was used to drive inner loop flight controls, produced time histories of responses to guidance commands and atmospheric disturbances at Mach numbers of 6, 10, 15, and 20. Angle of attack and throttle perturbation constraints, combined with high speed flight effects and the desire to maintain constant dynamic pressure, significantly impact the maneuver envelope for a hypersonic vehicle.

  15. Capturing and analyzing wheelchair maneuvering patterns with mobile cloud computing.

    PubMed

    Fu, Jicheng; Hao, Wei; White, Travis; Yan, Yuqing; Jones, Maria; Jan, Yih-Kuen

    2013-01-01

    Power wheelchairs have been widely used to provide independent mobility to people with disabilities. Despite great advancements in power wheelchair technology, research shows that wheelchair related accidents occur frequently. To ensure safe maneuverability, capturing wheelchair maneuvering patterns is fundamental to enable other research, such as safe robotic assistance for wheelchair users. In this study, we propose to record, store, and analyze wheelchair maneuvering data by means of mobile cloud computing. Specifically, the accelerometer and gyroscope sensors in smart phones are used to record wheelchair maneuvering data in real-time. Then, the recorded data are periodically transmitted to the cloud for storage and analysis. The analyzed results are then made available to various types of users, such as mobile phone users, traditional desktop users, etc. The combination of mobile computing and cloud computing leverages the advantages of both techniques and extends the smart phone's capabilities of computing and data storage via the Internet. We performed a case study to implement the mobile cloud computing framework using Android smart phones and Google App Engine, a popular cloud computing platform. Experimental results demonstrated the feasibility of the proposed mobile cloud computing framework.

  16. An Autonomous Onboard Targeting Algorithm Using Finite Thrust Maneuvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scarritt, Sara K.; Marchand, Belinda G.; Weeks, Michael W.

    2009-01-01

    In earlier investigations, the adaptation and implementation of a modified two-level corrections process as the onboard targeting algorithm for the Trans-Earth Injection phase of Orion is presented. The objective of that targeting algorithm is to generate the times of ignition and magnitudes of the required maneuvers such that the desired state at entry interface is achieved. In an actual onboard flight software implementation, these times of ignition and maneuvers are relayed onto Flight Control for command and execution. Although this process works well when the burn durations or burn arcs are small, this might not be the case during a contingency situation when lower thrust engines are employed to perform the maneuvers. Therefore, a new version of the modified two-level corrections process is formulated to handle the case of finite burn arcs. This paper presents the development and formulation of that finite burn modified two-level corrections process which can again be used as an onboard targeting algorithm for the Trans-Earth Injection phase of Orion. Additionally, performance results and a comparison between the two methods are presented. The finite burn two-level corrector formulation presented here ensures the entry constraints at entry interface are still met without violating the available fuel budget, while still accounting for much longer burn times in its design.

  17. An Autonomous Onboard Targeting Algorithm Using Finite Thrust Maneuvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scarritt, Sara K.; Marchand, Belinda G.; Brown, Aaron J.; Tracy, William H.; Weeks, Michael W.

    2010-01-01

    In earlier investigations, the adaptation and implementation of a modified two-level corrections (or targeting) process as the onboard targeting algorithm for the Trans-Earth Injection phase of Orion is presented. The objective of that targeting algorithm is to generate the times of ignition and magnitudes of the required maneuvers such that the desired state at entry interface is achieved. In an actual onboard flight software implementation, these times of ignition and maneuvers are relayed onto Flight Control for command and execution. Although this process works well when the burn durations or burn arcs are small, this might not be the case during a contingency situation when lower thrust engines are employed to perform the maneuvers. Therefore, a new model for the two-level corrections process is formulated here to accommodate finite burn arcs. This paper presents the development and formulation of the finite burn two-level corrector, used as an onboard targeting algorithm for the Trans-Earth Injection phase of Orion. A performance comparison between the impulsive and finite burn models is also presented. The present formulation ensures all entry constraints are met, without violating the available fuel budget, while allowing for low-thrust scenarios with long burn durations.

  18. A Fuel-Efficient Conflict Resolution Maneuver for Separation Assurance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowe, Aisha Ruth; Santiago, Confesor

    2012-01-01

    Automated separation assurance algorithms are envisioned to play an integral role in accommodating the forecasted increase in demand of the National Airspace System. Developing a robust, reliable, air traffic management system involves safely increasing efficiency and throughput while considering the potential impact on users. This experiment seeks to evaluate the benefit of augmenting a conflict detection and resolution algorithm to consider a fuel efficient, Zero-Delay Direct-To maneuver, when resolving a given conflict based on either minimum fuel burn or minimum delay. A total of twelve conditions were tested in a fast-time simulation conducted in three airspace regions with mixed aircraft types and light weather. Results show that inclusion of this maneuver has no appreciable effect on the ability of the algorithm to safely detect and resolve conflicts. The results further suggest that enabling the Zero-Delay Direct-To maneuver significantly increases the cumulative fuel burn savings when choosing resolution based on minimum fuel burn while marginally increasing the average delay per resolution.

  19. Closed-Loop Aerodynamic Flow Control of a Maneuvering Airfoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brzozowski, Daniel P.; Culp, John R.; Glezer, Ari

    2011-11-01

    The unsteady interaction between trailing edge aerodynamic flow control and airfoil motion in pitch and plunge is investigated in wind tunnel experiments using a 2-DOF traverse which enables application of time-dependent external torque and forces by servo motors. The global aerodynamic forces and moments are regulated by controlling vorticity generation and accumulation near the surface using hybrid synthetic jet actuators. The dynamic coupling between the actuation and the time-dependent flow field is characterized using simultaneous force and velocity measurements that are taken phase-locked to the commanded actuation waveform. The effect of the unsteady motion on the model-embedded flow control is assessed in unsteady several maneuvers. Circulation time history that is estimated from a PIV wake survey shows that the entire flow over the airfoil readjusts within about 1.5 TCONV, which is about two orders of magnitude shorter than the characteristic time associated with the controlled maneuver of the wind tunnel model. This illustrates that flow-control actuation can be typically effected on time scales that are commensurate with the flow's convective time scale, and that the maneuver response is primarily limited by the inertia of the platform.

  20. PM Science Working Group Meeting on Spacecraft Maneuvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parkinson, Claire L.

    1997-01-01

    The EOS PM Science Working Group met on May 6, 1997, to examine the issue of spacecraft maneuvers. The meeting was held at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center and was attended by the Team Leaders of all four instrument science teams with instruments on the PM-1 spacecraft, additional representatives from each of the four teams, the PM Project management, and random others. The meeting was chaired by the PM Project Scientist and open to all. The meeting was called in order to untangle some of the concerns raised over the past several months regarding whether or not the PM-1 spacecraft should undergo spacecraft maneuvers to allow the instruments to obtain deep-space views. Two of the Science Teams, those for the Moderate-Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES), had strongly expressed the need for deep-space views in order to calibrate their instruments properly and conveniently. The other two teams, those for the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer (AMSR-E) and the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU), and the Humidity Sounder for Brazil (HSB), had expressed concerns that the maneuvers involve risks to the instruments and undesired gaps in the data sets.

  1. Trajectory Control of Rendezvous with Maneuver Target Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, Zhinqiang

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, a nonlinear trajectory control algorithm of rendezvous with maneuvering target spacecraft is presented. The disturbance forces on the chaser and target spacecraft and the thrust forces on the chaser spacecraft are considered in the analysis. The control algorithm developed in this paper uses the relative distance and relative velocity between the target and chaser spacecraft as the inputs. A general formula of reference relative trajectory of the chaser spacecraft to the target spacecraft is developed and applied to four different proximity maneuvers, which are in-track circling, cross-track circling, in-track spiral rendezvous and cross-track spiral rendezvous. The closed-loop differential equations of the proximity relative motion with the control algorithm are derived. It is proven in the paper that the tracking errors between the commanded relative trajectory and the actual relative trajectory are bounded within a constant region determined by the control gains. The prediction of the tracking errors is obtained. Design examples are provided to show the implementation of the control algorithm. The simulation results show that the actual relative trajectory tracks the commanded relative trajectory tightly. The predicted tracking errors match those calculated in the simulation results. The control algorithm developed in this paper can also be applied to interception of maneuver target spacecraft and relative trajectory control of spacecraft formation flying.

  2. Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Orbit Design and Autonomous Maneuvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Folta, David; Mendelsohn, Chad; Mailhe, Laurie

    2003-01-01

    The NASA Goddard Space Flight Center's Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission must meet the challenge of measuring worldwide precipitation every three hours. The GPM core spacecraft, part of a constellation, will be required to maintain a circular orbit in a high drag environment at a near-critical inclination. Analysis shows that a mean orbit altitude of 407 km is necessary to prevent ground track repeating. Combined with goals to minimize maneuver operation impacts to science data collection and to enable reasonable long-term orbit predictions, the GPM project has decided to fly the GSFC autonomous maneuver system, AutoCon(TM). This system is a follow-up version of the highly successful New Millennium Program technology flown onboard the Earth Observing-1 formation flying mission. This paper presents the driving science requirements and goals of the GPM mission and shows how they will be met. Selection of the mean semi-major axis, eccentricity, and the AV budget for several ballistic properties are presented. The architecture of the autonomous maneuvering system to meet the goals and requirements is presented along with simulations using GPM parameters. Additionally, the use of the GPM autonomous system to mitigate possible collision avoidance and to aid other spacecraft systems during navigation outages is explored.

  3. Severe Turbulence and Maneuvering from Airline Flight Records

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wingrove, Rodney C.; Bach, R. E., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    Digital flight records from reported clear-air turbulence incidents are used to determine winds and turbulence, to determine maneuver g loads, and to analyze control problems. Many cases of severe turbulence are found downwind of mountains and thunderstorms where sharp, sudden jolts are associated with vortices in atmospheric waves. Other cases of severe turbulence are round in strong updrafts above thunderstorm buildups that may be undetected by onboard weather radar. An important finding is that there are large maneuvering loads in over half of the reported clear-air turbulence incidents. Maneuvering loads are determined through an analysis of the short-term variations in elevator deflection and aircraft pitch angle. For altitude control in mountain waves the results indicate that small pitch angle changes with proper timing are sufficient to counter variations in vertical wind. For airspeed control in strong mountain waves, however, there is neither the available thrust nor the quickness in engine response necessary to counter the large variations in winds.

  4. Aerodynamic role of dynamic wing morphing in hummingbird maneuvering flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Yan; Shallcross, Gregory; Dong, Haibo; Deng, Xinyan; Tobalske, Bret; Flow Simulation Research Group Team; Bio-robotics lab Collaboration; University of Montana Flight Laboratory Collaboration

    2014-11-01

    The flexibility and deformation of hummingbird wing gives hummingbird a great degree of control over fluid forces in flapping flight. Unlike insect wing's passive deformation, hummingbird wing employs a more complicated wing morphing mechanism through both active muscle control and passive feather-air interaction, which results in highly complex 3D wing topology variations during the unsteady flight. Three camera high speed (1000 fps) high resolution digital video was taken and digitized to measure 3D wing conformation in all its complexity during steady flying and maneuvering. Results have shown that the dynamic wing morphing is more prominent in maneuvering flight. Complicated cambering and twisting patterns are observed along the wing pitching axis. A newly developed immersed boundary method which realistically models wing-joint-body of the hummingbird is then employed to simulate the flow associated with dynamic morphing. The simulations provide a first of its kind glimpse of the fluid and vortex dynamics associated with dynamic wing morphing and aerodynamic force computations allow us to gain a better understanding of force producing mechanisms in hummingbird maneuvering flight. This work is supported by AFOSR FA9550-12-1-007 and NSF CEBT-1313217.

  5. Maneuver Performance Enhancement for an Advanced Fighter/Attack Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samuels, Jeff; Langan, Kevin J.; Schmitz, Frederic H. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    A small scale wind tunnel test of a realistic fighter configuration has been completed in NASA Ames' 7'x10' wind tunnel. This test was part of the Fighter Lift and Control (FLAC) program, a joint NASA - USAF research program, involving small and large-scale wind-tunnel tests and computational analysis of unique lift augmentation and control devices. The goal of this program is to enhance the maneuver and control capability of next-generation Air Force multi-role fighter aircraft with low-observables geometries. The principal objective of this test was to determine the effectiveness of passive boundary layer control devices at increasing L/D at sustained maneuver lift coefficients. Vortex generators (VGs) were used to energize the boundary layer to prevent or delay separation. Corotating vanes, counter-rotating vanes, and Wheeler Wishbone VGs were used in the vicinity of the leading and trailing edge flap hinge lines. Principle test parameters were leading and trailing edge flap deflections, and location, size, spacing, and orientation for each VG type. Gurney flaps were also tested. Data gathered include balance force and moment data, surface pressures, and flow visualization for characterizing flow behavior and locating separation lines. Results were quite different for the two best flap configurations tested. All VG types tested showed improvement (up to 5%) in maneuver L/D with flaps at LE=20 degrees, TE=0 degrees. The same VGs degraded performance, in all but a few cases, with flaps at LE=15 degrees, TE=10 degrees.

  6. Comparing introduction to Europe of highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses A(H5N8) in 2014 and A(H5N1) in 2005.

    PubMed

    Adlhoch, C; Gossner, C; Koch, G; Brown, I; Bouwstra, R; Verdonck, F; Penttinen, P; Harder, T

    2014-01-01

    Since the beginning of November 2014, nine outbreaks of highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (HPAIV) A(H5N8) in poultry have been detected in four European countries. In this report, similarities and differences between the modes of introduction of HPAIV A(H5N1) and A(H5N8) into Europe are described. Experiences from outbreaks of A(H5N1) in Europe demonstrated that early detection to control HPAIV in poultry has proven pivotal to minimise the risk of zoonotic transmission and prevention of human cases.

  7. An orbital period for the dwarf nova AH Herculis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moffat, A. F. J.; Shara, M. M.

    1984-07-01

    AH Her is the best-studied dwarf nova which displays rapid coherent oscillations at maximum light, yet its orbital period is not determined. Eleven nights of observations with the 1-meter Wise Observatory telescope with chopping secondary, and 'Nather' photometer, yield a period P = 0.247 + or - 0.008 day, in excellent agreement with that predicted from the decline rate of the outburst. The source of flickering in the system (presumably the hot spot) is shown to fluctuate with the same amplitude whether AH Her is in outburst or not. The implication is that the accretion stream, hot spot, and outer disk are unaffected by, and do not take part in the eruption.

  8. Hot gas ingestion effects on fuel control surge recovery and AH-1 rotor drive train torque spikes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tokarski, Frank; Desai, Mihir; Books, Martin; Zagranski, Raymond

    1994-01-01

    This report summarizes the work accomplished through computer simulation to understand the impact of the hydromechanical turbine assembly (TA) fuel control on rocket gas ingestion induced engine surges on the AH-1 (Cobra) helicopter. These surges excite the lightly damped torsional modes of the Cobra rotor drive train and can cause overtorqueing of the tail rotor shaft. The simulation studies show that the hydromechanical TA control has a negligible effect on drive train resonances because its response is sufficiently attenuated at the resonant frequencies. However, a digital electronic control working through the TA control's separate, emergency fuel metering system has been identified as a solution to the overtorqueing problem. State-of-the-art software within the electronic control can provide active damping of the rotor drive train to eliminate excessive torque spikes due to any disturbances including engine surges and aggressive helicopter maneuvers. Modifications to the existing TA hydromechanical control are relatively minor, and existing engine sensors can be utilized by the electronic control. Therefore, it is concluded that the combination of full authority digital electronic control (FADEC) with hydromechanical backup using the existing TA control enhances flight safety, improves helicopter performance, reduces pilot workload, and provides a substantial payback for very little investment.

  9. Application of a Comprehensive Analytical Model of Rotor Aerodynamics and Dynamics (CAMRAD) to the McDonnell Douglas AH-64A helicopter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callahan, Cynthia B.; Bassett, Duane E.

    1988-01-01

    A model of the AH-64A helicopter was generated in a Comprehensive Analytical Model of Rotorcraft Aerodynamics and Dynamics (CAMRAD) in an effort to validate its analytical capabilities for modeling a current advanced Army helicopter. The initial phase of the effort involved the generation of CAMRAD input files necessary for the complete aerodynamic, structural, and dynamic definition of the production AH-64A helicopter. The input files were checked by making comparisons of CAMRAD full helicopter trim and main rotor blade natural frequency predictions with those of full helicopter trim program, Blade Element Trim (BETRIM), and dynamic analysis code, Dynamic Analysis Research Tool (DART), respectively. The main thrust concerned the application of the AH-64A CAMRAD model thus developed and verified for main rotor blade structural loads predictions and comparison with DART analytical results. The investigation provided insight not only into the usefulness of CAMRAD for the AH-64A performance and dynamics prediction, but also into the limitations of the program for modeling advanced rotor and fuselage systems. The model development effort is discussed, the results of the CAMRAD correlation studies presented, and some general conclusions are offered on the applicability of CAMRAD for rotor aeroelastic loads prediction for current and future rotorcraft configurations.

  10. Orbit Maneuver Compensation of KAGUYA for Its Safe and Accurate Lunar Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawakatsu, Yasuhiro; Terada, Hiroshi; Matsuoka, Masatoshi; Ohnishi, Takafumi

    Reported in this paper are the results of the orbit maneuver compensation in KAGUYA's Lunar transfer. Because of the uncoupled allocation of the attitude control thrusters, extra velocity increment (δv ) is induced whenever KAGUYA performs an orbit maneuver. Since the observed level of δv was unacceptable range from the point of maneuver accuracy requirement, it was compensated by means of deducting estimated δv from the orbit maneuver command. The δv estimation model was updated step-by-step during the Lunar transfer, which leaded to significant improvement of the orbit maneuver accuracy and resulted in the omission of the last trajectory correction maneuver. The method of the compensation and its results are introduced in detail.

  11. Cassini Orbit Trim Maneuvers at Saturn - Overview of Attitude Control Flight Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burk, Thomas A.

    2011-01-01

    The Cassini spacecraft has been in orbit around Saturn since July 1, 2004. To remain on the planned trajectory which maximizes science data return, Cassini must perform orbit trim maneuvers using either its main engine or its reaction control system thrusters. Over 200 maneuvers have been executed on the spacecraft since arrival at Saturn. To improve performance and maintain spacecraft health, changes have been made in maneuver design command placement, in accelerometer scale factor, and in the pre-aim vector used to align the engine gimbal actuator prior to main engine burn ignition. These and other changes have improved maneuver performance execution errors significantly since 2004. A strategy has been developed to decide whether a main engine maneuver should be performed, or whether the maneuver can be executed using the reaction control system.

  12. A Semi-Empirical Noise Modeling Method for Helicopter Maneuvering Flight Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenwood, Eric; Schmitz, Fredric; Sickenberger, Richard D.

    2012-01-01

    A new model for Blade-Vortex Interaction noise generation during maneuvering flight is developed in this paper. Acoustic and performance data from both flight and wind tunnels are used to derive a non-dimensional and analytical performance/acoustic model that describes BVI noise in steady flight. The model is extended to transient maneuvering flight (pure pitch and roll transients) by using quasisteady assumptions throughout the prescribed maneuvers. Ground noise measurements, taken during maneuvering flight of a Bell 206B helicopter, show that many of the noise radiation details are captured. The result is a computationally efficient Blade-Vortex Interaction noise model with sufficient accuracy to account for transient maneuvering flight. The code can be run in real time to predict transient maneuver noise and is suitable for use in an acoustic mission-planning tool.

  13. Using the Two-Burn Escape Maneuver for Fast Transfers in the Solar System and Beyond

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Robert B.; Richardson, Georgia A.

    2010-01-01

    The two-burn maneuver to escape the gravitational pull of a central body is described. The maneuver, originally suggested by Hermann Oberth, improves efficiency considerably for a wide range of missions of interest in space exploration and scientific investigation. A clear delineation of when the maneuver is more effective is given, as are methods to extract the most advantage when using the maneuver. Some examples are given of how this maneuver can enable exploration of the outer solar system, near interstellar space, and crewed missions to Mars and beyond. The maneuver has the potential to halve the required infrastructure associated with a crewed mission to Mars and achieve increased solar escape velocities with existing spacecraft technologies.

  14. Maneuvering Rotorcraft Noise Prediction: A New Code for a New Problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brentner, Kenneth S.; Bres, Guillaume A.; Perez, Guillaume; Jones, Henry E.

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents the unique aspects of the development of an entirely new maneuver noise prediction code called PSU-WOPWOP. The main focus of the code is the aeroacoustic aspects of the maneuver noise problem, when the aeromechanical input data are provided (namely aircraft and blade motion, blade airloads). The PSU-WOPWOP noise prediction capability was developed for rotors in steady and transient maneuvering flight. Featuring an object-oriented design, the code allows great flexibility for complex rotor configuration and motion (including multiple rotors and full aircraft motion). The relative locations and number of hinges, flexures, and body motions can be arbitrarily specified to match the any specific rotorcraft. An analysis of algorithm efficiency is performed for maneuver noise prediction along with a description of the tradeoffs made specifically for the maneuvering noise problem. Noise predictions for the main rotor of a rotorcraft in steady descent, transient (arrested) descent, hover and a mild "pop-up" maneuver are demonstrated.

  15. Natural co-infection of influenza A/H3N2 and A/H1N1pdm09 viruses resulting in a reassortant A/H3N2 virus

    PubMed Central

    Rith, Sareth; Chin, Savuth; Sar, Borann; Y, Phalla; Horm, Srey Viseth; Ly, Sovann; Buchy, Philippe; Dussart, Philippe; Horwood, Paul F.

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite annual co-circulation of different subtypes of seasonal influenza, co-infections between different viruses are rarely detected. These co-infections can result in the emergence of reassortant progeny. Study design We document the detection of an influenza co-infection, between influenza A/H3N2 with A/H1N1pdm09 viruses, which occurred in a 3 year old male in Cambodia during April 2014. Both viruses were detected in the patient at relatively high viral loads (as determined by real-time RT-PCR CT values), which is unusual for influenza co-infections. As reassortment can occur between co-infected influenza A strains we isolated plaque purified clonal viral populations from the clinical material of the patient infected with A/H3N2 and A/H1N1pdm09. Results Complete genome sequences were completed for 7 clonal viruses to determine if any reassorted viruses were generated during the influenza virus co-infection. Although most of the viral sequences were consistent with wild-type A/H3N2 or A/H1N1pdm09, one reassortant A/H3N2 virus was isolated which contained an A/H1N1pdm09 NS1 gene fragment. The reassortant virus was viable and able to infect cells, as judged by successful passage in MDCK cells, achieving a TCID50 of 104/ml at passage number two. There is no evidence that the reassortant virus was transmitted further. The co-infection occurred during a period when co-circulation of A/H3N2 and A/H1N1pdm09 was detected in Cambodia. Conclusions It is unclear how often influenza co-infections occur, but laboratories should consider influenza co-infections during routine surveillance activities. PMID:26590689

  16. Functional Conservation and Divergence of Four Ginger AP1/AGL9 MADS–Box Genes Revealed by Analysis of Their Expression and Protein–Protein Interaction, and Ectopic Expression of AhFUL Gene in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Song, Juanjuan; Sun, Wei; Xia, Kuaifei; Liao, Jingping; Zhang, Mingyong

    2014-01-01

    Alpinia genus are known generally as ginger–lilies for showy flowers in the ginger family, Zingiberaceae, and their floral morphology diverges from typical monocotyledon flowers. However, little is known about the functions of ginger MADS–box genes in floral identity. In this study, four AP1/AGL9 MADS–box genes were cloned from Alpinia hainanensis, and protein–protein interactions (PPIs) and roles of the four genes in floral homeotic conversion and in floral evolution are surveyed for the first time. AhFUL is clustered to the AP1lineage, AhSEP4 and AhSEP3b to the SEP lineage, and AhAGL6–like to the AGL6 lineage. The four genes showed conserved and divergent expression patterns, and their encoded proteins were localized in the nucleus. Seven combinations of PPI (AhFUL–AhSEP4, AhFUL–AhAGL6–like, AhFUL–AhSEP3b, AhSEP4–AhAGL6–like, AhSEP4–AhSEP3b, AhAGL6–like–AhSEP3b, and AhSEP3b–AhSEP3b) were detected, and the PPI patterns in the AP1/AGL9 lineage revealed that five of the 10 possible combinations are conserved and three are variable, while conclusions cannot yet be made regarding the other two. Ectopic expression of AhFUL in Arabidopsis thaliana led to early flowering and floral organ homeotic conversion to sepal–like or leaf–like. Therefore, we conclude that the four A. hainanensis AP1/AGL9 genes show functional conservation and divergence in the floral identity from other MADS–box genes. PMID:25461565

  17. Computing and Visualizing Reachable Volumes for Maneuvering Satellites

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, M; de Vries, W H; Pertica, A J; Olivier, S S

    2011-09-11

    Detecting and predicting maneuvering satellites is an important problem for Space Situational Awareness. The spatial envelope of all possible locations within reach of such a maneuvering satellite is known as the Reachable Volume (RV). As soon as custody of a satellite is lost, calculating the RV and its subsequent time evolution is a critical component in the rapid recovery of the satellite. In this paper, we present a Monte Carlo approach to computing the RV for a given object. Essentially, our approach samples all possible trajectories by randomizing thrust-vectors, thrust magnitudes and time of burn. At any given instance, the distribution of the 'point-cloud' of the virtual particles defines the RV. For short orbital time-scales, the temporal evolution of the point-cloud can result in complex, multi-reentrant manifolds. Visualization plays an important role in gaining insight and understanding into this complex and evolving manifold. In the second part of this paper, we focus on how to effectively visualize the large number of virtual trajectories and the computed RV. We present a real-time out-of-core rendering technique for visualizing the large number of virtual trajectories. We also examine different techniques for visualizing the computed volume of probability density distribution, including volume slicing, convex hull and isosurfacing. We compare and contrast these techniques in terms of computational cost and visualization effectiveness, and describe the main implementation issues encountered during our development process. Finally, we will present some of the results from our end-to-end system for computing and visualizing RVs using examples of maneuvering satellites.

  18. Command shaping for residual vibration free crane maneuvers

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, G.G.; Petterson, B.; Dohrmann, C.; Robinett, R.D.

    1995-07-01

    Cranes used in the construction and transportation industries are generally devices with multiple degrees of freedom including variable load-line length, variable jib length (usually via a trolley), and variable boom angles. Point-to-point payload maneuvers using cranes are performed so as not to excite the spherical pendulum modes of their cable and payload assemblies. Typically, these pendulum modes, although time-varying, exhibit low frequencies. Current crane maneuvers are therefore performed slowly contributing to high construction and transportation costs. This investigation details a general method for applying command shaping to various multiple degree of freedom cranes such that the payload moves to a specified point without residual oscillation. A dynamic programming method is used for general command shaping for optimal maneuvers. Computationally, the dynamic programming approach requires order M calculations to arrive at a solution, where M is the number of discretizations of the input commands. This feature is exploited for the crane command shaping problem allowing for rapid calculation of command histories. Fast generation of commands is a necessity for practical use of command shaping for the applications described in this work. These results are compared to near-optimal solutions where the commands are linear combinations of acceleration pulse basis functions. The pulse shape is required due to hardware requirements. The weights on the basis functions are chosen as the solution to a parameter optimization problem solved using a Recursive Quadratic Programming technique. Simulation results and experimental verification for a variable load-line length rotary crane are presented using both design procedures.

  19. Force oscillations simulating breathing maneuvers do not prevent force adaptation.

    PubMed

    Pascoe, Chris; Jiao, Yuekan; Seow, Chun Y; Paré, Peter D; Bossé, Ynuk

    2012-07-01

    Airway inflammation in patients with asthma exposes the airway smooth muscle (ASM) to a variety of spasmogens. These spasmogens increase ASM tone, which can lead to force adaptation. Length oscillations of ASM, which occur in vivo due to breathing maneuvers, can attenuate force adaptation. However, in the presence of tone, the force oscillations required to achieve these length oscillations may be unphysiologic (i.e., magnitude greater than the ones achieved due to the swings in transpulmonary pressure required for breathing). In the present study, we applied force oscillations simulating the tension oscillations experienced by the wall of a fourth-generation airway during tidal breathing with or without deep inspirations (DI) to ASM. The goal was to investigate whether force adaptation occurs in conditions mimicking breathing maneuvers. Tone was induced by carbachol (average, 20 nM), and the force-generating capacity of the ASM was assessed at 5-minute intervals before and after carbachol administration using electrical field stimulations (EFS). The results show that force oscillations applied before the introduction of tone had a small effect on the force produced by EFS (declined to 96.8% [P > 0.05] and 92.3% [P < 0.05] with and without DI, respectively). The tone induced by carbachol transiently decreased after a DI and declined significantly (P < 0.05) due to tidal breathing oscillations (25%). These force oscillations did not prevent force adaptation (gain of force of 11.2 ± 2.2 versus 13.5 ± 2.7 and 11.2 ± 3.0% in static versus dynamic conditions with or without DI, respectively). The lack of effect of simulated breathing maneuvers on force adaptation suggests that this gain in ASM force may occur in vivo and could contribute to the development of airway hyperresponsiveness. PMID:22323367

  20. Development of a Smooth Trajectory Maneuver Method to Accommodate the Ares I Flight Control Constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinson, Robin M.; Schmitt, Terri L.; Hanson, John M.

    2008-01-01

    Six degree-of-freedom (DOF) launch vehicle trajectories are designed to follow an optimized 3-DOF reference trajectory. A vehicle has a finite amount of control power that it can allocate to performing maneuvers. Therefore, the 3-DOF trajectory must be designed to refrain from using 100% of the allowable control capability to perform maneuvers, saving control power for handling off-nominal conditions, wind gusts and other perturbations. During the Ares I trajectory analysis, two maneuvers were found to be hard for the control system to implement; a roll maneuver prior to the gravity turn and an angle of attack maneuver immediately after the J-2X engine start-up. It was decided to develop an approach for creating smooth maneuvers in the optimized reference trajectories that accounts for the thrust available from the engines. A feature of this method is that no additional angular velocity in the direction of the maneuver has been added to the vehicle after the maneuver completion. This paper discusses the equations behind these new maneuvers and their implementation into the Ares I trajectory design cycle. Also discussed is a possible extension to adjusting closed-loop guidance.

  1. Development of control laws for a flight test maneuver autopilot for an F-15 aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alag, G. S.; Duke, E. L.

    1985-01-01

    An autopilot can be used to provide precise control to meet the demanding requirements of flight research maneuvers with high-performance aircraft. The development of control laws within the context of flight test maneuver requirements is discussed. The control laws are developed using eigensystem assignment and command generator tracking. The eigenvalues and eigenvectors are chosen to provide the necessary handling qualities, while the command generator tracking enables the tracking of a specified state during the maneuver. The effectiveness of the control laws is illustrated by their application to an F-15 aircraft to ensure acceptable aircraft performance during a maneuver.

  2. Analysis of Transfer Maneuvers from Initial Circular Orbit to a Final Circular or Elliptic Orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharaf, M. A.; Saad, A. S.

    2016-04-01

    In the present paper an analysis of the transfer maneuvers from initial circular orbit to a final circular or elliptic orbit was developed to study the problem of impulsive transfers for space missions. It considers planar maneuvers using newly derived equations. With these equations, comparisons of circular and elliptic maneuvers are made. This comparison is important for the mission designers to obtain useful mappings showing where one maneuver is better than the other. In this aspect, we developed this comparison throughout ten results, together with some graphs to show their meaning.

  3. Space Shuttle OMS engine valve technology. [Orbital Maneuvering System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wichmann, H.

    1974-01-01

    Valve technology program to determine shutoff valve concepts suitable for the Orbital Maneuvering System (OMS) engine of the Space Shuttle. The tradeoff studies selected the electric torque motor operated dual poppet and ball valves as the most desirable valve concepts for the OMS Engine Shutoff Valve. A prototype of one of these concepts was built and subjected to a design verification program. A number of unique features were designed to include the required contamination insensitivity, operating fluid compatibility, decontamination capability, minimum maintenance requirement and long service life capability.

