Science.gov

Sample records for aid health professionals

  1. A Primer on Aids for Health Professionals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Healy, Ramona M.; Coleman, Ted

    1989-01-01

    This article provides health educators with a fundamental practical understanding of some of the characteristics of the AIDS virus and its adverse effects on the human body. Symptoms, preventive measures, transmission patterns, and guidelines for AIDS education are discussed. (IAH)

  2. AIDS-Related Stigma and Health Professionals in Puerto Rico

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Torres, Yamilette; Cintrón-Bou, Francheska N.; Varas-Díaz, Nelson

    2009-01-01

    This study addresses an important issue in the AIDS epidemic in Puerto Rico: AIDS stigma among health professionals and health profession students. AIDS stigma has been documented among health services providers such as doctors, nurses, psychologists, and social workers. It has detrimental effects of the services provided and the lives of people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA). The main objective of this study was to explore AIDS stigma manifestations among a sample composed of eighty health professionals and health profession students who participated in in-depth qualitative interviews. Four thematic categories stemmed from the data analysis process. These addressed the following subjects: social manifestations of stigma, stigma manifestations in the workplace, use of sensitive information to control PLWHA, and surveillance of PLWHA. Participants manifested instances of stigmatization they had witnessed in their work and training scenarios. Furthermore, they elaborated on the need to place effective surveillance mechanism on PLWHA in order to control the epidemic. PMID:21423837

  3. Mobilizing Lithuanian Health Professionals as Community Peer Leaders for AIDS Prevention: An International Primary Health Care Collaboration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norr, Kathleen F.; McElmurry, Beverly J.; Slutas, Frances M.; Christiansen, Carol D.; Misner, Susan J.; Marks, Beth A.

    2001-01-01

    Using primary health care and peer leadership models, U.S. nurses trained Lithuanian health professionals as community peer leaders in AIDS prevention. A national continuing education program is in place to sustain the initiative in Lithuania. (SK)

  4. Religion and HIV/AIDS stigma: Implications for health professionals in Puerto Rico

    PubMed Central

    Varas-Díaz, N.; Neilands, T.B.; Malavé Rivera, S.; Betancourt, E.

    2009-01-01

    HIV/AIDS stigma continues to be a barrier for prevention efforts. Its detrimental effects have been documented among people living with HIV/AIDS and encompass loss of social support and depression. When it is manifested by health professionals, it can lead to suboptimal services. Although strides have been made to document the effects of HIV/AIDS stigma, much needs to be done in order to understand the structural factors that can foster it. Such is the case of religion’s role on HIV/AIDS stigma in Puerto Rico. The Caribbean Island has a Judeo-Christian based culture due to years of Spanish colonisation. This religious influence continued under Protestantism as part of the Island’s integration as a non-incorporated territory of the USA. The main objective of this study was to explore the role of religion in HIV/AIDS stigma manifested by Puerto Rican health professionals in practice and in training. Through a mixed method approach, 501 health professionals completed qualitative interviews (n=80) and self-administered questionnaires (n=421). Results show that religion plays some role in conceptualisations of health and illness among participants in the study. Furthermore, the importance placed on religion and participation in such activities was related to higher levels of HIV/AIDS stigma. PMID:20087809

  5. A successful guide in understanding Latino immigrant patients: An aid for health care professionals

    PubMed Central

    McGuire, Allison A.; Garcés-Palacio, Isabel C.; Scarinci, Isabel C.

    2014-01-01

    Objective It has been shown that cultural and linguistic barriers may have a great impact on the quality of health care received by immigrants. The recent growth of Latino immigrants in new areas of the country (particularly in the South) has presented great challenges to the health care system and health care professionals in these states. Through a NCI funded community-based educational program (Sowing the Seeds of Health), we created an informative DVD to aid health care providers in better understanding Latino immigrant health beliefs and health care seeking behaviors. The educational DVD presented information on how to provide culturally competent care as it relates to Latino immigrants, their expectations when seeking care, and common cultural beliefs and practices. Health care professionals and Latino immigrants participated in the development and content of the DVD. Methods The intervention was delivered though various mediums; on-site, on-line, two national webcasts and mailed copies of the DVD. Pre- post self-administered questionnaires assessing knowledge and attitudes regarding culture competency and relevant topics addressed in the DVD. Results Four-hundred and sixty-three (N=463) health care professionals participated from across the United States. Intervention produced significant overall knowledge increase (p-value <0.001) in cultural competency, Latino cultural beliefs and barriers to healthcare access for Latino immigrants. Conclusion The findings indicate that a short DVD offered via multiple mediums may be a promising avenue for educating health care professionals about the needs and expectations of Latino immigrants in the U.S. PMID:22143490

  6. Plague Doctors in the HIV/AIDS Epidemic: Mental Health Professionals and the "San Francisco Model," 1981-1990.

    PubMed

    Blair, Thomas R

    2016-01-01

    Psychiatrists, psychologists, and other mental health professionals were among the first and most crucial responders to HIV/AIDS. Given an epidemic in which behavior and identity played fundamental roles, mental health professionals were uniquely positioned to conduct social research to explain the existence and spread of disease; to develop clinical understanding of psychological aspects of HIV/AIDS as they emerged; and to collaborate with affected communities to promote education and behavioral change. This study examines the roles of mental health professionals as "plague doctors" in San Francisco's response to HIV/AIDS, in the early years of the epidemic. Among the many collaborations and projects that distinguished the "San Francisco model" of response to this plague, bathhouse-based epidemiology, consult-liaison psychiatry, and community partnerships for counseling and education are examined in detail as illustrations of the epidemic-changing engagement of the mental health community. PMID:27374849

  7. Development and Validation of a Culturally Appropriate HIV/AIDS Stigma Scale for Puerto Rican Health Professionals in Training

    PubMed Central

    Díaz, Nelson Varas; Neilands, Torsten B.

    2009-01-01

    HIV/AIDS stigma continues to be an obstacle for primary and secondary HIV prevention. Its consequences for the lives of people living with the disease have been well documented and continue to be of great concern for health care providers and researchers in the field. These consequences are worsened when such stigma emanates from health professionals, as this can limit access to services. One of the main obstacles for HIV/AIDS Stigma research in Puerto Rico is the absence of quantitative measures to assess HIV/AIDS stigma manifestations among health professionals. In light of this gap in the scientific literature, the main objective of this study was to develop and test the psychometric properties of a culturally appropriate HIV/AIDS stigma scale for Puerto Rican health care providers and to develop a reduced form of the scale suitable for use in time-limited clinical settings. The developed measure was based on previous qualitative evidence gathered from Puerto Rican health professionals (Varas-Díaz, Serrano-García & Toro-Alfonso, 2005) and administered to a sample of 421 health professionals in training. The scale addresses 12 HIV/AIDS stigma dimensions. In quantitative analyses 11 of these dimensions demonstrated satisfactory validity and reliability. These dimensions in turn were subcomponents of a higher-order general stigma factor. Implications and limitations of these findings are discussed. PMID:20024702

  8. The use of professional theatre for health promotion including HIV / AIDS.

    PubMed

    Blair, C; Valadez, J J; Falkland, J

    1999-06-01

    Entertainment can be an effective form of information, education, and communication (IEC). In particular, theater can overcome any existing literacy barriers, add the personal face-to-face aspect of communication which uses the language and idiom of the people, and provoke emotional and analytical responses. The health promotion goals of theater productions should be made apparent in theatrical content. That content should be based upon a realistic assessment of the levels of knowledge held by the target audience, the attitudes they hold, and the behaviors they practice. The content should also be based upon an analysis of the barriers which audience members believe are impeding behavior change. Professional theatrical techniques should be used and thorough evaluation should always be conducted despite the additional costs it adds to a program. Decision-makers should also always consider the opportunity cost of using resources for a theater intervention and question what else could be accomplished with those funds. PMID:12349164

  9. Health Aides Serve...

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huscher, John

    1976-01-01

    The student health aide program of the University of Nebraska at Lincoln is a paid, auxiliary, trained health position in dorms, co-ops, and Greek houses, with personnel evaluated on the assistance provided for any physical, personal, social, or environmental health concerns students may have in accordance with the aide's training. (MB)

  10. First aid strategies that are helpful to young people developing a mental disorder: beliefs of health professionals compared to young people and parents

    PubMed Central

    Jorm, Anthony F; Morgan, Amy J; Wright, Annemarie

    2008-01-01

    Background Little is known about the best ways for a member of the public to respond when someone in their social network develops a mental disorder. Controlled trials are not feasible in this area, so expert consensus may be the best guide. Methods To assess expert views, postal surveys were carried out with Australian GPs, psychiatrists and psychologists listed on professional registers and with mental health nurses who were members of a professional college. These professionals were asked to rate the helpfulness of 10 potential first aid strategies for young people with one of four disorders: depression, depression with alcohol misuse, social phobia and psychosis. Data were obtained from 470 GPs, 591 psychiatrists, 736 psychologists and 522 mental health nurses, with respective response rates of 24%, 35%, 40% and 32%. Data on public views were available from an earlier telephone survey of 3746 Australian youth aged 12–25 years and 2005 of their parents, which included questions about the same strategies. Results A clear majority across the four professions believed in the helpfulness of listening to the person, suggesting professional help-seeking, making an appointment for the person to see a GP and asking about suicidal feelings. There was also a clear majority believing in the harmfulness of ignoring the person, suggesting use of alcohol to cope, and talking to them firmly. Compared to health professionals, young people and their parents were less likely to believe that asking about suicidal feelings would be helpful and more likely to believe it would be harmful. They were also less likely to believe that talking to the person firmly would be harmful. Conclusion Several first aid strategies can be recommended to the public based on agreement of clinicians about their likely helpfulness. In particular, there needs to be greater public awareness of the helpfulness of asking a young person with a mental health problem about suicidal feelings. PMID:18538033

  11. Health care and AIDS.

    PubMed

    Peck, J; Bezold, C

    1992-07-01

    The acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) is a harbinger for change in health care. There are many powerful forces poised to transform the industrialized health care structure of the twentieth century, and AIDS may act as either a catalyst or an amplifier for these forces. AIDS could, for example, swamp local resources and thereby help trigger national reform in a health care system that has already lost public confidence. AIDS can also hasten the paradigm shift that is occurring throughout health care. Many of the choices society will confront when dealing with AIDS carry implications beyond health care. Information about who has the disease, for example, already pits traditional individual rights against group interests. Future information systems could make discrimination based upon medical records a nightmare for a growing number of individuals. Yet these systems also offer the hope of accelerated progress against not only AIDS but other major health threats as well. The policy choices that will define society's response to AIDS can best be made in the context of a clearly articulated vision of a society that reflects our deepest values. PMID:10119289

  12. Facilitating Support Groups for Professionals Working with People with AIDS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grossman, Arnold H.; Silverstein, Charles

    1993-01-01

    Describes support groups for health care professionals who work with people with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) or Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) and who are experiencing burnout from excessive demands on their energy, strength, and resources. Discusses group administration, effective intervention techniques, and issues of health…

  13. AIDS: Legal Tools Helpful for Mental Health Counseling Interventions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedman, Ann Lorentson; Hughes, Rosemary B.

    1994-01-01

    Complex HIV and AIDS related legal issues confronting mental health professionals are addressed, specifically: living will, statutes, durable power of attorney, durable power of attorney for health care, rational suicide, euthanasia, workplace discrimination, and laws affecting minors. (JBJ)

  14. The Use of Health Aides in Migrant Health Projects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoff, Wilbur

    Intended for migrant project administrators and other professional workers, this document contains recommendations developed from a nationwide study for evaluating the utilization and effectiveness of health aides (indigenous workers) in migrant health programs. Recommendations are provided for five major phases of activity essential for effective…

  15. Health Professionals and the Bereaved.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osterweis, Marian; Townsend, Jessica

    Based on the premise that health care providers and institutions have a professional obligation to help bereaved families, this booklet focuses on the role of health care professionals in lessening distress, helping prevent pathological outcomes, and assisting the bereaved toward a satisfactory outcome. The information provided in this guide is…

  16. New Careers: The Community/Home Health Aide Trainee's Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hicks, Florence

    Intended for trainee use, the manual is in notebook format with a curriculum corresponding to the trainers' manual (VT 007 909), a related document. Part I, Basic Health Curriculum, deals with (1) the roles of health service aides, (2) Biological Potential and Equilibrium, (3) Professionals in the Health Field, (4) Public Health Administration,…

  17. Educating Future Environmental Health Professionals

    PubMed Central

    Knechtges, Paul L; Kelley, Timothy R

    2015-01-01

    Future environmental health problems will require a new generation of educated and trained professionals. Efforts to enhance the environmental public health workforce have been promoted by several organizations. While progress has been measured by these organizations, many environmental health academic programs are experiencing budget reductions and lower enrollments. One of the reasons for this trend is the so-called higher education crisis. We argue that training is not equivalent to education in the environmental health sciences, albeit the two terms are often used interchangeably. Organizations involved with the education, training, and credentialing of environmental health professionals must work together to ensure the viability and effectiveness of environmental health academic programs. PMID:26617460

  18. ICT and AIDS Literacy: A Challenge for Information Professionals in India

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ghosh, Maitrayee

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to describe the use of ICT to disseminate preventive health care information to combat the AIDS epidemic in India. The role of information professionals in various libraries and information centres and the challenges they are facing to increase HIV/AIDS awareness are discussed. Finally, recommendations are…

  19. The Financial Aid Professional: An Endangered Species?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russo, Joseph A.

    1995-01-01

    The changing role of the college financial aid administrator is examined, and contributing factors are discussed, including shifts in public perceptions of the aid officer's function, public lack of understanding of the financial aid process, technological advancement, economic change, the federal government's evolving influence, and changes in…

  20. Homemaker/Home Health Aide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missouri Univ., Columbia. Instructional Materials Lab.

    This curriculum guide provides materials for a five-unit home health aide course. Each unit contains 4 to 36 lesson plans. Unit topics and representative lesson plan topics are as follows: (1) introduction (ethical and legal responsibilities, time management, reporting and recording); (2) communication (techniques, meeting the public, therapeutic…

  1. Homemaker/Home Health Aide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    La Mothe, Dolores; And Others

    This curriculum guide is intended to assist vocational instructors in preparing students for entry-level employment as homemakers/home health aides and getting them ready for advanced training in the workplace. The package contains a competency/skill and task list, an instructor's guide, and an annotated bibliography. The following competencies…

  2. Internationally educated health professionals.

    PubMed

    Leatt, Peggy

    2010-01-01

    Even as recently as a decade ago, it was not uncommon for many Canadian decision- and policy makers in healthcare and government to ignore the matter of internationally educated healthcare professional (IEHP) integration and retention. With all the talk in the past few years, however, of employee shortages in nearly every healthcare profession and a rapidly aging population that requires more and more care, nobody can afford to neglect this potentially large and highly skilled talent pool. PMID:20523134

  3. Graduate and Professional Education (Including Admissions and Financial Aid)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    College and University, 1977

    1977-01-01

    Topics covered at the AACRAO's 63rd annual meeting include: graduate education forecasting, admissions management, aid, and recruitment; quality control in nontraditional graduate education; and financial planning for the professional school student. (LBH)

  4. Health scares: Professional priorities.

    PubMed

    Hooker, Claire

    2010-01-01

    Currently, many health scholars are concerned about health scares. But what do they mean by the term 'health scare' - are health scares an identifiable phenomenon and how do we currently understand their causation and consequences? By collecting and analysing published articles about events considered to be health scares, this article maps the current views of scholars on their characteristics and causes. Results show that health scares are generally understood as events characterized by fears of catastrophic consequences but little actual mortality. However, the social and economic impacts of these events have often been severe. This survey shows that health scares can be usefully sorted into six categories, each with identifiable internal dynamics, suggesting different communications strategies to achieve resolution in each category. Using the social amplification of risk framework, the conditions under which risk signals were amplified were traced in general terms among major stakeholders. Simple causes for health scare events could not be identified, though some triggers did emerge. Importantly, public ignorance of real risk, media scaremongering and political inaction could be dismissed as primary explanations, though they were sometimes factors in scare events. Implications for risk communication and for future research on risk and public health are discussed. PMID:20051427

  5. Space Derived Health Aids (AID, Heart Monitor)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    CPI's spinoff from miniaturized pace circuitry is the new heart-assist device, the AID implantable automatic pulse generator. AID pulse generator monitors the heart continuously, recognizes onset of fibrillation, then administers a corrective electrical shock. A mini- computer, a power source, and two electrodes which sense heart activity are included in the unit. An associated system was also developed. It includes an external recorder to be worn by AID patients and a physician's console to display the data stored by the recorder. System provides a record of fibrillation occurrences and the ensuing defibrillation.

  6. A Primer on Economics for Financial Aid Professionals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baum, Sandy

    This primer is intended to provide college financial aid professionals with a background in fundamental areas of economics. Its goal is to provide a stronger understanding of the key principles that shape need analysis systems. Part 1 presents basic economic concepts and discusses their application to college enrollment and student aid. These…

  7. Resources for Health Professionals

    Cancer.gov

    Get the latest information about cancer with our PDQ® Cancer Information Summaries and find NCI-supported clinical trials. We also offer training information and tools as well as resources for public health program planners and cancer registrars.

  8. Occupational Safety and Health Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wash, Pat

    1975-01-01

    The growing concern for safety in both the workplace and in consumer products will create many new jobs through the mid-1980's--especially in private industry. The largest number of safety professionals are safety engineers; others include fire protection engineers, industrial hygienists, loss control and occupational health consultants, and…

  9. Assessing Health Professional Education: Workshop Summary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cuff, Patricia A.

    2014-01-01

    "Assessing Health Professional Education" is the summary of a workshop hosted by the Institute of Medicine's Global Forum on Innovation in Health Professional Education to explore assessment of health professional education. At the event, Forum members shared personal experiences and learned from patients, students, educators, and…

  10. Health aid and governance in developing countries.

    PubMed

    Fielding, David

    2011-07-01

    Despite anecdotal evidence that the quality of governance in recipient countries affects the allocation of international health aid, there is no quantitative evidence on the magnitude of this effect, or on which dimensions of governance influence donor decisions. We measure health-aid flows over 1995-2006 for 109 aid recipients, matching aid data with measures of different dimensions of governance and a range of country-specific economic and health characteristics. Everything else being equal, countries with more political rights receive significantly more aid, but so do countries with higher corruption levels. The dependence of aid on political rights, even when we control for other governance indicators, suggests that health aid is sometimes used as an incentive to reward political reforms. PMID:20575152

  11. Spirituality and the health professional.

    PubMed

    Schaub, Richard

    2013-09-01

    The inclusion of spirituality in addictions recovery began with the 12-steps program of Alcoholics Anonymous. Cofounded by Bill Wilson, the 12-steps' spiritual orientation is based on Wilson's own recovery from alcoholism that was associated with a spiritual experience. His correspondence with Carl Jung, who verified the importance of Wilson's experience, empowered Wilson to make spirituality central to the 12 steps. Spirituality remains a source of misunderstanding between the scientific, empirically informed mental health community, and the 12-step recovery movement. This article offers an outline of spiritual development, based on neuroscience, which the professional can utilize in the spiritual aspect of a patient's recovery. PMID:24041179

  12. Undergraduate mental health nursing education in Australia: More than Mental Health First Aid.

    PubMed

    Happell, Brenda; Wilson, Rhonda; McNamara, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Mental Health First Aid training is designed to equip people with the skills to help others who may be developing mental health problems or experiencing mental health crises. This training has consistently been shown to increase: (1) the recognition of mental health problems; (2) the extent to which course trainees' beliefs about treatment align with those of mental health professionals; (3) their intentions to help others; and (4) their confidence in their abilities to assist others. This paper presents a discussion of the potential role of Mental Health First Aid training in undergraduate mental health nursing education. Three databases (CINAHL, Medline, and PsycINFO) were searched to identify literature on Mental Health First Aid. Although Mental Health First Aid training has strong benefits, this first responder level of education is insufficient for nurses, from whom people expect to receive professional care. It is recommended that: (1) Mental Health First Aid training be made a prerequisite of preregistration nurse education, (2) registered nurses make a larger contribution to addressing the mental health needs of Australians requiring care, and (3) current registered nurses take responsibility for ensuring that they can provided basic mental health care, including undertaking training to rectify gaps in their knowledge. PMID:26775530

  13. Theodore E. Woodward Award. HIV/AIDS, ethics, and medical professionalism: where went the debate?

    PubMed Central

    Bryan, Charles S.

    2003-01-01

    The recent surge of dialogue about medical professionalism has largely ignored HIV/AIDS, perhaps because the ethical issues that abounded during the 1980s and early 1990s have become largely passé. Prior to the introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in 1996, the care ethic for patients with HIV/AIDS depended heavily on compassion since effective treatment was unavailable. Moreover, physicians and other health care workers often assumed physical risks on behalf of patients. HAART transformed the care ethic for HIV/AIDS to one dependent mainly on medical competence. Reflecting on the epidemic, I propose a distinction between "basic" and "higher" professionalism. Basic professionalism requires discipline-specific competence, facilitated by adherence to the four cardinal virtues (prudence, temperance, justice, and courage). Higher professionalism brings into play the transcendent virtues: faith, hope, and--especially--love (compassion). Specific examples of "compassion" in the strict sense of "suffering with" include caring without adequate reimbursement, caring when one would rather be doing something else, and assuming emotional or physical risks on behalf of patients. The physicians and other health care workers who displayed such compassion in abundance between 1981 and 1996 deserve our remembrance as exemplars of a higher professionalism. PMID:12813930

  14. Education and Training for Health Professionals

    Cancer.gov

    The Cancer Classroom Series is a collection of webinars that highlights topics that provide the educational content, tools, and resources necessary for health professionals, especially those working in public health, to address cancer as a public health problem.

  15. Public Health Nursing for People with AIDS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dickinson, Dena; And Others

    Individuals with Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) or AIDS-related conditions (ARC) need continual care and support, at a level which can severely tax the health resources of a community. Public health nursing should have a central role in the effective and efficient response to this devastating problem. Since the early stages of the AIDS…

  16. A new world with AIDS--health promotion as a catalyst for change.

    PubMed

    Meyer, A J

    1987-12-01

    Preventing the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) requires an unprecedented response from public health professionals, particularly educators and communicators involved with health promotion. Health promotion is defined and discussed in the light of recent experience in a broad range of public health programs. Increased sophistication is needed in the application of social science within health promotion and increased facility in mobilizing cross-sectorial resources to achieve public health objectives and generate confidence in approaching AIDS prevention. PMID:3433755

  17. Changing Roles of Mental Health Professionals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garai, Josef E.

    The roles that mental health professionals must play to facilitate the prevention of mental illness and the introduction of mentally healthy attitudes in our society is discussed. Mental health professionals must re-examine the meaning of mental health in the context of the current world situation and ask themselves to what extent they are…

  18. Are rural health professionals also social entrepreneurs?

    PubMed

    Farmer, Jane; Kilpatrick, Sue

    2009-12-01

    Social entrepreneurs formally or informally generate community associations and networking that produces social outcomes. Social entrepreneurship is a relatively new and poorly understood concept. Policy promotes generating community activity, particularly in rural areas, for health and social benefits and 'community resilience'. Rural health professionals might be well placed to generate community activity due to their status and networks. This exploratory study, conducted in rural Tasmania and the Highlands and Islands of Scotland considered whether rural health professionals act as social entrepreneurs. We investigated activities generated and processes of production. Thirty-eight interviews were conducted with general practitioners, community nurses, primary healthcare managers and allied health professionals living and working rurally. Interviewees were self-selecting responders to an invitation for rural health professionals who were 'formally or informally generating community associations or networking that produced social outcomes'. We found that rural health professionals initiated many community activities with social outcomes, most related to health. Their identification of opportunities related to knowledge of health needs and examples of initiatives seen elsewhere. Health professionals described ready access to useful people and financial resources. In building activities, health professionals could simultaneously utilise skills and knowledge from professional, community member and personal dimensions. Outcomes included social and health benefits, personal 'buzz' and community capacity. Health professionals' actions could be described as social entrepreneurship: identifying opportunities, utilising resources and making 'deals'. They also align with community development. Health professionals use contextual knowledge to envisage and grow activities, indicating that, as social entrepreneurs, they do not explicitly choose a social mission, rather they

  19. New health professional practice patterns.

    PubMed

    Celentano, D D

    1978-10-01

    Career patterns and practice correlates of 143 New Health Professionals (NHPs) educated at one institution are studied to determine similarities among different types of practitioners (Health Associates and Nurse Practitioners). Employment since graduation has been high with low job turnover. Nurse Practitioners (NPs) are found most often in metropolitan areas, while over 50 per cent of Health Associates (HAs) are employed in rural settings. More NPs work in hospitals than HAs, who have a higher rate of employment in private practices, HAs are also involved in a wider range of medical specialties than NPs. In terms of patient care, HAs see more patients than NPs and also have larger primary care caseloads. From a functional perspective, only minimal differences are found in comparing the activities of the practitioners. Most NHPs have high job satisfaction, although HAs anticipate a high rate of job turnover; no differences were found in levels of perceived responsibility nor in the amount of supervision in patient care. Although there were only small differences in the activities of the two groups, numerous contextual and practice correlates were found to differentiate the NHPs, a finding which argues against the current practice of conceptualizing NHPs as a single group. PMID:29997

  20. The Relationship of Health Aid to Population Health Improvements

    PubMed Central

    Bendavid, Eran; Bhattacharya, Jay

    2016-01-01

    Importance Foreign aid to the health sector is an important component of all health spending in many developing countries. The relationship between health aid and changes in population health among aid recipients remains unknown. Objective To quantify the relationship between health aid and changes in life expectancy and under-5 mortality among aid recipient nations. Design Cross-country panel data analysis of the relationship between longitudinal measures of health aid, life expectancy, and under-5 mortality. Using difference models for longitudinal data with fixed effects for countries and years, we estimate the unique relationship between health aid and changes in life expectancy and under-5 mortality, controlling for gross domestic product per capita, urbanization, and total fertility rate. Setting and participants 140 aid-recipient countries between 1974 and 2010. Main Exposures and Outcomes and Measures The main exposure is the annual amount of development assistance directed to the health sector in constant 2010 US dollars; the principal outcomes are the improvements in under-5 mortality and life expectancy in in the period following aid receipt. Results We find that between 1974 and 2010, life expectancy increased by 0.24 months faster (95% CI 0.02-0.46, p=0.03) and under-5 mortality declined by 0.14 per 1,000 live births faster (95% CI 0.02-0.26, p=0.02) with each 1% increase in health aid. We also find that the association between health aid and health improvements has been strengthening over time, with the closest association between 2000 and 2010. We find that health improvements associated with health aid are measurable for 3-5 years after aid disbursement. These findings imply that an increase of $1 billion in health aid could be associated with 364,800 (95% CI 98,400-630,000) fewer under-5 deaths. Conclusions Foreign aid to the health sector is related to increasing life expectancy and declining under-5 mortality. The returns to aid appear to last

  1. Professional integration as a process of professional resocialization: internationally educated health professionals in Canada.

    PubMed

    Neiterman, Elena; Bourgeault, Ivy Lynn

    2015-04-01

    This paper examines the process of professional resocialization among internationally educated health care professionals (IEHPs) in Canada. Analyzing data from qualitative interviews with 179 internationally educated physicians, nurses, and midwives and 70 federal, provincial and regional stakeholders involved in integration of IEHPs, we examine (1) which aspects of professional work are modified in transition to a new health care system; (2) which aspects of professional practice are learned by IEHPs in the new health environment, and (3) how IEHPs maintain their professional identity in transition to a new health care system. In doing so, we compare the accounts of IEHPs with the policy stakeholders' positions and analyze the similarities and the differences across three health care professions (medicine, nursing, and midwifery). This enables us to explore the issue of professional resocialization from the analytical intersection of gender, professional dominance, and institutional/organizational lenses. PMID:25766266

  2. Mental Health Professionals and the Bereaved.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osterweis, Marian; Townsend, Jessica

    This booklet provides mental health professionals with an analytic framework for understanding psychosocial reactions to bereavement of adults and children and for selecting appropriate intervention strategies. It also identifies those people most likely to need the intervention of a mental health professional to help prevent or mitigate…

  3. HOME HEALTH AIDE TRAINING PROJECT. FINAL REPORT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greater New Haven Community Council, CT.

    THE HOME HEALTH AIDE PERFORMS SIMPLE PERSONAL CARE FUNCTIONS UNDER NURSING SUPERVISION IN THE HOME CARE OF AN ILL OR DISABLED PERSON. THE PROJECT OBJECTIVES WERE TO TRAIN AS AIDES 30 MEN AND WOMEN AGE 45 YEARS AND OLDER WITH LIMITED INCOMES TO MEET A COMMUNITY EMPLOYMENT NEED AND TO EXPERIMENT IN RECRUITMENT, SELECTION, TRAINING, AND EMPLOYMENT…

  4. AIDS, Alcohol & Health Care. Chapter 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Acampora, Alfonso P., Ed.; Nebelkopf, Ethan, Ed.

    This document contains 10 papers from the ninth World Conference of Therapeutic Communities (TC) that deal with a variety of health-related subjects. Papers include: (1) "AIDS among IV Drug Users: Epidemiology, Natural History & TC Experiences" (Don C. Des Jarlais, et al.); (2) "AIDS and Therapeutic Communities: Policy Implications" (Don C. Des…

  5. Sources of Dental Health Teaching Aids.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crawford, Jean H.

    1982-01-01

    Sources of dental health education teaching aids which are available for free or at minimal cost include: (1) The American Dental Health Association; (2) state and local departments of public health; (3) schools of dentistry, dental hygiene, and dental assisting; and (4) the Educator's International Guide. (JN)

  6. Minority Women's Health: HIV/AIDS

    MedlinePlus

    ... AIDS more than women of other races include: Poverty — One in 4 African-American women lives in poverty, which is strongly linked to HIV risk. People living in poverty also get lower-quality health care in general, ...

  7. [Health economic evaluation of AIDS response].

    PubMed

    Sun, Jiangping

    2015-06-01

    During the past over 20 years of AIDS response in China, different fields from the international society and domestic sources provide significant amounts of resources for China's AIDS response. The investment, distribution and use of these resources and their effect has become the concern of the society. The health economic evaluation method is used to scientifically answer these questions, which is also the motivation of the evaluation studies. Based on several studies on health economic evaluation of AIDS response in this issue, concepts and issues related to this area are summarized. It is important for the readers to make a point of health economics evaluation, and it is also of great importance to know its limitations to provide the basis for future proper use of AIDS health economic evaluation results. PMID:26310326

  8. Orientation to Health Aide Careers Mini-Course & Home Health Aide Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Novak, Kathy; And Others

    Designed for use in a self-paced, open-entry/open-exit vocational training program for home health aides, this program guide is one of six for teachers of adult women offenders from a correctional institution. Module topic outlines are presented on eight topics: your career as a health aide; maintaining health; recognizing illness; positioning and…

  9. College Health Professionals and Academic Librarians: Collaboration for Student Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hallyburton, Ann; Kolenbrander, Nancy; Robertson, Carolyn

    2008-01-01

    College health professionals must find new ways of educating students on finding and evaluating consumer health information, specifically in the online environment. Librarians are trained as information professionals; however, librarians at general academic libraries are not taking a lead role in providing consumer health information. Objective:…

  10. Financial Aid for Minorities in Health Fields.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrett Park Press, MD.

    This directory of financial aid sources for minority students majoring in health or health-related fields includes the following types of information: (1) summary and description of the fields, including college enrollment statistics, demand for graduates, including salary ranges, and definitions of the fields and specialty areas; (2) directory of…

  11. Professional Empowerment and Teaching Sociology to Health Care Professionals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iphofen, Ron; Poland, Fiona

    1997-01-01

    Provides an overview of the design, implementation, and evaluation of sociology courses in health-care-professional education in England. Discusses the policy changes that led to the inclusion of these courses into medical, nursing, midwifery, and radiography curricula. Examines pedagogical and logistical issues as well as course content. (MJP)

  12. Transforming Health Professionals into Population Health Change Agents

    PubMed Central

    Naccarella, Lucio; Butterworth, Iain; Moore, Timothy

    2016-01-01

    Background With the recognition that professional education has not kept pace with the challenges facing the health and human service system, there has been a move to transformative education and learning professional development designed to expand the number of enlightened and empowered change agents with the competence to implement changes at an individual, organisation and systems level. Design and Methods Since 2010, the Department of Health and Human Services in Victoria, Australia, in collaboration with The University of Melbourne’s School of Population and Global Health, has delivered seven population health short courses aimed to catalyse participants’ transformation into population health change agents. This paper presents key learnings from a combination of evaluation data from six population health short courses using a transformative learning framework from a 2010 independent international commission for health professionals that was designed to support the goals of transformative and interdependent health professionals. Participatory realist evaluation approaches and qualitative methods were used. Results Evaluation findings reveal that there were mixed outcomes in facilitating participants’ implementation of population health approaches, and their transformation into population health agents upon their return to their workplaces. Core enablers, barriers and requirements, at individual, organisational and system levels influence the capability of participants to implement population health approaches. The iterative and systemic evolution of the population health short courses, from a one off event to a program of inter-dependent modules, demonstrates sustained commitment by the short course developers and organisers to the promotion of transformative population health learning outcomes. Conclusions To leverage this commitment, recognising that professional development is not an event but part of an ongoing transformative process, suggestions to

  13. Health professionals' alcohol-related professional practices and the relationship between their personal alcohol attitudes and behavior and professional practices: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Bakhshi, Savita; While, Alison E

    2014-01-01

    Health professionals' personal health behaviors have been found to be associated with their practices with patients in areas such as smoking, physical activity and weight management, but little is known in relation to alcohol use. This review has two related strands and aims to: (1) examine health professionals' alcohol-related health promotion practices; and (2) explore the relationship between health professionals' personal alcohol attitudes and behaviors, and their professional alcohol-related health promotion practices. A comprehensive literature search of the Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, CINAHL, British Nursing Index, Web of Science, Scopus and Science Direct (2007-2013) identified 26 studies that met the inclusion criteria for Strand 1, out of which six were analyzed for Strand 2. The findings indicate that health professionals use a range of methods to aid patients who are high-risk alcohol users. Positive associations were reported between health professionals' alcohol-related health promotion activities and their personal attitudes towards alcohol (n = 2), and their personal alcohol use (n = 2). The findings have some important implications for professional education. Future research should focus on conducting well-designed studies with larger samples to enable us to draw firm conclusions and develop the evidence base. PMID:24366045

  14. 78 FR 44459 - Designation of Health Professional(s) Shortage Areas

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-24

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Public Health Service 42 CFR Part 5 Designation of Health Professional(s) Shortage Areas... having a mental health professional(s)'', insert the word ``shortage'' before the comma. BILLING...

  15. Exploring professionalization among Brazilian oral health technicians

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Professional dental auxiliaries emerged in the early 20th century in the United States of America and quickly spread to Europe and other regions of the world. In Brazil, however, oral health technicians (OHTs), who occupy a similar role as dental hygienists, had a long journey before the occupation achieved legal recognition: Brazilian Law 11.889, which regulates this occupation in the country, was only enacted in 2008. The aim of this paper is to review the literature on the professionalization of OHTs, highlighting the triggering, limiting and conflicting aspects that exerted an influence on the historical progress of these professionals in Brazil. We have tested Abbott’s and Larson’s theory on professionalization, against the history of OHTs. A number of different dental corporative interests exerted an influence over professionalization, especially in discussions regarding the permissible activities of these professionals in the oral cavity of patients. With primary health care advances in Brazil, the importance of these professionals has once again come to the forefront. This seems to be a key point in the consolidation of OHTs in the area of human resources for health in Brazil. PMID:22520155

  16. Exploring professionalization among Brazilian oral health technicians.

    PubMed

    Sanglard-Oliveira, Carla Aparecida; Werneck, Marcos Azeredo Furquim; Lucas, Simone Dutra; Abreu, Mauro Henrique Nogueira Guimarães

    2012-01-01

    Professional dental auxiliaries emerged in the early 20th century in the United States of America and quickly spread to Europe and other regions of the world. In Brazil, however, oral health technicians (OHTs), who occupy a similar role as dental hygienists, had a long journey before the occupation achieved legal recognition: Brazilian Law 11.889, which regulates this occupation in the country, was only enacted in 2008. The aim of this paper is to review the literature on the professionalization of OHTs, highlighting the triggering, limiting and conflicting aspects that exerted an influence on the historical progress of these professionals in Brazil. We have tested Abbott's and Larson's theory on professionalization, against the history of OHTs. A number of different dental corporative interests exerted an influence over professionalization, especially in discussions regarding the permissible activities of these professionals in the oral cavity of patients. With primary health care advances in Brazil, the importance of these professionals has once again come to the forefront. This seems to be a key point in the consolidation of OHTs in the area of human resources for health in Brazil. PMID:22520155

  17. [Professional health cards (CPS): informatic health care system in France].

    PubMed

    Fortuit, P

    2005-09-01

    The Professional Health Card Public interest group (Groupement d'Intérêt Public-Carte de professionnel de Santé (GIP-CPS)) was founded in 1993 as a joint initiative by the different parties involved in health care in France: the state, the representatives of the health care professions and the compulsory and complementary health insurance organizations. The CPS system enables safe exchange and electronic sharing of medical data. Via Intranet connections and Extranet hosting of medical files, databases, the CPS system enables health care professionals who access servers to be identified with certainty. For email exhanges, the CPS systems guarantees the sender's identity and capacity. The electronic signature gives legal value to the email. The system also enables confidential email. The health card system (CPS) contributes to making the health service efficient. Shared medical files, health care networks, health warning systems or electronic requests for reimbursement of health insurance expenses all use the CPS system. More than 300,000 health care professionals use it regularly. The freedom of movement of patients throughout Europe has led to the growth of exchanges and information sharing between health professionals in the States of the Union. More and more health professionals will be leaving their own countries to work in foreign countries in the future. It is essential that their freedom of movement is accompanied by the ability to prove their rights to practice. PMID:16385785

  18. School Health Promotion and Teacher Professional Identity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jourdan, Didier; Simar, Carine; Deasy, Christine; Carvalho, Graça S.; McNamara, Patricia Mannix

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Health and education are inextricably linked. Health promotion sits somewhat uncomfortably within schools, often remaining a marginal aspect of teachers' work. The purpose of this paper is to examine the compatibility of an HP-initiative with teacher professional identity. Design/methodology/approach: A qualitative research design was…

  19. 40 CFR 350.40 - Disclosure to health professionals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Disclosure to health professionals... COMMUNITY RIGHT-TO-KNOW INFORMATION: AND TRADE SECRET DISCLOSURES TO HEALTH PROFESSIONALS Disclosure of Trade Secret Information to Health Professionals § 350.40 Disclosure to health professionals....

  20. 40 CFR 350.40 - Disclosure to health professionals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Disclosure to health professionals... COMMUNITY RIGHT-TO-KNOW INFORMATION: AND TRADE SECRET DISCLOSURES TO HEALTH PROFESSIONALS Disclosure of Trade Secret Information to Health Professionals § 350.40 Disclosure to health professionals....

  1. 40 CFR 350.40 - Disclosure to health professionals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Disclosure to health professionals... COMMUNITY RIGHT-TO-KNOW INFORMATION: AND TRADE SECRET DISCLOSURES TO HEALTH PROFESSIONALS Disclosure of Trade Secret Information to Health Professionals § 350.40 Disclosure to health professionals....

  2. 40 CFR 350.40 - Disclosure to health professionals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Disclosure to health professionals... COMMUNITY RIGHT-TO-KNOW INFORMATION: AND TRADE SECRET DISCLOSURES TO HEALTH PROFESSIONALS Disclosure of Trade Secret Information to Health Professionals § 350.40 Disclosure to health professionals....

  3. 40 CFR 350.40 - Disclosure to health professionals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Disclosure to health professionals... COMMUNITY RIGHT-TO-KNOW INFORMATION: AND TRADE SECRET DISCLOSURES TO HEALTH PROFESSIONALS Disclosure of Trade Secret Information to Health Professionals § 350.40 Disclosure to health professionals....

  4. Reproductive health professionals' adoption of emerging technologies for health promotion.

    PubMed

    Smith, Peggy B; Buzi, Ruth S

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess reproductive health professionals' familiarity with and use of various electronic technologies to support health promotion. The study also examined the relationship between demographic characteristics and attitudes and beliefs of the effectiveness of new technologies and perceived barriers for usage. A total of 165 reproductive health professionals at two conferences related to reproductive health in the United States completed the study survey. Personal and organizational factors affected the adoption of electronic technologies for health promotion. This included lack of knowledge, skills, and confidence as well as privacy concerns. The results of the study also suggested that being from an older generation was associated with having lower levels of knowledge, skills, and confidence in using new media. These findings highlight the importance of creating learning opportunities on the use of new technology for health promotion as well as addressing specific perceived barriers among reproductive health professionals in order to promote the adoption of these technologies. PMID:25411221

  5. Development of a Decision Aid for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Involving Intensive Care Unit Patients' and Health Professionals' Participation Using User-Centered Design and a Wiki Platform for Rapid Prototyping: A Research Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Heyland, Daren Keith; Ebell, Mark H; Dupuis, Audrey; Lavoie-Bérard, Carole-Anne; Légaré, France; Archambault, Patrick Michel

    2016-01-01

    Background Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is an intervention used in cases of cardiac arrest to revive patients whose heart has stopped. Because cardiac arrest can have potentially devastating outcomes such as severe neurological deficits even if CPR is performed, patients must be involved in determining in advance if they want CPR in the case of an unexpected arrest. Shared decision making (SDM) facilitates discussions about goals of care regarding CPR in intensive care units (ICUs). Patient decision aids (DAs) are proven to support the implementation of SDM. Many patient DAs about CPR exist, but they are not universally implemented in ICUs in part due to lack of context and cultural adaptation. Adaptation to local context is an important phase of implementing any type of knowledge tool such as patient DAs. User-centered design supported by a wiki platform to perform rapid prototyping has previously been successful in creating knowledge tools adapted to the needs of patients and health professionals (eg, asthma action plans). This project aims to explore how user-centered design and a wiki platform can support the adaptation of an existing DA for CPR to the local context. Objective The primary objective is to use an existing DA about CPR to create a wiki-based DA that is adapted to the context of a single ICU and tailorable to individual patient’s risk factors while employing user-centered design. The secondary objective is to document the use of a wiki platform for the adaptation of patient DAs. Methods This study will be conducted in a mixed surgical and medical ICU at Hôtel-Dieu de Lévis, Quebec, Canada. We plan to involve all 5 intensivists and recruit at least 20 alert and oriented patients admitted to the ICU and their family members if available. In the first phase of this study, we will observe 3 weeks of daily interactions between patients, families, intensivists, and other allied health professionals. We will specifically observe 5 dyads of

  6. AIDS: Workplace Issues. INFO-LINE. Practical Guidelines for Training and Development Professionals. Issue 9208.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Society for Training and Development, Alexandria, VA.

    Practical guidelines are presented for training and development professionals dealing with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) in the workplace. The following topics are covered: AIDS in the workplace; AIDS basics, including information on the required corporate commitment and transmission of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV); employment…

  7. Confronting AIDS. Directions for Public Health, Health Care, and Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Institute of Medicine (NAS), Washington, DC.

    This book is addressed to anyone involved with or affected by the Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) epidemic, including legislators, researchers, health care personnel, insurance providers, educators, health officials, executives in the pharmaceutical industry, blood bank administrators, and other concerned individuals. The following…

  8. Breastfeeding. COTALMA: training health professionals.

    PubMed

    Casanovas, M C

    1994-01-01

    The Comite Tecnico de Apoyo a la Lactancia Materna (COTALMA), the Technical Breastfeeding Support Committee, was founded in Bolivia in 1989. It is financed by the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) and the United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF). It is administered in coordination with the Ministry of Health (MOH). MOH and UNICEF choose the hospitals, who send teams that include a pediatrician, a gynecologist, a nurse, and a nutritionist. The first phase of the course (5.5 days) covers the scientific background of breastfeeding. A baseline study is then planned and conducted at each hospital. 2 to 3 months later, the second phase takes place during which data is presented and breast feeding programs are developed for each hospital. Communication, training, counseling, and planning and evaluation are covered. Practicums are conducted at hospitals. Trainers are usually members of COTALMA. The person in charge of maternal and child health services at MOH lectures on national health policies concerning mothers and children. Training includes use of the national health card, breastfeeding and child survival, and breastfeeding as a family planning method. Culturally appropriate course materials, which are in Spanish, are adapted from those developed by Wellstart International. Articles by COTALMA members and others are added. Participants are encouraged to train all staff at their institutions. PMID:12287930

  9. Radiologic Professionalism in Modern Health Care.

    PubMed

    Hryhorczuk, Anastasia L; Hanneman, Kate; Eisenberg, Ronald L; Meyer, Elaine C; Brown, Stephen D

    2015-10-01

    Modern radiology is at the forefront of technological progress in medicine, a position that often places unique challenges on its professional character. This article uses "Medical Professionalism in the New Millennium: A Physician Charter," a document published in 2002 and endorsed by several major radiology organizations, as a lens for exploring professional challenges in modern radiology. The three main tenets of the Charter emphasize patient welfare, patient autonomy, and the reduction of disparities in health care distribution. This article reviews the ways in which modern technology and financial structures potentially create stressors on professionalism in radiology, while highlighting the opportunities they provide for radiologists seeking to fulfill the professional goals articulated in the Charter. Picture archiving and communication systems (PACS) and voice recognition systems have transformed the speed of radiology and enhanced the ability of radiologists to improve patient care but also have brought new tensions to the workplace. Although teleradiology may improve global access to radiologists, it may also promote the commoditization of radiology, which diminishes the professional stature of radiologists. Social media and patient portals provide radiologists with new forums for interacting with the public and patients, potentially promoting patient welfare. However, patient privacy and autonomy are important considerations. Finally, modern financial structures provide radiologists with both entrepreneurial opportunities as well as the temptation for unprofessional conduct. Each of these advances carries the potential for professional growth while testing the professional stature of radiology. By considering the risks and benefits of emerging technologies in the modern radiology world, radiologists can chart an ethical and professional future path. PMID:26466185

  10. Hispanic Mental Health Professionals. Monograph No. 5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olmedo, Esteban L., Ed.; Lopez, Steven, Ed.

    This volume is a collection of reports presented at a 1976 meeting held on the issue of Spanish American professional representation in the mental health field in the United States. Paper topics include: (1) Hispanics in psychiatry; (2) the current status of Hispanic social workers; (3) Hispanic psychiatric nursing personnel in the U.S.; (4) the…

  11. Media for the education of health professionals.

    PubMed

    Gibson, D A

    1991-03-01

    The benefits and pitfalls of applying media and communications techniques to the education of health professionals are considered in the context of their use in the classroom, for independent study and for distance education. The difficulties are emphasized for managing learning materials of this kind, and for keeping them up-to-date. PMID:1713376

  12. Death Education for the Health Professional.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benoliel, Jeanne Quint, Ed.

