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Sample records for aids acquired immune

  1. Acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS).

    PubMed

    1987-02-01

    The International Planned Parenthood Medical Advisory Panel has developed recommendations to assist family planning associations in playing a more active role in the prevention and control of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Of primary importance is an effective program of information and education aimed at communicating the following facts: AIDS is a fatal disease for which there is no cure; AIDS is spread by sexual intercourse, contaminated blood, and contaminated needles; an infected woman can transmit AIDS to her fetus during pregnancy; a monogamous sexual relationship is the surest way to avoid AIDS infection; condom use is good protection; an infected person can look and feel well, yet still be able to transmit the AIDS virus; and AIDS is not spread by ordinary contact with an infected person. Family planning associations should include information on AIDS in all existing IEC projects, as well as develop new materials. Among the target audiences for IEC activities are family planning workers, family planning clients, and the general public including youth, teachers, parents, employers, and national leaders. Special attention should be given to high-risk groups such as homosexual and bisexual men, hemophiliacs, male and female prostitutes, clients of sexually transmitted disease clinics, people with many sexual partners, illegal users of intravenous drugs, and the sexual partners of those in any of these groups. Wide promotion of condom use is a priority activity for family planning organizations. PMID:12340977

  2. Teaching AIDS. A Resource Guide on Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome. Third Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quackenbush, Marcia; Sargent, Pamela

    The first edition of this resource guide for educators on how to teach students about Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) was published in 1986. Since then, basic facts about the transmission and prevention of the AIDS virus have not changed substantially. The terminologies about the disease, however, have changed and the changing…

  3. AIDS: Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome, Information and Procedural Guidelines for Providing Services to Persons with AIDS/HTLV-III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montana State Dept. of Health and Environmental Sciences, Helena.

    This manual presents information about the disease, Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS), and guidelines for service delivery to Montana residents who have been diagnosed with AIDS or related disorders. The first section describes the disease's causes, symptoms, and transmission; risk factors; high-risk populations; prevention suggestions;…

  4. AIDS: Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome; Information and Procedural Guidelines for Providing Services to Persons with AIDS/HIV. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montana State Dept. of Health and Environmental Sciences, Helena. Health Education Bureau.

    This volume consists of updated information to be inserted into a Montana AIDS Project manual on providing services to persons with acquired immune deficiency syndrome/human immunodeficiency virus (AIDS/HIV), originally published in December 1985. The updates are mainly statistics and terminology, along with the addition of several new sections.…

  5. Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome, AIDS: A Selected Bibliography of Federal Government Publications. Research Guide 90 104.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexander, Margaret

    This research guide presents a selected bibliography of federal government publications about the Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). These documents are listed in five categories: (1) Bibliographies (7); (2) Congressional Publications (69 hearings and reports); (3) Executive Branch Publications (43 reports); (4) Federal Government…

  6. Semantic Differential Responses to Educational Posters on Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Christopher; Stewin, Leonard L.

    1992-01-01

    Undergraduate students (n=131) responded to eight educational posters dealing with the Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) using a nine-item semantic differential scale. Two posters were consistently rated as more informative, reassuring, effective, decent, and better than the others. The first utilized an objective and informative…

  7. Non-pulmonary Rhodococcus equi infections in patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS).

    PubMed Central

    Fierer, J; Wolf, P; Seed, L; Gay, T; Noonan, K; Haghighi, P

    1987-01-01

    Rhodococcus equi, formerly known as Corynebacterium equi, was isolated repeatedly from the blood of two patients with the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). Neither of the patients had pneumonia while they were bacteraemic, whereas pneumonia has been present in all previously reported cases of human infection with R equi. One of our patients had diarrhoea and the organism was isolated from a stool culture; the other patient had a large granulomatous soft tissue mass in his pelvis caused by R equi. Both isolates were resistant to penicillin and one produced a beta-lactamase. Both patients were treated with vancomycin but only one recovered. Images Figure PMID:3584508

  8. Coping Strategies of Patients with Haemophilia as a Risk Group for AIDS (Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome). Brief Research Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naji, Simon; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Plans are described for a 2-year project whose major focus is the identification of ways in which patients with hemophilia and their families assimilate, interpret, and act on information about Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). Findings will be related to perceived risk, anxiety levels, and the development of coping strategies.…

  9. AIDS: acquired immunodeficiency syndrome *

    PubMed Central

    Gilmore, N.J.; Beaulieu, R.; Steben, M.; Laverdière, M.

    1992-01-01

    Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, or AIDS, is a new illness that occurs in previously healthy individuals. It is characterized by immunodeficiency, opportunistic infections and unusual malignant diseases. Life-threatening single or multiple infections with viruses, mycobacteria, fungi or protozoa are common. A rare neoplasm, Kaposi's sarcoma, has developed in approximately one third of patients with AIDS. More than 800 cases of AIDS have been reported in North America, over 24 of them in Canada. The majority of patients are male homosexuals, although AIDS has also developed in abusers of intravenously administered drugs, Haitian immigrants, individuals with hemophilia, recipients of blood transfusions, prostitutes, and infants, spouses and partners of patients with AIDS. The cause of AIDS is unknown, but the features are consistent with an infectious process. Early diagnosis can be difficult owing to the nonspecific symptoms and signs of the infections and malignant diseases. Therefore, vigilance by physicians is of the utmost importance. PMID:1544049

  10. Acquired Immune-Deficiency Syndrome, AIDS, and the Development of School Board Policies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Jean Marie

    1989-01-01

    Public schools in Illinois have been developing policies for students and employees with AIDS or AIDS-Related Complex (ARC). Following national and state guidelines and recommendations, boards of education have adopted approaches that include procedures and policies for individual determinations regarding students and personnel, curriculum…

  11. Gallium scans of the thorax in patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS): Description and utilization

    SciTech Connect

    Le, G.; Chen, D.C.P.; Siegel, M.E.

    1984-01-01

    The pattern of distribution of gallium uptake in the thorax was investigated in patients (pts) with AIDS. Eleven pts (ages 18-53), all active homosexual males suspected of having acute pulmonary infection were studied. Ga lung scans were performed at 24-48 and/or 72 hrs. post injection. The diagnosis of AIDS was based on appropriate clinical and laboratory findings. The Ga activity in the lung was graded from zero = background to 4+ which is > liver activity. Eight of eleven pts have positive Ga scan while seven of eleven pts had positive CXR. Six pts had both positive CXR and Ga scan. One pt had a positive Ga scan with negative CXR, and one with positive CXR and negative Ga scan. The positive Ga scans included 3 pts with 4+ diffuse uptake, two pts with 2+ diffuse uptake, two pts with 1+ diffuse uptake, and two with hilar node uptake. Three pts have focal increased uptake superimposed on diffuse uptake. Two pts with 4+ diffuse uptake had mild abnormality on their CXR. One pt with 4+ uptake in the initial scan shows decreased activity on follow-up with clinical improvement after therapy. Thus, all but two pts with positive Ga scans had diffuse lung uptake. These two patients alone had B cell immunoblastic sarcoma and oral candidiasis. The pattern of Ga lung uptake in pts with AIDS reveal that a majority of positive scans are diffuse (6/8) and the intensity may suggest more active disease than CXR (2 normal) and, thus, the study may be useful in detecting changes from atypical pulmonary infection in this population.

  12. Communication and education as vaccine against the spread of acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) in Africa.

    PubMed

    Soola, E O

    1991-01-01

    Attention is focused on the segmentation of the audience (urban, rural, urban slum) and messages, and on how appropriate communication and educational strategies can be adopted to create awareness of AIDS among the African population. It is important to determine the scope, nature, and content of the message in addition to the delivery of these messages through proper channels. Channels of communication vary in reach and influence, and different segments of the population vary in the capacity to absorb information. Rural people are considered susceptible because of their penchant for continually using injections for treatment of any ailment; the source of concern is unsterilized needles and syringes. The semantics of AIDs is discussed to emphasize the problem of how to identify AIDs among the multiplicity of languages in individual countries. For instance, in Nigeria there may be 150-400 languages, and these languages lack systematically developed metalanguage and specialized vocabularies. The view that local language use must be one way, linear is accepted, and the difficulties surmounted. Local languages may be used to transmit information of a nontechnical nature. The literate minority should have access to detailed information on causes, modes of transmission, symptoms, treatment or management, but not everyone needs this extent of detail. The rural and urban residents should know about the incurability of the disease, the mode of transmission, its symptoms, and what should be done if someone is suspected of having an HIV infection. Already the Hausa of Nigeria have a term for AIDs, Karya-Garkuwa, which suggests a disease that breaks down the mechanism of the biological functioning of the body. Communicators must be knowledgeable and able to effectively transmit facts not myths. Of the 3 modes of transmission (sex, blood, mother to child), sexual transmission is the most important. Blood routes are through transfusions, contaminated blood products for

  13. Induction of antibody to asialo GM1 by spermatozoa and its occurrence in the sera of homosexual men with the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS).

    PubMed Central

    Witkin, S S; Sonnabend, J; Richards, J M; Purtilo, D T

    1983-01-01

    Compared to healthy homosexual and heterosexual men, homosexual men with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) possessed significantly higher levels of IgG antibody to the neutral glycolipid asialo GM1 (ganglio-N-tetraosylceramide) (P less than 0.01). Of 31 homosexuals with AIDS, 36% possessed levels of this antibody that were at least two standard deviations above the mean of the healthy men. Furthermore, asialo GM1 antibody could be removed from serum by adsorption with spermatozoa. Weekly rectal insemination of male rabbits with rabbit semen also led to the appearance of antibody to asialo GM1 by 15 weeks. These results suggest that asialo GM1 is a component of ejaculated spermatozoa and demonstrate that rectal insemination by itself can lead to the production of antibodies to this glycolipid in the rabbit. In addition, asialo GM1 antibodies may be of value as a serological marker for the early detection of individuals with AIDS. PMID:6652964

  14. Unusual development of polyoma virus in the brains of two patients with the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS).

    PubMed

    Scaravilli, F; Ellis, D S; Tovey, G; Harcourt-Webster, J N; Guiloff, R J; Sinclair, E

    1989-01-01

    Two HIV-positive male patients presented with a variety of symptoms including hemiparesis, unsteadiness, progressive loss of vision and poor memory. There were multiple non-enhancing lesions shown by CT scan in the white matter of the cerebral hemispheres. Specimens obtained by burr-hole biopsy showed the features of progressive multifocal leucoencephalopathy (PML) in both cases. Electron microscopy demonstrated round and rod shaped particles of papovavirus in the nuclei and cytoplasm of oligodendrocytes and in processes of astrocytes where abnormal and florid modes of viral replication were seen. Additional features observed were viral particles suggestive of an enterovirus in Case 1 and, in both specimens, massive membrane proliferation within both nuclei and cytoplasm of infected cells together with the presence of tubuloreticular structures (TRS) in the cytoplasm of endothelial cells. At post-mortem, the brain of patient 2 showed PML and HIV encephalitis. The presence of HIV was confirmed by immunohistochemical methods. We suggest that in AIDS patients the abnormality of the immune system induced by HIV causes abnormal replication patterns of papovavirus in the brain. In addition, these cases confirm the frequent occurrence in AIDS patients of TRS, now considered to be a marker for HIV. PMID:2555730

  15. Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) and the Veterans' Administration. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Hospitals and Health Care of the Committee on Veterans' Affairs. House of Representatives, One Hundredth Congress, First Session.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Committee on Veterans' Affairs.

    This document presents witness testimony and prepared statements from the Congressional hearing called to examine the issue of acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) and the role of the Veterans' Administration (VA) in combating AIDS. Opening statements are included from Representatives G. V. Montgomery, J. Roy Rowland, Joseph P. Kennedy, II,…

  16. AIDS Federal Policy Act of 1987. Hearings on S. 1575: To Amend the Public Health Service Act To Establish a Grant Program To Provide for Counseling and Testing Services Relating to Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome and To Establish Certain Prohibitions for the Purpose of Protecting Individuals with Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome or Related Conditions. Committee on Labor and Human Resources. United States Senate, One Hundredth Congress, First Session.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Senate Committee on Labor and Human Resources.

    This document presents the text from two Senate hearings on the AIDS Federal Policy Act of 1987 which concerns voluntary testing for AIDS virus, education and counseling to stop the spread of AIDS (Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome), and confidentiality and discrimination against AIDS victims. In the first hearing, opening statements are…

  17. Outcome of patients with relapsed/refractory acquired immune deficiency syndrome-related lymphoma diagnosed 1999-2008 and treated with curative intent in the AIDS Malignancy Consortium.

    PubMed

    Bayraktar, Ulas D; Ramos, Juan Carlos; Petrich, Adam; Gupta, Neel; Lensing, Shelly; Moore, P C; Reid, Erin G; Aboulafia, David M; Ratner, Lee; Mitsuyasu, Ronald; Cooley, Timothy; Henry, David H; Barr, Paul; Noy, Ariela

    2012-12-01

    No comparative studies exist for relapsed/refractory (rel/rfr) acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS)-related lymphoma (ARL). To determine practices over the last decade and to assess the outcomes of salvage chemotherapy with curative intent and autologous stem cell transplant (ASCT), we retrospectively evaluated treatment outcomes in patients with rel/rfr ARL who were treated in 13 national AIDS Malignancy Consortium (AMC) sites between 1999 and 2008 (n = 88). The most commonly used second-line therapies were ICE (ifosfamide/carboplatin/etoposide, n = 34), dose adjusted EPOCH (etoposide/prednisone/vincristine/cyclophosphamide/doxorubicin, n = 17) and ESHAP (etoposide/methylprednisolone/cytarabine/cisplatin, n = 11). The odds of achieving a response were lower for those with non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) than for those with HL and for those with primary refractory disease than for those with relapse. Overall survival (OS) was significantly longer for those with relapsed disease compared to those with refractory disease and for those with non-Burkitt NHL compared to those with Burkitt. OS was longer in patients who underwent ASCT compared to those who did not (1-year OS: 63.2% vs. 37.2%). However, among 32 patients (36%) who achieved a complete or partial response (CR/PR) after second-line therapy, 1-year OS was not different between the two groups (87.5% for ASCT vs. 81.8% for non-ASCT). Long-term survival in some patients with rel/rfr ARL may be possible without transplant, although transplant remains the standard of care for chemotherapy sensitive disease. PMID:22642936

  18. Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy occurring with the acquired immune deficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    England, J D; Hsu, C Y; Garen, P D; Goust, J M; Biggs, P J

    1984-08-01

    A 33-year-old homosexual man with symptoms and signs of a focal brain process was subsequently found to have an acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) with biopsy-proven progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy. This report reemphasizes the association of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy with AIDS and probably is best viewed as another example of an opportunistic CNS infection complicating deficient cell-mediated immunity. PMID:6540476

  19. Neurologic Complications of the Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Slade, Walter R.

    1987-01-01

    The acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) is a syndrome requiring unique knowledge of its versatile manifestations for accurate diagnosis and skillfull management of its numerous complications for successful treatment. The human T-cell lymphotropic virus type III (HTLV-III), a replication-complete virus, is now reported as the etiologic agent. The neurologic complications of AIDS cover the spectrum of neurologic diseases and usually have multiple causative factors, all of which should be appropriately managed. These complications can be successfully treated, although constant monitoring is required because recurrence is frequent. The neurologic complications are the second most frequent cause of death in AIDS patients. Tests that are usually reliable in diagnosing neurologic diseases may not be reliable in patients with AIDS. The management of AIDS is a multidisciplinary effort, and the neurologist should fulfill a role in the management team. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4 PMID:3334059

  20. Precipitable immune complexes in healthy homosexual men, acquired immune deficiency syndrome and the related lymphadenopathy syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Euler, H H; Kern, P; Löffler, H; Dietrich, M

    1985-01-01

    Increased levels of 3% PEG precipitable circulating immune complexes (CIC) were found in healthy homosexual men, in homosexual patients with the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS), and in the AIDS related lymphadenopathy syndrome (LAS). The degree of CIC elevation increases from healthy homosexual men to LAS and AIDS. Patients suffering from AIDS associated with opportunistic infections had a more pronounced increase in CIC than patients with AIDS associated Kaposi's sarcoma. In LAS and AIDS the amount of CIC correlated with the degree of inversion of the T4/T8 lymphocyte ratio, whereas in healthy homosexual men with increased levels of CIC the T4/T8 ratio was not significantly altered. Laser nephelometric partial components analysis revealed that these complexes were of a complement poor subtype with low component levels of C4, C1q and C3c. IgM and IgG were found to be the major components. It is suggested that these CIC might represent a marker of the total antigenic burden of the immune system. Possibly, they are of prognostic and monitoring value for clinical handling of patients at risk for AIDS. PMID:3156700

  1. Autopsy pathology in the acquired immune deficiency syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Reichert, C. M.; O'Leary, T. J.; Levens, D. L.; Simrell, C. R.; Macher, A. M.

    1983-01-01

    The acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) is a devastating new illness which appears to be sexually and parenterally transmissible. AIDS was first described in the male homosexual community; however, the disease has more recently been described among intravenous drug abusers, Haitians, hemophiliacs, and others. The etiologic agent is unknown. AIDS may represent an infection by a previously undescribed organism, a mutant of a known microorganism, or a multifactorial combination of environmental, immunologic, and genetic factors. As a consequence of the disease's seemingly irreversible ablation of the cell-mediated immune system, AIDS victims succumb to a variety of infections and/or unusual neoplasms. In its fully developed form, mortality approaches 100%. At autopsy the gross and microscopic pathology of the syndrome can be divided into three general categories: 1) morphologic manifestations of profound lymphoid depletion; 2) infections, usually with mixed opportunistic pathogens; and 3) unusual neoplasms, most frequently Kaposi's sarcoma or high-grade lymphomas. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 14 Figure 15 Figure 16 Figure 17 Figure 18 Figure 19 Figure 20 Figure 21 PMID:6311021

  2. Introduction and immunopathogenesis of acquired immune deficiency syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Sudharshan, S

    2008-01-01

    India has a large number of patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS), the third largest population of this group in the world. This disease was first described in patients with Pneumocystis pneumonia in 1981. Ocular lesions can occur at any stage of the disease but are more commonly seen at the late stages. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), the causative agent of AIDS is a retrovirus with RNA genome and a unique ′Reverse transcriptase enzyme′ and is of two types, HIV-1 and 2. Most human diseases are caused by HIV-1. The HIV-1 subtypes prevalent in India are A, B and C. They act predominantly by reducing the CD4+ cells and thus the patient becomes susceptible to opportunistic infections. High viral titers in the peripheral blood during primary infection lead to decrease in the number of CD4+ T lymphocytes. Onset of HIV-1-specific cellular immune response with synthesis of HIV-1 specific antibodies leads to the decline of plasma viral load and chronification of HIV-1 infection. However, the asymptomatic stage of infection may lead to persistent viral replication and a rapid turnover of plasma virions which is the clinical latency. During this period, there is further decrease in the CD4+ counts which makes the patient′s immune system incapable of controlling opportunistic pathogens and thus life-threatening AIDS-defining diseases emerge. Advent of highly active antiretroviral treatment (HAART) has revolutionized the management of AIDS though there is associated increased development of immune recovery uveitis in a few of these patients. PMID:18711263

  3. Gastrointestinal surgery and the acquired immune deficiency syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Weledji, Elroy P.; Nsagha, Dickson; Chichom, Alain; Enoworock, George

    2015-01-01

    Acquired immune-deficiency syndrome (AIDS) is becoming an increasing problem to the surgeon. The impact of HIV/AIDS on surgical practice include the undoubted risk to which the surgeon will expose him or herself, the atypical conditions that may be encountered and the outcome and long term benefit of the surgical treatment in view of disease progression. The two factors most associated with surgical outcome and poor wound healing were AIDS and poor performance status (ASA score). This article questions whether gastrointestinal surgical procedures can be safe and effective therapeutic measures in HIV/AIDS patients and if surgical outcome is worthy of the surgeon's ethical responsibility to treat. As HIV/AIDS patients are not a homogeneous group, with careful patient selection, emergency laparotomy for peritonitis confers worthwhile palliation. However, aggressive surgical intervention must be undertaken with caution and adequate peri-operative care is required. Symptomatic improvement of anorectal pathology may make delayed wound healing an acceptable complication. Alternatives to surgery can be contemplated for diagnosis, prophylaxis or palliation. PMID:25685343

  4. Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome: A Preliminary Examination of the Effects on Gay Couples and Coupling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carl, Douglas

    1986-01-01

    The Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) epidemic significantly influences attitudes about life and lifestyles. Homosexuals have to give increased consideration to coupling, the nature of coupled relationships, sex and intimacy, and death long before the normal time. Discusses impact of AIDS on the early stages of gay coupling and on the…

  5. Update: acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS)--worldwide.

    PubMed

    1988-05-13

    As of March 21, 1988, 136 countries or territories throughout the world had reported a total of 84,256 cases of AIDS to the Global Programme on AIDS (GPA) (formerly the Special Programme on AIDS) of the World Health Organization (WHO). 37 countries or territories had reported no AIDS cases. Reports are based on either the Centers for Disease Control (CDC)/WHO surveillance definition, the WHO clinical definition, or a physician's diagnosis. From 1979 through March 21, 1988, the number of AIDS cases increased markedly in all geographic regions. The cumulative world total increased from 11,965 in 1984 to 25,150 in 1985 (a 11% increase) and to 48,413 in 1986 (a 92% increase). Because of reporting lags, the global total of AIDS cases reported for 1987 is not yet complete; however, as of March 21, 1988, 34,913 cases had been reported for 1987 (a 72% increase). Data on the distribution of AIDS cases by region are presented, followed by a discussion of the findings. Regions include: Americas, Europe, Africa, Oceania, Asia, and eastern Mediterranean countries. Epidemiologic studies indicate 3 broad yet distinct geographic patterns of transmission. Pattern I is typical of industrialized countries with large numbers of reported AIDS cases, such as North America, Western Europe, Australia, New Zealand, and parts of Latin America. In these areas, most cases occur among homosexual or bisexual males and urban intravenous (IV) drug users. Pattern II is observed in areas of central, eastern, and southern Africa and in some Carribean countries. In these areas, most cases occur among heterosexuals. Pattern III is found in areas of Eastern Europe, the Middle East, Asia, and most of the Pacific. Only small numbers of cases have been reported in these areas. PMID:3129644

  6. Acquired and innate immunity to polyaromatic hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Yusuf, Nabiha Timares, Laura; Seibert, Megan D.; Xu Hui; Elmets, Craig A.

    2007-11-01

    Polyaromatic hydrocarbons are ubiquitous environmental pollutants that are potent mutagens and carcinogens. Researchers have taken advantage of these properties to investigate the mechanisms by which chemicals cause cancer of the skin and other organs. When applied to the skin of mice, several carcinogenic polyaromatic hydrocarbons have also been shown to interact with the immune system, stimulating immune responses and resulting in the development of antigen-specific T-cell-mediated immunity. Development of cell-mediated immunity is strain-specific and is governed by Ah receptor genes and by genes located within the major histocompatibility complex. CD8{sup +} T cells are effector cells in the response, whereas CD4{sup +} T cells down-regulate immunity. Development of an immune response appears to have a protective effect since strains of mice that develop a cell-mediated immune response to carcinogenic polyaromatic hydrocarbons are less likely to develop tumors when subjected to a polyaromatic hydrocarbon skin carcinogenesis protocol than mice that fail to develop an immune response. With respect to innate immunity, TLR4-deficient C3H/HeJ mice are more susceptible to polyaromatic hydrogen skin tumorigenesis than C3H/HeN mice in which TLR4 is normal. These findings support the hypothesis that immune responses, through their interactions with chemical carcinogens, play an active role in the prevention of chemical skin carcinogenesis during the earliest stages. Efforts to augment immune responses to the chemicals that cause tumors may be a productive approach to the prevention of tumors caused by these agents.

  7. Behcet's disease in acquired immune deficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Beenish; Fernandes, Denise; Chaucer, Benjamin; Chevenon, Marie; Nandi, Minesh; Saverimuttu, Jessie; Nfonoyim, Jay

    2016-01-01

    HIV/AIDS patients often present with orogenital ulcers. In the immunocompromised patient diagnosis of these ulcers pose a challenge, as there is a myriad of etiologies. We present a case of an HIV/AIDS patient with recurrent orogenital aphthosis that was confirmed to have concomitant diagnosis of Behcet's disease. Proper awareness of the causes of these ulcers is essential for prompt and effective treatment. While rare causes may be at the bottom of a differential list in an immunocompetent host, when HIV/AIDS is involved these rare causes often percolate to the top. PMID:26793479

  8. Behcet's disease in acquired immune deficiency syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Siddiqui, Beenish; Fernandes, Denise; Chaucer, Benjamin; Chevenon, Marie; Nandi, Minesh; Saverimuttu, Jessie; Nfonoyim, Jay

    2015-01-01

    HIV/AIDS patients often present with orogenital ulcers. In the immunocompromised patient diagnosis of these ulcers pose a challenge, as there is a myriad of etiologies. We present a case of an HIV/AIDS patient with recurrent orogenital aphthosis that was confirmed to have concomitant diagnosis of Behcet's disease. Proper awareness of the causes of these ulcers is essential for prompt and effective treatment. While rare causes may be at the bottom of a differential list in an immunocompetent host, when HIV/AIDS is involved these rare causes often percolate to the top. PMID:26793479

  9. Subject Control of the Literature of Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bierbaum, Esther Green; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Describes a study that analyzed the Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) terms used to index the literature of Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS). Subject access to the AIDSLINE database developed by the National Library of Medicine (NLM) is examined, and changes in subject headings that reflect the growth of the field are analyzed. (12…

  10. Why AIDS? The Mystery of How HIV Attacks the Immune System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christensen, Damaris

    1999-01-01

    Reviews differing theories surrounding the mystery of how human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) attacks the immune system. Claims that understanding how HIV triggers immune-cell depletion may enable researchers to block its effects. New knowledge could reveal strategies for acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) therapies that go beyond the drugs…

  11. The spatial distribution pattern of human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immune deficiency syndrome in China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Yang, Yongli; Shi, Xuezhong; Mao, Saicai; Shi, Nian; Hui, Xiaoqing

    2016-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) exhibit variable patterns among the provinces of China. Knowledge of the geographical distribution of the HIV/AIDS epidemic is needed for the prevention and control of AIDS. Thus, the cumulative number of reported cases of HIV/AIDS from the period 1985-2013, and the incidence rate of AIDS in 2013 were determined. Spatial autocorrelation analysis and hotspot analysis were conducted using ArcGIS10.2 to explore the spatial distribution of the HIV/AIDS epidemic. Both the thematic map and the global spatial autocorrelation Moran's I statistics revealed a clustered distribution of the spatial pattern. A local spatial autocorrelation analysis indicated hotspots of AIDS incidence rate that were confined to the provinces of Guangxi, Yunnan and Sichuan. The hotspots encompassed Guangxi and Yunnan, while Henan Province displayed a negative autocorrelation with more variable numbers that included neighbouring regions. The Getis-Ord Gi* statistics identified 6 hotspots and 8 coldspots for the incidence of AIDS, and 7 hotspots and 1 coldspot for the cumulative number of reported cases of HIV/AIDS. The spatial distribution pattern of the HIV/AIDS epidemic in China is clustered, demonstrating hotspots located in the Southwest. Specific interventions targeting provinces with severe HIV/AIDS epidemic are urgently needed. PMID:27245799

  12. Regulation of innate and acquired immunity in African trypanosomiasis.

    PubMed

    Mansfield, J M; Paulnock, D M

    2005-01-01

    African trypanosomes are well known for their ability to avoid immune elimination by switching the immunodominant variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) coat during infection. However, antigenic variation is only one of several means by which trypanosomes manipulate the immune system of their hosts. In this article, the role of parasite factors such as GPI anchor residues of the shed VSG molecule and the release of CpG DNA, in addition to host factors such as IFN-gamma, in regulating key aspects of innate and acquired immunity during infection is examined. The biological relevance of these immunoregulatory events is discussed in the context of host and parasite survival. PMID:16179030

  13. Acquired immune heterogeneity and its sources in human helminth infection

    PubMed Central

    BOURKE, C. D.; MAIZELS, R. M.; MUTAPI, F.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Similarities in the immunobiology of different parasitic worm infections indicate that co-evolution of humans and helminths has shaped a common anti-helminth immune response. However, recent in vitro and immuno-epidemiological studies highlight fundamental differences and plasticity within host-helminth interactions. The ‘trade-off’ between immunity and immunopathology inherent in host immune responses occurs on a background of genetic polymorphism, variable exposure patterns and infection history. For the parasite, variation in life-cycle and antigen expression can influence the effector responses directed against them. This is particularly apparent when comparing gastrointestinal and tissue-dwelling helminths. Furthermore, insights into the impact of anti-helminthic treatment and co-infection on acquired immunity suggest that immune heterogeneity arises not from hosts and parasites in isolation, but also from the environment in which immune responses develop. Large-scale differences observed in the epidemiology of human helminthiases are a product of complex host-parasite-environment interactions which, given potential for exposure to parasite antigens in utero, can arise even before a parasite interacts with its human host. This review summarizes key differences identified in human acquired immune responses to nematode and trematode infections of public health importance and explores the factors contributing to these variations. PMID:20946693

  14. Erythema elevatum diutinum in acquired immune deficiency syndrome: Can it be an immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome?

    PubMed Central

    Jose, Sheethal K; Marfatia, Yogesh S.

    2016-01-01

    A 47-year-old male with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) presented with multiple hyperpigmented papules and nodules on both ankles, dorsum of bilateral feet and soles. It was associated with mild itching and pain. The patient was diagnosed with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in 2007. First-line antiretroviral therapy (ART) was started in 2009 to which he responded initially. He was shifted to second-line ART 11 months ago in March 2015 due to treatment failure as suggested by CD4 count of 50 cells/mm3. The present skin lesions started 2 months after the initiation of second-line ART. Differential diagnoses considered were Kaposi's sarcoma and immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) related infections, but biopsy was suggestive of erythema elevatum diutinum (EED). Patient was started on oral dapsone 100 mg/day and increased to 200 mg/day to which he is responding gradually. In the present case, appearance of the lesions after initiation of second-line ART coupled with increase in CD4 count and decrease of viral load below undetectable level suggest that EED could be an IRIS. PMID:27190420

  15. Erythema elevatum diutinum in acquired immune deficiency syndrome: Can it be an immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome?

    PubMed

    Jose, Sheethal K; Marfatia, Yogesh S

    2016-01-01

    A 47-year-old male with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) presented with multiple hyperpigmented papules and nodules on both ankles, dorsum of bilateral feet and soles. It was associated with mild itching and pain. The patient was diagnosed with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in 2007. First-line antiretroviral therapy (ART) was started in 2009 to which he responded initially. He was shifted to second-line ART 11 months ago in March 2015 due to treatment failure as suggested by CD4 count of 50 cells/mm(3). The present skin lesions started 2 months after the initiation of second-line ART. Differential diagnoses considered were Kaposi's sarcoma and immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) related infections, but biopsy was suggestive of erythema elevatum diutinum (EED). Patient was started on oral dapsone 100 mg/day and increased to 200 mg/day to which he is responding gradually. In the present case, appearance of the lesions after initiation of second-line ART coupled with increase in CD4 count and decrease of viral load below undetectable level suggest that EED could be an IRIS. PMID:27190420

  16. Primary cardiac lymphoma in a patient with acquired immune deficiency syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Constantino, A.; West, T.E.; Gupta, M.; Loghmanee, F.

    1987-12-01

    A 34-year-old male prisoner with a history of intravenous drug abuse presented with fever, lymphadenopathy, weight loss, and recent onset of congestive heart failure. Serologic testing was positive for antibodies to human immune deficiency virus. There was intense myocardial uptake of gallium. Autopsy showed a primary immunoblastic lymphoma involving only the myocardium. While primary cardiac lymphoma is an extremely rare condition, the incidence may be higher in patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) and should be suspected in cases with atypical cardiomyopathy.

  17. Effectiveness and safety of traditional Chinese medicine in treating acquired immune deficiency syndrome: 2004-2014.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhi-Bin; Yang, Ji-Ping; Xu, Li-Ran

    2015-01-01

    Substantial progress has been made in China in using traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) to treat acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). Our objective was to review the latest developments in TCM treatment of AIDS in China between 2004 and 2014. We reviewed the content of original articles investigating the efficacy and safety of TCM for treating AIDS published in Chinese and English language journals. Relevant references from 2004 to 2014 were found using PubMed and the China National Knowledge Infrastructure Database. We found that TCM has been widely used for treating AIDS and its complications in China. The number of TCM studies has increased, which indicates efficacy and safety. Measures of efficacy in the reviewed articles included the alleviation of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-related signs and symptoms, improvements in quality of life, improvements in long-term survival, counteraction of the adverse side effects of antiviral drugs, promotion of immune reconstitution, and improvement of laboratory results. In sum, the literature indicates that TCM is safe. TCM plays an important role in the treatment of AIDS. Some studies have attempted to measure the efficacy and safety of TCM for treating AIDS, but more evidence is needed. Therefore, more research on this topic is required in the future. PMID:26699285

  18. [Neutrophils and immunity: is it innate or acquired?].

    PubMed

    Chakravarti, Arpita; Allaeys, Isabelle; Poubelle, Patrice E

    2007-10-01

    The neutrophil has long been considered a phagocytic cell with a short life-span whose major role is to destroy intruders to the body. Toll receptors and anti-infectious factors such as defensin, perforin and granzymes are newly discovered mechanisms used by neutrophils for the first line of defense against invaders. Moreover, subpopulations of neutrophils share specific functions like the synthesis of certain cytokines and chemokines, as well as the expression of immunoreceptors like the T cell receptor. A primary consequence of inflammation on neutrophils is a delay in their spontaneous programmed cell death. Hence, this multifunctional cell is also a necessary actor of the acquired immune response. Neutrophils have the capacity to degrade and process antigens as well as efficiently present antigenic peptides to lymphocytes. Neutrophil interactions with immune cells, in particular dendritic cells, lead to the formation of IL-12 and TNF-alpha deviating the immune response towards a Th1 phenotype. Thus, the neutrophil exhibits a cellular plasticity that explains its capacity to transdifferentiate depending on the local requirements of the immune response. The neutrophil is probably the most underappreciated immune cell among hematopoietic leukocytes, and many neutrophil functions remain to be unraveled. PMID:17937896

  19. Antibody levels for cytomegalovirus, herpes simplex virus, and rubella in patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Halbert, S P; Kiefer, D J; Friedman-Kien, A E; Poiesz, B

    1986-01-01

    Significantly higher proportions of patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) or lymphadenopathy syndrome (LAS) were positive for antibodies to cytomegalovirus (CMV) and herpes simplex virus (HSV) compared with control groups of commercial blood donors. In contrast, no differences were found in the incidence of individuals positive for antibodies to rubella in these groups of subjects. Of those positive for antibodies to CMV and HSV in each group, the mean antibody levels were significantly higher in AIDS-LAS patients compared with the controls. The entire distribution of antibody concentrations to CMV and HSV in AIDS patients was shifted upward, so that significantly more patients showed high values and significantly fewer showed low values, indicating hyperactive humoral immune responses to these viruses. In sharp contrast, the AIDS patients with antibody levels for rubella showed the same distribution of antibody levels as did two groups of controls. No correlation was found between concentrations of CMV and HSV antibodies in individual AIDS-LAS patients. PMID:3009534

  20. Cytomegalovirus Retinitis and the Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome: Bench to Bedside: LXVII Edward Jackson Memorial Lecture

    PubMed Central

    Jabs, Douglas A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To update information on cytomegalovirus (CMV) retinitis in patients with the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) and to integrate information on its pathogenesis and clinical outcomes. Design Literature review. Methods Selected articles from the medical literature, particularly large epidemiologic studies, including the Johns Hopkins Cytomegalovirus Retinitis Cohort Study, the Longitudinal Study of the Ocular Complications of AIDS, and the Cytomegalovirus Retinitis and Viral Resistance Study, were reviewed. Clinical information is discussed in light of knowledge on CMV, its pathogenesis, and its interactions with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Results Cytomegalovirus uses several mechanisms to evade the immune system and establish latent infection in immunologically normal hosts. With immune deficiency, such as late-stage AIDS, CMV reactivates, is disseminated to the eye, and establishes a productive infection, resulting in retinal necrosis. HIV and CMV potentiate each other: CMV accelerates HIV disease, and CMV retinitis is associated with increased mortality. Randomized clinical trials have demonstrated the efficacy of treatments for CMV retinitis. Systemically-administered treatment for CMV retinitis decreases AIDS mortality. Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), effectively suppresses HIV replication, resulting in immune recovery, which, if sufficient, controls retinitis without anti-CMV therapy. Resistant CMV, detected in the blood, correlates with resistant virus in the eye and is associated with worse clinical outcomes, including mortality. Host factors, including host genetics and access to care, play a role in the development of CMV retinitis. Conclusions Clinical outcomes of CMV retinitis in patients with AIDS are dependent on characteristics of the virus and host and on HIV–CMV interactions. PMID:21168815

  1. Duodenal mucosal T cell subpopulation and bacterial cultures in acquired immune deficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Budhraja, M; Levendoglu, H; Kocka, F; Mangkornkanok, M; Sherer, R

    1987-05-01

    Enteric infections, chronic diarrhea frequently with no obvious etiology, and weight loss cause major morbidity and mortality in acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). Alterations in mucosal immunity may explain the increased incidence of enteric infections, and contamination of the upper small intestine with bacteria may be the cause of weight loss observed in these patients. To test this hypothesis we studied the mucosal T lymphocyte subset in duodenal mucosal biopsies in 14 AIDS and seven control patients. Duodenal fluid was also cultured for aerobic and anaerobic bacteria. There was a significant decrease among leu-3a T cells (helper/inducer) subset in AIDS. The proportion of mucosal T cells reacting with leu-2a (cytotoxic/suppressor) was significantly increased in AIDS patients. These patients also had a significant reversal of the normal mucosal helper/suppressor T cell ratio. There was no change in the number of leu-7 cells (cells mediate natural killer and antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity) as compared to controls. All patients with diarrhea and three of five patients without diarrhea had bacteria in their duodenal fluid. Mean number of organisms was 4.5 X 10(4)/ml. Cultures were negative in all control subjects. The results reveal that the abnormalities of T cell subpopulation in the blood of AIDS patients also occur in their duodenal mucosa. This immunological abnormality is associated with the bacterial colonization of upper gastrointestinal tract which may explain the diarrhea and weight loss observed in majority of our patients. The results also indicate that increased incidence of enteric infections in AIDS may be explained on the basis of altered mucosal immunity. PMID:2953237

  2. Liver biopsies in the acquired immune deficiency syndrome: influence of endemic disease and drug abuse.

    PubMed

    Comer, G M; Mukherjee, S; Scholes, J V; Holness, L G; Clain, D J

    1989-12-01

    A retrospective review of 48 liver biopsies in 34 patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) and 10 patients with AIDS-related complex (ARC) was performed at Harlem Hospital Center to assess the diagnostic yield of liver biopsies in this distinct patient population. Among the patients, 93.2% were black and 32 were males, with a mean age of 36.7 yr. Intravenous drug abuse was a risk factor for AIDS in 81.8% of patients. Liver biopsies were particularly useful in patients with fever of unclear origin, which was positively correlated with the presence of granulomas (p = 0.01). Granulomas due to mycobacteria were present in 16 (33.3%) of the biopsies. Liver biopsy proved to be clinically significant in 14 of 17 patients (82.3%) with mycobacterial disease, or 29.3% of the liver biopsies. Chronic active hepatitis was present in 12 (29.2%) of the biopsies, and in all but one was due to non-A non-B hepatitis viruses. All patients with chronic active hepatitis were intravenous drug abusers or the sexual partners of intravenous drug abusers. Liver biopsy can provide important diagnostic information in AIDS patients. The pathological findings in this series reflect the high risk of exposure to tuberculosis and hepatitis in the intravenous drug abusers in Harlem. PMID:2596454

  3. HIV/AIDS and Alcohol

    MedlinePlus

    ... Psychiatric Disorders Other Substance Abuse HIV/AIDS HIV/AIDS Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) targets the body’s immune ... and often leads to acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). Each year in the United States, between 55, ...

  4. The immune pathogenesis of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome associated with highly active antiretroviral therapy in AIDS.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yuhuang; Zhou, Huaying; He, Yan; Chen, Zi; He, Bo; He, Mei

    2014-12-01

    The present study investigated the immunological pathogenesis of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) patients undergoing highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). A total of 238 patients with AIDS who received initial HAART were included in this prospective cohort study. Blood samples were collected immediately, at baseline, at week 12, and at week 24 after initial HAART and at the onset of IRIS. Lymphocyte subsets, Th1 and Th2 cytokines, and interleukin (IL)-7 levels were measured by flow cytometry or ELISA. Among the 238 patients with AIDS who received HAART, 47 patients developed IRIS. The percentages of CD4(+) and CD8(+) naive, memory, and activated cells exhibited no significant differences between AIDS patients with and without IRIS 24 weeks after initial HAART. The percentage of CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells was lower in IRIS patients than in non-IRIS patients before HAART, 12 weeks after HAART, 24 weeks after HAART, and at the onset of IRIS. IL-2 and interferon (IFN)-γ levels were significantly higher at week 4 and at the onset of IRIS in IRIS patients than in non-IRIS patients. In contrast, IL-4 and IL-10 levels were significantly lower at week 4 and at the onset of IRIS in IRIS patients than in non-IRIS patients. Plasma IL-7 decreased gradually with the progression of HAART. The level of IL-7 was higher in IRIS patients than in non-IRIS patients at all follow-up time points. An imbalance of Th1/Th2 cytokines, a consistently low CD(+)CD25(+)Fox3(+) percentage, and a high IL-7 level may be crucial in the pathogenesis of IRIS in AIDS patients who had received HAART. PMID:25131160

  5. AIDS (image)

    MedlinePlus

    AIDS (acquired immune deficiency syndrome) is caused by HIV (human immunodeficiency virus), and is a syndrome that ... life-threatening illnesses. There is no cure for AIDS, but treatment with antiviral medication can suppress symptoms. ...

  6. Trade-offs between acquired and innate immune defenses in humans

    PubMed Central

    McDade, Thomas W.; Georgiev, Alexander V.; Kuzawa, Christopher W.

    2016-01-01

    Immune defenses provide resistance against infectious disease that is critical to survival. But immune defenses are costly, and limited resources allocated to immunity are not available for other physiological or developmental processes. We propose a framework for explaining variation in patterns of investment in two important subsystems of anti-pathogen defense: innate (non-specific) and acquired (specific) immunity. The developmental costs of acquired immunity are high, but the costs of maintenance and activation are relatively low. Innate immunity imposes lower upfront developmental costs, but higher operating costs. Innate defenses are mobilized quickly and are effective against novel pathogens. Acquired responses are less effective against novel exposures, but more effective against secondary exposures due to immunological memory. Based on their distinct profiles of costs and effectiveness, we propose that the balance of investment in innate versus acquired immunity is variable, and that this balance is optimized in response to local ecological conditions early in development. Nutritional abundance, high pathogen exposure and low signals of extrinsic mortality risk during sensitive periods of immune development should all favor relatively higher levels of investment in acquired immunity. Undernutrition, low pathogen exposure, and high mortality risk should favor innate immune defenses. The hypothesis provides a framework for organizing prior empirical research on the impact of developmental environments on innate and acquired immunity, and suggests promising directions for future research in human ecological immunology. PMID:26739325

  7. Trade-offs between acquired and innate immune defenses in humans.

    PubMed

    McDade, Thomas W; Georgiev, Alexander V; Kuzawa, Christopher W

    2016-01-01

    Immune defenses provide resistance against infectious disease that is critical to survival. But immune defenses are costly, and limited resources allocated to immunity are not available for other physiological or developmental processes. We propose a framework for explaining variation in patterns of investment in two important subsystems of anti-pathogen defense: innate (non-specific) and acquired (specific) immunity. The developmental costs of acquired immunity are high, but the costs of maintenance and activation are relatively low. Innate immunity imposes lower upfront developmental costs, but higher operating costs. Innate defenses are mobilized quickly and are effective against novel pathogens. Acquired responses are less effective against novel exposures, but more effective against secondary exposures due to immunological memory. Based on their distinct profiles of costs and effectiveness, we propose that the balance of investment in innate versus acquired immunity is variable, and that this balance is optimized in response to local ecological conditions early in development. Nutritional abundance, high pathogen exposure and low signals of extrinsic mortality risk during sensitive periods of immune development should all favor relatively higher levels of investment in acquired immunity. Undernutrition, low pathogen exposure, and high mortality risk should favor innate immune defenses. The hypothesis provides a framework for organizing prior empirical research on the impact of developmental environments on innate and acquired immunity, and suggests promising directions for future research in human ecological immunology. PMID:26739325

  8. Passive hyperimmune therapy: a viable treatment option for the patient with acquired immune deficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Raven, N C

    1994-01-01

    New drugs and therapies are continually emerging in an effort to delay the progression of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive status to acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). One such treatment is passive hyperimmune therapy (PHT), which was first researched and subsequently published in 1988. Passive hyperimmune therapy involves plasmapheresis of an asymptomatic HIV-positive donor with high p24 antibodies, no detectable p24 antigen, and a helper-inducer T-cell count greater than 400. The plasma is then pooled, sterilized, and administered to symptomatic HIV-positive patients as a monthly intravenous infusion in an effort to provide passive immunotherapy. In this article, an overview of PHT is provided, including benefits, adverse reactions, and other similar therapies available, so that the nurse who cares for HIV-positive patients can continue to be a significant source of information to them. PMID:7965365

  9. Nutrition, the gastrointestinal tract and the acquired immune deficiency syndrome. Facts and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Singer, P; Rothkopf, M M; Kvetan, V; Gaare, J; Mello, L; Askanazi, J

    1989-12-01

    Diarrhoea and malnutrition are common findings in patients with the Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). In this disease, enteropathy leads to fat and D-xylose malabsorption and chronic non-specific inflammation of the small bowel. Moreover, gastrointestinal infection can induce severe diarrhoea. Depletion in real body cell mass, body fat content, and weight loss have been observed. Nutritional therapy is mandatory when weight loss is 10% or greater. Enteral feeding is not easily achieved. Parenteral feeding including fat as a nonprotein calorie source improves general condition. The use of intravenous fat emulsions has been hypothesized to have several beneficial effects. Fluidisation of human immunodeficiency virus membranes by lipid emulsions through cholesterol extraction could decrease the infectivity of the virus. Long term intravenous nutrition may be more than a treatment for malabsorption and depletion; it may possibly have direct pharmacological effects. PMID:16837303

  10. Concerns of medical and pediatric house officers about acquiring AIDS from their patients.

    PubMed Central

    Link, R N; Feingold, A R; Charap, M H; Freeman, K; Shelov, S P

    1988-01-01

    To assess the degree of house officers' concerns about acquiring AIDS (acquired immunodeficiency syndrome) from their patients, we surveyed 263 medical and pediatric interns and residents in four housestaff training programs affiliated with seven New York City hospitals with large AIDS patient populations; 258 questionnaires (98 per cent) were returned. Thirty-six per cent of medical and 17 per cent of pediatric house officers reported percutaneous exposures to needles contaminated with blood of AIDS patients. Forty-eight per cent of medical and 30 per cent of pediatric house officers reported a moderate to major concern about acquiring AIDS from their patients. Greater concern about personal risk was noted in those house officers who were earlier in their residency training, who reported having treated a greater number of AIDS patients, and who were in medicine rather than pediatrics programs. Twenty-five per cent of all respondents reported that they would not continue to care for AIDS patients if given a choice. The results demonstrate a substantial degree of concern about acquiring AIDS among house officers caring for AIDS patients and suggest the need for housestaff program administrators for formally address these concerns. PMID:3348474

  11. The implicated and the immune: cultural responses to AIDS.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, R

    1990-01-01

    Unlike previous epidemics in American history, AIDS has spawned a host of creative works in the arts and mass media. Representations in the fine arts have emphasized perspectives of the insider or the "implicated," i.e., people with AIDS, while commercial programs and performers in popular culture have adopted the vantage point of the "immune," viewing AIDS as emblematic of a stigmatized "other." These cultural responses embody tensions between contemporary and traditional approaches to social life. Some television and commercial films are beginning to portray AIDS from the "implicated" perspective, however; this tentative change suggests that the epidemic is becoming more broadly experienced in the United States. PMID:2381387

  12. Dawn of antioxidants and immune modulators to stop HIV-progression and boost the immune system in HIV/AIDS patients: An updated comprehensive and critical review.

