Science.gov

Sample records for aided assessment caa

  1. CFD-CAA Coupled Calculations of a Tandem Cylinder Configuration to Assess Facility Installation Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redonnet, Stephane; Lockard, David P.; Khorrami, Mehdi R.; Choudhari, Meelan M.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a numerical assessment of acoustic installation effects in the tandem cylinder (TC) experiments conducted in the NASA Langley Quiet Flow Facility (QFF), an open-jet, anechoic wind tunnel. Calculations that couple the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) and Computational Aeroacoustics (CAA) of the TC configuration within the QFF are conducted using the CFD simulation results previously obtained at NASA LaRC. The coupled simulations enable the assessment of installation effects associated with several specific features in the QFF facility that may have impacted the measured acoustic signature during the experiment. The CFD-CAA coupling is based on CFD data along a suitably chosen surface, and employs a technique that was recently improved to account for installed configurations involving acoustic backscatter into the CFD domain. First, a CFD-CAA calculation is conducted for an isolated TC configuration to assess the coupling approach, as well as to generate a reference solution for subsequent assessments of QFF installation effects. Direct comparisons between the CFD-CAA calculations associated with the various installed configurations allow the assessment of the effects of each component (nozzle, collector, etc.) or feature (confined vs. free jet flow, etc.) characterizing the NASA LaRC QFF facility.

  2. When Summative Computer-Aided Assessments Go Wrong: Disaster Recovery after a Major Failure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harwood, Ian

    2005-01-01

    This case study outlines the events of a recent summative computer-aided assessment (CAA) failure involving 280 first-year undergraduate students. Post-test analysis found that the central server had become unexpectedly overloaded, thereby causing the CAA to be abandoned. Practical advice on just what to do in the event of a summative CAA failure…

  3. Effective Computer-Aided Assessment of Mathematics; Principles, Practice and Results

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenhow, Martin

    2015-01-01

    This article outlines some key issues for writing effective computer-aided assessment (CAA) questions in subjects with substantial mathematical or statistical content, especially the importance of control of random parameters and the encoding of wrong methods of solution (mal-rules) commonly used by students. The pros and cons of using CAA and…

  4. Does Computer-Aided Formative Assessment Improve Learning Outcomes?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hannah, John; James, Alex; Williams, Phillipa

    2014-01-01

    Two first-year engineering mathematics courses used computer-aided assessment (CAA) to provide students with opportunities for formative assessment via a series of weekly quizzes. Most students used the assessment until they achieved very high (>90%) quiz scores. Although there is a positive correlation between these quiz marks and the final…

  5. Cellular antioxidant activity (CAA) assay for assessing antioxidants, foods, and dietary supplements.

    PubMed

    Wolfe, Kelly L; Liu, Rui Hai

    2007-10-31

    A cellular antioxidant activity (CAA) assay for quantifying the antioxidant activity of phytochemicals, food extracts, and dietary supplements has been developed. Dichlorofluorescin is a probe that is trapped within cells and is easily oxidized to fluorescent dichlorofluorescein (DCF). The method measures the ability of compounds to prevent the formation of DCF by 2,2'-azobis(2-amidinopropane) dihydrochloride (ABAP)-generated peroxyl radicals in human hepatocarcinoma HepG2 cells. The decrease in cellular fluorescence when compared to the control cells indicates the antioxidant capacity of the compounds. The antioxidant activities of selected phytochemicals and fruit extracts were evaluated using the CAA assay, and the results were expressed in micromoles of quercetin equivalents per 100 micromol of phytochemical or micromoles of quercetin equivalents per 100 g of fresh fruit. Quercetin had the highest CAA value, followed by kaempferol, epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), myricetin, and luteolin among the pure compounds tested. Among the selected fruits tested, blueberry had the highest CAA value, followed by cranberry > apple = red grape > green grape. The CAA assay is a more biologically relevant method than the popular chemistry antioxidant activity assays because it accounts for some aspects of uptake, metabolism, and location of antioxidant compounds within cells.

  6. How Effective Is Feedback in Computer-Aided Assessments?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gill, Mundeep; Greenhow, Martin

    2008-01-01

    Computer-Aided Assessments (CAAs) have been used increasingly at Brunel University for over 10 years to test students' mathematical abilities. Recently, we have focussed on providing very rich feedback to the students; given the work involved in designing and coding such feedback, it is important to study the impact of the interaction between…

  7. Does computer-aided formative assessment improve learning outcomes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannah, John; James, Alex; Williams, Phillipa

    2014-02-01

    Two first-year engineering mathematics courses used computer-aided assessment (CAA) to provide students with opportunities for formative assessment via a series of weekly quizzes. Most students used the assessment until they achieved very high (>90%) quiz scores. Although there is a positive correlation between these quiz marks and the final exam marks, spending time on the CAA component of the course was negatively correlated with final exam performance. Students across the ability spectrum reduced their time commitment to CAA in their second semester, with weaker students achieving lower quiz totals, but with more able students' quiz marks hardly affected. Despite this lower quiz performance, the weaker students still improved their final exam marks in the second semester.

  8. Antioxidant activity of puha (Sonchus oleraceus L.) as assessed by the cellular antioxidant activity (CAA) assay.

    PubMed

    McDowell, Arlene; Thompson, Scott; Stark, Mirjam; Ou, Zong-Quan; Gould, Kevin S

    2011-12-01

    There is considerable interest in antioxidant dietary components that can be protective against degenerative diseases in humans. Puha (Sonchus oleraceus L.) is a rich source of polyphenols, and exhibits strong antioxidant activity as measured by the 2,2-diphenylpicrylhydrazyl (DPPH) assay. However, the potential of puha to protect against degenerative diseases requires that low molecular weight antioxidants (LMWA) are absorbed by, and active in, human cells. The cellular antioxidant activity (CAA) assay was used to investigate the antioxidant activity of puha leaf extracts. Preparation methods of freezing and freeze-drying reduced the total polyphenolic content compared with fresh puha, but did not affect the LMWA potential as determined by the DPPH assay. The IC(50) values were 0.012 ± 0.003 mg/mL and 0.010 ± 0.005 mg/mL for freeze-dried and fresh puha leaves, respectively. Using the CAA assay, it was shown that LMWAs from foliar extracts of puha were effectively absorbed into HepG2 cells, and exerted antioxidant activity at levels comparable to those of extracts from blueberry fruits, the much-touted antioxidant superfood. Methylene blue staining of HepG2 cells indicated that puha extracts were not cytotoxic at concentrations below 100 mg DW/mL. The data indicate the potential of puha as a nutraceutical supplement for human health.

  9. A Design Science Research Methodology for Developing a Computer-Aided Assessment Approach Using Method Marking Concept

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Genemo, Hussein; Miah, Shah Jahan; McAndrew, Alasdair

    2016-01-01

    Assessment has been defined as an authentic method that plays an important role in evaluating students' learning attitude in acquiring lifelong knowledge. Traditional methods of assessment including the Computer-Aided Assessment (CAA) for mathematics show limited ability to assess students' full work unless multi-step questions are sub-divided…

  10. CAA for Jet Noise Physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mankbadi, Reda

    2001-01-01

    Dr. Mankbadi summarized recent CAA results. Examples of the effect of various boundary condition schemes on the computed acoustic field, for a point source in a uniform flow, were shown. Solutions showing the impact of inflow excitations on the result were also shown. Results from a large eddy simulation, using a fourth-order MacCormack scheme with a Smagorinsky sub-grid turbulence model, were shown for a Mach 2.1 unheated jet. The results showed that the results were free from spurious modes. Results were shown for a Mach 1.4 jet using LES in the near field and the Kirchhoff method for the far field. Predicted flow field characteristics were shown to be in good agreement with data and predicted far field directivities were shown to be in qualitative agree with experimental measurements.

  11. Assessing the binocular advantage in aided vision.

    PubMed

    Harrington, Lawrence K; McIntire, John P; Hopper, Darrel G

    2014-09-01

    Advances in microsensors, microprocessors, and microdisplays are creating new opportunities for improving vision in degraded environments through the use of head-mounted displays. Initially, the cutting-edge technology used in these new displays will be expensive. Inevitably, the cost of providing the additional sensor and processing required to support binocularity brings the value of binocularity into question. Several assessments comparing binocular, binocular, and monocular head-mounted displays for aided vision have concluded that the additional performance, if any, provided by binocular head-mounted displays does not justify the cost. The selection of a biocular [corrected] display for use in the F-35 is a current example of this recurring decision process. It is possible that the human binocularity advantage does not carry over to the aided vision application, but more likely the experimental approaches used in the past have been too coarse to measure its subtle but important benefits. Evaluating the value of binocularity in aided vision applications requires an understanding of the characteristics of both human vision and head-mounted displays. With this understanding, the value of binocularity in aided vision can be estimated and experimental evidence can be collected to confirm or reject the presumed binocular advantage, enabling improved decisions in aided vision system design. This paper describes four computational approaches-geometry of stereopsis, modulation transfer function area for stereopsis, probability summation, and binocular summation-that may be useful in quantifying the advantage of binocularity in aided vision.

  12. Program management assessment of Federal Facility Compliance Agreement regarding CAA-40 C.F.R. Part 61, Subpart H at the Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    1997-01-01

    An assessment of Los Alamos National Laboratory`s management system related to facility compliance with an element of the Clean Air Act was performed under contract by a team from Northern Arizona University. More specifically, a Federal Facilities Compliance Agreement (FFCA) was established in 1996 to bring the Laboratory into compliance with emissions standards of radionuclides, commonly referred to as Rad/NESHAP. In the fall of 1996, the four-person team of experienced environmental managers evaluated the adequacy of relevant management systems to implement the FFCA provisions. The assessment process utilized multiple procedures including document review, personnel interviews and re-interviews, and facility observations. The management system assessment was completed with a meeting among team members, Laboratory officials and others on November 1, 1996 and preparation of an assessment report.

  13. A PROBABILISTIC ARSENIC EXPOSURE ASSESSMENT FOR CHILDREN WHO CONTACT CHROMATED COPPER ARSENATE ( CAA )-TREATED PLAYSETS AND DECKS: PART 2 SENSITIVITY AND UNCERTAINTY ANALYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A probabilistic model (SHEDS-Wood) was developed to examine children's exposure and dose to chromated copper arsenate (CCA)-treated wood, as described in Part 1 of this two part paper. This Part 2 paper discusses sensitivity and uncertainty analyses conducted to assess the key m...

  14. Hybrid CFD/CAA Modeling for Liftoff Acoustic Predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strutzenberg, Louise L.; Liever, Peter A.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents development efforts at the NASA Marshall Space flight Center to establish a hybrid Computational Fluid Dynamics and Computational Aero-Acoustics (CFD/CAA) simulation system for launch vehicle liftoff acoustics environment analysis. Acoustic prediction engineering tools based on empirical jet acoustic strength and directivity models or scaled historical measurements are of limited value in efforts to proactively design and optimize launch vehicles and launch facility configurations for liftoff acoustics. CFD based modeling approaches are now able to capture the important details of vehicle specific plume flow environment, identifY the noise generation sources, and allow assessment of the influence of launch pad geometric details and sound mitigation measures such as water injection. However, CFD methodologies are numerically too dissipative to accurately capture the propagation of the acoustic waves in the large CFD models. The hybrid CFD/CAA approach combines the high-fidelity CFD analysis capable of identifYing the acoustic sources with a fast and efficient Boundary Element Method (BEM) that accurately propagates the acoustic field from the source locations. The BEM approach was chosen for its ability to properly account for reflections and scattering of acoustic waves from launch pad structures. The paper will present an overview of the technology components of the CFD/CAA framework and discuss plans for demonstration and validation against test data.

  15. Adaptive Peircean decision aid project summary assessments.

    SciTech Connect

    Senglaub, Michael E.

    2007-01-01

    This efforts objective was to identify and hybridize a suite of technologies enabling the development of predictive decision aids for use principally in combat environments but also in any complex information terrain. The technologies required included formal concept analysis for knowledge representation and information operations, Peircean reasoning to support hypothesis generation, Mill's's canons to begin defining information operators that support the first two technologies and co-evolutionary game theory to provide the environment/domain to assess predictions from the reasoning engines. The intended application domain is the IED problem because of its inherent evolutionary nature. While a fully functioning integrated algorithm was not achieved the hybridization and demonstration of the technologies was accomplished and demonstration of utility provided for a number of ancillary queries.

  16. Streamlining CAA compliance plans yields added benefits

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, D.A. )

    1993-02-01

    A common approach to compliance with air emissions standards at some facilities consists of correcting deficiencies noted by regulators during their annual or semi-annual visits without developing long-term compliance plans. Many times, plant officials do not know which regulations apply to their sources. Industry no longer can afford to depend on such hit-or-miss compliance strategies. Under the CAA Amendments, EPA is empowerd to issue field citations of $5,000 per day for each violation, and monetary penalties can reach millions of dollars and be accompanied by prison sentences up to 15 years. Developing a plant-wide emissions compliance plan is one of the best ways to minimize future compliance liabilities. Data collected for such plans typically are stored in a computerized database, which also can be used in other compliance activities.

  17. AIDS: Assessing the Risk among Athletes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamel, Ruth

    1992-01-01

    Since Magic Johnson's retirement, athletes and sports organizations are more interested in HIV and AIDS. Many seek answers from physicians about the risk of transmission through athletic competition and the rights of HIV-positive players. Physicians can counsel patients about reducing risk. The article discusses risk, testing, policies, education,…

  18. Decision Aiding in Europe: Assessment Report,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-05-26

    bodies and ship contours BRLT ratings, the decision-maker keeps produced in this way are quite striking, working on a goal point or reference point and...graphic functions but are multicriteria aspirations are often contra- not specifically European. Cinematic dictory and cannot be achieved simulta...above a certain threshold, then more of Hamburg. Starting from a bare minimum information and aiding are of little use, of assumptions (e.g., rigidity

  19. Second Computational Aeroacoustics (CAA) Workshop on Benchmark Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tam, C. K. W. (Editor); Hardin, J. C. (Editor)

    1997-01-01

    The proceedings of the Second Computational Aeroacoustics (CAA) Workshop on Benchmark Problems held at Florida State University are the subject of this report. For this workshop, problems arising in typical industrial applications of CAA were chosen. Comparisons between numerical solutions and exact solutions are presented where possible.

  20. An assessment of global Internet-based HIV/AIDS media coverage: implications for United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS' Global Media HIV/AIDS initiative.

    PubMed

    Anema, A; Freifeld, C C; Druyts, E; Montaner, J S G; Hogg, R S; Brownstein, J S

    2010-01-01

    No studies to date have assessed the quantity of HIV/AIDS-related media on the Internet. We assessed the quantity of language-specific HIV/AIDS Internet-based news coverage, and the correlation between country-specific HIV/AIDS news coverage and HIV/AIDS prevalence. Internet-based HIV/AIDS news articles were queried from Google News Archives for 168 countries, for the year 2007, in the nine most commonly spoken languages worldwide. English, French and Spanish sources had the greatest number of HIV/AIDS-related articles, representing 134,000 (0.70%), 11,200 (0.65%) and 24,300 (0.49%) of all news articles, respectively. A strong association between country-specific HIV/AIDS news coverage and HIV/AIDS prevalence was found, Spearman's rank correlation: 0.6 (P < 0.001). Among countries with elevated HIV/AIDS prevalence (> or =10%), the volume of HIV/AIDS-specific media was highest in Swaziland (15.9%) and Malawi (13.2%), and lowest in South Africa (4.8%) and Namibia (4.9%). Increased media attention should be placed on countries with high HIV/AIDS prevalence and limited HIV/AIDS-specific news coverage.

  1. Benchmark Solutions for Computational Aeroacoustics (CAA) Code Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, James R.

    2004-01-01

    NASA has conducted a series of Computational Aeroacoustics (CAA) Workshops on Benchmark Problems to develop a set of realistic CAA problems that can be used for code validation. In the Third (1999) and Fourth (2003) Workshops, the single airfoil gust response problem, with real geometry effects, was included as one of the benchmark problems. Respondents were asked to calculate the airfoil RMS pressure and far-field acoustic intensity for different airfoil geometries and a wide range of gust frequencies. This paper presents the validated that have been obtained to the benchmark problem, and in addition, compares them with classical flat plate results. It is seen that airfoil geometry has a strong effect on the airfoil unsteady pressure, and a significant effect on the far-field acoustic intensity. Those parts of the benchmark problem that have not yet been adequately solved are identified and presented as a challenge to the CAA research community.

  2. AIDS

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000594.htm HIV/AIDS To use the sharing features on this page, ... immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is the virus that causes AIDS. When a person becomes infected with HIV, the ...

  3. Assessing business responses to HIV / AIDS in Kenya.

    PubMed

    Roberts, M; Wangombe, J

    1995-01-01

    A consulting firm conducted interviews with managers of 16 businesses in 3 Kenyan cities, representatives of 2 trade unions, focus groups with workers at 13 companies, and an analysis of financial/labor data from 4 companies. It then did a needs assessment. The business types were light industry, manufacturing companies, tourism organizations, transport firms, agro-industrial and plantation businesses, and the service industry. Only one company followed all the workplace policy principles recommended by the World Health Organization and the International Labor Organization. Six businesses required all applicants and/or employees to undergo HIV testing. All their managers claimed that they would not discriminate against HIV-infected workers. Many workers thought that they would be fired if they were--or were suspected to be--HIV positive. Lack of a non-discrimination policy brings about worker mistrust of management. 11 companies had some type of HIV/AIDS education program. All the programs generated positive feedback. The main reasons for not providing HIV/AIDS education for the remaining 5 companies were: no employee requests, fears that it would be taboo, and assumptions that workers could receive adequate information elsewhere. More than 90% of all companies distributed condoms. 60% offered sexually transmitted disease diagnosis and treatment. About 33% offered counseling. Four companies provided volunteer HIV testing. Almost 50% of companies received financial or other external support for their programs. Most managers thought AIDS to be a problem mainly with manual staff and not with professional staff. Almost all businesses offered some medical benefits. The future impact of HIV/AIDS would be $90/employee/year (by 2005, $260) due to health care costs, absenteeism, retraining, and burial benefits. The annual costs of a comprehensive workplace HIV/AIDS prevention program varied from $18 to $54/worker at one company.

  4. A modular Human Exposure Model (HEM) framework to characterize near-field chemical exposure in LCIA and CAA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Life Cycle Impact Analysis (LCIA) has proven to be a valuable tool for systematically comparing processes and products, and has been proposed for use in Chemical Alternatives Analysis (CAA). The exposure assessment portion of the human health impact scores of LCIA has historicall...

  5. CART V: recent advancements in computer-aided camouflage assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Thomas; Müller, Markus

    2011-05-01

    In order to facilitate systematic, computer aided improvements of camouflage and concealment assessment methods, the software system CART (Camouflage Assessment in Real-Time) was built up for the camouflage assessment of objects in multispectral image sequences (see contributions to SPIE 2007-2010 [1], [2], [3], [4]). It comprises a semi-automatic marking of target objects (ground truth generation) including their propagation over the image sequence and the evaluation via user-defined feature extractors as well as methods to assess the object's movement conspicuity. In this fifth part in an annual series at the SPIE conference in Orlando, this paper presents the enhancements over the recent year and addresses the camouflage assessment of static and moving objects in multispectral image data that can show noise or image artefacts. The presented methods fathom the correlations between image processing and camouflage assessment. A novel algorithm is presented based on template matching to assess the structural inconspicuity of an object objectively and quantitatively. The results can easily be combined with an MTI (moving target indication) based movement conspicuity assessment function in order to explore the influence of object movement to a camouflage effect in different environments. As the results show, the presented methods contribute to a significant benefit in the field of camouflage assessment.

  6. 29 CFR 457.10 - CSRA; FSA; CAA; LMRDA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Regulations Relating to Labor OFFICE OF LABOR-MANAGEMENT STANDARDS, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR STANDARDS OF CONDUCT GENERAL Meaning of Terms as Used in This Chapter § 457.10 CSRA; FSA; CAA; LMRDA. CSRA means the Civil... Accountability Act of 1995; LMRDA means the Labor-Management Reporting and Disclosure Act of 1959, as amended....

  7. Fourth Computational Aeroacoustics (CAA) Workshop on Benchmark Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dahl, Milo D. (Editor)

    2004-01-01

    This publication contains the proceedings of the Fourth Computational Aeroacoustics (CAA) Workshop on Benchmark Problems. In this workshop, as in previous workshops, the problems were devised to gauge the technological advancement of computational techniques to calculate all aspects of sound generation and propagation in air directly from the fundamental governing equations. A variety of benchmark problems have been previously solved ranging from simple geometries with idealized acoustic conditions to test the accuracy and effectiveness of computational algorithms and numerical boundary conditions; to sound radiation from a duct; to gust interaction with a cascade of airfoils; to the sound generated by a separating, turbulent viscous flow. By solving these and similar problems, workshop participants have shown the technical progress from the basic challenges to accurate CAA calculations to the solution of CAA problems of increasing complexity and difficulty. The fourth CAA workshop emphasized the application of CAA methods to the solution of realistic problems. The workshop was held at the Ohio Aerospace Institute in Cleveland, Ohio, on October 20 to 22, 2003. At that time, workshop participants presented their solutions to problems in one or more of five categories. Their solutions are presented in this proceedings along with the comparisons of their solutions to the benchmark solutions or experimental data. The five categories for the benchmark problems were as follows: Category 1:Basic Methods. The numerical computation of sound is affected by, among other issues, the choice of grid used and by the boundary conditions. Category 2:Complex Geometry. The ability to compute the sound in the presence of complex geometric surfaces is important in practical applications of CAA. Category 3:Sound Generation by Interacting With a Gust. The practical application of CAA for computing noise generated by turbomachinery involves the modeling of the noise source mechanism as a

  8. Erratum: Development, appraisal, validation and implementation of a consensus protocol for the assessment of cerebral amyloid angiopathy in post-mortem brain tissue.

    PubMed

    Love, Seth; Chalmers, Katy; Ince, Paul; Esiri, Margaret; Attems, Johannes; Kalaria, Raj; Jellinger, Kurt; Yamada, Masahito; McCarron, Mark; Minett, Thais; Matthews, Fiona; Greenberg, Steven; Mann, David; Kehoe, Patrick Gavin

    2015-01-01

    In a collaboration involving 11 groups with research interests in cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA), we used a two-stage process to develop and in turn validate a new consensus protocol and scoring scheme for the assessment of CAA and associated vasculopathic abnormalities in post-mortem brain tissue. Stage one used an iterative Delphi-style survey to develop the consensus protocol. The resultant scoring scheme was tested on a series of digital images and paraffin sections that were circulated blind to a number of scorers. The scoring scheme and choice of staining methods were refined by open-forum discussion. The agreed protocol scored parenchymal and meningeal CAA on a 0-3 scale, capillary CAA as present/absent and vasculopathy on 0-2 scale, in the 4 cortical lobes that were scored separately. A further assessment involving three centres was then undertaken. Neuropathologists in three centres (Bristol, Oxford and Sheffield) independently scored sections from 75 cases (25 from each centre) and high inter-rater reliability was demonstrated. Stage two used the results of the three-centre assessment to validate the protocol by investigating previously described associations between APOE genotype (previously determined), and both CAA and vasculopathy. Association of capillary CAA with or without arteriolar CAA with APOE ε4 was confirmed. However APOE ε2 was also found to be a strong risk factor for the development of CAA, not only in AD but also in elderly non-demented controls. Further validation of this protocol and scoring scheme is encouraged, to aid its wider adoption to facilitate collaborative and replication studies of CAA.[This corrects the article on p. 19 in vol. 3, PMID: 24754000.].

  9. Development, appraisal, validation and implementation of a consensus protocol for the assessment of cerebral amyloid angiopathy in post-mortem brain tissue.

    PubMed

    Love, Seth; Chalmers, Katy; Ince, Paul; Esiri, Margaret; Attems, Johannes; Jellinger, Kurt; Yamada, Masahito; McCarron, Mark; Minett, Thais; Matthews, Fiona; Greenberg, Steven; Mann, David; Kehoe, Patrick Gavin

    2014-01-01

    In a collaboration involving 11 groups with research interests in cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA), we used a two-stage process to develop and in turn validate a new consensus protocol and scoring scheme for the assessment of CAA and associated vasculopathic abnormalities in post-mortem brain tissue. Stage one used an iterative Delphi-style survey to develop the consensus protocol. The resultant scoring scheme was tested on a series of digital images and paraffin sections that were circulated blind to a number of scorers. The scoring scheme and choice of staining methods were refined by open-forum discussion. The agreed protocol scored parenchymal and meningeal CAA on a 0-3 scale, capillary CAA as present/absent and vasculopathy on 0-2 scale, in the 4 cortical lobes that were scored separately. A further assessment involving three centres was then undertaken. Neuropathologists in three centres (Bristol, Oxford and Sheffield) independently scored sections from 75 cases (25 from each centre) and high inter-rater reliability was demonstrated. Stage two used the results of the three-centre assessment to validate the protocol by investigating previously described associations between APOE genotype (previously determined), and both CAA and vasculopathy. Association of capillary CAA with or without arteriolar CAA with APOE ε4 was confirmed. However APOE ε2 was also found to be a strong risk factor for the development of CAA, not only in AD but also in elderly non-demented controls. Further validation of this protocol and scoring scheme is encouraged, to aid its wider adoption to facilitate collaborative and replication studies of CAA.

  10. Third Computational Aeroacoustics (CAA) Workshop on Benchmark Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dahl, Milo D. (Editor)

    2000-01-01

    The proceedings of the Third Computational Aeroacoustics (CAA) Workshop on Benchmark Problems cosponsored by the Ohio Aerospace Institute and the NASA Glenn Research Center are the subject of this report. Fan noise was the chosen theme for this workshop with representative problems encompassing four of the six benchmark problem categories. The other two categories were related to jet noise and cavity noise. For the first time in this series of workshops, the computational results for the cavity noise problem were compared to experimental data. All the other problems had exact solutions, which are included in this report. The Workshop included a panel discussion by representatives of industry. The participants gave their views on the status of applying computational aeroacoustics to solve practical industry related problems and what issues need to be addressed to make CAA a robust design tool.

  11. A Computer-Aided Analysis Method of SPECT Brain Images for Quantitative Treatment Monitoring: Performance Evaluations and Clinical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Wentao; Huang, Qiu; Wan, Jieqing; Huang, Gang

    2017-01-01

    The objective and quantitative analysis of longitudinal single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) images are significant for the treatment monitoring of brain disorders. Therefore, a computer aided analysis (CAA) method is introduced to extract a change-rate map (CRM) as a parametric image for quantifying the changes of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in longitudinal SPECT brain images. The performances of the CAA-CRM approach in treatment monitoring are evaluated by the computer simulations and clinical applications. The results of computer simulations show that the derived CRMs have high similarities with their ground truths when the lesion size is larger than system spatial resolution and the change rate is higher than 20%. In clinical applications, the CAA-CRM approach is used to assess the treatment of 50 patients with brain ischemia. The results demonstrate that CAA-CRM approach has a 93.4% accuracy of recovered region's localization. Moreover, the quantitative indexes of recovered regions derived from CRM are all significantly different among the groups and highly correlated with the experienced clinical diagnosis. In conclusion, the proposed CAA-CRM approach provides a convenient solution to generate a parametric image and derive the quantitative indexes from the longitudinal SPECT brain images for treatment monitoring. PMID:28251150

  12. A Computer-Aided Analysis Method of SPECT Brain Images for Quantitative Treatment Monitoring: Performance Evaluations and Clinical Applications.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiujuan; Wei, Wentao; Huang, Qiu; Song, Shaoli; Wan, Jieqing; Huang, Gang

    2017-01-01

    The objective and quantitative analysis of longitudinal single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) images are significant for the treatment monitoring of brain disorders. Therefore, a computer aided analysis (CAA) method is introduced to extract a change-rate map (CRM) as a parametric image for quantifying the changes of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in longitudinal SPECT brain images. The performances of the CAA-CRM approach in treatment monitoring are evaluated by the computer simulations and clinical applications. The results of computer simulations show that the derived CRMs have high similarities with their ground truths when the lesion size is larger than system spatial resolution and the change rate is higher than 20%. In clinical applications, the CAA-CRM approach is used to assess the treatment of 50 patients with brain ischemia. The results demonstrate that CAA-CRM approach has a 93.4% accuracy of recovered region's localization. Moreover, the quantitative indexes of recovered regions derived from CRM are all significantly different among the groups and highly correlated with the experienced clinical diagnosis. In conclusion, the proposed CAA-CRM approach provides a convenient solution to generate a parametric image and derive the quantitative indexes from the longitudinal SPECT brain images for treatment monitoring.

  13. Implementing Computer Algebra Enabled Questions for the Assessment and Learning of Mathematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sangwin, Christopher J.; Naismith, Laura

    2008-01-01

    We present principles for the design of an online system to support computer algebra enabled questions for use within the teaching and learning of mathematics in higher education. The introduction of a computer algebra system (CAS) into a computer aided assessment (CAA) system affords sophisticated response processing of student provided answers.…

  14. Assessment of Lecture Strategy with Different Teaching Aids

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Manoj; Kumar, Jayballabh; Kumar, Gaurav; Kapoor, Sangeeta

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Medical/dental colleges in Northern India cater to students with diverse backgrounds, mother tongues, levels of comprehending English, and intelligence levels. This study was conducted to identify lecture strategy and teaching aid best suited for North Indian dental and medical students. It was conducted in two parts – 1. Survey of teachers’ and students’ opinion to obtain their preferences in teaching-learning practices followed in a conventional lecture, and 2. Comparison of students’ performances after a single trial lecture with different groups of students, using different teaching aids (TAs). Materials and Methods: Opinions of 33 faculty teaching first year dental/ medical students and 506 volunteer students (320 female) were compiled. Students were divided into four groups. A single trial lecture was held with each group (on the same topic, using identical lesson plan, by the same teacher) using a different teaching aid with each group. Lecture strategy was designed according to students’ preferences (as obtained from opinion survey) regarding language of instruction and the number of mental breaks. TAs used with different groups were chalk and board (C&B), PowerPoint (PPT), overhead projector (OHP), and a combination of C&B and PPT. Pre- and post-tests using multiple choice questions were conducted with each group. Results of post-test questionnaire and feedback from faculty attending the lecture were assessed for students’ satisfaction and attentiveness in all four groups. Results: Survey results indicated that although 97.6% students believed they had good/fair proficiency in English, 83.6% preferred being taught in a combination of English and Hindi; 44.3% students preferred C&B, 40.1% preferred PPT and 15.6% preferred the use of OHP as TA. After conducting a trial lecture with different TAs with each group, more than 90% students expressed satisfaction with the TA used for that group. Significantly better

  15. Cluster Ion Spectrometry (CIS) Data Archiving in the CAA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dandouras, I. S.; Barthe, A.; Penou, E.; Brunato, S.; Reme, H.; Kistler, L. M.; Blagau, A.; Facsko, G.; Kronberg, E.; Laakso, H. E.

    2009-12-01

    The Cluster Active Archive (CAA) aims at preserving the four Cluster spacecraft data, so that they are usable in the long-term by the scientific community as well as by the instrument team PIs and Co-Is. This implies that the data are filed together with the descriptive and documentary elements making it possible to select and interpret them. The CIS (Cluster Ion Spectrometry) experiment is a comprehensive ionic plasma spectrometry package onboard the four Cluster spacecraft, capable of obtaining full three-dimensional ion distributions (about 0 to 40 keV/e) with a time resolution of one spacecraft spin (4 sec) and with mass-per-charge composition determination. The CIS package consists of two different instruments, a Hot Ion Analyser (HIA) and a time-of-flight ion Composition Distribution Function (CODIF) analyser. For the archival of the CIS data a multi-level approach has been adopted. The CAA archival includes processed raw data (Level 1 data), moments of the ion distribution functions (Level 2 data), and calibrated high-resolution data in a variety of physical units (Level 3 data). The latter are 3-D ion distribution functions and 2-D pitch-angle distributions. In addition, a software package has been developed to allow the CAA user to interactively calculate partial or total moments of the ion distributions. Instrument cross-calibration has been an important activity in preparing the data for archival. The CIS data archive includes also experiment documentation, graphical products for browsing through the data, and data caveats. In addition, data quality indexes are under preparation, to help the user. Given the complexity of an ion spectrometer, and the variety of its operational modes, each one being optimised for a different magnetospheric region or measurement objective, consultation of the data caveats by the end user will always be a necessary step in the data analysis.

  16. Review of Multi-Criteria Decision Aid for Integrated Sustainability Assessment of Urban Water Systems - MCEARD

    EPA Science Inventory

    Integrated sustainability assessment is part of a new paradigm for urban water decision making. Multi-criteria decision aid (MCDA) is an integrative framework used in urban water sustainability assessment, which has a particular focus on utilising stakeholder participation. Here ...

  17. Assessment of AIDS Risk among Treatment Seeking Drug Abusers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Black, John L.; And Others

    Intravenous (IV) drug abusers are at risk for contracting transmittable diseases such as acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and hepatitis B. This study was conducted to investigate the prevalence of risk behaviors for acquiring and transmitting AIDS and hepatitis B among treatment-seeking drug abusers (N=168). Subjects participated in a…

  18. CAA for Jet Noise Physics: Issues and Recent Progress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mankbadi, Reda

    2001-01-01

    Dr. Mankbadi summarized recent CAA results. Examples of the effect of various boundary condition schemes on the computed acoustic field, for a point source in a uniform flow, were shown. Solutions showing the impact of inflow excitations on the result were also shown. Results from a large eddy simulation, using a fourth-order MacCormack scheme with a Smagorinsky sub-grid turbulence model, were shown for a Mach 2.1 unheated jet. The results showed that the results were free from spurious modes. Results were shown for a Mach 1.4 jet using LES in the near field and the Kirchhoff method for the far field. Predicted flow field characteristics were shown to be in good agreement with data and predicted far field directivities were shown to be in qualitative agree with experimental measurements.

  19. The International AIDS Questionnaire-English Version (IAQ-E): Assessing the Validity and Reliability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Cindy; Sloan, Melissa; MacMaster, Samuel; Hughes, Leslie

    2006-01-01

    In order to address HIV infection among college students, a comprehensive measure is needed that can be used with samples from culturally diverse populations. Therefore, this paper assessed the reliability and validity of an HIV/AIDS questionnaire that measures fours dimensions of HIV/AIDS awareness--factual knowledge, prejudice, personal risk,…

  20. Evaluation and Assessment of a Biomechanics Computer-Aided Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington, N.; Parnianpour, M.; Fraser, J. M.

    1999-01-01

    Describes the Biomechanics Tutorial, a computer-aided instructional tool that was developed at Ohio State University to expedite the transition from lecture to application for undergraduate students. Reports evaluation results that used statistical analyses and student questionnaires to show improved performance on posttests as well as positive…

  1. Medical Devices; Neurological Devices; Classification of the Computerized Cognitive Assessment Aid for Concussion. Final order.

    PubMed

    2016-12-06

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is classifying the Computerized Cognitive Assessment Aid for Concussion into class II (special controls). The special controls that will apply to the device are identified in this order and will be part of the codified language for the computerized cognitive assessment aid for concussion's classification. The Agency is classifying the device into class II (special controls) in order to provide a reasonable assurance of safety and effectiveness of the device.

  2. Assessment of HIV/AIDS knowledge, attitudes and behaviours among students in higher education in Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Mkumbo, Kitila

    2013-01-01

    There is a paucity of studies that have systematically and comprehensively investigated the knowledge level, attitudes and the pattern of sexual behaviours related to HIV and AIDS in higher education settings in sub-Saharan Africa in general and Tanzania in particular. This study attempted to fill a void in knowledge. A cross-sectional descriptive design was used, employing a self-administered questionnaire as the main data collection tool. More than 400 higher education students completed a questionnaire assessing their knowledge, attitudes and behaviours related to HIV and AIDS. About three quarters of respondents demonstrated comprehensive knowledge about HIV and AIDS, and the majority of respondents expressed positive attitudes towards people living with HIV and AIDS. Despite demonstrating high knowledge level about HIV and AIDS, the results show that sexual behaviours among students in higher education are characteristically risky, and do not significantly differ from youth in the general population.

  3. An optimized spectral difference scheme for CAA problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Junhui; Yang, Zhigang; Li, Xiaodong

    2012-05-01

    In the implementation of spectral difference (SD) method, the conserved variables at the flux points are calculated from the solution points using extrapolation or interpolation schemes. The errors incurred in using extrapolation and interpolation would result in instability. On the other hand, the difference between the left and right conserved variables at the edge interface will introduce dissipation to the SD method when applying a Riemann solver to compute the flux at the element interface. In this paper, an optimization of the extrapolation and interpolation schemes for the fourth order SD method on quadrilateral element is carried out in the wavenumber space through minimizing their dispersion error over a selected band of wavenumbers. The optimized coefficients of the extrapolation and interpolation are presented. And the dispersion error of the original and optimized schemes is plotted and compared. An improvement of the dispersion error over the resolvable wavenumber range of SD method is obtained. The stability of the optimized fourth order SD scheme is analyzed. It is found that the stability of the 4th order scheme with Chebyshev-Gauss-Lobatto flux points, which is originally weakly unstable, has been improved through the optimization. The weak instability is eliminated completely if an additional second order filter is applied on selected flux points. One and two dimensional linear wave propagation analyses are carried out for the optimized scheme. It is found that in the resolvable wavenumber range the new SD scheme is less dispersive and less dissipative than the original scheme, and the new scheme is less anisotropic for 2D wave propagation. The optimized SD solver is validated with four computational aeroacoustics (CAA) workshop benchmark problems. The numerical results with optimized schemes agree much better with the analytical data than those with the original schemes.

  4. The DANGERTOME Personal Risk Threat Assessment Scale: An Instrument to Help Aid Immediate Threat Assessment for Counselors, Faculty, and Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Juhnke, Gerald A.

    2010-01-01

    Threats of violence are not uncommon to counselors, faculty, or teachers. Each must be taken seriously, quickly analyzed, and safety procedures implemented. Yet, there exists a paucity of brief, face-to-face, assessments designed to aid threat assessment. To address this paucity, the author created The DANGERTOME Personal Risk Threat Assessment…

  5. Extending LMS to Support IRT-Based Assessment Test Calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fotaris, Panagiotis; Mastoras, Theodoros; Mavridis, Ioannis; Manitsaris, Athanasios

    Developing unambiguous and challenging assessment material for measuring educational attainment is a time-consuming, labor-intensive process. As a result Computer Aided Assessment (CAA) tools are becoming widely adopted in academic environments in an effort to improve the assessment quality and deliver reliable results of examinee performance. This paper introduces a methodological and architectural framework which embeds a CAA tool in a Learning Management System (LMS) so as to assist test developers in refining items to constitute assessment tests. An Item Response Theory (IRT) based analysis is applied to a dynamic assessment profile provided by the LMS. Test developers define a set of validity rules for the statistical indices given by the IRT analysis. By applying those rules, the LMS can detect items with various discrepancies which are then flagged for review of their content. Repeatedly executing the aforementioned procedure can improve the overall efficiency of the testing process.

  6. Assessing the Impact of Testing Aids on Post-Secondary Student Performance: A Meta-Analytic Investigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larwin, Karen H.; Gorman, Jennifer; Larwin, David A.

    2013-01-01

    Testing aids, including student-prepared testing aids (a.k.a., cheat sheets or crib notes) and open-textbook exams, are common practice in post-secondary assessment. There is a considerable amount of published research that discusses and investigates the impact of these testing aids. However, the findings of this research are contradictory and…

  7. Assessment and Screening. A Center Quick Training Aid.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Univ., Los Angeles. Center for Mental Health in Schools.

    Efficient and accurate screening and assessment strategies are essential for matching students with the programs and interventions to address their current needs and prevent problems from getting bigger. This process calls for screening tools that range from descriptions by referrers, through surveys to identify unrecognized problems, to analysis…

  8. Do CT scans aid assessment of distal tibial physeal fractures?

    PubMed

    Cutler, L; Molloy, A; Dhukuram, V; Bass, A

    2004-03-01

    Distal tibial physeal fractures are the second most common growth plate injury and the most common cause of growth arrest and deformity. This study assesses the accuracy of pre-operative planning for placement of the screws in these fractures using either standard radiographs or CT scans. We studied 62 consecutive physeal fractures over a period of four years. An outline of a single cut of the CT scan was used for each patient. An ideal position for the screw was determined as being perpendicular to and at the midpoint of the fracture. The difference in entry point and direction of the screw between the ideal and the observers' assessments were compared using the paired Student's t-test. There was a statistically significant improvement (p < 0.0001) in the accuracy of the point of insertion and the direction of the screw on the pre-operative plan when CT scans were used rather than plain radiographs. We would, therefore, recommend that CT scans are routinely used in the pre-operative assessment and treatment of distal tibial physeal fractures.

  9. Exposing variation to aid climate change risk assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, M. J.; Purves, D. W.; Joppa, L. N.; Emmott, S.; Lyutsarev, V.; Bishop, C. M.; Palmer, P. I.; Calderhead, B.; Vanderwel, M. C.

    2015-12-01

    Considerable efforts to quantify different sources of variation in climate change projections (some might say uncertainty) have led to a welcome set of additional information on which to base confidence about what and how different futures might unfold and how different types of mediating efforts might affect the future. Quantifying the impacts of these different sources of variation on key climate change projection metrics should be used in part to guide future model development efforts. I will report on several of my team's recent research projects to better quantify and assess the importance of different sources of variation. I will show how we use inference techniques to estimate parameter uncertainty in land and marine carbon components of earth system models by comparing them with observational evidence and show how we propagate such uncertainty to better assess how such systems might respond to climate change and quantify the impact of reducing uncertainty for different applications. I will also show how we use such techniques on simulation models themselves to identify key sources of variation in their predictions: helping to pinpoint important focal areas for model improvement. Lastly, I will show a new software prototype being designed to enable any user to view climate model projections alongside historical and recent observational evidence while, importantly, also exposing some of the variation / uncertainty in the reported information.

  10. 75 FR 46909 - Solicitation of Input From Stakeholders Regarding Assessments Focused on Improving Food Aid and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-04

    ... National Institute of Food and Agriculture Solicitation of Input From Stakeholders Regarding Assessments Focused on Improving Food Aid and Providing Safe Water AGENCY: National Institute of Food and Agriculture, USDA. ACTION: Notice; request for public comment. SUMMARY: The National Institute of Food...

  11. Assessing Riverside Community College Nursing Student Attitudes toward Exposure to AIDS/HIV-Positive Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kross, Carolyn Sue

    In fall 1990, a study was conducted to assess the attitudes of nursing students who were attending Riverside Community College (RCC), in California, toward exposure to Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome/Human Immunodeficiency Virus (AIDS/HIV) positive patients in a hospital setting. All students enrolled in RCC's associate degree nursing program…

  12. Using a Technology-Based Case to Aid in Improving Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zelin, Robert C., II

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes how a technology-based case using Microsoft Access can aid in the assessment process. A case was used in lieu of giving a final examination in an Accounting Information Systems course. Students worked in small groups to design a database-driven payroll system for a hypothetical company. Each group submitted its results along…

  13. Technology-aided assessment of sensorimotor function in early infancy.

    PubMed

    Allievi, Alessandro G; Arichi, Tomoki; Gordon, Anne L; Burdet, Etienne

    2014-01-01

    There is a pressing need for new techniques capable of providing accurate information about sensorimotor function during the first 2 years of childhood. Here, we review current clinical methods and challenges for assessing motor function in early infancy, and discuss the potential benefits of applying technology-assisted methods. We also describe how the use of these tools with neuroimaging, and in particular functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), can shed new light on the intra-cerebral processes underlying neurodevelopmental impairment. This knowledge is of particular relevance in the early infant brain, which has an increased capacity for compensatory neural plasticity. Such tools could bring a wealth of knowledge about the underlying pathophysiological processes of diseases such as cerebral palsy; act as biomarkers to monitor the effects of possible therapeutic interventions; and provide clinicians with much needed early diagnostic information.

  14. Technology-Aided Assessment of Sensorimotor Function in Early Infancy

    PubMed Central

    Allievi, Alessandro G.; Arichi, Tomoki; Gordon, Anne L.; Burdet, Etienne

    2014-01-01

    There is a pressing need for new techniques capable of providing accurate information about sensorimotor function during the first 2 years of childhood. Here, we review current clinical methods and challenges for assessing motor function in early infancy, and discuss the potential benefits of applying technology-assisted methods. We also describe how the use of these tools with neuroimaging, and in particular functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), can shed new light on the intra-cerebral processes underlying neurodevelopmental impairment. This knowledge is of particular relevance in the early infant brain, which has an increased capacity for compensatory neural plasticity. Such tools could bring a wealth of knowledge about the underlying pathophysiological processes of diseases such as cerebral palsy; act as biomarkers to monitor the effects of possible therapeutic interventions; and provide clinicians with much needed early diagnostic information. PMID:25324827

  15. Electron transfer dynamics of Rhodothermus marinus caa3 cytochrome c domains on biomimetic films.

    PubMed

    Molinas, Maria F; De Candia, Ariel; Szajnman, Sergio H; Rodríguez, Juan B; Martí, Marcelo; Pereira, Manuela; Teixeira, Miguel; Todorovic, Smilja; Murgida, Daniel H

    2011-10-28

    The subunit II of the caa(3) oxygen reductase from Rhodothermus marinus contains, in addition to the Cu(A) center, a c-type heme group in the cytochrome c domain (Cyt-D) that is the putative primary electron acceptor of the enzyme. In this work we have combined surface-enhanced resonance Raman (SERR) spectroelectrochemistry, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and electron pathway calculations to assess the most likely interaction domains and electron entry/exit points of the truncated Cyt-D of subunit II in the reactions with its electron donor, HiPIP and electron acceptor, Cu(A). The results indicate that the transient interaction between Cyt-D and HiPIP relies upon a delicate balance of hydrophobic and polar contacts for establishing an optimized electron transfer pathway that involves the exposed edge of the heme group and guaranties efficient inter-protein electron transfer on the nanosecond time scale. The reorganization energy of ca. 0.7 eV was determined by time-resolved SERR spectroelectrochemistry. The intramolecular electron transfer pathway in integral subunit II from Cyt-D to the Cu(A) redox center most likely involves the iron ligand histidine 20 as an electron exit point in Cyt-D.

  16. Assessment of broadcast media airings of AIDS-related public service announcements--United States, 1987-1990.

    PubMed

    1991-08-09

    Television and radio public service announcements (PSAs) are an integral part of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) public information campaigns. This report summarizes an assessment of airings of AIDS PSAs in the United States during October 1987-December 1990 that were produced by CDC's "America Responds to AIDS" (ARTA) campaign and other groups.* The assessment used data obtained from Broadcast Advertisers Reports (BAR) of the Arbitron Company.

  17. Assess/Mitigate Risk through the Use of Computer-Aided Software Engineering (CASE) Tools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aguilar, Michael L.

    2013-01-01

    The NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) was requested to perform an independent assessment of the mitigation of the Constellation Program (CxP) Risk 4421 through the use of computer-aided software engineering (CASE) tools. With the cancellation of the CxP, the assessment goals were modified to capture lessons learned and best practices in the use of CASE tools. The assessment goal was to prepare the next program for the use of these CASE tools. The outcome of the assessment is contained in this document.

  18. Electrochemical dechlorination of chloroacetic acids (CAAs) using hemoglobin-loaded carbon nanotube electrode.

    PubMed

    Li, Yu-Ping; Cao, Hong-Bin; Zhang, Yi

    2006-04-01

    Hemoglobin (Hb) was immobilized on carbon nanotube (CNT) electrode to catalyze the dechlorination of chloroacetic acids (CAAs), and the electrocatalytic behaviors of the Hb-loaded electrode for the dechlorination of trichloroacetic acid (TCAA) were studied by cyclic voltammetry and constant-potential electrolysis technique. An Hb-loaded packed-bed flow reactor was also constructed for bioelectrocatalytic dechloriantion of CAAs from drinking water. The results showed that the reduced heme of Hb immobilized on CNT electrode was easily regenerated, and Hb exhibited a stable and high activity for reductive dechlorination of CAAs with significant lowering of overpotential. TCAA could be reduced at -0.450 V (vs. saturated calomel electrode (SCE)) with catalysis of Hb-loaded electrode and its dechlorination was stepwise, following the pathway of TCAA-->dichloroacetic acid (DCAA)-->monochloroacetic acid (MCAA)-->acetic acid. It was also found that all CAAs, e.g., TCAA, DCAA and MCAA, could be dechlorinated completely at -0.450 V. The removal of 30.0 mM TCAA and DCAA is ca. 40% and 31%, respectively, with electrolysis for 100 min at -0.600 V (vs. SCE) using the Hb-loaded packed-bed flow reactor. The dechlorination activities of CAAs follow the decreasing order: TCAA>DCAA>MCAA, and the average current efficiency is over 90%.

  19. Information needs assessment for HIV/AIDS and STIs in the Eastern Mediterranean Region.

    PubMed

    Tawilah, J; Tawil, O; Bassiri, S; Ziady, H

    2002-11-01

    We assessed information needs about HIV/AIDS and sexually transmitted infections (STI) in the Eastern Mediterranean Region by surveying a sample of people considered knowledgeable about the subject. Respondents felt that information on certain areas of HIV/AIDS/STIs was much needed. Health care workers were perceived to see a high need for information and services generally. Religious and community leaders were perceived to see less need for some information and services (such as condom promotion, sex education for young people). All groups were perceived to see a need for education and services for people living with AIDS and drug users. Television and radio were considered the best channels for health education while training was seen as the most effective method for information exchange.

  20. Study to assess the prevalence, nature and extent of cognitive impairment in people living with AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Muniyandi, Karthigaipriya; Venkatesan, J.; Arutselvi, T.; Jayaseelan, V.

    2012-01-01

    Background: HIV directly affects the brain and produces varied psychiatric manifestations. 10-30% of patients with AIDS were found to have cognitive impairment and the virus is isolated in the CSF in 70% of AIDS patients. Aim: The present study is aimed at finding out the prevalence, nature, and extent of cognitive changes in AIDS patients. Materials and Methods: The consecutive sample of 33 patients with AIDS attending the ART center of our college were clinically interviewed and administered MMSE, BGT, Wechsler Memory Scale, and International HIV Dementia Scale. Results: In clinical assessment, only 1/33 (3%) patients could be diagnosed as dementia in HIV disease (ICD10-F02.4). This confirms the current Indian reports which indicate a lower prevalence of HIV dementia in our population. 2/33 (6%) patients were recognized to have mild cognitive disorder due to HIV disease (ICD10-F06.7). Asymptomatic cognitive impairment is very common in AIDS patients and it was noted in 69% of our study population. In the tests, MMSE was positive in only 3 of the 33 patients (9%) and it was not helpful to recognize cognitive deficits in our patients. The Wechsler Memory Scale was abnormal in 18 of the 33 patients (55%). BGT was abnormal in 48.5% of patients. The International HIV Dementia Scale was the most sensitive instrument and 63.6% the patients had abnormal scores in this scale. Conclusion: Tests which assess cognitive and motor speed may be more helpful than clinical psychiatric interview to spot the AIDS patients who have cognitive impairment. PMID:22988322

  1. Intramolecular triple helix as a model for regular polyribonucleotide (CAA)(n).

    PubMed

    Efimov, Alexander V; Spirin, Alexander S

    2009-10-09

    The regular (CAA)(n) polyribonucleotide, as well as the omega leader sequence containing (CAA)-rich core, have recently been shown to form cooperatively melted and compact structures. In this report, we propose a structural model for the (CAA)(n) sequence in which the polyribonucleotide chain is folded upon itself, so that it forms an intramolecular triple helix. The triple helix is stabilized by hydrogen bonding between bases thus forming coplanar triads, and by stacking interactions between the base triads. A distinctive feature of the proposed triple helix is that it does not contain the canonical double-helix elements. The difference from the known triple helices is that Watson-Crick hydrogen bond pairings do not take place in the interactions between the bases within the base triads.

  2. Pharmacokinetics and expert systems as aids for risk assessment in reproductive toxicology.

    PubMed Central

    Mattison, D R; Jelovsek, F R

    1987-01-01

    A minimal approach to risk assessment in reproductive toxicology involves four components: hazard identification, hazard characterization, exposure characterization, and risk characterization. In practice, risk assessment in reproductive toxicology has been reduced to arbitrary safety factors or mathematical models of the dose-response relationship. These approaches obscure biological differences across species rather than using this important and frequently accessible information. Two approaches that are formally capable of using biologically relevant information (pharmacokinetics and expert system shells) are explored as aids to risk assessment in reproductive toxicology. PMID:3447888

  3. Thinking about "Think Again" in Canada: assessing a social marketing HIV/AIDS prevention campaign.

    PubMed

    Lombardo, Anthony P; Léger, Yves A

    2007-06-01

    The Canadian "Think Again" social marketing HIV/AIDS prevention campaign, adapted from an American effort, encourages gay men to rethink their assumptions about their partners' HIV statuses and the risks of unsafe sex with them. To improve future efforts, existing HIV/AIDS prevention initiatives require critical reflection. While a formal evaluation of this campaign has been carried out elsewhere, here we use the campaign as a social marketing case study to illustrate its strengths and weaknesses, as a learning tool for other campaigns. After describing the campaign and its key results, we assess how it utilized central tenets of the social marketing process, such as formative research and the marketing mix. We then speak to the importance of theoretical influence in campaign design and the need to account for social-contextual factors in safer sex decision making. We conclude with a summary of the lessons learned from the assessment of this campaign.

  4. Assessing the impact of international conservation aid on deforestation in sub-Saharan Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bare, Matthew; Kauffman, Craig; Miller, Daniel C.