    The perspectives of a number of health professionals based on their experiences in providing death education courses are presented in essays. In "Interdisciplinary Death Education in a Nursing School" (Helen L. Swain and Kathleen V. Cowles), the development of an undergraduate elective course in death, dying, and bereavement at the University of…

  13. AIDS, policy analysis, and the electorate: the role of schools of public health.

    PubMed

    Krieger, N; Lashof, J C

    1988-04-01

    Current debates concerning appropriate policy to combat the epidemic of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) have raised critical questions regarding the role that schools of public health and individual public health professionals should play, if any, in AIDS-related policy analysis and social advocacy. In the summer of 1986, the School of Public Health at the University of California at Berkeley initiated a telegram sent by the Deans of all 23 schools of public health to protest US Department of Justice AIDS policy and, in the subsequent fall, the school expanded its public educational role in an unprecedented manner by initiating and issuing, with California's other three schools of public health, a policy analysis of Proposition 64, the LaRouche AIDS Quarantine Initiative. That analysis exposed the proposition's fallacious claims regarding casual transmission of AIDS and served to educate the electorate on the likely public health impact of this deleterious legislation. Based on these experiences, and in light of ongoing national controversy regarding AIDS, we believe schools of public health have an important role to play in policy analysis, and individual public health professionals have a role to play in social advocacy. PMID:3348472

  14. AIDS, policy analysis, and the electorate: the role of schools of public health.

    PubMed Central

    Krieger, N; Lashof, J C

    1988-01-01

    Current debates concerning appropriate policy to combat the epidemic of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) have raised critical questions regarding the role that schools of public health and individual public health professionals should play, if any, in AIDS-related policy analysis and social advocacy. In the summer of 1986, the School of Public Health at the University of California at Berkeley initiated a telegram sent by the Deans of all 23 schools of public health to protest US Department of Justice AIDS policy and, in the subsequent fall, the school expanded its public educational role in an unprecedented manner by initiating and issuing, with California's other three schools of public health, a policy analysis of Proposition 64, the LaRouche AIDS Quarantine Initiative. That analysis exposed the proposition's fallacious claims regarding casual transmission of AIDS and served to educate the electorate on the likely public health impact of this deleterious legislation. Based on these experiences, and in light of ongoing national controversy regarding AIDS, we believe schools of public health have an important role to play in policy analysis, and individual public health professionals have a role to play in social advocacy. PMID:3348472

  15. Health professionals for global health: include dental personnel upfront!

    PubMed

    Preet, Raman

    2013-01-01

    The Global Health Beyond 2015 was organized in Stockholm in April 2013, which was announced as public engagement and where the dialogue focused on three main themes: social determinants of health, climate change and the non-communicable diseases. This event provided opportunity for both students and health professionals to interact and brainstorm ideas to be formalized into Stockholm Declaration on Global Health. Amongst the active participation of various health professionals, one that was found significantly missing was that of oral health. Keeping this as background in this debate, a case for inclusion of oral health professions is presented by organizing the argument in four areas: education, evidence base, political will and context and what each one offers at a time when Scandinavia is repositioning itself in global health. PMID:23863132

  16. Designing an Electronic Personal Health Record for Professional Iranian Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Abdolkhani, Robab; Halabchi, Farzin; Safdari, Reza; Dargahi, Hossein; Shadanfar, Kamran

    2014-01-01

    Background: By providing sports organizations with electronic records and instruments that can be accessed at any time or place, specialized care can be offered to athletes regardless of injury location, and this makes the follow-up from first aid through to full recovery more efficient. Objectives: The aim of this study was to develop an electronic personal health record for professional Iranian athletes. Patients and Methods: First, a comparative study was carried out on the types of professional athletes’existing handheld and electronic health information management systems currently being used in Iran and leading countries in the field of sports medicine including; Australia, Canada and the United States. Then a checklist was developed containing a minimum dataset of professional athletes’ personal health records and distributed to the people involved, who consisted of 50 specialists in sports medicine and health information management, using the Delphi method. Through the use of data obtained from this survey, a basic paper model of professional athletes' personal health record was constructed and then an electronic model was created accordingly. Results: Access to information in the electronic record was through a web-based, portal system. The capabilities of this system included: access to information at any time and location, increased interaction between the medical team, comprehensive reporting and effective management of injuries, flexibility and interaction with financial, radiology and laboratory information systems. Conclusions: It is suggested that a framework should be created to promote athletes’ medical knowledge and provide the education necessary to manage their information. This would lead to improved data quality and ultimately promote the health of community athletes. PMID:25741410

  17. New data on African health professionals abroad

    PubMed Central

    Clemens, Michael A; Pettersson, Gunilla

    2008-01-01

    Background The migration of doctors and nurses from Africa to developed countries has raised fears of an African medical brain drain. But empirical research on the causes and effects of the phenomenon has been hampered by a lack of systematic data on the extent of African health workers' international movements. Methods We use destination-country census data to estimate the number of African-born doctors and professional nurses working abroad in a developed country circa 2000, and compare this to the stocks of these workers in each country of origin. Results Approximately 65,000 African-born physicians and 70,000 African-born professional nurses were working overseas in a developed country in the year 2000. This represents about one fifth of African-born physicians in the world, and about one tenth of African-born professional nurses. The fraction of health professionals abroad varies enormously across African countries, from 1% to over 70% according to the occupation and country. Conclusion These numbers are the first standardized, systematic, occupation-specific measure of skilled professionals working in developed countries and born in a large number of developing countries. PMID:18186916

  18. Addressing health literacy in patient decision aids

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Effective use of a patient decision aid (PtDA) can be affected by the user’s health literacy and the PtDA’s characteristics. Systematic reviews of the relevant literature can guide PtDA developers to attend to the health literacy needs of patients. The reviews reported here aimed to assess: 1. a) the effects of health literacy / numeracy on selected decision-making outcomes, and b) the effects of interventions designed to mitigate the influence of lower health literacy on decision-making outcomes, and 2. the extent to which existing PtDAs a) account for health literacy, and b) are tested in lower health literacy populations. Methods We reviewed literature for evidence relevant to these two aims. When high-quality systematic reviews existed, we summarized their evidence. When reviews were unavailable, we conducted our own systematic reviews. Results Aim 1: In an existing systematic review of PtDA trials, lower health literacy was associated with lower patient health knowledge (14 of 16 eligible studies). Fourteen studies reported practical design strategies to improve knowledge for lower health literacy patients. In our own systematic review, no studies reported on values clarity per se, but in 2 lower health literacy was related to higher decisional uncertainty and regret. Lower health literacy was associated with less desire for involvement in 3 studies, less question-asking in 2, and less patient-centered communication in 4 studies; its effects on other measures of patient involvement were mixed. Only one study assessed the effects of a health literacy intervention on outcomes; it showed that using video to improve the salience of health states reduced decisional uncertainty. Aim 2: In our review of 97 trials, only 3 PtDAs overtly addressed the needs of lower health literacy users. In 90% of trials, user health literacy and readability of the PtDA were not reported. However, increases in knowledge and informed choice were reported in those studies

  19. Support System for Mental Health Professionals*

    PubMed Central

    Dandekar, Ajit

    2015-01-01

    This paper talks of support systems for mental health professionals wherein the Bombay Psychiatric Society (BPS) should devote some meetings exclusively to problems pertaining to the profession, e.g., long and odd working hours leading to potentially hazardous practice schedules, unhealthy competitive attitudes and culture. A crash course in self-defence against potentially psychotic patients and drug addicts is advocated as also awareness of the potential hazards in dealing with the litigious paranoid patients, erotomaniacs and some of the difficult hysterical patients. Potential medicolegal problems arise in treating an uncooperative patient without his knowledge and consent on an outpatient department basis, admitting such an uncooperative patient to a nursing home or a hospital, administering electroconvulsive therapies, maintaining detailed clinical records of patients, and legal issues involving smaller psychiatric private nursing homes. This paper stresses on the use of Yoga as a recognised psycho-physiological therapy. Furthermore, it suggests on the need for BPS, as a professional body, to have a cell to guide and help aspiring young professionals in setting up private practice. It points out the need to evolve some concrete programmes that in the long run should help alleviate stresses and strains and promote positive comprehensive health amongst mental health professionals. PMID:25838730

  20. Support system for mental health professionals.

    PubMed

    Dandekar, Ajit

    2015-01-01

    This paper talks of support systems for mental health professionals wherein the Bombay Psychiatric Society (BPS) should devote some meetings exclusively to problems pertaining to the profession, e.g., long and odd working hours leading to potentially hazardous practice schedules, unhealthy competitive attitudes and culture. A crash course in self-defence against potentially psychotic patients and drug addicts is advocated as also awareness of the potential hazards in dealing with the litigious paranoid patients, erotomaniacs and some of the difficult hysterical patients. Potential medicolegal problems arise in treating an uncooperative patient without his knowledge and consent on an outpatient department basis, admitting such an uncooperative patient to a nursing home or a hospital, administering electroconvulsive therapies, maintaining detailed clinical records of patients, and legal issues involving smaller psychiatric private nursing homes. This paper stresses on the use of Yoga as a recognised psycho-physiological therapy. Furthermore, it suggests on the need for BPS, as a professional body, to have a cell to guide and help aspiring young professionals in setting up private practice. It points out the need to evolve some concrete programmes that in the long run should help alleviate stresses and strains and promote positive comprehensive health amongst mental health professionals. PMID:25838730

  1. [The pharmacist: health professional and citizen].

    PubMed

    Rozenfeld, Suely

    2008-04-01

    This text was presented at the V Congress on Pharmacy Care/Riopharma with the intent to approach some aspects important for discussing the role of the pharmacist as health professional and citizen capable of acting in society. To this purpose we decided to recall some of the cornerstones of the Brazilian health reform; the pressure of the industry on health professionals and regulatory agencies; the inequity in the distribution of medicaments among the different social classes. Some of the changes proposed in this paper are: to widen the role the pharmacist plays in pharmacotherapy; to prohibit drug advertising; a global and independent evaluation of the national regulatory agency; inclusion of information about medicament consumption during hospitalizations in the national databases. PMID:21936158

  2. Armchair Aids to Better Teaching. Professional Development Directory, Part II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Learning, 1993

    1993-01-01

    Describes a variety of teacher-recommended books and videos to help educators sharpen their professional edge at home. Topics include classroom management, understanding students, professional development, changing the system, and curriculum (language arts, social studies, science, and math). (SM)

  3. Building a peer mentor home health aide program: implications for home health aide retention.

    PubMed

    Kreiser, Athena Lu; Adamski, Tom; Gallagher, Bridget

    2010-09-01

    The Home Health Aide (HHA) industry is challenged with low wages, little possibility of career advancement, and high turnover rates. Jewish Home Lifecare, Home Assistance Personnel Inc. (HAPI) is a home care aide agency that has developed a Peer Mentor HHA program. Peer Mentor HHAs mentor newly hired/trained HHAs within our agency. This career path leads to higher paying work that allows for growth of our workforce for the identified growing care need and positively impacts HHA retention. PMID:20811183

  4. Professional activities of experienced occupational health nurses.

    PubMed

    Harber, Philip; Alongi, Gabriela; Su, Jing

    2014-06-01

    Occupational health nurses have diverse backgrounds and their practices require the ability to perform unique professional tasks. This study empirically evaluated their activities and skills using a web-based log system to describe activities at 15 specific sampled times. A national sample of 128 occupational health nurses provided 1,893 activity logs revealing occupational health nurses use both clinical and management skills on a regular basis; indirect client care is as common as direct "hands-on" client care. Most occupational health nurses are directly paid by their employer and activities serve to benefit both individual workers and their employers. Occupational health nurses have specific knowledge and skills in addition to general nursing competencies. Understanding the actual work of occupational health nurses is necessary to align training, certification, and competency maintenance systems such as continuing education with the unique skills used in actual practice activities. PMID:24971818

  5. Section 1--The Value of Psychology in Health Professional Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Upton, Dominic

    2008-01-01

    The education of nurses, midwives and allied health care professionals in the UK is guided by professional bodies and the over arching Health Professionals Council (HPC)/Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC). Each of these professional bodies provides regulatory frameworks and guidance notes on the educational content of the degree level programmes…

  6. Death with Dignity: The Developing Debate Among Health Care Professionals.

    PubMed

    Oakman, Brittany N; Campbell, Hope E; Runk, Lindsay M

    2015-06-01

    The right-to-die movement-known variously as death with dignity, physician-assisted suicide, or aid in dying-remains controversial. The recently publicized death of 29-year-old Brittany Maynard, who chose to end her life through physician-assisted suicide, forced many health care professionals to evaluate or re-evaluate their stance on the issue. Currently, only five states have aid-in-dying laws, but many others have bills under consideration. The legalized process for physician-assisted suicide has a strict set of procedures that physicians and patients must follow to ensure the competency and safety of all parties involved. Opposition against legalizing physician-assisted suicide encompasses more than simply moral, religious, or ethical differences. While some individuals believe that physician-assisted suicide gives patients autonomy in their end-of-life care, health care professionals also may have reservations about the liability of the situation. Pharmacists, in particular, play a pertinent role in the dispensing of, and counseling about, the medications used to assist patients in hastening their death. It is imperative that pharmacists be aware of the intended use of the particular medication so that they can make informed decisions about their participation and ensure that they perform all the necessary steps required to remain compliant with the laws or statutes in their jurisdiction. This practice places an increased burden on pharmacists to evaluate their opinion on the concept of death with dignity and whether or not they want to participate. PMID:26048466

  7. 42 CFR 5.3 - Procedures for designation of health professional(s) shortage areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... annually prepare listings (by State and health service area) of currently designated health professional(s... Department. Relevant portions of this material will then be forwarded to each health systems agency, State... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Procedures for designation of health...

  8. 42 CFR 5.3 - Procedures for designation of health professional(s) shortage areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... annually prepare listings (by State and health service area) of currently designated health professional(s... Department. Relevant portions of this material will then be forwarded to each health systems agency, State... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Procedures for designation of health...

  9. 42 CFR 5.3 - Procedures for designation of health professional(s) shortage areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... annually prepare listings (by State and health service area) of currently designated health professional(s... Department. Relevant portions of this material will then be forwarded to each health systems agency, State... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Procedures for designation of health...

  10. 42 CFR 5.3 - Procedures for designation of health professional(s) shortage areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... annually prepare listings (by State and health service area) of currently designated health professional(s... Department. Relevant portions of this material will then be forwarded to each health systems agency, State... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Procedures for designation of health...

  11. 42 CFR 5.3 - Procedures for designation of health professional(s) shortage areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... annually prepare listings (by State and health service area) of currently designated health professional(s... Department. Relevant portions of this material will then be forwarded to each health systems agency, State... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Procedures for designation of health...

  12. Competencies for Rural Development Professionals in the Era of HIV/AIDS

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brinkman, Dine; Westendorp, Annemarie M. B.; Wals, Arjen E. J.; Mulder, Martin

    2007-01-01

    The impact of HIV/AIDS on food security and rural livelihoods is still insufficiently understood. It is evident, however, that rural development professionals need to respond to the changes that have taken place in rural areas due to the pandemic. This article explores competencies that they need in order to deal with the complex HIV/AIDS issues…

  13. A Financial Aid Competency Model for Professional Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woolf, Neil; Martinez, Mario

    2013-01-01

    This research explores the competencies that financial aid officers need to be successful in their jobs. A survey of 30 competencies was distributed to 508 financial aid officers in the Western United States. Respondents were asked to rate 30 job competencies for their relative importance and frequency of use. Using exploratory factor analysis,…

  14. Health and productivity: a role for occupational health professionals.

    PubMed

    McCunney, R J

    2001-01-01

    The impressive economic gains achieved by many nations within the past decade have been attributed primarily to improvements in productivity from technological changes. The resultant low unemployment levels, however, emphasize the importance of human capital in the success of any enterprise. Concurrently, some economists have proposed an alternative economic view regarding the relationship between health and income, postulating that improvements in the health of the nation's population have a substantial effect on its economic viability. Such a view directly pertains to occupational health professionals, who are often charged with promoting the health of the worker. Although studies relating the beneficial impact of occupational health on productivity and human performance are limited, some efforts have shown impressive effects, as measured primarily by reduced absenteeism. The prompt, assertive management of occupational injuries and illnesses and their treatment have been well documented. Illnesses not considered traditional occupational ailments, such as migraine headaches, allergic disorders, infectious diseases, and depression, offer opportunities for occupational health professionals to ensure an accurate diagnosis and proper treatment for minimizing the impact on work performance. Considerable opportunities exist for occupational health professionals to demonstrate the importance of certain services to productivity. PMID:11201767

  15. The Nursing Research Center on HIV/AIDS Health Disparities.

    PubMed

    Holzemer, William L; Méndez, Marta Rivero; Portillo, Carmen; Padilla, Geraldine; Cuca, Yvette; Vargas-Molina, Ricardo L

    2004-01-01

    This report describes the partnership between the schools of nursing at the University of California San Francisco and the University of Puerto Rico to address the need for nursing research on HIV/AIDS health disparities. The partnership led to the creation of the Nursing Research Center on HIV/AIDS Health Disparities with funding from the National Institutes of Health/National Institute of Nursing Research. We provide background information on the disproportionate impact of the HIV/AIDS epidemic on racial and ethnic minorities, describe the major predictors of health disparities in persons at risk for or diagnosed with HIV/AIDS using the Outcomes Model for Health Care Research, and outline the major components of the Nursing Research Center. The center's goal is to improve health outcomes for people living with and affected by HIV/AIDS by enhancing the knowledge base for HIV/AIDS care. PMID:15499311

  16. Camp Health Aide Manual = Manual para trabajadores de salud.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, June Grube; And Others

    This bilingual manual serves as a textbook for migrant Camp Health Aides. Camp Health Aides are members of migrant labor camps enlisted to provide information about health and social services to migrant workers and their families. The manual is divided into 12 tabbed sections representing lessons. Teaching notes printed on contrasting paper…

  17. Health care professionals and adolescent vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Zimet, Gregory D

    2014-01-01

    In their recently published research study, Gargano et al. found that a physician's recommendation and parental health beliefs had significant effects on adolescent vaccination rates and on parental intentions to vaccinate. This research replicates the findings of a number of human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine-focused research studies, but explores new territory by focusing on all recommended adolescent vaccines: meningococcal-conjugate (MCV4), HPV, influenza, and tetanus, diphtheria, and acellular pertussis (Tdap) vaccines. Although Gargano et al.'s study is relatively small in scale and focuses on only one county in Georgia, their results are consistent with many other research reports, suggesting that their findings are robust and replicable. Most published intervention studies have targeted parents and young adults, with little focus on health care professionals. However, given the centrality of physician recommendation in adolescent vaccination, as shown by Gargano et al., it is clear that the time has come to develop and evaluate interventions that help physicians and other health care professionals to more effectively implement strong and routine recommendations for all adolescent platform vaccines. PMID:25483506

  18. Confusion, Crisis, and Opportunity: Professional School Counselors' Role in Responding to Student Mental Health Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walley, Cynthia; Grothaus, Tim; Craigen, Laurie

    2009-01-01

    With the array of challenges facing today's youth, school counselors are in a unique position to recognize and respond to the diverse mental health needs of students. After a brief examination of the challenges and some promising responses, this article will consider the use of advocacy, collaboration, and professional development to aid school…

  19. Danish Health Professionals' Experiences of Being Coached: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ammentorp, Jette; Jensen, Hanne Irene; Uhrenfeldt, Lisbeth

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: In recent years, coaching, as a supplement to professional development, has received increased attention, especially in nursing. Still, only little is known about how health professionals experience participating in coaching sessions. The purpose of this pilot study was to describe and analyze health professionals' experiences from…

  20. A Measure of Staff Burnout among Health Professionals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, John W.

    Staff burnout among health professionals refers to a syndrome of physical and emotional exhaustion involving the development of negative job attitudes, a poor professional self-concept, and a loss of empathic concern for clients. The Staff Burnout Scale for Health Professionals (SBS-HP) is a 20-item inventory assessing cognitive, affective,…

  1. Guide to Planning Health Promotion for AIDS Prevention and Control. WHO AIDS Series 5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    World Health Organization, Geneva (Switzerland).

    This guide is intended to provide planners, managers, and technical staff with guidelines for planning, implementing, monitoring, and evaluating an Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) health promotion program. As such, it can be used in the development of a detailed AIDS health promotion action plan. The guide reviews the steps, processes,…

  2. Training of Home Health Aides and Nurse Aides: Findings from National Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sengupta, Manisha; Ejaz, Farida K.; Harris-Kojetin, Lauren D.

    2012-01-01

    Training and satisfaction with training were examined using data from nationally representative samples of 2,897 certified nursing assistants (CNAs) from the National Nursing Assistant Survey and 3,377 home health aides (HHAs) from the National Home Health Aide Survey conducted in 2004 and 2007, respectively. This article focuses on the…

  3. Advocacy: the role of health professional associations.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Dorothy

    2014-10-01

    The FIGO Leadership in Obstetrics and Gynecology for Impact and Change (LOGIC) Initiative in Maternal and Newborn Health was developed on the premise that organizational capacity strengthening in eight low- and middle-income countries would result in improved ability of member associations to take a leadership role in engaging a range of stakeholders in the health sector to discuss evidence and facilitate policy change and clinical practice in maternal and newborn health. Definitions of relevant terms, principles, and a framework for an advocacy plan are presented. The term advocacy is typically not well understood by health professionals, nor generally thought to be part of their role as a clinician, researcher, or educator. "Influence" based on expertise is often more consonant with a clinician's reality, especially where advocacy is perceived as a more political process that may present a barrier in some countries. The organizational capacity development of the FIGO member associations was integral to their ability to exert influence based on evidence, both internally in their associations and with other stakeholders, including the Ministry of Health. Examples of advocacy from each of the eight LOGIC countries are provided, noting that evaluation of impact can be challenging. PMID:25174787

  4. Linguistic Stereotyping in Older Adults' Perceptions of Health Care Aides.

    PubMed

    Rubin, Donald; Coles, Valerie Berenice; Barnett, Joshua Trey

    2016-07-01

    The cultural and linguistic diversity of the U.S. health care provider workforce is expanding. Diversity among health care personnel such as paraprofessional health care assistants (HCAs)-many of whom are immigrants-means that intimate, high-stakes cross-cultural and cross-linguistic contact characterizes many health interactions. In particular, nonmainstream HCAs may face negative patient expectations because of patients' language stereotypes. In other contexts, reverse linguistic stereotyping has been shown to result in negative speaker evaluations and even reduced listening comprehension quite independently of the actual language performance of the speaker. The present study extends the language and attitude paradigm to older adults' perceptions of HCAs. Listeners heard the identical speaker of Standard American English as they watched interactions between an HCA and an older patient. Ethnolinguistic identities-either an Anglo native speaker of English or a Mexican nonnative speaker-were ascribed to HCAs by means of fabricated personnel files. Dependent variables included measures of perceived HCA language proficiency, personal characteristics, and professional competence, as well as listeners' comprehension of a health message delivered by the putative HCA. For most of these outcomes, moderate effect sizes were found such that the HCA with an ascribed Anglo identity-relative to the Mexican guise-was judged more proficient in English, socially superior, interpersonally more attractive, more dynamic, and a more satisfactory home health aide. No difference in listening comprehension emerged, but the Anglo guise tended to engender a more compliant listening mind set. Results of this study can inform both provider-directed and patient-directed efforts to improve health care services for members of all linguistic and cultural groups. PMID:26606170

  5. Counselors' Perceptions of HIV/AIDS Counseling in Botswana: Professional Identity, Practice, and Training Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stockton, Rex; Paul, Tebatso; Voils-Levenda, Amanda; Robbins, Melanie; Li, Peiwei; Zaitsoff, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Mental health concerns can exacerbate the progression and transmission of HIV/AIDS. Thus there have been calls for increased research and integration of mental health care into HIV/AIDS treatment in Sub-Saharan Africa, where the disease has reached pandemic levels. This qualitative study analyzed the open-ended survey responses of 181 individuals…

  6. Has the Swap Influenced Aid Flows in the Health Sector?

    PubMed

    Sweeney, Rohan; Mortimer, Duncan

    2016-05-01

    The sector wide approach (SWAp) emerged during the 1990s as a mechanism for managing aid from the multiplicity of development partners that operate in the recipient country's health, education or agricultural sectors. Health SWAps aim to give increased control to recipient governments, allowing greater domestic influence over how health aid is allocated and facilitating allocative efficiency gains. This paper assesses whether health SWAps have increased recipient control of health aid via increased general sector-support and have facilitated (re)allocations of health aid across disease areas. Using a uniquely compiled panel data set of countries receiving development assistance for health over the period 1990-2010, we employ fixed effects and dynamic panel models to assess the impact of introducing a health SWAp on levels of general sector-support for health and allocations of health-sector aid across key funding silos (including HIV, 'maternal and child health' and 'sector-support'). Our results suggest that health SWAps have influenced health-sector aid flows in a manner consistent with increased recipient control and improvements in allocative efficiency. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:25762110

  7. Content of Weblogs Written by Health Professionals

    PubMed Central

    Kaufman, Elinore J.; Asch, David A.; Armstrong, Katrina

    2008-01-01

    Background Medical weblogs (“blogs”) have emerged as a new connection between health professionals and the public. Objective To examine the scope and content of medical blogs and approximate how often blog authors commented about patients, violated patient privacy, or displayed a lack of professionalism. Design We defined medical blogs as those that contain some medical content and were apparently written by physicians or nurses. We used the Google search term “medical blog” to begin a modified snowball sampling method to identify sites posting entries from 1/1/06 through 12/14/06. We reviewed five entries per blog, categorizing content and characteristics. Results We identified 271 medical blogs. Over half (56.8%) of blog authors provided sufficient information in text or image to reveal their identities. Individual patients were described in 114 (42.1%) blogs. Patients were portrayed positively in 43 blogs (15.9%) and negatively in 48 blogs (17.7%). Of blogs that described interactions with individual patients, 45 (16.6%) included sufficient information for patients to identify their doctors or themselves. Three blogs showed recognizable photographic images of patients. Healthcare products were promoted, either by images or descriptions, in 31 (11.4%) blogs. Conclusions Blogs are a growing part of the public face of the health professions. They offer physicians and nurses the opportunity to share their narratives. They also risk revealing confidential information or, in their tone or content, risk reflecting poorly on the blog authors and their professions. The health professions should assume some responsibility for helping authors and readers negotiate these challenges. PMID:18649110

  8. Development of Home Health Aide Curriculum Project. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Patricia

    This package contains materials intended for use in a new home health aide curriculum that is designed to be presented as a two-quarter program at Tacoma Community College in Tacoma, Washington. Included in the package are a final report outlining the objectives and outcomes of the project to develop a home health aide curriculum that would meet…

  9. Is Health Aid Reaching the Poor? Analysis of Household Data from Aid Recipient Countries

    PubMed Central

    Bendavid, Eran

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine the extent to which the narrowing of child mortality across wealth gradients has been related to foreign aid to the health sector in low- and middle-income countries. Methods Mortality and wealth data on 989,901 under-5 children from 957,674 households in 49 aid recipient countries in Africa, Asia, South America, and the Caribbean between 1993 and 2012 were used in the analysis. Declines in under-5 mortality in the four poorest wealth quantiles were compared to the decline among the wealthiest at varying levels of health aid per capita using fixed effects multivariable regression models and controlling for maternal education, urbanization, and domestic spending on health among recipient countries. Results Each additional dollar in total health aid per capita was associated with 5.7 fewer deaths per 10,000 child-years among children in the poorest relative to the wealthiest households (p<0.001). This was also true when measured in percent declines (1.90% faster decline in under-5 mortality among the poorest compared with the wealthiest with each dollar in total health aid, p = 0.008). The association was stronger when using health aid specifically for malaria than total health aid, 12.60% faster decline among the poorest compared with the wealthiest with each dollar in malaria aid, p = 0.001. Conclusions Foreign aid to the health sector is preferentially related to reductions in under-5 mortality among the poorest compared with the wealthiest. Health aid addressing malaria, which imposes a disproportionate burden among the poor, may explain the observed effect. PMID:24404148

  10. Update on Validity of Required Competencies for Worksite Health Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Becker, Craig; Rager, Robin C.; Wright, Fred Egbert

    2013-01-01

    Background: To improve global health, the workforce capacity of health promotion professionals must be strengthened through the provision of competencies necessary to deliver effective programs. Purpose: This study provides an updated analysis of the validity of the worksite health promotion (WHP) professional competencies developed in 2000 by the…

  11. Factors in Recruiting and Retaining Health Professionals for Rural Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daniels, Zina M.; VanLeit, Betsy J.; Skipper, Betty J.; Sanders, Margaret L.; Rhyne, Robert L.

    2007-01-01

    Context: Rural communities, often with complex health care issues, have difficulty creating and sustaining an adequate health professional workforce. Purpose: To identify factors associated with rural recruitment and retention of graduates from a variety of health professional programs in the southwestern United States. Methods: A survey…

  12. Governance of HIV/AIDS: implications for health sector response

    PubMed Central

    Kar, Manoj

    2014-01-01

    This paper reviews the essence of effective governance and importance of a multi-sectoral approach in generating health systems response to HIV/AIDS. This comprehensive approach highlights the importance of integrating reproductive sexual health programs and HIV prevention services, including peer education, life skills, and Voluntary Counseling and Testing (VCT), for Prevention of Mother–to-Child Transmission (PMTCT) and reaching out to People Living with HIV/AIDS (PLHA). Research implications for governance of health systems response to HIV/AIDS, integrated youth health policies and high-level political commitment, are emphasized by strategic implications for HIV/AIDS control and followed by a policy thrust on health systems as a strategic plan to achieve sustainability in the fight against HIV/AIDS. PMID:24596903

  13. User metaphors for health care professional workstations.

    PubMed

    Esterhay, R J

    1994-01-01

    The problem encountered by health care professionals and software developers has been a lack of demonstrable visions (prototypes) for Computer-based Patient Record (CPR) and Clinical Information System (CIS) applications. This deficiency has resulted in a quest for and consideration of models, metaphors, and mind maps for the Healthcare Professional Workstation (HPW)--the access mechanism for the CPR and the CIS. The familiar physician desktop and traditional paper-based metaphors are not adequate for all aspects of clinical information processes. In the clinical care environment, the flowsheet is a transporting metaphor because many different applications and tasks can be 'transported' into the flowsheet. 3D Rooms, Gopher and Genes are familiar and transporting metaphors to be exploited for HPWs. Using transporting metaphors for HPW software emphasizes commonality and de-emphasizes diversity. Each model and metaphor has an associated mind map. Only the mental model, mental metaphor or mind map for HPW software is important. Metaphors communicate real-world analogies, and communication is at the core of what defines usability. A mind map facilitates communication by building a model in the user's mind. The barriers to HPWs are not technical; they are related to economics, ownership of patient information, liability and information standards. PMID:8125658

  14. HIV/AIDS: a minority health issue.

    PubMed

    Cargill, Victoria A; Stone, Valerie E

    2005-07-01

    bias in referring to clinical trials, (2) mistrust of clinical research, (3) past poor experience with the health care system, and (4) the conspiracy theories of HIV disease. The paucity of minority health care professionals and minority investigators in HIV research further affects minority participation in clinical research. To improve racial and ethnic minority participation in clinical trials a sustained effort is necessary at multiple levels. Increased recruitment and retention is an ongoing need, and one that will not be satisfactorily addressed until there are better community-academic and research partner-ships, and the research questions posed also address issues of concern and significance to the affected community. Reduction in barriers to participation in clinical trials, especially given the many competing needs of racial and ethnic minority patients, is also needed. Multidisciplinary HIV care teams and research staff with training in cultural competency and cultural sensitivity may also be helpful. Prevention of HIV infection remains essential, especially among those seeking care for HIV infection. Despite several published recommendations for the inclusion of HIV prevention in the clinical care setting, studies have documented how few providers actually achieve this goal, especially those who care for disadvantaged patients. Although there are many barriers to discussing HIV risk behaviors and prevention strategies in an office visit,including time constraints and potential provider discomfort in discussing these matters, clinical visits represent an important opportunity to reinforce HIV prevention and possibly decrease further HIV transmission. PMID:15925655

  15. Guidelines for the Development and Utilization of Home Health Aide Services in the Community; A Supplement to A Guide for the Utilization of Personnel Supportive of Public Health Nursing Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Nurses' Association, New York, NY.

    This analysis is intended to assist public health nurses and others to apply the principles and standards of professional nursing conduct and practice to the development and utilization of home health aide services. Part I, "Development of a Home Health Aide Service" covers (1) agency organization and policies, including such topics as legal…

  16. Attributes of Quality in Audiovisual Materials for Health Professionals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suter, Emanuel; Waddell, Wendy H.

    1981-01-01

    Defines attributes of quality in content, instructional design, technical production, and packaging of audiovisual materials used in the education of health professionals. Seven references are listed. (FM)

  17. Impaired Black Health Professionals: Vulnerabilities and Treatment Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Carl C.

    1986-01-01

    The impaired black health professional is in a unique position in American society. Factors that contribute to this uniqueness include: the small number of black health professionals, which limits resources for program development and referrals; overt and covert racism in society and in medical school curriculums; differences in black and white drug and alcohol abuse and suicide patterns; and upward mobility, which tends to isolate the black professional from black support systems. These factors need to be recognized by the health care profession. Bias-free investigations are needed to provide more information on ethnic differences so that impaired health professional programs and services may give more appropriate treatment. PMID:3783748

  18. Contributions of Public Health to Genetics Education for Health Care Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burke, Wylie

    2005-01-01

    With growing knowledge about the role of genetics in health, genetics education for health care professionals has taken on increasing importance. Many efforts are under way to develop new genetics curricula. Although such efforts are primarily the responsibility of health professional schools and professional societies, the public health system is…

  19. The Design, Implementation, and Formative Evaluation of a Classroom Aide Professional Development Training Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dulfer, Katherine J.

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation focused on the process of designing, implementing, and formatively evaluating an eight week Classroom Aide Professional Development Training Program (CAPD-TP) on behavior management and academic instruction within the context of a New Jersey state approved private special education school for students with behavioral and/or…

  20. Volcanic activity: a review for health professionals

    SciTech Connect

    Newhall, C.G.; Fruchter, J.S.

    1986-03-01

    Volcanoes erupt magma (molten rock containing variable amounts of solid crystals, dissolved volatiles, and gas bubbles) along with pulverized pre-existing rock (ripped from the walls of the vent and conduit). The resulting volcanic rocks vary in their physical and chemical characteristics, e.g., degree of fragmentation, sizes and shapes of fragments, minerals present, ratio of crystals to glass, and major and trace element composition. Variability in the properties of magma, and in the relative roles of magmatic volatiles and groundwater in driving an eruption, determine to a great extent the type of an eruption; variability in the type of an eruption in turn influences the physical characteristics and distribution of the eruption products. The principal volcanic hazards are: ash and larger fragments that rain down from an explosion cloud (airfall tephra and ballistic fragments); flows of hot ash, blocks, and gases down the slopes of a volcano (pyroclastic flows); mudflows (debris flows); lava flows; and concentrations of volcanic gases in topographic depressions. Progress in volcanology is bringing improved long- and short-range forecasts of volcanic activity, and thus more options for mitigation of hazards. Collaboration between health professionals and volcanologists helps to mitigate health hazards of volcanic activity.

  1. MEDLINE: the options for health professionals.

    PubMed

    Wood, E H

    1994-01-01

    The bibliographic database MEDLINE, produced by the National Library of Medicine (NLM), is a computerized index to the world's biomedical literature. The database can be searched back to 1966 and contains 6.8 million records. The various means of access are divided, for the purposes of this article, into three categories: logging onto a remote host computer by telephone and modem or by the Internet; subscribing to part or all of the database on compact disc (CD-ROM); and leasing the data on a transport medium such as magnetic tape or CDs for loading on a local host computer. Decisions about which method is preferable in a given situation depend on cost, availability of hardware and software, local expertise, and the size of the intended user population. Trends include increased access to the Internet by health professionals, increased network speed, links from MEDLINE records to full-text databases or online journals, and integration of MEDLINE into wider health information systems. PMID:7850561

  2. Motoneuron diseases: impact on health professionals.

    PubMed

    Cerutti, Paola; Solara, Valentina; Ferrario, Silvia Rossi

    2016-01-01

    The approach to patients affected by motor neuron disease (MND) and their caregivers requires specific training for the care-team. In fact, the progression of the disease, with the decline of physical--and sometimes cognitive--function, the increasing difficulties in speaking, breathing, and swallowing and the need of invasive choices, as the artificial nutrition and tracheostomy, constitute a challenge for the health professionals, often generating distress. For this reason, their cohesion and sharing abilities are fundamental. Psychologist assumes a strategic role in supporting and facilitating the analysis of clinical cases and of the team's intra/interpersonal dynamics. For this aim, he/she needs specific training and instruments. We here present a semi-structured interview--the Motor Neuron Disease-Psychological Interview (MoNeDi-PI)--which may guide in the psychological assessment of patients affected by MNDs and their caregivers. It can also be a handy reference tool for other members of the healthcare team providing necessary information about the patient and caregiver in order to optimize clinical decision making about which health interventions to apply. PMID:27459838

  3. Volcanic activity: a review for health professionals.

    PubMed Central

    Newhall, C G; Fruchter, J S

    1986-01-01

    Volcanoes erupt magma (molten rock containing variable amounts of solid crystals, dissolved volatiles, and gas bubbles) along with pulverized pre-existing rock (ripped from the walls of the vent and conduit). The resulting volcanic rocks vary in their physical and chemical characteristics, e.g., degree of fragmentation, sizes and shapes of fragments, minerals present, ratio of crystals to glass, and major and trace elements composition. Variability in the properties of magma, and in the relative roles of magmatic volatiles and groundwater in driving an eruption, determine to a great extent the type of an eruption; variability in the type of an eruption in turn influences the physical characteristics and distribution of the eruption products. The principal volcanic hazards are: ash and larger fragments that rain down from an explosion cloud (airfall tephra and ballistic fragments); flows of hot ash, blocks, and gases down the slopes of a volcano (pyroclastic flows); "mudflows" (debris flows); lava flows; and concentrations of volcanic gases in topographic depressions. Progress in volcanology is bringing improved long- and short-range forecasts of volcanic activity, and thus more options for mitigation of hazards. Collaboration between health professionals and volcanologists helps to mitigate health hazards of volcanic activity. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 6a-6e FIGURE 6a-6e FIGURE 8 FIGURE 9 FIGURE 10 FIGURE 11 PMID:3946726

  4. Mental health first aid for eating disorders: pilot evaluation of a training program for the public

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Eating disorders cause significant burden that may be reduced by early and appropriate help-seeking. However, despite the availability of effective treatments, very few individuals with eating disorders seek treatment. Training in mental health first aid is known to be effective in increasing mental health literacy and supportive behaviours, in the social networks of individuals with mental health problems. Increases in these domains are thought to improve the likelihood that effective help is sought. However, the efficacy of mental health first aid for eating disorders has not been evaluated. The aim of this research was to examine whether specific training in mental health first aid for eating disorders was effective in changing knowledge, attitudes and behaviours towards people with eating disorders. Methods A repeated measures, uncontrolled trial was conducted to establish proof of concept and provide guidance on the future design of a randomised controlled trial. Self-report questionnaires, administered at baseline, post-training and 6-month follow-up, assessed the effectiveness of the 4-hour, single session, mental health first aid training. Results 73 participants completed the training and all questionnaires. The training intervention was associated with statistically significant increases in problem recognition and knowledge of appropriate mental health first aid strategies, which were maintained at 6-month follow-up. Sustained significant changes in attitudes and behaviours were less clear. 20 participants reported providing assistance to someone with a suspected eating disorder, seven of whom sought professional help as a result of the first aid interaction. Results provided no evidence of a negative impact on participants or the individuals they provided assistance to. Conclusions This research provides preliminary evidence for the use of training in mental health first aid as a suitable intervention for increasing community knowledge of and

  5. AIDS public health communication: a new challenge for communicators.

    PubMed

    Meyer, A

    1987-01-01

    Communicators have gained valuable experience which can contribute to the control of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS), yet AIDS prevention and control needs to progress beyond all that has been achieved in the best of programs. The topic is sensitive, and AIDS is itself often a political issue. The behavior to be changed is deeply rooted. It is a global problem and requires appropriate knowledge and targeted behavior change throughout the entire adult population of the world. Combating AIDS requires that every communication lesson of the past be adapted, for education and communication are the only vaccine against AIDS. The community of communicators working in the health sector has evolved beyond a simple paradigm, and the term public health communication is used to suggest this evolution. Public health communication means the systematic attempt to influence health practices of large populations positively, using principles and methods of mass communication, instructional design, health education, social marketing, behavioral analysis, anthropology, and related public health and social sciences. The term implies reliance on multiple channels, coordinated to introduce sustained change in specific practices crucial to realizing a public health impact. The World Health Organization is coordinating worldwide action as well as facilitating the formation of national AIDS prevention and control committees and plans of action in countries which request their assistance. Major international organizations along with thousands of local institutions are at work developing their own complementary action plans. Each will have a significant public health communication component. PMID:12281285

  6. Information Technology Education for Health Professionals: Opportunities and Challenges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haque, Syed S.; Gibson, David M.

    1998-01-01

    Describes surveys of potential health-care employers and health-care professionals to identify the need for biomedical informatics programs. Outlines a certificate program, master of science in biomedicine and nursing informatics, and a Ph.D. program. (SK)

  7. Talking with Your Health Care Professionals about Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... care providers Alternate Language URL ​Talking with Your Health Care Professionals Page Content The most important person on ... if you already have it. Tips for Your Health Care Visits Be prepared. The more you plan for ...

  8. Mental health first aid responses of the public: results from an Australian national survey

    PubMed Central

    Jorm, Anthony F; Blewitt, Kelly A; Griffiths, Kathleen M; Kitchener, Betty A; Parslow, Ruth A

    2005-01-01

    Background The prevalence of mental disorders is so high that members of the public will commonly have contact with someone affected. How they respond to that person (the mental health first aid response) may affect outcomes. However, there is no information on what members of the public might do in such circumstances. Methods In a national survey of 3998 Australian adults, respondents were presented with one of four case vignettes and asked what they would do if that person was someone they had known for a long time and cared about. There were four types of vignette: depression, depression with suicidal thoughts, early schizophrenia, and chronic schizophrenia. Verbatim responses to the open-ended question were coded into categories. Results The most common responses to all vignettes were to encourage professional help-seeking and to listen to and support the person. However, a significant minority did not give these responses. Much less common responses were to assess the problem or risk of harm, to give or seek information, to encourage self-help, or to support the family. Few respondents mentioned contacting a professional on the person's behalf or accompanying them to a professional. First aid responses were generally more appropriate in women, those with less stigmatizing attitudes, and those who correctly identified the disorder in the vignette. Conclusions There is room for improving the range of mental health first aid responses in the community. Lack of knowledge of mental disorders and stigmatizing attitudes are important barriers to effective first aid. PMID:15694008

  9. Designing a Multi-Disciplinary Geriatrics Health Professional Mentoring Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cotter, J. James; Coogle, Constance L.; Parham, Iris A.; Head, Colleen; Fulton, LaQuana; Watson, Kathleen; Curtis, Angela

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes a Geriatric Health Professionals Mentoring Program designed to address recruitment and retention of health professionals in geriatrics and gerontology. The training provided information on the mentoring process, negotiating mentoring agreements, and coaching mentees. The evaluative framework described examines: (a) the effects…

  10. Survey on Continuing Education Needs for Health Professionals: Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    System Development Corp., Santa Monica, CA.

    The report documents the results of a 1967 survey of health professionals in the four-State Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education (WICHE) Mountain States Regional Medical Program (MS/RMP). Addressed to health professionals in each of the four States--Idaho, Montana, Nevada, and Wyoming--the survey focuses primarily on the…

  11. Health Professionals' Perceptions of Sexual Assault Management: A Delphi Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jancey, Jonine; Meuleners, Lynn; Phillips, Maureen

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To explore health professionals' perceptions of sexual assault management practices and identify issues related to these practices across Western Australia (WA). Design: A two-round electronic Delphi study was undertaken with health professionals (medical doctors, registered nurses, social workers and managers). Setting: Healthcare…

  12. A Principal Calling: Professionalism and Health Care Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cornett, Becky Sutherland

    2006-01-01

    As health care professionals, our ''product'' is clinical service. We demonstrate professionalism by attitudes, knowledge, and behaviors that reflect a multi-faceted approach to the standards, regulations, and principles underlying successful clinical practices. The issues facing practitioners who work in health care environments are complex,…

  13. Behavioral Ratings of Health Professionals' Interactions with the Geriatric Patient.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adelson, R.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Reports the reliability and validity of the Health Professional-Geriatric Patient Interaction Behavior Rating Code, an observational instrument that is used to quantify the interpersonal behaviors of health professionals in the care of the geriatric patient. Condensed 15 behavioral factors into 10 operationally defined behavioral categories.…

  14. Complexity or Meaning in Health Professional Education and Practice?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowe, Wendy Anne

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Discourses of complexity have entered health professional education. This paper explores the meaning of complexity by asking how health professionals are educated and some of the consequences of that education. Design: A qualitative study was carried out drawing on reflexivity, discourse analysis and grounded methodology. Setting: Two…

  15. Medical Humanitarianism Under Atmospheric Violence: Health Professionals in the 2013 Gezi Protests in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Aciksoz, Salih Can

    2016-06-01

    During the 2013 Gezi protests in Turkey, volunteering health professionals provided on-site medical assistance to protesters faced with police violence characterized by the extensive use of riot control agents. This led to a government crackdown on the medical community and the criminalization of "unauthorized" first aid amidst international criticisms over violations of medical neutrality. Drawing from ethnographic observations, in-depth interviews with health care professionals, and archival research, this article ethnographically analyzes the polarized encounter between the Turkish government and medical professionals aligned with social protest. I demonstrate how the context of "atmospheric violence"-the extensive use of riot control agents like tear gas-brings about new politico-ethical spaces and dilemmas for healthcare professionals. I then analyze how Turkish health professionals framed their provision of health services to protestors in the language of medical humanitarianism, and how the state dismissed their claims to humanitarian neutrality by criminalizing emergency care. Exploring the vexed role that health workers and medical organizations played in the Gezi protests and the consequent political contestations over doctors' ethical, professional, and political responsibilities, this article examines challenges to medical humanitarianism and neutrality at times of social protest in and beyond the Middle East. PMID:26246184

  16. HIV and Mental Health Institutions. AIDS Technical Report, No. 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harvey, David C.

    This technical report is part of a series on AIDS/HIV (Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome/Human Immunodeficiency Virus) and is intended to help link various legal advocacy organizations providing services to persons with mental illness or developmental disabilities. This paper examines AIDS policy issues in mental health institutions. The paper…

  17. Genetic competencies essential for health care professionals in primary care.

    PubMed

    Engstrom, Janet L; Sefton, Marlene G S; Matheson, Jolie Kim; Healy, Kristine M

    2005-01-01

    The completion of the sequencing of the human genome in 2003 signaled the onset of the genomic era in health care. The knowledge gleaned from the Human Genome Project has led to the understanding that every health problem has a genetic component and that clinicians should include the application of genetic information in all aspects of health care. This article describes the genetic competencies essential for all health care professionals in primary care. Health care professionals should augment their current practice by obtaining a multigenerational genetic family history for each patient, assessing all patients for potentially heritable conditions, providing referrals to genetic health professionals as needed, offering genetic testing when indicated, and considering an individual's genetic makeup in the selection of medications and treatments for that person. Finally, all health care professionals ought to be prepared to address the complex personal, cultural, theological, ethical, legal, and social issues associated with genetic testing and other genetic issues commonly encountered in clinical practice. PMID:15894994

  18. Reproductive health and blurred professional boundaries.

    PubMed

    Chavkin, W; Breitbart, V

    1996-01-01

    We recognize that many of the issues raised are not simple. Our proposal calls for the same thoughtful deliberation applied in other settings to be brought to bear on reproductive health care. Some have already tried alternative approaches. In Albuquerque, New Mexico, a university hospital neonatologist and the district attorney have collaborated to create an alternative to sentencing program for women who are arrested for drug-related crimes and found to be both pregnant and drug addicted. Rather than proceed with criminal sanctions, these women are offered entry into a drug treatment program that is geared to families with young children and run by the pediatrics department. Here, the physician and the district attorney collaboratively responded in ways congruent with the professional integrity of each. In another example in Portland, Oregon, physicians, drug treatment providers, and child protective social service representatives cooperatively defeated a legislative proposal to mandatorily test and report pregnant women for illicit drug use and, instead, formed a task force to jointly develop state policy regarding the issue. Drug use, HIV infection, child abuse, and poverty are all cause for alarm. Yet it is critical that our frustration about these difficult problems not be translated into blaming individuals for "deviance," or into short-term inadequate responses. In developing policy we should consider the impact on the legal and ethical rights and obligations of both patient and physician. For every course, we should evaluate both immediate and long-term efficacy, the consequences for the doctor-patient relationship, and the consequences for medical integrity. In the midst of the present regulatory and fiscal turmoil affecting health care, we urge physicians to be careful and deliberate in the policies they embrace and the actions they take. PMID:8932462

  19. Overview of Home Health Aides: United States, 2007

    MedlinePlus

    ... 56.1%) valued their work very much. Aides’ perceptions of the three groups’ value of their work ... Aide Survey, 2007. Figure 3. Home health aides’ perception of how others value their work: United States, ...

  20. Aid effectiveness in rebuilding the Afghan health system: a reflection.

    PubMed

    Dalil, Suraya; Newbrander, William; Loevinsohn, Benjamin; Naeem, Ahmad Jan; Griffin, James; Salama, Peter; Momand, Faiz Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    The Paris Declaration defined five components of aid effectiveness: ownership, alignment, harmonisation, managing for results and mutual accountability. Afghanistan, which has received a high level of donor aid for health since 2002, has seen significant improvements in health indicators, expanded access to health services and an increased range of services. Do the impressive health outcomes in this fragile state mean that aid has been effectively utilised? The factors that contributed to the success of the Ministry of Public Health (MOPH)-donor partnership include as follows: Ownership: a realistic role for the MOPH as the steward of the health sector that was clearly articulated to all stakeholders; Donor alignment: donor coordination and collaboration initiated by the MOPH; Joint decisions: participatory decision-making by the MOPH and donors, such as the major decision to use contracts with nongovernmental organisations for health service delivery; Managing for results: basing programmes on available evidence, supplementing that evidence where possible and performance monitoring of health-sector activities using multiple data sources; Reliable aid flows: the availability of sufficient donor funding for more than 10 years for MOPH priorities, such as the Basic Package of Health Services, and other programmes that boosted system development and capacity building; Human factors: these include a critical mass of individuals with the right experience and expertise being deployed at the right time and able to look beyond agency mandates and priorities to support sector reform and results. These factors, which made aid to Afghanistan effective, can be applied in other countries. PMID:24922192

  1. Aid effectiveness in rebuilding the Afghan health system: A reflection

    PubMed Central

    Dalil, Suraya; Newbrander, William; Loevinsohn, Benjamin; Naeem, Ahmad Jan; Griffin, James; Salama, Peter; Momand, Faiz Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    The Paris Declaration defined five components of aid effectiveness: ownership, alignment, harmonisation, managing for results and mutual accountability. Afghanistan, which has received a high level of donor aid for health since 2002, has seen significant improvements in health indicators, expanded access to health services and an increased range of services. Do the impressive health outcomes in this fragile state mean that aid has been effectively utilised? The factors that contributed to the success of the Ministry of Public Health (MOPH)-donor partnership include as follows: Ownership: a realistic role for the MOPH as the steward of the health sector that was clearly articulated to all stakeholders; Donor alignment: donor coordination and collaboration initiated by the MOPH; Joint decisions: participatory decision-making by the MOPH and donors, such as the major decision to use contracts with nongovernmental organisations for health service delivery; Managing for results: basing programmes on available evidence, supplementing that evidence where possible and performance monitoring of health-sector activities using multiple data sources; Reliable aid flows: the availability of sufficient donor funding for more than 10 years for MOPH priorities, such as the Basic Package of Health Services, and other programmes that boosted system development and capacity building; Human factors: these include a critical mass of individuals with the right experience and expertise being deployed at the right time and able to look beyond agency mandates and priorities to support sector reform and results. These factors, which made aid to Afghanistan effective, can be applied in other countries. PMID:24922192

  2. [Professional practice and ethics in the context of health policies].

