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Sample records for aid health professionals

  1. A Primer on Aids for Health Professionals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Healy, Ramona M.; Coleman, Ted

    1989-01-01

    This article provides health educators with a fundamental practical understanding of some of the characteristics of the AIDS virus and its adverse effects on the human body. Symptoms, preventive measures, transmission patterns, and guidelines for AIDS education are discussed. (IAH)

  2. AIDS-Related Stigma and Health Professionals in Puerto Rico

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Torres, Yamilette; Cintrón-Bou, Francheska N.; Varas-Díaz, Nelson

    2009-01-01

    This study addresses an important issue in the AIDS epidemic in Puerto Rico: AIDS stigma among health professionals and health profession students. AIDS stigma has been documented among health services providers such as doctors, nurses, psychologists, and social workers. It has detrimental effects of the services provided and the lives of people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA). The main objective of this study was to explore AIDS stigma manifestations among a sample composed of eighty health professionals and health profession students who participated in in-depth qualitative interviews. Four thematic categories stemmed from the data analysis process. These addressed the following subjects: social manifestations of stigma, stigma manifestations in the workplace, use of sensitive information to control PLWHA, and surveillance of PLWHA. Participants manifested instances of stigmatization they had witnessed in their work and training scenarios. Furthermore, they elaborated on the need to place effective surveillance mechanism on PLWHA in order to control the epidemic. PMID:21423837

  3. Mobilizing Lithuanian Health Professionals as Community Peer Leaders for AIDS Prevention: An International Primary Health Care Collaboration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norr, Kathleen F.; McElmurry, Beverly J.; Slutas, Frances M.; Christiansen, Carol D.; Misner, Susan J.; Marks, Beth A.

    2001-01-01

    Using primary health care and peer leadership models, U.S. nurses trained Lithuanian health professionals as community peer leaders in AIDS prevention. A national continuing education program is in place to sustain the initiative in Lithuania. (SK)

  4. Religion and HIV/AIDS stigma: Implications for health professionals in Puerto Rico

    PubMed Central

    Varas-Díaz, N.; Neilands, T.B.; Malavé Rivera, S.; Betancourt, E.

    2009-01-01

    HIV/AIDS stigma continues to be a barrier for prevention efforts. Its detrimental effects have been documented among people living with HIV/AIDS and encompass loss of social support and depression. When it is manifested by health professionals, it can lead to suboptimal services. Although strides have been made to document the effects of HIV/AIDS stigma, much needs to be done in order to understand the structural factors that can foster it. Such is the case of religion’s role on HIV/AIDS stigma in Puerto Rico. The Caribbean Island has a Judeo-Christian based culture due to years of Spanish colonisation. This religious influence continued under Protestantism as part of the Island’s integration as a non-incorporated territory of the USA. The main objective of this study was to explore the role of religion in HIV/AIDS stigma manifested by Puerto Rican health professionals in practice and in training. Through a mixed method approach, 501 health professionals completed qualitative interviews (n=80) and self-administered questionnaires (n=421). Results show that religion plays some role in conceptualisations of health and illness among participants in the study. Furthermore, the importance placed on religion and participation in such activities was related to higher levels of HIV/AIDS stigma. PMID:20087809

  5. Religion and HIV/AIDS stigma: implications for health professionals in Puerto Rico.

    PubMed

    Varas-Díaz, N; Neilands, T B; Malavé Rivera, S; Betancourt, E

    2010-01-01

    Abstract HIV/AIDS stigma continues to be a barrier for prevention efforts. Its detrimental effects have been documented among people living with HIV/AIDS and encompass loss of social support and depression. When it is manifested by health professionals, it can lead to sub-optimal services. Although strides have been made to document the effects of HIV/AIDS stigma, much needs to be done in order to understand the structural factors that can foster it. Such is the case of religion's role on HIV/AIDS stigma in Puerto Rico. The Caribbean Island has a Judeo-Christian-based culture due to years of Spanish colonisation. This religious influence continued under Protestantism as part of the Island's integration as a non-incorporated territory of the USA. The main objective of this study was to explore the role of religion in HIV/AIDS stigma manifested by Puerto Rican health professionals in practice and in training. Through a mixed-method approach, 501 health professionals completed qualitative interviews (n=80) and self-administered questionnaires (n=421). Results show that religion plays some role in conceptualisations of health and illness among participants in the study. Furthermore, the importance placed on religion and participation in such activities was related to higher levels of HIV/AIDS stigma.

  6. Development and Validation of a Culturally Appropriate HIV/AIDS Stigma Scale for Puerto Rican Health Professionals in Training

    PubMed Central

    Díaz, Nelson Varas; Neilands, Torsten B.

    2009-01-01

    HIV/AIDS stigma continues to be an obstacle for primary and secondary HIV prevention. Its consequences for the lives of people living with the disease have been well documented and continue to be of great concern for health care providers and researchers in the field. These consequences are worsened when such stigma emanates from health professionals, as this can limit access to services. One of the main obstacles for HIV/AIDS Stigma research in Puerto Rico is the absence of quantitative measures to assess HIV/AIDS stigma manifestations among health professionals. In light of this gap in the scientific literature, the main objective of this study was to develop and test the psychometric properties of a culturally appropriate HIV/AIDS stigma scale for Puerto Rican health care providers and to develop a reduced form of the scale suitable for use in time-limited clinical settings. The developed measure was based on previous qualitative evidence gathered from Puerto Rican health professionals (Varas-Díaz, Serrano-García & Toro-Alfonso, 2005) and administered to a sample of 421 health professionals in training. The scale addresses 12 HIV/AIDS stigma dimensions. In quantitative analyses 11 of these dimensions demonstrated satisfactory validity and reliability. These dimensions in turn were subcomponents of a higher-order general stigma factor. Implications and limitations of these findings are discussed. PMID:20024702

  7. Information needs of health care professionals in an AIDS outpatient clinic as determined by chart review.

    PubMed Central

    Giuse, N B; Huber, J T; Giuse, D A; Brown, C W; Bankowitz, R A; Hunt, S

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the information needs of health care professionals in HIV-related clinical encounters, and to determine the suitability of existing information sources to address those needs. SETTING: HIV outpatient clinic. PARTICIPANTS: Seven health care professionals with diverse training and patient care involvement. METHODS: Based on patient charts describing 120 patient encounters, participants generated 266 clinical questions. Printed and on-line information sources were used to answer questions in two phases: using commonly available sources and using all available medical library sources. MEASUREMENTS: The questions were divided into 16 categories by subject. The number of questions answered, their categories, the information source(s) providing answers, and the time required to answer questions were recorded for each phase. RESULTS: Each participant generated an average of 3.8 clinical questions per chart. Five categories accounted for almost 75% of all questions; the treatment protocols/regimens category was most frequent (24%). A total of 245 questions (92%) were answered, requiring an average of 15 minutes per question. Most (87%) of the questions were answered via electronic sources, even though paper sources were consulted first. CONCLUSIONS: The participating professionals showed considerable information needs. A combination of on-line and paper sources was necessary to provide the answers. The study suggests that present-day information sources are not entirely satisfactory for answering clinical questions generated by examining charts of HIV-infected patients. PMID:7850563

  8. Knowledge, Beliefs and Attitudes about HIV/AIDS related issues, and the Sources of Knowledge among Health Care Professionals in Southern Nigeria.

    PubMed Central

    Umeh, Chiamaka N.; Ezedinachi, Emmanuel N.; Ross, Michael W.

    2006-01-01

    The HIV/AIDS pandemic has become one of the most important public health problems in recent times and it is having a profound impact on the lives of infected people and their families. There is an acknowledged burden of HIV/AIDS in Nigeria. As the prevalence of HIV/AIDS infection rises, health care professionals worldwide can expect greater clinical exposure to infected patients. Aims: The care of people living with AIDS presents a significant challenge to the health care sector. This study seeks to explore the relationship between sources of HIV/AIDS information and knowledge, and the relationship between knowledge of HIV/AIDS and care for people with AIDS among health care providers in three different levels of health care institutions in the Southern region of Nigeria. Mehods: Health care workers from two states in southern Nigeria completed a questionnaire that was designed to assess knowledge, attitudes and practices about HIV/AIDS. The sample was composed of 277 (65%) females and 135 (31.7%) males. Results: The results showed a fair level of knowledge among all health care professionals, with the highest knowledge among the doctors and the lowest among laboratory workers. There was a significant gender difference in the level of knowledge but the data suggested that knowledge did not differ by hospital settings. There were generally negative feelings and views about the care of HIV/AIDS patients among the professionals, these views being worst at the Community Health Centers and best at the Government Hospital. The greatest source of information for the majority of professionals was health talks/seminars, and those respondents who got their information from school scored the highest on the items on general knowledge of HIV/AIDS incidence, cause, transmission, and clinical treatment. Conclusions: The study showed a fair level of knowledge among all health care professionals, with the highest knowledge among the doctors and the lowest among laboratory workers

  9. Occupational risk of HIV infection among western health care professionals posted in AIDS endemic areas.

    PubMed

    de Graaf, R; Houweling, H; van Zessen, G

    1998-08-01

    In this study on occupational risks of HIV infection among 99 Dutch medics working in AIDS endemic areas, 61% reported percutaneous exposures during an average stay of 21 months. The mean number of injuries was lower among physicians (2.0 versus 3.9 per year) and higher among nurses (1.9 versus 1.2) than in previous research conducted in 1987-1990 among Dutch medics returning from Africa. But the reduction of exposures among physicians might be explained by the fact that the number of procedures they carried out was less in the later study. Also among nurses a shift of tasks was seen. On the basis of an estimated HIV prevalence in the patient population of 19%, a chance of transmission per accident of 0.3%, and 1.9 percutaneous exposures per year, the mean occupational risk of HIV infection per year can be estimated at 0.11% per person. Besides length of stay and number of activities, characteristics of the work setting were associated with the frequency of different kinds of injuries. From the analysis of 109 extensive descriptions of recent accidents, it appeared that the majority of the injuries occurred during routine activities and were self-inflicted. Injuries with hollow needles usually occurred after the actual medical act (e.g. during recapping). Carelessness (e.g. due to fatigue) or being in a hurry (e.g. because of an emergency) were also often the cause of percutaneous injuries, as were the poor quality of the equipment, lack of professional skills, or a combination of these factors. Prevention activities are still important to reduce the frequency of occupational exposures. But they will not eliminate them totally; from the descriptions of recent exposures it was clear that some of the injuries occurred in spite of precautions.

  10. A qualitative study on a decision aid for breast cancer screening: Views from women and health professionals.

    PubMed

    Toledo-Chávarri, A; Rué, M; Codern-Bové, N; Carles-Lavila, M; Perestelo-Pérez, L; Pérez-Lacasta, M J; Feijoo-Cid, M

    2017-02-01

    This qualitative study evaluates a decision aid that includes the benefits and harms of breast cancer screening and analyses women's perception of the information received and healthcare professionals' perceptions of the convenience of providing it. Seven focus groups of women aged 40-69 years (n = 39) and two groups of healthcare professionals (n = 23) were conducted in Catalonia and the Canary Islands. The focus groups consisted of guided discussions regarding decision-making about breast cancer screening, and acceptability and feasibility of the decision aid. A content analysis was performed. Women positively value receiving information regarding the benefits and harms of breast cancer screening. Several women had difficulties understanding some concepts, especially those regarding overdiagnosis. Women preferred to share the decisions on screening with healthcare professionals. The professionals noted the lack of inclusion of some harms and benefits in the decision aid, and proposed improving the clarity of the statistical information. The information on overdiagnosis generates confusion among women and controversy among professionals. Faced with the new information presented by the decision aid, the majority of women prefer shared decision-making; however, its feasibility might be limited by a lack of knowledge and attitudes of rejection from healthcare professionals.

  11. Home Health Aides

    MedlinePlus

    ... do the following: Assist clients in their daily personal tasks, such as bathing or dressing Provide basic ... social networks and communities Home health aides, unlike personal care aides , typically work for certified home health ...

  12. [Perception of AIDS among health professionals who experienced the epidemic while caring for people with the disease in Florianópolis in the state of Santa Catarina, Brazil (1986-2006)].

    PubMed

    Villarinho, Mariana Vieira; Padilha, Maria Itayra

    2014-06-01

    The scope of this study is to ascertain how the health professionals of a Reference Hospital for Infectious diseases experienced the AIDS epidemic while caring for people with the disease between 1986 and 2006. It involved a qualitative study with a socio-historical approach that used oral history to collect data from twenty-three health professionals. The following categories emerged from the content analysis: a change in profile of the AIDS epidemic; the improvement of care for people with HIV/AIDS; and an improvement in working conditions. The health professionals who experienced the epidemic while caring for patients with the disease perceived how much public health policies on AIDS, with advances and research, led to the consolidation of many laws. It also led to the coordination of health programs aimed at the improvement of services, assistance to people with the disease and ensuring a safer and less tiring work environment.

  13. Facilitating Support Groups for Professionals Working with People with AIDS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grossman, Arnold H.; Silverstein, Charles

    1993-01-01

    Describes support groups for health care professionals who work with people with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) or Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) and who are experiencing burnout from excessive demands on their energy, strength, and resources. Discusses group administration, effective intervention techniques, and issues of health…

  14. Job Skills of the Financial Aid Professional.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heist, Vali

    2002-01-01

    Describes the skills practiced by student financial aid professionals which are valued by all employers, including problem solving, human relations, computer programming, teaching/training, information management, money management, business management, and science and math. Also describes how to develop skills outside of the office. (EV)

  15. AIDS: Legal Tools Helpful for Mental Health Counseling Interventions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedman, Ann Lorentson; Hughes, Rosemary B.

    1994-01-01

    Complex HIV and AIDS related legal issues confronting mental health professionals are addressed, specifically: living will, statutes, durable power of attorney, durable power of attorney for health care, rational suicide, euthanasia, workplace discrimination, and laws affecting minors. (JBJ)

  16. The Use of Health Aides in Migrant Health Projects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoff, Wilbur

    Intended for migrant project administrators and other professional workers, this document contains recommendations developed from a nationwide study for evaluating the utilization and effectiveness of health aides (indigenous workers) in migrant health programs. Recommendations are provided for five major phases of activity essential for effective…

  17. Therapeutic Recreation Professionals' Attitudes toward and Knowledge of AIDS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glenn, Cherie; Dattilo, John

    1993-01-01

    Survey of therapeutic recreation professionals' attitudes toward persons with Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) and knowledge of AIDS found no significant relationship between knowledge and attitudes but a positive relationship between attendance at workshops and knowledge. Professionals who knowingly cared for persons with AIDS expressed…

  18. New Careers: The Community/Home Health Aide Trainee's Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hicks, Florence

    Intended for trainee use, the manual is in notebook format with a curriculum corresponding to the trainers' manual (VT 007 909), a related document. Part I, Basic Health Curriculum, deals with (1) the roles of health service aides, (2) Biological Potential and Equilibrium, (3) Professionals in the Health Field, (4) Public Health Administration,…

  19. Health Professionals' Knowledge of Women's Health Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beatty, Rebecca M.

    2000-01-01

    Survey responses from 71 health professionals, benchmarking data from 8 hospitals, continuing education program evaluations, and focus groups with nursing, allied health, and primary care providers indicated a need for professional continuing education on women's health issues. Primary topic needs were identified. The data formed the basis for…

  20. Drug problems among health professionals.

    PubMed

    Janecek, E; Marshman, J A; Brewster, J M

    1989-03-01

    Available information on patterns of alcohol and drug abuse among health professionals, as well as information on abuse versus impairment, is reviewed. Past and present attitudes and approaches to helping the alcohol- or drug-impaired health professional in Ontario are examined.

  1. 21 CFR 801.420 - Hearing aid devices; professional and patient labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Hearing aid devices; professional and patient labeling. 801.420 Section 801.420 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND...) Identification of any known side effects associated with the use of a hearing aid that may warrant...

  2. 21 CFR 801.420 - Hearing aid devices; professional and patient labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Hearing aid devices; professional and patient labeling. 801.420 Section 801.420 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND...) Identification of any known side effects associated with the use of a hearing aid that may warrant...

  3. ICT and AIDS Literacy: A Challenge for Information Professionals in India

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ghosh, Maitrayee

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to describe the use of ICT to disseminate preventive health care information to combat the AIDS epidemic in India. The role of information professionals in various libraries and information centres and the challenges they are facing to increase HIV/AIDS awareness are discussed. Finally, recommendations are…

  4. Homemaker/Home Health Aide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missouri Univ., Columbia. Instructional Materials Lab.

    This curriculum guide provides materials for a five-unit home health aide course. Each unit contains 4 to 36 lesson plans. Unit topics and representative lesson plan topics are as follows: (1) introduction (ethical and legal responsibilities, time management, reporting and recording); (2) communication (techniques, meeting the public, therapeutic…

  5. Homemaker/Home Health Aide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    La Mothe, Dolores; And Others

    This curriculum guide is intended to assist vocational instructors in preparing students for entry-level employment as homemakers/home health aides and getting them ready for advanced training in the workplace. The package contains a competency/skill and task list, an instructor's guide, and an annotated bibliography. The following competencies…

  6. Space Derived Health Aids (AID, Heart Monitor)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    CPI's spinoff from miniaturized pace circuitry is the new heart-assist device, the AID implantable automatic pulse generator. AID pulse generator monitors the heart continuously, recognizes onset of fibrillation, then administers a corrective electrical shock. A mini- computer, a power source, and two electrodes which sense heart activity are included in the unit. An associated system was also developed. It includes an external recorder to be worn by AID patients and a physician's console to display the data stored by the recorder. System provides a record of fibrillation occurrences and the ensuing defibrillation.

  7. A Primer on Economics for Financial Aid Professionals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baum, Sandy

    This primer is intended to provide college financial aid professionals with a background in fundamental areas of economics. Its goal is to provide a stronger understanding of the key principles that shape need analysis systems. Part 1 presents basic economic concepts and discusses their application to college enrollment and student aid. These…

  8. Computer-Aided Instruction for Adult Professionals: A Research Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, Doris Smith

    1992-01-01

    Discusses computer-aided instruction (CAI) for adult learners and describes research conducted at the U.S. Army Construction Engineering Research Laboratory to study the impact of CAI on design professionals, i.e., architects and engineers. Attitudes of adult professionals are examined, and design requirements for a CAI system for professionals…

  9. Resources for Health Professionals

    Cancer.gov

    Get the latest information about cancer with our PDQ® Cancer Information Summaries and find NCI-supported clinical trials. We also offer training information and tools as well as resources for public health program planners and cancer registrars.

  10. Health aid and governance in developing countries.

    PubMed

    Fielding, David

    2011-07-01

    Despite anecdotal evidence that the quality of governance in recipient countries affects the allocation of international health aid, there is no quantitative evidence on the magnitude of this effect, or on which dimensions of governance influence donor decisions. We measure health-aid flows over 1995-2006 for 109 aid recipients, matching aid data with measures of different dimensions of governance and a range of country-specific economic and health characteristics. Everything else being equal, countries with more political rights receive significantly more aid, but so do countries with higher corruption levels. The dependence of aid on political rights, even when we control for other governance indicators, suggests that health aid is sometimes used as an incentive to reward political reforms.

  11. Assessing Health Professional Education: Workshop Summary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cuff, Patricia A.

    2014-01-01

    "Assessing Health Professional Education" is the summary of a workshop hosted by the Institute of Medicine's Global Forum on Innovation in Health Professional Education to explore assessment of health professional education. At the event, Forum members shared personal experiences and learned from patients, students, educators, and…

  12. Oral health & HIV/AIDS.

    PubMed

    Gennaro, Susan; Naidoo, Sudeshi; Berthold, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Oral lesions are common in women and children with HIV/AIDS and may decrease the overall quality of life in these patients because of pain, dry mouth, and difficulty in eating. An oral cavity screening is an easy, noninvasive, quick, and inexpensive procedure that provides nurses with invaluable information about the need for referral, treatment, and health education. Nurses can use the information obtained from a careful oral screening to decrease the symptoms experienced with oral lesions and optimize a patient's ability to chew and enjoy food. Common oral manifestations of HIV infection include fungal, viral, and bacterial infections, although neoplasms, periodontal disease, salivary gland disease, and lesions of uncertain origin are also seen. Oral lesions such as candidiasis, oral hairy leukoplakia, herpetic ulcers, and Kaposi's sarcoma are often among the first symptoms of HIV infection.

  13. Increasing collaboration between health professionals

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background: Scholars have recently started to pay more attention in the potential of the inter-professional relationship between general practitioners and specialists to improve outcomes, through consideration given to the effect on prescribing practices. However, more empirical research is needed. Objective: To explore inter-professional network factors that may explain effects on General Practitioners prescription behaviours. Methods: A qualitative study was conducted in an integrated diabetes care program. Data was collected through semi-structured interviews from 16 health practices and a hospital diabetes clinic, using a convenience sample of general practitioners, practices nurses, diabetes nurse specialists and endocrinologists. A conceptual mapping was performed to identify factors underlying networks and effects on patient outcomes. Results: Four themes with their concepts emerged from the conceptual map. These demonstrated the need for building effective channels of communication to share experience and knowledge timely in diabetes care. Communication, collaboration and coordination are critical factors to influence prescription behaviours within primary and secondary care. Conclusions: conceptual mapping allowed understanding factors that might explain how links between health professionals can improve patient outcomes at the primary and secondary care interface. PMID:26309341

  14. Theodore E. Woodward Award. HIV/AIDS, ethics, and medical professionalism: where went the debate?

    PubMed

    Bryan, Charles S

    2003-01-01

    The recent surge of dialogue about medical professionalism has largely ignored HIV/AIDS, perhaps because the ethical issues that abounded during the 1980s and early 1990s have become largely passé. Prior to the introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in 1996, the care ethic for patients with HIV/AIDS depended heavily on compassion since effective treatment was unavailable. Moreover, physicians and other health care workers often assumed physical risks on behalf of patients. HAART transformed the care ethic for HIV/AIDS to one dependent mainly on medical competence. Reflecting on the epidemic, I propose a distinction between "basic" and "higher" professionalism. Basic professionalism requires discipline-specific competence, facilitated by adherence to the four cardinal virtues (prudence, temperance, justice, and courage). Higher professionalism brings into play the transcendent virtues: faith, hope, and--especially--love (compassion). Specific examples of "compassion" in the strict sense of "suffering with" include caring without adequate reimbursement, caring when one would rather be doing something else, and assuming emotional or physical risks on behalf of patients. The physicians and other health care workers who displayed such compassion in abundance between 1981 and 1996 deserve our remembrance as exemplars of a higher professionalism.

  15. Theodore E. Woodward Award. HIV/AIDS, ethics, and medical professionalism: where went the debate?

    PubMed Central

    Bryan, Charles S.

    2003-01-01

    The recent surge of dialogue about medical professionalism has largely ignored HIV/AIDS, perhaps because the ethical issues that abounded during the 1980s and early 1990s have become largely passé. Prior to the introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in 1996, the care ethic for patients with HIV/AIDS depended heavily on compassion since effective treatment was unavailable. Moreover, physicians and other health care workers often assumed physical risks on behalf of patients. HAART transformed the care ethic for HIV/AIDS to one dependent mainly on medical competence. Reflecting on the epidemic, I propose a distinction between "basic" and "higher" professionalism. Basic professionalism requires discipline-specific competence, facilitated by adherence to the four cardinal virtues (prudence, temperance, justice, and courage). Higher professionalism brings into play the transcendent virtues: faith, hope, and--especially--love (compassion). Specific examples of "compassion" in the strict sense of "suffering with" include caring without adequate reimbursement, caring when one would rather be doing something else, and assuming emotional or physical risks on behalf of patients. The physicians and other health care workers who displayed such compassion in abundance between 1981 and 1996 deserve our remembrance as exemplars of a higher professionalism. PMID:12813930

  16. Undergraduate mental health nursing education in Australia: More than Mental Health First Aid.

    PubMed

    Happell, Brenda; Wilson, Rhonda; McNamara, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Mental Health First Aid training is designed to equip people with the skills to help others who may be developing mental health problems or experiencing mental health crises. This training has consistently been shown to increase: (1) the recognition of mental health problems; (2) the extent to which course trainees' beliefs about treatment align with those of mental health professionals; (3) their intentions to help others; and (4) their confidence in their abilities to assist others. This paper presents a discussion of the potential role of Mental Health First Aid training in undergraduate mental health nursing education. Three databases (CINAHL, Medline, and PsycINFO) were searched to identify literature on Mental Health First Aid. Although Mental Health First Aid training has strong benefits, this first responder level of education is insufficient for nurses, from whom people expect to receive professional care. It is recommended that: (1) Mental Health First Aid training be made a prerequisite of preregistration nurse education, (2) registered nurses make a larger contribution to addressing the mental health needs of Australians requiring care, and (3) current registered nurses take responsibility for ensuring that they can provided basic mental health care, including undertaking training to rectify gaps in their knowledge.

  17. Counselling in STD/HIV/AIDS in the context of rapid test: Perception of users and health professionals at a counselling and testing centre in Porto Alegre.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Fernanda T; Both, Nalu S; Alnoch, Edi M; Conz, Jaqueline; Rocha, Katia B

    2016-03-01

    This article discusses the perceptions of professionals and users about counselling practices at a counselling and testing centre in Porto Alegre/RS based on interviews with 27 service users and 14 members of the staff. The following categories emerged from thematic analysis: professionals' perceptions on counselling, users' perceptions on counselling and changes in counselling due to the introduction of rapid test procedures. The results show that, although initially there were some imprecision and apparent contradictions in its use, rapid testing was considered an invitation to rethink practices, bringing service closer to users' needs.

  18. Public Health Nursing for People with AIDS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dickinson, Dena; And Others

    Individuals with Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) or AIDS-related conditions (ARC) need continual care and support, at a level which can severely tax the health resources of a community. Public health nursing should have a central role in the effective and efficient response to this devastating problem. Since the early stages of the AIDS…

  19. AIDS Instructional Guide: Grades K-12. Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Bureau of Curriculum Development.

    This guide provides a framework for Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) instruction within a comprehensive health education program stressing positive health behaviors. The guide is structured to: (1) provide information to school personnel on how to implement a home/school/community approach to AIDS instruction; (2) provide suggested…

  20. Health Professionals' Explanations of Suicidal Behaviour.

    PubMed

    Rothes, Inês Areal; Henriques, Margarida Rangel

    2017-01-01

    In a help relation with a suicidal person, the theoretical models of suicidality can be essential to guide the health professional's comprehension of the client/patient. The objectives of this study were to identify health professionals' explanations of suicidal behaviors and to study the effects of professional group, theoretical intervention models, and patient suicide experience in professionals' representations. Two hundred and forty-two health professionals filled out a self-report questionnaire. Exploratory principal components analysis was used. Five explanatory models were identified: psychological suffering, affective cognitive, sociocommunicational, adverse life events, and psychopathological. Results indicated that the psychological suffering and psychopathological models were the most valued by the professionals, while the sociocommunicational was seen as the least likely to explain suicidal behavior. Differences between professional groups were found. We concluded that training and reflection on theoretical models in general and in communicative issues in particular are needed in the education of health professionals.

  1. Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and health care professionals.

    PubMed

    Menon, V; Bharucha, K

    1994-01-01

    As health care professionals, we face a grave risk of acquiring HIV infection in the course of our work. But how many of us really know the precautions to be applied in the hospital set up in dealing with HIV infected patients? A knowledge, attitude and practice (KAP) study was conducted in Pune hospitals to assess the current status. Among the results 65% servants had not heard of AIDS, 85% nursing staff did not apply the Universal Safety Precautions (USP) approach, 13.5% resident thought that the HIV was not transmitted by blood, 30% consultants would avoid contact with an HIV positive patient. This study has shown that definite lacunae exist in knowledge specific to the particular population in question. A proposal for an education programme which is target specific and one of constant renewal is sought.

  2. Education and Training for Health Professionals

    Cancer.gov

    The Cancer Classroom Series is a collection of webinars that highlights topics that provide the educational content, tools, and resources necessary for health professionals, especially those working in public health, to address cancer as a public health problem.

  3. Changing Roles of Mental Health Professionals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garai, Josef E.

    The roles that mental health professionals must play to facilitate the prevention of mental illness and the introduction of mentally healthy attitudes in our society is discussed. Mental health professionals must re-examine the meaning of mental health in the context of the current world situation and ask themselves to what extent they are…

  4. The Relationship of Health Aid to Population Health Improvements

    PubMed Central

    Bendavid, Eran; Bhattacharya, Jay

    2016-01-01

    Importance Foreign aid to the health sector is an important component of all health spending in many developing countries. The relationship between health aid and changes in population health among aid recipients remains unknown. Objective To quantify the relationship between health aid and changes in life expectancy and under-5 mortality among aid recipient nations. Design Cross-country panel data analysis of the relationship between longitudinal measures of health aid, life expectancy, and under-5 mortality. Using difference models for longitudinal data with fixed effects for countries and years, we estimate the unique relationship between health aid and changes in life expectancy and under-5 mortality, controlling for gross domestic product per capita, urbanization, and total fertility rate. Setting and participants 140 aid-recipient countries between 1974 and 2010. Main Exposures and Outcomes and Measures The main exposure is the annual amount of development assistance directed to the health sector in constant 2010 US dollars; the principal outcomes are the improvements in under-5 mortality and life expectancy in in the period following aid receipt. Results We find that between 1974 and 2010, life expectancy increased by 0.24 months faster (95% CI 0.02-0.46, p=0.03) and under-5 mortality declined by 0.14 per 1,000 live births faster (95% CI 0.02-0.26, p=0.02) with each 1% increase in health aid. We also find that the association between health aid and health improvements has been strengthening over time, with the closest association between 2000 and 2010. We find that health improvements associated with health aid are measurable for 3-5 years after aid disbursement. These findings imply that an increase of $1 billion in health aid could be associated with 364,800 (95% CI 98,400-630,000) fewer under-5 deaths. Conclusions Foreign aid to the health sector is related to increasing life expectancy and declining under-5 mortality. The returns to aid appear to last

  5. Are rural health professionals also social entrepreneurs?

    PubMed

    Farmer, Jane; Kilpatrick, Sue

    2009-12-01

    Social entrepreneurs formally or informally generate community associations and networking that produces social outcomes. Social entrepreneurship is a relatively new and poorly understood concept. Policy promotes generating community activity, particularly in rural areas, for health and social benefits and 'community resilience'. Rural health professionals might be well placed to generate community activity due to their status and networks. This exploratory study, conducted in rural Tasmania and the Highlands and Islands of Scotland considered whether rural health professionals act as social entrepreneurs. We investigated activities generated and processes of production. Thirty-eight interviews were conducted with general practitioners, community nurses, primary healthcare managers and allied health professionals living and working rurally. Interviewees were self-selecting responders to an invitation for rural health professionals who were 'formally or informally generating community associations or networking that produced social outcomes'. We found that rural health professionals initiated many community activities with social outcomes, most related to health. Their identification of opportunities related to knowledge of health needs and examples of initiatives seen elsewhere. Health professionals described ready access to useful people and financial resources. In building activities, health professionals could simultaneously utilise skills and knowledge from professional, community member and personal dimensions. Outcomes included social and health benefits, personal 'buzz' and community capacity. Health professionals' actions could be described as social entrepreneurship: identifying opportunities, utilising resources and making 'deals'. They also align with community development. Health professionals use contextual knowledge to envisage and grow activities, indicating that, as social entrepreneurs, they do not explicitly choose a social mission, rather they

  6. [Social representations of health education in a time of AIDS].

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Elizabeth; de Oliveira, Denize Cristina

    2014-01-01

    This is a qualitative and descriptive study, which aimed at identifying and analyzing social representations of health education to HIV patients among health professionals. The setting included three healthcare DST/HIV/AIDS services in Belém-PA, Brazil, and 37 health professionals participated in the study. Data collection was conducted in 2012-2013 on the basis of in-depth interviews and analysis was made on Alceste 4.0 software. Final results indicated that health education can be comprehended in light of categories: educational action; sine qua non: education and training at work, and unit structure; teaching-learning process. Conclusions show that social representations are set as guidance-information for precaution-prevention and that they come forth along continuous and emerging action flow, bringing about permanent health education to ensure healthcare services in full.

  7. AIDS, Alcohol & Health Care. Chapter 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Acampora, Alfonso P., Ed.; Nebelkopf, Ethan, Ed.

    This document contains 10 papers from the ninth World Conference of Therapeutic Communities (TC) that deal with a variety of health-related subjects. Papers include: (1) "AIDS among IV Drug Users: Epidemiology, Natural History & TC Experiences" (Don C. Des Jarlais, et al.); (2) "AIDS and Therapeutic Communities: Policy Implications" (Don C. Des…

  8. Minority Women's Health: HIV/AIDS

    MedlinePlus

    ... AIDS more than women of other races include: Poverty — One in 4 African-American women lives in poverty, which is strongly linked to HIV risk. People living in poverty also get lower-quality health care in general, ...

  9. Sources of Dental Health Teaching Aids.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crawford, Jean H.

    1982-01-01

    Sources of dental health education teaching aids which are available for free or at minimal cost include: (1) The American Dental Health Association; (2) state and local departments of public health; (3) schools of dentistry, dental hygiene, and dental assisting; and (4) the Educator's International Guide. (JN)

  10. Health professionals' attitudes toward abortion.

    PubMed

    Hudson Rosen, R A et

    1974-01-01

    The attitudes toward abortion of students and faculty in 3 health related fields--nursing, medicine, and social work--are examined and compared with the views of the population at large. The relation of religious affiliation to attitude toward abortion is also examined. The data was obtained via questionnaire in 47 nursing, 11 medical, and 15 social work schools in the fall and winter of 1971. 7 attitudinal items provided the focus of attention. 5 dealt with conditions under which an abortion should be performed; 2 dealt with the willingness of the respondent to help a client get an abortion. Nursing students and faculty had the most conservative attitude, followed by medical personnel and social workers. The nursing faculty's opinions were most like those of the general public; the medical and social work students and faculty generally mirrored respondents with some college education. Catholic health professionals were even less in favor of abortion than Catholics at large, even those with only a grade-school education. Catholic students, however, were more favorably disposed than Catholic faculty, indicating a more liberal trend in the Catholic Church.

  11. Orientation to Health Aide Careers Mini-Course & Home Health Aide Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Novak, Kathy; And Others

    Designed for use in a self-paced, open-entry/open-exit vocational training program for home health aides, this program guide is one of six for teachers of adult women offenders from a correctional institution. Module topic outlines are presented on eight topics: your career as a health aide; maintaining health; recognizing illness; positioning and…

  12. Celiac Disease Testing (for Health Care Professionals)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Urodynamic Testing Virtual Colonoscopy Celiac Disease Testing (for Health Care Professionals) Serologic tests for celiac disease provide an ... 6332) or visit www.fda.gov . Consult your health care provider for more information. September 2013 Share Alternate ...

  13. AIDS denialism and public health practice.

    PubMed

    Chigwedere, Pride; Essex, M

    2010-04-01

    In this paper, we respond to AIDS denialist arguments that HIV does not cause AIDS, that antiretroviral drugs are not useful, and that there is no evidence of large-scale deaths from AIDS, and discuss the key implications of the relationship between AIDS denialism and public health practice. We provide a brief history of how the cause of AIDS was investigated, of how HIV fulfills Koch's postulates and Sir Bradford Hil's criteria for causation, and of the inconsistencies in alternatives offered by denialists. We highlight clinical trials as the standard for assessing efficacy of drugs, rather than anecdotal cases or discussions of mechanism of action, and show the unanimous data demonstrating antiretroviral drug efficacy. We then show how statistics on mortality and indices such as crude death rate, life expectancy, child mortality, and population growth are consistent with the high mortality from AIDS, and expose the weakness of statistics from death notification, quoted by denialists. Last we emphasize that when denialism influences public health practice as in South Africa, the consequences are disastrous. We argue for accountability for the loss of hundreds of thousands of lives, the need to reform public health practice to include standards and accountability, and the particular need for honesty and peer review in situations that impact public health policy.

  14. Financial Aid for Minorities in Health Fields.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrett Park Press, MD.

    This directory of financial aid sources for minority students majoring in health or health-related fields includes the following types of information: (1) summary and description of the fields, including college enrollment statistics, demand for graduates, including salary ranges, and definitions of the fields and specialty areas; (2) directory of…

  15. Cautioning Health-Care Professionals.

    PubMed

    Stroebe, Margaret; Schut, Henk; Boerner, Kathrin

    2017-03-01

    Science and practice seem deeply stuck in the so-called stage theory of grief. Health-care professionals continue to "prescribe" stages. Basically, this perspective endorses the idea that bereaved people go through a set pattern of specific reactions over time following the death of a loved one. It has frequently been interpreted prescriptively, as a progression that bereaved persons must follow in order to adapt to loss. It is of paramount importance to assess stage theory, not least in view of the current status of the maladaptive "persistent complex bereavement-related disorder" as a category for further research in DSM-5. We therefore review the status and value of this approach. It has remained hugely influential among researchers as well as practitioners across recent decades, but there has also been forceful opposition. Major concerns include the absence of sound empirical evidence, conceptual clarity, or explanatory potential. It lacks practical utility for the design or allocation of treatment services, and it does not help identification of those at risk or with complications in the grieving process. Most disturbingly, the expectation that bereaved persons will, even should, go through stages of grieving can be harmful to those who do not. Following such lines of reasoning, we argue that stage theory should be discarded by all concerned (including bereaved persons themselves); at best, it should be relegated to the realms of history. There are alternative models that better represent grieving processes. We develop guidelines to enhance such a move beyond the stage approach in both theory and practice.

  16. Cautioning Health-Care Professionals

    PubMed Central

    Schut, Henk; Boerner, Kathrin

    2017-01-01

    Science and practice seem deeply stuck in the so-called stage theory of grief. Health-care professionals continue to “prescribe” stages. Basically, this perspective endorses the idea that bereaved people go through a set pattern of specific reactions over time following the death of a loved one. It has frequently been interpreted prescriptively, as a progression that bereaved persons must follow in order to adapt to loss. It is of paramount importance to assess stage theory, not least in view of the current status of the maladaptive “persistent complex bereavement-related disorder” as a category for further research in DSM-5. We therefore review the status and value of this approach. It has remained hugely influential among researchers as well as practitioners across recent decades, but there has also been forceful opposition. Major concerns include the absence of sound empirical evidence, conceptual clarity, or explanatory potential. It lacks practical utility for the design or allocation of treatment services, and it does not help identification of those at risk or with complications in the grieving process. Most disturbingly, the expectation that bereaved persons will, even should, go through stages of grieving can be harmful to those who do not. Following such lines of reasoning, we argue that stage theory should be discarded by all concerned (including bereaved persons themselves); at best, it should be relegated to the realms of history. There are alternative models that better represent grieving processes. We develop guidelines to enhance such a move beyond the stage approach in both theory and practice. PMID:28355991

  17. Health and environment handbook for health professionals: Health and environment

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-31

    This handbook has been prepared primarily as a resource for health professionals working in Ontario communities, in response to public concerns regarding environmental health issues. It is structured around the following ideas: The basic concepts of environmental health; common causes of concern and key environmental health issues; and where to find more information. Sections of the handbook cover the following topics: The human health effects of environmental contaminants; risk determination, perception, and communication, and the groups most at risk; exposure pathways and absorption; dose and response relationships for chemicals; water quality; outdoor air quality and human health; food quality, including exposure to contaminants from food, pesticide residues, additives, and cookware safety; soil quality; and home environments (indoor air quality, home renovation safety, home products safety). Includes glossary, index, resource guide, and information sheets on individual contaminants (origin, uses, persistence and movement in the environment, human exposure and its reduction, health considerations, and bibliographic references).

  18. [Prescribing, the perspectives of health professionals].

    PubMed

    Debout, Christophe; Lescot, Thomas; Loyer, Frédérique; Ambrosino, Florence

    2016-10-01

    While, in France, various health professionals are authorised to prescribe, they approach this activity in a different way, depending on the professional category to which they belong. The areas and products concerned are specific to each profession, and inevitably evolve. This article presents the different perspectives of a doctor, a midwife and a nurse.

  19. Celiac Disease Testing (for Health Care Professionals)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Tract Imaging Urodynamic Testing Virtual Colonoscopy Celiac Disease Testing (for Health Care Professionals) Serologic tests for celiac ... MA, Loots CM, Salvatore S, Vandenplas Y, ESPGHAN EURO-PIG Working Group. Indications, methodology, and interpretation of combined ...

  20. Changing Health Care Professionals' Attitudes Toward Spanking.

    PubMed

    Burkhart, Kimberly; Knox, Michele; Hunter, Kimberly

    2016-10-01

    Twenty-two pediatric residents and 31 medical students viewed the Play Nicely program. The Play Nicely program is a multimedia program that teaches health care professionals how to counsel parents to use positive parenting and disciplining strategies in response to early childhood aggression. Health care professionals completed pre- and posttraining questionnaires to assess changes in comfort with counseling, parenting knowledge, and attitudes toward spanking. Results indicated at posttraining that health care professionals were significantly more comfortable with counseling parents, had increased parenting knowledge, and decreased positive attitudes toward spanking. Findings suggest that this program holds promise for educating health care professionals on how to counsel parents on positive parenting strategies and positively change attitudes toward spanking.

  1. Imaginary Companions: Considerations for the Health Professional.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schilling, Lynne S.

    1985-01-01

    A small but significant proportion of preschoolers have imaginary companions who serve many different developmental functions. Prevalence and related demographic and environmental factors surrounding the phenomenon of imaginary companions and implications for health care professionals are discussed. (Author/DST)

  2. Transforming Health Professionals into Population Health Change Agents

    PubMed Central

    Naccarella, Lucio; Butterworth, Iain; Moore, Timothy

    2016-01-01

    Background With the recognition that professional education has not kept pace with the challenges facing the health and human service system, there has been a move to transformative education and learning professional development designed to expand the number of enlightened and empowered change agents with the competence to implement changes at an individual, organisation and systems level. Design and Methods Since 2010, the Department of Health and Human Services in Victoria, Australia, in collaboration with The University of Melbourne’s School of Population and Global Health, has delivered seven population health short courses aimed to catalyse participants’ transformation into population health change agents. This paper presents key learnings from a combination of evaluation data from six population health short courses using a transformative learning framework from a 2010 independent international commission for health professionals that was designed to support the goals of transformative and interdependent health professionals. Participatory realist evaluation approaches and qualitative methods were used. Results Evaluation findings reveal that there were mixed outcomes in facilitating participants’ implementation of population health approaches, and their transformation into population health agents upon their return to their workplaces. Core enablers, barriers and requirements, at individual, organisational and system levels influence the capability of participants to implement population health approaches. The iterative and systemic evolution of the population health short courses, from a one off event to a program of inter-dependent modules, demonstrates sustained commitment by the short course developers and organisers to the promotion of transformative population health learning outcomes. Conclusions To leverage this commitment, recognising that professional development is not an event but part of an ongoing transformative process, suggestions to

  3. 78 FR 44459 - Designation of Health Professional(s) Shortage Areas

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-24

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Public Health Service 42 CFR Part 5 Designation of Health Professional(s) Shortage Areas... having a mental health professional(s)'', insert the word ``shortage'' before the comma. BILLING...

  4. Exploring professionalization among Brazilian oral health technicians.

    PubMed

    Sanglard-Oliveira, Carla Aparecida; Werneck, Marcos Azeredo Furquim; Lucas, Simone Dutra; Abreu, Mauro Henrique Nogueira Guimarães

    2012-04-20

    Professional dental auxiliaries emerged in the early 20th century in the United States of America and quickly spread to Europe and other regions of the world. In Brazil, however, oral health technicians (OHTs), who occupy a similar role as dental hygienists, had a long journey before the occupation achieved legal recognition: Brazilian Law 11.889, which regulates this occupation in the country, was only enacted in 2008. The aim of this paper is to review the literature on the professionalization of OHTs, highlighting the triggering, limiting and conflicting aspects that exerted an influence on the historical progress of these professionals in Brazil. We have tested Abbott's and Larson's theory on professionalization, against the history of OHTs. A number of different dental corporative interests exerted an influence over professionalization, especially in discussions regarding the permissible activities of these professionals in the oral cavity of patients. With primary health care advances in Brazil, the importance of these professionals has once again come to the forefront. This seems to be a key point in the consolidation of OHTs in the area of human resources for health in Brazil.

  5. Exploring professionalization among Brazilian oral health technicians

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Professional dental auxiliaries emerged in the early 20th century in the United States of America and quickly spread to Europe and other regions of the world. In Brazil, however, oral health technicians (OHTs), who occupy a similar role as dental hygienists, had a long journey before the occupation achieved legal recognition: Brazilian Law 11.889, which regulates this occupation in the country, was only enacted in 2008. The aim of this paper is to review the literature on the professionalization of OHTs, highlighting the triggering, limiting and conflicting aspects that exerted an influence on the historical progress of these professionals in Brazil. We have tested Abbott’s and Larson’s theory on professionalization, against the history of OHTs. A number of different dental corporative interests exerted an influence over professionalization, especially in discussions regarding the permissible activities of these professionals in the oral cavity of patients. With primary health care advances in Brazil, the importance of these professionals has once again come to the forefront. This seems to be a key point in the consolidation of OHTs in the area of human resources for health in Brazil. PMID:22520155

  6. [Professional health cards (CPS): informatic health care system in France].

    PubMed

    Fortuit, P

    2005-09-01

    The Professional Health Card Public interest group (Groupement d'Intérêt Public-Carte de professionnel de Santé (GIP-CPS)) was founded in 1993 as a joint initiative by the different parties involved in health care in France: the state, the representatives of the health care professions and the compulsory and complementary health insurance organizations. The CPS system enables safe exchange and electronic sharing of medical data. Via Intranet connections and Extranet hosting of medical files, databases, the CPS system enables health care professionals who access servers to be identified with certainty. For email exhanges, the CPS systems guarantees the sender's identity and capacity. The electronic signature gives legal value to the email. The system also enables confidential email. The health card system (CPS) contributes to making the health service efficient. Shared medical files, health care networks, health warning systems or electronic requests for reimbursement of health insurance expenses all use the CPS system. More than 300,000 health care professionals use it regularly. The freedom of movement of patients throughout Europe has led to the growth of exchanges and information sharing between health professionals in the States of the Union. More and more health professionals will be leaving their own countries to work in foreign countries in the future. It is essential that their freedom of movement is accompanied by the ability to prove their rights to practice.

  7. Death Education for the Health Professional.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benoliel, Jeanne Quint, Ed.

    1982-01-01

    Contains seven articles reviewing various death education programs for health professionals. Discusses death education in undergraduate and advanced nursing practice programs; a graduate course focusing on social, psychological, and cultural conditions influencing death; two death education programs in medical schools; and humanistic health care…

  8. School Health Promotion and Teacher Professional Identity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jourdan, Didier; Simar, Carine; Deasy, Christine; Carvalho, Graça S.; McNamara, Patricia Mannix

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Health and education are inextricably linked. Health promotion sits somewhat uncomfortably within schools, often remaining a marginal aspect of teachers' work. The purpose of this paper is to examine the compatibility of an HP-initiative with teacher professional identity. Design/methodology/approach: A qualitative research design was…

  9. 40 CFR 350.40 - Disclosure to health professionals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Disclosure to health professionals... COMMUNITY RIGHT-TO-KNOW INFORMATION: AND TRADE SECRET DISCLOSURES TO HEALTH PROFESSIONALS Disclosure of Trade Secret Information to Health Professionals § 350.40 Disclosure to health professionals....

  10. 40 CFR 350.40 - Disclosure to health professionals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Disclosure to health professionals... COMMUNITY RIGHT-TO-KNOW INFORMATION: AND TRADE SECRET DISCLOSURES TO HEALTH PROFESSIONALS Disclosure of Trade Secret Information to Health Professionals § 350.40 Disclosure to health professionals....

  11. 40 CFR 350.40 - Disclosure to health professionals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Disclosure to health professionals... COMMUNITY RIGHT-TO-KNOW INFORMATION: AND TRADE SECRET DISCLOSURES TO HEALTH PROFESSIONALS Disclosure of Trade Secret Information to Health Professionals § 350.40 Disclosure to health professionals....

  12. 40 CFR 350.40 - Disclosure to health professionals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Disclosure to health professionals... COMMUNITY RIGHT-TO-KNOW INFORMATION: AND TRADE SECRET DISCLOSURES TO HEALTH PROFESSIONALS Disclosure of Trade Secret Information to Health Professionals § 350.40 Disclosure to health professionals....

  13. 40 CFR 350.40 - Disclosure to health professionals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Disclosure to health professionals... COMMUNITY RIGHT-TO-KNOW INFORMATION: AND TRADE SECRET DISCLOSURES TO HEALTH PROFESSIONALS Disclosure of Trade Secret Information to Health Professionals § 350.40 Disclosure to health professionals....

  14. Confronting AIDS. Directions for Public Health, Health Care, and Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Institute of Medicine (NAS), Washington, DC.