    2015-12-01

    International conservation donors have spent at least 3.4 billion to protect biodiversity and stem tropical deforestation in Africa since the early 1990s. Despite more than two decades of experience, however, there is little research on the effect of this aid at a region-wide scale. Numerous case studies exist, but show mixed results. Existing research is usually based on community perception or focused on short-term donor objectives rather than specific conservation outcomes, like deforestation rates. Thus, the impact of billions of dollars of conservation aid on deforestation rates remains an open question. This article uses an original dataset to analyze the effect of international conservation aid on deforestation rates in 42 African countries between 2000 and 2013. We first describe patterns of conservation aid across the continent and then assess its impact (with one to five-year lags), controlling for other factors that may also affect deforestation, including rural population, protected areas (PAs), governance, and other economic and commodity production variables. We find that conservation aid is associated with higher rates of forest loss after one- or two-year lags. A similar result holds for PA extent, suggesting possible displacement of deforestation from PAs. However, governance quality in high forest cover countries moderates these effects such that deforestation rates are reduced. Rural population is the most consistent factor associated with forest loss, confirming previous studies of this driver. Our results suggest that in heavily forested countries, development projects designed to support conservation work initially in conditions of good governance, but that conservation aid alone is insufficient to mitigate larger deforestation drivers.

  5. Computer-aided quantitative bone scan assessment of prostate cancer treatment response

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Matthew S.; Chu, Gregory H.; Kim, Hyun J.; Allen-Auerbach, Martin; Poon, Cheryce; Bridges, Juliette; Vidovic, Adria; Ramakrishna, Bharath; Ho, Judy; Morris, Michael J.; Larson, Steven M.; Scher, Howard I.; Goldin, Jonathan G.

    2012-01-01

    Objective The development and evaluation of a computer-aided bone scan analysis technique to quantify changes in tumor burden and assess treatment effects in prostate cancer clinical trials. Methods We have developed and report on a commercial fully automated computer-aided detection system. Using this system, scan images were intensity normalized, then lesions identified and segmented by anatomic region-specific intensity thresholding. Detected lesions were compared against expert markings to assess the accuracy of the computer-aided detection system. The metrics Bone Scan Lesion Area, Bone Scan Lesion Intensity, and Bone Scan Lesion Count were calculated from identified lesions, and their utility in assessing treatment effects was evaluated by analyzing before and after scans from metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer patients: 10 treated and 10 untreated. In this study, patients were treated with cabozantinib, a MET/VEGF inhibitor resulting in high rates of resolution of bone scan abnormalities. Results Our automated computer-aided detection system identified bone lesion pixels with 94% sensitivity, 89% specificity, and 89% accuracy. Significant differences in changes from baseline were found between treated and untreated groups in all assessed measurements derived by our system. The most significant measure, Bone Scan Lesion Area, showed a median (interquartile range) change from baseline at week 6 of 7.13% (27.61) in the untreated group compared with −73.76% (45.38) in the cabozantinib-treated group (P = 0.0003). Conclusions Our system accurately and objectively identified and quantified metastases in bone scans, allowing for interpatient and intrapatient comparison. It demonstrates potential as an objective measurement of treatment effects, laying the foundation for validation against other clinically relevant outcome measures. PMID:22367858

  6. 40 CFR 59.1 - Final determinations under Section 183(e)(3)(C) of the CAA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... COMMERCIAL PRODUCTS General § 59.1 Final determinations under Section 183(e)(3)(C) of the CAA. This section identifies the consumer and commercial product categories for which EPA has determined that CTGs will be... paneling coatings; (h) Industrial cleaning solvents; (i) Paper, film, and foil coatings; (j)...

  7. [Questionnaire to assess advertising campaigns impact about HIV/AIDS prevention].

    PubMed

    Bretón-López, Juana; Buela-Casal, Gualberto

    2006-08-01

    Present work is concerned with a questionnaire aimed to the impact evaluation of a selection of Spanish advertising campaigns about HIV/AIDS prevention. The work objective is to determine reliability and factorial structure of the instrument. It is described the designed questionnaire and its three scales (affective impact scale, cognitive impact scale and behavioural intention impact scale). The sample was composed by 405 high school teenagers to who were projected the advertising campaigns. So, teenagers filled the designed questionnaire. From a theoretical and psychometric point of view, data show the instrument is appropriate about internal consistency and factorial structure. The final goal of the questionnaire is to become useful tool to assess the persuasive effectiveness of the advertising campaigns within the HIV/AIDS network, as an intervention of primary prevention to reduce the expansion of epidemic.

  8. Digital hand atlas and computer-aided bone age assessment via the Web

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Fei; Huang, H. K.; Pietka, Ewa; Gilsanz, Vicente

    1999-07-01

    A frequently used assessment method of bone age is atlas matching by a radiological examination of a hand image against a reference set of atlas patterns of normal standards. We are in a process of developing a digital hand atlas with a large standard set of normal hand and wrist images that reflect the skeletal maturity, race and sex difference, and current child development. The digital hand atlas will be used for a computer-aided bone age assessment via Web. We have designed and partially implemented a computer-aided diagnostic (CAD) system for Web-based bone age assessment. The system consists of a digital hand atlas, a relational image database and a Web-based user interface. The digital atlas is based on a large standard set of normal hand an wrist images with extracted bone objects and quantitative features. The image database uses a content- based indexing to organize the hand images and their attributes and present to users in a structured way. The Web-based user interface allows users to interact with the hand image database from browsers. Users can use a Web browser to push a clinical hand image to the CAD server for a bone age assessment. Quantitative features on the examined image, which reflect the skeletal maturity, will be extracted and compared with patterns from the atlas database to assess the bone age. The relevant reference imags and the final assessment report will be sent back to the user's browser via Web. The digital atlas will remove the disadvantages of the currently out-of-date one and allow the bone age assessment to be computerized and done conveniently via Web. In this paper, we present the system design and Web-based client-server model for computer-assisted bone age assessment and our initial implementation of the digital atlas database.

  9. Ten years of the International Patient Decision Aid Standards Collaboration: evolution of the core dimensions for assessing the quality of patient decision aids.

    PubMed

    Volk, Robert J; Llewellyn-Thomas, Hilary; Stacey, Dawn; Elwyn, Glyn

    2013-01-01

    In 2003, the International Patient Decision Aid Standards (IPDAS) Collaboration was established to enhance the quality and effectiveness of patient decision aids by establishing an evidence-informed framework for improving their content, development, implementation, and evaluation. Over this 10 year period, the Collaboration has established: a) the background document on 12 core dimensions to inform the original modified Delphi process to establish the IPDAS checklist (74 items); b) the valid and reliable IPDAS instrument (47 items); and c) the IPDAS qualifying (6 items), certifying (6 items + 4 items for screening), and quality criteria (28 items). The objective of this paper is to describe the evolution of the IPDAS Collaboration and discuss the standardized process used to update the background documents on the theoretical rationales, evidence and emerging issues underlying the 12 core dimensions for assessing the quality of patient decision aids.

  10. Assessing the relevance, efficiency, and sustainability of HIV/AIDS in-service training in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Burlew, Randi; Puckett, Amanda; Bailey, Rebecca; Caffrey, Margaret; Brantley, Stephanie

    2014-04-17

    More than three million people in Nigeria are living with HIV/AIDS. In order to reduce the HIV/AIDS burden in Nigeria, the US Government (USG) has dedicated significant resources to combating the epidemic through the President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR). In-service training (IST) of health workers is one of the most commonly used strategies to improve the quality and coverage of HIV/AIDS services. At USAID/Nigeria's request, the USAID-funded CapacityPlus project conducted an assessment of PEPFAR-funded IST for all cadres of health workers in Nigeria. Using the IST Improvement Framework, developed by the USAID Applying Sciences to Strengthen and Improve Systems Project (ASSIST), as a guide, the authors developed a survey tool to assess the efficiency, effectiveness and sustainability of IST provided between January 2007 and July 2012 by PEPFAR-funded implementing partners in Nigeria. The instrument was adapted to the Nigerian context and refined through a stakeholder engagement process. It was then distributed via an online platform to more than 50 PEPFAR-funded implementing partners who provided IST in Nigeria. A total of 39 implementing partners completed the survey. Our survey found that PEPFAR implementing partners have been providing a wide range of IST to a diverse group of health workers in Nigeria since 2007. Most trainings are developed using national curricula, manuals and/or other standard operating procedures. Many of the partners are conducting Training Needs Assessments to inform the planning, design and development of their training programs. However, the assessment also pointed to a number of recommendations to increase the efficiency, effectiveness and sustainability of PEPFAR-funded IST. These actions are as follows: improve collaboration and coordination among implementing partners; apply a more diverse and cost-effective set of training modalities; allocate funding specifically for the evaluation of the effectiveness of training

  11. Evaluating social outcomes of HIV/AIDS interventions: a critical assessment of contemporary indicator frameworks

    PubMed Central

    Mannell, Jenevieve; Cornish, Flora; Russell, Jill

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Contemporary HIV-related theory and policy emphasize the importance of addressing the social drivers of HIV risk and vulnerability for a long-term response. Consequently, increasing attention is being given to social and structural interventions, and to social outcomes of HIV interventions. Appropriate indicators for social outcomes are needed in order to institutionalize the commitment to addressing social outcomes. This paper critically assesses the current state of social indicators within international HIV/AIDS monitoring and evaluation frameworks. Methods We analyzed the indicator frameworks of six international organizations involved in efforts to improve and synchronize the monitoring and evaluation of the HIV/AIDS response. Our analysis classifies the 328 unique indicators according to what they measure and assesses the degree to which they offer comprehensive measurement across three dimensions: domains of the social context, levels of change and organizational capacity. Results and discussion The majority of indicators focus on individual-level (clinical and behavioural) interventions and outcomes, neglecting structural interventions, community interventions and social outcomes (e.g. stigma reduction; community capacity building; policy-maker sensitization). The main tool used to address social aspects of HIV/AIDS is the disaggregation of data by social group. This raises three main limitations. Indicator frameworks do not provide comprehensive coverage of the diverse social drivers of the epidemic, particularly neglecting criminalization, stigma, discrimination and gender norms. There is a dearth of indicators for evaluating the social impacts of HIV interventions. Indicators of organizational capacity focus on capacity to effectively deliver and manage clinical services, neglecting capacity to respond appropriately and sustainably to complex social contexts. Conclusions Current indicator frameworks cannot adequately assess the social

  12. Assessment of Chair-side Computer-Aided Design and Computer-Aided Manufacturing Restorations: A Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Baroudi, Kusai; Ibraheem, Shukran Nasser

    2015-01-01

    Background: This paper aimed to evaluate the application of computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD-CAM) technology and the factors that affect the survival of restorations. Materials and Methods: A thorough literature search using PubMed, Medline, Embase, Science Direct, Wiley Online Library and Grey literature were performed from the year 2004 up to June 2014. Only relevant research was considered. Results: The use of chair-side CAD/CAM systems is promising in all dental branches in terms of minimizing time and effort made by dentists, technicians and patients for restoring and maintaining patient oral function and aesthetic, while providing high quality outcome. Conclusion: The way of producing and placing the restorations made with the chair-side CAD/CAM (CEREC and E4D) devices is better than restorations made by conventional laboratory procedures. PMID:25954082

  13. Identification, functional expression and enzymic analysis of two distinct CaaX proteases from Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Cadiñanos, Juan; Schmidt, Walter K; Fueyo, Antonio; Varela, Ignacio; López-Otín, Carlos; Freije, José M P

    2003-03-15

    Post-translational processing of proteins such as the Ras GTPases, which contain a C-terminal CaaX motif (where C stands for cysteine, a for aliphatic and X is one of several amino acids), includes prenylation, proteolytic removal of the C-terminal tripeptide and carboxy-methylation of the isoprenyl-cysteine residue. In the present study, we report the presence of two distinct CaaX-proteolytic activities in membrane extracts from Caenorhabditis elegans, which are sensitive to EDTA and Tos-Phe-CH(2)Cl (tosylphenylalanylchloromethane; 'TPCK') respectively. A protein similar to the mammalian and yeast farnesylated-proteins converting enzyme-1 (FACE-1)/Ste24p CaaX metalloprotease, encoded by a hypothetical gene (CeFACE-1/C04F12.10) found in C. elegans chromosome I, probably accounts for the EDTA-sensitive activity. An orthologue of FACE-2/Rce1p, the enzyme responsible for the proteolytic maturation of Ras oncoproteins and other prenylated substrates, probably accounts for the Tos-Phe-CH(2)Cl-sensitive activity, even though the gene for FACE-2/Rce1 has not been previously identified in this model organism. We have identified a previously overlooked gene in C. elegans chromosome V, which codes for a 266-amino-acid protein (CeFACE-2) with 30% sequence identity to human FACE-2/Rce1. We show that both CeFACE-1 and CeFACE-2 have the ability to promote production of the farnesylated yeast pheromone a -factor in vivo and to cleave a farnesylated peptide in vitro. These results indicate that CeFACE-1 and CeFACE-2 are bona fide CaaX proteases and support the evolutionary conservation of this proteolytic system in eukaryotes.

  14. Identification, functional expression and enzymic analysis of two distinct CaaX proteases from Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed Central

    Cadiñanos, Juan; Schmidt, Walter K; Fueyo, Antonio; Varela, Ignacio; López-Otín, Carlos; Freije, José M P

    2003-01-01

    Post-translational processing of proteins such as the Ras GTPases, which contain a C-terminal CaaX motif (where C stands for cysteine, a for aliphatic and X is one of several amino acids), includes prenylation, proteolytic removal of the C-terminal tripeptide and carboxy-methylation of the isoprenyl-cysteine residue. In the present study, we report the presence of two distinct CaaX-proteolytic activities in membrane extracts from Caenorhabditis elegans, which are sensitive to EDTA and Tos-Phe-CH(2)Cl (tosylphenylalanylchloromethane; 'TPCK') respectively. A protein similar to the mammalian and yeast farnesylated-proteins converting enzyme-1 (FACE-1)/Ste24p CaaX metalloprotease, encoded by a hypothetical gene (CeFACE-1/C04F12.10) found in C. elegans chromosome I, probably accounts for the EDTA-sensitive activity. An orthologue of FACE-2/Rce1p, the enzyme responsible for the proteolytic maturation of Ras oncoproteins and other prenylated substrates, probably accounts for the Tos-Phe-CH(2)Cl-sensitive activity, even though the gene for FACE-2/Rce1 has not been previously identified in this model organism. We have identified a previously overlooked gene in C. elegans chromosome V, which codes for a 266-amino-acid protein (CeFACE-2) with 30% sequence identity to human FACE-2/Rce1. We show that both CeFACE-1 and CeFACE-2 have the ability to promote production of the farnesylated yeast pheromone a -factor in vivo and to cleave a farnesylated peptide in vitro. These results indicate that CeFACE-1 and CeFACE-2 are bona fide CaaX proteases and support the evolutionary conservation of this proteolytic system in eukaryotes. PMID:12487630

  15. Computer aided diagnosis for severity assessment of pneumoconiosis using CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Hidenobu; Matsuhiro, Mikio; Kawata, Yoshiki; Niki, Noboru; Kato, Katsuya; Kishimoto, Takumi; Ashizawa, Kazuto

    2016-03-01

    240,000 participants have a screening for diagnosis of pneumoconiosis every year in Japan. Radiograph is used for staging of severity in pneumoconiosis worldwide. This paper presents a method for quantitative assessment of severity in pneumoconiosis using both size and frequency of lung nodules that detected by thin-section CT images. This method consists of three steps. First, thoracic organs (body, ribs, spine, trachea, bronchi, lungs, heart, and pulmonary blood vessels) are segmented. Second, lung nodules that have radius over 1.5mm are detected. These steps used functions of our developed computer aided detection system of chest CT images. Third, severity in pneumoconiosis is quantified using size and frequency of lung nodules. This method was applied to nine pneumoconiosis patients. The initial results showed that proposed method can assess severity in pneumoconiosis quantitatively. This paper demonstrates effectiveness of our method in diagnosis and prognosis of pneumoconiosis in CT screening.

  16. 129Xe nuclear magnetic resonance studies of xenon in zeolite CaA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jameson, Cynthia J.; Jameson, A. Keith; Gerald, Rex, II; de Dios, Angel C.

    1992-02-01

    The average 129Xe nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shift for xenon atoms in alpha cages of zeolite CaA is observed in a single peak dependent on xenon loading (=0.5-8.9 Xe atoms/alpha cage) and temperature (240-360 K). The general increase of the shift with increasing average number of xenon atoms per alpha cage is shown to be due largely to the changing distribution of occupancies with increasing , coupled with increasing increments in the chemical shifts of Xen with increasing n. Except at the highest loadings, the results obtained for xenon in CaA are predicted nicely on the basis of δav(T)=(1/)Σnnδn(T)Pn (,T), where the fractions Pn of alpha cages containing n Xe atoms are imported from the Pn measured in xenon in zeolite NaA. The high loading data in CaA are interpreted in terms of contributions to the average 129Xe chemical shifts associated with xenon atoms in the window positions.

  17. Electron transfer kinetics of caa3 oxidase from Bacillus stearothermophilus: a hypothesis for thermophilicity.

    PubMed Central

    Giuffrè, A; Watmough, N J; Giannini, S; Brunori, M; Konings, W N; Greenwood, C

    1999-01-01

    The O2 reaction and the reverse electron transfer of the thermophilic caa3 terminal oxidase of Bacillus stearothermophilus have been studied by laser flash-photolysis. The results show that both reactions, although studied at a temperature of 20 degreesC, far from the optimal temperature of > 60 degreesC for caa3, follow a kinetic behavior essentially identical to that observed with the electrostatic complex between mammalian cyt c and cyt c oxidase. In the O2 reaction cyt a and cyt a3 are very quickly oxidized; cyt a is then re-reduced via CuA, whereas cyt c oxidation is apparently rate-limited by the oxidation of CuA. Upon photodissociation of the mixed valence-CO caa3, reverse electron transfer from the binuclear center to cyt a3+ (tau1 = 3 micros) and CuA2+ (tau2 = 64 micros) is observed, while cyt c is not reduced by any detectable level. These results seem to rule out accounting for enzymatic thermophilicity by altered kinetics of intramolecular electron transfer involving the cyt center in the reduced configuration, which is very fast. On the basis of these results and previous data, we propose that thermophilicity involves an increased activation barrier for the reduction of cyt a3-CuB in the configuration typical of the oxidized site. PMID:9876155

  18. Self-Assessment of Hearing and Purchase of Hearing Aids by Middle-Aged and Elderly Adults

    PubMed Central

    Otavio, Andressa Colares da Costa; Coradini, Patricia Pérez; Teixeira, Adriane Ribeiro

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Presbycusis is a consequence of aging. Prescription of hearing aids is part of the treatment, although the prevalence of use by elderly people is still small. Objective To verify whether or not self-assessment of hearing is a predictor for purchase of hearing aids. Methods Quantitative, cross-sectional, descriptive, and observational study. Participants were subjects who sought a private hearing center for selection of hearing aids. During the diagnostic interview, subjects answered the following question: “On a scale of 1 to 10, with 1 being the worst and 10 the best, how would you rate your overall hearing ability?” After that, subjects underwent audiometry, selected a hearing aid, performed a home trial, and decided whether or not to purchase the hearing aid. The variables were associated and analyzed statistically. Results The sample was comprised of 32 subjects, both men and women, with a higher number of women. Mean age was 71.41 ± 12.14 years. Self-assessment of hearing ranged from 2 to 9 points. Overall, 71.9% of the subjects purchased hearing aids. There was no association between scores in the self-assessment and the purchase of hearing aids (p = 0.263). Among those who scored between 2 and 5 points, 64.7% purchased the device; between 6 and 7 points, 76.09% purchased the device; and between 8 and 9 points, 50% purchased the device, respectively. Conclusion There is evidence that low self-assessment scores lead to the purchase of hearing aids, although no significant association was observed in the sample. PMID:26722346

  19. Psychological assessment and AIDS research with intravenous drug users: challenges in measurement.

    PubMed

    Huang, K H; Watters, J K; Case, P

    1988-01-01

    The instruments used for psychological assessment have been under close scrutiny for many years. In particular, ethnic and racial minorities have pointed out that misapplication of instruments standardized to White middle-class norms can result in incorrect assessments. An analogous situation exists with IVDUs. In the work of the present authors with IVDUs, they were found to be a very diverse group. Contrary to common wisdom, they differ by race, ethnicity, age, and drug use profiles. However, their economic circumstances and social stigma make them a special case in terms of psychological assessment. Given the unique characteristics of IVDUs, it behooves researchers to carefully examine the standardized instruments that are available for psychological evaluation. Too often, measures standardized on White middle-class samples lack the value neutrality that makes them applicable across disparate groups. In addition, many such measures are designed with certain presumptions that do not necessarily hold true with this population (e.g., willingness and/or ability to communicate intimate information about one's feelings and psychological states). This article briefly describes some of the challenges encountered in examining standardized instruments for use in the study of IVDUs, their health psychology and AIDS-related behavior. Concerns with self-report biases, literacy, attentional focus, measurement constructs, and drug states confounding psychological states all pose challenges to psychological research with this heterogeneous population. While the need for direct intervention on the sexual and needle-sharing behaviors of IVDUs remains paramount in the combat against the spread of AIDS, researchers must also continue with the further development of basic measurement tools.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  20. 40 CFR 51.1103 - Application of classification and attainment date provisions in CAA section 181 of subpart 2 to...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... attainment date provisions in CAA section 181 of subpart 2 to areas subject to § 51.1102(a). 51.1103 Section... attainment date provisions in CAA section 181 of subpart 2 to areas subject to § 51.1102(a). (a) In... Ozone NAAQS (0.075 ppm) for Areas Subject to Section 51.1102(a) Area class 8-hour design value(ppm...

  1. 40 CFR 51.1103 - Application of classification and attainment date provisions in CAA section 181 of subpart 2 to...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... attainment date provisions in CAA section 181 of subpart 2 to areas subject to § 51.1102(a). 51.1103 Section... attainment date provisions in CAA section 181 of subpart 2 to areas subject to § 51.1102(a). (a) In... Ozone NAAQS (0.075 ppm) for Areas Subject to Section 51.1102(a) Area class 8-hour design value(ppm...

  2. 40 CFR 51.1103 - Application of classification and attainment date provisions in CAA section 181 of subpart 2 to...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... attainment date provisions in CAA section 181 of subpart 2 to areas subject to § 51.1102(a). 51.1103 Section... attainment date provisions in CAA section 181 of subpart 2 to areas subject to § 51.1102(a). (a) In... Ozone NAAQS (0.075 ppm) for Areas Subject to Section 51.1102(a) Area class 8-hour design value(ppm...

  3. Microcomputer Integrated Library System (MILS). The Online Integrated Technical Information Center System at US Army Concepts Analysis Agency (CAA).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-09-01

    Integrated Library System (MILS) 1. Attached is "Microcomputer Integrated Library System (MILS), a technical paper on some recent work accomplished...8217 irectorate War"w~umIFT 77 MTT-ZF . - ~ ~ MILS: THE ONLINE INTEGRATED TECHNICAL STUDY CAA INFORMATION CENTER SYSTEM AT CAASMMR sm’ 0A CAA-TP-8610 THE...REASON FOR PERFORMING THE STUDY was to determine the most efficient and effective method of evolving from a two-system (manual and batch) environ- ment

  4. A Model for Integrating a Job-Aiding, Training, and Performance Assessment System--A Preliminary Concept Paper. Final Technical Paper for Period June-August 1985.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kline, Charles R., Jr.; Lester, Mark

    This paper presents a model for an integrated system used for job-aiding, training, and performance assessment for persons who maintain systems of various types. The model is driven by updatable job aids, by integrated human-machine heuristics, and by an expanding matrix of maintenance activities. The model uses the job-aiding base, updated by…

  5. A Predeployment Limited Technical Assessment of the iPod Touch to Aid the United States Marine Corps

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-08-01

    ASSESSMENT OF THE IPOD TOUCH TO AID THE UNITED STATES MARINE CORPS BY PETER N. SQUIRE WARFARE SYSTEMS DEPARTMENT AUGUST 2009...2010 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE A PREDEPLOYMENT LIMITED TECHNICAL ASSESSMENT OF THE IPOD TOUCH TO AID THE UNITED...public release; distribution is unlimited. 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES "Safari," "iTunes," " iPod ," " iPod touch," and "iPhone" are registered trademarks

  6. After Detection: The Improved Accuracy of Lung Cancer Assessment Using Radiologic Computer-aided Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Amir, Guy J.; Lehmann, Harold P.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale and Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the improved accuracy of radiologic assessment of lung cancer afforded by computer-aided diagnosis (CADx). Materials and Methods Inclusion/exclusion criteria were formulated, and a systematic inquiry of research databases was conducted. Following title and abstract review, an in-depth review of 149 surviving articles was performed with accepted articles undergoing a Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies (QUADAS)-based quality review and data abstraction. Results A total of 14 articles, representing 1868 scans, passed the review. Increases in the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) area under the curve of .8 or higher were seen in all nine studies that reported it, except for one that employed subspecialized radiologists. Conclusions This systematic review demonstrated improved accuracy of lung cancer assessment using CADx over manual review, in eight high-quality observer-performance studies. The improved accuracy afforded by radiologic lung-CADx suggests the need to explore its use in screening and regular clinical workflow. PMID:26616209

  7. Assessing the trend of HIV/AIDS mortality rate in Asia and North Africa: an application of latent growth models.

    PubMed

    Zayeri, F; Talebi Ghane, E; Borumandnia, N

    2016-02-01

    Over the last 30 years, HIV/AIDS has emerged as a major global health challenge. This study evaluates the change of HIV/AIDS mortality rates in Asian and North African countries from 1990 to 2010 using the Global Burden of Disease (GBD) study. HIV/AIDS mortality rates were derived from the GBD database from 1990 to 2010, for 52 countries in Asia and North Africa. First, a Latent Growth Model was employed to assess the change in AIDS mortality rate over time in six different regions of Asia, and also the change in AIDS mortality rate over time for males and females in Asia and North Africa. Finally, Latent Growth Mixture Models (LGMMs) were applied to identify distinct groups in which countries within each group have similar trends over time. Our results showed that increase in mortality rate over time for males is about three times greater than for females. The highest and lowest trend of AIDS mortality rates were observed in South-East Asia and high-income Asia-Pacific regions, respectively. The LGMM allocated most countries in the South and South-East region into two classes with the highest trend of AIDS mortality rates. Although the HIV/AIDS mortality rates are decreasing in some countries and clusters, the general trend in the Asian continent is upwards. Therefore, it is necessary to provide programmes to achieve the goal of access to HIV prevention measures, treatment, care, and support for high-risk groups, especially in countries with a higher trend of AIDS mortality rates.

  8. Aiding alternatives assessment with an uncertainty-tolerant hazard scoring method.

    PubMed

    Faludi, Jeremy; Hoang, Tina; Gorman, Patrick; Mulvihill, Martin

    2016-11-01

    This research developed a single-score system to simplify and clarify decision-making in chemical alternatives assessment, accounting for uncertainty. Today, assessing alternatives to hazardous constituent chemicals is a difficult task-rather than comparing alternatives by a single definitive score, many independent toxicological variables must be considered at once, and data gaps are rampant. Thus, most hazard assessments are only comprehensible to toxicologists, but business leaders and politicians need simple scores to make decisions. In addition, they must balance hazard against other considerations, such as product functionality, and they must be aware of the high degrees of uncertainty in chemical hazard data. This research proposes a transparent, reproducible method to translate eighteen hazard endpoints into a simple numeric score with quantified uncertainty, alongside a similar product functionality score, to aid decisions between alternative products. The scoring method uses Clean Production Action's GreenScreen as a guide, but with a different method of score aggregation. It provides finer differentiation between scores than GreenScreen's four-point scale, and it displays uncertainty quantitatively in the final score. Displaying uncertainty also illustrates which alternatives are early in product development versus well-defined commercial products. This paper tested the proposed assessment method through a case study in the building industry, assessing alternatives to spray polyurethane foam insulation containing methylene diphenyl diisocyanate (MDI). The new hazard scoring method successfully identified trade-offs between different alternatives, showing finer resolution than GreenScreen Benchmarking. Sensitivity analysis showed that different weighting schemes in hazard scores had almost no effect on alternatives ranking, compared to uncertainty from data gaps.

  9. Cluster Ion Spectrometry (CIS) Data in the Cluster Active Archive (CAA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dandouras, I.; Barthe, A.; Penou, E.; Brunato, S.; Rème, H.; Kistler, L. M.; Bavassano-Cattaneo, M. B.; Blagau, A.

    The Cluster Active Archive (CAA) aims at preserving the four Cluster spacecraft data, so that they are usable in the long-term by the scientific community as well as by the instrument team PIs and Co-Is. This implies that the data are filed together with the descriptive and documentary elements making it possible to select and interpret them. The CIS (Cluster Ion Spectrometry) experiment is a comprehensive ionic plasma spectrometry package onboard the four Cluster spacecraft, capable of obtaining full three-dimensional ion distributions (about 0-40 keV/e) with a time resolution of one spacecraft spin (4 s) and with mass-per-charge composition determination. The CIS package consists of two different instruments, a Hot Ion Analyser (HIA) and a time-of-flight ion Composition Distribution Function (CODIF) analyser, plus a sophisticated dual-processor based instrument control and data processing system (DPS). For the archival of the CIS data a multi-level approach has been adopted. The CAA archival includes processed raw data (Level 1 data), moments of the ion distribution functions (Level 2 data), and calibrated high-resolution data in a variety of physical units (Level 3 data). The latter are 3-D ion distribution functions. In addition, a software package has been developed to allow the CAA user to interactively calculate partial or total moments of the ion distributions. The CIS data archive includes also experiment documentation, graphical products for browsing through the data, and data caveats. Given the complexity of an ion spectrometer, and the variety of its operational modes, each one being optimised for a different magnetospheric region or measurement objective, consultation of the data caveats by the end user will always be a necessary step in the data analysis.

  10. Methodology for assessing the performance of urine absorbing aids in controlling malodour release.

    PubMed

    Sironi, S; Capelli, L; Dentoni, L; Del Rosso, R

    2013-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the possibility of comparing the performance of different absorbent aids in terms of odour control by discussing a suitable methodology for product evaluation. To overcome the problems of low test reproducibility owing to biological urine variability, the first step of the work consisted of the identification and the production of artificial urine having a constant and stable composition over time, moreover preventing sensorial assessors from any risk of biological contamination. Sensorial measurements were performed to optimize the similarity between artificial and biological urine, especially as far as the composition of the volatile component and therefore of the odour properties are concerned. The assessment of absorbent articles performance to control urine malodour includes both the concentration and the hedonic tone of the odour released by the article itself loaded with synthetic urine. Analyses were run on different products, which can be grouped into two different classes: absorbing aids with or without odour control technology (OCT) respectively. Results show that, despite of the presence or absence of OCT on absorbing products, their odour concentrations are almost identical, being comprised between 10 000 and 12 000 ouE m(-3) . For this reason, it is evident that odour concentration is not suitable as the sole parameter for comparison of different absorbing products. Instead, the hedonic odour tone (odour pleasantness/unpleasantness) relevant to the different product typologies (that is products with and without OCT) should be used as an additional discriminating factor for this kind of comparative tests.

  11. Selecting Appropriate Tests to Assess the Benefits of Bilateral Amplification With Hearing Aids.

    PubMed

    van Schoonhoven, Jelmer; Schulte, Michael; Boymans, Monique; Wagener, Kirsten C; Dreschler, Wouter A; Kollmeier, Birger

    2016-07-26

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of bilateral hearing aids (HA) in subjects with mild and moderate-to-severe hearing loss. This study was designed as a within-subject feasibility study. Bilateral HA use was assessed using different laboratory tests on speech reception, listening effort, noise tolerance, and localization. All data were evaluated with bilateral and unilateral HA fittings. Forty experienced bilateral HA users were included with hearing impairment ranging from mild to moderate-to-severe. Subjects were stratified into two groups based on the degree of hearing loss. Speech reception in noise, listening effort, and localization tests showed a bilateral benefit for the moderate-to-severely hearing-impaired subjects. A bilateral benefit was also observed for listening effort in the mildly hearing-impaired group. The assessment of listening effort shows promise as a measure of bilateral HA benefit for mild hearing impairment. Localization and speech reception in noise tests provide additional value for larger losses. The next step is to compare experienced unilateral with bilateral HA users.

  12. Computer-aided bone age assessment for ethnically diverse older children using integrated fuzzy logic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Kevin; Moin, Paymann; Zhang, Aifeng; Liu, Brent

    2010-03-01

    Bone Age Assessment (BAA) of children is a clinical procedure frequently performed in pediatric radiology to evaluate the stage of skeletal maturation based on the left hand x-ray radiograph. The current BAA standard in the US is using the Greulich & Pyle (G&P) Hand Atlas, which was developed fifty years ago and was only based on Caucasian population from the Midwest US. To bring the BAA procedure up-to-date with today's population, a Digital Hand Atlas (DHA) consisting of 1400 hand images of normal children of different ethnicities, age, and gender. Based on the DHA and to solve inter- and intra-observer reading discrepancies, an automatic computer-aided bone age assessment system has been developed and tested in clinical environments. The algorithm utilizes features extracted from three regions of interests: phalanges, carpal, and radius. The features are aggregated into a fuzzy logic system, which outputs the calculated bone age. The previous BAA system only uses features from phalanges and carpal, thus BAA result for children over age of 15 is less accurate. In this project, the new radius features are incorporated into the overall BAA system. The bone age results, calculated from the new fuzzy logic system, are compared against radiologists' readings based on G&P atlas, and exhibits an improvement in reading accuracy for older children.

  13. Selecting Appropriate Tests to Assess the Benefits of Bilateral Amplification With Hearing Aids

    PubMed Central

    Schulte, Michael; Boymans, Monique; Wagener, Kirsten C.; Dreschler, Wouter A.; Kollmeier, Birger

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of bilateral hearing aids (HA) in subjects with mild and moderate-to-severe hearing loss. This study was designed as a within-subject feasibility study. Bilateral HA use was assessed using different laboratory tests on speech reception, listening effort, noise tolerance, and localization. All data were evaluated with bilateral and unilateral HA fittings. Forty experienced bilateral HA users were included with hearing impairment ranging from mild to moderate-to-severe. Subjects were stratified into two groups based on the degree of hearing loss. Speech reception in noise, listening effort, and localization tests showed a bilateral benefit for the moderate-to-severely hearing-impaired subjects. A bilateral benefit was also observed for listening effort in the mildly hearing-impaired group. The assessment of listening effort shows promise as a measure of bilateral HA benefit for mild hearing impairment. Localization and speech reception in noise tests provide additional value for larger losses. The next step is to compare experienced unilateral with bilateral HA users. PMID:27460871

  14. An Assessment of the Policies and Programmes of Zimbabwe in Addressing the HIV/Aids Epidemic in the Education Sector

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rembe, Symphorosa

    2006-01-01

    This study assessed the policies, strategic plans and structures that have been put in place in Zimbabwe to address the HIV/AIDS epidemic in the education sector. It also examined the comprehensiveness of projects and programmes currently being implemented by the government in collaboration with partner organisations and NGOs. The findings show…

  15. Assessing Strategies for Reducing HIV/AIDS Scourge among Fitness and Recreation Student Clientele of EDO State Tertiary Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Okunbor, A. O.; Agwubike, E. O.

    2007-01-01

    The study assessed strategies for reducing the HIV/AIDS scourge among fitness and recreation student clientele in Edo State tertiary institutions. A total of 192 males and 88 females participated in the study. The participants were drawn from five tertiary institutions and a self-structured questionnaire was used in collecting data for the study.…

  16. Design and Evaluation of a Protocol to Assess Electronic Travel Aids for Persons Who Are Visually Impaired

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Havik, Else M.; Steyvers, Frank J. J. M.; van der Velde, Hanneke; Pinkster, J. Christiaan; Kooijman, Aart C.

    2010-01-01

    This study evaluated a protocol that was developed to assess how beneficial electronic travel aids are for persons who are visually impaired. Twenty persons with visual impairments used an electronic travel device (Trekker) for six weeks to conform to the protocol, which proved useful in identifying successful users of the device. (Contains 2…

  17. Least-Squares Spectral Element Solutions to the CAA Workshop Benchmark Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Wen H.; Chan, Daniel C.

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents computed results for some of the CAA benchmark problems via the acoustic solver developed at Rocketdyne CFD Technology Center under the corporate agreement between Boeing North American, Inc. and NASA for the Aerospace Industry Technology Program. The calculations are considered as benchmark testing of the functionality, accuracy, and performance of the solver. Results of these computations demonstrate that the solver is capable of solving the propagation of aeroacoustic signals. Testing of sound generation and on more realistic problems is now pursued for the industrial applications of this solver. Numerical calculations were performed for the second problem of Category 1 of the current workshop problems for an acoustic pulse scattered from a rigid circular cylinder, and for two of the first CAA workshop problems, i. e., the first problem of Category 1 for the propagation of a linear wave and the first problem of Category 4 for an acoustic pulse reflected from a rigid wall in a uniform flow of Mach 0.5. The aim for including the last two problems in this workshop is to test the effectiveness of some boundary conditions set up in the solver. Numerical results of the last two benchmark problems have been compared with their corresponding exact solutions and the comparisons are excellent. This demonstrates the high fidelity of the solver in handling wave propagation problems. This feature lends the method quite attractive in developing a computational acoustic solver for calculating the aero/hydrodynamic noise in a violent flow environment.

  18. Assessing Employee Attitudes in a Community-Based AIDS Service Organization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liou, Kuotsai Tom; Cruise, Peter L.

    1994-01-01

    Thirty-one employees of the Comprehensive Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) Program of Palm Beach County (Florida) were surveyed to explore their motives and attitudes toward their jobs, clients, and the organization. Implications for management of AIDS service organizations and program quality are discussed. (SLD)

  19. 40 CFR 51.903 - How do the classification and attainment date provisions in section 181 of subpart 2 of the CAA...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... attainment date provisions in section 181 of subpart 2 of the CAA apply to areas subject to § 51.902(a)? 51... date provisions in section 181 of subpart 2 of the CAA apply to areas subject to § 51.902(a)? (a) In accordance with section 181(a)(1) of the CAA, each area subject to § 51.902(a) shall be classified...

  20. 40 CFR 51.903 - How do the classification and attainment date provisions in section 181 of subpart 2 of the CAA...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... attainment date provisions in section 181 of subpart 2 of the CAA apply to areas subject to § 51.902(a)? 51... date provisions in section 181 of subpart 2 of the CAA apply to areas subject to § 51.902(a)? (a) In accordance with section 181(a)(1) of the CAA, each area subject to § 51.902(a) shall be classified...

  1. 40 CFR 51.903 - How do the classification and attainment date provisions in section 181 of subpart 2 of the CAA...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... attainment date provisions in section 181 of subpart 2 of the CAA apply to areas subject to § 51.902(a)? 51... date provisions in section 181 of subpart 2 of the CAA apply to areas subject to § 51.902(a)? (a) In accordance with section 181(a)(1) of the CAA, each area subject to § 51.902(a) shall be classified...

  2. 40 CFR 51.903 - How do the classification and attainment date provisions in section 181 of subpart 2 of the CAA...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... attainment date provisions in section 181 of subpart 2 of the CAA apply to areas subject to § 51.902(a)? 51... date provisions in section 181 of subpart 2 of the CAA apply to areas subject to § 51.902(a)? (a) In accordance with section 181(a)(1) of the CAA, each area subject to § 51.902(a) shall be classified...

  3. 40 CFR 51.903 - How do the classification and attainment date provisions in section 181 of subpart 2 of the CAA...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... attainment date provisions in section 181 of subpart 2 of the CAA apply to areas subject to § 51.902(a)? 51... date provisions in section 181 of subpart 2 of the CAA apply to areas subject to § 51.902(a)? (a) In accordance with section 181(a)(1) of the CAA, each area subject to § 51.902(a) shall be classified...

  4. [Assessment criteria in the choice of aids for the lifting of patients].

    PubMed

    Panciera, D; Menoni, O; Ricci, M G; Occhipinti, E

    1999-01-01

    A fundamental part of the prevention strategies aimed at reducing risk due to manual handling of patients is the use of appropriate aids. This paper defines the basic types of aids for hospital wards: patient lifting devices, aids for hygiene and minor aids; and also proposes a procedure for choice of the type of aid: the procedure uses a specific protocol and also analyzes work organization and the environmental features of the ward. The proposed criteria for choice concern in the first place the fundamental requirements of the equipment: safety for operator and patient, simplicity of use and comfort for the patient. Secondly the basic determinants for choice of the type of aid are the type of disabled patient usually present in the ward and the analysis of the movements made in handling patients. On this basis, for each type of aid, the specific features are defined which direct the choice of supply for the various wards that will be adequate and effective both in reducing risk due to manual handling of patients and in improving the comfort of the patients.

  5. Cultural Adaptation of a Survey to Assess Medical Providers’ Knowledge of and Attitudes towards HIV/AIDS in Albania

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, Shane D.; Rashidi, Vania; Banushi, Vilson H.; Barbhaiya, Namrata J.; Gashi, Valbona H.; Sarnquist, Clea; Maldonado, Yvonne; Harxhi, Arjan

    2013-01-01

    Though the HIV/AIDS epidemic in Southeastern Europe is one of low reported prevalence, numerous studies have described the pervasiveness of medical providers’ lack of knowledge of HIV/AIDS in the Balkans. This study sought to culturally adapt an instrument to assess medical providers’ knowledge of and attitudes towards HIV/AIDS in Albania. Cultural adaptation was completed through development of a survey from previously validated instruments, translation of the survey into Albanian, blinded back translation, expert committee review of the draft instrument, focus group pre-testing with community- and University Hospital Center of Tirana-based physicians and nurses, and test-retest reliability testing. Blinded back translation of the instrument supported the initial translation with slight changes to the idiomatic and conceptual equivalences. Focus group pre-testing generally supported the instrument, yet some experiential and idiomatic changes were implemented. Based on unweighted kappa and/or prevalence adjusted bias adjusted kappa (PABAK), 20 of the 43 questions were deemed statistically significant at kappa and/or PABAK ≥0.5, while 12 others did not cross zero on the 95% confidence interval for kappa, indicating their probable significance. Subsequently, an instrument to assess medical providers’ knowledge of and attitudes toward HIV/AIDS for an Albanian population was developed which can be expanded within Albania and potentially to other countries within the Balkans, which have an Albanian-speaking population. PMID:23544101

  6. Microfinance and HIV/AIDS prevention: assessing its promise and limitations.

    PubMed

    Dworkin, Shari L; Blankenship, Kim

    2009-06-01

    Researchers increasingly argue that poverty and gender inequality exacerbate the spread of HIV/AIDS and that economic empowerment can therefore assist in the prevention and mitigation of the disease, particularly for women. This paper critically evaluates such claims. First, we examine the promises and limits of integrated HIV/AIDS prevention and microfinance programs by examining the available evidence base. We then propose future research agendas and next steps that may help to clear current ambiguities about the potential for economic programs to contribute to HIV/AIDS risk reduction efforts.

  7. Microfinance and HIV/AIDS Prevention: Assessing its Promise and Limitations

    PubMed Central

    Dworkin, Shari L.; Blankenship, Kim

    2013-01-01

    Researchers increasingly argue that poverty and gender inequality exacerbate the spread of HIV/AIDS and that economic empowerment can therefore assist in the prevention and mitigation of the disease, particularly for women. This paper critically evaluates such claims. First, we examine the promises and limits of integrated HIV/AIDS prevention and microfinance programs by examining the available evidence base. We then propose future research agendas and next steps that may help to clear current ambiguities about the potential for economic programs to contribute to HIV/AIDS risk reduction efforts. PMID:19294500

  8. CAA amendments` Title III could mean `future shock` to U.S. industry competitiveness

    SciTech Connect

    Rocco, V.A.

    1995-06-01

    While the regulated community awaits congressional action that could alter the government`s role in environmental protection and enforcement, the stipulations of existing regulations continue to unfold. Attention is focused on upcoming permitting deadlines imposed by the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990, due by November for most facilities, and on products and strategies for air pollution control. Unless Congress adopts the unlikely strategy of rolling back all environmental regulations, the obligations on industry imposed by the CAA Amendments will continue to set forth a formidable compliance task. The Amendments ``created a complex maze of new and dramatically altered regulatory programs that will influence how US industry must operate well into the next century.`` This article provides an overview and guidelines for complying with the new rules.

  9. Assessing social preparedness for antiretroviral therapy in a generalized AIDS epidemic: a diffusion of innovations approach.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Shannon K; Kelly, Kevin J; Potgieter, François E; Moon, Martha W

    2009-02-01

    Researchers conducted focus groups in the Eastern Cape Province of South Africa concerning AIDS and treatment options. Constituent groups included adults aged 25-45, HIV/AIDS caregivers, HIV-positive adults, nurses, rural elders, teenagers, and traditional healers. This pilot work aimed to gather early evidence on perceptions about the government's rollout of antiretroviral treatment (ART), identify potential barriers to success, and inform a subsequent pilot survey. Diffusion of innovations theory was used to interpret the data and helped identify potential obstacles to the ART rollout. AIDS stigma and a weakened healthcare system were negatively impacting the program. There was a lack of accurate knowledge about HIV/AIDS and antiretroviral treatment, with wide disparities among groups. Many people were not convinced that antiretroviral treatment is superior to other treatments, and a few people were afraid it was poisonous. There was no evidence that people were aware of the long-term difficulties of adherence to the regimen.

  10. Perceptions of University Students regarding Computer Assisted Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jamil, Mubashrah

    2012-01-01

    Computer assisted assessment (CAA) is a common technique of assessment in higher educational institutions in Western countries, but a relatively new concept for students and teachers in Pakistan. It was therefore interesting to investigate students' perceptions about CAA practices from different universities of Pakistan. Information was collected…

  11. Assessing the impact of AIDS on the growth path of the Malawian economy.

    PubMed

    Cuddington, J T; Hancock, J D

    1994-04-01

    More than 1% of people of sub-Saharan Africa aged 15-49 years are infected with HIV, with over half likely to develop AIDS in the next decade. As rates of HIV infection continue to climb, there will be staggering financial consequences to bear in the years ahead in terms of high medical treatment costs and crippled macroeconomies. The authors employ a modified Solow growth model to simulate the impact of the AIDS epidemic on output capacity and other key macroeconomic aggregates in Malawi. They compare a counterfactual no-AIDS scenario to medium and extreme AIDS projections and find that average real GDP growth over the 1985-2010 period will be 0.2-0.3 percentage points lower in the medium case and 1.2-1.5% lower in the extreme case relative to the no-AIDS case. The size of the economy by 2010 will therefore be reduced from a real GDP of 5.03 billion (constant 1985) Kwacha without AIDS to 4.81-4.77 and 3.80-3.46 billion Kwacha in the medium and extreme scenarios, respectively.

  12. Rocky Flats CAAS System Recalibrated, Retested, and Analyzed to Install in the Criticality Experiments Facility at the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S; Heinrichs, D; Biswas, D; Huang, S; Dulik, G; Scorby, J; Boussoufi, M; Liu, B; Wilson, R

    2009-05-27

    Neutron detectors and control panels transferred from the Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) were recalibrated and retested for redeployment to the CEF. Testing and calibration were successful with no failure to any equipment. Detector sensitivity was tested at a TRIGA reactor, and the response to thermal neutron flux was satisfactory. MCNP calculated minimum fission yield ({approx} 2 x 10{sup 15} fissions) was applied to determine the thermal flux at selected detector positions at the CEF. Thermal flux levels were greater than 6.39 x 10{sup 6} (n/cm{sup 2}-sec), which was about four orders of magnitude greater than the minimum alarm flux. Calculations of detector survivable distances indicate that, to be out of lethal area, a detector needs to be placed greater than 15 ft away from a maximum credible source. MCNP calculated flux/dose results were independently verified by COG. CAAS calibration and the testing confirmed that the RFP CAAS system is performing its functions as expected. New criteria for the CAAS detector placement and 12-rad zone boundaries at the CEF are established. All of the CAAS related documents and hardware have been transferred from LLNL to NSTec for installation at the CEF high bay areas.

  13. An IR Study of Benzoyl Chloride Adsorbed on KA, NaA, and CaA Zeolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardakçı, B.; Bahçeli, Semiha

    2005-09-01

    Infrared spectroscopy has been used to investigate the adsorption of liquid benzoyl chloride on A-type zeolites. The data show that at room temperature the Fermi resonance phenomenon occurs in the adsorption on KA, NaA and CaA zeolites which are little acidic aluminosilicates.

  14. 40 CFR 51.902 - Which classification and nonattainment area planning provisions of the CAA shall apply to areas...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... area planning provisions of the CAA shall apply to areas designated nonattainment for the 1997 8-hour NAAQS? 51.902 Section 51.902 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Implementation of 8-hour Ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standard § 51.902 Which classification...

  15. Amine-Appended Hierarchical Ca-A Zeolite for Enhancing CO2 /CH4 Selectivity of Mixed-Matrix Membranes.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Tien Hoa; Gong, Heqing; Lee, Siew Siang; Bae, Tae-Hyun

    2016-10-18

    An amine-appended hierarchical Ca-A zeolite that can selectively capture CO2 was synthesized and incorporated into inexpensive membrane polymers, in particular polyethylene oxide and Matrimid, to design mixed-matrix membranes with high CO2 /CH4 selectivities. Binary mixture permeation testing reveals that amine-appended mesoporous Ca-A is highly effective in improving CO2 /CH4 selectivity of polymeric membranes. In particular, the CO2 /CH4 selectivity of the polyethylene oxide membrane increases from 15 to 23 by incorporating 20 wt % amine-appended Ca-A zeolite. Furthermore, the formation of filler/polymer interfacial defects, which is typically found in glassy polymer-zeolite pairs, is inhibited owing to the interaction between the amine groups on the external surface of zeolites and polymer chains. Our results suggest that the amine-appended hierarchial Ca-A, which was utilized in membrane fabrication for the first time, is a good filler material for fabricating a CO2 -selective mixed-matrix membrane with defect-free morphology.

  16. 40 CFR 51.126 - Determination of widespread use of ORVR and waiver of CAA section 182(b)(3) Stage II gasoline...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Determination of widespread use of ORVR and waiver of CAA section 182(b)(3) Stage II gasoline vapor recovery requirements. 51.126 Section 51... Determination of widespread use of ORVR and waiver of CAA section 182(b)(3) Stage II gasoline vapor...

  17. The Development, Pilot, and Field Test of the Core HIV/AIDS Knowledge Assessment for Undergraduate and Graduate Students in Counseling-Related Degree Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Acklin, Carrie

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a core HIV/AIDS knowledge assessment (CHAKA) for students enrolled in counseling-related degree programs. Although there are studies that examined counseling HIV/AIDS knowledge, the instruments that were used were limited in ways that may compromise the accuracy of the inferences that were made. This study…

  18. The Design of a Project to Assess Bilateral Versus Unilateral Hearing Aid Fitting

    PubMed Central

    Arlinger, Stig; Gatehouse, Stuart; Kiessling, Jürgen; Naylor, Graham; Verschuure, Hans; Wouters, Jan

    2008-01-01

    Binaural hearing provides advantages over monaural in several ways, particularly in difficult listening situations. For a person with bilateral hearing loss, the bilateral fitting of hearing aids thus seems like a natural choice. However, surprisingly few studies have been reported in which the additional benefit of bilateral versus unilateral hearing aid use has been investigated based on real-life experiences. Therefore, a project has been designed to address this issue and to find tools to identify people for whom the drawbacks would outweigh the advantages of bilateral fitting. A project following this design is likely to provide reliable evidence concerning differences in benefit between unilateral and bilateral fitting of hearing aids by evaluating correlations between entrance data and outcome measures and final preferences. PMID:18567594

  19. Assessment of left ventricular wall motion abnormalities with the use of color kinesis: a valuable visual and training aid.

    PubMed

    Lau, Y S; Puryear, J V; Gan, S C; Fowler, M B; Vagelos, R H; Popp, R L; Schnittger, I

    1997-01-01

    Accurate interpretation of left ventricular segmental wall motion by echocardiography is an important yet difficult skill to learn. Color-coded left ventricular wall motion (color kinesis) is a tool that potentially could aid in the interpretation and provide semiquantification. We studied the usefulness of color kinesis in 42 patients with a history of congestive cardiomyopathy who underwent two-dimensional echocardiograms and a color kinesis study. The expert's reading of the two-dimensional wall motion served as a reference for comparison of color kinesis studies interpreted by the expert and a cardiovascular trainee. Correlation between two-dimensional echocardiography and the expert's and trainee's color coded wall motion scores were r = 0.83 and r = 0.67, respectively. Reproducibility between reviewers and between operators was also assessed. Interobserver variability for color-coded wall motion showed a correlation of r = 0.78. Correlation between operators was also good; r = 0.84. Color kinesis is reliable and appears promising as an adjunct in the assessment of wall motion abnormalities by echocardiography. It is both a valuable visual aid, as well as a training aid for the cardiovascular trainee.

  20. Assessing Pricing and Aid Strategies: Rethinking Planning and Evaluation Practices. AIR 1994 Annual Forum Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    St. John, Edward P.

    This paper explores the need for a better understanding of the influences of prices and student aid on student enrollment and college budgets. The theory of net price has not been found to adequately explain changes in enrollment. Based on a critical review of recent research on student price response, this paper develops an alternative approach…

  1. Assessment of Discharge Planning Referral to Nursing Homes for People with AIDS and HIV Infection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linsk, Nathan L.; Marder, Reggi E.

    This study was conducted to identify efforts by hospital discharge planners to refer clients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) or Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) to nursing homes; to determine the responses of the facilities contacted; and to identify gaps in services, discharge planner practices, and relationships between…

  2. Diagnostic Accuracy of Computer-Aided Assessment of Intranodal Vascularity in Distinguishing Different Causes of Cervical Lymphadenopathy.