  4. Sequential Probability Ratio Test for Collision Avoidance Maneuver Decisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, J. Russell; Markley, F. Landis

    2010-01-01

    When facing a conjunction between space objects, decision makers must chose whether to maneuver for collision avoidance or not. We apply a well-known decision procedure, the sequential probability ratio test, to this problem. We propose two approaches to the problem solution, one based on a frequentist method, and the other on a Bayesian method. The frequentist method does not require any prior knowledge concerning the conjunction, while the Bayesian method assumes knowledge of prior probability densities. Our results show that both methods achieve desired missed detection rates, but the frequentist method's false alarm performance is inferior to the Bayesian method's

  5. The aerodynamics of free-flight maneuvers in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Fry, Steven N; Sayaman, Rosalyn; Dickinson, Michael H

    2003-04-18

    Using three-dimensional infrared high-speed video, we captured the wing and body kinematics of free-flying fruit flies as they performed rapid flight maneuvers. We then "replayed" the wing kinematics on a dynamically scaled robotic model to measure the aerodynamic forces produced by the wings. The results show that a fly generates rapid turns with surprisingly subtle modifications in wing motion, which nonetheless generate sufficient torque for the fly to rotate its body through each turn. The magnitude and time course of the torque and body motion during rapid turns indicate that inertia, not friction, dominates the flight dynamics of insects.

  6. Pseudosteady-state analysis of nonlinear aircraft maneuvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, J. W.; Schy, A. A.; Johnson, K. G.

    1980-01-01

    An analytical method was developed for studying the combined effects of rotational coupling and nonlinear aerodynamics on aircraft response for specified control inputs. The method involves the simultaneous solution of two nonlinear equations which are functions of angle attack, roll rate, and control inputs. The method was applied to a number of maneuvers for a fighter-type aircraft. Time history responses verified the usefulness of the analysis for predicting a variety of response characteristics caused by interacting nonlinear aerodynamic and inertial effects, including spin conditions.

  7. Near Earth Asteroid redirect missions based on gravity assist maneuver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ledkov, Anton; Shustov, Boris M.; Eismont, Natan; Boyarsky, Michael; Nazirov, Ravil; Fedyaev, Konstantin

    During last years several events attracted world community attention to the hazards of hitting the Earth by sky objects. One of these objects is Apophis asteroid what was expected with nonzero probability to hit the Earth in 2036. Luckily after more precise measurements this event is considered as practically improbable. But the other object has really reached the Earth, entered the atmosphere in the Chelyabinsk area and caused vast damages. After this the hazardous near Earth objects problem received practical confirmation of the necessity to find the methods of its resolution. The methods to prevent collision of the dangerous sky object with the Earth proposed up to now look not practical enough if one mentions such as gravitational tractor or changing the reflectivity of the asteroid surface. Even the method supposing the targeting of the spacecraft to the hazardous object in order to deflect it from initial trajectory by impact does not work because its low mass as compared with the mass of asteroid to be deflected. For example the mass of the Apophis is estimated to be about 40 million tons but the spacecraft which can be launched to intercept the asteroid using contemporary launchers has the mass not more than 5 tons. So the question arises where to find the heavier projectile which is possible to direct to the dangerous object? The answer proposed in our paper is very simple: to search it among small near Earth asteroids. As small ones we suppose those which have the cross section size not more than 12-15 meters and mass not exceeding 1500 -1700 tons. According to contemporary estimates the number of such asteroids is not less than 100000. The other question is how to redirect such asteroid to the dangerous one. In the paper the possibilities are studied to use for that purpose gravity assist maneuvers near Earth. It is shown that even among asteroids included in contemporary catalogue there are the ones which could be directed to the trajectory of the

  8. The Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle Training Facility visual system concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Keith

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of the Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle (OMV) Training Facility (OTF) is to provide effective training for OMV pilots. A critical part of the training environment is the Visual System, which will simulate the video scenes produced by the OMV Closed-Circuit Television (CCTV) system. The simulation will include camera models, dynamic target models, moving appendages, and scene degradation due to the compression/decompression of video signal. Video system malfunctions will also be provided to ensure that the pilot is ready to meet all challenges the real-world might provide. One possible visual system configuration for the training facility that will meet existing requirements is described.

  9. Error Analysis and Trajectory Correction Maneuvers of Lunar Transfer Orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yu-hui; Hou, Xi-yun; Liu, Lin

    2013-10-01

    For a returnable lunar probe, this paper studies the characteristics of both the Earth-Moon transfer orbit and the return orbit. On the basis of the error propagation matrix, the linear equation to estimate the first midcourse trajectory correction maneuver (TCM) is figured out. Numerical simulations are performed, and the features of error propagation in lunar transfer orbit are given. The advantages, disadvantages, and applications of two TCM strategies are discussed, and the computation of the second TCM of the return orbit is also simulated under the conditions at the reentry time.

  10. Error Analysis and Trajectory Correction Maneuvers of Lunar Transfer Orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Y. H.; Hou, X. Y.; Liu, L.

    2013-05-01

    For the sample return lunar missions and human lunar exploration, this paper studies the characteristics of both the Earth-Moon transfer orbit and the return orbit. On the basis of the error propagation matrix, the linear equation to estimate the first midcourse trajectory correction maneuver (TCM) is figured out. Numerical simulations are performed, and the features of error propagation in lunar transfer orbit are given. The advantages, disadvantages, and applications of two TCM strategies are discussed, and the computation of the second TCM of the return orbit is also simulated under the conditions at the reentry time.

  11. Flight simulator fidelity assessment in a rotorcraft lateral translation maneuver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hess, R. A.; Malsbury, T.; Atencio, A., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    A model-based methodology for assessing flight simulator fidelity in closed-loop fashion is exercised in analyzing a rotorcraft low-altitude maneuver for which flight test and simulation results were available. The addition of a handling qualities sensitivity function to a previously developed model-based assessment criteria allows an analytical comparison of both performance and handling qualities between simulation and flight test. Model predictions regarding the existence of simulator fidelity problems are corroborated by experiment. The modeling approach is used to assess analytically the effects of modifying simulator characteristics on simulator fidelity.

  12. Safe Maneuvering Envelope Estimation Based on a Physical Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lombaerts, Thomas J. J.; Schuet, Stefan R.; Wheeler, Kevin R.; Acosta, Diana; Kaneshige, John T.

    2013-01-01

    This paper discusses a computationally efficient algorithm for estimating the safe maneuvering envelope of damaged aircraft. The algorithm performs a robust reachability analysis through an optimal control formulation while making use of time scale separation and taking into account uncertainties in the aerodynamic derivatives. This approach differs from others since it is physically inspired. This more transparent approach allows interpreting data in each step, and it is assumed that these physical models based upon flight dynamics theory will therefore facilitate certification for future real life applications.

  13. OMV: A simplified mathematical model of the orbital maneuvering vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teoh, W.

    1984-01-01

    A model of the orbital maneuvering vehicle (OMV) is presented which contains several simplications. A set of hand controller signals may be used to control the motion of the OMV. Model verification is carried out using a sequence of tests. The dynamic variables generated by the model are compared, whenever possible, with the corresponding analytical variables. The results of the tests show conclusively that the present model is behaving correctly. Further, this model interfaces properly with the state vector transformation module (SVX) developed previously. Correct command sentence sequences are generated by the OMV and and SVX system, and these command sequences can be used to drive the flat floor simulation system at MSFC.

  14. Assessing Antigenic Drift of Seasonal Influenza A(H3N2) and A(H1N1)pdm09 Viruses.

    PubMed

    Tewawong, Nipaporn; Prachayangprecha, Slinporn; Vichiwattana, Preeyaporn; Korkong, Sumeth; Klinfueng, Sirapa; Vongpunsawad, Sompong; Thongmee, Thanunrat; Theamboonlers, Apiradee; Poovorawan, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Under selective pressure from the host immune system, antigenic epitopes of influenza virus hemagglutinin (HA) have continually evolved to escape antibody recognition, termed antigenic drift. We analyzed the genomes of influenza A(H3N2) and A(H1N1)pdm09 virus strains circulating in Thailand between 2010 and 2014 and assessed how well the yearly vaccine strains recommended for the southern hemisphere matched them. We amplified and sequenced the HA gene of 120 A(H3N2) and 81 A(H1N1)pdm09 influenza virus samples obtained from respiratory specimens and calculated the perfect-match vaccine efficacy using the pepitope model, which quantitated the antigenic drift in the dominant epitope of HA. Phylogenetic analysis of the A(H3N2) HA1 genes classified most strains into genetic clades 1, 3A, 3B, and 3C. The A(H3N2) strains from the 2013 and 2014 seasons showed very low to moderate vaccine efficacy and demonstrated antigenic drift from epitopes C and A to epitope B. Meanwhile, most A(H1N1)pdm09 strains from the 2012-2014 seasons belonged to genetic clades 6A, 6B, and 6C and displayed the dominant epitope mutations at epitopes B and E. Finally, the vaccine efficacy for A(H1N1)pdm09 (79.6-93.4%) was generally higher than that of A(H3N2). These findings further confirmed the accelerating antigenic drift of the circulating influenza A(H3N2) in recent years.

  15. SRMS Assisted Docking and Undocking for the Orbiter Repair Maneuver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quiocho, Leslie J.; Briscoe, Timothy J.; Schliesing, John A.; Braman, Julia M.

    2005-01-01

    As part of the Orbiter Repair Maneuver (ORM) planned for Return to Flight (RTF) operations, the Shuttle Remote Manipulator System (SRMS) must undock the Orbiter, maneuver it through a complex trajectory at extremely low rates, present it to an EVA crewman at the end of the Space Station Remote Manipulator System to perform the Thermal Protection System (TPS) repair, and then retrace back through the trajectory to dock the Orbiter with the Orbiter Docking System (ODs). The initial and final segments of this operation involve the interaction between the SRMS, ISS, Orbiter and ODs. This paper first provides an overview of the Monte-Carlo screening analysis for the installation (both nominal and contingency), including the variation of separation distance, misalignment conditions, SRMS joint/brake parameter characteristics, and PRCS jet combinations and corresponding thrust durations. The resulting 'optimum' solution is presented based on trade studies between predicted capture success and integrated system loads. This paper then discusses the upgrades to the APAS math model associated with the new SRMS assisted undocking technique and reviews simulation results for various options investigated for either the active and passive separation of the ISS from the Orbiter.

  16. Robust Aerial Object Tracking in High Dynamic Flight Maneuvers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nussberger, A.; Grabner, H.; van Gool, L.

    2015-08-01

    Integrating drones into the civil airspace is one of the biggest challenges for civil aviation, responsible authorities and involved com- panies around the world in the upcoming years. For a full integration into non-segregated airspace such a system has to provide the capability to automatically detect and avoid other airspace users. Electro-optical cameras have proven to be an adequate sensor to detect all types of aerial objects, especially for smaller ones such as gliders or paragliders. Robust detection and tracking of approaching traffic on a potential collision course is the key component for a successful avoidance maneuver. In this paper we focus on the aerial object tracking during dynamic flight maneuvers of the own-ship where accurate attitude information corresponding to the camera images is essential. Because the 'detect and avoid' functionality typically extends existing autopilot systems the received attitude measurements have unknown delays and dynamics. We present an efficient method to calculate the angular rates from a multi camera rig which we fuse with the delayed attitude measurements. This allows for estimating accurate absolute attitude angles for every camera frame. The proposed method is further integrated into an aerial object tracking framework. A detailed evaluation of the pipeline on real collision encounter scenarios shows that the multi camera rig based attitude estimation enables the correct tracking of approaching traffic during dynamic flight, at which the tracking framework previously failed.

  17. Synthetic C-start maneuver in fish-like swimming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zenit, R.; Godoy-Diana, R.

    2013-11-01

    We investigate the mechanics of the unsteady fish-like swimming maneuver using a simplified experimental model in a water tank. A flexible foil (which emulates the fish body) is impulsively actuated by rotating a cylindrical rod that holds the foil. This rod constitutes the head of the swimmer and is mounted through the shaft of the driving motor on an rail with an air bearing. The foil is initially positioned at a start angle and then rapidly rotated to a final angle, which coincides with the free-moving direction of the rail. As the foil rotates, it pushes the surrounding fluid, it deforms and stores elastic energy which drive the recovery of the straight body shape after the motor actuation has stopped; during the rotation, a trust force is induced which accelerates the array. We measure the resulting escape velocity and acceleration as a function of the beam stiffness, size, initial angle, etc. Some measurements of the velocity field during the escape were obtained using a PIV technique. The measurements agree well with a simple mechanical model that quantifies the impulse of the maneuver. The objective of this work is to understand the fundamental mechanisms of thrust generation in unsteady fast-start swimming. We acknowledge support of EADS Foundation through the project ``Fluids and elasticity in biomimetic propulsion'' and of the Chaire Total for RZ as a visiting professor at ESPCI ParisTech.

  18. Orbital maneuvering vehicle teleoperation and video data compression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Steve

    1989-01-01

    The Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle (OMV) and concepts of teleoperation and video data compression as applied to OMV design and operation are described. The OMV provides spacecraft delivery, retrieval, reboost, deboost and viewing services, with ground-control or Space Station operation, through autonomous navigation and pilot controlled maneuvers. Communications systems are comprised of S-band RF command, telemetry, and compressed video data links through the TDRSS and GSTDN networks. The control console video monitors display a monochrome image at an update rate of five frames per second. Depending upon the mode of operation selected by the pilot, the video resolution is either 255 x 244 pixels, or 510 x 244 pixels. Since practically all video image redundancy is removed by the compression process, the video reconstruction is particularly sensitive to data transmission bit errors. Concatenated Reed-Solomon and convolution coding are used with helical data interleaving for error detection and correction, and an error-containment process minimizes the propagation of error effects throughout the video image. Video sub-frame replacement is used, in the case of a non-correctable error or error burst, to minimize the visual impact to the pilot.

  19. Propulsive Maneuver Design for the 2007 Mars Phoenix Lander Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raofi, Behzad; Bhat, Ramachandra S.; Helfrich, Cliff

    2008-01-01

    On May 25, 2008, the Mars Phoenix Lander (PHX) successfully landed in the northern planes of Mars in order to continue and complement NASA's "follow the water" theme as its predecessor Mars missions, such as Mars Odyssey (ODY) and Mars Exploration Rovers, have done in recent years. Instruments on the lander, through a robotic arm able to deliver soil samples to the deck, will perform in-situ and remote-sensing investigations to characterize the chemistry of materials at the local surface, subsurface, and atmosphere. Lander instruments will also identify the potential history of key indicator elements of significance to the biological potential of Mars, including potential organics within any accessible water ice. Precise trajectory control and targeting were necessary in order to achieve the accurate atmospheric entry conditions required for arriving at the desired landing site. The challenge for the trajectory control maneuver design was to meet or exceed these requirements in the presence of spacecraft limitations as well as other mission constraints. This paper describes the strategies used, including the specialized targeting specifically developed for PHX, in order to design and successfully execute the propulsive maneuvers that delivered the spacecraft to its targeted landing site while satisfying the planetary protection requirements in the presence of flight system constraints.

  20. Muscular Control of Turning and Maneuvering in Jellyfish Bells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoover, Alexander; Miller, Laura; Griffith, Boyce

    2014-11-01

    Jellyfish represent one of the earliest and simplest examples of swimming by a macroscopic organism. Contractions of an elastic bell that expels water are driven by coronal swimming muscles. The re-expansion of the bell is passively driven by stored elastic energy. A current question in jellyfish propulsion is how the underlying neuromuscular organization of their bell allows for maneuvering. Using an immersed boundary framework, we will examine the mechanics of swimming by incorporating material models that are informed by the musculature present in jellyfish into a model of the elastic jellyfish bell in three dimensions. The fully-coupled fluid structure interaction problem is solved using an adaptive and parallelized version of the immersed boundary method (IBAMR). We then use this model to understand how variability in the muscular activation patterns allows for complicated swimming behavior, such as steering. We will compare the results of the simulations with the actual turning maneuvers of several species of jellyfish. Numerical flow fields will also be compared to those produced by actual jellyfish using particle image velocimetry (PIV).

  1. Control and dynamics of a flexible spacecraft during stationkeeping maneuvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, D.; Yocum, J.; Kang, D. S.

    1991-01-01

    A case study of a spacecraft having flexible solar arrays is presented. A stationkeeping attitude control mode using both earth and rate gyro reference signals and a flexible vehicle dynamics modeling and implementation is discussed. The control system is designed to achieve both pointing accuracy and structural mode stability during stationkeeping maneuvers. Reduction of structural mode interactions over the entire mode duration is presented. The control mode using a discrete time observer structure is described to show the convergence of the spacecraft attitude transients during Delta-V thrusting maneuvers without preloading thrusting bias to the onboard control processor. The simulation performance using the three axis, body stabilized nonlinear dynamics is provided. The details of a five body dynamics model are discussed. The spacecraft is modeled as a central rigid body having cantilevered flexible antennas, a pair of flexible articulated solar arrays, and to gimballed momentum wheels. The vehicle is free to undergo unrestricted rotations and translations relative to inertial space. A direct implementation of the equations of motion is compared to an indirect implementation that uses a symbolic manipulation software to generate rigid body equations.

  2. Independent Orbiter Assessment (IOA): Analysis of the manned maneuvering unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, P. S.

    1986-01-01

    Results of the Independent Orbiter Assessment (IOA) of the Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) and Critical Items List (CIL) are presented. The IOA approach features a top-down analysis of the hardware to determine failure modes, criticality, and potential critical items (PCIs). To preserve indepedence, this analysis was accomplished without reliance upon the results contained within the NASA FMEA/CIL documentation. This report documents the independent analysis results corresponding to the Manned Maneuvering Unit (MMU) hardware. The MMU is a propulsive backpack, operated through separate hand controllers that input the pilot's translational and rotational maneuvering commands to the control electronics and then to the thrusters. The IOA analysis process utilized available MMU hardware drawings and schematics for defining hardware subsystems, assemblies, components, and hardware items. Final levels of detail were evaluated and analyzed for possible failure modes and effects. Criticality was assigned based upon the worst case severity of the effect for each identified failure mode. The IOA analysis of the MMU found that the majority of the PCIs identified are resultant from the loss of either the propulsion or control functions, or are resultant from inability to perform an immediate or future mission. The five most severe criticalities identified are all resultant from failures imposed on the MMU hand controllers which have no redundancy within the MMU.

  3. Valsalva maneuver: Insights into baroreflex modulation of human sympathetic activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Michael L.; Eckberg, Dwain L.; Fritsch, Janice M.; Beightol, Larry A.; Ellenbogen, Kenneth A.

    1991-01-01

    Valsalva's maneuver, voluntary forced expiration against a closed glottis, is a well-characterized research tool, used to assess the integrity of human autonomic cardiovascular control. Valsalva straining provokes a stereotyped succession of alternating positive and negative arterial pressure and heart rate changes mediated in part by arterial baroreceptors. Arterial pressure changes result primarily from fluctuating levels of venous return to the heart and changes of sympathetic nerve activity. Muscle sympathetic activity was measured directly in nine volunteers to explore quantitatively the relation between arterial pressure and human sympathetic outflow during pressure transients provoked by controlled graded Valsalva maneuvers. Our results underscore several properties of sympathetic regulation during Valsalva straining. First, muscle sympathetic nerve activity changes as a mirror image of changes in arterial pressure. Second, the magnitude of sympathetic augmentation during Valsalva straining predicts phase 4 arterial pressure elevations. Third, post-Valsalva sympathetic inhibition persists beyond the return of arterial and right atrial pressures to baseline levels which reflects an alteration of the normal relation between arterial pressure and muscle sympathetic activity. Therefore, Valsalva straining may have some utility for investigating changes of reflex control of sympathetic activity after space flight; however, measurement of beat-to-beat arterial pressure is essential for this use. The utility of this technique in microgravity can not be determined from these data. Further investigations are necessary to determine whether these relations are affected by the expansion of intrathoracic blood volume associated with microgravity.

  4. Control System and Flexible Satellite Interaction During Orbit Transfer Maneuver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    daSilva, Adenilson Roberto; GadelhadeSouza, Luiz Carlos

    1998-01-01

    In this paper the interaction between the attitude control system and the flexible structure of an artificial satellite during orbit transfer maneuver has been investigated. The satellite was modeled by a rigid central body with one or more flexible appendages. The dynamics equations were obtained by Lagrangean approach. The flexible appendages were treated as clamped-free beam and its displacement was discretized by assumed- mode method. In order to transfer the satellite, a typical Hohmann transfer and a burn-coast-burn strategy were used and the attitude was controlled by an on-off controller. During transfer procedure a global analysis of satellite has been done, such as: performance of control system, influence of elastic response in control system, thruster firing frequency, fuel consumption and variation of orbital elements. In order to avoid the interaction with structure motion, a control system with bandwidth of one decade bellow the fundamental frequency was used. In the simulations the firing frequency was evaluated in an approximately way but kept below the fundamental frequency of the structure. The control system has kept the attitude below the specifications. As a result, the orbit transfer maneuvering has been done correctly without excessive excitation of flexible appendage.

  5. Independent Orbiter Assessment (IOA): Analysis of the orbital maneuvering system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prust, C. D.; Paul, D. J.; Burkemper, V. J.

    1987-01-01

    The results of the Independent Orbiter Assessment (IOA) of the Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) and Critical Items List (CIL) are presented. The IOA approach features a top-down analysis of the hardware to determine failure modes, criticality, and potential critical items. To preserve independence, this analysis was accomplished without reliance upon the results contained within the NASA FMEA/CIL documentation. The independent analysis results for the Orbital Maneuvering System (OMS) hardware are documented. The OMS provides the thrust to perform orbit insertion, orbit circularization, orbit transfer, rendezvous, and deorbit. The OMS is housed in two independent pods located one on each side of the tail and consists of the following subsystems: Helium Pressurization; Propellant Storage and Distribution; Orbital Maneuvering Engine; and Electrical Power Distribution and Control. The IOA analysis process utilized available OMS hardware drawings and schematics for defining hardware assemblies, components, and hardware items. Each level of hardware was evaluted and analyzed for possible failure modes and effects. Criticality was asigned based upon the severity of the effect for each failure mode.

  6. Single and dual burn maneuvers for low earth orbit maintenance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez, Andrew A.

    1994-12-01

    Optimal control theory suggests maintaining an orbital altitude band for Low-Earth-Orbiting (LEO) satellites using periodic thrusting than forced Keplerian motion, i.e. a trajectory obtained by thrust-drag cancellation. Designing guidance algorithm for orbit maintenance is complicated by the nonlinearities associated with orbital motion. An algorithm developed previously using thrusters firing significantly off the direction of motion successfully maintains an orbital band, but is very inefficient. This thesis develops two different control strategies based on the osculating orbital parameters. taking a conservative approach to keeping within altitude limitations. Thrust is in the local horizontal plane along the direction of flight. Single and dual burn maneuvers are considered for various bandwidths and thruster sizes. The dual burn strategy is somewhat close to a Hohmann transfer. The specified orbital band is generally maintained, with some cases slightly exceeding the upper limit. Propellant consumptions for both maneuvers is significantly better than previous methods. This thesis shows that forward firing thrusters can be used with osculating orbital parameters to obtain efficiencies within forced Keplerian motion values.

  7. Learning evasive maneuvers using evolutionary algorithms and neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Moung Hung

    In this research, evolutionary algorithms and recurrent neural networks are combined to evolve control knowledge to help pilots avoid being struck by a missile, based on a two-dimensional air combat simulation model. The recurrent neural network is used for representing the pilot's control knowledge and evolutionary algorithms (i.e., Genetic Algorithms, Evolution Strategies, and Evolutionary Programming) are used for optimizing the weights and/or topology of the recurrent neural network. The simulation model of the two-dimensional evasive maneuver problem evolved is used for evaluating the performance of the recurrent neural network. Five typical air combat conditions were selected to evaluate the performance of the recurrent neural networks evolved by the evolutionary algorithms. Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) tests and response graphs were used to analyze the results. Overall, there was little difference in the performance of the three evolutionary algorithms used to evolve the control knowledge. However, the number of generations of each algorithm required to obtain the best performance was significantly different. ES converges the fastest, followed by EP and then by GA. The recurrent neural networks evolved by the evolutionary algorithms provided better performance than the traditional recommendations for evasive maneuvers, maximum gravitational turn, for each air combat condition. Furthermore, the recommended actions of the recurrent neural networks are reasonable and can be used for pilot training.

  8. A 65 Ah rechargeable lithium molybdenum disulfide battery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandt, K.

    1986-01-01

    A rechargeable lithium molybdenum disulfide battery which has a number of superior performance characteristics which includes a high energy density, a high power density, and a long charge retention time was developed. The first cell sizes developed included a C size cell and an AA size cell. Over the last two years, a project to demonstrate the feasibility of the scale up to this technology to a BC size cell with 65 Ah capacity was undertaken. The objective was to develop, build, and test a .6 kWh storage battery consisting of 6 BC cells in series.

  9. Calorimetry of 25 Ah lithium/thionyl chloride cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, C. J.; Dawson, S.

    1991-01-01

    Heat flow measurements of 25-Ah lithium thionyl chloride cells provided a method to calculate an effective thermal potential, E(TP) of 3.907 V. The calculation is useful to determine specific heat generation of this cell chemistry and design. The E(TP) value includes heat generation by electrochemical cell reactions, competitive chemical reactions, and resistance heating at the tabs, connectors, and leads. Heat flow was measured while applying electrical loads to the cell in an isothermal calorimeter set at 0, 20, and 60 C.

  10. 77 FR 76939 - Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement: Definition of Cost or Pricing Data (DFARS Case...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-31

    ... 0750-AH49 Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement: Definition of Cost or Pricing Data (DFARS... consistency with FAR changes addressing the definition of cost or pricing data which clarified the distinction... as the requirements for the submission of cost or pricing data (75 FR 53135, August 30, 2010)....

  11. Applying Dynamical Systems Theory to Optimize Libration Point Orbit Stationkeeping Maneuvers for WIND

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Jonathan M.; Petersen, Jeremy D.

    2014-01-01

    NASA's WIND mission has been operating in a large amplitude Lissajous orbit in the vicinity of the interior libration point of the Sun-Earth/Moon system since 2004. Regular stationkeeping maneuvers are required to maintain the orbit due to the instability around the collinear libration points. Historically these stationkeeping maneuvers have been performed by applying an incremental change in velocity, or (delta)v along the spacecraft-Sun vector as projected into the ecliptic plane. Previous studies have shown that the magnitude of libration point stationkeeping maneuvers can be minimized by applying the (delta)v in the direction of the local stable manifold found using dynamical systems theory. This paper presents the analysis of this new maneuver strategy which shows that the magnitude of stationkeeping maneuvers can be decreased by 5 to 25 percent, depending on the location in the orbit where the maneuver is performed. The implementation of the optimized maneuver method into operations is discussed and results are presented for the first two optimized stationkeeping maneuvers executed by WIND.

  12. Modeling helicopter near-horizon harmonic noise due to transient maneuvers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sickenberger, Richard D.

    A new first principles model has been developed to estimate the external harmonic noise radiation for a helicopter performing transient maneuvers in the longitudinal plane. This model, which simulates the longitudinal fuselage dynamics, main rotor blade flapping, and far field acoustics, was validated using in-flight measurements and recordings from ground microphones during a full-scale flight test featuring a Bell 206B-3 helicopter. The flight test was specifically designed to study transient maneuvers. The validated model demonstrated that the flapping of the main rotor blades does not significantly affect the acoustics radiated by the helicopter during maneuvering flight. Furthermore, the model also demonstrated that Quasi-Static Acoustic Mapping (Q-SAM) methods can be used to reliably predict the noise radiated during transient maneuvers. The model was also used to identify and quantify the contributions of main rotor thickness noise, low frequency loading noise, and blade-vortex interaction (BVI) noise during maneuvering flight for the Bell 206B-3 helicopter. Pull-up and push-over maneuvers from pure longitudinal cyclic and pure collective control inputs were investigated. The contribution of thickness noise and low frequency loading noise during maneuvering flight was found to depend on the orientation of the tip-path plane relative to the observer. The contribution of impulsive BVI noise during maneuvering flight was found to depend on the inflow through the main rotor and the orientation of the tip-path plane relative to the observer.

  13. 46 CFR 35.20-40 - Maneuvering characteristics-T/OC.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Maneuvering characteristics-T/OC. 35.20-40 Section 35.20-40 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS OPERATIONS Navigation § 35.20-40 Maneuvering characteristics—T/OC. For each ocean and coastwise tankship of 1,600 gross tons...

  14. 32 CFR Appendix C to Part 552 - Authorized Activities for Fort Lewis Maneuver Area Access

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true Authorized Activities for Fort Lewis Maneuver Area Access C Appendix C to Part 552 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF.... 552, App. C Appendix C to Part 552—Authorized Activities for Fort Lewis Maneuver Area Access...

  15. Detail view of the "underside" of the Orbiter Maneuvering/Reaction Control ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail view of the "underside" of the Orbiter Maneuvering/Reaction Control Systems pod looking at the two spherical propellant tanks for the Reaction Control System, and the elongated propellant tanks for the Orbiter Maneuvering System. This view was taken at Kennedy Space Center. - Space Transportation System, Orbiter Discovery (OV-103), Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, 2101 NASA Parkway, Houston, Harris County, TX

  16. 32 CFR 552.38 - Acquisition of maneuver agreements for Army commanders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Acquisition of maneuver agreements for Army commanders. 552.38 Section 552.38 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY... Real Estate and Interest Therein § 552.38 Acquisition of maneuver agreements for Army commanders....

  17. 32 CFR 552.38 - Acquisition of maneuver agreements for Army commanders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true Acquisition of maneuver agreements for Army commanders. 552.38 Section 552.38 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY... Real Estate and Interest Therein § 552.38 Acquisition of maneuver agreements for Army commanders....

  18. Orbital Maneuvering System Design and Performance for the Magnetosperic Multiscale Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Queen, Steven; Chai, Dean; Placanica, Sam

    2015-01-01

    Once in science mission orbits, the four 0.12-km diameter observatories plan to form a tetrahedron with as little as 4-km of separation between spacecraft. The stated operational goal of maneuvering the fleet is no more often than once every two weeks (on average). Derived maneuvering accuracy requirement levied on the ACS

  19. 32 CFR 552.38 - Acquisition of maneuver agreements for Army commanders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Acquisition of maneuver agreements for Army commanders. 552.38 Section 552.38 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY... Real Estate and Interest Therein § 552.38 Acquisition of maneuver agreements for Army commanders....

  20. 32 CFR 552.38 - Acquisition of maneuver agreements for Army commanders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Acquisition of maneuver agreements for Army commanders. 552.38 Section 552.38 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY... Real Estate and Interest Therein § 552.38 Acquisition of maneuver agreements for Army commanders....

  1. 32 CFR 552.38 - Acquisition of maneuver agreements for Army commanders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2012-07-01 2009-07-01 true Acquisition of maneuver agreements for Army commanders. 552.38 Section 552.38 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY... Real Estate and Interest Therein § 552.38 Acquisition of maneuver agreements for Army commanders....

  2. Teaching Cardiac Autonomic Function Dynamics Employing the Valsalva (Valsalva-Weber) Maneuver

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Junqueira, Luiz Fernando, Jr.

    2008-01-01

    In this report, a brief history of the Valsalva (Valsalva-Weber) maneuver is outlined, followed by an explanation on the use of this approach for the evaluation of cardiac autonomic function based on underlying heart rate changes. The most important methodological and interpretative aspects of the Valsalva-Weber maneuver are critically updated,…

  3. The Generation of Cues Based on a Maneuver Analysis. Technical Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerlach, Vernon; And Others

    A model for the systematic generation of verbal instructional cues is presented. The model utilizes a task analytic procedure referred to as "Maneuver Analysis," which is outlined and applied to the maneuver Vertical S-A. The cues generated on this basis are compared to current operational cues as found in "How to Fly" manuals, such as ATCM 5k-4…

  4. The Total In-Flight Simulator (TIFS) aerodynamics and systems: Description and analysis. [maneuver control and gust alleviators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrisani, D., II; Daughaday, H.; Dittenhauser, J.; Rynaski, E.

