Science.gov

Sample records for aided facility management

  1. Facility management of computer-aided design, drafting/manufacturing systems (CADD/M)

    SciTech Connect

    Norton, F.J.

    1980-09-23

    Interactive Computer-Aided Design Drafting/Manufacturing systems have been installed in thousands of companies, applying CADD/M capabilities to many applications. This has been done with varying degrees of success even among companies with identical applications. Investigation of individual companies reveals a gap between the capabilities of CADD/M systems and the actual usage by industry of those capabilities. This company usage often determines the degree of success or failure of an interactive graphics facility and is largely controlled by management. The responsibilities of the interactive graphics facility managemant team are explained in detail. Proper management of a CADD/M facility is more critical to the success or failure of the facility than any other factor.

  2. Aid for Facilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Mike

    2009-01-01

    Even before the state fire marshal ordered the Somersworth (N.H.) School District in 2007 to abandon the top two floors of Hilltop Elementary School because of safety concerns, folks in the city of 12,000 had been debating whether the aging facility should be replaced--and how to pay for it. Finally, in February 2009, the city council approved…

  3. Facilities Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bete, Tim, Ed.

    1998-01-01

    Presents responses from Matt McGovern, "School Planning and Management's" Maintenance and Operations columnist, on the issue of school facility maintenance. McGovern does not believe schools will ever likely meet acceptable levels of maintenance, nor use infrared thermography for assessing roofs, outsource all maintenance work, nor find a pressing…

  4. Management of Student Aid.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nevin, Jeanne, Ed.

    The principles, practices, responsibilities, and controls in student financial aid are described in this manual. It traces the flow of funds, management activities, and legal issues as they occur in the process. The emphasis is on sound management principles of a general and permanent nature rather than on specific government requirements that may…

  5. Software aids plant management

    SciTech Connect

    Winiger, T. )

    1992-11-01

    This paper reports that for most utilities, computer aided engineering (CAE) systems are currently used for operating plant support rather than new plant design particularly for nuclear plant maintenance. For nuclear power generating utilities, switching to a modern, integrated CAE information system can offer significant benefits. During the last decade, however, most engineering automation in the power generation industry focused on computer-aided drafting and stand-alone engineering applications. An integrated CAE system can be a useful too, assisting engineers with many engineering and operational activities. It also can be used to manage the massive amount of information created throughout the life of a plant.

  6. Assessment of laboratory logistics management information system practice for HIV/AIDS and tuberculosis laboratory commodities in selected public health facilities in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Desale, Adino; Taye, Bineyam; Belay, Getachew; Nigatu, Alemayehu

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Logistics management information system for health commodities remained poorly implemented in most of developing countries. To assess the status of laboratory logistics management information system for HIV/AIDS and tuberculosis laboratory commodities in public health facilities in Addis Ababa. Methods A cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted from September 2010-January 2011 at selected public health facilities. A stratified random sampling method was used to include a total of 43 facilities which, were investigated through quantitative methods using structured questionnaires interviews. Focus group discussion with the designated supply chain managers and key informant interviews were conducted for the qualitative method. Results There exists a well-designed logistics system for laboratory commodities with trained pharmacy personnel, distributed standard LMIS formats and established inventory control procedures. However, majority of laboratory professionals were not trained in LMIS. Majority of the facilities (60.5%) were stocked out for at least one ART monitoring and TB laboratory reagents and the highest stock out rate was for chemistry reagents. Expired ART monitoring laboratory commodities were found in 25 (73.5%) of facilities. Fifty percent (50%) of the assessed hospitals and 54% of health centers were currently using stock/bin cards for all HIV/AIDS and TB laboratory commodities in main pharmacy store, among these only 25% and 20.8% of them were updated with accurate information matching with the physical count done at the time of visit for hospitals and health centers respectively. Conclusion Even though there exists a well designed laboratory LMIS, keeping quality stock/bin cards and LMIS reports were very low. Key ART monitoring laboratory commodities were stock out at many facilities at the day of visit and during the past six months. Based on findings, training of laboratory personnel's managing laboratory commodities and keeping

  7. Sports Facility Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Marcia L., Ed.; Stotlar, David K., Ed.

    The numbers of both sports facility management college courses and sport and exercise facilities are increasing, along with the need for an understanding of the trends and management concepts of these facilities. This book focuses exclusively on managing facilities where sporting events occur and includes examples in physical education, athletics,…

  8. Facility Planning and Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Earthman, Glen I.

    This chapter of "Principles of School Business Management" reviews the extensive range of activities associated with planning for and constructing school facilities. These activities include (1) organizing the staff and organizing the task; (2) conducting long-range planning (involving the gathering of data, the development of a planning document,…

  9. 29 CFR 1917.26 - First aid and lifesaving facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false First aid and lifesaving facilities. 1917.26 Section 1917..., DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) MARINE TERMINALS Marine Terminal Operations § 1917.26 First aid and..., to the employer. (b) A first aid kit shall be available at the terminal, and at least one...

  10. 29 CFR 1917.26 - First aid and lifesaving facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false First aid and lifesaving facilities. 1917.26 Section 1917..., DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) MARINE TERMINALS Marine Terminal Operations § 1917.26 First aid and..., to the employer. (b) A first aid kit shall be available at the terminal, and at least one...

  11. 29 CFR 1917.26 - First aid and lifesaving facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false First aid and lifesaving facilities. 1917.26 Section 1917..., DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) MARINE TERMINALS Marine Terminal Operations § 1917.26 First aid and..., to the employer. (b) A first aid kit shall be available at the terminal, and at least one...

  12. 29 CFR 1917.26 - First aid and lifesaving facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false First aid and lifesaving facilities. 1917.26 Section 1917..., DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) MARINE TERMINALS Marine Terminal Operations § 1917.26 First aid and..., to the employer. (b) A first aid kit shall be available at the terminal, and at least one...

  13. 29 CFR 1917.26 - First aid and lifesaving facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false First aid and lifesaving facilities. 1917.26 Section 1917.26 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) MARINE TERMINALS Marine Terminal Operations § 1917.26 First aid and lifesaving facilities. (a) Employers shall...

  14. A Program Management Framework for Facilities Managers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Dan

    2012-01-01

    The challenge faced by senior facility leaders is not how to execute a single project, but rather, how to successfully execute a large program consisting of hundreds of projects. Senior facilities officers at universities, school districts, hospitals, airports, and other organizations with extensive facility inventories, typically manage project…

  15. The Future of Facilities Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daigneau, William A.

    1997-01-01

    Reports on a conference of college facility managers at which facilities professionals identified forces affecting the profession's future in five areas (information technology, resource scarcity, societal changes, government role in education, environmental deterioration) and six important roles for the manager (operational efficiency expert,…

  16. 48 CFR 970.3770 - Facilities management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Facilities management. 970... REGULATIONS DOE MANAGEMENT AND OPERATING CONTRACTS Facilities Management Contracting 970.3770 Facilities management....

  17. 48 CFR 970.3770 - Facilities management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Facilities management. 970... REGULATIONS DOE MANAGEMENT AND OPERATING CONTRACTS Facilities Management Contracting 970.3770 Facilities management....

  18. 48 CFR 970.3770 - Facilities management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Facilities management. 970... REGULATIONS DOE MANAGEMENT AND OPERATING CONTRACTS Facilities Management Contracting 970.3770 Facilities management....

  19. 48 CFR 970.3770 - Facilities management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Facilities management. 970... REGULATIONS DOE MANAGEMENT AND OPERATING CONTRACTS Facilities Management Contracting 970.3770 Facilities management....

  20. 48 CFR 970.3770 - Facilities management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Facilities management. 970... REGULATIONS DOE MANAGEMENT AND OPERATING CONTRACTS Facilities Management Contracting 970.3770 Facilities management....

  1. General Framework of Hearing Aid Fitting Management

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Soo Hee

    2016-01-01

    Hearing aids are one of the most widely used treatment options for the hearing impaired and optimal outcomes of hearing aids are supported by comprehensive hearing aid fitting protocols. Currently, the term 'hearing aid fitting' is prevalently used among service and industry sectors with its comprehensive procedures not systematically explicated. In addition, a variety of non-normalized guidelines for hearing aid fitting has led to non-uniform care, outcome variability, and dissatisfaction of the use of hearing aids. The main purpose of the present study is to suggest a general framework of standardized practice for hearing aid fitting management including its pre- and post-fitting stages. The management framework centers on its fitting process with its prior steps of assessment as well as its posterior steps of follow-up, thereby eliminating diverging interpretations and non-uniform practices. Outcomes of this study are also expected to improve potential benefits such as quality of hearing aid fitting, user satisfaction, and cost effectiveness across relevant stakeholders. PMID:27144226

  2. Data Management Facility Operations Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Keck, Nicole N

    2014-06-30

    The Data Management Facility (DMF) is the data center that houses several critical Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility services, including first-level data processing for the ARM Mobile Facilities (AMFs), Eastern North Atlantic (ENA), North Slope of Alaska (NSA), Southern Great Plains (SGP), and Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) sites, as well as Value-Added Product (VAP) processing, development systems, and other network services.

  3. Nothing prepared me to manage AIDS.

    PubMed

    Banas, G E

    1992-01-01

    Articles and seminars about AIDS in the workplace are not adequate preparation for the genuine problems faced by actual managers in real organizations. There are no easy, win-win solutions to the impossible dilemmas AIDS presents, only various forms of damage control and, at best, more or less humane compromises. Gary Banas knows. Over a period of four years, two of his direct reports developed AIDS, and he watched them suffer through debility, slowly deteriorating performance, and eventual death. He also watched the gradual decline of their subordinates' productivity and morale. He found that, to different degrees, both men refused to acknowledge their illness and their decreasing organizational effectiveness. One of them resisted the author's efforts to give him an easier job at no loss in salary. Both insisted on confidentiality long after the rumor mill had identified their problem. In the course of these two consecutive ordeals, Banas discovered that AIDS patients fall into no single, neat category. AIDS is not an issue but a disease, and the people who get it are human beings first and victims second. He also learned that AIDS affects everyone around the sick individual and that almost every choice a manager makes will injure someone. Finally, he came to understand that while managers have an unequivocal obligation to treat AIDS-afflicted employees with compassion and respect, they have an equally unequivocal obligation to keep their organizations functioning. "Don't let anyone kid you," Banas warns. "When you confront AIDS in the workplace, you will face untenable choices that seem to pit your obligation to humanity against your obligation to your organization.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:10119719

  4. Optimization Techniques for College Financial Aid Managers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bosshardt, Donald I.; Lichtenstein, Larry; Palumbo, George; Zaporowski, Mark P.

    2010-01-01

    In the context of a theoretical model of expected profit maximization, this paper shows how historic institutional data can be used to assist enrollment managers in determining the level of financial aid for students with varying demographic and quality characteristics. Optimal tuition pricing in conjunction with empirical estimation of…

  5. Computer-Aided Corrosion Program Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacDowell, Louis

    2010-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews Computer-Aided Corrosion Program Management at John F. Kennedy Space Center. The contents include: 1) Corrosion at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC); 2) Requirements and Objectives; 3) Program Description, Background and History; 4) Approach and Implementation; 5) Challenges; 6) Lessons Learned; 7) Successes and Benefits; and 8) Summary and Conclusions.

  6. 29 CFR 1918.97 - First aid and lifesaving facilities. (See appendix V of this part).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false First aid and lifesaving facilities. (See appendix V of... LONGSHORING General Working Conditions. § 1918.97 First aid and lifesaving facilities. (See appendix V of this... injury, regardless of severity, to the employer. (b) First aid. A first aid kit shall be available at...

  7. 29 CFR 1918.97 - First aid and lifesaving facilities. (See appendix V of this part).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false First aid and lifesaving facilities. (See appendix V of... LONGSHORING General Working Conditions. § 1918.97 First aid and lifesaving facilities. (See appendix V of this... injury, regardless of severity, to the employer. (b) First aid. A first aid kit shall be available at...

  8. 29 CFR 1918.97 - First aid and lifesaving facilities. (See appendix V of this part).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false First aid and lifesaving facilities. (See appendix V of... LONGSHORING General Working Conditions. § 1918.97 First aid and lifesaving facilities. (See appendix V of this... injury, regardless of severity, to the employer. (b) First aid. A first aid kit shall be available at...

  9. 29 CFR 1918.97 - First aid and lifesaving facilities. (See appendix V of this part).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false First aid and lifesaving facilities. (See appendix V of... LONGSHORING General Working Conditions. § 1918.97 First aid and lifesaving facilities. (See appendix V of this... injury, regardless of severity, to the employer. (b) First aid. A first aid kit shall be available at...

  10. Utilizing Interns in Facilities Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Judkins, Clarissa; Morris, John P.; Molocznik, Chuck

    2011-01-01

    Facilities management is rapidly changing and developing from a position an individual stumbles into--or work one's way up through--to a discipline and vocation all of its own. There is a need for a collaborative strategy among leaders in practice, education, and research to share knowledge and experience and to establish professional and ethical…

  11. Facility Management's Role in Organizational Sustainability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Gregory K.

    2013-01-01

    Facility managers have questions about sustainability. How do an organization's physical facilities--its built environment--and the management of them, influence the sustainability of the organization or institution as a whole? How important is Facility Management (FM) to the overall sustainability profile of an organization? Facility managers…

  12. Uncertainty management in intelligent design aiding systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Donald E.; Gabbert, Paula S.

    1988-01-01

    A novel approach to uncertainty management which is particularly effective in intelligent design aiding systems for large-scale systems is presented. The use of this approach in the materials handling system design domain is discussed. It is noted that, during any point in the design process, a point value can be obtained for the evaluation of feasible designs; however, the techniques described provide unique solutions for these point values using only the current information about the design environment.

  13. 7 CFR 210.13 - Facilities management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Facilities management. 210.13 Section 210.13... Participation § 210.13 Facilities management. Link to an amendment published at 74 FR 66216, Dec. 15, 2009. (a..., the added text is set forth as follows: § 210.13 Facilities management. (c) Food safety program....

  14. Emergency Management Computer-Aided Trainer (EMCAT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez, R. C.; Johnson, R. P.

    1986-01-01

    The Emergency Management Computer-Aided Trainer (EMCAT) developed by Essex Corporation or NASA and the Federal Emergency Management Administration's (FEMA) National Fire Academy (NFA) is described. It is a computer based training system for fire fighting personnel. A prototype EMCAT system was developed by NASA first using video tape images and then video disk images when the technology became available. The EMCAT system is meant to fill the training needs of the fire fighting community with affordable state-of-the-art technologies. An automated real time simulation of the fire situation was needed to replace the outdated manual training methods currently being used. In order to be successful, this simulator had to provide realism, be user friendly, be affordable, and support multiple scenarios. The EMCAT system meets these requirements and therefore represents an innovative training tool, not only for the fire fighting community, but also for the needs of other disciplines.

  15. The mixed waste management facility

    SciTech Connect

    Streit, R.D.

    1995-10-01

    During FY96, the Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) Project has the following major objectives: (1) Complete Project Preliminary Design Review (PDR). (2) Complete final design (Title II) of MWMF major systems. (3) Coordinate all final interfaces with the Decontamination and Waste Treatment Facility (DWTF) for facility utilities and facility integration. (4) Begin long-lead procurements. (5) Issue Project Baseline Revision 2-Preliminary Design (PB2), modifying previous baselines per DOE-requested budget profiles and cost reduction. Delete Mediated Electrochemical Oxidation (MEO) as a treatment process for initial demonstration. (6) Complete submittal of, and ongoing support for, applications for air permit. (7) Begin detailed planning for start-up, activation, and operational interfaces with the Laboratory`s Hazardous Waste Management Division (HWM). In achieving these objectives during FY96, the Project will incorporate and implement recent DOE directives to maximize the cost savings associated with the DWTF/MWMF integration (initiated in PB1.2); to reduce FY96 new Budget Authority to {approximately}$10M (reduced from FY97 Validation of $15.3M); and to keep Project fiscal year funding requirements largely uniform at {approximately}$10M/yr. A revised Project Baseline (i.e., PB2), to be issued during the second quarter of FY96, will address the implementation and impact of this guidance from an overall Project viewpoint. For FY96, the impact of this guidance is that completion of final design has been delayed relative to previous baselines (resulting from the delay in the completion of preliminary design); ramp-up in staffing has been essentially eliminated; and procurements have been balanced through the Project to help balance budget needs to funding availability.

  16. The Changing Role of Financial Aid and Enrollment Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kurz, Kathy A.

    1995-01-01

    Explores common institutional strategies for pricing, awarding aid, and controlling the growth of aid budgets in light of changing recruitment practices. Concludes by discussing the new services that aid offices must provide to meet their new challenges effectively. Discusses net tuition revenue goals to enhance effective management of resources.…

  17. Management of Student Aid: A Guide for Presidents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    El-Khawas, Elaine

    A guide offering a quick review of principles, decisions, and responsibilities in financial aid management has been developed to aid presidents, trustees, and senior administrators of colleges and universities. The handbook stresses the possible implications of aid for enrollment, financial stability, and institutional mission. Topics that are…

  18. Life cycle cost estimating of waste management facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Shropshire, D.; Feizollahi, F.; Teheranian, B.; Waldman, M.

    1994-12-31

    Waste Management Facilities cost Information (WMFCI) provides a modular cost method for estimating planning-level life-cycle costs of waste management alternatives. This methodology includes over 120 cost modules that cover a variety of treatment, storage, disposal, and support facility options. The WMFCI method can be used to estimate virtually every technology option and related facilities needed by the Department of Energy for cradle-to-grave management of hazardous, radioactive, mixed waste, and spent nuclear fuel. Various waste streams covered by the WMFCI are low-level waste (LLW), mixed low-level waste (MLLW), alpha contaminated LLW, alpha contaminated MLLW, transuranic waste, spent nuclear fuel, Greater-Than-Class C and DOE equivalent special case wastes, and hazardous wastes. The methodology also contains cost versus capacity relationships for each cost module to aid in estimating various waste management configurations.

  19. HIV/AIDS managed care program.

    PubMed

    Bartlett, J G

    2000-01-01

    Approximately one-half of all patients with HIV infection who are under care have Medicaid as the third party payor. Unlike Medicare, Medicaid is a state-specific program that has huge variations in reimbursement strategies. Multiple studies have shown that care for persons with AIDS is about $20,000/year, but reimbursement through various state Medicaid programs varies about $100/m/m to $2800/m/m despite the fact that expectations for care are identical. Hopkins has a major commitment to persons with HIV infection with a program that now includes 30 faculty members and a support staff of 170. With the introduction of mandatory managed care for Medicaid recipients in July, 1997, we were confronted with the issue of substantial downsizing with abandonment of over half of our patients, or learning the transition to managed care. This has been a steep learning curve involving negotiations with the state Medicaid office, reorganization of our clinic, careful scrutiny of our database regarding resource utilization and cost, education of providers, and longitudinal collection of new information and integration of the rapid changes in the field. In the process of this transition, we learned that there are precious few resources to provide guidance and that there is a perceived need for assistance by HIV providers throughout the country. Consequently, we have now established the "HIV Managed Care Network" with substantial funding from diverse sources to support education, data collection, and public policy review. It is premature to evaluate performance since most of these activities have just begun, but we expect that this Network will serve as a demonstration model for methods to deal with chronic diseases under managed care. PMID:10881336

  20. RCRA COVER SYSTEMS FOR WASTE MANAGEMENT FACILITIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The closure of waste management facilities, whether Subtitle C, Subtitle D or CERCLA, requires consideration of site-specific information, the Federal regulations and applicability of state regulations and the liquids management strategy. This paper will present the current EPA ...

  1. Integrated Facilities Management and Fixed Asset Accounting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Golz, W. C., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    A record of a school district's assets--land, buildings, machinery, and equipment--can be a useful management tool that meets accounting requirements and provides appropriate information for budgeting, forecasting, and facilities management. (MLF)

  2. Does PDC Belong in Facilities Management?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dessoff, Alan

    2012-01-01

    Whether planning, design, and construction (PDC) of buildings should be part of facilities management, with its traditional operations and maintenance functions, or separated from it, has been a divisive question on many campuses for a long time. Now, although it is not happening everywhere, facilities managers at a number of institutions, public…

  3. 7 CFR 210.13 - Facilities management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Facilities management. 210.13 Section 210.13 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) FOOD AND NUTRITION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... Participation § 210.13 Facilities management. (a) Health standards. The school food authority shall ensure...

  4. 7 CFR 210.13 - Facilities management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Facilities management. 210.13 Section 210.13 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) FOOD AND NUTRITION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... Participation § 210.13 Facilities management. (a) Health standards. The school food authority shall ensure...

  5. 7 CFR 210.13 - Facilities management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Facilities management. 210.13 Section 210.13 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) FOOD AND NUTRITION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... Participation § 210.13 Facilities management. (a) Health standards. The school food authority shall ensure...

  6. Federal facility compliance: Strategies, policies and management

    SciTech Connect

    1999-07-01

    Federal Facility Compliance reviews developments in environmental legislative/regulatory analysis, climate change, and environmental management practices at the US Postal Service. It also covers the management of ozone-depleting chemicals at US Army Reserve facilities, Title 5, and wastewater system assessments at military installations.

  7. Sport Facility Planning and Management. Sport Management Library.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farmer, Peter J.; Mulrooney, Aaron L.; Ammon, Rob, Jr.

    Students of sports facilities management will need to acquire a wide variety of managerial skills and knowledge in order to be adequately prepared to plan and manage these facilities. This textbook offers students a mix of practical examples and recognized theory to help them in the planning, constructing, promoting, and managing of sports…

  8. Disaster Management and Educational Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kenny, Grace

    2002-01-01

    Summarizes discussions from a seminar focusing on earthquakes and educational facilities, including findings related to educational buildings; partnerships; training; standards, regulations, and procedures; finance and legislation; and research and support. (EV)

  9. Planning and Managing School Facilities. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kowalski, Theodore J.

    This book addresses the administrative procedures associated with planning and managing school facilities. As noted at the outset, practitioner interest in school facilities has been growing rapidly in recent years because decades of neglect, poor planning, and cost cutting have created a situation in which large numbers of America's school…

  10. Computer Aided Management for Information Processing Projects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akman, Ibrahim; Kocamustafaogullari, Kemal

    1995-01-01

    Outlines the nature of information processing projects and discusses some project management programming packages. Describes an in-house interface program developed to utilize a selected project management package (TIMELINE) by using Oracle Data Base Management System tools and Pascal programming language for the management of information system…

  11. Stigmatization, HIV/AIDS, and communities of color: exploring response to human service facilities.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, L M

    1997-09-01

    HIV and AIDS are rapidly becoming leading causes of death for men and women in large cities across the US. Epidemiological data indicate that persons of color in particular have been disproportionately affected by HIV/AIDS. The continuing growth in the incidence of HIV/AIDS among persons of color implies that human service facilities will be needed in close proximity. However, there has been little research exploring response to human service facilities associated with HIV/AIDS in communities of color. This paper explores community response to facilities associated with HIV/AIDS by analyzing in-depth interviews with fifteen Vietnamese and Latino/Latina informal opinion leaders in Orange County, California. These interviews indicate that the stigma surrounding HIV/AIDS emanates to a large degree from the social construction of "HIV/AIDS as homosexuality". Even with the deviance and marginalization associated with HIV/AIDS, however, creative coping strategies have been developed by families within the Latino and Vietnamese communities to enable the maintenance of family ties with persons living with HIV/AIDS. PMID:10670970

  12. Computer Uses in School Facility Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vornberg, James A.

    Educational institutions and larger public school districts have implemented computerized systems of planning and management functions. The application of computers to facility management roughly may be divided into two general areas: (1) planning efforts of administrators and designers through methods of simulation, and (2) systems management…

  13. A public aid clinic prototype: utilizing a dental hygiene educational facility to increase access to care.

    PubMed

    Maurizio, Sandra J; DeMattei, Ronda; Meyer, Jennifer; Cotner, Danna

    2003-01-01

    Few dentists in a rural Midwestern community participate in providing oral health care to public aid recipients. In response, faculty at a baccalaureate degree dental hygiene program located at Southern illinois University, Carbondale (SIUC) proposed, developed, and implemented the Heartland Dental Clinic to serve Medicaid participants. The unique program utilizes existing facilities, staff, and students to provide comprehensive oral health care to underserved populations. The state awarded a small grant to cover start-up costs. Two dental units were upgraded with fiber optics to allow restorative procedures. Dental hygiene students provide intake examinations and preventive care, while a staff dentist provides restorative care, dentures, and examinations. Dental technology students and faculty fabricate prostheses. A part-time clinic manager facilitates communication, patient scheduling, and billing. Two local Rotary Club members volunteer as receptionists for the clinic on the one evening per week that the clinic operates. The Rotary Club purchased educational pamphlets, a television/VCR, videotapes, and two signs for the clinic. By locating the clinic in the existing SIUC facility and utilizing dental hygiene students, a staff dentist, volunteer receptionists and dentists, student workers, and health care management interns, the clinic overhead costs have been kept to a minimum. The clinic provides a unique opportunity for dental hygiene students to experience firsthand scheduling, billing, and treating public aid patients while providing patients with an additional source for oral health care. The Heartland Dental Clinic model represents a cost effective method for increasing oral health access to underserved populations while also benefiting students in an educational program. PMID:14596165

  14. Management of pesticide mixing and loading facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Dwinell, S.E.

    1994-12-31

    Many pesticide applicators have decided that a Chemical Mixing Facility (CMF) is the best way to manage problems of soil and water contamination at pesticide mixing and loading sites. These facilities must be managed properly to avoid the accumulation of potentially hazardous wastes, the creation of a point source of pollution, and possible fines for violation of environmental protection laws. Proper management must include pesticide containers, equipment rinsewater, sludge and sediments that accumulate on the pad, and materials used to contain and collect spills.

  15. XML Based Scientific Data Management Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehrotra, P.; Zubair, M.; Bushnell, Dennis M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The World Wide Web consortium has developed an Extensible Markup Language (XML) to support the building of better information management infrastructures. The scientific computing community realizing the benefits of XML has designed markup languages for scientific data. In this paper, we propose a XML based scientific data management ,facility, XDMF. The project is motivated by the fact that even though a lot of scientific data is being generated, it is not being shared because of lack of standards and infrastructure support for discovering and transforming the data. The proposed data management facility can be used to discover the scientific data itself, the transformation functions, and also for applying the required transformations. We have built a prototype system of the proposed data management facility that can work on different platforms. We have implemented the system using Java, and Apache XSLT engine Xalan. To support remote data and transformation functions, we had to extend the XSLT specification and the Xalan package.

  16. XML Based Scientific Data Management Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehrotra, Piyush; Zubair, M.; Ziebartt, John (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The World Wide Web consortium has developed an Extensible Markup Language (XML) to support the building of better information management infrastructures. The scientific computing community realizing the benefits of HTML has designed markup languages for scientific data. In this paper, we propose a XML based scientific data management facility, XDMF. The project is motivated by the fact that even though a lot of scientific data is being generated, it is not being shared because of lack of standards and infrastructure support for discovering and transforming the data. The proposed data management facility can be used to discover the scientific data itself, the transformation functions, and also for applying the required transformations. We have built a prototype system of the proposed data management facility that can work on different platforms. We have implemented the system using Java, and Apache XSLT engine Xalan. To support remote data and transformation functions, we had to extend the XSLT specification and the Xalan package.

  17. New Spaces for Learning: Designing College Facilities to Utilize Instructional Aids and Media. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hauf, Harold D.; And Others

    Colleges need appropriate large group instructional facilities for effective and efficient use of instructional aids and media. A well planned system of facilities must provide space for learning; production, origination, and support; storage and retrieval. Design begins with a building plan--a statement, made jointly by the administrator and…

  18. Enhancing the safety of tailings management facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Meggyes, T.; Niederleithinger, E.; Witt, K.J.; Csovari, M.; Kreft-Burman, K.; Engels, J.; McDonald, C.; Roehl, K.E.

    2008-07-01

    Unsafe tailings management facilities (TMFs) have caused serious accidents in Europe threatening human health/life and the environment. While advanced design, construction and management procedures are available, their implementation requires greater emphasis. An integrated research project funded by the European Union was carried out between 2002 and 2005 with the overall goal of improving the safety of TMFs (Sustainable Improvement in Safety of Tailings Facilities - TAILSAFE, http://www.tailsafe.com/). The objective of TAILSAFE was to develop and apply methods of parameter evaluation and measurement for the assessment and improvement of the safety state of tailings facilities, with particular attention to the stability of tailings dams and slurries, the special risks inherent when such materials include toxic or hazardous wastes, and authorization and management procedures for tailings facilities. Aspects of tailings facilities design, water management and slurry transport, non-destructive and minimally intrusive testing methods, monitoring and the application of sensors, intervention and remediation options were considered in TAILSAFE. A risk reduction framework (the TAILSAFE Parameter Framework) was established to contribute to the avoidance of catastrophic accidents and hazards from tailings facilities. Tailings from the mining and primary processing of metals, minerals and coal were included within the scope of TAILSAFE. The project focused on the avoidance of hazards by developing procedures and methods for investigating and improving the stability of tailings dams and tailings bodies.

  19. Home Health Management Aide. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mincemoyer, Betty Jane

    The report describes a demonstration project to provide a course of study at the senior high level in home health management for the academically handicapped. The course consisted of practice in nursing skills, home management and laboratory work in food preparation techniques, the family, and child care. Activities included field trips,…

  20. 20 CFR 638.303 - Site selection and facilities management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... center, facilities engineering and real estate management will be conducted by the Job Corps Director or... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Site selection and facilities management. 638... Facilities Management § 638.303 Site selection and facilities management. (a) The Job Corps Director...

  1. Software Schedules Missions, Aids Project Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    NASA missions require advanced planning, scheduling, and management, and the Space Agency has worked extensively to develop the programs and software suites necessary to facilitate these complex missions. These enormously intricate undertakings have hundreds of active components that need constant management and monitoring. It is no surprise, then, that the software developed for these tasks is often applicable in other high-stress, complex environments, like in government or industrial settings. NASA work over the past few years has resulted in a handful of new scheduling, knowledge-management, and research tools developed under contract with one of NASA s partners. These tools have the unique responsibility of supporting NASA missions, but they are also finding uses outside of the Space Program.

  2. Predicting Nursing Facility Transition Candidates Using AID: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, Mary L.; Wiley, Elizabeth; Fries, Brant E.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Although the nursing facility transition literature is growing, little research has analyzed the characteristics of individuals so assisted or compared participants to those who remain institutionalized. This article describes an analytic method that researchers can apply to address these knowledge gaps, using the Arkansas Passages…

  3. Waste Management Facilities Cost Information Report

    SciTech Connect

    Feizollahi, F.; Shropshire, D.

    1992-10-01

    The Waste Management Facility Cost Information (WMFCI) Report, commissioned by the US Department of Energy (DOE), develops planning life-cycle cost (PLCC) estimates for treatment, storage, and disposal facilities. This report contains PLCC estimates versus capacity for 26 different facility cost modules. A procedure to guide DOE and its contractor personnel in the use of estimating data is also provided. Estimates in the report apply to five distinctive waste streams: low-level waste, low-level mixed waste, alpha contaminated low-level waste, alpha contaminated low-level mixed waste, and transuranic waste. The report addresses five different treatment types: incineration, metal/melting and recovery, shredder/compaction, solidification, and vitrification. Data in this report allows the user to develop PLCC estimates for various waste management options.

  4. Perspectives on Leadership in Facilities Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenkins, Charles W. Ed.

    This collection of papers examines issues concerning leadership in facilities management in higher education. Chapters include: (1) "Catch the Spirit of Leadership" (Jack Hug); (2) "Visionary Leadership: Creating a New Tomorrow" (Burt Nanus); (3) "Some Thoughts on Leadership" (Charles W. Jenkins); (4) "Educational Leadership: The Role of…

  5. Managing Energy in Your Educational Facility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2001

    This booklet explains how to develop and implement a plan to manage energy in educational facilities. It can be used to identify energy savings opportunities and implement a plan to reduce energy costs. It discusses the following steps for creating an effective energy-use plan: (1) get started and organize for success; (2) look at energy use and…

  6. Arid Lands Ecology Facility management plan

    SciTech Connect

    1993-02-01

    The Arid Lands Ecology (ALE) facility is a 312-sq-km tract of land that lies on the western side of the Hanford Site in southcentral Washington. The US Atomic Energy Commission officially set aside this land area in 1967 to preserve shrub-steppe habitat and vegetation. The ALE facility is managed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the US Department of Energy (DOE) for ecological research and education purposes. In 1971, the ALE facility was designated the Rattlesnake Hills Research Natural Area (RNA) as a result of an interagency federal cooperative agreement, and remains the largest RNA in Washington. it is also one of the few remaining large tracts of shrub-steppe vegetation in the state retaining a predominant preeuropean settlement character. This management plan provides policy and implementation methods for management of the ALE facilities consistent with both US Department of Energy Headquarters and the Richland Field Office decision (US Congress 1977) to designate and manage ALE lands as an RNA and as a component of the DOE National Environmental Research Park System.

  7. Managing Inventory At A Transitional Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutchins, Henry A.

    1993-01-01

    Kennedy Inventory Management System, KIMS, geared to needs of facility in transition from research and development to manufacturing. Operated jointly by several contractors at Kennedy Space Center, KIMS designed to reduce cost and increase efficiency of fabrication and maintenance of spaceflight hardware.

  8. Award for Excellence in Facilities Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gretchen, Stephanie

    1989-01-01

    Recipients of Association of Physical Plant Administrators awards for excellence in facilities management in various institutional categories are noted. Specific areas of outstanding achievement include cooperation, energy conservation, attention to detail, use of customer feedback, emergency preparedness, individual employee recognition, utility…

  9. Adverse events among nurse aides in long-term care facilities in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Yu, Man-Ling; Perng, Shoa-Jen

    2014-01-01

    The study investigated the relationship between the incidence of adverse events and related factors among nurse aides in long-term settings in Taiwan. Of 213 nurse aides, 54.93% experienced an adverse event during the previous year. Four variables, including institution type, certification, years of work experience as a nurse aide, and job type, were found to be associated with the occurrence of adverse events. Findings suggested that health care managers provide training to nurse aides with a specific focus on maintaining quality care. PMID:24375108

  10. Management Aids and Procedures for Strategic Planning. Staff Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cope, Robert G.

    Management aids required in strategic planning are divided into three categories: (1) assessing the environment, (2) providing a process for reaching decisions, and (3) presenting criteria to evaluate strategic decisions. A model for scanning the environment has four dimensions that concern economic, social, knowledge-technology, and public policy…

  11. Automated Store Management For Drum Storage Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Koller, W.; Lang, R.

    2008-07-01

    This paper describes advanced system technology developed for a new Drum Storage Facility to be operated by Taiwan Power Company (TPC). A logistics management concept is applied for the storage of solid rad-wastes in terms of automated handling, transportation and storing as well as in terms of data management. The individual equipments, such as automated Bridge Cranes, Automatic Guided Vehicles and auxiliary systems are introduced in this paper and the store management process is outlined. The authors report furthermore on challenges during the design and engineering phase and review the project implementation from the equipment supplier's end. (authors)

  12. Application of expert systems in project management decision aiding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Regina; Shaffer, Steven; Stokes, James; Goldstein, David

    1987-01-01

    The feasibility of developing an expert systems-based project management decision aid to enhance the performance of NASA project managers was assessed. The research effort included extensive literature reviews in the areas of project management, project management decision aiding, expert systems technology, and human-computer interface engineering. Literature reviews were augmented by focused interviews with NASA managers. Time estimation for project scheduling was identified as the target activity for decision augmentation, and a design was developed for an Integrated NASA System for Intelligent Time Estimation (INSITE). The proposed INSITE design was judged feasible with a low level of risk. A partial proof-of-concept experiment was performed and was successful. Specific conclusions drawn from the research and analyses are included. The INSITE concept is potentially applicable in any management sphere, commercial or government, where time estimation is required for project scheduling. As project scheduling is a nearly universal management activity, the range of possibilities is considerable. The INSITE concept also holds potential for enhancing other management tasks, especially in areas such as cost estimation, where estimation-by-analogy is already a proven method.

  13. Total facility energy management at Mercy Hospital

    SciTech Connect

    Hobbs, R.E.

    1988-01-01

    In large facilities, successful energy management cannot be measured by a few projects, no matter how significant the energy savings. Large facilities today are comprised of extensive energy consuming systems. For every energy project developed, two more projects remain to be discovered. The successful energy manager is one who has completed ten projects, or twenty, or thirty, and is still finding more projects to do. Nothing is assumed to be as efficient as possible, and no part of any system is ignored. The successful energy manager is willing to take risks, not of being fired, but to use imagination, study engineering theory, exercise common sense, develop concept designs, calculate savings, sell projects to management, control designers, study equipment performance, pre-select contractors, manage the contractor efforts, solve inherent problems along the way, and then optimize the project after acceptance when the designers and contractors all walk off. Once the successful energy manager establishes his credibility, his problem becomes finding enough time to get the projects rolling as he dreams them up. He sees what others do not. As they say in the North, only the lead dog sees new scenery.

  14. Chlorophyll Meters Aid Plant Nutrient Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    On December 7, 1972, roughly 5 hours and 6 minutes after launch, the crew of Apollo 17 took one of history s most famous photographs. The brilliant image of the fully illuminated Earth, the African and Antarctic continents peering out from behind swirling clouds, came to be known as the Blue Marble. Today, Earth still sometimes goes by the Blue Marble nickname, but as the satellites comprising NASA s Earth Observing System (EOS) scan the planet daily in ever greater resolutions, it is often the amount of green on the planet that is a focus of researchers attention. Earth s over 400,000 known plant species play essential roles in the planet s health: They absorb carbon dioxide and release the oxygen we breathe, help manage the Earth s temperature by absorbing and reflecting sunlight, provide food and habitats for animals, and offer building materials, medication, and sustenance for humans. As part of NASA s efforts to study our own planet along with the universe around it, the Agency s EOS satellites have been accumulating years of valuable data about Earth s vegetation (not to mention its land features, oceans, and atmosphere) since the first EOS satellite launched in 1997. Among the powerful sensors used is the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on board the NASA Terra and Aqua satellites. MODIS sweeps the entire Earth every few days, beaming back information gathered across 36 bands of visible and infrared light, yielding images that let scientists track how much of Earth is green over the course of seasons and years. Monitoring the density and distribution of vegetation on Earth provides a means of determining everything from the impact of natural and human-induced climate change to the potential outbreak of disease. (Goddard Space Flight Center and U.S. Department of Defense researchers have determined, for example, that vegetation density can be used to pinpoint regions of heavy rainfall in Africa regions ripe for outbreaks of rainfall

  15. 29 CFR 1918.97 - First aid and lifesaving facilities. (See appendix V of this part).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false First aid and lifesaving facilities. (See appendix V of this part). 1918.97 Section 1918.97 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR LONGSHORING General Working Conditions. § 1918.97...

  16. Computer-Aided Evaluation of Forage Management: Forage Manager.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Panciera, M. T.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Presents the Forage Manager spreadsheet, developed as a forage management teaching tool to integrate agronomic, livestock, and cost data to demonstrate the impact of forage management on livestock production costs. Teaching applications, examples involving agronomic data and conventional agronomic evaluation, and limitations of the program are…

  17. Mixed Waste Management Facility Groundwater Monitoring Report

    SciTech Connect

    Chase, J.

    1998-03-01

    During fourth quarter 1997, eleven constituents exceeded final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) in groundwater samples from downgradient monitoring wells at the Mixed Waste Management Facility. No constituents exceeded final PDWS in samples from upgradient monitoring wells. As in previous quarters, tritium and trichloroethylene were the most widespread elevated constituents. The groundwater flow directions and rates in the three hydrostratigraphic units were similar to those of previous quarters.

  18. Use of information technology for medication management in residential care facilities: correlates of facility characteristics.

    PubMed

    Bhuyan, Soumitra S; Chandak, Aastha; Powell, M Paige; Kim, Jungyoon; Shiyanbola, Olayinka; Zhu, He; Shiyanbola, Oyewale

    2015-06-01

    The effectiveness of information technology in resolving medication problems has been well documented. Long-term care settings such as residential care facilities (RCFs) may see the benefits of using such technologies in addressing the problem of medication errors among their resident population, who are usually older and have numerous chronic conditions. The aim of this study was two-fold: to examine the extent of use of Electronic Medication Management (EMM) in RCFs and to analyze the organizational factors associated with the use of EMM functionalities in RCFs. Data on RCFs were obtained from the 2010 National Survey of Residential Care Facilities. The association between facility, director and staff, and resident characteristics of RCFs and adoption of four EMM functionalities was assessed through multivariate logistic regression. The four EMM functionalities included were maintaining lists of medications, ordering for prescriptions, maintaining active medication allergy lists, and warning of drug interactions or contraindications. About 12% of the RCFs adopted all four EMM functionalities. Additionally, maintaining lists of medications had the highest adoption rate (34.5%), followed by maintaining active medication allergy lists (31.6%), ordering for prescriptions (19.7%), and warning of drug interactions or contraindications (17.9%). Facility size and ownership status were significantly associated with adoption of all four EMM functionalities. Medicaid certification status, facility director's age, education and license status, and the use of personal care aides in the RCF were significantly associated with the adoption of some of the EMM functionalities. EMM is expected to improve the quality of care and patient safety in long-term care facilities including RCFs. The extent of adoption of the four EMM functionalities is relatively low in RCFs. Some RCFs may strategize to use these functionalities to cater to the increasing demands from the market and also to

  19. Federal facilities compliance act waste management

    SciTech Connect

    Bowers, J; Gates-Anderson, D; Hollister, R; Painter, S

    1999-07-06

    Site Treatment Plans (STPs) developed through the Federal Facilities Compliance Act pose many technical and administrative challenges. Legacy wastes managed under these plans require Land Disposal Restriction (LDR) compliance through treatment and ultimate disposal. Although capacity has been defined for most of the Department of Energy wastes, many waste streams require further characterization and many need additional treatment and handling beyond LDR criteria to be able to dispose of the waste. At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), the Hazardous Waste Management Division has developed a comprehensive Legacy Waste Program. The program directs work to manage low level and mixed wastes to ensure compliance with nuclear facility rules and its STP. This paper provides a survey of work conducted on these wastes at LLNL. They include commercial waste treatment and disposal, diverse forms of characterization, inventory maintenance and reporting, on-site treatment, and treatability studies. These activities are conducted in an integrated fashion to meet schedules defined in the STP. The processes managing wastes are dynamic due to required integration of administrative, regulatory, and technical concerns spanning the gamut to insure safe proper disposal.

  20. 40 CFR 792.31 - Testing facility management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Testing facility management. 792.31... CONTROL ACT (CONTINUED) GOOD LABORATORY PRACTICE STANDARDS Organization and Personnel § 792.31 Testing facility management. For each study, testing facility management shall: (a) Designate a study director...

  1. 40 CFR 160.31 - Testing facility management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Testing facility management. 160.31... GOOD LABORATORY PRACTICE STANDARDS Organization and Personnel § 160.31 Testing facility management. For each study, testing facility management shall: (a) Designate a study director as described in §...

  2. 40 CFR 792.31 - Testing facility management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Testing facility management. 792.31... CONTROL ACT (CONTINUED) GOOD LABORATORY PRACTICE STANDARDS Organization and Personnel § 792.31 Testing facility management. For each study, testing facility management shall: (a) Designate a study director...

  3. 22 CFR 214.3 - A.I.D. Advisory Committee Management Officer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false A.I.D. Advisory Committee Management Officer. 214.3 Section 214.3 Foreign Relations AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT ADVISORY COMMITTEE MANAGEMENT General § 214.3 A.I.D. Advisory Committee Management Officer. The Advisory Committee Management Officer is responsible to the Administrator...

  4. Improving HIV/AIDS Knowledge Management Using EHRs

    PubMed Central

    Malmberg, Erik D.; Phan, Thao M.; Harmon, Glynn; Nauert, Richard F.

    2012-01-01

    Background A primary goal for the development of EHRs and EHR-related technologies should be to facilitate greater knowledge management for improving individual and community health outcomes associated with HIV / AIDS. Most of the current developments of EHR have focused on providing data for research, patient care and prioritization of healthcare provider resources in other areas. More attention should be paid to using information from EHRs to assist local, state, national, and international entities engaged in HIV / AIDS care, research and prevention strategies. Unfortunately the technology and standards for HIV-specific reporting modules are still being developed. Methods: A literature search and review supplemented by the author’s own experiences with electronic health records and HIV / AIDS prevention strategies will be used. This data was used to identify both opportunities and challenges for improving public health informatics primarily through the use of latest innovations in EHRs. Qualitative analysis and suggestions are offered for how EHRs can support knowledge management and prevention strategies associated with HIV infection. Results: EHR information, including demographics, medical history, medication and allergies, immunization status, and other vital statistics can help public health practitioners to more quickly identify at-risk populations or environments; allocate scarce resources in the most efficient way; share information about successful, evidenced-based prevention strategies; and increase longevity and quality of life. Conclusion: Local, state, and federal entities need to work more collaboratively with NGOs, community-based organizations, and the private sector to eliminate barriers to implementation including cost, interoperability, accessibility, and information security. PMID:23569643

  5. 21 CFR 58.31 - Testing facility management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Testing facility management. 58.31 Section 58.31 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL GOOD... management. For each nonclinical laboratory study, testing facility management shall: (a) Designate a...

  6. Technical Facilities Management, Loan Pool, and Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Jacob

    2011-01-01

    My work at JPL for the SURF program began on June 11, 2012 with the Technical Facilities Management group (TFM). As well as TFM, I worked with Loan Pool and Metrology to help them out with various tasks. Unlike a lot of other interns, I did not have a specific project rather many different tasks to be completed over the course of the 10 weeks.The first task to be completed was to sort through old certification reports in 6 different boxes to locate reports that needed to be archived into a digital database. There were no reports within these boxes that needed to be archived but rather were to be shredded. The reports went back to the early 1980's and up to the early 2000's. I was looking for reports dated from 2002 to 2012

  7. ATF (Advanced Toroidal Facility) data management

    SciTech Connect

    Kannan, K.L.; Baylor, L.R.

    1988-01-01

    Data management for the Advanced Toroidal Facility (ATF), a stellarator located at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), is provided by DMG, a locally developed, VAX-based software system. DMG is a data storage and retrieval software system that provides the user interface to ATF raw and analyzed data. Data are described in terms of data models and data types and are organized as signals into files, which are internally documented. The system was designed with user accessibility, software maintainability, and extensibility as primary goals. Extensibility features include compatibility with ATF as it moves from pulsed to steady-state operation and capability for use of the DMG system with experiments other than ATF. DMG is implemented as a run-time library of routines available as a shareable image. General-purpose and specialized data acquisition and analysis applications have been developed using the DMG system. This paper describes the DMG system and the interfaces to it. 4 refs., 2 figs.

  8. Artificial insemination with donor sperm (AID): heterogeneity in sperm banking facilities in a single country (Belgium).

    PubMed

    Thijssen, A; Dhont, N; Vandormael, E; Cox, A; Klerkx, E; Creemers, E; Ombelet, W

    2014-01-01

    Due to the high inflow of foreign patients seeking cross-border reproductive care in Belgium and the increased number of lesbian couples and single women who call for artificial insemination with donor sperm (AID), Belgian sperm banks nowadays face a shortage in donor sperm. However, since there is no central registration system for sperm donors in Belgium, no figures are currently available supporting this statement. Therefore a study was performed to obtain a detailed overview of the sperm banking facilities in Belgium. Questionnaires were sent to all Belgian centres for assisted reproduction with laboratory facilities (n = 18) to report on their sperm banking methods. The results showed that 82% of the centres rely partially or completely on foreign donor sperm. Moreover, four of the thirteen centres that have their own sperm bank use imported donor sperm in > 95% AID cycles. Our results show that in 63% of the Belgian AID cycles imported Danish donor sperm is being used. Donor recruitment is mainly performed through the centre's website (61%) or by distributing flyers in the centre (46%) and 9 to 180 potential donors have been recruited per centre in 2013. Eventually, 15 to 50% of these candidate donors were accepted. Different criteria for donor acceptance are handled by the centres: donor age limits range from 18-25 to 36-46 years old, and thresholds for sperm normality differ considerably. We can conclude that a wide variation in methods associated with sperm banking is observed in Belgian centres. PMID:25009728

  9. Aiding the environment: the Australian Development Agency's experience of implementing an environmental management system

    SciTech Connect

    Keen, Meg . E-mail: meg.keen@anu.edu.au; Sullivan, Marjorie

    2005-08-15

    Aid agencies, like commercial businesses, are increasingly concerned with incorporating sound environmental management into their operations. Different approaches are being used to integrate sustainability into development assistance to ensure that environmental impacts are assessed and managed. One approach being used by AusAID, the Australian aid agency, is to implement an environmental management system (EMS) across program and project areas. This paper examines how AusAID has adapted the EMS approach to suit aid agency operations, and some of the lessons from the Australian experience.

  10. Management of Children Using Cochlear Implants and Hearing Aids.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ching, Teresa Y. C.; Psarros, Colleen; Incerti, Paula; Hill, Mandy

    2001-01-01

    Four case studies identify six factors affecting successful use of a hearing aid with a cochlear implant: duration of hearing aid use prior to implantation, amount of residual hearing in the non-implanted ear, educational and listening demands, cosmetic issues, hearing aid rejection, and extended period of non-use of hearing aid. (Contains…

  11. Facilities management system (FMS). Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1992-04-01

    This report provides a detailed, final status of Andersen Consulting`s participation in the Facilities Management System (FMS) implementation project under contract with Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and offers suggestions for continued FMS improvements. The report presents the following topics of discussion: (1) summary and status of work (2) recommendations for continued success (3) contract deliverables and client satisfaction. The Summary and Status of Work section presents a detailed, final status of the FMS project at the termination of Andersen`s full-time participation. This section discusses the status of each FMS sub-system and of the Andersen major project deliverables. The Recommendations section offers suggestions for continued FMS success. The topics discussed include recommendations for each of the following areas: (1) End User and Business Operations; (2) AISD; Development and Computer Operations; (3) Software; (4) Technical Platform; and (5) Control Procedures The Contract Deliverables and Client Satisfaction section discusses feedback received from Johnson Controls management and FMS system users. The report also addresses Andersen`s observations from the feedback.

  12. The Design Manager's Aid for Intelligent Decomposition (DeMAID)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, James L.

    1994-01-01

    Before the design of new complex systems such as large space platforms can begin, the possible interactions among subsystems and their parts must be determined. Once this is completed, the proposed system can be decomposed to identify its hierarchical structure. The design manager's aid for intelligent decomposition (DeMAID) is a knowledge based system for ordering the sequence of modules and identifying a possible multilevel structure for design. Although DeMAID requires an investment of time to generate and refine the list of modules for input, it could save considerable money and time in the total design process, particularly in new design problems where the ordering of the modules has not been defined.

  13. Creating a strategic plan for configuration management using computer aided software engineering (CASE) tools

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, P.R.; Sarfaty, R.

    1993-05-01

    This paper provides guidance in the definition, documentation, measurement, enhancement of processes, and validation of a strategic plan for configuration management (CM). The approach and methodology used in establishing a strategic plan is the same for any enterprise, including the Department of Energy (DOE), commercial nuclear plants, the Department of Defense (DOD), or large industrial complexes. The principles and techniques presented are used world wide by some of the largest corporations. The authors used industry knowledge and the areas of their current employment to illustrate and provide examples. Developing a strategic configuration and information management plan for DOE Idaho Field Office (DOE-ID) facilities is discussed in this paper. A good knowledge of CM principles is the key to successful strategic planning. This paper will describe and define CM elements, and discuss how CM integrates the facility`s physical configuration, design basis, and documentation. The strategic plan does not need the support of a computer aided software engineering (CASE) tool. However, the use of the CASE tool provides a methodology for consistency in approach, graphics, and database capability combined to form an encyclopedia and a method of presentation that is easily understood and aids the process of reengineering. CASE tools have much more capability than those stated above. Some examples are supporting a joint application development group (JAD) to prepare a software functional specification document and, if necessary, provide the capability to automatically generate software application code. This paper briefly discusses characteristics and capabilities of two CASE tools that use different methodologies to generate similar deliverables.