    PubMed

    Ying, Michael; Cheng, Sammy C H; Ahuja, Anil T

    2016-08-01

    Ultrasound is useful in assessing cervical lymphadenopathy. Advancement of computer science technology allows accurate and reliable assessment of medical images. The aim of the study described here was to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of computer-aided assessment of the intranodal vascularity index (VI) in differentiating the various common causes of cervical lymphadenopathy. Power Doppler sonograms of 347 patients (155 with metastasis, 23 with lymphoma, 44 with tuberculous lymphadenitis, 125 reactive) with palpable cervical lymph nodes were reviewed. Ultrasound images of cervical nodes were evaluated, and the intranodal VI was quantified using a customized computer program. The diagnostic accuracy of using the intranodal VI to distinguish different disease groups was evaluated and compared. Metastatic and lymphomatous lymph nodes tend to be more vascular than tuberculous and reactive lymph nodes. The intranodal VI had the highest diagnostic accuracy in distinguishing metastatic and tuberculous nodes with a sensitivity of 80%, specificity of 73%, positive predictive value of 91%, negative predictive value of 51% and overall accuracy of 68% when a cutoff VI of 22% was used. Computer-aided assessment provides an objective and quantitative way to evaluate intranodal vascularity. The intranodal VI is a useful parameter in distinguishing certain causes of cervical lymphadenopathy and is particularly useful in differentiating metastatic and tuberculous lymph nodes. However, it has limited value in distinguishing lymphomatous nodes from metastatic and reactive nodes.

  3. At the Intersection of HIV/AIDS and Cancer: A Qualitative Needs Assessment of Community-Based HIV/AIDS Service Organizations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burkhalter, Jack E.; Cahill, Sean; Shuk, Elyse; Guidry, John; Corner, Geoffrey; Berk, Alexandra; Candelario, Norman; Kornegay, Mark; Lubetkin, Erica I.

    2013-01-01

    Due to advances in treatment, persons living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) or acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) are living longer, but with aging, immune deficits, and lifestyle factors, they are at increased risk for cancer. This challenges community-based AIDS service organizations (ASOs) to address the growing cancer needs of…

  4. Assessing the impact of HAART on the incidence of defining and non-defining AIDS cancers among patients with HIV/AIDS: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Cobucci, Ricardo Ney Oliveira; Lima, Paulo Henrique; de Souza, Pollyana Carvalho; Costa, Vanessa Viana; Cornetta, Maria da Conceição de Mesquita; Fernandes, José Veríssimo; Gonçalves, Ana Katherine

    2015-01-01

    After highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) became widespread, several studies demonstrated changes in the incidence of defining and non-defining AIDS cancers among HIV/AIDS patients. We conducted a systematic review of observational studies evaluating the incidence of malignancies before and after the introduction of HAART in people with HIV/AIDS. Eligible studies were searched up to December 2012 in the following databases: Pubmed, Embase, Scielo, Cancerlit and Google Scholar. In this study, we determined the cancer risk ratio by comparing the pre- and post-HAART eras. Twenty-one relevant articles were found, involving more than 600,000 people with HIV/AIDS and 10,891 new cases of cancers. The risk for the development of an AIDS-defining cancer decreased after the introduction of HAART: Kaposi's sarcoma (RR=0.30, 95% CI: 0.28-0.33) and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (RR=0.52, 95% CI: 0.48-0.56), in contrast to invasive cervical cancer (RR=1.46, 95% CI: 1.09-1.94). Among the non-AIDS-defining cancers, the overall risk increased after the introduction of HAART (RR=2.00, 95% CI: 1.79-2.23). The incidence of AIDS-defining cancers decreased and the incidence of non-AIDS-defining cancers increased after the early use of HAART, probably due to better control of viral replication, increased immunity and increased survival provided by new drugs.

  5. Assessment of ventricular diastolic function in AIDS patients from Congo: a Doppler echocardiographic study

    PubMed Central

    Longo-Mbenza, B; Seghers, L; Vita, E; Tonduangu, K; Bayekula, M

    1998-01-01

    Objective—To investigate the prevalence of left ventricular dysfunction in African patients infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). The hypothesis was that HIV infected patients with left ventricular dysfunction are asymptomatic.
Methods—M mode, cross sectional, and Doppler echocardiography were performed in 49 consecutive patients (30 HIV positive (HIV+) carriers and 19 AIDS patients). None of the patients or 58 controls had a medical history of cardiovascular abnormalities.
Results—Cardiac abnormalities were not suspected on physical, electrocardiographic, and radiological examination. Forty two of the HIV infected patients had left ventricular diastolic dysfunction; this was more pronounced in AIDS patients than in HIV+ carriers. Systolic function was normal in both stages of HIV infection. Left ventricular isovolumic relaxation time (mean (SD)) increased from 87.2 (12.4) ms in the carrier state to 103.9 (19.3) ms in AIDS (p < 0.05, Bonferoni correction), peak early filling velocity declined from 0.54 (0.1) to 0.44 (0.1) m/s (p < 0.05), and late velocity increased from 0.64 (0.1) to 0.69 (0.2) m/s. A restrictive filling pattern was explained by concentric hypertrophy in 23 HIV infected patients, and by systemic amyloidosis with left ventricular dilatation in 12 of 49 HIV infected patients.
Conclusions—Echocardiography is a useful technique for detecting left ventricular diastolic dysfunction in HIV infected patients with clinically unsuspected cardiac lesions. Systolic function was normal despite the presence of such cardiac abnormalities.

 Keywords: HIV infection;  AIDS;  diastolic dysfunction;  black Africans;  echocardiography PMID:9813567

  6. Impact of training of teachers on their ability, skills, and confidence to teach HIV/AIDS in classroom: a qualitative assessment

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Considering the significant impact of school-based HIV/AIDS education, in 2007, a curriculum on HIV/AIDS was incorporated in the national curriculum for high school students of Bangladesh through the Government’s HIV-prevention program. Based on the curriculum, an intervention was designed to train teachers responsible for teaching HIV/AIDS in classes. Methods In-depth interviews were conducted with teachers to understand their ability, skills, and confidence in conducting HIV/AIDS classes. Focus-group discussions (FGDs) were conducted with students who participated in HIV/AIDS classes. HIV/AIDS classes were also observed in randomly-selected schools. Thematic assessment was made to analyze data. Results The findings showed that the trained teachers were more comfortable in using interactive teaching methods and in explaining sensitive issues to their students in HIV/AIDS classes. They were also competent in using interactive teaching methods and could ensure the participation of students in HIV/AIDS classes. Conclusions The findings suggest that cascading training may be scaled up as it helped increase ability, skills, and confidence of teachers to successfully conduct HIV/AIDS classes. PMID:24144065

  7. Key findings: a qualitative assessment of provider and patient perceptions of HIV/AIDS in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Ransom, James; Johnson, Anton F

    2009-01-01

    In 1997, at the Davos International Economic Forum, Nelson Mandela stated that "the poor, the vulnerable, the unschooled, the socially marginalized, the women, and the children, those who bear the burden of colonial legacy-these are the sectors of society which bear the burden of AIDS" (Richter, 2001). Nearly a decade later, that statement still holds true, especially in Mr. Mandela's home country. South Africa continues to have one of the world's highest prevalence ratios of HIV infection (UNAIDS, 2002). This paper explores the significance of perceptions, knowledge, practices, and attitudes toward HIV/AIDS in two important groups in South Africa: health care providers based in public health clinics and their patients. This paper will assess the provider-patient interaction from the perspective of members of the South African HIV/AIDS treatment and prevention community. The analysis will examine the results of in-depth interviews and focus group discussions with providers and patients, respectively, in two of South Africa's nine provinces. Between December 2002 and April 2003 in Guateng and KwaZulu-Natal provinces, we conducted (1) in-depth interviews of a spectrum of health care providers at five local public health clinics and (2) focus groups of patients who patronize those clinics. The results show that there are gaps in the HIV/AIDS knowledge of some of the health care providers and that the participants' health beliefs and practices are embedded in the social conditions in which they live and work, which has a ripple effect on their risk behaviors and trumps any intervention messages from their health care providers and larger public health intervention messages.

  8. Computer-Assisted Assessment in Higher Education. Staff and Educational Development Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Sally, Ed.; Race, Phil, Ed.; Bull, Joanna, Ed.

    This book profiles how computer-assisted assessment can help both staff and students by drawing on the experience and expertise of practitioners, in the United Kingdom and internationally, who are already using computer-assisted assessment. The publication is organized into three main sections--"Pragmatics and Practicalities of CAA,""Using CAA for…

  9. Computer-aided assessment of pulmonary disease in novel swine-origin H1N1 influenza on CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Jianhua; Dwyer, Andrew J.; Summers, Ronald M.; Mollura, Daniel J.

    2011-03-01

    The 2009 pandemic is a global outbreak of novel H1N1 influenza. Radiologic images can be used to assess the presence and severity of pulmonary infection. We develop a computer-aided assessment system to analyze the CT images from Swine-Origin Influenza A virus (S-OIV) novel H1N1 cases. The technique is based on the analysis of lung texture patterns and classification using a support vector machine (SVM). Pixel-wise tissue classification is computed from the SVM value. The method was validated on four H1N1 cases and ten normal cases. We demonstrated that the technique can detect regions of pulmonary abnormality in novel H1N1 patients and differentiate these regions from visually normal lung (area under the ROC curve is 0.993). This technique can also be applied to differentiate regions infected by different pulmonary diseases.

  10. Interactive Voice Response Self-Monitoring to Assess Risk Behaviors in Rural Substance Users Living with HIV/AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Tucker, Jalie A.; Blum, Elizabeth R.; Xie, Lili; Roth, David L.; Simpson, Cathy A.

    2011-01-01

    Community-dwelling HIV/AIDS patients in rural Alabama self-monitored (SM) daily HIV risk behaviors using an Interactive Voice Response (IVR) system, which may enhance reporting, reduce monitored behaviors, and extend the reach of care. Sexually active substance users (35 men, 19 women) engaged in IVR SM of sex, substance use, and surrounding contexts for 4–10 weeks. Baseline predictors of IVR utilization were assessed, and longitudinal IVR SM effects on risk behaviors were examined. Frequent (n = 22), infrequent (n = 22), and non-caller (n = 10) groups were analyzed. Non-callers had shorter durations of HIV medical care and lower safer sex self-efficacy and tended to be older heterosexuals. Among callers, frequent callers had lost less social support. Longitudinal logistic regression models indicated reductions in risky sex and drug use with IVR SM over time. IVR systems appear to have utility for risk assessment and reduction for rural populations living with HIV disease. PMID:21311964

  11. Interactive voice response self-monitoring to assess risk behaviors in rural substance users living with HIV/AIDS.

    PubMed

    Tucker, Jalie A; Blum, Elizabeth R; Xie, Lili; Roth, David L; Simpson, Cathy A

    2012-02-01

    Community-dwelling HIV/AIDS patients in rural Alabama self-monitored (SM) daily HIV risk behaviors using an Interactive Voice Response (IVR) system, which may enhance reporting, reduce monitored behaviors, and extend the reach of care. Sexually active substance users (35 men, 19 women) engaged in IVR SM of sex, substance use, and surrounding contexts for 4-10 weeks. Baseline predictors of IVR utilization were assessed, and longitudinal IVR SM effects on risk behaviors were examined. Frequent (n = 22), infrequent (n = 22), and non-caller (n = 10) groups were analyzed. Non-callers had shorter durations of HIV medical care and lower safer sex self-efficacy and tended to be older heterosexuals. Among callers, frequent callers had lost less social support. Longitudinal logistic regression models indicated reductions in risky sex and drug use with IVR SM over time. IVR systems appear to have utility for risk assessment and reduction for rural populations living with HIV disease.

  12. A Profiling System for the Assessment of Individual Needs for Rehabilitation With Hearing Aids

    PubMed Central

    de Ronde-Brons, I.

    2016-01-01

    This study focuses on the development of a profiling system to specify the needs of hearing-aid candidates. As a basis for the profile of compensation needs, we used a slightly modified version of the Amsterdam Inventory of Disability and Handicap, combined with the well-known Client-Oriented Scale of Improvement (COSI). The first questionnaire results in scores for six audiological dimensions: detection, speech in quiet, speech in noise, localization, focus or discrimination, and noise tolerance. The goal of this study was to determine whether the six dimensions derived from the disability questionnaire are appropriate to also categorize individual COSI targets. The results show a good agreement between eight audiologists in the categorization of COSI goals along the six dimensions. The results per dimension show that the dimension focus or discrimination can be regarded as superfluous. Possible additional dimensions were tinnitus and listening effort. The results indicate that it is possible to translate individual user needs (administered using COSI) into more general dimensions derived from a disability questionnaire. This allows to summarize the compensation needs for individual patients in a profile of general dimensions, based on the degree of disability and the individual user needs. This profile can be used as a starting point in hearing aid selection. This approach also offers a well-structured method for the evaluation of the postfitting results. PMID:27815547

  13. Epidemiological assessment of food aid in the Bosnian conflict, 1994-97.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Neil; Paredes-Solís, Sergio; Cockcroft, Anne; Sherr, Lorraine

    2012-04-01

    Surveys in emergency settings are important for the accountability of food aid. Four household surveys conducted between 1994 and 1997 measured the performance of the Bosnia food aid programme, covering a random sample of clusters in Bosnia and Herzegovina and the Republica Srpska. The team calculated coverage, exclusion and inclusion errors, programme misses, and under-supply. Despite intended universal coverage from 1994-96, 15, 19, and 31 per cent, respectively, did not receive food across the three-year time frame. Households categorised as vulnerable were somewhat more likely to receive food. Programme misses were rare, whereas under-supply fell from 30 per cent in 1994 to four per cent in 1997, as the availability of other food increased. Extrapolation suggested that 61 per cent of the food distributed did not reach households. The programme introduced priority categories for targeting in 1997, yet nearly one-half of the highest priority households did not receive food. Incomplete coverage and weak targeting were related to political constraints.

  14. Novel method based on DDE technology for computer-aided alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yifan; Li, Lin

    2008-03-01

    A new method based on Dynamic Data Exchange (DDE) technology for computer-aided alignment is put forward in this paper. It is adopted to realize the automatic data transferring between Matlab and Zemax optical software. Based on the analysis of CAA and its procedure, a self-made program is developed to perform all the CAA steps under Matlab environment. Flow process of this program is shown in this paper. A Gregorian system is adopted as an example to verify the feasibility of the program. Comparisons of the image quality between the misaligned system and the post-aligned system are presented. Results show that this program is very effective.

  15. Hearing Aids

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Info » Hearing, Ear Infections, and Deafness Hearing Aids On this page: What is a hearing aid? ... the ear through a speaker. How can hearing aids help? Hearing aids are primarily useful in improving ...

  16. Computer-Aided Assessment of Tumor Grade for Breast Cancer in Ultrasound Images

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    This study involved developing a computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) system for discriminating the grades of breast cancer tumors in ultrasound (US) images. Histological tumor grades of breast cancer lesions are standard prognostic indicators. Tumor grade information enables physicians to determine appropriate treatments for their patients. US imaging is a noninvasive approach to breast cancer examination. In this study, 148 3-dimensional US images of malignant breast tumors were obtained. Textural, morphological, ellipsoid fitting, and posterior acoustic features were quantified to characterize the tumor masses. A support vector machine was developed to classify breast tumor grades as either low or high. The proposed CAD system achieved an accuracy of 85.14% (126/148), a sensitivity of 79.31% (23/29), a specificity of 86.55% (103/119), and an AZ of 0.7940. PMID:25810750

  17. Indices of body fat distribution for assessment of lipodysthrophy in people living with HIV/AIDS

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Metabolic and morphological changes associated with excessive abdominal fat, after the introduction of Antiretroviral Therapy, increase the risk of cardiovascular disease in people living with HIV/AIDS(PLWHA). Accurate methods for body composition analysis are expensive and the use of anthropometric indices is an alternative. However the investigations about this subject in PLWHA are rare, making this research very important for clinical purpose and to advance scientific knowledge. The aim of this study is to correlate results of anthropometric indices of evaluation of body fat distribution with the results obtained by Dual-energy X-Ray Absorptiometry(DEXA), in people living with HIV/AIDS. Methods The sample was of 67 PLWHA(39 male and 28 female), aged 43.6+7.9 years. Body mass index, conicity index, waist/hip ratio, waist/height ratio and waist/thigh were calculated. Separated by sex, each index/ratio was plotted in a scatter chart with linear regression fit and their respective Pearson correlation coefficients. Analyses were performed using Prism statistical program and significance was set at 5%. Results The waist/height ratio presented the highest correlation coefficient, for both male (r=0.80, p<0.001) and female (r=0.87, p <001), while the lowest were in the waist/thigh also for both: male group (r=0.58, p<0.001) and female group (r=0.03, p=0.86). The other indices also showed significant positive correlation with DEXA. Conclusion Anthropometric indices, especially waist/height ratio may be a good alternative way to be used for evaluating the distribution of fat in the abdominal region of adults living with HIV/ADIS. PMID:23031203

  18. [Analysis methods for educational needs assessment for family caregivers of HIV positive or AIDS patients in Thailand].

    PubMed

    Girault, P; Gagnayre, R; d'Ivernois, J F

    2001-03-01

    Identification of educational needs of natural helpers for the home-based care of persons living with HIV or AIDS. Surin, Thailand. The very significant increase in the number of persons living with aids in Thailand, (1995: 20,154 notified cases; 1996: 23,309 cases; 1997: 25,064 cases), and the insufficiency of medical care for patients within Thailand's health structures, have driven Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) to put in place since 1996 a home-based care project in Surin province (North-Eastern Thailand). In Thai culture, the sick are commonly cared for by one family member, known as the natural helper. An evaluation of the health situation showed that natural helpers who took care of a family member living with HIV or aids were not prepared for this situation. In order to better define the tasks that they ought to perform, we carried out a needs assessment in three interdependent steps: a records analysis of the activities delegated to natural helpers by nurses; an enquiry on the acceptability of natural helpers to carry out these cares and on the perceived usefulness of being trained; an expert consensus on the cares to be carried out by the natural helpers, obtained by the Delphi method. Twenty seven cares were identified as being able to be provided by natural helpers. They constitute as a list of reference for the training for natural helpers. This work has shown a social coherence between the different actors of the project. At no stage was the role of the natural helpers questioned. On the contrary, natural helpers have a privileged place within the family and in the home-based care programme. Natural helpers will allow continuity of care between the health structures and the patient's home.

  19. The cellulose synthase 3 (CesA3) gene of oomycetes: structure, phylogeny and influence on sensitivity to carboxylic acid amide (CAA) fungicides.

    PubMed

    Blum, Mathias; Gamper, Hannes A; Waldner, Maya; Sierotzki, Helge; Gisi, Ulrich

    2012-04-01

    Proper disease control is very important to minimize yield losses caused by oomycetes in many crops. Today, oomycete control is partially achieved by breeding for resistance, but mainly by application of single-site mode of action fungicides including the carboxylic acid amides (CAAs). Despite having mostly specific targets, fungicidal activity can differ even in species belonging to the same phylum but the underlying mechanisms are often poorly understood. In an attempt to elucidate the phylogenetic basis and underlying molecular mechanism of sensitivity and tolerance to CAAs, the cellulose synthase 3 (CesA3) gene was isolated and characterized, encoding the target site of this fungicide class. The CesA3 gene was present in all 25 species included in this study representing the orders Albuginales, Leptomitales, Peronosporales, Pythiales, Rhipidiales and Saprolegniales, and based on phylogenetic analyses, enabled good resolution of all the different taxonomic orders. Sensitivity assays using the CAA fungicide mandipropamid (MPD) demonstrated that only species belonging to the Peronosporales were inhibited by the fungicide. Molecular data provided evidence, that the observed difference in sensitivity to CAAs between Peronosporales and CAA tolerant species is most likely caused by an inherent amino acid configuration at position 1109 in CesA3 possibly affecting fungicide binding. The present study not only succeeded in linking CAA sensitivity of various oomycetes to the inherent CesA3 target site configuration, but could also relate it to the broader phylogenetic context.

  20. Assessing a conceptual framework of health-related quality of life in a HIV/AIDS population.

    PubMed

    Vidrine, Damon J; Amick, Benjamin C; Gritz, Ellen R; Arduino, Roberto C

    2005-05-01

    With the recognition of health-related quality of life (HRQOL) as an important outcome in the course of HIV-disease, it is important to gain a better understanding of the complex relationships among the various factors that influence it. This study assesses a conceptual framework of HRQOL, consisting of disease status, socio-economic status (SES), behavioral variables, symptom status, role-specific functional status and HRQOL, among a multiethnic, economically disadvantaged population of individuals living with HIV/AIDS. Self-report data were collected from 348 patients receiving care at a large HIV/AIDS care center, serving residents of a large metropolitan area. The relationships between the study variables were examined using structural equation modeling. Results indicated that the hypothesized framework provided a well-fitted solution to the data, chi2(44df) = 57.62], p = 0.08 and root mean square error of approximation = 0.03, 90% confidence interval 0.01; 0.05. This framework suggests that health-related variables fall along a continuum, beginning with disease status and ending in generic HRQOL. In addition, the framework suggests that behavioral factors (i.e., smoking status, alcohol consumption, and illicit drug use) and SES exert significant effects along this continuum and should be carefully considered when analyzing and interpreting HRQOL data.

  1. Computer simulation to aid the risk assessment of wheelchair and special seating systems used in transport.

    PubMed

    Rogers, P D; Gibson, C; Wilcox, S J; Chong, A

    2009-01-01

    The crashworthiness of occupied proprietary wheelchairs, which are transported in motor vehicles, is currently assessed by physical crash testing in accordance with ISO 7176-19. If such wheelchairs are modified to meet the needs of the occupant, e.g. the addition of special seating, environmental control systems or life support equipment, then those making the modifications take on the manufacturer's responsibilities, one of these being the assessment of the modified wheelchair's ability to withstand vehicle crash forces. Destructively testing bespoke wheelchair designs is not practical so, currently, the transport-related risk is assessed using best engineering judgement. To improve this process virtual crash testing of the wheelchair and occupant was used. A modified crash criteria from ISO 7176-19 is proposed to enable assessment of the wheelchair's crashworthiness and provide the clinical engineer with an informed judgement of how both wheelchair alone and occupant and wheelchair together will behave in a crash.

  2. Garrett County Aids AID

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Appalachia, 1975

    1975-01-01

    Garrett County, Maryland volunteered to act as a pre-overseas learning laboratory for AID (Agency for International Development) interns who practiced data collection and planning techniques with the help of local citizenry. (JC)

  3. At the Intersection of HIV/AIDS and Cancer: A Qualitative Needs Assessment of Community-Based HIV/AIDS Service Organizations

    PubMed Central

    Burkhalter, Jack E.; Cahill, Sean; Shuk, Elyse; Guidry, John; Corner, Geoffrey; Berk, Alexandra; Candelario, Norman; Kornegay, Mark; Lubetkin, Erica I.

    2014-01-01

    Due to advances in treatment, persons living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) or acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) are living longer, but with aging, immune deficits, and lifestyle factors, they are at increased risk for cancer. This challenges community-based AIDS service organizations (ASOs) to address the growing cancer needs of persons living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA). Community-based participatory research was applied to engage ASOs in exploring their capacities and needs for integrating cancer-focused programming into their services. Focus groups were conducted with a community advisory board (CAB) representing 10 community-based organizations serving PLWHA. Three 90-minute, serial focus groups were conducted with a mean number of seven participants. Topics explored CAB members’ organizational capacities and needs in cancer prevention, detection, treatment, and survivorship. Transcript analyses identified six themes: (a) agencies have limited experience with cancer-focused programs, which were not framed as cancer specific; (b) agencies need resources and collaborative partnerships to effectively incorporate cancer services; (c) staff and clients must be educated about the relevance of cancer to HIV/AIDS; (d) agencies want to know about linkages between HIV/AIDS and cancer; (e) cancer care providers should be culturally competent; and (f) agencies see opportunities to improve their services through research participation but are wary. Agency capacities were strong in relationships with clients and cultural competency, a holistic view of PLWHA health, expertise in prevention activities, and eagerness to be on the cutting edge of knowledge. Cancer education and prevention were of greatest interest and considered most feasible, suggesting that future projects develop accordingly. These findings suggest a high level of receptivity to expanding or initiating cancer-focused activities but with a clear need for education and awareness building

  4. At the intersection of HIV/AIDS and cancer: a qualitative needs assessment of community-based HIV/AIDS service organizations.

    PubMed

    Burkhalter, Jack E; Cahill, Sean; Shuk, Elyse; Guidry, John; Corner, Geoffrey; Berk, Alexandra; Candelario, Norman; Kornegay, Mark; Lubetkin, Erica I

    2013-08-01

    Due to advances in treatment, persons living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) or acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) are living longer, but with aging, immune deficits, and lifestyle factors, they are at increased risk for cancer. This challenges community-based AIDS service organizations (ASOs) to address the growing cancer needs of persons living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA). Community-based participatory research was applied to engage ASOs in exploring their capacities and needs for integrating cancer-focused programming into their services. Focus groups were conducted with a community advisory board (CAB) representing 10 community-based organizations serving PLWHA. Three 90-minute, serial focus groups were conducted with a mean number of seven participants. Topics explored CAB members' organizational capacities and needs in cancer prevention, detection, treatment, and survivorship. Transcript analyses identified six themes: (a) agencies have limited experience with cancer-focused programs, which were not framed as cancer specific; (b) agencies need resources and collaborative partnerships to effectively incorporate cancer services; (c) staff and clients must be educated about the relevance of cancer to HIV/AIDS; (d) agencies want to know about linkages between HIV/AIDS and cancer; (e) cancer care providers should be culturally competent; and (f) agencies see opportunities to improve their services through research participation but are wary. Agency capacities were strong in relationships with clients and cultural competency, a holistic view of PLWHA health, expertise in prevention activities, and eagerness to be on the cutting edge of knowledge. Cancer education and prevention were of greatest interest and considered most feasible, suggesting that future projects develop accordingly. These findings suggest a high level of receptivity to expanding or initiating cancer-focused activities but with a clear need for education and awareness building

  5. Assessment of DOD and industry networks for Computer-Aided Logistics Support (CALS) telecommunications. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    DeLaura, F.L.; Sharp, S.J.; Clark, R.

    1987-06-01

    The Department of Defense is committed to applying the best in modern technology toward improving the transfer of design, engineering, and manufacturing technical information among weapon-system contractors and DoD organizations. The Military Services, the Defense Logistics Agency (DLA), the Defense Communications Agency (DCA), and industry are undertaking or planning telecommunications support for such transfer. In view of these many and diverse efforts, the Computer Aided Logistics Support (CALS) Steering Group through the CALS Communications Working Group has recognized the need for evaluating them. The report presents an evaluation of CALS-related telecommunications requirements in DoD, the major efforts for automating engineering drawing and technical data repositories, and various intelligent-gateway efforts in each of the Services. The overall direction within each Service for telecommunication support and transitioning to the OSI (Open Systems Interconnection) standards is presented, as well as the status of commercial efforts for defining and implementing the OSI standards and improving long-haul telecommunications support.

  6. Computer-aided design of dry powder inhalers using computational fluid dynamics to assess performance.

    PubMed

    Suwandecha, Tan; Wongpoowarak, Wibul; Srichana, Teerapol

    2016-01-01

    Dry powder inhalers (DPIs) are gaining popularity for the delivery of drugs. A cost effective and efficient delivery device is necessary. Developing new DPIs by modifying an existing device may be the simplest way to improve the performance of the devices. The aim of this research was to produce a new DPIs using computational fluid dynamics (CFD). The new DPIs took advantages of the Cyclohaler® and the Rotahaler®. We chose a combination of the capsule chamber of the Cyclohaler® and the mouthpiece and grid of the Rotahaler®. Computer-aided design models of the devices were created and evaluated using CFD. Prototype models were created and tested with the DPI dispersion experiments. The proposed model 3 device had a high turbulence with a good degree of deagglomeration in the CFD and the experiment data. The %fine particle fraction (FPF) was around 50% at 60 L/min. The mass median aerodynamic diameter was around 2.8-4 μm. The FPF were strongly correlated to the CFD-predicted turbulence and the mechanical impaction parameters. The drug retention in the capsule was only 5-7%. In summary, a simple modification of the Cyclohaler® and Rotahaler® could produce a better performing inhaler using the CFD-assisted design.

  7. An assessment of the ANV 20/20 focusing aid for night vision devices.

    PubMed

    Manton, A G; Webster, K W

    1996-10-01

    Night vision goggles (NVGs) are becoming an increasingly important tool in military aviation. They provide superior visual capability over unaided night vision, but any reduction in goggle performance can have a serious effect on flight safety and operational effectiveness. This study shows that the use of the ANV 20/20 focusing aid provides an effective method for aircrew to obtain a better visual capability than is currently obtained by focusing on distant features of the landscape or distant lights. Visual acuities using the current and proposed focusing methods were compared in 50 aircrew. The visual acuity showed an average improvement of 18% with the proposed method compared with the current method. This was found to be statistically significant (p < 0.01). Using the current method of focusing there was a significant (p < 0.01) difference in the visual acuity achieved between the right and left tubes/eyes. Using the ANV 20/20 there was no difference between tubes/eyes. ANV 20/20 was found to improve visual acuity when using NVG as well as enabling the user to achieve equal visual acuities with both eyes.

  8. Links between Mental and Behavioral Health among Children Affected by HIV/AIDS and Teachers’ Assessments of Children

    PubMed Central

    DU, Hongfei; LI, Xiaoming; WEINSTEIN, Traci L.; CHI, Peilian; ZHAO, Junfeng; ZHAO, Guoxiang

    2015-01-01

    Teachers are considered to be one of the most important influences in the lives of students. Teachers’ assessments of students may be a primary source of information on children’s mental and behavioral health; however, this topic has received little attention in research. We examined this issue through linking teachers’ ratings of students and mental and behavioral outcomes of children affected by HIV. The hypothesis is that teacher ratings will be predictive of specific child mental and behavioral health outcomes. A quantitative cross-sectional design with self-administered paper-and-pencil instruments was used. The sample included 1221 children (ages 6-18, grades 1-11) affected by HIV including 755 orphans who lost one or both parents to AIDS and 466 vulnerable children living with HIV-infected parents in a central province of China. The corresponding teacher sample included 185 participants. Each child completed an assessment inventory of demographic information, mental and behavioral health measures. Teachers completed a questionnaire about children’s school performance. SEM analyses revealed a good model fit according to all fit indices, CFI = .93, RMSEA = .07, SRMR = .04. Structural equation modeling revealed that problem ratings by teachers were positively associated with child loneliness and behavioral problems, social competence ratings by teachers were negatively related to child depression, and personal growth and social interaction ratings by teachers were negatively related to child loneliness, depression, and trauma. The current study represents a unique contribution to the field, in that it recognizes that teachers can be a valuable source of information on children’s psychological health. Results from this study have implications for health prevention and intervention for children and families suffering from HIV /AIDS. PMID:25703050

  9. Assessment of the relationship between lesion segmentation accuracy and computer-aided diagnosis scheme performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Bin; Pu, Jiantao; Park, Sang Cheol; Zuley, Margarita; Gur, David

    2008-03-01

    In this study we randomly select 250 malignant and 250 benign mass regions as a training dataset. The boundary contours of these regions were manually identified and marked. Twelve image features were computed for each region. An artificial neural network (ANN) was trained as a classifier. To select a specific testing dataset, we applied a topographic multi-layer region growth algorithm to detect boundary contours of 1,903 mass regions in an initial pool of testing regions. All processed regions are sorted based on a size difference ratio between manual and automated segmentation. We selected a testing dataset involving 250 malignant and 250 benign mass regions with larger size difference ratios. Using the area under ROC curve (A Z value) as performance index we investigated the relationship between the accuracy of mass segmentation and the performance of a computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) scheme. CAD performance degrades as the size difference ratio increases. Then, we developed and tested a hybrid region growth algorithm that combined the topographic region growth with an active contour approach. In this hybrid algorithm, the boundary contour detected by the topographic region growth is used as the initial contour of the active contour algorithm. The algorithm iteratively searches for the optimal region boundaries. A CAD likelihood score of the growth region being a true-positive mass is computed in each iteration. The region growth is automatically terminated once the first maximum CAD score is reached. This hybrid region growth algorithm reduces the size difference ratios between two areas segmented automatically and manually to less than +/-15% for all testing regions and the testing A Z value increases to from 0.63 to 0.90. The results indicate that CAD performance heavily depends on the accuracy of mass segmentation. In order to achieve robust CAD performance, reducing lesion segmentation error is important.

  10. CERCLA compliance with other laws manual: Summary and Part 2. CAA, TSCA, and other statutes. Fact sheet (Final)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-04-01

    The fact sheet provides a guide to Chapters 2 and 3 of Part II of the CERCLA Compliance With Other Laws Manual. The sixth in a series, this fact sheet focuses on CERCLA compliance with the Clean Air Act (CAA), the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA), and the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act. In addition, it discusses other statutes that set standards for radioactive wastes, mining wastes, and other resource protection statutes that are potential Applicable or Relevant and Appropriate Requirements (ARARs) for CERCLA actions.

  11. Jernberg Industries, Inc: Forging Facility Uses Plant-Wide Assessment to Aid Conversion to Lean Manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    2004-10-01

    Jernberg Industries conducted a plant-wide assessment while converting to lean manufacturing at a forging plant. Seven projects were identified that could yield annual savings of $791,000, 64,000 MMBtu in fuel and 6 million kWh.

  12. Manned space station environmental control and life support system computer-aided technology assessment program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, J. B., Jr.; Pickett, S. J.; Sage, K. H.

    1984-01-01

    A computer program for assessing manned space station environmental control and life support systems technology is described. The methodology, mission model parameters, evaluation criteria, and data base for 17 candidate technologies for providing metabolic oxygen and water to the crew are discussed. Examples are presented which demonstrate the capability of the program to evaluate candidate technology options for evolving space station requirements.

  13. Self-Assessment in Autonomous Computer-Aided Second Language Writing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, Kirk; Lindgren, Eva

    2002-01-01

    Presents the results of a study carried out in Sweden to investigate the promotion of self assessment and reflection in the adult second language classroom. Proposes a method in which the computer is used to record a writing session and later to replay the entire text production in retrospective peer sessions. After using the method, all writers…

  14. Computer-Aided Assessment Questions in Engineering Mathematics Using "MapleTA"[R

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, I. S.

    2008-01-01

    The use of "MapleTA"[R] in the assessment of engineering mathematics at Liverpool John Moores University (JMU) is discussed with particular reference to the design of questions. Key aspects in the formulation and coding of questions are considered. Problems associated with the submission of symbolic answers, the use of randomly generated numbers…

  15. Predicting pathogen risks to aid beach management: the real value of quantitative microbial risk assessment (QMRA)

    EPA Science Inventory

    There has been an ongoing dilemma for agencies who set criteria for safe recreational waters in how to provide for a seasonal assessment of a beach site versus guidance for day-to-day management. Typically an overall 'safe' criterion level is derived from epidemiologic studies o...

  16. Intentional Movement Performance Ability (IMPA): a method for robot-aided quantitative assessment of motor function.

    PubMed

    Shin, Sung Yul; Kim, Jung Yoon; Lee, Sanghyeop; Lee, Junwon; Kim, Seung-Jong; Kim, ChangHwan

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this paper is to propose a new assessment method for evaluating motor function of the patients who are suffering from physical weakness after stroke, incomplete spinal cord injury (iSCI) or other diseases. In this work, we use a robotic device to obtain the information of interaction occur between patient and robot, and use it as a measure for assessing the patients. The Intentional Movement Performance Ability (IMPA) is defined by the root mean square of the interactive torque, while the subject performs given periodic movement with the robot. IMPA is proposed to quantitatively determine the level of subject's impaired motor function. The method is indirectly tested by asking the healthy subjects to lift a barbell to disturb their motor function. The experimental result shows that the IMPA has a potential for providing a proper information of the subject's motor function level.

  17. HIV / AIDS

    MedlinePlus

    ... facebook share with twitter share with linkedin HIV/AIDS HIV, or human immunodeficiency virus, is the virus ... HIV/AIDS. Why Is the Study of HIV/AIDS a Priority for NIAID? Nearly 37 million people ...

  18. Hearing Aids

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Consumer Devices Consumer Products Hearing Aids Hearing Aids Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... to restrict your daily activities. Properly fitted hearing aids and aural rehabilitation (techniques used to identify and ...

  19. Hearing Aids

    MedlinePlus

    ... Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Hearing Aids KidsHealth > For Teens > Hearing Aids Print A A ... with certain types of hearing loss. How Hearing Aids Help So you went to audiologist and found ...

  20. Mechanistic insights aid the search for CFC substitutes: risk assessment of HCFC-123 as an example.

    PubMed

    Jarabek, A M; Fisher, J W; Rubenstein, R; Lipscomb, J C; Williams, R J; Vinegar, A; McDougal, J N

    1994-06-01

    An international consensus on the need to reduce the use of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) and other ozone-depleting gases such as the halons led to the adoptions of the 1987 Montreal Protocol and Title VI of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments, "Protecting Stratospheric Ozone." These agreements included major provisions for reducing and eventually phasing out production and use of CFCs and halons as well as advancing the development of replacement chemicals. Because of the ubiquitous use and benefits of CFCs and halons, an expeditious search for safe replacements to meet the legislative deadlines is of critical importance. Toxicity testing and health risk assessment programs were established to evaluate the health and environmental impact of these replacement chemicals. Development and implementation of these programs as well as the structural-activity relationships significant for the development of the replacement chemicals are described below. A dose-response evaluation for the health risk assessment of the replacement chemical HCFC-123 (2,2-dichloro-1,1,1-trifluoroethane) is also presented to show an innovative use of physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling. This is based on a parallelogram approach using data on the anesthetic gas halothane, a structural analog to HCFC-123. Halothane and HCFC-123 both form the same metabolite, trifluoroacetic acid (TFA), indicative of the same metabolic oxidative pathway attributed to hepatotoxicity. The parallelogram approach demonstrates the application of template model structures and shows how PBPK modeling, together with judicious experimental design, can be used to improve the accuracy of health risk assessment and to decrease the need for extensive laboratory animal testing.

  1. Mutagenicity assessment strategy for pharmaceutical intermediates to aid limit setting for occupational exposure.

    PubMed

    Araya, Selene; Lovsin-Barle, Ester; Glowienke, Susanne

    2015-11-01

    Pharmaceutical intermediates (IM) are used in the synthesis of active pharmaceutical ingredients. They are not intended for human administration, yet employees may be exposed to IM during the manufacturing process. In the context of occupational health, hazard assessment of IM is needed to identify potential intrinsic hazards which could cause unwanted adverse effects. In particular, a carcinogenic potential influences the protection strategy in the workplace. DNA reactive substances may, even if present at very low levels, lead to mutations and therefore, potentially cause cancer. The use of in silico methods to predict mutagenicity is increasingly acknowledged and implemented in the recently released ICH M7 guideline for the limitation of DNA reactive impurities. In this study we investigate the possibility to apply (quantitative) structure-activity-relationships ((Q)SARs) during hazard identification to reduce the number of Ames tests needed for a hazard assessment of IM while maintaining high standards of protection of employees. Ames test outcomes for 188 substances used in the pharmaceutical production were compared with their in silico predictions using two different (Q)SAR methodologies (knowledge based and statistical) complemented by expert knowledge. The results of the analysis showed that a negative prediction for mutagenicity provides a high confidence that the IM is not mutagenic in the Ames test with the negative predictive value of 97%. On the other hand the positive predictive value was only 57% and therefore considered too low to reliably consider positive predicted IM to be mutagenic. In order to avoid any unnecessary burden for occupational health purposes caused by falsely positive predicted IM, all positive predicted IM and those with insufficient coverage by the in silico systems are submitted to an Ames test to verify or reject the prediction. It is shown that the described in silico prediction approach ensures appropriate protection

  2. Validation of High-Fidelity CFD/CAA Framework for Launch Vehicle Acoustic Environment Simulation against Scale Model Test Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liever, Peter A.; West, Jeffrey S.

    2016-01-01

    A hybrid Computational Fluid Dynamics and Computational Aero-Acoustics (CFD/CAA) modeling framework has been developed for launch vehicle liftoff acoustic environment predictions. The framework couples the existing highly-scalable NASA production CFD code, Loci/CHEM, with a high-order accurate discontinuous Galerkin solver developed in the same production framework, Loci/THRUST, to accurately resolve and propagate acoustic physics across the entire launch environment. Time-accurate, Hybrid RANS/LES CFD modeling is applied for predicting the acoustic generation physics at the plume source, and a high-order accurate unstructured discontinuous Galerkin (DG) method is employed to propagate acoustic waves away from the source across large distances using high-order accurate schemes. The DG solver is capable of solving 2nd, 3rd, and 4th order Euler solutions for non-linear, conservative acoustic field propagation. Initial application testing and validation has been carried out against high resolution acoustic data from the Ares Scale Model Acoustic Test (ASMAT) series to evaluate the capabilities and production readiness of the CFD/CAA system to resolve the observed spectrum of acoustic frequency content. This paper presents results from this validation and outlines efforts to mature and improve the computational simulation framework.

  3. Validation of High-Fidelity CFD/CAA Framework for Launch Vehicle Acoustic Environment Simulation against Scale Model Test Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liever, Peter A.; West, Jeffrey S.; Harris, Robert E.

    2016-01-01

    A hybrid Computational Fluid Dynamics and Computational Aero-Acoustics (CFD/CAA) modeling framework has been developed for launch vehicle liftoff acoustic environment predictions. The framework couples the existing highly-scalable NASA production CFD code, Loci/CHEM, with a high-order accurate Discontinuous Galerkin solver developed in the same production framework, Loci/THRUST, to accurately resolve and propagate acoustic physics across the entire launch environment. Time-accurate, Hybrid RANS/LES CFD modeling is applied for predicting the acoustic generation physics at the plume source, and a high-order accurate unstructured mesh Discontinuous Galerkin (DG) method is employed to propagate acoustic waves away from the source across large distances using high-order accurate schemes. The DG solver is capable of solving 2nd, 3rd, and 4th order Euler solutions for non-linear, conservative acoustic field propagation. Initial application testing and validation has been carried out against high resolution acoustic data from the Ares Scale Model Acoustic Test (ASMAT) series to evaluate the capabilities and production readiness of the CFD/CAA system to resolve the observed spectrum of acoustic frequency content. This paper presents results from this validation and outlines efforts to mature and improve the computational simulation framework.

  4. Links between teacher assessment and child self-assessment of mental health and behavior among children affected by HIV/AIDS.

    PubMed

    Du, Hongfei; Li, Xiaoming; Weinstein, Traci L; Chi, Peilian; Zhao, Junfeng; Zhao, Guoxiang

    2015-01-01

    Teachers are considered to be one of the most important influences in the lives of students. Teachers' assessments of students may be a primary source of information on children's mental and behavioral health; however, this topic has received little attention in research. We examined this issue through linking teachers' ratings of students and mental and behavioral outcomes of children affected by HIV. The hypothesis is that teacher ratings will be predictive of specific child mental and behavioral health outcomes. A quantitative cross-sectional design with self-administered paper-and-pencil instruments was used. The sample included 1221 children (aged 6-18, grades 1-11) affected by HIV including 755 orphans who lost one or both parents to AIDS and 466 vulnerable children living with HIV-infected parents in a central province of China. The corresponding teacher sample included 185 participants. Each child completed an assessment inventory of demographic information and mental and behavioral health measures. Teachers completed a questionnaire about children's school performance. SEM analyses revealed a good model fit according to all fit indices: comparative fit index = 0.93, root mean square error of approximation = 0.07, and standardized root mean square residual = 0.04. Structural equation modeling revealed that problem ratings by teachers were positively associated with child loneliness and behavioral problems, social competence ratings by teachers were negatively related to child depression, and personal growth and social interaction ratings by teachers were negatively related to child loneliness, depression, and trauma. The current study represents a unique contribution to the field in that it recognizes that teachers can be a valuable source of information on children's psychological health. Results from this study have implications for health prevention and intervention for children and families suffering from HIV/AIDS.

  5. A shunt pathway limits the CaaX processing of Hsp40 Ydj1p and regulates Ydj1p-dependent phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Hildebrandt, Emily R; Cheng, Michael; Zhao, Peng; Kim, June H; Wells, Lance; Schmidt, Walter K

    2016-01-01

    The modifications occurring to CaaX proteins have largely been established using few reporter molecules (e.g. Ras, yeast a-factor mating pheromone). These proteins undergo three coordinated COOH-terminal events: isoprenylation of the cysteine, proteolytic removal of aaX, and COOH-terminal methylation. Here, we investigated the coupling of these modifications in the context of the yeast Ydj1p chaperone. We provide genetic, biochemical, and biophysical evidence that the Ydj1p CaaX motif is isoprenylated but not cleaved and carboxylmethylated. Moreover, we demonstrate that Ydj1p-dependent thermotolerance and Ydj1p localization are perturbed when alternative CaaX motifs are transplanted onto Ydj1p. The abnormal phenotypes revert to normal when post-isoprenylation events are genetically interrupted. Our findings indicate that proper Ydj1p function requires an isoprenylatable CaaX motif that is resistant to post-isoprenylation events. These results expand on the complexity of protein isoprenylation and highlight the impact of post-isoprenylation events in regulating the function of Ydj1p and perhaps other CaaX proteins. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15899.001 PMID:27525482

  6. Modeling error in assessment of mammographic image features for improved computer-aided mammography training: initial experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazurowski, Maciej A.; Tourassi, Georgia D.

    2011-03-01

    In this study we investigate the hypothesis that there exist patterns in erroneous assessment of BI-RADS image features among radiology trainees when performing diagnostic interpretation of mammograms. We also investigate whether these error making patterns can be captured by individual user models. To test our hypothesis we propose a user modeling algorithm that uses the previous readings of a trainee to identify whether certain BI-RADS feature values (e.g. "spiculated" value for "margin" feature) are associated with higher than usual likelihood that the feature will be assessed incorrectly. In our experiments we used readings of 3 radiology residents and 7 breast imaging experts for 33 breast masses for the following BI-RADS features: parenchyma density, mass margin, mass shape and mass density. The expert readings were considered as the gold standard. Rule-based individual user models were developed and tested using the leave one-one-out crossvalidation scheme. Our experimental evaluation showed that the individual user models are accurate in identifying cases for which errors are more likely to be made. The user models captured regularities in error making for all 3 residents. This finding supports our hypothesis about existence of individual error making patterns in assessment of mammographic image features using the BI-RADS lexicon. Explicit user models identifying the weaknesses of each resident could be of great use when developing and adapting a personalized training plan to meet the resident's individual needs. Such approach fits well with the framework of adaptive computer-aided educational systems in mammography we have proposed before.

  7. Compliance assessment of ambulatory Alzheimer patients to aid therapeutic decisions by healthcare professionals

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Compliance represents a major determinant for the effectiveness of pharmacotherapy. Compliance reports summarising electronically compiled compliance data qualify healthcare needs and can be utilised as part of a compliance enhancing intervention. Nevertheless, evidence-based information on a sufficient level of compliance is scarce complicating the interpretation of compliance reports. The purpose of our pilot study was to determine the compliance of ambulatory Alzheimer patients to antidementia drugs under routine therapeutic use using electronic monitoring. In addition, the forgiveness of donepezil (i.e. its ability to sustain adequate pharmacological response despite suboptimal compliance) was characterised and evidence-based guidance for the interpretation of compliance reports was intended to be developed. Methods We determined the compliance of four different antidementia drugs by electronic monitoring in 31 patients over six months. All patients were recruited from the gerontopsychiatric clinic of a university hospital as part of a pilot study. The so called medication event monitoring system (MEMS) was employed, consisting of a vial with a microprocessor in the lid which records the time (date, hour, minute) of every opening. Daily compliance served as primary outcome measure, defined as percentage of days with correctly administered doses of medication. In addition, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of donepezil were simulated to systematically assess therapeutic undersupply also incorporating study compliance patterns. Statistical analyses were performed with SPSS and Microsoft Excel. Results Median daily compliance was 94% (range 48%-99%). Ten patients (32%) were non-compliant at least for one month. One-sixth of patients taking donepezil displayed periods of therapeutic undersupply. For 10 mg and 5 mg donepezil once-daily dosing, the estimated forgiveness of donepezil was 80% and 90% daily compliance or two and one dosage omissions at

  8. International exchange of emergency phase information and assessments: an aid to national/international decision makers.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Thomas J; Chino, Masamichi; Ehrhardt, Joachim; Shershakov, Vyacheslav

    2004-01-01

    This paper discusses a collaborative project (1) to demonstrate the feasibility and benefit of a system seeking early review, in a 'quasi peer review' mode, of nuclear accident plume and dose assessment predictions by four major international nuclear accident emergency response systems before release of calculations to respective national authorities followed by (2) sharing these results with responsible national/international authorities, (3) development of an affordable/accessible system to distribute results to countries without prediction capabilities and (4) utilisation for exercises and collaboration studies. The project exploits Internet browser technology and low-cost PC hardware, incorporates an Internet node, with access control, for depositing a minimal set of XML-based graphics files for presentation in an identical map format. Side-by-side viewing and televideo conferencing will permit rapid evaluation, data elaboration and recalculation (if necessary) and should produce strong consensus among decision makers. Successful completion affords easy utilisation by national/international organisations and non-nuclear states at risk of trans-boundary incursion.

  9. PMU-Aided Voltage Security Assessment for a Wind Power Plant: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, H.; Zhang, Y. C.; Zhang, J. J.; Muljadi, E.

    2015-04-08

    Because wind power penetration levels in electric power systems are continuously increasing, voltage stability is a critical issue for maintaining power system security and operation. The traditional methods to analyze voltage stability can be classified into two categories: dynamic and steady-state. Dynamic analysis relies on time-domain simulations of faults at different locations; however, this method needs to exhaust faults at all locations to find the security region for voltage at a single bus. With the widely located phasor measurement units (PMUs), the Thevenin equivalent matrix can be calculated by the voltage and current information collected by the PMUs. This paper proposes a method based on a Thevenin equivalent matrix to identify system locations that will have the greatest impact on the voltage at the wind power plant’s point of interconnection. The number of dynamic voltage stability analysis runs is greatly reduced by using the proposed method. The numerical results demonstrate the feasibility, effectiveness, and robustness of the proposed approach for voltage security assessment for a wind power plant.

  10. PMU-Aided Voltage Security Assessment for a Wind Power Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Huaiguang; Zhang, Yingchen; Zhang, Jun Jason; Muljadi, Eduard

    2015-10-05

    Because wind power penetration levels in electric power systems are continuously increasing, voltage stability is a critical issue for maintaining power system security and operation. The traditional methods to analyze voltage stability can be classified into two categories: dynamic and steady-state. Dynamic analysis relies on time-domain simulations of faults at different locations; however, this method needs to exhaust faults at all locations to find the security region for voltage at a single bus. With the widely located phasor measurement units (PMUs), the Thevenin equivalent matrix can be calculated by the voltage and current information collected by the PMUs. This paper proposes a method based on a Thevenin equivalent matrix to identify system locations that will have the greatest impact on the voltage at the wind power plant's point of interconnection. The number of dynamic voltage stability analysis runs is greatly reduced by using the proposed method. The numerical results demonstrate the feasibility, effectiveness, and robustness of the proposed approach for voltage security assessment for a wind power plant.

  11. The Use of Mobile Devices in Aiding Dietary Assessment and Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Fengqing; Bosch, Marc; Woo, Insoo; Kim, SungYe; Boushey, Carol J.; Ebert, David S.; Delp, Edward J.

    2010-01-01

    There is a growing concern about chronic diseases and other health problems related to diet including obesity and cancer. The need to accurately measure diet (what foods a person consumes) becomes imperative. Dietary intake provides valuable insights for mounting intervention programs for prevention of chronic diseases. Measuring accurate dietary intake is considered to be an open research problem in the nutrition and health fields. In this paper, we describe a novel mobile telephone food record that will provide an accurate account of daily food and nutrient intake. Our approach includes the use of image analysis tools for identification and quantification of food that is consumed at a meal. Images obtained before and after foods are eaten are used to estimate the amount and type of food consumed. The mobile device provides a unique vehicle for collecting dietary information that reduces the burden on respondents that are obtained using more classical approaches for dietary assessment. We describe our approach to image analysis that includes the segmentation of food items, features used to identify foods, a method for automatic portion estimation, and our overall system architecture for collecting the food intake information. PMID:20862266

  12. Validation of the facial assessment by computer evaluation (FACE) program for software-aided eyelid measurements.

    PubMed

    Choi, Catherine J; Lefebvre, Daniel R; Yoon, Michael K

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this article is to validate the accuracy of Facial Assessment by Computer Evaluation (FACE) program in eyelid measurements. Sixteen subjects between the ages of 27 and 65 were included with IRB approval. Clinical measurements of upper eyelid margin reflex distance (MRD1) and inter-palpebral fissure (IPF) were obtained. Photographs were then taken with a digital single lens reflex camera with built-in pop-up flash (dSLR-pop) and a dSLR with lens-mounted ring flash (dSLR-ring) with the cameras upright, rotated 90, 180, and 270 degrees. The images were analyzed using both the FACE and ImageJ software to measure MRD1 and IPF.Thirty-two eyes of sixteen subjects were included. Comparison of clinical measurement of MRD1 and IPF with FACE measurements of photos in upright position showed no statistically significant differences for dSLR-pop (MRD1: p = 0.0912, IPF: p = 0.334) and for dSLR-ring (MRD1: p = 0.105, IPF: p = 0.538). One-to-one comparison of MRD1 and IPF measurements in four positions obtained with FACE versus ImageJ for dSLR-pop showed moderate to substantial agreement for MRD1 (intraclass correlation coefficient = 0.534 upright, 0.731 in 90 degree rotation, 0.627 in 180 degree rotation, 0.477 in 270 degree rotation) and substantial to excellent agreement in IPF (ICC = 0.740, 0.859, 0.849, 0.805). In photos taken with dSLR-ring, there was excellent agreement of all MRD1 (ICC = 0.916, 0.932, 0.845, 0.812) and IPF (ICC = 0.937, 0.938, 0.917, 0.888) values. The FACE program is a valid method for measuring margin reflex distance and inter-palpebral fissure.

