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Sample records for aid protein levels

  1. Serum levels of HSP70 and other DAMP proteins can aid in patient diagnosis after traumatic injury.

    PubMed

    Ren, Biqiong; Zou, Guoying; Huang, Yiran; Xu, Guofeng; Xu, Fei; He, Junyu; Zhu, Haowen; Yu, Ping

    2016-07-01

    Danger-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) are activated by endogenous signals that originate from stressed, injured, or necrotic cells, signifying "danger" to the host. In this study, we evaluated the expression of the DAMP heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) in trauma patients with and without secondary infections. Levels of glucose (GLU), procalcitonin (PCT), total cholesterol (T-Chol), and white blood cell (WBC) counts were also evaluated at three time stages after trauma. Our analysis showed that the levels of serum HSP70 in patients with minor, moderate, and severe injuries were significantly higher than in healthy patients at each time point post-injury (P < 0.01), and levels of serum HSP70 in the severe injury group were significantly higher than in the minor injury group at 1-6 h after trauma (P = 0.047). HSP70 was correlated with GLU and was negatively correlated with T-Chol in the period 1-6 h after injury (P = 0.008/0.032). WBC and GLU were elevated after trauma, with mutual positive correlation (P < 0.001). PCT levels increased later than WBC counts and GLU levels; these levels were correlated at the two later time periods, 24-48 h and 60-90 h (P = 0.008/0.041). PCT continued to rise in patients with secondary infection, but PCT dropped at the third time period in patients without secondary infection. In summary, our results suggest that danger and stress theory can be used to predict severity of trauma. PMID:27137634

  2. A New Sandwich ELISA for Quantification of Thymidine Kinase 1 Protein Levels in Sera from Dogs with Different Malignancies Can Aid in Disease Management

    PubMed Central

    Jagarlamudi, Kiran Kumar; Moreau, Laura; Westberg, Sara; Rönnberg, Henrik; Eriksson, Staffan

    2015-01-01

    Thymidine kinase 1 (TK1) is a DNA precursor enzyme whose expression is closely correlated with cell proliferation and cell turnover. Sensitive serum TK1 activity assays have been used for monitoring and prognosis of hematological malignancies in both humans and dogs. Here we describe the development of a specific sandwich TK1-ELISA for the quantification of TK1 protein levels in sera from dogs with different malignancies. A combination of rabbit polyclonal anti-dog TK1 antibody and a mouse monoclonal anti-human TK1 antibody was used. Different concentrations of recombinant canine TK1 was used as standard. Clinical evaluation of the ELISA was done by using sera from 42 healthy dogs, 43 dogs with hematological tumors and 55 with solid tumors. An established [3H]-dThd phosphorylation assay was used to determine the TK1 activity levels in the same sera. The mean TK1 activities in dogs with hematological tumors were significantly higher than those found in healthy dogs. In agreement with earlier studies, no significant difference was observed in serum TK1 activities between healthy dogs and dogs with solid tumors. However, the mean TK1 protein levels determined by new TK1-ELISA were significantly higher not only in hematological tumors but also in solid tumors compared to healthy dogs (mean ± SD = 1.30 ± 1.16, 0.67 ± 0.55 and 0.27± 0.10 ng/mL, respectively). Moreover, TK1-ELISA had significantly higher ability to distinguish lymphoma cases from healthy based on receiver operating characteristic analyses (area under the curve, AUC, of 0.96) to that of the activity assay (AUC, 0.84). Furthermore, fluctuations in TK1 protein levels during the course of chemotherapy in dogs with lymphoma closely associated with clinical outcome. Overall, the TK1-ELISA showed significant linear correlation with the TK1 activity assay (rs = 0.6, p<0.0001). Thus, the new TK1-ELISA has sufficient sensitivity and specificity for routine clinical use in veterinary oncology. PMID:26366881

  3. HSP90 inhibitors decrease AID levels and activity in mice and in human cells

    PubMed Central

    Montamat-Sicotte, Damien; Liztler, Ludivine C; Abreu, Cecilia; Safavi, Shiva; Zahn, Astrid; Orthwein, Alexandre; Muschen, Markus; Oppezzo, Pablo; Muñoz, Denise P; Di Noia, Javier M

    2015-01-01

    Activation induced deaminase (AID) initiates somatic hypermutation and class switch recombination of the Ig genes in antigen-activated B cells, underpinning antibody affinity maturation and isotype switching. AID can also be pathogenic by contributing to autoimmune diseases and oncogenic mutations. Moreover, AID can exert non-canonical functions when aberrantly expressed in epithelial cells. The lack of specific inhibitors prevents therapeutic applications to modulate AID functions. Here, we have exploited our previous finding that the HSP90 molecular chaperoning pathway stabilizes AID in B cells, to test whether HSP90 inhibitors could target AID in vivo. We demonstrate that chronic administration of HSP90 inhibitors decreases AID protein levels and isotype switching in immunized mice. HSP90 inhibitors also reduce disease severity in a mouse model of acute B-cell lymphoblastic leukemia in which AID accelerates disease progression. We further show that human AID protein levels are sensitive to HSP90 inhibition in normal and leukemic B cells, and that HSP90 inhibition prevents AID-dependent epithelial to mesenchymal transition in a human breast cancer cell line in vitro. Thus, we provide proof-of-concept that HSP90 inhibitors indirectly target AID in vivo and that endogenous human AID is widely sensitive to them, which could have therapeutic applications. PMID:25912253

  4. HSP90 inhibitors decrease AID levels and activity in mice and in human cells.

    PubMed

    Montamat-Sicotte, Damien; Litzler, Ludivine C; Abreu, Cecilia; Safavi, Shiva; Zahn, Astrid; Orthwein, Alexandre; Müschen, Markus; Oppezzo, Pablo; Muñoz, Denise P; Di Noia, Javier M

    2015-08-01

    Activation induced deaminase (AID) initiates somatic hypermutation and class switch recombination of the Ig genes in antigen-activated B cells, underpinning antibody affinity maturation and isotype switching. AID can also be pathogenic by contributing to autoimmune diseases and oncogenic mutations. Moreover, AID can exert noncanonical functions when aberrantly expressed in epithelial cells. The lack of specific inhibitors prevents therapeutic applications to modulate AID functions. Here, we have exploited our previous finding that the HSP90 molecular chaperoning pathway stabilizes AID in B cells, to test whether HSP90 inhibitors could target AID in vivo. We demonstrate that chronic administration of HSP90 inhibitors decreases AID protein levels and isotype switching in immunized mice. HSP90 inhibitors also reduce disease severity in a mouse model of acute B-cell lymphoblastic leukemia in which AID accelerates disease progression. We further show that human AID protein levels are sensitive to HSP90 inhibition in normal and leukemic B cells, and that HSP90 inhibition prevents AID-dependent epithelial to mesenchymal transition in a human breast cancer cell line in vitro. Thus, we provide proof-of-concept that HSP90 inhibitors indirectly target AID in vivo and that endogenous human AID is widely sensitive to them, which could have therapeutic applications. PMID:25912253

  5. Level of Education, Sexual Promiscuity, and AIDS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krull, Catherine D.

    1994-01-01

    Responses of 595 unmarried persons on the 1991 General Social Survey suggest that educational attainment indirectly increases promiscuous sexual behavior by liberalizing sexual attitudes. In a second study, the incidence of AIDS was partly explained by educational attainment, liberal sexual attitudes, and promiscuous sexual practices. (KS)

  6. A review of HIV/AIDS system-level interventions

    PubMed Central

    Bauermeister, José A.; Tross, Susan; Ehrhardt, Anke A.

    2010-01-01

    The escalating HIV/AIDS epidemic worldwide demands that on-going prevention efforts be strengthened, disseminated, and scaled-up. System-level interventions refer to programs aiming to improve the functioning of an agency as well as the delivery of its services to the community. System-level interventions are a promising approach to HIV/AIDS prevention because they focus on (a) improving the agency’s ability to adopt evidence-based HIV prevention and care programs; (b) develop and establish policies and procedures that maximize the sustainability of on-going prevention and care efforts; and (c) improve decision-making processes such as incorporating the needs of communities into their tailored services. We reviewed studies focusing on system-level interventions by searching multiple electronic abstracting indices, including PsycInfo, PubMed, and ProQuest. Twenty-three studies out of 624 peer-reviewed studies (published from January 1985 to February 2007) met study criteria. Most of the studies focused on strengthening agency infrastructure, while other studies included collaborative partnerships and technical assistance programs. Our findings suggest that system-level interventions are promising in strengthening HIV/AIDS prevention and treatment efforts. Based on our findings, we propose recommendations for future work in developing and evaluating system-level interventions. PMID:18369722

  7. Lymphocyte protein synthesis is increased with the progression of HIV-associated disease to AIDS.

    PubMed

    Caso, G; Garlick, P J; Gelato, M C; McNurlan, M A

    2001-12-01

    HIV infection has been shown to affect lymphocyte function and to reduce lymphocyte responsiveness in vitro to mitogenic stimulation, but little is known about lymphocyte metabolism in vivo and how it is affected during the course of the disease. This study investigated the metabolic activity of lymphocytes in vivo through the progression of HIV-associated disease. Lymphocyte protein synthesis was measured with L-[(2)H(5)]phenylalanine (45 mg/kg body weight) in healthy volunteers (n=7), in patients who were HIV-positive (n=7) but asymptomatic, and in patients with AIDS (n=8). The rates of lymphocyte protein synthesis [expressed as a percentage of lymphocyte protein, i.e. fractional synthesis rate (FSR)] were not altered in HIV-positive patients compared with healthy controls (7.9+/-1.28% and 9.1+/-0.53%/day respectively), but were significantly elevated in AIDS patients (14.0+/-1.16%/day; P<0.05). The serum concentration of the cytokine tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) increased with the progression of the disease, and TNF-alpha levels were significantly higher in AIDS patients (6.81+/-0.88 ng/l) than in healthy controls (3.09+/-0.27 ng/l; P<0.05). Lymphocyte protein FSR was positively correlated with serum TNF-alpha concentration (r=0.55, P=0.009) and negatively correlated with CD4(+) lymphocyte count (r=-0.70, P=0.004). The elevation of lymphocyte protein synthesis in AIDS patients suggests a higher rate of turnover of lymphocytes. This may be associated with a generalized activation of the immune system, which is also reflected by the elevated serum TNF-alpha concentration in the late stages of HIV-associated disease. PMID:11724643

  8. Functional requirements of AID's higher order structures and their interaction with RNA-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Samiran; Begum, Nasim A; Hu, Wenjun; Honjo, Tasuku

    2016-03-15

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) is essential for the somatic hypermutation (SHM) and class-switch recombination (CSR) of Ig genes. Although both the N and C termini of AID have unique functions in DNA cleavage and recombination, respectively, during SHM and CSR, their molecular mechanisms are poorly understood. Using a bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) assay combined with glycerol gradient fractionation, we revealed that the AID C terminus is required for a stable dimer formation. Furthermore, AID monomers and dimers form complexes with distinct heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (hnRNPs). AID monomers associate with DNA cleavage cofactor hnRNP K whereas AID dimers associate with recombination cofactors hnRNP L, hnRNP U, and Serpine mRNA-binding protein 1. All of these AID/ribonucleoprotein associations are RNA-dependent. We propose that AID's structure-specific cofactor complex formations differentially contribute to its DNA-cleavage and recombination functions. PMID:26929374

  9. Multisectoral strategy for AIDS prevention at community level.

    PubMed

    Elkins, D B; Kuyyakanond, T; Maticka-Tyndale, E; Rujkorakarn, D; Haswell-Elkins, M

    1996-01-01

    In north-east Thailand a five-act drama is broadcast on the village sound system to catalyse involvement in planning and carrying out AIDS prevention activities. Each community's own suggestions for an effective strategy are presented to the relevant government and nongovernmental agencies for endorsement and support. PMID:8820147

  10. Flavin-Induced Oligomerization in Escherichia coli Adaptive Response Protein AidB

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The process known as “adaptive response” allows Escherichia coli to respond to small doses of DNA-methylating agents by upregulating the expression of four proteins. While the role of three of these proteins in mitigating DNA damage is well understood, the function of AidB is less clear. Although AidB is a flavoprotein, no catalytic role has been established for the bound cofactor. Here we investigate the possibility that flavin plays a structural role in the assembly of the AidB tetramer. We report the generation and biophysical characterization of deflavinated AidB and of an AidB mutant that has greatly reduced affinity for flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD). Using fluorescence quenching and analytical ultracentrifugation, we find that apo AidB has a high affinity for FAD, as indicated by an apparent dissociation constant of 402.1 ± 35.1 nM, and that binding of substoichiometric amounts of FAD triggers a transition in the AidB oligomeric state. In particular, deflavinated AidB is dimeric, whereas the addition of FAD yields a tetramer. We further investigate the dimerization and tetramerization interfaces of AidB by determining a 2.8 Å resolution crystal structure in space group P32 that contains three intact tetramers in the asymmetric unit. Taken together, our findings provide strong evidence that FAD plays a structural role in the formation of tetrameric AidB. PMID:22004173

  11. Detection of HIV-1 Tat and JCV capsid protein, VP1, in AIDS brain with progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Del Valle, L; Croul, S; Morgello, S; Amini, S; Rappaport, J; Khalili, K

    2000-06-01

    HIV-1 infection can lead to severe central nervous system (CNS) clinical syndromes in more than 50% of HIV-1 positive individuals. Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) is the frequent opportunistic infection of the CNS which is seen in as high as 5% of AIDS patients. Results from previous cell culture studies showed that the HIV-1 regulatory protein, Tat can potentiate transcription of the human neurotropic virus, JCV, the causative agent for PML in cells derived from the human CNS. In this communication we examine the presence of the HIV-1 regulatory protein, Tat, as well as the HIV-1 and JCV structural proteins, p24 and VP1, respectively in AIDS/PML clinical samples. We demonstrate high level expression of the JCV capsid protein, VP1, in oligodendrocytes and to some degree in astrocytes of AIDS with PML. In HIV-1+ samples expression of HIV-1 core protein, p24 was detected in perivascular monocytic cells and to a lesser extent in astrocytes and endothelial cells. A lack of p24 expression in oligodendrocytes suggested no infection of these cells with HIV-1. Interestingly, HIV-1 Tat was detected in various infected cells as well as in uninfected oligodendrocytes from HIV-1+ tissue, supporting the earlier in vitro findings that secreted Tat from the infected cells can be localized in the neighboring uninfected cells. The presence of Tat in oligodendrocytes was particularly interesting as this protein can up-modulate JCV gene transcription and several key cell cycle regulatory proteins including cyclin E, Cdk2, and pRb. The data presented here provide in vivo evidence for a role of HIV-1 Tat in the pathogenesis of AIDS/PML by acting as a positive regulatory protein that affects the expression of JCV and other cell regulatory proteins in the CNS. PMID:10878711

  12. A Study on the Level of the First Aid Knowledge of Educators Working in Preschools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dincer, Caglayan; Atakurt, Yildir; Simsek, Isil

    This questionnaire study examined the level of knowledge of first aid of 138 educators in private and state preschools in Turkey. Questionnaires were completed by educators between May and July 1997. The findings indicated that about 17 percent of the educators thought that they had sufficient first aid knowledge, with 62 percent indicating that…

  13. Extenuating Circumstances in Perceptions of Suicide: Disease Diagnosis (AIDS, Cancer), Pain Level, and Life Expectancy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Stephen K.; Range, Lillian M.

    1991-01-01

    Examined whether illness type, pain level, and life expectancy affected reactions of undergraduates (n=160) toward a terminal illness suicide with Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) or cancer. AIDS patients were more stigmatized than cancer patients; suicide was more tolerated if victim was suffering greater pain. (Author/ABL)

  14. Financial issues in defining levels for HIV/AIDS research.

    PubMed

    Eastaugh, S R

    1998-01-01

    This article outlines the issues in cost identification and fair payment for acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) research. Costs need to be better identified using activity-based costing methods to reveal the structural pattern of care. Patterns of care can be too expensive if they: (1) overutilize the hospital as the locus of care, or (2) underutilize prevention and education. Managers need to learn more about the cost identification issues payers face in designing a fair payment system. In the long run, more health care professionals would serve the cause of innovation and biomedical research if they all work together to define a stable fair funding mechanism. Payers need to learn that fair payment of indirect costs is not a bonus or a windfall profit. PMID:9718508

  15. Electrochemical Characterization of Escherichia coli Adaptive Response Protein AidB

    PubMed Central

    Hamill, Michael J.; Jost, Marco; Wong, Cintyu; Bene, Nicholas C.; Drennan, Catherine L.; Elliott, Sean J.

    2012-01-01

    When exposed to known DNA-damaging alkylating agents, Escherichia coli cells increase production of four DNA repair enzymes: Ada, AlkA, AlkB, and AidB. The role of three enzymes (Ada, AlkA, and AlkB) in repairing DNA lesions has been well characterized, while the function of AidB is poorly understood. AidB has a distinct cofactor that is potentially related to the elusive role of AidB in adaptive response: a redox active flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD). In this study, we report the thermodynamic redox properties of the AidB flavin for the first time, both for free protein and in the presence of potential substrates. We find that the midpoint reduction potential of the AidB flavin is within a biologically relevant window for redox chemistry at −181 mV, that AidB significantly stabilizes the flavin semiquinone, and that small molecule binding perturbs the observed reduction potential. Our electrochemical results combined with structural analysis allow for fresh comparisons between AidB and the homologous acyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase (ACAD) family of enzymes. AidB exhibits several discrepancies from ACADs that suggest a novel catalytic mechanism distinct from that of the ACAD family enzymes. PMID:23443126

  16. Protein Crystal Growth With the Aid of Microfluidics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    vanderWoerd, Mark

    2003-01-01

    Protein crystallography is one of three well-known methods to obtain the structure of proteins. A major rate limiting step in protein crystallography is protein crystal nucleation and growth, which is still largely a process conducted by trial-and-error methods. Many attempts have been made to improve protein crystal growth by performing growth in microgravity. Although the use of microgravity appears to improve crystal quality in some attempts, this method has been inefficient because several reasons: we lack a fundamental understanding of macromolecular crystal growth in general and of the influence of microgravity in particular, we have to start with crystal growth conditions in microgravity based on conditions on the ground and finally the hardware does not allow for experimental iteration without reloading samples on the ground. To partially accommodate the disadvantages of the current hardware, we have used microfluidic technology (Lab-on-a-Chip devices) to design the concept of a more efficient crystallization device, suitable for use on the International Space Station and in high-throughput applications on the ground. The concept and properties of microfluidics, the application design process, and the advances in protein crystal growth hardware will be discussed in this presentation. Some examples of proteins crystallized in the new hardware will be discussed, including the differences between conventional crystallization versus crystallization in microfluidics.

  17. Tagging recombinant proteins to enhance solubility and aid purification.

    PubMed

    Walls, Dermot; Loughran, Sinéad T

    2011-01-01

    Protein fusion technology has enormously facilitated the efficient production and purification of individual recombinant proteins. The use of genetically engineered affinity and solubility-enhancing polypeptide "tags" has increased greatly in recent years and there now exists a considerable repertoire of these that can be used to solve issues related to the expression, stability, solubility, folding, and purification of their fusion partner. In the case of large-scale proteomic studies, the development of purification procedures tailored to individual proteins is not practicable, and affinity tags have therefore become indispensable tools for structural and functional proteomic initiatives that involve the expression of many proteins in parallel. Here, the rationale and applications of a range of established and more recently developed solubility-enhancing and affinity tags are outlined. PMID:20978965

  18. Level 5: user refinement to aid the fusion process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blasch, Erik P.; Plano, Susan

    2003-04-01

    The revised JDL Fusion model Level 4 process refinement covers a broad spectrum of actions such as sensor management and control. A limitation of Level 4 is the purpose of control - whether it be for user needs or system operation. Level 5, User Refinement, is a modification to the Revised JDL model that distinguishes between machine process refinement and user refinement. User refinement can either be human control actions or refinement of the user's cognitive model. In many cases, fusion research concentrates on the machine and does not take full advantage of the human as not only a qualified expert to refine the fusion process, but also as customer for whom the fusion system is designed. Without user refinement, sensor fusion is incomplete, inadequate, and the user neglects its worthiness. To capture user capabilities, we explore the concept of user refinement through decision and action based on situational leadership models. We develop a Fuse-Act Situational User Refinement (FASUR) model that details four refinement behaviors: Neglect, Consult, Rely, and Interact and five refinement functions: Planning, Organizing, Coordinating, Directing, and Controlling. Process refinement varies for different systems and different user information needs. By designing a fusion system with a specific user in mind, vis Level 5, a fusion architecture can meet user's information needs for varying situations, extend user sensing capabilities for action, and increase the human-machine interaction.

  19. Matt: local flexibility aids protein multiple structure alignment.

    PubMed

    Menke, Matthew; Berger, Bonnie; Cowen, Lenore

    2008-01-01

    Even when there is agreement on what measure a protein multiple structure alignment should be optimizing, finding the optimal alignment is computationally prohibitive. One approach used by many previous methods is aligned fragment pair chaining, where short structural fragments from all the proteins are aligned against each other optimally, and the final alignment chains these together in geometrically consistent ways. Ye and Godzik have recently suggested that adding geometric flexibility may help better model protein structures in a variety of contexts. We introduce the program Matt (Multiple Alignment with Translations and Twists), an aligned fragment pair chaining algorithm that, in intermediate steps, allows local flexibility between fragments: small translations and rotations are temporarily allowed to bring sets of aligned fragments closer, even if they are physically impossible under rigid body transformations. After a dynamic programming assembly guided by these "bent" alignments, geometric consistency is restored in the final step before the alignment is output. Matt is tested against other recent multiple protein structure alignment programs on the popular Homstrad and SABmark benchmark datasets. Matt's global performance is competitive with the other programs on Homstrad, but outperforms the other programs on SABmark, a benchmark of multiple structure alignments of proteins with more distant homology. On both datasets, Matt demonstrates an ability to better align the ends of alpha-helices and beta-strands, an important characteristic of any structure alignment program intended to help construct a structural template library for threading approaches to the inverse protein-folding problem. The related question of whether Matt alignments can be used to distinguish distantly homologous structure pairs from pairs of proteins that are not homologous is also considered. For this purpose, a p-value score based on the length of the common core and average root

  20. Knowledge levels of pre-school teachers related with basic first-aid practices, Isparta sample*

    PubMed Central

    Sönmez, Yonca; Uskun, Ersin; Pehlivan, Azize

    2014-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate the levels of knowledge of pre-school teachers working in the province center of Isparta related with basic first-aid practices and some factors which affected these levels of knowledge. Material and Methods: In this cross-sectional, analytic study, 110 pre-school teachers working in the province center of Isparta constituted the population. A questionnaire questioning sociodemographic properties and the level of knowledge related with first-aid practices was applied under supervision. The level of knowledge was evaluated on a 20-point scale. In the analyses, Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U tests and Spearman’s rank correlation were used. The study was approved by the Ethical Committee for Clinical Studies of Süleyman Demirel University School of Medicine (registration number: 105). Results: The mean score of first-aid knowledge of the pre-school teachers was found to be 11.9±2.9. The least known issues included washing the wound by soap and water after a dog bite, information related with the necessity of immobilization of a child who has fallen from a high level and the phone number of National Poison Information Center (16.4%, 20.9% and 22.7%, respectively). The scores of the subjects whose knowledge of first-aid was evaluated to be well were higher compared to the subjects whose knowledge of first-aid was evaluated to be moderate (p=0.009) and poor (p=0.001). It was found that first-aid scores did not show significant difference in terms of age, working period, having received first-aid training and having faced with a condition requiring first-aid previously (p>0.05, for all comparisons). Conclusions: It was found that pre-school teachers had insufficient first-aid knowledge. Since the first-aid knowledge scores of the subjects who reported that they received first-aid training before did not show significant difference, it was thought that the quality of training was as important as receiving training. PMID

  1. Structure and DNA binding of alkylation response protein AidB

    SciTech Connect

    Bowles, Timothy; Metz, Audrey H.; O'Quin, Jami; Wawrzak, Zdzislaw; Eichman, Brandt F.

    2009-01-12

    Exposure of Escherichia coli to alkylating agents activates expression of AidB in addition to DNA repair proteins Ada, AlkA, and AlkB. AidB was recently shown to possess a flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) cofactor and to bind to dsDNA, implicating it as a flavin-dependent DNA repair enzyme. However, the molecular mechanism by which AidB acts to reduce the mutagenic effects of specific DNA alkylators is unknown. We present a 1.7-{angstrom} crystal structure of AidB, which bears superficial resemblance to the acyl-CoA dehydrogenase superfamily of flavoproteins. The structure reveals a unique quaternary organization and a distinctive FAD active site that provides a rationale for AidB's limited dehydrogenase activity. A highly electropositive C-terminal domain not present in structural homologs was identified by mutational analysis as the DNA binding site. Structural analysis of the DNA and FAD binding sites provides evidence against AidB-catalyzed DNA repair and supports a model in which AidB acts to prevent alkylation damage by protecting DNA and destroying alkylating agents that have yet to reach their DNA target.

  2. Patient Decision Aids: A Case for Certification at the National Level in the United States.

    PubMed

    Poddar, Urbashi; Brownlee, Shannon; Stacey, Dawn; Volk, Robert J; Williams, John W; Elwyn, Glyn

    2015-01-01

    Patient decision aids enable patients to be better informed about the potential benefits and harms of their healthcare options. Certification of patient decision aids at the national level in the United States is a critical step towards responsible governance-primarily as a quality measure that increases patients' safety, as mandated in the U.S. Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA). Certification would provide a verification process to identify conflicts of interest that may otherwise bias the scientific evidence presented in decision aids. Certification also benefits clinicians who may otherwise face malpractice claims based on harm to patients caused by possible reliance on patient decision aids that are inaccurate, incomplete, or presented in a manner that biases the patient's decision. Existing work by the International Patient Decision Aid Standards Collaboration could guide the establishment of a certification process within the U.S. This article argues for national certification of patient decision aids and discusses how that may be achieved. PMID:26752384

  3. Proteomic profiling of cellulase-aid-extracted membrane proteins for functional identification of cellulose synthase complexes and their potential associated- components in cotton fibers

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ao; Wang, Ruyi; Li, Xianliang; Liu, Mingyong; Fan, Jian; Guo, Kai; Luo, Bing; Chen, Tingting; Feng, Shengqiu; Wang, Yanting; Wang, Bingrui; Peng, Liangcai; Xia, Tao

    2016-01-01

    Cotton fibers are an excellent model for understanding of cellulose biosynthesis in higher plants. In this study, we determined a high cellulose biosynthesis activity in vitro by optimizing biochemical reaction conditions in cotton fibers. By adding a commercial cellulase enzyme into fibers extraction process, we extracted markedly higher levels of GhCESA1 and GhCESA8 proteins and observed an increase in β-1,4-glucan and β-1,3-glucan products in vitro. LC-MS/MS analysis of anti-GhCESA8-immunoprecipitated proteins showed that 19 proteins could be found in three independent experiments including four CESAs (GhCESA1,2,7,8), five well-known non-CESA proteins, one callose synthase (CALS) and nine novel proteins. Notably, upon the cellulase treatment, four CESAs, one CALS and four novel proteins were measured at relatively higher levels by calculating total peptide counts and distinct peptide numbers, indicating that the cellulase-aid-extracted proteins most likely contribute to the increase in β-glucan products in vitro. These results suggest that the cellulase treatment may aid to release active cellulose synthases complexes from growing glucan chains and make them more amenable to extraction. To our knowledge, it is the first time report about the functional identification of the potential proteins that were associated with plant cellulose and callose synthases complexes by using the cellulase-aided protein extraction. PMID:27192945

  4. Proteomic profiling of cellulase-aid-extracted membrane proteins for functional identification of cellulose synthase complexes and their potential associated- components in cotton fibers.

    PubMed

    Li, Ao; Wang, Ruyi; Li, Xianliang; Liu, Mingyong; Fan, Jian; Guo, Kai; Luo, Bing; Chen, Tingting; Feng, Shengqiu; Wang, Yanting; Wang, Bingrui; Peng, Liangcai; Xia, Tao

    2016-01-01

    Cotton fibers are an excellent model for understanding of cellulose biosynthesis in higher plants. In this study, we determined a high cellulose biosynthesis activity in vitro by optimizing biochemical reaction conditions in cotton fibers. By adding a commercial cellulase enzyme into fibers extraction process, we extracted markedly higher levels of GhCESA1 and GhCESA8 proteins and observed an increase in β-1,4-glucan and β-1,3-glucan products in vitro. LC-MS/MS analysis of anti-GhCESA8-immunoprecipitated proteins showed that 19 proteins could be found in three independent experiments including four CESAs (GhCESA1,2,7,8), five well-known non-CESA proteins, one callose synthase (CALS) and nine novel proteins. Notably, upon the cellulase treatment, four CESAs, one CALS and four novel proteins were measured at relatively higher levels by calculating total peptide counts and distinct peptide numbers, indicating that the cellulase-aid-extracted proteins most likely contribute to the increase in β-glucan products in vitro. These results suggest that the cellulase treatment may aid to release active cellulose synthases complexes from growing glucan chains and make them more amenable to extraction. To our knowledge, it is the first time report about the functional identification of the potential proteins that were associated with plant cellulose and callose synthases complexes by using the cellulase-aided protein extraction. PMID:27192945

  5. The auxin-inducible degradation (AID) system enables versatile conditional protein depletion in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liangyu; Ward, Jordan D; Cheng, Ze; Dernburg, Abby F

    2015-12-15

    Experimental manipulation of protein abundance in living cells or organisms is an essential strategy for investigation of biological regulatory mechanisms. Whereas powerful techniques for protein expression have been developed in Caenorhabditis elegans, existing tools for conditional disruption of protein function are far more limited. To address this, we have adapted the auxin-inducible degradation (AID) system discovered in plants to enable conditional protein depletion in C. elegans. We report that expression of a modified Arabidopsis TIR1 F-box protein mediates robust auxin-dependent depletion of degron-tagged targets. We document the effectiveness of this system for depletion of nuclear and cytoplasmic proteins in diverse somatic and germline tissues throughout development. Target proteins were depleted in as little as 20-30 min, and their expression could be re-established upon auxin removal. We have engineered strains expressing TIR1 under the control of various promoter and 3' UTR sequences to drive tissue-specific or temporally regulated expression. The degron tag can be efficiently introduced by CRISPR/Cas9-based genome editing. We have harnessed this system to explore the roles of dynamically expressed nuclear hormone receptors in molting, and to analyze meiosis-specific roles for proteins required for germ line proliferation. Together, our results demonstrate that the AID system provides a powerful new tool for spatiotemporal regulation and analysis of protein function in a metazoan model organism. PMID:26552885

  6. The auxin-inducible degradation (AID) system enables versatile conditional protein depletion in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Liangyu; Ward, Jordan D.; Cheng, Ze; Dernburg, Abby F.

    2015-01-01

    Experimental manipulation of protein abundance in living cells or organisms is an essential strategy for investigation of biological regulatory mechanisms. Whereas powerful techniques for protein expression have been developed in Caenorhabditis elegans, existing tools for conditional disruption of protein function are far more limited. To address this, we have adapted the auxin-inducible degradation (AID) system discovered in plants to enable conditional protein depletion in C. elegans. We report that expression of a modified Arabidopsis TIR1 F-box protein mediates robust auxin-dependent depletion of degron-tagged targets. We document the effectiveness of this system for depletion of nuclear and cytoplasmic proteins in diverse somatic and germline tissues throughout development. Target proteins were depleted in as little as 20-30 min, and their expression could be re-established upon auxin removal. We have engineered strains expressing TIR1 under the control of various promoter and 3′ UTR sequences to drive tissue-specific or temporally regulated expression. The degron tag can be efficiently introduced by CRISPR/Cas9-based genome editing. We have harnessed this system to explore the roles of dynamically expressed nuclear hormone receptors in molting, and to analyze meiosis-specific roles for proteins required for germ line proliferation. Together, our results demonstrate that the AID system provides a powerful new tool for spatiotemporal regulation and analysis of protein function in a metazoan model organism. PMID:26552885

  7. The Reliability and Validity of the Comfort Level Method of Setting Hearing Aid Gain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walden, Brian E.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    Investigated in a series of experiments with 40 adults (20- to 70-years-old) having bilateral sensorineural hearing impairments was the test-retest reliability of the comfort level method for setting the acoustic gain of hearing aids, and the relationship between the comfort settings utilized in more realistic daily listening situations.…

  8. Mass-Elastic Band Thermodynamics: A Visual Teaching Aid at the Introductory Level

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galley, William C.

    2007-01-01

    The analysis a recently developed mass-elastic band process that will help in providing a better understanding of various aspects of chemical thermodynamics. These processes also include the use of a visual teaching aid at the introductory level, which helps students to think better.

  9. Productive human immunodeficiency virus infection levels correlate with AIDS-related manifestations in the patient

    SciTech Connect

    Mathez, D.; Paul, D.; de Belilovsky, C.; Sultan, Y.; Deleuze, J.; Gorin, I.; Saurin, W.; Decker, R.; Leibowitch, J. )

    1990-10-01

    Mononuclear cells were obtained from 71 human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) seropositive subjects presenting and first visit either as asymptomatic or with minor symptoms and with CD4 lymphocytes greater than 550 per mm3 (group A, 35 patients) or as patients with AIDS, AIDS-related illnesses, or CD4 lymphocytes less than 400 per mm3 (group B, 36 patients). After 1-5 years of follow-up, 13 patients of group A had essentially retained their initial status (asymptomatics); the 22 others had suffered clinical or immunological deterioration (progressors). Frozen cells were thawed and submitted to lethal gamma-irradiation in vitro (4500 rads; 1 rad = 0.01 Gy) before they were cultured with normal phytohemagglutinin-stimulated lymphocytes to determine radiation-resistant HIV expression ex vivo (R-HEV). HIV antigenemia correlated with R-HEV values in 142 samples (r = 0.92, P less than 0.001) but was a less sensitive predictor of disease than R-HEV. R-HEV was detected in all specimens from patients with major AIDS-related illnesses or HIV-associated CD4 lymphopenia. In 77% of the progressors from group A, R-HEV detection preceded the onset of AIDS-associated disease or CD4 lymphopenia by 1 year (average). Conversely, R-HEV was low or was not detected in 36 sequential specimens from the 13 patients who remained asymptomatic over the following 2-5 years. Thus, persistently low HIV expression in vivo predicted a nondiseased state, whereas higher HIV expression levels seemed necessary for disease to occur. These data indicate that R-HEV is related to productive HIV infection in vivo, the latter acting as a determinant of AIDS-related illnesses. In view of this, measurement of HIV expression levels in the patient should be useful in antiviral efficacy trials.

  10. The effects of an HIV/AIDS educational programme on the anxiety level of nursing students.

    PubMed

    All, A C; Sullivan, L

    1997-10-01

    Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) is a serious disease that has special concern for the health care provider. AIDS has continued to grow despite control efforts. As the disease infectivity period remains lengthy, and the heterosexual population is affected to a greater degree, the level of anxiety has also risen despite educational endeavours. Many fears and anxieties have been associated with AIDS patients by health care workers. The reduction of stress, perceived risk and discomfort following educational efforts have been supported in past research. Educational programmes will need to be given for current health care workers at all levels as well as nursing students. Future nurses must be prepared to meet this challenge. This study was conducted using a convenience sample of nursing students at a university in western United States. Its purpose was to assess any changes that occurred in state anxiety following an educational presentation. Spielberger's State-Trait Anxiety Inventory was used as the measurement instrument. Some anxiety levels were significantly reduced. PMID:9354994

  11. Atomic-level analysis of membrane-protein structure.

    PubMed

    Hendrickson, Wayne A

    2016-06-01

    Membrane proteins are substantially more challenging than natively soluble proteins as subjects for structural analysis. Thus, membrane proteins are greatly underrepresented in structural databases. Recently, focused consortium efforts and advances in methodology for protein production, crystallographic analysis and cryo-EM analysis have accelerated the pace of atomic-level structure determination of membrane proteins. PMID:27273628

  12. Examining a Financial Climate of Support: How Institutional-Level Financial Aid Relates to Teamwork, Leadership, and Critical Thinking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Julie J.; Denson, Nida; Johnson, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    Financial aid plays a critical role in college access and student success. It plays an increasingly important role as the college-going population continues to diversify and the cost of college continues to rise at both public and private institutions. In this study, the authors examined whether institutional level financial aid has any direct…

  13. Antioxidative activity of protein hydrolysates prepared from alkaline-aided channel catfish protein isolates.

    PubMed

    Theodore, Ann E; Raghavan, Sivakumar; Kristinsson, Hordur G

    2008-08-27

    Antioxidative activity of hydrolyzed protein prepared from alkali-solubilized catfish protein isolates was studied. The isolates were hydrolyzed to 5, 15, and 30% degree of hydrolysis using the protease enzyme, Protamex. Hydrolyzed protein was separated into hydrolysates and soluble supernatants, and both of these fractions were studied for their metal chelating ability, 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging ability, ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP), oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC), and their ability to inhibit the formation of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) in washed tilapia muscle containing tilapia hemolysate. Both hydrolysates and supernatants were characterized using sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Results showed that DPPH radical scavenging ability and reducing power of catfish protein hydrolysates decreased, whereas the ORAC value, metal chelating ability, and ability to inhibit TBARS increased, with an increase in the degree of hydrolysis. Hydrolysate samples showed higher DPPH radical scavenging ability and Fe(3+) reducing ability, and supernatant samples had higher metal chelating ability. In general, low molecular weight (MW) peptides had high ORAC values and high metal chelating ability, and high MW peptides had a higher reducing power (FRAP) and were more effective in scavenging DPPH radicals. In a washed muscle model system, the ability of catfish protein hydrolysates and their corresponding supernatants to inhibit the formation of TBARS increased with an increase in the degree of hydrolysis. PMID:18662014

  14. Yeast prions: Paramutation at the protein level?

    PubMed

    Tuite, Mick F

    2015-08-01

    Prions are proteins that have the potential to refold into a novel conformation that templates the conversion of like molecules to the altered infectious form. In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, trans-generational epigenetic inheritance can be mediated by a number of structurally and functionally diverse prions. Prionogenesis can confer both loss-of-function and gain-of-function properties to the prion protein and this in turn can have a major impact on host phenotype, short-term adaptation and evolution of new traits. Prionogenesis shares a number of properties in common with paramutation and can be considered as a mitotically and meiotically heritable change in protein conformation induced by trans-interactions between homologous proteins. PMID:26386407

  15. Hearing aid coupler output level variability and coupler correction levels for insert earphones.

    PubMed

    Frank, T; Richards, W D

    1991-06-01

    HA coupler type SPLs were independently determined by two experimenters for five repeated measurements with and without replacement of two ER-3A and two EARTONE 3A insert earphones. Measurements were made using a B&K DB-0138 coupler configured as an HA-1, HA-2 earphone coupler and HA-2 earphone coupler with entrance through a rigid tube referred to as the DB-0138 coupler. The HA-1, HA-2, and DB-0138 SPLs were found to be very stable (+/- 0.2 dB) for all intra- and interexperimenter measurements for each insert earphone and coupler type from 125 to 8000 Hz. Averaged across both experimenters and all repeated measurements, the mean HA-1 and HA-2 coupler SPLs were similar for each insert earphone from 125 to 8000 Hz. The mean HA-1, HA-2, and DB-0138 coupler SPLs were similar for each insert earphone from 125 to 2000 Hz; however, from 3000 to 8000 Hz the DB-0138 coupler SPLs were higher than the HA-1 and HA-2 coupler SPLs for each insert earphone. This occurred because of the geometrical differences between the insert earphone to coupler connections and coupler types. The HA-1 minus DB-0138 and HA-2 minus DB-0138 coupler SPL differences, or coupler correction levels, could be explained by quarter-wave resonances and stepped-diameter tubing systems creating acoustic horn effects. PMID:1916048

  16. abFASP-MS: Affinity-Based Filter-Aided Sample Preparation Mass Spectrometry for Quantitative Analysis of Chemically Labeled Protein Complexes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Affinity purification coupled to 1-D gel-free liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC–MS) is a well-established and widespread approach for the analyses of noncovalently interacting protein complexes. In this study, two proteins conjugated to a streptavidin-binding peptide and hemagglutinin double tag were expressed in the respective Flp-In HEK293 cell lines: green fluorescent protein (SH-GFP) and TANK binding kinase 1 (SH-TBK1_MOUSE). Fluorescent anti-HA immunoblots revealed that the expression level of SH-GFP was ∼50% lower than that of SH-TBK1_MOUSE. Subsequently, the input material was normalized to obtain a similar quantity of purified SH-tagged proteins. Optimization of the release of protein complexes from the anti-HA-agarose with different eluting agents was then assessed. With respect to the total number of protein groups identified in the purified complexes, elution with 2% SDS surpassed both 100 mM glycine and 100 mM formic acid. Relative quantitation of the purified protein complexes using TMT 6-plex reagents confirmed the higher efficiency of the 2% SDS elution followed by filter-aided sample preparation (FASP). The data presented in this study provide a new application of FASP to quantitative MS analysis of affinity-purified protein complexes. We have termed the approach abFASP-MS, or affinity-based filter-aided sample preparation mass spectrometry. PMID:24400740

  17. High levels of plasma protein C in nephrotic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pabinger-Fasching, I; Lechner, K; Niessner, H; Schmidt, P; Balzar, E; Mannhalter, C

    1985-02-18

    In patients with severe nephrotic syndrome determinations of plasma protein C: Ag levels (8 patients: 5 adults, 3 children) and protein C activity (3 out of 8 patients) revealed significantly elevated plasma protein C concentrations. Furthermore we observed a significant inverse correlation of protein C: Ag to AT III: Ag levels. No protein C: Ag could be detected in the urine of two patients studied. We conclude from our data, that changes of plasma protein C do not contribute to the high thrombotic tendency in nephrotic syndrome. PMID:3838827

  18. A level set segmentation for computer-aided dental x-ray analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shuo; Fevens, Thomas; Krzyzak, Adam; Li, Song

    2005-04-01

    A level-set-based segmentation framework for Computer Aided Dental X-rays Analysis (CADXA) is proposed. In this framework, we first employ level set methods to segment the dental X-ray image into three regions: Normal Region (NR), Potential Abnormal Region (PAR), Abnormal and Background Region (ABR). The segmentation results are then used to build uncertainty maps based on a proposed uncertainty measurement method and an analysis scheme is applied. The level set segmentation method consists of two stages: a training stage and a segmentation stage. During the training stage, manually chosen representative images are segmented using hierarchical level set region detection. The segmentation results are used to train a support vector machine (SVM) classifier. During the segmentation stage, a dental X-ray image is first classified by the trained SVM. The classifier provides an initial contour which is close to the correct boundary for the coupled level set method which is then used to further segment the image. Different dental X-ray images are used to test the framework. Experimental results show that the proposed framework achieves faster level set segmentation and provides more detailed information and indications of possible problems to the dentist. To our best knowledge, this is one of the first results on CADXA using level set methods.

  19. Neighborhood-level and individual-level correlates of cannabis use among young persons living with HIV/AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Bruce, Douglas; Kahana, Shoshana Y.; Bauermeister, Jose A.; Nichols, Sharon L.; Hightow-Weidman, Lisa B.; Heinze, Justin E.; Shea, Jaclyn; Fernández, M. Isabel

    2015-01-01

    Introduction In addition to individual characteristics, there may be a wide range of environmental or neighborhood stressors that contribute to elevated cannabis use in groups of youth living with HIV/AIDS (YLHIV); however, the effects of social disorganization on cannabis use in YLHIV to date have not been studied. Methods We examined the effects of individual-level and neighborhood-level factors by developing hierarchical generalized linear models estimating odds of current cannabis use (any use during the past 3 months) and daily cannabis use among a sample of YLHIV (N=1921) currently receiving medical care. Results The final model for daily cannabis use in the past 3 months included significant positive effects associated with hostility (O.R.=1.08, 95% C.I.: 1.05, 1.11), being older (O.R.= 1.12, 95% C.I.: 1.05, 1.20), being a bisexual male (O.R.=1.72, 95% C.I.: 1.10, 2.70), and residing in a community with a murder rate in the highest quartile (O.R.= 1.91, 95% C.I.: 1.27, 2.87), second highest quartile (O.R.=1.62, 95% C.I.: 1.06, 2.46), or third highest quartile (O.R.=1.52, 95% C.I.: 1.01, 2.30). Discussion This paper advances our knowledge of the multilevel factors associated with elevated cannabis use among groups of YLHIV and furthers our understanding of social and structural determinants of health in this population. Future research into cannabis use among YLHIV should consider, not only cannabis use within the context of the adjustment of living with HIV/AIDS, but also the stressors that characterize the environments in which groups of YLHIV live. PMID:25858786

  20. Dietary protein source and level alters growth in neon tetras.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nutritional studies for aquarium fish like the neon tetra are sparse in comparison with those for food fish. To determine the optimum dietary protein level and source for growth of neon tetras, diets were formulated to contain 25, 35, 45 and 55% dietary protein from either marine animal protein or ...

  1. Synaptic protein levels altered in vascular dementia

    PubMed Central

    Sinclair, Lindsey I; Tayler, Hannah M; Love, Seth

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Cerebral ischaemia is the defining pathophysiological abnormality in most forms of vascular dementia (VAD), but the pathogenesis of the dementia remains poorly understood. In Alzheimer's disease (AD), there is early loss of synaptic proteins, but these have been little studied in VAD. Materials and Methods We measured synaptophysin, postsynaptic density protein 95 (PSD-95), drebrin, synaptosomal-associated protein 25 (SNAP-25) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays in superior temporal cortex from 11 patients with VAD and, initially, 11 non-dementia controls. We corrected for neuronal content by measurement of neuron-specific enolase. A further 11 controls were subsequently used in a validation study. Simulation of post-mortem delay found that PSD-95 was stable at 4°C but declined slightly at RT. SNAP-25 and drebrin showed good post-mortem stability. Previous studies had shown good post-mortem preservation of synaptophysin and VEGF. Results The VAD cases had lower synaptophysin (but P > 0.05 in initial study), significantly lower SNAP-25 (P = 0.024) and significantly higher drebrin (P = 0.020). On comparison with the second control group, the reduction in synaptophysin was significant (P = 0.008), and the other results were confirmed. Conclusion There is probably a reduction in presynaptic proteins in the temporal cortex in VAD, although not as marked as in AD. In VAD, there is also an increase in drebrin, which may be a response to reduced synaptic input. PMID:25559750

  2. The Impact of a Credit Course on AIDS at the Collegiate Level.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fennell, Reginald

    1990-01-01

    Developed, implemented, and investigated course on Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) to determine effectiveness of different teaching methods on increasing knowledge and decreasing negative attitudes toward AIDS and homosexuality. Results revealed that course participants (N=63) increased knowledge of AIDS and adopted more positive…

  3. Structural modification of serum vitamin D3-binding protein and immunosuppression in AIDS patients.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, N; Naraparaju, V R; Srinivasula, S M

    1995-11-01

    A serum glycoprotein, vitamin D3-binding protein (Gc protein), can be converted by beta-galactosidase of stimulated B lymphocytes and sialidase of T lymphocytes to a potent macrophage-activating factor (MAF), a protein with N-acetylgalactosamine as the remaining sugar moiety. Thus, Gc protein is a precursor for MAF. Treatment of purified Gc protein with immobilized beta-galactosidase and sialidase generates an extremely high-titered MAF (GcMAF). When peripheral blood monocytes/macrophages of 46 HIV-infected patients were treated with GcMAF (100 pg/ml), the monocytes/macrophages of all patients were efficiently activated. However, the MAF precursor activity of plasma Gc protein was low in 16 (35%) of of these patients. Loss of the MAF precursor activity appeared to be due to deglycosylation of plasma Gc protein by alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase found in the patient blood stream. Levels of plasma alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase activity in individual patients had an inverse correlation with the MAF precursor activity of their plasma Gc protein. Thus, precursor activity of Gc protein and alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase activity in patient blood can serve as diagnostic and prognostic indices. PMID:8573395

  4. Task analysis for computer-aided design (CAD) at a keystroke level.

    PubMed

    Chi, C F; Chung, K L

    1996-08-01

    The purpose of this research was to develop a new model to describe and predict a computerized task. AutoCAD was utilized as the experimental tool to collect operating procedure and time data at a keystroke level for a computer aided design (CAD) task. Six undergraduate students participated in the experiment. They were required to complete one simple and one complex engineering drawing. A model which characterized the task performance by software commands and predicted task execution time using keystroke-level model operators was proposed and applied to the analysis of the dialogue data. This task parameter model adopted software commands, e.g. LINE, OFFSET in AutoCAD, to describe the function of a task unit and used up to five parameters to indicate the number of keystrokes, chosen function for a command and ways of starting and ending a command. Each task unit in the task parameter model can be replaced by a number of primitive operators as in the keystroke level model to predict the task execution time. The observed task execution times of all task units were found to be highly correlated with the task execution times predicted by the keystroke level model. Therefore, the task parameter model was proved to be a usable analytical tool for evaluating the human-computer interface (HCI). PMID:15677066

  5. Computer aided root lesion detection using level set and complex wavelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shuo; Fevens, Thomas; Krzyżak, Adam; Jin, Chao; Li, Song

    2007-03-01

    A computer aided root lesion detection method for digital dental X-rays is proposed using level set and complex wavelets. The detection method consists of two stages: preprocessing and root lesion detection. During preprocessing, a level set segmentation is applied to separate the teeth from the background. Tailored for the dental clinical environment, a segmentation clinical acceleration scheme is applied by using a support vector machine (SVM) classifier and individual principal component analysis (PCA) to provide an initial contour. Then, based on the segmentation result, root lesion detection is performed. Firstly, the teeth are isolated by the average intensity profile. Secondly, a center-line zero crossing based candidate generation is applied to generate the possible root lesion areas. Thirdly, the Dual-Tree Complex Wavelets Transform (DT-CWT) is used to further remove false positives. Lastly when the root lesion is detected, the area of root lesion is automatically marked with color indication representing different levels of seriousness. 150 real dental X-rays with various degrees of root lesions are used to test the proposed method. The results were validated by the dentist. Experimental results show that the proposed method is able to successfully detect the root lesion and provide visual assistance to the dentist.

  6. Toward automatic computer aided dental X-ray analysis using level set method.

    PubMed

    Li, Shuo; Fevens, Thomas; Krzyzak, Adam; Jin, Chao; Li, Song

    2005-01-01

    A Computer Aided Dental X-rays Analysis (CADXA) framework is proposed to semi-automatically detect areas of bone loss and root decay in digital dental X-rays. In this framework, first, a new proposed competitive coupled level set method is proposed to segment the image into three pathologically meaningful regions using two coupled level set functions. Tailored for the dental clinical environment, the segmentation stage uses a trained support vector machine (SVM) classifier to provide initial contours. Then, based on the segmentation results, an analysis scheme is applied. First, the scheme builds an uncertainty map from which those areas with bone loss will be automatically detected. Secondly, the scheme employs a method based on the SVM and the average intensity profile to isolate the teeth and detect root decay. Experimental results show that our proposed framework is able to automatically detect the areas of bone loss and, when given the orientation of the teeth, it is able to automatically detect the root decay with a seriousness level marked for diagnosis. PMID:16685904

  7. PPR (pentatricopeptide repeat) proteins in mammals: important aids to mitochondrial gene expression.

    PubMed

    Lightowlers, Robert N; Chrzanowska-Lightowlers, Zofia M A

    2008-11-15

    Genes encoding PPR (pentatricopeptide repeat)-containing proteins constitute one of the largest gene families in plants. The majority of these proteins are predicted to target organelles and to bind to RNA. Strikingly, there is a dearth of these proteins in mammals, although genomic searches reveal six candidates, all of which are also predicted to target the mitochondrion. Two of these proteins, POLRMT (the mitochondrial RNA polymerase) and MRPS27, a mitoribosomal protein, are involved in transcription and translation respectively. PTCD1 (pentatricopeptide repeat domain protein 1) and PTCD3 are predicted to be involved in the assembly of respiratory chain complexes, whereas mutations in one other protein, LRPPRC (leucine-rich pentatricopeptide repeat cassette), have been shown to cause defects in the levels of cytochrome c oxidase, the terminal member of the respiratory chain. In this issue of the Biochemical Journal, Xu et al. turn their attention to the remaining candidate, PTCD2. Depletion in a mouse model led to deficiencies of the third complex of the respiratory chain that caused profound ultrastructural changes in the heart. The exact molecular function of PTCD2 remains unclear, but depletion leads to an apparent lack of processing of the mitochondrial transcript encoding apocytochrome b, a critical member of complex III. These data are consistent with PTCD2 playing an important role in the post-transcriptional expression of the mitochondrial genome. PMID:18939947

  8. The desmosomal protein Desmoglein 1 aids recovery of epidermal differentiation after acute ultraviolet light exposure

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Jodi L.; Koetsier, Jennifer L.; Sirico, Anna; Agidi, Ada T.; Antonini, Dario; Missero, Caterina; Green, Kathleen J.

    2014-01-01

    Epidermal structure is damaged by exposure to ultraviolet (UV) light but the molecular mechanisms governing structural repair are largely unknown. UVB (290-320 nm wavelengths) exposure prior to induction of differentiation reduced expression of differentiation-associated proteins, including Desmoglein 1 (Dsg1), Desmocollin 1 (Dsc1) and Keratins 1 and 10 (K1/K10) in a dose-dependent manner in normal human epidermal keratinocytes (NHEKs). The UVB- induced reduction in both Dsg1 transcript and protein was associated with reduced binding of the p63 transcription factor to previously unreported enhancer regulatory regions of the Dsg1 gene. Since Dsg1 promotes epidermal differentiation in addition to participating in cell-cell adhesion, the role of Dsg1 in aiding differentiation after UVB damage was tested. Compared to controls, depleting Dsg1 via shRNA resulted in further reduction of Dsc1 and K1/K10 expression in monolayer NHEK cultures and in abnormal epidermal architecture in organotypic skin models recovering from UVB exposure. Ectopic expression of Dsg1 in keratinocyte monolayers rescued the UVB-induced differentiation defect. Treatment of UVB-exposed monolayer or organotypic cultures with Trichostatin A, a histone deacetylase inhibitor, partially restored differentiation marker expression, suggesting a potential therapeutic strategy for reversing UV-induced impairment of epidermal differentiation after acute sun exposure. PMID:24594668

  9. Scientists Grow Therapeutic Protein in Engineered Soya Bean Seeds to Prevent AIDS | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Genetically modified soya beans provide a scalable, low-cost method of producing microbicides that prevent AIDS, a technique sustainable for resource-poor countries where AIDS is spreading rapidly. According to the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS, more than 36 million people worldwide are living with HIV. While the number of AIDS-related deaths are decreasing, infection rates are still increasing, specifically in Eastern and Southern Africa.

  10. Protein Quality, Growth, and Malnutrition: Advances in Science and the Role of Dairy Ingredients in Food Aid: Introduction.

    PubMed

    Whitsett-Morrow, Dacia; LaGrange, Veronique

    2016-03-01

    This article is the introduction to our formal proceedings of the symposium titled "Protein Quality, Growth and Malnutrition: Latest Scientific Findings and the Role of Dairy in Food Aid," held during the Experimental Biology 2015 annual meeting in Boston, Massachusetts. PMID:26880664

  11. Concurrent zidovudine levels in semen and serum determined by radioimmunoassay in patients with AIDS or AIDS-related complex

    SciTech Connect

    Henry, K.; Chinnock, B.J.; Quinn, R.P.; Fletcher, C.V.; de Miranda, P.; Balfour, H.H.

    1988-05-27

    Zidovudine was present in the semen and serum of six patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome or the related complex who were receiving 200 mg of the drug orally every four to six hours. Mean semen zidovudine levels (as measured by a new radioimmunoassay) in samples collected 0.75 to 1.25 hours after oral dosing were 3.63 to 7.19 ..mu..mol/L. Levels in semen samples collected 3.0 to 4.5 hours after oral dosing were 1.68 to 6.43 ..mu..mol/L. These values are above the in vitro minimum inhibitory concentration for the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). Mean serum concentrations at the early and late times after oral dosing were 0.22 to 3.07 ..mu..mol/L and 0.10 to 1.42 ..mu..mol/L, respectively. Ratios of semen/serum zidovudine levels ranged from 1.3 to 20.4. It is possible that a pH-dependent trapping mechanism, which has been described in the prostate for other antibiotics, was responsible for the relatively high semen levels observed.

  12. Translation Levels Control Multi-Spanning Membrane Protein Expression

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Cecilia; Bostrom, Jenny; Fuh, Germaine; Lee, Chingwei V.; Huang, Arthur; Vandlen, Richard L.; Yansura, Daniel G.

    2012-01-01

    Attempts to express eukaryotic multi-spanning membrane proteins at high-levels have been generally unsuccessful. In order to investigate the cause of this limitation and gain insight into the rate limiting processes involved, we have analyzed the effect of translation levels on the expression of several human membrane proteins in Escherichia coli (E. coli). These results demonstrate that excessive translation initiation rates of membrane proteins cause a block in protein synthesis and ultimately prevent the high-level accumulation of these proteins. Moderate translation rates allow coupling of peptide synthesis and membrane targeting, resulting in a significant increase in protein expression and accumulation over time. The current study evaluates four membrane proteins, CD20 (4-transmembrane (TM) helixes), the G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs, 7-TMs) RA1c and EG-VEGFR1, and Patched 1 (12-TMs), and demonstrates the critical role of translation initiation rates in the targeting, insertion and folding of integral membrane proteins in the E. coli membrane. PMID:22563408

  13. College Level Financial Aid Opportunities for Migrant Students Within The State University of New York.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stratton, Barbara; And Others

    Divided into three parts, this booklet is designed to assist guidance counselors and administrators in identifying financial programs which aid migrant students in obtaining a higher education within the State University of New York (SUNY) system. Part I lists 18 common student financial aid programs available within SUNY. These include grants,…

  14. The relationship between hearing aid frequency response and acceptable noise level in patients with sensorineural hearing loss

    PubMed Central

    Jalilvand, Hamid; Pourbakht, Akram; Jalaee, Shohreh

    2015-01-01

    Background: When fitting hearing aid as a compensatory device for an impaired cochlea in a patient with sensorineural hearing loss (HL), it is needed to the effective and efficient frequency response would be selected regarding providing the patient's perfect speech perception. There is not any research about the effects of frequency modifications on speech perception in patients with HL regarding the cochlear desensitization. The effect (s) of modifications in frequency response of hearing aid amplification on the results of acceptable noise level (ANL) test is the main aim of this study. Materials and Methods: The amounts of ANL in two conditions of linear amplification (high frequency emphasis [HFE] and mid frequency emphasis [MFE]) were measured. Thirty-two male subjects who participated in this study had the moderate to severe sensorineural HL. Results: There was not any significant difference between ANL in linear amplification of hearing aid with HFE frequency response and ANL in linear amplification of hearing aid with MFE frequency response. Conclusion: The gain modification of frequency response not only does not affect the patient's performance of speech intelligibility in ANL test. This indicates that we need to note to the cochlear desensitization phenomenon when fitting hearing aid as a compensatory device for an impaired cochlea in a patient. The cochlear desensitization has not been considered properly in hearing aid fitting formula which is needed to be explored more about the bio-mechanisms of impaired cochlea. PMID:26918238

  15. Posttraumatic stress in AIDS-orphaned children exposed to high levels of trauma: the protective role of perceived social support.

    PubMed

    Cluver, Lucie; Fincham, Dylan S; Seedat, Soraya

    2009-04-01

    Poor urban children in South Africa are exposed to multiple community traumas, but AIDS-orphaned children are at particular risk for posttraumatic stress. This study examined the hypothesis that social support may moderate the relationship between trauma exposure and posttraumatic stress for this group. Four hundred twenty-five AIDS-orphaned children were interviewed using standardized measures of psychopathology. Compared to participants with low perceived social support, those with high perceived social support demonstrated significantly lower levels of PTSD symptoms after both low and high levels of trauma exposure. This suggests that strong perception of social support from carers, school staff, and friends may lessen deleterious effects of exposure to trauma, and could be a focus of intervention efforts to improve psychological outcomes for AIDS-orphaned children. PMID:19319917

  16. Epstein-Barr virus nuclear protein EBNA3C directly induces expression of AID and somatic mutations in B cells.

    PubMed

    Kalchschmidt, Jens S; Bashford-Rogers, Rachael; Paschos, Kostas; Gillman, Adam C T; Styles, Christine T; Kellam, Paul; Allday, Martin J

    2016-05-30

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID), the enzyme responsible for induction of sequence variation in immunoglobulins (Igs) during the process of somatic hypermutation (SHM) and also Ig class switching, can have a potent mutator phenotype in the development of lymphoma. Using various Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) recombinants, we provide definitive evidence that the viral nuclear protein EBNA3C is essential in EBV-infected primary B cells for the induction of AID mRNA and protein. Using lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) established with EBV recombinants conditional for EBNA3C function, this was confirmed, and it was shown that transactivation of the AID gene (AICDA) is associated with EBNA3C binding to highly conserved regulatory elements located proximal to and upstream of the AICDA transcription start site. EBNA3C binding initiated epigenetic changes to chromatin at specific sites across the AICDA locus. Deep sequencing of cDNA corresponding to the IgH V-D-J region from the conditional LCL was used to formally show that SHM is activated by functional EBNA3C and induction of AID. These data, showing the direct targeting and induction of functional AID by EBNA3C, suggest a novel role for EBV in the etiology of B cell cancers, including endemic Burkitt lymphoma. PMID:27217538

  17. Cellular level nanomanipulation using atomic force microscope aided with superresolution imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chacko, Jenu Varghese; Harke, Benjamin; Canale, Claudio; Diaspro, Alberto

    2014-10-01

    Atomic force microscopes (AFM) provide topographical and mechanical information of the sample with very good axial resolution, but are limited in terms of chemical specificity and operation time-scale. An optical microscope coupled to an AFM can recognize and target an area of interest using specific identification markers like fluorescence tags. A high resolution fluorescence microscope can visualize fluorescence structures or molecules below the classical optical diffraction limit and reach nanometer scale resolution. A stimulated emission depletion (STED) microscopy superresolution (SR) microscope coupled to an AFM is an example in which the AFM tip gains nanoscale manipulation capabilities. The SR targeting and visualization ability help in fast and specific identification of subdiffraction-sized cellular structures and manoeuvring the AFM tip onto the target. We demonstrate how to build a STED AFM and use it for biological nanomanipulation aided with fast visualization. The STED AFM based bionanomanipulation is presented for the first time in this article. This study points to future nanosurgeries performable at single-cell level and a physical targeted manipulation of cellular features as it is currently used in research domains like nanomedicine and nanorobotics.

  18. Groundwater level prediction using a SOM-aided stepwise cluster inference model.

    PubMed

    Han, Jing-Cheng; Huang, Yuefei; Li, Zhong; Zhao, Chunhong; Cheng, Guanhui; Huang, Pengfei

    2016-11-01

    Accurate groundwater level (GWL) prediction can contribute to sustaining reliable water supply to domestic, agricultural and industrial uses as well as ecological services, especially in arid and semi-arid areas. In this paper, a regional GWL modeling framework was first presented through coupling both spatial and temporal clustering techniques. Specifically, the self-organizing map (SOM) was applied to identify spatially homogeneous clusters of GWL piezometers, while GWL time series forecasting was performed through developing a stepwise cluster multisite inference model with various predictors including climate conditions, well extractions, surface runoffs, reservoir operations and GWL measurements at previous steps. The proposed modeling approach was then demonstrated by a case of an arid irrigation district in the western Hexi Corridor, northwest China. Spatial clustering analysis identified 6 regionally representative central piezometers out of 30, for which sensitivity and uncertainty analysis were carried out regarding GWL predictions. As the stepwise cluster tree provided uncertain predictions, we added an AR(1) error model to the mean prediction to forecast GWL 1 month ahead. Model performance indicators suggest that the modeling system is a useful tool to aid decision-making for informed groundwater resource management in arid areas, and would have a great potential to extend its applications to more areas or regions in the future. PMID:27494607

  19. How Does Alkali Aid Protein Extraction in Green Tea Leaf Residue: A Basis for Integrated Biorefinery of Leaves

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chen; Sanders, Johan P. M.; Xiao, Ting T.; Bruins, Marieke E.

    2015-01-01

    Leaf protein can be obtained cost-efficiently by alkaline extraction, but overuse of chemicals and low quality of (denatured) protein limits its application. The research objective was to investigate how alkali aids protein extraction of green tea leaf residue, and use these results for further improvements in alkaline protein biorefinery. Protein extraction yield was studied for correlation to morphology of leaf tissue structure, protein solubility and hydrolysis degree, and yields of non-protein components obtained at various conditions. Alkaline protein extraction was not facilitated by increased solubility or hydrolysis of protein, but positively correlated to leaf tissue disruption. HG pectin, RGII pectin, and organic acids were extracted before protein extraction, which was followed by the extraction of cellulose and hemi-cellulose. RGI pectin and lignin were both linear to protein yield. The yields of these two components were 80% and 25% respectively when 95% protein was extracted, which indicated that RGI pectin is more likely to be the key limitation to leaf protein extraction. An integrated biorefinery was designed based on these results. PMID:26200774

  20. Dietary protein level and performance of growing Baladi kids

    PubMed Central

    Abdelrahman, M. M.; Aljumaah, R. S.

    2014-01-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate the effect of feeding different levels of protein to black Baladi breed kids. Weanling Baladi kids (n=18; 75 to 90 days old) were selected and individually housed at our experimental farm. Kids were divided randomly to one of the three treatments for 12 weeks. The three dietary treatments were: T1: control ration, formulated according to NRC to cover the protein (level 1) and other nutrients requirements. T2: ration formulated to cover only 75% of protein (level 2) recommended by NRC. T3: control diet + 2.4 g undegradable methionine (Smartamine®)/day/kid (level 3). Feed intake, initial and monthly body weights were recorded. Blood samples were collected monthly and analyzed for metabolites and Co, Zn and Cu levels. Decreasing the dietary level of protein (T2) negatively affected (P<0.05) the total live weight gain, average daily gain and feed conversion ratio when compared with the control and T3 groups. Moreover, treatment, time and time × treatment caused a significant change on Co concentration in blood serum with higher value at the end of the experiment. Treatments had a significant effect (P<0.05) on blood serum cholesterol and protein levels. Undegradable methionine supplementation (T3) significantly increased longissimus dorsi weight, fat thickness and omental fat%. In conclusion, feeding Baladi kids below the NRC requirements of protein negatively affect the growth performance and feed efficiency. The recommended protein level by NRC for growing kids cover the requirements of growing black Baladi kids for maximum growth and productivity. PMID:27175130

  1. Protein engineering strategies with potential applications for altering clinically relevant cellular pathways at the protein level.

    PubMed

    Regan, Lynne; Hinrichsen, Michael R; Oi, Curran

    2016-05-01

    All diseases can be fundamentally viewed as the result of malfunctioning cellular pathways. Protein engineering offers the potential to develop new tools that will allow these dysfunctional pathways to be better understood, in addition to potentially providing new routes to restore proper function. Here we discuss different approaches that can be used to change the intracellular activity of a protein by intervening at the protein level: targeted protein sequestration, protein recruitment, protein degradation, and selective inhibition of binding interfaces. The potential of each of these tools to be developed into effective therapeutic treatments will also be discussed, along with any major barriers that currently block their translation into the clinic. PMID:27031866

  2. Protein expression analyses at the single cell level.

    PubMed

    Ohno, Masae; Karagiannis, Peter; Taniguchi, Yuichi

    2014-01-01

    The central dogma of molecular biology explains how genetic information is converted into its end product, proteins, which are responsible for the phenotypic state of the cell. Along with the protein type, the phenotypic state depends on the protein copy number. Therefore, quantification of the protein expression in a single cell is critical for quantitative characterization of the phenotypic states. Protein expression is typically a dynamic and stochastic phenomenon that cannot be well described by standard experimental methods. As an alternative, fluorescence imaging is being explored for the study of protein expression, because of its high sensitivity and high throughput. Here we review key recent progresses in fluorescence imaging-based methods and discuss their application to proteome analysis at the single cell level. PMID:25197931

  3. Personal Finance. Predrafted Individual Short-Term Plan/Records (Secondary Level): Directions for Resource Teachers, Teachers and Aides.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flores, Merced, Comp.

    Developed by experienced migrant education teachers incorporating Sight and Sound Program concepts, this volume presents predrafted individual short-term Plan/Records for personal finance for secondary level students, plus step-by-step directions for their use by Oregon resource teachers, classroom teachers, and aides. This approach assumes that…

  4. Levels and Functions of HIV/AIDS Stigma within the Iranian Community Living in the Sydney Metropolitan Area

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hosseinzadeh, Hassan; Hossain, Syeda Zakia; Niknami, Shamsaddin

    2012-01-01

    Objective: This study examines the levels of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) related stigma among the Iranian population and the factors that contribute to the formation of stigma within the study population. Design: A quantitative research design was used in this research whereby participants completed…

  5. Science. Predrafted Individual Short-Term Plan/Records (Secondary Level): Directions for Resource Teachers, Teachers and Aides.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flores, Merced, Comp.

    Developed by experienced migrant education teachers incorporating Sight and Sound Program concepts, this volume presents predrafted individual short-term Plan/Records for secondary level chemistry, biology, and physics, plus step-by-step directions for their use by Oregon resource teachers, classroom teachers, and aides. The approach assumes that…

  6. Source and level of supplemental protein for growing lambs.

    PubMed

    Dabiri, N; Thonney, M L

    2004-11-01

    Two 3 x 2 factorial growth trials and a companion metabolism trial with 13, 15, or 17% dietary CP (DM basis), with or without 3% of the DM replaced with slowly degraded menhaden fish meal, were conducted to determine if level of dietary protein influences whether slowly degraded protein improves lamb growth and protein use. The growth trials included 32 and 34 pens of two weanling lambs initially weighing 23 to 26 kg and fed for 42 d. The metabolism trial included 12 additional lambs fed in metabolism cages with a 2-wk adjustment period, a 1-wk preliminary period, and a 7-d collection period. Plasma urea N (PUN) was measured in all lambs at the conclusion of the second growth trial and at the end of the metabolism trial. There was a protein level x protein source interaction (P = 0.05) for PUN of the 12 lambs in the metabolism trial but not for the 68 lambs in the second growth trial. Replacement of part of the soybean meal protein with protein from fish meal did not affect ADG or G:F at any protein level, but it lowered (P = 0.08) PUN in the second growth trial. Plasma urea N values were higher (P = 0.002) in lambs fed diets with 15 or 17% CP; however, ADG (P = 0.037 in Exp. 1 and P = 0.055 in Exp. 2), and G:F (P = 0.094 in Exp. 1 and P = 0.003 in Exp. 2) were lower for lambs fed the diets with 13% CP. There was little difference in ADG or G:F between lambs fed the diets with 15 or 17% CP, suggesting that a CP level of 15% with supplemental protein from soybean meal would be optimal for 25- to 40-kg growing Finnsheep x Dorset lambs. PMID:15542470

  7. Soy protein isolate molecular level contributions to bulk adhesive properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shera, Jeanne Norton

    Increasing environmental awareness and the recognized health hazards of formaldehyde-based resins has prompted a strong demand for environmentally-responsible adhesives for wood composites. Soy protein-based adhesives have been shown to be commercially viable with 90-day shelf stability and composite physical properties comparable to those of commercial formaldehyde-based particleboards. The main research focus is to isolate and characterize the molecular level features in soy protein isolate responsible for providing mechanical properties, storage stability, and water resistance during adhesive formulation, processing, and wood composite fabrication. Commercial composite board will be reviewed to enhance our understanding of the individual components and processes required for particleboard production. The levels of protein structure will be defined and an overview of current bio-based technology will be presented. In the process, the logic for utilizing soy protein as a sole binder in the adhesive will be reinforced. Variables such as adhesive components, pH, divalent ions, blend aging, protein molecular weight, formulation solids content, and soy protein functionalization will relate the bulk properties of soy protein adhesives to the molecular configuration of the soybean protein. This work has demonstrated that when intermolecular beta-sheet interactions and protein long-range order is disrupted, viscosity and mechanical properties decrease. Storage stability can be maintained through the stabilization of intermolecular beta-sheet interactions. When molecular weight is reduced through enzymatic digestion, long-range order is disrupted and viscosity and mechanical properties decrease accordingly. Processibility and physical properties must be balanced to increase solids while maintaining low viscosity, desirable mechanical properties, and adequate storage stability. The structure of the soybean protein must be related to the particleboard bulk mechanical

  8. A residue level protein-protein interaction model in electrolyte solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Xueyu

    2014-03-01

    The osmotic second virial coefficients B2 are directly related to the solubility of protein molecules in electrolyte solutions and can be useful to narrow down the search parameter space of protein crystallization conditions. Using a residue level model of protein-protein interaction in electrolyte solutions B2 of bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor and lysozyme in various solution conditions such as salt concentration, pH and temperature are calculated using an extended Fast Multipole Methods in combination with the boundary element formulation. Overall, the calculated B2 are well correlated with the experimental observations for various solution conditions. In combination with our previous work on the binding affinity calculations of protein complexes it is demonstrated that our residue level model can be used as a reliable model to describe protein-protein interaction in solutions.