    PubMed

    Mendes, H W; Caldas Júnior, A L

    2001-05-01

    This work addressed the professional practice in healthcare in the context of social policies in a municipality of São Paulo State, Brazil. It aimed at determining the influences of such policies on professional practices and on the observance of ethical principles and legal precepts established by the Unified Health System. Healthcare professionals responsible for the elaboration of health policies in the municipal district and for coordination of health institutions were interviewed. A fatalistic perception of the health system and a mechanicist vision of facts influenced by the liberal conception was verified. Thus, alternatives for solution of problems are looked at individually, not always in terms of law or ethics. PMID:12040787

  3. Health professionals' opinions on supporting a cancer biobank: identification of barriers to combat biobanking pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Caixeiro, Nicole J; Byun, Hei Lan; Descallar, Joseph; Levesque, Janelle V; de Souza, Paul; Soon Lee, Cheok

    2016-05-01

    Although rarely acknowledged, a successful biobank is highly dependent on the support of the health professionals who assist the biobank in all aspects of its activities. In many cases, the lack of health professional support can be a limiting factor in the biobanking process of collecting and processing high-quality biospecimens. The aim of this study was to determine the attitudes of health professionals towards cancer biobanking. Using a 5-point Likert scale questionnaire, important aspects of biobanking, including accrual, quality, knowledge, responsiveness, impact, access, trust, governance and accreditation, were investigated. In total, 95 of 124 health and medical practitioners who were approached participated in this study (77% response rate). Health professionals in general supported the aims of biobanking with 56% of participants showing willingness to create a biobank and recruit donors (accrual), 85% understanding the importance in the storage and distribution of biospecimens (quality), 88% having an appreciation for the role of a biobank in furthering cancer research (knowledge), 70% showing awareness of the use of biospecimens in future research initiatives (responsiveness) and 73% demonstrating support for a biobank with proper control, authority and credibility measures in place (governance and accreditation). Overall, provided that proper information about the activities of the biobank and researcher access was transparent, health professionals were very willing to support cancer biobanking. These findings may assist in developing strategies for the establishment and maintenance of biobanks and aid the implementation of more effective policies and procedures to embed biobanking into routine hospital practices. PMID:26328505

  4. AIDS and HIV Testing: Implications for Health Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quinn, Sandra Crouse

    1992-01-01

    The article makes health educators aware of issues raised by a move from anonymous to confidential HIV testing. It examines implications of contact tracing and notification and of reporting requirements that identify HIV-positive persons to public health departments. Implications for health education professionals responsible for HIV test…

  5. Making the transition from health professional to manager.

    PubMed

    Prideaux, G

    1993-01-01

    Health professionals who make a career change into a managerial role frequently find that the adjustment is a difficult one. Often they are not well prepared for the new role. They find that the world of the manager is different in a number of ways from the professional world they have known, and the skills required for effective performance are also different. This preliminary study, which involved interviews with a number of professionals who have made the transition, highlighted the adjustments they had to make and the transition difficulties they experienced. Attention is drawn to a number of ways in which health professionals can be assisted to develop into effective managers. PMID:10127672

  6. Beliefs about breastfeeding: a statewide survey of health professionals.

    PubMed

    Barnett, E; Sienkiewicz, M; Roholt, S

    1995-03-01

    A statewide project was implemented in 1993 to increase breastfeeding among low-income women in North Carolina through improved institutional policies and practices and professional lactation-management skills. A survey designed to ascertain professional beliefs about breastfeeding was mailed to 31 hospitals and 25 public health agencies. A total of 2209 health professionals completed the survey and met the study selection criteria. Nutritionists and pediatricians were most likely to have positive beliefs about breastfeeding, whereas hospital nurses were most likely to have negative beliefs. Personal breastfeeding experience contributed to positive beliefs. Professionals were least convinced of the emotional benefits of breastfeeding. Those with negative beliefs were most likely to advocate complete infant weaning from the breast before nine months of age. Although most health professionals had positive beliefs about breastfeeding, differences by profession, work environment, and personal breastfeeding experience indicate the need for comprehensive training in lactation management, and improvements in hospital and public health clinic environments. PMID:7741946

  7. The aging of the AIDS epidemic: emerging legal and public health issues for elderly persons living with HIV/AIDS.

    PubMed

    Waysdorf, Susan L

    2002-01-01

    As as the elderly population continues to grow, so does a subgroup of that population--elderly persons living with HIV infection and AIDS. In her article, Professor Waysdorf, a nationally recognized AIDS law expert who has taught, published, and practiced in this area for over a decade, introduces statistics and studies that show just how quickly the HIV/AIDS-infected elderly population is growing. She analyzes which groups within the elderly population are hit hardest by this epidemic, paying particular attention to women and minority groups. The article also considers how much larger these subgroups will become in the following years. Professor Waysdorf then examines existing and proposed legislation that may help this population address the health and legal concerns it faces every day. She recommends additional measures that governmental, medical, professional, and social service agencies can take to further address the needs of the HIV/AIDS infected elderly population. Professor Waysdorf concludes that while some legal safeguards do exist, much more is needed to protect these individuals. PMID:15586460

  8. Professional development of health informatics in Northern Ireland.

    PubMed

    McCullagh, Paul; McAllister, Gerry; Hanna, Paul; Finlay, Dewar; Comac, Paul

    2011-01-01

    This paper addresses the assessment and verification of health informatics professional competencies. Postgraduate provision in Health Informatics was targeted at informatics professionals working full-time in the National Health Service, in Northern Ireland, United Kingdom. Many informatics health service positions do not require a formal informatics background, and as we strive for professionalism, a recognized qualification provides important underpinning. The course, delivered from a computing perspective, builds upon work-based achievement and provides insight into emerging technologies associated with the 'connected health' paradigm. The curriculum was designed with collaboration from the Northern Ireland Health and Social Care ICT Training Group. Material was delivered by blended learning using a virtual learning environment and face-to-face sessions. Professional accreditation was of high importance. The aim was to provide concurrent qualifications: a postgraduate certificate, awarded by the University of Ulster and a professional certificate validated and accredited by a professional body comprising experienced health informatics professionals. Providing both qualifications puts significant demands upon part-time students, and a balance must be achieved for successful completion. PMID:21893745

  9. Collaboration between Clergy and Mental Health Professionals: A Review of Professional Health Care Journals from 1980 through 1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weaver, Andrew J.; Flannelly, Kevin J.; Flannelly, Laura T.; Oppenheimer, Julia E.

    2003-01-01

    Examines how collaboration with clergy was viewed by mental health and other health care professionals outside the religious community. Seven themes were identified through a content analysis of health care journals, including the benefits of collaboration to each profession, the need to increase the clergy's knowledge about mental health, and the…

  10. Mental health first aid training in a workplace setting: A randomized controlled trial [ISRCTN13249129

    PubMed Central

    Kitchener, Betty A; Jorm, Anthony F

    2004-01-01

    Background The Mental Health First Aid training course was favorably evaluated in an uncontrolled trial in 2002 showing improvements in participants' mental health literacy, including knowledge, stigmatizing attitudes, confidence and help provided to others. This article reports the first randomized controlled trial of this course. Methods Data are reported on 301 participants randomized to either participate immediately in a course or to be wait-listed for 5 months before undertaking the training. The participants were employees in two large government departments in Canberra, Australia, where the courses were conducted during participants' work time. Data were analyzed according to an intention-to-treat approach. Results The trial found a number of benefits from this training course, including greater confidence in providing help to others, greater likelihood of advising people to seek professional help, improved concordance with health professionals about treatments, and decreased stigmatizing attitudes. An additional unexpected but exciting finding was an improvement in the mental health of the participants themselves. Conclusions The Mental Health First Aid training has shown itself to be not only an effective way to improve participants' mental health literacy but also to improve their own mental health. It is a course that has high applicability across the community. PMID:15310395

  11. How are health professionals earning their living in Malawi?

    PubMed Central

    Muula, Adamson S; Maseko, Fresier C

    2006-01-01

    Background The migration of health professionals from southern Africa to developed nations is negatively affecting the delivery of health care services in the source countries. Oftentimes however, it is the reasons for the out-migration that have been described in the literature. The work and domestic situations of those health professionals continuing to serve in their posts have not been adequately studied. Methods The present study utilized a qualitative data collection and analysis method. This was achieved through focus group discussions and in-depth interviews with health professionals and administrators to determine the challenges they face and the coping systems they resort to and the perceptions towards those coping methods. Results Health professionals identified the following as some of the challenges there faced: inequitable and poor remuneration, overwhelming responsibilities with limited resources, lack of a stimulating work environment, inadequate supervision, poor access to continued professionals training, limited career progression, lack of transparent recruitment and discriminatory remuneration. When asked what kept them still working in Malawi when the pressures to emigrate were there, the following were some of the ways the health professionals mentioned as useful for earning extra income to support their families: working in rural areas where life was perceived to be cheaper, working closer to home village so as to run farms, stealing drugs from health facilities, having more than one job, running small to medium scale businesses. Health professionals would also minimize expenditure by missing meals and walking to work. Conclusion Many health professionals in Malawi experience overly challenging environments. In order to survive some are involved in ethically and legally questionable activities such as receiving "gifts" from patients and pilfering drugs. The efforts by the Malawi government and the international community to retain health

  12. Aids in the Black Community: Public Health Implications

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, Stephen C.

    1988-01-01

    As of the end of September 1988, 16,600 cases of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) have been reported in New York City, including 5,248 cases among blacks, 32 percent of the total. Of these, 4,220 (80 percent of adults) are men, 1,028 (19 percent of adults) are women, and 195 are children. The major source of the spread of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection within the black community is the intravenous (IV) drug user. Half of New York City's 200,000 IV drug users are estimated to be black; almost half of the women infected with AIDS through sexual contact with IV drug users are black. Every option for breaking the AIDS-IV drug abuser connection must be explored. AIDS among blacks is especially charged with the potential for discrimination or widespread backlash. AIDS education efforts must be increased, and legislation to protect against unauthorized disclosures of confidential health records must be supported. Comprehensive education programs must destigmatize AIDS among health care workers. To keep up with the epidemic, a national prevention strategy must consist of a massive national public health education program; voluntary, confidential counseling and HIV antibody testing expanded into every public and private clinical facility; and major efforts to curtail AIDS transmission by the IV drug user. PMID:3249321

  13. Perceptions of work in humanitarian assistance: interviews with returning Swedish health professionals.

    PubMed

    Bjerneld, Magdalena; Lindmark, Gunilla; Diskett, Patricia; Garrett, Martha J

    2004-01-01

    Health personnel volunteering for humanitarian assistance assignments work in increasingly dangerous situations and increasingly complex roles. A qualitative analysis of interviews with returning Swedish aid workers, who collectively had been on 74 missions in 32 different countries, revealed that they felt positive about their contribution, but experienced high levels of stress and frustration. They were also surprised and inadequately prepared for tasks that fell outside their professional health care training, including ones demanding pedagogic and management skills. The volunteers perceived their success on humanitarian assistance assignments as being affected not only by their own professional competence and special preparatory training, but also by many other factors. In particular, recruiting organizations could improve volunteer performance by accepting only experienced professionals, requiring special preparatory training, clarifying the exact nature of the work, and providing better support during the assignment. Further analysis of humanitarian assistance as a complex and dynamic system involving multiple 'actors' could lead to improved understanding and better performance. PMID:15448624

  14. Health Education Theater: Some Professional and Personal Challenges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owens, John C.

    2001-01-01

    Describes the author's experiences directing at an interactive health education theater piece on acquaintance rape. Discusses personal and professional challenges and ethical dilemmas that came up regarding Post Traumatic Stress disorder, the activating of traumatic experiences. Argues that input from healthcare professionals was crucial, and…

  15. Changing Our Ways of Thinking: Health Professionals and Nuclear Weapons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neal, Mary

    1984-01-01

    Outlines the issues raised by health professionals concerned about the threat of nuclear weapons and nuclear war, including epidemics, civil defense, arms costs, psychosocial aspects, and ethical responsibility. Appendixes include lists of antinuclear organizations, medical professional associations, and 160 references. (SK)

  16. HIV/AIDS, Reproductive and Sexual Health, and the Law

    PubMed Central

    Gostin, Lawrence O.; Hodge, James G.

    2008-01-01

    The law is a frequently overlooked tool for addressing the complex practical and ethical issues that arise from the HIV/AIDS pandemic. The law intersects with reproductive and sexual health issues and HIV/AIDS in many ways. Well-written and rigorously applied laws could benefit persons living with (or at risk of contracting) HIV/AIDS, particularly concerning their reproductive and sexual health. Access to reproductive health services should be a legal right, and discrimination based on HIV status, which undermines access, should be prohibited. Laws against sexual violence and exploitation, which perpetuate the spread of HIV and its negative effects, should be enforced. Finally, a human rights framework should inform the drafting of laws to more effectively protect health. PMID:18703431

  17. HIV/AIDS, reproductive and sexual health, and the law.

    PubMed

    Gable, Lance; Gostin, Lawrence O; Hodge, James G

    2008-10-01

    The law is a frequently overlooked tool for addressing the complex practical and ethical issues that arise from the HIV/AIDS pandemic. The law intersects with reproductive and sexual health issues and HIV/AIDS in many ways. Well-written and rigorously applied laws could benefit persons living with (or at risk of contracting) HIV/AIDS, particularly concerning their reproductive and sexual health. Access to reproductive health services should be a legal right, and discrimination based on HIV status, which undermines access, should be prohibited. Laws against sexual violence and exploitation, which perpetuate the spread of HIV and its negative effects, should be enforced. Finally, a human rights framework should inform the drafting of laws to more effectively protect health. PMID:18703431

  18. Weight bias reduction in health professionals: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Alberga, A S; Pickering, B J; Alix Hayden, K; Ball, G D C; Edwards, A; Jelinski, S; Nutter, S; Oddie, S; Sharma, A M; Russell-Mayhew, S

    2016-06-01

    Innovative and coordinated strategies to address weight bias among health professionals are urgently needed. We conducted a systematic literature review of empirical peer-reviewed published studies to assess the impact of interventions designed to reduce weight bias in students or professionals in a health-related field. Combination sets of keywords based on three themes (1: weight bias/stigma; 2: obesity/overweight; 3: health professional) were searched within nine databases. Our search yielded 1447 individual records, of which 17 intervention studies satisfied the inclusion criteria. Most studies (n = 15) included medical, dietetic, health promotion, psychology and kinesiology students, while the minority included practicing health professionals (n = 2). Studies utilized various bias-reduction strategies. Many studies had methodological weaknesses, including short assessment periods, lack of randomization, lack of control group and small sample sizes. Although many studies reported changes in health professionals' beliefs and knowledge about obesity aetiology, evidence of effectiveness is poor, and long-term effects of intervention strategies on weight bias reduction remain unknown. The findings highlight the lack of experimental research to reduce weight bias among health professionals. Although changes in practice will likely require multiple strategies in various sectors, well-designed trials are needed to test the impact of interventions to decrease weight bias in healthcare settings. PMID:27166133

  19. College and University Health Care Professionals: An Expanding Team.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grier, Phillip M.

    1980-01-01

    An historical perspective of the American College Health Association emphasizes the importance of teamwork among health personnel. The current trend in litigation toward health care professionals and the regulatory role of government has resulted in an apparent increase in legal activity, and necessitates teamwork between doctors and lawyers. (JN)

  20. Professionalism: good for patients and health care organizations.

    PubMed

    Brennan, Michael D; Monson, Verna

    2014-05-01

    Professionalism is an indispensable element in the compact between the medical profession and society that is based on trust and putting the needs of patients above all other considerations. The resurgence of interest in professionalism dates back to the 1980s when health maintenance organizations were formed and proprietary influences in health care increased. Since then, a rich and comprehensive literature has emerged in defining professionalism, including desirable individual attributes and behaviors and how they may be taught, promoted, and assessed. More recently, scholarship has shifted from individual to organizational professionalism. This literature addresses the role that health care organizations can play to establish environments that are conducive to the consistent expression of professionalism by individuals and health care teams. We reviewed interdisciplinary empirical studies from health care effectiveness and outcomes, organizational sciences, positive psychology, and social psychology, finding evidence that organizational and individual professionalism is associated with a wide range of benefits to patients and the organization. We identify actionable organizational strategies and approaches that, if adopted, can foster and promote combined organizational and individual professionalism. In doing so, trust in the medical profession and its institutions can be enhanced, which in turn will reconfirm a commitment to the social compact. PMID:24797645

  1. Capacity Building in Global Mental Health: Professional Training

    PubMed Central

    Fricchione, Gregory L; Borba, Christina P C; Alem, Atalay; Shibre, Teshome; Carney, Julia R; Henderson, David C

    2012-01-01

    We suggest that the optimal approach to building capacity in global mental health care will require partnerships between professional resources in high-income countries and promising health-related institutions in low- and middle-income countries. The result of these partnerships will be sustainable academic relationships that can educate a new generation of in-country primary care physicians and, eventually, specialized health professionals. Research capabilities will be an essential educational component to inform policy and practice, and to ensure careful outcome measurements of training and of intervention, prevention, and promotion strategies. The goal of these academic centers of excellence will be to develop quality, in-country clinical and research professionals, and to build a productive environment for these professionals to advance their careers locally. In sum, this article discusses human capacity building in global mental health, provides recommendations for training, and offers examples of recent initiatives. (Harv Rev Psychiatry 2012;20:47–57.) PMID:22335182

  2. Use of objective psychomotor tests in health professionals.

    PubMed

    Causby, Ryan; Reed, Lloyd; McDonnell, Michelle; Hillier, Susan

    2014-06-01

    Evaluation of psychomotor skills is undertaken in a number of broad contexts. This includes testing of health professional populations as a measure of innate ability, to evaluate skill acquisition, or to compare professions. However, the use of psychomotor tests is frequently confounded by a lack of understanding of a particular tool's psychometric properties, strengths, and weaknesses. To identify and appraise the most commonly used tests on health professional populations, 86 articles were reviewed and the top nine tests identified. Few tests have had sufficient validity or reliability testing on health professionals. Based on the evidence available, use of the Grooved Pegboard Test, the Purdue Pegboard Test, or the Finger Tapping Test is recommended for the evaluation of dexterity in a health professional population; however, this choice may be dependent on the task(s) to which findings are generalised. More rigorous evaluation of validity and other psychometric properties is required. PMID:25068745

  3. Mental-Health Aid for Immigrant Children Lags

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zehr, Mary Ann

    2007-01-01

    As educators and experts assess the quality of student mental-health services in light of the deadly shootings last April 16, the Virginia Tech gunman's immigrant background is focusing attention on what immigration workers say is a lack of services tailored to such groups. Mental-health professionals say that, in general, even school districts…

  4. HIV/AIDS peer education: a rural health project.

    PubMed

    Marick, Josephine

    2002-02-01

    This article describes a program conducted by a group of adolescents in a rural western Nebraska high school that was designed to inform their peers about the risk of HIV/AIDS. The program was funded by state and county agencies. An AIDS Task Force composed of community health leaders developed the guidelines for the program. The Task Force met annually to plan for the coming year, implement changes, and evaluate the program. A community health nurse served as the coordinator of the program and also served as a rural school nurse. A group of students called peer helpers carried out the HIV/AIDS program. Peer helpers created an awareness of HIV/AIDS with dissemination of factual information and also served as a referral resource for their peers. A number of recommendations are provided for future implementation of programs designed to help adolescents develop a healthy lifestyle. PMID:11853375

  5. The Health Care Professional as a Modern Abolitionist

    PubMed Central

    O'Callaghan, Michael G

    2012-01-01

    Health care professionals are in a unique position to identify and to assist victims of human trafficking. Human trafficking today occurs both domestically and globally. It manifests in many forms, including adult and child forced labor, involuntary domestic servitude, adult and child sexual slavery, involuntary servitude, debt bondage, and child soldiers. This article offers insight into modern human trafficking and ways health care professionals can be activists. PMID:22745622

  6. The health care professional as a modern abolitionist.

    PubMed

    O'Callaghan, Michael G

    2012-01-01

    Health care professionals are in a unique position to identify and to assist victims of human trafficking. Human trafficking today occurs both domestically and globally. It manifests in many forms, including adult and child forced labor, involuntary domestic servitude, adult and child sexual slavery, involuntary servitude, debt bondage, and child soldiers. This article offers insight into modern human trafficking and ways health care professionals can be activists. PMID:22745622

  7. Educating Health Care Professionals on Human Trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Grace, Aimee M.; Lippert, Suzanne; Collins, Kristin; Pineda, Noelle; Tolani, Alisha; Walker, Rebecca; Jeong, Monica; Trounce, Milana Boukhman; Graham-Lamberts, Caroline; Bersamin, Melina; Martinez, Det. Jeremy; Dotzler, Det. Jennifer; Vanek, Lt John; Storfer-Isser, Amy; Chamberlain, Lisa J.; Horwitz, Sarah M.

    2015-01-01

    Background The US Department of State estimates that there are between 4 and 27 million individuals worldwide in some form of modern slavery. Recent studies have demonstrated that 28% to 50% of trafficking victims in the United States encountered health care professionals while in captivity, but were not identified and recognized. This study aimed to determine whether an educational presentation increased emergency department (ED) providers' recognition of human trafficking (HT) victims and knowledge of resources to manage cases of HT. Methods The 20 largest San Francisco Bay Area EDs were randomized into intervention (10 EDs) or delayed intervention comparison groups (10 EDs) to receive a standardized educational presentation containing the following: background about HT, relevance of HT to health care, clinical signs in potential victims, and referral options for potential victims. Participants in the delayed intervention group completed a pretest in the period the immediate intervention group received the educational presentation, and all participants were assessed immediately before (pretest) and after (posttest) the intervention. The intervention effect was tested by comparing the pre–post change in the intervention group to the change in 2 pretests in the delayed intervention group adjusted for the effect of clustering within EDs. The 4 primary outcomes were importance of knowledge of HT to the participant's profession (5-point Likert scale), self-rated knowledge of HT (5-point Likert scale), knowledge of who to call for potential HT victims (yes/no), and suspecting that a patient was a victim of HT (yes/no). Findings There were 258 study participants from 14 EDs; 141 from 8 EDs in the intervention group and 117 from 7 EDs in the delayed intervention comparison group, of which 20 served as the delayed intervention comparison group. Participants in the intervention group reported greater increases in their level of knowledge about HT versus those in the

  8. Substance Abuse: A Guide for Health Professionals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Academy of Pediatrics, Elk Grove Village, IL.

    This book is a collection of essays and information representing the experience, perspective, and insight of professionals whose careers have been closely associated with the problem of youthful substance abuse. The first chapter outlines those circumstances that might make it more likely that a young person would experience drug-related…

  9. Certified Health Education Specialists' Participation in Professional Associations: Implications for Marketing and Membership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thackeray, Rosemary; Neiger, Brad L.; Roe, Kathleen M.

    2005-01-01

    A number of health education professional associations exist to advance the profession through research, practice, and professional development. Benefits of individual membership may include continuing education, networking, leadership, professional recognition, advocacy, professional mobility, access to research findings, advances in the…

  10. Health professionals' knowledge and understanding about Listeria monocytogenes indicates a need for improved professional training.

    PubMed

    Buffer, Janet L; Medeiros, Lydia C; Kendall, Patricia; Schroeder, Mary; Sofos, John

    2012-07-01

    Listeria monocytogenes causes listeriosis, an uncommon but potentially fatal disease in immunocompromised persons, with a public health burden of approximately $2 billion annually. Those consumers most at risk are the highly susceptible populations otherwise known as the immunocompromised. Health professionals have a considerable amount of interaction with the immunocompromised and are therefore a valuable resource for providing appropriate safe food handling information. To determine how knowledgeable health professionals are about Listeria monocytogenes, a nationwide Web-based survey was distributed targeting registered nurses (RNs) and registered dietitians (RDs) who work with highly susceptible populations. Responses were received from 499 health professionals. Knowledge and understanding of Listeria monocytogenes was assessed descriptively. Parametric and nonparametric analyses were used to detect differences between RNs and RDs. The major finding is that there are gaps in knowledge and a self-declared lack of understanding by both groups, but especially RNs, about Listeria monocytogenes. RDs were more likely than RNs to provide information about specific foods and food storage behaviors to prevent a Listeria infection. Notably, neither group of health professionals consistently provided Listeria prevention messages to their immunocompromised patients. Pathogens will continue to emerge as food production, climate, water, and waste management systems change. Health professionals, represented by RNs and RDs, need resources and training to ensure that they are providing the most progressive information about various harmful pathogens; in this instance, Listeria monocytogenes. PMID:22980015

  11. AVLINE: A Data Base and Critical Review System of Audiovisual Materials for the Education of Health Professionals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suter, Emanuel; Waddell, Wendy H.

    1982-01-01

    The AVLINE database, operated by the National Library of Medicine, was designed to aid in the selection, use, and sharing of quality audiovisual materials in the education of health professionals and to promote the quality production of such materials. AVLINE provides standardized bibliographic and critical review information. (Author/MLW)

  12. Black health professional families: assessment of strengths and stability.

    PubMed Central

    Carter, J. H.

    1992-01-01

    Despite pernicious racism, most black health professionals achieve professional success and most have stable marriages. A 19-item questionnaire was designed to assess this hypothesis following a lecture on the strengths and weaknesses of black health professional families to physicians, dentists, and their spouses (n = 38) at the 1990 annual meeting of the combined Old North State Medical and Dental Societies of North Carolina. Surprisingly, these families seemed eager to disclose feelings about themselves, their professions, and their marriages. Major preliminary findings were that these health professionals were more prone to indicate unhappiness than their spouses and less likely to see racism as an impediment to careers, and more willing to acknowledge that they would like to correct something in their lives. PMID:1602500

  13. Health Professionals in a Nuclear Age. Professional Obligations and Continuing Education Needs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanckel, Frances; Faden, Ruth

    1984-01-01

    Identifies contexts and levels of involvement in which health professionals could make a contribution on nuclear issues. Discusses the implications for continuing education on the anxiety about the health effects of nuclear technology and of the need for information in making decisions about it. (SK)

  14. “Silent Voices”: A Description of Views and Attitudes of Health Professionals towards Reproduction by HIV Positive People

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Objective. The role of health professionals in the decision making process of patients is usually heard or seen from the perspective of the patients. This paper gives the usually silent and invisible health professionals voice and visibility. It describes their views and attitudes towards reproduction by couples who are HIV positive and attempts to understand their perspectives. Methods. In-depth interviews were conducted with twelve health professionals at an opportunistic infections clinic. Transcribed interviews were analysed using the grounded approach to identify patterns and themes concerning views and attitudes of health professionals towards reproduction by HIV positive people. Results. The study found that most health professionals generally had a negative attitude towards childbearing by HIV positive couples. Their views and approaches on the issue were based mainly on biomedical considerations. The main discourses on childbearing that emerged from the study were the conditional choice, the antichildbearing, and the prorights. Conclusion. Most of the health professionals interviewed tend to take a generally negative stance towards reproduction by people with HIV/AIDS. There is a need for a clear set of guidelines for health professionals (HPs) on how to deal with HIV positive people who may desire to reproduce. PMID:27350998

  15. Consumer Health Informatics--integrating patients, providers, and professionals online.

    PubMed

    Klein-Fedyshin, Michele S

    2002-01-01

    Consumer Health Informatics (CHI) means different things to patients, health professionals, and health care systems. A broader perspective on this new and rapidly developing field will enable us to understand and better apply its advances. This article provides an overview of CHI discussing its evolution and driving forces, along with advanced applications such as Personal Health Records, Internet transmission of personal health data, clinical e-mail, online pharmacies, and shared decision-making tools. Consumer Health Informatics will become integrated with medical care, electronic medical records, and patient education to impact the whole process and business of health care. PMID:12238015

  16. Preferences for professional versus informal care at end of life amongst African-American drug users with HIV/AIDS.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Mary M; Robinson, Allysha C; Nguyen, Trang Q; Smith, Thomas J; Knowlton, Amy R

    2015-01-01

    With the advent of antiretroviral therapies, persons living with HIV/AIDS (PLHIVs) are living longer but with increased impairment and care needs. The purpose of this study was to assess whether a vulnerable population of PLHIVs preferred informal versus professional care when unable to care for themselves, and individual and support network factors associated with preference for informal care. The findings have potential implications for facilitating the population's informal care at end of life. Data were from the BEACON study, which examined social factors associated with health outcomes among former or current drug-using PLHIVs in Baltimore, MD. Structural equation modeling was used to identify individual and support network characteristics associated with PLHIVs' preference for informal (family or friends) compared to professional care. The structural equation model indicated preference for informal care was associated with female sex, greater informal care receipt, reporting one's main partner (i.e., boy/girlfriend or spouse) as the primary source of informal care, and a support network comprised greater numbers of female kin and persons supportive of the participant's HIV treatment adherence. Not asking for needed help to avoid owing favors was associated with preferring professional care. Findings suggest that interventions to promote informal end of life care should bolster supportive others' resources and skills for care provision and treatment adherence support, and should address perceived norms of reciprocity. Such intervention will help ensure community caregiving in a population with high needs for long-term care. PMID:25196174

  17. Home Health Management Aide. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mincemoyer, Betty Jane

    The report describes a demonstration project to provide a course of study at the senior high level in home health management for the academically handicapped. The course consisted of practice in nursing skills, home management and laboratory work in food preparation techniques, the family, and child care. Activities included field trips,…

  18. Agreement and disagreement on health care quality concepts among academic health professionals: the Saudi case.

    PubMed

    Mahrous, Mohamed Saad

    2014-01-01

    A systematic and rigorous implementation of quality improvement processes is likely to improve the well-being of staff members and heighten their job satisfaction. Assessing professionals' perceptions of health care quality should lead to the betterment of health care services. In Saudi Arabia, no previous studies examine how university health professionals view health care quality concepts. A cross-sectional analytical study employing a self-administered questionnaire with 43 statements assessing quality perceptions of academic health care professionals was used. Despite the agreement of health professionals on numerous quality concepts addressed in this study, there was insufficient agreement on 10 core quality concepts, 3 of which were the following: "quality focuses on customers" (50%), "quality is tangible and therefore measurable" (29.3%), and "quality is data-driven" (62%). Hence, providing health professionals with relevant training likely will generate a better understanding of quality concepts and optimize their performance. PMID:23897553

  19. Continuing Professional Education Programs of Voluntary Health Agencies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Medical Association, Chicago, IL.

    Organizational objectives and professional continuing education programs of ten voluntary health agencies--Allergy Foundation of America, American Cancer Society, American Heart Association, Arthritis Foundation, National Association for Mental Health, National Foundation for Infantile Paralysis, National Society for the Prevention of Blindness,…

  20. Wilderness Therapy: Ethical Considerations for Mental Health Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Becker, Stephen P.

    2010-01-01

    Wilderness therapy is a growing treatment modality for adolescents presenting with a variety of clinical concerns, and wilderness therapy clinicians and referring mental health professionals must carefully consider the ethical issues that are unique to this modality. Following an overview of wilderness therapy as a mental health treatment,…

  1. Mental Health Professional Shortage Areas in Rural Appalachia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hendryx, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Context: Research on health disparities in Appalachia has rarely compared Appalachia to other geographic areas in such a way as to isolate possible Appalachian effects. Purpose: This study tests hypotheses that nonmetropolitan Appalachia will have higher levels of mental health professional shortage areas than other nonmetropolitan areas of the…

  2. Engaging health professionals in advocacy against gun violence.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Andrew D

    2008-01-01

    Health professionals have long been involved with advocacy around the social determinants of health, including protesting against war and mitigating the production, trade and use of specific weapon systems. Small arms and light weapons are a key area on which to focus, as they are responsible for the majority of injuries and deaths in war and their availability is related to increased levels of crime and suicide. Challenges for health professionals hoping to engage in such advocacy include a lack of adequate data, the need to confront political questions and the gun-lobby, and difficulty in measuring the effectiveness of campaigns. This article discusses some examples of successful advocacy and suggests future directions for health professionals in this area. PMID:19065869

  3. Perceptions of infection control practices among health professionals.

    PubMed

    Watkins, Rochelle E; Wynaden, Dianne; Hart, Linda; Landsborough, Ian; McGowan, Sunita; Speed, Gaye; Orb, Angelica; Henderson, Saras; Wilson, Sally; Calnan, Wendy

    2006-07-01

    Infection control practice is a cornerstone of modern health care. However, there is minimal research into health professionals' perception of infection control practices and how those perceptions influence staff compliance with recommended protocols. The objective of this study was to explore health care professionals' perceptions of infection control practices in relation to the management of infectious diseases. A grounded theory approach was used as the research framework. Semi-structured interviews were completed with a sample of 16 nurses and doctors working at hospitals in Western Australia. Four major categories emerged from the data. These were: knowledge, culture, conflict, and risk assessment. The findings indicate the importance of both individual and organisational factors in determining clinicians' levels of compliance with recommended infection control practices. Identification of the factors that influence health professionals' level of compliance can be used to develop strategies to support long-term compliance with infection control practices. PMID:16863418

  4. International health financing and the response to AIDS.

    PubMed

    Lieberman, Samuel; Gottret, Pablo; Yeh, Ethan; de Beyer, Joy; Oelrichs, Robert; Zewdie, Debrework

    2009-11-01

    Efforts to finance HIV responses have generated large increases in funding, catalyzed activism and institutional innovation, and brought renewed attention to health issues and systems. The benefits go well beyond HIV programs. The substantial increases in HIV funding are a tiny percentage of overall increases in health financing, with other areas also seeing large absolute increases. Data on health funding suggest an improved "pro-poor" distribution, with Africa benefiting relatively more from increased external flows. A literature review found few evidence-based analyses of the impact of AIDS programs and funding on broader health financing. Conceptual frameworks that would facilitate such analysis are summarized. PMID:19858937

  5. [Social representations of HIV/AIDS among healthcare professionals in benchmark services].

    PubMed

    Dantas, Mariana de Sousa; Abrão, Fátima Maria da Silva; de Freitas, Clara Maria Silvestre Monteiro; de Oliveira, Denize Cristina

    2014-12-01

    This study was based on exploratory research and a qualitative approach within the framework of the Social Representations Theory. It aims to capture the social representations of healthcare providers in relation to HIV/AIDS by describing their structure.The Free Evocations technique was applied on 86 professionals of HIV/AIDS benchmark services in Recife, Pernambuco, Brazil, from 2011 to 2013. Analysis using EVOC 2005 software showed that the possible central core is prejudice in a negative attitude dimension; in the contrast zone, chronic disease translates living with the disease. In the first periphery, treatment and disease in a clinical/biometric conception; in the second periphery, death has a imagistic and negative nature. Positive and negative elements were observed, allowing healthcare personnel to construct meaning attributed to the phenomenon and reflect on their practices. PMID:25842786

  6. Attitudes of patients toward smoking by health professionals.

    PubMed Central

    Olive, K E; Ballard, J A

    1992-01-01

    Do the smoking behaviors of physicians and nurses affect patients' perceptions of the trust and effectiveness of these health professionals? In this exploratory study, a 40-item questionnaire was given to patients discharged from an Air Force hospital during a 4-week period. The survey resulted in 116 usable questionnaires from 40 patients who had never smoked, 44 who no longer smoked, and 32 who still smoked. Analyses of variance in the replies to the questionnaire indicated that nonsmokers felt strongly about health professionals not modeling unhealthy behaviors, while smokers indicated they had no opinion. Regarding the relationship between the smoking habits of physicians and nurses and patients' perceptions of trust and effectiveness, smokers felt strongly there was no relationship, whereas nonsmokers indicated no opinion. A review of the literature suggested that, on the average, health professionals who smoke may not be as effective in counseling patients to quit smoking as health professionals who do not smoke. Health professionals who smoke have the potential to affect unintentionally the smoking behaviors of others through modeling. PMID:1594744

  7. An interventional model to develop health professionals in West Africa.

    PubMed

    Sanou, Anselme Simeon; Awoyale, Florence Adeola; Diallo, Abdoulaye

    2014-01-01

    The health sector is characterized by a human resource base lacking in numbers, specialized skills, and management skills. West African Health Organization (WAHO) recognizes the need within the West Africa sub-region for bilingual professionals who are skilled in public health, management, leadership, and information technology to build human capacity in public health and developed the Young Professionals Internship Program (YPIP). Our study explores the evolution of the programme. YPIP program has successfully carried out its original aims and objectives to equip young professionals with basic principles of public health, management, and leadership, acquire competence in a second official language (French, English, and Portuguese), information and communication technology. Contributing factors towards this successful evaluation included positive ratings and commentary from previous interns about the relevance, usefulness, and quality of the programme, encouraging feedback from WAHO management, trainers, administrators, and intern employers on the impact of the YPIP program on young professionals, supporting evidence that demonstrates increased knowledge in professional skills and language competency. PMID:25419290

  8. An interventional model to develop health professionals in West Africa

    PubMed Central

    Sanou, Anselme Simeon; Awoyale, Florence Adeola; Diallo, Abdoulaye

    2014-01-01

    The health sector is characterized by a human resource base lacking in numbers, specialized skills, and management skills. West African Health Organization (WAHO) recognizes the need within the West Africa sub-region for bilingual professionals who are skilled in public health, management, leadership, and information technology to build human capacity in public health and developed the Young Professionals Internship Program (YPIP). Our study explores the evolution of the programme. YPIP program has successfully carried out its original aims and objectives to equip young professionals with basic principles of public health, management, and leadership, acquire competence in a second official language (French, English, and Portuguese), information and communication technology. Contributing factors towards this successful evaluation included positive ratings and commentary from previous interns about the relevance, usefulness, and quality of the programme, encouraging feedback from WAHO management, trainers, administrators, and intern employers on the impact of the YPIP program on young professionals, supporting evidence that demonstrates increased knowledge in professional skills and language competency. PMID:25419290

  9. The Impact of AIDS on Recruitment in the Health Professions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buccelli, Pamela B.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    A survey of 914 Philadelphia high school students (77 percent response) concerned their knowledge and attitudes toward acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) and the health professions. Results showed that most respondents had a good basic understanding of the transmission of the virus but they did not know or understand the health…

  10. Gerontologic Education for Allied Health Professionals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Namazi, Kevan H.; Green, Gordon

    2003-01-01

    Gives an overview of the aging population, allied health professions, and gerontology. Describes the modularization process used at the University of Texas--breaking a three-credit course into interdependent one-credit courses as a way to expose allied health students to a wide variety of gerontology topics through elective courses. (Contains 19…

  11. Professional Preparation: Multicultural Health Beliefs in Action.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Linda Sue

    1982-01-01

    A course dealing with the health beliefs of Hispanics, American Indians, and Anglo Americans was developed at the University of New Mexico. An ethnically diverse class visited different cultural settings in the Southwest to study beliefs about religion, nutrition, folk medicine, and other customs affecting health practices. (PP)

  12. Policy for prevention of oral manifestations in HIV/AIDS: the approach of the WHO Global Oral Health Program.

    PubMed

    Petersen, P-E

    2006-01-01

    The HIV/AIDS pandemic has become a human and social disaster, particularly affecting the developing countries of Africa, Southeast Asia, and Latin America. By the end of 2004, about 40 million people were estimated to be infected by HIV globally. The health sectors in many affected countries are facing severe shortages of human and financial resources, and are struggling to cope with the growing impact of HIV/AIDS. In most developed countries, the availability of antiretroviral treatment has resulted in a dramatic reduction in HIV/AIDS-related mortality and morbidity. In contrast, in the developing countries, there is little access to treatment, and access to HIV-prevention services is poor. The '3 by 5' initiative was launched by the WHO and UNAIDS in 2003 with the aim of providing antiretrovirals to three million people in developing countries by the year 2005. HIV infection has a significant negative impact on oral health, with approximately 40-50% of HIV-positive persons developing oral fungal, bacterial, or viral infections early in the course of the disease. Oral health services and professionals can contribute effectively to the control of HIV/AIDS through health education and health promotion, patient care, effective infection control, and surveillance. The WHO Global Oral Health Program has strengthened its work for prevention of HIV/AIDS-related oral disease. The WHO co-sponsored conference, Oral Health and Disease in AIDS, held in Phuket, Thailand (2004), issued a declaration calling for action by national and international health authorities. The aim is to strengthen oral health promotion and the care of HIV-infected persons, and to encourage research on the impact that HIV/AIDS, public health initiatives, and surveillance have on oral health. PMID:16672544

  13. A bridge to Africa: how health professionals can help in development.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, L W

    1991-05-01

    US secretary of Health and Human Services Sullivan addresses the issue of the role the US has now and the role it may play in improving health across the African continent. Progress made is attributed to the courageous individual commitment of many dedicated health care problems, and substantial cooperative international efforts. The 1990 US contribution through USAID is 80 million dollars for child survival in Africa and 80 million dollars for voluntary family planning activities. The 1991 figures increased in the total development fund from 560 million dollars to 800 million dollars. AIDS activities receive 11 million dollars out of a total world budget of 52 million dollars. An additional 14 million dollar grant was awarded for a Ugandan effort to fight AIDS and child health care problems and 242,000 dollar grant was given to the Soweto Township AIDS program and AIDS prevention and treatment. The future emphasis was directed to providing a steady, cooperative partnership with African countries, to increasing support for political stability and ending violence, and continuing US policy based on broad based economic growth which fosters sustainable and effective health assistance programs. Support must be provided to assist programs which develop indigenous primary health care systems. Work must be focused on helping Africans learn and practice personal health promotion and disease prevention, which is also of particular significance in breaking the AIDS transmission chain. Increased efforts must address malaria through applied and basic research and malaria control programs. US information technology in the form of, for instance, technical training in epidemiology, disease surveillance, and computer science and data use, needs to be provided to African health professionals. Utilitarian means in international cooperation and relief must be used to foster economic development, democracy, and delivery of health care improvements. The role for health professionals in

  14. [Conscientious objection for health professionals in ethics and deontology].

    PubMed

    Martínez León, Mercedes; Rabadán Jiménez, José

    2010-01-01

    The main objective of this paper is to highlight the numerous conflicts enters the consciousness and the laws are becoming more frequent health professionals in daily clinical practice. Clarify and define concepts such as ″conscientious objection for health professionals, to avoid confusion with other terms. This is work that aims to address the objection of conscience, not from the law but from the ethics and deontology, reviewing existing regulations both internationally and nationally. In addition to complete the studio, in a last part we discuss the state of the ″conscientious objection″ tars the recent passage of the organic law 2 / 2010, 3 march, sexual and reproductive health and the interruption of pregnancy. As a final conclusion we can say that ″conscientious objection″ is recognized in international declarations and even in the european constitution. in spain, the code of ethics and medical ethics, is one of the places where the objection of conscience of health professionals has great development for years, states that the doctor can refrain from the practice of certain professional acts such as abortion, in vitro fertilization or sterilization, if they are in contradiction with its ethical and scientific beliefs. Also recently, the general assembly of october 24, 2009, the central committee of ethics has made a declaration on ″conscientious objection″, insisting on its recognition. Finally, the organic law 2 / 2010, 3 march, sexual and reproductive health and the interruption of pregnancy, seems to be recognized ″the right to exercise conscientious objection″ of health professionals directly involved in the voluntary termination of pregnancy, after much discussion, but it is still early to assess the implementation of this right because, until july 5, 2010, will come into force this law, what will the future that we clarify the development of this important right for health professionals. PMID:20886912

  15. Appy Hour: Health Sciences Professionals Learn About Apps.

    PubMed

    Casucci, Tallie; Gregory, Joan M; Shipman, Jean P

    2016-01-01

    Appy Hour is a recurring event hosted by an academic health sciences library featuring apps that are informally presented and demonstrated by invited speakers. The audience is encouraged to ask questions during the presentation of the featured app(s). This event provides learning and networking opportunities for health sciences faculty, staff, students, and health care professionals. This article illustrates the process for hosting the event, shares lessons learned, and discusses possible future directions to gain a wider audience. PMID:27391175

  16. How do early career health sciences information professionals gain competencies?

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Bethany A.; Rodriguez, Bredny

    2016-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to describe early career health sciences information professionals' self-reported attainment of the Medical Library Association (MLA) Competencies for Lifelong Learning and Professional Success and to investigate the various methods by which participants developed these competencies. Methods A SurveyMonkey survey was designed to ascertain participants' demographic information and their competency attainment. “Early career” health information professionals were defined as those with less than five years of professional experience. Participants were asked to rate each of the seven competencies on a five-point Likert scale regarding their level of agreement with the statement, “I have demonstrated this competency.” Participants who responded positively were then asked to indicate how they acquired the competency on a multiple-choice, multiple-answer list. Free-text fields were provided for general comments and for participants to elaborate on their answers. The survey was distributed through the MLA email discussion list and other related email discussion lists. Participation was anonymous. Results One hundred eighty-seven responses were received. Out of those 187 respondents, 95 completed the entire survey. The majority of early career health sciences information professionals agreed that they had attained all 7 competencies. Of the various methods used to develop competencies, the most selected method was formal library and information studies education. Participants were least likely to report attaining competencies via mentoring, volunteering, or internships. Participants reported the highest level of confidence in having attained the “Health Sciences Information Services” competency, and the lowest level of confidence in having attained the “Research, Analysis, and Interpretation” competency. Conclusions These results contribute to the ongoing discussions regarding proposed changes to the MLA competencies

  17. Republic of Korea's Health Aid Governance: Perspectives from Partner Countries.

    PubMed

    Alley, Allison Baer; Park, Eunhee; Lee, Jong-Koo; Kang, Minah; Oh, Juhwan

    2015-11-01

    The Republic of Korea (ROK) has a remarkable development history, including its status as the first country to transition from aid recipient to member of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development Development Assistance Committee (DAC). However, since becoming a donor country, the ROK has struggled to achieve internationally accepted agreements related to aid effectiveness and several evaluations have identified the ROK as being one of the weakest DAC member countries at providing good aid. A survey was conducted to assess partner countries' perceptions of the ROK's governance of health official development assistance (ODA). The survey was administered to government officials based in partner countries' Ministries of Health and therefore presents the unique perspective of ODA recipients. The survey questions focused on governance principles established in the internationally-accepted Paris Declaration on Aid Effectiveness. The total response rate was 13 responses out of 26 individuals who received the email request (50%). The survey results indicate that progress has been made since earlier international evaluations but the ROK has not overcome all areas of concern. This confirms that the ROK is continuing to develop its capacity as a good donor but has yet to achieve all governance-related targets. The results of this survey can be used to inform a future aid strategy. PMID:26617449

  18. Republic of Korea's Health Aid Governance: Perspectives from Partner Countries

    PubMed Central

    Alley, Allison Baer; Park, Eunhee; Lee, Jong-Koo; Kang, Minah

    2015-01-01

    The Republic of Korea (ROK) has a remarkable development history, including its status as the first country to transition from aid recipient to member of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development Development Assistance Committee (DAC). However, since becoming a donor country, the ROK has struggled to achieve internationally accepted agreements related to aid effectiveness and several evaluations have identified the ROK as being one of the weakest DAC member countries at providing good aid. A survey was conducted to assess partner countries' perceptions of the ROK's governance of health official development assistance (ODA). The survey was administered to government officials based in partner countries' Ministries of Health and therefore presents the unique perspective of ODA recipients. The survey questions focused on governance principles established in the internationally-accepted Paris Declaration on Aid Effectiveness. The total response rate was 13 responses out of 26 individuals who received the email request (50%). The survey results indicate that progress has been made since earlier international evaluations but the ROK has not overcome all areas of concern. This confirms that the ROK is continuing to develop its capacity as a good donor but has yet to achieve all governance-related targets. The results of this survey can be used to inform a future aid strategy. PMID:26617449

  19. Public Health Platforms: An Emerging Informatics Approach to Health Professional Learning and Development

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Kathleen

    2016-01-01

    Health informatics has a major role to play in optimising the management and use of data, information and knowledge in health systems. As health systems undergo digital transformation, it is important to consider informatics approaches not only to curriculum content but also to the design of learning environments and learning activities for health professional learning and development. An example of such an informatics approach is the use of large-scale, integrated public health platforms on the Internet as part of health professional learning and development. This article describes selected examples of such platforms, with a focus on how they may influence the direction of health professional learning and development. Significance for public health The landscape of healthcare systems, public health systems, health research systems and professional education systems is fragmented, with many gaps and silos. More sophistication in the management of health data, information, and knowledge, based on public health informatics expertise, is needed to tackle key issues of prevention, promotion and policy-making. Platform technologies represent an emerging large-scale, highly integrated informatics approach to public health, combining the technologies of Internet, the web, the cloud, social technologies, remote sensing and/or mobile apps into an online infrastructure that can allow more synergies in work within and across these systems. Health professional curricula need updating so that the health workforce has a deep and critical understanding of the way that platform technologies are becoming the foundation of the health sector. PMID:27190977

  20. Public Health Platforms: An Emerging Informatics Approach to Health Professional Learning and Development.

    PubMed

    Gray, Kathleen

    2016-04-26

    Health informatics has a major role to play in optimising the management and use of data, information and knowledge in health systems. As health systems undergo digital transformation, it is important to consider informatics approaches not only to curriculum content but also to the design of learning environments and learning activities for health professional learning and development. An example of such an informatics approach is the use of large-scale, integrated public health platforms on the Internet as part of health professional learning and development. This article describes selected examples of such platforms, with a focus on how they may influence the direction of health professional learning and development. Significance for public healthThe landscape of healthcare systems, public health systems, health research systems and professional education systems is fragmented, with many gaps and silos. More sophistication in the management of health data, information, and knowledge, based on public health informatics expertise, is needed to tackle key issues of prevention, promotion and policy-making. Platform technologies represent an emerging large-scale, highly integrated informatics approach to public health, combining the technologies of Internet, the web, the cloud, social technologies, remote sensing and/or mobile apps into an online infrastructure that can allow more synergies in work within and across these systems. Health professional curricula need updating so that the health workforce has a deep and critical understanding of the way that platform technologies are becoming the foundation of the health sector. PMID:27190977

  1. New patterns in health sector aid to India.

    PubMed

    Jeffery, R

    1986-01-01

    Criticisms of health aid have largely been derived from African and Latin American experiences. It is suggested that such analyses, while valuable, cannot be applied wholesale to India without detailed examination of the patterns of health sector aid which have actually characterized the period since 1947. This article brings together material on the scale and form that this assistance has taken, and demonstrates that its focus has been preventive in emphasis and oriented towards the primary care sector. In some periods it has contributed a substantial share of total public sector expenditures, and in some spheres, it has played a major role, particularly the control of communicable diseases. However, the impact of less substantial sums going to prestige medical colleges or to population control programs should not be ignored; and several of the aid categories have been of dubious origin (PL-480 counterpart funds and U.S. food surpluses as the prime examples). However, the "new" health aid programs do not deserve the ready dismissal they have received in some quarters. PMID:3957509

  2. Health Professionals’ Alcohol-Related Professional Practices and the Relationship between Their Personal Alcohol Attitudes and Behavior and Professional Practices: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Bakhshi, Savita; While, Alison E.