  13. International Exchange of Emergency Phase Information and Assessment: An Aid to Inter/National Decision Makers

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, T J; Chino, M; Ehrhardt, J; Shershakov, V

    2003-09-01

    This paper discusses a collaborative project whose purpose is (1) to demonstrate the technical feasibility and mutual benefit of a system seeking early review or preview, in a ''quasi peer review'' mode, of nuclear accident plume and dose assessment predictions by four major international nuclear accident emergency response systems before release of their calculations to their respective national authorities followed by (2) sharing these results with responsible international authorities. The extreme sensitivity of the general public to any nuclear accident information has been a strong motivation to seek peer review prior to public release. Another intended objective of this work is (3) the development of an affordable/accessible system for distribution of prediction results to countries having no prediction capabilities and (4) utilization of the link for exercises and collaboration studies. The project exploits the Internet as a ubiquitous communications medium, browser technology as a simple, user friendly interface, and low-cost PC level hardware. The participants are developing a web based dedicated node with ID and password access control, where the four systems can deposit a minimal set of XML-based data and graphics files, which are then displayed in a common identical map format. Side-by-side viewing and televideo conferencing will permit rapid evaluation, correction or elaboration of data, recalculation (if necessary) and should produce a strong level of consensus to assist international decision makers. Successful completion of this work could lead to easy utilization by national and international organizations, such as the IAEA and WHO, as well as by non-nuclear states at risk of a trans-boundary incursion on their territory.

  14. Participative AIDS Education Methods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chambliss, Catherine; And Others

    Since assuring quality health care delivery to patients suffering from Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) and those who test positive for Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) is a priority, development of effective staff training methods is imperative. This pilot study assessed the effect on staff attitudes of a participative AIDS/HIV staff…

  15. Assessment of updated CAD without a new reader study: effect of calibration of computer output on the computer-aided reader performance in CADx

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Weijie; Petrick, Nicholas; Sahiner, Berkman

    2011-03-01

    It is very resource-demanding to assess each new version of a CAD system through a new reader study. We conjecture that the aided reader performance on a new version can be predicted by using certain characteristics of the computer output and the reader study conducted when the CAD system was initially introduced. This would likely reduce the need for additional reader studies. However, investigations are needed to develop a sound scientific foundation to test this conjecture. In this work, we consider a CADx system that outputs a disease score to aid the physician in making a diagnostic decision on a located lesion. Our major contribution is to show that calibration, reflected as a change in scale, is a characteristic of the computer output that needs to be considered in order to predict the aided reader performance in a new CADx version without a reader study. We used a bivariate bi-beta distribution to model the joint distribution of the decision variable underlying the reader without aid and the decision variable underlying the version 1 computer output in the initial version. We then applied a monotonic transformation to the computer output to simulate the computer output in a new version, i.e., the scores in the two versions differ only in calibration (specifically a change in scale). By further modeling certain mechanisms that the human reader may use for combining the computer output and the reader-alone scores, we computed the aided reader performance in terms of AUC for the new version of the CADx system. Our results show that the aided reader performance could depend on the degree of calibration difference between the two CAD system outputs. We conclude that for the purpose of predicting the aided reader performance of a new version of the CADx system, ROC performance (or any other rank-based metric) of the stand-alone CADx system may not be sufficient by itself.

  16. Computer-aided global breast MR image feature analysis for prediction of tumor response to chemotherapy: performance assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aghaei, Faranak; Tan, Maxine; Hollingsworth, Alan B.; Zheng, Bin; Cheng, Samuel

    2016-03-01

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced breast magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) has been used increasingly in breast cancer diagnosis and assessment of cancer treatment efficacy. In this study, we applied a computer-aided detection (CAD) scheme to automatically segment breast regions depicting on MR images and used the kinetic image features computed from the global breast MR images acquired before neoadjuvant chemotherapy to build a new quantitative model to predict response of the breast cancer patients to the chemotherapy. To assess performance and robustness of this new prediction model, an image dataset involving breast MR images acquired from 151 cancer patients before undergoing neoadjuvant chemotherapy was retrospectively assembled and used. Among them, 63 patients had "complete response" (CR) to chemotherapy in which the enhanced contrast levels inside the tumor volume (pre-treatment) was reduced to the level as the normal enhanced background parenchymal tissues (post-treatment), while 88 patients had "partially response" (PR) in which the high contrast enhancement remain in the tumor regions after treatment. We performed the studies to analyze the correlation among the 22 global kinetic image features and then select a set of 4 optimal features. Applying an artificial neural network trained with the fusion of these 4 kinetic image features, the prediction model yielded an area under ROC curve (AUC) of 0.83+/-0.04. This study demonstrated that by avoiding tumor segmentation, which is often difficult and unreliable, fusion of kinetic image features computed from global breast MR images without tumor segmentation can also generate a useful clinical marker in predicting efficacy of chemotherapy.

  17. Early detection of circulating anodic antigen (CAA) in a case of acute schistosomiasis mansoni with Katayama fever.

    PubMed

    Gundersen, S G; Ravn, J; Haagensen, I

    1992-01-01

    A 34-year-old male developed acute Katayama fever with fever, diarrhoea, joint pains, headache, urticarial rash and eosinophilia 18 days after falling into and spending 15 min in the water during water-skiing in the outlet of the Volta river. Low anti-schistosomal antibody titres were found by the immunofluorescence assay after 4 weeks, and the first Schistosoma mansoni eggs were found in faeces after 6 weeks. Both symptoms and eosinophilia increased the first days after treatment with oxamniquine, after which he improved gradually. Examination of frozen sera by the newly developed Magnetic Beads Antigen Capture-EIA (MBAC-EIA) later demonstrated a peak in schistosomal circulating anodic antigen (CAA) levels of diagnostic significance already 4 weeks after he was infected.

  18. Computer-Aided Energy Analysis for Buildings: An Assessment of Its Value for Students of Technology and Architecture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ridenour, Steven

    1981-01-01

    Demonstrates that computer aided energy analysis improves students' (N=29) comprehension and prediction accuracy of energy consumption in buildings and confirms that a reasonably accurate building energy analysis computer program can be designed for student users. (Author/SK)

  19. Assessment of water, sanitation, and hygiene practice and associated factors among people living with HIV/AIDS home based care services in Gondar city, Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background People living with HIV/AIDS have substantially greater need for water, sanitation, and hygiene. Encouraging hygiene education for People Living with HIV/AIDS in home based care services and additional support for the provision of water, sanitation, and hygiene services is recommended. Methods A cross-sectional study was carried during 2009 to assess water, sanitation status and hygiene practices and associated factors among People Living with HIV/AIDS in home based care services in Gondar city of Ethiopia. A systematic random sampling was used to select study subjects from 900 Home Based Care clients of People Living HIV/AIDS in Gondar city. Data was collected from 296 People Living with HIV/AIDS from two NGO’s in the city. For in-depth interview, four different categories were participated. Logistic regression and thematic framework analysis were performed for quantitative and qualitative part respectively. Results Two hundred ninety four subjects (72.8% (214) females and 27.2% (80) males) were studied. The mean age was 35.8 ± 8.7 years. In the study, 42.9% (126) of the households have unimproved water status, 67% (197) of the households have unimproved sanitation status, and 51.7% (152) of the households have poor hygienic practice. Diarrhoea with water status; educational status and latrine availability with sanitation status; and hand washing device availability and economical reasons for the affordability of soap with hygienic practice were significantly associated. Economical reasons and hygiene education were factors that affect water, sanitation, and hygienic practice. Stigma and discrimination were minimized as a factor in the study area. Conclusions There is high burden of water, sanitation and hygiene in people living HIV/AIDS in home based care services. Encouraging hygiene education for people living HIVAIDS in home based care services and additional support for the provision of water, sanitation, and hygiene services is recommended

  20. Knowing Both: Towards Integrating Two Main Approaches to the Tertiary Education of Health Care Workers Involved in Caring for People Living with HIV/AIDS. A Needs Assessment of HIV/AIDS Tertiary Education for Health Care Workers in Metropolitan South Australia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elsey, Barry; Mills, Patricia

    The need for continuing education about human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immune deficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) was assessed for health care workers in metropolitan South Australia. Seventeen focus group discussions were held to solicit the views and experiences of various persons regarding HIV/AIDS tertiary education. Included in the…

  1. Hearing Aids

    MedlinePlus

    ... more in both quiet and noisy situations. Hearing aids help people who have hearing loss from damage ... your doctor. There are different kinds of hearing aids. They differ by size, their placement on or ...

  2. AIDS (image)

    MedlinePlus

    AIDS (acquired immune deficiency syndrome) is caused by HIV (human immunodeficiency virus), and is a syndrome that ... life-threatening illnesses. There is no cure for AIDS, but treatment with antiviral medicine can suppress symptoms. ...

  3. A historical overview of the development of manganese (Mn) pharmacokinetic data under Section 211(b) of the Clean Air Act (CAA)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract for Manganese 2016A historical overview of the development of manganese (Mn) pharmacokinetic data under Section 211(b) of the Clean Air Act (CAA)William K BoyesBackground. In the 1990’s, the use of methylcyclopentadienyl manganese tricarbonyl (MMT) as an octane-enh...

  4. Comparison of sodium naphthenate and air-ionization corona discharge as surface treatments for the ethylene-tetrafluoroethylene polymer (ETFE) to improve adhesion between ETFE and acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene polymer (ABS) in the presence of a cyanoacrylate adhesive (CAA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucía Johanning-Solís, Ana; Stradi-Granados, Benito A.

    2014-09-01

    This study compares two ethylene-tetrafluoroethylene (ETFE) surface activation treatments, namely chemical attack with a solution of sodium naphthenate and plasma erosion via air-ionization corona discharge in order to improve the adhesive properties of the ETFE. An experimental design was prepared for both treatments in order to assess the effect of the treatment characteristics on the tensile load needed to break the bond between the ETFE and the acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene polymer (ABS) formed with a cyanoacrylate adhesive (CAA) applied between them. The reason for the selection of this problem is that both polymers are frequently used in the biomedical industry for their properties, and they need to be joined firmly in biomedical devices, and the cyanoacrylate adhesive is the adhesive traditionally used for fluoropolymers, in this case the ETFE, and the same CAA has also shown good adhesion with ABS. However, the strength of the bond for the triplet ETFE-CAA-ABS has not been reported and the improvement of the strength of the bond with surface treatments is not found in scholarly journals for modern medical devices such as stents and snares. Both treatments were compared based on the aforementioned design of experiments. The case where ETFE receives no surface treatment serves as the reference. The results indicated that the three factors evaluated (initial drying of the material, temperature of the chemical bath, and immersion time), and their interactions have no significant effect over the tensile load at failure (tensile strength) of the adhesive bond being evaluated. For the air-ionization corona discharge treatment, two factors were evaluated: discharge exposition time and air pressure. The results obtained from this experimental design indicate that there is no significant difference between the levels of the factors evaluated. These results were unexpected as the ranges used were representative of the maximum ranges permissible in manufacturing

  5. ICASE/LaRC Workshop on Benchmark Problems in Computational Aeroacoustics (CAA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardin, Jay C. (Editor); Ristorcelli, J. Ray (Editor); Tam, Christopher K. W. (Editor)

    1995-01-01

    The proceedings of the Benchmark Problems in Computational Aeroacoustics Workshop held at NASA Langley Research Center are the subject of this report. The purpose of the Workshop was to assess the utility of a number of numerical schemes in the context of the unusual requirements of aeroacoustical calculations. The schemes were assessed from the viewpoint of dispersion and dissipation -- issues important to long time integration and long distance propagation in aeroacoustics. Also investigated were the effect of implementation of different boundary conditions. The Workshop included a forum in which practical engineering problems related to computational aeroacoustics were discussed. This discussion took the form of a dialogue between an industrial panel and the workshop participants and was an effort to suggest the direction of evolution of this field in the context of current engineering needs.

  6. CaaX-prenyltransferases are essential for expression of genes involvedin the early stages of monoterpenoid biosynthetic pathway in Catharanthus roseus cells.

    PubMed

    Courdavault, Vincent; Thiersault, Martine; Courtois, Martine; Gantet, Pascal; Oudin, Audrey; Doireau, Pierre; St-Pierre, Benoit; Giglioli-Guivarc'h, Nathalie

    2005-04-01

    CaaX-prenyltransferases (CaaX-PTases) catalyse the covalent attachment of isoprenyl groups to conserved cysteine residues located at the C-terminal CaaX motif of a protein substrate. This post-translational modification is required for the function and/or subcellular localization of some transcription factors and components of signal transduction and membrane trafficking machinery. CaaX-PTases, including protein farnesyltransferase (PFT) and type-I protein geranylgeranyltransferase (PGGT-I), are heterodimeric enzymes composed of a common alpha subunit and a specific beta subunit. We have established RNA interference cell lines targeting the beta subunits of PFT and PGGT-I, respectively, in the Catharanthus roseus C20D cell line, which synthesizes monoterpenoid indole alkaloids in response to auxin depletion from the culture medium. In both types of RNAi cell lines, expression of a subset of genes involved in the early stage of monoterpenoid biosynthetic pathway (ESMB genes), including the MEP pathway, is strongly decreased. The role of CaaX-PTases in ESMB gene regulation was confirmed by using the general prenyltransferase inhibitor s-perillyl alcohol (SP) and the specific PFT inhibitor Manumycin A on the wild type line. Furthermore, supplementation of SP inhibited cells with monoterpenoid intermediates downstream of the steps encoded by the ESMB genes restores monoterpenoid indole alkaloids biosynthesis. We conclude that protein targets for both PFT and PGGT-I are required for the expression of ESMB genes and monoterpenoid biosynthesis in C. roseus, this represents a non previously described role for protein prenyltransferase in plants.

  7. Cross-talk between Aβ and endothelial SSAO/VAP-1 accelerates vascular damage and Aβ aggregation related to CAA-AD.

    PubMed

    Solé, Montse; Miñano-Molina, Alfredo J; Unzeta, Mercedes

    2015-02-01

    An association between semicarbazide-sensitive amine oxidase (SSAO) and cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) related to Alzheimer's disease (AD) has been largely postulated. Increased SSAO activity and expression have been detected in cerebrovascular tissue and plasma of AD patients, colocalizing with cerebrovascular amyloid-beta (Aβ) deposits. As an enzyme, SSAO metabolizes primary amines generating hydrogen peroxide, ammonia, and aldehydes. The ability of these products to generate oxidative stress, to enhance the advanced glycation end-product generation, to promote the Aβ aggregation in vitro, and to induce apoptosis supports its role in CAA-related vascular pathology. However, whether the SSAO increase constitutes a cause or it is a consequence of the pathologic process has not been elucidated so far. To set up the nature of this relationship, vascular cell models expressing SSAO were treated with different Aβ forms, simulating the CAA conditions in vitro. It was found that the presence of the vasculotropic Dutch-mutated Aβ1-40 increases (Aβ1-40 D) the SSAO-dependent toxicity, which is accompanied by an increase of SSAO protein availability in endothelial cell membranes. In addition, SSAO enhances Aβ1-40 D and Aβ1-42 deposition on vascular cells by both activity-dependent and -independent mechanisms. Thus, we provide evidences indicating that Aβ itself could be one of the factors inducing SSAO increase in AD, enhancing its toxic effect, and inducing the vascular dysfunction and, in turn, that SSAO stimulates Aβ deposition on the vascular walls, thereby contributing to the CAA-AD progression. Therefore, molecules inhibiting SSAO could provide an alternative treatment for preventing/delaying the progress of CAA-AD-associated vasculopathy.

  8. Relationship of cytochrome caa sub 3 from Thermus thermophilus to other heme- and copper-containing terminal oxidases

    SciTech Connect

    Mather, M.W.; Springer, P.; Fee, J.A.

    1990-01-01

    Cytochrome oxidases are a key component of the energy metabolism of most aerobic organisms from mammals to bacteria. They are the final enzyme of the membrane associated respiratory chain responsible for converting the chemical energy of reduced substrates to a transmembrane electrochemical potential, which issused by the cell for a wide variety of energy-requiring processes. The most widely studied oxidase is the cytochrome c oxidase of the mammalian mitochondrion. This complex, integral membrane protein contains 13 subunits and four canonical metal centers: heme center a and a{sub 3}; copper centers CU{sub A} and CU{sub B}. It is responsible for electron transfer from reduced chytochrome c to dioxygen with the concomitant reduction of dioxygen to water and the coupled vectorial transfer of protons across the mitochondrial membrane. In this communication we will describe preliminary results of DNA sequencing experiments with the cytochrome caa{sub 3} oxidase, initially undertaken to determine the nature of the subunits of this oxidase and shed light on the distribution of the metal centers. We will speculate on oxidase gene and protein structures and evolutionary relationships in the light of these results and recent sequencing results from other groups. 47 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Assessing the Sustainability of Japan's Foreign Aid Program: An Analysis of Development Assistance to Energy Sectors of Developing Countries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yamaguchi, Hideka

    2005-01-01

    This article examines the effect of Japan's official development assistance (ODA) over 10 years that proposed to facilitate environmental conservation in developing countries. Special emphasis is given to ODA disbursements in the energy sector to evaluate whether Japan's foreign aid has shifted its policy toward more environmentally sound goals.…

  10. Assessment of HIV/AIDS comprehensive correct knowledge among Sudanese university: a cross-sectional analytic study 2014

    PubMed Central

    Elbadawi, Abdulateef; Mirghani, Hyder

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Comprehensive correct HIV/AIDS knowledge (CCAK) is defined as correctly identify the two major ways of preventing the sexual transmission of HIV, and reject the most common misconceptions about HIV transmission. There are limited studies on this topic in Sudan. In this study we investigated the Comprehensive correct HIV/AIDS knowledge among Universities students. Methods A cross-sectional analytic study was conducted among 556 students from two universities in 2014. Data were collected by using the self-administered pre-tested structured questionnaire. Chi-square was used for testing the significance and P. Value of ≥ 0.05 is considered as statistically significant. Results The majority (97.1%) of study subjects have heard about a disease called HIV/AIDS, while only 28.6% of them knew anyone who is infected with AIDS in the local community. Minority (13.8%) of students had CCAK however, males showed a better level of CCAK than females (OR = 2.77) with high significant statistical differences (P. Value = 0.001). Conclusion Poor rate of CCAK among university students is noticed, especially among females. Almost half of students did not know preventive measures of HIV, nearly two thirds had misconception, about one third did not know the mode of transmission of HIV. PMID:27642389

  11. EXTENSION OF COMPUTER-AIDED PROCESS ENGINEERING APPLICATIONS TO ENVIRONMENTAL LIFE CYCLE ASSESSMENT AND SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The potential of computer-aided process engineering (CAPE) tools to enable process engineers to improve the environmental performance of both their processes and across the life cycle (from cradle-to-grave) has long been proffered. However, this use of CAPE has not been fully ach...

  12. Assessing an Institutional Response of Universities to HIV/AIDS Epidemic: A Case of National Open University of Nigeria (NOUN)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nom, Ambe-Uva Terhemba

    2007-01-01

    Universities have come under serious attack because of their lackluster response to HIV/AIDS. The article endevours--from an institutional perspective--to what extent National Open University of Nigeria (NOUN) has responded to this challenge. This is done by first, highlighting NOUN basic structures that position it to respond better to the…

  13. Confronting 'scale-down': assessing Namibia's human resource strategies in the context of decreased HIV/AIDS funding.

    PubMed

    Cairney, Liita-Iyaloo; Kapilashrami, Anuj

    2014-01-01

    In Namibia, support through the Global Fund and President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief has facilitated an increase in access to HIV and AIDS services over the past 10 years. In collaboration with the Namibian government, these institutions have enabled the rapid scale-up of prevention, treatment and care services. Inadequate human resources capacity in the public sector was cited as a key challenge to initial scale-up; and a substantial portion of donor funding has gone towards the recruitment of new health workers. However, a recent scale-down of donor funding to the Namibian health sector has taken place, despite the country's high HIV and AIDS burden. With a specific focus on human resources, this paper examines the extent to which management processes that were adopted at scale-up have proven sustainable in the context of scale-down. Drawing on data from 43 semi-structured interviews, we argue that human resources planning and management decisions made at the onset of the country's relationship with the two institutions appear to be primarily driven by the demands of rapid scale-up and counter-productive to the sustainability of interventions.

  14. Genetic evidence for in vivo cross-specificity of the CaaX-box protein prenyltransferases farnesyltransferase and geranylgeranyltransferase-I in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Trueblood, C E; Ohya, Y; Rine, J

    1993-01-01

    Two protein prenyltransferase enzymes, farnesyltransferase (FTase) and geranylgeranyltransferase-I (GGTase-I), catalyze the covalent attachment of a farnesyl or geranylgeranyl lipid group to the cysteine of a CaaX sequence (cysteine [C], two aliphatic amino acids [aa], and any amino acid [X]. In vitro studies reported here confirm previous reports that CaaX proteins with a C-terminal serine are farnesylated by FTase and those with a C-terminal leucine are geranylgeranylated by GGTase-I. In addition, we found that FTase can farnesylate CaaX proteins with a C-terminal leucine and can transfer a geranylgeranyl group to some CaaX proteins. Genetic data indicate that FTase and GGTase-I have the same substrate preferences in vivo as in vitro and also show that each enzyme can prenylate some of the preferred substrates of the other enzyme in vivo. Specifically, the viability of yeast cells lacking FTase is due to prenylation of Ras proteins by GGTase-I. Although this GGTase-I dependent prenylation of Ras is sufficient for growth, it is not sufficient for mutationally activated Ras proteins to exert deleterious effects on growth. The dependence of the activated Ras phenotype on FTase can be bypassed by replacing the C-terminal serine with leucine. This altered form of Ras appears to be prenylated by both GGTase-I and FTase, since it produces an activated phenotype in a strain lacking either FTase or GGTase-I. Yeast cells can grow in the absence of GGTase-I as long as two essential substrates are overexpressed, but their growth is slow. Such strains are dependent on FTase for viability and are able to grow faster when FTase is overproduced, suggesting that FTase can prenylate the essential substrates of GGTase-I when they are overproduced. Images PMID:8321228

  15. Identification of a novel prenyl and palmitoyl modification at the CaaX motif of Cdc42 that regulates RhoGDI binding.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Akiyuki; Linder, Maurine E

    2013-04-01

    Membrane localization of Rho GTPases is essential for their biological functions and is dictated in part by a series of posttranslational modifications at a carboxyl-terminal CaaX motif: prenylation at cysteine, proteolysis of the aaX tripeptide, and carboxymethylation. The fidelity and variability of these CaaX processing steps are uncertain. The brain-specific splice variant of Cdc42 (bCdc42) terminates in a CCIF sequence. Here we show that brain Cdc42 undergoes two different types of posttranslational modification: classical CaaX processing or novel tandem prenylation and palmitoylation at the CCaX cysteines. In the dual lipidation pathway, bCdc42 was prenylated, but it bypassed proteolysis and carboxymethylation to undergo modification with palmitate at the second cysteine. The alternative postprenylation processing fates were conserved in the GTPases RalA and RalB and the phosphatase PRL-3, proteins terminating in a CCaX motif. The differentially modified forms of bCdc42 displayed functional differences. Prenylated and palmitoylated brain Cdc42 did not interact with RhoGDIα and was enriched in the plasma membrane relative to the classically processed form. The alternative processing of prenylated CCaX motif proteins by palmitoylation or by endoproteolysis and methylation expands the diversity of signaling GTPases and enables another level of regulation through reversible modification with palmitate.

  16. Isolation of ubiquinol oxidase from Paracoccus denitrificans and resolution into cytochrome bc1 and cytochrome c-aa3 complexes.

    PubMed

    Berry, E A; Trumpower, B L

    1985-02-25

    An enzyme complex with ubiquinol-cytochrome c oxidoreductase, cytochrome c oxidase, and ubiquinol oxidase activities was purified from a detergent extract of the plasma membrane of aerobically grown Paracoccus denitrificans. This ubiquinol oxidase consists of seven polypeptides and contains two b cytochromes, cytochrome c1, cytochrome aa3, and a previously unreported c-type cytochrome. This c-type cytochrome has an apparent Mr of 22,000 and an alpha absorption maximum at 552 nm. Retention of this c cytochrome through purification presumably accounts for the independence of ubiquinol oxidase activity on added cytochrome c. Ubiquinol oxidase can be separated into a 3-subunit bc1 complex, a 3-subunit c-aa3 complex, and a 57-kDa polypeptide. This, together with detection of covalently bound heme and published molecular weights of cytochrome c1 and the subunits of cytochrome c oxidase, allows tentative identification of most of the subunits of ubiquinol oxidase with the prosthetic groups present. Ubiquinol oxidase contains cytochromes corresponding to those of the mitochondrial bc1 complex, cytochrome c oxidase complex, and a bound cytochrome c. Ubiquinol-cytochrome c oxidoreductase activity of the complex is inhibited by inhibitors of the mitochondrial bc1 complex. Thus it seems likely that the pathway of electron transfer through the bc1 complex of ubiquinol oxidase is similar to that through the mitochondrial bc1 complex. The number of polypeptides present is less than half the number in the corresponding mitochondrial complexes. This structural simplicity may make ubiquinol oxidase from P. denitrificans a useful system with which to study the mechanisms of electron transfer and energy transduction in the bc1 and cytochrome c oxidase sections of the respiratory chain.

  17. CAA: Computer Assisted Athletics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, John H.

    Computers have been used in a variety of applications for athletics since the late 1950's. These have ranged from computer-controlled electric scoreboards to computer-designed pole vaulting poles. Described in this paper are a computer-based athletic injury reporting system and a computer-assisted football scouting system. The injury reporting…

  18. Responding to climate change in New York State: the ClimAID integrated assessment for effective climate change adaptation in New York State. Final report.

    PubMed

    2011-12-01

    Climate change is already beginning to affect New York State, and these impacts are projected to grow. At the same time, the state has the ability to develop adaptation strategies to prepare for and respond to climate risks now and in the future. The ClimAID assessment provides information on climate change impacts and adaptation for eight sectors in New York State: water resources, coastal zones, ecosystems, agriculture, energy, transportation,telecommunications, and public health. Observed climate trends and future climate projections were developed for seven regions across the state. Within each of the sectors, climate risks, vulnerabilities, and adaptation strategies are identified. Integrating themes across all of the sectors are equity and environmental justice and economics.Case studies are used to examine specific vulnerabilities and potential adaptation strategies in each of the eight sectors. These case studies also illustrate the linkages among climate vulnerabilities, risks, and adaptation, and demonstrate specific monitoring needs. Stakeholder participation was critical to the ClimAID assessment process to ensure relevance to decision makers across the state.

  19. State Implementation Plans; General Preamble & Lead (Pb) Addendum for the Implementation of Title I of the Clean Air Act (CAA) Amendments of 1990 (57 FR 13498 & 58 FR 67748)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This page contains a copy of the 1993 & 1993 Federal Register publications of the State Implementation Plans (SIPs); General Preamble & Lead (Pb) Addendum for the Implementation of Title I of the Clean Air Act (CAA) Amendments of 1990.

  20. Hearing Aids

    MedlinePlus

    ... hair cells (outer and inner rows). When the vibrations move through this fluid, the tiny outer hair ... ear to the brain. Hearing aids intensify sound vibrations that the damaged outer hair cells have trouble ...

  1. Teaching Aids

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnard, W. Robert, Ed.

    1976-01-01

    Provides evaluations of several aids for teaching chemistry. Included are The Use of Chemical Abstracts, Practical Technical Writing, Infrared Spectroscopy Programs, and a film titled "You Can't Go Back." (RH)

  2. Benchmark Problems Used to Assess Computational Aeroacoustics Codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dahl, Milo D.; Envia, Edmane

    2005-01-01

    The field of computational aeroacoustics (CAA) encompasses numerical techniques for calculating all aspects of sound generation and propagation in air directly from fundamental governing equations. Aeroacoustic problems typically involve flow-generated noise, with and without the presence of a solid surface, and the propagation of the sound to a receiver far away from the noise source. It is a challenge to obtain accurate numerical solutions to these problems. The NASA Glenn Research Center has been at the forefront in developing and promoting the development of CAA techniques and methodologies for computing the noise generated by aircraft propulsion systems. To assess the technological advancement of CAA, Glenn, in cooperation with the Ohio Aerospace Institute and the AeroAcoustics Research Consortium, organized and hosted the Fourth CAA Workshop on Benchmark Problems. Participants from industry and academia from both the United States and abroad joined to present and discuss solutions to benchmark problems. These demonstrated technical progress ranging from the basic challenges to accurate CAA calculations to the solution of CAA problems of increasing complexity and difficulty. The results are documented in the proceedings of the workshop. Problems were solved in five categories. In three of the five categories, exact solutions were available for comparison with CAA results. A fourth category of problems representing sound generation from either a single airfoil or a blade row interacting with a gust (i.e., problems relevant to fan noise) had approximate analytical or completely numerical solutions. The fifth category of problems involved sound generation in a viscous flow. In this case, the CAA results were compared with experimental data.

  3. Assessment of Aided Phytostabilization of Copper-Contaminated Soil by X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy and Chemical Extractions

    SciTech Connect

    J Kumpiene; M Mench; C Bes; J Fitts

    2011-12-31

    Field plots were established at a timber treatment site to evaluate remediation of Cu contaminated topsoils with aided phytostabilization. Soil containing 2600 mg kg{sup -1} Cu was amended with a combination of 5 wt% compost and 2 wt% iron grit, and vegetated. Sequential extraction was combined with extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy to correlate changes in Cu distribution across five fractions with changes in the predominant Cu compounds two years after treatment in parallel treated and untreated field plots. Exchangeable Cu dominated untreated soil, most likely as Cu(II) species non-specifically bound to natural organic matter. The EXAFS spectroscopic results are consistent with the sequential extraction results, which show a major shift in Cu distribution as a result of soil treatment to the fraction bound to poorly crystalline Fe oxyhydroxides forming binuclear inner-sphere complexes.

  4. Comparison between low-cost marker-less and high-end marker-based motion capture systems for the computer-aided assessment of working ergonomics.

    PubMed

    Patrizi, Alfredo; Pennestrì, Ettore; Valentini, Pier Paolo

    2016-01-01

    The paper deals with the comparison between a high-end marker-based acquisition system and a low-cost marker-less methodology for the assessment of the human posture during working tasks. The low-cost methodology is based on the use of a single Microsoft Kinect V1 device. The high-end acquisition system is the BTS SMART that requires the use of reflective markers to be placed on the subject's body. Three practical working activities involving object lifting and displacement have been investigated. The operational risk has been evaluated according to the lifting equation proposed by the American National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health. The results of the study show that the risk multipliers computed from the two acquisition methodologies are very close for all the analysed activities. In agreement to this outcome, the marker-less methodology based on the Microsoft Kinect V1 device seems very promising to promote the dissemination of computer-aided assessment of ergonomics while maintaining good accuracy and affordable costs. PRACTITIONER’S SUMMARY: The study is motivated by the increasing interest for on-site working ergonomics assessment. We compared a low-cost marker-less methodology with a high-end marker-based system. We tested them on three different working tasks, assessing the working risk of lifting loads. The two methodologies showed comparable precision in all the investigations.

  5. HIV/AIDS - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - HIV/AIDS ... The following organizations are good resources for information on AIDS : AIDS.gov -- www.aids.gov AIDS Info -- aidsinfo.nih.gov The Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation -- www. ...

  6. Types of Hearing Aids

    MedlinePlus

    ... Devices Consumer Products Hearing Aids Types of Hearing Aids Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... some features for hearing aids? What are hearing aids? Hearing aids are sound-amplifying devices designed to ...

  7. A cross-sectional study to assess knowledge about HIV/AIDS transmission and prevention measures in company workers in Ecuador

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background HIV/AIDS was first reported in Ecuador in 1984 and its prevalence has been increasing ever since. In 2009, the National AIDS Program reported 21,810 HIV/AIDS cases and confirmed that the worker population was amongst the most affected groups. The objective of this study was to assess knowledge about HIV transmission and prevention measures in company workers in Ecuador. Methods A cross-sectional survey based on a random sample of 115 companies (1,732 workers), stratified by three large provinces and working sectors (commerce, manufacturing and real estate) was conducted. A validated instrument developed by Family Health International was used to evaluate HIV prevention knowledge and common local misconceptions about HIV transmission. Descriptive statistics, chi square test and logistic regression analysis were performed using SAS. Results Incorrect knowledge about HIV/AIDS transmission were found in 49.1% (95% CI: 46.6–51.6) of subjects. Incorrect knowledge was higher among males (OR = 1.73 [1.39–2.15]), older subjects (OR = 1.35 [1.02–1.77]), subjects with lower education (OR = 3.72 [2.44–5.65]), manual labor workers (OR = 2.93 [1.82–4.73]) and subjects without previous exposure to HIV intervention programs (OR = 2.26 [1.79–2.86]). Incorrect knowledge about preventive measures was found among 32.9% (95%CI: 30.6–35.2) of respondents. This proportion was higher among subjects with lower education (OR = 2.28 [1.52–3.43]), married subjects (OR = 1.34 [1.07–1.68]), manual labor workers (OR = 1.80 [1.34–2.42]), and subjects not previously exposed to HIV intervention programs (OR = 1.44 [1.14–1.83]). Conclusions HIV intervention programs targeting company workers are urgently needed to improve knowledge and reduce HIV transmission in Ecuador. PMID:23410074

  8. Assessment of stigma and discrimination experienced by people living with HIV and AIDS receiving care/treatment in University of Ilorin Teaching Hospital (UITH), Ilorin, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Owolabi, Rotimi S; Araoye, Margaret O; Osagbemi, Gordon K; Odeigah, Louis; Ogundiran, Adeniyi; Hussain, Nurudeen A

    2012-01-01

    The research was designed to assess the stigma and discrimination faced by People living with HIV and AIDS (PLWHA) that are receiving treatment in UITH, Ilorin. The study was a descriptive cross-sectional survey conducted on three hundred (300) people living with HIV and AIDS receiving care at the antiretroviral therapy (ART) clinics within University of Ilorin Teaching Hospital (which was the only ART site in Kwara State as at then). A quantitative method through the use of interviewer administered questionnaire was used for data collection. This study was a cross-sectional descriptive study design. All the patients who came to the clinic and met the selection criteria were recruited until the desired sample size was reached. Data were analyzed by EPI-INFO 2005 software package. The mean age of the respondents was 39 years (SD = 9.32), and their age ranged between 19 and 65 years. About two thirds (64.7%) of the respondents were females, 62.7% were married, and 62.9% were from monogamous family settings. Slightly less than half (47.3%) of the respondents were not informed before they were tested for HIV, majority (63.3%) were not counseled before the test, but only 11% did not receive posttest counseling. One quarter of the respondents had experienced stigmatization/discrimination. Various forms of stigmatization/discrimination experienced by the respondents include blame for being responsible for their HIV status, various name callings, telling them that they are no more useful to anybody, violation of confidentiality, social isolation, restriction of their participation in family/religious activities, rejection by their spouses/families, dismissal from place of work, isolating them from other patients, and denying them care at health centers. It is therefore recommended that government at all levels should develop and implement programs to educate health care providers about HIV and AIDS, ethics, and treatment and care; educate the general population on HIV and

  9. Usability Testing of a Web-Based Decision Aid for Breast Cancer Risk Assessment Among Multi-Ethnic Women.

    PubMed

    Coe, Austin M; Ueng, William; Vargas, Jennifer M; David, Raven; Vanegas, Alejandro; Infante, Katherine; Trivedi, Meghna; Yi, Haeseung; Dimond, Jill; Crew, Katherine D; Kukafka, Rita

    2016-01-01

    Chemoprevention with antiestrogens could decrease the incidence of invasive breast cancer but uptake has been low among high-risk women in the United States. We have designed a web-based patient-facing decision aid, called RealRisks, to inform high-risk women about the risks and benefits of chemoprevention and facilitate shared decision-making with their primary care provider. We conducted two rounds of usability testing to determine how subjects engaged with and understood the information in RealRisks. A total of 7 English-speaking and 4 Spanish-speaking subjects completed testing. Using surveys, think-aloud protocols, and subject recordings, we identified several themes relating to the usability of RealRisks, specifically in the content, ease of use, and navigability of the application. By conducting studies in two languages with a diverse multi-ethnic population, we were able to implement interface changes to make RealRisks accessible to users with varying health literacy and acculturation.

  10. Usability Testing of a Web-Based Decision Aid for Breast Cancer Risk Assessment Among Multi-Ethnic Women

    PubMed Central

    Coe, Austin M.; Ueng, William; Vargas, Jennifer M.; David, Raven; Vanegas, Alejandro; Infante, Katherine; Trivedi, Meghna; Yi, Haeseung; Dimond, Jill; Crew, Katherine D.; Kukafka, Rita

    2016-01-01

    Chemoprevention with antiestrogens could decrease the incidence of invasive breast cancer but uptake has been low among high-risk women in the United States. We have designed a web-based patient-facing decision aid, called RealRisks, to inform high-risk women about the risks and benefits of chemoprevention and facilitate shared decision-making with their primary care provider. We conducted two rounds of usability testing to determine how subjects engaged with and understood the information in RealRisks. A total of 7 English-speaking and 4 Spanish-speaking subjects completed testing. Using surveys, think-aloud protocols, and subject recordings, we identified several themes relating to the usability of RealRisks, specifically in the content, ease of use, and navigability of the application. By conducting studies in two languages with a diverse multi-ethnic population, we were able to implement interface changes to make RealRisks accessible to users with varying health literacy and acculturation. PMID:28269836

  11. Why do some countries spend more for health? An assessment of sociopolitical determinants and international aid for government health expenditures.

    PubMed

    Liang, Li-Lin; Mirelman, Andrew J

    2014-08-01

    A consensus exists that rising income levels and technological development are among key drivers of total health spending. Determinants of public sector health expenditure, by contrast, are less well understood. This study examines a complex relationship across government health expenditure (GHE), sociopolitical risks, and international aid, while taking into account the impacts of national income, debt and tax financing and aging populations on health spending. We apply a fixed-effects two-stage least squares regression method to a panel dataset comprising 120 countries for the years 1995 through 2010. Our results show that democratic accountability has a diminishing positive correlation with GHE, and that levels of GHE are higher when government is more stable. Corruption is associated with less GHE in developing countries, but with higher GHE in developed countries. We also find that development assistance for health (DAH) is fungible with domestically financed government health expenditure (DGHE). For an average country, a 1% increase in DAH to government is associated with a 0.03-0.04% decrease in DGHE. Furthermore, the degree of fungibility of DAH to government is higher in countries where corruption or ethnic tensions are widespread. However, DAH to non-governmental organizations is not fungible with DGHE.

  12. Assessment of laboratory logistics management information system practice for HIV/AIDS and tuberculosis laboratory commodities in selected public health facilities in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Desale, Adino; Taye, Bineyam; Belay, Getachew; Nigatu, Alemayehu

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Logistics management information system for health commodities remained poorly implemented in most of developing countries. To assess the status of laboratory logistics management information system for HIV/AIDS and tuberculosis laboratory commodities in public health facilities in Addis Ababa. Methods A cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted from September 2010-January 2011 at selected public health facilities. A stratified random sampling method was used to include a total of 43 facilities which, were investigated through quantitative methods using structured questionnaires interviews. Focus group discussion with the designated supply chain managers and key informant interviews were conducted for the qualitative method. Results There exists a well-designed logistics system for laboratory commodities with trained pharmacy personnel, distributed standard LMIS formats and established inventory control procedures. However, majority of laboratory professionals were not trained in LMIS. Majority of the facilities (60.5%) were stocked out for at least one ART monitoring and TB laboratory reagents and the highest stock out rate was for chemistry reagents. Expired ART monitoring laboratory commodities were found in 25 (73.5%) of facilities. Fifty percent (50%) of the assessed hospitals and 54% of health centers were currently using stock/bin cards for all HIV/AIDS and TB laboratory commodities in main pharmacy store, among these only 25% and 20.8% of them were updated with accurate information matching with the physical count done at the time of visit for hospitals and health centers respectively. Conclusion Even though there exists a well designed laboratory LMIS, keeping quality stock/bin cards and LMIS reports were very low. Key ART monitoring laboratory commodities were stock out at many facilities at the day of visit and during the past six months. Based on findings, training of laboratory personnel's managing laboratory commodities and keeping

  13. Imaging of skin birefringence for human scar assessment using polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography aided by vascular masking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Peijun; Chin, Lixin; Es'haghian, Shaghayegh; Liew, Yih Miin; Wood, Fiona M.; Sampson, David D.; McLaughlin, Robert A.

    2014-12-01

    We demonstrate the in vivo assessment of human scars by parametric imaging of birefringence using polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT). Such in vivo assessment is subject to artifacts in the detected birefringence caused by scattering from blood vessels. To reduce these artifacts, we preprocessed the PS-OCT data using a vascular masking technique. The birefringence of the remaining tissue regions was then automatically quantified. Results from the scars and contralateral or adjacent normal skin of 13 patients show a correspondence of birefringence with scar type: the ratio of birefringence of hypertrophic scars to corresponding normal skin is 2.2±0.2 (mean±standard deviation), while the ratio of birefringence of normotrophic scars to normal skin is 1.1±0.4. This method represents a new clinically applicable means for objective, quantitative human scar assessment.

  14. Classroom Aids

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science Activities: Classroom Projects and Curriculum Ideas, 2007

    2007-01-01

    This article describes 6 aids for science instruction, including (1) the use of fudge to represent lava; (2) the "Living by Chemistry" program, designed to make high school chemistry more accessible to a diverse pool of students without sacrificing content; (3) NOAA and NSTA's online coral reef teaching tool, a new web-based "science toolbox" for…

  15. Floriculture Aide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Joyce; Looney, Era

    Designed for use in a self-paced, open-entry/open-exit vocational training program for a floriculture aide, this program guide is one of six for teachers of adult women offenders from a correctional institution. Module topic outlines and sample lesson plans are presented on eleven topics: occupational opportunities in the retail florist industry;…

  16. Assessment of factors impacting cervical cancer screening among low-income women living with HIV-AIDS.

    PubMed

    Ogunwale, Abayomi N; Coleman, Maame Aba; Sangi-Haghpeykar, Haleh; Valverde, Ivan; Montealegre, Jane; Jibaja-Weiss, Maria; Anderson, Matthew L

    2016-01-01

    Very little is currently known about factors impacting the prevalence of cervical cancer screening among women living with HIV-AIDS (WLHA). To better understand this issue, we surveyed low-income, medically underserved women receiving subsidized gynecologic care through an integrated HIV clinic. A self-administered questionnaire was completed by 209 women who self-identified as HIV positive. A total of 179 subjects (85.7%) reported having had a Pap test in the last three years. The majority of WLHA (95%) knew that the Pap test screens for cervical cancer. However, overall knowledge of cervical cancer risk factors, such as multiple sexual partners or sex with a man with multiple partners, was low (43% and 35%, respectively). Unscreened women were younger and more likely to be single with multiple current sexual partners. In multivariable analyses, the only factors associated with Pap testing were a woman's perception that her partner wants her to receive regular screening (aOR 4.64; 95% CI: 1.15-23.76; p = .04), number of clinic visits during the past year (aOR 1.36, 95% CI: 1.05-1.94; p = .04) and knowledge that the need for a Pap test does not depend on whether or not a woman is experiencing vaginal bleeding (aOR 6.52, 95% CI: 1.04-49.71; p = .05). We conclude that support from male partners in addition to effective contact with the health system and knowledge of cervical cancer risk factors influence Pap utilization among low-income WLHA. Future measures to improve the care for this population should increase knowledge of cervical cancer risk factors and encourage social support for cervical cancer screening among WLHA.

  17. A Closer Look: A Workshop Guide Designed to Aid Teachers in Assessing Learning Tasks in Instructional Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manzo, Anthony V.; And Others

    This manual for workshop leaders offers guidelines for planning and conducting a teachers' workshop in assessing the tasks students are asked to perform. The focus is on individual tasks in self-help or auto-instructional materials, although closer examination of such tasks will suggest their value for adaptation and inclusion in standard teaching…

  18. Jernberg Industries, Inc.: Forging Facility Uses Plant-Wide Energy Assessment to Aid Conversion to Lean Manufacturing (Revised)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2004-10-01

    Jernberg Industries conducted a plant-wide assessment while converting to lean manufacturing at a forging plant. Seven projects were identified that could yield annual savings of $791,000, 64,000 MMBtu in fuel and 6 million kWh

  19. Development and validation of standard area diagrams to aide assessment of pecan scab symptoms on pecan fruit

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pecan scab (Fusicladium effusum) causes losses of pecan nutmeat yield and quality in the southeastern U.S. Disease assessment relies on visual rating, which can be inaccurate, imprecise with poor inter-rater reliability. A standard area diagram (SAD) set for pecan scab on fruit valves was develope...

  20. Computer-Aided Assessment of Tone Production: A Case of Zimbabwean Students Learning Chinese as a Foreign Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mushangwe, Herbert

    2014-01-01

    This study examined how technology can help in assessing and teaching Chinese tones to foreign students who are not used to tonal languages. It was an attempt to show how we can use the PRAAT software to make learners of Chinese as a foreign language realize their tonal errors. The data used was collected from the students at the University of…

  1. Assessing the Value-Added by the Environmental Testing Process with the Aide of Physics/Engineering of Failure Evaluations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cornford, S.; Gibbel, M.

    1997-01-01

    NASA's Code QT Test Effectiveness Program is funding a series of applied research activities focused on utilizing the principles of physics and engineering of failure and those of engineering economics to assess and improve the value-added by the various validation and verification activities to organizations.

  2. Novel Ergonomic Postural Assessment Method (NERPA) Using Product-Process Computer Aided Engineering for Ergonomic Workplace Design

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez-Lite, Alberto; Garcia, Manuel; Domingo, Rosario; Angel Sebastian, Miguel

    2013-01-01

    Background Musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) that result from poor ergonomic design are one of the occupational disorders of greatest concern in the industrial sector. A key advantage in the primary design phase is to focus on a method of assessment that detects and evaluates the potential risks experienced by the operative when faced with these types of physical injuries. The method of assessment will improve the process design identifying potential ergonomic improvements from various design alternatives or activities undertaken as part of the cycle of continuous improvement throughout the differing phases of the product life cycle. Methodology/Principal Findings This paper presents a novel postural assessment method (NERPA) fit for product-process design, which was developed with the help of a digital human model together with a 3D CAD tool, which is widely used in the aeronautic and automotive industries. The power of 3D visualization and the possibility of studying the actual assembly sequence in a virtual environment can allow the functional performance of the parts to be addressed. Such tools can also provide us with an ergonomic workstation design, together with a competitive advantage in the assembly process. Conclusions The method developed was used in the design of six production lines, studying 240 manual assembly operations and improving 21 of them. This study demonstrated the proposed method’s usefulness and found statistically significant differences in the evaluations of the proposed method and the widely used Rapid Upper Limb Assessment (RULA) method. PMID:23977340

  3. Congenital coronary artery anomalies silent until geriatric age: non-invasive assessment, angiography tips, and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Rigatelli, Gianluca; Dell'Avvocata, Fabio; Van Tan, Nguyen; Daggubati, Rames; Nanijundappa, Aravinda

    2015-01-01

    Coronary artery anomalies (CAAs) may be discovered more often as incidental findings during the normal diagnostic process for other cardiac diseases or less frequently on the basis of manifestations of myocardial ischemia. The cardiovascular professional may be involved in their angiographic diagnosis, functional assessment and eventual endovascular treatment. A complete angiographic definition is mandatory in order to understand the functional effects and plan any intervention in CAAs: computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging are useful non-invasive tools to detect three-dimensional morphology of the anomalies and its relationships with contiguous cardiac structures, whereas coronary arteriography remains the gold standard for a definitive anatomic picture. A practical idea of the possible functional significance is mandatory for deciding how to manage CAAs: non-invasive stress tests and in particular the invasive pharmacological stress tests with or without intravascular ultrasound monitoring can assess correctly the functional significance of the most CAAs. Finally, the knowledge of the particular endovascular techniques and material is of paramount importance for achieving technical and clinical success. CAAs represent a complex issue, which rarely involve the cardiovascular professional at different levels. A timely practical knowledge of the main issues regarding CAAs is important in the management of such entities. PMID:25678906

  4. The caa(3) terminal oxidase of Rhodothermus marinus lacking the key glutamate of the D-channel is a proton pump.

    PubMed

    Pereira, M M; Verkhovskaya, M L; Teixeira, M; Verkhovsky, M I

    2000-05-30

    The thermohalophilic bacterium Rhodothermus marinus expresses a caa(3)-type dioxygen reductase as one of its terminal oxidases. The subunit I amino acid sequence shows the presence of all the essential residues of the D- and K-proton channels, defined in most heme-copper oxidases, with the exception of the key glutamate residue located in the middle of the membrane dielectric (E278 in Paracoccus denitrificans). On the basis of homology modeling studies, a tyrosine residue (Y256, R. marinus numbering) has been proposed to act as a functional substitute [Pereira, M. M., Santana, M., Soares, C. M., Mendes, J., Carita, J. N., Fernandes, A. S., Saraste, M., Carrondo, M. A., and Teixeira, M. (1999) Biochim. Biophys. Acta 1413, 1-13]. Here, R. marinus caa(3) oxidase was reconstituted in liposomes and shown to operate as a proton pump, translocating protons from the cytoplasmic side of the bacterial inner membrane to the periplasmatic space with a stoichiometry of 1H(+)/e(-), as in the case in heme-copper oxidases that contain the glutamate residue. Possible mechanisms of proton transfer in the D-channel with the participation of the tyrosine residue are discussed. The observation that the tyrosine residue is conserved in several other members of the heme-copper oxidase superfamily suggests a common alternative mode of action for the D-channel.

  5. Commentary: Objective aids for the assessment of ADHD - further clarification of what FDA approval for marketing means and why NEBA might help clinicians. A response to Arns et al. (2016).

    PubMed

    Stein, Mark A; Snyder, Steven M; Rugino, Thomas A; Hornig, Mady

    2016-06-01

    Neuropsychiatric EEG-Based ADHD Assessment Aid (NEBA) is an EEG-based device designed to aid in the diagnostic process for ADHD by identifying individuals less likely to have ADHD by virtue of a lower theta/beta ratio. In using NEBA as an example, the Arns et al. commentary misstates the purpose of NEBA, which is to widen the differential rather than to make the diagnosis. Arns et al. caution about missing an ADHD diagnosis, but fail to mention the impact of overdiagnosis. If we are to advance our knowledge of the etiology and pathophysiology of ADHD, as well as develop tailored treatments and ultimately improve outcomes for ADHD, then biomarkers and objective assessment aids such as NEBA are needed to improve and refine diagnostic accuracy beyond symptom description and clinical history.

  6. Mechanistic insights aid the search for CFC substitutes: Risk assessment of HCFC-123 as an example. [CFC (chlorofluorocarbons)

    SciTech Connect

    Jarabek, A.M. ); Fisher, J.W.; Lipscomb, J.C.; Williams, R.J.; McDougal, J.N. ); Rubenstein, R. ); Vinegar, A. )

    1994-06-01

    An international consensus on the need to reduce the use of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) and other ozone-depleting gases such as the halons led to the adoptions of the 1987 Montreal Protocol and Title VI of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments, [open quotes]Protecting Stratospheric Ozone.[close quotes] These agreements included major provisions for reducing and eventually phasing out production and use of CFCs and halons as well as advancing the development of replacement chemicals. Because of the ubiquitous use and benefits of CFCs and halons, and expeditious search for safe replacements to meet the legislative deadlines is of critical importance. Toxicity testing and health risk assessment programs were established to evaluate the health and environmental impact of these replacement chemicals. Development and implementation of these programs as well as the structural-activity relationships significant for the development of the replacement chemicals are described below. A dose-response evaluation for the health risk assessment of the replacement chemical HCFC-123 (2,2-dichloro-1,1,1-trifluoroethane) is also presented to show an innovative use of physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling. This is based on a parallelogram approach using data on the anesthetic gas halothane, a structural analog to HCFC-123. Halothane and HCFC-123 both form the same metabolite, trifluoroacetic acid (TFA), indicative of the same metabolic oxidative pathway attributed to hepatotoxicity. The parallelogram approach demonstrates the application of template model structures and shows how PBPK modeling, together with judicious experimental design, can be used to improve the accuracy of health risk assessment and to decrease the need for extensive laboratory animal testing. 53 refs., 9 figs., 14 tabs.

  7. Combined robotic-aided gait training and 3D gait analysis provide objective treatment and assessment of gait in children and adolescents with Acquired Hemiplegia.

    PubMed

    Molteni, Erika; Beretta, Elena; Altomonte, Daniele; Formica, Francesca; Strazzer, Sandra

    2015-08-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of a fully objective rehabilitative and assessment process of the gait abilities in children suffering from Acquired Hemiplegia (AH), we studied the combined employment of robotic-aided gait training (RAGT) and 3D-Gait Analysis (GA). A group of 12 patients with AH underwent 20 sessions of RAGT in addition to traditional manual physical therapy (PT). All the patients were evaluated before and after the training by using the Gross Motor Function Measures (GMFM), the Functional Assessment Questionnaire (FAQ), and the 6 Minutes Walk Test. They also received GA before and after RAGT+PT. Finally, results were compared with those obtained from a control group of 3 AH children who underwent PT only. After the training, the GMFM and FAQ showed significant improvement in patients receiving RAGT+PT. GA highlighted significant improvement in stance symmetry and step length of the affected limb. Moreover, pelvic tilt increased, and hip kinematics on the sagittal plane revealed statistically significant increase in the range of motion during the hip flex-extension. Our data suggest that the combined program RAGT+PT induces improvements in functional activities and gait pattern in children with AH, and it demonstrates that the combined employment of RAGT and 3D-GA ensures a fully objective rehabilitative program.