    1978-01-01

    The aerodynamics, control system, instrumentation complement and recording system of the USAF Total In/Flight Simulator (TIFS) airplane are described. A control system that would allow the ailerons to be operated collectively, as well as, differentially to entrance the ability of the vehicle to perform the dual function of maneuver load control and gust alleviation is emphasized. Mathematical prediction of the rigid body and the flexible equations of longitudinal motion using the level 2.01 FLEXSTAB program are included along with a definition of the vehicle geometry, the mass and stiffness distribution, the calculated mode frequencies and mode shapes, and the resulting aerodynamic equations of motion of the flexible vehicle. A complete description of the control and instrumentation system of the aircraft is presented, including analysis, ground test and flight data comparisons of the performance and bandwidth of the aerodynamic surface servos. Proposed modification for improved performance of the servos are also presented.

  5. Identification of TMPRSS2 as a Susceptibility Gene for Severe 2009 Pandemic A(H1N1) Influenza and A(H7N9) Influenza.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Zhongshan; Zhou, Jie; To, Kelvin Kai-Wang; Chu, Hin; Li, Cun; Wang, Dong; Yang, Dong; Zheng, Shufa; Hao, Ke; Bossé, Yohan; Obeidat, Ma'en; Brandsma, Corry-Anke; Song, You-Qiang; Chen, Yu; Zheng, Bo-Jian; Li, Lanjuan; Yuen, Kwok-Yung

    2015-10-15

    The genetic predisposition to severe A(H1N1)2009 (A[H1N1]pdm09) influenza was evaluated in 409 patients, including 162 cases with severe infection and 247 controls with mild infection. We prioritized candidate variants based on the result of a pilot genome-wide association study and a lung expression quantitative trait locus data set. The GG genotype of rs2070788, a higher-expression variant of TMPRSS2, was a risk variant (odds ratio, 2.11; 95% confidence interval, 1.18-3.77; P = .01) to severe A(H1N1)pdm09 influenza. A potentially functional single-nucleotide polymorphism, rs383510, accommodated in a putative regulatory region was identified to tag rs2070788. Luciferase assay results showed the putative regulatory region was a functional element, in which rs383510 regulated TMPRSS2 expression in a genotype-specific manner. Notably, rs2070788 and rs383510 were significantly associated with the susceptibility to A(H7N9) influenza in 102 patients with A(H7N9) influenza and 106 healthy controls. Therefore, we demonstrate that genetic variants with higher TMPRSS2 expression confer higher risk to severe A(H1N1)pdm09 influenza. The same variants also increase susceptibility to human A(H7N9) influenza.

  6. Teaching cardiac autonomic function dynamics employing the Valsalva (Valsalva-Weber) maneuver.

    PubMed

    Junqueira, Luiz Fernando

    2008-03-01

    In this report, a brief history of the Valsalva (Valsalva-Weber) maneuver is outlined, followed by an explanation on the use of this approach for the evaluation of cardiac autonomic function based on underlying heart rate changes. The most important methodological and interpretative aspects of the Valsalva-Weber maneuver are critically updated, and some guidelines are established for simple application of the maneuver in a teaching or research laboratory setting. These include the hemodynamic and cardiac autonomic mechanisms involved, technical aspects such as the intensity and duration of the expiratory straining, frequency of maneuver sessions, training and posture of the individuals tested, different time- and grade change-dependent indexes of heart interval variation, and clinical application of the maneuver.

  7. AH-64 IHADSS aviator vision experiences in Operation Iraqi Freedom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiatt, Keith L.; Rash, Clarence E.; Harris, Eric S.; McGilberry, William H.

    2004-09-01

    Forty AH-64 Apache aviators representing a total of 8564 flight hours and 2260 combat hours during Operation Iraqi Freedom and its aftermath were surveyed for their visual experiences with the AH-64's monocular Integrated Helmet and Display Sighting System (IHADSS) helmet-mounted display in a combat environment. A major objective of this study was to determine if the frequencies of reports of visual complaints and illusions reported in the previous studies, addressing mostly benign training environments, differ in the more stressful combat environments. The most frequently reported visual complaints, both while and after flying, were visual discomfort and headache, which is consistent with previous studies. Frequencies of complaints after flying in the current study were numerically lower for all complaint types, but differences from previous studies are statistically significant only for visual discomfort and disorientation (vertigo). With the exception of "brownout/whiteout," reports of degraded visual cues in the current study were numerically lower for all types, but statistically significant only for impaired depth perception, decreased field of view, and inadvertent instrumental meteorological conditions. This study also found statistically lower reports of all static and dynamic illusions (with one exception, disorientation). This important finding is attributed to the generally flat and featureless geography present in a large portion of the Iraqi theater and to the shift in the way that the aviators use the two disparate visual inputs presented by the IHADSS monocular design (i.e., greater use of both eyes as opposed to concentrating primarily on display imagery).

  8. Aeroelastic characteristics of the AH-64 bearingless tail rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banerjee, D.

    1988-01-01

    The results of a wind tunnel test program to determine the performance loads and dynamic characteristics of the Composite Flexbeam Tail Rotor (CFTR) for the AH-64 Advanced Attack Helicopter are reported. The CFTR uses an elastomeric shear attachment of the flexbeam to the hub to provide soft-inplane S-mode and stiff-inplane C-mode configuration. The properties of the elastomer were selected for proper frequency placement and scale damping of the inplane S-mode. Kinematic pitch-lag coupling was introduced to provide the first cyclic inplane C-mode damping at high collective pitch. The CFTR was tested in a wind tunnel over the full slideslip envelop of the AH-64. It is found that the rotor was aeroelastically stable throughout the complete collective pitch range and up to rotor speeds of 1403 rpm. The dynamic characteristics of the rotor were found to be satisfactory at all pitch angles and rotor speeds of the tunnel tests. The design characteristics of the rotor which permit the high performance characteristics are discussed. Several schematic drawings and photographs of the rotor are provided.

  9. Detecting Spread of Avian Influenza A(H7N9) Virus Beyond China.

    PubMed

    Millman, Alexander J; Havers, Fiona; Iuliano, A Danielle; Davis, C Todd; Sar, Borann; Sovann, Ly; Chin, Savuth; Corwin, Andrew L; Vongphrachanh, Phengta; Douangngeun, Bounlom; Lindblade, Kim A; Chittaganpitch, Malinee; Kaewthong, Viriya; Kile, James C; Nguyen, Hien T; Pham, Dong V; Donis, Ruben O; Widdowson, Marc-Alain

    2015-05-01

    During February 2013-March 2015, a total of 602 human cases of low pathogenic avian influenza A(H7N9) were reported; no autochthonous cases were reported outside mainland China. In contrast, since highly pathogenic avian influenza A(H5N1) reemerged during 2003 in China, 784 human cases in 16 countries and poultry outbreaks in 53 countries have been reported. Whether the absence of reported A(H7N9) outside mainland China represents lack of spread or lack of detection remains unclear. We compared epidemiologic and virologic features of A(H5N1) and A(H7N9) and used human and animal influenza surveillance data collected during April 2013-May 2014 from 4 Southeast Asia countries to assess the likelihood that A(H7N9) would have gone undetected during 2014. Surveillance in Vietnam and Cambodia detected human A(H5N1) cases; no A(H7N9) cases were detected in humans or poultry in Southeast Asia. Although we cannot rule out the possible spread of A(H7N9), substantial spread causing severe disease in humans is unlikely.

  10. Detecting Spread of Avian Influenza A(H7N9) Virus Beyond China

    PubMed Central

    Havers, Fiona; Iuliano, A. Danielle; Davis, C. Todd; Sar, Borann; Sovann, Ly; Chin, Savuth; Corwin, Andrew L.; Vongphrachanh, Phengta; Douangngeun, Bounlom; Lindblade, Kim A.; Chittaganpitch, Malinee; Kaewthong, Viriya; Kile, James C.; Nguyen, Hien T.; Pham, Dong V.; Donis, Ruben O.; Widdowson, Marc-Alain

    2015-01-01

    During February 2013–March 2015, a total of 602 human cases of low pathogenic avian influenza A(H7N9) were reported; no autochthonous cases were reported outside mainland China. In contrast, since highly pathogenic avian influenza A(H5N1) reemerged during 2003 in China, 784 human cases in 16 countries and poultry outbreaks in 53 countries have been reported. Whether the absence of reported A(H7N9) outside mainland China represents lack of spread or lack of detection remains unclear. We compared epidemiologic and virologic features of A(H5N1) and A(H7N9) and used human and animal influenza surveillance data collected during April 2013–May 2014 from 4 Southeast Asia countries to assess the likelihood that A(H7N9) would have gone undetected during 2014. Surveillance in Vietnam and Cambodia detected human A(H5N1) cases; no A(H7N9) cases were detected in humans or poultry in Southeast Asia. Although we cannot rule out the possible spread of A(H7N9), substantial spread causing severe disease in humans is unlikely. PMID:25897654

  11. Deciphering Dimerization Modes of PAS Domains: Computational and Experimental Analyses of the AhR:ARNT Complex Reveal New Insights Into the Mechanisms of AhR Transformation

    PubMed Central

    Corrada, Dario; Soshilov, Anatoly A.; Denison, Michael S.

    2016-01-01

    The Aryl hydrocarbon Receptor (AhR) is a transcription factor that mediates the biochemical response to xenobiotics and the toxic effects of a number of environmental contaminants, including dioxins. Recently, endogenous regulatory roles for the AhR in normal physiology and development have also been reported, thus extending the interest in understanding its molecular mechanisms of activation. Since dimerization with the AhR Nuclear Translocator (ARNT) protein, occurring through the Helix-Loop-Helix (HLH) and PER-ARNT-SIM (PAS) domains, is needed to convert the AhR into its transcriptionally active form, deciphering the AhR:ARNT dimerization mode would provide insights into the mechanisms of AhR transformation. Here we present homology models of the murine AhR:ARNT PAS domain dimer developed using recently available X-ray structures of other bHLH-PAS protein dimers. Due to the different reciprocal orientation and interaction surfaces in the different template dimers, two alternative models were developed for both the PAS-A and PAS-B dimers and they were characterized by combining a number of computational evaluations. Both well-established hot spot prediction methods and new approaches to analyze individual residue and residue-pairwise contributions to the MM-GBSA binding free energies were adopted to predict residues critical for dimer stabilization. On this basis, a mutagenesis strategy for both the murine AhR and ARNT proteins was designed and ligand-dependent DNA binding ability of the AhR:ARNT heterodimer mutants was evaluated. While functional analysis disfavored the HIF2α:ARNT heterodimer-based PAS-B model, most mutants derived from the CLOCK:BMAL1-based AhR:ARNT dimer models of both the PAS-A and the PAS-B dramatically decreased the levels of DNA binding, suggesting this latter model as the most suitable for describing AhR:ARNT dimerization. These novel results open new research directions focused at elucidating basic molecular mechanisms underlying the

  12. Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle (OMV) missions applications and systems requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huber, W. G.; Cramblit, D. C.

    1984-01-01

    The routine delivery of large payloads to low earth orbit has become a reality with the Space Transportation System (STS). However, once earth orbit has been achieved, orbit transfer operations represent an inefficient use of the Space Shuttle. The Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle (OMV) will add a new and needed dimension to STS capabilities. Utilized in a reusable manner, the OMV is needed to deliver and retrieve satellites to and from orbital altitudes or inclinations beyond the practical limits of the Space Shuttle and to support basic Space Station activities. The initial OMV must also be designed to permit the addition of future mission kits to support the servicing, module changeout, or refueling of satellites in Low Earth Orbit (LEO) and Geostationary Earth Orbit (GEO), and the retrieval and deorbit of space debris. This paper addresses the mission needs along with the resulting performance implications, design requirements and operational capabilities imposed on the OMV planned for use in the late 1980s.

  13. Teleoperator Maneuvering System (TMS) mission applications and benefits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cramblit, D. C.; Turner, J. R.

    1984-01-01

    Studies conducted by NASA have shown that the operating range of the Shuttle can be substantially increased and cost of payload operation be decreased by making use of the Teleoperator Maneuvering System (TMS). The TMS is remotely controlled, free-flying, orbital mini-tug vehicle capable of performing a wide range of remote satellite services missions. It can operate out of the Shuttle cargo bay, from a space station, or on top of an upper stage like Centaur. For high energy missions up to and including geostationary orbit, the TMS propulsion stage will augment the Transfer Orbit Stage (TOS) recently proposed for commercial development in providing an effective low-cost second-stage system for delivering intermediate sized payloads to geosynchronous orbit (GEO). Attention is given to TMS capabilities for both long duration and short term orbital missions, taking into account also Space Station support operations.

  14. A FMCW Radar Ranging Device for the Teleoperator Maneuvering System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdonald, M. W.

    1983-01-01

    A frequency-modulated continuous wave radar system is under development in the Communications Systems Branch of the Information and Electronic Systems Laboratory at Marshall Space Flight Center. The radar unit is being designed for use on the teleoperator maneuvering system. Its function is to provide millimeter-level accuracy in range and range rate measurements out to a range of thirty meters. This will facilitate soft docking with accuracy. This report is an updating of previous developments reported on this system. An innovation in the system is the utilization of a standard reference signal generated by shunting a portion of the radar energy into a shorted coaxial delay line. The regular radar target return signal is constantly compared with the reference signal to provide internal error compensation. Within a five meter range, a limit imposed by present laboratory dimensions, the radar system exhibits reliable accuracy with range error less than 0.2%.

  15. Slew maneuver dynamics of the Spacecraft Control Laboratory experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kakad, Y. P.

    1987-01-01

    Mathematical expressions for slew maneuver dynamics are presented. The total kinetic energy expression of the system is given as T = T(0) + T(1) + T(2), where T(0), T(1), and T(2) refer to the kinetic energies of the shuttle, the flexible beam, and the tip mass (the reflector), respectively. The specific equations for each of these are defined and integrated into the total energy expression. Using the chain rule in the Lagrange equations and an expression allowing the transformation of the orbiter angular velocity from the inertial frame to the body-fixed frame, the rotational equations are obtained. Finally, the vibration equations for the beam are derived, again using the Lagrange equations.

  16. Differential maneuvering simulator data reduction and analysis software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beasley, G. P.; Sigman, R. S.

    1972-01-01

    A multielement data reduction and analysis software package has been developed for use with the Langley differential maneuvering simulator (DMS). This package, which has several independent elements, was developed to support all phases of DMS aircraft simulation studies with a variety of both graphical and tabular information. The overall software package is considered unique because of the number, diversity, and sophistication of the element programs available for use in a single study. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the overall DMS data reduction and analysis package by reviewing the development of the various elements of the software, showing typical results that can be obtained, and discussing how each element can be used.

  17. Visual display aid for orbital maneuvering - Experimental evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grunwald, Arthur J.; Ellis, Stephen R.

    1993-01-01

    An interactive proximity operations planning system, which allows on-site planning of fuel-efficient, multiburn maneuvers in a potential multispacecraft environment, has been experimentally evaluated. An experiment has been carried out in which nonastronaut operators with brief initial training were required to plan a trajectory to retrieve an object accidentally separated from a dual-keel Space Station, for a variety of different orbital situations. The experiments have shown that these operators were able to plan workable trajectories, satisfying a number of operational constraints. Fuel use and planning time were strongly correlated, both with the angle at which the object was separated and with the existence of spatial constraints. Planning behavior was found to be strongly operator-dependent. This finding calls for the need for standardizing planning strategies through operator training or the use of semiautomated planning schemes.

  18. Behavior learning in differential games and reorientation maneuvers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satak, Neha

    method is the Direct Approximation of Value Function (DAVF) method. In this method, unlike the CSR method, the player formulates an objective function for the opponent but does not formulates a strategy directly; rather, indirectly the player assumes that the opponent is playing optimally. Thus, a value function satisfying the HJB equation corresponding to the opponent's cost function exists. The DAVF method finds an approximate solution for the value function based on previous observations of the opponent's control. The approximate solution to the value function is then used to predict the opponent's future behavior. Game examples in which only a single player is learning its opponent's behavior are simulated. Subsequently, examples in which both players in a two-player game are learning each other's behavior are simulated. In the second part of this research, a reorientation control maneuver for a spinning spacecraft will be developed. This will aid the application of behavior learning and differential games concepts to the specific scenario involving multiple spinning spacecraft. An impulsive reorientation maneuver with coasting will be analytically designed to reorient the spin axis of the spacecraft using a single body fixed thruster. Cooperative maneuvers of multiple spacecraft optimizing fuel and relative orientation will be designed. Pareto optimality concepts will be used to arrive at mutually agreeable reorientation maneuvers for the cooperating spinning spacecraft.

  19. Optimal maneuvers at supersonic speeds in a vertical plane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vinh, N. X.; Lin, C. F.

    1981-01-01

    This paper presents several optimal maneuvers of supersonic aircraft in a vertical plane. The general dimensionless equations of motion are derived and the computation of the optimal trajectories are carried out using the aerodynamics and engine characteristics of a light-weight fighter called the supercruiser. Because of the normalizing of the control variables, namely, the load factor and the thrust-to-weight ratio, the results applied to any supersonic aircraft. The optimality of the singular thrust control and the optimal junction of different subarcs are discussed. The proposed method of computing the optimal trajectory is very efficient and makes explicit the selection of the optimal control. The technique should be useful for performance assessment of supersonic aircraft with potential for implementation of onboard flight control system.

  20. Optimal control of aeroassisted plane change maneuver using feedback expansions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mishne, D.; Speyer, J. L.

    1986-01-01

    A guidance law for an aeroassisted plane change maneuver is developed by an asymptotic expansion technique using a small parameter which essentially represents the ratio of the inertial forces to the atmospheric forces. This guidance law minimizes the energy loss while meeting terminal constraints on the altitude, flight path angle, and heading angle. By neglecting the inertial forces, the resulting optimization problem is integrable and can be determined in closed form. This zeroth-order solution is the first term in an asymptotic series solution of the Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman equation. The remaining terms are determined from the solution of a first-order, linear partial differential equation whose solution requires only quadrature integration. Our initial results in using this guidance scheme are encouraging.

  1. Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle (OMV) plume and plume effects study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Sheldon D.

    1991-01-01

    The objective was to characterize the Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle (OMV) propulsion and attitude control system engine exhaust plumes and predict the resultant plume impingement pressure, heat loads, forces, and moments. Detailed description is provided of the OMV gaseous nitrogen (GN2) thruster exhaust plume flow field characteristics calculated with the RAMP2 snd SFPGEN computer codes. Brief descriptions are included of the two models, GN2 thruster characteristics and RAMP2 input data files. The RAMP2 flow field could be recalculated by other organizations using the information presented. The GN2 flow field can be readily used by other organizations who are interested in GN2 plume induced environments which require local flow field properties which can be supplied using the SFPGEN GN2 model.

  2. Control and structural optimization for maneuvering large spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chun, H. M.; Turner, J. D.; Yu, C. C.

    1990-01-01

    Presented here are the results of an advanced control design as well as a discussion of the requirements for automating both the structures and control design efforts for maneuvering a large spacecraft. The advanced control application addresses a general three dimensional slewing problem, and is applied to a large geostationary platform. The platform consists of two flexible antennas attached to the ends of a flexible truss. The control strategy involves an open-loop rigid body control profile which is derived from a nonlinear optimal control problem and provides the main control effort. A perturbation feedback control reduces the response due to the flexibility of the structure. Results are shown which demonstrate the usefulness of the approach. Software issues are considered for developing an integrated structures and control design environment.

  3. Sequential Probability Ratio Test for Spacecraft Collision Avoidance Maneuver Decisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, J. Russell; Markley, F. Landis

    2013-01-01

    A document discusses sequential probability ratio tests that explicitly allow decision-makers to incorporate false alarm and missed detection risks, and are potentially less sensitive to modeling errors than a procedure that relies solely on a probability of collision threshold. Recent work on constrained Kalman filtering has suggested an approach to formulating such a test for collision avoidance maneuver decisions: a filter bank with two norm-inequality-constrained epoch-state extended Kalman filters. One filter models the null hypotheses that the miss distance is inside the combined hard body radius at the predicted time of closest approach, and one filter models the alternative hypothesis. The epoch-state filter developed for this method explicitly accounts for any process noise present in the system. The method appears to work well using a realistic example based on an upcoming, highly elliptical orbit formation flying mission.

  4. Estimate of avoidance maneuver rate for HASTOL tether boost facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forward, Robert L.

    2002-01-01

    The Hypersonic Airplane Space Tether Orbital Launch (HASTOL) Architecture uses a hypersonic airplane (or reusable launch vehicle) to carry a payload from the surface of the Earth to 150 km altitude and a speed of Mach 17. The hypersonic airplane makes a rendezvous with the grapple at the tip of a long, rotating, orbiting space tether boost facility, which picks up the payload from the airplane. Release of the payload at the proper point in the tether rotation boosts the payload into a higher orbit, typically into a Geosynchronous Transfer Orbit (GTO), with lower orbits and Earth escape other options. The HASTOL Tether Boost Facility will have a length of 636 km. Its center of mass will be in a 604 km by 890 km equatorial orbit. It is estimated that by the time of the start of operations of the HASTOL Tether Boost facility in the year 2020, there will be 500 operational spacecraft using the same volume of space as the HASTOL facility. These operational spacecraft would likely be made inoperative by an impact with one of the lines in the multiline HASTOL Hoytether™ and should be avoided. There will also be non-operational spacecraft and large pieces of orbital debris with effective size greater than five meters in diameter that could cut a number of lines in the HASTOL Hoytether™, and should also be avoided. It is estimated, using two different methods and combining them, that the HASTOL facility will need to make avoidance maneuvers about once every four days if the 500 operational spacecraft and large pieces of orbital debris greater than 5 m in diameter, were each protected by a 2 km diameter miss distance protection sphere. If by 2020, the ability to know the positions of operational spacecraft and large pieces of orbital debris improved to allow a 600 m diameter miss distance protection sphere around each object, then the number of HASTOL facility maneuvers needed drops to one every two weeks. .

  5. Is there central fatigue during simulated air combat maneuvering?

    PubMed

    Bain, B; Jacobs, I; Buick, F

    1995-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that repeated exposure to high levels of +Gz acceleration, in conjunction with repeated execution of an Anti-G Straining Maneuver (AGSM), causes central fatigue, presumably by impairing central nervous system (CNS) function. We speculated that central fatigue would impair the ability to recruit sufficient musculature at the intensity required to perform an adequate anti-G straining maneuver. Central fatigue was evaluated by measuring maximal force generation and surface electromyographic activity of leg extensor muscles before, during, and immediately upon termination of an SACM, and comparing these values to those obtained when the muscles were electrically stimulated during maximal voluntary contractions (MVCs). We assumed that any observed increase in force generation during the MVCs, caused by the stimulation, would indicate central fatigue. G-tolerance time was 230 +/- 172 s. Hypoxia was induced by the SACM as the arterial oxygen saturation decreased significantly from 97% to 90%. In spite of this hypoxia, there was no significant change in MVC force when the pre- and post-SACM values were compared. Electrical stimulation during the MVC's did not cause an increase in force generation. The average forces generated during the +7 Gz phase of the SACM were only about 35% of MVC force. This force value did not change significantly during the SACM. The results indicate that the inability to continue to perform the AGSM during an SACM is not likely due to central fatigue or to fatigue of the large skeletal muscle groups we have examined.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  6. Propulsion System and Orbit Maneuver Integration in CubeSats: Trajectory Control Strategies Using Micro Ion Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, Jennifer; Martinez, Andres; Petro, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    The Propulsion System and Orbit Maneuver Integration in CubeSats project aims to solve the challenges of integrating a micro electric propulsion system on a CubeSat in order to perform orbital maneuvers and control attitude. This represents a fundamentally new capability for CubeSats, which typically do not contain propulsion systems and cannot maneuver far beyond their initial orbits.

  7. Inlet Flow Characteristics During Rapid Maneuvers for an F/A-18A Airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steenken, William G.; Williams, John G.; Walsh, Kevin R.

    1999-01-01

    The F404-GE-400 engine powered F/A-18A High Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV) was used to examine the characteristics of inlet airflow during rapid aircraft maneuvers. A study of the degree of similarity between inlet data obtained during rapid aircraft maneuvers and inlet data obtained at steady aerodynamic attitudes was conducted at the maximum engine airflow of approximately 145 Ibm/sec using a computer model that was generated from inlet data obtained during steady aerodynamic maneuvers. Results show that rapid-maneuver inlet recoveries agreed very well with the recoveries obtained at equivalent stabilized angle-of-attack conditions. The peak dynamic circumferential distortion values obtained during rapid maneuvers agreed within 0.01 units of distortion over the 10 - 38 degree angle of attack range with the values obtained during steady aerodynamic maneuvers while similar agreement was found for the peak dynamic radial distortion values up to 29 degrees angle-of-attack. Exceedences of the rapid-maneuver peak dynamic circumferential distortion values relative to the peak distortion model values at steady attitudes occurred only at low or negative angles of attack and were inconsequential from an engine-stability assessment point of view. The results of this study validate the current industry practice of testing at steady aerodynamic conditions to characterize inlet recovery and peak dynamic distortion levels.

  8. A Monte Carlo error analysis program for near-Mars, finite-burn, orbital transfer maneuvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, R. N.; Hoffman, L. H.; Young, G. R.

    1972-01-01

    A computer program was developed which performs an error analysis of a minimum-fuel, finite-thrust, transfer maneuver between two Keplerian orbits in the vicinity of Mars. The method of analysis is the Monte Carlo approach where each off-nominal initial orbit is targeted to the desired final orbit. The errors in the initial orbit are described by two covariance matrices of state deviations and tracking errors. The function of the program is to relate these errors to the resulting errors in the final orbit. The equations of motion for the transfer trajectory are those of a spacecraft maneuvering with constant thrust and mass-flow rate in the neighborhood of a single body. The thrust vector is allowed to rotate in a plane with a constant pitch rate. The transfer trajectory is characterized by six control parameters and the final orbit is defined, or partially defined, by the desired target parameters. The program is applicable to the deboost maneuver (hyperbola to ellipse), orbital trim maneuver (ellipse to ellipse), fly-by maneuver (hyperbola to hyperbola), escape maneuvers (ellipse to hyperbola), and deorbit maneuver.

  9. Intrathoracic pressure changes after Valsalva strain and other maneuvers: implications for divers with patent foramen ovale.

    PubMed

    Balestra, C; Germonpré, P; Marroni, A

    1998-01-01

    Scuba divers with patent foramen ovale (PFO) may be at risk for paradoxical nitrogen gas emboli when performing maneuvers that cause a rebound blood loading to the right atrium. We measured the rise and fall in intrathoracic pressure (ITP) during various maneuvers in 15 divers. The tests were standard isometric exercises (control), forceful coughing, knee bend (with and without respiration blocked), and Valsalva maneuver (maximal, gradually increased to reach control ITP, and as performed by divers to equalize middle ear pressure). All the maneuvers, as well as the downward slope of ITP at the release phase, were related to the control value. ITP levels were significantly higher than the standard isometric effort during a breath-hold knee bend (172%, P < 0.001), cough (133%, P < 0.05), and maximal Valsalva (136%, P < 0.05) whereas "usual" Valsalva maneuvers produced ITPs significantly lower than the standard (28%, P < 0.001). The downward slope of the pressure release curve was not significantly different among the different maneuvers (P < 0.1447). We conclude that maneuvers other than the usual divers' Valsalva are more likely to cause post-release central blood shift, both by the levels of ITP reached and by the time during which these ITPs are sustained. Divers (especially with PFO) should be advised to refrain from strenuous leg, arm, or abdominal exercise after decompression dives.

  10. Selective Inflow Occlusion Technique Versus Intermittent Pringle Maneuver in Hepatectomy for Large Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Peng; Zhang, Binhao; Wang, Rui; Mei, Bin; Cheng, Qi; Chen, Lin; Wei, Gang; Xu, Da-feng; Yu, Jie; Xiao, Hua; Zhang, Bi-xiang; Chen, Xiao-ping

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Selective inflow occlusion (SIO) maneuver preserved inflow of nontumorous liver and was supposed to protect liver function. This study aims to evaluate whether SIO maneuver is superior to Pringle maneuver in patients undergoing partial hepatectomy with large hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs). Between January 2008 and May 2012, 656 patients underwent large HCC resections and were divided into 2 groups: intermittent Pringle maneuver (IP) group (n = 336) and SIO group (n = 320). Operative parameters, postoperative laboratory tests, and morbidity and mortality were analyzed. In comparison to the IP maneuver, the SIO maneuver significantly decreased intraoperative blood loss (473 vs 691 mL, P = 0.001) and transfusion rates (11.3% vs 28.6%, P = 0.006). The rate of major complication between the 2 groups was comparable (22.6% vs 18.8%, P = 0.541). Patients with moderate/severe cirrhosis, total bilirubin > 17 μmol/L, or HBV DNA> = 104 copy/mL in SIO group resulted in lower major complication rates. The SIO maneuver is a safe and effective technique for large HCC resections. In patients with moderate/severe cirrhosis, total bilirubin > 17 μmol/L, or HBV DNA> = 104 copy/mL, the SIO technique is preferentially recommended. PMID:26683942

  11. Precision Closed-Loop Orbital Maneuvering System Design and Performance for the Magnetospheric Multiscale Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chai, Dean J.; Queen, Steven Z.; Placanica, Samuel J.

    2015-01-01

    NASAs Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission successfully launched on March 13,2015 (UTC) consists of four identically instrumented spin-stabilized observatories that function as a constellation to study magnetic reconnection in space. The need to maintain sufficiently accurate spatial and temporal formation resolution of the observatories must be balanced against the logistical constraints of executing overly-frequent maneuvers on a small fleet of spacecraft. These two considerations make for an extremely challenging maneuver design problem. This paper focuses on the design elements of a 6-DOF spacecraft attitude control and maneuvering system capable of delivering the high-precision adjustments required by the constellation designers specifically, the design, implementation, and on-orbit performance of the closed-loop formation-class maneuvers that include initialization, maintenance, and re-sizing. The maneuvering control system flown on MMS utilizes a micro-gravity resolution accelerometer sampled at a high rate in order to achieve closed-loop velocity tracking of an inertial target with arc-minute directional and millimeter-per second magnitude accuracy. This paper summarizes the techniques used for correcting bias drift, sensor-head offsets, and centripetal aliasing in the acceleration measurements. It also discusses the on-board pre-maneuver calibration and compensation algorithms as well as the implementation of the post-maneuver attitude adjustments.

  12. Attack helicopter (AH-1T) cockpit systems integration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graf, V. A.

    1984-01-01

    This discussion summarizes the effort conducted by the BHTI Human Factors and Cockpit Arrangement group for a study and design of the integration of a cockpit control system for the AH 1T (TOW). The resulting design is a culmination of studies that were conducted using the existing configuration as a baseline and complementing it with new equipment and subsystems that fulfill the attack helicopter requirements for the foreseeable future. Of primary concern was the requirement to add a missile control system, with secondary considerations for improved NOE and night operations. In addition, growth capabilities for improved target acquisition, weapons delivery, and precise navigation was considered. Along with the addition of new equipment, the aircraft was assumed to have a central multiplex data bus system for information transfer throughout the aircraft and its subsystems.

  13. Adapting Covariance Propagation to Account for the Presence of Modeled and Unmodeled Maneuvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schiff, Conrad

    2006-01-01

    This paper explores techniques that can be used to adapt the standard linearized propagation of an orbital covariance matrix to the case where there is a maneuver and an associated execution uncertainty. A Monte Carlo technique is used to construct a final orbital covariance matrix for a 'propagate-burn-propagate' process that takes into account initial state uncertainty and execution uncertainties in the maneuver magnitude. This final orbital covariance matrix is regarded as 'truth' and comparisons between it and three methods using modified linearized covariance propagation are made. The first method accounts for the maneuver by modeling its nominal effect within the state transition matrix but excludes the execution uncertainty by omitting a process noise matrix from the computation. In the second method, the maneuver is not modeled but the uncertainty in its magnitude is accounted for by the inclusion of a process noise matrix. In the third method, which is essentially a hybrid of the first two, the nominal portion of the maneuver is included via the state transition matrix while a process noise matrix is used to account for the magnitude uncertainty. Since this method also correctly accounts for the presence of the maneuver in the nominal orbit, it is the best method for applications involving the computation of times of closest approach and the corresponding probability of collision, Pc. However, applications for the two other methods exist and are briefly discussed. Despite the fact that the process model ('propagate-burn-propagate') that was studied was very simple - point-mass gravitational effects due to the Earth combined with an impulsive delta-V in the velocity direction for the maneuver - generalizations to more complex scenarios, including high fidelity force models, finite duration maneuvers, and maneuver pointing errors, are straightforward and are discussed in the conclusion.