    PubMed

    Singh, Gurinder; Pai, Roopa S

    2015-06-01

    In the last two decades, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), the retrovirus responsible for the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality, worldwide. Providing the optimum management of HIV/AIDS is a major challenge in the 21st century. Since, HIV-infected persons have an extended lifespan due to the development of effective antiretroviral therapies, malnutrition is becoming central factors of long-term survivors. The nutrition status of AIDS patients has a significant influence on the maintenance and optimal effectiveness of the immune system. Micronutrient therapy in combination with allopathic treatments can extend and improve the quality and quantity of life in individuals infected with HIV/AIDS. HIV infection is thought to lead to augmented oxidative stress which may in turn lead to faster development of HIV disease. Hence, antioxidants might have a significant role in the treatment of HIV/AIDS. An additional approach to treating HIV infection is fortifying the immune response of infected people. Immune modulators help to activate and boost the normal immune function. The present review first describes the boon of antioxidants (especially Vitamin A) and immune modulators (cytolin, resveratrol, murabutide, setarud, tucaresol, AVR118, Immunitin (HE2000), reticulose, and interleukin-7) in the treatment of HIV/AIDS. Then, providing a comparatively succinct outline on updated patents study on antioxidants and immune modulators to treat HIV/AIDS will be discussed. PMID:25933975

  13. Gut epithelial barrier dysfunction in human immunodeficiency virus-hepatitis C virus coinfected patients: Influence on innate and acquired immunity

    PubMed Central

    Márquez, Mercedes; Fernández Gutiérrez del Álamo, Clotilde; Girón-González, José Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Even in cases where viral replication has been controlled by antiretroviral therapy for long periods of time, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients have several non-acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) related co-morbidities, including liver disease, cardiovascular disease and neurocognitive decline, which have a clear impact on survival. It has been considered that persistent innate and acquired immune activation contributes to the pathogenesis of these non-AIDS related diseases. Immune activation has been related with several conditions, remarkably with the bacterial translocation related with the intestinal barrier damage by the HIV or by hepatitis C virus (HCV)-related liver cirrhosis. Consequently, increased morbidity and mortality must be expected in HIV-HCV coinfected patients. Disrupted gut barrier lead to an increased passage of microbial products and to an activation of the mucosal immune system and secretion of inflammatory mediators, which in turn might increase barrier dysfunction. In the present review, the intestinal barrier structure, measures of intestinal barrier dysfunction and the modifications of them in HIV monoinfection and in HIV-HCV coinfection will be considered. Both pathogenesis and the consequences for the progression of liver disease secondary to gut microbial fragment leakage and immune activation will be assessed. PMID:26819512

  14. Dynamic optical projection of acquired luminescence for aiding oncologic surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarder, Pinaki; Gullicksrud, Kyle; Mondal, Suman; Sudlow, Gail P.; Achilefu, Samuel; Akers, Walter J.

    2013-12-01

    Optical imaging enables real-time visualization of intrinsic and exogenous contrast within biological tissues. Applications in human medicine have demonstrated the power of fluorescence imaging to enhance visualization in dermatology, endoscopic procedures, and open surgery. Although few optical contrast agents are available for human medicine at this time, fluorescence imaging is proving to be a powerful tool in guiding medical procedures. Recently, intraoperative detection of fluorescent molecular probes that target cell-surface receptors has been reported for improvement in oncologic surgery in humans. We have developed a novel system, optical projection of acquired luminescence (OPAL), to further enhance real-time guidance of open oncologic surgery. In this method, collected fluorescence intensity maps are projected onto the imaged surface rather than via wall-mounted display monitor. To demonstrate proof-of-principle for OPAL applications in oncologic surgery, lymphatic transport of indocyanine green was visualized in live mice for intraoperative identification of sentinel lymph nodes. Subsequently, peritoneal tumors in a murine model of breast cancer metastasis were identified using OPAL after systemic administration of a tumor-selective fluorescent molecular probe. These initial results clearly show that OPAL can enhance adoption and ease-of-use of fluorescence imaging in oncologic procedures relative to existing state-of-the-art intraoperative imaging systems.

  15. Mucosal Immunity in the Female Genital Tract, HIV/AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Reis Machado, Juliana; da Silva, Marcos Vinícius; Cavellani, Camila Lourencini; Antônia dos Reis, Marlene; Monteiro, Maria Luiza Gonçalves dos Reis; Teixeira, Vicente de Paula Antunes; Rosa Miranda Corrêa, Rosana

    2014-01-01

    Mucosal immunity consists of innate and adaptive immune responses which can be influenced by systemic immunity. Despite having been the subject of intensive studies, it is not fully elucidated what exactly occurs after HIV contact with the female genital tract mucosa. The sexual route is the main route of HIV transmission, with an increased risk of infection in women compared to men. Several characteristics of the female genital tract make it suitable for inoculation, establishment of infection, and systemic spread of the virus, which causes local changes that may favor the development of infections by other pathogens, often called sexually transmitted diseases (STDs). The relationship of these STDs with HIV infection has been widely studied. Here we review the characteristics of mucosal immunity of the female genital tract, its alterations due to HIV/AIDS, and the characteristics of coinfections between HIV/AIDS and the most prevalent STDs. PMID:25313360

  16. The epidemiology of disseminated nontuberculous mycobacterial infection in the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS).

    PubMed

    Horsburgh, C R; Selik, R M

    1989-01-01

    We analyzed cases of disseminated nontuberculous mycobacterial infection (DNTM) in patients with AIDS reported to the Centers for Disease Control. Between 1981 and 1987, 2,269 cases were reported. In 96% of cases, infection was caused by M. avium complex (MAC). The number of cases has risen steadily since 1981, but the rate as a percentage of AIDS cases has remained stable at 5.5%. DNTM was seen less frequently in AIDS cases with Kaposi's sarcoma than in other AIDS cases (p less than 0.01). Rates of DNTM were lower in Hispanics and declined with age but were not significantly different by patient sex or means of acquiring HIV infection. Rates of disseminated MAC varied by geographic region from 3.9% to 7.8% (p less than 0.0001). As assessed by helper/suppressor T-cell ratios, AIDS patients with DNTM were not more immunologically impaired than those with other opportunistic infections. Life table analysis revealed that AIDS patients with DNTM survived a shorter time (median, 7.4 months) than did other AIDS patients (median, 13.3 months; p less than 0.0001). We conclude that DNTM is acquired by unpreventable environmental exposures. Because DNTM adversely affects survival of AIDS patients, effective therapeutic agents must be vigorously sought. PMID:2912355

  17. Patterns of gallium-67 scintigraphy in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and the AIDS related complex

    SciTech Connect

    Bitran, J.; Bekerman, C.; Weinstein, R.; Bennett, C.; Ryo, U.; Pinsky, S.

    1987-07-01

    Thirty-two patients with AIDS related complex (ARC) or acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) underwent /sup 67/Ga scans as part of their evaluation. Three patterns of /sup 67/Ga biodistribution were found: lymph node uptake alone; diffuse pulmonary uptake; normal scan. Gallium-67 scans were useful in identifying clinically occult Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia in seven of 15 patients with ARC who were asymptomatic and had normal chest radiographs. Gallium scans are a useful ancillary procedure in the evaluation of patients with ARC or AIDS.

  18. Experimental oral polio vaccines and acquired immune deficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hooper, E

    2001-06-29

    The simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) of the common chimpanzee is widely acknowledged as the direct ancestor of HIV-1. There is increasing historical evidence that during the late 1950s, kidneys were routinely excised from central African chimpanzees by scientists who were collaborating with the polio vaccine research of Dr Hilary Koprowski, and sent - inter alia - to vaccine-making laboratories in the USA and Africa, and to unspecified destinations in Belgium. While there is no direct evidence that cells from these kidneys were used as a substrate for growing Dr Koprowski's oral polio vaccines, there is a startling coincidence between places in Africa where his CHAT vaccine was fed, and the first appearances in the world of HIV-1 group M and group-M-related AIDS. Because of the enormous implications of the hypothesis that AIDS may be an unintended iatrogenic (physician-caused) disease, it is almost inevitable that this theory will engender heated opposition from many of those in the scientific establishment, and those with vested interests. PMID:11405924

  19. Early developmental exposures shape trade-offs between acquired and innate immunity in humans

    PubMed Central

    Georgiev, Alexander V.; Kuzawa, Christopher W.; McDade, Thomas W.

    2016-01-01

    Background and objectives Life history theory predicts resource allocation trade-offs between competing functions and processes. We test the hypothesis that relative investment towards innate versus acquired immunity in humans is subject to such trade-offs and that three types of early developmental exposures are particularly salient in shaping adult immunophenotype: (i) pathogen exposure, (ii) nutritional resources; and (iii) extrinsic mortality cues. Methodology We quantified one aspect each of innate and acquired immune function, via C-reactive protein and Epstein–Barr virus antibodies, respectively, in a sample of 1248 men and women from the Philippines (ca. 21.5 years old). Early developmental exposures were assessed via long-term data collected prospectively since participants’ birth (1983–4). We calculated a standardized ratio to assess relative bias towards acquired versus innate immune function and examined its relationship to a suite of predictors via multiple regression. Results In partial support of our predictions, some of the measures of higher pathogen exposure, greater availability of nutritional resources, and lower extrinsic mortality cues in early life were associated with a bias toward acquired immunity in both men and women. The immune profile of women, in particular, appeared to be more sensitive to early life pathogen exposures than those of men. Finally, contrary to prediction, women exhibited a greater relative investment toward innate, not acquired, immunity. Conclusions and implications Early environments can exert considerable influence on the development of immunity. They affect trade-offs between innate and acquired immunity, which show adaptive plasticity and may differ in their influence in men and women. PMID:27530543

  20. Predictive factors for the Nursing Diagnoses in people living with Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome 1

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Richardson Augusto Rosendo; Costa, Romanniny Hévillyn Silva; Nelson, Ana Raquel Cortês; Duarte, Fernando Hiago da Silva; Prado, Nanete Caroline da Costa; Rodrigues, Eduardo Henrique Fagundes

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: to identify the predictive factors for the nursing diagnoses in people living with Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome. Method: a cross-sectional study, undertaken with 113 people living with AIDS. The data were collected using an interview script and physical examination. Logistic regression was used for the data analysis, considering a level of significance of 10%. Results: the predictive factors identified were: for the nursing diagnosis of knowledge deficit-inadequate following of instructions and verbalization of the problem; for the nursing diagnosis of failure to adhere - years of study, behavior indicative of failure to adhere, participation in the treatment and forgetfulness; for the nursing diagnosis of sexual dysfunction - family income, reduced frequency of sexual practice, perceived deficit in sexual desire, perceived limitations imposed by the disease and altered body function. Conclusion: the predictive factors for these nursing diagnoses involved sociodemographic and clinical characteristics, defining characteristics, and related factors, which must be taken into consideration during the assistance provided by the nurse. PMID:27384466

  1. Primary central nervous system lymphoma in acquired immune deficiency syndrome mimicking toxoplasmosis.

    PubMed

    Utsuki, Satoshi; Oka, Hidehiro; Abe, Katsutoshi; Osawa, Shigeyuki; Yamazaki, Tomoya; Yasui, Yoshie; Fujii, Kiyotaka

    2011-02-01

    A 37-year-old man, a hepatitis B virus carrier due to mother-to-child transmission, had a medical examination in September 2008 in nearby hospitals due to anorexia and weight loss. He was transported to our hospital because computed tomography (CT) detected intracranial lesions, and he had a positive human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) antibody test. Head computed tomography (CT) revealed multiple hemorrhagic lesions and enhancement effect, suggesting a thin wall. Also, an enhancement effect was present in the ventricle walls and the subarachnoid space. No accumulation was found in the thallium-201 scintigraphy. The enhancement effect of the ventricle walls and the subarachnoid space disappeared after oral administration of pyrimethamine, sulfadiazine, and calcium folinate, contributing to the diagnosis of an abscess and meningitis due to toxoplasma. However, mass lesions did not reduce. A biopsy was performed on 30 October, and the pathological diagnosis was malignant lymphoma. He died from respiratory function deterioration on 8 November. Lymphoma cells were found in ventricle wall tissue and the subarachnoid space at the autopsy. Toxoplasmosis will typically occur as a brain lesion most commonly in acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS), whereas malignant lymphoma commonly manifests as a brain neoplastic lesion. However, differentiating between images of these lesions is difficult, so diagnosis by early biopsy is recommended. PMID:21210240

  2. Primary stomal lymphoma. An unusual complication of ileostomy in a patient with transfusion-related acquired immune deficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Levecq, H; Hautefeuille, M; Hoang, C; Galian, A; Hautefeuille, P; Rambaud, J C

    1990-02-15

    A 73-year-old heterosexual man developed a high-grade non-Hodgkin's lymphoma at the site of an ileostomy only 2 years after proctectomy for undetermined colitis not cured by previous colectomy. In fact, the early occurrence of this usually very late and rare complication of ileostomy was probably favored by the simultaneous presence of acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) due to repeated blood transfusions for refractory anemia with excess blasts. The intestinal location of the tumor, its high-grade malignancy and B-cell origin are all features of AIDS-related non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. This case report seems to be one of the rarely identified examples of the cooperation between general predisposing factors and local irritating agents at the origin of a malignant tumor. PMID:2297651

  3. AIDS: Education's New Dilemma.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freeland, D. Kay; Faber, Charles F.

    The acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) is an incurable, fatal disease that is caused by a virus that eventually destroys the body's immune system. While AIDS is contagious, the risk of contracting AIDS through casual contact is said to be negligible. A review of the court cases involving students with AIDS reveals that the precedent has…

  4. Variation in the innate and acquired arms of the immune system among five shorebird species.

    PubMed

    Mendes, Luisa; Piersma, Theunis; Hasselquist, Dennis; Matson, Kevin D; Ricklefs, Robert E

    2006-01-01

    To contribute to an understanding of the evolutionary processes that shape variation in immune responses, we compared several components of the innate and acquired arms of the immune system in five related, but ecologically diverse, migratory shorebirds (ruff Philomachus pugnax L., ruddy turnstone Arenaria interpres L., bar-tailed godwit Limosa lapponica L., sanderling Calidris alba Pallas and red knot C. canutus L.). We used a hemolysis-hemagglutination assay in free-living shorebirds to assess two of the innate components (natural antibodies and complement-mediated lysis), and a modified quantitative enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in birds held in captivity to assess the acquired component (humoral antibodies against tetanus and diphtheria toxoid) of immunity. Ruddy turnstones showed the highest levels of both innate and acquired immune responses. We suggest that turnstones could have evolved strong immune responses because they scavenge among rotting organic material on the seashore, where they might be exposed to a particularly broad range of pathogens. Although ruffs stand out among shorebirds in having a high prevalence of avian malaria, they do not exhibit higher immune response levels. Our results indicate that relationships between immune response and infection are not likely to follow a broad general pattern, but instead depend on type of parasite exposure, among other factors. PMID:16391350

  5. Research Report: HIV/AIDS

    MedlinePlus

    ... Reports » HIV/AIDS » Letter from the Director HIV/AIDS Email Facebook Twitter Letter from the Director Human ... the virus that causes acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) — has been with us for three decades now. ...

  6. AIDS Training in the Workplace.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vest, Jusanne M.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Management training regarding Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) begins with three needs assessment tools--instruments measuring fear of AIDS, knowledge of AIDS, and beliefs about the business consequences of the disease. (SK)

  7. Toward immunogenetic studies of amphibian chytridiomycosis: Linking innate and acquired immunity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Richmond, J.Q.; Savage, Anna E.; Zamudio, Kelly R.; Rosenblum, E.B.

    2009-01-01

    Recent declines in amphibian diversity and abundance have contributed significantly to the global loss of biodiversity. The fungal disease chytridiomycosis is widely considered to be a primary cause of these declines, yet the critical question of why amphibian species differ in susceptibility remains unanswered. Considerable evidence links environmental conditions and interspecific variability of the innate immune system to differential infection responses, but other sources of individual, population, or species-typical variation may also be important. In this article we review the preliminary evidence supporting a role for acquired immune defenses against chytridiomycosis, and advocate for targeted investigation of genes controlling acquired responses, as well as those that functionally bridge the innate and acquired immune systems. Immunogenetic data promise to answer key questions about chytridiomycosis susceptibility and host-pathogen coevolution, and will draw much needed attention to the importance of considering evolutionary processes in amphibian conservation management and practice. ?? 2009 by American Institute of Biological Sciences.

  8. RESTRICTED EXPRESSION OF NEW GUANINE NUCLEOTIDE EXCHANGE FACTOR ZIZIMIN2 IN AGED ACQUIRED IMMUNE SYSTEM

    PubMed Central

    JIA, YANJUN; SAKABE, ISAMU; MATSUDA, TAKENORI; HAYAKAWA, TOMOKO; MARUYAMA, MITSUO

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT The activity of various biological functions, such as nervous, endocrine and immune systems including acquired immunity, is known to decline along with aging. To elucidate the molecular mechanism of this phenomenon, we here compared the number of thymocytes, splenocytes, and bone marrow lymphocytes in young and aged mice and found the age-related functional fragility of the immune system. However, the molecular mechanisms or even the key molecules remain elusive. Therefore, we further focused on a candidate for immunosenesence-related molecules, Zizimin2, which we have recently isolated and identified as a novel guanine nucleotide exchange factor that is highly expressed in murine splenic germinal center B cells after immunization with a T cell-dependent antigen. Here, we showed that endogenous Zizimin2 protein as well as mRNA expression levels in immune organs are strictly suppressed in aged mice. We further observed that the serum antigen specific antibody response is hampered in aged mice compared to that in young animals. Moreover, the Zizimin2 mRNA expression level was not activated after immunization in aged mice. Taken together, these data suggested that Zizimin2 is associated with the reduction of immune response in acquired immunity along with aging. PMID:23092103

  9. MICROFICHE AIDS DATA

    EPA Science Inventory

    This data set contains counts of AIDS (Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome) cases reported to state and local health departments, by demographics; case-definition; HIV exposure group (risk factors for AIDS); Half-year of diagnosis, report, and death.

  10. Mycobacterium simiae and Mycobacterium avium-M. intracellulare mixed infection in acquired immune deficiency syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Lévy-Frébault, V; Pangon, B; Buré, A; Katlama, C; Marche, C; David, H L

    1987-01-01

    Acquired immune deficiency syndrome was diagnosed in a 43-year-old man, born and living in Congo. The patient presented a disseminated infection caused by mycobacteria which were recovered from blood, jejunal fluid, and duodenal and rectal biopsies. Identification, according to conventional tests and mycolate profile determination, showed that Mycobacterium avium-M. intracellulare and M. simiae were both involved. Images PMID:3793869

  11. A cascade reaction network mimicking the basic functional steps of acquired immune response

    PubMed Central

    Han, Da; Wu, Cuichen; You, Mingxu; Zhang, Tao; Wan, Shuo; Chen, Tao; Qiu, Liping; Zheng, Zheng; Liang, Hao; Tan, Weihong

    2015-01-01

    Biological systems use complex ‘information processing cores’ composed of molecular networks to coordinate their external environment and internal states. An example of this is the acquired, or adaptive, immune system (AIS), which is composed of both humoral and cell-mediated components. Here we report the step-by-step construction of a prototype mimic of the AIS which we call Adaptive Immune Response Simulator (AIRS). DNA and enzymes are used as simple artificial analogues of the components of the AIS to create a system which responds to specific molecular stimuli in vitro. We show that this network of reactions can function in a manner which is superficially similar to the most basic responses of the vertebrate acquired immune system, including reaction sequences that mimic both humoral and cellular responses. As such, AIRS provides guidelines for the design and engineering of artificial reaction networks and molecular devices. PMID:26391084

  12. Effect of traditional Chinese medicine for treating human immunodeficiency virus infections and acquired immune deficiency syndrome: Boosting immune and alleviating symptoms.

    PubMed

    Zou, Wen; Wang, Jian; Liu, Ying

    2016-01-01

    To respond to the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) epidemic in China, the integration of antiretroviral therapy (ART) and traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) has important implications in health outcomes, especially in China where the use of TCM is widespread. The National Free TCM Pilot Program for HIV Infected People began in 5 provinces (Henan, Hebei, Anhui, Hubei, and Guangdong) in 2004, and quickly scaled up to 19 provinces, autonomous regions, and municipalities in China including some places with high prevalence, 26,276 adults have been treated thus far. Usually, people with HIV infection seek TCM for four main reasons: to enhance immune function, to treat symptoms, to improve quality of life, and to reduce side effects related to medications. Evidences from randomized controlled clinical trials suggested some beneficial effects of use of traditional Chinese herbal medicine for HIV infections and AIDS. More proofs from large, well-designed, rigorous trials is needed to give firm support. Challenges include interaction between herbs and antiretroviral drugs, stigma and discrimination. The Free TCM Program has made considerable progress in providing the necessary alternative care and treatment for HIV-infected people in China, and has strong government support for continued improvement and expansion, establishing and improving a work mechanism integrating Chinese and Western medicines. PMID:26577109

  13. Interleukin-1 and cutaneous inflammation: a crucial link between innate and acquired immunity.

    PubMed

    Murphy, J E; Robert, C; Kupper, T S

    2000-03-01

    As our primary interface with the environment, the skin is constantly subjected to injury and invasion by pathogens. The fundamental force driving the evolution of the immune system has been the need to protect the host against overwhelming infection. The ability of T and B cells to recombine antigen receptor genes during development provides an efficient, flexible, and powerful immune system with nearly unlimited specificity for antigen. The capacity to expand subsets of antigen-specific lymphocytes that become activated by environmental antigens (memory response) is termed "acquired" immunity. Immunologic memory, although a fundamental aspect of mammalian biology, is a relatively recent evolutionary event that permits organisms to live for years to decades. "Innate" immunity, mediated by genes that remain in germ line conformation and encode for proteins that recognize conserved structural patterns on microorganisms, is a much more ancient system of host defense. Defensins and other antimicrobial peptides, complement and opsonins, and endocytic receptors are all considered components of the innate immune system. None of these, however, are signal-transducing receptors. Most recently, a large family of cell surface receptors that mediate signaling through the NF-kappaB transcription factor has been identified. This family of proteins shares striking homology with plant and Drosophila genes that mediate innate immunity. In mammals, this family includes the type I interleukin-1 receptor, the interleukin-18 receptor, and a growing family of Toll-like receptors, two of which were recently identified as signal-transducing receptors for bacterial endotoxin. In this review, we discuss how interleukin-1 links the innate and acquired immune systems to provide synergistic host defense activities in skin. PMID:10692124

  14. IgM, IgG and IgA rheumatoid factors and circulating immune complexes in patients with AIDS and AIDS-related complex with serological abnormalities.

    PubMed Central

    Procaccia, S; Lazzarin, A; Colucci, A; Gasparini, A; Forcellini, P; Lanzanova, D; Foppa, C U; Novati, R; Zanussi, C

    1987-01-01

    To investigate some humoral aspects which may reflect the involvement of B lymphocytes in the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), we used an enzyme-linked immunoassay (ELISA) to determine the levels of IgM, IgG and IgA rheumatoid factors (RF) in 16 patients suffering from full-blown AIDS and 32 patients with AIDS-related complex (ARC), in the clinical form of lymphoadenopathy syndrome (LAS), compared with 40 healthy, young heterosexual subjects. Both AIDS and ARC patients showed a greater incidence of high IgM RF levels, with mean values significantly higher than controls, but with no differences between the two pathological groups. IgG RF behaviour was similar in the two patient populations and the healthy subjects. IgA RF were significantly raised in AIDS and ARC. Further information on RF was obtained by determination of the immunoglobulin levels of the respective isotypes in the same patients. Mean IgG levels were above normal in AIDS and ARC patients, but the latter group showed a higher incidence of increased values and higher mean levels. The IgA isotype was significantly increased mainly in AIDS patients. The behaviour of IgM was virtually the same in the three groups studied. A difference between AIDS and ARC patients was established by the detection of circulating immune-complexes (IC) by the C1q-binding and CIC-conglutinin assays. IC were significantly high, by both methods, only in the ARC group, but normal or very low in AIDS. These overall findings suggest once again the impairment of B cell function in AIDS, with prevalent hyperactivation in ARC and exhaustion in full-blown AIDS, and apparent preservation, in the latter group, of the antibody responses which are more closely related to the activity of subsets of T helper cells. PMID:3608224

  15. Percutaneous needle lung aspiration for diagnosing pneumonitis in the patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS).

    PubMed

    Wallace, J M; Batra, P; Gong, H; Ovenfors, C O

    1985-03-01

    Fourteen patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) or suspected AIDS underwent percutaneous needle lung aspiration (PNLA) for evaluation of 16 occurrences of acute pneumonitis. A 22-gauge spinal needle was passed 2 to 3 times in the area of greatest radiographic involvement under fluoroscopic guidance. The specimen was immediately placed on microscope slides for Gomori's methenamine silver and Papanicolaou staining. The needle was then flushed with sterile water for bacterial, Legionella, viral, mycobacterial, and fungal cultures, and for Legionella immunofluorescent staining. Diagnostic information was provided by 14 of the 16 procedures. Of 11 patients ultimately found to have P. carinii pneumonitis, PNLA specimens were diagnostic in 10 (91%). Infectious agents other than P. carinii also were identified by PNLA, including cytomegalovirus (4 cases), M. avium-intracellulare (1 case), and pyogenic bacteria (3 cases). Complications of PNLA were: pneumothorax in 7 cases (44%), 3 (19%) of which required chest tube evacuation; and minor hemoptysis (less than 50 ml) in 2. The PNLA can be a useful diagnostic procedure in the patient with AIDS and pneumonitis. It has the advantages of being less costly and time-consuming than fiberoptic bronchoscopy. It is, however, frequently complicated by pneumothorax, making it an inappropriate approach for patients with significant respiratory compromise. PMID:3872089

  16. Passive Immunization against HIV/AIDS by Antibody Gene Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Lili; Wang, Pin

    2014-01-01

    Despite tremendous efforts over the course of many years, the quest for an effective HIV vaccine by the classical method of active immunization remains largely elusive. However, two recent studies in mice and macaques have now demonstrated a new strategy designated as Vectored ImmunoProphylaxis (VIP), which involves passive immunization by viral vector-mediated delivery of genes encoding broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) for in vivo expression. Robust protection against virus infection was observed in preclinical settings when animals were given VIP to express monoclonal neutralizing antibodies. This unorthodox approach raises new promise for combating the ongoing global HIV pandemic. In this article, we survey the status of antibody gene transfer, review the revolutionary progress on isolation of extremely bnAbs, detail VIP experiments against HIV and its related virus conduced in humanized mice and macaque monkeys, and discuss the pros and cons of VIP and its opportunities and challenges towards clinical applications to control HIV/AIDS endemics. PMID:24473340

  17. Passive immunization against HIV/AIDS by antibody gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lili; Wang, Pin

    2014-02-01

    Despite tremendous efforts over the course of many years, the quest for an effective HIV vaccine by the classical method of active immunization remains largely elusive. However, two recent studies in mice and macaques have now demonstrated a new strategy designated as Vectored ImmunoProphylaxis (VIP), which involves passive immunization by viral vector-mediated delivery of genes encoding broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) for in vivo expression. Robust protection against virus infection was observed in preclinical settings when animals were given VIP to express monoclonal neutralizing antibodies. This unorthodox approach raises new promise for combating the ongoing global HIV pandemic. In this article, we survey the status of antibody gene transfer, review the revolutionary progress on isolation of extremely bnAbs, detail VIP experiments against HIV and its related virus conduced in humanized mice and macaque monkeys, and discuss the pros and cons of VIP and its opportunities and challenges towards clinical applications to control HIV/AIDS endemics. PMID:24473340

  18. Human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immune deficiency syndrome: Using drug from mathematical perceptive

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Amar Nath; Saha, Shubhankar; Roy, Priti Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Entry of acquired immune deficiency syndrome virus into the host immune cell involves the participation of various components of host and viral cell unit. These components may be categorized as attachment of the viral surface envelope protein subunit, gp120, to the CD4+ receptor and chemokine coreceptors, CCR5 and CXCR4, present on T cell surface. The viral fusion protein, gp41, the second cleaved subunit of Env undergoes reconfiguration and the membrane fusion reaction itself. Since the CD4+ T cell population is actively involved; the ultimate outcome of human immunodeficiency virus infection is total collapse of the host immune system. Mathematical modeling of the stages in viral membrane protein-host cell receptor-coreceptor interaction and the effect of antibody vaccine on the viral entry into the susceptible host cell has been carried out using as impulsive differential equations. We have studied the effect of antibody vaccination and determined analytically the threshold value of drug dosage and dosing interval for optimum levels of infection. We have also investigated the effect of perfect adherence of drug dose on the immune cell count in extreme cases and observed that systematic drug dosage of the immune cells leads to longer and improved lives. PMID:26568917

  19. Wernicke's Encephalopathy: An Unusual Consequence of the Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome—Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, Timothy R.; Williams, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Wernicke's encephalopathy is a well-described syndrome characterized by the classic triad of confusion, ataxia, and ophthalmoplegia. Wernicke's encephalopathy results from thiamine (vitamin B1) deficiency. Common causes include alcoholism and gastric disorders. Wernicke's has been described in patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS); however, given these patients' immunosuppressed state, the diagnosis of Wernicke's encephalopathy is not apparent. Case Presentation. A 31-year-old previously healthy male presented to the ER complaining of progressive dyspnea. Workup revealed HIV/AIDS and PCP pneumonia. He was treated and improved. On day 14 he became confused and developed nystagmus and ataxia. Considering his immunocompromised state, infectious and neoplastic etiologies topped the differential diagnosis. CT head was negative. Lumbar puncture was unremarkable. Brain MRI revealed increased T2 signal in the medial thalamus bilaterally. Intravenous thiamine was administered resulting in resolution of symptoms. Discussion. The classic triad of Wernicke's encephalopathy occurs in 10% of cases. When immunosuppressed patients develop acute neurologic symptoms infectious or neoplastic etiologies must be excluded. However, given the relative safety of thiamine supplementation, there should be a low threshold for initiating therapy in order to reverse the symptoms and prevent progression to Korsakoff dementia, which is permanent. PMID:23935638

  20. Wernicke's Encephalopathy: An Unusual Consequence of the Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome-Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Timothy R; Dragu, Dritan; Williams, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Wernicke's encephalopathy is a well-described syndrome characterized by the classic triad of confusion, ataxia, and ophthalmoplegia. Wernicke's encephalopathy results from thiamine (vitamin B1) deficiency. Common causes include alcoholism and gastric disorders. Wernicke's has been described in patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS); however, given these patients' immunosuppressed state, the diagnosis of Wernicke's encephalopathy is not apparent. Case Presentation. A 31-year-old previously healthy male presented to the ER complaining of progressive dyspnea. Workup revealed HIV/AIDS and PCP pneumonia. He was treated and improved. On day 14 he became confused and developed nystagmus and ataxia. Considering his immunocompromised state, infectious and neoplastic etiologies topped the differential diagnosis. CT head was negative. Lumbar puncture was unremarkable. Brain MRI revealed increased T2 signal in the medial thalamus bilaterally. Intravenous thiamine was administered resulting in resolution of symptoms. Discussion. The classic triad of Wernicke's encephalopathy occurs in 10% of cases. When immunosuppressed patients develop acute neurologic symptoms infectious or neoplastic etiologies must be excluded. However, given the relative safety of thiamine supplementation, there should be a low threshold for initiating therapy in order to reverse the symptoms and prevent progression to Korsakoff dementia, which is permanent. PMID:23935638

  1. The Unspecific Side of Acquired Immunity Against Infectious Disease: Causes and Consequences

    PubMed Central

    Muraille, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Acquired immunity against infectious disease (AIID) has long been considered as strictly dependent on the B and T lymphocytes of the adaptive immune system. Consequently, AIID has been viewed as highly specific to the antigens expressed by pathogens. However, a growing body of data motivates revision of this central paradigm of immunology. Unrelated past infection, vaccination, and chronic infection have been found to induce cross-protection against numerous pathogens. These observations can be partially explained by the poly-specificity of antigenic T and B receptors, the Mackaness effect and trained immunity. In addition, numerous studies highlight the importance of microbiota composition on resistance to infectious disease via direct competition or modulation of the immune response. All of these data support the idea that a non-negligible part of AIID in nature can be nonspecific to the pathogens encountered and even of the antigens expressed by pathogens. As this protection may be dependent on the private T and B repertoires produced by the random rearrangement of genes, past immune history, chronic infection, and microbiota composition, it is largely unpredictable at the individual level. However, we can reasonably expect that a better understanding of the underlying mechanisms will allow us to statistically predict cross-protection at the population level. From an evolutionary perspective, selection of immune mechanisms allowing for partially nonspecific AIID would appear to be advantageous against highly polymorphic and rapidly evolving pathogens. This new emerging paradigm may have several important consequences on our understanding of individual infectious disease susceptibility and our conception of tolerance, vaccination and therapeutic strategies against infection and cancer. It also underscores the importance of viewing the microbiota and persisting infectious agents as integral parts of the immune system. PMID:26793171

  2. AIDS Education for the Workplace.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mello, Jeffrey A.

    1990-01-01

    Sun Life in Wellesley, Massachusetts, has an ongoing education program about acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) that provides employees with facts and works to change attitudes about the implications of AIDS for the workplace. (SK)

  3. Refractory and/or Relapsing Cryptococcosis Associated with Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome: Clinical Features, Genotype, and Virulence Factors of Cryptococcus spp. Isolates.

    PubMed

    Nascimento, Erika; Vitali, Lucia H; Tonani, Ludmilla; Kress, Marcia R Von Zeska; Takayanagui, Osvaldo M; Martinez, Roberto

    2016-05-01

    Refractory and relapsing crytocococcosis in acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) patients have a poor prognosis. The risk factors for this complicated infection course were evaluated by comparing refractory and/or relapsing cryptococcosis in human immunodeficiency virus-coinfected patients (cohort 1) with another group of AIDS patients who adequately responded to antifungals (cohort 2). Except for one isolate of Cryptococcus gattii from a cohort 2 case, all other isolates were identified as Cryptococcus neoformans var. grubii, sex type α, genotype VNI, including Cryptococcus reisolated from the relapse or in the refractory state. No differences were observed with respect to Cryptococcus capsule size and in the melanin and phospholipase production. The cohort 1 patients presented higher prevalence of cryptococcemia, cerebral dissemination, chronic liver disease, and leucopenia, and have increased death rate. Apparently, the refractory and/or relapsing cryptococcosis in the AIDS patients were more related to the host and the extent of the infection than to the fungal characteristics. PMID:26928832

  4. Molecular characteristics of Illicium verum extractives to activate acquired immune response

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Wanxi; Lin, Zhi; Wang, Lansheng; Chang, Junbo; Gu, Fangliang; Zhu, Xiangwei

    2015-01-01

    Illicium verum, whose extractives can activate the demic acquired immune response, is an expensive medicinal plant. However, the rich extractives in I. verum biomass were seriously wasted for the inefficient extraction and separation processes. In order to further utilize the biomedical resources for the good acquired immune response, the four extractives were obtained by SJYB extraction, and then the immunology moleculars of SJYB extractives were identified and analyzed by GC–MS. The result showed that the first-stage extractives contained 108 components including anethole (40.27%), 4-methoxy-benzaldehyde (4.25%), etc.; the second-stage extractives had 5 components including anethole (84.82%), 2-hydroxy-2-(4-methoxy-phenyl)-n-methyl-acetamide (7.11%), etc.; the third-stage extractives contained one component namely anethole (100%); and the fourth-stage extractives contained 5 components including cyclohexyl-benzene (64.64%), 1-(1-methylethenyl)-3-(1-methylethyl)-benzene (17.17%), etc. The SJYB extractives of I. verum biomass had a main retention time between 10 and 20 min what’s more, the SJYB extractives contained many biomedical moleculars, such as anethole, eucalyptol, [1S-(1α,4aα,10aβ)]-1,2,3,4,4a,9,10,10a-octahydro-1,4a-dimethyl-7-(1-methylethyl)-1-phenanthrenecarboxylic acid, stigmast-4-en-3-one, γ-sitosterol, and so on. So the functional analytical results suggested that the SJYB extractives of I. verum had a function in activating the acquired immune response and a huge potential in biomedicine. PMID:27081359

  5. Molecular characteristics of Illicium verum extractives to activate acquired immune response.

    PubMed

    Peng, Wanxi; Lin, Zhi; Wang, Lansheng; Chang, Junbo; Gu, Fangliang; Zhu, Xiangwei

    2016-05-01

    Illicium verum, whose extractives can activate the demic acquired immune response, is an expensive medicinal plant. However, the rich extractives in I. verum biomass were seriously wasted for the inefficient extraction and separation processes. In order to further utilize the biomedical resources for the good acquired immune response, the four extractives were obtained by SJYB extraction, and then the immunology moleculars of SJYB extractives were identified and analyzed by GC-MS. The result showed that the first-stage extractives contained 108 components including anethole (40.27%), 4-methoxy-benzaldehyde (4.25%), etc.; the second-stage extractives had 5 components including anethole (84.82%), 2-hydroxy-2-(4-methoxy-phenyl)-n-methyl-acetamide (7.11%), etc.; the third-stage extractives contained one component namely anethole (100%); and the fourth-stage extractives contained 5 components including cyclohexyl-benzene (64.64%), 1-(1-methylethenyl)-3-(1-methylethyl)-benzene (17.17%), etc. The SJYB extractives of I. verum biomass had a main retention time between 10 and 20 min what's more, the SJYB extractives contained many biomedical moleculars, such as anethole, eucalyptol, [1S-(1α,4aα,10aβ)]-1,2,3,4,4a,9,10,10a-octahydro-1,4a-dimethyl-7-(1-methylethyl)-1-phenanthrenecarboxylic acid, stigmast-4-en-3-one, γ-sitosterol, and so on. So the functional analytical results suggested that the SJYB extractives of I. verum had a function in activating the acquired immune response and a huge potential in biomedicine. PMID:27081359

  6. Successful management of severe refractory acquired immune bleeding disorder: Prior to insisting surgery

    PubMed Central

    Al-Jafar, Hassan; Al-Barjas, H.; Hashem, Raed A.; Refaii, Thanaa M.K.; AlSaeed, Ahmad M.

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Acquired bleeding disorders are rare and may be missed before surgery. Additionally, they may be refractory to conventional treatments. PRESENTATION OF CASE A 50-year-old patient experienced prolonged post-operative bleeding when his bleeding disorder was missed prior to his undergoing inguinal herniorrhaphy. Post-operative investigations revealed severe acquired von Willebrand syndrome associated with a monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance. A few months later, he required umbilical herniorrhaphy, but he did not respond to attempts to raise his von Willebrand factor antigen and activity levels using conventional therapies, including desmopressin, cryoprecipitate, intravenous immunoglobulin, and Von Willebrand factor concentrate. A triple therapy combination of dexamethasone, intravenous immunoglobulin, and mycophenolate mofetil was administered, with a successful and sustained response, lasting about 2 months. The surgery was performed safely, without any complications. DISCUSSION Conventional acquired von Willebrand syndrome treatment is usually aimed at replacing von Willebrand factor or stimulating its secretion from storage in endothelial cells. In the present case, the alternative treatment was directed against both the humoral and cell-mediated immune mechanisms. CONCLUSION This case of acquired bleeding disorder showed that more attention must be given to a patient's coagulation profile, even if only very minor laboratory coagulation derangements are detected prior to surgery, to avoid missing such rare disorders. The described triple therapy demonstrated good effects and may be considered for inclusion in a controlled randomized study to determine its usefulness for other surgeries delayed due to severe acquired bleeding disorders. To the best of our knowledge, this triple combination treatment has not been previously used for the treatment of severe acquired bleeding disorders that are refractory to conventional therapies. PMID

  7. Gingival mass in acquired immune deficiency syndrome patient: An unusual manifestation

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Jigna S.; Prajapati, Monali N.

    2016-01-01

    Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) is designated as an acquired immune deficiency syndrome defining condition. Although uncommon, it is essential to be wary of this neoplasm since intraoral manifestations may be the first clinical manifestation of HIV disease. The gingiva is one of the rarest intraoral sites with a prevalence of 0.6%. Careful evaluation of patients presenting with solitary atypical gingival mass can lead to early detection of HIV disease. Here, we report a case of NHL manifesting as a gingival mass in a 45-year-old HIV-positive female patient. PMID:27190419

  8. Daily intake of heat-killed Lactobacillus plantarum L-137 augments acquired immunity in healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Hirose, Yoshitaka; Murosaki, Shinji; Yamamoto, Yoshihiro; Yoshikai, Yasunobu; Tsuru, Tomomi

    2006-12-01

    Heat-killed Lactobacillus plantarum strain L-137 (HK-LP) is a potent inducer of IL-12 in vitro as well as in vivo in mice. HK-LP has been shown to suppress IgE production against food allergens, as well as tumor growth in mice, through IL-12 production, which induces the T helper (Th) 1 type immune response. To determine whether the intake of HK-LP influences immune function and the quality of life (QOL), a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel study was conducted in healthy subjects. Sixty subjects (30 men and 30 women, mean age 56.3 y) were randomly assigned to receive a capsule containing 10 mg of HK-LP daily or a matching capsule for 12 wk. Biomarkers for innate immunity such as the natural killer activity of peripheral blood mononuclear cells, neutrophil phagocytosis, and cell surface expression of CD64 on monocytes were measured every 4 wk. Biomarkers for acquired immunity such as concanavalin A (Con A)-induced proliferation, percentages of INF-gamma and IL-4-producing cluster of differentiation (CD)4(+) T cells (Th1:Th2 ratio), and the serum IgG4:IgG ratio were measured every 4 wk or at wk 0 and wk 12. Health-related QOL was assessed using a self-rating questionnaire with 26 items. Among the measured biomarkers, the percent change in Con A-induced proliferation and the Th1:Th2 ratio in the HK-LP group was greater than those in the control group (P = 0.036 and P = 0.002, respectively). The degree of improvement in QOL was higher in the HK-LP group than in the control group at wk 8 (P = 0.049) and tended to be higher at wk 12 (P = 0.092). These results suggest that a daily intake of HK-LP augments acquired immunity, especially Th1-related immune functions in healthy subjects, thereby improving the health-related QOL. PMID:17116721

  9. Norovirus Infection and Acquired Immunity in 8 Countries: Results From the MAL-ED Study

    PubMed Central

    Rouhani, Saba; Peñataro Yori, Pablo; Paredes Olortegui, Maribel; Siguas Salas, Mery; Rengifo Trigoso, Dixner; Mondal, Dinesh; Bodhidatta, Ladaporn; Platts-Mills, James; Samie, Amidou; Kabir, Furqan; Lima, Aldo; Babji, Sudhir; Mason, Carl J.; Kalam, Adil; Bessong, Pascal; Ahmed, Tahmeed; Mduma, Estomih; Bhutta, Zulfiqar A.; Lima, Ila; Ramdass, Rakhi; Lang, Dennis; George, Ajila; Zaidi, Anita K. M.; Kang, Gagandeep; Houpt, Eric; Kosek, Margaret N.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Norovirus is an important cause of childhood diarrhea. We present data from a longitudinal, multicountry study describing norovirus epidemiology during the first 2 years of life. Methods. A birth cohort of 1457 children across 8 countries contributed 7077 diarrheal stools for norovirus testing. A subset of 199 children contributed additional asymptomatic samples (2307) and diarrheal stools (770), which were used to derive incidence rates and evaluate evidence for acquired immunity. Results. Across sites, 89% of children experienced at least 1 norovirus infection before 24 months, and 22.7% of all diarrheal stools were norovirus positive. Severity of norovirus-positive diarrhea was comparable to other enteropathogens, with the exception of rotavirus. Incidence of genogroup II (GII) infection was higher than genogroup I and peaked at 6–11 months across sites. Undernutrition was a risk factor for symptomatic norovirus infection, with an increase in 1 standard deviation of length-for-age z score associated with a 17% reduction (odds ratio, 0.83 [95% confidence interval, .72–.97]; P = .011) in the odds of experiencing diarrhea when norovirus was present, after accounting for genogroup, rotavirus vaccine, and age. Evidence of acquired immunity was observed among GII infections only: Children with prior GII infection were found to have a 27% reduction in the hazard of subsequent infection (hazard ratio, 0.727; P = .010). Conclusions. The high prevalence of norovirus across 8 sites in highly variable epidemiologic settings and demonstration of protective immunity for GII infections provide support for investment in vaccine development. PMID:27013692

  10. Persistence of Immunity Acquired after a Single Dose of Rubella Vaccine in Japan.

    PubMed

    Okafuji, Takao; Okafuji, Teruo; Nakayama, Tetsuo

    2016-05-20

    To date, Takahashi, Matsuura, and TO-336 strains of live-attenuated rubella vaccine have been used in Japan. Japan implemented a single-dose rubella vaccination program until 2006. However, few reports are available on the persistence of immunity after this vaccination program. We collected 276 serum samples from January 2009 to December 2011 at Okafuji Pediatric Clinic and assessed the immune status of these samples against rubella virus during 1-10 years after vaccination with a single dose of Takahashi rubella vaccine. Regional outbreak of rubella did not occur during 1999-2011. The collected serum samples were tested for antibodies against the rubella virus by performing a standard hemagglutination inhibition (HAI) test. Our results showed that all the tested serum samples contained antibodies against the rubella virus 10 years after the vaccination. Geometric mean titer of HAI antibodies was 1:180 and decreased to 1:68 at 10 years after the vaccination. The levels of HAI antibodies decreased logarithmically with time after the vaccination. In conclusion, vaccine-acquired immunity after vaccination with a single dose of live-attenuated Takahashi rubella vaccine was retained for at least 10 years when rubella was under regional control. PMID:26255735

  11. Outer Surface Protein A Protects Lyme Disease Spirochetes from Acquired Host Immunity in the Tick Vector▿

    PubMed Central

    Battisti, James M.; Bono, James L.; Rosa, Patricia A.; Schrumpf, Merry E.; Schwan, Tom G.; Policastro, Paul F.