  8. Global and local health burden trade-off through the hybridisation of quantitative microbial risk assessment and life cycle assessment to aid water management.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Yumi; Peters, Greg M; Ashbolt, Nicholas J; Heimersson, Sara; Svanström, Magdalena; Khan, Stuart J

    2015-08-01

    Life cycle assessment (LCA) and quantitative risk assessment (QRA) are commonly used to evaluate potential human health impacts associated with proposed or existing infrastructure and products. Each approach has a distinct objective and, consequently, their conclusions may be inconsistent or contradictory. It is proposed that the integration of elements of QRA and LCA may provide a more holistic approach to health impact assessment. Here we examine the possibility of merging LCA assessed human health impacts with quantitative microbial risk assessment (QMRA) for waterborne pathogen impacts, expressed with the common health metric, disability adjusted life years (DALYs). The example of a recent large-scale water recycling project in Sydney, Australia was used to identify and demonstrate the potential advantages and current limitations of this approach. A comparative analysis of two scenarios - with and without the development of this project - was undertaken for this purpose. LCA and QMRA were carried out independently for the two scenarios to compare human health impacts, as measured by DALYs lost per year. LCA results suggested that construction of the project would lead to an increased number of DALYs lost per year, while estimated disease burden resulting from microbial exposures indicated that it would result in the loss of fewer DALYs per year than the alternative scenario. By merging the results of the LCA and QMRA, we demonstrate the advantages in providing a more comprehensive assessment of human disease burden for the two scenarios, in particular, the importance of considering the results of both LCA and QRA in a comparative assessment of decision alternatives to avoid problem shifting. The application of DALYs as a common measure between the two approaches was found to be useful for this purpose.

  9. How the biodiversity sciences may aid biological tools and ecological engineering to assess the impact of climatic changes.

    PubMed

    Morand, S; Guégan, J-F

    2008-08-01

    This paper addresses how climate changes interact with other global changes caused by humans (habitat fragmentation, changes in land use, bioinvasions) to affect biodiversity. Changes in biodiversity at all levels (genetic, population and community) affect the functioning of ecosystems, in particular host-pathogen interactions, with major consequences in health ecology (emergence and re-emergence; the evolution of virulence and resistance). In this paper, the authors demonstrate that the biodiversity sciences, epidemiological theory and evolutionary ecology are indispensable in assessing the impact of climate changes, and also for modelling the evolution of host-pathogen interactions in a changing environment. The next step is to apply health ecology to the science of ecological engineering.

  10. HIV/AIDS Basics

    MedlinePlus

    ... Enter ZIP code or city Follow Act Against AIDS Act Against AIDS @talkHIV Act Against AIDS Get Email Updates on AAA Anonymous Feedback HIV/AIDS Media Infographics Syndicated Content Podcasts Slide Sets HIV/ ...

  11. Use of airborne remote sensing to detect riverside Brassica rapa to aid in risk assessment of transgenic crops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elliott, Luisa M.; Mason, David C.; Allainguillaume, Joel; Wilkinson, Mike J.

    2009-11-01

    High resolution descriptions of plant distribution have utility for many ecological applications but are especially useful for predictive modeling of gene flow from transgenic crops. Difficulty lies in the extrapolation errors that occur when limited ground survey data are scaled up to the landscape or national level. This problem is epitomized by the wide confidence limits generated in a previous attempt to describe the national abundance of riverside Brassica rapa (a wild relative of cultivated rapeseed) across the United Kingdom. Here, we assess the value of airborne remote sensing to locate B. rapa over large areas and so reduce the need for extrapolation. We describe results from flights over the river Nene in England acquired using Airborne Thematic Mapper (ATM) and Compact Airborne Spectrographic Imager (CASI) imagery, together with ground truth data. It proved possible to detect 97% of flowering B. rapa on the basis of spectral profiles. This included all stands of plants that occupied >2m square (>5 plants), which were detected using single-pixel classification. It also included very small populations (<5 flowering plants, 1-2m square) that generated mixed pixels, which were detected using spectral unmixing. The high detection accuracy for flowering B. rapa was coupled with a rather large false positive rate (43%). The latter could be reduced by using the image detections to target fieldwork to confirm species identity, or by acquiring additional remote sensing data such as laser altimetry or multitemporal imagery.

  12. Fracture risk assessment: improved evaluation of vertebral integrity among metastatic cancer patients to aid in surgical decision-making

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Augustine, Kurt E.; Camp, Jon J.; Holmes, David R.; Huddleston, Paul M.; Lu, Lichun; Yaszemski, Michael J.; Robb, Richard A.

    2012-03-01

    Failure of the spine's structural integrity from metastatic disease can lead to both pain and neurologic deficit. Fractures that require treatment occur in over 30% of bony metastases. Our objective is to use computed tomography (CT) in conjunction with analytic techniques that have been previously developed to predict fracture risk in cancer patients with metastatic disease to the spine. Current clinical practice for cancer patients with spine metastasis often requires an empirical decision regarding spinal reconstructive surgery. Early image-based software systems used for CT analysis are time consuming and poorly suited for clinical application. The Biomedical Image Resource (BIR) at Mayo Clinic, Rochester has developed an image analysis computer program that calculates from CT scans, the residual load-bearing capacity in a vertebra with metastatic cancer. The Spine Cancer Assessment (SCA) program is built on a platform designed for clinical practice, with a workflow format that allows for rapid selection of patient CT exams, followed by guided image analysis tasks, resulting in a fracture risk report. The analysis features allow the surgeon to quickly isolate a single vertebra and obtain an immediate pre-surgical multiple parallel section composite beam fracture risk analysis based on algorithms developed at Mayo Clinic. The analysis software is undergoing clinical validation studies. We expect this approach will facilitate patient management and utilization of reliable guidelines for selecting among various treatment option based on fracture risk.

  13. Teaching AIDS.

    PubMed

    Short, R V

    1989-06-01

    This article reviews a peer group Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) educational program at a university in Australia. Studies in the US have shown that most adolescents, although sexually active, do not believe they are likely to become infected with the Human Immunodeficiency Virus, and therefore do not attempt to modify their sexual behavior. A 1st step in educating students is to introduce them to condoms and impress upon them the fact that condoms should be used at the beginning of all sexual relationships, whether homosexual or heterosexual. In this program 3rd year medical students were targeted, as they are effective communicators and disseminators of information to the rest of the student body. After class members blow up condoms, giving them a chance to handle various brands and observe the varying degrees of strength, statistical evidence about the contraceptive failure rate of condoms (0.6-14.7 per 100 women-years) is discussed. Spermicides, such as nonoxynol-9 used in conjunction with condoms, are also discussed, as are condoms for women, packaging and marketing of condoms, including those made from latex and from the caecum of sheep, the latter condoms being of questionable effectiveness in preventing transmission of the virus. The care of terminal AIDS cases and current global and national statistics on AIDS are presented. The program also includes cash prizes for the best student essays on condom use, the distribution of condoms, condom key rings and T-shirts, and a student-run safe sex stand during orientation week. All of these activities are intended to involve students and attract the interest of the undergraduate community. Questionnaires administered to students at the end of the course revealed that the lectures were received favorably. Questionnaires administered to new medical and English students attending orientation week revealed that 72% of students thought the stand was a good idea and 81% and 83%, respectively found it

  14. Levels of H-ras codon 61 CAA to AAA mutation: response to 4-ABP-treatment and Pms2-deficiency.

    PubMed

    Parsons, Barbara L; Delongchamp, Robert R; Beland, Frederick A; Heflich, Robert H

    2006-01-01

    DNA mismatch repair (MMR) deficiencies result in increased frequencies of spontaneous mutation and tumor formation. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that a chemically-induced mutational response would be greater in a mouse with an MMR-deficiency than in the MMR-proficient mouse models commonly used to assay for chemical carcinogenicity. To accomplish this, the induction of H-ras codon 61 CAA-->AAA mutation was examined in Pms2 knockout mice (Pms2-/-, C57BL/6 background) and sibling wild-type mice (Pms2+/+). Groups of five or six neonatal male mice were treated with 0.3 micromol 4-aminobiphenyl (4-ABP) or the vehicle control, dimethylsulfoxide. Eight months after treatment, liver DNAs were isolated and analysed for levels of H-ras codon 61 CAA-->AAA mutation using allele-specific competitive blocker-PCR. In Pms2-proficient and Pms2-deficient mice, 4-ABP treatment caused an increase in mutant fraction (MF) from 1.65x10(-5) to 2.91x10(-5) and from 3.40x10(-5) to 4.70x10(-5), respectively. Pooling data from 4-ABP-treated and control mice, the approximately 2-fold increase in MF observed in Pms2-deficient as compared with Pms2-proficient mice was statistically significant (P=0.0207) and consistent with what has been reported previously in terms of induction of G:C-->T:A mutation in a Pms2-deficient background. Pooling data from both genotypes, the increase in H-ras MF in 4-ABP-treated mice, as compared with control mice, did not reach the 95% confidence level of statistical significance (P=0.0606). The 4-ABP treatment caused a 1.76-fold and 1.38-fold increase in average H-ras MF in Pms2-proficient and Pms2-deficient mice, respectively. Furthermore, the levels of induced mutation in Pms2-proficient and Pms2-deficient mice were nearly identical (1.26x10(-5) and 1.30x10(-5), respectively). We conclude that Pms2-deficiency does not result in an amplification of the H-ras codon 61 CAA-->AAA mutational response induced by 4-ABP.

  15. Soil erosion and non-point source pollution impacts assessment with the aid of multi-temporal remote sensing images.

    PubMed

    Ning, Shu-Kuang; Chang, Ni-Bin; Jeng, Kai-Yu; Tseng, Yi-Hsing

    2006-04-01

    Soil erosion associated with non-point source pollution is viewed as a process of land degradation in many terrestrial environments. Careful monitoring and assessment of land use variations with different temporal and spatial scales would reveal a fluctuating interface, punctuated by changes in rainfall and runoff, movement of people, perturbation from environmental disasters, and shifts in agricultural activities and cropping patterns. The use of multi-temporal remote sensing images in support of environmental modeling analysis in a geographic information system (GIS) environment leading to identification of a variety of long-term interactions between land, resources, and the built environment has been a highly promising approach in recent years. This paper started with a series of supervised land use classifications, using SPOT satellite imagery as a means, in the Kao-Ping River Basin, South Taiwan. Then, it was designed to differentiate the variations of eight land use patterns in the past decade, including orchard, farmland, sugarcane field, forest, grassland, barren, community, and water body. Final accuracy was confirmed based on interpretation of available aerial photographs and global positioning system (GPS) measurements. Finally, a numerical simulation model (General Watershed Loading Function, GWLF) was used to relate soil erosion to non-point source pollution impacts in the coupled land and river water systems. Research findings indicate that while the decadal increase in orchards poses a significant threat to water quality, the continual decrease in forested land exhibits a potential impact on water quality management. Non-point source pollution, contributing to part of the downstream water quality deterioration of the Kao-Ping River system in the last decade, has resulted in an irreversible impact on land integrity from a long-term perspective.

  16. FOCUSED ASSESSMENT WITH SONOGRAPHY AS AN AID FOR THE DIAGNOSIS OF GASTROINTESTINAL PERFORATION IN A BOBCAT ( FELIS RUFUS ).

    PubMed

    Mejia-Fava, Johanna; Mayer, Jörg; Divers, Stephen J; Cohen, Eli B; Schmiedt, Chad; Holmes, Shannon P

    2015-12-01

    A 10-yr-old female spayed bobcat (Felis rufus) presented with a 3-day history of lethargy, anorexia, and two episodes of vomiting. An emergency field visit was scheduled to perform abdominal radiography and ultrasonography. The bobcat was assessed to be approximately 5-10% dehydrated, on the basis of decreased skin turgor and tacky mucous membranes. Free peritoneal gas, reduced abdominal serosal detail, and an abnormal-appearing right-sided intestinal segment were identified in the abdominal radiographs. However, the emergency field clinicians were not knowledgeable of these abnormalities, because the radiographs could not be processed in the field. During an initial complete abdominal ultrasound evaluation, a nondependent hyperechoic interface with reverberation artifact suggestive of intestinal or free gas and focal intestinal changes indicative of marked enteritis or peritonitis were identified. Free peritoneal fluid was not present on initial examination. In a focused abdominal sonography for trauma (FAST) scan, made after subcutaneous fluid administration, a small volume of anechoic free fluid was present in the peritoneal space. With ultrasound guidance, the fluid was aspirated and appeared grossly turbid. This fluid was subsequently confirmed as septic suppurative effusion, secondary to a foreign body-associated intestinal perforation. The use of a FAST scan is well described in human medicine, and to a limited degree in veterinary literature. This case represents a novel application of FAST scanning in an emergency field setting in a nontraumatized patient. This case report illustrates the utility of the FAST scan in yielding critical clinical information after fluid resuscitation in a zoological setting.

  17. Assessment of the health system to support tuberculosis and AIDS care. A study of three rural health districts of Burkina Faso

    PubMed Central

    Drabo, Koine Maxime; Konfe, Salifou; Macq, Jean

    2010-01-01

    There is increasing evidence demonstrating the importance of healthcare systems for improvement of chronic illness care. The aims of this study were to develop a comprehensive assessment of the health services capacity to provide tuberculosis (TB) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) care but also to enhance patient empowerment, social network and community support. A cross-sectional study was conducted from 1 to 31 of August 2007 in 3 districts of Burkina Faso. We used a step-by-step model and the assessment of chronic illness care (ACIC) scale to assess capacities of 24 first line health centres (FLHC) and 3 district hospitals (DH) for providing TB and HIV/AIDS care. Data for the step-by-step model were extracted from medical records of 75 TB and 66 HIV patients. The ACIC scale was completed by health professionals, 6 medical doctors and 18 nurses, working at the DH level and at the FLHC level, respectively. The biological test for confirmation was free of charge for all the TB patients but only for 10.6% (7/66) HIV cases. Up to the time of the survey, 5 TB (6.6%) and 18 HIV+ patients (27.3%) have been hospitalised for care at least once, 64 TB (85.3%) had been declared cured and 38 HIV (54.5%) were under antiretroviral treatment. Health care process organisation for TB and HIV care had distinct areas of weaknesses. From a maximum ACIC score of 11, the overall score for TB care ranged between 1.9 and 4.9 with a median of 3.7 and for HIV care between 2.1 and 6.7 with a median of 4.1. This study provides an illustration of assessing the HIV and TB care combining data from the routine information system and from the chronic illness care assessment tool, to encompass both disease control and patient health perspective. It provides to health managers arguments for clear conclusions and sufficient data for action. PMID:28299038

  18. Assessing the performance of four different categories of histological criteria in brain tumours grading by means of a computer-aided diagnosis image analysis system.

    PubMed

    Kostopoulos, S; Konstandinou, C; Sidiropoulos, K; Ravazoula, P; Kalatzis, I; Asvestas, P; Cavouras, D; Glotsos, D

    2015-10-01

    Brain tumours are considered one of the most lethal and difficult to treat forms of cancer, with unknown aetiology and lack of any realistic screening. In this study, we examine, whether the combination of descriptive criteria, used by expert histopathologists in assessing histologic tissue samples, and quantitative image analysis features may improve the diagnostic accuracy of brain tumour grading. Data comprised 61 cases of brain cancers (astrocytomas, oligodendrogliomas, meningiomas) collected from the archives of the University Hospital of Patras, Greece. Incorporating physician's descriptive criteria and image analysis's quantitative features into a discriminant function, a computer-aided diagnosis system was designed for discriminating low-grade from high-grade brain tumours. Physician's descriptive features, when solely used in the system, proved of high discrimination accuracy (93.4%). When verbal descriptive features were combined with quantitative image analysis features in the system, discrimination accuracy improved to 98.4%. The generalization of the proposed system to unseen data converged to an overall prediction accuracy of 86.7% ± 5.4%. Considering that histological grading affects treatment selection and diagnostic errors may be notable in clinical practice, the utilization of the proposed system may safeguard against diagnostic misinterpretations in every day clinical practice.

  19. Assessment of plasma anti-elastin antibodies for use as a diagnostic aid for chronic progressive lymphoedema in Belgian Draught Horses.

    PubMed

    De Keyser, K; Berth, M; Christensen, N; Willaert, S; Janssens, S; Ducatelle, R; Goddeeris, B M; De Cock, H E V; Buys, N

    2015-01-15

    Diagnosis of chronic progressive lymphoedema (CPL) in draught horses, including the Belgian Draught Horse, is mainly based on clinical evaluation of typical lower limb lesions. A deficient perilymphatic elastic support, caused by a pathological elastin degradation in skin and subcutis, has been suggested as a contributing factor for CPL. Elastin degradation products induce the generation of anti-elastin Ab (AEAb), detectable in horse serum by ELISA. For a clinically healthy group of draught horses, a significantly lower average AEAb-level than 3 clinically affected groups (mild, moderate and severe symptoms) was demonstrated previously. To improve CPL-diagnosis, we evaluated the AEAb-ELISA as an in vitro diagnostic aid in individual horses. Test reproducibility was assessed, performing assays independently in 2 laboratories on a total of 345 horses. Possible factors associated with AEAb-levels (age, gender, pregnancy, test lab and date of blood collection) were analyzed using a mixed statistical model. Results were reproducible in both laboratories. AEAb-levels in moderately and severely affected horses were significantly higher than in healthy horses. Nevertheless, this was only demonstrated in barren mares, and, there was a very large overlap between the clinical groups. Consequently, even when a high AEAb cut-off was handled to obtain a reasonable specificity of 90%, a very low sensitivity (21%) of AEAb for CPL-diagnosis was obtained. Results on the present sample demonstrate that the described ELISA procedure is of no use as a diagnostic test for CPL in individual horses.

  20. EXTENDING THE ASSESSMENT OF TECHNOLOGY-AIDED PROGRAMS TO SUPPORT LEISURE AND COMMUNICATION IN PEOPLE WITH ACQUIRED BRAIN INJURY AND EXTENSIVE MULTIPLE DISABILITIES.

    PubMed

    Lancioni, Giulio E; Singh, Nirbhay N; O'reilly, Mark F; Sigafoos, Jeff; Buonocunto, Francesca; D'amico, Fiora; Quaranta, Sara; Navarro, Jorge; Lanzilotti, Crocifissa; Colonna, Fabio

    2015-10-01

    Intervention programs for people with acquired brain injury and extensive motor and communication impairment need to be diversified according to their characteristics and environment. These two studies assessed two technology-aided programs for supporting leisure (i.e., access to songs and videos) and communication (i.e., expressing needs and feelings and making requests) in six of those people. The three people participating in Study 1 did not possess speech but were able to understand spoken and written sentences. Their program presented leisure and communication options through written phrases appearing on the computer screen. The three people participating in Study 2 did not possess any speech and were unable to understand spoken or written language. Their program presented leisure and communication options through pictorial images. All participants relied on a simple microswitch response to enter the options and activate songs, videos, and communication messages. The data showed that the participants of both studies learned to use the program available to them and to engage in leisure and communication independently. The importance of using programs adapted to the participants and their environment was discussed.

  1. Aided phytoextraction of Cu, Pb, Zn, and As in copper-contaminated soils with tobacco and sunflower in crop rotation: Mobility and phytoavailability assessment.

    PubMed

    Hattab-Hambli, Nour; Motelica-Heino, Mikael; Mench, Michel

    2016-02-01

    Copper-contaminated soils were managed with aided phytoextraction in 31 field plots at a former wood preservation site, using a single incorporation of compost (OM) and dolomitic limestone (DL) followed by a crop rotation with tobacco and sunflower. Six amended plots, with increasing total soil Cu, and one unamended plot were selected together with a control uncontaminated plot. The mobility and phytoavailability of Cu, Zn, Cr and As were investigated after 2 and 3 years in soil samples collected in these eight plots. Total Cu, Zn, Cr and As concentrations were determined in the soil pore water (SPW) and available soil Cu and Zn fractions by DGT. The Cu, Zn, Cr and As phytoavailability was characterized by growing dwarf beans on potted soils and determining the biomass of their plant parts and their foliar ionome. Total Cu concentrations in the SPW increased with total soil Cu. Total Cu, Zn, Cr and As concentrations in the SPW decreased in year 3 as compared to year 2, likely due to annual shoot removals by the plants and the lixiviation. Available soil Cu and Zn fractions also declined in year 3. The Cu, Zn, Cr and As phytoavailability, assessed by their concentration and mineral mass in the primary leaves of beans, was reduced in year 3.

  2. Infrared and SEM analyses of polyethyleneglycol-400 adsorbed on zeolites NaA, CaA, NaX and NaY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Öztürk, Nuri; Ucun, Fatih; Didem Muhtar, A.; Bahçeli, Semiha

    2009-03-01

    The adsorption of polyethyleneglycol-400 (PEG-400) on zeolites NaA, CaA, NaX and NaY have been investigated by using FT-IR spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopic (SEM) analyses. The spectral data have indicated that the source of adsorption of the PEG-400 on the mentioned zeolites is the interaction between the (OH) group of the liquid adsorbent and the surface silanol groups of the zeolites by means of a hydrogen bond. Shortly, the PEG binds with the silanol groups through the hydrogen bonding where the ethereal oxygen acts as a hydrogen bond accepter. A part of the PEG molecule remains adsorbed on the surface and the rest part remains protruded. So, the most of the silanol groups on the zeolites are masked by the PEG-400.

  3. FT-IR Spectroscopic Study of 1,5-Pentanedithiol and 1,6-Hexanedithiol Adsorbed on NaA, CaA and NaY Zeolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Öztürk, Nuri; Çırak, Çağrı; Bahçeli, Semiha

    2005-09-01

    The adsorption of 1,5-pentanedithiol (1,5-PDT) and 1,6-hexanedithiol (1,6-HDT) in liquid phases on NaA (or 4A-type), CaA (or 5A-type) and NaY zeolites has been studied by using infrared spectroscopy. From the IR spectra it is found that the peak positions of the symmetric as well as the antisymmetric modes of the methylene (CH2) groups are observed at almost the same band values for the title dithiolates adsorbed on the A-type and NaY zeolites. On the other hand, the weak SH stretching vibration, observed for all samples, can be attributed to the sulphure atoms of 1,5-PDT and 1,6-HDT coordinatively adsorbed on cationic sites of the zeolites.

  4. Overcoming Geometry-Induced Stiffness with IMplicit-Explicit (IMEX) Runge-Kutta Algorithms on Unstructured Grids with Applications to CEM, CFD, and CAA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanevsky, Alex

    2004-01-01

    My goal is to develop and implement efficient, accurate, and robust Implicit-Explicit Runge-Kutta (IMEX RK) methods [9] for overcoming geometry-induced stiffness with applications to computational electromagnetics (CEM), computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and computational aeroacoustics (CAA). IMEX algorithms solve the non-stiff portions of the domain using explicit methods, and isolate and solve the more expensive stiff portions using implicit methods. Current algorithms in CEM can only simulate purely harmonic (up to lOGHz plane wave) EM scattering by fighter aircraft, which are assumed to be pure metallic shells, and cannot handle the inclusion of coatings, penetration into and radiation out of the aircraft. Efficient MEX RK methods could potentially increase current CEM capabilities by 1-2 orders of magnitude, allowing scientists and engineers to attack more challenging and realistic problems.

  5. A computer-aided diagnosis system using artificial intelligence for the diagnosis and characterization of thyroid nodules on ultrasound: initial clinical assessment.

    PubMed

    Choi, Young Jun; Baek, Jung Hwan; Park, Hye Sun; Shim, Woo Hyun; Kim, Tae Yong; Shong, YoungKee; Lee, Jeong Hyun

    2017-01-10

    Background We describe an initial clinical assessment of a new, commercially available, computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) system using artificial intelligence (AI) for thyroid ultrasound, and evaluate its performance in the diagnosis of malignant thyroid nodules and categorization of nodule characteristics. Methods This prospective study protocol was reviewed and approved by the institutional review board. Patients with thyroid nodules with decisive diagnosis, whether benign or malignant on the basis of cytopathologic or US results, were consecutively enrolled from November 2015 to February 2016. An experienced radiologist reviewed the ultrasound image characteristics of the thyroid nodules, while another radiologist assessed the same thyroid nodules using the CAD system, providing ultrasound characteristics and a diagnosis of whether nodules were benign or malignant. We compared the diagnostic performance and agreement of US characteristics between experienced radiologist and the CAD system. Results In total, 102 thyroid nodules from 89 patients were included; 59 (57.8%) were benign and 43 (42.2%) were malignant. The CAD system showed a similar sensitivity as the experienced radiologist (sensitivity: 90.7% versus 88.4%, P>0.99), but a lower specificity, and a lower area under the receiver operating characteristic (AUROC) curve (specificity: 74.6% versus 94.9%, P=0.002; AUROC: 0.83 versus 0.92, P=0.021). Classifications of the ultrasound characteristics (composition, orientation, echogenicity, and spongiform) between radiologist and CAD system were in substantial agreement (kappa=0.659, 0.740, 0.733, and 0.658, respectively), while margin definition showed a fair agreement (kappa=0.239). Conclusion The sensitivity of the CAD system using AI for malignant thyroid nodules was as good as that of the experienced radiologist, while specificity and accuracy were lower than those of the experienced radiologist. The CAD system showed an acceptable agreement with the

  6. Handbook of Student Financial Aid: Programs, Procedures, and Policies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fenske, Robert H.; And Others

    The full range of topics relevant to student financial aid are covered in this book by a variety of experts in financial aid administration and scholarship. The volume details how to organize, implement and assess a financial aid program--including how to determine student need, deal with student bankruptcy and aid termination, and improve…

  7. New Software Aids in Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carnevale, Dan

    2007-01-01

    The last time Virginia Commonwealth University had to prepare for an accreditation review, the school's officials found themselves overwhelmed with data. The university's accreditor, the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools, was asking for more information than ever before about how much students were learning: grades, test scores, written…

  8. Miscues: Meaningful Assessment Aids Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luft, Pamela

    2009-01-01

    LeRoy was a deaf sixth grader who used signs and his voice to communicate. Yanetta was a deaf eighth grader who had deaf parents and preferred American Sign Language (ASL). Michael was a deaf fifth grader in a suburban school who attended an oral program and used his voice exclusively to communicate. All three students struggled with reading. They…

  9. AIDS.gov

    MedlinePlus

    ... concerns. Search Services Share This Help National HIV/AIDS Strategy Check out NHAS's latest progress in the ... from AIDS.gov Read more AIDS.gov tweets AIDS.gov HIV/AIDS Basics • Federal Resources • Using New ...

  10. Crawling Aid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    The Institute for the Achievement of Human Potential developed a device known as the Vehicle for Initial Crawling (VIC); the acronym is a tribute to the crawler's inventor, Hubert "Vic" Vykukal; is an effective crawling aid. The VIC is used by brain injured children who are unable to crawl due to the problems of weight-bearing and friction, caused by gravity. It is a rounded plywood frame large enough to support the child's torso, leaving arms and legs free to move. On its underside are three aluminum discs through which air is pumped to create an air-bearing surface that has less friction than a film of oil. Upper side contains the connection to the air supply and a pair of straps which restrain the child and cause the device to move with him. VIC is used with the intent to recreate the normal neurological connection between brain and muscles. Over repetitive use of the device the child develops his arm and leg muscles as well as coordination. Children are given alternating therapy, with and without the VIC until eventually the device is no longer needed.

  11. Heart attack first aid

    MedlinePlus

    First aid - heart attack; First aid - cardiopulmonary arrest; First aid - cardiac arrest ... of patients with unstable angina/non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction (updating the 2007 guideline and replacing the 2011 ...

  12. Buying a Hearing Aid

    MedlinePlus

    ... aids typically cannot be custom-fit. What are costs and styles of hearing aids? Hearing aids vary ... and for improvement in hearing tones. Real ear measurements may also be done, which determine how much ...

  13. Neurological Complications of AIDS

    MedlinePlus

    ... Patient & Caregiver Education » Fact Sheets Neurological Complications of AIDS Fact Sheet Table of Contents (click to jump ... Where can I get more information? What is AIDS? AIDS (acquired immune deficiency syndrome) is a condition ...

  14. HIV and AIDS

    MedlinePlus

    ... dientes Video: Getting an X-ray HIV and AIDS KidsHealth > For Kids > HIV and AIDS Print A ... serious infection. continue How Many People Have HIV/AIDS? Since the discovery of the virus in 1983, ...

  15. Ergogenic aids.

    PubMed

    Coyle, E F

    1984-07-01

    The catabolism of bodily fuels provides the energy for muscular work. Work output can be limited by the size of fuel reserves, the rate of their catabolism, the build-up of by-products, or the neurologic activation of muscle. A substance that favorably affects a step that is normally limiting, and thus increases work output, can be considered an ergogenic aid. The maximal amount of muscular force generated during brief contractions can be acutely increased during hypnosis and with the ingestion of a placebo or psychomotor stimulant. This effect is most obvious in subjects under laboratory conditions and is less evident in athletes who are highly motivated prior to competition. Fatigue is associated with acidosis in the working musculature when attempts are made to maximize work output during a 4 to 15-minute period. Sodium bicarbonate ingestion may act to buffer the acid produced, provided that blood flow to the muscle is adequate. Prolonged intense exercise can be maintained for approximately two hours before carbohydrate stores become depleted. Carbohydrate feedings delay fatigue during prolonged exercise, especially in subjects who display a decline in blood glucose during exercise in the fasting state. Caffeine ingestion prior to an endurance bout has been reported to allow an individual to exercise somewhat more intensely than he or she would otherwise. Its effect may be mediated by augmenting fat metabolism or by altering the perception of effort. Amphetamines may act in a similar manner. Water ingestion during prolonged exercise that results in dehydration and hyperthermia can offset fluid losses and allow an individual to better maintain work output while substantially reducing the risk of heat-related injuries.

  16. Psychometric Limitations of the Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression Scale for Assessing Depressive Symptoms among Adults with HIV/AIDS: A Rasch Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kottorp, Anders; Lee, Kathryn A.

    2016-01-01

    The Center for Epidemiological Studies-Depression (CES-D) scale is a widely used measure of depressive symptoms, but its psychometric properties have not been adequately evaluated among adults with HIV/AIDS. This study used an item response theory approach (Rasch analysis) to evaluate the CES-D's validity and reliability in relation to key demographic and clinical variables in adults with HIV/AIDS. A convenience sample of 347 adults with HIV/AIDS (231 males, 93 females, and 23 transgenders; age range 22–77 years) completed the CES-D. A Rasch model application was used to analyze the CES-D's rating scale functioning, internal scale validity, person-response validity, person-separation validity, internal consistency, differential item functioning (DIF), and differential test functioning. CES-D scores were generally high and associated with several demographic and clinical variables. The CES-D distinguished 3 distinct levels of depression and had acceptable internal consistency but lacked unidimensionality, five items demonstrated poor fit to the model, 15% of the respondents demonstrated poor fit, and eight items demonstrated DIF related to gender, race, or AIDS diagnosis. Removal of misfitting items resulted in minimal improvement in the CES-D's substantive and structural validity. CES-D scores should be interpreted with caution in adults with HIV/AIDS, particularly when comparing scores across gender and racial groups. PMID:27042347

  17. A Standard Analysis Method (SAM) for the automated analysis of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in soils using the chemical analysis automation (CAA) paradigm: Validation and performance

    SciTech Connect

    Rzeszutko, C.; Johnson, C.R.; Monagle, M.; Klatt, L.N.

    1997-11-01

    The Chemical Analysis Automation (CAA) program is developing a standardized modular automation strategy for chemical analysis. In this automation concept, analytical chemistry is performed with modular building blocks that correspond to individual elements of the steps in the analytical process. With a standardized set of behaviors and interactions, these blocks can be assembled in a plug-and-play manner into a complete analysis system. These building blocks, which are referred to as Standard laboratory Modules (SLM), interface to a host control system that orchestrates the entire analytical process, from sample preparation through data interpretation. The integrated system is called a Standard Analysis Method (SAM). A SAM for the automated determination of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in soils, assembled in a mobile laboratory, is undergoing extensive testing and validation. The SAM consists of the following SLMs: a four-channel Soxhlet extractor, a high-volume concentration, a column clean-up, a gas chromatography, a PCB data-interpretation module, a robot, and a human-computer interface. The SAM is configured to meet the requirements specified in the US Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA) SW-846 methods 3541/3620A/8082 for the analysis of PCBs in soils. The PCB SAM will be described along with the developmental test plan. Performance data obtained during developmental testing will also be discussed.

  18. A standard analysis method (SAM) for the automated analysis of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in soils using the chemical analysis automation (CAA) paradigm: validation and performance

    SciTech Connect

    Rzeszutko, C.; Johnson, C.R.; Monagle, M.; Klatt, L.N.

    1997-10-01

    The Chemical Analysis Automation (CAA) program is developing a standardized modular automation strategy for chemical analysis. In this automation concept, analytical chemistry is performed with modular building blocks that correspond to individual elements of the steps in the analytical process. With a standardized set of behaviors and interactions, these blocks can be assembled in a `plug and play` manner into a complete analysis system. These building blocks, which are referred to as Standard Laboratory Modules (SLM), interface to a host control system that orchestrates the entire analytical process, from sample preparation through data interpretation. The integrated system is called a Standard Analysis Method (SAME). A SAME for the automated determination of Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCB) in soils, assembled in a mobile laboratory, is undergoing extensive testing and validation. The SAME consists of the following SLMs: a four channel Soxhlet extractor, a High Volume Concentrator, column clean up, a gas chromatograph, a PCB data interpretation module, a robot, and a human- computer interface. The SAME is configured to meet the requirements specified in U.S. Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA) SW-846 Methods 3541/3620A/8082 for the analysis of pcbs in soils. The PCB SAME will be described along with the developmental test plan. Performance data obtained during developmental testing will also be discussed.

  19. New Paradigms for Computer Aids to Invention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Langston, M. Diane

    Many people are interested in computer aids to rhetorical invention and want to know how to evaluate an invention aid, what the criteria are for a good one, and how to assess the trade-offs involved in buying one product or another. The frame of reference for this evaluation is an "old paradigm," which treats the computer as if it were…

  20. Children, Teachers and the AIDS Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silin, Jonathan G.

    For schools, acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) initially represented a policy problem requiring legal and public health experts to assess their ability to exclude students or staff infected with the human immuno-deficiency virus. As the crisis over the potential presence of people with AIDS in the schools abated and with the growing…

  1. The Master Hearing Aid

    PubMed Central

    Curran, James R.

    2013-01-01

    As early as the 1930s the term Master Hearing Aid (MHA) described a device used in the fitting of hearing aids. In their original form, the MHA was a desktop system that allowed for simulated or actual adjustment of hearing aid components that resulted in a changed hearing aid response. Over the years the MHA saw many embodiments and contributed to a number of rationales for the fitting of hearing aids. During these same years, the MHA was viewed by many as an inappropriate means of demonstrating hearing aids; the audio quality of the desktop systems was often superior to the hearing aids themselves. These opinions and the evolution of the MHA have molded the modern perception of hearing aids and the techniques used in the fitting of hearing aids. This article reports on a history of the MHA and its influence on the fitting of hearing aids. PMID:23686682

  2. Assessment of the utilization of a state AIDS/STD hotline by persons with and without HIV infection and their information needs.

    PubMed

    Vassilev, Zdravko P; Marcus, Steven M; Jennis, Thelma; Ruck, Bruce; Rego, German

    2005-10-01

    A large number of AIDS/sexually transmitted disease (STD) helplines provide support to people seeking information how to avoid infection with HIV or how to deal with the infection if they have already contracted it. Nevertheless, limited knowledge is available about how such helplines are being utilized by different segments of the population and what the main concerns of the people calling the helplines are. The goal of this study was to evaluate the use of the State AIDS/STD Hotline in New Jersey and describe the information needs of its callers. Callers were categorized as either having HIV or being free of the virus based on their self-reported HIV status. A cross-sectional design was then used combining caller information from the New Jersey AIDS/STD Hotline with data from the state health department on the number of people living with HIV in each county in New Jersey. The utilization rate of the New Jersey AIDS/STD Hotline was significantly higher among persons with HIV infection compared to the utilization rate among persons who were either free of the virus or unaware of their HIV status. The callers infected with HIV differed significantly from the rest of the callers in terms of the type of information they requested. While callers who had the infection were most likely to ask about treatment options, financial assistance, and support groups, the rest of the callers were more likely to inquire about testing site location and prevention information.

  3. How to Get Hearing Aids

    MedlinePlus

    ... Consumer Products Hearing Aids How to get Hearing Aids Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... my hearing aids? How do I get hearing aids? Before getting a hearing aid, you should consider ...

  4. A PROBABILISTIC ARSENIC EXPOSURE ASSESSMENT FOR CHILDREN WHO CONTACT CAA - TREATED PLAYSETS AND DECKS: PART 1. MODEL METHODOLOGY, VARIABILITY RESULTS, AND MODEL EVALUATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Concerns have been raised regarding the safety of young children who may contact arsenic residues while playing on and around chromated copper arsenate (CCA)-treated wood playsets and decks. Although CCA registrants voluntarily canceled the production of treated wood for residen...

  5. Human Factors Assessment of the UH-60M Common Avionics Architecture System (CAAS) Crew Station During the Limited User Evaluation (LEUE)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-12-01

    ratings between seat position and results between instrument flight rule ( IFR ) and visual flight rule (VFR) flights. The mean workload rating for...SART scores for left and right seats.............................................................. 15 Figure 13. Comparison of VFR with IFR SA for...left seat........................................................... 16 Figure 14. Comparison of VFR with IFR SA for right seat

  6. Help: first aid issues.

    PubMed

    Granitoff, N; Whitaker, I Y; Diccini, S; Goncalves, V C; Marin, H F

    1995-01-01

    First aid is the initial and immediate care given to a victim outside the hospital environment, with the purpose of assuring life and avoiding worsening conditions until he/she receives qualified assistance. Providing immediate aid to someone requires tranquility and, above all, knowledge on what has to be done or not in each situation. In addition to being treated by health professionals, the chances that a victim will receive early treatment by others are large. However, in Brazil, access to information, and the possibility of reviewing it whenever necessary, may contribute greatly to the process of assimilation of this knowledge, in addition to exercises on simulated cases. Informatics has been shown as an extremely useful tool in the development of educational software, considering its multiplicity of resources and providing for the users: motivation for an interactive experience, an individualized teaching that takes into account his/her own rhythm and desired complexity level, besides making possible the user's capacity for solving problems through simulated situations. Considering that, the number of individuals of the population prepared to act as First Aid helpers in situations of life threatening accidents or sudden illness is still very scarce. The ever increasing use of the computer as a mean of spreading information in schools, enterprises, and even households and considering the advantages of an educational software for the users regarding storage and retrieval of information when needed, we proposed the creation of an interactive teaching software. This software is being developed using Storyboard live. The methodology is the following: literature review, selection of images, development of the program, application tests. The initial selected issues are: assessment of the victim, cardiorespiratory arrest and resuscitation, airway obstruction, wounds, and hemorrhages. After utilizing the program, the user should be able to solve hypothetical

  7. Development of Bone-Conducted Ultrasonic Hearing Aid for the Profoundly Deaf: Assessments of the Modulation Type with Regard to Intelligibility and Sound Quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakagawa, Seiji; Fujiyuki, Chika; Kagomiya, Takayuki

    2012-07-01

    Bone-conducted ultrasound (BCU) is perceived even by the profoundly sensorineural deaf. A novel hearing aid using the perception of amplitude-modulated BCU (BCU hearing aid: BCUHA) has been developed; however, further improvements are needed, especially in terms of articulation and sound quality. In this study, the intelligibility and sound quality of BCU speech with several types of amplitude modulation [double-sideband with transmitted carrier (DSB-TC), double-sideband with suppressed carrier (DSB-SC), and transposed modulation] were evaluated. The results showed that DSB-TC and transposed speech were more intelligible than DSB-SC speech, and transposed speech was closer than the other types of BCU speech to air-conducted speech in terms of sound quality. These results provide useful information for further development of the BCUHA.

  8. Clinical Criteria for Physician Aid in Dying

    PubMed Central

    Pope, Thaddeus Mason; Rich, Ben A.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract More than 20 years ago, even before voters in Oregon had enacted the first aid in dying (AID) statute in the United States, Timothy Quill and colleagues proposed clinical criteria AID. Their proposal was carefully considered and temperate, but there were little data on the practice of AID at the time. (With AID, a physician writes a prescription for life-ending medication for a terminally ill, mentally capacitated adult.) With the passage of time, a substantial body of data on AID has developed from the states of Oregon and Washington. For more than 17 years, physicians in Oregon have been authorized to provide a prescription for AID. Accordingly, we have updated the clinical criteria of Quill, et al., based on the many years of experience with AID. With more jurisdictions authorizing AID, it is critical that physicians can turn to reliable clinical criteria. As with any medical practice, AID must be provided in a safe and effective manner. Physicians need to know (1) how to respond to a patient's inquiry about AID, (2) how to assess patient decision making capacity, and (3) how to address a range of other issues that may arise. To ensure that physicians have the guidance they need, Compassion & Choices convened the Physician Aid-in-Dying Clinical Criteria Committee, in July 2012, to create clinical criteria for physicians who are willing to provide AID to patients who request it. The committee includes experts in medicine, law, bioethics, hospice, nursing, social work, and pharmacy. Using an iterative consensus process, the Committee drafted the criteria over a one-year period. PMID:26539979

  9. Risk Factors for Mortality among Adult HIV/AIDS Patients Following Antiretroviral Therapy in Southwestern Ethiopia: An Assessment through Survival Models

    PubMed Central

    Seyoum, Dinberu; Degryse, Jean-Marie; Kifle, Yehenew Getachew; Taye, Ayele; Tadesse, Mulualem; Birlie, Belay; Banbeta, Akalu; Rosas-Aguirre, Angel; Duchateau, Luc; Speybroeck, Niko

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Efforts have been made to reduce HIV/AIDS-related mortality by delivering antiretroviral therapy (ART) treatment. However, HIV patients in resource-poor settings are still dying, even if they are on ART treatment. This study aimed to explore the factors associated with HIV/AIDS-related mortality in Southwestern Ethiopia. Method: A non-concurrent retrospective cohort study which collected data from the clinical records of adult HIV/AIDS patients, who initiated ART treatment and were followed between January 2006 and December 2010, was conducted, to explore the factors associated with HIV/AIDS-related mortality at Jimma University Specialized Hospital (JUSH). Survival times (i.e., the time from the onset of ART treatment to the death or censoring) and different characteristics of patients were retrospectively examined. A best-fit model was chosen for the survival data, after the comparison between native semi-parametric Cox regression and parametric survival models (i.e., exponential, Weibull, and log-logistic). Result: A total of 456 HIV patients were included in the study, mostly females (312, 68.4%), with a median age of 30 years (inter-quartile range (IQR): 23–37 years). Estimated follow-up until December 2010 accounted for 1245 person-years at risk (PYAR) and resulted in 66 (14.5%) deaths and 390 censored individuals, representing a median survival time of 34.0 months ( IQR: 22.8–42.0 months). The overall mortality rate was 5.3/100 PYAR: 6.5/100 PYAR for males and 4.8/100 PYAR for females. The Weibull survival model was the best model for fitting the data (lowest AIC). The main factors associated with mortality were: baseline age (>35 years old, AHR = 3.8, 95% CI: 1.6–9.1), baseline weight (AHR = 0.93, 95% CI: 0.90–0.97), baseline WHO stage IV (AHR = 6.2, 95% CI: 2.2–14.2), and low adherence to ART treatment (AHR = 4.2, 95% CI: 2.5–7.1). Conclusion: An effective reduction in HIV/AIDS mortality could be achieved through timely ART

  10. Neurological Complications of AIDS

    MedlinePlus

    ... the neurological complications of AIDS. Some disorders require aggressive therapy while others are treated symptomatically. Medicines range ... certain bacterial infections, and penicillin to treat neurosyphilis. Aggressive antiretroviral therapy is used to treat AIDS dementia ...

  11. Unconsciousness - first aid

    MedlinePlus

    Loss of consciousness - first aid; Coma - first aid; Mental status change; Altered mental status ... person is unconscious and: Does not return to consciousness quickly (within a minute) Has fallen down or ...

  12. First Aid Tips

    MedlinePlus

    ... NEI for Kids > First Aid Tips All About Vision About the Eye Ask a Scientist Video Series ... Eye Health and Safety First Aid Tips Healthy Vision Tips Protective Eyewear Sports and Your Eyes Fun ...

  13. Home Health Aides

    MedlinePlus

    ... do the following: Assist clients in their daily personal tasks, such as bathing or dressing Provide basic ... social networks and communities Home health aides, unlike personal care aides , typically work for certified home health ...

  14. AIDS and Athletes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calabrese, Leonard H.; Kelley, Dennis

    1989-01-01

    This article discusses the onset and progression of AIDS, its importance as a public health issue, and reducing the risk of AIDS transmission among athletes and those who work with them, including team physicians and athletic trainers. (IAH)

  15. HIV/AIDS

    MedlinePlus

    ... at risk for serious infections and certain cancers. AIDS stands for acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. It is the final stage of infection with HIV. Not everyone with HIV develops AIDS. HIV most often spreads through unprotected sex with ...

  16. HIV/AIDS

    MedlinePlus

    ... yeast infection (thrush) Shingles (herpes zoster) Progression to AIDS If you receive no treatment for your HIV ... childbirth or breast-feeding. How does HIV become AIDS? HIV destroys CD4 cells — a specific type of ...

  17. HIV/AIDS Coinfection

    MedlinePlus

    ... Laotian Mongolian Spanish Turkish Vietnamese Hindi Subscribe HIV/AIDS Coinfection Approximately 10% of the HIV-infected population ... Control and Prevention website to learn about HIV/AIDS and Viral Hepatitis guidelines and resources. Home About ...

  18. AIDS in Rural California.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wooten, Donald B.

    1989-01-01

    Examines the increase in AIDS patients in rural California, which is greater than that in urban areas, including AIDS population projections through 1991. Describes differences between AIDS populations in rural and urban areas and relates these to state expenditure patterns and differential needs. (DHP)

  19. A Teaching Aids Exhibition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahanja, Salah

    1985-01-01

    Describes an exhibition for the benefit of teachers of English in Arab Primary Schools, which was prepared by third-year students at the Teachers College for Arab Teachers. The exhibition included games, songs, audiovisual aids, crossword puzzles, vocabulary, spelling booklets, preposition aids, and worksheet and lesson planning aids. (SED)

  20. Difficult Decisions: AIDS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slesnick, Irwin L.

    1988-01-01

    Focuses on public education about the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) epidemic. Discusses the problems of a second epidemic of fear and anxiety. Presents several questions for classroom discussion and analysis of the public fear of AIDS. Gives some statistics highlighting misinformation about AIDS. (CW)

  1. Stroke: First Aid

    MedlinePlus

    First aid Stroke: First aid Stroke: First aid By Mayo Clinic Staff A stroke occurs when there's bleeding into your brain or when normal blood flow to ... next several hours. Seek immediate medical assistance. A stroke is a true emergency. The sooner treatment is ...

  2. Creating Motivating Job Aids.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tilaro, Angie; Rossett, Allison

    1993-01-01

    Explains how to create job aids that employees will be motivated to use, based on a review of pertinent literature and interviews with professionals. Topics addressed include linking motivation with job aids; Keller's ARCS (Attention, Relevance, Confidence, Satisfaction) model of motivation; and design strategies for job aids based on Keller's…

  3. HIV and AIDS

    MedlinePlus

    ... A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness HIV and AIDS KidsHealth > For Teens > HIV and AIDS Print A A A What's in this article? ... in human history. HIV causes a condition called acquired immunodeficiency syndrome — better known as AIDS . HIV destroys a type ...

  4. Designing State Aid Formulas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhao, Bo; Bradbury, Katharine

    2009-01-01

    This paper designs a new equalization-aid formula based on fiscal gaps of local communities. When states are in transition to a new local aid formula, the issue of whether and how to hold existing aid harmless poses a challenge. The authors show that some previous studies and the formulas derived from them give differential weights to existing and…

  5. Experimental Assays to Assess the Efficacy of Vinegar and Other Topical First-Aid Approaches on Cubozoan (Alatina alata) Tentacle Firing and Venom Toxicity.

    PubMed

    Yanagihara, Angel A; Wilcox, Christie; King, Rebecca; Hurwitz, Kikiana; Castelfranco, Ann M

    2016-01-11

    Despite the medical urgency presented by cubozoan envenomations, ineffective and contradictory first-aid management recommendations persist. A critical barrier to progress has been the lack of readily available and reproducible envenomation assays that (1) recapitulate live-tentacle stings; (2) allow quantitation and imaging of cnidae discharge; (3) allow primary quantitation of venom toxicity; and (4) employ rigorous controls. We report the implementation of an integrated array of three experimental approaches designed to meet the above-stated criteria. Mechanistically overlapping, yet distinct, the three approaches comprised (1) direct application of test solutions on live tentacles (termed tentacle solution assay, or TSA) with single image- and video-microscopy; (2) spontaneous stinging assay using freshly excised tentacles overlaid on substrate of live human red blood cells suspended in agarose (tentacle blood agarose assays, or TBAA); and (3) a "skin" covered adaptation of TBAA (tentacle skin blood agarose assay, or TSBAA). We report the use and results of these assays to evaluate the efficacy of topical first-aid approaches to inhibit tentacle firing and venom activity. TSA results included the potent stimulation of massive cnidae discharge by alcohols but only moderate induction by urine, freshwater, and "cola" (carbonated soft drink). Although vinegar, the 40-year field standard of first aid for the removal of adherent tentacles, completely inhibited cnidae firing in TSA and TSBAA ex vivo models, the most striking inhibition of both tentacle firing and subsequent venom-induced hemolysis was observed using newly-developed proprietary formulations (Sting No More™) containing copper gluconate, magnesium sulfate, and urea.

  6. Experimental Assays to Assess the Efficacy of Vinegar and Other Topical First-Aid Approaches on Cubozoan (Alatina alata) Tentacle Firing and Venom Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Yanagihara, Angel A.; Wilcox, Christie; King, Rebecca; Hurwitz, Kikiana; Castelfranco, Ann M.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the medical urgency presented by cubozoan envenomations, ineffective and contradictory first-aid management recommendations persist. A critical barrier to progress has been the lack of readily available and reproducible envenomation assays that (1) recapitulate live-tentacle stings; (2) allow quantitation and imaging of cnidae discharge; (3) allow primary quantitation of venom toxicity; and (4) employ rigorous controls. We report the implementation of an integrated array of three experimental approaches designed to meet the above-stated criteria. Mechanistically overlapping, yet distinct, the three approaches comprised (1) direct application of test solutions on live tentacles (termed tentacle solution assay, or TSA) with single image- and video-microscopy; (2) spontaneous stinging assay using freshly excised tentacles overlaid on substrate of live human red blood cells suspended in agarose (tentacle blood agarose assays, or TBAA); and (3) a “skin” covered adaptation of TBAA (tentacle skin blood agarose assay, or TSBAA). We report the use and results of these assays to evaluate the efficacy of topical first-aid approaches to inhibit tentacle firing and venom activity. TSA results included the potent stimulation of massive cnidae discharge by alcohols but only moderate induction by urine, freshwater, and “cola” (carbonated soft drink). Although vinegar, the 40-year field standard of first aid for the removal of adherent tentacles, completely inhibited cnidae firing in TSA and TSBAA ex vivo models, the most striking inhibition of both tentacle firing and subsequent venom-induced hemolysis was observed using newly-developed proprietary formulations (Sting No More™) containing copper gluconate, magnesium sulfate, and urea. PMID:26761033

  7. Space Derived Health Aids (AID, Heart Monitor)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    CPI's spinoff from miniaturized pace circuitry is the new heart-assist device, the AID implantable automatic pulse generator. AID pulse generator monitors the heart continuously, recognizes onset of fibrillation, then administers a corrective electrical shock. A mini- computer, a power source, and two electrodes which sense heart activity are included in the unit. An associated system was also developed. It includes an external recorder to be worn by AID patients and a physician's console to display the data stored by the recorder. System provides a record of fibrillation occurrences and the ensuing defibrillation.

  8. AIDS Knowledge and HIV Stigma among Children Affected by HIV/AIDS in Rural China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhao, Qun; Li, Xiaoming; Zhao, Guoxiang; Zhao, Junfeng; Fang, Xiaoyi; Lin, Xiuyun; Stanton, Bonita

    2011-01-01

    The current study was designed to assess the level of AIDS knowledge and its relationship with personal stigma toward people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) among children living in communities of high HIV prevalence in rural China. The data were collected in 2009 from 118 orphanage orphans (children who had lost both of their parents to HIV and…

  9. Global NeuroAIDS Roundtable

    PubMed Central

    Achim, Cristian L.; Boivin, Michael J.; Brew, Bruce J.; Clifford, David B.; Colosi, Deborah A.; Ellis, Ronald J.; Heaton, Robert K.; Gallo-Diop, Amadou; Grant, Igor; Kanmogne, Georgette D.; Kumar, Mahendra; Letendre, Scott; Marcotte, Thomas D.; Nath, Avindra; Pardo, Carlos A.; Paul, Robert H.; Pulliam, Lynn; Robertson, Kevin; Royal, Walter; Sacktor, Ned; Sithinamsuwan, Pasiri; Smith, Davey M.; Valcour, Victor; Wigdahl, Brian; Wood, Charles

    2013-01-01

    In May 2012, the Division of AIDS Research at the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) organized the “Global NeuroAIDS Roundtable” in conjunction with the 11th International Symposium on Neurovirology and the 2012 Conference on HIV in the Nervous System. The meeting was held in New York, NY, USA and brought together NIMH-funded investigators who are currently working on projects related to the neurological complications of AIDS (NeuroAIDS) in Africa, Asia, Eastern Europe, and Latin America in order to provide an opportunity to share their recent findings and discuss the challenges encountered within each country. The major goals of the roundtable were to evaluate HIV-associated neurocognitive impairment and determine if it may be directly attributable to distinct HIV subtypes or clades and to discuss the future priorities for global NeuroAIDS research. At the “Global NeuroAIDS Roundtable”, presentations of preliminary research indicated that HIV-associated neurocognitive impairment is prevalent in all countries examined regardless of which HIV clade is present in the region. The only clear-cut difference between HIV-1 clades was in relation to subtypes A and D in Uganda. However, a key point that emerged from the discussions was that there is an urgent need to standardize neurocognitive assessment methodologies across the globe before definitive conclusions can be drawn regarding the relationship between HIV clade diversity and neuropathogenesis. Future research directions were also discussed at the roundtable with particular emphasis on the potential of viral and host factor molecular interactions to impact the pathophysiology of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) from a global perspective. PMID:23354550

  10. What Is HIV/AIDS?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Subscribe Translate Text Size Print What Is HIV/AIDS? Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) HIV stands for human ... use the HIV Testing & Care Services Locator. GO Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) AIDS stands for acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. AIDS ...

