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Sample records for aids heart disease

  1. [Design and implementation of GpsOne remote heart disease first-aid system].

    PubMed

    Lin, Hua

    2008-09-01

    This paper introduces how to develop a novel remote heart disease first-aid system with N-tier architecture. The system applies GpsOne communication technology and professional ECG signal collection technology to the embedded SCM. It can provide an accurate location of the patient and his essential ECG details for remote heart disease first-aid.

  2. Heart attack first aid

    MedlinePlus

    First aid - heart attack; First aid - cardiopulmonary arrest; First aid - cardiac arrest ... of patients with unstable angina/non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction (updating the 2007 guideline and replacing the 2011 ...

  3. Implantable Heart Aid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    CPI's human-implantable automatic implantable defibrillator (AID) is a heart assist system, derived from NASA's space circuitry technology, that can prevent erratic heart action known as arrhythmias. Implanted AID, consisting of microcomputer power source and two electrodes for sensing heart activity, recognizes onset of ventricular fibrillation (VF) and delivers corrective electrical countershock to restore rhythmic heartbeat.

  4. Heart Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... you're like most people, you think that heart disease is a problem for others. But heart disease is the number one killer in the ... of disability. There are many different forms of heart disease. The most common cause of heart disease ...

  5. Implantable Heart Aid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Medrad utilized NASA's Apollo technology to develop a new device called the AID implantable automatic pulse generator which monitors the heart continuously, recognizes the onset of ventricular fibrillation and delivers a corrective electrical shock. AID pulse generator is, in effect, a miniaturized version of the defibrillator used by emergency squads and hospitals to restore rhythmic heartbeat after fibrillation, but has the unique advantage of being permanently available to the patient at risk. Once implanted, it needs no specially trained personnel or additional equipment. AID system consists of a microcomputer, a power source and two electrodes which sense heart activity.

  6. Space Derived Health Aids (AID, Heart Monitor)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    CPI's spinoff from miniaturized pace circuitry is the new heart-assist device, the AID implantable automatic pulse generator. AID pulse generator monitors the heart continuously, recognizes onset of fibrillation, then administers a corrective electrical shock. A mini- computer, a power source, and two electrodes which sense heart activity are included in the unit. An associated system was also developed. It includes an external recorder to be worn by AID patients and a physician's console to display the data stored by the recorder. System provides a record of fibrillation occurrences and the ensuing defibrillation.

  7. Women's Heart Disease: Heart Disease Risk Factors

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Women's Heart Disease Heart Disease Risk Factors Past Issues / Winter 2014 Table ... or habits may raise your risk for coronary heart disease (CHD). These conditions are known as risk ...

  8. Heart disease and diet

    MedlinePlus

    Diet - heart disease; CAD - diet; Coronary artery disease - diet; Coronary heart disease - diet ... diet and lifestyle can reduce your risk of: Heart disease, heart attacks, and stroke Conditions that lead ...

  9. Coronary heart disease

    MedlinePlus

    Heart disease, Coronary heart disease, Coronary artery disease; Arteriosclerotic heart disease; CHD; CAD ... buildup of plaque in the arteries to your heart. This may also be called hardening of the ...

  10. Diabetic Heart Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... be coronary heart disease (CHD), heart failure, and diabetic cardiomyopathy. Diabetes by itself puts you at risk for heart disease. Other risk factors include Family history of heart disease Carrying extra ...

  11. Heart disease - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - heart disease ... The following organizations are good resources for information on heart disease: American Heart Association -- www.heart.org Centers for Disease Control and Prevention -- www.cdc.gov/heartdisease

  12. Inflammation and Heart Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Inflammation and Heart Disease Updated:Oct 12,2016 Understand the risks of ... inflammation causes cardiovascular disease, inflammation is common for heart disease and stroke patients and is thought to be ...

  13. Heart disease - risk factors

    MedlinePlus

    Heart disease - prevention; CVD - risk factors; Cardiovascular disease - risk factors; Coronary artery disease - risk factors; CAD - risk ... a certain health condition. Some risk factors for heart disease you cannot change, but some you can. ...

  14. Computer aided decision making for heart disease detection using hybrid neural network-Genetic algorithm.

    PubMed

    Arabasadi, Zeinab; Alizadehsani, Roohallah; Roshanzamir, Mohamad; Moosaei, Hossein; Yarifard, Ali Asghar

    2017-04-01

    Cardiovascular disease is one of the most rampant causes of death around the world and was deemed as a major illness in Middle and Old ages. Coronary artery disease, in particular, is a widespread cardiovascular malady entailing high mortality rates. Angiography is, more often than not, regarded as the best method for the diagnosis of coronary artery disease; on the other hand, it is associated with high costs and major side effects. Much research has, therefore, been conducted using machine learning and data mining so as to seek alternative modalities. Accordingly, we herein propose a highly accurate hybrid method for the diagnosis of coronary artery disease. As a matter of fact, the proposed method is able to increase the performance of neural network by approximately 10% through enhancing its initial weights using genetic algorithm which suggests better weights for neural network. Making use of such methodology, we achieved accuracy, sensitivity and specificity rates of 93.85%, 97% and 92% respectively, on Z-Alizadeh Sani dataset.

  15. Heart disease and women

    MedlinePlus

    ... disease: a report of the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Task Force on Practice Guidelines, ... the American Heart Association and American College of Cardiology Foundation endorsed by the World Heart Federation and ...

  16. Heart disease and depression

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/ency/patientinstructions/000790.htm Heart disease and depression To use the sharing features on this page, ... a heart attack or heart surgery Signs of Depression It is pretty common to feel down or ...

  17. Men and Heart Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Related CDC Web Sites Heart Disease Stroke High Blood Pressure Salt ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Related CDC Web Sites Heart Disease Stroke High Blood Pressure Salt ...

  18. Heart Disease Risk Factors

    MedlinePlus

    ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Related CDC Web Sites Division for Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Related CDC Web Sites Division for Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention ...

  19. Heart Disease in Women

    MedlinePlus

    ... United States, 1 in 4 women dies from heart disease. The most common cause of heart disease in both men and women is narrowing ... the blood vessels that supply blood to the heart itself. This is called coronary artery disease, and ...

  20. Women's Heart Disease: Heart Attack Symptoms

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Women's Heart Disease Heart Attack Symptoms Past Issues / Winter 2014 Table ... NHLBI has uncovered some of the causes of heart diseases and conditions, as well as ways to prevent ...

  1. Congenital Heart Disease in Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... and genetics may play a role. Why congenital heart disease resurfaces in adulthood Some adults may find that ... in following adults with congenital heart disease. Congenital heart disease and pregnancy Women with congenital heart disease who ...

  2. Living with Heart Valve Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. Living With Heart Valve Disease Heart valve disease is a lifelong condition. However, ... all of your medicines as prescribed. Pregnancy and Heart Valve Disease Mild or moderate heart valve disease during pregnancy ...

  3. Congenital heart disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... defect - heartbeat Patent ductus arteriosis (PDA) - series References Fraser CD, Carberry KE. Congenital heart disease. In: Townsend ... ASD) Coarctation of the aorta Ellis-van Creveld syndrome Fetal alcohol syndrome Hypoplastic left heart syndrome Marfan ...

  4. Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... Heart disease and stroke prevention Heart Health and Stroke Heart disease and stroke prevention Related information Learn more about healthy eating ... to top More information on Heart disease and stroke prevention Read more from womenshealth.gov A Lifetime ...

  5. Heart Health - Heart Disease: Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Cover Story Heart Health Heart Disease: Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment Past Issues / Winter 2009 ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Most heart attacks happen when a clot in the coronary ...

  6. Diabetic Heart Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... cardiomyopathy (KAR-de-o-mi-OP-ah-thee). Coronary Heart Disease In CHD, a waxy substance called plaque (plak) ... DHD tend to have less success with some heart disease treatments, such as coronary artery bypass grafting and percutaneous coronary intervention , also ...

  7. Living with Diabetic Heart Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. Living With Diabetic Heart Disease Diabetic heart disease (DHD) increases the likelihood of earlier and more ... also tend to have less success from certain heart disease treatments, such as coronary artery bypass grafting and ...

  8. What Causes Heart Valve Disease?

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Causes Heart Valve Disease? Heart conditions and other disorders, age-related changes, ... valve disease. Other Conditions and Factors Linked to Heart Valve Disease Many other conditions and factors are linked to ...

  9. Genetics of Congenital Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Ashleigh A; Garg, Vidu

    2010-01-01

    Cardiovascular malformations are the most common type of birth defect and result in significant mortality worldwide. The etiology for the majority of these anomalies remains unknown but genetic factors are being recognized as playing an increasingly important role. Advances in our molecular understanding of normal heart development have led to the identification of numerous genes necessary for cardiac morphogenesis. This work has aided the discovery of an increasing number of monogenic causes of human cardiovascular malformations. More recently, studies have identified single nucleotide polymorphisms and submicroscopic copy number abnormalities as having a role in the pathogenesis of congenital heart disease. This review discusses these discoveries and summarizes our increasing understanding of the genetic basis of congenital heart disease. PMID:21532774

  10. Hypertensive heart disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... DL, Zipes DP, Libby P, Bonow RO, Braunwald E, eds. Braunwald's Heart Disease: A Textbook of Cardiovascular Medicine . 10th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier ... Updated by: Michael A. Chen, MD, PhD, Associate Professor of Medicine, ...

  11. [Heart and Steinert's disease].

    PubMed

    Fayssoil, A; Nardi, O

    2011-08-01

    Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (Steinert disease) is an autosomal dominant disease characterized by myotonia and multiorgan damage. This latter is the most frequent of the adult-onset muscular dystrophies. Heart involvement is often associated, including cardiomyopathies, atrioventricular block, atrial and ventricular arrhythmias.

  12. Risks for Heart Disease & Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... for Heart Disease & Stroke Risks for Heart Disease & Stroke About 1.5 million heart attacks and strokes happen every year in the United States. You ... some of your risks for heart disease and stroke, but you can manage many of your risks ...

  13. Diabetes, Heart Disease, and Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... Disease, & Other Dental Problems Diabetes & Sexual & Urologic Problems Diabetes, Heart Disease, and Stroke Having diabetes means that ... help to stop. What is the link between diabetes, heart disease, and stroke? Over time, high blood ...

  14. Heart Disease and Stroke Statistics

    MedlinePlus

    ... failure on the rise; cardiovascular diseases remain leading killer AHA News: Heart failure projected to increase dramatically, ... failure on the rise; cardiovascular diseases remain leading killer 2017 Statistics At-a-Glance Heart Disease and ...

  15. Hydatid disease of the heart

    PubMed Central

    Calamai, G.; Perna, A. M.; Venturini, A.

    1974-01-01

    Calamai, G., Perna, A. M., and Venturini, A. (1974).Thorax, 29, 451-458. Hydatid disease of the heart: report of five cases and review of the literature. The world literature on the surgical treatment of echinococcosis of the heart is reviewed. Few cases are surgically treated, although the disease has been known for a long time. Localization to the liver and lungs is the most frequent. Cardiopulmonary bypass techniques make possible surgical treatment of hydatid cyst of the heart. The present paper is concerned with five cases operated upon between 1959 and 1969, three males and two females, their ages ranging from 13 to 46 years. A preoperative diagnosis was made in each case. One case was operated upon under cardiopulmonary bypass. The need for cardiopulmonary bypass on a stand-by basis is emphasized. The localization of the hydatid cyst was in the left ventricular wall (three cases), right ventricular wall (one case), and multiple (one case). The frequency of cardiac echinococcosis ranges between 0·5% and 2% according to various authors. Diagnosis is achieved with the aid of laboratory tests, radiology, and angiography; but the presence of the disease must be suspected in all patients who come from endemic areas. Surgical therapy is mandatory. Due to the growth characteristics of the cyst itself, the danger of damaging the ventricular wall at operation is increased; thus it is essential to have cardiopulmonary bypass facilities immediately available. Images PMID:4277513

  16. Heart Disease: Know Your Risk

    MedlinePlus

    A project of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Office on Women's Health Skip ... Heart disease risk factors you can't control Other possible heart disease risk factors Stroke: Know your ...

  17. Hispanics and Heart Disease, Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Hispanics and Heart Disease, Stroke Updated:Aug 30,2016 Heart disease is the No. 1 killer for all Americans and stroke is the fifth leading cause of death. Hispanics ...

  18. Living with Coronary Heart Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... disease and is sponsored by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), part of the National Institutes of ... disease and is sponsored by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), part of the National Institutes of ...

  19. What Is Coronary Heart Disease?

    MedlinePlus

    ... disease and is sponsored by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), part of the National Institutes of ... disease and is sponsored by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), part of the National Institutes of ...

  20. Heart transplantation in adult congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Burchill, Luke J

    2016-12-01

    Heart failure (HF) in adult congenital heart disease (ACHD) is vastly different to that observed in acquired heart disease. Unlike acquired HF in which pharmacological strategies are the cornerstone for protecting and improving ventricular function, ACHD-related HF relies heavily upon structural and other interventions to achieve these aims. patients with ACHD constitute a small percentage of the total adult heart transplant population (∼3%), although the number of ACHD heart transplant recipients is growing rapidly with a 40% increase over the last two decades. The worldwide experience to date has confirmed heart transplantation as an effective life-extending treatment option in carefully selected patients with ACHD with end-stage cardiac disease. Opportunities for improving outcomes in patients with ACHD-related HF include (i) earlier recognition and referral to centres with combined expertise in ACHD and HF, (ii) increased awareness of arrhythmia and sudden cardiac death risk in this population, (iii) greater collaboration between HF and ACHD specialists at the time of heart transplant assessment, (iv) expert surgical planning to reduce ischaemic time and bleeding risk at the time of transplant, (v) tailored immunosuppression in the post-transplant period and (vi) development and validation of ACHD-specific risk scores to predict mortality and guide patient selection. The purpose of this article is to review current approaches to diagnosing and treating advanced HF in patients with ACHD including indications, contraindications and clinical outcomes after heart transplantation.

  1. [Ischaemic heart disease].

    PubMed

    Brotons, Carlos; Cuende, José I; Fernández Pardo, Jacinto; Plana, Nuria; Moral, Irene

    2013-01-01

    In the year 2011, cardiovascular diseases were responsible of 31.2% of total deaths in Spain. The absolute number of cases of acute coronary syndrome in this year will be approximately 115,752 cases (95%CI: 114,822-116,687). The prevalence of stable angina in the population aged 25-74 years is 2.6% in men and 3.5% in women. Cardiovascular diseases were in the year 2011 the first cause of hospitalizations representing 14.1% of the total hospitalizations. Diagnose of ischaemic heart disease and acute myocardial infarction were responsible of 110,950 and 50,064 hospitalizations, respectively. In the year 2003, the hospitalization rate was 314 while in the year 2011 was 237 per 100,000, a reduction of 24.4%. The average cost of hospitalization due to ischaemic heart disease in 1997 was 3,093.7euros while in the year 2011 was 7,028.71euros. Cardiovascular mortality rates have decreased from 2007 to 2011, showing a relative reduction of 7% in women and 8% in men. With regard to myocardial infarction, it was observed a relative reduction of 17% in men and 20% in women. According to EUROASPIREIII survey done in 8,966 patients with ischaemic heart disease in Europe, 17% of patients were still smokers, 35% were obese, 56% has uncontrolled blood pressure, 51% has raised blood cholesterol and 25% were diabetics. With regard to drugs utilisation, 91% were treated with antiplatelets agents, 80% with beta blockers, 71% with ACE inhibitors/ARBs.

  2. What Is Heart Valve Disease?

    MedlinePlus

    ... flow properly. Acquired heart valve disease usually involves aortic or mitral valves. Although the valves are normal at first, problems develop over time. Both congenital and acquired heart valve disease can cause stenosis or backflow. Outlook Many people have heart valve ...

  3. FastStats: Heart Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... 96 [PDF - 9.8 MB] Death rates for diseases of heart, by sex, race, Hispanic origin, and age Health, United States, 2015, table 22 [ ... causes of death, by sex, race, and Hispanic origin Health, United States, 2015, table ... in Heart Disease and Cancer Mortality Recent Trends in Heart Failure- ...

  4. How Is Heart Disease Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... structures inside your chest, such as your heart, lungs, and blood vessels. A chest x ray can reveal signs ... disease and is sponsored by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), part of the National Institutes of ...

  5. [Management of multivalvular heart disease].

    PubMed

    Sağ, Saim; Güllülü, Sümeyye

    2014-10-01

    Multivalvular heart valve disease is not an uncommon situation. Although many studies include only patients with regurgitation or stenosis involving only one heart valve, several scenarios in which patients present with regurgitation and/or stenosis involving two or more valves exist. Data on multivalve disease are scarce because of a large number of possible combinations and also owing to difficulties of exact quantification and an overlap in surgical indications. Therefore, many fields related to multiple valve disease are not encountered in the current valvular heart disease guidelines. This article aims to explain multi valvular heart disease from etiology and background definition to surgical outcome, with special emphasis on echocardiographic assessment.

  6. Radiology of congenital heart disease

    SciTech Connect

    Amplatz, K.

    1986-01-01

    This is a text on the radiologic diagnosis of congenital heart disease and its clinical manifestations. The main thrust of the book is the logical approach which allows an understanding of the complex theory of congenital heart disease. The atlas gives a concise overview of the entire field of congenital heart disease. Emphasis is placed on the understanding of the pathophysiology and its clinical and radiological consequences. Surgical treatment is included since it provides a different viewpoint of the anatomy.

  7. Menopause and Heart Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... minutes, you can get your own personal heart score and life plan. Live better with Life's Simple ... and wellness. Popular Articles 1 Understanding Blood Pressure Readings 2 Sodium and Salt 3 Target Heart Rates ...

  8. Heart Valve Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    Your heart has four valves. Normally, these valves open to let blood flow through or out of your heart, and then shut to keep it from flowing ... close tightly. It's one of the most common heart valve conditions. Sometimes it causes regurgitation. Stenosis - when ...

  9. Epidemiological aspects of heart diseases

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Aimin; Tao, Ziqi; Wei, Peng; Zhao, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) are the leading cause of mortality worldwide. Coronary heart disease (CHD) is the main cause of mortality in heart patients following stroke, rheumatic heart disease and myocardial infarctions. Approximately 80% of individuals succumb to CVDs, due to poor living conditions in low and middle income families and malnutrition. Infectious diseases, human immunodeficiency, tuberculosis, malaria, high blood pressure or hypertension, obesity and overweight, and nutritional disorders including smoking, excessive alcohol consumption, high salt and sugar intake, as well as other factors are responsible for CVDs and CHDs in young as well as elderly individuals. The focus of the present review are recent epidemiological aspects of CVD and CHD as well as the usefulness of a Mediterranean diet for heart patients and the prevention of heart diseases. PMID:27602082

  10. Genetics of valvular heart disease.

    PubMed

    LaHaye, Stephanie; Lincoln, Joy; Garg, Vidu

    2014-01-01

    Valvular heart disease is associated with significant morbidity and mortality and often the result of congenital malformations. However, the prevalence is increasing in adults not only because of the growing aging population, but also because of improvements in the medical and surgical care of children with congenital heart valve defects. The success of the Human Genome Project and major advances in genetic technologies, in combination with our increased understanding of heart valve development, has led to the discovery of numerous genetic contributors to heart valve disease. These have been uncovered using a variety of approaches including the examination of familial valve disease and genome-wide association studies to investigate sporadic cases. This review will discuss these findings and their implications in the treatment of valvular heart disease.

  11. Being active when you have heart disease

    MedlinePlus

    Heart disease - activity; CAD - activity; Coronary artery disease - activity; Angina - activity ... Getting regular exercise when you have heart disease is important. Exercise can make your heart muscle stronger. It may also help you be more active without chest pain or ...

  12. Heart Disease Risk Factors You Can Control

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Stroke Heart disease risk factors you can control Did you know? In women, high triglycerides combined ... information on Heart disease risk factors you can control Read more from womenshealth.gov Heart Disease Fact ...

  13. Anxiety and Heart Disease

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-01-01

    disability among women and men in the United States. By the year 2020, CHD is projected to be the number one cause of death worldwide.( American Heart Association , 2002...combined.( American Heart Association , 2002) The effect of various demographic (e.g., age, gender) and clinical (e.g., presence of comorbidities

  14. Cyanotic heart disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... the body and flows through the heart and lungs. Blood that is low in oxygen (blue blood) returns ... the way blood flows through the heart and lungs. This causes non-oxygenated blood to be pumped out to the body without ...

  15. Heart Diseases and Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... damage the heart muscle or valves. Electrical Disorders Arrhythmias that start in the heart’s upper chambers, the ... low blood count) or hyperthyroidism (overactive thyroid gland). Arrhythmias that originate in the heart’s lower chambers, the ...

  16. Caffeine and Heart Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... a Healthy Heart Healthy Kids Our Kids Programs Childhood Obesity What is childhood obesity? Overweight in Children BMI in Children Is Childhood Obesity an Issue in Your Home? Addressing your Child's ...

  17. Heart Disease (For Kids)

    MedlinePlus

    ... a variety of problems, including high blood pressure , hardening of the arteries, chest pain, heart attacks, and ... teer-ee-oh-skluh-ROW-sus): also called hardening of the arteries, arteriosclerosis means the arteries become ...

  18. Valvular heart disease in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Anthony, John; Osman, Ayesha; Sani, Mahmoud U

    2016-01-01

    Valvular heart disease may be a pre-existing complication of pregnancy or it may be diagnosed for the first time during pregnancy. Accurate diagnosis, tailored therapy and an understanding of the physiology and pathophysiology of pregnancy are necessary components of management, best achieved through the use of multidisciplinary clinics. This review outlines the management of specific lesions, with particular reference to post-rheumatic valvular heart disease.

  19. Heart Truth for Women: If You Have Heart Disease

    MedlinePlus

    THE FOR WO MEN TRUTH THE HEART TRUTH FoR WoMEN: iF You HAVE HEART DisEAsE If you have heart disease, or think you do, it’s vital to take action to protect your heart health. Fortunately, there’s a lot you can do. ...

  20. [Congenital heart diseases in women].

    PubMed

    Putotto, Carolina; Unolt, Marta; Caiaro, Angela; Marino, Dario; Massaccesi, Valerio; Marino, Bruno; Digilio, Maria Cristina

    2013-02-01

    Are there gender differences in prevalence, surgical results and long-term survival of patients with congenital heart disease? Available literature data allow us to state what follows. At birth there is a mild but significant prevalence of congenital heart disease in females. The most severe congenital heart diseases are less frequent in girls, but when they are present in females, they are linked to a higher surgical mortality rate, due perhaps to lower weight at birth and to the prevalence of extracardiac malformations and/or of associated genetic syndromes. On the other hand, in adults, surgery for congenital heart disease is at higher risk in males, and so the long-term survival rate is higher in females. Particular psychological attitudes, a higher incidence of pulmonary hypertension, as well as specific problems linked to the reproductive function characterize congenital heart disease in adult women. The knowledge and analysis of these data are essential for a correct management of congenital heart disease in neonates, children and adults.

  1. The global burden of congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Julien Ie

    2013-05-01

    Although the incidence of congenital heart disease (CHD) is similar worldwide, the burden of supporting these patients falls more heavily on countries with high fertility rates. In a country with a fertility rate of about eight per woman, the population has to support four times as many children with CHD as in a country with a fertility rate of two. Countries with the highest fertility rates tend to have the lowest incomes per capita, thus accentuating the disparity. Countries with high fertility rates have more children with congenital heart disease per wage earner. Improving local health services and controlling infectious diseases (diarrhoeal illness, rheumatic fever, measles, rotoviral infection) are important but are mere 'band-aids' compared to improving education, empowering women and reducing birth rates.

  2. How Is Heart Valve Disease Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Heart Valve Disease Diagnosed? Your primary care doctor may detect a heart murmur or other signs of heart valve disease. However, a cardiologist usually will diagnose the condition. ...

  3. Sleep Apnea and Heart Disease, Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... Aortic Aneurysm More Sleep Apnea and Heart Disease, Stroke Updated:Mar 14,2017 Plain old snoring can ... and is associated with high blood pressure , arrhythmia , stroke and heart failure . Heart disease is the leading ...

  4. How Is Diabetic Heart Disease Treated?

    MedlinePlus

    ... more information about medical procedures used to treat diabetes-related heart diseases, go to the treatment sections of the Health Topics Coronary Heart Disease , Heart Failure , and Cardiomyopathy articles. Diabetes-Specific Treatment Issues The treatments described above are ...

  5. Autoimmune Pathogenesis of Chagas Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bonney, Kevin M.; Engman, David M.

    2016-01-01

    Chagas heart disease is an inflammatory cardiomyopathy that develops in approximately one-third of individuals infected with the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi. Since the discovery of T. cruzi by Carlos Chagas >100 years ago, much has been learned about Chagas disease pathogenesis; however, the outcome of T. cruzi infection is highly variable and difficult to predict. Many mechanisms have been proposed to promote tissue inflammation, but the determinants and the relative importance of each have yet to be fully elucidated. The notion that some factor other than the parasite significantly contributes to the development of myocarditis was hypothesized by the first physician-scientists who noted the conspicuous absence of parasites in the hearts of those who succumbed to Chagas disease. One of these factors—autoimmunity—has been extensively studied for more than half a century. Although questions regarding the functional role of autoimmunity in the pathogenesis of Chagas disease remain unanswered, the development of autoimmune responses during infection clearly occurs in some individuals, and the implications that this autoimmunity may be pathogenic are significant. In this review, we summarize what is known about the pathogenesis of Chagas heart disease and conclude with a view of the future of Chagas disease diagnosis, pathogenesis, therapy, and prevention, emphasizing recent advances in these areas that aid in the management of Chagas disease. PMID:25857229

  6. Heart disease and intimacy

    MedlinePlus

    ... hard to talk to your heart doctor about these topics, talk to your primary care provider. If you are depressed, anxious, or afraid, medicine or talk therapy may help. Classes in lifestyle change, stress management, or therapy may help you, family members, and ...

  7. Valvular heart disease in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Windram, Jonathan D; Colman, Jack M; Wald, Rachel M; Udell, Jacob A; Siu, Samuel C; Silversides, Candice K

    2014-05-01

    In women with valvular heart disease, pregnancy-associated cardiovascular changes can contribute to maternal, foetal and neonatal complications. Ideally, a woman with valvular heart disease should receive preconception assessment and counselling from a cardiologist with expertise in pregnancy. For women with moderate- and high-risk valve lesions, appropriate risk stratification and management during pregnancy will optimise outcomes. Pregnancy in women with high-risk lesions, such as severe aortic stenosis, severe mitral stenosis and those with mechanical valves, requires careful planning and coordination of antenatal care by a multidisciplinary team. The purpose of this overview is to describe the expected haemodynamic changes in pregnancy, review pregnancy risks for women with valvular heart disease and discuss strategies for management.

  8. Congenital heart disease in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Swan, Lorna

    2014-05-01

    The story of congenital heart disease is one of the major successes of medicine in the last 50 years. Heart conditions previously associated with early death are now successfully treated. Many of these women are now in their child-bearing years wishing to have children of their own. All of these women should be offered comprehensive pre-conception counselling by a dedicated multi-disciplinary team. Each woman will present a unique set of cardiac and obstetric challenges that require an individualised assessment of risk and a carefully documented care plan. In this chapter, I describe the most common forms of congenital heart disease and the specific issues that should be assessed before conception. I present a systematic approach to risk stratification and care planning. These lesions range from mild disease with little implications for pregnancy to those with a sizable risk of maternal mortality or complications. I will also discuss fetal risk factors.

  9. Million Hearts: Key to Collaboration to Reduce Heart Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brinkman, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Extension has taught successful classes to address heart disease, yet heart disease remains the number one killer in the United States. The U.S. government's Million Hearts initiative seeks collaboration among colleges, local and state health departments, Extension and other organizations, and medical providers in imparting a consistent message…

  10. Genetic Testing for Inherited Heart Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the American Heart Association Cardiology Patient Page Genetic Testing for Inherited Heart Disease Allison L. Cirino , ... for developing the family’s heart condition. What Is Genetic Testing and What Can it Tell Me? Genetic ...

  11. Genetics Home Reference: critical congenital heart disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... right ventricle, D-transposition of the great arteries , Ebstein anomaly, hypoplastic left heart syndrome , interrupted aortic arch, ... Testing Registry: Congenital heart disease Genetic Testing Registry: Ebstein's anomaly Genetic Testing Registry: Hypoplastic left heart syndrome ...

  12. Heart Disease (For Kids)

    MedlinePlus

    ... brain. previous continue Surgeries If a patient has cardiovascular disease, the doctor will talk about how stopping smoking, losing weight, eating a healthy diet, and getting exercise can help. The person also may need to ...

  13. Hypothyroidism and Heart Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Thyroid Disease Featured Resource Find an Endocrinologist Search Hypothyroidism March 2010 Download PDFs English Espanol Hindi Editors ... NIH Mayo Clinic American Thyroid Association What is hypothyroidism? Hypothyroidism means you have too little thyroid hormone. ...

  14. HIV and Nonischemic Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Manga, Pravin; McCutcheon, Keir; Tsabedze, Nqoba; Vachiat, Ahmed; Zachariah, Don

    2017-01-03

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-associated heart disease encompasses a broad spectrum of diseases. HIV infection may involve the pericardium, myocardium, coronary arteries, pulmonary vasculature, and valves, as well as the systemic vasculature. Access to combination antiretroviral therapy, as well as health resources, has had a significant influence on the prevalence and severity of the effects on each cardiac structure. Investigations over the recent past have improved our understanding of the epidemiology and pathophysiology of HIV-associated cardiovascular disease. This review will focus on our current understanding of pathogenesis and risk factors associated with HIV infection and heart disease, and it will discuss relevant advances in diagnosis and management of these conditions.

  15. Aids and Infectious Diseases (aid) Pmp 2013 Report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buonaguro, Franco M.

    2014-07-01

    The AIDS and Infectious Diseases (AID) PMP of the WFS contributed this year with a session on August 22nd to the Plenary Sessions of the International Seminars on Planetary Emergencies and Associated Meetings--46th Session: The Role of Science in the Third Millennium (Erice, 19-24 August 2013). Furthermore a workshop on August 24th was organized...

  16. Towards defining heart failure in adults with congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Bolger, Aidan P; Gatzoulis, Michael A

    2004-12-01

    Injury to the myocardium disrupts geometric integrity and results in changes to intracardiac pressure, wall stress and tension, and the pattern of blood flow through the heart. Significant disruption to pump function results in heart failure which is defined in terms of symptoms: breathlessness and fatigue, signs of salt and water retention, and neurohormonal activation. This syndrome most commonly occurs in the context of injury due to ischaemic heart disease and dilated cardiomyopathy but because patients with congenital heart disease (CHD) are born with sometimes gross distortions of cardiac anatomy they too are subject to the forces that drive heart failure. This paper explores the available data relating to the clinical and neurohormonal manifestations of heart failure in patients with congenital heart disease and describes how, by additionally exploring events at a cellular level, we may be able to arrive at a definition of heart failure relevant to this population.

  17. Xenopus: An Emerging Model for Studying Congenital Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kaltenbrun, Erin; Tandon, Panna; Amin, Nirav M.; Waldron, Lauren; Showell, Chris; Conlon, Frank L.

    2011-01-01

    Congenital heart defects affect nearly 1% of all newborns and are a significant cause of infant death. Clinical studies have identified a number of congenital heart syndromes associated with mutations in genes that are involved in the complex process of cardiogenesis. The African clawed frog, Xenopus, has been instrumental in studies of vertebrate heart development and provides a valuable tool to investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying human congenital heart diseases. In this review, we discuss the methodologies that make Xenopus an ideal model system to investigate heart development and disease. We also outline congenital heart conditions linked to cardiac genes that have been well-studied in Xenopus and describe some emerging technologies that will further aid in the study of these complex syndromes. PMID:21538812

  18. Carcinoid heart disease.

    PubMed

    Flaherty, Anne Marie C

    2014-11-01

    The patient, C.P., is a 59-year-old woman who was diagnosed with metastatic carcinoid of the terminal ileum in May 2003. In June 2003, she underwent an extensive resection including hemicolectomy, cholecystectomy, distal pancreatectomy, and splenectomy with metastatic disease in her pancreas, mesentery, and liver. She had been treated with octreotide, everolimus, oxaliplatin, and multiple hepatic artery embolizations in the past eight years and, most recently, capecitabine and bevacizumab with monthly octreotide. She has had intermittent pleural effusions not requiring intervention and a trace pericardial effusion. Her tumor is functional, meaning it demonstrates hormonal hypersecretion which causes flushing, diarrhea, bronchospasm, and abdominal pain.