    2008-01-01

    The Lyme disease spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi alters the expression of outer surface protein (osp) genes as the bacterium cycles between ticks and mammals. OspA is produced as borreliae enter the tick vector and remains a major surface antigen during midgut colonization. To elucidate the role of OspA in the vector, we created an insertional deletion of ospA in strain B31-A3. The ospA mutant infects mice when it is injected intradermally and is acquired by larval ticks fed on these mice, where it persists through the molt to the nymph stage. Bacterial survival rates in artificially infected tick larvae fed on naïve mice were compared with those in the vector fed on immune mice. The ospA mutant proliferates in larvae if it is exposed to blood from naïve mice, but it declines in density after larval feeding if the blood is from immune mice. When uninfected larvae are fed on B-cell-deficient mice infected with the ospA mutant, larvae show borrelial densities and persistence that are significantly greater than those fed on infected, immunocompetent mice. We conclude that OspA serves a critical antibody-shielding role during vector blood meal uptake from immune hosts and is not required for persistence in the tick vector. PMID:18779341

  12. Chronic beryllium disease: an updated model interaction between innate and acquired immunity.

    PubMed

    Sawyer, Richard T; Maier, Lisa A

    2011-02-01

    During the last decade, there have been concerted efforts to reduce beryllium (Be) exposure in the workplace and thereby reduce potential cases of this occupational lung disorder. Despite these efforts, it is estimated that there are at least one million Be-exposed individuals in the U.S. who are potentially at risk for developing chronic beryllium disease (CBD). Previously, we reviewed the current CBD literature and proposed that CBD represents a model interaction between innate and acquired immunity (Sawyer et al., Int Immunopharmacol 2:249-261, 2002). We closed this review with a section on "future directions" that identified key gaps in our understanding of the pathogenesis of CBD. In the intervening period, progress has been made to fill in some of these gaps, and the current review will provide an update on that progress. Based on recent findings, we provide a new hypothesis to explain how Be drives sustained chronic inflammation and granuloma formation in CBD leading to progressive compromised lung function in CBD patients. This paradigm has direct implications for our understanding of the development of an immune response to Be, but is also likely applicable to other immune-mediated lung diseases of known and unknown etiology. PMID:20981472

  13. Acquired transmission-blocking immunity to Plasmodium vivax in a population of southern coastal Mexico.

    PubMed

    Ramsey, J M; Salinas, E; Rodríguez, M H

    1996-05-01

    Naturally acquired transmission-blocking immunity to Plasmodium vivax was studied in three groups of patients from the southern coast of Mexico: primary cases (Group A, 61% of the study population), secondary cases with the prior infection seven or more months earlier (Group B, 23%), and secondary cases with the previous malaria experience within six months of the present study (Group C, 16%). Anopheles albimanus mosquitoes were fed with patients' infected blood cells in the presence of autologous or control serum, with or without heat-inactivation. Patients from all three groups had transmission-blocking immunity, although the quality and quantity of this blocking activity was significantly higher in the two secondary patient groups (B and C). Only primary malaria cases produced transmission-enhancing activity (23% of the cases), which was dependent on heat-labile serum components. The levels of patient group transmission-blocking immunity and mosquito infectivity were used to calculate the probabilities of a mosquito becoming infective after taking a blood meal from a P. vivax-infected patient from any one of the three groups. This probability was 0.025, with Group A patients providing the major source of these infections (92% risk from Group A and 4% risk for Groups B and C). PMID:8644898

  14. Dual role of B cells in mediating innate and acquired immunity to herpes simplex virus infections.

    PubMed

    Deshpande, S P; Kumaraguru, U; Rouse, B T

    2000-06-15

    mu-immunoglobulin chain gene targeted B-cell-deficient mice of susceptible BALB/c strain and resistant C57B1/6 strain are up to 100- to 1000-fold more susceptible to cutaneous infection by herpes simplex virus (HSV) than the respective control wild type mice. The effect of the lack of B cells on immunity to HSV infections was analyzed and B cells were found to play a dual role in affecting both innate and acquired immune responses. Natural antibodies (IgM isotype), reactive with HSV have an anti-viral effect in the innate control of primary cutaneous HSV infection. B cells can also function as antigen-presenting cells for the stimulation of HSV-specific CD4+ T-cell responses. Consequently, CD4+ T cells and interferon-gamma responses were found to be significantly impaired in HSV-infected B-cell-deficient mice compared to that seen in control mice. No significant differences were found in natural-killer-cell- or HSV-specific CD8+ T-cell activity between control and B-cell-deficient mice. Our results imply a role for B cell in mediating innate and CD4+ T-cell-specific immunity in determining susceptibility to primary HSV infections. PMID:10896767

  15. Substantially reduced pre-patent parasite multiplication rates are associated with naturally acquired immunity to Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Douglas, A D; Andrews, L; Draper, S J; Bojang, K; Milligan, P; Gilbert, S C; Imoukhuede, E B; Hill, A V S

    2011-05-01

    Naturally acquired immunity to Plasmodium falciparum's asexual blood stage reduces parasite multiplication at microscopically detectable densities. The effect of natural immunity on initial prepatent parasite multiplication during the period following a new infection has been uncertain, contributing to doubt regarding the utility of experimental challenge models for blood-stage vaccine trials. Here we present data revealing that parasite multiplication rates during the initial prepatent period in semi-immune Gambian adults are substantially lower than in malaria-naive participants. This supports the view that a blood-stage vaccine capable of emulating the disease-reducing effect of natural immunity could achieve a detectable effect during the prepatent period. PMID:21459819

  16. Radiation-resistant acquired immunity of vaccinated mice to Schistosoma mansoni

    SciTech Connect

    Aitken, R.; Coulson, P.S.; Dixon, B.; Wilson, R.A.

    1987-11-01

    Vaccination of mice with attenuated cercariae of Schistosoma mansoni induces specific acquired resistance to challenge infection. This resistance is immunologically-mediated, possibly via a delayed-type hypersensitivity. Studies of parasite migration have shown that the protective mechanism operates most effectively in the lungs of vaccinated mice. We have probed the mechanism by exposing mice to 500 rads of gamma radiation before challenge infection. Our results show that the effector mechanism operative against challenge larvae is resistant to radiation. In contrast, classical immune responses are markedly suppressed by the same treatment. While leukocyte populations in the blood fall dramatically after irradiation, numbers of cells recoverable by bronchoalveolar lavage are unaffected. We suggest that vaccination with attenuated cercariae establishes populations of sensitized cells in the lungs which trigger the mechanism of resistance when challenge schistosomula migrate through pulmonary capillary beds. Although the cells may be partially disabled by irradiation, they remain responsive to worm antigens and thereby capable of initiating the elimination mechanism. This hypothesis would explain the radiation resistance of vaccine-induced immunity to S. mansoni.

  17. HIV/AIDS

    MedlinePlus

    HIV stands for human immunodeficiency virus. It kills or damages the body's immune system cells. AIDS stands for acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. It is the most advanced stage of infection with HIV. HIV most ...

  18. AIDS Education Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horry County Board of Education, Conway, SC.

    This curriculum guide was developed, based on sound principles of human growth and development, to present the most recently available information on AIDS (Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome). The curriculum presents information on the known facts about AIDS and the AIDS virus infection. It also addresses the potential for adolescents and adults…

  19. Children with AIDS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jessee, Peggy O; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Discusses the prevalence of pediatric Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) cases in the United States, the quality of life of children with AIDS, and concerns that parents and the community have about the disease. Suggests some responses for educational institutions and teachers to help confront AIDS and help children with the disease. (MDM)

  20. The effects of immunity and resistance on the development of AIDS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abell, Martha; Braselton, James; Braselton, Lorraine

    2007-09-01

    We incorporate basic genetics into an AIDS model. We illustrate that if a homozygote is immune to the disease or is resistant to the effects of the disease, the corresponding allele goes to fixation. On the other hand, if the heterozygote is immune to the disease or is resistant to the effects of the disease, polymorphism usually occurs.

  1. Mommy, Daddy--What's AIDS?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Association of Pediatric Nurse Associates and Practitioners, Cherry Hill, NJ.

    This brochure is designed to help parents answer the questions that their children may ask them about Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) and the Human Immuno Deficiency Virus (HIV), the virus that causes AIDS. It provides basic information about AIDS and HIV, as well as sources for further information, such as the National AIDS Hotline. It…

  2. Answering Your Questions about AIDS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalichman, Seth C.

    This book focuses on AIDS education and answers 350 commonly asked questions about Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) and Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) taken from questions addressed to two major urban AIDS hotlines (Milwaukee, Wisconsin, and Houston, Texas). Chapter 1, "HIV - The Virus That Causes AIDS," discusses: the HIV virus; the…

  3. AIDS, the Schools, and Policy Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, James H.

    1986-01-01

    This article reviews the discovery of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) and describes the biology of the disease. The problem of AIDS among children is discussed and implications for school policy decisions are cited. (Author/MT)

  4. Attitudes towards and Knowledge of AIDS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Andrew; Hiday, Virginia Aldige'

    Most research on Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) has been medical and most social science research on AIDS has been concerned with social factors in its spread and with social-psychological effects of contracting AIDS. This study was conducted to examine public attitudes toward, and public knowledge about AIDS. Knowledge about AIDS was…

  5. Decreased expression of human class II antigens on monocytes from patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome. Increased expression with interferon-gamma.

    PubMed Central

    Heagy, W; Kelley, V E; Strom, T B; Mayer, K; Shapiro, H M; Mandel, R; Finberg, R

    1984-01-01

    The expression of HLA-DR (a class II histocompatibility antigen) on monocytes isolated from the peripheral blood of normal individuals and patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) was investigated by the use of dual fluorescent staining and cytofluorometry. In animal models the absence of class II positive monocytes is linked to a failure of T cells to respond to antigens. We now report that patients with AIDS have a paucity of HLA-DR+ monocytes. The percentage of HLA-DR+ monocytes among eight normal individuals ranged from 49.3 to 95.0%+, and only one individual had less than 50% HLA-DR+ monocytes. HLA-DR expression on monocytes from homosexual male patients with lymphadenopathy was similar to that of normal subjects (range, 58.0 to 97.4%+). In contrast, seven of nine patients with AIDS had less than 50% HLA-DR+ monocytes (range, 13.4 to 78.8%+). The in vitro incubation of monocytes from AIDS patients with cloned human interferon-gamma resulted in an increase of the expression of HLA-DR to near normal levels. PMID:6439741

  6. Utility of /sup 67/Ga scintigraphy and bronchial washings in the diagnosis and treatment of Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia in patients with the acquired immune deficiency syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Tuazon, C.U.; Delaney, M.D.; Simon, G.L.; Witorsch, P.; Varma, V.M.

    1985-11-01

    Twenty patients with the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) and suspected Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia were evaluated by /sup 67/Ga scintigraphy and fiberoptic bronchoscopy for initial diagnosis and response to therapy. Lung uptake of /sup 67/Ga was demonstrated in 100% of AIDS patients with P. carinii pneumonia, including those with subclinical infection. Fiberoptic bronchoscopy identified P. carinii in the bronchial washings of 100% of cases (19 patients), whereas only 13 of 16 (81%) patients had P. carinii in lung tissue obtained by transbronchial biopsy. Repeat fiberoptic bronchoscopy was performed in 16 of 20 patients. After 2 to 4 wk of therapy, P. carinii was identified in bronchial washings in 8 of 16 (50%) patients and in transbronchial biopsy in 1 of 10 (10%) patients examined. Bronchial washing has a higher yield than transbronchial biopsy in demonstrating P. carinii in patients with AIDS and may evolve as the procedure of choice in such patients. Based on the clinical course and results of /sup 67/Ga scintigraphy and fiberoptic bronchoscopy in AIDS patients with P. carinii pneumonia, optimal therapy may require at least 3 wk of treatment.

  7. Changes in cytokine production associated with acquired immunity to Plasmodium falciparum malaria

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, M S M; Akanmori, B D; Waterfall, M; Riley, E M

    2001-01-01

    Individuals living in malaria-endemic areas eventually develop clinical immunity to Plasmodium falciparum. That is, they are able to limit blood parasite densities to extremely low levels and fail to show symptoms of infection. As the clinical symptoms of malaria infection are mediated in part by pro-inflammatory cytokines it is not clear whether the acquisition of clinical immunity is due simply to the development of antiparasitic mechanisms or whether the ability to regulate inflammatory cytokine production is also involved. We hypothesize that there is a correlation between risk of developing clinical malaria and the tendency to produce high levels of proinflammatory cytokines in response to malaria infection. In order to test this hypothesis, we have compared the ability of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from malaria-naive and malaria-exposed adult donors to proliferate and to secrete IFN-γ in response to P. falciparum schizont extract (PfSE). In order to determine how PfSE-induced IFN-γ production is regulated, we have also measured production of IL-12p40 and IL-10 from PfSE-stimulated PBMC and investigated the role of neutralizing antibody to IL-12 in modulating IFN-γ production. We find that cells from naive donors produce moderate amounts of IFN-γ in response to PfSE and that IFN-γ production is strongly IL-12 dependent. Cells from malaria-exposed donors living in an area of low malaria endemicity produce much higher levels of IFN-γ and this response is also at least partially IL-12 dependent. In complete contrast, cells from donors living in an area of very high endemicity produce minimal amounts of IFN-γ. No significant differences were detected between the groups in IL-10 production, suggesting that this cytokine does not play a major role in regulating malaria-induced IFN-γ production. The data from this study thus strongly support the hypothesis that down-regulation of inflammatory cytokine production may be a component of acquired clinical

  8. AID and APOBECs span the gap between innate and adaptive immunity

    PubMed Central

    Moris, Arnaud; Murray, Shannon; Cardinaud, Sylvain

    2014-01-01

    The activation-induced deaminase (AID)/APOBEC cytidine deaminases participate in a diversity of biological processes from the regulation of protein expression to embryonic development and host defenses. In its classical role, AID mutates germline-encoded sequences of B cell receptors, a key aspect of adaptive immunity, and APOBEC1, mutates apoprotein B pre-mRNA, yielding two isoforms important for cellular function and plasma lipid metabolism. Investigations over the last ten years have uncovered a role of the APOBEC superfamily in intrinsic immunity against viruses and innate immunity against viral infection by deamination and mutation of viral genomes. Further, discovery in the area of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection revealed that the HIV viral infectivity factor protein interacts with APOBEC3G, targeting it for proteosomal degradation, overriding its antiviral function. More recently, our and others’ work have uncovered that the AID and APOBEC cytidine deaminase family members have an even more direct link between activity against viral infection and induction and shaping of adaptive immunity than previously thought, including that of antigen processing for cytotoxic T lymphocyte activity and natural killer cell activation. Newly ascribed functions of these cytodine deaminases will be discussed, including their newly identified roles in adaptive immunity, epigenetic regulation, and cell differentiation. Herein this review we discuss AID and APOBEC cytodine deaminases as a link between innate and adaptive immunity uncovered by recent studies. PMID:25352838

  9. Schistosomiasis Coinfection in Children Influences Acquired Immune Response against Plasmodium falciparum Malaria Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Gaayeb, Lobna; Schacht, Anne-Marie; Charrier, Nicole; De Clerck, Dick; Dompnier, Jean-Pierre; Pillet, Sophie; Garraud, Olivier; N'Diaye, Abdoulaye A.; Riveau, Gilles

    2010-01-01

    Background Malaria and schistosomiasis coinfection frequently occurs in tropical countries. This study evaluates the influence of Schistosoma haematobium infection on specific antibody responses and cytokine production to recombinant merozoite surface protein-1-19 (MSP1-19) and schizont extract of Plasmodium falciparum in malaria-infected children. Methodology Specific IgG1 to MSP1-19, as well as IgG1 and IgG3 to schizont extract were significantly increased in coinfected children compared to P. falciparum mono-infected children. Stimulation with MSP1-19 lead to a specific production of both interleukin-10 (IL-10) and interferon-γ (IFN-γ), whereas the stimulation with schizont extract produced an IL-10 response only in the coinfected group. Conclusions Our study suggests that schistosomiasis coinfection favours anti-malarial protective antibody responses, which could be associated with the regulation of IL-10 and IFN-γ production and seems to be antigen-dependent. This study demonstrates the importance of infectious status of the population in the evaluation of acquired immunity against malaria and highlights the consequences of a multiple infection environment during clinical trials of anti-malaria vaccine candidates. PMID:20856680

  10. Risk factor analysis among men referred for possible acquired immune deficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Newell, G R; Mansell, P W; Wilson, M B; Lynch, H K; Spitz, M R; Hersh, E M

    1985-01-01

    Responses to a lifestyle questionnaire among 13 patients with Kaposi's sarcoma and 18 with an opportunistic infection were compared with those of 29 symptom-free referred individuals. Odds ratios (OR) with 95% confidence limits were calculated as an estimate of risk. Significantly elevated odds ratios (P less than 0.05) were found for cigarette smoking (OR = 3.4), marijuana use (OR = 3.7), nitrite use (OR = 5.5), frequenting bathhouses (OR = 7.6), prior syphilis (OR = 3.4), and fist-rectal sexual practices (OR = 3.5). A response gradient for the risk estimates was found for marijuana use (OR = 2.7 for occasional, OR = 4.3 for frequent use); nitrites (OR = 4.0 for occasional; OR = 6.3 for frequent use); and prior syphilis (OR = 2.9 for one to two previous infections and 9.0 for three or more). We believe the evidence is now sufficient to recommend preventive practices which may reduce the male homosexual's risk for developing acquired immune deficiency syndrome, Kaposi's sarcoma, and/or opportunistic infections. These include cessation of cigarette smoking, marijuana use, and nitrite inhalation; reduction in number of anonymous sexual partners to decrease risk of sexually transmitted diseases; and avoidance of fisting. PMID:3839923

  11. Classical complement activation and acquired immune response pathways are not essential for retinal degeneration in the rd1 mouse

    PubMed Central

    Rohrer, Bärbel; Demos, Christina; Frigg, Rico; Grimm, Christian

    2007-01-01

    Misregulation of the innate immune response and other immune-related processes have been suggested to play a critical role in the pathogenesis of a number of different neurodegenerative diseases, including age related macular degeneration. In an animal model for photoreceptor degeneration, several genes of the innate and acquired immune system were found to be differentially regulated in the retina during the degenerative process. In addition to this differential regulation of individual genes, we found that in the rd1 retina a significantly higher number of genes involved in immune-related responses were expressed at any given time during the degenerative period. The peak of immune-related gene expression was at postnatal day 14, coinciding with the peak of photoreceptor apoptosis in the rd1 mouse. We directly tested the potential involvement of acquired and innate immune responses in initiation and progression of photoreceptor degeneration by analyzing double mutant animals. Retinal morphology and photoreceptor apoptosis of rd1 mice on a SCID genetic background (no mature T- and B-cells) or in combination with a RAG-1 (no functional B- and T-cells) or a C1qα (no functional classical complement activation pathway) knockout was followed during the degenerative process using light microscopy or TUNEL staining, respectively. Although complement factor C1qα was highly up-regulated in the rd1 retina concomitantly with the degenerative process, lack of this protein did not protect the rd1 retina. Similarly, retinal degeneration and photoreceptor apoptosis appeared to proceed normally in the rd1 mouse lacking functional B- and T-cells. Our results suggest that both, the classical complement system of innate immunity and a functional acquired immune response are not essential for the degenerative process in the rd1 mouse retina. PMID:17069800

  12. IgG4-related disease and its pathogenesis—cross-talk between innate and acquired immunity

    PubMed Central

    Nakajima, Akio; Nakamura, Takuji; Kawanami, Takafumi; Tanaka, Masao; Dong, Lingli; Kawano, Mitsuhiro

    2014-01-01

    IgG4-related disease (IgG4-RD) is a novel clinical entity proposed in Japan in the 21th century and is attracting strong attention over the world. The characteristic manifestations of IgG4-RD are increased serum IgG4 concentration and tumefaction by IgG4+ plasma cells. Although the clinical manifestations in various organs have been established, the pathogenesis of IgG4-RD is still unknown. Recently, many reports of aberrant acquired immunity such as Th2-diminated immune responses have been published. However, many questions still remain, including questions about the pathogenesis of IgG4-RD and the roles of IgG4. In this review, we discuss the pathogenesis of IgG4-RD by focusing on the cross-talk between innate and acquired immunity. PMID:25024397

  13. Functions of innate and acquired immune system are reduced in domestic pigeons (Columba livia domestica) given a low protein diet.

    PubMed

    Mabuchi, Yuko; Frankel, Theresa L

    2016-03-01

    Racing pigeons are exposed to and act as carriers of diseases. Dietary protein requirement for their maintenance has not been determined experimentally despite their being domesticated for over 7000 years. A maintenance nitrogen (protein) requirement (MNR) for pigeons was determined in a balance study using diets containing 6, 10 and 14% crude protein (CP). Then, the effects of feeding the diets were investigated to determine whether they were adequate to sustain innate and acquired immune functions. Nitrogen intake from the 6% CP diet was sufficient to maintain nitrogen balance and body weight in pigeons. However, the immune functions of phagocytosis, oxidative burst and lymphocyte proliferation in pigeons fed this diet were reduced compared with those fed 10 and 14% CP diets. Pigeons given the 6 and 10% CP diets had lower antibody titres following inoculation against Newcastle disease (ND) than those on the 14% CP diet. A confounding factor found on autopsy was the presence of intestinal parasites in some of the pigeons given the 6 and 10% CP diets; however, none of the pigeons used to measure MNR or acquired immunity to ND were infested with parasites. In conclusion, neither the 6 nor 10% CP diets adequately sustained acquired immune function of pigeons. PMID:27069640

  14. Functions of innate and acquired immune system are reduced in domestic pigeons (Columba livia domestica) given a low protein diet

    PubMed Central

    Mabuchi, Yuko; Frankel, Theresa L.

    2016-01-01

    Racing pigeons are exposed to and act as carriers of diseases. Dietary protein requirement for their maintenance has not been determined experimentally despite their being domesticated for over 7000 years. A maintenance nitrogen (protein) requirement (MNR) for pigeons was determined in a balance study using diets containing 6, 10 and 14% crude protein (CP). Then, the effects of feeding the diets were investigated to determine whether they were adequate to sustain innate and acquired immune functions. Nitrogen intake from the 6% CP diet was sufficient to maintain nitrogen balance and body weight in pigeons. However, the immune functions of phagocytosis, oxidative burst and lymphocyte proliferation in pigeons fed this diet were reduced compared with those fed 10 and 14% CP diets. Pigeons given the 6 and 10% CP diets had lower antibody titres following inoculation against Newcastle disease (ND) than those on the 14% CP diet. A confounding factor found on autopsy was the presence of intestinal parasites in some of the pigeons given the 6 and 10% CP diets; however, none of the pigeons used to measure MNR or acquired immunity to ND were infested with parasites. In conclusion, neither the 6 nor 10% CP diets adequately sustained acquired immune function of pigeons. PMID:27069640

  15. Proceedings of the Joint AADS-AADR Symposium: Dentistry's Response to AIDS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bader, James D.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Presentation topics on dentistry's response to Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) include: AIDS-related changes in dental education, public programs, and dental practice and the impact of AIDS on dental practice. (MSE)

  16. Role of adult worm antigen-specific immunoglobulin E in acquired immunity to Schistosoma mansoni infection in baboons.

    PubMed

    Nyindo, M; Kariuki, T M; Mola, P W; Farah, I O; Elson, L; Blanton, R E; King, C L

    1999-02-01

    Allergic-type immune responses, particularly immunoglobulin E (IgE), correlate with protective immunity in human schistosomiasis. To better understand the mechanisms of parasite elimination we examined the immune correlates of protection in baboons (Papio cynocephalus anubis), which are natural hosts for Schistosoma mansoni and also develop allergic-type immunity with infection. In one experiment, animals were exposed to a single infection (1,000 cercariae) or were exposed multiple times (100 cercariae per week for 10 weeks) and subsequently were cured with praziquantel prior to challenge with 1, 000 cercariae. Singly and multiply infected animals mounted 59 and 80% reductions in worm burden, respectively (P < 0.01). In a second experiment, animals were inoculated with S. mansoni ova and recombinant human interleukin 12 (IL-12). This produced a 37 to 39% reduction in adult worm burden after challenge (P < 0.05). Parasite-specific IgG, IgE, IgM, and peripheral blood cytokine production were evaluated. The only immune correlate of protection in both experiments was levels of soluble adult worm antigen (SWAP)-specific IgE in serum at the time of challenge infection and/or 6 weeks later. Baboons repeatedly infected with cercariae or immunized with ova and IL-12 developed two- to sixfold-greater levels of SWAP-specific IgE in serum than did controls, and this correlated with reductions in worm burden (r2, -0.40 to -0.64; P, <0. 01). Thus, in baboons and unlike mice, adult worm-specific IgE is uniquely associated with acquired immunity to S. mansoni infection. This similar association of parasite-specific IgE and protection among primates infected with schistosomiasis, along with similar pathology, anatomy, and genetic make-up, indicates that baboons provide an excellent permissive experimental model for better understanding the mechanisms of innate and acquired immunity to schistosomiasis in humans. PMID:9916070

  17. No One Is Immune: A Community Education Partnership Addressing HIV/AIDS and Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Orel, Nancy A; Stelle, Charlie; Watson, Wendy K; Bunner, Betsy L

    2010-06-01

    There has been a dramatic increase in the number of new HIV diagnoses among people aged 50 to 64 in the United States, and according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), in just 7 years (by 2015) 50% of those living with AIDS will be aged 50 or older. To address this public health concern, viable HIV/AIDS prevention and treatment options for individuals over the age of 50 are necessary. This article discusses the No One Is Immune initiative that planned, implemented, and coordinated evidence- based HIV/AIDS prevention and education programs specifically tailored for middle-aged and older adults. Guided by the health belief model, an educational conference entitled "Sexuality, Medication, and HIV/AIDS in Middle and Later Adulthood" was conducted along with research activities that assessed HIV/AIDS knowledge gained using both qualitative and quantitative measures. This project can be replicated by other providers within the aging network. PMID:22745521

  18. Schistosoma mansoni: is acquired immunity induced by highly x-irradiated cercariae dependent on the size of the challenging dose

    SciTech Connect

    Hsue, S.Y.; Hsue, H.F.; Osborne, J.W.; Johnson, S.C.

    1982-04-01

    A high degree of immunity, as shown by a 91% reduction of the number of worms recovered was found in five groups of mice that were immunized five times with highly X-irradiated cercariae and then challenged with 10, 20, 50, 100, or 500 normal Schistosoma mansoni cercariae. The results indicated that there were no significant differences in worm reduction in immunized mice challenged with different numbers of cercariae; consequently the immunity induced by this immunization method did not appear to be challenge-dose-dependent. However, the results also showed that when immunized mice were challenged with 500, 100, 50, 20, and 10 cercariae, 0, 13, 26, 56, and 68%, respectively, of the experimental animals were free of worms. Thus, the percentage of worm-negative cases increased as the number of challenge cercariae decreased. When viewed in this manner, the acquired immunity may be considered challenge-dose-dependent as well. If this method of vaccination is used for schistosomiasis control, we may anticipate that in both hypo- and hyperendemic areas, the intensity of infection and the severity of the disease will be reduced owing to a reduction in worms burdens, and in hypoendemic areas, there will be a number of worm-free cases.

  19. Computer-Aided Relearning Activity Patterns for People with Acquired Brain Injury

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montero, Francisco; Lopez-Jaquero, Victor; Navarro, Elena; Sanchez, Enriqueta

    2011-01-01

    People with disabilities constitute a collective that requires continuous and customized attention, since their conditions or abilities are affected with respect to specific standards. People with "Acquired Brain Injury" (ABI), or those who have suffered brain injury at some stage after birth, belong to this collective. The treatment these people…

  20. HIV/AIDS and Pediatric AIDS. The Arc Q & A.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kowalski, Jo Anne T.

    This fact sheet uses a question-and-answer format to summarize what is known about HIV/AIDS (Human Immunodeficiency Virus and Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome) and pediatric AIDS and applies this information to children in school settings. Questions and answers address the following topics: what the AIDS disease and HIV infection are; estimates…

  1. Therapeutic Transcutaneous Immunization with a Band-Aid Vaccine Resolves Experimental Otitis Media

    PubMed Central

    Novotny, Laura A.; Clements, John D.

    2015-01-01

    Transcutaneous immunization (TCI) is a noninvasive strategy to induce protective immune responses. We describe TCI with a band-aid vaccine placed on the postauricular skin to exploit the unique organization of the stratum corneum and to promote the development of immune responses to resolve active experimental otitis media due to nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHI). This therapeutic immunization strategy induced significantly earlier resolution of middle ear fluid and rapid eradication of both planktonic and mucosal biofilm-resident NTHI within 7 days after receipt of the first immunizing band-aid vaccine. Efficacy was ascribed to the homing of immunogen-bearing cutaneous dendritic cells to the nasal-associated lymphoid tissue, induction of polyfunctional CD4+ T cells, and the presence of immunogen-specific IgM and IgG within the middle ear. TCI using band-aid vaccines could expand the use of traditional parenteral preventative vaccines to include treatment of active otitis media, in addition to other diseases of the respiratory tract due to NTHI. PMID:26018536

  2. Therapeutic Transcutaneous Immunization with a Band-Aid Vaccine Resolves Experimental Otitis Media.

    PubMed

    Novotny, Laura A; Clements, John D; Bakaletz, Lauren O

    2015-08-01

    Transcutaneous immunization (TCI) is a noninvasive strategy to induce protective immune responses. We describe TCI with a band-aid vaccine placed on the postauricular skin to exploit the unique organization of the stratum corneum and to promote the development of immune responses to resolve active experimental otitis media due to nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHI). This therapeutic immunization strategy induced significantly earlier resolution of middle ear fluid and rapid eradication of both planktonic and mucosal biofilm-resident NTHI within 7 days after receipt of the first immunizing band-aid vaccine. Efficacy was ascribed to the homing of immunogen-bearing cutaneous dendritic cells to the nasal-associated lymphoid tissue, induction of polyfunctional CD4(+) T cells, and the presence of immunogen-specific IgM and IgG within the middle ear. TCI using band-aid vaccines could expand the use of traditional parenteral preventative vaccines to include treatment of active otitis media, in addition to other diseases of the respiratory tract due to NTHI. PMID:26018536

  3. HIV/AIDS in Women

    MedlinePlus

    HIV, the human immunodeficiency virus, kills or damages cells of the body's immune system. The most advanced stage of infection with HIV is AIDS, which stands for acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. ...

  4. HIV/AIDS in Women

    MedlinePlus

    HIV, the human immunodeficiency virus, kills or damages cells of the body's immune system. The most advanced stage of infection with HIV is AIDS, which stands for acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. HIV often ...

  5. Pharmacotherapeutics for the AIDS Patient.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fife, Kenneth H.

    1991-01-01

    Anticipated shifts in the demographics of the Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) epidemic are examined, current state-of-the-art AIDS patient management is summarized, and some unique facets of drug therapy in the AIDS patient are discussed, including adverse reactions, complex drug interactions, use of investigational drugs, and…

  6. AIDS Awareness in Industrial Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lundy, Lyndall L.

    1994-01-01

    Survey responses from 88 of 293 industrial technology education department heads found that 68% could not identify courses in which acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) is covered; 52% were not aware of AIDS-related activities on their campuses; and 48% had AIDS education programs at their institutions. (SK)

  7. Acquired immune response of white leghorn hens to populations of northern fowl mite, Ornithonyssus sylviarum (Canestrini and Fanzago).

    PubMed

    DeVaney, J A; Ziprin, R L

    1980-08-01

    Three levels (high, low and control) of northern fowl mite, Ornithonyssus sylviarum (Canestrini and Fanzago), were maintained on White Leghorn hens for 24 weeks. The hens were then treated with carbaryl to eradicate the mites, were induced to molt, and were reinfested with mites 9 weeks later. Subsequent levels of mites on the three groups showed that the degree of acquired immunity was related to the initial level of mite infestation. PMID:7413581

  8. Human Subjects Issues in AIDS Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bayer, Ronald, Ed.

    1990-01-01

    Six articles are presented on the use of human subjects in research on acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). Topics include the ethics of human experimentation, female and pediatric AIDS patients, Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection and AIDS among correctional inmates, community-based AIDS research, and clinical trials of HIV…

  9. AIDS Epidemiological models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahmani, Fouad Lazhar

    2010-11-01

    The aim of this paper is to present mathematical modelling of the spread of infection in the context of the transmission of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). These models are based in part on the models suggested in the field of th AIDS mathematical modelling as reported by ISHAM [6].

  10. A New AIDS Agenda.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Popham, W. James

    1993-01-01

    Thousands of young people are affected with the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) that causes the Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). An effective AIDS education program must address functional knowledge, relevant skills, and motivation. The program must be comprehensive and taught by trained teachers. Lists a source of an annotated…

  11. What about AIDS?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dreyfuss, Katharine R.

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the nature of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). Suggests ways in which camp directors can establish procedures for making appropriate decisions about accepting campers/staff workers with AIDS. Reviews aspects of environmental sanitation, physical health, confidentiality, camper/staff drug use and sexual behavior, medical…

  12. AIDS Fact Pack.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Population Options, Washington, DC.

    The three fact sheets presented in this document address issues surrounding adolescent sexuality and sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), especially the Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). The first fact sheet, "Young Women and AIDS: A Worldwide Perspective," suggests that since open discussions of adolescent sexuality have long been…

  13. Preventing AIDS via Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    House, Reese M.; Walker, Catherine M.

    1993-01-01

    Compares the Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) epidemic to past epidemics, including social and political responses. Identifies populations at risk for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Discusses current social and economic factors affecting AIDS education programs. Makes recommendations and identifies resources for starting…

  14. Teaching Children about AIDS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koop, C. Everett

    1987-01-01

    Calls for more education as the immediate preventative measure against acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). Discusses the known ways that AIDS is transmitted and cautions that many innocent people may also contract the disease. Promotes the presentation of accurate and personally sensitive information to children. (TW)

  15. AIDS: Children Too.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lejeune, Genevieve, Ed.

    1994-01-01

    This journal issue is devoted to the many problems faced by children with Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) who live in both developing and developed countries. Section 1 provides general information on the pandemic, defining AIDS and exploring the social aspects of the disease. It also addresses child health, child mortality, moral and…

  16. Development of cryptococcal immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome 41 months after the initiation of antiretroviral therapy in an AIDS patient.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Hideki; Hatakeyama, Shuji; Yotsuyanagi, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Cryptococcal meningitis is one of the most lethal fungal infections in patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). The incidence of and mortality from cryptococcal meningitis have markedly decreased since the introduction of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). However, despite its benefits, the initiation of cART results in immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) in some patients. Although IRIS is occasionally difficult to distinguish from relapse or treatment failure, the distinction is important because IRIS requires a different treatment. Here, we present the case of a patient with AIDS who developed symptoms of cryptococcal IRIS 41 months after starting cART. To the best of our knowledge, the time between cART initiation and the onset of cryptococcal IRIS in this patient is the longest that has been reported in the literature. PMID:26425133

  17. Attitudes of Dental Faculty toward Individuals with AIDS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Leonard A.; Grace, Edward G., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    A survey of one dental school's faculty concerning attitudes toward homosexual or heterosexual patients with either Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) or leukemia found significant negative biases both toward individuals with AIDS and toward homosexuals. (MSE)

  18. AIDS: Setting Policy, Educating Employees at Bank of America.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagel, William H.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses how Bank of America has responded to the problem of acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) in the workplace by devising a comprehensive policy on life-threatening illnesses and initiating an employee education program on AIDS. (CH)

  19. Humoral immunity in experimental syphilis. II. The relationship of neutralizing factors in immune serum to acquired resistance.

    PubMed

    Bishop, N H; Miller, J N

    1976-07-01

    Evidence for a humoral mechanism in immunity to experimental syphilis was provided by the demonstration of immune rabbit serum factor(s) capable of inactivating virulent Treponema pallidum, Nichols strain, in an in vitro-in vivo neutralization test. After intratesticular infection, rabbits were bled periodically and their resistance to reinfection was determined by challenge with T. pallidum. The results of challenge showed that resistance to reinfection begins to develop by 11 days after infection, becomes complete by 3 months, and persists for at least 2 years. In the neutralization test, a mixture of treponemal suspension and serum from the infected animals was incubated anaerobically at 34 degrees C and the virulence of the treponemes was determined by intradermal inoculation into normal rabbits. Complete inactivation of treponemes by immune serum required heat-stable and heat-labile (56 degrees C, 30 min) serum components and 16 hr of incubation, and was accelerated by pre-incubation of the treponemes for 4 hr with nonimmune serum but not by 100 mug/ml of added lysozyme. Serum-neutralizing activity, first demonstrable 1 month postinfection, was quantitated by a neutralizing endpoint (NEP). A relatively close quantitative correlation was shown between the development of resistance to symptomatic reinfection and the appearance and persistence of both TPI antibody and neutralizing serum factor(s). The nature of the serum factor(s), the mechanism of treponemal inactivation, and the application of the test in assessing the immune status are discussed. PMID:778262

  20. Influence of the home environment on the prevention of mother to child transmission of human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immune-deficiency syndrome in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Sewnunan, A; Modiba, L M

    2015-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus and acquired immune-deficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) is still a 'family crises' which marks the beginning of the deterioration of the family unit and the trauma in the emotional, psychological and material lives of both the mother and child. In South African context where the majority of HIV-positive mothers are young single women who live in extended families, disclosure to the sexual partner alone is not an adequate condition for the success of prevention of mother to child transmission (PMTCT). In South Africa, close to one in three women who attend antenatal clinics are HIV positive. KwaZulu-Natal is one of the worst affected provinces, where as many as 40-60% of pregnant women attending antenatal services are living with HIV infection. The study sought to investigate the link between the home environment and its contribution to the success of the programme on PMTCT of HIV/AIDS. A qualitative, explorative, descriptive and contextual study was used in this study to explore whether the home environment for the support system is available for the HIV-positive women on the PMTCT programme. The population of this study included all women who have undergone counselling and tested HIV positive and who have joined the programme on PMTCT of HIV/AIDS in a specific hospital in KwaZulu-Natal Province. Although 14 women agreed to participate in the study, only 10 women were interviewed as saturation was attained. Data were collected using semi-structured interview schedule. Interviews were audio-taped and field notes were taken. Content analysis was used and it was done manually. This study revealed that one of the major issues still surrounding HIV/AIDS and PMTCT is that of non-disclosure, selective disclosure and the stigma and discrimination that surrounds this disease. PMID:26694631

  1. The AIDS Challenge: Prevention Education for Young People.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quackenbush, Marcia, Ed.; And Others

    This book on Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) education was developed by national and international experts to aid educators, professionals, parents, and youth leaders in developing and implementing AIDS education programs. Included are: (1) "Living with AIDS" (Jack Martin Balcer); (2) "The AIDS Epidemic: Problems in Limiting Its Impact"…

  2. Sexually transmitted disease (STD) and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) in South East Asia.

    PubMed

    Ismail, R

    1999-01-01

    This article reports on the prevalence of AIDS and sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) in Southeast Asia. The spread of HIV infection in this region has been predicted to be worse than that of Africa. The high-prevalence countries are Thailand, Cambodia, and Myanmar, where prevalence rates in the population at risk (15-49 year olds) are up to 2%; while low prevalence countries with rates of 0.1% include the Philippines, Indonesia, Laos, Brunei, and Singapore. Heterosexual transmission in Southeast Asia is the main mode of spread of HIV. Another route is through migration, rural-to-urban or international migration of people seeking jobs; with concurrent loneliness and anonymity, they become vulnerable to STDs and HIV infection. Intravenous drug use poses an increasing risk of transmission. The unavailability of data in some countries makes it difficult to evaluate the extent of the epidemic or if there's an impending epidemic. There are a number of caveats to the data compilation from various countries. These include the following: under-reporting of cases; underdiagnosis; missed diagnosis; and differences in the time of data collection. It is clear that poverty, illiteracy, and poor access to educational information in most countries in this region facilitate the rapid spread of HIV. These coupled with lack of primary health care services, and in most instances, enormously high cost of drugs make the pain and suffering due to the HIV/AIDS epidemic a human disaster far worse than the ravages of war. PMID:10330595

  3. The Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS)—A Multidisciplinary Enigma

    PubMed Central

    1984-01-01

    These discussions are selected from the weekly staff conferences in the Department of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco. Taken from transcriptions, they are prepared by Drs Homer A. Boushey, Associate Professor of Medicine, and David G. Warnock, Associate Professor of Medicine, under the direction of Dr Lloyd H. Smith, Jr, Professor of Medicine and Chairman of the Department of Medicine. Requests for reprints should be sent to the Department of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco, School of Medicine, San Francisco, CA 94143. PMID:6702195

  4. Helping Parents Communicate Effectively with Children about Preventing Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Umeh, David C.

    1995-01-01

    Describes a communication activities workshop designed to improve communication skills on any subject. The workshop involves discussing the five critical steps in effective communication, then, in groups, practicing and presenting an improved performance which the other groups evaluate. A parent-child scenario on sexual promiscuity is included.…

  5. Immune response

    MedlinePlus

    Innate immunity; Humoral immunity; Cellular immunity; Immunity; Inflammatory response; Acquired (adaptive) immunity ... and usually does not react against them. INNATE IMMUNITY Innate, or nonspecific, immunity is the defense system ...

  6. Purinergic signaling and human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immune deficiency syndrome: From viral entry to therapy

    PubMed Central

    Passos, Daniela F; Schetinger, Maria Rosa C; Leal, Daniela BR

    2015-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is a serious condition associated to severe immune dysfunction and immunodeficiency. Mechanisms involved in HIV-associated immune activation, inflammation and loss of CD4+ T cells have been extensively studied, including those concerning purinergic signaling pathways. Purinergic signaling components are involved in viral entry and replication and disease progression. Research involving the participation of purinergic signaling in HIV infection has been not only important to elucidate disease mechanisms but also to introduce new approaches to therapy. The involvement of purinergic signaling in the pathogenesis of HIV infection and its implications in the control of the HIV infection are reviewed in this paper. PMID:26279989

  7. The use of metaphors as aids to and interferers of acquiring appropriate science conceptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandomir, Mark Richard

    of metaphors to aid content learning and accurate conceptions of phenomena are inappropriate and appear themselves to be misconceptions about metaphoric language.

  8. Plasmodesmata localizing proteins regulate transport and signaling during systemic acquired immunity in plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Systemic acquired resistance (SAR) in plants is mediated by the signaling molecules azelaic acid (AzA),glycerol-3-phosphate (G3P), and salicylic acid (SA).Here, we show that AzA and G3P transport occurs via the symplastic route, which is regulated by channels known as plasmodesmata (PD). In contrast...

  9. The role of PfEMP1 as targets of naturally acquired immunity to childhood malaria: prospects for a vaccine.

    PubMed

    Bull, Peter C; Abdi, Abdirahman I

    2016-02-01

    The Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 antigens that are inserted onto the surface of P. falciparum infected erythrocytes play a key role both in the pathology of severe malaria and as targets of naturally acquired immunity. They might be considered unlikely vaccine targets because they are extremely diverse. However, several lines of evidence suggest that underneath this molecular diversity there are a restricted set of epitopes which may act as effective targets for a vaccine against severe malaria. Here we review some of the recent developments in this area of research, focusing on work that has assessed the potential of these molecules as possible vaccine targets. PMID:26741401

  10. Immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome in association with HIV/AIDS and tuberculosis: Views over hidden possibilities

    PubMed Central

    Shankar, Esaki Muthu; Vignesh, Ramachandran; Murugavel, Kailapuri G; Balakrishnan, Pachamuthu; Sekar, Ramalingam; Lloyd, Charmaine AC; Solomon, Suniti; Kumarasamy, Nagalingeswaran

    2007-01-01

    Gut immune components are severely compromised among persons with AIDS, which allows increased translocation of bacterial lipopolysaccharides (LPS) into the systemic circulation. These microbial LPS are reportedly increased in chronically HIV-infected individuals and findings have correlated convincingly with measures of immune activation. Immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) is an adverse consequence of the restoration of pathogen-specific immune responses in a subset of HIV-infected subjects with underlying latent infections during the initial months of highly active antiretroviral treatment (HAART). Whether IRIS is the result of a response to a high antigen burden, an excessive response by the recovering immune system, exacerbated production of pro-inflammatory cytokines or a lack of immune regulation due to inability to produce regulatory cytokines remains to be determined. We theorize that those who develop IRIS have a high burden of proinflammatory cytokines produced also in response to systemic bacterial LPS that nonspecifically act on latent mycobacterial antigens. We also hypothesize that subjects that do not develop IRIS could have developed either tolerance (anergy) to persistent LPS/tubercle antigens or could have normal FOXP3+ gene and that those with defective FOXP3+ gene or those with enormous plasma LPS could be vulnerable to IRIS. The measure of microbial LPS, anti-LPS antibodies and nonspecific plasma cytokines in subjects on HAART shall predict the role of these components in IRIS. PMID:18053126

  11. "Repellent and Shameful": The Portrayal of AIDS in "America Responds to AIDS" Broadcast Public Service Announcements, 1987-1992.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swanson, Douglas J.

    To address a need for increased discussion of the dangers of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) and an increased educative effort to prevent people from acquiring HIV infection, a study investigated one element of an AIDS campaign of the past: the "America Responds to AIDS" television and radio public service announcements (PSAs). Taking…

  12. The Role of Nutrition in AIDS and Aging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zumwalt, Sally A.; Schmidt, Robert M.

    1989-01-01

    Nutrition plays an important role in immunity both among the elderly and among persons with Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). Appropriate nutritional intake and counseling may improve immune status and enable both prevention and progression of AIDS and the susceptibility of the elderly to infectious diseases. (SK)

  13. Dendritic cells, indoleamine 2,3 dioxygenase and acquired immune privilege

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Lei; Baban, Babak; Johnson, Burles A; Mellor, Andrew L.