  11. HIV, AIDS, and the Future

    MedlinePlus

    ... Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues HIV / AIDS HIV, AIDS, and the Future Past Issues / Summer 2009 Table ... and your loved ones from HIV/AIDS. The AIDS Memorial Quilt In 1987, a total of 1, ...

  12. Hearing Aid Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grugel, Richard N. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    Progress in hearing aids has come a long way. Yet despite such progress hearing aids are not the perfect answer to many hearing problems. Some adult ears cannot accommodate tightly fitting hearing aids. Mouth movements such as chewing, talking, and athletic or other active endeavors also lead to loosely fitting ear molds. It is well accepted that loosely fitting hearing aids are the cause of feedback noise. Since feedback noise is the most common complaint of hearing aid wearers it has been the subject of various patents. Herein a hearing aid assembly is provided eliminating feedback noise. The assembly includes the combination of a hearing aid with a headset developed to constrict feedback noise.

  13. Tracer-aided modelling using long-term and high resolution data to assess non-stationarity in stream water age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soulsby, C.; Birkel, C.; Tetzlaff, D.

    2015-12-01

    Understanding how water and solutes move through watersheds and the associated travel times remains a key research frontier in hydrology. Here we integrate long-term data (6 years of weekly isotope measurements in rainfall and runoff) into a tracer-aided conceptual modelling approach to provide fresh insights into the complex interrelationships between catchment storage dynamics, hydrological connectivity and resulting non-stationary stream water ages. We show that in a wet Scottish upland catchment dominated by runoff generation from riparian peats (histosols) with high water storage capacity, the storage dynamics of different landscape units (e.g. hillslope vs. riparian zones) regulate both mixing processes and the strength of hydrological connectivity that govern water and solute fluxes and determine catchment travel times. We also found that the frequency and longevity of hydrological connectivity and the associated relative importance of dynamic flow paths control the contribution of younger (< 1 month) or older (>4 years) waters to the stream. Water and solute transport is mainly facilitated by overland flow from saturated histosols connected to the stream network even during smaller events. However, during prolonged dry periods, near-surface runoff "switches off" and stream water is dominated by older groundwater. The saturated riparian soils represent large mixing zones that buffer the time variance of water age and act as "isostats" damping variable inputs. These zones also integrate catchment-scale partial mixing processes. Although simulations depend on model performance, which is influenced by stochastic variation in isotope inputs, a longer-term storage analysis using this tracer-aided model allowed us to examine the sensitivity of the catchment response and transit times to extreme hydroclimatic variability. These insights were validated using a more recent high resolution dataset (3 years of daily isotope data) which also improved constraints on

  14. Effect of a Cognitive Aid on Adherence to Perioperative Assessment and Management Guidelines for the Cardiac Evaluation of Non-Cardiac Surgical Patients

    PubMed Central

    Bridges, Kathryn H; Stiegler, Marjorie P; Schell, Randall M; DiLorenzo, Amy N; Ehrenfeld, Jesse M; Nietert, Paul J; McEvoy, Matthew D

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND The 2007 American College of Cardiologists/American Heart Association Guidelines on Perioperative Cardiac Evaluation and Care for Noncardiac Surgery is the standard for perioperative cardiac evaluation. Recent work has shown residents and anesthesiologists do not apply these guidelines when tested. This research hypothesized that a decision support tool would improve adherence to this consensus guideline. METHODS Anesthesiology residents at 4 training programs participated in an unblinded prospective randomized cross-over trial in which they completed two tests covering clinical scenarios. One quiz was completed from memory and one with the aid of an electronic decision support tool. Performance was evaluated by overall score (% correct), number of incorrect answers with possibly increased cost or risk of care, and the amount of time required to complete the quizzes both with and without the cognitive aid. The primary outcome was the proportion of correct responses attributable to the use of the decision support tool. RESULTS All anesthesiology residents at four institutions were recruited and 111 residents participated. Use of the decision support tool resulted in a 25% improvement in adherence to guidelines compared to memory alone (p<0.0001), and participants made 77% fewer incorrect responses that would have resulted in increased costs. Use of the tool was associated with a 3.4-minute increase in time to complete the test (p<0.001). CONCLUSIONS Use of an electronic decision support tool significantly improved adherence to the guidelines as compared to memory alone. The decision support tool also prevented inappropriate management steps possibly associated with increased healthcare costs. PMID:24705442

  15. General Framework of Hearing Aid Fitting Management

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Soo Hee

    2016-01-01

    Hearing aids are one of the most widely used treatment options for the hearing impaired and optimal outcomes of hearing aids are supported by comprehensive hearing aid fitting protocols. Currently, the term 'hearing aid fitting' is prevalently used among service and industry sectors with its comprehensive procedures not systematically explicated. In addition, a variety of non-normalized guidelines for hearing aid fitting has led to non-uniform care, outcome variability, and dissatisfaction of the use of hearing aids. The main purpose of the present study is to suggest a general framework of standardized practice for hearing aid fitting management including its pre- and post-fitting stages. The management framework centers on its fitting process with its prior steps of assessment as well as its posterior steps of follow-up, thereby eliminating diverging interpretations and non-uniform practices. Outcomes of this study are also expected to improve potential benefits such as quality of hearing aid fitting, user satisfaction, and cost effectiveness across relevant stakeholders. PMID:27144226

  16. AIDS: acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Gilmore, N. J.; Beaulieu, R.; Steben, M.; Laverdière, M.

    1983-01-01

    Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, or AIDS, is a new illness that occurs in previously healthy individuals. It is characterized by immunodeficiency, opportunistic infections and unusual malignant diseases. Life-threatening single or multiple infections with viruses, mycobacteria, fungi or protozoa are common. A rare neoplasm, Kaposi's sarcoma, has developed in approximately one third of patients with AIDS. More than 800 cases of AIDS have been reported in North America, over 24 of them in Canada. The majority of patients are male homosexuals, although AIDS has also developed in abusers of intravenously administered drugs, Haitian immigrants, individuals with hemophilia, recipients of blood transfusions, prostitutes, and infants, spouses and partners of patients with AIDS. The cause of AIDS is unknown, but the features are consistent with an infectious process. Early diagnosis can be difficult owing to the nonspecific symptoms and signs of the infections and malignant diseases. Therefore, vigilance by physicians is of utmost importance. PMID:6342737

  17. AIDS: acquired immunodeficiency syndrome *

    PubMed Central

    Gilmore, N.J.; Beaulieu, R.; Steben, M.; Laverdière, M.

    1992-01-01

    Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, or AIDS, is a new illness that occurs in previously healthy individuals. It is characterized by immunodeficiency, opportunistic infections and unusual malignant diseases. Life-threatening single or multiple infections with viruses, mycobacteria, fungi or protozoa are common. A rare neoplasm, Kaposi's sarcoma, has developed in approximately one third of patients with AIDS. More than 800 cases of AIDS have been reported in North America, over 24 of them in Canada. The majority of patients are male homosexuals, although AIDS has also developed in abusers of intravenously administered drugs, Haitian immigrants, individuals with hemophilia, recipients of blood transfusions, prostitutes, and infants, spouses and partners of patients with AIDS. The cause of AIDS is unknown, but the features are consistent with an infectious process. Early diagnosis can be difficult owing to the nonspecific symptoms and signs of the infections and malignant diseases. Therefore, vigilance by physicians is of the utmost importance. PMID:1544049

  18. Medical aid schemes respond to AIDS.

    PubMed

    Taylor, G

    1999-01-01

    The insurance and medical aid industries reacted strongly in the 1980s to alarmist predictions of the likely impact of HIV upon employee benefits. Actuaries and accountants moved quickly to contain the risk, and most medical aid trustees quickly implemented a total exclusion of HIV treatment from their benefits. For more than 1 decade, it was argued that HIV/AIDS is a self-inflicted illness, often categorized with other STDs. In response, healthcare providers simply bypassed insurance restrictions and compensation limits by masking patient diagnoses to reflect pneumonia or other ambiguous, yet fully reimbursable, illnesses. Now, common sense has finally prevailed as a few managed healthcare programs are stepping forward to break the impasse. The largest such program is Aid for AIDS, run by Pharmaceutical Benefit Management Ltd. for schemes within the Medscheme Group. The Group built an entirely new, secure unit off-site from their normal branches to guarantee the confidentiality of patients' records and diagnoses, while treatment guidelines have been issued to every practicing physician in the country.

  19. AIDS in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Ijsselmuiden, C; Evian, C; Matjilla, J; Steinberg, M; Schneider, H

    1993-01-01

    The National AIDS Convention in South Africa (NACOSA) in October 1992 was the first real attempt to address HIV/AIDS. In Soweto, government, the African National Congress, nongovernmental organizations, and organized industry and labor representatives worked for 2 days to develop a national plan of action, but it did not result in a united effort to fight AIDS. The highest HIV infection rates in South Africa are among the KwaZulu in Natal, yet the Inkatha Freedom Party did not attend NACOSA. This episode exemplifies the key obstacles for South Africa to prevent and control AIDS. Inequality of access to health care may explain why health workers did not diagnose the first AIDS case in blacks until 1985. Migrant labor, Bantu education, and uprooted communities affect the epidemiology of HIV infection. Further, political and social polarization between blacks and whites contributes to a mindset that AIDS is limited to the other race which only diminishes the personal and collective sense of susceptibility and the volition and aptitude to act. The Department of National Health and Population Development's voluntary register of anonymously reported cases of AIDS specifies 1517 cumulative AIDS cases (October 1992), but this number is low. Seroprevalence studies show between 400,000-450,000 HIV positive cases. Public hospitals cannot give AIDS patients AZT and DDI. Few communities provided community-based care. Not all hospitals honor confidentiality and patients' need for autonomy. Even though HIV testing is not mandatory, it is required sometimes, e.g., HIV testing of immigrants. AIDS Training, Information and Counselling Centers are in urban areas, but not in poor areas where the need is most acute. The government just recently developed in AIDS education package for schools, but too many people consider it improper, so it is not being used. The poor quality education provided blacks would make it useless anyhow. Lifting of the academic boycott will allow South African

  20. Music and hearing aids.

    PubMed

    Madsen, Sara M K; Moore, Brian C J

    2014-10-31

    The signal processing and fitting methods used for hearing aids have mainly been designed to optimize the intelligibility of speech. Little attention has been paid to the effectiveness of hearing aids for listening to music. Perhaps as a consequence, many hearing-aid users complain that they are not satisfied with their hearing aids when listening to music. This issue inspired the Internet-based survey presented here. The survey was designed to identify the nature and prevalence of problems associated with listening to live and reproduced music with hearing aids. Responses from 523 hearing-aid users to 21 multiple-choice questions are presented and analyzed, and the relationships between responses to questions regarding music and questions concerned with information about the respondents, their hearing aids, and their hearing loss are described. Large proportions of the respondents reported that they found their hearing aids to be helpful for listening to both live and reproduced music, although less so for the former. The survey also identified problems such as distortion, acoustic feedback, insufficient or excessive gain, unbalanced frequency response, and reduced tone quality. The results indicate that the enjoyment of listening to music with hearing aids could be improved by an increase of the input and output dynamic range, extension of the low-frequency response, and improvement of feedback cancellation and automatic gain control systems.

  1. Music and Hearing Aids

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Brian C. J.

    2014-01-01

    The signal processing and fitting methods used for hearing aids have mainly been designed to optimize the intelligibility of speech. Little attention has been paid to the effectiveness of hearing aids for listening to music. Perhaps as a consequence, many hearing-aid users complain that they are not satisfied with their hearing aids when listening to music. This issue inspired the Internet-based survey presented here. The survey was designed to identify the nature and prevalence of problems associated with listening to live and reproduced music with hearing aids. Responses from 523 hearing-aid users to 21 multiple-choice questions are presented and analyzed, and the relationships between responses to questions regarding music and questions concerned with information about the respondents, their hearing aids, and their hearing loss are described. Large proportions of the respondents reported that they found their hearing aids to be helpful for listening to both live and reproduced music, although less so for the former. The survey also identified problems such as distortion, acoustic feedback, insufficient or excessive gain, unbalanced frequency response, and reduced tone quality. The results indicate that the enjoyment of listening to music with hearing aids could be improved by an increase of the input and output dynamic range, extension of the low-frequency response, and improvement of feedback cancellation and automatic gain control systems. PMID:25361601

  2. AIDS and confidentiality.

    PubMed

    Kirkman, M B; Bell, S K

    1989-01-01

    AIDS has created many challenges for those who provide care for AIDS patients. One major challenge has been the request of many public officials for healthcare professionals to abandon the traditional view of confidentiality and to reveal AIDS patients' names. This ethical dilemma is explored and some ethical theories are presented as possible resolutions. The conclusion presented is that healthcare professionals must recognize that the power of the healthcare system over an AIDS patient is immense. Therefore, healthcare professionals must make a commitment to protect the patient's right to privacy by preventing any unauthorized disclosure at all costs.

  3. The Aid Debate: Beyond the Liberal/Conservative Divide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kamat, Sangeeta

    2010-01-01

    Recent works that assess whether development has been well-served, or served at all, by international aid, are overwhelmingly pessimistic in their assessment and in favor of the market as the antidote to international aid (Klees, 2010). The author finds that Steve Klees' essay focuses on the neoliberal and liberal frameworks that represent the…

  4. NeuroAIDS in Africa.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Kevin; Liner, Jeff; Hakim, James; Sankalé, Jean-Louis; Grant, Igor; Letendre, Scott; Clifford, David; Diop, Amadou Gallo; Jaye, Assan; Kanmogne, Georgette; Njamnshi, Alfred; Langford, T Dianne; Weyessa, Tufa Gemechu; Wood, Charles; Banda, Mwanza; Hosseinipour, Mina; Sacktor, Ned; Nakasuja, Noeline; Bangirana, Paul; Paul, Robert; Joska, John; Wong, Joseph; Boivin, Michael; Holding, Penny; Kammerer, Betsy; Van Rie, Annelies; Ive, Prudence; Nath, Avindra; Lawler, Kathy; Adebamowo, Clement; Royal, Walter; Joseph, Jeymohan

    2010-05-01

    In July 2009, the Center for Mental Health Research on AIDS at the National Institute of Mental Health organized and supported the meeting "NeuroAIDS in Africa." This meeting was held in Cape Town, South Africa, and was affiliated with the 5th IAS Conference on HIV Pathogenesis, Treatment and Prevention. Presentations began with an overview of the epidemiology of HIV in sub-Saharan Africa, the molecular epidemiology of HIV, HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HANDs), and HAND treatment. These introductory talks were followed by presentations on HAND research and clinical care in Botswana, Cameroon, Ethiopia, The Gambia, Kenya, Malawi, Nigeria, Senegal, South Africa, Uganda, and Zambia. Topics discussed included best practices for assessing neurocognitive disorders, patterns of central nervous system (CNS) involvement in the region, subtype-associated risk for HAND, pediatric HIV assessments and neurodevelopment, HIV-associated CNS opportunistic infections and immune reconstitution syndrome, the evolving changes in treatment implementation, and various opportunities and strategies for NeuroAIDS research and capacity building in the region.

  5. Antiretroviral treatment outcomes from a nurse-driven, community-supported HIV/AIDS treatment programme in rural Lesotho: observational cohort assessment at two years

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Lesotho has the third highest HIV prevalence in the world (an adult prevalence of 23.2%). Despite a lack of resources for health, the country has implemented state-of-the-art antiretroviral treatment guidelines, including early initiation of treatment (<350 cells/mm3), tenofovir in first line, and nurse-initiated and managed HIV care, including antiretroviral therapy (ART), at primary health care level. Programme approach We describe two-year outcomes of a decentralized HIV/AIDS care programme run by Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières, the Ministry of Health and Social Welfare, and the Christian Health Association of Lesotho in Scott catchment area, a rural health zone covering 14 clinics and one district hospital. Outcome data are described through a retrospective cohort analysis of adults and children initiated on ART between 2006 and 2008. Discussion and Evaluation Overall, 13,243 people have been enrolled in HIV care (5% children), and 5376 initiated on ART (6.5% children), 80% at primary care level. Between 2006 and 2008, annual enrolment more than doubled for adults and children, with no major external increase in human resources. The proportion of adults arriving sick (CD4 <50 cells/mm3) decreased from 22.2% in 2006 to 11.9% in 2008. Twelve-month outcomes are satisfactory in terms of mortality (11% for adults; 9% for children) and loss to follow up (8.8%). At 12 months, 80% of adults and 89% of children were alive and in care, meaning they were still taking their treatment; at 24 months, 77% of adults remained in care. Conclusion Despite major resource constraints, Lesotho is comparing favourably with its better resourced neighbour, using the latest international ART recommendations. The successful two-year outcomes are further evidence that HIV/AIDS care and treatment can be provided effectively at the primary care level. The programme highlights how improving HIV care strengthened the primary health care system, and validates

  6. Using Health Surveillance Systems Data to Assess the Impact of AIDS and Antiretroviral Treatment on Adult Morbidity and Mortality in Botswana

    PubMed Central

    Stoneburner, Rand; Korenromp, Eline; Lazenby, Mark; Tassie, Jean-Michel; Letebele, Judith; Motlapele, Diemo; Granich, Reuben; Boerma, Ties; Low-Beer, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Botswana's AIDS response included free antiretroviral treatment (ART) since 2002, achieving 80% coverage of persons with CD4<350 cells/µl by 2009–10. We explored impact on mortality and HIV prevalence, analyzing surveillance and civil registration data. Methods Hospital natural cause admissions and deaths from the Health Statistics Unit (HSU) over 1990–2009, all-cause deaths from Midnight Bed Census (MNC) over 1990–2011, institutional and non-institutional deaths recorded in the Registry of Birth and Deaths (RBD) over 2003–2010, and antenatal sentinel surveillance (ANC) over 1992–2011 were compared to numbers of persons receiving ART. Mortality was adjusted for differential coverage and completeness of institutional and non-institutional deaths, and compared to WHO and UNAIDS Spectrum projections. Results HSU deaths per 1000 admissions declined 49% in adults 15–64 years over 2003–2009. RBD mortality declined 44% (807 to 452/100,000 population in adults 15–64 years) over 2003–2010, similarly in males and females. Generally, death rates were higher in males; declines were greater and earlier in younger adults, and in females. In contrast, death rates in adults 65+, particularly females increased over 2003–2006. MNC all-age post-neonatal mortality declined 46% and 63% in primary and secondary level hospitals, over 2003–2011. We estimated RBD captured 80% of adult deaths over 2006–2011. Comparing empirical, completeness-adjusted deaths to Spectrum estimates, declines over 2003–2009 were similar overall (47% vs. 54%); however, Spectrum projected larger and earlier declines particularly in women. Following stabilization and modest decreases over 1998–2002, HIV prevalence in pregnant women 15–24 and 25–29-years declined by >50% and >30% through 2011, while continuing to increase in older women. Conclusions Adult mortality in Botswana fell markedly as ART coverage increased. HIV prevalence declines may reflect ART

  7. Erciyes University Students' Knowledge about AIDS: Differences between Students of Natural and Social Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tasci, Sultan; Baser, Muruvvet; Mucuk, Salime; Bayat, Meral; Zincir, Handan; Sungur, Gonul

    2008-01-01

    The authors' goal in this study was to assess differences in knowledge about AIDS between students of natural science (NS) and social science (SS). The authors surveyed 542 students at Erciyes University in Kayseri, Turkey, regarding their knowledge of AIDS. Some differences in knowledge about AIDS (eg, regarding the virus that causes AIDS, the…

  8. First aid in the dental practice: an overview.

    PubMed

    Jevon, P

    2016-06-24

    First aid encompasses a wide range of scenarios ranging from simple reassurance following a minor mishap to dealing with a life-threatening emergency. Dentists may need to provide first aid in their dental practice to a patient, relative or member of staff. This article provides an overview to first aid in the dental practice, including priorities, responsibilities when providing first aid, assessment of the environment and the casualty (primary survey &secondary survey). The new A3 'First Aid in the Workplace' poster is now available and is included as an insert in this issue (BDJ Vol. 220, Issue 12).

  9. Assessing the Impact of Food Assistance on Stigma Among People Living with HIV in Uganda Using the HIV/AIDS Stigma Instrument-PLWA (HASI-P).

    PubMed

    Maluccio, John A; Wu, Fan; Rokon, Redwan B; Rawat, Rahul; Kadiyala, Suneetha

    2017-03-01

    HIV-related stigma among persons living with HIV/AIDS (PLHIV) is prevalent throughout sub-Saharan Africa. There is limited evidence, however, on which interventions are effective in reducing it. We used data from a prospective impact evaluation of a 12-month food assistance intervention among 904 antiretroviral therapy (ART)- naïve PLHIV in Uganda to examine the program impact on stigma. Stigma was measured using the comprehensive HASI-P scale, which demonstrated good internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha = 0.87) and was correlated with several related constructs including physical and mental health-related quality of life, disclosure, and physical health symptoms in the sample. Using quasi-experimental difference-in-difference matching methods to better infer causality, we tested whether the intervention improved the overall stigma scale and its subscales. The food assistance intervention had a significant effect on reported internalized (but not external) stigma of approximately 0.2 SD (p < 0.01). The HASI-P stigma scale is a useful tool for measuring and tracking stigma. Food assistance interventions, embedded in an HIV care program, can reduce internalized stigma.

  10. A review and assessment of non-governmental organization-based STD/AIDS education and prevention projects for marginalized groups.

    PubMed

    Crane, S F; Carswell, J W

    1992-06-01

    A review of projects run by non-governmental organizations (NGOs) in primarily developing countries, which have aimed to provide STD/AIDS education and prevention skills to various marginalized groups, reveals that past quantitative and formative research has failed to identify key programmatic factors which lead to more successful project implementation and sustainability. In observations, interviews with field staff, visits to program sites and information drawn from the literature, a variety of methods to reach a wide range of groups such as men who have sex with men, prostitutes, clients of prostitutes, prisoners, street children, migrant workers and refugees are explored. Factors found to facilitate project success include the following: at least one full-time committed staff member; respectful treatment and appropriate motivation of the target group; suitable and sufficient equipment and supplies (particularly condoms); planning ahead for the participation of HIV-positive individuals and ways to meet their needs; focusing on qualitative rather than quantitative evaluation; planning in advance beyond a 9 or 12 month 'model'. Despite some evidence that marginalized groups can be successfully motivated to practise safer sex through prevention education, long-term behaviour change still presents major challenges--even when specific conditions are met.

  11. The social geography of AIDS and hepatitis risk: qualitative approaches for assessing local differences in sterile-syringe access among injection drug users.

    PubMed Central

    Singer, M; Stopka, T; Siano, C; Springer, K; Barton, G; Khoshnood, K; Gorry de Puga, A; Heimer, R

    2000-01-01

    While significant gains have been achieved in understanding and reducing AIDS and hepatitis risks among injection drug users (IDUs), it is necessary to move beyond individual-level characteristics to gain a fuller understanding of the impact of social context on risk. In this study, 6 qualitative methods were used in combination with more traditional epidemiologic survey approaches and laboratory bioassay procedures to examine neighborhood differences in access to sterile syringes among IDUs in 3 northeastern cities. These methods consisted of (1) neighborhood-based IDU focus groups to construct social maps of local equipment acquisition and drug use sites; (2) ethnographic descriptions of target neighborhoods; (3) IDU diary keeping on drug use and injection equipment acquisition; (4) ethnographic day visits with IDUs in natural settings; (5) interviews with IDUs about syringe acquisition and collection of syringes for laboratory analysis; and (6) focused field observation and processual interviewing during drug injection. Preliminary findings from each of these methods are reported to illustrate the methods' value in elucidating the impact of local and regional social factors on sterile syringe access. PMID:10897181

  12. AIDS is your business.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Sydney; Simon, Jonathon; Vincent, Jeffrey R; MacLeod, William; Fox, Matthew; Thea, Donald M

    2003-02-01

    If your company operates in a developing country, AIDS is your business. While Africa has received the most attention, AIDS is also spreading swiftly in other parts of the world. Russia and Ukraine had the fastest-growing epidemics last year, and many experts believe China and India will suffer the next tidal wave of infection. Why should executives be concerned about AIDS? Because it is destroying the twin rationales of globalization strategy-cheap labor and fast-growing markets--in countries where people are heavily affected by the epidemic. Fortunately, investments in programs that prevent infection and provide treatment for employees who have HIV/AIDS are profitable for many businesses--that is, they lead to savings that outweigh the programs' costs. Due to the long latency period between HIV infection and the onset of AIDS symptoms, a company is not likely to see any of the costs of HIV/AIDS until five to ten years after an employee is infected. But executives can calculate the present value of epidemic-related costs by using the discount rate to weigh each cost according to its expected timing. That allows companies to think about expenses on HIV/AIDS prevention and treatment programs as investments rather than merely as costs. The authors found that the annual cost of AIDS to six corporations in South Africa and Botswana ranged from 0.4% to 5.9% of the wage bill. All six companies would have earned positive returns on their investments if they had provided employees with free treatment for HIV/AIDS in the form of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), according to the mathematical model the authors used. The annual reduction in the AIDS "tax" would have been as much as 40.4%. The authors' conclusion? Fighting AIDS not only helps those infected; it also makes good business sense.

  13. Letter regarding 'Comparison between low-cost marker-less and high-end marker-based motion capture systems for the computer-aided assessment of working ergonomics' by Patrizi et al. and research reproducibility.

    PubMed

    2017-04-01

    The reporting of research in a manner that allows reproduction in subsequent investigations is important for scientific progress. Several details of the recent study by Patrizi et al., 'Comparison between low-cost marker-less and high-end marker-based motion capture systems for the computer-aided assessment of working ergonomics', are absent from the published manuscript and make reproduction of findings impossible. As new and complex technologies with great promise for ergonomics develop, new but surmountable challenges for reporting investigations using these technologies in a reproducible manner arise. Practitioner Summary: As with traditional methods, scientific reporting of new and complex ergonomics technologies should be performed in a manner that allows reproduction in subsequent investigations and supports scientific advancement.

  14. Defining natural history: assessment of the ability of college students to aid in characterizing clinical progression of Niemann-Pick disease, type C.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jenny; Epperson, Katrina; Yanjanin, Nicole M; Albus, Jennifer; Borgenheimer, Laura; Bott, Natalie; Brennan, Erin; Castellanos, Daniel; Cheng, Melissa; Clark, Michael; Devany, Margaret; Ensslin, Courtney; Farivari, Nina; Fernando, Shanik; Gabriel, Lauren; Gallardo, Rani; Castleman, Moriah; Gutierrez, Olimpia; Herschel, Allison; Hodge, Sarah; Horst, Anne; Howard, Mary; James, Evan; Jones, Lindsey; Kearns, Mary; Kelly, Mary; Kim, Christine; Kiser, Kinzie; Klazura, Gregory; Knoedler, Chris; Kolbus, Emily; Lange, Lauren; Lee, Joan; Li, Eileena; Lu, Wei; Luttrell, Andrew; Ly, Emily; McKeough, Katherine; McSorley, Brianna; Miller, Catherine; Mitchell, Sean; Moon, Abbey; Moser, Kevin; O'Brien, Shane; Olivieri, Paula; Patzwahl, Aaron; Pereira, Marie; Pymento, Craig; Ramelb, Erin; Ramos, Bryce; Raya, Teresa; Riney, Stephen; Roberts, Geoff; Robertshaw, Mark; Rudolf, Frannie; Rund, Samuel; Sansone, Stephanie; Schwartz, Lindsay; Shay, Ryan; Siu, Edwin; Spear, Timothy; Tan, Catherine; Truong, Marisa; Uddin, Mairaj; Vantrieste, Jennifer; Veloz, Omar; White, Elizabeth; Porter, Forbes D; Haldar, Kasturi

    2011-01-01

    Niemann-Pick Disease, type C (NPC) is a fatal, neurodegenerative, lysosomal storage disorder. It is a rare disease with broad phenotypic spectrum and variable age of onset. These issues make it difficult to develop a universally accepted clinical outcome measure to assess urgently needed therapies. To this end, clinical investigators have defined emerging, disease severity scales. The average time from initial symptom to diagnosis is approximately 4 years. Further, some patients may not travel to specialized clinical centers even after diagnosis. We were therefore interested in investigating whether appropriately trained, community-based assessment of patient records could assist in defining disease progression using clinical severity scores. In this study we evolved a secure, step wise process to show that pre-existing medical records may be correctly assessed by non-clinical practitioners trained to quantify disease progression. Sixty-four undergraduate students at the University of Notre Dame were expertly trained in clinical disease assessment and recognition of major and minor symptoms of NPC. Seven clinical records, randomly selected from a total of thirty seven used to establish a leading clinical severity scale, were correctly assessed to show expected characteristics of linear disease progression. Student assessment of two new records donated by NPC families to our study also revealed linear progression of disease, but both showed accelerated disease progression, relative to the current severity scale, especially at the later stages. Together, these data suggest that college students may be trained in assessment of patient records, and thus provide insight into the natural history of a disease.

  15. A novel approach in assessment of root canal curvature

    PubMed Central

    Sadeghi, Shiva; Poryousef, Vahideh

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: The purpose of this in vitro study was to introduce a new method to describe root canal curvatures and to assess the degree of curvature of human permanent mandibular teeth with curved root canals. Materials and Methods: One hundred and thirty five mesial root canals of mandibular first and second molar teeth were selected. Access cavities were prepared. After inserting a K-file size #10 into each canal, radiographs were taken. Canal curvature was determined by measuring the Schneider angle, canal access angle, as well as the canal radius, length, height and curvature starting distance on scanned radiographs using a computerized image processing system. Data was evaluated statistically using Pearson correlation. Results: The mean canal access angle (CAA) and Schneider angle (S) were 8.04◦ (3.46) and 19◦ (6.99), respectively. The Pearson correlation analysis found significant positive correlation between S and CAA (r=0.826, P<0.0001). Negative correlations were found between radius and length (r= –0.4, P<0.0001), radius and Schneider angle (r= –0.4, P<0.0001), radius and CAA (r= –0.24, P=0.004) and CAA and curvature starting distance (r= 0.4, P<0.0001). There was no correlation between height and distance (r=0.013, P=0.789), as well as CAA and height (r=0.654, P=0.001). Conclusion: Under the limitations of this study, the results indicated that the shape of root canal curvature can be more accurately described using two angles, Schneider in combination with Canal access angle. The related parameters included radius, length, distance and height of curvature. [Iranian Endodontic Journal 2009;4(4):131-4] PMID:24019833

  16. BEMFAM delivers AIDS alert.

    PubMed

    1993-05-01

    The Sociedade Civil Bem-Estar Familiar (BEMFAM) of Brazil developed a project using integrated communication strategies to alert prostitutes and their clients about the risks of contracting HIV. The project specifically promoted condom use and was conducted within the context of BEMFAM's Integrated Family Planning Program. Villa Mimoza, a prostitution zone in the Estacio neighborhood of Rio de Janeiro, was the site of the intervention. This neighborhood harbors 44 houses of prostitution where an estimated 500 female prostitutes receive clients. An agreement was reached with the Association of Prostitutes of the State of Rio de Janeiro whereby it would help mobilize local women, merchants, brothel owners, and clients. Initial needs were assessed by BEMFAM and AIDSCOM through questionnaires and focus groups. It was subsequently resolved that radio programs, counter displays of educational materials in brothels, and posters in brothel rooms would be the most effective channels through which to carry integrated, effective messages to the community. Final evaluation found a change in attitude and an awareness of the importance of measures to prevent AIDS along with a prevalent increase in condom use.

  17. AIDS Fact Pack.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Population Options, Washington, DC.

    The three fact sheets presented in this document address issues surrounding adolescent sexuality and sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), especially the Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). The first fact sheet, "Young Women and AIDS: A Worldwide Perspective," suggests that since open discussions of adolescent sexuality have long been…

  18. Detecting Student Aid Fraud.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheppard, Jeffrey

    1998-01-01

    Describes the varied kinds of student aid fraud found to be occurring within and outside colleges and universities, and examines implications for public policy on student aid programs. Discusses specific fraud cases and their outcomes, and makes suggestions for institutional action if student fraud is suspected. (MSE)

  19. Computer Aids to Translation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krollmann, Friedrich

    1981-01-01

    Describes the structure and modes of operation of the Bundessprachenamt's (BSprA: Federal Office of Languages of the Federal Republic of Germany) terminology data bank as an aid to translation. Analyzes advantages and disadvantages of each user mode, and discusses probable developments in the immediate future of machine-aided translation. (MES)

  20. International Aid to Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benavot, Aaron

    2010-01-01

    Recent evidence highlights several worrisome trends regarding aid pledges and disbursements, which have been exacerbated by the global financial crisis. First, while overall development assistance rose in 2008, after 2 years of decline, the share of all sector aid going to the education sector has remained virtually unchanged at about 12 percent…

  1. AIDS as Metaphor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMillen, Liz

    1994-01-01

    Scholarly interest in Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) has spread throughout the humanities, attracting the attention of historians of medicine, political scientists, sociologists, public health scholars, and anthropologists. Most theorists hope their research will aid in policymaking or change understanding of the epidemic. (MSE)

  2. First Aid: Diaper Rash

    MedlinePlus

    ... Your 1- to 2-Year-Old First Aid: Diaper Rash KidsHealth > For Parents > First Aid: Diaper Rash A A A Diaper rash is a common skin condition in babies. ... rash is due to irritation caused by the diaper, but it can have other causes not related ...

  3. Hospital Nurse Aide. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iowa Univ., Iowa City. Coll. of Education.

    This report presents results of a project to revise the current 120-hour advanced nurse aide course to include all recommended minimum competencies. A three-page description of project objectives, activities, and outcomes is followed by a list of the competencies for the 75-hour nurse aide course for long-term care and for the 120-hour advanced…

  4. Preventing AIDS via Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    House, Reese M.; Walker, Catherine M.

    1993-01-01

    Compares the Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) epidemic to past epidemics, including social and political responses. Identifies populations at risk for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Discusses current social and economic factors affecting AIDS education programs. Makes recommendations and identifies resources for starting…

  5. THE AIDS MYTH

    PubMed Central

    Poehlmann, Karl Horst

    1996-01-01

    AIDS is now said to threaten humanity as a modern-day scourge. However, there is a group of scientists which maintains that this scare is unwarranted. Some arguments in favour of the re-evaluation of the AIDS hypothesis are presented in this article. PMID:22556763

  6. AIDS: Children Too.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lejeune, Genevieve, Ed.

    1994-01-01

    This journal issue is devoted to the many problems faced by children with Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) who live in both developing and developed countries. Section 1 provides general information on the pandemic, defining AIDS and exploring the social aspects of the disease. It also addresses child health, child mortality, moral and…

  7. Aid, Development, and Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klees, Steven J.

    2010-01-01

    The world faces pervasive poverty and inequality. Hundreds of billions of dollars in international aid have been given or loaned to developing countries though bilateral and multilateral mechanisms, at least, ostensibly, in order to do something about these problems. Has such aid helped? Debates around this question have been ongoing for decades,…

  8. BIBLIOGRAPHY OF TRAINING AIDS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MCKEONE, CHARLES J.

    THIS COMPILATION OF INSTRUCTIONAL AIDS FOR USE IN AIR-CONDITIONING AND REFRIGERATION TRAINING PROGRAMS CONTAINS LISTS OF VISUAL AND AUDIOVISUAL TRAINING AIDS AND GUEST LECTURERS AVAILABLE FROM MEMBER COMPANIES OF THE AIR-CONDITIONING AND REFRIGERATION INSTITUTE AS AN INDUSTRY SERVICE TO SCHOOL OFFICIALS INTERESTED IN CONDUCTING SUCH PROGRAMS. THE…

  9. AIDS and Chemical Dependency.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pohl, Melvin I.

    After defining HIV and the AIDS disease and outlining symptoms and means of infection, this fact sheet lists the ways alcohol and drugs are involved with the AIDS epidemic, noting that needle-sharing transmits the virus; that alcohol or mood-altering drugs like crack cocaine cause disinhibition, increase sex drive, encourage sex for drugs, and…

  10. First Aid: Falls

    MedlinePlus

    ... Your 1- to 2-Year-Old First Aid: Falls KidsHealth > For Parents > First Aid: Falls Print A A A en español Folleto de instructiones: Caídas (Falls) With all the running, climbing, and exploring kids ...

  11. Implantable Heart Aid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    CPI's human-implantable automatic implantable defibrillator (AID) is a heart assist system, derived from NASA's space circuitry technology, that can prevent erratic heart action known as arrhythmias. Implanted AID, consisting of microcomputer power source and two electrodes for sensing heart activity, recognizes onset of ventricular fibrillation (VF) and delivers corrective electrical countershock to restore rhythmic heartbeat.

  12. Inertially Aided Robotics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-12-31

    0031 dis~bti:,1 is uitsnjt( Deczmllcr 31: 1989 92-05530 2:.-: 3o : T >VE?-A ~ : Inertially Aided Robotics FINAL REPORT for Contract No. DAAHO1 -88-D-0057...1 2 Advantages of Inertially Aided Robotics ...86 iii List of Figures Figure 1 - Robot Manipulator having Joint Sensor Based Control ..................... 2

  13. Marketing Financial Aid

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huddleston, Thomas, Jr.; Batty, Burt F.

    1978-01-01

    Student financial assistance services are becoming a major part of the institutional marketing plan as traditional college-age students decline in numbers and price competition among institutions increases. The effect of financial aid on enrollment and admissions processes is discussed along with the role of the financial aid officer. (Author/LBH)

  14. Innovative Teaching Aids.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christner, Chris

    1988-01-01

    Describes the DACUM (Developing A CurriculUM) process and how it is used at Universal Technical Institute to determine what types of training aids to produce. Indicates that examining the employment needs of industry and educational needs of students enhances programs and promotes development of innovative aids. (JOW)

  15. First Aid: Burns

    MedlinePlus

    ... Your 1- to 2-Year-Old First Aid: Burns KidsHealth > For Parents > First Aid: Burns A A A Scald burns from hot water and other liquids are the most common burns in early childhood. Because burns range from mild ...

  16. The New Merit Aid

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dynarski, Susan

    2004-01-01

    Merit aid, a discount to college costs contingent upon academic performance, is nothing new. Colleges and private organizations have long rewarded high-achieving, college-bound high school students with scholarships. While merit aid has a long history in the private sector, it has not played a major role in the public sector. At the state level,…

  17. AIDS Epidemiological models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahmani, Fouad Lazhar

    2010-11-01

    The aim of this paper is to present mathematical modelling of the spread of infection in the context of the transmission of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). These models are based in part on the models suggested in the field of th AIDS mathematical modelling as reported by ISHAM [6].

  18. AIDS in the pre-AIDS era.

    PubMed

    Huminer, D; Rosenfeld, J B; Pitlik, S D

    1987-01-01

    A search of the medical literature published since 1950 disclosed 19 cases of probable AIDS reported before the start of the current epidemic. These cases retrospectively met the Centers for Disease Control's surveillance definition of the syndrome and had a clinical course suggestive of AIDS. The reports originated from North America, Western Europe, Africa, and the Middle East. The mean age of patients was 37 years, and the ratio of male to female patients was 1.7:1. Sixteen patients had opportunistic infections(s) without Kaposi's sarcoma. The remainder had disseminated Kaposi's sarcoma. The commonest opportunistic infection was Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia. Two patients were reported to be homosexual. Three others had been living in Africa, and one patient was born in Haiti. In two instances concurrent or subsequent opportunistic infection occurred in family members. All patients died 1 month to 6 years after the initial manifestation of disease. In view of the historical data, unrecognized cases of AIDS appear to have occurred sporadically in the pre-AIDS era.

  19. Accuracy of Image-guided Surgical Systems at the Lateral Skull Base as Clinically Assessed Using Bone-Anchored Hearing Aid Posts as Surgical Targets

    PubMed Central

    Balachandran, Ramya; Fitzpatrick, J. Michael

    2009-01-01

    Objective Image-guided surgical (IGS) technology has been clinically available for over a decade. To date, no acceptable standard exists for reporting the accuracy of IGS systems, especially for lateral skull base applications. We present a validation method that uses the post from bone anchored hearing aid (BAHA) patients as a target. We then compare the accuracy of two IGS systems—one using laser skin-surface scanning (LSSS) and another using a non-invasive fiducial frame (FF) attached to patient via dental bite-block (DBB) for registration. Study design Prospective. Setting Tertiary referral center. Patients Six BAHA patients who had adequate dentition for creation of a DBB. Intervention(s) For each patient, a dental impression was obtained, and a customized DBB was made to hold a FF. Temporal bone CT scans were obtained with the patient wearing the DBB, FF, and a customized marker on the BAHA post. In a mock OR, CT scans were registered to operative anatomy using two methods: (a) LSSS, (b) FF. Main outcome measure(s) For each patient and each system, the position of the BAHA marker in the CT scan and in the mock OR (using optical measurement technology) were compared and the distances between them are reported to demonstrate accuracy. Results Accuracy (mean ± standard deviation) was 1.54 ± 0.63 mm for DBB registration and 3.21 ± 1.02 mm for LSSS registration. Conclusions An IGS system using FF registration is more accurate than one using LSSS (p = 0.03, two-sided Student's t-test). BAHA patients provide a unique patient population upon which IGS systems may be validated. PMID:18836389

  20. An online real-time DICOM web-based computer-aided diagnosis system for bone age assessment of children in a PACS environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Kevin C.; Zhang, Aifeng; Moin, Paymann; Fleshman, Mariam; Vachon, Linda; Liu, Brent; Huang, H. K.

    2009-02-01

    Bone age assessment is a radiological procedure to evaluate a child's bone age based on his or her left-hand x-ray image. The current standard is to match patient's hand with Greulich & Pyle hand atlas, which is outdated by 50 years and only uses subjects from one region and one ethnicity. To improve bone age assessment accuracy for today's children, an automated race- and gender-specific bone age assessment (BAA) system has been developed in IPILab. 1390 normal left-hand x-ray images have been collected at Children's Hospital of Los Angeles (CHLA) to form the digital hand atlas (DHA). DHA includes both male and female children of ages one to eighteen and of four ethnic groups: African American, Asian American, Caucasian, and Hispanic. In order to apply DHA and BAA CAD into a clinical environment, a web-based BAA CAD system and graphical user interface (GUI) has been implemented in Women and Children's Hospital at Los Angeles County (WCH-LAC). A CAD server has been integrated in WCH's PACS environment, and a clinical validation workflow has been designed for radiologists, who compare CAD readings with G&P readings and determine which reading is more suited for a certain case. Readings are logged in database and analyzed to assess BAA CAD performance in a clinical setting. The result is a successful installation of web-based BAA CAD system in a clinical setting.

  1. Assessment of the accuracy of portion size reports using computer-based food photographs aids in the development of an automated self-administered 24-hour recall

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of the study is to assess the accuracy of portion-size estimates and participant preferences using various presentations of digital images. Two observational feeding studies were conducted. In both, each participant selected and consumed foods for breakfast and lunch, buffet style, se...

  2. Computer-aided diagnosis for classifying benign versus malignant thyroid nodules based on ultrasound images: A comparison with radiologist-based assessments

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Yongjun; Paul, Anjan Kumar; Kim, Namkug Baek, Jung Hwan; Choi, Young Jun; Ha, Eun Ju; Lee, Kang Dae; Lee, Hyoung Shin; Shin, DaeSeock; Kim, Nakyoung

    2016-01-15

    Purpose: To develop a semiautomated computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) system for thyroid cancer using two-dimensional ultrasound images that can be used to yield a second opinion in the clinic to differentiate malignant and benign lesions. Methods: A total of 118 ultrasound images that included axial and longitudinal images from patients with biopsy-confirmed malignant (n = 30) and benign (n = 29) nodules were collected. Thyroid CAD software was developed to extract quantitative features from these images based on thyroid nodule segmentation in which adaptive diffusion flow for active contours was used. Various features, including histogram, intensity differences, elliptical fit, gray-level co-occurrence matrixes, and gray-level run-length matrixes, were evaluated for each region imaged. Based on these imaging features, a support vector machine (SVM) classifier was used to differentiate benign and malignant nodules. Leave-one-out cross-validation with sequential forward feature selection was performed to evaluate the overall accuracy of this method. Additionally, analyses with contingency tables and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were performed to compare the performance of CAD with visual inspection by expert radiologists based on established gold standards. Results: Most univariate features for this proposed CAD system attained accuracies that ranged from 78.0% to 83.1%. When optimal SVM parameters that were established using a grid search method with features that radiologists use for visual inspection were employed, the authors could attain rates of accuracy that ranged from 72.9% to 84.7%. Using leave-one-out cross-validation results in a multivariate analysis of various features, the highest accuracy achieved using the proposed CAD system was 98.3%, whereas visual inspection by radiologists reached 94.9% accuracy. To obtain the highest accuracies, “axial ratio” and “max probability” in axial images were most frequently included in the

  3. Using Landsat ETM+ and ASTER Sensors to Aid the Mineral Assessment of the Desert National Wildlife Refuge, Clark and Lincoln Counties, Nevada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cramer, Timothy F.

    The Desert National Wildlife Refuge in southern Nevada has been selected for remote sensing analysis as part of a mineral assessment required for renewal of mineral withdrawal. The area of interest is nearly 3,000 km2 and covers portions of 5 different ranges with little to no infrastructure. Assessing such a large area using traditional field methods is very time intensive and expensive. The study described here serves as a pilot study, testing the capability of Landsat ETM+ and ASTER satellite imagery to remotely identify areas of potentially mineralized lithologies. This is done by generating a number of band ratio, band index, and mineral likelihood maps identifying 5 key mineral classes (silica, clay, iron oxide, dolomite and calcite), which commonly have patterned zonation around ore deposits. When compiled with available geologic and geochemical data sets, these intermediate products can provide guidance for targeted field evaluation and exploration. Field observations and spectral data collected in the laboratory can then be integrated with ASTER imagery to guide a Spectral Angle Mapper algorithm to generate a distribution map of the five mineral classes. The methods presented found the ASTER platform to be capable of remotely assessing the distribution of various lithologies and the mineral potential of large, remote areas. Furthermore areas of both high and low potential for ore deposits can be identified and used to guide field evaluation and exploration. Remote sensing studies of this caliber can be performed relatively quickly and inexpensively resulting in datasets, which can result in more accurate mapping and the identification of both lithologic boundaries and previously unidentified alteration associated with mineralization. Future mineral assessments and exploration activity should consider similar studies prior to field work.

  4. HIV / AIDS and tourism.

    PubMed

    Forsythe, S

    1999-01-01

    Since it tends to be significantly affected by HIV/AIDS, the tourism sector is a likely target for HIV/AIDS interventions in many countries. The tourist industry is at particular risk from the pandemic because of the mobility of the work force, the presence of sex tourists, and the heavy reliance of many countries upon tourism revenues. Indeed, tourism is one of the largest and fastest growing industries in many countries. Some people have speculated that potential tourists' fear of AIDS could discourage them from visiting certain countries, while others have even suggested that tourism should be discouraged because the industry contributes to the spread of HIV/AIDS. When traveling, tourists often take risks that they would not take at home. They tend to drink more, use drugs more, and be generally more adventurous while on holiday. Such adventures often include taking sexual risks. When tourists have sex with prostitutes, hotel staff, and others in the local population, a bridge can be created for HIV to cross back and forth between the tourist's home country and the tourist destination. The author reviews selected studies on the relationship between HIV/AIDS and tourism. Overall, the existing literature offers no definitive evidence that AIDS has had any lasting impact upon the tourism industry anywhere in the world. Rather, promoting a healthy tourism industry and HIV/AIDS prevention are likely complementary in many ways.

  5. AIDS radio triggers.

    PubMed

    Elias, A M

    1991-07-01

    In April 1991, the Ethnic Communities' Council of NSW was granted funding under the Community AIDS Prevention and Education Program through the Department of Community Services and Health, to produce a series of 6x50 second AIDS radio triggers with a 10-second tag line for further information. The triggers are designed to disseminate culturally-sensitive information about HIV/AIDS in English, Italian, Greek, Spanish, Khmer, Turkish, Macedonian, Serbo-Croatian, Arabic, Cantonese, and Vietnamese, with the goal of increasing awareness and decreasing the degree of misinformation about HIV/AIDS among people of non-English-speaking backgrounds through radio and sound. The 6 triggers cover the denial that AIDS exists in the community, beliefs that words and feelings do not protect one from catching HIV, encouraging friends to be compassionate, compassion within the family, AIDS information for a young audience, and the provision of accurate and honest information on HIV/AIDS. The triggers are slated to be completed by the end of July 1991 and will be broadcast on all possible community, ethnic, and commercial radio networks across Australia. They will be available upon request in composite form with an information kit for use by health care professionals and community workers.

  6. Hearing AIDS and music.

    PubMed

    Chasin, Marshall; Russo, Frank A

    2004-01-01

    Historically, the primary concern for hearing aid design and fitting is optimization for speech inputs. However, increasingly other types of inputs are being investigated and this is certainly the case for music. Whether the hearing aid wearer is a musician or merely someone who likes to listen to music, the electronic and electro-acoustic parameters described can be optimized for music as well as for speech. That is, a hearing aid optimally set for music can be optimally set for speech, even though the converse is not necessarily true. Similarities and differences between speech and music as inputs to a hearing aid are described. Many of these lead to the specification of a set of optimal electro-acoustic characteristics. Parameters such as the peak input-limiting level, compression issues-both compression ratio and knee-points-and number of channels all can deleteriously affect music perception through hearing aids. In other cases, it is not clear how to set other parameters such as noise reduction and feedback control mechanisms. Regardless of the existence of a "music program,'' unless the various electro-acoustic parameters are available in a hearing aid, music fidelity will almost always be less than optimal. There are many unanswered questions and hypotheses in this area. Future research by engineers, researchers, clinicians, and musicians will aid in the clarification of these questions and their ultimate solutions.

  7. Solidarity and AIDS: introduction.

    PubMed

    Krieger, N

    1991-01-01

    Perhaps more than any other disease in recent history, AIDS has taught a cruel and crucial lesson: the constraints on our response to this epidemic are as deep as our denial, as entrenched as the inequities that permeate our society, as circumscribed as our knowledge, and as unlimited as our compassion and our commitment to human rights. Elaborating on these themes, the final three articles in this Special Section on AIDS consider three widely divergent yet intimately connected topics: AIDS in Cuba, AIDS in Brazil, and global AIDS prevention in the 1990s. Together, they caution that if we persist in treating AIDS as a problem only of "others," no country will be spared the social and economic devastation that promises to be the cost of our contempt and our folly. Solidarity is not an option; it is a necessity. Without conscious recognition of the worldwide relationship between health, human rights, and social inequalities, our attempts to abate the spread of AIDS--and to ease the suffering that follows in its wake--most surely will fall short of our goals. Finally, as we mourn our dead, we must take to heart the words of Mother Jones, and "fight like hell for living." This is the politics of survival.

  8. Hearing Aids and Music

    PubMed Central

    Chasin, Marshall; Russo, Frank A.

    2004-01-01

    Historically, the primary concern for hearing aid design and fitting is optimization for speech inputs. However, increasingly other types of inputs are being investigated and this is certainly the case for music. Whether the hearing aid wearer is a musician or merely someone who likes to listen to music, the electronic and electro-acoustic parameters described can be optimized for music as well as for speech. That is, a hearing aid optimally set for music can be optimally set for speech, even though the converse is not necessarily true. Similarities and differences between speech and music as inputs to a hearing aid are described. Many of these lead to the specification of a set of optimal electro-acoustic characteristics. Parameters such as the peak input-limiting level, compression issues—both compression ratio and knee-points—and number of channels all can deleteriously affect music perception through hearing aids. In other cases, it is not clear how to set other parameters such as noise reduction and feedback control mechanisms. Regardless of the existence of a “music program,” unless the various electro-acoustic parameters are available in a hearing aid, music fidelity will almost always be less than optimal. There are many unanswered questions and hypotheses in this area. Future research by engineers, researchers, clinicians, and musicians will aid in the clarification of these questions and their ultimate solutions. PMID:15497032

  9. Women and HIV/AIDS

    MedlinePlus

    ... AIDS email updates Enter email Submit HIV and AIDS The human immunodeficiency (IH-myoo-noh-di-FISH- ... health Pregnancy and HIV View more HIV and AIDS resources Related information Birth control methods Sexually transmitted ...

  10. HIV / AIDS: An Unequal Burden

    MedlinePlus

    ... Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues HIV / AIDS HIV / AIDS: An Unequal Burden Past Issues / Summer 2009 Table ... Victoria Cargill talks to students about HIV and AIDS at the opening of a National Library of ...

  11. HIV/AIDS and Alcohol

    MedlinePlus

    ... Psychiatric Disorders Other Substance Abuse HIV/AIDS HIV/AIDS Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) targets the body’s immune ... and often leads to acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). Each year in the United States, between 55, ...