    2013-01-01

    Health professionals’ personal health behaviors have been found to be associated with their practices with patients in areas such as smoking, physical activity and weight management, but little is known in relation to alcohol use. This review has two related strands and aims to: (1) examine health professionals’ alcohol-related health promotion practices; and (2) explore the relationship between health professionals’ personal alcohol attitudes and behaviors, and their professional alcohol-related health promotion practices. A comprehensive literature search of the Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, CINAHL, British Nursing Index, Web of Science, Scopus and Science Direct (2007–2013) identified 26 studies that met the inclusion criteria for Strand 1, out of which six were analyzed for Strand 2. The findings indicate that health professionals use a range of methods to aid patients who are high-risk alcohol users. Positive associations were reported between health professionals’ alcohol-related health promotion activities and their personal attitudes towards alcohol (n = 2), and their personal alcohol use (n = 2). The findings have some important implications for professional education. Future research should focus on conducting well-designed studies with larger samples to enable us to draw firm conclusions and develop the evidence base. PMID:24366045

  3. An Exploration of How Health Professionals Create eHealth and mHealth Education Interventions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tamim, Suha Rahif

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore how health education professionals create ehealth and mhealth education interventions. Three research questions led this qualitative study. The first research question focused on the use of learning theories, instructional models, and instructional design models. The second research question focused on the…

  4. Issues of expressed stigma of HIV/AIDS among professionals in Southern Sudan.

    PubMed

    Machine, Edwin M; Ross, Michael W; McCurdy, Sheryl A

    2011-08-01

    HIV-related stigma continues to be a significant barrier to HIV testing, treatment, and care. Understanding the factors that underlie this stigma could help remove barriers to HIV/AIDS intervention. We identified these factors among nurses as well as community leaders in Lui, Southern Sudan. Participants included health workers at a local hospital, a women's group, local market traders, religious leaders, and teachers. We categorized the responses generated from group interaction forums as concerns, fears, and perceptions. We found that stigma persisted not only toward people with conspicuous signs of full-blown AIDS, but also toward community programs, like voluntary counseling and testing centers. Future interventions, including delabeling the counseling and testing centers and demonstrating the efficacy of highly active antiretroviral therapy, will be critical in reducing the stigma of HIV/AIDS in communities. PMID:21149851

  5. Regional Climate Change and Development of Public Health Decision Aids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hegedus, A. M.; Darmenova, K.; Grant, F.; Kiley, H.; Higgins, G. J.; Apling, D.

    2011-12-01

    According to the World Heath Organization (WHO) climate change is a significant and emerging threat to public health, and changes the way we must look at protecting vulnerable populations. Worldwide, the occurrence of some diseases and other threats to human health depend predominantly on local climate patterns. Rising average temperatures, in combination with changing rainfall patterns and humidity levels, alter the lifecycle and regional distribution of certain disease-carrying vectors, such as mosquitoes, ticks and rodents. In addition, higher surface temperatures will bring heat waves and heat stress to urban regions worldwide and will likely increase heat-related health risks. A growing body of scientific evidence also suggests an increase in extreme weather events such as floods, droughts and hurricanes that can be destructive to human health and well-being. Therefore, climate adaptation and health decision aids are urgently needed by city planners and health officials to determine high risk areas, evaluate vulnerable populations and develop public health infrastructure and surveillance systems. To address current deficiencies in local planning and decision making with respect to regional climate change and its effect on human health, our research is focused on performing a dynamical downscaling with the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model to develop decision aids that translate the regional climate data into actionable information for users. WRF model is initialized with the Max Planck Institute European Center/Hamburg Model version 5 (ECHAM5) General Circulation Model simulations forced with the Special Report on Emissions (SRES) A1B emissions scenario. Our methodology involves development of climatological indices of extreme weather, quantifying the risk of occurrence of water/rodent/vector-borne diseases as well as developing various heat stress related decision aids. Our results indicate that the downscale simulations provide the necessary

  6. Nonprofit Board Membership for Health Care Professionals: Honor or Responsibility?

    PubMed

    Johnson, Joyce M; Calderwood, James A

    2016-09-01

    Physicians and other health care professionals are often invited to serve on nonprofit boards. Although service on a nonprofit board is an honor, it carries a large responsibility. Many health care professionals are unaware of the level of commitment and involvement board service requires, particularly fiduciary boards, which have accompanying risks and legal functions. In the present article, the authors describe the activities and responsibilities of a fiduciary board member. They also provide a checklist of questions to ask before agreeing to serve on a board and discuss how to decide whether one is the right fit for a specific board position. PMID:27571299

  7. Training Mental Health Professionals in Child Sexual Abuse: Curricular Guidelines.

    PubMed

    Kenny, Maureen C; Abreu, Roberto L

    2015-01-01

    Given the incidence of child sexual abuse in the United States, mental health professionals need training to detect, assess, and treat victims and should possess a clear understanding of the process of victimization. However, many mental health professionals who work with children and families have not been exposed to any training in child sexual abuse during their formal education. This article will examine the need for such training, suggest critical components of child sexual abuse training, and describe various methods of training (e.g., in person, Web-based, and community resources). PMID:26301441

  8. Reducing HIV-related stigma among health-care professionals: a game-based experiential approach.

    PubMed

    Mak, Winnie W S; Cheng, Shannon S Y; Law, Rita W; Cheng, Winnie W L; Chan, Fei

    2015-01-01

    Stigmatizing attitudes from health professionals toward people living with HIV (PLHIV) constitute a key barrier to HIV care. Despite considerable progress in HIV stigma-reduction research, we are still searching for effective strategies that can be implemented on a larger scale. To narrow this research gap, the present study investigated a novel cost-effective approach to reducing HIV-related stigma among health professionals. Interactive experiential games were used to help participants gain first-hand experience of potential stressors that PLHIV might encounter. The effectiveness of this game-based experiential approach was compared with that of in vivo contact in reducing HIV-related stigma among students in the health-care fields. Eighty-eight students of health-related programs in Hong Kong were randomly assigned to either the game-based or in vivo contact program. They completed measures of stigmatizing attitudes and HIV/AIDS-related knowledge at pre-program, post-program, and one-month follow-up. Findings showed that the effectiveness of the game-based experiential approach in reducing HIV-related stigma was similar to that of in vivo contact both at post-program and one-month follow-up. Further research is needed to explore the potential value of the game-based approach in reducing HIV stigma among health professionals. PMID:25671591

  9. Mental health first aid training for high school teachers: a cluster randomized trial

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Mental disorders often have their first onset during adolescence. For this reason, high school teachers are in a good position to provide initial assistance to students who are developing mental health problems. To improve the skills of teachers in this area, a Mental Health First Aid training course was modified to be suitable for high school teachers and evaluated in a cluster randomized trial. Methods The trial was carried out with teachers in South Australian high schools. Teachers at 7 schools received training and those at another 7 were wait-listed for future training. The effects of the training on teachers were evaluated using questionnaires pre- and post-training and at 6 months follow-up. The questionnaires assessed mental health knowledge, stigmatizing attitudes, confidence in providing help to others, help actually provided, school policy and procedures, and teacher mental health. The indirect effects on students were evaluated using questionnaires at pre-training and at follow-up which assessed any mental health help and information received from school staff, and also the mental health of the student. Results The training increased teachers' knowledge, changed beliefs about treatment to be more like those of mental health professionals, reduced some aspects of stigma, and increased confidence in providing help to students and colleagues. There was an indirect effect on students, who reported receiving more mental health information from school staff. Most of the changes found were sustained 6 months after training. However, no effects were found on teachers' individual support towards students with mental health problems or on student mental health. Conclusions Mental Health First Aid training has positive effects on teachers' mental health knowledge, attitudes, confidence and some aspects of their behaviour. Trial registration ACTRN12608000561381 PMID:20576158

  10. Teaching Computer Science to Health Professionals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Safir, Aran; And Others

    1981-01-01

    In 1971 the National Library of Medicine underwrote the promotion of computer technology integration into clinical medicine by providing graduate-level training for faculty members in the health sciences. The experience of the Mount Sinai School of Medicine in the implementation of an NLM training grant is reported. (MLW)

  11. Preparing health science students for interdisciplinary professional practice.

    PubMed

    Cleak, Helen; Williamson, Dianne

    2007-01-01

    In 2002, a number of lecturers from different clinical schools within the Faculty of Health Sciences at La Trobe University embarked on the development of a new interdisciplinary professional practice subject to be undertaken by all final-year undergraduate health science students. The subject was designed to better prepare students for their first professional appointment by introducing them to the concepts of interdisciplinary teamwork, the health care context, and the challenges and constraints that organizational contexts present. This report details the background of the project, the consultation and development that took place in the design of the subject, and implementation of the subject. The uniqueness of the project is explained by the number of disciplines involved, the online delivery, and the focus on a set of generic graduate attributes for health science students. It is hoped that students who have undertaken this subject will have a better understanding of the roles of other health professionals and the context in which they will be working by grappling with many real-life professional issues that they will face when they graduate and enter the workforce. PMID:17941408

  12. The library's role in the continuing education of health professionals.

    PubMed Central

    Van Vuren, D D; Adelson, R; Caplan, R

    1987-01-01

    Health sciences librarians have historically viewed disseminating information to health professionals as a major role. Typically, they have provided individualized services and are among the professions that help health professionals further their education after finishing formal education. Another group directly involved in health professional continuing education is continuing education (CE) providers who offer ongoing learning through group activities. These two professions often reached the same audiences in the past, and their different approaches--individual and group--were complementary. Health professionals who needed information immediately or who wished individual learning used the library while those who wanted to hear eminent colleagues tended to use CE meetings or seminars; some did both. The librarians and CE providers rarely interacted, but this is now changing. With the introduction of personal computers, medical librarians have expanded their responsibilities to include formalized classroom instruction. At the same time, CE providers have increased their scope beyond formalized group instruction into individualized education. Librarians and CE providers can either collaborate and share their expertise or they can compete against each other. PMID:3450347

  13. Exercises in Emergency Preparedness for Health Professionals in Community Clinics

    PubMed Central

    Blossom, H. John; Sandrock, Christian; Mitchell, Brenda; Brandstein, Kendra

    2010-01-01

    Health professionals in community settings are generally unprepared for disasters. From 2006 to 2008 the California Statewide Area Health Education Center (AHEC) program conducted 90 table top exercises in community practice sites in 18 counties. The exercises arranged and facilitated by AHEC trained local coordinators and trainers were designed to assist health professionals in developing and applying their practice site emergency plans using simulated events about pandemic influenza or other emergencies. Of the 1,496 multidisciplinary health professionals and staff participating in the exercises, 1,176 (79%) completed learner evaluation forms with 92–98% of participants rating the training experiences as good to excellent. A few reported helpful effects when applying their training to a real time local disaster. Assessments of the status of clinic emergency plans using 15 criteria were conducted at three intervals: when the exercises were scheduled, immediately before the exercises, and for one-third of sites, three months after the exercise. All sites made improvements in their emergency plans with some or all of the plan criteria. Of the sites having follow up, most (N = 23) were community health centers that made statistically significant changes in two-thirds of the plan criteria (P = .001–.046). Following the exercises, after action reports were completed for 88 sites and noted strengths, weaknesses, and plans for improvements in their emergency plans Most sites (72–90%) showed improvements in how to activate their plans, the roles of their staff, and how to participate in a coordinated response. Challenges in scheduling exercises included time constraints and lack of resources among busy health professionals. Technical assistance and considerations of clinic schedules mitigated these issues. The multidisciplinary table top exercises proved to be an effective means to develop or improve clinic emergency plans and enhance the dialogue and

  14. 75 FR 20999 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Survey of Health Care Professionals' Awareness and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-22

    ... Professionals' Awareness and Perceptions of the National Cancer Institute's Intramural Clinical Trials (NCI... Collection: Title: The Survey of Health Care Professionals' Awareness and Perceptions of the National...

  15. Border restrictions and HIV / AIDS: a public health policy disaster.

    PubMed

    1993-01-01

    Some governments restrict people with HIV/AIDS from entering their countries, claiming that doing so reduced HIV transmission. Yet, this claim does not stand to reason in the US which has the world's highest number of AIDS cases or in countries with no reported AIDS cases since some people may already be HIV infected. Some countries require HIV testing for people crossing borders. Yet, some people cross borders illegally. Further, HIV tests only detect HIV antibodies, but they are not present for a period after HIV infection. Some countries claim that people with HIV/AIDS burden the pubic health system. Yet, the countries do not apply this economic standard to travelers with other life-threatening diseases, thus, it is discriminatory. Besides, it is immaterial for short-term visitors and visitors with health insurance. HIV-related border restrictions violate the human right of freedom of movement. Some countries require HIV testing of just certain travelers, often based on country of origin or sexual orientation another form of discrimination. These practices set a bad precedent and encourage local governments to adopt like measures, leading to discrimination of HIV seropositive citizens. These national policies may keep tourists from traveling to some countries, perhaps affecting national revenues. Compulsory testing is very costly and takes money away from needed HIV prevention programs. People in countries with low HIV prevalence often think they are not at risk because HIV-infected foreigners are kept out of their country, so those who partake in risky behavior do not examine this behavior. Further, citizens from such countries will not consider AIDS information necessary. In those cases where HIV/AIDS information is presented in combination with mandatory testing, people will tend not to be interested in the messages. In conclusion, border restrictions based on HIV testing are counter productive and impede efforts to contain the pandemic. PMID:12286989

  16. Domestic violence against women: representations of health professionals 1

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Vera Lúcia de Oliveira; Silva, Camila Daiane; de Oliveira, Denize Cristina; Acosta, Daniele Ferreira; Amarijo, Cristiane Lopes

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective: to analyze the representations about domestic violence against women, among health professionals of Family Health Units. Method: qualitative study based on the Theory of Social Representations. Data were collected by means of evocations and interviews, treating them in the Ensemble de Programmes Pemettant L'Analyse des Evocations software - EVOC and content analysis. Results: nurses, physicians, nursing technicians and community health agents participated. The evocations were answered by 201 professionals and, of these, 64 were interviewed. The central core of this representation, comprised by the terms "aggression", "physical-aggression", "cowardice" and "lack of respect", which have negative connotations and were cited by interviewees. In the contrast zone, comprised by the terms "abuse", "abuse-power", "pain", "humiliation", "impunity", "suffering", "sadness" and "violence", two subgroups were identified. The first periphery contains the terms "fear", evoked most often, followed by "revolt", "low self-esteem" and "submission", and in the second periphery "acceptance" and "professional support". Conclusion: this is a structured representation since it contains conceptual, imagetic and attitudinal elements. The subgroups were comprised by professionals working in the rural area and by those who had completed their professional training course in or after 2004. These presented a representation of violence different from the representation of the general group, although all demonstrated a negative connotation of this phenomenon. PMID:26444175

  17. Education of health professionals using a proposed telehealth system.

    PubMed Central

    Chang, B. L.; Trelease, R.

    1999-01-01

    The movement of health care from hospitals to the community has demanded a major shift in the way in which health care professionals are being taught. This paper describes the collaboration of the Schools of Nursing and Medicine in the use of telehealth technology for the education of health care professionals. The specific aims of the project were to use the technology for the verification of the students' assessment and physical examinations, for the conduct of multi-professional patient rounds, and provision of consultations to professionals at remote sites. Capitalizing on the Schools' previous experience for observing students via computer technology at remote sites, we employed PC-based workstations, specialized peripherals, and Internet connecting protocols to implement a telehealth project for professional clinical education. Initial student, faculty and staff reactions were generally positive. The formal evaluation plan focuses on students, faculty, and staff. Structured questionnaires are used and a comparison of learning by telehealth technology will be made with alternative (more conventional) methods in evaluating knowledge and quality of verification of physical examination findings, and satisfaction with the learning process. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:10566408

  18. Personal factors related to compassion fatigue in health professionals.

    PubMed

    Zeidner, Moshe; Hadar, Dafna; Matthews, Gerald; Roberts, Richard D

    2013-01-01

    This study examines the role of some personal and professional factors in compassion fatigue among health-care professionals. Research participants included 182 (89 mental and 93 medical) health-care professionals who completed an assessment battery measuring compassion fatigue, emotion management, trait emotional intelligence, situation-specific coping strategies, and negative affect. Major findings indicate that both self-report "trait" emotional intelligence and ability-based emotion management are inversely associated with compassion fatigue; adaptive coping is inversely related to compassion fatigue; and differences exist between mental and medical professions in emotional intelligence, coping strategies, and negative affect. Furthermore, problem-focused coping appears to mediate the association between trait emotional intelligence and compassion fatigue. These findings shed light on the role of emotional factors in compassion fatigue among health-care professionals. Beyond enhancing our knowledge of practitioners' professional quality of life, the current study serves as a basis for the early identification of groups of practitioners at risk for compassion fatigue. PMID:23614527

  19. Integrating cultural humility into health care professional education and training.

    PubMed

    Chang, E-shien; Simon, Melissa; Dong, XinQi

    2012-05-01

    As US populations become increasing diverse, healthcare professionals are facing a heightened challenge to provide cross-cultural care. To date, medical education around the world has developed specific curricula on cultural competence training in acknowledgement of the importance of culturally sensitive and grounded services. This article proposes to move forward by integrating the concept of cultural humility into current trainings, in which we believe, is vital in complementing the current model, and better prepare future professionals to address health challenges with culturally appropriate care. Based on the works of Chinese philosophers, cultural values and the contemporary Chinese immigrants' experience, we hereby present the QIAN (Humbleness) curriculum: the importance of self-Questioning and critique, bi-directional cultural Immersion, mutually Active-listening, and the flexibility of Negotiation. The principles of the QIAN curriculum reside not only between the patient and the healthcare professional dyad, but also elicit the necessary support of family, health care system as well as the community at large. The QIAN curriculum could improve practice and enhance the exploration, comprehension and appreciation of the cultural orientations between healthcare professionals and patients which ultimately could improve patient satisfaction, patient-healthcare professional relationship, medical adherence and the reduction of health disparities. QIAN model is highly adaptable to other cultural and ethnic groups in multicultural societies around the globe. Incorporating its framework into the current medical education may enhance cross-cultural clinical encounters. PMID:21161680

  20. Negotiating skill for health care professionals.

    PubMed

    Umiker, W

    1996-03-01

    Health workers engage in negotiations at work and at home on a daily basis. The ability to negotiate is a vital part of interpersonal skill. The paradigm of negotiation strategy is undergoing a profound shift from power pressure to an egalitarian form of problem solving or value-added approach that is much more likely to result in win/win outcomes. The basic principle of this refreshing innovation is similar to what we learned about brainstorming and creative problem solving. PMID:10154918

  1. AIDS and traditional health beliefs and practices of black women.

    PubMed

    Flaskerud, J H; Rush, C E

    1989-01-01

    This study examines whether traditional health beliefs and practices of black Americans reported in the literature were consistent with those of a target population of low-income black women in Los Angeles County and describes how these traditional classifications of illness and healing practices were related to their understanding of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). A qualitative approach was used to gather the data in unstructured interviews. Content analysis was used to classify data. Sources of illness and remedies identified by the women were divided into two categories: natural and supernatural. Natural sources included cold, impurities, diet, weakness, lack of moderation, and stress. Supernatural sources included illnesses allowed by God, witchcraft, and evil influences. Remedies included antidotes, food, medicines, prayer, and healing. Analysis of the relationship of AIDS to traditional beliefs revealed that AIDS had been integrated into the traditional conceptualization of illness, health practices, and healing, and was attributed to both natural and supernatural causes. Prevention, prayer, and spiritual healing were recommended as remedies. Implications were that AIDS education, prevention, and treatment programs be within the context of traditional belief system. PMID:2748354

  2. Your Health: Prevention, Safety and First Aid, Personal Health Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oxley, Gloria; Torre, Liz

    Information and accompanying exercises are provided in this learning module to reinforce students' basic reading and writing skills and, at the same time, increase their awareness of and motivation toward sound personal health practices. Written at an elementary level, the module considers eleven personal health topics: prevention of illness;…

  3. Palau assessment for a continuing health care professional development program.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tai-Ho; Dever, Gregory; Kuartei, Stevenson; Maskarinec, Gregory G

    2007-03-01

    In 2003, the University of Hawai'i Department of Family Medicine and Community Health entered a 4-year cooperative agreement with the U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration to establish the "Pacific Association for Clinical Training" (PACT). PACT's goal is to develop effective distance education methods to improve the education and skills of health care professionals in the U.S.-Affiliated Pacific Island nations. To determine the situation existing in 2004, one of PACT's first projects was to perform site visits to each jurisdiction, conducting needs assessments through interviews with key health care professionals, hospital administrators and government officials. This article highlights findings of PACT's Palau assessment. Meant to establish a baseline for future reference, all data were collected in 2004-2005 and have not been updated. PMID:19772140

  4. Outreach to public health professionals: lessons learned from a collaborative Iowa public health project*

    PubMed Central

    Walton, Linda J.; Hasson, Seana; Ross, Faith VanToll; Martin, Elaine Russo

    2000-01-01

    In 1995, the National Library of Medicine (NLM) and the Public Health Service (PHS) recommended that special attention be given to the information needs of unaffiliated public health professionals. In response, the National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NN/LM) Greater Midwest Region initiated a collaborative outreach program for public health professionals working in rural east and central Iowa. Five public health agencies were provided equipment, training, and support for accessing the Internet. Key factors in the success of this project were: (1) the role of collaborating agencies in the implementation and ongoing success of information access outreach projects; (2) knowledge of the socio-cultural factors that influence the information-seeking habits of project participants (public health professionals); and (3) management of changing or varying technological infrastructures. Working with their funding, personnel from federal, state, and local governments enhanced the information-seeking skills of public health professionals in rural eastern and central Iowa communities. PMID:10783972

  5. General Information about AIDS-Related Lymphoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... AIDS-Related Lymphoma Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About AIDS-Related Lymphoma Go to Health Professional ... the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  6. Internet Continuing Education for Health Care Professionals: An Integrative Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cobb, Susan Copley

    2004-01-01

    Introduction: The objective was to review key articles and research studies on practices, preferences, and evaluation of on-line continuing education used by health care professionals. Methods: Data sources included searches of the "MEDLINE," "CINAHL," and "ERIC" databases (January 1990 to June 2004) and manual searches of the "Journal of…

  7. Infant Mental Health Home Visitation: Setting and Maintaining Professional Boundaries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barron, Carla; Paradis, Nichole

    2010-01-01

    Relationship-based infant mental health home visiting services for infants, toddlers, and their families intensify the connection between the personal and professional. To promote the therapeutic relationship and maximize the effectiveness of the intervention, home visitors must exercise good judgment, in the field and in the moment, to set and…

  8. Deviance Theory, Black Youth and Mental Health Professionals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Paul L.

    The nature of some of the relationships and interactions between black youth and mental health professionals are explored by this paper. It is organized into the following four discussions: (1) a portrait of black youth, given as background information; (2) specific portions of deviance theory as it relates to black youth; (3) black youth as…

  9. Critically Reflective Work Behavior of Health Care Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Groot, Esther; Jaarsma, Debbie; Endedijk, Maaike; Mainhard, Tim; Lam, Ineke; Simons, Robert-Jan; van Beukelen, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Better understanding of critically reflective work behavior (CRWB), an approach for work-related informal learning, is important in order to gain more profound insight in the continuing development of health care professionals. Methods: A survey, developed to measure CRWB and its predictors, was distributed to veterinary…

  10. Implementation of School Health Promotion: Consequences for Professional Assistance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boot, N. M. W. M.; de Vries, N. K.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This case study aimed to examine the factors influencing the implementation of health promotion (HP) policies and programs in secondary schools and the consequences for professional assistance. Design/methodology/approach: Group interviews were held in two schools that represented the best and worst case of implementation of a health…

  11. Seizure Recognition and Observation: A Guide for Allied Health Professionals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Epilepsy Foundation of America, Landover, MD.

    Intended for allied health professionals, this guide provides information on seizure recognition and classification to help them assist the patient, the family, and the treating physician in obtaining control of epileptic seizures. A section on seizure recognition describes epilepsy and seizures, covering seizure classification and the causes of…

  12. Conceptualizations of Professional Competencies in School Health Promotion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlsson, Monica

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the paper is to contribute to the conceptualization and discussion of professional competencies needed for supporting the development of the whole-school approach in school health promotion (SHP). Design/methodology/approach: The paper is based on a conceptual synthesis of literature, guided by a theoretical perspective on…

  13. Factors Affecting the Technology Readiness of Health Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, Stephanie E.

    2010-01-01

    Federal government policies are promoting diffusion of technologies into the healthcare system. If health professionals reject the new technologies planned for the healthcare system, it could result in costly failures, delays, and workforce problems. There is a lack of knowledge about factors that affect technology readiness (TR), defined as the…

  14. Understanding Early Childhood Mental Health: A Practical Guide for Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Summers, Susan Janko, Ed.; Chazan-Cohen, Rachel, Ed.

    2012-01-01

    Integrating infant mental health services into early education programs leads to better child outcomes and stronger parent-child relationships--the big question is how to do it appropriately and effectively. Clear answers are in this accessible textbook, created to prepare early childhood professionals and programs to weave best practices in…

  15. Geriatric Knowledge and Educational Needs among Rural Health Care Professionals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goins, R. Turner; Gainor, Sara Jane; Pollard, Cecil; Spencer, S. Melinda

    2003-01-01

    In a needs assessment of 84 rural health care professionals (44.1% physicians, 15.5% pharmacists, 14.3% nurses, 26.1% other), 39% considered their geriatrics knowledge above average. They were interested in learning more about Alzheimer's/dementia, medication use, and adverse effects. Preferred methods were videotapes, CD-ROM, and an…

  16. Knowledge of Conductive Education among Health Service Professionals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Mervyn; Emery, Rachel

    1995-01-01

    A survey of 89 United Kingdom health service professionals (pediatricians, physiotherapists, speech and occupational therapists) found widely varying levels of knowledge and understanding of the system of conductive education. A generally positive but cautious acknowledgement of the method's benefits for selected children was also found. The role…

  17. Psychiatry and the death penalty: dilemma for mental health professionals.

    PubMed

    Kermani, E J; Drob, S L

    1988-01-01

    The arguments for and against mental health professionals' participation in death penalty proceedings are presented against the background of U.S. Supreme Court decisions which have had a bearing on this issue. It is concluded that the possibility of presenting mitigating psychologic testimony in such proceedings necessitates the possibility of exacerbating psychiatric testimony and that hence, mental health professionals who testify for the prosecution in such cases do not, on a wider view, violate their hippocratic oaths or other ethical codes. A number of safeguards, however, should be instituted with respect to such testimony. Psychiatrists, psychologists or other qualified mental health professionals should (1) testify with medical "possibility" or "probability," (2) not be permitted to address ultimate legal issues and (3) be permitted, in fact encouraged, to present alternative interpretations of forensic psychiatric findings. It is further argued that in addition to being justified in testifying for the prosecution on death penalty cases, mental health professionals may have a moral rationale for treating death row prisoners and restoring them to competency. PMID:3070607

  18. The Teaching of Psychology on Health Professional Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Upton, Dominic; Mansell, Hayley

    2008-01-01

    Psychology is taught on a range of vocational courses including such training for professions as nurses, medics, physiotherapists, occupational therapists, and other health care professionals. However, what is uncertain is what psychology is taught, who it is taught by and how it is taught. This project aims to address these unresolved questions…

  19. Health Potential of Female Candidates to the Professional Military Service

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaiser, Alicja; Sokolowski, Marek

    2011-01-01

    Study aim: To assess health and social characteristics of female candidates for professional officers and non-commissioned officers of Polish Army. Material and methods: All female students of officer and non-commissioned officer Military Academies (16 each) were studied in 2009. Two questionnaires were applied in the study: IPAQ (short) for…

  20. Interdisciplinary Collaborative Training for School-Based Health Professionals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Papa, Patricia A.; Rector, Cherie; Stone, Carol

    1998-01-01

    Interdisciplinary training and education for school-based health professionals is important, but few such programs exist. This paper describes the California State University Interprofessional Collaboration Training Project and the Catholic University of America School Nurse Practitioner Program, offering suggestions for expanding…

  1. A child in detention: dilemmas faced by health professionals.

    PubMed

    Zwi, Karen J; Herzberg, Brenda; Dossetor, David; Field, Jyotsna

    2003-09-15

    A 6-year-old child, held in detention with his parents pending the outcome of their application for refugee status, manifested psychological distress by repeated episodes of refusing to eat or drink. This case presented clinical and ethical dilemmas for health professionals who were constrained from acting in the child's best interests by government policy of mandatory detention. PMID:12964917

  2. Health Care Professionals' Views about Supporting Patients' Self-Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mikkonen, Irma; Hynynen, Marja-Anneli

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to describe nurses' and other health care professionals' views about their patient education skills and how to develop them. Design/methodology/approach: The data for the study were collected from the participants of the online education course on patient education. The data were analyzed using qualitative…

  3. Terminal Cancer and Suicide: The Health Care Professional's Dilemma.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, Leslie C.; McAleer, Charles A.

    1984-01-01

    Examined factors influencing the evaluation of a patient contemplating suicide, in a study of 138 health care professionals. Results showed subjects' evaluations, acceptance, and behavior were affected by their belief that the patient had cancer and/or was dying, and by their own degree of death anxiety. (JAC)

  4. Teaching Death Management Skills: Health Professionals Confront Patient Avoidance Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lanham, Raymond; And Others

    Health professionals tend to view dying patients with two intertwined attitudes. On one hand the patient possesses an irreversible pathological condition and the doctor is obliged to help that patient embrace death with as much dignity as possible. On the other hand, the patient's imminent death is daily testimony to the limits of the doctor's…

  5. How well do health professionals interpret diagnostic information? A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Whiting, Penny F; Davenport, Clare; Jameson, Catherine; Burke, Margaret; Sterne, Jonathan A C; Hyde, Chris; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate whether clinicians differ in how they evaluate and interpret diagnostic test information. Design Systematic review. Data sources MEDLINE, EMBASE and PsycINFO from inception to September 2013; bibliographies of retrieved studies, experts and citation search of key included studies. Eligibility criteria for selecting studies Primary studies that provided information on the accuracy of any diagnostic test (eg, sensitivity, specificity, likelihood ratios) to health professionals and that reported outcomes relating to their understanding of information on or implications of test accuracy. Results We included 24 studies. 6 assessed ability to define accuracy metrics: health professionals were less likely to identify the correct definition of likelihood ratios than of sensitivity and specificity. –25 studies assessed Bayesian reasoning. Most assessed the influence of a positive test result on the probability of disease: they generally found health professionals’ estimation of post-test probability to be poor, with a tendency to overestimation. 3 studies found that approaches based on likelihood ratios resulted in more accurate estimates of post-test probability than approaches based on estimates of sensitivity and specificity alone, while 3 found less accurate estimates. 5 studies found that presenting natural frequencies rather than probabilities improved post-test probability estimation and speed of calculations. Conclusions Commonly used measures of test accuracy are poorly understood by health professionals. Reporting test accuracy using natural frequencies and visual aids may facilitate improved understanding and better estimation of the post-test probability of disease. PMID:26220870

  6. VA Health Professional Scholarship and Visual Impairment and Orientation and Mobility Professional Scholarship Programs. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2013-08-20

    The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) is amending its VA Health Professional Scholarship Program (HPSP) regulations. VA is also establishing regulations for a new program, the Visual Impairment and Orientation and Mobility Professional Scholarship Program (VIOMPSP). These regulations comply with and implement sections 302 and 603 of the Caregivers and Veterans Omnibus Health Services Act of 2010 (the 2010 Act). Section 302 of the 2010 Act established the VIOMPSP, which authorizes VA to provide financial assistance to certain students seeking a degree in visual impairment or orientation or mobility, in order to increase the supply of qualified blind rehabilitation specialists for VA and the United States. Section 603 of the 2010 Act reauthorized and modified HPSP, a program that provides scholarships for education or training in certain health care occupations. PMID:23977714

  7. Journalists and public health professionals: challenges of a symbiotic relationship.

    PubMed

    Lubens, Pauline

    2015-02-01

    Journalists and health professionals share a symbiotic relationship during a disease outbreak as both professions play an important role in informing the public's perceptions and the decisions of policy makers. Although critics in the United States have focused on US reporters and media outlets whose coverage has been sensationalist and alarmist, the discussion in this article is based on the ideal--gold standard--for US journalists. Journalists perform three primary functions during times of health crises: disseminating accurate information to the public, medical professionals, and policy makers; acting as the go-between for the public and decision makers and health and science experts; and monitoring the performance of institutions responsible for the public health response. A journalist's goal is to responsibly inform the public in order to optimize the public health goals of prevention while minimizing panic. The struggle to strike a balance between humanizing a story and protecting the dignity of patients while also capturing the severity of an epidemic is harder in the era of the 24-7 news cycle. Journalists grapple with dueling pressures: confirming that their information is correct while meeting the demand for rapid updates. Just as health care professionals triage patients, journalists triage information. The challenge going forward will be how to get ahead of the story from the onset, racing against the pace of digital dissemination of misinformation by continuing to refine the media-science relationship. PMID:25382141

  8. Professional development through policy advocacy: communicating and advocating for health and health equity.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Lydia Berenice; Hernandez, Kristen Eileen; Mata, Holly

    2015-03-01

    Communicating and advocating for evidence-based public health policy is a key component of health promotion practice, but public health professionals often lack experience in policy advocacy. This article provides perspectives from public health professionals who participated in successful public health policy advocacy efforts in their community. Their experiences using evidence-based research to advocate for policies that promote health equity contributed significantly to their career development, and also contributed to community capacity to reduce tobacco-related disparities. This article builds on previous work emphasizing the value of career development opportunities that enhance and diversify the public health workforce, and provides practical tips and "lessons learned" that are relevant to a wide range of public health professionals. PMID:25416310

  9. Preferences for Professional vs. Informal Care at End of Life Amongst African American Drug Users with HIV/AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Mary M.; Robinson, Allysha C.; Nguyen, Trang Q.; Smith, Thomas J.; Knowlton, Amy R.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction With the advent of antiretroviral therapies (ART), persons living with HIV/AIDS (PLHIVs) are living longer, but with increased impairment and care needs. The purpose of this study was to assess whether a vulnerable population of PLHIVs preferred informal versus professional care when unable to care for themselves, and individual and support network factors associated with preference for informal care. The findings have potential implications for facilitating the population’s informal care at end of life. Method Data were from the BEACON study, which examined social factors associated with health outcomes among former or current drug using PLHIVs in Baltimore, Maryland. Structural equation modeling was used to identify individual and support network characteristics associated with PLHIVs’ preference for informal (family or friends) compared to professional care. Results The structural equation model indicated preference for informal care was associated with female sex, greater informal care receipt, reporting one’s main partner (i.e., boy/girlfriend, spouse) as the primary source of informal care, and a support network comprised of greater numbers of female kin and persons supportive of the participant’s HIV treatment adherence. Not asking for needed help to avoid owing favors was associated with preferring professional care. Discussion Findings suggest that interventions to promote informal end of life care should bolster supportive others’ resources and skills for care provision and treatment adherence support, and should address perceived norms of reciprocity. Such intervention will help ensure community caregiving in a population with high needs for long term care. PMID:25196174

  10. Stigma and Mental Illness: Investigating Attitudes of Mental Health and Non-Mental-Health Professionals and Trainees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Allison L.; Cashwell, Craig S.

    2010-01-01

    The authors explored attitudes toward adults with mental illness. Results suggest that mental health trainees and professionals had less stigmatizing attitudes than did non-mental-health trainees and professionals. Professionals receiving supervision had higher mean scores on the Benevolence subscale than did professionals who were not receiving…

  11. Professional development through attending conferences: reflections of a health librarian.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Ruth

    2015-06-01

    In this article, guest writer Ruth Jenkins from Berkshire Heathcare Foundation Trust reflects on two conferences she attended in 2014, LILAC and SLA. Through the process of reflection, she considers the benefits that attending conferences can have to library and information professionals in the health sector. In particular, she discusses the opportunities and areas for learning and professional development that conferences can offer including evidence-based practice and current awareness, gaining new knowledge and objectivity, and networking and the unexpected benefits of conferences. Ruth also offers some practical hints and tips on ways to facilitate your attendance at conferences, including through awards and funding. H.S. PMID:25943972

  12. Preparing future faculty and professionals for public health careers.

    PubMed

    Koblinsky, Sally A; Hrapczynski, Katie M; Clark, Jane E

    2015-03-01

    Recent years have brought rapid growth in schools of public health and an increasing demand for public health practitioners. These trends highlight the need for innovative approaches to prepare doctoral graduates for academic and high-level practice positions. The University of Maryland's School of Public Health developed a "Preparing Future Faculty and Professionals" program to enrich the graduate education and professional development of its doctoral students. We describe the program's key elements, including foundational seminars to enhance students' knowledge and skills related to teaching, research, and service; activities designed to foster career exploration and increase competitiveness in the job market; and independent, faculty-mentored teaching and research experiences. We present a model for replicating the program and share student outcomes of participation. PMID:25706007

  13. Observation of influences of mental health promotion and mental intervention on mental health status of professionals

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Shu-Qiang; Zhang, Jian-Ling

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To observe the influences of mental health promotion and mental intervention on mental health status of professionals. Method: 2878 professionals for physical examination were selected and randomly divided into treatment group and control group, with 1443 professionals and 1435 professionals, respectively. Then, the difference of mental health status before and after mental intervention between two groups was compared. Results: In treatment group, the proportion of people with healthy mental and modest pressure after mental intervention was higher than that before mental intervention and that in control group after mental intervention (P<0.01); the proportion of people with psychological sub-heath and moderate pressure after mental intervention was significantly lower than that before mental intervention and that in control group after mental intervention (P<0.05). There was no significant difference in mental health status in control group before and after mental intervention (P>0.05). Mental health consciousness, health status, self pressure-relief capability, job satisfaction, and happiness index of professionals were up to 63.3%~78.8%. Conclusions: Mental health promotion and mental intervention may significantly improve mental health status of professionals. PMID:26221385

  14. Smoking among Vietnamese health professionals: knowledge, beliefs, attitudes, and health care practice.

    PubMed

    Dao, Thi Minh An; Nguyen, Van Huy; Dao, Ngoc Phong

    2008-01-01

    The study aimed to investigate smoking patterns and compare knowledge, beliefs, and attitudes, as well as explore predictors of smoking status among Vietnamese health professionals. A global survey questionnaire on tobacco use among health professionals by the World Health Organization and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention was adapted for data collection. Data from 2151 health workers from the 3 largest hospitals--each of which is located in South, Central, and North Vietnam, respectively--were collected using quantitative methods. Both descriptive and inferential statistics were used in the data analysis. Smoking prevalence among Vietnamese health professionals is 13.4%, dominant among male health professionals compared with female counterparts (35.6% vs 1.8%), and significantly varies by regions. Physicians and dentists display a greater smoking proportion than nurses (23.0%, 10.5%, and 7.7%, respectively). The findings highlight the importance of improving and promoting beliefs of health professionals about being role models for their patients by not smoking. Special attention should be given to the following slogan: "Health professionals should act as nonsmoking role models for their patients and the public." This message should be incorporated into cigarette restriction regulations and policies at hospitals and recognized as one of the effective measures in cigarette control in the hospital context. PMID:19124294

  15. Religious beliefs and HIV / AIDS / STD health promotion.

    PubMed

    Solomon, S

    1996-01-01

    Most people are raised in an environment that espouses a religion. Religions use different codes to structure people's lives. These codes contribute to the enforcement of societal discipline. Some religious laws bestow privileges to men (e.g., polygamy), which may make women more vulnerable to HIV/sexually transmitted diseases (STDs). These laws do not reflect the great changes in lifestyles. Communities still condemn people with HIV/AIDS as deserving the infection because they are immoral. Some community members, proclaiming religion as their justification, control the content of health education by limiting health education to sexual abstinence and fidelity. Should not religions also support the promotion of condom use? Everyone needs to learn about HIV/AIDS and to have access to preventive methods. Educators and counselors must avoid moralizing, but should instead offer people different options to protect themselves and others. Health educators should emphasize those religious codes and edicts with positive values relevant to the HIV/AIDS pandemic. No religious law calls for ostracizing individuals. Religious laws prohibit stigmatization, discrimination, prejudice, and ill-treatment. Religions tend to call for tolerance. They are founded on a universal belief of duty to support all suffering persons and to help them receive the best possible care and treatment. Thus, religion can help make HIV infection an acceptable social condition. On the grounds of edict or morality, religion cannot be a non-participant. In many cases, religion has restored respect, dignity, and understanding for persons with HIV/AIDS. Many religious groups provide care for such persons. PMID:12291633

  16. An eHealth Application in Head and Neck Cancer Survivorship Care: Health Care Professionals' Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    van Uden-Kraan, Cornelia F; Peek, Niels; Cuijpers, Pim; Leemans, C René; Verdonck-de Leeuw, Irma M

    2015-01-01

    Background Although many cancer survivors could benefit from supportive care, they often do not utilize such services. Previous studies have shown that patient-reported outcomes (PROs) could be a solution to meet cancer survivors’ needs, for example through an eHealth application that monitors quality of life and provides personalized advice and supportive care options. In order to develop an effective application that can successfully be implemented in current health care, it is important to include health care professionals in the development process. Objective The aim of this study was to investigate health care professionals’ perspectives toward follow-up care and an eHealth application, OncoKompas, in follow-up cancer care that monitors quality of life via PROs, followed by automatically generated tailored feedback and personalized advice on supportive care. Methods Health care professionals involved in head and neck cancer care (N=11) were interviewed on current follow-up care and the anticipated value of the proposed eHealth application (Step 1). A prototype of the eHealth application, OncoKompas, was developed (Step 2). Cognitive walkthroughs were conducted among health care professionals (N=21) to investigate perceived usability (Step 3). Interviews were recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed by 2 coders. Results Health care professionals indicated several barriers in current follow-up care including difficulties in detecting symptoms, patients’ perceived need for supportive care, and a lack of time to encourage survivors to obtain supportive care. Health care professionals expected the eHealth application to be of added value. The cognitive walkthroughs demonstrated that health care professionals emphasized the importance of tailoring care. They considered the navigation structure of OncoKompas to be complex. Health care professionals differed in their opinion toward the best strategy to implement the application in clinical practice but

  17. Mental Health First Aid guidelines for helping a suicidal person: a Delphi consensus study in Japan

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background This study aimed to develop guidelines for how a member of the Japanese public should provide mental health first aid to a person who is suicidal. Methods The guidelines were produced by developing a questionnaire containing possible first aid actions and asking an expert panel of 32 Japanese mental health professionals to rate whether each action should be included in the guidelines. The content of the questionnaire was based on a systematic search of the relevant evidence and claims made by authors of consumer and carer guides and websites. The panel members were asked to complete the questionnaire by web survey. Three rounds of the rating were carried and, at the end of each round, items that reached the consensus criterion were selected for inclusion in the guidelines. During the first round, panel members were also asked to suggest any additional actions that were not covered in the original questionnaire (to include items that are relevant to local cultural circumstances, values, and social norms). Responses to these open-ended questions were used to generate new items. Results The output from the Delphi process was a set of agreed upon action statements. The Delphi process started with 138 statements, 38 new items were written based on suggestions from panel members and, of these 176 items, 56 met the consensus criterion. These statements were used to develop the guidelines appended to this article. Conclusions There are a number of actions that are considered to be useful for members of the Japanese public when they encounter someone who is experiencing suicidal thoughts or engaging in suicidal behaviour. Although the guidelines are designed for members of the public, they may also be helpful to health professionals working in health and welfare settings who do not have clinical mental health training. PMID:21592409

  18. Finding toxicological information: An approach for occupational health professionals

    PubMed Central

    Laamanen, Irja; Verbeek, Jos; Franco, Giuliano; Lehtola, Marika; Luotamo, Marita

    2008-01-01

    Background It can be difficult for occupational health professionals to assess which toxicological databases available on the Internet are the most useful for answering their questions. Therefore we evaluated toxicological databases for their ability to answer practical questions about exposure and prevention. We also propose recommended practices for searching for toxicological properties of chemicals. Methods We used a systematic search to find databases available on the Internet. Our criteria for the databases were the following: has a search engine, includes factual information on toxic and hazardous chemicals harmful for human health, and is free of charge. We developed both a qualitative and a quantitative rating method, which was used by four independent assessors to determine appropriateness, the quality of content, and ease of use of the database. Final ratings were based on a consensus of at least two evaluators. Results Out of 822 results we found 21 databases that met our inclusion criteria. Out of these 21 databases 14 are administered in the US, five in Europe, one in Australia, and one in Canada. Nine are administered by a governmental organization. No database achieved the maximum score of 27. The databases GESTIS, ESIS, Hazardous Substances Data Bank, TOXNET and NIOSH Pocket Guide to Chemical Hazards all scored more than 20 points. The following approach was developed for occupational health professionals searching for the toxicological properties of chemicals: start with the identity of the chemical; then search for health hazards, exposure route and measurement; next the limit values; and finally look for the preventive measures. Conclusion A rating system of toxicological databases to assess their value for occupational health professionals discriminated well between databases in terms of their appropriateness, quality of information, and ease of use. Several American and European databases yielded high scores and provide a valuable source for

  19. National Institutes of Health, Office of AIDS Research

    MedlinePlus

    ... Contact Us Main Navigation for the Office of AIDS Research Homepage ABOUT OAR SCIENTIFIC AREAS STRATEGIC PLAN ... HIV/AIDS INFORMATION Welcome to the Office of AIDS Research. Welcome to the Office of AIDS Research ...

  20. [Peculiarities of oral health of organized collectives and professional communities].

    PubMed

    Makeeva, I M; Avdeenko, O E

    2016-01-01

    The analysis of scientific literature on the peculiarities of the dental status of organized groups and professional associations. After reviewing the literature, it becomes clear that the studies carried out in organized groups and professional societies are very relevant today, because the prevalence of dental diseases among them remains high, fueled by a number of factors: habitat, diet, lifestyle, occupational hazards, particularly hygienic oral care. Nowadays there is no information about the features of the dental status among the clergy, whose professional activity is connected with direct close contact with people. This profession covers a large number of our population. The research of certain groups is of special interest, since a number of different factors affect dental health. PMID:27182563

  1. [Collaboration among health professionals (II). Usefulness of a model].

    PubMed

    D'Amour, Danielle; San Martín Rodríguez, Leticia

    2006-09-01

    This second article provides a model which helps one to better understand the process of collaboration by interprofessional teams and makes it possible to evaluate the quality of the aforementioned collaboration. To this end, the authors first present a structural model of inter-professional collaboration followed by a typology of collaboration which is derived from the functionality of said model. This model is composed by four interrelated dimensions; the functionality of these has given rise to a typology of collaboration at three intensities: in action, in construction and collaboration during inertia. The model and the typology constitute a useful tool for managers and for health professionals since they help to better understand, manage and develop collaboration among the distinct professionals inside of the same organization as among those who belong to distinct organizations. PMID:17061473

  2. Misconceptions about traumatic brain injury among correctional health care professionals.

    PubMed

    Yuhasz, James E

    2013-04-01

    This study explored the prevalence of misconceptions of traumatic brain injury (TBI) among a sample of correctional health care professionals. Prior research has identified a high prevalence of TBI among criminal offenders, and misconceptions about TBI exist among laypersons and nonexpert professionals. Participants (N = 155) completed a 25-item survey about the sequelae of TBI. Results were compared with previous studies. This sample performed significantly better than laypersons and commensurable to other nonexpert professionals. Misconceptions were higher on items related to loss of consciousness, memory, and recovery. Gender, prior familiarity to someone with a history of TBI, and prior training in TBI accounted for statistically fewer misconceptions. The findings support the need for continued training and increased awareness about TBI among inmates. PMID:23446874

  3. Medical information, health sciences librarians, and professional liability.

    PubMed

    Hafner, A W

    1990-01-01

    As a gatekeeper to medical literature and a critical link in the delivery of information to physicians, the librarian's role raises the issue of the librarian's professional liability. The paper suggests several ways in which liability may attach to the librarian or the librarian's employers. Although the librarian's personal risk is negligible, the physician's exposure due to ineffective library work is substantial since the courts have held that a physician must keep abreast of progress in his field. Librarians can also become associated with professional liability actions as part of a case against a physician or hospital through the legal doctrine of vicarious liability. The paper concludes by suggesting several proactive steps for health sciences librarians to pursue to insulate themselves from professional liability and to insulate physicians and institutions from vicarious liability. PMID:10107630

  4. A Reaction to: What about Health Educators? Nutrition Education for Allied Health Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Lori W.; Knol, Linda; Meyer, Mary Kay

    2012-01-01

    "What about Health Educators? Nutrition Education for Allied Health Professionals" describes an important issue in health care that is the provision of nutrition education. Obesity and chronic disease rates are rapidly increasing. Due to increase in the prevalence rates of obesity and nutrition-related chronic diseases, there is a growing need for…

  5. Predictors of recovery-oriented competencies among mental health professionals in one community mental health system.

    PubMed

    Stuber, Jennifer; Rocha, Anita; Christian, Ann; Johnson, David

    2014-11-01

    A survey of 813 mental health professionals serving adults with severe mental illness clustered in 25 community mental health centers assessed the extent to which mental health professionals possess clinical competencies that support recovery and the predictors of these competencies. The results suggest there is room for improvement in recovery-oriented competencies. In-depth professional training in recovery, greater job variety, more years practicing in mental health, participation on an intensive case management team, and perceptions of workplace recovery culture were predictors of recovery-oriented competencies. Prioritization of on-going professional, worker retention, and management strategies that incorporate a team approach to treatment and improvements in workplace recovery culture may potentially increase recovery-oriented clinical practice. PMID:24510273

  6. Advancing Public Health through Continuing Education of Health Care Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hudmon, Karen Suchanek; Addleton, Robert L.; Vitale, Frank M.; Christiansen, Bruce A.; Mejicano, George C.

    2011-01-01

    This article describes how the CS2day (Cease Smoking Today) initiative positioned continuing education (CE) in the intersection between medicine and public health. The authors suggest that most CE activities address the medical challenges that clinicians confront, often to the neglect of the public health issues that are key risk factors for the…

  7. Health literacy practices and educational competencies for health professionals: a consensus study.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Clifford A; Hudson, Stan; Maine, Lucinda L

    2013-01-01

    Health care professionals often lack adequate knowledge about health literacy and the skills needed to address low health literacy among patients and their caregivers. Many promising practices for mitigating the effects of low health literacy are not used consistently. Improving health literacy training for health care professionals has received increasing emphasis in recent years. The development and evaluation of curricula for health professionals has been limited by the lack of agreed-upon educational competencies in this area. This study aimed to identify a set of health literacy educational competencies and target behaviors, or practices, relevant to the training of all health care professionals. The authors conducted a thorough literature review to identify a comprehensive list of potential health literacy competencies and practices, which they categorized into 1 or more educational domains (i.e., knowledge, skills, attitudes) or a practice domain. The authors stated each item in operationalized language following Bloom's Taxonomy. The authors then used a modified Delphi method to identify consensus among a group of 23 health professions education experts representing 11 fields in the health professions. Participants rated their level of agreement as to whether a competency or practice was both appropriate and important for all health professions students. A predetermined threshold of 70% agreement was used to define consensus. After 4 rounds of ratings and modifications, consensus agreement was reached on 62 out of 64 potential educational competencies (24 knowledge items, 27 skill items, and 11 attitude items), and 32 out of 33 potential practices. This study is the first known attempt to develop consensus on a list of health literacy practices and to translate recommended health literacy practices into an agreed-upon set of measurable educational competencies for health professionals. Further work is needed to prioritize the competencies and practices in

  8. Task Analysis for Health Occupations. Cluster: Nursing. Occupation: Home Health Aide. Education for Employment Task Lists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lake County Area Vocational Center, Grayslake, IL.