    2013-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are specialized to stimulate T cell immunity. Paradoxically some DCs suppress T cell responses, and activate regulatory T cells. In this review we focus on a potent counter-regulatory pathway mediated by plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs) expressing the immunosuppressive enzyme indoleamine 2,3 dioxygenase (IDO). IDO-expressing pDCs inhibit effector T cell responses, activate regulatory T cells, and attenuate pro-inflammatory responses in settings of chronic inflammation that manifest in clinical syndromes such as infectious, allergic and autoimmune diseases, cancer, and transplantation. Thus IDO-expressing pDCs create immune privilege, and provide novel opportunities to improve immunotherapy in multiple disease syndromes. PMID:20367139

  14. Malaria transmission and naturally acquired immunity to PfEMP-1.

    PubMed

    Piper, K P; Hayward, R E; Cox, M J; Day, K P

    1999-12-01

    Why there are so few gametocytes (the transmission stage of malaria) in the blood of humans infected with Plasmodium spp. is intriguing. This may be due either to reproductive restraint by the parasite or to unidentified gametocyte-specific immune-mediated clearance mechanisms. We propose another mechanism, a cross-stage immunity to Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP-1). This molecule is expressed on the surface of the erythrocyte infected with either trophozoite or early gametocyte parasites. Immunoglobulin G antibodies to PfEMP-1, expressed on both life cycle stages, were measured in residents from an area where malaria is endemic, Papua New Guinea. Anti-PfEMP-1 prevalence increased with age, mirroring the decline in both the prevalence and the density of asexual and transmission stages in erythrocytes. These data led us to propose that immunity to PfEMP-1 may influence malaria transmission by regulation of the production of gametocytes. This regulation may be achieved in two ways: (i) by controlling asexual proliferation and density and (ii) by affecting gametocyte maturation. PMID:10569752

  15. Development of Acquired Immunity following Repeated Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections in Cotton Rats

    PubMed Central

    Yamaji, Yoshiaki; Yasui, Yosuke; Nakayama, Tetsuo

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infections occur every year worldwide. Most infants are infected with RSV by one year of age and are reinfected because immune responses after the first infection are too weak to protect against subsequent infections. In the present study, immune responses against RSV were investigated in order to obtain a better understanding of repetitive RSV infections in cotton rats. No detectable neutralizing antibody (NT) was developed after the first infection, and the second infection was not prevented. The results of histological examinations revealed severe inflammation, viral antigens were detected around bronchial epithelial cells, and infectious viruses were recovered from lung homogenates. Following the second infection neutralizing antibodies were significantly elevated, and CD8+ cells were activated in response to RSV-F253-265. No viral antigens was detected thereafter in lung tissues and infectious viruses were not recovered. Similar results were obtained in the present study using the subgroups A and B. These results support the induction of humoral and cellular immune responses following repetitive infections with RSV; however, these responses were insufficient to eliminate viruses in the first and second infections. PMID:27224021

  16. Inducible lymphoid clusters, iSALTs, in contact dermatitis: a new concept of acquired cutaneous immune responses.

    PubMed

    Natsuaki, Yohei; Kabashima, Kenji

    2016-09-01

    Antigen presentation to peripheral memory T cells is a key step in the prompt elicitation of acquired immune responses. In the mucosa, specific sentinel lymphoid tissues called mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue serve as antigen presentation sites. Correspondingly, the concept of skin-associated lymphoid tissue (SALT) has been proposed in the 1980s. However, the details of SALT have not been clarified so far. Recently, the live imaging analysis using two photon microscopes are developed. Here, we have identified inducible lymphoid clusters in the skin, we called it inducible SALTs (iSALTs), using a murine contact hypersensitivity model. In the elicitation phase, dendritic cells (DCs) formed clusters and interacted for several hours with effector memory T cells in the dermis. This interaction was essential for proliferation and activation of effector memory T cells in situ in an antigen dependent manner. Interestingly, DC clusters were abrogated by depletion of skin macrophages. Furthermore, IL-1 treatment induced CXCL2 production from macrophages and DC clusters were suppressed with the blockade of IL-1R or CXCR2. Taken together, this sustained conjugation between DCs and memory T cells, iSALTs, is essential for establishment of the effector phase in acquired cutaneous immunity. PMID:26941109

  17. Naturally-Acquired Immune Response against Plasmodium vivax Rhoptry-Associated Membrane Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Changrob, Siriruk; Wang, Bo; Han, Jin-Hee; Lee, Seong-Kyun; Nyunt, Myat Htut; Lim, Chae Seung; Tsuboi, Takafumi; Chootong, Patchanee; Han, Eun-Taek

    2016-01-01

    Rhoptry-associated membrane antigen (RAMA) is an abundant glycophosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored protein that is embedded within the lipid bilayer and is implicated in parasite invasion. Antibody responses against rhoptry proteins are produced by individuals living in a malaria-endemic area, suggesting the immunogenicity of Plasmodium vivax RAMA (PvRAMA) for induction of immune responses during P. vivax infection. To determine whether PvRAMA contributes to the acquisition of immunity to malaria and could be a rational candidate for a vaccine, the presence of memory T cells and the stability of the antibody response against PvRAMA were evaluated in P. vivax-exposed individuals. The immunogenicity of PvRAMA for the induction of T cell responses was evaluated by in vitro stimulation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). High levels of interferon (IFN)-γ and interleukin (IL)-10 cytokines were detected in the culture supernatant of PBMCs, and the CD4+ T cells predominantly produced IL-10 cytokine. The levels of total anti-PvRAMA immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibody were significantly elevated, and these antibodies persisted over the 12 months of the study. Interestingly, IgG1, IgG2 and IgG3 were the major antibody subtypes in the response to PvRAMA. The frequency of IgG3 in specific to PvRAMA antigen maintained over 12 months. These data could explain the immunogenicity of PvRAMA antigen in induction of both cell-mediated and antibody-mediated immunity in natural P. vivax infection, in which IFN-γ helps antibody class switching toward the IgG1, IgG2 and IgG3 isotypes and IL-10 supports PvRAMA-specific antibody production. PMID:26886867

  18. What High School Students Who Are Mildly Mentally Retarded Know about the Human Immunodeficiency Virus/Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cobb, Hazel B.; Horn, Charles J., Jr.

    Alabama high school students (N=309) with mild mental retardation completed a questionnaire concerning their knowledge, attitudes, and sources of information about human immune deficiency virus/acquired immune deficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS). Students demonstrated some basic knowledge of HIV/AIDS, and expressed some concern about getting AIDS. They…

  19. Optimal vaccination and bednet maintenance for the control of malaria in a region with naturally acquired immunity.

    PubMed

    Prosper, Olivia; Ruktanonchai, Nick; Martcheva, Maia

    2014-07-21

    Following over two decades of research, the malaria vaccine candidate RTS,S has reached the final stages of vaccine trials, demonstrating an efficacy of roughly 50% in young children. Regions with high malaria prevalence tend to have high levels of naturally acquired immunity (NAI) to severe malaria; NAI is caused by repeated exposure to infectious bites and results in large asymptomatic populations. To address concerns about how these vaccines will perform in regions with existing NAI, we developed a simple malaria model incorporating vaccination and NAI. Typically, if the basic reproduction number (R0) for malaria is greater than unity, the disease will persist; otherwise, the disease will become extinct. However, analysis of this model revealed that NAI, compounded by a subpopulation with only partial protection to malaria, may render vaccination efforts ineffective and potentially detrimental to malaria control, by increasing R0 and increasing the likelihood of malaria persistence even when R0<1. The likelihood of this scenario increases when non-immune infected individuals are treated disproportionately compared with partially immune individuals - a plausible scenario since partially immune individuals are more likely to be asymptomatically infected. Consequently, we argue that active case-detection of asymptomatic infections is a critical component of an effective malaria control program. We then investigated optimal vaccination and bednet control programs under two endemic settings with varying levels of naturally acquired immunity: a typical setting under which prevalence decays when R0<1, and a setting in which subthreshold endemic equilibria exist. A qualitative comparison of the optimal control results under the first setting revealed that the optimal policy differs depending on whether the goal is to reduce total morbidity, or to reduce clinical infections. Furthermore, this comparison dictates that control programs should place less effort in

  20. Identifying risk factors of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome in AIDS patients receiving highly active anti-retroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    He, Bo; Zheng, Yuhuang; Liu, Meng; Zhou, Guoqiang; Chen, Xia; Mamadou, Diallo; He, Yan; Zhou, Huaying; Chen, Zi

    2013-01-01

    Immune reconstitution inflammation syndrome typically occurs within days after patients undergo highly active anti-retroviral therapy and is a big hurdle for effective treatment of AIDS patients. In this study, we monitored immune reconstitution inflammation syndrome occurrence in 238 AIDS patients treated with highly active anti-retroviral therapy. Among them, immune reconstitution inflammation syndrome occurred in 47 cases (19.7%). Immune reconstitution inflammation syndrome patients had significantly higher rate of opportunistic infection (p<0.001) and persistently lower CD4(+) cell count (p<0.001) compared to the non-immune reconstitution inflammation syndrome patients. In contrast, no significant differences in HIV RNA loads were observed between the immune reconstitution inflammation syndrome group and non-immune reconstitution inflammation syndrome group. These data suggest that a history of opportunistic infection and CD4(+) cell counts at baseline may function as risk factors for immune reconstitution inflammation syndrome occurrence in AIDS patients as well as potential prognostic markers. These findings will improve the management of AIDS with highly active anti-retroviral therapy. PMID:23434049

  1. A novel elicitor protein from Phytophthora parasitica induces plant basal immunity and systemic acquired resistance.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yi-Hsuan; Yan, Hao-Zhi; Liou, Ruey-Fen

    2015-02-01

    The interaction between Phytophthora pathogens and host plants involves the exchange of complex molecular signals from both sides. Recent studies of Phytophthora have led to the identification of various apoplastic elicitors known to trigger plant immunity. Here, we provide evidence that the protein encoded by OPEL of Phytophthora parasitica is a novel elicitor. Homologues of OPEL were identified only in oomycetes, but not in fungi and other organisms. Quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) revealed that OPEL is expressed throughout the development of P. parasitica and is especially highly induced after plant infection. Infiltration of OPEL recombinant protein from Escherichia coli into leaves of Nicotiana tabacum (cv. Samsun NN) resulted in cell death, callose deposition, the production of reactive oxygen species and induced expression of pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP)-triggered immunity markers and salicylic acid-responsive defence genes. Moreover, the infiltration conferred systemic resistance against a broad spectrum of pathogens, including Tobacco mosaic virus, the bacteria wilt pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum and P. parasitica. In addition to the signal peptide, OPEL contains three conserved domains: a thaumatin-like domain, a glycine-rich protein domain and a glycosyl hydrolase (GH) domain. Intriguingly, mutation of a putative laminarinase active site motif in the predicted GH domain abolished its elicitor activity, which suggests enzymatic activity of OPEL in triggering the defence response. PMID:24965864

  2. Risk of Cataract among Subjects with the Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome Free of Ocular Opportunistic Infections

    PubMed Central

    Kempen, John H.; Sugar, Elizabeth A.; Varma, Rohit; Dunn, James P.; Heinemann, Murk-Hein; Jabs, Douglas A.; Lyon, Alice T.; Lewis, Richard A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the risk of cataract in the setting of AIDS. Design Prospective cohort study. Participants Subjects with AIDS free of ocular opportunistic infections throughout catamnesis. Methods During 1998–2008 inclusive, subjects ≥13 years of age were enrolled. Demographic characteristics and clinical characteristics were documented at enrollment and semiannually. Main Outcome Measures Cataract was defined as high-grade lens opacity observed by biomicroscopy and judged to be the cause of a best-corrected visual acuity worse than 20/40. Eyes that underwent cataract surgery during follow-up were considered to have developed cataract prior to the first visit when pseudophakia or aphakia was observed. Results Among 1,606 participants (3,212 eyes), at enrollment 1.9% (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.3%−2.7%) were observed to have cataract or prior cataract surgery. Among the 2,812 eyes initially free of cataract, and followed longitudinally (median follow-up=4.6 years), the incidence of cataract was 0.37%/eye-year (95% CI: 0.26%– 0.53%). In addition to age, significant cataract risk factors included prior cataract in the contralateral eye (adjusted hazard ratio (aHR)=21.6, 95% CI: 10.4–44.8), anterior segment inflammation (aHR=4.40, 95% CI: 1.64–11.9), prior retinal detachment (aHR=4.94, 95% CI: 2.21–11.0), and vitreous inflammation (aHR=7.12, 95% CI: 2.02– 25.0), each studied as a time-updated characteristic. Detectable HIV RNA in peripheral blood was associated with lower risk of cataract at enrollment (adjusted odds ratio=0.32, 95% CI: 0.12–0.80) but not of incident cataract (aHR=1.58, 95% CI: 0.90–2.76). After adjustment for other factors, neither the then current absolute CD4+ T cell count nor antiretroviral therapy status showed consistent association with cataract risk, nor did an additive diagnosis of other other co-morbidities. Compared to the available population-based studies that used similar definitions of cataract, the age

  3. Living with HIV/AIDS in School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sedletter, 1993

    1993-01-01

    This newsletter article is concerned with understanding what schools can and must do to sustain life in the age of human immunodeficiency virus and Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (HIV/AIDS). The article looks at the incidence of AIDS and reviews legislation related to AIDS infection and school attendance. School policy as it relates to…

  4. Superintendents' Views on AIDS: A National Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keough, Katherine E.; Seaton, George

    1988-01-01

    Presents results from a survey of selected school superintendents about how to deal with the disease Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) in the schools. They are in agreement that AIDS education should be part of the regular school curriculum. There is no general agreement on how schools should deal with other aspects of the AIDS disease.…

  5. Risk Communication about AIDS in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keeling, Richard P.

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the importance of education as the primary response of higher education to the epidemic associated with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). Focuses on the personal, social and institutional issues that bear on AIDS education on college campuses and the important features of AIDS education programs. (TW)

  6. Educating Students about HIV/AIDS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gorman, Phyllis

    1989-01-01

    Maintains that the Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) issue presents two opportunities for feminist educators: providing basic information on AIDS and Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV), and analyzing societal responses to AIDS in terms of a feminist perspective. Provides three classroom exercises designed to explore student attitudes…

  7. Counseling Persons with a Fear of AIDS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruhn, John G.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses the increasing incidence of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) which has created a societal fear of AIDS that, in turn, has raised the level of fear and anxiety in individuals prone to fear responses. Discusses fear accentuated by AIDS and guidelines for counseling people exhibiting this fear. (Author/ABL)

  8. Providing Empowerment to the Person with AIDS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haney, Patrick

    1988-01-01

    Describes author's experiences after his own diagnoses of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) Related Complex (ARC) and AIDS itself. Discusses six ways for social workers to provide empowerment to persons with AIDS, which focus on the positive, the healing power of caring, reconnections, direction, victim mindset, and advocacy. (ABL)

  9. Comorbidities in Children and Adolescents with AIDS Acquired by HIV Vertical Transmission in Vitória, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Moreira-Silva, Sandra F.; Zandonade, Eliana; Frauches, Diana O.; Machado, Elisa A.; Lopes, Lays Ignacia A.; Duque, Lívia L.; Querido, Polyana P.; Miranda, Angélica E.

    2013-01-01

    Background Studying diseases associated with AIDS is essential for establishing intervention strategies because comorbidities can lead to death. The objectives were to describe the frequency of comorbidities and verify their distribution according to demographic, epidemiological and clinical data as well as to classify diseases in children and adolescents with AIDS in Vitória, Brazil. Methods A retrospective cohort study was conducted among children with AIDS, as defined according to the criteria established by the Ministry of Health, who acquired HIV via vertical transmission, were aged 0 to 18 years, and were monitored at a referral hospital from January 2001 to December 2011. Results A total of 177 patients were included, of whom 97 were female (55%). There were 60 patients (34%) <1 year old, 67 patients (38%) between the ages of 1 and 5, and 50 patients (28%) ≥6 years of age included at the time of admission to the Infectious Diseases Ward. Regarding clinical-immunological classification, 146 patients (82.5%) showed moderate/severe forms of the disease at the time of admission into the Ward, and 26 patients (14.7%) died during the study. The most common clinical signs were hepatomegaly (81.62%), splenomegaly (63.8%), lymphadenopathy (68.4%) and persistent fever (32.8%). The most common comorbidities were anaemia (67.2%), pneumonia/septicaemia/acute bacterial meningitis (ABM) (64.2%), acute otitis media (AOM)/recurrent sinusitis (55.4%), recurrent severe bacterial infections (47.4%) and dermatitis (43.1%). An association between severe clinical-immunological classification and admission to the Ward for children aged less than one year old was found for several comorbidities (p<0.001). Conclusion Delayed diagnosis was observed because the majority of patients were admitted to the Infectious Diseases Ward at ≥1 year of age and were already presenting with serious diseases. The general paediatrician should be alert to this possibility to make an early

  10. Counseling Roles and AIDS. Highlights: An ERIC/CAPS Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Thomas C.

    This fact sheet considers the counselor's role in dealing with Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). Three counselor roles are examined: (1) direct counseling for those affected by AIDS; (2) coordination of support systems for victims of AIDS; and (3) education. Seven recommendations for health professionals dealing with AIDS patients are…

  11. Serious Non-AIDS Events: Therapeutic Targets of Immune Activation and Chronic Inflammation in HIV Infection.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Denise C; Sereti, Irini

    2016-04-01

    In the antiretroviral therapy (ART) era, serious non-AIDS events (SNAEs) have become the major causes of morbidity and mortality in HIV-infected persons. Early ART initiation has the strongest evidence for reducing SNAEs and mortality. Biomarkers of immune activation, inflammation and coagulopathy do not fully normalize despite virologic suppression and persistent immune activation is an important contributor to SNAEs. A number of strategies aimed to reduce persistent immune activation including ART intensification to reduce residual viremia; treatment of co-infections to reduce chronic antigen stimulation; the use of anti-inflammatory agents, reducing microbial translocation as well as interventions to improve immune recovery through cytokine administration and reducing lymphoid tissue fibrosis, have been investigated. To date, there is little conclusive evidence on which strategies beyond treatment of hepatitis B and C co-infections and reducing cardiovascular risk factors will result in clinical benefits in patients already on ART with viral suppression. The use of statins seems to show early promise and larger clinical trials are underway to confirm their efficacy. At this stage, clinical care of HIV-infected patients should therefore focus on early diagnosis and prompt ART initiation, treatment of active co-infections and the aggressive management of co-morbidities until further data are available. PMID:26915027

  12. Psychopathology in 90 consecutive human immunodeficiency virus-seropositive and acquired immune deficiency syndrome patients with mostly intravenous drug use history.

    PubMed

    Perretta, P; Nisita, C; Zaccagnini, E; Lorenzetti, C; Nuccorini, A; Cassano, G B; Akiskal, H S

    1996-01-01

    This report presents systematic clinical data regarding psychiatric diagnoses, personal and family psychiatric histories, and symptomatologic aspects of 90 consecutive human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-seropositive and acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) patients, of whom slightly less than two thirds were at risk due to intravenous drug abuse. In addition, a comparison was made between the distribution patterns of these variables at various stages of HIV illness and related at-risk behaviors. Eighty-four percent of the patients met criteria for a spectrum of DSM-III-R diagnoses (mostly affective) that were associated with high rates of affective and alcohol abuse disorders among first-degree relatives. Mood disorders did not differ significantly between the two main groups at risk (intravenous drug users [IVDUs] v others) by gender, age, or stage of illness. The overall data from the rating scales show high levels of psychic and somatic anxiety in the early stages of illness, whereas cognitive symptoms, retardation, and disorientation are dominant in later stages. A noteworthy finding in this study is that many depressed patients demonstrated current and/or past hypomanic, hyperthymic, or cyclothymic features with no evidence of brain damage detectable by computed axial tomography (CAT). These temperamental attributes, which preceded HIV infection, may have served as risk factors for both drug abuse and impulsive sexual behavior in all types of at-risk groups. PMID:8826691

  13. AIDS Resource Manual for Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Sara A., Ed.; And Others

    This manual presents, for educators, known facts about Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS), how it is transmitted, and how it can be prevented. Answers to common questions about AIDS are listed and a summary sheet is provided. A resource list is included that contains names, addresses, and phone numbers of organizations that produce or…

  14. Production and function of cytokines in natural and acquired immunity to Candida albicans infection.

    PubMed Central

    Ashman, R B; Papadimitriou, J M

    1995-01-01

    Host resistance against infections caused by the yeast Candida albicans is mediated predominantly by polymorphonuclear leukocytes and macrophages. Antigens of Candida stimulate lymphocyte proliferation and cytokine synthesis, and in both humans and mice, these cytokines enhance the candidacidal functions of the phagocytic cells. In systemic candidiasis in mice, cytokine production has been found to be a function of the CD4+ T helper (Th) cells. The Th1 subset of these cells, characterized by the production of gamma interferon and interleukin-2, is associated with macrophage activation and enhanced resistance against reinfection, whereas the Th2 subset, which produces interleukins-4, -6, and -10, is linked to the development of chronic disease. However, other models have generated divergent data. Mucosal infection generally elicits Th1-type cytokine responses and protection from systemic challenge, and identification of cytokine mRNA present in infected tissues of mice that develop mild or severe lesions does not show pure Th1- or Th2-type responses. Furthermore, antigens of C. albicans, mannan in particular, can induce suppressor cells that modulate both specific and nonspecific cellular and humoral immune responses, and there is an emerging body of evidence that molecular mimicry may affect the efficiency of anti-Candida responses within defined genetic contexts. PMID:8531890

  15. Small noncleaved B cell Burkitt-like lymphoma with chromosome t(8;14) translocation and Epstein-Barr virus nuclear-associated antigen in a homosexual man with acquired immune deficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Petersen, J M; Tubbs, R R; Savage, R A; Calabrese, L C; Proffitt, M R; Manolova, Y; Manolov, G; Shumaker, A; Tatsumi, E; McClain, K

    1985-01-01

    This case report describes new manifestations of the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) in a promiscuous homosexual man. Investigation of upper gastrointestinal bleeding in the patient lead to discovery of a high-grade, small, noncleaved cell (Burkitt-like) gastroduodenal lymphoma with visceral and extralymphatic extension. Specific phenotyping of the lymphoma revealed that it was a monoclonal B cell lymphoma of mu kappa isotype. An in vitro cell line was established that was Epstein-Barr virus nuclear-associated antigen-positive. The lymphoma cells displayed a t(8;14) translocation similar to endemic African Burkitt lymphoma. Epstein-Barr virus genomes were identified in the lymphoma and an axillary lymph node biopsy specimen by molecular hybridization. These data strongly suggest that Epstein-Barr virus actively infected this patient. However, he showed normal Epstein-Barr virus-specific serologic responses, indicating an immune defect against the virus. PMID:2981469

  16. Immune endocrinological evaluation in patients with severe vascular acquired brain injuries: therapeutical approaches.

    PubMed

    Amico, Angelo Paolo; Terlizzi, Annamaria; Annamaria, Terlizzi; Megna, Marisa; Marisa, Megna; Megna, Gianfranco; Gianfranco, Megna; Damiani, Sabino; Sabino, Damiani

    2013-06-01

    It is known that in severe acquired brain injuries there is process of neuroinflammation, with the activation of a local and general stress response. In our study we considered six patients with disorders of consciousness (five in vegetative state and one in minimal consciousness state) in subacute phase, which had both a clinical assessment and a functional imaging (fMRI): in all these patients we analised blood levels of osteopontin (OPN), a cytokin involved in neuroinflammation but also in neurorepair with a still discussed role. Besides we studied the lymphocyte subsets and blood levels of some hormones (ADH, ACTH, PRL, GH, TSH, fT3, fT4). We found a positive correlation between the levels of serum osteopontin (higher than normal in all subjects) and the severity of the brain injury, especially for prognosis: actually, the patient with the lowest level has emerged from minimal consciousness state, while the one with the highest level has died a few days after the evaluation. The lymphocyte subset was altered, with a general increase of CD4+/CD3+ ratio, but without a so strict correlation with clinical severity; the only hormone with a significant increase in the worse patients was prolactin. In fMRI we detected some responses to visual and acoustic stimuli also in vegetative states, which had no clinical response to this kind of stimulation but generally have had a better prognosis. So we conclude that osteopontin could be a good marker of neuroinflammation and relate to a worse prognosis of brain injuries; the lymphocyte alterations in these disorders are not clear, but we suspect an unbalance of CD4 towards Th2; PRL is the best endocrinological marker of brain injury severity; fMRI surely plays an important role in the detection of subclinical responses and in prognostic stratification, that is still to define with more studies and statistical analysis. PMID:23701252

  17. AIDS Education Curriculum Guide. Grades 7-10. Bulletin 1827, 1988.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Louisiana State Dept. of Education, Baton Rouge.

    This curriculum guide on acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) was developed for students at the junior high school level. There are five major sections: (1) introduction, an overview of AIDS; (2) an overview of the history of AIDS; (3) basic immunology; (4) the effects of AIDS on the host; and (5) prevention of AIDS. The appendices include…

  18. The Brain in AIDS: Central Nervous System HIV-1 Infection and AIDS Dementia Complex.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, Richard W.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the complicated infection of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) in its late stages of the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) dementia complex. Explains the syndrome's development of abnormalities in cognition, motor performance, and behavior. (TW)

  19. Circulating Mediators of Inflammation and Immune Activation in AIDS-Related Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Nolen, Brian M.; Breen, Elizabeth Crabb; Bream, Jay H.; Jenkins, Frank J.; Kingsley, Lawrence A.; Rinaldo, Charles R.; Lokshin, Anna E.

    2014-01-01

    Background Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) is the most common AIDS-related malignancy in developed countries. An elevated risk of developing NHL persists among HIV-infected individuals in comparison to the general population despite the advent of effective antiretroviral therapy. The mechanisms underlying the development of AIDS-related NHL (A-NHL) are not fully understood, but likely involve persistent B-cell activation and inflammation. Methods This was a nested case-control study within the ongoing prospective Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study (MACS). Cases included 47 HIV-positive male subjects diagnosed with high-grade B-cell NHL. Controls were matched to each case from among participating HIV-positive males who did not develop any malignancy. Matching criteria included time HIV+ or since AIDS diagnosis, age, race and CD4+ cell count. Sera were tested for 161 serum biomarkers using multiplexed bead-based immunoassays. Results A subset of 17 biomarkers, including cytokines, chemokines, acute phase proteins, tissue remodeling agents and bone metabolic mediators was identified to be significantly altered in A-NHL cases in comparison to controls. Many of the biomarkers included in this subset were positively correlated with HIV viral load. A pathway analysis of our results revealed an extensive network of interactions between current and previously identified biomarkers. Conclusions These findings support the current hypothesis that A-NHL develops in the context of persistent immune stimulation and inflammation. Further analysis of the biomarkers identified in this report should enhance our ability to diagnose, monitor and treat this disease. PMID:24922518

  20. AIDS: The Second Decade.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Heather G., Ed.; And Others

    This report reviews the course of the Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) epidemic and its current status, examining changing patterns of sexual behavior and intravenous drug use, the distribution of cases of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, and the results of intervention efforts under way. It also discusses prevention…

  1. AIDS: Implications for Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macklin, Eleanor D.

    1988-01-01

    Reviews facts about Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) and its epidemiology. Discusses implications for families (social stigma and isolation, fears of contagion, infection and abandonment, guilt, anger, grief, and economic hardship) and for human service professionals (public education, voluntary, anonymous testing with counseling, and…

  2. Street Youth & AIDS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Radford, Joyce L.; And Others

    Interviews were conducted with 712 Canadian street youth (ages 15-20 years) to assess their knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors with regard to Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) and other sexually transmitted diseases (STDs). Youth were interviewed in 10 cities across Canada on the basis of 5 street culture lifestyles: prostitution, drug…

  3. Living with AIDs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graubard, Stephen R., Ed.

    1989-01-01

    Because events move swiftly in the contemporary world, it is easy to forget that acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) is a phenomenon of the 1980s. It is generally agreed that this is only the very beginning of a scientific investigation that will go on well into the 21st century. This issue attempts to provide some of the basic information…

  4. Mathematical and Numerical Analysis of Model Equations on Interactions of the HIV/AIDS Virus and the Immune System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parumasur, N.; Willie, R.

    2008-09-01

    We consider a simple HIV/AIDs finite dimensional mathematical model on interactions of the blood cells, the HIV/AIDs virus and the immune system for consistence of the equations to the real biomedical situation that they model. A better understanding to a cure solution to the illness modeled by the finite dimensional equations is given. This is accomplished through rigorous mathematical analysis and is reinforced by numerical analysis of models developed for real life cases.

  5. Poor Initial CD4+ Recovery With Antiretroviral Therapy Prolongs Immune Depletion and Increases Risk for AIDS and Non-AIDS Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Jason V.; Peng, Grace; Rapkin, Joshua; Krason, David; Reilly, Cavan; Cavert, Winston P.; Abrams, Donald I.; MacArthur, Rodger D.; Henry, Keith; Neaton, James D.

    2013-01-01

    Background Low CD4+ increases risk for both AIDS- and non–AIDS-related morbidity and mortality. The magnitude of CD4+ recovery early after initial antiretroviral therapy (ART) is important in the ultimate duration of immune depletion. Methods We examined CD4+ recovery among 850 participants in the Community Program for Clinical Research on AIDS Flexible Initial Retrovirus Suppressive Therapies study with virologic suppression (ie, achieved an HIV RNA level <400 copies/mL) with 8 months of initial ART and determined subsequent risk for AIDS, non-AIDS diseases (non-AIDS cancers and cardiovascular, end-stage renal, and liver diseases), or death using Cox regression during a median 5-year follow-up. Results Mean pretreatment CD4+ was 221 cells/μL; 18% (n = 149) had a poor CD4+ recovery (<50 cells/μL) after 8 months of effective ART, resulting in lower CD4+ over 5 years. Older age (hazard ratio 1.34/10 yrs, P = 0.003) and lower screening HIV RNA (hazard ratio 0.65 per log10 copies/mL higher, P = 0.001), but not screening CD4+, were associated with a poor CD4+ recovery. After 8 months of effective ART, 30 patients experienced the composite outcome of AIDS, non-AIDS, or death among participants with a poor CD4+ recovery (rate = 5.8/100 person-years) and 74 patients among those with an adequate recovery (≥50 cells/μL; rate = 2.7/100 personyears) (adjusted hazard ratio = 2.24, P < 0.001). The risk of this composite outcome associated with a poor CD4+ recovery declined when ART was initiated at higher CD4+ counts (P < 0.01). Conclusions Impaired immune recovery, despite effective ART, results in longer time spent at low CD4+, thereby increasing risk for a broad category of HIV-related morbidity and mortality conditions. PMID:18645520

  6. Nurses' Attitudes toward Gay and Hemophiliac Patients with AIDS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strasser, Judith A.; Damrosch, Shirley

    A sample of nurses (N=183) enrolled in a School of Nursing's master degree program was randomly assigned to read one of six vignettes about a patient who differed only in terms of diagnosis and lifestyle. Possible diagnoses were Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS), AIDS acquired by a hemophiliac through blood therapy, and leukemia; possible…

  7. HIV/AIDS Education for Students with Special Needs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colson, Steven E.; Carlson, Judith K.

    1993-01-01

    This article discusses human immune deficiency disease, the role of education as a prevention tool, a rationale for the inclusion of students with special needs in Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) education, a scope and sequence of skills related to AIDS, suggestions for implementing objectives across curricular areas, and multimedia…

  8. Measles antibody: comparison of long-term vaccination titres, early vaccination titres and naturally acquired immunity to and booster effects on the measles virus.

    PubMed

    Christenson, B; Böttiger, M

    1994-02-01

    A two-dose vaccination programme, using a combined measles, mumps and rubella vaccine (MMR) and administration at the ages of 18 months and 12 years, was introduced into Sweden in 1982. Since the combined MMR vaccine was introduced, a yearly evaluation of the immunity patterns and seroconversion rates in 12-year-old children has been carried out. This study includes three study groups. All groups consisted of pre- and postvaccination samples from 12-year-old children taken in connection with the MMR immunization. There were 332 paired samples from children who 8-10 years previously had received live measles vaccine. Prevaccination sera from these children represent late postvaccination titres. The postvaccination sera of 49 children seronegative to measles before vaccination, obtained 2 months after vaccination, represent early postvaccination immunity. Ninety-five children who had not been vaccinated earlier and who were seropositive to measles represent naturally acquired immunity. All samples were studied by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Sera from children with late postvaccination immunity had significantly lower titres than children in group 2, who represented early postvaccination sera (p < 0.001). Children with naturally acquired immunity had significantly higher titres than children with vaccine-induced immunity titres (p < 0.001). After revaccination of the previously vaccinated children, a significant booster rise was seen (p < 0.001). After revaccination of children with naturally acquired immunity, no significant booster effect was observed. Sixty-five children of the 332 (20%) previously vaccinated children had no or borderline measles titres prior to the booster. The study suggests that the vaccine-induced measles antibodies decline with time and may fall under the protective level.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8147093

  9. Paleo-Immunology: Evidence Consistent with Insertion of a Primordial Herpes Virus-Like Element in the Origins of Acquired Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Dreyfus, David H.

    2009-01-01

    Background The RAG encoded proteins, RAG-1 and RAG-2 regulate site-specific recombination events in somatic immune B- and T-lymphocytes to generate the acquired immune repertoire. Catalytic activities of the RAG proteins are related to the recombinase functions of a pre-existing mobile DNA element in the DDE recombinase/RNAse H family, sometimes termed the “RAG transposon”. Methodology/Principal Findings Novel to this work is the suggestion that the DDE recombinase responsible for the origins of acquired immunity was encoded by a primordial herpes virus, rather than a “RAG transposon.” A subsequent “arms race” between immunity to herpes infection and the immune system obscured primary amino acid similarities between herpes and immune system proteins but preserved regulatory, structural and functional similarities between the respective recombinase proteins. In support of this hypothesis, evidence is reviewed from previous published data that a modern herpes virus protein family with properties of a viral recombinase is co-regulated with both RAG-1 and RAG-2 by closely linked cis-acting co-regulatory sequences. Structural and functional similarity is also reviewed between the putative herpes recombinase and both DDE site of the RAG-1 protein and another DDE/RNAse H family nuclease, the Argonaute protein component of RISC (RNA induced silencing complex). Conclusions/Significance A “co-regulatory” model of the origins of V(D)J recombination and the acquired immune system can account for the observed linked genomic structure of RAG-1 and RAG-2 in non-vertebrate organisms such as the sea urchin that lack an acquired immune system and V(D)J recombination. Initially the regulated expression of a viral recombinase in immune cells may have been positively selected by its ability to stimulate innate immunity to herpes virus infection rather than V(D)J recombination Unlike the “RAG-transposon” hypothesis, the proposed model can be readily tested by

  10. Public perceptions about HIV/AIDS and discriminatory attitudes toward people living with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome in Iran.

    PubMed

    Masoudnia, Ebrahim

    2015-01-01

    Negative and discriminatory attitudes towards people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) are one of the biggest experienced challenges by people suffering from HIV, and these attitudes have been regarded as a serious threat to the fundamental rights of all infected people who are affected or associated with this disease in Iran. This study aimed to determine the relationship between public perception about HIV/AIDS and discriminatory attitudes toward PLWHA . The present study was conducted using a descriptive and survey design. Data were collected from 450 patients (236 male and 214 female) in Tehran and Yazd cities. The research instruments were modified HIV-related knowledge/attitude and perception questions about PLWHA, and discriminatory attitudes toward PLWHA. The results showed that prevalence of discriminatory attitudes toward PLWHA in the studied population was 60.0%. There was a significant negative correlation between citizens' awareness about HIV/AIDS, HIV-related attitudes, negative perception toward people with HIV/AIDS symptoms and their discriminatory attitudes toward PLWHA (p < .01). The hierarchical multiple regression analysis showed that components of public perception about HIV/AIDS explained for 23.7% of the variance of discriminatory attitudes toward PLWHA. Negative public perceptions about HIV/AIDS in Iran associated with discriminatory attitudes toward PLWHA and cultural beliefs in Iran tend to stigmatize and discriminate against the LWHA. PMID:26726933

  11. The Tragedy of AIDS: A New Trial for Nursing Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodges, Linda C.; Poteet, Gaye W.

    1987-01-01

    Presents some recent facts regarding Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). Discusses the needs of nursing students for knowledge about this disease and how to protect themselves while caring for patients. Discusses the fear of contagion among health workers. (CH)

  12. AIDS and Herpes Carry Weighty Policy Implications for Your Board.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCormick, Kathleen

    1985-01-01

    Few schools have policies to deal specifically with herpes and Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). Discusses some schools and states that have developed such policies and includes a source list for more information. (MD)

  13. Latinas and HIV/AIDS: Implications for the 90s.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maldonado, Miguelina

    1991-01-01

    Among Latinas, the number of cases of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) is increasing relentlessly. From August 1989 to August 1990, there was a 53 percent increase nationally in cumulative AIDS cases among Latinas. In New York City, AIDS is the leading cause of death among Latinas aged 25-34. The conditions and circumstances that place…

  14. The Science of AIDS. Readings from Scientific American Magazine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scientific American, Inc., New York, NY.

    This collection of scientific articles on the subject of acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) covers many facets of the physical and social aspects of the disease. Technical articles deal with the molecular and cellular biology of AIDS and the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV). The national and international epidemiology of AIDS and HIV are…

  15. AIDS, Social Sciences, and Health Education: A Personal Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osborn, June E.

    1986-01-01

    Explores the nature of the new AIDS (Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome) virus and its diseases, avoidance strategies, neurologic disease and AIDS, co-factors involved in progression from asymptomatic infection to disease, AIDS versus civil liberties--barriers to effective communication, the importance of language in communication, and health…

  16. College Students' Awareness and Interpretation of the AIDS Risk.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freimuth, Vicki S.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Reports on a study designed to provide insight on college students' perception about acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). Focuses on students knowledge about AIDS, their perceptions about their own risk, and any change in behavior they have made in response to the AIDS risk. (TW)

  17. The Creative Use of Psychotherapy with Terminally Ill AIDS Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fraenkel, William A.

    One clinical psychologist who worked with terminally ill, end-stage Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) patients in a hospice type setting experienced more than 150 deaths over an 18-month time period. Many of the patients denied that they had AIDS; some distinguished between having AIDS and testing positive for Human Immunodeficiency Virus…

  18. AIDS: What Early Childhood Educators Need To Know.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spar, Ruth

    Noting that Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) is expected to become the fifth leading cause of death for children ages 1 to 4, this paper provides relevant information on AIDS and the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) to help educators understand that they can work with children and adults who are HIV positive or who have AIDS. The…

  19. The Correlation between Homosexuality and an AIDS Diagnosis: Is It Perceived or Real?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Triplet, Rodney G.; And Others

    Prior research on observer perceptions of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) patients has concluded that there is a strong tendency to assume that homosexuals are patients of AIDS while heterosexuals are patients of anything but AIDS. This study sought to determine if there was a greater tendency to diagnose AIDS among female homosexuals…

  20. Fourth Graders' Attitudes toward AIDS Issues: A Concern for the Elementary School Counselor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holcomb, Thomas F.

    1990-01-01

    Examined attitudes toward Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) issues among 224 fourth grade students. Student responses to 36-item questionnaire revealed that students had good understanding of 3 major modes of spreading AIDS. They perceived AIDS as real and formidable health problem and expressed fears and concerns about AIDS. Findings…

  1. Illness Cognition and Responses to AIDS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bishop, George D.

    Along with the current epidemic of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) has come what some have called an epidemic of fear. Two studies were conducted to explore lay responses to AIDS from the perspective of recent research on how lay people process illness information. The research examines the cognitive organization of disease information…

  2. Workers' Reactions to AIDS and Other Illnesses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheehan, Eugene P.; And Others

    Previous research on the public's response to Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) has been concerned with attitudes and knowledge in relation to the disease itself. This study investigated people's willingness to interact with individuals with AIDS in the workplace. Participants (N=358) were college students with an average age of 25.…

  3. Adolescents and AIDS: Stopping the Time Bomb.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yondorf, Barbara A.

    1990-01-01

    There is mounting evidence that the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) that causes acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) is spreading rapidly among teenagers. To stop this spread of HIV infection, experts agree that states need to include HIV/AIDS prevention and education as an integral part of comprehensive health education programs for…

  4. Children, Teachers and the AIDS Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silin, Jonathan G.

    For schools, acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) initially represented a policy problem requiring legal and public health experts to assess their ability to exclude students or staff infected with the human immuno-deficiency virus. As the crisis over the potential presence of people with AIDS in the schools abated and with the growing…

  5. Judicial Attitude toward Legal Rights and AIDS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stavis, Paul F.

    1989-01-01

    Caselaw that functions as law until statutes are enacted has been characteristic of legal issues surrounding the HIV (Human Immunodeficiency Virus) and AIDS (Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome) diseases. In most cases such caselaw has protected the civil rights of persons with HIV/AIDS under established law as well as the traditions of Western…

  6. Counseling Gay Men with AIDS: Human Dimensions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barret, Robert L.

    1989-01-01

    Provides case material that demonstrates the emotional response of homosexual men to Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). Discusses denial, anger, rage, guilt, and shame experienced by these men with an emphasis on the human dimensions of AIDS. Concludes that most powerful contribution of counselors is their willingness to "be with" persons…

  7. Public Health Nursing for People with AIDS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dickinson, Dena; And Others

    Individuals with Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) or AIDS-related conditions (ARC) need continual care and support, at a level which can severely tax the health resources of a community. Public health nursing should have a central role in the effective and efficient response to this devastating problem. Since the early stages of the AIDS…

  8. HIV & AIDS Prevention Guide for Parents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lerro, Marc

    This guide is intended to help parents of adolescents and adults with mental retardation to teach their sons and daughters about HIV (Human Immunodeficiency Virus) and AIDS (Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome). An official resolution on AIDS adopted by The Arc, an organization for citizens with mental retardation, begins the guide. This…

  9. College Students' Perception of AIDS Victims.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailey, Roger C.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Evaluated college students' (N=60) perceptions of victims of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) based on how the victim contracted the disease. Found in nondeterioration condition victims contracting AIDS via sexual encounters or illicit drug injection were perceived as less trustworthy, less moral, and less desirable as a prospective…

  10. How To Talk to Your Teens and Children about AIDS = Como hablar con sus adolescentes y sus ninos sobre el SIDA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National PTA, Chicago, IL.

    Two brochures, one in English and one in Spanish, provide parents with basic information that will enable them to educate their children about Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). Contents address 11 questions: (1) What is AIDS? (2) How do you get AIDS? (3) How is AIDS not spread? (4) Who can get AIDS? (5) How can you tell if someone has…

  11. Dilemmatic group memberships of hard-of-hearing employees during the process of acquiring and adapting to the use of hearing aids.

    PubMed

    Koskela, Inka; Ruusuvuori, Johanna; Juvonen-Posti, Pirjo; Nevala, Nina; Husman, Päivi; Aaltonen, Tarja; Lonka, Eila; Laakso, Minna

    2016-09-01

    We describe how hard-of-hearing (HOH) employees renegotiate both their existing and new group memberships when they acquire and begin to use hearing aids (HAs). Our research setting was longitudinal and we carried out a theory-informed qualitative analysis of multiple qualitative data. When an individual discovers that they have a hearing problem and acquire a HA, their group memberships undergo change. First, HOH employees need to start negotiating their relationship with the HOH group. Second, they need to consider whether they see themselves as members of the disabled or the nondisabled employee group. This negotiation tends to be context-bound, situational, and nonlinear as a process, involving a back-and-forth movement in the way in which HOH employees value different group memberships. The dilemmatic negotiation of new group memberships and the other social aspects involved in HA rehabilitation tend to remain invisible to rehabilitation professionals, occupational healthcare, and employers. PMID:27128825

  12. Brain Microbial Populations in HIV/AIDS: α-Proteobacteria Predominate Independent of Host Immune Status

    PubMed Central

    Branton, William G.; Ellestad, Kristofor K.; Maingat, Ferdinand; Wheatley, B. Matt; Rud, Erling; Warren, René L.; Holt, Robert A.; Surette, Michael G.; Power, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    The brain is assumed to be a sterile organ in the absence of disease although the impact of immune disruption is uncertain in terms of brain microbial diversity or quantity. To investigate microbial diversity and quantity in the brain, the profile of infectious agents was examined in pathologically normal and abnormal brains from persons with HIV/AIDS [HIV] (n = 12), other disease controls [ODC] (n = 14) and in cerebral surgical resections for epilepsy [SURG] (n = 6). Deep sequencing of cerebral white matter-derived RNA from the HIV (n = 4) and ODC (n = 4) patients and SURG (n = 2) groups revealed bacterially-encoded 16 s RNA sequences in all brain specimens with α-proteobacteria representing over 70% of bacterial sequences while the other 30% of bacterial classes varied widely. Bacterial rRNA was detected in white matter glial cells by in situ hybridization and peptidoglycan immunoreactivity was also localized principally in glia in human brains. Analyses of amplified bacterial 16 s rRNA sequences disclosed that Proteobacteria was the principal bacterial phylum in all human brain samples with similar bacterial rRNA quantities in HIV and ODC groups despite increased host neuroimmune responses in the HIV group. Exogenous viruses including bacteriophage and human herpes viruses-4, -5 and -6 were detected variably in autopsied brains from both clinical groups. Brains from SIV- and SHIV-infected macaques displayed a profile of bacterial phyla also dominated by Proteobacteria but bacterial sequences were not detected in experimentally FIV-infected cat or RAG1−/− mouse brains. Intracerebral implantation of human brain homogenates into RAG1−/− mice revealed a preponderance of α-proteobacteria 16 s RNA sequences in the brains of recipient mice at 7 weeks post-implantation, which was abrogated by prior heat-treatment of the brain homogenate. Thus, α-proteobacteria represented the major bacterial component of the primate brain

  13. Guide to Planning Health Promotion for AIDS Prevention and Control. WHO AIDS Series 5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    World Health Organization, Geneva (Switzerland).

    This guide is intended to provide planners, managers, and technical staff with guidelines for planning, implementing, monitoring, and evaluating an Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) health promotion program. As such, it can be used in the development of a detailed AIDS health promotion action plan. The guide reviews the steps, processes,…

  14. Physicians Mutual Aid Group: A Response to AIDS-Related Burnout.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garside, Bruce

    1993-01-01

    Describes origins and functioning of physician's mutual aid group for physicians providing primary care to people with Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). Offers suggestions related to overcoming resistance physicians might have to participating in such a group and reviews modalities that were helpful in facilitating participants' ability…

  15. The Influence of Homophobia and Knowledge of AIDS on Empathy for Persons with AIDS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walters, Andrew S.

    There has been considerable variation in reports of how much people know about Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). This study explored empathy towards persons with AIDS. The first part of the study involved pretesting subjects on two scales. Data were collected from 125 male and 125 female college students. A factor analysis revealed there…

  16. Fear of AIDS and Risk Reduction among Heroin-Addicted Female Street Prostitutes: Personal Interviews with 72 Southern California Subjects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bellis, David J.

    1990-01-01

    Interviewed 72 heroin-addicted female street prostitutes and assessed fear of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS), AIDS risk reduction behavior, and prostitutes' recommendations for AIDS risk reduction programs. Self-reported data showed that, although subjects were afraid of AIDS, irrationality produced by addiction compelled risky…

  17. Adolescents, AIDS and HIV. Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Resources for Educators, 1990

    1990-01-01

    This compilation of educational resources is designed for communities which have been either overlooked in Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) education efforts or disproportionately affected by Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection. The materials listed target Blacks, Latinos, Asians and Pacific Islanders, Native Americans, young…

  18. AIDS Victims and Heterosexual Attitudes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larsen, Knud S.; And Others

    This study reports on the development of a Likert scale measuring attitudes toward Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) victims (ATAV) in five phases. Participants included a total of 215 male and 268 female undergraduates at Oregon State University. The results for phase 1 yielded a scale with high part-whole correlations, corrected…

  19. AIDS. CSAP Prevention Resource Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zuckerman, Karen, Ed.

    This resource guide was compiled from a variety of publications and data bases and represents the most current information to date on Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) prevention. The guide is organized into three major sections. The first section lists prevention materials. For each entry, information is provided on the organization…

  20. Morph-specific genetic and environmental variation in innate and acquired immune response in a color polymorphic raptor.

    PubMed

    Gangoso, Laura; Roulin, Alexandre; Ducrest, Anne-Lyse; Grande, Juan Manuel; Figuerola, Jordi

    2015-08-01

    Genetic color polymorphism is widespread in nature. There is an increasing interest in understanding the adaptive value of heritable color variation and trade-off resolution by differently colored individuals. Melanin-based pigmentation is often associated with variation in many different life history traits. These associations have recently been suggested to be the outcome of pleiotropic effects of the melanocortin system. Although pharmacological research supports that MC1R, a gene with a major role in vertebrate pigmentation, has important immunomodulatory effects, evidence regarding pleiotropy at MC1R in natural populations is still under debate. We experimentally assessed whether MC1R-based pigmentation covaries with both inflammatory and humoral immune responses in the color polymorphic Eleonora's falcon. By means of a cross-fostering experiment, we disentangled potential genetic effects from environmental effects on the covariation between coloration and immunity. Variation in both immune responses was primarily due to genetic factors via the nestlings' MC1R-related color genotype/phenotype, although environmental effects via the color morph of the foster father also had an influence. Overall, dark nestlings had lower immune responses than pale ones. The effect of the color morph of the foster father was also high, but in the opposite direction, and nestlings raised by dark eumelanic foster fathers had higher immune responses than those raised by pale foster fathers. Although we cannot completely discard alternative explanations, our results suggest that MC1R might influence immunity in this species. Morph-specific variation in immunity as well as pathogen pressure may therefore contribute to the long-term maintenance of genetic color polymorphism in natural populations. PMID:25834999

  1. A Generation in Jeopardy: Children and AIDS. A Report of the Select Committee on Children, Youth, and Families. U.S. House of Representatives, One Hundredth Congress, First Session (December 1987).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Select Committee on Children, Youth, and Families.