  19. [Valvular heart disease in women].

    PubMed

    Tornos, Pilar

    2006-08-01

    Very few studies of valvular heart disease have been specifically carried out in women. It is well known that the prevalence of some types of valve disease is influenced by sex: rheumatic mitral stenosis is very common in women but degenerative valve disease affects both sexes similarly. A number of sex differences in the physiopathology of degenerative aortic stenosis have been reported: the degree of calcification is less in women than men and women's ventricles respond to equivalent reductions in valve area with a greater increase in gradient and greater contractility. With regard to prognosis, it is generally accepted that mortality associated with heart surgery is higher in women than men, for both coronary artery and valve surgery. The underlying reasons for the increase in mortality are not clear. Pregnancy presents particular difficulties for women with valvular heart disease. In those with significant valve lesions, it is advisable to correct the valve disease before pregnancy is considered. Anticoagulant treatment involves serious problems for pregnant women with a mechanical prosthesis. They suffer increased risks of prosthetic valve thrombosis and of fetal embryopathy if they take oral anticoagulants during the first trimester.

  20. Brisk Walk May Help Sidestep Heart Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... fullstory_162978.html Brisk Walk May Help Sidestep Heart Disease In just 10 weeks, cholesterol, blood pressure and ... at moderate intensity may lower the risk of heart disease, a small study suggests. "We know walking is ...

  1. Screening for Coronary Heart Disease with Electrocardiography

    MedlinePlus

    ... Force Recommendations Screening for Coronary Heart Disease with Electrocardiography The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (Task Force) ... recommendations on Screening for Coronary Heart Disease with Electrocardiography . These recommendations are for adult men and women ...

  2. Data and Statistics: Women and Heart Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Related CDC Web Sites Heart Disease Stroke High Blood Pressure Salt ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Related CDC Web Sites Heart Disease Stroke High Blood Pressure Salt ...

  3. Heart Disease Affects Women of All Ages

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Current Issue Past Issues Heart Disease Affects Women of All Ages Past Issues / Winter 2007 Table ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Young Women: Lifestyle-related factors that increase heart disease risk ...

  4. Heart Disease Prevention: Does Oral Health Matter?

    MedlinePlus

    ... oral health isn't a key to heart disease prevention, it's important to take care of your teeth ... and cleanings. If you're concerned about heart disease prevention, ask your doctor about proven ways to reduce ...

  5. What Are Coronary Heart Disease Risk Factors?

    MedlinePlus

    ... disease and is sponsored by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), part of the National Institutes of ... disease and is sponsored by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), part of the National Institutes of ...

  6. Heart transplantation in adults with congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Houyel, Lucile; To-Dumortier, Ngoc-Tram; Lepers, Yannick; Petit, Jérôme; Roussin, Régine; Ly, Mohamed; Lebret, Emmanuel; Fadel, Elie; Hörer, Jürgen; Hascoët, Sébastien

    2017-02-22

    With the advances in congenital cardiac surgery and postoperative care, an increasing number of children with complex congenital heart disease now reach adulthood. There are already more adults than children living with a congenital heart defect, including patients with complex congenital heart defects. Among these adults with congenital heart disease, a significant number will develop ventricular dysfunction over time. Heart failure accounts for 26-42% of deaths in adults with congenital heart defects. Heart transplantation, or heart-lung transplantation in Eisenmenger syndrome, then becomes the ultimate therapeutic possibility for these patients. This population is deemed to be at high risk of mortality after heart transplantation, although their long-term survival is similar to that of patients transplanted for other reasons. Indeed, heart transplantation in adults with congenital heart disease is often challenging, because of several potential problems: complex cardiac and vascular anatomy, multiple previous palliative and corrective surgeries, and effects on other organs (kidney, liver, lungs) of long-standing cardiac dysfunction or cyanosis, with frequent elevation of pulmonary vascular resistance. In this review, we focus on the specific problems relating to heart and heart-lung transplantation in this population, revisit the indications/contraindications, and update the long-term outcomes.

  7. Adult Congenital Heart Disease in Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Lindley, Kathryn J; Conner, Shayna N; Cahill, Alison G

    2015-06-01

    With the success of modern surgical techniques for congenital heart disease, the population of women of childbearing age with congenital heart disease is growing. Because of the significant hemodynamic load of pregnancy, labor, and delivery, women with congenital heart disease require preconceptual risk assessment and expert multidisciplinary care throughout pregnancy. The aim of this review is to discuss the management of cardiovascular, obstetric, and fetal care issues that are commonly encountered during pregnancy in women with congenital heart disease.

  8. Women's Heart Disease: Join the Heart Truth Community

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Women's Heart Disease Join The Heart Truth Community Past Issues / Winter 2014 Table of Contents National Symbol The centerpiece of The Heart Truth ® is The Red Dress ® which was introduced ...

  9. [Cyanotic heart disease. Part 2].

    PubMed

    Masuda, Munetaka

    2011-07-01

    Tetralogy of Fallot is the most common cyanotic heart disease. Its operative mortality and long-term result are quite good in these days. At the late phase after the correction, pulmonary valve regurgitation associated with right side heart failure, aortic valve regurgitation, arrhythmia and sudden death become major adverse outcomes. Double-outlet right ventricle is a cyanotic heart disease with a wide spectrum of morphology and is divided according to the site of ventricular septal defect: subaortic, subpulmonary, doubly committed and remote type. Its operative methods are completely dependent on its morphology, and vary such as intracardiac tunnel repair, Rastelli type repair, arterial switch procedure and Fontan type repair. Left ventricular outflow tract obstruction is one of the most important problems after the correction. Recent operative strategies for the treatment of tricuspid atresia and single ventricle are quite similar and its final goal is the completion of right heart bypass operation using total cavo-pulmonary connection with staging strategy. Pleural effusion, ascites, protein loosing enteropathy and supraventricular arrhythmia are major adverse outcomes after Fontan type repair, while extracardiac total cavopulmonary connection is expected to reduce the incidence of supraventricular arrhythmia.

  10. [Congenital heart diseases and sports].

    PubMed

    Martínez Quintana, E; Agredo Muñoz, J; Rodríguez González, F; Nieto Lago, V

    2008-04-01

    Congenital heart diseases are a frequent cause of cardiology consultation. New diagnostic and therapeutic techniques have allowed greater survival and quality of life of patients who wish to participate in sports. What they can do is not always easy to determine. Guidelines are helpful at the time of deciding, although finally is the doctor the one that must determine in each case the situation of the patient and the type of exercise they can do depending on the severity and type of cardiopathy.

  11. Pathophysiology of valvular heart disease.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Y I; Sun, Rongrong; Li, Xianchi; Liu, Min; Chen, Shuang; Zhang, Peiying

    2016-04-01

    Valvular heart disease (VHD) is caused by either damage or defect in one of the four heart valves, aortic, mitral, tricuspid or pulmonary. Defects in these valves can be congenital or acquired. Age, gender, tobacco use, hypercholesterolemia, hypertension, and type II diabetes contribute to the risk of disease. VHD is an escalating health issue with a prevalence of 2.5% in the United States alone. Considering the likely increase of the aging population worldwide, the incidence of acquired VHD is expected to increase. Technological advances are instrumental in identifying congenital heart defects in infants, thereby adding to the growing VHD population. Almost one-third of elderly individuals have echocardiographic or radiological evidence of calcific aortic valve (CAV) sclerosis, an early and subclinical form of CAV disease (CAVD). Of individuals ages >60, ~2% suffer from disease progression to its most severe form, calcific aortic stenosis. Surgical intervention is therefore required in these patients as no effective pharmacotherapies exist. Valvular calcium load and valve biomineralization are orchestrated by the concerted action of diverse cell-dependent mechanisms. Signaling pathways important in skeletal morphogenesis are also involved in the regulation of cardiac valve morphogenesis, CAVD and the pathobiology of cardiovascular calcification. CAVD usually occurs without any obvious symptoms in early stages over a long period of time and symptoms are identified at advanced stages of the disease, leading to a high rate of mortality. Aortic valve replacement is the only primary treatment of choice. Biomarkers such as asymmetric dimethylarginine, fetuin-A, calcium phosphate product, natriuretic peptides and osteopontin have been useful in improving outcomes among various disease states. This review, highlights the current understanding of the biology of VHD, with particular reference to molecular and cellular aspects of its regulation. Current clinical questions

  12. Screening Tests for Women Who Have Heart Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Library Campaign Materials The Healthy Heart Handbook for Women FOR WOMEN WHO HAVE HEART DISEASE If you have heart ... blockages. COULD YOU HAVE HIDDEN HEART DISEASE? Many women have undiagnosed heart disease—even after getting tested ...

  13. [Heart disease or sick at heart].

    PubMed

    Nager, F

    1993-02-27

    It is attempted to draw attention to the demanding and complementary reality of the modern cardiologist by confronting cardiology and cordiology (symbolistic theory of the heart). After a short survey of the symbolic and mythological world of the heart, the question of compatibility between the apparently opposing poles of cardiologic curative technology and cordiologic emotionalism is posed. With respect to the comprehensive cardiology of tomorrow, it is crucial whether the modern cardiac specialist will be capable of a difficult quadruple synthesis, namely: (1) the harmonious interaction between a rational basic position (raison de la mathématique) and an irrational-emotional standpoint (raison du coeur), (2) the increasing closeness of science and humanity, (3) the balanced care and culture of technology and medical language, and (4) the increasing harmony of male and female norms. Future cardiology must follow the call of the complementary, which reflects the apparent contrast between the scientific and the poetic heart; between having a symbolic heart condition and being heartsick.

  14. Stress echocardiography in valvular heart disease: a current appraisal.

    PubMed

    Naji, Peyman; Patel, Krishna; Griffin, Brian P; Desai, Milind Y

    2015-03-01

    Stress echocardiography is increasingly used in the management of patients with valvular heart disease and can aid in evaluation, risk stratification and clinical decision making in these patients. Evaluation of symptoms, exercise capacity and changes in blood pressure can be done during the exercise portion of the test, whereas echocardiographic portion can reveal changes in severity of disease, pulmonary artery pressure and left ventricular function in response to exercise. These parameters, which are not available at rest, can have diagnostic and prognostic importance. In this article, we will review the indications and diagnostic implications, prognostic implications, and clinical impact of stress echocardiography in decision making and management of patients with valvular heart disease.

  15. Living with heart disease and angina

    MedlinePlus

    ... disease: a report of the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Task Force on Practice Guidelines, ... adults: a report of the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association task force on practice guidelines. ...

  16. How Is Coronary Heart Disease Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... structures inside your chest, such as your heart, lungs, and blood vessels. A chest x ray can reveal signs ... disease and is sponsored by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), part of the National Institutes of ...

  17. Who Is at Risk for Heart Disease?

    MedlinePlus

    ... considered obese. You can use the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute's (NHLBI's) online BMI calculator to figure out ... disease and is sponsored by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), part of the National Institutes of ...

  18. The epidemic of the 20(th) century: coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Dalen, James E; Alpert, Joseph S; Goldberg, Robert J; Weinstein, Ronald S

    2014-09-01

    Heart disease was an uncommon cause of death in the US at the beginning of the 20th century. By mid-century it had become the commonest cause. After peaking in the mid-1960s, the number of heart disease deaths began a marked decline that has persisted to the present. The increase in heart disease deaths from the early 20th century until the 1960s was due to an increase in the prevalence of coronary atherosclerosis with resultant coronary heart disease, as documented by autopsy studies. This increase was associated with an increase in smoking and dietary changes leading to an increase in serum cholesterol levels. In addition, the ability to diagnose acute myocardial infarction with the aid of the electrocardiogram increased the recognition of coronary heart disease before death. The substantial decrease in coronary heart disease deaths after the mid-1960s is best explained by the decreased incidence, and case fatality rate, of acute myocardial infarction and a decrease in out-of-hospital sudden coronary heart disease deaths. These decreases are very likely explained by a decrease in coronary atherosclerosis due to primary prevention, and a decrease in the progression of nonobstructive coronary atherosclerosis to obstructive coronary heart disease due to efforts of primary and secondary prevention. In addition, more effective treatment of patients hospitalized with acute myocardial infarction has led to a substantial decrease in deaths due to acute myocardial infarction. It is very likely that the 20th century was the only century in which heart disease was the most common cause of death in America.

  19. Illegal Drugs and Heart Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... vessels and heart valves. Many drugs, such as cocaine, heroin and various forms of amphetamine, affect the ... heart attacks, seizures, and respiratory arrest More about Cocaine - the "perfect heart-attack drug" The powdered form ...

  20. Mercury Exposure and Heart Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Genchi, Giuseppe; Sinicropi, Maria Stefania; Carocci, Alessia; Lauria, Graziantonio; Catalano, Alessia

    2017-01-01

    Environmental contamination has exposed humans to various metal agents, including mercury. It has been determined that mercury is not only harmful to the health of vulnerable populations such as pregnant women and children, but is also toxic to ordinary adults in various ways. For many years, mercury was used in a wide variety of human activities. Nowadays, the exposure to this metal from both natural and artificial sources is significantly increasing. Recent studies suggest that chronic exposure, even to low concentration levels of mercury, can cause cardiovascular, reproductive, and developmental toxicity, neurotoxicity, nephrotoxicity, immunotoxicity, and carcinogenicity. Possible biological effects of mercury, including the relationship between mercury toxicity and diseases of the cardiovascular system, such as hypertension, coronary heart disease, and myocardial infarction, are being studied. As heart rhythm and function are under autonomic nervous system control, it has been hypothesized that the neurotoxic effects of mercury might also impact cardiac autonomic function. Mercury exposure could have a long-lasting effect on cardiac parasympathetic activity and some evidence has shown that mercury exposure might affect heart rate variability, particularly early exposures in children. The mechanism by which mercury produces toxic effects on the cardiovascular system is not fully elucidated, but this mechanism is believed to involve an increase in oxidative stress. The exposure to mercury increases the production of free radicals, potentially because of the role of mercury in the Fenton reaction and a reduction in the activity of antioxidant enzymes, such as glutathione peroxidase. In this review we report an overview on the toxicity of mercury and focus our attention on the toxic effects on the cardiovascular system. PMID:28085104

  1. Animal models of coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Liao, Jiawei; Huang, Wei; Liu, George

    2015-08-20

    Cardiovascular disease, predominantly coronary heart disease and stroke, leads to high morbidity and mortality not only in developed worlds but also in underdeveloped regions. The dominant pathologic foundation for cardiovascular disease is atherosclerosis and as to coronary heart disease, coronary atherosclerosis and resulting lumen stenosis, even total occlusions. In translational research, several animals, such as mice, rabbits and pigs, have been used as disease models of human atherosclerosis and related cardiovascular disorders. However, coronary lesions are either naturally rare or hard to be fast induced in these models, hence, coronary heart disease induction mostly relies on surgical or pharmaceutical interventions with no or limited primary coronary lesions, thus unrepresentative of human coronary heart disease progression and pathology. In this review, we will describe the progress of animal models of coronary heart disease following either spontaneous or diet-accelerated coronary lesions.

  2. Heart transplantation in adults with congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Garrick C; Mayer, John E

    2014-01-01

    Heart transplantation has become an increasingly common and effective therapy for adults with end-stage congenital heart disease (CHD) because of advances in patient selection and surgical technique. Indications for transplantation in CHD are similar to other forms of heart failure. Pretransplant assessment of CHD patients emphasizes evaluation of cardiac anatomy, pulmonary vascular disease, allosensitization, hepatic dysfunction, and neuropsychiatric status. CHD patients experience longer waitlist times and higher waitlist mortality than other transplant candidates. Adult CHD patients undergoing transplantation carry an early hazard for mortality compared with non-CHD recipients, but by 10 years posttransplant, CHD patients have a slight actuarial survival advantage.

  3. The changing epidemiology of congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    van der Bom, Teun; Zomer, A Carla; Zwinderman, Aeilko H; Meijboom, Folkert J; Bouma, Berto J; Mulder, Barbara J M

    2011-01-01

    Congenital heart disease is the most common congenital disorder in newborns. Advances in cardiovascular medicine and surgery have enabled most patients to reach adulthood. Unfortunately, prolonged survival has been achieved at a cost, as many patients suffer late complications, of which heart failure and arrhythmias are the most prominent. Accordingly, these patients need frequent follow-up by physicians with specific knowledge in the field of congenital heart disease. However, planning of care for this population is difficult, because the number of patients currently living with congenital heart disease is difficult to measure. Birth prevalence estimates vary widely according to different studies, and survival rates have not been well recorded. Consequently, the prevalence of congenital heart disease is unclear, with estimates exceeding the number of patients currently seen in cardiology clinics. New developments continue to influence the size of the population of patients with congenital heart disease. Prenatal screening has led to increased rates of termination of pregnancy. Improved management of complications has changed the time and mode of death caused by congenital heart disease. Several genetic and environmental factors have been shown to be involved in the etiology of congenital heart disease, although this knowledge has not yet led to the implementation of preventative measures. In this Review, we give an overview of the etiology, birth prevalence, current prevalence, mortality, and complications of congenital heart disease.

  4. Epidemiology of acquired valvular heart disease.

    PubMed

    Iung, Bernard; Vahanian, Alec

    2014-09-01

    Population-based studies including systematic echocardiographic examinations are required to assess the prevalence of valvular heart disease. In industrialized countries, the prevalence of valvular heart disease is estimated at 2.5%. Because of the predominance of degenerative etiologies, the prevalence of valvular disease increases markedly after the age of 65 years, in particular with regard to aortic stenosis and mitral regurgitation, which accounts for 3 in 4 cases of valvular disease. Rheumatic heart disease still represents 22% of valvular heart disease in Europe. The prevalence of secondary mitral regurgitation cannot be assessed reliably but it seems to be a frequent disease. The incidence of infective endocarditis is approximately 30 cases per million individiuals per year. Its stability is associated with marked changes in its presentation. Patients are getting older and staphylococcus is now becoming the microorganism most frequently responsible. Heath care-associated infections are the most likely explanation of changes in the microbiology of infective endocarditis. In developing countries, rheumatic heart disease remains the leading cause of valvular heart disease. Its prevalence is high, between 20 and 30 cases per 1000 subjects when using systematic echocardiographic screening. In conclusion, the temporal and geographical heterogeneity illustrates the effect of socioeconomic status and changes in life expectancy on the frequency and presentation of valvular heart disease. A decreased burden of valvular disease would require the elaboration of preventive strategies in industrialized countries and an improvement in the socioeconomic environment in developing countries.

  5. [The acromegalic heart disease (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Thiene, G; Giordano, R; Valente, M; Pennelli, N; Rossi, L

    1980-01-01

    The clinical and pathological findings of 3 patients with acromegalic heart disease are reported. In 2 of them no other causes of the cardiopathy could be recognized but a primitive involvement of the myocardium. The GH is responsible of cardiac hypertrophy without overload, which would shift towards progressive congestive heart failure. A possible depletion of intramyocardial cathecolamines is postulated in acromegalic heart disease as much as in cardiomegalies with pressure or volume overload.

  6. Smoking, Stress, and Coronary Heart Disease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Epstein, Leonard H.; Perkins, Kenneth A.

    1988-01-01

    Focuses on the interrelation between stressors and smoking, and on its potential impact on coronary heart disease risk beyond that due to stressors or to smoking alone. Reviews evidence supporting the stress-smoking interrelationship, its relevance to the risk of heart disease, and mechanisms explaining why smokers smoke more during stress and why…

  7. Psychosocial factors in coronary heart disease

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    French, J. R. P., Jr.; Chaplan, R. D.

    1969-01-01

    The relationship between job satisfaction and coronary heart disease is explored for blue and white collar groups, different personalities and physiological risk factors. Differences found among administrators, engineers and scientists with regard to variables associated with heart disease are in terms of physiology, personality, reported job stress, and smoking.

  8. Valvular Disorders in Carcinoid Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Shi-Min

    2016-01-01

    Carcinoid heart disease is a rare but important cause of intrinsic right heart valve disorders leading to right heart failure. Occasionally, left-sided heart valves may also be involved. The characteristic cardiac pathological findings of carcinoid heart disease are endocardial thickening as a result of fibrous deposits on the endocardium. Echocardiographic examination and right heart catheterization are very useful for the diagnosis of the lesion. If more cardiac valves are affected, multiple valve replacement should be considered. The management of the pulmonary valve lesion depends on the extent of the diseased valve, either by valvulotomy, valvectomy, or valve replacement. Percutaneous valve implantations in the pulmonary and in the inferior vena cava positions have been advocated for high-risk patients. PMID:27982350

  9. [Acquired and congenital heart diseases during pregancy].

    PubMed

    De Feo, Stefania; Iacovoni, Attilio; Faggiano, Pompilio

    2012-05-01

    Heart diseases are the leading cause of maternal morbidity and mortality. The number of patients with congenital heart diseases reaching childbearing age, as well as the proportion of women with acquired conditions, such as ischemic heart disease, becoming pregnant is constantly increasing. All women with known heart disease should have pre-pregnancy counseling, to assess maternal and fetal risk. Women at moderate or high risk should be under the care of a specialist prenatal team with experience in managing women with heart disease during pregnancy. Conditions that are considered at particularly high risk (mortality >10%) include Marfan syndrome with dilated aortic root, severe left ventricular dysfunction, severe left heart obstructive lesions, and pulmonary hypertension. Peripartum cardiomyopathy is a rare and potentially fatal disease related to pregnancy and the postnatal period that presents with symptoms of congestion and/or hypoperfusion and may rapidly progress to acute and life-threatening heart failure. However, the majority of women with heart disease can tolerate pregnancy; therefore an adequate multidisciplinary approach with the gynecologist, anesthesiologist and cardiologist should be advocated in order to reduce maternal and fetal risks associated with pregnancy.

  10. 3D Whole Heart Imaging for Congenital Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Greil, Gerald; Tandon, Animesh (Aashoo); Silva Vieira, Miguel; Hussain, Tarique

    2017-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) whole heart techniques form a cornerstone in cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging of congenital heart disease (CHD). It offers significant advantages over other CHD imaging modalities and techniques: no ionizing radiation; ability to be run free-breathing; ECG-gated dual-phase imaging for accurate measurements and tissue properties estimation; and higher signal-to-noise ratio and isotropic voxel resolution for multiplanar reformatting assessment. However, there are limitations, such as potentially long acquisition times with image quality degradation. Recent advances in and current applications of 3D whole heart imaging in CHD are detailed, as well as future directions. PMID:28289674

  11. Heart Disease, Stroke, or Other Cardiovascular Disease and Adult Vaccination

    MedlinePlus

    ... Disease, Stroke, or Other Cardiovascular Disease and Adult Vaccination Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... more about health insurance options. Learn about adult vaccination and other health conditions Asplenia Diabetes Heart Disease, ...

  12. Clues in diagnosing congenital heart disease.

    PubMed Central

    Moss, A. J.

    1992-01-01

    A number of practical office and bedside clues to cardiac disease in infants and children have been passed on through the years. They relate to the history, to the inspection and palpation components of the physical examination, and to knowledge of the specific cardiac defects that are likely to be associated with certain clinical syndromes. With the possible exception of coarctation of the aorta, the clues are not diagnostically specific. In many instances, however, they serve to narrow a broad array of diagnostic possibilities to 2 or 3 and, with the aid of other clues and auscultation, they can often be distinguished from one another. When a primary care physician is confronted with a child who has an incidental murmur that is "probably" innocent but could be organic, useful clues favoring an organic murmur are a history of congenital heart disease in a first-degree relative; a history of maternal rubella syndrome, alcohol use, or teratogenic drug use during pregnancy; a history of inappropriate sweating; a history of syncope, chest pain, or squatting; maternal diabetes mellitus; premature birth; birth at a high altitude; cyanosis; abnormal pulsations; recurrent bronchiolitis or pneumonia; chronic unexplained hoarseness; asymmetric facies with crying; and a physical appearance suggestive of a clinical syndrome. PMID:1574882

  13. Heart Disease Detection Using Wavelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González S., A.; Acosta P., J. L.; Sandoval M., M.

    2004-09-01

    We develop a wavelet based method to obtain standardized gray-scale chart of both healthy hearts and of hearts suffering left ventricular hypertrophy. The hypothesis that early bad functioning of heart can be detected must be tested by comparing the wavelet analysis of the corresponding ECD with the limit cases. Several important parameters shall be taken into account such as age, sex and electrolytic changes.

  14. Resilience in Patients with Ischemic Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    de Lemos, Conceição Maria Martins; Moraes, David William; Pellanda, Lucia Campos

    2016-01-01

    Background Resilience is a psychosocial factor associated with clinical outcomes in chronic diseases. The relationship between this protective factor and certain diseases, such heart diseases, is still under-explored. Objective The present study sought to investigate the frequency of resilience in individuals with ischemic heart disease. Method This was a cross-sectional study with 133 patients of both genders, aged between 35 and 65 years, treated at Rio Grande do Sul Cardiology Institute - Cardiology University Foundation, with a diagnosis of ischemic heart disease during the study period. Sixty-seven patients had a history of acute myocardial infarction. The individuals were interviewed and evaluated by the Wagnild & Young resilience scale and a sociodemographic questionnaire. Results Eighty-one percent of patients were classified as resilient according to the scale. Conclusion In the sample studied, resilience was identified in high proportion among patients with ischemic heart disease. PMID:26815312

  15. Antidepressants and Valvular Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chia-Hui; Hsiao, Fei-Yuan; Liu, Yen-Bin; Gau, Susan Shur-Fen; Wang, Chi-Chuan; Shen, Li-Jiuan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Empirical evidence regarding the association between antidepressants and valvular heart disease (VHD) is scarce. Using Taiwan's National Health Insurance Research database, this nested case-control study assessed the association between antidepressants and VHD in a Chinese population. Among a cohort of patients who used at least 3 prescription antidepressants, 874 cases with VHD and 3496 matched controls (1:4 ratio) were identified. Conditional logistic regression models were used to examine the timing, duration, dose and type of antidepressants use, and the risk of VHD. Current use of antidepressants was associated with a 1.4-fold increase in the risk of VHD (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 1.44; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.17–1.77). Among current users, a dose–response association was observed in terms of the cumulative duration and the cumulative antidepressant dose. Significantly higher risks of VHD were observed among the current users of tricyclic antidepressants (aOR 1.40 [1.05–1.87]). We found that the use of antidepressants was associated with a greater risk of VHD and that the risks varied according to different antidepressants. PMID:27057841

  16. Glycemic index and heart disease.

    PubMed

    Leeds, Anthony R

    2002-07-01

    A diet high in carbohydrates with high glycemic indexes (GI) and glycemic load were linked to risk of coronary heart disease development in women in a large prospective study. Two cross-sectional studies showed that low-GI diets are associated with high HDL-cholesterol concentrations, especially in women. In a tightly controlled study of patients with type 2 diabetes, serum total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, and apolipoprotein B concentrations fell more significantly after a low-GI diet than after a high-GI diet. In the same study, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 concentrations were reduced by 58% after the low-GI diet. Insulin-stimulated glucose uptake by adipocytes was significantly higher in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft surgery after 4 wk of consuming a low-GI diet than after consuming a high-GI diet. The effects of low-GI diets may be mediated by changes in postprandial fatty acid concentrations or by hormonal signals from adipocytes, but a possible association of low-GI diets with some other dietary factor such as chromium must not be excluded. Proof of the clinical value of low-GI diets awaits prospective trials, which should include short-term observations covering periods of metabolic stress induced by surgery as well as long-term trials with clinical endpoints.

  17. Behavior patterns and coronary heart disease

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, J. C.; Cronin, J. P.

    1975-01-01

    The relationships between two behavioral patterns, cardiac risk factors, and coronary heart disease are investigated. Risk factors used in the analysis were family history of coronary disease, smoking, cholesterol, obesity, systotic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, blood sugar, uric acid, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and white blood unit. It was found that conventional, non-behavioral pattern risk factors alone were not significantly related to coronary heart disease.

  18. HIV/AIDS, chronic diseases and globalisation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    HIV/AIDS has always been one of the most thoroughly global of diseases. In the era of widely available anti-retroviral therapy (ART), it is also commonly recognised as a chronic disease that can be successfully managed on a long-term basis. This article examines the chronic character of the HIV/AIDS pandemic and highlights some of the changes we might expect to see at the global level as HIV is increasingly normalised as "just another chronic disease". The article also addresses the use of this language of chronicity to interpret the HIV/AIDS pandemic and calls into question some of the consequences of an uncritical acceptance of concepts of chronicity. PMID:21871074

  19. HIV/AIDS, chronic diseases and globalisation.

    PubMed

    Colvin, Christopher J

    2011-08-26

    HIV/AIDS has always been one of the most thoroughly global of diseases. In the era of widely available anti-retroviral therapy (ART), it is also commonly recognised as a chronic disease that can be successfully managed on a long-term basis. This article examines the chronic character of the HIV/AIDS pandemic and highlights some of the changes we might expect to see at the global level as HIV is increasingly normalised as "just another chronic disease". The article also addresses the use of this language of chronicity to interpret the HIV/AIDS pandemic and calls into question some of the consequences of an uncritical acceptance of concepts of chronicity.

  20. Public health research in congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Lara, Diego A; Lopez, Keila N

    2014-01-01

    Public health research is an integral part of the study of congenital heart disease. While this type of research has become more popular, particularly over the past decade, it has a history that stretches back to almost the beginnings of pediatric cardiology as a field. This review aims to introduce the concepts and methodologies of public health and how they relate to congenital heart disease, describe some of the challenges of traditional research methods in congenital heart disease, describe the history of public health research, and demonstrate the relevance of public health research, particularly databases, to pediatric cardiology fellows.

  1. Cardiac imaging in valvular heart disease.

    PubMed

    Choo, W S; Steeds, R P

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this article is to provide a perspective on the relative importance and contribution of different imaging modalities in patients with valvular heart disease. Valvular heart disease is increasing in prevalence across Europe, at a time when the clinical ability of physicians to diagnose and assess severity is declining. Increasing reliance is placed on echocardiography, which is the mainstay of cardiac imaging in valvular heart disease. This article outlines the techniques used in this context and their limitations, identifying areas in which dynamic imaging with cardiovascular magnetic resonance and multislice CT are expanding.

  2. Cardiac imaging in valvular heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Choo, W S; Steeds, R P

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this article is to provide a perspective on the relative importance and contribution of different imaging modalities in patients with valvular heart disease. Valvular heart disease is increasing in prevalence across Europe, at a time when the clinical ability of physicians to diagnose and assess severity is declining. Increasing reliance is placed on echocardiography, which is the mainstay of cardiac imaging in valvular heart disease. This article outlines the techniques used in this context and their limitations, identifying areas in which dynamic imaging with cardiovascular magnetic resonance and multislice CT are expanding. PMID:22723532

  3. [Indications for surgery for valvular heart disease].

    PubMed

    Halbach, Marcel; Wahlers, Thorsten; Baldus, Stephan; Rudolph, Volker

    2015-11-01

    Due to the demographic change, chronic valvular heart disease becomes increasingly important - especially age-related primary diseases of the aortic and mitral valve as well as secondary diseases of the mitral and tricuspid valve caused by other age-related cardiac disorders. Medical treatment is limited to symptom relief by use of diuretics. Specific drugs or drugs with a prognostic benefit are not available. Thus, valve repair or replacement are the key options for treatment of relevant valvular heart disease. While open heart surgery was the only approach for a long time, interventional, catheter-based therapies have evolved in the last decade. This article describes up-to-date recommendations on indications for surgery for the most prevalent valvular heart diseases in adults - aortic stenosis, and aortic, mitral and tricuspid regurgitation).

  4. [Atrial fibrillation concomitant with valvular heart disease].

    PubMed

    Ishii, Yosuke

    2013-01-01

    Patients with valvular heart disease frequently have atrial fibrillation(AF) due to elevated pressure and dilatation of the left and right atria and pulmonary veins. Guidelines for valvular heart disease and AF recommend that surgical treatment for the valvular heart disease should be performed concomitantly with AF surgery. The Full-Maze procedure has evolved into the gold standard of treatment for medically refractory AF. In addition to the pulmonary vein isolation, the right and left atrial incisions of the Full-Maze procedure are designed to block potential macroreentrant pathways. According to the mechanisms of AF with valvular heart disease, the Full-Maze procedure is more effective for the patients than the pulmonary vein isolation alone.