    This document contains a task analysis for health occupations (home health aid) in the nursing cluster. For each task listed, occupation, duty area, performance standard, steps, knowledge, attitudes, safety, equipment/supplies, source of analysis, and Illinois state goals for learning are listed. For the duty area of "providing therapeutic…

  9. Professional fighters brain health study: rationale and methods.

    PubMed

    Bernick, Charles; Banks, Sarah; Phillips, Michael; Lowe, Mark; Shin, Wanyong; Obuchowski, Nancy; Jones, Stephen; Modic, Michael

    2013-07-15

    Repetitive head trauma is a risk factor for Alzheimer's disease and is the primary cause of chronic traumatic encephalopathy. However, little is known about the natural history of, and risk factors for, chronic traumatic encephalopathy or about means of early detection and intervention. The Professional Fighters Brain Health Study is a longitudinal study of active professional fighters (boxers and mixed martial artists), retired professional fighters, and controls matched for age and level of education. The main objective of the Professional Fighters Brain Health Study is to determine the relationships between measures of head trauma exposure and other potential modifiers and changes in brain imaging and neurological and behavioral function over time. The study is designed to extend over 5 years, and we anticipate enrollment of more than 400 boxers and mixed martial artists. Participants will undergo annual evaluations that include 3-tesla magnetic resonance imaging scanning, computerized cognitive assessments, speech analysis, surveys of mood and impulsivity, and blood sampling for genotyping and exploratory biomarker studies. Statistical models will be developed and validated to predict early and progressive changes in brain structure and function. A composite fight exposure index, developed as a summary measure of cumulative traumatic exposure, shows promise as a predictor of brain volumes and cognitive function. PMID:23735309

  10. Development of mental health first aid guidelines for panic attacks: a Delphi study

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Claire M; Jorm, Anthony F; Kitchener, Betty A

    2009-01-01

    Background Panic attacks are common, and while they are not life-threatening events, they can lead to the development of panic disorder and agoraphobia. Appropriate help at the time that a panic attack occurs may decrease the fear associated with the attack and reduce the risk of developing an anxiety disorder. However, few people have the knowledge and skills required to assist. Simple first aid guidelines may help members of the public to offer help to people who experience panic attacks. Methods The Delphi method was used to reach consensus in a panel of experts. Experts included 50 professionals and 6 people who had experience of panic attacks and were active in mental health advocacy. Statements about how to assist someone who is having a panic attack were sourced through a systematic search of both professional and lay literature. These statements were rated for importance as first aid guidelines by the expert and consumer panels and guidelines were written using the items most consistently endorsed. Results Of 144 statements presented to the panels, 27 were accepted. These statements were used to develop the guidelines appended to this paper. Conclusion There are a number of actions which are considered to be useful for members of the public to do if they encounter someone who is having a panic attack. These guidelines will be useful in revision of curricula of mental health first aid programs. They can also be used by members of the public who want immediate information about how to assist someone who is experiencing panic attacks. PMID:19664244

  11. Understanding, Treating, and Preventing STDs / Questions to Ask your Health Care Professional

    MedlinePlus

    ... Treating, and Preventing STDs / Questions to Ask your Health Care Professional Past Issues / Fall 2008 Table of Contents ... than one sexual partner Questions to Ask Your Health Care Professional How can I prevent getting an STD? ...

  12. Innovations in Public Health Education: Promoting Professional Development and a Culture of Health

    PubMed Central

    Gentry, Daniel; Klesges, Lisa M.

    2015-01-01

    As the field of public health advances toward addressing complex, systemic problems, future public health professionals must be equipped with leadership and interprofessional skills that support collaboration and a culture of health. The University of Memphis School of Public Health has infused innovative strategies into graduate education via experiential learning opportunities to enhance leadership, collaboration, and professional development. Novel training programs such as Day One, Public Health Interdisciplinary Case Competition, and Memphis Healthy U support Association of Schools and Programs of Public Health cross-cutting competencies and prepare Master of Public Health and Master of Health Administration graduates to function effectively at the outset of their careers and become catalysts for creating a culture of health. PMID:25706016

  13. Innovations in public health education: promoting professional development and a culture of health.

    PubMed

    Levy, Marian; Gentry, Daniel; Klesges, Lisa M

    2015-03-01

    As the field of public health advances toward addressing complex, systemic problems, future public health professionals must be equipped with leadership and interprofessional skills that support collaboration and a culture of health. The University of Memphis School of Public Health has infused innovative strategies into graduate education via experiential learning opportunities to enhance leadership, collaboration, and professional development. Novel training programs such as Day One, Public Health Interdisciplinary Case Competition, and Memphis Healthy U support Association of Schools and Programs of Public Health cross-cutting competencies and prepare Master of Public Health and Master of Health Administration graduates to function effectively at the outset of their careers and become catalysts for creating a culture of health. PMID:25706016

  14. 'Train the trainer' model: implications for health professionals and farm family health in Australia.

    PubMed

    Brumby, Susan; Smith, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    Australia is a large country with 60% of land used for agricultural production. Its interior is sparsely populated, with higher morbidity and mortality recorded in rural areas, particularly farmers, farm families, and agricultural workers. Rural health professionals in addressing health education gaps of farming groups have reported using behavioralist approaches. These approaches in isolation have been criticized as disempowering for participants who are identified as passive learners or 'empty vessels.' A major challenge in rural health practice is to develop more inclusive and innovative models in building improved health outcomes. The Sustainable Farm Families Train the Trainer (SFFTTT) model is a 5-day program developed by Western District Health Service designed to enhance practice among health professionals working with farm families in Australia. This innovative model of addressing farmer health asks health professionals to understand the context of the farm family and encourages them to value the experience and existing knowledge of the farmer, the family and the farm business. The SFFTTT program has engaged with health agencies, community, government, and industry groups across Australia and over 120 rural nurses have been trained since 2005. These trainers have successfully delivered programs to 1000 farm families, with high participant completion, positive evaluation, and improved health indicators. Rural professionals report changes in how they approach health education, clinical practice, and promotion with farm families and agricultural industries. This paper highlights the success of SFFTTT as an effective tool in enhancing primary health practice in rural and remote settings. The program is benefiting not only drought ravaged farmers but assisting rural nurses, health agencies, and health boards to engage with farm families at a level not identified previously. Furthermore, nurses and health professionals are now embracing a more 'farmer

  15. Going on to Graduate or Professional School: Sources of Financial Aid and Educational Programs for Native Americans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKusick, John A., Ed.

    The booklet provides brief information on about 250 sources of financial aid and educational programs for Native Americans wanting to enter graduate or professional level study. Most of those listed have been selected because they are earmarked for minority group students as a general group or Native Americans specifically. Section I contains…

  16. Public perceptions of health care professionals' participation in pharmaceutical marketing.

    PubMed

    Crigger, Nancy J; Courter, Laura; Hayes, Kristen; Shepherd, K

    2009-09-01

    Trust in the nurse-patient relationship is maintained not by how professionals perceive their actions but rather by how the public perceives them. However, little is known about the public's view of nurses and other health care professionals who participate in pharmaceutical marketing. Our study describes public perceptions of health care providers' role in pharmaceutical marketing and compares their responses with those of a random sample of licensed family nurse practitioners. The family nurse practitioners perceived their participation in marketing activities as significantly more ethically appropriate than did the public responders. Further research is warranted before conclusions can be drawn, but these early findings suggest that nurse practitioners should consider a conservative approach to participating in pharmaceutical marketing. PMID:19671650

  17. Information technology in health professional education: why IT matters.

    PubMed

    Haigh, Jackie

    2004-10-01

    This paper analyses the potential of information technology (IT) to transform the process of learning in higher education, particularly health professional education. It is argued that IT, although very much part of the infrastructure of the modern university has yet to make its full impact on teaching and learning processes. The expectations of students and demands for improved flexibility and access make it inevitable that IT will become an integral part of teaching and learning despite inherent resistance to change. The potential benefits of IT are identified as: transmission of high quality content, support of life-long learning, flexibility of access and enhanced opportunities for communication. These concepts are explored in the context of health professional education. It is argued that universities cannot survive without harnessing the power of IT to improve the educational experience of students but lecturers should ensure that this is underpinned by sound educational theory. PMID:15465170

  18. Changing images of professionalism: the case of public health nurses.

    PubMed

    Bloom, J R; O'Reilly, C A; Parlette, G N

    1979-01-01

    A survey of 89 public health nurses in a California county explored factors that might account for the growing support of unions and subsequent militancy among nurses. As predicted, changes in the backgrounds of public health nurses have occurred over time: 1) older nurses are more likely to have graduated from a diploma program and to have parents of lower educational and occupational attainment than younger nurses; 2) older nurses are more likely to view nursing as a calling and less likely to desire representation in collective bargaining by the union or to believe striking professional; 3) older nurses and those from lower social class backgrounds were less likely to belong to the union and less likely to participate in a county-wide strike. Because age and parental background factors are independently related to our indicators of militancy--union membership and participation in a strike--the results are interpreted as a change in nurses' images of professionalism. PMID:420355

  19. HIV-AIDS Information and the American Library Community: An Overview of Responses to the HIV-AIDS Health Crisis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lukenbill, W. Bernard

    This paper presents an overview of how American libraries have responded to the health crisis caused by HIV (Human Immunodeficiency Virus) and AIDS (Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome). AIDS information dissemination practices of libraries and the social role which American librarians have articulated regarding their special responsibilities are…

  20. Professional competencies in health promotion and public health: what is common and what is specific? Review of the European debate and perspectives for professional development.

    PubMed

    Mereu, Alessandra; Sotgiu, Alessandra; Buja, Alessandra; Casuccio, Alessandra; Cecconi, Rosaria; Fabiani, Leila; Guberti, Emilia; Lorini, Chiara; Minelli, Liliana; Pocetta, Giancarlo; Contu, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    According to the Nairobi Call to Action, the growth of practitioners' skills can be favoured by setting accreditation standards and by reorienting professional competencies of current and future health workers. This will make it possible to develop a critical mass of competent practitioners, foster training, and increase visibility of the professional field. Through a review of the literature, the authors offer an overview of competency-based strategies for professional development in health promotion. The main research questions discussed were as follows: Is there a shared definition of public health?; Is there a shared definition of health promotion?; Who are the main stakeholders for public health and health promotion in Europe?; What is the meaning of professional competencies in education and practice for public health and health promotion?; Is there a shared system of professional core competencies in public health and health promotion?;What is common and what is specific between the two systems of professional competencies?; Is it useful and feasible to create specific strategies of professional development for public health and health promotion? A transformative use of competencies makes it possible to inform students, professionals, employers, and political decision-makers about what is expected from a specific profession and its values. PMID:26499413

  1. Health education about AIDS among seropositive blood donors.

    PubMed

    Cleary, P D; Rogers, T F; Singer, E; Avorn, J; van Devanter, N; Perry, S; Pindyck, J

    1986-01-01

    The New York Blood Center is developing a health education and psychosocial support program for blood donors who are notified that they are HIV antibody positive. The goals of that program are: to provide accurate and intelligible information about the test results to notified donors; to encourage behavior that will reduce the likelihood of spreading the virus; to encourage notified donors to behave in ways that will reduce the probability that they will develop AIDS; and to provide support and facilitate functional coping responses. This article reviews the theoretical and empirical work which informs the intervention program, and it describes how the program is being implemented. PMID:3023260

  2. Understanding global health and development partnerships: Perspectives from African and global health system professionals.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Amy; Brown, Garrett W; Harman, Sophie

    2016-06-01

    Partnership is a key idea in current debates about global health and development assistance, yet little is known about what partnership means to those who are responsible for operationalising it or how it is experienced in practice. This is particularly the case in the context of African health systems. This paper explores how health professionals working in global health hubs and the health systems of South Africa, Tanzania and Zambia understand and experience partnership. Drawing on semi-structured interviews with 101 professionals based in each country, Washington DC and Geneva between October 2012 and June 2013, the paper makes four key arguments. First, partnership has a legitimating function in global health policy processes for international development institutions, government agencies and civil society organisations alike. Second, the practice of partnership generates idiosyncratic and complicated relationships that health professionals have to manage and navigate, often informally. Third, partnership is shaped by historical legacies, critical events, and independent consultants. Fourth, despite being an accepted part of global health policy, there is little shared understanding of what good partnership is meant to include or resemble in practice. Knowing more about the specific socio-cultural and political dynamics of partnership in different health system contexts is critical to equip health professionals with the skills to build the informal relations that are essential to effective partnership engagement. PMID:27155226

  3. Occupational health management system: A study of expatriate construction professionals.

    PubMed

    Chan, I Y S; Leung, M Y; Liu, A M M

    2016-08-01

    Due to its direct impact on the safety and function of organizations, occupational health has been a concern of the construction industry for many years. The inherent complexity of occupational health management presents challenges that make a systems approach essential. From a systems perspective, health is conceptualized as an emergent property of a system in which processes operating at the individual and organizational level are inextricably connected. Based on the fundamental behavior-to-performance-to-outcome (B-P-O) theory of industrial/organizational psychology, this study presents the development of an I-CB-HP-O (Input-Coping Behaviors-Health Performance-Outcomes) health management systems model spanning individual and organizational boundaries. The model is based on a survey of Hong Kong expatriate construction professionals working in Mainland China. Such professionals tend to be under considerable stress due not only to an adverse work environment with dynamic tasks, but also the need to confront the cross-cultural issues arising from expatriation. A questionnaire was designed based on 6 focus groups involving 44 participants, and followed by a pilot study. Of the 500 questionnaires distributed in the main study, 137 valid returns were received, giving a response rate of 27.4%. The data were analyzed using statistical techniques such as factor analysis, reliability testing, Pearson correlation analysis, multiple regression modeling, and structural equation modeling. Theories of coping behaviors and health performance tend to focus on the isolated causal effects of single factors and/or posits the model at single, individual level; while industrial practices on health management tend to focus on organizational policy and training. By developing the I-CB-HP-O health management system, incorporating individual, interpersonal, and organizational perspectives, this study bridges the gap between theory and practice while providing empirical support for a

  4. Beyond alphabet soup: helping college health professionals understand sexual fluidity.

    PubMed

    Oswalt, Sara B; Evans, Samantha; Drott, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Many college students today are no longer using the terms straight, gay, lesbian, bisexual, or transgender to self-identify their sexual orientation or gender identity. This commentary explores research related to fluidity of sexual identities, emerging sexual identities used by college students, and how these identities interact with the health and well-being of the student. Additionally, the authors discuss strategies to help college health professionals provide a sensitive environment and clinical experience for students whose sexual identity is fluid. PMID:27043261

  5. Discovering Sexual Health Conversations between Adolescents and Youth Development Professionals

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Niodita; Chandak, Aastha; Gilson, Glen; Pelster, Aja Kneip; Schober, Daniel J.; Goldsworthy, Richard; Baldwin, Kathleen; Fortenberry, J. Dennis; Fisher, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Youth development professionals (YDPs), working at community-based organizations are in a unique position to interact with the adolescents as they are neither parents/guardians nor teachers. The objectives of this study were to explore qualitatively what sexual health issues adolescents discuss with YDPs and to describe those issues using the framework of the Sexuality Information and Education Council of the United States (SIECUS) comprehensive sexuality education guidelines. YDPs reported conversations with adolescents that included topics related to the SIECUS key concepts of human development, relationships, personal skills, sexual behavior, and sexual health. PMID:27081375

  6. "It depends on what you mean": a qualitative study of Swedish health professionals' views on health and health promotion

    PubMed Central

    Johansson, Helene; Weinehall, Lars; Emmelin, Maria

    2009-01-01

    Background The role of health services must be re-oriented towards health promotion to more effectively contribute to population health. One of the objectives of the Swedish public health policy is that health promotion and disease prevention should be an integral part of the health care system and an important component of all care and treatment. However, the uncertainty about what the concepts of health and health promotion mean poses a challenge for implementation. Depending on how these concepts are interpreted, the attitudes of health professionals toward health promoting practices will differ. Thus, a more in-depth understanding of health professionals' views can be a starting point for a discussion about the values and attitudes that influence the current health care system and about the barriers and possibilities for future development of a health promoting health service. Methods Seven focus group discussions (n = 34) were carried out with health professionals, from different health care settings, to understand how they communicate about health and health promotion. The data were analyzed using qualitative content analysis. Results The analysis of health professional's general understanding of the concept of health resulted in the category; a multi-facetted concept, whilst the category; a subjective assessment describes what health means to themselves. A third category; health is about life, the whole life. describes their understanding of health as an outcome of a multiplicity of contextually dependent determinants. The health professional's multiple ways of associating health promotion to disease prevention suggest a concept that is diffuse, elusive and difficult to apply in practice. Despite a shared view of health, the health professionals described their health promotion role very differently depending partly on how the concept of health promotion was interpreted. The analysis resulted in the development of three ideal types, labelled the demarcater

  7. Health Professionals' Attitudes towards Evidence-Based Medicine and the Role of the Information Professional in Exploitation of the Research Evidence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Ruth A.; Rolinson, Janet; Urquhart, Christine J.

    1998-01-01

    A survey of 182 doctors, nurses, and allied professionals examined health professionals' awareness of evidence-based medicine (EBM). Results show most health professionals wanted workplace access to resources, that doctors preferred to do their own searching, and that health professionals doubted librarians could find relevant articles, suggesting…

  8. Revictimization and recovery from sexual assault: implications for health professionals.

    PubMed

    Ranjbar, Vania; Speer, Susan A

    2013-01-01

    Twenty-seven adult females' responses from an online qualitative questionnaire were analyzed to explore their views on being recovered from an experience of sexual assault, and identify aspects of their postassault health service encounters that facilitated or impeded their recovery process. Being recovered involved accepting the experience, being freed from negative states, regaining control and trust, and receiving help from and being believed by others. Participants predominantly reported negative experiences with health services. Factors perceived as impeding the recovery process include health professionals' inexperience in dealing with survivors of sexual assault, adhering to rape myths and stereotypes, and disrespectful or inconsiderate treatment of survivors. We argue that these postassault negative experiences revictimized survivors. Addressing these factors may reduce revictimization, facilitate recovery, and decrease assaulted women's long-term use of health services. PMID:23763112

  9. Health needs: the interface between the discourse of health professionals and victimized women1

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Rebeca Nunes Guedes; da Fonseca, Rosa Maria Godoy Serpa

    2015-01-01

    Objective: to understand the limits and the evaluative possibilities of the Family Health Strategy regarding the recognition of the health needs of women who experience violence. Method: a study with a qualitative approach, grounded in the perspective of gender, and which adopted health needs as the analytical category. The data were collected through interviews with health professionals and women who made use of a health service, and were analyzed using the method of discourse analysis. Results: the meeting between the discourses of women who use the services and the professionals of the health service revealed, as the interface, human needs, as in the example of autonomy and of bonds. The understanding regarding the needs was limited to the recognition of health problems of physical and psychological natures, just as the predominance of the recognition of needs for maintaining life in the light of essentially human needs was revealed in the professionals' discourses as an important limitation of the practices. Conclusion: emphasis is placed on the perspective of gender as a tool which must be aggregated to the routine of the professional practices in health so as to confirm or deny the transformative character of the care in place regarding the recognition and confronting of the women's health needs. PMID:26039301

  10. Improving access to cancer guidelines: feedback from health care professionals

    PubMed Central

    Sahota, I.S.; Kostaras, X.; Hagen, N.A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We examined access to locally developed and other available clinical practice guidelines (cpgs) for the management of cancer and evaluated how to improve uptake. Methods A 12-question online survey was administered to 772 members of 12 multidisciplinary tumour teams in a Canadian provincial oncology program. The teams are composed of physicians, surgeons, nurses, allied health professionals, and researchers involved in the provision of cancer care across the province. Many of these individuals construct or provide input into the provincial cpgs. The questionnaires were administered online and were completed voluntarily. Results Responses were received from 232 individuals, a response rate of 30.1%. Most respondents (75.1%) indicated they actively referenced cpgs for cancer treatment. Of the 177 respondents who identified barriers to cpg access, 24.9% said that the cause was being too busy; 24.3% and 22.6% cited the user-unfriendliness of the Web site and a lack of awareness about the cpgs. When asked about innovative changes that could be made to improve access, the creation of cpg summary documents was identified as the most effective change (46.3%). The creation of summary documents was ranked highest by physicians, surgeons, and nurses. Conclusions Clinical practice guidelines are important tools for standardizing treatment protocols and improving outcomes in health care systems, but support for their use is variable among health care professionals. We have identified barriers to—and potential mitigating strategies for—more widespread access to cpgs by the various health professions involved in cancer care. Local creation of succinct and easily accessible cpgs was identified as the single most effective way to enhance access by health care professionals. PMID:26715871

  11. HIV / AIDS and STD health promotion in Tanzanian fishing villages.

    PubMed

    Balyagati, D; Luhamba, D; Nnko, S; Nyonyo, V; Schapink, D

    1995-01-01

    The Tanzania-Netherlands Project to Support AIDS Control (TANESA) conducted rapid appraisals in 14 villages with fishing camps along Lake Victoria to determine needs and resources available for HIV/STD (sexually transmitted disease) prevention. Discussions with village members sparked interest, so TANESA launched a health promotion program. It first set up a pilot project in a village of about 600 persons with an established fishing camp. TANESA trained 6 young women and 8 fishermen during a 4-day workshop as peer educators. The topics included anatomy and biology, STDs, HIV prevention, adult education, counseling, and communication skills. Training techniques used were short lectures, group discussions, role-playing, and exercises from a workbook. The newly trained peer educators helped set up a general education campaign: video shows, exhibition boards, pamphlets, condom distribution, and discussion sessions with peers. Village leaders did not support the idea of official classes, an AIDS information room, or a village health committee. Nevertheless, the peer educators continued their mission. Once a month, the program coordinator visits them and advocates the program to village leaders. TANESA next replicated the program in a larger village (about 6000 population). This time, it first mobilized village leaders to develop the program themselves. The core groups were fishermen, female bar and guesthouse workers, and young unemployed women offering sex for money. Each group chose its own peer educators. Village leaders were responsible for the educational campaign organized by the peer educators. The campaign received a positive response and effected positive attitudes towards condom use. Village leaders organized an AIDS action committee. TANESA now provides technical support, fosters a team spirit among peer educators, and supports monitoring activities. Peer educators express an increase in their self-esteem and self-confidence. PMID:12289840

  12. Expanding the lens of HIV services provision in Canada: results of a national survey of HIV health professionals.

    PubMed

    Worthington, Catherine; O'Brien, Kelly; Myers, Ted; Nixon, Stephanie; Cockerill, Rhonda

    2009-11-01

    Those living with HIV may experience a range of disabilities, including body impairments, activity limitations, and social participation restrictions. The aim of this study was to examine HIV services provision in Canada by exploring practices, referrals, and service delivery challenges from the perspective of HIV health professionals (including nurses, physicians, social workers, pharmacists, psychologists, and dieticians), and to explore differences in referrals and perceived service delivery challenges by professional group, jurisdiction, community size, and practice in a Northern region. We conducted a nationwide mail survey with the population of selected HIV health professionals in Canada using the Dillman tailored design survey method. Of the 731 deliverable mailings, we received 462 (63%) responses, with 36% of eligible respondents completing the survey (n=214). The large majority (90%) of HIV professionals were located in metropolitan or urban communities and worked predominantly in hospital in-patient (42%), out-patient (50%), and HIV specialty clinic (46%) settings in one of the three provinces (Ontario, Quebec, and British Columbia) with the highest HIV prevalence. HIV health professionals referred primarily, and at relatively high levels, to AIDS service organizations (79%) and social workers (84%) to address participation restrictions and social issues; a lower percentage referred to rehabilitation professionals and other service providers to address impairments, activity limitations, or participation restrictions. Of respondents, 74% perceived barriers to care specific to HIV. Our results suggest that there is little difference in referral patterns by profession, jurisdiction, community size, or northern region of practice. There is a need for increased information and education of HIV health professionals that may refer to rehabilitation and other health services. In addition, new approaches are needed to coordinate multisectoral care and enhance

  13. The role of Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine in training of health professionals.

    PubMed

    Ford, Carol A

    2016-08-01

    The Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine (SAHM) was created by health professionals committed to identifying and better addressing the health needs of adolescents and young adults, and this work has continued for nearly 50 years. The society initially focused primarily on clinical education, but has evolved to include educational activities providing clinical, research, policy, advocacy, and professional development content. Strategies have included high-quality annual meetings designed to meet the educational needs of its multi-disciplinary membership, publishing an internationally recognized journal, and developing strategic collaborations to advocate for legitimacy of the field and reform in health profession education. Historically, SAHM has been most successful at increasing specialized training in the United States among physicians, and primarily pediatricians, likely driven by the nuances of the development of adolescent medicine in this country. Successes are often linked to strategic collaborations with other professional organizations, and have been facilitated by federally funded initiatives to improve adolescent and young adult health. Recent efforts to improve professional training are focused on the use of technology, and SAHM is also currently exploring strategies to directly reach adolescents, young adults, and their parents. As the society becomes increasingly multidisciplinary and international, members have extraordinary opportunities to learn from each other, build upon lessons learned, and collaborate. Descriptions of the history of SAHM's training-focused efforts, selected highlights, and current priorities will be used to illustrate this long-standing commitment to the training of health professionals. PMID:26115503

  14. Oral health care during pregnancy recommendations for oral health professionals.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Jayanth; Samelson, Renee

    2009-11-01

    Pregnancy is a unique time in a woman's life and is characterized by complex physiological changes. These changes can adversely affect oral health. Pregnancy is also an opportune time to educate women about preventing dental caries in young children, a common childhood problem. Although multiple studies have shown an association between periodontal infection and adverse pregnancy outcomes, such as premature delivery and low birth weight, recent randomized clinical trials conducted in the United States failed to show that treatment of periodontal disease during pregnancy improved birth outcomes. However, the studies confirmed the safety and effectiveness of providing oral health care during pregnancy. Pregnancy by itself is not a reason to defer routine dental care and necessary treatment for oral health problems. Diagnosis and treatment, including needed dental X-rays, can be undertaken safely during the first trimester of pregnancy. Needed treatment can be provided throughout the remainder of the pregnancy; however, the time period between the 14th and 20th week is considered ideal. PMID:20069785

  15. Queer patients and the health care professional-regulatory arrangements matter.

    PubMed

    Schuklenk, Udo; Smalling, Ricardo

    2013-06-01

    This paper discusses a number of critical ethical problems that arise in interactions between queer patients and health care professionals attending them. Using real-world examples, we discuss the very practical problems queer patients often face in the clinic. Health care professionals face conflicts in societies that criminalise same sex relationships. We also analyse the question of what ought to be done to confront health care professionals who propagate falsehoods about homosexuality in the public domain. These health care professionals are more often than not motivated by strong religious convictions that conflict with mainstream medical opinion on homosexuality. We argue that they ought to be held accountable for their conduct by their professional statutory bodies, given that they abuse their professional standing to propagate sectarian views not representative of their profession. Lastly, we propose that medical schools have special responsibilities in training future health care professionals that will enable them to respond professionally to queer patients seeking health care. PMID:23443248

  16. The need for professional doctors of public health.

    PubMed Central

    Roemer, M I

    1986-01-01

    Planning, organizing, and operating today's complex health care systems or heading Federal, State, and city public health agencies in the United States and other countries require professionals broadly prepared in the meaning, philosophy, and strategies of public health. It is and has been recognized that the best trained clinical physician could not be expected to know the policies and practices of official public health programs. The chief health official of a State or other jurisdiction, for example, deals with the epidemiology of many diseases; with all aspects of the environment; with hospitals, drugs, health manpower, and nutrition; with issues of health economics, finance, and politics; and with administration. For these tasks, most of medical education is irrelevant. To produce the needed specialists, candidates with a BA degree would be educated as doctors of public health. The proposed 5-year postgraduate curriculum is as demanding as the training for the MD degree, but completely different. The 38 subjects or courses in the curriculum are grouped into four categories: basic tools of social analysis, health and disease in populations, protection of health and prevention of disease, and health care systems and management. At present, MPH degree holders take only a handful of core and elective courses and emerge with little systematic knowledge about the majority of problems they face. The DrPH candidates at schools of public health spend most of their time on research and dissertation writing--adequate preparation for university teachers, but academia is not the goal of most candidates, nor the greatest need of society.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3080785

  17. Health Care Professionals' Perceptions of Seriously Ill Women.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardin, Kimeron Norman

    1990-01-01

    The research was designed to measure the perceptions of health care professionals toward women with serious illness. Physicians, psychologists and nurses were randomly chosen from lists of licensed practicing professionals and were surveyed. Each respondent read one of four vignettes describing a woman who had received one of four diagnoses: breast cancer, lung cancer, heart attack, or severe burn. The respondents were asked to respond to the Profile of Mood States (POMS) as they perceived the woman had been feeling during the past week. They then answered a series of ten questions about the woman's recovery and about their own anticipated behaviors while interacting with her. Two-way ANOVAs revealed that nurses and psychologists perceived the woman as having more mood disturbance and they saw more need for psychological counseling than physicians, regardless of her diagnosis. Several differences emerged in terms of perceptions of diagnosis. Subjects perceived themselves as being more comfortable around heart attack patients than lung cancer patients, breast cancer patients or burn patients and as having more difficulty talking to a woman with lung cancer than a woman with a heart attack. They also perceived a woman with lung cancer as having poorer chances of survival and they perceived women with more disfiguring disorders, breast cancer and severe burns, as having more sexual adjustment problems than the other diagnostic groups. The results of this survey supports the need for training for health care professionals in recognizing psychological distress in, and appropriately referring, seriously ill women.

  18. How health care complexity leads to cooperation and affects the autonomy of health care professionals.

    PubMed

    Molleman, Eric; Broekhuis, Manda; Stoffels, Renee; Jaspers, Frans

    2008-12-01

    Health professionals increasingly face patients with complex health problems and this pressurizes them to cooperate. The authors have analyzed how the complexity of health care problems relates to two types of cooperation: consultation and multidisciplinary teamwork (MTW). Moreover, they have analyzed the impact of these two types of cooperation on perceived professional autonomy. Two teams were studied, one team dealing with geriatric patients and another treating oncology patients. The authors conducted semi-structured interviews, studied written documents, held informal discussions and observed the teams at work. Consultation was most likely to take place when a patient had multiple problems. However, if these problems were interrelated, i.e. the solution for one problem interfered with solving another, then MTW was favored. The same was true when the available information was equivocal such that there were conflicting interpretations of a problem. How the professionals perceived the relationship between complexity and the need to cooperate depended on their expertise, their occupational background, and their work orientation. Consultation did not affect the professional autonomy of the health care professionals. MTW however did decrease the perceived level of professional autonomy. The extent to which this occurred seemed to depend on the quality of the interpersonal relations within the team. The findings can help in selecting the most appropriate and efficient type of cooperation based on the complexity of a patient's problems. They can also help team leaders to stimulate reflection and feedback processes, and medical trainers to develop competencies among students related to such teamwork behaviors. PMID:18193356

  19. Coping with AIDS: Psychological and Social Considerations in Helping People with HTLV-III Infection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Runck, Bette

    This booklet was written to familiarize health and mental health professionals and paraprofessionals with the psychological and social problems associated with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). It briefly reviews the realities of AIDS and describes the challenge that AIDS poses for health care professionals. A section on neuropsychiatric…

  20. Child Care Health Connections, 2001: A Health and Safety Newsletter for California Child Care Professionals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walery, Nancy, Ed.; Evinger, Sara, Ed.; Dailey, Lyn, Ed.; Zamani, Rahman, Ed.; Guralnick, Eva, Ed.

    2001-01-01

    This document is comprised of the six 2001 issues of a bimonthly newsletter providing information on young children's health and safety for California's child care professionals. Regular features include a column on infant/toddler concerns, a question-answer column regarding medical and health issues, and resources for child care providers.…

  1. Child Care Health Connections, 1999: A Health and Safety Newsletter for California Child Care Professionals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walery, Nancy, Ed.; Evinger, Sara, Ed.; Dailey, Lyn, Ed.; Sherman, Marsha, Ed.; Zamani, Rahman, Ed.

    1999-01-01

    This document is comprised of the six 1999 issues of a bimonthly newsletter providing information on young children's health and safety for California's child care professionals. Regular features include a column on infant/toddler concerns, a question-answer column regarding medical and health issues, a nutrition column, and resources for child…

  2. Child Care Health Connections, 2000: A Health and Safety Newsletter for California Child Care Professionals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walery, Nancy, Ed.; Evinger, Sara, Ed.; Dailey, Lyn, Ed.; Sherman, Marsha, Ed.; Zamani, Rahman, Ed.

    2000-01-01

    This document is comprised of the six 2000 issues of a bimonthly newsletter providing information on young children's health and safety for California's child care professionals. Regular features include a column on infant/toddler concerns, a question-answer column regarding medical and health issues, a nutrition column, and resources for child…

  3. The Design of Health Care Management Program for Chinese Health Care Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Qiu, Xiao Ling

    2008-01-01

    Business education has been booming in China due to the increasing demand of business graduates since China's economic reform. Chinese health care professionals are eager for business education to improve their competencies. The purpose of the study was to investigate the determinants of a successful health care management program for Chinese…

  4. Engaging Health Professionals in Health Economics: A Human Capital Informed Approach for Adults Learning Online

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lieberthal, Robert D.; Leon, Juan

    2015-01-01

    The authors describe a Wikipedia-based project designed for a graduate course introducing health economics to experienced healthcare professionals. The project allows such students to successfully write articles on niche topics in rapidly evolving health economics subspecialties. These students are given the opportunity to publish their completed…

  5. Changing access to mental health care and social support when people living with HIV/AIDS become service providers.

    PubMed

    Li, Alan Tai-Wai; Wales, Joshua; Wong, Josephine Pui-Hing; Owino, Maureen; Perreault, Yvette; Miao, Andrew; Maseko, Precious; Guiang, Charlie

    2015-01-01

    As people living with HIV/AIDS (PHAs) achieve more stable health, many have taken on active peer support and professional roles within AIDS service organizations. Although the increased engagement has been associated with many improved health outcomes, emerging program and research evidence have identified new challenges associated with such transition. This paper reports on the results of a qualitative interpretive study that explored the effect of this role transition on PHA service providers' access to mental health support and self care. A total of 27 PHA service providers of diverse ethno-racial backgrounds took part in the study. Results show that while role transition often improves access to financial and health-care benefits, it also leads to new stress from workload demands, emotional triggers from client's narratives, feeling of burnout from over-immersion in HIV at both personal and professional levels, and diminished self care. Barriers to seeking support included: concerns regarding confidentiality; self-imposed and enacted stigma associated with accessing mental health services; and boundary issues resulting from changes in relationships with peers and other service providers. Evolving support mechanisms included: new formal and informal peer support networks amongst colleagues or other PHA service providers to address both personal and professional challenges, and having access to professional support offered through the workplace. The findings suggest the need for increased organizational recognition of HIV support work as a form of emotional labor that places complex demands on PHA service providers. Increased access to employer-provided mental health services, supportive workplace policies, and adequate job-specific training will contribute to reduced work-related stress. Community level strategies that support expansion of social networks amongst PHA service providers would reduce isolation. Systemic policies to increase access to insurance

  6. Recommendations for mental health professionals in the NICU

    PubMed Central

    Hynan, M T; Steinberg, Z; Baker, L; Cicco, R; Geller, P A; Lassen, S; Milford, C; Mounts, K O; Patterson, C; Saxton, S; Segre, L; Stuebe, A

    2015-01-01

    This article describes recommended activities of social workers, psychologists and psychiatric staff within the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). NICU mental health professionals (NMHPs) should interact with all NICU parents in providing emotional support, screening, education, psychotherapy and teleservices for families. NMHPs should also offer educational and emotional support for the NICU health-care staff. NMHPs should function at all levels of layered care delivered to NICU parents. Methods of screening for emotional distress are described, as well as evidence for the benefits of peer-to-peer support and psychotherapy delivered in the NICU. In the ideal NICU, care for the emotional and educational needs of NICU parents are outcomes equal in importance to the health and development of their babies. Whenever possible, NMHPs should be involved with parents from the antepartum period through after discharge. PMID:26597800

  7. The Armero tragedy: lessons for mental health professionals.

    PubMed

    Cohen, R E

    1987-12-01

    A U.S. mental health consultant worked closely with medical personnel soon after a volcanic eruption and mud avalanche killed about 22,000 persons and devastated the area around Armero, Colombia. The consultant conducted workshops and courses on crisis intervention for health personnel operating disaster relief units and for mental health professionals, pediatric nurses, and family workers; she also provided consultations to clinic and shelter directors and case consultation with hospitalized victims. Observations of early postdisaster responses of hospitalized victims showed recurring themes such as victims' ambivalence about learning the full extent of the disaster and their own losses, delayed mourning because many bodies could not be recovered, somatic expressions of anxiety and fear, and the use of primitive defenses, such as magical thinking. PMID:3692458

  8. Cambodian patients' and health professionals' views regarding the allocation of antiretroviral drugs.

    PubMed

    Nann, Stephanie; Dousset, Jean-Phlippe; Sok, Chanthy; Khim, Pisey; Sopheap, Y; Sorum, Paul; Mullet, Etienne

    2012-08-01

    The way Cambodian patients and health professionals judge the priority of HIV-infected patients in relation to the allocation of antiretroviral drugs was examined. Participants were either HIV-infected patients attending the HIV/AIDS Care and Support Centre for People Living with HIV/AIDS in Phnom Penh (29 females and 21 males) or members of the staff (9 physicians, 6 pharmacists and 15 health counsellors and health educators). They were presented with stories of a few lines depicting a patient's situation and were instructed to judge the extent to which the patient should be given priority for HIV drugs. The stories were composed according to a four within-subject factor design: (a) the patient's family responsibilities, (b) the severity of infection, (c) the time elapsed since the first consultation, and (d) the financial difficulties of the family. Most patients expressed the view that the drugs should be used for the patients who are most important from a familial point of view, namely, when the family contains small children and/or is already in a precarious financial condition. PMID:22515379

  9. Research governance: implications for health library and information professionals.

    PubMed

    Sen, Barbara A

    2003-03-01

    The Research Governance Framework for Health and Social Care published by the Department of Health in 2001 provides a model of best practice and a framework for research in the health and social care sector. This article reviews the Department of Health Research Governance Framework, discusses the implications of research governance for library and information professionals undertaking research in the health- and social-care sector and recommends strategies for best practice within the information profession relating to research governance. The scope of the Framework document that covers both clinical and non-clinical research is outlined. Any research involving, amongst other issues, patients, NHS staff and use or access to NHS premises may require ethics committee approval. Particular reference is made to the roles, responsibilities and professional conduct and the systems needed to support effective research practice. Issues such as these combine to encourage the development of a quality research culture which supports best practice. Questions arise regarding the training and experience of researchers, and access to the necessary information and support. The use of the Framework to guide research practice complements the quality issues within the evidence-based practice movement and supports the ongoing development of a quality research culture. Recommendations are given in relation to the document's five domains of ethics, science, information, health and safety and finance and intellectual property. Practical recommendations are offered for incorporating research governance into research practice in ways which conform to the Framework's standards and which are particularly relevant for research practitioners in information science. Concluding comments support the use of the Research Governance Framework as a model for best practice. PMID:12641525

  10. Area Health Education Centers: A Directory of Federal, State, Local and Private Decentralized Health Professional Education Programs. Health Manpower References.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pagan (C. E.) Associates, Inc., Baltimore, MD.

    This Area Health Education Centers (AHEC) directory catalogues the Federal, State, local, and private decentralized professional health education programs initiated in direct response to the recommendations of the 1970 "Carnegie Commission Report of Higher Education and the Nation's Health." The introductory section briefly presents the history of…

  11. 25 CFR 36.82 - May behavioral health professional(s) provide services during the academic school day?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... during the academic school day? 36.82 Section 36.82 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE...) provide services during the academic school day? Behavioral health professional(s) must average at least... outside of the academic school day, except in emergency situations as deemed by the administrative head...

  12. 25 CFR 36.82 - May behavioral health professional(s) provide services during the academic school day?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... during the academic school day? 36.82 Section 36.82 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE...) provide services during the academic school day? Behavioral health professional(s) must average at least... outside of the academic school day, except in emergency situations as deemed by the administrative head...

  13. 25 CFR 36.82 - May behavioral health professional(s) provide services during the academic school day?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... during the academic school day? 36.82 Section 36.82 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE...) provide services during the academic school day? Behavioral health professional(s) must average at least... outside of the academic school day, except in emergency situations as deemed by the administrative head...

  14. 25 CFR 36.82 - May behavioral health professional(s) provide services during the academic school day?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... during the academic school day? 36.82 Section 36.82 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR EDUCATION MINIMUM ACADEMIC STANDARDS FOR THE BASIC EDUCATION OF INDIAN CHILDREN AND NATIONAL...) provide services during the academic school day? Behavioral health professional(s) must average at...

  15. 25 CFR 36.82 - May behavioral health professional(s) provide services during the academic school day?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... during the academic school day? 36.82 Section 36.82 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR EDUCATION MINIMUM ACADEMIC STANDARDS FOR THE BASIC EDUCATION OF INDIAN CHILDREN AND NATIONAL...) provide services during the academic school day? Behavioral health professional(s) must average at...

  16. Have Broad-Based Community and Professional Education Programs Influenced Mental Health Literacy and Treatment Seeking of those with Major Depression and Suicidal Ideation?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldney, Robert D.; Fisher, Laura J.

    2008-01-01

    "Mental health literacy" is the knowledge and beliefs about mental disorders that aid in their recognition, management, or prevention; it is also a determinant of help seeking. As such, it is presumed to be important in community suicide prevention programs. In Australia there have been a number of government, professional, and charitable…

  17. Youth Suicide Prevention: Mental Health and Public Health Perspectives. A Presentation and Training Aid.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Univ., Los Angeles. Center for Mental Health in Schools.

    This presentation and training aid provides a brief overview and discussion of the nature and scope of youth suicide, what prevention programs try to do, a framework for a public health approach, guides to programs and more. This material can be used for both handouts and as overheads for use with presentations. (GCP)

  18. Suicide Intervention Skills and Related Factors in Community and Health Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scheerder, Gert; Reynders, Alexandre; Andriessen, Karl; Van Audenhove, Chantal

    2010-01-01

    Health and community professionals have considerable exposure to suicidal people and need to be well skilled to deal with them. We assessed suicide intervention skills with a Dutch version of the SIRI in 980 health and community professionals and psychology students. Suicide intervention skills clearly differed among professional groups and were…

  19. Dimensions of privacy in palliative care: views of health professionals.

    PubMed

    Street, Annette F; Love, Anthony

    2005-04-01

    This paper explores the dimensions of privacy evident in the views of practice of health professionals in different inpatient palliative care settings. Eighty-eight semi-structured interviews were conducted with doctors, nurses and pastoral carers at 12 Australian regional and metropolitan locations. Transcribed interviews were coded and discursively content analysed. Privacy was one category that emerged in the transcript analysis. Results showed the necessity of attending to the physical, psycho-social and moral dimensions of privacy in the provision of palliative care that respects dignity, autonomy and supportive social relationships. PMID:15686810

  20. [AIDS, public health and ethics: the issue of barriers].

    PubMed

    Martin, J

    1987-01-01

    Repeatedly, the AIDS threat has caused the emergence of proposals for obligatory, authoritarian measures. It has above all been conceived to isolate given groups, so that they be "prevented to do harm". This is done, however, against the scientific and experiential evidence which shows that such measures would be either unnecessary or ineffective. It is not in the direction of discriminations of so-called risk persons or groups that appropriate "barriers" are to be sought. What is relevant is to reevaluate positive "barriers" that each and everyone should set and manage for himself/herself, especially: interest in the other person, whom it is worth first to know well (instead of thinking right away in engaging in a mechanical and impersonal sexual relationship); reserve and courtesy; choice; respect for the other's personality and health, as well as for one's own. The reintroduction of such behaviours as preferred ways of being/living would make an effective contribution to the struggle against AIDS, contrarily to the "ghettoizing" and totalitarian temptations, which would have above all counterproductive consequences. PMID:3433965

  1. Categorizing Health Websites: E-Knowledge, E-Business and E-Professional

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Usher, Wayne; Skinner, James

    2011-01-01

    This article presents three types of health website categories (e-knowledge, e-business and e-professional) which are currently being used to disseminate health-related information, services and medical literature to the health consumer and professional. Moreover, criteria which have been used to establish a health website's category is…

  2. Virtual reality training for health-care professionals.

    PubMed

    Mantovani, Fabrizia; Castelnuovo, Gianluca; Gaggioli, Andrea; Riva, Giuseppe

    2003-08-01

    Emerging changes in health-care delivery are having a significant impact on the structure of health-care professionals' education. Today it is recognized that medical knowledge doubles every 6-8 years, with new medical procedures emerging everyday. While the half-life of medical information is so short, the average physician practices 30 years and the average nurse 40 years. Continuing education thus represents an important challenge to face. Recent advances in educational technology are offering an increasing number of innovative learning tools. Among these, Virtual Reality represents a promising area with high potential of enhancing the training of health-care professionals. Virtual Reality Training can provide a rich, interactive, engaging educational context, thus supporting experiential learning-by-doing; it can, in fact, contribute to raise interest and motivation in trainees and to effectively support skills acquisition and transfer, since the learning process can be settled within an experiential framework. Current virtual training applications for health-care differ a lot as to both their technological/multimedia sophistication and to the types of skills trained, varying for example from telesurgical applications to interactive simulations of human body and brain, to virtual worlds for emergency training. Other interesting applications include the development of immersive 3D environments for training psychiatrists and psychologists in the treatment of mental disorders. This paper has the main aim of discussing the rationale and main benefits for the use of virtual reality in health-care education and training. Significant research and projects carried out in this field will also be presented, followed by discussion on key issues concerning current limitations and future development directions. PMID:14511451

  3. Predictors of burnout among correctional mental health professionals.

    PubMed

    Gallavan, Deanna B; Newman, Jody L

    2013-02-01

    This study focused on the experience of burnout among a sample of correctional mental health professionals. We examined the relationship of a linear combination of optimism, work family conflict, and attitudes toward prisoners with two dimensions derived from the Maslach Burnout Inventory and the Professional Quality of Life Scale. Initially, three subscales from the Maslach Burnout Inventory and two subscales from the Professional Quality of Life Scale were subjected to principal components analysis with oblimin rotation in order to identify underlying dimensions among the subscales. This procedure resulted in two components accounting for approximately 75% of the variance (r = -.27). The first component was labeled Negative Experience of Work because it seemed to tap the experience of being emotionally spent, detached, and socially avoidant. The second component was labeled Positive Experience of Work and seemed to tap a sense of competence, success, and satisfaction in one's work. Two multiple regression analyses were subsequently conducted, in which Negative Experience of Work and Positive Experience of Work, respectively, were predicted from a linear combination of optimism, work family conflict, and attitudes toward prisoners. In the first analysis, 44% of the variance in Negative Experience of Work was accounted for, with work family conflict and optimism accounting for the most variance. In the second analysis, 24% of the variance in Positive Experience of Work was accounted for, with optimism and attitudes toward prisoners accounting for the most variance. PMID:23421364

  4. [Constructing knowledge about solid waste in health services in the education of health professionals].