  9. Multi-level machine learning prediction of protein-protein interactions in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Zubek, Julian; Tatjewski, Marcin; Boniecki, Adam; Mnich, Maciej; Basu, Subhadip; Plewczynski, Dariusz

    2015-01-01

    Accurate identification of protein-protein interactions (PPI) is the key step in understanding proteins' biological functions, which are typically context-dependent. Many existing PPI predictors rely on aggregated features from protein sequences, however only a few methods exploit local information about specific residue contacts. In this work we present a two-stage machine learning approach for prediction of protein-protein interactions. We start with the carefully filtered data on protein complexes available for Saccharomyces cerevisiae in the Protein Data Bank (PDB) database. First, we build linear descriptions of interacting and non-interacting sequence segment pairs based on their inter-residue distances. Secondly, we train machine learning classifiers to predict binary segment interactions for any two short sequence fragments. The final prediction of the protein-protein interaction is done using the 2D matrix representation of all-against-all possible interacting sequence segments of both analysed proteins. The level-I predictor achieves 0.88 AUC for micro-scale, i.e., residue-level prediction. The level-II predictor improves the results further by a more complex learning paradigm. We perform 30-fold macro-scale, i.e., protein-level cross-validation experiment. The level-II predictor using PSIPRED-predicted secondary structure reaches 0.70 precision, 0.68 recall, and 0.70 AUC, whereas other popular methods provide results below 0.6 threshold (recall, precision, AUC). Our results demonstrate that multi-scale sequence features aggregation procedure is able to improve the machine learning results by more than 10% as compared to other sequence representations. Prepared datasets and source code for our experimental pipeline are freely available for download from: http://zubekj.github.io/mlppi/ (open source Python implementation, OS independent). PMID:26157620

  10. RanGTP aids anaphase entry through Ubr5-mediated protein turnover

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Hao; He, Xiaonan; Feng, Di

    2015-01-01

    RanGTP is known to regulate the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC), but the underlying molecular mechanism is unclear. BuGZ stabilizes SAC protein Bub3 through direct interaction and facilitates its mitotic function. Here we show that RanGTP promotes the turnover of BuGZ and Bub3 in metaphase, which in turn facilitates metaphase-to-anaphase transition. BuGZ and Bub3 interact with either importin-β or an E3 ubiquitin ligase, Ubr5. RanGTP promotes the dissociation of importin-β from BuGZ and Bub3 in metaphase. This results in increased binding of BuGZ and Bub3 to Ubr5, leading to ubiquitination and subsequent turnover of both proteins. We propose that elevated metaphase RanGTP levels use Ubr5 to couple overall chromosome congression to SAC silencing. PMID:26438829

  11. Magnetic protein microbead-aided indirect fluoroimmunoassay for the determination of canine virus specific antibodies.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xueqin; Ren, Li; Tu, Qin; Wang, Jianchun; Zhang, Yanrong; Li, Manlin; Liu, Rui; Wang, Jinyi

    2011-03-15

    Rabies, canine distemper, and canine parvovirus are common contagious viral diseases of dogs and many other carnivores, and pose a severe threat to the population dynamics of wild carnivores, as well as endangering carnivore conservation. However, clinical diagnosis of these diseases, especially canine distemper and canine parvovirus, is difficult because of the broad spectrum of symptoms that may be confused with other respiratory and enteric diseases of dogs. The most frequently used and proven techniques for diagnosing viral diseases include the conventional enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), rapid fluorescent focus inhibition test (RFFIT), mouse neutralisation test (MNT), and fluorescent antibody virus neutralization (FAVN) test. However, these methods still have some inherent limitations. In this study, a magnetic protein microbead-aided indirect fluoroimmunoassay was developed to detect canine virus specific antibodies, human rabies immunoglobulin, CDV McAbs, and CPV McAbs. In this assay, an avidin-biotin system was employed to combine magnetic microbeads and virus antigens (rabies virus, canine distemper virus, and canine parvovirus). Quantification of the targeted virus antibodies was analyzed through indirect fluoroimmunoassay using the specific antigen-antibody reaction, as well as their corresponding FITC-labeled detection antibodies (mouse anti-human IgG/FITC conjugate or rabbit anti-dog IgG/FITC conjugate). The results indicated that the fluorescence intensity increased when a higher concentration of the targeted analyte was used, but the control had almost no fluorescence, much like the conventional ELISA. For human rabies immunoglobulin, CDV McAbs, and CPV McAbs, the minimum detectable concentrations were 0.2 IU/mL, 0.3 ng/mL, and 0.5 ng/mL, respectively. All of these results indicate that this assay can be employed to determine the presence of canine virus specific antibodies. In addition, the method devised here can be utilized as a general

  12. DPF2 regulates OCT4 protein level and nuclear distribution.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chao; Zhang, Dijuan; Shen, Yuxian; Tao, Xiaofang; Liu, Lihua; Zhong, Yongwang; Fang, Shengyun

    2015-12-01

    The amount of transcription factor OCT4 is strictly regulated. A tight regulation of OCT4 levels is crucial for mammalian embryonic development and oncogenesis. However, the mechanisms underlying regulation of OCT4 protein expression and nuclear distribution are largely unknown. Here, we report that DPF2, a plant homeodomain (PHD) finger protein, is upregulated during H9 cell differentiation induced by retinoic acid. Endogenous interaction between DPF2 and OCT4 in P19 cells was revealed by an immunoprecipitation assay. GST-pull down assay proved that OCT4 protein in H9 cells and recombinant OCT4 can precipitate with DPF2 in vitro. In vitro ubiquitination assay demonstrated DPF2 might serve as an E3 ligase. Knock down of dpf2 using siRNA increased OCT4 protein level and stability in P19 cells. DPF2 siRNAs also up-regulates OCT4 but not NANOG in H9 cells. However, RA fails to downregulates OCT4 protein level in cells infected by lenitviruses containing DPF2 siRNA. Moreover, overexpression of both DPF2 and OCT4 in 293 cells proved the DPF2-OCT4 interaction. DPF2 but not PHD2 mutant DPF2 enhanced ubiquitination and degradation of OCT4 in 293 cells co-expressed DPF2 and OCT4. Both wild type DPF2 and PHD2 mutant DPF2 redistributes nuclear OCT4 without affecting DPF2-OCT4 interaction. Further analysis indicated that DPF2 decreases monomeric and mono-ubiquitinated OCT4, assembles poly-ubiquitin chains on OCT4 mainly through Ub-K48 linkage. These findings contribute to an understanding of how OCT4 protein level and nuclear distribution is regulated by its associated protein. PMID:26417682

  13. imFASP: An integrated approach combining in-situ filter-aided sample pretreatment with microwave-assisted protein digestion for fast and efficient proteome sample preparation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qun; Fang, Fei; Wu, Ci; Wu, Qi; Liang, Yu; Liang, Zhen; Zhang, Lihua; Zhang, Yukui

    2016-03-17

    An integrated sample preparation method, termed "imFASP", which combined in-situ filter-aided sample pretreatment and microwave-assisted trypsin digestion, was developed for preparation of microgram and even nanogram amounts of complex protein samples with high efficiency in 1 h. For imFASP method, proteins dissolved in 8 M urea were loaded onto a filter device with molecular weight cut off (MWCO) as 10 kDa, followed by in-situ protein preconcentration, denaturation, reduction, alkylation, and microwave-assisted tryptic digestion. Compared with traditional in-solution sample preparation method, imFASP method generated more protein and peptide identifications (IDs) from preparation of 45 μg Escherichia coli protein sample due to the higher efficiency, and the sample preparation throughput was significantly improved by 14 times (1 h vs. 15 h). More importantly, when the starting amounts of E. coli cell lysate decreased to nanogram level (50-500 ng), the protein and peptide identified by imFASP method were improved at least 30% and 44%, compared with traditional in-solution preparation method, suggesting dramatically higher peptide recovery of imFASP method for trace amounts of complex proteome samples. All these results demonstrate that the imFASP method developed here is of high potential for high efficient and high throughput preparation of trace amounts of complex proteome samples. PMID:26920773

  14. [Financial Aid to Independent Students at the Post Secondary Level: The Federal Government's Role

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dellenback, John

    One of the new and complex issues related to student aid is the independent student controversy. The author wishes to increase the Basic Opportunity Grant (BOG) and substantially increase work study to help the independent student. For the immediate future the author would like to see: (1) The BOG refined as a major Federal grant program committed…

  15. Level of Interactivity of Videodisc Instruction on College Students' Recall of AIDS Information.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kritch, Kale M.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Two experiments confirmed the greater effectiveness of constructed-response interactive videodisc instruction when compared to a click-to-continue or passive viewing formats on posttest recall of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) information by 101 college students. The necessity of constructing answers appears to be an important factor…

  16. Research and Prediction of the Application of Multimedia Teaching Aid in Teaching Technical Education on the 2nd Level of Primary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stebila, Ján

    2011-01-01

    The purpose and the main aim of the pedagogic experiment were to practically verify the success of Multimedia Teaching Aid (MTA) in conditions of primary schools. We assumed that the use of our multimedia teaching aid in teaching technical education on the 2nd level of primary schools would significantly affect the level of knowledge of pupils…

  17. Smoking, COPD and 3-Nitrotyrosine Levels of Plasma Proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Hongjun; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Peterson, Elena S.; Tan, Ruimin; Bigelow, Diana J.; Scholand, Mary Beth; Hoidal, John R.; Pounds, Joel G.; Zangar, Richard C.

    2011-09-01

    BACKGROUND: Nitric oxide is a physiologically regulator of endothelial function and hemodynamics. Oxidized products of nitric oxide can form nitrotyrosine, which is a marker of nitrative stress. Cigarette smoking decreases exhaled nitric oxide, and the underlying mechanism may be important in the cardiovascular toxicity of cigarette smoke, although it is not clear if this effect results from decreased nitric oxide production or oxidation of nitric oxide to reactive, nitrating, species. These processes would be expected to have opposite effects on nitrotyrosine levels, a marker of nitrative stress. OBJECTIVE: In this study, we determine the effects of smoking and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) on circulating levels of nitrotyrosine, and thereby gain insight into the processes regulating nitrotyrosine formation. METHODS: A custom antibody microarray platform was used to analyze the levels of 3-nitrotyrosine modifications on 24 proteins in plasma. Plasma samples from 458 individuals were analyzed. RESULTS: Nitrotyrosine levels in circulating proteins were uniformly reduced in smokers but increased in COPD patients. We also observed a persistent suppression of nitrotyrosine in former smokers. CONCLUSIONS: Smoking broadly suppresses the levels of 3-nitrotyrosine in plasma proteins, suggesting that cigarette smoke suppresses endothelial nitric oxide production. In contrast, the increase in nitrotyrosine levels in COPD patients most likely results from inflammatory processes. This study provides the first evidence that smoking has irreversible effects on endothelial production of nitric oxide, and provides insight into how smoking could induce a loss of elasticity in the vasculature and a long-term increase in the risk of cardiovascular disease.

  18. Computer-aided diagnosis method for MRI-guided prostate biopsy within the peripheral zone using grey level histograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rampun, Andrik; Malcolm, Paul; Zwiggelaar, Reyer

    2015-02-01

    This paper describes a computer-aided diagnosis method for targeted prostate biopsies within the peripheral zone in T2-Weighted MRI. We subdivided the peripheral zone into four regions and compare each sub region's grey level histogram with malignant and normal histogram models, and use specific metrics to estimate the presence of abnormality. The initial evaluation based on 200 MRI slices taken from 40 different patients and we achieved 87% correct classification rate with 89% and 86% sensitivity and specificity, respectively. The main contribution of this paper is a novel approach of Computer Aided Diagnosis which is using grey level histograms analysis between sub regions. In clinical point of view, the developed method could assist clinicians to perform targeted biopsies which are better than the random ones which are currently used.

  19. Predicting Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Target Genes by Level-2 Protein-Protein Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Yi; Cui, Qinghua; Kong, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is frequently lethal and has no effective pharmaceutical treatment, posing a great threat to human health. Previous bioinformatics studies of the mechanisms underlying AAA relied largely on the detection of direct protein-protein interactions (level-1 PPI) between the products of reported AAA-related genes. Thus, some proteins not suspected to be directly linked to previously reported genes of pivotal importance to AAA might have been missed. In this study, we constructed an indirect protein-protein interaction (level-2 PPI) network based on common interacting proteins encoded by known AAA-related genes and successfully predicted previously unreported AAA-related genes using this network. We used four methods to test and verify the performance of this level-2 PPI network: cross validation, human AAA mRNA chip array comparison, literature mining, and verification in a mouse CaPO4 AAA model. We confirmed that the new level-2 PPI network is superior to the original level-1 PPI network and proved that the top 100 candidate genes predicted by the level-2 PPI network shared similar GO functions and KEGG pathways compared with positive genes. PMID:26496478

  20. ORMDL proteins regulate ceramide levels during sterile inflammation.

    PubMed

    Cai, Lin; Oyeniran, Clement; Biswas, Debolina D; Allegood, Jeremy; Milstien, Sheldon; Kordula, Tomasz; Maceyka, Michael; Spiegel, Sarah

    2016-08-01

    The bioactive sphingolipid metabolite, ceramide, regulates physiological processes important for inflammation and elevated levels of ceramide have been implicated in IL-1-mediated events. Although much has been learned about ceramide generation by activation of sphingomyelinases in response to IL-1, the contribution of the de novo pathway is not completely understood. Because yeast ORM1 and ORM2 proteins negatively regulate ceramide levels through inhibition of serine palmitoyltransferase, the first committed step in ceramide biosynthesis, we examined the functions of individual mammalian ORM orthologs, ORM (yeast)-like (ORMDL)1-3, in regulation of ceramide levels. In HepG2 liver cells, downregulation of ORMDL3 markedly increased the ceramide precursors, dihydrosphingosine and dihydroceramide, primarily from de novo biosynthesis based on [U-(13)C]palmitate incorporation into base-labeled and dual-labeled dihydroceramides, whereas downregulation of each isoform increased dihydroceramides [(13)C]labeled in only the amide-linked fatty acid. IL-1 and the IL-6 family cytokine, oncostatin M, increased dihydroceramide and ceramide levels in HepG2 cells and concomitantly decreased ORMDL proteins. Moreover, during irritant-induced sterile inflammation in mice leading to induction of the acute-phase response, which is dependent on IL-1, expression of ORMDL proteins in the liver was strongly downregulated and accompanied by increased ceramide levels in the liver and accumulation in the blood. Together, our results suggest that ORMDLs may be involved in regulation of ceramides during IL-1-mediated sterile inflammation. PMID:27313060

  1. Predicting Protein-Protein Interactions from the Molecular to the Proteome Level.

    PubMed

    Keskin, Ozlem; Tuncbag, Nurcan; Gursoy, Attila

    2016-04-27

    Identification of protein-protein interactions (PPIs) is at the center of molecular biology considering the unquestionable role of proteins in cells. Combinatorial interactions result in a repertoire of multiple functions; hence, knowledge of PPI and binding regions naturally serve to functional proteomics and drug discovery. Given experimental limitations to find all interactions in a proteome, computational prediction/modeling of protein interactions is a prerequisite to proceed on the way to complete interactions at the proteome level. This review aims to provide a background on PPIs and their types. Computational methods for PPI predictions can use a variety of biological data including sequence-, evolution-, expression-, and structure-based data. Physical and statistical modeling are commonly used to integrate these data and infer PPI predictions. We review and list the state-of-the-art methods, servers, databases, and tools for protein-protein interaction prediction. PMID:27074302

  2. Low copper and high manganese levels in prion protein plaques

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Christopher J.; Gilbert, P.U.P.A.; Abrecth, Mike; Baldwin, Katherine L.; Russell, Robin E.; Pedersen, Joel A.; McKenzie, Debbie

    2013-01-01

    Accumulation of aggregates rich in an abnormally folded form of the prion protein characterize the neurodegeneration caused by transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs). The molecular triggers of plaque formation and neurodegeneration remain unknown, but analyses of TSE-infected brain homogenates and preparations enriched for abnormal prion protein suggest that reduced levels of copper and increased levels of manganese are associated with disease. The objectives of this study were to: (1) assess copper and manganese levels in healthy and TSE-infected Syrian hamster brain homogenates; (2) determine if the distribution of these metals can be mapped in TSE-infected brain tissue using X-ray photoelectron emission microscopy (X-PEEM) with synchrotron radiation; and (3) use X-PEEM to assess the relative amounts of copper and manganese in prion plaques in situ. In agreement with studies of other TSEs and species, we found reduced brain levels of copper and increased levels of manganese associated with disease in our hamster model. We also found that the in situ levels of these metals in brainstem were sufficient to image by X-PEEM. Using immunolabeled prion plaques in directly adjacent tissue sections to identify regions to image by X-PEEM, we found a statistically significant relationship of copper-manganese dysregulation in prion plaques: copper was depleted whereas manganese was enriched. These data provide evidence for prion plaques altering local transition metal distribution in the TSE-infected central nervous system.

  3. Treating 'AIDS blindness': a critical pedagogical approach to HIV education at tertiary level.

    PubMed

    Wood, Lesley; Rens, Julialet

    2014-01-01

    HIV and AIDS affect all South Africans, irrespective of gender, race, age and economic status. Teachers should therefore be able to meaningfully integrate HIV content into the school curriculum. However, pre-service teacher education programmes still do not pay adequate attention to HIV education, particularly in institutions where students are being prepared to work in environments that are perceived to be unaffected by the consequences of the pandemic. This article advocates that HIV education should be integrated into contexts of privilege and presents evidence of the influence that a critical pedagogical approach can have on changing student perceptions of the need to address HIV in and through their teaching. We led 109 Post-graduate Certificate of Education students through a series of activities that required them to critically reflect on their feelings, attitudes and perceived skills with regard to HIV and AIDS education; to identify potential areas of personal change; and to begin to imagine alternative professional possibilities. We generated qualitative data through drawings, group discussions, individual written reflections, and a voluntary focus group. A content analysis of the data revealed that the participating students initially felt incompetent to incorporate HIV and related issues into their teaching, and felt hesitant and uncomfortable at the prospect. However, a critical reflection on their thinking, both individually and in a group setting, served to shift them towards a more holistic, critical and humanising understanding of the pandemic and the role they could play as future teachers in helping to mitigate its impact. The findings provide evidence that a critical pedagogical approach - particularly with groups who believe that HIV and AIDS is not something that concerns them - can provide an effective way to mediate the knowledge, skills and attitudes that competent teachers need in today's world. PMID:25174517

  4. MORBIDITY AND MORTALITY DUE TO AIDS: A STUDY OF BURDEN OF DISEASE AT A MUNICIPAL LEVEL

    PubMed Central

    SILVA, Jane DA; RAMOS, Victoria; SILVA, Helena Caetano Gonçalves DA; TRAEBERT, Jefferson

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The purpose of measuring the burden of disease involves aggregating morbidity and mortality components into a single indicator, the disability-adjusted life year (DALY), to measure how much and how people live and suffer the impact of a disease. Objective: To estimate the global burden of disease due to AIDS in a municipality of southern Brazil. Methods: An ecological study was conducted in 2009 to examine the incidence and AIDS-related deaths among the population residing in the city of Tubarao, Santa Catarina State, Brazil. Data from the Mortality Information System in the National Health System was used to calculate the years of life lost (YLL) due to premature mortality. The calculation was based on the difference between a standardized life expectancy and age at death, with a discount rate of 3% per year. Data from the Information System for Notifiable Diseases were used to calculate the years lived with disability (YLD). The DALY was estimated by the sum of YLL and YLD. Indicator rates were estimated per 100,000 inhabitants, distributed by age and gender. Results: A total of 131 records were examined, and a 572.5 DALYs were estimated, which generated a rate of 593.1 DALYs/100,000 inhabitants. The rate among men amounted to 780.7 DALYs/100,000, whereas among women the rate was 417.1 DALYs/100,000. The most affected age groups were 30-44 years for men and 60-69 years for women. Conclusion: The burden of disease due to AIDS in the city of Tubarao was relatively high when considering the global trend. The mortality component accounted for more than 90% of the burden of disease. PMID:26603227

  5. Ascertaining effects of nanoscale polymeric interfaces on competitive protein adsorption at the individual protein level.

    PubMed

    Song, Sheng; Xie, Tian; Ravensbergen, Kristina; Hahm, Jong-in

    2016-02-14

    With the recent development of biomaterials and biodevices with reduced dimensionality, it is critical to comprehend protein adhesion processes to nanoscale solid surfaces, especially those occurring in a competitive adsorption environment. Complex sequences of adhesion events in competitive adsorption involving multicomponent protein systems have been extensively investigated, but our understanding is still limited primarily to macroscopic adhesion onto chemically simple surfaces. We examine the competitive adsorption behavior from a binary protein mixture containing bovine serum albumin and fibrinogen at the single protein level. We subsequently evaluate a series of adsorption and displacement processes occurring on both the macroscopic homopolymer and nanoscopic diblock copolymer surfaces, while systematically varying the protein concentration and incubation time. We identify the similarities and dissimilarities in competitive protein adsorption behavior between the two polymeric surfaces, the former presenting chemical uniformity at macroscale versus the latter exhibiting periodic nanointerfaces of chemically alternating polymeric segments. We then present our novel experimental finding of a large increase in the nanointerface-engaged residence time of the initially bound proteins and further explain the origin of this phenomenon manifested on nanoscale diblock copolymer surfaces. The outcomes of this study may provide timely insight into nanoscale competitive protein adsorption that is much needed in designing bioimplant and tissue engineering materials. In addition, the fundamental understanding gained from this study can be beneficial for the development of highly miniaturized biodevices and biomaterials fabricated by using nanoscale polymeric materials and interfaces. PMID:26794230

  6. Improved analysis of membrane protein by PVDF-aided, matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chih-Yang; Liao, Hsin-Kai; Juo, Chiun-Gung; Chen, Shu-Hua; Chen, Yu-Ju

    2006-01-18

    Characterization of membrane proteins remains an analytical challenge because of difficulties associated with tedious isolation and purification. This study presents the utility of the polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF) membrane for direct sub-proteome profiling and membrane protein characterization by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS). The hydrophobic adsorption of protein, particularly membrane proteins, on the PVDF surface enables efficient on-PVDF washing to remove high concentrations of detergents and salts, such as up to 5% sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). The enhanced spectrum quality for MALDI detection is particularly notable for high molecular weight proteins. By using on-PVDF washing prior to MALDI detection, we obtained protein profiles of the detergent-containing and detergent-insoluble membrane fractions from Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath). Similar improvements of signal-to-noise ratios were shown on the MALDI spectra for proteins electroblotted from SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) onto the PVDF membrane. We have applied this strategy to obtain intact molecular weights of the particulate methane monooxygenase (pMMO) composed of three intrinsic membrane-bound proteins, PmoA, PmoB, and PmoC. Together with peptide sequencing by tandem mass spectrometry, post-translational modifications including N-terminal acetylation of PmoA and PmoC and alternative C-terminal truncation of PmoB were identified. The above results show that PVDF-aided MALDI-MS can be an effective approach for profiling and characterization of membrane proteins. PMID:17723354

  7. Stabilizing Additives Added during Cell Lysis Aid in the Solubilization of Recombinant Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Leibly, David J.; Nguyen, Trang Nhu; Kao, Louis T.; Hewitt, Stephen N.; Barrett, Lynn K.; Van Voorhis, Wesley C.

    2012-01-01

    Insoluble recombinant proteins are a major issue for both structural genomics and enzymology research. Greater than 30% of recombinant proteins expressed in Escherichia coli (E. coli) appear to be insoluble. The prevailing view is that insolubly expressed proteins cannot be easily solubilized, and are usually sequestered into inclusion bodies. However, we hypothesize that small molecules added during the cell lysis stage can yield soluble protein from insoluble protein previously screened without additives or ligands. We present a novel screening method that utilized 144 additive conditions to increase the solubility of recombinant proteins expressed in E. coli. These selected additives are natural ligands, detergents, salts, buffers, and chemicals that have been shown to increase the stability of proteins in vivo. We present the methods used for this additive solubility screen and detailed results for 41 potential drug target recombinant proteins from infectious organisms. Increased solubility was observed for 80% of the recombinant proteins during the primary and secondary screening of lysis with the additives; that is 33 of 41 target proteins had increased solubility compared with no additive controls. Eleven additives (trehalose, glycine betaine, mannitol, L-Arginine, potassium citrate, CuCl2, proline, xylitol, NDSB 201, CTAB and K2PO4) solubilized more than one of the 41 proteins; these additives can be easily screened to increase protein solubility. Large-scale purifications were attempted for 15 of the proteins using the additives identified and eight (40%) were prepared for crystallization trials during the first purification attempt. Thus, this protocol allowed us to recover about a third of seemingly insoluble proteins for crystallography and structure determination. If recombinant proteins are required in smaller quantities or less purity, the final success rate may be even higher. PMID:23285060

  8. Effect of Crude Protein Levels in Concentrate and Concentrate Levels in Diet on In vitro Fermentation

    PubMed Central

    Van Dung, Dinh; Shang, Weiwei; Yao, Wen

    2014-01-01

    The effect of concentrate mixtures with crude protein (CP) levels 10%, 13%, 16%, and 19% and diets with roughage to concentrate ratios 80:20, 60:40, 40:60, and 20:80 (w/w) were determined on dry matter (DM) and organic matter (OM) digestibility, and fermentation metabolites using an in vitro fermentation technique. In vitro fermented attributes were measured after 4, 24, and 48 h of incubation respectively. The digestibility of DM and OM, and total volatile fatty acid (VFA) increased whereas pH decreased with the increased amount of concentrate in the diet (p<0.001), however CP levels of concentrate did not have any influence on these attributes. Gas production reduced with increased CP levels, while it increased with increasing concentrate levels. Ammonia nitrogen (NH3-N) concentration and microbial CP production increased significantly (p<0.05) by increasing CP levels and with increasing concentrate levels in diet as well, however, no significant difference was found between 16% and 19% CP levels. Therefore, 16% CP in concentrate and increasing proportion of concentrate up to 80% in diet all had improved digestibility of DM and organic matter, and higher microbial protein production, with improved fermentation characteristics. PMID:25050017

  9. Traversing the folding pathway of proteins using temperature-aided cascade molecular dynamics with conformation-dependent charges.

    PubMed

    Jani, Vinod; Sonavane, Uddhavesh; Joshi, Rajendra

    2016-07-01

    Protein folding is a multi-micro second time scale event and involves many conformational transitions. Crucial conformational transitions responsible for biological functions of biomolecules are difficult to capture using current state-of-the-art molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Protein folding, being a stochastic process, witnesses these transitions as rare events. Many new methodologies have been proposed for observing these rare events. In this work, a temperature-aided cascade MD is proposed as a technique for studying the conformational transitions. Folding studies for Engrailed homeodomain and Immunoglobulin domain B of protein A have been carried out. Using this methodology, the unfolded structures with RMSD of 20 Å were folded to a structure with RMSD of 2 Å. Three sets of cascade MD runs were carried out using implicit solvation, explicit solvation, and charge updation scheme. In the charge updation scheme, charges based on the conformation obtained are calculated and are updated in the topology file. In all the simulations, the structure of 2 Å was reached within a few nanoseconds using these methods. Umbrella sampling has been performed using snapshots from the temperature-aided cascade MD simulation trajectory to build an entire conformational transition pathway. The advantage of the method is that the possible pathways for a particular reaction can be explored within a short duration of simulation time and the disadvantage is that the knowledge of the start and end state is required. The charge updation scheme adds the polarization effects in the force fields. This improves the electrostatic interaction among the atoms, which may help the protein to fold faster. PMID:26872480

  10. Identification and analysis of potential targets in Streptococcus sanguinis using computer aided protein data analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, Md Rabiul Hossain; Bhuiyan, Md IqbalKaiser; Saha, Ayan; Mosleh, Ivan MHAI; Mondol, Sobuj; Ahmed, C M Sabbir

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Streptococcus sanguinis is a Gram-positive, facultative aerobic bacterium that is a member of the viridans streptococcus group. It is found in human mouths in dental plaque, which accounts for both dental cavities and bacterial endocarditis, and which entails a mortality rate of 25%. Although a range of remedial mediators have been found to control this organism, the effectiveness of agents such as penicillin, amoxicillin, trimethoprim–sulfamethoxazole, and erythromycin, was observed. The emphasis of this investigation was on finding substitute and efficient remedial approaches for the total destruction of this bacterium. Materials and methods In this computational study, various databases and online software were used to ascertain some specific targets of S. sanguinis. Particularly, the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes databases were applied to determine human nonhomologous proteins, as well as the metabolic pathways involved with those proteins. Different software such as Phyre2, CastP, DoGSiteScorer, the Protein Function Predictor server, and STRING were utilized to evaluate the probable active drug binding site with its known function and protein–protein interaction. Results In this study, among 218 essential proteins of this pathogenic bacterium, 81 nonhomologous proteins were accrued, and 15 proteins that are unique in several metabolic pathways of S. sanguinis were isolated through metabolic pathway analysis. Furthermore, four essentially membrane-bound unique proteins that are involved in distinct metabolic pathways were revealed by this research. Active sites and druggable pockets of these selected proteins were investigated with bioinformatic techniques. In addition, this study also mentions the activity of those proteins, as well as their interactions with the other proteins. Conclusion Our findings helped to identify the type of protein to be considered as an efficient drug target. This study will pave the way for researchers to

  11. Progress and challenges in modelling country-level HIV/AIDS epidemics: the UNAIDS Estimation and Projection Package 2007

    PubMed Central

    Brown, T; Salomon, J A; Alkema, L; Raftery, A E; Gouws, E

    2008-01-01

    The UNAIDS Estimation and Projection Package (EPP) was developed to aid in country-level estimation and short-term projection of HIV/AIDS epidemics. This paper describes advances reflected in the most recent update of this tool (EPP 2007), and identifies key issues that remain to be addressed in future versions. The major change to EPP 2007 is the addition of uncertainty estimation for generalised epidemics using the technique of Bayesian melding, but many additional changes have been made to improve the user interface and efficiency of the package. This paper describes the interface for uncertainty analysis, changes to the user interface for calibration procedures and other user interface changes to improve EPP’s utility in different settings. While formal uncertainty assessment remains an unresolved challenge in low-level and concentrated epidemics, the Bayesian melding approach has been applied to provide analysts in these settings with a visual depiction of the range of models that may be consistent with their data. In fitting the model to countries with longer-running epidemics in sub-Saharan Africa, a number of limitations have been identified in the current model with respect to accommodating behaviour change and accurately replicating certain observed epidemic patterns. This paper discusses these issues along with their implications for future changes to EPP and to the underlying UNAIDS Reference Group model. PMID:18647867

  12. Progress and challenges in modelling country-level HIV/AIDS epidemics: the UNAIDS Estimation and Projection Package 2007.

    PubMed

    Brown, T; Salomon, J A; Alkema, L; Raftery, A E; Gouws, E

    2008-08-01

    The UNAIDS Estimation and Projection Package (EPP) was developed to aid in country-level estimation and short-term projection of HIV/AIDS epidemics. This paper describes advances reflected in the most recent update of this tool (EPP 2007), and identifies key issues that remain to be addressed in future versions. The major change to EPP 2007 is the addition of uncertainty estimation for generalised epidemics using the technique of Bayesian melding, but many additional changes have been made to improve the user interface and efficiency of the package. This paper describes the interface for uncertainty analysis, changes to the user interface for calibration procedures and other user interface changes to improve EPP's utility in different settings. While formal uncertainty assessment remains an unresolved challenge in low-level and concentrated epidemics, the Bayesian melding approach has been applied to provide analysts in these settings with a visual depiction of the range of models that may be consistent with their data. In fitting the model to countries with longer-running epidemics in sub-Saharan Africa, a number of limitations have been identified in the current model with respect to accommodating behaviour change and accurately replicating certain observed epidemic patterns. This paper discusses these issues along with their implications for future changes to EPP and to the underlying UNAIDS Reference Group model. PMID:18647867

  13. Ascertaining effects of nanoscale polymeric interfaces on competitive protein adsorption at the individual protein level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Sheng; Xie, Tian; Ravensbergen, Kristina; Hahm, Jong-In

    2016-02-01

    With the recent development of biomaterials and biodevices with reduced dimensionality, it is critical to comprehend protein adhesion processes to nanoscale solid surfaces, especially those occurring in a competitive adsorption environment. Complex sequences of adhesion events in competitive adsorption involving multicomponent protein systems have been extensively investigated, but our understanding is still limited primarily to macroscopic adhesion onto chemically simple surfaces. We examine the competitive adsorption behavior from a binary protein mixture containing bovine serum albumin and fibrinogen at the single protein level. We subsequently evaluate a series of adsorption and displacement processes occurring on both the macroscopic homopolymer and nanoscopic diblock copolymer surfaces, while systematically varying the protein concentration and incubation time. We identify the similarities and dissimilarities in competitive protein adsorption behavior between the two polymeric surfaces, the former presenting chemical uniformity at macroscale versus the latter exhibiting periodic nanointerfaces of chemically alternating polymeric segments. We then present our novel experimental finding of a large increase in the nanointerface-engaged residence time of the initially bound proteins and further explain the origin of this phenomenon manifested on nanoscale diblock copolymer surfaces. The outcomes of this study may provide timely insight into nanoscale competitive protein adsorption that is much needed in designing bioimplant and tissue engineering materials. In addition, the fundamental understanding gained from this study can be beneficial for the development of highly miniaturized biodevices and biomaterials fabricated by using nanoscale polymeric materials and interfaces.With the recent development of biomaterials and biodevices with reduced dimensionality, it is critical to comprehend protein adhesion processes to nanoscale solid surfaces, especially those

  14. Paired natural cysteine mutation mapping: aid to constraining models of protein tertiary structure.

    PubMed Central

    Kreisberg, R.; Buchner, V.; Arad, D.

    1995-01-01

    This paper discusses the benefit of mapping paired cysteine mutation patterns as a guide to identifying the positions of protein disulfide bonds. This information can facilitate the computer modeling of protein tertiary structure. First, a simple, paired natural-cysteine-mutation map is presented that identifies the positions of putative disulfide bonds in protein families. The method is based on the observation that if, during the process of evolution, a disulfide-bonded cysteine residue is not conserved, then it is likely that its counterpart will also be mutated. For each target protein, protein databases were searched for the primary amino acid sequences of all known members of distinct protein families. Primary sequence alignment was carried out using PileUp algorithms in the GCG package. To search for correlated mutations, we listed only the positions where cysteine residues were highly conserved and emphasized the mutated residues. In proteins of known three-dimensional structure, a striking pattern of paired cysteine mutations correlated with the positions of known disulfide bridges. For proteins of unknown architecture, the mutation maps showed several positions where disulfide bridging might occur. PMID:8563638

  15. Characterization of protein expression levels with label-free detected reverse phase protein arrays.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xuexue; Deng, Yihong; Zhu, Chenggang; Cai, Junlong; Zhu, Xiangdong; Landry, James P; Zheng, Fengyun; Cheng, Xunjia; Fei, Yiyan

    2016-09-15

    In reverse-phase protein arrays (RPPA), one immobilizes complex samples (e.g., cellular lysate, tissue lysate or serum etc.) on solid supports and performs parallel reactions of antibodies with immobilized protein targets from the complex samples. In this work, we describe a label-free detection of RPPA that enables quantification of RPPA data and thus facilitates comparison of studies performed on different samples and on different solid supports. We applied this detection platform to characterization of phosphoserine aminotransferase (PSAT) expression levels in Acanthamoeba lysates treated with artemether and the results were confirmed by Western blot studies. PMID:27372609

  16. Computer-aided analyses of transport protein sequences: gleaning evidence concerning function, structure, biogenesis, and evolution.

    PubMed Central

    Saier, M H

    1994-01-01

    Three-dimensional structures have been elucidated for very few integral membrane proteins. Computer methods can be used as guides for estimation of solute transport protein structure, function, biogenesis, and evolution. In this paper the application of currently available computer programs to over a dozen distinct families of transport proteins is reviewed. The reliability of sequence-based topological and localization analyses and the importance of sequence and residue conservation to structure and function are evaluated. Evidence concerning the nature and frequency of occurrence of domain shuffling, splicing, fusion, deletion, and duplication during evolution of specific transport protein families is also evaluated. Channel proteins are proposed to be functionally related to carriers. It is argued that energy coupling to transport was a late occurrence, superimposed on preexisting mechanisms of solute facilitation. It is shown that several transport protein families have evolved independently of each other, employing different routes, at different times in evolutionary history, to give topologically similar transmembrane protein complexes. The possible significance of this apparent topological convergence is discussed. PMID:8177172

  17. Neutral genetic drift can alter promiscuous protein functions, potentially aiding functional evolution

    PubMed Central

    Bloom, Jesse D; Romero, Philip A; Lu, Zhongyi; Arnold, Frances H

    2007-01-01

    Background Many of the mutations accumulated by naturally evolving proteins are neutral in the sense that they do not significantly alter a protein's ability to perform its primary biological function. However, new protein functions evolve when selection begins to favor other, "promiscuous" functions that are incidental to a protein's original biological role. If mutations that are neutral with respect to a protein's primary biological function cause substantial changes in promiscuous functions, these mutations could enable future functional evolution. Results Here we investigate this possibility experimentally by examining how cytochrome P450 enzymes that have evolved neutrally with respect to activity on a single substrate have changed in their abilities to catalyze reactions on five other substrates. We find that the enzymes have sometimes changed as much as four-fold in the promiscuous activities. The changes in promiscuous activities tend to increase with the number of mutations, and can be largely rationalized in terms of the chemical structures of the substrates. The activities on chemically similar substrates tend to change in a coordinated fashion, potentially providing a route for systematically predicting the change in one activity based on the measurement of several others. Conclusion Our work suggests that initially neutral genetic drift can lead to substantial changes in protein functions that are not currently under selection, in effect poising the proteins to more readily undergo functional evolution should selection favor new functions in the future. Reviewers This article was reviewed by Martijn Huynen, Fyodor Kondrashov, and Dan Tawfik (nominated by Christoph Adami). PMID:17598905

  18. Listeria monocytogenes can grow in macrophages without the aid of proteins induced by environmental stresses.

    PubMed

    Hanawa, T; Yamamoto, T; Kamiya, S

    1995-12-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a facultative intracellular pathogen which is able to survive and grow within phagocytic cells. Some facultative intracellular bacteria have been shown to respond to the hostile environment within phagocytic cells by producing a set of stress proteins. Since L. monocytogenes has a mechanism for intracellular survival that is distinct from those of other bacteria, we studied the phenotypic response of the bacterium to phagocytosis by macrophages. After phagocytosis of L. monocytogenes EGD by J774-1 macrophage cells, the microorganism rapidly increased in numbers about 20-fold during an incubation period of 5 h. In this phase of phagocytosis, the selective induction of 32 proteins was observed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. The responses to the environmental stresses of heat and hydrogen peroxide were also studied, and it was found that 14 heat shock proteins and 13 oxidative stress proteins were induced. Five of the induced proteins were common to both heat and oxidative stresses. By amino acid sequencing analysis, homologs of DnaK and GroEL were confirmed among the heat shock proteins. A comparison of the autoradiograms of the two-dimensional gels revealed that none of these stress proteins were among the proteins induced by L. monocytogenes within the macrophages. This behavior is entirely different from that shown by other facultative intracellular pathogens. Stress proteins known to be induced by environmental stresses were absent in intracellularly grown L. monocytogenes in the present study. This absence could be due to the mechanism by which the microorganisms rapidly escape from this stressful environment at a very early phase of phagocytosis. PMID:7591111

  19. Effects of soy protein and calcium levels on mineral bioaccessibility and protein digestibility from enteral formulas.

    PubMed

    Galán, María Gimena; Drago, Silvina Rosa

    2014-09-01

    Enteral formulas (EF) are complex food systems which have all the nutrients in their matrix for the complete human nourishment. However, there are components in EF which can interact with minerals, reducing their absorption, and thereof the EF nutritional quality. The effect of soy protein (SP) and Ca content on Fe, Zn, and Ca bioaccessibility and protein digestibility (%DP) was assessed using a response surface design in EF. Tested SP levels were 2.5-5.0 g/100 mL of total protein. Ca levels were adjusted with Ca citrate within a range between 50 and 100 mg/100 mL. SP content negatively influenced %DP and Fe, Zn and Ca bioaccessibility. As SP content increased, mineral bioaccessibility and %DP decreased, probably due to the increased levels of phytic acid and trypsin inhibitors from SP. Ca content only affected %DCa, which had a direct relationship with Ca levels, while did not affect Fe and Zn bioaccessibility or %DP. Since Ca citrate did not impair Fe and Zn bioaccessibility, it could be an appropriate Ca source for EF fortification. PMID:25079612

  20. C-reactive protein levels in hereditary angioedema.

    PubMed

    Hofman, Z L M; Relan, A; Hack, C E

    2014-07-01

    Hereditary angioedema (HAE) patients experience recurrent episodes of angioedema attacks that can be painful, disfiguring and even life-threatening. The disorder results from a mutation in the gene that controls the synthesis of C1-inhibitor (C1INH). C1INH is a major regulator of activation of the contact system. It is often assumed that attacks results from uncontrolled local activation of the contact system with subsequent formation of bradykinin. To evaluate the involvement of inflammatory reactions in HAE, we analysed C-reactive protein (CRP) levels. HAE patients included in a clinical database of recombinant human C1-inhibitor (rhC1INH) studies were evaluated. For the current study we analysed CRP levels when patients were asymptomatic, during a clinical attack and in a follow-up period, and correlated these with the clinical manifestations of the attack. Data from 68 HAE patients were analysed and included CRP levels on 273 occasions. While asymptomatic, 20% of the patients analysed had increased CRP. At the onset of the attack (P = 0·049) and during the next 24 h CRP rose significantly (P = 0·002) in patients with an abdominal location, and post-attack levels were significantly higher in these patients than in patients with attacks at other locations (P = 0·034). In conclusion, CRP levels are elevated in a substantial proportion of asymptomatic HAE patients. Levels of CRP increase significantly during an abdominal attack. These data suggest low-grade systemic inflammatory reactions in HAE patients as well as a triggering event for attacks that starts prior to symptom onset. PMID:24588117

  1. [AIDS: "We will win"].

    PubMed

    Chabrier, H

    1989-11-13

    An international colloquium on AIDS held near Paris from October 26-28, 1989, unlike the World Conference on AIDS in Montreal the year before, was able to find reasons for optimism. Significant progress was reported in immunotherapy and in chemotherapy. Successful experiments in vaccinating monkeys against the AIDS virus were reported from the US, France, and Zaire. Time is needed to prove the efficacy of the vaccines because of the slow development in AIDS. A vaccine is being tested by Jonas Salk and collaborators in 75 seropositive volunteers who do not yet show full blown disease but who have very low levels of T4 lymphocytes. Plans are underway for a larger test on 500 seropositive patients at different stages of infection. According to Salk, the new chemical and logical approach toward AIDS will allow combinations of immunotherapy and chemotherapy to destroy the virus. R. Gallo of France listed as accomplishments of the past year a better understanding of the virus, improved case management techniques, increased ability to control Kaposi's sarcoma, considerable progress in the search for a vaccine, and detection of immune proteins that affect the virus. New biological markers permit establishment of correlations between cellular modifications and the progress of the disease as well as the precise effects of treatment. The new immune system drugs immuthiol and DDI are expected to reach the market soon. Patients very soon will be able to receive less toxic alternative treatments, which can be combined for greater efficacy once their toxic interactions are understood. PMID:12342689

  2. Estimation of endogenous protein and amino acid ileal losses in weaned piglets by regression analysis using diets with graded levels of casein

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Many studies have investigated endogenous loss of proteins and amino acids (AAs) at the ileal level in growing pigs. However, only a few studies have researched this subject in piglets. Knowledge regarding AA ileal digestibility in piglets would be helpful during the formulation of diets for weaning piglets, rather than just using coefficients obtained in growing pigs. Therefore, in this study, we sought to estimate endogenous protein and AA ileal losses in piglets. Furthermore, apparent and true ileal digestibility (AID and TID) of protein and AAs from casein were measured. Results The average flow of protein was 20.8 g/kg of dry matter intake (DMI). Basal protein loss, as estimated by regression, was 16.9 g/kg DMI. Glutamic acid, arginine, and aspartic acid (2.2, 1.4, and 1.2 g/kg DMI, respectively) were the AAs for which greater losses were seen. The AID of protein and AAs increased as the protein level in the diet increased. A higher increment in AID was observed between diets with 80 and160 g CP/kg of feed; this finding was mainly attributable to increases in glycine and arginine (46.1% and 18%, respectively). The TID of protein was 97.8, and the TID of AAs varied from 93.9 for histidine to 100.2 for phenylalanine. Conclusions The basal endogenous protein loss in piglets was 16.9 g/kg DMI. Endogenous protein was rich in glutamic acid, aspartic acid, and arginine, which represented 32.7% of endogenous protein loss in weaning piglets. The TID of casein was high and varied from 93.0 for histidine to 100.2 for phenylalanine. PMID:24053636

  3. Orphans of the AIDS Epidemic: An Examination of Clinical Level Problems of Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pelton, Jennifer; Forehand, Rex

    2005-01-01

    Objective: The percentage of children with clinical levels of internalizing and externalizing problems before and after maternal death from acquired immunodeficiency syndrome was contrasted with two comparison groups: children whose mothers were human immunodeficiency virus infected but continued to live and children whose mothers were not…

  4. The Development of Multi-Level Audio-Visual Teaching Aids for Earth Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pitt, William D.

    The project consisted of making a multi-level teaching film titled "Rocks and Minerals of the Ouachita Mountains," which runs for 25 minutes and is in color. The film was designed to be interesting to earth science students from junior high to college, and consists of dialogue combined with motion pictures of charts, sequential diagrams, outcrops,…

  5. PCDq: human protein complex database with quality index which summarizes different levels of evidences of protein complexes predicted from H-Invitational protein-protein interactions integrative dataset

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Proteins interact with other proteins or biomolecules in complexes to perform cellular functions. Existing protein-protein interaction (PPI) databases and protein complex databases for human proteins are not organized to provide protein complex information or facilitate the discovery of novel subunits. Data integration of PPIs focused specifically on protein complexes, subunits, and their functions. Predicted candidate complexes or subunits are also important for experimental biologists. Description Based on integrated PPI data and literature, we have developed a human protein complex database with a complex quality index (PCDq), which includes both known and predicted complexes and subunits. We integrated six PPI data (BIND, DIP, MINT, HPRD, IntAct, and GNP_Y2H), and predicted human protein complexes by finding densely connected regions in the PPI networks. They were curated with the literature so that missing proteins were complemented and some complexes were merged, resulting in 1,264 complexes comprising 9,268 proteins with 32,198 PPIs. The evidence level of each subunit was assigned as a categorical variable. This indicated whether it was a known subunit, and a specific function was inferable from sequence or network analysis. To summarize the categories of all the subunits in a complex, we devised a complex quality index (CQI) and assigned it to each complex. We examined the proportion of consistency of Gene Ontology (GO) terms among protein subunits of a complex. Next, we compared the expression profiles of the corresponding genes and found that many proteins in larger complexes tend to be expressed cooperatively at the transcript level. The proportion of duplicated genes in a complex was evaluated. Finally, we identified 78 hypothetical proteins that were annotated as subunits of 82 complexes, which included known complexes. Of these hypothetical proteins, after our prediction had been made, four were reported to be actual subunits of the

  6. MVsCarta: A protein database of matrix vesicles to aid understanding of biomineralization.

    PubMed

    Cui, Yazhou; Xu, Quan; Luan, Jing; Hu, Shichang; Pan, Jianbo; Han, Jinxiang; Ji, Zhiliang

    2015-06-01

    Matrix vesicles (MVs) are membranous nanovesicles released by chondrocytes, osteoblasts, and odontoblasts. They play a critical role in modulating mineralization. Here, we present a manually curated database of MV proteins, namely MVsCara to provide comprehensive information on MVs of protein components. In the current version, the database contains 2,713 proteins of six organisms identified in bone, cartilage, tooth tissues, and cells capable of producing a mineralized bone matrix. The MVsCarta database is now freely assessed at http://bioinf.xmu.edu.cn/MVsCarta. The search and browse methods were developed for better retrieval of data. In addition, bioinformatic tools like Gene Ontology (GO) analysis, network visualization and protein-protein interaction analysis were implemented for a functional understanding of MVs components. Similar database hasn't been reported yet. We believe that this free web-based database might serve as a useful repository to elucidate the novel function and regulation of MVs during mineralization, and to stimulate the advancement of MV studies. PMID:26166372

  7. Proteins with abortifacient, ribosome inactivating, immunomodulatory, antitumor and anti-AIDS activities from Cucurbitaceae plants.

    PubMed

    Ng, T B; Chan, W Y; Yeung, H W

    1992-07-01

    1. The biochemical characteristics and biological activities of eight Cucurbitaceae plant proteins designated trichosanthin (isolated from tubers of Trichosanthes kirilowii), beta-trichosanthin (isolated from tubers of Trichosanthes cucumeroides), alpha- and beta-momorcharins (isolated from seeds of Momordica charantia), momorchochin (isolated from tubers of Momordica cochinchinensis), luffaculin (isolated from seeds of Luffa acutangula) and luffin-a and luffin-b (isolated from seeds of Luffa cylindrica), were reviewed. 2. The isolation procedures for all eight proteins are based on aqueous extraction, acetone fractionation and ion exchange chromatography. Ammonium sulfate precipitation and gel filtration are steps which may be included to improve purification. 3. The proteins are basic in nature and possess a molecular weight of approx. 30,000. All except trichosanthin are glycoproteins. The content of Asx and Glx residues is high. The N-terminal amino acid residue is Asp. Their amino acid compositions and N-terminal amino acid sequences are similar. 4. Circular dichroism spectroscopic studies revealed that trichosanthin, alpha- and beta-momorcharins possess similar secondary but different tertiary structures. 5. Most of the proteins are immunologically distinct. 6. The proteins exhibit abortifacient, antitumor, ribosome inactivating and immunomodulatory activities. Trichosanthin manifests anti-human immunodeficiency virus activity. PMID:1397965

  8. Sputum and BAL Clara cell secretory protein and surfactant protein D levels in asthma.

    PubMed

    Emmanouil, P; Loukides, S; Kostikas, K; Papatheodorou, G; Papaporfyriou, A; Hillas, G; Vamvakaris, I; Triggidou, R; Katafigiotis, P; Kokkini, A; Papiris, S; Koulouris, N; Bakakos, P

    2015-06-01

    Clara cell secretory protein (CC16) is associated with Th2 modulation. Surfactant protein D (SPD) plays an important role in surfactant homeostasis and eosinophil chemotaxis. We measured CC16 and SPD in sputum supernatants of 84 asthmatic patients and 12 healthy controls. In 22 asthmatics, we additionally measured CC16 and SPD levels in BAL and assessed smooth muscle area (SMA), reticular basement membrane (RBM) thickness, and epithelial detachment (ED) in bronchial biopsies. Induced sputum CC16 and SPD were significantly higher in patients with severe asthma (SRA) compared to mild-moderate and healthy controls. BAL CC16 and SPD levels were also higher in SRA compared to mild-moderate asthma. CC16 BAL levels correlated with ED, while SPD BAL levels correlated with SMA and RBM. Severity represented a significant covariate for these associations. CC16 and SPD levels are upregulated in SRA and correlate with remodeling indices, suggesting a possible role of these biomarkers in the remodeling process. PMID:25728058

  9. Honey bee protein atlas at organ-level resolution.

    PubMed

    Chan, Queenie W T; Chan, Man Yi; Logan, Michelle; Fang, Yuan; Higo, Heather; Foster, Leonard J

    2013-11-01

    Genome sequencing has provided us with gene lists but cannot tell us where and how their encoded products work together to support life. Complex organisms rely on differential expression of subsets of genes/proteins in organs and tissues, and, in concert, evolved to their present state as they function together to improve an organism's overall reproductive fitness. Proteomics studies of individual organs help us understand their basic functions, but this reductionist approach misses the larger context of the whole organism. This problem could be circumvented if all the organs in an organism were comprehensively studied by the same methodology and analyzed together. Using honey bees (Apis mellifera L.) as a model system, we report here an initial whole proteome of a complex organism, measuring 29 different organ/tissue types among the three honey bee castes: queen, drone, and worker. The data reveal that, e.g., workers have a heightened capacity to deal with environmental toxins and queens have a far more robust pheromone detection system than their nestmates. The data also suggest that workers altruistically sacrifice not only their own reproductive capacity but also their immune potential in favor of their queen. Finally, organ-level resolution of protein expression offers a systematic insight into how organs may have developed. PMID:23878156

  10. Honey bee protein atlas at organ-level resolution

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Queenie W.T.; Chan, Man Yi; Logan, Michelle; Fang, Yuan; Higo, Heather; Foster, Leonard J.

    2013-01-01

    Genome sequencing has provided us with gene lists but cannot tell us where and how their encoded products work together to support life. Complex organisms rely on differential expression of subsets of genes/proteins in organs and tissues, and, in concert, evolved to their present state as they function together to improve an organism's overall reproductive fitness. Proteomics studies of individual organs help us understand their basic functions, but this reductionist approach misses the larger context of the whole organism. This problem could be circumvented if all the organs in an organism were comprehensively studied by the same methodology and analyzed together. Using honey bees (Apis mellifera L.) as a model system, we report here an initial whole proteome of a complex organism, measuring 29 different organ/tissue types among the three honey bee castes: queen, drone, and worker. The data reveal that, e.g., workers have a heightened capacity to deal with environmental toxins and queens have a far more robust pheromone detection system than their nestmates. The data also suggest that workers altruistically sacrifice not only their own reproductive capacity but also their immune potential in favor of their queen. Finally, organ-level resolution of protein expression offers a systematic insight into how organs may have developed. PMID:23878156

  11. Computer-aided identification of novel protein targets of bisphenol A.

    PubMed

    Montes-Grajales, Diana; Olivero-Verbel, Jesus

    2013-10-01

    The xenoestrogen bisphenol A (2,2-bis-(p-hydroxyphenyl)-2-propane, BPA) is a known endocrine-disrupting chemical used in the fabrication of plastics, resins and flame retardants, that can be found throughout the environment and in numerous every day products. Human exposure to this chemical is extensive and generally occurs via oral route because it leaches from the food and beverage containers that contain it. Although most of the effects related to BPA exposure have been linked to the activation of the estrogen receptor (ER), the mechanisms of the interaction of BPA with protein targets different from ER are still unknown. Therefore, the objective of this work was to use a bioinformatics approach to identify possible new targets for BPA. Docking studies were performed between the optimized structure of BPA and 271 proteins related to different biochemical processes, as selected by text-mining. Refinement docking experiments and conformational analyses were carried out using LigandScout 3.0 for the proteins selected through the affinity ranking (lower than -8.0kcal/mol). Several proteins including ERR gamma (-9.9kcal/mol), and dual specificity protein kinases CLK-4 (-9.5kcal/mol), CLK-1 (-9.1kcal/mol) and CLK-2 (-9.0kcal/mol) presented great in silico binding affinities for BPA. The interactions between those proteins and BPA were mostly hydrophobic with the presence of some hydrogen bonds formed by leucine and asparagine residues. Therefore, this study suggests that this endocrine disruptor may have other targets different from the ER. PMID:23973438

  12. Levels of Murine, but Not Human, CXCL13 Are Greatly Elevated in NOD-SCID Mice Bearing the AIDS-Associated Burkitt Lymphoma Cell Line, 2F7

    PubMed Central

    Widney, Daniel P.; Olafsen, Tove; Wu, Anna M.; Kitchen, Christina M. R.; Said, Jonathan W.; Smith, Jeffrey B.; Peña, Guadalupe; Magpantay, Larry I.; Penichet, Manuel L.; Martinez-Maza, Otoniel

    2013-01-01

    Currently, few rodent models of AIDS-associated non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (AIDS-NHL) exist. In these studies, a novel mouse/human xenograft model of AIDS-associated Burkitt lymphoma (AIDS-BL) was created by injecting cells of the human AIDS-BL cell line, 2F7, intraperitoneally into NOD-SCID mice. Mice developed tumors in the peritoneal cavity, with metastases to the spleen, thymus, and mesenteric lymph nodes. Expression of the chemokine receptor, CXCR5, was greatly elevated in vivo on BL tumor cells in this model, as shown by flow cytometry. CXCL13 is the ligand for CXCR5, and serum and ascites levels of murine, but not human, CXCL13 showed a striking elevation in tumor-bearing mice, with levels as high as 200,000 pg/ml in ascites, as measured by ELISA. As shown by immunohistochemistry, murine CXCL13 was associated with macrophage-like tumor-infiltrating cells that appeared to be histiocytes. Blocking CXCR5 on 2F7 cells with neutralizing antibodies prior to injection into the mice substantially delayed tumor formation. The marked elevations in tumor cell CXCR5 expression and in murine CXCL13 levels seen in the model may potentially identify an important link between tumor-interacting histiocytes and tumor cells in AIDS-BL. These results also identify CXCL13 as a potential biomarker for this disease, which is consistent with previous studies showing that serum levels of CXCL13 were elevated in human subjects who developed AIDS-lymphoma. This mouse model may be useful for future studies on the interactions of the innate immune system and AIDS-BL tumor cells, as well as for the assessment of potential tumor biomarkers for this disease. PMID:23936541

  13. Apparent or Standardized Ileal Digestibility of Amino Acids of Diets Containing Different Protein Feedstuffs Fed at Two Crude Protein Levels for Growing Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Adebiyi, A. O.; Ragland, D.; Adeola, O.; Olukosi, O. A.

    2015-01-01

    The current study determined the apparent or standardized ileal digestibility of amino acids (AID or SID of AA) in growing pigs fed diets containing three protein feedstuffs with different fiber characteristics at two dietary crude protein (CP) levels. Twenty boars (Yorkshire×Landrace) with average initial body weight of 35 (±2.6) kg were fitted with a simple T-cannula at the distal ileum. These pigs were offered six diets containing soybean meal (SBM), canola meal (CM) or corn distillers dried grains with solubles (corn-DDGS) that were either adequate (19%) or marginal (15%) in CP using a triplicated 6×2 Youden Square Design. Except for Met, Trp, Cys, and Pro, AID of AA was greater (p<0.05) in the SBM diet compared with the CM diet. Apparent ileal digestibility for Gly and Asp was greater (p<0.05) in the SBM diet compared with the corn-DDGS diet. The AID of Ile, Leu, Phe, Val, Ala, Tyr, and Asp was greater (p<0.05) in the corn-DDGS diet compared with the CM diet. Standardized ileal digestibility of AA was greater (p<0.05) in the SBM diet compared with the CM diet for all AA except Trp and Pro. The SID of Ile, Leu, Val, Ala, Tyr, and Asp was greater (p<0.05) in the corn-DDGS diet compared with the CM diet. It was concluded that protein feedstuff affects ileal AA digestibility and is closely related to dietary fiber characteristics, and a 4-percentage unit reduction in dietary CP had no effect on ileal AA digestibility in growing pigs. PMID:26194226

  14. Cytokine polymorphisms and plasma levels are associated with sleep onset insomnia in adults living with HIV/AIDS.

    PubMed

    Gay, Caryl L; Zak, Rochelle S; Lerdal, Anners; Pullinger, Clive R; Aouizerat, Bradley E; Lee, Kathryn A

    2015-07-01

    Sleep disturbance has been associated with inflammation and cytokine activity, and we previously described genetic associations between cytokine polymorphisms and sleep maintenance and duration among adults with HIV/AIDS. Although sleep onset insomnia (SOI) is also a commonly reported sleep problem, associations between cytokine biomarkers and SOI have not been adequately studied. The purpose of this study was to describe SOI in relation to cytokine plasma concentrations and gene polymorphisms in a convenience sample of 307 adults (212 men, 72 women, and 23 transgender) living with HIV/AIDS. Based on the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index item that asks the time it usually took to fall asleep in the past month, participants were categorized as either >30min to fall asleep (n=70, 23%) or 30min or less to fall asleep (n=237). Plasma cytokines were analyzed, and genotyping was conducted for 15 candidate genes involved in cytokine signaling: interferon-gamma (IFNG), IFNG receptor 1 (IFNGR1), interleukins (IL1R2, IL2, IL4, IL6, IL8, IL10, IL13, IL17A), nuclear factor of kappa light polypeptide gene enhancer in B cells (NFKB1 and NFKB2), and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFA). Demographic and clinical variables were evaluated as potential covariates. After adjusting for genomic estimates of ancestry, self-reported race/ethnicity and viral load, SOI was associated with higher IL-13 plasma levels and with six single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs): IL1B rs1143642 and rs1143623, IL6 rs4719714, IL13 rs1295686, NFKB1 rs4648110, and TNFA rs2857602. In addition, the IL1B rs1143642 polymorphism was associated with plasma levels of IL-1β in adjusted analyses. This study strengthens the evidence for an association between inflammation and sleep disturbance, particularly self-report of habitual SOI. In this chronic illness population, the cytokine polymorphisms associated with SOI provide direction for future personalized medicine intervention research. PMID:25535857

  15. Circulating Heat Shock Protein 60 Levels Are Elevated in HIV Patients and Are Reduced by Anti-Retroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Anraku, Itaru; Rajasuriar, Reena; Dobbin, Caroline; Brown, Richard; Lewin, Sharon R.; Suhrbier, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    Circulating heat shock protein 60 (Hsp60) and heat shock protein 10 (Hsp10) have been associated with pro- and anti-inflammatory activity, respectively. To determine whether these heat shock proteins might be associated with the immune activation seen in HIV-infected patients, the plasma levels of Hsp60 and Hsp10 were determined in a cohort of 20 HIV-infected patients before and after effective combination anti-retroviral therapy (cART). We show for the first time that circulating Hsp60 levels are elevated in HIV-infected patients, with levels significantly reduced after cART, but still higher than those in HIV-negative individuals. Hsp60 levels correlated significantly with viral load, CD4 counts, and circulating soluble CD14 and lipopolysaccharide levels. No differences or correlations were seen for Hsp10 levels. Elevated circulating Hsp60 may contribute to the immune dysfunction and non-AIDS clinical events seen in HIV-infected patients. PMID:23028910

  16. Forecasting future water levels to aid in flash flood risk management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, P. J.; Beven, K.; Marchandise, A.; Pappenberger, F.

    2012-04-01

    Flash floods are typically triggered by local intense rainfall in small catchments with short response times. The work presented explores the use of ensemble numerical weather prediction products coupled with a simplified hydrological model to forecast such floods, with up to 2 days lead time, when water level observations can be regularly assimilated. The techniques outlined are presented with reference to a case study, the Gardon d'Anduze basin in France. A Data Based Mechanistic time series model of the rainfall run-off dynamics of the catchment is constructed. The model formulated to address two common sources of observational errors, shifting baselines in the water level observation and incorrect characterisation of the magnitude of the precipitation. It is cast in a state space form shown to be an effective forecaster when driven by observed precipitation data. Substitution of ensemble precipitation forecasts the observed data is used to generate forecasts with with longer lead times. A simple adaptation of the hydrological model is used to represent the uncertainty in the forecasts that may result from incorrect characterisation of the magnitude of the forecast precipitation. Observed water levels are assimilated condition the model forecasts. They can be used both to condition the initial states to the hydrological model prior to being run with the ensemble NWP input but also to condition the hydrological forecasts generated by running the ensemble NWP inputs after they have been generated. The balance between using the hydrological forecasts of most recent NWP ensemble, or those of an older generated by an older ensemble which have undergone more data assimilation is considered.

  17. Fluorescent Protein Aided Insights on Plastids and their Extensions: A Critical Appraisal

    PubMed Central

    Delfosse, Kathleen; Wozny, Michael R.; Jaipargas, Erica-Ashley; Barton, Kiah A.; Anderson, Cole; Mathur, Jaideep

    2016-01-01

    Multi-colored fluorescent proteins targeted to plastids have provided new insights on the dynamic behavior of these organelles and their interactions with other cytoplasmic components and compartments. Sub-plastidic components such as thylakoids, stroma, the inner and outer membranes of the plastid envelope, nucleoids, plastoglobuli, and starch grains have been efficiently highlighted in living plant cells. In addition, stroma filled membrane extensions called stromules have drawn attention to the dynamic nature of the plastid and its interactions with the rest of the cell. Use of dual and triple fluorescent protein combinations has begun to reveal plastid interactions with mitochondria, the nucleus, the endoplasmic reticulum and F-actin and suggests integral roles of plastids in retrograde signaling, cell to cell communication as well as plant-pathogen interactions. While the rapid advances and insights achieved through fluorescent protein based research on plastids are commendable it is necessary to endorse meaningful observations but subject others to closer scrutiny. Here, in order to develop a better and more comprehensive understanding of plastids and their extensions we provide a critical appraisal of recent information that has been acquired using targeted fluorescent protein probes. PMID:26834765

  18. Dr. Sanger's Apprentice: A Computer-Aided Instruction to Protein Sequencing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt, Thomas G.; Place, Allen R.

    1985-01-01

    Modeled after the program "Mastermind," this program teaches students the art of protein sequencing. The program (written in Turbo Pascal for the IBM PC, requiring 128K, a graphics adapter, and an 8070 mathematics coprocessor) generates a polypeptide whose sequence and length can be user-defined (for practice) or computer-generated (for grading).…

  19. Estimating uncomfortable loudness levels using evoked potentials to auditory stimuli for hearing aid fitting.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Shinobu; Morikawa, Koji; Kato, Yumiko O; Ozawa, Jun; Nittono, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    Determining the loudest sound level that a person can comfortably tolerate (uncomfortable loudness level: UCL) imposes a strain on people suffering from hearing loss. In the present study, we propose a method of estimating UCL based on auditory evoked potentials (AEPs). Adults with normal hearing (18 men aged 25-56 years) participated in the study. Three tone bursts (S1, S2 and S3; a triplet) of the same frequency (either 1k, 2k or 4k Hz) were presented to the right or left ear with an interstimulus interval of 300 ms. The sound intensity decreased gradually by 5 dB HL from 80 dB (S1) to 70 dB HL (S3). The interval between triplets was 450 ± 50 ms. The frequency of a given triplet differed from the frequency of the preceding triplet. An electroencephalogram was recorded from three scalp electrode sites (Cz, C3, and C4) with the right mastoid reference. The 900-ms period after the onset of the triplet was transformed to a wavelet coefficient and averaged separately by stimulated ear and tone frequency. The UCLs were estimated by linear discriminant analysis on the basis of trained data of the other participants' subjective UCLs and the wavelet coefficients. The mean estimation error was 4.9 ± 5.0 dB. This result suggests that the UCLs could be estimated successfully on the basis of AEPs to triplets of auditory tones. PMID:23366337

  20. Lack of association of acute phase response proteins with hormone levels and antidepressant medication in perimenopausal depression

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Major depression is associated with higher plasma levels of positive acute-phase proteins, as well as with lower plasma levels of negative acute-phase proteins. The aim of this study is to examine the levels of acute-phase response proteins and whether these levels are influenced by reproductive hormones and antidepressant medication in the perimenopausal depression. Methods Sixty-five women (age range: 40–58 years old) participated in this study. All women were in the perimenopausal phase. The diagnosis of depression was made through a psychiatric interview and with the aid of Hamilton Depression Rating Scale 17 (HAM-D 17). The acute-phase response proteins, such as haptoglobin (HP), transferrine (TRf), α1-antitrypsin, complement protein 3 (C3), complement protein 4 (C4) and C-reactive protein (CRP) and the reproductive hormones, for example follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH) and estradiol (E2), were analyzed using standard laboratory methods. Pearson’s correlations were applied to evaluate the relationship between acute-phase proteins and hormones. Results Perimenopausal women were divided into three groups. The first group consisted of normal controls, the second one involved depressed perimenopausal women, who were taking selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), and the third one included depressed women that were not treated with SSRIs. Depressed women in perimenopause, when being compared to non-depressed women, did not differ as to serum levels of acute-phase proteins. There was a positive correlation between HP and E2 in depressed perimenopausal women, who were not taking SSRIs. Conclusions The lack of association between acute-phase proteins and depressive mood mentioned in this study does not support previous findings in patients with major depression. This negative finding in perimenopausal depression indicates either the absence or a more complex nature of the interactions between acute-phase proteins

  1. Modelling level, trend and geographical variations in stigma and discrimination against people living with HIV/AIDS in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Adebayo, Samson B; Fakolade, Richard; Anyanti, Jennifer; Ekweremadu, Bright; Ladipo, Olaronke; Ankomah, Augustine

    2011-01-01

    People living with HIV and AIDS (PLHA) often face stigma and discrimination. Stigma is a powerful tool for social control and PLHA are to varying degrees stigmatised against. Consequences of stigma and discrimination against PLHA may result in low turn-out for HIV counselling and testing, identity crises, isolation, loneliness, low self-esteem and lack of interest in containing the disease. To achieve the millennium development goal on HIV reduction, efforts should be targeted at measuring impact of HIV preventive interventions. In this paper, effort was made to explore geographical variations in addition to level and trend of accepting attitude towards PLHA using 2003 - 2007 population-based household survey data. Inferences are based on Markov Chain Monte Carlo techniques, while model selection was based on Deviance Information Criteria. Findings revealed significant positive trend and spatial variations on level of accepting attitude towards PLHA. Level of exposure to HIV prevention interventions and perceptions about social support received on HIV are significantly associated with accepting attitude towards PLHA. Findings provide policy makers with tools to discern states where prevention efforts on HIV-related stigma and discrimination should be intensified. This in turn, can enhance an effective utilization of scarce resources that is paramount in developing countries. PMID:23237726

  2. An Analysis of Training Effects on School Personnel's Knowledge, Attitudes, Comfort, and Confidence Levels toward Educating Students about HIV/AIDS in Pennsylvania

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deutschlander, Sharon

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the training effects on school personnel's knowledge, attitudes, comfort, and confidence levels toward educating students about HIV/AIDS in Pennsylvania. The following four research questions were explored: (a) What is the knowledge, attitudes, confidence, and comfort levels of school personnel regarding…

  3. Modelling the structures of G protein-coupled receptors aided by three-dimensional validation

    PubMed Central

    Dastmalchi, Siavoush; Church, W Bret; Morris, Michael B

    2008-01-01

    Background G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are abundant, activate complex signalling and represent the targets for up to ~60% of pharmaceuticals but there is a paucity of structural data. Bovine rhodopsin is the first GPCR for which high-resolution structures have been completed but significant variations in structure are likely to exist among the GPCRs. Because of this, considerable effort has been expended on developing in silico tools for refining structures of individual GPCRs. We have developed REPIMPS, a modification of the inverse-folding software Profiles-3D, to assess and predict the rotational orientation and vertical position of helices within the helix bundle of individual GPCRs. We highlight the value of the method by applying it to the Baldwin GPCR template but the method can, in principle, be applied to any low- or high-resolution membrane protein template or structure. Results 3D models were built for transmembrane helical segments of 493 GPCRs based on the Baldwin template, and the models were then scored using REPIMPS and Profiles-3D. The compatibility scores increased significantly using REPIMPS because it takes into account the physicochemical properties of the (lipid) environment surrounding the helix bundle. The arrangement of helices in the helix bundle of the 493 models was then altered systematically by rotating the individual helices. For most GPCRs in the set, changes in the rotational position of one or more helices resulted in significant improvement in the compatibility scores. In particular, for most GPCRs, a rotation of helix VII by 240–300° resulted in improved scores. Bovine rhodopsin modelled using this method showed 3.31 Å RMSD to its crystal structure for 198 Cα atom pairs, suggesting the utility of the method even when starting with idealised structures such as the Baldwin template. Conclusion We have developed an in silico tool which can be used to test the validity of, and refine, models of GPCRs with respect to

  4. Auxin acts independently of DELLA proteins in regulating gibberellin levels.

    PubMed

    Reid, James B; Davidson, Sandra E; Ross, John J

    2011-03-01

    Shoot elongation is a vital process for plant development and productivity, in both ecological and economic contexts. Auxin and bioactive gibberellins (GAs), such as GA1, play critical roles in the control of elongation, along with environmental and endogenous factors, including other hormones such as the brassinosteroids. The effect of auxins, such as indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), is at least in part mediated by its effect on GA metabolism, since auxin up-regulates biosynthesis genes such as GA 3-oxidase and GA 20-oxidase and down regulates GA catabolism genes such as GA 2-oxidases, leading to elevated levels of bioactive GA 1. In our recent paper, we have provided evidence that this action of IAA is largely independent of DELLA proteins, the negative regulators of GA action, since the auxin effects are still present in the DELLA-deficient la cry-s genotype of pea. This was a crucial issue to resolve, since like auxin, the DELLAs also promote GA 1 synthesis and inhibit its deactivation. DELLAs are deactivated by GA, and thereby mediate a feedback system by which bioactive GA regulates its own level. However, our recent results, in themselves, do not show the generality of the auxin-GA relationship across species and phylogenetic groups or across different tissue types and responses. Further, they do not touch on the ecological benefits of the auxin-GA interaction. These issues are discussed below as well as the need for the development of suitable experimental systems to allow this process to be examined. PMID:21358281

  5. Gel-aided sample preparation (GASP)--a simplified method for gel-assisted proteomic sample generation from protein extracts and intact cells.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Roman; Kessler, Benedikt M

    2015-04-01

    We describe a "gel-assisted" proteomic sample preparation method for MS analysis. Solubilized protein extracts or intact cells are copolymerized with acrylamide, facilitating denaturation, reduction, quantitative cysteine alkylation, and matrix formation. Gel-aided sample preparation has been optimized to be highly flexible, scalable, and to allow reproducible sample generation from 50 cells to milligrams of protein extracts. This methodology is fast, sensitive, easy-to-use on a wide range of sample types, and accessible to nonspecialists. PMID:25515006

  6. Pharmacological Targeting of AMP-Activated Protein Kinase and Opportunities for Computer-Aided Drug Design.

    PubMed

    Miglianico, Marie; Nicolaes, Gerry A F; Neumann, Dietbert

    2016-04-14

    As a central regulator of metabolism, the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is an established therapeutic target for metabolic diseases. Beyond the metabolic area, the number of medical fields that involve AMPK grows continuously, expanding the potential applications for AMPK modulators. Even though indirect AMPK activators are used in the clinics for their beneficial metabolic outcome, the few described direct agonists all failed to reach the market to date, which leaves options open for novel targeting methods. As AMPK is not actually a single molecule and has different roles depending on its isoform composition, the opportunity for isoform-specific targeting has notably come forward, but the currently available modulators fall short of expectations. In this review, we argue that with the amount of available structural and ligand data, computer-based drug design offers a number of opportunities to undertake novel and isoform-specific targeting of AMPK. PMID:26510622

  7. D-Dimer Levels before HIV Seroconversion Remain Elevated Even after Viral Suppression and Are Associated with an Increased Risk of Non-AIDS Events

    PubMed Central

    Freiberg, Matthew S.; Bebu, Ionut; Tracy, Russell; So-Armah, Kaku; Okulicz, Jason; Ganesan, Anuradha; Armstrong, Adam; O’Bryan, Thomas; Rimland, David; Justice, Amy C.; Agan, Brian K.

    2016-01-01

    The mechanism underlying the excess risk of non-AIDS diseases among HIV infected people is unclear. HIV associated inflammation/hypercoagulability likely plays a role. While antiretroviral therapy (ART) may return this process to pre-HIV levels, this has not been directly demonstrated. We analyzed data/specimens on 249 HIV+ participants from the US Military HIV Natural History Study, a prospective, multicenter observational cohort of >5600 active duty military personnel and beneficiaries living with HIV. We used stored blood specimens to measure D-dimer and Interleukin-6 (IL-6) at three time points: pre-HIV seroconversion, ≥6 months post-HIV seroconversion but prior to ART initiation, and ≥6 months post-ART with documented HIV viral suppression on two successive evaluations. We evaluated the changes in biomarker levels between time points, and the association between these biomarker changes and future non-AIDS events. During a median follow-up of 3.7 years, there were 28 incident non-AIDS diseases. At ART initiation, the median CD4 count was 361cells/mm3; median duration of documented HIV infection 392 days; median time on ART was 354 days. Adjusted mean percent increase in D-dimer levels from pre-seroconversion to post-ART was 75.1% (95% confidence interval 24.6–148.0, p = 0.002). This increase in D-dimer was associated with a significant 22% increase risk of future non-AIDS events (p = 0.03). Changes in IL-6 levels across time points were small and not associated with future non-AIDS events. In conclusion, ART initiation and HIV viral suppression does not eliminate HIV associated elevation in D-dimer levels. This residual pathology is associated with an increased risk of future non-AIDS diseases. PMID:27088215

  8. D-Dimer Levels before HIV Seroconversion Remain Elevated Even after Viral Suppression and Are Associated with an Increased Risk of Non-AIDS Events.