    This book is addressed to anyone involved with or affected by the Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) epidemic, including legislators, researchers, health care personnel, insurance providers, educators, health officials, executives in the pharmaceutical industry, blood bank administrators, and other concerned individuals. The following…

  15. Development of a Decision Aid for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Involving Intensive Care Unit Patients' and Health Professionals' Participation Using User-Centered Design and a Wiki Platform for Rapid Prototyping: A Research Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Heyland, Daren Keith; Ebell, Mark H; Dupuis, Audrey; Lavoie-Bérard, Carole-Anne; Légaré, France; Archambault, Patrick Michel

    2016-01-01

    Background Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is an intervention used in cases of cardiac arrest to revive patients whose heart has stopped. Because cardiac arrest can have potentially devastating outcomes such as severe neurological deficits even if CPR is performed, patients must be involved in determining in advance if they want CPR in the case of an unexpected arrest. Shared decision making (SDM) facilitates discussions about goals of care regarding CPR in intensive care units (ICUs). Patient decision aids (DAs) are proven to support the implementation of SDM. Many patient DAs about CPR exist, but they are not universally implemented in ICUs in part due to lack of context and cultural adaptation. Adaptation to local context is an important phase of implementing any type of knowledge tool such as patient DAs. User-centered design supported by a wiki platform to perform rapid prototyping has previously been successful in creating knowledge tools adapted to the needs of patients and health professionals (eg, asthma action plans). This project aims to explore how user-centered design and a wiki platform can support the adaptation of an existing DA for CPR to the local context. Objective The primary objective is to use an existing DA about CPR to create a wiki-based DA that is adapted to the context of a single ICU and tailorable to individual patient’s risk factors while employing user-centered design. The secondary objective is to document the use of a wiki platform for the adaptation of patient DAs. Methods This study will be conducted in a mixed surgical and medical ICU at Hôtel-Dieu de Lévis, Quebec, Canada. We plan to involve all 5 intensivists and recruit at least 20 alert and oriented patients admitted to the ICU and their family members if available. In the first phase of this study, we will observe 3 weeks of daily interactions between patients, families, intensivists, and other allied health professionals. We will specifically observe 5 dyads of

  16. Teaching health professionals to teach.

    PubMed

    Grant, J P

    1989-01-01

    One of the most pressing problems in the health system is the lag between modern knowledge and its use in the community. This is caused by the inadequate scientific study of methods to apply this knowledge to society, and the poor training of health personnel to apply these methods. These failures are illustrated every day by the death of 50,000 people, mostly children under 5 years, from causes that are preventable at low costs. The medical education system is primarily responsible for what is taught and how it is taught, and yet less than 1% of the this education is related to community health and broad health education. Social organization is the key to efficiency of health protection and use of medical knowledge. The mass media and increasing communications development with modern marketing have allowed social organization at reasonable cost. Changes in human behavior can prevent most health problems and premature deaths. There are examples of how growth monitoring, oral rehydration therapy, breast feeding promotion, immunization, family planning, and female literacy have saved millions of children. There is now a global recognition that healthy children and healthy families are the foundation for national development. International goals are to reduce mortality rates for children under 5 to 70/1000, eliminate polio, have universal primary education, have less than 1% malnutrition, and promote water supply expansion and sanitation. There is also a need for better recordings of births and deaths and, especially in developing countries, low cost methods of collecting data are needed. Medical education needs to use the full range of resources, and students need to learn to promote health as well as treat diseases. Medical schools in consideration of primary health care must revise curricula to achieve a balanced education in the community, and students should be taught in a variety of environments from rural health areas to urban institutions.

  17. Reproductive health professionals' adoption of emerging technologies for health promotion.

    PubMed

    Smith, Peggy B; Buzi, Ruth S

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess reproductive health professionals' familiarity with and use of various electronic technologies to support health promotion. The study also examined the relationship between demographic characteristics and attitudes and beliefs of the effectiveness of new technologies and perceived barriers for usage. A total of 165 reproductive health professionals at two conferences related to reproductive health in the United States completed the study survey. Personal and organizational factors affected the adoption of electronic technologies for health promotion. This included lack of knowledge, skills, and confidence as well as privacy concerns. The results of the study also suggested that being from an older generation was associated with having lower levels of knowledge, skills, and confidence in using new media. These findings highlight the importance of creating learning opportunities on the use of new technology for health promotion as well as addressing specific perceived barriers among reproductive health professionals in order to promote the adoption of these technologies.

  18. Breastfeeding. COTALMA: training health professionals.

    PubMed

    Casanovas, M C

    1994-01-01

    The Comite Tecnico de Apoyo a la Lactancia Materna (COTALMA), the Technical Breastfeeding Support Committee, was founded in Bolivia in 1989. It is financed by the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) and the United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF). It is administered in coordination with the Ministry of Health (MOH). MOH and UNICEF choose the hospitals, who send teams that include a pediatrician, a gynecologist, a nurse, and a nutritionist. The first phase of the course (5.5 days) covers the scientific background of breastfeeding. A baseline study is then planned and conducted at each hospital. 2 to 3 months later, the second phase takes place during which data is presented and breast feeding programs are developed for each hospital. Communication, training, counseling, and planning and evaluation are covered. Practicums are conducted at hospitals. Trainers are usually members of COTALMA. The person in charge of maternal and child health services at MOH lectures on national health policies concerning mothers and children. Training includes use of the national health card, breastfeeding and child survival, and breastfeeding as a family planning method. Culturally appropriate course materials, which are in Spanish, are adapted from those developed by Wellstart International. Articles by COTALMA members and others are added. Participants are encouraged to train all staff at their institutions.

  19. High Tech, High Touch, as Perceived by Health Professionals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shea, Mary Lou

    1984-01-01

    This article describes the results of a survey of health professionals to determine their perceptions of "high tech, high touch" in health occupations education. Health professionals' concerns related to five major questions are presented. (CT)

  20. Addressing health literacy in patient decision aids

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Effective use of a patient decision aid (PtDA) can be affected by the user’s health literacy and the PtDA’s characteristics. Systematic reviews of the relevant literature can guide PtDA developers to attend to the health literacy needs of patients. The reviews reported here aimed to assess: 1. a) the effects of health literacy / numeracy on selected decision-making outcomes, and b) the effects of interventions designed to mitigate the influence of lower health literacy on decision-making outcomes, and 2. the extent to which existing PtDAs a) account for health literacy, and b) are tested in lower health literacy populations. Methods We reviewed literature for evidence relevant to these two aims. When high-quality systematic reviews existed, we summarized their evidence. When reviews were unavailable, we conducted our own systematic reviews. Results Aim 1: In an existing systematic review of PtDA trials, lower health literacy was associated with lower patient health knowledge (14 of 16 eligible studies). Fourteen studies reported practical design strategies to improve knowledge for lower health literacy patients. In our own systematic review, no studies reported on values clarity per se, but in 2 lower health literacy was related to higher decisional uncertainty and regret. Lower health literacy was associated with less desire for involvement in 3 studies, less question-asking in 2, and less patient-centered communication in 4 studies; its effects on other measures of patient involvement were mixed. Only one study assessed the effects of a health literacy intervention on outcomes; it showed that using video to improve the salience of health states reduced decisional uncertainty. Aim 2: In our review of 97 trials, only 3 PtDAs overtly addressed the needs of lower health literacy users. In 90% of trials, user health literacy and readability of the PtDA were not reported. However, increases in knowledge and informed choice were reported in those studies

  1. Radon: implications for the health professional

    SciTech Connect

    Romano, C.A.

    1990-01-01

    Radon is a colorless, odorless gas formed by radioactive decay of radium and uranium, which are naturally present in the earth's crust. When concentrated indoors, this invisible gas becomes a potential health hazard. The Environmental Protection Agency estimates that up to 20,000 lung cancer deaths annually can be attributed to prolonged radon exposure. Radon is an important health issue that should be understood by all health care professionals. This paper discusses some of the important issues regarding radon, such as the incidences of lung cancer believed to be attributable to radon, the high-risk areas in the United States, federal safety guidelines, and public apathy. These issues and their impact on the health care required by professionals, especially nurse practitioners, are discussed.

  2. Radiologic Professionalism in Modern Health Care.

    PubMed

    Hryhorczuk, Anastasia L; Hanneman, Kate; Eisenberg, Ronald L; Meyer, Elaine C; Brown, Stephen D

    2015-10-01

    Modern radiology is at the forefront of technological progress in medicine, a position that often places unique challenges on its professional character. This article uses "Medical Professionalism in the New Millennium: A Physician Charter," a document published in 2002 and endorsed by several major radiology organizations, as a lens for exploring professional challenges in modern radiology. The three main tenets of the Charter emphasize patient welfare, patient autonomy, and the reduction of disparities in health care distribution. This article reviews the ways in which modern technology and financial structures potentially create stressors on professionalism in radiology, while highlighting the opportunities they provide for radiologists seeking to fulfill the professional goals articulated in the Charter. Picture archiving and communication systems (PACS) and voice recognition systems have transformed the speed of radiology and enhanced the ability of radiologists to improve patient care but also have brought new tensions to the workplace. Although teleradiology may improve global access to radiologists, it may also promote the commoditization of radiology, which diminishes the professional stature of radiologists. Social media and patient portals provide radiologists with new forums for interacting with the public and patients, potentially promoting patient welfare. However, patient privacy and autonomy are important considerations. Finally, modern financial structures provide radiologists with both entrepreneurial opportunities as well as the temptation for unprofessional conduct. Each of these advances carries the potential for professional growth while testing the professional stature of radiology. By considering the risks and benefits of emerging technologies in the modern radiology world, radiologists can chart an ethical and professional future path.

  3. Financial Aid Policies and Practices at Graduate and Professional Programs. Results from the 1998 Survey of Graduate Aid Policies, Practices, and Procedures (SOGAPPP).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators, Washington, DC.

    To obtain information about the distribution of financial aid funds to graduate and professional students, the National Association of Student Financial Aid Information developed a survey about specific programs and awards, distribution methods, loan packaging policies, the use of professional judgment, the use of technology in aid offices, and…

  4. Death Education for the Health Professional.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benoliel, Jeanne Quint, Ed.

    The perspectives of a number of health professionals based on their experiences in providing death education courses are presented in essays. In "Interdisciplinary Death Education in a Nursing School" (Helen L. Swain and Kathleen V. Cowles), the development of an undergraduate elective course in death, dying, and bereavement at the…

  5. Hispanic Mental Health Professionals. Monograph No. 5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olmedo, Esteban L., Ed.; Lopez, Steven, Ed.

    This volume is a collection of reports presented at a 1976 meeting held on the issue of Spanish American professional representation in the mental health field in the United States. Paper topics include: (1) Hispanics in psychiatry; (2) the current status of Hispanic social workers; (3) Hispanic psychiatric nursing personnel in the U.S.; (4) the…

  6. [Basic health care. AIDS and children].

    PubMed

    van de Pasch, T

    1994-02-17

    The total number of children in Africa who died of AIDS is estimated at 700,000. Based on a 30% rate of maternal transmission of HIV infection to children and an annual birth rate of 40/1000, in urban areas about 120,000 children are born with HIV infection. In rural areas the figure is 240,000. In addition, another 120,000 die because of diminished care, thus it is estimated that a total of 480,000 children die of AIDS per year, 30-40% of child mortality of the continent. In the AIDS-affected areas, 30% of children have become orphans. In Katete, Zambia, with a population of 157,000, there are 20,000 orphans, half of whom lost one or both parents because of AIDS, and 2400 of whom lost both parents. A project was designed with the objective of helping orphans. First they had to be counted, using an interview team of 39 persons who visited 450 households in five villages. There were a total of 311 orphans of whom 148 were AIDS orphans. 62% of the 20,000 orphans in the district of Katete do not go to school. In Lusaka in 1990, orphans made up 10% of all children, but 3 years later in Katete, 23% of all children were orphans. The girls are often kept away from school in order to take of their sick mothers. When the father is also sick, there is no more money for school uniforms or fees. In the plans of the St. Francis Hospital AIDS project for 1994-98, a great deal of attention was given to the care of orphans. This will be carried out by local health workers who have taken a course in the hospital and have solid work experience. They will deliver a package containing the most essential necessities for the orphans: school uniform, books, pens, soap, flour, milk powder, and dried beans. There are more projects in the program, including a women's group that wants to sew school uniforms and a health education plan.

  7. New data on African health professionals abroad

    PubMed Central

    Clemens, Michael A; Pettersson, Gunilla

    2008-01-01

    Background The migration of doctors and nurses from Africa to developed countries has raised fears of an African medical brain drain. But empirical research on the causes and effects of the phenomenon has been hampered by a lack of systematic data on the extent of African health workers' international movements. Methods We use destination-country census data to estimate the number of African-born doctors and professional nurses working abroad in a developed country circa 2000, and compare this to the stocks of these workers in each country of origin. Results Approximately 65,000 African-born physicians and 70,000 African-born professional nurses were working overseas in a developed country in the year 2000. This represents about one fifth of African-born physicians in the world, and about one tenth of African-born professional nurses. The fraction of health professionals abroad varies enormously across African countries, from 1% to over 70% according to the occupation and country. Conclusion These numbers are the first standardized, systematic, occupation-specific measure of skilled professionals working in developed countries and born in a large number of developing countries. PMID:18186916

  8. Occupational health nursing and the quest for professional authority.

    PubMed

    Draper, Elaine; Ladou, Joseph; Tennenhouse, Dan J

    2011-01-01

    Occupational health nurses provide most of the in-plant health care services in U.S. industry but have dubious credentials to provide care for many of the injuries and illnesses they encounter. The nurses work directly for the employer in an atmosphere designed to control employer costs and employee benefits. Their loyalty to the company and limited autonomy make it unlikely that they will represent the workers' interests. They generally embrace any expansion of their roles within the company. However, employers and government have made no serious effort to determine whether nurses can adequately take on these new functions and advance occupational health. A nurse-directed model carries the risk that nurses who are not knowledgeable enough about the law, or are overly committed to reducing costs, may overdelegate responsibilities, thereby aiding and abetting the unlicensed practice of nursing. This overreaching is part of an ill-conceived effort to establish nursing as a profession with the greater independence, expertise, and control over training that longstanding professions such as medicine and law have achieved. An extensive literature devoted to the approval and acceptance of occupational health nursing exists, yet constructive criticism of occupational health nursing is almost nonexistent. Occupational health and safety is much too important to be largely relegated to an inadequately defined semi-profession, striving to attain higher professional status and control while lacking the expertise, power, professional standards, and autonomy required of a profession.

  9. 42 CFR 5.3 - Procedures for designation of health professional(s) shortage areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Department. Relevant portions of this material will then be forwarded to each health systems agency, State... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Procedures for designation of health professional(s) shortage areas. 5.3 Section 5.3 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND...

  10. Discriminatory Attitudes and Practices by Health Workers toward Patients with HIV/AIDS in Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Background Nigeria has an estimated 3.6 million people with HIV/AIDS and is home to one out of every 11 people with HIV/AIDS worldwide. This study is the first population-based assessment of discrimination against people living with HIV/AIDS in the health sector of a country. The purpose of this study was to characterize the nature and extent of discriminatory practices and attitudes in the health sector and indicate possible contributing factors and intervention strategies. The study involved a cross-sectional survey of 1,021 Nigerian health-care professionals (including 324 physicians, 541 nurses, and 133 midwives identified by profession) in 111 health-care facilities in four Nigerian states. Methods and Findings Fifty-four percent of the health-care professionals (550/1,021) were sampled from public tertiary care facilities. Nine percent of professionals reported refusing to care for an HIV/AIDS patient, and 9% indicated that they had refused an HIV/AIDS patient admission to a hospital. Fifty-nine percent agreed that people with HIV/AIDS should be on a separate ward, and 40% believed a person's HIV status could be determined by his or her appearance. Ninety-one percent agreed that staff and health-care professionals should be informed when a patient is HIV-positive so they can protect themselves. Forty percent believed that health-care professionals with HIV/AIDS should not be allowed to work in any area of health-care that requires patient contact. Twenty percent agreed that many with HIV/AIDS behaved immorally and deserve the disease. Basic materials needed for treatment and prevention of HIV were not adequately available. Twelve percent agreed that treatment of opportunistic infections in HIV/AIDS patients wastes resources, and 8% indicated that treating someone with HIV/AIDS is a waste of precious resources. Providers who reported working in facilities that did not always practice universal precautions were more likely to favor restrictive policies toward

  11. Section 1--The Value of Psychology in Health Professional Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Upton, Dominic

    2008-01-01

    The education of nurses, midwives and allied health care professionals in the UK is guided by professional bodies and the over arching Health Professionals Council (HPC)/Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC). Each of these professional bodies provides regulatory frameworks and guidance notes on the educational content of the degree level programmes…

  12. Competencies for Rural Development Professionals in the Era of HIV/AIDS

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brinkman, Dine; Westendorp, Annemarie M. B.; Wals, Arjen E. J.; Mulder, Martin

    2007-01-01

    The impact of HIV/AIDS on food security and rural livelihoods is still insufficiently understood. It is evident, however, that rural development professionals need to respond to the changes that have taken place in rural areas due to the pandemic. This article explores competencies that they need in order to deal with the complex HIV/AIDS issues…

  13. A Financial Aid Competency Model for Professional Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woolf, Neil; Martinez, Mario

    2013-01-01

    This research explores the competencies that financial aid officers need to be successful in their jobs. A survey of 30 competencies was distributed to 508 financial aid officers in the Western United States. Respondents were asked to rate 30 job competencies for their relative importance and frequency of use. Using exploratory factor analysis,…

  14. Oral health care in pediatric AIDS.

    PubMed

    Davis, M J

    1990-02-01

    At the time of this writing, over 1500 cases of HIV infection in children under 13 have been documented. Estimates have been made that ten times that number exist. The oral manifestations of HIV infection in these children, the management of these problems, and access to care pose significant issues for the dentist who treats children. In Washington, D.C., in March of 1989, the Massachusetts Department of Public Health and the Office of Maternal Child Health funded a conference and workshop on oral complications of HIV infection in the pediatric population. This report uses information presented at the workshop and certain recent key papers to provide an overview of current knowledge about pediatric AIDS.

  15. AIDS, empire, and public health behaviorism.

    PubMed

    Basu, Sanjay

    2004-01-01

    Much of the current health approach to designing HIV/AIDS interventions in resource-poor settings involves behavior-change initiatives, particularly those adopting education-based and "culturally competent" frameworks for the reduction of HIV-associated "risk behaviors." This article reviews the evidence and social assumptions behind this approach to preventing HIV transmission, and argues that these approaches are often inadequate or misguided, particularly in their conflation of the concept of "culture" with social circumstances. By analyzing the socioeconomic circumstances that constrain individual agency, and by combining data from prevention literature with analyses of international trade agreements and the controversies over antiretroviral drug distribution, the author argues that the movement of capital and the maintenance of inequality are central to the problems associated with behavior-change initiatives and must be addressed through new paradigms in order to respond appropriately to the global AIDS pandemic. Hardt and Negri's paradigm of "Empire"--that is, examining the system through which social inequalities are maintained not only between countries but also within them--offers prospects for the design of new interventions and targets for public health workers and social movements.

  16. The relationships between foreign aid, HIV and government health spending.

    PubMed

    Youde, Jeremy

    2010-11-01

    This paper provides an empirical evaluation of adult HIV prevalence rates, foreign aid for HIV/AIDS programmes, and the amount of government spending on health care. It finds that there exists a statistically significant relationship between adult HIV prevalence rates and the amount of foreign funding for HIV/AIDS programmes, suggesting that need does in fact play some role in the allocation of HIV aid. It suggests there may be an additive relationship between foreign and domestic health spending, where governments turn the funding of their AIDS programmes over to foreign donors and instead put their own monies toward other parts of the health care system.

  17. [Health literacy - a concept for professional nursing?].

    PubMed

    Thilo, F; Sommerhalder, K; Hahn, S

    2012-12-01

    Research results show that health literacy is an important concept in nursing. It has a positive effect on the health of individuals as well as on the costs of the healthcare system. The results of a comprehensive literature search (1980 - March 2009) revealed that the concept of health literacy is being increasingly discussed; however, the concept is barely addressed in literature specific to nursing. The existing definitions of health literacy are formulated predominantly within the medical context. Only one study from the United States analyzed the concept within the context of nursing care. The concept of health literacy is highly relevant because its' aim is to empower the patients, along with their relatives, in dealing with health and disease. In order to thoroughly examine health literacy, it must first be reviewed conceptually within the context of the profession of nursing. This has occurred in this article. The specific terms relevant to health literacy were identified. Moreover, an operational definition for health literacy was developed for the professional nursing setting. Possibilities for nursing practice, due to the conceptualization of health literacy, are discussed.

  18. [Professionalization of public health officers in Japan].

    PubMed

    Yokota, Yoko

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, I describe how public health officers in Japan in the period of the late Taisho and early Showa eras claimed their position as professionals in the sanitary administrations of central and local governments. In the background of this push for recognition, there were related international and national movements. Internationally, public health ministries were established in developed countries and the League of Nations Health Organization (LNHO) was created. LNHO wanted to improve the level of public health officials world-wide, so the organization sponsored international exchanges of officials. These activities made a strong impression on Japanese public health officials, who realized that they belonged to an internationally recognized profession and that they needed to work hard to improve the substandard Japanese public health situation. Meanwhile, at the level of domestic politics, there were several movements of technical experts in different fields of government administration that worked to fight the unfair treatment of administrative officials, a situation that had existed since Meiji Period. The public health officers collaborated with the other technical experts to improve their positions and to play key roles in society. But while the other technical experts actively pursued social leadership, public health officials wanted to remain scientists. This is because the sanitary departments in the local governments were organized within police departments. In this environment, the law was dominant and science was secondary. But public health officials insisted that the basis of public health should be science, so they emphasized their scientific expertise.

  19. How Do Professional Learning Communities Aid and Hamper Professional Learning of Beginning Teachers Related to Differentiated Instruction?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Neve, Debbie; Devos, Geert

    2017-01-01

    Research has shown that adequate support from the school environment is necessary to help beginning teachers in applying differentiated instruction (DI), but how schools can aid in this process remains unclear. This qualitative study explores how professional learning communities (PLCs), an indicator of a supportive school environment, can enhance…

  20. Prostitutes and AIDS: a health department priority?

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberg, M J; Weiner, J M

    1988-01-01

    With increasing competition for resources, health departments are faced with the question of whether to target female prostitutes as a high priority component of AIDS prevention strategy. Prostitutes are considered to be a reservoir for transmission of certain sexually transmitted diseases (STDs). However, a variety of studies suggest that human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection in prostitutes follows a different pattern than that for STDs: HIV infection in non-drug using prostitutes tends to be low or absent, implying that sexual activity alone does not place them at high risk, while prostitutes who use intravenous drugs are far more likely to be infected with HIV. Emerging data from heterosexual groups similarly suggest a low rate of heterosexual transmission, particularly from women to men. Prostitutes who do not use intravenous drugs probably face their highest risk from steady partners who may be infected with HIV and other STDs and with whom barrier protection is generally not used. Nevertheless, there are good reasons for health departments to place high priority on prevention efforts directed to prostitutes: 1) prostitutes often have other risky behaviors such as drug use; and 2) prostitutes are reachable, being a group which is already in the health care system administered by health departments. PMID:3279838

  1. Why Knowledge of Financial Aid Is Important to Orientation Professionals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pope, Myron

    2001-01-01

    Discusses the origins, philosophy, and current status of student financial aid, asserting that this information is important for orientation personnel as they develop programs and promote a holistic view of student success, including how students pay for college. (EV)

  2. The Nursing Research Center on HIV/AIDS Health Disparities.

    PubMed

    Holzemer, William L; Méndez, Marta Rivero; Portillo, Carmen; Padilla, Geraldine; Cuca, Yvette; Vargas-Molina, Ricardo L

    2004-01-01

    This report describes the partnership between the schools of nursing at the University of California San Francisco and the University of Puerto Rico to address the need for nursing research on HIV/AIDS health disparities. The partnership led to the creation of the Nursing Research Center on HIV/AIDS Health Disparities with funding from the National Institutes of Health/National Institute of Nursing Research. We provide background information on the disproportionate impact of the HIV/AIDS epidemic on racial and ethnic minorities, describe the major predictors of health disparities in persons at risk for or diagnosed with HIV/AIDS using the Outcomes Model for Health Care Research, and outline the major components of the Nursing Research Center. The center's goal is to improve health outcomes for people living with and affected by HIV/AIDS by enhancing the knowledge base for HIV/AIDS care.

  3. Camp Health Aide Manual = Manual para trabajadores de salud.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, June Grube; And Others

    This bilingual manual serves as a textbook for migrant Camp Health Aides. Camp Health Aides are members of migrant labor camps enlisted to provide information about health and social services to migrant workers and their families. The manual is divided into 12 tabbed sections representing lessons. Teaching notes printed on contrasting paper…

  4. HIV/AIDS Community Health Information System.

    PubMed

    Fulcher, Christopher L; Kaukinen, Catherine E

    2003-01-01

    Given changes in the faces of AIDS over the last decade, it is crucial that disparities in health and access to healthcare are addressed. An Internet-based GIS was developed using ESRI's Arc Internet Map Server (Arc IMS) to provide users with a suite of tools to interact with geographic data and conduct spatial analyses related to the characteristics that promote or impede the provision of HIV-related services. Internet Mapping allows those engaged in local decision-making to: (1) geographically visualize information via the Internet; (2) Assess the relationship between the distribution of HIV services and spatially referenced socio-economic data; and (3) generate "what if" scenarios" that may direct the allocation of healthcare resources.

  5. Literature review: Afghanistan women's health crisis, health service delivery, and ethical issues for international aid.

    PubMed

    Turner, Helen

    2006-09-01

    The literature indicates that the health of women in Afghanistan is poor. In 1997 maternal mortality in Afghanistan was one of the worst in the world. Difficulties in establishing health services revolve around fundamentalist Islamic ideas and ongoing violence within Afghanistan. The literature holds advice on key behaviours for health professionals who may chose to work in Afghanistan. The literature also identifies the local level action that is occurring as the issue of women's health is recognised. Humanitarian assistance has been provided, with international aid agencies having to weigh the ethical responsibilities they hold and one agency tragically facing the violent loss of its own staff. Easy answers are not in the literature, merely an opportunity to understand, consider, and take action about what is facing women in Afghanistan and those who try to help.

  6. Guide to Planning Health Promotion for AIDS Prevention and Control. WHO AIDS Series 5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    World Health Organization, Geneva (Switzerland).

    This guide is intended to provide planners, managers, and technical staff with guidelines for planning, implementing, monitoring, and evaluating an Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) health promotion program. As such, it can be used in the development of a detailed AIDS health promotion action plan. The guide reviews the steps, processes,…

  7. Counselors' Perceptions of HIV/AIDS Counseling in Botswana: Professional Identity, Practice, and Training Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stockton, Rex; Paul, Tebatso; Voils-Levenda, Amanda; Robbins, Melanie; Li, Peiwei; Zaitsoff, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Mental health concerns can exacerbate the progression and transmission of HIV/AIDS. Thus there have been calls for increased research and integration of mental health care into HIV/AIDS treatment in Sub-Saharan Africa, where the disease has reached pandemic levels. This qualitative study analyzed the open-ended survey responses of 181 individuals…

  8. Danish Health Professionals' Experiences of Being Coached: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ammentorp, Jette; Jensen, Hanne Irene; Uhrenfeldt, Lisbeth

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: In recent years, coaching, as a supplement to professional development, has received increased attention, especially in nursing. Still, only little is known about how health professionals experience participating in coaching sessions. The purpose of this pilot study was to describe and analyze health professionals' experiences from…

  9. A Measure of Staff Burnout among Health Professionals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, John W.

    Staff burnout among health professionals refers to a syndrome of physical and emotional exhaustion involving the development of negative job attitudes, a poor professional self-concept, and a loss of empathic concern for clients. The Staff Burnout Scale for Health Professionals (SBS-HP) is a 20-item inventory assessing cognitive, affective,…

  10. Has the Swap Influenced Aid Flows in the Health Sector?

    PubMed

    Sweeney, Rohan; Mortimer, Duncan

    2016-05-01

    The sector wide approach (SWAp) emerged during the 1990s as a mechanism for managing aid from the multiplicity of development partners that operate in the recipient country's health, education or agricultural sectors. Health SWAps aim to give increased control to recipient governments, allowing greater domestic influence over how health aid is allocated and facilitating allocative efficiency gains. This paper assesses whether health SWAps have increased recipient control of health aid via increased general sector-support and have facilitated (re)allocations of health aid across disease areas. Using a uniquely compiled panel data set of countries receiving development assistance for health over the period 1990-2010, we employ fixed effects and dynamic panel models to assess the impact of introducing a health SWAp on levels of general sector-support for health and allocations of health-sector aid across key funding silos (including HIV, 'maternal and child health' and 'sector-support'). Our results suggest that health SWAps have influenced health-sector aid flows in a manner consistent with increased recipient control and improvements in allocative efficiency.

  11. Is Health Aid Reaching the Poor? Analysis of Household Data from Aid Recipient Countries

    PubMed Central

    Bendavid, Eran

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine the extent to which the narrowing of child mortality across wealth gradients has been related to foreign aid to the health sector in low- and middle-income countries. Methods Mortality and wealth data on 989,901 under-5 children from 957,674 households in 49 aid recipient countries in Africa, Asia, South America, and the Caribbean between 1993 and 2012 were used in the analysis. Declines in under-5 mortality in the four poorest wealth quantiles were compared to the decline among the wealthiest at varying levels of health aid per capita using fixed effects multivariable regression models and controlling for maternal education, urbanization, and domestic spending on health among recipient countries. Results Each additional dollar in total health aid per capita was associated with 5.7 fewer deaths per 10,000 child-years among children in the poorest relative to the wealthiest households (p<0.001). This was also true when measured in percent declines (1.90% faster decline in under-5 mortality among the poorest compared with the wealthiest with each dollar in total health aid, p = 0.008). The association was stronger when using health aid specifically for malaria than total health aid, 12.60% faster decline among the poorest compared with the wealthiest with each dollar in malaria aid, p = 0.001. Conclusions Foreign aid to the health sector is preferentially related to reductions in under-5 mortality among the poorest compared with the wealthiest. Health aid addressing malaria, which imposes a disproportionate burden among the poor, may explain the observed effect. PMID:24404148

  12. Development of Home Health Aide Curriculum Project. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Patricia

    This package contains materials intended for use in a new home health aide curriculum that is designed to be presented as a two-quarter program at Tacoma Community College in Tacoma, Washington. Included in the package are a final report outlining the objectives and outcomes of the project to develop a home health aide curriculum that would meet…

  13. Talking with Your Health Care Professionals about Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Disease Questions to Ask Your Health Care Professional Contact Us Health Information Center Phone: 1-800-860- ... to share this content freely. March 1, 2012 Contact Us Health Information Center Phone: 1-800-860- ...

  14. [Agrochemicals and human health: contributions of healthcare professionals].

    PubMed

    de Siqueira, Soraia Lemos; Kruse, Maria Henriqueta Luce

    2008-09-01

    This paper focuses on the scientific production of health professionals, especially nurses, about agrochemicals and human health. The essay combines and presents information by means of literature review, with a view to acknowledge the contribution of each author and their use for the human health field. Thirty-two research articles, published in Brazilian journals, were located. The analysis of these articles highlights that healthcare professionals' contributions focus on human health, especially, workers' health and food quality. With a view to minimize the effects from agrochemicals on human and environmental health, the authors exposes action suggestions both for health professionals and for the institutions associated.

  15. Factors in Recruiting and Retaining Health Professionals for Rural Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daniels, Zina M.; VanLeit, Betsy J.; Skipper, Betty J.; Sanders, Margaret L.; Rhyne, Robert L.

    2007-01-01

    Context: Rural communities, often with complex health care issues, have difficulty creating and sustaining an adequate health professional workforce. Purpose: To identify factors associated with rural recruitment and retention of graduates from a variety of health professional programs in the southwestern United States. Methods: A survey…

  16. Update on Validity of Required Competencies for Worksite Health Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Becker, Craig; Rager, Robin C.; Wright, Fred Egbert

    2013-01-01

    Background: To improve global health, the workforce capacity of health promotion professionals must be strengthened through the provision of competencies necessary to deliver effective programs. Purpose: This study provides an updated analysis of the validity of the worksite health promotion (WHP) professional competencies developed in 2000 by the…

  17. The Design, Implementation, and Formative Evaluation of a Classroom Aide Professional Development Training Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dulfer, Katherine J.

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation focused on the process of designing, implementing, and formatively evaluating an eight week Classroom Aide Professional Development Training Program (CAPD-TP) on behavior management and academic instruction within the context of a New Jersey state approved private special education school for students with behavioral and/or…

  18. Embedded Filming for Social Change Learning about HIV/AIDS and Rural Development Professionalism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Witteveen, Loes; Lie, Rico

    2009-01-01

    Rural Development Professionals (RDPs) are key actors in processes of social change for people living with HIV/AIDS in rural areas. This article reports on the filming of a series of workshops and courses for RDPs in Ghana, India, Tanzania and Zambia. In this article the filming and the films are analyzed as tools for learning and social change…

  19. 21 CFR 801.420 - Hearing aid devices; professional and patient labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Hearing aid devices; professional and patient... a waiver statement declining the medical evaluation for religious or personal beliefs that preclude... strongly discouraged. children with hearing loss In addition to seeing a physician for a medical...

  20. 21 CFR 801.420 - Hearing aid devices; professional and patient labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Hearing aid devices; professional and patient... a waiver statement declining the medical evaluation for religious or personal beliefs that preclude... strongly discouraged. children with hearing loss In addition to seeing a physician for a medical...

  1. 21 CFR 801.420 - Hearing aid devices; professional and patient labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hearing aid devices; professional and patient... a waiver statement declining the medical evaluation for religious or personal beliefs that preclude... strongly discouraged. children with hearing loss In addition to seeing a physician for a medical...

  2. Attributes of Quality in Audiovisual Materials for Health Professionals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suter, Emanuel; Waddell, Wendy H.

    1981-01-01

    Defines attributes of quality in content, instructional design, technical production, and packaging of audiovisual materials used in the education of health professionals. Seven references are listed. (FM)

  3. Impaired Black Health Professionals: Vulnerabilities and Treatment Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Carl C.

    1986-01-01

    The impaired black health professional is in a unique position in American society. Factors that contribute to this uniqueness include: the small number of black health professionals, which limits resources for program development and referrals; overt and covert racism in society and in medical school curriculums; differences in black and white drug and alcohol abuse and suicide patterns; and upward mobility, which tends to isolate the black professional from black support systems. These factors need to be recognized by the health care profession. Bias-free investigations are needed to provide more information on ethnic differences so that impaired health professional programs and services may give more appropriate treatment. PMID:3783748

  4. Contributions of Public Health to Genetics Education for Health Care Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burke, Wylie

    2005-01-01

    With growing knowledge about the role of genetics in health, genetics education for health care professionals has taken on increasing importance. Many efforts are under way to develop new genetics curricula. Although such efforts are primarily the responsibility of health professional schools and professional societies, the public health system is…

  5. HIV infection and AIDS in the public health and health care systems: the role of law and litigation.

    PubMed

    Gostin, L O; Webber, D W

    1998-04-08

    The AIDS Litigation Project has reviewed nearly 600 reported cases involving individuals with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) in the federal and state courts in the United States between 1991 and 1997. Cases were identified through a federal and 50-state computer and library search. An important subset of litigation relates to HIV/AIDS in the public health and health care systems, since the law affects health care institutions and professionals, patients, and public health policy in America. This subset of HIV/AIDS litigation includes testing and reporting; privacy, the duty to warn, and the right to know; physician standards of care in prevention and treatment; and discrimination and access to health care. In broad terms, the review demonstrates a reliance on voluntary testing and protection of patient privacy through HIV-specific statutes and the common law. Negligence with potential civil and criminal liability has been alleged in cases of erroneous or missed diagnosis of HIV infection. In the first AIDS case to be considered by the Supreme Court, the Court will decide whether patients with asymptomatic HIV infection are protected under the Americans With Disabilities Act. Considerable progress has been made, both socially and legally, during the first 2 decades of the epidemic, but much still needs to be accomplished to protect privacy, prevent discrimination, and promote tolerance.

  6. Examining Health Care Students’ Attitudes toward E-Professionalism

    PubMed Central

    Noronha, Sandhya; Graneto, John; Obucina, Lillian; Christensen, Kelli J.; Fjortoft, Nancy F.

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To compare pharmacy, osteopathic medicine, dental medicine, and physician assistant (PA) students’ perceptions of e-professionalism. Methods. A 20-item questionnaire was developed and administered to four cohorts of health care professions students early in their first professional year. The questionnaire contained 16 scenarios in which a hypothetical health care student or professional shared information or content electronically and students were asked to indicate how much they agreed that the scenario represented professional behavior. Results. Ninety-four percent of students completed the questionnaire. More female students were in the pharmacy and PA cohorts. There were statistical differences in students’ perceptions of e-professionalism in five of 16 scenarios. Specific differences were most often between the osteopathic medicine students and the other cohorts. Conclusions. The health care professions students surveyed had similar perceptions of e-professionalism. Of the four cohorts, osteopathic medicine students appeared less conservative in their approach to e-professionalism than the other cohorts. PMID:28179718

  7. Volcanic activity: a review for health professionals.

    PubMed Central

    Newhall, C G; Fruchter, J S

    1986-01-01

    Volcanoes erupt magma (molten rock containing variable amounts of solid crystals, dissolved volatiles, and gas bubbles) along with pulverized pre-existing rock (ripped from the walls of the vent and conduit). The resulting volcanic rocks vary in their physical and chemical characteristics, e.g., degree of fragmentation, sizes and shapes of fragments, minerals present, ratio of crystals to glass, and major and trace elements composition. Variability in the properties of magma, and in the relative roles of magmatic volatiles and groundwater in driving an eruption, determine to a great extent the type of an eruption; variability in the type of an eruption in turn influences the physical characteristics and distribution of the eruption products. The principal volcanic hazards are: ash and larger fragments that rain down from an explosion cloud (airfall tephra and ballistic fragments); flows of hot ash, blocks, and gases down the slopes of a volcano (pyroclastic flows); "mudflows" (debris flows); lava flows; and concentrations of volcanic gases in topographic depressions. Progress in volcanology is bringing improved long- and short-range forecasts of volcanic activity, and thus more options for mitigation of hazards. Collaboration between health professionals and volcanologists helps to mitigate health hazards of volcanic activity. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 6a-6e FIGURE 6a-6e FIGURE 8 FIGURE 9 FIGURE 10 FIGURE 11 PMID:3946726

  8. Volcanic activity: a review for health professionals.

    PubMed

    Newhall, C G; Fruchter, J S

    1986-03-01

    Volcanoes erupt magma (molten rock containing variable amounts of solid crystals, dissolved volatiles, and gas bubbles) along with pulverized pre-existing rock (ripped from the walls of the vent and conduit). The resulting volcanic rocks vary in their physical and chemical characteristics, e.g., degree of fragmentation, sizes and shapes of fragments, minerals present, ratio of crystals to glass, and major and trace elements composition. Variability in the properties of magma, and in the relative roles of magmatic volatiles and groundwater in driving an eruption, determine to a great extent the type of an eruption; variability in the type of an eruption in turn influences the physical characteristics and distribution of the eruption products. The principal volcanic hazards are: ash and larger fragments that rain down from an explosion cloud (airfall tephra and ballistic fragments); flows of hot ash, blocks, and gases down the slopes of a volcano (pyroclastic flows); "mudflows" (debris flows); lava flows; and concentrations of volcanic gases in topographic depressions. Progress in volcanology is bringing improved long- and short-range forecasts of volcanic activity, and thus more options for mitigation of hazards. Collaboration between health professionals and volcanologists helps to mitigate health hazards of volcanic activity.

  9. MEDLINE: the options for health professionals.

    PubMed Central

    Wood, E H

    1994-01-01

    The bibliographic database MEDLINE, produced by the National Library of Medicine (NLM), is a computerized index to the world's biomedical literature. The database can be searched back to 1966 and contains 6.8 million records. The various means of access are divided, for the purposes of this article, into three categories: logging onto a remote host computer by telephone and modem or by the Internet; subscribing to part or all of the database on compact disc (CD-ROM); and leasing the data on a transport medium such as magnetic tape or CDs for loading on a local host computer. Decisions about which method is preferable in a given situation depend on cost, availability of hardware and software, local expertise, and the size of the intended user population. Trends include increased access to the Internet by health professionals, increased network speed, links from MEDLINE records to full-text databases or online journals, and integration of MEDLINE into wider health information systems. PMID:7850561

  10. Community Health Aides in Grenada: A Proposed Experimental Training Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaur, Manjit; Mayfield, James B.

    1994-01-01

    Key factors of a model for training community health aides are (1) extended time for updating and reinforcing skills; (2) relevance to local situations; (3) group process and interpersonal communication training; (4) practical materials; and (5) participation of physicians, local health workers, and community leaders in rural health policy…

  11. Information Technology Education for Health Professionals: Opportunities and Challenges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haque, Syed S.; Gibson, David M.

    1998-01-01

    Describes surveys of potential health-care employers and health-care professionals to identify the need for biomedical informatics programs. Outlines a certificate program, master of science in biomedicine and nursing informatics, and a Ph.D. program. (SK)

  12. A comparative study of professional and interprofessional values between health professional associations.

    PubMed

    Tsou, PaiHsuan; Shih, Julie; Ho, Ming-Jung

    2015-01-01

    The need for effective interprofessional collaboration to ensure safe patient care is crucial. However, health professions are guided by separate professional codes of conduct. To examine whether professional codes are consistent across professions, this review examines 13 key health professional associations in the United States and compares their values to the guiding principles of interprofessional practice defined by the Interprofessional Professionalism Collaborative (IPC). Findings indicate that all six of the IPC's principles (altruism/caring, excellence, ethics, respect, communication, and accountability) were shared by the majority of professions, with many emphasizing two additional attributes, integrity and justice, suggesting there is room to expand the IPC's core principles. Few associations included interprofessional communication and collaboration in their professional codes. There is potential for associations to promote greater interprofessional collaboration by reshaping their professional frameworks. With many shared values across professions, establishing a common framework of interprofessional professionalism is feasible.

  13. Survey on Continuing Education Needs for Health Professionals: Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    System Development Corp., Santa Monica, CA.

    The report documents the results of a 1967 survey of health professionals in the four-State Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education (WICHE) Mountain States Regional Medical Program (MS/RMP). Addressed to health professionals in each of the four States--Idaho, Montana, Nevada, and Wyoming--the survey focuses primarily on the…

  14. A Principal Calling: Professionalism and Health Care Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cornett, Becky Sutherland

    2006-01-01

    As health care professionals, our ''product'' is clinical service. We demonstrate professionalism by attitudes, knowledge, and behaviors that reflect a multi-faceted approach to the standards, regulations, and principles underlying successful clinical practices. The issues facing practitioners who work in health care environments are complex,…

  15. Complexity or Meaning in Health Professional Education and Practice?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowe, Wendy Anne

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Discourses of complexity have entered health professional education. This paper explores the meaning of complexity by asking how health professionals are educated and some of the consequences of that education. Design: A qualitative study was carried out drawing on reflexivity, discourse analysis and grounded methodology. Setting: Two…

  16. Health Professionals' Perceptions of Sexual Assault Management: A Delphi Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jancey, Jonine; Meuleners, Lynn; Phillips, Maureen

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To explore health professionals' perceptions of sexual assault management practices and identify issues related to these practices across Western Australia (WA). Design: A two-round electronic Delphi study was undertaken with health professionals (medical doctors, registered nurses, social workers and managers). Setting: Healthcare…

  17. Lessons from a Transgender Patient for Health Care Professionals.

    PubMed

    Sallans, Ryan K

    2016-11-01

    It is not uncommon for transgender patients to avoid sharing information about their identity and medical history with health care professionals, due to past negative experiences within health care settings. Professionals who show sensitivity to the topic and express care about health record documentation can increase a transgender patient's trust. There are many opportunities to increase transgender health literacy, including consultation, conferences, webinars, books, and articles focused on transgender health care. It's critical for professionals to listen closely to individual patients' stated needs. This article shares one transgender patient's encounters and experiences within health care settings and offers lessons on how health care professionals can be more inclusive, respectful, and responsive to the needs of transgender patients.

  18. The Opinion of Professional Caregivers About The Platform UnderstAID for Patients with Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Malak, Roksana; Krawczyk-Wasielewska, Agnieszka; Mojs, Ewa; Grobelny, Bartosz; Głodowska, Katarzyna B.; Millán-Calenti, José Carlos; Núñez-Naveira, Laura; Samborski, Włodzimierz

    2016-01-01

    Background The person with dementia should be treated as an unique person regarding symptoms directly associated with dementia, such as problems with memory, hallucinations, and delusions, as well as other physical, mental, or neurological deficits. The symptoms not directly typical of dementia, such as musculoskeletal disorders or depression, should be also be considered in order to improve the quality of life of a person with dementia. That is why professional caregivers have to broaden their current knowledge not only of medical symptoms but also of the patient’s psychosocial condition and increase their inquisitiveness about the individual condition of the patient. The aim of the study was to get to know the opinion of professional caregivers about the UnderstAID platform and its usefulness for informal caregivers. Material/Methods Participants in the study group consisted of professional caregivers: nurses, sociologists, psychologists, physiotherapists, and occupational therapists, all of whom specialized in geriatrics and had experience in working with people with dementia. All professional caregivers answered 24 questions that refer to positive and negative aspects of the UnderstAID platform. Results The study group of professional caregivers highly appreciated that the application could give support to caregivers (mean score of 4.78; 5 points means that they totally agreed, and 1 point means that they totally disagreed) and that a wide range of multimedia materials helped the informal caregivers to gain a better understanding of the contents (mean score of 4.78). There was a statistically significant correlation between the age of the professional caregivers and the frequency of positive opinions that the UnderstAID application gave support to caregivers of relatives with dementia (p=0.028) and the opinion that videos, photos, and pictures may help the informal caregivers to gain a better understanding of the contents (p=0.028). Conclusions A group of

  19. [Professionalization of nursing aides at the State of Sao Paulo: a study of supply/demand regarding training].

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Lavínia Santos de Souza; Lampe, Glória Nicoladelli; Martins, Cleide Lavieri; Miyashiro, Sueli Yuriko

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this exploratory study was to verify the problem of nursing aides professionalization and to analyze the offer of courses and demand regarding technical level capacitation at the state of São Paulo, Brazil. Data were obtained through the analysis of documents on professional capacitation in the area in the 1990s. Authors identified a scenario of conceptual and political changes regarding the professionalization and the existence of a great number of aides being professionalized. They also verified a tendency to increase the offer of courses and the demand regarding the capacitation and specialization at the technical level.

  20. Collaboration between Clergy and Mental Health Professionals: A Review of Professional Health Care Journals from 1980 through 1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weaver, Andrew J.; Flannelly, Kevin J.; Flannelly, Laura T.; Oppenheimer, Julia E.

    2003-01-01

    Examines how collaboration with clergy was viewed by mental health and other health care professionals outside the religious community. Seven themes were identified through a content analysis of health care journals, including the benefits of collaboration to each profession, the need to increase the clergy's knowledge about mental health, and the…

  1. Mobility Aids: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    MedlinePlus

    ... interface. Article: How does playing adapted sports affect quality of life of... Article: Training and orthotic effects ... - PDF Eldercare at Home: Mobility Problems (AGS Foundation for Health ...

  2. 25 CFR 36.82 - May behavioral health professional(s) provide services during the academic school day?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false May behavioral health professional(s) provide services...) provide services during the academic school day? Behavioral health professional(s) must average at least 75 percent of their work hours with students in their dormitories. These work hours must...

  3. The importance of good communication between patient and health professionals.

    PubMed

    Markides, Markos

    2011-10-01

    This article emphasizes the importance of a good communication between patients and health professionals. It focuses on how patients feels during the cancer journey and how professionals should behave to them. It also go through the different dilemmas and conflicts health professionals may come across in their interaction with patients and it suggests different ways about how those dilemmas can be resolved. The main idea of this article is the fact that health professionals-whether physicians, nurses or psychologists-need to focus on and improve, if necessary, their communication with patients; basically, learn how to unite the humanistic side of care with the technical side; how to be professionals without losing their humanistic identity.

  4. Mental-Health Aid for Immigrant Children Lags

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zehr, Mary Ann

    2007-01-01

    As educators and experts assess the quality of student mental-health services in light of the deadly shootings last April 16, the Virginia Tech gunman's immigrant background is focusing attention on what immigration workers say is a lack of services tailored to such groups. Mental-health professionals say that, in general, even school districts…

  5. How are health professionals earning their living in Malawi?

    PubMed Central

    Muula, Adamson S; Maseko, Fresier C

    2006-01-01

    Background The migration of health professionals from southern Africa to developed nations is negatively affecting the delivery of health care services in the source countries. Oftentimes however, it is the reasons for the out-migration that have been described in the literature. The work and domestic situations of those health professionals continuing to serve in their posts have not been adequately studied. Methods The present study utilized a qualitative data collection and analysis method. This was achieved through focus group discussions and in-depth interviews with health professionals and administrators to determine the challenges they face and the coping systems they resort to and the perceptions towards those coping methods. Results Health professionals identified the following as some of the challenges there faced: inequitable and poor remuneration, overwhelming responsibilities with limited resources, lack of a stimulating work environment, inadequate supervision, poor access to continued professionals training, limited career progression, lack of transparent recruitment and discriminatory remuneration. When asked what kept them still working in Malawi when the pressures to emigrate were there, the following were some of the ways the health professionals mentioned as useful for earning extra income to support their families: working in rural areas where life was perceived to be cheaper, working closer to home village so as to run farms, stealing drugs from health facilities, having more than one job, running small to medium scale businesses. Health professionals would also minimize expenditure by missing meals and walking to work. Conclusion Many health professionals in Malawi experience overly challenging environments. In order to survive some are involved in ethically and legally questionable activities such as receiving "gifts" from patients and pilfering drugs. The efforts by the Malawi government and the international community to retain health

  6. Changing Our Ways of Thinking: Health Professionals and Nuclear Weapons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neal, Mary

    1984-01-01

    Outlines the issues raised by health professionals concerned about the threat of nuclear weapons and nuclear war, including epidemics, civil defense, arms costs, psychosocial aspects, and ethical responsibility. Appendixes include lists of antinuclear organizations, medical professional associations, and 160 references. (SK)

  7. Health Sciences Graduate and Professional Students and Debt.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minnesota Higher Education Services Office, St. Paul.