  14. Human Infection with Highly Pathogenic A(H7N7) Avian Influenza Virus, Italy, 2013

    PubMed Central

    Rossini, Giada; Facchini, Marzia; Vaccari, Gabriele; Di Trani, Livia; Di Martino, Angela; Gaibani, Paolo; Vocale, Caterina; Cattoli, Giovanni; Bennett, Michael; McCauley, John W.; Rezza, Giovanni; Moro, Maria Luisa; Rangoni, Roberto; Finarelli, Alba Carola; Landini, Maria Paola; Castrucci, Maria Rita; Donatelli, Isabella

    2014-01-01

    During an influenza A(H7N7) virus outbreak among poultry in Italy during August–September 2013, infection with a highly pathogenic A(H7N7) avian influenza virus was diagnosed for 3 poultry workers with conjunctivitis. Genetic analyses revealed that the viruses from the humans were closely related to those from chickens on affected farms. PMID:25271444

  15. Pityriazepin and other potent AhR ligands isolated from Malassezia furfur yeast

    PubMed Central

    Mexia, Nikitia; Gaitanis, George; Velegraki, Aristea; Soshilov, Anatoly; Denison, Michael S.; Magiatis, Prokopios

    2015-01-01

    Malassezia furfur yeast strains isolated from diseased human skin preferentially biosynthesize indole alkaloids which can be detected in human skin and are highly potent activators of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) and AhR-dependent gene expression. Chemical analysis of an EtOAc extract of a M. furfur strain obtained from diseased human skin and grown on L-tryptophan agar revealed several known AhR active tryptophan metabolites along with a previously unidentified compound, pityriazepin. While its structure resembled that of the known alkaloid pityriacitrin, the comprised pyridine ring had been transformed into an azepinone. The indoloazepinone scaffold of pityriazepin is extremely rare in nature and has only been reported once previously. Pityriazepin, like the other isolated compounds, was found to be a potent activator of the AhR-dependent reporter gene assays in recombinant cell lines derived from four different species, although significant species differences in relative potency was observed. The ability of pityriazepin to competitively bind to the AhR and directly stimulate AhR DNA binding classified it as a new naturally-occurring potent AhR agonist. Malassezia furfur produces an expanded collection of extremely potent naturally occurring AhR agonists, which produce their biological effects in a species-specific manner.1 PMID:25721496

  16. A historical perspective of influenza A(H1N2) virus.

    PubMed

    Komadina, Naomi; McVernon, Jodie; Hall, Robert; Leder, Karin

    2014-01-01

    The emergence and transition to pandemic status of the influenza A(H1N1)A(H1N1)pdm09) virus in 2009 illustrated the potential for previously circulating human viruses to re-emerge in humans and cause a pandemic after decades of circulating among animals. Within a short time of the initial emergence of A(H1N1)pdm09 virus, novel reassortants were isolated from swine. In late 2011, a variant (v) H3N2 subtype was isolated from humans, and by 2012, the number of persons infected began to increase with limited person-to-person transmission. During 2012 in the United States, an A(H1N2)v virus was transmitted to humans from swine. During the same year, Australia recorded its first H1N2 subtype infection among swine. The A(H3N2)v and A(H1N2)v viruses contained the matrix protein from the A(H1N1)pdm09 virus, raising the possibility of increased transmissibility among humans and underscoring the potential for influenza pandemics of novel swine-origin viruses. We report on the differing histories of A(H1N2) viruses among humans and animals.

  17. Use of natural AhR ligands as potential therapeutic modalities against inflammatory disorders

    PubMed Central

    Busbee, Philip B; Rouse, Michael; Nagarkatti, Mitzi; Nagarkatti, Prakash S

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this review is to discuss research involving ligands for the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) and their role in immunomodulation. While activation of the AhR is well known for its ability to regulate the biochemical and toxic effects of environmental chemicals, more recently an exciting discovery has been made indicating that AhR ligation can also regulate T-cell differentiation, specifically through activation of Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) and downregulation of the proinflammatory Th17 cells. Such findings have opened new avenues of research on the possibility of targeting the AhR to treat inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. Specifically, this review will discuss the current research involving natural and dietary AhR ligands. In addition, evidence indicating the potential use of these ligands in regulating inflammation in various diseases will be highlighted. The importance of the AhR in immunological processes can be illustrated by expression of this receptor on a majority of immune cell types. In addition, AhR signaling pathways have been reported to influence a number of genes responsible for mediating inflammation and other immune responses. As interest in the AhR and its ligands increases, it seems prudent to consolidate current research on the contributions of these ligands to immune regulation during the course of inflammatory diseases. PMID:23731446

  18. TCDD and omeprazole prime platelets through the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) non-genomic pathway.

    PubMed

    Pombo, Mónica; Lamé, Michael W; Walker, Naomi J; Huynh, Danh H; Tablin, Fern

    2015-05-19

    The role of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) in hemostasis has recently gained increased attention. Here, we demonstrate, by qRT-PCR and western blot, that human platelets express both AhR mRNA and AhR protein. AhR protein levels increase in a dose dependent manner when incubated with either 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) or omeprazole. Treatment of platelets with puromycin blocks increased AhR protein synthesis in the presence of AhR activators. Additionally, treatment of platelets with either activator results in phosphorylation of p38MAPK and cPLA2, two key signaling molecules in platelet activation pathways. Using the AhR competitive inhibitors alpha naphthoflavone and CH-223191, we show that phosphorylation of p38MAPK is AhR dependent. Further, inhibition of p38MAPK blocks downstream cPLA2 phosphorylation induced by TCDD or omeprazole. Treatment with AhR activators results in platelet priming, as demonstrated by increased platelet aggregation, which is inhibited by AhR antagonists. Our data support a model of the platelet AhR non-genomic pathway in which treatment with AhR activators results in increased expression of the AhR, phosphorylation of p38MAPK and cPLA2, leading to platelet priming in response to agonist. PMID:25797602

  19. A pilot in the loop analysis of helicopter acceleration/deceleration maneuvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heffley, R. K.

    1982-01-01

    Helicopter flight acceleration/deceleration maneuvers are quantified and put to use in the fields of handling qualities, flight training and evaluation of simulator fidelity. The three specific cases include the normal speed change maneuver, the nap-of-the-Earth dash/quickstop, and the decelerating approach to hover. All of these maneuvers share common generic features in terms of pilot adaptation and mathematical description; yet each differs in terms of the essential feedback loop structure, implications for handling qualities requirements, and simulator fidelity criteria.

  20. Passenger comfort during terminal-area flight maneuvers. M.S. Thesis.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoonover, W. E., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    A series of flight experiments was conducted to obtain passenger subjective responses to closely controlled and repeatable flight maneuvers. In 8 test flights, reactions were obtained from 30 passenger subjects to a wide range of terminal-area maneuvers, including descents, turns, decelerations, and combinations thereof. Analysis of the passenger rating variance indicated that the objective of a repeatable flight passenger environment was achieved. Multiple linear regression models developed from the test data were used to define maneuver motion boundaries for specified degrees of passenger acceptance.

  1. High alpha feedback control for agile half-loop maneuvers of the F-18 airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stalford, Harold

    1988-01-01

    A nonlinear feedback control law for the F/A-18 airplane that provides time-optimal or agile maneuvering of the half-loop maneuver at high angles of attack is given. The feedback control law was developed using the mathematical approach of singular perturbations, in which the control devices considered were conventional aerodynamic control surfaces and thrusting. The derived nonlinear control law was used to simulate F/A-18 half-loop maneuvers. The simulated results at Mach 0.6 and 0.9 compared well with pilot simulations conducted at NASA.

  2. Effects of automobile steering characteristics on driver/vehicle system performance in discrete maneuvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klein, R. H.; Mcruer, D. T.

    1975-01-01

    A series of discrete maneuver tasks were used to evaluate the effects of steering gain and directional mode dynamic parameters on driver/vehicle responses. The importance and ranking of these parameters were evaluated through changes in subjective driver ratings and performance measures obtained from transient maneuvers such as a double lane change, an emergency lane change, and an unexpected obstacle. The unexpected obstacle maneuver proved more sensitive to individual driver differences than to vehicle differences. Results were based on full scale tests with an experienced test driver evaluating many different dynamic configurations plus seventeen ordinary drivers evaluating six key configurations.

  3. Out-of-plane orbital maneuvers using swing-bys with the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neto, J. B. S.; Prado, A. F. B. A.; Formiga, J. K. S.

    2015-10-01

    This paper has the goal of showing some cases of plane change maneuvers using a swing-by with the Moon to decrease the magnitude of the impulses used, when compared to a classical Hohmann maneuver. The analytical model is based on the "patched-conics" approach, where a series of "two-body" problems is considered to build the whole maneuver. A study of the effects of the semi-major axes of the transfer orbits were made, to complete some previous studies made in the literature. The results show that, for some final inclinations, the use of the swing-by in the Moon is really advantageous.

  4. Computation of Hypersonic Flow about Maneuvering Vehicles with Changing Shapes

    SciTech Connect

    Ferencz, R M; Felker, F F; Castillo, V M

    2004-02-23

    Vehicles moving at hypersonic speeds have great importance to the National Security. Ballistic missile re-entry vehicles (RV's) travel at hypersonic speeds, as do missile defense intercept vehicles. Despite the importance of the problem, no computational analysis method is available to predict the aerodynamic environment of maneuvering hypersonic vehicles, and no analysis is available to predict the transient effects of their shape changes. The present state-of-the-art for hypersonic flow calculations typically still considers steady flow about fixed shapes. Additionally, with present computational methods, it is not possible to compute the entire transient structural and thermal loads for a re-entry vehicle. The objective of this research is to provide the required theoretical development and a computational analysis tool for calculating the hypersonic flow about maneuvering, deforming RV's. This key enabling technology will allow the development of a complete multi-mechanics simulation of the entire RV flight sequence, including important transient effects such as complex flight dynamics. This will allow the computation of the as-delivered state of the payload in both normal and unusual operational environments. This new analysis capability could also provide the ability to predict the nonlinear, transient behavior of endo-atmospheric missile interceptor vehicles to the input of advanced control systems. Due to the computational intensity of fluid dynamics for hypersonics, the usual approach for calculating the flow about a vehicle that is changing shape is to complete a series of steady calculations, each with a fixed shape. However, this quasi-steady approach is not adequate to resolve the frequencies characteristic of a vehicle's structural dynamics. Our approach is to include the effects of the unsteady body shape changes in the finite-volume method by allowing for arbitrary translation and deformation of the control volumes. Furthermore, because the Eulerian

  5. Precursor systems analyses of automated highway systems. Activity area K AHS roadway operational analysis. Final report, September 1993-November 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Schulze, R.; Roper, D.; Tsao, J.; Michael, B.

    1995-05-01

    This study considers the roadway operational requirements of an automated highway system (AHS) in light of corresponding operational requirements for existing conventional highways with traffic operations centers (TOCs). Contrasts and similarities between TOC and AHS operations are identified. Maintenance operations and activities are the focus of the study. Similarities and contrasts between AHS and conventional highways are considered, analyzed, and discussed to raise issues risks. Urban/rural, passenger/heavy vehicle, and representative system configuration differences are covered insofar as there are significant differences among these categories of possible AHS operations. Maintenance needs and incident response requirements as they would impact as AHS operating agency are qualitatively analyzed. Two possible staged deployment scenarios for AHS are presented. The fault tolerance of the AHS is assessed. Results of interviews with personnel in charge of several existing TOCs have been summarized. The role of the driver in an AHS is discussed.

  6. Teleoperator Maneuvering System (TMS) benefits assessment study. Volume 1: Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Teleoperator Maneuvering System (TMS) versus integral spacecraft propulsion, spacecraft maintenance, cost benefits, launch prices, integral propulsion length penalties, remote maintenance versus EVA, potential weight reduction benefits, basing mode, mission models and payload requirements, and program profitability are discussed.

  7. Aerodynamic Characteristics of an Aerospace Vehicle During a Subsonic Pitch-Over Maneuver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleb, William L.

    1996-01-01

    Time-dependent CFD has been used to predict aerospace vehicle aerodynamics during a subsonic rotation maneuver. The inviscid 3D3U code is employed to solve the 3-D unsteady flow field using an unstructured grid of tetrahedra. As this application represents a challenge to time-dependent CFD, observations concerning spatial and temporal resolution are included. It is shown that even for a benign rotation rate, unsteady aerodynamic effects are significant during the maneuver. Possibly more significant, however, the rotation maneuver creates ow asymmetries leading to yawing moment, rolling moment, and side force which are not present in the quasi-steady case. A series of steady solutions at discrete points in the maneuver are also computed for comparison with wind tunnel measurements and as a means of quantifying unsteady effects.

  8. Global Optimization of N-Maneuver, High-Thrust Trajectories Using Direct Multiple Shooting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vavrina, Matthew A.; Englander, Jacob A.; Ellison, Donald H.

    2016-01-01

    The performance of impulsive, gravity-assist trajectories often improves with the inclusion of one or more maneuvers between flybys. However, grid-based scans over the entire design space can become computationally intractable for even one deep-space maneuver, and few global search routines are capable of an arbitrary number of maneuvers. To address this difficulty a trajectory transcription allowing for any number of maneuvers is developed within a multi-objective, global optimization framework for constrained, multiple gravity-assist trajectories. The formulation exploits a robust shooting scheme and analytic derivatives for computational efficiency. The approach is applied to several complex, interplanetary problems, achieving notable performance without a user-supplied initial guess.

  9. Comparison of various schema of filter adaptivity for the tracking of maneuvering targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jouan, Alexandre; Bosse, Eloi; Simard, Marc-Alain; Shahbazian, Elisa

    1998-09-01

    Tracking maneuvering targets is a complex problem which has generated a great deal of effort over the past several years. It has now been well established that in terms of tracking accuracy, the Interacting Multiple Model (IMM) algorithm, where state estimates are mixed, performs significantly better for maneuvering targets than other types of filters. However, the complexity of the IMM algorithm can prohibit its use in these applications of which similar algorithms cannot provide the necessary accuracy and which can ont afford the computational load of IMM algorithm. This paper presents the evaluation of the tracking accuracy of a multiple model track filter using three different constant-velocity models running in parallel and a maneuver detector. The output estimate is defined by selecting the model whose likelihood function is lower than a target maneuver threshold.

  10. A Computer Simulation of the System-Wide Effects of Parallel-Offset Route Maneuvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lauderdale, Todd A.; Santiago, Confesor; Pankok, Carl

    2010-01-01

    Most aircraft managed by air-traffic controllers in the National Airspace System are capable of flying parallel-offset routes. This paper presents the results of two related studies on the effects of increased use of offset routes as a conflict resolution maneuver. The first study analyzes offset routes in the context of all standard resolution types which air-traffic controllers currently use. This study shows that by utilizing parallel-offset route maneuvers, significant system-wide savings in delay due to conflict resolution of up to 30% are possible. It also shows that most offset resolutions replace horizontal-vectoring resolutions. The second study builds on the results of the first and directly compares offset resolutions and standard horizontal-vectoring maneuvers to determine that in-trail conflicts are often more efficiently resolved by offset maneuvers.

  11. Efficacy of Epley's Maneuver in Treating BPPV Patients: A Prospective Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Gaur, Sushil; Awasthi, Sanjeev Kumar; Bhadouriya, Sunil Kumar Singh; Saxena, Rohit; Pathak, Vivek Kumar; Bisht, Mamta

    2015-01-01

    Vertigo and balance disorders are among the most common symptoms encountered in patients who visit ENT outpatient department. This is associated with risk of falling and is compounded in elderly persons with other neurologic deficits and chronic medical problems. BPPV is the most common cause of peripheral vertigo. BPPV is a common vestibular disorder leading to significant morbidity, psychosocial impact, and medical costs. The objective of Epley's maneuver, which is noninvasive, inexpensive, and easily administered, is to move the canaliths out of the canal to the utricle where they no longer affect the canal dynamics. Our study aims to analyze the response to Epley's maneuver in a series of patients with posterior canal BPPV and compares the results with those treated exclusively by medical management alone. Even though many studies have been conducted to prove the efficacy of this maneuver, this study reinforces the validity of Epley's maneuver by comparison with the medical management. PMID:26495002

  12. Method to maintain artificial gravity during transfer maneuvers for tethered spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Kaela M.; Landau, Damon F.; Longuski, James M.

    2016-03-01

    Artificial gravity has long been proposed to limit the harmful effects of the micro-gravity environment on human crews during mission to Mars. A tethered spacecraft spinning at 4 rpm (to avoid motion sickness) provides an attractive configuration. However, if the spacecraft is required to spin down for impulsive maneuvers and then spin up for interplanetary travel, the propellant cost may be unacceptably high. This paper proposes a maneuver that is performed while the spacecraft is spinning thus avoiding additional spin-down and spin-up maneuvers. A control law is provided to achieve the required ΔV while maintaining spin rate. A hypothetical human mission from Earth to Mars is analyzed using the new maneuver which, in this example, may save over 700 kg of propellant.

  13. Global Optimization of N-Maneuver, High-Thrust Trajectories Using Direct Multiple Shooting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vavrina, Matthew A.; Englander, Jacob A.; Ellison, Donald H.

    2015-01-01

    The performance of impulsive, gravity-assist trajectories often improves with the inclusion of one or more maneuvers between flybys. However, grid-based scans over the entire design space can become computationally intractable for even one deep-space maneuver, and few global search routines are capable of an arbitrary number of maneuvers. To address this difficulty a trajectory transcription allow-ing for any number of maneuvers is developed within a multi-objective, global optimization framework for constrained, multiple gravity-assist trajectories. The formulation exploits a robust shooting scheme and analytic derivatives for com-putational efficiency. The approach is applied to several complex, interplanetary problems, achieving notable performance without a user-supplied initial guess.

  14. Understanding the Role of Moment-of-Inertia Variation in Insect Flight Maneuvers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Tiras; Mittal, Rajat; Zheng, Lingxiao; Hedrick, Tyson

    2011-11-01

    The objective of this study is to gain insights into insect flight maneuvers and, in particular, the role that changes in body moment-of-inertia might play during these maneuvers. High-speed, high-resolution videogrammetry is used to quantify the trajectory and body conformation of Painted Lady butterflies during flight maneuvers; the 3D kinematics of the center-of-masses of the various body parts of the insect are determined experimentally. Measurements of the mass properties of the insect are then made and used to parameterize a simple flight dynamics model of the butterfly. Even though the mass of the flapping wings is small compared to the total mass of the insect, these experiments and subsequent analyses indicate that changes in moment-of-inertia during flight are large enough to have a noticeable impact on the maneuvers of these insects. Research is supported by NSF and AFOSR.

  15. 76 FR 8319 - Special Conditions: Gulfstream Model GVI Airplane; Design Roll Maneuver Requirement for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-14

    ... Roll Maneuver Requirement for Electronic Flight Controls AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA... airplanes. These design features include an electronic flight control system that provides roll control of the airplane through pilot inputs to the flight ] computers. These proposed special conditions...

  16. Efficacy of Epley's Maneuver in Treating BPPV Patients: A Prospective Observational Study.

    PubMed

    Gaur, Sushil; Awasthi, Sanjeev Kumar; Bhadouriya, Sunil Kumar Singh; Saxena, Rohit; Pathak, Vivek Kumar; Bisht, Mamta

    2015-01-01

    Vertigo and balance disorders are among the most common symptoms encountered in patients who visit ENT outpatient department. This is associated with risk of falling and is compounded in elderly persons with other neurologic deficits and chronic medical problems. BPPV is the most common cause of peripheral vertigo. BPPV is a common vestibular disorder leading to significant morbidity, psychosocial impact, and medical costs. The objective of Epley's maneuver, which is noninvasive, inexpensive, and easily administered, is to move the canaliths out of the canal to the utricle where they no longer affect the canal dynamics. Our study aims to analyze the response to Epley's maneuver in a series of patients with posterior canal BPPV and compares the results with those treated exclusively by medical management alone. Even though many studies have been conducted to prove the efficacy of this maneuver, this study reinforces the validity of Epley's maneuver by comparison with the medical management. PMID:26495002

  17. Independent Orbiter Assessment (IOA): Assessment of the manned maneuvering unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huynh, M.; Duffy, R. E.; Saiidi, M. J.

    1988-01-01

    The results of the Independent Orbiter Assessment (IOA) of the Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) and Critical Items List (CIL) are presented. The IOA effort first completed an analysis of the Manned Maneuvering Unit (MMU) hardware, generating draft failure modes and potential critical items. To preserve independence, this analysis was accomplished without reliance upon the results contain within the NASA FMEA/CIL documentation. The IOA results were then compared to the proposed Martin Marietta FMEA/CIL Post 51-L updates. A discussion of each discrepancy from the comparison is provided through additional analysis as required. These discrepancies were flagged as issues, and recommendations were made based on the FMEA data available at the time. The results of this comparison for the Orbiter MMU hardware are documented. The IOA product for the MMU analysis consisted of 204 failure mode worksheets that resulted in 95 potential critical items being identified. Comparison was made to the NASA baseline which consisted of 179 FMEAs and 110 CIL items. This comparison produced agreement on all 121 FMEAs which caused differences in 92 CIL items.

  18. Critical closing pressure explains cerebral hemodynamics during the Valsalva maneuver.

    PubMed

    Dawson, S L; Panerai, R B; Potter, J F

    1999-02-01

    The Valsalva maneuver (VM), a voluntary increase in intrathoracic pressure of approximately 40 mmHg, has been used to examine cerebral autoregulation (CA). During phase IV of the VM there are pronounced changes in mean arterial blood pressure (MABP), pulse interval, and cerebral blood flow (CBF), but the changes in CBF are of a much greater magnitude than those seen in MABP, a finding to date attributed to either a delay in activation of the CA mechanism or the inability of this mechanism to cope with the size and speed of the blood pressure changes involved. These changes in CBF also precede those in MABP, a pattern of events not explained by the physiological process of CA. Measurements of CBF velocity (transcranial Doppler) and MABP (Finapres) were performed in 53 healthy volunteers (aged 31-80 yr). By calculating beat-to-beat values of critical closing pressure (CCP) during the VM, we have found that this parameter suddenly drops at the start of phase IV, providing a coherent explanation for the large increase in CBF. If CCP is included in the estimation of cerebrovascular resistance, a temporal pattern more consistent with an autoregulatory response to the MABP overshoot is also found. CCP is intricately involved in the control of CBF during the VM and should be considered in the assessment of CA. PMID:9931207

  19. Open Platform for Limit Protection with Carefree Maneuver Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeram, Geoffrey J.

    2004-01-01

    This Open Platform for Limit Protection guides the open design of maneuver limit protection systems in general, and manned, rotorcraft, aerospace applications in particular. The platform uses three stages of limit protection modules: limit cue creation, limit cue arbitration, and control system interface. A common set of limit cue modules provides commands that can include constraints, alerts, transfer functions, and friction. An arbitration module selects the "best" limit protection cues and distributes them to the most appropriate control path interface. This platform adopts a holistic approach to limit protection whereby it considers all potential interface points, including the pilot's visual, aural, and tactile displays; and automatic command restraint shaping for autonomous limit protection. For each functional module, this thesis guides the control system designer through the design choices and information interfaces among the modules. Limit cue module design choices include type of prediction, prediction mechanism, method of critical control calculation, and type of limit cue. Special consideration is given to the nature of the limit, particularly the level of knowledge about it, and the ramifications for limit protection design, especially with respect to intelligent control methods such as fuzzy inference systems and neural networks.

  20. Space shuttle orbital maneuvering engine platelet injector program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    A platelet face injector for the Orbit Maneuvering Engine (OME) on the space shuttle was evaluated as a means of obtaining additional design margin and lower cost. The program was conducted in three phases. The first phase evaluated single injection elements, or unielements; it involved visual flow studies, mixing experiments using propellant simulants, and hot firings to assess combustion efficiency, chamber wall compatibility, and injector face temperatures. In the second phase, subscale units producing 600 lbf thrust were used to further evaluate the orifice patterns chosen on the basis of unielement testing. In addition to combustion efficiency, chamber and injector heat transfer, the subscale testing provided a preliminary indication of injector stability. Full scale testing of the selected patterns at 6,000 lbf thrust was performed in the third phase. Performance, heat transfer, and combustion stability were evaluated over the anticipated range of OMS operating conditions. The effects on combustion stability of acoustic cavity configuration, including cavity depth, open area, inlet contour, and other parameters, were investigated.

  1. Space shuttle orbit maneuvering engine reusable thrust chamber program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Senneff, J. M.

    1975-01-01

    Reusable thrust chamber and injector concepts were evaluated for the space shuttle orbit maneuvering engine (OME). Parametric engine calculations were carried out by computer program for N2O4/amine, LOX/amine and LOX/hydrocarbon propellant combinations for engines incorporating regenerative cooled and insulated columbium thrust chambers. The calculation methods are described including the fuel vortex film cooling method of combustion gas temperature control, and performance prediction. A method of acceptance of a regeneratively cooled heat rejection reduction using a silicone oil additive was also demonstrated by heated tube heat transfer testing. Regeneratively cooled thrust chamber operation was also demonstrated where the injector was characterized for the OME application with a channel wall regenerative thrust chamber. Bomb stability testing of the demonstration chambers/injectors demonstrated recovery for the nominal design of acoustic cavities. Cavity geometry changes were also evaluated to assess their damping margin. Performance and combustion stability was demonstrated of the originally developed 10 inch diameter combustion pattern operating in an 8 inch diameter thrust chamber.

  2. MEMS Reaction Control and Maneuvering for Picosat Beyond LEO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexeenko, Alina

    2016-01-01

    The MEMS Reaction Control and Maneuvering for Picosat Beyond LEO project will further develop a multi-functional small satellite technology for low-power attitude control, or orientation, of picosatellites beyond low Earth orbit (LEO). The Film-Evaporation MEMS Tunable Array (FEMTA) concept initially developed in 2013, is a thermal valving system which utilizes capillary forces in a microchannel to offset internal pressures in a bulk fluid. The local vapor pressure is increased by resistive film heating until it exceeds meniscus strength in a nozzle which induces vacuum boiling and provides a stagnation pressure equal to vapor pressure at that point which is used for propulsion. Interplanetary CubeSats can utilize FEMTA for high slew rate attitude corrections in addition to desaturating reaction wheels. The FEMTA in cooling mode can be used for thermal control during high-power communication events, which are likely to accompany the attitude correction. Current small satellite propulsion options are limited to orbit correction whereas picosatellites are lacking attitude control thrusters. The available attitude control systems are either quickly saturated reaction wheels or movable high drag surfaces with long response times.

  3. Spacecraft Attitude Tracking and Maneuver Using Combined Magnetic Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, Zhiqiang

    2010-01-01

    The accuracy of spacecraft attitude control using magnetic actuators only is low and on the order of 0.4-5 degrees. The key reason is that the magnetic torque is two-dimensional and it is only in the plane perpendicular to the magnetic field vector. In this paper novel attitude control algorithms using the combination of magnetic actuators with Reaction Wheel Assembles (RWAs) or other types of actuators, such as thrusters, are presented. The combination of magnetic actuators with one or two RWAs aligned with different body axis expands the two-dimensional control torque to three-dimensional. The algorithms can guarantee the spacecraft attitude and rates to track the commanded attitude precisely. A design example is presented for Nadir pointing, pitch and yaw maneuvers. The results show that precise attitude tracking can be reached and the attitude control accuracy is comparable with RWAs based attitude control. The algorithms are also useful for the RWAs based attitude control. When there are only one or two workable RWAs due to RWA failures, the attitude control system can switch to the control algorithms for the combined magnetic actuators with the RWAs without going to the safe mode and the control accuracy can be maintained.

  4. Support and maneuvering apparatus for solar energy receivers

    DOEpatents

    Murphy, L.M.

    1988-07-28

    A support and maneuvering apparatus is disclosed for a solar energy receiving device adapted for receiving and concentrating solar energy and having a central axis extending through the center thereof. The apparatus includes a frame for mounting the perimeter of said solar energy receiving device. A support member extends along the central axis of the receiving device and has a base end passing through the center of the receiving device and an outer distal end adapted for carrying a solar energy receiving and conversion mechanism. A variable tension mechanism interconnects the support member with the frame to provide stiffening for the support member and the frame and to assist in the alignment of the frame to optimize the optical efficiency of the solar energy receiving device. A rotatable base is provided, and connecting members extend from the base for pivotable attachment to the frame at spaced positions therealong. Finally, an elevation assembly is connected to the receiving device for selectively pivoting the receiving about an axis defined between the attachment positions of the connecting members on the frame. 4 figs.

  5. Support and maneuvering apparatus for solar energy receivers

    DOEpatents

    Murphy, Lawrence M.

    1989-01-01

    A support and maneuvering apparatus is disclosed for a solar energy receiving device adpated for receiving and concentrating solar energy and having a central axis extending through the center thereof. The apparatus includes a frame for mounting the perimeter of said solar energy receiving device. A support member extends along the central axis of the receiving device and has a base end passing through the center of the receiving device and an outer distal end adapted for carrying a solar energy receiving and conversion mechanism. A variable tension mechanism interconnects the support member with the frame to provide stiffening for the support member and the frame and to assist in the alignment of the frame to optimize the optical efficiency of the solar energy receiving device. A rotatable base is provided, and connecting members extend from the base for pivotable attachment to the frame at spaced positions therealong. Finally, an elevation assembly is connected to the receiving device for selectively pivoting the receiving device about an axis defined between the attachment positions of the connecting members on the frame.

  6. Electromagnetic investigation at the Combat Maneuver Training Center, Hohenfels, Germany

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, M.D.; Benson, M.A.; McGinnis, L.D.; Glennon, M.A.

    1997-10-01

    Electromagnetic surveys were conducted at the Combat Maneuver Training Center (CMTC), Hohenfels, Germany to detect zones where solution cavities develop within lowland areas of the karst valley systems. Geologic models indicate that solution activity occurs at the loess-bedrock interface, and is concentrated along loess-filled fracture trends within the underlying carbonate bedrock. Soil arches that develop along these fracture trends have the potential to fail catastrophically, posing a considerable degree of danger to current training activities. Rapid, continuously recording electromagnetic instruments provide an economical solution for locating zones of high conductivity associated with loess-filled fractures. The electromagnetic surveys delineated high-conductivity trends interpreted to be fracture-controlled. In many instances dolines were observed either along or immediately adjacent to these conductivity lineaments. Analysis of anomaly maps indicate that high-conductivity lineaments are aligned subparallel to fracture and joint orientations measured in nearby outcrops. These associations are the basis for predicting locations where solution cavity collapse and doline development will occur in the future. Information derived from the EM data can be extended directly to hydrologic modeling and to safety programs for military training at the CMTC.

  7. OARE flight maneuvers and calibration measurements on STS-58

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanchard, Robert C.; Nicholson, John Y.; Ritter, James R.; Larman, Kevin T.

    1994-01-01

    The Orbital Acceleration Research Experiment (OARE), which has flown on STS-40, STS-50, and STS-58, contains a three axis accelerometer with a single, nonpendulous, electrostatically suspended proofmass which can resolve accelerations to the nano-g level. The experiment also contains a full calibration station to permit in situ bias and scale factor calibration. This on-orbit calibration capability eliminates the large uncertainty of ground-based calibrations encountered with accelerometers flown in the past on the orbiter, thus providing absolute acceleration measurement accuracy heretofore unachievable. This is the first time accelerometer scale factor measurements have been performed on orbit. A detailed analysis of the calibration process is given along with results of the calibration factors from the on-orbit OARE flight measurements on STS-58. In addition, the analysis of OARE flight maneuver data used to validate the scale factor measurements in the sensor's most sensitive range is also presented. Estimates on calibration uncertainties are discussed. This provides bounds on the STS-58 absolute acceleration measurements for future applications.