  5. Flu and Heart Disease and Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... Video Medscape Podcasts Public Service Announcements (PSAs) Toolkits Influenza Types Seasonal Avian Swine/Variant Pandemic Other Get ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Past Newsletters Flu and Heart Disease & Stroke Language: English Español ...

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging of congenital heart disease

    SciTech Connect

    Fletcher, B.D.; Jacobstein, M.D.

    1988-01-01

    Focusing primarily on MR imaging of the heart, this book covers other diagnostic imaging modalities as well. The authors review new technologies and diagnostic procedures pertinent to congenital heat disease and present each congenital heat abnormality as a separate entity.

  7. What Are Heart Disease and Stroke?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Aortic Aneurysm More What Are Heart Disease and Stroke? Updated:Dec 8,2015 There are many types ... build-up in the lungs, called “pulmonary congestion”. STROKE and TIA happen when a blood vessel that ...

  8. Job Dissatisfaction and Coronary Heart Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friis, Robert

    1976-01-01

    Based on the psychosocial factor that life dissatisfactions may be associated with physical illnesses, this research examines the relationship between job dissatisfaction and its causal link to premature death from heart disease. (Author/RK)

  9. [Heart failure, a disease of the elderly].

    PubMed

    Hanon, Olivier

    2004-09-25

    INCREASING PREVALENCE OF HOSPITALISATIONS AND MORTALITY: Heart failure represents a major public health problem. Indeed, the ageing of the population and the frequency of cardiovascular risk factors explain the considerable increase in the prevalence of heart failure over the past few years. SYSTOLIC FUNCTION IS USUALLY PRESERVED: The physiopathological features of cardiovascular ageing have resulted in the high prevalence of heart failure with preserved systolic function. Hence, in patients aged over 75 presenting with heart failure, around 50% exhibit preserved ejection fraction. THE NEED FOR GERONTOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT: The prognosis of heart failure remains severe, notably in elderly, fragile patients often exhibiting several diseases. Within this context, a gerontological assessment is crucial in order to screen for concomitant diseases, the degree of the patients' dependence and the presence of "fragility". This work-up must assess the cognitive function, autonomy, somatic status, living conditions and the medico-social management of these patients.

  10. Chagas Heart Disease: Report on Recent Developments

    PubMed Central

    Machado, Fabiana S.; Jelicks, Linda A.; Kirchhoff, Louis V.; Shirani, Jamshid; Nagajyothi, Fnu; Mukherjee, Shankar; Nelson, Randin; Coyle, Christina M.; Spray, David C.; Campos de Carvalho, Antonio C.; Guan, Fangxia; Prado, Cibele M.; Lisanti, Michael P.; Weiss, Louis M.; Montgomery, Susan P.; Tanowitz, Herbert B.

    2011-01-01

    Chagas disease, caused by the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, is an important cause of cardiac disease in endemic areas of Latin America. It is now being diagnosed in non-endemic areas due to immigration. Typical cardiac manifestations of Chagas disease include dilated cardiomyopathy, congestive heart failure, arrhythmias, cardioembolism and stroke. Clinical and laboratory-based research to define the pathology resulting from T. cruzi infection has shed light on many of the cellular and molecular mechanisms leading to these manifestations. Antiparasitic treatment may not be appropriate for patients with advanced cardiac disease. Clinical management of Chagas heart disease is similar to that used for cardiomyopathies due to other processes. Cardiac transplantation has been successfully performed in a small number of patients with Chagas heart disease. PMID:22293860

  11. Major Risk Factors for Heart Disease: High Blood Cholesterol

    MedlinePlus

    ... Major Risk Factors for Heart Disease High Blood Cholesterol High blood cholesterol is another major risk factor for heart disease ... can do something about. The higher your blood cholesterol level, the greater your risk for developing heart ...

  12. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Diabetic Heart Disease?

    MedlinePlus

    ... heart disease. This is called “silent” heart disease. Diabetes -related nerve damage that blunts heart pain may explain ... not be the same for another one. Also, diabetes-related nerve damage can interfere with pain signals in ...

  13. Coronary Artery Disease - Coronary Heart Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... total cholesterol score is calculated using the following equation: HDL + LDL + 20 percent of your triglyceride level. ... keeping your heart healthy. Sign up today! Email:* State: Zip Code: By clicking submit below you agree ...

  14. Heart failure disease management: implementation and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Whellan, David J

    2005-01-01

    Millions of dollars are being spent to identify new therapies to improve mortality and morbidity for the growing epidemic of patients sustaining heart failure. However, in clinical practice, these therapies are currently underused. To bridge the gap between proven therapies and clinical practice, the medical community has turned to disease management. Heart failure disease management interventions vary from vital-sign monitoring to multidisciplinary approaches involving a pharmacist, nutritionist, nurse practitioner, and physician. This review attempts to categorize these inventions based on location. We compared the published results from randomized, controlled trials of the following types of heart failure disease management interventions: inpatient, clinic visits, home visits, and telephone follow up. Although research shows an improvement in the quality of care and a decrease in hospitalizations for patients sustaining heart failure, the economic impact of disease management is still unclear. The current reimbursement structure is a disincentive to providers wanting to offer disease management services to patients sustaining heart failure. Additionally, the cost of providing disease management services such as additional clinical visits, patient education materials, or additional personnel time has not been well documented. Most heart failure disease management studies do confirm the concept that providing increased access to healthcare providers for an at-risk group of patients sustaining heart failure does improve outcomes. However, a large-scale randomized, controlled clinical trial based in the United States is needed to prove that this concept can be implemented beyond a single center and to determine how much it will cost patients, providers, healthcare systems, and payers.

  15. Design for Heart Disease Prevention Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Bureau of Continuing Education Curriculum Development.

    In this teaching and curriculum guide for community health education, a design is suggested for a course that could help prevent premature deaths due to heart disease. The course communicates facts regarding the causes of cardiovascular diseases, and outlines opportunities for attaining the degree of physical conditioning essential to prevention.…

  16. Software innovations in computed tomography for structural heart disease interventions.

    PubMed

    Hell, Michaela; Marwan, Mohamed; Gaede, Luise; Achenbach, Stephan

    2016-05-17

    Computed tomography (CT) provides high, isotropic spatial resolution and has become firmly established in pre-procedural imaging for structural heart disease interventions. It allows determination of the exact dimensions of the target structure, provides information regarding the access route and permits identification of fluoroscopic projection angles to provide optimal visualisation for device placement. Several software solutions are available and have been systematically evaluated in the context of transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). The use of software products to perform automated measurements can be useful, especially when the experience and expertise regarding evaluation of CT in the context of structural heart disease are limited. In scientific studies, software has been demonstrated to provide accurate support for annulus sizing and prosthesis selection, to aid in reliably identifying patients in whom a transfemoral access may be problematic, and to suggest suitable angulations for fluoroscopic imaging to achieve an orthogonal view onto the aortic valve during implantation.

  17. Pregnancy and Adult Congenital Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Bhatt, Ami B; DeFaria Yeh, Doreen

    2015-11-01

    Most women with known congenital heart disease can have successful pregnancy, labor, and delivery. Preconception assessment is essential in understanding anatomy, repairs, and current physiology, all of which can influence risk in pregnancy. With that foundation, a multidisciplinary cardio-obstetric team can predict and prepare for complications that may occur with superimposed hemodynamic changes of pregnancy. Individuals with Eisenmenger syndrome, pulmonary hypertension, cyanosis, significant left heart obstruction, ventricular dysfunction, or prior major cardiac event are among the highest risk for complications.

  18. Radiation-induced heart disease in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Lauk, S.; Kiszel, Z.; Buschmann, J.; Trott, K.R.

    1985-04-01

    After local irradiation of the rat heart with X ray doses of over 10 Gy (single dose), animals developed symptoms of radiation-induced heart disease, which at higher doses would lead to fatal cardiac failure. The LD 50 at 1 year was between 15 Gy and 20 Gy. The pericardium and epicardium responded to irradiation with exudative pericarditis after 4 months. Focal myocardial damage was secondary to progressive capillary damage.

  19. Project SuperHeart: An Evaluation of a Heart Disease Intervention Program For Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Way, Joyce W.

    1981-01-01

    An effective way to prevent coronary heart disease in later life is to concentrate on preventive measures in the early years before coronary heart disease becomes established. Project SuperHeart, a heart disease intervention program for young children, includes physical fitness and classroom activities emphasizing basic nutritional habits. (JN)

  20. [Evaluation of congenital heart disease in adults].

    PubMed

    Oliver Ruiz, José María; Mateos García, Marta; Bret Zurita, Montserrat

    2003-06-01

    Improvements in the diagnosis and surgical treatment of congenital heart disease during infancy and childhood have resulted in an outstanding increase in the prevalence of these entities during adulthood. Congenital heart disease in the adult represents a new diagnostic challenge to the consultant cardiologist, unfamiliar with the anatomical and functional complexities of cardiac malformations. Assessment of adult congenital heart disease with imaging techniques can be as accurate as in children. However, these techniques cannot substitute for a detailed clinical assessment. Physical examination, electrocardiography and chest x-rays remain the three main pillars of bedside diagnosis. Transthoracic echocardiography is undoubtedly the imaging technique which provides most information, and in many situations no additional studies are needed. Nevertheless, ultrasound imaging properties in adults are not as favorable as in children, and prior surgical procedures further impair image quality. Despite recent advances in ultrasound technologies such as harmonic or contrast imaging, other diagnostic procedures are sometimes required. Fortunately, transesophageal echocardiography and magnetic resonance imaging are easily performed in the adult, and do not require anaesthetic support, in contrast to pediatric patients. These techniques, together with nuclear cardiology and cardiac catheterization, complete the second tier of diagnostic techniques for congenital heart disease. To avoid unnecessary repetition of diagnostic procedures, the attending cardiologist should choose the sequence of diagnostic techniques carefully; although the information this yields is often redundant, it is also frequently complementary. This article aims to compare the diagnostic utility of different imaging techniques in adult patients with congenital heart disease, both with and without prior surgical repair.

  1. 2013 update on congenital heart disease, clinical cardiology, heart failure, and heart transplant.

    PubMed

    Subirana, M Teresa; Barón-Esquivias, Gonzalo; Manito, Nicolás; Oliver, José M; Ripoll, Tomás; Lambert, Jose Luis; Zunzunegui, José L; Bover, Ramon; García-Pinilla, José Manuel

    2014-03-01

    This article presents the most relevant developments in 2013 in 3 key areas of cardiology: congenital heart disease, clinical cardiology, and heart failure and transplant. Within the area of congenital heart disease, we reviewed contributions related to sudden death in adult congenital heart disease, the importance of specific echocardiographic parameters in assessing the systemic right ventricle, problems in patients with repaired tetralogy of Fallot and indication for pulmonary valve replacement, and confirmation of the role of specific factors in the selection of candidates for Fontan surgery. The most recent publications in clinical cardiology include a study by a European working group on correct diagnostic work-up in cardiomyopathies, studies on the cost-effectiveness of percutaneous aortic valve implantation, a consensus document on the management of type B aortic dissection, and guidelines on aortic valve and ascending aortic disease. The most noteworthy developments in heart failure and transplantation include new American guidelines on heart failure, therapeutic advances in acute heart failure (serelaxin), the management of comorbidities such as iron deficiency, risk assessment using new biomarkers, and advances in ventricular assist devices.

  2. New Genetic Insights into Congenital Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ware, Stephanie M.; Jefferies, John Lynn

    2012-01-01

    There has been remarkable progress in understanding the genetic basis of cardiovascular malformations. Chromosome microarray analysis has provided a new tool to understand the genetic basis of syndromic cardiovascular malformations resulting from microdeletion or microduplication of genetic material, allowing the delineation of new syndromes. Improvements in sequencing technology have led to increasingly comprehensive testing for aortopathy, cardiomyopathy, single gene syndromic disorders, and Mendelian-inherited congenital heart disease. Understanding the genetic etiology for these disorders has improved their clinical recognition and management and led to new guidelines for treatment and family-based diagnosis and surveillance. These new discoveries have also expanded our understanding of the contribution of genetic variation, susceptibility alleles, and epigenetics to isolated congenital heart disease. This review summarizes the current understanding of the genetic basis of syndromic and non-syndromic congenital heart disease and highlights new diagnostic and management recommendations. PMID:22822471

  3. [Valvular heart disease: multidetector computed tomography evaluation].

    PubMed

    Franco, A; Fernández-Pérez, G C; Tomás-Mallebrera, M; Badillo-Portugal, S; Orejas, M

    2014-01-01

    Heart valve disease is a clinical problem that has been studied with classical imaging techniques like echocardiography and MRI. Technological advances in CT make it possible to obtain static and dynamic images that enable not only a morphological but also a functional analysis in many cases. Although it is currently indicated only in patients with inconclusive findings at echocardiography and MRI or those in whom these techniques are contraindicated, multidetector CT makes it possible to diagnose stenosis or regurgitation through planimetry, to evaluate and quantify valvular calcium, and to show the functional repercussions of these phenomena on the rest of the structures of the heart. Given that multidetector CT is being increasingly used in the diagnosis of ischemic heart disease, we think it is interesting for radiologists to know its potential for the study of valvular disease.

  4. Heart failure and Alzheimer′s disease

    PubMed Central

    Cermakova, P; Eriksdotter, M; Lund, L H; Winblad, B; Religa, P; Religa, D

    2015-01-01

    It has recently been proposed that heart failure is a risk factor for Alzheimer′s disease. Decreased cerebral blood flow and neurohormonal activation due to heart failure may contribute to the dysfunction of the neurovascular unit and cause an energy crisis in neurons. This leads to the impaired clearance of amyloid beta and hyperphosphorylation of tau protein, resulting in the formation of amyloid beta plaques and neurofibrillary tangles. In this article, we will summarize the current understanding of the relationship between heart failure and Alzheimer′s disease based on epidemiological studies, brain imaging research, pathological findings and the use of animal models. The importance of atherosclerosis, myocardial infarction, atrial fibrillation, blood pressure and valve disease as well as the effect of relevant medications will be discussed. PMID:25041352

  5. Epidemiology of congenital heart disease in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Pinto Júnior, Valdester Cavalcante; Branco, Klébia Magalhães P. Castello; Cavalcante, Rodrigo Cardoso; Carvalho Junior, Waldemiro; Lima, José Rubens Costa; de Freitas, Sílvia Maria; Fraga, Maria Nazaré de Oliveira; de Souza, Nayana Maria Gomes

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Congenital heart disease is an abnormality in the structure or cardiocirculatory function, occurring from birth, even if diagnosed later. It can result in intrauterine death in childhood or in adulthood. Accounted for 6% of infant deaths in Brazil in 2007. Objective To estimate underreporting in the prevalence of congenital heart disease in Brazil and its subtypes. Methods The calculations of prevalence were performed by applying coefficients, giving them function rates for calculations of health problems. The study makes an approach between the literature and the governmental registries. It was adopted an estimate of 9: 1000 births and prevalence rates for subtypes applied to births of 2010. Estimates of births with congenital heart disease were compared with the reports to the Ministry of Health and were studied by descriptive methods with the use of rates and coefficients represented in tables. Results The incidence in Brazil is 25,757 new cases/year, distributed in: North 2,758; Northeast 7,570; Southeast 10,112; South 3,329; and Midwest 1,987. In 2010, were reported to System of Live Birth Information of Ministry of Health 1,377 cases of babies with congenital heart disease, representing 5.3% of the estimated for Brazil. In the same period, the most common subtypes were: ventricular septal defect (7,498); atrial septal defect (4,693); persistent ductus arteriosus (2,490); pulmonary stenosis (1,431); tetralogy of Fallot (973); coarctation of the aorta (973); transposition of the great arteries (887); and aortic stenosis 630. The prevalence of congenital heart disease, for the year of 2009, was 675,495 children and adolescents and 552,092 adults. Conclusion In Brazil, there is underreporting in the prevalence of congenital heart disease, signaling the need for adjustments in the methodology of registration. PMID:26107454

  6. The natural cure of coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Withnell, Allan

    2003-01-01

    Following the development of coronary heart disease in 1989 I was introduced to an alumnus of the Pritikin Longevity Center in California and I adopted the regimen of diet and exercise. Within five months I was able to abandon all medication and was symptom free. My medical colleagues maintained that, because I had recovered, the Consultant's diagnosis must have been wrong--there can be no cure of coronary heart disease by lifestyle changes alone. As a result of my experience I decided to review the literature to study the natural history of coronary heart disease. My findings strongly suggest that the increase in incidence in the last hundred years from virtually nil to epidemic proportions is due to lifestyle changes and that the disease can be reversed. I list a number of doctors who have influenced large numbers of people to change their lifestyles with great success. They have utilised mainly plant-based diets whose composition is the same or similar to that which Pritikin originally used and which is still extant at the Longevity Center. I conclude by suggesting that the possibility of reversal of coronary heart disease has profound implications for its treatment with enormous potential savings for the National Health Service.

  7. Cyanotic congenital heart disease and atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Tarp, Julie Bjerre; Jensen, Annette Schophuus; Engstrøm, Thomas; Holstein-Rathlou, Niels-Henrik; Søndergaard, Lars

    2017-03-04

    Improved treatment options in paediatric cardiology and congenital heart surgery have resulted in an ageing population of patients with cyanotic congenital heart disease (CCHD). The risk of acquired heart disease such as atherosclerosis increases with age.Previous studies have speculated whether patients with CCHD are protected against atherosclerosis. Results have shown that the coronary arteries of patients with CCHD are free from plaques and stenosis. Decreased carotid intima-media thickness and low total plasma cholesterol may indicate a reduced risk of later development of atherosclerosis. However, the evidence is still sparse and questionable, and a reasonable explanation for the decreased risk of developing atherosclerosis in patients with CCHD is still missing.This review provides an overview of what is known about the prevalence and potential causes of the reduced risk of atherosclerosis in patients with CCHD.

  8. Apical aneurysm of Chagas's heart disease.

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, J S; Mello De Oliveira, J A; Frederigue, U; Lima Filho, E C

    1981-01-01

    A retrospective study of Chagas's heart disease was carried out by a review of necropsy reports with special reference to the lesion known as the apical aneurysm. It was concluded that this lesion was more frequent in men, was unrelated to age, and was unrelated to heart weight. Patients dying of the cardiac consequences of Chagas's cardiomyopathy were more likely to have an apical aneurysm than those whose death was unrelated to the disease but the mode of death (sudden, or with heart failure) was unconnected with its presence. Transillumination from within the ventricle at necropsy was not only useful in demonstrating the aneurysm but also showed areas of myocardial thinning elsewhere. Thrombosis within the lesion was frequent. The aetiology of the apical aneurysm is discussed and it is concluded that while ischaemia, inflammation, thrombosis, and mechanical factors may produce and localise this lesion, the underlying cause is the basic pathogenetic process-parasympathetic nerve cell destruction. Images PMID:7295439

  9. Amyloid heart disease: genetics translated into disease-modifying therapy.

    PubMed

    Sperry, Brett W; Tang, W H Wilson

    2017-03-02

    Given increased awareness and improved non-invasive diagnostic tools, cardiac amyloidosis has become an increasingly recognised aetiology of increased ventricular wall thickness and heart failure with preserved ejection fraction. Once considered a rare disease with no treatment options, translational research has harnessed novel pathways and led the way to promising treatment options. Gene variants that contribute to amyloid heart disease provide unique opportunities to explore potential disease-modifying therapeutic strategies. Amyloidosis has become the model disease through which gene therapy using small interfering RNAs and antisense oligonucleotides has evolved.

  10. Changing Landscape of Congenital Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Bouma, Berto J; Mulder, Barbara J M

    2017-03-17

    Congenital heart disease is the most frequently occurring congenital disorder affecting ≈0.8% of live births. Thanks to great efforts and technical improvements, including the development of cardiopulmonary bypass in the 1950s, large-scale repair in these patients became possible, with subsequent dramatic reduction in morbidity and mortality. The ongoing search for progress and the growing understanding of the cardiovascular system and its pathophysiology refined all aspects of care for these patients. As a consequence, survival further increased over the past decades, and a new group of patients, those who survived congenital heart disease into adulthood, emerged. However, a large range of complications raised at the horizon as arrhythmias, endocarditis, pulmonary hypertension, and heart failure, and the need for additional treatment became clear. Technical solutions were sought in perfection and creation of new surgical techniques by developing catheter-based interventions, with elimination of open heart surgery and new electronic devices enabling, for example, multisite pacing and implantation of internal cardiac defibrillators to prevent sudden death. Over time, many pharmaceutical studies were conducted, changing clinical treatment slowly toward evidence-based care, although results were often limited by low numbers and clinical heterogeneity. More attention has been given to secondary issues like sports participation, pregnancy, work, and social-related difficulties. The relevance of these issues was already recognized in the 1970s when the need for specialized centers with multidisciplinary teams was proclaimed. Finally, research has become incorporated in care. Results of intervention studies and registries increased the knowledge on epidemiology of adults with congenital heart disease and their complications during life, and at the end, several guidelines became easily accessible, guiding physicians to deliver care appropriately. Over the past decades

  11. Coronary heart disease mortality after irradiation for Hodgkin's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Boivin, J.F.; Hutchison, G.B.

    1982-01-01

    The authors conducted a study designed to evaluate the hypothesis that irradiation to the heart in the treatment for Hodgkin's disease (HD) is associated with increased coronary heart disease (CHD) mortality. This report describes 957 patients diagnosed with HD in 1942-75 and analyzes follow-up findings through December 1977. Twenty-five coronary heart disease deaths have been observed, and 4258.2 person-years of experience at risk have been accrued. The relative death rate (RDR), defined as the CHD mortality for heart-irradiated subjects divided by the mortality for nonirradiated subjects, was estimated. After adjustment for the effect of interval of observation, age, stage, and class, the RDR estimate is 1.5 but does not differ significantly from unit (95% confidence limits: 0.59, 3.7).

  12. Economic cycles and heart disease in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Quast, Troy; Gonzalez, Fidel

    2014-05-01

    While a considerable literature has emerged regarding the relationship between the business cycles and mortality rates, relatively little is known regarding how economic fluctuations are related to morbidity. We investigate the relationship between business cycles and heart disease in Mexico using a unique state-level dataset of 512 observations consisting of real GDP and heart disease incidence rates (overall and by age group) from 1995 to 2010. Our study is one of the first to use a state-level panel approach to analyze the relationship between the business cycle and morbidity. Further, the state and year fixed effects employed in our econometric specification reduce possible omitted variable bias. We find a general procyclical, although largely statistically insignificant, contemporaneous relationship. However, an increase in GDP per capita sustained over five years is associated with considerable increases in the incidence rates of ischemic heart disease and hypertension. This procyclical relationship appears strongest in the states with the lowest levels of development and for the oldest age groups. Our results suggest that economic fluctuations may have important lagged effects on heart disease in developing countries.

  13. Other Possible Heart Disease Risk Factors

    MedlinePlus

    ... and anxiety Negative emotions like depression, stress, and anxiety can raise your risk of developing heart disease . Researchers aren't exactly sure why this is. Perhaps these emotions lead to unhealthy ways of coping, such as smoking, drink too much, or eating high-fat foods — ...

  14. Warning signs and symptoms of heart disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... DL, Zipes DP, Libby P, Bonow RO, Braunwald E, eds. Braunwald's Heart Disease: A Textbook of Cardiovascular Medicine . 10th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2015:chap 54. Review Date 9/26/2016 Updated by: Michael A. Chen, MD, PhD, Associate Professor of Medicine, ...

  15. The Counselor and Coronary Heart Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ottens, Allen J.

    1977-01-01

    It is clear that steps can be taken for heart disease prevention and that counselors must give thought to adapting existing ideas and techniques and to developing and experimenting with new and innovative preventive tactics. Of utmost importance is the belief that behavioral intervention is both warranted and worthwhile. (Author)

  16. Update on heart failure, heart transplant, congenital heart disease, and clinical cardiology.

    PubMed

    Almenar, Luis; Zunzunegui, José Luis; Barón, Gonzalo; Carrasco, José Ignacio; Gómez-Doblas, Juan José; Comín, Josep; Barrios, Vivencio; Subirana, M Teresa; Díaz-Molina, Beatriz

    2013-04-01

    In the year 2012, 3 scientific sections-heart failure and transplant, congenital heart disease, and clinical cardiology-are presented together in the same article. The most relevant development in the area of heart failure and transplantation is the 2012 publication of the European guidelines for heart failure. These describe new possibilities for some drugs (eplerenone and ivabradine); expand the criteria for resynchronization, ventricular assist, and peritoneal dialysis; and cover possibilities of percutaneous repair of the mitral valve (MitraClip(®)). The survival of children with hypoplastic left heart syndrome in congenital heart diseases has improved significantly. Instructions for percutaneous techniques and devices have been revised and modified for the treatment of atrial septal defects, ostium secundum, and ventricular septal defects. Hybrid procedures for addressing structural congenital heart defects have become more widespread. In the area of clinical cardiology studies have demonstrated that percutaneous prosthesis implantation has lower mortality than surgical implantation. Use of the CHA2DS2-VASc criteria and of new anticoagulants (dabigatran, rivaroxaban and apixaban) is also recommended. In addition, the development of new sequencing techniques has enabled the analysis of multiple genes.

  17. Congenital Heart Disease: Causes, Diagnosis, Symptoms, and Treatments.

    PubMed

    Sun, RongRong; Liu, Min; Lu, Lei; Zheng, Yi; Zhang, Peiying

    2015-07-01

    The congenital heart disease includes abnormalities in heart structure that occur before birth. Such defects occur in the fetus while it is developing in the uterus during pregnancy. About 500,000 adults have congenital heart disease in USA (WebMD, Congenital heart defects medications, www.WebMD.com/heart-disease/tc/congenital-heart-defects-medications , 2014). 1 in every 100 children has defects in their heart due to genetic or chromosomal abnormalities, such as Down syndrome. The excessive alcohol consumption during pregnancy and use of medications, maternal viral infection, such as Rubella virus, measles (German), in the first trimester of pregnancy, all these are risk factors for congenital heart disease in children, and the risk increases if parent or sibling has a congenital heart defect. These are heart valves defects, atrial and ventricular septa defects, stenosis, the heart muscle abnormalities, and a hole inside wall of the heart which causes defect in blood circulation, heart failure, and eventual death. There are no particular symptoms of congenital heart disease, but shortness of breath and limited ability to do exercise, fatigue, abnormal sound of heart as heart murmur, which is diagnosed by a physician while listening to the heart beats. The echocardiogram or transesophageal echocardiogram, electrocardiogram, chest X-ray, cardiac catheterization, and MRI methods are used to detect congenital heart disease. Several medications are given depending on the severity of this disease, and catheter method and surgery are required for serious cases to repair heart valves or heart transplantation as in endocarditis. For genetic study, first DNA is extracted from blood followed by DNA sequence analysis and any defect in nucleotide sequence of DNA is determined. For congenital heart disease, genes in chromosome 1 show some defects in nucleotide sequence. In this review the causes, diagnosis, symptoms, and treatments of congenital heart disease are described.

  18. Pharmacometabolomics-aided Pharmacogenomics in Autoimmune Disease.

    PubMed

    Katsila, Theodora; Konstantinou, Evangelia; Lavda, Ioanna; Malakis, Harilaos; Papantoni, Ioanna; Skondra, Lamprini; Patrinos, George P

    2016-03-01

    Inter-individual variability has been a major hurdle to optimize disease management. Precision medicine holds promise for improving health and healthcare via tailor-made therapeutic strategies. Herein, we outline the paradigm of "pharmacometabolomics-aided pharmacogenomics" in autoimmune diseases. We envisage merging pharmacometabolomic and pharmacogenomic data (to address the interplay of genomic and environmental influences) with information technologies to facilitate data analysis as well as sense- and decision-making on the basis of synergy between artificial and human intelligence. Humans can detect patterns, which computer algorithms may fail to do so, whereas data-intensive and cognitively complex settings and processes limit human ability. We propose that better-informed, rapid and cost-effective omics studies need the implementation of holistic and multidisciplinary approaches.

  19. Pharmacometabolomics-aided Pharmacogenomics in Autoimmune Disease

    PubMed Central

    Katsila, Theodora; Konstantinou, Evangelia; Lavda, Ioanna; Malakis, Harilaos; Papantoni, Ioanna; Skondra, Lamprini; Patrinos, George P.

    2016-01-01

    Inter-individual variability has been a major hurdle to optimize disease management. Precision medicine holds promise for improving health and healthcare via tailor-made therapeutic strategies. Herein, we outline the paradigm of “pharmacometabolomics-aided pharmacogenomics” in autoimmune diseases. We envisage merging pharmacometabolomic and pharmacogenomic data (to address the interplay of genomic and environmental influences) with information technologies to facilitate data analysis as well as sense- and decision-making on the basis of synergy between artificial and human intelligence. Humans can detect patterns, which computer algorithms may fail to do so, whereas data-intensive and cognitively complex settings and processes limit human ability. We propose that better-informed, rapid and cost-effective omics studies need the implementation of holistic and multidisciplinary approaches. PMID:27077110

  20. Appetite suppressants and valvular heart disease.

    PubMed

    Weissman, N J

    2001-04-01

    The association between valvular heart disease and diet pills was discovered several years ago in a small cohort of patients. Subsequent uncontrolled surveys and reports suggested a prevalence of cardiac abnormalities as high as 30%. These results led to widespread concern by millions of appetite suppressant users and the withdrawal of both fenfluramine and dexfenfluramine from the market. Through this review of the literature, it becomes apparent that we have better defined the association between valvular heart disease and appetite suppressants; nonetheless, many questions and controversies remain. Most large scale, multicenter, controlled studies have shown that a prevalence of significant valve regurgitation is between 2 and 12% and that the likelihood of disease increases with increasing dose and/or duration of appetite suppressant use, but several other issues, such as the mechanism of action, remain unanswered.

  1. Serotonergic Drugs and Valvular Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Rothman, Richard B.; Baumann, Michael H.

    2009-01-01

    Background The serotonin (5-HT) releasers (±)-fenfluramine and (+)-fenfluramine were withdrawn from clinical use due to increased risk of valvular heart disease. One prevailing hypothesis (i.e., the “5-HT hypothesis”) suggests that fenfluramine-induced increases in plasma 5-HT underlie the disease. Objective Here we critically evaluate the possible mechanisms responsible for fenfluramine-associated valve disease. Methods Findings from in vitro and in vivo experiments performed in our laboratory are reviewed. The data are integrated with existing literature to address the validity of the 5-HT hypothesis and suggest alternative explanations. Conclusions The overwhelming majority of evidence refutes the 5-HT hypothesis. A more likely cause of fenfluramine-induced valvulopathy is activation of 5-HT2B receptors on heart valves by the metabolite norfenfluramine. Future serotonergic medications should be designed to lack 5-HT2B agonist activity. PMID:19505264

  2. Pharmacogenomics of Hypertension and Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Arwood, Meghan J.; Cavallari, Larisa H.; Duarte, Julio D.

    2016-01-01

    Heart disease is a leading cause of death in the United States, and hypertension is a predominant risk factor. Thus, effective blood pressure control is important to prevent adverse sequelae of hypertension, including heart failure, coronary artery disease, atrial fibrillation, and ischemic stroke. Over half of Americans have uncontrolled blood pressure, which may in part be explained by interpatient variability in drug response secondary to genetic polymorphism. As such, pharmacogenetic testing may be a supplementary tool to guide treatment. This review highlights the pharmacogenetics of antihypertensive response and response to drugs that treat adverse hypertension-related sequelae, particularly coronary artery disease and atrial fibrillation. While pharmacogenetic evidence may be more robust for the latter with respect to clinical implementation, there is increasing evidence of genetic variants that may help predict antihypertensive response. However, additional research and validation are needed before clinical implementation guidelines for antihypertensive therapy can become a reality. PMID:26272307

  3. Women's Heart Disease: Cindy Parsons and Follow the Fifty

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Women's Heart Disease Cindy Parsons and Follow the Fifty Past Issues / ... Program, knowing that her personal risk factors for heart disease, including family history, were high. She watched her ...