    The 1999 Minnesota Legislature asked for a study of the borrowing and repayment problems of students in the Academic Health Center (AHC) at the University of Minnesota. Findings of this study show that most graduate and professional students at the AHC borrowed by the time they completed their graduation or professional programs. Many borrowed…

  8. Health Concerns (excluding AIDS) for Male Homosexual Patients

    PubMed Central

    Willoughby, Brian C.

    1988-01-01

    Since 1981, the Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) has emerged as the major infectious epidemic of our time and has focused much attention on the male homosexual community. While AIDS is the most serious of gay-related health concerns, it is only one of several infectious diseases that have particular relevance for this group of patients. In addition, the mere acknowledgement of homosexuality by a male patient evokes unique psychosocial concerns that are important considerations for the primary health-care provider. The author of this article describes an approach to gay male patients for those who provide health care to such men and provides a review of specific infectious diseases (excluding AIDS) for which they are at risk. PMID:21253077

  9. Factors influencing the migration of West African health professionals

    PubMed Central

    Lowe, Mat; Chen, Duan-Rung

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The West African health sector is characterized by a human resource base lacking in numbers and specialized skills. Among the contributory factors to this lack of human resource for health workforce include but not limited to the migration of health professionals. Methods This cross-sectional survey targeted 118 young professionals who have participated in the Young Professional Internship Program (YPIP) of the West African Health Organization (WAHO), from (2005-2013). It inquired about their socio-demographic characteristics associated with migration and reasons for going to their preferred or most likely destinations through online survey. Results Of the 118 young professionals, 100 responded to the online survey, of which (28%) have migrated and (72%) did not migrate. Migration was more common among males and those (age≤31 years old), single with high dependency level and no previous work experience. Having a medical profession and being posted to urban or semi-urban area was also associated with their emigration. Their most important reasons for going to preferred or most likely destinations were to have fair level of workload, job promotion and limited occupational risks. Conclusion This finding suggests that the migration of health professionals is situation dependent, mediated by basic socio-demographic variables and work related conditions. These issues have implications for curbing the brain drain potential of health professionals in the West African health sector. PMID:27800092

  10. Health equity in humanitarian emergencies: a role for evidence aid.

    PubMed

    Pottie, Kevin

    2015-02-01

    Humanitarian emergencies require a range of planned and coordinated actions: security, healthcare, and, as this article highlights, health equity responses. Health equity is an evidence-based science that aims to address unfair and unjust health inequality outcomes. New approaches are using health equity to guide the development of community programs, equity methods are being used to identify disadvantaged groups that may face health inequities in a humanitarian emergency, and equity is being used to prevent unintended harms and consequences in interventions. Limitations to health equity approaches include acquiring sufficient data to make equity interpretations, integrating disadvantage populations in to the equity approach, and ensuring buy-in from decision-makers. This article uses examples from World Health Organization, Refugee Health Guidelines and Health Impact Assessment to demonstrate the emerging role for health equity in humanitarian emergencies. It is based on a presentation at the Evidence Aid Symposium, on 20 September 2014, at Hyderabad, India.

  11. College and University Health Care Professionals: An Expanding Team.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grier, Phillip M.

    1980-01-01

    An historical perspective of the American College Health Association emphasizes the importance of teamwork among health personnel. The current trend in litigation toward health care professionals and the regulatory role of government has resulted in an apparent increase in legal activity, and necessitates teamwork between doctors and lawyers. (JN)

  12. The role of emotions in health professional ethics teaching.

    PubMed

    Gillam, Lynn; Delany, Clare; Guillemin, Marilys; Warmington, Sally

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, we put forward the view that emotions have a legitimate and important role in health professional ethics education. This paper draws upon our experience of running a narrative ethics education programme for ethics educators from a range of healthcare disciplines. It describes the way in which emotions may be elicited in narrative ethics teaching and considers the appropriate role of emotions in ethics education for health professionals. We argue there is a need for a pedagogical framework to productively incorporate the role of emotions in health professional ethics teaching. We suggest a theoretical basis for an ethics pedagogy that integrates health professional emotions in both the experience and the analysis of ethical practice, and identify a range of strategies to support the educator to incorporate emotion within their ethics teaching.

  13. Capacity Building in Global Mental Health: Professional Training

    PubMed Central

    Fricchione, Gregory L; Borba, Christina P C; Alem, Atalay; Shibre, Teshome; Carney, Julia R; Henderson, David C

    2012-01-01

    We suggest that the optimal approach to building capacity in global mental health care will require partnerships between professional resources in high-income countries and promising health-related institutions in low- and middle-income countries. The result of these partnerships will be sustainable academic relationships that can educate a new generation of in-country primary care physicians and, eventually, specialized health professionals. Research capabilities will be an essential educational component to inform policy and practice, and to ensure careful outcome measurements of training and of intervention, prevention, and promotion strategies. The goal of these academic centers of excellence will be to develop quality, in-country clinical and research professionals, and to build a productive environment for these professionals to advance their careers locally. In sum, this article discusses human capacity building in global mental health, provides recommendations for training, and offers examples of recent initiatives. (Harv Rev Psychiatry 2012;20:47–57.) PMID:22335182

  14. Capacity building in global mental health: professional training.

    PubMed

    Fricchione, Gregory L; Borba, Christina P C; Alem, Atalay; Shibre, Teshome; Carney, Julia R; Henderson, David C

    2012-01-01

    We suggest that the optimal approach to building capacity in global mental health care will require partnerships between professional resources in high-income countries and promising health-related institutions in low- and middle-income countries. The result of these partnerships will be sustainable academic relationships that can educate a new generation of in-country primary care physicians and, eventually, specialized health professionals. Research capabilities will be an essential educational component to inform policy and practice, and to ensure careful outcome measurements of training and of intervention, prevention, and promotion strategies. The goal of these academic centers of excellence will be to develop quality, in-country clinical and research professionals, and to build a productive environment for these professionals to advance their careers locally. In sum, this article discusses human capacity building in global mental health, provides recommendations for training, and offers examples of recent initiatives.

  15. The health care professional as a modern abolitionist.

    PubMed

    O'Callaghan, Michael G

    2012-01-01

    Health care professionals are in a unique position to identify and to assist victims of human trafficking. Human trafficking today occurs both domestically and globally. It manifests in many forms, including adult and child forced labor, involuntary domestic servitude, adult and child sexual slavery, involuntary servitude, debt bondage, and child soldiers. This article offers insight into modern human trafficking and ways health care professionals can be activists.

  16. [Post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms among professionals during humanitarian aid in Haiti after the earthquake in 2010].

    PubMed

    Guimaro, Melissa Simon; Caiuby, Andrea Vannini Santesso; dos Santos, Oscar Fernando Pavão; Lacerda, Shirley Silva; Andreoli, Sergio Baxter

    2013-11-01

    The scope of this article is to screen the symptoms of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) among the professionals who provided humanitarian aid for the Haitian population after the 2010 earthquake. It involvess a cross-sectional study. The Impact of Event Scale - Revised (IES-R) was used for screening symptoms of PTSD. The participants included 32 Brazilians (mean age = 37.58 +/-7.01), 22 Americans (mean age =33.67 +/-8.03) and 12 Ecuadorians (mean age = 44.80 +/- 15.88). The professionals did not have PTSD symptoms. The relationship between prior experience variables in disaster situations and the total score of the IES-R (F (2) = 4.34, p = 0.017), as well as prior experience in disaster situations and the intrusion subscale (F (2) = 3.94, p = 0.024) were significant in linear regression models. The number of prior experiences was revealed as a significant predictor for the total score of IES (p < 0.05). The results showed that current experiences can be exacerbated by memories of prior experiences, increasing the likelihood of developing PTSD. Therefore the mental health care of the professionals should foster the early identification of prior experience risk factors, thereby not permitting voluntary initiative to transcend selective criteria and specific care.

  17. Educating Health Care Professionals on Human Trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Grace, Aimee M.; Lippert, Suzanne; Collins, Kristin; Pineda, Noelle; Tolani, Alisha; Walker, Rebecca; Jeong, Monica; Trounce, Milana Boukhman; Graham-Lamberts, Caroline; Bersamin, Melina; Martinez, Det. Jeremy; Dotzler, Det. Jennifer; Vanek, Lt John; Storfer-Isser, Amy; Chamberlain, Lisa J.; Horwitz, Sarah M.

    2015-01-01

    Background The US Department of State estimates that there are between 4 and 27 million individuals worldwide in some form of modern slavery. Recent studies have demonstrated that 28% to 50% of trafficking victims in the United States encountered health care professionals while in captivity, but were not identified and recognized. This study aimed to determine whether an educational presentation increased emergency department (ED) providers' recognition of human trafficking (HT) victims and knowledge of resources to manage cases of HT. Methods The 20 largest San Francisco Bay Area EDs were randomized into intervention (10 EDs) or delayed intervention comparison groups (10 EDs) to receive a standardized educational presentation containing the following: background about HT, relevance of HT to health care, clinical signs in potential victims, and referral options for potential victims. Participants in the delayed intervention group completed a pretest in the period the immediate intervention group received the educational presentation, and all participants were assessed immediately before (pretest) and after (posttest) the intervention. The intervention effect was tested by comparing the pre–post change in the intervention group to the change in 2 pretests in the delayed intervention group adjusted for the effect of clustering within EDs. The 4 primary outcomes were importance of knowledge of HT to the participant's profession (5-point Likert scale), self-rated knowledge of HT (5-point Likert scale), knowledge of who to call for potential HT victims (yes/no), and suspecting that a patient was a victim of HT (yes/no). Findings There were 258 study participants from 14 EDs; 141 from 8 EDs in the intervention group and 117 from 7 EDs in the delayed intervention comparison group, of which 20 served as the delayed intervention comparison group. Participants in the intervention group reported greater increases in their level of knowledge about HT versus those in the

  18. Awareness of nutrition problems among Vietnamese health and education professionals.

    PubMed

    Pham, Thi Hai Quynh; Worsley, Anthony; Lawrence, Mark; Marshall, Bernie

    2016-03-22

    Professionals who provide nutrition education and consulting to the public are encouraged to take into account the health, environmental and social contexts that influence health-related attitudes and behaviours in the population. This paper examined the awareness of shifts in population health outcomes associated with the nutrition transition in Vietnam among university nutrition lecturers, health professionals and school education professionals. Most of these professionals held accurate views of the current population health issues in Vietnam. However, they differed in their awareness of the seriousness of overweight and obesity. Although the majority indicated that the prevalence of obesity and non-communicable diseases (NCDs) had increased, nearly half believed that the government should complete its attempts to control undernutrition before trying to control obesity. More health professionals believed that food marketing was responsible for the growing prevalence of children's obesity, and more of them disapproved of the marketing of less healthy food to children. In contrast, the university nutrition lecturers were least aware of food marketing and the seriousness of obesity. Of the three groups, the university nutrition lecturers held less accurate perceptions of nutrition transition problems and their likely drivers. There is an urgent need for greater provision of public nutrition education for all three groups of professionals.

  19. Health Professionals' Responses to Women's Disclosure of Domestic Violence.

    PubMed

    Keeling, June; Fisher, Colleen

    2015-08-01

    This study explored women's experiences of their responses from health professionals following disclosure of domestic violence within a health setting. The existence of health-based policies guiding professionals in the provision of appropriate support following disclosure of domestic violence is only effective if health professionals understand the dynamics of violent relationships. This article focuses on the findings from the interviews conducted with 15 women living in the United Kingdom who disclosed their experiences of domestic violence when accessing health care. Following thematic analysis, themes emerged that rotated around their disclosure and the responses they received from health professionals. The first two themes revealed the repudiation of, or recognition of and failure to act upon, domestic violence. A description of how the health professional's behavior became analogous with that of the perpetrator is discussed. The final theme illuminated women's receipt of appropriate and sensitive support, leading to a positive trajectory away from a violent relationship. The findings suggest that the implicit understanding of the dynamics of violent relationships and the behaviors of the perpetrator of domestic violence are essential components of health care provision to avoid inadvertent inappropriate interactions with women.

  20. [The social representation of nurse's professional autonomy in public health].

    PubMed

    Gomes, Antônio Marcos Tosoli; de Oliveira, Denize Cristina

    2005-01-01

    The object of this study was the nurse's professional autonomy and had the following specific objectives: describe and analyze the social representations of the nurses 'professional role and analyze the professional autonomy-dependence binomial. As theoretical methodological reference it was chose the Social Representations Theory It was proceeded in-depth interviews with 30 nurses of the basic health system from a county in Rio de Janeiro state. To the data analysis it was used the Alceste 4.5 software. The software generated five classes, two express the professional formation/absorption and three the professional. Practice. The analytical categories were constituted from the dimensions in which the social representations express themselves: the conceptions, the positions and the professional practices autonomy.

  1. Teaching health care professionals about health literacy: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Clifford

    2011-01-01

    Low health literacy is a common and serious issue in U.S. health care. Health care professionals lack adequate training in health literacy principles. Increasing and improving health literacy training for the health care workforce is needed. Health professions educators have responded to this need by developing health literacy curricula, which use a wide variety of didactic and experiential teaching techniques and tools. This article reviews the literature on teaching health literacy principles to health professionals and presents a menu of teaching options for health professions educators.

  2. Women's groups and professional organizations in advocacy for sexual and reproductive health and rights.

    PubMed

    Germain, Adrienne; Liljestrand, Jerker

    2009-08-01

    After the International Conference on Population and Development (ICPD) in 1994 and the Fourth World Conference on Women in 1995, sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) have improved in many countries, and been supported by awareness raised by women's health advocates, increasingly by youth groups, and also by organizations of health professionals. In the HIV/AIDS area, involvement of organizations of people living with HIV/AIDS is crucial to improve prevention and care. However, after victories during the 1990s, combating opposition by social and political conservatives has taken up much energy in recent years. Continuous advocacy to broaden acceptance of the fundamental importance of SRHR, their role in meeting the Millennium Development Goals, and the imperative to increase funding, is essential.

  3. Certified Health Education Specialists' Participation in Professional Associations: Implications for Marketing and Membership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thackeray, Rosemary; Neiger, Brad L.; Roe, Kathleen M.

    2005-01-01

    A number of health education professional associations exist to advance the profession through research, practice, and professional development. Benefits of individual membership may include continuing education, networking, leadership, professional recognition, advocacy, professional mobility, access to research findings, advances in the…

  4. [Social representations of HIV/AIDS among healthcare professionals in benchmark services].

    PubMed

    Dantas, Mariana de Sousa; Abrão, Fátima Maria da Silva; de Freitas, Clara Maria Silvestre Monteiro; de Oliveira, Denize Cristina

    2014-12-01

    This study was based on exploratory research and a qualitative approach within the framework of the Social Representations Theory. It aims to capture the social representations of healthcare providers in relation to HIV/AIDS by describing their structure.The Free Evocations technique was applied on 86 professionals of HIV/AIDS benchmark services in Recife, Pernambuco, Brazil, from 2011 to 2013. Analysis using EVOC 2005 software showed that the possible central core is prejudice in a negative attitude dimension; in the contrast zone, chronic disease translates living with the disease. In the first periphery, treatment and disease in a clinical/biometric conception; in the second periphery, death has a imagistic and negative nature. Positive and negative elements were observed, allowing healthcare personnel to construct meaning attributed to the phenomenon and reflect on their practices.

  5. International health financing and the response to AIDS.

    PubMed

    Lieberman, Samuel; Gottret, Pablo; Yeh, Ethan; de Beyer, Joy; Oelrichs, Robert; Zewdie, Debrework

    2009-11-01

    Efforts to finance HIV responses have generated large increases in funding, catalyzed activism and institutional innovation, and brought renewed attention to health issues and systems. The benefits go well beyond HIV programs. The substantial increases in HIV funding are a tiny percentage of overall increases in health financing, with other areas also seeing large absolute increases. Data on health funding suggest an improved "pro-poor" distribution, with Africa benefiting relatively more from increased external flows. A literature review found few evidence-based analyses of the impact of AIDS programs and funding on broader health financing. Conceptual frameworks that would facilitate such analysis are summarized.

  6. [Professional stressors and common mental health disorders: Causal links?

    PubMed

    Nicolas, C; Chawky, N; Jourdan-Ionescu, C; Drouin, M-S; Page, C; Houlfort, N; Beauchamp, G; Séguin, M

    2017-03-22

    According to the World Health Organization, depression has become the leading cause of disability in the world, contributing significantly to the burden of health issues especially in the industrialized countries. This is a major public health problem, with potential impact on work climates, productivity at work and the continued existence of the organizations. Some recent studies have examined potential links between professional factors and common mental health disorders, but none have demonstrated a direct causal link.

  7. Health care delivery for people with HIV infection and AIDS.

    PubMed

    Arkell, S

    Health care delivery for people with HIV infection and AIDS will need to change in the future to accommodate the expected increasing numbers of people affected. Nurses have an important role in preventing the spread of HIV infection and in caring for this group of people.

  8. Selected Bibliography on AIDS for Health Services Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Joyce V., Comp.; Ball, Judy K., Comp.

    This bibliography cites 355 references to journal articles and other reports dealing with Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) and how it is being addressed through the health services delivery system. Annotations are arranged alphabetically by principal author within the following major categories: (1) bibliographies; (2) classification and…

  9. Republic of Korea's Health Aid Governance: Perspectives from Partner Countries.

    PubMed

    Alley, Allison Baer; Park, Eunhee; Lee, Jong-Koo; Kang, Minah; Oh, Juhwan

    2015-11-01

    The Republic of Korea (ROK) has a remarkable development history, including its status as the first country to transition from aid recipient to member of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development Development Assistance Committee (DAC). However, since becoming a donor country, the ROK has struggled to achieve internationally accepted agreements related to aid effectiveness and several evaluations have identified the ROK as being one of the weakest DAC member countries at providing good aid. A survey was conducted to assess partner countries' perceptions of the ROK's governance of health official development assistance (ODA). The survey was administered to government officials based in partner countries' Ministries of Health and therefore presents the unique perspective of ODA recipients. The survey questions focused on governance principles established in the internationally-accepted Paris Declaration on Aid Effectiveness. The total response rate was 13 responses out of 26 individuals who received the email request (50%). The survey results indicate that progress has been made since earlier international evaluations but the ROK has not overcome all areas of concern. This confirms that the ROK is continuing to develop its capacity as a good donor but has yet to achieve all governance-related targets. The results of this survey can be used to inform a future aid strategy.

  10. Viewpoint: professionalism and humanism beyond the academic health center.

    PubMed

    Swick, Herbert M

    2007-11-01

    Medical professionalism and humanism have long been integral to the practice of medicine, and they will continue to shape practice in the 21st century. In recent years, many advances have been made in understanding the nature of medical professionalism and in efforts to teach and assess professional values and behaviors. As more and more teaching of both medical students and residents occurs in settings outside of academic medical centers, it is critically important that community physicians demonstrate behaviors that resonate professionalism and humanism. As teachers, they must be committed to being role models for what physicians should be. Activities that are designed to promote and advance professionalism, then, must take place not only in academic settings but also in clinical practice sites that are beyond the academic health center. The author argues that professionalism and humanism share common values and that each can enrich the other. Because the cauldron of practice threatens to erode traditional values of professionalism, not only for individual physicians but also for the medical profession, practicing physicians must incorporate into practice settings activities that are explicitly designed to exemplify those values, not only with students and patients, but also within their communities. The author cites a number of examples of ways in which professionalism and humanism can be fostered by individual physicians as well as professional organizations.

  11. Wilderness Therapy: Ethical Considerations for Mental Health Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Becker, Stephen P.

    2010-01-01

    Wilderness therapy is a growing treatment modality for adolescents presenting with a variety of clinical concerns, and wilderness therapy clinicians and referring mental health professionals must carefully consider the ethical issues that are unique to this modality. Following an overview of wilderness therapy as a mental health treatment,…

  12. Facilitating Online Reflective Learning for Health and Social Care Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, Jane; Rawlinson, Mark; Weaver, Mike

    2006-01-01

    Health and social care education has a long established association with reflective learning as a way of developing post-qualifying professional practice. Reflective learning is also a key feature of self-regulatory learning, which is an essential aspect of life-long learning for today's National Health Service workforce. Using a small-scale case…

  13. Continuing Professional Education Programs of Voluntary Health Agencies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Medical Association, Chicago, IL.

    Organizational objectives and professional continuing education programs of ten voluntary health agencies--Allergy Foundation of America, American Cancer Society, American Heart Association, Arthritis Foundation, National Association for Mental Health, National Foundation for Infantile Paralysis, National Society for the Prevention of Blindness,…

  14. Mental Health Professional Shortage Areas in Rural Appalachia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hendryx, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Context: Research on health disparities in Appalachia has rarely compared Appalachia to other geographic areas in such a way as to isolate possible Appalachian effects. Purpose: This study tests hypotheses that nonmetropolitan Appalachia will have higher levels of mental health professional shortage areas than other nonmetropolitan areas of the…

  15. Engaging health professionals in advocacy against gun violence.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Andrew D

    2008-01-01

    Health professionals have long been involved with advocacy around the social determinants of health, including protesting against war and mitigating the production, trade and use of specific weapon systems. Small arms and light weapons are a key area on which to focus, as they are responsible for the majority of injuries and deaths in war and their availability is related to increased levels of crime and suicide. Challenges for health professionals hoping to engage in such advocacy include a lack of adequate data, the need to confront political questions and the gun-lobby, and difficulty in measuring the effectiveness of campaigns. This article discusses some examples of successful advocacy and suggests future directions for health professionals in this area.

  16. A bridge to Africa: how health professionals can help in development.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, L W

    1991-05-01

    US secretary of Health and Human Services Sullivan addresses the issue of the role the US has now and the role it may play in improving health across the African continent. Progress made is attributed to the courageous individual commitment of many dedicated health care problems, and substantial cooperative international efforts. The 1990 US contribution through USAID is 80 million dollars for child survival in Africa and 80 million dollars for voluntary family planning activities. The 1991 figures increased in the total development fund from 560 million dollars to 800 million dollars. AIDS activities receive 11 million dollars out of a total world budget of 52 million dollars. An additional 14 million dollar grant was awarded for a Ugandan effort to fight AIDS and child health care problems and 242,000 dollar grant was given to the Soweto Township AIDS program and AIDS prevention and treatment. The future emphasis was directed to providing a steady, cooperative partnership with African countries, to increasing support for political stability and ending violence, and continuing US policy based on broad based economic growth which fosters sustainable and effective health assistance programs. Support must be provided to assist programs which develop indigenous primary health care systems. Work must be focused on helping Africans learn and practice personal health promotion and disease prevention, which is also of particular significance in breaking the AIDS transmission chain. Increased efforts must address malaria through applied and basic research and malaria control programs. US information technology in the form of, for instance, technical training in epidemiology, disease surveillance, and computer science and data use, needs to be provided to African health professionals. Utilitarian means in international cooperation and relief must be used to foster economic development, democracy, and delivery of health care improvements. The role for health professionals in

  17. Regional Climate Change and Development of Public Health Decision Aids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hegedus, A. M.; Darmenova, K.; Grant, F.; Kiley, H.; Higgins, G. J.; Apling, D.

    2011-12-01

    According to the World Heath Organization (WHO) climate change is a significant and emerging threat to public health, and changes the way we must look at protecting vulnerable populations. Worldwide, the occurrence of some diseases and other threats to human health depend predominantly on local climate patterns. Rising average temperatures, in combination with changing rainfall patterns and humidity levels, alter the lifecycle and regional distribution of certain disease-carrying vectors, such as mosquitoes, ticks and rodents. In addition, higher surface temperatures will bring heat waves and heat stress to urban regions worldwide and will likely increase heat-related health risks. A growing body of scientific evidence also suggests an increase in extreme weather events such as floods, droughts and hurricanes that can be destructive to human health and well-being. Therefore, climate adaptation and health decision aids are urgently needed by city planners and health officials to determine high risk areas, evaluate vulnerable populations and develop public health infrastructure and surveillance systems. To address current deficiencies in local planning and decision making with respect to regional climate change and its effect on human health, our research is focused on performing a dynamical downscaling with the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model to develop decision aids that translate the regional climate data into actionable information for users. WRF model is initialized with the Max Planck Institute European Center/Hamburg Model version 5 (ECHAM5) General Circulation Model simulations forced with the Special Report on Emissions (SRES) A1B emissions scenario. Our methodology involves development of climatological indices of extreme weather, quantifying the risk of occurrence of water/rodent/vector-borne diseases as well as developing various heat stress related decision aids. Our results indicate that the downscale simulations provide the necessary

  18. An interventional model to develop health professionals in West Africa.

    PubMed

    Sanou, Anselme Simeon; Awoyale, Florence Adeola; Diallo, Abdoulaye

    2014-01-01

    The health sector is characterized by a human resource base lacking in numbers, specialized skills, and management skills. West African Health Organization (WAHO) recognizes the need within the West Africa sub-region for bilingual professionals who are skilled in public health, management, leadership, and information technology to build human capacity in public health and developed the Young Professionals Internship Program (YPIP). Our study explores the evolution of the programme. YPIP program has successfully carried out its original aims and objectives to equip young professionals with basic principles of public health, management, and leadership, acquire competence in a second official language (French, English, and Portuguese), information and communication technology. Contributing factors towards this successful evaluation included positive ratings and commentary from previous interns about the relevance, usefulness, and quality of the programme, encouraging feedback from WAHO management, trainers, administrators, and intern employers on the impact of the YPIP program on young professionals, supporting evidence that demonstrates increased knowledge in professional skills and language competency.

  19. Professional Preparation: Multicultural Health Beliefs in Action.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Linda Sue

    1982-01-01

    A course dealing with the health beliefs of Hispanics, American Indians, and Anglo Americans was developed at the University of New Mexico. An ethnically diverse class visited different cultural settings in the Southwest to study beliefs about religion, nutrition, folk medicine, and other customs affecting health practices. (PP)

  20. Professional Assistance in Implementing School Health Policies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boot, Nicole; van Assema, Patricia; Hesdahl, Bert; de Vries, Nanne

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the role of a school health promotion (SHP) advisor in the implementation of the six steps of the Dutch "Schoolbeat" approach, aimed at establishing health promotion policies and activities in secondary schools. Design/methodology/approach: In total, 80 school board members, and 18…

  1. Relationships among nurses' professional self-concept, health, and lifestyles.

    PubMed

    Hensel, Desiree

    2011-02-01

    According to the American Nurses Association, the entire profession of nursing exists to serve and improve society's health. Thus, to become a nurse, individuals must master a body of knowledge surrounding numerous health aspects. While acquiring the unique knowledge, skills, and values of their profession, nurses form perceptions of personal adequacy in their role, known as professional or nurse self-concept. Given the centrality of health to the profession, it would seem logical that nurses would personally value health and integrate core health behaviors into their professional self-concept and everyday lives. Yet the prevailing evidence leaves in question whether nurses associate their personal health and lifestyles with their professional roles. This article explores the relationships among nurse self-concept, health status, and healthy lifestyle practices in a sample of Midwestern nurses in an attempt to better understand if nurses who integrate healthy behaviors into their everyday lives feel a stronger sense of professional adequacy relative to nurses who do not.

  2. Continuing health professional education: objectives and instructional strategies.

    PubMed

    Batmangelich, S; Demopoulos, J T

    1984-11-01

    The efficacy of continuing health professional education (CHPE) depends upon both the learner and the teacher. The goals of CHPE activities are to improve, enhance, and maintain the learner's professional competence. This article, third in a series of six on CHPE, focuses on two essential components of CHPE program planning: (1) the establishment of clear and concise educational objectives in the learner's language, and (2) the formulation of appropriate instructional strategies for the learner to achieve those objectives.

  3. [Conscientious objection for health professionals in ethics and deontology].

    PubMed

    Martínez León, Mercedes; Rabadán Jiménez, José

    2010-01-01

    The main objective of this paper is to highlight the numerous conflicts enters the consciousness and the laws are becoming more frequent health professionals in daily clinical practice. Clarify and define concepts such as ″conscientious objection for health professionals, to avoid confusion with other terms. This is work that aims to address the objection of conscience, not from the law but from the ethics and deontology, reviewing existing regulations both internationally and nationally. In addition to complete the studio, in a last part we discuss the state of the ″conscientious objection″ tars the recent passage of the organic law 2 / 2010, 3 march, sexual and reproductive health and the interruption of pregnancy. As a final conclusion we can say that ″conscientious objection″ is recognized in international declarations and even in the european constitution. in spain, the code of ethics and medical ethics, is one of the places where the objection of conscience of health professionals has great development for years, states that the doctor can refrain from the practice of certain professional acts such as abortion, in vitro fertilization or sterilization, if they are in contradiction with its ethical and scientific beliefs. Also recently, the general assembly of october 24, 2009, the central committee of ethics has made a declaration on ″conscientious objection″, insisting on its recognition. Finally, the organic law 2 / 2010, 3 march, sexual and reproductive health and the interruption of pregnancy, seems to be recognized ″the right to exercise conscientious objection″ of health professionals directly involved in the voluntary termination of pregnancy, after much discussion, but it is still early to assess the implementation of this right because, until july 5, 2010, will come into force this law, what will the future that we clarify the development of this important right for health professionals.

  4. Appy Hour: Health Sciences Professionals Learn About Apps.

    PubMed

    Casucci, Tallie; Gregory, Joan M; Shipman, Jean P

    2016-01-01

    Appy Hour is a recurring event hosted by an academic health sciences library featuring apps that are informally presented and demonstrated by invited speakers. The audience is encouraged to ask questions during the presentation of the featured app(s). This event provides learning and networking opportunities for health sciences faculty, staff, students, and health care professionals. This article illustrates the process for hosting the event, shares lessons learned, and discusses possible future directions to gain a wider audience.

  5. Moral distress and the contemporary plight of health professionals.

    PubMed

    Austin, Wendy

    2012-03-01

    Once a term used primarily by moral philosophers, "moral distress" is increasingly used by health professionals to name experiences of frustration and failure in fulfilling moral obligations inherent to their fiduciary relationship with the public. Although such challenges have always been present, as has discord regarding the right thing to do in particular situations, there is a radical change in the degree and intensity of moral distress being expressed. Has the plight of professionals in healthcare practice changed? "Plight" encompasses not only the act of pledging, but that of predicament and peril. The author claims that health professionals are increasingly put in peril by healthcare reform that undermines their efficacy and jeopardizes ethical engagement with those in their care. The re-engineering of healthcare to give precedence to corporate and commercial values and strategies of commodification, service rationing, streamlining, and measuring of "efficiency," is literally demoralizing health professionals. Healthcare practice needs to be grounded in a capacity for compassion and empathy, as is evident in standards of practice and codes of ethics, and in the understanding of what it means to be a professional. Such grounding allows for humane response to the availability of unprecedented advances in biotechnological treatments, for genuine dialogue and the raising of difficult, necessary ethical questions, and for the mutual support of health professionals themselves. If healthcare environments are not understood as moral communities but rather as simulated marketplaces, then health professionals' moral agency is diminished and their vulnerability to moral distress is exacerbated. Research in moral distress and relational ethics is used to support this claim.

  6. How do early career health sciences information professionals gain competencies?

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Bethany A.; Rodriguez, Bredny

    2016-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to describe early career health sciences information professionals' self-reported attainment of the Medical Library Association (MLA) Competencies for Lifelong Learning and Professional Success and to investigate the various methods by which participants developed these competencies. Methods A SurveyMonkey survey was designed to ascertain participants' demographic information and their competency attainment. “Early career” health information professionals were defined as those with less than five years of professional experience. Participants were asked to rate each of the seven competencies on a five-point Likert scale regarding their level of agreement with the statement, “I have demonstrated this competency.” Participants who responded positively were then asked to indicate how they acquired the competency on a multiple-choice, multiple-answer list. Free-text fields were provided for general comments and for participants to elaborate on their answers. The survey was distributed through the MLA email discussion list and other related email discussion lists. Participation was anonymous. Results One hundred eighty-seven responses were received. Out of those 187 respondents, 95 completed the entire survey. The majority of early career health sciences information professionals agreed that they had attained all 7 competencies. Of the various methods used to develop competencies, the most selected method was formal library and information studies education. Participants were least likely to report attaining competencies via mentoring, volunteering, or internships. Participants reported the highest level of confidence in having attained the “Health Sciences Information Services” competency, and the lowest level of confidence in having attained the “Research, Analysis, and Interpretation” competency. Conclusions These results contribute to the ongoing discussions regarding proposed changes to the MLA competencies

  7. Transforming medical professionalism to fit changing health needs

    PubMed Central

    Plochg, Thomas; Klazinga, Niek S; Starfield, Barbara

    2009-01-01

    Background The professional organization of medical work no longer reflects the changing health needs caused by the growing number of complex and chronically ill patients. Key stakeholders enforce coordination and remove power from the medical professions in order allow for these changes. However, it may also be necessary to initiate basic changes to way in which the medical professionals work in order to adapt to the changing health needs. Discussion Medical leaders, supported by health policy makers, can consciously activate the self-regulatory capacity of medical professionalism in order to transform the medical profession and the related professional processes of care so that it can adapt to the changing health needs. In doing so, they would open up additional routes to the improvement of the health services system and to health improvement. This involves three consecutive steps: (1) defining and categorizing the health needs of the population; (2) reorganizing the specialty domains around the needs of population groups; (3) reorganizing the specialty domains by eliminating work that could be done by less educated personnel or by the patients themselves. We suggest seven strategies that are required in order to achieve this transformation. Summary Changing medical professionalism to fit the changing health needs will not be easy. It will need strong leadership. But, if the medical world does not embark on this endeavour, good doctoring will become merely a bureaucratic and/or marketing exercise that obscures the ultimate goal of medicine which is to optimize the health of both individuals and the entire population. PMID:19857246

  8. Supervising allied health assistants: a concerning skill gap in allied health professionals.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, David

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to identify and discuss the problem of a skill gap in the training of allied health professionals. Allied health assistants are required to work under the supervision of allied health professionals. There is little evidence to suggest supervisory skills are routinely taught as part of the development of professional behavior. With increasing concern about a lack of supervisory skill, there is an opportunity for supervisory skills to be incorporated into the undergraduate curriculum. A combination of classroom and clinical experience is required to ensure this professional skill does not continue to be overlooked.

  9. Health Professionals’ Alcohol-Related Professional Practices and the Relationship between Their Personal Alcohol Attitudes and Behavior and Professional Practices: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Bakhshi, Savita; While, Alison E.

    2013-01-01

    Health professionals’ personal health behaviors have been found to be associated with their practices with patients in areas such as smoking, physical activity and weight management, but little is known in relation to alcohol use. This review has two related strands and aims to: (1) examine health professionals’ alcohol-related health promotion practices; and (2) explore the relationship between health professionals’ personal alcohol attitudes and behaviors, and their professional alcohol-related health promotion practices. A comprehensive literature search of the Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, CINAHL, British Nursing Index, Web of Science, Scopus and Science Direct (2007–2013) identified 26 studies that met the inclusion criteria for Strand 1, out of which six were analyzed for Strand 2. The findings indicate that health professionals use a range of methods to aid patients who are high-risk alcohol users. Positive associations were reported between health professionals’ alcohol-related health promotion activities and their personal attitudes towards alcohol (n = 2), and their personal alcohol use (n = 2). The findings have some important implications for professional education. Future research should focus on conducting well-designed studies with larger samples to enable us to draw firm conclusions and develop the evidence base. PMID:24366045

  10. AIDS stigma in health services in the Eastern Caribbean.

    PubMed

    Rutledge, Scott Edward; Abell, Neil; Padmore, Jacqueline; McCann, Theresa J

    2009-01-01

    Stigma obstructs HIV/AIDS prevention and care worldwide, including in the Caribbean, where the prevalence of AIDS is second only to sub-Saharan Africa. To contextualise the experience of AIDS stigma in health services in Grenada and Trinidad and Tobago, we conducted eight focus groups with 51 people living with HIV/AIDS (PLHA), families, and service providers. Quasi-deductive content analysis revealed consonance with Western and Northern conceptualisations of AIDS stigma wherein stigma is enacted upon marginalized populations and reinforced through psycho-sociological processes comparing 'in' and 'out' groups. Socially constructed to be physically contagious and socially deviant, PLHA are scorned by some service providers, especially when they are perceived to be gay or bisexual. PLHA and providers identified passive neglect and active refusal by hospital and clinic staff to provide care to PLHA. Institutional practices for safeguarding patient confidentiality are perceived as marginally enforced. Interventions are needed to reduce provider stigma so the public will access HIV testing and PLHA will seek treatment.

  11. Public Health Platforms: An Emerging Informatics Approach to Health Professional Learning and Development

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Kathleen

    2016-01-01

    Health informatics has a major role to play in optimising the management and use of data, information and knowledge in health systems. As health systems undergo digital transformation, it is important to consider informatics approaches not only to curriculum content but also to the design of learning environments and learning activities for health professional learning and development. An example of such an informatics approach is the use of large-scale, integrated public health platforms on the Internet as part of health professional learning and development. This article describes selected examples of such platforms, with a focus on how they may influence the direction of health professional learning and development. Significance for public health The landscape of healthcare systems, public health systems, health research systems and professional education systems is fragmented, with many gaps and silos. More sophistication in the management of health data, information, and knowledge, based on public health informatics expertise, is needed to tackle key issues of prevention, promotion and policy-making. Platform technologies represent an emerging large-scale, highly integrated informatics approach to public health, combining the technologies of Internet, the web, the cloud, social technologies, remote sensing and/or mobile apps into an online infrastructure that can allow more synergies in work within and across these systems. Health professional curricula need updating so that the health workforce has a deep and critical understanding of the way that platform technologies are becoming the foundation of the health sector. PMID:27190977

  12. Public Health Platforms: An Emerging Informatics Approach to Health Professional Learning and Development.

    PubMed

    Gray, Kathleen

    2016-04-26

    Health informatics has a major role to play in optimising the management and use of data, information and knowledge in health systems. As health systems undergo digital transformation, it is important to consider informatics approaches not only to curriculum content but also to the design of learning environments and learning activities for health professional learning and development. An example of such an informatics approach is the use of large-scale, integrated public health platforms on the Internet as part of health professional learning and development. This article describes selected examples of such platforms, with a focus on how they may influence the direction of health professional learning and development. Significance for public healthThe landscape of healthcare systems, public health systems, health research systems and professional education systems is fragmented, with many gaps and silos. More sophistication in the management of health data, information, and knowledge, based on public health informatics expertise, is needed to tackle key issues of prevention, promotion and policy-making. Platform technologies represent an emerging large-scale, highly integrated informatics approach to public health, combining the technologies of Internet, the web, the cloud, social technologies, remote sensing and/or mobile apps into an online infrastructure that can allow more synergies in work within and across these systems. Health professional curricula need updating so that the health workforce has a deep and critical understanding of the way that platform technologies are becoming the foundation of the health sector.

  13. Treatment Option Overview (AIDS Related-Lymphoma)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma Treatment Childhood NHL Treatment Research AIDS-Related Lymphoma Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About AIDS-Related Lymphoma Go to Health Professional Version Key ...

  14. Stages of AIDS-Related Lymphoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma Treatment Childhood NHL Treatment Research AIDS-Related Lymphoma Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About AIDS-Related Lymphoma Go to Health Professional Version Key ...

  15. Treatment Options for AIDS-Related Lymphoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma Treatment Childhood NHL Treatment Research AIDS-Related Lymphoma Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About AIDS-Related Lymphoma Go to Health Professional Version Key ...

  16. General Information about AIDS-Related Lymphoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma Treatment Childhood NHL Treatment Research AIDS-Related Lymphoma Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About AIDS-Related Lymphoma Go to Health Professional Version Key ...

  17. Effects of donor proliferation in development aid for health on health program performance: A conceptual framework.

    PubMed

    Pallas, Sarah Wood; Ruger, Jennifer Prah

    2017-02-01

    Development aid for health increased dramatically during the past two decades, raising concerns about inefficiency and lack of coherence among the growing number of global health donors. However, we lack a framework for how donor proliferation affects health program performance to inform theory-based evaluation of aid effectiveness policies. A review of academic and gray literature was conducted. Data were extracted from the literature sample on study design and evidence for hypothesized effects of donor proliferation on health program performance, which were iteratively grouped into categories and mapped into a new conceptual framework. In the framework, increases in the number of donors are hypothesized to increase inter-donor competition, transaction costs, donor poaching of recipient staff, recipient control over aid, and donor fragmentation, and to decrease donors' sense of accountability for overall development outcomes. There is mixed evidence on whether donor proliferation increases or decreases aid volume. These primary effects in turn affect donor innovation, information hoarding, and aid disbursement volatility, as well as recipient country health budget levels, human resource capacity, and corruption, and the determinants of health program performance. The net effect of donor proliferation on health will vary depending on the magnitude of the framework's competing effects in specific country settings. The conceptual framework provides a foundation for improving design of aid effectiveness practices to mitigate negative effects from donor proliferation while preserving its potential benefits.

  18. An Exploration of How Health Professionals Create eHealth and mHealth Education Interventions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tamim, Suha Rahif

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore how health education professionals create ehealth and mhealth education interventions. Three research questions led this qualitative study. The first research question focused on the use of learning theories, instructional models, and instructional design models. The second research question focused on the…

  19. Conceptions of mental health among Ugandan youth orphaned by AIDS.

    PubMed

    Harms, Sheila; Kizza, Ruth; Sebunnya, Joshua; Jack, Susan

    2009-03-01

    The AIDS epidemic has disproportionately affected developing or low-income sub-Saharan African countries. Within the context of the epidemic, children and youth are at risk of losing their parents at an early age. The experience of orphanhood due to AIDS has the potential to negatively impact on a child's mental health. A qualitative study was conducted to comprehensively describe the experience of orphanhood and its impact on mental health from the culturally specific perspective of Ugandan youths. We conducted interviews with a purposeful sample of 13 youths (ages 12 to 18) who had lost one or both parents to AIDS illness and who were also affiliated with a non-governmental organisation providing support to orphans. The orphaned youths experienced significant ongoing emotional difficulties following the death of their parent(s). The youths in this study were unfamiliar with the term 'mental health,' however they easily identified factors associated with good or poor mental health. In general, good mental health was associated with social conduct that is culturally appropriate. Poor mental health was perceived as a form of madness or insanity and it was associated with a loss of basic life necessities, such as access to food, education or shelter. The youths also identified factors that promote more successful orphans. The findings of this study suggest that Western terminologies and symptom constellations in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual IV may not be applicable in an African cultural context. There are several clinical implications, including the development of a mental health intervention paradigm that emphasises resilience.

  20. Teaching statistics to health professionals: the legal analogy.

    PubMed

    Mintz, E; Ostbye, T

    1992-01-01

    Despite the importance of statistical concepts to health professionals, the teaching of statistics to students from this field has generally been unrewarding. We feel that a few central concepts are crucial to all statistical thinking and that, for most health professionals, the communication of these is more important than learning about complex mathematical models. A device for demonstrating the parallels between a criminal legal trial and statistical hypothesis testing is presented. We feel that it can facilitate the learning of this central statistical concept.

  1. Delivering information skills training at a health professionals continuing professional development conference: an evaluation.

    PubMed

    Lawton, Aoife; Manning, Padraig; Lawler, Fiona

    2017-03-01

    In this feature, guest writer Aoife Lawton discusses the outcomes of an information skills workshop delivered at a continuing professional development conference for health and social care professionals in Ireland. The primary aim of the study was to evaluate perceptions of the effectiveness of the workshop. The study provides details of how, through collaborative partnership, the workshop was developed and delivered. Application of an adapted version of the Kirkpatrick model of evaluation is presented alongside details of what impact the event had on the attendees both immediately after the workshop and 3 months post-workshop. The authors also reflect on the benefits delivery of the workshops had for professional health library practice and service improvement. H. S.

  2. Integrating Poverty and Gender into Health Programs: A Sourcebook for Health Professionals.

    PubMed

    Coll-Black, Sarah; Bhushan, Anjana; Fritsch, Kathleen

    2007-12-01

    Evidence increasingly shows that poverty and gender inequalities are important determinants of health and influence the opportunity for timely and appropriate health care. These findings suggest that health professionals need to have a sound understanding of health inequalities and their causes, as well as of how they can be addressed. However, through surveys to health ministries and educational institutions in 2001, the World Health Organization Regional Office for the Western Pacific found that awareness of, and capacity to respond to, poverty and gender concerns in health was weak. In response, the Regional Office initiated a project to develop materials to support the integration of poverty and gender concerns into health professional education curricula. The multimodule publication, Integrating Poverty and Gender into Health Programmes: A Sourcebook for Health Professionals, supports evidence-based and participatory learning. The experience to date suggests that the publication might be meeting a long-felt need for such a response.

  3. Your Health: Prevention, Safety and First Aid, Personal Health Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oxley, Gloria; Torre, Liz

    Information and accompanying exercises are provided in this learning module to reinforce students' basic reading and writing skills and, at the same time, increase their awareness of and motivation toward sound personal health practices. Written at an elementary level, the module considers eleven personal health topics: prevention of illness;…

  4. Oral health needs of HIV/AIDS orphans in Gauteng, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Blignaut, E

    2007-04-01

    To care for HIV/AIDS orphans will put health and social services in South Africa before a major challenge. Published clinical information on South and Southern African HIV-positive children is limited to hospitalized children. A cross-sectional, prospective study was conducted on a convenience sample of HIV-positive children, living in orphanages in Gauteng, South Africa, in order to determine the oral health needs of the children. Five homes for abandoned/orphaned HIV/AIDS children were visited, 11 caregivers, excluding the nursing sisters (registered nurses), were interviewed to determine their knowledge regarding oral health. An oral examination was performed on 87 children who were not receiving antiretroviral treatment. The caregivers were knowledgeable regarding pseudomembranous candidiasis but all lacked knowledge on oral hygiene procedures and the cariogenic potential of a baby bottle. The mean age of the children ranged between 3.2 and 7 years, with one home having children older than 11 years. Rampant early childhood caries in 19 (21.8%) children was the major finding, with 5 children suffering severe pain from multiple carious teeth. In the hospice section of the homes all 12 children had clinically detectable candidiasis, while in 4 (33.3%) there was an associated bleeding and ulceration of the oral mucosa, impairing their ability to eat. The findings indicate a training need among caregivers regarding the oral health of children and a role for health professionals in preventing oral diseases and reducing suffering.

  5. Teaching Computer Science to Health Professionals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Safir, Aran; And Others

    1981-01-01

    In 1971 the National Library of Medicine underwrote the promotion of computer technology integration into clinical medicine by providing graduate-level training for faculty members in the health sciences. The experience of the Mount Sinai School of Medicine in the implementation of an NLM training grant is reported. (MLW)

  6. Exercises in emergency preparedness for health professionals in community clinics.

    PubMed

    Fowkes, Virginia; Blossom, H John; Sandrock, Christian; Mitchell, Brenda; Brandstein, Kendra

    2010-10-01

    Health professionals in community settings are generally unprepared for disasters. From 2006 to 2008 the California Statewide Area Health Education Center (AHEC) program conducted 90 table top exercises in community practice sites in 18 counties. The exercises arranged and facilitated by AHEC trained local coordinators and trainers were designed to assist health professionals in developing and applying their practice site emergency plans using simulated events about pandemic influenza or other emergencies. Of the 1,496 multidisciplinary health professionals and staff participating in the exercises, 1,176 (79%) completed learner evaluation forms with 92-98% of participants rating the training experiences as good to excellent. A few reported helpful effects when applying their training to a real time local disaster. Assessments of the status of clinic emergency plans using 15 criteria were conducted at three intervals: when the exercises were scheduled, immediately before the exercises, and for one-third of sites, three months after the exercise. All sites made improvements in their emergency plans with some or all of the plan criteria. Of the sites having follow up, most (N = 23) were community health centers that made statistically significant changes in two-thirds of the plan criteria (P = .001-.046). Following the exercises, after action reports were completed for 88 sites and noted strengths, weaknesses, and plans for improvements in their emergency plans Most sites (72-90%) showed improvements in how to activate their plans, the roles of their staff, and how to participate in a coordinated response. Challenges in scheduling exercises included time constraints and lack of resources among busy health professionals. Technical assistance and considerations of clinic schedules mitigated these issues. The multidisciplinary table top exercises proved to be an effective means to develop or improve clinic emergency plans and enhance the dialogue and coordination among

  7. Exercises in Emergency Preparedness for Health Professionals in Community Clinics

    PubMed Central

    Blossom, H. John; Sandrock, Christian; Mitchell, Brenda; Brandstein, Kendra

    2010-01-01

    Health professionals in community settings are generally unprepared for disasters. From 2006 to 2008 the California Statewide Area Health Education Center (AHEC) program conducted 90 table top exercises in community practice sites in 18 counties. The exercises arranged and facilitated by AHEC trained local coordinators and trainers were designed to assist health professionals in developing and applying their practice site emergency plans using simulated events about pandemic influenza or other emergencies. Of the 1,496 multidisciplinary health professionals and staff participating in the exercises, 1,176 (79%) completed learner evaluation forms with 92–98% of participants rating the training experiences as good to excellent. A few reported helpful effects when applying their training to a real time local disaster. Assessments of the status of clinic emergency plans using 15 criteria were conducted at three intervals: when the exercises were scheduled, immediately before the exercises, and for one-third of sites, three months after the exercise. All sites made improvements in their emergency plans with some or all of the plan criteria. Of the sites having follow up, most (N = 23) were community health centers that made statistically significant changes in two-thirds of the plan criteria (P = .001–.046). Following the exercises, after action reports were completed for 88 sites and noted strengths, weaknesses, and plans for improvements in their emergency plans Most sites (72–90%) showed improvements in how to activate their plans, the roles of their staff, and how to participate in a coordinated response. Challenges in scheduling exercises included time constraints and lack of resources among busy health professionals. Technical assistance and considerations of clinic schedules mitigated these issues. The multidisciplinary table top exercises proved to be an effective means to develop or improve clinic emergency plans and enhance the dialogue and

  8. 75 FR 39022 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request; Survey of Health Care Professionals' Awareness and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-07

    ... Health Care Professionals' Awareness and Perceptions of the National Cancer Institute's Intramural.... Affected Public: Individual adults. Type of Respondents: Health care providers (AMA members who have... Frequency of response (minutes/ Annual burden respondents response hour) hours Health care professionals...