  14. Facility Design and Management: Innovative Approaches to Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldfine, Bernard D.; Walker, M.

    Sport facility design and management courses rely heavily or exclusively upon lectures and readings--modes of instruction that engage students in a passive form of learning. This paper advocates one method of stimulating higher-level thinking and active learning in facility courses--the use of cooperative small-group learning. In facility courses,…

  15. 20 CFR 638.303 - Site selection and facilities management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Site selection and facilities management. 638.303 Section 638.303 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR JOB CORPS PROGRAM UNDER TITLE IV-B OF THE JOB TRAINING PARTNERSHIP ACT Funding, Site Selection, and Facilities Management § 638.303 Site...

  16. Managing the Theatre Facility at Smoky Hill High School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pearl, Michael

    1989-01-01

    Discusses the management of a school theater facility. Discusses the role of the theater manager at Smoky Hill High School. Discusses the creation of the plan to oversee the operation and scheduling of the theater facility. Includes a copy of the contract form for using the theater. (SR)

  17. 40 CFR 792.31 - Testing facility management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... facility management. For each study, testing facility management shall: (a) Designate a study director as described in § 792.33 before the study is initiated. (b) Replace the study director promptly if it becomes necessary to do so during the conduct of a study. (c) Assure that there is a quality assurance unit...

  18. 40 CFR 792.31 - Testing facility management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... facility management. For each study, testing facility management shall: (a) Designate a study director as described in § 792.33 before the study is initiated. (b) Replace the study director promptly if it becomes necessary to do so during the conduct of a study. (c) Assure that there is a quality assurance unit...

  19. 40 CFR 792.31 - Testing facility management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... facility management. For each study, testing facility management shall: (a) Designate a study director as described in § 792.33 before the study is initiated. (b) Replace the study director promptly if it becomes necessary to do so during the conduct of a study. (c) Assure that there is a quality assurance unit...

  20. 20 CFR 638.303 - Site selection and facilities management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Site selection and facilities management. 638.303 Section 638.303 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR JOB CORPS PROGRAM UNDER TITLE IV-B OF THE JOB TRAINING PARTNERSHIP ACT Funding, Site Selection, and Facilities Management § 638.303 Site...

  1. Insect pest management decisions in food processing facilities

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pest management decision making in food processing facilities such as flour mills, rice mills, human and pet food manufacturing facilities, distribution centers and warehouses, and retail stores is a challenging undertaking. Insect pest management programs require an understanding of the food facili...

  2. A Self-Instructional Course in Student Financial Aid Administration. Module 17--Evaluation of Student Aid Management: Self-Evaluation, Audit, and Program Review. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington Consulting Group, Inc., Washington, DC.

    The 17th module in the 17-module self-instructional course on student financial aid administration discusses the evaluation of student aid management in terms of self-evaluation, audit, and program review. The full course offers a systematic introduction to the management of federal financial aid programs authorized by Title IV of the Higher…

  3. Central Facilities Area Facilities Radioactive Waste Management Basis and DOE Manual 435.1-1 Compliance Tables

    SciTech Connect

    Lisa Harvego; Brion Bennett

    2011-11-01

    Department of Energy Order 435.1, 'Radioactive Waste Management,' along with its associated manual and guidance, requires development and maintenance of a radioactive waste management basis for each radioactive waste management facility, operation, and activity. This document presents a radioactive waste management basis for Idaho National Laboratory's Central Facilities Area facilities that manage radioactive waste. The radioactive waste management basis for a facility comprises existing laboratory-wide and facilityspecific documents. Department of Energy Manual 435.1-1, 'Radioactive Waste Management Manual,' facility compliance tables also are presented for the facilities. The tables serve as a tool for developing the radioactive waste management basis.

  4. HIV/AIDS Case Managers and Client HIV Status Disclosure: Perceived Client Needs, Practices, and Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalichman, Seth C.; Klein, Susan J.; Kalichman, Moira O.; O'Connell, Daniel A.; Freedman, Jay A.; Eaton, Lisa; Cain, Demetria

    2007-01-01

    People living with HIV/AIDS often need assistance in deciding whether or how to disclose their HIV status to others, and case managers are in a unique position to offer this assistance. The current study surveyed 223 case managers providing services to people living with HIV/AIDS in New York State. The survey was conducted anonymously, and case…

  5. Open source GIS for HIV/AIDS management

    PubMed Central

    Vanmeulebrouk, Bas; Rivett, Ulrike; Ricketts, Adam; Loudon, Melissa

    2008-01-01

    Background Reliable access to basic services can improve a community's resilience to HIV/AIDS. Accordingly, work is being done to upgrade the physical infrastructure in affected areas, often employing a strategy of decentralised service provision. Spatial characteristics are one of the major determinants in implementing services, even in the smaller municipal areas, and good quality spatial information is needed to inform decision making processes. However, limited funds, technical infrastructure and human resource capacity result in little or no access to spatial information for crucial infrastructure development decisions at local level. This research investigated whether it would be possible to develop a GIS for basic infrastructure planning and management at local level. Given the resource constraints of the local government context, particularly in small municipalities, it was decided that open source software should be used for the prototype system. Results The design and development of a prototype system illustrated that it is possible to develop an open source GIS system that can be used within the context of local information management. Usability tests show a high degree of usability for the system, which is important considering the heavy workload and high staff turnover that characterises local government in South Africa. Local infrastructure management stakeholders interviewed in a case study of a South African municipality see the potential for the use of GIS as a communication tool and are generally positive about the use of GIS for these purposes. They note security issues that may arise through the sharing of information, lack of skills and resource constraints as the major barriers to adoption. Conclusion The case study shows that spatial information is an identified need at local level. Open source GIS software can be used to develop a system to provide local-level stakeholders with spatial information. However, the suitability of the technology

  6. Keeping a tight grip on the reins: donor control over aid coordination and management in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Buse, K

    1999-09-01

    A long-standing consensus that aid coordination should be owned by recipient authorities has been eclipsed by accord on the desirability of recipient management of aid along-side domestic resources. Nonetheless, in many low and lower-middle income countries, donors remain remarkably uncoordinated; where attempts at coordination are made, they are often donor-driven, and only a small proportion of aid is directly managed by recipients. This paper draws on evidence from an in-depth review of aid to the health sector in Bangladesh to analyze the systems by which external resources are managed. Based on interviews with key stakeholders, a questionnaire survey and analysis of documentary sources, the factors constraining the government from assuming a more active role in aid management are explored. The results suggest that donor perceptions of weak government capacity, inadequate accountability and compromised integrity only partially account for the propensity for donor leadership. Equally important is the consideration that aid coordination has a markedly political dimension. Stakeholders are well aware of the power, influence and leverage which aid coordination confers, an awareness which colours the desire of some stakeholders to lead aid coordination processes, and conditions the extent and manner by which others wish to be involved. It is argued that recipient management of external aid is dependent on major changes in the attitudes and behaviours of recipients and donors alike. PMID:10621239

  7. Policy initiatives for electric-utility load management in AID-assisted countries

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-08-01

    The demand for electricity has been growing at a rate of over 7 percent per year, on average, for developing countries (in contrast, demand has been rising by less than 3% annually in the United States). While developing nations have traditionally relied on building new power plants to satisfy their increasing needs for electricity, the strategy has proven to be expensive, consuming over one-quarter of their development budgets and over a quarter of their foreign borrowings. Load management, whereby an electric utility modifies its customers' demand characteristics, offers developing countries an alternative for reducing the need to construct new generating capacity and for better utilizing their existing supply facilities. To mitigate the problems associated with high energy growth rates, especially in the power sector, the lack of investment capital for the electricity sector, and the growing concern for environmental hazards including global climate change, the Office of Energy promotes energy efficiency, the role of private power and other supply options to ensure sustainable development. In view of these objectives, the report examines the rationale for load management in the electricity sector and summarizes the positive U.S. experience with these techniques. Additionally, it recommends a strategy for achieving energy efficiency via load management. Lastly, it recommends to A.I.D. a method for identifying priority Agency-assisted countries as candidates for load management assistance.

  8. Upstream dispersal of an invasive crayfish aided by a fish passage facility

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Welsh, Stuart; Loughman, Zachary J.

    2015-01-01

    Fish passage facilities for reservoir dams have been used to restore habitat connectivity within riverine networks by allowing upstream passage for native species. These facilities may also support the spread of invasive species, an unintended consequence and potential downside of upstream passage structures. We documented dam passage of the invasive virile crayfish, Orconectes virilis (Hagen, 1870), at fish ladders designed for upstream passage of American eels, Anguilla rostrata (Lesueur, 1817), in the Shenandoah River drainage, USA. Ladder use and upstream passage of 11 virile crayfish occurred from 2007–2014 during periods of low river discharge (<30 m3s–1) and within a wide range of water temperatures from 9.0–28.6 °C. Virile crayfish that used the eel ladders were large adults with a mean carapace length and width of 48.0 mm and 24.1 mm, respectively. Our data demonstrated the use of species-specific fish ladders by a non-target non-native species, which has conservation and management implications for the spread of aquatic invasive species and upstream passage facilities. Specifically, managers should consider implementing long-term monitoring of fish passage facilities with emphasis on detection of invasive species, as well as methods to reduce or eliminate passage of invasive species. 

  9. Resident's concerns and attitudes towards Solid Waste Management facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Rahardyan, B.; Matsuto, T.; Kakuta, Y.; Tanaka, N

    2004-07-01

    Because of limited space, the siting and construction of a new SWM facility is a big challenge in Japan. An SWM facility should be socially accepted as well as environmentally and economically sound. This study aimed to investigate people's concerns about SWM facilities and their attitudes towards such facilities. A questionnaire was designed based on literature reviews and was sent to residents in three municipalities with different backgrounds. The questions covered concerns on the impact of an SWM facility, management aspects, unfairness of facility siting, and attitudes to facility construction. Of the many concerns, 'pollution and health effect' had the highest rating, followed by 'reliability', 'damage to nature' and 'cost'. The rating was different between municipalities, reflecting their geographic and social backgrounds. Using factor analysis, correlations among concerns were analyzed, and five principal components were extracted, namely 'pollution', 'nuisance', 'facility management', 'planning of facility', and 'merit/demerit'. Although obvious correlations were not found between individual items of concern and attitudes to construction of a facility, the discriminant analysis indicated dominant concerns of attitudes, but the disagreement between actual impact and citizens were found. As for attributes, the 'opposed' attitude decreased for residents who had visited an SWM facility, even if they had only seen it from outside.

  10. Resident's concerns and attitudes towards Solid Waste Management facilities.

    PubMed

    Rahardyan, B; Matsuto, T; Kakuta, Y; Tanaka, N

    2004-01-01

    Because of limited space, the siting and construction of a new SWM facility is a big challenge in Japan. An SWM facility should be socially accepted as well as environmentally and economically sound. This study aimed to investigate people's concerns about SWM facilities and their attitudes towards such facilities. A questionnaire was designed based on literature reviews and was sent to residents in three municipalities with different backgrounds. The questions covered concerns on the impact of an SWM facility, management aspects, unfairness of facility siting, and attitudes to facility construction. Of the many concerns, "pollution and health effect" had the highest rating, followed by "reliability", "damage to nature" and "cost". The rating was different between municipalities, reflecting their geographic and social backgrounds. Using factor analysis, correlations among concerns were analyzed, and five principal components were extracted, namely "pollution", "nuisance", "facility management", "planning of facility", and "merit/demerit". Although obvious correlations were not found between individual items of concern and attitudes to construction of a facility, the discriminant analysis indicated dominant concerns of attitudes, but the disagreement between actual impact and citizens were found. As for attributes, the "opposed" attitude decreased for residents who had visited an SWM facility, even if they had only seen it from outside. PMID:15120428

  11. Effective and Innovative Practices for Stronger Facilities Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banick, Sarah

    2002-01-01

    Describes the five winners of the APPA's Effective & Innovative Practices Award. These facilities management programs and processes were recognized for enhancing service delivery, lowering costs, increasing productivity, improving customer service, generating revenue, or otherwise benefiting the educational institution. (EV)

  12. Information security management system planning for CBRN facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Lenaeu, Joseph D.; O'Neil, Lori Ross; Leitch, Rosalyn M.; Glantz, Clifford S.; Landine, Guy P.; Bryant, Janet L.; Lewis, John; Mathers, Gemma; Rodger, Robert; Johnson, Christopher

    2015-12-01

    The focus of this document is to provide guidance for the development of information security management system planning documents at chemical, biological, radiological, or nuclear (CBRN) facilities. It describes a risk-based approach for planning information security programs based on the sensitivity of the data developed, processed, communicated, and stored on facility information systems.

  13. The ORNL Surplus Facilities Management Program Long Range Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Myrick, T.E.

    1984-09-01

    The Surplus Facilities Management Program (SFMP) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is part of the Department of Energy`s (DOE) National SFMP, administered by the Richland Operations Office. This program was established to provide for the management of DOE surplus radioactively contaminated facilities from the end of their operating life until final facility disposition is completed. As part of this program, the ORNL SFMP oversees some 76 individual surplus facilities, ranging in complexity from abandoned waste storage tanks to large experimental reactors. The ORNL SFMP has prepared this Long Range Plan to outline the long-term management strategy for those facilities included in the program. The primary objective of this plan are to: (1) develop a base of information for each ORNL SFMP facility, (2) conduct preliminary decommissioning analyses to identify feasible alternatives, (3) assess the current and future risk of each facility, (4) establish a priority list for the decommissioning projects, and (5) integrate the individual project costs and schedules into an overall program schedule and cost estimate for the ORNL site. The Long Range Plan also provides an overview of the ORNL SFMP management structure, specifies the decommissioning criteria to be employed, and identifies special technical problems, research and development needs, and special facilities and equipment that may be required for decommissioning operations.

  14. Institutional Management of Core Facilities during Challenging Financial Times

    PubMed Central

    Haley, Rand

    2011-01-01

    The economic downturn is likely to have lasting effects on institutions of higher education, prioritizing proactive institutional leadership and planning. Although by design, core research facilities are more efficient and effective than supporting individual pieces of research equipment, cores can have significant underlying financial requirements and challenges. This paper explores several possible institutional approaches to managing core facilities during challenging financial times. PMID:22131887

  15. Redesigning Facilities Management Information Systems for the 21st Century.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonald, Fred; Lancaster, Michael; Graham, Mike

    1997-01-01

    Describes one Canadian school district's use of an integrated Facilities Management Information System (FMIS) to help address the effective and efficient planning, building, operating, and maintaining of their schools and other Board facilities. Development of the FMIS and its demands for organizational restructuring and change in the workplace…

  16. 7 CFR 205.271 - Facility pest management practice standard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...) ORGANIC FOODS PRODUCTION ACT PROVISIONS NATIONAL ORGANIC PROGRAM Organic Production and Handling Requirements § 205.271 Facility pest management practice standard. (a) The producer or handler of an organic... habitat, food sources, and breeding areas; (2) Prevention of access to handling facilities; and...

  17. 7 CFR 205.271 - Facility pest management practice standard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...) ORGANIC FOODS PRODUCTION ACT PROVISIONS NATIONAL ORGANIC PROGRAM Organic Production and Handling Requirements § 205.271 Facility pest management practice standard. (a) The producer or handler of an organic... habitat, food sources, and breeding areas; (2) Prevention of access to handling facilities; and...

  18. Managing the Rural School Facility Construction Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Passarelli, Angelo; Goehring, Wade; Harley, Anne

    The decision to renovate or replace a school building is the starting point for a long and challenging journey with many phases: planning, development, and project delivery and construction. Each phase requires different levels of expertise, skills, and activities. The challenge of a rural facility project is to find leadership to provide guidance…

  19. 7 CFR 210.13 - Facilities management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... AGRICULTURE CHILD NUTRITION PROGRAMS NATIONAL SCHOOL LUNCH PROGRAM Requirements for School Food Authority... required to obtain two food safety inspections per school year if the nutrition programs offered use the same facilities for the production and service of meals. (c) Food safety program. The school...

  20. Managing costs. [Resource recovery facility costs

    SciTech Connect

    Paret, M.P. ); Strouse, R.K. )

    1992-03-01

    This article examines the costs associated with a resource recovery facility in Indianapolis and how keeping these costs low provides flexibility for enacting economic incentives and new funding mechanisms that are generally needed today to encourage cost-effective recycling. The topics discussed in the article include project development, program finances, cogeneration, and the future outlook.

  1. Facilities Management: A Manual for Plant Administration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Teresa Burnau, Ed.

    Major aspects of the management of the physical plant of campuses are considered in 42 chapters. The five major sections cover: personnel services; budgeting and accounting; maintenance management; plant operations; and planning, design, and construction. A conclusion describes proven methods and criteria for self-evaluation of the physical plant.…

  2. AIDS in the Workplace: A Training for Managers and Supervisors. District of Oregon.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tyree, Jimmy L.

    This document provides a summary of "AIDS in the Workplace for Court Managers," a 3-hour seminar that was presented to the District of Oregon. The document begins with a summary of the seminar goals and objectives, which included the following: reduce fears and anxieties about HIV/AIDS in the workplace; provide information about the fundamentals…

  3. Enrollment Management and Financial Aid Part Two: A Public Policy Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hossler, Don; Kalsbeek, David

    2008-01-01

    In our previous essay, we considered the role of institutional financial aid and the practice of enrollment management. In that essay we explored the use of financial aid as a tool to enhance equity increase prestige, as a revenue enhancement tool and as a means to shape institutional image in the various markets that comprise our diverse system…

  4. Assessment of facilities management process capability: a NHS facilities case study.

    PubMed

    Amaratunga, Dilanthi; Haigh, Richard; Sarshar, Marjan; Baldry, David

    2002-01-01

    Describes a process to assess facilities management (FM) process capabilities: the structured process improvement for construction environments--facilities management (SPICE FM) approach. The SPICE FM framework is a method that FM organizations can use to monitor continuously and subsequently improve their performance. The SPICE FM framework is being tested in a series of case studies to ensure that its outputs are appropriate to the FM sector and of value in the real world. Documents the outcomes of a study undertaken at a facilities directorate of a healthcare NHS trust, in searching its applicability within the NHS. Further describes the study methodology and the key activities undertaken and reviews the key communication and management processes that are in place to support the implementation of the strategic FM objectives within the specific NHS facilities directorate. PMID:12500653

  5. Evaluation of a hybrid paper-electronic medication management system at a residential aged care facility.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Rohan A; Lee, Cik Yin; Hussainy, Safeera Y

    2016-06-01

    Objectives The aims of the study were to investigate discrepancies between general practitioners' paper medication orders and pharmacy-prepared electronic medication administration charts, back-up paper charts and dose-administration aids, as well as delays between prescribing, charting and administration, at a 90-bed residential aged care facility that used a hybrid paper-electronic medication management system. Methods A cross-sectional audit of medication orders, medication charts and dose-administration aids was performed to identify discrepancies. In addition, a retrospective audit was performed of delays between prescribing and availability of an updated electronic medication administration chart. Medication administration records were reviewed retrospectively to determine whether discrepancies and delays led to medication administration errors. Results Medication records for 88 residents (mean age 86 years) were audited. Residents were prescribed a median of eight regular medicines (interquartile range 5-12). One hundred and twenty-five discrepancies were identified. Forty-seven discrepancies, affecting 21 (24%) residents, led to a medication administration error. The most common discrepancies were medicine omission (44.0%) and extra medicine (19.2%). Delays from when medicines were prescribed to when they appeared on the electronic medication administration chart ranged from 18min to 98h. On nine occasions (for 10% of residents) the delay contributed to missed doses, usually antibiotics. Conclusion Medication discrepancies and delays were common. Improved systems for managing medication orders and charts are needed. What is known about the topic? Hybrid paper-electronic medication management systems, in which prescribers' orders are transcribed into an electronic system by pharmacy technicians and pharmacists to create medication administration charts, are increasingly replacing paper-based medication management systems in Australian residential aged care

  6. The Mixed Waste Management Facility. Monthly report, September 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Streit, R.

    1994-10-01

    This document is a monthly report for September, 1994 of the significant developments that have taken place at the Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) located at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). This report presents a project financial summary, describes the quality assurance programs, project management, and presents a monthly summary of activities for the various treatment operations.

  7. 21 CFR 58.31 - Testing facility management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... management. For each nonclinical laboratory study, testing facility management shall: (a) Designate a study director as described in § 58.33, before the study is initiated. (b) Replace the study director promptly if it becomes necessary to do so during the conduct of a study. (c) Assure that there is a...

  8. DEMAID - A DESIGN MANAGER'S AID FOR INTELLIGENT DECOMPOSITION (MACINTOSH VERSION)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, J. L.

    1994-01-01

    Many engineering systems are large and multi-disciplinary. Before the design of new complex systems such as large space platforms can begin, the possible interactions among subsystems and their parts must be determined. Once this is completed the proposed system can be decomposed to identify its hierarchical structure. DeMAID (A Design Manager's Aid for Intelligent Decomposition) is a knowledge-based system for ordering the sequence of modules and identifying a possible multilevel structure for the design problem. DeMAID displays the modules in an N x N matrix format (called a design structure matrix) where a module is any process that requires input and generates an output. (Modules which generate an output but do not require an input, such as an initialization process, are also acceptable.) Although DeMAID requires an investment of time to generate and refine the list of modules for input, it could save a considerable amount of money and time in the total design process, particularly in new design problems where the ordering of the modules has not been defined. The decomposition of a complex design system into subsystems requires the judgement of the design manager. DeMAID reorders and groups the modules based on the links (interactions) among the modules, helping the design manager make decomposition decisions early in the design cycle. The modules are grouped into circuits (the subsystems) and displayed in an N x N matrix format. Feedback links, which indicate an iterative process, are minimized and only occur within a subsystem. Since there are no feedback links among the circuits, the circuits can be displayed in a multilevel format. Thus, a large amount of information is reduced to one or two displays which are stored for later retrieval and modification. The design manager and leaders of the design teams then have a visual display of the design problem and the intricate interactions among the different modules. The design manager could save a substantial

  9. DEMAID - A DESIGN MANAGER'S AID FOR INTELLIGENT DECOMPOSITION (SUN VERSION)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, J. L.

    1994-01-01

    Many engineering systems are large and multi-disciplinary. Before the design of new complex systems such as large space platforms can begin, the possible interactions among subsystems and their parts must be determined. Once this is completed the proposed system can be decomposed to identify its hierarchical structure. DeMAID (A Design Manager's Aid for Intelligent Decomposition) is a knowledge-based system for ordering the sequence of modules and identifying a possible multilevel structure for the design problem. DeMAID displays the modules in an N x N matrix format (called a design structure matrix) where a module is any process that requires input and generates an output. (Modules which generate an output but do not require an input, such as an initialization process, are also acceptable.) Although DeMAID requires an investment of time to generate and refine the list of modules for input, it could save a considerable amount of money and time in the total design process, particularly in new design problems where the ordering of the modules has not been defined. The decomposition of a complex design system into subsystems requires the judgement of the design manager. DeMAID reorders and groups the modules based on the links (interactions) among the modules, helping the design manager make decomposition decisions early in the design cycle. The modules are grouped into circuits (the subsystems) and displayed in an N x N matrix format. Feedback links, which indicate an iterative process, are minimized and only occur within a subsystem. Since there are no feedback links among the circuits, the circuits can be displayed in a multilevel format. Thus, a large amount of information is reduced to one or two displays which are stored for later retrieval and modification. The design manager and leaders of the design teams then have a visual display of the design problem and the intricate interactions among the different modules. The design manager could save a substantial

  10. DEMAID - A DESIGN MANAGER'S AID FOR INTELLIGENT DECOMPOSITION (MACINTOSH VERSION)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, J. L.

    1994-01-01

    Many engineering systems are large and multi-disciplinary. Before the design of new complex systems such as large space platforms can begin, the possible interactions among subsystems and their parts must be determined. Once this is completed the proposed system can be decomposed to identify its hierarchical structure. DeMAID (A Design Manager's Aid for Intelligent Decomposition) is a knowledge-based system for ordering the sequence of modules and identifying a possible multilevel structure for the design problem. DeMAID displays the modules in an N x N matrix format (called a design structure matrix) where a module is any process that requires input and generates an output. (Modules which generate an output but do not require an input, such as an initialization process, are also acceptable.) Although DeMAID requires an investment of time to generate and refine the list of modules for input, it could save a considerable amount of money and time in the total design process, particularly in new design problems where the ordering of the modules has not been defined. The decomposition of a complex design system into subsystems requires the judgement of the design manager. DeMAID reorders and groups the modules based on the links (interactions) among the modules, helping the design manager make decomposition decisions early in the design cycle. The modules are grouped into circuits (the subsystems) and displayed in an N x N matrix format. Feedback links, which indicate an iterative process, are minimized and only occur within a subsystem. Since there are no feedback links among the circuits, the circuits can be displayed in a multilevel format. Thus, a large amount of information is reduced to one or two displays which are stored for later retrieval and modification. The design manager and leaders of the design teams then have a visual display of the design problem and the intricate interactions among the different modules. The design manager could save a substantial

  11. DEMAID - A DESIGN MANAGER'S AID FOR INTELLIGENT DECOMPOSITION (SUN VERSION)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, J. L.

    1994-01-01

    Many engineering systems are large and multi-disciplinary. Before the design of new complex systems such as large space platforms can begin, the possible interactions among subsystems and their parts must be determined. Once this is completed the proposed system can be decomposed to identify its hierarchical structure. DeMAID (A Design Manager's Aid for Intelligent Decomposition) is a knowledge-based system for ordering the sequence of modules and identifying a possible multilevel structure for the design problem. DeMAID displays the modules in an N x N matrix format (called a design structure matrix) where a module is any process that requires input and generates an output. (Modules which generate an output but do not require an input, such as an initialization process, are also acceptable.) Although DeMAID requires an investment of time to generate and refine the list of modules for input, it could save a considerable amount of money and time in the total design process, particularly in new design problems where the ordering of the modules has not been defined. The decomposition of a complex design system into subsystems requires the judgement of the design manager. DeMAID reorders and groups the modules based on the links (interactions) among the modules, helping the design manager make decomposition decisions early in the design cycle. The modules are grouped into circuits (the subsystems) and displayed in an N x N matrix format. Feedback links, which indicate an iterative process, are minimized and only occur within a subsystem. Since there are no feedback links among the circuits, the circuits can be displayed in a multilevel format. Thus, a large amount of information is reduced to one or two displays which are stored for later retrieval and modification. The design manager and leaders of the design teams then have a visual display of the design problem and the intricate interactions among the different modules. The design manager could save a substantial

  12. National Ignition Facility Risk Management Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Brereton, S.J.

    1997-02-01

    The NIF Risk Management Plan has been prepared in accordance with the DOE Life Cycle Asset Management Good Practice Guide to support Critical Decision 3 of the NIF Project. The objectives of the plan are to: 1) identify the risks to the completion of the Project in terms of meeting technical and regulatory requirements, cost, and schedule, 2) assess the risks in terms of likelihood of occurrence and their impact potential relative to technical performance, ES&H (environment, safety and health), costs, and schedule, and 3) address each identified risk in terms of suitable risk mitigation measures. The documents that form the basis for this risk assessment are as follows: 1. Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Stockpile Stewardship and Management (DOE, 1996a) and Record of Decision (DOE, 1996b), 2. Preliminary Hazards Analysis (Brereton, 1993), 3. Fire Hazards Analysis (Jensen, 1997), 4. Preliminary Safety Analysis Report (LLNL, 1996a), 5. Reliability, Availability and Maintainability Report, 6. Radiation Protection Evaluation, 7. Primary Criteria and Functional Requirements (LLNL, 1996b), 8. Project Execution Plan (DOE, 1996c), 9. Schedule Risk Assessment, 10. Construction Safety Program (LLNL, 1997), 11. Title I Design Media, 12. Congressional Data Sheet. The process used in developing this plan was to form a Risk Assessment team of knowledgeable project personnel. This included: Assurances Manager, Systems Integration Manager, Project Control Manager, a Risk Management consultant, Deputy Associate Project Engineer for Activation and Start-up (Co-chairperson), and Lead Engineer for Safety Analysis (Co-chairperson). They were familiar with the risk basis documents and developed a list of the key risk elements. A methodology for assigning likelihoods, consequences, and risks was developed. Risk elements were then reviewed, and likelihoods, consequences, and risks were assigned. Risk mitigation measures were then developed. Comments were obtained

  13. Use of job aids to improve facility-based postnatal counseling and care in rural Benin.

    PubMed

    Jennings, L; Yebadokpo, A; Affo, J; Agbogbe, M

    2015-03-01

    This study examined the effect of a job aids-focused intervention on quality of facility-based postnatal counseling, and whether increased communication improved in-hospital newborn care and maternal knowledge of home practices and danger signs requiring urgent care. Ensuring mothers and newborns receive essential postnatal services, including health counseling, is integral to their survival. Yet, quality of clinic-based postnatal services is often low, and evidence on effective improvement strategies is scarce. Using a pre-post randomized design, data were drawn from direct observations and interviews with 411 mother-newborn pairs. Multi-level regression models with difference-in-differences analyses estimated the intervention's relative effect, adjusting for changes in the comparison arm. The mean percent of recommended messages provided to recently-delivered women significantly improved in the intervention arm as compared to the control (difference-in-differences [∆i - ∆c] +30.9, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 19.3, 42.5), and the proportion of newborns thermally protected within the first hour (∆i - ∆c +33.7, 95 % CI 19.0, 48.4) and delayed for bathing (∆i - ∆c +23.9, 95 % CI 9.4, 38.4) significantly increased. No significant changes were observed in early breastfeeding (∆i - ∆c +6.8, 95 % CI -2.8, 16.4) which was nearly universal. Omitting traditional umbilical cord substances rose slightly, but was insignificant (∆i - ∆c +8.5, 95 % CI -2.8, 19.9). The proportion of mothers with correct knowledge of maternal (∆i - ∆c +27.8, 95 % CI 11.0, 44.6) and newborn (∆i - ∆c +40.3, 95 % CI 22.2, 58.4) danger signs grew substantially, as did awareness of several home-care practices (∆i - ∆c +26.0, 95 % CI 7.7, 44.3). Counseling job aids can improve the quality of postnatal services. However, achieving reduction goals in maternal and neonatal mortality will likely require more comprehensive approaches to link enhanced facility services with

  14. MANAGING BERYLLIUM IN NUCLEAR FACILITY APPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    R. Rohe; T. N. Tranter

    2011-12-01

    Beryllium plays important roles in nuclear facilities. Its neutron multiplication capability and low atomic weight make it very useful as a reflector in fission reactors. Its low atomic number and high chemical affinity for oxygen have led to its consideration as a plasma-facing material in fusion reactors. In both applications, the beryllium and the impurities in it become activated by neutrons, transmuting them to radionuclides, some of which are long-lived and difficult to dispose of. Also, gas production, notably helium and tritium, results in swelling, embrittlement, and cracking, which means that the beryllium must be replaced periodically, especially in fission reactors where dimensional tolerances must be maintained. It has long been known that neutron activation of inherent iron and cobalt in the beryllium results in significant {sup 60}Co activity. In 2001, it was discovered that activation of naturally occurring contaminants in the beryllium creates sufficient {sup 14}C and {sup 94}Nb to render the irradiated beryllium 'Greater-Than-Class-C' for disposal in U.S. radioactive waste facilities. It was further found that there was sufficient uranium impurity in beryllium that had been used in fission reactors up to that time that the irradiated beryllium had become transuranic in character, making it even more difficult to dispose of. In this paper we review the extent of the disposal issue, processes that have been investigated or considered for improving the disposability of irradiated beryllium, and approaches for recycling.

  15. Developing Mobile BIM/2D Barcode-Based Automated Facility Management System

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yen-Pei

    2014-01-01

    Facility management (FM) has become an important topic in research on the operation and maintenance phase. Managing the work of FM effectively is extremely difficult owing to the variety of environments. One of the difficulties is the performance of two-dimensional (2D) graphics when depicting facilities. Building information modeling (BIM) uses precise geometry and relevant data to support the facilities depicted in three-dimensional (3D) object-oriented computer-aided design (CAD). This paper proposes a new and practical methodology with application to FM that uses an integrated 2D barcode and the BIM approach. Using 2D barcode and BIM technologies, this study proposes a mobile automated BIM-based facility management (BIMFM) system for FM staff in the operation and maintenance phase. The mobile automated BIMFM system is then applied in a selected case study of a commercial building project in Taiwan to verify the proposed methodology and demonstrate its effectiveness in FM practice. The combined results demonstrate that a BIMFM-like system can be an effective mobile automated FM tool. The advantage of the mobile automated BIMFM system lies not only in improving FM work efficiency for the FM staff but also in facilitating FM updates and transfers in the BIM environment. PMID:25250373

  16. Developing mobile BIM/2D barcode-based automated facility management system.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yu-Cheng; Su, Yu-Chih; Chen, Yen-Pei

    2014-01-01

    Facility management (FM) has become an important topic in research on the operation and maintenance phase. Managing the work of FM effectively is extremely difficult owing to the variety of environments. One of the difficulties is the performance of two-dimensional (2D) graphics when depicting facilities. Building information modeling (BIM) uses precise geometry and relevant data to support the facilities depicted in three-dimensional (3D) object-oriented computer-aided design (CAD). This paper proposes a new and practical methodology with application to FM that uses an integrated 2D barcode and the BIM approach. Using 2D barcode and BIM technologies, this study proposes a mobile automated BIM-based facility management (BIMFM) system for FM staff in the operation and maintenance phase. The mobile automated BIMFM system is then applied in a selected case study of a commercial building project in Taiwan to verify the proposed methodology and demonstrate its effectiveness in FM practice. The combined results demonstrate that a BIMFM-like system can be an effective mobile automated FM tool. The advantage of the mobile automated BIMFM system lies not only in improving FM work efficiency for the FM staff but also in facilitating FM updates and transfers in the BIM environment. PMID:25250373

  17. Fire Safety. Managing School Facilities, Guide 6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department for Education and Employment, London (England). Architects and Building Branch.

    This booklet discusses how United Kingdom schools can manage fire safety and minimize the risk of fire. The guide examines what legislation school buildings must comply with and covers the major risks. It also describes training and evacuation procedures and provides guidance on fire precautions, alarm systems, fire fighting equipment, and escape…

  18. STORMWATER BEST MANAGEMENT PRACTICES TEST FACILITY - SWALES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The NRMRL swale evaluation is part of a larger collection of long-term research projects that evaluates many Best Management Practices. EPA has ongoing research examining the performance of constructed wet lands, and detention and retention ponds. Other projects will evaluate ra...

  19. Saving Energy. Managing School Facilities, Guide 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department for Education and Employment, London (England). Architects and Building Branch.

    This guide offers information on how schools can implement an energy saving action plan to reduce their energy costs. Various low-cost energy-saving measures are recommended covering heating levels and heating systems, electricity demand reduction and lighting, ventilation, hot water usage, and swimming pool energy management. Additional…

  20. Swimming Pools. Managing School Facilities, Guide 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department for Education and Employment, London (England). Architects and Building Branch.

    This guide for schools with swimming pools offers advice concerning appropriate training for pool managers, the importance of water quality and testing, safety in the handling of chemicals, maintenance and cleaning requirements, pool security, and health concerns. The guide covers both indoor and outdoor pools, explains some technical terms,…

  1. Computer-aided design drafting/manufacturing (CADD/M) facility preparation

    SciTech Connect

    Norton, F.J.

    1980-09-23

    Computer-Aided Design, Drafting and Manufacturing (CADD/M) equipment requires careful facilities preparation before installation takes place. This paper presents what a company should consider to ensure a proper installation. This includes consideration of working conditions. To get the most out of the system, the operators must be provided with a relaxed, comfortable environment, free from noise and other distractions. Such things as temperature requirements, lighting, power, security and fire protection are discussed. Also, future expansion needs are considered so that major construction will not be required for future years. Advanced planning in these areas is needed to ensure successful implementation of a CADD/M system. This will lead to considerable cost savings, and in the long run, improve the scheduling for an entire project, from initial design to final production. This careful preparation will minimize unplanned events and problem areas. These are ambitious goals but easily realized if a logical and rational plan is adopted in the same manner as that used in a typical development program.

  2. 75 FR 54627 - Best Management Practices for Unused Pharmaceuticals at Health Care Facilities

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-08

    ... AGENCY Best Management Practices for Unused Pharmaceuticals at Health Care Facilities AGENCY... guidance document entitled, Best Management Practices for Unused Pharmaceuticals at Health Care Facilities... been studying unused pharmaceutical disposal practices at health care facilities, prompted by...

  3. The Mixed Waste Management Facility. Preliminary design review

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    This document presents information about the Mixed Waste Management Facility. Topics discussed include: cost and schedule baseline for the completion of the project; evaluation of alternative options; transportation of radioactive wastes to the facility; capital risk associated with incineration; radioactive waste processing; scaling of the pilot-scale system; waste streams to be processed; molten salt oxidation; feed preparation; initial operation to demonstrate selected technologies; floorplans; baseline revisions; preliminary design baseline; cost reduction; and project mission and milestones.

  4. DeMAID/GA USER'S GUIDE Design Manager's Aid for Intelligent Decomposition with a Genetic Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, James L.

    1996-01-01

    Many companies are looking for new tools and techniques to aid a design manager in making decisions that can reduce the time and cost of a design cycle. One tool that is available to aid in this decision making process is the Design Manager's Aid for Intelligent Decomposition (DeMAID). Since the initial release of DEMAID in 1989, numerous enhancements have been added to aid the design manager in saving both cost and time in a design cycle. The key enhancement is a genetic algorithm (GA) and the enhanced version is called DeMAID/GA. The GA orders the sequence of design processes to minimize the cost and time to converge to a solution. These enhancements as well as the existing features of the original version of DEMAID are described. Two sample problems are used to show how these enhancements can be applied to improve the design cycle. This report serves as a user's guide for DeMAID/GA.

  5. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Facilities Revitalization Project - Project Management Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Myrick, T.E.

    2000-06-06

    The Facilities Revitalization Project (FRP) has been established at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to provide new and/or refurbished research and support facilities for the Laboratory's science mission. The FRP vision is to provide ORNL staff with world-class facilities, consolidated at the X-10 site, with the first phase of construction to be completed within five years. The project will utilize a combination of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), State of Tennessee, and private-sector funds to accomplish the new construction, with the facilities requirements to be focused on support of the ORNL Institutional Plan. This FRP Project Management Plan has been developed to provide the framework under which the project will be conducted. It is intended that the FRP will be managed as a programmatic office, with primary resources for execution of the project to be obtained from the responsible organizations within ORNL (Engineering, Procurement, Strategic Planning, etc.). The FRP Project Management Plan includes a definition of the project scope, the organizational responsibilities, and project approach, including detailed Work Breakdown Structure (WBS), followed by more detailed discussions of each of the main WBS elements: Project Planning Basis, Facility Deactivation and Consolidation, and New Facilities Development. Finally, a general discussion of the overall project schedule and cost tracking approach is provided.

  6. Remote sensing as an aid for marsh management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ragan, J. G.; Green, J. H.

    1973-01-01

    NASA aerial photography, primarily color infrared and color positive transparencies, is used in a study of marsh management practices and in comparing managed and unmanaged marsh areas. Weir locations for tidal control are recommended.

  7. Data management for Computer-Aided Engineering (CAE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryant, W. A.; Smith, M. R.

    1984-01-01

    Analysis of data flow through the design and manufacturing processes has established specific information management requirements and identified unique problems. The application of data management technology to the engineering/manufacturing environment addresses these problems. An overview of the IPAD prototype data base management system, representing a partial solution to these problems, is presented here.

  8. 41 CFR 102-192.135 - Must we have a mail center manager at our facility?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... center manager at our facility? 102-192.135 Section 102-192.135 Public Contracts and Property Management... PROGRAMS 192-MAIL MANAGEMENT Mail Center Manager Requirements § 102-192.135 Must we have a mail center manager at our facility? Yes, every facility that has more than two full time people dedicated...

  9. Pilot decision making in a computer-aided flight management situation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, Y. Y.; Rouse, W. B.

    1978-01-01

    An experimental representation of a computer-aided multi-task flight management situation has been developed. A computer aiding program was implemented to serve as a back-up decision maker. An experiment was conducted with a balanced design of several subject runs for different workload levels. This was achieved using three levels of subsystem event arrival rates, three levels of control task involvement, and three levels of availability of computer aiding. Experimental results compared quite favorably with those from a computer simulation which employed a queueing model. It was shown that the aiding had enhanced system performance as well as subjective ratings, and that the adaptive aiding policy further reduced subsystem delay.

  10. Facilities management system (FMS). Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1992-04-01

    The remainder of this report provides a detailed, final status of Andersen Consulting`s participation in the FMS systems implementation project and offers suggestions for continued FMS improvements. The report presents the following topics of discussion: (1) Summary and Status of Work (2) Recommendations for Continued Success (3) Contract Deliverables and Client Satisfaction The Summary and Status of Work section presents a detailed, final status of the FMS project at the termination of Andersen`s full-time participation. This section discusses the status of each FMS sub-system and of the Andersen major project deliverables. The Recommendations section offers suggestions for continued FMS success. The topics discussed include recommendations for each of the following areas: (1) End User and Business Operations (2) AISD; Development and Computer Operations (3) Software (4) Technical Platform (5) Control Procedures The Contract Deliverables and Client Satisfaction section discusses feedback received from Johnson Controls management and FMS system users. The report also addresses Andersen`s observations from the feedback.

  11. Dismantlement and Radioactive Waste Management of DPRK Nuclear Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Jooho, W.; Baldwin, G. T.

    2005-04-01

    One critical aspect of any denuclearization of the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (DPRK) involves dismantlement of its nuclear facilities and management of their associated radioactive wastes. The decommissioning problem for its two principal operational plutonium facilities at Yongbyun, the 5MWe nuclear reactor and the Radiochemical Laboratory reprocessing facility, alone present a formidable challenge. Dismantling those facilities will create radioactive waste in addition to existing inventories of spent fuel and reprocessing wastes. Negotiations with the DPRK, such as the Six Party Talks, need to appreciate the enormous scale of the radioactive waste management problem resulting from dismantlement. The two operating plutonium facilities, along with their legacy wastes, will result in anywhere from 50 to 100 metric tons of uranium spent fuel, as much as 500,000 liters of liquid high-level waste, as well as miscellaneous high-level waste sources from the Radiochemical Laboratory. A substantial quantity of intermediate-level waste will result from disposing 600 metric tons of graphite from the reactor, an undetermined quantity of chemical decladding liquid waste from reprocessing, and hundreds of tons of contaminated concrete and metal from facility dismantlement. Various facilities for dismantlement, decontamination, waste treatment and packaging, and storage will be needed. The shipment of spent fuel and liquid high level waste out of the DPRK is also likely to be required. Nuclear facility dismantlement and radioactive waste management in the DPRK are all the more difficult because of nuclear nonproliferation constraints, including the call by the United States for “complete, verifiable and irreversible dismantlement,” or “CVID.” It is desirable to accomplish dismantlement quickly, but many aspects of the radioactive waste management cannot be achieved without careful assessment, planning and preparation, sustained commitment, and long

  12. Building a GIS Database for Space and Facilities Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valcik, Nicolas A.; Huesca-Dorantes, Patricia

    2003-01-01

    Growth and technology have driven the University of Texas at Dallas (UTD) to build a geographic information system (GIS) database for its facilities and space management. This chapter reviews several issues concerning this implementation: (1) the challenges involved in implementing the system; (2) the lack of efficiency and accuracy that existed…

  13. Stocking the Toolbox: Ideas for Successful Facility Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gadzikowski, Ann

    2005-01-01

    From snow removal to dishwasher repair, from pest control to playground renovations, there are countless demands on a child care director's time and attention. A child care director is required to juggle a wide variety of roles and expectations related to facility management, often with very little training or expertise in this area. Some child…

  14. BUILDING 67 CENTER, ENGINEERING AND FACILITIES MANAGEMENT TO THE RIGHT. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    BUILDING 67 CENTER, ENGINEERING AND FACILITIES MANAGEMENT TO THE RIGHT. BUILDING 67 IS SURMISED TO HAVE BEEN A RAILROAD STATION DAYS WHEN SITE WAS A RESORT - National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers, Eastern Branch, 1 VA Center, Augusta, Kennebec County, ME

  15. 21 CFR 58.31 - Testing facility management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Testing facility management. 58.31 Section 58.31 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL GOOD LABORATORY PRACTICE FOR NONCLINICAL LABORATORY STUDIES Organization and Personnel § 58.31 Testing...

  16. 21 CFR 58.31 - Testing facility management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Testing facility management. 58.31 Section 58.31 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL GOOD LABORATORY PRACTICE FOR NONCLINICAL LABORATORY STUDIES Organization and Personnel § 58.31 Testing...

  17. 21 CFR 58.31 - Testing facility management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Testing facility management. 58.31 Section 58.31 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL GOOD... appropriately tested for identity, strength, purity, stability, and uniformity, as applicable. (e) Assure...

  18. Medical Waste Management Implications for Small Medical Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byrns, George; Burke, Thomas

    1992-01-01

    Discusses the implications of the Medical Waste Management Act of 1988 for small medical facilities, public health, and the environment. Reviews health and environmental risks associated with medical waste, current regulatory approaches, and classifications. Concludes that the health risk of medical wastes has been overestimated; makes…

  19. 40 CFR 160.31 - Testing facility management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... each study, testing facility management shall: (a) Designate a study director as described in § 160.33 before the study is initiated. (b) Replace the study director promptly if it becomes necessary to do so during the conduct of a study. (c) Assure that there is a quality assurance unit as described in §...

  20. 40 CFR 160.31 - Testing facility management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... each study, testing facility management shall: (a) Designate a study director as described in § 160.33 before the study is initiated. (b) Replace the study director promptly if it becomes necessary to do so during the conduct of a study. (c) Assure that there is a quality assurance unit as described in §...

  1. 40 CFR 160.31 - Testing facility management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... each study, testing facility management shall: (a) Designate a study director as described in § 160.33 before the study is initiated. (b) Replace the study director promptly if it becomes necessary to do so during the conduct of a study. (c) Assure that there is a quality assurance unit as described in §...

  2. 40 CFR 160.31 - Testing facility management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... each study, testing facility management shall: (a) Designate a study director as described in § 160.33 before the study is initiated. (b) Replace the study director promptly if it becomes necessary to do so during the conduct of a study. (c) Assure that there is a quality assurance unit as described in §...

  3. 7 CFR 205.271 - Facility pest management practice standard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Facility pest management practice standard. 205.271 Section 205.271 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) ORGANIC FOODS PRODUCTION ACT PROVISIONS...

  4. 7 CFR 205.271 - Facility pest management practice standard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Facility pest management practice standard. 205.271 Section 205.271 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) ORGANIC FOODS PRODUCTION ACT PROVISIONS...

  5. The mixed waste management facility, FY95 plan

    SciTech Connect

    Streit, R.

    1994-12-01

    This document contains the Fiscal Year 1995 Plan for the Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Major objectives to be completed during FY 1995 for the MWMF project are listed and described. This report also contains a budget plan, project task summaries, a milestone control log, and a responsibility assignment matrix for the MWMF project.

  6. Adaptive management: a paradigm for remediation of public facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Janecky, David R; Whicker, Jeffrey J; Doerr, Ted B

    2009-01-01

    Public facility restoration planning traditionally focused on response to natural disasters and hazardous materials accidental releases. These plans now need to integrate response to terrorist actions. Therefore, plans must address a wide range of potential vulnerabilities. Similar types of broad remediation planning are needed for restoration of waste and hazardous material handling areas and facilities. There are strong similarities in damage results and remediation activities between unintentional and terrorist actions; however, the uncertainties associated with terrorist actions result in a re-evaluation of approaches to planning. Restoration of public facilities following a release of a hazardous material is inherently far more complex than in confined industrial settings and has many unique technical, economic, social, and political challenges. Therefore, they arguably involve a superset of drivers, concerns and public agencies compared to other restoration efforts. This superset of conditions increases complexity of interactions, reduces our knowledge of the initial conditions, and even condenses the timeline for restoration response. Therefore, evaluations of alternative restoration management approaches developed for responding to terrorist actions provide useful knowledge for large, complex waste management projects. Whereas present planning documents have substantial linearity in their organization, the 'adaptive management' paradigm provides a constructive parallel operations paradigm for restoration of facilities that anticipates and plans for uncertainty, multiple/simUltaneous public agency actions, and stakeholder participation. Adaptive management grew out of the need to manage and restore natural resources in highly complex and changing environments with limited knowledge about causal relationships and responses to restoration actions. Similarities between natural resource management and restoration of a facility and surrounding area(s) after a

  7. Conceptualizing the cross-cultural gaps in managing international aid: HIV/AIDS and TB project delivery in Southern Africa.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Terence

    2011-01-01

    There appears to be a gap between the billions of dollars inputted into fighting HIV/AIDS and TB and outcomes. This in part can be attributed to the lack of attention in International Development to managing programmes and projects within complex levels of cross-cultural interactions. International Development often ignores management issues, yet Management Studies is left wanting through a lack of engagement with development issues including the fight against disease and poverty. This paper attempts to link these two disciplines towards mutual benefit, through a critical cross-cultural approach. It provides contextualization of international development policies/strategies; conceptualization of dominant paradigms; structural analysis of how a programme/project fits into the global governance structure; analysis of complexities and levels of cross-cultural interaction and their consequences and the process and implications of knowledge transfer across cultural distances. It concludes with implications for policy and practice, as well as what is needed from cross-disciplinary research. This includes how feedback loops can be strengthened from local to global, how indigenous knowledge may be better understood and integrated, how power relations within the global governance structure could be managed, how cross-cultural interaction could be better understood, and how knowledge transfer/sharing should be critically managed. PMID:20957771

  8. AIDS in Correctional Facilities: Issues and Options. Issues and Practices in Criminal Justice. Third Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammett, Theodore M.

    This document, written for officials involved in making and implementing decisions regarding the correctional response to Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS), provides the most current figures and trend data on the incidence of AIDS among incarcerated offenders. The stated purpose of this document is to be informational rather than…

  9. Gaps between HIV/AIDS policies and treatment in correctional facilities.

    PubMed

    Amankwaa, A A; Bavon, A L; Amankwaa, L C

    2001-01-01

    In this article the authors examined correctional policy and its impact on the incidence of HIV/AIDS in prison population. Using data from the Florida Correctional System, they find that HIV/AIDS is still the leading cause of death. Improved treatment and care may have led to declines in AIDS-related mortality but the prison population continues to experience a much higher risk of mortality than he general population in spite of changes in the treatment and provision of care to infected patients. The dominance of HIV-related deaths indicates that treatment and voluntary testing policy have been ineffective. The authors argue that the persistence of HIV infections and AIDS-related deaths is largely attributable to continuing unequal distribution of health care resources between identified and unidentified HIV-infected inmates. Their analysis suggests that future changes in HIV/AIDS policy ib testing and treatment can contribute to improvement in health conditions of infected inmates. PMID:12638386

  10. An intelligent flight-management aid for procedure execution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammer, J. M.

    1984-01-01

    A computer program is described that contains a model of the procedures used in the operation of a twin engine aircraft. This program, by comparing the model to the aircraft state, can determine when a procedure (or checklist) should be or is invoked and when each step (detectable by a change in the aircraft state) is completed. Thus, the program tracks the flight crew's procedure execution through changes in the aircraft state. Data were used for evaluation from an earlier experiment on a Link GAT-II simulator. The program had been able to identify practically all of the errors identified by human judges as well as locate some missed by them. It is felt that this model could significantly aid flight crews.