    This document presents a Congressional report on the topic of children and Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). These topics are addressed: (1) dramatic increases in AIDS among infants and young children; (2) differences in pediatric AIDS and AIDS among adults; (3) minority children's disproportional rate of infection with AIDS; (4)…

  2. "Does AIDS Hurt?": Educating Young Children about AIDS. Suggestions for Parents, Teachers, and Other Care Providers of Children to Age 10.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quackenbush, Marcia; Villarreal, Sylvia

    This document gives parents, teachers, and others basic information and suggested guidelines for teaching children aged 10 and younger about Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). These topics concerning AIDS and young children are discussed: (1) talking with young children about AIDS; (2) things to keep in mind when talking with children,…

  3. Women and AIDS: What We Need To Know. A Workshop and Resource Manual on Educating Women about AIDS and Safer Sex (January 1988).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Redman, Julie M.

    This document focuses on women and Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). The first part discusses the topic of women and AIDS. A workshop is described and a agenda provided. The role of facilitators is discussed. Materials required for the workshop are listed. The second section presents a curriculum on women and AIDS. An overview of the…

  4. Respiratory failure and acalculous cholecystitis in a patient with AIDS and disseminated tuberculosis: masking effect of fluoroquinolone monotherapy and immune restoration syndrome.

    PubMed

    Chen, Po-Lin; Lee, Hsin-Chun; Shan, Yan-Shen; Ko, Nai-Ying; Lee, Nan-Yao; Chang, Chia-Ming; Wu, Chi-Jung; Lee, Ching-Chi; Ko, Wen-Chien

    2009-07-01

    The clinical presentation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection varies in patients with AIDS. We report a case of disseminated tuberculosis in an AIDS patient. The initial manifestation was masked by fluoroquinolone monotherapy, and subsequently complicated by acalculous cholecystitis and immune restoration syndrome after antiretroviral therapy. PMID:19008140

  5. Successful treatment with autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation for acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS)-related malignant lymphoma.

    PubMed

    NAGAI, Yuya; MORI, Minako; INOUE, Daichi; KIMURA, Takaharu; SHIMOJI, Sonoko; TOGAMI, Katsuhiro; TABATA, Sumie; MATSUSHITA, Akiko; NAGAI, Kenichi; Imai, Yukihiro; Takafuta, Toshiro; Takahashi, Takayuki

    2009-11-01

    A 62-year-old man was diagnosed with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection while suffering from recurrent herpes zoster infection. Laboratory examination revealed CD4(+) lymphocyte count 16 cells/mul and HIV loading 150,000 copies/ml at presentation. In addition, he had multiple lymph node swelling. Histologic diagnosis of a biopsied lymph node was diffuse, large, B cell-type malignant lymphoma. The karyotype of the lymphoma cells was t(8;14)(q24;q32), which was confirmed by G-banding and fluorescent in situ hybridization. Positron emission tomography (PET)-combined CT scanning revealed systemic extranodal tumors involving the gastrointestinal tract, pancreas, and bone marrow. The clinical stage of the lymphoma was IVB and the international prognosis index was categorized as high. Complete remission (CR) of the lymphoma was obtained after 2 courses of CHOP (cyclophosphamide, adriamycin, vincristine, prednisolone) chemotherapy and 4 subsequent courses of rituximab-combined CHOP (R-CHOP). Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) was started at the initiation of CHOP. Because of the poor prognosis of AIDS-related lymphoma, he received autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation with the MEAM protocol (ranimustine, etoposide, cytarabine, melphalan) as a conditioning procedure without a severe infectious episode. He remains in CR 24 months after the transplantation. PMID:20009441

  6. Evaluation of abdominal pain in the AIDS patient.

    PubMed Central

    Potter, D A; Danforth, D N; Macher, A M; Longo, D L; Stewart, L; Masur, H

    1984-01-01

    Acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) is a recently recognized entity characterized by a deficiency in cell mediated immune response. The syndrome is manifested by the development of otherwise rare malignant neoplasms and severe life-threatening opportunistic infections. Case histories of five AIDS patients evaluated for abdominal pain are presented to demonstrate the unusual spectrum of intra-abdominal pathology that may be encountered in the AIDS patient. As the number of patients with AIDS continues to escalate, surgical evaluation and intervention will be required more frequently. An understanding of this syndrome and its complications is mandatory for the surgeon to adequately evaluate AIDS patients with abdominal pain. PMID:6322708

  7. Severe Community-Acquired Pneumonia with Bacteremia Caused by Herbaspirillum aquaticum or Herbaspirillum huttiense in an Immune-Competent Adult

    PubMed Central

    Kimball, Joanna; Smith, L. Patrick; Salzer, William

    2015-01-01

    Herbaspirillum spp. are Gram-negative bacteria that inhabit soil and water. Infections caused by these organisms have been reported in immunocompromised hosts. We describe severe community-acquired pneumonia and bacteremia caused by Herbaspirillum aquaticum or H. huttiense in an immunocompetent adult male. PMID:26179298

  8. Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) with lymphocytic interstitial pneumonitis (LIP) in a multi transfused child with thalassemia major.

    PubMed

    Sen, S; Goyal, R S; Kumar, A; Pande, I; Khare, S D; Chattopadhya, D; Malaviya, A N

    1992-11-01

    The case of a 10.5-year-old girl, who was diagnosed with a case of thalassemia major at the age of 8 months and had been on regular blood transfusions since then, is related. Donor screening for HIV was started in mid-1988, thus she had received unscreened blood for a number of years. In February 1991, she presented with a dry persistent cough, moderate grade continuous fever, and breathlessness on exertion for over 2 weeks. Chest X-ray showed bilateral infiltrations. She was put on penicillin and chloramphenicol with a provisional diagnosis of bronchopneumonia. In March 1991, she had to be hospitalized for impending respiratory failure. After treatment with intravenous fluids and parenteral antimicrobials, her condition stabilized and she was discharged. In April 1991, she was readmitted because of complaints of difficulty in swallowing and weight loss. Her chest signs had persisted and she had developed oropharyngeal candidiasis with ulcerations. She also had alopecia, a generalized lymphadenopathy, digital clubbing, and bilateral parotid enlargement. Candidiasis responded to vigorous therapy with clotrimazole. Fine needle aspiration of lymph node showed a reactive hyperplasia. HIV antibodies were detected in the serum with ELISA and confirmed by Western blot. Immunologic tests showed evidence of severe immunodeficiency. The Multitest CMI, which simultaneously tests delayed skin hypersensitivity to seven common recall antigens, was totally nonreactive. She was classified as having AIDS according to World Health Organization criteria for children under 13 years of age. The diagnosis of lymphocytic interstitial pneumonitis (LIP) was also made based on the symptoms. Oral prednisolone was given 2 mg/kg/day in 3 divided doses for a month. The cough and dyspnea showed great improvement and the parotid swellings disappeared; lymphadenopathy, clubbing, and alopecia, however, persisted. The child was kept on maintenance therapy of prednisolone and on alternate day co

  9. Assessment of duration of staying free from acquiring rehappening opportunistic infections among pre-ART people living with HIV/AIDS between 2008 and 2013.

    PubMed

    Bizuayehu, Habtamu Mellie; Abyu, Direslgne Misker; Aweke, Amlaku Mulat

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. In regional state of the study area, HIV (Human Immunodeficiency Virus) prevalence is 2.2% and opportunistic infections (OIs) occurred in 88.9% of pre-ART (Antiretroviral Therapy) people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA). Even though OIs are prevalent in the study area, duration of staying free from acquiring rehappening opportunistic infections and its determinant factors are not studied. Method. The study was conducted in randomly selected 341 adult Pre-ART PLWHA who are included in chronic HIV care. OI free duration was estimated using the actuarial life table and Kaplan Meier survival. Cox proportional-hazard model was used to calculate hazard rate. Result. OIs were rediagnosed in three quarters (75.37%) participants. In each week the probability of getting new recurrence OI was about 15.04 per 1000 person weeks. The median duration of not acquiring OI recurrence was 54 weeks. After adjustment, variables associated with recurrence were employment status, marital status, exposure for prophylaxis and adherence to it, CD4 count, and hemoglobin value. Conclusion. Giving prophylaxis and counseling to adhere it, rise in CD4 and hemoglobin level, and enhancing job opportunities should be given for PLWHA who are on chronic HIV care while continuing the care. PMID:25685772

  10. Recent Sexually Transmitted Disease Prevention Efforts and Their Implications for AIDS Health Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solomon, Mildred Zeldes; DeJong, William

    1986-01-01

    The authors describe the principles and underlying assumptions that have guided the design of their STD (sexually transmitted diseases) initiatives, drawing special attention to the implications for AIDS (Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome) health education efforts. (Author/CT)

  11. College Students and AIDS Awareness: The Effects of Condom Perception and Self-Efficacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Ulysses J. III; Jara, Ursula; Braxton, Erika

    2005-01-01

    This paper examined the attitudes and perceptions of urban college students regarding Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) awareness and prevention. AIDS has devastated the lives of citizens in the United States. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention indicate that the AIDS incidence rate for young Americans between the ages of 13 to…

  12. Alternative Techniques for Teaching about HIV/AIDS in the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peace Corps, Washington, DC. Information Collection and Exchange Div.

    This volume is a collection of interactive games and activities created to supplement existing curricula on Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) and designed to give students a sense of responsibility in the fight against AIDS while taking the fear out of AIDS education. All of the games and activities in the volume have undergone…

  13. Psychosocial Impact of the AIDS Epidemic on the Lives of Gay Men.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stulberg, Ian; Smith, Margaret

    1988-01-01

    Assessed the psychosocial impact of the Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) epidemic on the lives of homosexual men (N=301) who had not been diagnosed with AIDS or AIDS Related Complex (ARC). Found subjects reported increasing frequency of no-risk sexual activities and decreased frequency of possible risk and high-risk activities. (ABL)

  14. AIDS and the Education of Our Children: A Guide for Parents and Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Education, Washington, DC.

    Guidelines for parents, teachers, and other adults to use in the education of children about acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) are presented in this document. The first part of the document presents a review of the known facts concerning the history and spread of AIDS. Specific topics discussed include AIDS symptoms, lack of a cure or…

  15. Psychological Distress amongst AIDS-Orphaned Children in Urban South Africa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cluver, Lucie; Gardner, Frances; Operario, Don

    2007-01-01

    Background: South Africa is predicted to have 2.3 million children orphaned by Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) by 2020 (Actuarial Society of South Africa, 2005). There is little knowledge about impacts of AIDS-related bereavement on children, to aid planning of services. This study aimed to investigate psychological consequences of AIDS…

  16. The Impact of a Credit Course on AIDS at the Collegiate Level.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fennell, Reginald

    1990-01-01

    Developed, implemented, and investigated course on Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) to determine effectiveness of different teaching methods on increasing knowledge and decreasing negative attitudes toward AIDS and homosexuality. Results revealed that course participants (N=63) increased knowledge of AIDS and adopted more positive…

  17. Coping with AIDS: Psychological and Social Considerations in Helping People with HTLV-III Infection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Runck, Bette

    This booklet was written to familiarize health and mental health professionals and paraprofessionals with the psychological and social problems associated with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). It briefly reviews the realities of AIDS and describes the challenge that AIDS poses for health care professionals. A section on neuropsychiatric…

  18. AIDS: Workplace Issues. INFO-LINE. Practical Guidelines for Training and Development Professionals. Issue 9208.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Society for Training and Development, Alexandria, VA.

    Practical guidelines are presented for training and development professionals dealing with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) in the workplace. The following topics are covered: AIDS in the workplace; AIDS basics, including information on the required corporate commitment and transmission of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV); employment…

  19. Therapeutic imprinting of the immune system: towards a remission of AIDS in primates?

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Our inability to cure HIV/AIDS is related to the ability of the virus to establish reservoirs during treatment. In order to develop new strategies, it is certainly essential that a suitable animal model be implemented. In the recent work of Shytaj et al., it has been possible to inhibit viral replication to levels below the assay detection limit in the macaque AIDS model. Moreover, different therapeutic regimens applied to the rhesus macaque AIDS model (herein reviewed), including ours, are starting to show the potential to induce, following therapy suspension, conditions reminiscent of a drug-free control of the infection. PMID:22978787

  20. Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP): a regulator of the innate and acquired immune functions in juvenile fish.

    PubMed

    Lugo, Juana Maria; Carpio, Yamila; Oliva, Aymé; Morales, Antonio; Estrada, Mario Pablo

    2010-09-01

    To date, published in-vivo studies on the action of the PACAP in fish are few and these are concerned with reproduction, brain development and feeding behavior. Recently, we demonstrated for the first time that PACAP, apart from its neuroendocrine role, influences immune functions in fish larvae. In this work, we have evaluated the effects of recombinant Clarias gariepinus PACAP administration by intraperitoneal injection on important immune parameters in juvenile fish. We observed that a single injection of the recombinant peptide (0.1 microg per g of body weight) was able to increase the nitric oxide synthase-derived metabolites (NOS) and total immunoglobulin M (IgM) concentration in serum of juvenile catfish C. gariepinus and tilapia Orechromis niloticus respectively, after 24 h of its administration. In addition, our results showed that recombinant PACAP increases IgM, NOS and lysozyme in serum correlated with its ability to enhance growth performance in juvenile fish. Finally, the PACAP mRNA expression and PACAP immunoreactivity detected in peripheral blood leucocytes from juvenile catfish suggest a direct autocrine or/and paracrine mechanism of regulation of this peptide to mediate immune functions in fish. PMID:20510368

  1. Evasion of human innate and acquired immunity by a bacterial homolog of CD11b that inhibits opsonophagocytosis.

    PubMed

    Lei, B; DeLeo, F R; Hoe, N P; Graham, M R; Mackie, S M; Cole, R L; Liu, M; Hill, H R; Low, D E; Federle, M J; Scott, J R; Musser, J M

    2001-12-01

    Microbial pathogens must evade the human immune system to survive, disseminate and cause disease. By proteome analysis of the bacterium Group A Streptococcus (GAS), we identified a secreted protein with homology to the alpha-subunit of Mac-1, a leukocyte beta2 integrin required for innate immunity to invading microbes. The GAS Mac-1-like protein (Mac) was secreted by most pathogenic strains, produced in log-phase and controlled by the covR-covS two-component gene regulatory system, which also regulates transcription of other GAS virulence factors. Patients with GAS infection had titers of antibody specific to Mac that correlated with the course of disease, demonstrating that Mac was produced in vivo. Mac bound to CD16 (FcgammaRIIIB) on the surface of human polymorphonuclear leukocytes and inhibited opsonophagocytosis and production of reactive oxygen species, which resulted in significantly decreased pathogen killing. Thus, by mimicking a host-cell receptor required for an innate immune response, the GAS Mac protein inhibits professional phagocyte function by a novel strategy that enhances pathogen survival, establishment of infection and dissemination. PMID:11726969

  2. Prenatal cadmium exposure produces persistent changes to thymus and spleen cell phenotypic repertoire as well as the acquired immune response

    SciTech Connect

    Holásková, Ida; Elliott, Meenal; Hanson, Miranda L.; Schafer, Rosana; Barnett, John B.

    2012-12-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is a common environmental contaminant. Adult exposure to Cd alters the immune system, however, there are limited studies on the effects of prenatal exposure to Cd. Pregnant C57Bl/6 mice were exposed to an environmentally relevant dose of CdCl{sub 2} (10 ppm) and the effects on the immune system of the offspring were assessed at 20 weeks of age. Prenatal Cd exposure caused an increase in the percent of CD4{sup −}CD8{sup −}CD44{sup +}CD25{sup −} (DN1) thymocytes in both sexes and a decrease in the percent of CD4{sup −}CD8{sup −}CD44{sup −}CD25{sup +} (DN3) thymocytes in females. Females had an increase in the percent of splenic CD4{sup +} T cells, CD8{sup +} T cells, and CD45R/B220{sup +} B cells and a decrease in the percent of NK cells and granulocytes (Gr-1{sup +}). Males had an increase in the percent of splenic CD4{sup +} T cells and CD45R/B220{sup +} B cells and a decrease in the percent of CD8{sup +} T cells, NK cells, and granulocytes. The percentage of neutrophils and myeloid-derived suppressor cells were reduced in both sexes. The percent of splenic nTreg cells was decreased in all Cd-exposed offspring. Cd-exposed offspring were immunized with a streptococcal vaccine and the antibody response was determined. PC-specific serum antibody titers were decreased in Cd exposed female offspring but increased in the males. PspA-specific serum IgG titers were increased in both females and males compared to control animals. Females had a decrease in PspA-specific serum IgM antibody titers. Females and males had a decrease in the number of splenic anti-PspA antibody-secreting cells when standardized to the number of B cells. These findings demonstrate that very low levels of Cd exposure during gestation can result in long term sex-specific alterations on the immune system of the offspring. -- Highlights: ► Prenatal exposure to cadmium alters the immune system of 20 week old offspring. ► The percentage of DN1 and DN3 thymocytes was changed

  3. AIDS Knowledge and Attitudes, Provisional Data from the National Health Interview Survey: United States, August 1987. Advance Data from Vital and Health Statistics. No. 146.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dawson, Deborah A.; And Others

    This document presents provisional data for all Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) questionnaire items from the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) for August 1987. It notes that the AIDS questionnaire was designed to provide baseline estimates of public knowledge and attitudes about AIDS transmission, the prevention of AIDS virus…

  4. Epidemiology, clinical, immune, and molecular profiles of microsporidiosis and cryptosporidiosis among HIV/AIDS patients

    PubMed Central

    Wumba, Roger; Longo-Mbenza, Benjamin; Menotti, Jean; Mandina, Madone; Kintoki, Fabien; Situakibanza, Nani Hippolyte; Kakicha, Marie Kapepela; Zanga, Josue; Mbanzulu-Makola, Kennedy; Nseka, Tommy; Mukendi, Jean Pierre; Kendjo, Eric; Sala, Jean; Thellier, Marc

    2012-01-01

    parasites. Rural areas, public toilets, and exposure to farm pigs were the univariate risk factors present in the 28 cases with opportunistic intestinal parasites. In logistic regression analysis, a CD4 count of <100 cells/mm3 (OR = 4.60; 95% CI 1.70–12.20; P = 0.002), no ART (OR = 5.00; 95% CI 1.90–13.20; P < 0.001), and exposure to surface water (OR = 2.90; 95% CI 1.01–8.40; P = 0.048) were identified as the significant and independent determinants for the presence of opportunistic intestinal parasites. Conclusion E. bieneusi and Cryptosporidium are becoming more prevalent in Kinshasa, Congo. Based on the findings, we recommend epidemiology surveillance and prevention by means of hygiene, the emphasis of sensitive PCR methods, and treating opportunistic intestinal parasites that may be acquired through fecal–oral transmission, surface water, normal immunity, rural area-based person–person and animal–human infection, and transmission of HIV. Therapy, including ART and treatment with fumagillin, is needed. PMID:22924007

  5. AIDS: Is Any Risk Too Great? The 1987 Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartog-Rapp, Fay

    This report discusses public school legal liability in the Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) controversy with regard to the right of privacy of AIDS victims who are students and employees and the concern of risk of contagion to other students and employees and the public's right to know what is going on in their schools. Several steps…

  6. HIV and Mental Health Institutions. AIDS Technical Report, No. 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harvey, David C.

    This technical report is part of a series on AIDS/HIV (Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome/Human Immunodeficiency Virus) and is intended to help link various legal advocacy organizations providing services to persons with mental illness or developmental disabilities. This paper examines AIDS policy issues in mental health institutions. The paper…

  7. Introduction: Psychosocial Aspects of AIDS Prevention among African Americans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belgrave, Faye Z.; Randolph, Suzanne M.

    1993-01-01

    Articles in this special issue are devoted to psychosocial aspects of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) prevention in the African-American community. The core assumption is that the values, beliefs, and world views of people of African descent must be understood for AIDS prevention to be effective. (SLD)

  8. Attitudes of Dental Hygiene Students toward Individuals with AIDS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haring, Joen Iannucci; Lind, Laura J.

    1992-01-01

    At Ohio State University, 81 dental hygiene students' attitudes toward homosexual and heterosexual patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) or leukemia were assessed using ratings of prejudice, social interaction, and interpersonal interaction. Negative bias toward individuals with AIDS and unwillingness to engage in everyday…

  9. Children and AIDS: A Need to Rethink Child Welfare Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Jaclyn; Carlton, Thomas O.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the problems of children with Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). Questions whether society is prepared to respond to these children's needs. Asserts that the definitions of child abuse and neglect need to include the transmission of AIDS and that the foster care system will probably not be able to meet the needs of this…

  10. HIV/AIDS Education in Teacher Preparation Programs. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skripak, Danielle; Summerfield, Liane

    Experts agree that prevention through education is the best way to fight the transmission of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV), which causes Acquired Immune Deficiency (AIDS). However, the capacity of teachers to provide instruction about AIDS and other related health problems with knowledge and comfort may be limited by a lack of preservice…

  11. An Interview with AIDS Vaccine Researcher Chris Parks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, Megan

    2010-01-01

    The search for an AIDS (acquired immune deficiency syndrome) vaccine is truly a global effort, with university laboratories, biotech firms, pharmaceutical companies, nonprofit research organizations, hospitals, and clinics all working together to develop an effective vaccine as quickly as possible. The International AIDS Vaccine Initiative (IAVI)…

  12. AIDS: Are Children at Risk? ERIC Digest 16.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ERIC Clearinghouse on Teacher Education, Washington, DC.

    Lack of knowledge and misinformation about Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS), a fatal disease with no cure or vaccine, has caused widespread public concern. Education is an effective way to reduce fears and prevent the spread of the disease. Public school personnel must have accurate information about AIDS in order to make suitable…

  13. How They Handle It: Young Canadians, Sex, and AIDS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hobart, Charles

    1992-01-01

    Describes how young unmarried Canadians cope with sexuality in the era of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). Responses of 1,775 Anglophone and 493 Francophone college students in Canada indicate that those who are most aware of the risks of AIDS are also the most careless in putting themselves at risk. (SLD)

  14. Burnout in Hospital Social Workers Who Work with AIDS Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oktay, Julianne S.

    1992-01-01

    Surveyed 128 hospital social workers who worked with Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) patients. Found that hospital AIDS social workers had slightly higher rates of emotional exhaustion and depersonalization on Maslach Burnout Inventory but also felt substantially higher level of personal accomplishment. Age, autonomy, and belonging to…

  15. Countertransference Issues in Working with Persons with AIDS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunkel, Joan; Hatfield, Shellie

    1986-01-01

    In the Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) epidemic, social workers must interact with numerous systems-persons diagnosed with AIDS and their friends and families and human services agencies. Subsequently, workers must deal with their responses to such interaction, including countertransference. Eight countertransference issues and…

  16. Psychological Consequences of AIDS-Related Bereavement among Gay Men.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, John L.

    1988-01-01

    Interviewed 745 homosexual men to examine relation between Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS)-related bereavement and psychological distress. Loss of lover or close friend to AIDS was reported by 27 percent of sample. Found direct relation between number of bereavements and symptoms of traumatic stress response, demoralization, sleep…

  17. Adolescent Coping Behavior When Confronted with a Friend with AIDS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Larry K.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Examined coping of adolescents (n=871) presented with hypothetical situation of friend with Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) and compared subjects with sample (n=472) responding to hypothetical situation of suicidal peer. Found more distress in girls for AIDS problem, more distress in boys for suicide problem. Adolescents were more…

  18. AIDS Awareness of High School Students: An Exploratory Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCoy, Leah P.; Calvin, Richmond E.

    The Surgeon General's information material on the Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS), which was mailed to every household in the United States, was used to develop an AIDS Awareness Inventory. The inventory was designed for administration to 182 high school students enrolled in schools in three districts, which have adopted an AIDS…

  19. School-Based HIV-AIDS Education in Canada.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allan, Margaret C.

    Health and education matters in Canada are the responsibility of the government of each individual province. These opportunities for improvement in the Canadian system regarding Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) education exist. First, a nationally standardized curriculum is needed. Second, more time allocated for AIDS education is…

  20. Teaching an AIDS Course from a Medical Sociology Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Carole A.

    1992-01-01

    A sociology course on Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) and its societal context, taught at California State University, Long Beach, is described. The background, content, organization, administrative and emotional demands, teaching methods (including input from patients with AIDS), texts, and impact of the interdisciplinary course are…

  1. AIDS in Rural Areas: Challenges to Providing Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rounds, Kathleen A.

    1988-01-01

    Examined the development and provision of social services to persons with Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) and their families in rural areas and barriers to the delivery of care. Subjects (N=15) were persons who coordinated or provided services to AIDS victims. Found structural factors, confidentiality, fear of contagion, and homophobia…

  2. Computer-Assisted Instruction in AIDS Infection Control for Physicians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrett, T. J.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    A microcomputer program to provide health care workers with instruction in Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) infection control was assessed by medical residents. The experimental group (n=24) acquired more knowledge than controls (n=33). Response to the method was positive, and computer-assisted instruction is seen as useful for AIDS…

  3. HIV-AIDS Information and the American Library Community: An Overview of Responses to the HIV-AIDS Health Crisis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lukenbill, W. Bernard

    This paper presents an overview of how American libraries have responded to the health crisis caused by HIV (Human Immunodeficiency Virus) and AIDS (Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome). AIDS information dissemination practices of libraries and the social role which American librarians have articulated regarding their special responsibilities are…

  4. Stigma, HIV and AIDS: An Exploration and Elaboration of the Illness Trajectory Surrounding HIV Infection and AIDS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alonzo, Angelo A.; Reynolds, Nancy R.

    In this paper, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) are analyzed in terms of stigma and illness trajectory. The primary purpose is to conceptualize how individuals with HIV/AIDS experience stigma and to demonstrate how these experiences are affected by the social and biophysical dimensions of the…

  5. Illusions of Immortality: The Confrontation of Adolescence and AIDS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Dept. of Health, Albany.

    Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) is a potent and a present danger for teenagers, casting a dark shadow over their lives now and in the future. A small, but significant, number of teenagers will develop Human Immune Virus (HIV)-related illness before they turn 20; a far greater number will become infected with the virus during…

  6. Profiling of Human Acquired Immunity Against the Salivary Proteins of Phlebotomus papatasi Reveals Clusters of Differential Immunoreactivity

    PubMed Central

    Geraci, Nicholas S.; Mukbel, Rami M.; Kemp, Michael T.; Wadsworth, Mariha N.; Lesho, Emil; Stayback, Gwen M.; Champion, Matthew M.; Bernard, Megan A.; Abo-Shehada, Mahmoud; Coutinho-Abreu, Iliano V.; Ramalho-Ortigão, Marcelo; Hanafi, Hanafi A.; Fawaz, Emadeldin Y.; El-Hossary, Shabaan S.; Wortmann, Glenn; Hoel, David F.; McDowell, Mary Ann

    2014-01-01

    Phlebotomus papatasi sand flies are among the primary vectors of Leishmania major parasites from Morocco to the Indian subcontinent and from southern Europe to central and eastern Africa. Antibody-based immunity to sand fly salivary gland proteins in human populations remains a complex contextual problem that is not yet fully understood. We profiled the immunoreactivities of plasma antibodies to sand fly salivary gland sonicates (SGSs) from 229 human blood donors residing in different regions of sand fly endemicity throughout Jordan and Egypt as well as 69 US military personnel, who were differentially exposed to P. papatasi bites and L. major infections in Iraq. Compared with plasma from control region donors, antibodies were significantly immunoreactive to five salivary proteins (12, 26, 30, 38, and 44 kDa) among Jordanian and Egyptian donors, with immunoglobulin G4 being the dominant anti-SGS isotype. US personnel were significantly immunoreactive to only two salivary proteins (38 and 14 kDa). Using k-means clustering, donors were segregated into four clusters distinguished by unique immunoreactivity profiles to varying combinations of the significantly immunogenic salivary proteins. SGS-induced cellular proliferation was diminished among donors residing in sand fly-endemic regions. These data provide a clearer picture of human immune responses to sand fly vector salivary constituents. PMID:24615125

  7. Immunization

    MedlinePlus

    ... a lot worse. Some are even life-threatening. Immunization shots, or vaccinations, are essential. They protect against things like measles, ... B, polio, tetanus, diphtheria, and pertussis (whooping cough). Immunizations are important for adults as well as children. ...

  8. Immunizations

    MedlinePlus

    ... How Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Immunizations KidsHealth > For Teens > Immunizations Print A A A ... That Shot? en español Las vacunas Why Are Vaccinations Important? Measles, mumps, and whooping cough may seem ...

  9. Immunization

    MedlinePlus

    ... a lot worse. Some are even life-threatening. Immunization shots, or vaccinations, are essential. They protect against ... B, polio, tetanus, diphtheria, and pertussis (whooping cough). Immunizations are important for adults as well as children. ...

  10. Does AIDS involve some collusion by the neuro-immune system because of positive learning of the disarmament strategy?

    PubMed

    Sandoz, Patrick

    2013-04-01

    Korzybski's general semantics recommends considering living beings as organisms-as-a-whole in their environment. Our cognitive abilities, specific to the human species, have thus to be taken into account. In this framework we establish a semantic similarity between particular stressful events of the 20th century and AIDS in which the immune-deficiency-caused is semiotically seen as a biological state of disarmament of the organism. It then appears that: These observations suggest that AIDS could benefit from some collusion by the neuro-immune system because of positive learning of the semiotic concept of disarmament, thus making the terrain favorable to the germ in response to intense stress. The disease would then result from a conditioning process based on semiotics and involve some confusion at the level of the unconscious cognitive system between disarmament toward outside the body and disarmament toward inside the body. This hypothesis is discussed within a multidisciplinary perspective considering the specificities of our modern lifestyles, the cybernetic ability of signs to control metabolism and behavior, and the recent advances of epigenetics and cognition sciences. This hypothesis may explain the multiple cross-species transmissions of the immunodeficiency virus into humans during the 20th century. Further research is suggested for evaluating this hypothesis. PMID:23317541

  11. Chloroquine and beyond: exploring anti-rheumatic drugs to reduce immune hyperactivation in HIV/AIDS.

    PubMed

    Savarino, Andrea; Shytaj, Iart Luca

    2015-01-01

    The restoration of the immune system prompted by antiretroviral therapy (ART) has allowed drastically reducing the mortality and morbidity of HIV infection. However, one main source of clinical concern is the persistence of immune hyperactivation in individuals under ART. Chronically enhanced levels of T-cell activation are associated with several deleterious effects which lead to faster disease progression and slower CD4(+) T-cell recovery during ART. In this article, we discuss the rationale, and review the results, of the use of antimalarial quinolines, such as chloroquine and its derivative hydroxychloroquine, to counteract immune activation in HIV infection. Despite the promising results of several pilot trials, the most recent clinical data indicate that antimalarial quinolines are unlikely to exert a marked beneficial effect on immune activation. Alternative approaches will likely be required to reproducibly decrease immune activation in the setting of HIV infection. If the quinoline-based strategies should nevertheless be pursued in future studies, particular care must be devoted to the dosage selection, in order to maximize the chances to obtain effective in vivo drug concentrations. PMID:26084487

  12. Genetic Regulation of Acquired Immune Responses to Antigens of Mycobacterium tuberculosis: a Study of Twins in West Africa

    PubMed Central

    Jepson, Annette; Fowler, Amanda; Banya, Winston; Singh, Mahavir; Bennett, Steve; Whittle, Hilton; Hill, Adrian V. S.

    2001-01-01

    The role of genetic factors in clinical tuberculosis is increasingly recognized; how such factors regulate the immune response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis in healthy individuals is unclear. In this study of 255 adult twin pairs residing in The Gambia, West Africa, it is apparent that memory T-cell responses to secreted mycobacterial antigens (85-kDa antigen complex, “short-term culture filtrate,” and peptides from the ESAT-6 protein), as well as to the 65-kDa heat shock protein, are subject to effective genetic regulation. The delayed hypersensitivity response to intradermal tuberculin also demonstrates significant genetic variance, while quantitative T-cell and antibody responses to the 38-kDa cell membrane protein appear to be determined largely by environmental factors. Such findings have implications for vaccine development. PMID:11349068

  13. Fulminant inflammatory leukoencephalopathy associated with HAART-induced immune restoration in AIDS-related progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Vendrely, Aurélie; Bienvenu, Boris; Gasnault, Jacques; Thiebault, Jean Baptiste; Salmon, Dominique; Gray, Françoise

    2005-04-01

    HAART-induced immune restoration is beneficial for patients with AIDS-related progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML). However, in rare instances, an immune-reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) may cause paradoxical clinical deterioration. We report the neuropathological study of an AIDS patient who presented with progressive cognitive deterioration; CD4(+) count was 117 and the HIV viral load >10(4); imaging showed non-enhancing lesions consistent with PML. Following initiation of HAART, CD4(+) was 300 and HIV viral load <10(3), but his neurological symptoms continued to deteriorate. Imaging revealed an increase in the size and number of lesions and enhancement of all the lesions. A stereotactic biopsy showed severe inflammatory and demyelinating lesions with marked infiltration by macrophages and T lymphocytes in the absence of a detectable infectious agent. Despite high doses of steroids, the patient died 3 months after admission. Autopsy showed two types of lesions: (1) active inflammatory PML changes with abundant JC virus, and intraparenchymal and perivascular infiltration by T lymphocytes, and (2) acute perivenous leukoencephalitis devoid of JC virus. Most lymphocytes were CD8(+) lymphocytes; CD4(+) lymphocytes were virtually absent. Two pathological reactions were associated with the paradoxical clinical deterioration related to dysregulation of the immune response characteristic of IRIS in PML: (1) an accentuation of JCV infection, and (2) a nonspecific acute perivenous leukoencephalitis. We suggest that both these types of lesions are due to an imbalance of CD8(+)/CD4(+) T cells, with massive infiltration of the cerebral parenchyma by CD8(+) cytotoxic T lymphocytes in the absence of sufficient CD4(+) response. Better understanding of the mechanisms of the IRIS may enable prevention or cure of this severe, sometimes fatal complication of HAART. PMID:15739098

  14. Utilizing Rapid Multiple-Locus Variable-Number Tandem-Repeat Analysis Typing To Aid Control of Hospital-Acquired Clostridium difficile Infection: a Multicenter Study

    PubMed Central

    Manzoor, Susan; Marriott, Claire; Parsons, Helen; Waddington, Claire; Gossain, Savita; Szczepura, Ala; Stallard, Nigel; Hawkey, Peter M.

    2012-01-01

    The early identification of outbreaks is crucial for the control of Clostridium difficile infection. This study aimed to determine if the number of hospital-acquired C. difficile infections could be reduced by rapidly typing C. difficile strains using multiple-locus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis (MLVA) compared to typing using PCR ribotyping. A total of 16 hospitals were recruited to the study, and all periods of increased incidence (PIIs) of C. difficile infection were identified. The hospitals were randomized into two study arms, the test and the control, with all isolates typed in the test using MLVA and in the control using PCR ribotyping. Following a PII, each hospital received a structured questionnaire regarding control measures implemented or stopped prior to or following the typing results. During the study period, there were a total of 1,682 hospital-apportioned C. difficile toxin-positive cases, with 868 in the control and 814 in the test, with modeling demonstrating no differences between the two arms. A total of 245 PIIs occurred, involving 785 patients. There was a significant difference in the mean turnaround time between the ribotyping and MLVA typing (13.6 and 5.3 days, respectively [P < 0.001]). The discriminatory ability of MLVA was greater than ribotyping, with 85 outbreaks being confirmed by ribotyping and 62 by MLVA. In the test arm, 40.6% of respondents strongly agreed that the typing result had aided their management of clusters, as opposed to 9.9% in the control. The study demonstrated the utility of rapidly typing C. difficile strains, demonstrating that it aided the management of clusters, enabling effective targeting of infection control resources. PMID:22837319

  15. Pulmonary leukocytic responses are linked to the acquired immunity of mice vaccinated with irradiated cercariae of Schistosoma mansoni

    SciTech Connect

    Aitken, R.; Coulson, P.S.; Wilson, R.A.

    1988-05-15

    Pulmonary cellular responses in C57BL/6 mice exposed to Schistosoma mansoni have been investigated by sampling cells from the respiratory airways with bronchoalveolar lavage. Mice exposed to cercariae attenuated with 20 krad gamma-radiation developed stronger and more persistent pulmonary leukocytic responses than animals exposed to equal numbers of normal parasites. Although vaccination with irradiated cercariae also stimulated T cell responses of greater magnitude and duration than normal infection, the lymphocytic infiltrate elicited by each regimen did not differ substantially in its composition, 5 wk after exposure. Studies with cercariae attenuated by different treatments established that a link exists between the recruitment of leukocytes to the lungs of vaccinated mice and resistance to reinfection. There was a strong association between pulmonary leukocytic responses and the elimination of challenge infections by vaccinated mice. Animals exposed to irradiated cercariae of S. mansoni were resistant to homologous challenge infection but were not protected against Schistosoma margrebowiei. Homologous challenge of vaccinated mice stimulated anamnestic leukocytic and T lymphocytic responses in the lungs, 2 wk postinfection, but exposure of immunized animals to the heterologous species failed to trigger an expansion in these populations of cells. Our studies indicate that pulmonary leukocytes and T lymphocytes are intimately involved in the mechanism of vaccine-induced resistance to S. mansoni. It remains unclear whether these populations of cells initiate protective inflammatory reactions against challenge parasites in the lungs, or accumulate in response to the activation of the protective mechanism by other means.

  16. EXTENDING THE ASSESSMENT OF TECHNOLOGY-AIDED PROGRAMS TO SUPPORT LEISURE AND COMMUNICATION IN PEOPLE WITH ACQUIRED BRAIN INJURY AND EXTENSIVE MULTIPLE DISABILITIES.

    PubMed

    Lancioni, Giulio E; Singh, Nirbhay N; O'reilly, Mark F; Sigafoos, Jeff; Buonocunto, Francesca; D'amico, Fiora; Quaranta, Sara; Navarro, Jorge; Lanzilotti, Crocifissa; Colonna, Fabio

    2015-10-01

    Intervention programs for people with acquired brain injury and extensive motor and communication impairment need to be diversified according to their characteristics and environment. These two studies assessed two technology-aided programs for supporting leisure (i.e., access to songs and videos) and communication (i.e., expressing needs and feelings and making requests) in six of those people. The three people participating in Study 1 did not possess speech but were able to understand spoken and written sentences. Their program presented leisure and communication options through written phrases appearing on the computer screen. The three people participating in Study 2 did not possess any speech and were unable to understand spoken or written language. Their program presented leisure and communication options through pictorial images. All participants relied on a simple microswitch response to enter the options and activate songs, videos, and communication messages. The data showed that the participants of both studies learned to use the program available to them and to engage in leisure and communication independently. The importance of using programs adapted to the participants and their environment was discussed. PMID:26445152

  17. Combined robotic-aided gait training and 3D gait analysis provide objective treatment and assessment of gait in children and adolescents with Acquired Hemiplegia.

    PubMed

    Molteni, Erika; Beretta, Elena; Altomonte, Daniele; Formica, Francesca; Strazzer, Sandra

    2015-08-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of a fully objective rehabilitative and assessment process of the gait abilities in children suffering from Acquired Hemiplegia (AH), we studied the combined employment of robotic-aided gait training (RAGT) and 3D-Gait Analysis (GA). A group of 12 patients with AH underwent 20 sessions of RAGT in addition to traditional manual physical therapy (PT). All the patients were evaluated before and after the training by using the Gross Motor Function Measures (GMFM), the Functional Assessment Questionnaire (FAQ), and the 6 Minutes Walk Test. They also received GA before and after RAGT+PT. Finally, results were compared with those obtained from a control group of 3 AH children who underwent PT only. After the training, the GMFM and FAQ showed significant improvement in patients receiving RAGT+PT. GA highlighted significant improvement in stance symmetry and step length of the affected limb. Moreover, pelvic tilt increased, and hip kinematics on the sagittal plane revealed statistically significant increase in the range of motion during the hip flex-extension. Our data suggest that the combined program RAGT+PT induces improvements in functional activities and gait pattern in children with AH, and it demonstrates that the combined employment of RAGT and 3D-GA ensures a fully objective rehabilitative program. PMID:26737310

  18. Conocimiento de Transmision de SIDA y Percepcion Hacia los Ninos con SIDA en el Salon de Clases de los Maestros de Educacion Especial (Knowledge of AIDS Transmission and Special Education Teachers' Attitudes towards Children with AIDS in the Classroom).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lopez de Williams, Milka

    This Spanish-language master's thesis presents a study which measured special education teachers' knowledge of AIDS (Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome) virus transmission and their attitudes toward children with AIDS in schools. Attitudes were then related to social variables such as sex, teacher's age, and knowing someone with AIDS. A survey of…

  19. AIDS-Related Factors Predictive of Suicidal Ideation of Low and High Intent among Gay and Bisexual Men.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schneider, Stephen G.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Studied Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS)-related stressors and suicidal ideation/intent among 778 gay and bisexual men (none with AIDS). Compared to those who reported no suicidal ideation over past six months, those who reported ideation (n=212) were more likely to report recent bereavement of partner, AIDS-Related Disorder (ARC)…

  20. Analysis of Antibodies to Newly Described Plasmodium falciparum Merozoite Antigens Supports MSPDBL2 as a Predicted Target of Naturally Acquired Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Osier, Faith H. A.; Salanti, Ali; Kamuyu, Gathoni; Drought, Laura; Failly, Marilyne; Martin, Christophe; Marsh, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    Prospective studies continue to identify malaria parasite genes with particular patterns of polymorphism which indicate they may be under immune selection, and the encoded proteins require investigation. Sixteen new recombinant protein reagents were designed to characterize three such polymorphic proteins expressed in Plasmodium falciparum schizonts and merozoites: MSPDBL1 (also termed MSP3.4) and MSPDBL2 (MSP3.8), which possess Duffy binding-like (DBL) domains, and SURFIN4.2, encoded by a member of the surface-associated interspersed (surf) multigene family. After testing the antigenicities of these reagents by murine immunization and parasite immunofluorescence, we analyzed naturally acquired antibody responses to the antigens in two cohorts in coastal Kenya in which the parasite was endemic (Chonyi [n = 497] and Ngerenya [n = 461]). As expected, the prevalence and levels of serum antibodies increased with age. We then investigated correlations with subsequent risk of clinical malaria among children <11 years of age during 6 months follow-up surveillance. Antibodies to the polymorphic central region of MSPDBL2 were associated with reduced risk of malaria in both cohorts, with statistical significance remaining for the 3D7 allelic type after adjustment for individuals' ages in years and antibody reactivity to whole-schizont extract (Chonyi, risk ratio, 0.51, and 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.28 to 0.93; Ngerenya, risk ratio, 0.38, and 95% CI, 0.18 to 0.82). For the MSPDBL1 Palo Alto allelic-type antigen, there was a protective association in one cohort (Ngerenya, risk ratio, 0.53, and 95% CI, 0.32 to 0.89), whereas the other antigens showed no protective associations after adjustment. These findings support the prediction that antibodies to the polymorphic region of MSPDBL2 contribute to protective immunity. PMID:23897617

  1. Acquired immune responses to the N- and C-terminal regions of Plasmodium vivax merozoite surface protein 1 in individuals exposed to malaria.

    PubMed Central

    Soares, I S; Levitus, G; Souza, J M; Del Portillo, H A; Rodrigues, M M

    1997-01-01

    In this study, we evaluated the naturally acquired immune response to Plasmodium vivax merozoite surface protein 1 (PvMSP1) in individuals with recent clinical episodes of malaria from the state of Para, Brazil. Ten recombinant proteins representing the first 682 amino acids (aa) of the N-terminal region and one representing the final 111 aa of the C-terminal region were expressed in Escherichia coli as glutathione S-transferase fusion proteins. Both of these regions have been suggested as candidates for development of a vaccine against Plasmodium sp. The total frequencies of individuals with antibodies and cellular immune responses to PvMSP1 were high (83.8 and 75%, respectively). The recombinant proteins representing the N- and C-terminal regions were recognized by 51.4 and 64.1% of sera, respectively. The frequency of responders to the C-terminal region increased according to the number of previous malaria episodes, reaching 83.3% after four episodes. Cellular immune response was measured by in vitro proliferation and gamma interferon production. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells of 75 and 47.2% of individuals proliferated in response to stimulation by the N- and C-terminal regions, respectively. Also, we found that one protein representing the N terminus and a second representing the C terminus of PvMSP1 stimulated 54.5% of individuals to secrete gamma interferon. We concluded that PvMSP1 is immunogenic to a large proportion of individuals exposed to malaria. Our results also suggested that the C-terminal region of PvMSP1 containing the two epidermal growth factor-like domains is particularly immunogenic to antibodies and T cells during natural infection in humans. PMID:9125537

  2. Training Volunteers for an AIDS Buddy Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ojanlatva, Ansa; And Others

    In 1986, the Baton Rouge Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) Task Force began to implement an individual volunteer support program to provide support services through a companion, a buddy, whose functions would be either emotional support or assistance in daily activities, or both. In order to have trained volunteers, an education program…

  3. Liability for Failure To Provide AIDS Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Michael R.

    1990-01-01

    The U.S. Constitution guarantees a right to privacy that requires deputies and jailers to avoid the unnecessary disclosure of sensitive information about a person. This privacy right especially covers Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome-related (AIDS) information, and it even protects the immediate family of persons infected with human…

  4. Which of These Teens Has AIDS?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanchez, Ellen

    This curriculum focuses on: (1) increasing adolescent students' knowledge of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) and the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV); (2) increasing students' knowledge of prevention of HIV infection; (3) developing students' skills in recognizing risk behaviors; (4) developing students' skills in responsible decision…

  5. The U.S. and AIDS Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burd, Stephen

    1994-01-01

    Despite key changes in the federal Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) research program, activists and some scientists are frustrated that not enough has been done and the actions taken have not had sufficient impact on the problem. Controversy over basic vs. clinical-trial research persists. (MSE)

  6. AIDS, Contact Notification, and Public Policy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dejowski, Edmund F.

    The concept of contact tracing and notification once used for sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) is being mentioned for Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). Some professional organizations have supported contact notification; others have opposed it. Initially, states were free to establish their own contact notification programs. More…

  7. SAFE: Stopping AIDS through Functional Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hylton, Judith

    This functional curriculum is intended to teach people with developmental disabilities or other learning problems how to prevent infection with HIV/AIDS (Human Immunodeficiency Virus/Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome). The entire curriculum includes six video segments, four illustrated brochures, 28 slides and illustrations, as well as a guide…

  8. Psychotherapy with AIDS Patients: Countertransference Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilk, Carole A.