  9. 77 FR 37415 - Office of Urban Indian Health Programs; Title V HIV/AIDS Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-21

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Indian Health Service Office of Urban Indian Health Programs; Title V HIV/AIDS Program... applications for the Office of Urban Indian Health Programs Title V HIV/AIDS program. This program is... The Minority AIDS Initiative funding that the grants are awarded from was awarded to the...

  10. Integrating cultural humility into health care professional education and training.

    PubMed

    Chang, E-shien; Simon, Melissa; Dong, XinQi

    2012-05-01

    As US populations become increasing diverse, healthcare professionals are facing a heightened challenge to provide cross-cultural care. To date, medical education around the world has developed specific curricula on cultural competence training in acknowledgement of the importance of culturally sensitive and grounded services. This article proposes to move forward by integrating the concept of cultural humility into current trainings, in which we believe, is vital in complementing the current model, and better prepare future professionals to address health challenges with culturally appropriate care. Based on the works of Chinese philosophers, cultural values and the contemporary Chinese immigrants' experience, we hereby present the QIAN (Humbleness) curriculum: the importance of self-Questioning and critique, bi-directional cultural Immersion, mutually Active-listening, and the flexibility of Negotiation. The principles of the QIAN curriculum reside not only between the patient and the healthcare professional dyad, but also elicit the necessary support of family, health care system as well as the community at large. The QIAN curriculum could improve practice and enhance the exploration, comprehension and appreciation of the cultural orientations between healthcare professionals and patients which ultimately could improve patient satisfaction, patient-healthcare professional relationship, medical adherence and the reduction of health disparities. QIAN model is highly adaptable to other cultural and ethnic groups in multicultural societies around the globe. Incorporating its framework into the current medical education may enhance cross-cultural clinical encounters.

  11. Domestic violence against women: representations of health professionals 1

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Vera Lúcia de Oliveira; Silva, Camila Daiane; de Oliveira, Denize Cristina; Acosta, Daniele Ferreira; Amarijo, Cristiane Lopes

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective: to analyze the representations about domestic violence against women, among health professionals of Family Health Units. Method: qualitative study based on the Theory of Social Representations. Data were collected by means of evocations and interviews, treating them in the Ensemble de Programmes Pemettant L'Analyse des Evocations software - EVOC and content analysis. Results: nurses, physicians, nursing technicians and community health agents participated. The evocations were answered by 201 professionals and, of these, 64 were interviewed. The central core of this representation, comprised by the terms "aggression", "physical-aggression", "cowardice" and "lack of respect", which have negative connotations and were cited by interviewees. In the contrast zone, comprised by the terms "abuse", "abuse-power", "pain", "humiliation", "impunity", "suffering", "sadness" and "violence", two subgroups were identified. The first periphery contains the terms "fear", evoked most often, followed by "revolt", "low self-esteem" and "submission", and in the second periphery "acceptance" and "professional support". Conclusion: this is a structured representation since it contains conceptual, imagetic and attitudinal elements. The subgroups were comprised by professionals working in the rural area and by those who had completed their professional training course in or after 2004. These presented a representation of violence different from the representation of the general group, although all demonstrated a negative connotation of this phenomenon. PMID:26444175

  12. Gamification in Healthcare: Perspectives of Mental Health Service Users and Health Professionals.

    PubMed

    Hopia, Hanna; Raitio, Katja

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of this descriptive qualitative study is to explore the perceptions and experiences that mental health service users (n = 10) and healthcare professionals (n = 32) have regarding the use of gamification in mental health care. Data was gathered by interviews. The mental health service users described promoting and retarding factors in the use of gamification, while professionals described the requirements for using gamification and changes occurring in the work culture. Additional research is needed on how game-playing elements could be integrated as a systematic part of mental health practice and how the digital skills of professionals could be effectively developed.

  13. Managing workplace depression: an untapped opportunity for occupational health professionals.

    PubMed

    Putnam, Kelly; McKibbin, Laura

    2004-03-01

    Depression is one of the most prevalent and costly health issues affecting the American work force. Despite well established research demonstrating the association between employee depression and reduced on-the-job productivity, increased absenteeism, and higher health care use, most employers remain largely unresponsive to the need for company based depression initiatives. Organizational and individual barriers can prevent companies from effectively managing employee depression. Organizational barriers include information gaps, lack of data to justify increased investment in employee mental health programs, and employers' ambiguous roles in addressing depression. Individual barriers such as an inability to recognize signs and symptoms; stigma; confidentiality and privacy concerns; and unavailability of easily accessible, quality resources can keep employees who are depressed from seeking treatment. Many occupational health professionals may feel ill prepared or uncomfortable taking the lead in creating more aggressive worksite responses to depression, but they are, perhaps, in the best of all possible positions within an organization to succeed. Occupational health professionals have the credentials, credibility, training, and experience necessary to build a strong case for business leaders for why investing in workplace depression programs is so important. Occupational health professionals are the most qualified to design and deliver destigmatized, customer friendly programs and services for employees to access for help with depression, and to integrate their services with other departments such as benefits, health promotion, EAP, and human resources, to create an effective, organization-wide depression initiative.

  14. Making sense of domestic violence intervention in professional health care.

    PubMed

    Husso, Marita; Virkki, Tuija; Notko, Marianne; Holma, Juha; Laitila, Aarno; Mäntysaari, Mikko

    2012-07-01

    Intervening in domestic violence in the health care and social service settings is a complex and contested issue. In this qualitative, multidisciplinary study, the barriers to but also the possibilities for health care professionals in encountering victims of violence were scrutinised. The focus was on omissions in service structure and practices. The data consisted of six focus group interviews with nurses, physicians, social workers and psychologists in specialist health care (n = 30) conducted in Finland in 2009. The aim was to explore professionals' processes of making sense of violence interventions and the organisational practices of violence interventions. Four types of framing of the domestic violence issue were identified: (i) practical frame, (ii) medical frame, (iii) individualistic frame and (iv) psychological frame. Each frame consisted of particular features relating to explaining, structuring or dismissing the question of domestic violence in health care settings. The main themes included the division of responsibilities and feasibility of treatment. All four frames underlie the tendency for healthcare professionals to arrive at sense-making practices where it is possible to focus on fixing the injuries and consequences of domestic violence and bypassing the issue of violence as the cause of symptoms and injuries. The results indicate that developing successful practices both in identifying survivors of domestic violence and in preventing further victimisation requires a broad understanding of the effects of domestic violence and the challenges for health care professionals in dealing with it. New perspectives are needed in creating adequate practices both for victims of violence seeking help and for professionals working with this issue. Strong support at the organisational level and established practices throughout the fields of health and social care are the key elements in building a responsible approach to domestic violence.

  15. Mental Health of Children and Youth and the Role of Public Health Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Mental Health in Schools at UCLA, 2004

    2004-01-01

    Those in the public health field are in a unique position to help promote the mental health of young people and reshape how the nation thinks about and addresses mental health. This brief highlights ways in which such professionals can join in the process of ensuring the impending transformation of the mental health system leads to better outcomes…

  16. Health Care Professionals Devise Ways to Get Around Using Electronic Health Record Systems

    MedlinePlus

    ... atención médica Search Health Topics Search ahrq.gov Health Care Delivery Access to Care Costs Health Care Utilization ... Newsroom Newsletter Blog Events Research Activities, September 2013 Health care professionals devise ways to get around using electronic ...

  17. National Institutes of Health, Office of AIDS Research

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search Term(s): Main Navigation for the Office of AIDS Research Homepage ABOUT OAR SCIENTIFIC AREAS STRATEGIC PLAN ... HIV/AIDS INFORMATION Welcome to the Office of AIDS Research. Welcome to the Office of AIDS Research ...

  18. Critically Reflective Work Behavior of Health Care Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Groot, Esther; Jaarsma, Debbie; Endedijk, Maaike; Mainhard, Tim; Lam, Ineke; Simons, Robert-Jan; van Beukelen, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Better understanding of critically reflective work behavior (CRWB), an approach for work-related informal learning, is important in order to gain more profound insight in the continuing development of health care professionals. Methods: A survey, developed to measure CRWB and its predictors, was distributed to veterinary…

  19. Health Potential of Female Candidates to the Professional Military Service

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaiser, Alicja; Sokolowski, Marek

    2011-01-01

    Study aim: To assess health and social characteristics of female candidates for professional officers and non-commissioned officers of Polish Army. Material and methods: All female students of officer and non-commissioned officer Military Academies (16 each) were studied in 2009. Two questionnaires were applied in the study: IPAQ (short) for…

  20. Understanding Early Childhood Mental Health: A Practical Guide for Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Summers, Susan Janko, Ed.; Chazan-Cohen, Rachel, Ed.

    2012-01-01

    Integrating infant mental health services into early education programs leads to better child outcomes and stronger parent-child relationships--the big question is how to do it appropriately and effectively. Clear answers are in this accessible textbook, created to prepare early childhood professionals and programs to weave best practices in…

  1. Implementation of School Health Promotion: Consequences for Professional Assistance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boot, N. M. W. M.; de Vries, N. K.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This case study aimed to examine the factors influencing the implementation of health promotion (HP) policies and programs in secondary schools and the consequences for professional assistance. Design/methodology/approach: Group interviews were held in two schools that represented the best and worst case of implementation of a health…

  2. Health Care Professionals' Views about Supporting Patients' Self-Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mikkonen, Irma; Hynynen, Marja-Anneli

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to describe nurses' and other health care professionals' views about their patient education skills and how to develop them. Design/methodology/approach: The data for the study were collected from the participants of the online education course on patient education. The data were analyzed using qualitative…

  3. Tobacco cessation in India: how can oral health professionals contribute?

    PubMed

    Oberoi, Sukhvinder Singh; Sharma, Gaurav; Nagpal, Archana; Oberoi, Avneet

    2014-01-01

    Tobacco use is described as the single most preventable cause of morbidity and mortality globally, with the World Bank predicting over 450 million tobacco-related deaths in the next fifty years. In India, the proportion of all deaths that can be attributed to tobacco use is expected to rise from 1.4% in 1990 to 13.3% in 2020 of which smoking alone will cause about 930,000 adult deaths by 2010. Many studies have shown that counseling from a health professional is an effective method of helping patients quit the tobacco habit. Tobacco cessation needs to be urgently expanded by training health professionals in providing routine clinical interventions, increasing availability and subsidies of pharmacotherapy, developing wide-reaching strategies such as quitlines, and cost- effective strategies, including group interventions. The WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (FCTC) emphasizes the vital contribution of participation of health professional bodies, as well as training and healthcare institutions in tobacco control efforts. Dentists can play an important role in helping patients quit using tobacco. One of the key strategies to reduce tobacco-related morbidity and mortality is to encourage the involvement of health professionals in tobacco-use prevention and cessation counselling. The dental office is an ideal setting for tobacco cessation services since preventive treatment services, oral screening, and patient education have always been a large part of the dental practice.

  4. Conceptualizations of Professional Competencies in School Health Promotion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlsson, Monica

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the paper is to contribute to the conceptualization and discussion of professional competencies needed for supporting the development of the whole-school approach in school health promotion (SHP). Design/methodology/approach: The paper is based on a conceptual synthesis of literature, guided by a theoretical perspective on…

  5. Geriatric Knowledge and Educational Needs among Rural Health Care Professionals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goins, R. Turner; Gainor, Sara Jane; Pollard, Cecil; Spencer, S. Melinda

    2003-01-01

    In a needs assessment of 84 rural health care professionals (44.1% physicians, 15.5% pharmacists, 14.3% nurses, 26.1% other), 39% considered their geriatrics knowledge above average. They were interested in learning more about Alzheimer's/dementia, medication use, and adverse effects. Preferred methods were videotapes, CD-ROM, and an…

  6. The Teaching of Psychology on Health Professional Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Upton, Dominic; Mansell, Hayley

    2008-01-01

    Psychology is taught on a range of vocational courses including such training for professions as nurses, medics, physiotherapists, occupational therapists, and other health care professionals. However, what is uncertain is what psychology is taught, who it is taught by and how it is taught. This project aims to address these unresolved questions…

  7. Infant Mental Health Home Visitation: Setting and Maintaining Professional Boundaries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barron, Carla; Paradis, Nichole

    2010-01-01

    Relationship-based infant mental health home visiting services for infants, toddlers, and their families intensify the connection between the personal and professional. To promote the therapeutic relationship and maximize the effectiveness of the intervention, home visitors must exercise good judgment, in the field and in the moment, to set and…

  8. Factors Affecting the Technology Readiness of Health Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, Stephanie E.

    2010-01-01

    Federal government policies are promoting diffusion of technologies into the healthcare system. If health professionals reject the new technologies planned for the healthcare system, it could result in costly failures, delays, and workforce problems. There is a lack of knowledge about factors that affect technology readiness (TR), defined as the…

  9. Continuing Health Professional Education: Principles for Global Application.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woolf, Colin R.

    1993-01-01

    Offers a list of continuing health professional education principles developed by a network of 26 individuals in 14 countries that provide a broad perspective and, as a result of this consultation with individuals of varying cultural circumstances, show differences in emphasis. Proposes personal, educational, and administrative principles.…

  10. Mental Health First Aid guidelines for helping a suicidal person: a Delphi consensus study in Japan

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background This study aimed to develop guidelines for how a member of the Japanese public should provide mental health first aid to a person who is suicidal. Methods The guidelines were produced by developing a questionnaire containing possible first aid actions and asking an expert panel of 32 Japanese mental health professionals to rate whether each action should be included in the guidelines. The content of the questionnaire was based on a systematic search of the relevant evidence and claims made by authors of consumer and carer guides and websites. The panel members were asked to complete the questionnaire by web survey. Three rounds of the rating were carried and, at the end of each round, items that reached the consensus criterion were selected for inclusion in the guidelines. During the first round, panel members were also asked to suggest any additional actions that were not covered in the original questionnaire (to include items that are relevant to local cultural circumstances, values, and social norms). Responses to these open-ended questions were used to generate new items. Results The output from the Delphi process was a set of agreed upon action statements. The Delphi process started with 138 statements, 38 new items were written based on suggestions from panel members and, of these 176 items, 56 met the consensus criterion. These statements were used to develop the guidelines appended to this article. Conclusions There are a number of actions that are considered to be useful for members of the Japanese public when they encounter someone who is experiencing suicidal thoughts or engaging in suicidal behaviour. Although the guidelines are designed for members of the public, they may also be helpful to health professionals working in health and welfare settings who do not have clinical mental health training. PMID:21592409

  11. VA Health Professional Scholarship and Visual Impairment and Orientation and Mobility Professional Scholarship Programs. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2013-08-20

    The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) is amending its VA Health Professional Scholarship Program (HPSP) regulations. VA is also establishing regulations for a new program, the Visual Impairment and Orientation and Mobility Professional Scholarship Program (VIOMPSP). These regulations comply with and implement sections 302 and 603 of the Caregivers and Veterans Omnibus Health Services Act of 2010 (the 2010 Act). Section 302 of the 2010 Act established the VIOMPSP, which authorizes VA to provide financial assistance to certain students seeking a degree in visual impairment or orientation or mobility, in order to increase the supply of qualified blind rehabilitation specialists for VA and the United States. Section 603 of the 2010 Act reauthorized and modified HPSP, a program that provides scholarships for education or training in certain health care occupations.

  12. [The complex interplay between health services administration, health professionals and patients. A challenge to take up].

    PubMed

    Del Puente, Antonio; Esposito, Antonella; Lombardi, Vinicio; Bova, Aldo; Zecca, Roberto; Torella, Roberto

    2013-02-01

    The risk of loss of essential elements of our professionalism, such as sense of duty, altruism and collegiality, contributes to the difficulties in the interplay between health services administration, health professionals and patients. It is not enough to increase salaries or change organization models. It is also insufficient a generic reference to the values of our profession, but it is mandatory to overcome the self-referencing attitude of health professions.

  13. Professionalization and public health: historical legacies, continuing dilemmas.

    PubMed

    Starr, Paul

    2009-11-01

    Professionalization in public health reflects wider institutional and political forces. Depending on the historical context in different countries, public health has developed as a medical specialty or as an independent field, entirely within the state or in mixed public-private institutions, closely or weakly tied to social movements, and in varying relations to fields such as engineering, nursing, environmental science, and the military. In early 20th-century America, the rise of the medical profession and the biomedical model of disease had a formative influence on public health, leading to a different institutional pattern from Britain. Public health in the United States emerged (1) largely outside the medical profession, but under the sway of the biomedical model; (2) without medicine's command of an exclusive jurisdiction and high status; and (3) with a limited role in healthcare organization and planning. Professionalism in public health continues to be subjected to contradictory pressures and uncertainties. Healthcare reform, bioterrorism, and environmental crises could expand its mandate and access to resources, but conflicts with other institutions are likely to result in limits on the capacity of public health professionals to assert an exclusive jurisdiction.

  14. Plagiarism and registered health professionals: navigating the borderlands between scholarly and professional misconduct.

    PubMed

    Wardle, Jon

    2013-12-01

    As access to published materials becomes more readily available, the ability to plagiarise material, deliberately or unwittingly has become easier than ever. This article explores important recent decisions in Australia and the United Kingdom regarding registered health practitioners who have engaged in plagiarism, both related and unrelated to their clinical practice, and explores the ways in which regulatory authorities in these countries have viewed scholarly misconduct committed by registered health professionals. This article also examines the implications of plagiarism for the registered health professions, and makes suggestions for strategies to reduce its influence and incidence in modern clinical practice.

  15. Pre-implementation investigation of the readiness of allied health professionals to adopt electronic health records.

    PubMed

    Hailey, David; Yu, Ping; Munyisia, Esther

    2014-01-01

    There has been limited uptake of electronic health records (EHR) by allied health professionals. Yet, not much attention has been given to their information needs. For EHR to work for these health professionals, it is essential to understand their current practice of information management and their perceptions towards EHR. A qualitative interview study was thus conducted with four managers in four allied health practices in Sydney to understand their perceptions for the adoption and use of a new Australian e-health standards compliant EHR system. We found that these allied health professionals were highly confident with the use of electronic information system and were enthusiastically expecting the introduction of the EHR system to support their information management and practice. A number of issues related to the use of EHR in practice for small, independent allied health practices were also discussed. It appears that allied health professionals today are information technology (IT) savvy and ready to adopt EHR. EHR for allied health practices in Australia are long overdue. The health informatics community can no longer ignore the need and want of allied health professionals for EHR that are tailored and built to support their information and practice management.

  16. Stress, Cognitive Appraisal and Psychological Health: Testing Instruments for Health Professionals.

    PubMed

    Gomes, A Rui; Teixeira, Pedro M

    2016-04-01

    The job of health professionals, including nurses, is considered inherently stressful, and thus, it is important to improve and develop specific measures that are sensitive to the demands that health professionals face. This study analysed the psychometric properties of three instruments that focus on the professional experiences of nurses in aspects related to occupational stress, cognitive appraisal and mental health issues. The evaluation protocol included the Stress Questionnaire for Health Professionals (SQHP), the Cognitive Appraisal Scale (CAS) and the General Health Questionnaire-12 (GHQ-12). Validity and reliability issues were considered with statistical analysis (i.e., confirmatory factor analysis, convergent validity and composite reliability) that revealed adequate values for all of the instruments, namely a six-factor structure for the SQHP, a five-factor structure for the CAS and a two-factor structure for the GHQ-12. In conclusion, this study proposes three consistent instruments that may be useful for analysing nurses' adaptation to work contexts.

  17. Stigma and Mental Illness: Investigating Attitudes of Mental Health and Non-Mental-Health Professionals and Trainees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Allison L.; Cashwell, Craig S.

    2010-01-01

    The authors explored attitudes toward adults with mental illness. Results suggest that mental health trainees and professionals had less stigmatizing attitudes than did non-mental-health trainees and professionals. Professionals receiving supervision had higher mean scores on the Benevolence subscale than did professionals who were not receiving…

  18. HIV-AIDS Information and the American Library Community: An Overview of Responses to the HIV-AIDS Health Crisis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lukenbill, W. Bernard

    This paper presents an overview of how American libraries have responded to the health crisis caused by HIV (Human Immunodeficiency Virus) and AIDS (Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome). AIDS information dissemination practices of libraries and the social role which American librarians have articulated regarding their special responsibilities are…

  19. Task Analysis for Health Occupations. Cluster: Nursing. Occupation: Home Health Aide. Education for Employment Task Lists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lake County Area Vocational Center, Grayslake, IL.

    This document contains a task analysis for health occupations (home health aid) in the nursing cluster. For each task listed, occupation, duty area, performance standard, steps, knowledge, attitudes, safety, equipment/supplies, source of analysis, and Illinois state goals for learning are listed. For the duty area of "providing therapeutic…

  20. Observation of influences of mental health promotion and mental intervention on mental health status of professionals

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Shu-Qiang; Zhang, Jian-Ling

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To observe the influences of mental health promotion and mental intervention on mental health status of professionals. Method: 2878 professionals for physical examination were selected and randomly divided into treatment group and control group, with 1443 professionals and 1435 professionals, respectively. Then, the difference of mental health status before and after mental intervention between two groups was compared. Results: In treatment group, the proportion of people with healthy mental and modest pressure after mental intervention was higher than that before mental intervention and that in control group after mental intervention (P<0.01); the proportion of people with psychological sub-heath and moderate pressure after mental intervention was significantly lower than that before mental intervention and that in control group after mental intervention (P<0.05). There was no significant difference in mental health status in control group before and after mental intervention (P>0.05). Mental health consciousness, health status, self pressure-relief capability, job satisfaction, and happiness index of professionals were up to 63.3%~78.8%. Conclusions: Mental health promotion and mental intervention may significantly improve mental health status of professionals. PMID:26221385

  1. An eHealth Application in Head and Neck Cancer Survivorship Care: Health Care Professionals' Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    van Uden-Kraan, Cornelia F; Peek, Niels; Cuijpers, Pim; Leemans, C René; Verdonck-de Leeuw, Irma M

    2015-01-01

    Background Although many cancer survivors could benefit from supportive care, they often do not utilize such services. Previous studies have shown that patient-reported outcomes (PROs) could be a solution to meet cancer survivors’ needs, for example through an eHealth application that monitors quality of life and provides personalized advice and supportive care options. In order to develop an effective application that can successfully be implemented in current health care, it is important to include health care professionals in the development process. Objective The aim of this study was to investigate health care professionals’ perspectives toward follow-up care and an eHealth application, OncoKompas, in follow-up cancer care that monitors quality of life via PROs, followed by automatically generated tailored feedback and personalized advice on supportive care. Methods Health care professionals involved in head and neck cancer care (N=11) were interviewed on current follow-up care and the anticipated value of the proposed eHealth application (Step 1). A prototype of the eHealth application, OncoKompas, was developed (Step 2). Cognitive walkthroughs were conducted among health care professionals (N=21) to investigate perceived usability (Step 3). Interviews were recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed by 2 coders. Results Health care professionals indicated several barriers in current follow-up care including difficulties in detecting symptoms, patients’ perceived need for supportive care, and a lack of time to encourage survivors to obtain supportive care. Health care professionals expected the eHealth application to be of added value. The cognitive walkthroughs demonstrated that health care professionals emphasized the importance of tailoring care. They considered the navigation structure of OncoKompas to be complex. Health care professionals differed in their opinion toward the best strategy to implement the application in clinical practice but

  2. Going on to Graduate or Professional School: Sources of Financial Aid and Educational Programs for Native Americans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKusick, John A., Ed.

    The booklet provides brief information on about 250 sources of financial aid and educational programs for Native Americans wanting to enter graduate or professional level study. Most of those listed have been selected because they are earmarked for minority group students as a general group or Native Americans specifically. Section I contains…

  3. Can Addiction-Related Self-Help/Mutual Aid Groups Lower Demand for Professional Substance Abuse Treatment?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Humphreys, Keith

    1998-01-01

    Discusses the potential of self-help/mutual-aid groups as a way to reduce the demand for professional substance-abuse treatment and proposes a model that combines the two approaches for cost-effective and therapeutically effective networks of services. (SLD)

  4. Communicating with parents about vaccination: a framework for health professionals

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background A critical factor shaping parental attitudes to vaccination is the parent’s interactions with health professionals. An effective interaction can address the concerns of vaccine supportive parents and motivate a hesitant parent towards vaccine acceptance. Poor communication can contribute to rejection of vaccinations or dissatisfaction with care. We sought to provide a framework for health professionals when communicating with parents about vaccination. Methods Literature review to identify a spectrum of parent attitudes or ‘positions’ on childhood vaccination with estimates of the proportion of each group based on population studies. Development of a framework related to each parental position with determination of key indicators, goals and strategies based on communication science, motivational interviewing and valid consent principles. Results Five distinct parental groups were identified: the ‘unquestioning acceptor’ (30–40%), the ‘cautious acceptor’ (25–35%); the ‘hesitant’ (20–30%); the ‘late or selective vaccinator’ (2–27%); and the ‘refuser’ of all vaccines (<2%). The goals of the encounter with each group will vary, depending on the parents’ readiness to vaccinate. In all encounters, health professionals should build rapport, accept questions and concerns, and facilitate valid consent. For the hesitant, late or selective vaccinators, or refusers, strategies should include use of a guiding style and eliciting the parent’s own motivations to vaccinate while, avoiding excessive persuasion and adversarial debates. It may be necessary to book another appointment or offer attendance at a specialised adverse events clinic. Good information resources should also be used. Conclusions Health professionals have a central role in maintaining public trust in vaccination, including addressing parents’ concerns. These recommendations are tailored to specific parental positions on vaccination and provide a structured

  5. Rural versus urban: Tennessee health administrators' strategies on recruitment and retention for allied health professionals.

    PubMed

    Slagle, Derek R; Byington, Randy L; Verhovsek, Ester L

    2012-01-01

    Due to an increase in the need for allied health professionals, there is a growing interest to assess the allied health workforce and its employment needs. This is especially true in medically underserved rural areas where there is a critical shortage of allied health professionals. A survey was sent to allied health administrators across a variety of allied health disciplines working in Tennessee hospitals in order to gauge opinions on retention and recruitment strategies. Overall successful strategies for recruitment and retention of allied health professionals were reported as well as differences between urban and rural areas, differences of perceptions of strategy effectiveness among allied health disciplines, and key strategies for rural allied health recruitment. Little is known about organizational policies impacting recruitment and retention practices of allied health professionals in Tennessee hospitals. Understanding of this problem is vital to the prevention of a critical shortage of allied health professionals. Therefore, this study sought to compare rural and urban hospital in Tennessee with respect to recruitment and retention needs.

  6. Professional centred shared decision making: Patient decision aids in practice in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Burges Watson, Duika; Thomson, Richard G; Murtagh, Madeleine J

    2008-01-01

    Background Patient decision aids are increasingly regarded as important components of clinical practice that enable shared decision making (SDM) and evidence based patient choice. Despite broad acceptance of their value, there remains little evidence of their successful implementation in primary care settings. Methods Health care practitioners from five general practice surgeries in northern England participated in focus group sessions around the themes of patient decision aids, patient and practitioner preferences and SDM. Participants included general practitioners (n = 19), practice nurses (n = 5) and auxiliary staff (n = 3). Transcripts were analysed using a framework approach. Results We report a) practitioners' discussion of the current impetus towards sharing decisions and their perspectives on barriers to SDM, and b) the implementation of patient decision aids in practice and impediments such as lack of an evidence base and time available in consultations. Conclusion We demonstrate two orientations to sharing decisions: practitioner-centred and patient-centred with the former predominating. We argue that it is necessary to rethink the changes required in practice for the implementation of SDM. PMID:18190683

  7. Use of Social Media for Professional Development by Health Care Professionals: A Cross-Sectional Web-Based Survey

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background Social media can be used in health care settings to enhance professional networking and education; patient communication, care, and education; public health programs; organizational promotion; and research. Objective The aim of this study was to explore the use of social media networks for the purpose of professional development among health care professionals in Saudi Arabia using a purpose-designed Web-based survey. Methods A cross-sectional web-based survey was undertaken. A link to the survey was posted on the investigator’s personal social media accounts including Twitter, LinkedIn, and WhatsApp. Results A total of 231 health care professionals, who are generally social media users, participated in the study. Of these professionals, 70.6% (163/231) use social media for their professional development. The social media applications most frequently used, in the descending order, for professional development were Twitter, YouTube, Instagram, Facebook, Snapchat, and LinkedIn. The majority of respondents used social media for professional development irrespective of their age group, with the highest proportion seen in those aged 20-30 years. Social media were perceived as being most beneficial for professional development in terms of their impact on the domains of knowledge and problem solving and least helpful for enhancing clinical skills. Twitter was perceived as the most helpful type of social media for all domains listed. Respondents most frequently reported that social media were useful for professional development for the reasons of knowledge exchange and networking. Conclusions Social media are frequently used by health care professionals in Saudi Arabia for the purposes of professional development, with Twitter most frequently used for this purpose. These findings suggest that social media networks can be powerful tools for engaging health care professionals in their professional development. PMID:27731855

  8. Medical information, health sciences librarians, and professional liability.

    PubMed

    Hafner, A W

    1990-01-01

    As a gatekeeper to medical literature and a critical link in the delivery of information to physicians, the librarian's role raises the issue of the librarian's professional liability. The paper suggests several ways in which liability may attach to the librarian or the librarian's employers. Although the librarian's personal risk is negligible, the physician's exposure due to ineffective library work is substantial since the courts have held that a physician must keep abreast of progress in his field. Librarians can also become associated with professional liability actions as part of a case against a physician or hospital through the legal doctrine of vicarious liability. The paper concludes by suggesting several proactive steps for health sciences librarians to pursue to insulate themselves from professional liability and to insulate physicians and institutions from vicarious liability.

  9. [Peculiarities of oral health of organized collectives and professional communities].

    PubMed

    Makeeva, I M; Avdeenko, O E

    2016-01-01

    The analysis of scientific literature on the peculiarities of the dental status of organized groups and professional associations. After reviewing the literature, it becomes clear that the studies carried out in organized groups and professional societies are very relevant today, because the prevalence of dental diseases among them remains high, fueled by a number of factors: habitat, diet, lifestyle, occupational hazards, particularly hygienic oral care. Nowadays there is no information about the features of the dental status among the clergy, whose professional activity is connected with direct close contact with people. This profession covers a large number of our population. The research of certain groups is of special interest, since a number of different factors affect dental health.

  10. Experiences with perinatal loss from the health professionals' perspective.

    PubMed

    Pastor Montero, Sonia María; Romero Sánchez, José Manuel; Hueso Montoro, César; Lillo Crespo, Manuel; Vacas Jaén, Ana Gema; Rodríguez Tirado, María Belén

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to know the experience of health professionals in situations of perinatal death and grief and to describe their action strategies in the management of perinatal loss. A qualitative study with a phenomenological approach was carried out through interviews conducted with 19 professionals. Three thematic categories were identified: Healthcare practice, feelings aroused by perinatal loss and meaning and beliefs about perinatal loss and grief. The results revealed that the lack of knowledge and skills to deal with perinatal loss are identified as the main reason behind unsuitable attitudes that are usually adopted in these situations. This generates anxiety, helplessness and frustration that compromise professional competency. The conclusion reached is that the promotion of training programs to acquire knowledge, skills and abilities in management of perinatal bereavement and the development of a clinical practice guideline for perinatal loss are necessary.

  11. [Collaboration among health professionals (II). Usefulness of a model].

    PubMed

    D'Amour, Danielle; San Martín Rodríguez, Leticia

    2006-09-01

    This second article provides a model which helps one to better understand the process of collaboration by interprofessional teams and makes it possible to evaluate the quality of the aforementioned collaboration. To this end, the authors first present a structural model of inter-professional collaboration followed by a typology of collaboration which is derived from the functionality of said model. This model is composed by four interrelated dimensions; the functionality of these has given rise to a typology of collaboration at three intensities: in action, in construction and collaboration during inertia. The model and the typology constitute a useful tool for managers and for health professionals since they help to better understand, manage and develop collaboration among the distinct professionals inside of the same organization as among those who belong to distinct organizations.

  12. Health Center Professional Programs and Primary Care Workforce

    PubMed Central

    Aysola, Jaya; Groves, DaShawn; Hicks, LeRoi S

    2016-01-01

    Background Current policy promotes health center professional training and pipeline programs as solutions to bolster primary care workforce in shortage areas, despite the paucity of evidence. Methods We analyzed data from US health centers we surveyed from March to June 2010, merged with federal health center data, to estimate associations between health center training and pipeline programs and provider recruitment and retention. Results Of the 976 surveyed, 391 health centers responded. Health centers with career ladder programs compared to those without had higher adjusted rates of no/minimal difficulty in recruitment of primary care providers. (17.6% vs. 10.6%; p=.01) and close to double the adjusted rates of reporting no/minimal difficulty in retention of primary care providers (39.4% vs. 21.2%; p=.0001). Discussion There remains a need for further evaluation of health professional programs in order to expand models, such as career ladder programs, that demonstrate effectiveness in improving the primary care workforce in shortage areas. PMID:27891532

  13. Health Care Providers Inventory: a method for evaluating nursing aides.

    PubMed

    Beach, D A

    1988-01-01

    The Health Care Providers Inventory (HCPI) is a 70-item questionnaire containing five primary scales and a validity scale. It is a pre-employment instrument designed to evaluate American nursing aides. In this study, I determined that the HCPI is a reliable, non-discriminatory test. Concurrent, construct, and predictive validity data are reported, which indicate that the HCPI measures significant personality characteristics, and is of value to administrators in their hiring of suitable applicants and in the reduction of employee turnover in nursing homes.

  14. A Reaction to: What about Health Educators? Nutrition Education for Allied Health Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Lori W.; Knol, Linda; Meyer, Mary Kay

    2012-01-01

    "What about Health Educators? Nutrition Education for Allied Health Professionals" describes an important issue in health care that is the provision of nutrition education. Obesity and chronic disease rates are rapidly increasing. Due to increase in the prevalence rates of obesity and nutrition-related chronic diseases, there is a growing need for…

  15. Advancing Public Health through Continuing Education of Health Care Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hudmon, Karen Suchanek; Addleton, Robert L.; Vitale, Frank M.; Christiansen, Bruce A.; Mejicano, George C.

    2011-01-01

    This article describes how the CS2day (Cease Smoking Today) initiative positioned continuing education (CE) in the intersection between medicine and public health. The authors suggest that most CE activities address the medical challenges that clinicians confront, often to the neglect of the public health issues that are key risk factors for the…

  16. Health literacy practices and educational competencies for health professionals: a consensus study.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Clifford A; Hudson, Stan; Maine, Lucinda L

    2013-01-01

    Health care professionals often lack adequate knowledge about health literacy and the skills needed to address low health literacy among patients and their caregivers. Many promising practices for mitigating the effects of low health literacy are not used consistently. Improving health literacy training for health care professionals has received increasing emphasis in recent years. The development and evaluation of curricula for health professionals has been limited by the lack of agreed-upon educational competencies in this area. This study aimed to identify a set of health literacy educational competencies and target behaviors, or practices, relevant to the training of all health care professionals. The authors conducted a thorough literature review to identify a comprehensive list of potential health literacy competencies and practices, which they categorized into 1 or more educational domains (i.e., knowledge, skills, attitudes) or a practice domain. The authors stated each item in operationalized language following Bloom's Taxonomy. The authors then used a modified Delphi method to identify consensus among a group of 23 health professions education experts representing 11 fields in the health professions. Participants rated their level of agreement as to whether a competency or practice was both appropriate and important for all health professions students. A predetermined threshold of 70% agreement was used to define consensus. After 4 rounds of ratings and modifications, consensus agreement was reached on 62 out of 64 potential educational competencies (24 knowledge items, 27 skill items, and 11 attitude items), and 32 out of 33 potential practices. This study is the first known attempt to develop consensus on a list of health literacy practices and to translate recommended health literacy practices into an agreed-upon set of measurable educational competencies for health professionals. Further work is needed to prioritize the competencies and practices in

  17. Understanding, Treating, and Preventing STDs / Questions to Ask your Health Care Professional

    MedlinePlus

    ... Treating, and Preventing STDs / Questions to Ask your Health Care Professional Past Issues / Fall 2008 Table of Contents ... than one sexual partner Questions to Ask Your Health Care Professional How can I prevent getting an STD? ...

  18. Professional fighters brain health study: rationale and methods.

    PubMed

    Bernick, Charles; Banks, Sarah; Phillips, Michael; Lowe, Mark; Shin, Wanyong; Obuchowski, Nancy; Jones, Stephen; Modic, Michael

    2013-07-15

    Repetitive head trauma is a risk factor for Alzheimer's disease and is the primary cause of chronic traumatic encephalopathy. However, little is known about the natural history of, and risk factors for, chronic traumatic encephalopathy or about means of early detection and intervention. The Professional Fighters Brain Health Study is a longitudinal study of active professional fighters (boxers and mixed martial artists), retired professional fighters, and controls matched for age and level of education. The main objective of the Professional Fighters Brain Health Study is to determine the relationships between measures of head trauma exposure and other potential modifiers and changes in brain imaging and neurological and behavioral function over time. The study is designed to extend over 5 years, and we anticipate enrollment of more than 400 boxers and mixed martial artists. Participants will undergo annual evaluations that include 3-tesla magnetic resonance imaging scanning, computerized cognitive assessments, speech analysis, surveys of mood and impulsivity, and blood sampling for genotyping and exploratory biomarker studies. Statistical models will be developed and validated to predict early and progressive changes in brain structure and function. A composite fight exposure index, developed as a summary measure of cumulative traumatic exposure, shows promise as a predictor of brain volumes and cognitive function.

  19. [Ebola in Guinea: experience of stigma among health professional survivors].

    PubMed

    Sow, S; Desclaux, A; Taverne, B

    2016-10-01

    This article aims to describe the various forms of stigma faced by Ebola health professional survivors. A study based on in-depth interviews with 20 survivors was conducted in Conakry as part of PostEboGui multidisciplinary cohort research Program (Life after Ebola) in July-August 2015. Participants were health professionals, male and female, mostly with precarious positions in the health system. The results show that stigmatization is mainly expressed through avoidance, rejection, or being refused to be reinstated in the position at work and non-acceptance of the disease by third parties. This stigmatization appears to be rooted in fear of contagion and in diverging conceptions of the disease aetiology that may engender conflict. Being health workers did not protect them against stigma and some of them faced rejection in their own health care facility. This stigmatization was not based on moral grounds, contrary to the one experienced by people living with HIV, and attitudes of solidarity were encountered in family and confessional networks. Responders found support within an association of survivors (Association des personnes guéries et affectées d'Ebola en Guinée, APEGUAEG) that was created in early 2015. Stigmatization was temporary and disappeared for most responders owing to strategies implemented by survivors and because the fear of contagion had vanished: interviews were conducted when the notion of persistence of Ebola virus in the semen was not spread in the population. This research study shows that stigma is perpetuated among health agents, towards workers who were exposed by their professional role. This observation should be considered for specific measures towards behavioural change. Finally, the very notion of "stigmatization", widely used by public health institutions, is challenged by the diversity of individual experiences that are particular to Ebola virus disease regarding their expression and evolution. Studies on stigma related to Ebola

  20. AIDS

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000594.htm HIV/AIDS To use the sharing features on this page, ... immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is the virus that causes AIDS. When a person becomes infected with HIV, the ...

  1. Innovations in Public Health Education: Promoting Professional Development and a Culture of Health

    PubMed Central

    Gentry, Daniel; Klesges, Lisa M.

    2015-01-01

    As the field of public health advances toward addressing complex, systemic problems, future public health professionals must be equipped with leadership and interprofessional skills that support collaboration and a culture of health. The University of Memphis School of Public Health has infused innovative strategies into graduate education via experiential learning opportunities to enhance leadership, collaboration, and professional development. Novel training programs such as Day One, Public Health Interdisciplinary Case Competition, and Memphis Healthy U support Association of Schools and Programs of Public Health cross-cutting competencies and prepare Master of Public Health and Master of Health Administration graduates to function effectively at the outset of their careers and become catalysts for creating a culture of health. PMID:25706016

  2. Innovations in public health education: promoting professional development and a culture of health.

    PubMed

    Levy, Marian; Gentry, Daniel; Klesges, Lisa M

    2015-03-01

    As the field of public health advances toward addressing complex, systemic problems, future public health professionals must be equipped with leadership and interprofessional skills that support collaboration and a culture of health. The University of Memphis School of Public Health has infused innovative strategies into graduate education via experiential learning opportunities to enhance leadership, collaboration, and professional development. Novel training programs such as Day One, Public Health Interdisciplinary Case Competition, and Memphis Healthy U support Association of Schools and Programs of Public Health cross-cutting competencies and prepare Master of Public Health and Master of Health Administration graduates to function effectively at the outset of their careers and become catalysts for creating a culture of health.

  3. Oral Care during Pregnancy: Attitudes of Brazilian Public Health Professionals

    PubMed Central

    Alves, Renata Toledo; Ribeiro, Rosangela Almeida; Costa, Luciane Rezende; Leles, Claudio Rodrigues; Freire, Maria do Carmo Matias; Paiva, Saul Martins

    2012-01-01

    There is little information about health professionals’ behavior regarding oral health care during pregnancy. We evaluated attitudes of obstetricians/gynecologists, nurses, and dentists working at a public community service towards pregnant women’s oral health. Health professionals responded to a self-applied questionnaire. Cluster analysis identified two clusters of respondents; Chi-square, Student’s t test, and logistic regression were used to compare the two clusters in terms of the independent variables. Respondents were categorized into cluster 1 ‘less favorable’ (n = 159) and cluster 2 ‘more favorable’ (n = 124) attitudes. Professionals that had attended a residency or specialization program (OR = 2.08, 95% CI = 1.15–3.77, p = 0.016) and worked exclusively at the public service (OR = 2.15, 95% CI = 1.10–4.20, p = 0.025) presented more favorable attitudes. Obstetricians/gynecologists (OR = 0.22, 95% CI = 0.09–0.54, p = 0.001) and nurses (OR = 0.50, 95% CI = 0.29–0.86, p = 0.013) showed less favorable attitudes than dentists. Health care providers’ attitudes regarding pregnant women’s oral health were related to their occupation, qualification, and dedication to the public service. PMID:23202756

  4. Public perceptions of health care professionals' participation in pharmaceutical marketing.

    PubMed

    Crigger, Nancy J; Courter, Laura; Hayes, Kristen; Shepherd, K

    2009-09-01

    Trust in the nurse-patient relationship is maintained not by how professionals perceive their actions but rather by how the public perceives them. However, little is known about the public's view of nurses and other health care professionals who participate in pharmaceutical marketing. Our study describes public perceptions of health care providers' role in pharmaceutical marketing and compares their responses with those of a random sample of licensed family nurse practitioners. The family nurse practitioners perceived their participation in marketing activities as significantly more ethically appropriate than did the public responders. Further research is warranted before conclusions can be drawn, but these early findings suggest that nurse practitioners should consider a conservative approach to participating in pharmaceutical marketing.

  5. Coping with AIDS: Psychological and Social Considerations in Helping People with HTLV-III Infection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Runck, Bette

    This booklet was written to familiarize health and mental health professionals and paraprofessionals with the psychological and social problems associated with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). It briefly reviews the realities of AIDS and describes the challenge that AIDS poses for health care professionals. A section on neuropsychiatric…

  6. People living with HIV / AIDS: promoting health through partnership.

    PubMed

    De Gagne, D

    1994-01-01

    In 1992, eight persons living with HIV/AIDS, (PHIV), in Rwanda organized themselves into a self-help group,"Mirror of Health." One month before the war began, the group had evolved into an organization with about 200 members (all ages, men and women, Tutsis and Hutus); they have not been heard from since. While all PHIV must fight for their lives against the disease, those in developing countries have many additional problems. The first problem faced by PHIV is isolation, which must be broken to develop effective partnerships and promote one's own health. However, many people are not willing to identify themselves as PHIV; doing so invites discrimination, abuse, and loss of fundamental human rights. It seems as if your entire identity becomes that of a PHIV; your prior history is forgotten. You no longer ever contributed to society (and certainly never will) and are incapable of loving relationships, including sexual ones, without putting others at risk. PHIV who reveal themselves face disrespect, distrust, and lack of interest in the part they play in the response to, and treatment of, AIDS. The group in Rwanda received support from health care workers, community groups, and the government; the relief PHIV felt as a result of this was reflected in their general sense of well-being. Promotion of one's health begins by helping yourself, moves to helping others who are in the same situation, and ends with educating society in general. Many PHIV have spoken about living with the disease (care) to ensure that others do not become infected (prevention). The two should not be separated. When a PHIV worked with a District HIV Prevention and Care Team in Zambia, the knowledge and perceptions of the people attending the educational sessions were greatly enhanced. PHIV are putting a human face to the disease. They are not part of the problem, but part of the solution.

  7. Professional competencies in health promotion and public health: what is common and what is specific? Review of the European debate and perspectives for professional development.

    PubMed

    Mereu, Alessandra; Sotgiu, Alessandra; Buja, Alessandra; Casuccio, Alessandra; Cecconi, Rosaria; Fabiani, Leila; Guberti, Emilia; Lorini, Chiara; Minelli, Liliana; Pocetta, Giancarlo; Contu, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    According to the Nairobi Call to Action, the growth of practitioners' skills can be favoured by setting accreditation standards and by reorienting professional competencies of current and future health workers. This will make it possible to develop a critical mass of competent practitioners, foster training, and increase visibility of the professional field. Through a review of the literature, the authors offer an overview of competency-based strategies for professional development in health promotion. The main research questions discussed were as follows: Is there a shared definition of public health?; Is there a shared definition of health promotion?; Who are the main stakeholders for public health and health promotion in Europe?; What is the meaning of professional competencies in education and practice for public health and health promotion?; Is there a shared system of professional core competencies in public health and health promotion?;What is common and what is specific between the two systems of professional competencies?; Is it useful and feasible to create specific strategies of professional development for public health and health promotion? A transformative use of competencies makes it possible to inform students, professionals, employers, and political decision-makers about what is expected from a specific profession and its values.

  8. Use of health professionals for obstetric care in northern Ghana.

    PubMed

    Mills, Samuel; Bertrand, Jane T

    2005-03-01

    This study explores the role of access versus traditional beliefs in the decision to seek obstetric care from health professionals. Eighteen purposively sampled homogenous groups in Kassena-Nankana District of northern Ghana participated in focus-group discussions about traditional beliefs, barriers to the use of health professionals, and ways to improve obstetric care. All the groups were knowledgeable about the life-threatening signs and symptoms of complications of pregnancy and labor. Decisions about place of delivery generally were made after the onset of labor. Accessibility factors (cost, distance, transport, availability of health facilities, and nurses' attitudes) were major barriers, whereas traditional beliefs were reported as less significant. Informants made pertinent recommendations on how to improve obstetric services in the district. These findings demonstrate that even in this district, where African traditional religion is practiced by a third of the population, compared with a national average of 4 percent, lack of access was perceived as the main barrier to seeking professional obstetric care.

  9. Professionalism and Occupational Well-Being: Similarities and Differences Among Latin American Health Professionals

    PubMed Central

    San-Martín, Montserrat; Delgado-Bolton, Roberto; Vivanco, Luis

    2017-01-01

    age and collateral effects was confirmed in physicians (P = -0.22; p < 0.001) and in nurses (P = -28; p < 0.001). Comparison by gender confirmed higher somatization in women physicians and nurses than in men groups (p < 0.001). On the other hand, comparison by discipline confirmed higher exhaustion and alienation in physicians than in nurses (p < 0.01). Conclusion: The findings support the importance that empathy, teamwork, and lifelong learning have in practitioners’ health and welfare, and the role that cultural behaviors, associated to work professional models and social stereotypes, play in the interaction between professionalism and occupational well-being. PMID:28179893

  10. Professionalism and Occupational Well-Being: Similarities and Differences Among Latin American Health Professionals.

    PubMed

    San-Martín, Montserrat; Delgado-Bolton, Roberto; Vivanco, Luis

    2017-01-01

    age and collateral effects was confirmed in physicians (P = -0.22; p < 0.001) and in nurses (P = -28; p < 0.001). Comparison by gender confirmed higher somatization in women physicians and nurses than in men groups (p < 0.001). On the other hand, comparison by discipline confirmed higher exhaustion and alienation in physicians than in nurses (p < 0.01). Conclusion: The findings support the importance that empathy, teamwork, and lifelong learning have in practitioners' health and welfare, and the role that cultural behaviors, associated to work professional models and social stereotypes, play in the interaction between professionalism and occupational well-being.