  11. High level radioactive waste management facility design criteria

    SciTech Connect

    Sheikh, N.A.; Salaymeh, S.R.

    1993-10-01

    This paper discusses the engineering systems for the structural design of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). At the DWPF, high level radioactive liquids will be mixed with glass particles and heated in a melter. This molten glass will then be poured into stainless steel canisters where it will harden. This process will transform the high level waste into a more stable, manageable substance. This paper discuss the structural design requirements for this unique one of a kind facility. A special emphasis will be concentrated on the design criteria pertaining to earthquake, wind and tornado, and flooding.

  12. 76 FR 2908 - Nonprofit Management LLC and Jeremy Ryan Claeys; Analysis of Proposed Consent Order To Aid Public...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-18

    ... Nonprofit Management LLC and Jeremy Ryan Claeys; Analysis of Proposed Consent Order To Aid Public Comment... or unfair methods of competition. The attached Analysis to Aid Public Comment describes both the... following Analysis to Aid Public Comment describes the terms of the consent agreement, and the...

  13. Ideologies of aid, practices of power: lessons for Medicaid managed care.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Nancy L

    2005-03-01

    The articles in this special issue teach valuable lessons based on what happened in New Mexico with the shift to Medicaid managed care. By reframing these lessons in broader historical and cultural terms with reference to aid programs, we have the opportunity to learn a great deal more about the relationship between poverty, public policy, and ideology. Medicaid as a state and federal aid program in the United States and economic development programs as foreign aid provide useful analogies specifically because they exhibit a variety of parallel patterns. The increasing concatenation of corporate interests with state and nongovernmental interests in aid programs is ultimately producing a less centralized system of power and responsibility. This process of decentralization, however, is not undermining the sources of power behind aid efforts, although it does make the connections between intent, planning, and outcome less direct. Ultimately, the devolution of power produces many unintended consequences for aid policy. But it also reinforces the perspective that aid and the need for it are nonpolitical issues. PMID:15789629

  14. Management concepts and safety applications for nuclear fuel facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Eisner, H.; Scotti, R.S.; Delicate, W.S.

    1995-05-01

    This report presents an overview of effectiveness of management control of safety. It reviews several modern management control theories as well as the general functions of management and relates them to safety issues at the corporate and at the process safety management (PSM) program level. Following these discussions, structured technique for assessing management of the safety function is suggested. Seven modern management control theories are summarized, including business process reengineering, the learning organization, capability maturity, total quality management, quality assurance and control, reliability centered maintenance, and industrial process safety. Each of these theories is examined for-its principal characteristics and implications for safety management. The five general management functions of planning, organizing, directing, monitoring, and integrating, which together provide control over all company operations, are discussed. Under the broad categories of Safety Culture, Leadership and Commitment, and Operating Excellence, key corporate safety elements and their subelements are examined. The three categories under which PSM program-level safety issues are described are Technology, Personnel, and Facilities.

  15. Risk management program for the 283-W water treatment facility

    SciTech Connect

    GREEN, W.E.

    1999-05-11

    This Risk Management (RM) Program covers the 283-W Water Treatment Facility (283W Facility), located in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site. A RM Program is necessary for this facility because it stores chlorine, a listed substance, in excess of or has the potential to exceed the threshold quantities defined in Title 40 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 68 (EPA, 1998). The RM Program contains data that will be used to prepare a RM Plan, which is required by 40 CFR 68. The RM Plan is a summary of the RM Program information, contained within this document, and will be submitted to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ultimately for distribution to the public. The RM Plan will be prepared and submitted separately from this document.

  16. Software solutions manage the definition, operation, maintenance and configuration control of the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Dobson, D; Churby, A; Krieger, E; Maloy, D; White, K

    2011-07-25

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is the world's largest laser composed of millions of individual parts brought together to form one massive assembly. Maintaining control of the physical definition, status and configuration of this structure is a monumental undertaking yet critical to the validity of the shot experiment data and the safe operation of the facility. The NIF business application suite of software provides the means to effectively manage the definition, build, operation, maintenance and configuration control of all components of the National Ignition Facility. State of the art Computer Aided Design software applications are used to generate a virtual model and assemblies. Engineering bills of material are controlled through the Enterprise Configuration Management System. This data structure is passed to the Enterprise Resource Planning system to create a manufacturing bill of material. Specific parts are serialized then tracked along their entire lifecycle providing visibility to the location and status of optical, target and diagnostic components that are key to assessing pre-shot machine readiness. Nearly forty thousand items requiring preventive, reactive and calibration maintenance are tracked through the System Maintenance & Reliability Tracking application to ensure proper operation. Radiological tracking applications ensure proper stewardship of radiological and hazardous materials and help provide a safe working environment for NIF personnel.

  17. The grand challenge of managing the petascale facility.

    SciTech Connect

    Aiken, R. J.; Mathematics and Computer Science

    2007-02-28

    This report is the result of a study of networks and how they may need to evolve to support petascale leadership computing and science. As Dr. Ray Orbach, director of the Department of Energy's Office of Science, says in the spring 2006 issue of SciDAC Review, 'One remarkable example of growth in unexpected directions has been in high-end computation'. In the same article Dr. Michael Strayer states, 'Moore's law suggests that before the end of the next cycle of SciDAC, we shall see petaflop computers'. Given the Office of Science's strong leadership and support for petascale computing and facilities, we should expect to see petaflop computers in operation in support of science before the end of the decade, and DOE/SC Advanced Scientific Computing Research programs are focused on making this a reality. This study took its lead from this strong focus on petascale computing and the networks required to support such facilities, but it grew to include almost all aspects of the DOE/SC petascale computational and experimental science facilities, all of which will face daunting challenges in managing and analyzing the voluminous amounts of data expected. In addition, trends indicate the increased coupling of unique experimental facilities with computational facilities, along with the integration of multidisciplinary datasets and high-end computing with data-intensive computing; and we can expect these trends to continue at the petascale level and beyond. Coupled with recent technology trends, they clearly indicate the need for including capability petascale storage, networks, and experiments, as well as collaboration tools and programming environments, as integral components of the Office of Science's petascale capability metafacility. The objective of this report is to recommend a new cross-cutting program to support the management of petascale science and infrastructure. The appendices of the report document current and projected DOE computation facilities, science

  18. Managing dyslipidemia in HIV/AIDS patients: challenges and solutions

    PubMed Central

    Husain, Nazik Elmalaika OS; Ahmed, Mohamed H

    2015-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is a chronic disease associated with dyslipidemia and insulin resistance. In addition, the administration of combination antiretroviral therapy is associated with an increase in the incidence of metabolic risk factors (insulin resistance, lipoatrophy, dyslipidemia, and abnormalities of fat distribution in HIV patients). HIV dyslipidemia is a common problem, and associated with an increase in incidence of cardiovascular disease. Further challenges in the management of HIV dyslipidemia are the presence of diabetes and metabolic syndrome, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, hypothyroidism, chronic kidney disease, the risk of diabetes associated with statin administration, age and ethnicity, and early menopause in females. Dyslipidemia in patients with HIV is different from the normal population, due to the fact that HIV increases insulin resistance and HIV treatment not only may induce dyslipidemia but also may interact with lipid-lowering medication. The use of all statins (apart from simvastatin and lovastatin) is safe and effective in HIV dyslipidemia, and the addition of ezetimibe, fenofibrate, fish oil, and niacin can be used in statin-unresponsive HIV dyslipidemia. The management of dyslipidemia and cardiovascular disease risks associated with HIV is complex, and a certain number of patients may require management in specialist clinics run by specialist physicians in lipid disorders. Future research is needed to address best strategies in the management of hyperlipidemia with HIV infection. PMID:25565897

  19. Graphic visualization of program performance aids management review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eisenhart, G. N.

    1967-01-01

    Chart technique /PERTREE/ which displays the essential status elements of a PERT system in a vertical flow array, of high graphic quality, enables visual review by management of program performance. Since the display is versatile, it can accommodate any aspect of the program which the presenter wishes to accent.

  20. Enrollment Management and Financial Aid: Seeking a Strategic Integration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalsbeek, David H.; Hossler, Donald

    2008-01-01

    Enrollment management has become an important leadership function on many college and university campuses. It is also attracting critical attention here and abroad among observers of the system of postsecondary education. With this essay, the authors continue a series that examines policies and practices that are central to campus-based efforts to…

  1. Management of a complex cavern storage facility for natural gas

    SciTech Connect

    1998-04-01

    The Epe cavern storage facility operated by Ruhrgas AG has developed into one of the largest gas cavern storage facilities in the world. Currently, there are 32 caverns and 18 more are planned in the future. Working gas volume will increase from approximately 1.5 {times} 10{sup 9} to 2 {times} 10{sup 9} m{sup 3}. The stratified salt deposit containing the caverns has a surface area of approximately 7 km{sup 2} and is 250 m thick at the edge and 400 m thick in the center. Caverns are leached by a company that uses the recovered brine in the chlorine industry. Cavern dimensions are determined before leaching. The behavior of each cavern, as well as the thermodynamic properties of natural gas must be considered in cavern management. The full-length paper presents the components of a complex management system covering the design, construction, and operation of the Epe gas-storage caverns.

  2. Fast Flux Test Facility Closure Project - Project Management Plan

    SciTech Connect

    BEACH, R.R.

    2002-09-26

    The Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) Closure Project, Project Management Plan, Revision 5, provides the scope, cost, and schedule to achieve the most cost effective and expeditious closure of the FFTF to an assumed final end-state with the reactor vessel and the containment building, below the 5504 grade level, being entombed in place. Closure will be completed by December 2009 at a cost of $547 million.

  3. Software Manages Documentation in a Large Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gurneck, Joseph M.

    2001-01-01

    The 3MCS computer program assists and instrumentation engineer in performing the 3 essential functions of design, documentation, and configuration management of measurement and control systems in a large test facility. Services provided by 3MCS are acceptance of input from multiple engineers and technicians working at multiple locations;standardization of drawings;automated cross-referencing; identification of errors;listing of components and resources; downloading of test settings; and provision of information to customers.

  4. Study on Customer Satisfaction with Facilities Management Services in Lithuania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lepkova, Natalija; Žūkaitė-Jefimovienė, Giedrė

    2012-12-01

    The article introduces the concept and content of facilities management (FM) services. The paper presents the concept of customer satisfaction and discusses the key factors which influence the opinions of customers and their satisfaction or dissatisfaction with the services provided. The article presents two studies: a brief survey of several FM service providers and a survey of customer satisfaction with FM services in Lithuania. The conclusions are given at the end of the article.

  5. Smartphone applications to aid weight loss and management: current perspectives.

    PubMed

    Sutton, Elizabeth F; Redman, Leanne M

    2016-01-01

    The development and dissemination of smart devices has cultivated a global environment of hyperconnectivity and increased our access to information. The paralleled launch and success of the Mobile Health industry has created a market of commercially available applications or "apps" along with tools or sensors, which allow the user to receive and collect personal health information. Apps and accompanying tools now allow an individual to "self-digitize" and, pertaining to weight management, monitor their body weight, caloric intake, physical activity, and more. These products possess the ability to improve the scalability of traditional in-person weight management services considering their near ubiquity, affordability, and capability to deliver information directly and personally to the user. However, similar to the dietary supplement market, the anecdotal value of these products has driven their popularity and acceptance by the general public without requirement of scientific validation or, in the area of weight management or diet/exercise, validation of the safety and efficacy by the Food and Drug Administration prior to market launch. By conducting a literature and clinical trial search, we found remarkably few active, completed, or published studies testing the efficacy of smart device applications using randomized controlled trials. Research efforts must be focused on illuminating the efficacy of behavioral interventions and remote self-monitoring for weight loss/maintenance treatment with true, randomized controlled trials. PMID:27486338

  6. Smartphone applications to aid weight loss and management: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Sutton, Elizabeth F; Redman, Leanne M

    2016-01-01

    The development and dissemination of smart devices has cultivated a global environment of hyperconnectivity and increased our access to information. The paralleled launch and success of the Mobile Health industry has created a market of commercially available applications or “apps” along with tools or sensors, which allow the user to receive and collect personal health information. Apps and accompanying tools now allow an individual to “self-digitize” and, pertaining to weight management, monitor their body weight, caloric intake, physical activity, and more. These products possess the ability to improve the scalability of traditional in-person weight management services considering their near ubiquity, affordability, and capability to deliver information directly and personally to the user. However, similar to the dietary supplement market, the anecdotal value of these products has driven their popularity and acceptance by the general public without requirement of scientific validation or, in the area of weight management or diet/exercise, validation of the safety and efficacy by the Food and Drug Administration prior to market launch. By conducting a literature and clinical trial search, we found remarkably few active, completed, or published studies testing the efficacy of smart device applications using randomized controlled trials. Research efforts must be focused on illuminating the efficacy of behavioral interventions and remote self-monitoring for weight loss/maintenance treatment with true, randomized controlled trials. PMID:27486338

  7. The Film as Visual Aided Learning Tool in Classroom Management Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Altinay Gazi, Zehra; Altinay Aksal, Fahriye

    2011-01-01

    This research aims to investigate the impact of the visual aided learning on pre-service teachers' co-construction of subject matter knowledge in teaching practice. The study revealed the examination of film as an active cognizing and learning tool in classroom management course within teacher education programme. Within the framework of action…

  8. Data Management Standards in Computer-aided Acquisition and Logistic Support (CALS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jefferson, David K.

    1990-01-01

    Viewgraphs and discussion on data management standards in computer-aided acquisition and logistic support (CALS) are presented. CALS is intended to reduce cost, increase quality, and improve timeliness of weapon system acquisition and support by greatly improving the flow of technical information. The phase 2 standards, industrial environment, are discussed. The information resource dictionary system (IRDS) is described.

  9. The Role of Social Entrepreneurship in HIV/AIDS Management across the Education Sector in Kenya

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ayiro, Laban P.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The overall purpose of this study is to identify key entrepreneurial variables in the realm of social entrepreneurship that may contribute to enhancing impact mitigation of HIV/AIDS. In addition, the study seeks to establish which of the correlations between the entrepreneurial variables and management of response of impact mitigation of…

  10. Functional Specifications for Computer Aided Training Systems Development and Management (CATSDM) Support Functions. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, John; And Others

    This report provides a description of a Computer Aided Training System Development and Management (CATSDM) environment based on state-of-the-art hardware and software technology, and including recommendations for off the shelf systems to be utilized as a starting point in addressing the particular systematic training and instruction design and…

  11. Ethnobotanical Study of Plants Used in the Management of HIV/AIDS-Related Diseases in Livingstone, Southern Province, Zambia

    PubMed Central

    Chinsembu, Kazhila C.

    2016-01-01

    Faced with critical shortages of staff, long queues, and stigma at public health facilities in Livingstone, Zambia, persons who suffer from HIV/AIDS-related diseases use medicinal plants to manage skin infections, diarrhoea, sexually transmitted infections, tuberculosis, cough, malaria, and oral infections. In all, 94 medicinal plant species were used to manage HIV/AIDS-related diseases. Most remedies are prepared from plants of various families such as Combretaceae, Euphorbiaceae, Fabaceae, and Lamiaceae. More than two-thirds of the plants (mostly leaves and roots) are utilized to treat two or more diseases related to HIV infection. Eighteen plants, namely, Achyranthes aspera L., Lannea discolor (Sond.) Engl., Hyphaene petersiana Klotzsch ex Mart., Asparagus racemosus Willd., Capparis tomentosa Lam., Cleome hirta Oliv., Garcinia livingstonei T. Anderson, Euclea divinorum Hiern, Bridelia cathartica G. Bertol., Acacia nilotica Delile, Piliostigma thonningii (Schumach.) Milne-Redh., Dichrostachys cinerea (L.) Wight and Arn., Abrus precatorius L., Hoslundia opposita Vahl., Clerodendrum capitatum (Willd.) Schumach., Ficus sycomorus L., Ximenia americana L., and Ziziphus mucronata Willd., were used to treat four or more disease conditions. About 31% of the plants in this study were administered as monotherapies. Multiuse medicinal plants may contain broad-spectrum antimicrobial agents. However, since widely used plants easily succumb to the threats of overharvesting, they need special protocols and guidelines for their genetic conservation. There is still need to confirm the antimicrobial efficacies, pharmacological parameters, cytotoxicity, and active chemical ingredients of the discovered plants. PMID:27069489

  12. Ethnobotanical Study of Plants Used in the Management of HIV/AIDS-Related Diseases in Livingstone, Southern Province, Zambia.

    PubMed

    Chinsembu, Kazhila C

    2016-01-01

    Faced with critical shortages of staff, long queues, and stigma at public health facilities in Livingstone, Zambia, persons who suffer from HIV/AIDS-related diseases use medicinal plants to manage skin infections, diarrhoea, sexually transmitted infections, tuberculosis, cough, malaria, and oral infections. In all, 94 medicinal plant species were used to manage HIV/AIDS-related diseases. Most remedies are prepared from plants of various families such as Combretaceae, Euphorbiaceae, Fabaceae, and Lamiaceae. More than two-thirds of the plants (mostly leaves and roots) are utilized to treat two or more diseases related to HIV infection. Eighteen plants, namely, Achyranthes aspera L., Lannea discolor (Sond.) Engl., Hyphaene petersiana Klotzsch ex Mart., Asparagus racemosus Willd., Capparis tomentosa Lam., Cleome hirta Oliv., Garcinia livingstonei T. Anderson, Euclea divinorum Hiern, Bridelia cathartica G. Bertol., Acacia nilotica Delile, Piliostigma thonningii (Schumach.) Milne-Redh., Dichrostachys cinerea (L.) Wight and Arn., Abrus precatorius L., Hoslundia opposita Vahl., Clerodendrum capitatum (Willd.) Schumach., Ficus sycomorus L., Ximenia americana L., and Ziziphus mucronata Willd., were used to treat four or more disease conditions. About 31% of the plants in this study were administered as monotherapies. Multiuse medicinal plants may contain broad-spectrum antimicrobial agents. However, since widely used plants easily succumb to the threats of overharvesting, they need special protocols and guidelines for their genetic conservation. There is still need to confirm the antimicrobial efficacies, pharmacological parameters, cytotoxicity, and active chemical ingredients of the discovered plants. PMID:27069489

  13. 75 FR 55341 - Recovery Policy, RP 9523.6, Mutual Aid Agreements for Public Assistance and Fire Management...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-10

    ... Assistance and Fire Management Assistance AGENCY: Federal Emergency Management Agency, DHS. ACTION: Notice of... comments on Recovery Policy, RP 9523.6, Mutual Aid Agreements for Public Assistance and Fire...

  14. 41 CFR 102-74.10 - What is the basic facility management policy?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What is the basic facility management policy? 102-74.10 Section 102-74.10 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal... MANAGEMENT General Provisions § 102-74.10 What is the basic facility management policy? Executive...

  15. Environmental management of quarries as waste disposal facilities.

    PubMed

    El-Fadel, M; Sadek, S; Chahine, W

    2001-04-01

    Problems associated with the disposal of municipal solid waste have become a source of public concern worldwide as awareness of potential adverse environmental impacts and health threats from solid waste has increased. Communities are concerned about the generation and management of solid waste to the extent of refusing to allow new disposal facilities near their homes, often after witnessing the legacy of existing facilities. Under these conditions, the development of national policies for the management of solid waste becomes highly political, all while requiring appropriate technical solutions that ensure environmental protection and proper management plans that support an acceptable solution for the disposal of municipal solid waste. In some locations, the conversion of old quarries into well-engineered and controlled landfills appears as a promising solution to a continuously increasing problem, at least for many decades to come. This paper describes the environmental impacts associated with solid waste disposal in a converted quarry site and the mitigation measures that can be adopted to alleviate potential adverse impacts. Environmental management and monitoring plans are also discussed in the context of ensuring adequate environmental protection during and after the conversion process. PMID:11289451

  16. WIPP Facility Work Plan for Solid Waste Management Units

    SciTech Connect

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2001-02-25

    This 2001 Facility Work Plan (FWP) has been prepared as required by Module VII, Section VII.M.1 of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Hazardous Waste Facility Permit, NM4890139088-TSDF (the Permit); (NMED, 1999a), and incorporates comments from the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) received on December 6, 2000 (NMED, 2000a). This February 2001 FWP describes the programmatic facility-wide approach to future investigations at Solid Waste Management Units (SWMUs) and Areas of Concern (AOCs) specified in the Permit. The permittees are evaluating data from previous investigations of the SWMUs and AOCs against the newest guidance proposed by the NMED. Based on these data, the permittees expect that no further sampling will be required and that a request for No Further Action (NFA) at the SWMUs and AOCs will be submitted to the NMED. This FWP addresses the current Permit requirements. It uses the results of previous investigations performed at WIPP and expands the investigations as required by the Permit. As an alternative to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Facility Investigation (RFI) specified in Module VII of the Permit, current NMED guidance identifies an Accelerated Corrective Action Approach (ACAA) that may be used for any SWMU or AOC (NMED, 1998). This accelerated approach is used to replace the standard RFI Work Plan and Report sequence with a more flexible decision-making approach. The ACAA process allows a Facility to exit the schedule of compliance contained in the Facility’s Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments (HSWA) permit module and proceed on an accelerated time frame. Thus, the ACAA process can be entered either before or after an RFI Work Plan. According to the NMED's guidance, a facility can prepare an RFI Work Plan or Sampling and Analysis Plan (SAP) for any SWMU or AOC (NMED, 1998). Based on this guidance, a SAP constitutes an acceptable alternative to the RFI Work Plan specified in the Permit.

  17. Service Delivery and Patient Outcomes in Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program–Funded and –Nonfunded Health Care Facilities in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Weiser, John; Beer, Linda; Frazier, Emma L.; Patel, Roshni; Dempsey, Antigone; Hauck, Heather; Skarbinski, Jacek

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Outpatient human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) health care facilities receive funding from the Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program (RWHAP) to provide medical care and essential support services that help patients remain in care and adhere to treatment. Increased access to Medicaid and private insurance for HIV-infected persons may provide coverage for medical care but not all needed support services and may not supplant the need for RWHAP funding. OBJECTIVE To examine differences between RWHAP-funded and non–RWHAP-funded facilities and in patient outcomes between the 2 systems. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS The study was conducted from June 1, 2009, to May 31, 2012, using data from the 2009 and 2011 cycles of the Medical Monitoring Project, a national probability sample of 8038 HIV-infected adults receiving medical care at 989 outpatient health care facilities providing HIV medical care. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Data were used to compare patient characteristics, service needs, and access to services at RWHAP-funded vs non–RWHAP-funded facilities. Differences in prescribed antiretroviral treatment and viral suppression were assessed. Data analysis was performed between February 2012 and June 2015. RESULTS Overall, 34.4% of facilities received RWHAP funding and 72.8% of patients received care at RWHAP-funded facilities. With results reported as percentage (95% CI), patients attending RWHAP-funded facilities were more likely to be aged 18 to 29 years (8.5%[7.4%–9.5%] vs 5.0%[3.9%–6.2%]), female (29.2%[27.2%–31.2%] vs 20.1%[17.0%–23.1%]), black (47.5% [41.5%–53.5%] vs 25.8% [20.6%–31.0%]) or Hispanic (22.5%[16.4%–28.6%] vs 12.9%[10.6%–15.2%]), have less than a high school education (26.1% [24.0%–28.3%] vs 10.9%[8.7%–13.1%]), income at or below the poverty level (53.6%[50.3%–56.9%] vs 23.9%[19.7%–28.0%]), and lack health care coverage (25.0%[21.9%–28.1%] vs 6.1% [4.1%–8.0%]). The RWHAP-funded facilities were more likely to provide

  18. Waste Management facilities fault tree databank 1995 status report

    SciTech Connect

    Minnick, W.V.; Wellmaker, K.A.

    1995-08-16

    The Safety Information Management and Analysis Group (SIMA) of the Safety Engineering Department (SED) maintains compilations of incidents that have occurred in the Separations and Process Control, Waste Management, Fuel Fabrication, Tritium and SRTC facilities. This report records the status of the Waste Management (WM) Databank at the end of CY-1994. The WM Databank contains more than 35,000 entries ranging from minor equipment malfunctions to incidents with significant potential for injury or contamination of personnel. This report documents the status of the WM Databank including the availability, training, sources of data, search options, Quality Assurance, and usage to which these data have been applied. Periodic updates to this memorandum are planned as additional data or applications are acquired.

  19. Energy-management financing for state facilities and public schools

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-12-01

    The Department of Natural Resources (DNR) has committed to facilitate comprehensive energy management for state facilities, schools, hospitals, local governments, and other nonprofit organizations. The goal is to install all cost effective improvements, those with an aggregate payback of 6 years or less, by using private sector financing. To meet this goal, several programs were developed under Iowa's Building Energy Management Program. The DNR established a nonprofit corporation, the State of Iowa Facilities Improvement Corporation. The corporation finances, installs, and leases improvements to state agencies. The savings from improvements are used to make the lease payment. The Iowa School Energy Bank was established to serve Iowa public schools and community colleges. Six-month interest-free loans are offered to the schools for engineering analyses. Lease financing is offered for improvements under a master lease agreement with a regional bank at a group municipal financing rate. The publication documents the development of both the State of Iowa Facilities Improvement Corporation and the Iowa School Energy Bank Program.

  20. Gender asymmetry in healthcare-facility attendance of people living with HIV/AIDS in Burkina Faso.

    PubMed

    Bila, Blandine; Egrot, Marc

    2009-09-01

    Anthropological research in Burkina Faso indicates that more HIV-positive women than HIV-positive men are attending care facilities for people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWH) and accessing antiretroviral medicine. This article, situated in the field of study of interactions between gender and AIDS, offers a description of this asymmetry and an anthropological analysis of the socio-cultural determinants, through analysis of data from ethnographic research among PLWH and health actors. Examining social representations of femininity and masculinity in Burkinabe society and the organisation of the healthcare system in connection with gender shed light on the decision-making processes of both sexes around therapeutic choices and the itinerary of care. On the one hand, the social values attached to femininity, maternity and the status of wife create conditions for women that favour their attendance at care facilities for PLWH and encourage a widespread practice where wives take the place of their husbands in healthcare queues. Moreover, health policies and the effects of women's empowerment within the healthcare system strengthen women's access to health services. On the other hand, representations of masculinity are fully implicated in the cultural construction of men's reluctance to attend care facilities for PLWH. The values associated with this masculinity cause men to run great health, economic and social risks, not only for themselves, but also for their wives and children. By better understanding the interaction between gender, the experience of HIV and the institutional organisation of healthcare, we can identify ways to reduce men's reluctance to attend care facilities for PLWH and improve both prevention and treatment-oriented programmes. PMID:19539415

  1. Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) groundwater monitoring report

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, C.Y.

    1992-12-01

    During third quarter 1992, 12 constituents exceeded the US Environmental Protection Agency Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) in one or more groundwater samples from monitoring wells at the Mixed Waste Management Facility and adjacent facilities. Tritium and trichloroethylene were the most widespread constituents: 57 (48%) and 23 (19%) of the 119 monitoring wells contained elevated tritium and trichloroethylene levels, respectively. Elevated constituents were found primarily in Aquifer Zone IIB[sub 2] (Water Table) and Aquifer Zone IIB[sub 1] (Barnwell/McBean). Elevated constituents also occurred in five Aquifer Unit IIA (Congaree) wells. Upgradient wells BGO 1D and 2D and HSB 85A, 85B, and 85C did not contain any constituents that exceeded the PDWS. Downgradient wells in the three hydrostratigraphic units contained elevated levels of tritium, trichloroethylene, tetrachloroethylene, chloroethene, antimony, 1,1-dichloroethylene, gross alpha, lead, nonvolatile beta, thallium, total alpha-emitting radium (radium-224 and radium-226), or cadmium.

  2. Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) groundwater monitoring report

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, C.Y.

    1992-06-01

    During first quarter 1992, tritium, trichloroethylene, tetrachloroethylene, lead, antimony, I,I-dichloroethylene, 1,2-dichloroethane, gross alpha, mercury, nickel, nitrate, nonvolatile beta, and total alpha-emitting radium (radium-224 and radium-226) exceeded the US Environmental Protection Agency Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) in groundwater samples from monitoring wells at the Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) and adjacent facilities. Tritium and trichloroethylene were the most widespread constituents; 57 (49%) of the 116 monitored wells contained elevated tritium activities, and 21 (18%) wells exhibited elevated trichloroethylene concentrations Sixty-one downgradient wells screened in Aquifer Zone IIB2 (Water Table), Aquifer Zone IIB[sub 2] (Barnwell/McBean), and Aquifer Unit IIA (Congaree) contained constituents that exceeded the PDWS during first quarter 1992. Upgradient wells BGO 1D and HSB 85A, BC, and 85C did not contain any constituents that exceeded the PDWS. Upgradient well BGO 2D contained elevated tritium.

  3. Patient-related barriers to pain management in ambulatory AIDS patients.

    PubMed

    Breitbart, W; Passik, S; McDonald, M V; Rosenfeld, B; Smith, M; Kaim, M; Funesti-Esch, J

    1998-05-01

    A number of studies have demonstrated that pain is dramatically undertreated among patients with AIDS and that opioids in particular are rarely prescribed. To date, however, there has been no systematic attempt to examine patient-related barriers to the management of pain in AIDS. This study examines potential patient-related barriers to pain management in patients with AIDS using the Barriers Questionnaire (Ward et al., Pain, 52 (1993) 319-324), and assesses gender, racial, and other demographic differences in the endorsement of these barriers. We surveyed 199 ambulatory patients with AIDS, recruited from numerous sites in New York City, as part of an ongoing study of pain and quality of life in ambulatory AIDS patients. In addition to obtaining demographic and medical data, we administered a number of self-report questionnaires including the Brief Pain Inventory (BPI), the Brief Symptom Index (BSI), the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), and the Memorial Symptom Assessment Scale (MSAS). Barriers to pain management were assessed using a modified version of the Barriers Questionnaire (BQ), including the original 27 questions from this self-report instrument along with an additional 12 items developed for an AIDS population. Results indicated that the most frequently endorsed BQ items were those concerning the addiction potential of pain medications and physical discomfort associated with opioid administration (e.g. injections) or side effects (e.g. nausea, constipation). There were no associations between age, gender, or HIV transmission risk factor and total scores on the BQ; however, Caucasian patients endorsed significantly fewer BQ items than did non-Caucasian patients and years of education was negatively correlated with BQ scores. Scores on the BQ were also significantly correlated with number of physical symptoms (MSAS) and scores on several self-report measures of psychological distress (the BSI Global Distress Index, BDI total scores). Patient

  4. Decentralised information management in facility management using radio frequency identification technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cong, Zixiang; Manzoor, Farhan; Yin, Hang; Menzel, Karsten

    2009-07-01

    Facility Management (FM) is a critical component of the operational phase of a building's life cycle, which includes management of building systems and its services. A large quantity of data is collected from maintaining a building through FM. One question that arises is how can this data be distributed between different systems? A solution to this problem is important for facility managers and maintenance staff. This paper discusses the merits of Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) technology and its potential use in applications within the FM sector. The paper also reports a prototypical demonstrator implementation of an RFID based information management system for FM-scenarios. The prototype was deployed and tested in an office room at University College Cork (UCC), Ireland. The applicability of RFID for Decentralised Information Management (DIM) was applied and specific results for demonstration outputs were achieved.

  5. WIPP Facility Work Plan for Solid Waste Management Units

    SciTech Connect

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2002-02-14

    This 2002 Facility Work Plan (FWP) has been prepared as required by Module VII, Permit Condition VII.U.3 of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Hazardous Waste Facility Permit, NM4890139088-TSDF (the Permit) (New Mexico Environment Department [NMED], 1999a), and incorporates comments from the NMED received on December 6, 2000 (NMED, 2000a). This February 2002 FWP describes the programmatic facility-wide approach to future investigations at Solid Waste Management Units (SWMU) and Areas of Concern (AOC) specified in the Permit. The Permittees are evaluating data from previous investigations of the SWMUs and AOCs against the most recent guidance proposed by the NMED. Based on these data, and completion of the August 2001 sampling requested by the NMED, the Permittees expect that no further sampling will be required and that a request for No Further Action (NFA) at the SWMUs and AOCs will be submitted to the NMED. This FWP addresses the current Permit requirements. It uses the results of previous investigations performed at WIPP and expands the investigations as required by the Permit. As an alternative to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Facility Investigation (RFI) specified in Module VII of the Permit, current NMED guidance identifies an Accelerated Corrective Action Approach (ACAA) that may be used for any SWMU or AOC (NMED, 1998). This accelerated approach is used to replace the standard RFI Work Plan and Report sequence with a more flexible decision-making approach. The ACAA process allows a facility to exit the schedule of compliance contained in the facility's Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments (HSWA) permit module and proceed on an accelerated time frame. Thus, the ACAA processcan be entered either before or after an RFI Work Plan. According to the NMED's guidance, a facility can prepare an RFI Work Plan or Sampling and Analysis Plan (SAP) for any SWMU or AOC (NMED, 1998). Based on this guidance, a SAP constitutes an acceptable

  6. DeMAID/GA an Enhanced Design Manager's Aid for Intelligent Decomposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, J. L.

    1996-01-01

    Many companies are looking for new tools and techniques to aid a design manager in making decisions that can reduce the time and cost of a design cycle. One tool is the Design Manager's Aid for Intelligent Decomposition (DeMAID). Since the initial public release of DeMAID in 1989, much research has been done in the areas of decomposition, concurrent engineering, parallel processing, and process management; many new tools and techniques have emerged. Based on these recent research and development efforts, numerous enhancements have been added to DeMAID to further aid the design manager in saving both cost and time in a design cycle. The key enhancement, a genetic algorithm (GA), will be available in the next public release called DeMAID/GA. The GA sequences the design processes to minimize the cost and time in converging a solution. The major enhancements in the upgrade of DeMAID to DeMAID/GA are discussed in this paper. A sample conceptual design project is used to show how these enhancements can be applied to improve the design cycle.

  7. Tritium and ignition target management at the National Ignition Facility.

    PubMed

    Draggoo, Vaughn

    2013-06-01

    Isotopic mixtures of hydrogen constitute the basic fuel for fusion targets of the National Ignition Facility (NIF). A typical NIF fusion target shot requires approximately 0.5 mmoles of hydrogen gas and as much as 750 GBq (20 Ci) of 3H. Isotopic mix ratios are specified according to the experimental shot/test plan and the associated test objectives. The hydrogen isotopic concentrations, absolute amounts, gas purity, configuration of the target, and the physical configuration of the NIF facility are all parameters and conditions that must be managed to ensure the quality and safety of operations. An essential and key step in the preparation of an ignition target is the formation of a ~60 μm thick hydrogen "ice" layer on the inner surface of the target capsule. The Cryogenic Target Positioning System (Cryo-Tarpos) provides gas handling, cyro-cooling, x-ray imaging systems, and related instrumentation to control the volumes and temperatures of the multiphase (solid, liquid, and gas) hydrogen as the gas is condensed to liquid, admitted to the capsule, and frozen as a single spherical crystal of hydrogen in the capsule. The hydrogen fuel gas is prepared in discrete 1.7 cc aliquots in the LLNL Tritium Facility for each ignition shot. Post-shot hydrogen gas is recovered in the NIF Tritium Processing System (TPS). Gas handling systems, instrumentation and analytic equipment, material accounting information systems, and the shot planning systems must work together to ensure that operational and safety requirements are met. PMID:23629062

  8. Idiopathic ulcers as an oral manifestation in pediatric patients with AIDS: multidisciplinary management.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Sandoval, B; Ceballos-Hernández, H; Téllez-Rodríguez, J; Xochihua-Díaz, L; Durán-Ibarra, G; Pozos-Guillen, A J

    2012-01-01

    HIV infection is a major global health problem affecting developing and developed countries alike. HIV infection is associated with multiple oral lesions, some of which are of value in diagnosing the disease. The aim of this report is to describe the clinical manifestations and their multidisciplinary management, in a 6-year-old girl with AIDS. The findings of this case report indicate that, it is essential to be familiar with the early oral manifestations of AIDS in order to understand the patient's dental health needs, apply preventive methods, control caries, and understand the value of oral lesions as diagnostic markers of disease progression in children with HIV infection. A multidisciplinary management is fundamental. PMID:23342569

  9. Computer-Aided Nodule Assessment and Risk Yield Risk Management of Adenocarcinoma: The Future of Imaging?

    PubMed

    Foley, Finbar; Rajagopalan, Srinivasan; Raghunath, Sushravya M; Boland, Jennifer M; Karwoski, Ronald A; Maldonado, Fabien; Bartholmai, Brian J; Peikert, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    Increased clinical use of chest high-resolution computed tomography results in increased identification of lung adenocarcinomas and persistent subsolid opacities. However, these lesions range from very indolent to extremely aggressive tumors. Clinically relevant diagnostic tools to noninvasively risk stratify and guide individualized management of these lesions are lacking. Research efforts investigating semiquantitative measures to decrease interrater and intrarater variability are emerging, and in some cases steps have been taken to automate this process. However, many such methods currently are still suboptimal, require validation and are not yet clinically applicable. The computer-aided nodule assessment and risk yield software application represents a validated tool for the automated, quantitative, and noninvasive tool for risk stratification of adenocarcinoma lung nodules. Computer-aided nodule assessment and risk yield correlates well with consensus histology and postsurgical patient outcomes, and therefore may help to guide individualized patient management, for example, in identification of nodules amenable to radiological surveillance, or in need of adjunctive therapy. PMID:27568149

  10. Enhancements to the Design Manager's Aide for Intelligent Decomposition (DeMaid)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, James L.; Barthelemy, Jean-Francois M.

    1992-01-01

    This paper discusses the addition of two new enhancements to the program Design Manager's Aide for Intelligent Decomposition (DeMAID). DeMAID is a knowledge-based tool used to aid a design manager in understanding the interactions among the tasks of a complex design problem. This is done by ordering the tasks to minimize feedback, determining the participating subsystems, and displaying them in an easily understood format. The two new enhancements include (1) rules for ordering a complex assembly process and (2) rules for determining which analysis tasks must be re-executed to compute the output of one task based on a change in input to that or another task.

  11. Enhancements to the Design Manager's Aide for Intelligent Decomposition (DeMAID)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, James L.; Barthelemy, Jean-Francois M.

    1992-01-01

    This paper discusses the addition of two new enhancements to the program Design Manager's Aide for Intelligent Decomposition (DeMAID). DeMAID is a knowledge-based tool used to aid a design manager in understanding the interactions among the tasks of a complex design problem. This is done by ordering the tasks to minimize feedback, determining the participating subsystems, and displaying them in an easily understood format. The two new enhancements include (1) rules for ordering a complex assembly process and (2) rules for determining which analysis tasks must be re-executed to compute the output of one task based on a change in input to that or another task.

  12. Energy management planning and control in a large industrial facility

    SciTech Connect

    Rood, L.; Korber, J.

    1995-06-01

    Eastman Kodak`s Kodak Park Manufacturing facility is a collection of hundreds of buildings and millions of square feet operated by dozens of semi-autonomous manufacturing units. The facility is served by a centralized Utilities system which cogenerates electricity and distributes steam, chilled water, compressed air, and several other services throughout the site. Energy management at Kodak Park has been active since the 70`s. In 1991, the Utilities Division took ownership of a site wide energy thrust to address capacity limitations of electric, compressed air and other services. Planning and organizing a program to meet Utilities Division goals in such a large complex site was a slightly daunting task. Tracking progress and keeping on schedule is also a challenge. The authors will describe innovative use of a project management software program called Open Plan{reg_sign} to accomplish much of the planning and control for this program. Open Plan{reg_sign} has been used since the initial planning to the current progress of about 50% completion of the program. Hundreds of activities performed by dozens of resource people are planned and tracked. Not only the usual cost and schedule information is reported, but also the schedule for savings in terms of kilowatt-hours, pounds of steam, etc. These savings schedules are very useful for tracking against energy goals and Utilities business planning. Motivation of the individual departments to participate in the program and collection of data from these departments will also be discussed.

  13. National Ignition Facility Risk Management Plan, Revision 2

    SciTech Connect

    Brereton, S J

    2002-06-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) Risk Management Plan (LLNL, 1997a) was originally prepared in 1997 in accordance with the Department of Energy (DOE) Life Cycle Asset Management Good Practice Guide (DOE, 1996a) and supported NIF Critical Decision 3, approval to initiate construction (DOE, 1997a). The plan was updated in 1998 to reflect realized risks such as the finding and successful clean up of polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB)-filled electrical capacitors at the NIF excavation during initial construction and the litigation of the Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Stockpile Stewardship (DOE, 1996b) by a group of non-governmental organizations led by the Natural Resources Defense Council. The current update of the Risk Management Plan brings it into compliance with the applicable DOE Orders and Standards and addresses new risks, such as assuring safety during the period when construction, special equipment installation, and commissioning are occurring simultaneously at the NIF site, and the extensive use of models to manage technical performance risk. The objectives of the updated plan are to: (1) Identify the risks to the completion of the Project in terms of meeting performance and regulatory requirements, ES&H, cost, and schedule; (2) Assess or the risks in terms of likelihood of occurrence and their impact potential relative to technical performance, ES&H, costs, and schedule; and (3) Address suitable risk mitigation measures for each identified risk.

  14. Barrier-Free School Facilities for Handicapped Students. ERS Information Aid.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kunder, Linda H.

    The purpose of this document is to assemble and summarize suggestions, recommendations, and regulations--most of which have been made in the light of increasing local, state, and federal mandates--that might be helpful to school officials in making educational facilities barrier-free for handicapped students. Three survey forms are included to…

  15. Building capacity in health facility management: guiding principles for skills transfer in Liberia

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Management training is fundamental to developing human resources for health. Particularly as Liberia revives its health delivery system, facility and county health team managers are central to progress. Nevertheless, such management skills are rarely prioritized in health training, and sustained capacity building in this area is limited. We describe a health management delivery program in which a north and south institution collaborated to integrate classroom and field-based training in health management and to transfer the capacity for sustained management development in Liberia. Methods We developed and implemented a 6-month training program in health management skills (i.e. strategic problem solving, financial management, human resource management and leadership) delivered by Yale University and Mother Patern College from Liberia, with support from the Clinton HIV/AIDS Initiative. Over three 6-month cycles, responsibility for course instruction was transferred from the north institution to the south institution. A self-administered survey was conducted of all participants completing the course to measure changes in self-rated management skills, the degree to which the course was helpful and met its stated objectives, and faculty members' responsiveness to participant needs as the transfer process occurred. Results Respondents (n = 93, response rate 95.9%) reported substantial improvement in self-reported management skills, and rated the helpfulness of the course and the degree to which the course met its objectives highly. Levels of improvement and course ratings were similar over the three cohorts as the course was transferred to the south institution. We suggest a framework of five elements for implementing successful management training programs that can be transferred and sustained in resource-limited settings, including: 1) use a short-course format focusing on four key skill areas with practical tools; 2) include didactic training, on

  16. A Generalized Management Information System for Computer Facilities at Educational Institutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowman, Patrick Awalt

    The problem of managing computer facilities at educational institutions is examined. User categories are defined, and the interrelations between user requirements and the goals/objectives of the facility are discussed. Enumerations of the factors that influence computer facility operations is also accomplished. In addition, management information…

  17. Waste management facility accident analysis (WASTE ACC) system: software for analysis of waste management alternatives

    SciTech Connect

    Kohout, E.F.; Folga, S.; Mueller, C.; Nabelssi, B.

    1996-03-01

    This paper describes the Waste Management Facility Accident Analysis (WASTE{underscore}ACC) software, which was developed at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) to support the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Waste Management (WM) Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS). WASTE{underscore}ACC is a decision support and database system that is compatible with Microsoft{reg_sign} Windows{trademark}. It assesses potential atmospheric releases from accidents at waste management facilities. The software provides the user with an easy-to-use tool to determine the risk-dominant accident sequences for the many possible combinations of process technologies, waste and facility types, and alternative cases described in the WM PEIS. In addition, its structure will allow additional alternative cases and assumptions to be tested as part of the future DOE programmatic decision-making process. The WASTE{underscore}ACC system demonstrates one approach to performing a generic, systemwide evaluation of accident risks at waste management facilities. The advantages of WASTE{underscore}ACC are threefold. First, the software gets waste volume and radiological profile data that were used to perform other WM PEIS-related analyses directly from the WASTE{underscore}MGMT system. Second, the system allows for a consistent analysis across all sites and waste streams, which enables decision makers to understand more fully the trade-offs among various policy options and scenarios. Third, the system is easy to operate; even complex scenario runs are completed within minutes.

  18. Building capacity for HIV/AIDS program leadership and management in Uganda through mentored Fellowships

    PubMed Central

    Matovu, Joseph K.B.; Wanyenze, Rhoda K.; Mawemuko, Susan; Wamuyu-Maina, Gakenia; Bazeyo, William; Olico-Okui; Serwadda, David

    2011-01-01

    Background Around the world, health professionals and program managers are leading and managing public and private health organizations with little or no formal management and leadership training and experience. Objective To describe an innovative 2-year, long-term apprenticeship Fellowship training program implemented by Makerere University School of Public Health (MakSPH) to strengthen capacity for leadership and management of HIV/AIDS programs in Uganda. Implementation process The program, which began in 2002, is a 2-year, full-time, non-degree Fellowship. It is open to Ugandan nationals with postgraduate training in health-related disciplines. Enrolled Fellows are attached to host institutions implementing HIV/AIDS programs and placed under the supervision of host institution and academic mentors. Fellows spend 75% of their apprenticeship at the host institutions while the remaining 25% is dedicated to didactic short courses conducted at MakSPH to enhance their knowledge base. Achievements Overall, 77 Fellows have been enrolled since 2002. Of the 57 Fellows who were admitted between 2002 and 2008, 94.7% (54) completed the Fellowship successfully and 50 (92.3%) are employed in senior leadership and management positions in Uganda and internationally. Eighty-eight percent of those employed (44/54) work in institutions registered in Uganda, indicating a high level of in-country retention. Nineteen of the 20 Fellows who were admitted between 2009 and 2010 are still undergoing training. A total of 67 institutions have hosted Fellows since 2002. The host institutions have benefited through staff training and technical expertise from the Fellows as well as through grant support to Fellows to develop and implement innovative pilot projects. The success of the program hinges on support from mentors, stakeholder involvement, and the hands-on approach employed in training. Conclusion The Fellowship Program offers a unique opportunity for hands-on training in HIV/AIDS

  19. Nanostructured Delivery Systems: Augmenting the Delivery of Antiretroviral Drugs for Better Management of HIV/AIDS.

    PubMed

    Singh, Gurinder; Pai, Roopa S; Mustafa, Sanaul

    2015-01-01

    In the last two decades, HIV-1, the retrovirus associated with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), is globally one of the primary causes of morbidity and mortality. Unfortunately, existing approaches for interventions are not able to suppress the progression of infection due to this virus. Of the many obstacles, viral entry into the mono-nuclear phagocyte system encompassing monocytes/macrophages and dendritic cells is a major concern. Viral infection is also responsible for the subsequent distribution of the virus into various tissues throughout the organism. Tremendous progress has been made during the past few years to diagnose and treat patients with HIV/AIDS infection, yet much remains to be done. Recommended treatment involves long-term and multiple drug therapy that causes severe side effects. With almost 12% of the world population suffering from HIV/AIDS, better management of this global threat is highly desired. Nanostructured delivery systems hold promise for improving the situation. Such systems can facilitate the uptake of antiretroviral drugs, causing a considerable improvement in HIV/AIDS therapy. Nanoscale systems have intriguing potential to drastically improve existing HIV/AIDS diagnosis and treatment platforms. Nanosystems constitute a wide range of systems varying from polymeric nanoparticles, to solid-lipid nanoparticles, liposomes, micro- and nanoemulsions, dendrimers, and self-nanoemulsifying systems. Improved bioavailability, solubility, stability, and biocompatibility make them an ideal choice for delivery of antiretroviral drugs. The present review initially describes an updated bird's-eye view account of the literature. Then, we provide a relatively sententious overview on updated patents of recent nanostructured delivery systems for antiretroviral drugs. Finally, we discuss low-cost therapy (such as antioxidants and immune modulators) for the treatment and prevention of HIV/AIDS. PMID:26559551

  20. The mixed waste management facility: Cost-benefit for the Mixed Waste Management Facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Brinker, S.D.; Streit, R.D.

    1996-04-01

    The Mixed Waste Management Facility, or MWMF, has been proposed as a national testbed facility for the demonstration and evaluation of technologies that are alternatives to incineration for the treatment of mixed low-level waste. The facility design will enable evaluation of technologies at pilot scale, including all aspects of the processes, from receiving and feed preparation to the preparation of final forms for disposal. The MWMF will reduce the risk of deploying such technologies by addressing the following: (1) Engineering development and scale-up. (2) Process integration and activation of the treatment systems. (3) Permitting and stakeholder issues. In light of the severe financial constraints imposed on the DOE and federal programs, DOE/HQ requested a study to assess the cost benefit for the MWMF given other potential alternatives to meet waste treatment needs. The MVVMF Project was asked to consider alternatives specifically associated with commercialization and privatization of the DOE site waste treatment operations and the acceptability (or lack of acceptability) of incineration as a waste treatment process. The result of this study will be one of the key elements for a DOE decision on proceeding with the MWMF into Final Design (KD-2) vs. proceeding with other options.

  1. WIPP Facility Work Plan for Solid Waste Management Units

    SciTech Connect

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2000-02-25

    This Facility Work Plan (FWP) has been prepared as required by Module VII,Section VII.M.1 of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Hazardous Waste Permit, NM4890139088-TSDF (the Permit); (NMED, 1999a). This work plan describes the programmatic facility-wide approach to future investigations at Solid Waste Management Units (SWMUs) and Areas of Concern (AOCs) specified in the Permit. This FWP addresses the current Permit requirements. It uses the results of previous investigations performed at WIPP and expands the investigations as required by the Permit. As an alternative to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Facility Investigation (RFI) specified in Module VII of the Permit, current New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) guidance identifies an Accelerated Corrective Action Approach (ACAA) that may be used for any SWMU or AOC (NMED, 1998). This accelerated approach is used to replace the standard RFI Work Plan and Report sequence with a more flexible decision-making approach. The ACAA process allows a Facility to exit the schedule of compliance contained in the Facility’s Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments (HSWA) permit module and proceed on an accelerated time frame. Thus, the ACAA process can be entered either before or after an RFI Work Plan. According to NMED’s guidance, a facility can prepare an RFI Work Plan or Sampling and Analysis Plan (SAP) for any SWMU or AOC (NMED, 1998). Based on this guidance, a SAP constitutes an acceptable alternative to the RFI Work Plan specified in the Permit. The scope of work for the RFI Work Plan or SAP is being developed by the Permittees. The final content of the RFI Work Plan or SAP will be coordinated with the NMED for submittal on May 24, 2000. Specific project-related planning information will be included in the RFI Work Plan or SAP. The SWMU program at WIPP began in 1994 under U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regulatory authority. NMED subsequently received regulatory authority from EPA

  2. Prevalence and clinical management of cytomegalovirus retinitis in AIDS patients in shanghai, china

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Cytomegalovirus retinitis is a common AIDS-associated illness, leading to blindness in up to 30% of patients. This study was to investigate the prevalence and clinical management of the cytomegalovirus retinitis associated with AIDS in a large municipality of China. Methods Clinical and laboratory data from 23 cytomegalovirus retinitis patients (35 eyes) out of 303 hospitalized AIDS individuals in a single medical center were analyzed retrospectively. Two of 23 patients were diagnosed cytomegalovirus retinitis just before hospitalization without anti-CMV therapy. Ganciclovir combined with the high active anti-retroviral therapy was installed for treatment of cytomegalovirus retinitis after diagnosis was confirmed. The data were analyzed by specialists and statistics was also applied. Results The prevalence of cytomegalovirus retinitis in hospitalized AIDS patients was 7.6% in this study. The level of CD4+ T lymphocytes was correlated well with the occurrence of cytomegalovirus retinitis, showing 16.8% (19/113) (95% confidence interval: 10.4,25.0), 5.4% (3/56) (95% confidence interval: 1.1,14.9), and 1.4% (1/69) (95% confidence interval: 0.0,7.8) occurrence in the patients with CD4+ T lymphocyte counts < 50, 50~99, and 100~199 cells/μl, respectively. The mean CD4+ T lymphocyte counts was 31.7 ± 38.6 cells/μl in 23 AIDS patients with cytomegalovirus retinitis. Median CD4+ T lymphocyte count is 20 cells/μl with inter-quartile range as (5, 36). Seven patients died (11 eyes) and 16 patients (24 eyes) survived. The proportion of blindness and low vision in eyes infected with cytomegalovirus retinitis respectively was 20.8% (5/24) and 29.2% (7/24) when they were diagnosed in survivors. The ganciclovir therapy was effective in 16 patients (24 eyes). Clinical recovery of cytomegalovirus retinitis was 41.7% (10/24) and clinical improvement 58.3% (14/24). After anti-CMV treatment, the proportion of blindness or low vision was 16.7% (4/24). Conclusions The AIDS

  3. A distributed data base management facility for the CAD/CAM environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balza, R. M.; Beaudet, R. W.; Johnson, H. R.