    PubMed

    Freiberg, Matthew S; Bebu, Ionut; Tracy, Russell; So-Armah, Kaku; Okulicz, Jason; Ganesan, Anuradha; Armstrong, Adam; O'Bryan, Thomas; Rimland, David; Justice, Amy C; Agan, Brian K

    2016-01-01

    The mechanism underlying the excess risk of non-AIDS diseases among HIV infected people is unclear. HIV associated inflammation/hypercoagulability likely plays a role. While antiretroviral therapy (ART) may return this process to pre-HIV levels, this has not been directly demonstrated. We analyzed data/specimens on 249 HIV+ participants from the US Military HIV Natural History Study, a prospective, multicenter observational cohort of >5600 active duty military personnel and beneficiaries living with HIV. We used stored blood specimens to measure D-dimer and Interleukin-6 (IL-6) at three time points: pre-HIV seroconversion, ≥6 months post-HIV seroconversion but prior to ART initiation, and ≥6 months post-ART with documented HIV viral suppression on two successive evaluations. We evaluated the changes in biomarker levels between time points, and the association between these biomarker changes and future non-AIDS events. During a median follow-up of 3.7 years, there were 28 incident non-AIDS diseases. At ART initiation, the median CD4 count was 361cells/mm3; median duration of documented HIV infection 392 days; median time on ART was 354 days. Adjusted mean percent increase in D-dimer levels from pre-seroconversion to post-ART was 75.1% (95% confidence interval 24.6-148.0, p = 0.002). This increase in D-dimer was associated with a significant 22% increase risk of future non-AIDS events (p = 0.03). Changes in IL-6 levels across time points were small and not associated with future non-AIDS events. In conclusion, ART initiation and HIV viral suppression does not eliminate HIV associated elevation in D-dimer levels. This residual pathology is associated with an increased risk of future non-AIDS diseases. PMID:27088215

  9. Development, Characterization, and Optimization of Protein Level in Date Bars Using Response Surface Methodology

    PubMed Central

    Nadeem, Muhammad; Salim-ur-Rehman; Muhammad Anjum, Faqir; Murtaza, Mian Anjum; Mueen-ud-Din, Ghulam

    2012-01-01

    This project was designed to produce a nourishing date bar with commercial value especially for school going children to meet their body development requirements. Protein level of date bars was optimized using response surface methodology (RSM). Economical and underutilized sources, that is, whey protein concentrate and vetch protein isolates, were explored for protein supplementation. Fourteen date bar treatments were produced using a central composite design (CCD) with 2 variables and 3 levels for each variable. Date bars were then analyzed for nutritional profile. Proximate composition revealed that addition of whey protein concentrate and vetch protein isolates improved the nutritional profile of date bars. Protein level, texture, and taste were considerably improved by incorporating 6.05% whey protein concentrate and 4.35% vetch protein isolates in date bar without affecting any sensory characteristics during storage. Response surface methodology was observed as an economical and effective tool to optimize the ingredient level and to discriminate the interactive effects of independent variables. PMID:22792044

  10. Development, characterization, and optimization of protein level in date bars using response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Nadeem, Muhammad; Salim-ur-Rehman; Muhammad Anjum, Faqir; Murtaza, Mian Anjum; Mueen-ud-Din, Ghulam

    2012-01-01

    This project was designed to produce a nourishing date bar with commercial value especially for school going children to meet their body development requirements. Protein level of date bars was optimized using response surface methodology (RSM). Economical and underutilized sources, that is, whey protein concentrate and vetch protein isolates, were explored for protein supplementation. Fourteen date bar treatments were produced using a central composite design (CCD) with 2 variables and 3 levels for each variable. Date bars were then analyzed for nutritional profile. Proximate composition revealed that addition of whey protein concentrate and vetch protein isolates improved the nutritional profile of date bars. Protein level, texture, and taste were considerably improved by incorporating 6.05% whey protein concentrate and 4.35% vetch protein isolates in date bar without affecting any sensory characteristics during storage. Response surface methodology was observed as an economical and effective tool to optimize the ingredient level and to discriminate the interactive effects of independent variables. PMID:22792044

  11. Microsecond protein dynamics observed at the single-molecule level

    PubMed Central

    Otosu, Takuhiro; Ishii, Kunihiko; Tahara, Tahei

    2015-01-01

    How polypeptide chains acquire specific conformations to realize unique biological functions is a central problem of protein science. Single-molecule spectroscopy, combined with fluorescence resonance energy transfer, is utilized to study the conformational heterogeneity and the state-to-state transition dynamics of proteins on the submillisecond to second timescales. However, observation of the dynamics on the microsecond timescale is still very challenging. This timescale is important because the elementary processes of protein dynamics take place and direct comparison between experiment and simulation is possible. Here we report a new single-molecule technique to reveal the microsecond structural dynamics of proteins through correlation of the fluorescence lifetime. This method, two-dimensional fluorescence lifetime correlation spectroscopy, is applied to clarify the conformational dynamics of cytochrome c. Three conformational ensembles and the microsecond transitions in each ensemble are indicated from the correlation signal, demonstrating the importance of quantifying microsecond dynamics of proteins on the folding free energy landscape. PMID:26151767

  12. Upper Primary Level History Teachers' Attitudes toward the Use of School Field Trips as an Educational Aid throughout Schools in Irbid First Education Directorate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Menazel, Basil H.

    2015-01-01

    The study aimed to identify upper primary level History teachers' attitudes toward the use of school field trips as an educational aid throughout schools in the Irbid First Education Directorate, through exploring the importance of school field trips in the creation of an interactive atmosphere and to encourage school administration attitudes…

  13. Atomic-level Snapshot Catches Protein Motor in Action

    SciTech Connect

    2009-01-01

    Using a state-of-the-art protein crystallography beamline at Berkeley Labs Advanced Light Source, researchers have captured a critical action shapshot of an enzyme that is vital to the survival of all biological cells.

  14. Nrf2 reduces levels of phosphorylated tau protein by inducing autophagy adaptor protein NDP52

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jo, Chulman; Gundemir, Soner; Pritchard, Susanne; Jin, Youngnam N.; Rahman, Irfan; Johnson, Gail V. W.

    2014-03-01

    Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) is a pivotal transcription factor in the defence against oxidative stress. Here we provide evidence that activation of the Nrf2 pathway reduces the levels of phosphorylated tau by induction of an autophagy adaptor protein NDP52 (also known as CALCOCO2) in neurons. The expression of NDP52, which we show has three antioxidant response elements (AREs) in its promoter region, is strongly induced by Nrf2, and its overexpression facilitates clearance of phosphorylated tau in the presence of an autophagy stimulator. In Nrf2-knockout mice, phosphorylated and sarkosyl-insoluble tau accumulates in the brains concurrent with decreased levels of NDP52. Moreover, NDP52 associates with phosphorylated tau from brain cortical samples of Alzheimer disease cases, and the amount of phosphorylated tau in sarkosyl-insoluble fractions is inversely proportional to that of NDP52. These results suggest that NDP52 plays a key role in autophagy-mediated degradation of phosphorylated tau in vivo.

  15. Exonuclease III-aided autocatalytic DNA biosensing platform for immobilization-free and ultrasensitive electrochemical detection of nucleic acid and protein.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shufeng; Lin, Ying; Wang, Li; Liu, Tao; Cheng, Chuanbin; Wei, Wenji; Tang, Bo

    2014-04-15

    Homogenous electrochemical biosensor has attracted substantial attention owing to its simplicity, rapid response, and improved recognition efficiency compared with heterogeneous biosensor, but the relatively low detection sensitivity and the limited detection analytes prohibit its potential applications. To address these issues, herein, a simple, rapid, isothermal, and ultrasensitive homogeneous electrochemical DNA biosensing platform for target DNA and protein detection has been developed on the basis of an exonuclease III (Exo III)-aided autocatalytic target recycling strategy. A ferrocene-labeled hairpin probe (HP1) is ingeniously designed, which contains a protruding DNA fragment at 3'-termini as the recognition unit for target DNA. Also, the DNA fragment that could be used as secondary target analogue was introduced, but it was caged in the stem region of HP1. In the presence of target DNA, its recognition with the protruding fragment of HP1 triggered the Exo III cleavage process, accompanied with the target recycling and autonomous generation of secondary target analogues. This accordingly resulted into the autonomous accumulation of ferrocene-labeled mononucleotide, inducing a distinct increase in the electrochemical signal owing to its elevated diffusivity toward indium tin oxide (ITO) electrode surface. The autocatalytic biosensing system was further extended for protein detection by advising an aptamer hairpin switch with the use of thrombin as a model analyte. The current developed autocatalytic and homogeneous strategy provided an ultrasensitive electrochemical detection of DNA and thrombin down to the 0.1 and 5 pM level, respectively, with a high selectivity. It should be further used as a general autocatalytic and homogeneous strategy toward the detection of a wide spectrum of analytes and may be associated with more analytical techniques. Thus, it holds great potential for the development of ultrasensitive biosensing platform for the applications in

  16. Methods to alter levels of a DNA repair protein

    DOEpatents

    Petrini, John H.; Morgan, William Francis; Maser, Richard Scott; Carney, James Patrick

    2006-10-17

    An isolated and purified DNA molecule encoding a DNA repair protein, p95, is provided, as is isolated and purified p95. Also provided are methods of detecting p95 and DNA encoding p95. The invention further provides p95 knock-out mice.

  17. Effect of N-acetylcysteine administration on homocysteine level, oxidative damage to proteins, and levels of iron (Fe) and Fe-related proteins in lead-exposed workers.

    PubMed

    Kasperczyk, Sławomir; Dobrakowski, Michał; Kasperczyk, Aleksandra; Romuk, Ewa; Rykaczewska-Czerwińska, Monika; Pawlas, Natalia; Birkner, Ewa

    2016-09-01

    N-Acetylcysteine (NAC) could be included in protocols designed for the treatment of lead toxicity. Therefore, in this study, we decided to investigate the influence of NAC administration on homocysteine (Hcy) levels, oxidative damage to proteins, and the levels of iron (Fe), transferrin (TRF), and haptoglobin (HPG) in lead (Pb)-exposed workers. The examined population (n = 171) was composed of male employees who worked with Pb. They were randomized into four groups. Workers who were not administered any antioxidants, drugs, vitamins, or dietary supplements were classified as the reference group (n = 49). The remaining three groups consisted of workers who were treated orally with NAC at three different doses (1 × 200, 2 × 200, or 2 × 400 mg) for 12 weeks. After the treatment, blood Pb levels significantly decreased in the groups receiving NAC compared with the reference group. The protein concentration was not affected by NAC administration. In contrast, Hcy levels significantly decreased or showed a strong tendency toward lower values depending on the NAC dose. Levels of the protein carbonyl groups were significantly decreased in all of the groups receiving NAC. Conversely, glutamate dehydrogenase activity was significantly elevated in all of the groups receiving NAC, while the level of protein thiol groups was significantly elevated only in the group receiving 200 mg of NAC. Treatment with NAC did not significantly affect Fe and TRF levels, whereas HPG levels showed a tendency toward lower values. Treatment with NAC normalized the level of Hcy and decreased oxidative stress as measured by the protein carbonyl content; this effect occurred in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, small doses of NAC elevated the levels of protein thiol groups. Therefore, NAC could be introduced as an alternative therapy for chronic Pb toxicity in humans. PMID:25731901

  18. Computer aided screening of secreted frizzled-related protein 4 (SFRP4): a potential control for diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Bukhari, Shazia Anwer; Shamshari, Waseem Akhtar; Ur-Rahman, Mahmood; Zia-Ul-Haq, Muhammad; Jaafar, Hawa Z E

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a life threatening disease and scientists are doing their best to find a cost effective and permanent treatment of this malady. The recent trend is to control the disease by target base inhibiting of enzymes or proteins. Secreted frizzled-related protein 4 (SFRP4) is found to cause five times more risk of diabetes when expressed above average levels. This study was therefore designed to analyze the SFRP4 and to find its potential inhibitors. SFRP4 was analyzed by bio-informatics tools of sequence tool and structure tool. A total of three potential inhibitors of SFRP4 were found, namely cyclothiazide, clopamide and perindopril. These inhibitors showed significant interactions with SFRP4 as compared to other inhibitors as well as control (acetohexamide). The findings suggest the possible treatment of diabetes mellitus type 2 by inhibiting the SFRP4 using the inhibitors cyclothiazide, clopamide and perindopril. PMID:25019556

  19. Wiki-Pi: A Web-Server of Annotated Human Protein-Protein Interactions to Aid in Discovery of Protein Function

    PubMed Central

    Orii, Naoki; Ganapathiraju, Madhavi K.

    2012-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions (PPIs) are the basis of biological functions. Knowledge of the interactions of a protein can help understand its molecular function and its association with different biological processes and pathways. Several publicly available databases provide comprehensive information about individual proteins, such as their sequence, structure, and function. There also exist databases that are built exclusively to provide PPIs by curating them from published literature. The information provided in these web resources is protein-centric, and not PPI-centric. The PPIs are typically provided as lists of interactions of a given gene with links to interacting partners; they do not present a comprehensive view of the nature of both the proteins involved in the interactions. A web database that allows search and retrieval based on biomedical characteristics of PPIs is lacking, and is needed. We present Wiki-Pi (read Wiki-π), a web-based interface to a database of human PPIs, which allows users to retrieve interactions by their biomedical attributes such as their association to diseases, pathways, drugs and biological functions. Each retrieved PPI is shown with annotations of both of the participant proteins side-by-side, creating a basis to hypothesize the biological function facilitated by the interaction. Conceptually, it is a search engine for PPIs analogous to PubMed for scientific literature. Its usefulness in generating novel scientific hypotheses is demonstrated through the study of IGSF21, a little-known gene that was recently identified to be associated with diabetic retinopathy. Using Wiki-Pi, we infer that its association to diabetic retinopathy may be mediated through its interactions with the genes HSPB1, KRAS, TMSB4X and DGKD, and that it may be involved in cellular response to external stimuli, cytoskeletal organization and regulation of molecular activity. The website also provides a wiki-like capability allowing users to describe or

  20. Centimeter-Level Robust Gnss-Aided Inertial Post-Processing for Mobile Mapping Without Local Reference Stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutton, J. J.; Gopaul, N.; Zhang, X.; Wang, J.; Menon, V.; Rieck, D.; Kipka, A.; Pastor, F.

    2016-06-01

    For almost two decades mobile mapping systems have done their georeferencing using Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) to measure position and inertial sensors to measure orientation. In order to achieve cm level position accuracy, a technique referred to as post-processed carrier phase differential GNSS (DGNSS) is used. For this technique to be effective the maximum distance to a single Reference Station should be no more than 20 km, and when using a network of Reference Stations the distance to the nearest station should no more than about 70 km. This need to set up local Reference Stations limits productivity and increases costs, especially when mapping large areas or long linear features such as roads or pipelines. An alternative technique to DGNSS for high-accuracy positioning from GNSS is the so-called Precise Point Positioning or PPP method. In this case instead of differencing the rover observables with the Reference Station observables to cancel out common errors, an advanced model for every aspect of the GNSS error chain is developed and parameterized to within an accuracy of a few cm. The Trimble Centerpoint RTX positioning solution combines the methodology of PPP with advanced ambiguity resolution technology to produce cm level accuracies without the need for local reference stations. It achieves this through a global deployment of highly redundant monitoring stations that are connected through the internet and are used to determine the precise satellite data with maximum accuracy, robustness, continuity and reliability, along with advance algorithms and receiver and antenna calibrations. This paper presents a new post-processed realization of the Trimble Centerpoint RTX technology integrated into the Applanix POSPac MMS GNSS-Aided Inertial software for mobile mapping. Real-world results from over 100 airborne flights evaluated against a DGNSS network reference are presented which show that the post-processed Centerpoint RTX solution agrees with

  1. GUN1 Controls Accumulation of the Plastid Ribosomal Protein S1 at the Protein Level and Interacts with Proteins Involved in Plastid Protein Homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Tadini, Luca; Pesaresi, Paolo; Kleine, Tatjana; Rossi, Fabio; Guljamow, Arthur; Sommer, Frederik; Mühlhaus, Timo; Schroda, Michael; Masiero, Simona; Pribil, Mathias; Rothbart, Maxi; Hedtke, Boris; Grimm, Bernhard; Leister, Dario

    2016-03-01

    Developmental or metabolic changes in chloroplasts can have profound effects on the rest of the plant cell. Such intracellular responses are associated with signals that originate in chloroplasts and convey information on their physiological status to the nucleus, which leads to large-scale changes in gene expression (retrograde signaling). A screen designed to identify components of retrograde signaling resulted in the discovery of the so-called genomes uncoupled (gun) mutants. Genetic evidence suggests that the chloroplast protein GUN1 integrates signals derived from perturbations in plastid redox state, plastid gene expression, and tetrapyrrole biosynthesis (TPB) in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) seedlings, exerting biogenic control of chloroplast functions. However, the molecular mechanism by which GUN1 integrates retrograde signaling in the chloroplast is unclear. Here we show that GUN1 also operates in adult plants, contributing to operational control of chloroplasts. The gun1 mutation genetically interacts with mutations of genes for the chloroplast ribosomal proteins S1 (PRPS1) and L11. Analysis of gun1 prps1 lines indicates that GUN1 controls PRPS1 accumulation at the protein level. The GUN1 protein physically interacts with proteins involved in chloroplast protein homeostasis based on coimmunoprecipitation experiments. Furthermore, yeast two-hybrid and bimolecular fluorescence complementation experiments suggest that GUN1 might transiently interact with several TPB enzymes, including Mg-chelatase subunit D (CHLD) and two other TPB enzymes known to activate retrograde signaling. Moreover, the association of PRPS1 and CHLD with protein complexes is modulated by GUN1. These findings allow us to speculate that retrograde signaling might involve GUN1-dependent formation of protein complexes. PMID:26823545

  2. Effect of phosphorus levels on the protein profiles of secreted protein and root surface protein of rice.

    PubMed

    Shinano, Takuro; Yoshimura, Tomoko; Watanabe, Toshihiro; Unno, Yusuke; Osaki, Mitsuru; Nanjo, Yohei; Komatsu, Setsuko

    2013-11-01

    Plant roots are complicated organs that absorb water and nutrients from the soil. Roots also play an essential role in protecting plants from attack by soil pathogens and develop a beneficial role with some soil microorganisms. Plant-derived rhizosphere proteins (e.g., root secretory proteins and root surface binding proteins) are considered to play important roles in developing mutual relationships in the rhizosphere. In the rhizosphere, where plant roots meet the surrounding environment, it has been suggested that root secretory protein and root surface binding protein are important factors. Furthermore, it is not known how the physiological status of the plant affects the profile of these proteins. In this study, rice plants were grown aseptically, with or without phosphorus nutrition, and proteins were obtained from root bathing solution (designated as root secretory proteins) and obtained using 0.2 M CaCl2 solution (designated as root surface binding proteins). The total number of identified proteins in the root bathing solution was 458, and the number of root surface binding proteins was 256. More than half of the proteins were observed in both fractions. Most of the proteins were categorized as either having signal peptides or no membrane transport helix sites. The functional categorization suggested that most of the proteins seemed to have secretory pathways and were involved in defense/disease-related functions. These characteristics seem to be unique to rhizosphere proteins, and the latter might be part of the plants strategy to defeat pathogens in the soil. The low phosphorus treatment significantly increased the number of pathogenesis-related proteins in the root secretory proteins, whereas the change was small in the case of the root surface binding proteins. The results suggested that the roots are actively and selectively secreting protein into the rhizosphere. PMID:24083427

  3. Protein metabolism in growing pigs fed corn or cassava peel based diets containing graded protein levels.

    PubMed

    Tewe, O O

    1985-05-01

    Sixty-four Large White cross Landrace weanling pigs were randomly allotted to eight treatments in a two by four factorial arrangement. The two dietary variables were cassava peel (0 and 40 per cent) and crude protein (20, 15, 10 and 5 per cent). Total serum protein concentration was significantly (P less than 0.01) reduced by protein deficiency and by its interaction with cassava peel. The multiple coefficient of determination (R2) showed that protein intake was the primary factor determining changes in serum protein. R2 values for cyanide intake (independent variable) on serum protein (dependent variable) increased from day 30 to 90 of the trial. Serum urea was increased on the 5 per cent protein diets on days 60 and 90 of the trial. The R2 values for cyanide and protein intake on serum urea concentration increased from day 30 to day 90 of the trial. Serum creatinine increased (P less than 0.05) on the 5 per cent protein diet on day 90 of the trial. The R2 value for the effects of protein intake on serum creatinine was higher than for cyanide intake on days 30 and 90. The results confirm the progressive and pronounced effects of long term cyanide intake on serum nitrogenous metabolites in pigs consuming between 110 and 120 ppm hydrocyanic acid, especially in diets containing 10 per cent or less protein. PMID:2989987

  4. Real-time quantification of protein expression at the single-cell level via dynamic protein synthesis translocation reporters

    PubMed Central

    Aymoz, Delphine; Wosika, Victoria; Durandau, Eric; Pelet, Serge

    2016-01-01

    Protein expression is a dynamic process, which can be rapidly induced by extracellular signals. It is widely appreciated that single cells can display large variations in the level of gene induction. However, the variability in the dynamics of this process in individual cells is difficult to quantify using standard fluorescent protein (FP) expression assays, due to the slow maturation of their fluorophore. Here we have developed expression reporters that accurately measure both the levels and dynamics of protein synthesis in live single cells with a temporal resolution under a minute. Our system relies on the quantification of the translocation of a constitutively expressed FP into the nucleus. As a proof of concept, we used these reporters to measure the transient protein synthesis arising from two promoters responding to the yeast hyper osmolarity glycerol mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway (pSTL1 and pGPD1). They display distinct expression dynamics giving rise to strikingly different instantaneous expression noise. PMID:27098003

  5. Assessment of the Effectiveness of the Educational Environment Supported by Computer Aided Presentations at Primary School Level

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kose, Erdogan

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study is to assess the effectiveness of the educational environment supported by computer aided presentations at primary school. The effectiveness of the environment has been evaluated in terms of students' learning and remembering what they have learnt. In the study, we have compared experimental group and control group in…

  6. The Effects of Cooperative and Individualistic Learning Structures on Achievement in a College-Level Computer-Aided Drafting Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swab, A. Geoffrey

    2012-01-01

    This study of cooperative learning in post-secondary engineering education investigated achievement of engineering students enrolled in two intact sections of a computer-aided drafting (CAD) course. Quasi-experimental and qualitative methods were employed in comparing student achievement resulting from out-of-class cooperative and individualistic…

  7. HIV / AIDS

    MedlinePlus

    ... Marketing Share this: Main Content Area Understanding HIV/AIDS AIDS was first reported in the United States in ... and has since become a major worldwide epidemic. AIDS is caused by the human immunodeficiency virus, or ...

  8. Fractionated neem leaf extract is safe and increases CD4+ cell levels in HIV/AIDS patients.

    PubMed

    Mbah, A U; Udeinya, I J; Shu, E N; Chijioke, C P; Nubila, T; Udeinya, F; Muobuike, Angela; Mmuobieri, Ancila; Obioma, Maria S

    2007-01-01

    The safety and effect of an acetone-water neem leaf extract (IRAB) on CD4 cells was investigated in 60 HIV/AIDS patients as part of an ongoing study to determine the influence of neem on immunity and viral load in HIV/AIDS. Patients were confirmed as HIV I or II positive, as having CD4 cell count, less than 300 cells/microL, and as antiretrovirally naïve. They were given oral IRAB (1.0 g daily for 12 weeks). Clinical and laboratory tests were carried out at baseline and at 4 weekly intervals. Thus, the patients served as their own controls. Sixty patients completed treatment. Fifty (83.33%) were completely compliant with respect to laboratory tests. Increase in mean CD4 cells, 266 cells/microL (159%), for the 50 patients was significant (P < 0.001) between baseline and week 12. Erythrocyte sedimentation rate (64 mm/hr at baseline) was 16 mm/hr at week 12, whereas total number of incidences of HIV/AIDS-related pathologies decreased from 120 at baseline to 5. Mean bodyweight, hemoglobin concentration, and lymphocyte differential count increased significantly by 12% (P < 0.05), 24% (P < 0.0001), and 20% (P < 0.0001), respectively. There were no adverse effects and no abnormalities in kidney and liver function parameters. The results support the safety of IRAB in HIV/AIDS, and its significant influence on CD4 cells may be useful in the formulation of multidrug combination therapies for HIV/AIDS. However, its antiretroviral activity is being evaluated in our laboratory. PMID:17667213

  9. High level expression of mammalian protein farnesyltransferase in a baculovirus system. The purified protein contains zinc.

    PubMed

    Chen, W J; Moomaw, J F; Overton, L; Kost, T A; Casey, P J

    1993-05-01

    The mammalian enzyme protein farnesyltransferase is a heterodimeric protein that catalyzes the addition of a farnesyl isoprenoid to a cysteine in ras proteins. Since oncogenic forms of ras proteins require the farnesyl group for transforming activity, the structure and mechanism of this enzyme are important to define. However, such studies have been difficult to approach because of the low abundance of the enzyme in mammalian tissues and hence the problems of obtaining large quantities of the protein. We report here the co-expression of the two subunits of protein farnesyltransferase by Sf9 cells infected with a recombinant baculovirus containing the coding sequences of both polypeptides. This results in the production of milligram quantities of enzyme which can be readily purified by conventional chromatographic methods. The individual subunits of the enzyme can also be expressed in the Sf9 cells, but the ability to reconstitute active enzyme from extracts containing individual subunits is quite low. In contrast, the enzyme produced by co-expression of the two subunits is fully active and retains the properties of the mammalian form, including the specificity for the COOH-terminal amino acid of substrate proteins and the ability to bind short peptides encompassing the prenylation site of a ras protein. Furthermore, through atomic absorption analysis of the purified protein, we have confirmed the previous tentative assignment of protein farnesyltransferase as a zinc metalloenzyme by demonstrating that it contains an essentially stoichiometric amount of zinc. The ability to produce and purify milligram quantities of protein farnesyltransferase readily will allow detailed mechanistic and structural studies on this enzyme. PMID:8486655

  10. Selected micronutrient levels and response to highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) among HIV/AIDS patients attending a teaching Hospital in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Eshetu, Amare; Tsegaye, Aster; Petros, Beyene

    2014-12-01

    Poor micronutrient levels are associated with an increased risk of progression to AIDS and are also suggested to influence outcome of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), though existing data are inconclusive to support the latter. Few published data are available on micronutrient levels in Ethiopian HIV/AIDS patients taking HAART. The objective of the study was to determine the association of micronutrient levels and response to HAART (CD4(+) T cell count) among adult HIV/AIDS patients attending a teaching Hospital in Addis Ababa. CD4(+) T cell counts and micronutrient (retinol, zinc, and iron) levels for 171 subjects were determined using standard procedures. Some proportions of the study participants were found deficient for retinol (14.03 %), zinc (47.3 %), and iron (2.8 %). Patients who were deficient in retinol had a significantly lower median CD4(+) T cell counts (P = 0.002) compared to non-deficient subjects. Association of micronutrient quartiles with CD4+ T cell count was assessed using adjusted multivariate regression by taking quartile 4 as a reference category. Accordingly, patients who had retinol levels in quartile 4 had a significantly lower mean CD4(+) T cell count compared to quartile 3 (P = 0.02). The significantly higher CD4(+) T cell counts in patients who were non-deficient in retinol imply the role of retinol in improving the production of CD4(+) T cells. However, both lower and higher retinol levels were associated with suppressed immunity (CD4 < 200 cells/mm(3)), suggesting an adverse effect of higher retinol levels. Thus, retinol may be potentially harmful depending on the dose, emphasizing the need for optimized level of retinol in nutrient supplements in patients taking HAART. PMID:25256923

  11. Interactive Effects of Indigestible Carbohydrates, Protein Type, and Protein Level on Biomarkers of Large Intestine Health in Rats.

    PubMed

    Taciak, Marcin; Barszcz, Marcin; Tuśnio, Anna; Pastuszewska, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    The effects of indigestible carbohydrates, protein type, and protein level on large intestine health were examined in rats. For 21 days, 12 groups of six 12-week-old male Wistar rats were fed diets with casein (CAS), or potato protein concentrate (PPC), providing 14% (lower protein level; LP), or 20% (higher protein level; HP) protein, and containing cellulose, resistant potato starch, or pectin. Fermentation end-products, pH, and β-glucuronidase levels in cecal digesta, and ammonia levels in colonic digesta were determined. Cecal digesta, tissue weights, cecal and colon morphology, and colonocyte DNA damage were also analyzed. Digesta pH was lower, whereas relative mass of cecal tissue and digesta were higher in rats fed pectin diets than in those fed cellulose. Cecal parameters were greater in rats fed PPC and HP diets than in those fed CAS and LP diets, respectively. Short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) concentrations were unaffected by protein or carbohydrate type. Total SCFA, acetic acid, and propionic acid concentrations were greater in rats fed LP diets than in those fed HP. Cecal pool of isobutyric and isovaleric acids was greater in rats fed PPC than in those fed CAS diets. PPC diets decreased phenol concentration and increased ammonia concentration in cecal and colonic digesta, respectively. Cecal crypt depth was greater in rats fed PPC and HP diets, and was unaffected by carbohydrates; whereas colonic crypt depth was greater in rats fed cellulose. Myenteron thickness in the cecum was unaffected by nutrition, but was greater in the colon of rats fed cellulose. Colonocyte DNA damage was greater in rats fed LP diets than in those fed HP diets, and was unaffected by carbohydrate or protein type. It was found that nutritional factors decreasing cecal digesta weight contribute to greater phenol production, increased DNA damage, and reduced ammonia concentration in the colon. PMID:26536028

  12. Interactive Effects of Indigestible Carbohydrates, Protein Type, and Protein Level on Biomarkers of Large Intestine Health in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Taciak, Marcin; Barszcz, Marcin; Tuśnio, Anna; Pastuszewska, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    The effects of indigestible carbohydrates, protein type, and protein level on large intestine health were examined in rats. For 21 days, 12 groups of six 12-week-old male Wistar rats were fed diets with casein (CAS), or potato protein concentrate (PPC), providing 14% (lower protein level; LP), or 20% (higher protein level; HP) protein, and containing cellulose, resistant potato starch, or pectin. Fermentation end-products, pH, and β-glucuronidase levels in cecal digesta, and ammonia levels in colonic digesta were determined. Cecal digesta, tissue weights, cecal and colon morphology, and colonocyte DNA damage were also analyzed. Digesta pH was lower, whereas relative mass of cecal tissue and digesta were higher in rats fed pectin diets than in those fed cellulose. Cecal parameters were greater in rats fed PPC and HP diets than in those fed CAS and LP diets, respectively. Short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) concentrations were unaffected by protein or carbohydrate type. Total SCFA, acetic acid, and propionic acid concentrations were greater in rats fed LP diets than in those fed HP. Cecal pool of isobutyric and isovaleric acids was greater in rats fed PPC than in those fed CAS diets. PPC diets decreased phenol concentration and increased ammonia concentration in cecal and colonic digesta, respectively. Cecal crypt depth was greater in rats fed PPC and HP diets, and was unaffected by carbohydrates; whereas colonic crypt depth was greater in rats fed cellulose. Myenteron thickness in the cecum was unaffected by nutrition, but was greater in the colon of rats fed cellulose. Colonocyte DNA damage was greater in rats fed LP diets than in those fed HP diets, and was unaffected by carbohydrate or protein type. It was found that nutritional factors decreasing cecal digesta weight contribute to greater phenol production, increased DNA damage, and reduced ammonia concentration in the colon. PMID:26536028

  13. Progranulin protein levels are differently regulated in plasma and CSF

    PubMed Central

    Nicholson, Alexandra M.; Finch, NiCole A.; Thomas, Colleen S.; Wojtas, Aleksandra; Rutherford, Nicola J.; Mielke, Michelle M.; Roberts, Rosebud O.; Boeve, Bradley F.; Knopman, David S.; Petersen, Ronald C.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: We aimed to investigate the relationship between plasma and CSF progranulin (PGRN) levels. Methods: Plasma and CSF PGRN were measured in a cohort of 345 subjects from the Mayo Clinic Study of Aging by ELISA. Single nucleotide polymorphism genotyping was performed using TaqMan assays. Associations between PGRN and sex, age at sample collection, diagnosis, single nucleotide polymorphism genotypes (GRN, SORT1, and APOE), and Pittsburgh compound B score were explored separately in CSF and plasma using single variable linear regression models. Pearson partial correlation coefficient was used to estimate the correlation of PGRN in CSF and plasma. Results: Plasma (p = 0.0031) and CSF (p = 0.0044) PGRN significantly increased with age, whereas plasma PGRN levels were 7% lower (p = 0.0025) and CSF PGRN levels 5% higher (p = 0.0024) in male compared with female participants. Correcting for age and sex, higher plasma PGRN was associated with higher CSF PGRN (partial r = 0.17, p = 0.004). In plasma, both rs5848 (GRN; p = 0.002) and rs646776 (SORT1; p = 3.56E-7) were associated with PGRN, while only rs5848 showed highly significant association in CSF (p = 5.59E-14). Age, sex, rs5848 genotype, and plasma PGRN together accounted for only 18% of the variability observed in CSF PGRN. Conclusions: While some correlation exists between plasma and CSF PGRN, age, sex, and genetic factors differently affect PGRN levels. Therefore, caution should be taken when using plasma PGRN to predict PGRN changes in the brain. These findings further highlight that plasma PGRN levels may not accurately predict clinical features or response to future frontotemporal lobar degeneration therapies. PMID:24771538

  14. Calcium, phosphorus and protein levels as factors in the distribution of the pheasant

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dale, F.H.; DeWitt, J.B.

    1958-01-01

    Summary of work on pheasant nutrition conducted since 1949 at the Patuxent Research Refuge. Pheasant chicks fed experimental diets failed to develop normally on protein levels of 15 and 18%. With 22% protein they grew at a reduced rate as compared to those on 28%. Protein level of the reproductive diet was shown to be important; low production of eggs and young resulted from levels below 25%. Calcium was found to be even more critical than protein level for reproduction; birds on a winter diet that furnished 145 mg./kg. per day had poor reproductive success the following spring. About 600 mg./kg. of Ca per day was necessary in the reproduction diet. Birds on an intermediate level of Ca (about 0.5% of diet) showed evidence of cumulative deficiency. It was concluded that pheasants receiving levels of Ca no higher than 0.5% in nature might display 'straggling failure' such as has been observed in several midwestern areas.

  15. Importin-β facilitates nuclear import of human GW proteins and balances cytoplasmic gene silencing protein levels

    PubMed Central

    Schraivogel, Daniel; Schindler, Susann G.; Danner, Johannes; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Pfaff, Janina; Hannus, Stefan; Depping, Reinhard; Meister, Gunter

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) guide Argonaute (Ago) proteins to distinct target mRNAs leading to translational repression and mRNA decay. Ago proteins interact with a member of the GW protein family, referred to as TNRC6A-C in mammals, which coordinate downstream gene-silencing processes. The cytoplasmic functions of TNRC6 and Ago proteins are reasonably well established. Both protein families are found in the nucleus as well. Their detailed nuclear functions, however, remain elusive. Furthermore, it is not clear which import routes Ago and TNRC6 proteins take into the nucleus. Using different nuclear transport assays, we find that Ago as well as TNRC6 proteins shuttle between the cytoplasm and the nucleus. While import receptors might function redundantly to transport Ago2, we demonstrate that TNRC6 proteins are imported by the Importin-β pathway. Finally, we show that nuclear localization of both Ago2 and TNRC6 proteins can depend on each other suggesting actively balanced cytoplasmic Ago – TNRC6 levels. PMID:26170235

  16. A local average connectivity-based method for identifying essential proteins from the network level.

    PubMed

    Li, Min; Wang, Jianxin; Chen, Xiang; Wang, Huan; Pan, Yi

    2011-06-01

    Identifying essential proteins is very important for understanding the minimal requirements of cellular survival and development. Fast growth in the amount of available protein-protein interactions has produced unprecedented opportunities for detecting protein essentiality from the network level. Essential proteins have been found to be more abundant among those highly connected proteins. However, there exist a number of highly connected proteins which are not essential. By analyzing these proteins, we find that few of their neighbors interact with each other. Thus, we propose a new local method, named LAC, to determine a protein's essentiality by evaluating the relationship between a protein and its neighbors. The performance of LAC is validated based on the yeast protein interaction networks obtained from two different databases: DIP and BioGRID. The experimental results of the two networks show that the number of essential proteins predicted by LAC clearly exceeds that explored by Degree Centrality (DC). More over, LAC is also compared with other seven measures of protein centrality (Neighborhood Component (DMNC), Betweenness Centrality (BC), Closeness Centrality (CC), Bottle Neck (BN), Information Centrality (IC), Eigenvector Centrality (EC), and Subgraph Centrality (SC)) in identifying essential proteins. The comparison results based on the validations of sensitivity, specificity, F-measure, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and accuracy consistently show that LAC outweighs these seven previous methods. PMID:21704260

  17. A Bayesian framework for cell-level protein network analysis for multivariate proteomics image data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovacheva, Violet N.; Sirinukunwattana, Korsuk; Rajpoot, Nasir M.

    2014-03-01

    The recent development of multivariate imaging techniques, such as the Toponome Imaging System (TIS), has facilitated the analysis of multiple co-localisation of proteins. This could hold the key to understanding complex phenomena such as protein-protein interaction in cancer. In this paper, we propose a Bayesian framework for cell level network analysis allowing the identification of several protein pairs having significantly higher co-expression levels in cancerous tissue samples when compared to normal colon tissue. It involves segmenting the DAPI-labeled image into cells and determining the cell phenotypes according to their protein-protein dependence profile. The cells are phenotyped using Gaussian Bayesian hierarchical clustering (GBHC) after feature selection is performed. The phenotypes are then analysed using Difference in Sums of Weighted cO-dependence Profiles (DiSWOP), which detects differences in the co-expression patterns of protein pairs. We demonstrate that the pairs highlighted by the proposed framework have high concordance with recent results using a different phenotyping method. This demonstrates that the results are independent of the clustering method used. In addition, the highlighted protein pairs are further analysed via protein interaction pathway databases and by considering the localization of high protein-protein dependence within individual samples. This suggests that the proposed approach could identify potentially functional protein complexes active in cancer progression and cell differentiation.

  18. Multi-level learning: improving the prediction of protein, domain and residue interactions by allowing information flow between levels

    PubMed Central

    Yip, Kevin Y; Kim, Philip M; McDermott, Drew; Gerstein, Mark

    2009-01-01

    Background Proteins interact through specific binding interfaces that contain many residues in domains. Protein interactions thus occur on three different levels of a concept hierarchy: whole-proteins, domains, and residues. Each level offers a distinct and complementary set of features for computationally predicting interactions, including functional genomic features of whole proteins, evolutionary features of domain families and physical-chemical features of individual residues. The predictions at each level could benefit from using the features at all three levels. However, it is not trivial as the features are provided at different granularity. Results To link up the predictions at the three levels, we propose a multi-level machine-learning framework that allows for explicit information flow between the levels. We demonstrate, using representative yeast interaction networks, that our algorithm is able to utilize complementary feature sets to make more accurate predictions at the three levels than when the three problems are approached independently. To facilitate application of our multi-level learning framework, we discuss three key aspects of multi-level learning and the corresponding design choices that we have made in the implementation of a concrete learning algorithm. 1) Architecture of information flow: we show the greater flexibility of bidirectional flow over independent levels and unidirectional flow; 2) Coupling mechanism of the different levels: We show how this can be accomplished via augmenting the training sets at each level, and discuss the prevention of error propagation between different levels by means of soft coupling; 3) Sparseness of data: We show that the multi-level framework compounds data sparsity issues, and discuss how this can be dealt with by building local models in information-rich parts of the data. Our proof-of-concept learning algorithm demonstrates the advantage of combining levels, and opens up opportunities for further

  19. Effects of dietary protein level on growth and utilization of protein and energy by juvenile mangrove red snapper (Lutjanus argentimaculatus)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghulam, Abbas; Khalid, Jamil; Rukhsana, Akhtar; Lin, Hong

    2005-01-01

    A feeding trial was conducted in a recirculating water system to investigate the effects of dietary protein levels on growth, feed utilization, hepatosomatic index and liver lipid deposition of juvenile red snapper, Lutjanus argentimaculatus (average initial wet weight 8.0 ± 0.39 g and total length 3.14 ± 0.3 cm). In the experiment, six fishmeal-based diets were formulated to contain various protein levels (20% to 45% in 5% increments), with dietary energy ranging from 2210.7kJ lOOg to 2250.2kJlOOg dry matter. The protein to energy ratios of diets ranged from 8.58 mg protein kJ-1 to 20.03 mg protein kJ-1. Diets were fed for 90d to triplicate groups of fish stocked in 0.128m3 seawater tanks, 25 individuals each. The daily ration of 2% wet body weight was offered to the fish thrice a day. The fish at the end of the study had more than ten-fold (77.0g) increase in weight compared to the initial (8.0g). Fish fed diets of 40% and 45% protein produced significantly (P<0.05) higher weight gain of 77.2g and 76.5g, and specific growth rate (SGR) of 2.65% and 2.62% than those of 67.0 g and 68.3g, and 2.49% and 2.51% of the other diets. The broken-line regression of SGR against dietary protein level yielded an optimum dietary protein requirement of 42.6% (Y=-1.6295 + 0.1114 X 2,P<0.05). Survival remained 100% among groups. Feed conversion ratio decreased from 0.45 for fish fed 20% dietary protein to 0.35 for fish fed 45% dietary protein. Nitrogen intake increased with an increase in dietary protein, which in turn resulted in an increase in nitrogen gain of fish whole body. Fish fed 40% and 45% protein diets showed higher (P<0.05) nitrogen gain (0.27g and 0.26g) than those (0.23g and 025g) fed all other diets. Gross energy intake (GEI) in fish fed 45% protein was lower (600.67kJ) than that (607.97 kJ) of 40% protein diet, though the differences were not statistically significant (P>0.05); GEI ranging from 677.31 kJ to 663.20 kJ at remaining four diets (20% to 35% protein

  20. Influence of protein level and supplemental methionine in practical rations for young endangered masked bobwhite quail

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Serafin, J.A.

    1982-01-01

    A study was conducted to examine the protein requirement of young endangered masked Bobwhite quail (Colinus virginianus ridgwayi). Five practical starting rations containing 24 to 32% protein were fed alone and supplemented with methionine for 5 weeks. Supplemental methionine significantly improved growth of quail fed diets containing 24 and 26% protein. Increasing the protein level improved growth of quail fed unsupplemented diets but did not do so when diets contained supplemental methionine. A methionine-supplemented ration containing 24% protein appeared adequate for supporting rapid growth of masked Bobwhite quail.

  1. A Simple Procedure for Depletion of Storage Proteins From Soybean (Glycine max) Seeds to Aid Proteome Analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two-dimensional electrophoretic analysis of plant proteomes containing thousands of proteins, has limited dynamic resolution because only abundant proteins can be detected. Proteomic assessment of the low abundance proteins within seeds is difficult when 60 – 80% is storage proteins. Resolution can ...

  2. Systematic Protein Level Regulation via Degradation Machinery Induced by Genotoxic Drugs.

    PubMed

    Kume, Kohei; Ishida, Kazushige; Ikeda, Miyuki; Takemoto, Kazuhiro; Shimura, Tsutomu; Young, Lynn; Nishizuka, Satoshi S

    2016-01-01

    In this study we monitored protein dynamics in response to cisplatin, 5-fluorouracil, and irinotecan with different concentrations and administration modes using "reverse-phase" protein arrays (RPPAs) in order to gain comprehensive insight into the protein dynamics induced by genotoxic drugs. Among 666 protein time-courses, 38% exhibited an increasing trend, 32% exhibited a steady decrease, and 30% fluctuated within 24 h after drug exposure. We analyzed almost 12,000 time-course pairs of protein levels based on the geometrical similarity by correlation distance (dCor). Twenty-two percent of the pairs showed dCor > 0.8, which indicates that each protein of the pair had similar dynamics. These trends were disrupted by a proteasome inhibitor, MG132, suggesting that the protein degradation system was activated in response to the drugs. Among the pairs with high dCor, the average dCor of pairs with apoptosis-related protein was significantly higher than those without, indicating that regulation of protein levels was induced by the drugs. These results suggest that the levels of numerous functionally distinct proteins may be regulated by common degradation machinery induced by genotoxic drugs. PMID:26625007

  3. Synergistic Control of Kinetochore Protein Levels by Psh1 and Ubr2

    PubMed Central

    Herrero, Eva; Thorpe, Peter H.

    2016-01-01

    The accurate segregation of chromosomes during cell division is achieved by attachment of chromosomes to the mitotic spindle via the kinetochore, a large multi-protein complex that assembles on centromeres. The budding yeast kinetochore comprises more than 60 different proteins. Although the structure and function of many of these proteins has been investigated, we have little understanding of the steady state regulation of kinetochores. The primary model of kinetochore homeostasis suggests that kinetochores assemble hierarchically from the centromeric DNA via the inclusion of a centromere-specific histone into chromatin. We tested this model by trying to perturb kinetochore protein levels by overexpressing an outer kinetochore gene, MTW1. This increase in protein failed to change protein recruitment, consistent with the hierarchical assembly model. However, we find that deletion of Psh1, a key ubiquitin ligase that is known to restrict inner kinetochore protein loading, does not increase levels of outer kinetochore proteins, thus breaking the normal kinetochore stoichiometry. This perturbation leads to chromosome segregation defects, which can be partially suppressed by mutation of Ubr2, a second ubiquitin ligase that normally restricts protein levels at the outer kinetochore. Together these data show that Psh1 and Ubr2 synergistically control the amount of proteins at the kinetochore. PMID:26891228

  4. Efficient monitoring of protein ubiquitylation levels using TUBEs-based microarrays.

    PubMed

    Serna, Sonia; Xolalpa, Wendy; Lang, Valérie; Aillet, Fabienne; England, Patrick; Reichardt, Niels; Rodriguez, Manuel S

    2016-08-01

    Analyzing protein ubiquitylation changes during physiological or pathological processes is challenging due to its high reversibility and dynamic turnover of modified targets. We have developed a protein microarray to assess endogenous ubiquitylation levels from cell cultures, employing tandem ubiquitin-binding entities (TUBEs) with three or four ubiquitin-associated (UBA) domains as capture probes. Adriamycin (ADR)-stimulated MCF7 cells were used to differentiate protein ubiquitylation levels between cells that are sensitive or resistant to ADR treatment. We show that TUBEs-based microarrays can be used for the analysis of cellular processes regulated by ubiquitylation and for the detection of pathologies with aberrant ubiquitylation levels. PMID:27410252

  5. A Cul-3-BTB ubiquitylation pathway regulates junctional levels and asymmetry of core planar polarity proteins

    PubMed Central

    Strutt, Helen; Searle, Elizabeth; Thomas-MacArthur, Victoria; Brookfield, Rosalind; Strutt, David

    2013-01-01

    The asymmetric localisation of core planar polarity proteins at apicolateral junctions is required to specify cell polarity in the plane of epithelia. This asymmetric distribution of the core proteins is proposed to require amplification of an initial asymmetry by feedback loops. In addition, generation of asymmetry appears to require the regulation of core protein levels, but the importance of such regulation and the underlying mechanisms is unknown. Here we show that ubiquitylation acts through more than one mechanism to control core protein levels in Drosophila, and that without this regulation cellular asymmetry is compromised. Levels of Dishevelled at junctions are regulated by a Cullin-3-Diablo/Kelch ubiquitin ligase complex, the activity of which is most likely controlled by neddylation. Furthermore, activity of the deubiquitylating enzyme Fat facets is required to maintain Flamingo levels at junctions. Notably, ubiquitylation does not alter the total cellular levels of Dishevelled or Flamingo, but only that of the junctional population. When junctional core protein levels are either increased or decreased by disruption of the ubiquitylation machinery, their asymmetric localisation is reduced and this leads to disruption of planar polarity at the tissue level. Loss of asymmetry by altered core protein levels can be explained by reference to feedback models for amplification of asymmetry. PMID:23487316

  6. Protein-Level Fluctuation Correlation at the Microcolony Level and Its Application to the Vibrio harveyi Quorum-Sensing Circuit

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yufang; Tu, Kimberly C.; Ong, N.P.; Bassler, Bonnie L.; Wingreen, Ned S.

    2011-01-01

    Gene expression is stochastic, and noise that arises from the stochastic nature of biochemical reactions propagates through active regulatory links. Thus, correlations in gene-expression noise can provide information about regulatory links. We present what to our knowledge is a new approach to measure and interpret such correlated fluctuations at the level of single microcolonies, which derive from single cells. We demonstrated this approach mathematically using stochastic modeling, and applied it to experimental time-lapse fluorescence microscopy data. Specifically, we investigated the relationships among LuxO, LuxR, and the small regulatory RNA qrr4 in the model quorum-sensing bacterium Vibrio harveyi. Our results show that LuxR positively regulates the qrr4 promoter. Under our conditions, we find that qrr regulation weakly depends on total LuxO levels and that LuxO autorepression is saturated. We also find evidence that the fluctuations in LuxO levels are dominated by intrinsic noise. We furthermore propose LuxO and LuxR interact at all autoinducer levels via an unknown mechanism. Of importance, our new method of evaluating correlations at the microcolony level is unaffected by partition noise at cell division. Moreover, the method is first-order accurate and requires less effort for data analysis than single-cell-based approaches. This new correlation approach can be applied to other systems to aid analysis of gene regulatory circuits. PMID:21689539

  7. Plasma IL-6/IL-10 Ratio and IL-8, LDH, and HBDH Level Predict the Severity and the Risk of Death in AIDS Patients with Pneumocystis Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jia; Su, Junwei; Xie, Yirui; Yin, Michael T; Huang, Ying; Xu, Lijun; Zhou, Qihui; Zhu, Biao

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To identify blood biomarkers to predict severity and mortality in AIDS PCP patients. Methods. Biomarkers including clinical parameters and plasma inflammatory cytokines were assessed in 32 HIV-infected patients with Pneumocystis pneumonia (PCP) at time of admission. Predictive value of the biomarkers for clinical severity and in-hospital mortality was evaluated by corresponding ROC curve. Results. Levels of CRP, WBC, LDH, HBDH, and Ferritin were significantly higher in the severe and nonsurvivor AIDS PCP patients. These important biochemical indicators have inverse correlation with oxygenation index, especially levels of LDH (P = 0.008, R (2) = 0.258), HBDH (P = 0.001, R (2) = 0.335), and Ferritin (P = 0.005, R (2) = 0.237). Plasma IL-8 and IL-6 levels were significantly higher in patients with PaO2/FiO2 ≤ 200 mmHg and nonsurvivors than in those with PaO2/FiO2 > 200 mmHg and survivors. Severe and nonsurvival groups showed higher ratio of mean IL-6/IL-10 level (1.78 ± 1.56, P < 0.001; 1.11 ± 0.72, P = 0.043), larger AUC (95% CI 0.781-1.000, P < 0.001; 95% CI 0.592-0.917, P = 0.043), and more significantly inverse correlation with the oxygenation index. Conclusion. Plasma IL-8, LDH, and HBDH levels and IL-6/IL-10 ratio could be helpful for early evaluation of the severity and predicting fatal outcomes in AIDS PCP patients. PMID:27579328

  8. Plasma IL-6/IL-10 Ratio and IL-8, LDH, and HBDH Level Predict the Severity and the Risk of Death in AIDS Patients with Pneumocystis Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jia; Su, Junwei; Xie, Yirui; Yin, Michael T.; Huang, Ying; Xu, Lijun; Zhou, Qihui

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To identify blood biomarkers to predict severity and mortality in AIDS PCP patients. Methods. Biomarkers including clinical parameters and plasma inflammatory cytokines were assessed in 32 HIV-infected patients with Pneumocystis pneumonia (PCP) at time of admission. Predictive value of the biomarkers for clinical severity and in-hospital mortality was evaluated by corresponding ROC curve. Results. Levels of CRP, WBC, LDH, HBDH, and Ferritin were significantly higher in the severe and nonsurvivor AIDS PCP patients. These important biochemical indicators have inverse correlation with oxygenation index, especially levels of LDH (P = 0.008, R2 = 0.258), HBDH (P = 0.001, R2 = 0.335), and Ferritin (P = 0.005, R2 = 0.237). Plasma IL-8 and IL-6 levels were significantly higher in patients with PaO2/FiO2 ≤ 200 mmHg and nonsurvivors than in those with PaO2/FiO2 > 200 mmHg and survivors. Severe and nonsurvival groups showed higher ratio of mean IL-6/IL-10 level (1.78 ± 1.56, P < 0.001; 1.11 ± 0.72, P = 0.043), larger AUC (95% CI 0.781–1.000, P < 0.001; 95% CI 0.592–0.917, P = 0.043), and more significantly inverse correlation with the oxygenation index. Conclusion. Plasma IL-8, LDH, and HBDH levels and IL-6/IL-10 ratio could be helpful for early evaluation of the severity and predicting fatal outcomes in AIDS PCP patients. PMID:27579328

  9. GTP Cyclohydrolase I Expression, Protein, and Activity Determine Intracellular Tetrahydrobiopterin Levels, Independent of GTP Cyclohydrolase Feedback Regulatory Protein Expression

    PubMed Central

    Tatham, Amy L.; Crabtree, Mark J.; Warrick, Nicholas; Cai, Shijie; Alp, Nicholas J.; Channon, Keith M.

    2009-01-01

    GTP cyclohydrolase I (GTPCH) is a key enzyme in the synthesis of tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4), a required cofactor for nitricoxide synthases and aromatic amino acid hydroxylases. Alterations of GTPCH activity and BH4 availability play an important role in human disease. GTPCH expression is regulated by inflammatory stimuli, in association with reduced expression of GTP cyclohydrolase feedback regulatory protein (GFRP). However, the relative importance of GTPCH expression versus GTPCH activity and the role of GFRP in relation to BH4 bioavailability remain uncertain. We investigated these relationships in a cell line with tet-regulated GTPCH expression and in the hph-1 mouse model of GTPCH deficiency. Doxycycline exposure resulted in a dose-dependent decrease in GTPCH protein and activity, with a strong correlation between GTPCH expression and BH4 levels (r2 = 0.85, p < 0.0001). These changes in GTPCH and BH4 had no effect on GFRP expression or protein levels. GFRP overexpression and knockdown in tet-GCH cells did not alter GTPCH activity or BH4 levels, and GTPCH-specific knockdown in sEnd.1 endothelial cells had no effect on GFRP protein. In mouse liver we observed a graded reduction of GTPCH expression, protein, and activity, from wild type, heterozygote, to homozygote littermates, with a striking linear correlation between GTPCH expression and BH4 levels (r2 = 0.82, p < 0.0001). Neither GFRP expression nor protein differed between wild type, heterozygote, nor homozygote mice, despite the substantial differences in BH4. We suggest that GTPCH expression is the primary regulator of BH4 levels, and changes in GTPCH or BH4 are not necessarily accompanied by changes in GFRP expression. PMID:19286659

  10. GTP cyclohydrolase I expression, protein, and activity determine intracellular tetrahydrobiopterin levels, independent of GTP cyclohydrolase feedback regulatory protein expression.

    PubMed

    Tatham, Amy L; Crabtree, Mark J; Warrick, Nicholas; Cai, Shijie; Alp, Nicholas J; Channon, Keith M

    2009-05-15

    GTP cyclohydrolase I (GTPCH) is a key enzyme in the synthesis of tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4), a required cofactor for nitricoxide synthases and aromatic amino acid hydroxylases. Alterations of GTPCH activity and BH4 availability play an important role in human disease. GTPCH expression is regulated by inflammatory stimuli, in association with reduced expression of GTP cyclohydrolase feedback regulatory protein (GFRP). However, the relative importance of GTPCH expression versus GTPCH activity and the role of GFRP in relation to BH4 bioavailability remain uncertain. We investigated these relationships in a cell line with tet-regulated GTPCH expression and in the hph-1 mouse model of GTPCH deficiency. Doxycycline exposure resulted in a dose-dependent decrease in GTPCH protein and activity, with a strong correlation between GTPCH expression and BH4 levels (r(2) = 0.85, p < 0.0001). These changes in GTPCH and BH4 had no effect on GFRP expression or protein levels. GFRP overexpression and knockdown in tet-GCH cells did not alter GTPCH activity or BH4 levels, and GTPCH-specific knockdown in sEnd.1 endothelial cells had no effect on GFRP protein. In mouse liver we observed a graded reduction of GTPCH expression, protein, and activity, from wild type, heterozygote, to homozygote littermates, with a striking linear correlation between GTPCH expression and BH4 levels (r(2) = 0.82, p < 0.0001). Neither GFRP expression nor protein differed between wild type, heterozygote, nor homozygote mice, despite the substantial differences in BH4. We suggest that GTPCH expression is the primary regulator of BH4 levels, and changes in GTPCH or BH4 are not necessarily accompanied by changes in GFRP expression. PMID:19286659

  11. Calpain expression in lymphoid cells. Increased mRNA and protein levels after cell activation.

    PubMed

    Deshpande, R V; Goust, J M; Chakrabarti, A K; Barbosa, E; Hogan, E L; Banik, N L

    1995-02-10

    Although calpain is ubiquitously present in human tissues and is thought to play a role in demyelination, its activity is very low in resting normal lymphocytes. To determine the nature of calpain expression at the mRNA and protein levels in human lymphoid cells, we studied human T lymphocytic, B lymphocytic, and monocytic lines as well as peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Stimulation of cells with the phorbol ester phorbol myristate acetate and the calcium ionophore A23187 resulted in increased calpain mRNA and protein expression. Calpain mRNA expression is also increased in human T cells stimulated with anti-CD3. A dissociation between the increases of RNA and protein suggested that calpain could be released from the cells; the subsequent experiments showed its presence in the extracellular environment. 5,6-Dichloro-1b-D-ribofuranosylbenzimidazole, a reversible inhibitor of mRNA synthesis, reduced calpain mRNA levels by 50-67% and protein levels by 72-91%. Its removal resulted in resumption of both calpain mRNA and protein synthesis. Cycloheximide, a translational inhibitor, reduced calpain protein levels by 77-81% and calpain mRNA levels by 96% in activated THP-1 cells. Interferon-gamma induced calpain mRNA and protein in U-937 and THP-1 cells. Dexamethasone increased mRNA expression in THP-1 cells. Our results indicate that activation of lymphoid cells results in de novo synthesis and secretion of calpain. PMID:7852311

  12. Identification and Validation of Genetic Variants that Influence Transcription Factor and Cell Signaling Protein Levels

    PubMed Central

    Hause, Ronald J.; Stark, Amy L.; Antao, Nirav N.; Gorsic, Lidija K.; Chung, Sophie H.; Brown, Christopher D.; Wong, Shan S.; Gill, Daniel F.; Myers, Jamie L.; To, Lida Anita; White, Kevin P.; Dolan, M. Eileen; Jones, Richard Baker

    2014-01-01

    Many genetic variants associated with human disease have been found to be associated with alterations in mRNA expression. Although it is commonly assumed that mRNA expression changes will lead to consequent changes in protein levels, methodological challenges have limited our ability to test the degree to which this assumption holds true. Here, we further developed the micro-western array approach and globally examined relationships between human genetic variation and cellular protein levels. We collected more than 250,000 protein level measurements comprising 441 transcription factor and signaling protein isoforms across 68 Yoruba (YRI) HapMap lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) and identified 12 cis and 160 trans protein level QTLs (pQTLs) at a false discovery rate (FDR) of 20%. Whereas up to two thirds of cis mRNA expression QTLs (eQTLs) were also pQTLs, many pQTLs were not associated with mRNA expression. Notably, we replicated and functionally validated a trans pQTL relationship between the KARS lysyl-tRNA synthetase locus and levels of the DIDO1 protein. This study demonstrates proof of concept in applying an antibody-based microarray approach to iteratively measure the levels of human proteins and relate these levels to human genome variation and other genomic data sets. Our results suggest that protein-based mechanisms might functionally buffer genetic alterations that influence mRNA expression levels and that pQTLs might contribute phenotypic diversity to a human population independently of influences on mRNA expression. PMID:25087611

  13. Clustering and meso-level variables in cross-sectional surveys: an example of food aid during the Bosnian crisis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Focus groups, rapid assessment procedures, key informant interviews and institutional reviews of local health services provide valuable insights on health service resources and performance. A long-standing challenge of health planning is to combine this sort of qualitative evidence in a unified analysis with quantitative evidence from household surveys. A particular challenge in this regard is to take account of the neighbourhood or clustering effects, recognising that these can be informative or incidental. Methods An example of food aid and food sufficiency from the Bosnian emergency (1995-96) illustrates two Lamothe cluster-adjustments of the Mantel Haenszel (MH) procedure, one assuming a fixed odds ratio and the other allowing for informative clustering by not assuming a fixed odds ratio. We compared these with conventional generalised estimating equations and a generalised linear mixed (GLMM) model, using a Laplace adjustment. Results The MH adjustment assuming incidental clustering generated a final model very similar to GEE. The adjustment that does not assume a fixed odds ratio produced a final multivariate model and effect sizes very similar to GLMM. Discussion In medium or large data sets with stratified last stage random sampling, the cluster adjusted MH is substantially more conservative than the naïve MH computation. In the example of food aid in the Bosnian crisis, the cluster adjusted MH that does not assume a fixed odds ratio produced similar results to the GLMM, which identified informative clustering. PMID:22376353

  14. Relationships between cell cycle regulator gene copy numbers and protein expression levels in Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed

    Chino, Ayako; Makanae, Koji; Moriya, Hisao

    2013-01-01

    We previously determined the copy number limits of overexpression for cell division cycle (cdc) regulatory genes in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe using the "genetic tug-of-war" (gTOW) method. In this study, we measured the levels of tandem affinity purification (TAP)-tagged target proteins when their copy numbers are increased in gTOW. Twenty analyzed genes showed roughly linear correlations between increased protein levels and gene copy numbers, which suggested a general lack of compensation for gene dosage in S. pombe. Cdc16 and Sid2 protein levels but not their mRNA levels were much lower than that expected by their copy numbers, which suggested the existence of a post-transcriptional down regulation of these genes. The cyclin Cig1 protein level and its mRNA level were much higher than that expected by its copy numbers, which suggested a positive feedback mechanism for its expression. A higher Cdc10 protein level and its mRNA level, probably due to cloning its gene into a plasmid, indicated that Cdc10 regulation was more robust than that previously predicted. PMID:24019917

  15. Optimality and evolutionary tuning of the expression level of a protein.

    PubMed

    Dekel, Erez; Alon, Uri

    2005-07-28

    Different proteins have different expression levels. It is unclear to what extent these expression levels are optimized to their environment. Evolutionary theories suggest that protein expression levels maximize fitness, but the fitness as a function of protein level has seldom been directly measured. To address this, we studied the lac system of Escherichia coli, which allows the cell to use the sugar lactose for growth. We experimentally measured the growth burden due to production and maintenance of the Lac proteins (cost), as well as the growth advantage (benefit) conferred by the Lac proteins when lactose is present. The fitness function, given by the difference between the benefit and the cost, predicts that for each lactose environment there exists an optimal Lac expression level that maximizes growth rate. We then performed serial dilution evolution experiments at different lactose concentrations. In a few hundred generations, cells evolved to reach the predicted optimal expression levels. Thus, protein expression from the lac operon seems to be a solution of a cost-benefit optimization problem, and can be rapidly tuned by evolution to function optimally in new environments. PMID:16049495

  16. High level expression of peptides and proteins using cytochrome b5 as a fusion host.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Ashima; Chakrabarti, Kalyan Sundar; Shahul Hameed, M S; Srinivas, Kalyan V; Senthil Kumar, Ganesan; Sarma, Siddhartha P

    2005-05-01

    A novel fusion protein system based on the highly soluble heme-binding domain of cytochrome b5 has been designed. The ability of cytochrome b5 to increase the levels of expression and solubility of target proteins has been tested by expressing several proteins and peptides, viz., alpha hemoglobin stabilizing protein, the regulatory subunits of acetohydroxy acid synthase I (ilvM) and II (ilvN), the carboxy terminal domains of mouse neuronal kinesin and pantothenate synthatase, two peptide toxins from cone snails, and the inactivation gate from the brain voltage gated sodium channel, NaV1.2. The fusion protein system has been designed to incorporate protease cleavage sites for commonly used proteases, viz., enterokinase, Factor Xa, and Tobacco etch virus protease. Accumulation of expressed protein as a function of time may be visually ascertained by the fact that the cells take on a bright red color during the course of induction. In all the cases tested so far, the fusion protein accumulates in the soluble fraction to high levels. A novel purification protocol has been designed to purify the fusion proteins using metal affinity chromatography, without the need of a hexahistidine-tag. Mass spectral analysis has shown that the fusion proteins are of full length. CD studies have shown that the solubilized fusion proteins are structured. The proteins of interest may be cleaved from the parent protein by either chemical or enzymatic means. The results presented here demonstrate the versatility of the cytochrome b5 based fusion system for the production of peptides and small proteins (<15 kDa). PMID:15802225

  17. Integrative analysis of RNA, translation, and protein levels reveals distinct regulatory variation across humans

    PubMed Central

    Cenik, Can; Cenik, Elif Sarinay; Byeon, Gun W.; Grubert, Fabian; Candille, Sophie I.; Spacek, Damek; Alsallakh, Bilal; Tilgner, Hagen; Araya, Carlos L.; Tang, Hua; Ricci, Emiliano; Snyder, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    Elucidating the consequences of genetic differences between humans is essential for understanding phenotypic diversity and personalized medicine. Although variation in RNA levels, transcription factor binding, and chromatin have been explored, little is known about global variation in translation and its genetic determinants. We used ribosome profiling, RNA sequencing, and mass spectrometry to perform an integrated analysis in lymphoblastoid cell lines from a diverse group of individuals. We find significant differences in RNA, translation, and protein levels suggesting diverse mechanisms of personalized gene expression control. Combined analysis of RNA expression and ribosome occupancy improves the identification of individual protein level differences. Finally, we identify genetic differences that specifically modulate ribosome occupancy—many of these differences lie close to start codons and upstream ORFs. Our results reveal a new level of gene expression variation among humans and indicate that genetic variants can cause changes in protein levels through effects on translation. PMID:26297486

  18. Monitoring protein phosphatase 1 isoform levels as a marker for cellular stress.

    PubMed

    Amador, Fátima Camões; Henriques, Ana Gabriela; da Cruz E Silva, Odete A B; da Cruz E Silva, Edgar F

    2004-01-01

    Reversible protein phosphorylation is a central mechanism regulating many biological functions, and abnormal protein phosphorylation can have a devastating impact on cellular control mechanisms, including a contributing role in neurodegenerative processes. Hence, many promising novel drug development strategies involve targeting protein phosphorylation systems. In this study, we demonstrate that various cellular stresses relevant to neurodegeneration can specifically affect the protein expression levels of protein phosphatase 1 (PP1). PP1 levels were altered upon exposure of PC12 and COS-1 cells to aluminium, Abeta peptides, sodium azide, and even heat shock. Particularly interesting, given PP1's involvement in aging and neurodegeneration, was the consistent decrease in PP1gamma(1) levels in response to stress agents. In fact, alterations in the expression levels of PP1 appear to correspond to an early response of stress induction, that is, before alterations in heat shock proteins can be detected. Our data suggest that monitoring PP1 isoform expression could constitute a useful diagnostic tool for cellular stress, possibly even neurodegeneration. Additionally, our results strengthen the rationale for signal transduction therapeutics and indicate that altering the specific activity of PP1 either directly or by targeting its regulatory proteins may be a useful therapeutic development strategy for the future. PMID:15113600

  19. Increased levels of hyper-stable protein aggregates in plasma of older adults.

    PubMed

    Xia, Ke; Trasatti, Hannah; Wymer, James P; Colón, Wilfredo

    2016-06-01

    Proteins that misfold into hyper-stable/degradation-resistant species during aging may accumulate and disrupt protein homeostasis (i.e., proteostasis), thereby posing a survival risk to any organism. Using the method diagonal two-dimensional (D2D) SDS-PAGE, which separates hyper-stable SDS-resistant proteins at a proteomics level, we analyzed the plasma of healthy young (<30 years) and older (60-80 years) adults. We discovered the presence of soluble SDS-resistant protein aggregates in the plasma of older adults, but found significantly lower levels in the plasma of young adults. We identified the inflammation-related chaperone protein haptoglobin as the main component of the hyper-stable aggregates. This observation is consistent with the growing link between accumulations of protein aggregates and aging across many organisms. It is plausible higher amounts of SDS-resistant protein aggregates in the plasma of older adults may reflect a compromise in proteostasis that may potentially indicate cellular aging and/or disease risk. The results of this study have implications for further understanding the link between aging and the accumulation of protein aggregates, as well as potential for the development of aging-related biomarkers. More broadly, this novel application of D2D SDS-PAGE may be used to identify, quantify, and characterize the degradation-resistant protein aggregates in human plasma or any biological system. PMID:27179971

  20. System-level comparison of protein-protein interactions between viruses and the human type I interferon system network.

    PubMed

    Navratil, V; de Chassey, B; Meyniel, L; Pradezynski, F; André, P; Rabourdin-Combe, C; Lotteau, V

    2010-07-01

    Innate immunity has evolved complex molecular pathways to protect organisms from viral infections. One pivotal line of cellular defense is the induction of the antiviral effect of interferon. To circumvent this primary response and achieve their own replication, viruses have developed complex molecular strategies. Here, we provide a systems-level study of the human type I interferon system subversion by the viral proteome, by reconstructing the underlying protein-protein interaction network. At this network level, viruses establish a massive and a gradual attack, from receptors to transcription factors, by interacting preferentially with highly connected and central proteins as well as interferon-induced proteins. We also demonstrate that viruses significantly target 22% of the proteins directly interacting with the type I interferon system network, suggesting the relevance of our network-based method to identify new candidates involved in the regulation of the antiviral response. Finally, based on the comparative analysis of interactome profiles across four viral families, we provide evidence of common and differential targeting strategies. PMID:20459142

  1. Protein level affects the relative lysine requirement of growing rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) fry.

    PubMed

    Bodin, Noelie; Govaerts, Bernadette; Abboudi, Tarik; Detavernier, Christel; De Saeger, Sarah; Larondelle, Yvan; Rollin, Xavier

    2009-07-01

    The effect of two digestible protein levels (310 and 469 g/kg DM) on the relative lysine (Lys; g Lys/kg DM or g Lys/100 g protein) and the absolute Lys (g Lys intake/kg 0.75 per d) requirements was studied in rainbow trout fry using a dose-response trial. At each protein level, sixteen isoenergetic (22-23 MJ digestible energy/kg DM) diets were tested, involving a full range (2-70 g/kg DM) of sixteen Lys levels. Each diet was given to one group of sixty rainbow trout fry (mean initial body weight 0.78 g) reared at 15 degrees C for 31 feeding d. The Lys requirements were estimated based on the relationships between weight, protein, and Lys gains (g/kg 0.75 per d) and Lys concentration (g/kg DM or g/100 g protein) or Lys intake (g/kg 0.75 per d), using the broken-line model (BLM) and the non-linear four-parameter saturation kinetics model (SKM-4). Both the model and the response criterion chosen markedly impacted the relative Lys requirement. The relative Lys requirement for Lys gain of rainbow trout estimated with the BLM (and SKM-4 at 90 % of the maximum response) increased from 16.8 (19.6) g/kg DM at a low protein level to 23.4 (24.5) g/kg DM at a high protein level. However, the dietary protein content affected neither the absolute Lys requirement nor the relative Lys requirement expressed as g Lys/100 g protein nor the Lys requirement for maintenance (21 mg Lys/kg 0.75 per d). PMID:19138439

  2. AIDS Vaccination Studies with an Ex Vivo Feline Immunodeficiency Virus Model: Analysis of the Accessory ORF-A Protein and DNA as Protective Immunogens

    PubMed Central

    Pistello, Mauro; Bonci, Francesca; Flynn, J. Norman; Mazzetti, Paola; Isola, Patrizia; Zabogli, Elisa; Camerini, Valentina; Matteucci, Donatella; Freer, Giulia; Pelosi, Paolo; Bendinelli, Mauro

    2006-01-01

    Determining which antigen must be included in AIDS vaccines to confer maximum protection is of utmost importance. In primate models, vaccines consisting of or including accessory viral proteins have yielded conflicting results. We investigated the protective potential of the accessory protein ORF-A of feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) in cats. All three immunization strategies used (protein alone in alum adjuvant, DNA alone, or DNA prime-protein boost) clearly generated detectable immune responses. Upon challenge with ex vivo homologous FIV, ORF-A-immunized cats showed distinct enhancement of acute-phase infection relative to mock-immunized animals given alum or empty vector DNA. This effect was tentatively attributed to increased expression of the FIV receptor CD134 that was observed in the immunized cats. However, at subsequent sampling points that were continued for up to 10 months postchallenge, the average plasma viral loads of the ORF-A-immunized animals were slightly but consistently reduced relative to those of the control animals. In addition, CD4+ T lymphocytes in the circulation system declined more slowly in immunized animals than in control animals. These findings support the contention that immunization with lentiviral accessory proteins can improve the host's ability to control virus replication and slow down disease progression but also draw attention to the fact that even simple immunogens that eventually contribute to protective activity can transiently exacerbate subsequent lentiviral infections. PMID:16940498

  3. Identification of putative drug targets in Vancomycin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (VRSA) using computer aided protein data analysis.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Md Anayet; Khan, Md Arif; Sharmin, Tahmina; Hasan Mazumder, Md Habibul; Chowdhury, Afrin Sultana

    2016-01-01

    Vancomycin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (VRSA) is a Gram-positive, facultative aerobic bacterium which is evolved from the extensive exposure of Vancomycin to Methicillin resistant S. aureus (MRSA) that had become the most common cause of hospital and community-acquired infections. Due to the emergence of different antibiotic resistance strains, there is an exigency to develop novel drug targets to address the provocation of multidrug-resistant bacteria. In this study, in-silico genome subtraction methodology was used to design potential and pathogen specific drug targets against VRSA. Our study divulged 1987 proteins from the proteome of 34,549 proteins, which have no homologues in human genome after sequential analysis through CD-HIT and BLASTp. The high stringency analysis of the remaining proteins against database of essential genes (DEG) resulted in 169 proteins which are essential for S. aureus. Metabolic pathway analysis of human host and pathogen by KAAS at the KEGG server sorted out 19 proteins involved in unique metabolic pathways. 26 human non-homologous membrane-bound essential proteins including 4 which were also involved in unique metabolic pathway were deduced through PSORTb, CELLO v.2.5, ngLOC. Functional classification of uncharacterized proteins through SVMprot derived 7 human non-homologous membrane-bound hypothetical essential proteins. Study of potential drug target against Drug Bank revealed pbpA-penicillin-binding protein 1 and hypothetical protein MQW_01796 as the best drug target candidate. 2D structure was predicted by PRED-TMBB, 3D structure and functional analysis was also performed. Protein-protein interaction network of potential drug target proteins was analyzed by using STRING. The identified drug targets are expected to have great potential for designing novel drugs against VRSA infections and further screening of the compounds against these new targets may result in the discovery of novel therapeutic compounds that can be

  4. C-reactive protein gene variants: independent association with late-life depression and circulating protein levels.

    PubMed

    Ancelin, M-L; Farré, A; Carrière, I; Ritchie, K; Chaudieu, I; Ryan, J

    2015-01-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP) is a heritable biomarker of systemic inflammation that is commonly elevated in depressed patients. Variants in the CRP gene that influence protein levels could thus be associated with depression but this has seldom been examined, especially in the elderly. Depression was assessed in 990 people aged at least 65 years as part of the ESPRIT study. A clinical level of depression (DEP) was defined as having a score of ⩾16 on The Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression scale or a diagnosis of current major depression based on the Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview and according to Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-IV criteria. Five single-nucleotide polymorphisms spanning the CRP gene were genotyped, and circulating levels of high-sensitivity CRP were determined. Multivariable analyses adjusted for socio-demographic characteristics, smoking, ischemic pathologies, cognitive impairment and inflammation-related chronic pathologies. The minor alleles of rs1130864 and rs1417938 were associated with a decreased risk of depression in women at Bonferroni-corrected significance levels (P=0.002). CRP gene variants were associated with serum levels in a gender-specific manner, but only rs1205 was found to be nominally associated with both an increased risk of DEP and lower circulating CRP levels in women. Variants of the CRP gene thus influence circulating CRP levels and appear as independent susceptibility factors for late-life depression. PMID:25603415

  5. Hearing Aids

    MedlinePlus

    ... more in both quiet and noisy situations. Hearing aids help people who have hearing loss from damage ... your doctor. There are different kinds of hearing aids. They differ by size, their placement on or ...