  11. Occupational health management system: A study of expatriate construction professionals.

    PubMed

    Chan, I Y S; Leung, M Y; Liu, A M M

    2016-08-01

    Due to its direct impact on the safety and function of organizations, occupational health has been a concern of the construction industry for many years. The inherent complexity of occupational health management presents challenges that make a systems approach essential. From a systems perspective, health is conceptualized as an emergent property of a system in which processes operating at the individual and organizational level are inextricably connected. Based on the fundamental behavior-to-performance-to-outcome (B-P-O) theory of industrial/organizational psychology, this study presents the development of an I-CB-HP-O (Input-Coping Behaviors-Health Performance-Outcomes) health management systems model spanning individual and organizational boundaries. The model is based on a survey of Hong Kong expatriate construction professionals working in Mainland China. Such professionals tend to be under considerable stress due not only to an adverse work environment with dynamic tasks, but also the need to confront the cross-cultural issues arising from expatriation. A questionnaire was designed based on 6 focus groups involving 44 participants, and followed by a pilot study. Of the 500 questionnaires distributed in the main study, 137 valid returns were received, giving a response rate of 27.4%. The data were analyzed using statistical techniques such as factor analysis, reliability testing, Pearson correlation analysis, multiple regression modeling, and structural equation modeling. Theories of coping behaviors and health performance tend to focus on the isolated causal effects of single factors and/or posits the model at single, individual level; while industrial practices on health management tend to focus on organizational policy and training. By developing the I-CB-HP-O health management system, incorporating individual, interpersonal, and organizational perspectives, this study bridges the gap between theory and practice while providing empirical support for a

  12. Forensic mental health professionals in the immigration process.

    PubMed

    Prabhu, Maya; Baranoski, Madelon

    2012-12-01

    This article adds to the existing literature on the role of mental health professionals in assisting attorneys in the asylum and refugee determination process primarily in the United States. The authors describe the legal context for asylum and refugee processing, challenges in conducting evaluations, diagnostic considerations, and specific competencies needed for mental health evaluators. Various cases are presented to illustrate key points. These cases purposely do not include any identifying information of any specific client, yet they are representative of the range and scope of issues that arise in this context.

  13. Discovering Sexual Health Conversations between Adolescents and Youth Development Professionals

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Niodita; Chandak, Aastha; Gilson, Glen; Pelster, Aja Kneip; Schober, Daniel J.; Goldsworthy, Richard; Baldwin, Kathleen; Fortenberry, J. Dennis; Fisher, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Youth development professionals (YDPs), working at community-based organizations are in a unique position to interact with the adolescents as they are neither parents/guardians nor teachers. The objectives of this study were to explore qualitatively what sexual health issues adolescents discuss with YDPs and to describe those issues using the framework of the Sexuality Information and Education Council of the United States (SIECUS) comprehensive sexuality education guidelines. YDPs reported conversations with adolescents that included topics related to the SIECUS key concepts of human development, relationships, personal skills, sexual behavior, and sexual health. PMID:27081375

  14. The need for professional doctors of public health.

    PubMed

    Roemer, M I

    1986-01-01

    Planning, organizing, and operating today's complex health care systems or heading Federal, State, and city public health agencies in the United States and other countries require professionals broadly prepared in the meaning, philosophy, and strategies of public health. It is and has been recognized that the best trained clinical physician could not be expected to know the policies and practices of official public health programs. The chief health official of a State or other jurisdiction, for example, deals with the epidemiology of many diseases; with all aspects of the environment; with hospitals, drugs, health manpower, and nutrition; with issues of health economics, finance, and politics; and with administration. For these tasks, most of medical education is irrelevant. To produce the needed specialists, candidates with a BA degree would be educated as doctors of public health. The proposed 5-year postgraduate curriculum is as demanding as the training for the MD degree, but completely different. The 38 subjects or courses in the curriculum are grouped into four categories: basic tools of social analysis, health and disease in populations, protection of health and prevention of disease, and health care systems and management. At present, MPH degree holders take only a handful of core and elective courses and emerge with little systematic knowledge about the majority of problems they face. The DrPH candidates at schools of public health spend most of their time on research and dissertation writing--adequate preparation for university teachers, but academia is not the goal of most candidates, nor the greatest need of society. Recruits for the proposed new doctorate in public health may be found among the thousands of young people who want to do "community health work" but see no way to play a significant role without getting an MD degree first.

  15. [The gender perspective and health professionals: notes from the Brazilian collective health field].

    PubMed

    Schraiber, Lilia Blima; d'Oliveira, Ana Flávia Pires Lucas

    2014-12-01

    We examine the incorporation of the gender perspective in the health field, considering scientific production, health policies and programs and everyday professional practices within the health services. These distinct layers are necessary given the different possibilities each presents for the incorporation of gender. In scientific production, we identify increasing inclusion of the gender perspective, but with little methodological use of the concept; in health policies and programs, the incorporation of the gender perspective is not comprehensive and varies temporally; and in professional practices, incorporation is anchored more in practical knowledge than in a technical and scientific basis. In the daily work of health professionals, this set of difficulties generates different tensions regarding the scientific and technological basis and the moral basis for intervention.

  16. Changing access to mental health care and social support when people living with HIV/AIDS become service providers.

    PubMed

    Li, Alan Tai-Wai; Wales, Joshua; Wong, Josephine Pui-Hing; Owino, Maureen; Perreault, Yvette; Miao, Andrew; Maseko, Precious; Guiang, Charlie

    2015-01-01

    As people living with HIV/AIDS (PHAs) achieve more stable health, many have taken on active peer support and professional roles within AIDS service organizations. Although the increased engagement has been associated with many improved health outcomes, emerging program and research evidence have identified new challenges associated with such transition. This paper reports on the results of a qualitative interpretive study that explored the effect of this role transition on PHA service providers' access to mental health support and self care. A total of 27 PHA service providers of diverse ethno-racial backgrounds took part in the study. Results show that while role transition often improves access to financial and health-care benefits, it also leads to new stress from workload demands, emotional triggers from client's narratives, feeling of burnout from over-immersion in HIV at both personal and professional levels, and diminished self care. Barriers to seeking support included: concerns regarding confidentiality; self-imposed and enacted stigma associated with accessing mental health services; and boundary issues resulting from changes in relationships with peers and other service providers. Evolving support mechanisms included: new formal and informal peer support networks amongst colleagues or other PHA service providers to address both personal and professional challenges, and having access to professional support offered through the workplace. The findings suggest the need for increased organizational recognition of HIV support work as a form of emotional labor that places complex demands on PHA service providers. Increased access to employer-provided mental health services, supportive workplace policies, and adequate job-specific training will contribute to reduced work-related stress. Community level strategies that support expansion of social networks amongst PHA service providers would reduce isolation. Systemic policies to increase access to insurance

  17. Current status of cardiac surgery allied health professionals in Asia.

    PubMed

    Liu, Z; Ye, W

    2011-01-01

    More and more allied health professions are getting involved in clinical health care. One estimate reported allied health personnel makes up 60 percent of the total health workforce. In Asia, in the field of cardiothoracic surgery, allied health personnel includes perfusionists, physician assistants, physiotherapist, intensivists, rehabilitation therapists, nutritionists and social workers. They work in collaboration with surgeons to provide a range of diagnostic, technical, therapeutic, cardiac care and support services to the patients and their families.Some allied health professions are more specialized. They must adhere to national training and education standards and their professional scope of practice. For example, the training of perfusionists consists of at least five years of academic in medical schools and another three-year-long clinical training in the hospital. The cardiac intensivists usually are medical doctors with a background in cardiology. They spend 3-4 years rotating in Internal Medicine, Anesthesiology, Emergency Rooms and Intensive Care Units. There have specialized medical societies to grant certified credentials and to provide continuing education. Other allied health professions require no special training or credentials and are trained for their work by the hospitals through on-the-job training. Many young health care providers are getting involved in the allied health personnel projects. They consider this as a career ladder because of the opportunities for advancement within specific fields.

  18. Delivering a basic mental health training programme: views and experiences of Mental Health First Aid instructors in Wales.

    PubMed

    Terry, J

    2011-10-01

    Originating in Australia, 'Mental Health First Aid' (MHFA) is a way of providing support to someone who is experiencing a mental health problem before professional help is obtained. Positive evaluations have shown that it both increases confidence while decreasing stigmatizing attitudes. However, the evidence base surrounding the delivery of basic mental health programmes remains underdeveloped. This descriptive qualitative study explored the views and experiences of 14 MHFA instructors from across Wales through semi-structured interviews, as a means to identify the experience of course delivery from their perspective. Data were collected between January and April 2009. The study found individuals benefited from being an MHFA instructor through increased confidence and self-development. However, instructors encountered logistical difficulties in course delivery and noted that as attendees related to the course material, they wished to discuss their own mental health problems during the course. This created considerable challenges for instructors, who noted both positive and negative impacts on themselves, and on their expectations of the role of becoming MHFA instructors. In conclusion, basic mental health training courses must build a clear infrastructure, ongoing quality assurance processes and reliable support structures to train, support and monitor those delivering them.

  19. Satisfaction with a distance continuing education program for health professionals.

    PubMed

    Bynum, Ann B; Irwin, Cathy A; Cohen, Betty

    2010-09-01

    This study assessed differences in program satisfaction among health professionals participating in a distance continuing education program by gender, ethnicity, discipline, and community size. A one-group posttest design was used with a sample of 45,996 participants in the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Rural Hospital, Distance Continuing Medical Education Program during 1995-2007. This program provided 2,219 continuing education programs for physicians (n = 7,047), nurses (n = 21,264), allied health (n = 3,230) and dental (n = 305) professionals, pharmacists (n = 4,088), administrators (n = 1,211), and marketing/finance/human resources professionals (n = 343). These programs were provided in Arkansas hospitals, clinics, and area health education centers. Interactive video technology and the Internet were used to deliver these programs. The program satisfaction instrument demonstrated adequate internal consistency reliability (Cronbach's alpha = 0.91) and construct validity. Participants had high levels of satisfaction regarding knowledge and skills, use of information to enhance patient care, program quality, and convenience of the technology (mean total satisfaction score = 4.44, range: 1-5). Results from the t-test for independent samples and one-way analysis of variance indicated that men (p = 0.01), African-Americans and Hispanics (p < 0.01), dental professionals (p < 0.01), and participants in larger urban communities (population of 75,001-185,000) (p < 0.01) had significantly greater satisfaction. Nurses and physicians had significantly greater satisfaction regarding the use of information in practice to enhance patient care (p < 0.01). Results suggest that socioeconomic and demographic factors can affect satisfaction with distance continuing education programs.

  20. Health needs: the interface between the discourse of health professionals and victimized women1

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Rebeca Nunes Guedes; da Fonseca, Rosa Maria Godoy Serpa

    2015-01-01

    Objective: to understand the limits and the evaluative possibilities of the Family Health Strategy regarding the recognition of the health needs of women who experience violence. Method: a study with a qualitative approach, grounded in the perspective of gender, and which adopted health needs as the analytical category. The data were collected through interviews with health professionals and women who made use of a health service, and were analyzed using the method of discourse analysis. Results: the meeting between the discourses of women who use the services and the professionals of the health service revealed, as the interface, human needs, as in the example of autonomy and of bonds. The understanding regarding the needs was limited to the recognition of health problems of physical and psychological natures, just as the predominance of the recognition of needs for maintaining life in the light of essentially human needs was revealed in the professionals' discourses as an important limitation of the practices. Conclusion: emphasis is placed on the perspective of gender as a tool which must be aggregated to the routine of the professional practices in health so as to confirm or deny the transformative character of the care in place regarding the recognition and confronting of the women's health needs. PMID:26039301

  1. Aged care in Indonesia: information needs of health care professionals in community health centers.

    PubMed

    Sakti, G M; Boldy, D P

    1998-01-01

    This study assessed the usefulness and relevance of the information, which had been provided by the Ministry of Health for use in community health centers. Furthermore, this identified the needs of health professionals in terms of relevant information for providing health care to the elderly in the community health centers. A total of 105 questionnaires were administered to 35 doctors and 70 health care workers. The overall response rate of the 105 questionnaires sent out was 80%. Findings revealed that the overall opinion expressed by the health professionals was that the information leaflets, in general, were good. However, some gaps existed between the information provided by the Ministry of Health and the information needs perceived by health professionals working in community health centers for providing health care to the elderly. The majority commented that pertinent information on health problems related to hypertension, arthritis, and heart disease needed to be added. Furthermore, effective pre-testing of the prepared information materials with the target groups before their production and distribution may lessen such gaps or deficiencies. Recommendations to ensure appropriate information are also given and presented in this article.

  2. Inclusiveness: a mental health strategy for preventing future mental health problems among adolescents orphaned by AIDS.

    PubMed

    Thupayagale-Tshweneagae, G; Mokomane, Z

    2012-10-01

    The purpose of this paper is to raise an argument that inclusiveness will lessen the pain of losing a parent among adolescents orphaned by AIDS and as a result, prevent future mental health problems that may occur because of inappropriate grieving and maladaptive coping strategies. Participation of adolescents orphaned by AIDS in decisions pertaining to their parents' illnesses and funeral arrangements, for example, may shorten the grieving process and allow for closure. The paper draws data from focus group discussions that were held with 15 adolescents orphaned by AIDS in urban South Africa. The focus group discussions that were structured around four themes: grieving patterns; coping strategies; experience with loss; and expectations. The results of the study demonstrate inclusiveness as an overarching factor in the healing process. The concept is thus a strong recommendation for mental health practice and further study.

  3. Queer patients and the health care professional-regulatory arrangements matter.

    PubMed

    Schuklenk, Udo; Smalling, Ricardo

    2013-06-01

    This paper discusses a number of critical ethical problems that arise in interactions between queer patients and health care professionals attending them. Using real-world examples, we discuss the very practical problems queer patients often face in the clinic. Health care professionals face conflicts in societies that criminalise same sex relationships. We also analyse the question of what ought to be done to confront health care professionals who propagate falsehoods about homosexuality in the public domain. These health care professionals are more often than not motivated by strong religious convictions that conflict with mainstream medical opinion on homosexuality. We argue that they ought to be held accountable for their conduct by their professional statutory bodies, given that they abuse their professional standing to propagate sectarian views not representative of their profession. Lastly, we propose that medical schools have special responsibilities in training future health care professionals that will enable them to respond professionally to queer patients seeking health care.

  4. The role of major donors in health aid to the Democratic People's Republic of Korea.

    PubMed

    Lee, Haewon; Ahn, Deborah Y; Choi, Soyoung; Kim, Youngchan; Choi, Hyunju; Park, Sang Min

    2013-05-01

    We investigated the major trends in health aid financing in the Democratic People's Republic of Korea (DPRK) by identifying the primary donor organizations and examining several data sources to track overall health aid trends. We collected gross disbursements from bilateral donor countries and international organizations toward the DPRK according to specific health sectors by using the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development creditor reporting system database and the United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs financial tracking service database. We analyzed sources of health aid to the DPRK from the Republic of Korea (ROK) using the official records from the ROK's Ministry of Unification. We identified the ROK, United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF), World Health Organization (WHO), United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA), and The Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria (GFATM) as the major donor entities not only according to their level of health aid expenditures but also their growing roles within the health sector of the DPRK. We found that health aid from the ROK is comprised of funding from the Inter-Korean Cooperation Fund, private organizations, local governments, and South Korean branches of international organizations such as WHO and UNICEF. We also distinguished medical equipment aid from developmental aid to show that the majority of health aid from the ROK was developmental aid. This study highlights the valuable role of the ROK in the flow of health aid to the DPRK, especially in light of the DPRK's precarious international status. Although global health aid from many international organizations has decreased, organizations such as GFATM and UNFPA continue to maintain their focus on reproductive health and infectious diseases.

  5. Health Care Professionals' Perceptions of Seriously Ill Women.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardin, Kimeron Norman

    1990-01-01

    The research was designed to measure the perceptions of health care professionals toward women with serious illness. Physicians, psychologists and nurses were randomly chosen from lists of licensed practicing professionals and were surveyed. Each respondent read one of four vignettes describing a woman who had received one of four diagnoses: breast cancer, lung cancer, heart attack, or severe burn. The respondents were asked to respond to the Profile of Mood States (POMS) as they perceived the woman had been feeling during the past week. They then answered a series of ten questions about the woman's recovery and about their own anticipated behaviors while interacting with her. Two-way ANOVAs revealed that nurses and psychologists perceived the woman as having more mood disturbance and they saw more need for psychological counseling than physicians, regardless of her diagnosis. Several differences emerged in terms of perceptions of diagnosis. Subjects perceived themselves as being more comfortable around heart attack patients than lung cancer patients, breast cancer patients or burn patients and as having more difficulty talking to a woman with lung cancer than a woman with a heart attack. They also perceived a woman with lung cancer as having poorer chances of survival and they perceived women with more disfiguring disorders, breast cancer and severe burns, as having more sexual adjustment problems than the other diagnostic groups. The results of this survey supports the need for training for health care professionals in recognizing psychological distress in, and appropriately referring, seriously ill women.

  6. [Health communication and public media: professionals need to be heard].

    PubMed

    Meijman, F J

    2008-08-09

    The exchange of information on individual healthcare and public health as well as public opinion on medical matters are characterized by their own systems of values, norms and conventions that are not always compatible. All of these aspects put together give public communication on health and care its complex and dynamic nature--where the interests of the individual and the community are often opposed. In this respect, the free interaction of publicity forces and the educational role of healthcare providers have traditionally been the backbone of policy in the Netherlands. There is only limited support by public money, only a few restrictions (for example, on direct-to-consumer drug-advertising) but no substantive guidance from the government. Websites funded from public money that provide information on healthcare have only been set up in the last few years. The Health Council of the Netherlands has recently proposed trust marking for screening tests only. Research is urgently needed with regard to health literacy, direct-to-consumer advertising and public communication on the appropriate use of care. Furthermore, professional opinion in the public arena is required as well as a more active role on the part of clinical and scientific professionals in the area of public debate.

  7. Innovation in Graduate Education for Health Professionals in Humanitarian Emergencies.

    PubMed

    Evans, Dabney P; Anderson, Mark; Shahpar, Cyrus; Del Rio, Carlos; Curran, James W

    2016-10-01

    The objective of this report was to show how the Center for Humanitarian Emergencies (the Center) at Emory University (Atlanta, Georgia USA) has trained graduate students to respond to complex humanitarian emergencies (CHEs) through innovative educational programs, with the goal of increasing the number of trained humanitarian workers. Natural disasters are on the rise with more than twice as many occurring from 2000-2009 as there were from 1980-1989. In 2012 alone, 144 million people were affected by a natural disaster or displaced by conflict worldwide. This has created an immense need for trained humanitarian workers to respond effectively to such disasters. The Center has developed a model for educational programming that targets learners along an educational continuum ranging from the undergraduate level through continuing professional education. These programs, based in the Rollins School of Public Health (RSPH) of Emory University, include: a competency-based graduate certificate program (the Certificate) in humanitarian emergencies; a fellowship program for mid-career professionals; and funded field practica. The competency-based Certificate program began in 2010 with a cohort of 14 students. Since then, 101 students have received the Certificate with 50 more due for completion in 2016 and 2017 combined. The fellowship program for mid-career professionals has hosted four fellows from conflict-affected or resource-poor countries, who have then gone on to assume leadership positions with humanitarian organizations. From 2009-2015, the field practicum program supported 34 students in international summer practicum experiences related to emergency response or preparedness. Students have participated in summer field experiences on every continent but Australia. Together the Certificate, funded field practicum opportunities, and the fellowship comprise current efforts in providing innovative education and training for graduate and post-graduate students of public

  8. Perspectives on Terminology and Conceptual and Professional Issues in Health Education and Health Promotion Credentialing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taub, Alyson; Allegrante, John P.; Barry, Margaret M.; Sakagami, Keiko

    2009-01-01

    This article was prepared to inform the deliberations of the Galway Consensus Conference by providing a common and global reference point for the discussion of terminology and key conceptual and professional issues in the credentialing of health education and health promotion specialists. The article provides a review of the terminology that is…

  9. Can We Improve Training for Health Professionals to Sustain Local Health Development?

    PubMed

    King, Stephen

    2016-11-01

    Can we improve training for health professionals? We explore specific variables that need to be accounted for to achieve sustainable local health development through training. A problem-based approach with appreciation of the need for making changes is suggested as the only authentic basis for training.

  10. The Design of Health Care Management Program for Chinese Health Care Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Qiu, Xiao Ling

    2008-01-01

    Business education has been booming in China due to the increasing demand of business graduates since China's economic reform. Chinese health care professionals are eager for business education to improve their competencies. The purpose of the study was to investigate the determinants of a successful health care management program for Chinese…

  11. Child Care Health Connections, 1999: A Health and Safety Newsletter for California Child Care Professionals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walery, Nancy, Ed.; Evinger, Sara, Ed.; Dailey, Lyn, Ed.; Sherman, Marsha, Ed.; Zamani, Rahman, Ed.

    1999-01-01

    This document is comprised of the six 1999 issues of a bimonthly newsletter providing information on young children's health and safety for California's child care professionals. Regular features include a column on infant/toddler concerns, a question-answer column regarding medical and health issues, a nutrition column, and resources for child…

  12. Engaging Health Professionals in Health Economics: A Human Capital Informed Approach for Adults Learning Online

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lieberthal, Robert D.; Leon, Juan

    2015-01-01

    The authors describe a Wikipedia-based project designed for a graduate course introducing health economics to experienced healthcare professionals. The project allows such students to successfully write articles on niche topics in rapidly evolving health economics subspecialties. These students are given the opportunity to publish their completed…

  13. Can We Improve Training for Health Professionals to Sustain Local Health Development?

    PubMed Central

    King, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Can we improve training for health professionals? We explore specific variables that need to be accounted for to achieve sustainable local health development through training. A problem-based approach with appreciation of the need for making changes is suggested as the only authentic basis for training. PMID:28090174

  14. [Drugs, health policy and AIDS: changes in a dependent policy].

    PubMed

    Loyola, Maria Andréa

    2008-04-01

    Since the 1970s the Brazilian government has made efforts to implement a pharmaceutical policy that, in spite of a market predominantly oligopolized and dominated by multinational pharmaceutical industries, guarantees access to essential drugs for the population. In this context, in 1999, a law regarding generics was approved. This article aims at analyzing the elements that interfered in the implementation process of this law. Based on specialized bibliography, on the debate in the Brazilian press (1992-2002) and on interviews with industry members, physicians, politicians, activists and civil servants we try to show that the implementation of generics in Brazil is strongly related to the AIDS epidemic. More precisely, it is related to the successful health policy against this disease involving different actors and a variety of elements to be analyzed here, among them the policy of copycat versions of drugs, the law of universal access to anti-AIDS drugs, the struggle of organized social movements, the governmental bureaucracy implemented for fighting this epidemic and the strong mobilization of the media.

  15. E-Aid Office 2000: Financial Aid Software Selection, Implementation, and Operation. Monograph. A NASFAA Series, Number 12. Practical Information for Student Aid Professionals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators, Washington, DC.

    This monograph provides guidance to financial aid administrators in navigating the waters of computer systems selection and implementation. It outlines the various areas where aid officers rely on computer assistance and discusses technology-driven personnel issues, institution-wide system integration, and emerging technologies that will affect…

  16. Self-efficacy of first aid for home accidents among parents with 0- to 4-year-old children at a metropolitan community health center in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Wei, Yu-Li; Chen, Li-Li; Li, Tsai-Chung; Ma, Wei-Fen; Peng, Niang-Huei; Huang, Li-Chi

    2013-03-01

    Although accidental injury is the main factor involved in the death of young children in many countries, few studies have focused on parents' competence with regard to self-efficacy of first aid for their children following injuries occurring at home. The purpose of this cross-sectional study was to investigate parental self-sufficiency of first aid for home accidents in children aged 0-4 years. The study is a cross-sectional designed. Data from 445 parents recruited were collected by purposive sampling at eight metropolitan community health centers in central Taiwan. Measurements were taken from a self-developed questionnaire that included 37 questions. Logistic regression analysis was applied to explore the associations between factors and parents' self-efficacy of first aid at home accident. Our findings show that parents' overall rate of knowledge of first aid was 72%. The mean score for 100% certainty in parents' self-efficacy of first aid was 26.6%. The lowest scores for self-efficacy were with regard to choking and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). There was a significantly positive correlation between parents' knowledge and self-efficacy of first aid (p<0.01), and thus knowledge of first aid is a predictor of parents' self-efficacy. Knowledge of first aid is also a partly mediator between participants' attending first aid program, participants' first aid information obtained from health personnel and self-efficacy of first aid. Our findings suggest that medical services should provide first aid resources to help manage accidental injuries involving children, particularly information on how to deal with choking and CPR. With an appropriate program provided by health professionals, parents' self-efficacy of first aid for home accidents will be positively enhanced.

  17. Ready for eHealth? Health Professionals' Acceptance and Adoption of eHealth Interventions in Inpatient Routine Care.

    PubMed

    Hennemann, Severin; Beutel, Manfred E; Zwerenz, Rüdiger

    2017-03-01

    eHealth interventions can be effective in treating health problems. However, adoption in inpatient routine care seems limited. The present study therefore aimed to investigate barriers and facilitators to acceptance of eHealth interventions and of online aftercare in particular in health professionals of inpatient treatment. A total of 152 out of 287 health professionals of various professional groups in four inpatient rehabilitation facilities filled out a self-administered web-based questionnaire (response rate: 53%); 128 individuals were eligible for further data analysis. Acceptance and possible predictors were investigated with a complex research model based on the Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology. Acceptance of eHealth interventions was rather low (M = 2.47, SD = 0.98); however, acceptance of online aftercare was moderate (M = 3.08, SD = 0.96, t(127) = 8.22, p < .001), and eHealth literacy was elevated. Social influence, performance expectancy, and treatment-related internet and mobile use significantly predicted overall acceptance. No differences were found between professional and age groups. Although acceptance of eHealth interventions was limited in health professionals of inpatient treatment, moderate acceptance of online aftercare for work-related stress implies a basis for future implementation. Tailored eHealth education addressing misconceptions about inferiority and incongruity with conventional treatment considering the systemic aspect of acceptance formation are needed.

  18. Have Broad-Based Community and Professional Education Programs Influenced Mental Health Literacy and Treatment Seeking of those with Major Depression and Suicidal Ideation?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldney, Robert D.; Fisher, Laura J.

    2008-01-01

    "Mental health literacy" is the knowledge and beliefs about mental disorders that aid in their recognition, management, or prevention; it is also a determinant of help seeking. As such, it is presumed to be important in community suicide prevention programs. In Australia there have been a number of government, professional, and…

  19. [Health challenges as the second millenium is ending. Conceptual epidemiology, social pathology, medicine and professional ethics].

    PubMed

    Velasco Suárez, M

    1990-01-01

    In this article it is outlined the work of doctor Bustamante in fighting against diseases such as yellow fever, typhus, malaria, and smallpox; and the development and impel that this professional gave to preventive and social medicine is pointed out. It is established that health care professionals currently must not only highly studied and prepared, as they should manage all features related with public health, but also change-men-and-women who are capable to influence future generations, which will be the responsible in relocating men at the equilibrium point concerned to their health. Said equilibrium point is not only modified in its biopsychosocial aspect, but also its essence is deeply affected. This paper is a warning to physicians to fight together in response to humanity, that has set their confidence in them, as the current problem of drugs and dependence to drugs unhinges everything wholeness. To doctor Suarez is intolerable that, in spite of technological advances in the world, yet exist deaths caused by pneumonia or diarrhea. The hazards of the century are frightened: nuclear war and AIDS; but the characteristics that have distinguished human species and allowed its survival and superation are trusted: mental activity, ability of judgement, and consciousness; which are valuable for a deep philosophic discussion that allows us to continue our advance. An enumeration of the medicine achievements in this century is made.

  20. Preparing Future Faculty and Professionals for Public Health Careers

    PubMed Central

    Hrapczynski, Katie M.; Clark, Jane E.

    2015-01-01

    Recent years have brought rapid growth in schools of public health and an increasing demand for public health practitioners. These trends highlight the need for innovative approaches to prepare doctoral graduates for academic and high-level practice positions. The University of Maryland’s School of Public Health developed a “Preparing Future Faculty and Professionals” program to enrich the graduate education and professional development of its doctoral students. We describe the program’s key elements, including foundational seminars to enhance students’ knowledge and skills related to teaching, research, and service; activities designed to foster career exploration and increase competitiveness in the job market; and independent, faculty-mentored teaching and research experiences. We present a model for replicating the program and share student outcomes of participation. PMID:25706007

  1. A wellness system: the challenge for health professionals

    PubMed Central

    Coulter, Ian D

    1993-01-01

    Beginning with the Lalonde Report, the Federal Government has consistently articulated a new perspective for health whose objective is to move away from a preoccupation with disease and move towards promoting health and wellness. Taken seriously this perspective would logically imply either a new kind of “health” delivery system (a wellness system) and/or a new kind of practitioner, a wellness practitioner. With regard to the latter this would imply either “retooling” present illness practitioners or considering alternative wellness practitioners. There are cogent reasons why the former is not a realistic option. On the other hand, the universities have shown little enthusiasm to date for including those alternative health professionals whose practices already resemble that of a wellness practice, that is, are not focused on serious trauma or disease and that include such things as exercise, nutrition, posture, weight, stress management etc. Currently this includes, but is not limited to, chiropractors, osteopaths, naturopaths, homeopaths.

  2. Internationally educated health professionals and the challenge of workforce distribution.

    PubMed

    Landry, Michel D; Gupta, Neeru; Tepper, Joshua

    2010-01-01

    Internationally educated health professionals (IEHPs) have always been an important part of the Canadian health workforce. A particularly important aspect related to the role of IEHPs is their distribution across different sectors of the healthcare system and various geographical regions. Several provinces and territories have implemented strategies that restrict the initial practice of IEHPs to areas that have long-standing workforce shortages. While the outcomes of these approaches are mixed, some evidence suggests that IEHPs remain in place only as long as their contractual requirements stipulate. However, studies also indicate that IEHPs are increasingly practising in care settings that are perceived to be less attractive by their Canadian-trained counterparts. Whether the contribution of IEHPs is framed in terms of short- or long-term sustainable solutions, their role will continue to be an important component of health service across Canada.

  3. Recommendations for mental health professionals in the NICU

    PubMed Central

    Hynan, M T; Steinberg, Z; Baker, L; Cicco, R; Geller, P A; Lassen, S; Milford, C; Mounts, K O; Patterson, C; Saxton, S; Segre, L; Stuebe, A

    2015-01-01

    This article describes recommended activities of social workers, psychologists and psychiatric staff within the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). NICU mental health professionals (NMHPs) should interact with all NICU parents in providing emotional support, screening, education, psychotherapy and teleservices for families. NMHPs should also offer educational and emotional support for the NICU health-care staff. NMHPs should function at all levels of layered care delivered to NICU parents. Methods of screening for emotional distress are described, as well as evidence for the benefits of peer-to-peer support and psychotherapy delivered in the NICU. In the ideal NICU, care for the emotional and educational needs of NICU parents are outcomes equal in importance to the health and development of their babies. Whenever possible, NMHPs should be involved with parents from the antepartum period through after discharge. PMID:26597800

  4. Design and Development of Learning Objects for Health Professionals.

    PubMed

    Cilene Ferreira Pacheco, Katia; Schenk de Azambuja, Marcelo

    2016-01-01

    Infectious diseases have been re-emerging in developed and underdeveloped countries. In Brazil, the increasing incidence of communicable diseases is ongoing. This new reality generates the need to update the professionals of the sector, in order to make them capable of dealing with such important problem of public health. Educational actions through the usage of the learning objects can contribute to a review and an adoption of effective and safer public health practices. Thus, this scenario leads to the proposal to disseminate knowledge based on the development of learning objects concerning surveillance and prevention of communicable diseases to primary care providers, specifically community health agents. Learning Objects are interactive tools based on web which support specific learning conceptions enhancing, expanding and guiding the learners cognitive process, and when they are combined with other objects may create an efficient and flexible learning environment.

  5. Health care personnel's critique on the Philippines' first movie on AIDS.

    PubMed

    Zaldivar, S B

    1995-01-01

    The "Dolzura Cortez Story" was the Philippines' first movie on AIDS that provided 'a name and a face' among the 50 recorded lives that were lost to AIDS in 1992. This movie was utilized as a focus of discussion by some health care personnel to express their thoughts, opinions and recommendations regarding the use of cinema as a powerful tool for AIDS information dissemination.

  6. The Nation's Top HIV/AIDS Researcher Discusses This Continuing Health Threat

    MedlinePlus

    ... Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues HIV / AIDS The Nation's Top HIV/AIDS Researcher Discusses This Continuing Health Threat Past Issues / ... For more than 30 years, the NIH's HIV/AIDS research program has been led by Dr. Anthony S. ...

  7. [Barriers in access and utilization of health services among immigrants: the perspective of health professionals].

    PubMed

    Dias, Sónia; Gama, Ana; Silva, António Carlos; Cargaleiro, Helena; Martins, Maria O

    2011-01-01

    The growing international migration has reinforcing the importance of a greater adequacy of health services in order to respond effectively to immigrants' needs. Previous studies indicate that several difficulties in the access and utilization of health services persist for some immigrant groups. The objective of this study was to understand the perspective of different health professionals' groups about the barriers in access and utilization of services by immigrants. In a transversal study a questionnaire was applied to 320 primary health care professionals of Lisbon and Tagus Valley. Differences between professional groups were analysed using the Kruskal-Wallis test. To determine which groups diverged more in their perceptions, mean ranks of each group were compared. Of the total participants, 64.2% evaluated their knowledge and competencies to deal with immigrants as reasonable however, 15.2% evaluated it as bad. Around one third of professionals admitted to be unaware of the legislation which regulates migrants' access to services. The largest proportion considered that, at the individual level, the frequent change of residence, the lack of economic resources, the cultural and religious beliefs and traditions, the fear of denunciation when the immigrant is undocumented, the lack of knowledge about legislation and services, and the linguistic differences influence access and utilization of health services. Most considered as barriers at the professionals' and services' level the limited sociocultural skills, the complex bureaucratic procedures, the cost and the lack of interpreters. The divergences in the perception of these factors occurred mainly between office workers and the other professionals. The perceptions of health professionals about the barriers in access and utilization of services by immigrants highlight opportunities for intervention in the context of cultural diversity. Given the different perceptions among the professional groups, which may be

  8. Research governance: implications for health library and information professionals.

    PubMed

    Sen, Barbara A

    2003-03-01

    The Research Governance Framework for Health and Social Care published by the Department of Health in 2001 provides a model of best practice and a framework for research in the health and social care sector. This article reviews the Department of Health Research Governance Framework, discusses the implications of research governance for library and information professionals undertaking research in the health- and social-care sector and recommends strategies for best practice within the information profession relating to research governance. The scope of the Framework document that covers both clinical and non-clinical research is outlined. Any research involving, amongst other issues, patients, NHS staff and use or access to NHS premises may require ethics committee approval. Particular reference is made to the roles, responsibilities and professional conduct and the systems needed to support effective research practice. Issues such as these combine to encourage the development of a quality research culture which supports best practice. Questions arise regarding the training and experience of researchers, and access to the necessary information and support. The use of the Framework to guide research practice complements the quality issues within the evidence-based practice movement and supports the ongoing development of a quality research culture. Recommendations are given in relation to the document's five domains of ethics, science, information, health and safety and finance and intellectual property. Practical recommendations are offered for incorporating research governance into research practice in ways which conform to the Framework's standards and which are particularly relevant for research practitioners in information science. Concluding comments support the use of the Research Governance Framework as a model for best practice.

  9. Development of mental health first aid guidelines for deliberate non-suicidal self-injury: A Delphi study

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Claire M; Jorm, Anthony F; Kitchener, Betty A; Langlands, Robyn L

    2008-01-01

    Background It is estimated that around 4% of the population engages, or has engaged, in deliberate non-suicidal self-injury. In clinical samples, the figures rise as high as 21%. There is also evidence to suggest that these figures may be increasing. A family member or friend may suspect that a person is injuring themselves, but very few people know how to respond if this is the case. Simple first aid guidelines may help members of the public assist people to seek and receive the professional help they require to overcome self-injury. Methods This research was conducted using the Delphi methodology, a method of reaching consensus in a panel of experts. Experts recruited to the panels included 26 professionals, 16 people who had engaged in self-injurious behaviour in the past and 3 carers of people who had engaged in self-injurious behaviour in the past. Statements about providing first aid to a person engaged in self-injurious behaviour were sought from the medical and lay literature, but little was found. Panel members were asked to respond to general questions about first aid for NSSI in a variety of domains and statements were extracted from their responses. The guidelines were written using the items most consistently endorsed by the consumer and professional panels. Results Of 79 statements rated by the panels, 18 were accepted. These statements were used to develop the guidelines appended to this paper. Conclusion There are a number of actions which are considered to be useful for members of the public when they encounter someone who is engaging in deliberate, non-suicidal self-injury. These guidelines will be useful in revising curricula for mental health first aid and NSSI first aid training programs. They can also be used by members of the public who want immediate information about how to assist a person who is engaging in such behaviour. PMID:18647420

  10. Deteriorating child health in countries with severe AIDS epidemics: forecasts and challenges.

    PubMed

    Foster, G

    1997-10-01

    AIDS is having a major adverse impact upon child health. UNAIDS estimated that by mid-1996, worldwide, there were 3 million HIV infections among children and 9 million maternal orphans due to AIDS. At least 30 million children living with HIV-positive parents will probably be orphaned over the next few years. The author discusses the direct and indirect impact of AIDS upon children, using estimates recently published by the US Bureau of the Census. Countries with severe HIV/AIDS epidemics are experiencing rising infant mortality rates; two-thirds of AIDS deaths among children occur among those aged 1-4 years; life expectancy has fallen due to AIDS in Zambia, Zimbabwe, Uganda, and Kenya; and the level of orphanhood will increase as HIV spreads and the prevalence of AIDS rises. Child health, poverty, and challenges in the context of AIDS are considered.

  11. Competencies for Financial Aid Officers: A Competency Model for Professional Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woolf, Michael Neil

    2012-01-01

    Financial aid officers play a vital role in assisting prospective and current college students in enrolling and graduating from college. This study explores the competencies that financial aid officers need to be successful in their jobs. A survey of thirty competencies was distributed to 508 practicing financial aid officers in the Western United…

  12. Suicide Intervention Skills and Related Factors in Community and Health Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scheerder, Gert; Reynders, Alexandre; Andriessen, Karl; Van Audenhove, Chantal

    2010-01-01

    Health and community professionals have considerable exposure to suicidal people and need to be well skilled to deal with them. We assessed suicide intervention skills with a Dutch version of the SIRI in 980 health and community professionals and psychology students. Suicide intervention skills clearly differed among professional groups and were…

  13. Teacher education professionals as partners in health science outreach.

    PubMed

    Houtz, Lynne E; Kosoko-Lasaki, Omofolasade; Zardetto-Smith, Andrea M; Mu, Keli; Royeen, Charlotte B

    2004-01-01

    Medical school and other health science outreach programs to educate and recruit precollege students always have relied on successful collaborative efforts. Creighton University shares the value, significance, and strategies of involving teacher education professionals in several of its current outreach programs, including HPPI, Brains Rule! Neuroscience Expositions, and HHMI Build a Human Project. The education department partner serves as an essential team member in the development, implementation, assessment, and dissemination of these projects to promote science and mathematics achievement and interest in medical careers. Specific examples and mistakes to avoid are included.

  14. Ethics education for health professionals: a values based approach.

    PubMed

    Godbold, Rosemary; Lees, Amanda

    2013-11-01

    It is now widely accepted that ethics is an essential part of educating health professionals. Despite a clear mandate to educators, there are differing approaches, in particular, how and where ethics is positioned in training programmes, underpinning philosophies and optimal modes of assessment. This paper explores varying practices and argues for a values based approach to ethics education. It then explores the possibility of using a web-based technology, the Values Exchange, to facilitate a values based approach. It uses the findings of a small scale study to signal the potential of the Values Exchange for engaging, meaningful and applied ethics education.

  15. Categorizing Health Websites: E-Knowledge, E-Business and E-Professional

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Usher, Wayne; Skinner, James

    2011-01-01

    This article presents three types of health website categories (e-knowledge, e-business and e-professional) which are currently being used to disseminate health-related information, services and medical literature to the health consumer and professional. Moreover, criteria which have been used to establish a health website's category is…

  16. State variation in HIV/AIDS health outcomes: the effect of spending on social services and public health

    PubMed Central

    Talbert-Slagle, Kristina M.; Canavan, Maureen E.; Rogan, Erika M.; Curry, Leslie A.; Bradley, Elizabeth H.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Despite considerable advances in the prevention and treatment of HIV/AIDS, the burden of new infections of HIV and AIDS varies substantially across the country. Previous studies have demonstrated associations between increased healthcare spending and better HIV/AIDS outcomes; however, less is known about the association between spending on social services and public health spending and HIV/AIDS outcomes. We sought to examine the association between state-level spending on social services and public health and HIV/AIDS case rates and AIDS deaths across the United States. Design: We conducted a retrospective, longitudinal study of the 50 U.S. states over 2000–2009 using a dataset of HIV/AIDS case rates and AIDS deaths per 100 000 people matched with a unique dataset of state-level spending on social services and public health per person in poverty. Methods: We estimated multivariable regression models for each HIV/AIDS outcome as a function of the social service and public health spending 1 and 5 years earlier in the state, adjusted for the log of state GDP per capita, regional and time fixed effects, Medicaid spending as % of GDP, and socio-demographic, economic, and health resource factors. Results: States with higher spending on social services and public health per person in poverty had significantly lower HIV and AIDS case rates and fewer AIDS deaths, both 1 and 5 years post expenditure (P ≤ 0.05). Conclusion: Our findings suggest that spending on social services and public health may provide a leverage point for state policymakers to reduce HIV/AIDS case rates and AIDS deaths in their state. PMID:26605512

  17. Experiential Learning--from Theory to Practice. A Case Study Based on the Professional Awards in IM&T (Health).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bond, Christopher; Wilson, Valerie

    1998-01-01

    Britain's National Health Service has a flexible program for achieving professional qualifications in information management/technology in health care. It is based on the concept of professional artistry, a constructivist view of professional practice as a practical art. (SK)

  18. PET-Health as inducer of professional education to Unified Health System.

    PubMed

    Farias-Santos, Bárbara Cássia de Santana; Noro, Luiz Roberto Augusto

    2017-03-01

    PET-Health is configured as a program developed by health courses guided by the principle Unified Health System (SUS), with the preceptorship of a professional from health public service. The aim of the research was to compare the performance between PET-Health undergraduate of Dentistry, Medical and Nursing courses by the results of National Student Performance Exam (ENADE) in 2010 with those who did not participate in the program. The study population consisted of 49,758 students, which 761 participated in PET-Health. To analyze the performance of students in 2010 were considered the mean scores in general education, expertise skill and public health. Students who participated in PET-Health had superior performance in all means (55.48) when compared to those who did not (50.96). The shared investment between the Ministries of Health and Education in PET-Health, strategy involving students, professionals from public services and professor, contribute to the reorientation of health training, producing a great relationship between public health services and university.

  19. Integrating immigrant health professionals into the US health care workforce: a report from the field.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Peña, José Ramón

    2012-06-01

    Since 2001, the Welcome Back Initiative (WBI) has implemented a program model in ten US cities to help foreign trained health professionals enter the US healthcare workforce. This paper reviews how the WBI has worked toward achieving this goal through community needs assessment, the development of a comprehensive program model and ongoing program evaluation. Since 2001, the WBI has served over 10,700 immigrant health professionals. Of these participants, 66% were not previously working in the health sector. After participating in the WBI's services, 23% of participants found work in health care for the first time, 21% passed a licensing exam, and 87 physicians were connected to a residency program. As the US is facing a major shortfall of health care providers, the WBI is uniquely positioned to help fill a gap in provider supply with qualified, culturally aware, experienced clinicians that the current medical education infrastructure is unable to meet.

  20. Usefulness of a Tailored eHealth Service for Informal Caregivers and Professionals in the Dementia Treatment and Care Setting: The eHealthMonitor Dementia Portal

    PubMed Central

    Marinova-Schmidt, Velislava; Setzer, Manuela; Kondylakis, Haridimos; Griebel, Lena; Sedlmayr, Martin; Graessel, Elmar; Maler, Juan Manuel; Kirn, Stefan; Kolominsky-Rabas, Peter L

    2016-01-01

    Background The European eHealthMonitor project (eHM) developed a user-sensitive and interactive Web portal for the dementia care setting called the eHM Dementia Portal (eHM-DP). It aims to provide targeted support for informal caregivers of persons with dementia and professionals. Objective The objective of this study was to assess the usefulness and impact of the eHM-DP service in the dementia care setting from two user perspectives: informal caregivers and professionals. Methods The evaluation study was conducted from June to September 2014 and followed a before-after, user-participatory, mixed-method design with questionnaires and interviews. The used intervention was the eHM-DP: an interactive Web portal for informal caregivers and professionals that was tested for a 12-week period. Primary outcomes for caregivers included empowerment, quality of life, caregiver burden, decision aid, as well as perceived usefulness and benefits of the eHM-DP. Primary outcomes for professionals involved decision aid, perceived usefulness, and benefits of the eHM-DP. Results A total of 25 informal caregivers and 6 professionals used the eHM-DP over the 12-week study period. Both professionals and informal caregivers indicated perceived benefits and support by the eHM-DP. In total, 65% (16/25) of informal caregivers would use the eHM-DP if they had access to it. Major perceived benefits were individualized information acquisition, improved interaction between informal caregivers and professionals, access to support from home, and empowerment in health-related decisions (PrepDM Score: 67.9). Professionals highlighted the improved treatment and care over the disease course (83%, 5/6) and improved health care access for people living in rural areas (67%, 4/6). However, there was no improvement in caregiver burden (Burden Scale for Family Caregivers) and quality of life (EuroQol-5D-5L) over the study period. Conclusions Our study provides insight into the different user perspectives

  1. Health care professional workstation: software system construction using DSSA scenario-based engineering process.

    PubMed

    Hufnagel, S; Harbison, K; Silva, J; Mettala, E

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes a new method for the evolutionary determination of user requirements and system specifications called scenario-based engineering process (SEP). Health care professional workstations are critical components of large scale health care system architectures. We suggest that domain-specific software architectures (DSSAs) be used to specify standard interfaces and protocols for reusable software components throughout those architectures, including workstations. We encourage the use of engineering principles and abstraction mechanisms. Engineering principles are flexible guidelines, adaptable to particular situations. Abstraction mechanisms are simplifications for management of complexity. We recommend object-oriented design principles, graphical structural specifications, and formal components' behavioral specifications. We give an ambulatory care scenario and associated models to demonstrate SEP. The scenario uses health care terminology and gives patients' and health care providers' system views. Our goal is to have a threefold benefit. (i) Scenario view abstractions provide consistent interdisciplinary communications. (ii) Hierarchical object-oriented structures provide useful abstractions for reuse, understandability, and long term evolution. (iii) SEP and health care DSSA integration into computer aided software engineering (CASE) environments. These environments should support rapid construction and certification of individualized systems, from reuse libraries.

  2. Properties, promotive and obstructive conditions of multi-professional teaching and learning of health professions and non-health professions: an explorative survey from the perspective of teachers

    PubMed Central

    Schmitz, Daniela; Höhmann, Ulrike

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Care for people with dementia is considered a multi-professional challenge that requires a collaborative approach between health professionals and non-health professionals. Didactic strategies to ensure the same qualifications across these occupational groups are lacking. This article presents the joint learning of selected properties and promotive and obstructive conditions, using the example of a multi-professional Master's programme. It subsequently draws conclusions for didactic concepts. Methodology: The perceptions of 12 teachers on this Master's programme, all representing different professions, were determined by using a qualitative exploratory survey on the three stated dimensions. With the aid of a summarising content analysis, their statements were condensed and abstracted so as to deduce appropriate requirements for methodical and didactic learning scenarios. Results: In view of the fact that the students have very varied previous knowledge, the main challenge is finding a balance between expertise and tediousness. Establishing essential and common expertise, as well as sensitivity for different perspectives, is made particularly difficult by the fact that health and non-health professions differ greatly in terms of methods and approaches. For a successful outcome, the content focal points and didactic and methodical concepts for a learning group need to take into account the composition of that specific group. Recourse to didactic standard concepts is only possible to a limited extent. Conclusions: The aim of joint teaching and learning of health and non-health professionals is to enhance the understanding of a profession: This is done by making individuals aware of their role in the chain of care, so they can recognise and organise the mutual conditionality of their own and external professional contributions. PMID:27280137

  3. Mentoring health information professionals in the Department of Veterans Affairs.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, Susan S; Fenton, Susan H

    2008-04-07

    As a major employer of health information professionals, the VA faces significant recruitment and retention challenges. The authors evaluated mentoring as a retention tool through a review of existing literature and the retrospective review of a VA health information management mentoring program. The literature review showed a link between employer mentorship and employee retention, regardless of the nature and structure of the mentoring relationship. Most organizations support employees who are willing to serve as mentors through increased compensation, recognition, and other types of support. No literature was found that studied retention rates for more than three years after a mentoring experience. The review of the VA mentoring program showed increased retention in the three years following enrollment in the program, but the increase was not statistically significant. The review did not demonstrate improvement in retention over a seven-year period. The combined evaluation gives mixed findings for mentorship as a retention tool and demonstrates the need for more research on the topic.