    1984-01-01

    Current/PAD research in the area of distributed data base management considers facilities for supporting CAD/CAM data management in a heterogeneous network of computers encompassing multiple data base managers supporting a variety of data models. These facilities include coordinated execution of multiple DBMSs to provide for administration of and access to data distributed across them.

  4. 25 CFR 170.806 - What is an IRR Transportation Facilities Maintenance Management System?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Management System? 170.806 Section 170.806 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND... Transportation Facilities Maintenance Management System? An IRR Transportation Facilities Maintenance Management System (TFMMS) is a tool BIA and tribes will use to budget, prioritize, and schedule...

  5. An attempt at the computer-aided management of HIV infection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ida, A.; Oharu, Y.; Sankey, O.

    2007-07-01

    The immune system is a complex and diverse system in the human body and HIV virus disrupts and destroys it through extremely complicated but surprisingly logical process. The purpose of this paper is to make an attempt to present a method for the computer-aided management of HIV infection process by means of a mathematical model describing the dynamics of the host pathogen interaction with HIV-1. Treatments for the AIDS disease must be changed to more efficient ones in accordance with the disease progression and the status of the immune system. The level of progression and the status are represented by parameters which are governed by our mathematical model. It is then exhibited that our model is numerically stable and uniquely solvable. With this knowledge, our mathematical model for HIV disease progression is formulated and physiological interpretations are provided. The results of our numerical simulations are visualized, and it is seen that our results agree with medical aspects from the point of view of antiretroviral therapy. It is then expected that our approach will take to address practical clinical issues and will be applied to the computer-aided management of antiretroviral therapies.

  6. Planning and managing future space facility projects. [management by objectives and group dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sieber, J. E.; Wilhelm, J. A.; Tanner, T. A.; Helmreich, R. L.; Burgenbauch, S. F.

    1979-01-01

    To learn how ground-based personnel of a space project plan and organize their work and how such planning and organizing relate to work outcomes, longitudinal study of the management and execution of the Space Lab Mission Development Test 3 (SMD 3) was performed at NASA Ames Research Center. A view of the problems likely to arise in organizations and some methods of coping with these problems are presented as well as the conclusions and recommendations that pertain strictly to SMD 3 management. Emphasis is placed on the broader context of future space facility projects and additional problems that may be anticipated. A model of management that may be used to facilitate problem solving and communication - management by objectives (MBO) is presented. Some problems of communication and emotion management that MBO does not address directly are considered. Models for promoting mature, constructive and satisfying emotional relationships among group members are discussed.

  7. The Mixed Waste Management Facility: A DOE technology demonstration project

    SciTech Connect

    Adamson, M.G.; Streit, R.D.

    1994-05-01

    The Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) is a national demonstration test bed that will be used to evaluate, at pilot scale, emerging technologies for the effective treatment of low-level radioactive, organic mixed wastes. The treatment technologies will be selected from candidates of advanced processes that have been sufficiently demonstrated in laboratory and bench-scale tests, and most closely meet suitable criteria for demonstration. The primary and initial goal will be to demonstrate technologies that have the potential to effectively treat a selection of organic-based mixed waste streams, currently in storage within the DOE, that list incineration as the best demonstrated available technology (BDAT). In future operations, the facility may also be used to demonstrate technology that addresses a broader range of government, university, medical, and industry needs. The primary objective of the MWMF is to demonstrate integrated mixed-waste processing technologies. While primary treatment processes are an essential component of integrated treatment trains, they are only a part of a fully integrated demonstration.

  8. National Ignition Facility and Managing Location, Component, and State

    SciTech Connect

    Foxworthy, C; Fung, T; Beeler, R; Li, J; Dugorepec, J; Chang, C

    2011-07-25

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is a stadium-sized facility that contains a 192-beam, 1.8-Megajoule, 500-Terawatt, ultraviolet laser system coupled with a 10-meter diameter target chamber. There are over 6,200 Line Replaceable Units (LRUs) comprised of more than 104,000 serialized parts that make up the NIF. Each LRU is a modular unit typically composed of a mechanical housing, laser optics (glass, lenses, or mirrors), and utilities. To date, there are more than 120,000 data sets created to characterize the attributes of these parts. Greater than 51,000 Work Permits have been issued to install, maintain, and troubleshoot the components. One integrated system is used to manage these data, and more. The Location Component and State (LoCoS) system is a web application built using Java Enterprise Edition technologies and is accessed by over 1,200 users. It is either directly or indirectly involved with each aspect of NIF work activity, and interfaces with ten external systems including the Integrated Computer Control System (ICCS) and the Laser Performance Operations Model (LPOM). Besides providing business functionality, LoCoS also acts as the NIF enterprise service bus. In this role, numerous integration approaches had to be adopted including: file exchange, database sharing, queuing, and web services in order to accommodate various business, technical, and security requirements. Architecture and implementation decisions are discussed.

  9. Waste Management Planned for the Advanced Fuel Cycle Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Soelberg

    2007-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) program has been proposed to develop and employ advanced technologies to increase the proliferation resistance of spent nuclear fuels, recover and reuse nuclear fuel resources, and reduce the amount of wastes requiring permanent geological disposal. In the initial GNEP fuel cycle concept, spent nuclear fuel is to be reprocessed to separate re-useable transuranic elements and uranium from waste fission products, for fabricating new fuel for fast reactors. The separated wastes would be converted to robust waste forms for disposal. The Advanced Fuel Cycle Facility (AFCF) is proposed by DOE for developing and demonstrating spent nuclear fuel recycling technologies and systems. The AFCF will include capabilities for receiving and reprocessing spent fuel and fabricating new nuclear fuel from the reprocessed spent fuel. Reprocessing and fuel fabrication activities will generate a variety of radioactive and mixed waste streams. Some of these waste streams are unique and unprecedented. The GNEP vision challenges traditional U.S. radioactive waste policies and regulations. Product and waste streams have been identified during conceptual design. Waste treatment technologies have been proposed based on the characteristics of the waste streams and the expected requirements for the final waste forms. Results of AFCF operations will advance new technologies that will contribute to safe and economical commercial spent fuel reprocessing facilities needed to meet the GNEP vision. As conceptual design work and research and design continues, the waste management strategies for the AFCF are expected to also evolve.

  10. 41 CFR 102-74.10 - What is the basic facility management policy?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What is the basic facility management policy? 102-74.10 Section 102-74.10 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System (Continued) FEDERAL MANAGEMENT REGULATION REAL PROPERTY...

  11. 41 CFR 102-74.15 - What are the facility management responsibilities of occupant agencies?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What are the facility management responsibilities of occupant agencies? 102-74.15 Section 102-74.15 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System (Continued) FEDERAL MANAGEMENT REGULATION...

  12. 41 CFR 102-72.40 - What are facility management delegations?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What are facility management delegations? 102-72.40 Section 102-72.40 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System (Continued) FEDERAL MANAGEMENT REGULATION REAL PROPERTY 72-DELEGATION...

  13. Materials and Security Consolidation Complex Facilities Radioactive Waste Management Basis and DOE Manual 435.1-1 Compliance Tables

    SciTech Connect

    Not Listed

    2011-09-01

    Department of Energy Order 435.1, 'Radioactive Waste Management,' along with its associated manual and guidance, requires development and maintenance of a radioactive waste management basis for each radioactive waste management facility, operation, and activity. This document presents a radioactive waste management basis for Idaho National Laboratory's Materials and Security Consolidation Center facilities that manage radioactive waste. The radioactive waste management basis for a facility comprises existing laboratory-wide and facility-specific documents. Department of Energy Manual 435.1-1, 'Radioactive Waste Management Manual,' facility compliance tables also are presented for the facilities. The tables serve as a tool for developing the radioactive waste management basis.

  14. Research and Education Campus Facilities Radioactive Waste Management Basis and DOE Manual 435.1-1 Compliance Tables

    SciTech Connect

    L. Harvego; Brion Bennett

    2011-11-01

    U.S. Department of Energy Order 435.1, 'Radioactive Waste Management,' along with its associated manual and guidance, requires development and maintenance of a radioactive waste management basis for each radioactive waste management facility, operation, and activity. This document presents a radioactive waste management basis for Idaho National Laboratory Research and Education Campus facilities that manage radioactive waste. The radioactive waste management basis for a facility comprises existing laboratory-wide and facility-specific documents. Department of Energy Manual 435.1-1, 'Radioactive Waste Management Manual,' facility compliance tables also are presented for the facilities. The tables serve as a tool to develop the radioactive waste management basis.

  15. Materials and Fuels Complex Facilities Radioactive Waste Management Basis and DOE Manual 435.1-1 Compliance Tables

    SciTech Connect

    Lisa Harvego; Brion Bennett

    2011-09-01

    Department of Energy Order 435.1, 'Radioactive Waste Management,' along with its associated manual and guidance, requires development and maintenance of a radioactive waste management basis for each radioactive waste management facility, operation, and activity. This document presents a radioactive waste management basis for Idaho National Laboratory's Materials and Fuels Complex facilities that manage radioactive waste. The radioactive waste management basis for a facility comprises existing laboratory-wide and facility-specific documents. Department of Energy Manual 435.1-1, 'Radioactive Waste Management Manual,' facility compliance tables also are presented for the facilities. The tables serve as a tool for developing the radioactive waste management basis.

  16. Waste receiving and processing facility module 1 data management system software project management plan

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, R.E.

    1994-11-02

    This document provides the software development plan for the Waste Receiving and Processing (WRAP) Module 1 Data Management System (DMS). The DMS is one of the plant computer systems for the new WRAP 1 facility (Project W-026). The DMS will collect, store, and report data required to certify the low level waste (LLW) and transuranic (TRU) waste items processed at WRAP 1 as acceptable for shipment, storage, or disposal.

  17. A randomized controlled trial testing the efficacy of an HIV/AIDS symptom management manual.

    PubMed

    Wantland, Dean J; Holzemer, William L; Moezzi, Shahnaz; Willard, Suzanne S; Arudo, John; Kirksey, Kenn M; Portillo, Carmen J; Corless, Inge B; Rosa, María E; Robinson, Linda L; Nicholas, Patrice K; Hamilton, Mary Jane; Sefcik, Elizabeth F; Human, Sarie; Rivero, Marta M; Maryland, Mary; Huang, Emily

    2008-09-01

    This study investigates whether using an HIV/AIDS symptom management manual with self-care strategies for 21 common symptoms, compared to a basic nutrition manual, had an effect on reducing symptom frequency and intensity. A 775-person, repeated measures, randomized controlled trial was conducted over three months in 12 sites from the United States, Puerto Rico, and Africa to assess the relationship between symptom intensity with predictors for differences in initial symptom status and change over time. A mixed model growth analysis showed a significantly greater decline in symptom frequency and intensity for the group using the symptom management manual (intervention) compared to those using the nutrition manual (control) (t=2.36, P=0.018). The models identified three significant predictors for increased initial symptom intensities and in intensity change over time: (1) protease inhibitor-based therapy (increased mean intensity by 28%); (2) having comorbid illness (nearly twice the mean intensity); and (3) being Hispanic receiving care in the United States (increased the mean intensity by 2.5 times). In addition, the symptom manual showed a significantly higher helpfulness rating and was used more often compared to the nutrition manual. The reduction in symptom intensity scores provides evidence of the need for palliation of symptoms in individuals with HIV/AIDS, as well as symptoms and treatment side effects associated with other illnesses. The information from this study may help health care providers become more aware of self-management strategies that are useful to persons with HIV/AIDS and help them to assist patients in making informed choices. PMID:18400461

  18. Effectiveness and Comparison of Various Audio Distraction Aids in Management of Anxious Dental Paediatric Patients

    PubMed Central

    Johri, Nikita; Khan, Suleman Abbas; Singh, Rahul Kumar; Chadha, Dheera; Navit, Pragati; Sharma, Anshul; Bahuguna, Rachana

    2015-01-01

    Background Dental anxiety is a widespread phenomenon and a concern for paediatric dentistry. The inability of children to deal with threatening dental stimuli often manifests as behaviour management problems. Nowadays, the use of non-aversive behaviour management techniques is more advocated, which are more acceptable to parents, patients and practitioners. Therefore, this present study was conducted to find out which audio aid was the most effective in the managing anxious children. Aims and Objectives The aim of the present study was to compare the efficacy of audio-distraction aids in reducing the anxiety of paediatric patients while undergoing various stressful and invasive dental procedures. The objectives were to ascertain whether audio distraction is an effective means of anxiety management and which type of audio aid is the most effective. Materials and Methods A total number of 150 children, aged between 6 to 12 years, randomly selected amongst the patients who came for their first dental check-up, were placed in five groups of 30 each. These groups were the control group, the instrumental music group, the musical nursery rhymes group, the movie songs group and the audio stories group. The control group was treated under normal set-up & audio group listened to various audio presentations during treatment. Each child had four visits. In each visit, after the procedures was completed, the anxiety levels of the children were measured by the Venham’s Picture Test (VPT), Venham’s Clinical Rating Scale (VCRS) and pulse rate measurement with the help of pulse oximeter. Results A significant difference was seen between all the groups for the mean pulse rate, with an increase in subsequent visit. However, no significant difference was seen in the VPT & VCRS scores between all the groups. Audio aids in general reduced anxiety in comparison to the control group, and the most significant reduction in anxiety level was observed in the audio stories group

  19. Analysis of decay dose rates and dose management in the National Ignition Facility.

    PubMed

    Khater, Hesham; Brereton, Sandra; Dauffy, Lucile; Hall, Jim; Hansen, Luisa; Kim, Soon; Kohut, Tom; Pohl, Bertram; Sitaraman, Shiva; Verbeke, Jerome; Young, Mitchell

    2013-06-01

    A detailed model of the Target Bay (TB) at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) has been developed to estimate the post-shot radiation environment inside the facility. The model includes the large number of structures and diagnostic instruments present inside the TB. These structures and instruments are activated by neutrons generated during a shot, and the resultant gamma dose rates are estimated at various decay times following the shot. A set of computational tools was developed to help in estimating potential radiation exposure to TB workers. The results presented in this paper describe the expected radiation environment inside the TB following a low-yield DT shot of 10(16) neutrons. General environment dose rates drop below 30 μSv h(-1) within 3 h following a shot, with higher dose rates observed in the vicinity (~30 cm) of few components. The dose rates drop by more than a factor of two at 1 d following the shot. Dose rate maps of the different TB levels were generated to aid in estimating worker stay-out times following a shot before entry is permitted into the TB. Primary components, including the Target Chamber and diagnostic and beam line components, are constructed of aluminum. Near-term TB accessibility is driven by the decay of the aluminum activation product, 24Na. Worker dose is managed using electronic dosimeters (EDs) self-issued at kiosks using commercial dose management software. The software programs the ED dose and dose rate alarms based on the Radiological Work Permit (RWP) and tracks dose by individual, task, and work group. PMID:23629063

  20. Conceptual design of an in-space cryogenic fluid management facility, executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willen, G. S.; Riemer, D. H.; Hustvedt, D. C.

    1981-01-01

    The conceptual design of a Spacelab experiment to develop the technology associated with low gravity propellant management is summarized. The preliminary facility definition, conceptual design and design analysis, and facility development plan, including schedule and cost estimates for the facility, are presented.

  1. Lease Approval and Building Aid for Leased School Buildings and Facilities Located Off School Property (Pursuant to CR 155.8). Instruction Guide for Public School Districts Outside of New York City.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Office of Facilities Planning.

    State regulations allow public school districts outside of New York City to apply for Building Aid on leasing costs involving instructional facilities for grades Pre-K through 12 located off school district property. This guide explains how the districts should proceed when applying for Building Aid on leased facilities. Attached is the…

  2. Understanding and Managing Aging of Spent Nuclear Fuel and Facility Components in Wet Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, A. Burton

    2007-07-01

    Storage of nuclear fuel after it has been discharged from reactors has become the leading spent fuel management option. Many storage facilities are being required to operate longer than originally anticipated. Aging is a term that has emerged to focus attention on the consequences of extended operation on systems, structures, and components that comprise the storage facilities. The key to mitigation of age-related degradation in storage facilities is to implement effective strategies to understand and manage aging of the facility materials. A systematic approach to preclude serious effects of age-related degradation is addressed in this paper, directed principally to smaller facilities (test and research reactors). The first need is to assess the materials that comprise the facility and the environments that they are subject to. Access to historical data on facility design, fabrication, and operation can facilitate assessment of expected materials performance. Methods to assess the current condition of facility materials are summarized in the paper. Each facility needs an aging management plan to define the scope of the management program, involving identification of the materials that need specific actions to manage age-related degradation. For each material identified, one or more aging management programs are developed and become part of the plan Several national and international organizations have invested in development of comprehensive and systematic approaches to aging management. A method developed by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission is recommended as a concise template to organize measures to effectively manage age-related degradation of storage facility materials, including the scope of inspection, surveillance, and maintenance that is needed to assure successful operation of the facility over its required life. Important to effective aging management is a staff that is alert for evidence of materials degradation and committed to carry out the aging

  3. Knowledge Management tools integration within DLR's concurrent engineering facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, R. P.; Soragavi, G.; Deshmukh, M.; Ludtke, D.

    The complexity of space endeavors has increased the need for Knowledge Management (KM) tools. The concept of KM involves not only the electronic storage of knowledge, but also the process of making this knowledge available, reusable and traceable. Establishing a KM concept within the Concurrent Engineering Facility (CEF) has been a research topic of the German Aerospace Centre (DLR). This paper presents the current KM tools of the CEF: the Software Platform for Organizing and Capturing Knowledge (S.P.O.C.K.), the data model Virtual Satellite (VirSat), and the Simulation Model Library (SimMoLib), and how their usage improved the Concurrent Engineering (CE) process. This paper also exposes the lessons learned from the introduction of KM practices into the CEF and elaborates a roadmap for the further development of KM in CE activities at DLR. The results of the application of the Knowledge Management tools have shown the potential of merging the three software platforms with their functionalities, as the next step towards the fully integration of KM practices into the CE process. VirSat will stay as the main software platform used within a CE study, and S.P.O.C.K. and SimMoLib will be integrated into VirSat. These tools will support the data model as a reference and documentation source, and as an access to simulation and calculation models. The use of KM tools in the CEF aims to become a basic practice during the CE process. The settlement of this practice will result in a much more extended knowledge and experience exchange within the Concurrent Engineering environment and, consequently, the outcome of the studies will comprise higher quality in the design of space systems.

  4. Does identity shape leadership and management practice? Experiences of PHC facility managers in Cape Town, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Daire, Judith; Gilson, Lucy

    2014-09-01

    In South Africa, as elsewhere, Primary Health Care (PHC) facilities are managed by professional nurses. Little is known about the dimensions and challenges of their job, or what influences their managerial practice. Drawing on leadership and organizational theory, this study explored what the job of being a PHC manager entails, and what factors influence their managerial practice. We specifically considered whether the appointment of professional nurses as facility managers leads to an identity transition, from nurse to manager. The overall intention was to generate ideas about how to support leadership development among PHC facility managers. Adopting case study methodology, the primary researcher facilitated in-depth discussions (about their personal history and managerial experiences) with eight participating facility managers from one geographical area. Other data were collected through in-depth interviews with key informants, document review and researcher field notes/journaling. Analysis involved data triangulation, respondent and peer review and cross-case analysis. The experiences show that the PHC facility manager's job is dominated by a range of tasks and procedures focused on clinical service management, but is expected to encompass action to address the population and public health needs of the surrounding community. Managing with and through others, and in a complex system, requiring self-management, are critical aspects of the job. A range of personal, professional and contextual factors influence managerial practice, including professional identity. The current largely facility-focused management practice reflects the strong nursing identity of managers and broader organizational influences. However, three of the eight managers appear to self-identify an emerging leadership identity and demonstrate related managerial practices. Nonetheless, there is currently limited support for an identity transition towards leadership in this context. Better

  5. Professional Development through Organizational Assessment: Using APPA's Facilities Management Evaluation Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Medlin, E. Lander; Judd, R. Holly

    2013-01-01

    APPA's Facilities Management Evaluation Program (FMEP) provides an integrated system to optimize organizational performance. The criteria for evaluation not only provide a tool for organizational continuous improvement, they serve as a compelling leadership development tool essential for today's facilities management professional. The senior…

  6. Metallurgical Laboratory Hazardous Waste Management Facility groundwater monitoring report

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, C.Y.

    1993-03-01

    During fourth quarter 1992, samples from 18 groundwater monitoring wells of the AMB series at the Metallurgical Laboratory Hazardous Waste Management Facility were analyzed for certain heavy metals, indicator parameters, radionuclides, volatile organic compounds, and other constituents. Six parameters exceeded final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) and the Savannah River Site Flag 2 criteria during the quarter. The results for fourth quarter 1992 are fairly consistent with the rest of the year's data. Tetrachloroethylene exceeded the final PDWS in well AMB 4D only two of the four quarters; in the other three wells in which it was elevated, it was present at similar levels throughout the year. Trichloroethylene consistently exceeded its PDWS in wells AMB 4A, 4B, 4D, 5, and 7A during the year. Trichloroethylene was elevated in well AMB 6 only during third and fourth quarters and in well AMB 7 only during fourth quarter. Total alpha-emitting radium was above the final PDWS for total radium in well AMB 5 at similar levels throughout the year and exceeded the PDWS during one of the three quarters it was analyzed for (third quarter 1992) in well AMB 10B.

  7. Mixed Waste Management Facility groundwater monitoring report: Third quarter 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-12-01

    Currently, 125 wells monitor groundwater quality in the uppermost aquifer beneath the Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) at the Savannah River Site. Samples from the wells are analyzed for selected heavy metals, herbicides/pesticides, indicator parameters, radionuclides, volatile organic compounds, and other constituents. As in previous quarters, tritium and trichloroethylene were the most widespread elevated constituents during third quarter 1994. Sixty-four (51%) of the 125 monitoring wells contained elevated tritium activities. Trichloroethylene concentrations exceeded the final PDWS in 22 (18%) wells. Chloroethene, 1,1-dichloroethylene, and tetrachloroethylene, elevated in one or more wells during third quarter 1994, also occurred in elevated levels during second quarter 1994. These constituents generally were elevated in the same wells during both quarters. Gross alpha, which was elevated in only one well during second quarter 1994, was elevated again during third quarter. Mercury, which was elevated during first quarter 1994, was elevated again in one well. Dichloromethane was elevated in two wells for the first time in several quarters.

  8. Mixed Waste Management Facility groundwater monitoring report. Second quarter 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Chase, J.A.

    1994-09-01

    Currently, 125 wells monitor groundwater quality in the uppermost aquifer beneath the Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) at the Savannah River Site. Samples from the wells are analyzed for selected heavy metals, indicator parameters, radionuclides, volatile organic compounds, and other constituents. During second quarter 1994, chloroethene (vinyl chloride), 1,1-dichloroethylene, gross alpha, lead, tetrachloroethylene, trichloroethylene, or tritium exceeded final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) in approximately half of the downgradient wells at the MWMF. Consistent with historical trends, elevated constituent levels were found primarily in Aquifer Zone. As in previous quarters, tritium and trichloroethylene were the most widespread elevated constituents during second quarter 1994. Sixty-two of the 125 monitoring wells contained elevated tritium activities. Trichloroethylene concentrations exceeded the final PDWS in 23 wells. Chloroethene, 1,1-dichloroethylene, lead, and tetrachloroethylene, elevated in one or more wells during second quarter 1994, also occurred in elevated levels during first quarter 1994. These constituents generally were elevated in the same wells during both quarters. Gross alpha, which was not elevated in any well during first quarter 1994, was elevated in one well during second quarter. Copper, mercury, and nonvolatile beta were elevated during first quarter 1994 but not during second quarter.

  9. Optimizing Watershed Management by Coordinated Operation of Storing Facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anghileri, Daniela; Castelletti, Andrea; Pianosi, Francesca; Soncini-Sessa, Rodolfo; Weber, Enrico

    2013-04-01

    Water storing facilities in a watershed are very often operated independently one to another to meet specific operating objectives, with no information sharing among the operators. This uncoordinated approach might result in upstream-downstream disputes and conflicts among different water users, or inefficiencies in the watershed management, when looked at from the viewpoint of an ideal central decision-maker. In this study, we propose an approach in two steps to design coordination mechanisms at the watershed scale with the ultimate goal of enlarging the space for negotiated agreements between competing uses and improve the overall system efficiency. First, we compute the multi-objective centralized solution to assess the maximum potential benefits of a shift from a sector-by-sector to an ideal fully coordinated perspective. Then, we analyze the Pareto-optimal operating policies to gain insight into suitable strategies to foster cooperation or impose coordination among the involved agents. The approach is demonstrated on an Alpine watershed in Italy where a long lasting conflict exists between upstream hydropower production and downstream irrigation water users. Results show that a coordination mechanism can be designed that drive the current uncoordinated structure towards the performance of the ideal centralized operation.

  10. CAMEO-Valdez: A user's perspective. [Computer-Aided Management of Emergency Operations

    SciTech Connect

    Haas, T.J.

    1990-01-11

    On the morning of March 24, 1989, the tanker EXXON VALDEZ ran aground on Bligh Reef in Alaska's Prince William Sound. The vessel was carrying over 53 million gallons of North Slope crude oil of which almost 11 million gallons were spilled in the water. The immediately impacted area included most of the western part of the Sound, but eventually, the area expanded to include parts of Seward, Homer, and Kodiak. This event constituted the worst oil spill in the history of this country, and was identified as a 'spill of national significance.' A major response to clean up the oil by EXXON, which was closely monitored by Federal and State agencies and various interest groups, was necessary. Early in the response it was obvious to the Federal On-Scene Coordinator (FOSC) that a computer-aided management system was necessary to monitor the progress of the spill clean-up operations. This paper will describe CAMEO (Computer-Aided Management of Emergency Operations) - Valdez, developed for the FOSC by the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration acting in its role as the Scientific Support Coordinator (SSC). A discussion of how CAMEO was used and an evaluation of its effectiveness will also be presented.

  11. Effect of Structured Teaching Programme on Knowledge of School Teachers regarding First Aid Management in Selected Schools of Bangalore.

    PubMed

    De, Piyali

    2014-01-01

    Safe childhood is the foundation of a good future. Children face different kinds of accidents at school premises while playing. Prevention of these accidents and their management is essential. A study was therefore conducted among school teachers at Anekal Taluk, Bangalore to make them aware about different accidents of children at school premises and their first aid management. The sample consisted of 30 primary and higher primary school teachers selected by convenience sampling technique. The analysis showed that improvement of knowledge occurred after administering structured teaching programme (STP) on first aid management. Nursing professionals can benefit from the study result at the area of community, administration, research and education. PMID:26182823

  12. A randomized controlled trial of an HIV/AIDS Symptom Management Manual for depressive symptoms.

    PubMed

    Eller, Lucille S; Kirksey, Kenn M; Nicholas, Patrice K; Corless, Inge B; Holzemer, William L; Wantland, Dean J; Willard, Suzanne S; Robinson, Linda; Hamilton, Mary Jane; Sefcik, Elizabeth F; Moezzi, Shahnaz; Mendez, Marta Rivero; Rosa, Maria; Human, Sarie

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Depressive symptoms are highly prevalent, underdiagnosed, and undertreated in people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWH), and are associated with poorer health outcomes. This randomized controlled trial examined the effects of the HIV/AIDS Symptom Management Manual self-care symptom management strategies compared with a nutrition manual on depressive symptoms in an international sample of PLWH. The sample consisted of a sub-group (N=222) of participants in a larger study symptom management study who reported depressive symptoms. Depressive symptoms of the intervention (n=124) and control (n=98) groups were compared over three months: baseline, one-month, and two-months. Use and effectiveness of specific strategies were examined. Depressive symptom frequency at baseline varied significantly by country (χ (2) 12.9; p=0.04). Within the intervention group there were significant differences across time in depressive symptom frequency [F(2, 207) = 3.27, p=0.05], intensity [F(2, 91) = 4.6, p=0.01], and impact [F(2, 252) = 2.92, p= 0.05), and these were significantly lower at one month but not at two months, suggesting that self-care strategies are effective in reducing depressive symptoms, however effects may be short term. Most used and most effective self-care strategies were distraction techniques and prayer. This study suggests that people living with HIV can be taught and will employ self-care strategies for management of depressive symptoms and that these strategies are effective in reducing these symptoms. Self-care strategies are noninvasive, have no side-effects, and can be readily taught as an adjunct to other forms of treatment. Studies are needed to identify the most effective self-care strategies and quantify optimum dose and frequency of use as a basis for evidence-based practice. PMID:22880943

  13. Does identity shape leadership and management practice? Experiences of PHC facility managers in Cape Town, South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Daire, Judith; Gilson, Lucy

    2014-01-01

    In South Africa, as elsewhere, Primary Health Care (PHC) facilities are managed by professional nurses. Little is known about the dimensions and challenges of their job, or what influences their managerial practice. Drawing on leadership and organizational theory, this study explored what the job of being a PHC manager entails, and what factors influence their managerial practice. We specifically considered whether the appointment of professional nurses as facility managers leads to an identity transition, from nurse to manager. The overall intention was to generate ideas about how to support leadership development among PHC facility managers. Adopting case study methodology, the primary researcher facilitated in-depth discussions (about their personal history and managerial experiences) with eight participating facility managers from one geographical area. Other data were collected through in-depth interviews with key informants, document review and researcher field notes/journaling. Analysis involved data triangulation, respondent and peer review and cross-case analysis. The experiences show that the PHC facility manager’s job is dominated by a range of tasks and procedures focused on clinical service management, but is expected to encompass action to address the population and public health needs of the surrounding community. Managing with and through others, and in a complex system, requiring self-management, are critical aspects of the job. A range of personal, professional and contextual factors influence managerial practice, including professional identity. The current largely facility-focused management practice reflects the strong nursing identity of managers and broader organizational influences. However, three of the eight managers appear to self-identify an emerging leadership identity and demonstrate related managerial practices. Nonetheless, there is currently limited support for an identity transition towards leadership in this context. Better

  14. The LLNL Heavy Element Facility -- Facility Management, Authorization Basis, and Readiness Assessment Lessons Learned in the Heavy Element Facility (B251) Transition from Category II Nuclear Facility to Radiological Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, M; Anderson, B; Brown, E; Gray, L

    2006-04-10

    This paper presents Facility Management, Readiness Assessment, and Authorization Basis experience gained and lessons learned during the Heavy Element Facility Risk Reduction Program (RRP). The RRP was tasked with removing contaminated glove boxes, radioactive inventory, and contaminated ventilation systems from the Heavy Element Facility (B251) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The RRP was successful in its goal in April 2005 with the successful downgrade of B251 from a Category II Nuclear Facility to a Radiological Facility. The expertise gained and the lessons learned during the planning and conduct of the RRP included development of unique approaches in work planning/work control (''Expect the unexpected and confirm the expected'') and facility management. These approaches minimized worker dose and resulted in significant safety improvements and operational efficiencies. These lessons learned can help similar operational and management activities at other sites, including facilities restarting operations or new facility startup. B251 was constructed at LLNL to provide research areas for conducting experiments in radiochemistry using transuranic elements. Activities at B251 once included the preparation of tracer sets associated with the underground testing of nuclear devices and basic research devoted to a better understanding of the chemical and nuclear behavior of the transuranic elements. Due to the age of the facility, even with preventative maintenance, facility safety and experimental systems were deteriorating. A variety of seismic standards were used in the facility design and construction, which encompassed eight building increments constructed over a period of 26 years. The cost to bring the facility into compliance with the current seismic and other requirements was prohibitive, and simply maintaining B251 as a Category II nuclear facility posed serious cost considerations under a changing regulatory environment. Considering the high

  15. The Mixed Waste Management Facility monthly report August 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Streit, R.D.

    1995-09-01

    The project is concerned with the design of a mixed waste facility to prepare solid and liquid wastes for processing by electrochemical oxidation, molten salt oxidation, wet oxidation, or UV photolysis. The facility will have a receiving and shipping unit, preparation and processing units, off-gas scrubbing, analytical services, water treatment, and transport and storage facilities. This monthly report give task summaries for 25 tasks which are part of the overall design effort.

  16. DeMAID: A Design Manager's Aide for Intelligent Decomposition user's guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, James L.

    1989-01-01

    A design problem is viewed as a complex system divisible into modules. Before the design of a complex system can begin, the couplings among modules and the presence of iterative loops is determined. This is important because the design manager must know how to group the modules into subsystems and how to assign subsystems to design teams so that changes in one subsystem will have predictable effects on other subsystems. Determining these subsystems is not an easy, straightforward process and often important couplings are overlooked. Moreover, the planning task must be repeated as new information become available or as the design specifications change. The purpose of this research is to develop a knowledge-based tool called the Design Manager's Aide for Intelligent Decomposition (DeMAID) to act as an intelligent advisor for the design manager. DeMaid identifies the subsystems of a complex design problem, orders them into a well-structured format, and marks the couplings among the subsystems to facilitate the use of multilevel tools. DeMAID also provides the design manager with the capability of examining the trade-offs between sequential and parallel processing. This type of approach could lead to a substantial savings or organizing and displaying a complex problem as a sequence of subsystems easily divisible among design teams. This report serves as a User's Guide for the program.

  17. Nuclear Storage Facility Inventory and Information Management using the GraFIC Software.

    SciTech Connect

    Hickerson, T.W.

    1999-05-04

    Oak Ridge has developed an intelligent facility and information management system to provide near real time, verifiable status of safeguarded materials in a nuclear storage facility. The Graphical Facility Information System (GraFIC{trademark}) is a versatile software package designed to operate in a distributed computing environment. GraFIC{trademark} is integrated with a suite of rugged, low-cost sensors that remotely monitor the physical and/or assigned attributes associated with stored nuclear materials and reports item and facility activity to an unlimited number of authorized clients. The software also contains facility management tools to assist with space planning, record management, item location, and a variety of other facilities needs.

  18. Corporate crisis management managing a major crisis in a chemical facility.

    PubMed

    Marwitz, Steve; Maxson, Neil; Koch, Bill; Aukerman, Todd; Cassidy, Jim; Belonger, David

    2008-11-15

    Chemical sites should have well trained and organized emergency response plans to manage an incident within the plant or during transport. The implementation of an incident command system utilizing either internal resources or external response through mutual aid agreements is generally sufficient to address the direct impact of an event on the site. When the site resources become overwhelmed in addressing resulting issues such as press releases, medical advice/support, employees and family support, Agency notifications, etc, Corporate should be ready and able to respond. This paper, taken from an in-depth CCPS workshop led by the author, describes an outline for corporate assistance in the event of a major incident at a site or during transportation. PMID:18054433

  19. Knowledge Management at the Fast Flux Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Wootan, David W.; Omberg, Ronald P.

    2013-06-01

    One of the goals of the Department of Energy’s Office of Nuclear Energy, initiated under the Fuel Cycle Research and Development Program (FCRD) and continued under the Advanced Reactor Concepts Program (ARC) is to preserve the knowledge that has been gained in the United States on Liquid Metal Reactors (LMRs) that could support the development of an environmentally and economically sound nuclear fuel cycle. The Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) is the most recent LMR to operate in the United States, from 1982 to 1992, and was designed as a fully instrumented test reactor with on-line, real time test control and performance monitoring of components and tests installed in the reactor. The 10 years of operation of the FFTF provided a very useful framework for testing the advances in LMR safety technology based on passive safety features that may be of increased importance to new designs after the events at Fukushima. Knowledge preservation at the FFTF is focused on the areas of design, construction, and startup of the reactor, as well as on preserving information obtained from 10 years of successful operating history and extensive irradiation testing of fuels and materials. In order to ensure protection of information at risk, the program to date has sequestered reports, files, tapes, and drawings to allow for secure retrieval. The FFTF knowledge management program includes a disciplined and orderly approach to respond to client’s requests for documents and data in order to minimize the search effort and ensure that future requests for this information can be readily accommodated.

  20. The mixed waste management facility. Monthly report, October 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Streit, R.D.

    1995-11-01

    A continuing concern over the last few months was resolved with the approval of the Environmental Assessment (EA) and signing of the Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI). This was completed in time to allow approval of the DWTF Phase 1 KD-3 and subsequent award of the construction contract for this phase (site preparation). The Project continues to make progress toward the Project Preliminary Design Review (PDR), scheduled for November 15-16, 1995. We completed the conventional feed preparation and solid feed preparation demonstration technologies (telerobotic sorting) and conducted a prereview of the Analytical Services element. Molten Salt is scheduled for October 3-4, with Water Treatment and Analytical Services completing the reviews by October 12. While a number of design issues have been raised and are being tracked, the general level of engineering progress is consistent with completing the PDR on schedule. No show-stoppers have been identified, and all items requiring resolution before PDR will be completed. We completed the initial iteration of the cost roll-ups for the preliminary design and have developed a plan consistent with the guidance issued for the Project (level funding at {approximately}$10M/yr, reduced scope, integrated with the DWTF). This was accomplished by staging the completion of various elements (e.g., MSO in FY98, Telerobotics in FY99), and reducing to the extent possible project support functions. Two significant modifications will be noted in the Project Baseline Revision 2.0-Preliminary Design (PB2.0) relative to previous estimates: (1) the cost of the MSO system has increased due to a better understanding of the system needs (relative to CDR assessment), and (2) project management has increased owing to a restructuring of how LLNL distributes facility charge costs. However, both these increases have been offset by reduction in other elements and by a general lowering of Project contingency.

  1. Medication Manager for Child Caring Facilities, MR (Less than 15 Bed Facilities), Supervised Apartment Living.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iowa Univ., Iowa City. Coll. of Education.

    This guide contains materials for use in conducting a 10-hour classroom and laboratory course to train individuals in the safe administration of nonparenteral medications in a 15-bed or smaller residential facility for mentally retarded persons, a child care facility, or a supervised apartment living setting. The guide begins with a course…

  2. Management of Chronic Diseases in Sub-Saharan Africa: Cross-Fertilisation between HIV/AIDS and Diabetes Care

    PubMed Central

    van Olmen, Josefien; Schellevis, François; Van Damme, Wim; Kegels, Guy; Rasschaert, Freya

    2012-01-01

    There is growing attention for chronic diseases in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) and for bridges between the management of HIV/AIDS and other (noncommunicable) chronic diseases. This becomes more urgent with increasing numbers of people living with both HIV/AIDS and other chronic conditions. This paper discusses the commonalities between chronic diseases by reviewing models of care, focusing on the two most dominant ones, diabetes mellitus type 2 (DM2) and HIV/AIDS. We argue that in order to cope with care for HIV patients and diabetes patients, health systems in SSA need to adopt new strategies taking into account essential elements of chronic disease care. We developed a “chronic dimension framework,” which analyses the “disease dimension,” the “health provider dimension,” the patient or “person dimension,” and the “environment dimension” of chronic diseases. Applying this framework to HIV/AIDS and DM2 shows that it is useful to think about management of both in tandem, comparing care delivery platforms and self-management strategies. A literature review on care delivery models for diabetes and HIV/AIDS in SSA revealed potential elements for cross-fertilisation: rapid scale-up approaches through the public health approach by simplification and decentralisation; community involvement, peer support, and self-management strategies; and strengthening health services. PMID:23209477

  3. Human-resources strategies for managing HIV/AIDS: the case of the South African forestry industry.

    PubMed

    Gow, Jeff; Grant, Bligh

    2010-09-01

    Previous work has focused on HIV prevalence among forestry workers and the impact of HIV/AIDS on the sustainability of forest resources. Following a review of work examining the impacts of HIV/AIDS on the South African economy, this article presents original qualitative research examining the responses of company management to the HIV epidemic across a range of enterprises in the South African forestry industry, including large companies, contractors and cooperatives. At the level of the enterprise, management occupies a critical nexus, at which the intersecting requirements of complex government legislation, the wellbeing of workers and the demands of the business must be met. The research demonstrates that large forestry companies tend to provide only a small fraction of their workforces with HIV/AIDS education, prevention or treatment services, as they have essentially outsourced the requirement through the use of labour-supply contractors who, by and large, provide workers with scant HIV/AIDS-related programmes or benefits. Moreover, the extent to which the different types of forestry enterprises incorporate the management of HIV/AIDS in the workforce with the management of the business is highly variable, and in most instances falls short of legislative requirements that have been in place for over a decade. The implications of this for the forestry industry in South Africa are acute. PMID:25860632

  4. Educational Facilities: Planning, Modernization, and Management. Third Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castaldi, Basil

    Written for both students and practitioners, this book is a comprehensive treatise on the planning, remodeling, and maintenance of educational facilities. The subject matter is organized to blend theory and practice. Part I deals primarily with theory, principles, and techniques of educational facilities planning, covering school building history,…

  5. Getting into the brain: Potential of nanotechnology in the management of NeuroAIDS.

    PubMed

    Nair, Madhavan; Jayant, Rahul Dev; Kaushik, Ajeet; Sagar, Vidya

    2016-08-01

    In spite of significant advances in antiretroviral (ARV) therapy, the elimination of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) reservoirs from the periphery and the central nervous system (CNS) remains a formidable task. The incapability of ARV to go across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) after systemic administration makes the brain one of the dominant HIV reservoirs. Thus, screening, monitoring, and elimination of HIV reservoirs from the brain remain a clinically daunting and key task. The practice and investigation of nanomedicine possesses potentials for therapeutics against neuroAIDS. This review highlights the advancements in nanoscience and nanotechnology to design and develop specific size therapeutic cargo for efficient navigation across BBB so as to recognize and eradicate HIV brain reservoirs. Different navigation and drug release strategies, their biocompatibility and efficacy with related challenges and future prospects are also discussed. This review would be an excellent platform to understand nano-enable multidisciplinary research to formulate efficient nanomedicine for the management of neuroAIDS. PMID:26944096

  6. Managing external resources in Mozambique: building new aid relationships on shifting sands?

    PubMed

    Pavignani, E; Durão, J R

    1999-09-01

    The Mozambican health sector is recovering from war and general disruption. This massive endeavour is supported by several donor agencies, which contribute a substantial proportion of national health expenditure. The final years of the war and the transition period have seen an extreme fragmentation of the health sector. To correct it, serious efforts to coordinate the plethora of aid agencies and related external inputs have taken place. This paper reviews the actors present on the Mozambican health scene and their interactions. The existing aid management mechanisms are described and their effectiveness appraised. The factors affecting both the process and its outcomes are analyzed. Given the prevailing complexity, this research presents a number of tentative conclusions. First, the evidence suggests that coordination efforts have paid off. However, progress has required intense and sustained work. Incremental approaches, where donor demands are progressively raised as the system is strengthened, have been crucial. The initiative has come mainly from donors, with the Ministry of Health receptive and reactive. When the recipient administration has been able to take advantage of donor initiatives, success has ensued. Individual people have been crucial in shaping the process. Critical factors contributing to positive developments on both sides of the donor-recipient relationship have been frankness, risk-taking and a long-term perspective. PMID:10621241

  7. Management of hearing aid assembly by urban-dwelling hearing-impaired adults in a developed country: implications for a self-fitting hearing aid.

    PubMed

    Convery, Elizabeth; Keidser, Gitte; Hartley, Lisa; Caposecco, Andrea; Hickson, Louise; Meyer, Carly

    2011-12-01

    A self-fitting hearing aid, designed to be assembled and programmed without audiological or computer support, could bring amplification to millions of people in developing countries, who remain unaided due to the lack of a local, professional, audiological infrastructure. The ability to assemble and insert a hearing aid is fundamental to the successful use of a self-fitting device. In this study, the management of such tasks was investigated. Eighty older, urban-dwelling, hearing-impaired adults in a developed country were asked to follow a set of written, illustrated instructions to assemble two slim-fit behind-the-ear hearing aids. Participants were allowed to access assistance with the task from an accompanying partner. A range of personal and audiometric variables was measured through the use of structured questionnaires and standardized tests of health literacy, cognitive function, and manual dexterity. The results showed that 99% of participants were able to complete the hearing aid assembly task, either on their own or with assistance. Health literacy, or the ability to read and understand health-related text, and gender most strongly influenced participants' ability to complete the assembly task independently and accurately. Higher levels of health literacy were associated with an increased likelihood of independent and successful task completion. Male participants were more likely to complete the task on their own, while female participants were more likely to assemble the device without errors. The results of this study will inform future work regarding development of educational material for the self-fitting hearing aid as well as candidacy for such a device. PMID:22200734

  8. Facility Management as Part of an Integrated Design of Civil Engineering Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyben, Ivan; Podmanický, Peter

    2014-11-01

    The present article deals about facility management, as still relatively young component of an integrated planning and design of buildings. Attention is focused on the area of the proposal, which can greatly affect to amount of future operating costs. Operational efficiency has been divided into individual components and satisfaction with the solution of buildings already constructed was assessed by workers, who are actually dedicated facility management in these organizations. The results were then assessed and evaluated through regression analysis. The aim of this paper is to determine to what extent is desired update project documentation of new buildings from the perspective of facility management.

  9. Efficient health information management systems using wireless communications technology to aid disaster victims.

    PubMed

    Nasu, Yasuhiro; Ashida, Nobuyuki; Kanzaki, Hatsumi; Sagawa, Setsuko; Tsuji, Masatsugu

    2012-08-01

    Japan is an earthquake-prone country, and disasters have a devastating effect on the lives of residents in stricken areas. Shelters can be constructed in order to secure the physical safety of residents, but there are no such provisions for the shock of experiencing a disaster, losing property and friends, and transitioning to an unfamiliar life in a shelter, all of which can lead to mental disorders. Caretakers such as medical doctors and nurses who are dispatched to disaster sites also face difficulties in the disruption of communications and transportation, thus a system able to secure efficient health management in those facilities is also required. This paper proposes a health information management system that utilizes mobile phone cameras and mark-sensing cards to improve recovery conditions in disaster-stricken areas. PMID:21626399

  10. Risk management technique for liquefied natural gas facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fedor, O. H.; Parsons, W. N.

    1975-01-01

    Checklists have been compiled for planning, design, construction, startup and debugging, and operation of liquefied natural gas facilities. Lists include references to pertinent safety regulations. Methods described are applicable to handling of other hazardous materials.

  11. 48 CFR 801.602-80 - Legal and technical review-Office of Construction and Facilities Management and National Cemetery...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...-Office of Construction and Facilities Management and National Cemetery Administration. 801.602-80 Section... Responsibilities 801.602-80 Legal and technical review-Office of Construction and Facilities Management and National Cemetery Administration. An Office of Construction and Facilities Management or National...

  12. 48 CFR 801.602-80 - Legal and technical review-Office of Construction and Facilities Management and National Cemetery...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...-Office of Construction and Facilities Management and National Cemetery Administration. 801.602-80 Section... Responsibilities 801.602-80 Legal and technical review-Office of Construction and Facilities Management and National Cemetery Administration. An Office of Construction and Facilities Management or National...

  13. 48 CFR 801.602-80 - Legal and technical review-Office of Construction and Facilities Management and National Cemetery...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...-Office of Construction and Facilities Management and National Cemetery Administration. 801.602-80 Section... Responsibilities 801.602-80 Legal and technical review-Office of Construction and Facilities Management and National Cemetery Administration. An Office of Construction and Facilities Management or National...

  14. 48 CFR 801.602-80 - Legal and technical review-Office of Construction and Facilities Management and National Cemetery...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...-Office of Construction and Facilities Management and National Cemetery Administration. 801.602-80 Section... Responsibilities 801.602-80 Legal and technical review-Office of Construction and Facilities Management and National Cemetery Administration. An Office of Construction and Facilities Management or National...

  15. 48 CFR 801.602-80 - Legal and technical review-Office of Construction and Facilities Management and National Cemetery...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...-Office of Construction and Facilities Management and National Cemetery Administration. 801.602-80 Section... Responsibilities 801.602-80 Legal and technical review-Office of Construction and Facilities Management and National Cemetery Administration. An Office of Construction and Facilities Management or National...

  16. 25 CFR 170.807 - What must BIA include when it develops an IRR Transportation Facilities Maintenance Management...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... inter-modal facilities; (4) Information from other IRR Program management systems; (5) Future needs; and... Transportation Facilities Maintenance Management System? 170.807 Section 170.807 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS... What must BIA include when it develops an IRR Transportation Facilities Maintenance Management...

  17. An ethnobotanical survey of plants used to manage HIV/AIDS opportunistic infections in Katima Mulilo, Caprivi region, Namibia

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Katima Mulilo has the highest burden of HIV/AIDS in Namibia. Due to several constraints of the antiretroviral therapy programme, HIV-infected persons still use ethnomedicines to manage AIDS-related opportunistic infections. Despite the reliance on plants to manage HIV/AIDS in Katima Mulilo, there have been no empirical studies to document the specific plant species used by traditional healers to treat AIDS-related opportunistic infections. In this study, an ethnobotanical survey was conducted to record the various plant families, species, and plant parts used to manage different HIV/AIDS-related opportunistic infections in Katima Mulilo, Caprivi region, Namibia. The results showed that a total of 71 plant species from 28 families, mostly the Combretaceae (14%), Anacardiaceae (8%), Mimosaceae (8%), and Ebanaceae (7%), were used to treat conditions such as herpes zoster, diarrhoea, coughing, malaria, meningitis, and tuberculosis. The most plant parts used were leaves (33%), bark (32%), and roots (28%) while the least used plant parts were fruits/seeds (4%). Further research is needed to isolate the plants' active chemical compounds and understand their modes of action. PMID:20831821

  18. SEMINAR PUBLICATION: ORGANIC AIR EMISSIONS FROM WASTE MANAGEMENT FACILITIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The organic chemicals contained in wastes processed during waste management operations can volatilize into the atmosphere and cause toxic or carcinogenic effects or contribute to ozone formation. Because air emissions from waste management operations pose a threat to human health...

  19. Radioactive Waste Management at the New Conversion Facility of 'TVEL'{sup R} Fuel Company - 13474

    SciTech Connect

    Indyk, S.I.; Volodenko, A.V.; Tvilenev, K.A.; Tinin, V.V.; Fateeva, E.V.

    2013-07-01

    The project on the new conversion facility construction is being implemented by Joint Stock Company (JSC) 'Siberian Group of Chemical Enterprises' (SGChE) within TVEL{sup R} Fuel Company. The objective is to construct the up-to-date facility ensuring the industrial and environmental safety with the reduced impact on the community and environment in compliance with the Russian new regulatory framework on radioactive waste (RW) management. The history of the SGChE development, as well as the concepts and approaches to RW management implemented by now are shown. The SGChE future image is outlined, together with its objectives and concept on RW management in compliance with the new act 'On radioactive waste management' adopted in Russia in 2011. Possible areas of cooperation with international companies are discussed in the field of RW management with the purpose of deploying the best Russian and world practices on RW management at the new conversion facility. (authors)

  20. Using Construction Management for Public and Institutional Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Public Technology, Inc., Washington, DC.