  4. American Indian and Alaska Native Heart Disease and Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Related CDC Web Sites Heart Disease Stroke High Blood Pressure Salt ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Related CDC Web Sites Heart Disease Stroke High Blood Pressure Salt ...

  5. Heart Rate and Initial Presentation of Cardiovascular Diseases (Caliber)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-09-17

    Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm; Coronary Heart Disease NOS; Unheralded Coronary Death; Intracerebral Haemorrhage; Heart Failure; Ischemic Stroke; Myocardial Infarction; Stroke; Peripheral Arterial Disease; Stable Angina Pectoris; Subarachnoid Haemorrhage; Transient Ischemic Attack; Unstable Angina; Cardiac Arrest, Sudden Cardiac Death

  6. How Can Coronary Heart Disease Be Prevented or Delayed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... disease and is sponsored by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), part of the National Institutes of ... disease and is sponsored by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), part of the National Institutes of ...

  7. Who Is at Risk for Coronary Heart Disease?

    MedlinePlus

    ... disease and is sponsored by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), part of the National Institutes of ... disease and is sponsored by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), part of the National Institutes of ...

  8. Pulmonary Hypertension in Congenital Heart Disease: Beyond Eisenmenger Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Krieger, Eric V; Leary, Peter J; Opotowsky, Alexander R

    2015-11-01

    Patients with adult congenital heart disease have an increased risk of developing pulmonary hypertension. There are several mechanisms of pulmonary hypertension in patients with adult congenital heart disease, and understanding them requires a systematic approach to define the patient's hemodynamics and physiology. This article reviews the updated classification of pulmonary hypertension in patients with adult congenital heart disease with a focus on pathophysiology, diagnostics, and the evaluation of pulmonary hypertension in special adult congenital heart disease populations.

  9. Cardiac arrhythmias in Chagas' heart disease.

    PubMed

    Elizari, M V; Chiale, P A

    1993-10-01

    Chagas' disease is a chronic parasitosis affecting most Latin American countries. Its most important clinical manifestation is a late developing chronic myocarditis and, much less frequently, an early acute myocarditis. Chagasic myocardial damage is microfocal and disseminated throughout the heart. In most cases, the coexistence of areas of myocytic degeneration, inflammatory infiltration, and fibrosis suggests a permanent evolving process. Commonly, chronic chagasic myocarditis resembles a dilated cardiomyopathy, with characteristic ECG abnormalities (atrial and ventricular extrasystoles, intraventricular and/or AV conduction disturbances, and primary ST-T wave changes). Since myocardial damage is scattered throughout the heart, the ECG abnormalities (arrhythmias, conduction disturbances, and repolarization changes) are also representative of the widespread cardiac involvement. Thus, sick sinus syndrome, atrial extrasystoles, intraatrial conduction disturbances, and atrial fibrillation or flutter are common findings in different stages of the disease. At the ventricular level, both conduction disturbances and arrhythmias are conspicuous expressions of the myocardial damage. Right bundle branch block alone or in combination with left anterior hemiblock are the most common conduction defects. Further compromise of the conduction system can lead to different degrees of AV block. Chagas' disease is the main cause of bundle branch block and AV block in endemic areas. In advanced cases of Chagas' heart disease, ventricular premature contractions are extremely frequent, multiform, and repetitive (couplets and runs of ventricular tachycardia), and show R on T phenomenon. These arrhythmias are usually aggravated by increased sympathetic tone, implying an enhanced risk of cardiac sudden death among chagasic patients, which is sometimes the first manifestation of the illness. Chronic chagasic myocarditis is the leading cause of cardiovascular death, mostly as a consequence

  10. Radiation-associated valvular heart disease.

    PubMed

    Ong, Daniel S; Aertker, Robert A; Clark, Alexandra N; Kiefer, Todd; Hughes, G Chad; Harrison, J Kevin; Bashore, Thomas M

    2013-11-01

    Therapeutic ionizing radiation, such as that used in the treatment of Hodgkin's lymphoma, can cause cardiac valvular damage that may take several years to manifest as radiation-associated valvular heart disease. Treatment can be complicated by comorbid radiation injury to other cardiac and mediastinal structures that lead to traditional surgical valve replacement or repair becoming high-risk. A representative case is presented that demonstrates the complexity of radiation-associated valvular heart disease and its successful treatment with percutaneous transcatheter valve replacement. The prevalence and pathophysiologic mechanism of radiation-associated valvular injury are reviewed. Anthracycline adjuvant therapy appears to increase the risk of valvular fibrosis. Left-sided heart valves are more commonly affected than right-sided heart valves. A particular pattern of calcification has been noted in some patients, and experimental data suggest that radiation induction of an osteogenic phenotype may be responsible. A renewed appreciation of the cardiac valvular effects of therapeutic ionizing radiation for mediastinal malignancies is important, and the treatment of such patients may be assisted by the development of novel, less-invasive approaches.

  11. Arrhythmogenic inherited heart muscle diseases in children.

    PubMed

    Towbin, J A; Bowles, N E

    2001-01-01

    The left ventricle (LV) plays a central role in the maintenance of health of children and adults due to its role as the major pump of the heart. In cases of LV dysfunction, a significant percentage of affected individuals develop signs and symptoms of congestive heart failure, leading to the need for therapeutic intervention. Therapy for these patients include anticongestive medications and, in some, placement of devices such as aortic balloon pump or left ventricular assist device, or cardiac transplantation. In the majority of patients the origin is unknown, leading to the term idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy. During the past decade, the basis of LV dysfunction has begun to unravel. In approximately 30% to 40% of cases, the disorder is inherited; autosomal dominant inheritance is most common (although X-linked, autosomal recessive and mitochondrial inheritance occurs). In the remaining patients, the disorder is presumed to be acquired, with inflammatory heart disease playing an important role. In the case of familial dilated cardiomyopathy, the genetic basis is beginning to unfold. To date, 2 genes for X-linked familial dilated cardiomyopathy (dystrophin, G4.5) have been identified and 4 genes for the autosomal dominant form (actin, desmin, lamin A/C, delta-sarcoglycan) have been described. In 1 form of inflammatory heart disease, coxsackievirus myocarditis, inflammatory mediators, and dystrophin cleavage play a role in the development of LV dysfunction. This review describes the molecular genetics of LV dysfunction and provide evidence for a "final common pathway" responsible for the phenotype.

  12. Poor oral health and coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Joshipura, K J; Rimm, E B; Douglass, C W; Trichopoulos, D; Ascherio, A; Willett, W C

    1996-09-01

    A few recent studies have shown associations between poor oral health and coronary heart disease (CHD). The objective of this study was to examine the incidence of CHD in relation to number of teeth present and periodontal disease, and to explore potential mediators of this association, in a prospective cohort study. This study is a part of the ongoing Health Professionals Follow-Up Study (HPFS). Participants included a US national sample of 44,119 male health professionals (58% of whom were dentists), from 40 to 75 years of age, who reported no diagnosed CHD, cancer, or diabetes at baseline. We recorded 757 incident cases of CHD, including fatal and non-fatal myocardial infarction and sudden death, in six years of follow-up. Among men who reported pre-existing periodontal disease, those with 10 or fewer teeth were at increased risk of CHD compared with men with 25 or more teeth (relative risk = 1.67; 95% confidence interval, 1.03 to 2.71), after adjustment for standard CHD risk factors. Among men without pre-existing periodontal disease, no relationship was found (relative risk = 1.11; 95% confidence interval, 0.74 to 1.68). The associations were only slightly attenuated after we controlled for dietary factors. No overall associations were found between periodontal disease and coronary heart disease. Tooth loss may be associated with increased risk of CHD, primarily among those with a positive periodontal disease history; diet was only a small mediator of this association.

  13. Development of a Comprehensive Heart Disease Knowledge Questionnaire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergman, Hannah E.; Reeve, Bryce B.; Moser, Richard P.; Scholl, Sarah; Klein, William M. P.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Heart disease is the number one killer of both men and women in the United States, yet a comprehensive and evidence-based heart disease knowledge assessment is currently not available. Purpose: This paper describes the two-phase development of a novel heart disease knowledge questionnaire. Methods: After review and critique of the…

  14. Psychological Perspectives on the Development of Coronary Heart Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, Karen A.

    2005-01-01

    Psychological science has new opportunities to have major input into the understanding of the development of coronary heart disease. This article provides an overview of advances in understanding the etiology of heart disease, recently applied technologies for measuring early stages of heart disease, and an accumulating base of evidence on the…

  15. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Heart Valve Disease?

    MedlinePlus

    ... NHLBI on Twitter. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Heart Valve Disease? Major Signs and Symptoms The main sign of heart valve disease is ... and veins in the neck Other Signs and Symptoms Heart valve disease can cause chest pain that ...

  16. [Recovery of walk in persons with stroke and heart disease].

    PubMed

    Kapidzić-Duraković, Suada; Karabegović, Azra; Zonić-Imamović, Majda

    2006-01-01

    The goal of this research is to analyze the differences in recovery of walk of two groups of patients who have suffered the stroke--those who have and have not suffered from heart disease prior to the stroke. Test group consisted of patients who have suffered the stroke, and have been rehabilitated in the Clinic for physical medicine and rehabilitation in Tuzla, in 2003. Patients who have had a heart disease before suffering the stroke and have been treated by a cardiologist comprised the first test group (Group I, N=48), while patients without previous heart disease comprised the second test group (Group II, N=69). In relation to their ability to walk, patients have been divided into three groups: those who are able to walk without help, those who are not able to walk and those who are able to walk with a walking aid. Therapies used include kinesiotherapy, paraffin, criotherapy, and electro procedures. Total number of those rehabilitated in the hospital after the stroke is 117, out of which 45 (38.5 %) were women and 72 (61.5 %) men, with average of 68 +/- 9,2 years of age. According to the kind of stroke suffered, 105 patients have had ischemia (89.7 %) and 12 have had hemorrhagia (10.3 %). The highest number of patients have had paralysis of the left side of the body--48 (41.0 %), then paralysis of the right side--43 (36.8 %) and both sides--15 (12.8 %). In relation to the localization of the changes in the brain detected in the CT, the highest number of patients have had multiply lacunar changes--41 (35,0 %), then changes in parietal area--33 (28.2 %) and temporoparietal area--22 (18.8 %), and a bit less had changes in capsula interna--15 (12.8 %), occipital--3 (2.6 %) and cerebellum--3 (2.6 %). In relation to the heart diseases, most of the patients have had compensated weakness of the heart--20 (41.7 %), suffered infarctus myocardii--8 (16.7 %) and atrial fibrillation--8 (16.7 %), with angina pectoris 6 (12,5 %), with arrhitmia--3 (6.3 %) and heart surgery--3

  17. [Chronic ischaemic heart disease in the elderly].

    PubMed

    Martínez-Sellés, Manuel; Gómez Huelgas, Ricardo; Abu-Assi, Emad; Calderón, Alberto; Vidán, María Teresa

    2016-04-15

    It is the aim of this manuscript to take into account the peculiarities and specific characteristics of elderly patients with chronic ischaemic heart disease from a multidisciplinary perspective, with the participation of the Spanish Society of Cardiology (sections of Geriatric Cardiology and Ischaemic Heart Disease/Acute Cardiovascular Care), the Spanish Society of Internal Medicine, the Spanish Society of Primary Care Physicians and the Spanish Society of Geriatrics and Gerontology. This consensus document shows that in order to adequately address these elderly patients a comprehensive assessment is needed, which includes comorbidity, frailty, functional status, polypharmacy and drug interactions. We conclude that in most patients medical treatment is the best option and that this treatment must take into account the above factors and the biological changes associated with aging.

  18. [Chronic ischaemic heart disease in the elderly].

    PubMed

    Martínez-Sellés, M; Gómez Huelgas, R; Abu-Assi, E; Calderón, A; Vidán, M T

    2016-04-08

    It is the aim of this manuscript to take into account the peculiarities and specific characteristics of elderly patients with chronic ischaemic heart disease from a multidisciplinary perspective, with the participation of the Spanish Society of Cardiology (sections of Geriatric Cardiology and Ischaemic Heart Disease/Acute Cardiovascular Care), the Spanish Society of Internal Medicine, the Spanish Society of Primary Care Physicians and the Spanish Society of Geriatrics and Gerontology. This consensus document shows that in order to adequately address these elderly patients a comprehensive assessment is needed, which includes comorbidity, frailty, functional status, polypharmacy and drug interactions. We conclude that in most patients medical treatment is the best option and that this treatment must take into account the above factors and the biological changes associated with aging.

  19. [Chronic ischaemic heart disease in the elderly].

    PubMed

    Martínez-Sellés, Manuel; Gómez Huelgas, Ricardo; Abu-Assi, Emad; Calderón, Alberto; Vidán, María Teresa

    2016-01-01

    It is the aim of this manuscript to take into account the peculiarities and specific characteristics of elderly patients with chronic ischaemic heart disease from a multidisciplinary perspective, with the participation of the Spanish Society of Cardiology (sections of Geriatric Cardiology and Ischaemic Heart Disease/Acute Cardiovascular Care), the Spanish Society of Internal Medicine, the Spanish Society of Primary Care Physicians and the Spanish Society of Geriatrics and Gerontology. This consensus document shows that in order to adequately address these elderly patients a comprehensive assessment is needed, which includes comorbidity, frailty, functional status, polypharmacy and drug interactions. We conclude that in most patients medical treatment is the best option and that this treatment must take into account the above factors and the biological changes associated with aging.

  20. Coronary Heart Disease and Emotional Intelligence

    PubMed Central

    Vlachaki, Chrisanthy P.; Maridaki-Kassotaki, Katerina

    2013-01-01

    Background: Coronary Heart Disease (CHD) is associated with emotions, especially negative ones, namely anxiety and depression. Emotional Intelligence (EI) is a psychological model that consists of a variety of emotional skills. Aims: The aim of the present study was to examine the relation between different dimensions of Emotional Intelligence and coronary heart disease. Methods: A total of 300 participants were studied during a 3-year period in an attempt to partially replicate and further expand a previous study conducted in Greece among CHD patients, which indicated a strong association between certain dimensions of Emotional Intelligence and the incidence of CHD. All participants completed a self-report questionnaire, assessing several aspects of Emotional Intelligence. Findings: The results showed that there is a link between the regulation of emotions and the occurrence of CHD. Conclusions: The evidence reported in the present study makes stronger the claim that EI plays a significant role in the occurrence of CHD. PMID:24171883

  1. Lung and Heart Disease Secondary to Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Goldberg, David S.; Fallon, Michael B.

    2015-01-01

    Patients with chronic liver disease are at risk of extra-hepatic complications related to cirrhosis and portal hypertension, as well organ-specific complications of certain liver diseases. These complications can compromise quality-of-life, while also increasing morbidity and mortality pre- and post-liver transplantation. Patients with chronic liver disease are at risk for pulmonary complications of hepaotpulmonary syndrome and portopulmonary syndrome; the major cardiac complication falls under the general concept of the cirrhotic cardiomyopathy, which can affect systolic and diastolic function, as well as cardiac conduction. In addition, patients with certain diseases are at risk of lung and/or cardiac complications that are specific to the primary disease (i.e., emphysema in alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency) or occur with increased incidence in certain conditions (i.e., ischemic heart disease associated with non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. This section will focus on the epidemiology, clinical presentation, pathogenesis, treatment options, and role of transplantation for lung and heart diseases secondary to liver disease, while also highlighting select liver diseases that directly affect the lungs and hearts. PMID:25934564

  2. Acyanotic Congenital Heart Disease and Transesophageal Echocardiography

    PubMed Central

    Sreedhar, Rupa

    2017-01-01

    The spectrum of congenital heart disease (CHD) seen in the adult varies widely. Malformations range from mild anomalies requiring no intervention to extremely complex pathologies characterized by the presence of multiple coexistent defects. Echocardiography represents the primary noninvasive imaging modality in the assessment of these lesions. The transesophageal approach expands the applications of echocardiography by allowing the acquisition of anatomic and functional information that may not be obtainable by transthoracic imaging. PMID:28074821

  3. Epigenetic mechanisms in heart development and disease.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Shannalee R; Gay, Maresha S; Zhang, Lubo

    2015-07-01

    Suboptimal intrauterine development has been linked to predisposition to cardiovascular disease in adulthood, a concept termed 'developmental origins of health and disease'. Although the exact mechanisms underlying this developmental programming are unknown, a growing body of evidence supports the involvement of epigenetic regulation. Epigenetic mechanisms such as DNA methylation, histone modifications and micro-RNA confer added levels of gene regulation without altering DNA sequences. These modifications are relatively stable signals, offering possible insight into the mechanisms underlying developmental origins of health and disease. This review will discuss the role of epigenetic mechanisms in heart development as well as aberrant epigenetic regulation contributing to cardiovascular disease. Additionally, we will address recent advances targeting epigenetic mechanisms as potential therapeutic approaches to cardiovascular disease.

  4. Pregnancy in women with heart disease: risk assessment and management of heart failure.

    PubMed

    Grewal, Jasmine; Silversides, Candice K; Colman, Jack M

    2014-01-01

    Heart disease, present in 0.5% to 3% of pregnant women, is an important cause of morbidity and the leading cause of death among pregnant women in the developed world. Certain heart conditions are associated with an increased risk of heart failure during pregnancy or the postpartum period; for these conditions, management during pregnancy benefits from multidisciplinary care at a center with expertise in pregnancy and heart disease. This article focuses on cardiac risks and management strategies for women with acquired and congenital heart disease who are at increased risk of heart failure during pregnancy.

  5. Challenges for heart disease stem cell therapy

    PubMed Central

    Hoover-Plow, Jane; Gong, Yanqing

    2012-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) are the leading cause of death worldwide. The use of stem cells to improve recovery of the injured heart after myocardial infarction (MI) is an important emerging therapeutic strategy. However, recent reviews of clinical trials of stem cell therapy for MI and ischemic heart disease recovery report that less than half of the trials found only small improvements in cardiac function. In clinical trials, bone marrow, peripheral blood, or umbilical cord blood cells were used as the source of stem cells delivered by intracoronary infusion. Some trials administered only a stem cell mobilizing agent that recruits endogenous sources of stem cells. Important challenges to improve the effectiveness of stem cell therapy for CVD include: (1) improved identification, recruitment, and expansion of autologous stem cells; (2) identification of mobilizing and homing agents that increase recruitment; and (3) development of strategies to improve stem cell survival and engraftment of both endogenous and exogenous sources of stem cells. This review is an overview of stem cell therapy for CVD and discusses the challenges these three areas present for maximum optimization of the efficacy of stem cell therapy for heart disease, and new strategies in progress. PMID:22399855

  6. Evaluation of Adults With Congenital Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Graziani, Francesca; Delogu, Angelica Bibiana

    2016-03-01

    The clinical approach to adults with congenital heart diseases (ACHDs) is unique in cardiovascular medicine because these patients encompass a broad range of presentations. Each patient, despite having similar diagnosis, will be anatomically and physiologically unlike others within ACHD population, in relation to the type of repair, age at repair, associated defects, with specific long-term risk factors and complications. Furthermore, as many patients will not complain of symptoms, clinical evaluation and diagnostic testing must also be based on the underlying main diagnostic category, with complete standardized lesion-specific clinical protocols, investigating all known risk factors specific for each congenital heart disease and performed as part of screening for significant long-term complications. The first part of this review will focus on clinical history, physical examination, and the most important diagnostic testing in ACHD population. The second part of the article will focus on some clinical issues we have to face in our daily practice, such as heart failure, cyanosis, and pulmonary hypertension. Furthermore, as survival rates of ACHD population continue to improve and patients with this condition live longer, we will briefly report on a new clinical concern regarding the impact of acquired morbidities like coronary artery disease that appear to be of greater importance in defining outcome in older patients with ACHD.

  7. Epidemiology of coronary heart disease in women.

    PubMed

    Bello, Natalie; Mosca, Lori

    2004-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of mortality in women and a major cause of morbidity. Coronary heart disease (CHD) accounts for nearly half of all CVD deaths. Gender differences in CHD include a later age of onset for women, a greater prevalence of comorbid diseases, and differences in the initial manifestations of the disease. Traditional risk factors for CHD include tobacco use, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia, obesity, sedentary lifestyle, and atherogenic diet. More recently identified risk factors in women include high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP), homocysteine, and lipoprotein (a). Appropriate management of risk factors is associated with a reduced incidence of CHD, yet poor implementation in women is widely documented. Barriers to optimal risk factor management in women should be identified and overcome in an effort to maximize the cardiovascular health of women.

  8. Perspectives on Trypanosoma cruzi-induced heart disease (Chagas disease)

    PubMed Central

    Tanowitz, Herbert B.; Machado, Fabiana S.; Jelicks, Linda A.; Shirani, Jamshid; Campos de Carvalho, Antonio C.; Spray, David C.; Factor, Stephen M.; Kirchhoff, Louis V.; Weiss, Louis M.

    2009-01-01

    Chagas disease is caused by the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi it is the most common cause of heart disease in endemic areas of Latin America. The year 2009 marks the 100th anniversary of the discovery of T. cruzi infection and Chagas disease by the Brazilian physician Carlos Chagas. Chagasic cardiomyopathy develops in from 10 to 30 percent of persons who are chronically infected with this parasite. Echocardiography and magnetic resonance imaging are important modalities in the evaluation and prognosis of individuals with chagasic heart disease. The etiology of chagasic heart disease likely is multifactorial. Parasite persistence, autoimmunity, and microvascular abnormalities have been studied extensively as possible pathogenic mechanisms. Experimental studies suggest that alterations in cardiac gap junctions may be etiologic in the pathogenesis of conduction abnormalities. The diagnosis of chronic Chagas disease is made by serology. The treatment of this infection has shortcomings that need to be addressed. Cardiac transplantation and bone marrow stem cell therapy for persons with Chagas disease have received increasing research attention in recent years. PMID:19410685

  9. Acquired heart conditions in adults with congenital heart disease: a growing problem.

    PubMed

    Tutarel, Oktay

    2014-09-01

    The number of adults with congenital heart disease is increasing due to the great achievements in the field of paediatric cardiology, congenital heart surgery and intensive care medicine over the last decades. Mortality has shifted away from the infant and childhood period towards adulthood. As congenital heart disease patients get older, a high prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors is encountered similar to the general population. Consequently, the contribution of acquired morbidities, especially acquired heart conditions to patient outcome, is becoming increasingly important. Therefore, to continue the success story of the last decades in the treatment of congenital heart disease and to further improve the outcome of these patients, more attention has to be given to the prevention, detection and adequate therapy of acquired heart conditions. The aim of this review is to give an overview about acquired heart conditions that may be encountered in adults with congenital heart disease.

  10. Heart Disease in Women | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Women's Heart Disease Heart Disease in Women Past Issues / Winter 2014 Table of Contents fast ... one every minute and a half. Awareness among women about their No. 1 killer is increasing. Heart ...

  11. Neurologic complications of valvular heart disease.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Flores, Salvador

    2014-01-01

    Valvular heart disease (VHD) is frequently associated with neurologic complications; cerebral embolism is the most common of these since thrombus formation results from the abnormalities in the valvular surfaces or from the anatomic and physiologic changes associated with valve dysfunction, such as atrial or ventricular enlargement, intracardiac thrombi, and cardiac dysrhythmias. Prosthetic heart valves, particularly mechanical valves, are very thrombogenic, which explains the high risk of thromboembolism and the need for anticoagulation for the prevention of embolism. Infective endocarditis is a disease process with protean manifestations that include not only cerebral embolism but also intracranial hemorrhage, mycotic aneurysms, and systemic manifestations such as fever and encephalopathy. Other neurologic complications include nonbacterial thrombotic endocarditis, a process associated with systemic diseases such as cancer and systemic lupus erythematosus. For many of these conditions, anticoagulation is the mainstay of treatment to prevent cerebral embolism, therefore it is the potential complications of anticoagulation that can explain other neurologic complications in patients with VHD. The prevention and management of these complications requires an understanding of their natural history in order to balance the risks posed by valvular disease itself against the risks and benefits associated with treatment.

  12. Congenital heart disease and rheumatic heart disease in Africa: recent advances and current priorities.

    PubMed

    Zühlke, Liesl; Mirabel, Mariana; Marijon, Eloi

    2013-11-01

    Africa has one of the highest prevalence of heart diseases in children and young adults, including congenital heart disease (CHD) and rheumatic heart disease (RHD). We present here an extensive review of recent data from the African continent highlighting key studies and information regarding progress in CHD and RHD since 2005. Main findings include evidence that the CHD burden is underestimated mainly due to the poor outcome of African children with CHD. The interest in primary prevention for RHD has been recently re-emphasised, and new data are available regarding echocardiographic screening for subclinical RHD and initiation of secondary prevention. There is an urgent need for comprehensive service frameworks to improve access and level of care and services for patients, educational programmes to reinforce the importance of prevention and early diagnosis and a relevant research agenda focusing on the African context.

  13. Current applications of lasers in heart disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Garrett; Chan, Ming C.; Mason, Dean T.

    1993-03-01

    Although the laser has been in existence for abut 30 years, its application in heart disease has only been examined in the past decade. Much attention has been given its exciting potential in treating coronary artery disease. Transmitted through a catheter comprised of one or more thin optical fibers which can be threaded nonsurgically into the coronary artery, the laser can ablate atherosclerotic plaque that obstructs the artery and diminishes blood flow to the myocardium. In clinical studies, the laser can treat some obstructive lesions that are not suitable for balloon angioplasty (i.e., long and diffuse lesions, very tight stenoses, ostial lesions, calcified lesions). In patients who failed balloon angioplasty due to severe dissection or abrupt closure, the laser may seal up the dissections and restore antegrade blood flow. In addition, the laser may have other applications and treatment modalities that are still under investigation. It may ablate ectopic ventricular foci, or terminate supraventricular tachyrhythmia by destroying the heart's abnormal conduction pathways. It can cut the hypertrophied septum that is associated with left ventricular outflow tract obstruction, or create a channel in the atrial septum as a palliative procedure in newborns with transposition of the great vessels. It may provide a wider orifice for blood flow within the heart in infants with pulmonary outflow obstruction and in adults with aortic valvular stenosis. It is also capable of fusing small thin-walled blood vessels together. Further, a more intriguing possibility is its use to bore several tiny channels in the myocardium to allow oxygenated blood from within the ventricular chamber to perfuse the ischemic heart tissue.

  14. Medical therapy in adults with congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Book, Wendy M; Shaddy, Robert E

    2014-01-01

    Heart failure is a common late complication in adults with congenital heart defects, both repaired and unrepaired. The onset of clinical heart failure is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Some patients with congenital heart disease may benefit from medications shown to improve survival in the population with acquired heart failure, but these same therapies may be of no benefit to other patients. Further studies are needed to better guide the choice of medical therapies.

  15. Appetite suppressants and valvular heart disease.

    PubMed

    Seghatol, Frank F; Rigolin, Vera H

    2002-09-01

    Appetite suppressants fenfluramine, dexfenfluramine, and phentermine have been used alone or in combination as an alternative to diet and surgery in the management of obesity. This therapy was halted in 1997 after reports of valvular lesions affecting almost one third of patients treated with these drugs. Fortunately, most cases of appetite suppressant-related valve disease are mild or moderate and rarely required valve repair or replacement. Follow-up studies have suggested improvement in valvulopathy after discontinuation of the treatment. The mechanism of valve disease induced by these drugs is speculative and may be related to their serotonergic effects. Echocardiographic features are similar to carcinoid heart disease and valvulopathy associated with ergot use. Most cases require only follow-up and endocarditis prophylaxis; surgery is rarely needed.

  16. [Disease management for chronic heart failure patient].

    PubMed

    Bläuer, Cornelia; Pfister, Otmar; Bächtold, Christa; Junker, Therese; Spirig, Rebecca

    2011-02-01

    Patients with chronic heart failure (HF) are limited in their quality of life, have a poor prognosis and face frequent hospitalisations. Patient self-management was shown to improve quality of life, reduce rehospitalisations and costs in patients with chronic HF. Comprehensive disease management programmes are critical to foster patient self-management. The chronic care model developed by the WHO serves as the basis of such programmes. In order to develop self-management skills a needs orientated training concept is mandatory, as patients need both knowledge of the illness and the ability to use the information to make appropriate decisions according to their individual situation. Switzerland has no established system for the care of patients with chronic diseases in particular those with HF. For this reason a group of Swiss experts for HF designed a model for disease management for HF patients in Switzerland. Since 2009 the Swiss Heart Foundation offers an education programme based on this model. The aim of this programme is to offer education and support for practitioners, patients and families. An initial pilot evaluation of the program showed mixed acceptance by practitioners, whereas patient assessed the program as supportive and in line with their requirements.

  17. Patients' knowledge of heart disease in general practice

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Philip; Garraway, Michael

    1977-01-01

    Interviews with 400 consecutive patients attending a general practice sought their knowledge of the signs and symptoms of an acute heart attack, what action they would take for such an event, and their understanding of the predisposing factors contributing to heart disease. The survey revealed poor recognition of the relevant signs and symptoms of an acute heart attack and lack of knowledge of some of the main predisposing factors associated with heart disease. PMID:618352

  18. Chorea, polycythaemis, and cyanotic heart disease.

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, P D; Prosser, R; Wells, C E

    1975-01-01

    Two cases of polycythaemic chorea are described, both of which were complicated by severe heart disease. The first was a child with patent ductus arteriosus and coarctation of the aorta causing severe cyanosis and secondary polycythaemia. Chorea began intermittently at an early age, becoming continuous by his fifth birthday. The second was a middle-aged male with tight mitral stenosis and a story of paralytic chorea in his teens. Polycythaemia rubra vera was eventually diagnosed two years after mitral valvotomy, some seven years after the onset of chorea. Images PMID:1185193

  19. Anatomical assessment of congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Wood, John C

    2006-01-01

    Cardiac MRI (CMR) is replacing diagnostic cardiac catheterization as the modality of choice for anatomic and functional characterization of congenital heart disease (CHD) when echocardiographic imaging is insufficient. In this manuscript, we discuss the principles of anatomic imaging of CHD, placing emphasis on the appropriate choice and modification of pulse sequences necessary to evaluate infants and small children. Clinical examples are provided to illustrate the relative strengths and shortcomings of different CMR imaging techniques. Although cardiovascular function and flow techniques are not described, their role in evaluating the severity of anatomic defects is emphasized. Anatomic characterization represents the first component of a carefully-planned, integrated CMR assessment of CHD.

  20. Genetics of Congenital Heart Disease: Past and Present.

    PubMed

    Muntean, Iolanda; Togănel, Rodica; Benedek, Theodora

    2017-04-01

    Congenital heart disease is the most common congenital anomaly, representing an important cause of infant morbidity and mortality. Congenital heart disease represents a group of heart anomalies that include septal defects, valve defects, and outflow tract anomalies. The exact genetic, epigenetic, or environmental basis of congenital heart disease remains poorly understood, although the exact mechanism is likely multifactorial. However, the development of new technologies including copy number variants, single-nucleotide polymorphism, next-generation sequencing are accelerating the detection of genetic causes of heart anomalies. Recent studies suggest a role of small non-coding RNAs, micro RNA, in congenital heart disease. The recently described epigenetic factors have also been found to contribute to cardiac morphogenesis. In this review, we present past and recent genetic discoveries in congenital heart disease.

  1. Adult Congenital Heart Disease: Scope of the Problem.

    PubMed

    Mazor Dray, Efrat; Marelli, Ariane J

    2015-11-01

    This article reviews the changing epidemiology of congenital heart disease summarizing its impact on the demographics of the congenital heart disease population and the progress made in order to improve outcomes in this patient population. Birth prevalence of congenital heart disease can be modified by many factors. As a result of decreasing mortality and increasing survival in all forms of congenital heart disease, the median age of patients has increased and adults now compose two-thirds of patients with congenital heart disease. Disease burden and resulting health services utilization increase significantly across the lifespan. Bridging the gap between policy and quality of care can be improved by referral to specialized adult congenital heart disease centers and planning delivery of specialized services that are commensurate with population needs, program accreditation criteria and certified training of designated workforce.

  2. Lack of prion infectivity in fixed heart tissue from patients with Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease or amyloid heart disease.