    This paper provides a personal account of the process of psychotherapy for Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) patients, as seen from both the client's and the psychotherapist's perspective, with a focus on countertransference issues found in the early phases of treatment. Based on case material, the discussion explores themes presented by…

  9. The CDC AIDS Survey: A Psychometric Critique.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Volkan, Kevin

    The latent structure, reliability, and item discrimination of 33 items on a Centers for Disease Control (CDC) instrument representing knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs about the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) were assessed. The study sample included 311 adolescents ranging from ages 12 to 19 years. Demographic characteristics of the…

  10. Taking Care of Young Children with AIDS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federlein, Anne Cairns

    This booklet provides an overview of the Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) and guidelines for child care administrators and caregivers. It is argued that reason must overcome fear about the spread of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in early childhood centers. Discussion addresses such questions as: (1) Can child caregivers get AIDS…

  11. Optometric Education's Challenge: AIDS in the Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Roger J.

    1988-01-01

    A national survey of schools of optometry suggests that acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) needs to be more thoroughly addressed in some curricula. Suggestions are made for curriculum development in the areas of public health, basic coursework, immunology, clinical medicine, psychology, ocular manifestations, and contact lenses. (MSE)

  12. Implications of interferon-induced tryptophan catabolism in cancer, auto-immune diseases and AIDS.

    PubMed

    Brown, R R; Ozaki, Y; Datta, S P; Borden, E C; Sondel, P M; Malone, D G

    1991-01-01

    Tryptophan (Trp) is an indispensable amino acid required for biosynthesis of proteins, serotonin and niacin. Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) is induced by infections, viruses, lipopolysaccharides, or interferons (IFNs) and this results in significant catabolism of Trp along the kynurenine (Kyn) pathway. Intracellular growth of Toxoplasma gondii and Chlamydia psittaci in human fibroblasts in vitro is inhibited by IFN-gamma and this inhibition is negated by extra Trp in the medium. Similarly, growth of a number of human cell lines in vitro is inhibited by IFN-gamma and addition of extra Trp restores growth. Thus, in some in vitro systems, antiproliferative effects of IFN-gamma are mediated by induced depletion of Trp. We find that cancer patients given Type I or Type II IFNs can induce IDO which results in decreased serum Trp levels (20-50% of pretreatment) and increased urinary metabolites of the Kyn pathway (5 to 500 fold of pretreatment). We speculate that in vivo antineoplastic effects of IFNs and clinical side effects are mediated, at least in part, by a general or localized depletion of Trp. In view of reported increases of IFNs in autoimmune diseases and our earlier findings of elevated urinary Trp metabolites in autoimmune diseases, it seems likely that systemic or local depletion of Trp occurs in autoimmune diseases and may relate to degeneration, wasting and other symptoms in such diseases. We find high levels of IDO in cells isolated from synovia of arthritic joints. IFNs are also elevated in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) patients and increasing IFN levels are associated with a worsening prognosis. We propose that IDO is induced chronically by HIV infection, is further increased by opportunistic infections, and that this chronic loss of Trp initiates mechanisms responsible for the cachexia, dementia, diarrhea and possibly immunosuppression of AIDS patients. In these symptoms, AIDS resembles classical pellagra due to dietary deficiency of Trp and

  13. Immune responses during spontaneous control of HIV and AIDS: what is the hope for a cure?

    PubMed Central

    Saez-Cirion, A.; Jacquelin, B.; Barré-Sinoussi, F.; Müller-Trutwin, M.

    2014-01-01

    HIV research has made rapid progress and led to remarkable achievements in recent decades, the most important of which are combination antiretroviral therapies (cART). However, in the absence of a vaccine, the pandemic continues, and additional strategies are needed. The ‘towards an HIV cure’ initiative aims to eradicate HIV or at least bring about a lasting remission of infection during which the host can control viral replication in the absence of cART. Cases of spontaneous and treatment-induced control of infection offer substantial hope. Here, we describe the scientific knowledge that is lacking, and the priorities that have been established for research into a cure. We discuss in detail the immunological lessons that can be learned by studying natural human and animal models of protection and spontaneous control of viraemia or of disease progression. In particular, we describe the insights we have gained into the immune mechanisms of virus control, the impact of early virus–host interactions and why chronic inflammation, a hallmark of HIV infection, is an obstacle to a cure. Finally, we enumerate current interventions aimed towards improving the host immune response. PMID:24821922

  14. Gastrointestinal Manifestations of the Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Rodgers, Vance D.; Kagnoff, Martin F.

    1987-01-01

    In addition to abnormalities in systemic immune function, patients with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and the pre-AIDS syndromes have significant abnormalities in the distribution of T-cell subsets in the intestinal tract. Such immune deficits predispose such patients to opportunistic infections and tumors, many of which involve the gastrointestinal tract. For example, Candida albicans often causes stomatitis and esophagitis. Intestinal infections with parasites (Cryptosporidium, Isospora belli, Microsporidia) or bacteria (Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare) are associated with severe diarrhea and malabsorption, whereas viruses like cytomegalovirus and herpes simplex virus cause mucosal ulcerations. Clinically debilitating chronic diarrhea develops in many AIDS patients for which no clear cause can be identified. Enteric pathogens like Salmonella and Campylobacter can be associated with bacteremias. Kaposi's sarcoma and lymphoma involving the intestinal tract are now well-recognized complications of AIDS. Although AIDS is not associated with a pathognomonic liver lesion, opportunistic infections and Kaposi's sarcoma or lymphoma may involve the liver. ImagesFigure 3.Figure 4.Figure 5.Figure 6.Figure 7. PMID:3825111

  15. Evaluation of immune markers in asymptomatic AIDS patients receiving fish oil supplementation.

    PubMed

    Virgili, N; Farriol, M; Castellanos, J M; Giró, M; Podzamczer, D; A M, P

    1997-10-01

    The effects of oral fish oil (FO) supplementation (8 g/day, capsules) on nutritional status and selected immune markers (CD4/CD8 ratio, IL-1beta, erythrocyte MDA release, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate [DHEA-S]) were studied in a homogeneous group of asymptomatic HIV-infected patients during 6 weeks. All subjects were classified clinically as A2 according to the CDC revised criteria (mean CD4 count 290 +/-123 cells/mm(3)) and were receiving zidovudine retroviral treatment. The calculated mean energy intake was 3437 +/- 372 Kcal/d, composed of 14% protein, 38% lipids and 48% carbohydrates, and was not modified during the study. The anthropometric parameters, and hematological and plasma biochemistry data showed non-significant changes after FO supplementation. Mean malonyldialdehyde (MDA) release before treatment was: unstimulated 71.5 +/- 37 and stimulated 350.9 +/- 79.8 nmol/g Hb. After FO supplementation (T(6)) MDA release showed unstimulated values of 96.1 +/- 62, and a significant increase after stimulation of 614.1 106.4 nmol/g Hb, which was, however, within the normal range. In the patient's samples, IL-1beta levels in the unstimulated blood culture showed a statistical increase with respect to the normal range before (T(0)) and after (T(6)) FO supplementation with a slight decrease after (mean 49.8 vs 40.9 pg/ml). The stimulated IL-1beta levels after treatment showed a statistically significant decrease that was maintained within the normal range (T(0): 797.7 vs T(6): 535.6 pg/ml). Taken collectively, these results suggest a tendency toward improvement in immune function. PMID:16844605

  16. Health care and AIDS.

    PubMed

    Peck, J; Bezold, C

    1992-07-01

    The acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) is a harbinger for change in health care. There are many powerful forces poised to transform the industrialized health care structure of the twentieth century, and AIDS may act as either a catalyst or an amplifier for these forces. AIDS could, for example, swamp local resources and thereby help trigger national reform in a health care system that has already lost public confidence. AIDS can also hasten the paradigm shift that is occurring throughout health care. Many of the choices society will confront when dealing with AIDS carry implications beyond health care. Information about who has the disease, for example, already pits traditional individual rights against group interests. Future information systems could make discrimination based upon medical records a nightmare for a growing number of individuals. Yet these systems also offer the hope of accelerated progress against not only AIDS but other major health threats as well. The policy choices that will define society's response to AIDS can best be made in the context of a clearly articulated vision of a society that reflects our deepest values. PMID:10119289

  17. Medawar's legacy to cellular immunology and clinical transplantation: a commentary on Billingham, Brent and Medawar (1956) 'Quantitative studies on tissue transplantation immunity. III. Actively acquired tolerance'.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Elizabeth

    2015-04-19

    'Quantitative studies on tissue transplantation immunity. III. Actively acquired tolerance', published in Philosophical Transactions B in 1956 by Peter Medawar and his colleagues, PhD graduate Leslie Brent and postdoctoral fellow Rupert Billingham, is a full description of the concept of acquired transplantation tolerance. Their 1953 Nature paper (Billingham RE et al. 1953 Nature 172, 603-606. (doi:10.1038/172603a0)) had provided initial evidence with experimental results from a small number of neonatal mice, with mention of similar findings in chicks. The Philosophical Transactions B 1956 paper is clothed with an astonishing amount of further experimental detail. It is written in Peter Medawar's landmark style: witty, perceptive and full of images that can be recalled even when details of the supporting information have faded. Those images are provided not just by a series of 20 colour plates showing skin graft recipient mice, rats, rabbits, chickens and duck, bearing fur or plumage of donor origin, but by his choice of metaphor, simile and analogy to express the questions being addressed and the interpretation of their results, along with those of relevant published data and his prescient ideas of what the results might portend. This work influenced both immunology researchers and clinicians and helped to lay the foundations for successful transplantation programmes. It led to the award of a Nobel prize in 1960 to Medawar, and subsequently to several scientists who advanced these areas. This commentary was written to celebrate the 350th anniversary of the journal Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society. PMID:25750245

  18. Medawar's legacy to cellular immunology and clinical transplantation: a commentary on Billingham, Brent and Medawar (1956) ‘Quantitative studies on tissue transplantation immunity. III. Actively acquired tolerance’

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    ‘Quantitative studies on tissue transplantation immunity. III. Actively acquired tolerance’, published in Philosophical Transactions B in 1956 by Peter Medawar and his colleagues, PhD graduate Leslie Brent and postdoctoral fellow Rupert Billingham, is a full description of the concept of acquired transplantation tolerance. Their 1953 Nature paper (Billingham RE et al. 1953 Nature 172, 603–606. (doi:10.1038/172603a0)) had provided initial evidence with experimental results from a small number of neonatal mice, with mention of similar findings in chicks. The Philosophical Transactions B 1956 paper is clothed with an astonishing amount of further experimental detail. It is written in Peter Medawar's landmark style: witty, perceptive and full of images that can be recalled even when details of the supporting information have faded. Those images are provided not just by a series of 20 colour plates showing skin graft recipient mice, rats, rabbits, chickens and duck, bearing fur or plumage of donor origin, but by his choice of metaphor, simile and analogy to express the questions being addressed and the interpretation of their results, along with those of relevant published data and his prescient ideas of what the results might portend. This work influenced both immunology researchers and clinicians and helped to lay the foundations for successful transplantation programmes. It led to the award of a Nobel prize in 1960 to Medawar, and subsequently to several scientists who advanced these areas. This commentary was written to celebrate the 350th anniversary of the journal Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society. PMID:25750245

  19. At the Intersection of HIV/AIDS and Cancer: A Qualitative Needs Assessment of Community-Based HIV/AIDS Service Organizations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burkhalter, Jack E.; Cahill, Sean; Shuk, Elyse; Guidry, John; Corner, Geoffrey; Berk, Alexandra; Candelario, Norman; Kornegay, Mark; Lubetkin, Erica I.

    2013-01-01

    Due to advances in treatment, persons living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) or acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) are living longer, but with aging, immune deficits, and lifestyle factors, they are at increased risk for cancer. This challenges community-based AIDS service organizations (ASOs) to address the growing cancer needs of…

  20. Designing and Implementing an Educational Program on AIDS for Minority Childbearing Women To Enhance AIDS Awareness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nimphius, Gail M.

    Ignorance, misinformation, and a failure to personalize the risk for acquisition of the Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) virus has created a situation in which the incidence of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) seroprevalence among minority childbearing women in a Florida county is increasing. An increased incidence in this population…

  1. School Health Education To Prevent AIDS and Sexually Transmitted Diseases. WHO AIDS Series 10.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    World Health Organization, Geneva (Switzerland).

    This guide provides a framework within which education authorities can work with teachers, parents, and community leaders to help young people learn the facts about Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) and Sexually Transmitted Diseases (STDs). It emphasizes the importance of education about human behavior and sexuality that is appropriate to…

  2. Late onset of cryptococcal cervical lymphadenitis following immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome in a patient with AIDS.

    PubMed

    Sethupathi, Meenakshi; Yoganathan, Kathir

    2015-01-01

    A 32-year-old woman was diagnosed HIV positive with disseminated cryptococcal infection in May 2006. Her initial CD4 was 7 cells/µL and she had a right supraclavicular nodal mass, which was biopsied and shown to be consistent with cryptococcal lymphadenitis. She was treated for disseminated cryptococcal infection and was started on antiretroviral medications subsequently. Two years later, she developed a left supraclavicular mass. Her CD4 count was 320 cells/µL and HIV RNA level was undetectable. Investigations and biopsy results were consistent with a late presentation of cryptococcal immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS). She was treated with oral corticosteroids and her symptoms resolved completely. IRIS is a recognised complication of HIV treatment and occurs in a significant percentage of patients within the first 3 months of starting antiretroviral therapy. This case report illustrates the importance of recognising late presentations of IRIS. It is vital to differentiate true cryptococcal lymphadenitis from IRIS-induced cryptococcal lymphadenitis. PMID:25564633

  3. Immunizations.

    PubMed

    Sanford, Christopher A; Jong, Elaine C

    2016-03-01

    Vaccinations are a cornerstone of the pretravel consultation. The pretravel provider should assess a traveler's past medical history, planned itinerary, activities, mode of travel, and duration of stay and make appropriate vaccine recommendations. Given that domestic vaccine-preventable illnesses are more common in international travelers than are exotic or low-income nation-associated vaccine-preventable illnesses, clinicians should first ensure that travelers are current regarding routine immunizations. Additional immunizations may be indicated in some travelers. Familiarity with geographic distribution and seasonality of infectious diseases is essential. Clinicians should be cognizant of which vaccines are live, as there exist contraindications for live vaccines. PMID:26900111

  4. Bacillus cereus AR156 activates PAMP-triggered immunity and induces a systemic acquired resistance through a NPR1-and SA-dependent signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Niu, Dongdong; Wang, Xiujuan; Wang, Yanru; Song, Xiaoou; Wang, Jiansheng; Guo, Jianhua; Zhao, Hongwei

    2016-01-01

    Induced resistance responses play a potent role in plant defense system against pathogen attack. Bacillus cereus AR156 is a plant growth promoting rhizobacterium (PGPR) that installs induced systemic resistance (ISR) to Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst) in Arabidopsis. Here, we show that AR156 leaf infiltration enhances disease resistance in Arabidopsis through the activation of a systemic acquired resistance (SAR). PR1 protein expression and reactive oxygen species (ROS) burst are strongly induced in plants treated with AR156 and inoculated with Pst than that in plants inoculated with Pst only. Moreover, AR156 can trigger SAR in jar1 or ein2 mutants, but not in the NahG transgenic and NPR1 mutant plants. Our results indicate that AR156-induced SAR depends on SA-signaling pathway and NPR1, but not JA and ET. Also, AR156-treated plants are able to rapidly activate MAPK signaling and FRK1 gene expression, which are involved in pathogen associated molecular pattern (PAMP)-triggered immunity (PTI). Altogether, our results indicate that AR156 can induce SAR by the SA-signaling pathways in an NPR1-dependent manner and involves multiple PTI components. PMID:26616055

  5. Naturally acquired immune responses to malaria vaccine candidate antigens MSP3 and GLURP in Guahibo and Piaroa indigenous communities of the Venezuelan Amazon

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Malaria transmission in most of Latin America can be considered as controlled. In such a scenario, parameters of baseline immunity to malaria antigens are of specific interest with respect to future malaria eradication efforts. Methods A cross-sectional study was carried out in two indigenous population groups in Amazonas/Venezuela. Data from the regional malaria documentation system were extracted and participants from the ethnic groups of the Guahibo (n = 180) and Piaroa (n = 295) were investigated for the presence of Plasmodium parasites and naturally acquired antibodies to Plasmodium falciparum antigens in serum. The GMZ2 vaccine candidate proteins MSP3 and GLURP were chosen as serological markers. Results The incidence of P. falciparum in both communities was found to be less than 2%, and none of the participants harboured P. falciparum at the time of the cross-sectional. Nearly a quarter of the participants (111/475; 23,4%) had positive antibody titres to at least one of the antigens. 53/475 participants (11.2%) were positive for MSP3, and 93/475 participants (19.6%) were positive for GLURP. High positive responses were detected in 36/475 participants (7.6%) and 61/475 participants (12.8%) for MSP3 and GLURP, respectively. Guahibo participants had significantly higher antibody titres than Piaroa participants. Conclusions Considering the low incidence of P. falciparum, submicroscopical infections may explain the comparatively high anti-P. falciparum antibody concentrations. PMID:22335967

  6. Negative labeling and social exclusion of people living with human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immune deficiency syndrome in the antiretroviral therapy era: insight from attitudes and behavioral intentions of female heads of households in Zambézia Province, Mozambique.

    PubMed

    Mukolo, Abraham; Blevins, Meridith; Hinton, Nicole; Victor, Bart; Vaz, Lara M E; Sidat, Mohsin; Vergara, Alfredo E

    2014-01-01

    In the age of antiretroviral therapy (ART), unraveling specific aspects of stigma that impede uptake and adherence to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) services and the complex intersections among them might enhance the efficacy of stigma-reduction interventions targeted at the general public. Few studies have described community stigma in high HIV prevalence regions of Mozambique where program scale-up has been concentrated, but fear of stigma persists as a barrier to HIV service uptake. Principal components analysis of attitudinal data from 3749 female heads of households surveyed in Zambézia Province was used to examine patterns of agreement with stigmatizing attitudes and behavior toward people living with HIV. Inferences were based on comparison of factor loadings and commonality estimates. Construct validity was established through correlations with levels of knowledge about HIV transmission and consistency with the labeling theory of stigma. Two unique domains of community stigma were observed: negative labeling and devaluation (NLD, α = 0.74) and social exclusion (SoE, α = 0.73). NLD is primarily an attitudinal construct, while SoE captures behavioral intent. About one-third of the respondents scored in the upper tertile of the NLD stigma scale (scale: 0-100 stigma points) and the equivalent was 41.3% in the SoE stigma scale. Consistent with literature, NLD and SoE stigma scores were inversely correlated with HIV transmission route knowledge. In item level analysis, fear of being labeled a prostitute/immoral and of negative family affect defined the nature of stigma in this sample. Thus, despite ART scale-up and community education about HIV/acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS), NLD and SoE characterized the community stigma of HIV in this setting. Follow-up studies could compare the impact of these stigma domains on HIV services uptake, in order to inform domain-focused stigma-reduction interventions. PMID:24274172

  7. Immunization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guerin, Nicole; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Contents of this double journal issue concern immunization and primary health care of children. The issue decribes vaccine storage and sterilization techniques, giving particular emphasis to the role of the cold chain, i.e., the maintenance of a specific temperature range to assure potency of vaccines as they are moved from a national storage…

  8. Vitamin D supplementation and antibacterial immune responses in adolescents and young adults with HIV/AIDS.

    PubMed

    Chun, Rene F; Liu, Nancy Q; Lee, T; Schall, Joan I; Denburg, Michelle R; Rutstein, Richard M; Adams, John S; Zemel, Babette S; Stallings, Virginia A; Hewison, Martin

    2015-04-01

    Human monocytes activated by toll-like receptor 2/1 ligand (TLR2/1L) show enhanced expression of the vitamin D receptor (VDR) and the vitamin D-activating enzyme 1α-hydroxylase (CYP27B1). The resulting intracrine conversion of precursor 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 (25OHD) to active 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25(OH)2D) can stimulate expression of antibacterial cathelicidin (CAMP). To determine whether this response is functional in HIV-infected subjects (HIV+ ), serum from HIV+ subjects pre- and post-vitamin D supplementation was utilized in monocyte cultures with or without TLR2/1L. Expression of CYP27B1 and VDR was enhanced following treatment with TLR2/1L, although this effect was lower in HIV+ vs HIV- serum (p<0.05). CAMP was also lower in TLR2/1L-treated monocytes cultured in HIV+ serum (p<0.01). In a dose study, supplementation of HIV+ subjects with 4000IU or 7000IU vitamin D/day increased serum 25OHD from 17.3±8.0 and 20.6±6.2ng/ml (43nM and 51nM) at baseline to 41.1±12.0 and 51.9±23.1ng/ml (103nM and 130nM) after 12 weeks (both p<0.001). Greater percent change from baseline 25OHD was significantly associated with enhanced TLR2/1L-induced monocyte CAMP adjusted for baseline expression (p=0.009). In a randomized placebo-controlled trial, 7000IU vitamin D/day increased serum 25OHD from 18.0±8.6 to 32.7±13.8ng/ml (45nM and 82nM) after 12 weeks. Expression of CAMP increased significantly from baseline after 52 weeks of vitamin D-supplementation. At this time point, TLR2/1L-induced CAMP was positively associated with percent change from baseline in 25OHD (p=0.029 overall and 0.002 within vitamin D-supplemented only). These data indicate that vitamin D supplementation in HIV-infected subjects can promote improved antibacterial immunity, but also suggest that longer periods of supplementation are required to achieve this. PMID:25092518

  9. Female Secondary School Adolescents' Sexual Behavior and School Based HIV/AIDS Education Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Inyang, Mfrekemfon P.

    2013-01-01

    Most adolescents engage in indiscriminate sexual experimentations. This practice exposes them to the risk of contracting sexually transmitted infections including HIV/AIDS. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and acquired immune deficiency syndromes (AIDS) are among the deadly diseases that exist globally. Twice as many girls, compared to boys…

  10. The Facts about AIDS. A Special NEA "Higher Education Advocate" Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wechsler, Harold, Ed.

    1987-01-01

    Information about Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) is presented to alert National Education Association educators to behaviors that place people at risk for AIDS. The material was prepared by the Public Health Service. Topics include: sexual transmission, transmission from injected blood, transmission during pregnancy, groups at greatest…

  11. Teaching Collegiate AIDS Prevention Programs: A State-wide Training Workshop.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fennell, Reginald; Kerr, Dianne L.

    Teaching Collegiate AIDS (Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome) Prevention Programs (TCAPP) is a 3-day education workshop which educates and trains student development professionals, college faculty, other university personnel, and students on how to provide HIV (Human Immunodeficiency Virus)/AIDS education. The workshop, held annually since 1988,…

  12. Older Americans and AIDS: Transmission Risks and Primary Prevention Research Needs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Catania, Joseph A.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Growing number of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) cases among older Americans is of increasing concern. In context of primary prevention, reviews findings that bear on modes of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) transmission (blood transfusions, sexual) among older individuals and knowledge of magnitude of the AIDS problem represented…

  13. Assessing Employee Attitudes in a Community-Based AIDS Service Organization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liou, Kuotsai Tom; Cruise, Peter L.

    1994-01-01

    Thirty-one employees of the Comprehensive Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) Program of Palm Beach County (Florida) were surveyed to explore their motives and attitudes toward their jobs, clients, and the organization. Implications for management of AIDS service organizations and program quality are discussed. (SLD)

  14. AIDS and Child Care: A Booklet for Child Care Workers, Management Committees and Parents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fricke, Caroline; Glasson, Mark

    This booklet provides Australians with basic information about the Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). Contents cover the definiton of AIDS, ways the disease is transmitted, Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) antibody testing for adults and children, variations among children infected with HIV, information that HIV is not transmitted…

  15. Predictors of Intention To Take Precautions against AIDS among Black College Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tashakkori, Abbas; Thompson, Vaida D.

    This research explored the effects of a number of factors derived from extant intention-behavior models on a general behavioral intention to engage in protection against Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) and a specific behavioral intention to use condoms as protection in vaginal sex. Data pertaining to beliefs, knowledge about AIDS, fear…

  16. Sound Policies and Expert Advice Are Your Best Protection against AIDS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCormick, Kathleen

    1986-01-01

    A panel of AIDS (Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome) experts at a recent conference sponsored by the National School Boards Association provided useful advice and information to school officials on medical, legal, and policy-related issues raised by the AIDS epidemic. Highlights of the conference are discussed. (TE)

  17. Toward an Understanding of (EM)Power(Ment) for HIV/AIDS Prevention with Adolescent Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gutierrez, Lorraine; Oh, Hyun Joo; Gillmore, Mary Rogers

    Preventing the spread of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) among women is a national priority. In the United States, AIDS is the sixth leading cause of death among young adult women, and their rate of infection is four times higher than men. This article was developed to help stimulate interest in the power dynamics of relationships and…

  18. Lazarus and Group Psychotherapy: AIDS in the Era of Protease Inhibitors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gushue, George V.; Brazaitis, Sarah J.

    2003-01-01

    A new class of medications, protease inhibitors, has dramatically improved the health of many people with Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) and Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). This development has had a major impact on the lives of those affected by HIV/AIDS. This article considers how a group is affected by the larger systems of…

  19. AIDS in South Africa: Therapeutic Interventions to Strengthen Resilience among Orphans and Vulnerable Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heath, Melissa Allen; Donald, David R.; Theron, Linda C.; Lyon, Rachel Crook

    2014-01-01

    Worldwide, approximately 10% of the 34.2 million individuals infected by human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immune deficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) are under the age of 18. Additionally, 17.8 million children have experienced one or both parents dying of HIV/AIDS. In comparison to other countries, South Africa has the highest per capita of…

  20. Getting the Word Out: A Practical Guide to AIDS Materials Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matiella, Ana Consuelo, Ed.

    This book provides health professionals with a "how to" approach to developing culturally sensitive and effective Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) education materials. It is a collection of chapters written by community AIDS educators who have specialized knowledge and skill in developing educational materials in multi-ethnic…

  1. Safe Sex and Dangerous Poems: AIDS, Literature and the Gay and Lesbian Community College Student.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engler, Robert Klein

    Some of the denial and fear that accompanies homosexuality and the Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) can be dealt with by discussing the following three issues: the AIDS epidemic, the problems of gay and lesbian community college students, and finally, the teaching of literature--especially poetry. Exploring both poetry and the AIDS…

  2. AIDS in Correctional Facilities: Issues and Options. Issues and Practices in Criminal Justice. Third Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammett, Theodore M.

    This document, written for officials involved in making and implementing decisions regarding the correctional response to Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS), provides the most current figures and trend data on the incidence of AIDS among incarcerated offenders. The stated purpose of this document is to be informational rather than…

  3. AIDS in the World of Work: When Information Is Not Enough.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buhrer, Michel

    2000-01-01

    Acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) is a critical problem in Africa, where 80 percent of AIDS-related deaths attack the 20- to 49-year age group. Uganda has developed a strategy to fight the epidemic, including unions' work in fighting the virus and the discrimination affecting those with the disease. (JOW)

  4. Sexually Transmitted Diseases and Young Adults. and Update on AIDS for Teachers and Policy Makers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yarber, William L.; Newschwander, Gregg E.

    1987-01-01

    Consists of two articles on the topics of (1) sexually transmitted diseases and (2) acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). Yarber discusses how these topics should be taught to young people, with emphasis on health education as opposed to morality. Newschwander states the facts related to AIDS, including risks of enrolling infected students.…

  5. Experiential Service-Based Learning: An Integrated HIV/AIDS Education Model for College Campuses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, Judith R.; Schwartz, Lisa B.

    1993-01-01

    Reports on a approach to teaching the sociology of acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) by combining coursework with weekly volunteer work in an AIDS agency. Concludes with a discussion of the benefits of experiential learning and five guidelines for establishing similar community service programs. (CFR)

  6. AIDS: The Global Impact. Academy for Educational Development 25th Anniversary Seminar Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mann, Jonathan

    This paper describes why acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) is a global health problem and discusses special features of the virus and its infection. This disease's transmission and interaction with other diseases, along with 1986 statistics concerning AIDS, are presented in terms of selected continents and countries. The World Health…

  7. College Students' Knowledge about AIDS and Reported Changes in Sexual Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walters, Andrew S.

    1992-01-01

    Examined extent to which college students (n=180) change their sexual behavior in response to understanding of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). Results suggest students have an understanding of AIDS. For this sample, some high-risk behaviors did decrease, presumably as a result of this knowledge, but there was much behavior that still…

  8. Experiencing an Epidemic: The Development of an AIDS Education Program for Community College Students in Maryland.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rochlin, Joyce T.

    In 1991, a project was undertaken to suggest components for an Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) education program for community college students. The project sought to identify AIDS programs and policies in place at the 17 community colleges in Maryland; assessed community college students' knowledge about the spread and prevention of…

  9. Teens for AIDS Prevention. Washington, D.C. Demonstration Project: Program Summary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Population Options, Washington, DC.

    The nation's attention must be focused on the growing risk to its teenagers of contracting AIDS (Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome). As part of this effort, the Center for Population Options (CPO) organized a teen AIDS prevention project in Washington, D.C., based on information obtained from four focus groups comprised of 8-12 teens each. The…

  10. Extenuating Circumstances in Perceptions of Suicide: Disease Diagnosis (AIDS, Cancer), Pain Level, and Life Expectancy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Stephen K.; Range, Lillian M.

    1991-01-01

    Examined whether illness type, pain level, and life expectancy affected reactions of undergraduates (n=160) toward a terminal illness suicide with Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) or cancer. AIDS patients were more stigmatized than cancer patients; suicide was more tolerated if victim was suffering greater pain. (Author/ABL)

  11. The Evaluation of Educational Help in Aids Prevention among Youth for Educators Working Outside the School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaudreau, Louise; And Others

    Training of professionals as educators in the Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) and sex education domains has been seen as part of the solution to slow down the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) transmission and eventually stop it. This study evaluated an educational guide for AIDS prevention which was distributed to youth workers…

  12. Family Structure and Functions Identified by Persons Living with HIV/AIDS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong-Wylie, Gina; Doherty-Poirier, Maryanne; Kieren, Dianne

    1999-01-01

    A study looked at the structural and functional aspects of family from the perspective of six people living with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) or human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Results showing how HIV/AIDS affects all members of the sufferer's family have implications for family practitioners. (Author/JOW)

  13. Social Constructs and Disease: Implications for a Controlled Vocabulary for HIV/AIDS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huber, Jeffrey T.; Gillaspy, Mary L.

    1998-01-01

    The body of knowledge associated with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) represents complexity not present in any other disease. A controlled vocabulary and classification structure used to organize the body of knowledge associated with HIV/AIDS is discussed. (Author/AEF)

  14. The Incorporation of HIV/AIDS Into Identity Over Time: Transformational Tales Continued.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baumgartner, Lisa M.

    The incorporation of human immune deficiency virus/acquired immune deficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) into identity over time was examined by collecting data from the same 11 HIV-positive individuals at 3 points in time (in 1995, early 1998, and late 1999). By the time of their semi-structured interviews in late 1999, the seven men and four women…

  15. HIV-associated chronic immune activation

    PubMed Central

    Paiardini, Mirko; Müller-Trutwin, Michaela

    2013-01-01

    Summary Systemic chronic immune activation is considered today as the driving force of CD4+ T-cell depletion and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). A residual chronic immune activation persists even in HIV-infected patients in which viral replication is successfully inhibited by antiretroviral therapy, with the extent of this residual immune activation being associated with CD4+ T-cell loss. Unfortunately, the causal link between chronic immune activation and CD4+ T-cell loss has not been formally established. This article provides first a brief historical overview on how the perception of the causative role of immune activation has changed over the years and lists the different kinds of immune activation that have been observed to be characteristic for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. The mechanisms proposed to explain the chronic immune activation are multiple and are enumerated here, as well as the mechanisms proposed on how chronic immune activation could lead to AIDS. In addition, we summarize the lessons learned from natural hosts that know how to ‘show AIDS the door’, and discuss how these studies informed the design of novel immune modulatory interventions that are currently being tested. Finally, we review the current approaches aimed at targeting chronic immune activation and evoke future perspectives. PMID:23772616

  16. Chronic immune thrombocytopenic purpura in hemophilia A.

    PubMed Central

    Reen, B. S.; Card, R. T.; McSheffrey, J. B.; Skinnider, L. F.

    1983-01-01

    Chronic immune thrombocytopenic purpura resistant to steroid therapy occurred in a 30-year-old patient with severe hemophilia A. This association has recently been reported in other patients, and a possible relation to the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) has been suggested. Although this patient had been treated with factor VIII concentrate for 4 years, the proportions of helper and suppressor T cells were normal, and there was no evidence of AIDS. An uncomplicated splenectomy gave excellent results. All patients with hemophilia should have their platelet counts monitored closely and should report any unusual pattern of bleeding. PMID:6686949

  17. Autoimmunity and dysmetabolism of human acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yan-Mei; Hong, Xue-Zhi; Xu, Jia-Hua; Luo, Jiang-Xi; Mo, Han-You; Zhao, Hai-Lu

    2016-06-01

    Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) remains ill-defined by lists of symptoms, infections, tumors, and disorders in metabolism and immunity. Low CD4 cell count, severe loss of body weight, pneumocystis pneumonia, and Kaposi's sarcoma are the major disease indicators. Lines of evidence indicate that patients living with AIDS have both immunodeficiency and autoimmunity. Immunodeficiency is attributed to deficits in the skin- and mucosa-defined innate immunity, CD4 T cells and regulatory T cells, presumably relating human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. The autoimmunity in AIDS is evident by: (1) overproduction of autoantibodies, (2) impaired response of CD4 cells and CD8 cells, (3) failure of clinical trials of HIV vaccines, and (4) therapeutic benefits of immunosuppression following solid organ transplantation and bone marrow transplantation in patients at risk of AIDS. Autoantibodies are generated in response to antigens such as debris and molecules de novo released from dead cells, infectious agents, and catabolic events. Disturbances in metabolic homeostasis occur at the interface of immunodeficiency and autoimmunity in the development of AIDS. Optimal treatments favor therapeutics targeting on the regulation of metabolism to restore immune homeostasis. PMID:26676359

  18. Psychological Interventions with AIDS and HIV: Prevention and Treatment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Jeffrey A.; Murphy, Debra A.

    1992-01-01

    Notes that research to date has yielded important findings for primary prevention efforts for Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) and has identified psychological dimensions relevant to mental health interventions for persons with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Sees pressing need for more systematic intervention outcome research in…

  19. Seasons: The National Native American AIDS Prevention Center Quarterly. 1993.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rush, Andrea Green, Ed.

    1993-01-01

    The three 1993 issues of "Seasons" (the Spring/Summer issues are combined) address various aspects of dealing with Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) and Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) among Native Americans. The Winter issue focuses on tuberculosis (TB) and its incidence and treatment among HIV-positive individuals. "Remembering…

  20. Are Victims of AIDS 'Handicapped' under Federal Law?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flygare, Thomas J.

    1986-01-01

    Discusses whether the disease AIDS (Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome) could be considered a "handicap." Describes a recent court decision, "Arline vs. School Board of Nassau County," in which the court found that a teacher with tuberculosis could be defined as handicapped and that her dismissal was in violation of Section 504 of the…

  1. AIDS Education: Does It Change Attitudes toward Gay Men?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slusher, Morgan P.; Anderson, Craig A.

    Two studies were conducted to examine how attitudes toward homosexual men might affect reactions to Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) education efforts, or how those attitudes might be changed by those efforts. The first study involved 69 male and 75 female subjects, randomly assigned to four conditions receiving different information…

  2. Planning, Implementation, and Evaluation of AIDS Education Programs for Dentists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerbert, Barbara; And Others

    1991-01-01

    An office-based continuing education program on acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) for dentists is described, including needs assessment, model development, local piloting, national implementation with 119 dentists, and evaluation phases. Program evaluation indicated an improvement in risk perception, knowledge, and practice resulted, but…

  3. Future Directions: HIV/AIDS Education in the Nation's Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sex Information and Education Council of the United States, Inc., New York, NY.

    While states have developed the infrastructure to support effective education programs on Human Immunodeficiency Virus/Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (HIV/AIDS), inadequacies exist in the content of curricula, guidelines, and program design. Many state programs fail to provide children with all the information they need in order to avoid and…

  4. Medical Students' Perceptions and Proposed Treatment Strategies for AIDS Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ladany, Nicholas; Stern, Marilyn

    Research has consistently found that health care providers report having negative attitudes and perceptions toward Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) patients. This study was conducted to examine the independent and joint influences of a patient's mode of acquisition of illness (blood transfusion versus sexual promiscuity), patient blame…

  5. The Creative Use of Psychotherapy with Terminally Ill with AIDS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fraenkel, William A.

    One clinical psychologist worked with terminally ill, end-stage Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) patients in a hospice type setting for an 18-month time period. Interventions included individual psychotherapy, mental status assessments, staff group sessions, and supportive services for families and significant others. During that time,…

  6. Victims of AIDS: Family, Society, Cost and Outlook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peyton, Doris F.

    Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) has become an increasing problem throughout the nation. Experts predict that there will have been 270,000 cases, including 179,000 deaths, by 1991. The disease has devastating psychosocial as well as physical effects. Neither preventive medicine nor a cure is anywhere in sight. Everyone needs to be…

  7. Epidemiology of HIV Infection and AIDS in the United States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curran, James W.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Reports that by the end of 1987, nearly 50,000 cases of acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) had been reported in the United States since 1981, with 20,745 in 1987 alone. Discusses the disordinate proportion of cases involving black and Hispanic adults and children. (TW)

  8. AIDS: An Inter-Disciplinary Secondary Curriculum Supplement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carr, Marianne

    This curriculum guide to teaching secondary students about Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) using an interdisciplinary approach includes lessons that are meant to supplement the existing curriculum, but may be used to supplant existing lessons. Most of the lessons employ the investigative approach to learning and require student…

  9. AIDS on Campus: Emerging Issues for College and University Administrators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steinbach, Sheldon Elliot

    Legal information concerning Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) that college presidents may find helpful in establishing policies and procedures is provided in a paper by the general counsel of the American Council on Education. Sources of medical information, including the American College Health Association, hotlines, and federal…

  10. AIDS Resource Directory and Repertoire de ressources sur le SIDA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of National Health and Welfare, Ottawa (Ontario).

    This set of documents presents directories of resources on the topic of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) available in Canada in English and in French. The first section in each directory contains a list of names, addresses, and telephone numbers of organizations from which readers may obtain the listed resources. Resources are then…

  11. Teaching about AIDS/HIV Disease to College Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heller, Joseph R.

    This paper presents a psychology professor's account of his experiences teaching a course on Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome/Human Immunodeficiency Virus (AIDS/HIV) to college students. The first section discusses how to introduce and market the course on campus, and anticipate students' and colleagues' questions about one's motivations for…

  12. Facilitating Support Groups for Professionals Working with People with AIDS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grossman, Arnold H.; Silverstein, Charles

    1993-01-01

    Describes support groups for health care professionals who work with people with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) or Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) and who are experiencing burnout from excessive demands on their energy, strength, and resources. Discusses group administration, effective intervention techniques, and issues of health…

  13. The Impact of AIDS on Recruitment in the Health Professions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buccelli, Pamela B.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    A survey of 914 Philadelphia high school students (77 percent response) concerned their knowledge and attitudes toward acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) and the health professions. Results showed that most respondents had a good basic understanding of the transmission of the virus but they did not know or understand the health…

  14. Campuses Confront AIDS: Tapping the Vitality of Caring and Community.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keeling, Richard P.

    1993-01-01

    In response to needs created by the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) epidemic, colleges and universities have struggled to develop or redesign policies and services to promote behavioral change. Effective institutional response requires comprehensive policy, services and referral, and education and prevention focusing on identity and…

  15. Guidelines on AIDS in Europe. First Revised Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zoffmann, H.; And Others

    The problem of acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) in Europe and public health measures that can be taken to reduce the spread of infection are discussed. These guidelines cover: the magnitude of the problem in Europe, the virus and its mode of transmission, major clinical features of the disease, laboratory tests, possibilities of…

  16. Gambling with Your Health: Predictors of Risk for AIDS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lasorsa, Dominic L.; Shoemaker, Pamela J.

    To examine risk for Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) in terms of risk-related behaviors, and to investigate the factors that may be involved in putting one at risk, a study conducted telephone interviews with 493 randomly selected adults (18 years or older) in Austin, Texas in the fall of 1987. Respondents answered approximately 40…

  17. Confronting AIDS. Directions for Public Health, Health Care, and Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Institute of Medicine (NAS), Washington, DC.

    This book is addressed to anyone involved with or affected by the Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) epidemic, including legislators, researchers, health care personnel, insurance providers, educators, health officials, executives in the pharmaceutical industry, blood bank administrators, and other concerned individuals. The following…

  18. Political Reflections on AIDS and Developmental Disabilities: Conference Keynote Address.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westmorland, Timothy M.

    1989-01-01

    The keynote address of a November, 1988, symposium on developmental disabilities and the HIV (Human Immunodeficiency Virus) examines four basic areas of AIDS (Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome) concern in Congress: research, education, testing and discrimination protection, and health care services. (DB)

  19. Criteria for Evaluating an AIDS Curriculum. Third Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Coalition of Advocates for Students, Boston, MA.

    This booklet presents a set of criteria that can be used to evaluate and compare curricula for the teaching of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) and Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV). The criteria are arranged in a checklist covering curriculum content and curriculum development/implementation. The booklet discusses developmental…

  20. Drug Use and AIDS Risk in a Soup Kitchen Population.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schilling, Robert F.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Interviewed 148 drug users in urban soup kitchen. Focused on subjects' risk-taking and risk-reduction behavior related to injection drug use, perceived changes in risk behavior, perceived risk for contracting Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS), and socioeconomic and attitudinal correlates of injecting and sharing needles. Findings…

  1. AIDS: New Challenge to the Counseling Psychologist in Private Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fradkin, Howard R.

    Counseling psychologists, especially those who work with homosexual men, may find that Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) is a major focus of their work. Therapists must be comfortable talking explicitly with these clients about sex, and must be able to help clients talk explicitly about their behavior. Clients often feel ambivalent about…

  2. AIDS: Lay Perceptions of a Group of Gay Men.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schurink, Evanthe; Schurink, W. J.

    A research design was devised that allowed for the employment of a combination of qualitative and quantitative methods in the collection of data on a group of homosexual men's lay perceptions of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS), and those social processes at work in coping with the threat of this terminal disease. The research was…

  3. Searching for Objectivity and Prejudice in Writing about AIDS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luboff, Gerald F.

    Three writing assignments not only gave students the opportunity to practice various rhetorical approaches in the assignments, but also provided students a learning opportunity and a chance to explore their own attitudes towards the problems and issues raised by the Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) crisis. The first assignment involved…

  4. Indiana AIDS Prevention Plan, 1986. Version 1.0.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Indiana State Board of Health, Indianapolis.

    The Indiana statewide Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) prevention plan focuses on community education efforts targeted for specific high risk groups as well as health care and other professionals. Plans are summarized for dissemination of information to the following groups: risk groups, physicians, dental health, nursing, ancillary…

  5. AIDS Epidemic. Hearing before the Committee on Labor and Human Resources. United States Senate, One Hundredth Congress, First Session on Reviewing Federal Efforts Being Conducted toward Combating the AIDS Epidemic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Senate Committee on Labor and Human Resources.

    The text of a Senate hearing called to review federal efforts combating acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) is presented in this document. Opening statements reviewing the AIDS crisis are given by Senators Edward Kennedy and Lowell Weicker, Jr. Prepared statements are included by Senators Orrin Hatch and Ted Stevens. David Baltimore and…

  6. AIDS:Information on Global Dimensions and Possible Impacts. Fact Sheet to the Honorable Jesse Helms, U.S. Senate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    General Accounting Office, Washington, DC.

    Information is provided on the impact of the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) and Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) on world population and demographics and the likely effects of AIDS on Zaire. The views of United States and World Health Organization (WHO) officials were obtained on regional differences in the incidence and natural…

  7. How Can You Teach Middle Grade Students about the Effects of AIDS and the HIV Virus in a Conservative Community?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferrand, Shirley; Wattenbarger, Barbara

    This paper describes an interdisciplinary approach to conveying knowledge and promoting understanding of the disease of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) at the middle school level in a conservative community. Discussion of AIDS was included in a sixth grade unit on communicable diseases designed to teach how diseases are transmitted, how…

  8. Perceived Control, Specific At-Risk and General Fear of AIDS: Intraracial Variation among African American College Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Livingston, Ivor Lensworth; Johnson, Theodora E. Maxwell

    1991-01-01

    Explores relationships between perceived control of life of 375 African-American college students and both specific and general fears of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). African-American students have relatively variable responses, but feeling in control is related to lower levels of specific and general fears of AIDS. (SLD)

  9. Health Care and the Social Construction of AIDS: Impact of Disease Definitions on Psychosocial Adaptation and Economic Circumstances.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crystal, Stephen; Jackson, Marguerite

    As with other illnesses, Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) is a socially constructed phenomenon, not simply a biological entity. Biologically, Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection causes immunosuppression, which in turn causes a spectrum of disease states. The official definition of AIDS by the Centers for Disease Control requires…

  10. Mass Media Messages, Myths and Martyrs: Analyzing "America Responds to AIDS" Public Service Announcements, 1987-1992.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swanson, Douglas J.

    Focusing on the federal government's efforts to educate the public to the dangers of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS), a study examined "America Responds to AIDS" public service announcements (PSA's) through a traditional rhetorical analysis (PSA characters, plot, pace, tone, and message design). Forty-four English-language television…

  11. The Tuskegee Syphilis Study, 1932 to 1972: Implications for HIV Education and AIDS Risk Education Programs in the Black Community.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Stephen B.; Quinn, Sandra Crouse

    1991-01-01

    The Tuskegee study of untreated syphilis in black males caused distrust by blacks of the public health system that has implications for Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) and Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) studies. AIDS prevention among blacks may require openness about the Tuskegee study to allay fears of repetition. (SLD)

  12. Representation of AIDS in Televised Public Service Announcements: The Discursive Practices of Government in the Constitution of Knowledge about AIDS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myrick, Roger; And Others

    Using a textualist approach (looking at meaning above and beyond overt message elements), a study examined televised public service announcements (PSAs) about Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) produced by the Ad Council and the United States Department of Health and Human Services. Both ads identify young people who should be concerned…

  13. The Role of Language and Education in Eradicating HIV/AIDS in Africa: Evidence from Parents, Teachers, and Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Okebukola, Foluso O.; Adegbite, Hassan H.; Owolabi, Tunde

    2013-01-01

    The study focuses on the eradication and reversal of the spread of HIV/AIDS (human immune virus/acquired immune deficiency syndrome) as one of the main thrusts of Africa's 21st Century Development Goals. It investigates the significant role which language and education can play in fast tracking the attainment of this goal using a three-pronged…

  14. Behavioral intervention to reduce AIDS risk activities.

    PubMed

    Kelly, J A; St Lawrence, J S; Hood, H V; Brasfield, T L

    1989-02-01

    Behavior change can curtail the spread of acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). In this study, 104 gay men with a history of frequent AIDS high-risk behavior completed self-report, self-monitoring, and behavioral measures related to AIDS risk. The sample was randomly divided into experimental and waiting-list control groups. The experimental intervention provided AIDS risk education, cognitive-behavioral self-management training, sexual assertion training, and attention to the development of steady and self-affirming social supports. Experimental group participants greatly reduced their frequency of high-risk sexual practices and increased behavioral skills for refusing sexual coercions, AIDS risk knowledge, and adoption of "safer sex" practices. Change was maintained at the 8-month follow-up. PMID:2925974

  15. How to develop a company AIDS policy.

    PubMed

    Bompey, S H

    1986-07-01

    It is for most businesses only a matter of time before they will have experience with Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS), and the experience could be very costly for companies which fail to implement an effective AIDS policy. Potential AIDS problems include: antidiscrimination suits based on firing or failing to hire an individual who had AIDS or carries the AIDS virus antibodies; defamation suits from employees who are wrongly identified; disability claims that do not fit the pattern for other diseases; civil rights penalties in some situations when AIDS victims are prevented from working; and run-ins with the Occupational Safety and Health Administration or the National Labor Relations Board if healthy workers refuse to work alongside AIDS victims. A company needs to think through its AIDS policy, but that does not mean establishing a "special" AIDS policy which may create paranoia among employees. The best approach is to develop a health policy that includes all catastrophic illnesses, not just AIDS. There have been few court decisions involving AIDS because AIDS is a recent illness, victims often do not live long enough to pursue the matter, and it often pays to settle AIDS cases out of court. Employers need to know that judges, administrative agencies, and arbitrators take the position that AIDS is a disability. As such, AIDS is treated under the anti-handicap discrimination laws on the books of most states. Additionally, the Federal Rehabilitation Act of 1973 prohibits discrimination against the disabled by companies that contract with the federal government or receive federal financial assistance. It usually is illegal to discriminate against the disabled workers, and in some states against workers who are perceived to have a disability. The best defense against the fear of working alongside and AIDs sufferer is education. PMID:12315303

  16. The Effects of a Kansas Education Class on Students' Knowledge and Attitudes of Human Immunodeficiency Virus and Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sager, R. Warren, Jr.