  4. Writing skills enhancement for public health professionals in Rwanda

    PubMed Central

    Deonandan, Raywat; Sangwa, Nodine; Kanters, Steve; Nsanzimana, Sabin

    2017-01-01

    In 2013, Canadian scholars delivered a 1-week workshop to 30 junior public health professionals in Rwanda. The goal was to improve the Rwandans’ skills and confidence with respect to writing scientific papers for submission to international peer-reviewed global health journals. As a result of the workshop, there was a statistically significant improvement in participants’ reported confidence in many aspects of navigating the publishing process, but no improvement in confidence regarding statistically analyzing their data. Remarkably, as a group, participants were able to write an article for a leading international journal, which was subsequently published. Results indicate that similar interventions would be both successful and well received, especially if targeted to individuals at a similar stage of career progress.

  5. Opportunities for health and safety professionals in environmental restoration work

    SciTech Connect

    Norris, A.E.

    1991-01-01

    The safety of workers in waste management and in environmental restoration work is regulated in large part by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA). Many of the OSHA rules are given in Part 1910, Occupational Safety and Health Standards, of Title 29 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR). Section 120 of 29 CFR 1910 specifically addresses hazardous waste operations and emergency response operations. The remainder of this discussion focuses on clean-up operations. The purpose of this paper is to review areas of employment opportunity in environmental restoration work for health and safety professionals. Safety and health risk analyses are mentioned as one area of opportunity, and these analyses are required by the standards. Site safety and health supervisors will be needed during field operations. Those who enjoy teaching might consider helping to meet the training needs that are mandated. Finally, engineering help both to separate workers from hazards and to improve personal protective equipment, when it must be worn, would benefit those actively involved in environmental restoration activities.

  6. African traditional healers: what health care professionals need to know.

    PubMed

    Puckree, Threethambal; Mkhize, Melody; Mgobhozi, Zama; Lin, Johnson

    2002-12-01

    Traditional healing has always been a component of health care. In South Africa, traditional healers can obtain licences to practise but very little groundwork has been done to integrate Westernized medicine with traditional healing. The actual contribution of traditional healers to health care in the province of Kwa-Zulu Natal or South Africa is not known. This study determined the role of traditional healers in Durban, Kwa-Zulu Natal, the number of patients who consulted traditional healers, the types of conditions treated and the frequency of consultations. The opinions about physiotherapy of the patients who frequently consult traditional healers were also explored. Data were collected from 30 traditional healers and their 300 patients by means of questionnaires and interviews. The results show 70% of the patients would consult traditional healers as a first choice. Sangomas were the most popular type of healers and had as many as 20 patients per day. A significantly large number of patients consulted traditional healers for potentially life-threatening conditions. The patients knew very little or nothing about physiotherapy. We conclude that traditional healing is an integral component of health care in South Africa. Health care professionals need to be proactive in integrating traditional healing with Westernized practices to promote health for all.

  7. [Community participation. Some perspectives on professional involvement in health programs].

    PubMed

    Pérez Mendoza, S; Ascanio, S V

    1990-01-01

    Action Community regarding health is but part of a long-term project started out back in the 1960. As far as Latin America was concerned the so-called experience did not work out; notwithstanding, it has become an Attention-Getter among the countries of the area once again. How so? Because of the Primary-Approach. Understood as an approach based on the global development of society, self-involvement lies at the cornerstone of the whole process. The health section gives full measure of the primary-approach theoretical framework and propose alternatives to get it of the ground. Professionals from the health section aim at "self-involvement" as activity performed willingly. Besides as it were, it should be supervised by experts. Nowadays the venezuelan government promotes action community claiming it will endorse the Primary-Approach on health granted the national health system bill is approved. Amid such context dentistry most meet the challenge of upcoming changes, so must fellow-dentists who, in the end, will dominate center stage. The process must narrow down to actions with will stem from its own dynamics along the way. Needless to say, these actions can not be easily foreseen, let alone do they guarantee success.

  8. Setting AIDS priorities: the need for a closer alliance of public health and clinical approaches toward the control of AIDS.

    PubMed Central

    Henry, K

    1988-01-01

    The approach to the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) taken by public health departments and clinicians varies. Public health programs often neglect the human side of AIDS while clinicians often overlook public health issues. Current research on AIDS has failed to address many fundamental questions including: the biology of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in semen; whether present antiretroviral therapy has any effect on sexual infectivity; and whether adequate counseling was given to persons in HIV discordant partner studies. These unanswered basic questions highlight how research efforts framed from clinical, basic science, or public health viewpoints may have too narrow a focus. Three suggestions are made: 1) additional studies about the biology of HIV in the genital tract need to be conducted; 2) clinical trials studying drug therapy of HIV infection need to assess effect on HIV in the genital tract; 3) clinicians involved in studies and care of HIV infection need to implement educational strategies minimizing transmission of HIV from their patients. More interaction between public health and clinical approaches toward AIDS is needed. PMID:3407822

  9. Marketing HPV vaccine: implications for adolescent health and medical professionalism.

    PubMed

    Rothman, Sheila M; Rothman, David J

    2009-08-19

    The new vaccine against 4 types of human papillomavirus (HPV), Gardasil, like other immunizations appears to be a cost-effective intervention with the potential to enhance both adolescent health and the quality of their adult lives. However, the messages and the methods by which the vaccine was marketed present important challenges to physician practice and medical professionalism. By making the vaccine's target disease cervical cancer, the sexual transmission of HPV was minimized, the threat of cervical cancer to adolescents was maximized, and the subpopulations most at risk practically ignored. The vaccine manufacturer also provided educational grants to professional medical associations (PMAs) concerned with adolescent and women's health and oncology. The funding encouraged many PMAs to create educational programs and product-specific speakers' bureaus to promote vaccine use. However, much of the material did not address the full complexity of the issues surrounding the vaccine and did not provide balanced recommendations on risks and benefits. As important and appropriate as it is for PMAs to advocate for vaccination as a public good, their recommendations must be consistent with appropriate and cost-effective use.

  10. Teaching vaccine safety communication to medical students and health professionals.

    PubMed

    Rath, Barbara; Muhlhans, Susann; Gaedicke, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    Not only the general public, but also those studying to become health professionals, are struggling to keep up with a growing body of evidence and increasingly complex information about the many different types of vaccines available to date. At the same time, a number of increasingly complex subjects of study are competing for their attention during undergraduate and graduate education. In many medical school curricula in German-speaking countries, the subject of vaccines has been entirely omitted, or is regarded a minor subtopic. During the studies, most medical school curricula in German-speaking countries do not offer obligatory courses and/ or hands-on training vaccinology in vaccination. In Germany, private pediatricians administer the majority of immunizations. Even during postgraduate training programs in pediatrics, which are largely hospital-based, vaccinations are rarely a topic, and vaccinology remains a "hobby" and a "field without lobby" lacking specific certification requirements. Studies of acceptance of vaccines among health professionals and medical students have shown that many may still have their own doubts and uncertainties about vaccines revealing a number of unanswered questions during their studies and postgraduate training.

  11. Health discourse and within-group stigma in professional BDSM.

    PubMed

    Lindemann, Danielle J

    2013-12-01

    This article directly deals with health and stigma within practices of erotic labor. Scant previous literature has focused on erotic laborers' perceptions of stigma and the ways in which regimes of stigmatization operate within their particular social worlds. I use the commercial BDSM (Bondage, Discipline, Sadism, Masochism) "dungeon" as a strategic research site to investigate these workers' conceptions and management of their own stigma, and I find that discourses about stigma are inextricably entwined with concerns about health and wellbeing. Data are derived from ethnographic fieldwork with professional dominatrices ("pro-dommes") who work in New York City and San Francisco as well as in-depth interviews conducted between September 2007 and April 2008. Counter to stereotypes of erotic laborers as violent or as vectors of disease, BDSM workers are in fact not only concerned about safety but professionally invested in it, reinforcing it through an identity politics of hierarchies of erotic labor. There are multiple implications of this work for public perception and policy-implications that could only be brought to light through the ethnographic method.

  12. 42 CFR 484.36 - Condition of participation: Home health aide services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... individual under the direct supervision of a registered nurse or licensed practical nurse. (2) Conduct of... at the discretion of the CMS or the State); (D) Has been assessed a civil monetary penalty of not.... The training of home health aides and the supervision of home health aides during the...

  13. Health Aide Education and Utilization: A Task Identification Study. Final Report. Volume 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilligan, Thomas J.; Sherman, V. Clayton

    A study of the Licensed Practical Nurse (LPN), Nurse Aide (NA), and Homemaker-Home Health Aide (H-HHA) occupations was conducted during 1972-73 in Metropolitan Washington, D.C. Questionnaires were administered to 600 LPNs, NAs, and H-HHAs in 30 health facilities who rated the frequency and importance of 346 tasks. Usable questionnaires numbered…

  14. Attitudes of health care students about computer-aided neuroanatomy instruction.

    PubMed

    McKeough, D Michael; Bagatell, Nancy

    2009-01-01

    This study examined students' attitudes toward computer-aided instruction (CAI), specifically neuroanatomy learning modules, to assess which components were primary in establishing these attitudes and to discuss the implications of these attitudes for successfully incorporating CAI in the preparation of health care providers. Seventy-seven masters degree, entry-level, health care professional students matriculated in an introductory neuroanatomy course volunteered as subjects for this study. Students independently reviewed the modules as supplements to lecture and completed a survey to evaluate teaching effectiveness. Responses to survey statements were compared across the learning modules to determine if students viewed the modules differently. Responses to individual survey statements were averaged to measure the strength of agreement or disagreement with the statement. Responses to open-ended questions were theme coded, and frequencies and percentages were calculated for each. Students saw no differences between the learning modules. Students perceived the learning modules as valuable; they enjoyed using the modules but did not prefer CAI over traditional lecture format. The modules were useful in learning or reinforcing neuroanatomical concepts and improving clinical problem-solving skills. Students reported that the visual representation of the neuroanatomical systems, computer animation, ability to control the use of the modules, and navigational fidelity were key factors in determining attitudes. The computer-based learning modules examined in this study were effective as adjuncts to lecture in helping entry-level health care students learn and make clinical applications of neuroanatomy information.

  15. The New York Needle Trial: the politics of public health in the age of AIDS.

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, W

    1991-01-01

    During the past 5 years, the exchange of sterile needles and syringes for dirty injecting equipment has gained increasing acceptance outside the United States as a potential means of reducing the transmission of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) among intravenous drug users. This article describes the controversy over attempts to establish a needle and syringe exchange scheme in New York City between 1985 and 1991. The response to a health crisis is used as an indicator of patterns of social and institutional practice. Advocates of needle exchanges had reached a stalemate with the promoters of law enforcement, and the strategic reformulation of the policy problem in terms of the research process seemed to offer a solution. The article discusses the practical limitations on designing and carrying out a controversial health promotion policy; the use (under constraint) of a restrictive research process to constitute--rather than simply to guide or monitor--public policy; and the potential ethical hazards of health professionals' seeking a polemical recourse to the clinical trial. The efforts to establish a needle exchange in New York thus illustrate more general problems for AIDS prevention. Images p1511-a p1512-a p1513-a PMID:1951815

  16. Collaboration in crisis: Carer perspectives on police and mental health professional's responses to mental health crises.

    PubMed

    Brennan, Alice; Warren, Narelle; Peterson, Violeta; Hollander, Yitzchak; Boscarato, Kara; Lee, Stuart

    2016-10-01

    For many situations involving a mental health crisis, carers (e.g. family or friends) are present and either attempt to help the person overcome the crisis or request assistance from professional services (e.g. mental health or police). Comparatively, little research has explored how carers experience the crisis, the professional response and how the nature of the response, in turn, impacts carers. The current study was conducted to explore these issues during individual interviews with nine carers who had previous contact with police and mental health services during a crisis response. Collected data described the definition and perceived impact of a mental health crisis for carers, how carers had experienced a crisis response from police and mental health services, and how the professional response had impacted on carers. Of importance was the finding that carers were often themselves traumatized by witnessing or being involved in the crisis, however, were rarely offered direct education or support to help them cope or prevent future crises. A number of carers described a reluctance to request assistance from professional services due to previous poor experiences. This highlighted the importance of implementing strategies to deliver more timely, respectful, specialist and collaborative crisis responses to improve carer and consumer outcomes.

  17. Hearing Aids

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Info » Hearing, Ear Infections, and Deafness Hearing Aids On this page: What is a hearing aid? ... the ear through a speaker. How can hearing aids help? Hearing aids are primarily useful in improving ...

  18. Demoralization in health professional practice: development, amelioration, and implications for continuing education.

    PubMed

    Gabel, Stewart

    2013-01-01

    Demoralization is a feeling state of dejection, hopelessness, and a sense of personal "incompetence" that may be tied to a loss of or threat to one's own goals or values. It has an existential dimension when beliefs and values about oneself are disconfirmed. Numerous sources describe high rates of dissatisfaction and burnout in physicians and other health professionals. This article reviews historical and empirical findings that describe the professional and personal value orientations of physicians and other health professionals. It reviews empirical and theoretical findings to consider the implications of conflict between these values and negatively perceived ethical and values orientations of health care organizations and commercial health care entities. Conflicts between personal and professional values of health professionals and larger health care related organizations and commercial entities with which they are associated may contribute to the development of demoralization and burnout. Physicians and other health professionals frequently experience values related conflicts with larger social, organizational or bureaucratic systems. These conflicts place health professionals at risk for demoralization and burnout. "Remoralization," or renewal of morale, depends on the reestablishment of the potential for fulfillment of one's values in the work environment. This depends on organizational, group, and personal efforts. Continuing education and continuing professional development programs should have a programmatic focus on the importance of a values orientation in health care and support program development aimed at recognizing, addressing, and reducing demoralization and its potential for negative health care consequences for health professionals and patients.

  19. Health economics: potential applications in HIV/AIDS control in Africa.

    PubMed

    Kirigia, Joses M; Sambo, Luis G; Anikpo, Emilienne; Karisa, Eddie; Mwabu, Germano

    2005-01-01

    There is growing evidence that HIV/ AIDS has enormous negative impact on health status and economic development of individuals, households, communities and nations in the African region. Thus, there is urgent need for various disciplines to demonstrate how they can contribute in curbing the spread of this deadly disease in the African region. This paper, using an extended version of Professor Alan Williams schema as the conceptual framework, attempts to demonstrate how health economics can be used to inform policy and managerial choices related to HIV/AIDS advocacy, prevention, treatment and management. It argues that the discipline of health economics (and economics generally) is extremely valuable in: measuring health impacts of the disease and interventions; evaluating the relationships between health care-seeking behaviour of individuals and health system specific attributes; the estimation of determinants of compliance of HIV/AIDS patients with treatment regimen; establishing of health institutions efficiency in combating AIDS; guiding choices of HIV/AIDS interventions; assessing the relationships between HIV/AIDS, development, poverty, and trade; programme planning, monitoring and evaluation; and assessing health system's overall performance. The paper is a modest attempt to show how the discipline of health economics can elucidate, and help in resolving practical and conceptual issues in HIV/AIDS control in Africa.

  20. Health professionals' familiarity and attributions to mental illness.

    PubMed

    Chikaodiri, Aghukwa Nkereuwem

    2010-01-25

    A few months from the time of this survey, the nearly completed inpatient psychiatric facility within the Aminu Kano Teaching Hospital's complex would be ready for admissions. Understanding the health workers' level of experience of mental illness and their likely behavioural responses towards people with psychiatric illness, therefore, should be a good baseline to understanding their likely reactions towards admitting such patients within a general hospital setting. The study, which used a pre-tested and adapted attribution questionnaire, was prospective and cross-sectional. Randomly selected health workers in Aminu Kano Teaching Hospital had their level of familiarity and attributions towards psychiatric patients assessed. The respondents showed a high level of experience with mental illness, with more than 3 in 5 of them having watched movies on mental illness before. More than half of them held positive (favorable) attributions towards persons with mental illness on nine of the ten assessed attribution factors. Almost all held negative (unfavourable) opinion towards intimate relationships with such persons. Attribution factors, "Responsibility, "Anger", "Dangerousness", "Fear" and "Segregation" were significantly related to the respondents' level of education (P<0.05). Marital status of the respondents related significantly to "Pity" and "Avoidance" factors (P<0.05). Having watched movies on mental illness significantly related to "Responsibility" and "Fear" factors (P<0.05). Programs designed to improve the health workers mental health literacy, and increased positive professional contacts with mentally ill persons on treatment, would further enhance their perceived positive attributions towards them.

  1. Professionalization and the experience-based expert: strengthening partnerships between health educators and community health workers.

    PubMed

    Gilkey, Melissa; Garcia, Cezanne Cochran; Rush, Carl

    2011-03-01

    The recent inclusion of community health workers (CHWs) in the U.S. Department of Labor's 2010 Standard Occupational Classification System provides an opportunity for health educators to reflect on their relationship with CHWs. The authors discuss the ways that health educators and CHWs differ in their orientation toward professionalization and employ the concept of the "experience-based expert" to highlight what they believe to be the unique contributions of CHWs. Finally, considerations important for health educators and CHWs as they work to advance supportive and complementary practices are discussed.

  2. Factors influencing korean international students' preferences for mental health professionals: a conjoint analysis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eun-Jeong; Chan, Fong; Ditchman, Nicole; Feigon, Maia

    2014-01-01

    Asian students comprise over half of all international students in the United States, yet little is known about their help-seeking behaviors and preferences for mental health professionals. The purpose of this study was to use conjoint analysis to examine characteristics of mental health professionals influencing Korean international students' preferences when choosing a mental health professional. Korean international students from three universities in the United States were recruited on a volunteer basis to participate in this study (N = 114). Results indicated that mental health professional characteristics, including ethnicity, age, professional identity, and training institution, were significant factors in students' preference formation; however, gender of the mental health professional was not found to be a significant factor in the present study. Ethnic similarity was the most powerful predictor of preference formation. Implications for promoting help-seeking and mental health service utilization among Asian international students are discussed.

  3. The role of health professional associations in the promotion of global women's health.

    PubMed

    Lalonde, André B; Menendez, Hector; Perron, Liette

    2010-11-01

    Health professional associations, especially those from countries with the highest maternal death burden, have vital roles to play in improving maternal and newborn health and in achieving the Millennium Development Goals 4 and 5. Possessing the knowledge, skills, and influence to positively impact practice at the service delivery level, they can also advocate for change at the policy level and lobby for higher priority and greater investment in the maternal and newborn health field at the national level. The ability of professional associations to assume this leadership is nevertheless contingent on their institutional capacities to achieve planned goals and objectives in support of their organizational mission and strategic priorities. Since 1998, the Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada (SOGC) has been supporting the capacity development efforts of peer professional associations in low-resource countries. SOGC's work in this specific area has led it to develop and pilot an Organization Capacity Improvement Framework (OCIF) that guides professional associations, incrementally, in successive cycles of capacity development. Building on capacity developed within previous capacity-building cycles, this article summarizes and reports on the recent outcomes of the Asociación de Gynecoloígia y Obstetricia de Guatemala's (AGOG) organizational development efforts and the impact they have had in positioning the association as an important contributor in national efforts to improve maternal and newborn health outcomes in the country.

  4. Teaching Health Sciences Students about Culturally Sensitive Communication between Health Professionals and Patients from Diverse Cultures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olivares, Mónica; Pena, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    As members of a nationally accredited research project (I?+?D+i) InterMED (ref.: FF2011-25500) being carried out in the field of Intercultural Mediation, we are aware of the mediator's delicate role in communicative interactions between health professionals and foreign population. Sales has pointed out the dangers of stereotyping minorities and…

  5. 75 FR 7610 - Office of Urban Indian Health Programs; Title V HIV/AIDS Competing Continuation Grants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-22

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Indian Health Service Office of Urban Indian Health Programs; Title V HIV/AIDS Competing Continuation Grants Announcement Type: Title V HIV/AIDS Competing Continuation Grants. Funding Opportunity... responding to an Office of HIV/AIDS Policy (OHAP), Minority AIDS (Acquired Immunodeficiency...

  6. Defining and Assessing the Competence of Health Care Professionals in France

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matillon, Yves; LeBoeuf, Dominique; Maisonneuve, Herve

    2005-01-01

    Introduction: During the past decade, the public, health care professionals, and governments have shown much interest in ensuring that professionals, specifically physicians, are skilled in their work and competent in managing health care organizations. The need to assess competence in the health care sector was explored, with the aim of proposing…

  7. 75 FR 7218 - Payment for Inpatient and Outpatient Health Care Professional Services at Non-Departmental...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-18

    ... AFFAIRS 38 CFR Part 17 RIN 2900-AN37 Payment for Inpatient and Outpatient Health Care Professional... calculate VA payments for inpatient and outpatient health care professional services and other medical... other health facility furnishing the care or services if such care or services were provided in...

  8. Teachers' Aides Working in Secondary School Settings: Preparedness and Professional Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibson, Dianne; Paatsch, Louise; Toe, Dianne; Wells, Muriel; Rawolle, Shaun

    2015-01-01

    In Victoria, Australia teachers' aides (TAs) are employed to provide support to students with disabilities in accessing their education. The role of the TAs varies within and across school settings. Drawing from the findings of a quantitative study, the purpose of this paper is to develop an understanding of teachers' aides' perceptions of their…

  9. Treating the elite athlete: anti-doping information for the health professional.

    PubMed

    Tandon, Shikha; Bowers, Larry D; Fedoruk, Matthew N

    2015-01-01

    Physicians and health professionals are a vital component in preserving the integrity of competition and the core principles of true sport. When treating an athlete, health professionals need to be cognizant of the anti-doping rules of the relevant sport organization. This review aims to provide an overview of the World Anti-Doping Agency Prohibited List, Therapeutic Use Exemptions, roles and responsibilities of the health professional, as well as provide resources that will guide their work with athletes.

  10. Time, dual roles, and departments of public health: lessons learned in CBPR by an AIDS service organization.

    PubMed

    Cole, Christopher A; Edelman, E Jennifer; Boshnack, Nicholas; Jenkins, Heidi; Richardson, Wanda; Rosenthal, Marjorie S

    2013-01-01

    Community-based participatory research (CBPR) is an important approach to inform the development and implementation of HIV/AIDS prevention and treatment strategies. However, there is a paucity of literature describing CBPR from the perspective of community-based organizations (CBOs), specifically AIDS service organizations (ASO). Focusing on the perspective of the executive director (ED) from the partnering ASO, we describe in this paper lessons learned during Project Counseling Others About Contacts and Exposures with HIV (COACH), a CBPR, qualitative study intended to examine perspectives and experiences of professionals and clients regarding partner notification (PN) for HIV. Specifically, we describe opportunities and challenges associated with the time investment, balancing a dual role of service provider and researcher, and partnering with the department of public health. This description of the perspective of the ED from the ASO and the associated lessons learned may inform the actions of other CBOs, including ASOs, considering partnering with academic institutions for CBPR.

  11. Caregiver alcohol use and mental health among children orphaned by HIV/AIDS in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Jardin, Charles; Marais, Lochner; Bakhshaie, Jafar; Skinner, Donald; Neighbors, Clayton; Zvolensky, Michael; Sharp, Carla

    2017-03-01

    Research in the developed world suggests that parental alcohol use negatively impacts child mental health. However, little research has examined these relations among children in the developing world and no studies to date have done so in the context of AIDS-orphanhood. Therefore, the present study tested the interactive effect of AIDS-orphan status with caregiver alcohol use on child mental health. The sample included 742 children (51.2% female; Mage = 9.18; age range: 7-11 years; 29.8 AIDS-orphans; 36.8% orphaned by causes other than AIDS; 33.4% non-orphaned) recruited from Mangaung in the Free State Province of South Africa. Child mental health was assessed via child self-report, caregiver, and teacher reports; and caregiver alcohol use via self-report. Path analyses, via structural equation modeling, revealed significant direct effects for AIDS-orphan status on caregiver-reported child mental health; and for caregiver alcohol-use problems on teacher-reported child mental health. However, the interaction effect of AIDS-orphan status with caregiver alcohol use did not reach significance on all three reports of child mental health problems. These results suggest that orphan status and caregiver alcohol use may independently relate to mental health problems in children and that the effects of both should be considered in the context of the mental health needs of children in AIDS-affected countries.

  12. Mapping competencies for the multiskilled health care professional: an allied health curriculum reform project.

    PubMed

    Sherrill, Windsor W; Keels-Williams, Frankie

    2005-01-01

    Health care organizations increasingly face the pressures of meeting the needs of patients while responding to the financial pressures of cost containment and quality optimization. One strategy that health care providers use to adapt to the changing environment is multiskilling. Multi-skilled health care technicians are trained to perform multiple tasks so that they can be deployed more efficiently within health care organizations. Multiskilling can provide numerous benefits to providers, organizations, and patients, but appropriate training for such individuals is critical. The Multiskilled Competencies Development Project was initiated to identify professional standards for entry-level multi-skilled health care technicians. The project was designed to meet the training needs of multiskilled workers through improved allied health curricula. The results of the DACUM (Developing a Curriculum) competency profile for multiskilled health care technicians are presented.

  13. Exploring Canadians' and Europeans' Health Care Professionals' Perception of Biological Risks, Patient Safety, and Professional's Safety Practices.

    PubMed

    Bernard, Laurence; Bernard, Agnès; Biron, Alain; Lavoie-Tremblay, Mélanie

    2017-04-03

    Patient safety has become a worldwide concern in relation to infectious diseases (Ebola/severe acute respiratory syndrome/flu). During the pandemic, different sanitary responses were documented between Europe and North America in terms of vaccination and compliance with infection prevention and control measures. The purpose of this study was to explore the health care professional's perceptions of biological risks, patient safety, and their practices in European and Canadian health care facilities. A qualitative-descriptive design was used to explore the perceptions of biological risks and patient safety practices among health care professionals in 3 different facilities. Interviews (n = 39) were conducted with health care professionals in Canada and Europe. The thematic analysis pinpointed 3 main themes: risk and infectious disease, patient safety, and occupational health and safety. These themes fit within safety cultures described by participants: individual culture, blame culture, and collaborative culture. The preventive terminology used in the European health care facility focuses on hospital hygiene from the perspective of environmental risk (individual culture). In Canadian health care facilities, the focus was on risk management for infection prevention either from a punitive perspective (blame culture) or from a collaborative perspective (collaborative culture). This intercultural dialogue described the contextual realities on different continents regarding the perceptions of health care professionals about risks and infections.

  14. Evaluating knowledge about human papillomavirus infection among Brazilian health professionals.

    PubMed

    Villar, Livia Melo; Rabello, Aline Dutra; de Paula, Vanessa Salete

    2011-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is one of the most common sexually transmitted diseases worldwide. Although two safe and clinically effective vaccines against HPV have been developed, they are not available to the public health network in Brazil. This study was performed to assess knowledge about HPV among seventy-nine professionals who completed a questionnaire about diagnosis, transmission, symptoms, prevention and general information. General knowledge about HPV was high, as most of them recognized that HPV is transmitted sexually (98.7%), the disease can be asymptomatic (82.3%) or warts can be present on the genitals (84.8 ) and the Pap smear is the screening method to identify cellular changes on the cervix (88.6%). However, many professionals did not know that there are now vaccines available for many HPV variants (38.0%) and that not all of them are oncogenic (44.3%). These data show that further educational programs, especially about HPV prevention, are needed in Brazil.

  15. Trust in the health care professional and health outcome: A meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Gaab, Jens; Kossowsky, Joe; Hasler, Sebastian; Krummenacher, Peter; Werner, Christoph; Gerger, Heike

    2017-01-01

    Objective To examine whether patients’ trust in the health care professional is associated with health outcomes. Study selection We searched 4 major electronic databases for studies that reported quantitative data on the association between trust in the health care professional and health outcome. We screened the full-texts of 400 publications and included 47 studies in our meta-analysis. Data extraction and data synthesis We conducted random effects meta-analyses and meta-regressions and calculated correlation coefficients with corresponding 95% confidence intervals. Two interdependent researchers assessed the quality of the included studies using the Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology guidelines. Results Overall, we found a small to moderate correlation between trust and health outcomes (r = 0.24, 95% CI: 0.19–0.29). Subgroup analyses revealed a moderate correlation between trust and self-rated subjective health outcomes (r = 0.30, 0.24–0.35). Correlations between trust and objective (r = -0.02, -0.08–0.03) as well as observer-rated outcomes (r = 0.10, -0.16–0.36) were non-significant. Exploratory analyses showed a large correlation between trust and patient satisfaction and somewhat smaller correlations with health behaviours, quality of life and symptom severity. Heterogeneity was small to moderate across the analyses. Conclusions From a clinical perspective, patients reported more beneficial health behaviours, less symptoms and higher quality of life and to be more satisfied with treatment when they had higher trust in their health care professional. There was evidence for upward bias in the summarized results. Prospective studies are required to deepen our understanding of the complex interplay between trust and health outcomes. PMID:28170443

  16. Nigeria's National Health Act: An assessment of health professionals' knowledge and perception

    PubMed Central

    Enabulele, Osahon; Enabulele, Joan Emien

    2016-01-01

    Background: Nigeria's National Health Act 2014 (NHA 2014) was signed into law on October 31, 2014. It provides a legal framework for the regulation, development, and management of Nigeria's Health System. This study assessed the knowledge and perception of the NHA 2014 by health professionals. Materials and Methods: This was a descriptive, cross-sectional, questionnaire-based study conducted in December 2015, in Ota, Ogun State, Nigeria. Data entry and analysis were done using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences version 16 (IBM SPSS, Chicago, IL, USA) statistical software, with Pearson's Chi-square, which is used to determine the associations between variables. Statistical significance was set at a P < 0.05. Results: The study population comprised 130 health professionals (medical doctors/dentists, nurses, pharmacists, laboratory scientists, and other health-related professionals) in attendance at a medical conference. The respondents' age ranged from 21 to 75 years with a mean age of 44.53 ± 12.46 years. Medical practitioners accounted for 82.3% of the respondents. Although most (79.2%) respondents had a good perception of the NHA 2014 with majority (86.2%) claiming they were aware of the act, majority (73.8%) exhibited poor knowledge of the act. A little more than half (53.1%) of the respondents believed that the NHA 2014 will help to reduce strike actions in the health sector. Conclusion: Although health professionals in Nigeria have good awareness and perception of the NHA 2014, their knowledge of the Act is poor. PMID:27833244

  17. Occupational Risks and Exposures Among Wildlife Health Professionals.

    PubMed

    Garland-Lewis, Gemina; Whittier, Christopher; Murray, Suzan; Trufan, Sally; Rabinowitz, Peter M

    2017-03-01

    Most emerging infectious diseases are zoonotic in origin, with wildlife a frequent source of zoonotic disease events. Although individuals with extensive wildlife contact may be at the greatest risk of contracting novel infectious agents, the occupational risk of those working closely with wildlife has not been well studied. This study assessed the occupational exposures among wildlife health professionals working in multiple countries worldwide. An occupational risk survey of past and present exposures was developed and administered online in a confidential manner to wildlife workers recruited through an ongoing international wildlife pathogen surveillance project. Surveys were completed by 71 participants in 14 countries. Significant lifetime exposures reported included bites from bats and rodents and touching dead animals. Completion of training in occupational safety was reported by 75% of respondents. While gloves were used for most tasks, use of N95 respirators and other personal protective equipment varied by task. Eighty percent of workers reported rabies vaccination. Some respondents indicated interest in enhanced occupational health services targeting their unique needs. Wildlife workers represent an occupational population at risk of zoonotic infection and injury. Enhanced occupational health services targeting wildlife workers could reduce the risk and sequelae of zoonotic exposure and infection.

  18. Collaboration between health professionals in the era of antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Chetty, Verusia; Maharaj, Sonil S

    2013-01-01

    After antiretroviral therapy (ART) became available in South Africa, persons living with HIV (PLWH) began to survive, but they often experienced disability as a result of their illness and treatments. Management of HIV is more often successful with a holistic approach including medicine, rehabilitation, and social care. There is limited literature on collaborations between nurses and allied health professionals in the rehabilitation of PLWH, with no documentation of partnerships between nurses and physiotherapists in high-HIV burdened countries. We investigated the collaboration between nurses and physiotherapists in the rehabilitation of PLWH. We conducted two focus groups with experienced nurses at two residential facilities for PLWH in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa, using Van Manen's pedagogy on interpretive phenomenology as the conceptual framework. Three barriers to collaboration were found: role governance, environmental structure, and organizational variance. Education and in-service programs and workshops were suggested to curb the divide.

  19. Development of critically reflective dialogues in communities of health professionals.

    PubMed

    de Groot, Esther; Endedijk, Maaike; Jaarsma, Debbie; van Beukelen, Peter; Simons, Robert-Jan

    2013-10-01

    Critically reflective dialogues (CRD) are important for knowledge sharing and creating meaning in communities. CRD includes different aspects: being open about mistakes, critical opinion sharing, asking for and giving feedback, experimentation, challenging groupthink and research utilisation. In this article we explore whether CRD aspects change over time, through a study of two dialogues each from six different communities of veterinary health professionals. Change was studied from the perspective of observations, through analysing transcripts of dialogues, and from the perspective of community members' perceptions, through an evaluative discussion with members. The results showed that some communities became more open about mistakes, a finding that is related to an increase in trust. Other observed aspects of CRD seemed to be fairly stable over time. Community members perceived research utilisation and asking for and giving feedback to have been increased. From an analysis of perceptions of the community members it emerged that limited interaction could be associated with the epistemological conceptions of community members.

  20. Sexuality beliefs among Cambodians: implications for health care professionals.

    PubMed

    Kulig, J C

    1994-01-01

    An ethnographic study was conducted among 53 Cambodian women and men to generate information about the sexuality beliefs of this group. Major themes included the relationship between women's sexuality and family honor, the acceptance of pregnancy as inevitable, and the limited discussion of sexuality among intimate friends and family members. During the war, sexuality was controlled by the Khmer Rouge when family life was restructured. Personnel in the refugee camps introduced the concept of family planning to Cambodians, exposing them not only to new information, but also to discussion of an intimate topic with strangers. The resettlement experience continues this trend while rumors about family planning methods continue and premarital pregnancies occur. Health care professionals who work with Cambodians need to do so in collaboration and conjunction with the community.

  1. Factors impacting HPV vaccination: lessons for health care professionals.

    PubMed

    Hofstetter, Annika M; Rosenthal, Susan L

    2014-08-01

    HPV infection leads to significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. The HPV vaccine is currently licensed and recommended for adolescents and young adults in many countries. Nonetheless, coverage levels remain low, especially in settings using a clinic-based rather than school-based delivery model. Health care professionals (HCPs) have the potential to strongly impact HPV vaccine acceptability and uptake, yet often fail to discuss and/or strongly recommend HPV vaccination. This article reviews the myriad factors that influence HPV vaccination, focusing, in particular, on those relevant to HCP communication with patients and families. It also provides a historical framework and highlights recent evidence related to HPV vaccination that may be valuable for these conversations. Lastly, it discusses strategies targeting HCPs and their practices that may increase HPV vaccination initiation and completion rates globally.

  2. Role of concept map in teaching general awareness and pharmacotherapy of HIV/AIDS among second professional medical students

    PubMed Central

    Bala, Suman; Dhasmana, D. C.; Kalra, Juhi; Kohli, Saurabh; Sharma, Taruna

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Medical students as future doctors will play an important role in caring for HIV-infected patients. This study assessed and evaluated the existing level of knowledge of MBBS students about HIV/AIDS given through lecture delivery methods and by use of concept map (CM). Materials and Methods: This study was carried out on 150 professional MBBS students of tertiary care hospital. A pretest was conducted by giving 10 multiple choice questions (MCQ) of general awareness and 15 questions regarding pharmacotherapy of HIV/AIDS. In between pre- and post-test, a session of 1-week integrated teaching module was organized. After completion of integrated teaching, 2 h session of CM on general awareness and pharmacotherapy of HIV/AIDS was taken. A posttest was conducted using MCQs and problem-based question (PBQ) to assess the effect of integrated teaching and CM on their knowledge about HIV/AIDS. Feedback was also taken from the students to regarding their views about CM. Results: There was a significant increase in student’s score in MCQ test after integrated teaching than pretest (P < 0.05). There was also significant improvement in PBQ score after CM than that of after integrated teaching (P < 0.05). Students’ perception about the effectiveness of CM was positive. Conclusion: CM can make a significant improvement in the knowledge of medical students and were motivated and developed interest in the subject. PMID:28031606

  3. Impact of "+Contigo" training on the knowledge and attitudes of health care professionals about suicide

    PubMed Central

    Santos, José Carlos; Simões, Rosa Maria Pereira; Erse, Maria Pedro Queiroz de Azevedo; Façanha, Jorge Daniel Neto; Marques, Lúcia Amélia Fernandes Alves

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: to evaluate the results of "+Contigo" training, developed by nurses and directed at 66 health professionals of integrated school health teams in Primary Health Care. METHOD: quantitative with data collection through the Suicide Behavior Attitude Questionnaire, administered before and after the training. RESULTS: significant increases were observed in suicide prevention knowledge and in changing attitudes of health professionals towards individuals with suicidal behavior. CONCLUSION: these results allow us to affirm that nurses hold scientific and pedagogical knowledge that grant them a privileged position in the health teams, to develop training aimed at health professionals involved in suicide prevention. PMID:25296153

  4. Primary Health Care Evaluation: the view of clients and professionals about the Family Health Strategy1

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Simone Albino; Baitelo, Tamara Cristina; Fracolli, Lislaine Aparecida

    2015-01-01

    Objective: to evaluate the attributes of primary health care as for access; longitudinality; comprehensiveness; coordination; family counseling and community counseling in the Family Health Strategy, triangulating and comparing the views of stakeholders involved in the care process. Method: evaluative research with a quantitative approach and cross-sectional design. Data collected using the Primary Care Assessment Tool for interviews with 527 adult clients, 34 health professionals, and 330 parents of children up to two years old, related to 33 family health teams, in eleven municipalities. Analysis conducted in the Statistical Package for Social Sciences software, with a confidence interval of 95% and error of 0.1. Results: the three groups assessed the first contact access - accessibility with low scores. Professionals evaluated with a high score the other attributes. Clients assigned low score evaluations for the attributes: community counseling; family counseling; comprehensiveness - services rendered; comprehensiveness - available services. Conclusions: the quality of performance self-reported by the professionals of the Family Health Strategy is not perceived or valued by clients, and the actions and services may have been developed inappropriately or insufficiently to be apprehended by the experience of clients. PMID:26487150

  5. A systematic review of missed opportunities for improving tuberculosis and HIV/AIDS control in Sub-saharan Africa: what is still missed by health experts?

    PubMed

    Keugoung, Basile; Fouelifack, Florent Ymele; Fotsing, Richard; Macq, Jean; Meli, Jean; Criel, Bart

    2014-01-01

    In sub-Saharan Africa, HIV/AIDS and tuberculosis are major public health problems. In 2010, 64% of the 34 million of people infected with HIV were reported to be living in sub-Saharan Africa. Only 41% of eligible HIV-positive people had access to antiretroviral therapy (ART). Regarding tuberculosis, in 2010, the region had 12% of the world's population but reported 26% of the 8.8 million incident cases and 254000 tuberculosis-related deaths. This paper aims to review missed opportunities for improving HIV/AIDS and tuberculosis prevention and care. We conducted a systematic review in PubMed using the terms 'missed'(Title) AND 'opportunities'(Title). We included systematic review and original research articles done in sub-Saharan Africa on missed opportunities in HIV/AIDS and/or tuberculosis care. Missed opportunities for improving HIV/AIDS and/or tuberculosis care can be classified into five categories: i) patient and community; ii) health professional; iii) health facility; iv) local health system; and v) vertical programme (HIV/AIDS and/or tuberculosis control programmes). None of the reviewed studies identified any missed opportunities related to health system strengthening. Opportunities that are missed hamper tuberculosis and/or HIV/AIDS care in sub-Saharan Africa where health systems remain weak. What is still missing in the analysis of health experts is the acknowledgement that opportunities that are missed to strengthen health systems also undermine tuberculosis and HIV/AIDS prevention and care. Studying why these opportunities are missed will help to understand the rationales behind the missed opportunities, and customize adequate strategies to seize them and for effective diseases control.

  6. Mental Health Professionals in Children's Advocacy Centers: Is There Role Conflict?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cross, Theodore P.; Fine, Janet E.; Jones, Lisa M.; Walsh, Wendy A.

    2012-01-01

    Two recent chapters in professional books have criticized children's advocacy centers for creating role conflict for mental health professionals because of their work with criminal justice and child protection professionals in children's advocacy centers as part of a coordinated response to child abuse. This article argues that these critiques…

  7. The impact of the US president’s emergency plan for AIDS relief (PEPFAR) HIV and AIDS program on the Nigerian health system

    PubMed Central

    Odekunle, Florence Femi; Odekunle, Raphael Oluseun

    2016-01-01

    The PEPFAR HIV/AIDS program has had noticeable impacts on the Nigerian health system. The impacts are presented using the World Health Organization (WHO) health system six building blocks. These include service delivery, health workforce, health information, medical products, vaccines and technologies, financing and governance. PEPFAR HIV/AIDS program has improved the delivery of prevention and care services for people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA). The most important measure of PEPFAR’s success is the availability of free ART in Nigeria for PLWHA who need this. The PEPFAR program has brought about increased political awareness of and raised the priority given to public health by governments and civil society through its scaling up response to HIV/AIDS. The scaled-up program has direct benefits on the health workforce by preserving HIV-infected health personnel’s lives so that they can live longer enjoy a better quality of life and return to their jobs; all of which invariably enhances the country’s health workforce. Moreover, the training and retraining in PEPFAR HIV/AIDS program have boosted both the morale and the skills of the health workforce. Considerable resources have been brought into Nigeria for scaled-up HIV/AIDS treatment by PEPFAR. However, this has contributed to the development of donor dependency syndrome by Nigerian government. There is a non-alignment between PEPFAR HIV/AIDS program and the recipient country’s health system. Attention to maternal mortality and other reproductive health services has suffered as non-governmental organizations (NGOs) pursue AIDS money and local governments receive signals from the political center to prioritize HIV/AIDS over other problems that are just as serious. A functional health system is important in prevention of the HIV epidemic. Hence efforts should be made to strengthen health systems. The PEPFAR HIV/AIDS program should be harmonized with the country’s health system for maximum impact. PMID

  8. The impact of the US president's emergency plan for AIDS relief (PEPFAR) HIV and AIDS program on the Nigerian health system.

    PubMed

    Odekunle, Florence Femi; Odekunle, Raphael Oluseun

    2016-01-01

    The PEPFAR HIV/AIDS program has had noticeable impacts on the Nigerian health system. The impacts are presented using the World Health Organization (WHO) health system six building blocks. These include service delivery, health workforce, health information, medical products, vaccines and technologies, financing and governance. PEPFAR HIV/AIDS program has improved the delivery of prevention and care services for people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA). The most important measure of PEPFAR's success is the availability of free ART in Nigeria for PLWHA who need this. The PEPFAR program has brought about increased political awareness of and raised the priority given to public health by governments and civil society through its scaling up response to HIV/AIDS. The scaled-up program has direct benefits on the health workforce by preserving HIV-infected health personnel's lives so that they can live longer enjoy a better quality of life and return to their jobs; all of which invariably enhances the country's health workforce. Moreover, the training and retraining in PEPFAR HIV/AIDS program have boosted both the morale and the skills of the health workforce. Considerable resources have been brought into Nigeria for scaled-up HIV/AIDS treatment by PEPFAR. However, this has contributed to the development of donor dependency syndrome by Nigerian government. There is a non-alignment between PEPFAR HIV/AIDS program and the recipient country's health system. Attention to maternal mortality and other reproductive health services has suffered as non-governmental organizations (NGOs) pursue AIDS money and local governments receive signals from the political center to prioritize HIV/AIDS over other problems that are just as serious. A functional health system is important in prevention of the HIV epidemic. Hence efforts should be made to strengthen health systems. The PEPFAR HIV/AIDS program should be harmonized with the country's health system for maximum impact.

  9. The impact of eLearning on health professional educators’ attitudes to information and communication technology

    PubMed Central

    Neville, Victoria; Lam, Mary; Gordon, Christopher J

    2015-01-01

    Background The use of information and communication technology (ICT) in health professional education is increasing rapidly. Health professional educators need to be responsive to health professionals’ information and communication technological needs; however, there is a paucity of information about educators’ attitudes to, and capabilities with, ICT. Methods Fifty-two health professional educators, enrolled in health professional education postgraduate studies, participated in an online subject with specific eLearning components requiring the use of ICT. They completed a pre- and postquestionnaire pertaining to ICT attitudes, confidence, and usage. Results Participants reported significant increases in overall ICT confidence during the subject despite it being high at baseline (mean: 7.0 out of 10; P=0.02). Even with increased ICT confidence, there were decreases in the participants’ sense of ICT control when related to health professional education (P=0.002); whereas, the amount of time participants engaged with ICT devices was negatively correlated with the sense of ICT control (P=0.002). The effect of age and health discipline on ICT attitudes and confidence was not significant (P>0.05). Conclusion This study reports that health professional educators have perceptual deficits toward ICT. The impact of eLearning increased confidence in ICT but caused a reduction in participants’ sense of control of ICT. Health professional educators require more ICT training and support to facilitate better ICT integration in health professional education settings. PMID:25678796

  10. Fetal alcohol syndrome related knowledge assessment and comparison in New Jersey health professional groups.

    PubMed

    Brimacombe, M; Nayeem, A; Adubato, S; Dejoseph, M; Zimmerman-Bier, B

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND There is a need to educate health professionals in regard to Fetal Alcohol Syndrome and Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders across many health and allied health fields. OBJECTIVE Conduct evaluations of educational programs designed to assess knowledge, attitudes and beliefs in relation to Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders (FASD) among health and allied health professionals in the northeastern United States. METHODS FASD related educational efforts were carried out and evaluated in New Jersey for various health-related professional groups over a four-month period using a common set of materials. Pre and post-test evaluation comprised 20 questions on FASD recognition, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention. Groups surveyed included nurses, social workers, counselors, therapists, clinicians and allied health professionals comprising physician assistants, dieticians, physical therapists, occupational therapists. RESULTS Results showed that a majority of health care professionals in New Jersey possess basic knowledge related to FASD and the effects of alcohol on a child in utero. They also had significant awareness of the importance of early diagnosis and the importance of reducing secondary disabilities. The study did however reveal areas for improvement in some professional groups. CONCLUSIONS FASD is the most important preventable cause of mental retardation. Health professionals attending workshops typically had a good basic understanding of FASD, though with some weaknesses specific to their discipline. Educational efforts in regard to FASD should be sensitive to the various health professionals engaged in preventing, diagnosing and treating FASD.

  11. [Professional values: a strategic component of health professionals. The contribution of decisional research at the Toulouse University Hospital Center].

    PubMed

    Péoc'h, Nadia; Ceaux, Christine

    2012-03-01

    The organizational involvement concept is often developed by many researchers and practitioners. This study is in the right inheritance of Allen and Meyer (1990) and Thevenet and Neveu (2002) works who all considered the involvement as "an affective or emotional attachment towards the organization such as an individual strongly involved identifies himself, reinforces his own agreement and enjoys being a member of the organization that employs him". The aim of this study was to demonstrate the impact of professional values (in terms of adherence to the purposes, norms and values of the establishment upon the subject's involvement in professional activities). 1538 health professionals practising in Toulouse academic hospital center have answered a questionnaire upon the subject's individual perception of his personal involvement in his workplace; the possible working impacts upon his own motivation, the perceptions upon professional values. Results indicate that if involvement is subject to professional values, it turns towards a double determination: technical and axiological or ethical. The professional and axiological dimension introduces a moral position and a cognitive framework that participates in the decision-making action : working together, creating a climate of confidence, trusting the group, and progressing for greater cohesion. The ethical dimension joins historic and humanist values: self respect and altruism; developing human values for oneself and for others. Specifying values is already a project in itself, in terms of consciousness. Understanding those impacts upon health professionals involvements' is also the aim to include the historical of our Care Project in collective interaction, alteration and construction purposes.

  12. AIDS Prevention and Control: Invited Presentations and Papers from the World Summit of Ministers of Health on Programmes for AIDS Prevention (London, England, January 26-28, 1988).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    World Health Organization, Geneva (Switzerland).

    Papers from the World Summit of Ministers of Health on Programmes for AIDS Prevention in this book include: (1) "Global AIDS: Epidemiology, Impact, Projections, Global Strategy," (Jonathan Mann); (2) "Modes of Transmission: The Basis for Prevention Strategies," (Donald Acheson); (3) "National AIDS Information Programme in…

  13. Language and Culture in Health Literacy for People Living with HIV: Perspectives of Health Care Providers and Professional Care Team Members

    PubMed Central

    Mogobe, Keitshokile Dintle; Shaibu, Sheila; Matshediso, Ellah; Sabone, Motshedisi; Ntsayagae, Esther; Nicholas, Patrice K.; Portillo, Carmen J.; Corless, Inge B.; Rose, Carol Dawson; Johnson, Mallory O.; Webel, Allison; Cuca, Yvette; Rivero-Méndez, Marta; Solís Báez, Solymar S.; Nokes, Kathleen; Reyes, Darcel; Kemppainen, Jeanne; Reid, Paula; Sanzero Eller, Lucille; Lindgren, Teri; Holzemer, William L.; Wantland, Dean

    2016-01-01

    Low health literacy has been linked to inadequate engagement in care and may serve as a contributor to poor health outcomes among people living with HIV and AIDS. The purpose of this paper was to examine the perspectives of health care providers and professional care team members regarding health literacy in HIV disease. A secondary data analysis was conducted from a qualitative study aimed at understanding factors that help an HIV positive person to manage their HIV disease. Data were collected from sites in Botswana, the US, and Puerto Rico. In the parent study, data were collected through focus group discussions with 135 people living with HIV, 32 HIV health care providers (HCPs), and 39 HIV professional care team members (PCTMs). SPSS was used to analyze quantitative data while ATLAS.ti was used to analyze qualitative data. The findings from analyses of the perspectives of HCPs/PCTMs suggested that linguistic and cultural factors were important themes in the exchange of HIV information between health care providers and PLHIV. These themes included ineffective communication, health seeking behavior, cultural facilitators, and complementary and alternative/traditional healing methods. Thus, this study suggests that language and culture have a major role in health literacy for PLHIV. PMID:27340564

  14. Language and Culture in Health Literacy for People Living with HIV: Perspectives of Health Care Providers and Professional Care Team Members.