    PubMed

    Corrêa, Luciara Bilhalva; Lunardi, Valéria Lerch; Santos, Silvana Sidney Costa

    2008-12-01

    The need to implement policies to manage solid residues in health services (SRHS) in different health institutions is unquestionable, considering the risks they pose to public health and the environmental degradation caused by them. In order to find out how knowledge about SRHS has been constructed in the education of the health professional, data were collected with semistructured interviews with students, professors and coordinators in four schools (Nursing and Obstetrics, Odontology, Veterinary Sciences, and Medicine) at a Higher Education Institution located in the south of Brazil. The data content and document analysis identified based on the Complexity Theory ideas, show the need for a teaching reform which should include new concepts, such as integrality, articulation, dialog, and problematization, in the Teaching Projects developed by those courses, so that future health professionals can construct their knowledge about solid residues with responsibility and commitment. PMID:19320342

  5. Self-efficacy of first aid for home accidents among parents with 0- to 4-year-old children at a metropolitan community health center in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Wei, Yu-Li; Chen, Li-Li; Li, Tsai-Chung; Ma, Wei-Fen; Peng, Niang-Huei; Huang, Li-Chi

    2013-03-01

    Although accidental injury is the main factor involved in the death of young children in many countries, few studies have focused on parents' competence with regard to self-efficacy of first aid for their children following injuries occurring at home. The purpose of this cross-sectional study was to investigate parental self-sufficiency of first aid for home accidents in children aged 0-4 years. The study is a cross-sectional designed. Data from 445 parents recruited were collected by purposive sampling at eight metropolitan community health centers in central Taiwan. Measurements were taken from a self-developed questionnaire that included 37 questions. Logistic regression analysis was applied to explore the associations between factors and parents' self-efficacy of first aid at home accident. Our findings show that parents' overall rate of knowledge of first aid was 72%. The mean score for 100% certainty in parents' self-efficacy of first aid was 26.6%. The lowest scores for self-efficacy were with regard to choking and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). There was a significantly positive correlation between parents' knowledge and self-efficacy of first aid (p<0.01), and thus knowledge of first aid is a predictor of parents' self-efficacy. Knowledge of first aid is also a partly mediator between participants' attending first aid program, participants' first aid information obtained from health personnel and self-efficacy of first aid. Our findings suggest that medical services should provide first aid resources to help manage accidental injuries involving children, particularly information on how to deal with choking and CPR. With an appropriate program provided by health professionals, parents' self-efficacy of first aid for home accidents will be positively enhanced. PMID:23348100

  6. First Aid Recommendations for Psychosis: Using the Delphi Method to Gain Consensus Between Mental Health Consumers, Carers, and Clinicians

    PubMed Central

    Langlands, Robyn L.; Jorm, Anthony F.; Kelly, Claire M.; Kitchener, Betty A.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Members of the general public often lack the knowledge and skills to intervene effectively to help someone who may be developing a psychotic illness before appropriate professional help is received. Methods: We used the Delphi method to determine recommendations on first aid for psychosis. An international panel of 157 mental health consumers, carers, and clinicians completed a 146-item questionnaire about how a member of the public could help someone who may be experiencing psychosis. The panel members rated each questionnaire item according to whether they believed the statement should be included in the first aid recommendations. The results were analyzed by comparing consensus rates across the 3 groups. Three rounds of ratings were required to consolidate consensus levels. Results: Eighty-nine items were endorsed by ≥80% of panel members from all 3 groups as essential or important for psychosis first aid. These items were grouped under the following 9 headings: how to know if someone is experiencing psychosis; how to approach someone who may be experiencing psychosis; how to be supportive; how to deal with delusions and hallucinations; how to deal with communication difficulties; whether to encourage the person to seek professional help; what to do if the person does not want help; what to do in a crisis situation when the person has become acutely unwell; what to do if the person becomes aggressive. Conclusions: These recommendations will improve the provision of first aid to individuals who are developing a psychotic disorder by informing the content of training courses. PMID:17768307

  7. Helping someone with problem drinking: Mental health first aid guidelines - a Delphi expert consensus study

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Alcohol is a leading risk factor for avoidable disease burden. Research suggests that a drinker's social network can play an integral role in addressing hazardous (i.e., high-risk) or problem drinking. Often however, social networks do not have adequate mental health literacy (i.e., knowledge about mental health problems, like problem drinking, or how to treat them). This is a concern as the response that a drinker receives from their social network can have a substantial impact on their willingness to seek help. This paper describes the development of mental health first aid guidelines that inform community members on how to help someone who may have, or may be developing, a drinking problem (i.e., alcohol abuse or dependence). Methods A systematic review of the research and lay literature was conducted to develop a 285-item survey containing strategies on how to help someone who may have, or may be developing, a drinking problem. Two panels of experts (consumers/carers and clinicians) individually rated survey items, using a Delphi process. Surveys were completed online or via postal mail. Participants were 99 consumers, carers and clinicians with experience or expertise in problem drinking from Australia, Canada, Ireland, New Zealand, the United Kingdom, and the United States. Items that reached consensus on importance were retained and written into guidelines. Results The overall response rate across all three rounds was 68.7% (67.6% consumers/carers, 69.2% clinicians), with 184 first aid strategies rated as essential or important by ≥80% of panel members. The endorsed guidelines provide guidance on how to: recognize problem drinking; approach someone if there is concern about their drinking; support the person to change their drinking; respond if they are unwilling to change their drinking; facilitate professional help seeking and respond if professional help is refused; and manage an alcohol-related medical emergency. Conclusion The guidelines

  8. Development of mental health first aid guidelines for deliberate non-suicidal self-injury: A Delphi study

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Claire M; Jorm, Anthony F; Kitchener, Betty A; Langlands, Robyn L

    2008-01-01

    Background It is estimated that around 4% of the population engages, or has engaged, in deliberate non-suicidal self-injury. In clinical samples, the figures rise as high as 21%. There is also evidence to suggest that these figures may be increasing. A family member or friend may suspect that a person is injuring themselves, but very few people know how to respond if this is the case. Simple first aid guidelines may help members of the public assist people to seek and receive the professional help they require to overcome self-injury. Methods This research was conducted using the Delphi methodology, a method of reaching consensus in a panel of experts. Experts recruited to the panels included 26 professionals, 16 people who had engaged in self-injurious behaviour in the past and 3 carers of people who had engaged in self-injurious behaviour in the past. Statements about providing first aid to a person engaged in self-injurious behaviour were sought from the medical and lay literature, but little was found. Panel members were asked to respond to general questions about first aid for NSSI in a variety of domains and statements were extracted from their responses. The guidelines were written using the items most consistently endorsed by the consumer and professional panels. Results Of 79 statements rated by the panels, 18 were accepted. These statements were used to develop the guidelines appended to this paper. Conclusion There are a number of actions which are considered to be useful for members of the public when they encounter someone who is engaging in deliberate, non-suicidal self-injury. These guidelines will be useful in revising curricula for mental health first aid and NSSI first aid training programs. They can also be used by members of the public who want immediate information about how to assist a person who is engaging in such behaviour. PMID:18647420

  9. Mental Health First Aid guidelines for helping a suicidal person: a Delphi consensus study in India

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background This study aimed to develop guidelines for how a member of the Indian public should provide mental health first aid to a person who is suicidal. Methods The guidelines were produced by developing a questionnaire containing possible first aid actions and asking an expert panel of Indian mental health clinicians to rate whether each action should be included in the guidelines. The content of the questionnaire was based on a systematic search of the relevant evidence and claims made by authors of consumer and carer guides and websites. Experts were recruited by SC, EC and HM. The panel members were asked to complete the questionnaire by web survey. Three rounds of the rating were carried and, at the end of each round, items that reached the consensus criterion were selected for inclusion in the guidelines. During the first round, panel members were also asked to suggest any additional actions that were not covered in the original questionnaire (to include items that are relevant to local cultural circumstances, values, and social norms.). Responses to the open-ended questions were used to generate new items. Results The output from the Delphi process was a set of agreed upon action statements. The Delphi process started with 138 statements, 30 new items were written based on suggestions from panel members and, of these 168 items, 71 met the consensus criterion. These statements were used to develop the guidelines appended to this paper. Translated versions of the guidelines will be produced and used for training. Conclusions There are a number of actions that are considered to be useful for members of the public when they encounter someone who is experiencing suicidal thoughts or engaging in suicidal behaviour. Although the guidelines are designed for members of the public, they may also be helpful to non-mental health professionals working in health and welfare settings. PMID:20167125

  10. Opportunities for health and safety professionals in environmental restoration work

    SciTech Connect

    Norris, A.E.

    1991-01-01

    The safety of workers in waste management and in environmental restoration work is regulated in large part by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA). Many of the OSHA rules are given in Part 1910, Occupational Safety and Health Standards, of Title 29 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR). Section 120 of 29 CFR 1910 specifically addresses hazardous waste operations and emergency response operations. The remainder of this discussion focuses on clean-up operations. The purpose of this paper is to review areas of employment opportunity in environmental restoration work for health and safety professionals. Safety and health risk analyses are mentioned as one area of opportunity, and these analyses are required by the standards. Site safety and health supervisors will be needed during field operations. Those who enjoy teaching might consider helping to meet the training needs that are mandated. Finally, engineering help both to separate workers from hazards and to improve personal protective equipment, when it must be worn, would benefit those actively involved in environmental restoration activities.

  11. [Community participation. Some perspectives on professional involvement in health programs].

    PubMed

    Pérez Mendoza, S; Ascanio, S V

    1990-01-01

    Action Community regarding health is but part of a long-term project started out back in the 1960. As far as Latin America was concerned the so-called experience did not work out; notwithstanding, it has become an Attention-Getter among the countries of the area once again. How so? Because of the Primary-Approach. Understood as an approach based on the global development of society, self-involvement lies at the cornerstone of the whole process. The health section gives full measure of the primary-approach theoretical framework and propose alternatives to get it of the ground. Professionals from the health section aim at "self-involvement" as activity performed willingly. Besides as it were, it should be supervised by experts. Nowadays the venezuelan government promotes action community claiming it will endorse the Primary-Approach on health granted the national health system bill is approved. Amid such context dentistry most meet the challenge of upcoming changes, so must fellow-dentists who, in the end, will dominate center stage. The process must narrow down to actions with will stem from its own dynamics along the way. Needless to say, these actions can not be easily foreseen, let alone do they guarantee success. PMID:2131730

  12. The Nation's Top HIV/AIDS Researcher Discusses This Continuing Health Threat

    MedlinePlus

    ... Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues HIV / AIDS The Nation's Top HIV/AIDS Researcher Discusses This Continuing Health Threat Past Issues / ... For more than 30 years, the NIH's HIV/AIDS research program has been led by Dr. Anthony S. ...

  13. Effect of Progressive Muscle Relaxation in Female Health Care Professionals

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhuri, A; Ray, M; Saldanha, D; Bandopadhyay, AK

    2014-01-01

    Background: Increasing population, fast paced industrialization, increased, competitiveness, unanticipated problems in the work place have increased the stress among the females working in health care in recent times. Aim: The aim of the following study is to detect the stress levels among female health care professionals in the age group of 25-35 years and its impact on health. Subjects and Methods: A prospective cross-sectional pilot project was conducted in a tertiary care hospital in Eastern part of India, after receiving approval from the Institutional Ethics Committee and informed consent form was taken from the subjects. Stress level in the subjects was assessed according to the presumptive life event stress scale. Females with scores above 200 were selected. For these, initial assessment of anthropometric measurement, electrocardiogram and lipid profile analysis, resting pulse rate, blood pressure, physical fitness index (PFI), breath holding time (BHT), isometric hand grip (IHG) test results were evaluated and recorded. All subjects were given training of progressive muscle relaxation (PMR) for 3 months. After 3 months, the lipid profile and vital parameters, Perceived Stress Scale values were re-evaluated and subjects were asked to repeat the same exercises and data thus recorded were analyzed using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) version 16 (SPSS Inc. Released 2007. SPSS for Windows, Version 16.0. Chicago, SPSS Inc.). Results: Significant decrease in resting heart rate, blood pressure and Perceived Stress Scale levels was seen after PMR training in the subjects. Results of BHT, IHG tests and PFI were significantly increased after PMR training. There was a significant decrease in total cholesterol, triglyceride and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol in subjects after practicing PMR for 3 months. Conclusions: Increasing stress among female health care professionals is a cause for concern and there is a need to adopt early life

  14. Professional stress and health among critical care nurses in Serbia.

    PubMed

    Milutinović, Dragana; Golubović, Boris; Brkić, Nina; Prokeš, Bela

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this study was to identify and analyse professional stressors, evaluate the level of stress in nurses in Intensive Care Units (ICU), and assess the correlation between the perception of stress and psychological and somatic symptoms or diseases shown by nurses. The research, designed as a cross-sectional study, was carried out in the Intensive Care Units (ICU), in health centres in Serbia. The sample population encompassed 1000 nurses. Expanded Nursing Stress Scale (ENSS) was used as the research instrument. ENSS revealed a valid metric characteristic within our sample population. Nurses from ICUs rated situations involving physical and psychological working environments as the most stressful ones, whereas situations related to social working environment were described as less stressful; however, the differences in the perception of stressfulness of these environments were minor. Socio-demographic determinants of the participants (age, marital status and education level) significantly affected the perception of stress at work. Significant differences in the perception of stressfulness of particular stress factors were observed among nurses with respect to psychological and somatic symptoms (such as headache, insomnia, fatigue, despair, lower back pain, mood swings etc.) and certain diseases (such as hypertension, myocardial infarction, stroke, diabetes mellitus etc). In view of permanent escalation of professional stressors, creating a supportive working environment is essential for positive health outcomes, prevention of job-related diseases and better protection of already ill nurses. PMID:22728799

  15. Teaching vaccine safety communication to medical students and health professionals.

    PubMed

    Rath, Barbara; Muhlhans, Susann; Gaedicke, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    Not only the general public, but also those studying to become health professionals, are struggling to keep up with a growing body of evidence and increasingly complex information about the many different types of vaccines available to date. At the same time, a number of increasingly complex subjects of study are competing for their attention during undergraduate and graduate education. In many medical school curricula in German-speaking countries, the subject of vaccines has been entirely omitted, or is regarded a minor subtopic. During the studies, most medical school curricula in German-speaking countries do not offer obligatory courses and/ or hands-on training vaccinology in vaccination. In Germany, private pediatricians administer the majority of immunizations. Even during postgraduate training programs in pediatrics, which are largely hospital-based, vaccinations are rarely a topic, and vaccinology remains a "hobby" and a "field without lobby" lacking specific certification requirements. Studies of acceptance of vaccines among health professionals and medical students have shown that many may still have their own doubts and uncertainties about vaccines revealing a number of unanswered questions during their studies and postgraduate training. PMID:25859671

  16. Health discourse and within-group stigma in professional BDSM.

    PubMed

    Lindemann, Danielle J

    2013-12-01

    This article directly deals with health and stigma within practices of erotic labor. Scant previous literature has focused on erotic laborers' perceptions of stigma and the ways in which regimes of stigmatization operate within their particular social worlds. I use the commercial BDSM (Bondage, Discipline, Sadism, Masochism) "dungeon" as a strategic research site to investigate these workers' conceptions and management of their own stigma, and I find that discourses about stigma are inextricably entwined with concerns about health and wellbeing. Data are derived from ethnographic fieldwork with professional dominatrices ("pro-dommes") who work in New York City and San Francisco as well as in-depth interviews conducted between September 2007 and April 2008. Counter to stereotypes of erotic laborers as violent or as vectors of disease, BDSM workers are in fact not only concerned about safety but professionally invested in it, reinforcing it through an identity politics of hierarchies of erotic labor. There are multiple implications of this work for public perception and policy-implications that could only be brought to light through the ethnographic method. PMID:24045145

  17. Usefulness of a Tailored eHealth Service for Informal Caregivers and Professionals in the Dementia Treatment and Care Setting: The eHealthMonitor Dementia Portal

    PubMed Central

    Marinova-Schmidt, Velislava; Setzer, Manuela; Kondylakis, Haridimos; Griebel, Lena; Sedlmayr, Martin; Graessel, Elmar; Maler, Juan Manuel; Kirn, Stefan; Kolominsky-Rabas, Peter L

    2016-01-01

    Background The European eHealthMonitor project (eHM) developed a user-sensitive and interactive Web portal for the dementia care setting called the eHM Dementia Portal (eHM-DP). It aims to provide targeted support for informal caregivers of persons with dementia and professionals. Objective The objective of this study was to assess the usefulness and impact of the eHM-DP service in the dementia care setting from two user perspectives: informal caregivers and professionals. Methods The evaluation study was conducted from June to September 2014 and followed a before-after, user-participatory, mixed-method design with questionnaires and interviews. The used intervention was the eHM-DP: an interactive Web portal for informal caregivers and professionals that was tested for a 12-week period. Primary outcomes for caregivers included empowerment, quality of life, caregiver burden, decision aid, as well as perceived usefulness and benefits of the eHM-DP. Primary outcomes for professionals involved decision aid, perceived usefulness, and benefits of the eHM-DP. Results A total of 25 informal caregivers and 6 professionals used the eHM-DP over the 12-week study period. Both professionals and informal caregivers indicated perceived benefits and support by the eHM-DP. In total, 65% (16/25) of informal caregivers would use the eHM-DP if they had access to it. Major perceived benefits were individualized information acquisition, improved interaction between informal caregivers and professionals, access to support from home, and empowerment in health-related decisions (PrepDM Score: 67.9). Professionals highlighted the improved treatment and care over the disease course (83%, 5/6) and improved health care access for people living in rural areas (67%, 4/6). However, there was no improvement in caregiver burden (Burden Scale for Family Caregivers) and quality of life (EuroQol-5D-5L) over the study period. Conclusions Our study provides insight into the different user perspectives

  18. Competencies for Financial Aid Officers: A Competency Model for Professional Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woolf, Michael Neil

    2012-01-01

    Financial aid officers play a vital role in assisting prospective and current college students in enrolling and graduating from college. This study explores the competencies that financial aid officers need to be successful in their jobs. A survey of thirty competencies was distributed to 508 practicing financial aid officers in the Western United…

  19. 21 CFR 801.420 - Hearing aid devices; professional and patient labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... incorporation by reference in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies are available from the... the ear. Special care should be exercised in selecting and fitting a hearing aid whose maximum sound... hearing aid user. (This provision is required only for those hearing aids with a maximum sound...

  20. Properties, promotive and obstructive conditions of multi-professional teaching and learning of health professions and non-health professions: an explorative survey from the perspective of teachers

    PubMed Central

    Schmitz, Daniela; Höhmann, Ulrike

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Care for people with dementia is considered a multi-professional challenge that requires a collaborative approach between health professionals and non-health professionals. Didactic strategies to ensure the same qualifications across these occupational groups are lacking. This article presents the joint learning of selected properties and promotive and obstructive conditions, using the example of a multi-professional Master's programme. It subsequently draws conclusions for didactic concepts. Methodology: The perceptions of 12 teachers on this Master's programme, all representing different professions, were determined by using a qualitative exploratory survey on the three stated dimensions. With the aid of a summarising content analysis, their statements were condensed and abstracted so as to deduce appropriate requirements for methodical and didactic learning scenarios. Results: In view of the fact that the students have very varied previous knowledge, the main challenge is finding a balance between expertise and tediousness. Establishing essential and common expertise, as well as sensitivity for different perspectives, is made particularly difficult by the fact that health and non-health professions differ greatly in terms of methods and approaches. For a successful outcome, the content focal points and didactic and methodical concepts for a learning group need to take into account the composition of that specific group. Recourse to didactic standard concepts is only possible to a limited extent. Conclusions: The aim of joint teaching and learning of health and non-health professionals is to enhance the understanding of a profession: This is done by making individuals aware of their role in the chain of care, so they can recognise and organise the mutual conditionality of their own and external professional contributions. PMID:27280137

  1. Chronic Disease Prevalence and Healthy Lifestyle Behaviors Among US Health Care Professionals.

    PubMed

    Dayoub, Elias; Jena, Anupam B

    2015-12-01

    Although health care professionals may be assumed to make healthier lifestyle choices and have better health outcomes than others because of their greater health literacy, little is known about how actual health outcomes of health care professionals compare with those of the overall population. We analyzed how trends in obesity, diabetes, hypertension, and coronary artery disease prevalence as well as several health behaviors (smoking, alcohol use, and exercise) varied between health care professionals and the general US population from 2002 to 2013, using nationally representative data collected by the National Health Interview Survey. We estimated multivariate logistic regressions of each disease and behavior adjusted for age, race, sex, geographic region, and year. Although rates of obesity, diabetes, and hypertension were lower among health care professionals compared with the overall population, disease was still common among health care professionals and increased over time at a rate similar to that of the overall population. For example, obesity prevalence was lower among health care professionals but increased similarly from 2002 to 2013 (health care professionals, 20.5% in 2002 to 22.1% in 2013; other occupations, 28.4% to 31.7%; P=.64 for difference in trend). Diabetes prevalence was modestly lower among health care professionals but increased at a similar rate (health care professionals, 7.4% in 2005 to 8.6% in 2013; other occupations, 8.7% to 9.9%; P=.67 for difference in trend). Similar patterns were noted in hypertension. Coronary artery disease prevalence declined over time among health care professionals but increased for others. Health care professionals reported better health behaviors than others in smoking and physical activity but not in moderate to heavy alcohol use. PMID:26422242

  2. Health care professional workstation: software system construction using DSSA scenario-based engineering process.

    PubMed

    Hufnagel, S; Harbison, K; Silva, J; Mettala, E

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes a new method for the evolutionary determination of user requirements and system specifications called scenario-based engineering process (SEP). Health care professional workstations are critical components of large scale health care system architectures. We suggest that domain-specific software architectures (DSSAs) be used to specify standard interfaces and protocols for reusable software components throughout those architectures, including workstations. We encourage the use of engineering principles and abstraction mechanisms. Engineering principles are flexible guidelines, adaptable to particular situations. Abstraction mechanisms are simplifications for management of complexity. We recommend object-oriented design principles, graphical structural specifications, and formal components' behavioral specifications. We give an ambulatory care scenario and associated models to demonstrate SEP. The scenario uses health care terminology and gives patients' and health care providers' system views. Our goal is to have a threefold benefit. (i) Scenario view abstractions provide consistent interdisciplinary communications. (ii) Hierarchical object-oriented structures provide useful abstractions for reuse, understandability, and long term evolution. (iii) SEP and health care DSSA integration into computer aided software engineering (CASE) environments. These environments should support rapid construction and certification of individualized systems, from reuse libraries. PMID:8125652

  3. State variation in HIV/AIDS health outcomes: the effect of spending on social services and public health

    PubMed Central

    Talbert-Slagle, Kristina M.; Canavan, Maureen E.; Rogan, Erika M.; Curry, Leslie A.; Bradley, Elizabeth H.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Despite considerable advances in the prevention and treatment of HIV/AIDS, the burden of new infections of HIV and AIDS varies substantially across the country. Previous studies have demonstrated associations between increased healthcare spending and better HIV/AIDS outcomes; however, less is known about the association between spending on social services and public health spending and HIV/AIDS outcomes. We sought to examine the association between state-level spending on social services and public health and HIV/AIDS case rates and AIDS deaths across the United States. Design: We conducted a retrospective, longitudinal study of the 50 U.S. states over 2000–2009 using a dataset of HIV/AIDS case rates and AIDS deaths per 100 000 people matched with a unique dataset of state-level spending on social services and public health per person in poverty. Methods: We estimated multivariable regression models for each HIV/AIDS outcome as a function of the social service and public health spending 1 and 5 years earlier in the state, adjusted for the log of state GDP per capita, regional and time fixed effects, Medicaid spending as % of GDP, and socio-demographic, economic, and health resource factors. Results: States with higher spending on social services and public health per person in poverty had significantly lower HIV and AIDS case rates and fewer AIDS deaths, both 1 and 5 years post expenditure (P ≤ 0.05). Conclusion: Our findings suggest that spending on social services and public health may provide a leverage point for state policymakers to reduce HIV/AIDS case rates and AIDS deaths in their state. PMID:26605512

  4. Demoralization in health professional practice: development, amelioration, and implications for continuing education.

    PubMed

    Gabel, Stewart

    2013-01-01

    Demoralization is a feeling state of dejection, hopelessness, and a sense of personal "incompetence" that may be tied to a loss of or threat to one's own goals or values. It has an existential dimension when beliefs and values about oneself are disconfirmed. Numerous sources describe high rates of dissatisfaction and burnout in physicians and other health professionals. This article reviews historical and empirical findings that describe the professional and personal value orientations of physicians and other health professionals. It reviews empirical and theoretical findings to consider the implications of conflict between these values and negatively perceived ethical and values orientations of health care organizations and commercial health care entities. Conflicts between personal and professional values of health professionals and larger health care related organizations and commercial entities with which they are associated may contribute to the development of demoralization and burnout. Physicians and other health professionals frequently experience values related conflicts with larger social, organizational or bureaucratic systems. These conflicts place health professionals at risk for demoralization and burnout. "Remoralization," or renewal of morale, depends on the reestablishment of the potential for fulfillment of one's values in the work environment. This depends on organizational, group, and personal efforts. Continuing education and continuing professional development programs should have a programmatic focus on the importance of a values orientation in health care and support program development aimed at recognizing, addressing, and reducing demoralization and its potential for negative health care consequences for health professionals and patients. PMID:23775912

  5. The Perceived Need for Home Health Care of the Elderly as Stated by Both the Elderly and Health Professionals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Cindy C.; Wallace, Bill C.

    The differences between what health professionals and the elderly perceive concerning the need for home health care were studied. Elderly persons were interviewed to ascertain their perceived needs while health professionals responded to a questionnaire. Preliminary analysis of the resulting data revealed that the most frequently perceived…

  6. Impact of the European Union enlargement on health professionals and health care systems.

    PubMed

    Avgerinos, Efthimios D; Koupidis, Sotirios A; Filippou, Dimitrios K

    2004-09-01

    As the European family enlarges, the admission of new human resources in the health services will have an impact on the European market and health care system. Under the umbrella of the European Union (EU) equality, the educational quality barriers (e.g. PLAB test in UK, DIKATSA test in Greece) will be abolished. The overproduction of health professionals and their heterogeneous regional and per specialty distribution will lead to medical unemployment and demotion of the medical profession. Medical and political authorities and decision makers of the EU need to reform the European Health System, supervise, and assess the quality of medical education, harmonize the individual National Health System policies, and follow the World Health Organization (regional office for Europe) guidelines on health policy. An agreed, structured European Health Policy might moderate the vibrations of the forthcoming EU enlargement. PMID:15276318

  7. AIDS, Social Sciences, and Health Education: A Personal Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osborn, June E.

    1986-01-01

    Explores the nature of the new AIDS (Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome) virus and its diseases, avoidance strategies, neurologic disease and AIDS, co-factors involved in progression from asymptomatic infection to disease, AIDS versus civil liberties--barriers to effective communication, the importance of language in communication, and health…

  8. Perceptions of the population and health professionals regarding visceral leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Carmo, Rose Ferraz; da Luz, Zélia Maria Profeta; Bevilacqua, Paula Dias

    2016-02-01

    Based on theoretical qualitative research reference methodology, this study sought to investigate the perception of visceral leishmaniasis (VL) by social actors directly involved in the prevention and control of the disease. Thirty-eight semi-structured interviews were conducted with residents, focus groups were staged with 18 health workers in an endemic VL area and depositions were collected, which after being processed by content analysis revealed shortcomings and challenges. The population associated VL with dogs, acknowledged their co-responsibility in tackling the disease and demanded information. Health workers identified environmental sanitation as an essential factor for VL prevention. Among the shortcomings, the lack of information about the disease and culpability of the individual because of non-adherence to prevention measures were observed, especially environmental management. Probably, approaches emphasizing the role of the environment as a health promotion agent and the timely definition of specific environmental measures against VL, constitute a prospect for overcoming these shortcomings. The consensus is that the main challenge for enhancing the prevention and control might be the participatory and dialogical construction of these approaches between health professionals and the population. PMID:26910169

  9. Teaching Health Sciences Students about Culturally Sensitive Communication between Health Professionals and Patients from Diverse Cultures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olivares, Mónica; Pena, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    As members of a nationally accredited research project (I?+?D+i) InterMED (ref.: FF2011-25500) being carried out in the field of Intercultural Mediation, we are aware of the mediator's delicate role in communicative interactions between health professionals and foreign population. Sales has pointed out the dangers of stereotyping minorities…

  10. How does a decision aid help people decide whether to disclose a mental health problem to employers? Qualitative interview study.

    PubMed

    Lassman, F; Henderson, R Claire; Dockery, L; Clement, S; Murray, J; Bonnington, O; Farrelly, S; Thornicroft, G

    2015-06-01

    Background Decisions about whether to disclose mental health problems to employers are complex, with potential personal, employment and legal implications. Decision aids are evidence based tools, designed to help individuals make specific choices between treatment options. We previously developed a decision aid-Conceal Or ReveAL (CORAL)-to assist service users with decisions about disclosure to employers. As part of a mixed methods exploratory RCT, which demonstrated that the CORAL decision aid was effective in reducing decisional conflict, we aimed to explore its mechanism of action and to optimise the intervention for a future full scale trial. Methods In depth interviews were conducted with individuals receiving vocational support from a mental health trust and participating in the intervention arm of the pilot trial. Thematic analysis was conducted to identify the main themes relating to participants' perceptions of the CORAL decision aid. Results Thirteen participants were interviewed and five main themes were identified: sense of self and values; sense of control; anticipation of disclosure; experience of disclosure; and mechanism of action of the decision aid. Conclusions Data from our 13 participants suggest that the CORAL decision aid acts on several dimensions of decisional conflict: clarifying the pros and cons of different choices; increasing knowledge; structuring the decision making process; and clarifying needs and values. The current study indicated that it would be most effective when delivered by a professional well versed in employment and mental health matters such as a vocational adviser. The need for employers and policymakers to reduce the negative impact of disclosure is also highlighted. PMID:25427673

  11. Defining and Assessing the Competence of Health Care Professionals in France

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matillon, Yves; LeBoeuf, Dominique; Maisonneuve, Herve

    2005-01-01

    Introduction: During the past decade, the public, health care professionals, and governments have shown much interest in ensuring that professionals, specifically physicians, are skilled in their work and competent in managing health care organizations. The need to assess competence in the health care sector was explored, with the aim of proposing…

  12. The New York Needle Trial: the politics of public health in the age of AIDS.

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, W

    1991-01-01

    During the past 5 years, the exchange of sterile needles and syringes for dirty injecting equipment has gained increasing acceptance outside the United States as a potential means of reducing the transmission of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) among intravenous drug users. This article describes the controversy over attempts to establish a needle and syringe exchange scheme in New York City between 1985 and 1991. The response to a health crisis is used as an indicator of patterns of social and institutional practice. Advocates of needle exchanges had reached a stalemate with the promoters of law enforcement, and the strategic reformulation of the policy problem in terms of the research process seemed to offer a solution. The article discusses the practical limitations on designing and carrying out a controversial health promotion policy; the use (under constraint) of a restrictive research process to constitute--rather than simply to guide or monitor--public policy; and the potential ethical hazards of health professionals' seeking a polemical recourse to the clinical trial. The efforts to establish a needle exchange in New York thus illustrate more general problems for AIDS prevention. Images p1511-a p1512-a p1513-a PMID:1951815

  13. Treating the elite athlete: anti-doping information for the health professional.

    PubMed

    Tandon, Shikha; Bowers, Larry D; Fedoruk, Matthew N

    2015-01-01

    Physicians and health professionals are a vital component in preserving the integrity of competition and the core principles of true sport. When treating an athlete, health professionals need to be cognizant of the anti-doping rules of the relevant sport organization. This review aims to provide an overview of the World Anti-Doping Agency Prohibited List, Therapeutic Use Exemptions, roles and responsibilities of the health professional, as well as provide resources that will guide their work with athletes. PMID:25958657

  14. [Palliative care: an approach based on the professional health categories].

    PubMed

    Hermes, Hélida Ribeiro; Lamarca, Isabel Cristina Arruda

    2013-09-01

    Palliative care has emerged as a humanitarian philosophy of caring for terminally ill patients, alleviating their pain and suffering. This care involves the action of an interdisciplinary team, in which all the professional recognize the limits of their performance will help the terminally ill patient to die with dignity. This article deals with the issue of death and dying, both from the traditional and the contemporary standpoint, and how palliative care have been treated in the job categories of medicine, social work, psychology and nursing. The methodology of this study consists of a literature review of articles in the SciELO database, electronic journals and technical books related to the topic. Analysis of the articles revealed a shortage of subjects that deal with the theme of death in professional curricula, as well as few palliative care services in Brazilian society and barriers faced by this new approach to the terminal patient. This research aims to broaden the discussion of palliative care in public health, and provide information for future studies that will address the theme. PMID:23989564

  15. Mental health first aid training of the public in a rural area: a cluster randomized trial [ISRCTN53887541

    PubMed Central

    Jorm, Anthony F; Kitchener, Betty A; O'Kearney, Richard; Dear, Keith BG

    2004-01-01

    Background A Mental Health First Aid course has been developed which trains members of the public in how to give initial help in mental health crisis situations and to support people developing mental health problems. This course has previously been evaluated in a randomized controlled trial in a workplace setting and found to produce a number of positive effects. However, this was an efficacy trial under relatively ideal conditions. Here we report the results of an effectiveness trial in which the course is given under more typical conditions. Methods The course was taught to members of the public in a large rural area in Australia by staff of an area health service. The 16 Local Government Areas that made up the area were grouped into pairs matched for size, geography and socio-economic level. One of each Local Government Area pair was randomised to receive immediate training while one served as a wait-list control. There were 753 participants in the trial: 416 in the 8 trained areas and 337 in the 8 control areas. Outcomes measured before the course started and 4 months after it ended were knowledge of mental disorders, confidence in providing help, actual help provided, and social distance towards people with mental disorders. The data were analysed taking account of the clustered design and using an intention-to-treat approach. Results Training was found to produce significantly greater recognition of the disorders, increased agreement with health professionals about which interventions are likely to be helpful, decreased social distance, increased confidence in providing help to others, and an increase in help actually provided. There was no change in the number of people with mental health problems that trainees had contact with nor in the percentage advising someone to seek professional help. Conclusions Mental Health First Aid training produces positive changes in knowledge, attitudes and behaviour when the course is given to members of the public by

  16. Convergent evolution of health information management and health informatics: a perspective on the future of information professionals in health care.

    PubMed

    Gibson, C J; Dixon, B E; Abrams, K

    2015-01-01

    Clearly defined boundaries are disappearing among the activities, sources, and uses of health care data and information managed by health information management (HIM) and health informatics (HI) professionals. Definitions of the professional domains and scopes of practice for HIM and HI are converging with the proliferation of information and communication technologies in health care settings. Convergence is changing both the roles that HIM and HI professionals serve in their organizations as well as the competencies necessary for training future professionals. Many of these changes suggest a blurring of roles and responsibilities with increasingly overlapping curricula, job descriptions, and research agendas. Blurred lines in a highly competitive market create confusion for students and employers. In this essay, we provide some perspective on the changing landscape and suggest a course for the future. First we review the evolving definitions of HIM and HI. We next compare the current domains and competencies, review the characteristics as well as the education and credentialing of both disciplines, and examine areas of convergence. Given the current state, we suggest a path forward to strengthen the contributions HIM and HI professionals and educators make to the evolving health care environment. PMID:25848421

  17. Under what conditions is euthanasia acceptable to lay people and health professionals?

    PubMed

    Teisseyre, Nathalie; Mullet, Etienne; Sorum, Paul Clay

    2005-01-01

    Euthanasia is legal only in the Netherlands and Belgium, but it is on occasion performed by physicians elsewhere. We recruited in France two convenience samples of 221 lay people and of 189 professionals (36 physicians, 92 nurses, 48 nurse's aides, and 13 psychologists) and asked them how acceptable it would be for a patient's physician to perform euthanasia in each of 72 scenarios. The scenarios were all combinations of three levels of the patient's life expectancy (3 days, 10 days, or 1 month), four levels of the patient's request for euthanasia (no request, unable to formulate a request because in a coma, some form of request, repeated formal requests), three of the family's attitude (do not uselessly prolong care, no opinion, try to keep the patient alive to the very end), and two of the patient's willingness to undergo organ donation (willing or not willing). We found that most lay people and health care professionals structure the factors in the patient scenarios in the same way: they assign most importance to the extent of requests for euthanasia by the patient and least importance (the lay people) or none (the health professionals) to the patient's willingness to donate organs. They also integrate the information from the different factors in the same way: the factors of patient request, patient life expectancy, and (for the lay people) organ donation are combined additively, and the family's attitude toward prolonging care interacts with patient request (playing a larger role when the patient can make no request). Thus we demonstrate a common cognitive foundation for future discussions, at the levels of both clinical care and public policy, of the conditions under which physician-performed euthanasia might be acceptable. PMID:15522491

  18. The Impact of Official Development Aid on Maternal and Reproductive Health Outcomes: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Emma Michelle; Hayman, Rachel; Crawford, Fay; Jeffery, Patricia; Smith, James

    2013-01-01

    Background Progress toward meeting Millennium Development Goal 5, which aims to improve maternal and reproductive health outcomes, is behind schedule. This is despite ever increasing volumes of official development aid targeting the goal, calling into question the distribution and efficacy of aid. The 2005 Paris Declaration on Aid Effectiveness represented a global commitment to reform aid practices in order to improve development outcomes, encouraging a shift toward collaborative aid arrangements which support the national plans of aid recipient countries (and discouraging unaligned donor projects). Methods and Findings We conducted a systematic review to summarise the evidence of the impact on MDG 5 outcomes of official development aid delivered in line with Paris aid effectiveness principles and to compare this with the impact of aid in general on MDG 5 outcomes. Searches of electronic databases identified 30 studies reporting aid-funded interventions designed to improve maternal and reproductive health outcomes. Aid interventions appear to be associated with small improvements in the MDG indicators, although it is not clear whether changes are happening because of the manner in which aid is delivered. The data do not allow for a meaningful comparison between Paris style and general aid. The review identified discernible gaps in the evidence base on aid interventions targeting MDG 5, notably on indicators MDG 5.4 (adolescent birth rate) and 5.6 (unmet need for family planning). Discussion This review presents the first systematic review of the impact of official development aid delivered according to the Paris principles and aid delivered outside this framework on MDG 5 outcomes. Its findings point to major gaps in the evidence base and should be used to inform new approaches and methodologies aimed at measuring the impact of official development aid. PMID:23468860

  19. Correlates of perceived helpfulness of mental health professionals following disclosure of sexual assault.

    PubMed

    Starzynski, Laura L; Ullman, Sarah E

    2014-01-01

    A diverse sample of more than 365 adult sexual assault survivors, recruited from college and community sources, was surveyed about sexual assault experiences, post-assault factors, and perceived helpfulness of and satisfaction with mental health professionals. Regression analyses were conducted to identify factors associated with perceived helpfulness of and satisfaction with mental health professionals. Older age, higher posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), greater control over recovery, and more emotional support reactions were associated with positive perceptions of mental health professionals. Stranger offenders, greater resistance during assault, high victim post-assault upset, and blaming social reactions from others were associated with negative perceptions of mental health professionals. PMID:24567537

  20. Occupational hazards to the health of professional gardeners.

    PubMed

    Knibbs, Luke D

    2014-01-01

    Professional gardening is a broad occupation that involves a wide range of tasks. Gardeners confront an equally wide variety of physical, chemical, biological and psychosocial hazards in their workplace. Consequently, occupational injuries and mortality are unfortunately common. The aim of this brief review is to collate and summarise the main hazards of gardening, their health effects and control measures. The diversity and size of gardeners' occupational exposures to the hazards outlined in this paper highlight some of the underlying causes of their increased risk of occupational injury or death. The risk can be reduced in many cases by ensuring appropriate protective strategies are adopted. Other ways through which the burden of occupational injury and mortality can be minimised are introduced and discussed in this paper. PMID:24517285

  1. Teaching bioethics as a new paradigm for health professionals.

    PubMed

    Tealdi, Juan Carlos

    1993-04-01

    In The Clouds by Aristophanes, Strepsiades brings his son before Socrates so that he could learn Philosophy for he has heard that this science teaches how to overcome the most difficult causes with reasons. And Strepsiades wants his son to learn the art of failing to pay debts. Regarding medical education in our time, Edmund Pellegrino has noted that the educational philosophy of medical schools determines what a "good" physician is. Thus, teaching bioethics to future health professionals makes us face old problems now: What teaching method to choose among all the possible various ones? What should teaching aim at? Which will be our educational philosophy? Therefore I shall introduce here the epistemological basis of our Bioethics teaching program in Argentina and its implementing strategies in the undergraduate curriculum and the post-graduate level. PMID:11651531

  2. Development of critically reflective dialogues in communities of health professionals.

    PubMed

    de Groot, Esther; Endedijk, Maaike; Jaarsma, Debbie; van Beukelen, Peter; Simons, Robert-Jan

    2013-10-01

    Critically reflective dialogues (CRD) are important for knowledge sharing and creating meaning in communities. CRD includes different aspects: being open about mistakes, critical opinion sharing, asking for and giving feedback, experimentation, challenging groupthink and research utilisation. In this article we explore whether CRD aspects change over time, through a study of two dialogues each from six different communities of veterinary health professionals. Change was studied from the perspective of observations, through analysing transcripts of dialogues, and from the perspective of community members' perceptions, through an evaluative discussion with members. The results showed that some communities became more open about mistakes, a finding that is related to an increase in trust. Other observed aspects of CRD seemed to be fairly stable over time. Community members perceived research utilisation and asking for and giving feedback to have been increased. From an analysis of perceptions of the community members it emerged that limited interaction could be associated with the epistemological conceptions of community members. PMID:22976456

  3. Development of mental health first aid guidelines for suicidal ideation and behaviour: A Delphi study

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Claire M; Jorm, Anthony F; Kitchener, Betty A; Langlands, Robyn L

    2008-01-01

    Background Suicide is a statistically rare event, but devastating to those left behind and one of the worst possible outcomes associated with mental illness. Although a friend, family member or co-worker may be the first person to notice that a person is highly distressed, few have the knowledge and skills required to assist. Simple guidelines may help such a person to encourage a suicidal individual to seek professional help or decide against suicide. Methods This research was conducted using the Delphi methodology, a method of reaching consensus in a panel of experts. Experts recruited to the panels included 22 professionals, 10 people who had been suicidal in the past and 6 carers of people who had been suicidal in the past. Statements about how to assist someone who is thinking about suicide were sourced through a systematic search of both professional and lay literature. The guidelines were written using the items most consistently endorsed by all three panels. Results Of 114 statements presented to the panels, 30 were accepted. These statements were used to develop the guidelines appended to this paper. Conclusion There are a number of actions which are considered to be useful for members of the public when they encounter someone who is experiencing suicidal thoughts or engaging in suicidal behaviour. These guidelines will be useful in revision of curricula of mental health first aid and suicide intervention training programs. They can also be used by members of the public who want immediate information about how to assist a suicidal person. PMID:18366657

  4. Cross-border mobility of health professionals: contesting patients' right to health.

    PubMed

    Plotnikova, Evgeniya Vadimovna

    2012-01-01

    Cross-border labour mobility in the health sector is portrayed as both an opportunity for health professionals immigrating to developed countries, and as a challenge for patients remaining in low-income countries with restricted access to health care provision. In policy debate, this problem is articulated as the opposition between, 'the right to freedom of movement' and 'the right to health'. The underlying layers of this dilemma expose competing institutional interests for source and destination countries, international organisations, private recruitment agencies, trade unions and professional organisations. To resolve some of these tensions, a 'soft law' regulation (ethical recruitment policy) was adopted in the UK in the early 2000s. This article argues that this ethical recruitment policy produces an ambivalent effect. The qualitative content analysis refers to documents produced by international organisations, government bodies, professional organisations and trade unions in the UK and source countries. We found that ethical recruitment on the one hand proposes a practical mechanism to the realisation of the right to health in source countries, through encouraging employers' behaviour in accordance with ethical principles in international recruitment. On the other hand, this policy protects the reputation of institutional stakeholders changing rhetoric around international recruitment rather than the practice. The findings of this study contribute to a broader discussion of the international norms diffusion and the ambivalent role of 'soft law' in their implementation. PMID:21435766

  5. Primary Health Care Evaluation: the view of clients and professionals about the Family Health Strategy1

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Simone Albino; Baitelo, Tamara Cristina; Fracolli, Lislaine Aparecida

    2015-01-01

    Objective: to evaluate the attributes of primary health care as for access; longitudinality; comprehensiveness; coordination; family counseling and community counseling in the Family Health Strategy, triangulating and comparing the views of stakeholders involved in the care process. Method: evaluative research with a quantitative approach and cross-sectional design. Data collected using the Primary Care Assessment Tool for interviews with 527 adult clients, 34 health professionals, and 330 parents of children up to two years old, related to 33 family health teams, in eleven municipalities. Analysis conducted in the Statistical Package for Social Sciences software, with a confidence interval of 95% and error of 0.1. Results: the three groups assessed the first contact access - accessibility with low scores. Professionals evaluated with a high score the other attributes. Clients assigned low score evaluations for the attributes: community counseling; family counseling; comprehensiveness - services rendered; comprehensiveness - available services. Conclusions: the quality of performance self-reported by the professionals of the Family Health Strategy is not perceived or valued by clients, and the actions and services may have been developed inappropriately or insufficiently to be apprehended by the experience of clients. PMID:26487150

  6. Health economics: potential applications in HIV/AIDS control in Africa.

    PubMed

    Kirigia, Joses M; Sambo, Luis G; Anikpo, Emilienne; Karisa, Eddie; Mwabu, Germano

    2005-01-01

    There is growing evidence that HIV/ AIDS has enormous negative impact on health status and economic development of individuals, households, communities and nations in the African region. Thus, there is urgent need for various disciplines to demonstrate how they can contribute in curbing the spread of this deadly disease in the African region. This paper, using an extended version of Professor Alan Williams schema as the conceptual framework, attempts to demonstrate how health economics can be used to inform policy and managerial choices related to HIV/AIDS advocacy, prevention, treatment and management. It argues that the discipline of health economics (and economics generally) is extremely valuable in: measuring health impacts of the disease and interventions; evaluating the relationships between health care-seeking behaviour of individuals and health system specific attributes; the estimation of determinants of compliance of HIV/AIDS patients with treatment regimen; establishing of health institutions efficiency in combating AIDS; guiding choices of HIV/AIDS interventions; assessing the relationships between HIV/AIDS, development, poverty, and trade; programme planning, monitoring and evaluation; and assessing health system's overall performance. The paper is a modest attempt to show how the discipline of health economics can elucidate, and help in resolving practical and conceptual issues in HIV/AIDS control in Africa. PMID:17298133

  7. Mental Health Professionals in Children's Advocacy Centers: Is There Role Conflict?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cross, Theodore P.; Fine, Janet E.; Jones, Lisa M.; Walsh, Wendy A.

    2012-01-01

    Two recent chapters in professional books have criticized children's advocacy centers for creating role conflict for mental health professionals because of their work with criminal justice and child protection professionals in children's advocacy centers as part of a coordinated response to child abuse. This article argues that these critiques…

  8. Occupational Risk Factors and Asthma among Health Care Professionals

    PubMed Central

    Delclos, George L.; Gimeno, David; Arif, Ahmed A.; Burau, Keith D.; Carson, Arch; Lusk, Christine; Stock, Thomas; Symanski, Elaine; Whitehead, Lawrence W.; Zock, Jan-Paul; Benavides, Fernando G.; Antó, Josep M.

    2007-01-01

    Rationale: Recent U.S. data suggest an increased risk of work-related asthma among health care workers, yet only a few specific determinants have been elucidated. Objectives: To evaluate associations of asthma prevalence with occupational exposures in a cross-sectional survey of health care professionals. Methods: A detailed questionnaire was mailed to a random sample (n = 5,600) of all Texas physicians, nurses, respiratory therapists, and occupational therapists with active licenses in 2003. Information on asthma symptoms and nonoccupational asthma risk factors obtained from the questionnaire was linked to occupational exposures derived through an industry-specific job-exposure matrix. Measurements: There were two a priori defined outcomes: (1) physician-diagnosed asthma with onset after entry into health care (“reported asthma”) and (2) “bronchial hyperresponsiveness–related symptoms,” defined through an 8-item symptom-based predictor. Main Results: Overall response rate was 66%. The final study population consisted of 862 physicians, 941 nurses, 968 occupational therapists, and 879 respiratory therapists (n = 3,650). Reported asthma was associated with medical instrument cleaning (odds ratio [OR], 2.22; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.34–3.67), general cleaning (OR, 2.02; 95% CI, 1.20–3.40), use of powdered latex gloves between 1992 and 2000 (OR, 2.17; 95% CI, 1.27–3.73), and administration of aerosolized medications (OR, 1.72; 95% CI, 1.05–2.83). The risk associated with latex glove use was not apparent after 2000. Bronchial hyperresponsiveness–related symptoms were associated with general cleaning (OR, 1.63; 95% CI, 1.21–2.19), aerosolized medication administration (OR, 1.40; 95% CI, 1.06–1.84), use of adhesives on patients (OR, 1.65; 95% CI, 1.22–2.24), and exposure to a chemical spill (OR, 2.02; 95% CI, 1.28–3.21). Conclusions: The contribution of occupational exposures to asthma in health care professionals is not trivial

  9. The impact of eLearning on health professional educators’ attitudes to information and communication technology

    PubMed Central

    Neville, Victoria; Lam, Mary; Gordon, Christopher J

    2015-01-01

    Background The use of information and communication technology (ICT) in health professional education is increasing rapidly. Health professional educators need to be responsive to health professionals’ information and communication technological needs; however, there is a paucity of information about educators’ attitudes to, and capabilities with, ICT. Methods Fifty-two health professional educators, enrolled in health professional education postgraduate studies, participated in an online subject with specific eLearning components requiring the use of ICT. They completed a pre- and postquestionnaire pertaining to ICT attitudes, confidence, and usage. Results Participants reported significant increases in overall ICT confidence during the subject despite it being high at baseline (mean: 7.0 out of 10; P=0.02). Even with increased ICT confidence, there were decreases in the participants’ sense of ICT control when related to health professional education (P=0.002); whereas, the amount of time participants engaged with ICT devices was negatively correlated with the sense of ICT control (P=0.002). The effect of age and health discipline on ICT attitudes and confidence was not significant (P>0.05). Conclusion This study reports that health professional educators have perceptual deficits toward ICT. The impact of eLearning increased confidence in ICT but caused a reduction in participants’ sense of control of ICT. Health professional educators require more ICT training and support to facilitate better ICT integration in health professional education settings. PMID:25678796

  10. The health of Swiss adolescents and its implications for training of health professionals in Switzerland.

    PubMed

    Meynard, Anne; Rutishauser, Christoph; Thomi, Mirjam; Stronski Huwiler, Suzanne M

    2016-08-01

    Swiss adolescents generally enjoy satisfying life conditions. Nonetheless, violence, suicide and mental health are the main concerns together with injuries, chronic conditions and eating disorders. Adolescents still face barriers to access the care they need. Adequate training can improve practitioners' skills when dealing with adolescents. The last two decades have seen the development of innovative adolescent health units and networks in various regions of Switzerland as well as research and public health programmes. Training programmes in adolescent health (continuous medical education, post-graduate or pre-graduate) for physicians and nurses are developing but still patchy in Switzerland. Adolescent health is not a sub-specialty as such. Efforts have to be made in order to link with professional associations and institutions to implement adolescent health curricula more efficiently. PMID:26124048

  11. Teachers' Aides Working in Secondary School Settings: Preparedness and Professional Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibson, Dianne; Paatsch, Louise; Toe, Dianne; Wells, Muriel; Rawolle, Shaun

    2015-01-01

    In Victoria, Australia teachers' aides (TAs) are employed to provide support to students with disabilities in accessing their education. The role of the TAs varies within and across school settings. Drawing from the findings of a quantitative study, the purpose of this paper is to develop an understanding of teachers' aides' perceptions of their…

  12. Privacy in practice: professional discourse about information control in health care.

    PubMed

    Anthony, Denise L; Stablein, Timothy

    2016-04-11

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to explore different health care professionals' discourse about privacy - its definition and importance in health care, and its role in their day-to-day work. Professionals' discourse about privacy reveals how new technologies and laws challenge existing practices of information control within and between professional groups in health care, with implications not only for patient privacy, but also for the role of information control in professions more generally. Design/methodology/approach - The authors conducted in-depth, semi-structured interviews with n=83 doctors, nurses, and health information professionals in two academic medical centers and one veteran's administration hospital/clinic in the Northeastern USA. Interview responses were qualitatively coded for themes and patterns across groups were identified. Findings - The health care providers and the authors studied actively sought to uphold the protection (and control) of patient information through professional ethics and practices, as well as through the use of technologies and compliance with legal regulations. They used discourses of professionalism, as well as of law and technology, to sometimes accept and sometimes resist changes to practice required in the changing technological and legal context of health care. The authors found differences across professional groups; for some, protection of patient information is part of core professional ethics, while for others it is simply part of their occupational work, aligned with organizational interests. Research limitations/implications - This qualitative study of physicians, nurses, and health information professionals revealed some differences in views and practices for protecting patient information in the changing technological and legal context of health care that suggest some professional groups (doctors) may be more likely to resist such changes and others (health information professionals) will actively

  13. Language and Culture in Health Literacy for People Living with HIV: Perspectives of Health Care Providers and Professional Care Team Members

    PubMed Central

    Mogobe, Keitshokile Dintle; Shaibu, Sheila; Matshediso, Ellah; Sabone, Motshedisi; Ntsayagae, Esther; Nicholas, Patrice K.; Portillo, Carmen J.; Corless, Inge B.; Rose, Carol Dawson; Johnson, Mallory O.; Webel, Allison; Cuca, Yvette; Rivero-Méndez, Marta; Solís Báez, Solymar S.; Nokes, Kathleen; Reyes, Darcel; Kemppainen, Jeanne; Reid, Paula; Sanzero Eller, Lucille; Lindgren, Teri; Holzemer, William L.; Wantland, Dean

    2016-01-01

    Low health literacy has been linked to inadequate engagement in care and may serve as a contributor to poor health outcomes among people living with HIV and AIDS. The purpose of this paper was to examine the perspectives of health care providers and professional care team members regarding health literacy in HIV disease. A secondary data analysis was conducted from a qualitative study aimed at understanding factors that help an HIV positive person to manage their HIV disease. Data were collected from sites in Botswana, the US, and Puerto Rico. In the parent study, data were collected through focus group discussions with 135 people living with HIV, 32 HIV health care providers (HCPs), and 39 HIV professional care team members (PCTMs). SPSS was used to analyze quantitative data while ATLAS.ti was used to analyze qualitative data. The findings from analyses of the perspectives of HCPs/PCTMs suggested that linguistic and cultural factors were important themes in the exchange of HIV information between health care providers and PLHIV. These themes included ineffective communication, health seeking behavior, cultural facilitators, and complementary and alternative/traditional healing methods. Thus, this study suggests that language and culture have a major role in health literacy for PLHIV. PMID:27340564

  14. Language and Culture in Health Literacy for People Living with HIV: Perspectives of Health Care Providers and Professional Care Team Members.