  8. Physical Examination of the Wrist: Useful Provocative Maneuvers.

    PubMed

    Kleinman, William B

    2015-07-01

    Chronic wrist pain resulting from partial interosseous ligament injury remains a diagnostic dilemma for many hand and orthopedic surgeons. Overuse of costly diagnostic studies including magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography scans, and bone scans can be further frustrating to the clinician because of their inconsistent specificity and reliability in these cases. Physical diagnosis is an effective (and underused) means of establishing a working diagnosis of partial ligament injury to the wrist. Carefully performed provocative maneuvers can be used by the clinician to reproduce the precise character of a patient's problem, reliably establish a working diagnosis, and initiate a plan of treatment. Using precise physical examination techniques, the examiner introduces energy into the wrist in a manner that puts load on specific support ligaments of the carpus, leading to an accurate diagnosis. This article provides a broad spectrum of physical diagnostic tools to help the surgeon develop a working diagnosis of partial wrist ligament injuries in the face of chronic wrist pain and normal x-rays.

  9. Analysis of single point moored tanker using maneuvering hydrodynamic model

    SciTech Connect

    Nishimoto, K.; Brinati, H.L.; Fucatu, C.H.

    1995-12-31

    The Single Point Mooring Systems (SPM) are widely used as a tanker terminal in Brazilian south coast by Petrobras, Brazilian oil company. Although different authors (Wichers, 1987, Obokata, 1987, and Jiang et al., 1988) had analyzed the dynamic stability of SPM system, the down time of these systems due to large oscillatory ship motion in the horizontal plane is significant until now. The main source of the instability of these systems is considered to be the use of inadequate hawser length and bad weather. This paper deals with the dynamic behavior of SPM moored vessels considering the influence of the environmental forces as well as shallow water effects. In a first step, a nonlinear mathematical model developed for the simulation of low speed ship maneuvers (Takashina, 1986) is extended to study the behavior of a tanker moored to a single buoy in comparison with the Obokata`s SPM model, 1987. A large number of tanker motion simulations were carried out both for deep and shallow water and different environmental conditions. The influence of the system parameters shown by the study is, in general, in a good agreement with those obtained by the traditional SPM system analysis.

  10. Tactical approach to maneuvering within the chemical contamination labyrinth

    SciTech Connect

    Joseph, T.W.

    1990-12-31

    The Department of Energy (DOE) recognized the need and accepts the responsibility for understanding the reality and mitigating the consequence of the complex chemical contamination legacy it inherited as well as controlling, reducing, and eliminating extant emissions and effluents. The key to maneuvering through this complicated and multifaceted labyrinth of concerns, from which a meaningful, high quality, and cost-effective restoration/mitigation machine is then set in motions, is the ability to perform accurate, factual, and explicit health and environmental/ecological risk assessments. Likewise, the common denominator for carrying out this essential task is to have access to comprehensive and reliable data of known quality with which to perform those analyses. DOE is committed to identifying the data universe; to technically scrutinize and ensure the quality of that data; to develop efficient and cost-effective means to maximize the handling, utilization, and sharing of that universe; and to undertake those assessments. DOE views this as an effort that can only be accomplished through a merging of the technical excellence that exists within federal and state agencies, academia, and industry. The task at hand is so large that only by integrating that intelligence base can we hope to accomplish the goals of establishing meaningful standards, developing functional and effective solutions, and providing quality guidance at a national scale.

  11. Adapting Covariance Propagation to Account for the Presence of Modeled and Unmodeled Maneuvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schiff, Conrad

    2006-01-01

    This paper explores techniques that can be used to adapt the standard linearized propagation of an orbital covariance matrix to the case where there is a maneuver and an associated execution uncertainty. A Monte Carlo technique is used to construct a final orbital covariance matrix for a 'prop-burn-prop' process that takes into account initial state uncertainty and execution uncertainties in the maneuver magnitude. This final orbital covariance matrix is regarded as 'truth' and comparisons are made with three methods using modified linearized covariance propagation. The first method accounts for the maneuver by modeling its nominal effect within the state transition matrix but excludes the execution uncertainty by omitting a process noise matrix from the computation. The second method does not model the maneuver but includes a process noise matrix to account for the uncertainty in its magnitude. The third method, which is essentially a hybrid of the first two, includes the nominal portion of the maneuver via the state transition matrix and uses a process noise matrix to account for the magnitude uncertainty. The first method is unable to produce the final orbit covariance except in the case of zero maneuver uncertainty. The second method yields good accuracy for the final covariance matrix but fails to model the final orbital state accurately. Agreement between the simulated covariance data produced by this method and the Monte Carlo truth data fell within 0.5-2.5 percent over a range of maneuver sizes that span two orders of magnitude (0.1-20 m/s). The third method, which yields a combination of good accuracy in the computation of the final covariance matrix and correct accounting for the presence of the maneuver in the nominal orbit, is the best method for applications involving the computation of times of closest approach and the corresponding probability of collision, PC. However, applications for the two other methods exist and are briefly discussed. Although

  12. The Maneuver Planning Process for the Microwave Anisotropy Probe (MAP) Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mesarch, Michael A.; Andrews, Stephen; Bauer, Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Microwave Anisotropy Probe (MAP) was successfully launched from Kennedy Space Center's Eastern Range on June 30, 2001. MAP will measure the cosmic microwave background as a follow up to NASA's Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) mission from the early 1990's. MAP will take advantage of its mission orbit about the Sun-Earth/Moon L2 Lagrangian point to produce results with higher resolution, sensitivity, and accuracy than COBE. A strategy comprising highly eccentric phasing loops with a lunar gravity assist was utilized to provide a zero-cost insertion into a lissajous orbit about L2. Maneuvers were executed at the phasing loop perigees to correct for launch vehicle errors and to target the lunar gravity assist so that a suitable orbit at L2 was achieved. This paper will discuss the maneuver planning process for designing, verifying, and executing MAP's maneuvers. A discussion of the tools and how they interacted will also be included. The maneuver planning process was iterative and crossed several disciplines, including trajectory design, attitude control, propulsion, power, thermal, communications, and ground planning. Several commercial, off-the-shelf (COTS) packages were used to design the maneuvers. STK/Astrogator was used as the trajectory design tool. All maneuvers were designed in Astrogator to ensure that the Moon was met at the correct time and orientation to provide the energy needed to achieve an orbit about L2. The Mathworks Matlab product was used to develop a tool for generating command quaternions. The command quaternion table (CQT) was used to drive the attitude during the perigee maneuvers. The MatrixX toolset, originally written by Integrated Systems, Inc., now distributed by Mathworks, was used to create HiFi, a high fidelity simulator of the MAP attitude control system. HiFi was used to test the CQT and to make sure that all attitude requirements were met during the maneuver. In addition, all ACS data plotting and output were generated in

  13. Application of a helicopter mathematical model to the Langley differential maneuvering simulator for use in a helicopter/fighter evasive maneuver study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houck, J. A.; Ashworth, B. R.; Baker, D. R.

    1976-01-01

    A real time simulation study was conducted using a differential maneuvering simulator to determine and evaluate helicopter evasive maneuvers when attacked by fighter aircraft. A general helicopter mathematical model was modified to represent an H-53 helicopter. The helicopter model was compared to H-53 flight test data to determine any differences between the simulated and actual vehicles. The simulated helicopter was also subjectively validated by participating pilots. Two fighter mathematical models validated in previous studies were utilized for the attacking aircraft. The results of this simulation study have been verified in a flight test program conducted by the U. S. Air Force and were found to closely match the flight results.

  14. Orbital transfer vehicle concept definition and system analysis study. Volume 2: OTV concept definition and evaluation. Book 1: Mission and system requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kofal, Allen E.

    1987-01-01

    The mission and system requirements for the concept definition and system analysis of the Orbital Transfer Vehicle (OTV) are established. The requirements set forth constitute the single authority for the selection, evaluation, and optimization of the technical performance and design of the OTV. This requirements document forms the basis for the Ground and Space Based OTV concept definition analyses and establishes the physical, functional, performance and design relationships to STS, Space Station, Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle (OMV), and payloads.

  15. [Therapeutic maneuvers in the treatment of paroxysmal positional vertigo: can they indicate a central genesis?].

    PubMed

    Casani, A P; Dallan, I; Berrettini, S; Raffi, G; Segnini, G

    2002-04-01

    Typical Paroxysmal Positional Nystagmus (PPNy) is a highly specific clinical finding that indicates the existence of a specific peripheral lesion: Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo (PPV). However, besides this typical nystagmus of high topodiagnostic significance, atypical PPNy's are also frequently found. Such atypical findings can lead one to suspect a central vestibular system pathology and often require additional diagnostic testing. Of 1805 patients with complaints of vertigo, 305 proved affected by PPV. The present study evaluated how patients affected by the posterior semicircular canal PPV (278/305, 91.2%) responded to canalith repositioning maneuvers. In 246 patients (88.5%) the Semont maneuver was performed as simplified by Toupet, while the remaining 32 subjects (11.5%) were treated with the Epley maneuver as modified by Herdman. The Semont maneuver provides the relief of symptoms in 96% of patients while the Epley maneuver resolved 78% of cases. The patients that did not respond to the maneuvers, even after several attempts, were subsequently treated using "habituation"-based rehabilitation techniques (the Brandt-Daroff technique and Vestibular Habituation Training). The presence of atypical PPNy was found in 57 subjects. Of these, the liberatory maneuver always resolved the PPV. In the present study, the choice to perform a neuroradiological study was based on the lack of response to physical therapy, whether performed with liberatory maneuvers or with habituation techniques. In 2 of the 3 cases of PPV which remained unchanged despite treatment, imaging revealed a severe expansive CNS pathology. In these patients the dizziness complaints disappeared after neurosurgery: this fact appears to confirm the central origin of these PPNy cases. These data clearly indicate that the results of PPV treatment must be carefully evaluated. In cases of PPV of the PSC, when either typical or atypical PPNy persists one month after diagnosis, with no appreciable period of

  16. Alveolar recruitment maneuver and perioperative ventilatory support in obese patients undergoing abdominal surgery

    PubMed Central

    Forgiarini Júnior, Luiz Alberto; Rezende, Juliana Castilhos; Forgiarini, Soraia Genebra Ibrahim

    2013-01-01

    The development of abdominal surgery represents an alternative therapy for the morbidly obese; however, patients undergoing this surgical procedure often experience postoperative pulmonary complications. The use of alveolar recruitment maneuvers and/or perioperative ventilatory strategies is a possible alternative to reduce these complications, focusing on the reduction of postoperative pulmonary complications. In this review, the benefits of perioperative ventilatory strategies and the implementation of alveolar recruitment maneuvers in obese patients undergoing abdominal surgery are described. PMID:24553513

  17. A Monte Carlo model for determining copperhead probability of acquisition and maneuver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starks, M.

    1980-08-01

    This report documents AMSAA's Probability of Acquisition and Maneuver (PAM) model. The model is used to develop performance estimates for COPPERHEAD and related weapon systems. A mathematical method for modeling the acquisition and maneuver portions of a COPPERHEAD trajectory is presented. In addition, the report contains a FORTRAN implementation of the model, a description of the required inputs, and a sample case with input and output.

  18. The prospect of responsive spacecraft using aeroassisted, trans-atmospheric maneuvers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bettinger, Robert A.

    Comprised of exo- and trans-atmospheric trajectory segments, atmospheric re-entry represents a complex dynamical event which traditionally signals the mission end-of-life for low-Earth orbit (LEO) spacecraft, both manned and unmanned. Transcending this paradigm, atmospheric re-entry can be employed as a means of operational maneuver whereby the aerodynamic forces of the upper atmosphere can be exploited to create an aeroassisted maneuver. Utilizing a notional trans-atmospheric, lifting re-entry vehicle with L/D=6, the first phase of research demonstrates the terrestrial reachability potential for skip entry aeroassisted maneuvers. By overflying a geographically diverse set of sample ground targets, comparative analysis indicates a significant savings in DeltaV expenditure for skip entry compared with planar phasing and simple plane change exo-atmospheric maneuvers. In the second phase, the Design of Experiments method of orthogonal arrays provides optimal vehicle and skip entry trajectory designs by employing main effects and Pareto front analysis. Depending on the chosen re-circularization altitude, the coupled optimal design can achieve an inclination change of 19.91 deg with 50-85% less DeltaV than a simple plane change. Finally, the third phase introduces the descent-boost aeroassisted maneuver as an alternative to combined Hohmann and bi-elliptic transfers in order to perform LEO injection. Compared with bi-elliptic transfers, simulations demonstrate that a lifting re-entry vehicle with L/D=6 performing a descent-boost maneuver requires 6-12% less DeltaV for injection into orbits lower than 650 km. In addition, the third phase also introduces the "Maneuver Performance Number" as a dimensionless means of comparative effectiveness analysis for both exo- and trans-atmospheric maneuvers.

  19. Effect of width and boundary conditions on meeting maneuvers on two-way separated cycle tracks.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Alfredo; Gomez, Fernando Agustin; Llorca, Carlos; Angel-Domenech, Antonio

    2015-05-01

    Cycle track design guidelines are rarely based on scientific studies. In the case of off-road two-way cycle tracks, a minimum width must facilitate both passing and meeting maneuvers, being meeting maneuvers the most frequent. This study developed a methodology to observe meeting maneuvers using an instrumented bicycle, equipped with video cameras, a GPS tracker, laser rangefinders and speed sensors. This bicycle collected data on six two-way cycle tracks ranging 1.3-2.15m width delimitated by different boundary conditions. The meeting maneuvers between the instrumented bicycle and every oncoming bicycle were characterized by the meeting clearance between the two bicycles, the speed of opposing bicycle and the reaction of the opposing rider: change in trajectory, stop pedaling or braking. The results showed that meeting clearance increased with the cycle track width and decreased if the cycle track had lateral obstacles, especially if they were higher than the bicycle handlebar. The speed of opposing bicycle shown the same tendency, although were more disperse. Opposing cyclists performed more reaction maneuvers on narrower cycle tracks and on cycle tracks with lateral obstacles to the handlebar height. Conclusions suggested avoiding cycle tracks narrower than 1.6m, as they present lower meeting clearances, lower bicycle speeds and frequent reaction maneuvers. PMID:25779982

  20. Induction of human UGT1A1 by bilirubin through AhR dependent pathway.

    PubMed

    Togawa, Hiroshi; Shinkai, Shigeko; Mizutani, Takaharu

    2008-12-01

    UDP-glucuronosyltransferase1A1 (UGT1A1) plays a key role to conjugate bilirubin and preventing jaundice, but there is no report showing the induction of human UGT1A1 (UGT1A1) by bilirubin. In this report, we show findings of the induction of the reporter gene (-3475/+14) of UGT1A1 in HepG2 cells by bilirubin at 50 microM, 100 microM, with human aryl hydrocarbon receptor (hAhR). We confirmed that induction of the reporter gene by bilirubin is dependent on the position of the xenobiotic responsive element (XRE) (-3328/-3319) of UGT1A1, because the XRE deletion UGT1A1 gene did not respond to stimulation by a complex of bilirubin and hAhR. alpha-Naphthoflavone (alpha-NF) of a typical AhR antagonist at 50 microM inhibited induction by bilirubin, suggesting that bilirubin stimulates through binding with hAhR. Meanwhile, bilirubin itself did not stimulate the induction of AhR, because we detected no-elevation of the mRNA level of AhR by RT-PCR. These results indicate that the induction of UGT1A1 by bilirubin-AhR did not depend on the elevation of AhR but on ligand binding. From this result, we considered that high bilirubin in neonates must induce the elevation of UGT1A1 after birth to prevent jaundice, and bilirubin in adults also regulates the level of UGT1A1. This is the first report showing direct induction of UGT1A1 by a bilirubin through AhR pathway. PMID:19356098

  1. The 50 Ah NiH2 CPV qualification tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garner, J. C.; Barnes, Wilbert L.; Hickman, Gary L.

    1995-01-01

    In 1992, the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) started a program to qualify a large diameter common pressure vessel (CPV) nickel-hydrogen (NiH2) batteries for use on future Navy/NRL spacecraft electrical power subsystems. NRL's involvement with the qualification of CPV NiH2 batteries dates back to 1988 when COMSAT and Johnson Controls, Inc. initiated a joint effort to fly the first ever NiH2 CPV in space. A later NRL-JCI cooperative research and development agreement led to the launch of a space experiment in 1993 and to the use of a single NiH2 CPV battery on the BMDO Clementine spacecraft in 1994. NRL initiated procurement of two, 50 Ah CPV NiH2 batteries in the Fall of 1992. The two batteries were delivered to NRL in June 1994. NiH2 CPV batteries have almost 2x the specific energy (Wh/kg) of nickel cadium batteries and 2x the energy density (Wh/l) of individual pressure vessel NiH2 CPV's. This presentation discusses the results of electrical and mechanical qualification tests conducted at NRL. The tests included electrical characterization, standard capacity, random vibration, peak load, and thermal vacuum. The last slides of the presentation show initial results from the life cycle tests of the second NiH2 CPV battery at 40% depth of discharge and a temperature of 10 C.

  2. The 50 Ah NiH2 CPV qualification tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garner, J. C.; Barnes, Wilbert L.; Hickman, Gary L.

    1995-02-01

    In 1992, the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) started a program to qualify a large diameter common pressure vessel (CPV) nickel-hydrogen (NiH2) batteries for use on future Navy/NRL spacecraft electrical power subsystems. NRL's involvement with the qualification of CPV NiH2 batteries dates back to 1988 when COMSAT and Johnson Controls, Inc. initiated a joint effort to fly the first ever NiH2 CPV in space. A later NRL-JCI cooperative research and development agreement led to the launch of a space experiment in 1993 and to the use of a single NiH2 CPV battery on the BMDO Clementine spacecraft in 1994. NRL initiated procurement of two, 50 Ah CPV NiH2 batteries in the Fall of 1992. The two batteries were delivered to NRL in June 1994. NiH2 CPV batteries have almost 2x the specific energy (Wh/kg) of nickel cadium batteries and 2x the energy density (Wh/l) of individual pressure vessel NiH2 CPV's. This presentation discusses the results of electrical and mechanical qualification tests conducted at NRL. The tests included electrical characterization, standard capacity, random vibration, peak load, and thermal vacuum. The last slides of the presentation show initial results from the life cycle tests of the second NiH2 CPV battery at 40% depth of discharge and a temperature of 10 C.

  3. Non-dioxin-like AhR ligands in a mouse peanut allergy model.

    PubMed

    Schulz, Veronica J; Smit, Joost J; Huijgen, Veerle; Bol-Schoenmakers, Marianne; van Roest, Manon; Kruijssen, Laura J W; Fiechter, Daniëlle; Hassing, Ine; Bleumink, Rob; Safe, Stephen; van Duursen, Majorie B M; van den Berg, Martin; Pieters, Raymond H H

    2012-07-01

    Recently, we have shown that AhR activation by 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) suppresses sensitization to peanut at least in part by inducing a functional shift toward CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) T cells. Next to TCDD, numerous other AhR ligands have been described. In this study, we investigated the effect of three structurally different non-dioxin-like AhR ligands, e.g., 6-formylindolo[3,2-b]carbazole (FICZ), β-naphthoflavone (β-NF), and 6-methyl-1,3,8-trichlorodibenzofuran (6-MCDF), on peanut sensitization. Female C57BL/6 mice were sensitized by administering peanut extract (PE) by gavage in the presence of cholera toxin. Before and during peanut sensitization, mice were treated with FICZ, β-NF, or 6-MCDF. AhR gene transcription in duodenum and liver was investigated on day 5, even as the effect of these AhR ligands on CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) T(reg) cells in spleen and mesenteric lymph nodes (MLNs). Mice treated with TCDD were included as a positive control. Furthermore, the murine reporter cell line H1G1.1c3 (CAFLUX) was used to investigate the possible role of metabolism of TCDD, FICZ, β-NF, and 6-MCDF on AhR activation in vitro. TCDD, but not FICZ, β-NF, and 6-MCDF, suppressed sensitization to peanut (measured by PE-specific IgE, IgG1, IgG2a and PE-induced interleukin (IL)-5, IL-10, IL-13, IL-17a, IL-22, and interferon-γ). In addition, FICZ, β-NF, and 6-MCDF treatments less effectively induced AhR gene transcription (measured by gene expression of AhR, AhRR, CYP1A1, CYP1A2, CYP1B1) compared with TCDD-treated mice. Furthermore, FICZ, β-NF and 6-MCDF did not increase the percentage of CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) T(reg) cells in spleen and mesenteric lymph nodes compared with PE-sensitized mice, in contrast to TCDD. Inhibition of metabolism in vitro increased AhR activation. Together, these data shows that TCDD, but not FICZ, β-NF, and 6-MCDF suppresses sensitization to peanut. Differences in metabolism, AhR binding and subsequent gene transcription might

  4. FIXING JEJUNAL MANEUVER TO PREVENT PETERSEN HERNIA IN GASTRIC BYPASS

    PubMed Central

    MURAD-JUNIOR, Abdon José; SCHEIBE, Christian Lamar; CAMPELO, Giuliano Peixoto; de LIMA, Roclides Castro; MURAD, Lucianne Maria Moraes Rêgo Pereira; dos SANTOS, Eduardo Pachu Raia; RAMOS, Almino Cardoso; VALADÃO, José Aparecido

    2015-01-01

    Background : Among Roux-en-Y gastric bypass complications is the occurrence of intestinal obstruction by the appearance of internal hernias, which may occur in Petersen space or the opening in mesenteric enteroenteroanastomosis. Aim : To evaluate the efficiency and safety in performing a fixing jejunal maneuver in the transverse mesocolon to prevent internal hernia formation in Petersen space. Method : Two surgical points between the jejunum and the transverse mesocolon, being 5 cm and 10 cm from duodenojejunal angle are made. In all patients was left Petersen space open and closing the opening of the mesenteric enteroenteroanastomosis. Results : Among 52 operated patients, 35 were women (67.3%). The age ranged 18-63 years, mean 39.2 years. BMI ranged from 35 to 56 kg/m2 (mean 40.5 kg/m2). Mean follow-up was 15.1 months (12-18 months). The operative time ranged from 68-138 min. There were no intraoperative complications, and there were no major postoperative complications and no reoperations. The hospital stay ranged from 2-3 days. During the follow-up, no one patient developed suspect clinical presentation of internal hernia. Follow-up in nine patients (17.3%) showed asymptomatic cholelithiasis and underwent elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy. During these procedures were verified the Petersen space and jejunal fixation. In all nine, there was no herniation of the jejunum to the right side in Petersen space. Conclusion : The fixation of the first part of the jejunum to left side of the transverse mesocolon is safe and effective to prevent internal Petersen hernia in RYGB postoperatively in the short and medium term. It may be interesting alternative to closing the Petersen space. PMID:26537279

  5. The cerebrovascular response to graded Valsalva maneuvers while standing

    PubMed Central

    Perry, Blake G.; Mündel, Toby; Cochrane, Darryl J.; Cotter, James D.; Lucas, Samuel J. E.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The Valsalva maneuver (VM) produces large and abrupt increases in mean arterial pressure (MAP) at the onset of strain (Phase I), however, hypotension, sufficient to induce syncope, occurs upon VM release (phase III). We examined the effect of VM intensity and duration on middle cerebral artery blood velocity (MCAv) responses. Healthy men (n =10; mean ± SD: 26 ± 4 years) completed 30%, 60%, and 90% of their maximal VM mouth pressure, for 5 and 10 sec (order randomized) while standing. Beat‐to‐beat MCAv and MAP during phase I (peak), at nadir (phase III), and recovery are reported as the change from standing baseline. During phase I, MCAv rose 15 ± 6 cm·s−1 (P <0.001), which was not reliably different between intensities (P =0.11), despite graded increases in MAP (P <0.001; e.g., +12 ± 9 mmHg vs. +35 ± 14 for 5 sec 30% and 90% VM, respectively). During Phase III, the MCAv response was duration‐ (P = 0.045) and intensity dependent (P < 0.001), with the largest decrease observed following the 90% VM (e.g., −19 ± 13 and −15 ± 11 cm·s−1 for 5 and 10 sec VM, respectively) with a concomitant decrease in MAP (P <0.001, −23 ± 11 and −23 ± 9 mmHg). This asymmetric response may be attributable to the differential modulators of MCAv throughout the VM. The mechanical effects of the elevated intrathoracic pressure during phase I may restrain increases in cerebral perfusion via related increases in intracranial pressure; however, during phase III the decrease in MCAv arises from an abrupt hypotension, the extent of which is dependent upon both the duration and intensity of the VM. PMID:24744902

  6. Manned maneuvering unit applications for automated rendezvous and capture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brehm, Donald L.; Cuseo, John A.; Lenda, Joseph A.; Ray, Lex; Whitsett, C. Edward

    1991-01-01

    Automated Rendezvous and Capture (AR&C) is an important technology to multiple National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) programs and centers. The recent Johnson Spacecraft Center (JSC) AR&C Quality Function Deployment (QFD) has listed on-orbit demonstration of related technologies as a near term priority. Martin Marietta has been evaluating use of the Manned Maneuvering Unit (MMU) for a low cost near term on-orbit demonstration of AR&C technologies such as control algorithms, sensors, and processors as well as system level performance. The MMU Program began in 1979 as the method of repairing the Space Shuttle (STS) Thermal Protection System (the tiles). The units were not needed for this task, but were successfully employed during three Shuttle flights in 1984: a test flight was flown in in February as proof of concept, in April the MMU participated in the Solar Max Repair Mission, and in November the MMU's returned to space to successfully rescue the two errant satellites, Westar and Palapa. In the intervening years, the MMU simulator and MMU Qualification Test Unit (QTU) have been used for Astronaut training and experimental evaluations. The Extra-Vehicular Activities (EVA) Retriever has used the QTU, in an unmanned form, as a free-flyer on the Johnson Space Center (JSC) Precision Air Bearing Floor (PABF). Currently, the MMU is undergoing recertification for flight. The two flight units were removed from storage in September, 1991 and evaluation tests were performed. The tests demonstrated that the units are in good shape with no discrepancies that would preclude further use. The Return to Flight effort is currently clearing up recertification issues and evaluating the design against the present Shuttle environments.

  7. Manned maneuvering unit applications for automated rendezvous and capture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brehm, Donald L.; Cuseo, John A.; Lenda, Joseph A.; Ray, Lex; Whitsett, C. Edward

    Automated Rendezvous and Capture (AR&C) is an important technology to multiple National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) programs and centers. The recent Johnson Spacecraft Center (JSC) AR&C Quality Function Deployment (QFD) has listed on-orbit demonstration of related technologies as a near term priority. Martin Marietta has been evaluating use of the Manned Maneuvering Unit (MMU) for a low cost near term on-orbit demonstration of AR&C technologies such as control algorithms, sensors, and processors as well as system level performance. The MMU Program began in 1979 as the method of repairing the Space Shuttle (STS) Thermal Protection System (the tiles). The units were not needed for this task, but were successfully employed during three Shuttle flights in 1984: a test flight was flown in in February as proof of concept, in April the MMU participated in the Solar Max Repair Mission, and in November the MMU's returned to space to successfully rescue the two errant satellites, Westar and Palapa. In the intervening years, the MMU simulator and MMU Qualification Test Unit (QTU) have been used for Astronaut training and experimental evaluations. The Extra-Vehicular Activities (EVA) Retriever has used the QTU, in an unmanned form, as a free-flyer on the Johnson Space Center (JSC) Precision Air Bearing Floor (PABF). Currently, the MMU is undergoing recertification for flight. The two flight units were removed from storage in September, 1991 and evaluation tests were performed. The tests demonstrated that the units are in good shape with no discrepancies that would preclude further use. The Return to Flight effort is currently clearing up recertification issues and evaluating the design against the present Shuttle environments.

  8. Communicating by Doppler: Detecting Spacecraft Dynamics During Critical Maneuvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asmar, Sami W.

    2012-01-01

    Communicating information from spacecraft in deep space utilizes sophisticated techniques of modulations onto a microwave signal carrier. Under most conditions, there is a high success rate of sending commands to the spacecraft and receiving science data acquired by on-board instruments along with health and status information. There are conditions, however, where the signal dynamics are too high and/or the received signal-to-noise ratio is below the receiver threshold. Under these conditions, often by design and sometimes as a result of planned or unplanned critical maneuvers, events (e.g., orbit insertion or descent and landing), safe mode, etc., it becomes highly critical but exceedingly challenging to receive information about the health and dynamical behavior of the spacecraft. The Deep Space Network, being a world-class instrument for Radio Science research, developed openloop receivers, called the Radio Science Receiver, designed to capture the raw incoming electromagnetic signals and associated noise for Radio Science experiments; post data capture digital signal processing extracts the signal carrier for scientific analysis. This receiver provides a high level of configuration flexibility and can be optimized for the various types of experiments. In addition to its scientific utility, it proved to be useful, and in some cases critical, for the support of missions during specific scenarios were the link budget is below the threshold of the tracking receiver to maintain lock or the frequency dynamics are faster than the limits of the tracking receiver. In these cases, the signal carrier is often detected only in the open-loop receiver to provide information on the specific behavior of the spacecraft from the carrier dynamics. This paper describes the utility of the system to support mission-critical events for the three cases of Cassini's Saturn orbit insertion, Huygens Titan landing, and Mars rovers landing.

  9. East-West Station-Keeping maneuver strategy for COMS satellite using iterative process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Byoung-Sun; Hwang, Yoola; Kim, Hae-Yeon; Park, Sangwook

    2011-01-01

    The first Korean multi-mission geostationary satellite, Communication, Ocean, and Meteorological Satellite (COMS) will be launched in 2010. The missions of this satellite will be Ka-band communications, ocean color monitoring, and meteorological imaging. The satellite was designed with only one solar array on the south panel. This novel configuration will keep imaging instruments on the north side from heating up. Asymmetry of the spacecraft configuration requires twice-a-day thruster-based Wheel Off-Loading (WOL) operations to keep the satellite attitude for imaging and communication. Thruster firings during the WOL operations cause the satellite orbit to change two times a day. Weekly East-West Station-Keeping (EWSK) and North-South Station-Keeping (NSSK) maneuver operations are planned for the COMS satellite in order to maintain the satellite in ±0.05° box at 128.2°E longitude.The EWSK maneuver is planned to be performed two days after the NSSK maneuver to correct small side effects in East-West direction due to plume impingement against the solar array during NSSK maneuver. Normally thruster firings during the WOL operation affect the satellite orbit only in the North-South direction, but there are also small perturbations in the East-West direction.In this paper, EWSK maneuver strategy for the COMS satellite is presented. This strategy takes twice-a-day thruster-based WOL operations and plume impingement effect of the NSSK maneuver into account. And an iterative process to calculate the velocity changes and maneuver time for the EWSK maneuver is applied. One year of the EWSK and NSSK maneuver simulations are performed with twice-a-day WOL to verify the proposed strategy. The proposed strategy showed that the mean longitude of the satellite is controlled at 128.2° ± 0.007° which is three times tighter than that of non-iterative process. Required Delta velocity (ΔV) for EWSK maneuver is also slightly smaller for iterative process. Tightly controlled mean

  10. Avian Influenza A(H5N1) and A(H9N2) Seroprevalence and Risk Factors for Infection Among Egyptians: A Prospective, Controlled Seroepidemiological Study

    PubMed Central

    Gomaa, Mokhtar R.; Kayed, Ahmed S.; Elabd, Mona A.; Zeid, Dina Abu; Zaki, Shaimaa A.; El Rifay, Amira S.; Sherif, Lobna S.; McKenzie, Pamela P.; Webster, Robert G.; Webby, Richard J.; Ali, Mohamed A.; Kayali, Ghazi

    2015-01-01

    Background. A(H5N1) and A(H9N2) avian influenza viruses are enzootic in Egyptian poultry, and most A(H5N1) human cases since 2009 have occurred in Egypt. Our understanding of the epidemiology of avian viruses in humans remains limited. Questions about the frequency of infection, the proportion of infections that are mild or subclinical, and the case-fatality rate remain largely unanswered. Methods. We conducted a 3-year, prospective, controlled, seroepidemiological study that enrolled 750 poultry-exposed and 250 unexposed individuals in Egypt. Results. At baseline, the seroprevalence of anti-A(H5N1) antibodies (titer, ≥80) among exposed individuals was 2% significantly higher than that among the controls (0%). Having chronic lung disease was a significant risk factor for infection. Antibodies against A(H9N2) were not detected at baseline when A(H9N2) was not circulating in poultry. At follow-up, A(H9N2) was detected in poultry, and consequently, the seroprevalence among exposed humans was between 5.6% and 7.5%. Vaccination of poultry, older age, and exposure to ducks were risk factors for A(H9N2) infection. Conclusions. Results of this study indicate that the number of humans infected with avian influenza viruses is much larger than the number of reported confirmed cases. In an area where these viruses are enzootic in the poultry, human exposure to and infection with avian influenza becomes more common. PMID:25355942

  11. Identification and expression of aryl hydrocarbon receptors (AhR1 and AhR2) provide insight in an evolutionary context regarding sensitivity of white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) to dioxin-like compounds.