    PubMed

    Mogobe, Keitshokile Dintle; Shaibu, Sheila; Matshediso, Ellah; Sabone, Motshedisi; Ntsayagae, Esther; Nicholas, Patrice K; Portillo, Carmen J; Corless, Inge B; Rose, Carol Dawson; Johnson, Mallory O; Webel, Allison; Cuca, Yvette; Rivero-Méndez, Marta; Solís Báez, Solymar S; Nokes, Kathleen; Reyes, Darcel; Kemppainen, Jeanne; Reid, Paula; Sanzero Eller, Lucille; Lindgren, Teri; Holzemer, William L; Wantland, Dean

    2016-01-01

    Low health literacy has been linked to inadequate engagement in care and may serve as a contributor to poor health outcomes among people living with HIV and AIDS. The purpose of this paper was to examine the perspectives of health care providers and professional care team members regarding health literacy in HIV disease. A secondary data analysis was conducted from a qualitative study aimed at understanding factors that help an HIV positive person to manage their HIV disease. Data were collected from sites in Botswana, the US, and Puerto Rico. In the parent study, data were collected through focus group discussions with 135 people living with HIV, 32 HIV health care providers (HCPs), and 39 HIV professional care team members (PCTMs). SPSS was used to analyze quantitative data while ATLAS.ti was used to analyze qualitative data. The findings from analyses of the perspectives of HCPs/PCTMs suggested that linguistic and cultural factors were important themes in the exchange of HIV information between health care providers and PLHIV. These themes included ineffective communication, health seeking behavior, cultural facilitators, and complementary and alternative/traditional healing methods. Thus, this study suggests that language and culture have a major role in health literacy for PLHIV.

  15. A Learning Health Care System Using Computer-Aided Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Cahan, Amos; Cimino, James J

    2017-03-08

    Physicians intuitively apply pattern recognition when evaluating a patient. Rational diagnosis making requires that clinical patterns be put in the context of disease prior probability, yet physicians often exhibit flawed probabilistic reasoning. Difficulties in making a diagnosis are reflected in the high rates of deadly and costly diagnostic errors. Introduced 6 decades ago, computerized diagnosis support systems are still not widely used by internists. These systems cannot efficiently recognize patterns and are unable to consider the base rate of potential diagnoses. We review the limitations of current computer-aided diagnosis support systems. We then portray future diagnosis support systems and provide a conceptual framework for their development. We argue for capturing physician knowledge using a novel knowledge representation model of the clinical picture. This model (based on structured patient presentation patterns) holds not only symptoms and signs but also their temporal and semantic interrelations. We call for the collection of crowdsourced, automatically deidentified, structured patient patterns as means to support distributed knowledge accumulation and maintenance. In this approach, each structured patient pattern adds to a self-growing and -maintaining knowledge base, sharing the experience of physicians worldwide. Besides supporting diagnosis by relating the symptoms and signs with the final diagnosis recorded, the collective pattern map can also provide disease base-rate estimates and real-time surveillance for early detection of outbreaks. We explain how health care in resource-limited settings can benefit from using this approach and how it can be applied to provide feedback-rich medical education for both students and practitioners.

  16. A Learning Health Care System Using Computer-Aided Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Cimino, James J

    2017-01-01

    Physicians intuitively apply pattern recognition when evaluating a patient. Rational diagnosis making requires that clinical patterns be put in the context of disease prior probability, yet physicians often exhibit flawed probabilistic reasoning. Difficulties in making a diagnosis are reflected in the high rates of deadly and costly diagnostic errors. Introduced 6 decades ago, computerized diagnosis support systems are still not widely used by internists. These systems cannot efficiently recognize patterns and are unable to consider the base rate of potential diagnoses. We review the limitations of current computer-aided diagnosis support systems. We then portray future diagnosis support systems and provide a conceptual framework for their development. We argue for capturing physician knowledge using a novel knowledge representation model of the clinical picture. This model (based on structured patient presentation patterns) holds not only symptoms and signs but also their temporal and semantic interrelations. We call for the collection of crowdsourced, automatically deidentified, structured patient patterns as means to support distributed knowledge accumulation and maintenance. In this approach, each structured patient pattern adds to a self-growing and -maintaining knowledge base, sharing the experience of physicians worldwide. Besides supporting diagnosis by relating the symptoms and signs with the final diagnosis recorded, the collective pattern map can also provide disease base-rate estimates and real-time surveillance for early detection of outbreaks. We explain how health care in resource-limited settings can benefit from using this approach and how it can be applied to provide feedback-rich medical education for both students and practitioners. PMID:28274905

  17. Professional roles of a health team: a view of its components.

    PubMed

    da Costa Saar, Sandra Regina; Trevizan, Maria Auxiliadora

    2007-01-01

    Based on the Theory of Roles, this study aimed to examine health team professionals' views on the role played by their colleagues. We interviewed 39 health professionals: 01 nutritionist, 02 psychologists, 02 nurses, 03 physiotherapists, 04 pharmacists, 10 dentists and 17 physicians. The results showed that the participants considered that teamwork shares responsibility, which relieves stress and is a way of learning; they also indicate that expectations regarding the professionals' role are not very clear and that most participants have little knowledge about their colleagues' professional role. The most clearly described professional roles are those of physicians, nurses and pharmacists. The most obscure is the psychologist's role.

  18. Leadership styles of service professionals aiding women of abuse: enhancing service delivery.

    PubMed

    Haeseler, Lisa Ann

    2013-01-01

    Leadership styles of service professionals--including social workers and teachers--in the area of family abuse were investigated. Leadership characteristics of the professionals were measured by their responses to a survey. Results indicated that the interviewed service professionals demonstrated productive leadership traits. Study findings are congruent with leadership styles described in the research. Holistic and collaborative services are required to enhance care for women of abuse, as their needs are multifaceted and complex. Specific leadership styles promote better care for women; leaders need to collaboratively initiate and deliver more interdisciplinary and unified service.

  19. Filipino Health Care Aides and the Nursing Home Labour Market in Winnipeg.

    PubMed

    Novek, Sheila

    2013-12-01

    Canada’s nursing homes have become increasingly dependent on immigrant health care aides. More than any other ethnic group, Filipino women are over-represented among health care aides in the Canadian health care system. This qualitative study explored the employment experiences of Filipino health care aides in nursing homes from their own perspectives as well as those of policy stakeholders. Fourteen in-depth interviews were conducted with Filipino health care aides and long-term-care policy stakeholders in Winnipeg, Manitoba. The results indicated that migrant social networks act as pathways linking immigrant women with employment opportunities in nursing homes. The composition of the labour force is also shaped by management strategies and labour market accommodations that respond to, and reinforce, these social networks. These findings have implications for workforce planning and the quality of care provision in nursing homes.

  20. Health Care Assisting Lesson Planning Guide for Long-Term Care Aide Certification. South Carolina Health Occupations Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Carolina State Dept. of Education, Columbia. Office of Occupational Education.

    This document consists of 13 competency outlines/lesson plans that have been developed for use in preparing students for certification as long-term care aides through South Carolina's health occupations education program. The following competencies are covered in the individual lessons: identify the function and responsibilities of nurses aides;…

  1. HIV/AIDS and Infections: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    MedlinePlus

    ... infections (OIs). There are many types of OIs. Tuberculosis and a serious related disease, Mycobacterium avium complex ( ... for Disease Control and Prevention) Also in Spanish Tuberculosis (AIDS.gov) Tuberculosis: The Connection between TB and ...

  2. Acceptance of health information technology in health professionals: an application of the revised technology acceptance model.

    PubMed

    Ketikidis, Panayiotis; Dimitrovski, Tomislav; Lazuras, Lambros; Bath, Peter A

    2012-06-01

    The response of health professionals to the use of health information technology (HIT) is an important research topic that can partly explain the success or failure of any HIT application. The present study applied a modified version of the revised technology acceptance model (TAM) to assess the relevant beliefs and acceptance of HIT systems in a sample of health professionals (n = 133). Structured anonymous questionnaires were used and a cross-sectional design was employed. The main outcome measure was the intention to use HIT systems. ANOVA was employed to examine differences in TAM-related variables between nurses and medical doctors, and no significant differences were found. Multiple linear regression analysis was used to assess the predictors of HIT usage intentions. The findings showed that perceived ease of use, but not usefulness, relevance and subjective norms directly predicted HIT usage intentions. The present findings suggest that a modification of the original TAM approach is needed to better understand health professionals' support and endorsement of HIT. Perceived ease of use, relevance of HIT to the medical and nursing professions, as well as social influences, should be tapped by information campaigns aiming to enhance support for HIT in healthcare settings.

  3. Diabetes Professionals Must Seize the Opportunity in Mobile Health

    PubMed Central

    Brandell, Brian; Ford, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    The number of diabetes management mobile applications (apps) available on the market has grown exponentially since 2009; however, most patients lack the skills necessary for finding relevant health care information. Thus, clinical best practices emphasize the need for ongoing patient education. Despite the importance of education in clinical guidelines, very few of these apps include education in their top functionalities. Most diabetes management mobile apps are not medical devices by definition, according to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, and therefore do not require clearance or approval for market, and very few have been subject to clinical evaluation. There has been little research on the use of diabetes management mobile apps, marginalizing the role of diabetes professionals and educators in a burgeoning market, hungry for information and an improved quality of life. Still, mobile technology holds great promise as a platform for self-management. Health care providers must not only educate patients about these resources, but take steps to ensure that mobile apps follow accepted best practices and guidelines. PMID:24351188

  4. Diabetes professionals must seize the opportunity in mobile health.

    PubMed

    Brandell, Brian; Ford, Christopher

    2013-11-01

    The number of diabetes management mobile applications (apps) available on the market has grown exponentially since 2009; however, most patients lack the skills necessary for finding relevant health care information. Thus, clinical best practices emphasize the need for ongoing patient education. Despite the importance of education in clinical guidelines, very few of these apps include education in their top functionalities. Most diabetes management mobile apps are not medical devices by definition, according to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, and therefore do not require clearance or approval for market, and very few have been subject to clinical evaluation. There has been little research on the use of diabetes management mobile apps, marginalizing the role of diabetes professionals and educators in a burgeoning market, hungry for information and an improved quality of life. Still, mobile technology holds great promise as a platform for self-management. Health care providers must not only educate patients about these resources, but take steps to ensure that mobile apps follow accepted best practices and guidelines.

  5. An Instrument to Predict Job Performance of Home Health Aides--Testing the Reliability and Validity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sturges, Jack; Quina, Patricia

    The development of four paper-and-pencil tests, useful in assessing the effectiveness of inservice training provided to either nurses aides or home health aides, was described. These tests were designed for utilization in employment selection and case assignment. Two tests of 37 multiple-choice items and two tests of 10 matching items were…

  6. Willingness of Health-Professions Students to Treat Patients with AIDS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Currey, Charles J.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    This 1988-89 survey of 319 students in the medical, dental, nursing, and allied health-care professions revealed that over one-third had reservations about treating AIDS (Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome) patients. Unwillingness to treat AIDS patients was strongly associated with homophobic attitudes. Education should emphasize methods for the…

  7. The UCSF AIDS Health Project Guide to Counseling: Perspectives on Psychotherapy, Prevention, and Therapeutic Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dilley, James W., Ed.; Marks, Robert, Ed.

    The University of California San Francisco AIDS Health Project has more than 15 years' experience in working with thousands of people with AIDS. This guide, developed by the Project, provides practical, state-of-the-art resources in the field. Part 1, "Risk and Behavior: Helping Clients Remain Uninfected," covers the following topics:…

  8. Talking about AIDS in Hong Kong: Cultural Models in Public Health Discourse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Rodney H.

    A study explored the issues of cultural identity and interaction in public health discourse concerning Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) in Hong Kong's multilingual, multicultural social context. Twenty public service announcements (PSAs) concerning AIDS awareness televised in both English and Cantonese in Hong Kong from 1987 to 1994 were…

  9. Job satisfaction, job stress and psychosomatic health problems in software professionals in India.

    PubMed

    Madhura, Sahukar; Subramanya, Pailoor; Balaram, Pradhan

    2014-01-01

    This questionnaire based study investigates correlation between job satisfaction, job stress and psychosomatic health in Indian software professionals. Also, examines how yoga practicing Indian software professionals cope up with stress and psychosomatic health problems. The sample consisted of yoga practicing and non-yoga practicing Indian software professionals working in India. The findings of this study have shown that there is significant correlation among job satisfaction, job stress and health. In Yoga practitioners job satisfaction is not significantly related to Psychosomatic health whereas in non-yoga group Psychosomatic Health symptoms showed significant relationship with Job satisfaction.

  10. Job satisfaction, job stress and psychosomatic health problems in software professionals in India

    PubMed Central

    Madhura, Sahukar; Subramanya, Pailoor; Balaram, Pradhan

    2014-01-01

    This questionnaire based study investigates correlation between job satisfaction, job stress and psychosomatic health in Indian software professionals. Also, examines how yoga practicing Indian software professionals cope up with stress and psychosomatic health problems. The sample consisted of yoga practicing and non-yoga practicing Indian software professionals working in India. The findings of this study have shown that there is significant correlation among job satisfaction, job stress and health. In Yoga practitioners job satisfaction is not significantly related to Psychosomatic health whereas in non-yoga group Psychosomatic Health symptoms showed significant relationship with Job satisfaction. PMID:25598623

  11. Attitude of Health Care Workers (HCWs) toward Patients Affected by HIV/AIDS and Drug Users: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Ledda, Caterina; Cicciù, Francesca; Puglisi, Beatrice; Ramaci, Tiziana; Nunnari, Giuseppe; Rapisarda, Venerando

    2017-01-01

    Caring for HIV/AIDS patients and/or drug users requires health care workers (HCWs) to have good knowledge of the issues. Cultural differences in HCWs, combined with professional ethics and personal beliefs, could also result in conflicting attitudes, leading to difficulties related to looking after people affected by HIV/AIDS or drug users. A cross-sectional study was carried out to assess the attitude towards HIV/AIDS patients and/or drug users in a sample of workers operating in a large university hospital in southern Italy. A total of 736 workers were surveyed from May to November 2016. During the periodic occupational health surveillance, a questionnaire was administered about attitudes of discrimination, acceptance and fear towards these patients. Respondents showed average levels of acceptance to HIV/AIDS and drug user patients. As years of experience and professional training increased, scores for discrimination, acceptance of HIV/AIDS, acceptance of drug users and fear decreased. Factors positively influencing levels of attitudes were being female and younger. Supplementary education is needed to strengthen the awareness of HCWs. PMID:28282937

  12. Attitude of Health Care Workers (HCWs) toward Patients Affected by HIV/AIDS and Drug Users: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    PubMed

    Ledda, Caterina; Cicciù, Francesca; Puglisi, Beatrice; Ramaci, Tiziana; Nunnari, Giuseppe; Rapisarda, Venerando

    2017-03-09

    Caring for HIV/AIDS patients and/or drug users requires health care workers (HCWs) to have good knowledge of the issues. Cultural differences in HCWs, combined with professional ethics and personal beliefs, could also result in conflicting attitudes, leading to difficulties related to looking after people affected by HIV/AIDS or drug users. A cross-sectional study was carried out to assess the attitude towards HIV/AIDS patients and/or drug users in a sample of workers operating in a large university hospital in southern Italy. A total of 736 workers were surveyed from May to November 2016. During the periodic occupational health surveillance, a questionnaire was administered about attitudes of discrimination, acceptance and fear towards these patients. Respondents showed average levels of acceptance to HIV/AIDS and drug user patients. As years of experience and professional training increased, scores for discrimination, acceptance of HIV/AIDS, acceptance of drug users and fear decreased. Factors positively influencing levels of attitudes were being female and younger. Supplementary education is needed to strengthen the awareness of HCWs.

  13. How Adolescents Use Technology for Health Information: Implications for Health Professionals from Focus Group Studies

    PubMed Central

    Biscope, Sherry; Poland, Blake; Goldberg, Eudice

    2003-01-01

    Background Adolescents present many challenges in providing them effective preventive services and health care. Yet, they are typically the early adopters of new technology (eg, the Internet). This creates important opportunities for engaging youths via eHealth. Objective To describe how adolescents use technology for their health-information needs, identify the challenges they face, and highlight some emerging roles of health professionals regarding eHealth services for adolescents. Methods Using an inductive qualitative research design, 27 focus groups were conducted in Ontario, Canada. The 210 participants (55% female, 45% male; median age 16 years) were selected to reflect diversity in age, sex, geographic location, cultural identity, and risk. An 8-person team analyzed and coded the data according to major themes. Results Study participants most-frequently sought or distributed information related to school (89%), interacting with friends (85%), social concerns (85%), specific medical conditions (67%), body image and nutrition (63%), violence and personal safety (59%), and sexual health (56%). Finding personally-relevant, high-quality information was a pivotal challenge that has ramifications on the depth and types of information that adolescents can find to answer their health questions. Privacy in accessing information technology was a second key challenge. Participants reported using technologies that clustered into 4 domains along a continuum from highly-interactive to fixed information sources: (1) personal communication: telephone, cell phone, and pager; (2) social communication: e-mail, instant messaging, chat, and bulletin boards; (3) interactive environments: Web sites, search engines, and computers; and (4) unidirectional sources: television, radio, and print. Three emerging roles for health professionals in eHealth include: (1) providing an interface for adolescents with technology and assisting them in finding pertinent information sources; (2

  14. Coordinated school health program and dietetics professionals: partners in promoting healthful eating.

    PubMed

    Gross, Sandra M; Cinelli, Bethann

    2004-05-01

    Although research indicates that school meal programs contribute to improved academic performance and healthier eating behaviors for students who participate, fewer than 60% of students choose the National School Lunch Program or School Breakfast Program. School meal programs have a difficult time competing with foods that are marketed to young people through sophisticated advertising campaigns. Youth's preferences for fast foods, soft drinks, and salty snacks; mixed messages sent by school personnel; school food preparation and serving space limitations; inadequate meal periods; and lack of education standards for school foodservice directors challenge school meal programs as well. A coordinated school health program offers a framework for meeting these challenges and provides children and adolescents with the knowledge and skills necessary for healthful eating. This article identifies challenges facing school foodservice directors in delivering healthful meals and acquaints dietetics professionals with the coordinated school health program to be used as a tool for addressing unhealthful weight gain and promoting healthful eating.

  15. Online Professional Profiles: Health Care and Library Researchers Show Off Their Work.

    PubMed

    Brigham, Tara J

    2016-01-01

    In an increasingly digital world, online profiles can help health care and library professionals showcase their research and scholarly work. By sharing information about their investigations, studies, and projects, health care and library researchers can elevate their personal brand and connect with like-minded individuals. This column explores different types of online professional profiles and addresses some of the concerns that come with using them. A list of online professional profile and platform examples is also provided.

  16. [Professional biological risk factors of health care workers].

    PubMed

    Gailiene, Greta; Cenenkiene, Regina

    2009-01-01

    Health care workers are attributed to the group at highest risk of biological factors, as they are daily exposed to fluids of the human body. The risk of sharps injuries and exposure to blood is associated with bloodborne infections. The aim of this study was to determine the frequency and type of professional biological risk factors, to evaluate the use of personal protective devices, application of immunoprophylaxis to health care workers in the surgical departments. METHODS. A retrospective study was carried out from January to June 2006. Data were collected in the surgical departments of Hospital of Kaunas University of Medicine. An anonymous questionnaire survey was performed. RESULTS. More than half (51.4%) of the respondents experienced sharps injuries, 62.1% were exposed to biological fluids, and 39.6% of the workers experienced both injury and exposure. In all cases, the hands were injured during sharps injuries. Exposure of healthy skin and eyes to biological fluids occurred in 63% and 20% of the cases, respectively. Majority of exposures were blood splashes (60%). Physicians most frequently experienced sharps injury during the surgery (79.3%), nurses - during the preparation of instruments (35.1%), supporting staff - disposing the waste (75.8%). Commonly physicians were injured by surgical needles (72.4%), nurses - by needlestick (72.4%), and supporting staff - by glass waste (60.6%). Majority of the respondents (86%) were not vaccinated with HB vaccine. No personal protective equipment was used by 14.5% of the respondents during sharps injuries and 5% during exposures. CONCLUSIONS. More than half of the respondents experienced sharps injury or exposure to biological fluids during the study period. Physicians and nurses experience sharps injury and exposure to biological fluids more commonly as compared to supporting staff. Hepatitis B vaccination is insufficient among health care workers.

  17. Young people's mental health first aid intentions and beliefs prospectively predict their actions: findings from an Australian National Survey of Youth.

    PubMed

    Yap, Marie Bee Hui; Jorm, Anthony Francis

    2012-04-30

    Little is known about whether mental health first aid knowledge and beliefs of young people actually translate into actual behavior. This study examined whether young people's first aid intentions and beliefs predicted the actions they later took to help a close friend or family member with a mental health problem. Participants in a 2006 national survey of Australian youth (aged 12-25 years) reported on their first aid intentions and beliefs based on one of four vignettes: depression, depression with alcohol misuse, psychosis, and social phobia. At a two-year follow-up interview, they reported on actions they had taken to help any family member or close friend with a problem similar to the vignette character since the initial interview. Of the 2005 participants interviewed at follow-up, 608 reported knowing someone with a similar problem. Overall, young people's first aid intentions and beliefs about the helpfulness of particular first aid actions predicted the actions they actually took to assist a close other. However, the belief in and intention to encourage professional help did not predict subsequent action. Findings suggest that young people's mental health first aid intentions and beliefs may be valid indicators of their subsequent actions.

  18. Survey of research activity among multidisciplinary health professionals.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Andrea P; Roberts, Shelley; Baker, Mark J; Keijzers, Gerben; Young, Jessica; Stapelberg, N J Chris; Crilly, Julia

    2016-02-01

    Objective The aim of the present study was to describe the research activities being undertaken by health service employees within one Australian health service and explore their experiences with undertaking research.Methods The present mixed-methods study was conducted across one health service in Queensland, Australia, and included a cross-sectional online survey and interviews with healthcare service employees. The anonymous survey was a self-administered online questionnaire, distributed to all 6121 employees at the health service via email, asking about research activity and engagement. Willing participants were also interviewed on their perceptions and experiences with research and capacity building.Results In all, 151 participants responded to the survey and 22 participated in interviews. Three-quarters of respondents reported actively participating in research over the past 6 years and several research outputs, such as publications, conference presentations and competitive grant funding, were displayed. Four concepts emerged from interview findings, namely collaborative partnerships, skilled mentorship, embedding research and organisational support, which represented the overall theme 'opportunities for a research-infused health service'.Conclusion Employees of the health service recognised the importance of research and had a range of research skills, knowledge and experience. They also identified several opportunities for building research capacity in this service.What is known about the topic? Building research capacity among healthcare professionals is important for enabling the conduct of high-quality research in healthcare institutions. However, building research capacity is complex and influenced by the uniqueness of organisational context. In order to successfully build research capacity among employees at any health service, current research activity, skills and experience, as well as staff perceptions around building research capacity in that

  19. Bilingual Glossary of Professional Mental Health Terms = Glosario Bilingue de Terminos Profesionales de Salud Mental.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cherry, Ralph, Comp.

    Designed to acquaint social workers and other professionals in the mental health field with the basic terms necessary for professional discussions, paper presentations, and international correspondence, the English/Spanish-Spanish/English glossary lists 130 selected mental health terms. The glossary includes two sections: English to Spanish and…

  20. 42 CFR 414.67 - Incentive payments for services furnished in Health Professional Shortage Areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Professional Shortage Areas. 414.67 Section 414.67 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM PAYMENT FOR PART B MEDICAL AND OTHER... amount paid for their professional services under the physician fee schedule. (4) Physicians...

  1. 42 CFR 414.67 - Incentive payments for services furnished in Health Professional Shortage Areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Professional Shortage Areas. 414.67 Section 414.67 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM (CONTINUED) PAYMENT FOR PART B MEDICAL... amount paid for their professional services under the physician fee schedule. (4) Physicians...

  2. 42 CFR 414.67 - Incentive payments for services furnished in Health Professional Shortage Areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Professional Shortage Areas. 414.67 Section 414.67 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM (CONTINUED) PAYMENT FOR PART B MEDICAL... amount paid for their professional services under the physician fee schedule. (4) Physicians...

  3. The Rural Texas Domestic Violence Health Professionals Education Program. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mountain, Karen; And Others

    The Rural Texas Domestic Violence Health Professionals Education Program (RTDVHPEP) was designed as an initial and circumscribed effort in the establishment of a comprehensive network of services for Texas victims of rural domestic violence. Immediate goals of RTDVHPEP were to provide rural health care professionals with knowledge and skills to…

  4. Health Professionals' Responses to Disclosure of Child Sexual Abuse History: Female Child Sexual Abuse Survivors' Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGregor, Kim; Julich, Shirley; Glover, Marewa; Gautam, Jeny

    2010-01-01

    This study reports on a postal questionnaire, conducted in 2004, with female survivors of historic child sexual abuse. The questionnaire explored their experiences of health professionals' responsiveness to disclosure of child sexual abuse history. Of 61 participants, aged between 22 and 65, 69% had disclosed to health professionals. Those who had…

  5. Substance Abuse among Health-Care Professionals in Rutherford and Surrounding Counties.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Sherri Reid; Heritage, Jeannette G.

    Drug abuse is a serious problem in today's work force. It is found in every occupation, from the entry-level employee to the chief executive officer. Among health care professionals alcohol is the number-one substance abused, prescription drugs are second, and cocaine is third. Substance abuse among health-care professionals in Rutherford,…

  6. Information Literacy for Health Professionals: Teaching Essential Information Skills with the Big6 Information Literacy Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santana Arroyo, Sonia

    2013-01-01

    Health professionals frequently do not possess the necessary information-seeking abilities to conduct an effective search in databases and Internet sources. Reference librarians may teach health professionals these information and technology skills through the Big6 information literacy model (Big6). This article aims to address this issue. It also…

  7. Developing Consensus on the CompHP Professional Standards for Health Promotion in Europe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Speller, Viv; Parish, Richard; Davison, Heather; Zilnyk, Anna

    2012-01-01

    Building on the CompHP Core Competencies for health promotion the Professional Standards for Health Promotion have been developed and consulted on across Europe. The standards were formulated to fit within the complexity of professional, occupational and educational standards frameworks in Europe as learning outcome standards with performance…

  8. Health Care Professionals' Death Attitudes, Experiences, and Advance Directive Communication Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Black, Kathy

    2007-01-01

    The study surveyed 135 health care professionals (74 nurses, 32 physicians, and 29 social workers) to examine their personal death attitudes and experiences in relation to their reported advance directive communication practice behavior. Negative correlations were found between collaborating with other health care professionals regarding the…

  9. Evaluating Long Term Impact of Nursing and Other Health Care Professionals Continuing Education Workshops.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henschke, John A.

    From October, 1977, through December, 1979, 13 one-day continuing education workshops were given by the University of Missouri Extension for nurses and other health-care professionals. A total of 520 different health care professionals attended the sessions, with multiple registrations bringing the total enrollment in the program to 925. Programs…

  10. Addressing the shortage of health professionals in rural China: issues and progress

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Jianlin; Ke, Yang

    2015-01-01

    Maldistribution of health professionals between urban and rural areas has been a serious problem in China. Urban hospitals attract most of the health professionals with serious shortages in rural areas. To address this issue, a number of policies have been implemented by the government, such as free medical education in exchange for obligatory rural service. PMID:25905487

  11. Domestic Violence Training Experiences and Needs Among Mental Health Professionals: Implications From a Statewide Survey.

    PubMed

    Murray, Christine E; Davis, Justin; Rudolph, Lin; Graves, Kelly N; Colbert, Robin; Fryer, Maria; Mason, Anita; Thigpen, Bernetta

    2016-01-01

    There is growing recognition of the interconnections between domestic violence and mental health, especially related to mental health concerns among those who have experienced domestic violence victimization. Despite high rates of mental health concerns among victims and survivors, many mental health professionals lack sufficient training to understand and address domestic violence in their clinical work. The North Carolina Governor's Crime Commission convened a task force to examine training experiences and needs among mental health professionals in the state. A statewide survey revealed that mental health professionals vary in their levels of training to address domestic violence. A key finding was that mental health professionals who had received any training in domestic violence reported engaging in more comprehensive assessment and intervention practices. Implications for future research, practice, and policy are discussed.

  12. Perceptions and practices of Angolan health care professionals concerning intimate partner violence against women.

    PubMed

    Nascimento, Edna de Fátima Gonçalves Alves do; Ribeiro, Adalgisa Peixoto; Souza, Edinilsa Ramos de

    2014-06-01

    This was a qualitative exploratory study with the objective of identifying perceptions and practices among health professionals in Angola concerning intimate partner violence against women. Semi-structured interviews were held with a senior health administrator, head nurses, medical directors, psychologists, and nurse technicians in three national hospitals in the capital city of Luanda. The perceptions of Angolan health professionals towards violence against women are marked by the cultural construction of woman's social role in the family and the belief in male superiority and female weakness. Despite their familiarity with the types of violence and the consequences for physical and mental health, the health professionals' practices in providing care for women in situations of violence focus on the treatment of physical injuries, overlooking the subjectivity and complexity of these situations. Recent inclusion of the issue in public policies is reflected in health professionals' practices and raises challenges for the health sector in caring for women in situations of violence.

  13. [Professional training and competency development for health promotion capacity building in Latin America].

    PubMed

    Arroyo, Hiram V

    2009-06-01

    The subject of health promotion professional training has raised a lot of interest in academic spheres, in professional organizations and in the health services sector at global and regional levels. Some of the topics that have stimulated regional dialogue and actions have been the following: developing curriculum and professional competencies for health promotion and health education academic programs; defining competencies and know-how in order to reorient health promotion capacity building initiatives for public health personnel; strengthening and increasing the academic and professional health promotion networks in Latin America; and organizing meetings and academic events and publications around the subject. During the academic years 2006-8, the Inter-American Coalition of Universities and Training Centers for Health Education and Health Promotion Personnel (www.ciueps.org) has been studying the different foci, competencies and characteristics of health promotion and health education professional training programs in the Latin American region. As part of this study, they have observed differences in curriculum foci between undergraduate, postgraduate and other levels of academic training and certifications. The Coalition as well as other Latin American entities has reiterated the challenges in the field of health promotion of professional training in the region. These include: maintaining an active forum to constantly refine professional competencies;expanding offerings at the different levels of health promotion training; developing courses on health-promotion-related disciplines; increasing the networks and academic exchanges between institutions in Latin America; encouraging the development of international courses on health promotion; increasing the production of theory and concepts on health promotion, health education and related practices in the Latin American context; improving dissemination of experiences in publications, at conferences and in

  14. Mutual Aid Agreements: Essential Legal Tools for Public Health Preparedness and Response

    PubMed Central

    Stier, Daniel D.; Goodman, Richard A.

    2007-01-01

    Mutual aid is the sharing of supplies, equipment, personnel, and information across political boundaries. States must have agreements in place to ensure mutual aid to facilitate effective responses to public health emergencies and to detect and control potential infectious disease outbreaks. The 2005 hurricanes triggered activation of the Emergency Management Assistance Compact (EMAC), a mutual aid agreement among the 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, and the US Virgin Islands. Although EMAC facilitated the movement of an unprecedented amount of mutual aid to disaster areas, inadequacies in the response demonstrated a need for improvement. Mutual aid may also be beneficial in circumstances where EMAC is not activated. We discuss the importance of mutual aid, examine obstacles, and identify legal “gaps” that must be filled to strengthen preparedness. PMID:17413085

  15. Global HIV/AIDS funding and health systems: Searching for the win-win.

    PubMed

    Levine, Ruth; Oomman, Nandini

    2009-11-01

    Donors, developing country governments, and NGOs are searching for ways to use funding for HIV/AIDS programs that strengthen the functioning of weak health systems. This is motivated both by the realization that a large share of donor funding for global health is and will continue to be dedicated to HIV/AIDS, and that the aims of more and better treatment, prevention, and care can be achieved only with attention to systemic capacities. For AIDS resources to strengthen health systems, decision makers should: (a) mitigate the risks that AIDS spending may weaken the ability of health systems to respond to other health problems; (b) find ways for procurement, supply chain, management information, and other systems that are created to support AIDS treatment to be broadened to serve other types of services; and (c) build upon the ways in which AIDS programs have overcome some demand-side barriers to use of services. In pursuing this agenda, donors should recognize that health system development is a function of the national and local political economy and place respect for national sovereignty as a central tenet of their policies and practices.

  16. Best interests decisions: professional practices in health and social care.

    PubMed

    Williams, Val; Boyle, Geraldine; Jepson, Marcus; Swift, Paul; Williamson, Toby; Heslop, Pauline

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports on data collected in 2011 from a national study about the operation of the best interests principle, a key feature of the Mental Capacity Act (MCA) 2005 for England and Wales. The objective was to provide a picture of current professional practices in best interests decision-making. Four contrasting sample sites were selected, in which National Health Service trusts, social care and other organisations were recruited to participate. A multimethod design was followed, including an online survey with 385 participants, followed by qualitative research through a telephone survey of 68 participants, and face-to-face semi-structured interviews following up 25 best interests cases, with different perspectives on the process in 12 of those cases. The current paper reports only on the qualitative findings. The findings indicate that the MCA was successful in providing a structure for these practitioners, and that the five principles of the MCA were in general adhered to. A variety of perceived risks led to best interests processes being undertaken, and a typical scenario was for a period of hospitalisation or ill health to trigger a best interests decision process about a social care and or a life decision. The study supported previous research in finding the notion of capacity the most difficult aspect of the MCA, and it provides evidence of some specific capacity assessment practices, including problematic ones relating to 'insight'. Best interests decisions were often made by consensus, with practitioners taking on different roles within the process. Meetings played a key part, but other ways of involving people lacking capacity and significant others were also important. It was recommended that the issues highlighted in this research could be clarified further in the Code of Practice, or within risk guidance.

  17. Expertise about herbs and dietary supplements among diverse health professionals

    PubMed Central

    Kemper, Kathi J; Gardiner, Paula; Gobble, Jessica; Woods, Charles

    2006-01-01

    Background Herbs and other dietary supplements are among the most commonly used complementary medical therapies. However, clinicians generally have limited knowledge, confidence and communication about herbs and dietary supplements (HDS). We compared diverse clinicians' expertise about HDS to better target future curricula. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional survey of physicians, pharmacists, nurses, dietitians and trainees in these professions prior to e-curriculum about HDS in 2004–2005. The survey had 28 questions about knowledge, 19 questions about their confidence and 11 questions about their communication practices about HDS. Results Of the 1,268 participants, 25% were male; the average age was 40 years. Mean scores were 66% correct for knowledge; 53/95 on the confidence scale and 2.2 out of possible 10 on the communication practices scale. On average, scores were lowest for those who used fewer HDS; and trainees and nurses compared with physicians, pharmacists and dietitians (P<0.01 for all comparisons). Conclusion Clinicians have moderate levels of knowledge and confidence, but poor communication skills about HDS. Future curricula about HDS should target nurses, students, practitioners and those not currently using HDS. Research is needed to determine the most cost-effective educational strategies for diverse health professionals. PMID:16646964

  18. Perception of Suicide Risk in Mental Health Professionals

    PubMed Central

    Gale, Tim M.; Hawley, Christopher J.; Butler, John; Morton, Adrian; Singhal, Ankush

    2016-01-01

    This study employed an independent-groups design (4 conditions) to investigate possible biases in the suicide risk perception of mental health professionals. Four hundred participants comprising doctors, nurses and social workers viewed a vignette describing a fictitious patient with a long-term mental illness. The case was presented as being drawn from a sample of twenty similar clinical case reports, of which 10 were associated with an outcome of suicide. The participant tasks were (i) to decide whether the presented vignette was one of those cases or not, and (ii) to provide an assessment of confidence in that decision. The 4 conditions were used to investigate whether the presence of an associated face, and the nature of the emotional state expressed by that face, affected the response profile. In fact, there were no significant differences between conditions, but there was a significant bias across all conditions towards associating the vignette with suicide, despite the base rate being pre-determined at 50%. The bias was more pronounced in doctors and in male respondents. Moreover, many participants indicated substantial confidence in their decisions. The results are discussed in terms of availability bias and over-confidence bias. PMID:26909886

  19. Perception of Suicide Risk in Mental Health Professionals.

    PubMed

    Gale, Tim M; Hawley, Christopher J; Butler, John; Morton, Adrian; Singhal, Ankush

    2016-01-01

    This study employed an independent-groups design (4 conditions) to investigate possible biases in the suicide risk perception of mental health professionals. Four hundred participants comprising doctors, nurses and social workers viewed a vignette describing a fictitious patient with a long-term mental illness. The case was presented as being drawn from a sample of twenty similar clinical case reports, of which 10 were associated with an outcome of suicide. The participant tasks were (i) to decide whether the presented vignette was one of those cases or not, and (ii) to provide an assessment of confidence in that decision. The 4 conditions were used to investigate whether the presence of an associated face, and the nature of the emotional state expressed by that face, affected the response profile. In fact, there were no significant differences between conditions, but there was a significant bias across all conditions towards associating the vignette with suicide, despite the base rate being pre-determined at 50%. The bias was more pronounced in doctors and in male respondents. Moreover, many participants indicated substantial confidence in their decisions. The results are discussed in terms of availability bias and over-confidence bias.

  20. Activity level and risk of overweight in male health professionals.

    PubMed Central

    Ching, P L; Willett, W C; Rimm, E B; Colditz, G A; Gortmaker, S L; Stampfer, M J

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES. This study undertook to examine relationships between nonsedentary activity level, time spent watching television (TV)/videocassette recorder (VCR), and risk of overweight among men. METHODS. Men participating in the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study were mailed surveys. Cross-sectional analyses examined the prevalence and odds of being overweight, prospective analyses determined cumulative incidence rates and relative risks of becoming overweight over 2 years of follow-up. RESULTS. Cross-sectionally, odds of being overweight were 50% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 45%; 55%) lower for men in the highest quintile of nonsedentary activity level when compared with men in the lowest quintile. Among men watching 41 or more hours of TV/VCR per week, the odds of being overweight were 406 (95% CI = 2.67, 6.17) times greater than those for men watching no more than 1 hour per week. Prospectively, higher levels is of nonsedentary activity and lower levels of TV/VCR viewing were independently associated with lower relative risks for becoming overweight between survey years. CONCLUSIONS. Both a lack of nonsedentary activity and time spent watching TV/VCR contribute to the development of overweight in men. Sedentary and nonsedentary activities represent separate domains, each with independent risks for overweight. PMID:8561237

  1. Depression and Burnout in Hospital Health Care Professionals.

    PubMed

    Martin; Poyen; Bouderlique; Gouvernet; Rivet; Disdier; Martinez; Scotto

    1997-07-01

    A cross-sectional study was conducted on a random sample of 1,200 health care professionals in Marseille, France, in order to assess the prevalences of depression and burnout, and to compare these two entities. Depression was assessed by the Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression scale (CES-D), and burnout by the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI). Burnout is a syndrome of emotional exhaustion, depersonalization towards patients, and reduced sense of personal accomplishment. Some psychiatrists consider burnout to be a clinical form of depression. The prevalences of depression and burnout were very close: 17.1% and 15.7% among the women, 19.4% and 22% among the men, but 6.5% of the women and 9.4% of the men were both depressive and burned-out. A correlation was found between the CES-D and the subscales Emotional Exhaustion and Depersonalization of the MBI. Multivariate analysis and logistic regression models showed that many demographic and subjective variables influenced depression and burnout in different ways.

  2. Publication planning: an effective corporate strategy to influence health professionals.

    PubMed

    2013-12-01

    Pharmaceutical companies integrate scientific publications into the communication strategies they employ to influence the practices of health professionals. In their"publication plan", pharmaceutical companies, or the communication agencies they hire, develop key messages to promote their drugs and then plan in advance how, when and where to disseminate them in medical journals or at conferences. Although their true intent is promotional, these messages must appear to be purely scientific, and are therefore disseminated as research articles, review articles, editorials, commentaries. Publication planning involves the use of "ghost" authors who work directly for pharmaceutical companies, but whose contribution is rarely acknowledged in the final published article. Key opinion leaders are recruited as the honorary authors of these articles, to which they have made little, if any, contribution. The criteria for authorship set by journals that publish primary research articles do not provide adequate protection against the practice of ghost and honorary authorship. Certain journals publishing primary research derive a large proportion of their revenue from selling reprints used by pharmaceutical companies to promote their drugs, especially by their sales representatives.

  3. More than First Aid

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schoessler, Sally

    2011-01-01

    The school nurse is an important member of the school team since school health services keep students in school, in the classroom, and ready to learn. Although school nurses are often seen as the people who deliver first aid at school, their role is much deeper and has such breadth that only a registered, professional nurse has the skill set to…

  4. Programs to Aid Unemployed Aerospace Professionals: Implications for Mid-Life Career Redirection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Velma Montoya

    The Rand paper on programs facilitating the mid-life career redirection of unemployed aerospace professionals is 1 of 20 policy-related research reports commissioned by the Division of Social Systems and Human Resources in the Research Applied to National Needs Program of the National Science Foundation. It is based on the evaluation of some 300…

  5. Competency Guidelines for Public Health Laboratory Professionals: CDC and the Association of Public Health Laboratories.

    PubMed

    Ned-Sykes, Renée; Johnson, Catherine; Ridderhof, John C; Perlman, Eva; Pollock, Anne; DeBoy, John M

    2015-05-15

    These competency guidelines outline the knowledge, skills, and abilities necessary for public health laboratory (PHL) professionals to deliver the core services of PHLs efficiently and effectively. As part of a 2-year workforce project sponsored in 2012 by CDC and the Association of Public Health Laboratories (APHL), competencies for 15 domain areas were developed by experts representing state and local PHLs, clinical laboratories, academic institutions, laboratory professional organizations, CDC, and APHL. The competencies were developed and reviewed by approximately 170 subject matter experts with diverse backgrounds and experiences in laboratory science and public health. The guidelines comprise general, cross-cutting, and specialized domain areas and are divided into four levels of proficiency: beginner, competent, proficient, and expert. The 15 domain areas are 1) Quality Management System, 2) Ethics, 3) Management and Leadership, 4) Communication, 5) Security, 6) Emergency Management and Response, 7) Workforce Training, 8) General Laboratory Practice, 9) Safety, 10) Surveillance, 11) Informatics, 12) Microbiology, 13) Chemistry, 14) Bioinformatics, and 15) Research. These competency guidelines are targeted to scientists working in PHLs, defined as governmental public health, environmental, and agricultural laboratories that provide analytic biological and/or chemical testing and testing-related services that protect human populations against infectious diseases, foodborne and waterborne diseases, environmental hazards, treatable hereditary disorders, and natural and human-made public health emergencies. The competencies support certain PHL workforce needs such as identifying job responsibilities, assessing individual performance, and providing a guiding framework for producing education and training programs. Although these competencies were developed specifically for the PHL community, this does not preclude their broader application to other professionals

  6. Gambling with Your Health: Predictors of Risk for AIDS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lasorsa, Dominic L.; Shoemaker, Pamela J.

    To examine risk for Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) in terms of risk-related behaviors, and to investigate the factors that may be involved in putting one at risk, a study conducted telephone interviews with 493 randomly selected adults (18 years or older) in Austin, Texas in the fall of 1987. Respondents answered approximately 40…

  7. Emergency Child Aid. Child Health and Safety Series (Module VI).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iscoe, Louise; And Others

    This manual for child care personnel in day care homes and centers provides a step by step review of what to do in common emergency situations. It is emphasized that the manual is not a substitute for the complete first aid course which every careperson should have. Initial sections of the manual focus on preparing for emergency conditions,…

  8. Empowerment of health professionals: how high level security education can raise awareness and confidence.

    PubMed

    Herbst, Matthias; Busch, Christoph; Pharow, Peter; Blobel, Bernd

    2008-01-01

    Setting up networks among physicians and other health professionals in virtually any medical discipline is an important part of establishing eHealth world-wide. Medical research strategies nowadays advance diagnostic and therapeutic knowledge and guidelines allowing patients to benefits. Patient data and samples are among the most sensitive information and must carefully be protected according to rules of ethics and professional discretion as well as national and international privacy legislation. A lot has been said about "patient involvement, patient empowerment". What about health professionals? How can they be involved and empowered to address the paradigm shift towards a personalized health service provision? Information and communication technology (ICT), medical devices, and software applications are not among the topics health professionals typically deal with while being theoretically and practically trained to diagnose diseases and treat patients. An ICT-based training and information provision is required to update the ICT skills of health professionals. The German CAST association provides such an information platform where health professionals attend applied computer security education events. This article aims at describing how ICT and security education is provided to health professionals, and how these training courses are designed, structured, performed, and assessed.

  9. Evidence-based practice training for health professionals in the Philippines.

    PubMed

    Dizon, Janine Margarita; Dizon, Ryan Joseph; Regino, Jocel; Gabriel, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Evidence-based practice (EBP) is integral in the health care system whether in developed or developing countries. Thus, all health professionals need to be trained in EBP. An EBP training program was conducted to health professionals in a developing country, the Philippines. The health professionals (medical doctors and allied health professionals [physical therapists and occupational therapists]) were working in hospitals in Manila, Philippines. The program aimed to build capacity in EBP in terms of knowledge and skills. The EBP training program was conducted as a 1-day face-to-face training. Pre- and post-test measures of EBP knowledge and skills were taken prior to and immediately after the 1-day training, using the Fresno test of evidence-based medicine for the medical doctors and the Adapted Fresno test for the allied health professionals. The EBP training program resulted in significant improvements in knowledge and skills for both the medical doctors (change in pre- and post-Fresno test measures, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 14.6-23.5; P≤0.05) and the allied health professionals (change in pre- and post-Adapted Fresno test measures, 95% CI: 32.7-38.5; P≤0.05). The EBP training conducted amongst the health professionals is an effective and tested undertaking in introducing EBP in developing countries such as the Philippines.

  10. PERCEIVED RACIAL DISCRIMINATION AMONG HOME HEALTH AIDES: EVIDENCE FROM A NATIONAL SURVEY.

    PubMed

    Lee, Doohee; Muslin, Ivan; McInerney, Marjorie

    2016-01-01

    Home health aides are one of our essential human resources in the U.S. long-term care industry but understanding whether home health aides experience racial discrimination in the workplace and, if so, which personal/organizational factors are associated at the national level has been unnoticed. Using a nationally representative sample (n=3377), we attempt to investigate the association between racial discrimination and personal and organizational factors. The study found the 13.5% prevalence rate of racial discrimination. The study findings from multiple regression analysis reveal that black home care aides are more likely than white aides to experience racial discrimination in the workplace, suggesting that racial disparity may be an additional barrier to our home health care industry. National chain affiliation and low income were also found to be associated with perceived racial discrimination.

  11. Finding health and AIDS information in the mass media: an exploratory study among Chinese college students.

    PubMed

    Walsh-Childers, K; Treise, D; Swain, K A; Dai, S

    1997-12-01

    Western health officials believe the incidence of HIV infection in the People's Republic of China is much higher than has been reported, but knowledge about the disease remains low. This paper describes a preliminary study of Chinese college students' AIDS knowledge and beliefs and of the acceptability of mass media for AIDS education. Focus group interviews of 73 Xiamen University students showed that the students used radio more consistently than any other media and viewed magazines as the best media source of health information. However, they expressed a general distrust of the health information media offer. They possessed quite a bit of accurate information about AIDS but also harbored many inaccurate beliefs. Most felt that their personal risk from AIDS was very low because they felt distanced--either geographically or morally--from those at risk. Disturbing numbers felt that fate, not individual behavior, determines whether or not a person contracts HIV. The paper discusses the study's implications for future research.

  12. 42 CFR 414.67 - Incentive payments for services furnished in Health Professional Shortage Areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Incentive payments for services furnished in Health Professional Shortage Areas. 414.67 Section 414.67 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES... 332(a)(1)(A) of the Public Health Service Act. (2) HPSA bonuses are payable for services furnished...

  13. 75 FR 20999 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Survey of Health Care Professionals' Awareness and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-22

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Survey of Health Care... Collection: Title: The Survey of Health Care Professionals' Awareness and Perceptions of the National Cancer... Response: Yearly. Affected Public: Individual adults. Type of Respondents: Health care providers...

  14. 42 CFR 422.206 - Interference with health care professionals' advice to enrollees prohibited.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Interference with health care professionals' advice to enrollees prohibited. 422.206 Section 422.206 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM MEDICARE ADVANTAGE...

  15. 42 CFR 414.67 - Incentive payments for Health Professional Shortage Areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... mental health HPSA are entitled to a 10 percent incentive payment above the amount paid for their... incentive payment in mental health HPSAs that do not overlap with primary care HPSAs are psychiatrists.) (d... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Incentive payments for Health Professional...

  16. Collaboration, credibility, compassion, and coordination: professional nurse communication skill sets in health care team interactions.