    PubMed

    Mogobe, Keitshokile Dintle; Shaibu, Sheila; Matshediso, Ellah; Sabone, Motshedisi; Ntsayagae, Esther; Nicholas, Patrice K; Portillo, Carmen J; Corless, Inge B; Rose, Carol Dawson; Johnson, Mallory O; Webel, Allison; Cuca, Yvette; Rivero-Méndez, Marta; Solís Báez, Solymar S; Nokes, Kathleen; Reyes, Darcel; Kemppainen, Jeanne; Reid, Paula; Sanzero Eller, Lucille; Lindgren, Teri; Holzemer, William L; Wantland, Dean

    2016-01-01

    Low health literacy has been linked to inadequate engagement in care and may serve as a contributor to poor health outcomes among people living with HIV and AIDS. The purpose of this paper was to examine the perspectives of health care providers and professional care team members regarding health literacy in HIV disease. A secondary data analysis was conducted from a qualitative study aimed at understanding factors that help an HIV positive person to manage their HIV disease. Data were collected from sites in Botswana, the US, and Puerto Rico. In the parent study, data were collected through focus group discussions with 135 people living with HIV, 32 HIV health care providers (HCPs), and 39 HIV professional care team members (PCTMs). SPSS was used to analyze quantitative data while ATLAS.ti was used to analyze qualitative data. The findings from analyses of the perspectives of HCPs/PCTMs suggested that linguistic and cultural factors were important themes in the exchange of HIV information between health care providers and PLHIV. These themes included ineffective communication, health seeking behavior, cultural facilitators, and complementary and alternative/traditional healing methods. Thus, this study suggests that language and culture have a major role in health literacy for PLHIV. PMID:27340564

  15. Quality of health care: the responsibility of health care professionals in delivering high quality services.

    PubMed

    Giangrande, A

    1998-11-01

    According to a recent definition, quality of care consists of the degree to which health services increase the likelihood of desired health outcomes and are consistent with current professional knowledge; a definition that introduces both requirements of outcomes and the appropriateness of the process used. Clearly many different figures are interested in quality assessment initiatives in the health care field and these include patients, administrators and doctors each having different perspective. Doctors obviously pay greater attention to technical quality and results, giving greater emphasis to the health of the individual patient, tending to give priority to technical excellence and interaction between patient and doctor. Although the perspective of health care professionals is widely acknowledged to be important and useful, other perspectives on quality have been emphasised in recent years. The most important of these is the recognition that care must be responsive to the preferences and values of the consumers of health care services. In complete harmony with one's own professional commitment, the attention to the perspectives of patients must give physician the chance to identify methods of measuring and verifying quality which take account of the expectations of the many groups with an interest in improving the functioning of the health system. A global approach in the health field is needed the more specialization advances. The quality of medicine lies in its capacity to integrate what science says is appropriate and to be recommended, what can be reconciled with human rights and the self determination of the patient and what can be achieved by optimising available resources. In this complex context, the doctor could take on both the role of the person who decides on the use of resources and the one of social mediator. PMID:9894749

  16. Reproductive health care for asylum-seeking women - a challenge for health professionals

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Dealing with pregnancy, childbirth and the care of newborn babies is a challenge for female asylum seekers and their health care providers. The aim of our study was to identify reproductive health issues in a population of women seeking asylum in Switzerland, and to examine the care they received. The women were insured through a special Health Maintenance Organisation (HMO) and were attending the Women's Clinic of the University Hospital in Basel. We also investigated how the health professionals involved perceived the experience of providing health care for these patients. Methods A mixed methods approach combined the analysis of quantitative descriptive data and qualitative data obtained from semi-structured interviews with health care providers and from patients' files. We analysed the records of 80 asylum-seeking patients attending the Women's Clinic insured through an HMO. We conducted semi-structured interviews with 10 care providers from different professional groups. Quantitative data were analysed descriptively. Qualitative data analysis was guided by Grounded Theory. Results The principal health problems among the asylum seekers were a high rate of induced abortions (2.5 times higher than in the local population), due to inadequate contraception, and psychosocial stress due to the experience of forced migration and their current difficult life situation. The language barriers were identified as a major difficulty for health professionals in providing care. Health care providers also faced major emotional challenges when taking care of asylum seekers. Additional problems for physicians were that they were often required to act in an official capacity on behalf of the authorities in charge of the asylum process, and they also had to make decisions about controlling expenditure to fulfil the requirements of the HMO. They felt that these decisions sometimes conflicted with their duty towards the patient. Conclusion Health policies for asylum

  17. It's like a family: the significance attributed by health professionals to diabetes health education groups.

    PubMed

    Melo, Lucas Pereira de

    2016-08-01

    This article analyzes the significance that health professionals attribute to health education groups for people with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM). This ethnographic study was developed with five professionals from an Expanded Family Health team that operated in five diabetes health education groups. Information was gathered using participant observations and semi-structured interviews. Data were analyzed by means of a thematic coding technique. Three different categories emerged: (1) It is a way of educating them: groups as an educational and clinical monitoring forum; (2) they know I will be there for them: the groups as a resource to access the health system; and (3) this serves as a self-help group: after all, what purpose does this group serve? The conclusion reached is that the groups studied were a therapy and support hybrid that, by means of their structure, made it possible for the informants (perhaps, also for the patients) to construct other significance for the standardization of health policies and the dilemma of chronicity. Such hybridization made it possible to create outcomes for the specificities of health work in a "total life" context. PMID:27557022

  18. Acceptance of health information technology in health professionals: an application of the revised technology acceptance model.

    PubMed

    Ketikidis, Panayiotis; Dimitrovski, Tomislav; Lazuras, Lambros; Bath, Peter A

    2012-06-01

    The response of health professionals to the use of health information technology (HIT) is an important research topic that can partly explain the success or failure of any HIT application. The present study applied a modified version of the revised technology acceptance model (TAM) to assess the relevant beliefs and acceptance of HIT systems in a sample of health professionals (n = 133). Structured anonymous questionnaires were used and a cross-sectional design was employed. The main outcome measure was the intention to use HIT systems. ANOVA was employed to examine differences in TAM-related variables between nurses and medical doctors, and no significant differences were found. Multiple linear regression analysis was used to assess the predictors of HIT usage intentions. The findings showed that perceived ease of use, but not usefulness, relevance and subjective norms directly predicted HIT usage intentions. The present findings suggest that a modification of the original TAM approach is needed to better understand health professionals' support and endorsement of HIT. Perceived ease of use, relevance of HIT to the medical and nursing professions, as well as social influences, should be tapped by information campaigns aiming to enhance support for HIT in healthcare settings. PMID:22733680

  19. Counseling Roles and AIDS. Highlights: An ERIC/CAPS Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Thomas C.

    This fact sheet considers the counselor's role in dealing with Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). Three counselor roles are examined: (1) direct counseling for those affected by AIDS; (2) coordination of support systems for victims of AIDS; and (3) education. Seven recommendations for health professionals dealing with AIDS patients are…

  20. Diabetes Professionals Must Seize the Opportunity in Mobile Health

    PubMed Central

    Brandell, Brian; Ford, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    The number of diabetes management mobile applications (apps) available on the market has grown exponentially since 2009; however, most patients lack the skills necessary for finding relevant health care information. Thus, clinical best practices emphasize the need for ongoing patient education. Despite the importance of education in clinical guidelines, very few of these apps include education in their top functionalities. Most diabetes management mobile apps are not medical devices by definition, according to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, and therefore do not require clearance or approval for market, and very few have been subject to clinical evaluation. There has been little research on the use of diabetes management mobile apps, marginalizing the role of diabetes professionals and educators in a burgeoning market, hungry for information and an improved quality of life. Still, mobile technology holds great promise as a platform for self-management. Health care providers must not only educate patients about these resources, but take steps to ensure that mobile apps follow accepted best practices and guidelines. PMID:24351188

  1. Mentoring health information professionals in the Department of Veterans Affairs.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, Susan S; Fenton, Susan H

    2008-01-01

    As a major employer of health information professionals, the VA faces significant recruitment and retention challenges. The authors evaluated mentoring as a retention tool through a review of existing literature and the retrospective review of a VA health information management mentoring program. The literature review showed a link between employer mentorship and employee retention, regardless of the nature and structure of the mentoring relationship. Most organizations support employees who are willing to serve as mentors through increased compensation, recognition, and other types of support. No literature was found that studied retention rates for more than three years after a mentoring experience. The review of the VA mentoring program showed increased retention in the three years following enrollment in the program, but the increase was not statistically significant. The review did not demonstrate improvement in retention over a seven-year period. The combined evaluation gives mixed findings for mentorship as a retention tool and demonstrates the need for more research on the topic. PMID:18418462

  2. Diabetes professionals must seize the opportunity in mobile health.

    PubMed

    Brandell, Brian; Ford, Christopher

    2013-11-01

    The number of diabetes management mobile applications (apps) available on the market has grown exponentially since 2009; however, most patients lack the skills necessary for finding relevant health care information. Thus, clinical best practices emphasize the need for ongoing patient education. Despite the importance of education in clinical guidelines, very few of these apps include education in their top functionalities. Most diabetes management mobile apps are not medical devices by definition, according to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, and therefore do not require clearance or approval for market, and very few have been subject to clinical evaluation. There has been little research on the use of diabetes management mobile apps, marginalizing the role of diabetes professionals and educators in a burgeoning market, hungry for information and an improved quality of life. Still, mobile technology holds great promise as a platform for self-management. Health care providers must not only educate patients about these resources, but take steps to ensure that mobile apps follow accepted best practices and guidelines. PMID:24351188

  3. Job satisfaction, job stress and psychosomatic health problems in software professionals in India

    PubMed Central

    Madhura, Sahukar; Subramanya, Pailoor; Balaram, Pradhan

    2014-01-01

    This questionnaire based study investigates correlation between job satisfaction, job stress and psychosomatic health in Indian software professionals. Also, examines how yoga practicing Indian software professionals cope up with stress and psychosomatic health problems. The sample consisted of yoga practicing and non-yoga practicing Indian software professionals working in India. The findings of this study have shown that there is significant correlation among job satisfaction, job stress and health. In Yoga practitioners job satisfaction is not significantly related to Psychosomatic health whereas in non-yoga group Psychosomatic Health symptoms showed significant relationship with Job satisfaction. PMID:25598623

  4. Should health care professionals encourage living kidney donation?

    PubMed

    Hilhorst, Medard T; Kranenburg, Leonieke W; Busschbach, Jan J V

    2007-03-01

    Living kidney donation provides a promising opportunity in situations where the scarcity of cadaveric kidneys is widely acknowledged. While many patients and their relatives are willing to accept its benefits, others are concerned about living kidney programs; they appear to feel pressured into accepting living kidney transplantations as the only proper option for them. As we studied the attitudes and views of patients and their relatives, we considered just how actively health care professionals should encourage living donation. We argue that active interference in peoples' personal lives is justified - if not obligatory. First, we address the ambiguous ideals of non-directivity and value neutrality in counselling. We describe the main pitfalls implied in these concepts, and conclude that these concepts cannot account for the complex reality of living donation and transplantation. We depict what is required instead as truthful information and context-relative counselling. We then consider professional interference into personal belief systems. We argue that individual convictions are not necessarily strong, stable, or deep. They may be flawed in many ways. In order to justify interference in peoples' personal lives, it is crucial to understand the structure of these convictions. Evidence suggests that both patients and their relatives have attitudes towards living kidney donation that are often open to change and, accordingly, can be influenced. We show how ethical theories can account for this reality and can help us to discern between justified and unjustified interference. We refer to Stephen Toulmin's model of the structure of logical argument, the Rawlsian model of reflective equilibrium, and Thomas Nagel's representation of the particularistic position. PMID:16847727

  5. How Adolescents Use Technology for Health Information: Implications for Health Professionals from Focus Group Studies

    PubMed Central

    Biscope, Sherry; Poland, Blake; Goldberg, Eudice

    2003-01-01

    Background Adolescents present many challenges in providing them effective preventive services and health care. Yet, they are typically the early adopters of new technology (eg, the Internet). This creates important opportunities for engaging youths via eHealth. Objective To describe how adolescents use technology for their health-information needs, identify the challenges they face, and highlight some emerging roles of health professionals regarding eHealth services for adolescents. Methods Using an inductive qualitative research design, 27 focus groups were conducted in Ontario, Canada. The 210 participants (55% female, 45% male; median age 16 years) were selected to reflect diversity in age, sex, geographic location, cultural identity, and risk. An 8-person team analyzed and coded the data according to major themes. Results Study participants most-frequently sought or distributed information related to school (89%), interacting with friends (85%), social concerns (85%), specific medical conditions (67%), body image and nutrition (63%), violence and personal safety (59%), and sexual health (56%). Finding personally-relevant, high-quality information was a pivotal challenge that has ramifications on the depth and types of information that adolescents can find to answer their health questions. Privacy in accessing information technology was a second key challenge. Participants reported using technologies that clustered into 4 domains along a continuum from highly-interactive to fixed information sources: (1) personal communication: telephone, cell phone, and pager; (2) social communication: e-mail, instant messaging, chat, and bulletin boards; (3) interactive environments: Web sites, search engines, and computers; and (4) unidirectional sources: television, radio, and print. Three emerging roles for health professionals in eHealth include: (1) providing an interface for adolescents with technology and assisting them in finding pertinent information sources; (2

  6. [Rereading contraceptive policy: health professionals' views of daily routine in public health services].

    PubMed

    Stephan-Souza, A I

    1995-01-01

    This essay is part a larger study on the relationship between the Brazilian government and contraceptive policy and precedes a survey performed in health services in Rio de Janeiro. It is also intended to analyze what health care professionals and users think about contraception. It presents considerations by a social worker with experience in family planning activities in outlying public health care services and also provides data facilitating activities in this area. It thus touches on some elements that interfere in practical work in this field, such as academic life and social representation, in addition to submitting a written critique to PAISM (the Brazilian Ministry of Health's Program for Integrated Women's Health Care) as an official contraceptive policy. PMID:12973621

  7. Coordinated school health program and dietetics professionals: partners in promoting healthful eating.

    PubMed

    Gross, Sandra M; Cinelli, Bethann

    2004-05-01

    Although research indicates that school meal programs contribute to improved academic performance and healthier eating behaviors for students who participate, fewer than 60% of students choose the National School Lunch Program or School Breakfast Program. School meal programs have a difficult time competing with foods that are marketed to young people through sophisticated advertising campaigns. Youth's preferences for fast foods, soft drinks, and salty snacks; mixed messages sent by school personnel; school food preparation and serving space limitations; inadequate meal periods; and lack of education standards for school foodservice directors challenge school meal programs as well. A coordinated school health program offers a framework for meeting these challenges and provides children and adolescents with the knowledge and skills necessary for healthful eating. This article identifies challenges facing school foodservice directors in delivering healthful meals and acquaints dietetics professionals with the coordinated school health program to be used as a tool for addressing unhealthful weight gain and promoting healthful eating. PMID:15127066

  8. A systematic review of missed opportunities for improving tuberculosis and HIV/AIDS control in Sub-saharan Africa: what is still missed by health experts?

    PubMed Central

    Keugoung, Basile; Fouelifack, Florent Ymele; Fotsing, Richard; Macq, Jean; Meli, Jean; Criel, Bart

    2014-01-01

    In sub-Saharan Africa, HIV/AIDS and tuberculosis are major public health problems. In 2010, 64% of the 34 million of people infected with HIV were reported to be living in sub-Saharan Africa. Only 41% of eligible HIV-positive people had access to antiretroviral therapy (ART). Regarding tuberculosis, in 2010, the region had 12% of the world's population but reported 26% of the 8.8 million incident cases and 254000 tuberculosis-related deaths. This paper aims to review missed opportunities for improving HIV/AIDS and tuberculosis prevention and care. We conducted a systematic review in PubMed using the terms ‘missed’(Title) AND ‘opportunities’(Title). We included systematic review and original research articles done in sub-Saharan Africa on missed opportunities in HIV/AIDS and/or tuberculosis care. Missed opportunities for improving HIV/AIDS and/or tuberculosis care can be classified into five categories: i) patient and community; ii) health professional; iii) health facility; iv) local health system; and v) vertical programme (HIV/AIDS and/or tuberculosis control programmes). None of the reviewed studies identified any missed opportunities related to health system strengthening. Opportunities that are missed hamper tuberculosis and/or HIV/AIDS care in sub-Saharan Africa where health systems remain weak. What is still missing in the analysis of health experts is the acknowledgement that opportunities that are missed to strengthen health systems also undermine tuberculosis and HIV/AIDS prevention and care. Studying why these opportunities are missed will help to understand the rationales behind the missed opportunities, and customize adequate strategies to seize them and for effective diseases control. PMID:25478041

  9. Leadership styles of service professionals aiding women of abuse: enhancing service delivery.

    PubMed

    Haeseler, Lisa Ann

    2013-01-01

    Leadership styles of service professionals--including social workers and teachers--in the area of family abuse were investigated. Leadership characteristics of the professionals were measured by their responses to a survey. Results indicated that the interviewed service professionals demonstrated productive leadership traits. Study findings are congruent with leadership styles described in the research. Holistic and collaborative services are required to enhance care for women of abuse, as their needs are multifaceted and complex. Specific leadership styles promote better care for women; leaders need to collaboratively initiate and deliver more interdisciplinary and unified service. PMID:23368994

  10. Mental health first aid training for the public: evaluation of effects on knowledge, attitudes and helping behavior

    PubMed Central

    Kitchener, Betty A; Jorm, Anthony F

    2002-01-01

    Background Many members of the public have poor mental health literacy. A Mental Health First Aid training course was developed in order to improve this. This paper describes the training course and reports an evaluation study looking at changes in knowledge, stigmatizing attitudes and help provided to others. Methods Data are reported on the first 210 participants in public courses. Evaluation questionnaires were given at the beginning of courses, at the end and at 6 months follow-up. Data were analyzed using an intention-to-treat approach. Results The course improved participants' ability to recognize a mental disorder in a vignette, changed beliefs about treatment to be more like those of health professionals, decreased social distance from people with mental disorders, increased confidence in providing help to someone with a mental disorder, and increased the amount of help provided to others. Conclusions Mental Health First Aid training appears to be an effective method of improving mental health literacy which can be widely applied. PMID:12359045

  11. Substance Abuse among Health-Care Professionals in Rutherford and Surrounding Counties.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Sherri Reid; Heritage, Jeannette G.

    Drug abuse is a serious problem in today's work force. It is found in every occupation, from the entry-level employee to the chief executive officer. Among health care professionals alcohol is the number-one substance abused, prescription drugs are second, and cocaine is third. Substance abuse among health-care professionals in Rutherford,…

  12. Health Care Professionals' Death Attitudes, Experiences, and Advance Directive Communication Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Black, Kathy

    2007-01-01

    The study surveyed 135 health care professionals (74 nurses, 32 physicians, and 29 social workers) to examine their personal death attitudes and experiences in relation to their reported advance directive communication practice behavior. Negative correlations were found between collaborating with other health care professionals regarding the…

  13. Information Literacy for Health Professionals: Teaching Essential Information Skills with the Big6 Information Literacy Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santana Arroyo, Sonia

    2013-01-01

    Health professionals frequently do not possess the necessary information-seeking abilities to conduct an effective search in databases and Internet sources. Reference librarians may teach health professionals these information and technology skills through the Big6 information literacy model (Big6). This article aims to address this issue. It also…

  14. Developing Consensus on the CompHP Professional Standards for Health Promotion in Europe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Speller, Viv; Parish, Richard; Davison, Heather; Zilnyk, Anna

    2012-01-01

    Building on the CompHP Core Competencies for health promotion the Professional Standards for Health Promotion have been developed and consulted on across Europe. The standards were formulated to fit within the complexity of professional, occupational and educational standards frameworks in Europe as learning outcome standards with performance…

  15. Bilingual Glossary of Professional Mental Health Terms = Glosario Bilingue de Terminos Profesionales de Salud Mental.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cherry, Ralph, Comp.

    Designed to acquaint social workers and other professionals in the mental health field with the basic terms necessary for professional discussions, paper presentations, and international correspondence, the English/Spanish-Spanish/English glossary lists 130 selected mental health terms. The glossary includes two sections: English to Spanish and…

  16. Health Professionals' Responses to Disclosure of Child Sexual Abuse History: Female Child Sexual Abuse Survivors' Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGregor, Kim; Julich, Shirley; Glover, Marewa; Gautam, Jeny

    2010-01-01

    This study reports on a postal questionnaire, conducted in 2004, with female survivors of historic child sexual abuse. The questionnaire explored their experiences of health professionals' responsiveness to disclosure of child sexual abuse history. Of 61 participants, aged between 22 and 65, 69% had disclosed to health professionals. Those who had…

  17. The Impact of Professional Development to Infuse Health and Reading in Elementary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deal, Tami Benham; Jenkins, Jayne M.; Deal, Laurence O.; Byra, Adelle

    2010-01-01

    Background: Elementary classroom teachers must overcome a number of instructional barriers, including time constraints and professional preparation, if they are to deliver effective health education and enhance health literacy among youth. Purpose: This study examined the direct impact of a long-term professional development program on integrating…

  18. The cost of health professionals' brain drain in Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Kirigia, Joses Muthuri; Gbary, Akpa Raphael; Muthuri, Lenity Kainyu; Nyoni, Jennifer; Seddoh, Anthony

    2006-01-01

    Background Past attempts to estimate the cost of migration were limited to education costs only and did not include the lost returns from investment. The objectives of this study were: (i) to estimate the financial cost of emigration of Kenyan doctors to the United Kingdom (UK) and the United States of America (USA); (ii) to estimate the financial cost of emigration of nurses to seven OECD countries (Canada, Denmark, Finland, Ireland, Portugal, UK, USA); and (iii) to describe other losses from brain drain. Methods The costs of primary, secondary, medical and nursing schools were estimated in 2005. The cost information used in this study was obtained from one non-profit primary and secondary school and one public university in Kenya. The cost estimates represent unsubsidized cost. The loss incurred by Kenya through emigration was obtained by compounding the cost of educating a medical doctor and a nurse over the period between the average age of emigration (30 years) and the age of retirement (62 years) in recipient countries. Results The total cost of educating a single medical doctor from primary school to university is US$ 65,997; and for every doctor who emigrates, a country loses about US$ 517,931 worth of returns from investment. The total cost of educating one nurse from primary school to college of health sciences is US$ 43,180; and for every nurse that emigrates, a country loses about US$ 338,868 worth of returns from investment. Conclusion Developed countries continue to deprive Kenya of millions of dollars worth of investments embodied in her human resources for health. If the current trend of poaching of scarce human resources for health (and other professionals) from Kenya is not curtailed, the chances of achieving the Millennium Development Goals would remain bleak. Such continued plunder of investments embodied in human resources contributes to further underdevelopment of Kenya and to keeping a majority of her people in the vicious circle of ill-health

  19. AIDS Prevention and Control: Invited Presentations and Papers from the World Summit of Ministers of Health on Programmes for AIDS Prevention (London, England, January 26-28, 1988).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    World Health Organization, Geneva (Switzerland).

    Papers from the World Summit of Ministers of Health on Programmes for AIDS Prevention in this book include: (1) "Global AIDS: Epidemiology, Impact, Projections, Global Strategy," (Jonathan Mann); (2) "Modes of Transmission: The Basis for Prevention Strategies," (Donald Acheson); (3) "National AIDS Information Programme in France," (Alain…

  20. Investment in HIV/AIDS programs: Does it help strengthen health systems in developing countries?

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Dongbao; Souteyrand, Yves; Banda, Mazuwa A; Kaufman, Joan; Perriëns, Joseph H

    2008-01-01

    Background There is increasing debate about whether the scaled-up investment in HIV/AIDS programs is strengthening or weakening the fragile health systems of many developing countries. This article examines and assesses the evidence and proposes ways forward. Discussion Considerably increased resources have been brought into countries for HIV/AIDS programs by major Global Health Initiatives. Among the positive impacts are the increased awareness of and priority given to public health by governments. In addition, services to people living with HIV/AIDS have rapidly expanded. In many countries infrastructure and laboratories have been strengthened, and in some, primary health care services have been improved. The effect of AIDS on the health work force has been lessened by the provision of antiretroviral treatment to HIV-infected health care workers, by training, and, to an extent, by task-shifting. However, there are reports of concerns, too – among them, a temporal association between increasing AIDS funding and stagnant reproductive health funding, and accusations that scarce personnel are siphoned off from other health care services by offers of better-paying jobs in HIV/AIDS programs. Unfortunately, there is limited hard evidence of these health system impacts. Because service delivery for AIDS has not yet reached a level that could conceivably be considered "as close to Universal Access as possible," countries and development partners must maintain the momentum of investment in HIV/AIDS programs. At the same time, it should be recognized that global action for health is even more underfunded than is the response to the HIV epidemic. The real issue is therefore not whether to fund AIDS or health systems, but how to increase funding for both. Summary The evidence is mixed – mostly positive but some negative – as to the impact on health systems of the scaled-up responses to HIV/AIDS driven primarily by global health partnerships. Current scaled-up responses

  1. A New Online Strategy in Teaching Racial and Ethnic Health and Health Disparities to Public Health Professionals.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Eric; Moore, Justin; Joyner, Shanekia

    2016-09-01

    In the fall 2010, East Carolina University's Department of Public Health in the Brody School of Medicine introduced a new graduate certificate online program to its curriculum-the Ethnic and Rural Health Disparities (ERHD) program. By the spring 2014, the Ethnic and Rural Health Disparities (ERHD) program graduated 20 public health professionals with expertise in ethnic and rural health disparities. In order to examine its effectiveness, we conducted a qualitative and quantitative study of our graduates. The major objectives of our ERHD alumni study were: (1) to evaluate the effectiveness of the ERHD program, and (2) to assess new strategies for improving our ERHD program. Quantitative and qualitative results from our small sample of alumni indicate that the ERHD program is fulfilling its objectives. The ERHD program has developed a new online strategy in teaching racial and ethnic health and health disparities for public health professionals who are ready to not only address health disparities in a different approach but also ready to develop new culturally competent public health programs for increasing diverse racial, ethnic, and rural populations in the U.S.A. PMID:27294738

  2. Health Care Assisting Lesson Planning Guide for Long-Term Care Aide Certification. South Carolina Health Occupations Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Carolina State Dept. of Education, Columbia. Office of Occupational Education.

    This document consists of 13 competency outlines/lesson plans that have been developed for use in preparing students for certification as long-term care aides through South Carolina's health occupations education program. The following competencies are covered in the individual lessons: identify the function and responsibilities of nurses aides;…

  3. United States global health policy: HIV/AIDS, maternal and child health, and The President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR).

    PubMed

    Leeper, Sarah C; Reddi, Anand

    2010-09-10

    The Obama administration has unveiled a new 6-year, $63 billion Global Health Initiative. In addition to the reauthorization of the President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) to fund HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis, and malaria, the plan also supports maternal and child health (MCH) initiatives that are rooted in a proposal known as the Mother and Child Campaign. The architects of the Obama administration's Global Health Initiative recommend funding the Mother and Child Campaign at the expense of future funding increases for PEPFAR. The idea that differing global health initiatives must compete with each other lacks not only ethical legitimacy but also scientific merit. We believe that MCH need not to be framed in opposition to PEPFAR. Confronting illness in isolation - whether by funding PEPFAR at the expense of programs that target MCH or vice versa - cannot be our way forward. Given the intimate connection between HIV/AIDS and MCH, we affirm supporting PEPFAR and MCH programs together. We argue that policies that de-emphasize PEPFAR threaten to undermine, rather than support, MCH in countries with high HIV/AIDS prevalence. PEPFAR has directly and indirectly supported the care and treatment of other milieu specific diseases, including those afflicting mothers and children, bringing about broad benefits to the primary healthcare systems of recipient countries. We advocate the vertical integration of MCH initiatives into PEPFAR in order to create a comprehensive approach to addressing MCH against the global backdrop of HIV/AIDS. PMID:20606571

  4. Perceptions and practices of Angolan health care professionals concerning intimate partner violence against women.

    PubMed

    Nascimento, Edna de Fátima Gonçalves Alves do; Ribeiro, Adalgisa Peixoto; Souza, Edinilsa Ramos de

    2014-06-01

    This was a qualitative exploratory study with the objective of identifying perceptions and practices among health professionals in Angola concerning intimate partner violence against women. Semi-structured interviews were held with a senior health administrator, head nurses, medical directors, psychologists, and nurse technicians in three national hospitals in the capital city of Luanda. The perceptions of Angolan health professionals towards violence against women are marked by the cultural construction of woman's social role in the family and the belief in male superiority and female weakness. Despite their familiarity with the types of violence and the consequences for physical and mental health, the health professionals' practices in providing care for women in situations of violence focus on the treatment of physical injuries, overlooking the subjectivity and complexity of these situations. Recent inclusion of the issue in public policies is reflected in health professionals' practices and raises challenges for the health sector in caring for women in situations of violence. PMID:25099046

  5. Professionalism Redundant, Reshaped, or Reinvigorated? Realizing the "Third Logic" in Contemporary Health Care.

    PubMed

    Martin, Graham P; Armstrong, Natalie; Aveling, Emma-Louise; Herbert, Georgia; Dixon-Woods, Mary

    2015-09-01

    Recent decades have seen the influence of the professions decline. Lately, commentators have suggested a revived role for a "new" professionalism in ensuring and enhancing high-quality health care in systems dominated by market and managerial logics. The form this new professionalism might take, however, remains obscure. This article uses data from an ethnographic study of three English health care improvement projects to analyze the place, potential, and limitations of professionalism as a means of engaging clinicians in efforts to improve service quality. We found that appeals to notions of professionalism had strong support among practitioners, but converting enthusiasm for the principle of professionalism into motivation to change practice was not straightforward. Some tactics used in pursuit of this deviated sharply from traditional models of collegial social control. In systems characterized by fissures between professional groups and powerful market and managerial influences, we suggest that professionalism must interact creatively but carefully with other logics. PMID:26276676

  6. Health professionals' beliefs about domestic abuse and the issue of disclosure: a critical incident technique study.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Julie; Bradbury-Jones, Caroline; Kroll, Thilo; Duncan, Fiona

    2013-09-01

    Domestic abuse is increasingly recognised as a serious, worldwide public health concern. There is a significant body of literature regarding domestic abuse, but little is known about health professionals' beliefs about domestic abuse disclosure. In addition, the intersection between health professionals' beliefs and abused women's views remains uninvestigated. We report on a two-phase, qualitative study using Critical Incident Technique (CIT) that aimed to explore community health professionals' beliefs about domestic abuse and the issue of disclosure. We investigated this from the perspectives of both health professionals and abused women. The study took place in Scotland during 2011. The study was informed theoretically by the Common Sense Model of Self-Regulation of Health and Illness (CSM). This model is typically used in disease-orientated research. In our innovative use, however, CSM was used to study the social phenomenon, domestic abuse. The study involved semi-structured, individual CIT interviews with health professionals and focus groups with women who had experienced domestic abuse. Twenty-nine health professionals (Midwives, Health Visitors and General Practitioners) participated in the first phase of the study. In the second phase, three focus groups were conducted with a total of 14 women. Data were analysed using a combination of an inductive classification and framework analysis. Findings highlight the points of convergence and divergence between abused women's and health professionals' beliefs about abuse. Although there was some agreement, they do not always share the same views. For example, women want to be asked about abuse, but many health professionals do not feel confident or comfortable discussing the issue. Overall, the study shows the dynamic interaction between women's and health professionals' beliefs about domestic abuse and readiness to discuss and respond to it. Understanding these complex dynamics assists in the employment of

  7. Pastoral care professionals in health and mental health care: recognizing classic and newer versions of ageism.

    PubMed

    Kane, Michael N; Green, Diane L; Jacobs, Robin J

    2011-01-01

    Pastoral care professionals are cognizant of many forms of prejudice and discrimination in society and health care environments. Ageism is perhaps the least likely to be challenged as prejudice or discrimination. Ageist perception is suspicious of the health and cognitive ability of older persons; without consideration of emotional, spiritual, or social abilities. While positive and negative ageist attributions are culturally abundant, new and subtle versions of ageism offer convincing guidance about personal responsibility for health status and insist on personal social engagement. Older persons who are not free of disease or disability may be viewed as culpable for their failure to age well. Additionally, elders may be expected to maintain social involvement; especially through volunteerism. Elders who are unable or unwilling to engage in volunteerism may be viewed as selfish or irresponsible. If individuals are held responsible for their health as they age, then services and reimbursement for service may be limited to evidence-based medical interventions that result in complete recovery rather than life-quality improvement and only for "worthy" individuals. This paper seeks to heighten the awareness of pastoral care professionals to common ageist themes found in health and mental care service delivery. PMID:22452152

  8. Perceptions of people living with HIV/AIDS regarding access to health care.

    PubMed

    Vaswani, Vina; Vaswani, Ravi

    2014-04-01

    Although the health care is replete with technology in the present day, it is not freely accessible in a developing country. The situation could be even more compromised in the case of people living with HIV/AIDS, with the added dimension of stigma and discrimination. What are the factors that act as barriers to health care? This study was conducted to look into perceptions of people living with HIV/AIDS with regard to access to health care. The study looked into accessibility of general health vis-à-vis access to antiretroviral therapy. Demographic variables like age, gender, income were studied in relation to factors such as counseling, confidentiality, stigma and discrimination, which are known to influence access to health care. People living with HIV/AIDS perceive general health care as more accessible than care for HIV treatment. Discrimination by health care workers causes a barrier to accessibility. PMID:24946513

  9. Player or referee? Aid effectiveness and the governance of health policy development: Lessons from Viet Nam.

    PubMed

    Dodd, Rebecca; Olivé, Jean-Marc

    2011-01-01

    Viet Nam is one of the brightest stars in the constellation of developing countries. Its remarkable achievements in reducing poverty and improving health and education outcomes are well known, and as a result it has enjoyed generous aid programmes. Viet Nam also has a reputation for taking a strong lead in disciplining its donors and pushing for more efficient and effective forms of aid delivery, both at home and internationally. This article discusses how efforts to improve the effectiveness of aid intersect with policy-making processes in the health sector. It presents a quantitative review of health aid flows in Viet Nam and a qualitative analysis of the aid environment using event analysis, participant observation and key informant interviews. The analysis reveals a complex and dynamic web of incentives influencing the implementation of the aid effectiveness agenda in the health sector. There are contradictory forces within the Ministry of Health, within government as a whole, within the donor community and between donors and government. Analytical frameworks drawn from the study of policy networks and governance can help explain these tensions. They suggest that governance of health aid in Viet Nam is characterised by multiple, overlapping 'policy networks' which cut across the traditional donor-government divide. The principles of aid effectiveness make sense for some of these communities, but for others they are irrational and may lead to a loss of influence and resources. However, sustained engagement combined with the building of strategic coalitions can overcome individual and institutional incentives. This article suggests that aid reform efforts should be understood not as a technocratic agenda but as a political process with all the associated tensions, perverse incentives and challenges. Partners thus need to recognise - and find new ways of making sense of - the complexity of forces affecting aid delivery. PMID:21623508

  10. The UCSF AIDS Health Project Guide to Counseling: Perspectives on Psychotherapy, Prevention, and Therapeutic Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dilley, James W., Ed.; Marks, Robert, Ed.

    The University of California San Francisco AIDS Health Project has more than 15 years' experience in working with thousands of people with AIDS. This guide, developed by the Project, provides practical, state-of-the-art resources in the field. Part 1, "Risk and Behavior: Helping Clients Remain Uninfected," covers the following topics: (1) "HIV…

  11. Best interests decisions: professional practices in health and social care.

    PubMed

    Williams, Val; Boyle, Geraldine; Jepson, Marcus; Swift, Paul; Williamson, Toby; Heslop, Pauline

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports on data collected in 2011 from a national study about the operation of the best interests principle, a key feature of the Mental Capacity Act (MCA) 2005 for England and Wales. The objective was to provide a picture of current professional practices in best interests decision-making. Four contrasting sample sites were selected, in which National Health Service trusts, social care and other organisations were recruited to participate. A multimethod design was followed, including an online survey with 385 participants, followed by qualitative research through a telephone survey of 68 participants, and face-to-face semi-structured interviews following up 25 best interests cases, with different perspectives on the process in 12 of those cases. The current paper reports only on the qualitative findings. The findings indicate that the MCA was successful in providing a structure for these practitioners, and that the five principles of the MCA were in general adhered to. A variety of perceived risks led to best interests processes being undertaken, and a typical scenario was for a period of hospitalisation or ill health to trigger a best interests decision process about a social care and or a life decision. The study supported previous research in finding the notion of capacity the most difficult aspect of the MCA, and it provides evidence of some specific capacity assessment practices, including problematic ones relating to 'insight'. Best interests decisions were often made by consensus, with practitioners taking on different roles within the process. Meetings played a key part, but other ways of involving people lacking capacity and significant others were also important. It was recommended that the issues highlighted in this research could be clarified further in the Code of Practice, or within risk guidance. PMID:23981053

  12. Publication planning: an effective corporate strategy to influence health professionals.

    PubMed

    2013-12-01

    Pharmaceutical companies integrate scientific publications into the communication strategies they employ to influence the practices of health professionals. In their"publication plan", pharmaceutical companies, or the communication agencies they hire, develop key messages to promote their drugs and then plan in advance how, when and where to disseminate them in medical journals or at conferences. Although their true intent is promotional, these messages must appear to be purely scientific, and are therefore disseminated as research articles, review articles, editorials, commentaries. Publication planning involves the use of "ghost" authors who work directly for pharmaceutical companies, but whose contribution is rarely acknowledged in the final published article. Key opinion leaders are recruited as the honorary authors of these articles, to which they have made little, if any, contribution. The criteria for authorship set by journals that publish primary research articles do not provide adequate protection against the practice of ghost and honorary authorship. Certain journals publishing primary research derive a large proportion of their revenue from selling reprints used by pharmaceutical companies to promote their drugs, especially by their sales representatives. PMID:24600737

  13. Assessment of knowledge of celiac disease among health care professionals

    PubMed Central

    Assiri, Asaad M.; Saeed, Anjum; Saeed, Elshazaly; El-Mouzan, Mohammad I.; Alsarkhy, Ahmed A.; Al-Turaiki, Muath; Al-Mehaidib, Ali; Rashid, Mohsin; Ullah, Anhar

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To assess knowledge of celiac disease among medical professionals (physicians). Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional survey of hospital-based medical staff in primary, secondary, and tertiary care public, and private hospitals in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia (KSA). We carried out the study between January 2013 and January 2104 at King Khalid University Hospital, King Saud University, Riyadh, KSA. A pretested questionnaire was distributed to the potential participants. A scoring system was used to classify the level of knowledge of participants into 3 categories: poor, fair, and good. Results: A total of 109 physicians completed the survey and of these participants, 86.3% were from public hospitals, and 13.7% from private hospitals; 58.7% were males. Of the physicians, 19.2% had poor knowledge. Interns and residents had fair to good knowledge, but registrars, specialists, and even the consultants were less knowledgeable of celiac disease. Conclusion: Knowledge of celiac disease is poor among a significant number of physicians including consultants, which can potentially lead to delays in diagnosis. Educational programs need to be developed to improve awareness of celiac disease in the health care profession. PMID:25987121

  14. Activity level and risk of overweight in male health professionals.

    PubMed Central

    Ching, P L; Willett, W C; Rimm, E B; Colditz, G A; Gortmaker, S L; Stampfer, M J

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES. This study undertook to examine relationships between nonsedentary activity level, time spent watching television (TV)/videocassette recorder (VCR), and risk of overweight among men. METHODS. Men participating in the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study were mailed surveys. Cross-sectional analyses examined the prevalence and odds of being overweight, prospective analyses determined cumulative incidence rates and relative risks of becoming overweight over 2 years of follow-up. RESULTS. Cross-sectionally, odds of being overweight were 50% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 45%; 55%) lower for men in the highest quintile of nonsedentary activity level when compared with men in the lowest quintile. Among men watching 41 or more hours of TV/VCR per week, the odds of being overweight were 406 (95% CI = 2.67, 6.17) times greater than those for men watching no more than 1 hour per week. Prospectively, higher levels is of nonsedentary activity and lower levels of TV/VCR viewing were independently associated with lower relative risks for becoming overweight between survey years. CONCLUSIONS. Both a lack of nonsedentary activity and time spent watching TV/VCR contribute to the development of overweight in men. Sedentary and nonsedentary activities represent separate domains, each with independent risks for overweight. PMID:8561237

  15. Perception of Suicide Risk in Mental Health Professionals

    PubMed Central

    Gale, Tim M.; Hawley, Christopher J.; Butler, John; Morton, Adrian; Singhal, Ankush

    2016-01-01

    This study employed an independent-groups design (4 conditions) to investigate possible biases in the suicide risk perception of mental health professionals. Four hundred participants comprising doctors, nurses and social workers viewed a vignette describing a fictitious patient with a long-term mental illness. The case was presented as being drawn from a sample of twenty similar clinical case reports, of which 10 were associated with an outcome of suicide. The participant tasks were (i) to decide whether the presented vignette was one of those cases or not, and (ii) to provide an assessment of confidence in that decision. The 4 conditions were used to investigate whether the presence of an associated face, and the nature of the emotional state expressed by that face, affected the response profile. In fact, there were no significant differences between conditions, but there was a significant bias across all conditions towards associating the vignette with suicide, despite the base rate being pre-determined at 50%. The bias was more pronounced in doctors and in male respondents. Moreover, many participants indicated substantial confidence in their decisions. The results are discussed in terms of availability bias and over-confidence bias. PMID:26909886

  16. Internet chemotherapy information: impact on patients and health professionals

    PubMed Central

    Davies, E; Yeoh, K-W

    2012-01-01

    Background: Reliable information can improve patients' knowledge of chemotherapy. As internet chemotherapy information (ICI) is increasingly viewed as a valuable patient education tool, we investigated the impact of ICI on patient care and analysed health professionals' (HPs') attitudes towards ICI. Methods: The following questionnaires were distributed: (1) self-administered questionnaire randomly given to 261 patients receiving chemotherapy (80% returned); and (2) separate questionnaire given to 58 HPs at the same UK Oncology Centre (83% returned). Results: Just over half of the patient respondents accessed the internet regularly. They were younger, with higher incomes and qualifications. Key search topics included chemotherapy modes of action, symptom management and treatment success, and most considered ICI useful. More than half wanted to discuss ICI with HPs but most did not get the opportunity. Although the majority of HP respondents supported the need for patients to retrieve ICI, most questioned the accuracy of ICI and did not routinely recommend its use. Conclusion: This study has shown that ICI is generally perceived by patients to be a valuable information resource. Given the potential impact of ICI, the following should be addressed in future studies: (1) inequalities in accessing ICI; (2) maintaining the quality of ICI (with clear guidance on recommended websites); (3) bridging the gap between the perception of ICI by patients and HPs; (4) integration of ICI with traditional consultation models. PMID:22262319

  17. [Domestic violence in the conception of health professionals trainers].

    PubMed

    de Souza, Edinilsa Ramos; Ribeiro, Adalgisa Peixoto; Penna, Lúcia Helena Garcia; Ferreira, Ana Lúcia; dos Santos, Neuci Cunha; Tavares, Claudia Mara de Melo

    2009-01-01

    This article identifies the conceptions and suggestions of professors of medicine and nursing courses about the insertion of this subject in the formation of their students. An exploratory research was carried out using a questionnaire applied to coordinators of disciplines in such courses at public and private universities in the cities of Rio de Janeiro and Cuiabá. Many of them recognizes violence as a health problem, although 40.7% of medicine professors and 71.1% of nursing professors of the two cities discusses this subject in their classes. The medicine professors suggests the insertion of the violence subject in their students formation with visits to institutions, meeting groups with people in violence situations and interviews with experienced professionals of the area. The nursing professors prefer resources such as films and videos, seminaries and conferences. Gaps were also identified in the students and professors formation, which do not feel able to discuss this thematic. It is indicated that a renovation in the curriculum is urgently necessary. PMID:19851583

  18. A Comprehensive Careers Cluster Curriculum Model. Health Occupations Cluster Curriculum Project and Health-Care Aide Curriculum Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bortz, Richard F.

    To prepare learning materials for health careers programs at the secondary level, the developmental phase of two curriculum projects--the Health Occupations Cluster Curriculum Project and Health-Care Aide Curriculum Project--utilized a model which incorporated a key factor analysis technique. Entitled "A Comprehensive Careers Cluster Curriculum…

  19. Competency Guidelines for Public Health Laboratory Professionals: CDC and the Association of Public Health Laboratories.

    PubMed

    Ned-Sykes, Renée; Johnson, Catherine; Ridderhof, John C; Perlman, Eva; Pollock, Anne; DeBoy, John M

    2015-05-15

    These competency guidelines outline the knowledge, skills, and abilities necessary for public health laboratory (PHL) professionals to deliver the core services of PHLs efficiently and effectively. As part of a 2-year workforce project sponsored in 2012 by CDC and the Association of Public Health Laboratories (APHL), competencies for 15 domain areas were developed by experts representing state and local PHLs, clinical laboratories, academic institutions, laboratory professional organizations, CDC, and APHL. The competencies were developed and reviewed by approximately 170 subject matter experts with diverse backgrounds and experiences in laboratory science and public health. The guidelines comprise general, cross-cutting, and specialized domain areas and are divided into four levels of proficiency: beginner, competent, proficient, and expert. The 15 domain areas are 1) Quality Management System, 2) Ethics, 3) Management and Leadership, 4) Communication, 5) Security, 6) Emergency Management and Response, 7) Workforce Training, 8) General Laboratory Practice, 9) Safety, 10) Surveillance, 11) Informatics, 12) Microbiology, 13) Chemistry, 14) Bioinformatics, and 15) Research. These competency guidelines are targeted to scientists working in PHLs, defined as governmental public health, environmental, and agricultural laboratories that provide analytic biological and/or chemical testing and testing-related services that protect human populations against infectious diseases, foodborne and waterborne diseases, environmental hazards, treatable hereditary disorders, and natural and human-made public health emergencies. The competencies support certain PHL workforce needs such as identifying job responsibilities, assessing individual performance, and providing a guiding framework for producing education and training programs. Although these competencies were developed specifically for the PHL community, this does not preclude their broader application to other professionals

  20. Managing professional work: three models of control for health organizations.

    PubMed Central

    Scott, W R

    1982-01-01

    Three arrangements for structuring the work of professional participants in professional organizations are described, contrasted and evaluated. Arguments are illustrated by application to the organization of physicians within hospitals. The primary rationale, the support structures that have fostered its development, the key structural features and the advantages and disadvantages of each arrangement are described. The effect on these arrangements of structures and forces external to any particular professional organization is emphasized. PMID:6749761

  1. School Health Education To Prevent AIDS and Sexually Transmitted Diseases. WHO AIDS Series 10.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    World Health Organization, Geneva (Switzerland).