    PubMed

    Doering, Jon A; Wiseman, Steve; Beitel, Shawn C; Giesy, John P; Hecker, Markus

    2014-05-01

    Sturgeons are ancient fishes, which are endangered in many parts of the world. Due to their benthic nature and longevity, sturgeon are at great risk of exposure to bioaccumulative contaminants such as dioxin-like compounds (DLCs). Despite their endangered status, little research has been conducted to characterize the relative sensitivity of sturgeons to DLCs. Proper assessment of risk of DLCs posed to these fishes therefore, requires a better understanding of this sensitivity and the factors that are driving it. Adverse effects associated with exposure to DLCs are mediated by the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). This study identified and characterized two distinct AhRs, AhR1 and AhR2, in white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) for the first time as a first step in studying the relative sensitivities of sturgeons to DLCs. Furthermore, tissue-specific expression of both AhRs under basal conditions and in response to exposure to the model DLC, β-naphthoflavone (βNF), was determined. The sequence of amino acids of AhR1 of white sturgeon had greater similarity to AhRs of tetrapods, including amphibians, birds, and mammals, than to AhR1s of other fishes. The sequence of amino acids in the ligand binding domain of the AhR1 had greater than 80% similarity to AhRs known to bind DLCs and was less similar to AhRs not known to bind DLCs. AhR2 of white sturgeon had greatest similarity to AhR2 of other fishes. Profiles of expression of AhR1 and AhR2 in white sturgeon were distinct from those known in other fishes and appear more similar to profiles observed in birds. Expressions of both AhR1 and AhR2 of white sturgeon were greatest in liver and heart, which are target organs for DLCs. Furthermore, abundances of transcripts of AhR1 and AhR2 in all tissues from white sturgeon were greater than controls (up to 35-fold) following exposure to βNF. Based upon both AhRs having similar abundances of transcript in target organs of DLC toxicity, both AhRs being up-regulated following

  12. Identification and expression of aryl hydrocarbon receptors (AhR1 and AhR2) provide insight in an evolutionary context regarding sensitivity of white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) to dioxin-like compounds.

    PubMed

    Doering, Jon A; Wiseman, Steve; Beitel, Shawn C; Giesy, John P; Hecker, Markus

    2014-05-01

    Sturgeons are ancient fishes, which are endangered in many parts of the world. Due to their benthic nature and longevity, sturgeon are at great risk of exposure to bioaccumulative contaminants such as dioxin-like compounds (DLCs). Despite their endangered status, little research has been conducted to characterize the relative sensitivity of sturgeons to DLCs. Proper assessment of risk of DLCs posed to these fishes therefore, requires a better understanding of this sensitivity and the factors that are driving it. Adverse effects associated with exposure to DLCs are mediated by the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). This study identified and characterized two distinct AhRs, AhR1 and AhR2, in white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) for the first time as a first step in studying the relative sensitivities of sturgeons to DLCs. Furthermore, tissue-specific expression of both AhRs under basal conditions and in response to exposure to the model DLC, β-naphthoflavone (βNF), was determined. The sequence of amino acids of AhR1 of white sturgeon had greater similarity to AhRs of tetrapods, including amphibians, birds, and mammals, than to AhR1s of other fishes. The sequence of amino acids in the ligand binding domain of the AhR1 had greater than 80% similarity to AhRs known to bind DLCs and was less similar to AhRs not known to bind DLCs. AhR2 of white sturgeon had greatest similarity to AhR2 of other fishes. Profiles of expression of AhR1 and AhR2 in white sturgeon were distinct from those known in other fishes and appear more similar to profiles observed in birds. Expressions of both AhR1 and AhR2 of white sturgeon were greatest in liver and heart, which are target organs for DLCs. Furthermore, abundances of transcripts of AhR1 and AhR2 in all tissues from white sturgeon were greater than controls (up to 35-fold) following exposure to βNF. Based upon both AhRs having similar abundances of transcript in target organs of DLC toxicity, both AhRs being up-regulated following

  13. Objective evaluation method of steering comfort based on movement quality evaluation of driver steering maneuver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yiyong; Liu, Yahui; Wang, Man; Ji, Run; Ji, Xuewu

    2014-09-01

    The existing research of steering comfort mainly focuses on the subjective evaluation, aiming at designing and optimizing the steering system. In the development of steering system, especially the evaluation of steering comfort, the objective evaluation methods considered the kinematic characteristics of driver steering maneuver are not proposed, which means that the objective evaluation of steering cannot be conducted with the evaluation of kinematic characteristics of driver in steering maneuver. In order to propose the objective evaluation methods of steering comfort, the evaluation of steering movement quality of driver is developed on the basis of the study of the kinematic characteristics of steering maneuver. First, the steering motion trajectories of the driver in both comfortable and certain extreme uncomfortable operation conditions are detected using the Vicon motion capture system. The operation conditions are under the restrictions of the vertical height and horizontal distance between steering wheel center and the H-point of driver, and the steering resisting torque else. Next, the movement quality evaluation of driver steering maneuver is assessed using twelve kinds of evaluation indices based on the kinematic analyses of the steering motion trajectories to propose an objective evaluation method. Finally, an integrated discomfort index of steering maneuver is proposed on the basis of the regression analysis of subjective evaluation rating and the movement quality evaluation indices, including the Jerk, Discomfort and Joint Torque indices. The test results show that the proposed integrated discomfort index gives a good fitting with the subjective evaluation of discomfort, which means it can be used to evaluate or predict the discomfort level of steering maneuver. This paper proposes an objective evaluation method of steering comfort based on the movement quality evaluation of driver steering maneuver.

  14. Comparison of Mallampati test with lower jaw protrusion maneuver in predicting difficult laryngoscopy and intubation

    PubMed Central

    Ul Haq, Muhammad Irfan; Ullah, Hameed

    2013-01-01

    Background: Failure to maintain a patent airway is one of the commonest causes of anesthesia-related morbidity and mortality. Many protocols, algorithms, and different combinations of tested methods for airway assessment have been developed to predict difficult laryngoscopy and intubation. The reported incidence of a difficult intubation varies from 1.5% to 13%. The objective of this study was to compare Mallampati test (MT) with lower jaw protrusion (LJP) maneuver in predicting difficult laryngoscopy and intubation. Materials and Methods: Seven hundred and sixty patients were included in the study. All the patients underwent MT and LJP maneuver for their airway assessment. After a standardized technique of induction of anesthesia, primary anesthetist performed laryngoscopy and graded it according to the grades described by Cormack and Lehane. Sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, and positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) were calculated for both these tests with 95% confidence interval (CI) using conventional laryngoscopy as gold standard. Area under curve was also calculated for both, MT and LJP maneuver. A P < 0.05 was taken as significant. Results: LJP maneuver had higher sensitivity (95.9% vs. 27.1%), NPV (98.7% vs. 82.0%), and accuracy (90.1% vs. 80.3%) when compared to MT in predicting difficult laryngoscopy and intubation. Both tests, however, had similar specificity and PPV. There was marked difference in the positive and negative likelihood ratio between LJP and MT. Similarly, the area under the curve favored LJP maneuver over MT. Conclusion: The results of this study show that LJP maneuver is a better test to predict difficult laryngoscopy and tracheal intubation. We recommend the addition of this maneuver to the routine preoperative evaluation of airway. PMID:24106353

  15. AHS and CASI Processing for the REFLEX Remote Sensing Campaign: Methods and Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Miguel, Eduardo; Jiménez, Marcos; Pérez, Irene; de la Cámara, Óscar G.

    2015-12-01

    The airborne spectroradiometers AHS and CASI were used as a source of hyperspectral and thermal remote sensing data during the REFLEX campaign. Data geolocation and a first simple atmospheric correction was performed by INTA in near-real time with a specific on-site setup and distributed to all campaign participants. In this paper we present briefly the AHS and CASI REFLEX flight campaign followed by a detailed description of the methodology used for image processing and finally the results obtained in terms of image quality. As a conclusion, near-real time processing for AHS and CASI level 1 geolocated products was successful as most of CASI level 2 results but further work is needed for achieving accurate AHS level 2 products.

  16. Activation of AhR-mediated toxicity pathway by emerging pollutants polychlorinated diphenyl sulfides

    EPA Science Inventory

    Polychlorinated diphenyl sulfides (PCDPSs) are a group of environmental pollutants for which limited toxicological information is available. This study tested the hypothesis that PCDPSs could activate the mammalian aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) mediated toxicity pathways. Eight...

  17. The 50Ah NiH2 cell life test results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jamin, Thierry; Puig, Olivier

    1992-01-01

    Information is given in viewgraph form for the 50 AhNiH2 cell life test results. Information is given on pressure vessel design, electrochemical/stack design, cell electrical characteristics, and cell life test results.

  18. Ship operation and failure mode analysis using a maneuver simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabrerizo-Morales, Miguel Angel; Molina, Rafael; de los Santos, Francisco; Camarero, Alberto

    2013-04-01

    In a ship or floating structure operation the agents that contribute to the systems behaviour are not only those derived from fluid-structure interaction, but also the ones linked to mooring-control line set-up evolution and human interaction. Therefore, the analysis of such systems is affected by boundary conditions that change during a complete operation. Frequently, monitoring techniques in laboratory (model) and field (prototype) are based in different instrumental techniques adding difficulty to data comparison and, in some cases, inducing precision and repeatability errors. For this reason, the main aim of this study is to develop the methods and tools to achieve a deep knowledge of those floating systems and obtain capabilities to optimize their operationally thresholds. This abstract presents a methodology and an instrumental system applicable both in field and laboratory: SRECMOCOS Project (Small scale REal-time Caisson MOnitoring and COntrol System). SRECMOCOS compiles three modules. For the monitoring and control of the structure it has been developed a synchronized open and modular microcontroller-based electronic system that comprises sensors, to monitor agents and reactions, and actuators to perform pertinent actions after processing the sensors' data. A secondary objective has been to design and implement a global scaled simulator (1:22), at the 3D basin of The Harbour Research Lab at Technical University of Madrid, in which climatic agents and those derived from the rig/maneuvering setup and the structural design were included. The particular case of Campamento's drydock, in Algeciras Bay (Spain), has been used to apply and validate the methodology. SRECMOCOS Project conjugates control, monitoring and wireless communication systems in a real time basis, offering the possibility to register and simulate all the parameters involved in port operations. This approach offers a step forward into a monitoring strategy to be included in monitoring

  19. Inclination Adjustment Maneuver and Frozen Orbit Keeping of The Advanced Land Observing Satellite (ALOS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Someya, Kazunori; Iwata, Takanori; Uchida, Masashi

    The Advanced Land Observing Satellite "Daichi" (ALOS) was successfully injected into its mission orbit on March 26, 2006. ALOS' missions require the orbit to be precisely recurrent regarding both the ground track and altitude. Therefore, the ALOS mission orbit is a sun-synchronous sub-recurrent frozen orbit. A sun-synchronous orbit has to be maintained by compensating inclination change caused by lunisolar gravity perturbation. In the ALOS case, inclination adjustment is planned every two and a half years. The inclination adjustment should be done by out-of-plane maneuvers. During the inclination adjustment, it is also required that the ground track and altitude error should be minimized. However, it is difficult because there are some restrictions on the out-of-plane maneuvers; such as necessity of attitude change maneuver, extra in-plane accelerations by the attitude change maneuver. JAXA planned and performed the inclination adjustment which kept the ground track and altitude error as small as possible by estimating extra in-plane accelerations and exploiting rotation of eccentricity vector caused by gravity perturbations. In this paper, we review the ALOS requirements for orbit keeping, and discuss the challenges of ALOS inclination adjustment maneuvers due to the restrictions. Our strategies and the theoretical background are also presented with subsequent evaluation of flight results.

  20. Glenoumeral dislocation: a prospective randomized study comparing spazo and kocher maneuvers

    PubMed Central

    Rezende, Bruno da Rocha Moreira; de Almeida, José Inácio; de Sousa, Uriel Jaime; Bomfim, Leônidas de Souza; Ferreira, Mário Soares

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate and to compare the Spaso and Kocher reduction maneuvers in terms of efficiency, time of reduction, facileness, pain, discomfort to the patient, complications and risks, besides promoting the comparison between the two maneuvers, aiming to ground the emergency conduct. METHODS: A prospective study with 105 patients with acute shoulder dislocations were enrolled in the study between February 2011 and September 2012. The patients were randomized into two groups and they were submitted to the reduction of dislocation using the Spaso maneuver (group A) or the Kocher technique (group B) by first, second or third-year orthopedic surgery residents from our service. The results were evaluated and compared. RESULTS: There was no statistically significant difference between the two groups in terms of age, gender, timing of reduction, number of precedent episodes and complications after reduction. However, reduction was achieved in more cases using the Spaso method than it was among the Kocher group, as well as the mean duration of the reduction maneuver and discomfort were shorter in the group A patients. CONCLUSIONS: Both methods presented good results in terms of dislocation reduction and low complications rates. Nevertheless, the Spaso maneuver was more efficient, fast and easily applicable in comparison with Kocher's method. Level of Evidence I, Therapeutic. PMID:26327800

  1. Implementation of a Collision Probability Prediction Technique for Constellation Maneuver Planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Concha, Marco a.

    2007-01-01

    On March 22, 2006, the Space Technology 5 (ST5) constellation spacecraft were successfully delivered to orbit by a Pegasus XI, launch vehicle. An unexpected relative motion experienced by the constellation after orbit insertion brought about a problem. Soon after launch the observed relative position of the inert rocket body was between the leading and the middle spacecraft within the constellation. The successful planning and execution of an orbit maneuver that would create a fly-by of the rocket body was required to establish the.formation. This maneuver would create a close approach that needed to conform to predefined collision probability requirements. On April 21, 2006, the ST5 "155" spacecraft performed a large orbit maneuver and successfully passed the inert Pegasus 3rd Stage Rocket Body on April 30, 2006 15:20 UTC at a distance of 2.55 km with a Probability of Collision of less than 1.0E-06. This paper will outline the technique that was implemented to establish the safe planning and execution of the fly-by maneuver. The method makes use of Gaussian distribution models of state covariance to determine underlying probabilities of collision that arise under low velocity encounters. Specific numerical examples used for this analysis are discussed in detail. The mechanics of this technique are explained to foster deeper understanding of the concepts presented and to improve existing processes for use in future constellation maneuver planning.

  2. Combinatorial optimization of long-term maneuver sequences applied to geostationary orbit control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haerting, A.; Meixner, H.

    Eccentricity control schemes for geostationary satellites are discussed considering realistic mission profiles. The advantages of long-term maneuver planning are outlined in terms of fuel savings, number of maneuvers, orbit control accuracy and safety. The planning ahead of a dozen or more maneuvers involves, in particular, the selection of discrete alternatives such as thruster branches and time intervals. The proposed planning scheme is developed by heuristic augmentation taking the TVSat-2 spacecraft as an example. Then it is formalized in the framework of combinatorial optimization by adapting the method of simulated annealing to maneuver sequences. Results for TVSat-2 are shown and compared to actual mission experience. As a conclusion, optimal control of the eccentricity vector need not be along a sun-pointing perigee circle, but along a more sophisticated path depending on spacecraft characteristics. The number of double east-west maneuvers is reduced to two per year and these are scheduled when the eccentricity is smallest. The long-term planning scheme is also demonstrated for contingency analyses.

  3. Is soccer kick performance better after a "faking" (cutting) maneuver task?

    PubMed

    Katis, Athanasios; Kellis, Eleftherios

    2011-03-01

    Cutting in soccer is a common skill used to avoid the opponent's pressure but the potential effects of such a skill on instep kicking performance have not been previously investigated. The purpose of this study was to examine the differences in lower limb biomechanics between straight approach soccer kicks and kicks performed following a cutting maneuver task. Ten young amateur soccer players performed, in a random order, instep kicks after a two-step straight approach run and kicks after a double "faking" cutting maneuver task. The results showed that kicking after a cutting maneuver task displayed significantly lower ball speed values compared with the straight approach instep kicking (16.73 vs. 19.78 m/s, respectively; p < 0.05). Moreover, analysis of variance showed significant differences between the two kicking conditions in ankle, knee and hip joint displacements. The present study indicated that performing instep kicks after a double-cutting maneuver reduces ball and foot speed probably due to increasing joint frontal and transverse plane rotations. Improvements in the performance of the cutting maneuver task through training might result in better transfer of energy and speed to the kicking task thus permitting players to perform more powerful kicks under realistic game conditions. PMID:21560750

  4. The effectiveness of the head-turn-plus-chin-down maneuver for eliminating vallecular residue.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Ahmed; Peladeau-Pigeon, Melanie; Valenzano, Teresa Josephine; Namasivayam, Ashwini Marini; Steele, Catriona Margaret

    2016-04-01

    Purpose When swallowing efficiency is impaired, residue accumulates in the pharynx. Cued or spontaneous swallows in the head neutral position do not always successfully clear residue. We investigated the impact of a novel maneuver on residue clearance by combining a head turn with the chin down posture. Methods Data were collected from 26 participants who demonstrated persistent vallecular residue after an initial head neutral clearance swallow in videofluoroscopy. Participants were cued to perform a head-turn-plus-chin-down swallow, with the direction of head turn randomized. Pixel-based measures of residue in the vallecular space before and after the maneuver were made on still frame lateral images using ImageJ software. Measures of % full and the Normalized Residue Ratio Scale (NRRS) were extracted. Univariate analyses of variance were used to detect significant reductions in residue. Results On average, pre-maneuver measures showed residue filling 56-73% of the valleculae, depending on stimulus consistency (NRRS scores: 0.2-0.4). More than 80% of pre-swallow measures displayed NRRS ratios > 0.06, a threshold previously linked to increased risk of post-swallow aspiration. Conclusion The head-turn-plus-chin-down maneuver achieved significant reductions in residue for thin and nectar-thick fluids, suggesting that this maneuver can be effective in reducing persistent vallecular residue with these consistencies. PMID:27191873

  5. Biological role of Trichoderma harzianum-derived platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase (PAF-AH) on stress response and antagonism.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chuanjin; Fan, Lili; Wu, Qiong; Fu, Kehe; Gao, Shigang; Wang, Meng; Gao, Jinxin; Li, Yaqian; Chen, Jie

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the properties of platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase (PAF-AH) derived from Trichoderma harzianum. The enzyme, comprised of 572 amino acids, shares high homology with PAF-AH proteins from T. koningii and other microbial species. The optimum enzymatic activity of PAF-AH occurred at pH 6 in the absence of Ca2+ and it localized in the cytoplasm, and we observed the upregulation of PAF-AH expression in response to carbon starvation and strong heat shock. Furthermore, PAF-AH knockout transformant growth occurred more slowly than wild type cells and over-expression strains grown in SM medium at 37°C and 42°C. In addition, PAF-AH expression significantly increased under a series of maize root induction assay. Eicosanoic acid and ergosterol levels decreased in the PAF-AH knockouts compared to wild type cells, as revealed by GC/MS analysis. We also determined stress responses mediated by PAF-AH were related to proteins HEX1, Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase, and cytochrome c. Finally, PAF-AH exhibited antagonistic activity against Rhizoctonia solani in plate confrontation assays. Our results indicate PAF-AH may play an important role in T. harzianum stress response and antagonism under diverse environmental conditions.

  6. Emergence in China of human disease due to avian influenza A(H10N8)--cause for concern?

    PubMed

    To, Kelvin K W; Tsang, Alan K L; Chan, Jasper F W; Cheng, Vincent C C; Chen, Honglin; Yuen, Kwok-Yung

    2014-03-01

    In December 2013, China reported the first human case of avian influenza A(H10N8). A 73-year-old female with chronic diseases who had visited a live poultry market succumbed with community-acquired pneumonia. While human infections with avian influenza viruses are usually associated with subtypes prevalent in poultries, A(H10N8) isolates were mostly found in migratory birds and only recently in poultries. Although not possible to predict whether this single intrusion by A(H10N8) is an accident or the start of another epidemic like the preceding A(H7N9) and A(H5N1), several features suggest that A(H10N8) is a potential threat to humans. Recombinant H10 could attach to human respiratory epithelium, and A(H10N4) virus could cause severe infections in minks and chickens. A(H10N8) viruses contain genetic markers for mammalian adaptation and virulence in the haemagglutinin (A135T, S138A[H3 numbering]), M1(N30D, T215A), NS1(P42S) and PB2(E627K) protein. Studies on this human A(H10N8) isolate will reveal its adaptability to humans. Clinicians should alert the laboratory to test for A(H5,6,7,9,10) viruses in patients with epidemiological exposure in endemic geographical areas especially when human influenza A(H1,3) and B are negative. Vigilant virological and serological surveillance for A(H10N8) in human, poultry and wild bird is important for following the trajectory of this emerging influenza virus.

  7. Effect of Conflict Resolution Maneuver Execution Delay on Losses of Separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cone, Andrew C.

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines uncertainty in the maneuver execution delay for data linked conflict resolution maneuvers. This uncertainty could cause the previously cleared primary conflict to reoccur or a secondary conflict to appear. Results show that the likelihood of a primary conflict reoccurring during a horizontal conflict resolution maneuver increases with larger initial turn-out angles and with shorter times until loss of separation. There is also a significant increase in the probability of a primary conflict reoccurring when the time until loss falls under three minutes. Increasing horizontal separation by an additional 1.5 nmi lowers the risk, but does not completely eliminate it. Secondary conflicts were shown to have a small probability of occurring in all tested configurations.

  8. Importance of back blow maneuvers in a 6 month old patient with sudden upper airway obstruction.

    PubMed

    Gencpinar, Pinar; Duman, Murat

    2015-12-01

    Foreign body aspiration in children under four years old is one of the most frequently observed reasons for accident related deaths. It is more common in this age group due to inadequate swallowing functions and exploration of objects with the mouth. The most frequently encountered foreign bodies are food and toy parts. Life threatening complete laryngeal obstruction is rarely observed. Dyspnea, hypersalivation, cough and cyanosis can be seen. The basic and life-saving treatment approach is complete removal of foreign body maneuvers in the sudden onset of total obstruction. Here we report a six-month old male, who ingested a foreign body and was treated with back blow maneuvers successfully. In this case we emphasized the importance of back blow maneuvers. PMID:27239623

  9. The Maneuver Planning Process for the Microwave Anisotropy Probe (MAP) Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mesarch, Michael A.; Andrews, Stephen F.; Bauer, Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Microwave Anisotropy Probe (MAP) mission utilized a strategy combining highly eccentric phasing loops with a lunar gravity assist to provide a zero-cost insertion into a Lissajous orbit about the Sun-Earth/Moon L2 point. Maneuvers were executed at the phasing loop perigees to correct for launch vehicle errors and to target the lunar gravity assist so that a suitable orbit at L2 was achieved. This paper will discuss the maneuver planning process for designing, verifying, and executing MAP's maneuvers. This paper will also describe how commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) tools were used to execute these tasks and produce a command sequence ready for upload to the spacecraft. These COTS tools included Satellite Tool Kit, MATLAB, and Matrix-X.

  10. Zero-Propellant Maneuver[TM] Flight Results for 180 deg ISS Rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bedrossian, Nazareth; Bhatt, Sagar; Lammers, Mike; Nguyen, Louis

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents results for the Zero Propellant Maneuver (ZPM) TradeMark attitude control concept flight demonstration. On March 3, 2007, a ZPM was used to reorient the International Space Station 180 degrees without using any propellant. The identical reorientation performed with thrusters would have burned 110lbs of propellant. The ZPM was a pre-planned trajectory used to command the CMG attitude hold controller to perform the maneuver between specified initial and final states while maintaining the CMGs within their operational limits. The trajectory was obtained from a PseudoSpectral solution to a new optimal attitude control problem. The flight test established the breakthrough capability to simultaneously perform a large angle attitude maneuver and momentum desaturation without the need to use thrusters. The flight implementation did not require any modifications to flight software. This approach is applicable to any spacecraft that are controlled by momentum storage devices.

  11. Effects of exposure time during flight maneuvers on passenger subjective comfort rating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, V. J.

    1975-01-01

    The effects were investigated of length of exposure time to a flight maneuver environment on subjective passenger evaluation of ride comfort. Four statistical analysis tests were performed on ride comfort ratings obtained during one two-hour test flight wherein eleven test subjects were exposed to two identical programmed sequences of twenty four flight segments which covered a wide range of maneuver conditions. The results of the analysis indicate that, for over ninety five percent of the segments, there is no significant change in the test subjects comfort ratings of identical segments spaced one hour apart. These results are in contrast to those found in previous studies involving a vibration environment, rather than flight maneuver environment, where increased exposure-time was found to cause a degradation of ride comfort ratings.

  12. On maneuvering large flexible spacecraft using an annular momentum control device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oz, H.; Meirovitch, L.; Montgomery, R. C.

    1980-01-01

    A scheme for the control and maneuvering of a large flexible spacecraft by means of two flexible AMCD's using noncontacting magnetic suspension is presented. The system consists of a flexible vehicle, two flexible rings and a magnetic suspension and driving assembly. The necessary skewing of the rings for maneuvering of the vehicle is accomplished by moving the pairs of magnets along tracks distributed around the circumference of the vehicle. The equations of motion for each subsystem are derived by the Lagrangian approach. Attitude motions are described in terms of quasi-coordinates. For small vehicle angular rates and rings attitude motions, an ordering scheme can be used to separate the equations of motion according to the magnitude of the terms. The ordered equations of motion lead to a linear time-variant optimal control problem for the maneuvering of the spacecraft.

  13. Effect of bird maneuver on frequency-domain helicopter EM response

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fitterman, D.V.; Yin, C.

    2004-01-01

    Bird maneuver, the rotation of the coil-carrying instrument pod used for frequency-domain helicopter electromagnetic surveys, changes the nominal geometric relationship between the bird-coil system and the ground. These changes affect electromagnetic coupling and can introduce errors in helicopter electromagnetic, (HEM) data. We analyze these effects for a layered half-space for three coil configurations: vertical coaxial, vertical coplanar, and horizontal coplanar. Maneuver effect is shown to have two components: one that is purely geometric and another that is inductive in nature. The geometric component is significantly larger. A correction procedure is developed using an iterative approach that uses standard HEM inversion routines. The maneuver effect correction reduces inversion misfit error and produces laterally smoother cross sections than obtained from uncorrected data. ?? 2004 Society of Exploration Geophysicists. All rights reserved.

  14. Mixing effectiveness in the Apollo oxygen tanks of spin-up and rotation-reversal maneuvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baldwin, B.; Martin, E. D.; Reinhardt, W. A.; Sheaffer, Y.

    1971-01-01

    Two-dimensional simulations of stratified flows in the Apollo oxygen tanks have been used to estimate the mixing effectiveness of spin-up and rotation-reversal maneuvers. Calculations have been made for square and circular cylindrical tank geometries. Differences arising from heater position on the tank wall or near the center of the tank have been investigated. In the event of a prolonged period without normal maneuvers, the potential pressure decay (drop in pressure that would result from adiabatic mixing) can be suppressed by more than a factor of two through the use of spin-up and rotation-reversal maneuvers. Changes in rotation rate of order three revolutions per hour or greater are sufficient for this purpose.

  15. Contingency Trajectory Design for a Lunar Orbit Insertion Maneuver Failure by the LADEE Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Genova, A. L.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents results from a contingency trajectory analysis performed for the Lunar Atmosphere & Dust Environment Explorer (LADEE) mission in the event of a missed lunar-orbit insertion (LOI) maneuver by the LADEE spacecraft. The effects of varying solar perturbations in the vicinity of the weak stability boundary (WSB) in the Sun-Earth system on the trajectory design are analyzed and discussed. It is shown that geocentric recovery trajectory options existed for the LADEE spacecraft, depending on the spacecraft's recovery time to perform an Earth escape-prevention maneuver after the hypothetical LOI maneuver failure and subsequent path traveled through the Sun-Earth WSB. If Earth-escape occurred, a heliocentric recovery option existed, but with reduced science capacapability for the spacecraft in an eccentric, not circular near-equatorial retrograde lunar orbit.

  16. Attitude maneuver of spacecraft with a variable-speed double-gimbal control moment gyro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jikuya, Ichiro; Fujii, Kenta; Yamada, Katsuhiko

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, two types of computational procedures are presented for a rest-to-rest spacecraft maneuver using a variable-speed double-gimbal control moment gyro (VSDGCMG). The first procedure is a numerical computational procedure in which a quasi-time-optimal trajectory satisfying several physical constraints is obtained by repeating the Newton's method. The other procedure is an approximate computational procedure in which an analytical solution is obtained by approximately solving a series of linear optimal control problems. The two procedures play complementary roles: the former is suitable for implementation, and the latter can be used to select an initial value for use in the former. The effectiveness of the proposed procedures is demonstrated by plotting the surfaces of maneuvering time for all rotational axes and by plotting time responses for several maneuvering examples.

  17. Trial maneuver generation and selection in the Paladin tactical decision generation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chappell, Alan R.; Mcmanus, John W.; Goodrich, Kenneth H.

    1993-01-01

    To date, increased levels of maneuverability and controllability in aircraft have been postulated as tactically advantageous, but little research has studied maneuvers or tactics that make use of these capabilities. In order to help fill this void, a real-time tactical decision generation system for air combat engagements, Paladin, has been developed. Paladin models an air combat engagement as a series of discrete decisions. A detailed description of Paladin's decision making process is presented. This includes the sources of data used, methods of generating reasonable maneuvers for the Paladin aircraft, and selection criteria for choosing the 'best' maneuver. Simulation results are presented that show Paladin to be relatively insensitive to errors introduced into the decision process by estimation of future positional and geometric data.

  18. Trial Maneuver Generation and Selection in the Paladin Tactical Decision Generation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chappell, Alan R.; McManus, John W.; Goodrich, Kenneth H.

    1992-01-01

    To date, increased levels of maneuverability and controllability in aircraft have been postulated as tactically advantageous, but little research has studied maneuvers or tactics that make use of these capabilities. In order to help fill this void, a real time tactical decision generation system for air combat engagements, Paladin, has been developed. Paladin models an air combat engagement as a series of discrete decisions. A detailed description of Paladin's decision making process is presented. This includes the sources of data used, methods of generating reasonable maneuvers for the Paladin aircraft, and selection criteria for choosing the "best" maneuver. Simulation results are presented that show Paladin to be relatively insensitive to errors introduced into the decision process by estimation of future positional and geometric data.

  19. CLINICAL DIAGNOSIS OF SUBSCAPULARIS TENDON TEAR USING THE BEAR HUG SEMIOLOGICAL MANEUVER

    PubMed Central

    Schiefer, Márcio; Júnior, Yonder Archanjo Ching-San; Silva, Sérgio Maurício; Fontenelle, César; Dias Carvalho, Marcos Genúncio; de Faria, Fabio Garcia; Franco, José Sérgio

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the Bear Hug maneuver for clinically diagnosing subscapularis tendon tears, and compare this with other maneuvers described previously (Lift-off, Napoleon and Belly Press). Methods: Forty-nine patients with rotator cuff injuries who had undergone arthroscopy to repair the injury and had previously been assessed using the semiological maneuvers mentioned above were evaluated. Results: The diagnostic values obtained for the Bear Hug test were as follows: sensitivity 75%, specificity 56%, positive predictive value 62%, negative predictive value 70% and accuracy 65%. Conclusion: The highest sensitivity and negative predictive value values were obtained with the Bear Hug test. The highest specificity value was seen with the Lift-off test. The Belly press test gave the greatest specificity, positive predictive and accuracy values. PMID:27047870

  20. Bringing Definitions into High Definition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mason, John

    2010-01-01

    Why do definitions play such a central role in mathematics? It may seem obvious that precision about the terms one uses is necessary in order to use those terms reasonably (while reasoning). Definitions are chosen so as to be definite about the terms one uses, but also to make both the statement of, and the reasoning to justify, theorems as…

  1. Hydrology of the U.S. Army Pinon Canyon maneuver site, Las Animas County, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Von Guerard, Paul; Abbott, P.O.; Nickless, Raymond C.