    PubMed

    Priola, Suzette A; Ward, Anne E; McCall, Sherman A; Trifilo, Matthew; Choi, Young Pyo; Solforosi, Laura; Williamson, R Anthony; Cruite, Justin T; Oldstone, Michael B A

    2013-09-01

    In most forms of prion disease, infectivity is present primarily in the central nervous system or immune system organs such as spleen and lymph node. However, a transgenic mouse model of prion disease has demonstrated that prion infectivity can also be present as amyloid deposits in heart tissue. Deposition of infectious prions as amyloid in human heart tissue would be a significant public health concern. Although abnormal disease-associated prion protein (PrP(Sc)) has not been detected in heart tissue from several amyloid heart disease patients, it has been observed in the heart tissue of a patient with sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease (sCJD), the most common form of human prion disease. In order to determine whether prion infectivity can be found in heart tissue, we have inoculated formaldehyde fixed brain and heart tissue from two sCJD patients, as well as prion protein positive fixed heart tissue from two amyloid heart disease patients, into transgenic mice overexpressing the human prion protein. Although the sCJD brain samples led to clinical or subclinical prion infection and deposition of PrP(Sc) in the brain, none of the inoculated heart samples resulted in disease or the accumulation of PrP(Sc). Thus, our results suggest that prion infectivity is not likely present in cardiac tissue from sCJD or amyloid heart disease patients.

  3. The changing pattern of ischemic heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, T. W.

    1973-01-01

    Male and female death rates from all the major forms of cardiovascular disease were approximately equal until about 1920. Since that time the male:female ratio in fatal ischemic heart disease (IHD) has risen dramatically, but some closely related diseases such as cerebrovascular disease and uncomplicated angina pectoris have maintained sex ratios close to unity. It is difficult to reconcile this divergent trend in the sex ratio of IHD with a simple stenotic-thrombotic view of myocardial infarction (MI) and it is suggested that the modern epidemic of MI in men may be the result of a disorder of muscle metabolism (“vulnerable myocardium”) superimposed on a relatively stable background of stenotic-thrombotic arterial disease. The proposed mechanism would also help to explain the selective action of some modern “coronary risk factors” (such as cigarette smoking and physical inactivity) which increase the risk of MI but have little or no effect on the risk of developing cerebrovascular disease or uncomplicated angina pectoris. PMID:4714875

  4. Dietary factors and coronary heart disease*

    PubMed Central

    Masironi, R.

    1970-01-01

    Mortality data from arteriosclerotic and degenerative heart disease (AHD) and per capita consumption of total fat, saturated fat, sucrose, simple sugars, complex carbohydrates, and protein, and calorie intake for 37 countries were statistically evaluated to investigate possible relationships between dietary factors and incidence of AHD. On a geographical basis, consumption of total and saturated fats is strongly and positively correlated with the death rates, while consumption of complex carbohydrates is negatively correlated. No correlations were found with temporal changes in death rates or with differences within one country. These findings are discussed in the light of the works of many other investigators. It is concluded that the relation of diet to AHD is still controversial, and that the development and severity of the disease cannot be confidently attributed to any single dietary factor nor to blood cholesterol. The contributing effects of other factors, such as physical activity, mental stress, and affluence, are also discussed. PMID:5309508

  5. Drug Therapy for Heart Valve Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Borer, Jeffrey S.; Sharma, Abhishek

    2015-01-01

    Valvular heart diseases (VHDs) are progressive. When not caused by acute comorbidities they are generally characterized by long asymptomatic phases during which hemodynamic severity may progress leading to morbidity and mortality. Treatment depends on VHD type and severity but when severe and symptomatic, usually involves mechanical intervention. Asymptomatic patients, and those who lack objective descriptors associated with high risk, are closely observed clinically with optimization of associated cardiovascular risk factors until surgical indications develop. Though often prescribed based on theory, no rigorous evidence supports pharmacological therapy in most chronic situations though drugs may be appropriate in acute valvular diseases, or as a bridge to surgery in severely decompensated patients. Herein, we examine evidence supporting drug use for chronic VHDs. PMID:26371236

  6. Pulmonary arterial hypertension in congenital heart diseases.

    PubMed

    Beghetti, Maurice; Tissot, Cecile

    2009-08-01

    Pulmonary hypertension complicates the course of many children and adults with congenital heart diseases (CHDs). The increase in pulmonary pressure associated with CHD is secondary to either increased pulmonary blood flow or increased postcapillary pressures. Pulmonary arterial hypertension is in the vast majority associated with congenital cardiac shunts. Despite major advances in the understanding of the regulation of the pulmonary vascular bed and the pulmonary endothelial lesions leading to pulmonary vascular disease, despite the advances in surgical repair and the discovery of potential therapies in the pre- and postoperative period, pulmonary hypertension still carries a significant mortality and morbidity in patients with CHD. The recent introduction of targeted therapies in other forms of pulmonary arterial hypertension has led to a renewed interest in pulmonary hypertension associated with CHD and this particularly for the most advanced form, the so-called Eisenmenger syndrome (ES). This review summarizes the current knowledge on pulmonary hypertension associated with CHD, focusing on the pathophysiology and treatment of ES.

  7. Medical management of ischemic heart disease.

    PubMed

    Timmis, G C

    1981-03-01

    Medical therapy primarily affects myocardial oxygen demands. Nitrates and other vasodilators decrease filling pressure, ventricular diastolic volume and to some extent, impedance to ventricular emptying. Beta blockers decrease myocardial contractility and heart rate through a reduction of sympathetic neural traffic. Afterload reduction by the control of hypertension and preload reduction via the LaPlace relationship through reversal of congestive failure are critical for successful therapy. Modification of smoking habits and personality traits with renunciation of a sedentary life-style are also therapeutically useful. While increases in myocardial blood flow have depended primarily on surgical revascularization procedures, calcium antagonists such as nifedipine have been shown to affect flow by reversing vasospasm, which has been recognized with increasing frequency as a concomitant of even fixed coronary arterial disease. The first therapy, however, is diet since it affects both the supply and demand sides of myocardial oxygen balance. Reduction of body bulk decreases myocardial oxygen demand since both vary in obligate parallel. Religious abstention from saturated fats and cholesterol-containing foods, especially by those with pre-existing coronary heart disease, may arrest the otherwise inexorable deterioration.

  8. High sensitivity troponin and valvular heart disease.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Cian P; Donnellan, Eoin; Phelan, Dermot; Griffin, Brian P; Sarano, Maurice Enriquez-; McEvoy, John W

    2017-01-16

    Blood-based biomarkers have been extensively studied in a range of cardiovascular diseases and have established utility in routine clinical care, most notably in the diagnosis of acute coronary syndrome (e.g., troponin) and the management of heart failure (e.g., brain-natriuretic peptide). The role of biomarkers is less well established in the management of valvular heart disease (VHD), in which the optimal timing of surgical intervention is often challenging. One promising biomarker that has been the subject of a number of recent VHD research studies is high sensitivity troponin (hs-cTn). Novel high-sensitivity assays can detect subclinical myocardial damage in asymptomatic individuals. Thus, hs-cTn may have utility in the assessment of asymptomatic patients with severe VHD who do not have a clear traditional indication for surgical intervention. In this state-of-the-art review, we examine the current evidence for hs-cTn as a potential biomarker in the most commonly encountered VHD conditions, aortic stenosis and mitral regurgitation. This review provides a synopsis of early evidence indicating that hs-cTn has promise as a biomarker in VHD. However, the impact of its measurement on clinical practice and VHD outcomes needs to be further assessed in prospective studies before routine clinical use becomes a reality.

  9. Poisson Mixture Regression Models for Heart Disease Prediction.

    PubMed

    Mufudza, Chipo; Erol, Hamza

    2016-01-01

    Early heart disease control can be achieved by high disease prediction and diagnosis efficiency. This paper focuses on the use of model based clustering techniques to predict and diagnose heart disease via Poisson mixture regression models. Analysis and application of Poisson mixture regression models is here addressed under two different classes: standard and concomitant variable mixture regression models. Results show that a two-component concomitant variable Poisson mixture regression model predicts heart disease better than both the standard Poisson mixture regression model and the ordinary general linear Poisson regression model due to its low Bayesian Information Criteria value. Furthermore, a Zero Inflated Poisson Mixture Regression model turned out to be the best model for heart prediction over all models as it both clusters individuals into high or low risk category and predicts rate to heart disease componentwise given clusters available. It is deduced that heart disease prediction can be effectively done by identifying the major risks componentwise using Poisson mixture regression model.

  10. Renovascular heart failure: heart failure in patients with atherosclerotic renal artery disease.

    PubMed

    Kawarada, Osami; Yasuda, Satoshi; Noguchi, Teruo; Anzai, Toshihisa; Ogawa, Hisao

    2016-07-01

    Atherosclerotic renal artery disease presents with a broad spectrum of clinical features, including heart failure as well as hypertension, and renal failure. Although recent randomized controlled trials failed to demonstrate renal artery stenting can reduce blood pressure or the number of cardiovascular or renal events more so than medical therapy, increasing attention has been paid to flash pulmonary edema and congestive heart failure associated with atherosclerotic renal artery disease. This clinical entity "renovascular heart failure" is diagnosed retrospectively. Given the increasing global burden of heart failure, this review highlights the background and catheter-based therapeutic aspects for renovascular heart failure.

  11. [Heart murmur--auscultation or echocardiography in the diagnostic assessment of congenital or valvular heart disease?].

    PubMed

    Attenhofer Jost, C H

    2006-07-01

    The incidence of patients with degenerative valvular but also of patients with congenital heart disease surviving until adulthood or even old age will increase in the next decades. Auscultation with the stethoscope remains an important diagnostic means in the detection and treatment of heart disease. Heart murmurs (especially systolic heart murmurs) are extremely common. There are helpful clues to differentiate heart murmurs. It can occasionally be relatively simple to differentiate a systolic murmur due to valvular heart disease from an innocent, ejection murmur; however, there are important limitations of auscultation. Overall, auscultation and clinical examination alone do not suffice to correctly diagnose and treat patients with heart failure or a murmur Clinically significant aortic stenosis, aortic regurgitation and mitral regurgitation as well as hypertrophic cardiomyopathy are not uncommonly missed or misinterpreted. An echocardiographic exam is mandatory in all patients with more than a soft systolic murmur, any diastolic murmur, cardiac symptoms and/or ECG changes.

  12. The heart-liver metabolic axis: defective communication exacerbates disease

    PubMed Central

    Baskin, Kedryn K; Bookout, Angie L; Olson, Eric N

    2014-01-01

    The heart has been recognized as an endocrine organ for over 30 years (de Bold, 2011); however, little is known about how the heart communicates with other organs in the body, and even less is known about this process in the diseased heart. In this issue of EMBO Molecular Medicine, Magida and Leinwand (2014) introduce the concept that a primary genetic defect in the heart results in aberrant hepatic lipid metabolism, which consequently exacerbates hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). This study provides evidence in support of the hypothesis that crosstalk occurs between the heart and liver, and that this becomes disrupted in the diseased state. PMID:24623378

  13. In vino veritas: alcohol and heart disease.

    PubMed

    Hill, Joseph A

    2005-03-01

    Numerous epidemiological studies, numbering nearly 100, have documented an inverse association between alcohol consumption and vascular risk. The preponderance of evidence supports an independent beneficial effect of mild-to-moderate alcoholic beverage consumption on risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). However, it is important to remember that observational data cannot prove causation; unmeasured or incompletely controlled confounding factors cannot be excluded. That said, most authorities now attribute a causal role to the relationship: moderate alcohol consumption reduces the risk of CHD, and current research centers on the mechanistic underpinnings and whether patterns of drinking are important. Here, I review the association between alcohol use and CHD risk, explore putative mechanisms, and make recommendations.

  14. Heart Failure Update: Chronic Disease Management Programs.

    PubMed

    Fountain, Lorna B

    2016-03-01

    With high mortality and readmission rates among patients with heart failure (HF), multiple disease management models have been and continue to be tested, with mixed results. Early postdischarge care improves outcomes for patients. Telemonitoring also can assist in reducing mortality and HF-related hospitalizations. Office-based team care improves patient outcomes, with important components including rapid access to physicians, partnerships with clinical pharmacists, education, monitoring, and support. Pay-for-performance measures developed for HF, primarily use of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and beta blockers, also improve patient outcomes, but the influence of adherence to other measures has been minimal. Evaluating comorbid conditions, including diabetes and hypertension, and making drug adjustments for patients with HF to include blood pressure control and use of metformin, when possible, can reduce mortality and morbidity.

  15. [Stress, mental disorders and coronary heart disease].

    PubMed

    Lederbogen, F; Ströhle, A

    2012-11-01

    There are numerous associations between stress, mental disorders and coronary heart disease (CHD). Exposure to an acute stressor leads to activation of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal and sympathoadrenal systems and chronic stressors are associated with sustained functional changes of these systems. Experiencing acute and chronic stress is paralleled by an increased incidence of mental disorders with the most consistent evidence on the triggering of major depressive episodes. Various mental disorders, including depression, anxiety and schizophrenia, are associated with an increased risk of CHD. Furthermore, acute and chronic stressors have been identified as risk factors or triggers of acute coronary syndromes. Thus therapeutic strategies aim at reducing subjective stress experience, therapy of mental disorders and treatment of cardiac risk factors known to be more prevalent in increased stress states and mental disorders.

  16. Use of nitrates in ischemic heart disease.

    PubMed

    Giuseppe, Cocco; Paul, Jerie; Hans-Ulrich, Iselin

    2015-01-01

    Short-acting nitrates are beneficial in acute myocardial ischemia. However, many unresolved questions remain about the use of long-acting nitrates in stable ischemic heart disease. The use of long-acting nitrates is weakened by the development of endothelial dysfunction and tolerance. Also, we currently ignore whether lower doses of transdermal nitroglycerin would be better than those presently used. Multivariate analysis data from large nonrandomized studies suggested that long-acting nitrates increase the incidence of acute coronary syndromes, while data from another multivariate study indicate that they have positive effects. Because of methodological differences and open questions, the two studies cannot be compared. A study in Japanese patients with vasospastic angina has shown that, when compared with calcium antagonists, long-acting nitrates do not improve long-term prognosis and that the risk for cardiac adverse events increases with the combined therapy. We have many unanswered questions.

  17. FISH CONSUMPTION, METHYLMERCURY, AND HUMAN HEART DISEASE.

    SciTech Connect

    LIPFERT, F.W.; SULLIVAN, T.M.

    2005-09-21

    Environmental mercury continues to be of concern to public health advocates, both in the U.S. and abroad, and new research continues to be published. A recent analysis of potential health benefits of reduced mercury emissions has opened a new area of public health concern: adverse effects on the cardiovascular system, which could account for the bulk of the potential economic benefits. The authors were careful to include caveats about the uncertainties of such impacts, but they cited only a fraction of the applicable health effects literature. That literature includes studies of the potentially harmful ingredient (methylmercury, MeHg) in fish, as well as of a beneficial ingredient, omega-3 fatty acids or ''fish oils''. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recently certified that some of these fat compounds that are primarily found in fish ''may be beneficial in reducing coronary heart disease''. This paper briefly summarizes and categorizes the extensive literature on both adverse and beneficial links between fish consumption and cardiovascular health, which are typically based on studies of selected groups of individuals (cohorts). Such studies tend to comprise the ''gold standard'' of epidemiology, but cohorts tend to exhibit a great deal of variability, in part because of the limited numbers of individuals involved and in part because of interactions with other dietary and lifestyle considerations. Note that eating fish will involve exposure to both the beneficial effects of fatty acids and the potentially harmful effects of contaminants like Hg or PCBs, all of which depend on the type of fish but tend to be correlated within a population. As a group, the cohort studies show that eating fish tends to reduce mortality, especially due to heart disease, for consumption rates up to about twice weekly, above which the benefits tend to level off. A Finnish cohort study showed increased mortality risks in the highest fish-consuming group ({approx}3 times

  18. Stop inhaling smoke: prevent coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Kilburn, Kaye H

    2003-02-01

    Acute myocardial infarction (AMI) was rare a century ago and was diagnosed in few living patients prior to 1925. By 1950, it was the most common heart problem seen by clinicians. Thought at first to have been overlooked, there were many explanations offered for its neglect. Smoking, hypertension, and elevated cholesterol are associated with AMI, but of these only smoking should be considered a cause. Hypertension and hypercholesterolemia may be co-effects, perhaps of inflammation stimulated in the lung and blood vessels by smoking and air pollution, thus affecting vessels and arteries subjected to systemic blood pressure. Air pollution--the 20th century's other "big smoke"--deserves consideration as a 2nd cause. Auto exhaust blankets the world's cities. It consists of smoke and other effluents of petroleum vaporization and combustion that emanate from the crankcases and exhaust pipes of trucks and automobiles. The major living spaces (conurbations) of the world now imitate and exceed Los Angeles in their levels of air pollution. Auto exhaust gases fit the timeline, and their increasing amounts parallel the worldwide rise in coronary heart disease. Increasing doses of these chemicals imitate cigarette smoke and stimulate inflammation in the lungs. They appear to be absorbed into the blood, where they cause inflammation in blood vessels, increased blood pressure, and clogged coronary arteries. Avoidance is the obvious solution. Quit inhaling cigarette smoke and motor vehicle exhaust. The benefits have been shown and can be proved by intervention. The quest for clean air is hygienic-like avoiding water contaminated with feces was 150 yr ago. Clear air must be made a moral right. Its attainment requires a major revolution in priorities for energy use and lifestyle. Two types of smoke must be avoided. The world's most lethal disease.

  19. Age, dental infections, and coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Mattila, K J; Asikainen, S; Wolf, J; Jousimies-Somer, H; Valtonen, V; Nieminen, M

    2000-02-01

    Epidemiological and intervention studies have suggested that infections are risk factors for coronary heart disease (CHD). Dental infections have appeared as cardiovascular risk factors in cross-sectional and in follow-up studies, and the association has been independent of the "classic" coronary risk factors. This case-control study aimed at detailed assessment of the dental pathology found in various CHD categories (including elderly patients). Altogether, 85 patients with proven coronary heart disease and 53 random controls, matched for sex, age, geographic area, and socio-economic status, were compared with regard to dental status, assessed blindly with four separate scores, and to the "classic" coronary risk factors (seven of the controls had CHD, and they were not included in the analyses). The dental indices were higher among CHD patients than in the controls, but, contrary to previous studies, the differences were not significant (between the CHD patients and their matched controls or among the different CHD categories). This result could not be explained by potential confounding factors. The participants in the present study were older and had more often undergone recent dental treatment in comparison with subjects in our earlier studies. Age correlated with the severity of dental infections only in the random controls but not in the coronary patients who, although young, already had high dental scores. We believe that the higher age of the participants in the present study is the most likely reason for the results. Other possible explanations include an age-related selection bias among older CHD patients, and the fact that those participating in studies like this may have better general health and thus also less severe dental infections. Thus, the role of dental infections as a coronary risk factor varies according to the characteristics of the population studied.

  20. Heart Disease and Stroke Statistics—2011 Update

    PubMed Central

    Roger, Véronique L.; Go, Alan S.; Lloyd-Jones, Donald M.; Adams, Robert J.; Berry, Jarett D.; Brown, Todd M.; Carnethon, Mercedes R.; Dai, Shifan; de Simone, Giovanni; Ford, Earl S.; Fox, Caroline S.; Fullerton, Heather J.; Gillespie, Cathleen; Greenlund, Kurt J.; Hailpern, Susan M.; Heit, John A.; Ho, P. Michael; Howard, Virginia J.; Kissela, Brett M.; Kittner, Steven J.; Lackland, Daniel T.; Lichtman, Judith H.; Lisabeth, Lynda D.; Makuc, Diane M.; Marcus, Gregory M.; Marelli, Ariane; Matchar, David B.; McDermott, Mary M.; Meigs, James B.; Moy, Claudia S.; Mozaffarian, Dariush; Mussolino, Michael E.; Nichol, Graham; Paynter, Nina P.; Rosamond, Wayne D.; Sorlie, Paul D.; Stafford, Randall S.; Turan, Tanya N.; Turner, Melanie B.; Wong, Nathan D.; Wylie-Rosett, Judith

    2015-01-01

    Summary Each year, the American Heart Association (AHA), in conjunction with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the National Institutes of Health, and other government agencies, brings together the most up-to-date statistics on heart disease, stroke, other vascular diseases, and their risk factors and presents them in its Heart Disease and Stroke Statistical Update. The Statistical Update is a valuable resource for researchers, clinicians, healthcare policy makers, media professionals, the lay public, and many others who seek the best national data available on disease morbidity and mortality and the risks, quality of care, medical procedures and operations, and costs associated with the management of these diseases in a single document. Indeed, since 1999, the Statistical Update has been cited more than 8700 times in the literature (including citations of all annual versions). In 2009 alone, the various Statistical Updates were cited ≈1600 times (data from ISI Web of Science). In recent years, the Statistical Update has undergone some major changes with the addition of new chapters and major updates across multiple areas. For this year’s edition, the Statistics Committee, which produces the document for the AHA, updated all of the current chapters with the most recent nationally representative data and inclusion of relevant articles from the literature over the past year and added a new chapter detailing how family history and genetics play a role in cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. Also, the 2011 Statistical Update is a major source for monitoring both cardiovascular health and disease in the population, with a focus on progress toward achievement of the AHA’s 2020 Impact Goals. Below are a few highlights from this year’s Update. Death Rates From CVD Have Declined, Yet the Burden of Disease Remains High The 2007 overall death rate from CVD (International Classification of Diseases 10, I00–I99) was 251.2 per 100 000. The rates were 294

  1. Prevalence and correlates of heart disease among adults in Singapore.

    PubMed

    Picco, Louisa; Subramaniam, Mythily; Abdin, Edimansyah; Vaingankar, Janhavi Ajit; Chong, Siow Ann

    2016-02-01

    Heart disease is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide and it has been well established that it is associated with both mental and physical conditions. This paper describes the prevalence of heart disease with mental disorders and other chronic physical conditions among the Singapore resident population. Data were from the Singapore Mental Health Study which was a representative, cross-sectional epidemiological survey undertaken with 6616 Singapore residents, between December 2009 and December 2010. The Composite International Diagnostic Interview Version 3.0 was used to establish the diagnosis of mental disorders, while a chronic medical conditions checklist was used to gather information on 15 physical conditions, including various forms of heart disease. Health-related quality of life was measured using the Euro-Quality of Life Scale (EQ-5D). The lifetime prevalence of heart disease was 2.8%. Socio-demographic correlates of heart disease included older age, Indian ethnicity, secondary education (vs. tertiary) and being economically inactive. After adjusting for socio-demographic variables and other comorbid physical and mental disorders, the prevalence of major depressive disorder and bipolar disorder were significantly higher among those with heart disease, as were diabetes, arthritis, kidney failure and lung disease. These findings highlight important associations between heart disease and various socio-demographic correlates, mental disorders and physical conditions. Given the high prevalence of mood disorders among heart disease patients, timely and appropriate screening and treatment of mental disorders among this group is essential.

  2. Sequential segmental classification of feline congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Scansen, Brian A; Schneider, Matthias; Bonagura, John D

    2015-12-01

    Feline congenital heart disease is less commonly encountered in veterinary medicine than acquired feline heart diseases such as cardiomyopathy. Understanding the wide spectrum of congenital cardiovascular disease demands a familiarity with a variety of lesions, occurring both in isolation and in combination, along with an appreciation of complex nomenclature and variable classification schemes. This review begins with an overview of congenital heart disease in the cat, including proposed etiologies and prevalence, examination approaches, and principles of therapy. Specific congenital defects are presented and organized by a sequential segmental classification with respect to their morphologic lesions. Highlights of diagnosis, treatment options, and prognosis are offered. It is hoped that this review will provide a framework for approaching congenital heart disease in the cat, and more broadly in other animal species based on the sequential segmental approach, which represents an adaptation of the common methodology used in children and adults with congenital heart disease.

  3. Genetic testing in congenital heart disease: ethical considerations.

    PubMed

    Lin, Kimberly Y; D'Alessandro, Lisa C A; Goldmuntz, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    On March 16, 2012, the Ethics of the Heart 2012: Ethical and Policy Challenges in Pediatric and Adult Congenital Heart Disease Conference took place in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The first session focused on the ethics surrounding genetic testing in patients with congenital heart disease. Summarized here is the introductory presentation given by Dr Elizabeth Goldmuntz entitled "The Role of Genetic Testing in Congenital Heart Disease," followed by a case presentation given by Dr Lisa D'Alessandro. The case and the panel discussion that ensued highlight several ethical principles and challenges in this unique patient population.

  4. Impact of Pulmonary Vascular Resistances in Heart Transplantation for Congenital Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Gazit, Avihu Z; Canter, Charles E

    2011-01-01

    Congenital heart disease is one of the major diagnoses in pediatric heart transplantation recipients of all age groups. Assessment of pulmonary vascular resistance in these patients prior to transplantation is crucial to determine their candidacy, however, it is frequently inaccurate because of their abnormal anatomy and physiology. This problem places them at significant risk for pulmonary hypertension and right ventricular failure post transplantation. The pathophysiology of pulmonary vascular disease in children with congenital heart disease depends on their pulmonary blood flow patterns, systemic ventricle function, as well as semilunar valves and atrioventricular valves structure and function. In our review we analyze the pathophysiology of pulmonary vascular disease in children with congenital heart disease and end-stage heart failure, and outline the state of the art pre-transplantation medical and surgical management to achieve reverse remodeling of the pulmonary vasculature by using pulmonary vasodilators and mechanical circulatory support. PMID:22548028

  5. [Resting heart rate and cardiovascular disease].

    PubMed

    Brito Díaz, Buenaventura; Alemán Sánchez, José Juan; Cabrera de León, Antonio

    2014-07-07

    Heart rate reflects autonomic nervous system activity. Numerous studies have demonstrated that an increased heart rate at rest is associated with cardiovascular morbidity and mortality as an independent risk factor. It has been shown a link between cardiac autonomic balance and inflammation. Thus, an elevated heart rate produces a micro-inflammatory response and is involved in the pathogenesis of endothelial dysfunction. In turn, decrease in heart rate produces benefits in congestive heart failure, myocardial infarction, atrial fibrillation, obesity, hyperinsulinemia, insulin resistance, and atherosclerosis. Alteration of other heart rate-related parameters, such as their variability and recovery after exercise, is associated with risk of cardiovascular events. Drugs reducing the heart rate (beta-blockers, calcium antagonists and inhibitors of If channels) have the potential to reduce cardiovascular events. Although not recommended in healthy subjects, interventions for reducing heart rate constitute a reasonable therapeutic goal in certain pathologies.

  6. Air Pollution and Heart Disease, Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... Giving for Heart.org Media for Heart.org Arrhythmia About Arrhythmia Why Arrhythmia Matters Understand Your Risk for Arrhythmia Symptoms, Diagnosis & Monitoring of Arrhythmia Prevention & Treatment of ...

  7. A Hybrid Classification System for Heart Disease Diagnosis Based on the RFRS Method

    PubMed Central

    Su, Qiang; Zhang, Mo; Zhu, Yanhong; Wang, Qiugen; Wang, Qian

    2017-01-01

    Heart disease is one of the most common diseases in the world. The objective of this study is to aid the diagnosis of heart disease using a hybrid classification system based on the ReliefF and Rough Set (RFRS) method. The proposed system contains two subsystems: the RFRS feature selection system and a classification system with an ensemble classifier. The first system includes three stages: (i) data discretization, (ii) feature extraction using the ReliefF algorithm, and (iii) feature reduction using the heuristic Rough Set reduction algorithm that we developed. In the second system, an ensemble classifier is proposed based on the C4.5 classifier. The Statlog (Heart) dataset, obtained from the UCI database, was used for experiments. A maximum classification accuracy of 92.59% was achieved according to a jackknife cross-validation scheme. The results demonstrate that the performance of the proposed system is superior to the performances of previously reported classification techniques. PMID:28127385

  8. African-Americans and Heart Disease, Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... Gandy, M.D., a cardiologist and chief medical marketing officer with the Piedmont Heart Institute in Atlanta ... and fill up with those rather than other foods,” he said. Dr. Gandy cautioned that even things that are ... Rate (Pulse) 8 Tachycardia | Fast Heart Rate 9 Warning Signs of a Heart ...

  9. Recent advances in echocardiography for valvular heart disease.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    Echocardiography is the imaging modality of choice for the assessment of patients with valvular heart disease. Echocardiographic advancements may have particular impact on the assessment and management of patients with valvular heart disease. This review will summarize the current literature on advancements, such as three-dimensional echocardiography, strain imaging, intracardiac echocardiography, and fusion imaging, in this patient population.

  10. Recognizing the Symptoms of Worsening Heart Valve Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Aortic Aneurysm More Recognizing the Symptoms of Worsening Heart Valve Disease Updated:Sep 29,2016 Would you recognize the ... Options • Recovery and Healthy Living Goals • Personal Stories Heart Valve Disease Symptoms Dr. Robert Bonow describes the symptoms that ...

  11. Heart Disease Risk Perception in College Men and Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, John S.; Grant, Melinda; Hill, Kathy L.; Brizzolara, Jeff; Belmont, Barbara

    2003-01-01

    The authors sought to assess the perception of risks for coronary heart disease (CHD) in college men and women. They surveyed 470 undergraduates from 2 major 4-year institutions who completed a questionnaire that measured perceived risks for heart disease. Sixty-eight percent of the respondents rated their risks as lower or much lower than those…

  12. Endodontic variables and coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Frisk, Fredrik; Hakeberg, Magnus; Ahlqwist, Margareta; Bengtsson, Calle

    2003-10-01

    This cross-sectional study was designed to explore a possible association between endodontic disease variables and coronary heart disease (CHD). Dental infections are hypothesized to be linked to atherosclerosis and could be a cause of vascular changes crucial for the development of CHD. Most studies have focused on periodontal disease. To our knowledge, no one has specifically studied endodontic variables as risk factors for the development of CHD. In 1992-93, a representative sample (n = 1056) of women in Göteborg, Sweden, aged between 38 and 84 years, took part in a combined dental and medical survey. The dependent variable was CHD, i.e. subjects with angina pectoris and/or a history of myocardial infarction (n = 106). The independent variables were number of root-filled teeth (RF), number of teeth with periapical radiolucencies (PA), tooth loss (TL), age, life situation, marital status, smoking, alcohol habits, body mass index, waist-hip ratio, serum cholesterol and triglyceride concentrations, hypertension and diabetes. The multivariate logistic regression analysis did not prove the endodontic variables to be predictive of CHD. Only age and tooth loss were significantly associated with CHD, with OR = 1.07 (CI = 1.03-1.12) and OR = 2.70 (CI = 1.49-4.87), respectively. The bivariate logistic regression analysis showed a positive significant association between subjects with RF = 2 and CHD, but for PA the bivariate analysis did not support an association with CHD. This cross-sectional study did not reveal a significant association between endodontically treated teeth and CHD nor between teeth with periapical disease and CHD.

  13. DNA methylation abnormalities in congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Serra-Juhé, Clara; Cuscó, Ivon; Homs, Aïda; Flores, Raquel; Torán, Núria; Pérez-Jurado, Luis A

    2015-01-01

    Congenital heart defects represent the most common malformation at birth, occurring also in ∼50% of individuals with Down syndrome. Congenital heart defects are thought to have multifactorial etiology, but the main causes are largely unknown. We have explored the global methylation profile of fetal heart DNA in comparison to blood DNA from control subjects: an absolute correlation with the type of tissue was detected. Pathway analysis revealed a significant enrichment of differential methylation at genes related to muscle contraction and cardiomyopathies in the developing heart DNA. We have also searched for abnormal methylation profiles on developing heart-tissue DNA of syndromic and non-syndromic congenital heart defects. On average, 3 regions with aberrant methylation were detected per sample and 18 regions were found differentially methylated between groups. Several epimutations were detected in candidate genes involved in growth regulation, apoptosis and folate pathway. A likely pathogenic hypermethylation of several intragenic sites at the MSX1 gene, involved in outflow tract morphogenesis, was found in a fetus with isolated heart malformation. In addition, hypermethylation of the GATA4 gene was present in fetuses with Down syndrome with or without congenital heart defects, as well as in fetuses with isolated heart malformations. Expression deregulation of the abnormally methylated genes was detected. Our data indicate that epigenetic alterations of relevant genes are present in developing heart DNA in fetuses with both isolated and syndromic heart malformations. These epimutations likely contribute to the pathogenesis of the malformation by cis-acting effects on gene expression.