    This guide provides a framework within which education authorities can work with teachers, parents, and community leaders to help young people learn the facts about Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) and Sexually Transmitted Diseases (STDs). It emphasizes the importance of education about human behavior and sexuality that is appropriate to…

  2. Health Care Professionals' Views on Discussing Sexual Wellbeing with Patients Who Have Had a Stroke: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Mellor, Ruth M.; Greenfield, Sheila M.; Dowswell, George; Sheppard, James P.; Quinn, Tom; McManus, Richard J.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To examine the experiences of health care professionals discussing sexual wellbeing with patients who have had a stroke. Design In-depth qualitative interview study with purposive sampling and thematic analysis. Participants 30 health care professionals purposively recruited to include different roles and settings along the stroke patient pathway in secondary and primary care. Setting Two hospitals and three general practices in the West Midlands, UK. Results Sexual wellbeing was a topic that participants did not raise with patients and was infrequently raised by patients. Barriers to raising discussion were on four levels: structural, health care professional, patient, and professional-patient interface. Barriers within these levels included: sexual wellbeing not present within hospital stroke policy; the perception that sexual wellbeing was not within participants' role; participants' concern that raising the issue could cause harm to the patient; and the views that discussion would be inappropriate with older people or unimportant to women. Resources exist to aid discussion but many participants were unaware of them, and most of those that were, did not use them routinely. Conclusions Participants lacked motivation, ownership, and the confidence and skills to raise sexual wellbeing routinely after stroke. Similar findings have been reported in cancer care and other taboo subjects such as incontinence potentially resulting in a sub-optimal experience for patients. Normalisation of the inclusion of sensitive topics in discussions post-stroke does not seem to need significant structural intervention and simple changes such as information provision and legitimisation through consideration of the issue in standard care policies may be all that is required. The experiences recounted by professionals in this study suggest that such changes are needed now. PMID:24205318

  3. A Role for Community HealthCorps Members in Youth HIV/AIDS Prevention Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Leslie A.; Ulmer, Cheryl; Chimnani, Jaya

    2003-01-01

    Community HealthCorps members working in community health centers provided HIV/AIDS prevention education to youth as part of their community service work. After HealthCorps members received training in the curriculum, Be Proud! Be Responsible!, they recruited youth from their communities to complete the program, offering prevention education which…

  4. Recent Sexually Transmitted Disease Prevention Efforts and Their Implications for AIDS Health Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solomon, Mildred Zeldes; DeJong, William

    1986-01-01

    The authors describe the principles and underlying assumptions that have guided the design of their STD (sexually transmitted diseases) initiatives, drawing special attention to the implications for AIDS (Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome) health education efforts. (Author/CT)

  5. 42 CFR 414.67 - Incentive payments for Health Professional Shortage Areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... mental health HPSA are entitled to a 10 percent incentive payment above the amount paid for their... incentive payment in mental health HPSAs that do not overlap with primary care HPSAs are psychiatrists.) (d... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Incentive payments for Health Professional...

  6. 42 CFR 414.67 - Incentive payments for services furnished in Health Professional Shortage Areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... psychiatrists in areas designated as of December 31 of the prior year as geographic mental health HPSAs if the... 42 Public Health 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Incentive payments for services furnished in Health Professional Shortage Areas. 414.67 Section 414.67 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID...

  7. 42 CFR 422.206 - Interference with health care professionals' advice to enrollees prohibited.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...'s health status, medical care, or treatment options (including any alternative treatments that may... 42 Public Health 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Interference with health care professionals' advice to enrollees prohibited. 422.206 Section 422.206 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE &...

  8. 42 CFR 422.206 - Interference with health care professionals' advice to enrollees prohibited.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Interference with health care professionals' advice to enrollees prohibited. 422.206 Section 422.206 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM (CONTINUED) MEDICARE ADVANTAGE PROGRAM Relationships With Providers...

  9. 42 CFR 422.206 - Interference with health care professionals' advice to enrollees prohibited.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Interference with health care professionals' advice to enrollees prohibited. 422.206 Section 422.206 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM MEDICARE ADVANTAGE...

  10. 42 CFR 422.206 - Interference with health care professionals' advice to enrollees prohibited.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...'s health status, medical care, or treatment options (including any alternative treatments that may... 42 Public Health 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Interference with health care professionals' advice to enrollees prohibited. 422.206 Section 422.206 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE &...

  11. 42 CFR 422.206 - Interference with health care professionals' advice to enrollees prohibited.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Interference with health care professionals' advice to enrollees prohibited. 422.206 Section 422.206 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM MEDICARE ADVANTAGE...

  12. 42 CFR 414.67 - Incentive payments for services furnished in Health Professional Shortage Areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... psychiatrists in areas designated as of December 31 of the prior year as geographic mental health HPSAs if the... 42 Public Health 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Incentive payments for services furnished in Health Professional Shortage Areas. 414.67 Section 414.67 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID...

  13. [Alcohol consumption patterns among patients in primary health care and detection by health professionals].

    PubMed

    Taufick, Maíra Lemos de Castro; Evangelista, Lays Aparecida; Silva, Michelle da; Oliveira, Luiz Carlos Marques de

    2014-02-01

    This cross-sectional study investigated patterns of alcohol consumption among patients enrolled in the Family Health Program (FHP) in a city in Southeast Brazil, as well as the detection of such consumption by FHP professionals. A total of 932 adult patients were evaluated from November 2010 to November 2011. Of this total, 17.5% were considered at risk for hazardous drinking (AUDIT ≥ 8); increased risk was associated with male gender, younger age, and chronic illness. The CAGE questionnaire was positive in 98 patients (10.5%), with a higher proportion in men. Health professionals were more likely to ask about alcohol consumption in men, individuals aged ≥ 55 years, those with chronic illnesses, and heavier drinkers (438/932; 47.8%). Positive diagnosis of alcoholism was more frequent in men, individuals aged 35-54 years, and those with serious alcohol abuse (22/175; 12.6%). The study concluded that alcohol consumption is common among patients treated by FHP teams (although insufficiently recognized by professionals) and that a minority of alcoholics is instructed on the risks of drinking. PMID:24627069

  14. Abortion in modern health care: Considering the issues for health-care professionals.

    PubMed

    Smyth, Dawn; Lane, Paula

    2016-04-01

    This paper explores the challenging and contentious issue of abortion and its ethical, legal and political significance regarding public health. It is intended as an educational guide for health-care professionals. A comprehensive search strategy of international health, law and political source materials was undertaken in order to benchmark from international approaches to abortion. Test cases illustrate the application of legislation, ethical, political and cultural issues surrounding abortion. Abortion is a complex contemporary issue where balancing the well-being of both the mother and the unborn has prompted considerable international discourse. The right to life of the woman and the unborn continues to lie in tension. Ambiguity surrounds the concept of personhood, and the inception of human life prevails across many International jurisdictions. Health-care professionals must be well informed in order to respond safely and appropriately to a diverse range of clinical scenarios in which decisions regarding abortion are required. Research and evidence of test cases will better inform how abortion issues evolve and are managed. Ultimately, the abortion debate requires a balance between legislation and clinical governance. PMID:26818437

  15. A Multimedia E-Book—A Story of Health: Filling a Gap in Environmental Health Literacy for Health Professionals

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Mark D.; Valenti, Maria; Schettler, Ted; Tencza, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Summary: Narrative approaches and storytelling are emerging as powerful health promotion tools that can spark interest, increase understanding of determinants of health, and translate complex science. A Story of Health, a multimedia e-book with continuing education credits was designed to harness the power of storytelling to increase environmental health literacy. Health professionals are a key audience. They recognize that patients may be suffering from preventable illnesses of environmental origin but often feel ill-equipped to educate individuals and families about risks associated with common exposures. A Story of Health seeks to fill this gap and help readers develop the competencies they need in order to help patients make informed choices, reduce health risks, improve quality of life, and protect the environment. Americans rate nurses and medical doctors as having the highest honesty and ethical standards of all professions. These medical professionals can play a key role in changing patterns of patient behavior and influencing public policies. The e-book provides an easily accessible method of developing environmental health competency. The multimedia format with graphical interpretations allows for quick reviews of topics or for more in-depth analysis via links to additional resources. The CE evaluations have been overwhelmingly positive. PMID:27479986

  16. The Medical Library Association: promoting new roles for health information professionals

    PubMed Central

    Homan, J. Michael; McGowan, Julie J.

    2002-01-01

    As the Medical Library Association (MLA) enters its second century, its role in providing leadership and focus for the education of health information professionals in a changing environment will be critical. MLA members face dramatic changes in the health care environment as well as significant opportunities and must position themselves to thrive in the new environment. This paper examines new roles for health information professionals, new approaches to education and training, and related issues of credentialing, certification, and licensure. PMID:11838464

  17. Pharmacists and Natural Health Products: A systematic analysis of professional responsibilities in Canada

    PubMed Central

    Farrell, Jennifer; Ries, Nola M.; Boon, Heather

    2007-01-01

    Natural health products such as herbs, vitamins and homeopathic medicines are widely available in Canadian pharmacies. Purpose to conduct a systematic analysis of Canadian pharmacy policies and guidelines to explore pharmacists’ professional responsibilities with respect to natural health products. Methods Legislation, codes of ethics, standards of practice and guidance documents that apply to the practice of pharmacy in each Canadian jurisdiction were systematically collected and examined to identify if, and how, these instruments establish professional duties in regard to natural health products. Results The majority of Canadian jurisdictions now include some explicit reference to natural health products in standards of practice policy or guideline documents. Often natural health products are simply assumed to be included in the over-the-counter (OTC) product category and thus professional responsibilities for OTCs are relevant for natural health products. A minority of provinces have specific policies on natural health products, herbals or homeopathy. In addition, the National Association of Pharmacy Regulatory Authorities’ Model Standards of Practice specifically refers to natural health products. Most policy documents indicate that pharmacists should inquire about natural health product use when counselling patients and, when asked, should provide accurate information regarding the efficacy, toxicity, side effects or interactions of natural health products. Public messaging also indicates that pharmacists are knowledgeable professionals who can provide evidence-based information about natural health products. Conclusions Explicit policies or guidelines regarding pharmacists’ professional responsibilities with respect to natural health products currently exist in the majority of Canadian jurisdictions. PMID:22282720

  18. Reliability and Validity of a New Survey to Assess Global Health Competencies of Health Professionals

    PubMed Central

    Veras, Mirella; Pottie, Kevin; Welch, Vivian; Labonte, Ron; Eslava-Schmalbach, Javier; Borkhoff, Cornelia M.; Kristjansson, Elizabeth A.; Tugwell, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Health professionals are paying increased attention to issues of global health. However, there are no current competency assessment tools appropriate for evaluating their competency in global health. This study aims to assess the validity and reliability of a global health competency survey for different health disciplines. Methods: A total of 429 students participated in the Global Health Competency Survey, drawn from family medicine residency, nursing, physiotherapy and occupational therapy programs of five universities in Ontario, Canada. The surveys were evaluated for face and content validity and reliability. Results: Factor analysis was used to identify the main factors to be included in the reliability analysis. Content validity was supported with one floor effect in the “racial/ethnic disparities” variable (36.1%), and few ceiling effects. Seven of the twenty-two variables performed the best (between 34% and 59.6%). For the overall rating score, no participants had floor or ceiling effects. Five factors were identified which accounted for 95% of the variance. Cronbach’s alpha was >0.8 indicating that the survey items had good internal consistency and represent a homogeneous construct. Conclusion: The Global Health Competency Survey demonstrated good internal consistency and validity. PMID:23283032

  19. Impact of court rulings on health care coverage: the case of HIV/AIDS in Colombia.

    PubMed

    González, Ana Cristina; Durán, Juanita

    2011-07-01

    This article addresses an emerging issue in health care systems: the impact of judicial rulings on public policy regarding financing and delivery of health care services, and the attendant tensions, contradictions and questions. In Colombia, HIV/AIDS patients' use of a legal instrument called tutela, or writ of protection, has produced abundant jurisprudence and prompted health authorities to respond with decisions about HIV/AIDS service coverage that do not consider epidemiologic criteria and sustainability, introducing distortions in the health care system with respect to financing, priority-setting and universality. PMID:21778962

  20. An Interactive Session on Nutritional Pathologies for Health Professional Students

    PubMed Central

    DeSipio, Joshua; Phadtare, Sangita

    2015-01-01

    Various studies have emphasized the need to improve the nutrition training of health professionals, which will help them to provide optimal patient care. Nutrition-based interactive sessions may serve as an efficient approach to instigate an interest in nutrition among the students. Here we report the reception and effectiveness of a nutrition-pathology based interactive activity that we designed and implemented in the gastroenterology course given to the second year students at our medical school. The activity involved team work, individual accountability and peer-teaching. Nutrition pathology case stems (Kwashiorkor, vitamin B-12 deficiency, zinc deficiency and zinc-induced copper deficiency) were posted on the course website for the students to read before the session. At the start of the session, all the groups (each made up of four members) took a pre-quiz. Each student was then given an information sheet describing one case. Each group discussed the four cases with students acting as the “teacher” for the case assigned to them. A post-quiz was administered to the groups to assess acquisition of knowledge as well as in-depth thinking about the nutrition aspects discussed. The efficacy of the session measured by pre (39% questions correctly answered in total) and post-quizzes (96% questions correctly answered in total) and the overwhelmingly positive student feedback indicated that the session was highly effective. Ninety-five percent of students thought that the session demonstrated the clinical relevance of nutrition, while 98% students found the peer teaching to be engaging.

  1. Gambling with Your Health: Predictors of Risk for AIDS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lasorsa, Dominic L.; Shoemaker, Pamela J.

    To examine risk for Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) in terms of risk-related behaviors, and to investigate the factors that may be involved in putting one at risk, a study conducted telephone interviews with 493 randomly selected adults (18 years or older) in Austin, Texas in the fall of 1987. Respondents answered approximately 40…

  2. Emergency Child Aid. Child Health and Safety Series (Module VI).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iscoe, Louise; And Others

    This manual for child care personnel in day care homes and centers provides a step by step review of what to do in common emergency situations. It is emphasized that the manual is not a substitute for the complete first aid course which every careperson should have. Initial sections of the manual focus on preparing for emergency conditions,…

  3. Networked Learning and Network Science: Potential Applications to Health Professionals' Continuing Education and Development.

    PubMed

    Margolis, Alvaro; Parboosingh, John

    2015-01-01

    Prior interpersonal relationships and interactivity among members of professional associations may impact the learning process in continuing medical education (CME). On the other hand, CME programs that encourage interactivity between participants may impact structures and behaviors in these professional associations. With the advent of information and communication technologies, new communication spaces have emerged that have the potential to enhance networked learning in national and international professional associations and increase the effectiveness of CME for health professionals. In this article, network science, based on the application of network theory and other theories, is proposed as an approach to better understand the contribution networking and interactivity between health professionals in professional communities make to their learning and adoption of new practices over time. PMID:26378427

  4. Integrating oral health into professional nursing practice: an interprofessional faculty tool kit.

    PubMed

    Dolce, Maria C

    2014-01-01

    Millions of children and adults in the United States have unmet oral health care needs, and professional nurses can play a central role in reducing oral health disparities and expanding access to care. Interprofessional education is requisite to improving oral health care outcomes. Baccalaureate nursing programs need to prepare collaborative practice-ready professional nurses to improve oral health care especially for vulnerable and underserved individuals, communities, and populations. This article presents an interprofessional faculty tool kit that builds upon The Essentials of Baccalaureate Education for Professional Nursing Practice as a framework for preparing professional nurses with basic knowledge, skills, and attitudes in oral health promotion and disease and injury prevention across the life cycle. Expectations for professional nursing practice are described within the context of The Essentials and contemporary oral health care issues. Exemplars of interprofessional teaching-learning strategies are provided to assist nurse faculty with integrating oral health into baccalaureate nursing curriculum. Nurse educators are called to prioritize oral health as an essential component of overall health and well-being, increase the visibility of evidence-based oral health promotion and disease and injury prevention in baccalaureate nursing curricula, and support interprofessional oral health education and collaborative care. PMID:24503317

  5. Food aid in emergencies and public health nutrition.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Rita; Thorne-Lyman, Andrew

    2003-01-01

    HUNGER LEAVES SCARS: The visible kind may be born by the survivors of famine. Less visible, but all the more damaging, are the long-term effects of hunger that run through families through generations. Hunger passed from mother to child represents a ruinous inheritance. It marks a cycle of hunger that transcends generations, unless the cycle is broken. Food aid provided at crucial times in the lives of women and infants represents an investment for future. Thus, in contrast to former conceptions of food aid as an exclusively life-saving vehicle, modern aims of food aid also include preventing increases in the prevalence of malnutrition and asset depletion. Mass migration and food shortages have been responsible for most deaths following civil conflicts around the world. The most visible form of migration occurs when people cross international borders. The reasons for the flight of refugees and internally displaced persons are generally same; war, civil strife, and persecution. "NUTRITIONAL GATEWAYS": Finally, the importance of timely and sustained delivery of adequate food aid adequate in quality and quantity to people in dire need during the emergency is paramount. Food aid is the most direct means for conveying nutritional benefits: the time frame is often limited, sustainability is not an issue. However, in the case of drought victims, refugees or displaced people, the nutritional situation and the actions needed are more complex. In many situations people arrive are often in very bad state. While high prevalence of malnutrition is associated with inadequate food rations, in some situation malnutrition developed primarily because of the high incidence of diarrhoeal diseases. The synergism between high malnutrition and increased incidence of communicable diseases explains much of excess mortality seen in refugee and displaced persons. PMID:15806950

  6. More than First Aid

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schoessler, Sally

    2011-01-01

    The school nurse is an important member of the school team since school health services keep students in school, in the classroom, and ready to learn. Although school nurses are often seen as the people who deliver first aid at school, their role is much deeper and has such breadth that only a registered, professional nurse has the skill set to…

  7. Health sciences librarians' attitudes toward the Academy of Health Information Professionals

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Lynda M.; Kars, Marge; Petty, Janet

    2004-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of the study was to ascertain health sciences librarians' attitudes toward the Academy of Health Information Professionals (AHIP). Sample: Systematic sampling was used to select 210 names from the list of members of the Midwest Chapter of the Medical Library Association. Methods: A questionnaire containing open- and closed-ended questions was used to collect the data. Results: A total of 135 usable questionnaires were returned. Of the respondents, 34.8% are members of the academy and most are at the senior or distinguished member levels. The academy gives them a sense of professionalism and helps them to keep current with new trends. The majority of participants (65.2%) are not members of the academy. Among the various reasons proffered are that neither institutions nor employers require it and that there is no obvious benefit to belonging to the academy. Conclusions: More research needs to be done with a larger sample size to determine the attitudes of health sciences librarians, nationwide, toward the academy. PMID:15243638

  8. PERCEIVED RACIAL DISCRIMINATION AMONG HOME HEALTH AIDES: EVIDENCE FROM A NATIONAL SURVEY.

    PubMed

    Lee, Doohee; Muslin, Ivan; McInerney, Marjorie

    2016-01-01

    Home health aides are one of our essential human resources in the U.S. long-term care industry but understanding whether home health aides experience racial discrimination in the workplace and, if so, which personal/organizational factors are associated at the national level has been unnoticed. Using a nationally representative sample (n=3377), we attempt to investigate the association between racial discrimination and personal and organizational factors. The study found the 13.5% prevalence rate of racial discrimination. The study findings from multiple regression analysis reveal that black home care aides are more likely than white aides to experience racial discrimination in the workplace, suggesting that racial disparity may be an additional barrier to our home health care industry. National chain affiliation and low income were also found to be associated with perceived racial discrimination. PMID:27079055

  9. The Southern Rural Access Program and Alabama's Rural Health Leaders Pipeline: A Partnership To Develop Needed Minority Health Care Professionals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rackley, Benjamin P.; Wheat, John R.; Moore, Cynthia E.; Garner, Robert G.; Harrell, Barbara W.

    2003-01-01

    In Alabama's Black Belt counties, two organizations collaborate to recruit and prepare rural minority and disadvantaged students for health care careers. Premedical students and other college students in the programs shadow health professionals, visit medical schools, complete health projects, participate in summer seminars and tutorials, receive…

  10. Western health practitioners' view about African traditional health practitioners' treatment and care of people living with HIV/AIDS.

    PubMed

    Summerton, J V

    2006-08-01

    African traditional health practitioners are an important source of health care for many South Africans. Thus, they are a health resource in this society. However, the integration of traditional health practitioners into the mainstream of health care is a complex process. Various factors contribute to this complexity, including the skepticism and reservation with which some western health practitioners view traditional health practitioners. This paper highlights the perceived strengths and weaknesses of the traditional healing system for people living with HIV/AIDS, as perceived by western health practitioners. The use of traditional practitioners as a choice of health care is attributed to both the strengths and weaknesses of this system of health care. The strength of the traditional healing system is in its sharing of the worldview and belief system of its users, it being an alternative to an inefficient western health care system (official system), privacy and absence of time limitations per consultation, treating patients psychologically, and scientifically unexplained physiological relief of the symptoms of specific illnesses. The perceived weaknesses of the traditional healing system include harmful treatment regimens, especially for people living with HIV/AIDS; prolonging the seeking of appropriate health care when traditional remedies fail to produce the desired effect; destroying interpersonal relationships of people living with HIV/AIDS through witchcraft accusations; psychological torment caused by the belief that HIV/AIDS can be cured by traditional remedies/intervention; and increasing the workload of western practitioners who are requested by patients to conduct multiple HIV tests after undergoing various traditional treatment regimens to cure HIV/AIDS. It is recommended that traditional practitioners be encouraged to adapt harmful traditional healing practices to the benefit of their patients in a non-judgemental and non-critical manner. In addition

  11. Health promotion practices as perceived by primary healthcare professionals at the Ministry of National Guard Health Affairs, Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Altamimi, Samar; Alshoshan, Feda; Al Shaman, Ghada; Tawfeeq, Nasser; Alasmary, May; Ahmed, Anwar E.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: In recent years, several research studies have investigated health promotion practices in Saudi healthcare organizations, yet no published literature exists on health promotion practices of primary healthcare professionals working for the Ministry of National Guard Health Affairs (MNG-HA). Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted in a convenience sample of 206 primary healthcare professionals at the MNG-HA. A self-reporting questionnaire was used to investigate the attitudes, awareness, satisfaction, and methods regarding health promotion practices of primary healthcare professionals. Results: Of the 206 primary healthcare professionals surveyed, 58.1% reported awareness of health promotion programs conducted in the hospitals and 64.6% reported that the health promotion system in the hospitals needs to be improved. Language barriers and cultural beliefs were viewed as obstacles to carrying out effective health promotion by 65% and 64.6% of primary healthcare professionals, respectively. The majority (79.9%) of the primary healthcare professionals perceived themselves as having the necessary skills to promote health and 80.6% believed that printed educational materials are the most prevalent method of health promotion/education, whereas 55.8% reported that counseling was the most preferred method of health promotion. Conclusion: The awareness level of health promotion policies, strategies, and programs conducted in the hospitals was not found to be satisfactory. Therefore, widespread training programs are recommended to improve the health promotion system in the hospitals. These programs include facilitating behavioral change, introducing health promotion policies and strategies in hospitals, mandatory workshops, and systematic reminders. PMID:27482512

  12. The community health worker cultural mentoring project: preparing professional students for team work with health workers from urban communities.

    PubMed

    Sherwen, Laurie N; Schwolsky-Fitch, Elena; Rodriquez, Romelia; Horta, Greg; Lopez, Ivanna

    2007-01-01

    Community Health Workers or CHWs (also known by a variety of alternative titles) are health workers drawn from communities to provide access to care for members of their communities. CHWs have been documented as effective in delivering a variety of services in a culturally-sensitive manner, and in providing a bridge between health professionals and underserved or minority communities. Yet, CHWs have not been well incorporated into interdisciplinary health care teams. The majority of health professionals are not even aware of the possible role and skills of CHWs. Believing that the best time to educate professionals about this valuable health worker and ensure that CHWs become part of interdisciplinary health care teams is during the student years, the Hunter College Schools of the Health Professions, and the Community Health Worker Network of New York City developed a pilot project, the Community Health Worker Cultural Mentoring Project. Community Health Workers, who were members of the Network, served as "community mentors" for health professions students drawn from the programs of community health education, nursing, and nutrition. CHWs worked with faculty of selected courses in each of the professional programs, and served as panelists in these courses, presenting information about health beliefs and alternative health practices of diverse cultural groups in communities of New York City. Class sessions were first held in the fall of 2004; subsequent sessions were held in following semesters. Approximately 40 students participated in 7 classes, with 6 CHWs serving as mentors - two per class. At the end of the classroom presentations, students wrote reflections relating to their understanding of the CHW role and relevance for their future interdisciplinary practice. The majority of reflections met the goal of increasing professional students' understanding of the CHW role and skills. At this point, quantitative and qualitative data will need to be collected to

  13. Parent Educators-An Aide for Total Health Plans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giammatteo, Michael C.

    This paper is concerned with a description of the basic philosophy, training, and task of the parent educator as part of the health team in multi-discipline, comprehensive approach to the total health needs of the central city population of Portland, Oregon. Objectives of the program are: (1) to ease the health manpower shortage by on-the-job…

  14. AIDS Knowledge and Attitudes, Provisional Data from the National Health Interview Survey: United States, August 1987. Advance Data from Vital and Health Statistics. No. 146.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dawson, Deborah A.; And Others

    This document presents provisional data for all Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) questionnaire items from the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) for August 1987. It notes that the AIDS questionnaire was designed to provide baseline estimates of public knowledge and attitudes about AIDS transmission, the prevention of AIDS virus…

  15. Professional Development in Law, Health Care, and Aging: A Model Fellowship Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kapp, Marshall B.

    2000-01-01

    Argues there is a growing need for a core of professionals with the education and sensitivities necessary to integrate the fields of law, health care, and gerontology. Paper describes a professional development fellowship program which attempts to address this need by having recently graduated attorneys assess, on a firsthand level, provisions of…

  16. Learning Processes in the Professional Development of Mental Health Counselors: Knowledge Restructuring and Illness Script Formation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strasser, Josef; Gruber, Hans

    2015-01-01

    An important part of learning processes in the professional development of counselors is the integration of declarative knowledge and professional experience. It was investigated in-how-far mental health counselors at different levels of expertise (experts, intermediates, novices) differ in their availability of experience-based knowledge…

  17. Impact of a School-Based Pediatric Obesity Prevention Program Facilitated by Health Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston, Craig A.; Moreno, Jennette P.; El-Mubasher, Abeer; Gallagher, Martina; Tyler, Chermaine; Woehler, Deborah

    2013-01-01

    Background: This study evaluated a school-based obesity intervention for elementary school children (N = 835) where health professionals assisted teachers with the integration of healthy messages into the school curriculum. Methods: Schools were randomized into a professional-facilitated intervention (PFI; N = 4) or a self-help (SH; N = 3)…

  18. Important Competencies for Future Health and Wellness Professionals: An Investigation of Employer Desired Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Becker, Craig; Loy, Marty

    2004-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the validity of the professional competencies developed by the Association of Worksite Health Promotion (AWHP) Professional Standards Task Force. The Task Force identified a competency framework that included business skills, program coordination skills, and human resource skills with corresponding…

  19. 75 FR 39022 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request; Survey of Health Care Professionals' Awareness and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-07

    ... Register on April 22, 2010 (75 FR 20999) and allowed 60-days for public comment. There were no public... Health Care Professionals' Awareness and Perceptions of the National Cancer Institute's Intramural... Care Professionals' Awareness and Perceptions of the National Cancer Institute's Intramural...

  20. Professional Competencies in Health Sciences Education: From Multiple Intelligences to the Clinic Floor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lane, India F.

    2010-01-01

    Nontechnical competencies identified as essential to the health professionals success include ethical behavior, interpersonal, self-management, leadership, business, and thinking competencies. The literature regarding such diverse topics, and the literature regarding "professional success" is extensive and wide-ranging, crossing educational,…

  1. Reactions of Mental Health Professionals to Hypothetical Clients: A Comparison Based on Clients' Adoptive Status.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiss, Andrea

    Mental health professionals have often reported differences in the psychiatric symptoms and diagnoses of adopted and nonadopted children and adolescents. Since psychiatric diagnoses are influenced by the judgments of the professionals who assign them, it is possible that the differences observed between adopted and nonadopted psychiatric patients…

  2. A Review of Contemporary Ethical Decision-Making Models for Mental Health Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Francis, Perry C.

    2015-01-01

    Mental health professionals are faced with increasingly complex ethical decisions that are impacted by culture, personal and professional values, and the contexts in which they and their clients inhabit. This article presents the reasons for developing and implementing multiple ethical decision making models and reviews four models that address…

  3. Professional Norms versus Managerialism in Campus Mental Health Centers: The Experiences of Eight Clinicians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jodoin, Elizabeth C.; Ayers, David F.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to understand better how, if at all, eight campus-based mental health clinicians experienced and negotiated managerialist practices, and with what outcomes. It was found that managerialism was experienced as challenges to professional ethics, clinical judgment, and challenges related to professional role…

  4. Salient Attributes of Two Types of Helpers: Friends and Mental Health Professionals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corrigan, John D.

    1978-01-01

    Undergraduates rated the importance of expertness, attractiveness, and trustworthiness for a friend and a mental health professional from whom they might seek help. Results indicated salient attributes of a professional were perceived expertness and trustworthiness. Salient attributes of a friend were perceived attractiveness and trustworthiness.…

  5. Problems Caused for Mental Health Professionals Worldwide by Increasing Multicultural Populations and Proposed Solutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chiu, Thomas L.

    1996-01-01

    Psychiatric disorders on a global scale, combined with rapid national population diversification, demand that mental health professionals worldwide become more informed about the realities of diagnosing and treating a multicultural patient population. Recommendations are offered to enable such professionals to most efficaciously diagnose and treat…

  6. Impact of a school-based pediatric obesity prevention program faciliated by health professionals

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study evaluated a school-based obesity intervention for elementary school children (N=835) where health professionals assisted teachers with the integration of healthy messages into the school curriculum. Schools were randomized into a professional-facilitated intervention (PFI; N=4) or a self-...

  7. Survey of Distance Learning Provision in Continuing Health Professional Education in Canada

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curran, Vernon; Kirby, Fran; Fleet, Lisa

    2003-01-01

    In Canada, the trend is towards greater use of distance learning technologies in the provision of continuing professional education in the health professions. Lack of access to professional development is a common deterrent to practice in rural and remote areas. Distance learning technologies have an important role to play in addressing the…

  8. Developing European guidelines for training care professionals in mental health promotion

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Although mental health promotion is a priority mental health action area for all European countries, high level training resources and high quality skills acquisition in mental health promotion are still relatively rare. The aim of the current paper is to present the results of the DG SANCO-funded PROMISE project concerning the development of European guidelines for training social and health care professionals in mental health promotion. Methods The PROMISE project brought together a multidisciplinary scientific committee from eight European sites representing a variety of institutions including universities, mental health service providers and public health organisations. The committee used thematic content analysis to filter and analyse European and international policy documents, scientific literature reviews on mental health promotion and existing mental health promotion programmes with regard to identifying quality criteria for training care professionals on this subject. The resulting PROMISE Guidelines quality criteria were then subjected to an iterative feedback procedure with local steering groups and training professionals at all sites with the aim of developing resource kits and evaluation tools for using the PROMISE Guidelines. Scientific committees also collected information from European, national and local stakeholder groups and professional organisations on existing training programmes, policies and projects. Results The process identified ten quality criteria for training care professionals in mental health promotion: embracing the principle of positive mental health; empowering community stakeholders; adopting an interdisciplinary and intersectoral approach; including people with mental health problems; advocating; consulting the knowledge base; adapting interventions to local contexts; identifying and evaluating risks; using the media; evaluating training, implementation processes and outcomes. The iterative feedback process produced

  9. Resident Assistant Training Program for Increasing Alcohol, Other Drug, and Mental Health First-Aid Efforts

    PubMed Central

    Thombs, Dennis L.; Gonzalez, Jennifer M. Reingle; Osborn, Cynthia J.; Rossheim, Matthew E.; Suzuki, Sumihiro

    2014-01-01

    In college and university residence halls, resident assistants (RAs) are expected to serve as first-aid providers to students who may have alcohol, other drug, mental health, and academic problems. Despite this responsibility, evidence-based, first-aid programs have not been developed and tested for the RA workforce. The current study examined effects of an investigational first-aid program designed specifically for RAs. The online Peer Hero Training program is a novel approach to RA training in its use of interactive video dramatizations of incidents involving substance-using or distressed residents. A 9-month randomized trial conducted on 8 U.S. campuses compared RAs who participated in the Peer Hero Training program to RAs who received training-as-usual. Participation in the Peer Hero Training program significantly increased RA first-aid efforts for residential students who may have had alcohol, other drug, mental health, or academic problems six months after baseline. Compared to those in the training-as-usual condition, RAs in the Peer Hero Training program made more than 10 times as many first-aid efforts for possible alcohol problems, almost 14 times the number of first-aid efforts for possible drug use, almost 3 times the number of first-aid efforts for possible mental health problems, and 3 times the number of first-aid efforts for academic problems. There was no evidence that measured RA attitudes mediated the effects of the intervention. Results of this preliminary evaluation trial suggest that online training using interactive video dramatizations is a viable approach to strengthening RAs’ ability to provide alcohol, other drug, and mental health first-aid to undergraduates. PMID:25322950

  10. The roles of healthcare professionals in implementing clinical prevention and population health.

    PubMed

    Zenzano, Tatiana; Allan, Janet D; Bigley, Mary Beth; Bushardt, Reamer L; Garr, David R; Johnson, Ken; Lang, William; Maeshiro, Rika; Meyer, Susan M; Shannon, Stephen C; Spolsky, Vladimir W; Stanley, Joan M

    2011-02-01

    Across the health disciplines, clinical prevention and population health activities increasingly are recognized as integral to the practice of their professions. Most of the major clinical health professions organizations have begun incorporating clinical prevention and population health activities and services into educational curricula, the accreditation process, and training to affect clinical practice. Students in each health profession need to understand the roles played by those in other health professions. This understanding is a prerequisite for better communication and collaboration among the professions and for accomplishing the educational objectives included in Healthy People 2020 and organized using the Education for Health framework. To help accomplish these goals, this article summarizes each health profession's contributions to the field of prevention and population health, explains how the profession contributes to interprofessional education or practice, reviews specific challenges faced in the provision of these types of services, and highlights future opportunities to expand the provision of these services. Several general themes emerge from a review of the different health professions' contributions to this area. First, having well-trained prevention and population health professionals outside of the traditional public health field is important because prevention and population health activities occur in almost all healthcare settings. Second, because health professionals work in interprofessional teams in the clinical setting, training and educating all health professionals within interprofessional models would be prudent. Third, in order to expand services, reimbursement for health promotion counseling, preventive medicine, and disease management assistance needs to be appropriate for each of the professions. PMID:21238876

  11. Latinos and Cancer Information: Perspectives of Patients, Health Professionals and Telephone Cancer Information Specialists

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, Celia P.; Nápoles, Anna; Davis, Sharon; Lopez, Monica; Pasick, Rena J.; Livaudais-Toman, Jennifer; Pérez-Stable, Eliseo J.

    2016-01-01

    Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 16 Latino cancer patients diagnosed in California; 10 health professionals from the San Francisco Bay Area and Fresno, California; and 10 Cancer Information Services (CIS) information specialists from the regional offices handling calls from Spanish-speakers. Interview guides were designed by the investigators to answer three main research questions: 1) How do Latinos obtain information about cancer and what types of information do they access?; 2) What sources of cancer information do they seek out and find credible?; and 3) What are the barriers and facilitators to Latinos obtaining cancer information? Stakeholders generally viewed health professionals as the most credible source of cancer information. All groups regarded family and friends as important sources of information. Patients and health professionals tended to differ on the value of print materials. Although patients found them generally useful, health professionals tended to view them as inadequate for meeting the informational needs of their Latino patients due to the challenge of low health literacy. Health professionals also tended to undervalue Internet resources compared to patients and CIS specialists. All stakeholders viewed language, ethnic discordance and the impact on patients of the initial diagnosis as barriers to effective communication of cancer information. Health professionals and CIS specialists, but not patients, mentioned low literacy as a barrier. Our findings underscore the importance of the physician-patient relationship as a point of intervention to address the unmet informational and psychosocial needs of Latino cancer patients.

  12. Learning reflexively from a health promotion professional development program in Canada

    PubMed Central

    Tremblay, Marie-Claude; Richard, Lucie; Brousselle, Astrid; Beaudet, Nicole

    2014-01-01

    In recent decades, reflexivity has received much attention in the professional education and training literature, especially in the public health and health promotion fields. Despite general agreement on the importance of reflexivity, there appears to be no consensus on how to assess reflexivity or to conceptualize the different forms developed among professionals and participants of training programs. This paper presents an analysis of the reflexivity outcomes of the Health Promotion Laboratory, an innovative professional development program aimed at supporting practice changes among health professionals by fostering competency development and reflexivity. More specifically, this paper explores the difference between two levels of reflexivity (formative and critical) and highlights some implications of each for practice. Data were collected through qualitative interviews with participants from two intervention sites. Results showed that involvement in the Health Promotion Laboratory prompted many participants to modify their vision of their practice and professional role, indicating an impact on reflexivity. In many cases, new understandings seem to have played a formative function in enabling participants to improve their practice and their role as health promoters. The reflective process also served a critical function culminating in a social and moral understanding of the impacts on society of the professionals' practices and roles. This type of outcome is greatly desired in health promotion, given the social justice and equity concerns of this field of practice. By redefining the theoretical concept of reflexivity on two levels and discussing their impacts on practice, this study supports the usefulness of both levels of reflexivity. PMID:23996539

  13. Millennium Development Goals: how public health professionals perceive the achievement of MDGs

    PubMed Central

    Lomazzi, Marta; Laaser, Ulrich; Theisling, Mareike; Tapia, Leticia; Borisch, Bettina

    2014-01-01

    Background There have been various consultations on the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) by different groups. However, even if it is clear that the health sector has led the development success of the MDGs, only a few MDG reports consider public health experts’ points of view and these are mainly government driven. Designs The World Federation of Public Health Associations (WFPHA) has executed a global survey to consult public health professionals worldwide concerning the implementation and achievements of the MDGs. The survey was conceived by WFPHA health professionals and promulgated online. Public health professionals and organisations dealing with MDGs responded to the survey. Content analysis was conducted to analyse the data. Results Survey participants attributed the highest importance worldwide to MDGs dealing with women, poverty and hunger reduction, and disease prevention and management. Moreover, they underlined the role of education, referring both to school children and professionals. In high and upper-middle income countries, environmental challenges also received considerable attention. Notably, respondents underlined that weak governance and unstable political situations, as well as the gap between professionals and politicians, were among the main causes that detracted from MDG achievements. Conclusion The public health workforce felt it would be imperative to be included from the outset in the design and implementation of further goals. This implies that those professionals have to take an active part in the political process leading to a new and accountable framework. PMID:25249060

  14. Professional and Community Satisfaction with the Brazilian Family Health Strategy, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Perez, Lilian G.; Sheridan, Juliet D.; Nicholls, Andrea Y.; Mues, Katherine E.; Saleme, Priscila S.; Resende, Joana C.; Ferreira, José A. G.; Leon, Juan S.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To analyze the strengths and limitations of the Family Health Strategy (ESF) from the perceptions of healthcare professionals and community. Methods Between June-August 2009, in the city of Vespasiano, Minas Gerais State, Southeastern Brazil, a questionnaire was applied to evaluate the ESF with 77 healthcare professionals and 293 caretakers of children under five. Health professional ESF training, community access to care, patient communication, and delivery of health education and pediatric care were of main interest in the evaluation. Logistic regression analysis was used to obtain odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). Results The majority of health care professionals reported their program training was insufficient in quantity, content and method of delivery. Caretakers and professionals identified similar weaknesses (services not accessible to the caretakers, lack of healthcare professionals, poor training for professionals) and strengths (community health worker-patient communications, provision of educational information, and pediatric care). Recommendations for improvement included: more doctors and specialists, more and better training, and scheduling improvements. Caretaker satisfaction with the ESF was found to be related to perceived benefits such as community health agent household visits (OR 5.8, 95%CI 2.8;12.1), good professional-patient relationships (OR 4.8, 95%CI 2.5;9.3), and family-focused health (OR 4.1, 95%CI 1.6;10.2); and perceived problems such as lack of personnel (OR 0.3, 95%CI 0.2;0.6), difficulty with access (OR 0.2, 95%CI 0.1;0.4), and poor quality of care (OR 0.3, 95%CI 0.1;0.6). Overall, 62% of caretakers reported being generally satisfied with the ESF services. Conclusions Identifying the limitations and strengths of the ESF from the healthcare professional and caretaker perspective may serve to advance primary community healthcare in Brazil. PMID:24037368

  15. A Model for Health Professional Education in South Texas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramirez, Amelie; Vela, Leonel; Cigarroa, Francisco G.

    2008-01-01

    In 1997, The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio established the Regional Academic Health Center (RAHC) for the Lower Rio Grande Valley in south Texas. Through medical education programs, research facilities, and partnerships with health-care providers, the RAHC aims to improve the health status and access to health services…

  16. The Relationship between Professional Preparation and Class Structure on Health Instruction in the Secondary Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammig, Bart; Ogletree, Roberta; Wycoff-Horn, Marcie R.

    2011-01-01

    Background: The aim of the present study was to examine the impact of professional preparation and class structure on health content delivery and time spent delivering content among required health education classes in the United States. Methods: Data from the classroom-level file of the 2006 School Health Policies and Programs Study were…

  17. Accreditation of Professional Preparation Programs for School Health Educators: The Changing Landscape

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taub, Alyson; Goekler, Susan; Auld, M. Elaine; Birch, David A.; Muller, Susan; Wengert, Deitra; Allegrante, John P.

    2014-01-01

    The health education profession is committed to maintaining the highest standards of quality assurance, including accreditation of professional preparation programs in both school and community/public health education. Since 2001, the Society for Public Health Education (SOPHE) has increased attention to strengthening accreditation processes for…

  18. Mobile Devices and Their Use in Library Professional Practice: The Health Librarian and the Ipad

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duncan, Vicky; Kumaran, Maha; Lê, Mê-Linh; Murphy, Susan

    2013-01-01

    Mobile devices are being extensively adopted by health sciences faculty, students, and practitioners, but there is little evidence of how this technology is being used by health librarians in their own professional practice. In 2011, health sciences librarians at the University of Saskatchewan undertook a project to familiarize themselves with…

  19. Promoting Cultural Competence, Health Behaviors, and Professional Practice in Undergraduate Education through Peer Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yan, Zi; FitzPatrick, Kathleen

    2016-01-01

    Cultural competence (CC) has been identified as an important skill for all healthcare and public health professionals, and it must be integrated into all aspects of health practice. However, few university and college health education programs in North America have included CC education in their curriculums. This article describes an…

  20. Reflections on Government Service Rotations by an Academic Health Education Professional

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Lawrence W.

    2016-01-01

    This reflection is on a health education professional's rotation from professor in a school of public health to a government position and back parallels that of Professor Howard Koh's journey to Assistant Secretary of Health, one level higher in the same federal bureaucracy. We both acknowledge the steep learning curve and some bureaucratic…

  1. 75 FR 78901 - Payment for Inpatient and Outpatient Health Care Professional Services at Non-Departmental...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-17

    ... activity to prevent us from promulgating a valid rule that conforms to national health care policy. We make... AFFAIRS 38 CFR Part 17 RIN 2900-AN37 Payment for Inpatient and Outpatient Health Care Professional... concerning the payment methodology used to calculate VA payments for inpatient and outpatient health...

  2. Teamworking in Mental Health: Zones of Comfort and Challenge. Researching Professional Education Research Report Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stark, Sheila; Stronach, Ian; Warne, Tony; Skidmore, David; Cotton, Angela; Montgomery, Mark

    A study evaluated the effectiveness of educational preparation for mental health nursing in multi-professional, multi-agency team environments in a range of mental health settings in England. The following data collection activities were conducted: an extensive literature review; local focus groups with mental health service users, care providers,…

  3. Lung Cancer, Questions to Ask Your Health Professional | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Lung Cancer Questions to Ask Your Health Professional Past Issues / ... 2013 Table of Contents Tests What type of lung cancer do I have? Has the cancer spread from ...

  4. Job Attributes Preferred by Female Health Professionals, before and after Entering the Work Force.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nordholm, Lena A.; Westbrook, Mary T.

    1982-01-01

    Studied female health professionals' (N=125) preferences for 12 job characteristics at graduation and 20 months later. After employment, respondents placed increased importance on skill development and respect received, and less emphasis on security and promotion opportunities. (Author)

  5. 78 FR 44574 - Third Annual Food and Drug Administration Health Professional Organizations Conference

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-24

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Third Annual Food and Drug Administration Health Professional Organizations Conference AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice of conference. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing a conference for representatives of...

  6. 76 FR 55928 - Food and Drug Administration Health Professional Organizations Conference

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-09

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Food and Drug Administration Health Professional Organizations Conference AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice of public conference. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing a conference for representatives of...

  7. 77 FR 47652 - Second Annual Food and Drug Administration Health Professional Organizations Conference

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-09

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Second Annual Food and Drug Administration Health Professional Organizations Conference AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice of conference. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing a conference for representatives of...

  8. A Model to Build Collaborative Research or Educational Teams of Health Professionals in Gerontology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gitlin, Laura N.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    A model of academic faculty/health professional collaboration includes assessment/goal setting, determining collaborative fit, resource identification, refinement/implementation, and evaluation. It is based on concepts of social exchange, negotiation, role differentiation, and trust. (SK)

  9. Lung Cancer, Questions to Ask Your Health Professional | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Lung Cancer Questions to Ask Your Health Professional Past ... 2013 Table of Contents Tests What type of lung cancer do I have? Has the cancer spread ...

  10. Social media and health care professionals: benefits, risks, and best practices.

    PubMed

    Ventola, C Lee

    2014-07-01

    Health care professionals can use a variety of social media tools to improve or enhance networking, education, and other activities. However, these tools also present some potential risks, such as unreliable information and violations of patients' privacy rights. PMID:25083128

  11. Health-related Culinary Education: A Summary of Representative Emerging Programs for Health Professionals and Patients

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Edward M.; Nordgren, Julia; La Puma, John; La Barba, Julie; Cucuzzella, Mark; Graham, Robert; Harlan, Timothy S.; Burg, Tracey; Eisenberg, David

    2016-01-01

    Background: Beneficial correlations are suggested between food preparation and home food preparation of healthy choices. Therefore, there is an emergence of culinary medicine (CM) programs directed at both patients and medical professionals which deliver education emphasizing skills such as shopping, food storage, and meal preparation. Objective: The goal of this article is to provide a description of emerging CM programs and to imagine how this field can mature. Methods: During April 2015, 10 CM programs were identified by surveying CM and lifestyle medicine leaders. Program directors completed a narrative describing their program's structure, curricula, educational design, modes of delivery, funding, and cost. Interviews were conducted in an effort to optimize data collection. Results: All 10 culinary programs deliver medical education curricula educating 2654 health professionals per year. Educational goals vary within the domains of (1) provider's self-behavior, (2) nutritional knowledge and (3) prescribing nutrition. Six programs deliver patients' curricula, educating 4225 individuals per year. These programs' content varies and focuses on either specific diets or various culinary behaviors. All the programs' directors are health professionals who are also either credentialed chefs or have a strong culinary background. Nine of these programs offer culinary training in either a hands-on or visual demonstration within a teaching kitchen setting, while one delivers remote culinary tele-education. Seven programs track outcomes using various questionnaires and biometric data. Conclusions: There is currently no consensus about learning objectives, curricular domains, staffing, and facility requirements associated with CM, and there has been little research to explore its impact. A shared strategy is needed to collectively overcome these challenges. PMID:26937315

  12. Aids for Health and Home Extension Volunteers. Appropriate Technologies for Development. Reprint R-3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peace Corps, Washington, DC. Information Collection and Exchange Div.

    This book contains various aids for Peace Corps home extension volunteers. Section I, "Culture Resource Material," contains four articles by Paul Benjamin: (1) "Values in American Culture"; (2) "The Cultural Context of Health Education"; (3) "Problems of Introducing Public Health Programs in 'Underdeveloped Areas'"; and (4) "The Role of Beliefs…

  13. Internet-Based Health Information Consumer Skills Intervention for People Living with HIV/AIDS

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalichman, Seth C.; Cherry, Charsey; Cain, Demetria; Pope, Howard; Kalichman, Moira; Eaton, Lisa; Weinhardt, Lance; Benotsch, Eric G.

    2006-01-01

    Medical information can improve health, and there is an enormous amount of health information available on the Internet. A randomized clinical trial tested the effectiveness of an intervention based on social-cognitive theory to improve information use among people living with HIV/AIDS. Men and women (N = 448) were placed in either (a) an…

  14. Dietary Supplements and Health Aids - A Critical Evaluation Part 2 - Macronutrients and Fiber.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dubick, Michael A.

    1983-01-01

    Part 1 of this evaluation of dietary supplements and health aids (SE 533 788) focused on various therapeutic claims made for vitamins and minerals. This part examines health-promoting claims made for selected macronutrients and fiber. Macronutrients examined include selected proteins, amino acids, enzymes, carbohydrates, and lipids. (JN)

  15. 77 FR 60128 - Noncompetitive Supplements to Nursing Assistant and Home Health Aide Program Grantees

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-02

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Noncompetitive Supplements to Nursing... Nursing Assistant and Home Health Aide (NAHHA) Program grantees to develop, implement, and evaluate... Sciences Center (TTUHSC) School of Nursing, 302 Pine Street, Abilene, TX 79601, T51HP20702...

  16. Factors Influencing the Retention and Attrition of Community Health Aides/Practitioners in Alaska

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landon, Beth; Loudon, Jenny; Selle, Mariko; Doucette, Sanna

    2004-01-01

    The Community Health Aide Program (CHAP) is a unique program employing local, indigenous peoples as primary care nonphysician providers in extremely remote frontier, tribal Alaskan communities. With attrition rates up to 20%, recommendations for improving retention are necessary to maintain access to health services for Alaska Natives in these…

  17. Recommendations for the School Health Nurse in Addressing HIV/AIDS with Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uris, Patricia

    The school is a defined setting where health issues can be addressed. School nurses providing health care to adolescents who are infected or affected by HIV/AIDS need strong policies and good training to make their efforts effective. the goal of these recommendations is to strengthen adolescent HIV programs in schools and to improve standards of…

  18. 42 CFR 484.36 - Condition of participation: Home health aide services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ..., but are not limited to— (i) Ensuring the overall quality of the care provided by the aide; (ii... job. They are closely supervised to ensure their competence in providing care. For home health... endanger the health and safety of the HHA's patients and has had a temporary management appointed...

  19. 42 CFR 484.36 - Condition of participation: Home health aide services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ..., but are not limited to— (i) Ensuring the overall quality of the care provided by the aide; (ii... job. They are closely supervised to ensure their competence in providing care. For home health... endanger the health and safety of the HHA's patients and has had a temporary management appointed...

  20. National Library of Medicine Web Resources for Student Health Professionals

    SciTech Connect

    Womble, R.

    2010-04-02

    Familiarize students affiliated with the Student National Medical Association with the National Library of Medicine's online resources that address medical conditions, health disparities, and public health preparedness needs.