    1987-01-01

    The U.S. Department of the Army (Fort Carson Military Reservation) has acquired 381 sq mi of semiarid rangeland in southeastern Colorado for mechanized military maneuvers. The study area, known as the Pinon Canyon Maneuver Site, drains into the Purgatoire River, a major tributary of the upper Arkansas River. A multidisciplined hydrologic investigation began in October 1982. The primary aquifer in the Maneuver Site is the Dakota-Purgatoire. Well yields generally range from 10 to 500 gal/min. Dissolved solids concentrations in groundwater ranged from 195 to 6,150 mg/L. Streamflow in the Purgatoire River is perennial. Tributaries draining the Maneuver Site are intermittent or ephemeral and contribute only about 4.4% of the streamflow of the Purgatoire River downstream from the Maneuver Site. Flood frequencies were calculated by using the log Pearson III procedure and compared well with a regional estimating technique that was developed that uses physical drainage-basin characteristics. Calcium and sulfate are the predominant ions in the surface water of the area. Time-series plots indicate that instream water-quality standards for nitrate and metals are exceeded. About 80% of the suspended-sediment load is transported by rainfall runoff, which occurs less than 8% of the time. Ephermal tributaries contributed less than 25% of the suspended-sediment load transported to the Purgatoire River downstream from the Maneuver Site. Historic annual mean sediment yields were measured for 29 small watersheds. Sediment yields were measured for 29 small watersheds. Sediment yields ranged from 9.5 to 1,700 tons/sq mi. Sediment yields were estimated by a multiple-linear-regression model developed by using physical drainage-basin characteristics and by the Pacific Southwest Interagency Committee method. (USGS)

  2. Proximity Operations for Space Situational Awareness Spacecraft Rendezvous and Maneuvering using Numerical Simulations and Fuzzy Logic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrico, T.; Langster, T.; Carrico, J.; Alfano, S.; Loucks, M.; Vallado, D.

    The authors present several spacecraft rendezvous and close proximity maneuvering techniques modeled with a high-precision numerical integrator using full force models and closed loop control with a Fuzzy Logic intelligent controller to command the engines. The authors document and compare the maneuvers, fuel use, and other parameters. This paper presents an innovative application of an existing capability to design, simulate and analyze proximity maneuvers; already in use for operational satellites performing other maneuvers. The system has been extended to demonstrate the capability to develop closed loop control laws to maneuver spacecraft in close proximity to another, including stand-off, docking, lunar landing and other operations applicable to space situational awareness, space based surveillance, and operational satellite modeling. The fully integrated end-to-end trajectory ephemerides are available from the authors in electronic ASCII text by request. The benefits of this system include: A realistic physics-based simulation for the development and validation of control laws A collaborative engineering environment for the design, development and tuning of spacecraft law parameters, sizing actuators (i.e., rocket engines), and sensor suite selection. An accurate simulation and visualization to communicate the complexity, criticality, and risk of spacecraft operations. A precise mathematical environment for research and development of future spacecraft maneuvering engineering tasks, operational planning and forensic analysis. A closed loop, knowledge-based control example for proximity operations. This proximity operations modeling and simulation environment will provide a valuable adjunct to programs in military space control, space situational awareness and civil space exploration engineering and decision making processes.

  3. Evaluation of the Safe Ischemic Time of Clamping During Intermittent Pringles Maneuver in Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Kolahdoozan, Mohsen; Behdad, Akbar; Hosseinpour, Mehrdad; Behdad, Samin; Rezaei, Mohammad Taghi

    2015-01-01

    Background: The liver is the most commonly injured organ in blunt abdominal trauma. Although major hepatic bleeding may be partially controlled with portal triade clamping (the Pringle’s maneuver), continuous prolonged clamping results in liver ischemia. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to determine the safe time of Pringle maneuver based on pathologic changes of liver in rabbit models. Materials and Methods: In an experimental study, 20 New-Zealand white rabbits were selected. In laparotomy, a blunt dissector was passed through the foramen of Winslow and the hepato-duodenal ligament encircled with an umbilical tape. En masse Pringle maneuver was performed using atraumatic flexible clamps. Rabbits were divided into four groups based on Pringle maneuver time (30 minutes, 45 minutes, 60 minutes, and 75 minutes). A hepatic biopsy was performed at the beginning of operation. The degree of tissue injury was evaluated using blood markers. Results: There were five rabbits in each group. At the end of 60 minutes ischemia, only minor alterations were observed in pathological specimens. At the end of 75 minutes, hepatocyte damage and necrosis were observed. The serum levels of alanine aminotransferase (Group A: P = 0.02; Group B: P = 0.01; Group C: P = 0.0002; Group D: P = 0.01) and Aspartate aminotransferase (Group A: P = 0.03; Group B: P = 0.002; Group C: P = 0.0004; Group D: P = 0.0003) were significantly increased post-operatively. The maximum level was in the first day after operation. Conclusions: Continuous portal triade clamping (the Pringle maneuver) during liver ischemia (30 and 45 minutes) in rabbits resulted in no ischemic change. Increasing time of clamping to 30 minutes was safe in intermittent Pringle maneuver. PMID:26848477

  4. Anterior Displacement of Lamina Cribrosa during Valsalva Maneuver in Young Healthy Eyes

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yong Woo; Girard, Michael J. A.; Mari, Jean Martial; Jeoung, Jin Wook

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To investigate lamina cribrosa (LC) displacement during the Valsalva maneuver in young healthy eyes using enhanced depth imaging (EDI) spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). Methods Forty-eight eyes of 48 young healthy volunteers (age range: 20–34 years) underwent intraocular pressure (IOP) measurement by Goldmann applanation tonometry as well as Cirrus HD-OCT scans before and during the Valsalva maneuver. The optic nerve head (ONH) parameters (average retinal nerve fiber layer thickness, rim area, disc area, average C/D ratio, vertical C/D ratio, cup volume), anterior LC depth (LCD), subfoveal and peripapillary choroidal thickness, and neural canal opening diameter were measured on compensated OCT and compared during Valsalva challenge. The subjects were asked to take a five-minute break after each Valsalva maneuver. Results During the Valsalva maneuver, the IOP significantly increased, from 12.7 ± 3.0 mmHg to 16.0 ± 3.2 mmHg (P < 0.001), while the LCD sharply decreased, from 463.4 ± 118.8 μm to 427.3 ± 106.4 μm (P < 0.001). The subfoveal choroidal thickness (300.7 ± 90.6 vs. 309.6 ± 93.5 μm), peripapilllary choroidal thickness (152.2 ± 55.4 vs. 150.8 ± 49.3 μm), neural canal opening diameter (1651.8 ± 204.2 vs. 1651.0 ± 217.6 μm), and all of the ONH parameters did not change significantly (all P > 0.05). Conclusions The Valsalva maneuver induced anterior displacement of the LC, but did not alter the choroidal thickness or ONH morphology. The data describe the positional characteristics of the LC in response to the Valsalva maneuver in young healthy eyes. PMID:27442120

  5. Summary of AH-1G flight vibration data for validation of coupled rotor-fuselage analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dompka, R. V.; Cronkhite, J. D.

    1986-01-01

    Under a NASA research program designated DAMVIBS (Design Analysis Methods for VIBrationS), four U. S. helicopter industry participants (Bell Helicopter, Boeing Vertol, McDonnell Douglas Helicopter, and Sikorsky Aircraft) are to apply existing analytical methods for calculating coupled rotor-fuselage vibrations of the AH-1G helicopter for correlation with flight test data from an AH-1G Operational Load Survey (OLS) test program. Bell Helicopter, as the manufacturer of the AH-1G, was asked to provide pertinent rotor data and to collect the OLS flight vibration data needed to perform the correlations. The analytical representation of the fuselage structure is based on a NASTRAN finite element model (FEM) developed by Bell which has been extensively documented and correlated with ground vibration tests.The AH-1G FEM was provided to each of the participants for use in their coupled rotor-fuselage analyses. This report describes the AH-1G OLS flight test program and provides the flight conditions and measured vibration data to be used by each participant in their correlation effort. In addition, the mechanical, structural, inertial and aerodynamic data for the AH-1G two-bladed teetering main rotor system are presented. Furthermore, modifications to the NASTRAN FEM of the fuselage structure that are necessary to make it compatible with the OLS test article are described. The AH-1G OLS flight test data was found to be well documented and provide a sound basis for evaluating currently existing analysis methods used for calculation of coupled rotor-fuselage vibrations.

  6. Phylodynamics of influenza A(H3N2) in South America, 1999-2012.

    PubMed

    Born, Priscila Silva; Siqueira, Marilda Mendonça; Faria, Nuno Rodrigues; Resende, Paola Cristina; Motta, Fernando Couto; Bello, Gonzalo

    2016-09-01

    The limited influenza A(H3N2) genetic data available from the Southern Hemisphere (particularly from Africa and Latin America), constrains the accurate reconstruction of viral dissemination dynamics within those regions. Our objective was to describe the spatial dissemination dynamics of influenza A(H3N2) within South America. A total of 469 sequences of the HA1 portion of the hemagglutinin gene (HA) from influenza A(H3N2) viruses sampled in temperate and tropical South American countries between 1999 and 2012 were combined with available contemporary sequences from Australia, Hong Kong, United Kingdom and the United States. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that influenza A(H3N2) sequences from South America were highly intermixed with sequences from other geographical regions, although a clear geographic virus population structure was detected globally. We identified 14 clades mostly (≥80%) composed of influenza sequences from South American countries. Bayesian phylogeographic analyses of those clades support a significant role of both temperate and tropical regions in the introduction and dissemination of new influenza A(H3N2) strains within South America and identify an intensive bidirectional viral exchange between different geographical areas. These findings indicate that seasonal influenza A(H3N2) epidemics in South America are seeded by both the continuous importation of viral variants from other geographic regions and the short-term persistence of local lineages. This study also supports a complex metapopulation model of influenza A(H3N2) dissemination in South America, with no preferential direction in viral movement between temperate and tropical regions. PMID:27275847

  7. STS-39 OV-103 reaction control system (RCS) jets fire during onorbit maneuver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    During STS-39 rendezvous maneuvers, two of Discovery's, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103's, right reaction control system (RCS) jets fire (one up and one to the right). The RCS jet firings create a glow around OV-103's orbital maneuvering system (OMS) pods and vertical tail against the blackness of space. Some reflection from the crew compartment windows is visible. In the foreground are the Space Test Payload 1 (STP-1) multipurpose experiment support structure (MPESS) (front) and the Air Force Program 675 (AFP-675) experiment support system (ESS) (back). The remote manipulator system (RMS) arm is stowed along the port side sill longeron.

  8. Cassini-Huygens Maneuver Experience: First Year of the Equinox Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gist, Emily M.; Ballard, Christopher G.; Hahn, Yungsun; Stumpf, Paul W.; Wagner, Sean V.; Williams, Powtawche N.

    2009-01-01

    The Cassini-Huygens spacecraft was launched in 1997 on a mission to observe Saturn and its many moons. After a seven-year cruise, it entered a Saturnian orbit for a four-year, prime mission. Due to the success of the prime mission, spacecraft health, and remaining propellant, a two-year extended mission, the Equinox Mission, was approved. Maneuver designs and analyses performed through the first year of the Equinox Mission are presented. Results for the 46 most recent maneuvers are given. A substantial contribution to the navigation success of the Cassini-Huygens spacecraft is the continued accurate performance, which has exceeded the pre-launch expectations and requirements.

  9. Maneuver Acoustic Flight Test of the Bell 430 Helicopter Data Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watts, Michael E.; Greenwood, Eric; Smith, Charles D.; Snider, Royce; Conner, David A.

    2014-01-01

    A cooperative ight test by NASA, Bell Helicopter and the U.S. Army to characterize the steady state acoustics and measure the maneuver noise of a Bell Helicopter 430 aircraft was accomplished. The test occurred during June/July 2011 at Eglin Air Force Base, Florida. This test gathered a total of 410 test points over 10 test days and compiled an extensive database of dynamic maneuver measurements. Three microphone arrays with up to 31 microphon. es in each were used to acquire acoustic data. Aircraft data included Differential Global Positioning System, aircraft state and rotor state information. This paper provides an overview of the test and documents the data acquired.

  10. Astronaut Alan Bean flies the Astronaut Maneuvering Equipment in the OWS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Astronaut Alan L. Bean, Skylab 3 commander, flies the M509 Astronaut Maneuvering Equipment, as seen in this photographic reproduction taken from a television transmission made by a color television camera in the Orbital Workshop (OWS) of the Skylab space station in Earth orbit. Bean is strapped into the back-mounted, hand-controlled Automatically stabilized Maneuvering Unit (ASMU). The M509 exercise was in the forward dome area of the OWS. THe dome area is about 22 feet in diameter and 19 feet form top to bottom.

  11. Operationally optimal maneuver strategy for spacecraft injected into sub-geosynchronous transfer orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiran, B. S.; Singh, Satyendra; Negi, Kuldeep

    The GSAT-12 spacecraft is providing Communication services from the INSAT/GSAT system in the Indian region. The spacecraft carries 12 extended C-band transponders. GSAT-12 was launched by ISRO’s PSLV from Sriharikota, into a sub-geosynchronous Transfer Orbit (sub-GTO) of 284 x 21000 km with inclination 18 deg. This Mission successfully accomplished combined optimization of launch vehicle and satellite capabilities to maximize operational life of the s/c. This paper describes mission analysis carried out for GSAT-12 comprising launch window, orbital events study and orbit raising maneuver strategies considering various Mission operational constraints. GSAT-12 is equipped with two earth sensors (ES), three gyroscopes and digital sun sensor. The launch window was generated considering mission requirement of minimum 45 minutes of ES data for calibration of gyros with Roll-sun-pointing orientation in T.O. Since the T.O. period was a rather short 6.1 hr, required pitch biases were worked out to meet the gyro-calibration requirement. A 440 N Liquid Apogee Motor (LAM) is used for orbit raising. The objective of the maneuver strategy is to achieve desired drift orbit satisfying mission constraints and minimizing propellant expenditure. In case of sub-GTO, the optimal strategy is to first perform an in-plane maneuver at perigee to raise the apogee to synchronous level and then perform combined maneuvers at the synchronous apogee to achieve desired drift orbit. The perigee burn opportunities were examined considering ground station visibility requirement for monitoring the burn. Two maneuver strategies were proposed: an optimal five-burn strategy with two perigee burns centered around perigee#5 and perigee#8 with partial ground station visibility and three apogee burns with dual station visibility, a near-optimal five-burn strategy with two off-perigee burns at perigee#5 and perigee#8 with single ground station visibility and three apogee burns with dual station visibility

  12. Robust Maneuvering Envelope Estimation Based on Reachability Analysis in an Optimal Control Formulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lombaerts, Thomas; Schuet, Stefan R.; Wheeler, Kevin; Acosta, Diana; Kaneshige, John

    2013-01-01

    This paper discusses an algorithm for estimating the safe maneuvering envelope of damaged aircraft. The algorithm performs a robust reachability analysis through an optimal control formulation while making use of time scale separation and taking into account uncertainties in the aerodynamic derivatives. Starting with an optimal control formulation, the optimization problem can be rewritten as a Hamilton- Jacobi-Bellman equation. This equation can be solved by level set methods. This approach has been applied on an aircraft example involving structural airframe damage. Monte Carlo validation tests have confirmed that this approach is successful in estimating the safe maneuvering envelope for damaged aircraft.

  13. Genome-Wide Analysis of Evolutionary Markers of Human Influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 and A(H3N2) Viruses May Guide Selection of Vaccine Strain Candidates

    PubMed Central

    Belanov, Sergei S.; Bychkov, Dmitrii; Benner, Christian; Ripatti, Samuli; Ojala, Teija; Kankainen, Matti; Kai Lee, Hong; Wei-Tze Tang, Julian; Kainov, Denis E.

    2015-01-01

    Here we analyzed whole-genome sequences of 3,969 influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 and 4,774 A(H3N2) strains that circulated during 2009–2015 in the world. The analysis revealed changes at 481 and 533 amino acid sites in proteins of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 and A(H3N2) strains, respectively. Many of these changes were introduced as a result of random drift. However, there were 61 and 68 changes that were present in relatively large number of A(H1N1)pdm09 and A(H3N2) strains, respectively, that circulated during relatively long time. We named these amino acid substitutions evolutionary markers, as they seemed to contain valuable information regarding the viral evolution. Interestingly, influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 and A(H3N2) viruses acquired non-overlapping sets of evolutionary markers. We next analyzed these characteristic markers in vaccine strains recommended by the World Health Organization for the past five years. Our analysis revealed that vaccine strains carried only few evolutionary markers at antigenic sites of viral hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA). The absence of these markers at antigenic sites could affect the recognition of HA and NA by human antibodies generated in response to vaccinations. This could, in part, explain moderate efficacy of influenza vaccines during 2009–2014. Finally, we identified influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 and A(H3N2) strains, which contain all the evolutionary markers of influenza A strains circulated in 2015, and which could be used as vaccine candidates for the 2015/2016 season. Thus, genome-wide analysis of evolutionary markers of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 and A(H3N2) viruses may guide selection of vaccine strain candidates. PMID:26615216

  14. Genome-Wide Analysis of Evolutionary Markers of Human Influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 and A(H3N2) Viruses May Guide Selection of Vaccine Strain Candidates.

    PubMed

    Belanov, Sergei S; Bychkov, Dmitrii; Benner, Christian; Ripatti, Samuli; Ojala, Teija; Kankainen, Matti; Kai Lee, Hong; Wei-Tze Tang, Julian; Kainov, Denis E

    2015-11-27

    Here we analyzed whole-genome sequences of 3,969 influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 and 4,774 A(H3N2) strains that circulated during 2009-2015 in the world. The analysis revealed changes at 481 and 533 amino acid sites in proteins of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 and A(H3N2) strains, respectively. Many of these changes were introduced as a result of random drift. However, there were 61 and 68 changes that were present in relatively large number of A(H1N1)pdm09 and A(H3N2) strains, respectively, that circulated during relatively long time. We named these amino acid substitutions evolutionary markers, as they seemed to contain valuable information regarding the viral evolution. Interestingly, influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 and A(H3N2) viruses acquired non-overlapping sets of evolutionary markers. We next analyzed these characteristic markers in vaccine strains recommended by the World Health Organization for the past five years. Our analysis revealed that vaccine strains carried only few evolutionary markers at antigenic sites of viral hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA). The absence of these markers at antigenic sites could affect the recognition of HA and NA by human antibodies generated in response to vaccinations. This could, in part, explain moderate efficacy of influenza vaccines during 2009-2014. Finally, we identified influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 and A(H3N2) strains, which contain all the evolutionary markers of influenza A strains circulated in 2015, and which could be used as vaccine candidates for the 2015/2016 season. Thus, genome-wide analysis of evolutionary markers of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 and A(H3N2) viruses may guide selection of vaccine strain candidates.

  15. International Laboratory Comparison of Influenza Microneutralization Assays for A(H1N1)pdm09, A(H3N2), and A(H5N1) Influenza Viruses by CONSISE.

    PubMed

    Laurie, Karen L; Engelhardt, Othmar G; Wood, John; Heath, Alan; Katz, Jacqueline M; Peiris, Malik; Hoschler, Katja; Hungnes, Olav; Zhang, Wenqing; Van Kerkhove, Maria D

    2015-08-01

    The microneutralization assay is commonly used to detect antibodies to influenza virus, and multiple protocols are used worldwide. These protocols differ in the incubation time of the assay as well as in the order of specific steps, and even within protocols there are often further adjustments in individual laboratories. The impact these protocol variations have on influenza serology data is unclear. Thus, a laboratory comparison of the 2-day enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and 3-day hemagglutination (HA) microneutralization (MN) protocols, using A(H1N1)pdm09, A(H3N2), and A(H5N1) viruses, was performed by the CONSISE Laboratory Working Group. Individual laboratories performed both assay protocols, on multiple occasions, using different serum panels. Thirteen laboratories from around the world participated. Within each laboratory, serum sample titers for the different assay protocols were compared between assays to determine the sensitivity of each assay and were compared between replicates to assess the reproducibility of each protocol for each laboratory. There was good correlation of the results obtained using the two assay protocols in most laboratories, indicating that these assays may be interchangeable for detecting antibodies to the influenza A viruses included in this study. Importantly, participating laboratories have aligned their methodologies to the CONSISE consensus 2-day ELISA and 3-day HA MN assay protocols to enable better correlation of these assays in the future.

  16. 78 FR 11555 - Special Conditions: Embraer S.A., Model EMB-550 Airplane; Design Roll Maneuver for Electronic...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-19

    ... Embraer S.A. EMB-550 airplanes was published in the Federal Register on November 26, 2012 (77 FR 70384...; Design Roll Maneuver for Electronic Flight Controls AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT... design roll maneuver for electronic flight controls, specifically an electronic flight control...

  17. Studies on the role of the Ah receptor in hexachloro-benzene-induced porphyria

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, M.E.

    1987-01-01

    Many of the effects of hexachlorobenzene (HCB) resemble those of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), whose effects are initiated by its binding to the AH receptor, the regulatory gene product of the Ah locus. I investigated the ability of HCB to interact with the AH receptor and the involvement of this protein in HCB-induced porphyria. The induction of two cytochrome P450 isozymes regulated by the Ah locus was also examined in light of their possible role in the pathogenesis of HCB- and TCDD-induced porphyria. HCB competitively inhibited the in vitro specific binding of ({sup 3}H)-TCDD to the rat hepatic Ah receptor (K{sub I} = 2.1 {mu}M) without affecting the solubility of ({sup 3}H)TCDD. Following the administration of HCB to rats, the number of ({sup 3}H)TCDD specific binding sites was reduced by up to 40%. HCB induced cytochromes P450b, P450e, P450c, and P450d, confirming that it is a mixed-type P450 inducer. The presence of porphyria in mice was assessed by measuring urinary and hepatic porphyrins and hepatic uroporphyrinogen decarboxylase activity.

  18. Airborne Transmission of Influenza A/H5N1 Virus Between Ferrets

    PubMed Central

    Herfst, Sander; Schrauwen, Eefje J. A.; Linster, Martin; Chutinimitkul, Salin; de Wit, Emmie; Munster, Vincent J.; Sorrell, Erin M.; Bestebroer, Theo M.; Burke, David F.; Smith, Derek J.; Rimmelzwaan, Guus F.; Osterhaus, Albert D. M. E.; Fouchier, Ron A. M.

    2016-01-01

    Highly pathogenic avian influenza A/H5N1 virus can cause morbidity and mortality in humans but thus far has not acquired the ability to be transmitted by aerosol or respiratory droplet (“airborne transmission”) between humans. To address the concern that the virus could acquire this ability under natural conditions, we genetically modified A/H5N1 virus by site-directed mutagenesis and subsequent serial passage in ferrets. The genetically modified A/H5N1 virus acquired mutations during passage in ferrets, ultimately becoming airborne transmissible in ferrets. None of the recipient ferrets died after airborne infection with the mutant A/H5N1 viruses. Four amino acid substitutions in the host receptor-binding protein hemagglutinin, and one in the polymerase complex protein basic polymerase 2, were consistently present in airborne-transmitted viruses. The transmissible viruses were sensitive to the antiviral drug oseltamivir and reacted well with antisera raised against H5 influenza vaccine strains. Thus, avian A/H5N1 influenza viruses can acquire the capacity for airborne transmission between mammals without recombination in an intermediate host and therefore constitute a risk for human pandemic influenza. PMID:22723413

  19. Long-Term Cytotoxicity, pH and Dissolution Rate of AH Plus and MTA Fillapex.

    PubMed

    Silva, Emmanuel João Nogueira Leal da; Accorsi-Mendonça, Thais; Pedrosa, Ana Carolina; Granjeiro, José Mauro; Zaia, Alexandre A

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to verify the long-term cytotoxic effects of the MTA Fillapex and to compare them with AH Plus. Dissolution rate and pH were also evaluated. Human osteoblast cells were incubated with elutes of fresh specimens from AH Plus and MTA Fillapex, and with elutes of the same specimens for 4 successive weeks. Elute's pH was evaluated at each time point. A multiparametric cell viability assay was performed. For dissolution rate, ISO methodology was used. The results were analyzed by one-way analysis of variance, complemented with the Tukey post-test (p<0.05). No significant difference was found among the materials when fresh mixed (p>0.05). After 1 week, AH Plus became non-cytotoxic on all three evaluated parameters. Conversely, MTA Fillapex remained severely and mildly cytotoxic over the entire experimental period (p<0.05). The dissolution rate of AH Plus was significantly lower than MTA Fillapex at all time points (p>0.05). The pH of AH Plus was significantly lower than MTA Fillapex at the second and third week (p<0.05). In the other tested time points no statistical difference was observed. In conclusion, MTA Fillapex remained cytotoxic after 4 weeks and its cytotoxicity may be related to the high dissolution rate of this material. PMID:27652704

  20. Effects of scorched food leachates with or without activated charcoal pretreatment on AhR activation in cultured cells.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Satoshi; Morita, Koji; Kinoshita, Makoto; Fujimori, Shin; Ishikawa, Toshio

    2015-12-01

    Aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a transcription factor activated by xenobiotics, including dioxins and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Although AhR is also activated by some dietary constituents, it has not been completely clarified in what circumstances AhR ligands are ingested in our daily life. Because PAHs are formed by the incomplete combustion of organic materials, we hypothesized that scorched foods might contain and leach out AhR ligands sufficient to stimulate AhR in vitro. To test this hypothesis, scorched foods (bread, cheese, etc.) were mixed vigorously with water, and the supernatants were retrieved as samples. The samples were added to HepG2 cells stably expressing an AhR-responsive reporter gene. Also, expression of CYP1A1, an endogenous AhR-responsive gene, was analyzed by RT-PCR in different cell lines treated with the samples. We further tested whether pretreatment of the samples with activated charcoal would alter their AhR-stimulating activity. All the supernatant samples tested induced AhR-dependent reporter gene activity and CYP1A1 mRNA expression. In some samples, these inductions were inhibited by pretreatment with activated charcoal. Our findings indicate that scorched food leachates stimulate AhR in cultured cells and that activated charcoal adsorbs the AhR-stimulating substances in some leachates. Thus, people who habitually eat scorched foods are exposed to AhR ligands on a regular basis. Further studies are needed to elucidate whether burnt foods actually exert biological effects on our health.

  1. Effects of scorched food leachates with or without activated charcoal pretreatment on AhR activation in cultured cells.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Satoshi; Morita, Koji; Kinoshita, Makoto; Fujimori, Shin; Ishikawa, Toshio

    2015-12-01

    Aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a transcription factor activated by xenobiotics, including dioxins and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Although AhR is also activated by some dietary constituents, it has not been completely clarified in what circumstances AhR ligands are ingested in our daily life. Because PAHs are formed by the incomplete combustion of organic materials, we hypothesized that scorched foods might contain and leach out AhR ligands sufficient to stimulate AhR in vitro. To test this hypothesis, scorched foods (bread, cheese, etc.) were mixed vigorously with water, and the supernatants were retrieved as samples. The samples were added to HepG2 cells stably expressing an AhR-responsive reporter gene. Also, expression of CYP1A1, an endogenous AhR-responsive gene, was analyzed by RT-PCR in different cell lines treated with the samples. We further tested whether pretreatment of the samples with activated charcoal would alter their AhR-stimulating activity. All the supernatant samples tested induced AhR-dependent reporter gene activity and CYP1A1 mRNA expression. In some samples, these inductions were inhibited by pretreatment with activated charcoal. Our findings indicate that scorched food leachates stimulate AhR in cultured cells and that activated charcoal adsorbs the AhR-stimulating substances in some leachates. Thus, people who habitually eat scorched foods are exposed to AhR ligands on a regular basis. Further studies are needed to elucidate whether burnt foods actually exert biological effects on our health. PMID:26558458

  2. A human intervention study with foods containing natural Ah-receptor agonists does not significantly show AhR-mediated effects as measured in blood cells and urine.

    PubMed

    de Waard, Pim W J; Peijnenburg, Ad A C M; Baykus, Hakan; Aarts, Jac M M J G; Hoogenboom, Ron L A P; van Schooten, Frederik J; de Kok, Theo M C M

    2008-10-22

    Binding and activation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is thought to be an essential step in the toxicity of the environmental pollutants dioxins and dioxin-like PCBs. However, also a number of natural compounds, referred to as NAhRAs (natural Ah-receptor agonists), which are present in, for example, fruits and vegetables, can bind and activate this receptor. To study their potential effects in humans, we first investigated the effect of the prototypical AhR agonist 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) on gene expression in ex vivo exposed freshly isolated human lymphocytes, and compared the resulting gene expression profile with those caused by the well-known NAhRA indolo[3,2-b]carbazole (ICZ), originating from cruciferous vegetables, and by a hexane extract of NAhRA-containing grapefruit juice (GJE). Only ICZ induced a gene expression profile similar to TCDD in the lymphocytes, and both significantly up-regulated CYP1B1 and TIPARP (TCDD-inducible poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase) mRNA. Next, we performed a human intervention study with NAhRA-containing cruciferous vegetables and grapefruit juice. The expression of the prototypical AhR-responsive genes CYP1A1, CYP1B1 and NQO1 in whole blood cells and in freshly isolated lymphocytes was not significantly affected. Also enzyme activities of CYP1A2, CYP2A6, N-acetyltransferase 2 (NAT2) and xanthine oxidase (XO), as judged by caffeine metabolites in urine, were unaffected, except for a small down-regulation of NAT2 activity by grapefruit juice. Examination of blood plasma with DR CALUX showed a 12% increased AhR agonist activity 3 and 24 h after consumption of cruciferous vegetables, but did not show a significant effect of grapefruit juice consumption. We conclude that intake of NAhRAs from food may result in minor AhR-related effects measurable in human blood and urine. PMID:18762178

  3. AhR expression and polymorphisms are associated with risk of coronary arterial disease in Chinese population

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Shian; Shui, Xiaorong; He, Yuan; Xue, Yiqiang; Li, Jianwen; Li, Guoming; Lei, Wei; Chen, Can

    2015-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) mediates the control of environmental toxicity, and modulates the development and pathogenesis of the cardiovascular system. However, little is known about the role of AhR in coronary arterial disease (CAD) susceptibility. We therefore conducted a case-control study in a Chinese population, and assessed the potential association between AhR variants and CAD susceptibility. Compared with the controls, circulating AhR expression was found to be significantly increased in patients with CAD and its subtypes including ST-segment and non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction, and stable and unstable angina pectoris. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis to evaluate the effect of AhR on CAD progression showed it to be a potent biomarker for CAD. Genotype frequencies of AhR rs2066853 differed significantly between CAD and control subjects, while smoking and hyperlipidemia markedly promoted CAD risk relative to the AhR polymorphism. Moreover, a significant difference in AhR variant distribution was observed between the four CAD subtypes with different severities. The expression level and functional polymorphisms of circulating AhR may affect the susceptibility and progression of CAD in Chinese populations. This provides a novel view of the etiology and epidemiology of CAD, and will contribute to the diagnosis and therapy of this severe disease. PMID:25620626

  4. Physicochemical properties and surfaces morphologies evaluation of MTA FillApex and AH plus.

    PubMed

    Borges, Álvaro Henrique; Orçati Dorileo, Maura Cristiane Gonçales; Dalla Villa, Ricardo; Borba, Alexandre Meireles; Semenoff, Tereza Aparecida Delle Vedove; Guedes, Orlando Aguirre; Estrela, Cyntia Rodrigues Araújo; Bandeca, Matheus Coelho

    2014-01-01

    The solubility, pH, electrical conductivity, and radiopacity of AH Plus and MTA FillApex were evaluated. In addition, the surfaces morphologies of the sealers were analyzed by using scanning electron microscopy. For pH test, the samples were immersed in distilled water at different periods of time. The same solution was used for electrical conductivity measurement. The solubility and radiopacity were evaluated according to ANSI/ADA. Statistical analyses were carried out at 5% level of significance. MTA FillApex presented higher mean value for solubility and electrical conductivity. No significant difference was observed in the mean values for pH reading. AH Plus presented higher radiopacity mean values. MTA FillApex presented an external surface with porosities and a wide range of sizes. In conclusion, the materials fulfill the ANSI/ADA requirements when considering the radiopacity and solubility. AH Plus revealed a compact and homogeneous surface with more regular aspects and equal particle sizes.