    PubMed

    Apker, Julie; Propp, Kathleen M; Zabava Ford, Wendy S; Hofmeister, Nancee

    2006-01-01

    This study explored how nurses communicate professionalism in interactions with members of their health care teams. Extant research show that effective team communication is a vital aspect of a positive nursing practice environment, a setting that has been linked to enhanced patient outcomes. Although communication principles are emphasized in nursing education as an important component of professional nursing practice, actual nurse interaction skills in team-based health care delivery remain understudied. Qualitative analysis of interview transcripts with 50 participants at a large tertiary hospital revealed four communicative skill sets exemplified by nursing professionals: collaboration, credibility, compassion, and coordination. Study findings highlight specific communicative behaviors associated with each skill set that exemplify nurse professionalism to members of health care teams. Theoretical and pragmatic conclusions are drawn regarding the communicative responsibilities of professional nurses in health care teams. Specific interaction techniques that nurses could use in nurse-team communication are then offered for use in baccalaureate curriculum and organizational in-service education.

  17. Perception of Environmental Risks and Health Promotion Attitudes of French Perinatal Health Professionals

    PubMed Central

    Marie, Cécile; Lémery, Didier; Vendittelli, Françoise; Sauvant-Rochat, Marie-Pierre

    2016-01-01

    The exposure of pregnant women to environmental contaminants is a subject of international concern. However, the risk perception of these contaminants by health professionals (HP) has not been extensively investigated. The main objective of the PERI–HELPE study (Perception of Risk–HEaLth Professionals & Environment Study) was to assess the risk perception of environmental exposure of pregnant women by perinatal HPs. The secondary objectives were to describe the preventive attitudes of perinatal HPs concerning chemicals exposure of pregnant women and to identify the barriers to preventive attitude. A cross-sectional study was performed in 2015 in France. One hundred eighty-nine HPs (obstetricians, midwives, and general practitioners) replied to an online self-administered questionnaire (participation rate: 11%). Carbon monoxide, pesticides and lead were the contaminants most frequently perceived as a high risk for pregnant women. A minority of HPs asked women about their chemical exposure and advised them to reduce exposure. The lack of information, training and scientific evidence in environmental health were the main difficulties declared by the HPs to advise pregnant women. Despite the low response rate, our findings provide important information to encourage French health authorities to take into account the difficulties encountered by HPs and set up appropriate training programs in Environmental health. PMID:27999342

  18. Perception of Environmental Risks and Health Promotion Attitudes of French Perinatal Health Professionals.

    PubMed

    Marie, Cécile; Lémery, Didier; Vendittelli, Françoise; Sauvant-Rochat, Marie-Pierre

    2016-12-18

    The exposure of pregnant women to environmental contaminants is a subject of international concern. However, the risk perception of these contaminants by health professionals (HP) has not been extensively investigated. The main objective of the PERI-HELPE study (Perception of Risk-HEaLth Professionals & Environment Study) was to assess the risk perception of environmental exposure of pregnant women by perinatal HPs. The secondary objectives were to describe the preventive attitudes of perinatal HPs concerning chemicals exposure of pregnant women and to identify the barriers to preventive attitude. A cross-sectional study was performed in 2015 in France. One hundred eighty-nine HPs (obstetricians, midwives, and general practitioners) replied to an online self-administered questionnaire (participation rate: 11%). Carbon monoxide, pesticides and lead were the contaminants most frequently perceived as a high risk for pregnant women. A minority of HPs asked women about their chemical exposure and advised them to reduce exposure. The lack of information, training and scientific evidence in environmental health were the main difficulties declared by the HPs to advise pregnant women. Despite the low response rate, our findings provide important information to encourage French health authorities to take into account the difficulties encountered by HPs and set up appropriate training programs in Environmental health.

  19. A Multimedia E-Book—A Story of Health: Filling a Gap in Environmental Health Literacy for Health Professionals

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Mark D.; Valenti, Maria; Schettler, Ted; Tencza, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Summary: Narrative approaches and storytelling are emerging as powerful health promotion tools that can spark interest, increase understanding of determinants of health, and translate complex science. A Story of Health, a multimedia e-book with continuing education credits was designed to harness the power of storytelling to increase environmental health literacy. Health professionals are a key audience. They recognize that patients may be suffering from preventable illnesses of environmental origin but often feel ill-equipped to educate individuals and families about risks associated with common exposures. A Story of Health seeks to fill this gap and help readers develop the competencies they need in order to help patients make informed choices, reduce health risks, improve quality of life, and protect the environment. Americans rate nurses and medical doctors as having the highest honesty and ethical standards of all professions. These medical professionals can play a key role in changing patterns of patient behavior and influencing public policies. The e-book provides an easily accessible method of developing environmental health competency. The multimedia format with graphical interpretations allows for quick reviews of topics or for more in-depth analysis via links to additional resources. The CE evaluations have been overwhelmingly positive. PMID:27479986

  20. Hearing Aids

    MedlinePlus

    ... Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Hearing Aids KidsHealth > For Teens > Hearing Aids Print A A ... with certain types of hearing loss. How Hearing Aids Help So you went to audiologist and found ...

  1. AIDS Knowledge and Attitudes, Provisional Data from the National Health Interview Survey: United States, August 1987. Advance Data from Vital and Health Statistics. No. 146.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dawson, Deborah A.; And Others

    This document presents provisional data for all Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) questionnaire items from the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) for August 1987. It notes that the AIDS questionnaire was designed to provide baseline estimates of public knowledge and attitudes about AIDS transmission, the prevention of AIDS virus…

  2. Portfolios and Professional Development in the Health Professions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jensen, Gail M.; Saylor, Coleen

    1994-01-01

    Using portfolios as vehicles for reflection and professional development was studied with 32 physical therapy students, 12 baccalaureate nursing students, and 5 master's degree nursing students. Results suggest that portfolios are useful in professional development, though they may vary in structure and complexity. (SLD)

  3. Portfolios and Professional Development in the Health Professions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jensen, Gail M.; Saylor, Coleen

    The usefulness of portfolios for professional development and reflection was studied in the disciplines of physical therapy and nursing. The student sample may not represent the larger population of professional students, but data are presented as useful in understanding more about the general phenomenon of use of portfolios in professional…

  4. The need to incorporate health information technology into physicians' education and professional development.

    PubMed

    Graham-Jones, Pierce; Jain, Sachin H; Friedman, Charles P; Marcotte, Leah; Blumenthal, David

    2012-03-01

    Nationwide, as physicians and health care systems adopt electronic health records, health information technology is becoming integral to the practice of medicine. But current medical education and professional development curricula do not systematically prepare physicians to use electronic health records and the data these systems collect. We detail how training in meaningful use of electronic health records could be incorporated into physician training, from medical school, through licensure and board certification, to continuing medical education and the maintenance of licensure and board certification. We identify six near-term opportunities for professional organizations to accelerate the integration of health information technology into their requirements.

  5. A qualitative study of the promotion of exclusive breastfeeding by health professionals in Niamey, Niger

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The practice of exclusive breastfeeding depends on various factors related to both mothers and their environment, including the services delivered by health professionals. It is known that support and counseling by health professionals can improve rates, early initiation and total duration of breastfeeding, particularly exclusive breastfeeding. Mothers' decisions are influenced by health professionals' advice. However, in Niger the practice of exclusive breastfeeding is almost non-existent. The purpose of this exploratory study, of which some results are presented here, was to document health professionals' attitudes and practices with regard to exclusive breastfeeding promotion in hospital settings in the urban community of Niamey, Niger. Methods Fieldwork was conducted in Niamey, Niger. A qualitative approach was employed. Health professionals' practices were observed in a sample of frontline public healthcare facilities. Results The field observation results presented here indicate that exclusive breastfeeding is not promoted in healthcare facilities because the health professionals do not encourage it and their practices are inappropriate. Some still have limited knowledge or are misinformed about this practice or do not believe in it. They do not systematically discuss exclusive breastfeeding with mothers, or they mention it only briefly and without giving any explanation. Worse still, some encourage the use of breast milk substitutes, which are frequently promoted in healthcare facilities. Thus mothers often receive contradictory messages. Conclusion The results suggest the need to train or retrain health professionals with regard to exclusive breastfeeding, and regularly supervise their activities. PMID:20691108

  6. Exploring the role of GIS during community health assessment problem solving: experiences of public health professionals

    PubMed Central

    Scotch, Matthew; Parmanto, Bambang; Gadd, Cynthia S; Sharma, Ravi K

    2006-01-01

    Background A Community health assessment (CHA) involves the use of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) in conjunction with other software to analyze health and population data and perform numerical-spatial problem solving. There has been little research on identifying how public health professionals integrate this software during typical problem solving scenarios. A better understanding of this is needed to answer the "What" and the "How". The "What" identifies the specific software being used and the "How" explains the way they are integrated together during problem solving steps. This level of understanding will highlight the role of GIS utilization during problem solving and suggest to developers how GIS can be enhanced to better support data analysis during community health assessment. Results An online survey was developed to identify the information technology used during CHA analysis. The tasks were broken down into steps and for our analysis these steps were categorized by action: Data Management/Access, Data Navigation, Geographic Comparison, Detection of Spatial Boundaries, Spatial Modelling, and Ranking Analysis. 27 CHA professionals completed the survey, with the majority of participants (14) being from health departments. Statistical software (e.g. SPSS) was the most popular software for all but one of the types of steps. For this step (detection of spatial boundaries), GIS was identified as the most popular technology. Conclusion Most CHA professionals indicated they use statistical software in conjunction with GIS. The statistical software appears to drive the analysis, while GIS is used primarily for simple spatial display (and not complex spatial analysis). This purpose of this survey was to thoroughly examine into the process of problem solving during community health assessment data analysis and to gauge how GIS is integrated with other software for this purpose. These findings suggest that GIS is used more for spatial display while other

  7. Resident assistant training program for increasing alcohol, other drug, and mental health first-aid efforts.

    PubMed

    Thombs, Dennis L; Gonzalez, Jennifer M Reingle; Osborn, Cynthia J; Rossheim, Matthew E; Suzuki, Sumihiro

    2015-05-01

    In college and university residence halls, resident assistants (RAs) are expected to serve as first-aid providers to students who may have alcohol, other drug, mental health, and academic problems. Despite this responsibility, evidence-based, first-aid programs have not been developed and tested for the RA workforce. The current study examined effects of an investigational first-aid program designed specifically for RAs. The online Peer Hero Training program is a novel approach to RA training in its use of interactive video dramatizations of incidents involving substance-using or distressed residents. A 9-month randomized trial conducted on eight US campuses compared RAs who participated in the Peer Hero Training program to RAs who received training-as-usual. Participation in the Peer Hero Training program significantly increased RA first-aid efforts for residential students who may have had alcohol, other drug, mental health, or academic problems 6 months after baseline. Compared with those in the training-as-usual condition, RAs in the Peer Hero Training program made more than 10 times as many first-aid efforts for possible alcohol problems, almost 14 times the number of first-aid efforts for possible drug use, almost 3 times the number of first-aid efforts for possible mental health problems, and 3 times the number of first-aid efforts for academic problems. There was no evidence that measured RA attitudes mediated the effects of the intervention. Results of this preliminary evaluation trial suggest that online training using interactive video dramatizations is a viable approach to strengthening RAs' ability to provide alcohol, other drugs, and mental health first-aid to undergraduates.

  8. Resident Assistant Training Program for Increasing Alcohol, Other Drug, and Mental Health First-Aid Efforts

    PubMed Central

    Thombs, Dennis L.; Gonzalez, Jennifer M. Reingle; Osborn, Cynthia J.; Rossheim, Matthew E.; Suzuki, Sumihiro

    2014-01-01

    In college and university residence halls, resident assistants (RAs) are expected to serve as first-aid providers to students who may have alcohol, other drug, mental health, and academic problems. Despite this responsibility, evidence-based, first-aid programs have not been developed and tested for the RA workforce. The current study examined effects of an investigational first-aid program designed specifically for RAs. The online Peer Hero Training program is a novel approach to RA training in its use of interactive video dramatizations of incidents involving substance-using or distressed residents. A 9-month randomized trial conducted on 8 U.S. campuses compared RAs who participated in the Peer Hero Training program to RAs who received training-as-usual. Participation in the Peer Hero Training program significantly increased RA first-aid efforts for residential students who may have had alcohol, other drug, mental health, or academic problems six months after baseline. Compared to those in the training-as-usual condition, RAs in the Peer Hero Training program made more than 10 times as many first-aid efforts for possible alcohol problems, almost 14 times the number of first-aid efforts for possible drug use, almost 3 times the number of first-aid efforts for possible mental health problems, and 3 times the number of first-aid efforts for academic problems. There was no evidence that measured RA attitudes mediated the effects of the intervention. Results of this preliminary evaluation trial suggest that online training using interactive video dramatizations is a viable approach to strengthening RAs’ ability to provide alcohol, other drug, and mental health first-aid to undergraduates. PMID:25322950

  9. Reliability and Validity of a New Survey to Assess Global Health Competencies of Health Professionals

    PubMed Central

    Veras, Mirella; Pottie, Kevin; Welch, Vivian; Labonte, Ron; Eslava-Schmalbach, Javier; Borkhoff, Cornelia M.; Kristjansson, Elizabeth A.; Tugwell, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Health professionals are paying increased attention to issues of global health. However, there are no current competency assessment tools appropriate for evaluating their competency in global health. This study aims to assess the validity and reliability of a global health competency survey for different health disciplines. Methods: A total of 429 students participated in the Global Health Competency Survey, drawn from family medicine residency, nursing, physiotherapy and occupational therapy programs of five universities in Ontario, Canada. The surveys were evaluated for face and content validity and reliability. Results: Factor analysis was used to identify the main factors to be included in the reliability analysis. Content validity was supported with one floor effect in the “racial/ethnic disparities” variable (36.1%), and few ceiling effects. Seven of the twenty-two variables performed the best (between 34% and 59.6%). For the overall rating score, no participants had floor or ceiling effects. Five factors were identified which accounted for 95% of the variance. Cronbach’s alpha was >0.8 indicating that the survey items had good internal consistency and represent a homogeneous construct. Conclusion: The Global Health Competency Survey demonstrated good internal consistency and validity. PMID:23283032

  10. The role of health professional organizations in improving maternal and newborn health: The FIGO LOGIC experience.

    PubMed

    Taylor, David J

    2015-10-01

    The FIGO Leadership in Obstetrics and Gynecology for Impact and Change (LOGIC) Initiative in Maternal and Newborn Health improved the internal and external capacity of eight national professional organizations of obstetrics and gynecology in six African and two Asian countries. The initiative was funded by a grant from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation and had three key objectives: to support the eight FIGO member associations to strengthen their capacity to work effectively; to influence national policies on maternal and newborn health; and to work toward improving clinical practice in this area. Through improved capacity, and underpinned by Memoranda of Understanding with their governments, the associations influenced national policy in maternal and newborn health, impacted clinical care through the development of over forty national clinical guidelines, delivered national curricula, trained clinical and management staff, and led the development of national maternal death and near-miss review programs.

  11. Community mental health nurses speak out: the critical relationship between emotional wellbeing and satisfying professional practice.

    PubMed

    Rose, Jayln; Glass, Nel

    2006-10-01

    The article reports on selected findings of a research study concerning emotional wellbeing and professional nursing practice (Rose 2002). It highlights the relationship between community mental health nurses' and emotional wellbeing, and their capacity to provide satisfying professional nursing practice (Rose 2002). The notion of emotional wellbeing, factors that impacted upon the participants' emotional wellbeing, and the relationship of emotional wellbeing to professional practice were revealed in the study. These findings were based on a qualitative critical feminist research inquiry and specifically, interviews with five women community mental health nurses in Australia. Whilst complex, emotional wellbeing was found to be both implicitly and explicitly linked to the participants intertwined personal and professional experiences. Four key components were identified: the nebulous notion; the stress relationship; the mind, body, spirit connection; and, inner sense of balance. In terms of emotional wellbeing and professional practice, three themes were revealed. These were: being able to speak out (or not); being autonomous (or not) and being satisfied (or not). The authors argue that the emotional wellbeing of nurses working in community mental health settings is critical to satisfying professional practice. Furthermore nursing work involves emotional work which impacts on one's emotional wellbeing and emotional wellbeing is integrally linked to professional practice. It is recommended that health organisations must be pro-active in addressing the emotional needs of nurses to ensure the delivery of health care that is aligned to professional practice. This approach will ensure nurses will feel more recognised and validated in terms of their nursing practice.

  12. The escalating health care cost of AIDS: who will pay?

    PubMed

    Kerley, L J

    1990-01-01

    AIDS is a crisis that has been imposed on an imperfect healthcare system. The flaws are easy to recognize but difficult to treat. Difficult choices about who pays for the medical care for AIDS patients will be made by upper-class and upper middle-class policymakers who are influenced by their own sense of vulnerability and by an aroused public. Social prejudice and moral judgment must be set aside. While the public ethic speaks the language of social justice, public activity often speaks the language of market justice. Beauchamp (1984) cites the philosophy of Anthony Downs when he states that solving social problems "requires painful losses, the restructuring of society and the acceptance of new burdens by the most powerful and the most numerous on behalf of the least powerful or the least numerous" (p. 306). It is characteristic of the public to attend to social problems until "it becomes clear that solving these problems requires painful costs that the dominant interests in society are unwilling to pay" (p. 306). The problem of AIDS care will require painful costs; but unlike many social problems, it will refuse to be hidden, refuse to be contained, refuse to be silenced, and refuse to be equitable in the marketplace and in the social system.

  13. Networked Learning and Network Science: Potential Applications to Health Professionals' Continuing Education and Development.

    PubMed

    Margolis, Alvaro; Parboosingh, John

    2015-01-01

    Prior interpersonal relationships and interactivity among members of professional associations may impact the learning process in continuing medical education (CME). On the other hand, CME programs that encourage interactivity between participants may impact structures and behaviors in these professional associations. With the advent of information and communication technologies, new communication spaces have emerged that have the potential to enhance networked learning in national and international professional associations and increase the effectiveness of CME for health professionals. In this article, network science, based on the application of network theory and other theories, is proposed as an approach to better understand the contribution networking and interactivity between health professionals in professional communities make to their learning and adoption of new practices over time.

  14. Achieving Excellence in Palliative Care: Perspectives of Health Care Professionals

    PubMed Central

    Fitch, Margaret I.; DasGupta, Tracey; Ford, Bill

    2016-01-01

    Caring for individuals at the end of life in the hospital environment is a challenging proposition. Understanding the challenges to provide quality end of life care is an important first step in order to develop appropriate approaches to support and educate staff members and facilitate their capacity remaining “caring.” Four studies were undertaken at our facility to increase our understanding about the challenges health professionals experience in caring for patients at end of life and how staff members could be supported in providing care to patients and families: (1) In-depth interviews were used with cancer nurses (n = 30) to explore the challenges talking about death and dying with patients and families; (2) Surveys were used with nurses (n = 27) and radiation therapists (n = 30) to measure quality of work life; (3) and interprofessional focus groups were used to explore what it means “to care” (five groups held); and (4) interprofessional focus groups were held to understand what “support strategies for staff” ought to look like (six groups held). In all cases, staff members confirmed that interactions concerning death and dying are challenging. Lack of preparation (knowledge and skill in palliative care) and lack of support from managers and colleagues are significant barriers. Key strategies staff members thought would be helpful included: (1) Ensuring all team members were communicating and following the same plan of care, (2) providing skill-based education on palliative care, and (3) facilitating “debriefing” opportunities (either one-on-one or in a group). For staff to be able to continue caring for patients at the end of life with compassion and sensitivity, they need to be adequately prepared and supported appropriately. PMID:27981141

  15. Educational needs of health professionals working in rheumatology in Europe

    PubMed Central

    Vliet Vlieland, Theodora P M; van den Ende, Cornelia H.M; Alliot-Launois, Francoise; Beauvais, Catherine; Gobbo, Milena; Iagnocco, Annamaria; Lundberg, Ingrid E; Munuera-Martínez, Pedro V; Opava, Christina H; Prior, Yeliz; Redmond, Anthony; Smucrova, Hana; Wiek, Dieter

    2016-01-01

    Objective To explore the availability of postgraduate education for health professionals (HPs) working in rheumatology in Europe, and their perceived educational needs and barriers for participation in current educational offerings. Methods Structured interviews were conducted with national representatives of rheumatology HPs' organisations and an online survey among individual HPs was disseminated through existing European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) networks (10 languages including English). These comprised questions on: availability of postgraduate education, familiarity with EULAR and its educational offerings, unmet needs regarding the contents and mode of delivery and potential barriers to participate in education (0–10 scales). Results According to 17 national representatives, postgraduate rheumatology education was most common for nurses, physical and occupational therapists. There were 1041 individuals responding to the survey, of whom 48% completed all questions. More than half (56%) were familiar with EULAR as an organisation, whereas <25% had attended the EULAR congress or were familiar with EULAR online courses. Educational needs regarding contents were highest for ‘inflammatory arthritis’ and ‘connective tissue diseases’ and regarding modes of delivery for ‘courses organised in own country’ and ‘online courses’. Important barriers to participation included lack of ‘resources’, ‘time’ and ‘English language skills’. Overall, there was considerable variation in needs and barriers among countries. Conclusions There is a lack of postgraduate rheumatology education for HPs in most countries. There are opportunities to raise awareness regarding EULAR educational offerings and to develop courses provided in HPs' own country, tailored to national needs and barriers and taking language barriers into consideration. PMID:27933210

  16. Integrating oral health into professional nursing practice: an interprofessional faculty tool kit.

    PubMed

    Dolce, Maria C

    2014-01-01

    Millions of children and adults in the United States have unmet oral health care needs, and professional nurses can play a central role in reducing oral health disparities and expanding access to care. Interprofessional education is requisite to improving oral health care outcomes. Baccalaureate nursing programs need to prepare collaborative practice-ready professional nurses to improve oral health care especially for vulnerable and underserved individuals, communities, and populations. This article presents an interprofessional faculty tool kit that builds upon The Essentials of Baccalaureate Education for Professional Nursing Practice as a framework for preparing professional nurses with basic knowledge, skills, and attitudes in oral health promotion and disease and injury prevention across the life cycle. Expectations for professional nursing practice are described within the context of The Essentials and contemporary oral health care issues. Exemplars of interprofessional teaching-learning strategies are provided to assist nurse faculty with integrating oral health into baccalaureate nursing curriculum. Nurse educators are called to prioritize oral health as an essential component of overall health and well-being, increase the visibility of evidence-based oral health promotion and disease and injury prevention in baccalaureate nursing curricula, and support interprofessional oral health education and collaborative care.

  17. Health Emergency 2003: The Spread of Drug-Related AIDS and Hepatitis C among African American and Latinos. Health Emergency Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Day, Dawn

    This report is the fifth in a series detailing the impact of the injection-related AIDS epidemic on African Americans and Latinos. Ten chapters include: (1) "Health Emergency: The Spread of AIDS among African Americans Who Inject Drugs"; (2) "Health Emergency: The Spread of AIDS Among Latinos Who Inject Drugs"; (3) "A…

  18. Internet-Based Health Information Consumer Skills Intervention for People Living with HIV/AIDS

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalichman, Seth C.; Cherry, Charsey; Cain, Demetria; Pope, Howard; Kalichman, Moira; Eaton, Lisa; Weinhardt, Lance; Benotsch, Eric G.

    2006-01-01

    Medical information can improve health, and there is an enormous amount of health information available on the Internet. A randomized clinical trial tested the effectiveness of an intervention based on social-cognitive theory to improve information use among people living with HIV/AIDS. Men and women (N = 448) were placed in either (a) an…

  19. Evaluating the Effectiveness of Mental Health First Aid Program for Chinese People in Hong Kong

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, Daniel F. K.; Lau, Ying; Kwok, Sylvia; Wong, Prudence; Tori, Christopher

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Chinese people generally lack knowledge of mental illness. Such phenomenon may lead to a delay in seeking psychiatric treatments. This study evaluated the effectiveness of Mental Health First Aid (MHFA) program in improving mental health knowledge of the general public in Hong Kong. Methods: A quasi-experimental design was adopted whereby…

  20. Aids for Health and Home Extension Volunteers. Appropriate Technologies for Development. Reprint R-3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peace Corps, Washington, DC. Information Collection and Exchange Div.

    This book contains various aids for Peace Corps home extension volunteers. Section I, "Culture Resource Material," contains four articles by Paul Benjamin: (1) "Values in American Culture"; (2) "The Cultural Context of Health Education"; (3) "Problems of Introducing Public Health Programs in 'Underdeveloped…

  1. Dietary Supplements and Health Aids - A Critical Evaluation Part 2 - Macronutrients and Fiber.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dubick, Michael A.

    1983-01-01

    Part 1 of this evaluation of dietary supplements and health aids (SE 533 788) focused on various therapeutic claims made for vitamins and minerals. This part examines health-promoting claims made for selected macronutrients and fiber. Macronutrients examined include selected proteins, amino acids, enzymes, carbohydrates, and lipids. (JN)

  2. Rural Women with HIV and AIDS: Perceptions of Service Accessibility, Psychosocial, and Mental Health Counseling Needs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Jennifer

    2002-01-01

    Study examines rural women with HIV and AIDS and the staff members who work with them. Results revealed (a) barriers to these women regarding the accessibility of services, including mental health counseling; (b) a need to empower these women to be proactive in their health care; and (c) a stronger social support system and sense of hope in women…

  3. Factors Influencing the Retention and Attrition of Community Health Aides/Practitioners in Alaska

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landon, Beth; Loudon, Jenny; Selle, Mariko; Doucette, Sanna

    2004-01-01

    The Community Health Aide Program (CHAP) is a unique program employing local, indigenous peoples as primary care nonphysician providers in extremely remote frontier, tribal Alaskan communities. With attrition rates up to 20%, recommendations for improving retention are necessary to maintain access to health services for Alaska Natives in these…

  4. Epidemiological Criminology: Contextualization of HIV/AIDS Health Care for Female Inmates.

    PubMed

    Lanier, Mark M; Zaitzow, Barbara H; Farrell, C Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Worldwide, women are increasingly being incarcerated. One unintended consequence is the increase in unhealthy female offenders. Among the more serious health concerns are HIV and AIDS. Challenges associated with caring for women with HIV/AIDS impacts not only disease management and infection control within correctional facilities but also the prisoners' home communities where they will need health care, drug and alcohol rehabilitation, housing assistance, and employment opportunities. No bridging theory has been presented that links prison and community health concerns with criminal justice policy. This article not only presents recommendations for effective HIV/AIDS policy but also suggests epidemiological criminology as a means of explicit merging of health with justice issues and consequently provides a bridging framework.

  5. The changing donor landscape of health sector aid to Vietnam: a qualitative case study.

    PubMed

    Pallas, Sarah Wood; Khuat, Thi Hai Oanh; Le, Quang Duong; Ruger, Jennifer Prah

    2015-05-01

    The study objective was to identify how donors and government agencies in Vietnam responded to donor proliferation in health sector aid between 1995 and 2012. Interviews were conducted with key informants from donor agencies, central government, and civil society in Hanoi in 2012 (n = 34 interviews), identified through OECD Creditor Reporting System data, internet research, and snowball sampling. Interview transcripts were coded for key themes using the constant comparative method. Documentary materials were used in triangulation and validation of key informant accounts. The study identified a timeline of key events and key themes. The number of donors providing health sector aid to Vietnam increased sharply during the late 1990s and early 2000s, then leveled off and declined between 2008 and 2012. Reasons for donor entry included Vietnam's health needs, perceptions of health as less politically sensitive, and donor interests in facilitating market access. Reasons for donor withdrawal included Vietnam's achievement of middle-income status, the global financial crisis, and donors' shifting global priorities. Key themes included high competition among donors, strategic actions by government to increase its control over aid, and the multiplicity of government units involved with health sector aid. The study concludes that central government and donor agencies in Vietnam responded to donor proliferation in health sector aid by endorsing aid effectiveness policies but implementing these policies inconsistently in practice. Whereas previous literature has emphasized donor proliferation's transaction costs, this study finds that the benefits of a large number of less coordinated donors may outweigh the increased administrative costs under certain conditions. In Vietnam, these conditions included relatively high capacity within government, low government dependence on aid, and government interest in receiving diverse donor recommendations. Vietnam's experience of donor

  6. Health Beliefs and Breast Cancer Screening Behavior among a Group of Female Health Professionals in Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Yılmaz, Meryem; Durmuş, Tuğba

    2016-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to identify the health beliefs and breast cancer (BC) screening behavior of a group of female health professionals (FHPs) [physicians, nurses and midwives] in Turkey. Materials and Methods This descriptive study was conducted at primary and secondary level healthcare institutions in Central Anatolia, Turkey. The study group included 720 FHPs. Data was collected by a questionnaire and the Turkish version of Champion’s Health Belief Model Scales (CHBMS). Results The mean age of the FHPs was 30.2 years (±6.12 range; 20–50), 8.9 % of them were ≥40 years. The majority (93.9%) of FHPs did not have annual mammography (MMG) or clinical breast examination (CBE) (95.1%); and 42.9% reported to perform breast self-examinations (BSE). None of the physicians reported having a CBE or MMG. The physicians’ perception of susceptibility, severity and barriers to screening was lower than the nurses and midwives; however, their perception of benefits, self-efficacy and health motivation was higher. The perception of benefit among nurses, and self-efficacy and perception of health motivation among midwives were lower than those of the physicians. The perception of barriers to screening was highest among nurses. Conclusion The compliance rate with early detection practices for BC screening was low among FHPs. Health beliefs influenced their behavior on BC screening.

  7. Poverty and psychological health among AIDS-orphaned children in Cape Town, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Cluver, Lucie; Gardner, Frances; Operario, Don

    2009-06-01

    This study examined associations between AIDS-orphanhood status, poverty indicators, and psychological problems (depression, anxiety, post-traumatic stress, peer problems, delinquency, conduct problems) among children and adolescents in townships surrounding Cape Town, South Africa. One thousand and twenty-five children and adolescents completed standardized and culturally sensitive cross-sectional surveys. Children orphaned by AIDS had more psychological problems including depression, peer problems, post-traumatic stress, and conduct problems. Specific poverty indicators including food security, access to social welfare grants, employment in the household and access to school were associated with better psychological health. Poverty indicators mediated associations of AIDS-orphanhood with psychological problems. Food security showed the most consistent association with reduced psychological problems. Poverty alleviation measures have the potential to improve psychological health for AIDS-orphaned children in South African townships.

  8. Health professionals' roles in animal agriculture, climate change, and human health.

    PubMed

    Akhtar, Aysha Z; Greger, Michael; Ferdowsian, Hope; Frank, Erica

    2009-02-01

    What we eat is rapidly becoming an issue of global concern. With food shortages, the rise in chronic disease, and global warming, the impact of our dietary choices seems more relevant today than ever. Globally, a transition is taking place toward greater consumption of foods of animal origin, in lieu of plant-based diets. With this transition comes intensification of animal agriculture that in turn is associated with the emergence of zoonotic infectious diseases, environmental degradation, and the epidemics of chronic disease and obesity. Health professionals should be aware of these trends and consider them as they promote healthier and more environmentally-sustainable diets.

  9. Impact of a School-Based Pediatric Obesity Prevention Program Facilitated by Health Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston, Craig A.; Moreno, Jennette P.; El-Mubasher, Abeer; Gallagher, Martina; Tyler, Chermaine; Woehler, Deborah

    2013-01-01

    Background: This study evaluated a school-based obesity intervention for elementary school children (N = 835) where health professionals assisted teachers with the integration of healthy messages into the school curriculum. Methods: Schools were randomized into a professional-facilitated intervention (PFI; N = 4) or a self-help (SH; N = 3)…

  10. Survey of Distance Learning Provision in Continuing Health Professional Education in Canada

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curran, Vernon; Kirby, Fran; Fleet, Lisa

    2003-01-01

    In Canada, the trend is towards greater use of distance learning technologies in the provision of continuing professional education in the health professions. Lack of access to professional development is a common deterrent to practice in rural and remote areas. Distance learning technologies have an important role to play in addressing the…

  11. 77 FR 75918 - VA Health Professional Scholarship and Visual Impairment and Orientation and Mobility...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-26

    ... AFFAIRS 38 CFR Part 17 RIN 2900-AO34 VA Health Professional Scholarship and Visual Impairment and... program, the Visual Impairment and Orientation and Mobility Professional Scholarship Program (VIOMPSP... visual impairment or orientation or mobility, in order to increase the supply of qualified...

  12. Important Competencies for Future Health and Wellness Professionals: An Investigation of Employer Desired Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Becker, Craig; Loy, Marty

    2004-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the validity of the professional competencies developed by the Association of Worksite Health Promotion (AWHP) Professional Standards Task Force. The Task Force identified a competency framework that included business skills, program coordination skills, and human resource skills with corresponding…

  13. School Absenteeism and School Refusal Behavior: A Review and Suggestions for School-Based Health Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kearney, Christopher A.; Bensaheb, Arva

    2006-01-01

    School absenteeism and school refusal behavior are particularly difficult problems that school health professionals often face. Unfortunately, few recommendations are available to such professionals about how to address this population. In this article, we (1) outline the major characteristics of school absenteeism and school refusal behavior, (2)…

  14. Professional Education and Technical Education Needs of Health Occupations Education Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevens, Rachel H.

    A study examined the professional and technical education needs of health occupations education (HOE) teachers in North Carolina. Utilizing an ex post facto research design, researchers administered professional education needs assessment surveys to all 1,058 teachers in attendance at the 1981 North Carolina Annual Vocational Conference. A…

  15. Unity in diversity: toward a common professional vision of health sciences librarianship.

    PubMed Central

    Opena, M M

    1996-01-01

    A redefinition of librarianship is necessary to respond to the ever-changing environment. Librarians must view their profession more broadly, because they are part of a network of relationships. To meet these challenges, health information professionals must commit to spending the time necessary to engage in both professional and personal growth. PMID:8938338

  16. Professional Competencies in Health Sciences Education: From Multiple Intelligences to the Clinic Floor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lane, India F.

    2010-01-01

    Nontechnical competencies identified as essential to the health professionals success include ethical behavior, interpersonal, self-management, leadership, business, and thinking competencies. The literature regarding such diverse topics, and the literature regarding "professional success" is extensive and wide-ranging, crossing educational,…

  17. Impact of a school-based pediatric obesity prevention program faciliated by health professionals

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study evaluated a school-based obesity intervention for elementary school children (N=835) where health professionals assisted teachers with the integration of healthy messages into the school curriculum. Schools were randomized into a professional-facilitated intervention (PFI; N=4) or a self-...

  18. Professional Norms versus Managerialism in Campus Mental Health Centers: The Experiences of Eight Clinicians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jodoin, Elizabeth C.; Ayers, David F.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to understand better how, if at all, eight campus-based mental health clinicians experienced and negotiated managerialist practices, and with what outcomes. It was found that managerialism was experienced as challenges to professional ethics, clinical judgment, and challenges related to professional role…

  19. Social contract theory as a foundation of the social responsibilities of health professionals.

    PubMed

    Welie, Jos V M

    2012-08-01

    This paper seeks to define and delimit the scope of the social responsibilities of health professionals in reference to the concept of a social contract. While drawing on both historical data and current empirical information, this paper will primarily proceed analytically and examine the theoretical feasibility of deriving social responsibilities from the phenomenon of professionalism via the concept of a social contract.

  20. A Review of Contemporary Ethical Decision-Making Models for Mental Health Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Francis, Perry C.

    2015-01-01

    Mental health professionals are faced with increasingly complex ethical decisions that are impacted by culture, personal and professional values, and the contexts in which they and their clients inhabit. This article presents the reasons for developing and implementing multiple ethical decision making models and reviews four models that address…

  1. Fulbright Scholar opportunities for global health and women's health care in HIV/AIDS in sub-Saharan Africa.

    PubMed

    Nicholas, Patrice K; Adejumo, Oluyinka; Nokes, Kathleen M; Ncama, Busisiwe P; Bhengu, Busisiwe R; Elston, Elizabeth; Nicholas, Thomas P

    2009-02-01

    This article addresses global health opportunities related to HIV/AIDS and women's health care in sub-Saharan Africa through Fulbright Scholar and Fulbright Student Awards. Although many universities offer a gateway to the J. William Fulbright awards, some disciplines and areas of specialization, including nursing and women's health, have had fewer scholars or students as recipients of these awards. Resource-limited countries, including the countries of sub-Saharan Africa, offer rich opportunities for cross-cultural exchange and advancement of global health. Amidst the context of the shortage of health care workers, the increasing prevalence of HIV/AIDS and other infectious and chronic diseases in sub-Saharan Africa, and the challenges of public health, this article addresses an example of partnerships in global nursing that can be developed through the Fulbright programs.

  2. Understanding the Differences Between Oncology Patients and Oncology Health Professionals Concerning Spirituality/Religiosity

    PubMed Central

    de Camargos, Mayara Goulart; Paiva, Carlos Eduardo; Barroso, Eliane Marçon; Carneseca, Estela Cristina; Paiva, Bianca Sakamoto Ribeiro

    2015-01-01

    Abstract This study investigated whether spirituality/religiosity (S/R) plays an important role in the lives of cancer patients and in the work of health professionals who provide care for these patients. The correlations between spiritual quality of life (QOL) and the other QOL domain scores of patients and health professionals were also assessed. Moreover, QOL domain scores were compared between patients and health professionals. In this cross-sectional study, 1050 participants (525 oncology patients and 525 health professionals) were interviewed. Quality of life was assessed with the World Health Organization quality of life spiritual, religious, and personal beliefs (WHOQOL-SRPB). To compare the groups with respect to the instruments’ domains, a quantile regression and an analysis of covariance model were used. The WHOQOL-Bref and WHOQOL-SRPB domains were correlated by performing Pearson and partial correlation tests. It was demonstrated that 94.1% of patients considered it important that health professionals addressed their spiritual beliefs, and 99.2% of patients relied on S/R to face cancer. Approximately, 99.6% of the patients reported that S/R support is necessary during cancer treatment; 98.3% of health professionals agreed that spiritual and religious support was necessary for oncology patients. Positive correlations between spiritual QOL and the other QOL domains were observed. When compared among themselves, patients exhibited significantly higher levels of spiritual QOL. In conclusion, S/R was an important construct in the minds of cancer patients and health professionals. Both groups often use S/R resources in their daily lives, which seems to positively affect their perceptions of QOL. Further studies are needed to determine how health professionals effectively address S/R during oncology practice. PMID:26632743

  3. Latinos and Cancer Information: Perspectives of Patients, Health Professionals and Telephone Cancer Information Specialists

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, Celia P.; Nápoles, Anna; Davis, Sharon; Lopez, Monica; Pasick, Rena J.; Livaudais-Toman, Jennifer; Pérez-Stable, Eliseo J.

    2016-01-01

    Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 16 Latino cancer patients diagnosed in California; 10 health professionals from the San Francisco Bay Area and Fresno, California; and 10 Cancer Information Services (CIS) information specialists from the regional offices handling calls from Spanish-speakers. Interview guides were designed by the investigators to answer three main research questions: 1) How do Latinos obtain information about cancer and what types of information do they access?; 2) What sources of cancer information do they seek out and find credible?; and 3) What are the barriers and facilitators to Latinos obtaining cancer information? Stakeholders generally viewed health professionals as the most credible source of cancer information. All groups regarded family and friends as important sources of information. Patients and health professionals tended to differ on the value of print materials. Although patients found them generally useful, health professionals tended to view them as inadequate for meeting the informational needs of their Latino patients due to the challenge of low health literacy. Health professionals also tended to undervalue Internet resources compared to patients and CIS specialists. All stakeholders viewed language, ethnic discordance and the impact on patients of the initial diagnosis as barriers to effective communication of cancer information. Health professionals and CIS specialists, but not patients, mentioned low literacy as a barrier. Our findings underscore the importance of the physician-patient relationship as a point of intervention to address the unmet informational and psychosocial needs of Latino cancer patients. PMID:27642542

  4. Millennium Development Goals: how public health professionals perceive the achievement of MDGs

    PubMed Central

    Lomazzi, Marta; Laaser, Ulrich; Theisling, Mareike; Tapia, Leticia; Borisch, Bettina

    2014-01-01

    Background There have been various consultations on the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) by different groups. However, even if it is clear that the health sector has led the development success of the MDGs, only a few MDG reports consider public health experts’ points of view and these are mainly government driven. Designs The World Federation of Public Health Associations (WFPHA) has executed a global survey to consult public health professionals worldwide concerning the implementation and achievements of the MDGs. The survey was conceived by WFPHA health professionals and promulgated online. Public health professionals and organisations dealing with MDGs responded to the survey. Content analysis was conducted to analyse the data. Results Survey participants attributed the highest importance worldwide to MDGs dealing with women, poverty and hunger reduction, and disease prevention and management. Moreover, they underlined the role of education, referring both to school children and professionals. In high and upper-middle income countries, environmental challenges also received considerable attention. Notably, respondents underlined that weak governance and unstable political situations, as well as the gap between professionals and politicians, were among the main causes that detracted from MDG achievements. Conclusion The public health workforce felt it would be imperative to be included from the outset in the design and implementation of further goals. This implies that those professionals have to take an active part in the political process leading to a new and accountable framework. PMID:25249060

  5. Learning reflexively from a health promotion professional development program in Canada.

    PubMed

    Tremblay, Marie-Claude; Richard, Lucie; Brousselle, Astrid; Beaudet, Nicole

    2014-09-01

    In recent decades, reflexivity has received much attention in the professional education and training literature, especially in the public health and health promotion fields. Despite general agreement on the importance of reflexivity, there appears to be no consensus on how to assess reflexivity or to conceptualize the different forms developed among professionals and participants of training programs. This paper presents an analysis of the reflexivity outcomes of the Health Promotion Laboratory, an innovative professional development program aimed at supporting practice changes among health professionals by fostering competency development and reflexivity. More specifically, this paper explores the difference between two levels of reflexivity (formative and critical) and highlights some implications of each for practice. Data were collected through qualitative interviews with participants from two intervention sites. Results showed that involvement in the Health Promotion Laboratory prompted many participants to modify their vision of their practice and professional role, indicating an impact on reflexivity. In many cases, new understandings seem to have played a formative function in enabling participants to improve their practice and their role as health promoters. The reflective process also served a critical function culminating in a social and moral understanding of the impacts on society of the professionals' practices and roles. This type of outcome is greatly desired in health promotion, given the social justice and equity concerns of this field of practice. By redefining the theoretical concept of reflexivity on two levels and discussing their impacts on practice, this study supports the usefulness of both levels of reflexivity.

  6. A Model for Health Professional Education in South Texas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramirez, Amelie; Vela, Leonel; Cigarroa, Francisco G.

    2008-01-01

    In 1997, The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio established the Regional Academic Health Center (RAHC) for the Lower Rio Grande Valley in south Texas. Through medical education programs, research facilities, and partnerships with health-care providers, the RAHC aims to improve the health status and access to health services…

  7. Growing older with HIV/AIDS: new public health challenges.

    PubMed

    Cahill, Sean; Valadéz, Robert

    2013-03-01

    At present, the health care infrastructure is ill-equipped to handle the unique treatment and care needs of HIV-positive older adults. The long-term effects of antiretroviral use are still being discovered and have been associated with a number of comorbidities. Stigma presents challenges for those in need of services and health care, and can significantly affect mental health and treatment adherence. The training of elder service providers and health care providers in meeting the needs of HIV-positive older adults, including gay and transgender people, is needed as the population ages. HIV-related and antigay stigma should be challenged by social marketing campaigns. Continued research and key policy changes could greatly improve health outcomes for HIV-positive elderly persons by increasing access to treatment and support.

  8. Growing Older With HIV/AIDS: New Public Health Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Cahill, Sean; Valadéz, Robert

    2013-01-01

    At present, the health care infrastructure is ill-equipped to handle the unique treatment and care needs of HIV-positive older adults. The long-term effects of antiretroviral use are still being discovered and have been associated with a number of comorbidities. Stigma presents challenges for those in need of services and health care, and can significantly affect mental health and treatment adherence. The training of elder service providers and health care providers in meeting the needs of HIV-positive older adults, including gay and transgender people, is needed as the population ages. HIV-related and antigay stigma should be challenged by social marketing campaigns. Continued research and key policy changes could greatly improve health outcomes for HIV-positive elderly persons by increasing access to treatment and support. PMID:23327276

  9. Mobile Devices and Their Use in Library Professional Practice: The Health Librarian and the Ipad

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duncan, Vicky; Kumaran, Maha; Lê, Mê-Linh; Murphy, Susan

    2013-01-01

    Mobile devices are being extensively adopted by health sciences faculty, students, and practitioners, but there is little evidence of how this technology is being used by health librarians in their own professional practice. In 2011, health sciences librarians at the University of Saskatchewan undertook a project to familiarize themselves with…

  10. Reflections on Government Service Rotations by an Academic Health Education Professional

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Lawrence W.

    2016-01-01

    This reflection is on a health education professional's rotation from professor in a school of public health to a government position and back parallels that of Professor Howard Koh's journey to Assistant Secretary of Health, one level higher in the same federal bureaucracy. We both acknowledge the steep learning curve and some bureaucratic…

  11. Collaborative Learning Processes in the Context of a Public Health Professional Development Program: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tremblay, Marie-Claude; Richard, Lucie; Brousselle, Astrid; Chiocchio, François; Beaudet, Nicole

    2017-01-01

    The health promotion laboratory (HPL-Canada) is a public health professional development program building on a collaborative learning approach in order to support long-term practice change in local health services teams. This study aims to analyse the collaborative learning processes of two teams involved in the program during the first year of…

  12. Accreditation of Professional Preparation Programs for School Health Educators: The Changing Landscape

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taub, Alyson; Goekler, Susan; Auld, M. Elaine; Birch, David A.; Muller, Susan; Wengert, Deitra; Allegrante, John P.

    2014-01-01

    The health education profession is committed to maintaining the highest standards of quality assurance, including accreditation of professional preparation programs in both school and community/public health education. Since 2001, the Society for Public Health Education (SOPHE) has increased attention to strengthening accreditation processes for…

  13. 75 FR 78901 - Payment for Inpatient and Outpatient Health Care Professional Services at Non-Departmental...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-17

    ... AFFAIRS 38 CFR Part 17 RIN 2900-AN37 Payment for Inpatient and Outpatient Health Care Professional... concerning the payment methodology used to calculate VA payments for inpatient and outpatient health care... health facility furnishing the care or services if such care or services were provided in a...

  14. Promoting Cultural Competence, Health Behaviors, and Professional Practice in Undergraduate Education through Peer Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yan, Zi; FitzPatrick, Kathleen

    2016-01-01

    Cultural competence (CC) has been identified as an important skill for all healthcare and public health professionals, and it must be integrated into all aspects of health practice. However, few university and college health education programs in North America have included CC education in their curriculums. This article describes an…

  15. The Relationship between Professional Preparation and Class Structure on Health Instruction in the Secondary Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammig, Bart; Ogletree, Roberta; Wycoff-Horn, Marcie R.

    2011-01-01

    Background: The aim of the present study was to examine the impact of professional preparation and class structure on health content delivery and time spent delivering content among required health education classes in the United States. Methods: Data from the classroom-level file of the 2006 School Health Policies and Programs Study were…

  16. Role-Modeling, Health Promotion, and Disease Prevention for Medical Laboratory Professionals: A Pilot Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cornish, James P.

    1985-01-01

    Describes a pilot program designed to prepare models for health promotion and disease prevention through participation in a planned program for the expressed purpose of affecting improvement in the health and health promotion acuity of laboratory professionals, with a plan to expand the concept for use by other hospital employees, and the…

  17. Health professionals' perspectives on service delivery in two Northern Ireland communities.

    PubMed

    Mason, C; Orr, J; Harrisson, S; Moore, R

    1999-10-01

    This research builds on the findings of an ethnographic study of health inequalities in two small, rural communities in Northern Ireland. Through further analysis of existing data, this second study aimed to explore health professionals' perspectives on issues of service delivery relevant to government policy on primary care. Anthropological fieldwork was conducted for two consecutive 4-month periods during 1995 and 1996 in one predominantly Catholic and one predominantly Protestant town. To preserve confidentiality, the locations have been given the pseudonyms, respectively, of Ballymacross and Hunterstown. Research tools included fieldwork journals and a fieldwork diary, meetings with key informants, tape-recorded interviews, group discussions, participant observation and use of secondary material such as census data, local newspapers and community health profiles. Interviews with 15 health workers revealed that there was not a coherent approach to achieving health gain, little collaborative enterprise and minimal interaction between the different professional groups. The National Health Service (NHS)-employed primary care professionals, more than local community workers, appeared to be demoralized, exhausted and suspicious of the business-orientated health service. In this respect, the primary care-led NHS appeared not to be working. It is concluded that a shared health agenda should be developed by NHS-employed primary care professionals and local community workers to create a health-inducing environment at community level. This needs to be complemented by the establishment of formal mechanisms for inter-agency working at local, professional and government levels.

  18. 42 CFR 422.206 - Interference with health care professionals' advice to enrollees prohibited.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Relationships With Providers § 422.206 Interference with health care professionals' advice to enrollees... (concerning approval of marketing materials and election forms) and with § 422.111. (ii) To...

  19. Developing Continuing Professional Education in the Health and Medical Professions through Collaboration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tisdell, Elizabeth J.; Wojnar, Margaret; Sinz, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    This chapter focuses on how to negotiate power and interest among multiple stakeholders to develop continuing professional education programs as graduate study for those in the health and medical professions.

  20. Public Health Programs and Licensed Professional Counselors: Practice Impact and Advocacy Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Counseling Association, 2005

    2005-01-01

    This report summarizes the impact of federal programs on individual counselors, including suggestions on advocating to improve the programs' recognition of professional mental health counselors. These are all separate programs, formulated under their own laws, regulations, and agencies.