  6. AIDS (image)

    MedlinePlus

    AIDS (acquired immune deficiency syndrome) is caused by HIV (human immunodeficiency virus), and is a syndrome that ... life-threatening illnesses. There is no cure for AIDS, but treatment with antiviral medication can suppress symptoms. ...

  7. EFFECTS OF VARYING DIETARY PROTEIN AND ENERGY LEVELS ON THE PRODUCTION OF LACTATING DAIRY COWS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Forty-five multiparous and 18 primiparous Holstein cows averaging 41 kg/d of milk were fed three levels of crude protein (CP), each at three levels of neutral detergent fiber (NDF), to identify optimal dietary CP and energy. Cows were blocked by lactation and days in milk into seven groups of nine a...

  8. Burial Level Change Defines a High Energetic Relevance for Protein Binding Interfaces.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhenhua; He, Ying; Wong, Limsoon; Li, Jinyan

    2015-01-01

    Protein-protein interfaces defined through atomic contact or solvent accessibility change are widely adopted in structural biology studies. But, these definitions cannot precisely capture energetically important regions at protein interfaces. The burial depth of an atom in a protein is related to the atom's energy. This work investigates how closely the change in burial level of an atom/residue upon complexation is related to the binding. Burial level change is different from burial level itself. An atom deeply buried in a monomer with a high burial level may not change its burial level after an interaction and it may have little burial level change. We hypothesize that an interface is a region of residues all undergoing burial level changes after interaction. By this definition, an interface can be decomposed into an onion-like structure according to the burial level change extent. We found that our defined interfaces cover energetically important residues more precisely, and that the binding free energy of an interface is distributed progressively from the outermost layer to the core. These observations are used to predict binding hot spots. Our approach's F-measure performance on a benchmark dataset of alanine mutagenesis residues is much superior or similar to those by complicated energy modeling or machine learning approaches. PMID:26357227

  9. Decreased melatonin levels and increased levels of advanced oxidation protein products in the seminal plasma are related to male infertility.

    PubMed

    Kratz, Ewa Maria; Piwowar, Agnieszka; Zeman, Michal; Stebelová, Katarína; Thalhammer, Theresia

    2016-03-01

    Melatonin, an indolamine secreted by the pineal gland, is known as a powerful free-radical scavenger and wide-spectrum antioxidant. Therefore, the aim of this study was to correlate markers of oxidative protein damage (advanced oxidation protein products, AOPPs) and the total antioxidant capacity (TAC) with melatonin levels in the seminal plasma of men with azoospermia (n=37), theratozoospermia (n=29) and fertile controls (normozoospermia, n=37). Melatonin concentration was measured by radioimmunoassay. The levels of AOPP as well as TAC efficiency (determined by the ferric reducing antioxidant power, FRAP) were estimated by spectrophotometric methods. The concentration of melatonin and AOPP significantly differed in azoospermic (P<0.0001) and theratozoospermic (P<0.0001) patients versus fertile men, and correlated negatively (r=-0.33, P=0.0016). The TAC levels were significantly higher in azoospermia than in theratozoospermia (P=0.0022) and the control group (P=0.00016). In azoospermia, the AOPP concentration was also significantly higher than that observed in theratozoospermia (P=0.00029). Decreased levels of melatonin together with elevated AOPP altered the oxidative-antioxidative balance in the ejaculate, thereby reducing fertility. Therefore, melatonin and AOPP levels may serve as additional diagnostic markers of semen quality and male reproductive potential. PMID:25218686

  10. Hearing Aids

    MedlinePlus

    ... type and degree of loss. Are there different styles of hearing aids? Styles of hearing aids Source: NIH/NIDCD Behind-the- ... the ear canal and are available in two styles. The in-the-canal (ITC) hearing aid is ...

  11. Targeting of a histone acetyltransferase domain to a promoter enhances protein expression levels in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Kwaks, T H J; Sewalt, R G A B; van Blokland, R; Siersma, T J; Kasiem, M; Kelder, A; Otte, A P

    2005-01-12

    Silencing of transfected genes in mammalian cells is a fundamental problem that probably involves the (in)accessibility status of chromatin. A potential solution to this problem is to provide a cell with protein factors that make the chromatin of a promoter more open or accessible for transcription. We tested this by targeting such proteins to different promoters. We found that targeting the p300 histone acetyltransferase (HAT) domain to strong viral or cellular promoters is sufficient to result in higher expression levels of a reporter protein. In contrast, targeting the chromatin-remodeling factor Brahma does not result in stable, higher protein expression levels. The long-term effects of the targeted p300HAT domain on protein expression levels are positively reinforced, when also anti-repressor elements are applied to flank the reporter construct. These elements were previously shown to be potent blockers of chromatin-associated repressors. The simultaneous application of the targeted p300HAT domain and anti-repressor elements conveys long-term stability to protein expression. Whereas no copy number dependency is achieved by targeting of the p300HAT domain alone, copy number dependency is improved when anti-repressor elements are included. We conclude that targeting of protein domains such as HAT domains helps to facilitate expression of transfected genes in mammalian cells. However, the simultaneous application of other genomic elements such as the anti-repressor elements prevents silencing more efficiently. PMID:15607223

  12. Exceptionally high heterologous protein levels in transgenic dicotyledonous seeds using Phaseolus vulgaris regulatory sequences.

    PubMed

    De Jaeger, Geert; Angenon, Geert; Depicker, Ann

    2003-01-01

    Seeds are concentrated sources of protein and thus may be ideal 'bioreactors' for the production of heterologous proteins. For this application, strong seed-specific expression signals are required. A set of expression cassettes were designed using 5' and 3' regulatory sequences of the seed storage protein gene arcelin 5-I (arc5-I) from Phaseolus vulgaris, and evaluated for the production of heterologous proteins in dicotyledonous plant species. A murine single-chain variable fragment (scFv) was chosen as model protein because of the current industrial interest to produce antibodies and derived fragments in crops. Because the highest scFv accumulation in seed had previously been achieved in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), the scFv-encoding sequence was provided with signal sequences for accumulation in the ER. Transgenic Arabidopsis seed stocks, expressing the scFv under control of the 35S promoter, contained scFv accumulation levels in the range of 1% of total soluble protein (TSP). However, the seed storage promoter constructs boosted the scFv to exceptionally high levels. Maximum scFv levels were obtained in homozygous seed stocks, being 12.5% of TSP under control of the arc5-I regulatory sequences and even up to 36.5% of TSP upon replacing the arc5-I promoter by the beta-phaseolin promoter of Phaseolus vulgaris. Even at such very high levels, the scFv proteins retain their full antigen-binding activity. Moreover, the presence of very high scFv levels has only minory effects on seed germination and no effect on seed production. These results demonstrate that the expression levels of arcelin 5-I and beta-phaseolin seed storage protein genes can be transferred to heterologous proteins, giving exceptionally high levels of heterologous proteins, which can be of great value for the molecular farming industry by raising production yield and lowering bio-mass production and purification costs. Finally, the feasibility of heterologous protein production using the

  13. Intercellular Variability in Protein Levels from Stochastic Expression and Noisy Cell Cycle Processes

    PubMed Central

    Soltani, Mohammad; Vargas-Garcia, Cesar A.; Antunes, Duarte; Singh, Abhyudai

    2016-01-01

    Inside individual cells, expression of genes is inherently stochastic and manifests as cell-to-cell variability or noise in protein copy numbers. Since proteins half-lives can be comparable to the cell-cycle length, randomness in cell-division times generates additional intercellular variability in protein levels. Moreover, as many mRNA/protein species are expressed at low-copy numbers, errors incurred in partitioning of molecules between two daughter cells are significant. We derive analytical formulas for the total noise in protein levels when the cell-cycle duration follows a general class of probability distributions. Using a novel hybrid approach the total noise is decomposed into components arising from i) stochastic expression; ii) partitioning errors at the time of cell division and iii) random cell-division events. These formulas reveal that random cell-division times not only generate additional extrinsic noise, but also critically affect the mean protein copy numbers and intrinsic noise components. Counter intuitively, in some parameter regimes, noise in protein levels can decrease as cell-division times become more stochastic. Computations are extended to consider genome duplication, where transcription rate is increased at a random point in the cell cycle. We systematically investigate how the timing of genome duplication influences different protein noise components. Intriguingly, results show that noise contribution from stochastic expression is minimized at an optimal genome-duplication time. Our theoretical results motivate new experimental methods for decomposing protein noise levels from synchronized and asynchronized single-cell expression data. Characterizing the contributions of individual noise mechanisms will lead to precise estimates of gene expression parameters and techniques for altering stochasticity to change phenotype of individual cells. PMID:27536771

  14. Intercellular Variability in Protein Levels from Stochastic Expression and Noisy Cell Cycle Processes.

    PubMed

    Soltani, Mohammad; Vargas-Garcia, Cesar A; Antunes, Duarte; Singh, Abhyudai

    2016-08-01

    Inside individual cells, expression of genes is inherently stochastic and manifests as cell-to-cell variability or noise in protein copy numbers. Since proteins half-lives can be comparable to the cell-cycle length, randomness in cell-division times generates additional intercellular variability in protein levels. Moreover, as many mRNA/protein species are expressed at low-copy numbers, errors incurred in partitioning of molecules between two daughter cells are significant. We derive analytical formulas for the total noise in protein levels when the cell-cycle duration follows a general class of probability distributions. Using a novel hybrid approach the total noise is decomposed into components arising from i) stochastic expression; ii) partitioning errors at the time of cell division and iii) random cell-division events. These formulas reveal that random cell-division times not only generate additional extrinsic noise, but also critically affect the mean protein copy numbers and intrinsic noise components. Counter intuitively, in some parameter regimes, noise in protein levels can decrease as cell-division times become more stochastic. Computations are extended to consider genome duplication, where transcription rate is increased at a random point in the cell cycle. We systematically investigate how the timing of genome duplication influences different protein noise components. Intriguingly, results show that noise contribution from stochastic expression is minimized at an optimal genome-duplication time. Our theoretical results motivate new experimental methods for decomposing protein noise levels from synchronized and asynchronized single-cell expression data. Characterizing the contributions of individual noise mechanisms will lead to precise estimates of gene expression parameters and techniques for altering stochasticity to change phenotype of individual cells. PMID:27536771

  15. Controlled levels of protein modification through a chromatography-mediated bioconjugation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kwant, Richard L.; Jaffe, Jake; Palmere, Peter J.; Francis, Matthew B.

    2015-02-27

    Synthetically modified proteins are increasingly finding applications as well-defined scaffolds for materials. In practice it remains difficult to construct bioconjugates with precise levels of modification because of the limited number of repeated functional groups on proteins. This article describes a method to control the level of protein modification in cases where there exist multiple potential modification sites. A protein is first tagged with a handle using any of a variety of modification chemistries. This handle is used to isolate proteins with a particular number of modifications via affinity chromatography, and then the handle is elaborated with a desired moiety usingmore » an oxidative coupling reaction. This method results in a sample of protein with a well-defined number of modifications, and we find it particularly applicable to systems like protein homomultimers in which there is no way to discern between chemically identical subunits. We demonstrate the use of this method in the construction of a protein-templated light-harvesting mimic, a type of system which has historically been difficult to make in a well-defined manner.« less

  16. Controlled levels of protein modification through a chromatography-mediated bioconjugation

    SciTech Connect

    Kwant, Richard L.; Jaffe, Jake; Palmere, Peter J.; Francis, Matthew B.

    2015-02-27

    Synthetically modified proteins are increasingly finding applications as well-defined scaffolds for materials. In practice it remains difficult to construct bioconjugates with precise levels of modification because of the limited number of repeated functional groups on proteins. This article describes a method to control the level of protein modification in cases where there exist multiple potential modification sites. A protein is first tagged with a handle using any of a variety of modification chemistries. This handle is used to isolate proteins with a particular number of modifications via affinity chromatography, and then the handle is elaborated with a desired moiety using an oxidative coupling reaction. This method results in a sample of protein with a well-defined number of modifications, and we find it particularly applicable to systems like protein homomultimers in which there is no way to discern between chemically identical subunits. We demonstrate the use of this method in the construction of a protein-templated light-harvesting mimic, a type of system which has historically been difficult to make in a well-defined manner.

  17. A two level hierarchical model of protein retention in ion exchange chromatography.

    PubMed

    Salvalaglio, Matteo; Paloni, Matteo; Guelat, Bertrand; Morbidelli, Massimo; Cavallotti, Carlo

    2015-09-11

    Predicting protein retention in ion exchange chromatography (IEX) from first principles is a fascinating perspective. In this work a two level hierarchical modeling strategy is proposed in order to calculate protein retention factors. Model predictions are tested against experimental data measured for Lysozyme and Chymotrypsinogen A in IEX columns as a function of ionic strength and pH. At the highest level of accuracy Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations in explicit water are used to determine the interaction free energy between each of the two proteins and the IEX stationary phase for a reference pH and ionic strength. At a lower level of accuracy a linear response model based on an implicit treatment of solvation and adopting a static protein structure is used to calculate interaction free energies for the full range of pHs and ionic strengths considered. A scaling coefficient, determined comparing MD and implicit solvent simulations, is then introduced in order to correct the linear response model for errors induced by the adoption of a static protein structure. The calculated free energies are then used to compute protein retention factors, which can be directly compared with experimental data. The possibility to introduce a third level of accuracy is explored testing the predictions of a semiempirical model. A quantitative agreement between the predicted and measured protein retention factors is obtained using the coupled MD-linear response models, supporting the reliability of the proposed approach. The model allows quantifying the electrostatic, van der Waals, and conformational contributions to the interaction free energies. A good agreement between experiments and model is obtained also using the semiempirical model that, although requiring parameterization over higher level models or experimental data, proves to be useful in order to rapidly determine protein retention factors across wide pH and ionic strength ranges as it is computationally inexpensive

  18. BCRP protein levels do not differ regionally in adult human livers, but decline in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Riches, Zoe; Abanda, Ngu; Collier, Abby C

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize the ontogeny and variability of the BCRP (ABCG2) transporter in healthy human liver. Levels of BCRP mRNA and protein were determined with q-RT-PCR and western blot in a cohort of 87 human livers aged from 7 days to 87 years. A study of the regional expression of BCRP within adult livers was also performed in a nested cohort of 14 individuals with multiple samples per person collected from pre-selected sites. Levels of BCRP mRNA were not significantly different at any age, but protein levels for BCRP were lower in the elderly compared with adults (p < 0.001) and children (p < 0.05). The intra-liver levels of BCRP protein ranged approximately 6.5-fold and inter-liver BCRP protein varied 8.5-fold in the cohort. No differences in BCRP mRNA or protein were observed with sex or ethnicity, although higher levels of BCRP mRNA were observed in livers from overweight individuals (Body Mass Index ≥ 25-29.9) as compared to underweight or ideal weight individuals. There were no differences in the levels of BCRP mRNA or protein in different regions of the large lobe (n = 3 regions), small lobe (n = 3 regions), directly adjacent to the portal vein or directly adjacent to the common bile duct. This indicates that BCRP researchers can source tissue from all parts of the adult liver without artificial bias in their results. Lower BCRP protein expression in the elderly may be associated with compromised xeno- and endobiotic transport. PMID:26462791

  19. Reduced activity-dependent protein levels in a mouse model of the fragile X premutation.

    PubMed

    von Leden, Ramona E; Curley, Lindsey C; Greenberg, Gian D; Hunsaker, Michael R; Willemsen, Rob; Berman, Robert F

    2014-03-01

    Environmental enrichment results in increased levels of Fmrp in brain and increased dendritic complexity. The present experiment evaluated activity-dependent increases in Fmrp levels in the motor cortex in response to training on a skilled forelimb reaching task in the CGG KI mouse model of the fragile X premutation. Fmrp, Arc, and c-Fos protein levels were quantified by Western blot in the contralateral motor cortex of mice following training to reach for sucrose pellets with a non-preferred paw and compared to levels in the ipsilateral motor cortex. After training, all mice showed increases in Fmrp, Arc, and c-Fos protein levels in the contralateral compared to the ipsilateral hemisphere; however, the increase in CGG KI mice was less than wildtype mice. Increases in Fmrp and Arc proteins scaled with learning, whereas this relationship was not observed with the c-Fos levels. These data suggest the possibility that reduced levels of activity-dependent proteins associated with synaptic plasticity such as Fmrp and Arc may contribute to the neurocognitive phenotype reported in the CGG KI mice and the fragile X premutation. PMID:24462720

  20. Alcohol-Binding Sites in Distinct Brain Proteins: The Quest for Atomic Level Resolution

    PubMed Central

    Howard, Rebecca J.; Slesinger, Paul A.; Davies, Daryl L.; Das, Joydip; Trudell, James R.; Harris, R. Adron

    2011-01-01

    Defining the sites of action of ethanol on brain proteins is a major prerequisite to understanding the molecular pharmacology of this drug. The main barrier to reaching an atomic-level understanding of alcohol action is the low potency of alcohols, ethanol in particular, which is a reflection of transient, low-affinity interactions with their targets. These mechanisms are difficult or impossible to study with traditional techniques such as radioligand binding or spectroscopy. However, there has been considerable recent progress in combining X-ray crystallography, structural modeling, and site-directed mutagenesis to define the sites and mechanisms of action of ethanol and related alcohols on key brain proteins. We review such insights for several diverse classes of proteins including inwardly rectifying potassium, transient receptor potential, and neurotransmit-ter-gated ion channels, as well as protein kinase C epsilon. Some common themes are beginning to emerge from these proteins, including hydrogen bonding of the hydroxyl group and van der Waals interactions of the methylene groups of ethanol with specific amino acid residues. The resulting binding energy is proposed to facilitate or stabilize low-energy state transitions in the bound proteins, allowing ethanol to act as a “molecular lubricant” for protein function. We discuss evidence for characteristic, discrete alcohol-binding sites on protein targets, as well as evidence that binding to some proteins is better characterized by an interaction region that can accommodate multiple molecules of ethanol. PMID:21676006

  1. AFM visualization at a single-molecule level of denaturated states of proteins on graphite.

    PubMed

    Barinov, Nikolay A; Prokhorov, Valery V; Dubrovin, Evgeniy V; Klinov, Dmitry V

    2016-10-01

    Different graphitic materials are either already used or believed to be advantageous in biomedical and biotechnological applications, e.g., as biomaterials or substrates for sensors. Most of these applications or associated important issues, such as biocompatibility, address the problem of adsorption of protein molecules and, in particular the conformational state of the adsorbed protein molecule on graphite. High-resolution AFM demonstrates highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) induced denaturation of four proteins of blood plasma, such as ferritin, fibrinogen, human serum albumin (HSA) and immunoglobulin G (IgG), at a single molecule level. Protein denaturation is accompanied by the decrease of the heights of protein globules and spreading of the denatured protein fraction on the surface. In contrast, the modification of HOPG with the amphiphilic oligoglycine-hydrocarbon derivative monolayer preserves the native-like conformation and provides even more mild conditions for the protein adsorption than typically used mica. Protein unfolding on HOPG may have universal character for "soft" globular proteins. PMID:27451365

  2. Hydrophobic carboxy-terminal residues dramatically reduce protein levels in the haloarchaeon Haloferax volcanii

    PubMed Central

    Reuter, Christopher J.; Uthandi, Sivakumar; Puentes, Jose A.; Maupin-Furlow, Julie A.

    2010-01-01

    Proteolysis is important not only to cell physiology but also to the successful development of biocatalysts. While a wide-variety of signals are known to trigger protein degradation in bacteria and eukaryotes, these mechanisms are poorly understood in archaea, known for their ability to withstand harsh conditions. Here we present a systematic study in which single C-terminal amino acid residues were added to a reporter protein and shown to influence its levels in an archaeal cell. All 20 amino acid residues were examined for their impact on protein levels, using the reporter protein soluble modified red-shifted GFP (smRS-GFP) expressed in the haloarchaeon Haloferax volcanii as a model system. Addition of hydrophobic residues, including Leu, Cys, Met, Phe, Ala, Tyr, Ile and Val, gave the most pronounced reduction in smRS-GFP levels compared with the addition of either neutral or charged hydrophilic residues. In contrast to the altered protein levels, the C-terminal alterations had no influence on smRS-GFP-specific transcript levels, thus revealing that the effect is post-transcriptional. PMID:19850616

  3. Relevance of Education and Intelligence at the National Level for Health: The Case of HIV and AIDS

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rindermann, Heiner; Meisenberg, Gerhard

    2009-01-01

    Studies at the individual level have shown a negative effect of education and intelligence on risky behavior. The same has been demonstrated for risky sexual behavior and for HIV-infection rates in sub-Saharan Africa. In path analyses at the country data level, cognitive abilities (seen as depending on education) show a strong negative effect on…

  4. Ranking Hearing Aid Input-Output Functions for Understanding Low-, Conversational-, and High-Level Speech in Multitalker Babble

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chung, King; Killion, Mead C.; Christensen, Laurel A.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the rankings of 6 input-output functions for understanding low-level, conversational, and high-level speech in multitalker babble without manipulating volume control for listeners with normal hearing, flat sensorineural hearing loss, and mildly sloping sensorineural hearing loss. Method: Peak clipping, compression limiting,…

  5. Protein Consumption and the Elderly: What Is the Optimal Level of Intake?

    PubMed Central

    Baum, Jamie I.; Kim, Il-Young; Wolfe, Robert R.

    2016-01-01

    Maintaining independence, quality of life, and health is crucial for elderly adults. One of the major threats to living independently is the loss of muscle mass, strength, and function that progressively occurs with aging, known as sarcopenia. Several studies have identified protein (especially the essential amino acids) as a key nutrient for muscle health in elderly adults. Elderly adults are less responsive to the anabolic stimulus of low doses of amino acid intake compared to younger individuals. However, this lack of responsiveness in elderly adults can be overcome with higher levels of protein (or essential amino acid) consumption. The requirement for a larger dose of protein to generate responses in elderly adults similar to the responses in younger adults provides the support for a beneficial effect of increased protein in older populations. The purpose of this review is to present the current evidence related to dietary protein intake and muscle health in elderly adults. PMID:27338461

  6. Effect of dietary protein levels on sex hormones in growing male rats kept under constant darkness.

    PubMed

    Hanai, Miho; Esashi, Takatoshi

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this experiment was to clarify the effects of dietary protein levels on the gonadal development and sex hormones in male rats kept under constant darkness as a model of disturbed daily rhythm. Four-week-old male rats (Fischer 344 strain) were kept under constant darkness or normal lighting (12-h light/dark cycle). Two kinds of experimental diet were prepared, one with low dietary protein levels (9% casein) and one with normal levels (18% casein). Harper mineral mixture and Panvitan were used as mineral and vitamin sources, respectively. After 4 weeks, gonadal weight, serum testosterone, and other hormone contents were evaluated. The gonadal weight in the constant darkness groups (D-groups) was lower than that in the normal lighting groups (N-groups). Although the low-protein diet in the D-groups significantly reduced gonadal weight, the normal-protein diet mitigated the reduction of gonadal weight in rats kept under constant darkness. Serum testosterone and androstenedione concentrations were lower in D-group rats fed the low-protein diet. There were no effects of lighting condition or protein levels on serum luteinizing hormone (LH), follicle- stimulating hormone (FSH), or progesterone concentrations. These results indicate that the suppression of gonadal development in D-group rats fed the low-protein diet was caused by low testosterone, which we attribute to the inhibition of synthesized androstenedione, a precursor of testosterone. The present study showed that constant darkness and the low- protein diet inhibited the synthetic pathway from progesterone to androstenedione. PMID:23095819

  7. Expression of fas protein on CD4+T cells irradiated by low level He-Ne

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, Fan; Zhu, Jing; Zhang, Hui-Guo

    2005-07-01

    Objective: To investigate the influence on the Expression of Fas protein on CD4+ T cells irradiated by low level He-Ne laser in the cases of psoriasis. Methods:the expression of CD4+ T Fas protein was determined in the casee of psoriasis(n=5) pre and post-low level laser irradiation(30 min、60min and 120min)by flow cytometry as compared withthe control(n=5). Results:In the cases of psoriasis,the expression of CD4+T FAS protein 21.4+/-3.1% was increased significantly than that of control group 16.8+/-2.1% pre-irradiation, p<0.05in the control,there is no difference between pre and post- irradiation,p>0.05in the cases , the expression of CD4+T Fas protein wae positively corelated to the irradiation times, when the energy density arrived to 22.92J/cm2(60 minutes)and 45.84J/cm2(120minutes), the expression of CD4+ T Fas protein was increased significantly as compared with pre-irradiation,p<0.05.Conclusion: The expression of CD4+T Fas protein may be increased by low level He-Ne laser irradiation ,the uncontrolled status of apoptosis could be corrected.

  8. Low-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol Levels and Statin Treatment by HIV Status Among Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study Men

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Wei; Zikusoka, Michelle N.; Jacobson, Lisa P.; Witt, Mallory D.; Palella, Frank J.; Kingsley, Lawrence A.; Post, Wendy S.; Brown, Todd T.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Treating cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors, including dyslipidemia, is important in HIV care. Low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-c) target achievement is a readily available benchmark for dyslipidemia control, although use of this target is not uniformly endorsed by professional societies. We examined whether HIV serostatus is associated with not achieving LDL-c target. Among Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study (MACS) participants completing visit 56 (10/1/2011–3/31/2012), we categorized each man as on or off statin therapy and used NCEP ATP III guidelines to determine if each man was at LDL-c target or not at target. We compared proportions of men not at target and determined predictors using multivariate logistic regression. Sixty of 543 (11.1%) HIV-infected men and 87 of 585 (14.9%) HIV-uninfected men not receiving statin therapy were not at target (p=0.07), while 31 of 230 (13.5%) HIV-infected and 29 of 204 (14.2%) HIV-uninfected men receiving statin therapy were not at target (p=0.82). Factors associated with not being at target (among men not receiving statin therapy) included current smoking (OR=2.31, 95% CI 1.31, 4.06) and a diagnosis of hypertension (OR=4.69, 95% CI 2.68, 8.21). Factors associated with not being at target (among men receiving statin therapy) included current smoking (OR=2.72, 95% CI 1.30, 5.67) and diabetes (OR=5.31, 95% CI 2.47, 11.42). HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected men receiving statin therapy demonstrated similar nonachievement of LDL-c targets. Comorbidities (e.g., diabetes) lowered targets and may explain why goals were less likely to be met. PMID:25664922

  9. Acute effect of protein or carbohydrate breakfasts on human cerebrospinal fluid monoamine precursor and metabolite levels.

    PubMed

    Teff, K L; Young, S N; Marchand, L; Botez, M I

    1989-01-01

    Patients with normal pressure hydrocephalus who had three lumbar punctures during 1 week ingested either water, a protein breakfast, or a carbohydrate breakfast 2.5 h before each of the lumbar punctures. The CSF was analyzed for biogenic amine precursors and metabolites. The protein meal raised CSF tyrosine levels, a finding consistent with animal data, but did not alter those of tryptophan or any of the biogenic amine metabolites. The carbohydrate meal increased CSF 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylethylene glycol, an unexplained finding. The carbohydrate meal did not affect CSF tryptophan, tyrosine, 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid, or homovanillic acid. Our results support the idea that in humans protein or carbohydrate meals do not alter plasma amino acid levels sufficiently to cause appreciable changes in CNS tryptophan levels or 5-hydroxytryptamine synthesis. PMID:2462018

  10. Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) is localized to subnuclear domains enriched in splicing factors

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Yi Ericsson, Ida Doseth, Berit Liabakk, Nina B. Krokan, Hans E. Kavli, Bodil

    2014-03-10

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) is the mutator enzyme in adaptive immunity. AID initiates the antibody diversification processes in activated B cells by deaminating cytosine to uracil in immunoglobulin genes. To some extent other genes are also targeted, which may lead to genome instability and B cell malignancy. Thus, it is crucial to understand its targeting and regulation mechanisms. AID is regulated at several levels including subcellular compartmentalization. However, the complex nuclear distribution and trafficking of AID has not been studied in detail previously. In this work, we examined the subnuclear localization of AID and its interaction partner CTNNBL1 and found that they associate with spliceosome-associated structures including Cajal bodies and nuclear speckles. Moreover, protein kinase A (PKA), which activates AID by phosphorylation at Ser38, is present together with AID in nuclear speckles. Importantly, we demonstrate that AID physically associates with the major spliceosome subunits (small nuclear ribonucleoproteins, snRNPs), as well as other essential splicing components, in addition to the transcription machinery. Based on our findings and the literature, we suggest a transcription-coupled splicing-associated model for AID targeting and activation. - Highlights: • AID and its interaction partner CTNNBL1 localize to Cajal bodies and nuclear speckles. • AID associates with its activating kinase PKA in nuclear speckles. • AID is linked to the splicing machinery in switching B-cells. • Our findings suggest a transcription-coupled splicing associated mechanism for AID targeting and activation.

  11. Differential Acute and Chronic Effects of Leptin on Hypothalamic Astrocyte Morphology and Synaptic Protein Levels

    PubMed Central

    García-Cáceres, Cristina; Fuente-Martín, Esther; Burgos-Ramos, Emma; Granado, Miriam; Frago, Laura M.; Barrios, Vicente; Horvath, Tamas

    2011-01-01

    Astrocytes participate in neuroendocrine functions partially through modulation of synaptic input density in the hypothalamus. Indeed, glial ensheathing of neurons is modified by specific hormones, thus determining the availability of neuronal membrane space for synaptic inputs, with the loss of this plasticity possibly being involved in pathological processes. Leptin modulates synaptic inputs in the hypothalamus, but whether astrocytes participate in this action is unknown. Here we report that astrocyte structural proteins, such as glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and vimentin, are induced and astrocyte morphology modified by chronic leptin administration (intracerebroventricular, 2 wk), with these changes being inversely related to modifications in synaptic protein densities. Similar changes in glial structural proteins were observed in adult male rats that had increased body weight and circulating leptin levels due to neonatal overnutrition (overnutrition: four pups/litter vs. control: 12 pups/litter). However, acute leptin treatment reduced hypothalamic GFAP levels and induced synaptic protein levels 1 h after administration, with no effect on vimentin. In primary hypothalamic astrocyte cultures leptin also reduced GFAP levels at 1 h, with an induction at 24 h, indicating a possible direct effect of leptin. Hence, one mechanism by which leptin may affect metabolism is by modifying hypothalamic astrocyte morphology, which in turn could alter synaptic inputs to hypothalamic neurons. Furthermore, the responses to acute and chronic leptin exposure are inverse, raising the possibility that increased glial activation in response to chronic leptin exposure could be involved in central leptin resistance. PMID:21343257

  12. Regulation of Aicda expression and AID activity.

    PubMed

    Zan, Hong; Casali, Paolo

    2013-03-01

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) is expressed in a B cell differentiation stage-specific fashion and is essential for immunoglobulin (Ig) gene class switch DNA recombination (CSR) and somatic hypermutation (SHM). CSR and SHM play a central role in the maturation of antibody and autoantibody responses. AID displays a mutagenic activity by catalyzing targeted deamination of deoxycytidine (dC) residues in DNA resulting in dU:dG mismatches, which are processed into point-mutations in SHM or double-strand breaks (DSBs) in CSR. Although AID specifically targets the Ig gene loci (IgH, Igκ and Igλ), it can also home into a wide array of non-Ig genes in B-and non-B-cell backgrounds. Aberrant expression of AID is associated with multiple diseases such as allergy, inflammation, autoimmunity and cancer. In autoimmune systemic lupus erythematosus, dysregulated AID expression underpins increased CSR, SHM and autoantibody production. As a potent mutator, AID is under stringent transcriptional, post-transcriptional and post-translational regulation. AID is also regulated in its targeting and enzymatic function. In resting naïve or memory B cells, AID transcripts and protein are undetectable. These, however, are readily and significantly up-regulated in B cells induced to undergo CSR and/or SHM. Transcription factors, such as HoxC4 and NF-κB, which are up-regulated in a B cell lineage-and/or differentiation stage-specific manner, regulate the induction of AID. HoxC4 induces AID expression by directly binding to the AID gene promoter through an evolutionarily conserved 5'-ATTT-3' motif. HoxC4 is induced by the same stimuli that induce AID and CSR. It is further up-regulated by estrogen through three estrogen responsive elements in its promoter region. The targeting of AID to switch (S) regions is mediated by 14-3-3 adaptor proteins, which specifically bind to 5'-AGCT-3' repeats that are exist at high frequency in S region cores. Like HoxC4, 14-3-3 adaptors are induced

  13. Health behavior change models for HIV prevention and AIDS care: practical recommendations for a multi-level approach.

    PubMed

    Kaufman, Michelle R; Cornish, Flora; Zimmerman, Rick S; Johnson, Blair T

    2014-08-15

    Despite increasing recent emphasis on the social and structural determinants of HIV-related behavior, empirical research and interventions lag behind, partly because of the complexity of social-structural approaches. This article provides a comprehensive and practical review of the diverse literature on multi-level approaches to HIV-related behavior change in the interest of contributing to the ongoing shift to more holistic theory, research, and practice. It has the following specific aims: (1) to provide a comprehensive list of relevant variables/factors related to behavior change at all points on the individual-structural spectrum, (2) to map out and compare the characteristics of important recent multi-level models, (3) to reflect on the challenges of operating with such complex theoretical tools, and (4) to identify next steps and make actionable recommendations. Using a multi-level approach implies incorporating increasing numbers of variables and increasingly context-specific mechanisms, overall producing greater intricacies. We conclude with recommendations on how best to respond to this complexity, which include: using formative research and interdisciplinary collaboration to select the most appropriate levels and variables in a given context; measuring social and institutional variables at the appropriate level to ensure meaningful assessments of multiple levels are made; and conceptualizing intervention and research with reference to theoretical models and mechanisms to facilitate transferability, sustainability, and scalability. PMID:25007194

  14. Health Behavior Change Models for HIV Prevention and AIDS Care: Practical Recommendations for a Multi-Level Approach

    PubMed Central

    Cornish, Flora; Zimmerman, Rick S.; Johnson, Blair T.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract: Despite increasing recent emphasis on the social and structural determinants of HIV-related behavior, empirical research and interventions lag behind, partly because of the complexity of social–structural approaches. This article provides a comprehensive and practical review of the diverse literature on multi-level approaches to HIV-related behavior change in the interest of contributing to the ongoing shift to more holistic theory, research, and practice. It has the following specific aims: (1) to provide a comprehensive list of relevant variables/factors related to behavior change at all points on the individual–structural spectrum, (2) to map out and compare the characteristics of important recent multi-level models, (3) to reflect on the challenges of operating with such complex theoretical tools, and (4) to identify next steps and make actionable recommendations. Using a multi-level approach implies incorporating increasing numbers of variables and increasingly context-specific mechanisms, overall producing greater intricacies. We conclude with recommendations on how best to respond to this complexity, which include: using formative research and interdisciplinary collaboration to select the most appropriate levels and variables in a given context; measuring social and institutional variables at the appropriate level to ensure meaningful assessments of multiple levels are made; and conceptualizing intervention and research with reference to theoretical models and mechanisms to facilitate transferability, sustainability, and scalability. PMID:25007194

  15. Physiological enzymology: The next frontier in understanding protein structure and function at the cellular level.

    PubMed

    Lee, Irene; Berdis, Anthony J

    2016-01-01

    Historically, the study of proteins has relied heavily on characterizing the activity of a single purified protein isolated from other cellular components. This classic approach allowed scientists to unambiguously define the intrinsic kinetic and chemical properties of that protein. The ultimate hope was to extrapolate this information toward understanding how the enzyme or receptor behaves within its native cellular context. These types of detailed in vitro analyses were necessary to reduce the innate complexities of measuring the singular activity and biochemical properties of a specific enzyme without interference from other enzymes and potential competing substrates. However, recent developments in fields encompassing cell biology, molecular imaging, and chemical biology now provide the unique chemical tools and instrumentation to study protein structure, function, and regulation in their native cellular environment. These advancements provide the foundation for a new field, coined physiological enzymology, which quantifies the function and regulation of enzymes and proteins at the cellular level. In this Special Edition, we explore the area of Physiological Enzymology and Protein Function through a series of review articles that focus on the tools and techniques used to measure the cellular activity of proteins inside living cells. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Physiological Enzymology and Protein Functions. PMID:26277093

  16. Luciferase NanoLuc as a reporter for gene expression and protein levels in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Masser, Anna E; Kandasamy, Ganapathi; Kaimal, Jayasankar Mohanakrishnan; Andréasson, Claes

    2016-05-01

    Reporter proteins are essential tools in the study of biological processes and are employed to monitor changes in gene expression and protein levels. Luciferases are reporter proteins that enable rapid and highly sensitive detection with an outstanding dynamic range. Here we evaluated the usefulness of the 19 kDa luciferase NanoLuc (Nluc), derived from the deep sea shrimp Oplophorus gracilirostris, as a reporter protein in yeast. Cassettes with codon-optimized genes expressing yeast Nluc (yNluc) or its destabilized derivative yNlucPEST have been assembled in the context of the dominant drug resistance marker kanMX. The reporter proteins do not impair the growth of yeast cells and exhibit half-lives of 40 and 5 min, respectively. The commercial substrate Nano-Glo® is compatible with detection of yNluc bioluminescence in < 50 cells. Using the unstable yNlucPEST to report on the rapid and transient expression of a heat-shock promoter (PCYC1-HSE ), we found a close match between the intensity of the bioluminescent signal and mRNA levels during both induction and decay. We demonstrated that the bioluminescence of yNluc fused to the C-terminus of a temperature-sensitive protein reports on its protein levels. In conclusion, yNluc and yNlucPEST are valuable new reporter proteins suitable for experiments with yeast using standard commercial substrate. © 2016 The Authors. Yeast published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:26860732

  17. Ground level environmental protein concentrations in various ecuadorian environments: potential uses of aerosolized protein for ecological research

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Staton, Sarah J.R.; Woodward, Andrea; Castillo, Josemar A.; Swing, Kelly; Hayes, Mark A.

    2014-01-01

    Large quantities of free protein in the environment and other bioaerosols are ubiquitous throughout terrestrial ground level environments and may be integrative indicators of ecosystem status. Samples of ground level bioaerosols were collected from various ecosystems throughout Ecuador, including pristine humid tropical forest (pristine), highly altered secondary humid tropical forest (highly altered), secondary transitional very humid forest (regrowth transitional), and suburban dry montane deforested (suburban deforested). The results explored the sensitivity of localized aerosol protein concentrations to spatial and temporal variations within ecosystems, and their value for assessing environmental change. Ecosystem specific variations in environmental protein concentrations were observed: pristine 0.32 ± 0.09 μg/m3, highly altered 0.07 ± 0.05 μg/m3, regrowth transitional 0.17 ± 0.06 μg/m3, and suburban deforested 0.09 ± 0.04 μg/m3. Additionally, comparisons of intra-environmental differences in seasonal/daily weather (dry season 0.08 ± 0.03 μg/m3 and wet season 0.10 ± 0.04 μg/m3), environmental fragmentation (buffered 0.19 ± 0.06 μg/m3 and edge 0.15 ± 0.06 μg/m3), and sampling height (ground level 0.32 ± 0.09 μg/m3 and 10 m 0.24 ± 0.04 μg/m3) demonstrated the sensitivity of protein concentrations to environmental conditions. Local protein concentrations in altered environments correlated well with satellite-based spectral indices describing vegetation productivity: normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) (r2 = 0.801), net primary production (NPP) (r2 = 0.827), leaf area index (LAI) (r2 = 0.410). Moreover, protein concentrations distinguished the pristine site, which was not differentiated in spectral indices, potentially due to spectral saturation typical of highly vegetated environments. Bioaerosol concentrations represent an inexpensive method to increase understanding of environmental changes, especially in densely vegetated

  18. Tuberculosis and HIV at the National Level in Kenya: Results From the Second Kenya AIDS Indicator Survey

    PubMed Central

    Mbithi, Agneta; Gichangi, Anthony; Kim, Andrea A.; Katana, Abraham; Weyenga, Herman; Williamson, John; Robinson, Katherine; Oluoch, Tom; Maina, William K.; Kellogg, Timothy A.; De Cock, Kevin M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Co-morbidity with tuberculosis and HIV is a common cause of mortality in sub-Saharan Africa. In the second Kenya AIDS Indicator Survey, we collected data on knowledge and experience of HIV and tuberculosis, as well as on access to and coverage of relevant treatment services and antiretroviral therapy (ART) in Kenya. Methods A national, population-based household survey was conducted from October 2012 to February 2013. Information was collected through household questionnaires, and blood samples were taken for HIV, CD4 cell counts, and HIV viral load testing at a central laboratory. Results Overall, 13,720 persons aged 15–64 years participated; 96.7% [95% confidence interval (CI): 96.3 to 97.1] had heard of tuberculosis, of whom 2.0% (95% CI: 1.7 to 2.2) reported having prior tuberculosis. Among those with laboratory-confirmed HIV infection, 11.6% (95% CI: 8.9 to 14.3) reported prior tuberculosis. The prevalence of laboratory-confirmed HIV infection in persons reporting prior tuberculosis was 33.2% (95% CI: 26.2 to 40.2) compared to 5.1% (95% CI: 4.5 to 5.8) in persons without prior tuberculosis. Among those in care, coverage of ART for treatment-eligible persons was 100% for those with prior tuberculosis and 88.6% (95% CI: 81.6 to 95.7) for those without. Among all HIV-infected persons, ART coverage among treatment-eligible persons was 86.9% (95% CI: 74.2 to 99.5) for persons with prior tuberculosis and 58.3% (95% CI: 47.6 to 69.0) for those without. Conclusions Morbidity from tuberculosis and HIV remain major health challenges in Kenya. Tuberculosis is an important entry point for HIV diagnosis and treatment. Lack of knowledge of HIV serostatus is an obstacle to access to HIV services and timely ART for prevention of HIV transmission and HIV-associated disease, including tuberculosis. PMID:24732814

  19. Disparity in Frontal Lobe Connectivity on a Complex Bimanual Motor Task Aids in Classification of Operator Skill Level.

    PubMed

    Andreu-Perez, Javier; Leff, Daniel Richard; Shetty, Kunal; Darzi, Ara; Yang, Guang-Zhong

    2016-06-01

    Objective metrics of technical performance (e.g., dexterity, time, and path length) are insufficient to fully characterize operator skill level, which may be encoded deep within neural function. Unlike reports that capture plasticity across days or weeks, this articles studies long-term plasticity in functional connectivity that occurs over years of professional task practice. Optical neuroimaging data are acquired from professional surgeons of varying experience on a complex bimanual coordination task with the aim of investigating learning-related disparity in frontal lobe functional connectivity that arises as a consequence of motor skill level. The results suggest that prefrontal and premotor seed connectivity is more critical during naïve versus expert performance. Given learning-related differences in connectivity, a least-squares support vector machine with a radial basis function kernel is employed to evaluate skill level using connectivity data. The results demonstrate discrimination of operator skill level with accuracy ≥0.82 and Multiclass Matthew's Correlation Coefficient ≥0.70. Furthermore, these indices are improved when local (i.e., within-region) rather than inter-regional (i.e., between-region) frontal connectivity is considered (p = 0.002). The results suggest that it is possible to classify operator skill level with good accuracy from functional connectivity data, upon which objective assessment and neurofeedback may be used to improve operator performance during technical skill training. PMID:26899241

  20. Determination of protein levels in soy and peanut oils by colorimetric assay and ELISA.

    PubMed

    Jablonski, Joseph E; Fu, Tong-Jen; Jackson, Lauren S; Gendel, Steven M

    2010-01-01

    Analytical methods are needed for measuring the levels of protein from allergenic food transferred into cooking oil. A simple method for determination of total protein in cooking oils was developed. Oil was extracted with phosphate-buffered saline with 0.05% Tween (PBST) and the extracts were partitioned with hexane to remove residual oil. Total protein in the PBST extracts was assayed with bicinchoninic acid (BCA), micro-BCA, reducing-agent compatible BCA and CB-XT kits. These methods were used to measure recovery of protein from peanut butter spikes of soy and peanut oil in the range of 50-1000 ppm. Recoveries were generally above 70%. However, the BCA and micro-BCA assays were subject to interference and enhanced color formation which were probably due to co-extracted antioxidants present in oil. The reducing agent-compatible BCA and CB-X protein assays reduced interference and gave lower protein values in crude, cold-pressed, and refined peanut oils. Heating oil to 180 degrees C before extraction also reduced interference-induced color enhancement. A commercial ELISA test kit was also used to measure peanut protein in oil spiked with peanut butter. Recovery of peanut residues measured by ELISA was significantly decreased when the peanut butter-spiked oil was heated to 180 degrees C compared to unheated oil. Recovery of spiked peanut butter protein measured by the buffer extraction-colorimetric method was not decreased in heated oil. The method developed here could be used to determine protein levels in crude and refined oil, and to assess the potential for allergen cross-contact from reused cooking oil. PMID:20334183

  1. mRNA and Protein levels of rat pancreas specific protein disulphide isomerase are downregulated during Hyperglycemia.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Rajani; Bhar, Kaushik; Sen, Nandini; Bhowmick, Debajit; Mukhopadhyay, Satinath; Panda, Koustubh; Siddhanta, Anirban

    2016-02-01

    Diabetes (Type I and Type II) which affects nearly every organ in the body is a multi-factorial non-communicable disorder. Hyperglycemia is the most characteristic feature of this disease. Loss of beta cells is common in both types of diabetes whose detailed cellular and molecular mechanisms are yet to be elucidated. As this disease is complex, identification of specific biomarkers for its early detection, management and devising new therapies is challenging. Based on the fact that functionally defective proteins provide the biochemical basis for many diseases, in this study, we tried to identify differentially expressed proteins during hyperglycemia. For that, hyperglycemia was induced in overnight fasted rats by intra-peritoneal injection of streptozotocin (STZ). The pancreas was isolated from control and treated rats for subsequent analyses. The 2D-gel electrophoresis followed by MALDI-TOF-MS-MS analyses revealed several up- and down-regulated proteins in hyperglycemic rat pancreas including the downregulation of a pancreas specific isoform of protein disulphide isomerase a2 (Pdia2).This observation was validated by western blot. Quantitative PCR experiments showed that the level of Pdia2 mRNA is also proportionally reduced in hyperglycemic pancreas. PMID:26934777

  2. Codon influence on protein expression in E. coli correlates with mRNA levels.

    PubMed

    Boël, Grégory; Letso, Reka; Neely, Helen; Price, W Nicholson; Wong, Kam-Ho; Su, Min; Luff, Jon D; Valecha, Mayank; Everett, John K; Acton, Thomas B; Xiao, Rong; Montelione, Gaetano T; Aalberts, Daniel P; Hunt, John F

    2016-01-21

    Degeneracy in the genetic code, which enables a single protein to be encoded by a multitude of synonymous gene sequences, has an important role in regulating protein expression, but substantial uncertainty exists concerning the details of this phenomenon. Here we analyse the sequence features influencing protein expression levels in 6,348 experiments using bacteriophage T7 polymerase to synthesize messenger RNA in Escherichia coli. Logistic regression yields a new codon-influence metric that correlates only weakly with genomic codon-usage frequency, but strongly with global physiological protein concentrations and also mRNA concentrations and lifetimes in vivo. Overall, the codon content influences protein expression more strongly than mRNA-folding parameters, although the latter dominate in the initial ~16 codons. Genes redesigned based on our analyses are transcribed with unaltered efficiency but translated with higher efficiency in vitro. The less efficiently translated native sequences show greatly reduced mRNA levels in vivo. Our results suggest that codon content modulates a kinetic competition between protein elongation and mRNA degradation that is a central feature of the physiology and also possibly the regulation of translation in E. coli. PMID:26760206

  3. Using screening level environmental life cycle assessment to aid decision making: A case study of a college annual report

    EPA Science Inventory

    Purpose – In this study we compare the life cycle environmental impacts of the University of Cincinnati College of Engineering and Applied Sciences’ current printed annual report to a version distributed via the Internet. This case study demonstrates how a screening level life cy...

  4. Is Quality/Effectiveness An Empirically Demonstrable School Attribute? Statistical Aids for Determining Appropriate Levels of Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffith, James

    2002-01-01

    Describes and demonstrates analytical techniques used in organizational psychology and contemporary multilevel analysis. Using these analytic techniques, examines the relationship between educational outcomes and the school environment. Finds that at least some indicators might be represented as school-level phenomena. Results imply that the…

  5. Levels of major proteins of Escherichia coli during growth at different temperatures.

    PubMed Central

    Herendeen, S L; VanBogelen, R A; Neidhardt, F C

    1979-01-01

    The adaptation of Escherichia coli B/r to temperature was studied by measuring the levels of 133 proteins (comprising 70% of the cell's protein mass) during balanced growth in rich medium at seven temperatures from 13.5 to 46 degrees C. The growth rate of this strain in either rich or minimal medium varies as a simple function of temperature with an Arrhenius constant of approximately 13,500 cal (ca. 56,500 J) per mol from 23 to 37 degrees C, the so-called normal range; above and below this range the growth rate decreases sharply. Analysis of the detailed results indicates that (i) metabolic coordination within the normal (Arrhenius) range is largely achieved by modulation of enzyme activity rather than amount; (ii) the restricted growth that occurs outside this range is accompanied by marked changes in the levels of most of these proteins; (iii) a few proteins are thermometer-like in varying simply with temperature over the whole temperature range irrespective of the influence of temperature on cell growth; and (iv) the temperature response of half of the proteins can be predicted from current information on their metabolic role or from their variation in level in different media at 37 degrees C. PMID:156716

  6. Modeling of growth factor-receptor systems: from molecular-level protein interaction networks to whole-body compartment models

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Florence T.H.; Stefanini, Marianne O.; Mac Gabhann, Feilim; Popel, Aleksander S.

    2010-01-01

    Most physiological processes are subjected to molecular regulation by growth factors, which are secreted proteins that activate chemical signal transduction pathways through binding of specific cell-surface receptors. One particular growth factor system involved in the in vivo regulation of blood vessel growth is called the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) system. Computational and numerical techniques are well-suited to handle the molecular complexity (the number of binding partners involved, including ligands, receptors, and inert binding sites) and multi-scale nature (intra-tissue vs. inter-tissue transport and local vs. systemic effects within an organism) involved in modeling growth factor system interactions and effects. This paper introduces a variety of in silico models that seek to recapitulate different aspects of VEGF system biology at various spatial and temporal scales: molecular-level kinetic models focus on VEGF ligand-receptor interactions at and near the endothelial cell surface; meso-scale single-tissue 3D models can simulate the effects of multi-cellular tissue architecture on the spatial variation in VEGF ligand production and receptor activation; compartmental modeling allows efficient prediction of average interstitial VEGF concentrations and cell-surface VEGF signaling intensities across multiple large tissue volumes, permitting the investigation of whole-body inter-tissue transport (e.g., vascular permeability and lymphatic drainage). The given examples will demonstrate the utility of computational models in aiding both basic science and clinical research on VEGF systems biology. PMID:19897104

  7. Protein Fibrillar Nanopolymers: Molecular-Level Insights into Their Structural, Physical and Mechanical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trusova, Valeriya M.

    2015-09-01

    Amyloid fibrils represent a generic class of mechanically strong and stable biomaterials with extremely advantageous properties. Although amyloids were initially associated only with severe neurological disorders, the role of these structures nowadays is shifting from health debilitating to highly beneficial both in biomedical and technological aspects. Intensive involvement of fibrillar assemblies into the wide range of pathogenic and functional processes strongly necessitate the molecular level characterization of the structural, physical and elastic features of protein nanofibrils. In the present contribution, we made an attempt to highlight the up-to-date progress in the understanding of amyloid properties from the polymer physics standpoint. The fundamental insights into protein fibril behavior are essential not only for development of therapeutic strategies to combat the protein misfolding disorders but also for rational and precise design of novel biodegradable protein-based nanopolymers.

  8. Insulin regulates milk protein synthesis at multiple levels in the bovine mammary gland.

    PubMed

    Menzies, Karensa K; Lefèvre, Christophe; Macmillan, Keith L; Nicholas, Kevin R

    2009-05-01

    The role of insulin in milk protein synthesis is unresolved in the bovine mammary gland. This study examined the potential role of insulin in the presence of two lactogenic hormones, hydrocortisone and prolactin, in milk protein synthesis. Insulin was shown to stimulate milk protein gene expression, casein synthesis and (14)C-lysine uptake in mammary explants from late pregnant cows. A global assessment of changes in gene expression in mammary explants in response to insulin was undertaken using Affymetrix microarray. The resulting data provided insight into the molecular mechanisms stimulated by insulin and showed that the hormone stimulated the expression of 28 genes directly involved in protein synthesis. These genes included the milk protein transcription factor, ELF5, translation factors, the folate metabolism genes, FOLR1 and MTHFR, as well as several genes encoding enzymes involved in catabolism of essential amino acids and biosynthesis of non-essential amino acids. These data show that insulin is not only essential for milk protein gene expression, but stimulates milk protein synthesis at multiple levels within bovine mammary epithelial cells. PMID:19107532

  9. Transcriptional Bursting Explains the Noise Versus Mean Relationship in mRNA and Protein Levels

    SciTech Connect

    Dar, Dr. Roy; Shaffer, S; Singh, A; Razooky, B; Simpson, Michael L; Raj, A; Weinberger, Dr. Leor

    2016-01-01

    Recent analysis demonstrates that the HIV-1 Long Terminal Repeat (HIV LTR) promoter exhibits a range of possible transcriptional burst sizes and frequencies for any mean-expression level. However, these results have also been interpreted as demonstrating that cell-tocell expression variability (noise) and mean are uncorrelated, a significant deviation from previous results. Here, we re-examine the available mRNA and protein abundance data for the HIV LTR and find that noise in mRNA and protein expression scales inversely with the mean along analytically predicted transcriptional burst-size manifolds. We then experimentally perturb transcriptional activity to test a prediction of the multiple burst-size model: that increasing burst frequency will cause mRNA noise to decrease along given burst-size lines as mRNA levels increase. The data show that mRNA and protein noise decrease as mean expression increases, supporting the canonical inverse correlation between noise and mean.

  10. Manipulating the Prion Protein Gene Sequence and Expression Levels with CRISPR/Cas9

    PubMed Central

    Kaczmarczyk, Lech; Mende, Ylva; Zevnik, Branko; Jackson, Walker S.

    2016-01-01

    The mammalian prion protein (PrP, encoded by Prnp) is most infamous for its central role in prion diseases, invariably fatal neurodegenerative diseases affecting humans, food animals, and animals in the wild. However, PrP is also hypothesized to be an important receptor for toxic protein conformers in Alzheimer's disease, and is associated with other clinically relevant processes such as cancer and stroke. Thus, key insights into important clinical areas, as well as into understanding PrP functions in normal physiology, can be obtained from studying transgenic mouse models and cell culture systems. However, the Prnp locus is difficult to manipulate by homologous recombination, making modifications of the endogenous locus rarely attempted. Fortunately in recent years genome engineering technologies, like TALENs or CRISPR/Cas9 (CC9), have brought exceptional new possibilities for manipulating Prnp. Herein, we present our observations made during systematic experiments with the CC9 system targeting the endogenous mouse Prnp locus, to either modify sequences or to boost PrP expression using CC9-based synergistic activation mediators (SAMs). It is our hope that this information will aid and encourage researchers to implement gene-targeting techniques into their research program. PMID:27128441

  11. Manipulating the Prion Protein Gene Sequence and Expression Levels with CRISPR/Cas9.

    PubMed

    Kaczmarczyk, Lech; Mende, Ylva; Zevnik, Branko; Jackson, Walker S

    2016-01-01

    The mammalian prion protein (PrP, encoded by Prnp) is most infamous for its central role in prion diseases, invariably fatal neurodegenerative diseases affecting humans, food animals, and animals in the wild. However, PrP is also hypothesized to be an important receptor for toxic protein conformers in Alzheimer's disease, and is associated with other clinically relevant processes such as cancer and stroke. Thus, key insights into important clinical areas, as well as into understanding PrP functions in normal physiology, can be obtained from studying transgenic mouse models and cell culture systems. However, the Prnp locus is difficult to manipulate by homologous recombination, making modifications of the endogenous locus rarely attempted. Fortunately in recent years genome engineering technologies, like TALENs or CRISPR/Cas9 (CC9), have brought exceptional new possibilities for manipulating Prnp. Herein, we present our observations made during systematic experiments with the CC9 system targeting the endogenous mouse Prnp locus, to either modify sequences or to boost PrP expression using CC9-based synergistic activation mediators (SAMs). It is our hope that this information will aid and encourage researchers to implement gene-targeting techniques into their research program. PMID:27128441

  12. Nucleoside diphosphate regulation of overall rates of protein biosynthesis acting at the level of initiation.

    PubMed

    Hucul, J A; Henshaw, E C; Young, D A

    1985-12-15

    A sensitive assay method developed to examine the effects of subtle, physiologically relevant, changes in the levels of adenine and guanine mono-, di-, and triphosphorylated nucleotides specifically on the initiation of protein synthesis is described. Initiation rates are quantified by measuring the amount of protein synthesis resulting from the run-off of ribosomes which have initiated during defined intervals in a modified in vitro protein-synthesizing system developed from Ehrlich ascites tumor cell lysates (Henshaw, E.C., and Panniers, R. (1983) Methods Enzymol. 101, 616-629). The modifications include the attenuation of the ATP-regenerating system so that the relative nucleotide levels more nearly reflect actual intracellular conditions. With this system the rate of initiation is highly sensitive to changes in the ADP:ATP and GDP:GTP ratios, but indifferent to the absolute levels of either diphosphate. While the tight coupling of these two ratios by endogenous nucleoside diphosphate kinase activity prevents the independent manipulation of either ratio, the data do eliminate both AMP and GMP per se as inhibitory species. The close agreement of our data calculated in terms of energy charge to previously published results on overall rates of protein synthesis in rat thymocytes (Mendelsohn, S.K., Nordeen, S.K., and Young, D.A. (1977) Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 79, 53-60) continues to suggest a physiologically relevant regulatory influence of subtle changes in nucleotides acting at the level of the initiation reaction. PMID:2999123

  13. Systemic Glucose Level Changes with a Carbohydrate-Restricted and Higher Protein Diet Combined with Exercise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowden, Rodney G.; Lanning, Beth A.; Doyle, Eva I.; Slonaker, Becky; Johnston, Holly M.; Scanes, Georgene

    2007-01-01

    Objective: The authors' purpose in this study was to compare the effects of macronutrient intake on systemic glucose levels in previously sedentary participants who followed 1 of 4 diets that were either higher protein or high carbohydrate, while initiating an exercise program. Participants and Methods: The authors randomly assigned 94 sedentary…

  14. Low levels of aflatoxin B1, ricin and milk enhance recombinant protein production in mammalian cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Changing the optimal tissue culture medium by adding low levels of environmental stress such as 1 µM of the fungal toxin aflatoxin B1 (AFB1), 1 ng of the castor bean protein toxin ricin in transduced mammalian cells or 1% reconstituted milk enhances transcription and increases production of the foll...

  15. A Tick Gut Protein with Fibronectin III Domains Aids Borrelia burgdorferi Congregation to the Gut during Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Schuijt, Tim J.; Boder, Eric; Hovius, Joppe W.; Fikrig, Erol

    2014-01-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi transmission to the vertebrate host commences with growth of the spirochete in the tick gut and migration from the gut to the salivary glands. This complex process, involving intimate interactions of the spirochete with the gut epithelium, is pivotal to transmission. We utilized a yeast surface display library of tick gut proteins to perform a global screen for tick gut proteins that might interact with Borrelia membrane proteins. A putative fibronectin type III domain-containing tick gut protein (Ixofin3D) was most frequently identified from this screen and prioritized for further analysis. Immunization against Ixofin3D and RNA interference-mediated reduction in expression of Ixofin3D resulted in decreased spirochete burden in tick salivary glands and in the murine host. Microscopic examination showed decreased aggregation of spirochetes on the gut epithelium concomitant with reduced expression of Ixofin3D. Our observations suggest that the interaction between Borrelia and Ixofin3D facilitates spirochete congregation to the gut during transmission, and provides a “molecular exit” direction for spirochete egress from the gut. PMID:25102051

  16. POTAMOS mass spectrometry calculator: computer aided mass spectrometry to the post-translational modifications of proteins. A focus on histones.

    PubMed

    Vlachopanos, A; Soupsana, E; Politou, A S; Papamokos, G V

    2014-12-01

    Mass spectrometry is a widely used technique for protein identification and it has also become the method of choice in order to detect and characterize the post-translational modifications (PTMs) of proteins. Many software tools have been developed to deal with this complication. In this paper we introduce a new, free and user friendly online software tool, named POTAMOS Mass Spectrometry Calculator, which was developed in the open source application framework Ruby on Rails. It can provide calculated mass spectrometry data in a time saving manner, independently of instrumentation. In this web application we have focused on a well known protein family of histones whose PTMs are believed to play a crucial role in gene regulation, as suggested by the so called "histone code" hypothesis. The PTMs implemented in this software are: methylations of arginines and lysines, acetylations of lysines and phosphorylations of serines and threonines. The application is able to calculate the kind, the number and the combinations of the possible PTMs corresponding to a given peptide sequence and a given mass along with the full set of the unique primary structures produced by the possible distributions along the amino acid sequence. It can also calculate the masses and charges of a fragmented histone variant, which carries predefined modifications already implemented. Additional functionality is provided by the calculation of the masses of fragments produced upon protein cleavage by the proteolytic enzymes that are most widely used in proteomics studies. PMID:25450216

  17. Effects of prebiotic, protein level, and stocking density on performance, immunity, and stress indicators of broilers.

    PubMed

    Houshmand, M; Azhar, K; Zulkifli, I; Bejo, M H; Kamyab, A

    2012-02-01

    An experiment was conducted to determine the effects of period on the performance, immunity, and some stress indicators of broilers fed 2 levels of protein and stocked at a normal or high stocking density. Experimental treatments consisted of a 2 × 2 × 2 factorial arrangement with 2 levels of prebiotic (with or without prebiotic), 2 levels of dietary CP [NRC-recommended or low CP level (85% of NRC-recommended level)], and 2 levels of stocking density (10 birds/m(2) as the normal density or 16 birds/m(2) as the high density), for a total of 8 treatments. Each treatment had 5 replicates (cages). Birds were reared in 3-tiered battery cages with wire floors in an open-sided housing system under natural tropical conditions. Housing and general management practices were similar for all treatment groups. Starter and finisher diets in mash form were fed from 1 to 21 d and 22 to 42 d of age, respectively. Supplementation with a prebiotic had no significant effect on performance, immunity, and stress indicators (blood glucose, cholesterol, corticosterone, and heterophil:lymphocyte ratio). Protein level significantly influenced broiler performance but did not affect immunity or stress indicators (except for cholesterol level). The normal stocking density resulted in better FCR and also higher antibody titer against Newcastle disease compared with the high stocking density. However, density had no significant effect on blood levels of glucose, cholesterol, corticosterone, and the heterophil:lymphocyte ratio. Significant interactions between protein level and stocking density were observed for BW gain and final BW. The results indicated that, under the conditions of this experiment, dietary addition of a prebiotic had no significant effect on the performance, immunity, and stress indicators of broilers. PMID:22252353

  18. A Computer-Aided Diagnosis System for Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MR Images Based on Level Set Segmentation and ReliefF Feature Selection

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Dongmei; Li, Li

    2015-01-01

    This study established a fully automated computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) system for the classification of malignant and benign masses via breast magnetic resonance imaging (BMRI). A breast segmentation method consisting of a preprocessing step to identify the air-breast interfacing boundary and curve fitting for chest wall line (CWL) segmentation was included in the proposed CAD system. The Chan-Vese (CV) model level set (LS) segmentation method was adopted to segment breast mass and demonstrated sufficiently good segmentation performance. The support vector machine (SVM) classifier with ReliefF feature selection was used to merge the extracted morphological and texture features into a classification score. The accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity measurements for the leave-half-case-out resampling method were 92.3%, 98.2%, and 76.2%, respectively. For the leave-one-case-out resampling method, the measurements were 90.0%, 98.7%, and 73.8%, respectively. PMID:25628755

  19. Effect of host plant and immune challenge on the levels of chemosensory and odorant-binding proteins in caterpillar salivary glands.

    PubMed

    Celorio-Mancera, Maria de la Paz; Ytterberg, A Jimmy; Rutishauser, Dorothea; Janz, Niklas; Zubarev, Roman A

    2015-06-01

    More than half of the proteome from mandibular glands in caterpillars is represented by chemosensory proteins. Based on sequence similarity, these proteins are putative transporters of ligands to gustatory receptors in sensory organs of insects. We sought to determine whether these proteins are inducible by comparing, both qualitatively and quantitatively, the salivary (mandibular and labial) proteomes from caterpillars (Vanessa cardui) reared on different plants and artificial diet containing either bacteria or bacterial cell-walls. We included a treatment where the caterpillars were switched from feeding on artificial diet to plant material at some point in their development. Additionally, we evaluated the degree of overlap between the proteomes in the hemolymph-filled coelom and salivary glands of caterpillars reared on plant material. We found that the quality and quantity of the identified proteins differed clearly between hemolymph-filled coelome, labial and mandibular glands. Our results indicated that even after molting and two-day feeding on a new diet, protein production is affected by the previous food source used by the caterpillar. Candidate proteins involved in chemosensory perception by insects were detected: three chemosensory (CSPs) and two odorant-binding proteins (OBPs). Using the relative amounts of these proteins across tissues and treatments as criteria for their classification, we detected hemolymph- and mandibular gland-specific CSPs and observed that their levels were affected by caterpillar diet. Moreover, we could compare the protein and transcript levels across tissues and treatment for at least one CSP and one OBP. Therefore, we have identified specific isoforms for testing the role of CSPs and OBPs in plant and pathogen recognition. We detected catalase, immune-related protein and serine proteases and their inhibitors in high relative levels in the mandibular glands in comparison to the labial glands. These findings suggest that the

  20. Quantitative mass spectrometric analysis of dipeptides in protein hydrolysate by a TNBS derivatization-aided standard addition method.

    PubMed

    Hanh, Vu Thi; Kobayashi, Yutaro; Maebuchi, Motohiro; Nakamori, Toshihiro; Tanaka, Mitsuru; Matsui, Toshiro

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to establish, through a standard addition method, a convenient quantification assay for dipeptides (GY, YG, SY, YS, and IY) in soybean hydrolysate using 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonate (TNBS) derivatization-aided LC-TOF-MS. Soybean hydrolysate samples (25.0 mg mL(-1)) spiked with target standards were subjected to TNBS derivatization. Under the optimal LC-MS conditions, five target dipeptides derivatized with TNBS were successfully detected. Examination of the standard addition curves, with a correlation coefficient of r(2) > 0.979, provided a reliable quantification of the target dipeptides, GY, YG, SY, YS, and IY, in soybean hydrolysate to be 424 ± 20, 184 ± 9, 2188 ± 199, 327 ± 16, and 2211 ± 133 μg g(-1) of hydrolysate, respectively. The proposed LC-MS assay is a reliable and convenient assay method, with no interference from matrix effects in hydrolysate, and with no requirement for the use of an isotope labeled internal standard. PMID:26212980

  1. Relationship between C-reactive protein levels and obstructive sleep apnea syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tie, Y X; Fu, Y Y; Xu, Z; Peng, Y

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to determine the relationship between C-reactive protein levels and obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). We recruited 30 OSAS patients into the observation group (OSAS group), and subdivided them into mild, moderate and severe groups according to the apnea hypopnea index. In addition, 20 normal individuals were included in the control group. Plasma CRP levels of two groups were measured. As compared with the control group, the CRP levels in the OSAS group were significantly increased (P < 0.05). ANOVA showed that CRP levels in the three subgroups differ; statistically significant differences between the mild and severe OSA patients were observed (P < 0.05). It was hypothesized that OSAS patients show elevated serum CRP levels, and that serum CRP levels are associated with OSAS severity. PMID:27323094

  2. Financial Aid.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graves, Mary A.

    This workbook assists college and vocational school bound American Indian students in determining their financial needs and in locating sources of financial aid. A checklist helps students assess the state of their knowledge of financial programs; a glossary defines terms pertinent to the realm of financial aid (i.e., graduate study programs,…

  3. Influence of thyroid dysfunction on serum levels of angiopoietin-like protein 6.

    PubMed

    Lim, Jung Ah; Kim, Hyo Jeong; Ahn, Hwa Young; Park, Kyoung Un; Yi, Ka Hee; Park, Do Joon; Jang, Hak Chul; Park, Young Joo

    2015-10-01

    Angiopoietin-like protein 6 (ANGPTL6) is a novel metabolic regulator that modulates energy expenditure as well as glucose and lipid metabolism. Thyroid hormone can induce metabolic changes that are similar to those induced by ANGPTL6. Herein, we investigated whether circulating ANGPTL6 levels change according to thyroid hormone status in humans. We measured the serum levels of ANGPTL6 and metabolic parameters in 150 drug-naïve subjects with overt hyperthyroid, subclinical hyperthyroid, euthyroid, subclinical hypothyroid, or overt hypothyroid status (n=30 in each group). Serum ANGPTL6 levels were significantly higher in patients with overt hypothyroidism than in the other subjects. Women had significantly higher serum levels of ANGPTL6 than men. ANGPTL6 levels correlated positively with thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), total cholesterol, aspartate aminotransferase, and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and negatively with serum free thyroxine (T4) level. Multiple stepwise linear regression analysis revealed that sex, TSH, free T4, and ALT were independent predictors of serum ANGPTL6 levels. In summary, serum ANGPTL6 levels increased in patients with a hypothyroid status, and both TSH and free T4 levels are associated with ANGPLT6 levels, suggesting a possible association between thyroid function and ANGPTL6 levels. Whether the upregulated ANGPTL6 level in the hypothyroid status is primarily owing to a direct association or a compensatory mechanism remains to be determined. PMID:26189599

  4. A novel import route for an N-anchor mitochondrial outer membrane protein aided by the TIM23 complex.

    PubMed

    Song, Jiyao; Tamura, Yasushi; Yoshihisa, Tohru; Endo, Toshiya

    2014-06-01

    The membrane topology of Om45 in the yeast mitochondrial outer membrane (OM) is under debate. Here, we confirm that Om45 is anchored to the OM from the intermembrane space (IMS) by its N-terminal hydrophobic segment. We show that import of Om45 requires the presequence receptors, Tom20 and Tom22, and the import channel of Tom40. Unlike any of the known OM proteins, Om45 import requires the TIM23 complex in the inner membrane, a translocator for presequence-containing proteins, and the membrane potential (ΔΨ). Therefore, Om45 is anchored to the OM via the IMS by a novel import pathway involving the TIM23 complex. PMID:24781694

  5. Protein Domain-Level Landscape of Cancer-Type-Specific Somatic Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Fan; Petsalaki, Evangelia; Rolland, Thomas; Hill, David E.; Vidal, Marc; Roth, Frederick P.

    2015-01-01

    Identifying driver mutations and their functional consequences is critical to our understanding of cancer. Towards this goal, and because domains are the functional units of a protein, we explored the protein domain-level landscape of cancer-type-specific somatic mutations. Specifically, we systematically examined tumor genomes from 21 cancer types to identify domains with high mutational density in specific tissues, the positions of mutational hotspots within these domains, and the functional and structural context where possible. While hotspots corresponding to specific gain-of-function mutations are expected for oncoproteins, we found that tumor suppressor proteins also exhibit strong biases toward being mutated in particular domains. Within domains, however, we observed the expected patterns of mutation, with recurrently mutated positions for oncogenes and evenly distributed mutations for tumor suppressors. For example, we identified both known and new endometrial cancer hotspots in the tyrosine kinase domain of the FGFR2 protein, one of which is also a hotspot in breast cancer, and found new two hotspots in the Immunoglobulin I-set domain in colon cancer. Thus, to prioritize cancer mutations for further functional studies aimed at more precise cancer treatments, we have systematically correlated mutations and cancer types at the protein domain level. PMID:25794154

  6. Elevated levels of an exocrine pancreatic secretory protein in Alzheimer disease brain.

    PubMed Central

    Ozturk, M; de la Monte, S M; Gross, J; Wands, J R

    1989-01-01

    We identified by a monoclonal antibody-based immunoradiometric assay high concentrations of an exocrine pancreatic protein called pancreatic thread protein (PTP) in several areas of Alzheimer disease (AD) brain. The saline-extractable soluble immunoreactivity shares at least three epitopes in common with the native pancreatic form of the protein; the Mr varies from approximately 17,000 to 20,000. Quantitative measurements of PTP immunoreactivity in various regions of several AD brains revealed levels varying from 12 to 295 ng/g of tissue (mean, 116 ng/g) compared with 1-11 ng/g of tissue (mean, 5 ng/g) found in comparable areas of control brains. Immunocytochemistry performed with the anti-PTP monoclonal antibodies demonstrate PTP immunoreactivity within large pyramidal neurons--many of which contain neurofibrillary tangles in both AD and Down syndrome. Less accumulation was observed in astrocytes, and some PTP immunoreactivity was found extracellularly. The highest number of labeled cells in AD and Down syndrome was seen in the hippocampal formation. Fewer positive-staining cells were noted in normal and disease control brains. We conclude, therefore, that an exocrine pancreatic protein is present in the central nervous system of normal individuals at low levels; in AD brain concentrations of this protein are much higher. Images PMID:2463628

  7. Understanding epigenetic regulation: Tracking protein levels across multiple generations of cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowat, A. C.; Weitz, D. A.

    2009-11-01

    Cells and organisms are remarkably robust: they alter the variety and levels of expressed genes and proteins in response to environmental stimuli, including temperature, chemicals, and the stiffness of their surroundings. Ultimately changes in gene and protein expression can result in a distinct phenotypic state, which in some cases is maintained over multiple generations; the ability to pass on a particular phenotypic state to progeny cells is critical for differentiation. Moreover, epigenetic regulation of phenotype is also thought to provide an evolutionary advantage for a population of cells adapting to a fluctuating environment on faster timescales than the occurrence of genetic mutations. However, simple methods to study patterns of gene and protein expression on multi-generational timescales are sparse. Here we describe a technique to study lineages of single cells over multiple generations using a microfluidic device; this reveals patterns of expression where protein levels are correlated across multiple generations. Such quantitative information of protein expression in the context of pedigree remains hidden when studying the population as an ensemble.