    Construction management has been developed as an alternative to the traditional public building process and seeks to save an owner time and cost primarily through better activity coordination and project management. This report was developed to guide public agencies in their evaluation of construction management for their particular needs. It…

  1. Mixed Waste Management Facility Preliminary Safety Analysis Report. Chapters 1 to 20

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-09-01

    This document provides information on waste management practices, occupational safety, and a site characterization of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. A facility description, safety engineering analysis, mixed waste processing techniques, and auxiliary support systems are included.

  2. Mixed Waste Management Facility Groundwater Monitoring Report, Fourth Quarter 1998 and 1998 Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Chase, J.

    1999-04-29

    During fourth quarter 1998, ten constituents exceeded final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) in groundwater samples from downgradient monitoring wells at the Mixed Waste Management Facility. No constituents exceeded final PDWS in samples from the upgradient monitoring wells.

  3. Health and Safety Management for Small-scale Methane Fermentation Facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaoka, Masaru; Yuyama, Yoshito; Nakamura, Masato; Oritate, Fumiko

    In this study, we considered health and safety management for small-scale methane fermentation facilities that treat 2-5 ton of biomass daily based on several years operation experience with an approximate capacity of 5 t·d-1. We also took account of existing knowledge, related laws and regulations. There are no qualifications or licenses required for management and operation of small-scale methane fermentation facilities, even though rural sewerage facilities with a relative similar function are required to obtain a legitimate license. Therefore, there are wide variations in health and safety consciousness of the operators of small-scale methane fermentation facilities. The industrial safety and health laws are not applied to the operation of small-scale methane fermentation facilities. However, in order to safely operate a small-scale methane fermentation facility, the occupational safety and health management system that the law recommends should be applied. The aims of this paper are to clarify the risk factors in small-scale methane fermentation facilities and encourage planning, design and operation of facilities based on health and safety management.

  4. Preventing sexual attacks in healthcare facilities: risk management considerations.

    PubMed

    Banja, John D

    2014-01-01

    Reports or allegations of sexual attacks in healthcare facilities are extremely upsetting and sometimes not given the attention they deserve. In June 2011, the United States Government Accountability Office (GAO) issued a remarkable report on sexual attacks occurring in Veterans Affairs (VA) health facilities that not only raised awareness of the magnitude of the problem but that detailed numerous system weaknesses in VA facilities that might have enabled such attacks. This article discusses some of the GAO's findings as well as other instances of sexual attacks, such as occurred in the criminal prosecution of Paul Serdula, a former health professional who might have sexually assaulted hundreds of women. Some of Serdula's victims have subsequently sued in civil court, charging Serdula's employers with lack of supervision and raising the possibility of serial sexual attacks such as his evolving into large-scale patient safety disasters. This article will review certain ethical and legal considerations bearing on the liability of healthcare facilities in which sexual attacks are alleged to have occurred. Following a discussion of how two courts have used the legal construct of "foreseeability" in determining a healthcare facility's liability when an employee is charged with sexual assault, the article will conclude with a host of patient safety recommendations aimed at discouraging or deterring the occurrence of sexual attacks. PMID:24549696

  5. Managing facility risk: external threats and health care organizations.

    PubMed

    Reid, Daniel J; Reid, William H

    2014-01-01

    Clinicians and clinical administrators should have a basic understanding of physical and financial risk to mental health facilities related to external physical threat, including actions usually viewed as "terrorism" and much more common sources of violence. This article refers to threats from mentally ill persons and those acting out of bizarre or misguided "revenge," extortionists and other outright criminals, and perpetrators usually identified as domestic or international terrorists. The principles apply both to relatively small and contained acts (such as a patient or ex-patient attacking a staff member) and to much larger events (such as bombings and armed attack), and are relevant to facilities both within and outside the U.S. Patient care and accessibility to mental health services rest not only on clinical skills, but also on a place to practice them and an organized system supported by staff, physical facilities, and funding. Clinicians who have some familiarity with the non-clinical requirements for care are in a position to support non-clinical staff in preventing care from being interrupted by external threats or events such as terrorist activity, and/or to serve at the interface of facility operations and direct clinical care. Readers should note that this article is an introduction to the topic and cannot address all local, state and national standards for hospital safety, or insurance providers' individual facility requirements. PMID:24733720

  6. Medically important venomous animals: biology, prevention, first aid, and clinical management.

    PubMed

    Junghanss, Thomas; Bodio, Mauro

    2006-11-15

    Venomous animals are a significant health problem for rural populations in many parts of the world. Given the current level of the international mobility of individuals and the inquisitiveness of travelers, clinicians and travel clinics need to be able to give advice on the prevention, first aid, and clinical management of envenoming. Health professionals often feel overwhelmed by the taxonomy of venomous animals; however, venomous animals can be grouped, using a simple set of criteria, into cnidarians, venomous fish, sea snakes, scorpions, spiders, hymenoterans, and venomous terrestrial snakes. Geographic distribution, habitats, and circumstances of accidents further reduce the range of culprits that need to be considered in any single event. Clinical management of envenomed patients relies on supportive therapy and, if available, specific antivenoms. Supplies of life-saving antivenoms are scarce, and this scarcity particularly affects rural populations in resource-poor settings. Travel clinics and hospitals in highly industrialized areas predominantly see patients with injuries caused by accidents involving marine animals: in particular, stings by venomous fish and skin damage caused by jellyfish. However, globally, terrestrial venomous snakes are the most important group of venomous animals. PMID:17051499

  7. Cognitive Aids for Role Definition (CARD) to improve interprofessional team crisis resource management: An exploratory study.

    PubMed

    Renna, Tania Di; Crooks, Simone; Pigford, Ashlee-Ann; Clarkin, Chantalle; Fraser, Amy B; Bunting, Alexandra C; Bould, M Dylan; Boet, Sylvain

    2016-09-01

    This study aimed to assess the perceived value of the Cognitive Aids for Role Definition (CARD) protocol for simulated intraoperative cardiac arrests. Sixteen interprofessional operating room teams completed three consecutive simulated intraoperative cardiac arrest scenarios: current standard, no CARD; CARD, no CARD teaching; and CARD, didactic teaching. Each team participated in a focus group interview immediately following the third scenario; data were transcribed verbatim and qualitatively analysed. After 6 months, participants formed eight new teams randomised to two groups (CARD or no CARD) and completed a retention intraoperative cardiac arrest simulation scenario. All simulation sessions were video recorded and expert raters assessed team performance. Qualitative analysis of the 16 focus group interviews revealed 3 thematic dimensions: role definition in crisis management; logistical issues; and the "real life" applicability of CARD. Members of the interprofessional team perceived CARD very positively. Exploratory quantitative analysis found no significant differences in team performance with or without CARD (p > 0.05). In conclusion, qualitative data suggest that the CARD protocol clarifies roles and team coordination during interprofessional crisis management and has the potential to improve the team performance. The concept of a self-organising team with defined roles is promising for patient safety. PMID:27294389

  8. Knowledge, attitude and practices of students about first aid epilepsy seizures management in a Northern Indian City

    PubMed Central

    Goel, Sonu; Singh, Navpreet; Lal, Vivek; Singh, Amarjeet

    2013-01-01

    Background: Knowledge about epilepsy and its management is not satisfactory among school students in developing countries. The present study was planned to ascertain the knowledge, attitude and practices (KAP) of students regarding first-aid management of epilepsy seizures in school setting. Materials and Methods: A total of 177 students of government schools of Chandigarh, a city of northern India, were taken. They were administered with a pre-tested semi-structured questionnaire (for knowledge and attitude assessment) and an observational checklist after role play (for practice assessment) on first-aid management of epilepsy. A scoring system was devised to quantify the knowledge and practices of students. Results: Seventy-one percent of them had either heard or read about epilepsy. Half of the students believed epilepsy as a hindrance to education. Ayurvedic treatment was preferred by more than half of the students; however, many believed that visit to religious places and exorcism as ways to cure epilepsy. Nearly 74% of students would call a doctor as first-aid measure for seizure in a person with epilepsy. Conclusion: We concluded that the knowledge about various aspects of epilepsy was average among school students in Chandigarh. However, there was no significant difference in knowledge, attitude and practice between students who lived in urban, urban slum and rural areas. It is recommended that first-aid management of seizures in epilepsy should be a part of school curriculum. PMID:24339575

  9. Are Health Facility Management Committees in Kenya ready to implement financial management tasks: findings from a nationally representative survey

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Community participation in peripheral public health facilities has in many countries focused on including community representatives in Health Facility Management Committees (HFMCs). In Kenya, HFMC roles are being expanded with the phased implementation of the Health Sector Services Fund (HSSF). Under HSSF, HFMCs manage facility funds which are dispersed directly from central level into facility bank accounts. We assessed how prepared HFMCs were to undertake this new role in advance of HSSF roll out, and considered the implications for Kenya and other similar settings. Methods Data were collected through a nationally representative sample of 248 public health centres and dispensaries in 24 districts in 2010. Data collection included surveys with in-charges (n = 248), HFMC members (n = 464) and facility users (n = 698), and record reviews. These data were supplemented by semi-structured interviews with district health managers in each district. Results Some findings supported preparedness of HFMCs to take on their new roles. Most facilities had bank accounts and HFMCs which met regularly. HFMC members and in-charges generally reported positive relationships, and HFMC members expressed high levels of motivation and job satisfaction. Challenges included users’ low awareness of HFMCs, lack of training and clarity in roles among HFMCs, and some indications of strained relations with in-charges. Such challenges are likely to be common to many similar settings, and are therefore important considerations for any health facility based initiatives involving HFMCs. Conclusion Most HFMCs have the basic requirements to operate. However to manage their own budgets effectively and meet their allocated roles in HSSF implementation, greater emphasis is needed on financial management training, targeted supportive supervision, and greater community awareness and participation. Once new budget management roles are fully established, qualitative and quantitative

  10. KSC facilities status and planned management operations. [for Shuttle launches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, R. H.; Omalley, T. J.

    1979-01-01

    A status report is presented on facilities and planned operations at the Kennedy Space Center with reference to Space Shuttle launch activities. The facilities are essentially complete, with all new construction and modifications to existing buildings almost finished. Some activity is still in progress at Pad A and on the Mobile Launcher due to changes in requirements but is not expected to affect the launch schedule. The installation and testing of the ground checkout equipment that will be used to test the flight hardware is now in operation. The Launch Processing System is currently supporting the development of the applications software that will perform the testing of this flight hardware.

  11. 7 CFR 205.271 - Facility pest management practice standard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...) Management of environmental factors, such as temperature, light, humidity, atmosphere, and air circulation... controls including but not limited to traps, light, or sound; or (2) Lures and repellents...

  12. Risk management study for the Hanford Site facilities: Risk reduction cost comparison for the retired Hanford Site facilities. Volume 4

    SciTech Connect

    Coles, G.A.; Egge, R.G.; Senger, E.; Shultz, M.W.; Taylor, W.E.

    1994-02-01

    This document provides a cost-comparison evaluation for implementing certain risk-reduction measures and their effect on the overall risk of the 100 and 200 Area retired, surplus facilities. The evaluation is based on conditions that existed at the time the risk evaluation team performed facility investigations, and does not acknowledge risk-reduction measures that occurred soon after risk identification. This evaluation is one part of an overall risk management study for these facilities. The retired facilities investigated for this evaluation are located in the 100 and 200 Areas of the 1450-km{sup 2} Hanford Site. The Hanford Site is a semiarid tract of land in southeastern Washington State. The nearest population center is Richland, Washington, (population 32,000) 30 km southeast of the 200 Area. This cost-comparison evaluation (1) determines relative costs for reducing risk to acceptable levels; (2) compares the cost of reducing risk using different risk-reduction options; and (3) compares the cost of reducing risks at different facilities. The result is an identification of the cost effective risk-reduction measures. Supporting information required to develop costs of the various risk-reduction options also is included.

  13. Centralization and Decentralization of Schools' Physical Facilities Management in Nigeria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ikoya, Peter O.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: This research aims to examine the difference in the availability, adequacy and functionality of physical facilities in centralized and decentralized schools districts, with a view to making appropriate recommendations to stakeholders on the reform programmes in the Nigerian education sector. Design/methodology/approach: Principals,…

  14. A Facilities Manager's Guide to Green Building Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, Walter

    2001-01-01

    Explains how the "green building" approach to educational facilities design creates healthy, naturally lit, attractive buildings with lower operating and life cycle costs. Tips on getting started on a green design and overcoming the barriers to the green design concept are discussed. (GR)

  15. Psychometric Properties of a Symptom Management Self-Efficacy Scale for Women Living with HIV/AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Webel, Allison R.; Okonsky, Jennifer

    2010-01-01

    Context Many people with HIV/AIDS find it difficult to manage the symptoms of the disease, but by adopting effective symptom management behavior, they increase the potential of alleviating the burden of those symptoms. Self-efficacy is a recognized mediator of successful behavior change and is utilized by many researchers and clinicians when developing symptom management interventions. Despite this, an instrument measuring the self-efficacy of symptom management behavior specifically for people living with HIV/AIDS has not yet been made available. Objective To introduce and test the psychometric properties of the HIV Symptom Management Self-Efficacy for Women Scale (HSM-SEWS) for women with HIV/AIDS. This scale, a new 9-item measurement instrument, was modified from the Chronic Disease Self-Efficacy Scale. Methods In this study, psychometric testing focused on the reliability and validity of the HSM-SEWS instrument. Reliability was assessed using Cronbach’s alpha. Exploratory factor analysis with oblique promax rotation was used to examine validity and test hypothetical associations. Results Eighty-nine HIV-positive women were recruited and asked to complete the scale every four weeks for a total of 16 weeks. Factor analysis supported a one-factor solution explaining 93% of the variance among items. Internal consistency of the nine items was found to range from 0.83–0.93, with an overall Cronbach’s alpha of 0.92. Conclusions Psychometric analyses suggest that the HIV Symptom Management Self-Efficacy for Women Scale is a reliable and valid instrument that measures the self-efficacy of symptom management behavior in women with HIV/AIDS and can be used during interventions and in research targeting this area of health care research. PMID:21145198

  16. The use of a spatial information system in the management of HIV/AIDS in South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Busgeeth, Karishma; Rivett, Ulrike

    2004-01-01

    Background South Africa is experiencing an HIV/AIDS pandemic of shattering dimensions. The availability and provision of antiretroviral (ARV) drugs could bring relief to the situation, but the treatment is unfortunately complex with each patient being assigned a different antiretroviral therapy varying in diet-medication regiment. The context of South Africa, its variety of urban and rural settings adds to the challenge of administering and monitoring the HIV+ person throughout the treatment, which will last for the rest of their lives. The lack of physical infrastructure, reliable statistics and adequate resources hinder the efficient management of HIV/AIDS. Results The collection of reliable data will be a first step to assess the status of HIV/AIDS in communities. A number of hospitals have started this process using the conventional approach to collect information about their patients using a paper-based system. Since time is of essence in the fight against the pandemic, data exchange between various hospitals, municipalities and decision-making bodies is becoming more and more important. The logical response to such a need is a computerised system, which will collect and administer HIV/AIDS related information within the local context and allow a monitored access to the data from a number of stakeholders. Conclusions The purpose of this study was to design and develop an HIV/AIDS database, which is embedded in a Spatial Information Management System. The pilot study area is the Gugulethu township in Cape Town where more than 27% of the 325 000 residents are HIV+. It is shown that the implementation of the HIV/AIDS database and the Spatial Information Management System can play a critical role in determining where and when to intervene, improving the quality of care for HIV+ patients, increasing accessibility of service and delivering a cost-effective mode of information. PMID:15239839

  17. Construction Management. Educational Facilities Review Series Number 20.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baas, Alan M.

    Replacing the general contractor with a "construction manager" directly accountable to the owner promises greatly improved control over cost and scheduling economies. The construction manager should have special skills in construction, cost analysis, critical path method scheduling, and be familiar with the qualifications of local subcontractors.…

  18. Facilities Management of Existing School Buildings: Two Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Building Technology, Inc., Silver Spring, MD.

    While all school districts are responsible for the management of their existing buildings, they often approach the task in different ways. This document presents two models that offer ways a school district administration, regardless of size, may introduce activities into its ongoing management process that will lead to improvements in earthquake…

  19. A Management Information System for Facilities. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griggs, Robert J.; And Others

    Goodwill Industries of America, Inc. developed a management information system designed to provide rehabilitation workshop managers with information needed to make sound administrative decisions, statistics to measure the outcome of these decisions in terms of service to the handicapped, and the financial resources needed to deliver the services.…

  20. Facility Design and Health Management Program at the Sinnhuber Aquatic Research Laboratory.

    PubMed

    Barton, Carrie L; Johnson, Eric W; Tanguay, Robert L

    2016-07-01

    The number of researchers and institutions moving to the utilization of zebrafish for biomedical research continues to increase because of the recognized advantages of this model. Numerous factors should be considered before building a new or retooling an existing facility. Design decisions will directly impact the management and maintenance costs. We and others have advocated for more rigorous approaches to zebrafish health management to support and protect an increasingly diverse portfolio of important research. The Sinnhuber Aquatic Research Laboratory (SARL) is located ∼3 miles from the main Oregon State University campus in Corvallis, Oregon. This facility supports several research programs that depend heavily on the use of adult, larval, and embryonic zebrafish. The new zebrafish facility of the SARL began operation in 2007 with a commitment to build and manage an efficient facility that diligently protects human and fish health. An important goal was to ensure that the facility was free of Pseudoloma neurophilia (Microsporidia), which is very common in zebrafish research facilities. We recognize that there are certain limitations in space, resources, and financial support that are institution dependent, but in this article, we describe the steps taken to build and manage an efficient specific pathogen-free facility. PMID:26981844

  1. How can models better aid the decision processes for the management of water resources?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brugnach, M.; Pahl-Wostl, C.

    2007-12-01

    Despite the long history of development and use of models in policy making, there is still a poor integration between modeling and the decision process. This is influenced by several factors, such as a lack of understanding of models from policy makers, limitations in the applicability and use of models, modeller's behaviour, and a lack of stakeholder involvement in the whole modelling process. But, most relevant of all, is the fact that models are perceived as non reliable tools for policy making, due to the uncertainty associated with them and the lack of confidence this uncertainty generates. Commonly, in fields like natural resource management, and in particular water management, models are build to predict, in space or time, the state of the system to be managed (e.g. real time flood forecasting). These models are then used by policy makers as a surrogate of a real system to inform their decisions. In this view, the efficacy of a model depends on how well it can approximate reality and how much confidence policy makers can have on model's results. However, even though predictive models can be used to convey scientific argumentation that can aid decision making, these models fall short in supporting the processes of negotiation, learning, and communication, which constitute the basis for policy making. In this presentation we explore and discuss the relationship between models used in water resource management and policy making: how models can be used and how uncertainty should be treated depending on the purpose models are supposed to serve. We identify four major modeling purposes that are important for understanding and managing complex environmental systems: prediction, exploratory analysis, communication and learning, and investigate the implications of the different purposes in dealing with uncertainty. In predictive models, the presence of uncertainty is understood as a critical constraint for decision making, and as such it ought to be eliminated or

  2. The Proposal of Key Performance Indicators in Facility Management and Determination the Weights of Significance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rimbalová, Jarmila; Vilčeková, Silvia

    2013-11-01

    The practice of facilities management is rapidly evolving with the increasing interest in the discourse of sustainable development. The industry and its market are forecasted to develop to include non-core functions, activities traditionally not associated with this profession, but which are increasingly being addressed by facilities managers. The scale of growth in the built environment and the consequential growth of the facility management sector is anticipated to be enormous. Key Performance Indicators (KPI) are measure that provides essential information about performance of facility services delivery. In selecting KPI, it is critical to limit them to those factors that are essential to the organization reaching its goals. It is also important to keep the number of KPI small just to keep everyone's attention focused on achieving the same KPIs. This paper deals with the determination of weights of KPI of FM in terms of the design and use of sustainable buildings.

  3. Advanced Test Reactor Complex Facilities Radioactive Waste Management Basis and DOE Manual 435.1-1 Compliance Tables

    SciTech Connect

    Lisa Harvego; Brion Bennett

    2011-11-01

    U.S. Department of Energy Order 435.1, 'Radioactive Waste Management,' along with its associated manual and guidance, requires development and maintenance of a radioactive waste management basis for each radioactive waste management facility, operation, and activity. This document presents a radioactive waste management basis for Idaho National Laboratory's Advanced Test Reactor Complex facilities that manage radioactive waste. The radioactive waste management basis for a facility comprises existing laboratory-wide and facility-specific documents. U.S. Department of Energy Manual 435.1-1, 'Radioactive Waste Management Manual,' facility compliance tables also are presented for the facilities. The tables serve as a tool to develop the radioactive waste management basis.

  4. Pinellas Plant contingency plan for the hazardous waste management facility

    SciTech Connect

    1988-04-01

    Subpart D of Part 264 (264.50 through .56) of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) regulations require that each facility maintain a contingency plan detailing procedures to {open_quotes}minimize hazards to human health or the environment from fires, explosions, or any unplanned sudden or non-sudden release of hazardous waste or hazardous waste constituents to air, soil, or surface water.{close_quotes}

  5. The Mixed Waste Management Facility. Monthly report, February 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Streit, R.D.

    1996-03-01

    During February the Project activities included completion of the cost-benefit analysis for the MWMF Project, completion of the 95% Title 2 design review for the DWTF Phase 2, further development of an MWMF business plan for working with industry, and finalization of outstanding issues from the Preliminary Design Review. Based on the best available data, the results of the cost-benefit analysis lead to three simple conclusions: (1) it would be cost effective for the DOE to complete pilot-scale demonstrations of alternatives to incineration prior to design and construction of full-scale facilities; (2) given that demonstrations are to be conducted, it is more cost effective to consolidate these in the MWMF, cost-benefit from a centralized demonstration facility will more than pay for the cost of the facility over the first eight demonstrations; (3) as the cost for independent site demonstrations or the cost for deploying full-scale treatment facilities is reduced, the net benefit of demonstrations is reduced. However, under these circumstances, the risk of deploying technologies increases and the ability to promote competition among small companies, unable to compete with independent pilot-scale demonstrations, will be significantly reduced. The 95% design review of the MWMF building, DWTF Phase 2, was completed with a number of minor comments to be incorporated in the final design. Technically, the first phase of testing for the MSO (Molten Salt Oxidation) demonstrations in the engineering development unit (EDU) have been completed. A number of key engineering issues were identified and resolved including the parameters associated with the chloride content for salt recycle, baffle design, side injector, burst disk design, and material evaluations. The EDU unit will be refurbished in March for continued operations to finalize design details for the downcomer injector for solid and liquid feeds, alternate baffle design, and other engineering design issues.

  6. Resource management in community residential facilities for adults with learning disabilities.

    PubMed

    Shiell, A; Wright, K; Pettipher, C; Raynes, N

    1992-11-01

    The trend towards community living for people with learning disabilities puts pressure on traditional hierarchical lines of resource management. A sample of 150 community residential facilities is surveyed in order to describe the systems used to manage resources in the community and to assess the impact they have on the quality of service provided. There are marked differences amongst provider agencies in the degree to which responsibility for resource management is devolved to facility managers and this has a direct effect on the quality of care. Residential homes which operate under centralised management systems are more institutional in their care practices and less responsive to individual clients' needs. In contrast, homes in which responsibility is delegated to the facility manager provide a service more in keeping with current philosophies of care. The results of this survey suggest that more responsibility for resource management can be delegated to facility managers without losing control of expenditure and with improvements in the efficiency and effectiveness of care. PMID:10122814

  7. Bureau of Indian Affairs Schools: New Facilities Management Information System Promising, but Improved Data Accuracy Needed.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    General Accounting Office, Washington, DC.

    A General Accounting Office (GAO) study evaluated the Bureau of Indian Affairs' (BIA) new facilities management information system (FMIS). Specifically, the study examined whether the new FMIS addresses the old system's weaknesses and meets BIA's management needs, whether BIA has finished validating the accuracy of data transferred from the old…

  8. Managing Complex Environmental Remediation amidst Aggressive Facility Revitalization Milestones

    SciTech Connect

    Richter Pack, S.

    2008-07-01

    Unlike the final closure projects at Rocky Flats and Fernald, many of the Department of Energy's future CERCLA and RCRA closure challenges will take place at active facilities, such as the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) central campus. ORNL has aggressive growth plans for a Research Technology Park and cleanup must address and integrate D and D, soil and groundwater remediation, and on-going and future business plans for the Park. Different planning and tracking tools are needed to support closures at active facilities. To support some large Airport redevelopment efforts, we created tools that allowed the Airline lease-holder to perform environmental remediation on the same schedule as building D and D and new building construction, which in turn allowed them to migrate real estate from unusable to usable within an aggressive schedule. In summary: The FIM and OpenGate{sup TM} spatial analysis system were two primary tools developed to support simultaneous environmental remediation, D and D, and construction efforts at an operating facility. These tools helped redevelopers to deal with environmental remediation on the same schedule as building D and D and construction, thereby meeting their goals of opening gates, restarting their revenue streams, at the same time complying with all environmental regulations. (authors)

  9. Mergers of healthcare facilities: impact upon materiel management.

    PubMed

    Carroll, P E

    1993-04-01

    Hospital mergers afford healthcare providers the chance to take advantage of economies of scale, integrate clinical, administrative and support functions, eliminate functional redundancies and redesign patient care delivery. This article explains how such advantages were realized, demonstrated through a hypothetical case based on information obtained from actual mergers. A corporate materiel management division was established, and centralized warehousing, product evaluation and purchasing instituted. Some management positions were eliminated or restructured and patient care services were closed, relocated, or opened among the various entities in the merger. Through these and other changes, the new healthcare system was about to realize about $1.7 million in one-time savings and expects savings in the seven digits over at least the next three years. The article concludes that as hospital mergers continue to increase, the position of corporate director of materiel management will evolve as the next logical career step for materiel management professionals. PMID:10124963

  10. Environmental Management Waste Management Facility (EMWMF) Site-Specific Health and Safety Plan, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Flynn, N.C. Bechtel Jacobs

    2008-04-21

    The Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC (BJC) policy is to provide a safe and healthy workplace for all employees and subcontractors. The implementation of this policy requires that operations of the Environmental Management Waste Management Facility (EMWMF), located one-half mile west of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex, be guided by an overall plan and consistent proactive approach to environment, safety and health (ES&H) issues. The BJC governing document for worker safety and health, BJC/OR-1745, 'Worker Safety and Health Program', describes the key elements of the BJC Safety and Industrial Hygiene (IH) programs, which includes the requirement for development and implementation of a site-specific Health and Safety Plan (HASP) where required by regulation (refer also to BJC-EH-1012, 'Development and Approval of Safety and Health Plans'). BJC/OR-1745, 'Worker Safety and Health Program', implements the requirements for worker protection contained in Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 851. The EMWMF site-specific HASP requirements identifies safe operating procedures, work controls, personal protective equipment, roles and responsibilities, potential site hazards and control measures, site access requirements, frequency and types of monitoring, site work areas, decontamination procedures, and outlines emergency response actions. This HASP will be available on site for use by all workers, management and supervisors, oversight personnel and visitors. All EMWMF assigned personnel will be briefed on the contents of this HASP and will be required to follow the procedures and protocols as specified. The policies and procedures referenced in this HASP apply to all EMWMF operations activities. In addition the HASP establishes ES&H criteria for the day-to-day activities to prevent or minimize any adverse effect on the environment and personnel safety and health and to meet standards that define acceptable waste management practices. The

  11. Waste Management Facilities cost information for low-level waste

    SciTech Connect

    Shropshire, D.; Sherick, M.; Biadgi, C.

    1995-06-01

    This report contains preconceptual designs and planning level life-cycle cost estimates for managing low-level waste. The report`s information on treatment, storage, and disposal modules can be integrated to develop total life-cycle costs for various waste management options. A procedure to guide the US Department of Energy and its contractor personnel in the use of cost estimation data is also summarized in this report.

  12. Waste management facilities cost information for hazardous waste. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Shropshire, D.; Sherick, M.; Biagi, C.

    1995-06-01

    This report contains preconceptual designs and planning level life-cycle cost estimates for managing hazardous waste. The report`s information on treatment, storage, and disposal modules can be integrated to develop total life-cycle costs for various waste management options. A procedure to guide the US Department of Energy and its contractor personnel in the use of cost estimation data is also summarized in this report.

  13. Waste management facilities cost information for transuranic waste

    SciTech Connect

    Shropshire, D.; Sherick, M.; Biagi, C.

    1995-06-01

    This report contains preconceptual designs and planning level life-cycle cost estimates for managing transuranic waste. The report`s information on treatment and storage modules can be integrated to develop total life-cycle costs for various waste management options. A procedure to guide the U.S. Department of Energy and its contractor personnel in the use of cost estimation data is also summarized in this report.

  14. Native American Technical Assistance and Training for Renewable Energy Resource Development and Electrical Generation Facilities Management

    SciTech Connect

    A. David Lester

    2008-10-17

    The Council of Energy Resource Tribes (CERT) will facilitate technical expertise and training of Native Americans in renewable energy resource development for electrical generation facilities, and distributed generation options contributing to feasibility studies, strategic planning and visioning. CERT will also provide information to Tribes on energy efficiency and energy management techniques.This project will provide facilitation and coordination of expertise from government agencies and private industries to interact with Native Americans in ways that will result in renewable energy resource development, energy efficiency program development, and electrical generation facilities management by Tribal entities. The intent of this cooperative agreement is to help build capacity within the Tribes to manage these important resources.

  15. [EMOTIONAL MANAGEMENT AND CRITICAL THINKING IN THE AID RELATIONSHIP OF THE HOLISTIC CARE OF PALLIATIVE PATIENTS].

    PubMed

    De Blas Gómez, Irene; Rodríguez García, Marta

    2015-05-01

    To care for palliative patients is essential that healthcare professionals develop emotional competencies. This means acquiring the habit of self reflection and be emphatic with other people, in order to be able to identify the personal emotions of patients, family and team. Reflection involves a continuing effort to reason about aspects of professional practice, especially on issues as complex as suffering and death. Both reflective reasoning and emotional management are vital in an Aid Relationship. For nursing healthcare professionals, to care the emotional aspects means becoming aware of their own and others feelings, and get to understand and accept to handle them properly. Nursing actions involves many qualities of social competence, such as empathy, understanding, communication skills, honesty, flexibility and adaptability to the individual needs of people cared. In the context of palliative care patients and their families all these aspects are fundamental and are part of the same philosophy. Emotional education still remains a challenge in our profession both in the initial and continuing training. PMID:26540895

  16. Management of Indigenous Plant-Microbe Symbioses Aids Restoration of Desertified Ecosystems

    PubMed Central

    Requena, Natalia; Perez-Solis, Estefania; Azcón-Aguilar, Concepción; Jeffries, Peter; Barea, José-Miguel

    2001-01-01

    Disturbance of natural plant communities is the first visible indication of a desertification process, but damage to physical, chemical, and biological soil properties is known to occur simultaneously. Such soil degradation limits reestablishment of the natural plant cover. In particular, desertification causes disturbance of plant-microbe symbioses which are a critical ecological factor in helping further plant growth in degraded ecosystems. Here we demonstrate, in two long-term experiments in a desertified Mediterranean ecosystem, that inoculation with indigenous arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and with rhizobial nitrogen-fixing bacteria not only enhanced the establishment of key plant species but also increased soil fertility and quality. The dual symbiosis increased the soil nitrogen (N) content, organic matter, and hydrostable soil aggregates and enhanced N transfer from N-fixing to nonfixing species associated within the natural succession. We conclude that the introduction of target indigenous species of plants associated with a managed community of microbial symbionts is a successful biotechnological tool to aid the recovery of desertified ecosystems. PMID:11157208

  17. Challenges Associated With Managing Suicide Risk in Long-Term Care Facilities

    PubMed Central

    O'Riley, Alisa; Nadorff, Michael R.; Conwell, Yeates; Edelstein, Barry

    2016-01-01

    Little information about suicidal ideation and behavior in long-term care (LTC) facilities is available. Nonetheless, the implementation of the Minimum Data Set 3.0 requires that LTC facilities screen their residents for suicide risk and have protocols in place to effectively manage residents’ responses. In this article, the authors briefly discuss the risk factors of suicide in the elderly and the problems that suicidal ideation and behavior pose in the LTC environment. The authors explain issues that arise when trying to manage suicide risk in the elderly LTC population with general, traditional approaches. These inherent issues make it difficult to develop an effective protocol for managing suicide risk in LTC facilities, leading the authors to propose their own framework for assessing and managing suicide risk in the LTC setting.

  18. Improving heart failure disease management in skilled nursing facilities: lessons learned.

    PubMed

    Dolansky, Mary A; Hitch, Jeanne A; Piña, Ileana L; Boxer, Rebecca S

    2013-11-01

    The purpose of the study was to design and evaluate an improvement project that implemented HF management in four skilled nursing facilities (SNFs). Kotter's Change Management principles were used to guide the implementation. In addition, half of the facilities had an implementation coach who met with facility staff weekly for 4 months and monthly for 5 months. Weekly and monthly audits were performed that documented compliance with eight key aspects of the protocol. Contextual factors were captured using field notes. Adherence to the HF management protocols was variable ranging from 17% to 82%. Facilitators of implementation included staff who championed the project, an implementation coach, and physician involvement. Barriers were high staff turnover and a hierarchal culture. Opportunities exist to integrate HF management protocols to improve SNF care. PMID:23606187

  19. Screensaver: an open source lab information management system (LIMS) for high throughput screening facilities

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Shared-usage high throughput screening (HTS) facilities are becoming more common in academe as large-scale small molecule and genome-scale RNAi screening strategies are adopted for basic research purposes. These shared facilities require a unique informatics infrastructure that must not only provide access to and analysis of screening data, but must also manage the administrative and technical challenges associated with conducting numerous, interleaved screening efforts run by multiple independent research groups. Results We have developed Screensaver, a free, open source, web-based lab information management system (LIMS), to address the informatics needs of our small molecule and RNAi screening facility. Screensaver supports the storage and comparison of screening data sets, as well as the management of information about screens, screeners, libraries, and laboratory work requests. To our knowledge, Screensaver is one of the first applications to support the storage and analysis of data from both genome-scale RNAi screening projects and small molecule screening projects. Conclusions The informatics and administrative needs of an HTS facility may be best managed by a single, integrated, web-accessible application such as Screensaver. Screensaver has proven useful in meeting the requirements of the ICCB-Longwood/NSRB Screening Facility at Harvard Medical School, and has provided similar benefits to other HTS facilities. PMID:20482787

  20. Technology requirements to be addressed by the NASA Lewis Research Center Cryogenic Fluid Management Facility program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aydelott, J. C.; Rudland, R. S.

    1985-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center is responsible for the planning and execution of a scientific program which will provide advance in space cryogenic fluid management technology. A number of future space missions were identified that require or could benefit from this technology. These fluid management technology needs were prioritized and a shuttle attached reuseable test bed, the cryogenic fluid management facility (CFMF), is being designed to provide the experimental data necessary for the technology development effort.

  1. Project Management Actions Demolition of a Research Facility Building 431

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, W L

    2005-09-06

    The Demolition of B431 is required to achieve the mission of LLNL and the NNSA FIRP objectives by: (1) Supporting the NNSA Infrastructure Plan goal to ''demolish excess facilities as early as possible''; (2) Banking square footage that allows continued application of advanced science and nuclear technology to the Nation's defense; and (3) Helping maintain and enhance the safety, security, and reliability of the weapons stockpile. A significant effort has been put into the demolition concept in order to ensure that it is well thought out and represents best-value to the government for the money.

  2. Removal of criticality accident alarm systems at the Y-12 Plant waste management facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Marble, R.C.; Taylor, R.G.

    1998-09-01

    This paper discusses why criticality accident alarm systems (CAASs) were installed in certain waste management buildings at the Y-12 Plant, why the plant now wants to remove them, and what steps were taken to allow the US Department of Energy (DOE) to authorize the removal of the systems. To begin with, the systems in question were installed in the mid- to late-1980s. Some of the facilities were new, and there was no operating experience with the processes. A CAAS, although expensive, is an absolute necessity where criticality accidents are credible. But, they are a superfluous and unnecessary expense in those facilities where it has been determined that a criticality accident is incredible (defined as having a probability of <1 {times} 10{sup {minus}6}/yr). The PRAs have been performed to evaluate six Y-12 Plant waste management facilities, five storage facilities, and a nondestructive analysis facility, with an additional study now being performed on the West End Treatment Facility. The results to date have shown that the probability of various criticality accident scenarios at these facilities is <1 {times} 10{sup {minus}6}/yr and that the CAASs are not needed in these facilities.

  3. Vulnerability and risk perception in the management of HIV/AIDS: Public priorities in a global pandemic

    PubMed Central

    Tsasis, Peter; Nirupama, N.

    2008-01-01

    Understanding the way perception of risk is shaped and constructed is crucial in understanding why it has been so difficult to mitigate the spread of HIV/AIDS. This paper uses the Pressure and Release (PAR) model, used to predict the onset of natural disasters as the conceptual framework. It substitutes vulnerability and risk perception as the trigger factors in the model, in making the case that HIV/AIDS can be characterized as a slow onset disaster. The implications are that vulnerability must be managed and reduced by addressing root causes, dynamic pressures, and unsafe conditions that contribute to the HIV/AIDS pandemic. HIV/AIDS programs must be culturally appropriate and work toward influencing risk perception, while addressing social norms and values that negatively impact vulnerable populations. By impacting cultural and social expectations, individuals will be able to more readily adopt safer sex behaviors. The development of policies and programs addressing the issues in context, as opposed to individual behaviors alone, allows for effective public health intervention. This may have implications for public health measures implemented for combating the spread of HIV/AIDS. PMID:22312198

  4. Risk Management Technique for design and operation of facilities and equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fedor, O. H.; Parsons, W. N.; Coutinho, J. De S.

    1975-01-01

    The Risk Management System collects information from engineering, operating, and management personnel to identify potentially hazardous conditions. This information is used in risk analysis, problem resolution, and contingency planning. The resulting hazard accountability system enables management to monitor all identified hazards. Data from this system are examined in project reviews so that management can decide to eliminate or accept these risks. This technique is particularly effective in improving the management of risks in large, complex, high-energy facilities. These improvements are needed for increased cooperation among industry, regulatory agencies, and the public.

  5. An Author Management System and Other Computer-Based Aids to ISD.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Neal, A. F.

    A brief review of some of the more important needs imposed by current and projected Department of Defense training problems is followed by descriptions of such automated aids as the LAMPS MARK III Weapons System and the Air Force's F-16 Instructional System Development (ISD) effort. These aids have been designed and developed in response to the…

  6. AIDS and Child Care: A Booklet for Child Care Workers, Management Committees and Parents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fricke, Caroline; Glasson, Mark

    This booklet provides Australians with basic information about the Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). Contents cover the definiton of AIDS, ways the disease is transmitted, Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) antibody testing for adults and children, variations among children infected with HIV, information that HIV is not transmitted…

  7. Experiences managing radioactive material at the National Ignition Facility.

    PubMed

    Thacker, Rick L

    2013-06-01

    The National Ignition Facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is the world's largest and most energetic laser system for inertial confinement fusion and experiments studying high energy density science. Many experiments performed at the National Ignition Facility involve radioactive materials; these may take the form of tritium and small quantities of depleted uranium used in targets, activation products created by neutron-producing fusion experiments, and fission products produced by the fast fissioning of the depleted uranium. While planning for the introduction of radioactive material, it was recognized that some of the standard institutional processes would need to be customized to accommodate aspects of NIF operations, such as surface contamination limits, radiological postings, airborne tritium monitoring protocols, and personnel protective equipment. These customizations were overlaid onto existing work practices to accommodate the new hazard of radioactive materials. This paper will discuss preparations that were made prior to the introduction of radioactive material, the types of radiological work activities performed, and the hazards and controls encountered. Updates to processes based on actual monitoring results are also discussed. PMID:23629067

  8. Simulation Modeling of a Facility Layout in Operations Management Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yazici, Hulya Julie

    2006-01-01

    Teaching quantitative courses can be challenging. Similarly, layout modeling and lean production concepts can be difficult to grasp in an introductory OM (operations management) class. This article describes a simulation model developed in PROMODEL to facilitate the learning of layout modeling and lean manufacturing. Simulation allows for the…

  9. Improving Security in Schools. Managing School Facilities, Guide 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department for Education and Employment, London (England).

    This booklet offers guidance on how to improve school security, including advice on the management of security and the roles of local education authorities, school governors, and headteachers. The guide describes how schools can carry out their own security surveys, assess themselves in terms of risk, and then consider security measures…

  10. Recommendations for Emergency Management Planning for School Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Education Agency, Austin.

    Numerous events, such as hurricanes, floods, and tornadoes, constitute a natural disaster for public schools. Human-caused disasters include hazardous-material emergencies, civil riots, fires, and nuclear accidents. This document contains emergency-management planning guidelines, developed by the Texas Education Agency, to help local school…

  11. PIMS sequencing extension: a laboratory information management system for DNA sequencing facilities

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Facilities that provide a service for DNA sequencing typically support large numbers of users and experiment types. The cost of services is often reduced by the use of liquid handling robots but the efficiency of such facilities is hampered because the software for such robots does not usually integrate well with the systems that run the sequencing machines. Accordingly, there is a need for software systems capable of integrating different robotic systems and managing sample information for DNA sequencing services. In this paper, we describe an extension to the Protein Information Management System (PIMS) that is designed for DNA sequencing facilities. The new version of PIMS has a user-friendly web interface and integrates all aspects of the sequencing process, including sample submission, handling and tracking, together with capture and management of the data. Results The PIMS sequencing extension has been in production since July 2009 at the University of Leeds DNA Sequencing Facility. It has completely replaced manual data handling and simplified the tasks of data management and user communication. Samples from 45 groups have been processed with an average throughput of 10000 samples per month. The current version of the PIMS sequencing extension works with Applied Biosystems 3130XL 96-well plate sequencer and MWG 4204 or Aviso Theonyx liquid handling robots, but is readily adaptable for use with other combinations of robots. Conclusions PIMS has been extended to provide a user-friendly and integrated data management solution for DNA sequencing facilities that is accessed through a normal web browser and allows simultaneous access by multiple users as well as facility managers. The system integrates sequencing and liquid handling robots, manages the data flow, and provides remote access to the sequencing results. The software is freely available, for academic users, from http://www.pims-lims.org/. PMID:21385349

  12. Development of an Integrated Leachate Treatment Solution for the Port Granby Waste Management Facility - 12429

    SciTech Connect

    Conroy, Kevin W.; Vandergaast, Gerald

    2012-07-01

    The Port Granby Project (the Project) is located near the north shore of Lake Ontario in the Municipality of Clarington, Ontario, Canada. The Project consists of relocating approximately 450,000 m{sup 3} of historic Low-Level Radioactive Waste (LLRW) and contaminated soil from the existing Port Granby Waste Management Facility (WMF) to a proposed Long-Term Waste Management Facility (LTWMF) located adjacent to the WMF. The LTWMF will include an engineered waste containment facility, a Wastewater Treatment Plant (WTP), and other ancillary facilities. A series of bench- and pilot-scale test programs have been conducted to identify preferred treatment processes to be incorporated into the WTP to treat wastewater generated during the construction, closure and post-closure periods at the WMF/LTWMF. (authors)

  13. Laser programs facility management plan for environment, safety, and health

    SciTech Connect

    Cruz, G.E.

    1996-01-01

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory`s (LLNL) Laser Programs ES&H policy is established by the Associate Director for Laser Programs. This FMP is one component of that policy. Laser Programs personnel design, construct and operate research and development equipment located in various Livermore and Site 300 buildings. The Programs include a variety of activities, primarily laser research and development, inertial confinement fusion, isotope separation, and an increasing emphasis on materials processing, imaging systems, and signal analysis. This FMP is a formal statement of responsibilities and controls to assure operational activities are conducted without harm to employees, the general public, or the environment. This plan identifies the hazards associated with operating a large research and development facility and is a vehicle to control and mitigate those hazards. Hazards include, but are not limited to: laser beams, hazardous and radioactive materials, criticality, ionizing radiation or x rays, high-voltage electrical equipment, chemicals, and powered machinery.

  14. Computer software configuration management plan for 200 East/West Liquid Effluent Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Graf, F.A. Jr.

    1995-02-27

    This computer software management configuration plan covers the control of the software for the monitor and control system that operates the Effluent Treatment Facility and its associated truck load in station and some key aspects of the Liquid Effluent Retention Facility that stores condensate to be processed. Also controlled is the Treated Effluent Disposal System`s pumping stations and monitors waste generator flows in this system as well as the Phase Two Effluent Collection System.

  15. Fast Flux Test Facility performance monitoring management information, November 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Newland, D J

    1987-12-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide management with performance data on key performance indicators selected from the FFTF Early Warning System performance indicators. This report contains the results for key performance indicators divided into two categories of ``overall`` and ``other``. The ``overall`` performance indicators, when considered in the aggregate, provide one means of monitoring overall plant performance. The data should be used in conjunction with the results of other management assessment activities to focus improvement efforts. Use of these key performance indicators as a group is stressed, since focusing on a single indicator or a narrow set of indicators can be counterproductive both to safety and to long-term performance improvement.

  16. Knowledge, attitudes and practices of oral health care workers in Lesotho regarding the management of patients with oral manifestations of HIV/AIDS.

    PubMed

    Ramphoma, K J; Naidoo, S

    2014-11-01

    Lesotho has the third highest prevalence of HIV in the world with an estimated 23% of the adult population infected. At least 70% of people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) have presented with oral manifestation of HIV as the first sign of the disease. Oral health workers regularly encounter patients presenting with oral lesions associated with HIV disease and therefore need to have adequate knowledge of these conditions for diagnosis and management. The aim of the present study was to determine the knowledge, attitudes and practices of oral health care workers (OHCW) of Lesotho regarding the management of oral manifestations of HIV/AIDS. A descriptive cross-sectional survey was conducted on all 46 OHCW in 26 public and private care facilities in all ten districts of Lesotho. A self-administered questionnaire was used to gather information. The response rate was 100%. Nearly all (94.7%) agreed that oral lesions are common in people living with HIV and/or AIDS. The majority (91.3%) named oral candidiasis (OC) as the most common lesion found in PLWHA while Kaposi's Sarcoma (KS) (34.7%) and Oral Hairy Leukoplakia (OHL) (32.6%) were mentioned as the least common oral lesions of HIV. Most correctly identified the images of oral candidiasis (97.8%), angular cheilitis (86.9%) and herpes zoster (80.4%). Only 16.7% felt they had comprehensive knowledge of oral HIV lesions, although 84.8% reported having previously received training. Almost three quarters (71%) reported that there was no need to treat HIV positive patients differently from HIV negative patients. OHCW in Lesotho demonstrated high confidence levels in their competence in managing dental patients with oral lesions associated with HIV, however, they lacked an in-depth knowledge in this regard. Amongst this group there is a need for comprehensive training with regards to diagnosis and management of oral lesions of HIV including the training of other cadres of health care workers together with nurses and community

  17. Radioactive Waste Management and Nuclear Facility Decommissioning Progress in Iraq - 13216

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Musawi, Fouad; Shamsaldin, Emad S.; Jasim, Hadi; Cochran, John R.

    2013-07-01

    Management of Iraq's radioactive wastes and decommissioning of Iraq's former nuclear facilities are the responsibility of Iraq's Ministry of Science and Technology (MoST). The majority of Iraq's former nuclear facilities are in the Al-Tuwaitha Nuclear Research Center located a few kilometers from the edge of Baghdad. These facilities include bombed and partially destroyed research reactors, a fuel fabrication facility and radioisotope production facilities. Within these facilities are large numbers of silos, approximately 30 process or waste storage tanks and thousands of drums of uncharacterised radioactive waste. There are also former nuclear facilities/sites that are outside of Al-Tuwaitha and these include the former uranium processing and waste storage facility at Jesira, the dump site near Adaya, the former centrifuge facility at Rashdiya and the former enrichment plant at Tarmiya. In 2005, Iraq lacked the infrastructure needed to decommission its nuclear facilities and manage its radioactive wastes. The lack of infrastructure included: (1) the lack of an organization responsible for decommissioning and radioactive waste management, (2) the lack of a storage facility for radioactive wastes, (3) the lack of professionals with experience in decommissioning and modern waste management practices, (4) the lack of laws and regulations governing decommissioning or radioactive waste management, (5) ongoing security concerns, and (6) limited availability of electricity and internet. Since its creation eight years ago, the MoST has worked with the international community and developed an organizational structure, trained staff, and made great progress in managing radioactive wastes and decommissioning Iraq's former nuclear facilities. This progress has been made, despite the very difficult implementing conditions in Iraq. Within MoST, the Radioactive Waste Treatment and Management Directorate (RWTMD) is responsible for waste management and the Iraqi Decommissioning

  18. HIV/AIDS and lipodystrophy: Implications for clinical management in resource-limited settings

    PubMed Central

    Finkelstein, Julia L; Gala, Pooja; Rochford, Rosemary; Glesby, Marshall J; Mehta, Saurabh

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Lipodystrophy is a term used to describe a metabolic complication of fat loss, fat gain, or a combination of fat loss and gain, which is associated with some antiretroviral (ARV) therapies given to HIV-infected individuals. There is limited research on lipodystrophy in low- and middle-income countries, despite accounting for more than 95% of the burden of HIV/AIDS. The objective of this review was to evaluate the prevalence, pathogenesis and prognosis of HIV-related lipoatrophy, lipohypertrophy and mixed syndrome, to inform clinical management in resource-limited settings. Methods We conducted a structured literature search using MEDLINE electronic databases. Relevant MeSH terms were used to identify published human studies on HIV and lipoatrophy, lipohypertrophy, or mixed syndrome in low-, low-middle- and upper-middle-income countries through 31 March 2014. The search resulted in 5296 articles; after 1599 studies were excluded (958 reviews, 641 non-human), 3697 studies were extracted for further review. After excluding studies conducted in high-income settings (n=2808), and studies that did not meet inclusion criteria (n=799), 90 studies were included in this review. Results and Discussion Of the 90 studies included in this review, only six were from low-income countries and eight were from lower middle-income economies. These studies focused on lipodystrophy prevalence, risk factors and side effects of antiretroviral therapy (ART). In most studies, lipodystrophy developed after the first six months of therapy, particularly with the use of stavudine. Lipodystrophy is associated with increased risk of cardiometabolic complications. This is disconcerting and anticipated to increase, given the rapid scale-up of ART worldwide, the increasing number and lifespan of HIV-infected patients on long-term therapy, and the emergence of obesity and non-communicable diseases in settings with extensive HIV burden. Conclusions Lipodystrophy is common in resource

  19. Towards a "fourth generation" of approaches to HIV/AIDS management: creating contexts for effective community mobilisation.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Catherine; Cornish, Flora

    2010-01-01

    Many biomedical and behavioural HIV/AIDS programmes aimed at prevention, care and treatment have disappointing outcomes because of a lack of effective community mobilisation. But community mobilisation is notoriously difficult to bring about. We present a conceptual framework that maps out those dimensions of social context that are likely to support or undermine community mobilisation efforts, proposing that attention should be given to three dimensions of social context: the material, symbolic and relational. This paper has four parts. We begin by outlining why community mobilisation is regarded as a core dimension of effective HIV/AIDS management: it increases the "reach" and sustainability of programmes; it is a vital component of the wider "task shifting" agenda given the scarcity of health professionals in many HIV/AIDS-vulnerable contexts. Most importantly it facilitates those social psychological processes that we argue are vital preconditions for effective prevention, care and treatment. Secondly we map out three generations of approaches to behaviour change within the HIV/AIDS field: HIV-awareness, peer education and community mobilisation. We critically evaluate each approach's underlying assumptions about the drivers of behaviour change, to frame our understandings of the pathways between mobilisation and health, drawing on the concepts of social capital, dialogue and empowerment. Thirdly we refer to two well-documented case studies of community mobilisation in India and South Africa to illustrate our claim that community mobilisation is unlikely to succeed in the absence of supportive material, symbolic and relational contexts. Fourthly we provide a brief overview of how the papers in this special issue help us flesh out our conceptualisation of the "health enabling social environment". We conclude by arguing for the urgent need for a 'fourth generation' of approaches in the theory and practice of HIV/AIDS management, one which pays far greater

  20. The European HST Science Data Archive. [and Data Management Facility (DMF)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pasian, F.; Pirenne, B.; Albrecht, R.; Russo, G.