  14. Psychosocial risk factors for coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Glozier, Nick; Tofler, Geoffrey H; Colquhoun, David M; Bunker, Stephen J; Clarke, David M; Hare, David L; Hickie, Ian B; Tatoulis, James; Thompson, David R; Wilson, Alison; Branagan, Maree G

    2013-08-05

    In 2003, the National Heart Foundation of Australia published a position statement on psychosocial risk factors and coronary heart disease (CHD). This consensus statement provides an updated review of the literature on psychosocial stressors, including chronic stressors (in particular, work stress), acute individual stressors and acute population stressors, to guide health professionals based on current evidence. It complements a separate updated statement on depression and CHD. Perceived chronic job strain and shift work are associated with a small absolute increased risk of developing CHD, but there is limited evidence regarding their effect on the prognosis of CHD. Evidence regarding a relationship between CHD and job (in)security, job satisfaction, working hours, effort-reward imbalance and job loss is inconclusive. Expert consensus is that workplace programs aimed at weight loss, exercise and other standard cardiovascular risk factors may have positive outcomes for these risk factors, but no evidence is available regarding the effect of such programs on the development of CHD. Social isolation after myocardial infarction (MI) is associated with an adverse prognosis. Expert consensus is that although measures to reduce social isolation are likely to produce positive psychosocial effects, it is unclear whether this would also improve CHD outcomes. Acute emotional stress may trigger MI or takotsubo ("stress") cardiomyopathy, but the absolute increase in transient risk from an individual stressor is low. Psychosocial stressors have an impact on CHD, but clinical significance and prevention require further study. Awareness of the potential for increased cardiovascular risk among populations exposed to natural disasters and other conditions of extreme stress may be useful for emergency services response planning. Wider public access to defibrillators should be available where large populations gather, such as sporting venues and airports, and as part of the response

  15. Genomic prediction of coronary heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, Gad; Havulinna, Aki S.; Bhalala, Oneil G.; Byars, Sean G.; De Livera, Alysha M.; Yetukuri, Laxman; Tikkanen, Emmi; Perola, Markus; Schunkert, Heribert; Sijbrands, Eric J.; Palotie, Aarno; Samani, Nilesh J.; Salomaa, Veikko; Ripatti, Samuli; Inouye, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Aims Genetics plays an important role in coronary heart disease (CHD) but the clinical utility of genomic risk scores (GRSs) relative to clinical risk scores, such as the Framingham Risk Score (FRS), is unclear. Our aim was to construct and externally validate a CHD GRS, in terms of lifetime CHD risk and relative to traditional clinical risk scores. Methods and results We generated a GRS of 49 310 SNPs based on a CARDIoGRAMplusC4D Consortium meta-analysis of CHD, then independently tested it using five prospective population cohorts (three FINRISK cohorts, combined n = 12 676, 757 incident CHD events; two Framingham Heart Study cohorts (FHS), combined n = 3406, 587 incident CHD events). The GRS was associated with incident CHD (FINRISK HR = 1.74, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.61–1.86 per S.D. of GRS; Framingham HR = 1.28, 95% CI 1.18–1.38), and was largely unchanged by adjustment for known risk factors, including family history. Integration of the GRS with the FRS or ACC/AHA13 scores improved the 10 years risk prediction (meta-analysis C-index: +1.5–1.6%, P < 0.001), particularly for individuals ≥60 years old (meta-analysis C-index: +4.6–5.1%, P < 0.001). Importantly, the GRS captured substantially different trajectories of absolute risk, with men in the top 20% of attaining 10% cumulative CHD risk 12–18 y earlier than those in the bottom 20%. High genomic risk was partially compensated for by low systolic blood pressure, low cholesterol level, and non-smoking. Conclusions A GRS based on a large number of SNPs improves CHD risk prediction and encodes different trajectories of lifetime risk not captured by traditional clinical risk scores. PMID:27655226

  16. Migrant labor and sexually transmitted disease: AIDS in Africa.

    PubMed

    Hunt, C W

    1989-12-01

    Acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) is worldwide, but the clinical and epidemiological pattern of the disease in Africa is different from that in developed areas. "Type 1 AIDS" occurs in industrialized North America and Europe; it has a distinctive sex ratio (16:1) and risk pattern of IV drug use and sexual practices. "Type 2 AIDS" occurs in Third World countries, particularly in eastern, southern, and central Africa. It is characterized by an entirely different sex ratio (1:1) and by distinctively different risk patterns. Both epidemics are caused by the HIV-1 virus. The key concept for understanding the origins of the differences between Type 1 and Type 2 AIDS is the migratory labor system in eastern, central, and southern Africa. This system causes long absences, increased family breakdown, and increased numbers of sexual partners. Historically the organization of this labor market has created a population which suffers from epidemics of sexually transmitted diseases. These historical patterns are presented as evidence for the contemporary transmission of AIDS. When contemporary AIDS and HIV-1 seropositivity prevalence data are examined, a systematic temporal and geographic pattern emerges for the AIDS epidemic in Africa. Despite a paucity of good data, the prevalence data from eastern, central, and southern Africa support the thesis of migrant labor's role in the transmission of AIDS.

  17. Mortality by Heart Failure and Ischemic Heart Disease in Brazil from 1996 to 2011

    PubMed Central

    Gaui, Eduardo Nagib; de Oliveira, Gláucia Maria Moraes; Klein, Carlos Henrique

    2014-01-01

    Background Circulatory system diseases are the first cause of death in Brazil. Objective To analyze the evolution of mortality caused by heart failure, by ischemic heart diseases and by ill-defined causes, as well as their possible relations, in Brazil and in the geoeconomic regions of the country (North, Northeast, Center-West, South and Southeast), from 1996 to 2011. Methods Data were obtained from DATASUS and death declaration records with codes I20 and I24 for acute ischemic diseases, I25 for chronic ischemic diseases, and I50 for heart failure, and codes in chapter XIII for ill-defined causes, according to geoeconomic regions of Brazil, from 1996 to 2011. Results Mortality rates due to heart failure declined in Brazil and its regions, except for the North and the Northeast. Mortality rates due to acute ischemic heart diseases increased in the North and Northeast regions, especially from 2005 on; they remained stable in the Center-West region; and decreased in the South and in the Southeast. Mortality due to chronic ischemic heart diseases decreased in Brazil and in the Center-West, South and Southeast regions, and had little variation in the North and in the Northeast. The highest mortality rates due to ill-defined causes occurred in the Northeast until 2005. Conclusions Mortality due to heart failure is decreasing in Brazil and in all of its geoeconomic regions. The temporal evolution of mortality caused by ischemic heart diseases was similar to that of heart failure. The decreasing number of deaths due to ill-defined causes may represent the improvement in the quality of information about mortality in Brazil. The evolution of acute ischemic heart diseases ranged according to regions, being possibly confused with the differential evolution of ill-defined causes. PMID:25004417

  18. The epidemiology of heart failure in adults with congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Fred H; Marelli, Ariane J

    2014-01-01

    The impact of lifelong exposure to myocardial dysfunction in populations with congenital heart disease (CHD) is becoming increasingly recognized. Most children born with CHD now reach adulthood and the long-term sequelae of treatment are contributing to substantial comorbidity. The combination of structural changes present at birth with changes resulting from cardiac surgery can result in heart failure. This article reports on the current state of knowledge on the epidemiology of heart failure in this patient population.

  19. Advanced imaging in valvular heart disease.

    PubMed

    Bax, Jeroen J; Delgado, Victoria

    2017-04-01

    Although echocardiography remains the mainstay imaging technique for the evaluation of patients with valvular heart disease (VHD), innovations in noninvasive imaging in the past few years have provided new insights into the pathophysiology and quantification of VHD, early detection of left ventricular (LV) dysfunction, and advanced prognostic assessment. The severity grading of valve dysfunction has been refined with the use of Doppler echocardiography, cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR), and CT imaging. LV ejection fraction remains an important criterion when deciding whether patients should be referred for surgery. However, echocardiographic strain imaging can now detect impaired LV systolic function before LV ejection fraction reduces, thus provoking the debate on whether patients with severe VHD should be referred for surgery at an earlier stage (before symptom onset). Impaired LV strain correlates with the amount of myocardial fibrosis detected with CMR techniques. Furthermore, accumulating data show that the extent of fibrosis associated with severe VHD has important prognostic implications. The present Review focuses on using these novel imaging modalities to assess pathophysiology, early LV dysfunction, and prognosis of major VHDs, including aortic stenosis, mitral regurgitation, and aortic regurgitation.

  20. Right ventricular failure in congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Cho, Young Kuk; Ma, Jae Sook

    2013-03-01

    Despite developments in surgical techniques and other interventions, right ventricular (RV) failure remains an important clinical problem in several congenital heart diseases (CHD). RV function is one of the most important predictors of mortality and morbidity in patients with CHD. RV failure is a progressive disorder that begins with myocardial injury or stress, neurohormonal activation, cytokine activation, altered gene expression, and ventricular remodeling. Pressure-overload RV failure caused by RV outflow tract obstruction after total correction of tetralogy of Fallot, pulmonary stenosis, atrial switch operation for transposition of the great arteries, congenitally corrected transposition of the great arteries, and systemic RV failure after the Fontan operation. Volume-overload RV failure may be caused by atrial septal defect, pulmonary regurgitation, or tricuspid regurgitation. Although the measurement of RV function is difficult because of many reasons, the right ventricle can be evaluated using both imaging and functional modalities. In clinical practice, echocardiography is the primary mode for the evaluation of RV structure and function. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging is increasingly used for evaluating RV structure and function. A comprehensive evaluation of RV function may lead to early and optimal management of RV failure in patients with CHD.

  1. Renal function in cyanotic congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Burlet, A; Drukker, A; Guignard, J P

    1999-01-01

    We performed renal function tests in 18 young patients, 1.8-14.6 years of age, with cyanotic congenital heart disease (CCHD). Glomerular filtration rate was normal (116 +/- 4.5 ml/min/1.73 m2), and renal plasma flow was decreased (410 +/- 25 ml/min/1.73 m2) with a rise in the filtration fraction (29 +/- 1.1%). The suggested pathophysiologic explanation of these findings is that the blood hyperviscosity seen in patients with CCHD causes an overall increase in renal vascular resistance with a rise in intraglomerular blood pressure. Despite a sluggish flow of blood in the glomerular capillary bed, the effective filtration pressure was adjusted to conserve the glomerular filtration rate. In addition to these renal hemodynamic parameters, we also studied renal acidification and tubular sodium and water handling during a forced water diuresis. Our data indicate that children with CCHD have a mild to moderate normal ion gap metabolic acidosis due to a low proximal tubular threshold for bicarbonate. Proximal tubular sodium and water reabsorption under these conditions were somewhat increased, though not significantly, probably due to intrarenal hydrostatic forces, in particular the rise in the oncotic pressure in the postglomerular capillaries in patients with high hematocrit values. The distal tubular functions such as sodium handling and acidification were not affected.

  2. [Pulmonary hypertension due to left heart diseases].

    PubMed

    Vachiéry, Jean-Luc; Adir, Yochai; Barberà, Joan Albert; Champion, Hunter; Coghlan, John Gerard; Cottin, Vincent; De Marco, Teresa; Galiè, Nazzareno; Ghio, Stefano; Gibbs, J Simon R; Martinez, Fernando; Semigran, Marc; Simonneau, Gerald; Wells, Athol; Seeger, Werner

    2014-10-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH), a common complication of left heart diseases (LHD), negatively impacts symptoms, exercise capacity, and outcome. Although the true prevalence of PH-LHD is unknown, a subset of patients might present significant PH that cannot be explained by a passive increase in left-sided filling pressures. The term "out-of-proportion" PH has been used to identify that population without a clear definition, which has been found less than ideal and created confusion. We propose a change in terminology and a new definition of PH due to LHD. We suggest to abandon "out-of-proportion" PH and to distinguish "isolated post-capillary PH" from "post-capillary PH with a pre-capillary component" on the basis of the pressure difference between diastolic pulmonary artery pressure and pulmonary artery wedge pressure. Although there is no validated treatment for PH-LHD, we provide insights into management and discuss completed and randomized trials in this condition. Finally, we provide recommendations for future clinical trials to establish safety and efficacy of novel compounds to target this area of unmet medical need. (J Am Coll Cardiol 2013;62:D100-8) ©2013 by the American College of Cardiology Foundation.

  3. Pulmonary hypertension due to left heart diseases.

    PubMed

    Vachiéry, Jean-Luc; Adir, Yochai; Barberà, Joan Albert; Champion, Hunter; Coghlan, John Gerard; Cottin, Vincent; De Marco, Teresa; Galiè, Nazzareno; Ghio, Stefano; Gibbs, J Simon R; Martinez, Fernando; Semigran, Marc; Simonneau, Gerald; Wells, Athol; Seeger, Werner

    2013-12-24

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH), a common complication of left heart diseases (LHD), negatively impacts symptoms, exercise capacity, and outcome. Although the true prevalence of PH-LHD is unknown, a subset of patients might present significant PH that cannot be explained by a passive increase in left-sided filling pressures. The term "out-of-proportion" PH has been used to identify that population without a clear definition, which has been found less than ideal and created confusion. We propose a change in terminology and a new definition of PH due to LHD. We suggest to abandon "out-of-proportion" PH and to distinguish "isolated post-capillary PH" from "post-capillary PH with a pre-capillary component" on the basis of the pressure difference between diastolic pulmonary artery pressure and pulmonary artery wedge pressure. Although there is no validated treatment for PH-LHD, we provide insights into management and discuss completed and randomized trials in this condition. Finally, we provide recommendations for future clinical trials to establish safety and efficacy of novel compounds to target this area of unmet medical need.

  4. Pandora's Box: mitochondrial defects in ischaemic heart disease and stroke.

    PubMed

    Andalib, Sasan; Divani, Afshin A; Michel, Tanja M; Høilund-Carlsen, Poul F; Vafaee, Manouchehr S; Gjedde, Albert

    2017-04-05

    Ischaemic heart disease and stroke are vascular events with serious health consequences worldwide. Recent genetic and epigenetic techniques have revealed many genetic determinants of these vascular events and simplified the approaches to research focused on ischaemic heart disease and stroke. The pathogenetic mechanisms of ischaemic heart disease and stroke are complex, with mitochondrial involvement (partially or entirely) recently gaining substantial support. Not only can mitochondrial reactive oxygen species give rise to ischaemic heart disease and stroke by production of oxidised low-density lipoprotein and induction of apoptosis, but the impact on pericytes contributes directly to the pathogenesis. Over the past two decades, publications implicate the causative role of nuclear genes in the development of ischaemic heart disease and stroke, in contrast to the potential role of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in the pathophysiology of the disorders, which is much less understood, although recent studies do demonstrate that the involvement of mitochondria and mtDNA in the development of ischaemic heart disease and stroke is likely to be larger than originally thought, with the novel discovery of links among mitochondria, mtDNA and vascular events. Here we explore the molecular events and mtDNA alterations in relation to the role of mitochondria in ischaemic heart disease and stroke.

  5. Relationship between TBX20 gene polymorphism and congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Yang, X F; Zhang, Y F; Zhao, C F; Liu, M M; Si, J P; Fang, Y F; Xing, W W; Wang, F L

    2016-06-02

    Congenital heart disease in children is a type of birth defect. Previous studies have suggested that the transcription factor, TBX20, is involved in the occurrence and development of congenital heart disease in children; however, the specific regulatory mechanisms are yet to be evaluated. Hence, this study aimed to evaluate the relationship between the TBX20 polymorphism and the occurrence and development of congenital heart disease. The TBX20 gene sequence was obtained from the NCBI database and the polymorphic locus candidate was predicted. Thereafter, the specific gene primers were designed for the restriction fragment length polymorphism-polymerase chain reaction (RFLP-PCR) of DNA extracted from the blood of 80 patients with congenital heart disease and 80 controls. The results of the PCR were subjected to correlation analysis to identify the differences between the amplicons and to determine the relationship between the TBX20 gene polymorphism and congenital heart disease. One of the single nucleotide polymorphic locus was found to be rs3999950: c.774T>C (Ala265Ala). The TC genotype frequency in the patients was higher than that in the controls, similar to that for the C locus. The odds ratio of the TC genotypes was above 1, indicating that the presence of the TC genotype increases the incidence of congenital heart diseases. Thus, rs3999950 may be associated with congenital heart disease, and TBX20 may predispose children to the defect.

  6. The Healthy Heart Program Lowers Heart Disease Risk in a Rural County.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Jennifer; Nixon, Jan; Woodard, Jennifer

    1998-01-01

    Follow-up of 55 adults who completed the Healthy Heart Program, which focused on heart disease risks, cholesterol, and diet, found that attitudes and knowledge were significantly higher after the program; fat intake, blood pressure, and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol were significantly lower. Locus of control did not change. (SK)

  7. The Heart Saver Handbook. A Manual for Those Working for Heart Disease Prevention through Dietary Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chicago Heart Association, IL.

    This handbook for nutritionists and dietitians as well as other health professionals (physicians, nurses, and health educators) is a guide to the content and conduct of the Heart Saver Program, a health education program designed to help prevent heart disease by bringing about significant changes in the food habits of the public. The content…

  8. How Is Diabetic Heart Disease Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... gives your doctor information about how your heart works during physical stress. During a stress test, you exercise (walk or run on a treadmill or pedal a bicycle) to make your heart work hard and beat fast. Tests are done on ...

  9. Preventing Heart Disease - At Any Age

    MedlinePlus

    ... how to add more color now! Lower Your Sodium in 21 Days! Learn how you can lower your sodium and change your salty ways in 21 Days! ... Popular Articles 1 Understanding Blood Pressure Readings 2 Sodium and Salt 3 Target Heart Rates 4 Heart ...

  10. Spectrum of congenital heart diseases in Kashmir, India.

    PubMed

    Ashraf, Mohd; Chowdhary, J; Khajuria, K; Reyaz, A M

    2009-12-01

    A retrospective analysis of case-records data of 53,653 patients (0-18 years) over a two and half year period was conducted to ascertain the spectrum of congenital heart diseases. Two hundred and twenty one patients were found having congenital heart diseases; a prevalence of 4.1/1000. Ventricular septal defect (VSD) was the most frequent lesion seen in 69 (31.2%), followed by patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) in 36 (16.3%) children. Tetralogy of Fallot (TOF) was the most frequent cyanotic heart disease seen in 17 (7.8%) patients.

  11. Intensive care of the adult patient with congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Allan, Catherine K

    2011-01-01

    Prevalence of congenital heart disease in the adult population has increased out of proportion to that of the pediatric population as survival has improved, and adult congenital heart disease patients make up a growing percentage of pediatric and adult cardiac intensive care unit admissions. These patients often develop complex multiorgan system disease as a result of long-standing altered cardiac physiology, and many require reoperation during adulthood. Practitioners who care for these patients in the cardiac intensive care unit must have a strong working knowledge of the pathophysiology of complex congenital heart disease, and a full team of specialists must be available to assist in the care of these patients. This chapter will review some of the common multiorgan system effects of long-standing congenital heart disease (eg, renal and hepatic dysfunction, coagulation abnormalities, arrhythmias) as well as some of the unique cardiopulmonary physiology of this patient population.

  12. Assessment of Diastolic Function in Congenital Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Panesar, Dilveer Kaur; Burch, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Diastolic function is an important component of left ventricular (LV) function which is often overlooked. It can cause symptoms of heart failure in patients even in the presence of normal systolic function. The parameters used to assess diastolic function often measure flow and are affected by the loading conditions of the heart. The interpretation of diastolic function in the context of congenital heart disease requires some understanding of the effects of the lesions themselves on these parameters. Individual congenital lesions will be discussed in this paper. Recently, load-independent techniques have led to more accurate measurements of ventricular compliance and remodeling in heart disease. The combination of inflow velocities and tissue Doppler measurements can be used to estimate diastolic function and LV filling pressures. This review focuses on diastolic function and assessment in congenital heart disease. PMID:28261582

  13. Computer Aided Diagnosis of Acute Gynaecologic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Fengling

    1982-01-01

    In this article, the application of electronic computers for diagnosis of ten common gynaecologic diseases is discussed. Verification by 1038 cases shows that the discussed method of diagnosis has an accuracy of 95.57%.

  14. [Problems connected with sexual activity in patients with heart disease].

    PubMed

    Rembek, Magdalena; Tylkowski, Michał; Piestrzeniewicz, Katarzyna; Goch, Jan Henryk

    2007-08-01

    The paper presents some basic data on sexual activity in patients with heart disease. The most typical problems of people with stable angina or after myocardial infarction connected with sexual intercourse have been presented. Modulation of risk of heart attack during sexual activity and main problems of sexual dysfunction after acute coronary syndromes have been described.

  15. Roles of FGF Signals in Heart Development, Health, and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Itoh, Nobuyuki; Ohta, Hiroya; Nakayama, Yoshiaki; Konishi, Morichika

    2016-01-01

    The heart provides the body with oxygen and nutrients and assists in the removal of metabolic waste through the blood vessels of the circulatory system. It is the first organ to form during embryonic morphogenesis. FGFs with diverse functions in development, health, and disease are signaling proteins, mostly as paracrine growth factors or endocrine hormones. The human/mouse FGF family comprises 22 members. Findings obtained from mouse models and human diseases with FGF signaling disorders have indicated that several FGFs are involved in heart development, health, and disease. Paracrine FGFs including FGF8, FGF9, FGF10, and FGF16 act as paracrine signals in embryonic heart development. In addition, paracrine FGFs including FGF2, FGF9, FGF10, and FGF16 play roles as paracrine signals in postnatal heart pathophysiology. Although FGF15/19, FGF21, and FGF23 are typical endocrine FGFs, they mainly function as paracrine signals in heart development or pathophysiology. In heart diseases, serum FGF15/19 levels or FGF21 and FGF23 levels decrease or increase, respectively, indicating their possible roles in heart pathophysiology. FGF2 and FGF10 also stimulate the cardiac differentiation of cultured stem cells and cardiac reprogramming of cultured fibroblasts. These findings provide new insights into the roles of FGF signaling in the heart and potential therapeutic strategies for cardiac disorders. PMID:27803896

  16. Running, Heart Disease, and the Ironic Death of Jim Fixx.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plymire, Darcy C.

    2002-01-01

    Runner Jim Fixx wrote a book about running and died young of a heart attack while running. Fixx and other authors believed heart disease resulted from overcivilization and recommended running as a way of life and cure, advising readers to listen to their bodies instead of their doctors. Fixx's adherence to that philosophy explains his behavior…

  17. Cohort profile: prevalence of valvular heart disease in community patients with suspected heart failure in UK

    PubMed Central

    Marciniak, Anna; Glover, Keli; Sharma, Rajan

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to evaluate the proportion of suspected heart failure patients with significant valvular heart disease. Early diagnosis of valve disease is essential as delay can limit treatment and negatively affect prognosis for undiagnosed patients. The prevalence of unsuspected valve disease in the community is uncertain. Participants We prospectively evaluated 79 043 patients, between 2001 and 2011, who were referred to a community open access echocardiography service for suspected heart failure. All patients underwent a standard transthoracic echocardiogram according to British Society of Echocardiography guidelines. Findings to date Of the total number, 29 682 patients (37.5%) were diagnosed with mild valve disease, 8983 patients (11.3%) had moderate valve disease and 2134 (2.7%) had severe valve disease. Of the total number of patients scanned, the prevalence of aortic stenosis, aortic regurgitation, mitral stenosis, mitral regurgitation was 10%, 8.4%, 1%, and 12.5% respectively. 18% had tricuspid regurgitation. 5% had disease involving one or more valves. Conclusions Of patients with suspected heart failure in the primary care setting, a significant proportion have important valvular heart disease. These patients are at high risk of future cardiac events and will require onward referral for further evaluation. We recommend that readily available community echocardiography services should be provided for general practitioners as this will result in early detection of valve disease. PMID:28131996

  18. Women, Loneliness, and Incident Coronary Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Thurston, Rebecca C.; Kubzansky, Laura D.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To examine associations between loneliness and risk of incident coronary heart disease (CHD) over a 19-year follow-up period in a community sample of men and women. Loneliness, the perceived discrepancy between actual and desired social relationships, has been linked to several adverse health outcomes. However, no previous research has prospectively examined the association between loneliness and incident CHD in a community sample of men and women. Methods Hypotheses were examined using data from the First National Health and Nutrition Survey and its follow-up studies (n = 3003). Loneliness, assessed by one item from the Center for Epidemiologic Studies of Depression scale, and covariates were derived from baseline interviews. Incident CHD was derived from hospital records/death certificates over 19 years of follow-up. Hypotheses were evaluated, using Cox proportional hazards models. Results Among women, high loneliness was associated with increased risk of incident CHD (high: hazard ratio = 1.76, 95% Confidence Interval = 1.17â2.63; medium: hazard ratio = 0.98, 95% Confidence Interval = 0.64â1.49; reference: low), controlling for age, race, education, income, marital status, hypertension, diabetes, cholesterol, physical activity, smoking, alcohol use, systolic and diastolic blood pressures, and body mass index. Findings persisted additionally controlling for depressive symptoms. No significant associations were observed among men. Conclusions Loneliness was prospectively associated with increased risk of incident CHD, controlling for multiple confounding factors. Loneliness among women may merit clinical attention, not only due to its impact on quality of life but also its potential implications for cardiovascular health. PMID:19661189

  19. Conceptual model for heart failure disease management.

    PubMed

    Andrikopoulou, Efstathia; Abbate, Kariann; Whellan, David J

    2014-03-01

    The objective of this review is to propose a conceptual model for heart failure (HF) disease management (HFDM) and to define the components of an efficient HFDM plan in reference to this model. Articles that evaluated 1 or more of the following aspects of HFDM were reviewed: (1) outpatient clinic follow-up; (2) self-care interventions to enhance patient skills; and (3) remote evaluation of worsening HF either using structured telephone support (STS) or by monitoring device data (telemonitoring). The success of programs in reducing readmissions and mortality were mixed. Outpatient follow-up programs generally resulted in improved outcomes, including decreased readmissions. Based on 1 meta-analysis, specialty clinics improved outcomes and nonspecialty clinics did not. Results from self-care programs were inconsistent and might have been affected by patient cognitive status and educational level, and intervention intensity. Telemonitoring, despite initially promising meta-analyses demonstrating a decrease in the number and duration of HF-related readmissions and all-cause mortality rates at follow-up, has not been shown in randomized trials to consistently reduce readmissions or mortality. However, evidence from device monitoring trials in particular might have been influenced by technology and design issues that might be rectified in future trials. Results from the literature suggest that the ideal HFDM plan would include outpatient follow-up at an HF specialty clinic and continuous education to improve patient self-care. The end result of this plan would lead to better understanding on the part of the patient and improved patient ability to recognize and respond to signs of decompensation.

  20. Impact of diabetes, chronic heart failure, congenital heart disease and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease on acute and chronic exercise responses

    PubMed Central

    Brassard, Patrice; Ferland, Annie; Marquis, Karine; Maltais, François; Jobin, Jean; Poirier, Paul

    2007-01-01

    Several chronic diseases are known to negatively affect the ability of an individual to perform exercise. However, the altered exercise capacity observed in these patients is not solely associated with the heart and lungs dysfunction. Exercise has also been shown to play an important role in the management of several pathologies encountered in the fields of cardiology and pneumology. Studies conducted in our institution regarding the influence of diabetes, chronic heart failure, congenital heart disease and chronic pulmonary obstructive disease on the acute and chronic exercise responses, along with the beneficial effects of exercise training in these populations, are reviewed. PMID:17932595

  1. Relationship Between Ischemic Heart Disease and Sexual Satisfaction

    PubMed Central

    Afra, Leila Ghanbari; Taghadosi, Mohsen; Gilasi, Hamid Reza

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Ischemic heart disease is a life-threatening condition. Considerable doubts exist over the effects of this disease on patients’ sexual activity and satisfaction. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between ischemic heart disease and sexual satisfaction. Methods: In a retrospective cohort study, the convenience sample of 150 patients exposure with ischemic heart disease and 150 people without exposure it was drawn from Shahid Beheshti hospital, Kashan, Iran. Sampling was performed from March to September 2014. We employed the Larson’s Sexual Satisfaction Questionnaire for gathering the data. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and Chi-square, t-test and linear regression analysis. Results: The means of sexual satisfaction in patients exposure with ischemic heart disease and among the subjects without exposure it were 101.47±13.42 and 100.91±16.52, respectively. There was no significant difference between the two groups regarding sexual satisfaction. However, sexual satisfaction was significantly correlated with gender and the use of cardiac medications (P value < 0.05). Conclusion: The level of sexual satisfaction in patients with exposure ischemic heart disease is similar to the people without exposure it. Moreover, the men and the patients who do not receive cardiac medications have higher levels of sexual satisfaction. Nurses who are providing care to patients with ischemic heart disease need to pay closer attention to patient education about sexual issues. PMID:26234982

  2. When a Heart Murmur Signals Valve Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Problem: Valve Stenosis - Problem: Aortic Valve Stenosis - Problem: Mitral Valve Stenosis - Problem: Tricuspid Valve Stenosis - Problem: Pulmonary Valve Stenosis Problem: Mitral Valve Prolapse Problem: Heart Valve Regurgitation - Problem: Aortic ...

  3. [Heart rhythm disturbances in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in aggregate with coronary heart disease].

    PubMed

    Shoĭkhet, Ia N; Klester, E B; Golovin, V A

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of the research was to study kinds, frequencies and features of heart rhythm disturbances (HRD) in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) subject to degree of severity, including presence of coronary heart disease (CHD). 1189 of patients with registered HRD were examined. 315 of them had COPD (group 1), 531--combination of COPD and CHD (group 2), 343 were CHD patients (group 3). The extent of examinations included electrocardiogram (ECG), Halter monitoring (HM), bicycle ergometry (BEM), external respiration function estimation. Supraventricular HRD were registered statistically more frequently in group 1: according to ECG data in rest - in 37.2% patients, by BEM results--in 18.8%, by HM--in 50%. Combined (supraventricular and ventricular) HRD were registered most frequently in group 2: 41.2 24.4, and 45.5% respectively. Ventricular HRD dominated in group 3: 47.6, 29.3 and 48.6% respectively. The results of the study indicate that supraventricular HRDprevaile in patients with COPD, combined HRD - in patients with COPD and CHD. Ventricular HRD, which most informatively reflect changes in intracardiac geometry and left ventricle hemodynamics, dominate in CHD patients. The optimization of therapy correction consists in early diagnostics of HRD subject to features of cardiorespiratory system functional state.

  4. Screening for Critical Congenital Heart Disease in Newborns

    MedlinePlus

    ... critical congenital heart disease (CCHD) in newborns. 2 Physiology of Pulse Oximetry Oxygen breathed in through the ... Previous Article Next Article Jump to Article Introduction Physiology of Pulse Oximetry The Ductus Arteriosus in CCHD ...

  5. Heart Disease in Women: Understand Symptoms and Risk Factors

    MedlinePlus

    ... associated with an increased risk of heart disease. Waist circumference also is a useful tool to measure whether or not you're overweight. Women are generally considered overweight if their waist measurement is greater than 35 inches (89 centimeters). ...

  6. Congenital heart disease in spondylothoracic dysostosis: two familial cases.

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, J M; Cook, A; Fagg, N L; MacLachlan, N A; Sharland, G K

    1995-01-01

    Two familial cases of spondylothoracic dysostosis are reported. Both cases had severe congenital heart disease in addition to the skeletal malformations which are characteristic of the condition. Images PMID:7473656

  7. Keys to Heart Disease Care: Communication and Trust

    MedlinePlus

    ... fullstory_164421.html Keys to Heart Disease Care: Communication and Trust These factors linked to patients' greater ... trusted the medical profession. It's no secret that communication and trust are important in any doctor-patient ...

  8. Erectile Dysfunction: A Sign of Heart Disease?

    MedlinePlus

    ... of plaques in the arteries of your body (atherosclerosis) was believed to be the reason why erectile ... the penis, and aids in the development of atherosclerosis. Erectile dysfunction does not always indicate an underlying ...