  8. Protein stability: a single recorded mutation aids in predicting the effects of other mutations in the same amino acid site

    PubMed Central

    Wainreb, Gilad; Wolf, Lior; Ashkenazy, Haim; Dehouck, Yves; Ben-Tal, Nir

    2011-01-01

    Motivation: Accurate prediction of protein stability is important for understanding the molecular underpinnings of diseases and for the design of new proteins. We introduce a novel approach for the prediction of changes in protein stability that arise from a single-site amino acid substitution; the approach uses available data on mutations occurring in the same position and in other positions. Our algorithm, named Pro-Maya (Protein Mutant stAbilitY Analyzer), combines a collaborative filtering baseline model, Random Forests regression and a diverse set of features. Pro-Maya predicts the stability free energy difference of mutant versus wild type, denoted as ΔΔG. Results: We evaluated our algorithm extensively using cross-validation on two previously utilized datasets of single amino acid mutations and a (third) validation set. The results indicate that using known ΔΔG values of mutations at the query position improves the accuracy of ΔΔG predictions for other mutations in that position. The accuracy of our predictions in such cases significantly surpasses that of similar methods, achieving, e.g. a Pearson's correlation coefficient of 0.79 and a root mean square error of 0.96 on the validation set. Because Pro-Maya uses a diverse set of features, including predictions using two other methods, it also performs slightly better than other methods in the absence of additional experimental data on the query positions. Availability: Pro-Maya is freely available via web server at http://bental.tau.ac.il/ProMaya. Contact: nirb@tauex.tau.ac.il; wolf@cs.tau.ac.il Supplementary Information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:21998155

  9. SPX proteins regulate Pi homeostasis and signaling in different subcellular level

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Zhipeng; Wang, Zhiye; Lv, Qundan; Shi, Jing; Zhong, Yongjia; Wu, Ping; Mao, Chuanzao

    2015-01-01

    To cope with low phosphate (Pi) availability, plants have to adjust its gene expression profile to facilitate Pi acquisition and remobilization. Sensing the levels of Pi is essential for reprogramming the gene expression profile to adapt to the fluctuating Pi environment. AtPHR1 in Arabidopsis and OsPHR2 in rice are central regulators of Pi signaling, which regulates the expression of phosphate starvation-induced (PSI) genes by binding to the P1BS elements in the promoter of PSI genes. However, how the Pi level affects the central regulator to regulate the PSI genes have puzzled us for a decade. Recent progress in SPX proteins indicated that the SPX proteins play important role in regulating the activity of central regulator AtPHR1/OsPHR2 in a Pi dependent manner at different subcellular levels. PMID:26224365

  10. Computer-Aided TRIZ Ideality and Level of Invention Estimation Using Natural Language Processing and Machine Learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Christopher; Tate, Derrick

    Patent textual descriptions provide a wealth of information that can be used to understand the underlying design approaches that result in the generation of novel and innovative technology. This article will discuss a new approach for estimating Degree of Ideality and Level of Invention metrics from the theory of inventive problem solving (TRIZ) using patent textual information. Patent text includes information that can be used to model both the functions performed by a design and the associated costs and problems that affect a design’s value. The motivation of this research is to use patent data with calculation of TRIZ metrics to help designers understand which combinations of system components and functions result in creative and innovative design solutions. This article will discuss in detail methods to estimate these TRIZ metrics using natural language processing and machine learning with the use of neural networks.

  11. Estimation of Levels of Salivary Mucin, Amylase and Total Protein in Gingivitis and Chronic Periodontitis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Bhandary, Rahul; Thomas, Biju; Kumari, Suchetha

    2014-01-01

    Background: Periodontal diseases are a group of inflammatory conditions resulting from interaction between a pathogenic bacterial biofilm and susceptible host’s inflammatory response eventually leading to the destruction of periodontal structures and subsequent tooth loss. Hence, investigation of salivary proteins in individuals with periodontal diseases may be useful to enhance the knowledge of their roles in these diseases. Materials and Methods: This case-control study was conducted at A.B. Shetty Memorial Institute of Dental Sciences, Mangalore. The study comprised of 90 patients of age between 25-60 years who were clinically examined and divided into three groups of 30 each: namely clinically healthy, gingivitis and chronic periodontitis. These were classified according to the values of gingival index score, clinical attachment loss and probing pocket depth. Unstimulated saliva was collected and salivary mucin, amylase and total protein levels were determined. Statistical analysis: Results obtained were tabulated and statistically analyzed using ANOVA test and Karl pearson’s correlation test. Results: The results of the study showed an increased concentration of salivary mucin, amylase and total protein in gingivitis patients and increased levels of amylase and total protein in saliva of chronic periodontitis patients compared to healthy individuals which were statistically significant. A decrease in mucin concentration was observed in the periodontitis group compared to gingivitis group. A positive correlation was present between salivary mucin, amylase and total protein levels in the three groups. Conclusion: Salivary mucin, amylase and total protein may serve as an important biochemical parameter of inflammation of the periodontium. Also, it can be hypothesized that various enzyme inhibitors might be useful as a part of host modulation therapy in the treatment of periodontal diseases. PMID:25478449

  12. Alternatively Spliced Homologous Exons Have Ancient Origins and Are Highly Expressed at the Protein Level.

    PubMed

    Abascal, Federico; Ezkurdia, Iakes; Rodriguez-Rivas, Juan; Rodriguez, Jose Manuel; del Pozo, Angela; Vázquez, Jesús; Valencia, Alfonso; Tress, Michael L

    2015-06-01

    Alternative splicing of messenger RNA can generate a wide variety of mature RNA transcripts, and these transcripts may produce protein isoforms with diverse cellular functions. While there is much supporting evidence for the expression of alternative transcripts, the same is not true for the alternatively spliced protein products. Large-scale mass spectroscopy experiments have identified evidence of alternative splicing at the protein level, but with conflicting results. Here we carried out a rigorous analysis of the peptide evidence from eight large-scale proteomics experiments to assess the scale of alternative splicing that is detectable by high-resolution mass spectroscopy. We find fewer splice events than would be expected: we identified peptides for almost 64% of human protein coding genes, but detected just 282 splice events. This data suggests that most genes have a single dominant isoform at the protein level. Many of the alternative isoforms that we could identify were only subtly different from the main splice isoform. Very few of the splice events identified at the protein level disrupted functional domains, in stark contrast to the two thirds of splice events annotated in the human genome that would lead to the loss or damage of functional domains. The most striking result was that more than 20% of the splice isoforms we identified were generated by substituting one homologous exon for another. This is significantly more than would be expected from the frequency of these events in the genome. These homologous exon substitution events were remarkably conserved--all the homologous exons we identified evolved over 460 million years ago--and eight of the fourteen tissue-specific splice isoforms we identified were generated from homologous exons. The combination of proteomics evidence, ancient origin and tissue-specific splicing indicates that isoforms generated from homologous exons may have important cellular roles. PMID:26061177

  13. Alternatively Spliced Homologous Exons Have Ancient Origins and Are Highly Expressed at the Protein Level

    PubMed Central

    Abascal, Federico; Ezkurdia, Iakes; Rodriguez-Rivas, Juan; Rodriguez, Jose Manuel; del Pozo, Angela; Vázquez, Jesús; Valencia, Alfonso; Tress, Michael L.

    2015-01-01

    Alternative splicing of messenger RNA can generate a wide variety of mature RNA transcripts, and these transcripts may produce protein isoforms with diverse cellular functions. While there is much supporting evidence for the expression of alternative transcripts, the same is not true for the alternatively spliced protein products. Large-scale mass spectroscopy experiments have identified evidence of alternative splicing at the protein level, but with conflicting results. Here we carried out a rigorous analysis of the peptide evidence from eight large-scale proteomics experiments to assess the scale of alternative splicing that is detectable by high-resolution mass spectroscopy. We find fewer splice events than would be expected: we identified peptides for almost 64% of human protein coding genes, but detected just 282 splice events. This data suggests that most genes have a single dominant isoform at the protein level. Many of the alternative isoforms that we could identify were only subtly different from the main splice isoform. Very few of the splice events identified at the protein level disrupted functional domains, in stark contrast to the two thirds of splice events annotated in the human genome that would lead to the loss or damage of functional domains. The most striking result was that more than 20% of the splice isoforms we identified were generated by substituting one homologous exon for another. This is significantly more than would be expected from the frequency of these events in the genome. These homologous exon substitution events were remarkably conserved—all the homologous exons we identified evolved over 460 million years ago—and eight of the fourteen tissue-specific splice isoforms we identified were generated from homologous exons. The combination of proteomics evidence, ancient origin and tissue-specific splicing indicates that isoforms generated from homologous exons may have important cellular roles. PMID:26061177

  14. Effects crude protein levels on female Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) reproductive performance parameters.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Marinez Moraes; Ribeiro, Tainá; Orlando, Tamira Maria; de Oliveira, Dênio Garcia Silva; Drumond, Mariana Martins; de Freitas, Rilke Tadeu Fonseca; Rosa, Priscila Vieira

    2014-11-10

    The goal of the present work was to study the reproductive performance of Nile Tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) female broodstock fed diets containing different levels of crude protein (CP). Two hundred and forty Nile tilapia (O. niloticus) were used at an average age of 30 months, with 180 females and 60 males. The broodstock were lodged separately in masonry tanks with continuous water flow. The females were stocked in thirty tanks with dimensions of 8 m(3) in a completely randomized design consisting of five treatments and six replications. The treatments consisted of five diets with different levels of CP (32, 34, 36, 38 and 40%) and with digestible energy per gram of protein of 9.5 kg of feed. The crude protein (CP) levels positively influenced (p<0.05) reproductive parameters (female relative and absolute fecundity, egg diameter, fasting larvae survival capacity), the somatic indexes (gonadosomatic (GSI), hepatosomatic (HIS), viscerosomatic (VSI)), total plasma protein, albumin and triglycerides. There were no significant differences (p>0.05) observed with regard to spawning weight and female weight. The reproductive parameters studied in the present research indicate that diets formulated with 38% CP with digestible energy per gram of CP of 9.5 were the best diets for tilapia females during the reproductive period. PMID:25201770

  15. Expression level tuning for optimal heterologous protein secretion in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Parekh, R N; Wittrup, K D

    1997-01-01

    The relationship between expression level and secretion of bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI) was determined in Saccharomyces cerevisiae using a tunable amplifiable delta integration vector. Optimal secretory productivity of 15 mg of BPTI/g cell dry weight yields 180 mg/L secreted active BPTI in test-tube cultures, an order of magnitude increase over 2 mu plasmid-directed secretion. Maximum productivity is determined by the protein folding capacity of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Unfolded protein accumulates in the ER as synthesis increases, until a physiological instability is reached and secretion decreases precipitously despite high BPTI mRNA levels. Optimal specific productivity of a standard laboratory strain of S. cerevisiae is double that reported for secretion of BPTI by Pichia pastoris, indicating that efficient utilization of S. cerevisiae's available secretory capacity can eliminate apparent differences among yeast species in their capacity for heterologous protein secretion. Although not generally recognized, the existence of an optimum synthesis level for secretion is apparently a general feature of eucaryotic expression systems and could be of substantial significance for maximization of protein secretion in mammalian and insect cell culture. PMID:9104035

  16. Stable Plastid Transformation for High-Level Recombinant Protein Expression: Promises and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Meili; Li, Yongfei; Xue, Xiaochang; Wang, Xianfeng; Long, Jiangang

    2012-01-01

    Plants are a promising expression system for the production of recombinant proteins. However, low protein productivity remains a major obstacle that limits extensive commercialization of whole plant and plant cell bioproduction platform. Plastid genetic engineering offers several advantages, including high levels of transgenic expression, transgenic containment via maternal inheritance, and multigene expression in a single transformation event. In recent years, the development of optimized expression strategies has given a huge boost to the exploitation of plastids in molecular farming. The driving forces behind the high expression level of plastid bioreactors include codon optimization, promoters and UTRs, genotypic modifications, endogenous enhancer and regulatory elements, posttranslational modification, and proteolysis. Exciting progress of the high expression level has been made with the plastid-based production of two particularly important classes of pharmaceuticals: vaccine antigens, therapeutic proteins, and antibiotics and enzymes. Approaches to overcome and solve the associated challenges of this culture system that include low transformation frequencies, the formation of inclusion bodies, and purification of recombinant proteins will also be discussed. PMID:23093835

  17. Codon optimization for high level expression of human bone morphogenetic protein-2 in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Retnoningrum, Debbie S; Pramesti, H T; Santika, P Y; Valerius, O; Asjarie, S; Suciati, T

    2012-08-01

    Codons in the open reading frame (ORF) encoding for human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (hBMP-2) were optimized to reach high level expression in Escherichia coli. The optimization was done by the computer programs DNA works and DNA Star according to Thermodynamically Balanced Inside Out (TBIO) approach. The ORF consisting of 342 base pairs (bp) was assembled using two-steps Polymerase Chain Reaction, cloned into a pGEM-T vector with a mutation rate of 6.38 bp per kb and transformed into E. coli JM109. After a DNA sequence confirmation, mutation-free ORF was subcloned into pET32b and transformed into E. coli BL21(DE3). The rhBMP-2 was produced as a thioredoxin-his-tag fusion protein at relatively high level, approximately 60% of total intracellular proteins as inclusion bodies (IB), with a yield of 1.39 g per liter culture. Solubilization of IB gave soluble monomer rhBMP-2 with a recovery of 13.6% and refolding of soluble rhBMP-2 produced dimeric forms with a yield of 8.7%. The size and identity of the purified rhBMP-2 was confirmed by nano-LC-MS/MS2 analysis. Our work demonstrates for the first time that by using TBIO approach, a codon-optimized ORF encoding for rhBMP-2 protein can be expressed at high level in E. coli expression system. PMID:22691543

  18. High level protein expression in mammalian cells using a safe viral vector: modified vaccinia virus Ankara.

    PubMed

    Hebben, Matthias; Brants, Jan; Birck, Catherine; Samama, Jean-Pierre; Wasylyk, Bohdan; Spehner, Danièle; Pradeau, Karine; Domi, Arban; Moss, Bernard; Schultz, Patrick; Drillien, Robert

    2007-12-01

    Vaccinia virus vectors are attractive tools to direct high level protein synthesis in mammalian cells. In one of the most efficient strategies developed so far, the gene to be expressed is positioned downstream of a bacteriophage T7 promoter within the vaccinia genome and transcribed by the T7 RNA polymerase, also encoded by the vaccinia virus genome. Tight regulation of transcription and efficient translation are ensured by control elements of the Escherichia coli lactose operon and the encephalomyocarditis virus leader sequence, respectively. We have integrated such a stringently controlled expression system, previously used successfully in a standard vaccinia virus backbone, into the modified vaccinia virus Ankara strain (MVA). In this manner, proteins of interest can be produced in mammalian cells under standard laboratory conditions because of the inherent safety of the MVA strain. Using this system for expression of beta-galactosidase, about 15 mg protein could be produced from 10(8) BHK21 cells over a 24-h period, a value 4-fold higher than the amount produced from an identical expression system based on a standard vaccinia virus strain. In another application, we employed the MVA vector to produce human tubulin tyrosine ligase and demonstrate that this protein becomes a major cellular protein upon induction conditions and displays its characteristic enzymatic activity. The MVA vector should prove useful for many other applications in which mammalian cells are required for protein production. PMID:17892951

  19. Tumor redox metabolism correlation with the expression level of red fluorescent protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sha, Shuang; Wang, Anle; Lin, Qiaoya; Zhang, Zhihong

    2015-03-01

    The redox metabolism is variable and complicated with the progress of tumor development. Whether the tumor redox state will affect the exogenous gene expression or not, are still not clear now . To investigate the relationship between tumor endogenous redox state and the exogenous gene expression level, a far red fluorescent protein fRFP was used to monitor tumor cells proliferation and as an exogenous protein expression in tumors. NADH (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide) and Fp (flavin protein) are two important coenzymes in the mitochondria respiratory chain, which can be as a standard representation for redox metabolism state. Three tumor subcutaneous models (melanoma, human pancreatic carcinoma and nasopharyngeal carcinoma) were used to observe their redox state and protein expression by our home-made redox scanner. The results showed that the distribution of fRFP fluorescent protein expression in the inner tumor regions are heterogeneous, and the fluorescent intensity of fRFP and the fluorescent intensity of NADH have high correlation. In addition, we also found the linear coefficient in three tumors are different, the value of coefficient is (R2 = 0.966 and R2 = 0.943) in melanoma, (R2 = 0.701 and R2 = 0.942) in human pancreatic carcinoma, and (R2 = 0.994) in nasopharyngeal carcinoma, respectively. From these results, we consider that the exogenous protein expression of fRFP in tumor had some relationship with the tumor redox state of NADH.

  20. Low plasma protein nitrotyrosine levels distinguish primary Raynaud's phenomenon from scleroderma

    PubMed Central

    Kingdon, E J; Mani, A R; Frost, M T; Denton, C P; Powis, S H; Black, C M; Moore, K P

    2006-01-01

    Objective To investigate the hypothesis that increased formation of reactive nitrogen species may contribute to the vascular pathology that develops in patients with connective tissue disease such as scleroderma. Patients and methods The level of protein‐bound nitrotyrosine in plasma was measured by stable isotope dilution gas chromatography/negative ion chemical ionisation mass spectrometry in 11 patients with primary Raynaud's phenomenon, 37 with scleroderma, 13 with chronic renal impairment, and in 23 healthy controls. Results Plasma protein‐bound nitrotyrosine was markedly decreased in patients with primary Raynaud's phenomenon (mean (SEM) 0.60 (0.06) ng/mg dry protein) compared with patients with scleroderma (1.78 (0.21) ng/mg protein), chronic renal impairment (1.42 (0.17) ng/mg protein) or healthy controls (1.63±0.15 ng/mg protein, ANOVA p<0.001). Conclusion These data suggest that there is decreased nitration of plasma proteins, or increased degradation of nitrated proteins from the circulation of patients with primary but not secondary Raynaud's phenomenon. PMID:16308344

  1. High Level Expression and Purification of Recombinant Proteins from Escherichia coli with AK-TAG

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Dan; Wen, Caixia; Zhao, Rongchuan; Liu, Xinyu; Liu, Xinxin; Cui, Jingjing; Liang, Joshua G.; Liang, Peng

    2016-01-01

    Adenylate kinase (AK) from Escherichia coli was used as both solubility and affinity tag for recombinant protein production. When fused to the N-terminus of a target protein, an AK fusion protein could be expressed in soluble form and purified to near homogeneity in a single step from Blue-Sepherose via affinity elution with micromolar concentration of P1, P5- di (adenosine—5’) pentaphosphate (Ap5A), a transition-state substrate analog of AK. Unlike any other affinity tags, the level of a recombinant protein expression in soluble form and its yield of recovery during each purification step could be readily assessed by AK enzyme activity in near real time. Coupled to a His-Tag installed at the N-terminus and a thrombin cleavage site at the C terminus of AK, the streamlined method, here we dubbed AK-TAG, could also allow convenient expression and retrieval of a cleaved recombinant protein in high yield and purity via dual affinity purification steps. Thus AK-TAG is a new addition to the arsenal of existing affinity tags for recombinant protein expression and purification, and is particularly useful where soluble expression and high degree of purification are at stake. PMID:27214237

  2. Targeted quantification of low ng/mL level proteins in human serum without immunoaffinity depletion

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Tujin; Sun, Xuefei; Gao, Yuqian; Fillmore, Thomas L.; Schepmoes, Athena A.; Zhao, Rui; He, Jintang; Moore, Ronald J.; Kagan, Jacob; Rodland, Karin D.; Liu, Tao; Liu, Alvin Y.; Smith, Richard D.; Tang, Keqi; Camp, David G.; Qian, Weijun

    2013-07-05

    We recently reported an antibody-free targeted protein quantification strategy, termed high-pressure, high-resolution separations with intelligent selection and multiplexing (PRISM) for achieving significantly enhanced sensitivity using selected reaction monitoring (SRM) mass spectrometry. Integrating PRISM with front-end IgY14 immunoaffinity depletion, sensitive detection of targeted proteins at 50-100 pg/mL levels in human blood plasma/serum was demonstrated. However, immunoaffinity depletion is often associated with undesired losses of target proteins of interest. Herein we report further evaluation of PRISM-SRM quantification of low-abundance serum proteins without immunoaffinity depletion and the multiplexing potential of this technique. Limits of quantification (LOQs) at low ng/mL levels with a median CV of ~12% were achieved for proteins spiked into human female serum using as little as 2 µL serum. PRISM-SRM provided up to ~1000-fold improvement in the LOQ when compared to conventional SRM measurements. Multiplexing capability of PRISM-SRM was also evaluated by two sets of serum samples with 6 and 21 target peptides spiked at the low attomole/µL levels. The results from SRM measurements for pooled or post-concatenated samples were comparable to those obtained from individual peptide fractions in terms of signal-to-noise ratios and SRM peak area ratios of light to heavy peptides. PRISM-SRM was applied to measure several ng/mL-level endogenous plasma proteins, including prostate-specific antigen, in clinical patient sera where correlation coefficients > 0.99 were observed between the results from PRISM-SRM and ELISA assays. Our results demonstrate that PRISM-SRM can be successfully used for quantification of low-abundance endogenous proteins in highly complex samples. Moderate throughput (50 samples/week) can be achieved by applying the post-concatenation or fraction multiplexing strategies. We anticipate broad applications for targeted PRISM

  3. Modulation of Protein Levels in Chromosomal Dosage Series of Maize: The Biochemical Basis of Aneuploid Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Birchler, James A.; Newton, Kathleen J.

    1981-01-01

    Genetically defined dosage series of chromosome arms 1L, 3L, 4S, 5L, 7L, 9S, 10L and combinations of 1L–3L, collectively spanning approximately one-third of the maize genome, were examined for alterations in the expression of total protein profiles in scutellar tissue. The major effects found were negative correlations of specific proteins with the dosage of particular regions in a manner similar to that previously described for enzyme activity levels (Birchler 1979). Chromosome arms 1L, 4S and 5L produced the most severe negative effects, with 3L and 7L exhibiting this phenomenon to a lesser degree. Positive correlations of certain proteins were observed with the dosage of the 1L, 3L, 5L and 7L regions. The structural locus of one of the major scutellar proteins (PRO) is present in the long arm of chromosome 1 (Schwartz 1979), but exhibits compensation in a dosage series involving whole-arm comparisons. Multiple factors in 1L affect the level of the protein. The compound TB-1La-3L4759-3 (1L 0.20–0.39) has a slight negative effect on PRO, while TB-1La-3Le (1L 0.20–0.58) and TB-1La-3L5267 (1L 0.20–0.72) have a more pronounced negative influence. The level of this protein is not altered by the dosage of 3L. These observations suggest that compensation is brought about by the cancellation of a positive structural gene dosage effect by the negative inverse effect. Other regions of the genome that contribute to the control of PRO levels are 4S and 5L. Total protein profiles were also compared in haploid, diploid and tetraploid maize as a comparison to the aneuploid series. Most proteins exhibit structural-gene-dosage effects through the ploidy series, but others show a positive effect greater than expected from varying the structural genes. Still others are negatively affected by ploidy changes. In general, the ploidy alterations are not as great as predicted from the cumulative action of the aneuploid effects. The bearing of these observations on the

  4. A Study on Factors That Drive Variation in the Levels of Social Capital Among People Living With HIV/AIDS in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Rimaz, Shahnaz; Nikooseresht, Zahra; Vesali, Samera; Nedjat, Saharnaz; Asadi-Lari, Mohsen

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Social capital is increasingly used in relation to health issues, particularly in sexually transmitted diseases/infections and health behaviors. Experiences indicated that social capital can contribute in changing HIV related risk behaviors and a decline of HIV infection through social groups and networking and make more effective use of HIV/AIDS prevention, care, and treatment services. We aimed to assess social capital in these persons through a quantitative study. Method: This cross-sectional study was performed with a convenience sample of 300 people living HIV/AIDS referred to a counseling center of behavioral diseases, in Imam Khomeini Hospital, in Tehran, the capital of Iran, during September 2011 to May 2012. Data collection tools were a demographic questionnaire and World Bank Social Capital Questionnaire (SC-IQ). The analysis of data was performed by the SPSS statistic software version 18. To identify factors influencing social capital in participations, Pearson correlation coefficient, ANOVA, t-test, and a multiple regression were applied. The significant level was considered 0.05 in this study. Results: 165 (55%) were male and the rest female. The mean age of participants was 34.3±7.5. The mean score of total social capital was 2.34±0.5 in all participants. The domain of individual trust had the highest mean score (2.53±0.66). The lowest mean score was related to the domain of social trust and associative relations (2.23±0.62). Variables such as ethnicity, age, and middle economic status had a significant impact on the domain of individual trust so that the mean score of this component of social capital was lower among women (0.396) than men. Factors affecting total social capital were ethnicity and middle economic status. Conclusion: Finding emphasized on the role of economic status, ethnicity and gender in persons living with HIV/AIDS. Thus recommended that policy makers and program managers consider social groups and networks

  5. Elevation of serum heat-shock protein levels in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Daigo; Nakamura, Akinori; Hineno, Akiyo; Kobayashi, Chinatsu; Kinoshita, Tomomi; Yoshida, Kunihiro; Ikeda, Shu-Ichi

    2016-08-01

    Heat-shock proteins (HSPs) have been implicated in the pathogenesis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). In this study, we aimed to examine whether the serum levels of HSPs (HSP27, HSP70, and HSP90) are altered in patients with ALS. We included 58 patients diagnosed with ALS and 85 control individuals. Serum HSP levels of patients and controls were determined using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The serum levels of HSP70 and HSP90 were significantly higher in patients than in controls. In contrast, serum levels of HSP27 did not differ significantly between the patient and control groups. Moreover, serum levels of HSP70 and HSP90 in patients remained high throughout the duration of the disease. Taken together, our findings suggest that HSPs might have a role in ALS progression throughout the course of the disease. Further studies are needed to clarify the role of HSPs in the pathogenesis of ALS. PMID:27112486

  6. Improvement of a Clinical Score for Necrotizing Fasciitis: ‘Pain Out of Proportion’ and High CRP Levels Aid the Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Siegel, Ekkehard; Hanke, Eric; von Stebut, Esther

    2015-01-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis (NF) is a rare mono-/polymicrobial skin infection that spreads to underlying tissues. NF is quickly progressing and leads to life threatening situations. Immediate surgical debridement together with i.v. antibiotic administration is required to avoid fatal outcome. Early diagnosis is often delayed due to underestimation or confusion with cellulitis. We now compared the initial clinical and laboratory presentation of NF and cellulitis in detail to assess if a typical pattern can be identified that aids timely diagnosis of NF and avoidance of fatal outcome. 138 different clinical and laboratory features of 29 NF patients were compared to those of 59 age- and gender matched patients with severe erysipelas requiring a subsequent hospitalization time of ≥10 days. Differences in clinical presentation were not obvious; however, NF patients suffered significantly more often from strong pain. NF patients exhibited dramatically elevated CRP levels (5-fold, p>0.001). The overall laboratory risk indicator for necrotizing fasciitis (LRINEC) score was significantly higher in NF patients as compared to cellulitis. However, a modification of the score (alteration of laboratory parameters, addition of clinical parameters) led to a clear improvement of the score with a higher positive predictive value without losing specificity. In summary, clinical differentiation of NF from cellulitis appears to be hard. ‘Pain out of proportion’ may be an early sign for NF. An improvement of the LRINEC score emphasizing only relevant laboratory and clinical findings as suggested may aid the early diagnosis of NF in the future leading to improvement of disease outcome by enabling rapid adequate therapy. PMID:26196941

  7. Protein levels in beef cattle finishing diets: industry application, university research, and systems results.

    PubMed

    Galyean, M L

    1996-11-01

    Consulting nutritionists were surveyed to determine current formulation and management practices for finishing beef cattle. Among the six consultants surveyed, percentage of CP in finishing diets ranged from 12.5 to 14.4%, with urea levels ranging from .5 to 1.5% of DM. Finishing diets were based primarily on highly processed, rapidly fermented grains (steam-flaked and high-moisture grain), with roughage levels ranging from 3 to 11% of DM. All six consultants considered feed bunk management to be a critical factor affecting feed intake and performance; five of the six consultants used aggressive implant programs based on estrogen + trenbolone acetate. Recent university research was reviewed with respect to CP level and source in finishing diets. Finishing cattle managed on aggressive implant programs seem to respond to higher levels of CP better than would be expected from the factorial calculation approach. Moreover, improvements in performance noted in recent research seemed to be more consistent when supplemental CP was derived from ruminally degraded vs undegraded sources. Calculation of protein requirements with a metabolizable protein (MP) system yielded estimates of protein needs by finishing cattle that agreed more closely with current industry practices than did calculation based on the factorial method. The difference between the MP system and the factorial method was primarily a result of accounting for microbial N needs in the MP system. Reasons for production responses to CP levels that are greater than those calculated by the factorial method include increased accretion of protein by rapidly growing, implanted cattle, particularly during the initial phase of the finishing period, alleviation of a microbial N deficiency, and ruminal and systemic effects of ruminally degraded N on acid-base balance of beef cattle fed rapidly fermented, high-grain diets. Reasons for production responses to supplemental CP need further research. PMID:8923202

  8. Study of Serum Levels of Leptin, C-Reactive Protein and Nutritional Status in Hemodialysis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Montazerifar, Farzaneh; Karajibani, Mansour; Hassanpour, Zahra; Pourmofatteh, Mahla

    2015-01-01

    Background: Leptin is secreted by adipose tissue and decreases appetite. However, the role of leptin in the pathogenesis of hemodialysis (HD)-related malnutrition has not been fully evaluated. Objectives: The aim of study was to investigate the association between the serum leptin levels, serum C-reactive protein (CRP) levels, and nutritional status in hemodialysis patients. Patients and Methods: This analytical descriptive study included 45 hemodialysis patients and 40 healthy subjects. Biochemical parameters and serum leptin levels were measured. The nutritional status was evaluated using a food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) and the calculation of the body mass index (BMI). Results: Serum leptin (P < 0.05) and albumin (P < 0.0001) levels and BMI (P < 0.001) of HD patients were significantly lower, while CRP levels were significantly higher than those of controls (P < 0.0001). HD patients consumed the lower daily servings of the food groups compared to the control subjects (P < 0.0001). A significant positive correlation between serum levels of leptin and albumin and BMI was demonstrated. No significant correlations were identified between leptin level, CRP level, and other variables. Conclusions: The findings suggest that low levels of leptin may be a contributory factor for malnutrition in HD patients. Further studies are required to ascertain the significance of leptin levels in relation to nutritional factors in hemodialysis patients. PMID:26430525

  9. Improving the Anti-Toxin Abilities of the CMG2-Fc Fusion Protein with the Aid of Computational Design

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Hui; Chen, Hongxing; Chen, Huipeng; Hu, Xianwen; Yue, Junjie

    2014-01-01

    CMG2-Fc is a fusion protein composed of the extracellular domain of capillary morphogenesis protein 2 (CMG2) and the Fc region of human immunoglobulin G; CMG2-Fc neutralizes anthrax toxin and offers protection against Bacillus anthracis challenge. To enhance the efficacy of CMG2-Fc against anthrax toxin, we attempted to engineer a CMG2-Fc with an improved affinity for PA. Using the automatic design algorithm FoldX and visual inspection, we devised two CMG2-Fc variants that introduce mutations in the CMG2 binding interface and improve the computationally assessed binding affinity for PA. An experimental affinity assay revealed that the two variants showed increased binding affinity, and in vitro and in vivo toxin neutralization testing indicated that one of these mutants (CMG2-Fc(E117Q)) has superior activity against anthrax toxin and was suitable for further development as a therapeutic agent for anthrax infections. This study shows that the computational design of the PA binding interface of CMG2 to obtain CMG2-Fc variants with improving anti-toxin abilities is viable. Our results demonstrate that computational design can be further applied to generate other CMG2-Fc mutants with greatly improved therapeutic efficacy. PMID:25101992

  10. Phage receptor binding protein-based magnetic enrichment method as an aid for real time PCR detection of foodborne bacteria.

    PubMed

    Poshtiban, Somayyeh; Javed, Muhammad Afzal; Arutyunov, Denis; Singh, Amit; Banting, Graham; Szymanski, Christine M; Evoy, Stephane

    2013-10-01

    We present a novel phage receptor binding protein-based magnetic separation and pre-enrichment method as an alternative to the immunomagnetic separation methods by replacing antibodies with bacteriophage receptor binding proteins (RBPs). We couple the proposed RBP-based magnetic separation with real time PCR for rapid, sensitive and specific detection of Campylobacter jejuni cells in artificially contaminated skim milk, milk with 2% fat and chicken broth. Recovery rates, assessed by real time PCR, were greater than 80% for the samples spiked with as low as 100 cfu mL(-1) of C. jejuni cells. The specificity of capture was confirmed using Salmonella Typhimurium as a negative control where no bacteria were captured on the RBP-derivatized magnetic beads. The combination of RBP-based magnetic separation and real time PCR improved PCR sensitivity and allowed the detection of C. jejuni cells in milk and chicken broth samples without a time consuming pre-enrichment step through culturing. The total sample preparation and analysis time in the proposed RBP-based enrichment method coupled with real time PCR was less than 3 h. PMID:23897488

  11. Ultrasensitive detection of proteins and sugars at single-cell level

    PubMed Central

    Watabe, Satoshi; Morikawa, Mika; Kaneda, Mugiho; Nakaishi, Kazunari; Nakatsuma, Akira; Ninomiya, Masaki; Yoshimura, Teruki; Miura, Toshiaki; Ito, Etsuro

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Each cell produces its own responses even if it appears identical to other cells. To analyze these individual cell characteristics, we need to measure trace amounts of molecules in a single cell. Nucleic acids in a single cell can be easily amplified by polymerase chain reaction, but single-cell measurement of proteins and sugars will require de novo techniques. In the present study, we outline the techniques we have developed toward this end. For proteins, our ultrasensitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) coupled with thionicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide cycling can detect proteins at subattomoles per assay. For sugars, fluorescence correlation spectroscopy coupled with glucose oxidase-catalyzed reaction allows us to measure glucose at tens of nM. Our methods thus offer versatile techniques for single-cell-level analyses, and they are hoped to strongly promote single-cell biology as well as to develop noninvasive tests in clinical medicine. PMID:27064305

  12. Amyloid beta protein levels in cerebrospinal fluid are elevated in early-onset Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, T; Shoji, M; Harigaya, Y; Watanabe, M; Hosoda, K; Cheung, T T; Shaffer, L M; Golde, T E; Younkin, L H; Younkin, S G

    1994-12-01

    The 4-kd amyloid beta protein (A beta) deposited as amyloid in Alzheimer's disease (AD) is produced and released by normal proteolytic processing of the amyloid beta protein precursor (beta APP) and is readily detected in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Here, we present the levels of A beta in CSF from a total of 95 subjects, including 38 patients with AD, 14 with early-onset AD and 24 with late-onset AD, 25 normal control subjects, and 32 patients with other neurological diseases. The level of A beta decreased with normal aging, and there was a significant elevation in the level of A beta in the CSF of early-onset AD patients (4.14 +/- 1.37 pmol/ml, p < 0.01). Neither Mini-Mental State nor Functional Assessment Staging were correlated with the amount of A beta in the CSF. The A beta/secreted form of beta APP ratio was elevated, but the level of alpha 1-antichymotrypsin in the CSF did not correlate with the level of CSF A beta in early-onset AD patients. Thus, the level of A beta in the CSF is elevated in early-onset AD patients and is suggested to be correlated with the pathology in the brain that characterizes AD. PMID:7998778

  13. Correlating Flavivirus virulence and levels of intrinsic disorder in shell proteins: protective roles vs. immune evasion.

    PubMed

    Goh, Gerard Kian-Meng; Dunker, A Keith; Uversky, Vladimir N

    2016-05-24

    Computational analyses revealed correlations between the intrinsic disorder propensity of shell proteins and case fatality rates (CFRs) among Flaviviruses and within at least two Flavivirus species, such as tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV) and dengue virus (DENV). The shell proteins analyzed in this study are capsid (C) and membrane (PrM, Pr, and M) proteins. The highest correlations can be found when regression analyses were conducted using Pr (Flavivirus: r(2) = 0.78, p < 0.01) or M (Flavivirus: r(2) = 0.91, p < 0.01) as an independent variable with C and CFR as co-explanatory and dependent variables, respectively. Interestingly, while predicted intrinsic disorder levels (PIDs) of both C and M are positively correlated with the virulence, the PIDs of Pr and CFR are negatively correlated. This is likely due to the fact that the Pr portion of PrM plays various roles in protecting the virion from damage, whereas M and C are assisted by greater potential in binding promiscuity as a result of greater disorder. The C protein of yellow fever virus (YFV), which is the most virulent virus in the sample, has the highest PID levels, whereas the second most virulent TBEV FE subtype has the second highest PID score due to its C protein, and the least virulent West Nile virus (WNV) has the least disordered C protein. This knowledge can be used while working on the development and identification of attenuated strains for vaccine. Curiously, unlike Flaviviruses, a disordered outer shell was described for hepatitis C virus (HCV), human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), and human simplex virus 2 (HSV-2), which currently have no effective vaccine. PMID:27102744

  14. Hearing Aids and Music

    PubMed Central

    Chasin, Marshall; Russo, Frank A.

    2004-01-01

    Historically, the primary concern for hearing aid design and fitting is optimization for speech inputs. However, increasingly other types of inputs are being investigated and this is certainly the case for music. Whether the hearing aid wearer is a musician or merely someone who likes to listen to music, the electronic and electro-acoustic parameters described can be optimized for music as well as for speech. That is, a hearing aid optimally set for music can be optimally set for speech, even though the converse is not necessarily true. Similarities and differences between speech and music as inputs to a hearing aid are described. Many of these lead to the specification of a set of optimal electro-acoustic characteristics. Parameters such as the peak input-limiting level, compression issues—both compression ratio and knee-points—and number of channels all can deleteriously affect music perception through hearing aids. In other cases, it is not clear how to set other parameters such as noise reduction and feedback control mechanisms. Regardless of the existence of a “music program,” unless the various electro-acoustic parameters are available in a hearing aid, music fidelity will almost always be less than optimal. There are many unanswered questions and hypotheses in this area. Future research by engineers, researchers, clinicians, and musicians will aid in the clarification of these questions and their ultimate solutions. PMID:15497032

  15. Ultraviolet-ozone treatment reduces levels of disease-associated prion protein and prion infectivity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, C.J.; Gilbert, P.; McKenzie, D.; Pedersen, J.A.; Aiken, Judd M.

    2009-01-01

    Background. Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) are a group of fatal neurodegenerative diseases caused by novel infectious agents referred to as prions. Prions appear to be composed primarily, if not exclusively, of a misfolded isoform of the cellular prion protein. TSE infectivity is remarkably stable and can resist many aggressive decontamination procedures, increasing human, livestock and wildlife exposure to TSEs. Findings. We tested the hypothesis that UV-ozone treatment reduces levels of the pathogenic prion protein and inactivates the infectious agent. We found that UV-ozone treatment decreased the carbon and prion protein content in infected brain homogenate to levels undetectable by dry-ashing carbon analysis or immunoblotting, respectively. After 8 weeks of ashing, UV-ozone treatment reduced the infectious titer of treated material by a factor of at least 105. A small amount of infectivity, however, persisted despite UV-ozone treatment. When bound to either montmorillonite clay or quartz surfaces, PrPTSE was still susceptible to degradation by UV-ozone. Conclusion. Our findings strongly suggest that UV-ozone treatment can degrade pathogenic prion protein and inactivate prions, even when the agent is associated with surfaces. Using larger UV-ozone doses or combining UV-ozone treatment with other decontaminant methods may allow the sterilization of TSE-contaminated materials. ?? 2009 Aiken et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  16. Change in the protein level of mevalonate pyrophosphate decarboxylase in tissues of mouse by pravastatin.

    PubMed

    Michihara, Akihiro; Akasaki, Kenji; Yamori, Yukio; Tsuji, Hiroshi

    2003-08-01

    We previously reported that treatment of rats with a diet containing 0.1% pravastatin and 5% cholestyramine markedly increased mevalonate pyrophosphate decarboxylase (MPD) activity in liver crude extracts compared with nontreated rats. In this study, we examined the change in the protein level of MPD in the tissues of mice administered pravastatin. When MPD content in the tissues of nontreated mice was analyzed by quantitative immunoblotting, a single protein band with an apparent molecular weight of 46 kDa was detected in all tissues and the specific protein content of MPD in liver and kidney was markedly higher than that in other tissues. When MPD content in the tissues of pravastatin-treated mice was analyzed by immunoblotting, MPD was markedly increased (9-fold) only in the liver compared with nontreated mice. Next, when MPD activity was measured in the liver between nontreated and pravastatin-treated mice, MPD activity as well as protein levels were markedly increased (11-fold) in the liver of pravastatin-treated mice compared with nontreated mice. These data suggest that a marked induction of MPD in the liver by pravastatin is responsible for the tissue-specific effect of pravastatin. PMID:12913254

  17. Visualizing and quantifying protein polySUMOylation at the single-molecule level.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yong; Zhang, Chun-yang

    2014-01-21

    Protein polySUMOylation, the attachment of small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) chains to the target protein, is associated with a variety of physiological processes. However, the analysis of protein polySUMOylation is often complicated by the heterogeneity of SUMO-target conjugates. Here, we develop a new strategy to visualize and quantify polySUMOylation at the single-molecule level by integrating the tetracysteine (TC) tag labeling technology and total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF)-based single-molecule imaging. As a proof-of-concept, we employ the human SUMO-2 as the model. The addition of TC tag to SUMO-2 can specifically translate the SUMO-mediated modification into visible fluorescence signal without disturbing the function of SUMO-2. The SUMO monomers display homogeneous fluorescence spots at the single-molecule level, whereas the mixed SUMO chains exhibit nonuniform fluorescence spots with a wide range of intensities. Analysis of the number and the brightness of fluorescence spots enable quantitative measurement of the polySUMOylation degree inside the cells under different physiological conditions. Due to the frequent occurrence of posttranslational modification by polymeric chains in cells, this single-molecule strategy has the potential to be broadly applied for studying protein posttranslational modification in normal cellular physiology and disease etiology. PMID:24383460

  18. Quantitation of tyrosine hydroxylase, protein levels: Spot immunolabeling with an affinity-purified antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Haycock, J.W. )

    1989-09-01

    Tyrosine hydroxylase was purified from bovine adrenal chromaffin cells and rat pheochromocytoma using a rapid (less than 2 days) procedure performed at room temperature. Rabbits were immunized with purified enzyme that was denatured with sodium dodecylsulfate, and antibodies to tyrosine hydroxylase were affinity-purified from immune sera. A Western blot procedure using the affinity-purified antibodies and {sup 125}I-protein A demonstrated a selective labeling of a single Mr approximately 62,000 band in samples from a number of different tissues. The relative lack of background {sup 125}I-protein A binding permitted the development of a quantitative spot immunolabeling procedure for tyrosine hydroxylase protein. The sensitivity of the assay is 1-2 ng of enzyme. Essentially identical standard curves were obtained with tyrosine hydroxylase purified from rat pheochromocytoma, rat corpus striatum, and bovine adrenal medulla. An extract of PC 12 cells (clonal rat pheochromocytoma cells) was calibrated against purified rat pheochromocytoma tyrosine hydroxylase and used as an external standard against which levels of tyrosine hydroxylase in PC12 cells and other tissue were quantified. With this procedure, qualitative assessment of tyrosine hydroxylase protein levels can be obtained in a few hours and quantitative assessment can be obtained in less than a day.

  19. The Genomic Landscape of Position Effects on Protein Expression Level and Noise in Yeast.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaoshu; Zhang, Jianzhi

    2016-05-25

    Position effect, the influence of the chromosomal location of a gene on its activity, is a fundamental property of the genome. By placing a GFP gene cassette at 482 different locations across all chromosomes in budding yeast, we quantified the position effects on protein expression level and noise at the genomic scale. The position effects are significant, altering the mean protein expression level by up to 15 times and expression noise by up to 20 times. DNA replication timing, 3D chromosomal conformation, and several histone modifications are major covariates of position effects. Essential genes are enriched in genomic regions with inherently low expression noise, supporting the hypothesis that chromosomal clustering of essential genes results from selection against their expressional stochasticity. Position effects exhibit significant interactions with promoters. Together, our results suggest that position effects have shaped the evolution of chromosome organization and should inform future genome engineering efforts. PMID:27185547

  20. Finding the "community" in community-level HIV/AIDS interventions: formative research with young African American men who have sex with men.

    PubMed

    Kraft, J M; Beeker, C; Stokes, J P; Peterson, J L

    2000-08-01

    Data from 76 qualitative interviews with 18- to 29-year-old African American men who have sex with men (MSM) in Chicago and Atlanta were examined to identify perceptions of "community" and components of a community-level HIV/AIDS intervention. Many men reported feeling marginal to African American and gay White communities because of perceived homophobia and racism. Those who reported feeling part of gay African American communities characterized communities in terms of settings, social structures, and functions, including social support, socialization, and mobility. Despite these positive functions, divisions among groups of MSM, lack of settings for nonsexual interaction with other MSM, lack of leadership, and negative attitudes toward homosexuality may make it difficult for men to participate in activities to alter community contexts that influence behavior. Rather, changing norms, increasing social support, and community building should be part of initial community-level interventions. Community building might identify leaders, create new settings, and create opportunities for dialogue between MSM and African American community groups to address negative perceptions of homosexuality. PMID:10929751

  1. Association of androgen with gender difference in serum adipocyte fatty acid binding protein levels

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xiang; Ma, Xiaojing; Pan, Xiaoping; Luo, Yuqi; Xu, Yiting; Xiong, Qin; Bao, Yuqian; Jia, Weiping

    2016-01-01

    Clinical investigations have indicated women have higher levels of adipocyte fatty acid binding protein (A-FABP) than men. The present study aimed to identify factors related to gender difference in serum A-FABP levels. A total of 507 participants (194 men, 132 premenopausal women, and 181 postmenopausal women) were enrolled in the present study. Serum A-FABP levels increased in the order from men to premenopausal women to postmenopausal women in both body mass index categories (<25.0 and ≥25.0 kg/m2; all P < 0.05). Multiple stepwise regression analyses showed that after adjustment for factors related to serum A-FABP levels, the trunk fat mass was an independent and positive factor of serum A-FABP levels. For men, total testosterone was associated independently and inversely with serum A-FABP levels. For pre- and postmenopausal women, bioavailable testosterone and total testosterone were independent and positive factors associated with serum A-FABP levels, respectively. The present study demonstrated that the androgen was correlated with the serum A-FABP levels negatively in men, but positively in women. With these effects on the fat content, especially trunk fat, androgen might contribute to the gender difference in serum A-FABP levels. PMID:27270834

  2. Association of androgen with gender difference in serum adipocyte fatty acid binding protein levels.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiang; Ma, Xiaojing; Pan, Xiaoping; Luo, Yuqi; Xu, Yiting; Xiong, Qin; Bao, Yuqian; Jia, Weiping

    2016-01-01

    Clinical investigations have indicated women have higher levels of adipocyte fatty acid binding protein (A-FABP) than men. The present study aimed to identify factors related to gender difference in serum A-FABP levels. A total of 507 participants (194 men, 132 premenopausal women, and 181 postmenopausal women) were enrolled in the present study. Serum A-FABP levels increased in the order from men to premenopausal women to postmenopausal women in both body mass index categories (<25.0 and ≥25.0 kg/m(2); all P < 0.05). Multiple stepwise regression analyses showed that after adjustment for factors related to serum A-FABP levels, the trunk fat mass was an independent and positive factor of serum A-FABP levels. For men, total testosterone was associated independently and inversely with serum A-FABP levels. For pre- and postmenopausal women, bioavailable testosterone and total testosterone were independent and positive factors associated with serum A-FABP levels, respectively. The present study demonstrated that the androgen was correlated with the serum A-FABP levels negatively in men, but positively in women. With these effects on the fat content, especially trunk fat, androgen might contribute to the gender difference in serum A-FABP levels. PMID:27270834

  3. ESCRT-II controls retinal axon growth by regulating DCC receptor levels and local protein synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Konopacki, Filip A.; Dwivedy, Asha; Bellon, Anaïs; Blower, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    Endocytosis and local protein synthesis (LPS) act coordinately to mediate the chemotropic responses of axons, but the link between these two processes is poorly understood. The endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT) is a key regulator of cargo sorting in the endocytic pathway, and here we have investigated the role of ESCRT-II, a critical ESCRT component, in Xenopus retinal ganglion cell (RGC) axons. We show that ESCRT-II is present in RGC axonal growth cones (GCs) where it co-localizes with endocytic vesicle GTPases and, unexpectedly, with the Netrin-1 receptor, deleted in colorectal cancer (DCC). ESCRT-II knockdown (KD) decreases endocytosis and, strikingly, reduces DCC in GCs and leads to axon growth and guidance defects. ESCRT-II-depleted axons fail to turn in response to a Netrin-1 gradient in vitro and many axons fail to exit the eye in vivo. These defects, similar to Netrin-1/DCC loss-of-function phenotypes, can be rescued in whole (in vitro) or in part (in vivo) by expressing DCC. In addition, ESCRT-II KD impairs LPS in GCs and live imaging reveals that ESCRT-II transports mRNAs in axons. Collectively, our results show that the ESCRT-II-mediated endocytic pathway regulates both DCC and LPS in the axonal compartment and suggest that ESCRT-II aids gradient sensing in GCs by coupling endocytosis to LPS. PMID:27248654

  4. Hearing Aid

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Food and Drug Administration Staff FDA permits marketing of new laser-based hearing aid with potential ... feeds Follow FDA on Twitter Follow FDA on Facebook View FDA videos on YouTube View FDA photos ...

  5. Teaching Aids

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnard, W. Robert, Ed.

    1976-01-01

    Provides evaluations of several aids for teaching chemistry. Included are The Use of Chemical Abstracts, Practical Technical Writing, Infrared Spectroscopy Programs, and a film titled "You Can't Go Back." (RH)

  6. The human phenolsulphotransferase polymorphism is determined by the level of expression of the enzyme protein.

    PubMed Central

    Jones, A L; Roberts, R C; Coughtrie, M W

    1993-01-01

    We have examined the expression of platelet phenolsulphotransferase (PST) in 60 individuals. Using an antibody which recognizes both forms of PST present in man (P-PST and M-PST), we determined that the polymorphism of platelet P-PST activity is determined by the level of expression of the enzyme protein. The implications for susceptibility to adverse drug reactions and chemical carcinogenesis are discussed. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8257413

  7. Ileal apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter protein levels are down-regulated through ubiquitin-dependent protein degradation induced by bile acids.

    PubMed

    Miyata, Masaaki; Yamakawa, Hiroki; Hayashi, Kenjiro; Kuribayashi, Hideaki; Yamazoe, Yasushi; Yoshinari, Kouichi

    2013-08-15

    The ileal apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter (ASBT or SLC10A2) has a crucial role in intestinal bile acid absorption. We previously reported that enterobacteria-mediated bile acid conversion was involved in the alteration of ileal ASBT expression levels. In the present study, to investigate the hypothesis that ileal ASBT protein levels are post-translationally regulated by enterobacteria-associated bile acids, alteration of ileal ASBT protein levels was analysed in mice 12 h and 24 h after anti-bacterial drug ampicillin (ABPC) treatment (100 mg/kg, single shot) that altered bile acid composition in the intestinal lumen. In ABPC-treated mice, enterobacteria-biotransformed bile acid, taurodeoxycholic acid (TDCA) and cholic acid (CA) levels were decreased, whereas taurocholic acid (TCA) and tauro-β-muricholic acid levels were increased in the intestinal lumen. Ileal ASBT protein levels in brush-border membrane vesicles (BBMVs), but not ileal Asbt mRNA levels, were significantly increased in the ABPC-treated mice, and the extent of ubiquitination of the ileal ASBT protein was reduced in the ABPC-treated mice. Treatment of ABPC-pretreated mice with CA or TDCA, but not TCA, significantly decreased ileal ASBT protein levels and increased the extent of ubiquitination of ileal ASBT protein. Treatment of mice with the lysosome inhibitor, chloroquine, or the proteasome inhibitor, MG132, increased ileal ASBT protein levels in BBMVs. CA-mediated reduction of ASBT protein levels in the ABPC-pretreated mice was attenuated by co-treatment with chloroquine or MG132. These results suggest that ileal ASBT protein is degraded by a ubiquitin-dependent pathway in response to enterobacteria-associated bile acids. PMID:23872411

  8. Melamine Impairs Female Fertility via Suppressing Protein Level of Juno in Mouse Eggs

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Xiaoxin; Zhang, Mianqun; Lu, Yajuan; Miao, Yilong; Zhou, Changyin; Sun, Shaochen; Xiong, Bo

    2015-01-01

    Melamine is an organic nitrogenous compound widely used as an industrial chemical, and it has been recently reported by us that melamine has a toxic effect on the female reproductive system in mice, and renders females subfertile; the molecular basis, however, has not been adequately assessed. In the present study, we explore the underlying mechanism regarding how melamine compromises fertility in the mouse. The data showed that melamine exposure significantly impaired the fertilization capability of the egg during in vitro fertilization. To further figure out the cause, we analyzed ovastacin localization and protein level, the sperm binding ability of zona pellucida, and ZP2 cleavage status in unfertilized eggs from melamine fed mice, and no obvious differences were found between control and treatment groups. However, the protein level of Juno on the egg plasma membrane in the high-dose feeding group indeed significantly decreased compared to the control group. Thus, these data suggest that melamine compromises female fertility via suppressing Juno protein level on the egg membrane. PMID:26633308

  9. Melamine Impairs Female Fertility via Suppressing Protein Level of Juno in Mouse Eggs.

    PubMed

    Dai, Xiaoxin; Zhang, Mianqun; Lu, Yajuan; Miao, Yilong; Zhou, Changyin; Sun, Shaochen; Xiong, Bo

    2015-01-01

    Melamine is an organic nitrogenous compound widely used as an industrial chemical, and it has been recently reported by us that melamine has a toxic effect on the female reproductive system in mice, and renders females subfertile; the molecular basis, however, has not been adequately assessed. In the present study, we explore the underlying mechanism regarding how melamine compromises fertility in the mouse. The data showed that melamine exposure significantly impaired the fertilization capability of the egg during in vitro fertilization. To further figure out the cause, we analyzed ovastacin localization and protein level, the sperm binding ability of zona pellucida, and ZP2 cleavage status in unfertilized eggs from melamine fed mice, and no obvious differences were found between control and treatment groups. However, the protein level of Juno on the egg plasma membrane in the high-dose feeding group indeed significantly decreased compared to the control group. Thus, these data suggest that melamine compromises female fertility via suppressing Juno protein level on the egg membrane. PMID:26633308

  10. A Compendium of Caenorhabditis elegans RNA Binding Proteins Predicts Extensive Regulation at Multiple Levels

    PubMed Central

    Tamburino, Alex M.; Ryder, Sean P.; Walhout, Albertha J. M.

    2013-01-01

    Gene expression is regulated at multiple levels, including transcription and translation, as well as mRNA and protein stability. Although systems-level functions of transcription factors and microRNAs are rapidly being characterized, few studies have focused on the posttranscriptional gene regulation by RNA binding proteins (RBPs). RBPs are important to many aspects of gene regulation. Thus, it is essential to know which genes encode RBPs, which RBPs regulate which gene(s), and how RBP genes are themselves regulated. Here we provide a comprehensive compendium of RBPs from the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans (wRBP1.0). We predict that as many as 887 (4.4%) of C. elegans genes may encode RBPs ~250 of which likely function in a gene-specific manner. In addition, we find that RBPs, and most notably gene-specific RBPs, are themselves enriched for binding and modification by regulatory proteins, indicating the potential for extensive regulation of RBPs at many different levels. wRBP1.0 will provide a significant contribution toward the comprehensive delineation of posttranscriptional regulatory networks and will provide a resource for further studies regulation by RBPs. PMID:23390605

  11. Dietary whey protein hydrolysates increase skeletal muscle glycogen levels via activation of glycogen synthase in mice.

    PubMed

    Kanda, Atsushi; Morifuji, Masashi; Fukasawa, Tomoyuki; Koga, Jinichiro; Kanegae, Minoru; Kawanaka, Kentaro; Higuchi, Mitsuru

    2012-11-14

    Previously, we have shown that consuming carbohydrate plus whey protein hydrolysates (WPHs) replenished muscle glycogen after exercise more effectively than consuming intact whey protein or branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs). The mechanism leading to superior glycogen replenishment after consuming WPH is unclear. In this 5 week intervention, ddY mice were fed experimental diets containing WPH, a mixture of whey amino acids (WAAs), or casein (control). After the intervention, gastrocnemius muscle glycogen levels were significantly higher in the WPH group (4.35 mg/g) than in the WAA (3.15 mg/g) or control (2.51 mg/g) groups. In addition, total glycogen synthase (GS) protein levels were significantly higher in the WPH group (153%) than in the WAA (89.2%) or control groups, and phosphorylated GS levels were significantly decreased in the WPH group (51.4%). These results indicate that dietary WPH may increase the muscle glycogen content through increased GS activity. PMID:23113736

  12. Inclusion of Yucca schidigera extract in diets with different protein levels for dogs.

    PubMed

    Dos Reis, Jéssica S; Zangerônimo, Márcio G; Ogoshi, Rosana C S; França, Janine; Costa, Adriano C; Almeida, Thomás N; Dos Santos, João P F; Pires, Carolina P; Chizzotti, Ana F; Leite, Carlos A L; Saad, Flávia M O B

    2016-08-01

    This study evaluated the effects of inclusion of Yucca schidigera extract (YSE) in two diets with different levels of crude protein (CP) for dogs on facal odour, nutrient digestibility, ammonia concentration in feces and hematological and serum biochemical profiles. Twenty adults Beagles were used, distributed in a randomized block design in a 2 × 4 factorial design (two diets, 25% and 34% CP, and four YSE levels: 0, 250, 500 and 750 mg/kg) with five replicates, obtained during two experimental periods. The fecal odour reduced (P < 0.05) when 500 mg/kg of YSE was used in diets with higher CP. The inclusion of YSE reduced (P < 0.05) fecal ammonia, and the inclusion of 250 and 500 mg/kg YSE reduced intestinal gas. The inclusion of 750 mg/kg YSE increased the mean corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH), alanine aminotransferase (ALT) activity and tended to increase the serum cholesterol concentration, regardless of the protein level of the diets. There was no effect on the digestibility of nutrients, fecal consistency, nitrogen balance and thickness of the intestinal wall. The inclusion of 500 mg/kg YSE is effective in reducing fecal odour in dogs receiving diets with 34% of CP. Regardless of the protein content, YSE reduces fecal ammonia, but may cause adverse effects if included at higher doses. PMID:26800023

  13. Oxidative stress and hippocampal synaptic protein levels in elderly cognitively intact individuals with Alzheimer's disease pathology.

    PubMed

    Scheff, Stephen W; Ansari, Mubeen A; Mufson, Elliott J

    2016-06-01

    Neuritic amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles are hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and are major components used for the clinical diagnosis of this disorder. However, many individuals with no cognitive impairment (NCI) also present at autopsy with high levels of these AD pathologic hallmarks. In this study, we evaluated 15 autopsy cases from NCI individuals with high levels of AD-like pathology (high pathology no cognitive impairment) and compared them to age- and postmortem-matched cohorts of individuals with amnestic mild cognitive impairment and NCI cases with low AD-like pathology (low pathology no cognitive impairment [LPNCI]). Individuals classified as high pathology no cognitive impairment or amnestic mild cognitive impairment had a significant loss of both presynaptic and postsynaptic proteins in the hippocampus compared with those in the LPNCI cohort. In addition, these 2 groups had a significant increase in 3 different markers of oxidative stress compared with that in the LPNCI group. The changes in levels of synaptic proteins are strongly associated with levels of oxidative stress. These data suggest that cognitively older subjects without dementia but with increased levels of AD-like pathology may represent a very early preclinical stage of AD. PMID:27143416

  14. Studies of composition and major protein level in milk and colostrum of mares.

    PubMed

    Pecka, Ewa; Dobrzański, Zbigniew; Zachwieja, Andrzej; Szulc, Tadeusz; Czyż, Katarzyna

    2012-02-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the changes in composition and physicochemical features (pH, density, thermostability and acidity) of mare colostrum and milk, and of protein fraction contribution (serum albumin, β-casein, γ-casein, α-lactalbumin, G class immunoglobulins) depending on lactation stage. The research material was colostrum and milk samples from 12 Arabian mares. Colostrum samples were collected within 2 h after parturition and milk samples were collected twice, in the 3rd and 6th weeks of lactation. The level of basic milk components decreased significantly (only lactose content increased) as compared to colostrum. Total bacteria count and somatic cell count decreased significantly with an increase in resistance and urea level. The changes observed were connected to differentiated contribution of particular protein fractions and their relative proportions. Lower levels of γ-casein (P ≤ 0.05), β-casein, serum albumin as well as α-lactalbumin were observed in colostrum as compared to those in milk. Any relationship between lactation stage and β-casein content was observed. Serum albumin and α-lactalbumin content increased in subsequent milkings. The level of G class immunoglobulins decreased significantly and its highest level was noted in colostrum. Any significant differences between the 3rd and 6th lactation weeks were obtained. PMID:22339698

  15. Birdsong decreases protein levels of FoxP2, a molecule required for human speech.

    PubMed

    Miller, Julie E; Spiteri, Elizabeth; Condro, Michael C; Dosumu-Johnson, Ryan T; Geschwind, Daniel H; White, Stephanie A

    2008-10-01

    Cognitive and motor deficits associated with language and speech are seen in humans harboring FOXP2 mutations. The neural bases for FOXP2 mutation-related deficits are thought to reside in structural abnormalities distributed across systems important for language and motor learning including the cerebral cortex, basal ganglia, and cerebellum. In these brain regions, our prior research showed that FoxP2 mRNA expression patterns are strikingly similar between developing humans and songbirds. Within the songbird brain, this pattern persists throughout life and includes the striatal subregion, Area X, that is dedicated to song development and maintenance. The persistent mRNA expression suggests a role for FoxP2 that extends beyond the formation of vocal learning circuits to their ongoing use. Because FoxP2 is a transcription factor, a role in shaping circuits likely depends on FoxP2 protein levels which might not always parallel mRNA levels. Indeed our current study shows that FoxP2 protein, like its mRNA, is acutely downregulated in mature Area X when adult males sing with some differences. Total corticosterone levels associated with the different behavioral contexts did not vary, indicating that differences in FoxP2 levels are not likely attributable to stress. Our data, together with recent reports on FoxP2's target genes, suggest that lowered FoxP2 levels may allow for expression of genes important for circuit modification and thus vocal variability. PMID:18701760

  16. Birdsong Decreases Protein Levels of FoxP2, a Molecule Required for Human Speech

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Julie E.; Spiteri, Elizabeth; Condro, Michael C.; Dosumu-Johnson, Ryan T.; Geschwind, Daniel H.; White, Stephanie A.

    2008-01-01

    Cognitive and motor deficits associated with language and speech are seen in humans harboring FOXP2 mutations. The neural bases for FOXP2 mutation-related deficits are thought to reside in structural abnormalities distributed across systems important for language and motor learning including the cerebral cortex, basal ganglia, and cerebellum. In these brain regions, our prior research showed that FoxP2 mRNA expression patterns are strikingly similar between developing humans and songbirds. Within the songbird brain, this pattern persists throughout life and includes the striatal subregion, Area X, that is dedicated to song development and maintenance. The persistent mRNA expression suggests a role for FoxP2 that extends beyond the formation of vocal learning circuits to their ongoing use. Because FoxP2 is a transcription factor, a role in shaping circuits likely depends on FoxP2 protein levels which might not always parallel mRNA levels. Indeed our current study shows that FoxP2 protein, like its mRNA, is acutely downregulated in mature Area X when adult males sing with some differences. Total corticosterone levels associated with the different behavioral contexts did not vary, indicating that differences in FoxP2 levels are not likely attributable to stress. Our data, together with recent reports on FoxP2's target genes, suggest that lowered FoxP2 levels may allow for expression of genes important for circuit modification and thus vocal variability. PMID:18701760

  17. Increased Levels of Antinutritional and/or Defense Proteins Reduced the Protein Quality of a Disease-Resistant Soybean Cultivar

    PubMed Central

    Sousa, Daniele O. B.; Carvalho, Ana F. U.; Oliveira, José Tadeu A.; Farias, Davi F.; Castelar, Ivan; Oliveira, Henrique P.; Vasconcelos, Ilka M.

    2015-01-01

    The biochemical and nutritional attributes of two soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) cultivars, one susceptible (Seridó) and the other resistant (Seridó-RCH) to stem canker, were examined to assess whether the resistance to pathogens was related to levels of antinutritional and/or defense proteins in the plant and subsequently affected the nutritional quality. Lectin, urease, trypsin inhibitor, peroxidase and chitinase activities were higher in the resistant cultivar. Growing rats were fed with isocaloric and isoproteic diets prepared with defatted raw soybean meals. Those on the Seridó-RCH diet showed the worst performance in terms of protein quality indicators. Based on regression analysis, lectin, trypsin inhibitor, peroxidase and chitinase appear to be involved in the resistance trait but also in the poorer nutritional quality of Seridó-RCH. Thus, the development of cultivars for disease resistance may lead to higher concentrations of antinutritional compounds, affecting the quality of soybean seeds. Further research that includes the assessment of more cultivars/genotypes is needed. PMID:26205163

  18. Increased Levels of Antinutritional and/or Defense Proteins Reduced the Protein Quality of a Disease-Resistant Soybean Cultivar.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Daniele O B; Carvalho, Ana F U; Oliveira, José Tadeu A; Farias, Davi F; Castelar, Ivan; Oliveira, Henrique P; Vasconcelos, Ilka M

    2015-07-01

    The biochemical and nutritional attributes of two soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) cultivars, one susceptible (Seridó) and the other resistant (Seridó-RCH) to stem canker, were examined to assess whether the resistance to pathogens was related to levels of antinutritional and/or defense proteins in the plant and subsequently affected the nutritional quality. Lectin, urease, trypsin inhibitor, peroxidase and chitinase activities were higher in the resistant cultivar. Growing rats were fed with isocaloric and isoproteic diets prepared with defatted raw soybean meals. Those on the Seridó-RCH diet showed the worst performance in terms of protein quality indicators. Based on regression analysis, lectin, trypsin inhibitor, peroxidase and chitinase appear to be involved in the resistance trait but also in the poorer nutritional quality of Seridó-RCH. Thus, the development of cultivars for disease resistance may lead to higher concentrations of antinutritional compounds, affecting the quality of soybean seeds. Further research that includes the assessment of more cultivars/genotypes is needed. PMID:26205163

  19. Level of dietary protein does not impact whole body protein turnover during an exercise induced energy deficit

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction: This study examined the effect of a high protein diet on whole body protein turnover during an exercise-induced energy deficit. A sustained energy deficit induced by energy intake restriction increases protein catabolism which can cause lean-body mass loss. A high-protein diet has be...

  20. Optimal dietary protein level improved growth, disease resistance, intestinal immune and physical barrier function of young grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella).

    PubMed

    Xu, Jing; Wu, Pei; Jiang, Wei-Dan; Liu, Yang; Jiang, Jun; Kuang, Sheng-Yao; Tang, Ling; Tang, Wu-Neng; Zhang, Yong-An; Zhou, Xiao-Qiu; Feng, Lin

    2016-08-01

    This study investigated the effects of dietary proteins on the growth, disease resistance, intestinal immune and physical barrier functions of young grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella). A total of 540 young grass carp (264.11 ± 0.76 g) were fed six diets containing graded levels of protein (143.1, 176.7, 217.2, 257.5, 292.2 and 322.8 g digestible protein kg(-1) diet) for 8 weeks. After the growth trial, fish were challenged with Aeromonas hydrophila and mortalities were recorded for 14 days. The results indicated that optimal dietary protein levels: increased the production of antibacterial components, up-regulated anti-inflammatory cytokines, inhibitor of κBα, target of rapamycin and ribosomal protein S6 kinases 1 mRNA levels, whereas down-regulated pro-inflammatory cytokines, nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) P65, NF-κB P52, c-Rel, IκB kinase β, IκB kinase γ and eIF4E-binding proteins 2 mRNA levels in three intestinal segments of young grass carp (P < 0.05), suggesting that optimal dietary protein level could enhance fish intestinal immune barrier function; up-regulated the mRNA levels of tight junction complexes, B-cell lymphoma protein-2, inhibitor of apoptosis proteins, myeloid cell leukemia-1 and NF-E2-related factor 2, and increased the activities and mRNA levels of antioxidant enzymes, whereas down-regulated myosin light chain kinase, cysteinyl aspartic acid-protease 2, 3, 7, 8, 9, fatty acid synthetase ligand, apoptotic protease activating factor-1, Bcl-2 associated X protein, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, c-Jun N-terminal protein kinase and Kelch-like-ECH-associated protein 1b mRNA levels, and decreased reactive oxygen species, malondialdehyde and protein carbonyl contents in three intestinal segments of young grass carp (P < 0.05), indicating that optimal dietary protein level could improve fish intestinal physical barrier function. Finally, the optimal dietary protein levels for the growth performance (PWG) and against enteritis

  1. Protein level identification of the Listeria monocytogenes Sigma H, Sigma L, and Sigma C regulons

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Transcriptional regulation by alternative sigma (σ) factors represents an important mechanism that allows bacteria to rapidly regulate transcript and protein levels in response to changing environmental conditions. While the role of the alternative σ factor σB has been comparatively well characterized in L. monocytogenes, our understanding of the roles of the three other L. monocytogenes alternative σ factors is still limited. In this study, we employed a quantitative proteomics approach using Isobaric Tags for Relative and Absolute Quantitation (iTRAQ) to characterize the L. monocytogenes σL, σH, and σC protein regulons. Proteomic comparisons used a quadruple alternative σ factor mutant strain (ΔBCHL) and strains expressing a single alternative σ factor (i.e., σL, σH, and σC; strains ΔBCH, ΔBCL, and ΔBHL) to eliminate potential redundancies between σ factors. Results Among the three alternative σ factors studied here, σH provides positive regulation for the largest number of proteins, consistent with previous transcriptomic studies, while σL appears to contribute to negative regulation of a number of proteins. σC was found to regulate a small number of proteins in L. monocytogenes grown to stationary phase at 37°C. Proteins identified as being regulated by multiple alternative σ factors include MptA, which is a component of a PTS system with a potential role in regulation of PrfA activity. Conclusions This study provides initial insights into global regulation of protein production by the L. monocytogenes alternative σ factors σL, σH, and σC. While, among these σ factors, σH appears to positively regulate the largest number of proteins, we also identified PTS systems that appear to be co-regulated by multiple alternative σ factors. Future studies should not only explore potential roles of alternative σ factors in activating a “cascade” of PTS systems that potentially regulate PrfA, but also may want to explore the

  2. Effect of pumpkin seed (Cucurbita pepo) protein isolate on the activity levels of certain plasma enzymes in CCl4-induced liver injury in low-protein fed rats.

    PubMed

    Nkosi, C Z; Opoku, A R; Terblanche, S E

    2005-04-01

    The effects of pumpkin seed (Cucurbita pepo) protein isolate on the activity levels of lactate dehydrogenase (LD), alanine transaminase (ALT), aspartate transaminase (AST) and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) against carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)-induced acute liver injury in low-protein fed rats were investigated. A group of male Sprague-Dawley rats maintained on a low-protein diet for 5 days were divided into three subgroups. Two subgroups were injected with carbon tetrachloride and the other group with an equivalent amount of olive oil. Two hours after CCl4 intoxication one of the two subgroups was administered with pumpkin seed protein isolate. All three subgroups of rats were maintained on the low-protein diet for the duration of the investigation. Groups of rats from the different subgroups were killed at 24, 48 and 72 h after their respective treatments. After 5 days on the low-protein diet the activity levels of all four enzymes were significantly higher than their counterparts on a normal balanced diet. CCl4 intoxication resulted in significant increases in the activity levels of all four enzymes investigated. The administration of pumpkin seed protein isolate after CCl4 intoxication resulted in significantly reduced activity levels of all four enzymes. It is concluded that pumpkin seed protein isolate administration was effective in alleviating the detrimental effects associated with protein malnutrition. PMID:16041732

  3. Wolbachia Endosymbionts Modify Drosophila Ovary Protein Levels in a Context-Dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Christensen, Steen; Pérez Dulzaides, Ricardo; Hedrick, Victoria E.; Momtaz, A. J. M. Zehadee; Nakayasu, Ernesto S.; Paul, Lake N.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Endosymbiosis is a unique form of interaction between organisms, with one organism dwelling inside the other. One of the most widespread endosymbionts is Wolbachia pipientis, a maternally transmitted bacterium carried by insects, crustaceans, mites, and filarial nematodes. Although candidate proteins that contribute to maternal transmission have been identified, the molecular basis for maternal Wolbachia transmission remains largely unknown. To investigate transmission-related processes in response to Wolbachia infection, ovarian proteomes were analyzed from Wolbachia-infected Drosophila melanogaster and D. simulans. Endogenous and variant host-strain combinations were investigated. Significant and differentially abundant ovarian proteins were detected, indicating substantial regulatory changes in response to Wolbachia. Variant Wolbachia strains were associated with a broader impact on the ovary proteome than endogenous Wolbachia strains. The D. melanogaster ovarian environment also exhibited a higher level of diversity of proteomic responses to Wolbachia than D. simulans. Overall, many Wolbachia-responsive ovarian proteins detected in this study were consistent with expectations from the experimental literature. This suggests that context-specific changes in protein abundance contribute to Wolbachia manipulation of transmission-related mechanisms in oogenesis. IMPORTANCE Millions of insect species naturally carry bacterial endosymbionts called Wolbachia. Wolbachia bacteria are transmitted by females to their offspring through a robust egg-loading mechanism. The molecular basis for Wolbachia transmission remains poorly understood at this time, however. This proteomic study identified specific fruit fly ovarian proteins as being upregulated or downregulated in response to Wolbachia infection. The majority of these protein responses correlated specifically with the type of host and Wolbachia strain involved. This work corroborates previously identified

  4. Rapid Dietary Protein Changes and Relationships among Enzyme Activities, Their RNA's and Plasma Hormone Levels in the Broiler Chicken

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ross 708 broiler chickens were fed one of three levels of crude protein (12, 21 or 30%) from 7 to 28 days of age. Birds were then switched to either higher (12 to 30%, 21 to 30%) or lower levels of crude protein (30-12%, 21-12%) and sampled three days following the switch. The purpose of these treat...

  5. [Relation between serum eosinophil cationic protein (ECP) level and asthma attack in children].