    1993-01-01

    The paper describes the European HST Science Data Archive. Particular attention is given to the flow from the HST spacecraft to the Science Data Archive at the Space Telescope European Coordinating Facility (ST-ECF); the archiving system at the ST-ECF, including the hardware and software system structure; the operations at the ST-ECF and differences with the Data Management Facility; and the current developments. A diagram of the logical structure and data flow of the system managing the European HST Science Data Archive is included.

  1. Practical considerations for disaster preparedness and continuity management in research facilities.

    PubMed

    Mortell, Norman; Nicholls, Sam

    2013-10-01

    Many research facility managers, veterinarians and directors are familiar with the principles of Good Laboratory Practice, requirements of the Association for Assessment and Accreditation of Laboratory Animal Care International, tenets of biosecurity and standards of animal welfare and housing but may be less familiar with the ideas of business continuity. But business continuity considerations are as applicable to research facilities as they are to other institutions. The authors discuss how business continuity principles can be applied in the research context and propose that such application, or 'research continuity management,' enables a focused but wide-reaching approach to disaster preparedness. PMID:24051650

  2. CPP-603 Underwater Fuel Storage Facility Site Integrated Stabilization Management Plan (SISMP), Volume I

    SciTech Connect

    Denney, R.D.

    1995-10-01

    The CPP-603 Underwater Fuel Storage Facility (UFSF) Site Integrated Stabilization Management Plan (SISMP) has been constructed to describe the activities required for the relocation of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) from the CPP-603 facility. These activities are the only Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) actions identified in the Implementation Plan developed to meet the requirements of the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) Recommendation 94-1 to the Secretary of Energy regarding an improved schedule for remediation in the Defense Nuclear Facilities Complex. As described in the DNFSB Recommendation 94-1 Implementation Plan, issued February 28, 1995, an INEL Spent Nuclear Fuel Management Plan is currently under development to direct the placement of SNF currently in existing INEL facilities into interim storage, and to address the coordination of intrasite SNF movements with new receipts and intersite transfers that were identified in the DOE SNF Programmatic and INEL Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement Record, of Decision. This SISMP will be a subset of the INEL Spent Nuclear Fuel Management Plan and the activities described are being coordinated with other INEL SNF management activities. The CPP-603 relocation activities have been assigned a high priority so that established milestones will be meet, but there will be some cases where other activities will take precedence in utilization of available resources. The Draft INEL Site Integrated Stabilization Management Plan (SISMP), INEL-94/0279, Draft Rev. 2, dated March 10, 1995, is being superseded by the INEL Spent Nuclear Fuel Management Plan and this CPP-603 specific SISMP.

  3. The GraFIC TM Facility Management Software [TM = Trademark Symbol

    SciTech Connect

    Younkin, J.R.; Dunigan, J.J.; Gaby, J.E.; Hickerson, T.W.; Pickett, C.A.

    2002-06-01

    The Graphical Facility Information System{trademark} (GraFIC{trademark}) is an intelligent facility and information management system that provides near real time, verifiable status of safeguarded materials in a nuclear storage facility. GraFIC{trademark} is a versatile software package that is designed to operate in a distributed computing environment and to provide item and facility activity information to an unlimited number of authorized clients. Recent extensions to GraFIC{trademark} include the ability to link graphical entities to multimedia documents, interfaces to multiple material control and accountability systems, and alternate data entry and operator interaction mechanisms. Relevant multimedia documents such as still images and iPIX{trademark} immersive images can be summoned on demand from their icons on floor plans. An iPIX{trademark} image server, equipped with the appropriate sensors can signal GraFIC{trademark} that an event that warrants the review of a series of saved iPIX{trademark} images has occurred. GraFIC{trademark} provides mechanisms for presenting information obtained from sensor-based monitoring systems and/or other information systems in a common, easy-to-use graphical format. GraFIC{trademark} was initially integrated with the Continuous Automated Vault Inventory System's (CAVIS{trademark} ) suite of rugged, low-cost sensors that remotely monitor the physical and/or assigned attributes associated with stored nuclear materials. GraFIC{trademark} can now interface with the ReflectoActive Seals{trademark} (RASeals) System. The framework designed for the RASeals interface is suitable for integrating with other systems, such as SmartShelf{trademark} . GraFIC{trademark} can import existing data for stored material from other information systems. By retrieving existing information from other information systems, the expense, effort, and possible inaccuracies associated with manual entry are eliminated. Another data entry method involves

  4. Sensitivity of disease management decision aids to temperature input errors associated with out-of-canopy and reduced time-resolution measurements

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant disease management decision aids typically require inputs of weather elements such as air temperature. Whereas many disease models are created based on weather elements at the crop canopy, and with relatively fine time resolution, the decision aids commonly are implemented with hourly weather...

  5. Office of Federal Student Aid: Better Strategic and Human Capital Would Help Sustain Management Progress. Report to Congressional Committees. GAO-05-31

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashby, Cornelia M.

    2004-01-01

    In 2003, the Department of Education's Office of Federal Student Aid (FSA) managed about $60 billion in new financial aid. In 1998, the Congress designated FSA as a performance-based organization. In so doing, it specified purposes for the agency, such as to reduce program costs and increase accountability of its officials, and provided…

  6. Management of meteorological data at a former nuclear weapons facility

    SciTech Connect

    Dickerman, C.L.; Maxwell, D.R.

    1995-03-01

    The purposes of the Climatological Data Management and Meteorological Monitoring programs at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (Site), are to support Emergency Response (ER) programs at the Site for use in assessing the transport, diffusion, and deposition of effluents actually or potentially released into the atmosphere by Site operations, to provide information for on-site and off-site projects concerned with the design of environmental monitoring networks for impact assessments, environmental surveillance activities, and remediation activities. Also, maintenance of a meteorological monitoring network, which includes measuring, archiving, analyzing, interpreting, and summarizing resulting data is required for successfully generating monthly and annual environmental monitoring reports and for providing assistance for on-site and off-site projects. Finally, the Meteorological Monitoring Program provides information for site-specific weather forecasting, which supports Site operations, employee safety, and Emergency Response operations.

  7. Management of Biological Materials in Wastewater from Research & Development Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Raney, Elizabeth A.; Moon, Thomas W.; Ballinger, Marcel Y.

    2011-04-01

    PNNL has developed and instituted a systematic approach to managing work with biological material that begins in the project planning phase and carries through implementation to waste disposal. This paper describes two major processes used at PNNL to analyze and mitigate the hazards associated with working with biological materials and evaluate them for disposal to the sewer, ground, or surface water in a manner that protects human health and the environment. The first of these processes is the Biological Work Permit which is used to identify requirements for handling, storing, and working with biological materials and the second is the Sewer Approval process which is used to evaluate discharges of wastewaters containing biological materials to assure they meet industrial wastewater permits and other environmental regulations and requirements.

  8. Corporate restructuring in Duke Power: Its effect on environmental management systems and facility environmental auditing

    SciTech Connect

    Hogan, J.E.

    1997-12-31

    Duke Power`s environmental management system (EMS) before was disjointed and lacking full effectiveness. Downsizing itself was brought on in part by having better EMS processes. Restructuring and downsizing brought both greater focus and effectiveness. They accomplished this by (1) centralizing corporate-level functions such as policy making, regulatory interpretation, obtaining permits, influencing legislation and rule-making, and auditing, and (2) decentralizing business unit functions such as routine site support, self-inspections, and pollution prevention. Duke`s facility environmental auditing process profited from downsizing by focusing on cost/benefit. Auditing clearly provided a desired benefit. However, they were able to improve the process by incorporating risk management into the selection of facilities and environmental activities to audit. Duke Power developed a risk selection matrix that accounted for major factors influencing liabilities to the company from its facilities. The matrix includes such risks as ongoing construction activities, public sensitivity to the facility, and relative risk of regulatory inspection. They evaluated each risk using criteria to define the relative degree of risk. For example, relative risk of regulatory inspection was evaluated as low risk for facilities that had no permits and no substantial environmental activities. Facilities that had four or more permits, or were large quantity hazardous waste generators, or operated landfills or treatment, storage, or disposal facilities (TSDF), were evaluated as higher risk. They then weighted the degrees of risk using a multiplier to adjust for the importance of the risks. Finally, Duke Power summed the products to represent the relative risk for each facility. They considered this risk factor in conjunction with other factors, such as time since last audit, in determining which company facilities to audit.

  9. Optimization of the Operation of Green Buildings applying the Facility Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somorová, Viera

    2014-06-01

    Nowadays, in the field of civil engineering there exists an upward trend towards environmental sustainability. It relates mainly to the achievement of energy efficiency and also to the emission reduction throughout the whole life cycle of the building, i.e. in the course of its implementation, use and liquidation. These requirements are fulfilled, to a large extent, by green buildings. The characteristic feature of green buildings are primarily highly-sophisticated technical and technological equipments which are installed therein. The sophisticated systems of technological equipments need also the sophisticated management. From this point of view the facility management has all prerequisites to meet this requirement. The paper is aimed to define the facility management as an effective method which enables the optimization of the management of supporting activities by creating conditions for the optimum operation of green buildings viewed from the aspect of the environmental conditions

  10. DEMAID - A DESIGN MANAGER'S AID FOR INTELLIGENT DECOMPOSITION (SGI IRIS VERSION)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, J. L.

    1994-01-01

    Many engineering systems are large and multi-disciplinary. Before the design of new complex systems such as large space platforms can begin, the possible interactions among subsystems and their parts must be determined. Once this is completed the proposed system can be decomposed to identify its hierarchical structure. DeMAID (A Design Manager's Aid for Intelligent Decomposition) is a knowledge-based system for ordering the sequence of modules and identifying a possible multilevel structure for the design problem. DeMAID displays the modules in an N x N matrix format (called a design structure matrix) where a module is any process that requires input and generates an output. (Modules which generate an output but do not require an input, such as an initialization process, are also acceptable.) Although DeMAID requires an investment of time to generate and refine the list of modules for input, it could save a considerable amount of money and time in the total design process, particularly in new design problems where the ordering of the modules has not been defined. The decomposition of a complex design system into subsystems requires the judgement of the design manager. DeMAID reorders and groups the modules based on the links (interactions) among the modules, helping the design manager make decomposition decisions early in the design cycle. The modules are grouped into circuits (the subsystems) and displayed in an N x N matrix format. Feedback links, which indicate an iterative process, are minimized and only occur within a subsystem. Since there are no feedback links among the circuits, the circuits can be displayed in a multilevel format. Thus, a large amount of information is reduced to one or two displays which are stored for later retrieval and modification. The design manager and leaders of the design teams then have a visual display of the design problem and the intricate interactions among the different modules. The design manager could save a substantial

  11. DEMAID - A DESIGN MANAGER'S AID FOR INTELLIGENT DECOMPOSITION (SGI IRIS VERSION)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, J. L.

    1994-01-01

    Many engineering systems are large and multi-disciplinary. Before the design of new complex systems such as large space platforms can begin, the possible interactions among subsystems and their parts must be determined. Once this is completed the proposed system can be decomposed to identify its hierarchical structure. DeMAID (A Design Manager's Aid for Intelligent Decomposition) is a knowledge-based system for ordering the sequence of modules and identifying a possible multilevel structure for the design problem. DeMAID displays the modules in an N x N matrix format (called a design structure matrix) where a module is any process that requires input and generates an output. (Modules which generate an output but do not require an input, such as an initialization process, are also acceptable.) Although DeMAID requires an investment of time to generate and refine the list of modules for input, it could save a considerable amount of money and time in the total design process, particularly in new design problems where the ordering of the modules has not been defined. The decomposition of a complex design system into subsystems requires the judgement of the design manager. DeMAID reorders and groups the modules based on the links (interactions) among the modules, helping the design manager make decomposition decisions early in the design cycle. The modules are grouped into circuits (the subsystems) and displayed in an N x N matrix format. Feedback links, which indicate an iterative process, are minimized and only occur within a subsystem. Since there are no feedback links among the circuits, the circuits can be displayed in a multilevel format. Thus, a large amount of information is reduced to one or two displays which are stored for later retrieval and modification. The design manager and leaders of the design teams then have a visual display of the design problem and the intricate interactions among the different modules. The design manager could save a substantial

  12. AIDS Training in the Workplace.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vest, Jusanne M.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Management training regarding Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) begins with three needs assessment tools--instruments measuring fear of AIDS, knowledge of AIDS, and beliefs about the business consequences of the disease. (SK)

  13. 40 CFR 271.12 - Requirements for hazardous waste management facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Requirements for hazardous waste management facilities. 271.12 Section 271.12 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) REQUIREMENTS FOR AUTHORIZATION OF STATE HAZARDOUS WASTE PROGRAMS Requirements for Final Authorization §...

  14. 40 CFR 271.12 - Requirements for hazardous waste management facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... shall have standards for hazardous waste management facilities which are equivalent to 40 CFR parts 264... reporting. States that choose to receive electronic documents must include the requirements of 40 CFR Part 3... address referenced in 40 CFR 264.71(a)(3) and 265.71(a)(3), to indicate the receipt of a shipment...

  15. 40 CFR 271.12 - Requirements for hazardous waste management facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... shall have standards for hazardous waste management facilities which are equivalent to 40 CFR parts 264... reporting. States that choose to receive electronic documents must include the requirements of 40 CFR Part 3... address referenced in 40 CFR 264.71(a)(3) and 265.71(a)(3), to indicate the receipt of a shipment...

  16. 40 CFR 271.12 - Requirements for hazardous waste management facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... shall have standards for hazardous waste management facilities which are equivalent to 40 CFR parts 264... reporting. States that choose to receive electronic documents must include the requirements of 40 CFR Part 3... address referenced in 40 CFR 264.71(a)(3) and 265.71(a)(3), to indicate the receipt of a shipment...

  17. 40 CFR 271.12 - Requirements for hazardous waste management facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Requirements for hazardous waste management facilities. 271.12 Section 271.12 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) REQUIREMENTS FOR AUTHORIZATION OF STATE HAZARDOUS WASTE PROGRAMS Requirements for Final Authorization §...

  18. Building Air Quality: A Guide for Building Owners and Facility Managers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agle, Elizabeth; Galbraith, Susan

    The past two decades have witnessed increased concerns over the health and comfort of indoor air quality (IAQ), but little indoor air-related information has been targeted at building owners and facility managers of public and commercial buildings. This manual, specifically created for such a population, provides guidance on preventing,…

  19. F-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility Semiannual Correction Action Report, Vol. I and II

    SciTech Connect

    Chase, J.

    1999-11-18

    The groundwater in the uppermost aquifer beneath the F-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility (HWMF) at the Savannah River Site is routinely monitored for selected hazardous and radioactive constituents. This report presents the results of the required groundwater monitoring program.

  20. Sensitivities to source-term parameters of emergency planning zone boundaries for waste management facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, C.J.

    1995-07-01

    This paper reviews the key parameters comprising airborne radiological and chemical release source terms, discusses the ranges over which values of these parameters occur for plausible but severe waste management facility accidents, and relates the concomitant sensitivities of emergency planning zone boundaries predicted on calculated distances to early severe health effects.

  1. MANAGING AND DISPOSING OF RESIDUES FROM ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL FACILITIES IN THE STEEL INDUSTRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a study of the management and disposal of residues from environmental control facilities in the steel industry. Information from 13 integrated U.S. steel mills is compared with that found in the literature and with data collected during visits to Engli...

  2. Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) closure, Savannah River Plant: Clay cap test section construction report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-02-26

    This report contains appendices 3 through 6 for the Clay Cap Test Section Construction Report for the Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) closure at the Savannah River Plant. The Clay Cap Test Program was conducted to evaluate the source, lab. permeability, in-situ permeability, and compaction characteristics, representative of kaolin clays from the Aiken, South Carolina vicinity. (KJD)

  3. Operation, Maintenance and Management of Wastewater Treatment Facilities: A Bibliography of Technical Documents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Himes, Dottie

    This is an annotated bibliography of wastewater treatment manuals. Fourteen manuals are abstracted including: (1) A Planned Maintenance Management System for Municipal Wastewater Treatment Plants; (2) Anaerobic Sludge Digestion, Operations Manual; (3) Emergency Planning for Municipal Wastewater Treatment Facilities; (4) Estimating Laboratory Needs…

  4. 77 FR 31017 - Office of Facilities Management and Program Services; Information Collection; Background...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-24

    ..., presented in the Federal Register publication of February 17, 2009, 74 FR 7439. GSA is proceeding with the... Investigations for Child Care Workers AGENCY: Office of Facilities Management and Program Services, Public... collection of personal data for background investigations for child care workers accessing GSA owned...

  5. Manure management and temperature impacts on gas concentrations in monoslope cattle facilities

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Roofed and confined cattle feeding facilities are increasingly popular in the Northern Great Plains, but little is known about the impact this housing system and associated manure management methods have on the air quality inside and outside the barn. The objective of this study was to determine ga...

  6. EPA’s Experimental Stream Facility: Design and Research Supporting Watershed Management

    EPA Science Inventory

    The EPA’s Experimental Stream Facility (ESF) represents an important tool in research that is underway to further understanding of the relative importance of stream ecosystems and the services they provide for effective watershed management. The ESF is operated under the goal of ...

  7. Conceptual design of an in-space cryogenic fluid management facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willen, G. S.; Riemer, D. H.; Hustvedt, D. C.

    1981-01-01

    The conceptual design of a Spacelab experiment to develop the technology associated with low gravity propellant management is presented. The proposed facility consisting of a supply tank, receiver tank, pressurization system, instrumentation, and supporting hardware, is described. The experimental objectives, the receiver tank to be modeled, and constraints imposed on the design by the space shuttle, Spacelab, and scaling requirements, are described. The conceptual design, including the general configurations, flow schematics, insulation systems, instrumentation requirements, and internal tank configurations for the supply tank and the receiver tank, is described. Thermal, structural, fluid, and safety and reliability aspects of the facility are analyzed. The facility development plan, including schedule and cost estimates for the facility, is presented. A program work breakdown structure and master program schedule for a seven year program are included.

  8. Project Hanford management contract quality assurance program implementation plan for nuclear facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Bibb, E.K.

    1997-10-15

    During transition from the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) Management and Operations (M and O) contract to the Fluor Daniel Hanford (FDH) Management and Integration (M and I) contract, existing WHC policies, procedures, and manuals were reviewed to determine which to adopt on an interim basis. Both WHC-SP-1131,Hanford Quality Assurance Program and Implementation Plan, and WHC-CM-4-2, Quality Assurance Manual, were adopted; however, it was recognized that revisions were required to address the functions and responsibilities of the Project Hanford Management Contract (PHMC). This Quality Assurance Program Implementation Plan for Nuclear Facilities (HNF-SP-1228) supersedes the implementation portion of WHC-SP-1 13 1, Rev. 1. The revised Quality Assurance (QA) Program is documented in the Project Hanford Quality Assurance Program Description (QAPD), HNF-MP-599. That document replaces the QA Program in WHC-SP-1131, Rev. 1. The scope of this document is limited to documenting the nuclear facilities managed by FDH and its Major Subcontractors (MSCS) and the status of the implementation of 10 CFR 830.120, Quality Assurance Requirements, at those facilities. Since the QA Program for the nuclear facilities is now documented in the QAPD, future updates of the information provided in this plan will be by letter. The layout of this plan is similar to that of WHC-SP-1 13 1, Rev. 1. Sections 2.0 and 3.0 provide an overview of the Project Hanford QA Program. A list of Project Hanford nuclear facilities is provided in Section 4.0. Section 5.0 provides the status of facility compliance to 10 CFR 830.120. Sections 6.0, 7.0, and 8.0 provide requested exemptions, status of open items, and references, respectively. The four appendices correspond to the four projects that comprise Project Hanford.

  9. The impact of nursing leadership and management on the control of HIV/AIDS: an ethnographic study.

    PubMed

    Nawafleh, Hani; Francis, Karen; Chapman, Ysanne

    2012-10-01

    This paper reports on an aspect of a larger ethnographic study that sought to investigate the impact of HIV/AIDS on the practice of primary care nurses in Jordan. Nursing leadership and the style of management adopted by senior nursing and medical administrators at the Ministry of Heath were identified as factors impacting on the practice of the nurses and their capacity to raise community awareness and contribute to the prevention and control of HIV/AIDS. The study was undertaken in three rural and three urban primary health care centres (PHCC). Data collection included participant observation, key informant interviews, and document analysis. These data informed the development of descriptive ethnographic accounts that allowed for the subsequent identification of common and divergent themes reflective of factors recognized as influencing the practice of the nurse participants. PMID:23181375

  10. Spare parts management for nuclear power generation facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scala, Natalie Michele

    With deregulation, utilities in the power sector face a much more urgent imperative to emphasize cost efficiencies as compared to the days of regulation. One major opportunity for cost savings is through reductions in spare parts inventories. Most utilities are accustomed to carrying large volumes of expensive, relatively slow-moving parts because of a high degree of risk-averseness. This attitude towards risk is rooted in the days of regulation. Under regulation, companies recovered capital inventory costs by incorporating them into the base rate charged to their customers. In a deregulated environment, cost recovery is no longer guaranteed. Companies must therefore reexamine their risk profile and develop policies for spare parts inventory that are appropriate for a competitive business environment. This research studies the spare parts inventory management problem in the context of electric utilities, with a focus on nuclear power. It addresses three issues related to this problem: criticality, risk, and policy. With respect to criticality and risk, a methodology is presented that incorporates the use of influence diagrams and the Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP). A new method is developed for group aggregation in the AHP when Saaty and Vargas' (2007) dispersion test fails and decision makers are unwilling or unable to revise their judgments. With respect to policy, a quantitative model that ranks the importance of keeping a part in inventory and recommends a corresponding stocking policy through the use of numerical simulation is developed. This methodology and its corresponding models will enable utilities that have transitioned from a regulated to a deregulated environment become more competitive in their operations while maintaining safety and reliability standards. Furthermore, the methodology developed is general enough so that other utility plants, especially those in the nuclear sector, will be able to use this approach. In addition to regulated

  11. Forum Guide to Facilities Information Management: A Resource for State and Local Education Agencies. NFES 2012-808

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Forum on Education Statistics, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Safe and secure facilities that foster learning are crucial to providing quality education services, and developing and maintaining these facilities requires considerable resources and organization. Facility information systems allow education organizations to collect and manage data that can be used to inform and guide decisionmaking about the…

  12. Measuring HIV Self-Management in Women Living with HIV/AIDS: A Psychometric Evaluation Study of the HIV Self-Management Scale

    PubMed Central

    Webel, Allison R.; Asher, Alice; Cuca, Yvette; Okonsky, Jennifer G.; Kaihura, Alphoncina; Rose, Carol Dawson; Hanson, Jan E.; Salata, Robert A.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To develop and validate the HIV Self-Management Scale for women, a new measure of HIV self-management, defined as the day-to-day decisions that individuals make to manage their illness. Methods The development and validation of the scale was undertaken in three phases: focus groups, expert review and psychometric evaluation. Focus groups identified items describing the process and context of self-management in women living with HIV/AIDS (WLHA). Items were refined using expert review and were then administered to WLHA in two sites in the U.S. (n=260). Validity of the scale was assessed through factor analyses, model fit statistics, reliability testing, and convergent and discriminate validity. Results The final scale consists of 3-domains with 20 items describing the construct of HIV self-management. Daily self-management health practices, Social support and HIV self-management, and Chronicity of HIV self-management comprise the three domains. These domains explained 48.6% of the total variance in the scale. The item mean scores ranged from 1.7-2.77, and each domain demonstrated acceptable reliability (0.72-0.86) and stability (0.61-0.85). Conclusions Self-management is critical for WLHA, who constitute over 50% of PLWHA and have poorer health outcomes than their male counterparts. Methods to assess the self-management behavior of WLHA are needed to enhance their health and well-being. Presently no scales exist to measure HIV self-management. Our new 20-item HIV Self-Management Scale is a valid and reliable measure of HIV self-management in this population. Differences in aspects of self-management may be related to social roles and community resources and interventions targeting these factors may decrease morbidity in WLHA. PMID:22569267

  13. 25 CFR 170.807 - What must BIA include when it develops an IRR Transportation Facilities Maintenance Management...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false What must BIA include when it develops an IRR Transportation Facilities Maintenance Management System? 170.807 Section 170.807 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS... What must BIA include when it develops an IRR Transportation Facilities Maintenance Management...

  14. 25 CFR 170.807 - What must BIA include when it develops an IRR Transportation Facilities Maintenance Management...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Transportation Facilities Maintenance Management System? 170.807 Section 170.807 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS... What must BIA include when it develops an IRR Transportation Facilities Maintenance Management System? (a) At a minimum, an IRR TFMMS system must include components for: (1) Uniformly...

  15. 25 CFR 170.807 - What must BIA include when it develops an IRR Transportation Facilities Maintenance Management...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Transportation Facilities Maintenance Management System? 170.807 Section 170.807 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS... What must BIA include when it develops an IRR Transportation Facilities Maintenance Management System? (a) At a minimum, an IRR TFMMS system must include components for: (1) Uniformly...

  16. 25 CFR 170.807 - What must BIA include when it develops an IRR Transportation Facilities Maintenance Management...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Transportation Facilities Maintenance Management System? 170.807 Section 170.807 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS... What must BIA include when it develops an IRR Transportation Facilities Maintenance Management System? (a) At a minimum, an IRR TFMMS system must include components for: (1) Uniformly...

  17. Managing Risk and Experiencing Danger: Tensions between Government AIDS Education Policy and Young Women's Sexuality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holland, Janet; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Government AIDS education programs in Britain have focused on nonheterosexual behavior. Protection of population depends on changes in high-risk sexual practices among heterosexuals. The part played by young women has received little attention. Reviews data from a survey of young women's sexual beliefs and behavior and suggests that appropriate…

  18. CADIS: a kernel approach toward the development of intelligent data-management support for computer-aided design systems

    SciTech Connect

    Landis, D.M.

    1988-01-01

    Design and development of CADIS (Computer Aided Design Information System) is presented. CADIS addresses the data-management needs of Computer Aided Design (CAD) systems by providing a system that overcomes the inherent problems found when using conventional data base management systems (DBMS). Limitations found with other research and development efforts marked for correction include: lack of flexibility in the supported CAD system, separation of the design interaction from data-base interaction, separation of knowledge-base issues from data-management issues, lack of a distinction between a DBMS' implementation of system policy, and a DBMS mechanism to support system policy. A four-level data-base architecture is defined for CADIS. An augmented entity-relationship model (AERM) is also defined that supports the CADIS architecture. This model includes structures developed to specifically overcome limitations found in the use of the more-traditional data model. A definition and manipulation language for the model are defined. Translation rules derived enable the AERM to be translated into an underlying data-base scheme. A proof-of-concept model is presented via the definition and implementation of a system tool, the SARA/IDEAS System Browser.

  19. [Security Management in Clinical Laboratory Departments and Facilities: Current Status and Issues].

    PubMed

    Ishida, Haku; Nakamura, Junji; Yoshida, Hiroshi; Koike, Masaru; Inoue, Yuji

    2014-11-01

    We conducted a questionnaire survey regarding the current activities for protecting patients' privacy and the security of information systems (IS) related to the clinical laboratory departments of university hospitals, certified training facilities for clinical laboratories, and general hospitals in Yamaguchi Prefecture. The response rate was 47% from 215 medical institutions, including three commercial clinical laboratory centers. The results showed that there were some differences in management activities among facilities with respect to continuing education, the documentation or regulation of operational management for paper records, electronic information, remaining samples, genetic testing, and laboratory information for secondary use. They were suggested to be caused by differences in functions between university and general hospitals, differences in the scale of hospitals, or whether or not hospitals have received accreditation or ISO 15189. Regarding the IS, although the majority of facilities had sufficiently employed the access control to IS, there was some room for improvement in the management of special cases such as VIPs and patients with HIV infection. Furthermore, there were issues regarding the login method for computers shared by multiple staff, the showing of the names of personnel in charge of reports, and the risks associated with direct connections to systems and the Internet and the use of portable media such as USB memory sticks. These results indicated that further efforts are necessary for each facility to continue self-assessment and make improvements. PMID:27509732

  20. Randomized Trial of Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation and Hearing Aids for Tinnitus Management.

    PubMed

    Shekhawat, Giriraj Singh; Searchfield, Grant D; Stinear, Cathy M

    2013-11-01

    Background. The perception of sound in the absence of an external sound is tinnitus. Tinnitus can have a severe negative impact on quality of life. Objective. This trial investigated whether multisession anodal transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) of the left temporoparietal area would enhance sound therapy from hearing aids. Methods. Forty participants (mean age = 54 years) experiencing chronic tinnitus (minimum 2 years) completed a 7-month long double-blind randomized clinical trial. Participants were randomized into 2 groups: control receiving sham tDCS and experimental receiving tDCS. Each group underwent multisession (5 consecutive sessions with 24-hour gap) anodal tDCS (2 mA intensity and 20 minutes duration) of the left temporoparietal area, followed by hearing aid use for 6 months. The impact of tDCS and hearing aid use on tinnitus was assessed using questionnaires (primary measure: Tinnitus Functional Index) and minimum masking level measurement. Results. There was a significant reduction in the overall Tinnitus Functional Index score with time, F(2, 37) = 11.9, P = .0001, for both the groups. Similar patterns were seen for secondary measures. tDCS appeared to have a positive effect on minimum masking levels but not questionnaire responses. Conclusions. After 3 months of hearing aid use, there were significant improvements in tinnitus, which were sustained at 6 months of use. The hearing aid effects appeared independent of tDCS. Further investigations of tDCS or other neuromodulators priming the auditory system for sound therapy based tinnitus treatments are warranted. PMID:24213961

  1. Relative risk impacts of facility accidents in DOE`s Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Program

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, C.

    1994-12-31

    The Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) within the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is formulating an integrated national program to manage the treatment, storage, and disposal of existing and future wastes at DOE sites. As part of this process, a Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) is being prepared. A principal focus of the EM PEIS is the evaluation of strategies for remediating DOE sites and facilities to ensure the protection of human health and environment. A specific objective of DOE in implementing an integrated waste management program is to {open_quotes}reduce or eliminate risks to human health and safety and to the environment for environmental restoration and waste operation activities.{close_quotes} The EM PEIS calls for separate evaluations of the risk impacts for managing six different waste types: greater-than-Class-C low-level, hazardous, high-level, low-level mixed, low-level, and transuranic. For each waste type, four categorical strategies have been devised for consolidating wastes for treatment and storage: (a) no action, where existing sites will generally store and treat their own wastes consistent with approved plans, (b) decentralization, (c) regionalization, and (d) centralization. The last three alternatives refer to the degree of consolidation and affect the number of sites that will be used to treat, store, and dispose of a given waste type. Each consolidation strategy has associated siting options, and each option involves existing facilities, facilities in the design phase, and new facilities. Each siting option also implies unique inventories of waste to be stored and treated at each site and associated facilities. Finally, a number of treatment technologies and storage and disposal options for each waste type are to be evaluated for each alternative.

  2. Clostridium difficile in the Long-Term Care Facility: Prevention and Management

    PubMed Central

    Jump, Robin L. P.; Donskey, Curtis J.

    2014-01-01

    Residents of long-term care facilities are at high risk for Clostridium difficile infection due to frequent antibiotic exposure in a population already rendered vulnerable to infection due to advanced age, multiple comorbid conditions and communal living conditions. Moreover, asymptomatic carriage of toxigenic C. difficile and recurrent infections are prevalent in this population. Here, we discuss epidemiology and management of C. difficile infection among residents of long-term care facilities. Also, recognizing that both the population and culture differs significantly from that of hospitals, we also address prevention strategies specific to LTCFs. PMID:25685657

  3. Fast Flux Test Facility fuel and test management: The first 10 years

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, R.A.; Bennett, C.L.; Campbell, L.R.; Dobbin, K.D.; Tang, E.L.

    1991-07-01

    Core design and fuel and test management have been performed efficiently at the Fast Flux Test Facility. No outages have been extended to adjust core loadings. Development of mixed oxide fuels for advanced liquid metal breeder reactors has been carried out successfully. In fact, the fuel performance is extraordinary. Failures have been so infrequent that further development and refinement of fuel requirements seem appropriate and could lead to a significant reduction in projected electrical busbar costs. The Fast Flux Test Facility is also involved in early metal fuel development tests and appears to be an ideal test bed for any further fuel development or refinement testing. 3 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Forging the strategic linkage between facilities management and the corporation -- Production of a sites comprehensive plan

    SciTech Connect

    Petersen, T.P.; Williams, J.L.; Reyes, C.M.

    1997-06-01

    In 1996, Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) undertook a major effort to develop, produce, and execute a Sites Comprehensive Plan. Fundamentally, this document is intended to serve as a tool to clarify the strategic link between (1) current and future mission needs and responsibilities, and (2) the condition, capacity, and required amount of facilities space and infrastructure. It documents the Facilities Group`s response to programmatic requests for capability and makes the case for the required facilities investments through integrated master plans that document SNL`s short- and long-range needs. This paper outlines the history and business environment that led to the writing of the plan, the organizations and committees involved, the steps required to develop and produce it, the challenges encountered in selling it, both internally and externally, and the issues involved in executing the proposed actions set forth in the plan. The paper also articulates the benefits gained by Facilities Management (FM) and the corporation, as well as the lessons learned in producing the plan. SNL has concluded that the Sites Comprehensive Plan was a worthwhile effort in terms of retained facilities investment funding, increased awareness of facility needs, and other measures, despite the significant effort and cost required to produce it.

  5. Energy management in long-term care facilities: a hot or cold issue?

    PubMed

    Smith, H L; Discenza, R

    1981-01-01

    Conservation of energy resources through total energy management programs is receiving considerable attention in the health services sector. Although the total energy management concept has been favorably implemented in hospitals, the record is not entirely clear for other health care institutions. Thirty-one Arizona and 37 Minnesota long-term care facilities were surveyed to examine the attitudes, knowledge and practice of energy management in the nursing home context. Specific questions were directed toward average monthly energy costs, energy consumption, energy conservation methods implemented, energy conservation methods planned for future implementation, and administrator attitudes on the energy management problem. The results of this study indicate that energy is not perceived to be a major problem in long-term care facilities. Administrators generally lack basic knowledge about energy consumption and energy-related characteristics of their facilities. Few long-range plans and programs have been established to address energy problems. These results suggest the need for new energy policies in the health care system, particularly for institutions other than hospitals. PMID:10253193

  6. Remote sensing as an aid for marsh management: Lafouche parish, Louisiana. [aerial photography of Louisiana

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ragan, J. G.; Green, J. H.; Whitehurst, C. A.

    1974-01-01

    NASA aerial photography, primarily color infrared and color positive transparencies, was used in a study of marsh management practices and in comparing managed and unmanaged marsh areas. Weir locations for tidal control are recommended.

  7. Self Esteem Training as an Aid to Acquiring Conflict Management Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casey, Margaret; Casey, Paul

    1997-01-01

    The conflict management skills of 16 women receiving self-esteem training were assessed before and after the program. Most made significant gains in self-esteem and at the same time developed nonadversarial styles of conflict management. (SK)

  8. NOMINATION FOR THE PROJECT MANAGEMENT INSTITUTE (PMI) PROJECT OF THE YEAR AWARD INTEGRATED DISPOSAL FACILITY (IDF)

    SciTech Connect

    MCLELLAN, G.W.

    2007-02-07

    CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. (CH2M HILL) is pleased to nominate the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF) project for the Project Management Institute's consideration as 2007 Project of the Year, Built for the U.S, Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of River Protection (ORP) at the Hanford Site, the IDF is the site's first Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA)-compliant disposal facility. The IDF is important to DOE's waste management strategy for the site. Effective management of the IDF project contributed to the project's success. The project was carefully managed to meet three Tri-Party Agreement (TPA) milestones. The completed facility fully satisfied the needs and expectations of the client, regulators and stakeholders. Ultimately, the project, initially estimated to require 48 months and $33.9 million to build, was completed four months ahead of schedule and $11.1 million under budget. DOE directed construction of the IDF to provide additional capacity for disposing of low-level radioactive and mixed (i.e., radioactive and hazardous) solid waste. The facility needed to comply with federal and Washington State environmental laws and meet TPA milestones. The facility had to accommodate over one million cubic yards of the waste material, including immobilized low-activity waste packages from the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP), low-level and mixed low-level waste from WTP failed melters, and alternative immobilized low-activity waste forms, such as bulk-vitrified waste. CH2M HILL designed and constructed a disposal facility with a redundant system of containment barriers and a sophisticated leak-detection system. Built on a 168-area, the facility's construction met all regulatory requirements. The facility's containment system actually exceeds the state's environmental requirements for a hazardous waste landfill. Effective management of the IDF construction project required working through highly political and legal issues as well as challenges with

  9. An environmental testing facility for Space Station Freedom power management and distribution hardware

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackola, Arthur S.; Hartjen, Gary L.

    1992-01-01

    The plans for a new test facility, including new environmental test systems, which are presently under construction, and the major environmental Test Support Equipment (TSE) used therein are addressed. This all-new Rocketdyne facility will perform space simulation environmental tests on Power Management and Distribution (PMAD) hardware to Space Station Freedom (SSF) at the Engineering Model, Qualification Model, and Flight Model levels of fidelity. Testing will include Random Vibration in three axes - Thermal Vacuum, Thermal Cycling and Thermal Burn-in - as well as numerous electrical functional tests. The facility is designed to support a relatively high throughput of hardware under test, while maintaining the high standards required for a man-rated space program.

  10. Building partnerships to support community-led HIV/AIDS management: a case study from rural South Africa.

    PubMed

    Nair, Yugi; Campbell, Catherine

    2008-05-01

    The importance of partnerships between marginalised communities and support agencies (from the public sector, private sector and civil society) is a pillar of HIV/AIDS management policy. Such alliances are notoriously difficult to promote and sustain. We present a case study focusing on the first stage of a project seeking to build partnerships to facilitate local responses to HIV/AIDS in a remote rural community in South Africa. To date the Entabeni project has been successful in its goal of training volunteer health workers in home-based care, peer education, project management and procedures for accessing grants and services. The paper focuses on the project's other goal - to create external support structures for these volunteers (drawing on government departments, local NGOs and private-sector philanthropists). The partnership aims to empower volunteers to lead HIV-prevention and AIDS-care efforts, and to make public services more responsive to local needs. We illustrate how features of the local public-sector environment have actively worked against effective community empowerment. These include a rigid hierarchy, poor communication between senior and junior health professionals, lack of social development skills and the demoralisation and/or exhaustion of public servants dealing with multiple social problems in under-resourced settings. We outline the obstacles that have prevented private-sector involvement, suggesting a degree of scepticism about the potential for private-sector contributions to development in remote areas. We discuss how the project's most effective partners have been two small under-funded NGOs - run by highly committed individuals with a keen understanding of social-development principles, flexible working styles and a willingness to work hard for small gains. Despite many challenges, the partnership formation process has seen some positive achievements; we outline these and discuss the essential role played by an external change agent

  11. Data Acquisition and Database Management System for Samsung Superconductor Test Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Yong

    In order to fulfill the test requirement of KSTAR (Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research) superconducting magnet system, a large scale superconducting magnet and conductor test facility, SSTF (Samsung Superconductor Test Facility), has been constructed at Samsung Advanced Institute of Technology. The computer system for SSTF DAC (Data Acquisition and Control) is based on UNIX system and VxWorks is used for the real-time OS of the VME system. EPICS (Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System) is used for the communication between IOC server and client. A database program has been developed for the efficient management of measured data and a Linux workstation with PENTIUM-4 CPU is used for the database server. In this paper, the current status of SSTF DAC system, the database management system and recent test results are presented.

  12. Closure of hazardous and mixed radioactive waste management units at DOE facilities. [Contains glossary

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-06-01

    This is document addresses the Federal regulations governing the closure of hazardous and mixed waste units subject to Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) requirements. It provides a brief overview of the RCRA permitting program and the extensive RCRA facility design and operating standards. It provides detailed guidance on the procedural requirements for closure and post-closure care of hazardous and mixed waste management units, including guidance on the preparation of closure and post-closure plans that must be submitted with facility permit applications. This document also provides guidance on technical activities that must be conducted both during and after closure of each of the following hazardous waste management units regulated under RCRA.

  13. On the value of architecture and facility management in health administration education.

    PubMed

    Verderber, Stephen F

    2002-01-01

    This article discusses the role and function of architecture and facility management in health administration education vis-à-vis an interdisciplinary set of courses taught in a graduate-level health administration program. These courses provide the future health care executive with theory and applied knowledge on a variety of topics. These include the history of health care facilities, issues in facility planning and management, principles of patient and staff-focused design, campus master planning, participatory methods to involve end users in the design of their work, and care settings. Additional skills acquired include an introduction to contract negotiations, the reading of technical documents such as blueprints, the post-occupancy assessment of facilities-in-use, and familiarity with future trends. Students address the topic of managerial ethics in relation to the built environment in some detail as a vehicle to illustrate the nature of key fine-grain issues of importance to the health administration scholar and professional. The discussion concludes with the presentation of a model curriculum in this subject area. PMID:12199634

  14. Monitoring plan for routine organic air emissions at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex Waste Storage Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Galloway, K.J.; Jolley, J.G.

    1994-06-01

    This monitoring plan provides the information necessary to perform routine organic air emissions monitoring at the Waste Storage Facilities located at the Transuranic Storage Area of the Radioactive Waste Management Complex at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The Waste Storage Facilities include both the Type I and II Waste Storage Modules. The plan implements a dual method approach where two dissimilar analytical methodologies, Open-Path Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (OP-FTIR) and ancillary SUMMA{reg_sign} canister sampling, following the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) analytical method TO-14, will be used to provide qualitative and quantitative volatile organic concentration data. The Open-Path Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy will provide in situ, real time monitoring of volatile organic compound concentrations in the ambient air of the Waste Storage Facilities. To supplement the OP-FTIR data, air samples will be collected using SUMMA{reg_sign}, passivated, stainless steel canisters, following the EPA Method TO-14. These samples will be analyzed for volatile organic compounds with gas chromatograph/mass spectrometry analysis. The sampling strategy, procedures, and schedules are included in this monitoring plan. The development of this monitoring plan is driven by regulatory compliance to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, State of Idaho Toxic Air Pollutant increments, Occupational Safety and Health Administration. The various state and federal regulations address the characterization of the volatile organic compounds and the resultant ambient air emissions that may originate from facilities involved in industrial production and/or waste management activities.

  15. Savannah River Site Mixed Waste Management Facility Southwest Plume Tritium Phytoremediation Evaluating Irrigation Management Strategies Over 25 Years

    SciTech Connect

    Riah, Susan; Rebel, Karin

    2004-02-27

    To minimize movement of tritium into surface waters at the Mixed Waste Management Facility at the Savannah River Site, tritium contaminated seepage water is being retained in a constructed pond and used to irrigate forest acreage that lies above the pond and over the contaminated groundwater. Twenty five-year potential evapotranspiration and average precipitation are 1443 mm/year and 1127 mm/year, respectively, for the region in which the site is located. Management of the application of tritium contaminated irrigation water needs to be evaluated in the context of the large amount of rainfall relative to evapotranspiration, the strong seasonality in evapotranspiration, and intraannual and inter-annual variability in precipitation. A dynamic simulation model of water and tritium fluxes in the soil-plant-atmosphere continuum was developed to assess the efficiency (tritium transpired/tritium applied) of several irrigation management strategies.

  16. Management of contaminated structures at federal facilities : reuse considerations and other major issues.

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, M. J.; Picel, K. C.; Environmental Assessment

    2000-01-01

    The management of contaminated structures can be a major activity at some federal facilities and generally differs from management of contaminated environmental media. In particular, a major issue associated with a contaminated structure is whether there is a realistic potential for future use of the structure. This issue should be addressed early in a planning process. The resolution of this issue significantly affects other major issues associated with management of a contaminated structure such as: (1) What are the expected costs associated with management of the structure? (2) What regulatory requirements are applicable? (3) What characterization is needed? (4) What risk assessment is necessary? and (5) What remediation decisions must be made? This article considers all of these issues.

  17. An information management system for a spent nuclear fuel interim storage facility.

    SciTech Connect

    Finch, Robert J.; Chiu, Hsien-Lang; Giles, Todd; Horak, Karl Emanuel; Jow, Hong-Nian

    2010-12-01

    We describe an integrated information management system for an independent spent fuel dry-storage installation (ISFSI) that can provide for (1) secure and authenticated data collection, (2) data analysis, (3) dissemination of information to appropriate stakeholders via a secure network, and (4) increased public confidence and support of the facility licensing and operation through increased transparency. This information management system is part of a collaborative project between Sandia National Laboratories, Taiwan Power Co., and the Fuel Cycle Materials Administration of Taiwan's Atomic Energy Council, which is investigating how to implement this concept.

  18. Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) closure, Savannah River Plant: Clay cap test section construction report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-02-26

    This report contains appendix 2 for the Clay Cap Test Section Construction Report for the Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) closure at the Savannah River Plant. The Clay Cap Test Program was conducted to evaluate the source, Laboratory permeability, and compaction characteristics representative of Kaolin clays from the aiken, South Carolina vicinity. Included in this report are daily field reports Nos. 1 to 54. (KJD)

  19. Mixed Waste Management Facility FSS Well Data Groundwater Monitoring Report. Fourth Quarter 1994 and 1994 summary

    SciTech Connect

    Chase, J.A.

    1995-03-01

    During fourth quarter 1994, ten constituents exceeded final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) in groundwater samples from downgradient monitoring wells at the Mixed Waste Management Facility, the Old Burial Ground, the E-Area Vaults, the proposed Hazardous Waste/Mixed Waste Disposal Vaults, and the F-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site. No constituent exceeded final PDWS in samples from the upgradient monitoring wells. The groundwater flow directions and rates in the three hydrostratigraphic units were similar to those of previous quarters.

  20. Waste Receiving and Processing Facility Module 1 Data Management System Software Requirements Specification

    SciTech Connect

    Brann, E.C. II

    1994-09-09

    This document provides the software requirements for Waste Receiving and Processing (WRAP) Module 1 Data Management System (DMS). The DMS is one of the plant computer systems for the new WRAP 1 facility (Project W-026). The DMS will collect, store and report data required to certify the low level waste (LLW) and transuranic (TRU) waste items processed at WRAP 1 as acceptable for shipment, storage, or disposal.

  1. Waste Receiving and Processing Facility Module 1 Data Management System software requirements specification

    SciTech Connect

    Rosnick, C.K.

    1996-04-19

    This document provides the software requirements for Waste Receiving and Processing (WRAP) Module 1 Data Management System (DMS). The DMS is one of the plant computer systems for the new WRAP 1 facility (Project W-0126). The DMS will collect, store and report data required to certify the low level waste (LLW) and transuranic (TRU) waste items processed at WRAP 1 as acceptable for shipment, storage, or disposal.

  2. Metallurgical Laboratory Hazardous Waste Management Facility groundwater monitoring report, Third quarter 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-01

    During third quarter 1992, samples from 18 groundwater monitoring wells of the AMB series at the Metallurgical Laboratory Hazardous Waste Management Facility were analyzed for certain heavy metals, indicator parameters, radionuclides, volatile organic compounds, and other constituents. Eight parameters exceeded the US Environmental Protection Agency Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) and the Savannah River Site Flag 2 criteria during the quarter. This report details the groundwater sampling activities for third quarter 1992.

  3. Metallurgical Laboratory Hazardous Waste Management Facility (HWMF) groundwater monitoring report, second quarter 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, C.Y.

    1992-09-01

    During second quarter 1992, 18 groundwater monitoring wells of the AMB series at the Metallurgical Laboratory Hazardous Waste Management Facility (Met Lab HWMF) were visited for sampling. Groundwater samples were analyzed for certain heavy metals, indicator parameters, radionuclides, volatile organic compounds, and other constituents. This report describes the results that exceeded the US Environmental Protection Agency Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) and the Savannah River Site flagging criteria during the quarter.

  4. Characterization of infectious aerosols in health care facilities: an aid to effective engineering controls and preventive strategies.

    PubMed

    Cole, E C; Cook, C E

    1998-08-01

    Assessment of strategies for engineering controls for the prevention of airborne infectious disease transmission to patients and to health care and related workers requires consideration of the factors relevant to aerosol characterization. These factors include aerosol generation, particle size and concentrations, organism viability, infectivity and virulence, airflow and climate, and environmental sampling and analysis. The major focus on attention to engineering controls comes from recent increases in tuberculosis, particularly the multidrug-resistant varieties in the general hospital population, the severely immunocompromised, and those in at-risk and confined environments such as prisons, long-term care facilities, and shelters for the homeless. Many workers are in close contact with persons who have active, undiagnosed, or insufficiently treated tuberculosis. Additionally, patients and health care workers may be exposed to a variety of pathogenic human viruses, opportunistic fungi, and bacteria. This report therefore focuses on the nature of infectious aerosol transmission in an attempt to determine which factors can be systematically addressed to result in proven, applied engineering approaches to the control of infectious aerosols in hospital and health care facility environments. The infectious aerosols of consideration are those that are generated as particles of respirable size by both human and environmental sources and that have the capability of remaining viable and airborne for extended periods in the indoor environment. This definition precludes skin and mucous membrane exposures occurring from splashes (rather than true aerosols) of blood or body fluids containing infectious disease agents. There are no epidemiologic or laboratory studies documenting the transmission of bloodborne virus by way of aerosols. PMID:9721404

  5. Report: transboundary hazardous waste management. part II: performance auditing of treatment facilities in importing countries.

    PubMed

    Chang, Tien-Chin; Ni, Shih-Piao; Fan, Kuo-Shuh; Lee, Ching-Hwa

    2006-06-01

    Before implementing the self-monitoring model programme of the Basel Convention in the Asia, Taiwan has conducted a comprehensive 4-year follow-up project to visit the governmental authorities and waste-disposal facilities in the countries that import waste from Taiwan. A total of nine treatment facilities, six of which are reported in this paper, and the five countries where the plants are located were visited in 2001-2002. France, Belgium and Finland primarily handled polychlorinated biphenyl capacitors, steel mill dust and metal waste. The United States accepted metal sludge, mainly electroplating sludge, from Taiwan. Waste printed circuit boards, waste wires and cables, and a mixture of waste metals and electronics were the major items exported to China. Relatively speaking, most treatment plants for hazardous waste paid close attention to environmental management, such as pollution control and monitoring, site zoning, system management regarding occupational safety and hygiene, data management, permits application, and image promotion. Under the tight restrictions formulated by the central environment agency, waste treatment plants in China managed the environmental issues seriously. For example, one of the treatment plants had ISO 14001 certification. It is believed that with continuous implementation of regulations, more improvement is foreseeable. Meanwhile, Taiwan and China should also continuously enhance their collaboration regarding the transboundary management of hazardous waste. PMID:16784171

  6. The Mixed Waste Management Facility. Design basis integrated operations plan (Title I design)

    SciTech Connect

    1994-12-01

    The Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) will be a fully integrated, pilotscale facility for the demonstration of low-level, organic-matrix mixed waste treatment technologies. It will provide the bridge from bench-scale demonstrated technologies to the deployment and operation of full-scale treatment facilities. The MWMF is a key element in reducing the risk in deployment of effective and environmentally acceptable treatment processes for organic mixed-waste streams. The MWMF will provide the engineering test data, formal evaluation, and operating experience that will be required for these demonstration systems to become accepted by EPA and deployable in waste treatment facilities. The deployment will also demonstrate how to approach the permitting process with the regulatory agencies and how to operate and maintain the processes in a safe manner. This document describes, at a high level, how the facility will be designed and operated to achieve this mission. It frequently refers the reader to additional documentation that provides more detail in specific areas. Effective evaluation of a technology consists of a variety of informal and formal demonstrations involving individual technology systems or subsystems, integrated technology system combinations, or complete integrated treatment trains. Informal demonstrations will typically be used to gather general operating information and to establish a basis for development of formal demonstration plans. Formal demonstrations consist of a specific series of tests that are used to rigorously demonstrate the operation or performance of a specific system configuration.