    This study was undertaken to investigate the knowledge and attitudes of 8th, 9th, and 10th grade Kansas students pertaining to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). Attitudes and knowledge of 9th and 10th grade students who had participated in a Sex Respect Class offered in the 9th grade were compared…

  17. HIV/AIDS

    MedlinePlus

    ... at risk for serious infections and certain cancers. AIDS stands for acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. It is the final stage of infection with HIV. Not everyone with HIV develops AIDS. HIV most often spreads through unprotected sex with ...

  18. HIV and AIDS

    MedlinePlus

    ... that causes the disease AIDS. HIV Hurts the Immune System People who are HIV positive have been tested ... to everyone in the world. When the person's immune system has weakened and more of the blood's T ...

  19. Scarcity of HIV-AIDS Risk-Reduction Materials Targeting the Needs of Older Adults among State Departments of Public Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orel, Nancy A.; Wright, Jeanne M.; Wagner, Jennifer

    2004-01-01

    This study investigated the availability of printed human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immune deficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) education/prevention materials from state departments of public health within the United States, which specifically targeted the older adult population. Information on HIV/AIDS from public health departments in each of…

  20. A Comparison between a 1986 and 1989 Cohort of Inner-City Adolescent Females on Knowledge, Beliefs, and Risk Factors for AIDS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinman, Maxine L.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Compared responses of inner-city adolescent girls to measures of knowledge, beliefs and risk factors for Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) obtained in 1986 (n=205) and in 1989 (n=510). Between 1986 and 1989, number of sexual partners increased whereas concern about AIDS decreased. Those adolescents with most sexual partners also had most…

  1. Continuing Jeopardy: Children and AIDS. A Staff Report of the Select Committee on Children, Youth, and Families. One Hundredth Congress, Second Session.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Select Committee on Children, Youth, and Families.

    The challenges to Congress posed by the threat of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) to children are to support the development of more humane and cost-effective treatment and care, and to stop the spread of the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV). The rate of reported HIV infection and cases of AIDS among children and youth is increasing.…

  2. Condom Advertising and AIDS. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Health and the Environment of the Committee on Energy and Commerce. House of Representatives, One Hundredth Congress, First Session.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Committee on Energy and Commerce.

    This document present witnesses' testimonies from the Congressional hearing called to examine condom advertising and Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). Opening statements are included by Congressmen Henry Waxman, William Dannemeyer, and Jim Bates. C. Everett Koop, United States Surgeon General, and Gary Noble, AIDS coordinator for the…

  3. HLA-A68 and HLA-B15 alleles correlate with poor immune response among AIDS patients on combined antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    El-Beeli, Marah; Al-Mahrooqi, Samira Hamad; Youssef, Randa Mahmoud; Zadjali, Fahad; Balkhair, Abdullah; Al-Balushi, Mohammed Said; Said, Elias Anthony; Hasson, Sidgi Syed; Al-Jabri, Ali Abdullah

    2016-06-01

    Around 15-30% of AIDS patients fail to recover their CD4(+) T cell levels following combined antiretroviral therapy despite successful inhibition of HIV-1 replication. The exact reasons for this immune recovery failure are not completely understood. HLA alleles are among the candidate that may explain this failure. A total of 65 adult AIDS patients, with viral load of <50 copies per ml were investigated. Viral load and CD4 T cells counts were performed following standard techniques. HLA genotyping was performed using PCR-SSP technique. The Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS version 19) was used for data processing and analysis. A significantly higher proportion of poor immune responders were carrying HLA-A68 (4.8% compared to 25.0%, P=0.025) and HLA-B15 (2.4% compared to 20.8%, P=0.023). The etiological fraction (Efe%) among carriers of HLA-A68 was 57.89% (95% CI=26.79, 75.79) and was 61.35% (95% CI=35.33, 76.91) among carriers of HLA-B15. PMID:27067905

  4. Naturally Acquired and Conjugate Vaccine-Induced Antibody to Haemophilus influenzae Type b (Hib) Polysaccharide in Malian Children: Serological Assessment of the Hib Immunization Program in Mali

    PubMed Central

    Hutter, Julia; Pasetti, Marcela F.; Sanogo, Doh; Tapia, Milagritos D.; Sow, Samba O.; Levine, Myron M.

    2012-01-01

    Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) conjugate vaccine for infants (6, 10, and 14 weeks of age) was introduced into the Malian Expanded Program on Immunization in July 2005, to diminish invasive Hib disease in young children. Antibodies to Hib capsular polysaccharide (PRP) were measured in infants and toddlers from an area already served by the Hib immunization program (Bamako) and in unimmunized children of the same age in a district (Kangaba) where Hib immunization had not yet begun. Among vaccinated Bamako children 6–23 months of age, 77–93% exhibited PRP titers ≥ 1.0 μg/mL, indicating long-term protection, versus only 10–23% of Kangaba children of that age. High PRP antibody titers in immunized children persisted through 2 years of age. Moreover, ∼50% of Bamako children exhibited anti-PRP titers ≥ 5.0 μg/mL; a level that impedes Hib upper respiratory carriage, and may thereby diminish the Hib transmission to the unimmunized susceptible population (i.e., providing indirect protection). PMID:22665612

  5. Th1/Th2 cell dichotomy in acquired immunity to Bordetella pertussis: variables in the in vivo priming and in vitro cytokine detection techniques affect the classification of T-cell subsets as Th1, Th2 or Th0.

    PubMed Central

    Barnard, A; Mahon, B P; Watkins, J; Redhead, K; Mills, K H

    1996-01-01

    In studies of the mechanism of immunity to Bordetella pertussis in a murine respiratory infection model, we have previously demonstrated that natural infection of immunization with a whole cell vaccine induces a potent protective immune response, which is mediated by T-helper type-1 (Th1) cells. In contrast an acellular vaccine generates Th2 cells and is associated with delayed bacterial clearance following respiratory challenge. In the present study we have investigated the apparent Th1/Th2 cell dichotomy in acquired immunity and have examined the factors that affect their induction or detection. The cytokine profiles of B. pertussis-specific T cells in immune animals were determined using antigen-stimulated ex vivo spleen cells or CD4+ T-cell lines and clones established in the presence of interleukin-2 (IL-2) or IL-4. Antigen-specific T cells derived from mice immunized with the acellular vaccine were almost exclusively of the Th2 cell type. In contrast, T-cell lines and clones established following respiratory infection or immunization with the whole cell vaccine were predominantly of the Th1 type. However, a proportion of T cells from convalescent mice, especially when cultured in the presence of IL-4, secreted IL-4 and IL-5 with or without detectable IL-2 and interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), suggesting that Th0 or Th2 cells were also primed during natural infection in vivo. Furthermore, when mice were assessed 6 months after infection, spleen cells produced significant levels of IL-4 and IL-5, which were not evident at 6 weeks. The route of immunization and the genetic background of the mice were also found to influence the preferential priming of Th1 cells, and this was directly related to the level of protection against respiratory or intracerebral (i.c.) challenge. Our findings underline the critical role of CD4+ Th1 cells in immunity to B. pertussis, but also demonstrate that a number of factors in the in vivo priming and in vitro restimulation can skew the

  6. Transcriptomic Characterization of Innate and Acquired Immune Responses in Red-Legged Partridges (Alectoris rufa): A Resource for Immunoecology and Robustness Selection

    PubMed Central

    Sevane, Natalia; Cañon, Javier; Gil, Ignacio; Dunner, Susana

    2015-01-01

    Present and future challenges for wild partridge populations include the resistance against possible disease transmission after restocking with captive-reared individuals, and the need to cope with the stress prompted by new dynamic and challenging scenarios. Selection of individuals with the best immune ability may be a good strategy to improve general immunity, and hence adaptation to stress. In this study, non-infectious challenges with phytohemagglutinin (PHA) and sheep red blood cells allowed the classification of red-legged partridges (Alectoris rufa) according to their overall immune responses (IR). Skin from the area of injection of PHA and spleen, both from animals showing extreme high and low IR, were selected to investigate the transcriptional profiles underlying the different ability to cope with pathogens and external aggressions. RNA-seq yielded 97 million raw reads from eight sequencing libraries and approximately 84% of the processed reads were mapped to the reference chicken genome. Differential expression analysis identified 1488 up- and 107 down-regulated loci in individuals with high IR versus low IR. Partridges displaying higher innate IR show an enhanced activation of host defence gene pathways complemented with a tightly controlled desensitization that facilitates the return to cellular homeostasis. These findings indicate that the immune system ability to respond to aggressions (either diseases or stress produced by environmental changes) involves extensive transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulations, and expand our understanding on the molecular mechanisms of the avian immune system, opening the possibility of improving disease resistance or robustness using genome assisted selection (GAS) approaches for increased IR in partridges by using genes such as AVN or BF2 as markers. This study provides the first transcriptome sequencing data of the Alectoris genus, a resource for molecular ecology that enables integration of genomic tools

  7. Immune System

    EPA Science Inventory

    A properly functioning immune system is essential to good health. It defends the body against infectious agents and in some cases tumor cells. Individuals with immune deficiencies resulting from genetic defects, diseases (e.g., AIDS, leukemia), or drug therapies are more suscepti...

  8. The analysis of HIV/AIDS drug-resistant on networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Maoxing

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we present an Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)/Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) drug-resistant model using an ordinary differential equation (ODE) model on scale-free networks. We derive the threshold for the epidemic to be zero in infinite scale-free network. We also prove the stability of disease-free equilibrium (DFE) and persistence of HIV/AIDS infection. The effects of two immunization schemes, including proportional scheme and targeted vaccination, are studied and compared. We find that targeted strategy compare favorably to a proportional condom using has prominent effect to control HIV/AIDS spread on scale-free networks.

  9. Gallium scanning in lymphoid interstitial pneumonitis of children with AIDS

    SciTech Connect

    Schiff, R.G.; Kabat, L.; Kamani, N.

    1987-12-01

    Lymphoid interstitial pneumonitis (LIP) is a frequent pulmonary complication in the child with the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. We report the gallium scan findings in two children with AIDS and LIP. Gallium scintigraphy in both children demonstrated increased radionuclide concentration throughout the lungs, a pattern indistinguishable scintigraphically from that of Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia (PCP). This should alert nuclear medicine practitioners and referring physicians to another cause of diffusely increased gallium uptake in the lungs of patients with AIDS.

  10. AIDS: medicolegal considerations for Canadian hospitals.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, B J; Soskolne, C L

    1986-01-01

    Given the increasing endemicity of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), the agent implicated in the causation of acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS), in numerous sizeable subgroups of society, hospitals can expect increasing exposure to the legal implications presented by patients with AIDS. This paper reviews the duty of care owed by hospitals, both directly, through contractual obligations, and indirectly, through the acts of their employees and private contractors, to patients with AIDS, other patients and the public. Owing to the absence of case law directly related to AIDS or to HIV antibody reactivity, inferences were drawn from precedents set with other infectious diseases. Recommendations are made in the areas of confidentiality, informed consent, standards of care and vicarious liability. PMID:3464340

  11. The effect of delayed death in HIV/AIDS models.

    PubMed

    Lutambi, Angelina Mageni

    2016-01-01

    HIV-infected patients who receive treatment survive for some years after they have acquired the disease. The received treatment causes sustained reduction of viral reproduction by improving the immune function, leading to prolonged progression period to AIDS development. This prolonged progression period has created variability in survival times that affects estimates produced using mathematical models that do not include delay in disease related mortality. This paper investigates the effect of including delay in AIDS death occurrence in HIV/AIDS transmission models. A simple mathematical model with two stages of HIV progression is developed and extended to include time delay in the occurrence of AIDS deaths. Numerical simulations indicate that time delay changes the mortality curves considerably but has less effect on the proportion of infectives. The study highlights the importance of incorporating delay in models of HIV/AIDS for the production of accurate HIV/AIDS estimates. PMID:27141921

  12. Computer simulations of the interaction of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) aspartic protease with spherical gold nanoparticles: implications in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whiteley, Chris G.; Lee, Duu-Jong

    2016-09-01

    The interaction of gold nanoparticles (AuNP) with human immune-deficiency virus aspartic protease (HIVPR) is modelled using a regime of molecular dynamics simulations. The simulations of the ‘docking’, first as a rigid-body complex, and eventually through flexible-fit analysis, creates 36 different complexes from four initial orientations of the nanoparticle strategically positioned around the surface of the enzyme. The structural deviations of the enzymes from the initial x-ray crystal structure during each docking simulation are assessed by comparative analysis of secondary structural elements, root mean square deviations, B-factors, interactive bonding energies, dihedral angles, radius of gyration (R g), circular dichroism (CD), volume occupied by C α , electrostatic potentials, solvation energies and hydrophobicities. Normalisation of the data narrows the selection from the initial 36 to one ‘final’ probable structure. It is concluded that, after computer simulations on each of the 36 initial complexes incorporating the 12 different biophysical techniques, the top five complexes are the same no matter which technique is explored. The significance of the present work is an expansion of an earlier study on the molecular dynamic simulation for the interaction of HIVPR with silver nanoparticles. This work is supported by experimental evidence since the initial ‘orientation’ of the AgNP with the enzyme is the same as the ‘final’ AuNP-HIVPR complex generated in the present study. The findings will provide insight into the forces of the binding of the HIVPR to AuNP. It is anticipated that the protocol developed in this study will act as a standard process for the interaction of any nanoparticle with any biomedical target.

  13. Computer simulations of the interaction of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) aspartic protease with spherical gold nanoparticles: implications in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS).

    PubMed

    Whiteley, Chris G; Lee, Duu-Jong

    2016-09-01

    The interaction of gold nanoparticles (AuNP) with human immune-deficiency virus aspartic protease (HIVPR) is modelled using a regime of molecular dynamics simulations. The simulations of the 'docking', first as a rigid-body complex, and eventually through flexible-fit analysis, creates 36 different complexes from four initial orientations of the nanoparticle strategically positioned around the surface of the enzyme. The structural deviations of the enzymes from the initial x-ray crystal structure during each docking simulation are assessed by comparative analysis of secondary structural elements, root mean square deviations, B-factors, interactive bonding energies, dihedral angles, radius of gyration (R g), circular dichroism (CD), volume occupied by C α , electrostatic potentials, solvation energies and hydrophobicities. Normalisation of the data narrows the selection from the initial 36 to one 'final' probable structure. It is concluded that, after computer simulations on each of the 36 initial complexes incorporating the 12 different biophysical techniques, the top five complexes are the same no matter which technique is explored. The significance of the present work is an expansion of an earlier study on the molecular dynamic simulation for the interaction of HIVPR with silver nanoparticles. This work is supported by experimental evidence since the initial 'orientation' of the AgNP with the enzyme is the same as the 'final' AuNP-HIVPR complex generated in the present study. The findings will provide insight into the forces of the binding of the HIVPR to AuNP. It is anticipated that the protocol developed in this study will act as a standard process for the interaction of any nanoparticle with any biomedical target. PMID:27483476

  14. Hypothalamus-Pituitary-Adrenal cell-mediated immunity regulation in the Immune Restoration Inflammatory Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Khakshooy, Allen; Chiappelli, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Over one third of the patients sero-positive for the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) with signs of the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS), and under treatment with anti-retroviral therapy (ART), develop the immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS). It is not clear what variables are that determine whether a patient with HIV/AIDS will develop ART-related IRIS, but the best evidence base thus far indicates that HIV/AIDS patients with low CD4 cell count, and HIV/AIDS patients whose CD4 count recovery shows a sharp slope, suggesting a particularly fast "immune reconstitution", are at greater risk of developing IRIS. Here, we propose the hypothesis that one important variable that can contribute to low CD4 cell count number and function in ART-treated HIV/AIDS patients is altered hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) cell-mediated immune (CMI) regulation. We discuss HPA-CMI deregulation in IRIS as the new frontier in comparative effectiveness research (CRE) for obtaining and utilizing the best evidence base for treatment of patients with HIV/AIDS in specific clinical settings. We propose that our hypothesis about altered HPA-CMI may extend to the pathologies observed in related viral infection, including Zika PMID:27212842

  15. Hypothalamus-Pituitary-Adrenal cell-mediated immunity regulation in the Immune Restoration Inflammatory Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Khakshooy, Allen; Chiappelli, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Over one third of the patients sero-positive for the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) with signs of the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS), and under treatment with anti-retroviral therapy (ART), develop the immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS). It is not clear what variables are that determine whether a patient with HIV/AIDS will develop ART-related IRIS, but the best evidence base thus far indicates that HIV/AIDS patients with low CD4 cell count, and HIV/AIDS patients whose CD4 count recovery shows a sharp slope, suggesting a particularly fast "immune reconstitution", are at greater risk of developing IRIS. Here, we propose the hypothesis that one important variable that can contribute to low CD4 cell count number and function in ART-treated HIV/AIDS patients is altered hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) cell-mediated immune (CMI) regulation. We discuss HPA-CMI deregulation in IRIS as the new frontier in comparative effectiveness research (CRE) for obtaining and utilizing the best evidence base for treatment of patients with HIV/AIDS in specific clinical settings. We propose that our hypothesis about altered HPA-CMI may extend to the pathologies observed in related viral infection, including Zika. PMID:27212842

  16. Strategies for Implementing AIDS/HIV Policy Guidelines in Developmental and Mental Health Services: A Background and Checklist for Advocates. AIDS Technical Report, No. 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harvey, David C.

    This technical report is part of a series on AIDS/HIV (Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome/Human Immunodeficiency Virus) and is intended to help link various legal advocacy organizations providing services to persons with mental illness or developmental disabilities. Through a series of case examples, questions, background information, and…

  17. Clinical Relevance of Kynurenine Pathway in HIV/AIDS: An Immune Checkpoint at the Crossroads of Metabolism and Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Routy, Jean-Pierre; Mehraj, Vikram; Vyboh, Kishanda; Cao, Wei; Kema, Ido; Jenabian, Mohammad-Ali

    2015-01-01

    Tryptophan degradation along the kynurenine pathway is associated with a wide variety of pathophysiological processes, of which tumor tolerance and immune dysfunction in several chronic viral infections including HIV are well known. The kynurenine pathway is at the crossroads of metabolism and immunity and plays an important role in inflammation while also playing an opposing role in the control of acute and chronic infections. In this review we have summarized findings from recent studies reporting modulation of tryptophan degrading the kynurenine pathway in the context of HIV infection. This immuno-metabolic pathway is modulated by three distinct inducible enzymes: indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase 1 and 2 and tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase. Increased expression of these enzymes by antigen-presenting cells leads to local or systemic tryptophan depletion, resulting in a mechanism of defense against certain microorganisms. Conversely, it can also lead to immunosuppression by antigen-specific T-cell exhaustion and recruitment of T regulatory cells. Recently, among these enzymes, indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase 1 has been recognized to be an immune response checkpoint that plays an important role in HIV immune dysfunction, even in the context of antiretroviral therapy. In addition to the activation of the kynurenine pathway by HIV proteins Tat and Nef, the tryptophan-degrading bacteria present in the intestinal flora have been associated with dysfunction of gut mucosal CD4 Th17/Th22 cells, leading to microbial translocation and creating a systemic kynurenine pathway activation cycle. This self-sustaining feedback loop has deleterious effects on disease progression and on neurocognitive impairment in HIV-infected patients. Therapy designed to break the vicious cycle of induced tryptophan degradation is warranted to revert immune exhaustion in HIV-infected persons. PMID:26035167

  18. Neutrophils Aid in Protection of the Vaginal Mucosae of Immune Mice against Challenge with Herpes Simplex Virus Type 2

    PubMed Central

    Milligan, Gregg N.

    1999-01-01

    Large numbers of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) infiltrated the murine vaginal mucosa within 24 h after intravaginal inoculation with an attenuated strain of herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2). The role of these cells in resolution of a primary genital infection and in protection of HSV-immune animals against challenge with a fully virulent HSV-2 strain was investigated. Depletion of greater than 95% of the PMNs at the vaginal mucosal surface prior to intravaginal inoculation with an attenuated HSV-2 strain resulted in significantly higher virus titers on days 3 to 7 but only slightly delayed resolution of the primary genital infection. These results suggest that neutrophils helped control the infection but that other immune mechanisms ultimately cleared the virus. Interestingly, depletion of PMNs from HSV-immune mice prior to challenge with a fully virulent HSV-2 strain resulted in a rise in virus titers to levels comparable to those of nonimmune mice and a more pronounced diminution of virus clearance from the vaginal mucosa despite the presence of HSV-specific B and T cells. Levels of gamma interferon (IFN-γ) and HSV-specific antibody were comparable in neutrophil-depleted and control-treated immune mice following HSV-2 challenge, suggesting that RB6-8C5 treatment did not impair T- and B-cell function. Therefore, these results suggest that neutrophils play a role in limiting and clearing HSV-2 vaginal infections and that they are, in association with HSV-specific B and T cells, an important component in immune protection of the vaginal mucosa. PMID:10400730

  19. Acquired hyperpigmentations*

    PubMed Central

    Cestari, Tania Ferreira; Dantas, Lia Pinheiro; Boza, Juliana Catucci

    2014-01-01

    Cutaneous hyperpigmentations are frequent complaints, motivating around 8.5% of all dermatological consultations in our country. They can be congenital, with different patterns of inheritance, or acquired in consequence of skin problems, systemic diseases or secondary to environmental factors. The vast majority of them are linked to alterations on the pigment melanin, induced by different mechanisms. This review will focus on the major acquired hyperpigmentations associated with increased melanin, reviewing their mechanisms of action and possible preventive measures. Particularly prominent aspects of diagnosis and therapy will be emphasized, with focus on melasma, post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation, periorbital pigmentation, dermatosis papulosa nigra, phytophotodermatoses, flagellate dermatosis, erythema dyschromicum perstans, cervical poikiloderma (Poikiloderma of Civatte), acanthosis nigricans, cutaneous amyloidosis and reticulated confluent dermatitis PMID:24626644

  20. Community-Acquired urinary tract infection by pseudomonas oryzihabitans

    PubMed Central

    Bhatawadekar, Sunita M

    2013-01-01

    Pseudomonas oryzihabitans and Chrysomonas luteola has been placed in CDC group Ve2 and Ve1 respectively. These bacteria appear to be emerging pathogens. P. oryzihabitans was isolated from cases of bacteremia, CNS infections, wound infections, peritonitis, sinusitis, catheter associated infections in AIDS patient, and pneumonia. Most of the reports of P. oryzihabitans infection were of nosocomial origin in individuals with some predisposing factors. We report here a case of community acquired UTI by P. oryzihabitans in an immune-competent patient with stricture of urethra. PMID:23853437

  1. Community-Acquired urinary tract infection by pseudomonas oryzihabitans.

    PubMed

    Bhatawadekar, Sunita M

    2013-04-01

    Pseudomonas oryzihabitans and Chrysomonas luteola has been placed in CDC group Ve2 and Ve1 respectively. These bacteria appear to be emerging pathogens. P. oryzihabitans was isolated from cases of bacteremia, CNS infections, wound infections, peritonitis, sinusitis, catheter associated infections in AIDS patient, and pneumonia. Most of the reports of P. oryzihabitans infection were of nosocomial origin in individuals with some predisposing factors. We report here a case of community acquired UTI by P. oryzihabitans in an immune-competent patient with stricture of urethra. PMID:23853437

  2. [Pathology of urologic importance associated with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome].

    PubMed

    Musci, R; Meroni, T; Andres, M; De Cobelli, O; Larcher, P; Franchini, V; Bovo, G

    1993-04-01

    Infection by the HIV virus affects the urogenital system in a minor percentage of cases in comparison to other organs such as the lungs, the central nervous system and the haemolymphopoietic system. In recent years however, with the continued spread of the disease also urologists find themselves dealing with the various urogenital pathologies that are presented in seropositive or fully-blown Aids patients. The Authors present their experience and describe the problems correlated to the dealing with acquired immune deficiency syndrome patients that are affected with urogenital pathologies. PMID:8330057

  3. Detection of AIDS Virus in Macrophages in Brain Tissue from AIDS Patients with Encephalopathy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koenig, Scott; Gendelman, Howard E.; Orenstein, Jan M.; Canto, Mauro C.; Pezeshkpour, Gholam H.; Yungbluth, Margaret; Janotta, Frank; Aksamit, Allen; Martin, Malcolm A.; Fauci, Anthony S.

    1986-09-01

    One of the common neurological complications in patients with the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) is a subacute encephalopathy with progressive dementia. By using the techniques of cocultivation for virus isolation, in situ hybridization, immunocytochemistry, and transmission electron microscopy, the identity of an important cell type that supports replication of the AIDS retrovirus in brain tissue was determined in two affected individuals. These cells were mononucleated and multinucleated macrophages that actively synthesized viral RNA and produced progeny virions in the brains of the patients. Infected brain macrophages may serve as a reservoir for virus and as a vehicle for viral dissemination in the infected host.

  4. Immune reconstitution visceral leishmaniasis presented as hemophagocytic syndrome in a patient with AIDS from a nonendemic area: a case report.

    PubMed

    Patel, Ketan K; Patel, Atul K; Sarda, Parimal; Shah, Bhavin A; Ranjan, Rajiv

    2009-01-01

    Visceral Leishmaniasis (VL) is endemic in the Ganges and Brahmaputra plains of India. Leishmaniasis/HIV coinfection is on the rise in India and may pose a real diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. HIV-related immunosuppression increases the risk of reactivating leishmaniasis by 100 to 1000 times and it also increases the risk of drug resistant leishmaniasis. Immune reconstitution VL is not very well reported in literature. Hemophagocytosis is known to occur with various infectious agents like viruses, bacteria, and parasites, but is rare to occur with leishmaniasis. Here the authors describe a case of VL presenting as immune reconstitution disease and hemophagocytosis in an HIV infected patient coming from a nonendemic area. PMID:19535493

  5. Immunomodulatory and Antioxidant Effects of Purple Sweet Potato Extract in LP-BM5 Murine Leukemia Virus-Induced Murine Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ok-Kyung; Nam, Da-Eun; Yoon, Ho-Geun; Baek, Sun Jung; Jun, Woojin; Lee, Jeongmin

    2015-08-01

    The immunomodulatory effects of a dietary supplement of purple sweet potato extract (PSPE) in LP-BM5 murine leukemia virus (MuLV)-induced immune-deficient mice were investigated. Mice were divided into six groups: normal control, infected control (LP-BM5 MuLV infection), positive control (LP-BM5 MuLV infection+dietary supplement of red ginseng 300 mg/kg), purple sweet potato water extract (PSPWE) (LP-BM5 MuLV infection+dietary supplement of PSPE 300 mg/kg), PSP10EE (LP-BM5 MuLV infection+dietary supplement of 10% ethanol PSPE 300 mg/kg), and PSP80EE (LP-BM5 MuLV infection+dietary supplement of 80% ethanol PSPE 300 mg/kg). Dietary supplementation began on the day of LP-BM5 MuLV infection and continued for 12 weeks. Dietary supplementation of PSPE inhibited LP-BM5 MuLV-induced splenomegaly and lymphadenopathy and attenuated the suppression of T- and B-cell proliferation and T helper 1/T helper 2 cytokine imbalance in LP-BM5 MuLV-infected mice. Dietary supplement of PSPE increased the activity of the antioxidant enzymes, superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase. The data suggest that PSPE may ameliorate immune dysfunction due to LP-BM5 MuLV infection by modulating antioxidant defense systems. PMID:26076116

  6. HIV and AIDS

    MedlinePlus

    ... I Help a Friend Who Cuts? HIV and AIDS KidsHealth > For Teens > HIV and AIDS Print A A A Text Size What's in ... in human history. HIV causes a condition called acquired immunodeficiency syndrome — better known as AIDS . HIV destroys a type ...

  7. An AIDS campaign in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Janoff, D

    1987-01-01

    The Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) distribution program in Brazil, spearheaded by the National Division of Sanitary Surveillance in Ports, Airports, and Borders, was part of the government's massive education campaign to prevent the transmission of HIV-AIDS in Brazil. Beginning in February 1987, the climate was sufficiently favorable to operate a coordinated information campaign during the Carnival celebration, and tourists arriving in the cities of Brazil for the annual Carnival celebration were handed an educational brochure in Portugese, Spanish, English, and French. Yet, beyond reaching the tourist populations, it is particularly important to reach large portions of the Brazilian population. Planners of the national AIDS campaign intend to use television, radio, and all major newspapers in their effort to cover the country. Initial television coverage is comprised of short informational messages directed at high-risk groups. There also are plans to use radio and the print media in order to reach a wider audience. It is estimated that US $6 million will be needed to adequately meet the costs of AIDS prevention and medical care, but due to extreme budget constraints, only $45,000 has been earmarked for ongoing AIDS activities at this time. PMID:12281284

  8. Differential T-cell responses to a chimeric Plasmodium falciparum antigen; UB05-09, correlates with acquired immunity to malaria.

    PubMed

    Dinga, J N; Njimoh, D L; Kiawa, B; Djikeng, A; Nyasa, R B; Nkuo-Akenji, T; Pellé, R; Titanji, V P K

    2016-05-01

    The development of a sterilizing and cost-effective vaccine against malaria remains a major problem despite recent advances. In this study, it is demonstrated that two antigens of P. falciparum UB05, UB09 and their chimera UB05-09 can serve as protective immunity markers by eliciting higher T-cell responses in malaria semi-immune subjects (SIS) than in frequently sick subjects (FSS) and could be used to distinguish these two groups. UB05, UB09 and UB05-09 were cloned, expressed in E. coli, purified and used to stimulate PBMCs isolated from 63 subjects in a malaria endemic area, for IFN-γ production, which was measured by the ELISpot assay. The polymorphism of UB09 gene in the malaria infected population was also studied by PCR/sequencing of the gene in P. falciparum field isolates. All three antigens were preferentially recognized by PBMCs from SIS. IFN-γ production induced by these antigens correlated with the absence of fever and parasitaemia. UB09 was shown to be relatively well-conserved in nature. It is concluded that UB05, UB09 and the chimera UB05-09 posses T-cell epitopes that are associated with protection against malaria and could thus be used to distinguish SIS from FSS eventhough acute infection with malaria has been shown to reduce cytokine production in some studies. Further investigations of these antigens as potential diagnostic and/or vaccine candidates for malaria are indicated. PMID:27012849

  9. The Impact of Residency Training on Physicians' AIDS-Related Treatment Practices: A Longitudinal Panel Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yedidia, Michael J.; Berry, Carolyn A.

    1999-01-01

    Study of 394 physicians graduating in 1989 from six New York medical schools found that certain residency-training factors had sustained effects on physician behavior in caring for AIDS (acquired immune deficiency syndrome) patients, but not on the number of patients treated. Determinants of treatment practice included residency environment,…

  10. HIV Education for Persons with Mental Disabilities. AIDS Technical Report, No. 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harvey, David C.; Trivelli, Lucy U.

    This technical report is part of a series on AIDS/HIV (Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome/Human Immunodeficiency Virus) and is intended to help link various legal advocacy organizations providing services to persons with mental illness or developmental disabilities. Such persons, especially adolescents, are at risk for exposure to HIV because…

  11. HIV Liability & Disability Services Providers: An Introduction to Tort Principles. AIDS Technical Report, No. 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harvey, David C.; Decker, Curtis L.

    This technical report is part of a series on AIDS/HIV (Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome/Human Immunodeficiency Virus) and is intended to help link various legal advocacy organizations providing services to persons with mental illness or developmental disabilities. This report focuses on liability issues from worker and client exposure to HIV.…

  12. AIDS Preventive Education and Life Skills Training Programme for Secondary Schools: Development and Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer-Weitz, A.; Steyn, M.

    This publication reports on a pilot program on Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) and life skills training implemented in 12 schools in Pretoria, Laudium, Cape Town, and Soweto (South Africa). Data were collected through pre- and post-questionnaires and focus group interviews. The purpose of the program was to provide adolescents with…

  13. Software for Teaching about AIDS & Sex: A Critical Review of Products. A MicroSIFT Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weaver, Dave

    This document contains critical reviews of 10 microcomputer software packages and two interactive videodisc products designed for use in teaching about Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) and sex at the secondary school level and above. Each package was reviewed by one or two secondary school health teachers and by a staff member from the…

  14. An Africentric Model for AIDS Education, Prevention, and Psychological Services within the African American Community.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foster, Pamela M.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Describes an Africentric model for training psychologists who deliver Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) education, prevention, and services within the African-American community. Principles of the NTU philosophy (a Bantu concept) and Nguzo Saba were used in training 75 African-American psychologists to deliver prevention services. (SLD)

  15. AIDS and HIV. Policy Guidelines for Boards. Campus Life Policy Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keeling, Richard P.

    1992-01-01

    The report is designed to inform members of college and university and administration governing boards about facts and issues surrounding acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) and the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) so that they may develop education and prevention programs for their institutions and ensure protection from accidental…

  16. A Compliance Review of HIV/AIDS Instruction in New York City Public Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept., Albany.

    A team from the New York State Education Department examined the regulatory compliance of the human immunodeficiency virus acquired immune deficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) instructional program of the New York City Public Schools and assessed the policies and procedures of the New York City Central Board of Education and community school districts…

  17. What Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Adolescents Know and Think about AIDS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luckner, John L.; Gonzales, B. Robert

    1993-01-01

    A survey of 204 secondary students with deafness or hearing impairment suggested that adolescents had a general idea about what human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) are and the potential impact of the disease. However, they demonstrated gaps in knowledge of how the disease is transmitted and prevented…

  18. AIDS/HIV-Related Knowledge, Attitudes, and Risk Behavior. Minnesota Student Survey Report, 1989.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minnesota State Dept. of Education, St. Paul.

    The Minnesota Student Survey, including questions on Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) virus transmission and sexual activity, was completed by approximately 88,000 6th-, 9th-, and 12th-graders during the 1988-89 school year. Sexual activity questions were not asked of sixth graders. Over 90% of high school students knew about sharing…

  19. Sex, AIDS, and the Use of Condoms: A Survey of Compliance in College Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oswalt, Robert; Matsen, Krista

    The potential for an increase in the transmission of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) exists because the practice of sexual intercourse among unmarried individuals has increased in all age groups. Nonetheless, an earlier study in 1984 had found that the sexual activity and minimal condom use of college students had not changed…

  20. Growing Special and Free To Say No to HIV. HIV/AIDS Preventative Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iowa State Dept. of Education, Des Moines.

    This curriculum guide is written to provide special education teachers with a model for teaching students about the prevention of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). It is noted that special education students may be at risk for contracting the virus because they are often vulnerable to high-risk behaviors in an effort to belong to a peer…

  1. The Save-Your-Life Glossary of Alcohol, AIDS, Drug, & Tobacco Terms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adcock, Deborah

    This document presents the Save-Your-Life Glossary, which consists of four parts: (1) the glossary itself, which defines alcohol, Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS), drug, and tobacco-related terms; (2) the alerts sections, which focus on popular drugs or issues that concern young people; (3) the focus sections, which categorize and…

  2. The School and HIV Education after the First Decade of AIDS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robenstine, Clark

    This essay contends that the school as a social institution must be challenged to initiate or strengthen instruction on human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immune deficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS), as school instruction is potentially one of the most effective and efficient means for achieving a reduction in the rate of future HIV infection. The…

  3. If Your Child Had AIDS...: Responses of Parents with Homosexual Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cleveland, Peggy H.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Assessed the attitudes of parents of homosexual children, primarily members of support groups for parents of lesbians/gays, were they to discover their child(ren) had Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). Responses indicated devastation at the thought, with persistence of a bond between parent and child, though parents felt ambivalent…

  4. Guidelines for Counselling about HIV Infection and Disease. WHO AIDS Series 8.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    World Health Organization, Geneva (Switzerland).

    The present guidelines have been prepared to provide counselors, health care workers, and others with a model for use in counseling people affected directly or indirectly by Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection and Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). The guidelines describe the nature, role, and principles of counseling, the…

  5. Assessing Riverside Community College Nursing Student Attitudes toward Exposure to AIDS/HIV-Positive Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kross, Carolyn Sue

    In fall 1990, a study was conducted to assess the attitudes of nursing students who were attending Riverside Community College (RCC), in California, toward exposure to Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome/Human Immunodeficiency Virus (AIDS/HIV) positive patients in a hospital setting. All students enrolled in RCC's associate degree nursing program…

  6. Act Smart. HIV/AIDS Education Curriculum for Three Age Groups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American National Red Cross, Washington, DC.

    This Human Immunodeficiency Virus/Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (HIV/AIDS) education curriculum was developed for boys and girls, ages 6 to 17 years. It is a supplement to a similar program, "SMART Moves," aimed at prevention of drug abuse and premature sexual activity. The Act SMART prevention team should consist of a staff facilitator…

  7. Scope and Limits of Medical Discourse Concerning AIDS Prevention--Rationale and Preliminary Findings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singy, Pascal; Guex, Patrice

    1997-01-01

    Reports on a preliminary stage of a project funded by the Federal Office of Public Health in Switzerland to gain insights into physician-patient communication regarding Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) and apply findings to their teaching programs. Particular focus is on aspects of communication relating to primary prevention of HIV and…

  8. Children with HIV/AIDS: A Sourcebook for Caring. A Guide for Establishing Programs for Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allbritten, Dorothy J.

    This manual is intended for administrators and professional caregivers who wish to provide comprehensive health care to children with Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection, the cause of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). Chapter 1, an overview, examines the societal and economic issues that affect care and treatment of children…

  9. Assessment of Discharge Planning Referral to Nursing Homes for People with AIDS and HIV Infection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linsk, Nathan L.; Marder, Reggi E.

    This study was conducted to identify efforts by hospital discharge planners to refer clients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) or Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) to nursing homes; to determine the responses of the facilities contacted; and to identify gaps in services, discharge planner practices, and relationships between…

  10. New Hampshire Educators' Handbook: A Guide for Developing HIV/AIDS Curriculum and Policy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New Hampshire State Dept. of Education, Concord.

    This handbook was developed to facilitate the task school districts face in developing and implementing effective Human Immunodeficiency Virus/Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (HIV/AIDS) curriculum and policy. Organized into five sections, the guide begins with an introduction that includes the New Hampshire State Board of Education HIV/AIDS…

  11. Responding to HIV and AIDS. A Training Manual for United States Probation Officers. Participant's Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tyree, Jimmy L.

    This training manual provides U.S. Probation Officers with a useful guide in understanding the dynamics of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). It also gives advice on making this information specific and appropriate to the offenders with whom they work on their caseloads. The manual contains six core…

  12. Level of Interactivity of Videodisc Instruction on College Students' Recall of AIDS Information.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kritch, Kale M.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Two experiments confirmed the greater effectiveness of constructed-response interactive videodisc instruction when compared to a click-to-continue or passive viewing formats on posttest recall of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) information by 101 college students. The necessity of constructing answers appears to be an important factor…

  13. Considerations for Reaching the Latino Population with Sexuality and HIV/AIDS Information and Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de la Vega, Ernesto

    1990-01-01

    Latino and Latina sexual attitudes and behaviors must be understood if educators and counselors hope to reach this population with effective sexuality and Human Immunodeficiency Virus/Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (HIV/AIDS) information and education. The general U.S. Latino population is mostly sexually conservative; direct talk in public…

  14. AIDS and Young Children: Emerging Issues. Hearing before the Select Committee on Children, Youth, and Families. House of Representatives, One Hundredth Congress, First Session. Hearing Held in Berkeley, California.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Select Committee on Children, Youth, and Families.

    This field hearing in Berkeley, California examined: (1) the increasing incidence of babies born with, or at risk of contracting, Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS); (2) the ability of health and social service systems to care for AIDS-infected infants and children and their families; and (3) prevention efforts to reduce the spread of…

  15. Psychosocial Aspects of HIV and AIDS and the Evaluation of Preventive Strategies: Report on a WHO Meeting (Lisbon, Portugal, May 28-June 1, 1990). WHO Regional Publications, European Series, No. 36.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    World Health Organization, Copenhagen (Denmark). Regional Office for Europe.

    The spread of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) and Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) depends very much on the way people behave. Individuals from some groups have been successfully persuaded to modify behaviors that put them at increased risk of HIV infection. The salient questions for future AIDS prevention and control programs are…

  16. AIDS and Young Children in South Florida. Hearing before the Select Committee on Children, Youth, and Families. House of Representatives, One Hundred First Congress, First Session (Miami, FL, August 7, 1989).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Select Committee on Children, Youth, and Families.

    This document is a record of a hearing on acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) and young children in South Florida. Opening statements are provided by Congressmen George Miller, William Lehman, and Richard Durbin; a fact sheet on AIDS and young children in South Florida is also presented. Testimony is presented by the following: (1) Ana…

  17. Cumulative exposure to stimulants and immune function outcomes among HIV-positive and HIV-negative men in the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Shoptaw, Steven; Stall, Ron; Bordon, Jose; Kao, Uyen; Cox, Christopher; Li, Xiuhong; Ostrow, David G.; Plankey, Michael W.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY We examined associations between stimulant use (methamphetamine and cocaine) and other substances (nicotine, marijuana, alcohol, inhaled nitrites) with immune function biomarkers among HIV-seropositive (HIV+) men using highly active antiretroviral therapy (ART) and -seronegative (HIV−) men in the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study (MACS). Among HIV+ men, cumulative adherence to ART (4.07, 95% CI: 3.52, 4.71, per 10 years of adherent HAART use), and recent cohort enrollment (1.38; 95% CI: 1.24, 1.55) were multiplicatively associated with increases in CD4+/CD8+ ratios. Cumulative use of methamphetamine (0.93; 95% CI: 0.88, 0.98, per 10 use years), cocaine (0.93; 95% CI: 0.89, 0.96, per 10 use years), and cumulative medical visits (0.99; 95% CI: 0.98, 0.99, per 10 visit years), each showed small negative associations with CD4+/CD8+ ratios. Among HIV- men, cumulative medical visits (0.996; 95% CI: 0.993, 0.999), cumulative number of male sexual partners (0.999; 95% CI: 0.998, 0.9998, per 10 partner years) and cigarette pack years (1.10; 95% CI: 1.02, 1.18, per 10 pack years) were associated with CD4+/CD8+ ratios over the same period. ART adherence is associated with a positive immune function independent of stimulant use, underscoring the influence of ART on immune health for HIV+ men who engage in stimulant use. PMID:22930295

  18. Opposite effects of actively and passively acquired immunity to the carrier on responses of human infants to a Haemophilus influenzae type b conjugate vaccine.

    PubMed Central

    Barington, T; Gyhrs, A; Kristensen, K; Heilmann, C

    1994-01-01

    Vaccination of infants with Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) capsular polysaccharide (HibCP) coupled to carrier proteins has proven protective against invasive Hib diseases in several trials. However, insufficient immunogenicity has been noted in certain populations. Therefore, studies analyzing factors influencing the antibody response to conjugate vaccines are needed. In this study, the response to HibCP coupled to tetanus toxoid (TT) was examined in relation to (i) priming with or coadministration of the carrier protein and (ii) the levels of passively acquired maternal TT antibodies. One hundred forty-four infants were vaccinated with HibCP-TT at 5 and 6 months. They were randomized into three groups that received TT as part of a diphtheria-tetanus-polio vaccine at either 6 and 7 months (group A), 5 and 6 months (group B), or 4 and 5 months (group C). Maternally acquired TT antibodies inhibited the anti-HibCP response to the first HibCP-TT dose in groups A and B (r = -0.5 and -0.4, respectively; P < 0.005). In these groups, infants with prevaccination anti-TT levels above the median failed to reach the defined long-term protective level of HibCP antibodies (1 microgram/ml) more often than infants with low prevaccination levels after the first (P = 0.0001) and the second (P = 0.01) doses of HibCP-TT. In contrast, active priming with TT at 4 months resulted in a threefold-higher median level of anti-HibCP (group C; 1.34 micrograms/ml) than in the unprimed group (group A; 0.40 microgram/ml) after the first dose of HibCP-TT (P = 0.01). Coadministration of TT had no enhancing effect (group B; 0.58 microgram/ml). No significant differences between the median anti-HibCP levels were seen after the second HibCP-TT dose (6.72, 9.63, and 11.44 micrograms/ml in groups A, B, and C, respectively; P = 0.25). PMID:8262653

  19. The economic impact of AIDS in Africa.

    PubMed

    Whiteside, A W

    2000-09-01

    The experience of acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) in Africa is very different from that in the developed world. In the West, AIDS affects few people, and for those who are infected, it is an increasingly manageable illness. In Africa, huge numbers of people are being infected - mainly young adults through sexual intercourse. This is having a dramatic effect on key demographic indicators. Child mortality in some countries has doubled, while up to 25 years of life expectancy have been lost. The economic impact of AIDS is difficult to establish, but it is certainly leading to increased poverty in African families and communities. Development advances are being reversed, but the impact is incremental rather than catastrophic. PMID:11185534

  20. AIDS and racism in America.

    PubMed Central

    Hutchinson, J.