    PubMed

    Ishigaki, N; Masuhara, C; Sakamaki, K; Ishikawa, Y; Ohta, K; Koike, R; Mikuni, K; Haruna, H; Awa, S

    2000-11-01

    Serum eosinophil cationic protein (sECP) levels were measured in 339 patients with childhood asthma, and the clinical courses of these patients were followed for 57 weeks. While considering the history and characteristics of each patient, we examined the correlation between asthma attack frequency and sECP, blood eosinophil count, and serum total IgE (tIgE) to determine their usefulness in predicting asthma attacks. Among patients with no other allergic diseases, sECP levels in patients who had no asthma attacks two weeks before or after the measurement were significantly lower than those of patients who had attacks during the same four-week period. Among patients who had attacks, those patients with no attack for a year after the measurement were also found to have low sECP levels. Similarly, even among patients with asthma attacks and high sECP levels, there were cases where attacks were well controlled using nebulizer treatments with DSCG or BDP. The incident rate of attacks for patients with other allergic diseases and a low sECP was low. Yet, there was no common trend in patients with high sECP levels. Moreover, this study detected a significant correlation between sECP level and blood eosinophil count as well as between sECP level and serum tIgE. The most significant correlation with asthma attack frequency was sECP level. Thus, sECP level seems to reflect the allergy activity level, especially two weeks prior to and after the measurement. For patients without other allergic diseases, asthma attack prediction during the two weeks period after the measurement of sECP also seems possible. Therefore, periodic measurement of sECP level is useful in objectively monitoring the improvement of symptoms and establishing the treatment plan, including treatment with DSCG or BDP. PMID:11193461

  6. Serum levels of hypersensitive-C-reactive protein in moderate and severe acne

    PubMed Central

    Namazi, M. R.; Parhizkar, A. R.; Jowkar, F.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Elevation of C-reactive protein (CRP) has been reported to occur in psoriasis, urticaria, acne, rosacea and many other dermatological and nondermatological conditions. Chronic systemic inflammation has been implicated in the development of neuropsychiatric/degenerative disorders, atherosclerosis, coronary artery disease, diabetes mellitus and even carcinogenesis. The present study is designed to determine whether the level of inflammation created by acne vulgaris could be high enough to raise the serum levels of high-sensitive CRP. Materials and Methods: Forty-two patients with moderate and severe acne vulgaris were enrolled, along with 44 age and sex matched healthy blood donors as controls. Hypersensitive-CRP (Hs-CRP) was measured in both groups. Results: Hypersensitive-C-reactive protein levels in the case group varied between 0 and 28.1 μg/ml with an average of 2.24 ± 4.87 μg/ml (mean ± standard deviation) and a median of 0.6 μg/ml (interquartile range [IQR] =0.3, 1.4 μg/ml). Hs-CRP levels of the control group varied between 0 and 14 μg/ml with an average of 3.12 ± 3.67 μg/ml and a median of 1.5 μg/ml (IQR = 0.55, 5.0 μg/ml). No significant difference of Hs-CRP level between the two groups was seen (t = –0.961, 95% confidence interval: Lower = –2.6942, upper = 0.9377; P = 0.339). Additionally, no significant difference in the level of Hs-CRP was noted between the moderate and severe acne groups (95% confidence interval: Lower = –5.2495, upper = 1.6711; P = 0.165). Conclusion: Acne vulgaris, even in its severe grades (excluding acne fulminans and acne conglobata), does not induce significant inflammation at the systemic level. PMID:26225329

  7. Circulating growth arrest-specific protein 6 levels are associated with erythropoietin resistance in hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Chen, Miao-Pei; Chen, Chien-Wen; Chen, Jin-Shuen; Mao, Hung-Chung; Chou, Chu-Lin

    2016-01-01

    Growth arrest-specific protein 6 (Gas6) works synergistically with erythropoietin (EPO) to increase the proliferation and maturation of erythroblasts. However, the role of Gas 6 levels on EPO resistance in hemodialysis (HD) patients remains unclear. Therefore, the objective of this study was the first to examine the correlation between plasma Gas6 levels and EPO resistance in HD patients. We enrolled 134 HD patients and 85 healthy individuals. The HD patients were divided into 2 groups: 98 non-EPO-resistant patients and 36 EPO-resistant patients. Plasma levels of Gas6, interleukin 6 (IL-6), high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), and albumin were quantified. Compared with non-EPO-resistant patients, EPO-resistant patients had elevated plasma concentrations of Gas6 (15.4 ± 3.3 vs. 13.7 ± 3.2 ng/mL, P = 0.006), IL-6 (3.1 ± 3.1 vs. 2.1 ± 1.5 pg/mL, P = 0.009), and hs-CRP (12.7 ± 25.2 vs. 4.5 ± 5.5 mg/L, P = 0.002). In EPO-resistant HD patients, plasma Gas6 levels were negatively correlated with albumin levels (r = -0.388, P < 0.021). Elevated Gas6 levels are associated with EPO resistance in HD patients. Also, EPO resistance is related to inflammation and malnutrition. Thus, circulating Gas6 levels could be used as the potential marker in HD patients with EPO resistance. PMID:26788441

  8. Correlation between radiation dose and p53 protein expression levels in human lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Cavalcanti, Mariana B; Fernandes, Thiago S; Silva, Edvane B; Amaral, Ademir

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this research was to evaluate the relationship between p53 protein levels and absorbed doses from in vitro irradiated human lymphocytes. For this, samples of blood from 23 donors were irradiated with 0.5; 1; 2; and 4 Gy from a Cobalt-60 source, and the percentages of lymphocytes expressing p53 were scored using Flow Cytometry. The subjects were divided into 3 groups, in accordance with the p53 levels expressed per radiation dose: low (Group I), high (Group II), and excessive levels (Group III). For all groups, the analyses showed that the p53 expression levels increase with the absorbed dose. Particularly for groups I and II, the correlation between this protein expression and the dose follows the linear-quadratic model, such as for radioinduced chromosomal aberrations. In conclusion, our findings indicate possible applications of this approach in evaluating individual radiosensitivity prior to radiotherapeutical procedures as well as in medical surveillance of occupationally exposed workers. Furthermore, due to the rapidity of flow-cytometric analyses, the methodology here employed would play an important role in emergency responses to a large-scale radiation incident where many people may have been exposed. PMID:26312422

  9. Effect of Dietary Protein Levels on Composition of Odorous Compounds and Bacterial Ecology in Pig Manure.

    PubMed

    Cho, Sungback; Hwang, Okhwa; Park, Sungkwon

    2015-09-01

    This study was performed to investigate the effect of different levels of dietary crude protein (CP) on composition of odorous compounds and bacterial communities in pig manure. A total of 48 male pigs (average initial body weight 45 kg) fed diets containing three levels of dietary CP (20%, 17.5%, and 15%) and their slurry samples were collected from the pits under the floor every week for one month. Changes in composition of odorous compounds and bacterial communities were analyzed by gas chromatography and 454 FLX titanium pyrosequencing systems, respectively. Levels of phenols, indoles, short chain fatty acid and branched chain fatty acid were lowest (p<0.05) in CP 15% group among three CP levels. Relative abundance of Bacteroidetes phylum and bacterial genera including Leuconostoc, Bacillus, Atopostipes, Peptonphilus, Ruminococcaceae_uc, Bacteroides, and Pseudomonas was lower (p<0.05) in CP 15% than in CP 20% group. There was a positive correlation (p<0.05) between odorous compounds and bacterial genera: phenol, indole, iso-butyric acid, and iso-valeric acid with Atopostipes, p-cresol and skatole with Bacteroides, acetic acid and butyric acid with AM982595_g of Porphyromonadaceae family, and propionic acid with Tissierella. Taken together, administration of 15% CP showed less production of odorous compounds than 20% CP group and this result might be associated with the changes in bacterial communities especially whose roles in protein metabolism. PMID:26194219

  10. Effect of Dietary Protein Levels on Composition of Odorous Compounds and Bacterial Ecology in Pig Manure

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Sungback; Hwang, Okhwa; Park, Sungkwon

    2015-01-01

    This study was performed to investigate the effect of different levels of dietary crude protein (CP) on composition of odorous compounds and bacterial communities in pig manure. A total of 48 male pigs (average initial body weight 45 kg) fed diets containing three levels of dietary CP (20%, 17.5%, and 15%) and their slurry samples were collected from the pits under the floor every week for one month. Changes in composition of odorous compounds and bacterial communities were analyzed by gas chromatography and 454 FLX titanium pyrosequencing systems, respectively. Levels of phenols, indoles, short chain fatty acid and branched chain fatty acid were lowest (p<0.05) in CP 15% group among three CP levels. Relative abundance of Bacteroidetes phylum and bacterial genera including Leuconostoc, Bacillus, Atopostipes, Peptonphilus, Ruminococcaceae_uc, Bacteroides, and Pseudomonas was lower (p<0.05) in CP 15% than in CP 20% group. There was a positive correlation (p<0.05) between odorous compounds and bacterial genera: phenol, indole, iso-butyric acid, and iso-valeric acid with Atopostipes, p-cresol and skatole with Bacteroides, acetic acid and butyric acid with AM982595_g of Porphyromonadaceae family, and propionic acid with Tissierella. Taken together, administration of 15% CP showed less production of odorous compounds than 20% CP group and this result might be associated with the changes in bacterial communities especially whose roles in protein metabolism. PMID:26194219

  11. Development of Multigene Expression Signature Maps at the Protein Level from Digitized Immunohistochemistry Slides

    PubMed Central

    Metzger, Gregory J.; Dankbar, Stephen C.; Henriksen, Jonathan; Rizzardi, Anthony E.; Rosener, Nikolaus K.; Schmechel, Stephen C.

    2012-01-01

    Molecular classification of diseases based on multigene expression signatures is increasingly used for diagnosis, prognosis, and prediction of response to therapy. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) is an optimal method for validating expression signatures obtained using high-throughput genomics techniques since IHC allows a pathologist to examine gene expression at the protein level within the context of histologically interpretable tissue sections. Additionally, validated IHC assays may be readily implemented as clinical tests since IHC is performed on routinely processed clinical tissue samples. However, methods have not been available for automated n-gene expression profiling at the protein level using IHC data. We have developed methods to compute expression level maps (signature maps) of multiple genes from IHC data digitized on a commercial whole slide imaging system. Areas of cancer for these expression level maps are defined by a pathologist on adjacent, co-registered H&E slides, allowing assessment of IHC statistics and heterogeneity within the diseased tissue. This novel way of representing multiple IHC assays as signature maps will allow the development of n-gene expression profiling databases in three dimensions throughout virtual whole organ reconstructions. PMID:22438942

  12. Identification of proteins whose synthesis is preferentially enhanced by polyamines at the level of translation in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Kazuhiro; Okudaira, Hiroyuki; Ochiai, Eriko; Higashi, Kyohei; Kaneko, Mayumi; Ishii, Itsuko; Nishimura, Tomoe; Dohmae, Naoshi; Kashiwagi, Keiko; Igarashi, Kazuei

    2009-11-01

    In Escherichia coli, several proteins whose synthesis is enhanced by polyamines at the level of translation have been identified. We looked for proteins that are similarly regulated in eukaryotes using a mouse mammary carcinoma FM3A cell culture system. Polyamine deficiency was induced by adding an inhibitor of ornithine decarboxylase, alpha-difluoromethylornithine, to the medium. Proteins enhanced by polyamines were determined by comparison of protein levels in control and polyamine-deficient cells using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, and were identified by Edman degradation and/or LC/MALDI-TOF/TOF tandem mass spectrometry. Polyamine stimulation of the synthesis of these proteins at the level of translation was confirmed by measuring levels of the corresponding mRNAs and proteins, and levels of the [(35)S]methionine pulse-labeled proteins. The proteins identified in this way were T-complex protein 1, beta subunit (Cct2); heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein L (Hnrpl); and phosphoglycerate mutase 1 (Pgam1). Since Cct2 was most strongly enhanced by polyamines among three proteins, the mechanism of polyamine stimulation of Cct2 synthesis was studied using NIH3T3 cells transiently transfected with genes encoding Cct2-EGFP fusion mRNA with normal or mutated 5'-untranslated region (5'-UTR) of Cct2 mRNA. Polyamines most likely enhanced ribosome shunting on the 5'-UTR of Cct2 mRNA. PMID:19427401

  13. Mapping Hydrophobicity on the Protein Molecular Surface at Atom-Level Resolution

    PubMed Central

    Nicolau Jr., Dan V.; Paszek, Ewa; Fulga, Florin; Nicolau, Dan V.

    2014-01-01

    A precise representation of the spatial distribution of hydrophobicity, hydrophilicity and charges on the molecular surface of proteins is critical for the understanding of the interaction with small molecules and larger systems. The representation of hydrophobicity is rarely done at atom-level, as this property is generally assigned to residues. A new methodology for the derivation of atomic hydrophobicity from any amino acid-based hydrophobicity scale was used to derive 8 sets of atomic hydrophobicities, one of which was used to generate the molecular surfaces for 35 proteins with convex structures, 5 of which, i.e., lysozyme, ribonuclease, hemoglobin, albumin and IgG, have been analyzed in more detail. Sets of the molecular surfaces of the model proteins have been constructed using spherical probes with increasingly large radii, from 1.4 to 20 Å, followed by the quantification of (i) the surface hydrophobicity; (ii) their respective molecular surface areas, i.e., total, hydrophilic and hydrophobic area; and (iii) their relative densities, i.e., divided by the total molecular area; or specific densities, i.e., divided by property-specific area. Compared with the amino acid-based formalism, the atom-level description reveals molecular surfaces which (i) present an approximately two times more hydrophilic areas; with (ii) less extended, but between 2 to 5 times more intense hydrophilic patches; and (iii) 3 to 20 times more extended hydrophobic areas. The hydrophobic areas are also approximately 2 times more hydrophobicity-intense. This, more pronounced “leopard skin”-like, design of the protein molecular surface has been confirmed by comparing the results for a restricted set of homologous proteins, i.e., hemoglobins diverging by only one residue (Trp37). These results suggest that the representation of hydrophobicity on the protein molecular surfaces at atom-level resolution, coupled with the probing of the molecular surface at different geometric resolutions

  14. Correlation of diacylglycerol level and protein kinase C activity in rat retina to retinal circulation.

    PubMed

    Shiba, T; Inoguchi, T; Sportsman, J R; Heath, W F; Bursell, S; King, G L

    1993-11-01

    The increases in diacylglycerol (DAG) level and protein kinase C (PKC) activity have been characterized biochemically and functionally in the retina and the brain of diabetic rats as well as in cultured vascular cells. PKC specific activities were increased in the membraneous fraction of retina from streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats and the genetically determined diabetic BB rats, respectively, after 1 or 2 wk of diabetes, compared with control. The ratio of total PKC activities from membraneous and cytosol fractions was also increased in the retina of diabetic rats. With diabetes, all the isoenzymes and the total DAG level were increased in the rat retina, whereas no changes were found in the rat brain. Insulin treatment normalized plasma glucose levels and partially prevented the increases in the membraneous PKC activity and all the isoenzymes in the retina. In the retinal endothelial cells, the total DAG level and PKC specific activities are increased by 36 and 22%, respectively, in the membraneous pool when the glucose levels are changed from 5.5 to 22 mM. Activation of PKC activity and isoform beta II by the vitreal injection of phorbol dibutyrate mimicked the abnormal retinal blood circulation observed in diabetic rats (2.22 +/- 0.24 vs. 1.83 +/- 0.40 s). Thus diabetes and elevated glucose levels will increase DAG level and PKC activities and its isoenzyme specifically in vascular cells and may affect retinal hemodynamics. PMID:8238505

  15. AID AND SOMATIC HYPERMUTATION

    PubMed Central

    Maul, Robert W.; Gearhart, Patricia J.

    2010-01-01

    In response to an assault by foreign organisms, peripheral B cells can change their antibody affinity and isotype by somatically mutating their genomic DNA. The ability of a cell to modify its DNA is exceptional in light of the potential consequences of genetic alterations to cause human disease and cancer. Thus, as expected, this mechanism of antibody diversity is tightly regulated and coordinated through one protein, activation induced deaminase (AID). AID produces diversity by converting cytosine to uracil within the immunoglobulin loci. The deoxyuracil residue is mutagenic when paired with deoxyguanosine, since it mimics thymidine during DNA replication. Additionally, B cells can manipulate the DNA repair pathways so that deoxyuracils are not faithfully repaired. Therefore, an intricate balance exists which is regulated at multiple stages to promote mutation of immunoglobulin genes, while retaining integrity of the rest of the genome. Here we discuss and summarize the current understanding of how AID functions to cause somatic hypermutation. PMID:20510733

  16. Intermediate divergence levels maximize the strength of structure-sequence correlations in enzymes and viral proteins.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Eleisha L; Shahmoradi, Amir; Spielman, Stephanie J; Jack, Benjamin R; Wilke, Claus O

    2016-07-01

    Structural properties such as solvent accessibility and contact number predict site-specific sequence variability in many proteins. However, the strength and significance of these structure-sequence relationships vary widely among different proteins, with absolute correlation strengths ranging from 0 to 0.8. In particular, two recent works have made contradictory observations. Yeh et al. (Mol. Biol. Evol. 31:135-139, 2014) found that both relative solvent accessibility (RSA) and weighted contact number (WCN) are good predictors of sitewise evolutionary rate in enzymes, with WCN clearly out-performing RSA. Shahmoradi et al. (J. Mol. Evol. 79:130-142, 2014) considered these same predictors (as well as others) in viral proteins and found much weaker correlations and no clear advantage of WCN over RSA. Because these two studies had substantial methodological differences, however, a direct comparison of their results is not possible. Here, we reanalyze the datasets of the two studies with one uniform analysis pipeline, and we find that many apparent discrepancies between the two analyses can be attributed to the extent of sequence divergence in individual alignments. Specifically, the alignments of the enzyme dataset are much more diverged than those of the virus dataset, and proteins with higher divergence exhibit, on average, stronger structure-sequence correlations. However, the highest structure-sequence correlations are observed at intermediate divergence levels, where both highly conserved and highly variable sites are present in the same alignment. PMID:26971720

  17. Global Analysis of Protein Expression and Phosphorylation Levels in Nicotine-Treated Pancreatic Stellate Cells.

    PubMed

    Paulo, Joao A; Gaun, Aleksandr; Gygi, Steven P

    2015-10-01

    Smoking is a risk factor in pancreatic disease; however, the biochemical mechanisms correlating smoking with pancreatic dysfunction remain poorly understood. Strategies using multiplexed isobaric tag-based mass spectrometry facilitate the study of drug-induced perturbations on biological systems. Here, we present the first large-scale analysis of the proteomic and phosphoproteomic alterations in pancreatic stellate cells following treatment with two nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) ligands: nicotine and α-bungarotoxin. We treated cells with nicotine or α-bungarotoxin for 12 h in triplicate and compared alterations in protein expression and phosphorylation levels to mock-treated cells using a tandem mass tag (TMT9plex)-based approach. Over 8100 proteins were quantified across all nine samples, of which 46 were altered in abundance upon treatment with nicotine. Proteins with increased abundance included those associated with neurons, defense mechanisms, indicators of pancreatic disease, and lysosomal proteins. In addition, we measured differences for ∼16 000 phosphorylation sites across all nine samples using a titanium dioxide-based strategy, of which 132 sites were altered with nicotine and 451 with α-bungarotoxin treatment. Many altered phosphorylation sites were involved in nuclear function and transcriptional events. This study supports the development of future targeted investigations to establish a better understanding for the role of nicotine and associated receptors in pancreatic disease. PMID:26265067

  18. The RNA-binding protein gene, hermes, is expressed at high levels in the developing heart.

    PubMed

    Gerber, W V; Yatskievych, T A; Antin, P B; Correia, K M; Conlon, R A; Krieg, P A

    1999-01-01

    In a screen for novel sequences expressed during embryonic heart development we have isolated a gene which encodes a putative RNA-binding protein. This protein is a member of one of the largest families of RNA-binding proteins, the RRM (RNA Recognition Motif) family. The gene has been named hermes (for HEart, RRM Expressed Sequence). The hermes protein is 197-amino acids long and contains a single RRM domain. In situ hybridization analysis indicates that hermes is expressed at highest levels in the myocardium of the heart and to a lesser extent in the ganglion layer of the retina, the pronephros and epiphysis. Expression of hermes in each of these tissues begins at approximately the time of differentiation and is maintained throughout development. Analysis of the RNA expression of the hermes orthologues from chicken and mouse reveals that, like Xenopus, the most prominent tissue of expression is the developing heart. The sequence and expression pattern of hermes suggests a role in post-transcriptional regulation of heart development. PMID:10096065

  19. Global analysis of protein expression and phosphorylation levels in nicotine-treated pancreatic stellate cells

    PubMed Central

    Paulo, Joao A.; Gaun, Aleksandr; Gygi, Steven P.

    2016-01-01

    Smoking is a risk factor in pancreatic disease, however, the biochemical mechanisms correlating smoking with pancreatic dysfunction remain poorly understood. Strategies using multiplexed isobaric tag-based mass spectrometry facilitate the study of drug-induced perturbations on biological systems. Here, we present the first large scale analysis of the proteomic and phosphoproteomic alterations in pancreatic stellate cells following treatment with two nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) ligands: nicotine and α-bungarotoxin. We treated cells with nicotine or α-bungarotoxin for 12hr in triplicate and compared alterations in protein expression and phosphorylation levels to mock treated cells using a tandem mass tag (TMT9plex)-based approach. Over 8,100 proteins were quantified across all nine samples of which 46 were altered in abundance upon treatment with nicotine. Proteins with increased abundance included those associated with neurons, defense mechanisms, indicators of pancreatic disease and lysosomal proteins. In addition, we measured differences for ∼16,000 phosphorylation sites across all nine samples using a titanium dioxide-based strategy, of which 132 sites were altered with nicotine and 451 with α-bungarotoxin treatment. Many altered phosphorylation sites were involved in nuclear function and transcriptional events. This study supports the development of future targeted investigations to establish a better understanding for the role of nicotine and associated receptors in pancreatic disease. PMID:26265067

  20. Lung surfactant levels are regulated by Ig-Hepta/GPR116 by monitoring surfactant protein D.

    PubMed

    Fukuzawa, Taku; Ishida, Junji; Kato, Akira; Ichinose, Taro; Ariestanti, Donna Maretta; Takahashi, Tomoya; Ito, Kunitoshi; Abe, Jumpei; Suzuki, Tomohiro; Wakana, Shigeharu; Fukamizu, Akiyoshi; Nakamura, Nobuhiro; Hirose, Shigehisa

    2013-01-01

    Lung surfactant is a complex mixture of lipids and proteins, which is secreted from the alveolar type II epithelial cell and coats the surface of alveoli as a thin layer. It plays a crucial role in the prevention of alveolar collapse through its ability to reduce surface tension. Under normal conditions, surfactant homeostasis is maintained by balancing its release and the uptake by the type II cell for recycling and the internalization by alveolar macrophages for degradation. Little is known about how the surfactant pool is monitored and regulated. Here we show, by an analysis of gene-targeted mice exhibiting massive accumulation of surfactant, that Ig-Hepta/GPR116, an orphan receptor, is expressed on the type II cell and sensing the amount of surfactant by monitoring one of its protein components, surfactant protein D, and its deletion results in a pulmonary alveolar proteinosis and emphysema-like pathology. By a coexpression experiment with Sp-D and the extracellular region of Ig-Hepta/GPR116 followed by immunoprecipitation, we identified Sp-D as the ligand of Ig-Hepta/GPR116. Analyses of surfactant metabolism in Ig-Hepta(+/+) and Ig-Hepta(-/-) mice by using radioactive tracers indicated that the Ig-Hepta/GPR116 signaling system exerts attenuating effects on (i) balanced synthesis of surfactant lipids and proteins and (ii) surfactant secretion, and (iii) a stimulating effect on recycling (uptake) in response to elevated levels of Sp-D in alveolar space. PMID:23922714

  1. Levels of the E2 interacting protein TopBP1 modulate papillomavirus maintenance stage replication

    SciTech Connect

    Kanginakudru, Sriramana; DeSmet, Marsha; Thomas, Yanique; Morgan, Iain M.; Androphy, Elliot J.

    2015-04-15

    The evolutionarily conserved DNA topoisomerase II beta-binding protein 1 (TopBP1) functions in DNA replication, DNA damage response, and cell survival. We analyzed the role of TopBP1 in human and bovine papillomavirus genome replication. Consistent with prior reports, TopBP1 co-localized in discrete nuclear foci and was in complex with papillomavirus E2 protein. Similar to E2, TopBP1 is recruited to the region of the viral origin of replication during G1/S and early S phase. TopBP1 knockdown increased, while over-expression decreased transient virus replication, without affecting cell cycle. Similarly, using cell lines harboring HPV-16 or HPV-31 genome, TopBP1 knockdown increased while over-expression reduced viral copy number relative to genomic DNA. We propose a model in which TopBP1 serves dual roles in viral replication: it is essential for initiation of replication yet it restricts viral copy number. - Highlights: • Protein interaction study confirmed In-situ interaction between TopBP1 and E2. • TopBP1 present at papillomavirus ori in G1/S and early S phase of cell cycle. • TopBP1 knockdown increased, over-expression reduced virus replication. • TopBP1 protein level change did not influence cell survival or cell cycle. • TopBP1 displaced from papillomavirus ori after initiation of replication.

  2. Transcriptional Bursting Explains the Noise–Versus–Mean Relationship in mRNA and Protein Levels

    PubMed Central

    Dar, Roy D.; Shaffer, Sydney M.; Singh, Abhyudai; Razooky, Brandon S.; Simpson, Michael L.; Raj, Arjun; Weinberger, Leor S.

    2016-01-01

    Recent analysis demonstrates that the HIV-1 Long Terminal Repeat (HIV LTR) promoter exhibits a range of possible transcriptional burst sizes and frequencies for any mean-expression level. However, these results have also been interpreted as demonstrating that cell-to-cell expression variability (noise) and mean are uncorrelated, a significant deviation from previous results. Here, we re-examine the available mRNA and protein abundance data for the HIV LTR and find that noise in mRNA and protein expression scales inversely with the mean along analytically predicted transcriptional burst-size manifolds. We then experimentally perturb transcriptional activity to test a prediction of the multiple burst-size model: that increasing burst frequency will cause mRNA noise to decrease along given burst-size lines as mRNA levels increase. The data show that mRNA and protein noise decrease as mean expression increases, supporting the canonical inverse correlation between noise and mean. PMID:27467384

  3. Transcriptional Bursting Explains the Noise Versus Mean Relationship in mRNA and Protein Levels

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Dar, Dr. Roy; Shaffer, S; Singh, A; Razooky, B; Simpson, Michael L; Raj, A; Weinberger, Dr. Leor

    2016-01-01

    Recent analysis demonstrates that the HIV-1 Long Terminal Repeat (HIV LTR) promoter exhibits a range of possible transcriptional burst sizes and frequencies for any mean-expression level. However, these results have also been interpreted as demonstrating that cell-tocell expression variability (noise) and mean are uncorrelated, a significant deviation from previous results. Here, we re-examine the available mRNA and protein abundance data for the HIV LTR and find that noise in mRNA and protein expression scales inversely with the mean along analytically predicted transcriptional burst-size manifolds. We then experimentally perturb transcriptional activity to test a prediction of the multiple burst-size model: thatmore » increasing burst frequency will cause mRNA noise to decrease along given burst-size lines as mRNA levels increase. The data show that mRNA and protein noise decrease as mean expression increases, supporting the canonical inverse correlation between noise and mean.« less

  4. No association between lck gene polymorphisms and protein level in type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Nervi, Solange; Nicodeme, Sandra; Gartioux, Corinne; Atlan, Catherine; Lathrop, Marc; Reviron, Denis; Naquet, Philippe; Matsuda, Fumihiko; Imbert, Jean; Vialettes, Bernard

    2002-11-01

    We previously described a reduced expression of the protein tyrosine kinase Lck in T-cells from type 1 diabetic patients, the origin of which is still unknown. The human lck gene, located on chromosome 1p35-34.3, was evaluated as a candidate susceptibility gene for type 1 diabetes. A molecular scan of the sequence variations in the coding, the relevant promoter, and most of the intronic sequences of the lck gene (representing a total of 10.5 kb fragment) was performed in 187 Caucasian subjects including 91 type 1 diabetic patients and 96 normoglycemic control subjects. We identified 35 sequence variations, including one deletion and 34 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), 33 of them being new. Four variants were frequent but not significantly associated with diabetes or Lck protein level. Of the SNP variants, 11 were only found within the diabetic population and some were associated with low Lck protein levels. The low frequency of these polymorphisms did not permit any statistically significant correlations with the disease status, suggesting that the lck gene probably does not contribute to genetic susceptibility to type 1 diabetes. PMID:12401726

  5. Transcriptional bursting explains the noise–versus–mean relationship in mRNA and protein levels

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Dar, Roy; Shaffer, Sydney M.; Singh, Abhyudai; Razooky, Brandon S.; Simpson, Michael L.; Raj, Arjun; Weinberger, Leor S.

    2016-07-28

    Recent analysis demonstrates that the HIV-1 Long Terminal Repeat (HIV LTR) promoter exhibits a range of possible transcriptional burst sizes and frequencies for any mean-expression level. However, these results have also been interpreted as demonstrating that cell-tocell expression variability (noise) and mean are uncorrelated, a significant deviation from previous results. Here, we re-examine the available mRNA and protein abundance data for the HIV LTR and find that noise in mRNA and protein expression scales inversely with the mean along analytically predicted transcriptional burst-size manifolds. We then experimentally perturb transcriptional activity to test a prediction of the multiple burst-size model: thatmore » increasing burst frequency will cause mRNA noise to decrease along given burst-size lines as mRNA levels increase. In conclusion, the data show that mRNA and protein noise decrease as mean expression increases, supporting the canonical inverse correlation between noise and mean.« less

  6. Computer-aided detection of colonic polyps with level set-based adaptive convolution in volumetric mucosa to advance CT colonography toward a screening modality

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Hongbin; Duan, Chaijie; Pickhardt, Perry; Wang, Su; Liang, Zhengrong

    2009-01-01

    As a promising second reader of computed tomographic colonography (CTC) screening, the computer-aided detection (CAD) of colonic polyps has earned fast growing research interest. In this paper, we present a CAD scheme to automatically detect colonic polyps in CTC images. First, a thick colon wall representation, ie, a volumetric mucosa (VM) with several voxels wide in general, was segmented from CTC images by a partial-volume image segmentation algorithm. Based on the VM, we employed a level set-based adaptive convolution method for calculating the first- and second-order spatial derivatives more accurately to start the geometric analysis. Furthermore, to emphasize the correspondence among different layers in the VM, we introduced a middle-layer enhanced integration along the image gradient direction inside the VM to improve the operation of extracting the geometric information, like the principal curvatures. Initial polyp candidates (IPCs) were then determined by thresholding the geometric measurements. Based on IPCs, several features were extracted for each IPC, and fed into a support vector machine to reduce false positives (FPs). The final detections were displayed in a commercial system to provide second opinions for radiologists. The CAD scheme was applied to 26 patient CTC studies with 32 confirmed polyps by both optical and virtual colonoscopies. Compared to our previous work, all the polyps can be detected successfully with less FPs. At the 100% by polyp sensitivity, the new method yielded 3.5 FPs/dataset. PMID:20428331

  7. Telomere protein RAP1 levels are affected by cellular aging and oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Swanson, Mark J.; Baribault, Michelle E.; Israel, Joanna N.; Bae, Nancy S.

    2016-01-01

    Telomeres are important for maintaining the integrity of the genome through the action of the shelterin complex. Previous studies indicted that the length of the telomere did not have an effect on the amount of the shelterin subunits; however, those experiments were performed using immortalized cells with stable telomere lengths. The interest of the present study was to observe how decreasing telomere lengths over successive generations would affect the shelterin subunits. As neonatal human dermal fibroblasts aged and their telomeres became shorter, the levels of the telomere-binding protein telomeric repeat factor 2 (TRF2) decreased significantly. By contrast, the levels of one of its binding partners, repressor/activator protein 1 (RAP1), decreased to a lesser extent than would be expected from the decrease in TRF2. Other subunits, TERF1-interacting nuclear factor 2 and protection of telomeres protein 1, remained stable. The decrease in RAP1 in the older cells occurred in the nuclear and cytoplasmic fractions. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) stress was used as an artificial means of aging in the cells, and this resulted in RAP1 levels decreasing, but the effect was only observed in the nuclear portion. Similar results were obtained using U251 glioblastoma cells treated with H2O2 or grown in serum-depleted medium. The present findings indicate that TRF2 and RAP1 levels decrease as fibroblasts naturally age. RAP1 remains more stable compared to TRF2. RAP1 also responds to oxidative stress, but the response is different to that observed in aging. PMID:27446538

  8. Genome-Wide Tuning of Protein Expression Levels to Rapidly Engineer Microbial Traits.

    PubMed

    Freed, Emily F; Winkler, James D; Weiss, Sophie J; Garst, Andrew D; Mutalik, Vivek K; Arkin, Adam P; Knight, Rob; Gill, Ryan T

    2015-11-20

    The reliable engineering of biological systems requires quantitative mapping of predictable and context-independent expression over a broad range of protein expression levels. However, current techniques for modifying expression levels are cumbersome and are not amenable to high-throughput approaches. Here we present major improvements to current techniques through the design and construction of E. coli genome-wide libraries using synthetic DNA cassettes that can tune expression over a ∼10(4) range. The cassettes also contain molecular barcodes that are optimized for next-generation sequencing, enabling rapid and quantitative tracking of alleles that have the highest fitness advantage. We show these libraries can be used to determine which genes and expression levels confer greater fitness to E. coli under different growth conditions. PMID:26478262

  9. Classification of protein motifs based on subcellular localization uncovers evolutionary relationships at both sequence and functional levels

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Most proteins have evolved in specific cellular compartments that limit their functions and potential interactions. On the other hand, motifs define amino acid arrangements conserved between protein family members and represent powerful tools for assigning function to protein sequences. The ideal motif would identify all members of a protein family but in practice many motifs identify both family members and unrelated proteins, referred to as True Positive (TP) and False Positive (FP) sequences, respectively. Results To address the relationship between protein motifs, protein function and cellular localization, we systematically assigned subcellular localization data to motif sequences from the comprehensive PROSITE sequence motif database. Using this data we analyzed relationships between localization and function. We find that TPs and FPs have a strong tendency to localize in different compartments. When multiple localizations are considered, TPs are usually distributed between related cellular compartments. We also identified cases where FPs are concentrated in particular subcellular regions, indicating possible functional or evolutionary relationships with TP sequences of the same motif. Conclusions Our findings suggest that the systematic examination of subcellular localization has the potential to uncover evolutionary and functional relationships between motif-containing sequences. We believe that this type of analysis complements existing motif annotations and could aid in their interpretation. Our results shed light on the evolution of cellular organelles and potentially establish the basis for new subcellular localization and function prediction algorithms. PMID:23865897

  10. Serum Levels of Surfactant Proteins in Patients with Combined Pulmonary Fibrosis and Emphysema (CPFE)

    PubMed Central

    Papaioannou, Andriana I.; Kostikas, Konstantinos; Manali, Effrosyni D.; Papadaki, Georgia; Roussou, Aneza; Spathis, Aris; Mazioti, Argyro; Tomos, Ioannis; Papanikolaou, Ilias; Loukides, Stelios; Chainis, Kyriakos; Karakitsos, Petros; Griese, Matthias; Papiris, Spyros

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Emphysema and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) present either per se or coexist in combined pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema (CPFE). Serum surfactant proteins (SPs) A, B, C and D levels may reflect lung damage. We evaluated serum SP levels in healthy controls, emphysema, IPF, and CPFE patients and their associations to disease severity and survival. Methods 122 consecutive patients (31 emphysema, 62 IPF, and 29 CPFE) and 25 healthy controls underwent PFTs, ABG-measurements, 6MWT and chest HRCT. Serum levels of SPs were measured. Patients were followed-up for 1-year. Results SP-A and SP-D levels differed between groups (p = 0.006 and p<0.001 respectively). In post-hoc analysis, SP-A levels differed only between controls and CPFE (p<0.05) and CPFE and emphysema (p<0.05). SP-D differed between controls and IPF or CPFE (p<0.001 for both comparisons). In IPF SP-B correlated to pulmonary function while SP-A, correlated to the Composite Physiological Index (CPI). Controls current smokers had higher SP-A and SP-D levels compared to non-smokers (p = 0.026 and p = 0.023 respectively). SP-D levels were higher in CPFE patients with extended emphysema (p = 0.042). In patients with IPF, SP-B levels at the upper quartile of its range (≥26 ng/mL) presented a weak association with reduced survival (p = 0.05). Conclusion In conclusion, serum SP-A and SP-D levels were higher where fibrosis exists or coexists and related to disease severity, suggesting that serum SPs relate to alveolar damage in fibrotic lungs and may reflect either local overproduction or overleakage. The weak association between high levels of SP-B and survival needs further validation in clinical trials. PMID:27337142

  11. EFFECT OF DIETARY PROTEIN AND CARBOHYDRATE LEVELS ON WEIGHT GAIN AND GONAD PRODUCTION IN THE SEA URCHIN LYTECHINUS VARIEGATUS

    PubMed Central

    Heflin, Laura E.; Gibbs, Victoria K.; Powell, Mickie L; Makowsky, Robert; Lawrence, John M.; Lawrence, Addison L.; Watts, Stephen A.

    2014-01-01

    Adult Lytechinus variegatus were fed eight formulated diets with different protein (ranging from 12 to 36%) and carbohydrate (ranging from 21 to 39 %) levels. Each sea urchin (n = 8 per treatment) was fed a daily sub-satiation ration of 1.5% of average body weight for 9 weeks. Akaike information criterion analysis was used to compare six different hypothesized dietary composition models across eight growth measurements. Dietary protein level and protein: energy ratio were the best models for prediction of total weight gain. Diets with the highest (> 68.6 mg P kcal−-1) protein: energy ratios produced the most wet weight gain after 9 weeks. Dietary carbohydrate level was a poor predictor for most growth parameters examined in this study. However, the model containing a protein × carbohydrate interaction effect was the best model for protein efficiency ratio (PER). PER decreased with increasing dietary protein level, more so at higher carbohydrate levels. Food conversion ratio (FCR) was best modeled by total dietary energy levels: Higher energy diets produced lower FCRs. Dietary protein level was the best model of gonad wet weight gain. These data suggest that variations in dietary nutrients and energy differentially affect organismal growth and growth of body components. PMID:24994942

  12. Analysis of the Sperm Head Protein Profiles in Fertile Men: Consistency across Time in the Levels of Expression of Heat Shock Proteins and Peroxiredoxins

    PubMed Central

    Kichine, Elsa; Di Falco, Marcos; Hales, Barbara F.; Robaire, Bernard; Chan, Peter

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the identity and quantitative variations of proteins extracted from human sperm heads using a label-free Gel-MS approach. Sperm samples were obtained from three men with high sperm counts at three different time points. This design allowed us to analyse intra-individual and inter-individual variations of the human sperm head proteome. Each time point was analyzed in triplicate to minimize any background artifactual effects of the methodology on the variation analyses. Intra-individual analysis using the spectral counting method revealed that the expression levels of 90% of the common proteins identified in three samples collected at various time-points, separated by several months, had a coefficient of variation of less than 0.5 for each man. Across individuals, the expression level of more than 80% of the proteins had a CV under 0.7. Interestingly, 83 common proteins were found within the core proteome as defined by the intra- and inter-variation analyses set criteria (CV<0.7). Some of these uniformly expressed proteins were chaperones, peroxiredoxins, isomerases, and cytoskeletal proteins. Although there is a significant level of inter-individual variation in the protein profiles of human sperm heads even in a well-defined group of men with high sperm counts, the consistent expression levels of a wide range of proteins points to their essential role during spermatogenesis. PMID:24204839

  13. Effect of altered eating pattern on serum fructosamine: total protein ratio and plasma glucose level.

    PubMed

    Ch'ng, S L; Cheah, S H; Husain, R; Duncan, M T

    1989-05-01

    The effect of alteration of eating pattern during Ramadan on body mass index (BMI), serum fructosamine: total protein ratio (F/TP), and glucose level in 18 healthy male Asiatic Moslems were studied. The results showed a significant decrease (p less than 0.025) in F/TP at the second week of Ramadan in 11 subjects who experienced continuous decrease in BMI throughout Ramadan. The remaining 7 subjects showed no significant changes in BMI and F/TP. No evidence of hypoglycaemia was observed in the subjects during the study. Serum fructosamine: total protein ratio in subjects with altered eating pattern preferably should be interpreted along with the change in body mass index. PMID:2774480

  14. A Theoretical Lower Bound for Selection on the Expression Levels of Proteins.

    PubMed

    Price, Morgan N; Arkin, Adam P

    2016-01-01

    We use simple models of the costs and benefits of microbial gene expression to show that changing a protein's expression away from its optimum by 2-fold should reduce fitness by at least [Formula: see text], where P is the fraction the cell's protein that the gene accounts for. As microbial genes are usually expressed at above 5 parts per million, and effective population sizes are likely to be above 10(6), this implies that 2-fold changes to gene expression levels are under strong selection, as [Formula: see text], where Ne is the effective population size and s is the selection coefficient. Thus, most gene duplications should be selected against. On the other hand, we predict that for most genes, small changes in the expression will be effectively neutral. PMID:27289091

  15. Utility of C-Reactive Protein Levels for Early Prediction of Dengue Severity in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chien-Chih; Lee, Ing-Kit; Liu, Jien-Wei; Huang, Shi-Yu; Wang, Lin

    2015-01-01

    Dengue has broad clinical presentation with unpredictable clinical evolution and outcome. We aimed to evaluate the utility of C-reactive protein (CRP) levels for distinguishing between mild and severe cases in the early phase of the dengue illness. We retrospectively evaluated adults with dengue from 2006 to 2014, according to 1997 and 2009 World Health Organization (WHO) criteria for severity. Of 191 included patients, 32.9% had nonshock dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF), 3.1% dengue shock syndrome (DSS), and 7.9% severe dengue. The risk of DHF/DSS and severe dengue is significantly related to the increasing levels of CRP. Of 191 patients, 97 had CRP levels measured during the febrile (days 1–3); 85 during the critical (days 4–6); and 9 during the convalescent (days 7–10) illness phases. During the febrile phase, there was significant higher CRP level for DSS versus DF/nonshock DHF and severe dengue versus nonsevere dengue, with CRP cutoff level 30.1 mg/L (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC), 0.938; 100% sensitivity, 76.3% specificity) and 24.2 mg/L (AUC, 0.717; 70% sensitivity, 71.3% specificity), respectively. Our study highlights the utility of the CRP levels in early prediction of DSS and severe dengue in adult patients. PMID:26247033

  16. Mechanical Folding and Unfolding of Protein Barnase at the Single-Molecule Level.

    PubMed

    Alemany, Anna; Rey-Serra, Blanca; Frutos, Silvia; Cecconi, Ciro; Ritort, Felix

    2016-01-01

    The unfolding and folding of protein barnase has been extensively investigated in bulk conditions under the effect of denaturant and temperature. These experiments provided information about structural and kinetic features of both the native and the unfolded states of the protein, and debates about the possible existence of an intermediate state in the folding pathway have arisen. Here, we investigate the folding/unfolding reaction of protein barnase under the action of mechanical force at the single-molecule level using optical tweezers. We measure unfolding and folding force-dependent kinetic rates from pulling and passive experiments, respectively, and using Kramers-based theories (e.g., Bell-Evans and Dudko-Hummer-Szabo models), we extract the position of the transition state and the height of the kinetic barrier mediating unfolding and folding transitions, finding good agreement with previous bulk measurements. Measurements of the force-dependent kinetic barrier using the continuous effective barrier analysis show that protein barnase verifies the Leffler-Hammond postulate under applied force and allow us to extract its free energy of folding, ΔG0. The estimated value of ΔG0 is in agreement with our predictions obtained using fluctuation relations and previous bulk studies. To address the possible existence of an intermediate state on the folding pathway, we measure the power spectrum of force fluctuations at high temporal resolution (50 kHz) when the protein is either folded or unfolded and, additionally, we study the folding transition-path time at different forces. The finite bandwidth of our experimental setup sets the lifetime of potential intermediate states upon barnase folding/unfolding in the submillisecond timescale. PMID:26745410

  17. An alternative method of enhancing the expression level of heterologous protein in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Yin, Jun; Tian, Hong; Bao, Lichen; Dai, Xin; Gao, Xiangdong; Yao, Wenbing

    2014-12-12

    Though numerous strategy options are available for achieving high expression levels of genes in Escherichia coli, not every gene can be efficiently expressed in this organism. By investigating the relationship between the mRNA secondary structure of translational initiation region (TIR) and gene expression in E.coli, we establish a simple method to design sequences of appropriate TIR (from -35 to +36) that meet a specific expression level as we need. Using this method, overexpression of native human humor necrosis factor α and extracellular domain of Her2/neu protein (aa 23-146) in E. coli were achieved. Differences in expression appeared was mainly related to the efficiency of translation initiation and the stability of mRNA secondary structure, because the intracellular mRNA levels analyzed by real-time RT-PCR were quite similar. Our approach can overcome the steric hindrance of translation startup, and therefore promote translation smoothly to acquire high expression of exogenous protein. PMID:25449272

  18. Physicochemical and sensory characteristics of whey protein hydrolysates generated at different total solids levels.

    PubMed

    Spellman, David; O'Cuinn, Gerard; FitzGerald, Richard J

    2005-05-01

    Whey protein hydrolysates were generated at different total solids (TS) levels (50-300 g/l) using the commercially available proteolytic preparation Debitrase HYW20, while enzyme to substrate ratio, pH and temperature were maintained constant. Hydrolysis proceeded at a faster rate at lower TS reaching a degree of hydrolysis (DH) of 16.6% at 300 g TS/l, compared with a DH of 22.7% at 50 g TS/l after 6 h hydrolysis. The slower breakdown of intact whey proteins at high TS was quantified by gel-permeation HPLC. Reversed-phase (RP) HPLC of hydrolysate samples of equivalent DH (approximately 15%) generated at different TS levels indicated that certain hydrophobic peptide peaks were present at higher levels in hydrolysates generated at low TS. Sensory evaluation showed that hydrolysates with equivalent DH values were significantly (P < 0.0005) less bitter when generated at 300 g TS/l (mean bitterness score = 25.4%) than hydrolysates generated at 50 g TS/l (mean bitterness score = 39.9%). A specific hydrophobic peptide peak present at higher concentrations in hydrolysates generated at low TS was isolated and identified as beta-lactoglobulin f(43-57), a fragment having the physical and chemical characteristics of a bitter peptide. PMID:15909678

  19. Association Between Serum Levels of Adipocyte Fatty Acid-binding Protein and Free Thyroxine

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Fen-Yu; Chen, Pei-Lung; Chen, Yen-Ting; Chi, Yu-Chao; Shih, Shyang-Ron; Wang, Chih-Yuan; Chen, Chi-Ling; Yang, Wei-Shiung

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Adipocyte fatty acid-binding protein (AFABP) has been shown to be a biomarker of body weight change and atherosclerosis. Changes in thyroid function are associated with changes in body weight and risks of cardiovascular diseases. The association between AFABP and thyroid function status has been seldom evaluated. The aim of this study was to compare the serum AFABP concentrations in hyperthyroid patients and those in euthyroid individuals, and to evaluate the associations between serum AFABP and free thyroxine (fT4) levels. For this study, 30 hyperthyroid patients and 30 euthyroid individuals at a referral medical center were recruited. The patients with hyperthyroidism were treated with antithyroid regimens as clinically indicated. No medication was given to the euthyroid individuals. The body weight, body mass index, thyroid function, serum levels of AFABP, and biochemical data of both groups at baseline and at the 6th month were compared. Associations between AFABP and fT4 levels were also analyzed. At the baseline, the hyperthyroid patients had significantly higher serum AFABP levels than the euthyroid individuals (median [Q1, Q3]: 22.8 [19.4, 30.6] ng/mL vs 18.6 [15.3, 23.2] ng/mL; P = 0.038). With the antithyroid regimens, the AFABP serum levels of the hyperthyroid patients decreased to 16.6 (15.0, 23.9) ng/mL at the 6th month. No difference in the AFABP level was found between the hyperthyroid and the euthyroid groups at the 6th month. At baseline, sex (female vs male, ß = 7.65, P = 0.022) and fT4 level (ß = 2.51, P = 0.018) were significantly associated with AFABP levels in the univariate regression analysis. At the 6th month, sex and fT4 level (ß = 8.09, P < 0.001 and ß = 3.61, P = 0.005, respectively) were also significantly associated with AFABP levels. The associations between sex and fT4 level with AFABP levels remained significant in the stepwise multivariate regression analysis, both at baseline and at

  20. In vitro effect of dietary protein level and nondigestible oligosaccharides on feline fecal microbiota.

    PubMed

    Pinna, C; Stefanelli, C; Biagi, G

    2014-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate in vitro the effect of some prebiotic substances and 2 dietary protein levels on the composition and activity of feline fecal microbiota. Two in vitro studies were conducted. First, 6 nondigestible oligosaccharides were studied; treatments were control diet (CTRL), gluconic acid (GA), carrot fiber (CF), fructooligosaccharides (FOS), galactooligosaccharides (GOS), lactitol (LAC), and pectins from citrus fruit (PEC). Substrates were added to feline fecal cultures at 2 g/L for 24 h incubation. Compared with the CTRL, ammonia had been reduced (P<0.05) by GOS (-9%) after 6 h and by GA (-14%), LAC (-12%), and PEC (-10%) after 24 h. After 24 h, all treatments had resulted in a lower pH versus the CTRL. Putrescine concentrations at 24 h were greater (P<0.05) in cultures treated with FOS (+90%), GOS (+96%), and LAC (+87%). Compared with the CTRL, total VFA were higher (P<0.05) in bottles containing CF (+41%), whereas the acetic to propionic acid ratio was reduced by LAC (-51%; P<0.05). After 24 h, Enterobacteriaceae had been reduced (P<0.05) by LAC and PEC. In a second study, LAC and FOS were selected to be tested in the presence of 2 diets differing in their protein content. There were 6 treatments: low-protein (LP) CTRL with no addition of prebiotics (CTRL-LP), high-protein (HP) CTRL with no addition of prebiotics (CTRL-HP), LP diet plus FOS, CTRL-HP plus FOS, LP diet plus LAC, and CTRL-HP plus LAC. Both FOS and LAC were added to feline fecal cultures at 2 g/L for 24 h incubation. Ammonia at 24 h was affected (P<0.05) by the protein level (36.2 vs. 50.2 mmol/L for LP and HP, respectively). The CTRL-HPs resulted in a higher pH and increased concentrations of biogenic amines were found after 6 and 24 h of incubation (P<0.05); putrescine at 24 h showed an increase (P<0.05) in cultures treated with FOS. Total VFA were influenced (P<0.05) by the protein level (40.9 vs. 32.6 mmol/L for LP and HP, respectively). At 24 h, the CTRL

  1. The Nuclear Zinc Finger Protein Zfat Maintains FoxO1 Protein Levels in Peripheral T Cells by Regulating the Activities of Autophagy and the Akt Signaling Pathway.

    PubMed

    Ishikura, Shuhei; Iwaihara, Yuri; Tanaka, Yoko; Luo, Hao; Nishi, Kensuke; Doi, Keiko; Koyanagi, Midori; Okamura, Tadashi; Tsunoda, Toshiyuki; Shirasawa, Senji

    2016-07-15

    Forkhead box O1 (FoxO1) is a key molecule for the development and functions of peripheral T cells. However, the precise mechanisms regulating FoxO1 expression in peripheral T cells remain elusive. We previously reported that Zfat(f/f)-CD4Cre mice showed a marked decline in FoxO1 protein levels in peripheral T cells, partially through proteasomal degradation. Here we have identified the precise mechanisms, apart from proteasome-mediated degradation, of the decreased FoxO1 levels in Zfat-deficient T cells. First, we confirmed that tamoxifen-inducible deletion of Zfat in Zfat(f/f)-CreERT2 mice coincidently decreases FoxO1 protein levels in peripheral T cells, indicating that Zfat is essential for maintaining FoxO1 levels in these cells. Although the proteasome-specific inhibitors lactacystin and epoxomicin only moderately increase FoxO1 protein levels, the inhibitors of lysosomal proteolysis bafilomycin A1 and chloroquine restore the decreased FoxO1 levels in Zfat-deficient T cells to levels comparable with those in control cells. Furthermore, Zfat-deficient T cells show increased numbers of autophagosomes and decreased levels of p62 protein, together indicating that Zfat deficiency promotes lysosomal FoxO1 degradation through autophagy. In addition, Zfat deficiency increases the phosphorylation levels of Thr-308 and Ser-473 of Akt and the relative amounts of cytoplasmic to nuclear FoxO1 protein levels, indicating that Zfat deficiency causes Akt activation, leading to nuclear exclusion of FoxO1. Our findings have demonstrated a novel role of Zfat in maintaining FoxO1 protein levels in peripheral T cells by regulating the activities of autophagy and the Akt signaling pathway. PMID:27226588

  2. The Prognostic Value of C-Reactive Protein Serum Levels in Patients with Uterine Leiomyosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Schwameis, Richard; Grimm, Christoph; Petru, Edgar; Natter, Camilla; Staudigl, Christine; Lamm, Wolfgang; Koelbl, Heinz; Krainer, Michael; Brodowicz, Thomas; Reinthaller, Alexander; Polterauer, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    Objective C-reactive protein (CRP) has previously been shown to serve as a prognostic parameter in women with gynecologic malignancies. Due to the lack of valid prognostic markers for uterine leiomyosarcoma (ULMS) this study set out to investigate the value of pre-treatment CRP serum levels as prognostic parameter. Methods Data of women with ULMS were extracted from databases of three Austrian centres for gynaecologic oncology. Pre-treatment CRP serum levels were measured and correlated with clinico-pathological parameters. Univariate and multivariable survival analyses were performed. Results In total, 53 patients with ULMS were included into the analysis. Mean (SD) CRP serum level was 3.46 mg/dL (3.96). Solely, an association between pre-treatment CRP serum levels and tumor size (p = 0.04) but no other clinic-pathologic parameter such as tumor stage (p = 0.16), or histological grade (p = 0.07), was observed. Univariate and multivariable survival analyses revealed that CRP serum levels (HR 2.7 [1.1–7.2], p = 0.037) and tumor stage (HR 6.1 [1.9–19.5], p = 0.002) were the only independent prognostic factors for overall survival (OS) in patients with ULMS. Patients with high pre-treatment CRP serum levels showed impaired OS compared to women with low levels (5-year-OS rates: 22.6% and 52.3%, p = 0.007). Conclusion High pre-treatment CRP serum levels were independently associated with impaired prognosis in women with ULMS and might serve as a prognostic parameter in these patients. PMID:26248232

  3. Generalized Anxiety and C-Reactive Protein Levels: A Prospective, Longitudinal Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Copeland, William E.; Shanahan, Lilly; Worthman, Carol; Angold, Adrian; Costello, E. Jane

    2012-01-01

    Background Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD) is highly comorbid with depression. Depression is associated with elevated levels of the inflammation marker C-reactive protein (CRP), cross-sectionally and over time. To date, no studies have looked at the association of CRP with GAD. Methods Ten waves of data from the prospective population-based Great Smoky Mountains Study (N = 1,420) were used, covering children in the community aged 9-16, 19, and 21 years old. Structured interviews were used at each assessment to assess GAD symptoms, diagnosis, and cumulative episodes. Bloodspots were collected and assayed for CRP levels. Results GAD was associated with increased levels of CRP in bivariate cross-sectional analyses. These bivariate associations, however, were attenuated after accounting for demographic, substance use, and health-related covariates. In longitudinal models, there was little evidence that CRP predicted later GAD. Associations from GAD to later CRP were attenuated in models adjusted for health-related coavariates and there was evidence that the GAD-CRP association was mediated by BMI and medication use. Conclusions Similar to depression, GAD was associated with elevated levels of CRP, but the effect of GAD on CRP levels was explained by the effect of GAD on health-related behaviors such as BMI and medication use. This study suggests differences in the association between inflammation and depression and GAD. PMID:22716910

  4. Floriculture Aide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Joyce; Looney, Era

    Designed for use in a self-paced, open-entry/open-exit vocational training program for a floriculture aide, this program guide is one of six for teachers of adult women offenders from a correctional institution. Module topic outlines and sample lesson plans are presented on eleven topics: occupational opportunities in the retail florist industry;…

  5. Classroom Aids

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science Activities: Classroom Projects and Curriculum Ideas, 2007

    2007-01-01

    This article describes 6 aids for science instruction, including (1) the use of fudge to represent lava; (2) the "Living by Chemistry" program, designed to make high school chemistry more accessible to a diverse pool of students without sacrificing content; (3) NOAA and NSTA's online coral reef teaching tool, a new web-based "science toolbox" for…

  6. The impact of dietary protein levels on nutrient digestibility and water and nitrogen balances in eventing horses.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, C A A; Azevedo, J F; Martins, J A; Barreto, M P; Silva, V P; Julliand, V; Almeida, F Q

    2015-01-01

    This study was performed to evaluate the impact of dietary protein levels on nutrient digestibility and water and nitrogen balances in conditioning eventing horses. Twenty-four Brazilian Sport Horses, male and female (8.0 to 15.0 yr; 488 ± 32 kg BW), were used in a randomized design with 4 levels of CP diets: 7.5%, 9.0%, 11.0%, and 13.0%. A digestion assay was performed with partial feces collection over 4 d, followed by 1 d of total urine collection. Data were submitted to regression analysis and adjusted to linear and quadratic models (P < 0.05). No differences were observed in the intake of DM, OM, EE, ADF, and NDF as a function of dietary protein levels. Dry matter intake average was 1.7% of BW. CP and N intake showed a linear increase as a function of increasing protein level in diets. A quadratic response (P < 0.05) was observed on the CP and NDF digestibility coefficients, with the maximum estimated level of digestibility at 11.6% and 11.4% CP in the diet, respectively. There was a linear effect on ADF digestibility coefficients, digestible DM and protein intake, and CP/DE ratio according to dietary protein levels. There was no impact of dietary protein levels on daily water intake, total water intake, or fecal water excretion. Urinary excretion values showed a linear increase in response to increased dietary protein levels, but no impact was observed on water balance, with an average of 8.4 L/d. Nitrogen intake (NI), N absorption (NA), and urinary N increased linearly as a function of increasing dietary protein levels. There was no impact of dietary protein levels on N retention (NR), with an average of 7.5 g N/d. Nitrogen retention as a percentage of NI or NA showed no significant changes in the function of dietary protein levels. There was an impact of dietary protein levels on the digestibility coefficient of CP, NDF, ADF, and digestible protein intake on conditioning eventing horses. The 11.6% CP level in the diet provided an intake of 2.25 g CP/kg BW

  7. How Integrated Management Strategies Promote Protein Quality of Cotton Embryos: High Levels of Soil Available N, N Assimilation and Protein Accumulation Rate.

    PubMed

    Yang, HongKun; Meng, YaLi; Chen, BingLin; Zhang, XingYue; Wang, YouHua; Zhao, WenQing; Zhou, ZhiGuo

    2016-01-01

    Cottonseed is widely used as a source of ruminant feed and for industrial purposes. Therefore, there is a tremendous need to improve the nutritional value of cotton embryos. In this study, a conventional management (CM) and two integrated cotton management strategies (IMS1, IMS2) were performed at two soil fertility levels to study the relationships among soil N, N assimilation, embryonic protein accumulation and protein quality. The levels of proteins, essential amino acids, and semi-essential amino acids, especially those of glutamate, lysine, and methionine, were higher in IMS1 and IMS2 embryos than in CM embryos. These changes were significantly positively correlated with the soil-available N content, glutamine synthetase activity and peak value of protein accumulation rate and were negatively correlated with the free amino acid level. These results illustrated that integrated management strategies, especially the rates and timing of N application, raise the level of soil available N, which is beneficial for N assimilation in developing cotton embryos. The protein content was limited by the rate of protein accumulation rather than by the free amino acid content. The combination of target yield fertilization, a growth-driven N application schedule, a high plant density and the seedling raising with bio-organic fertilizer can substantially improve protein quality in cotton embryos, especially at a soil with low soil organic matter and total nitrogen. PMID:27532007

  8. How Integrated Management Strategies Promote Protein Quality of Cotton Embryos: High Levels of Soil Available N, N Assimilation and Protein Accumulation Rate

    PubMed Central

    Yang, HongKun; Meng, YaLi; Chen, BingLin; Zhang, XingYue; Wang, YouHua; Zhao, WenQing; Zhou, ZhiGuo

    2016-01-01

    Cottonseed is widely used as a source of ruminant feed and for industrial purposes. Therefore, there is a tremendous need to improve the nutritional value of cotton embryos. In this study, a conventional management (CM) and two integrated cotton management strategies (IMS1, IMS2) were performed at two soil fertility levels to study the relationships among soil N, N assimilation, embryonic protein accumulation and protein quality. The levels of proteins, essential amino acids, and semi-essential amino acids, especially those of glutamate, lysine, and methionine, were higher in IMS1 and IMS2 embryos than in CM embryos. These changes were significantly positively correlated with the soil-available N content, glutamine synthetase activity and peak value of protein accumulation rate and were negatively correlated with the free amino acid level. These results illustrated that integrated management strategies, especially the rates and timing of N application, raise the level of soil available N, which is beneficial for N assimilation in developing cotton embryos. The protein content was limited by the rate of protein accumulation rather than by the free amino acid content. The combination of target yield fertilization, a growth-driven N application schedule, a high plant density and the seedling raising with bio-organic fertilizer can substantially improve protein quality in cotton embryos, especially at a soil with low soil organic matter and total nitrogen. PMID:27532007

  9. BAG2 promotes tumorigenesis through enhancing mutant p53 protein levels and function

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Xuetian; Zhao, Yuhan; Liu, Juan; Zhang, Cen; Yu, Haiyang; Wang, Jiabei; Zheng, Tongsen; Liu, Lianxin; Li, Jun; Feng, Zhaohui; Hu, Wenwei

    2015-01-01

    Tumor suppressor p53 is the most frequently mutated gene in tumors. Many mutant p53 (mutp53) proteins promote tumorigenesis through the gain-of-function (GOF) mechanism. Mutp53 proteins often accumulate to high levels in tumors, which is critical for mutp53 GOF. Its underlying mechanism is poorly understood. Here, we found that BAG2, a protein of Bcl-2 associated athanogene (BAG) family, promotes mutp53 accumulation and GOF in tumors. Mechanistically, BAG2 binds to mutp53 and translocates to the nucleus to inhibit the MDM2-mutp53 interaction, and MDM2-mediated ubiquitination and degradation of mutp53. Thus, BAG2 promotes mutp53 accumulation and GOF in tumor growth, metastasis and chemoresistance. BAG2 is frequently overexpressed in tumors. BAG2 overexpression is associated with poor prognosis in patients and mutp53 accumulation in tumors. These findings revealed a novel and important mechanism for mutp53 accumulation and GOF in tumors, and also uncovered an important role of BAG2 in tumorigenesis through promoting mutp53 accumulation and GOF. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.08401.001 PMID:26271008

  10. Suppression of cytochrome P450 3A protein levels by proteasome inhibitors.

    SciTech Connect

    Zangar, Richard C. ); Kocarek, Thomas A.; Shen, Shang; Bollinger, Nikki ); Dahn, Michael S.; Lee, Donna W.

    2003-06-01

    We have previously reported that CYP3A cross-links with polyubiquitinated proteins in microsomes from nicardipine-treated rats in a process that is distinct from classical polyubiquitination. To further examine the role of the proteasome in CYP3A degradation, we investigated the effects of proteasome inhibitors lactacystin, MG132, proteasome inhibitor 1, and hemin in primary cultures of rat and human hepatocytes. With the exception of hemin, these agents increased the total pool of ubiquitinated proteins in microsomes isolated from rat hepatocytes, indicating that lactacystin, MG132, and proteasome inhibitor 1 effectively inhibited the proteasome in these cells. All four agents caused a reduction in the amount of the major approximately 55-kDa CYP3A band, opposite to what would be expected if the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway degraded CYP3A. Only hemin treatment caused an increase in high molecular mass (HMM) CYP3A bands. Because hemin treatment did not alter levels of ubiquitin in CYP3 A immunoprecipitates, the HMM CYP3A bands formed in response to hemin treatment clearly were not due to proteasome inhibition. Rather, because hemin treatment also caused an increase in HMM CYP3A in the detergent-insoluble fraction of the 10,000g pellet, the HMM CYP3A seems to represent a large protein complex that is unlikely to primarily represent ubiquitination.

  11. The level of major urinary proteins is socially regulated in wild Mus musculus musculus.

    PubMed

    Janotova, Katerina; Stopka, Pavel

    2011-06-01

    Major urinary proteins (MUPs) are highly polymorphic proteins that have been shown to perform several important functions in the chemical communication of the house mouse, Mus musculus. Production of these proteins in C57Bl/6 females is cyclic, reaching the maximum just before the beginning of estrus. Social environment is an important factor that increases MUP production in both sexes. We examined responsiveness of MUP production to social stimuli in wild mice, Mus musculus musculus. The direction of change of MUP production in males depended on the sex of the stimulus animal. Males up-regulated MUP production when caged with a female, but down-regulated MUP production when caged with a male. Down-regulation was more pronounced in males that were defeated in a male-male encounter. Females responded to a male's presence with a decrease in MUP production. We conclude that social modulation of MUP production is specific and, in coordination with other mechanisms, facilitates adjustment of the animal's odor profile to different social contexts. Our results also suggest that in males, MUPs may play an important role in advertizing the male's quality to females. Furthermore, we highlight the importance of analyzing data corrected with creatinine, which show MUP production on the (post)translational level as well as raw data (non-corrected with creatinine), which represent actual concentrations of MUPs in the urine. PMID:21594616

  12. Fluctuations in Species-Level Protein Expression Occur during Element and Nutrient Cycling in the Subsurface

    PubMed Central

    Wilkins, Michael J.; Wrighton, Kelly C.; Nicora, Carrie D.; Williams, Kenneth H.; McCue, Lee Ann; Handley, Kim M.; Miller, Chris S.; Giloteaux, Ludovic; Montgomery, Alison P.; Lovley, Derek R.; Banfield, Jillian F.; Long, Philip E.; Lipton, Mary S.

    2013-01-01

    While microbial activities in environmental systems play a key role in the utilization and cycling of essential elements and compounds, microbial activity and growth frequently fluctuates in response to environmental stimuli and perturbations. To investigate these fluctuations within a saturated aquifer system, we monitored a carbon-stimulated in situ Geobacter population while iron reduction was occurring, using 16S rRNA abundances and high-resolution tandem mass spectrometry proteome measurements. Following carbon amendment, 16S rRNA analysis of temporally separated samples revealed the rapid enrichment of Geobacter-like environmental strains with strong similarity to G. bemidjiensis. Tandem mass spectrometry proteomics measurements suggest high carbon flux through Geobacter respiratory pathways, and the synthesis of anapleurotic four carbon compounds from acetyl-CoA via pyruvate ferredoxin oxidoreductase activity. Across a 40-day period where Fe(III) reduction was occurring, fluctuations in protein expression reflected changes in anabolic versus catabolic reactions, with increased levels of biosynthesis occurring soon after acetate arrival in the aquifer. In addition, localized shifts in nutrient limitation were inferred based on expression of nitrogenase enzymes and phosphate uptake proteins. These temporal data offer the first example of differing microbial protein expression associated with changing geochemical conditions in a subsurface environment. PMID:23472107

  13. Postnatal alterations in GABAB receptor tone produce sensorimotor gating deficits and protein level differences in adulthood.

    PubMed

    Bolton, Monica M; Heaney, Chelcie F; Murtishaw, Andrew S; Sabbagh, Jonathan J; Magcalas, Christy M; Kinney, Jefferson W

    2015-04-01

    The GABA transmitter system plays a vital role in modulating synaptic formation and activity during development. The GABAB receptor subtype in particular has been implicated in cell migration, promotion of neuronal differentiation, neurite outgrowth, and synapse formation but it's role in development is not well characterized. In order to investigate the effects of brief alterations in GABAB signaling in development, we administered to rats the GABAB agonist baclofen (2.0mg/kg) or antagonist phaclofen (0.3mg/kg) on postnatal days 7, 9, and 12, and evaluated sensorimotor gating in adulthood. We also examined tissue for changes in multiple proteins associated with GABAB receptor function and proteins associated with synapse formation. Our data indicate that early postnatal alterations to GABAB receptor-mediated signaling produced sex differences in sensorimotor gating in adulthood. Additionally, we found differences in GABAB receptor subunits and kalirin protein levels in the brain versus saline treated controls. Our data demonstrate that a subtle alteration in GABAB receptor function in early postnatal life induces changes that persist into adulthood. PMID:25314921

  14. Dependence of intestinal amino acid uptake on dietary protein or amino acid levels

    SciTech Connect

    Karasov, W.H.; Solberg, D.H.; Diamond, J.M.

    1987-05-01

    To understand how intestinal amino acid (AA) transport is regulated by dietary substrate levels, the authors measured uptake of seven radioactively-labelled AAs and glucose across the jejunal brush-border membrane of mice kept on one of three isocaloric rations differing in nitrogen content. In the high-protein ration, uptake increased by 77-81% for the nonessential, less toxic AAs, proline, and aspartate but only by 32-61% for the more toxic essential AAs tested. In the nitrogen-deficient ration, uptake decreased for the nonessential aspartate and proline but stayed constant or increased for essential AAs and for the nonessential alanine. These patterns imply independent regulation of the intestine's various AA transporters. With decreasing dietary AA (or protein), the imino acid and acidic AA private transporters are repressed, while activities of the basic AA transporter and the neutral AA public transporter decrease to an asymptote or else go through a minimum. These regulatory patterns can be understood as a compromise among conflicting constraints imposed by protein's multiple roles as a source of calories, nitrogen, and essential AAs and by the toxicity of essential AAs at high concentrations.

  15. Fluctuations in species-level protein expression occur during element and nutrient cycling in the subsurface.

    PubMed

    Wilkins, Michael J; Wrighton, Kelly C; Nicora, Carrie D; Williams, Kenneth H; McCue, Lee Ann; Handley, Kim M; Miller, Chris S; Giloteaux, Ludovic; Montgomery, Alison P; Lovley, Derek R; Banfield, Jillian F; Long, Philip E; Lipton, Mary S

    2013-01-01

    While microbial activities in environmental systems play a key role in the utilization and cycling of essential elements and compounds, microbial activity and growth frequently fluctuates in response to environmental stimuli and perturbations. To investigate these fluctuations within a saturated aquifer system, we monitored a carbon-stimulated in situ Geobacter population while iron reduction was occurring, using 16S rRNA abundances and high-resolution tandem mass spectrometry proteome measurements. Following carbon amendment, 16S rRNA analysis of temporally separated samples revealed the rapid enrichment of Geobacter-like environmental strains with strong similarity to G. bemidjiensis. Tandem mass spectrometry proteomics measurements suggest high carbon flux through Geobacter respiratory pathways, and the synthesis of anapleurotic four carbon compounds from acetyl-CoA via pyruvate ferredoxin oxidoreductase activity. Across a 40-day period where Fe(III) reduction was occurring, fluctuations in protein expression reflected changes in anabolic versus catabolic reactions, with increased levels of biosynthesis occurring soon after acetate arrival in the aquifer. In addition, localized shifts in nutrient limitation were inferred based on expression of nitrogenase enzymes and phosphate uptake proteins. These temporal data offer the first example of differing microbial protein expression associated with changing geochemical conditions in a subsurface environment. PMID:23472107

  16. Fluctuations in Species-Level Protein Expression Occur during Element and Nutrient Cycling in the Subsurface

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkins, Michael J.; Wrighton, Kelly C.; Nicora, Carrie D.; Williams, Kenneth H.; McCue, Lee Ann; Handley, Kim M.; Miller, C. S.; Giloteaux, L.; Montgomery, A. P.; Lovley, Derek R.; Banfield, Jillian F.; Long, Philip E.; Lipton, Mary S.

    2013-03-05

    While microbial activities in environmental systems play a key role in the utilization and cycling of essential elements and compounds, microbial activity and growth frequently fluctuates in response to environmental stimuli and perturbations. To investigate these fluctuations within a saturated aquifer system, we monitored a carbon-stimulated in situ Geobacter population while iron reduction was occurring, using 16S rRNA abundances and high-resolution tandem mass spectrometry proteome measurements. Following carbon amendment, 16S rRNA analysis of temporally separated samples revealed the rapid enrichment of Geobacter-like environmental strains with strong similarity to G. bemidjiensis. Tandem mass spectrometry proteomics measurements suggest high carbon flux through Geobacter respiratory pathways, and the synthesis of anapleurotic four carbon compounds from acetyl-CoA via pyruvate ferredoxin oxidoreductase activity. Across a 40-day period where Fe(III) reduction was occurring, fluctuations in protein expression reflected changes in anabolic versus catabolic reactions, with increased levels of biosynthesis occurring soon after acetate arrival in the aquifer. In addition, localized shifts in nutrient limitation were inferred based on expression of nitrogenase enzymes and phosphate uptake proteins. These temporal data offer the first example of differing microbial protein expression associated with changing geochemical conditions in a subsurface environment.

  17. Racial Differences in C-Reactive Protein Levels During Normal Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Picklesimer, Amy H; Jared, Heather L.; Moss, Kevin; Offenbacher, Steven; Beck, James D; Boggess, Kim A

    2008-01-01

    Objective Characterization of serum C-Reactive Protein (CRP) levels in a diverse population of healthy pregnant women using a high sensitivity assay. Study Design Cross-sectional analysis of a cohort of 775 pregnant women. CRP measured on serum specimens drawn <26 weeks gestation using highly sensitive ELISA kits. Results Median CRP was 4.8 mg/L (inter-quartile range 0.63 – 15.7). Black women had higher median CRP values than whites (7.68 mg/L vs 2.59 mg/L, p<.001). Black women demonstrated higher levels of CRP even after controlling for known confounding factors such as smoking and maternal weight. Conclusion Pregnancy is an inflammatory stressor. The etiology of racial differences is unclear, but may be important for understanding racial disparities in the incidence inflammatory disorders such as preterm labor and pre-eclampsia. PMID:18539258

  18. Cypermethrin alters Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein levels in the rat brain.

    PubMed

    Malkiewicz, Katarzyna; Koteras, Marcin; Folkesson, Ronnie; Brzezinski, Jacek; Winblad, Bengt; Szutowski, Miroslaw; Benedikz, Eirikur

    2006-01-01

    Pyrethroids, widely used insecticides, are biologically active in neurons. Whether they act on the non-neuronal brain cells remains an open question. Thus, the aim of this study was to examine whether Cypermethrin intoxication affects astroglial cells in the rat brain. The levels of Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein (GFAP) in different brain regions were measured by ELISA following oral treatment with 5 or 10% of LD(50) of Cypermethrin per day for 6 days. A significant decrease of GFAP was observed in different brain regions of treated animals. The cerebral cortex showed the most pronounced effect with GFAP levels reduced to 81% of the controls 2 days after treatment and 77% 21 days after treatment. Although we did not find profound changes in the morphology of astrocytes in Cypermethrin treated animals, the decrease in GFAP suggests that astrocytes were affected by low doses of pyrethroids. The possible consequences were discussed. PMID:21783638

  19. Increased CSF Levels of Phosphorylated Neurofilament Heavy Protein following Bout in Amateur Boxers

    PubMed Central

    Neselius, Sanna; Zetterberg, Henrik; Blennow, Kaj; Marcusson, Jan; Brisby, Helena

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Diagnosis of mild TBI is hampered by the lack of imaging or biochemical measurements for identifying or quantifying mild TBI in a clinical setting. We have previously shown increased biomarker levels of protein reflecting axonal (neurofilament light protein and tau) and glial (GFAP and S-100B) damage in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) after a boxing bout. The aims of this study were to find other biomarkers of mild TBI, which may help clinicians diagnose and monitor mild TBI, and to calculate the role of APOE ε4 allele genotype which has been associated with poor outcome after TBI. Materials and Methods Thirty amateur boxers with a minimum of 45 bouts and 25 non-boxing matched controls were included in a prospective cohort study. CSF and blood were collected at one occasion between 1 and 6 days after a bout, and after a rest period for at least 14 days (follow up). The controls were tested once. CSF levels of neurofilament heavy (pNFH), amyloid precursor proteins (sAPPα and sAPPβ), ApoE and ApoA1 were analyzed. In blood, plasma levels of Aβ42 and ApoE genotype were analyzed. Results CSF levels of pNFH were significantly increased between 1 and 6 days after boxing as compared with controls (p<0.001). The concentrations decreased at follow up but were still significantly increased compared to controls (p = 0.018). CSF pNFH concentrations correlated with NFL (r =  0.57 after bout and 0.64 at follow up, p<0.001). No significant change was found in the other biomarkers, as compared to controls. Boxers carrying the APOE ε4 allele had similar biomarker concentrations as non-carriers. Conclusions Subconcussive repetitive trauma in amateur boxing causes a mild TBI that may be diagnosed by CSF analysis of pNFH, even without unconsciousness or concussion symptoms. Possession of the APOE ε4 allele was not found to influence biomarker levels after acute TBI. PMID:24260563

  20. Computer-aided measurement of liver volumes in CT by means of geodesic active contour segmentation coupled with level-set algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Kenji; Kohlbrenner, Ryan; Epstein, Mark L.; Obajuluwa, Ademola M.; Xu Jianwu; Hori, Masatoshi

    2010-05-15

    Purpose: Computerized liver extraction from hepatic CT images is challenging because the liver often abuts other organs of a similar density. The purpose of this study was to develop a computer-aided measurement of liver volumes in hepatic CT. Methods: The authors developed a computerized liver extraction scheme based on geodesic active contour segmentation coupled with level-set contour evolution. First, an anisotropic diffusion filter was applied to portal-venous-phase CT images for noise reduction while preserving the liver structure, followed by a scale-specific gradient magnitude filter to enhance the liver boundaries. Then, a nonlinear grayscale converter enhanced the contrast of the liver parenchyma. By using the liver-parenchyma-enhanced image as a speed function, a fast-marching level-set algorithm generated an initial contour that roughly estimated the liver shape. A geodesic active contour segmentation algorithm coupled with level-set contour evolution refined the initial contour to define the liver boundaries more precisely. The liver volume was then calculated using these refined boundaries. Hepatic CT scans of 15 prospective liver donors were obtained under a liver transplant protocol with a multidetector CT system. The liver volumes extracted by the computerized scheme were compared to those traced manually by a radiologist, used as ''gold standard.''Results: The mean liver volume obtained with our scheme was 1504 cc, whereas the mean gold standard manual volume was 1457 cc, resulting in a mean absolute difference of 105 cc (7.2%). The computer-estimated liver volumetrics agreed excellently with the gold-standard manual volumetrics (intraclass correlation coefficient was 0.95) with no statistically significant difference (F=0.77; p(F{<=}f)=0.32). The average accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, and percent volume error were 98.4%, 91.1%, 99.1%, and 7.2%, respectively. Computerized CT liver volumetry would require substantially less completion time

  1. Ck2-Dependent Phosphorylation Is Required to Maintain Pax7 Protein Levels in Proliferating Muscle Progenitors

    PubMed Central

    González, Natalia; Moresco, James J.; Bustos, Francisco; Yates, John R.; Olguín, Hugo C.