  7. Developing Mobile- and BIM-Based Integrated Visual Facility Maintenance Management System

    PubMed Central

    Su, Yu-Chih

    2013-01-01

    Facility maintenance management (FMM) has become an important topic for research on the operation phase of the construction life cycle. Managing FMM effectively is extremely difficult owing to various factors and environments. One of the difficulties is the performance of 2D graphics when depicting maintenance service. Building information modeling (BIM) uses precise geometry and relevant data to support the maintenance service of facilities depicted in 3D object-oriented CAD. This paper proposes a new and practical methodology with application to FMM using BIM technology. Using BIM technology, this study proposes a BIM-based facility maintenance management (BIMFMM) system for maintenance staff in the operation and maintenance phase. The BIMFMM system is then applied in selected case study of a commercial building project in Taiwan to verify the proposed methodology and demonstrate its effectiveness in FMM practice. Using the BIMFMM system, maintenance staff can access and review 3D BIM models for updating related maintenance records in a digital format. Moreover, this study presents a generic system architecture and its implementation. The combined results demonstrate that a BIMFMM-like system can be an effective visual FMM tool. PMID:24227995

  8. Developing mobile- and BIM-based integrated visual facility maintenance management system.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yu-Cheng; Su, Yu-Chih

    2013-01-01

    Facility maintenance management (FMM) has become an important topic for research on the operation phase of the construction life cycle. Managing FMM effectively is extremely difficult owing to various factors and environments. One of the difficulties is the performance of 2D graphics when depicting maintenance service. Building information modeling (BIM) uses precise geometry and relevant data to support the maintenance service of facilities depicted in 3D object-oriented CAD. This paper proposes a new and practical methodology with application to FMM using BIM technology. Using BIM technology, this study proposes a BIM-based facility maintenance management (BIMFMM) system for maintenance staff in the operation and maintenance phase. The BIMFMM system is then applied in selected case study of a commercial building project in Taiwan to verify the proposed methodology and demonstrate its effectiveness in FMM practice. Using the BIMFMM system, maintenance staff can access and review 3D BIM models for updating related maintenance records in a digital format. Moreover, this study presents a generic system architecture and its implementation. The combined results demonstrate that a BIMFMM-like system can be an effective visual FMM tool. PMID:24227995

  9. A knowledge acquisition process to analyse operational problems in solid waste management facilities.

    PubMed

    Dokas, Ioannis M; Panagiotakopoulos, Demetrios C

    2006-08-01

    The available expertise on managing and operating solid waste management (SWM) facilities varies among countries and among types of facilities. Few experts are willing to record their experience, while few researchers systematically investigate the chains of events that could trigger operational failures in a facility; expertise acquisition and dissemination, in SWM, is neither popular nor easy, despite the great need for it. This paper presents a knowledge acquisition process aimed at capturing, codifying and expanding reliable expertise and propagating it to non-experts. The knowledge engineer (KE), the person performing the acquisition, must identify the events (or causes) that could trigger a failure, determine whether a specific event could trigger more than one failure, and establish how various events are related among themselves and how they are linked to specific operational problems. The proposed process, which utilizes logic diagrams (fault trees) widely used in system safety and reliability analyses, was used for the analysis of 24 common landfill operational problems. The acquired knowledge led to the development of a web-based expert system (Landfill Operation Management Advisor, http://loma.civil.duth.gr), which estimates the occurrence possibility of operational problems, provides advice and suggests solutions. PMID:16941992

  10. Building owner`s and manager`s guide: Optimizing facility performance

    SciTech Connect

    Curl, R.S.

    1999-09-01

    This book was written for professionals who manage buildings, and who have the responsibility of keeping occupants, tenants and owners satisfied. The material presented addresses all the key areas which contribute to effective management of building operational performance. Specific topics include occupant comfort and complaint resolution, sick building syndrome prevention and remediation, using smart building design to facilitate optimum operational performance, HVAC system and control considerations, overall equipment management, and accident prevention and safety. Also covered are corrosion remediation, odor and noise control, types and placement of controls, maintenance access, and legal liability issues with example court cases.

  11. Decision Aids for Multiple-Decision Disease Management as Affected by Weather Input Errors

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many disease management decision support systems (DSS) rely, exclusively or in part, on weather inputs to calculate an indicator for disease hazard. Error in the weather inputs, typically due to forecasting, interpolation or estimation from off-site sources, may affect model calculations and manage...

  12. An Expanded View of the Role of the Financial Aid Administrator in Student Debt Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dennis, Marguerite J.

    1983-01-01

    Suggestions for changes administrators can make to assist students in debt management include (1) administrator willingness to expand his/her role and help other officials accept the change; (2) establishment of programs in financial counseling, debt management, and debt counseling; and (3) exploration of creative ways to finance educational…

  13. Current status of sharps waste management in the lower-level health facilities in Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Manyele, Samwel V; Mujuni, Churchil M

    2010-10-01

    Sharps waste is part of infectious medical waste, management of which is a critical problem in Tanzanian health facilities. This study aimed at assessing the current status of sharps waste management in lower level health facilities (LLHFs) in Ilala Municipality in Tanzania. In this study a sample of 135 LLHFs (103 dispensaries, 13 clinics, 11 laboratories, and 8 health centers) was involved. The average number of workers per facility was 10, with positively skewed probability density function (up to 80 workers). The average patient-to-workers ratio was 5.87. About 59% of the LLHFs improvised sharps waste containers (SWCs). Sharps waste was transported by hands in 77% of LLHFs leading to high risks of exposure to needle stick injuries. Boots, aprons and masks were among the personal protective equipment (PPE) missing in most LLHFs, while latex gloves that cannot protect workers from injuries caused by sharps waste were readily available. Most facilities stored sharps waste for about 72 hours (before treatment), which is beyond the recommended maximum storage time of 24 hours. About 39.3% of LLHFs utilized on-site single-chamber incinerators for sharps waste treatment, which are of poor design, have rusted mechanical parts, short and rusted chimneys, and without automatic flame ignition burners. It is concluded that sharps waste management in LLHFs is poor, which puts workers, the public and the environment at risk of exposure to blood-borne pathogens. It is, therefore, important that the municipality should establish a waste processing center which will collect and incinerate all sharps waste. PMID:24409634

  14. MicroArray Facility: a laboratory information management system with extended support for Nylon based technologies

    PubMed Central

    Honoré, Paul; Granjeaud, Samuel; Tagett, Rebecca; Deraco, Stéphane; Beaudoing, Emmanuel; Rougemont, Jacques; Debono, Stéphane; Hingamp, Pascal

    2006-01-01

    Background High throughput gene expression profiling (GEP) is becoming a routine technique in life science laboratories. With experimental designs that repeatedly span thousands of genes and hundreds of samples, relying on a dedicated database infrastructure is no longer an option. GEP technology is a fast moving target, with new approaches constantly broadening the field diversity. This technology heterogeneity, compounded by the informatics complexity of GEP databases, means that software developments have so far focused on mainstream techniques, leaving less typical yet established techniques such as Nylon microarrays at best partially supported. Results MAF (MicroArray Facility) is the laboratory database system we have developed for managing the design, production and hybridization of spotted microarrays. Although it can support the widely used glass microarrays and oligo-chips, MAF was designed with the specific idiosyncrasies of Nylon based microarrays in mind. Notably single channel radioactive probes, microarray stripping and reuse, vector control hybridizations and spike-in controls are all natively supported by the software suite. MicroArray Facility is MIAME supportive and dynamically provides feedback on missing annotations to help users estimate effective MIAME compliance. Genomic data such as clone identifiers and gene symbols are also directly annotated by MAF software using standard public resources. The MAGE-ML data format is implemented for full data export. Journalized database operations (audit tracking), data anonymization, material traceability and user/project level confidentiality policies are also managed by MAF. Conclusion MicroArray Facility is a complete data management system for microarray producers and end-users. Particular care has been devoted to adequately model Nylon based microarrays. The MAF system, developed and implemented in both private and academic environments, has proved a robust solution for shared facilities and

  15. Life cycle assessment of solid waste management strategies in a chlor-alkali production facility.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, Edmundo; Navia, Rodrigo

    2011-06-01

    The waste management of a chlor-alkali and calcium chloride industrial facility from southern Chile was the object of this study. The main solid waste materials generated in these processes are brine sediments and calcium chloride sediments, respectively. Both residues are mixed in the liquid phase and filtered in a press filter, obtaining a final low humidity solid waste, called 'mixed sediments', which is disposed of in an industrial landfill as non-hazardous waste. The aim of the present study was to compare by means of LCA, the current waste management option of the studied chlor-alkali facility, namely landfill disposal, with two new possible options: the reuse of the mixed sediments as mineral additive in compost and the use of brine sediments as an unconventional sorbent for the removal of heavy metals from wastewater. The functional unit was defined as 1 tonne of waste being managed. To perform this evaluation, software SimaPro 7.0 was used, selecting the Ecoindicator 99 and CML 2000 methodologies for impact evaluation. The obtained results indicate that the use of brine sediments as a novel material for the removal of heavy metals from wastewater (scenario 3) presented environmental benefits when compared with the waste management option of sediments landfilling (scenario 1). The avoided environmental loads, generated by the substitution of activated granular carbon and the removal of Cu and Zn from wastewater in the treatment process generated positive environmental impacts, enhancing the environmental performance of scenario 3. PMID:20699293

  16. Longitudinal feasibility of MINDSET: a clinic decision aid for epilepsy self-management.

    PubMed

    Begley, Charles; Shegog, Ross; Harding, Angelique; Goldsmith, Corey; Hope, Omotola; Newmark, Michael

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this paper is to report on the development and feasibility of the longitudinal version of MINDSET, a clinical tool to assist patients and health-care providers in epilepsy self-management. A previous study described the feasibility of using MINDSET to identify and prioritize self-management issues during a clinic visit. This paper describes the development of the longitudinal version of MINDSET and feasibility test over multiple visits with a printed action plan for goal setting and the capacity for monitoring changes in self-management. Feasibility was assessed based on 1) postvisit patient and provider interviews addressing ease of use and usefulness, patient/provider communication, and shared decision-making and 2) the capacity of the tool to monitor epilepsy characteristics and self-management over time. Results indicate MINDSET feasibility for 1) identifying and facilitating discussion of self-management issues during clinic visits, 2) providing a printable list of prioritized issues and tailored self-management goals, and 3) tracking changes in epilepsy characteristics and self-management over time. PMID:25705825

  17. The role and application of data base management in integrated computer-aided design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackburn, C. L.; Storaasli, O. O.; Fulton, R. E.

    1982-01-01

    The need to marshal the extensive data that figure in design problems is underlined. An approach to managing engineering data for use in a computerized integrated design system is described. The approach is embodied in an experimental integrated software system that is used to demonstrate and evaluate such data management functions as storage, retrieval, query, manipulation, and modification. The development and organization of the experimental integrated design system and the application of the system to selected test problems are discussed, together with insights into data management issues gained from the study.

  18. Computer simulation as a teaching aid in pharmacy management--Part 1: Principles of accounting.

    PubMed

    Morrison, D J

    1987-06-01

    The need for pharmacists to develop management expertise through participation in formal courses is now widely acknowledged. Many schools of pharmacy lay the foundations for future management training by providing introductory courses as an integral or elective part of the undergraduate syllabus. The benefit of such courses may, however, be limited by the lack of opportunity for the student to apply the concepts and procedures in a practical working environment. Computer simulations provide a means to overcome this problem, particularly in the field of resource management. In this, the first of two articles, the use of a computer model to demonstrate basic accounting principles is described. PMID:3301875

  19. Joint Assessment of Renewable Energy and Water Desalination Research Center (REWDC) Program Capabilities and Facilities In Radioactive Waste Management

    SciTech Connect

    Bissani, M; Fischer, R; Kidd, S; Merrigan, J

    2006-04-03

    The primary goal of this visit was to perform a joint assessment of the Renewable Energy and Water Desalination Center's (REWDC) program in radioactive waste management. The visit represented the fourth technical and scientific interaction with Libya under the DOE/NNSA Sister Laboratory Arrangement. Specific topics addressed during the visit focused on Action Sheet P-05-5, ''Radioactive Waste Management''. The Team, comprised of Mo Bissani (Team Lead), Robert Fischer, Scott Kidd, and Jim Merrigan, consulted with REWDC management and staff. The team collected information, discussed particulars of the technical collaboration and toured the Tajura facility. The tour included the waste treatment facility, waste storage/disposal facility, research reactor facility, hot cells and analytical labs. The assessment team conducted the first phase of Task A for Action Sheet 5, which involved a joint assessment of the Radioactive Waste Management Program. The assessment included review of the facilities dedicated to the management of radioactive waste at the Tourja site, the waste management practices, proposed projects for the facility and potential impacts on waste generation and management.

  20. Management of radioactive material safety programs at medical facilities. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Camper, L.W.; Schlueter, J.; Woods, S.

    1997-05-01

    A Task Force, comprising eight US Nuclear Regulatory Commission and two Agreement State program staff members, developed the guidance contained in this report. This report describes a systematic approach for effectively managing radiation safety programs at medical facilities. This is accomplished by defining and emphasizing the roles of an institution`s executive management, radiation safety committee, and radiation safety officer. Various aspects of program management are discussed and guidance is offered on selecting the radiation safety officer, determining adequate resources for the program, using such contractual services as consultants and service companies, conducting audits, and establishing the roles of authorized users and supervised individuals; NRC`s reporting and notification requirements are discussed, and a general description is given of how NRC`s licensing, inspection and enforcement programs work.

  1. Protecting Lake Ontario - Treating Wastewater from the Remediated Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Facility - 13227

    SciTech Connect

    Freihammer, Till; Chaput, Barb; Vandergaast, Gary; Arey, Jimi

    2013-07-01

    The Port Granby Project is part of the larger Port Hope Area Initiative, a community-based program for the development and implementation of a safe, local, long-term management solution for historic low level radioactive waste (LLRW) and marginally contaminated soils (MCS). The Port Granby Project involves the relocation and remediation of up to 0.45 million cubic metres of such waste from the current Port Granby Waste Management Facility located in the Municipality of Clarington, Ontario, adjacent to the shoreline of Lake Ontario. The waste material will be transferred to a new suitably engineered Long-Term Waste Management Facility (LTWMF) to be located inland approximately 700 m from the existing site. The development of the LTWMF will include construction and commissioning of a new Wastewater Treatment Plant (WWTP) designed to treat wastewater consisting of contaminated surface run off and leachate generated during the site remediation process at the Port Granby Waste Management Facility as well as long-term leachate generated at the new LTWMF. Numerous factors will influence the variable wastewater flow rates and influent loads to the new WWTP during remediation. The treatment processes will be comprised of equalization to minimize impacts from hydraulic peaks, fine screening, membrane bioreactor technology, and reverse osmosis. The residuals treatment will comprise of lime precipitation, thickening, dewatering, evaporation and drying. The distribution of the concentration of uranium and radium - 226 over the various process streams in the WWTP was estimated. This information was used to assess potential worker exposure to radioactivity in the various process areas. A mass balance approach was used to assess the distribution of uranium and radium - 226, by applying individual contaminant removal rates for each process element of the WTP, based on pilot scale results and experience-based assumptions. The mass balance calculations were repeated for various flow

  2. Sensitivity analysis to aid shelter management decisions: how does altering expenditure affect operational viability?

    PubMed

    Widmar, Nicole Olynk; Lord, Emily; Litster, Annette

    2015-01-01

    Streamlining purchasing in nonhuman animal shelters can provide multiple financial benefits. Streamlining shelter inputs and thus reducing shelter costs can include trading paid labor and management for fewer, more involved volunteers or purchasing large quantities of medical supplies from fewer vendors to take advantage of bulk-purchasing discounts. Beyond direct savings, time and energy spent on purchasing and inventory control can be reduced through careful management. Although cost-cutting measures may seem attractive, shelter managers are cautioned to consider the potential unintended consequences of short-term cost reduction measures that could limit revenues or increase costs in the future. This analysis illustrates an example of the impact of cost reductions in specific expense categories and the impact on shelter net revenue, as well as the share of expenses across categories. An in-depth discussion of labor and purchasing cost-reducing strategies in the real world of animal shelter management is provided. PMID:25775134

  3. Crop Management to Cope with Global Change: A Systems Perspective Aided by Information Technologies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Optimizing crop management must consider the dynamic interaction of abiotic and biotic factors within the context of economic, environmental, sociological, and policy constraints. A wide array of information technologies exists to assist producers, consultants, scientists, agribusiness, action agenc...

  4. Persons with moderate Alzheimer's disease use simple technology aids to manage daily activities and leisure occupation.

    PubMed

    Lancioni, Giulio E; Singh, Nirbhay N; O'Reilly, Mark F; Sigafoos, Jeff; Renna, Caterina; Pinto, Katia; De Vanna, Floriana; Caffò, Alessandro O; Stasolla, Fabrizio

    2014-09-01

    Two studies assessed technology-aided programs to support performance of daily activities and selection/activation of music items with patients with moderate Alzheimer's disease. In Study I, four patients were presented with activity-related pictorial instructions via a computer fitted with inexpensive, commercial software. In Study II, four patients were (a) presented with different music options and (b) allowed to select and activate the preferred option via a microswitch response. Study I showed that each patient learned to perform the two activities available with percentages of correct responses exceeding 85 by the end of the intervention. Study II showed that all patients learned to choose and activate music options. Psychology students, employed in a social validation check, scored the patients' behavior within the program better than their behavior in a control situation. The relevance and usability of simplified pictorial-instruction programs and music choice programs for patients with moderate Alzheimer's disease were discussed. PMID:24881006

  5. Strategy for introduction of rainwater management facility considering rainfall event applied on new apartment complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    KIM, H.; Lee, D. K.; Yoo, S.

    2014-12-01

    As regional torrential rains become frequent due to climate change, urban flooding happens very often. That is why it is necessary to prepare for integrated measures against a wide range of rainfall. This study proposes introduction of effective rainwater management facilities to maximize the rainwater runoff reductions and recover natural water circulation for unpredictable extreme rainfall in apartment complex scale. The study site is new apartment complex in Hanam located in east of Seoul, Korea. It has an area of 7.28ha and is analysed using the EPA-SWMM and STORM model. First, it is analyzed that green infrastructure(GI) had efficiency of flood reduction at the various rainfall events and soil characteristics, and then the most effective value of variables are derived. In case of rainfall event, Last 10 years data of 15 minutes were used for analysis. A comparison between A(686mm rainfall during 22days) and B(661mm/4days) knew that soil infiltration of A is 17.08% and B is 5.48% of the rainfall. Reduction of runoff after introduction of the GI of A is 24.76% and B is 6.56%. These results mean that GI is effective to small rainfall intensity, and artificial rainwater retarding reservoir is needed at extreme rainfall. Second, set of target year is conducted for the recovery of hydrological cycle at the predevelopment. And an amount of infiltration, evaporation, surface runoff of the target year and now is analysed on the basis of land coverage, and an arrangement of LID facilities. Third, rainwater management scenarios are established and simulated by the SWMM-LID. Rainwater management facilities include GI(green roof, porous pavement, vegetative swale, ecological pond, and raingarden), and artificial rainwater. Design scenarios are categorized five type: 1)no GI, 2)conventional GI design(current design), 3)intensive GI design, 4)GI design+rainwater retarding reservoir 5)maximized rainwater retarding reservoir. Intensive GI design is to have attribute value to

  6. Surficial geology and performance assessment for a Radioactive Waste Management Facility at the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect

    Snyder, K.E.; Gustafson, D.L.; Huckins-Gang, H.E.; Miller, J.J.; Rawlinson, S.E.

    1995-02-01

    At the Nevada Test Site, one potentially disruptive scenario being evaluated for the Greater Confinement Disposal (GCD) Facility Performance Assessment is deep post-closure erosion that would expose buried radioactive waste to the accessible environment. The GCD Facility located at the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) lies at the juncture of three alluvial fan systems. Geomorphic surface mapping in northern Frenchman Flat indicates that reaches of these fans where the RWMS is now located have been constructional since at least the middle Quaternary. Mapping indicates a regular sequence of prograding fans with entrenchment of the older fan surfaces near the mountain fronts and construction of progressively younger inset fans farther from the mountain fronts. At the facility, the oldest fan surfaces are of late Pleistocene and Holocene age. More recent geomorphic activity has been limited to erosion and deposition along small channels. Trench and pit wall mapping found maximum incision in the vicinity of the RWMS to be less than 1.5 m. Based on collected data, natural geomorphic processes are unlikely to result in erosion to a depth of more than approximately 2 m at the facility within the 10,000-year regulatory period.

  7. M-area hazardous waste management facility groundwater monitoring report-fourth quarter 1993 and 1993 summary

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, C.S.; Washburn, F.; Jordan, J.; Van Pelt, R.

    1994-09-01

    This report summarizes the ground water monitoring and corrective action program at the M-area Hazardous Waste Management Facility at the Savannah River Site during the fourth quarter 1993 and during the year 1993.

  8. Toxicity of Water and Sediment Samples Collected in the Vicinity of the Mixed Waste Management Facility, 1995 and 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Specht, W.L.

    1996-07-01

    Three rounds of toxicity tests were conducted on water collected from eleven locations in the vicinity of the Mixed Waste Management Facility and four reference locations between January 1995 and April 1996.

  9. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart Cccccc... - Applicability Criteria and Management Practices for Gasoline Dispensing Facilities With Monthly...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Practices for Gasoline Dispensing Facilities With Monthly Throughput of 100,000 Gallons of Gasoline or More1... CATEGORIES (CONTINUED) National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Source Category: Gasoline... Criteria and Management Practices for Gasoline Dispensing Facilities With Monthly Throughput of...

  10. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart Cccccc... - Applicability Criteria and Management Practices for Gasoline Dispensing Facilities With Monthly...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Practices for Gasoline Dispensing Facilities With Monthly Throughput of 100,000 Gallons of Gasoline or More1... CATEGORIES (CONTINUED) National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Source Category: Gasoline... Criteria and Management Practices for Gasoline Dispensing Facilities With Monthly Throughput of...

  11. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart Cccccc... - Applicability Criteria and Management Practices for Gasoline Dispensing Facilities With Monthly...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Practices for Gasoline Dispensing Facilities With Monthly Throughput of 100,000 Gallons of Gasoline or More1... CATEGORIES (CONTINUED) National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Source Category: Gasoline... Criteria and Management Practices for Gasoline Dispensing Facilities With Monthly Throughput of...

  12. Use of traditional medicines in the management of HIV/AIDS opportunistic infections in Tanzania: a case in the Bukoba rural district

    PubMed Central

    Kisangau, Daniel P; Lyaruu, Herbert VM; Hosea, Ken M; Joseph, Cosam C

    2007-01-01

    Background Ethnobotanical surveys were carried out to document herbal remedies used in the management of HIV/AIDS opportunistic infections in Bukoba Rural district, Tanzania. The district is currently an epicenter of HIV/AIDS and although over 90% of the population in the district relies on traditional medicines to manage the disease, this knowledge is impressionistic and not well documented. The HIV/AIDS opportunistic conditions considered during the study were Tuberculosis (TB), Herpes zoster (Shingles), Herpes simplex (Genital herpes), Oral candidiasis and Cryptococcal meningitis. Other symptomatic but undefined conditions considered were skin rashes and chronic diarrhea. Methods An open-ended semi-structured questionnaire was used in collecting field information. Descriptive statistics were used to analyze the ethnobotanical data collected. Factor of informant consensus (Fic) was used to analyze the ethnobotanical importance of the plants. Results In the present study, 75 plant species belonging to 66 genera and 41 families were found to be used to treat one or more HIV/AIDS related infections in the district. The study revealed that TB and oral candidiasis were the most common manifestations of HIV/AIDS opportunistic infections affecting most of the population in the area. It unveils the first detailed account of ethnomedical documentation of plants focusing the management of HIV/AIDS related infections in the district. Conclusion It is concluded that the ethnopharmacological information reported forms a basis for further research to identify and isolate bioactive constituents that can be developed to drugs for the management of the HIV/AIDS opportunistic infections. PMID:17623081

  13. Content Management System for Developing a Virtual Platform for Association of Women's Aid with Lack of Resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sainz de Abajo, Beatriz; Flores García, Alberto; García Salcines, Enrique; Burón Fernández, F. Javier; López Coronado, Miguel; de Castro Lozano, Carlos

    In this paper we show a Virtual Platform for an Association of Women's Aid called Centro Integral de Ayuda a la Mujer (CIAM). After analyzing different Content Management Systems (CMS) and the benefits that its use would contribute to the development of the Virtual Platform, taking into account the needs and requirements set by CIAM, we have opted for the use of Joomla!. This free CMS, for its characteristics, is the most benefits provided us. The virtual platform design has been developed following customer specifications, to have understood the simplicity and easy handling of the resulting platform. This platform will be integrated into the Web portal that has the Amarex Association and it will be able to be administrates from the CIAM without specific knowledge of programming languages. If new services were necessary, they would be easily implemented, adding new modules and components to perform these services.

  14. Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) groundwater monitoring report. Third quarter 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, C.Y.

    1992-12-01

    During third quarter 1992, 12 constituents exceeded the US Environmental Protection Agency Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) in one or more groundwater samples from monitoring wells at the Mixed Waste Management Facility and adjacent facilities. Tritium and trichloroethylene were the most widespread constituents: 57 (48%) and 23 (19%) of the 119 monitoring wells contained elevated tritium and trichloroethylene levels, respectively. Elevated constituents were found primarily in Aquifer Zone IIB{sub 2} (Water Table) and Aquifer Zone IIB{sub 1} (Barnwell/McBean). Elevated constituents also occurred in five Aquifer Unit IIA (Congaree) wells. Upgradient wells BGO 1D and 2D and HSB 85A, 85B, and 85C did not contain any constituents that exceeded the PDWS. Downgradient wells in the three hydrostratigraphic units contained elevated levels of tritium, trichloroethylene, tetrachloroethylene, chloroethene, antimony, 1,1-dichloroethylene, gross alpha, lead, nonvolatile beta, thallium, total alpha-emitting radium (radium-224 and radium-226), or cadmium.

  15. Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) groundwater monitoring report. First quarter 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, C.Y.

    1992-06-01

    During first quarter 1992, tritium, trichloroethylene, tetrachloroethylene, lead, antimony, I,I-dichloroethylene, 1,2-dichloroethane, gross alpha, mercury, nickel, nitrate, nonvolatile beta, and total alpha-emitting radium (radium-224 and radium-226) exceeded the US Environmental Protection Agency Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) in groundwater samples from monitoring wells at the Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) and adjacent facilities. Tritium and trichloroethylene were the most widespread constituents; 57 (49%) of the 116 monitored wells contained elevated tritium activities, and 21 (18%) wells exhibited elevated trichloroethylene concentrations Sixty-one downgradient wells screened in Aquifer Zone IIB2 (Water Table), Aquifer Zone IIB{sub 2} (Barnwell/McBean), and Aquifer Unit IIA (Congaree) contained constituents that exceeded the PDWS during first quarter 1992. Upgradient wells BGO 1D and HSB 85A, BC, and 85C did not contain any constituents that exceeded the PDWS. Upgradient well BGO 2D contained elevated tritium.

  16. Modeling, simulation and control for a cryogenic fluid management facility, preliminary report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Max A.; Vanbuskirk, P. D.

    1986-01-01

    The synthesis of a control system for a cryogenic fluid management facility was studied. The severe demand for reliability as well as instrumentation and control unique to the Space Station environment are prime considerations. Realizing that the effective control system depends heavily on quantitative description of the facility dynamics, a methodology for process identification and parameter estimation is postulated. A block diagram of the associated control system is also produced. Finally, an on-line adaptive control strategy is developed utilizing optimization of the velocity form control parameters (proportional gains, integration and derivative time constants) in appropriate difference equations for direct digital control. Of special concern are the communications, software and hardware supporting interaction between the ground and orbital systems. It is visualized that specialist in the OSI/ISO utilizing the Ada programming language will influence further development, testing and validation of the simplistic models presented here for adaptation to the actual flight environment.

  17. The Mixed Waste Management Facility: Technology selection and implementation plan, Part 2, Support processes

    SciTech Connect

    Streit, R.D.; Couture, S.A.

    1995-03-01

    The purpose of this document is to establish the foundation for the selection and implementation of technologies to be demonstrated in the Mixed Waste Management Facility, and to select the technologies for initial pilot-scale demonstration. Criteria are defined for judging demonstration technologies, and the framework for future technology selection is established. On the basis of these criteria, an initial suite of technologies was chosen, and the demonstration implementation scheme was developed. Part 1, previously released, addresses the selection of the primary processes. Part II addresses process support systems that are considered ``demonstration technologies.`` Other support technologies, e.g., facility off-gas, receiving and shipping, and water treatment, while part of the integrated demonstration, use best available commercial equipment and are not selected against the demonstration technology criteria.

  18. Expanding the Reach of Participatory Risk Management: Testing an Online Decision-Aiding Framework for Informing Internally Consistent Choices.

    PubMed

    Bessette, Douglas L; Campbell-Arvai, Victoria; Arvai, Joseph

    2016-05-01

    This article presents research aimed at developing and testing an online, multistakeholder decision-aiding framework for informing multiattribute risk management choices associated with energy development and climate change. The framework was designed to provide necessary background information and facilitate internally consistent choices, or choices that are in line with users' prioritized objectives. In order to test different components of the decision-aiding framework, a six-part, 2 × 2 × 2 factorial experiment was conducted, yielding eight treatment scenarios. The three factors included: (1) whether or not users could construct their own alternatives; (2) the level of detail regarding the composition of alternatives users would evaluate; and (3) the way in which a final choice between users' own constructed (or highest-ranked) portfolio and an internally consistent portfolio was presented. Participants' self-reports revealed the framework was easy to use and providing an opportunity to develop one's own risk-management alternatives (Factor 1) led to the highest knowledge gains. Empirical measures showed the internal consistency of users' decisions across all treatments to be lower than expected and confirmed that providing information about alternatives' composition (Factor 2) resulted in the least internally consistent choices. At the same time, those users who did not develop their own alternatives and were not shown detailed information about the composition of alternatives believed their choices to be the most internally consistent. These results raise concerns about how the amount of information provided and the ability to construct alternatives may inversely affect users' real and perceived internal consistency. PMID:26381043

  19. Technical Aspects Regarding the Management of Radioactive Waste from Decommissioning of Nuclear Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Dragolici, F.; Turcanu, C. N.; Rotarescu, G.; Paunica, I.

    2003-02-25

    The proper application of the nuclear techniques and technologies in Romania started in 1957, once with the commissioning of the Research Reactor VVR-S from IFIN-HH-Magurele. During the last 45 years, appear thousands of nuclear application units with extremely diverse profiles (research, biology, medicine, education, agriculture, transport, all types of industry) which used different nuclear facilities containing radioactive sources and generating a great variety of radioactive waste during the decommissioning after the operation lifetime is accomplished. A new aspect appears by the planning of VVR-S Research Reactor decommissioning which will be a new source of radioactive waste generated by decontamination, disassembling and demolition activities. By construction and exploitation of the Radioactive Waste Treatment Plant (STDR)--Magurele and the National Repository for Low and Intermediate Radioactive Waste (DNDR)--Baita, Bihor county, in Romania was solved the management of radioactive wastes arising from operation and decommissioning of small nuclear facilities, being assured the protection of the people and environment. The present paper makes a review of the present technical status of the Romanian waste management facilities, especially raising on treatment capabilities of ''problem'' wastes such as Ra-266, Pu-238, Am-241 Co-60, Co-57, Sr-90, Cs-137 sealed sources from industrial, research and medical applications. Also, contain a preliminary estimation of quantities and types of wastes, which would result during the decommissioning project of the VVR-S Research Reactor from IFIN-HH giving attention to some special category of wastes like aluminum, graphite and equipment, components and structures that became radioactive through neutron activation. After analyzing the technical and scientific potential of STDR and DNDR to handle big amounts of wastes resulting from the decommissioning of VVR-S Research Reactor and small nuclear facilities, the necessity of

  20. Conceptual design report: Nuclear materials storage facility renovation. Part 1, Design concept. Part 2, Project management

    SciTech Connect

    1995-07-14

    The Nuclear Materials Storage Facility (NMSF) at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) was a Fiscal Year (FY) 1984 line-item project completed in 1987 that has never been operated because of major design and construction deficiencies. This renovation project, which will correct those deficiencies and allow operation of the facility, is proposed as an FY 97 line item. The mission of the project is to provide centralized intermediate and long-term storage of special nuclear materials (SNM) associated with defined LANL programmatic missions and to establish a centralized SNM shipping and receiving location for Technical Area (TA)-55 at LANL. Based on current projections, existing storage space for SNM at other locations at LANL will be loaded to capacity by approximately 2002. This will adversely affect LANUs ability to meet its mission requirements in the future. The affected missions include LANL`s weapons research, development, and testing (WRD&T) program; special materials recovery; stockpile survelliance/evaluation; advanced fuels and heat sources development and production; and safe, secure storage of existing nuclear materials inventories. The problem is further exacerbated by LANL`s inability to ship any materials offsite because of the lack of receiver sites for mate rial and regulatory issues. Correction of the current deficiencies and enhancement of the facility will provide centralized storage close to a nuclear materials processing facility. The project will enable long-term, cost-effective storage in a secure environment with reduced radiation exposure to workers, and eliminate potential exposures to the public. This document provides Part I - Design Concept which describes the selected solution, and Part II - Project Management which describes the management system organization, the elements that make up the system, and the control and reporting system.

  1. Novel S-35 Intrinsic Tracer Method for Determining Groundwater Travel Time near Managed Aquifer Recharge Facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urióstegui, S. H.; Bibby, R. K.; Esser, B. K.; Clark, J. F.

    2013-12-01

    Identifying groundwater travel times near managed aquifer recharge (MAR) facilities is a high priority for protecting public and environmental health. For MAR facilities in California that incorporate tertiary wastewater into their surface-spreading recharge practices, the target subsurface residence time is >9 months to allow for the natural inactivation and degradation of potential contaminants (less time is needed for full advanced treated water). Established intrinsic groundwater tracer techniques such as tritium/helium-3 dating are unable to resolve timescales of <1 year. These limitations provide the motivation for evaluating a novel groundwater tracer method using a naturally occurring radioisotope of sulfur, sulfur-35 (S-35). After its production in the atmosphere by cosmic ray interaction with argon, S-35 enters the hydrologic cycle as dissolved sulfate through precipitation The short half-life of S-35 (3 months) is ideal for investigating recharge and transport of MAR groundwater on the <1 year timescale of interest to MAR managers. The method, however, has not been applied to MAR operations because of the difficulty in measuring S-35 with sufficient sensitivity in high-sulfate waters. We have developed a new method and have applied it at two southern California MAR facilities where groundwater travel times have previously been characterized using deliberate tracers: 1) Rio Hondo Spreading Grounds in Los Angeles County, and 2) Orange County Groundwater Recharge Facilities in Orange County. Reasonable S-35 travel times of <1 year were identified at both study sites. This method also identified seasonal patterns in subsurface travel times, which may not be revealed by a deliberate tracer study that is dependent on the hydrologic conditions during the tracer injection period.

  2. The mixed waste management facility. Project baseline revision 1.2

    SciTech Connect

    Streit, R.D.; Throop, A.L.

    1995-04-01

    Revision 1.2 to the Project Baseline (PB) for the Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) is in response to DOE directives and verbal guidance to (1) Collocate the Decontamination and Waste Treatment Facility (DWTF) and MWMF into a single complex, integrate certain and overlapping functions as a cost-saving measure; (2) Meet certain fiscal year (FY) new-BA funding objectives ($15.3M in FY95) with lower and roughly balanced funding for out years; (3) Reduce Total Project Cost (TPC) for the MWMF Project; (4) Include costs for all appropriate permitting activities in the project TPC. This baseline revision also incorporates revisions in the technical baseline design for Molten Salt Oxidation (MSO) and Mediated Electrochemical Oxidation (MEO). Changes in the WBS dictionary that are necessary as a result of this rebaseline, as well as minor title changes, at WBS Level 3 or above (DOE control level) are approved as a separate document. For completeness, the WBS dictionary that reflects these changes is contained in Appendix B. The PB, with revisions as described in this document, were also the basis for the FY97 Validation Process, presented to DOE and their reviewers on March 21-22, 1995. Appendix C lists information related to prior revisions to the PB. Several key changes relate to the integration of functions and sharing of facilities between the portion of the DWTF that will house the MWMF and those portions that are used by the Hazardous Waste Management (HWM) Division at LLNL. This collocation has been directed by DOE as a cost-saving measure and has been implemented in a manner that maintains separate operational elements from a safety and permitting viewpoint. Appendix D provides background information on the decision and implications of collocating the two facilities.

  3. Technological options for management of hazardous wastes from US Department of Energy facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Chiu, S.; Newsom, D.; Barisas, S.; Humphrey, J.; Fradkin, L.; Surles, T.

    1982-08-01

    This report provides comprehensive information on the technological options for management of hazardous wastes generated at facilities owned or operated by the US Department of Energy (DOE). These facilities annually generate a large quantity of wastes that could be deemed hazardous under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Included in these wastes are liquids or solids containing polychlorinated biphenyls, pesticides, heavy metals, waste oils, spent solvents, acids, bases, carcinogens, and numerous other pollutants. Some of these wastes consist of nonnuclear hazardous chemicals; others are mixed wastes containing radioactive materials and hazardous chemicals. Nearly 20 unit processes and disposal methods are presented in this report. They were selected on the basis of their proven utility in waste management and potential applicability at DOE sites. These technological options fall into five categories: physical processes, chemical processes, waste exchange, fixation, and ultimate disposal. The options can be employed for either resource recovery, waste detoxification, volume reduction, or perpetual storage. Detailed descriptions of each technological option are presented, including information on process performance, cost, energy and environmental considerations, waste management of applications, and potential applications at DOE sites. 131 references, 25 figures, 23 tables.

  4. Some aspects of computer aided decision making for the crisis management of unstable slopes

    SciTech Connect

    Faure, R.M.; Pairault, T.; Pham, M.; Bernardeau-Moreau, A.; Fayolle, G.; Robinson, J.C.; Foucheyrand, G.

    1995-12-31

    The authors present here the developments in their risk management research; software tools based on object oriented techniques, an image and graphics based man-machine interface, a new algorithm which allows the quick construction of a GIS, strong links with analysis software with the possibility of using fuzzy logic reasoning. The case of the threatening landslide at Sechilienne (Isere, France), studied using these tools, is briefly presented. The authors will show that is management is facilitated through the use of networks as in the WASSS project approach.

  5. [A questionnaire about radiation safety management of the draining-water system at nuclear medicine facilities].

    PubMed

    Shizukuishi, Kazuya; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Narita, Hiroto; Kanaya, Shinichi; Kobayashi, Kazumi; Yamamoto, Tetsuo; Tsukada, Masaru; Iwanaga, Tetsuo; Ikebuchi, Shuji; Kusama, Keiji; Tanaka, Mamoru; Namiki, Norio; Fuiimura, Youko; Horikoshi, Akiko; Inoue, Tomio; Kusakabe, Kiyoko

    2004-05-01

    We conducted a questionnaire survey about radiation-safety management condition in Japanese nuclear medicine facilities to make materials of proposition for more reasonable management of medical radioactive waste. We distributed a questionnaire to institutions equipped with Nuclear Medicine facilities. Of 1,125 institutions, 642 institutes (52.8%) returned effective answers. The questionnaire covered the following areas: 1) scale of an institution, 2) presence of enforcement of radiotherapy, 3) system of a tank, 4) size and number of each tank, 5) a form of draining-water system, 6) a displacement in a radioactive rays management area, 7) a measurement method of the concentration of medical radioactive waste in draining water system, 8) planned and used quantity of radioisotopes for medical examination and treatment, 9) an average displacement of hospital for one month. In most institutions, a ratio of dose limitation of radioisotope in draining-water system was less than 1.0, defined as an upper limitation in ordinance. In 499 hospitals without facilities of hospitalization for unsealed radioisotope therapy, 473 hospitals reported that sum of ratios of dose limits in a draining-water system was less than 1.0. It was calculated by used dose of radioisotope and monthly displacement from hospital, on the premise that all used radioisotope entered in the general draining-water system. When a drainage including radioactivity from a controlled area join with that from other area before it flows out of a institution, it may be diluted and its radioactive concentration should be less than its upper limitation defined in the rule. Especially, in all institutions with a monthly displacement of more than 25,000 m3, the sum of ratio of the concentration of each radionuclide to the concentration limit dose calculated by used dose of radioisotope, indicated less than 1.0. PMID:15354724

  6. Alternative Delivery Systems for the Computer-Aided Instruction Study Management System (CAISMS).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nievergelt, Jurg; And Others

    The Computer-Assisted Instruction Study Management System (CAISMS) was developed and implemented on the PLATO system to monitor and guide student study of text materials. It administers assignments, gives quizzes, and automatically keeps track of a student's progress. This report describes CAISMS and several hypothetical implementations of CAISMS…

  7. Predicting pathogen risks to aid beach management: the real value of quantitative microbial risk assessment (QMRA)

    EPA Science Inventory

    There has been an ongoing dilemma for agencies who set criteria for safe recreational waters in how to provide for a seasonal assessment of a beach site versus guidance for day-to-day management. Typically an overall 'safe' criterion level is derived from epidemiologic studies o...

  8. 75 Hour Nurse Aide Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iowa Univ., Iowa City. Coll. of Education.

    This 75-hour nurse aide course has been designed to meet the training requirements of the Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1987 for aides working in nursing facilities and skilled nursing facilities. Emphasis in the course is on students achieving a basic level of knowledge and demonstrating skills to provide safe, effective resident care. The…

  9. The prevention and management of constipation in older adults in a residential aged care facility.

    PubMed

    Grieve, Jennifer

    2006-03-01

    The need to implement programs for developing leadership and practice improvement skills using an evidence-based practice approach to practice change is becoming more apparent in the health and aged care services. This is no more apparent than in high care residential health and aged care services, where health professionals are increasingly required to provide care for older people with multifocal and complex healthcare needs. This paper describes one of the projects undertaken as part of the Joanna Briggs Institute Commonwealth Department of Health and Ageing Clinical Aged Care Fellowship program from February 2005 to June 2005. This purpose of this particular project was twofold. First it sought to improve the local practice in the prevention and management of constipation and that this practice was performed according to the best available evidence. Second to use the Joanna Briggs Institute Practical Application of Clinical Guidance (PACES) program to implement a process of audit and feedback as a strategy to improve practice. The project was designed to link in with the facility's existing quality improvement program and better practice continence management project. The project was conducted over 6 months and was divided into six stages involving the identification of evidence-based standards of care, an initial audit to determine appropriate sample size, a clinical audit across the facility, planning of the implementation process, implementation of the action plan and re-audit to assess practice change. Overall, the results were extremely positive and demonstrated a real improvement in practice relating to constipation in the project facility. This success, however, needs to be seen in the context of the benefits of having the support of senior management, an existing quality improvement and continence management better practice project, and a culture of clinical review. Although there will always be more work to be done, the success of this project can be

  10. Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) groundwater monitoring report. Second quarter 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    Groundwater monitoring continued at the Savannah River Plant. During second quarter 1993, nine constituents exceeded final Primary Drinking Water Standards in groundwater samples from downgradient monitoring wells at the Mixed Waste Management Facility, the Old Burial Ground, the E-Area Vaults, and the proposed Hazardous Waste/Mixed Waste Disposal Vaults. As in previous quarters, tritium and trichloroethylene were the most widespread constituents. Chloroethene (vinyl chloride), dichloromethane (methylene chloride), 1,1-dichloroethylene, gross alpha, lead, nonvolatile beta, or tetrachloroethylene also exceeded standards in one or more wells. The groundwater flow directions and rates in the three hydrostratigraphic units were similar to those of previous quarters.

  11. Management of diabetes mellitus and hypertension at UNRWA primary health care facilities in Lebanon.

    PubMed

    Yusef, J I

    2000-01-01

    A cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted at all UNRWA primary health care facilities in Lebanon Field, to assess the quality of care of diabetes mellitus and hypertension. The study reviewed 2202 records of diabetic and hypertensive patients. Both diseases were present at an early age (< 40 years), with family history, obesity and sedentary lifestyle being the main risk factors. The major complication was cardiovascular disease followed by retinopathy. Action-oriented measures to improve the organization and management of the health care services were identified. PMID:11556027

  12. Metallurgical Laboratory Hazardous Waste Management Facility groundwater monitoring report. Second quarter 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, C.Y.

    1993-09-01

    During second quarter 1993, samples from AMB groundwater monitoring wells at the metallurgical Laboratory Hazardous Waste Management Facility (HWMF) were analyzed for certain heavy metals, indicator parameters, radionuclides, volatile organic compounds, and other constituents. Six parameters exceeded standards during the quarter. As in previous quarters, tetrachloroethylene and trichloroethylene exceeded final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS), and pH and total organic halogens exceeded the Savannah River Site (SRS) Flag 2 criteria in one or more of the wells. Dichloromethane (methylene chloride), a common laboratory contaminant which was first compared to its final PDWS during first quarter 1993, was elevated in three wells.

  13. Metallurgical Laboratory Hazardous Waste Management Facility groundwater monitoring report. First quarter, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    During first quarter 1994, samples from AMB groundwater monitoring wells at the Metallurgical Laboratory Hazardous Waste Management Facility (HWMF) were analyzed for selected heavy metals, indicator parameters, radionuclides, volatile organic compounds, and other constituents. Nine parameters exceeded standards during the quarter. As in previous quarters, tetrachloroethylne and trichloroethylene exceeded final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS); in addition, gross alpha and lead exceeded final PDWS during first quarter 1994. Aluminum, iron, manganese, pH, and total organic halogens exceeded the Savannah River Site (SRS) Flag 2 criteria in one or more of the wells. Groundwater flow direction and rate in the water-table unit were similar to previous quarters.

  14. Metallurgical Laboratory Hazardous Waste Management Facility groundwater monitoring report: Third quarter 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-01

    During third quarter 1993, samples from AMB groundwater monitoring wells at the Metallurgical Laboratory Hazardous Waste Management Facility were analyzed for certain heavy metals, indicator parameters, radionuclides, volatile organic compounds, and other constituents. Eight parameters exceeded standards during the quarter. As in previous quarters, tetrachloroethylene and trichloroethylene exceeded final Primary Drinking Water Standards; and aluminum, iron, lead, manganese, pH, and total organic halogens exceeded the Savannah River Site Flag 2 criteria in one or more of the wells. Groundwater flow direction and rate in the water-table unit were similar to previous quarters.

  15. Zebrafish Database: Customizable, Free, and Open-Source Solution for Facility Management.

    PubMed

    Yakulov, Toma Antonov; Walz, Gerd

    2015-12-01

    Zebrafish Database is a web-based customizable database solution, which can be easily adapted to serve both single laboratories and facilities housing thousands of zebrafish lines. The database allows the users to keep track of details regarding the various genomic features, zebrafish lines, zebrafish batches, and their respective locations. Advanced search and reporting options are available. Unique features are the ability to upload files and images that are associated with the respective records and an integrated calendar component that supports multiple calendars and categories. Built on the basis of the Joomla content management system, the Zebrafish Database is easily extendable without the need for advanced programming skills. PMID:26421518

  16. WIPP Facility Work Plan for Solid Waste Management Units and Areas of Concern

    SciTech Connect

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2002-03-05

    his 2002 Facility Work Plan (FWP) has been prepared as required by Module VII,Permit Condition VII.U.3 of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Hazardous Waste Facility Permit, NM4890139088-TSDF (the Permit) (New Mexico Environment Department [NMED], 1999a), and incorporates comments from the NMED received onDecember 6, 2000 (NMED, 2000a). This February 2002 FWP describes the program-matic facility-wide approach to future investigations at Solid Waste Management Units (SWMU) and Areas of Concern (AOC) specified in the Permit. The Permittees are evaluating data from previous investigations of the SWMUs and AOCs against the mostrecent guidance proposed by the NMED. Based on these data, and completion of the August 2001 sampling requested by the NMED, the Permittees expect that no further sampling will be required and that a request for No Further Action (NFA) at the SWMUs and AOCs will be submitted to the NMED. This FWP addresses the current Permit requirements. It uses the results of previous investigations performed at WIPP and expands the investigations as required by the Permit. As an alternative to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA)Facility Investigation (RFI) specified in Module VII of the Permit, current NMED guidance identifies an Accelerated Corrective Action Approach (ACAA) that may beused for any SWMU or AOC (NMED, 1998). This accelerated approach is used toreplace the standard RFI Work Plan and Report sequence with a more flexible decision-making approach. The ACAA process allows a facility to exit the schedule of compliance contained in the facility's Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments (HSWA) permit module and proceed on an accelerated time frame. Thus, the ACAA process can be entered either before or after an RFI Work Plan. According to the NMED's guidance, a facility can prepare an RFI Work Plan or Sampling and Analysis Plan (SAP) for any SWMU or AOC (NMED, 1998). Based on this guidance, a SAP constitutes an acceptable alternative to

  17. WIPP Facility Work Plan for Solid Waste Management Units and Areas of Concern

    SciTech Connect

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2002-03-05

    This 2002 Facility Work Plan (FWP) has been prepared as required by Module VII, Permit Condition VII.U.3 of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Hazardous Waste Facility Permit, NM4890139088-TSDF (the Permit) (New Mexico Environment Department [NMED], 1999a), and incorporates comments from the NMED received on December 6, 2000 (NMED, 2000a). This February 2002 FWP describes the programmatic facility-wide approach to future investigations at Solid Waste Management Units (SWMU) and Areas of Concern (AOC) specified in the Permit. The Permittees are evaluating data from previous investigations of the SWMUs and AOCs against the most recent guidance proposed by the NMED. Based on these data, and completion of the August 2001 sampling requested by the NMED, the Permittees expect that no further sampling will be required and that a request for No Further Action (NFA) at the SWMUs and AOCs will be submitted to the NMED. This FWP addresses the current Permit requirements. It uses the results of previous investigations performed at WIPP and expands the investigations as required by the Permit. As an alternative to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Facility Investigation (RFI) specified in Module VII of the Permit, current NMED guidance identifies an Accelerated Corrective Action Approach (ACAA) that may be used for any SWMU or AOC (NMED, 1998). This accelerated approach is used to replace the standard RFI Work Plan and Report sequence with a more flexible decision-making approach. The ACAA process allows a facility to exit the schedule of compliance contained in the facility's Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments (HSWA) permit module and proceed on an accelerated time frame. Thus, the ACAA processcan be entered either before or after an RFI Work Plan. According to the NMED's guidance, a facility can prepare an RFI Work Plan or Sampling and Analysis Plan (SAP) for any SWMU or AOC (NMED, 1998). Based on this guidance, a SAP constitutes an acceptable

  18. Environmental surveillance for EG&G Idaho Waste Management facilities at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. 1993 annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Wilhelmsen, R.N.; Wright, K.C.; McBride, D.W.; Borsella, B.W.