    1992-01-01

    Institutionalized racism affects general health care as well as acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) health intervention and services in minority communities. The overrepresentation of minorities in various disease categories, including AIDS, is partially related to racism. The national response to the AIDS epidemic in minority communities has been slow, showing an insensitivity to ethnic diversity in prevention efforts and AIDS health services. PMID:1602509

  1. AIDS in the developing countries.

    PubMed

    Tinker, J

    1988-01-01

    Without a medical miracle, it seems inevitable that the Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) pandemic will become not only the most serious public health problem of this generation but a dominating issue in 3rd world development. As a present-day killer, AIDS in developing countries is insignificant compared to malaria, tuberculosis, or infant diarrhea, but this number is misleading in 3 ways. First, it fails to reflect the per capita rate of AIDS cases. On this basis, Bermuda, French Guyana, and the Bahamas have much higher rates than the US. Second, there is extensive underreporting of AIDS cases in most developing nations. Finally, the number of AIDS cases indicates where the epidemic was 5-7 years ago, when these people became infected. Any such projections of the growth of 3rd world AIDS epidemics are at this time based on epidemiologic data from the industrialized rations of the north and on the assumption that the virus acts similarly in the south as it does in the US and Europe. Yet, 3rd world conditions differ. Sexually transmitted diseases usually are more prevalent, and people have a different burden of other diseases and of other stresses to the immune system. In Africa, AIDS already is heavily affecting the mainstream population in some nations. Some regions will approach net population declines over the next decade. How far their populations eventually could decline because of AIDS is unclear and will depend crucially on countermeasures taken or not taken over the next 1-2 years. In purely economic terms, AIDS will affect the direct costs of health care, expenses which are unrealistic for most 3rd world countries. Further, the vast majority of deaths from AIDS in developing countries will occur among those in the sexually active age groups -- the wage earners and food producers. Deaths in this age group also will reduce the labor available for farming and industry. AIDS epidemics also may have significant effects on foreign investment in the 3rd

  2. Topical immune modulation (TIM): a novel approach to the immunotherapy of systemic disease.

    PubMed

    Stricker, R B; Goldberg, B; Epstein, W L

    1997-12-01

    In this article, we present the concept of topical immune modulation, or TIM. TIM is based on the observation that skin contact sensitizing agents such as poison ivy, poison oak and dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB) are potent stimulants of the cellular immune system that combats viruses and other pathogens. We discuss the evolution of DNCB as a therapeutic modality in the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and we explore the mechanism by which DNCB directs the immune response. The potential use of topical immune modulators in autoimmune disease and vaccine development is also delineated. TIM represents a novel approach to immunotherapy that should have widespread application for immunologic diseases. PMID:9419021

  3. Anti-F(ab')2 antibodies in thrombocytopenic patients at risk for acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Yu, J R; Lennette, E T; Karpatkin, S

    1986-01-01

    22 homosexual or narcotic addict patients at risk for acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) or with AIDS, were studied for the presence of antiimmunoglobulin antibodies and circulating immune complexes (20 were thrombocytopenic, 6 had AIDS). Circulating immune complex levels were 10-fold higher than levels in normal subjects. IgG anti-F(ab')2 antibodies were noted in homosexual as well as narcotic addict patients. Of 16 homosexual patients, 7 had IgG anti-F(ab')2 antibody of moderate to marked titer with broad reactivity against autologous, homologous, and control F(ab')2 fragments. Three others demonstrated limited reactivity against one or two F(ab')2 fragments. The remaining six patients were negative. Six of six narcotic addict patients had IgG anti-F(ab')2 antibody, five with limited reactivity, one with broad reactivity. In contrast, neither elevated circulating immune complexes nor anti-F(ab')2 antibodies were detectable in six autoimmune thrombocytopenic patients. Anti-F(ab')2 antibody could be affinity purified from serum or circulating immune complexes. Anti-F(ab')2 reactivity correlated with circulating immune complex levels, r = 0.83, P less than 0.01. PMID:3011860

  4. Investigational treatment suspension and enhanced cell-mediated immunity at rebound followed by drug-free remission of simian AIDS

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background HIV infection persists despite antiretroviral treatment (ART) and is reignited as soon as therapies are suspended. This vicious cycle is fueled by the persistence of viral reservoirs that are invulnerable to standard ART protocols, and thus therapeutic agents able to target these reservoirs are needed. One such agent, auranofin, has recently been shown to decrease the memory T-cell reservoir in chronically SIVmac251-infected macaques. Moreover, auranofin could synergize with a fully suppressive ART protocol and induce a drug-free post-therapy containment of viremia. Results We administered buthionine sulfoximine (BSO), an inhibitor of glutathione synthesis currently in clinical trials for cancer, in combination with auranofin to chronically SIVmac251-infected macaques under highly-intensified ART (H-iART). The ART/auranofin/BSO therapeutic protocol was followed, after therapy suspension, by a significant decrease of viral RNA and DNA in peripheral blood as compared to pre-therapy levels. Drug-free post-therapy control of the infection was achieved in animals with pre-therapy viral loads ranging from values comparable to average human set points to levels largely higher. This control was dependent on the presence CD8+ cells and associated with enhanced levels of cell-mediated immune responses. Conclusions The level of post-therapy viral set point reduction achieved in this study is the largest reported so far in chronically SIVmac251-infected macaques and may represent a promising strategy to improve over the current “ART for life” plight. PMID:23866829

  5. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection: The Spectrum Beyond AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Willoughby, Brain C.

    1987-01-01

    Since 1981, the Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) has emerged as the major infectious epidemic of our time. It is the most profound manifestation of infection with the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV). Since 1984, serologic methods have existed to detect antibody to HIV. Several other clinical entities have been detected and are attributable to HIV infection. Appropriate counsel must accompany antibody testing. The author discusses the acute seroconversion event, as well as asymptomatic carrier status, including generalized lymphadenopathy. He also reviews the symptomatic states that do not meet the surveillance definition of AIDS, including treatments where available. PMID:21263801

  6. Building Coalitions To Provide HIV Legal Advocacy Services: Utilizing Existing Disability Models. AIDS Technical Report, No. 5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harvey, David C.; Ardinger, Robert S.

    This technical report is part of a series on AIDS/HIV (Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome/Human Immunodeficiency Virus) and is intended to help link various legal advocacy organizations providing services to persons with mental illness or developmental disabilities. This report discusses strategies to utilize existing disability models for…

  7. Teaching Our Teachers To Teach: A SIECUS Study On Training and Preparation for HIV/AIDS Prevention and Sexuality Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodriguez, Monica; And Others

    1995-01-01

    This study looked at whether teacher education programs at 169 institutions offered courses designed to prepare preservice teachers to teach health education, sex education, and Human Immunodeficiency Virus/Acquired Immune Deficiency System (HIV/AIDS) prevention education. Using course catalogs to allow for a systematic comparison of programs,…

  8. AIDS-Related Stigmas and Safe-Sex Practices of African-American College Students: A Pilot Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chandler, Donald S., Jr.

    This study examined the safe-sex practices of African-American colleges students in light of culturally-specific beliefs that stigmatize Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) in the African-American community. A total of 21 self-selected, sexually-active African-American students (15 females and 6 males) aged 18-22 completed the AIDS…

  9. Reconstruction of a Situational Theory of Communication: Internal and External Concepts as Identifiers of Publics for AIDS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grunig, James E.; Childers, Linda

    A study by James E. Grunig and his students at the University of Maryland tested a refined version of Grunig's situational theory of communication behavior (1968) by surveying the attitudes of the public regarding Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). In preparation for the study, 20 years of research conducted by Grunig and his students was…

  10. American Teens: Sexually Active, Sexually Illiterate and AIDS Education in Our Schools: A Chance to Make a Difference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wattleton, Faye; Levy, Susan

    1988-01-01

    Two articles discuss sexual activity of teenagers, sex education in elementary and secondary schools, and instruction on Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). Highlights include disadvantaged teens, parent-child communication, television's influence, curriculum recommendations, and media reviews of video tapes and filmstrips dealing with…

  11. Development of Guidelines Related to Riverside Community College Nursing Student Mandatory Assignment to AIDS Patients in the Clinical Setting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kross, Carolyn Sue

    The purpose of this study was to develop Associate Degree nursing program guidelines for Riverside Community College (RCC), in California, regarding mandatory nursing student assignment to Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) patients, and student refusal of such assignments in a clinical setting. During the 1990 fall semester, RCC's Nursing…

  12. Modulation of innate and acquired immune responses by Escherichia coli heat-labile toxin: distinct pro- and anti-inflammatory effects of the nontoxic AB complex and the enzyme activity.

    PubMed

    Ryan, E J; McNeela, E; Pizza, M; Rappuoli, R; O'Neill, L; Mills, K H

    2000-11-15

    We have examined the roles of enzyme activity and the nontoxic AB complex of heat-labile toxin (LT) from Escherichia coli on its adjuvant and immunomodulatory properties. LTK63, an LT mutant that is completely devoid of enzyme activity, enhanced Th1 responses to coinjected Ags at low adjuvant dose. In contrast, LTR72, a partially detoxified mutant, enhanced Th2 responses and when administered intranasally to mice before infection with Bordetella pertussis suppressed Th1 responses and delayed bacterial clearance from the lungs. LTR72 or wild-type LT inhibited Ag-induced IFN-gamma production by Th1 cells, and LT enhanced IL-5 production by Th2 cells in vitro. Each of the toxins enhanced B7-1 expression on macrophages, but enhancement of B7-2 expression was dependent on enzyme activity. We also observed distinct effects of the nontoxic AB complex and enzyme activity on inflammatory cytokine production. LT and LTR72 suppressed LPS and IFN-gamma induced TNF-alpha and IL-12 production, but enhanced IL-10 secretion by macrophages in vitro and suppressed IL-12 production in vivo in a murine model of LPS-induced shock. In contrast, LTK63 augmented the production of IL-12 and TNF-alpha. Furthermore, LTK63 enhanced NF-kappaB translocation, whereas low doses of LTR72 or LT failed to activate NF-kappaB, but stimulated cAMP production. Thus, E. coli LT appears to be capable of suppressing Th1 responses and enhancing Th2 responses through the modulatory effects of enzyme activity on NF-kappaB activation and IL-12 production. In contrast, the nontoxic AB complex can stimulate acquired immune responses by activating components of the innate immune system. PMID:11067933

  13. The value of haematological screening for AIDS in an at risk population.

    PubMed Central

    Weber, J N; Walker, D; Engelkins, H; Bain, B; Harris, J R

    1985-01-01

    The haematological variables measured by automated full blood count in matched homosexual and heterosexual men attending a clinic for sexually transmitted diseases (STD) were compared with those of normal controls and patients infected with the human T lymphotropic virus type III (HTLV-III). Homosexual and heterosexual men were statistically identical for all variables, but both differed noticeably from patients with clinical diagnoses of the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) or AIDS related disease. A full blood count as a screening test for AIDS is only interpretable in the context of clinical assessment. PMID:2995238

  14. Clampdown on AIDS information in E. Africa.

    PubMed

    Hitchcock, B

    1986-01-01

    What is most alarming about Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) in East Africa is that it is taboo. The reason for the clamping down on publicity in Kenya is that the government sees AIDS as a killer of tourism, the country's 2nd largest revenue earner. The government of Kenya, like several other African governments, is reacting to the widespread belief in the West that AIDS originated in Africa and that it is rampant in Central and East Africa. These "facts" have yet to be proven conclusively by medical evidence. It is certain that a large percentage of the population of these regions have antibodies to the virus HTLV-III, which causes AIDS. From this, virologists deduce that the people concerned must have been exposed to the AIDS virus. The Western media has exaggerated the African AIDS connection and given the impression that African countries are gripped in raging AIDS epidemics. In response to the alarmist publicity, some African countries have clamped down in information about the disease. The result is that the Western press feels confirmed in its fears and the local population, depending on rumor and heresay, have been living in a state of absolute panic. Instead of allaying fears, the clampdown on news has fueled dangerous rumors at home and frightened away tourists. Whatever may be causing the disease and wherever it may have come from, there is no question at all that there are now confirmed cases of AIDS in East and Central Africa. Thus far, the number of confirmed cases if relatively small, but if governments continue to try and hide the facts from the public, there is a real danger of an epidemic developing. A ministerial statement admits to 7 confirmed AIDS cases in Kenya. There are discrepancies in the reports, however. Doctors interviewed by "New African" in Nairobi recently believe the situation is far more serious than the government admits. Doctors in Kenya make the point that the country is highly vulnerable to the spread of AIDS

  15. T cell reactivity against antigen 85 but not against the 18- and 65-kD heat shock proteins in the early stages of acquired immunity against Mycobacterium leprae.

    PubMed

    Launois, P; Niang N'Diaye, M; Sarthou, J L; Drowart, A; Van Vooren, J P; Cartel, J L; Huygen, K

    1994-04-01

    T cell proliferation and interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) production of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from 20 household contacts were tested against the 18- and 65-kD heat shock proteins from Mycobacterium leprae (ML18 and ML65 respectively) and antigen 85 from Myco. bovis bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) (Ag 85) during a 12-months follow-up study. Among the eight contacts that became positive, eight showed positive reactivity against Ag 85, 5/8 against ML65 and 4/8 against ML18 at the end of the study. Of the 16 contacts who were lepromin-positive either at first or second testing, all responded to Ag 85, 11 to ML 65, but only eight reacted to ML18 antigen. Contacts who were lepromin-positive at first testing developed responses to ML18 only at second testing. In contrast, among the four contacts that remained lepromin-negative during the follow up, three proliferated to Ag 85 either at first or second testing, but only one produced IFN-gamma against Ag 85 at the end of the study. These results demonstrated that T cell reactivity and particularly IFN-gamma secretion against Ag 85, but not against ML18 and ML65, might be a predominant mechanism in the early stages of acquired protective immunity against Myco. leprae. PMID:8149672

  16. Osteoimmunopathology in HIV/AIDS: A Translational Evidence-Based Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Barkhordarian, André; Ajaj, Reem; Ramchandani, Manisha H.; Demerjian, Gary; Cayabyab, Riana; Danaie, Sohrab; Ghodousi, Nora; Iyer, Natasha; Mahanian, Nicole; Phi, Linda; Giroux, Amy; Manfrini, Ercolano; Neagos, Negoita; Siddiqui, Muniza; Cajulis, Olivia S.; Brant, Xenia M. C.; Shapshak, Paul; Chiappelli, Francesco

    2011-01-01

    Infection with the human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV) and the resulting acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) alter not only cellular immune regulation but also the bone metabolism. Since cellular immunity and bone metabolism are intimately intertwined in the osteoimmune network, it is to be expected that bone metabolism is also affected in patients with HIV/AIDS. The concerted evidence points convincingly toward impaired activity of osteoblasts and increased activity of osteoclasts in patients with HIV/AIDS, leading to a significant increase in the prevalence of osteoporosis. Research attributes these outcomes in part at least to the ART, PI, and HAART therapies endured by these patients. We review and discuss these lines of evidence from the perspective of translational clinically relevant complex systematic reviews for comparative effectiveness analysis and evidence-based intervention on a global scale. PMID:21660263

  17. AIDS PUBLIC INFORMATION DATABASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The AIDS Public Information Data Set is computer software designed to run on a Microsoft Windows microcomputer, and contains information abstracted from acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) cases reported in the United States. The data set is created by the Division of HIV/A...

  18. Diagnostic utility of lymphocyte subset analysis in AIDS case finding.

    PubMed Central

    Boyko, W J; Schechter, M T; MacLeod, A; Douglas, B; Maynard, M; Sharp, R; Wiggs, B

    1986-01-01

    Abnormalities of lymphocyte subsets, especially low absolute number of helper T cells, are characteristically present in acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). Similar abnormalities can be found in patients with persistent generalized lymphadenopathy (PGL) or AIDS-related complex (ARC) and, to a lesser degree, in asymptomatic people who have been exposed to human T-lymphotropic virus type III (HTLV-III). Nevertheless, there appears to be a widespread perception that lymphocyte subset analysis may be useful in AIDS case finding within high-risk groups. We evaluated the diagnostic utility of absolute number of helper T cells and ratio of helper to suppressor T cells in 33 patients with AIDS, 43 patients with PGL who had been referred for lymph node biopsy, 90 patients with PGL and 195 male homosexual controls. At conventional cutoff levels the tests did not appear to revise the probability of AIDS upward to any clinically significant degree when the pretest probability of AIDS was low. Lymphocyte subset analysis does not appear to be a cost-effective method of AIDS case finding in identified groups at risk in which the prevalence of AIDS is low. PMID:2938707

  19. How Do People Get AIDS?

    MedlinePlus

    ... a Friend Who Cuts? How Do People Get AIDS? KidsHealth > For Teens > How Do People Get AIDS? Print A A A Text Size en español ¿Cómo contrae alguien el SIDA? AIDS stands for acquired immunodeficiency syndrome , a disease that ...

  20. Proceedings of the International Conference on AIDS and Homeless Youth: An Agenda for the Future (1st, San Francisco, California, June 25, 1990).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luna, G. Cajetan; And Others

    This proceedings of the first international conference on Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) and homeless youth included over 125 delegates from 32 countries. There was strong consensus among delegates that street youth are often in high and multiple Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) risk situations, and programmatic responses are needed.…

  1. Consultation on the Monitoring and Evaluation of AIDS Education/Health Promotion Programmes (Copenhagen, Denmark, May 2-4, 1990). Summary Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    World Health Organization, Copenhagen (Denmark). Regional Office for Europe.

    Thirteen participants from 11 countries, including experts in public health, health education, social sciences, epidemiology, planning, policy-making, and program management, took part in a consultation on the monitoring and evaluation of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) education and health promotion programs in Copenhagen. A…

  2. Summary of the National Forum on HIV/AIDS Prevention Education for Children and Youth with Special Education Needs (Reston, Virginia, January 31-February 2, 1989).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council for Exceptional Children, Reston, VA.

    Representatives from more than 25 national organizations and governmental offices assessed the state of education for prevention of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) in light of the needs of special education students. This forum report provides presentation highlights and summarizes small group…

  3. Relationship Between Health Literacy, Knowledge of Health Status, and Beliefs about HIV/AIDS Transmission among Ryan White Clients in Miami

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mooss, Angela; Brock-Getz, Petra; Ladner, Robert; Fiano, Theresa

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to examine the relationships between health literacy, knowledge of health status, and human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immune deficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) transmission beliefs among recipients of Ryan White care. Design: Quota and convenience sampled, quantitative analysis captured with closed and…

  4. Psychological Correlates of the Transmission and Acceptance of Rumors about AIDS = Correlates Psychologiques Entre la Transmission et l'Acceptation des Rumeurs sur le SIDA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kimmel, Allan J.

    Public reactions to the Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) crisis are accompanied by the sorts of emotional and cognitive factors that have been identified by researchers as predictors of rumor generation and transmission. The present investigation attempted to ascertain the extent that various subjective factors (including anxiety,…

  5. AIDS Education of School-Aged Youth. Hearing before the Committee on Governmental Affairs. United States Senate, One Hundred First Congress, Second Session.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Senate Committee on Governmental Affairs.

    The focus of this hearing was two Government Accounting Office (GAO) evaluative reports on the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) programs to educate school-aged youth about the dangers of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) and ways to avoid human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. The GAO's first report is based on its national survey…

  6. Vocational Rehabilitation Services to Persons with H.I.V. (AIDS). Institute on Rehabilitation Issues (16th, Savannah, Georgia). Report from the Study Group.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corthell, David W.; Oliverio, Michael

    This training manual addresses the vocational rehabilitation (VR) of persons with the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) or AIDS (Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome) and related conditions. It considers the medical, cultural, social, legal, psychological, and economic implications of this condition; and how these factors relate to the vocational…

  7. The Process and Pitfalls of Developing a Culturally Relevant Curriculum To Reduce AIDS among Sexually Active Teenagers: The Take 5 Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillmore, Mary R.; And Others

    Several studies have shown that adolescents have reasonably high levels of knowledge about Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) transmission and prevention, yet they still engage in risky sexual activities. In response to this dilemma, a theoretically and empirically grounded intervention which went beyond presenting facts and figures was…

  8. AIDS in Asia and the Pacific.

    PubMed

    Karel, S G; Robey, B

    1988-09-01

    Acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) has been an African and Western concern due to its epidemic nature. Although nearly 99% of all reported cases occurred in these regions, Asia has reported cases, and the potential for devastation of Asia's already strained health care reserves are undeniable. This review compiled by analysis of 1986-88 articles on AIDS research, demographics, official statements from government and health organizations, news reports, and public statements describe how AIDS has spread in well documented regions like America, Europe, and Africa, and how the Asian regions have attempted to handle the AIDS epidemic before it becomes as serious as in the West. The topics covered include a clinical overview of how human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) causes AIDS, how it is transmitted, and what are the primary forms of transmission in well documented regions. The report briefly documents what policies China, Hong Kong, Japan, Republic of Korea, Taiwan, Philippines, Thailand, Singapore, Malaysia, Indonesia, India, Sri Lanka, Bangladesh, Nepal, Pakistan, Australia, and New Zealand have individually instituted to stem the flow of AIDS into their country, and/or stop the spread of AIDS already found there. The efforts to combat AIDS globally by the World Health Organization/United Nations Development Program alliance (WHO-UNDP) along with the US Agency for International Development (USAID), and UNICEF are highlighted. The available research and aid programs are contrasted with how the Asian nations are preparing to deal with the AIDS epidemic. 1) AIDS has an incubation time wherein an infected individual is not AIDS symptomatic, but is capable of infecting others, and this hidden infected population makes it essential that containment policies are also enforced in countries with few reported cases. 2) A committee should be established in all Asian countries to coordinate education on safe sexual behaviors with specific programs for prostitutes

  9. Effect of Recombination in the Evolutionary Dynamics of HIV under the Surveillance of Immune System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Weiqun; Yang, Wenjing; Wang, Guanyu

    2009-03-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is a retrovirus that causes acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), which has become one of the most destructive pandemics in history. The fact that HIV virus evolves very fast plays a central role in AIDS immunopathogenesis and the difficulty we face in finding a cure or a vaccine for AIDS. A distinguishing feature of HIV is its high frequency of recombination. The effect of recombination in the HIV evolution is not clear. We establish a mathematical model of the evolutionary dynamics. This model incorporates both point mutation and recombination for genetic diversity, and employs a fitness function developed by Wang and Deem (PRL 97, 188106, 2006) that accounts for the effect of immune system. Using this model, we explore the role of recombination in the battle between the virus population and the immune system, with a special focus on the condition under which recombination helps the virus population to escape from the immune system.

  10. Community Immunity (Herd Immunity)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Content Marketing Share this: Main Content Area ​Community Immunity ("Herd" Immunity) Vaccines can prevent outbreaks of disease and save ... disease is contained. This is known as "community immunity." In the illustration below, the top box depicts ...

  11. Nutrition and immunity in ruminant animals

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The immune system can be generally separated into three broad components; natural immunity, innate immunity, and acquired immunity, all of which must be fully developed and functioning properly to provide adequate immunological protection. Natural and innate immunity are typically grouped together u...

  12. Hospital-acquired pneumonia

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000146.htm Hospital-acquired pneumonia To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Hospital-acquired pneumonia is an infection of the lungs ...

  13. Particular activation phenotype of T cells expressing HLA-DR but not CD38 in GALT from HIV-controllers is associated with immune regulation and delayed progression to AIDS.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Sandra M; Taborda, Natalia A; Correa, Luis A; Castro, Gustavo A; Hernandez, Juan C; Montoya, Carlos J; Rugeles, Maria T

    2016-06-01

    The spontaneous control of HIV replication in HIV-controllers underlines the importance of these subjects for exploring factors related to delayed progression. Several studies have revealed fewer immune alterations and effector mechanisms related to viral control, mainly in peripheral blood, in these individuals compared to normal progressors. However, immune characterization of gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT), the major target of infection, has not been thoroughly explored in these subjects. We evaluated the following parameters in GALT samples from 11 HIV-controllers and 15 HIV-progressors: (i) frequency and activation phenotype of T cells; (ii) expression of transcription factors associated with immune response profiles; and (iii) frequency of apoptotic cells. Interestingly, HIV-controllers exhibited a particular activation phenotype, with predominance of T cells expressing HLA-DR but not CD38 in GALT. This phenotype, previously associated with better control of infection, was correlated with low viral load and higher CD4(+) T cell count. Furthermore, a positive correlation of this activation phenotype with higher expression of Foxp3 and RORγT transcription factors suggested a key role for Treg and Th17 cells in the control of the immune activation and in the maintenance of gut mucosal integrity. Although we evaluated apoptosis by measuring expression of cleaved caspase-3 in GALT, we did not find differences between HIV-controllers and HIV-progressors. Taken together, our findings suggest that predominance of HLA-DR(+) T cells, along with lower immune activation and higher expression of transcription factors required for the development of Treg and Th17 cells, is associated with better viral control and delayed progression to AIDS. PMID:26724942

  14. Nonhospital Care for AIDS Victims. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Health and the Environment of the Committee on Energy and Commerce. House of Representatives, Ninety-Ninth Congress, Second Session (March 5, 1986).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Committee on Energy and Commerce.

    This document presents the text of the Congressional hearing called to discuss the provision of health care services to people with Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) outside of hospitals, including home health care, hospice care, nursing home care, personal care and counseling, and other support services for patients and their families.…

  15. A Decade of Denial: Teens and AIDS in America. A Report of the Select Committee on Children, Youth, and Families. Together with Additional Views and Dissenting Minority Views. House of Representatives, 102d Congress, 2nd Session.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Select Committee on Children, Youth, and Families.

    Based on hearings, current research, and interviews with experts, including researchers, medical and service providers, and Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) educators, this Select Committee report assesses the impact of the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) epidemic on youth and identifies strategies policymakers and program planners…

  16. AIDS public health communication: a new challenge for communicators.

    PubMed

    Meyer, A

    1987-01-01

    Communicators have gained valuable experience which can contribute to the control of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS), yet AIDS prevention and control needs to progress beyond all that has been achieved in the best of programs. The topic is sensitive, and AIDS is itself often a political issue. The behavior to be changed is deeply rooted. It is a global problem and requires appropriate knowledge and targeted behavior change throughout the entire adult population of the world. Combating AIDS requires that every communication lesson of the past be adapted, for education and communication are the only vaccine against AIDS. The community of communicators working in the health sector has evolved beyond a simple paradigm, and the term public health communication is used to suggest this evolution. Public health communication means the systematic attempt to influence health practices of large populations positively, using principles and methods of mass communication, instructional design, health education, social marketing, behavioral analysis, anthropology, and related public health and social sciences. The term implies reliance on multiple channels, coordinated to introduce sustained change in specific practices crucial to realizing a public health impact. The World Health Organization is coordinating worldwide action as well as facilitating the formation of national AIDS prevention and control committees and plans of action in countries which request their assistance. Major international organizations along with thousands of local institutions are at work developing their own complementary action plans. Each will have a significant public health communication component. PMID:12281285

  17. HIV / AIDS Network.

    PubMed

    1995-01-01

    The HIV/AIDS Network and the Philippines Department of Health (DOH) collaborated to produce the AIDS Candlelight Memorial at the Philippine International Convention Center (PICC), May 1995, and World AIDS Day activities on December 1, 1995. After the memorial, a fashion show, "Body Shots," provided a channel for information on acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). On World AIDS Day, at the request of DOH, the Network provided speakers who lectured on human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and AIDS in different government offices. Prior to World AIDS Day, the Network focused on strengthening its cohesiveness and building the capabilities of its member organizations through lectures and symposia during November. Network activities were coordinated by the Remedios AIDS Foundation with support from the other members of the Coordinating Council: Health Action Information Network (HAIN); Caritas; Kabalikat, Stop Trafficking of Pilopinos Foundation, Inc. (STOP);and the Library Foundation (TLF). The Coordinating Council elected for 1996 includes the Remedios AIDS Foundation, HAIN, Caritas, TLF, STOP, the Foundation for Adolescent Development (FAD), and the Salvation Army. PMID:12291699

  18. Polydnaviral Ankyrin Proteins Aid Parasitic Wasp Survival by Coordinate and Selective Inhibition of Hematopoietic and Immune NF-kappa B Signaling in Insect Hosts

    PubMed Central

    Gueguen, Gwenaelle; Kalamarz, Marta E.; Ramroop, Johnny; Uribe, Jeffrey; Govind, Shubha

    2013-01-01

    Polydnaviruses are mutualists of their parasitoid wasps and express genes in immune cells of their Lepidopteran hosts. Polydnaviral genomes carry multiple copies of viral ankyrins or vankyrins. Vankyrin proteins are homologous to IκB proteins, but lack sequences for regulated degradation. We tested if Ichnoviral Vankyrins differentially impede Toll-NF-κB-dependent hematopoietic and immune signaling in a heterologous in vivo Drosophila, system. We first show that hematopoiesis and the cellular encapsulation response against parasitoid wasps are tightly-linked via NF-κB signaling. The niche, which neighbors the larval hematopoietic progenitors, responds to parasite infection. Drosophila NF-κB proteins are expressed in the niche, and non cell-autonomously influence fate choice in basal and parasite-activated hematopoiesis. These effects are blocked by the Vankyrin I2-vank-3, but not by P-vank-1, as is the expression of a NF-κB target transgene. I2-vank-3 and P-vank-1 differentially obstruct cellular and humoral inflammation. Additionally, their maternal expression weakens ventral embryonic patterning. We propose that selective perturbation of NF-κB-IκB interactions in natural hosts of parasitic wasps negatively impacts the outcome of hematopoietic and immune signaling and this immune deficit contributes to parasite survival and species success in nature. PMID:24009508

  19. Connecting the disconnected: adult day care for people with AIDS in New York City.

    PubMed

    Smith, M Y; Knickman, J R; Oppenheimer, L M

    1992-11-01

    Despite pressing need, the development of a continuum of long-term-care services for people with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) has been hampered by the dearth of information on the characteristics and service needs of patients eligible for such care. This article presents findings from a process evaluation of an outpatient day care program for people with AIDS in New York City. The AIDS clients were highly functional but had a diverse range of needs and problems related to housing, substance abuse, medical care, and social support. The majority of clients reported being very satisfied with the level of staff support and with the overall program. The findings of the study suggest that day care is a valuable addition to the continuum of services and that the creative dissemination of this program may improve the delivery of services to people with AIDS. PMID:1478553

  20. AIDS and the Older Adult.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allers, Christopher T.

    1990-01-01

    Older adults are finding themselves the neighbors of Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) patients as well as the primary caregivers of infected adult children. Focuses on roles, issues, and conflicts older adults face in dealing with relatives or neighbors with AIDS. Case management and educational intervention strategies are also offered.…

  1. School Teachers' Knowledge of AIDS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robison, Van; Spangler, Tracy

    A survey was conducted of 100 elementary and secondary teachers in northwestern Ohio concerning their knowledge of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Results indicated a lack of basic knowledge of AIDS among the majority of respondents, with a mean score of 14 out of 21 points (67 percent). Several of the most frequently missed questions…

  2. Aids and the nervous system

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenblum, M.L. ); Levy, R.M. ); Bredesen, D.E. )

    1988-01-01

    This book contains 19 chapters. Some of the titles are: Neuroradiology of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome; The AIDS dementia complex; primary infection with human immunodeficiency virus; The biology of the human immunodeficiency virus and its role in neurological disease; and Algorithms for the treatment of AIDS patients with neurological disease.

  3. Uveitic angle closure glaucoma in a patient with inactive cytomegalovirus retinitis and immune recovery uveitis.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Daniel E; Freeman, William R

    2002-01-01

    We report a case of uveitic acute angle closure glaucoma in a patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) associated with inactive cytomegalovirus retinitis and immune recovery vitritis. We conducted a long-term, follow-up examination of a 47-year-old male with AIDS and inactive cytomegalovirus retinitis caused by immune recovery on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). We found vitritis and ultimate development of uveitic glaucoma in the postoperative periods following repair of retinal detachment and extracapsular cataract extraction with intraocular lens implant. An episode of acute angle closure secondary to posterior synechiae and iris bombé subsequently developed, requiring peripheral laser iridotomy. Immune recovery in the setting of inactive cytomegalovirus retinitis can result in intraocular inflammation severe enough to cause angle closure glaucoma and profound ocular morbidity. PMID:12358297

  4. Studies of group B streptococcal infection in mice deficient in complement component C3 or C4 demonstrate an essential role for complement in both innate and acquired immunity.

    PubMed Central

    Wessels, M R; Butko, P; Ma, M; Warren, H B; Lage, A L; Carroll, M C

    1995-01-01

    Group B streptococci (GBS) cause sepsis and meningitis in neonates and serious infections in adults with underlying chronic illnesses. Specific antibodies have been shown to be an important factor in protective immunity for neonates, but the role of serum complement is less well defined. To elucidate the function of the complement system in immunity to this pathogen, we have used the approach of gene targeting in embryonic stem cells to generate mice totally deficient in complement component C3. Comparison of C3-deficient mice with mice deficient in complement component C4 demonstrated that the 50% lethal dose for GBS infection was reduced by approximately 50-fold and 25-fold, respectively, compared to control mice. GBS were effectively killed in vitro by human blood leukocytes in the presence of specific antibody and C4-deficient serum but not C3-deficient serum. The defective opsonization by C3-deficient serum in vitro was corroborated by in vivo studies in which passive immunization of pregnant dams with specific antibodies conferred protection from GBS challenge to normal and C4-deficient pups but not C3-deficient pups. These results indicate that the alternative pathway is sufficient to mediate effective opsonophagocytosis and protective immunity to GBS in the presence of specific antibody. In contrast, the increased susceptibility to infection of non-immune mice deficient in either C3 or C4 implies that the classical pathway plays an essential role in host defense against GBS infection in the absence of specific immunity. Images Fig. 1 PMID:8524789

  5. HIV / AIDS

    MedlinePlus

    ... Marketing Share this: Main Content Area Understanding HIV/AIDS AIDS was first reported in the United States in ... and has since become a major worldwide epidemic. AIDS is caused by the human immunodeficiency virus, or ...

  6. Normalization of immunoregulatory T-helper T-suppressor sublineages and cell-mediated immunity by isoprinosine in vitro in the early stages of AIDS.

    PubMed

    Tsang, P; Bekesi, J G

    1987-01-01

    Applying flow cytometric analysis and a panel of monoclonal antibodies that define functional subsets and stages of lymphocyte differentiation, we found both inducer and suppressor regulating subsets of helper T cells to be depressed with concurrent increase in the functionally active effector suppressor T cells in prodromal homosexuals and patients with AIDS. Concomitantly a broad spectrum of aberrations in all stages of B cell developments were observed. Failure of isolated peripheral blood lymphocytes from these subjects to respond to formalin-fixed Staphylococcus aureus cowan 1 (SAC) indicated intrinsic defects in their resting B cells, while impairment in pokeweed mitogen (PWM)-induced blastogenesis coupled with increased levels of Ig secretion signified regulatory defects in their mature B cells, which may be related to helper-suppressor dysfunctions. Based on these findings, a multifactorial immunodysfunction in AIDS was proposed. The antiviral biological modulator drug isoprinosine was shown to enhance PWM-induced, T-cell dependent, B-cell blastogenesis and normalize the spontaneous secretion of Ig while showing no modulative effects on SAC-induced (resting B-cell) transformations. It also modified, in a selective fashion, the phenotypic coexpression of both HLA-DR and Leu8 antigen on helper and suppressor T cells. Among prodromal subjects at risk to develop AIDS, isoprinosine augmented the expression of both helper T-cell subsets while reducing the number of suppressor effector cells and activated suppressor cells. These interferences with the helper-suppressor regulatory loop may explain the therapeutic efficacy of this drug in the early stages of AIDS. PMID:2446761

  7. Canada Youth & AIDS Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Alan J. C.; And Others

    This report contains the findings from a survey of over 38,000 youth in grades 7, 9, 11, and the first year of college or university, designed to obtain a cross-sectional perspective of the development of knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors related to Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome and other sexually transmitted diseases (STDs). Also included…

  8. When AIDS Hits Home.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moberly, William J.

    1987-01-01

    When the Rincon Valley School District realized that a sixth-grade teacher's lengthening absences were due to Acquired Immune Deficiency Disease, the district and the teacher chose to handle the case in the open. The experience with the school, students, families, and the community has been positive while providing a supportive environment for the…

  9. Myeloid suppressor cells in cancer: recruitment, phenotype, properties, and mechanisms of immune suppression.

    PubMed

    Serafini, Paolo; Borrello, Ivan; Bronte, Vincenzo

    2006-02-01

    Growing tumors acquire the ability to resist immune recognition and immune-mediated injury. Among several mechanisms, mouse and human tumors share the ability to alter the normal hematopoiesis, leading to accumulation of cells of the myelo-monoctytic lineage at the tumor site and in different primary and secondary lymphoid organs. These cells aid tumor development by providing molecules and factors essential for tumor growth and neovascularization but also exert a profound inhibitory activity on both tumor-specific and nonspecific T lymphocytes. The present article summarizes recent findings on the interaction between developing cancers and these recently described "myeloid suppressor cells". PMID:16168663

  10. Acquired reactive perforating collagenosis.

    PubMed

    Basak, P Y; Turkmen, C

    2001-01-01

    Acquired perforating disorder has been recognized as an uncommon distinct dermatosis in which altered collagen is eliminated through the epidermis. Several disorders accompanied by itching and scratching were reported to be associated with reactive perforating collagenosis. A 67-year-old white woman diagnosed as acquired reactive perforating collagenosis with poorly controlled diabetes mellitus and congestive cardiac failure is presented. PMID:11525959

  11. AIDS and student attitudes.

    PubMed

    Merrill, J M; Laux, L; Thornby, J I

    1989-04-01

    When recently polled, one half of 4,100 physicians believed they had the right not to treat patients with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), and 15% said they would actually refuse to care for them. To assure medical care for the 365,000 AIDS patients projected for the US by 1992, it is imperative to know whether there is something unique about AIDS patients that produces aversion among physicians. We hypothesized that the desire to avoid AIDS patients derived from three fears: fear of contagion, homophobia, and a desire to avoid dying patients. To identify the extent to which these three fears affect the attitudes that students hold toward AIDS patients, we conducted three studies. In our first study, we discovered that students' views about a patient with a terminal illness are the same whether the illness is leukemia or AIDS. In the second study, we found that the patient's sexual preference was not the major reason students would avoid an AIDS patients. In a third study, we confirmed that fear of contagion is the principal cause of students' desire to avoid an AIDS patient. In the course of these studies, we found important differences between the attitudes of male and female students. Female students scored lower on the homophobic scale than male students, and they had less antipathy toward AIDS patients. Helping health care professionals understand their fears toward patients with AIDS will in the long run improve medical care. Since the origins of these fears are for the most part well hidden in our unconscious, dissemination of facts alone will not do the job. Interventions are needed to help health care professionals acknowledge and overcome their negative feelings about AIDS. PMID:2705068

  12. [AIDS and ophthalmology: a contemporary view].

    PubMed

    Pérez-Blázquez, Esther Ezquerro; Redondo, Mi; García, T

    2008-01-01

    The appearance of the Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) meant a revolution in medicine, which has also affected Ophthalmology: the routine presence of ophthalmological pathologies which until then had been exceptional, such as retinitis due to cytomegalovirus (CMV), and the appearance of other new pathologies such as progressive outer retinal necrosis (PORN). The generalised use of high activity antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in the second half of the 1990s represented a turning point, since when the immunological improvement of patients with Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) resulted in a fall in the cases with ophthalmological pathology associated to immunodepression (HIV retinopathy, retinitis due to CMV, PORN...), and the spontaneous improvement of symptoms which until then had had a torpid evolution (Kaposi's ocular sarcoma, Palpebral Molluscum...). On the other hand, the continuous increase in the prevalence of syphilis in these patients means an increase in the number of cases of ocular syphilis unassociated with immunodepression. New ophthalmological alterations also appear that are related to HAART: uveitis due to immune recovery in patients with CMV retinitis in complete remission and the enophthalmos due to the atrophy of orbital fat in the context of lipodystrophy, associated with antiretrovirals. At present preventive ophthalmological checks must be carried out on patients with severe immunodepression until a count of lymphocytes above 100 cells/microl is confirmed. If they also show HIV retinopathy, a monthly check up is advisable until immune recovery, given the greater risk of infection by CMV. PMID:19169296

  13. Clinical epidemiology of HIV/AIDS in China from 2004-2011.

    PubMed

    Li, Min; Shen, Yinzhong; Jiang, Xiaofei; Li, Qi; Zhou, Xiaoming; Lu, Hongzhou

    2014-02-01

    This study retrospectively analyzed Chinese publicly reported data on Human Immunodeficiency Virus/Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (HIV/AIDS). The HIV/AIDS morbidity (1/100,000) and mortality (1/100,000) rates in China continually increased from 0.23 and 0.06 in 2004 to 1.53 and 0.69 in 2011, respectively. The AIDS case fatality rate decreased yearly from 53.57% in 2008 to 45.11% in 2011, and the fatality rate in rural areas (0.25-0.42%) was higher than that in cities (0.13-0.22%). The number of HIV/AIDS patients discharged from city-level hospitals increased from 329 in 2004 to 7,266 in 2011, and this number was higher than the number of similar patients discharged from county-level (rural) hospitals (the number of HIV/AIDS patients increased from 252 in 2004 to 5,957 in 2011). The factors contributing to these trends include: enhanced physician HIV/AIDS education regarding diagnosis, intervention, monitoring, testing, and treatment; improved safety of blood collection and use; and improved management of HIV/AIDS patients. Therefore, HIV/AIDS prevention and control in rural areas of China is the key to reducing HIV transmission and mortality in China. PMID:24647113

  14. Implications of Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome for Professionals in the Field of Visual Impairments and Blindness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daugherty, William E.

    1988-01-01

    Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) has significant ocular implications. This article examines: the effect of AIDS on vision, historical and philosophical perspectives on public health education, AIDS education, legal and policy issues of concern to schools and service agencies, and sex education and AIDS-related education of blind and…

  15. A model for HIV/AIDS pandemic with optimal control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sule, Amiru; Abdullah, Farah Aini

    2015-05-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus and acquired immune deficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) is pandemic. It has affected nearly 60 million people since the detection of the disease in 1981 to date. In this paper basic deterministic HIV/AIDS model with mass action incidence function are developed. Stability analysis is carried out. And the disease free equilibrium of the basic model was found to be locally asymptotically stable whenever the threshold parameter (RO) value is less than one, and unstable otherwise. The model is extended by introducing two optimal control strategies namely, CD4 counts and treatment for the infective using optimal control theory. Numerical simulation was carried out in order to illustrate the analytic results.

  16. The Vancouver Lymphadenopathy-AIDS Study: 5. Antecedent behavioural, clinical and laboratory findings in patients with AIDS and HIV-seropositive controls.

    PubMed Central

    Boyko, W J; Schechter, M T; Craib, K J; Constance, P; Nitz, R; Fay, S; McLeod, A; O'Shaughnessy, M

    1986-01-01

    In a group of homosexual men in Vancouver studied prospectively since November 1982, 26 cases of acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) have arisen. To identify behavioural, clinical and laboratory findings that might predict the development of AIDS in people with antibody to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), we compared data for 25 patients with AIDS with corresponding data for 80 controls serologically positive for HIV selected from the cohort. The clinical and laboratory data for the patients with AIDS preceded the diagnosis of the syndrome by a mean of 17.5 months. The controls had been both seropositive and AIDS-free for a mean of 16.7 months after acquisition of their data. We detected significant differences between the patients with AIDS and the controls in IgG and IgA levels, absolute number of helper T cells and ratio of helper to suppressor T cells but not in lifetime number of male sexual partners, frequency of receptive anal intercourse or receptive fisting, illicit drug use or history of infectious disease. We also detected an increased risk of AIDS among those who had an elevated number of sexual contacts in AIDS-endemic areas in the 5 years before enrollment. A history of increased early sexual contact in AIDS-endemic areas is likely to be associated with early infection and with an increased risk of AIDS among men with HIV infection of unknown duration. Thus, although our analysis had limited statistical power, we conclude that most lifestyle variables appear to act as exposure factors in HIV infection but not as cofactors in the development of AIDS. PMID:3463386

  17. The Vancouver Lymphadenopathy-AIDS Study: 5. Antecedent behavioural, clinical and laboratory findings in patients with AIDS and HIV-seropositive controls.

    PubMed

    Boyko, W J; Schechter, M T; Craib, K J; Constance, P; Nitz, R; Fay, S; McLeod, A; O'Shaughnessy, M

    1986-10-15

    In a group of homosexual men in Vancouver studied prospectively since November 1982, 26 cases of acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) have arisen. To identify behavioural, clinical and laboratory findings that might predict the development of AIDS in people with antibody to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), we compared data for 25 patients with AIDS with corresponding data for 80 controls serologically positive for HIV selected from the cohort. The clinical and laboratory data for the patients with AIDS preceded the diagnosis of the syndrome by a mean of 17.5 months. The controls had been both seropositive and AIDS-free for a mean of 16.7 months after acquisition of their data. We detected significant differences between the patients with AIDS and the controls in IgG and IgA levels, absolute number of helper T cells and ratio of helper to suppressor T cells but not in lifetime number of male sexual partners, frequency of receptive anal intercourse or receptive fisting, illicit drug use or history of infectious disease. We also detected an increased risk of AIDS among those who had an elevated number of sexual contacts in AIDS-endemic areas in the 5 years before enrollment. A history of increased early sexual contact in AIDS-endemic areas is likely to be associated with early infection and with an increased risk of AIDS among men with HIV infection of unknown duration. Thus, although our analysis had limited statistical power, we conclude that most lifestyle variables appear to act as exposure factors in HIV infection but not as cofactors in the development of AIDS. PMID:3463386

  18. Complement-Mediated Virus Infectivity Neutralisation by HLA Antibodies Is Associated with Sterilising Immunity to SIV Challenge in the Macaque Model for HIV/AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Mark; Hassall, Mark; Cranage, Martin; Stott, James; Almond, Neil

    2014-01-01

    Sterilising immunity is a desired outcome for vaccination against human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and has been observed in the macaque model using inactivated simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV). This protection was attributed to antibodies specific for cell proteins including human leucocyte antigens (HLA) class I and II incorporated into virions during vaccine and challenge virus preparation. We show here, using HLA bead arrays, that vaccinated macaques protected from virus challenge had higher serum antibody reactivity compared with non-protected animals. Moreover, reactivity was shown to be directed against HLA framework determinants. Previous studies failed to correlate serum antibody mediated virus neutralisation with protection and were confounded by cytotoxic effects. Using a virus entry assay based on TZM-bl cells we now report that, in the presence of complement, serum antibody titres that neutralise virus infectivity were higher in protected animals. We propose that complement-augmented virus neutralisation is a key factor in inducing sterilising immunity and may be difficult to achieve with HIV/SIV Env-based vaccines. Understanding how to overcome the apparent block of inactivated SIV vaccines to elicit anti-envelope protein antibodies that effectively engage the complement system could enable novel anti-HIV antibody vaccines that induce potent, virolytic serological response to be developed. PMID:24551145

  19. A vaccine strategy against AIDS: an HIV gp41 peptide immunization prevents NKp44L expression and CD4+ T cell depletion in SHIV-infected macaques.

    PubMed

    Vieillard, Vincent; Le Grand, Roger; Dausset, Jean; Debré, Patrice

    2008-02-12

    We previously showed that a gp41 peptide (3S) induces expression of a natural killer (NK) ligand (NKp44L) on CD4+ T cells during HIV-1 infection and that those cells are highly sensitive to NK lysis. In HIV-infected patients, anti-3S antibodies are associated with the maintenance of CD4+ T cell counts close to their baseline values, and CD4+ T cells decrease with the antibody titer. This study sought to determine whether anti-3S immunization could prevent NKp44L expression on these CD4+ T cells in vivo and inhibits the subsequent decline in CD4+ T cell counts by immunizing macaques with 3S and then infecting them with simian HIV(162P3). The results show that anti-3S antibodies inhibited NKp44L expression and NK activity and cytotoxicity. They also decreased the apoptosis rate of CD4+ T cells in peripheral blood and lymph nodes. These data raise questions about the pathogenesis of HIV and present opportunities for both preventive and therapeutic HIV vaccine strategies. PMID:18234855

  20. A vaccine strategy against AIDS: An HIV gp41 peptide immunization prevents NKp44L expression and CD4+ T cell depletion in SHIV-infected macaques

    PubMed Central

    Vieillard, Vincent; Le Grand, Roger; Dausset, Jean; Debré, Patrice

    2008-01-01

    We previously showed that a gp41 peptide (3S) induces expression of a natural killer (NK) ligand (NKp44L) on CD4+ T cells during HIV-1 infection and that those cells are highly sensitive to NK lysis. In HIV-infected patients, anti-3S antibodies are associated with the maintenance of CD4+ T cell counts close to their baseline values, and CD4+ T cells decrease with the antibody titer. This study sought to determine whether anti-3S immunization could prevent NKp44L expression on these CD4+ T cells in vivo and inhibits the subsequent decline in CD4+ T cell counts by immunizing macaques with 3S and then infecting them with simian HIV162P3. The results show that anti-3S antibodies inhibited NKp44L expression and NK activity and cytotoxicity. They also decreased the apoptosis rate of CD4+ T cells in peripheral blood and lymph nodes. These data raise questions about the pathogenesis of HIV and present opportunities for both preventive and therapeutic HIV vaccine strategies. PMID:18234855