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal muscle regeneration and long term maintenance is directly link to the balance between self-renewal and differentiation of resident adult stem cells known as satellite cells. In turn, satellite cell fate is influenced by a functional interaction between the transcription factor Pax7 and members of the MyoD family of muscle regulatory factors. Thus, changes in the Pax7-to-MyoD protein ratio may act as a molecular rheostat fine-tuning acquisition of lineage identity while preventing precocious terminal differentiation. Pax7 is expressed in quiescent and proliferating satellite cells, while its levels decrease sharply in differentiating progenitors Pax7 is maintained in cells (re)acquiring quiescence. While the mechanisms regulating Pax7 levels based on differentiation status are not well understood, we have recently described that Pax7 levels are directly regulated by the ubiquitin-ligase Nedd4, thus promoting proteasome-dependent Pax7 degradation in differentiating satellite cells. Here we show that Pax7 levels are maintained in proliferating muscle progenitors by a mechanism involving casein kinase 2-dependent Pax7 phosphorylation at S201. Point mutations preventing S201 phosphorylation or casein kinase 2 inhibition result in decreased Pax7 protein in proliferating muscle progenitors. Accordingly, this correlates directly with increased Pax7 ubiquitination. Finally, Pax7 down regulation induced by casein kinase 2 inhibition results in precocious myogenic induction, indicating early commitment to terminal differentiation. These observations highlight the critical role of post translational regulation of Pax7 as a molecular switch controlling muscle progenitor fate. PMID:27144531

  2. Ck2-Dependent Phosphorylation Is Required to Maintain Pax7 Protein Levels in Proliferating Muscle Progenitors.

    PubMed

    González, Natalia; Moresco, James J; Cabezas, Felipe; de la Vega, Eduardo; Bustos, Francisco; Yates, John R; Olguín, Hugo C

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal muscle regeneration and long term maintenance is directly link to the balance between self-renewal and differentiation of resident adult stem cells known as satellite cells. In turn, satellite cell fate is influenced by a functional interaction between the transcription factor Pax7 and members of the MyoD family of muscle regulatory factors. Thus, changes in the Pax7-to-MyoD protein ratio may act as a molecular rheostat fine-tuning acquisition of lineage identity while preventing precocious terminal differentiation. Pax7 is expressed in quiescent and proliferating satellite cells, while its levels decrease sharply in differentiating progenitors Pax7 is maintained in cells (re)acquiring quiescence. While the mechanisms regulating Pax7 levels based on differentiation status are not well understood, we have recently described that Pax7 levels are directly regulated by the ubiquitin-ligase Nedd4, thus promoting proteasome-dependent Pax7 degradation in differentiating satellite cells. Here we show that Pax7 levels are maintained in proliferating muscle progenitors by a mechanism involving casein kinase 2-dependent Pax7 phosphorylation at S201. Point mutations preventing S201 phosphorylation or casein kinase 2 inhibition result in decreased Pax7 protein in proliferating muscle progenitors. Accordingly, this correlates directly with increased Pax7 ubiquitination. Finally, Pax7 down regulation induced by casein kinase 2 inhibition results in precocious myogenic induction, indicating early commitment to terminal differentiation. These observations highlight the critical role of post translational regulation of Pax7 as a molecular switch controlling muscle progenitor fate. PMID:27144531

  3. Effect of temperature on oxidative stress, antioxidant levels and uncoupling protein expression in striped hamsters.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Si-Si; Cao, Li-Li; Xu, Wei-Dong; Cao, Jing; Zhao, Zhi-Jun

    2015-11-01

    According to the rate of living-free radical hypothesis, higher metabolic rates should increase reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. However, the "uncoupling to survive" hypothesis postulates that uncoupling proteins (UCPs) can decrease ROS production by lowering the potential of the inner mitochondrial membrane, in which case the correlation between metabolic rate and ROS levels would be a negative rather than positive. In this study, we examined energy intake, oxidative stress levels, antioxidant activity and the expression of UCPs in brown adipose tissue (BAT), and in the liver, heart, skeletal muscle and brain, of striped hamsters (Cricetulus barabensis) acclimated to either 5 °C or 32.5 °C. The energy intake of hamsters acclimated to 5 °C increased by 70.7%, whereas the energy intake of hamsters acclimated to 32.5 °C decreased by 31.3%, relative to hamsters kept at room temperature (21 °C) (P<0.05). Malonadialdehyde (MDA) levels, total antioxidant capacity (T-AOC) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-PX) activity in BAT significantly decreased in 5 °C group, but increased in 32.5 °C group, relative to the 21 °C group. Neither ROS levels (i.e. H2O2 levels), nor antioxidants in skeletal muscle, liver, heart or brain tissue, were affected by temperature. UCP1 expression in BAT was significantly up-regulated in 5 °C group, but down-regulated in 32.5 °C group, relative to the 21 °C group. UCP3 expression of skeletal muscle was also up-regulated significantly in hamsters acclimated to 5 °C. These results suggest that the relationship between ROS levels and metabolic rate was negative, rather than positive. UCP1 expression in BAT may have played a role in lowering ROS levels. PMID:26244518

  4. Infection and immunoglobulin levels in Sudanese children with severe protein-energy malnutrition*

    PubMed Central

    Suliman, Omer S. M.; Salih, Mustafa A. M.; Karrar, Zein A.; Mohammed, Abdelrahim O.; Helsing, Chrestover

    2011-01-01

    A hospital-based case control study was carried out to determine the pattern of infections and immunoblobulin levels in Sudanese children with severe protein energy malnutrition (PEM). The pre-dietary rehabilitation levels of the three major immunoglobulins (IgG, IgA and IgM) were compared with those of normal controls, and with the levels after dietary rehabilitation. Eighty one children were included in the study: 49 with severe PEM (23 with marasmus, 17 with marasmic – kwashiorkor and 9 with kwashiorkor), 13 with tuberculosis and 19 healthy children as controls. The study showed high incidence of infections, especially pneumonia and gastrointestinal infections in the malnourished children. Of special concern was the high incidence of urinary tract infection: 13 (26.5%) had significant pyuria and 9 of them had positive urine cultures, mainly Escherichia coli. Eight of the malnourished children also had pulmonary TB, and the ESR and Mantoux tests were not helpful in the diagnosis. The Mantoux test was negative in 88.8% of the malnourished group compared to 62.5% in those malnourished with TB. The malnourished groups had significantly higher plasma levels of the 3 immunoglobulins. While the maramic group attained significantly higher levels of IgG and IgA compared to the marasmic –kwashiorkor and kwashiorkor groups, the 3 groups of PEM showed a uniformly higher level of the IgM. After 2 weeks of rehabilitation, the levels of the 3 immunoglobulins showed no significant changes, except for the IgA which significantly decreased in all malnourished and the oedematous groups, and the IgM which increased significantly in the oedematous group.

  5. An investigative study into the effectiveness of using computer-aided instruction (CAI) as a laboratory component of college-level biology: A case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrett, Joan Beverly

    Community colleges serve the most diverse student populations in higher education. They consist of non-traditional, part-time, older, intermittent, and mobile students of different races, ethnic backgrounds, language preferences, physical and mental abilities, and learning style preferences. Students who are academically challenged may have diverse learning characteristics that are not compatible with the more traditional approaches to the delivery of instruction. With this need come new ways of solving the dilemma, such as Computer-aided Instruction (CAI). This case study investigated the use of CAI as a laboratory component of college-level biology in a small, rural community college setting. The intent was to begin to fill a void that seems to exist in the literature regarding the role of the faculty in the development and use of CAI. In particular, the investigator was seeking to understand the practice and its effectiveness, especially in helping the under prepared student. The case study approach was chosen to examine a specific phenomenon within a single institution. Ethnographic techniques, such as interviewing, documentary analysis, life's experiences, and participant observations were used to collect data about the phenomena being studied. Results showed that the faculty was primarily self-motivated and self-taught in their use of CAI as a teaching and learning tool. The importance of faculty leadership and collegiality was evident. Findings showed the faculty confident that expectations of helping students who have difficulties with mathematical concepts have been met and that CAI is becoming the most valuable of learning tools. In a traditional college classroom, or practice, time is the constant (semesters) and competence is the variable. In the CAI laboratory time became the variable and competence the constant. The use of CAI also eliminated hazardous chemicals that were routinely used in the more traditional lab. Outcomes showed that annual savings

  6. Using formative research to lay the foundation for community level HIV prevention efforts: an example from the AIDS Community Demonstration Projects.

    PubMed Central

    Higgins, D L; O'Reilly, K; Tashima, N; Crain, C; Beeker, C; Goldbaum, G; Elifson, C S; Galavotti, C; Guenther-Grey, C

    1996-01-01

    The AIDS Community Demonstration Projects provided community-level HIV prevention interventions to historically hard-to-reach groups at high risk for HIV infection. The projects operated under a common research protocol which encompassed formative research, intervention delivery, process evaluation, and outcome evaluation. A formative research process specifically focusing on intervention development was devised to assist project staff in identifying, prioritizing, accessing, and understanding the intervention target groups. This process was central to the creation of interventions that were acceptable and unique to the target populations. Intended to be rapid, the process took 6 months to complete. Drawn from the disciplines of anthropology, community psychology, sociology, and public health, the formative research process followed distinct steps which included (a) defining the populations at high-risk for HIV; (b) gathering information about these populations through interviews with persons who were outside of, but who had contact with, the target groups (such as staff from the health department and alcohol and drug treatment facilities, as well as persons who interacted in an informal manner with the target groups, such as clerks in neighborhood grocery stores and bartenders); (c) interviewing people with access to the target populations (gatekeepers), and conducting observations in areas where these high-risk groups were reported to gather (from previous interviews); (d) interviewing members of these groups at high risk for HIV infection or transmission; and (e) systematically integrating information throughout the process. Semistructured interview schedules were used for all data collection in this process. This standardized systematic method yielded valuable information about the focal groups in each demonstration project site. The method, if adopted by others, would assist community intervention specialists in developing interventions that are culturally

  7. Effect of nutrient deprivation on lipid, carbohydrate, DNA, RNA, and protein levels in Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed Central

    Hood, M A; Guckert, J B; White, D C; Deck, F

    1986-01-01

    The response of Vibrio cholerae to low nutrient levels was determined by measuring the concentrations of lipids, carbohydrates, DNA, RNA, and proteins over a 30-day starvation period. Ultrastructural integrity was observed by transmission electron microscopy. Total lipids and carbohydrates declined rapidly within the first 7 days, while DNA and protein exhibited a more constant decline over the 30 days of starvation. In contrast, RNA showed little decrease upon starvation. Although neutral lipids were lost, the percentage of neutral lipids did not decline as rapidly as the phospholipids. Detectable levels of poly-beta-hydroxybutyrate disappeared completely by 7 days. Carbohydrate profiles revealed the relative loss of the five-carbon sugar ribose and N-acetylglucosamine and a relative increase in the total six-carbon sugars, especially glucose. Morphologically, ribosomes appeared to exhibit no structural change, while inclusion bodies and mesosomelike structures disappeared completely, and cell wall and membrane integrity was lost. The data suggest that V. cholerae differs somewhat from other marine vibrios in its response to low nutrients but shares some characteristics in common with them. The data also suggest that certain lipids and carbohydrates may provide the endogenous energy sources needed for dormancy preparation and cell maintenance under nutrient starvation. Images PMID:2430523

  8. Myb-domain protein Teb1 controls histone levels and centromere assembly in fission yeast

    PubMed Central

    Valente, Luis P; Dehé, Pierre-Marie; Klutstein, Michael; Aligianni, Sofia; Watt, Stephen; Bähler, Jürg; Promisel Cooper, Julia

    2013-01-01

    The TTAGGG motif is common to two seemingly unrelated dimensions of chromatin function—the vertebrate telomere repeat and the promoter regions of many Schizosaccharomyces pombe genes, including all of those encoding canonical histones. The essential S. pombe protein Teb1 contains two Myb-like DNA binding domains related to those found in telomere proteins and binds the human telomere repeat sequence TTAGGG. Here, we analyse Teb1 binding throughout the genome and the consequences of reduced Teb1 function. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP)-on-chip analysis reveals robust Teb1 binding at many promoters, notably including all of those controlling canonical histone gene expression. A hypomorphic allele, teb1-1, confers reduced binding and reduced levels of histone transcripts. Prompted by previously suggested connections between histone expression and centromere identity, we examined localization of the centromeric histone H3 variant Cnp1 and found reduced centromeric binding along with reduced centromeric silencing. These data identify Teb1 as a master regulator of histone levels and centromere identity. PMID:23314747

  9. Myb-domain protein Teb1 controls histone levels and centromere assembly in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Valente, Luis P; Dehé, Pierre-Marie; Klutstein, Michael; Aligianni, Sofia; Watt, Stephen; Bähler, Jürg; Cooper, Julia Promisel

    2013-02-01

    The TTAGGG motif is common to two seemingly unrelated dimensions of chromatin function-the vertebrate telomere repeat and the promoter regions of many Schizosaccharomyces pombe genes, including all of those encoding canonical histones. The essential S. pombe protein Teb1 contains two Myb-like DNA binding domains related to those found in telomere proteins and binds the human telomere repeat sequence TTAGGG. Here, we analyse Teb1 binding throughout the genome and the consequences of reduced Teb1 function. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP)-on-chip analysis reveals robust Teb1 binding at many promoters, notably including all of those controlling canonical histone gene expression. A hypomorphic allele, teb1-1, confers reduced binding and reduced levels of histone transcripts. Prompted by previously suggested connections between histone expression and centromere identity, we examined localization of the centromeric histone H3 variant Cnp1 and found reduced centromeric binding along with reduced centromeric silencing. These data identify Teb1 as a master regulator of histone levels and centromere identity. PMID:23314747

  10. Maternal High Fat Diet Affects Offspring’s Vitamin K-Dependent Proteins Expression Levels

    PubMed Central

    Lanham, Stuart; Cagampang, Felino R.; Oreffo, Richard O. C.

    2015-01-01

    Studies suggest bone growth & development and susceptibility to vascular disease in later life are influenced by maternal nutrition, during intrauterine and early postnatal life. There is evidence for a role of vitamin K-dependent proteins (VKDPs) including Osteocalcin, Matrix-gla protein, Periostin, and Gas6, in bone and vascular development. This study extends the analysis of VKDPs previously conducted in 6 week old offspring, into offspring of 30 weeks of age, to assess the longer term effects of a maternal and postnatal high fat (HF) diet on VKDP expression. Overall a HF maternal diet and offspring diet exacerbated the bone changes observed. Sex specific and tissue specific differences were observed in VKDP expression for both aorta and femoral tissues. In addition, significant correlations were observed between femoral OCN, Periostin Gas6, and Vkor expression levels and measures of femoral bone structure. Furthermore, MGP, OCN, Ggcx and Vkor expression levels correlated to mass and fat volume, in both sexes. In summary the current study has highlighted the importance of the long-term effects of maternal nutrition on offspring bone development and the correlation of VKDPs to bone structure. PMID:26381752

  11. Heat shock proteins in relation to heat stress tolerance of creeping bentgrass at different N levels.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kehua; Zhang, Xunzhong; Goatley, Mike; Ervin, Erik

    2014-01-01

    Heat stress is a primary factor causing summer bentgrass decline. Changes in gene expression at the transcriptional and/or translational level are thought to be a fundamental mechanism in plant response to environmental stresses. Heat stress redirects protein synthesis in higher plants and results in stress protein synthesis, particularly heat shock proteins (HSPs). The goal of this work was to analyze the expression pattern of major HSPs in creeping bentgrass (Agrostis stolonifera L.) during different heat stress periods and to study the influence of nitrogen (N) on the HSP expression patterns. A growth chamber study on 'Penn-A4' creeping bentgrass subjected to 38/28°C day/night for 50 days, was conducted with four nitrate rates (no N-0, low N-2.5, medium N-7.5, and high N-12.5 kg N ha-1) applied biweekly. Visual turfgrass quality (TQ), normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), photochemical efficiency of photosystem II (Fv/Fm), shoot electrolyte leakage (ShEL), and root viability (RV) were monitored, along with the expression pattern of HSPs. There was no difference in measured parameters between treatments until week seven, except TQ at week five. At week seven, grass at medium N had better TQ, NDVI, and Fv/Fm accompanied by lower ShEL and higher RV, suggesting a major role in improved heat tolerance. All the investigated HSPs (HSP101, HSP90, HSP70, and sHSPs) were up-regulated by heat stress. Their expression patterns indicated cooperation between different HSPs and their roles in bentgrass thermotolerance. In addition, their production seems to be resource dependent. This study could further improve our understanding about how different N levels affect bentgrass thermotolerance. PMID:25050702

  12. Auxins differentially regulate root system architecture and cell cycle protein levels in maize seedlings.

    PubMed

    Martínez-de la Cruz, Enrique; García-Ramírez, Elpidio; Vázquez-Ramos, Jorge M; Reyes de la Cruz, Homero; López-Bucio, José

    2015-03-15

    Maize (Zea mays) root system architecture has a complex organization, with adventitious and lateral roots determining its overall absorptive capacity. To generate basic information about the earlier stages of root development, we compared the post-embryonic growth of maize seedlings germinated in water-embedded cotton beds with that of plants obtained from embryonic axes cultivated in liquid medium. In addition, the effect of four different auxins, namely indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), 1-naphthaleneacetic acid (NAA), indole-3-butyric acid (IBA) and 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) on root architecture and levels of the heat shock protein HSP101 and the cell cycle proteins CKS1, CYCA1 and CDKA1 were analyzed. Our data show that during the first days after germination, maize seedlings develop several root types with a simultaneous and/or continuous growth. The post-embryonic root development started with the formation of the primary root (PR) and seminal scutellar roots (SSR) and then continued with the formation of adventitious crown roots (CR), brace roots (BR) and lateral roots (LR). Auxins affected root architecture in a dose-response fashion; whereas NAA and IBA mostly stimulated crown root formation, 2,4-D showed a strong repressing effect on growth. The levels of HSP101, CKS1, CYCA1 and CDKA in root and leaf tissues were differentially affected by auxins and interestingly, HSP101 registered an auxin-inducible and root specific expression pattern. Taken together, our results show the timing of early branching patterns of maize and indicate that auxins regulate root development likely through modulation of the HSP101 and cell cycle proteins. PMID:25615607

  13. Who Receives Federal Student Aid?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    College Entrance Examination Board, Washington, DC.

    Information on federal student aid recipients by income, undergraduate and graduate level, and financial dependency status is presented for Pell Grants, campus-based programs, and Guaranteed Student Loans (GSL). Income data are reported for all aid recipients and for financially dependent and independent students for 1983-1984 and for 1976-1977,…

  14. 75 Hour Nurse Aide Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iowa Univ., Iowa City. Coll. of Education.

    This 75-hour nurse aide course has been designed to meet the training requirements of the Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1987 for aides working in nursing facilities and skilled nursing facilities. Emphasis in the course is on students achieving a basic level of knowledge and demonstrating skills to provide safe, effective resident care. The…

  15. Fish protein intake induces fast-muscle hypertrophy and reduces liver lipids and serum glucose levels in rats.

    PubMed

    Kawabata, Fuminori; Mizushige, Takafumi; Uozumi, Keisuke; Hayamizu, Kohsuke; Han, Li; Tsuji, Tomoko; Kishida, Taro

    2015-01-01

    In our previous study, fish protein was proven to reduce serum lipids and body fat accumulation by skeletal muscle hypertrophy and enhancing basal energy expenditure in rats. In the present study, we examined the precise effects of fish protein intake on different skeletal muscle fiber types and metabolic gene expression of the muscle. Fish protein increased fast-twitch muscle weight, reduced liver triglycerides and serum glucose levels, compared with the casein diet after 6 or 8 weeks of feeding. Furthermore, fish protein upregulated the gene expressions of a fast-twitch muscle-type marker and a glucose transporter in the muscle. These results suggest that fish protein induces fast-muscle hypertrophy, and the enhancement of basal energy expenditure by muscle hypertrophy and the increase in muscle glucose uptake reduced liver lipids and serum glucose levels. The present results also imply that fish protein intake causes a slow-to-fast shift in muscle fiber type. PMID:25198797

  16. Effects of Different Exercise Intensities with Isoenergetic Expenditures on C-Reactive Protein and Blood Lipid Levels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsao, Te Hung; Yang, Chang Bin; Hsu, Chin Hsing

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the effects of different exercise intensities on C-reactive protein (CRP), and whether changes in CRP levels correlated with blood lipid levels. Ten men exercised at 25%, 65%, and 85% of their maximum oxygen consumption rates. Participants' blood was analyzed for CRP and blood lipid levels before and after the exercise sessions.…

  17. Low-level lasers affect uncoupling protein gene expression in skin and skeletal muscle tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canuto, K. S.; Sergio, L. P. S.; Paoli, F.; Mencalha, A. L.; Fonseca, A. S.

    2016-03-01

    Wavelength, frequency, power, fluence, and emission mode determine the photophysical, photochemical, and photobiological responses of biological tissues to low-level lasers. Free radicals are involved in these responses acting as second messengers in intracellular signaling processes. Irradiated cells present defenses against these chemical species to avoid unwanted effects, such as uncoupling proteins (UCPs), which are part of protective mechanisms and minimize the effects of free radical generation in mitochondria. In this work UCP2 and UCP3 mRNA gene relative expression in the skin and skeletal muscle tissues of Wistar rats exposed to low-level red and infrared lasers was evaluated. Samples of the skin and skeletal muscle tissue of Wistar rats exposed to low-level red and infrared lasers were withdrawn for total RNA extraction, cDNA synthesis, and the evaluation of gene expression by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. UCP2 and UCP3 mRNA expression was differently altered in skin and skeletal muscle tissues exposed to lasers in a wavelength-dependent effect, with the UCP3 mRNA expression dose-dependent. Alteration on UCP gene expression could be part of the biostimulation effect and is necessary to make cells exposed to red and infrared low-level lasers more resistant or capable of adapting in damaged tissues or diseases.

  18. Increased Circulating Levels of Vitamin D Binding Protein in MS Patients

    PubMed Central

    Rinaldi, Arturo Ottavio; Sanseverino, Isabella; Purificato, Cristina; Cortese, Antonio; Mechelli, Rosella; Francisci, Silvia; Salvetti, Marco; Millefiorini, Enrico; Gessani, Sandra; Gauzzi, Maria Cristina

    2015-01-01

    Vitamin D (vitD) low status is currently considered a main environmental factor in multiple sclerosis (MS) etiology and pathogenesis. VitD and its metabolites are highly hydrophobic and circulate mostly bound to the vitamin D binding protein (DBP) and with lower affinity to albumin, while less than 1% are in a free form. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the circulating levels of either of the two vitD plasma carriers and/or their relationship are altered in MS. We measured DBP and albumin plasma levels in 28 MS patients and 24 healthy controls. MS patients were found to have higher DBP levels than healthy subjects. Concomitant interferon beta therapy did not influence DBP concentration, and the difference with the control group was significant in both females and males. No significant correlation between DBP and albumin levels was observed either in healthy controls or in patients. These observations suggest the involvement of DBP in the patho-physiology of MS. PMID:25590278

  19. Serum C-reactive protein level as a biomarker for differentiation of ischemic from hemorrhagic stroke.

    PubMed

    Roudbary, Seyed Ali; Saadat, Farshid; Forghanparast, Kambiz; Sohrabnejad, Reza

    2011-01-01

    Cerebrovascular accidents rank first in the frequency and importance among all neurological disease. Although a number of studies had shown increased level of the high sensitive C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) in patients with ischemic stroke, the association of increased hs-CRP with various type of stroke especially the assessment hs-CRP level in ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke have not been investigated. In the present study, we assessed the concentration of hs-CRP in patients with documented ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke in the first 24 hours of the onset of symptoms. Thirty-two patients with Ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke were evaluated at neurology department of Poursina Hospital. The presence of baseline vascular risk factors, including hypertension, diabetes mellitus, hypercholesterolemia, obesity, and smoking, was determined. The blood samples were then collected and routine hematology and biochemistry tests were done. hs-CRP levels were determined using a highly sensitive immunonephelometric method. In this cross sectional study, the age of patient varied from 45-85 years (Mean 70.9 ± 9.4). Serum level of hs-CRP in Ischemic patients were 18.92 ± 11.28 and in hemorrhagic group was 2.65 ± 1.7. This relationship was statistically significant (P<0.0001). It might be concluded that hs-CRP might be considered as a usefully adjunct method for the initial diagnosis of the type of stroke. PMID:21681701

  20. ELEVATED LEVELS OF SOLUBLE ST2 PROTEIN IN DENGUE VIRUS INFECTED PATIENTS

    PubMed Central

    Becerra, Aniuska; Warke, Rajas V.; de Bosch, Norma; Rothman, Alan L.; Bosch, Irene

    2008-01-01

    Levels of the soluble form of the interleukin-1 receptor like 1 protein (IL-1RL-1 / ST2) are elevated in the serum of patients with diseases characterized by an inflammatory response. The objective of this study was to determine the concentration of soluble ST2 (sST2) in dengue infected patients during the course of the disease. Twenty four patients with confirmed dengue infection, classified as dengue fever, and eleven patients with other febrile illness (OFI) were evaluated. Levels of sST2 in serum and laboratory variables usually altered during dengue infections were measured. Dengue infected patients had higher serum sST2 levels than OFI at the end of the febrile stage and at defervescence (p=0.0088 and p=0.0004 respectively). Patients with secondary dengue infections had higher serum sST2 levels compared with patients with primary dengue infections (p=0.047 at last day of fever and p=0.030 at defervescence). Furthermore, in dengue infected patients, we found a significant negative correlation of sST2 with platelet and WBC counts, and positive correlation with thrombin time and transaminases activity. We suggest that sST2 could be a potential marker of dengue infection, could be associated with severity or could play a role in the immune response in secondary dengue virus infection. PMID:18226917

  1. Revolutionising the AIDS response.

    PubMed

    Ogden, Jessica; Gupta, Geeta Rao; Warner, Ann; Fisher, William F

    2011-01-01

    Individual behaviour change interventions and technological approaches to HIV prevention can only be effective over time if the broader social environment in which health-related decisions are made facilitate their uptake. People need to be not only willing but also able to take up and maintain preventive behaviours, seek testing, treatment and care for HIV. This paper presents findings and recommendations of the Social Drivers Working Group of the aids2031 initiative, which focus on how to ensure that efforts to address the root causes of HIV vulnerability are integrated into AIDS responses at the national level. Specific guidance is given on how to operationalise a structural approach. PMID:21970296

  2. Association of exome sequences with plasma C-reactive protein levels in >9000 participants

    PubMed Central

    Schick, Ursula M.; Auer, Paul L.; Bis, Joshua C.; Lin, Honghuang; Wei, Peng; Pankratz, Nathan; Lange, Leslie A.; Brody, Jennifer; Stitziel, Nathan O.; Kim, Daniel S.; Carlson, Christopher S.; Fornage, Myriam; Haessler, Jeffery; Hsu, Li; Jackson, Rebecca D.; Kooperberg, Charles; Leal, Suzanne M.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Tracy, Russell; Ardissino, Diego; Shah, Svati; Willer, Cristen; Loos, Ruth; Melander, Olle; Mcpherson, Ruth; Hovingh, Kees; Reilly, Muredach; Watkins, Hugh; Girelli, Domenico; Fontanillas, Pierre; Chasman, Daniel I.; Gabriel, Stacey B.; Gibbs, Richard; Nickerson, Deborah A.; Kathiresan, Sekar; Peters, Ulrike; Dupuis, Josée; Wilson, James G.; Rich, Stephen S.; Morrison, Alanna C.; Benjamin, Emelia J.; Gross, Myron D.; Reiner, Alex P.

    2015-01-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP) concentration is a heritable systemic marker of inflammation that is associated with cardiovascular disease risk. Genome-wide association studies have identified CRP-associated common variants associated in ∼25 genes. Our aims were to apply exome sequencing to (1) assess whether the candidate loci contain rare coding variants associated with CRP levels and (2) perform an exome-wide search for rare variants in novel genes associated with CRP levels. We exome-sequenced 6050 European-Americans (EAs) and 3109 African-Americans (AAs) from the NHLBI-ESP and the CHARGE consortia, and performed association tests of sequence data with measured CRP levels. In single-variant tests across candidate loci, a novel rare (minor allele frequency = 0.16%) CRP-coding variant (rs77832441-A; p.Thr59Met) was associated with 53% lower mean CRP levels (P = 2.9 × 10−6). We replicated the association of rs77832441 in an exome array analysis of 11 414 EAs (P = 3.0 × 10−15). Despite a strong effect on CRP levels, rs77832441 was not associated with inflammation-related phenotypes including coronary heart disease. We also found evidence for an AA-specific association of APOE-ε2 rs7214 with higher CRP levels. At the exome-wide significance level (P < 5.0 × 10−8), we confirmed associations for reported common variants of HNF1A, CRP, IL6R and TOMM40-APOE. In gene-based tests, a burden of rare/lower frequency variation in CRP in EAs (P ≤ 6.8 × 10−4) and in retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptor α (RORA) in AAs (P = 1.7 × 10−3) were associated with CRP levels at the candidate gene level (P < 2.0 × 10−3). This inquiry did not elucidate novel genes, but instead demonstrated that variants distributed across the allele frequency spectrum within candidate genes contribute to CRP levels. PMID:25187575

  3. Association of exome sequences with plasma C-reactive protein levels in >9000 participants.

    PubMed

    Schick, Ursula M; Auer, Paul L; Bis, Joshua C; Lin, Honghuang; Wei, Peng; Pankratz, Nathan; Lange, Leslie A; Brody, Jennifer; Stitziel, Nathan O; Kim, Daniel S; Carlson, Christopher S; Fornage, Myriam; Haessler, Jeffery; Hsu, Li; Jackson, Rebecca D; Kooperberg, Charles; Leal, Suzanne M; Psaty, Bruce M; Boerwinkle, Eric; Tracy, Russell; Ardissino, Diego; Shah, Svati; Willer, Cristen; Loos, Ruth; Melander, Olle; Mcpherson, Ruth; Hovingh, Kees; Reilly, Muredach; Watkins, Hugh; Girelli, Domenico; Fontanillas, Pierre; Chasman, Daniel I; Gabriel, Stacey B; Gibbs, Richard; Nickerson, Deborah A; Kathiresan, Sekar; Peters, Ulrike; Dupuis, Josée; Wilson, James G; Rich, Stephen S; Morrison, Alanna C; Benjamin, Emelia J; Gross, Myron D; Reiner, Alex P

    2015-01-15

    C-reactive protein (CRP) concentration is a heritable systemic marker of inflammation that is associated with cardiovascular disease risk. Genome-wide association studies have identified CRP-associated common variants associated in ∼25 genes. Our aims were to apply exome sequencing to (1) assess whether the candidate loci contain rare coding variants associated with CRP levels and (2) perform an exome-wide search for rare variants in novel genes associated with CRP levels. We exome-sequenced 6050 European-Americans (EAs) and 3109 African-Americans (AAs) from the NHLBI-ESP and the CHARGE consortia, and performed association tests of sequence data with measured CRP levels. In single-variant tests across candidate loci, a novel rare (minor allele frequency = 0.16%) CRP-coding variant (rs77832441-A; p.Thr59Met) was associated with 53% lower mean CRP levels (P = 2.9 × 10(-6)). We replicated the association of rs77832441 in an exome array analysis of 11 414 EAs (P = 3.0 × 10(-15)). Despite a strong effect on CRP levels, rs77832441 was not associated with inflammation-related phenotypes including coronary heart disease. We also found evidence for an AA-specific association of APOE-ε2 rs7214 with higher CRP levels. At the exome-wide significance level (P < 5.0 × 10(-8)), we confirmed associations for reported common variants of HNF1A, CRP, IL6R and TOMM40-APOE. In gene-based tests, a burden of rare/lower frequency variation in CRP in EAs (P ≤ 6.8 × 10(-4)) and in retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptor α (RORA) in AAs (P = 1.7 × 10(-3)) were associated with CRP levels at the candidate gene level (P < 2.0 × 10(-3)). This inquiry did not elucidate novel genes, but instead demonstrated that variants distributed across the allele frequency spectrum within candidate genes contribute to CRP levels. PMID:25187575

  4. Effects of Dietary Crude Protein Levels and Cysteamine Supplementation on Protein Synthetic and Degradative Signaling in Skeletal Muscle of Finishing Pigs.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ping; Zhang, Lin; Li, Jiaolong; Luo, Yiqiu; Zhang, Bolin; Xing, Shen; Zhu, Yuping; Sun, Hui; Gao, Feng; Zhou, Guanghong

    2015-01-01

    Dietary protein levels and cysteamine (CS) supplementation can affect growth performance and protein metabolism of pigs. However, the influence of dietary protein intake on the growth response of CS-treated pigs is unclear, and the mechanisms involved in protein metabolism remain unknown. Hence, we investigated the interactions between dietary protein levels and CS supplementation and the effects of dietary crude protein levels and CS supplementation on protein synthetic and degradative signaling in skeletal muscle of finishing pigs. One hundred twenty barrows (65.84 ± 0.61 kg) were allocated to a 2 × 2 factorial arrangement with five replicates of six pigs each. The primary variations were dietary crude protein (CP) levels (14% or 10%) and CS supplemental levels (0 or 700 mg/kg). The low-protein (LP) diets (10% CP) were supplemented with enough essential amino acids (EAA) to meet the NRC AA requirements of pigs and maintain the balanced supply of eight EAA including lysine, methionine, threonine, tryptophan, valine, phenylalanine, isoleucine, and leucine. After 41 days, 10 pigs per treatment were slaughtered. We found that LP diets supplemented with EAA resulted in decreased concentrations of plasma somatostatin (SS) (P<0.01) and plasma urea nitrogen (PUN) (P<0.001), while dietary protein levels did not affect other traits. However, CS supplementation increased the average daily gain (P<0.001) and lean percentage (P<0.05), and decreased the feed conversion ratio (P<0.05) and back fat (P<0.05). CS supplementation also increased the concentrations of plasma insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) (P<0.001), and reduced the concentrations of leptin, SS, and PUN (P<0.001). Increased mRNA abundance of Akt1 and IGF-1 signaling (P<0.001) and decreased mRNA abundance of Forkhead Box O (FOXO) 4 (P<0.01) and muscle atrophy F-box (P<0.001) were observed in pigs receiving CS. Additionally, CS supplementation increased the protein levels for the phosphorylated mammalian target

  5. Effects of Dietary Crude Protein Levels and Cysteamine Supplementation on Protein Synthetic and Degradative Signaling in Skeletal Muscle of Finishing Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Ping; Zhang, Lin; Li, Jiaolong; Luo, Yiqiu; Zhang, Bolin; Xing, Shen; Zhu, Yuping; Sun, Hui; Gao, Feng; Zhou, Guanghong

    2015-01-01

    Dietary protein levels and cysteamine (CS) supplementation can affect growth performance and protein metabolism of pigs. However, the influence of dietary protein intake on the growth response of CS-treated pigs is unclear, and the mechanisms involved in protein metabolism remain unknown. Hence, we investigated the interactions between dietary protein levels and CS supplementation and the effects of dietary crude protein levels and CS supplementation on protein synthetic and degradative signaling in skeletal muscle of finishing pigs. One hundred twenty barrows (65.84 ± 0.61 kg) were allocated to a 2 × 2 factorial arrangement with five replicates of six pigs each. The primary variations were dietary crude protein (CP) levels (14% or 10%) and CS supplemental levels (0 or 700 mg/kg). The low-protein (LP) diets (10% CP) were supplemented with enough essential amino acids (EAA) to meet the NRC AA requirements of pigs and maintain the balanced supply of eight EAA including lysine, methionine, threonine, tryptophan, valine, phenylalanine, isoleucine, and leucine. After 41 days, 10 pigs per treatment were slaughtered. We found that LP diets supplemented with EAA resulted in decreased concentrations of plasma somatostatin (SS) (P<0.01) and plasma urea nitrogen (PUN) (P<0.001), while dietary protein levels did not affect other traits. However, CS supplementation increased the average daily gain (P<0.001) and lean percentage (P<0.05), and decreased the feed conversion ratio (P<0.05) and back fat (P<0.05). CS supplementation also increased the concentrations of plasma insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) (P<0.001), and reduced the concentrations of leptin, SS, and PUN (P<0.001). Increased mRNA abundance of Akt1 and IGF-1 signaling (P<0.001) and decreased mRNA abundance of Forkhead Box O (FOXO) 4 (P<0.01) and muscle atrophy F-box (P<0.001) were observed in pigs receiving CS. Additionally, CS supplementation increased the protein levels for the phosphorylated mammalian target

  6. mTOR inhibition and levels of the DNA repair protein MGMT in T98G glioblastoma cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), the most common and most aggressive type of primary adult brain tumour, responds poorly to conventional treatment. Temozolomide (TMZ) chemotherapy remains the most commonly used treatment, despite a large proportion of tumours displaying TMZ resistance. 60% of GBM tumours have unmethylated MGMT promoter regions, resulting in an overexpression of the DNA repair protein O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT), which is responsible for tumour resistance to TMZ chemotherapy. Tumours also often exhibit hyperactive PI3-kinase/mTOR signalling, which enables them to resynthesise proteins quickly. Since MGMT is a suicide protein that is degraded upon binding to and repairing TMZ-induced O6-methylguanine adducts, it has been hypothesized that inhibition of translation via the mTOR signalling pathway could generate a tumour-specific reduction in MGMT protein and increase TMZ sensitivity. Methods MGMT was monitored at the post-transcriptional, translational and protein levels, to determine what effect mTOR inhibition was having on MGMT protein expression in vitro. Results We show that inhibiting mTOR signalling is indeed associated with acute inhibition of protein synthesis. Western blots show that despite this, relative to loading control proteins, steady state levels of MGMT protein increased and MGMT mRNA was retained in heavy polysomes. Whilst TMZ treatment resulted in maintained MGMT protein levels, concomitant treatment of T98G cells with TMZ and KU0063794 resulted in increased MGMT protein levels without changes in total mRNA levels. Conclusions These in vitro data suggest that, counterintuitively, mTOR inhibition may not be a useful adjunct to TMZ therapy and that more investigation is needed before applying mTOR inhibitors in a clinical setting. PMID:24909675

  7. Cumulative Depression Episodes Predicts Later C-Reactive Protein Levels: A Prospective Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Copeland, William E.; Shanahan, Lilly; Worthman, Carol; Angold, Adrian; Costello, E. Jane

    2013-01-01

    Background Depression is associated with elevated levels of the inflammation marker C -reactive protein (CRP), yet the direction of this association remains unclear. This study tested bi-directional longitudinal associations between CRP and depression in a sample of adolescent and young adults. The study compared the effects of current depression to the cumulative episodes of depression over time. Methods Nine waves of data from the prospective population-based Great Smoky Mountains Study (N = 1,420) were used, covering children in the community aged 9–16, 19, and 21 years old. Structured interviews were used to assess depressive symptoms, depression diagnosis, and cumulative depressive episodes. Bloodspots were collected at each observation and assayed for CRP levels. Results CRP levels were not associated with later depression status. In contrast, all depression-related variables displayed evidence of association with later CRP levels. The associations with depressive symptoms and diagnostic status were attenuated after controlling for covariates particularly body mass index, smoking, and medication use. The effect of cumulative depressive episodes, however, continued to be significant after accounting for a range of covariates. Body mass index, smoking behavior and recent infections may mediate a portion of the effect of cumulative episodes on later CRP, but cumulative depressive episodes continued to predict CRP levels independently. Conclusions The occurrence of multiple depressive episodes exerted the greatest effect on later CRP levels. This suggests that risk for the diseases of middle age - cardiovascular and metabolic disease – may begin in childhood and depend, in part, upon long-term emotional functioning. PMID:22047718

  8. Effect of dietary protein quality and feeding level on milk secretion and mammary protein synthesis in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Sampson, D.A.; Jansen, G.R.

    1985-04-01

    Protein synthesis was studied in mammary tissue of rats fed diets deficient in protein quality and/or restricted in food intake throughout gestation and lactation. Diets containing 25% wheat gluten (WG), wheat gluten plus lysine and threonine (WGLT), or casein (C) were pair-fed from conception until day 15 of lactation at 100% or 85% of WG ad libitum consumption (PF100 and PF85, respectively). A seventh group was fed C ad libitum. Rates of protein synthesis were measured in vivo at day 15 of lactation from incorporation of (3-/sup 3/H)phenylalanine. At both PF100 and PF85, fractional and absolute rates of mammary gland protein synthesis were two- to three-fold higher in rats fed C than in those fed WG. Pup weights showed similar treatment effects. Both mammary protein synthesis rates and pup weights were significantly higher in rats fed C at PF85 than rats fed WG ad libitum. Food restriction from PF100 to PF85 depressed pup weights and mammary protein synthesis rates in rats fed WGLT, but had no effect in rats fed WG. These results demonstrate that when food intake is restricted, improvement of protein quality of the maternal diet increases milk output in the rat in association with increased rates of mammary protein synthesis.

  9. Levels of synthesis of primate-specific nuclear proteins differ between growth-arrested and proliferating cells

    SciTech Connect

    Celis, J.E.; Madsen, P.; Nielsen, S.; Ratz, G.P.; Lauridsen, J.B.; Celis, A.

    1987-02-01

    A monoclonal antibody that reacts specifically with the proliferation-sensitive nuclear proteins, isoelectric focusing (IEF) 8Z31 (molecular weight (MW), 76,000 charge variants, HeLa protein catalogue number) has been characterized. As determined by indirect immunofluorescence, the antibody stains the nucleolus and nucleoplasm of interphase-cultured cells of primate origin, but does not react with cells of other species. Proteins having similar MWs and isoelectric points as the human or monkey (primates) proteins were not observed in cultured cells of the following species: aves, bat, dog, dolphin, goat, hamster, mink, mouse, pisces, potoroo, rabbit and rat. Quantitative two-dimensional (2D) gel electrophoretic analysis of (/sup 35/S)methionine-labelled proteins synthesized by normal (quiescent, proliferating) and SV40-transformed human MRC-5 fibroblasts revealed significant differences in the levels of synthesis of both IEF 8Z30 and 8Z31. In quiescent cells the main labelled product corresponded to IEF 8Z31 (ratio IEF 8Z31/8Z30, 2.3), while in the transformed cells the major product was IEF 8Z30 (ratio, 0.62). Normal proliferating fibroblasts exhibited similar levels of both proteins (ratio, 1.21). Combined levels of synthesis of both proteins were 1.50 and 1.20 times as high in the transformed cells as in the quiescent and proliferating cells, respectively. Modulation of the levels of synthesis of these proteins may play a role in cell proliferation.

  10. High Levels of Expression of P-glycoprotein/Multidrug Resistance Protein Result in Resistance to Vintafolide.

    PubMed

    Guertin, Amy D; O'Neil, Jennifer; Stoeck, Alexander; Reddy, Joseph A; Cristescu, Razvan; Haines, Brian B; Hinton, Marlene C; Dorton, Ryan; Bloomfield, Alicia; Nelson, Melissa; Vetzel, Marilynn; Lejnine, Serguei; Nebozhyn, Michael; Zhang, Theresa; Loboda, Andrey; Picard, Kristen L; Schmidt, Emmett V; Dussault, Isabelle; Leamon, Christopher P

    2016-08-01

    Targeting surface receptors overexpressed on cancer cells is one way to specifically treat cancer versus normal cells. Vintafolide (EC145), which consists of folate linked to a cytotoxic small molecule, desacetylvinblastine hydrazide (DAVLBH), takes advantage of the overexpression of folate receptor (FR) on cancer cells. Once bound to FR, vintafolide enters the cell by endocytosis, and the reducing environment of the endosome cleaves the linker, releasing DAVLBH to destabilize microtubules. Vintafolide has shown efficacy and improved tolerability compared with DAVLBH in FR-positive preclinical models. As the first FR-targeting drug to reach the clinic, vintafolide has achieved favorable responses in phase II clinical trials in FR-positive ovarian and lung cancer. However, some FR-positive patients in these clinical trials do not respond to vintafolide. We sought to identify potential biomarkers of resistance to aid in the future development of this and other FR-targeting drugs. Here, we confirm that high P-glycoprotein (P-gp) expression was the strongest predictor of resistance to DAVLBH in a panel of 359 cancer cell lines. Furthermore, targeted delivery of DAVLBH via the FR, as in vintafolide, fails to overcome P-gp-mediated efflux of DAVLBH in both in vitro and in vivo preclinical models. Therefore, we suggest that patients whose tumors express high levels of P-gp be excluded from future clinical trials for vintafolide as well as other FR-targeted therapeutics bearing a P-gp substrate. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(8); 1998-2008. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27256377

  11. Identification of a functional SNP in the 3'-UTR of caprine MTHFR gene that is associated with milk protein levels.

    PubMed

    An, Xiaopeng; Song, Yuxuan; Hou, Jinxing; Wang, Shan; Gao, Kexin; Cao, Binyun

    2016-08-01

    Xinong Saanen (n = 305) and Guanzhong (n = 317) dairy goats were used to detect SNPs in the caprine MTHFR 3'-UTR by DNA sequencing. One novel SNP (c.*2494G>A) was identified in the said region. Individuals with the AA genotype had greater milk protein levels than did those with the GG genotype at the c.*2494 G>A locus in both dairy goat breeds (P < 0.05). Functional assays indicated that the MTHFR:c.2494G>A substitution could increase the binding activity of bta-miR-370 with the MTHFR 3'-UTR. In addition, we observed a significant increase in the MTHFR protein level of AA carriers relative to that of GG carriers. These altered levels of MTHFR protein may account for the association of the SNP with milk protein level. PMID:27062401

  12. Chronic Low Level Complement Activation within the Eye Is Controlled by Intraocular Complement Regulatory Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Sohn, Jeong-Hyeon; Kaplan, Henry J.; Suk, Hye-Jung; Bora, Puran S.; Bora, Nalini S.

    2007-01-01

    -Crry mAb. Intracameral injection of anti-rat CD59 (6D1), anti-rat MHC class I antigen (OX-18), anti-rat Ig (G-16-510E3), or MOPC-21 caused no inflammatory reaction. Conclusions The results suggest that the complement system is continuously active at a low level in the normal eye and is tightly regulated by intraocular complement regulatory proteins. PMID:11006244

  13. C-reactive protein levels in stable COPD patients: a case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Denise Rossato; Gazzana, Marcelo Basso; Knorst, Marli Maria

    2015-01-01

    Background Previous studies have documented that C-reactive protein (CRP) levels are increased in stable COPD patients. However, most studies have also shown that higher CRP levels are observed in patients with comorbidities like diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease. We aimed to investigate if CRP levels are increased in stable COPD patients, and if there is an association between CRP levels and pulmonary function tests and clinical characteristics. Methods We conducted a case-control study in a tertiary care, university-affiliated hospital. COPD patients and controls were matched for sex and age in a 2:1 matching ratio. We included only those patients who had quit smoking. CRP levels were determined and pulmonary function tests were performed in both the groups. Results A total of 60 COPD patients and 30 controls were included in the analysis. The study subjects had a mean age of 64.8±8.5 years in COPD group and 64.3±9.2 years in control group (P=0.214). The median of CRP levels was 3.17 mg/L (interquartile range [IQR]: 1.73–5.99 mg/L) in COPD group and 2.13 mg/L (IQR: 1.18–7.69 mg/L) in control group (P=0.370). There were 34 (56.7%) patients in COPD group and 14 (46.7%) patients in control group with CRP levels greater than 3 mg/dL (P=0.382). Using bivariate correlations, we found significant positive correlations in COPD patients between body mass index (BMI) and CRP (r=0.3, P=0.045), and between CRP and forced vital capacity (FVC, % of predicted) (r=−0.3; P=0.023). In a multivariate model, female sex and FVC (% of predicted) were associated with a CRP value greater than 3 mg/dL in the COPD group. Conclusion The levels of CRP in the stable COPD patients were not significantly different when compared to those in the control subjects. Female sex and FVC (% predicted) were associated with CRP levels greater than 3 mg/dL in the COPD group. PMID:26357470

  14. A novel cryptochrome in the diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum influences the regulation of light-harvesting protein levels.

    PubMed

    Juhas, Matthias; von Zadow, Andrea; Spexard, Meike; Schmidt, Matthias; Kottke, Tilman; Büchel, Claudia

    2014-05-01

    Diatoms possess several genes for proteins of the cryptochrome/photolyase family. A typical sequence for a plant cryptochrome was not found in our analysis of the Phaeodactylum tricornutum genome, but one protein grouped with higher plant and green algal cryptochromes. This protein, CryP, binds FAD and 5,10-methenyltetrahydrofolate, according to our spectroscopic studies on heterologously expressed protein. 5,10-Methenyltetrahydrofolate binding is a feature common to both cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer photolyases and DASH cryptochromes. In recombinant CryP, however, the FAD chromophore was present in its neutral radical state and had a red-shifted absorption maximum at 637 nm, which is more characteristic for a DASH cryptochrome than a cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer photolyase. Upon illumination with blue light, the fully reduced state of FAD was formed in the presence of reductant. Expression of CryP was silenced by antisense approaches, and the resulting cell lines showed increased levels of proteins of light-harvesting complexes, the Lhcf proteins, in vivo. In contrast, the levels of proteins active in light protection, the Lhcx proteins, were reduced. Thus, CryP cannot be directly grouped with known members of the cryptochrome/photolyase family. Of all P. tricornutum proteins, it is the most similar in sequence to a plant cryptochrome, and is involved in the regulation of light-harvesting protein expression, but shows spectroscopic features and a chromophore composition that are most typical of a DASH cryptochrome. PMID:24628952

  15. Computer-aided drug designing.

    PubMed

    Gore, Mohini; Desai, Neetin S

    2014-01-01

    Computer-aided drug designing has emerged as a cost-effective and rapid tool for the discovery of newer therapeutic agents. Several algorithms have been developed to analyze protein structure and function, to identify interacting ligands, active site residues, and to study protein-ligand interactions, which can eventually lead to the identification of new drugs. In silico drug designing involves identification of the target protein which is responsible for the development of the disease under study. The three-dimensional structure of the protein can be predicted using homology modeling, while molecular docking is applied to study the interaction of a drug molecule with the protein. The best orientation of the ligand-protein docked structure which has overall minimum energy needs to be obtained. In silico methods can be used to identify potential drugs for various diseases. Thus, computer-aided drug designing has become an indispensible and integral part of the drug discovery process. PMID:24870144

  16. Whey Protein

    MedlinePlus

    ... shows that taking whey protein in combination with strength training increases lean body mass, strength, and muscle size. ... grams/kg of whey protein in combination with strength training for 6-10 weeks. For HIV/AIDS-related ...

  17. Prediction of the Grade of Acute Cholecystitis by Plasma Level of C-Reactive Protein

    PubMed Central

    Kabul Gurbulak, Esin; Gurbulak, Bunyamin; Akgun, Ismail Ethem; Duzkoylu, Yigit; Battal, Muharrem; Fevzi Celayir, Mustafa; Demir, Uygar

    2015-01-01

    Background: Acute cholecystitis is the most common complication of gallbladder stones. Today, Tokyo guidelines criteria are recommended for diagnosis, grading, and management of acute cholecystitis. Objectives: We aimed to evaluate the levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) at different cut-off values to predict the severity of the disease and its possible role in grading the disease with regard to the guideline. Patients and Methods: This is a retrospective study, analyzing 682 cases out of consecutive 892 patients with acute cholecystitis admitted to two different general surgery clinics in Istanbul, Turkey. Records of patients diagnosed with acute cholecystitis were screened retrospectively from the hospital computer database between January 2011 and July 2014. A total of 210 patients with concomitant diseases causing high CRP levels were excluded from the study. The criteria of Tokyo guidelines were used in grading the severity of acute cholecystitis, and patients were divided into 3 groups. CRP values at the time of admission were analyzed and compared among the groups. Results: Mean CRP levels of groups were found to be significantly different, 18.96 mg/L in Group I, 133.51 mg/L in Group II, and 237.23 mg/L in Group III (P < 0.001). Having examined CRP values among the groups, they were found to be highly and significantly correlated with the disease grade (P < 0.0001). After evaluating CRP levels according to the grade of the disease, group 2 was distinguished from group 1 with a cut-off CRP level of 70.65 mg/L, and from group 3 with a value of 198.95 mg/L. Those results were found to be statistically significant (P < 0.001). Conclusions: CRP, a well-known acute phase reactant that increases rapidly in various inflammatory processes, can be accepted as a strong predictor in classifying different grades of the disease, and treatment can be reliably planned according to this classification. PMID:26023353

  18. Retinol Binding Protein-4 and Adiponectin Levels in Thyroid Overt and Subclinical Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Kokkinos, S; Papazoglou, D; Zisimopoulos, A; Papanas, N; Tiaka, E; Antonoglou, C; Maltezos, E

    2016-02-01

    Thyroid dysfunction is accompanied by numerous changes in intermediary metabolism. Retinol binding protein-4 (RBP-4) and adiponectin are 2 adipocytokines that have multiple metabolic functions. The aim of our study was to examine serum RBP4 and adiponectin levels in clinical (before and after therapy) and subclinical hyperthyroid and hypothyroid subjects as compared to controls.150 patients with thyroid dysfunction were recruited (65 hyperthyroid and 85 hypothyroid) while 28 euthyroid subjects served as a control group. We measured anthropometric, biochemical and hormonal (free T4, free T3, TSH, insulin) parameters in all participants. RBP-4 and adiponectin were measured using commercial ELISA kits.Mean baseline levels of RBP-4 were higher in patients with clinical hypothyroidism (29.0±10.2 ng/ml, 25.1±12.6 ng/ml, 38.8±16.5 ng/ml, 31.9±13.2 ng/ml, 20.4±8.2 ng/ml in patients with hyperthyroidism, subclinical hyperthryrodism, hypothyroidism, subclinical hypothyroidism and controls respectively, F=4.86, P<0.001) and decreased significantly in patients with clinical hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism after normalization of thyroid hormones' levels (from 29.0±10.2 to 24.9±8.4 ng/ml, p=0.003 and from 38.8±16.5 to 29.0±10.8 ng/ml, p=0.001 respectively). We did not observe analogous changes in adiponectin levels in any of the studied groups.RBP-4 levels are higher in patients with clinical hypothyroidism and exhibit a marked decrease after normalization of thyroid function in both hyper and hypothyroid patients. We suggest that RBP-4 may play a role in the metabolic disturbances which accompany thyroid dysfunction. PMID:26575118

  19. A comparison of ghrelin, glucose, alpha-amylase and protein levels in saliva from diabetics.

    PubMed

    Aydin, Suleyman

    2007-01-31

    During the past decade, many salivary parameters have been used to characterize disease states. Ghrelin (GAH) is recently-discovered peptide hormone secreted mainly from the stomach but also produced in a number of other tissues including salivary glands. The aim of this work was to examine the relationship between active (aGAH) and inactive (dGAH) ghrelin in the saliva and other salivary parameters in type II diabetic patients and healthy controls. Salivary parameters were assessed in a single measurement of unstimulated whole saliva from 20 obese and 20 non-obese type II diabetes patients, and in 22 healthy controls. Total protein and alpha-amylase were determined by colorimetric methods, and glucose by the glucose-oxidase method. Saliva aGAH and dGAH levels were measured using a commercial radioimmunoassay (RIA) kit. Salivary concentrations of aGAH and dGAH ghrelin were more markedly decreased in obese diabetic subjects than in the two other groups. Glucose and alpha-amylase levels were higher in diabetic subjects than in controls. Furthermore, there were correlations between GAH levels and BMI, and between GAH and blood pressure. However, there was no marked variability in saliva flow rates among the groups. These results indicate that measurement of salivary GAH and its relationship to other salivary parameters might help to provide insight into the role of ghrelin in diabetes. PMID:17244479

  20. Dynamic regulation of basement membrane protein levels promotes egg chamber elongation in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Isabella, Adam J; Horne-Badovinac, Sally

    2015-10-15

    Basement membranes (BMs) are sheet-like extracellular matrices that provide essential support to epithelial tissues. Recent evidence suggests that regulated changes in BM architecture can direct tissue morphogenesis, but the mechanisms by which cells remodel BMs are largely unknown. The Drosophila egg chamber is an organ-like structure that transforms from a spherical to an ellipsoidal shape as it matures. This elongation coincides with a stage-specific increase in Type IV Collagen (Col IV) levels in the BM surrounding the egg chamber; however, the mechanisms and morphogenetic relevance of this remodeling event have not been established. Here, we identify the Collagen-binding protein SPARC as a negative regulator of egg chamber elongation, and show that SPARC down-regulation is necessary for the increase in Col IV levels to occur. We find that SPARC interacts with Col IV prior to secretion and propose that, through this interaction, SPARC blocks the incorporation of newly synthesized Col IV into the BM. We additionally observe a decrease in Perlecan levels during elongation, and show that Perlecan is a negative regulator of this process. These data provide mechanistic insight into SPARC's conserved role in matrix dynamics and demonstrate that regulated changes in BM composition influence organ morphogenesis. PMID:26348027

  1. Measurement of pulmonary status and surfactant protein levels during dexamethasone treatment of neonatal respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, J. Y.; Yeh, T. F.; Lin, Y. C.; Miyamura, K.; Holmskov, U.; Reid, K. B.

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Early postnatal use of dexamethasone in infants with respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) has been shown effectively to improve pulmonary status and to allow early weaning off mechanical ventilation. However, the mechanisms to explain the beneficial effects of dexamethasone in ventilatory dependent preterm infants remain unclear. METHODS: A double blind, placebo controlled study was performed to determine the change in pulmonary ventilation of premature infants with RDS as a result of dexamethasone treatment, and to evaluate the effect of dexamethasone on the levels of surfactant-associated proteins A (SP-A) and D (SP-D) in the tracheal fluid from 34 premature infants with RDS and 29 control subjects. RESULTS: Dexamethasone treatment decreased fractional inspired oxygen concentration (FIO2), arterial carbon dioxide tension (PCO2), mean airway pressure (MAP), and facilitated successful weaning from mechanical ventilation. SP-A concentrations in the tracheal aspirates were increased at days 7 and 14, and SP-D concentrations were increased during the period from days 3 to 14 in the dexamethasone treated group compared with the control group. However, albumin levels in the tracheal aspirate samples were decreased after dexamethasone treatment over the period from days 3 to 14. There was an inverse correlation between PCO2 values and SP-A concentrations. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that early use of dexamethasone can improve pulmonary status and also increase SP-A and SP-D levels in the tracheal fluid in premature infants with RDS. PMID:8984701

  2. Reduced levels of protein recoding by A-to-I RNA editing in Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Khermesh, Khen; D'Erchia, Anna Maria; Barak, Michal; Annese, Anita; Wachtel, Chaim; Levanon, Erez Y.; Picardi, Ernesto; Eisenberg, Eli

    2016-01-01

    Adenosine to inosine (A-to-I) RNA editing, catalyzed by the ADAR enzyme family, acts on dsRNA structures within pre-mRNA molecules. Editing of the coding part of the mRNA may lead to recoding, amino acid substitution in the resulting protein, possibly modifying its biochemical and biophysical properties. Altered RNA editing patterns have been observed in various neurological pathologies. Here, we present a comprehensive study of recoding by RNA editing in Alzheimer's disease (AD), the most common cause of irreversible dementia. We have used a targeted resequencing approach supplemented by a microfluidic-based high-throughput PCR coupled with next-generation sequencing to accurately quantify A-to-I RNA editing levels in a preselected set of target sites, mostly located within the coding sequence of synaptic genes. Overall, editing levels decreased in AD patients’ brain tissues, mainly in the hippocampus and to a lesser degree in the temporal and frontal lobes. Differential RNA editing levels were observed in 35 target sites within 22 genes. These results may shed light on a possible association between the neurodegenerative processes typical for AD and deficient RNA editing. PMID:26655226

  3. Ursolic acid regulates aging process through enhancing of metabolic sensor proteins level.

    PubMed

    Bahrami, Soroush Alaghehband; Bakhtiari, Nuredin

    2016-08-01

    We previously reported that Ursolic Acid (UA) ameliorates skeletal muscle performance through satellite cells proliferation and cellular energy status. In studying the potential role of the hypothalamus in aging, we developed a strategy to pursue UA effects on the hypothalamus anti-aging proteins such as; SIRT1, SIRT6, PGC-1β and α-Klotho. In this study, we used a model of aging animals (C57BL/6). UA dissolved in Corn oil (20mg/ml) and then administrated (200mg/Kg i.p injection) to mice, twice daily for 7days. After treatment times, the mice perfused and the hypothalamus isolated for preparing of tissue to Immunofluorescence microscopy. The data illustrated that UA significantly increased SIRT1 (∼3.5±0.3 folds) and SIRT-6 (∼1.5±0.2 folds) proteins overexpression (P<0.001). In addition, our results showed that UA enhanced α-Klotho (∼3.3±0.3) and PGC-1β (∼2.6±0.2 folds) proteins levels (P<0. 01). In this study, data were analyzed using SPSS 16 (ANOVA test). To the best of our knowledge, it seems that UA through enhancing of anti-aging biomarkers (SIRT1 and SIRT6) and PGC-1β in hypothalamus regulates aging-process and attenuates mitochondrial-related diseases. In regard to the key role of α-Klotho in aging, our data indicate that UA may be on the horizon to forestall diseases of aging. PMID:27470332

  4. Increased levels of myelin basic protein transcripts in virus-induced demyelination.

    PubMed

    Kristensson, K; Holmes, K V; Duchala, C S; Zeller, N K; Lazzarini, R A; Dubois-Dalcq, M

    In multiple sclerosis, a demyelinating disease of young adults, there is a paucity of myelin repair in the central nervous system (CNS) which is necessary for the restoration of fast saltatory conduction in axons. Consequently, this relapsing disease often causes marked disability. In similar diseases of small rodents, however, remyelination can be quite extensive, as in the demyelinating disease caused by the A59 strain of mouse hepatitis virus (MHV-A59), a coronavirus of mice. To investigate when and where oligodendrocytes are first triggered to repair CNS myelin in such disease, we have used a complementary DNA probe specific for one major myelin protein gene, myelin basic protein (MBP), which hybridizes with the four forms of MBP messenger RNA in rodents. Using Northern blot and in situ hybridization techniques, we previously found that MBP mRNA is first detected at about 5 days after birth, peaks at 18 days and progressively decreases to 25% of the peak levels in the adult. We now report that in spinal cord sections of adult animals with active demyelination and inflammatory cells, in situ hybridization reveals a dramatic increase in probe binding to MBP-specific mRNA at 2-3 weeks after virus inoculation and before remyelination can be detected by morphological methods. This increase of MBP-specific mRNA is found at the edge of the demyelinating area and extends into surrounding areas of normal-appearing white matter. Thus, in situ hybridization with myelin-specific probes appears to be a useful method for detecting the timing, intensity and location of myelin protein gene reactivation preceding remyelination. This method could be used to elucidate whether such a reactivation occurs in multiple sclerosis brain tissue. Our results suggest that in mice, glial cells react to a demyelinating process with widespread MBP mRNA synthesis which may be triggered by a diffusible factor released in the demyelinated areas. PMID:2426599

  5. The Influence of Tobacco Smoke on Protein and Metal Levels in the Serum of Women during Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Wrześniak, Marta; Kepinska, Marta; Królik, Małgorzata; Milnerowicz, Halina

    2016-01-01

    Background Tobacco smoking by pregnant women has a negative effect on fetal development and increases pregnancy risk by changing the oxidative balance and microelements level. Smoking affects the concentration, structure and function of proteins, potentially leading to various negative effects on pregnancy outcomes. Methodology/Principal Findings The influence of tobacco smoke on key protein fractions in smoking and non-smoking healthy pregnant women was determined by capillary electrophoresis (CE). Concentrations of the proteins α1-antitrypsin, α1-acid glycoprotein, α2-macroglobulin and transferrin were determined by ELISA tests. Total protein concentration was measured by the Biuret method. Smoking status was established by cotinine levels. Cadmium (Cd) and Zinc (Zn) concentrations were determined by flame atomic absorption spectrometry and the Zn/Cd ratio was calculated based on these numbers. Smoking women had a 3.7 times higher level of Cd than non-smoking women. Zn levels decreased during pregnancy for all women. The Zn/Cd ratio was three times lower in smoking women. The differences between the changes in the protein profile for smoking and non-smoking women were noted. Regarding proteins, α1-antitrypsin and α2-macroglobulin levels were lower in the non-smoking group than in the smoking group and correlated with Cd levels (r = -0.968, p = 0.032 for non-smokers; r = −0.835, p = 0.019 for smokers). Zn/Cd ratios correlated negatively with α1-, α2- and β-globulins. Conclusions/Significance Exposure to tobacco smoke increases the concentration of Cd in the blood of pregnant women and may lead to an elevated risk of pregnancy disorders. During pregnancy alter concentrations of some proteins. The correlation of Cd with proteins suggests that it is one of the causes of protein aberrations. PMID:27548057

  6. Endogenous salicylic acid levels correlate with accumulation of pathogenesis-related proteins and virus resistance in tobacco

    SciTech Connect

    Yalpani, N.; Shulaev, V.; Raskin, I. )

    1993-07-01

    Salicylic acid (SA) is hypothesized to be an endogenous regulator of local and systemic disease resistance and an inducer of pathogenesis-related (PR) proteins among plants. High levels of PR proteins have been observed in an uninoculated amphidiploid hybrid of Nicotiana glutinosa [times] N. debneyi, which is highly resistant to tobacco mosaic virus (TMV). Fluoresence, UV, and mass spectral analysis established that the levels of SA in healthy N. glutinosa [times] N. debneyi leaves were 30 times greater than in N. tabacum [open quotes]Xanthi-nc[close quotes] tobacco, which does not constitutively express PR proteins and is less resistant to TMV. Upon TMV-inoculation SA levels increased at least 70-fold leaves of Xanthi-nc but role only slightly in the hybrid. Phloem exudates of N. glutinosa [times] N. debneyi contained at least 500 times more SA than those of Xanthi-nc. SA treatment caused the appearance of PR-1 protein in Xanthi-nc but did not affect constitutively high levels of PR-1 protein in N. glutinosa [times] N. debneyi. In contrast to Xanthi-nc tobacco, TMV-inoculated N. glutinosa [times] N. debneyi kept at 32 C accumulated more than 0.5 [mu]g SA/g fresh weight, maintained high levels of PR proteins, and developed a hypersensitive response to TMV. PR proteins have previously been shown to accumulate in the lower leaves of healthy, flowering Xanthi-nc tobacco, which exhibited increased resistance to TMV. These developmentally induced increases in resistance and PR-1 proteins positively correlated with tissue levels of SA. These results affirm the regulatory role of SA in disease resistance and PR protein production. 31 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Influence of casein as a percentage of true protein and protein level on color and texture of milks containing 1 and 2% fat.

    PubMed

    Misawa, Noriko; Barbano, David M; Drake, MaryAnne

    2016-07-01

    Combinations of fresh liquid microfiltration retentate of skim milk, ultrafiltered retentate and permeate produced from microfiltration permeate, cream, and dried lactose monohydrate were used to produce a matrix of 20 milks. The milks contained 5 levels of casein as a percentage of true protein of about 5, 25, 50, 75, and 80% and 4 levels of true protein of 3.0, 3.76, 4.34, and 5.0% with constant lactose percentage of 5%. The experiment was replicated twice and repeated for both 1 and 2% fat content. Hunter color measurements, relative viscosity, and fat globule size distribution were measured, and a trained panel documented appearance and texture attributes on all milks. Overall, casein as a percentage of true protein had stronger effects than level of true protein on Hunter L, a, b values, relative viscosity, and fat globule size when using fresh liquid micellar casein concentrates and milk serum protein concentrates produced by a combination of microfiltration and ultrafiltration. As casein as a percentage of true protein increased, the milks became more white (higher L value), less green (lower negative a value), and less yellow (lower b value). Relative viscosity increased and d(0.9) generally decreased with increasing casein as a percentage of true protein. Panelists perceived milks with increasing casein as a percentage of true protein as more white, more opaque, and less yellow. Panelists were able to detect increased throat cling and mouthcoating with increased casein as a percentage of true protein in 2% milks, even when differences in appearance among milks were masked. PMID:27157580

  8. The Highwire ubiquitin ligase promotes axonal degeneration by tuning levels of Nmnat protein.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Xin; Hao, Yan; Sun, Kan; Li, Jiaxing; Li, Xia; Mishra, Bibhudatta; Soppina, Pushpanjali; Wu, Chunlai; Hume, Richard I; Collins, Catherine A

    2012-01-01

    Axonal degeneration is a hallmark of many neuropathies, neurodegenerative diseases, and injuries. Here, using a Drosophila injury model, we have identified a highly conserved E3 ubiquitin ligase, Highwire (Hiw), as an important regulator of axonal and synaptic degeneration. Mutations in hiw strongly inhibit Wallerian degeneration in multiple neuron types and developmental stages. This new phenotype is mediated by a new downstream target of Hiw: the NAD+ biosynthetic enzyme nicotinamide mononucleotide adenyltransferase (Nmnat), which acts in parallel to a previously known target of Hiw, the Wallenda dileucine zipper kinase (Wnd/DLK) MAPKKK. Hiw promotes a rapid disappearance of Nmnat protein in the distal stump after injury. An increased level of Nmnat protein in hiw mutants is both required and sufficient to inhibit degeneration. Ectopically expressed mouse Nmnat2 is also subject to regulation by Hiw in distal axons and synapses. These findings implicate an important role for endogenous Nmnat and its regulation, via a conserved mechanism, in the initiation of axonal degeneration. Through independent regulation of Wnd/DLK, whose function is required for proximal axons to regenerate, Hiw plays a central role in coordinating both regenerative and degenerative responses to axonal injury. PMID:23226106

  9. Protein carbonyl levels correlate with performance in elite field hockey players.

    PubMed

    Rosa-Lima, Frederico Luis; Lannes, Luiz; Viana-Gomes, Diego; Pierucci, Anna Paola T R; Salerno, Verônica P

    2015-07-01

    Excess and incorrectly selected exercise can degrade athletic performance from an imbalance in redox homeostasis and oxidative stress, but well-planned training and nutrition can improve antioxidant capacity. The aim of the study was to investigate how nutrient intake could influence oxidative stress and cell lesion biomarkers after 5 days of training followed by a game. Blood was collected from 10 athletes at the start of training (basal), after training (pre-game), and postgame. Their acceleration capacity also was measured pre- and postgame. Blood analysis showed an increase in lactate concentration postgame (13%) and total antioxidant capacity increased both pre-game (13.1%) and postgame (12.7%), all in comparison with basal levels. An oxidative stress marker, protein carbonyl (PC), increased 3-fold over the course of the game, which correlated with a decreased acceleration (r = 0.749). For biomarkers of tissue damage, creatine kinase and aspartate transaminase (AST) increased postgame by 150% and 75%, respectively. The AST variation had a high negative correlation with energy and carbohydrate consumption and a moderate correlation with lipid and vitamin C intake. Protein intake had a positive but moderate correlation with reduced glutathione. The observed correlations suggest that nutritional monitoring can improve exercise physiological homeostasis and that PC serves as a good biomarker for oxidative stress and performance loss. PMID:25962716

  10. Fused kinase is stabilized by Cdc37/Hsp90 and enhances Gli protein levels

    SciTech Connect

    Kise, Yoshiaki; Takenaka, Kei; Tezuka, Tohru; Yamamoto, Tadashi; Miki, Hiroaki . E-mail: miki@ims.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2006-12-08

    Serine/threonine kinase Fused (Fu) is an essential component of Hedgehog (Hh) signaling in Drosophila, but the biochemical functions of Fu remain unclear. Here, we have investigated proteins co-precipitated with mammalian Fu and identified a kinase-specific chaperone complex, Cdc37/Hsp90, as a novel-binding partner of Fu. Inhibition of Hsp90 function by geldanamycin (GA) induces rapid degradation of Fu through a ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. We next show that co-expression of Fu with transcription factors Gli1 and Gli2 significantly increases their protein levels and luciferase reporter activities, which are blocked by GA. These increases can be ascribed to Fu-mediated stabilization of Gli because co-expression of Fu prolongs half-life of Gli1 and reduces polyubiquitination of Gli1. Finally, we show that GA inhibits proliferation of PC3, a Hh signaling-activated prostate cancer cell line. This growth inhibition is partially rescued by expression of ectopic Gli1, suggesting that Fu may contribute to enhance Hh signaling activity in cancer cells.

  11. Correlation between erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein level in patients with rheumatic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Kotulska, Anna; Kopeć-Mędrek, Magdalena; Grosicka, Anida; Kubicka, Monika

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and serum level of C-reactive protein (CRP) are the acute phase reactants most commonly determined in patients with rheumatic diseases. The indices are affected by different factors, but both of them are applied for evaluation of the disease activity in patients with inflammatory disorders of the musculoskeletal system. Material and methods The authors compared the results of ESR and CRP, which were carried out during routine diagnosis in 200 patients admitted to the Department of Rheumatology. Results A significant correlation between ESR and CRP was found (ESR after 1 h/CRP: correlation coefficient 0.6944, ESR after 2 h/CRP: correlation coefficient 0.6126). There was no difference in ESR or CRP between male and female patients, and patients older than 40 years had higher ESR and CRP. Conclusions The obtained results support the usefulness of both indices in the clinical practice of rheumatologists.