  12. Research Report: HIV/AIDS

    MedlinePlus

    ... Reports » HIV/AIDS » Letter from the Director HIV/AIDS Email Facebook Twitter Letter from the Director Human ... the virus that causes acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) — has been with us for three decades now. ...

  13. HIV/AIDS and Vaccines

    MedlinePlus

    ... NIAID). /* // ** // */ Prevention Research Vaccines Microbicides Related Topics on AIDS.gov Clinical Trials Immune System 101 HIV Vaccine ... Be the Generation Last revised: 12/09/2016 AIDS.gov HIV/AIDS Basics • Federal Resources • Using New ...

  14. Political dimensions of AIDS.

    PubMed

    Blewett, N

    1988-01-01

    World political aspects and the example of Australia as a national political response to AIDS are presented. Global policy on AIDS is influenced by the fact that the AIDS epidemic is the 1st to be largely predictable, that long lag times occur between intervention and measurable events, and by the prompt, professional leadership of WHO, lead by Dr. J. Mann. WHO began a Global Programme on AIDS in 1987, modelled on the responses of Canada and Australia. A world summit of Ministers of Health was convened in January 1988. These moves generated a response qualified by openness, cooperation, hope and common sense. The AIDS epidemic calls for unprecedented involvement of politicians: they must coordinate medical knowledge with community action, deal with public fear, exert strong, rational leadership and avoid quick, appealing counterproductive responses. 3 clear directions must be taken to deal with the epidemic: 1) strong research and education campaigns; 2) close contact with political colleagues, interest groups and the community; 3) a national strategy which enjoins diverse interest groups, with courage, rationality and compassion. In Australia, the AIDS response began with the unwitting infection of 3 infants by blood transfusion. A public information campaign emphasizing a penetrating TV ad campaign was instituted in 1987. Policy discussions were held in all parliamentary bodies. The AIDS epidemic demands rapid, creative responses, a break from traditions in health bureaucracy, continual scrutiny of funding procedures and administrative arrangements. In practical terms in Australia, this meant establishing a special AIDS branch within the Health Advancement Division of the Community Health Department. AIDS issues must remain depoliticized to defuse adversary politics and keep leaders in a united front.

  15. Vulnerable to HIV / AIDS. Migration.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, I

    1998-01-01

    This special report discusses the impact of globalization, patterns of migration in Southeast Asia, gender issues in migration, the links between migration and HIV/AIDS, and spatial mobility and social networks. Migrants are particularly marginalized in countries that blame migrants for transmission of infectious and communicable diseases and other social ills. Effective control of HIV/AIDS among migrant and native populations requires a multisectoral approach. Programs should critically review the privatization of health care services and challenge economic models that polarize the rich and the poor, men and women, North and South, and migrant and native. Programs should recognize the equality between locals and migrants in receipt of health services. Countermeasures should have input from migrants in order to reduce the conditions that increase vulnerability to HIV/AIDS. Gender-oriented research is needed to understand women's role in migration. Rapid assessment has obscured the human dimension of migrants' vulnerability to HIV. Condom promotion is not enough. Migration is a major consequence of globalization, which holds the promise, real or imagined, of prosperity for all. Mass migration can be fueled by explosive regional developments. In Southeast Asia, migration has been part of the process of economic development. The potential to emigrate increases with greater per capita income. "Tiger" economies have been labor importers. Safe sex is not practiced in many Asian countries because risk is not taken seriously. Migrants tend to be used as economic tools, without consideration of social adjustment and sex behavior among singles.

  16. Implantable Heart Aid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Medrad utilized NASA's Apollo technology to develop a new device called the AID implantable automatic pulse generator which monitors the heart continuously, recognizes the onset of ventricular fibrillation and delivers a corrective electrical shock. AID pulse generator is, in effect, a miniaturized version of the defibrillator used by emergency squads and hospitals to restore rhythmic heartbeat after fibrillation, but has the unique advantage of being permanently available to the patient at risk. Once implanted, it needs no specially trained personnel or additional equipment. AID system consists of a microcomputer, a power source and two electrodes which sense heart activity.

  17. Pulmonary complications of AIDS: radiologic features. [AIDS

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, B.A.; Pomeranz, S.; Rabinowitz, J.G.; Rosen, M.J.; Train, J.S.; Norton, K.I.; Mendelson, D.S.

    1984-07-01

    Fifty-two patients with pulmonary complications of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) were studied over a 3-year period. The vast majority of the patients were homosexual; however, a significant number were intravenous drug abusers. Thirteen different organisms were noted, of which Pneumocystis carinii was by far the most common. Five patients had neoplasia. Most patients had initial abnormal chest films; however, eight patients subsequently shown to have Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia had normal chest films. A significant overlap in chest radiographic findings was noted among patients with different or multiple organisms. Lung biopsy should be an early consideration for all patients with a clinical history consistent with the pulmonary complications of AIDS. Of the 52 patients, 41 had died by the time this report was completed.

  18. SAFE for PTSD: noncontact psychophysiological measure based on high-resolution thermal imaging to aid in PTSD diagnosis and assessment of treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Familoni, Babajide O.; Ma, Lein; Hutchinson, J. Andrew; Morgan, C. Andrew, III; Rasmusson, Ann; O'Kane, Barbara L.

    2012-06-01

    Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) sometimes develops following exposure to very stressful or traumatic events such as motor vehicle accidents, rape, and war. It is arguably the signature injury of the conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan. Previous studies have demonstrated that PTSD sufferers exhibit autonomic hyper-responsiveness to both neutral and trauma-related stimuli. In this study, we propose using high resolution thermal imaging of sweat-pores to obtain a noncontact, remote, and quantifiable measure of the sympathetic autonomic nervous reactivity to guide diagnosis, assess response to treatment, and tease out important cues to suicidality as a PTSD comorbidity.

  19. First Aid and Safety

    MedlinePlus

    ... First-Aid Kit Food Safety for Your Family Gun Safety Halloween Candy Hints Household Safety Checklists Household ... Climbing, and Grabbing Household Safety: Preventing Injuries From Firearms Household Safety: Preventing Injuries in the Crib Household ...

  20. HIV and AIDS

    MedlinePlus

    ... known as AIDS . HIV destroys a type of defense cell in the body called a CD4 helper ... are part of the body's immune system , the defense system that fights infections. When HIV destroys these ...

  1. AIDS: A National Dilemma.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Issues in Science and Technology, 1987

    1987-01-01

    Contains excerpts from a special study on the AIDS epidemic by the Institute of Medicine and National Academy of Sciences. Presents an overview of the problem, outlines educational needs and public health measures, and identifies future research needs. (ML)

  2. Convulsions - first aid - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100212.htm Convulsions - first aid - series—Procedure, part 1 To use ... slide 2 out of 2 Overview When a seizure occurs, the main goal is to protect the ...

  3. First Aid: Burns

    MedlinePlus

    ... MORE ON THIS TOPIC Kitchen: Household Safety Checklist Fireworks Safety First Aid: Sunburn Firesetting Fire Safety Burns ... Being Safe in the Kitchen Finding Out About Fireworks Safety Playing With Fire? Dealing With Burns Fireworks ...

  4. Hearing Aid Tester

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Hearing aids often develop malfunctions that are not detected by the wearer. This is particularly true when the wearers are school-age children. Studies of selected groups showed that from 30 to more than 50 percent of school children were not getting adequate benefit from their hearing aids because of unrecognized malfunctions, usually low or dead batteries. This can be serious because hearing impairment retards a child's educational progress. NASA technology incorporated in the Hearing Aid Malfunction Detection Unit (HAMDU), the device pictured, is expected to provide an effective countermeasure to the childrens' hearing aid problem. A patent license has been awarded to a minority-owned firm, Hopkins International Company, a subsidiary of H. H. Aerospace Design Co., Inc., Elmford, New York. The company plans early commercial availability of its version of the device.

  5. First Aid: Croup

    MedlinePlus

    ... Development Infections Diseases & Conditions Pregnancy & Baby Nutrition & Fitness Emotions & Behavior School & Family Life First Aid & Safety Doctors & ... with each breath has a pale or bluish color around the mouth drools or has difficulty swallowing ...

  6. Computer Aided Creativity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Proctor, Tony

    1988-01-01

    Explores the conceptual components of a computer program designed to enhance creative thinking and reviews software that aims to stimulate creative thinking. Discusses BRAIN and ORACLE, programs intended to aid in creative problem solving. (JOW)

  7. HIV/AIDS Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... HIV/AIDS Influenza Malaria Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) Tuberculosis Zika Virus Find a Funding Opportunity Opportunities & Announcements ... related co-infections, such as hepatitis, malaria, and tuberculosis. Treatment of HIV Infection In the early 1980s ...

  8. First Aid: Croup

    MedlinePlus

    ... difficulty swallowing becomes tired easily Think Prevention! Frequent hand washing and avoiding contact with people who have respiratory ... Aid: Coughing X-Ray Exam: Neck Why Is Hand Washing So Important? Coughing Croup Contact Us Print Resources ...

  9. HIV and AIDS

    MedlinePlus

    ... that causes the disease AIDS. HIV Hurts the Immune System People who are HIV positive have been tested ... to everyone in the world. When the person's immune system has weakened and more of the blood's T ...

  10. AIDS in Africa

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-03-09

    have recommended that Africans infected with HIV be treated with an antibiotic/ sulfa drug combination known as cotrimoxazole in order to prevent...response is the subject of much debate. An estimated 500,000 Africa AIDS patients were being treated with antiretroviral drugs in mid-2005, up from 150,000...whether drugs can be made widely accessible without costly health infrastructure improvements. U.S. concern over AIDS in Africa grew in the 1980s, as the

  11. Naval Tactical Decision Aids

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-09-01

    Strike Planning Aid ( ESPA ) . .V-14 5.4. Tactical Environmental Ship Routing (TESR) V-24 5.5. Chaff Prediction and Planning System (CHAPPS).. V-29...chapter four TDAS from TESS: NAVSAR, acAS program for search and rescue (SARjat sea; ESPA , the Environmental Strike Planning Aid; TESR, the Tactical...STATISTICS CURRENT LOCATION AND CHARACTERISTICS SATELLITE DATA CONVERSION CONSTANTS In 5.1, we give a brief history of TESS. The TDAS NAVSAR, ESPA

  12. AIDS and National Security

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    the body loses its ability to fight off other infections like the flu or pneumonia that it could normally handle with ease.11 These infections are... children orphaned by AIDS in sub-Saharan Africa.32 Failing states are not able to provide care for these orphans so they are lured into crime or...four major program elements funded by USAID are primary prevention, caring for children affected by AIDS, home and community based care and treatment

  13. [Aids, physicians, Catholic Church].

    PubMed

    Pipino, Marica; Boldrini, Elena; Cristani, Alessandro

    2003-01-01

    The latest AIDS' congress (Barcelona) reminded the world this dramatic situation. The shown data are remarkable: 5 million people of new infected in 2001, 68 million people could die in the next 20 years because of AIDS and the biggest part of them is living in the South of the world. There are two different kind of AIDS: the AIDS of rich people (2% of infected ones), who can reach the modern therapies that changed the course of the disease now curable out of hospital, and the AIDS of poor ones, without therapies and future. The political-economic effort of Western governments, of global fund anti-AIDS and of non governmental organizations now is not able to answer to this emergency in the right way. The lacking sensibility of Western doctors and the inflexible position of Catholic Church about contraception make the situation more complicated. It's hopeful the overcoming of this position using a Catholic Church's precious concept: the distinction between "simpliciter" and "secundum quid" to agree the use of condoms in case of absolute need.

  14. SHOULD INSTITUTIONS PRIORITIZE RECTIFICATION OVER AID?

    PubMed Central

    Douglas, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Should an institutional scheme prioritize the rectification or compensation of harms it has wrongfully caused over provision of aid to persons it has not harmed? Some who think so rely on an analogy with the view that persons should give higher priority to rectification than to aid. Inference from the personal view to the institutional view would be warranted if either (i) the correct moral principles for institutional assessment are nearest possible equivalents of the correct personal moral principles, or (ii) the moral principles which ground the personal view also ground the institutional view. Neither claim can be justified. I briefly assess some alternative ways of defending the view that institutions should prioritize rectification over aid. PMID:21423857

  15. Nutrition Assessment, Counseling, and Support (NACS) interventions to improve health-related outcomes in people living with HIV/AIDS: a systematic review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Tang, AM; Quick, T; Chung, M; Wanke, CA

    2015-01-01

    Background While numerous studies have shown that severe to moderate wasting at the time of antiretroviral therapy (ART) initiation is strongly predictive of mortality, it remains unclear whether nutritional interventions at or prior to ART initiation will improve outcomes. This review examines data on nutrition assessment, counseling, and support (NACS) interventions in resource-limited settings. Methods We identified articles published between 2005 and 2014 on the effectiveness of NACS interventions, particularly its impact on five outcomes: mortality, morbidity, retention in care, quality of life, and/or prevention of ongoing HIV transmission. We rated the overall quality of individual articles and summarized the body of evidence and expected impact for each outcome. Results Twenty-one articles met all inclusion criteria. The overall quality of evidence was weak, predominantly due to few studies being designed to directly address the question of interest. Only two studies were randomized trials with proper control groups. The remainder were randomized studies of one type of food support versus another, cohort (non-randomized) studies, or single-arm studies. Ratings of individual study quality ranged from “medium” to “weak,” and the quality of the overall body of evidence ranged from “fair” to “poor.” We rated the expected impact on all outcomes as “uncertain.” Conclusion Rigorous, better designed studies in resource-limited settings are urgently needed to understand the effectiveness of nutrition assessment and counseling alone, as well as studies to understand better modalities of food support (targeting, timing, composition, form, and duration) to improve both short- and long-term patient retention in care and treatment, and clinical outcomes. PMID:25768873

  16. The sensitivity of approved Ninhydrin and Biuret tests in the assessment of protein contamination on surgical steel as an aid to prevent iatrogenic prion transmission.

    PubMed

    Lipscomb, I P; Pinchin, H E; Collin, R; Harris, K; Keevil, C W

    2006-11-01

    Regulations recommend the routine application of biochemical tests, such as the Ninhydrin or Biuret tests, to confirm the efficacy of hospital sterile service department (SSD) washer-disinfector cycles in removing proteinaceous material, particularly with respect to prions. The effectiveness of these methods relies on both the effective sampling of the instruments and the sensitivity of the tests employed. Two commercially available contamination assessment tests were evaluated for their sensitivity to ME7 brain homogenate on surgical-grade stainless steel surfaces. Controls were visualized by the application of episcopic differential interference contrast/Epi-fluorecence microscopy (EDIC/EF) combined with the sensitive fluorescent reagent, SYPRO Ruby, which has been shown previously to rapidly visualize and assess low levels of contamination on medical devices. The Ninhydrin test displayed a minimum level of detection observed by 75% of volunteers (MLD(75)) of 9.25 microg [95% confidence interval (95% CI) 8.6-10.0 microg]. The Biuret test provided better sensitivity, with a MLD(75) of 6.7 microg (95% CI 5.4-8.2 microg). However, much lower concentrations of proteinaceous soiling (pg) were visualized using the EDIC/EF microscopy method. From these findings, it is clear that these approved colorimetric tests of cleaning are relatively insensitive. This investigation demonstrates how large amounts (up to 6.5 microg) of proteinaceous brain contamination could remain undetected and the instruments deemed clean using such methods. The application of more sensitive cleanliness evaluation methods should be applied to reduce the risk of iatrogenic transmission of prion disease in 'high-risk' instruments such as neurosurgical devices.

  17. AIDS denialism and public health practice.

    PubMed

    Chigwedere, Pride; Essex, M

    2010-04-01

    In this paper, we respond to AIDS denialist arguments that HIV does not cause AIDS, that antiretroviral drugs are not useful, and that there is no evidence of large-scale deaths from AIDS, and discuss the key implications of the relationship between AIDS denialism and public health practice. We provide a brief history of how the cause of AIDS was investigated, of how HIV fulfills Koch's postulates and Sir Bradford Hil's criteria for causation, and of the inconsistencies in alternatives offered by denialists. We highlight clinical trials as the standard for assessing efficacy of drugs, rather than anecdotal cases or discussions of mechanism of action, and show the unanimous data demonstrating antiretroviral drug efficacy. We then show how statistics on mortality and indices such as crude death rate, life expectancy, child mortality, and population growth are consistent with the high mortality from AIDS, and expose the weakness of statistics from death notification, quoted by denialists. Last we emphasize that when denialism influences public health practice as in South Africa, the consequences are disastrous. We argue for accountability for the loss of hundreds of thousands of lives, the need to reform public health practice to include standards and accountability, and the particular need for honesty and peer review in situations that impact public health policy.

  18. Assessing the value of and contextual and cultural acceptability of the Strength and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ) in evaluating mental health problems in HIV/AIDS affected children

    PubMed Central

    Skinner, Donald; Sharp, Carla; Marais, Lochner; Serekoane, Motsaathebe; Lenka, Molefi

    2015-01-01

    Background The Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ) is a robust, powerful and internationally recognised diagnostic screening tool for emotional and behaviour problems among children, with the particular advantage that it can be used by non-health professionals. This makes it useful in a South African context characterized by shortages of professional mental health carers. However the cultural and contextual acceptability and potential uses of the SDQ have not yet been examined in the South African context. Methods The aim of the current study was to evaluate the acceptability of the SDQ in a Sesotho speaking area of South Africa. As part of a larger study to standardise the SDQ for use among Sotho speakers, teachers were asked to use the tool to assess learners in their class. Ten teachers were then asked to write a report on their experience of the SDQ and how useful and applicable they found it for their school setting. These findings were discussed at two later meetings with larger groupings of teachers. Reports were analysed using a modified contextualised interpretative content analysis method. Results Teachers found the SDQ very useful in the classroom and easy to administer and understand. They found it contextually relevant and particularly useful in gaining an understanding of the learners and the challenges that learners were facing. It further allowed them to differentiate between scholastic and emotional problems, assisting them in developing relationships with the pupils and facilitating accurate referrals. There were very few concerns raised, with the major problem being that it was difficult to assess items concerning contexts outside of the school setting. The teachers expressed interest in obtaining further training in the interpretation of the SDQ and a greater understanding of diagnostic labels so as to assist their learners. Conclusion The SDQ was found to be acceptable and useful in the context of this very disadvantaged community

  19. Field Psychometric Testing of the Instrument for Assessment of Psychological Predictors of Well-Being and Quality of Life in People with HIV or AIDS.

    PubMed

    Remor, Eduardo; Fuster-RuizdeApodaca, Maria José; Ballester-Arnal, Rafael; Gómez-Martínez, Sandra; Fumaz, Carmina R; González-Garcia, Marian; Ubillos-Landa, Silvia; Aguirrezabal-Prado, Arrate; Molero, Fernando; Ruzafa-Martínez, Maria

    2016-06-01

    The Screenphiv, a screening measure for psychological issues related to HIV, was psychometrically tested in a study involving 744 HIV-infected people in Spain. Participants ages 18-82 (M = 43.04, 72 % men, 28 % women) completed an assessment protocol that included the Screenphiv and the MOS-HIV. A trained interviewer also collected relevant illness-related clinical data and socio-demographics from the participants. A confirmatory factor analysis was used to evaluate the goodness of fit of the Screenphiv's theoretical model and confirmed six first-order factors and two second-order factors [RMSEA (IC 90 %) = 0.07 (0.07-0.08)]. No floor or ceiling effects were observed for the scores. Cronbach's alphas were acceptable for all of the factors (from 0.65 to 0.92). Criterion-related validity also achieved; Screenphiv scores were related to socio-demographic and clinical variables and MOS-HIV summary scores. The Screenphiv is a reliable and valid measure, ready to use in research and clinical settings in Spain.

  20. The harmonised data model for assessing Land Parcel Identification Systems compliance with requirements of direct aid and agri-environmental schemes of the CAP.

    PubMed

    Sagris, Valentina; Wojda, Piotr; Milenov, Pavel; Devos, Wim

    2013-03-30

    The EU Common Agricultural Policy (CAP) subsidies to farmers are administered through dedicated information systems, a part of which is the GIS-based Land Parcel Identification System (LPIS). The requirement to map and record land eligible for payments has led to a situation where the agricultural administrations have acquired a large amount of geographic data. As the geospatial community of data producers, custodians and users has grown during the last decades, so has the need to assess the quality and consistency of the LPIS towards the EU regulations on the CAP as well as for cross compliance with environmental legislation. In view of this, a LPIS Conceptual Model (LCM) is presented in this paper in order to address harmonisation and data quality needs. The ISO 19100 series standards on geoinformatics were used for LCM development, including an UML modelling approach and the handling of the quality of geographical information. This paper describes the core elements of the LCM and their integration with data supporting management of agri-environment schemes. Later, the paper shows how the LCM is used for conformity and quality checks of the member states' LPIS system; an Abstract Test Suite (ATS) for mapping the LCM model against existing system implementations was developed and tested in collaboration with several member states.

  1. Evaluation of HIV/AIDS Education Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keeton, Kato B.

    1998-01-01

    A study assessed effectiveness of Human Immunodeficiency Virus/Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (HIV/AIDS) education courses required in Florida of persons engaged in professions requiring licensure. Results indicate few differences in knowledge or attitudes before and after the course. In general, course participants had good knowledge of…

  2. The Student Guide: Financial Aid.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Education, Washington, DC. Student Financial Assistance.

    This publication explains what federal student financial aid is and what types of student aid are available. Two introductory sections present: federal student aid at-a-glance (what it is, who gets it, and how to get it) and finding out about student aid. The first section presents general information on the following subjects: student…

  3. Mommy, Daddy--What's AIDS?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Association of Pediatric Nurse Associates and Practitioners, Cherry Hill, NJ.

    This brochure is designed to help parents answer the questions that their children may ask them about Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) and the Human Immuno Deficiency Virus (HIV), the virus that causes AIDS. It provides basic information about AIDS and HIV, as well as sources for further information, such as the National AIDS Hotline. It…

  4. The First Aid Training Picture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Ian

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the history of first aid training provisions in the United Kingdom with respect to the outdoor industry, what to look for in a first aid training provider, an experiential model of first aid training, and the current National Governing Body requirements for first aid training for various types of coaches and instructors. (TD)

  5. Answering Your Questions about AIDS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalichman, Seth C.

    This book focuses on AIDS education and answers 350 commonly asked questions about Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) and Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) taken from questions addressed to two major urban AIDS hotlines (Milwaukee, Wisconsin, and Houston, Texas). Chapter 1, "HIV - The Virus That Causes AIDS," discusses: the HIV…

  6. Functional Analysis of HIV/AIDS Stigma: Consensus or Divergence?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hosseinzadeh, Hassan; Hossain, Syeda Zakia

    2011-01-01

    Functional theory proposes that attitudes may serve a variety of purposes for individuals. This study aimed to determine whether stigmatized attitudes toward HIV/AIDS serve the same function for all (consensus function) or serve different functions for different individuals (divergence function) by assessing various aspects of HIV/AIDS stigma…

  7. Maximizing Enrollment Yield through Financial Aid Packaging Policies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spaulding, Randy; Olswang, Steven

    2005-01-01

    Using institutional data, this paper presents a model to enable researchers and enrollment managers to assess the effectiveness of financial aid packaging policies in light of student characteristics and institutional market position. The model uses discriminant analysis and a series of hypothetical financial aid award scenarios to predict the…

  8. Attitudes of Dental Hygiene Students toward Individuals with AIDS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haring, Joen Iannucci; Lind, Laura J.

    1992-01-01

    At Ohio State University, 81 dental hygiene students' attitudes toward homosexual and heterosexual patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) or leukemia were assessed using ratings of prejudice, social interaction, and interpersonal interaction. Negative bias toward individuals with AIDS and unwillingness to engage in everyday…

  9. Domestic Violence Shelters as Prevention Agents for HIV/AIDS?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rountree, Michele A.; Pomeroy, Elizabeth C.; Marsiglia, Flavio F.

    2008-01-01

    The article reports findings from a pilot study of 21 domestic violence shelters in a southwestern state in the United States. The survey instrument included descriptive information on shelter service delivery. Specifically, questions were asked about the practice of assessing a client's risk of HIV/AIDS, the provision of HIV/AIDS educational and…

  10. Lessons on Stigma: Teaching about HIV/AIDS

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lichtenstein, Bronwen; DeCoster, Jamie

    2014-01-01

    Teaching about the sociology of HIV/AIDS involves teaching about the causes and effects of stigma. We describe a Sociology of HIV/AIDS course at the University of Alabama in which stigma reduction was assessed as a primary objective. The syllabus involved theory-based instruction, class visits, service learning, and student research on community…

  11. An Approach to Coping with Anxiety about AIDS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krieger, Irwin

    1988-01-01

    Describes a stepwise counseling approach for assisting persons with heightened anxiety about Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) and ways to handle fears about the sexual transmission of AIDS. Five steps discussed include getting accurate information, assessing fear prior to exposure, learning to protect oneself and others, gathering peer…

  12. Financial Aid at Proprietary Schools: How Important Is It?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scheaffer, Donald E.

    1979-01-01

    A study is reported that sought to determine the extent of utilization of federal student aid programs at proprietary schools, to assess the role of federal support for needy students enrolled at proprietary schools, and to evaluate the relationship of financial aid to the recruitment and training of students. (JMD)

  13. Assessing ligand selectivity for uranium over vanadium ions to aid in the discovery of superior adsorbents for extraction of UO22+ from seawater

    DOE PAGES

    Ivanov, Alexander S.; Bryantsev, Vyacheslav S.

    2016-06-06

    Uranium is used as the basic fuel for nuclear power plants, which generate significant amounts of electricity and have life cycle carbon emissions that are as low as renewable energy sources. However, the extraction of this valuable energy commodity from the ground remains controversial, mainly because of environmental and health impacts. Alternatively, seawater offers an enormous uranium resource that may be tapped at minimal environmental cost. Nowadays, amidoxime polymers are the most widely utilized sorbent materials for large-scale extraction of uranium from seawater, but they are not perfectly selective for uranyl, UO22+. In particular, the competition between UO22+ and VO2+/VO2+more » cations poses a significant challenge to the effi-cient mining of UO22+. Thus, screening and rational design of more selective ligands must be accomplished. One of the key components in achieving this goal is the establishment of computational techniques capable of assessing ligand selec-tivity trends. Here, we report an approach based on quantum chemical calculations that achieves high accuracy in repro-ducing experimental aqueous stability constants for VO2+/VO2+ complexes with ten different oxygen donor lig-ands. The predictive power of the developed computational protocol was demonstrated for amidoxime-type ligands, providing greater insights into new design strategies for the development of the next generation of adsorbents with high selectivity toward UO22+over VO2+/VO2+ ions. Furthermore, the results of calculations suggest that alkylation of amidox-ime moieties present in poly(acrylamidoxime) sorbents can be a potential route to better discrimination between the uranyl and competing vanadium ions within seawater.« less

  14. SafeTalk, a multicomponent, motivational interviewing-based, safer sex counseling program for people living with HIV/AIDS: a qualitative assessment of patients' views.

    PubMed

    Golin, Carol E; Davis, Rebecca A; Przybyla, Sarahmona M; Fowler, Beth; Parker, Sharon; Earp, Jo Anne; Quinlivan, E Byrd; Kalichman, Seth C; Patel, Shilpa N; Grodensky, Catherine A

    2010-04-01

    With the continued transmission of HIV each year, novel approaches to HIV prevention are needed. Since 2003, the U.S. HIV prevention focus has shifted from primarily targeting HIV-negative at-risk persons to including safer sex programs for people already infected with HIV. At least 20-30% of people infected with HIV engage in risky sexual practices. Based on these data, policymakers have recommended that interventionists develop strategies to help HIV-infected people reduce their risky sexual behaviors. In the past, the few safer sex interventions that targeted HIV-infected people met with limited success because they basically adapted strategies previously used with HIV-uninfected individuals. In addition, often these adaptations did not address issues of serostatus disclosure, HIV stigma, or motivation to protect others from HIV. We had previously tested, in a demonstration project named the Start Talking About Risks (STAR) Program, a monthly three-session motivational interviewing (MI)-based intervention to help people living with HIV practice safer sex. In this study, we refined that program by enhancing its frequency and intensity and adding written and audio components to support the counseling. We theorized that an intervention such as MI, which is tailored to each individual's circumstances more than standardized prevention messages, would be more successful when supplemented with other components. We qualitatively assessed participants' perceptions, reactions, and preferences to the refined prevention with positives counseling program we called SafeTalk and learned that participants found the SafeTalk MI counseling and educational materials appealing, understandable, and relevant to their lives.

  15. Assessing ligand selectivity for uranium over vanadium ions to aid in the discovery of superior adsorbents for extraction of UO2(2+) from seawater.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, Alexander S; Bryantsev, Vyacheslav S

    2016-06-28

    Uranium is used as the basic fuel for nuclear power plants, which generate significant amounts of electricity and have life cycle carbon emissions that are as low as renewable energy sources. However, the extraction of this valuable energy commodity from the ground remains controversial, mainly because of environmental and health impacts. Alternatively, seawater offers an enormous uranium resource that may be tapped at minimal environmental cost. Nowadays, amidoxime polymers are the most widely utilized sorbent materials for large-scale extraction of uranium from seawater, but they are not perfectly selective for uranyl, UO2(2+). In particular, the competition between UO2(2+) and VO(2+)/VO2(+) cations poses a significant challenge to the efficient mining of UO2(2+). Thus, screening and rational design of more selective ligands must be accomplished. One of the key components in achieving this goal is the establishment of computational techniques capable of assessing ligand selectivity trends. Here, we report an approach based on quantum chemical calculations that achieves high accuracy in reproducing experimental aqueous stability constants for VO(2+)/VO2(+) complexes with ten different oxygen donor ligands. The predictive power of the developed computational protocol is demonstrated for amidoxime-type ligands, providing greater insights into new design strategies for the development of the next generation of adsorbents with high selectivity toward UO2(2+) over VO(2+)/VO2(+) ions. Importantly, the results of calculations suggest that alkylation of amidoxime moieties present in poly(acrylamidoxime) sorbents can be a potential route to better discrimination between the uranyl and competing vanadium ions in seawater.

  16. Women and AIDS: introduction.

    PubMed

    Krieger, N; Margo, G

    1991-01-01

    Around the world, more and more women--principally poor women of color--are being diagnosed with and are dying of AIDS, the acquired immune deficiency syndrome. Yet, effective and appropriate prevention programs for women are sorely missing from the global program to control AIDS. To help us understand why this gap exists, and what we must do to close it, the three articles in this issue focus on women and AIDS. Examining the situation in such countries as Zimbabwe and South Africa, as well as in other economically underdeveloped and developed regions, the authors argue that women with the least control over their bodies and their lives are at greatest risk of acquiring AIDS. For example, the high rate of infection among women in Africa cannot be understood apart from the legacy of colonialism (including land expropriation and the forced introduction of a migrant labor system) and the insidious combination of traditional and European patriarchal values. Only by recognizing the socioeconomic and cultural determinants of both disease and sexual behavior, and only by incorporating these insights into our AIDS prevention programs, will we be able to curb the spread of this lethal disease.

  17. AIDS in Africa.

    PubMed

    Mokhobo, D

    1989-03-01

    Numerous cultural practices and attitudes in Africa represent formidable obstacles to the prevention of the further spread of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Polygamy and concubinage are still widely practiced throughout Africa. In fact, sexual promiscuity on the part of males is traditionally viewed as positive--a reflection of male supremacy and male sexual prowess. The disintegration of the rural African family, brought about by urbanization, the migrant labor system, and poverty, has resulted in widespread premarital promiscuity. Contraceptive practices are perceived by many as a white conspiracy aimed at limiting the growth of the black population and thereby diminishing its political power. Condom use is particularly in disfavor. Thus, AIDS prevention campaigns urging Africans to restrict the number of sexual partners and to use condoms are unlikely to be successful. Another problem is that most Africans cannot believe that AIDS is sexually linked in that the disease does not affect the sex organs as is the case with other sexually transmitted diseases. The degree to which African governments are able to allocate resources to AIDS education will determine whether the epidemic can be controlled. Even with a massive outpouring of resources, it may be difficult to arouse public alarm about AIDS since Africans are so acclimated to living with calamities of every kind.

  18. AIDS in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Boshell, J; Gacharná, M G; García, M; Jaramillo, L S; Márquez, G; Fergusson, M M; González, S; Prada, E Y; de Rangel, R; de Cabas, R

    1989-01-01

    Between January 1984 and December 1987 a total of 178 AIDS cases were reported to the Colombian Ministry of Health. The location of these cases suggests that the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is widely distributed in Colombia. Most of those afflicted (97%) have been adult males. HIV seroprevalence studies of selected population groups revealed the highest antibody prevalence (5.65% in females, 22.5% in males) among individuals involved in high-risk behaviors who participated in a free AIDS testing program. High prevalences (from 0.6% to 3.9% in females, and 14.6% to 15.9% in males) were also found in patients (primarily female prostitutes and male homosexuals) attending clinics for sexually transmitted diseases in several urban areas. The number of AIDS cases in Colombia has doubled or tripled annually since reporting began in 1984, a pattern similar to that observed worldwide.

  19. Recapture training aid.

    SciTech Connect

    Pacheco, James Edward

    2004-08-01

    The breacher's training aid described in this report was designed to simulate features of magazine and steel-plate doors. The training aid enables breachers to practice using their breaching tools on components that they may encounter when attempting to enter a facility. Two types of fixtures were designed and built: (1) a large fixture incorporates simulated hinges, hasps, lock shrouds, and pins, and (2) a small fixture simulates the cross section of magazine and steel-plate doors. The small fixture consists of steel plates on either side of a structural member, such as an I-beam. The report contains detailed descriptions and photographs of the training aids, assembly instructions, and drawings.

  20. AIDS and tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Morales Suárez-Valera, M M; Llopis González, A; Ballester Calabuig, M L

    1993-03-01

    Between 1985-1989 were diagnosed 376 cases of TBC in "La Fe" hospital in Valencia. 36 of this cases also had AIDS. We have carried out a compared study among the 340 cases of TBC and the 36 cases of AIDS+TBC. In this way we have described the social and work conditions of both groups, the hospitalization, the associated pathologies, the different risk factors, the different characteristics of the disease in each group of TBC, the diagnoses methods and the treatment of each case.

  1. Reducing HIV and AIDS in adolescents: opportunities and challenges.

    PubMed

    Kasedde, Susan; Luo, Chewe; McClure, Craig; Chandan, Upjeet

    2013-06-01

    Adolescents are critical to efforts to end the AIDS epidemic. Few national AIDS strategies explicitly program for children in their second decade of life. Adolescents (aged 10-19 years) are therefore largely invisible in global, regional, and country HIV and AIDS reports making it difficult to assess progress in this population. We have unprecedented knowledge to guide investment towards greater impact on HIV prevention, treatment, and care in adolescents, but it has not been applied to reach those most vulnerable and optimize efficiency and scale. The cost of this is increasing AIDS-related deaths and largely unchanged levels of new HIV infections in adolescents. An AIDS-free generation will remain out of reach if the global community does not prioritize adolescents. National AIDS responses must be accountable to adolescents, invest in strengthening and monitoring protective and supportive laws and policies and access for adolescents to high impact HIV interventions.

  2. Results of a randomized controlled trial to assess the effects of a mobile SMS-based intervention on treatment adherence in HIV/AIDS-infected Brazilian women and impressions and satisfaction with respect to incoming messages

    PubMed Central

    da Costa, Thiago Martini; Barbosa, Bárbara Jaqueline Peres; e Costa, Durval Alex Gomes; Sigulem, Daniel; de Fátima Marin, Heimar; Filho, Adauto Castelo; Pisa, Ivan Torres

    2013-01-01

    Objective To assess whether a warning system based on mobile SMS messages increases the adherence of HIV-infected Brazilian women to antiretroviral drug-based treatment regimens and their impressions and satisfaction with respect to incoming messages. Design A randomized controlled trial was conducted from May 2009 to April 2010 with HIV-infected Brazilian women. All participants (n = 21) had a monthly multidisciplinary attendance; each participant was followed over a 4-month period, when adherence measures were obtained. Participants in the intervention group (n = 8) received SMS messages 30 min before their last scheduled time for a dose of medicine during the day. The messages were sent every Saturday and Sunday and on alternate days during the working week. Participants in the control group (n = 13) did not receive messages. Measurements Self-reported adherence, pill counting, microelectronic monitors (MEMS) and an interview about the impressions and satisfaction with respect to incoming messages. Results The HIV Alert System (HIVAS) was developed over 7 months during 2008 and 2009. After the study period, self-reported adherence indicated that 11 participants (84.62%) remained compliant in the control group (adherence exceeding 95%), whereas all 8 participants in the intervention group (100.00%) remained compliant. In contrast, the counting pills method indicated that the number of compliant participants was 5 (38.46%) for the control group and 4 (50.00%) for the intervention group. Microelectronic monitoring indicated that 6 participants in the control group (46.15%) were adherent during the entire 4-month period compared to 6 participants in the intervention group (75.00%). According to the feedback of the 8 participants who completed the research in the intervention group, along with the feedback of 3 patients who received SMS for less than 4 months, that is, did not complete the study, 9 (81.81%) believed that the SMS messages aided them in treatment

  3. Fear of AIDS and Risk Reduction among Heroin-Addicted Female Street Prostitutes: Personal Interviews with 72 Southern California Subjects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bellis, David J.

    1990-01-01

    Interviewed 72 heroin-addicted female street prostitutes and assessed fear of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS), AIDS risk reduction behavior, and prostitutes' recommendations for AIDS risk reduction programs. Self-reported data showed that, although subjects were afraid of AIDS, irrationality produced by addiction compelled risky…

  4. Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reising, Bob

    1998-01-01

    Argues (guided by "The Challenge of Change: Assessment in the 21st Century") that in the decades ahead, assessment will play an unprecedented role as the vehicle that will influence and guide scheduling, curriculum, and instruction. (SR)

  5. Psychosocial factors as predictors of HIV/AIDS risky behaviors among people living with HIV/AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Gerbi, Gemechu B.; Habtemariam, Tsegaye; Robnett, Vinaida; Nganwa, David; Tameru, Berhanu

    2012-01-01

    Infection with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) that causes acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) is still rising globally. In order to develop effective HIV/AIDS risky behavior reduction intervention strategies and to further decrease the spread of HIV/AIDS, it is important to assess the prevalence of psychosocial problems and HIV/AIDS risky behaviors in people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA). The objective of this study is to assess the relationship between psychosocial variables and HIV/AIDS risky behaviors among PLWHA. A total of 341 questionnaires were distributed and 326 were fully completed and returned, 96% response rate. The relationships between the identified psychosocial and HIV/AIDS risky behaviors among PLWHA were analyzed using The Moment Structures software version 17.0 (SPSS Inc.) The results indicate that psychosocial health problems were significant predictors of HIV/AIDS risky behaviors in PLWA. Further cross-disciplinary research that addresses the manner in which psychosocial problems and HIV/AIDS risky behaviors interact with each other among PLWHA is needed. PMID:22374351

  6. An Assessment of Employment Opportunities for High School Graduates in Downtown Manhattan. A Study to Aid the Planning of a New Commercial High School, Including Assessment of Certain Community Resources Likely to be Available to the School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnes, Donald E.; And Others

    Characteristics of the entry-level job market in lower Manhattan, or "Downtown," for new high school graduates were assessed. Questionnaire-guided interviews with representatives of principal industries and occupations were conducted within five major employment groups: banking, insurance, securities, communications and transportation,…

  7. First aid kit

    MedlinePlus

    ... bandages (Band-Aid or similar brand); assorted sizes Aluminum finger splints Elastic (ACE) bandage for wrapping wrist, ... to reduce contamination risk Save-A-Tooth storage device in case a tooth is broken or knocked out; ... equipment, and medical supplies. In: Auerbach PS, ed. Auerbach: Wilderness Medicine . ...

  8. Machine Aids to Translation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brinkmann, Karl-Heinz

    1981-01-01

    Describes the TEAM Program System of the Siemens Language Services Department, particularly the main features of its terminology data bank. Discusses criteria to which stored terminology must conform and methods of data bank utilization. Concludes by summarizing the consequences that machine-aided translation development has had for the…

  9. Good Teaching Aids.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Audubon Society, New York, NY.

    This set of teaching aids consists of 14 Audubon Nature Bulletins with these titles: Schoolyard Laboratories, How to Lead a Field Trip, Natural Resources in the City, Mysteries of Bird Migration, Rock Stories and How to Read Them, The Ground Water Table, The Terrarium, Some Adventures With Wild Plants Outdoors and Indoors, Plant Propagation in the…

  10. More than First Aid

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schoessler, Sally

    2011-01-01

    The school nurse is an important member of the school team since school health services keep students in school, in the classroom, and ready to learn. Although school nurses are often seen as the people who deliver first aid at school, their role is much deeper and has such breadth that only a registered, professional nurse has the skill set to…

  11. Instructional Aide Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomson, Henry

    The Instructional Aide Program (Shoreline Community College, Seattle, Washington) is a flexible curriculum designed to prepare students to meet the paraprofessional manpower needs of several kinds of institution. It was prepared after consultation with representatives of the schools, the YMCA, and the country park system. Other agencies still to…

  12. Management of Student Aid.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nevin, Jeanne, Ed.

    The principles, practices, responsibilities, and controls in student financial aid are described in this manual. It traces the flow of funds, management activities, and legal issues as they occur in the process. The emphasis is on sound management principles of a general and permanent nature rather than on specific government requirements that may…

  13. Computer Aided Manufacturing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Insolia, Gerard

    This document contains course outlines in computer-aided manufacturing developed for a business-industry technology resource center for firms in eastern Pennsylvania by Northampton Community College. The four units of the course cover the following: (1) introduction to computer-assisted design (CAD)/computer-assisted manufacturing (CAM); (2) CAM…

  14. Coil Welding Aid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiesenbach, W. T.; Clark, M. C.

    1983-01-01

    Positioner holds coil inside cylinder during tack welding. Welding aid spaces turns of coil inside cylinder and applies contact pressure while coil is tack-welded to cylinder. Device facilitates fabrication of heat exchangers and other structures by eliminating hand-positioning and clamping of individual coil turns.

  15. Parent Hearing Aid Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munoz, Karen; Roberts, Mallory; Mullings, Day; Harward, Richard

    2012-01-01

    This study addresses parent experiences in obtaining and managing hearing aids for their young child. The purpose was to identify challenges parents encounter to determine what state agencies can do to improve parent access to amplification. Data were collected July through September of 2010; 40 parents of children ages birth to 3 years old…

  16. AIDS: The Second Decade.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Heather G., Ed.; And Others

    This report reviews the course of the Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) epidemic and its current status, examining changing patterns of sexual behavior and intravenous drug use, the distribution of cases of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, and the results of intervention efforts under way. It also discusses prevention…

  17. Impact Aid Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Elementary and Secondary Education (ED), Washington, DC.

    Impact Aid is a federal formula grant program designed to assist local school districts that have lost property tax revenue due to the presence of tax-exempt federal property or that have experienced increased expenditures due to the enrollment of federally connected children. Federally connected children are those whose parents pay minimal or no…

  18. AIDS Researcher Gives Retrospective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawkins, B. Denise

    2011-01-01

    Nearly 30 years ago, renowned immunologist James E.K. Hildreth, M.D., Ph.D., was compelled to start researching the virus that causes AIDS. He marveled at its enigma and was pressed into action by its ability to cut lives short and devastate communities. The disease set him on a course of medical inquiry that has included biomedical breakthroughs…

  19. Newspaper Lesson Aids.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Communication: Journalism Education Today (C:JET), 1986

    1986-01-01

    Provides photocopy-ready lesson aids on story ideas, interviewing, inverted pyramid writing style, newswriting, sports/scavenger hunt, finding feature material, identifying feature leads, feature lead selection, evaluating feature leads, compiling survey material, cutlines, headlines, paste-up rules, advertising, final semester project, newspaper…

  20. Computer Aided Art Major.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibson, Jim

    The Computer Aided Art program offered at Northern State State University (Aberdeen, South Dakota), is coordinated with the traditional art major. The program is designed to familiarize students with a wide range of art-related computer hardware and software and their applications and to prepare students for problem-solving with unfamiliar…

  1. First Aid: Dehydration

    MedlinePlus

    ... Aid: Heat Illness Sun Safety Dehydration Diarrhea Vomiting Word! Dehydration What's the Big Sweat About Dehydration? How to Be Safe When You're in the Sun What's Sweat? Dehydration Is It Important to Drink a Lot of Water? Contact Us Print Resources Send to a Friend ...

  2. Job Aids and Motivation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grau, Joseph A.

    1986-01-01

    Suggests job aids have motivational benefits and discusses three ways in which they positively affect motivation: increases worker's confidence of success and amount of effort they are willing to invest in attempting tasks; increases expectancy while decreasing amount of motivation needed; and reinforces task importance. (MBR)

  3. First Aid Challenge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roman, Harry T.

    2011-01-01

    This article describes a challenge wherein students will be asked to design a portable first aid kit that is normally carried in a recreational vehicle (RV), but can also be hand-carried or backpacked off road for distances of approximately 1-2 miles. This can be a very practical challenge for the students because it touches everyone. Everybody…

  4. [Post-transfusional AIDS].

    PubMed

    Azzini, M; Maccabruni, A; Marcellini, M; Michelone, G; Dei Cas, A

    1987-01-01

    Two cases of post-transfusional AIDS in two premature babies who received blood of the same seropositive donor, are reported. The risk of the susceptibility to HIV infection of these patients, in relation to the immaturity of immune system and to the transfusional treatment often necessary in premature newborns, is stressed.

  5. Designing Visual Aids That Promote Risk Literacy.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Retamero, Rocio; Cokely, Edward T

    2017-02-01

    Background Effective risk communication is essential for informed decision making. Unfortunately, many people struggle to understand typical risk communications because they lack essential decision-making skills. Objective The aim of this study was to review the literature on the effect of numeracy on risk literacy, decision making, and health outcomes, and to evaluate the benefits of visual aids in risk communication. Method We present a conceptual framework describing the influence of numeracy on risk literacy, decision making, and health outcomes, followed by a systematic review of the benefits of visual aids in risk communication for people with different levels of numeracy and graph literacy. The systematic review covers scientific research published between January 1995 and April 2016, drawn from the following databases: Web of Science, PubMed, PsycINFO, ERIC, Medline, and Google Scholar. Inclusion criteria were investigation of the effect of numeracy and/or graph literacy, and investigation of the effect of visual aids or comparison of their effect with that of numerical information. Thirty-six publications met the criteria, providing data on 27,885 diverse participants from 60 countries. Results Transparent visual aids robustly improved risk understanding in diverse individuals by encouraging thorough deliberation, enhancing cognitive self-assessment, and reducing conceptual biases in memory. Improvements in risk understanding consistently produced beneficial changes in attitudes, behavioral intentions, trust, and healthy behaviors. Visual aids were found to be particularly beneficial for vulnerable and less skilled individuals. Conclusion Well-designed visual aids tend to be highly effective tools for improving informed decision making among diverse decision makers. We identify five categories of practical, evidence-based guidelines for heuristic evaluation and design of effective visual aids.

  6. Severe Weather Forecast Decision Aid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauman, William H., III; Wheeler, Mark M.; Short, David A.

    2005-01-01

    This report presents a 15-year climatological study of severe weather events and related severe weather atmospheric parameters. Data sources included local forecast rules, archived sounding data, Cloud-to-Ground Lightning Surveillance System (CGLSS) data, surface and upper air maps, and two severe weather event databases covering east-central Florida. The local forecast rules were used to set threat assessment thresholds for stability parameters that were derived from the sounding data. The severe weather events databases were used to identify days with reported severe weather and the CGLSS data was used to differentiate between lightning and non-lightning days. These data sets provided the foundation for analyzing the stability parameters and synoptic patterns that were used to develop an objective tool to aid in forecasting severe weather events. The period of record for the analysis was May - September, 1989 - 2003. The results indicate that there are certain synoptic patterns more prevalent on days with severe weather and some of the stability parameters are better predictors of severe weather days based on locally tuned threat values. The results also revealed the stability parameters that did not display any skill related to severe weather days. An interactive web-based Severe Weather Decision Aid was developed to assist the duty forecaster by providing a level of objective guidance based on the analysis of the stability parameters, CGLSS data, and synoptic-scale dynamics. The tool will be tested and evaluated during the 2005 warm season.

  7. AIDS and society.

    PubMed

    Singh, N K

    1991-08-01

    Noting the hysteria caused by an outbreak of AIDS among intravenous drug users in the state of Manipur, India, the author discusses the social and emotional aspects of the epidemic. Local media has been Manipur's main source of information concerning the outbreak, but this information has often been misleading and has served to stir up fear and hatred of HIV carriers. Many have even begun talking about an Isolation Centre. The author, the director of a drug rehabilitation center, relates his experiences in counseling 50 intravenous drug users on the subject of AIDS. He discovered that the group had very poor knowledge about the disease. When told about AIDS, they became alarmed at the possibility of dying. 1/2 of the group swore to take revenge on those who had introduced them to drugs, but the other 1/2 showed a more positive attitude, saying that they would like to help other drug addicts. The author also describes the case history of a patient who had succeeded in staying off of drugs for 8 months. HIV screening, however, revealed that the young man was seropositive. Somehow, a local newspaper got a hold of this information and published his name as a seropositive along with the names of others. Distraught by this, the young man returned to drugs. The author stresses that revealing the names of HIV carriers serves no social purpose, and in fact, only makes the problem worse. He recommends the following for dealing with the outbreak of AIDS: 1) intensive public health education on AIDS with the aim or removing unwarranted fears; 2) education to prevent drug addiction; 3) counselling to parents of drug addicts; and 4) the establishment of Seropositive Anonymous, an organization designed to help carriers deal with their problems.

  8. A computer-aided differential diagnosis between UIP and NSIP using automated assessment of the extent and distribution of regional disease patterns at HRCT: comparison with the radiologist's decision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Namkug; Seo, Joon Beom; Park, Sang Ok; Lee, Youngjoo; Lee, Jeongjin

    2009-02-01

    To evaluate the accuracy of computer aided differential diagnosis (CADD) between usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP) and nonspecific interstitial pneumonia (NSIP) at HRCT in comparison with that of a radiologist's decision. A computerized classification for six local disease patterns (normal, NL; ground-glass opacity, GGO; reticular opacity, RO; honeycombing, HC; emphysema, EM; and consolidation, CON) using texture/shape analyses and a SVM classifier at HRCT was used for pixel-by-pixel labeling on the whole lung area. The mode filter was applied on the results to reduce noise. Area fraction (AF) of each pattern, directional probabilistic density function (pdf) (dPDF: mean, SD, skewness of pdf /3 directions: superior-inferior, anterior-posterior, central-peripheral), regional cluster distribution pattern (RCDP: number, mean, SD of clusters, mean, SD of centroid of clusters) were automatically evaluated. Spatially normalized left and right lungs were evaluated separately. Disease division index (DDI) on every combination of AFs and asymmetric index (AI) between left and right lung ((left-right)/left) were also evaluated. To assess the accuracy of the system, fifty-four HRCT data sets in patients with pathologically diagnosed UIP (n=26) and NSIP (n=28) were used. For a classification procedure, a CADD-SVM classifier with internal parameter optimization, and sequential forward floating feature selection (SFFS) were employed. The accuracy was assessed by a 5-folding cross validation with 20- times repetition. For comparison, two thoracic radiologists reviewed the whole HRCT images without clinical information and diagnose each case either as UIP or NSIP. The accuracies of radiologists' decision were 0.75 and 0.87, respectively. The accuracies of the CADD system using the features of AF, dPDF, AI of dPDF, RDP, AI of RDP, DDI were 0.70, 0.79, 0.77, 0.80, 0.78, 0.81, respectively. The accuracy of optimized CADD using all features after SFFS was 0.91. We developed the CADD

  9. Assessment of Computer Aids in Shipyards

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-04-01

    read NIAM diagrams with very little training. It takes really more to write good NIAM. Just like anyone can listen to music and appreciate it. Almost any...technology five years horn now. And just like the ex- ample of the antigravity machine, five years from now the computer business will look so different

  10. Assessing Binocular Advantage in Aided Vision

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-01

    SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES Report contains color. 88ABW Cleared 02/03/2014; 88ABW-2014-0320. 14. ABSTRACT Advances in microsensors, microprocessors and...HMD Abstract Advances in microsensors, microprocessors and microdisplays are creating new opportunities for improving vision in degraded...advantages of binocularity are lost. Discussion Recent advances in microsensors, microdisplays, and microprocessors are creating new technology

  11. Psychosocial Impact of the AIDS Epidemic on the Lives of Gay Men.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stulberg, Ian; Smith, Margaret

    1988-01-01

    Assessed the psychosocial impact of the Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) epidemic on the lives of homosexual men (N=301) who had not been diagnosed with AIDS or AIDS Related Complex (ARC). Found subjects reported increasing frequency of no-risk sexual activities and decreased frequency of possible risk and high-risk activities. (ABL)

  12. Measuring HIV/AIDS-Related Stigma across South Africa: A Versatile and Multidimensional Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Edward A.; Miller, Jacqueline A.; Newsome, Valerie; Sofolahan, Yewande A.; Airhihenbuwa, Collins O.

    2014-01-01

    Reducing HIV/AIDS-related stigma is critical in the fight against HIV/AIDS. Although national campaigns and prevention programs have been implemented across South Africa to address this critical concern, assessing the impact of these initiatives is difficult as it requires that measurement of HIV/AIDS-related stigma is uniform and comparable…

  13. Different Styles of Hearing Aids

    MedlinePlus

    ... aids available and offer some cosmetic and listening advantages. Photo courtesy of Phonak Click for larger image ... in place. These aids offer cosmetic and listening advantages and are used typically for adults. Photo courtesy ...