    1994-08-01

    This report describes calendar year 1993 environmental surveillance activities of Environmental Monitoring of EG&G Idaho, Inc., performed at EG&G Idaho operated Waste Management facilities at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The major facilities monitored include the Radioactive Waste Management Complex, the Waste Experimental Reduction Facility, the Mixed Waste Storage Facility, and two surplus facilities. Included are results of the sampling performed by the Radiological and Environmental Sciences Laboratory and the United States Geological Survey. The primary purposes of monitoring are to evaluate environmental conditions, to provide and interpret data, to ensure compliance with applicable regulations or standards, and to ensure protection of human health and the environment. This report compares 1993 environmental surveillance data with US Department of Energy derived concentration guides and with data from previous years.

  19. Municipal Solid Waste Management using Geographical Information System aided methods: a mini review.

    PubMed

    Khan, Debishree; Samadder, Sukha Ranjan

    2014-11-01

    Municipal Solid Waste Management (MSWM) is one of the major environmental challenges in developing countries. Many efforts to reduce and recover the wastes have been made, but still land disposal of solid wastes is the most popular one. Finding an environmentally sound landfill site is a challenging task. This paper addresses a mini review on various aspects of MSWM (suitable landfill site selection, route optimization and public acceptance) using the Geographical Information System (GIS) coupled with other tools. The salient features of each of the integrated tools with GIS are discussed in this paper. It is also addressed how GIS can help in optimizing routes for collection of solid wastes from transfer stations to disposal sites to reduce the overall cost of solid waste management. A detailed approach on performing a public acceptance study of a proposed landfill site is presented in this study. The study will help municipal authorities to identify the most effective method of MSWM. PMID:25352293

  20. A hidden view of wildlife conservation: How camera traps aid science, research and management

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Connell, Allan F.

    2015-01-01

    Camera traps — remotely activated cameras with infrared sensors — first gained measurable popularity in wildlife conservation in the early 1990s. Today, they’re used for a variety of activities, from species-specific research to broad-scale inventory or monitoring programs that, in some cases, attempt to detect biodiversity across vast landscapes. As this modern tool continues to evolve, it’s worth examining its uses and benefits for wildlife management and conservation.

  1. Design and implementation of a comprehensive residuals management system for the Cary/Apex water treatment facility

    SciTech Connect

    Tsang, K.R.; Dowbiggin, W.B.; White, M.; Fisher, K.; Bonne, R.; Creech, K.

    1998-07-01

    The Cary/Apex Water Treatment Facility was completed and began operation in 1993, with a design capacity of 0.526 m{sup 3}/s (12 mgd). Water demand has rapidly increased due to explosive growth in the service area. The residuals handling facilities initially provided at the WRF were soon overloaded, severely hampering the operation of the WTF. A comprehensive residuals management plan was developed and implemented to alleviate the existing problems. This paper presents a classic example of how residuals management needs are grossly overlooked in many treatment facility designs; the consequences of this neglect experienced by a rapidly growing community; and the development and implementation of a comprehensive residuals management plan to allow proper operation of the water treatment facility.

  2. Data management and its role in delivering science at DOE BES user facilities - Past, Present, and Future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Stephen D.; Herwig, Kenneth W.; Ren, Shelly; Vazhkudai, Sudharshan S.; Jemian, Pete R.; Luitz, Steffen; Salnikov, Andrei A.; Gaponenko, Igor; Proffen, Thomas; Lewis, Paul; Green, Mark L.

    2009-07-01

    The primary mission of user facilities operated by Basic Energy Sciences under the Department of Energy is to produce data for users in support of open science and basic research [1]. We trace back almost 30 years of history across selected user facilities illustrating the evolution of facility data management practices and how these practices have related to performing scientific research. The facilities cover multiple techniques such as X-ray and neutron scattering, imaging and tomography sciences. Over time, detector and data acquisition technologies have dramatically increased the ability to produce prolific volumes of data challenging the traditional paradigm of users taking data home upon completion of their experiments to process and publish their results. During this time, computing capacity has also increased dramatically, though the size of the data has grown significantly faster than the capacity of one's laptop to manage and process this new facility produced data. Trends indicate that this will continue to be the case for yet some time. Thus users face a quandary for how to manage today's data complexity and size as these may exceed the computing resources users have available to themselves. This same quandary can also stifle collaboration and sharing. Realizing this, some facilities are already providing web portal access to data and computing thereby providing users access to resources they need [2]. Portal based computing is now driving researchers to think about how to use the data collected at multiple facilities in an integrated way to perform their research, and also how to collaborate and share data. In the future, inter-facility data management systems will enable next tier cross-instrument-cross facility scientific research fuelled by smart applications residing upon user computer resources. We can learn from the medical imaging community that has been working since the early 1990's to integrate data from across multiple modalities to achieve

  3. Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) Groundwater Monitoring Report: Fourth quarter 1991 and 1991 summary

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, C.Y.

    1992-03-01

    During fourth quarter 1991, tritium, trichloroethylene, tetrachloroethylene, chloroethene (vinyl chloride), total radium, mercury, and lead exceeded the US Environmental Protection Agency primary drinking water standards (PDWS) in groundwater samples from monitoring wells at the Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) and adjacent facilities. Tritium and trichloroethylene were the most widespread contaminants; 55 (49%) wells exhibited elevated tritium activities, and 24 (21%) wells exhibited elevated trichloroethylene concentrations. Tritium and trichloroethylene levels exceeding the PDWS also occurred in several wells in Aquifer Unit IIA (Congaree). Levels of manganese, total organic halogens, nickel, iron, 1,1-dichloroethane, aluminum, nonvolatile beta, and trichlorofluoromethane that exceeded Flag 2 criteria were found in one or more wells beneath the MWMF. Downgradient wells in the three hydrostratigraphic units at the MWMF contained elevated levels of tritium, trichloroethylene, tetrachloroethylene, total radium, chloroethene (vinyl chloride), lead, mercury, manganese, total organic halogens, nickel, iron, 1,1-dichloroethane, aluminum, nonvolatile beta, or trichlorofluoromethane. Groundwater samples from 81 (72%) of the monitoring wells at the MWMF and adjacent facilities contained elevated levels of several contaminants.

  4. Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) groundwater monitoring report. Fourth quarter 1992 and 1992 summary

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-03-01

    During fourth quarter 1992, nine constituents exceeded final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) in one or more groundwater samples from monitoring wells at the Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) and adjacent facilities. As in previous quarters, tritium and trichloroethylene were the most widespread constituents. Fifty-seven (48%) of the 120 monitoring wells, contained elevated tritium activities, and 23 (19%) contained elevated trichloroethylene concentrations. Total alpha-emitting radium, tetrachloroethylene, chloroethene, cadmium, 1,1-dichloroethylene, lead, or nonvolatile beta levels exceeded standards in one or more wells. During 1992, elevated levels of 13 constituents were found in one or more of 80 of the 120 groundwater monitoring wells (67%) at the MWMF and adjacent facilities. Tritium and trichloroethylene exceeded their final PDWS more frequently and more consistently than did other constituents. Tritium activity exceeded its final PDWS m 67 wells and trichloroethylene was. elevated in 28 wells. Lead, tetrachloroethylene, total alpha-emitting radium, gross alpha, cadmium, chloroethene, 1,1-dichloroethylene 1,2-dichloroethane, mercury, or nitrate exceeded standards in one or more wells during the year. Nonvolatile beta exceeded its drinking water screening level in 3 wells during the year.

  5. Environmental assessment for the Radioactive and Mixed Waste Management Facility: Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-06-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA) (DOE/EA-0466) under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969 for the proposed completion of construction and subsequent operation of a central Radioactive and Mixed Waste Management Facility (RMWMF), in the southeastern portion of Technical Area III at Sandia National Laboratory, Albuquerque (SNLA). The RMWMF is designed to receive, store, characterize, conduct limited bench-scale treatment of, repackage, and certify low-level waste (LLW) and mixed waste (MW) (as necessary) for shipment to an offsite disposal or treatment facility. The RMWMF was partially constructed in 1989. Due to changing regulatory requirements, planned facility upgrades would be undertaken as part of the proposed action. These upgrades would include paving of road surfaces and work areas, installation of pumping equipment and lines for surface impoundment, and design and construction of air locks and truck decontamination and water treatment systems. The proposed action also includes an adjacent corrosive and reactive metals storage area, and associated roads and paving. LLW and MW generated at SNLA would be transported from the technical areas to the RMWMF in containers approved by the Department of Transportation. The RMWMF would not handle nonradioactive hazardous waste. Based on the analysis in the EA, the proposed completion of construction and operation of the RMWMF does not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of NEPA. Therefore, preparation of an environmental impact statement for the proposed action is not required.

  6. Breaking the Backlog Reduction Mold with FacMan: A Facilities Management Application for Maintenance Backlogs and Capital Renewal.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Managan, William H.

    1999-01-01

    Describes a facilities-management software program that helps managers better document and understand maintenance backlogs, improvements, and future cyclic renewal needs. Major software components are examined including a software tool that filters, groups, and ranks projects to help determine funding requests. (GR)

  7. Wastewater Facilities Operation and Management. Instructor Guide. Working for Clean Water: An Information Program for Advisory Groups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Long, David A.

    Local communities must be willing to spend funds to assure the proper operation and management of wastewater treatment facilities. Designed for citizen advisory groups, the one-hour learning session described in this instructor's manual covers problem areas, federal requirements, and responsibilities for wastewater plant operations and management.…

  8. [MATCHE: Management Approach to Teaching Consumer and Homemaking Education.] Occupational Strand: Human Development. Module II-E-4: Convalescent Home Aide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boogaert, John

    This competency-based preservice home economics teacher education module on convalescent home aide is the fourth in a set of four modules on establishing occupational programs for human development. (This set is part of a larger set of sixty-seven modules on the Management Approach to Teaching Consumer and Homemaking Education [MATCHE]--see CE 019…

  9. California Department of Education and California Community College Chancellor's Office Vocational and Technical Education Computer-Managed and Aided Instruction Project: Project Summary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Community Colleges, Sacramento. Office of the Chancellor.

    This description of the Computer-Managed and Aided Instruction (CMAI) Project includes a summary of a December 1989 CMAI planning meeting, the text of a paper presented at the meeting, and descriptions of each of the five phases of the project. The paper, "Programming the Future," by Gerald C. Angove and Scott Smith, discusses: (1) the…

  10. Pollution prevention opportunity assessment for the SNL/California waste management facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Braye, S.; Phillips, N.M.

    1995-01-01

    SNL/California`s waste management facilities, Bldgs. 961 and 962-2, generate a secondary stream of hazardous and radioactive waste. This waste stream is generated mainly during the processing and handling of hazardous, radioactive, and mixed wastes (primary waste stream), which are generated by the laboratories, and when cleaning up spills. The secondary waste stream begins with the removal of a generator`s hazardous, radioactive, and mixed waste from specified collection areas. The waste stream ends when the containers of processed waste are loaded for shipment off-site. The total amount of secondary hazardous waste generated in the waste management facilities from January 1993 to July 1994 was 1,160.6 kg. The total amount of secondary radioactive waste generated during the same period was 1,528.8 kg (with an activity of 0.070 mCi). Mixed waste usually is not generated in the secondary waste stream. This pollution prevention opportunity assessment (PPOA) was conducted using the graded approach methodology developed by the Department of Energy (DOE) PPOA task group. The original method was modified to accommodate the needs of Sandia`s site-specific processes. The options generated for potential hazardous waste minimization, cost savings, and environmental health and safety were the result of a waste minimization team effort. The results of the team efforts are summarized.

  11. Analyzing Impact of Intermodal Facilities on Design and Management of Biofuel Supply Chain

    SciTech Connect

    Eksioglu, Sandra D; Li, Song; Zhang, Shu; Petrolia, Daniel; Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine

    2010-09-01

    The impact of an intermodal facility on location and transportation decisions for biofuel production plants is analyzed. Location decisions affect the management of the inbound and outbound logistics of a plant. This supply chain design and management problem is modeled as a mixed integer program. Input data for this model are location of intermodal facilities and available transportation modes, cost and cargo capacity for each transportation mode, geographical distribution of biomass feedstock and production yields, and biomass processing and inventory costs. Outputs from this model are the number, location, and capacity of biofuel production plants. For each plant, the transportation mode used, timing of shipments, shipment size, inventory size, and production schedule that minimize the delivery cost of biofuel are determined. The model proposed in this research can be used as a decision-making tool for investors in the biofuels industry since it estimates the real cost of the business. The state of Mississippi is considered as the testing grounds for the model.

  12. Metallurgical Laboratory Hazardous Waste Management Facility groundwater monitoring report. Fourth quarter 1993 and 1993 summary

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-03-01

    The AMB wells at the Metallurgical Laboratory Hazardous Waste Management Facility (Met Lab HWMF) are monitored for selected constituents to comply with the Natural Resources Defense council et al. Consent Decree of May 1988 that identifies the Met Lab HWMF as subject to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. In addition, the wells are monitored, as requested, for other constituents as part of the Savannah River Site (SRS) Groundwater Monitoring Program. During the fourth quarter 1993, samples from AMB groundwater monitoring wells at the Metallurgical Laboratory Hazardous Waste Management Facility were analyzed for selected heavy metals, indicator parameters, radionuclides, volatile organic compounds, and other constituents. Six parameters exceeded standards during the quarter. As in previous quarters, dichloromethane (methylene chloride), tetrachloroethylene, and trichloroethylene exceeded final Primary Drinking Water Standards; pH, specific conductance, and total organic halogens exceeded the Savannah River Site Flag 2 criteria in one or more of the wells. Groundwater flow direction and rate in the water-table unit were similar to previous quarters.

  13. Risk management study for the retired Hanford Site facilities: Qualitative risk evaluation for the retired Hanford Site facilities. Volume 3

    SciTech Connect

    Coles, G.A.; Shultz, M.V.; Taylor, W.E.

    1993-09-01

    This document provides a risk evaluation of the 100 and 200 Area retired, surplus facilities on the Hanford Site. Also included are the related data that were compiled by the risk evaluation team during investigations performed on the facilities. Results are the product of a major effort performed in fiscal year 1993 to produce qualitative information that characterizes certain risks associated with these facilities. The retired facilities investigated for this evaluation are located in the 100 and 200 Areas of the 1,450-km{sup 2} (570-mi{sup 2}) Hanford Site. The Hanford Site is a semiarid tract of land in southeastern Washington State. The nearest population center is Richland, Washington, (population 32,000) 30-km (20 mi) southeast of the 200 Area. During walkdown investigations of these facilities, data on real and potential hazards that threatened human health or safety or created potential environmental release issues were identified by the risk evaluation team. Using these findings, the team categorized the identified hazards by facility and evaluated the risk associated with each hazard. The factors contributing to each risk, and the consequence and likelihood of harm associated with each hazard also are included in this evaluation.

  14. Predicting pathogen risks to aid beach management: the real value of quantitative microbial risk assessment (QMRA).

    PubMed

    Ashbolt, Nicholas J; Schoen, Mary E; Soller, Jeffrey A; Roser, David J

    2010-09-01

    There has been an ongoing dilemma for agencies that set criteria for safe recreational waters in how to provide for a seasonal assessment of a beach site versus guidance for day-to-day management. Typically an overall 'safe' criterion level is derived from epidemiologic studies of sewage-impacted beaches. The decision criterion is based on a percentile value for a single sample or a moving median of a limited number (e.g. five per month) of routine samples, which are reported at least the day after recreator exposure has occurred. The focus of this paper is how to better undertake day-to-day recreational site monitoring and management. Internationally, good examples exist where predictive empirical regression models (based on rainfall, wind speed/direction, etc.) may provide an estimate of the target faecal indicator density for the day of exposure. However, at recreational swimming sites largely impacted by non-sewage sources of faecal indicators, there is concern that the indicator-illness associations derived from studies at sewage-impacted beaches may be inappropriate. Furthermore, some recent epidemiologic evidence supports the relationship to gastrointestinal (GI) illness with qPCR-derived measures of Bacteroidales/Bacteroides spp. as well as more traditional faecal indicators, but we understand less about the environmental fate of these molecular targets and their relationship to bather risk. Modelling pathogens and indicators within a quantitative microbial risk assessment framework is suggested as a way to explore the large diversity of scenarios for faecal contamination and hydrologic events, such as from waterfowl, agricultural animals, resuspended sediments and from the bathers themselves. Examples are provided that suggest that more site-specific targets derived by QMRA could provide insight, directly translatable to management actions. PMID:20638095

  15. Serum Aspergillus Galactomannan for the Management of Disseminated Histoplasmosis in AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Rivière, Sébastien; Denis, Blandine; Bougnoux, Marie-Elisabeth; Lanternier, Fanny; Lecuit, Marc; Lortholary, Olivier

    2012-01-01

    Disseminated histoplasmosis is an emerging infection in patients with cellular immune deficiency in non-endemic countries, caused by the migration from endemic regions and the development of travels. Diagnosis can be challenging in this context because rapid diagnostic tools such as Histoplasma antigen detection or appropriate molecular tools are generally unavailable, serology is often negative in immunosuppressed patients, and isolation of the fungus from cultures often takes several weeks. Here, we report the contribution of galactomannan serum detection for the management of an HIV-infected patient with disseminated histoplasmosis. PMID:22855762

  16. The keys to CERN conference rooms - Managing local collaboration facilities in large organisations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baron, T.; Domaracky, M.; Duran, G.; Fernandes, J.; Ferreira, P.; Gonzalez Lopez, J. B.; Jouberjean, F.; Lavrut, L.; Tarocco, N.

    2014-06-01

    For a long time HEP has been ahead of the curve in its usage of remote collaboration tools, like videoconference and webcast, while the local CERN collaboration facilities were somewhat behind the expected quality standards for various reasons. This time is now over with the creation by the CERN IT department in 2012 of an integrated conference room service which provides guidance and installation services for new rooms (either equipped for videoconference or not), as well as maintenance and local support. Managing now nearly half of the 246 meeting rooms available on the CERN sites, this service has been built to cope with the management of all CERN rooms with limited human resources. This has been made possible by the intensive use of professional software to manage and monitor all the room equipment, maintenance and activity. This paper focuses on presenting these packages, either off-the-shelf commercial products (asset and maintenance management tool, remote audio-visual equipment monitoring systems, local automation devices, new generation touch screen interfaces for interacting with the room) when available or locally developed integration and operational layers (generic audio-visual control and monitoring framework) and how they help overcoming the challenges presented by such a service. The aim is to minimise local human interventions while preserving the highest service quality and placing the end user back in the centre of this collaboration platform.

  17. Corrective action management unit application for the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, G.C.

    1994-06-01

    The Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF) is to accept both CERCLA (EPA-regulated) and RCRA (Ecology-regulated) remediation waste. The ERDF is considered part of the overall remediation strategy on the Hanford Site, and as such, determination of ERDF viability has followed both RCRA and CERCLA decision making processes. Typically, determination of the viability of a unit, such as the ERDF, would occur as part of record of decision (ROD) or permit modification for each remediation site before construction of the ERDF. However, because construction of the ERDF may take a significant amount of time, it is necessary to begin design and construction of the ERDF before final RODs/permit modifications for the remediation sites. This will allow movement of waste to occur quickly once the final remediation strategy for the RCRA and CERCLA past-practice units is determined. Construction of the ERDF is a unique situation relative to Hanford Facility cleanup, requiring a Hanford Facility specific process be developed for implementing the ERDF that would satisfy both RCRA and CERCLA requirements. While the ERDF will play a significant role in the remediation process, initiation of the ERDF does not preclude the evaluation of remedial alternatives at each remediation site. To facilitate this, the January 1994 amendment to the Tri-Party Agreement recognizes the necessity for the ERDF, and the Tri-Party Agreement states: ``Ecology, EPA, and DOE agree to proceed with the steps necessary to design, approve, construct, and operate such a ... facility.`` The Tri-Party Agreement requires the DOE-RL to prepare a comprehensive ``package`` for the EPA and Ecology to consider in evaluating the ERDF. The package is to address the criteria listed in 40 CFR 264.552(c) for corrective action management unit (CAMU) designation and a CERCLA ROD. This CAMU application is submitted as part of the Tri-Party Agreement-required information package.

  18. Pain management in a long-term care facility: compliance with JCAHO standards.

    PubMed

    Mullins, Craig R; Wild, Teresa L

    2003-01-01

    An analysis of the treatment of nonmalignant pain in the elderly at a long-term facility was conducted to allow development of a pain management program that complies with both JCAHO guidelines for pain management and with the Tennessee Medicaid (TennCare) reimbursement schedule, and to determine if tramadol can meet the standards of pain management under these new guidelines. Inclusion criteria were residence in our long-term care facility; a pain intensity score > 4 on a modified Wong Baker Pain Scale; the patient having prescription orders for one or more of the following drugs: propoxyphene, meperidine, or high dosages of acetaminophen (approaching 4 g/day); suspected neuropathic or mixed nociceptive/neuropathic pain; and/or a diagnosis of diabetes, osteoarthritis, or degenerative joint disease. Exclusion criteria were history of seizures, history of opioid or alcohol abuse, and demonstrated hypersensitivity to tramadol or opioids. Tramadol administration began at a dose of 25 mg/day titrated up to a maximum of 300 mg/day over a 16-day period. Data were collected from computer records, dispensing reports, medication administration reports (MARs), current federal minimum data set (MDS) data, and weekly care plan meetings. Data were tabulated at baseline and 4-6 weeks after a stable dose of tramadol had been established. Fourteen residents (mean age 85 years, 1 male, 13 female) met the criteria and received tramadol up to 300 mg/day (qid). Tramadol reduced the residents' pain scores from an average of 6 to 2 using the Modified Wong Baker Pain Scale, reduced the percentage of residents taking propoxyphene from 50% to 14%, and reduced those taking high doses of APAP or APAP products from 43% to 14%. Tramadol reduced the percentage of residents falling, losing weight, showing no change or decline in activities in daily living (ADLs), displaying inappropriate behavioral symptoms, suffering depression, and/or taking psychotropic medications. In the state of Tennessee

  19. Quality of malaria case management at outpatient health facilities in Angola

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Angola's malaria case-management policy recommends treatment with artemether-lumefantrine (AL). In 2006, AL implementation began in Huambo Province, which involved training health workers (HWs), supervision, delivering AL to health facilities, and improving malaria testing with microscopy and rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs). Implementation was complicated by a policy that was sometimes ambiguous. Methods Fourteen months after implementation began, a cross-sectional survey was conducted in 33 outpatient facilities in Huambo Province to assess their readiness to manage malaria and the quality of malaria case-management for patients of all ages. Consultations were observed, patients were interviewed and re-examined, and HWs were interviewed. Results Ninety-three HWs and 177 consultations were evaluated, although many sampled consultations were missed. All facilities had AL in-stock and at least one HW trained to use AL and RDTs. However, anti-malarial stock-outs in the previous three months were common, clinical supervision was infrequent, and HWs had important knowledge gaps. Except for fever history, clinical assessments were often incomplete. Although testing was recommended for all patients with suspected malaria, only 30.7% of such patients were tested. Correct testing was significantly associated with caseloads < 25 patients/day (odds ratio: 18.4; p < 0.0001) and elevated patient temperature (odds ratio: 2.5 per 1°C increase; p = 0.007). Testing was more common among AL-trained HWs, but the association was borderline significant (p = 0.072). When the malaria test was negative, HWs often diagnosed patients with malaria (57.8%) and prescribed anti-malarials (60.0%). Sixty-six percent of malaria-related diagnoses were correct, 20.1% were minor errors, and 13.9% were major (potentially life-threatening) errors. Only 49.0% of malaria treatments were correct, 5.4% were minor errors, and 45.6% were major errors. HWs almost always dosed AL correctly and gave

  20. Management of complex knowledge in planning for sustainable development: The use of multi-criteria decision aids

    SciTech Connect

    Kain, Jaan-Henrik Soederberg, Henriette

    2008-01-15

    The vision of sustainable development entails new and complex planning situations, confronting local policy makers with changing political conditions, different content in decision making and planning and new working methods. Moreover, the call for sustainable development has been a major driving force towards an increasingly multi-stakeholder planning system. This situation requires competence in working in, and managing, groups of actors, including not only experts and project owners but also other categories of stakeholders. Among other qualities, such competence requires a working strategy aimed at integrating various, and sometimes incommensurable, forms of knowledge to construct a relevant and valid knowledge base prior to decision making. Consequently, there lies great potential in methods that facilitate the evaluation of strategies for infrastructural development across multiple knowledge areas, so-called multi-criteria decision aids (MCDAs). In the present article, observations from six case studies are discussed, where the common denominators are infrastructural planning, multi-stakeholder participation and the use of MCDAs as interactive decision support. Three MCDAs are discussed - NAIADE, SCA and STRAD - with an emphasis on how they function in their procedural context. Accordingly, this is not an analysis of MCDA algorithms, of software programming aspects or of MCDAs as context-independent 'decision machines'-the focus is on MCDAs as actor systems, not as expert systems. The analysis is carried out across four main themes: (a) symmetrical management of different forms of knowledge; (b) management of heterogeneity, pluralism and conflict; (c) functionality and ease of use; and (d) transparency and trust. It shows that STRAD, by far, seems to be the most useful MCDA in interactive settings. NAIADE and SCA are roughly equivalent but have their strengths and weaknesses in different areas. Moreover, it was found that some MCDA issues require further

  1. [The campaign against AIDS and the costs incurred by various forms of management].

    PubMed

    Bez, G

    1990-11-01

    It is not easy to identify these costs. One must start by setting out the data of the whole health system, either in hospitals or privately. Furthermore, the statistical disposition is purely administrative, not epidemiological. No budget has been set aside for pathology. However, the total health costs involved are estimated at 2.2 billion francs for 1990. A 27% increase of costs brings the total to 2.7 billion in 1991. This figure represents 1.2% of the overall sum allocated to French hospitals. Local medical care by physicians in town will include expenses of 200 MF in 1991, or 7% of the total sanitary budget. The bulk of these expenses go to hospital care for chronic cases, also strategically important are the outpatients, whose costs accounts for only 15-20% of the total. Various medical expenses form an impressionable part of these costs. At the heart of these expenses is the cost related to the use of antivirals. The bill for 1990 was particularly high: 190 millions of francs. These expenses equal to those incurred by local medical care. Numerous productive steps have been taken by French hospitals in the last 3 years, enabling significant cost control, particularly in operational management. Today they are more selective, less expensive and less frequent. Due to a broadening number of charges to be paid in advance, the continuing increase of expenses remains a worry, as for the availability and costs of putting new molecules on the market. Without a strong liaison between doctors and managers, there can be no compromise in the improvement of medical care and the research for financial stability. PMID:2128824

  2. Symptom management and self-care for peripheral neuropathy in HIV/AIDS.

    PubMed

    Nicholas, P K; Kemppainen, J K; Canaval, G E; Corless, I B; Sefcik, E F; Nokes, K M; Bain, C A; Kirksey, K M; Eller, L Sanzero; Dole, P J; Hamilton, M J; Coleman, C L; Holzemer, W L; Reynolds, N R; Portillo, C J; Bunch, E H; Wantland, D J; Voss, J; Phillips, R; Tsai, Y-F; Mendez, M Rivero; Lindgren, T G; Davis, S M; Gallagher, D M

    2007-02-01

    Peripheral neuropathy is the most common neurological complication in HIV and is often associated with antiretroviral therapy. As part of a larger study on self-care for symptoms in HIV disease, this study analyzed the prevalence and characteristics of peripheral neuropathy in HIV disease, sociodemographic and disease-related correlates and self-care strategies. A convenience sample of 1,217 respondents was recruited from data collection sites in several US cities, Puerto Rico, Colombia and Taiwan. Results of the study indicated that respondents with peripheral neuropathy (n=450) identified 20 self-care behaviors including complementary therapies, use of medications, exercise and rest and/or elevation of extremities. Ratings of frequency and effectiveness were also included. An activities checklist summarized into five categories of self-care behaviors including activities/thoughts, exercise, medications, complementary therapies and substance was used to determine self-care behaviors. Taking a hot bath was the most frequent strategy used by those with peripheral neuropathy (n=292) and received the highest overall rating of effectiveness of any self-management strategies included in this study at 8.1 (scale 1-10). Other self-care strategies to manage this symptom included: staying off the feet (n=258), rubbing the feet with cream (n=177), elevating the feet (n=236), walking (n=262), prescribed anti-epileptic agent (n=80), prescribed analgesics (n=84), over-the-counter medications (n=123), vitamin B (n=122), calcium supplements (n=72), magnesium (n=48), massage (n=156), acupuncture (n=43), reflexology (n=23) and meditation (n=80). Several behaviors that are often deemed unhealthy were included among the strategies reported to alleviate peripheral neuropathy including use of marijuana (n=67), cigarette smoking (n=139), drinking alcohol (n=81) and street drugs (n=30). PMID:17364396

  3. Residents' concerns and attitudes toward solid waste management facilities in Palestine: a case study of Hebron district.

    PubMed

    Al-Khatib, Issam A; Ajlouny, Hiba; Al-Sari', Majed I; Kontogianni, Stamatia

    2014-03-01

    Because of many limitations, the siting, construction and operation of a new solid waste management (SWM) facility is a significant challenge in Palestine. A SWM facility should operate in a sustainable in all aspects, including social acceptance, environmental protection, financial equity, and, in this particular case study, the political acceptance of all regional parts is extremely important. This article presents the outcomes of an extended study that aimed to investigate the concerns and attitudes of the residents of Hebron governorate related to the entire lifecycle of SWM facilities. A structured questionnaire was developed based on literature reviews and was distributed to residents in three different communities in the same governorate with various lifestyle backgrounds. The overall investigation focused on the collection of raw data regarding citizens' levels of concern regarding the environmental impacts of SWM facilities, the general waste management aspects, the benefits gained by the operation of various types of SWM facilities and the attitudes during the construction period of each facility. The results show that concerns about water pollution are significant; the benefits gained as a result of the operation of SWM facilities, particularly the heat supply from incinerators, are welcomed; and 'not in my backyard' syndrome is highlighted. The outcomes of this research are input data for the development of a roadmap that may include educational programs, incentive schemes and active public involvement during all phases of the implementation of SWM facilities (planning, siting, operation), in order to also ensure public acceptance, participation and regional sustainable development. PMID:24522776

  4. Assessment of External Hazards at Radioactive Waste and Used Fuel Management Facilities - 13505

    SciTech Connect

    Gerchikov, Mark; Schneider, Glenn; Khan, Badi; Alderson, Elizabeth

    2013-07-01

    One of the key lessons from the Fukushima accident is the importance of having a comprehensive identification and evaluation of risks posed by external events to nuclear facilities. While the primary focus has been on nuclear power plants, the Canadian nuclear industry has also been updating hazard assessments for radioactive waste and used fuel management facilities to ensure that lessons learnt from Fukushima are addressed. External events are events that originate either physically outside the nuclear site or outside its control. They include natural events, such as high winds, lightning, earthquakes or flood due to extreme rainfall. The approaches that have been applied to the identification and assessment of external hazards in Canada are presented and analyzed. Specific aspects and considerations concerning hazards posed to radioactive waste and used fuel management operations are identified. Relevant hazard identification techniques are described, which draw upon available regulatory guidance and standard assessment techniques such as Hazard and Operability Studies (HAZOPs) and 'What-if' analysis. Consideration is given to ensuring that hazard combinations (for example: high winds and flooding due to rainfall) are properly taken into account. Approaches that can be used to screen out external hazards, through a combination of frequency and impact assessments, are summarized. For those hazards that cannot be screened out, a brief overview of methods that can be used to conduct more detailed hazard assessments is also provided. The lessons learnt from the Fukushima accident have had a significant impact on specific aspects of the approaches used to hazard assessment for waste management. Practical examples of the effect of these impacts are provided. (authors)

  5. HIV / AIDS

    MedlinePlus

    ... Marketing Share this: Main Content Area Understanding HIV/AIDS AIDS was first reported in the United States in ... and has since become a major worldwide epidemic. AIDS is caused by the human immunodeficiency virus, or ...

  6. Annual Report for 2008 - 2009 Detection Monitoring at the Environmental Management Waste Management Facility, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Walker J.R.

    2010-03-01

    This annual Environmental Monitoring Report (EMR) presents results of environmental monitoring performed during fiscal year (FY) 2009 (October 1, 2008 - September 30, 2009) at the Environmental Management Waste Management Facility (EMWMF). The EMWMF is an operating state-of-the-art hazardous waste landfill located in Bear Creek Valley (BCV) west of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) on the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee (Appendix A, Fig. A.1). Opened in 2002 and operated by a DOE prime contractor, Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC (BJC), the EMWMF was built specifically to accommodate disposal of acceptable solid wastes generated from Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) remedial actions for former waste sites and buildings that have been impacted by past DOE operations on the ORR and at DOE sites off the ORR within the state of Tennessee. Environmental monitoring at the EMWMF is performed to detect and monitor the impact of facility operations on groundwater, surface water, stormwater, and air quality and to determine compliance with applicable or relevant and appropriate requirements (ARARs) specified in governing CERCLA decision documents. Annually, the EMR presents an evaluation of the groundwater, surface water, stormwater, and air monitoring data with respect to the applicable EMWMF performance standards. The purpose of the evaluation is to: (1) identify monitoring results that indicate evidence of a contaminant release from the EMWMF to groundwater, surface water, stormwater, or air, and (2) recommend appropriate changes to the associated sampling and analysis requirements, including sampling locations, methods, and frequencies; field measurements; or laboratory analytes that may be warranted in response to the monitoring data. Sect. 2 of this annual EMR provides background information relevant to environmental monitoring at the landfill, including

  7. Design of the Long-term Waste Management Facility for Historic LLRW Port Hope Project - 13322

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, Don; Barton, David; Case, Glenn

    2013-07-01

    The Municipality of Port Hope is located on the northern shores of Lake Ontario approximately 100 km east of Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Starting in the 1930's, radium and later uranium processing by Eldorado Gold Mines Limited (subsequently Eldorado Nuclear Limited) (Eldorado) at their refinery in Port Hope resulted in the generation of process residues and wastes that were disposed of indiscriminately throughout the Municipality until about the mid-1950's. These process residues contained radium (Ra- 226), uranium, arsenic and other contaminants. Between 1944 and 1988, Eldorado was a Federal Crown Corporation, and as such, the Canadian Federal Government has assumed responsibility for the clean-up and long-term management of the historic waste produced by Eldorado during this period. The Port Hope Project involves the construction and development of a new long-term waste management facility (LTWMF), and the remediation and transfer of the historic wastes located within the Municipality of Port Hope to the new LTWMF. The new LTWMF will consist of an engineered above-ground containment mound designed to contain and isolate the wastes from the surrounding environment for the next several hundred years. The design of the engineered containment mound consists of a primary and secondary composite base liner system and composite final cover system, made up of both natural materials (e.g., compacted clay, granular materials) and synthetic materials (e.g., geo-synthetic clay liner, geo-membrane, geo-textiles). The engineered containment mound will cover an area of approximately 13 hectares and will contain the estimated 1.2 million cubic metres of waste that will be generated from the remedial activities within Port Hope. The LTWMF will also include infrastructure and support facilities such as access roads, administrative offices, laboratory, equipment and personnel decontamination facilities, waste water treatment plant and other ancillary facilities. Preliminary

  8. A novel microgrid demand-side management system for manufacturing facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harper, Terance J.

    Thirty-one percent of annual energy consumption in the United States occurs within the industrial sector, where manufacturing processes account for the largest amount of energy consumption and carbon emissions. For this reason, energy efficiency in manufacturing facilities is increasingly important for reducing operating costs and improving profits. Using microgrids to generate local sustainable power should reduce energy consumption from the main utility grid along with energy costs and carbon emissions. Also, microgrids have the potential to serve as reliable energy generators in international locations where the utility grid is often unstable. For this research, a manufacturing process that had approximately 20 kW of peak demand was matched with a solar photovoltaic array that had a peak output of approximately 3 KW. An innovative Demand-Side Management (DSM) strategy was developed to manage the process loads as part of this smart microgrid system. The DSM algorithm managed the intermittent nature of the microgrid and the instantaneous demand of the manufacturing process. The control algorithm required three input signals; one from the microgrid indicating the availability of renewable energy, another from the manufacturing process indicating energy use as a percent of peak production, and historical data for renewable sources and facility demand. Based on these inputs the algorithm had three modes of operation: normal (business as usual), curtailment (shutting off non-critical loads), and energy storage. The results show that a real-time management of a manufacturing process with a microgrid will reduce electrical consumption and peak demand. The renewable energy system for this research was rated to provide up to 13% of the total manufacturing capacity. With actively managing the process loads with the DSM program alone, electrical consumption from the utility grid was reduced by 17% on average. An additional 24% reduction was accomplished when the microgrid

  9. Capacity of Health Facilities to Manage Hypertension in Mukono and Buikwe Districts in Uganda: Challenges and Recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Musinguzi, Geofrey; Bastiaens, Hilde; Wanyenze, Rhoda K.; Mukose, Aggrey; Van geertruyden, Jean-Pierre; Nuwaha, Fred

    2015-01-01

    Background The burden of chronic diseases is increasing in both low- and middle-income countries. However, healthcare systems in low-income countries are inadequately equipped to deal with the growing disease burden, which requires chronic care for patients. The aim of this study was to assess the capacity of health facilities to manage hypertension in two districts in Uganda. Methods In a cross-sectional study conducted between June and October 2012, we surveyed 126 health facilities (6 hospitals, 4 Health Center IV (HCIV), 23 Health Center III (HCIII), 41 Health Center II (HCII) and 52 private clinics/dispensaries) in Mukono and Buikwe districts in Uganda. We assessed records, conducted structured interviews with heads of facilities, and administered questionnaires to 271 health workers. The study assessed service provision for hypertension, availability of supplies such as medicines, guidelines and equipment, in-service training for hypertension, knowledge of hypertension management, challenges and recommendations. Results Of the 126 health facilities, 92.9% reported managing (diagnosing/treating) patients with hypertension, and most (80.2%) were run by non-medical doctors or non-physician health workers (NPHW). Less than half (46%) of the facilities had guidelines for managing hypertension. A 10th of the facilities lacked functioning blood pressure devices and 28% did not have stethoscopes. No facilities ever calibrated their BP devices except one. About a half of the facilities had anti-hypertensive medicines in stock; mainly thiazide diuretics (46%), beta blockers (56%) and calcium channel blockers (48.4%). Alpha blockers, mixed alpha & beta blockers and angiotensin II receptor antagonists were only stocked by private clinics/dispensaries. Most HCIIs lacked anti-hypertensive medicines, including the first line thiazide diuretics. Significant knowledge gaps in classification of patients as hypertensive were noted among respondents. All health workers (except 5

  10. Use of a DBMS (data base management system) to aid in the software conversion process

    SciTech Connect

    Huntley, A.F.; Bryant, R.A.; Buhrmaster, M.A.; Christian, J.L.; Hume, R.

    1987-02-01

    Procedures are described that provide for the automated conversion of a screen library containing over a thousand screen display definitions to a new screen definition software package. The first step is to extract the screen definition information from the original screen package. This information is then loaded into a data base management system (DBMS). The information is manipulated as necessary and output in a format that can be utilized by the new screen package. A major benefit of the procedures developed is that a DBMS allows bulk updates of multiple screen definitions to be performed. Both the source and target screen packages provide only for the updating of individual screens. Although the procedures described apply to the problem of converting screen definitions for a specific application using the two specific screen definition software packages, the flexibility inherent in a DBMS allows its use in solving many such complex problems. The concept can be modified to allow possibilities limited only by the creativity of the DBMS users and the information contained in the data base.

  11. Improving the Flexibility of Optimization-Based Decision Aiding Frameworks for Integrated Water Resource Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillaume, J. H.; Kasprzyk, J. R.

    2013-12-01

    Deep uncertainty refers to situations in which stakeholders cannot agree on the full suite of risks for their system or their probabilities. Additionally, systems are often managed for multiple, conflicting objectives such as minimizing cost, maximizing environmental quality, and maximizing hydropower revenues. Many objective analysis (MOA) uses a quantitative model combined with evolutionary optimization to provide a tradeoff set of potential solutions to a planning problem. However, MOA is often performed using a single, fixed problem conceptualization. Focus on development of a single formulation can introduce an "inertia" into the problem solution, such that issues outside the initial formulation are less likely to ever be addressed. This study uses the Iterative Closed Question Methodology (ICQM) to continuously reframe the optimization problem, providing iterative definition and reflection for stakeholders. By using a series of directed questions to look beyond a problem's existing modeling representation, ICQM seeks to provide a working environment within which it is easy to modify the motivating question, assumptions, and model identification in optimization problems. The new approach helps identify and reduce bottle-necks introduced by properties of both the simulation model and optimization approach that reduce flexibility in generation and evaluation of alternatives. It can therefore help introduce new perspectives on the resolution of conflicts between objectives. The Lower Rio Grande Valley portfolio planning problem is used as a case study.

  12. The use of an automated flight test management system in the development of a rapid-prototyping flight research facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duke, Eugene L.; Hewett, Marle D.; Brumbaugh, Randal W.; Tartt, David M.; Antoniewicz, Robert F.; Agarwal, Arvind K.

    1988-01-01

    An automated flight test management system (ATMS) and its use to develop a rapid-prototyping flight research facility for artificial intelligence (AI) based flight systems concepts are described. The ATMS provides a flight test engineer with a set of tools that assist in flight planning and simulation. This system will be capable of controlling an aircraft during the flight test by performing closed-loop guidance functions, range management, and maneuver-quality monitoring. The rapid-prototyping flight research facility is being developed at the Dryden Flight Research Facility of the NASA Ames Research Center (Ames-Dryden) to provide early flight assessment of emerging AI technology. The facility is being developed as one element of the aircraft automation program which focuses on the qualification and validation of embedded real-time AI-based systems.

  13. Environmental Management Assessment of the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-03-01

    This report documents the results of the Environmental Management Assessment performed at the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) in Newport News, Virginia. During this assessment, activities and records were reviewed and interviews were conducted with personnel from the CEBAF Site Office; the CEBAF management and operating contractor (M&O), Southeastern Universities Research Association, Inc. (SURA); the Oak Ridge Field Office (OR); and the responsible DOE Headquarters Program Office, the Office of Energy Research (ER). The onsite portion of the assessment was conducted from March 8 through March 19, 1993, by the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Office of Environmental Audit (EH-24) located within the office of Environment, Safety and Health (EH). DOE 5482.1 B, ``Environment, Safety and Health Appraisal Program,`` and Secretary of Energy Notice (SEN)-6E-92, ``Departmental Organizational and Management Arrangements,`` establish the mission of EH-24 to provide comprehensive, independent oversight of Department-wide environmental programs on behalf of the Secretary of Energy. The ultimate goal of EH-24 is enhancement of environmental protection and minimization of risk to public health and the environment. EH-24 accomplishes its mission utilizing systematic and periodic evaluations of the Department`s environmental programs within line organizations, and through use of supplemental activities which serve to strengthen self-assessment and oversight functions within program, field, and contractor organizations.

  14. Responsibilities of test facility management and sponsor in a GLP environment.

    PubMed

    Hendriks, Rik; Van den Eynde, Hilde; Coussement, Werner

    2008-01-01

    Compliance with the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) principles of good laboratory practice (GLP) is discussed in particular as regards the responsibility of the management of a test facility (TF) when performing a monosite study as compared to the responsibility in a multisite study. Other issues of interest in this context are dealt with, such as the qualification and training for professionals and technicians, the meaning of validity of standard operating procedures (SOP), the relation between management and quality assurance (QA), the role played by study plans, test and reference items, archives, master schedule, communication lines, validation of methods and calibration, and related activities. Furthermore, the consequences for the TF management and sponsors during multisite studies are discussed, with particular regard to the existence of other responsibilities set forward by health authorities in countries with not negligible differences in the applicable regulations. Hence, the major question on the floor is whether one global set of GLP principles can be agreed upon which in turn can lead to one global submission file. It is firmly hoped that health authorities and industry, hand in hand, can actually optimize their interaction to the overall benefit of human health. PMID:19352005

  15. Velo and REXAN - Integrated Data Management and High Speed Analysis for Experimental Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Kleese van Dam, Kerstin; Carson, James P.; Corrigan, Abigail L.; Einstein, Daniel R.; Guillen, Zoe C.; Heath, Brandi S.; Kuprat, Andrew P.; Lanekoff, Ingela T.; Lansing, Carina S.; Laskin, Julia; Li, Dongsheng; Liu, Yan; Marshall, Matthew J.; Miller, Erin A.; Orr, Galya; Pinheiro da Silva, Paulo; Ryu, Seun; Szymanski, Craig J.; Thomas, Mathew

    2013-01-10

    The Chemical Imaging Initiative at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is creating a ‘Rapid Experimental Analysis’ (REXAN) Framework, based on the concept of reusable component libraries. REXAN allows developers to quickly compose and customize high throughput analysis pipelines for a range of experiments, as well as supporting the creation of multi-modal analysis pipelines. In addition, PNNL has coupled REXAN with its collaborative data management and analysis environment Velo to create an easy to use data management and analysis environments for experimental facilities. This paper will discuss the benefits of Velo and REXAN in the context of three examples: PNNL High Resolution Mass Spectrometry - reducing analysis times from hours to seconds, and enabling the analysis of much larger data samples (100KB to 40GB) at the same time · ALS X-Ray tomography - reducing analysis times of combined STXM and EM data collected at the ALS from weeks to minutes, decreasing manual work and increasing data volumes that can be analysed in a single step ·Multi-modal nano-scale analysis of STXM and TEM data - providing a semi automated process for particle detection The creation of REXAN has significantly shortened the development time for these analysis pipelines. The integration of Velo and REXAN has significantly increased the scientific productivity of the instruments and their users by creating easy to use data management and analysis environments with greatly reduced analysis times and improved analysis capabilities.

  16. Managing biological networks by using text mining and computer-aided curation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Seok Jong; Cho, Yongseong; Lee, Min-Ho; Lim, Jongtae; Yoo, Jaesoo

    2015-11-01

    In order to understand a biological mechanism in a cell, a researcher should collect a huge number of protein interactions with experimental data from experiments and the literature. Text mining systems that extract biological interactions from papers have been used to construct biological networks for a few decades. Even though the text mining of literature is necessary to construct a biological network, few systems with a text mining tool are available for biologists who want to construct their own biological networks. We have developed a biological network construction system called BioKnowledge Viewer that can generate a biological interaction network by using a text mining tool and biological taggers. It also Boolean simulation software to provide a biological modeling system to simulate the model that is made with the text mining tool. A user can download PubMed articles and construct a biological network by using the Multi-level Knowledge Emergence Model (KMEM), MetaMap, and A Biomedical Named Entity Recognizer (ABNER) as a text mining tool. To evaluate the system, we constructed an aging-related biological network that consist 9,415 nodes (genes) by using manual curation. With network analysis, we found that several genes, including JNK, AP-1, and BCL-2, were highly related in aging biological network. We provide a semi-automatic curation environment so that users can obtain a graph database for managing text mining results that are generated in the server system and can navigate the network with BioKnowledge Viewer, which is freely available at http://bioknowledgeviewer.kisti.re.kr.

  17. The impact of tech aides in radiology.

    PubMed

    Sferrella, Sheila M; Story, Cathleen P

    2004-01-01

    As the staffing shortage continues to impact radiology departments and outpatient imaging centers, managers look for ways to solve staffing issues internally. Lehigh Valley Hospital and Health Network investigated the feasibility of adding a position of radiology tech aide. This proposal was driven by a desire to improve retention of staff, improve employee satisfaction and reduce turnover. A 6-month pilot program was conducted at the network's highest-volume facility. One tech aide underwent extensive training and eventually began performing some of the tasks identified in the analysis. Each area within radiology worked with an intern to identify each step in its work process. Each step identified led to the question, "What happens if?" The workflow process provided a detailed look a the number of steps required for a technologist to perform a study from start to finish. In May 2002, the administrator submitted a project proposal to management engineering to evaluate radiologic technologists' workloads and identify tasks that could be performed by a tech aide. Activity-Based Management (ABM)--a process that emphasizes activities over resources--was utilized to study work activities. The analysis identified the appropriate tasks and revealed that 5 FTEs were needed to assist the technologists in all areas of radiology. A workflow was completed for each area within radiology. Some areas identified bottlenecks, which caused delays in the process and some redundant work for the staff. Data were presented to the network administration. Staffing realities, labor pool availability within the existing network staff, and detailed task identifications also were provided. A total of 5 FTE tech aides were approved. The final program included in-depth tech-aide training; effective and open communication between management and technologists; and a collaborative, education-oriented relationship between technologists and tech aides. PMID:15098899

  18. Energy-Smart Building Choices: How School Facilities Managers and Business Officials Are Reducing Operating Costs and Saving Money (Revision)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2002-02-01

    Operating a typical school today is no easy task for facilities managers and business officials. You're expected to deliver increased services with constrained operating budgets. Many schools stay open for longer hours to accommodate community use of the facilities. Dilapidated buildings and systems gobble up energy, yet in many districts, maintenance needs are overshadowed by the need for expansion or new construction to serve growing student populations and changing educational needs.

  19. Mobile phone-based asthma self-management aid for adolescents (mASMAA): a feasibility study

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, Hyekyun; Allen, James; Mammen, Jennifer; Swift, Mary

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Adolescents report high asthma-related morbidity that can be prevented by adequate self-management of the disease. Therefore, there is a need for a developmentally appropriate strategy to promote effective asthma self-management. Mobile phone-based technology is portable, commonly accessible, and well received by adolescents. The purpose of this study was to develop and evaluate the feasibility and acceptability of a comprehensive mobile phone-based asthma self-management aid for adolescents (mASMAA) that was designed to facilitate symptom monitoring, treatment adherence, and adolescent–parent partnership. The system used state-of-the-art natural language-understanding technology that allowed teens to use unconstrained English in their texts, and to self-initiate interactions with the system. Materials and methods mASMAA was developed based on an existing natural dialogue system that supports broad coverage of everyday natural conversation in English. Fifteen adolescent–parent dyads participated in a 2-week trial that involved adolescents’ daily scheduled and unscheduled interactions with mASMAA and parents responding to daily reports on adolescents’ asthma condition automatically generated by mASMAA. Subsequently, four focus groups were conducted to systematically obtain user feedback on the system. Frequency data on the daily usage of mASMAA over the 2-week period were tabulated, and content analysis was conducted for focus group interview data. Results Response rates for daily text messages were 81%–97% in adolescents. The average number of self-initiated messages to mASMAA was 19 per adolescent. Symptoms were the most common topic of teen-initiated messages. Participants concurred that use of mASMAA improved awareness of symptoms and triggers, promoted treatment adherence and sense of control, and facilitated adolescent–parent partnerships. Conclusion This study demonstrates the utility and user acceptability of mASMAA as a potential asthma

  20. Improvement of the management of residual waste in areas without thermal treatment facilities: A life cycle analysis of an Italian management district

    SciTech Connect

    Di Maria, Francesco; Micale, Caterina; Morettini, Emanuela; Sisani, Luciano; Damiano, Roberto

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • LCA analysis of two option for residual waste management. • Exploitation of mechanical physical sorting facility for extracting recyclable from RMSW. • Processing the mechanically sorted organic fraction in bioreactor landfill. • Sensitivity analysis demonstrate high influence for impact assessment of substitution ratio for recycle materials. - Abstract: Starting from an existing waste management district without thermal treatment facilities, two different management scenarios for residual waste were compared by life cycle assessment (LCA). The adoption of a bioreactor landfill for managing the mechanically sorted organic fraction instead of bio-stabilization led to reduction of global warming and fresh water eutrophication by 50% and 10%, respectively. Extraction of recyclables from residual waste led to avoided emissions for particulate matter, acidification and resource depletion impact categories. Marginal energy and the amount of energy recovered from landfill gas marginally affected the LCA results. On the contrary the quality of the recyclables extracted can significantly modify the eco profile of the management schemes.