  5. Identification and simulation evaluation of an AH-64 helicopter hover math model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schroeder, J. A.; Watson, D. C.; Tischler, M. B.; Eshow, M. M.

    1991-01-01

    Frequency-domain parameter-identification techniques were used to develop a hover mathematical model of the AH-64 Apache helicopter from flight data. The unstable AH-64 bare-airframe characteristics without a stability-augmentation system were parameterized in the convectional stability-derivative form. To improve the model's vertical response, a simple transfer-function model approximating the effects of dynamic inflow was developed. Additional subcomponents of the vehicle were also modeled and simulated, such as a basic engine response for hover and the vehicle stick dynamic characteristics. The model, with and without stability augmentation, was then evaluated by AH-64 pilots in a moving-base simulation. It was the opinion of the pilots that the simulation was a satisfactory representation of the aircraft for the tasks of interest. The principal negative comment was that height control was more difficult in the simulation than in the aircraft.

  6. Orbital Period Investigations of Two W UMa-type Binaries: AH Aur and V728 Her

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yun-Xia; Xiang, Fu-Yuan; Hu, Ke

    2016-04-01

    The orbital period changes of two W UMa-type binaries, AH Aur and V728 Her, are investigated based on all available times of the light minimum taken from the databases and literature. It is revealed that the orbital period of AH Aur shows a long-term decrease at a rate of {dP}/{dt}=-2.491× {10}-7 days yr-1. For V728 Her, we find that the orbital period exhibits a secular increase at a rate of {dP}/{dt}=3.793× {10}-7 days yr-1. The secular period changes suggest that AH Aur and V728 Her are undergoing rapid mass transfer between the primary star and the secondary companion.

  7. 46 CFR 35.20-40 - Maneuvering characteristics-T/OC.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... degrees with maximum rudder angle and constant power settings. (2) The time and distance to stop the... for the normal load and normal ballast condition for: (1) Calm weather—wind 10 knots or less, calm sea... conditions, upon which the maneuvering information is based, are varied: (1) Calm weather—wind 10 knots...

  8. "Basal Cell Blanche": A Diagnostic Maneuver to Increase Early Detection of Basal Cell Carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Quach, Olivia Leigh; Barry, Megan; Roberts Cruse, Allison; Wilson, Barbara B

    2016-01-01

    Basal cell carcinomas represent one of the most common skin cancers and often present initially in the primary care setting. Subtle basal cell carcinomas may be difficult to detect, and early detection of these carcinomas remains important in limiting patient morbidity. In this article, we present a simple diagnostic maneuver, "basal cell blanche," to increase early detection of basal cell carcinomas. PMID:27170799

  9. 32 CFR Appendix D to Part 552 - Unauthorized Activities in Fort Lewis Maneuver Areas

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Areas D Appendix D to Part 552 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY MILITARY RESERVATIONS AND NATIONAL CEMETERIES REGULATIONS AFFECTING MILITARY RESERVATIONS Pt. 552, App. D Appendix D to Part 552—Unauthorized Activities in Fort Lewis Maneuver Areas Civilian...

  10. Adaptive chirp-Fourier transform for chirp estimation with applications in ISAR imaging of maneuvering targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Xiang-Gen; Wang, Genyuan; Chen, Victor C.

    2001-03-01

    This paper first reviews some basic properties of the discrete chirp-Fourier transform and then present an adaptive chirp- Fourier transform, a generalization of the amplitude and phase estimation of sinusoids (APES) algorithm proposed by Li and Stoica for sinusoidal signals. We finally applied it to the ISAR imaging of maneuvering targets.

  11. "Roller coaster maneuver via lateral orbital approach" for reduction of isolated zygomatic arch fractures.

    PubMed

    Pilanci, Ozgur; Basaran, Karaca; Datli, Asli; Kuvat, Samet Vasfi

    2013-11-01

    Numerous techniques have been reported for the reduction of zygomatic arch fractures. In this article, we aimed to describe a technique we named as "roller coaster maneuver via lateral orbital approach" to closed reduction of the isolated-type zygomatic arch fractures. Surgical outcomes of 14 patients treated with this method were outlined. PMID:24220411

  12. X-48B Phase 1 Flight Maneuver Database and ICP Airspace Constraint Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fast, Peter Alan

    2010-01-01

    The work preformed during the Summer 2010 by Peter Fast. The main tasks assigned were to update and improve the X-48 Flight Maneuver Database and conduct an Airspace Constraint Analysis for the Remotely Operated Aircraft Area used to flight test Unmanned Arial Vehicles. The final task was to develop and demonstrate a working knowledge of flight control theory.

  13. Conflict Resolution Performance in an Experimental Study of En Route Free Maneuvering Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doble, Nathan A.; Barhydt, Richard; Hitt, James M., II

    2005-01-01

    NASA has developed a far-term air traffic management concept, termed Distributed Air/Ground Traffic Management (DAG-TM). One component of DAG-TM, En Route Free Maneuvering, allows properly trained flight crews of equipped autonomous aircraft to assume responsibility for separation from other autonomous aircraft and from Instrument Flight Rules (IFR) aircraft. Ground-based air traffic controllers continue to separate IFR traffic and issue flow management constraints to all aircraft. To examine En Route Free Maneuvering operations, a joint human-in-the-loop experiment was conducted in summer 2004 at the NASA Ames and Langley Research Centers. Test subject pilots used desktop flight simulators to resolve traffic conflicts and adhere to air traffic flow constraints issued by subject controllers. The experimental airspace integrated both autonomous and IFR aircraft at varying traffic densities. This paper presents a subset of the En Route Free Maneuvering experimental results, focusing on airborne and ground-based conflict resolution, and the effects of increased traffic levels on the ability of pilots and air traffic controllers to perform this task. The results show that, in general, increases in autonomous traffic do not significantly impact conflict resolution performance. In addition, pilot acceptability of autonomous operations remains high throughout the range of traffic densities studied. Together with previously reported findings, these results continue to support the feasibility of the En Route Free Maneuvering component of DAG-TM.

  14. Preparing GMAT for Operational Maneuver Planning of the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Qureshi, Rizwan Hamid; Hughes, Steven P.

    2014-01-01

    The General Mission Analysis Tool (GMAT) is an open-source space mission design, analysis and trajectory optimization tool. GMAT is developed by a team of NASA, private industry, public and private contributors. GMAT is designed to model, optimize and estimate spacecraft trajectories in flight regimes ranging from low Earth orbit to lunar applications, interplanetary trajectories and other deep space missions. GMAT has also been flight qualified to support operational maneuver planning for the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) mission. ACE was launched in August, 1997 and is orbiting the Sun-Earth L1 libration point. The primary science objective of ACE is to study the composition of both the solar wind and the galactic cosmic rays. Operational orbit determination, maneuver operations and product generation for ACE are conducted by NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) Flight Dynamics Facility (FDF). This paper discusses the entire engineering lifecycle and major operational certification milestones that GMAT successfully completed to obtain operational certification for the ACE mission. Operational certification milestones such as gathering of the requirements for ACE operational maneuver planning, gap analysis, test plans and procedures development, system design, pre-shadow operations, training to FDF ACE maneuver planners, shadow operations, Test Readiness Review (TRR) and finally Operational Readiness Review (ORR) are discussed. These efforts have demonstrated that GMAT is flight quality software ready to support ACE mission operations in the FDF.

  15. Optimizing interplanetary trajectories with deep space maneuvers. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Navagh, John

    1993-01-01

    Analysis of interplanetary trajectories is a crucial area for both manned and unmanned missions of the Space Exploration Initiative. A deep space maneuver (DSM) can improve a trajectory in much the same way as a planetary swingby. However, instead of using a gravitational field to alter the trajectory, the on-board propulsion system of the spacecraft is used when the vehicle is not near a planet. The purpose is to develop an algorithm to determine where and when to use deep space maneuvers to reduce the cost of a trajectory. The approach taken to solve this problem uses primer vector theory in combination with a non-linear optimizing program to minimize Delta(V). A set of necessary conditions on the primer vector is shown to indicate whether a deep space maneuver will be beneficial. Deep space maneuvers are applied to a round trip mission to Mars to determine their effect on the launch opportunities. Other studies which were performed include cycler trajectories and Mars mission abort scenarios. It was found that the software developed was able to locate quickly DSM's which lower the total Delta(V) on these trajectories.

  16. Fugitive dust emissions from off-road vehicle maneuvers on military training lands

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Off-road vehicle training can contribute to air quality degradation because of increased wind erosion as a result of soil disruption during high wind events. However, limited information exists regarding the impacts of off-road vehicle maneuvering on wind erosion potential of soils. This study was c...

  17. Fugitive particulate air emissions from off-road vehicle maneuvers at military training lands

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Military training lands used for off-road vehicle maneuvers may be subject to severe soil loss and air quality degradation as a result of severe wind erosion. The objective of this study was to measure suspended particulate matter resulting from various different vehicle training scenarios. Soil s...

  18. International Space Station/Shuttle "Flip" Maneuver for Thermal Protection System Repair Consultation Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennehy, Cornelius J.; Bauer, Frank; Bilimoria, Karl D.; Dillman, Dennis B.; Gilbert, Michael G.; Hagopian, Michael; Hua, Tuyen; Legget, Jay; Maghami, Peiman G.; Mangus, David J.; Starin, Scott R.

    2009-01-01

    The intent of this Technical Consultation Report is to document the finding and recommendations of the NESC Orbiter Repair Maneuver (ORM) Peer Review conducted at NASA s Johnson Space Center (JSC) with the ORM Working Group (WG) over the period 8-10 June 2005.

  19. Candidate T-37 Pilot Performance Measures for Five Contact Maneuvers. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connelly, Edward M.; And Others

    The objective of this program was to develop candidate pilot performance measures for five undergraduate pilot training (UPT) contact training maneuvers flown in the T-37B aircraft. The work included development and application of a method of analyzing operator performance tasks for purposes of identifying candidate measures. This resulted in…

  20. Gender differences in hip adduction motion and torque during a single-leg agility maneuver.

    PubMed

    Hewett, Timothy E; Ford, Kevin R; Myer, Gregory D; Wanstrath, Kim; Scheper, Melia

    2006-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify gender differences in hip motion and kinetics during a single leg bidirectional deceleration maneuver. The rationale for the development of this maneuver was to test dynamic hip control during the deceleration of three different types of single-leg landings. The hypothesis was that female athletes would display increased hip adduction angles and moments during the maneuver compared to male athletes. Thirty-six collegiate soccer players (19 female, 17 male) volunteered to participate. Subjects were instructed to start the maneuver balancing on one foot, to hop through an agility-speed ladder on the same leg "up two boxes, back one, and then up one and hold it." Hip kinematics and kinetics during all three landings were examined. Females demonstrated significantly greater hip adduction angles at initial contact during all three landings and greater maximal hip adduction during landings 1 and 2 compared to male athletes. Females also exhibited significantly increased external hip adduction moments during landing 1, however, no differences were found between genders during landings 2 and 3.

  1. Spacecraft Formation Flying Maneuvers Using Linear Quadratic Regulation With No Radial Axis Inputs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starin, Scott R.; Yedavalli, R. K.; Sparks, Andrew G.; Bauer, Frank H. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Regarding multiple spacecraft formation flying, the observation has been made that control thrust need only be applied coplanar to the local horizon to achieve complete controllability of a two-satellite (leader-follower) formation. A formulation of orbital dynamics using the state of one satellite relative to another is used. Without the need for thrust along the radial (zenith-nadir) axis of the relative reference frame, propulsion system simplifications and weight reduction may be accomplished. This work focuses on the validation of this control system on its own merits, and in comparison to a related system which does provide thrust along the radial axis of the relative frame. Maneuver simulations are performed using commercial ODE solvers to propagate the Keplerian dynamics of a controlled satellite relative to an uncontrolled leader. These short maneuver simulations demonstrate the capacity of the controller to perform changes from one formation geometry to another. Control algorithm performance is evaluated based on measures such as the fuel required to complete a maneuver and the maximum acceleration required by the controller. Based on this evaluation, the exclusion of the radial axis of control still allows enough control authority to use Linear Quadratic Regulator (LQR) techniques to design a gain matrix of adequate performance over finite maneuvers. Additional simulations are conducted including perturbations and using no radial control inputs. A major conclusion presented is that control inputs along the three axes have significantly different relationships to the governing orbital dynamics that may be exploited using LQR.

  2. Control of a high beta maneuvering reentry vehicle using dynamic inversion.

    SciTech Connect

    Watts, Alfred Chapman

    2005-05-01

    The design of flight control systems for high performance maneuvering reentry vehicles presents a significant challenge to the control systems designer. These vehicles typically have a much higher ballistic coefficient than crewed vehicles like as the Space Shuttle or proposed crew return vehicles such as the X-38. Moreover, the missions of high performance vehicles usually require a steeper reentry flight path angle, followed by a pull-out into level flight. These vehicles then must transit the entire atmosphere and robustly perform the maneuvers required for the mission. The vehicles must also be flown with small static margins in order to perform the required maneuvers, which can result in highly nonlinear aerodynamic characteristics that frequently transition from being aerodynamically stable to unstable as angle of attack increases. The control system design technique of dynamic inversion has been applied successfully to both high performance aircraft and low beta reentry vehicles. The objective of this study was to explore the application of this technique to high performance maneuvering reentry vehicles, including the basic derivation of the dynamic inversion technique, followed by the extension of that technique to the use of tabular trim aerodynamic models in the controller. The dynamic inversion equations are developed for high performance vehicles and augmented to allow the selection of a desired response for the control system. A six degree of freedom simulation is used to evaluate the performance of the dynamic inversion approach, and results for both nominal and off nominal aerodynamic characteristics are presented.

  3. 46 CFR 35.20-40 - Maneuvering characteristics-T/OC.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... degrees with maximum rudder angle and constant power settings. (2) The time and distance to stop the... for the normal load and normal ballast condition for: (1) Calm weather—wind 10 knots or less, calm sea... conditions, upon which the maneuvering information is based, are varied: (1) Calm weather—wind 10 knots...

  4. Vertigo during the Epley maneuver and success rate in patients with BPPV.

    PubMed

    Fyrmpas, Georgios; Barkoulas, Eustathios; Haidich, Anna Bettina; Tsalighopoulos, Miltiadis

    2013-09-01

    To investigate whether reported vertigo during the Epley maneuver predicts therapeutic success in patients with benign paroxysmal positioning vertigo of the posterior semicircular canal (pc-BPPV). Fifty consecutive adult patients with pc-BPPV, based on a positive Dix-Hallpike test (DHT), were treated with the Epley maneuver and retested after 2 days. Patients were asked to report the presence of vertigo upon assuming each of the four positions of the maneuver. Thirty seven patients (74 %) were treated successfully in one session. Twenty out of 23 patients who reported vertigo at turning the head to the opposite side (2nd position) had a negative DHT on follow-up. These patients had a higher chance of a successful outcome compared to patients who did not report vertigo in the 2nd position (Odds ratio 5.3, 95 % CI: 1.3-22.2, p = 0.022). Report of vertigo at the other positions was not associated with the outcome. Report of vertigo at the second position of a single modified Epley maneuver is associated with therapeutic success.

  5. 32 CFR Appendix D to Part 552 - Unauthorized Activities in Fort Lewis Maneuver Areas

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Areas D Appendix D to Part 552 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY MILITARY RESERVATIONS AND NATIONAL CEMETERIES REGULATIONS AFFECTING MILITARY RESERVATIONS Pt. 552, App. D Appendix D to Part 552—Unauthorized Activities in Fort Lewis Maneuver Areas Civilian...

  6. Effect of hinge-moment parameters on elevator stick forces in rapid maneuvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Robert T; Greenberg, Harry

    1944-01-01

    The importance of the stick force per unit normal acceleration as a criterion of longitudinal stability and the critical dependence of this gradient on elevator hinge-moment parameters have been shown in previous reports. The present report continues the investigation with special reference to transient effects for maneuvers of short duration.

  7. 76 FR 36870 - Special Conditions: Gulfstream Model GVI Airplane; Design Roll Maneuver Requirement for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-23

    ..., 2011 (76 FR 8319). Only one comment was received, which was supportive, so these special conditions are...; Design Roll Maneuver Requirement for Electronic Flight Controls AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration... electronic flight control system that provides roll control of the airplane through pilot inputs to...

  8. The Relationship between Submental Surface Electromyography and Hyo-Laryngeal Kinematic Measures of Mendelsohn Maneuver Duration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Azola, Alba M.; Greene, Lindsey R.; Taylor-Kamara, Isha; Macrae, Phoebe; Anderson, Cheryl; Humbert, Ianessa A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The Mendelsohn Maneuver (MM) is a commonly prescribed technique that is taught to individuals with dysphagia to improve swallowing ability. Due to cost and safety concerns associated with videofluoroscopy (VFS) use, submental surface electromyography (ssEMG) is commonly used in place of VFS to train the MM in clinical and research…

  9. A computational investigation of the three-dimensional unsteady aerodynamics of Drosophila hovering and maneuvering.

    PubMed

    Ramamurti, Ravi; Sandberg, William C

    2007-03-01

    Three-dimensional unsteady computations of the flow past a fruit fly Drosophila under hovering and free flight conditions are computed. The kinematics of the wings and the body of the fruit fly are prescribed from experimental observations. The computed unsteady lift and thrust forces are validated with experimental results and are in excellent agreement. The unsteady aerodynamic origin of the time-varying yaw moment is identified. The differences in the kinematics between the right and the left wings show that subtle change in the stroke angle and deviation angle can result in the yaw moment for the turning maneuver. The computed yaw moment reaches a peak value at the beginning of the maneuver and remains positive throughout the remainder of the maneuver. The origin of the yaw moment is investigated by computing the center of pressures on each wing and the individual moment arms. This investigation leads to the conclusion that it is the forward force and a component of the lift force that combine to produce the turning moment while the side force alone produces the restoring torque during the maneuver. The vorticity shed from the wing's leading edge and the tips show a loop like structure that during stroke reversals pinches off into Lambda-like structures that have not been previously observed in the wakes of flapping fliers.

  10. Ground crewmen maneuver the Helios Prototype flying wing on its ground support dolly during function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Ground crewmen maneuver AeroVironment's solar-powered Helios Prototype flying wing on its ground support dolly during functional checkouts prior to its first flights under solar power from the U.S. Navy's Pacific Missile Range Facility on Kaua'i, Hawaii.

  11. Mathematical relation between the Hohmann transfer and continuous-low thrust Maneuvers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bettinger, Robert A.; Black, Jonathan T.

    2014-03-01

    Employed primarily by spacecraft with electric propulsion systems, spiral orbital transfers are characterized by continuous thrust throughout the maneuver. The ΔV required to conduct a continuous-low-thrust spiral transfer can be determined if the limit of the ΔV equation for a Hohmann transfer is evaluated as the number of consecutive Hohmann transfers, or burn frequency, approaches infinity.

  12. A Low Speed Maneuvering Technology for Docking of Unmanned Underwater Vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohseni, K.

    2006-12-01

    Reliable docking mechanisms are essential for operation of AUV networks in harsh environment such as under ice in polar region. Hydrodynamic design of AUVs are often driven on a few competing fronts: (i) Rapid and efficient deployment to the work-zone and (ii) low speed maneuvering during the docking procedure and for operations at the work-zone. Rapid deployment necessitates a streamlined body of revolution (eg. Torpedo- shape design) for fast cruising with minimal energy. However, since the trajectory of this type of vehicles is adjusted using control surfaces, the magnitude of the available control force is proportional to the vehicle's speed. Consequently, these vehicles are difficult to maneuver at low speeds and in tight spaces. Therefore, they are particularly difficult to dock. Such vehicles also cannot opportunistically enter a precise loitering or hovering mode. As a result much current effort is devoted to the development of docking mechanisms, but this is just a solution for the symptoms, and does not really address the problem of the vehicle's actual maneuvering capabilities. On the other hand, low speed maneuvering and better control are often achieved by the so-called box-design where the low drag body-of-revolution design is sacrificed by adding multiple thrusters at different locations and directions. In this case, precise maneuvering can be achieved at the cost of increased drag and the need for an alternate technique to transport the vehicle from the offshore base or an escort ship to the work-zone. In an effort to resolve this trade-off, we have recently proposed to use compact synthetic jets for low speed maneuvering or locomotion of small unmanned underwater vehicles (UUVs). Inspired by the propulsion of cephalopod, we have designed and implemented compact vortex generators for low speed maneuvering, station keeping, and docking of small underwater vehicles. Design, fabrication, thrust optimization, and implementation of such compact actuators

  13. Solution structure of the isolated histone H2A-H2B heterodimer.

    PubMed

    Moriwaki, Yoshihito; Yamane, Tsutomu; Ohtomo, Hideaki; Ikeguchi, Mitsunori; Kurita, Jun-Ichi; Sato, Masahiko; Nagadoi, Aritaka; Shimojo, Hideaki; Nishimura, Yoshifumi

    2016-01-01

    During chromatin-regulated processes, the histone H2A-H2B heterodimer functions dynamically in and out of the nucleosome. Although detailed crystal structures of nucleosomes have been established, that of the isolated full-length H2A-H2B heterodimer has remained elusive. Here, we have determined the solution structure of human H2A-H2B by NMR coupled with CS-Rosetta. H2A and H2B each contain a histone fold, comprising four α-helices and two β-strands (α1-β1-α2-β2-α3-αC), together with the long disordered N- and C-terminal H2A tails and the long N-terminal H2B tail. The N-terminal αN helix, C-terminal β3 strand, and 310 helix of H2A observed in the H2A-H2B nucleosome structure are disordered in isolated H2A-H2B. In addition, the H2A α1 and H2B αC helices are not well fixed in the heterodimer, and the H2A and H2B tails are not completely random coils. Comparison of hydrogen-deuterium exchange, fast hydrogen exchange, and {(1)H}-(15)N hetero-nuclear NOE data with the CS-Rosetta structure indicates that there is some conformation in the H2A 310 helical and H2B Lys11 regions, while the repression domain of H2B (residues 27-34) exhibits an extended string-like structure. This first structure of the isolated H2A-H2B heterodimer provides insight into its dynamic functions in chromatin. PMID:27181506

  14. Solution structure of the isolated histone H2A-H2B heterodimer

    PubMed Central

    Moriwaki, Yoshihito; Yamane, Tsutomu; Ohtomo, Hideaki; Ikeguchi, Mitsunori; Kurita, Jun-ichi; Sato, Masahiko; Nagadoi, Aritaka; Shimojo, Hideaki; Nishimura, Yoshifumi

    2016-01-01

    During chromatin-regulated processes, the histone H2A-H2B heterodimer functions dynamically in and out of the nucleosome. Although detailed crystal structures of nucleosomes have been established, that of the isolated full-length H2A-H2B heterodimer has remained elusive. Here, we have determined the solution structure of human H2A-H2B by NMR coupled with CS-Rosetta. H2A and H2B each contain a histone fold, comprising four α-helices and two β-strands (α1–β1–α2–β2–α3–αC), together with the long disordered N- and C-terminal H2A tails and the long N-terminal H2B tail. The N-terminal αN helix, C-terminal β3 strand, and 310 helix of H2A observed in the H2A-H2B nucleosome structure are disordered in isolated H2A-H2B. In addition, the H2A α1 and H2B αC helices are not well fixed in the heterodimer, and the H2A and H2B tails are not completely random coils. Comparison of hydrogen-deuterium exchange, fast hydrogen exchange, and {1H}-15N hetero-nuclear NOE data with the CS-Rosetta structure indicates that there is some conformation in the H2A 310 helical and H2B Lys11 regions, while the repression domain of H2B (residues 27–34) exhibits an extended string-like structure. This first structure of the isolated H2A-H2B heterodimer provides insight into its dynamic functions in chromatin. PMID:27181506

  15. Ah-receptor controlled luciferase expression: A novel species-specific bioassay for Ah-receptor active compounds in environmental matrices

    SciTech Connect

    Murk, A.J.; Aarts, J.M.M.J.G.; Koeman, J.H.; Brouwer, A.; Denison, M.S.

    1995-12-31

    Polyhalogenated aromatic hydrocarbons (PHAHs) such as polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs), dibenzofurans (PCDFs) and biphenyls (PCBs) are persistent lipophilic compounds that accumulate especially in sediments and in top predators of the aquatic foodchain. PHAHs elicit a number of common toxic responses, which are highly species-specific. The most toxic, planar, PHAHs share a common mechanism of action mediated by the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). Based on this mechanism, the toxic equivalency factor (TEF) concept has been developed, allowing hazard and risk assessment for mixtures of PHAHs. The TEF-approach assumes additive responses, but also synergistic and antagonistic interactions have been observed. In addition, the often large number of compounds in a mixture, low levels of individual congeners, possible presence of unknown AhR-active substances, and species differences in inducibility, ask for an comprehensive approach in hazard assessment. A number of recombinant cell lines, including Hepa1c1c7 mouse and H411E rat hepatoma cell lines, were developed, showing AhR-mediated firefly (Photinuspyralis) luciferase gene expression. The response by 2,3,7,8-TCDD in the CALUX (chemical activated luciferase expression) assay with these cell lines is dose-dependent, and not subjected to substrate inhibition at higher ligand concentrations. The detection limit for 2,3,7,8-TCDD is below 1 pM (0.2 fmol). The luciferase assay has been successfully applied for monitoring the amount of AhR-active compounds in small aliquots of blood plasma and in both sediment and pore-water samples, of which examples will be presented.

  16. Functional and phenotypic effects of AhR activation in inflammatory dendritic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Bankoti, Jaishree; Rase, Ben; Simones, Tom; Shepherd, David M.

    2010-07-15

    Aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) activation by 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) induces immune suppression. Dendritic cells (DCs) are key antigen presenting cells governing T cell activation and differentiation. However, the consequences of AhR activation in DCs are not fully defined. We hypothesized that AhR activation alters DC differentiation and generates dysfunctional DCs. To test this hypothesis, inflammatory bone marrow-derived DCs (BMDCs) from C57Bl/6 mice were generated in the presence of vehicle or TCDD. TCDD decreased CD11c expression but increased MHC class II, CD86 and CD25 expression on the BMDCs. The effects of TCDD were strictly AhR-dependent but not exclusively DRE-mediated. Similar effects were observed with two natural AhR ligands, 6-formylindolo[3,2-b]carbazole (FICZ) and 2-(1H-Indol-3-ylcarbonyl)-4-thiazolecarboxylic acid (ITE). TCDD increased LPS- and CpG-induced IL-6 and TNF-{alpha} production by BMDCs but decreased their NO production. TCDD decreased CpG-induced IL-12p70 production by BMDCs but did not affect their secretion of IL-10. TCDD downregulated LPS- and CpG-induced NF-kB p65 levels and induced a trend towards upregulation of RelB levels in the BMDCs. AhR activation by TCDD modulated BMDC uptake of both soluble and particulate antigens. Induction of indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) and TGF-{beta}3 has been implicated in the generation of regulatory T cells following AhR activation. TCDD increased IDO1, IDO2 and TGF-{beta}3 mRNA levels in BMDCs as compared to vehicle. Despite the induction of regulatory mediators, TCDD-treated BMDCs failed to suppress antigen-specific T cell activation. Thus, AhR activation can directly alter the differentiation and innate functions of inflammatory DCs without affecting their ability to successfully interact with T cells.

  17. Influenza A/H1N1 Severe Pneumonia: Novel Morphocytological Findings in Bronchoalveolar Lavage

    PubMed Central

    Faverio, Paola; Messinesi, Grazia; Brenna, Ambrogio; Pesci, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    We present the results of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) performed in three patients with severe influenza A/H1N1 pneumonia complicated by acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Light microscopy analysis of BAL cytocentrifugates showed the presence of characteristic large, mononuclear, plasmoblastic/plasmocytoid-like cells never described before. Via transmission electron microscopy, these cells were classified as atypical type II pneumocytes and some of them showed cytoplasmic vesicles and inclusions. We concluded that plasmoblastic/plasmocytoid-like type II pneumocytes might represent a morphologic marker of A/H1N1 influenza virus infection as well as reparative cellular activation after diffuse alveolar damage. PMID:25383078

  18. Physical Parameters of the Overcontact Binary AH Cnc in the Old Open Cluster M 67

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakut, K.; Aerts, C.

    2006-04-01

    We present a photometric study of the overcontact binary AH Cnc. The CCD observations were done with the Russian-Turkish 1.5 m telescope and the light-curve was solved with the Wilson-Devinney code. The physical parameters of the components have been deduced as M1 = 1.22 Msun, M2 = 0.20 Msun, R1 = 1.37 Rsun, R2 = 0.66 Rsun, L1 = 2.65 Lsun and L2 = 0.63 Lsun from the obtained orbital parameters and the distance modules of M 67. AH Cnc has been compared with similar systems in the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram.

  19. The predictive value of Muller maneuver in REM-dependent obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Ozcan, Kursat Murat; Ozcan, Muge; Ozdogan, Fatih; Hizli, Omer; Dere, Huseyin; Unal, Adnan

    2013-09-01

    To our knowledge, no studies up to date have investigated the correlation of rapid eye movement (REM) dependent obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) and Muller maneuver. The aim of this study is to investigate whether REM-dependent OSAS is predicted by the findings of the Muller maneuver. The study was conducted on 149 patients with witnessed apnea and daytime sleepiness. Muller maneuver was performed to all patients and the obstruction site was determined using a five-point scale. Then, polysomnography of the patient was obtained and the apnea-hypopnea indexes were determined in total sleep time, REM-dependent sleep and non-REM-dependent sleep. The correlations between the Muller maneuver findings and polysomnographic data were analyzed. The ages of the patients included in the study ranged between 25 and 73 years with a mean age of 49.3 ± 10.1 years. Their mean body mass index was 30.8 ± 5.1 kg/m(2) (range 21.9-55.4 kg/m(2)). The patients' mean apnea-hypopnea indexes in total sleep time was 28.1 and ranged between 5.4 and 124.3. REM-dependent OSAS was determined in 49 patients. When the data were analyzed, it was determined that there were no statistically significant correlations between tongue base or lateral pharyngeal band obstruction at the level of hypopharynx and the REM-dependent OSAS. At the level of the soft palate, the obstruction caused by the lateral pharyngeal bands or soft palate and REM dependency did not show any statistically significant correlation (p > 0.05). In conclusion, Muller maneuver does not provide useful data to predict REM dependency of OSAS.

  20. Fueling operational maneuver. Monograph report AY89/90

    SciTech Connect

    Bayles, W.J.

    1990-05-29

    Bulk petroleum products are vital to every facet of U.S. Army operations. What means will logisticians use to transport the needed fuel to the fighting units of a corps in an immature theater. Fuel transport methods available to the planner may include pipelines, railway tank cars, inland waterways, motor trucks and combinations of these models. Each method's characteristics and capacities indicate its suitability in a given area of operations. This paper examines the characteristics and capacities of each transport mode in terms of criteria based on the sustainment imperatives of FM 100-5. The study relies heavily on classical military theory. Definitions of modern terms are explained in their theoretical context. The sustainment imperatives anticipation, integration, continuity, responsiveness, and improvisation are derived from classical theory. These are then used to form six major categories of criteria to examine each transportation mode. The author concludes that current army doctrine describes a workable fuel transport system given the capacities of the various transport modes and today's technology. The concept of using pipeline transport as the mainstay of a mixed mode system that is phased into the theater best meets the sustainment imperatives. The analysis also suggests a sixth sustainment imperative, minimizing overhead, as a consideration for the operational logistical.