  9. Regenerative medicine for the treatment of heart disease.

    PubMed

    Hansson, E M; Lendahl, U

    2013-03-01

    Heart failure is a major cause of mortality worldwide with a steady increase in prevalence. There is currently no available cure beyond orthotopic heart transplantation, which for a number of reasons is an option only for a small fraction of all patients. Considerable hope has therefore been placed on the possibility of treating a failing heart by replacing lost cardiomyocytes, either through transplantation of various types of stem cells or by boosting endogenous regenerative mechanisms in the heart. Here, we review the current status of stem and progenitor cell-based therapies for heart disease. We discuss the pros and cons of different stem and progenitor cell types that can be considered for transplantation and describe recent advances in the understanding of how cardiomyocytes normally differentiate and how these cells can be generated from more immature cells ex vivo. Finally, we consider the possibility of activation of endogenous stem and progenitor cells to treat heart failure.

  10. Development of a Decision Aid for Patients with Advanced Heart Failure Considering a Destination Therapy Left Ventricular Assist Device

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Jocelyn S.; Matlock, Daniel D.; McIlvennan, Colleen K.; Jenkins, Amy R.; Allen, Larry A.

    2015-01-01

    STRUCTURED ABSTRACT Objective We aimed to create decision aids (DAs) for patients considering destination therapy left ventricular assist device (DT LVAD). Background DT LVAD is a major decision for patients with end-stage heart failure. Patients facing decisions with complex tradeoffs may benefit from high-quality decision support resources. Methods Following the International Patient Decision Aid Standards (IPDAS) guidelines and based on a needs assessment with stakeholders, we developed drafts of paper and video DAs. With input from patients, caregivers, and clinicians through alpha testing, we iteratively modified the DAs to ensure acceptability. Results We conducted semi-structured interviews with 24 patients, 20 caregivers, and 24 clinicians to assess readability, bias, and usability of the DAs. Stakeholder feedback allowed us to integrate aspects critical to decision-making around highly invasive therapies for life-threatening diseases, including addressing emotion and fear of death, using gain frames for all options that focus on living, highlighting palliative and hospice care, integrating the caregiver role, and utilizing a range of balanced testimonials. After 19 iterative versions of the paper DA and four versions of the video DA, final materials were made available for wider use. Conclusion We developed the first IPDAS-level DAs for DT LVAD. Given the extreme nature of this medical decision, we augmented traditional DA characteristics with non-traditional DA features to address a spectrum of cognitive, automatic, and emotional aspects of end-of-life decision-making. Not only are the DAs important tools for those confronting end-stage heart failure, but the lessons learned will likely inform decision support for other invasive therapies. UNSTRUCTURED ABSTRACT Destination therapy left ventricular assist device (DT LVAD) is a major decision for patients with end-stage heart failure. We aimed to create decision aids (DAs) to support patients and their

  11. [Valvular heart disease: preoperative assessment and postoperative care].

    PubMed

    Nägele, Reto; Kaufmann, Beat A

    2013-10-30

    Patients with valvular heart disease or with a prosthetic heart valve replacement are seen with increasing frequency in clinical practice. The medical care and evaluation of patients with valvular heart disease before valve surgery, but also the post-operative treatment is complex and managed by general practitioners, cardiologists and cardiac surgeons. In this mini-review we will first discuss the preoperative assessment of the two most common valvulopathies, aortic stenosis and mitral regurgitation. Then we will discuss the post-operative care, which includes the management of anticoagulation, serial follow up and as well as the diagnostic assessment of complications such as thromboembolism, hemolysis, endocarditis and valve dysfunction.

  12. Atlas-based Anatomical Modeling and Analysis of Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Medrano-Gracia, Pau; Cowan, Brett R; Suinesiaputra, Avan; Young, Alistair A

    2014-01-01

    Heart shape and function are major determinants of disease severity and predictors of future morbidity and mortality. Many studies now rely on non-invasive cardiac imaging techniques to quantify structural and functional changes. Statistical anatomical modeling of heart shape and motion provides a new tool for the quantification and evaluation of heart disease. This review surveys recent progress in the evaluation of statistical shape measures across populations and sub-cohorts, and highlights collaborative efforts to facilitate data sharing and atlas-based shape analysis. PMID:26688687

  13. Congenital heart disease and chromossomopathies detected by the karyotype

    PubMed Central

    Trevisan, Patrícia; Rosa, Rafael Fabiano M.; Koshiyama, Dayane Bohn; Zen, Tatiana Diehl; Paskulin, Giorgio Adriano; Zen, Paulo Ricardo G.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review the relationship between congenital heart defects and chromosomal abnormalities detected by the karyotype. DATA SOURCES: Scientific articles were searched in MEDLINE database, using the descriptors "karyotype" OR "chromosomal" OR "chromosome" AND "heart defects, congenital". The research was limited to articles published in English from 1980 on. DATA SYNTHESIS: Congenital heart disease is characterized by an etiologically heterogeneous and not well understood group of lesions. Several researchers have evaluated the presence of chromosomal abnormalities detected by the karyotype in patients with congenital heart disease. However, most of the articles were retrospective studies developed in Europe and only some of the studied patients had a karyotype exam. In this review, only one study was conducted in Latin America, in Brazil. It is known that chromosomal abnormalities are frequent, being present in about one in every ten patients with congenital heart disease. Among the karyotype alterations in these patients, the most important is the trisomy 21 (Down syndrome). These patients often have associated extra-cardiac malformations, with a higher risk of morbidity and mortality, which makes heart surgery even more risky. CONCLUSIONS: Despite all the progress made in recent decades in the field of cytogenetic, the karyotype remains an essential tool in order to evaluate patients with congenital heart disease. The detailed dysmorphological physical examination is of great importance to indicate the need of a karyotype. PMID:25119760

  14. Pregnancy in women with congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Greutmann, Matthias; Pieper, Petronella G

    2015-10-01

    Congenital heart defects are the most common birth defects. Major advances in open-heart surgery have led to rapidly evolving cohorts of adult survivors and the majority of affected women now survive to childbearing age. The risk of cardiovascular complications during pregnancy and peripartum depends on the type of the underlying defect, the extent and severity of residual haemodynamic lesions and comorbidities. Careful individualized, multi-disciplinary pre-pregnancy risk assessment and counselling, including assessment of risks in the offspring and estimation on long-term outcomes of the underlying heart defect, will enable informed decision making. Depending on the estimated risks, a careful follow-up plan during pregnancy as well as a detailed plan for delivery and postpartum care can reduce the risks and should be made by the multi-disciplinary team.

  15. Computer-aided periodontal disease diagnosis using computer vision.

    PubMed

    Juan, M C; Alcañiz, M; Monserrat, C; Grau, V; Knoll, C

    1999-01-01

    Periodontal diseases are the major cause of tooth loss. The study of the evolution of these diseases is crucial to achieve adequate planning and treatment. Depth probing is essential to know the periodontal disease stage. In this paper we present a new system for Computer-Aided Periodontal Disease Diagnosis using computer vision. The system automates the depth probing and incorporates a colour camera fitted together with a plastic probe that automatically and exactly obtains the depth probing measure. The system has been tested by several periodontists and with 125 teeth of different patients. The differences between the values taken by the system and two periodontists have not been significant.

  16. Fibrocytes are associated with the fibrosis of coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Lei, Pu-Ping; Qu, Yong-Qiang; Shuai, Qun; Tao, Si-Ming; Bao, Yu-Xia; Wang, Yu; Wang, Shang-Wen; Wang, Dian-Hua

    2013-01-15

    Fibrocytes contribute significantly to fibrosis in many cardiac diseases. However, it is not clear whether fibrocytes are associated with the fibrosis in coronary heart disease (CHD). The aim of this study was to determine whether fibrocytes are involved in cardiac fibrosis in CHD. We identified the presence of fibrocytes in CHD heart by immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy, examined the collagen volume fraction by Masson's Trichrome staining, and evaluated the correlation between fibrocytes and cardiac fibrosis. In conjunction, we examined the location of CXCL12, a homing factor and specific ligand for CXCR4, by immunohistochemistry. Fibrocytes were identified in 26 out of 27 CHD hearts and in 10 out of 11 normal hearts. Combinations, including CD34/αSMA, CD34/procollagen-I, CD45/αSMA, CXCR4/procollagen-I and CXCR4/αSMA, stained significantly more fibrocytes in CHD hearts as compared with those in normal hearts (p<0.05). There were positive correlations between the collagen volume fraction and the amount of fibrocytes (r=0.558; p=0.003<0.01) and between the number of CXCR4(+) fibrocytes and the CXCL12(+) cells (r=0.741; p=0.000<0.01) in CHD hearts. Based upon these findings, we conclude that fibrocytes, likely recruited through the CXCR4/CXCL12 axis, may contribute to the increase in the fibroblast population in CHD heart.

  17. Temporally Distinct Six2-Positive Second Heart Field Progenitors Regulate Mammalian Heart Development and Disease.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhengfang; Wang, Jingying; Guo, Chaoshe; Chang, Weiting; Zhuang, Jian; Zhu, Ping; Li, Xue

    2017-01-24

    The embryonic process of forming a complex structure such as the heart remains poorly understood. Here, we show that Six2 marks a dynamic subset of second heart field progenitors. Six2-positive (Six2(+)) progenitors are rapidly recruited and assigned, and their descendants are allocated successively to regions of the heart from the right ventricle (RV) to the pulmonary trunk. Global ablation of Six2(+) progenitors resulted in RV hypoplasia and pulmonary atresia. An early stage-specific ablation of a small subset of Six2(+) progenitors did not cause any apparent structural defect at birth but rather resulted in adult-onset cardiac hypertrophy and dysfunction. Furthermore, Six2 expression depends in part on Shh signaling, and Shh deletion resulted in severe deficiency of Six2(+) progenitors. Collectively, these findings unveil the chronological features of cardiogenesis, in which the mammalian heart is built sequentially by temporally distinct populations of cardiac progenitors, and provide insights into late-onset congenital heart disease.

  18. Quality of life among parents of children with heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Arafa, Mostafa A; Zaher, Salah R; El-Dowaty, Amira A; Moneeb, Dalia E

    2008-01-01

    Background Quality of life of parents of chronically ill children has become increasingly important as the mortality rates associated with such illnesses have decreased and survival rates have increased. Aim To describe the Health related quality of life (HRQOL) of parents whose children are suffering from heart diseases and to identify the most important factors that could affect it. Methods A cross sectional study was conducted in Alexandria, Egypt in the two main hospitals that treat children with heart diseases. 400 parents of children with heart diseases were recruited and a comparison group (400) of parents of children with minor illnesses were included from both hospitals. Socioeconomic and disease related data were collected, SF36 was used to collect data regarding the QOL. MANOVA was used to compare the SF-36 scores between groups and to explore the impact of different variables. Results In all SF-36 subscales, parents of children with heart diseases reported significantly poorer HRQOL, except for pain subscale. The most striking differences were for General Health, Vitality and role limitation physical. Factors that had a significant impact of HRQOL were severity of illness, type of heart disease in addition to age of child, having multiple children, financial situation and presence of comorbid condition. The mean scores for different domains were the lowest for younger age, rheumatic heart disease and female children. Conclusion QOL of parents of children with heart diseases was significantly impaired and it was influenced by several factors; mainly related to the clinical status of the child. Psychological status, social support and reassurance of the parents should be considered when making treatment decision for their children. PMID:18980676

  19. Resveratrol Reverses Functional Chagas Heart Disease in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Mata-Santos, Hilton; Vicentino, Amanda R. R.; Feijó, Daniel F.; Meyer-Fernandes, José R.; Paula-Neto, Heitor A.; Medei, Emiliano; Bozza, Marcelo T.; Lannes-Vieira, Joseli; Paiva, Claudia N.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic chagasic cardiomyopathy (CCC) develops years after acute infection by Trypanosoma cruzi and does not improve after trypanocidal therapy, despite reduction of parasite burden. During disease, the heart undergoes oxidative stress, a potential causative factor for arrhythmias and contractile dysfunction. Here we tested whether antioxidants/ cardioprotective drugs could improve cardiac function in established Chagas heart disease. We chose a model that resembles B1-B2 stage of human CCC, treated mice with resveratrol and performed electrocardiography and echocardiography studies. Resveratrol reduced the prolonged PR and QTc intervals, increased heart rates and reversed sinus arrhythmia, atrial and atrioventricular conduction disorders; restored a normal left ventricular ejection fraction, improved stroke volume and cardiac output. Resveratrol activated the AMPK-pathway and reduced both ROS production and heart parasite burden, without interfering with vascularization or myocarditis intensity. Resveratrol was even capable of improving heart function of infected mice when treatment was started late after infection, while trypanocidal drug benznidazole failed. We attempted to mimic resveratrol’s actions using metformin (AMPK-activator) or tempol (SOD-mimetic). Metformin and tempol mimicked the beneficial effects of resveratrol on heart function and decreased lipid peroxidation, but did not alter parasite burden. These results indicate that AMPK activation and ROS neutralization are key strategies to induce tolerance to Chagas heart disease. Despite all tissue damage observed in established Chagas heart disease, we found that a physiological dysfunction can still be reversed by treatment with resveratrol, metformin and tempol, resulting in improved heart function and representing a starting point to develop innovative therapies in CCC. PMID:27788262

  20. Resveratrol Reverses Functional Chagas Heart Disease in Mice.

    PubMed

    Vilar-Pereira, Glaucia; Carneiro, Vitor C; Mata-Santos, Hilton; Vicentino, Amanda R R; Ramos, Isalira P; Giarola, Naira L L; Feijó, Daniel F; Meyer-Fernandes, José R; Paula-Neto, Heitor A; Medei, Emiliano; Bozza, Marcelo T; Lannes-Vieira, Joseli; Paiva, Claudia N

    2016-10-01

    Chronic chagasic cardiomyopathy (CCC) develops years after acute infection by Trypanosoma cruzi and does not improve after trypanocidal therapy, despite reduction of parasite burden. During disease, the heart undergoes oxidative stress, a potential causative factor for arrhythmias and contractile dysfunction. Here we tested whether antioxidants/ cardioprotective drugs could improve cardiac function in established Chagas heart disease. We chose a model that resembles B1-B2 stage of human CCC, treated mice with resveratrol and performed electrocardiography and echocardiography studies. Resveratrol reduced the prolonged PR and QTc intervals, increased heart rates and reversed sinus arrhythmia, atrial and atrioventricular conduction disorders; restored a normal left ventricular ejection fraction, improved stroke volume and cardiac output. Resveratrol activated the AMPK-pathway and reduced both ROS production and heart parasite burden, without interfering with vascularization or myocarditis intensity. Resveratrol was even capable of improving heart function of infected mice when treatment was started late after infection, while trypanocidal drug benznidazole failed. We attempted to mimic resveratrol's actions using metformin (AMPK-activator) or tempol (SOD-mimetic). Metformin and tempol mimicked the beneficial effects of resveratrol on heart function and decreased lipid peroxidation, but did not alter parasite burden. These results indicate that AMPK activation and ROS neutralization are key strategies to induce tolerance to Chagas heart disease. Despite all tissue damage observed in established Chagas heart disease, we found that a physiological dysfunction can still be reversed by treatment with resveratrol, metformin and tempol, resulting in improved heart function and representing a starting point to develop innovative therapies in CCC.

  1. Employees' perceptions of the Aid-for-AIDS disease-management programme, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Rothberg, Alan; Van Huyssteen, Karen

    2008-11-01

    It is estimated that 18-20% of South Africa's more than 5 million HIV-positive individuals are formally employed. Disease management programmes for these employees vary in scope and sophistication, with services provided by the employer, or third-party specialist disease managers, or through medical aid schemes. This study surveyed 215 HIV-positive employees in two organisations contracted to the Aid for AIDS (AfA) disease management programme through their in-house medical aid schemes. The two organisations differed in their overall approach to HIV and AIDS: one mainly relies on on-site access to voluntary counselling and testing (VCT) and AfA's management of registered HIV-positive employees, while the other has invested in and actively developed a comprehensive programme that also extends to families and the community as well as links employees to the AfA programme. Responses received from 28 of the 215 employees surveyed indicate that fear of disclosure of one's HIV status and of stigmatisation are reasons for late registration with the AfA programme or non-utilisation of other available support programmes. Respondents mentioned that confidence in the employer's ability to maintain confidentiality was also an issue. Respondents' important suggestions for change included: a) on-site educational and awareness programmes for management personnel and staff in order to reduce HIV discrimination and stigmatisation; b) information directed at HIV-positive employees publicising the benefits and effectiveness of medical treatment; c) support groups for HIV-positive employees; and d) management personnel to engage with HIV-infected employees who are willing to take an active role in staff education and the development of workplace policies and programmes.

  2. Settling the 'Score' with Heart Disease

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Technology and medicine forged a bond in 1986 when a group of dedicated NASA scientists, University of Southern California (USC) medical professors, and a Dutch cardiologist joined forces to prevent heart attacks, using ultrasound images of astronauts blood-flow patterns and the supercomputer depended upon to orchestrate the "Star Wars" Strategic Defense Initiative.

  3. Heart-Healthy Families. Helping Your Kids Stay Fit Could Prevent Heart Disease in Their Futures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vagnini, Frederic J.; Malone, Mary Jo

    1994-01-01

    The conditions and habits that lead to heart disease begin early in life. Obesity is the predecessor of a host of cardiovascular-related diseases; childhood obesity poses serious physical and psychological roadblocks for youngsters as they mature. The article suggests how families can adopt fitter lifestyles and instill good eating and exercise…

  4. Association of maternal chronic disease with risk of congenital heart disease in offspring

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Hsin-Hsu; Chiou, Meng-Jiun; Liang, Fu-Wen; Chen, Lea-Hua; Lu, Tsung-Hsueh; Li, Chung-Yi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Information about known risk factors for congenital heart disease is scarce. In this population-based study, we aimed to investigate the relation between maternal chronic disease and congenital heart disease in offspring. Methods: The study cohort consisted of 1 387 650 live births from 2004 to 2010. We identified chronic disease in mothers and mild and severe forms of congenital heart disease in their offspring from Taiwan’s National Health Insurance medical claims. We used multivariable logistic regression analysis to assess the associations of all cases and specific types of congenital heart disease with various maternal chronic diseases. Results: For mothers with the following chronic diseases, the overall prevalence of congenital heart disease in their children was significantly higher than for mothers without these diseases: diabetes mellitus type 1 (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 2.32, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.66–3.25), diabetes mellitus type 2 (adjusted OR 2.85, 95% CI 2.60–3.12), hypertension (adjusted OR 1.87, 95% CI 1.69–2.07), congenital heart defects (adjusted OR 3.05, 95% CI 2.45–3.80), anemia (adjusted OR 1.31, 95% CI 1.25–1.38), connective tissue disorders (adjusted OR 1.39, 95% CI 1.19–1.62), epilepsy (adjusted OR 1.37, 95% CI 1.08–1.74) and mood disorders (adjusted OR 1.25, 95% CI 1.11–1.41). The same pattern held for mild forms of congenital heart disease. A higher prevalence of severe congenital heart disease was seen only among offspring of mothers with congenital heart defects or type 2 diabetes. Interpretation: The children of women with several kinds of chronic disease appear to be at risk for congenital heart disease. Preconception counselling and optimum treatment of pregnant women with chronic disease would seem prudent. PMID:27729382

  5. Percutaneous options for heart failure in adults with congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Mylotte, Darren; Martucci, Giuseppe; Piazza, Nicolo; McElhinney, Doff

    2014-01-01

    In the context of congenital heart disease (CHD), the complex biochemical and physiologic response to the pressure- or volume-loaded ventricle can be induced by stenotic and shunt/regurgitant lesions, respectively. A range of transcatheter therapies have recently emerged to expand the therapeutic potential of the more traditional surgical and medical interventions for heart failure in patients with CHD. Together, these complementary interventions aim to treat the growing patient population with adult CHD (ACHD). In this article, the most commonly used transcatheter interventions for heart failure in patients with ACHD are reviewed.

  6. Coconut Atrium in Long-Standing Rheumatic Valvular Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Onishi, Takahisa; Idei, Yuka; Otsui, Kazunori; Iwata, Sachiyo; Suzuki, Atsushi; Ozawa, Toru; Domoto, Koji; Takei, Asumi; Inamoto, Shinya; Inoue, Nobutaka

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Male, 76 Final Diagnosis: Rheumatic valvular heart disease Symptoms: Breathlessness and leg edema Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Medical treatment for heart failure Specialty: Cardiology Objective: Rare disease Background: Complete calcification of the left atrium (LA) is called “coconut atrium”, which decreases the compliance of LA, leading to the elevation of LA pressure that is transmitted to the right-side of the heart. The pathogenesis of LA calcification in patients with rheumatic heart disease is unknown; however, possible mechanisms include chronic strain force in the atrial wall and inflammation. We report here a patient with long-standing rheumatic valvular heart disease with coconut atrium. Case Report: A 76-year-old man presented with breathlessness and leg edema due to right-sided heart failure. He was diagnosed with rheumatic fever at 8 years of age. Mitral commissurotomy and the mitral and aortic valve replacement were previously performed to treat mitral and aortic valvular stenosis. The profile view of the chest X-ray indicated a diffuse calcified outline of the LA wall. A transthoracic echocardiogram revealed pulmonary hyper-tension and dilatation of both atria. Moreover, computed tomography showed nearly circumferential calcification of the LA wall. Despite intense medical treatment, he succumbed to heart failure. An autopsy demonstrated that the LA was markedly dilated, its wall was calcified, and its appearance was similar to the surface of an atherosclerotic aorta. Microscopic examination revealed intensive calcification in the endocardium. Minimal accumulation of inflammatory cells was noted. Although slight fibrosis was observed, the cardiac musculature was preserved. Conclusions: To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report that identifies the histological changes of LA calcification associated with long-standing rheumatic valvular heart disease. PMID:25819539

  7. Depression: links with ischemic heart disease and erectile dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Roose, Steven P

    2003-01-01

    This article examines the relationships among depression, ischemic heart disease, and erectile dysfunction. Depression is an independent risk factor for the development of ischemic heart disease, and depression in the post-myocardial infarction patient is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Ischemic heart disease and erectile dysfunction are also frequently comorbid and share many common risk factors including age, hypertension, diabetes, dyslipidemia, obesity, sedentary lifestyle, and smoking. Depression and erectile dysfunction often occur together; however, the causal relation may be difficult to determine because erectile dysfunction may be a symptom of depression, social distress accompanying erectile dysfunction may precipitate depressive symptoms, or both conditions may result from a common factor such as vascular disease.

  8. Prevention of coronary heart disease: a nonhormonal approach.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Vivian; Hoeger, Kathleen

    2005-05-01

    Coronary heart disease (CHD) is a common and serious health problem facing women as they move beyond the reproductive years. Until recently, many postmenopausal women and their physicians relied heavily on hormone therapy to prevent cardiovascular disease, neglecting the well-recognized nonhormonal aspects of cardiovascular health. Simple lifestyle changes--exercise, diet, weight control, and avoidance of tobacco--can significantly reduce the chance of heart disease and its major risk factors, which are essentially the same for men and women. As with men, obesity, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and diabetes are the major risk factors for heart disease in women. This review discusses the epidemiologic studies linking these risk factors to CHD in women, the guidelines for screening, and a brief overview of treatment recommendations.

  9. Heart diseases in mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke syndrome.

    PubMed

    Fayssoil, Abdallah

    2009-01-01

    Mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke (MELAS) syndrome is a mitochondrial genetic disorder caused by a point mutation, resulting in the substitution of guanine for adenine at nucleotide 3243 (A3243G) of mitochondrial DNA. This disease is characterized by a multisystem disorder with variable manifestations. The authors review heart involvement in this disease.

  10. [A possible correlation between periodontitis and ischaemic heart disease].

    PubMed

    Hansen, Gorm Mørk; Holmstrup, Palle; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim; Køllgaard, Tania; Nielsen, Claus Henrik; Givskov, Michael; Hansen, Peter Riis

    2014-04-28

    Periodontitis is a prevalent chronic inflammatory disease induced by bacterial biofilm in the dental pocket resulting in destruction of the periodontal tissues. Periodontitis is associated with ischaemic heart disease and we here provide a summary of the current evidence linking these two disorders.

  11. Reemphasizing the Role of Exercise in Preventing Heart Disease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nash, Heyward L.

    1989-01-01

    A recent study suggests that high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) level may be a better predictor of heart disease than total cholesterol level. Even moderate amounts of aerobic exercise can raise the level of HDL-C and lower the risk of coronary artery disease. (SM)

  12. Prophylactic arrhythmia surgery in association with congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Mavroudis, Constantine; Deal, Barbara J

    2016-07-01

    Certain congenital heart anomalies make patients more susceptible to arrhythmia development throughout their lives. This poses the question whether prophylactic arrhythmia surgery should be incorporated into reparative open heart procedures for congenital heart disease. There is currently no consensus on what constitutes a standard prophylactic procedure, owing to the questions that remain regarding lesions to be performed; energy sources to use; proximity of energy source or incisions to coronary arteries, sinoatrial node, atrioventricular node; circumstances for right atrial, left atrial, or biatrial appendectomy; and whether to perform a right, left, or biatrial maze procedure. These considerations are important because prophylactic arrhythmia procedures are performed without knowing if the patient will actually develop an arrhythmia in his or her lifetime. By reviewing and summarizing the literature, congenital heart disease patients who are at risk for developing atrial arrhythmias can be identified and lesion sets can be suggested in an effort to standardize experimental protocols for prophylactic arrhythmia surgery.

  13. Cardiac resynchronization therapy in congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Janoušek, Jan; Kubuš, Peter

    2016-06-01

    Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) is an established treatment option for adult patients suffering heart failure due to idiopathic or ischemic cardiomyopathy associated with electromechanical dyssynchrony. There is limited evidence suggesting similar efficacy of CRT in patients with congenital heart disease (CHD). Due to the heterogeneity of structural and functional substrates, CRT implantation techniques are different with a thoracotomy or hybrid approach prevailing. Efficacy of CRT in CHD seems to depend on the anatomy of the systemic ventricle with best results achieved in systemic left ventricular patients upgraded to CRT from conventional pacing. Indications for CRT in patients with CHD were recently summarized in the Pediatric and Congenital Electrophysiology Society (PACES) and the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) Expert Consensus Statement on the Recognition and Management of Arrhythmias in Adult Congenital Heart Disease and are presented in the text.

  14. Prophylactic arrhythmia surgery in association with congenital heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Deal, Barbara J.

    2016-01-01

    Certain congenital heart anomalies make patients more susceptible to arrhythmia development throughout their lives. This poses the question whether prophylactic arrhythmia surgery should be incorporated into reparative open heart procedures for congenital heart disease. There is currently no consensus on what constitutes a standard prophylactic procedure, owing to the questions that remain regarding lesions to be performed; energy sources to use; proximity of energy source or incisions to coronary arteries, sinoatrial node, atrioventricular node; circumstances for right atrial, left atrial, or biatrial appendectomy; and whether to perform a right, left, or biatrial maze procedure. These considerations are important because prophylactic arrhythmia procedures are performed without knowing if the patient will actually develop an arrhythmia in his or her lifetime. By reviewing and summarizing the literature, congenital heart disease patients who are at risk for developing atrial arrhythmias can be identified and lesion sets can be suggested in an effort to standardize experimental protocols for prophylactic arrhythmia surgery. PMID:27709096

  15. Heart disease and its related risk factors in Asian Indians.

    PubMed

    Uppaluri, Chitra R

    2002-01-01

    Although Asian Indians represent the second fastest growing Asian immigrant group in the United States, we know little about their increased risk for coronary artery disease (CAD). A key word search of Medline (using key words Asian Indian, South Asian Indian, coronary artery disease, and heart disease), from 1980-2001, was used to develop a database of articles relating to coronary artery disease for Asian Indians in the United States and abroad. We describe the prevalence and other data of CAD in Asian-Indian communities abroad and in the United States. We then outline certain risk factors for coronary artery disease, specifically diet, cholesterol, and Type 2 diabetes, which contribute to the increased risk of heart disease in Asian Indians. Finally, we describe an approach to screening and potential prevention of coronary artery disease in those of Asian-indian descent in this country.

  16. 21 CFR 101.75 - Health claims: dietary saturated fat and cholesterol and risk of coronary heart disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... of coronary heart disease. (1) Cardiovascular disease means diseases of the heart and circulatory system. Coronary heart disease is the most common and serious form of cardiovascular disease and...

  17. 21 CFR 101.75 - Health claims: dietary saturated fat and cholesterol and risk of coronary heart disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... of coronary heart disease. (1) Cardiovascular disease means diseases of the heart and circulatory system. Coronary heart disease is the most common and serious form of cardiovascular disease and...

  18. 21 CFR 101.75 - Health claims: dietary saturated fat and cholesterol and risk of coronary heart disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... of coronary heart disease. (1) Cardiovascular disease means diseases of the heart and circulatory system. Coronary heart disease is the most common and serious form of cardiovascular disease and...

  19. 21 CFR 101.75 - Health claims: dietary saturated fat and cholesterol and risk of coronary heart disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... of coronary heart disease. (1) Cardiovascular disease means diseases of the heart and circulatory system. Coronary heart disease is the most common and serious form of cardiovascular disease and...

  20. Stroke Prevention in Atrial Fibrillation and Valvular Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Saad; Wilt, Heath

    2016-01-01

    There is a clinically staggering burden of disease stemming from cerebrovascular events, of which a majority are ischemic in nature and many are precipitated by atrial fibrillation (AF). AF can occur in isolation or in association with myocardial or structural heart disease. In the latter case, and when considering health at an international level, congenital and acquired valve-related diseases are frequent contributors to the current pandemic of AF and its clinical impact. Guidelines crafted by the American Heart Association, American College of Cardiology, European Society of Cardiology and Heart Rhythm Society underscore the use of vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) among patients with valvular heart disease, particularly in the presence of concomitant AF, to reduce the risk of ischemic stroke of cardioembolic origin; however, the non-VKAs, also referred to as direct, target-specific or new oral anticoagulants (NOACs), have not been actively studied in this particular population. In fact, each of the new agents is approved in patients with AF not caused by a valve problem. The aim of our review is to carefully examine the available evidence from pivotal phase 3 clinical trials of NOACs and determine how they might perform in patients with AF and concomitant valvular heart disease.

  1. Coronary heart disease among Pacific Island people in New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Tukuitonga, C F; Stewart, A; Beaglehole, R

    1990-09-26

    Coronary heart disease is the leading cause of death in New Zealand. Death rates are higher among the Maori than the European population but rates have been declining in both groups over recent years. The occurrence of coronary heart disease among the Pacific Island population in New Zealand is unknown. Data from the National Health Statistics Centre (NHSC) and the Auckland coronary or stroke (ARCOS) study were used to describe the occurrence of coronary heart diseases among Pacific Island people. Age standardised mortality rates show that coronary heart disease is an important cause of death among Pacific Island men. Death rates have declined between 1973-77 and 1978-82 but this trend did not continue among men in the 1983-86 period. Age standardised mortality rates from coronary heart disease from the ARCOS data are 175/100,000 and 52/100,000 for Pacific Island men and women compared with 325/100,000 and 141/100,000 for Maori men and women. Age standardised rates for European men and women are 154/100,000 and 36/100,000 respectively.