  14. Basic HIV/AIDS Statistics

    MedlinePlus

    ... Other regions significantly affected by HIV/AIDS include Asia and the Pacific, Latin America and the Caribbean, and Eastern Europe and Central Asia. CDC’s Global AIDS website explains what CDC is ...

  15. American Foundation for AIDS Research

    MedlinePlus

    ... More To the Ends of the Earth for AIDS Research Swedish explorer Johan Ernst Nilson has raised ... More amfAR-Funded HIV Scholars Program Featured in AIDS and Behavior Supplement amfAR has partnered with the ...

  16. Factors Associated with HIV/AIDS in Sudan

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed, Badreldin Abdelrhman; Mahfouz, Mohamed Salih

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. To assess participants' knowledge about HIV/AIDS and to identify the factors associated with HIV/AIDS in Sudan. Methods. Observational cross-sectional study carried out at Omdurman National Voluntary Counseling and Testing Centre, Sudan covered 870 participants. Sociodemographic data as well as information related to sexual behavior were collected. Results. Most of the respondents were knowledgeable about the true transmission modes for AIDS virus. Very few respondents knew someone infected with AIDS (4.5%), died of AIDS (8.1%), accepted to live with someone infected with AIDS (4.7%) or to work with someone infected with AIDS (2.1%). Regarding sexual behavior, 96.5% had reported their first sexual experience between 20 and 30 years, with 85.7% reporting one or two partners, and only 1.8% reported using condom. Multivariate logistic regression showed that circumcision, religion, marital status, age at first sex, number of sexual partners, education level, and misconception of knowledge are the main risk factors associated with HIV/AIDS. Conclusion. Our results showed that a number of diversity risk factors were associated with HIV/AIDS. It is unlikely that a holistic approach will be found to immediately change sexual-risk-relating behavior. Interventions including sustained educational programs, promotion of condom, and encouragement of voluntary testing and active involvement of the country's political and religious leaders will be needed to alleviate this problem. PMID:23957014

  17. Living with AIDS: Part II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daedalus: Journal of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, 1989

    1989-01-01

    A series of articles concerning various aspects of AIDS and the dilemmas it poses for U.S. society, culture, and government are presented, in this theme issue, e.g., "Introduction to the Issue" (K. Keniston); "Prospects for the Medical Control of the AIDS Epidemic" (W. Haseltine); "Social Policy: AIDS and Intravenous Drug Use" (N. Zinberg);…

  18. Manual for Student Financial Aids.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacDonald, Douglas S.

    This manual was designed to provide structural guidelines for financial aid program operations and administration at the Community College of Baltimore. Topics discussed include: the philosophy of student aid at an open door college; the objectives of the student financial aid office; staff development and administrative improvement; organization,…

  19. Teachers' Aides: Tasks and Concerns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balderson, James H.; Nixon, Mary

    1976-01-01

    Addresses three questions: (1) What tasks do aides perform? (2) Does training make a difference in the type of tasks aides perform? (3) What are the concerns of aides? (Available from the Department of Educational Administration, The University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada T6G 2G5; $0.50, single copy.) (Author/IRT)

  20. Pharmacotherapeutics for the AIDS Patient.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fife, Kenneth H.

    1991-01-01

    Anticipated shifts in the demographics of the Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) epidemic are examined, current state-of-the-art AIDS patient management is summarized, and some unique facets of drug therapy in the AIDS patient are discussed, including adverse reactions, complex drug interactions, use of investigational drugs, and…

  1. How Do People Get AIDS?

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness How Do People Get AIDS? KidsHealth > For Teens > How Do People Get AIDS? Print A A A en español ¿Cómo contrae alguien el SIDA? AIDS stands for acquired immunodeficiency syndrome , a disease that ...

  2. HIV/AIDS and Croatian migrant workers.

    PubMed

    Stulhofer, Aleksandar; Brouillard, Pamela; Nikolić, Nebojga; Greiner, Nina

    2006-12-01

    Due to their geographical mobility and long periods of separation from intimate partners, migrant workers are at increased risk for a variety of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) including HIV/AIDS. This study sought to investigate patterns in HIV/AIDS related knowledge, attitudes and sexual behaviour in migrant workers in Croatia. In 2003, 566 male migrant workers were recruited during regular required medical examinations and surveyed at seven locations throughout the country. Each participant was asked to complete a self-administered KABP (sexual knowledge, attitudes, beliefs and practices) questionnaire. The average age of respondents was 38.2 years and the majority worked as seafarers (77.3%) and construction workers (20.5%). Only 18.5% of respondents were able to correctly answer all 13 questions assessing knowledge of HIV/AIDS. Seafarers reported higher levels of knowledge than did construction workers. The average respondent reported having had two sexual partners in the last 12 months, with slightly over half of the respondents (55.3%) reporting condom use at their last intercourse with a casual partner. One fifth of the respondents (20.3%) who reported having had intercourse with a sex worker during the last year reported not using condoms at last intercourse. The number of sexual partners was correlated with age, marital status, faith in God, and personal HIV risk assessment. Attitudes toward condom use, co-workers' HIV/AIDS concerns and the duration of migrant status (within the last two years) were shown to be significant correlates of condom use at last intercourse with a casual partner. The effect of HIV/AIDS related knowledge on analyzed behaviors did not reach statistical significance. Inadequate patterns of migrant workers' condom use, gaps in knowledge about HIV transmission and modes of protection, as well as widespread ignorance regarding available anonymous HIV testing found by this study suggest a critical need for expert intervention to

  3. Computer aided manipulator control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bejczy, A. K.; Zawacki, R. L.

    1980-01-01

    This paper describes the hardware and software system of a dedicated mini- and microcomputer network developed at the JPL teleoperator project to aid the operator in real-time control of remote manipulators. The operator can be in series or in parallel with the control computer during operation. The purpose of the project is to develop, demonstrate and evaluate advanced supervisory control concepts and techniques for space applications. The paper concludes with a brief outline of future development plans and issues.

  4. Directional Hearing Aid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jhabvala, M.; Lin, H. C.

    1989-01-01

    Hearing-aid device indicates visually whether sound is coming from left, right, back, or front. Device intended to assist individuals who are deaf in at least one ear and unable to discern naturally directions to sources of sound. Device promotes safety in street traffic, on loading docks, and in presence of sirens, alarms, and other warning sounds. Quadraphonic version of device built into pair of eyeglasses and binaural version built into visor.

  5. The pathology of AIDS.

    PubMed Central

    Macher, A M

    1988-01-01

    The acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) is a devastating new disease caused by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). This retrovirus causes profound immunoincompetence in its infected hosts, who are thereafter susceptible to develop myriad severe and relapsing protozoal, fungal, bacterial, viral, and arthropodal opportunistic infections, as well as unusual malignancies. The more than 50,000 patients who have developed AIDS in the United States have produced a sudden unexpected deluge of diagnostic dilemmas that are stressing laboratories of pathology everywhere. This paper describes the gross and microscopic pathology of the numerous complications in patients infected by HIV: (a) the prodromal AIDS-related complex with persistent generalized lymphadenopathy, (b) lymphoid infiltration of salivary gland and lung, including the complex of lymphoid interstitial pneumonitis-pulmonary lymphoid hyperplasia, (c) extranodal non-Hodgkin's lymphomas, (d) multifocal mucocutaneous and visceral Kaposi's sarcoma, (e) small cell undifferentiated (oat cell) carcinomas, (f) protozoal infections caused by Pneumocystis carinii, Toxoplasma gondii, Acanthamoeba, Cryptosporidium species (sp.), and Isospora belli, (g) the causes of chronic enteritis, (h) mycotic infections caused by Candida sp., Cryptococcus neoformans, Histoplasma capsulatum, Coccidioides immitis, and Sporothrix schenckii, (i) bacterial infections caused by Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare, M. tuberculosis, M. kansasii, Nocardia sp., Listeria monocytogenes, Legionella sp., Treponema pallidum, and others, (j) viral infections caused by cytomegalovirus, herpes simplex and zoster, polyomavirus (progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy), hepatitis B, molluscum contagiosum, and papillomavirus, (k) oral hairy leukoplakia, (l) subacute encephalopathy, and (m) Norwegian scabies. PMID:2836878

  6. Migrants and HIV / AIDS.

    PubMed

    Duckett, M

    2000-06-01

    This paper outlines some of the imperatives that should drive attention to the rights of legal and illegal migrants to health, particularly in relation to HIV/AIDS. It is noted that migrants can be especially vulnerable to HIV/AIDS/sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), but they are often excluded or simply missed in many prevention and care programs. In terms of the effects of globalization, it would seem that governments are required to ensure that this state of affairs does not continue. Evidence indicates that human rights and other ethical violations are occurring and need to be urgently addressed at local, national and international levels. In view of such, it is recommended that HIV/AIDS/STD prevention and care programs for migrant populations should be developed with and guided by migrant communities, and involving substantial community mobilization. Although some progress in preventing the spread of HIV to and from migrants have been documented, and projects addressing their needs have been made accessible, the challenge of dealing more comprehensively the complex issues involved still remains.

  7. Financial Aid Administrators' Views on Simplifying Financial Aid: NASFAA's 2008 Financial Aid Simplification Survey Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators (NJ1), 2008

    2008-01-01

    Despite a decade of simplification efforts, students and families are often still baffled by the student aid process and cringe at the sight of financial aid application forms. Contrary to its purpose of helping students to access college, the student aid application process causes families frustration and confusion that has been cited as an…

  8. Consultation on AIDS and the workplace.

    PubMed

    1988-12-01

    The 1988 Consultation on Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) and the Workplace, organized by the World Health Organization (WHO), addressed 3 issues: 1) risk factors associated with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection in the workplace, 2) the response of businesses and workers to the AIDS epidemic, and 3) use of the workplace for AIDS education. There is no evidence to suggest that HIV can be transmitted by casual, person-to-person contact in the workplace. The central policy issue for businesses concerns protection of the human rights of workers with HIV infection. Most workers with HIV/AIDS want to continue working as long as they are able to, and they should be enabled to contribute their creativity and productivity in a supportive occupational setting. Consistent policies and procedures should be developed at national and enterprise levels before HIV-related questions arise in the workplace. Such policies should be communicated to all concerned, continually reviewed in the light of scientific and epidemiologic evidence, monitored for their successful implementation, and evaluated for their effectiveness. Pre-employment HIV/AIDS screening, whether for assessment of fitness to work or for insurance purposes, should not be required and raises serious concerns about discrimination. Moreover, there should be no obligation on the worker's part to inform his or her employer if HIV infection develops. Information and educational activities at the workplace are essential to create the climate of collective responsibility and mutual understanding required to protect individuals with HIV or AIDS from stigmatization and discrimination by co-workers, employers or clients, and unions.

  9. A web service for service composition to aid geospatial modelers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bigagli, L.; Santoro, M.; Roncella, R.; Mazzetti, P.

    2012-04-01

    The identification of appropriate mechanisms for process reuse, chaining and composition is considered a key enabler for the effective uptake of a global Earth Observation infrastructure, currently pursued by the international geospatial research community. In the Earth and Space Sciences, such a facility could primarily enable integrated and interoperable modeling, for what several approaches have been proposed and developed, over the last years. In fact, GEOSS is specifically tasked with the development of the so-called "Model Web". At increasing levels of abstraction and generalization, the initial stove-pipe software tools have evolved to community-wide modeling frameworks, to Component-Based Architecture solution, and, more recently, started to embrace Service-Oriented Architectures technologies, such as the OGC WPS specification and the WS-* stack of W3C standards for service composition. However, so far, the level of abstraction seems too low for implementing the Model Web vision, and far too complex technological aspects must still be addressed by both providers and users, resulting in limited usability and, eventually, difficult uptake. As by the recent ICT trend of resource virtualization, it has been suggested that users in need of a particular processing capability, required by a given modeling workflow, may benefit from outsourcing the composition activities into an external first-class service, according to the Composition as a Service (CaaS) approach. A CaaS system provides the necessary interoperability service framework for adaptation, reuse and complementation of existing processing resources (including models and geospatial services in general) in the form of executable workflows. This work introduces the architecture of a CaaS system, as a distributed information system for creating, validating, editing, storing, publishing, and executing geospatial workflows. This way, the users can be freed from the need of a composition infrastructure and

  10. Severe and rapidly progressing cognitive phenotype in a SCA17-family with only marginally expanded CAG/CAA repeats in the TATA-box binding protein gene: A case report

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The autosomal dominant spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs) confine a group of rare and heterogeneous disorders, which present with progressive ataxia and numerous other features e.g. peripheral neuropathy, macular degeneration and cognitive impairment, and a subset of these disorders is caused by CAG-repeat expansions in their respective genes. The diagnosing of the SCAs is often difficult due to the phenotypic overlap among several of the subtypes and with other neurodegenerative disorders e.g. Huntington’s disease. Case presentation We report a family in which the proband had rapidly progressing cognitive decline and only subtle cerebellar symptoms from age 42. Sequencing of the TATA-box binding protein gene revealed a modest elongation of the CAG/CAA-repeat of only two repeats above the non-pathogenic threshold of 41, confirming a diagnosis of SCA17. Normally, repeats within this range show reduced penetrance and result in a milder disease course with slower progression and later age of onset. Thus, this case presented with an unusual phenotype. Conclusions The current case highlights the diagnostic challenge of neurodegenerative disorders and the need for a thorough clinical and paraclinical examination of patients presenting with rapid cognitive decline to make a precise diagnosis on which further genetic counseling and initiation of treatment modalities can be based. PMID:22889412

  11. Simultaneous detection of Hb constant spring (α142, TAA>CAA, α2) and the α2 IVS-I donor site (-TGAGG) deletion by a simple polymerase chain reaction-based method in Iran.

    PubMed

    Akhavan-Niaki, Haleh; Banihashemi, Ali; Mostafazadeh, Amrollah; Kholghi Oskooei, Vahid; Azizi, Mandana; Youssefi Kamangar, Reza; Elmi, Maryam Mitra

    2012-01-01

    Hb Constant Spring (Hb CS, codon 142, TAA>CAA, α2) (HBA2:c.427T>C) and α2 IVS-I donor site (GAGGTGAGG>GAGG - - - - -) (HBA2:c.95+2_95+6delTGAGG) are nondeletional α-thalassemia (α-thal) mutations found all over the world. Identification of α-thal genotypes in at-risk couples for severe anemia or in highly heterogeneous populations requires rapid, accurate and cost-effective genotyping methods. In this study, a pair of primers were used to specifically amplify an 883 bp fragment from the α2-globin gene in order to simultaneously identify these two mutations by a PCR-RFLP (polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism) method. We determined the genotypic frequencies of Hb CS and the α2 IVS-I donor site mutations after amplification and enzymatic digestion with Tru9I in 238 northern Iranian samples referred for α-thal testing. Hb CS and the α2 IVS-I donor site mutations accounted for 21 (8.8%) and 29 (12.2%) of the nondeletional cases. This genotyping assay has proven to be a rapid, reliable and useful diagnostic tool for simultaneous detection of these two anomalies for genetic counseling or further prenatal diagnosis.

  12. HIV infection and AIDS.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, A

    1996-09-01

    Many of the clinical features of HIV/AIDS can be ascribed to the profound immune deficiency which develops in infected patients. The destruction of the immune system by the virus results in opportunistic infection, as well as an increased risk of autoimmune disease and malignancy. In addition, disease manifestations related to the virus itself may occur. For example, during the primary illness which occurs within weeks after first exposure to HIV, clinical symptoms occur in at least 50% of cases, typically as a mononucleosis syndrome. HIV-related complications are rarely encountered in patients with preserved immunity (i.e. CD4 T-cell counts greater than 500 cells/mm3). Recurrent mucocutaneous herpes simplex (HSV), herpes zoster (VZV), oral candidiasis and oral hairy leukoplakia occur with increasing frequency as the CD4 count drops below this level. Immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) occurs in association with HIV and often presents early in the clinical course. The risk of developing opportunistic infections and malignancies typical of AIDS increases progressively as CD4 counts fall below 200 cells/mm3. The clinical manifestations of infections associated with AIDS tend to fall into well-recognized patterns of presentation, including pneumonia, dysphagia/odynophagia, diarrhoea, neurological symptoms, fever, wasting, anaemia and visual loss. The commonest pathogens include Candida albicans, Pneumocystis carinii, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Toxoplasma gondii, Cryptococcus neoformans, Mycobacterium avium intracellulare and cytomegalovirus. Malignant disease in patients with HIV infection also occurs in a characteristic pattern. Only two tumours are prevalent: Kaposi's sarcoma, a multifocal tumour of vascular endothelium which typically involves skin and mucosal surfaces; and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, which is typically high grade in phenotype, often arising within the central nervous system. The principles of therapy include reduction of HIV replication by antiretroviral

  13. AIDS and family planning.

    PubMed

    1992-01-01

    In 1991, an HIV prevention program advisor and a research/evaluation specialist for family planning programs discussed problems that affected HIV prevention and family planning services in Haiti before and after the coup of the Aristide government. Population activities began aimlessly in 1974 and HIV prevention efforts only began in 1988. After the coup, Haitians lost their newly found hope for meaningful development. All foreign assistance ended and they did not trust the army. In fact, other than essential child survival activities, no health and family planning services operated for several weeks. The situation grew worse after the economic embargo. 3 months after the coup, the US considered adding family planning assistance. Still little movement of condom, family planning, and health supplies left Port-au-Prince for the provinces which adversely affected all health related efforts. Condoms could no longer be distributed easily either in the socially marketed or US supplied condom distribution programs. Before the coup, HIV prevention and family planning programs depended on peer educators to educate the public (this approach made these programs quite successful), but the 2 experts feared that they would not return to those roles and that these programs would need to completely rebuild. Another concern was the large scale urban-rural migration making it difficult for them to continue care. Early in the AIDS epidemic, the Haitian government was on the defensive because the US considered Haitians as a high risk group so it did little to prevent HIV transmission. After 1988, HIV prevention activities in Haiti centered on raising awareness and personalizing the epidemic. The AIDS specialist noted, however, that a major obstacle to increasing knowledge is that AIDS is just 1 of many fatal diseases in Haiti. Moreover few health professionals in Haiti have ever had public health training.

  14. Computer-aided system design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, Carrie K.

    1991-01-01

    A technique has been developed for combining features of a systems architecture design and assessment tool and a software development tool. This technique reduces simulation development time and expands simulation detail. The Architecture Design and Assessment System (ADAS), developed at the Research Triangle Institute, is a set of computer-assisted engineering tools for the design and analysis of computer systems. The ADAS system is based on directed graph concepts and supports the synthesis and analysis of software algorithms mapped to candidate hardware implementations. Greater simulation detail is provided by the ADAS functional simulator. With the functional simulator, programs written in either Ada or C can be used to provide a detailed description of graph nodes. A Computer-Aided Software Engineering tool developed at the Charles Stark Draper Laboratory (CSDL CASE) automatically generates Ada or C code from engineering block diagram specifications designed with an interactive graphical interface. A technique to use the tools together has been developed, which further automates the design process.

  15. Should Aid Reward Performance?

    PubMed Central

    Olken, Benjamin A.; Onishi, Junko; Wong, Susan

    2014-01-01

    We report an experiment in 3,000 villages that tested whether incentives improve aid efficacy. Villages received block grants for maternal and child health and education that incorporated relative performance incentives. Subdistricts were randomized into incentives, an otherwise identical program without incentives, or control. Incentives initially improved preventative health indicators, particularly in underdeveloped areas, and spending efficiency increased. While school enrollments improved overall, incentives had no differential impact on education, and incentive health effects diminished over time. Reductions in neonatal mortality in non-incentivized areas did not persist with incentives. We find no systematic scoring manipulation nor funding reallocation toward richer areas. PMID:25485039

  16. Migration and AIDS.

    PubMed

    Decosas, J; Kane, F; Anarfi, J K; Sodji, K D; Wagner, H U

    1995-09-23

    A successful short-term solution to transmission of AIDS in Western Africa by migrants involves provision of accessible and acceptable basic health and social services to migrants at their destination. The aim is to establish a sense of security and community, which is a health requirement. When migrants are excluded from community life or victimized as carriers of HIV infections, they will be driven by basic survival needs and dysfunctional social organization, which results in the rapid spread of HIV. Closing borders and mass deportation may not be an option. The long-term solution is population policy, environmental protection, and economic development. The focus on mapping the spread of AIDS must shift to a consideration of the migrant social conditions that make them vulnerable to AIDS. The issue of migration and AIDS will be addressed at the First European Conference on Tropical Medicine in October 1995 in Hamburg, Germany. In Uganda, HIV seroprevalence rates ranged from 5.5% among the stable population to 12.4% among internal migrants moving between villages to 16.3% among migrants from other areas. A World Bank project is operating in Western Africa, which traces seasonal male migration from the Cameroon to Liberia, Senegal to Nigeria, and from the Sahel to the coast during dry seasons. National border rules may influence the routes but not the extent of migration. A major destination place is Cote d' Ivoire, which has 25% of total population comprised of migrants from other countries and one of the highest HIV prevalence rates in Western Africa. On plantations prostitutes are brought in. Each prostitute serves about 25 workers. The pattern of sexual mixing contributes to the high HIV rates. Female migration is smaller and usually concentrated in prostitution at place of destination. Illiteracy and poverty drive women migrants into the trade. Their frequent health problems are malaria, pelvic pain, menstrual irregularity, vaginal discharge, and genital

  17. HIV/AIDS eradication.

    PubMed

    Marsden, Matthew D; Zack, Jerome A

    2013-07-15

    Antiretroviral therapy can inhibit HIV replication in patients and prevent progression to AIDS. However, it is not curative. Here we provide an overview of what antiretroviral drugs do and how the virus persists during therapy in rare reservoirs, such as latently infected CD4+ T cells. We also outline several innovative methods that are currently under development to eradicate HIV from infected individuals. These strategies include gene therapy approaches intended to create an HIV-resistant immune system, and activation/elimination approaches directed towards flushing out latent virus. This latter approach could involve the use of novel chemically synthesized analogs of natural activating agents.

  18. Epigenetic regulation of HIV, AIDS, and AIDS-related malignancies.

    PubMed

    Verma, Mukesh

    2015-01-01

    Although epigenetics is not a new field, its implications for acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) research have not been explored fully. To develop therapeutic and preventive approaches against the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and AIDS, it is essential to understand the mechanisms of interaction between the virus and the host, involvement of genetic and epigenetic mechanisms, characterization of viral reservoirs, and factors influencing the latency of the virus. Both methylation of viral genes and histone modifications contribute to initiating and maintaining latency and, depending on the context, triggering viral gene repression or expression. This chapter discusses progress made at the National Institutes of Health (NIH), recommendations from the International AIDS Society Scientific Working Group on HIV Cure, and underlying epigenetic regulation. A number of epigenetic inhibitors have shown potential in treating AIDS-related malignancies. Epigenetic drugs approved by the US Food and Drug Administration and their implications for the eradication of HIV/AIDS and AIDS-related malignancies also are discussed.Past and current progress in developing treatments and understanding the molecular mechanisms of AIDS and HIV infection has greatly improved patient survival. However, increased survival has been coupled with the development of cancer at higher rates than those observed among the HIV/AIDS-negative population. During the early days of the AIDS epidemic, the most frequent AIDS-defining malignancies were Kaposi's sarcoma and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). Now, with increased survival as the result of widespread use in the developed world of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), non-AIDS defining cancers (i.e., anal, skin, and lung cancers, and Hodgkin disease) are on the increase in HIV-infected populations. The current status of AIDS-related malignancies also is discussed.

  19. Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrews, Theodore E., Ed.

    "The Role of the State in Performance-Based Teacher Education-Certification" by Robert Roth creates a context for viewing how state agencies are approaching performance education. Peter Airasian then explores the value questions that are at the heart of evaluation issues. Fred McDonald looks at "The State of the Art in Performance Assessment," and…

  20. Fuel dispenser aid

    SciTech Connect

    Bobst, J.M.

    1993-08-31

    A fuel dispenser aid is described for holding a trigger-like valve operating lever relative to a pistol grip-like handle portion of a valving device for dispensing gasoline or other fuels through a nozzle of the valving device, said fuel dispenser aid comprising: a mounting member formed of a material having a resilient, shape retaining character and configured for mounting over the pistol grip-like handle portion of the valving device, a flexible strap secured at a first end thereof to the mounting member and extending freely therefrom such that when the mounting member is mounted over the pistol grip-like handle portion of the valving device the free portion of the strap can he looped under the trigger-like valve operating lever and up to the mounting member, and fastening means for releasably and adjustably fastening the free portion of the strap to the mounting member after the free portion of the strap has been looped under the valve operating lever and up to the mounting member whereby the valve operating lever can be held in a desired set position relative to the handle portion of the valving device for dispensing fuel without requiring that the operating lever of the valving device continuously be manually held in said set position.

  1. Migration and AIDS.

    PubMed

    1998-01-01

    This article presents the perspectives of UNAIDS and the International Organization for Migration (IOM) on migration and HIV/AIDS. It identifies research and action priorities and policy issues, and describes the current situation in major regions of the world. Migration is a process. Movement is enhanced by air transport, rising international trade, deregulation of trade practices, and opening of borders. Movements are restricted by laws and statutes. Denial to freely circulate and obtain asylum is associated with vulnerability to HIV infections. A UNAIDS policy paper in 1997 and IOM policy guidelines in 1988 affirm that refugees and asylum seekers should not be targeted for special measures due to HIV/AIDS. There is an urgent need to provide primary health services for migrants, voluntary counseling and testing, and more favorable conditions. Research is needed on the role of migration in the spread of HIV, the extent of migration, availability of health services, and options for HIV prevention. Research must be action-oriented and focused on vulnerability to HIV and risk taking behavior. There is substantial mobility in West and Central Africa, economic migration in South Africa, and nonvoluntary migration in Angola. Sex workers in southeast Asia contribute to the spread. The breakup of the USSR led to population shifts. Migrants in Central America and Mexico move north to the US where HIV prevalence is higher.

  2. Interview: Nanomedicine and the fight against HIV/AIDS.

    PubMed

    Nel, André; Swindells, Susan; Bronich, Tatiana; Gendelman, Howard E

    2014-02-01

    Ahead of the 4th Annual Meeting of the American Society of Nanomedicine, this collection of interviews brings together experts from the fields of nanomedicine and HIV/AIDS treatment. Professor André Nel gives us a general introduction and update on the nanomedicine field and how he hopes it will progress. Professor Susan Swindells describes the current challenges faced in the clinic for HIV/AIDS treatment. Professor Tatiana Bronich explains the research efforts being undertaken by the nanomedicine community for the treatment of microbial infections and HIV/AIDS specifically. Finally, Professor Howard Gendelman looks to the future and assesses the potential and challenges of nanomedicine approaches for HIV eradication.

  3. Depression and HIV/AIDS.

    PubMed

    Benton, Tami D

    2008-06-01

    HIV/AIDS continues to be a significant public health problem. Millions of people worldwide are infected with this virus daily, and thousands die yearly of AIDS-related illnesses. Despite rapid advances in our knowledge about HIV and its mode of transmission, we have been unable to find a cure or prevent new infections. Psychiatric comorbidity is associated with HIV/AIDS: as a risk factor for HIV infection, a comorbidity of HIV infection, sequelae of HIV/AIDS, and a potential mediator for progression to AIDS. In this article, we focus on depression, which is prevalent in HIV/AIDS. We review the evidence associating depression with HIV, the challenges in recognizing depression in HIV-positive individuals, and the psychopharmacologic strategies known to be effective in the treatment of HIV-positive individuals with depression.

  4. Frequency-Shift Hearing Aid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinstein, Leonard M.

    1994-01-01

    Proposed hearing aid maps spectrum of speech into band of lower frequencies at which ear remains sensitive. By redirecting normal speech frequencies into frequency band from 100 to 1,500 Hz, hearing aid allows people to understand normal conversation, including telephone calls. Principle operation of hearing aid adapted to other uses such as, clearing up noisy telephone or radio communication. In addition, loud-speakers more easily understood in presence of high background noise.

  5. AIDS: A Statewide Survey of Students' Knowledge and Attitudes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salehi, Saeed; And Others

    A survey was conducted of 817 high school students in representative school districts in Maryland to: determine AIDS-related knowledge, beliefs and practices of high school students by grade, sex, age, and race; assess the perceived behavior of their peers and themselves; and assess the level of students interest in, and effectiveness of, AIDS…

  6. Recall of AIDS public service announcements and their impact on the ranking of AIDS as a national problem.

    PubMed

    Siska, M; Jason, J; Murdoch, P; Yang, W S; Donovan, R J

    1992-07-01

    The efficacy of two public service announcements from Phase V of the "America Responds to AIDS" (ARTA) campaign was assessed at two sites. Participants were randomly assigned to view a local news program, one with an ARTA public service announcement appearing six times and the other with no AIDS public service announcements. During telephone interviews with 907 participants 1 to 3 nights after viewing, 21% at Site A and 59% at Site B could correctly recall the ARTA public service announcements. Absolute mentions of AIDS as an important national issue increased.

  7. Recall of AIDS public service announcements and their impact on the ranking of AIDS as a national problem.

    PubMed Central

    Siska, M; Jason, J; Murdoch, P; Yang, W S; Donovan, R J

    1992-01-01

    The efficacy of two public service announcements from Phase V of the "America Responds to AIDS" (ARTA) campaign was assessed at two sites. Participants were randomly assigned to view a local news program, one with an ARTA public service announcement appearing six times and the other with no AIDS public service announcements. During telephone interviews with 907 participants 1 to 3 nights after viewing, 21% at Site A and 59% at Site B could correctly recall the ARTA public service announcements. Absolute mentions of AIDS as an important national issue increased. PMID:1609906

  8. Public knowledge about AIDS increasing.

    PubMed

    Campbell, M J; Waters, W E

    1987-04-04

    In response to concern over the perceived limited effectiveness of Department of Health and Social Security (UK) advertising campaigns to inform the public of the basic facts of Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS), a prospective questionnaire study was undertaken in Southampton, England to test the effectiveness of government education prior to a January, 1987 government television/leaflet advertising campaign. 300 questionnaires about AIDS were mailed in December of 1986 to a sample drawn from electoral rolls. The response rate was 61%. Most of the questions were drawn from material covered in the campaign. The results seemed to indicate a small overall increase in knowledge about AIDS. Some changes from a June survey were noted, e.g.: more people were aware that AIDS is a virus for which there is no cure and that it is not readily transmitted by sharing washing, eating or drinking utensils; more people believed that the statement that women are at greater risk for catching AIDS is false. Respondents were generally favorable to the government's continued use of television, even with explicit language, and to its use of the schools, for AIDS education. Many were not aware of the dangers to intravenous drug users or of the symptoms of AIDS. Other surveys have shown an increasing knowledge of AIDS dangers. It is possible that television coverage of the problem will continue to be necessary, in order that less literate populations be reached. Further AIDS health education in general is needed.

  9. Aids and Infectious Diseases (aid) Pmp 2013 Report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buonaguro, Franco M.

    2014-07-01

    The AIDS and Infectious Diseases (AID) PMP of the WFS contributed this year with a session on August 22nd to the Plenary Sessions of the International Seminars on Planetary Emergencies and Associated Meetings--46th Session: The Role of Science in the Third Millennium (Erice, 19-24 August 2013). Furthermore a workshop on August 24th was organized...

  10. Psychological First Aid

    PubMed Central

    Shultz, James M; Forbes, David

    2014-01-01

    Psychological first aid (PFA) has become the flagship early intervention for disaster survivors, with recent adaptations for disaster responders, in the post-9/11 era. PFA is broadly endorsed by expert consensus and integrated into guidelines for mental health and psychosocial support in disasters and extreme events. PFA frameworks are proliferating, with increasing numbers of models developed for delivery by a range of providers for use with an expanding array of target populations. Despite popularity and promotion there remains a dearth of evidence for effectiveness and recent independent reviews of PFA have highlighted this important gap. This commentary juxtaposes the current propagation of PFA against the compelling need to produce evidence for effectiveness and suggests a series of actions to prioritize and expedite real-time, real-event field evaluation of PFA.

  11. AIDS and sex tourism.

    PubMed

    Herold, E S; Van Kerkwijk, C

    1992-01-01

    Tourists traveling internationally lower their inhibitions and take greater risks than they would typically in their home cultures. Loneliness, boredom, and a sense of freedom contribute to this behavioral change. Some tourists travel internationally in search of sexual gratification. This motivation may be actively conscious or subconscious to the traveler. Billed as romantic with great natural beauty, Thailand, the Philippines, Brazil, the Dominican Republic, and Kenya are popular destinations of tourists seeking sex. The Netherlands and countries in eastern Europe are also popular. With most initial cases of HIV infection in Europe having histories of international travel, mass tourism is a major factor in the international transmission of AIDS. While abroad, tourists have sex with casual partners, sex workers, and/or other tourists. Far from all tourists, however, carry and consistently use condoms with these partners. One study found female and non white travelers to be less likely than Whites and males to carry condoms. The risk of HIV infection increases in circumstances where condoms are not readily available in the host country and/or are of poor quality. Regarding actual condom use, a study found only 34% of sex tourists from Switzerland to consistently use condoms while abroad. 28% of men in an STD clinic in Melbourne, Australia, reported consistent condom use in sexual relations while traveling in Asia; STDs were identified in 73% of men examined. The few studies of tourists suggest that a significant proportion engage in risky behavior while traveling. HIV prevalence is rapidly increasing in countries known as destinations for sex tourism. High infection rates are especially evident among teenage sex workers in Thailand. Simply documenting the prevalence of risky behavior among sex tourists will not suffice. More research is needed on travelers and AIDS with particular attention upon the motivating factors supporting persistent high-risk behavior.

  12. Both (+/-)syn- and (+/-)anti-7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene-3,4-diol-1,2-epoxides initiate tumors in mouse skin that possess -CAA- to -CTA- mutations at Codon 61 of c-H-ras.

    PubMed

    Tang, M S; Vulimiri, S V; Viaje, A; Chen, J X; Bilolikar, D S; Morris, R J; Harvey, R G; Slaga, T J; DiGiovanni, J

    2000-10-15

    We have determined the tumor-initiating activity of (+/-)syn- and (+/-)anti-7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene-3,4-diol-1,2-epoxide (syn- and anti-DMBADE), the two metabolically formed bay-region diol epoxides of DMBA, and we have also analyzed mutations in the H-ras gene from tumors induced by these compounds. Using a two-stage, initiation-promotion protocol for tumorigenesis in mouse skin, we have found that both syn- and anti-DMBADE are active tumor initiators, and that the occurrence of papillomas is carcinogen dose dependent. All of the papillomas induced by syn-DMBADE (a total of 40 mice), 96% of those induced by anti-DMBADE (a total of 25 mice), and 94% of those induced by DMBA (a total of 16 mice) possessed a -CAA- to -CTA- mutation at codon 61 of H-ras. No mutations in codons 12 or 13 were detected in any tumor. Topical application of syn- and anti-DMBADE produced stable adducts in mouse epidermal DNA, most of which comigrated with stable DNA adducts formed after topical application of DMBA. Further analysis of the data showed that levels of the major syn- and anti-DMBADE-deoxyadenosine adducts formed after topical application of DMBA are sufficient to account for the tumor-initiating activity of this carcinogen on mouse skin. Previously, we showed that both the syn- and anti-DMBADE bind to the adenine (A182) at codon 61 of H-ras. Collectively, these results indicate that the adenine adducts induced by both bay-region diol epoxides of DMBA lead to the mutation at codon 61 of H-ras and, consequently, initiate tumorigenesis in mouse skin.

  13. Aiding the environment: the Australian Development Agency's experience of implementing an environmental management system

    SciTech Connect

    Keen, Meg . E-mail: meg.keen@anu.edu.au; Sullivan, Marjorie

    2005-08-15

    Aid agencies, like commercial businesses, are increasingly concerned with incorporating sound environmental management into their operations. Different approaches are being used to integrate sustainability into development assistance to ensure that environmental impacts are assessed and managed. One approach being used by AusAID, the Australian aid agency, is to implement an environmental management system (EMS) across program and project areas. This paper examines how AusAID has adapted the EMS approach to suit aid agency operations, and some of the lessons from the Australian experience.

  14. Hearing Aid Use and Associated Factors in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Moon, Il Joon; Baek, Sun Young; Cho, Yang-Sun

    2015-10-01

    Despite the high prevalence of hearing impairment in the elderly, the rate of hearing aid use is still low. The objectives of this study were to report the nation-wide prevalence of hearing aid use in the Korean population and to determine the associated factors with hearing aid use utilizing a nationally representative data set.We obtained data from the 2010 to 2012 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys, which were cross-sectional surveys of the civilian, noninstitutionalized population of the Republic of Korea at age ≥40 years (N = 12,709). A field survey team performed interviews as well as physical examinations. Hearing aid use was assessed using an interviewer-administered questionnaire and pure-tone audiometry was administered for all participants in a sound-attenuating booth. Prevalence of hearing aid acquisition and regular use were calculated in participants who reported perceived hearing loss and who have bilateral hearing thresholds exceeding the 40 dB hearing level. Multivariable analyses were used to examine the associated factors with hearing aid use.The prevalence of hearing aid acquisition and regular use was 17.4% and 12.6%, respectively, in South Korea. Increased hearing threshold (OR 1.05, 95% CI 1.03-1.07), severe perceived hearing loss (OR 10.73, 95% CI 4.52-25.46), annoying tinnitus (OR 3.30, 95% CI 1.61-6.74), balance problems (OR 0.39, 95% CI 0.18-0.86), and myopia (OR 0.30, 95% CI 0.12-0.76) were associated factors of regular use of hearing aids.The prevalence of hearing aid use in Korea is relatively low. Finding relevant factors of hearing aid use could provide further insight in setting up hearing-rehabilitation strategy for the elderly with significant hearing loss.

  15. CAA Annual Report Fiscal Year 1998.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-12-01

    TRADOC TAC BAT Tactical Air Contributions in DCSOPS LMI-QRA Logistics Management OSD the BAT Study * Institute - QRA TACOS TAA-01A/COMRAD DCSOPS... Studies , 3-1 Quick Reaction Analyses & Projects 3-1 4 TECHNOLOGY RESEARCH AND ANALYSIS SUPPORT 4-1 Technology Research 4-1 Methodology Research 4-2...Publications, Graphics, and Reproduction 5-2 6 ANALYTICAL EFFORTS COMPLETED BETWEEN FY90 AND FY98 6-1 Appendix A Annual Study , Work Evaluation

  16. CAA Annual Report, Fiscal Year 1992.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-11-01

    Support - Excursion DCSOPS PTADS Persian Tiger Air Defense Study DCSOPS Q-FOCUS Quick - Force Comparison US vs Soviet OCSA- CAIG Q-FORCE-91 QUICKSILVER... PTADS Son of Persian Tiger Air Defense Study DCSOPS STAMKRAM STARDUST Mobility/Firepower Kill Replacement DCSOPS Analysis STARDUST STARDUSTQRA DCSOPS

  17. A CAA Primer for Practicing Engineers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-04-01

    when αΔx is small but becomes large when αΔx → π, one may use a Gaussian function centered at αΔx = π with half-width σ as a template for choosing the...the amplitude of the Gaussian function at the corner point. This value has to be adjusted in each problem until a satisfactory value is selected...approximation to a Gaussian function of half width σ centered at αΔx = π. Specifically, the integral DC αΔx( )− e−(ln 2)( αΔx−π σ ) 2[ ]0κ∫ d αΔx( ) is

  18. Translation: Aids, Robots, and Automation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andreyewsky, Alexander

    1981-01-01

    Examines electronic aids to translation both as ways to automate it and as an approach to solve problems resulting from shortage of qualified translators. Describes the limitations of robotic MT (Machine Translation) systems, viewing MAT (Machine-Aided Translation) as the only practical solution and the best vehicle for further automation. (MES)

  19. Revisiting the Archival Finding Aid

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cox, Richard J.

    2007-01-01

    Archivists have been creating finding aids for generations, and in the last three decades they have done this work via a succession of standardized formats. However, like many other disciplines, they have carried out such work in violation of systems analysis. Although purporting to have the users of finding aids systems first and foremost in…

  20. Aids and the nervous system

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenblum, M.L. ); Levy, R.M. ); Bredesen, D.E. )

    1988-01-01

    This book contains 19 chapters. Some of the titles are: Neuroradiology of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome; The AIDS dementia complex; primary infection with human immunodeficiency virus; The biology of the human immunodeficiency virus and its role in neurological disease; and Algorithms for the treatment of AIDS patients with neurological disease.

  1. Certification of Financial Aid Administrators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Stacey A.

    2011-01-01

    The certification of financial aid administrators has been debated for over 37 years. A job satisfaction survey conducted by the National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators (NASFAA, 2008a) revealed that college and university administrators' perceptions of the efficiency, effectiveness, and quality of the services provided by the…

  2. Nursing Aides, Orderlies, and Attendants

    MedlinePlus

    ... therapists. See How to Become One $54,520 Personal Care Aides Personal care aides help clients with self-care and everyday tasks. They also provide social supports and assistance that enable clients to participate in ... tab describes the typical duties and responsibilities of workers in the occupation, including what tools ...

  3. AIDS Resource Manual for Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Sara A., Ed.; And Others

    This manual presents, for educators, known facts about Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS), how it is transmitted, and how it can be prevented. Answers to common questions about AIDS are listed and a summary sheet is provided. A resource list is included that contains names, addresses, and phone numbers of organizations that produce or…

  4. HIV/AIDS and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    If you have HIV/AIDS and find out you are pregnant or think you may be pregnant, you should let your health care provider know as soon as possible. Some HIV/AIDS medicines may harm your baby. Your health care ...

  5. Moral Character and Student Aid

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flint, Thomas A.

    2012-01-01

    Thirty years after the creation of federal student financial aid programs through the Higher Education Act of 1965, the link between moral character and student financial aid programs is once again influencing the public policy debate. A careful look at the debate, though, shows that the nature of concerns has shifted. In the past, the question…

  6. Hearing aid malfunction detection system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kessinger, R. L. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A malfunction detection system for detecting malfunctions in electrical signal processing circuits is disclosed. Malfunctions of a hearing aid in the form of frequency distortion and/or inadequate amplification by the hearing aid amplifier, as well as weakening of the hearing aid power supply are detectable. A test signal is generated and a timed switching circuit periodically applies the test signal to the input of the hearing aid amplifier in place of the input signal from the microphone. The resulting amplifier output is compared with the input test signal used as a reference signal. The hearing aid battery voltage is also periodically compared to a reference voltage. Deviations from the references beyond preset limits cause a warning system to operate.

  7. Attitudes towards and Knowledge of AIDS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Andrew; Hiday, Virginia Aldige'

    Most research on Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) has been medical and most social science research on AIDS has been concerned with social factors in its spread and with social-psychological effects of contracting AIDS. This study was conducted to examine public attitudes toward, and public knowledge about AIDS. Knowledge about AIDS was…

  8. 76 FR 76025 - World AIDS Day, 2011

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-06

    ... Documents#0;#0; ] Proclamation 8762 of November 30, 2011 World AIDS Day, 2011 By the President of the United States of America A Proclamation On World AIDS Day, 30 years after the first cases of HIV/AIDS were... AIDS-free generation. My Administration is taking action to turn the corner on the HIV/AIDS pandemic...

  9. World Bank will lend more money to India for AIDS.

    PubMed

    Jayaraman, K S

    1998-07-01

    This article discusses the World Bank's plans to lend India money that will be used in part to fund HIV/AIDS prevention and control. The loan amounts to about US$200 million, of which 25% would be directed to research and development for HIV/AIDS. The loan is a 5-year extension of support that ended March 1999. The loan will cover the cost of blood safety programs, hospital and community care plans, and medical drugs for treating opportunistic infections. According to the Department of Biotechnology and the Indian Council of Medical Research, research and development money will be split between indigenous AIDS vaccine programs and assessment of local production of HIV diagnostic kits and development of vaginal microbicides. The government will support clinical trials of more than herbal medicines for treating tuberculosis. Funding will also support evaluation research on cost of patient care and the HIV/AIDS impact on the work force. A major focus will be on the high risk population of women and children. The World Bank requires that 50% of the loans go to nongovernmental organizations (NGOs). However, the National AIDS Control Organization (NACO) of India lost government financial funding and will not be able to fund NGO efforts directly. NACO must channel funding through state governments. There is fear that the AIDS control program will suffer due to the restructuring of operations and shortages of manpower. The AIDS program funding could be halted by the Bank due to India's nuclear testing.

  10. Psychological predictors of sexual behaviors related to AIDS transmission.

    PubMed

    Thompson, K L; Geher, G; Stevens, K F; Stem, S T; Lintz, M K

    2001-02-01

    This study was designed to assess the differential value of several psychological variables with regard to predicting safe-sex behavior. A sample of 94 male and 179 female undergraduate students, ranging in age from 16 to 66 years, were surveyed about sexual issues related to safe-sex practices. The survey included scales measuring participants' knowledge of transmission of AIDS, self-perception of safe-sex communication, fear and concern about AIDS, attitudes toward AIDS victims, and self-report of risky behavior. Several interesting relationships among predictor variables were found. For instance, favorable attitudes toward AIDS victims were positively correlated with knowledge about AIDS transmission, perceived communication with partners about safe sex, and fear of acquiring AIDS. However, only two predictor variables were independently predictive of self-reports of risky sexual behavior; specifically, fear about AIDS transmission was positively correlated with risky behavior, while communication was negatively correlated with risky behavior. These data suggest a need for a model that allows for complex, reciprocal relationships between the cognitive, emotional, and behavioral components of safe-sex practice. Implications are applied to research with college populations.

  11. Has the Swap Influenced Aid Flows in the Health Sector?

    PubMed

    Sweeney, Rohan; Mortimer, Duncan

    2016-05-01

    The sector wide approach (SWAp) emerged during the 1990s as a mechanism for managing aid from the multiplicity of development partners that operate in the recipient country's health, education or agricultural sectors. Health SWAps aim to give increased control to recipient governments, allowing greater domestic influence over how health aid is allocated and facilitating allocative efficiency gains. This paper assesses whether health SWAps have increased recipient control of health aid via increased general sector-support and have facilitated (re)allocations of health aid across disease areas. Using a uniquely compiled panel data set of countries receiving development assistance for health over the period 1990-2010, we employ fixed effects and dynamic panel models to assess the impact of introducing a health SWAp on levels of general sector-support for health and allocations of health-sector aid across key funding silos (including HIV, 'maternal and child health' and 'sector-support'). Our results suggest that health SWAps have influenced health-sector aid flows in a manner consistent with increased recipient control and improvements in allocative efficiency.

  12. [Pharmaceutical aids in gerontopharmacology].

    PubMed

    Kircher, W

    2013-01-01

    The administration of drugs is often subject to error when performed by geriatric patients, resulting in reduced therapeutic effects. In particular, the correct administration technique for different dosage forms is a problem in elderly patients with limited audiovisual and ergonomic abilities. In addition to physician and carer intervention, community pharmacists can also contribute to solving outpatient problems of this kind at the time of issuing the drugs. This should preferably be done in collaboration with the respective medical practice. Some of the most common problems in drug administration, as well as the corresponding solutions offered by the pharmacist, are featured in the present paper. Inhalers, injection devices and ophthalmic solutions often cause difficulties for geriatric patients, as do even simple dosage forms such as drops. Pharmacy-based solutions to these problems include for instance: taking over the assembly of complex devices comprising multiple components, instructing patients in the proper use of additional dosing aids or adapting the administration technique to the patient's abilities.

  13. [The AIDS patient in anesthesia].

    PubMed

    Jalowy, A; Flesche, C W; Lorenz, C

    1997-02-01

    Treatment of a patient with Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) is very challenging, and makes great demands on the anaesthesiologist. Any of an AIDS patient's vital organ systems may be compromised, either by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) itself, opportunistic infections, by tumours, or as a result of AIDS-related drug therapies. Infections of the lungs (e.g., Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia) are prevalent, and cardiac impairment can be found in as many as 50% of AIDS patients. In addition, disorders of the central and peripheral nervous system and water and electrolyte imbalances are often seen. Perioperatively, the AIDS patient is especially prone to infections as a result of a compromised immune system. The choice of anaesthetic procedure for the AIDS patient-aside from the type of operation-depends on the severity of the illness and progression of organ impairment. All anaesthesia personnel must be careful to avoid infection, as they frequently come in contact with the blood or body fluids of their patients. However, the risk of being infected by an AIDS patient is very low, provided hygiene regulations are followed strictly. The rate of seroconversion after accidental needle-stick injury is below 1%. If exposure does occur, regular serologic controls should be continued for one year. Prophylactic treatment with azidothymidine after exposition to HIV is recommended.

  14. Educating Brazilian workers about AIDS.

    PubMed

    1991-12-01

    This article contains a the script for a slide-tape presentation entitled Working Against AIDS, a presentation developed by the Brazil Family Planning Association (BEMFAM) which is designed to debunk common misconceptions about the disease. This audio-visual, which targets Brazilian workers, can be used during talks, seminars, and meetings. A discussion of the issues involved usually follows the presentation of Working Against AIDS. The presentation contains 30 illustrated slides (these are included in the article). The presentation begins by explaining that much of the information concerning AIDS is prejudicial and misleading. The next few slides point out some of the common misconceptions about AIDS, such as claims denying the existence of the disease, or suggestions that only homosexuals and prostitutes are at risk. The presentation then goes on to explain the ways in which the virus can and cannot be transmitted. Then it discusses how the virus destroys the body's natural defenses and explains the ensuing symptoms. Slides 14 and 15 point out that no cure yet exists for AIDS, making prevention essential. Slides 16-23 explain what actions are considered to be high risk and which ones do not entail risk. Noting that AIDS can be prevented, slide 24 says that the disease should not present an obstacle to spontaneous manifestations of human relations. The next slide explains that condoms should always be used when having sex with someone who could be infected with AIDS. Finally slides 26-30 demonstrate the proper way to use and dispose of a condom.

  15. Low Vision Aids and Low Vision Rehabilitation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Vision Resources Low Vision Rehabilitation and Low Vision Aids Written by: David Turbert Edited by: Robert H ... covers most services, but not devices.) Low vision aids There are many low vision aids and devices ...

  16. HIV / AIDS: Symptoms, Diagnosis, Prevention and Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues HIV / AIDS HIV / AIDS: Symptoms , Diagnosis, Prevention and Treatment Past Issues / Summer ... and have resulted in a dramatic decrease in AIDS deaths in the U.S. NIH Research to Results ...

  17. HIV/AIDS and the Flu

    MedlinePlus

    ... Submit What's this? Submit Button Past Newsletters HIV/AIDS and the Flu Questions & Answers Language: English Españ ... with HIV and AIDS. Should people with HIV/AIDS receive the inactivated influenza vaccine? People with HIV ...

  18. HIV/AIDS Clinical Trials Fact Sheet

    MedlinePlus

    ... and effective in people. What is an HIV/AIDS clinical trial? HIV/AIDS clinical trials help researchers ... to HIV Can anyone participate in an HIV/AIDS clinical trial? It depends on the study. Some ...

  19. AIDS. Grim news for Asia.

    PubMed

    1992-12-04

    While Asia was the last region to be exposed to the global spread of HIV and AIDS, the incidence of HIV infection there is increasing fastest. The Asian Development Bank predicts mortality from AIDS will cause some town and village populations to begin declining by the year 2000. With an estimated 1 million people infected in India, and 400,000 in Thailand, these 2 countries are particularly exposed to the risk of epidemic HIV spread. In 5 years, more people may be affected by AIDS in India than anywhere else in the world. Concern over a growing presence of HIV is also merited for the Philippines, Indonesia, China, and the drug trade's Golden Triangle. The Second International Conference on AIDS in Asia and the Pacific in November 1992 stressed that AIDS no longer affects only homosexual and IV drug using populations. 50% of new infections worldwide in the first half of 1992 were among women, 65% of Thailand's AIDS cases are among heterosexuals, and 3-5% of Thailand's long-haul truck drivers have tested positive for HIV infection. HIV and AIDS robs economies and societies of their best workers. The immediate costs of caring for AIDS patients will pale next to the far greater losses to be realized in private sector economic productivity. Asia's more developed economies will probably be able to survive the epidemic, but small, poor countries like Laos will wilt. Prompt action must be taken to overcome public and religious ignorance and objections to promoting and using condoms throughout the region. For the first time, Beijing has organized an AIDS awareness conference for male homosexuals. Further, Singapore has implemented compulsory testing for lower-income foreign workers. Pakistan has even solicited educational assistance and support from Islamic religious leaders; similar action is being considered in Bangladesh.

  20. AIDS in India: constructive chaos?

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, A

    1991-08-01

    Until recently, the only sustained AIDS activity in India has been alarmist media attention complemented by occasional messages calling for comfort and dignity. Public perception of the AIDS epidemic in India has been effectively shaped by mass media. Press reports have, however, bolstered awareness of the problem among literate elements of urban populations. In the absence of sustained guidance in the campaign against AIDS, responsibility has fallen to voluntary health activists who have become catalysts for community awareness and participation. This voluntary initiative, in effect, seems to be the only immediate avenue for constructive public action, and signals the gradual development of an AIDS network in India. Proceedings from a seminar in Ahmedabad are discussed, and include plans for an information and education program targeting sex workers, health and communication programs for 150 commercial blood donors and their agents, surveillance and awareness programs for safer blood and blood products, and dialogue with the business community and trade unions. Despite the lack of coordination among volunteers and activists, every major city in India now has an AIDS group. A controversial bill on AIDS has ben circulating through government ministries and committees since mid-1989, a national AIDS committee exists with the Secretary of Health as its director, and a 3-year medium-term national plan exists for the reduction of AIDS and HIV infection and morbidity. UNICEF programs target mothers and children for AIDS awareness, and blood testing facilities are expected to be expanded. The article considers the present chaos effectively productive in forcing the Indian population to face up to previously taboo issued of sexuality, sex education, and sexually transmitted disease.