  12. A Theoretical Lower Bound for Selection on the Expression Levels of Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Price, Morgan N.; Arkin, Adam P.

    2016-01-01

    We use simple models of the costs and benefits of microbial gene expression to show that changing a protein’s expression away from its optimum by 2-fold should reduce fitness by at least 0.2·P, where P is the fraction the cell’s protein that the gene accounts for. As microbial genes are usually expressed at above 5 parts per million, and effective population sizes are likely to be above 106, this implies that 2-fold changes to gene expression levels are under strong selection, as Ne·s≫1, where Ne is the effective population size and s is the selection coefficient. Thus, most gene duplications should be selected against. On the other hand, we predict that for most genes, small changes in the expression will be effectively neutral. PMID:27289091

  13. Effect of vitamins, protein level and probiotics on immune response of moulted male broiler breeders.

    PubMed

    Khan, R U; Rahman, Z U; Javed, I; Muhammad, F

    2014-08-01

    This study was planned to investigate the comparative effect of vitamins C (L-ascorbic acid), E (DL-α-tocopherol acetate), probiotics, lower than normal protein level (14%) and combination of these treatments on immune response of male broiler breeders after zinc-induced moulting. One hundred and eighty birds at the age of 65 weeks were induced to moult by mixing zinc oxide (ZnO) in feed at the rate 3000 IU/kg of feed. Upon completion of moulting, birds were divided into six groups (five replicates per group) in a completely randomized design and were fed vitamin C (500 IU/kg), vitamin E (100 IU/kg), lower protein level, probiotics (50 mg/l), and a combination of these components, while one group was kept as control. After completion of moulting phase (5 weeks), the treatment effects were tested as in vitro macrophages engulfment percentage, nitric oxide (NO) production, serum antibody titres against Newcastle disease (ND) and infectious bronchitis (IB). The results showed that in vitro macrophage engulfment percentage in unopsonized conditions was significantly higher in vitamin E-supplemented group. In addition, in opsonized condition, the macrophage engulfment percentage was significantly higher in both vitamin E- and C-supplemented groups. The NO (opsonized and unopsonized) production and antibody titre against ND and IB were significantly higher in vitamin E-supplemented group. It was concluded that vitamin E is a better option for enhanced immune response in broiler breeders after zinc-induced moulting. PMID:23782414

  14. Involvement of decreased neuroglobin protein level in cognitive dysfunction induced by 1-bromopropane in rats.

    PubMed

    Guo, Ying; Yuan, Hua; Jiang, Lulu; Yang, Junlin; Zeng, Tao; Xie, Keqin; Zhang, Cuili; Zhao, Xiulan

    2015-03-10

    1-Bromopropane (1-BP) is used as a substitute for ozone-depleting solvents (ODS) in industrial applications. 1-BP could display central nervous system (CNS) neurotoxicity manifested by cognitive dysfunction. Neuroglobin (Ngb) is an endogenous neuroprotectant and is predominantly expressed in the nervous system. The present study aimed to investigate Ngb involvement in CNS neurotoxicity induced by 1-BP in rats. Male Wistar rats were randomly divided into 5 groups (n=14) and treated with 0, 100, 200, 400 and 800 mg/kg bw 1-BP, respectively, by gavage for consecutive 12 days. Rats displayed cognitive dysfunction dose-dependently through Morris water maze (MWM) test. Significant neuron loss in layer 5 of the prelimbic cortex (PL) was observed. Moreover, 1-BP decreased Ngb protein level in cerebral cortex and Ngb decrease was significantly positively correlated with cognitive dysfunction. Glutathione (GSH) content, GSH/oxidized glutathione (GSSG) ratio and glutamate cysteine ligase (GCL) activity decreased in cerebral cortex, coupled with the increase in GSSG content. GSH and GSH/GSSG ratio decrease were significantly positively correlated with cortical Ngb decrease. Additionally, levels of N-epsilon-hexanoyl-lysine (HEL) and 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (4-HNE) modified proteins in cerebral cortex of 1-BP-treated rats increased significantly. In conclusion, it was suggested that 1-BP resulted in decreased endogenous neuroprotectant Ngb in cerebral cortex, which might play an important role in CNS neurotoxicity induced by 1-BP and that 1-BP-induced oxidative stress in cerebral cortex might partly be responsible for Ngb decrease. PMID:25557405

  15. Dietary protein quality differentially regulates trypsin enzymes at the secretion and transcription level in Panulirus argus by distinct signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Perera, Erick; Rodríguez-Viera, Leandro; Rodríguez-Casariego, Javier; Fraga, Iliana; Carrillo, Olimpia; Martínez-Rodríguez, Gonzalo; Mancera, Juan M

    2012-03-01

    The effects of pelleted diets with different protein composition (fish, squid or soybean meals as main protein sources) on trypsin secretion and expression were studied in the lobster Panulirus argus. Trypsin secretion was shown to be maximal 4 h after ingestion. At this time, fish- and squid-based diets induced trypsin secretion, as well as up-regulation of the major trypsin isoform at the transcription level. While fish- and squid-based diets elicited a prandial response, soybean-based diet failed to stimulate the digestive gland to secrete trypsin into the gastric fluid or induce trypsin expression above the levels observed in fasting lobsters. In vitro assays showed that intact proteins rather than protein hydrolysates stimulate trypsin secretion in the lobster. However, the signal for trypsin transcription appears to be different to that for secretion and is probably mediated by the appearance of free amino acids in the digestive gland, suggesting a stepwise regulation of trypsin enzymes during digestion. We conclude that trypsin enzymes in P. argus are regulated at the transcription and secretion level by the quality of dietary proteins through two distinct signaling pathways. Our results indicate that protein digestion efficiency in spiny lobsters can be improved by selecting appropriated protein sources. However, other factors like the poor solubility of dietary proteins in dry diets could hamper further enhancement of digestion efficiency. PMID:22323208

  16. HIV/AIDS Basics

    MedlinePlus

    ... Enter ZIP code or city Follow Act Against AIDS Act Against AIDS @talkHIV Act Against AIDS Get Email Updates on AAA Anonymous Feedback HIV/AIDS Media Infographics Syndicated Content Podcasts Slide Sets HIV/ ...

  17. Effects of dietary lysine/protein ratio and fat levels on growth performance and meat quality of finishing pigs.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Keisuke; Yamamoto, Fumika; Toyoshi, Masanari; Irie, Masakazu

    2014-04-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effects of dietary lysine/protein ratio and fat levels on the growth, carcass characteristics and meat quality of finishing pigs fed feed made from food waste, including noodles and chocolate. Four dietary treatments, 2 levels of lysine/protein ratio (0.035 and 0.046) and 2 levels of fat (3.3% and 6.0%), were adapted to a 2 × 2 factorial arrangement. Each diet for the finishing pigs contained the same levels of adequate crude protein (16%) and lysine (0.58-0.75%), and similar levels of high total digestible nutrients (90.2-92.6%). In total, 32 LWD pigs with an average body weight of 57.2 kg were assigned to 4 dietary groups. The pigs were slaughtered at about 115 kg. Growth performance was not influenced by the dietary treatments. Carcass characteristics were slightly influenced by the dietary fat level. As the dietary lysine/protein ratio decreased, the marbling score of Longissimus dorsi muscle increased and the intramuscular fat (IMF) increased from 6.82% to 9.46%. Marbling score was not significantly influenced by the dietary fat level. These results indicate that IMF increased without adverse effects on growth, carcass characteristics and meat quality, when pigs were fed a diet with low lysine/protein ratio. PMID:24261827

  18. Elevated urinary level of vitamin D-binding protein as a novel biomarker for diabetic nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    TIAN, XIAO-QIN; ZHAO, LI-MIN; GE, JIA-PU; ZHANG, YAN; XU, YAN-CHENG

    2014-01-01

    Improving the early prediction and detection of diabetic nephropathy (DN) remains a great challenge in disease management. The aim of this study was to evaluate the early detection power of urinary vitamin D-binding protein (VDBP) for the diagnosis of DN. Urine samples were obtained from 45 healthy volunteers and 105 diabetic patients with normoalbuminuria (DM group), microalbuminuria (DN1 group) and macroalbuminuria (DN2 group) (n=35 per group). The VDBP expression patterns in urine from patients and controls were quantified by western blot analysis. The excretion levels of urinary VDBP were quantified with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The quantification results were obtained by correcting for creatinine expression and showed that urinary VDBP levels were significantly elevated in the patients of the DN1 and DN2 groups compared with those of the DM group and normal controls (1,011.33±325.30 and 1,406.34±239.66 compared with 466.54±213.63 and 125.48±98.27 ng/mg, respectively) (P<0.001). Receiver operating characteristic analysis of urinary VDBP levels for the diagnosis of DN rendered an optimum cut-off value of 552.243 ng/mg corresponding to 92.86% sensitivity and 85.00% specificity, which also showed an area under the ROC curve of 0.966. In conclusion, the findings of the present study suggest that urinary VDBP may be a potential biomarker for the early detection and prevention of DN. Further studies are required to examine the pathogenic mechanisms of elevated VDBP levels and their role in the diagnosis of DN. PMID:24396416

  19. Diet quality is associated with circulating C-reactive protein but not irisin levels in humans

    PubMed Central

    Park, Kyung Hee; Zaichenko, Lesya; Peter, Patricia; Davis, Cynthia R.; Crowell, Judith A.; Mantzoros, Christos S.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Adherence to a healthy diet has been shown to decrease the incidence of obesity and associated comorbidities. C-reactive protein (CRP) is an established inflammatory marker and irisin was recently identified as a molecule which may play a role in energy regulation and obesity but whether diet alters irisin levels remains unknown. We aimed to investigate the association between circulating irisin, leptin, and CRP levels and dietary quantity and quality using the Alternate Healthy Eating Index (AHEI) and the Alternate Mediterranean Diet Score (aMED). Materials/Methods The study evaluated dietary data and biomarker levels of 151 participants between 2009 and 2011 (71 male vs. 80 female, over 35 years old, obese 43.7%). AHEI and aMED scores were calculated based on data derived from self-administered 110-item food-frequency questionnaires estimating usual nutrient intake over the past year. Cross-sectional associations between dietary quantity, quality, body composition by bioelectric impedance, and biomarker levels including irisin, leptin, and CRP after fasting were assessed. Results CRP, but not irisin, was negatively correlated with AHEI (r = −0.34) and aMED (r = −0.31). Irisin was positively correlated with BMI (r = 0.22), fat mass (r = 0.21), waist circumference (r = 0.24), waist-hip ratio (r = 0.20), leptin (r = 0.32), and CRP (r = 0.25). Participants with the highest AHEI scores tended to have 11.6% lower concentrations of irisin (P for trend =0.09), but they were not significant after adjustment for potential confounders. Better diet quality was associated with lower CRP concentrations (P for trend=0.02) in multivariate model. Percentage of energy from carbohydrate was inversely associated with CRP. Conclusions Unlike CRP, irisin is not associated with dietary quality or quantity. PMID:24315778

  20. YB-1 and MTA1 protein levels and not DNA or mRNA alterations predict for prostate cancer recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Sheridan, Christine Moore; Grogan, Tristan R.; Nguyen, Hao G.; Galet, Colette; Rettig, Matthew B.; Hsieh, Andrew C.; Ruggero, Davide

    2015-01-01

    Attempts to identify biomarkers to detect prostate tumorigenesis, and thus minimize prostate cancer progression and inform treatment decisions have primarily focused on alterations at the DNA and mRNA levels, ignoring alterations at the level of protein synthesis control. We have previously shown that the PI3K-AKT-mTOR pathway, frequently deregulated in prostate cancer, specifically induces the synthesis of proteins that contribute to metastasis, most notably YB-1 and MTA1, without altering mRNA levels thereby demonstrating the importance of translation control in driving the expression of these genes in cancer. Here, we analyze genomic sequencing and mRNA expression databases, as well as protein expression employing an annotated tissue microarray generated from 332 prostate cancer patients with 15 years of clinical follow-up to determine the combined prognostic capability of YB-1 and MTA1 alterations in forecasting prostate cancer outcomes. Remarkably, protein abundance, but not genomic or transcriptional alterations of YB-1 and MTA1, is predictive of disease recurrence, exhibiting a dose-dependent effect on time to PSA recurrence, an indicator of tumor relapse. Moreover, high protein levels of YB-1 and MTA1 are associated with a 3-fold increased risk for requiring future hormone therapy or radiation therapy. Importantly, YB-1 and MTA1 protein levels significantly increase the predictive capacity of a clinical model for prostate cancer recurrence. These findings demonstrate that protein abundance of YB-1 and MTA1, irrespective of DNA or mRNA status, can predict for prostate cancer relapse and uncover a vast underappreciated repository of biomarkers regulated at the level of protein expression. PMID:25797255

  1. Elevated C-reactive protein levels and metabolic syndrome in the elderly

    PubMed Central

    Zuliani, Giovanni; Volpato, Stefano; Galvani, Matteo; Blè, Alessandro; Bandinelli, Stefania; Corsi, Anna Maria; Lauretani, Fulvio; Maggio, Marcello; Guralnik, Jack M.; Fellin, Renato; Ferrucci, Luigi

    2009-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MS) and “low grade” systemic inflammation (LGSI) are very common findings in the older population. Although MS and LGSI have been associated in adults, it is not known what is the real contribution of MS, and its single components, to LGSI in older persons, due to the potential confounding effect of comorbidity and aging. We investigated the relationship between increased C-reactive protein (CRP) plasma levels, a marker of LGSI, and MS in 1044 older (≥65 years) community dwelling Italian individuals enrolled the InChianti study. Metabolic syndrome was defined by the NCEP-ATP III-AHA/NHLBI criteria. High sensitivity CRP (hs.CRP) levels were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and defined as high when >3 mg/L. The overall prevalence of MS was 31%. The prevalence of high hs.CRP was 54.5% in subjects with, and 41.3% in those without MS (p < 0.001). MS was associated with high hs.CRP levels after adjustment for age, gender, and comorbidity (OR: 1.93, 95% CI: 1.46-2.55). Compared to subjects with MS and no LGSI, individuals with MS and LGSI were characterized by higher waist circumference, BMI, and HOMA score. Multivariate logistic regression analysis confirmed the association between waist circumference and high hs.CRP levels in subjects with MS (waist circumference III vs. I tertile OR: 2.60, 95% CI: 1.79-3.77) independent of age, gender, and important confounding variables including comorbidity. Additional analyses, conducted with and without dichotomization of hs.CRP levels, confirmed the central role of waist circumference in the LGSI phenomenon, independent of gender and diagnosis of MS. We conclude that in older individuals, MS is associated with LGSI, but the association is mainly supported by a strong independent correlation between waist circumference and high hs.CRP levels. In the absence of this specific MS component, it seems that the contribution of MS to LGSI would be modest at best. PMID:18845301

  2. A tomato xylem sap protein represents a new family of small cysteine-rich proteins with structural similarity to lipid transfer proteins.

    PubMed

    Rep, Martijn; Dekker, Henk L; Vossen, Jack H; de Boer, Albert D; Houterman, Petra M; de Koster, Chris G; Cornelissen, Ben J C

    2003-01-16

    The coding sequence of a major xylem sap protein of tomato was identified with the aid of mass spectrometry. The protein, XSP10, represents a novel family of extracellular plant proteins with structural similarity to plant lipid transfer proteins. The XSP10 gene is constitutively expressed in roots and lower stems. The decline of XSP10 protein levels in tomato infected with a fungal vascular pathogen may reflect breakdown or modification by the pathogen. PMID:12527365

  3. Women and AIDS.

    PubMed

    Edemikpong, N B

    1990-01-01

    While the origin of the AIDS virus remains controversial, it is indisputable that AIDS is spreading worldwide. By June 1987, the World Health Organization estimated that 50 million Africans were infected with HIV and that the disease was epidemic in many parts of the continent. However, African governments chose to deny the threat of the disease. The AIDS crisis has diverted resources from other vital areas of disease prevention, health promotion, and research. Whereas AIDS is spread in developed nations by sexual promiscuity, by drug addicts sharing unclean hypodermic needles, and by homosexual behavior, in Africa cultural factors contribute to the transmission of AIDS. Female genital mutilation leads to extensive laceration of the female genitals upon initiation of sexual intercourse and/or to substitution of anal sex during the weeks and months before vaginal penetration can be achieved. In addition, the reuse of the same knives during the mutilation can spread HIV infection. Other factors that contribute to the spread of HIV in Africa include the patriarchal practice of polygamy, the subordinate position of women that makes them unable to insist on protection during intercourse, and a failure to screen blood used in transfusions. With all of these risk factors at play, women at the grassroots level must be equipped with the health education that is the only available tool to fight AIDS. Women's organizations can provide information and education to people at risk of acquiring HIV, counsel infected persons, ensure the safety of the blood supply, and work to overcome harmful traditional practices. PMID:12317073

  4. Protein pheromone expression levels predict and respond to the formation of social dominance networks

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Adam C.; Cunningham, Christopher B.; Ruff, James S.; Potts, Wayne K.

    2015-01-01

    Communication signals are key regulators of social networks, and are thought to be under selective pressure to honestly reflect social status, including dominance status. The odors of dominants and nondominants differentially influence behavior, and identification of the specific pheromones associated with, and predictive of, dominance status is essential for understanding the mechanisms of network formation and maintenance. In mice, major urinary proteins (MUPs) are excreted in extraordinary large quantities and expression level has been hypothesized to provide an honest signal of dominance status. Here, we evaluate whether MUPs are associated with dominance in wild-derived mice by analyzing expression levels before, during, and after competition for reproductive resources over three days. During competition, dominant males have 24% greater urinary MUP expression than nondominants. The MUP darcin, a pheromone that stimulates female attraction, is predictive of dominance status: dominant males have higher darcin expression before competition. Dominants also have a higher ratio of darcin to other MUPs before and during competition. These differences appear transient, because there are no differences in MUPs or darcin after competition. We also find MUP expression is affected by sire dominance status: socially naive sons of dominant males have lower MUP expression, but this apparent repression is released during competition. A requisite condition for the evolution of communication signals is honesty, and we provide novel insight into pheromones and social networks by showing that MUP and darcin expression is a reliable signal of dominance status, a primary determinant of male fitness in many species. PMID:25867293

  5. Elevated C-reactive protein level predicts lower gastrointestinal tract bleeding

    PubMed Central

    TOMIZAWA, MINORU; SHINOZAKI, FUMINOBU; HASEGAWA, RUMIKO; SHIRAI, YOSHINORI; MOTOYOSHI, YASUFUMI; SUGIYAMA, TAKAO; YAMAMOTO, SHIGENORI; ISHIGE, NAOKI

    2016-01-01

    Lower gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding can be caused by colorectal polyps or cancer. The aim of the present study was to identify blood test variables and medications that can predict lower GI bleeding, which would allow for appropriate colonoscopy. The medical records of patients who underwent colonoscopy from September 2014 to September 2015 were retrospectively analyzed. The selected patients included 278 men (mean age, 67.0±11.5 years) and 249 women (mean age, 69.6±12.0 years). The diagnosis, medications, and blood test variables were compared between patients with and without bleeding. Logistic regression analysis was performed to determine the factors associated with lower GI bleeding. The presence of colorectal polyp and cancer was associated with lower GI bleeding (P=0.0044) with an odds ratio of 6.71 (P=0.0148). No lower GI bleeding was observed in patients taking non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), corticosteroids, or anticoagulants. The C-reactive protein (CRP) levels were significantly higher in patients with lower GI bleeding (P=0.0227). The Hb levels were lower in patients with lower GI bleeding, however this finding was not statistically significant (P>0.05). No blood test variable was associated with lower GI bleeding. Elevated CRP was associated with lower GI bleeding, while there was no association between the medications and lower GI bleeding. PMID:27284411

  6. Counseling Persons with a Fear of AIDS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruhn, John G.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses the increasing incidence of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) which has created a societal fear of AIDS that, in turn, has raised the level of fear and anxiety in individuals prone to fear responses. Discusses fear accentuated by AIDS and guidelines for counseling people exhibiting this fear. (Author/ABL)

  7. Engineered Adjustment Classroom: The Instructional Assistant Aide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spilker, George

    Described is the role of the teacher aide in the Papillion (Nebraska) Title III elementary level "engineered classroom" program which stresses accomplishment of academic goals by emotionally disturbed students. Noted is the aides' goal of carrying out students' prescriptions provided by the teacher and psychologist. Described are the aides' duties…

  8. State Aid for Undergraduates in Postsecondary Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, John B.; Clery, Suzanne B.

    1999-01-01

    Examines differences among undergraduates who attended postsecondary education in states that provide different levels of state student financial aid. Describes aid types and sources, the price of college attendance, and personal characteristics of students. Also considers undergraduates' probability of attending institutions in high-aid or…

  9. Neuron-Specific Enolase, S100 Calcium-Binding Protein B, and Heat Shock Protein 70 Levels in Patients With Intracranial Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Alatas, Ömer Doğan; Gürger, Mehtap; Ateşçelik, Metin; Yildiz, Mustafa; Demir, Caner Feyzi; Kalayci, Mehmet; Ilhan, Nevin; Acar, Ethem

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The authors evaluated neuron-specific enolase (NSE), S100 calcium-binding protein B (S100B), and heat shock protein 70 (HSP 70) levels and their relationships with in-hospital mortality, Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) scores, and National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) scores. In total, 35 patients older than 18 years were presented to our emergency department and were diagnosed with non-traumatic intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) and 32 healthy controls were included. Blood samples were drawn on days 0 and 5. S100 calcium-binding protein B and HSP levels were significantly higher in patients than in controls on days 0 and 5. Neuron-specific enolase levels were higher in patients than in controls on day 0, but there was no significant difference on day 5. S100 calcium-binding protein B was negatively correlated with GCS, whereas it was positively correlated with NIHSS and bleeding volume. There was also a negative correlation between NSE and GCS, but it was not statistically significant. In addition, no significant correlation was found in terms of bleeding volume or NIHSS. Heat shock protein 70 was negatively correlated with GCS and positively correlated with bleeding volume and NIHSS, but these results were not statistically significant. S100 calcium-binding protein B and HSP 70 levels were significantly higher in those who died compared with survivors. The areas under the curve of S100 B, NSE, and HSP 70 for mortality were 0.635, 0.477, and 0.770, respectively. Neuron-specific enolase, S100B, and HSP 70 levels are simple, inexpensive, and objective measures in cases of ICH. These tests can be used to support an assessment for screening ICH patients with clinical scoring systems, such as GCS and NIHSS. PMID:26559295

  10. Fluorescent labeling for clonal selection of Marc 145 cells secreting high levels of recombinant protein PBD-1.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hai-Jun; Peng, Xia; Deng, Bing; Huang, Cong; Li, Jie; Qian, Yun-Guo; Gao, Qi-Shuang; Xiang, Min; Lu, Shun; Chen, Zhi-Hua; Zhan, Cai-Yao; Zhou, Li; Tao, Bi-Fei; Liu, Jie; Tan, Ben-Zhong

    2016-03-01

    Despite the powerful impact gene expression markers like the green fluorescent protein (GFP) or enhanced GFP (EGFP) exert on linking the expression of recombinant protein for selection of high producers in recent years, there is still a strong incentive to develop more economical and efficient methods for isolating mammalian cell clones secreting high levels of recombinant proteins. Here we present a new method based on the co-expression of EGFP that allows clonal selection in standard 96-well cell culture plates. The genes encoding the EGFP protein and the related protein are linked by an internal ribosome entry site and thus are transcribed into the same mRNA in an independent translation process. Since both proteins arise from a common mRNA, the EGFP expression level correlates with the expression level of the therapeutic protein in each clone. By expressing recombinant porcine β-defensin 1 in Marc 145 cells, we demonstrate the robustness and performance of this technique. The method can be served as an alternative to identify high-producer clones with various cell sorting methods. PMID:25297006

  11. Baseline C-Reactive Protein Levels and Life Prognosis in Parkinson Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sawada, Hideyuki; Oeda, Tomoko; Umemura, Atsushi; Tomita, Satoshi; Kohsaka, Masayuki; Park, Kwiyoung; Yamamoto, Kenji; Sugiyama, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Background C-reactive protein (CRP) is a biomarker of inflammation, and high levels of CRP correlate with vascular death. Chronic inflammation is considered to be involved in neurodegeneration, although there is no evidence linking it with the process of neurodegenerative diseases. Objective To determine the role of baseline CRP levels in the prognosis of patients with Parkinson disease (PD). Methods A cohort of 313 patients with a mean age of 69.1 and mean PD duration of 7.9 years was retrospectively followed for a mean observation time of 1,753 days. CRP was measured when patients were not diagnosed with any infections, and levels were repetitively measured to investigate a tendency of “regression to mean.” The primary outcome measure was a survival time from study enrollment to death. Results During the observation period 56 patients died. Baseline CRP was log-linearly associated with a risk of death in PD. Mean survival time was 3,149 (95% confidence interval; 3,009-3,289) days in patients with CRP ≤ 0.8mg/L (lower two thirds) and 2,620 (2,343-2,897) days in those with CRP > 0.8 mg/L (top third, p < 0.001, log-rank test). The adjusted hazard ratio (HR) per two-fold higher CRP concentration for all deaths was 1.29 (1.10-1.52), and after excluding PD-unrelated deaths, such as cancer or stroke, HR was 1.23 (1.01-1.49) (adjusted for age, sex, PD duration, modified Hohen-Yahr stages, MMSE scores, and serum albumin). Conclusions Baseline CRP concentrations were associated with the risk of death and predicted life prognosis of patients with PD. The associations were independent from PD duration, PD severity, cognitive function, ages, and nutritional conditions, suggesting the possibility that subclinical chronic inflammation is associated with a neurodegenerative process in PD. PMID:26218286

  12. Adult consumers of cranberry juice cocktail have lower C-reactive protein levels compared with nonconsumers.

    PubMed

    Duffey, Kiyah J; Sutherland, Lisa A

    2015-02-01

    Flavonoids are important bioactive plant constituents found in abundance in berries, including cranberries. Cranberry beverages have been shown to beneficially impact urinary and cardiovascular health in clinical and observational studies, but their association with anthropometric outcomes is unknown. We examined the association between cranberry juice cocktail (CJC) consumption with flavonoid intake, and cardiometabolic and anthropometric outcomes among adults in the US data for adults (≥19 years, n = 10334) were drawn from cross-sectional National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey combined 2005-2008 survey. We hypothesized that CJC consumers will have lower anthropometric measures and healthier cardiometabolic profiles, including lower cholesterol and C-reactive protein (CRP). A CJC consumer (n = 330) was defined as anyone consuming CJC for 2 nonconsecutive 24-hour dietary recalls. We used multivariate linear regression models to examine differences in anthropometric and cardiometabolic outcomes comparing CJC consumers to nonconsumers controlling for important confounders. Consumers drank an average 404 mL (14 fl oz) of CJC for 2 days and did not have higher total energy intakes compared with nonconsumers (mean [SD], 2259 [79] vs 2112 [24], respectively). In fully adjusted models, adult CJC consumers had significantly lower levels of CRP (mean [SD], -0.13 [0.05]; P = .015), results that were strengthened after further adjustment for body mass index (mean [SD], -0.98 [0.04]; P = .027). Trends toward lower weights and lower levels of cholesterol did not reach statistical significance. Intake of cranberry polyphenols may play a role in promoting anti-inflammatory markers among CJC consumers, specifically lowering CRP levels. PMID:25530012

  13. C-Reactive Protein Levels Among U.S. Adults Exposed to Parental Incarceration

    PubMed Central

    Boch, Samantha J.; Ford, Jodi L.

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have linked childhood adversity to low-grade inflammation via C-reactive protein (CRP) levels. This study analyzed the association between low-grade inflammation and prior biological parental incarceration. Data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health (1994–2008) were analyzed using multinomial logistic regression models. Measures included high-sensitivity (hs)-CRP (<3 mg/L = reference, 3–10 mg/L = low-grade inflammation, and >10 mg/L = acute inflammation), parent incarceration occurring in the child's lifetime, and frequency and timing of incarceration with respect to child's age (0–18 years or >18 years vs. never) of incarceration. Analyses were stratified by child's gender. Final sample sizes were n = 5,396 males and n = 6,447 females for maternal incarceration and n = 4,956 males and n = 5,860 females for paternal incarceration. In models with and without potential mediators, females whose fathers were ever incarcerated were more likely to have hs-CRP levels of 3–10 mg/L than females whose fathers were never incarcerated (adjusted odds ratio [AOR]: 1.44, 95% confidence interval [CI]: [1.09, 1.91]). Additionally, daughter's age (<18 years; AOR: 1.48, 95% CI: [1.11, 1.97]) and frequency of father's incarceration were significant (AOR: 1.24, 95% CI: [1.04, 1.49]). No mediating effects were observed. Males whose fathers were incarcerated when they were ≥ 18 years were less likely to have hs-CRP levels of 3–10 mg/L than those whose father was never incarcerated; the association was nonsignificant in the mediated model. Further investigation is needed on the physiological effects of exposure to parental incarceration and interventions to support children. PMID:25539769

  14. Determining synthesis rates of individual proteins in zebrafish (Danio rerio) with low levels of a stable isotope labelled amino acid.

    PubMed

    Geary, Bethany; Magee, Kieran; Cash, Phillip; Young, Iain S; Whitfield, Phillip D; Doherty, Mary K

    2016-05-01

    The zebrafish is a powerful model organism for the analysis of human cardiovascular development and disease. Understanding these processes at the protein level not only requires changes in protein concentration to be determined but also the rate at which these changes occur on a protein-by-protein basis. The ability to measure protein synthesis and degradation rates on a proteome-wide scale, using stable isotope labelling in conjunction with mass spectrometry is now a well-established experimental approach. With the advent of more selective and sensitive mass spectrometers, it is possible to accurately measure lower levels of stable isotope incorporation, even when sample is limited. In order to challenge the sensitivity of this approach, we successfully determined the synthesis rates of over 600 proteins from the cardiac muscle of the zebrafish using a diet where either 30% or 50% of the L-leucine was replaced with a stable isotope labelled analogue ([(2) H7 ]L-leucine]. It was possible to extract sufficient protein from individual zebrafish hearts to determine the incorporation rate of the label into hundreds of proteins simultaneously, with the two labelling regimens showing a good correlation of synthesis rates. PMID:26929125

  15. RESPONSE OF HEPATIC PROTEINS TO THE LOWERING OF HABITUAL DIETARY PROTEIN TO THE RECOMMENDED SAFE LEVEL OF INTAKE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The plasma concentrations of albumin, HDL apolipoprotein A1 (apoA1), retinol-binding protein (RBP), transthyretin (TTR), haptoglobulin, and fibrinogen were measured, and a stable isotope infusion protocol was used to determine the fractional and absolute synthesis rates of RBP, TTR, and fibrinogen i...

  16. The Effect of a Community-Based Exercise Program on Inflammation, Metabolic Risk, and Fitness Levels Among Persons Living with HIV/AIDS.

    PubMed

    Cutrono, Stacy E; Lewis, John E; Perry, Arlette; Signorile, Joseph; Tiozzo, Eduard; Jacobs, Kevin A

    2016-05-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) pandemic remains a top national health priority. Chronic inflammation may be a critical component in the disease course of HIV as C-reactive protein (CRP) is elevated and associated with increased mortality. This study examined the effect of 3 months of combined aerobic and resistance exercise training among a diverse cohort of HIV-infected men and women. The fixed effect of time for CRP was found to be non-significant (F[1,57.3] = 1.7, p = 0.19). There was a significant fixed effect for time for upper body (F[1,51.6] = 18.1, p < 0.05) and lower body strength (F[1,48.0] = 15.7, p < 0.05) and significant declines in diastolic blood pressure (p = 0.002) and waist circumference (p = 0.027). Though levels of CRP were not impacted after 3 months training, participants demonstrated a significant increase in muscular strength as well as beneficial changes in metabolic risk factors. Future studies should focus on determining the optimal exercise intervention length and mode to reduce inflammation among individuals living with HIV. PMID:26607928

  17. Identification of novel candidate drivers connecting different dysfunctional levels for lung adenocarcinoma using protein-protein interactions and a shortest path approach

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lei; Huang, Tao; Zhang, Yu-Hang; Jiang, Yang; Zheng, Mingyue; Cai, Yu-Dong

    2016-01-01

    Tumors are formed by the abnormal proliferation of somatic cells with disordered growth regulation under the influence of tumorigenic factors. Recently, the theory of “cancer drivers” connects tumor initiation with several specific mutations in the so-called cancer driver genes. According to the differentiation of four basic levels between tumor and adjacent normal tissues, the cancer drivers can be divided into the following: (1) Methylation level, (2) microRNA level, (3) mutation level, and (4) mRNA level. In this study, a computational method is proposed to identify novel lung adenocarcinoma drivers based on dysfunctional genes on the methylation, microRNA, mutation and mRNA levels. First, a large network was constructed using protein-protein interactions. Next, we searched all of the shortest paths connecting dysfunctional genes on different levels and extracted new candidate genes lying on these paths. Finally, the obtained candidate genes were filtered by a permutation test and an additional strict selection procedure involving a betweenness ratio and an interaction score. Several candidate genes remained, which are deemed to be related to two different levels of cancer. The analyses confirmed our assertions that some have the potential to contribute to the tumorigenesis process on multiple levels. PMID:27412431

  18. Identification of novel candidate drivers connecting different dysfunctional levels for lung adenocarcinoma using protein-protein interactions and a shortest path approach.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lei; Huang, Tao; Zhang, Yu-Hang; Jiang, Yang; Zheng, Mingyue; Cai, Yu-Dong

    2016-01-01

    Tumors are formed by the abnormal proliferation of somatic cells with disordered growth regulation under the influence of tumorigenic factors. Recently, the theory of "cancer drivers" connects tumor initiation with several specific mutations in the so-called cancer driver genes. According to the differentiation of four basic levels between tumor and adjacent normal tissues, the cancer drivers can be divided into the following: (1) Methylation level, (2) microRNA level, (3) mutation level, and (4) mRNA level. In this study, a computational method is proposed to identify novel lung adenocarcinoma drivers based on dysfunctional genes on the methylation, microRNA, mutation and mRNA levels. First, a large network was constructed using protein-protein interactions. Next, we searched all of the shortest paths connecting dysfunctional genes on different levels and extracted new candidate genes lying on these paths. Finally, the obtained candidate genes were filtered by a permutation test and an additional strict selection procedure involving a betweenness ratio and an interaction score. Several candidate genes remained, which are deemed to be related to two different levels of cancer. The analyses confirmed our assertions that some have the potential to contribute to the tumorigenesis process on multiple levels. PMID:27412431

  19. Enhanced skeletal muscle protein synthesis rates in pigs treated with somatotropin requires fed amino acids levels

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chronic somatotropin (pST) treatment in pigs increases skeletal muscle protein synthesis and circulating insulin, a known promoter of protein synthesis. Previously, we showed that the pST-mediated rise in insulin alone could not account for the pST-induced increase in protein synthesis. This study...

  20. Effects of balanced dietary protein levels on egg production and egg quality parameters of individual commercial layers.

    PubMed

    Shim, M Y; Song, E; Billard, L; Aggrey, S E; Pesti, G M; Sodsee, P

    2013-10-01

    The effects of a series of balanced dietary protein levels on egg production and egg quality parameters of laying hens from 18 through 74 wk of age were investigated. One hundred forty-four pullets (Bovans) were randomly assigned to individual cages with separate feeders including 3 different protein level series of isocaloric diets. Diets were separated into 4 phases of 18-22, 23-32, 33-44, and 45-74 wk of age. The high protein (H) series contained 21.62, 19.05, 16.32, and 16.05% CP, respectively. Medium protein (M) and low protein (L) series were 2 and 4% lower in balanced dietary protein. The results clearly demonstrated that the balanced dietary protein level was a limiting factor for BW, ADFI, egg weight, hen day egg production (HDEP), and feed per kilogram of eggs. Feeding with the L series resulted in lower ADFI and HDEP (90.33% peak production) and more feed per kilogram of eggs compared with the H or M series (HDEP; 93.23 and 95.68% peak production, monthly basis). Egg weight responded in a linear manner to balanced dietary protein level (58.78, 55.94, and 52.73 g for H, M, and L, respectively). Feed intake of all hens, but especially those in the L series, increased considerably after wk 54 when the temperature of the house decreased due to winter conditions. Thus, hens fed the L series seemed particularly dependent on house temperature to maintain BW, ADFI, and HDEP. For egg quality parameters, percent yolk, Haugh units, and egg specific gravity were similar regardless of diets. Haugh units were found to be greatly affected by the variation of housing temperature (P = 0.025). Maximum performance cannot always be expected to lead to maximum profits. Contrary to the idea of a daily amino acid requirement for maximum performance, these results may be used to determine profit-maximizing levels of balanced dietary protein based on the cost of protein and returns from different possible protein levels that may be fed. PMID:24046416

  1. E3 ubiquitin ligase RFWD2 controls lung branching through protein-level regulation of ETV transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Yokoyama, Shigetoshi; Herriges, John C; Zhang, Zhen; Young, Randee E; Verheyden, Jamie M; Sun, Xin

    2016-07-01

    The mammalian lung is an elaborate branching organ, and it forms following a highly stereotypical morphogenesis program. It is well established that precise control at the transcript level is a key genetic underpinning of lung branching. In comparison, little is known about how regulation at the protein level may play a role. Ring finger and WD domain 2 (RFWD2, also termed COP1) is an E3 ubiquitin ligase that modifies specific target proteins, priming their degradation via the ubiquitin proteasome system. RFWD2 is known to function in the adult in pathogenic processes such as tumorigenesis. Here, we show that prenatal inactivation of Rfwd2 gene in the lung epithelium led to a striking halt in branching morphogenesis shortly after secondary branch formation. This defect is accompanied by distalization of the lung epithelium while growth and cellular differentiation still occurred. In the mutant lung, two E26 transformation-specific (ETS) transcription factors essential for normal lung branching, ETS translocation variant 4 (ETV4) and ETV5, were up-regulated at the protein level, but not at the transcript level. Introduction of Etv loss-of-function alleles into the Rfwd2 mutant background attenuated the branching phenotype, suggesting that RFWD2 functions, at least in part, through degrading ETV proteins. Because a number of E3 ligases are known to target factors important for lung development, our findings provide a preview of protein-level regulatory network essential for lung branching morphogenesis. PMID:27335464

  2. Copper uptake is required for pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate-mediated oxidation and protein level increase of p53 in cells.

    PubMed Central

    Furuta, Saori; Ortiz, Fausto; Zhu Sun, Xiu; Wu, Hsiao-Huei; Mason, Andrew; Momand, Jamil

    2002-01-01

    The p53 tumour-suppressor protein is a transcription factor that activates the expression of genes involved in cell cycle arrest, apoptosis and DNA repair. The p53 protein is vulnerable to oxidation at cysteine thiol groups. The metal-chelating dithiocarbamates, pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC), diethyldithiocarbamate, ethylene(bis)dithiocarbamate and H(2)O(2) were tested for their oxidative effects on p53 in cultured human breast cancer cells. Only PDTC oxidized p53, although all oxidants tested increased the p53 level. Inductively coupled plasma MS analysis indicated that the addition of 60 microM PDTC increased the cellular copper concentration by 4-fold, which was the highest level of copper accumulated amongst all the oxidants tested. Bathocuproinedisulphonic acid, a membrane-impermeable Cu(I) chelator inhibited the PDTC-mediated copper accumulation. Bathocuproinedisulphonic acid as well as the hydroxyl radical scavenger d-mannitol inhibited the PDTC-dependent increase in p53 protein and oxidation. Our results show that a low level of copper accumulation in the range of 25-40 microg/g of cellular protein increases the steady-state levels of p53. At copper accumulation levels higher than 60 microg/g of cellular protein, p53 is oxidized. These results suggest that p53 is vulnerable to free radical-mediated oxidation at cysteine residues. PMID:11964141

  3. Spaceflight has compartment- and gene-specific effects on mRNA levels for bone matrix proteins in rat femur

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, G. L.; Morey-Holton, E.; Turner, R. T.

    1998-01-01

    In the present study, we evaluated the possibility that the abnormal bone matrix produced during spaceflight may be associated with reduced expression of bone matrix protein genes. To test this possibility, we investigated the effects of a 14-day spaceflight (SLS-2 experiment) on steady-state mRNA levels for glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), osteocalcin, osteonectin, and prepro-alpha(1) subunit of type I collagen in the major bone compartments of rat femur. There were pronounced site-specific differences in the steady-state levels of expression of the mRNAs for the three bone matrix proteins and GAPDH in normal weight-bearing rats, and these relationships were altered after spaceflight. Specifically, spaceflight resulted in decreases in mRNA levels for GAPDH (decreased in proximal metaphysis), osteocalcin (decreased in proximal metaphysis), osteonectin (decreased in proximal and distal metaphysis), and collagen (decreased in proximal and distal metaphysis) compared with ground controls. There were no changes in mRNA levels for matrix proteins or GAPDH in the shaft and distal epiphysis. These results demonstrate that spaceflight leads to site- and gene-specific decreases in mRNA levels for bone matrix proteins. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that spaceflight-induced decreases in bone formation are caused by concomitant decreases in expression of genes for bone matrix proteins.

  4. High-level expression, purification, and characterization of bifunctional ScFv-9R fusion protein.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiguang; Xie, Jiasen; Sun, Yan; Xu, Huijing; Du, Tonghua; Liu, Zixuan; Chen, Jinhui; Zheng, Zhong; Liu, Keqiang; Zhang, Jizhou; Kan, Mujie; Li, Xiaokun; Xiao, Yechen

    2014-06-01

    Fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3) is a noted proto-oncogene involved in the pathogenesis of many tumors, so more and more studies focus on the potential use of receptor kinase inhibitor and therapeutic antibodies against FGFR3. In this study, we designed a novel fusion protein containing the single-chain Fv (ScFv) against FGFR3 and 9-arginine, denoted as ScFv-9R. To achieve the high-level production and soluble expression, ScFv and ScFv-9R were fused with small ubiquitin-related modifier (Sumo) by polymerase chain reaction and expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3). The recombinant bacteria was induced by 0.5 mM isopropyl-β-D-thiogalactopyranoside for 20 h at 20 °C; supernatants of Sumo-ScFv was harvested and purified by DEAE Sepharose FF and Ni-NTA orderly, and supernatants of Sumo-ScFv-9R was harvested and purified by Ni-NTA. After cleaved by the Sumo protease, the recombinant ScFv or ScFv-9R was released from the fusion protein, respectively. The purity of ScFv or ScFV-9R was shown to be higher than 90 %, and their yield reached 3-5 mg per liter of bacterial culture. In vitro data showed that ScFV-9R can attenuate the phosphorylation of FGFR3 and ERK in the absence or presence of FGF9. Gel retardation assay showed that 1 μg of ScFv-9R could efficiently bind to about 4 pmol siRNA. Fluorescent microscope analysis showed that ScFv-9R can efficiently bind and deliver siRNA into RT112 cells. In conclusion, we use Sumo fusion system to acquire high-level production, soluble expression, and bifunctional activity of ScFv-9R in E. coli. Our results also revealed that ScFv-9R, as a novel carrier, may have potential applications in antitumor studies and pharmaceutical development. PMID:24519456

  5. Extracellular matrix controls tubulin monomer levels in hepatocytes by regulating protein turnover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mooney, D. J.; Hansen, L. K.; Langer, R.; Vacanti, J. P.; Ingber, D. E.

    1994-01-01

    Cells have evolved an autoregulatory mechanism to dampen variations in the concentration of tubulin monomer that is available to polymerize into microtubules (MTs), a process that is known as tubulin autoregulation. However, thermodynamic analysis of MT polymerization predicts that the concentration of free tubulin monomer must vary if MTs are to remain stable under different mechanical loads that result from changes in cell adhesion to the extracellular matrix (ECM). To determine how these seemingly contradictory regulatory mechanisms coexist in cells, we measured changes in the masses of tubulin monomer and polymer that resulted from altering cell-ECM contacts. Primary rat hepatocytes were cultured in chemically defined medium on bacteriological petri dishes that were precoated with different densities of laminin (LM). Increasing the LM density from low to high (1-1000 ng/cm2), promoted cell spreading (average projected cell area increased from 1200 to 6000 microns2) and resulted in formation of a greatly extended MT network. Nevertheless, the steady-state mass of tubulin polymer was similar at 48 h, regardless of cell shape or ECM density. In contrast, round hepatocytes on low LM contained a threefold higher mass of tubulin monomer when compared with spread cells on high LM. Furthermore, similar results were obtained whether LM, fibronectin, or type I collagen were used for cell attachment. Tubulin autoregulation appeared to function normally in these cells because tubulin mRNA levels and protein synthetic rates were greatly depressed in round cells that contained the highest level of free tubulin monomer. However, the rate of tubulin protein degradation slowed, causing the tubulin half-life to increase from approximately 24 to 55 h as the LM density was lowered from high to low and cell rounding was promoted. These results indicate that the set-point for the tubulin monomer mass in hepatocytes can be regulated by altering the density of ECM contacts and

  6. Influence of chlortetracycline and dietary protein level on visceral organ mass of growing beef steers.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, R L; McLeod, K R; Elsassert, T H; Kahl, S; Rumsey, T S; Streeter, M N

    2000-12-01

    Thirty-two beef steers (285 +/- 3 kg BW) were used to determine the effects of chlortetracycline and dietary protein level on visceral tissue mass, chemical composition, intestinal morphology, and proliferation rate indices. Steers were allotted randomly by weight to a factorial arrangement of dietary treatments consisting of either 10 or 13% CP diets top-dressed with a corn meal carrier (500 g/d) containing either 0 or 350 mg of chlortetracycline. After 84 d, steers were slaughtered and visceral organs removed and separated. Rinsed wet tissue mass was recorded; total RNA, total DNA, tissue DM, and tissue N content were determined; and tissue sections were prepared for immunohistochemical analysis. Thin tissue sections were evaluated to determine crypt depth and villus height as well as proliferation rate by immunohistochemical detection of the nuclear antigen Ki67. Rumen and abomasum weights and small intestinal length were greater (P < 0.04) in steers fed the 13% CP diet than in those fed the 10% CP diet on both an absolute weight basis and a percentage of empty BW. Chemical composition of the small intestinal and ruminal segments were largely unaffected by increased dietary protein. Increasing the dietary CP also increased the villus height in duodenal (P = 0.02) and the crypt depth of jejunal (P = 0.03) sections. Dietary administration of chlortetracycline decreased (P < 0.01) small intestinal weight both on absolute and empty BW bases. Nitrogen and RNA concentrations of the small intestinal segments were unaffected (P > 0.1) by dietary administration of subtherapeutic levels of chlortetracycline; however, because of increases (P < 0.05), or tendencies for an increase (P < 0.1), in the tissue content of DNA, the ratio of N to DNA was decreased (P < 0.05) or tended to be decreased (P < 0.1) in the small intestinal segments of the chlortetracycline-treated animals. The observed decrease in small intestinal epithelial mass does not appear to be due to alterations

  7. Identification of Leaf Proteins Differentially Accumulated between Wheat Cultivars Distinct in Their Levels of Drought Tolerance.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Zhiwei; Dong, Kun; Ge, Pei; Bian, Yanwei; Dong, Liwei; Deng, Xiong; Li, Xiaohui; Yan, Yueming

    2015-01-01

    The drought-tolerant 'Ningchun 47' (NC47) and drought-sensitive 'Chinese Spring' (CS) wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) cultivars were treated with different PEG6000 concentrations at the three-leaf stage. An analysis on the physiological and proteomic changes of wheat seedling in response to drought stress was performed. In total, 146 differentially accumulated protein (DAP) spots were separated and recognised using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. In total, 101 DAP spots representing 77 unique proteins were identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation time-of-flight mass spectrometry. These proteins were allocated to 10 groups according to putative functions, which were mainly involved in carbon metabolism (23.4%), photosynthesis/respiration (22.1%) and stress/defence/detoxification (18.2%). Some drought stress-related proteins in NC47, such as enolase, 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase, Oxygen-evolving enhancer protein 2, fibrillin-like protein, 2-Cys peroxiredoxin BAS1 and 70-kDa heat shock protein, were more upregulated than those in CS. Multivariate principal components analysis revealed obvious differences between the control and treatments in both NC47 and CS, while cluster analysis showed that the DAPs displayed five and six accumulation patterns in NC47 and CS, respectively. Protein-protein interaction network analysis showed that some key DAPs, such as 2-Cys peroxiredoxin BAS1, RuBisCO large subunit-binding protein, 50S ribosomal protein L1, 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase, glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase isoenzyme and 70-kDa heat shock protein, with upregulated accumulation in NC47, had complex interactions with other proteins related to amino acid metabolism, carbon metabolism, energy pathway, signal transduction, stress/defence/detoxification, protein folding and nucleotide metabolism. These proteins could play important roles in drought-stress tolerance and contribute to the relatively stronger drought tolerance of NC47. PMID

  8. Cholesterol and steroid synthesizing smooth endoplasmic reticulum of adrenocortical cells contains high levels of translocation apparatus proteins.

    PubMed

    Black, V H; Sanjay, A; van Leyen, K; Möeller, I; Lauring, B; Kreibich, G

    2002-11-01

    Steroid-secreting cells possess abundant smooth endoplasmic reticulum whose membranes contain many enzymes involved in sterol and steroid synthesis. In this study we demonstrate that adrenal smooth microsomal subfractions enriched in these membranes also possess high levels of proteins belonging to the translocation apparatus, proteins previously assumed to be confined to morphologically identifiable rough endoplasmic reticulum (RER). We further demonstrate that these smooth microsomal subfractions are capable of effecting the functions of these protein complexes: co-translational translocation, signal peptide cleavage and N-glycosylation of newly synthesized polypeptides. We hypothesize that these elements participate in regulating the levels of ER-targeted membrane proteins involved in cholesterol and steroid metabolism in a sterol-dependent and hormonally-regulated manner. PMID:12530645

  9. The nuclear localization of SOCS6 requires the N-terminal region and negatively regulates Stat3 protein levels

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Mi-Na; Min, Chan-Hee; Kim, Hyung Sik; Lee, Ho; Yoon, Kyong-Ah; Park, Sung Yong; Lee, Eun Sook; Yoon, Sungpil . E-mail: yoons@ncc.re.kr

    2007-08-24

    We determined that endogenous- and overexpressed- SOCS6 was localized in both the nucleus and cytoplasm. The localization of SOCS6 depended on amino acids 1-210 in the N-terminal region of the protein, which contains an unidentified domain. GFP-tagged SOCS6 or the N-terminal region, was exclusively localized and widely distributed throughout the entire nucleus, whereas the C-terminal region displayed a nuclear omission pattern. We also demonstrated that the SOCS6 protein could decrease the levels of the Stat3 protein in the nucleus, and that its negative regulation of the Stat3 protein level was dependent on its C-terminal region. These observations suggest that SOCS6 is composed of at least two functional domains required for its biological role in localizing and degrading Stat3 in the nucleus.

  10. Manufacturing Aids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    During a research program, MMTC/Textron invented a computer-aided automatic robotic system for spraying hot plasma onto a turbine blade. The need to control the thickness of the plasma deposit led to the development of advanced optical gaging techniques to monitor and control plasma spray build-up on blade surfaces. The techniques led to computerized optical gages for inspecting aircraft, industrial turbine blades, etc. MMTC offers 10 standard commercial robotic gages. The system also generates two dimensional profiles for assessing status and specifying repairs to the electromechanical cathodes used to make the parts. It is capable of accuracies to a ten-thousandth of an inch. An expanded product line is currently marketed. The gages offer multiple improvements in quality control and significant savings.

  11. Blood-brain barrier and neuro-AIDS.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y-L; Ouyang, Y-B; Liu, L-G; Chen, D-X

    2015-12-01

    Neuro-AIDS is becoming a major health problem among AIDS patients who experience improved survival under combined antiretroviral therapy (cART). Neuronal injury and loss are the critical issues of neuro-AIDS that need the entry of HIV into the central nervous system (CNS) via peripheral infected monocyte/macrophage carriers or viral direct penetration of blood-brain barrier (BBB). The mechanisms of HIV enhancing BBB permeability and entering CNS and the effect of drug abuse in HIV traffic across BBB are discussed. In addition, the current anti-HIV drugs, although they are effective in reducing plasma viral level, cannot eradicate the viruses completely from CNS. The possible mechanism of BBB hindrance and anti-HIV drug efflux by transport proteins, and general methods used to deliver antiretroviral drugs into brain are also discussed. PMID:26744885

  12. Is serum or sputum eosinophil cationic protein level adequate for diagnosis of mild asthma?

    PubMed

    Khakzad, Mohammad Reza; Mirsadraee, Majid; Sankian, Mojtaba; Varasteh, Abdolreza; Meshkat, Mojtaba

    2009-09-01

    Spirometry has been used as a common diagnostic test in asthma. Most of the patients with a mild asthma have a FEV1 within normal range. Hence, other diagnostic methods are usually used. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether eosinophil Cationic Protein (ECP) could be an accurate diagnostic marker of mild asthma. In this study diagnosis of asthma was made according to internationally accepted criteria. Asthma severity was evaluated according to frequency of symptoms and FEV1.Adequate sputum samples were obtained in 50 untreated subjects. A control group of 12 normal subjects that showed PC20 more than 8 mg/dl was also examined. Sputum was induced by inhalation of hypertonic saline. Inflammatory cells in sputum smears were assessed semi-quantitatively. ECP and IgE concentrations, eosinophil (EO) percentage and ECP/EO ratio in serum and sputum were also determined. The results revealed that Cough and dyspnea were the most frequent clinical findings. Dyspnea and wheezing were the symptoms that correlated with staging of asthma. FEV1 was within normal range (more than 80% of predicted) in 22 (44%) subjects.Asthmatic patients showed significantly higher numbers of blood eosinophils (4.5+/- 3.1% vs. 1.2+/-0.2%, P=0.009), and higher levels of serum ECP than control group (3.1+/- 2.6 % and 22.6+/- 15.8 ng/ml, respectively). Sputum ECP level in asthmatics was significantly higher than non- asthmatics (55.3+/-29.8ng/mL vs. 25.0+/-24.7ng/mL, P=0.045). Regression analysis showed no significant correlation between spirometric parameters and biomarkers, the only exception was significant correlation between FEF(25-75) and serum ECP (r= 0.28, P 0.041). Regarding clinical symptoms, wheezing was significantly correlated with elevation of most of biomarkers. Since, serum and sputum ECP levels are elevated in untreated asthmatics, the ECP level could be used for accurate diagnosis of mild form of asthma in which spirometry is unremarkable. PMID:20124607

  13. Signaling Pathways Related to Protein Synthesis and Amino Acid Concentration in Pig Skeletal Muscles Depend on the Dietary Protein Level, Genotype and Developmental Stages

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yingying; Li, Fengna; Kong, Xiangfeng; Tan, Bie; Li, Yinghui; Duan, Yehui; Blachier, François; Hu, Chien-An A.; Yin, Yulong

    2015-01-01

    Muscle growth is regulated by the homeostatic balance of the biosynthesis and degradation of muscle proteins. To elucidate the molecular interactions among diet, pig genotype, and physiological stage, we examined the effect of dietary protein concentration, pig genotype, and physiological stages on amino acid (AA) pools, protein deposition, and related signaling pathways in different types of skeletal muscles. The study used 48 Landrace pigs and 48 pure-bred Bama mini-pigs assigned to each of 2 dietary treatments: lower/GB (Chinese conventional diet)- or higher/NRC (National Research Council)-protein diet. Diets were fed from 5 weeks of age to respective market weights of each genotype. Samples of biceps femoris muscle (BFM, type I) and longissimus dorsi muscle (LDM, type II) were collected at nursery, growing, and finishing phases according to the physiological stage of each genotype, to determine the AA concentrations, mRNA levels for growth-related genes in muscles, and protein abundances of mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway. Our data showed that the concentrations of most AAs in LDM and BFM of pigs increased (P<0.05) gradually with increasing age. Bama mini-pigs had generally higher (P<0.05) muscle concentrations of flavor-related AA, including Met, Phe, Tyr, Pro, and Ser, compared with Landrace pigs. The mRNA levels for myogenic determining factor, myogenin, myocyte-specific enhancer binding factor 2 A, and myostatin of Bama mini-pigs were higher (P<0.05) than those of Landrace pigs, while total and phosphorylated protein levels for protein kinase B, mTOR, and p70 ribosomal protein S6 kinases (p70S6K), and ratios of p-mTOR/mTOR, p-AKT/AKT, and p-p70S6K/p70S6K were lower (P<0.05). There was a significant pig genotype-dependent effect of dietary protein on the levels for mTOR and p70S6K. When compared with the higher protein-NRC diet, the lower protein-GB diet increased (P<0.05) the levels for mTOR and p70S6K in Bama mini-pigs, but

  14. Signaling Pathways Related to Protein Synthesis and Amino Acid Concentration in Pig Skeletal Muscles Depend on the Dietary Protein Level, Genotype and Developmental Stages.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yingying; Li, Fengna; Kong, Xiangfeng; Tan, Bie; Li, Yinghui; Duan, Yehui; Blachier, François; Hu, Chien-An A; Yin, Yulong

    2015-01-01

    Muscle growth is regulated by the homeostatic balance of the biosynthesis and degradation of muscle proteins. To elucidate the molecular interactions among diet, pig genotype, and physiological stage, we examined the effect of dietary protein concentration, pig genotype, and physiological stages on amino acid (AA) pools, protein deposition, and related signaling pathways in different types of skeletal muscles. The study used 48 Landrace pigs and 48 pure-bred Bama mini-pigs assigned to each of 2 dietary treatments: lower/GB (Chinese conventional diet)- or higher/NRC (National Research Council)-protein diet. Diets were fed from 5 weeks of age to respective market weights of each genotype. Samples of biceps femoris muscle (BFM, type I) and longissimus dorsi muscle (LDM, type II) were collected at nursery, growing, and finishing phases according to the physiological stage of each genotype, to determine the AA concentrations, mRNA levels for growth-related genes in muscles, and protein abundances of mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway. Our data showed that the concentrations of most AAs in LDM and BFM of pigs increased (P<0.05) gradually with increasing age. Bama mini-pigs had generally higher (P<0.05) muscle concentrations of flavor-related AA, including Met, Phe, Tyr, Pro, and Ser, compared with Landrace pigs. The mRNA levels for myogenic determining factor, myogenin, myocyte-specific enhancer binding factor 2 A, and myostatin of Bama mini-pigs were higher (P<0.05) than those of Landrace pigs, while total and phosphorylated protein levels for protein kinase B, mTOR, and p70 ribosomal protein S6 kinases (p70S6K), and ratios of p-mTOR/mTOR, p-AKT/AKT, and p-p70S6K/p70S6K were lower (P<0.05). There was a significant pig genotype-dependent effect of dietary protein on the levels for mTOR and p70S6K. When compared with the higher protein-NRC diet, the lower protein-GB diet increased (P<0.05) the levels for mTOR and p70S6K in Bama mini-pigs, but

  15. In Situ Molecular Level Studies on Membrane Related Peptides and Proteins in Real Time Using Sum Frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Shuji; Nguyen, Khoi Tan; Le Clair, Stéphanie V.; Chen, Zhan

    2009-01-01

    Sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy has been demonstrated to be a powerful technique to study the molecular structures of surfaces and interfaces in different chemical environments. This review summarizes recent SFG studies on hybrid bilayer membranes and substrate-supported lipid monolayers and bilayers, the interaction between peptides/proteins and lipid monolayers/bilayers, and bilayer perturbation induced by peptides/proteins. To demonstrate the ability of SFG to determine the orientations of various secondary structures, studies on the interaction between different peptides/proteins (melittin, G proteins, almethicin, and tachyplesin I) and lipid bilayers are discussed. Molecular level details revealed by SFG in these studies show that SFG can provide a unique understanding on the interactions between a lipid monolayer/bilayer and peptides/proteins in real time, in situ and without any exogenous labeling. PMID:19306928

  16. Effect of level of dietary protein on arginine-stimulated citrulline synthesis. Correlation with mitochondrial N-acetylglutamate concentrations.

    PubMed Central

    Morimoto, B H; Brady, J F; Atkinson, D E

    1990-01-01

    Increases in dietary protein have been reported to increase the rate of citrulline synthesis and the level of N-acetylglutamate in liver. We have confirmed this effect of diet on citrulline synthesis in rat liver mitochondria and show parallel increases in N-acetylglutamate concentration. The magnitude of the effect of arginine in the suspending medium on citrulline synthesis was also dependent on dietary protein content. Mitochondria from rats fed on a protein-free diet initially contained low levels of N-acetylglutamate, and addition of arginine increased the rate of its synthesis. Citrulline synthesis and acetylglutamate content in these mitochondria increased more than 5-fold when 1 mM-arginine was added. A diet high in protein results in mitochondria with increased N-acetylglutamate and a high rate of citrulline synthesis; 1 mM-arginine increased citrulline synthesis in such mitochondria by only 36%. The concentration of arginine in portal blood was 47 microM in rats fed on a diet lacking protein, and 182 microM in rats fed on a diet containing 60% protein, suggesting that arginine may be a regulatory signal to the liver concerning the dietary protein intake. The rates of citrulline synthesis were proportional to the mitochondrial content of acetylglutamate in mitochondria obtained from rats fed on diets containing 0, 24, or 60% protein, whether incubated in the absence or presence of arginine. Although the effector concentrations are higher than the Ka for the enzymes, these results support the view that concentrations of both arginine and acetylglutamate are important in the regulation of synthesis of citrulline and urea. Additionally, the effects of dietary protein level (and of arginine) are exerted in large part by way of modulation of the concentration of acetylglutamate. PMID:2268294

  17. Atomic-level description of protein-lipid interactions using an accelerated membrane model.

    PubMed

    Baylon, Javier L; Vermaas, Josh V; Muller, Melanie P; Arcario, Mark J; Pogorelov, Taras V; Tajkhorshid, Emad

    2016-07-01

    Peripheral membrane proteins are structurally diverse proteins that are involved in fundamental cellular processes. Their activity of these proteins is frequently modulated through their interaction with cellular membranes, and as a result techniques to study the interfacial interaction between peripheral proteins and the membrane are in high demand. Due to the fluid nature of the membrane and the reversibility of protein-membrane interactions, the experimental study of these systems remains a challenging task. Molecular dynamics simulations offer a suitable approach to study protein-lipid interactions; however, the slow dynamics of the lipids often prevents sufficient sampling of specific membrane-protein interactions in atomistic simulations. To increase lipid dynamics while preserving the atomistic detail of protein-lipid interactions, in the highly mobile membrane-mimetic (HMMM) model the membrane core is replaced by an organic solvent, while short-tailed lipids provide a nearly complete representation of natural lipids at the organic solvent/water interface. Here, we present a brief introduction and a summary of recent applications of the HMMM to study different membrane proteins, complementing the experimental characterization of the presented systems, and we offer a perspective of future applications of the HMMM to study other classes of membrane proteins. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Membrane proteins edited by J.C. Gumbart and Sergei Noskov. PMID:26940626

  18. SET overexpression in HEK293 cells regulates mitochondrial uncoupling proteins levels within a mitochondrial fission/reduced autophagic flux scenario

    SciTech Connect

    Almeida, Luciana O.; Goto, Renata N.; Neto, Marinaldo P.C.; Sousa, Lucas O.; Curti, Carlos; Leopoldino, Andréia M.

    2015-03-06

    We hypothesized that SET, a protein accumulated in some cancer types and Alzheimer disease, is involved in cell death through mitochondrial mechanisms. We addressed the mRNA and protein levels of the mitochondrial uncoupling proteins UCP1, UCP2 and UCP3 (S and L isoforms) by quantitative real-time PCR and immunofluorescence as well as other mitochondrial involvements, in HEK293 cells overexpressing the SET protein (HEK293/SET), either in the presence or absence of oxidative stress induced by the pro-oxidant t-butyl hydroperoxide (t-BHP). SET overexpression in HEK293 cells decreased UCP1 and increased UCP2 and UCP3 (S/L) mRNA and protein levels, whilst also preventing lipid peroxidation and decreasing the content of cellular ATP. SET overexpression also (i) decreased the area of mitochondria and increased the number of organelles and lysosomes, (ii) increased mitochondrial fission, as demonstrated by increased FIS1 mRNA and FIS-1 protein levels, an apparent accumulation of DRP-1 protein, and an increase in the VDAC protein level, and (iii) reduced autophagic flux, as demonstrated by a decrease in LC3B lipidation (LC3B-II) in the presence of chloroquine. Therefore, SET overexpression in HEK293 cells promotes mitochondrial fission and reduces autophagic flux in apparent association with up-regulation of UCP2 and UCP3; this implies a potential involvement in cellular processes that are deregulated such as in Alzheimer's disease and cancer. - Highlights: • SET, UCPs and autophagy prevention are correlated. • SET action has mitochondrial involvement. • UCP2/3 may reduce ROS and prevent autophagy. • SET protects cell from ROS via UCP2/3.

  19. Activation of TLR3 Promotes the Degeneration of Retinal Ganglion Cells by Upregulating the Protein Levels of JNK3

    PubMed Central

    Chintala, Shravan K.; Putris, Nahrain; Geno, Mason

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate whether activation of Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3) promotes the degeneration of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) by upregulating the protein levels of c-jun N-terminal kinase 3 (JNK3). Methods. Toll-like receptor 3-specific activator, Poly(I:C) (polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid), or PBS was injected into the vitreous humor of Thy1-YFP mice. At 24, 48, and 72 hours after treatments, degeneration of RGCs was assessed by using antibodies against brain-specific homeobox/POU domain protein 3a (Brn3a). A TLR3-specific inhibitor was injected into the vitreous humor with or without Poly(I:C). Western blot assays were performed to determine relative levels of TLR3, JNK3, pJNK3, and sterile alpha and HEAT/Armadillo motif-containing 1 (SARM1) proteins in retinal protein extracts, and immunohistochemistry assays were performed to determine their cellular localization in the retina. Mouse eyes were treated with Poly(I:C) or PBS along with MitoTracker Red, and colocalization of MitoTracker Red and JNK3 in the retinas was determined by using antibodies against JNK3. Results. Poly(I:C) activated TLR3 and upregulated its downstream target protein JNK3 but not SARM1 in the retina. Poly(I:C) activated TLR3 and upregulated JNK3 specifically in RGCs and promoted a significant degeneration of RGCs over a 72-hour time period. Toll-like receptor 3 upregulated the levels of JNK3 protein in the cytoplasm of RGCs, but not in the mitochondria. Toll-like receptor 3-specific inhibitor downregulated Poly(I:C)-mediated upregulation of JNK3 protein, and, in turn, significantly attenuated TLR3-induced degeneration of RGCs. Conclusions. Results presented in this study show that the activation of TLR3 alone promotes the degeneration of RGCs by upregulating the protein levels of JNK3. PMID:25564448

  20. Computational Design of Self-Assembling Protein Nanomaterials with Atomic Level Accuracy

    SciTech Connect

    King, Neil P.; Sheffler, William; Sawaya, Michael R.; Vollmar, Breanna S.; Sumida, John P.; André, Ingemar; Gonen, Tamir; Yeates, Todd O.; Baker, David

    2015-09-17

    We describe a general computational method for designing proteins that self-assemble to a desired symmetric architecture. Protein building blocks are docked together symmetrically to identify complementary packing arrangements, and low-energy protein-protein interfaces are then designed between the building blocks in order to drive self-assembly. We used trimeric protein building blocks to design a 24-subunit, 13-nm diameter complex with octahedral symmetry and a 12-subunit, 11-nm diameter complex with tetrahedral symmetry. The designed proteins assembled to the desired oligomeric states in solution, and the crystal structures of the complexes revealed that the resulting materials closely match the design models. The method can be used to design a wide variety of self-assembling protein nanomaterials.

  1. [Interest of S100B protein blood level determination in severe or moderate head injury].

    PubMed

    Bouvier, Damien

    2013-01-01

    S100B, a suffering brain marker, exhibits a different interest in traumatic brain injury (TBI) as the trauma is severe (sTBI) or mild (mTBI). Our works presented for the attribution of the SFBC 2012 price talked about both aspects. Firstly, the extent of S100B elevation has been found to be useful in predicting clinical outcome after sTBI. However, few studies were realized with jugular venous blood samples. After comparing the interest between jugular venous and arterial blood concentrations evaluation of serum S100B protein in patients with sTBI, determination of S100B concentration in jugular blood samples appears to be better than in arterial ones to predict clinical outcome after brain injury. Secondly, it's difficult to determine the indication of cranial computed tomography (CCT) for patients with mTBI. Actually, 90% of patients with mTBI have unnecessary CCT or short hospitalization for observation. Serum concentrations of S100B were found to provide useful information. We have investigated in 2 studies (1 for adult, 1 for children) whether S100B concentrations in patients with mTBI could provide additional information to improve indication of the need for an initial CCT scan or for a short hospitalization. Patients with intracerebral lesions on the CCT scan (CCT+) or with bad clinical evolution were identified with a sensitivity level of 100% and a specificity level of 30%. Adding the measurement of S-100B serum concentration to the clinical decision rules for a CCT scan or hospitalization in patients with mTBI could allow a 30% reduction in scans and in hospitalization for clinical observation. PMID:23587577

  2. Identification of Leaf Proteins Differentially Accumulated between Wheat Cultivars Distinct in Their Levels of Drought Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Bian, Yanwei; Dong, Liwei; Deng, Xiong; Li, Xiaohui; Yan, Yueming

    2015-01-01

    The drought-tolerant ‘Ningchun 47’ (NC47) and drought-sensitive ‘Chinese Spring’ (CS) wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) cultivars were treated with different PEG6000 concentrations at the three-leaf stage. An analysis on the physiological and proteomic changes of wheat seedling in response to drought stress was performed. In total, 146 differentially accumulated protein (DAP) spots were separated and recognised using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. In total, 101 DAP spots representing 77 unique proteins were identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation time-of-flight mass spectrometry. These proteins were allocated to 10 groups according to putative functions, which were mainly involved in carbon metabolism (23.4%), photosynthesis/respiration (22.1%) and stress/defence/detoxification (18.2%). Some drought stress-related proteins in NC47, such as enolase, 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase, Oxygen-evolving enhancer protein 2, fibrillin-like protein, 2-Cys peroxiredoxin BAS1 and 70-kDa heat shock protein, were more upregulated than those in CS. Multivariate principal components analysis revealed obvious differences between the control and treatments in both NC47 and CS, while cluster analysis showed that the DAPs displayed five and six accumulation patterns in NC47 and CS, respectively. Protein–protein interaction network analysis showed that some key DAPs, such as 2-Cys peroxiredoxin BAS1, RuBisCO large subunit-binding protein, 50S ribosomal protein L1, 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase, glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase isoenzyme and 70-kDa heat shock protein, with upregulated accumulation in NC47, had complex interactions with other proteins related to amino acid metabolism, carbon metabolism, energy pathway, signal transduction, stress/defence/detoxification, protein folding and nucleotide metabolism. These proteins could play important roles in drought-stress tolerance and contribute to the relatively stronger drought tolerance of NC47

  3. Ezrin Binds to DEAD-Box RNA Helicase DDX3 and Regulates Its Function and Protein Level

    PubMed Central

    Çelik, Haydar; Sajwan, Kamal P.; Selvanathan, Saravana P.; Marsh, Benjamin J.; Pai, Amrita V.; Kont, Yasemin Saygideger; Han, Jenny; Minas, Tsion Z.; Rahim, Said; Erkizan, Hayriye Verda; Toretsky, Jeffrey A.

    2015-01-01

    Ezrin is a key regulator of cancer metastasis that links the extracellular matrix to the actin cytoskeleton and regulates cell morphology and motility. We discovered a small-molecule inhibitor, NSC305787, that directly binds to ezrin and inhibits its function. In this study, we used a nano-liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (nano-LC–MS-MS)-based proteomic approach to identify ezrin-interacting proteins that are competed away by NSC305787. A large number of the proteins that interact with ezrin were implicated in protein translation and stress granule dynamics. We validated direct interaction between ezrin and the RNA helicase DDX3, and NSC305787 blocked this interaction. Downregulation or long-term pharmacological inhibition of ezrin led to reduced DDX3 protein levels without changes in DDX3 mRNA. Ectopic overexpression of ezrin in low-ezrin-expressing osteosarcoma cells caused a notable increase in DDX3 protein levels. Ezrin inhibited the RNA helicase activity of DDX3 but increased its ATPase activity. Our data suggest that ezrin controls the translation of mRNAs preferentially with a structured 5′ untranslated region, at least in part, by sustaining the protein level of DDX3 and/or regulating its function. Therefore, our findings suggest a novel function for ezrin in regulation of gene translation that is distinct from its canonical role as a cytoskeletal scaffold at the cell membrane. PMID:26149384

  4. The Drosophila F-box protein Archipelago controls levels of the Trachealess transcription factor in the embryonic tracheal system

    PubMed Central

    Mortimer, Nathan T.; Moberg, Kenneth H.

    2007-01-01

    The archipelago gene (ago) encodes the F-box specificity subunit of an SCF(skp-cullin-f box) ubiquitin ligase that inhibits cell proliferation in Drosophila melanogaster and suppresses tumorigenesis in mammals. ago limits mitotic activity by targeting cell cycle and cell growth proteins for ubiquitin-dependent degradation, but the diverse developmental roles of other F-box proteins suggests that it is likely to have additional protein targets. Here we show that ago is required for the post-mitotic shaping of the Drosophila embryonic tracheal system, and that it acts in this tissue by targeting the Trachealess (Trh) protein, a conserved bHLH-PAS transcription factor. ago restricts Trh levels in vivo and antagonizes transcription of the breathless FGF receptor, a known target of Trh in the tracheal system. At a molecular level, the Ago protein binds Trh and is required for proteasome-dependent elimination of Trh in response to expression of the Dysfusion protein. ago mutations that elevate Trh levels in vivo are defective in binding forms of Trh found in Dysfusion-positive cells. These data identify a novel function for the ago ubiquitin-ligase in tracheal morphogenesis via Trh and its target breathless, and suggest that ago has distinct functions in mitotic and post-mitotic cells that influence its role in development and disease. PMID:17976568

  5. Proteomic Investigation of Protein Profile Changes and Amino Acid Residue Level Modification in Cooked Lamb Meat: The Effect of Boiling.

    PubMed

    Yu, Tzer-Yang; Morton, James D; Clerens, Stefan; Dyer, Jolon M

    2015-10-21

    Hydrothermal treatment (heating in water) is a common method of general food processing and preparation. For red-meat-based foods, boiling is common; however, how the molecular level effects of this treatment correlate to the overall food properties is not yet well-understood. The effects of differing boiling times on lamb meat and the resultant cooking water were here examined through proteomic evaluation. The longer boiling time was found to result in increased protein aggregation involving particularly proteins such as glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, as well as truncation in proteins such as in α-actinin-2. Heat-induced protein backbone cleavage was observed adjacent to aspartic acid and asparagine residues. Side-chain modifications of amino acid residues resulting from the heating, including oxidation of phenylalanine and formation of carboxyethyllysine, were characterized in the cooked samples. Actin and myoglobin bands from the cooked meat per se remained visible on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, even after significant cooking time. These proteins were also found to be the major source of observed heat-induced modifications. This study provides new insights into molecular-