  2. Stroke Prevention in Atrial Fibrillation and Valvular Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Saad; Wilt, Heath

    2016-01-01

    There is a clinically staggering burden of disease stemming from cerebrovascular events, of which a majority are ischemic in nature and many are precipitated by atrial fibrillation (AF). AF can occur in isolation or in association with myocardial or structural heart disease. In the latter case, and when considering health at an international level, congenital and acquired valve-related diseases are frequent contributors to the current pandemic of AF and its clinical impact. Guidelines crafted by the American Heart Association, American College of Cardiology, European Society of Cardiology and Heart Rhythm Society underscore the use of vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) among patients with valvular heart disease, particularly in the presence of concomitant AF, to reduce the risk of ischemic stroke of cardioembolic origin; however, the non-VKAs, also referred to as direct, target-specific or new oral anticoagulants (NOACs), have not been actively studied in this particular population. In fact, each of the new agents is approved in patients with AF not caused by a valve problem. The aim of our review is to carefully examine the available evidence from pivotal phase 3 clinical trials of NOACs and determine how they might perform in patients with AF and concomitant valvular heart disease. PMID:27347228

  3. Congenital Heart Disease and Impacts on Child Development

    PubMed Central

    Mari, Mariana Alievi; Cascudo, Marcelo Matos; Alchieri, João Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the child development and evaluate a possible association with the commitment by biopsychosocial factors of children with and without congenital heart disease. Methods: Observational study of case-control with three groups: Group 1 - children with congenital heart disease without surgical correction; Group 2 - children with congenital heart disease who underwent surgery; and Group 3 - healthy children. Children were assessed by socio-demographic and clinical questionnaire and the Denver II Screening Test. Results: One hundred and twenty eight children were evaluated, 29 in Group 1, 43 in Group 2 and 56 in Group 3. Of the total, 51.56% are girls and ages ranged from two months to six years (median 24.5 months). Regarding the Denver II, the children with heart disease had more "suspicious" and "suspect/abnormal" ratings and in the group of healthy children 53.6% were considered with "normal" development (P≤0.0001). The biopsychosocial variables that were related to a possible developmental delay were gender (P=0.042), child's age (P=0.001) and income per capita (P=0.019). Conclusion: The results suggest that children with congenital heart disease are likely to have a developmental delay with significant difference between children who have undergone surgery and those awaiting surgery under clinical follow-up. PMID:27074272

  4. Etiology of valvular heart disease-genetic and developmental origins.

    PubMed

    Lincoln, Joy; Garg, Vidu

    2014-01-01

    Valvular heart disease occurs as either a congenital or acquired condition and advances in medical care have resulted in valve disease becoming increasingly prevalent. Unfortunately, treatments remain inadequate because of our limited understanding of the genetic and molecular etiology of diseases affecting the heart valves. Therefore, surgical repair or replacement remains the most effective option, which comes with additional complications and no guarantee of life-long success. Over the past decade, there have been significant advances in our understanding of cardiac valve development and, not surprisingly, mutations in these developmental genes have been identified in humans with congenital valve malformations. Concurrently, there has been a greater realization that acquired valve disease is not simply a degenerative process. Molecular investigation of acquired valve disease has identified that numerous signaling pathways critical for normal valve development are re-expressed in diseased valves. This review will discuss recent advances in our understanding of the development of the heart valves, as well as the implications of these findings on the genetics of congenital and acquired valvular heart disease.

  5. Hypertension and hypertensive heart disease in African women.

    PubMed

    Sliwa, Karen; Ojji, Dike; Bachelier, Katrin; Böhm, Michael; Damasceno, Albertino; Stewart, Simon

    2014-07-01

    Hypertension and hypertensive heart disease is one of the main contributors to a growing burden of non-communicable forms of cardiovascular disease around the globe. The recently published global burden of disease series showed a 33 % increase of hypertensive disorders in pregnancy in the past two decades with long-term consequences. Africans, particularly younger African women, appear to be bearing the brunt of this increasing public health problem. Hypertensive heart disease is particularly problematic in pregnancy and is an important contributor to maternal case-fatality. European physicians increasingly need to attend to patients from African decent and need to know about unique aspects of disease presentation and pharmacological as well as non-pharmacological care. Reductions in salt consumption, as well as timely detection and treatment of hypertension and hypertensive heart disease remain a priority for effective primary and secondary prevention of CVD (particularly stroke and CHF) in African women. This article reviews the pattern, potential causes and consequences and treatment of hypertension and hypertensive heart disease in African women, identifying the key challenges for effective primary and secondary prevention in this regard.

  6. A computer-aided diagnostic system for kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Jahantigh, Farzad Firouzi; Malmir, Behnam; Avilaq, Behzad Aslani

    2017-01-01

    Background Disease diagnosis is complicated since patients may demonstrate similar symptoms but physician may diagnose different diseases. There are a few number of investigations aimed to create a fuzzy expert system, as a computer aided system for disease diagnosis. Methods In this research, a cross-sectional descriptive study conducted in a kidney clinic in Tehran, Iran in 2012. Medical diagnosis fuzzy rules applied, and a set of symptoms related to the set of considered diseases defined. The input case to be diagnosed defined by assigning a fuzzy value to each symptom and then three physicians asked about each suspected diseases. Then comments of those three physicians summarized for each disease. The fuzzy inference applied to obtain a decision fuzzy set for each disease, and crisp decision values attained to determine the certainty of existence for each disease. Results Results indicated that, in the diagnosis of seven cases of kidney disease by examining 21 indicators using fuzzy expert system, kidney stone disease with 63% certainty was the most probable, renal tubular was at the lowest level with 15%, and other kidney diseases were at the other levels. The most remarkable finding of this study was that results of kidney disease diagnosis (e.g., kidney stone) via fuzzy expert system were fully compatible with those of kidney physicians. Conclusion The proposed fuzzy expert system is a valid, reliable, and flexible instrument to diagnose several typical input cases. The developed system decreases the effort of initial physical checking and manual feeding of input symptoms. PMID:28392995

  7. The pediatric heart network: meeting the challenges to multicenter studies in pediatric heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Burns, Kristin M.; Pemberton, Victoria L.; Pearson, Gail D.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose of review Because of the relatively small numbers of pediatric patients with congenital heart disease cared for in any individual center, there is a significant need for multicenter clinical studies to validate new medical or surgical therapies. The Pediatric Heart Network (PHN), with 15 years of experience in multicenter clinical research, has tackled numerous challenges when conducting multicenter studies. Recent findings This review describes the challenges encountered and the strategies employed to conduct high-quality, collaborative research in pediatric cardiovascular disease. Summary Sharing lessons learned from the PHN can provide guidance to investigators interested in conducting pediatric multicenter studies. PMID:26196261

  8. Forkhead box transcription factors in embryonic heart development and congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Embryonic heart development is a very complicated process regulated precisely by a network composed of many genes and signaling pathways in time and space. Forkhead box (Fox, FOX) proteins are a family of transcription factors characterized by the presence of an evolutionary conserved "forkhead"or "winged-helix" DNA-binding domain and able to organize temporal and spatial gene expression during development. They are involved in a wide variety of cellular processes, such as cell cycle progression, proliferation, differentiation, migration, metabolism and DNA damage response. An abundance of studies in model organisms and systems has established that Foxa2, Foxc1/c2, Foxh1 and Foxm1, Foxos and Foxps are important components of the signaling pathways that instruct cardiogenesis and embryonic heart development, playing paramount roles in heart development. The previous studies also have demonstrated that mutations in some of the forkhead box genes and the aberrant expression of forkhead box gene are heavily implicated in the congenital heart disease (CHD) of humans. This review primarily focuses on the current understanding of heart development regulated by forkhead box transcription factors and molecular genetic mechanisms by which forkhead box factors modulate heart development during embryogenesis and organogenesis. This review also summarizes human CHD related mutations in forkhead box genes as well as the abnormal expression of forkhead box gene, and discusses additional possible regulatory mechanisms of the forkhead box genes during embryonic heart development that warrant further investigation.

  9. Disease management programs for heart failure: not just for the 'sick' heart failure population.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Ken; Conlon, Carmel; Ledwidge, Mark

    2007-02-01

    The development of disease management programs has been a major advance in heart failure care, bringing about significant improvements for the heart failure population, with reduction in readmission, better use of guideline therapy and improved survival. However, at present, the majority of such programs focus their attention only on the sicker segment of this population, with little application of this important service to the broader heart failure population, where potentially benefits may be even more impressive. This has led to an imbalance in the care of patients with heart failure, where aspects of management such as regular structured review and education are preferentially given to the group at the later stages of the natural history of the syndrome. This paper argues for a far wider application of the disease management program concept in heart failure care so as to bring the benefits of specialist care, patient education and follow-up to patients at an earlier stage in the natural history of heart failure.

  10. Angiopoietin-2 in Adults with Congenital Heart Disease and Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Kümpers, Philipp; Denecke, Agnieszka; Westhoff-Bleck, Mechthild; Schieffer, Bernhard; Bauersachs, Johann; Kielstein, Jan T.; Tutarel, Oktay

    2013-01-01

    Background Chronic heart failure is an important cause for morbidity and mortality in adults with congenital heart disease (ACHD). While NT-proBNP is an established biomarker for heart failure of non-congenital origin, its application in ACHD has limitations. The angiogenic factors Angiopoietin-1 and -2 (Ang-1, Ang-2), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and soluble receptor tyrosine kinase of the Tie family (sTie2) correlate with disease severity in heart failure of non-congenital origin. Their role in ACHD has not been studied. Methods In 91 patients Ang-2 and NT-proBNP were measured and related to New York Heart Association class, systemic ventricular function and parameters of cardiopulmonary exercise testing. Ang-1, VEGF, and sTie2 were also measured. Results Ang-2 correlates with NYHA class and ventricular dysfunction comparable to NT-proBNP. Further, Ang-2 showed a good correlation with parameters of cardiopulmonary exercise testing. Both, Ang-2 and NT-proBNP identified patients with severely limited cardiopulmonary exercise capacity. Additionally, Ang-2 is elevated in patients with a single ventricle physiology in contrast to NT-proBNP. VEGF, Ang-1, and sTie2 were not correlated with any clinical parameter. Conclusion The performance of Ang-2 as a biomarker for heart failure in ACHD is comparable to NT-proBNP. Its significant elevation in patients with single ventricle physiology indicates potential in this patient group and warrants further studies. PMID:23826161

  11. Ischemic Heart Disease in HIV: An In-depth Look at Cardiovascular Risk.

    PubMed

    Raposeiras-Roubín, Sergio; Triant, Virginia

    2016-12-01

    Although the incidence of cardiovascular diseases classically associated with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) has decreased considerably with antiretroviral therapy, cardiovascular risk, and especially ischemic heart disease, are higher in HIV-infected patients than in uninfected individuals. This is due to the interaction of patient-dependent factors with virus-dependent factors, as well as factors associated with antiretroviral therapy. With increasing of life expectancy and the chronicity of HIV infection, cardiovascular disease has emerged as an important cause of morbidity and mortality in HIV patients. In developed countries, the most common cardiovascular manifestation of HIV is ischemic heart disease. Currently, it is not uncommon to find HIV patients with acute coronary syndrome and, given the important pharmacokinetic interactions of antiretroviral drugs, it is important to know which cardiovascular treatments are safe in this group of patients. The ideal approach would be to mitigate the cardiovascular risk in HIV patients with specific primary prevention measures. All these issues are discussed in this review, which aims to aid clinical cardiologists faced with HIV patients with ischemic heart disease or with high cardiovascular risk in daily clinical practice.

  12. Valvular heart disease: classic teaching and emerging paradigms.

    PubMed

    Brinkley, D Marshall; Gelfand, Eli V

    2013-12-01

    Valvular heart disease is both prevalent and increases with age. The final pathway of valvular disease is heart failure and sometimes sudden death, so clinicians must identify and treat it before these endpoints occur. Noninvasive diagnostic modalities such as echocardiography, exercise tolerance testing, and cardiac magnetic resonance provide additional quantitative, qualitative, and prognostic data. Studies have elucidated predictors of disease progression and potential medical therapies, but the niche of valvular disease has benefited relatively less from randomized controlled clinical trials than other cardiovascular disease fields. New invasive techniques like transcatheter valve replacement offer hope for high-risk operative candidates. We review classic teaching with current guidelines and emphasize recent advances in disease management.

  13. Evolving Concepts of Pulmonary Hypertension Secondary to Left Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Ramu, Bhavadharini; Thenappan, Thenappan

    2016-04-01

    Pulmonary hypertension associated with left heart disease is the most common form of pulmonary hypertension. Although its pathophysiology remains incompletely understood, it is now well recognized that the presence of pulmonary hypertension is associated with a worse prognosis. Right ventricular failure has independent and additive prognostic value over pulmonary hypertension for adverse outcomes in left heart disease. Recently, several new terminologies have been introduced to better define and characterize the nature and severity of pulmonary hypertension. Several new treatment options including the use of pulmonary arterial hypertension specific therapies are being considered, but there is lack of evidence. Here, we review the recent advances in this field and summarize the diagnostic and therapeutic modalities of use in the management of pulmonary hypertension associated with left heart disease.

  14. [Congenita heart disease--is the procedure always unequivocal?].

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Piotr

    2015-01-01

    Excellent results of interventional treatment of congenital cardiac defects in childhood resulted in substantial increment of adult population with these diseases. Usually patients lead normal life, undertake work and start a family. Nonetheless vast majority of them still require regular cardiological check-up due to residual lesions, remote sequelae of the intervention or counselling in case of other health problems. Particular attention should be paid on pregnant women with congenital heart disease. As an invasive treatment does not fully normalize morphology and haemodynamics of the heart one has to assess to what extent physiological changes of the cardiovascular system secondary to the pregnancy, delivery and childbed may impact heart disease. The paper summarizes current recommendations associated with these issues.

  15. [Pediatric cardiology and congenital heart disease: from fetus to adult].

    PubMed

    Subirana, M Teresa; Oliver, José M; Sáez, José M; Zunzunegui, José L

    2012-01-01

    This article contains a review of some of the most important publications on congenital heart disease and pediatric cardiology that appeared in 2010 and up until September 2011. Of particular interest were studies on demographic changes reported in this patient population and on the need to manage the patients' transition from the pediatric to the adult cardiology department. This transition has given rise to the appearance of new areas of interest: for example, pregnancy in women with congenital heart disease, and the effect of genetic factors on the etiology and transmission of particular anomalies. In addition, this review considers some publications on fetal cardiology from the perspective of early diagnosis and, if possible, treatment. There follows a discussion on new contributions to Eisenmenger's syndrome and arrhythmias, as well as on imaging techniques, interventional catheterization and heart transplantation. Finally, there is an overview of the new version of clinical practice guidelines on the management of adult patients with congenital heart disease and of recently published guidelines on pregnancy in women with heart disease, both produced by the European Society of Cardiology.

  16. Computational fluid dynamics models and congenital heart diseases.

    PubMed

    Pennati, Giancarlo; Corsini, Chiara; Hsia, Tain-Yen; Migliavacca, Francesco

    2013-02-26

    Mathematical modeling is a powerful tool to investigate hemodynamics of the circulatory system. With improving imaging techniques and detailed clinical investigations, it is now possible to construct patient-specific models of reconstructive surgeries for the treatment of congenital heart diseases. These models can help clinicians to better understand the hemodynamic behavior of different surgical options for a treated patient. This review outlines recent advances in mathematical modeling in congenital heart diseases, the discoveries and limitations these models present, and future directions that are on the horizon.

  17. Health care issues facing adolescents with congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Canobbio, M M

    2001-10-01

    The number of children with congenital heart disease surviving beyond adolescence is rapidly increasing. Consequently, pediatric health providers not only have to address medical issues associated with the cardiac condition but must begin to develop programs that assist adolescents and their families in dealing with special health care needs for the young patient to successfully move into the adult world. Transitional health-related issues facing the adolescent with congenital heart disease including medical follow-up, insurability, employability, sexuality, and reproduction are described. Discussion about advising and counseling both patient and parents is included.

  18. Valve replacement for appetite suppressant-induced valvular heart disease.

    PubMed

    Biswas, S S; Donovan, C L; Forbess, J M; Royal, S H; Landolfo, K P

    1999-06-01

    Valvular heart disease associated with the use of appetite-suppressant medication is a recently described clinical entity. Although the mechanism of valvular injury remains elusive pathologically, the valvular abnormalities resemble those observed in carcinoid syndrome. The incidence of clinically evident valvular heart disease is low with short-term (less than 3 months) exposure to appetite-suppressant drugs. Prolonged exposure to higher doses in addition to combination drug therapy confers an excess risk for valvular pathologic changes. We report the case of a patient with severe mitral regurgitation who had short-term exposure (3 weeks) to the combination of fenfluramine (20 mg) and phenteramine (15 mg).

  19. A review of the economics of adult congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Seckeler, Michael D; Thomas, Ian D; Andrews, Jennifer; Joiner, Keith; Klewer, Scott E

    2016-01-01

    Adults living with congenital heart disease (CHD) now outnumber children with the disease. Thanks to medical advances over the past 75 years, many of these fatal childhood heart problems have changed to chronic medical conditions. As the population of adults with CHD increases, they will require increasingly complex medical, surgical and catheter-based therapies. In addition, social burdens including education, employment and insurability, which increase the societal costs of adult CHD, are now being recognized for adults living with CHD. This review summarizes the available literature on the economics of adult CHD.

  20. Heart failure treatment in adults with congenital heart disease: where do we stand in 2014?

    PubMed

    Krieger, Eric V; Valente, Anne Marie

    2014-09-01

    Heart failure (HF) is the leading cause of death in adults with repaired congenital heart disease (CHD). However there is currently little evidence to guide treatment strategies in this growing group of patients. Unlike the majority of HF, which is usually caused by LV systolic or diastolic dysfunction, CHD-HF is more often a consequence of RV disease, valve dysfunction, shunting or pulmonary hypertension. It is therefore not appropriate to extrapolate from the acquired HF literature and apply it to this heterogeneous population of CHD patients. Additionally, patients with CHD have been excluded from most large trials of medical or device therapy of HF, which has resulted in small retrospective and underpowered studies in the CHD population. This article critically reviews the current knowledge about CHD-HF, paying particular attention to medical therapy in different CHD populations, cardiac resynchronisation therapy and implantable cardiac defibrillators, and the challenges of heart transplantation and mechanical circulatory support in CHD patients.

  1. Heart failure: molecular, genetic and epigenetic features of the disease.

    PubMed

    D'Alessandro, R; Roselli, T; Valente, F; Iannaccone, M; Capogrosso, C; Petti, G; Alfano, G; Masarone, D; Ziello, B; Fimiani, F; Pacileo, G; Russo, M G; Calabrò, P; Limongelli, G; Maddaloni, V; Calabrò, R

    2012-12-01

    Factors that compete to establish heart failure (HF) are not completely known. In the last years the several technological improvements allowed us to deeply study the molecular and genetic aspects of this complex syndrome. This new approach to HF based on molecular biology new discoveries shows us more clearly the pathophysiological bases of this disease, and a future scenery where the genetics may be useful in the clinical practice, as screening of high risk populations, as well as in the diagnosis and therapy of underlying myocardial diseases. The purpose of this review was to analyse the molecular, genetic and epigenetic factors of HF. We described the molecular anatomy of the sarcomere and the pathogenesis of the heart muscle diseases, abandoning the previous monogenic theory for the concept of a polygenic disease. Different actors play a role to cause the illness by themselves, modifying the expression of the disease and, eventually, the prognosis of the patient.

  2. Acute rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease in indigenous populations.

    PubMed

    Steer, Andrew C; Carapetis, Jonathan R

    2009-12-01

    Acute rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease are diseases of socioeconomic disadvantage. These diseases are common in developing countries and in Indigenous populations in industrialized countries. Clinicians who work with Indigenous populations need to maintain a high index of suspicion for the potential diagnosis of acute rheumatic fever, particularly in patients presenting with joint pain. Inexpensive medicines, such as aspirin, are the mainstay of symptomatic treatment of rheumatic fever; however, antiinflammatory treatment has no effect on the long-term rate of progression or severity of chronic valvular disease. The current focus of global efforts at prevention of rheumatic heart disease is on secondary prevention (regular administration of penicillin to prevent recurrent rheumatic fever), although primary prevention (timely treatment of streptococcal pharyngitis to prevent rheumatic fever) is also important in populations in which it is feasible.

  3. Would selenium supplementation aid in therapy for Chagas Disease?

    PubMed Central

    Jelicks, Linda A.; de Souza, Andréa P.; Araújo-Jorge, Tania C; Tanowitz, Herbert B.

    2010-01-01

    Chagas disease, a neglected tropical disease discovered over 100 years ago, is caused by the intracellular parasite Trypanosoma cruzi and is most frequently associated with chronic cardiomyopathy and digestive disorders. Initial invasion of cells is followed by progressive inflammatory destruction of heart, muscles, nerves, and gastrointestinal (GI) tract tissue. About 30% of patients progress to a chronic cardiomyopathy associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Seven to 10% of patients develop megasyndromes involving the GI tract, in particular, the esophagus and the colon. Results from several studies suggest that selenium (Se) deficiency may be an important factor in the pathogenesis of Chagas disease. In this opinion article, Se supplementation is proposed as an adjuvant therapy for treatment of chronic Chagas disease. PMID:21212020

  4. How Can Heart Disease be Prevented?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Disease Treated?" Rate This Content: NEXT >> Featured Video All of Our Stories Are Red: Yaskary's Story 04/ ... part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH). All of Our Stories Are Red: Eileen's Story 04/ ...

  5. Novel therapeutic strategies targeting fibroblasts and fibrosis in heart disease.

    PubMed

    Gourdie, Robert G; Dimmeler, Stefanie; Kohl, Peter

    2016-09-01

    Our understanding of the functions of cardiac fibroblasts has moved beyond their roles in heart structure and extracellular matrix generation and now includes their contributions to paracrine, mechanical and electrical signalling during ontogenesis and normal cardiac activity. Fibroblasts also have central roles in pathogenic remodelling during myocardial ischaemia, hypertension and heart failure. As key contributors to scar formation, they are crucial for tissue repair after interventions including surgery and ablation. Novel experimental approaches targeting cardiac fibroblasts are promising potential therapies for heart disease. Indeed, several existing drugs act, at least partially, through effects on cardiac connective tissue. This Review outlines the origins and roles of fibroblasts in cardiac development, homeostasis and disease; illustrates the involvement of fibroblasts in current and emerging clinical interventions; and identifies future targets for research and development.

  6. Gene Specific Impedimetric Bacterial DNA Sensor for Rheumatic Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Singh, Swati; Kaushal, Ankur; Gupta, Sunil; Kumar, Ashok

    2017-03-01

    An impedimetric mga gene specific DNA sensor was developed by immobilization of single stranded DNA probe onto the screen printed modified gold-dendrimer nanohybrid composite electrode for early and rapid detection of S. pyogenes in human throat swab samples causing rheumatic heart disease. Electrochemical impedance response was measured after hybridization with bacterial single stranded genomic DNA (ssG-DNA) with probe. The sensor was found highly specific to S. pyogenes and can detect as low as 0.01 ng ssDNA in 6 µL sample only in 30 min. The nanohybrid sensor was also tested with non-specific pathogens and characterized by FTIR. An early detection of the pathogen S. pyogenes in human can save damage of mitral and aortic heart valves (rheumatic heart disease) by proper medical care.

  7. Longitudinal study of heart disease in a Jamaican rural population

    PubMed Central

    Miall, W. E.; Del Campo, E.; Fodor, J.; Rhode, J. R. Nava; Ruiz, L.; Standard, K. L.; Swan, A. V.

    1972-01-01

    A long-term epidemiological study of heart disease in a representative rural community in Jamaica was started in 1962-63 and the first follow-up survey was carried out in 1967-68. This report describes the prevalence of several cardiovascular characteristics at each survey, and their associations with other measurements. The nature of the electrocardiographic abnormalities and their relationship with symptoms of effort pain and prolonged chest pain suggests that much of the disease seen in this population is ultimately ischaemic in origin despite evidence that classical myocardial infarction and severe coronary atheroma are relatively infrequent. Nevertheless both the symptoms and the electrocardiographic abnormalities had features that were not completely typical of occlusive disease of extramural coronary arteries. These findings are discussed in terms of the four conditions—hypertension, conventional coronary heart disease, small artery disease, and cardiomyopathy—that are believed to account for most cases of heart disease in this community, and it is concluded that the overall pattern of disease cannot be explained by any single disorder of overriding importance. The evidence suggests that all may be important contributors. PMID:4538187

  8. Illustrated Imaging Essay on Congenital Heart Diseases: Multimodality Approach Part II: Acyanotic Congenital Heart Disease and Extracardiac Abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Belaval, Vinay; Gadabanahalli, Karthik; Raj, Vimal; Shah, Sejal

    2016-01-01

    Acyanotic heart disease constitutes a significant majority of patient who may present with non-cardiac symptoms. Either they are detected incidentally or present with respiratory complaints. Equipped with knowledge of anatomy by echocardiography and radiographic methods described in previous part of this presentation, diagnosis may be confidently attempted. On plain radiography acyanotic congenital heart diseases have variable appearance depending upon severity of disease. Cardiac size, chamber enlargement and pulmonary vascular pattern are key elements. Typically left to right shunts with large volume flow are associated with pulmonary plethora. Plain radiography has an important role in detecting manifestation of pulmonary arterial hypertension. Severe stenosis of pulmonary valve is associated with pulmonary oligemia. Small intra-cardiac shunts and anomalies of coronary arteries generally present with normal cardiac size and pulmonary arterial pattern. Disease spectrum presented in this illustration demands thorough scrutiny of pulmonary, osseous and abdominal abnormalities. This section illustrates some commonly encountered spectrum of acyanotic cardiac disease. PMID:27504381

  9. Illustrated Imaging Essay on Congenital Heart Diseases: Multimodality Approach Part II: Acyanotic Congenital Heart Disease and Extracardiac Abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Venkatraman; Belaval, Vinay; Gadabanahalli, Karthik; Raj, Vimal; Shah, Sejal

    2016-06-01

    Acyanotic heart disease constitutes a significant majority of patient who may present with non-cardiac symptoms. Either they are detected incidentally or present with respiratory complaints. Equipped with knowledge of anatomy by echocardiography and radiographic methods described in previous part of this presentation, diagnosis may be confidently attempted. On plain radiography acyanotic congenital heart diseases have variable appearance depending upon severity of disease. Cardiac size, chamber enlargement and pulmonary vascular pattern are key elements. Typically left to right shunts with large volume flow are associated with pulmonary plethora. Plain radiography has an important role in detecting manifestation of pulmonary arterial hypertension. Severe stenosis of pulmonary valve is associated with pulmonary oligemia. Small intra-cardiac shunts and anomalies of coronary arteries generally present with normal cardiac size and pulmonary arterial pattern. Disease spectrum presented in this illustration demands thorough scrutiny of pulmonary, osseous and abdominal abnormalities. This section illustrates some commonly encountered spectrum of acyanotic cardiac disease.

  10. Small mammalian animal models of heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Camacho, Paula; Fan, Huimin; Liu, Zhongmin; He, Jia-Qiang

    2016-01-01

    There is an urgent clinical need to develop new therapeutic approaches for treating cardiovascular disease, but the biology of cardiovascular regeneration is complex. Model systems are required to advance our understanding of the pathogenesis, progression, and mechanisms underlying cardiovascular disease as well as to test therapeutic approaches to regenerate tissue and restore cardiac function following injury. An ideal model system should be inexpensive, easily manipulated, reproducible, physiologically representative of human disease, and ethically sound. The choice of animal model needs to be considered carefully since it affects experimental outcomes and whether findings of the study can be reasonably translated to humans. This review presents a guideline for the commonly used small animal models (mice, rats, rabbits, and cats) used in cardiac research as an effort to standardize the most relevant procedures and obtain translatable and reproducible results. PMID:27679742

  11. Grover's Disease after Heart Transplantation: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Ippoliti, Giovanbattista; Paulli, Marco; Lucioni, Marco; D'Armini, Andrea Maria; Lauriola, Marinella; Mahrous Haleem Saaleb, Rany

    2012-01-01

    Grover's disease is a transient acantholytic dermatosis of unknown cause, manifesting clinically as a papular skin eruption that is usually located on the anterior chest and abdomen. Histologically characterized by an acantholytic pattern, it has been associated with numerous disorders, including hematologic malignancies, chronic renal failure, and HIV infection, as well as with chemotherapy and bone marrow and/or kidney transplant. Evaluation of followup and treatment is often complicated by spontaneous remission and the occasionally fluctuant course of the disease. Here we report the case of a patient with sudden onset of Grover's disease after heart transplantation. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first observation of Grover's disease as diagnosed after heart transplantation. PMID:23320241

  12. Heart Disease Management by Women: Does Intervention Format Matter?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Noreen M.; Janz, Nancy K.; Dodge, Julia A.; Lin, Xihong; Trabert, Britton L.; Kaciroti, Niko; Mosca, Lori; Wheeler, John R.; Keteyian, Steven

    2009-01-01

    A randomized controlled trial of two formats of a program (Women Take PRIDE) to enhance management of heart disease by patients was conducted. Older women (N = 575) were randomly assigned to a group or self-directed format or to a control group. Data regarding symptoms, functional health status, and weight were collected at baseline and at 4, 12,…

  13. Ischaemic heart disease mortality and the business cycle in Australia.

    PubMed

    Bunn, A R

    1979-08-01

    Trends in Australian heart disease mortality were assessed for association with the business cycle. Correlation models of mortality and unemployment series were used to test for association. An indicator series of "national stress" was developed. The three series were analyzed in path models to quantify the links between unemployment, national stress, and heart disease. Ischemic heart disease (IHD) mortality and national stress were found to follow the business cycle. The two periods of accelerating IHD mortality coincided with economic recession. The proposed "wave hypothesis" links the trend in IHD mortality to the high unemployment of severe recession. The mortality trend describes a typical epidemic parabolic path from the Great Depression to 1975, with a smaller parabolic trend at the 1961 recession. These findings appear consistent with the hypothesis that heart disease is, to some degree, a point source epidemic arising with periods of severe economic recession. Forecasts under the hypothesis indicate a turning point in the mortality trend between 1976 and 1978. (Am J Public Health 69:772-781, 1979).

  14. Heart Disease Management by Women: Does Intervention Format Matter?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Noreen M.; Janz, Nancy K.; Dodge, Julia A.; Lin, Xihong; Trabert, Britton L.; Kaciroti, Niko; Mosca, Lori; Wheeler, John R.; Keteyian, Steven

    2014-01-01

    A randomized controlled trial of two formats of a program (Women Take PRIDE) to enhance management of heart disease by patients was conducted. Older women (N = 575) were randomly assigned to a group or self-directed format or to a control group. Data regarding symptoms, functional health status, and weight were collected at baseline and at 4, 12,…

  15. Non-cardiac morphological stigmata of congenital heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Livesley, Brian

    1971-01-01

    The recognition of morphological stigmata other than cardiac, which are now known to be associated with congenital heart disease, coupled with a familial occurrence, may permit diagnosis of specific cardiac lesions at a very early age. Eleven such morphological associations have been reviewed. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 4 PMID:4400598

  16. Assessing Potential Predisposition of Elementary School Children to Heart Disease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crow, Thomas A.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    A health assessment battery was developed to screen elementary school children in Clovis (California) for factors that might lead to heart disease. Students' height, blood pressure, flexibility, weight, and body fatness (by skin-fold tests) were measured. Plans call for future development of longitudinal student profiles. (Authors/PP)

  17. Coping Behaviors of Parents with Children with Congenital Heart Disease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strobino, Jane

    The study addresses parental coping patterns of children with congenital heart disease in the state of Hawaii. Attention was given to geography and ethnicity as well as parental and child characteristics as factors impacting on the coping pattern. Telephone interviews with parents (N=32) obtained data concerning parent characteristics, their…

  18. Dyslipidaemia and coronary heart disease: nature vs nurture.

    PubMed

    Hegele, R A

    In order to enhance health care for patients with coronary heart disease (CHD), genetic markers of susceptibility could be incorporated into a formula for risk evaluation that includes traditional factors. Preventive measures could then be targeted towards 'high-risk' subjects. But can the genetic component be dissected from the environmental component in an intermediate CHD phenotype, such as plasma lipoproteins.

  19. Environmental Stress and Biobehavioral Antecedents of Coronary Heart Disease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krantz, David S.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Provides an overview of research on the biobehavioral antecedents of coronary heart disease, including stressful occupational settings characterized by high demands and little control over the job, and the Type A pattern, particularly hostility and mode of anger expression (anger-in). Discusses research on physiologic responsiveness (reactivity)…

  20. Management of pulmonary hypertension in left heart disease.

    PubMed

    Schmeisser, Alexander; Schroetter, Hagen; Braun-Dulleaus, Ruediger C

    2013-06-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) due to left heart disease is classified as group II according to the Dana Point classification, which includes left ventricular systolic and/or diastolic left heart failure, and left-sided valvular disease. PH due to left heart disease is the most common cause and when present, especially with right ventricular dysfunction, is associated with a worse prognosis. Left heart disease with secondary PH is associated with increased left atrial pressure, which causes a passive increase in pulmonary pressure. Passive PH could be superimposed by an active protective, and in some patients by an 'out of proportion', elevated precapillary pulmonary vasoconstriction and vascular remodelling which leads to greater or lesser further increase of the pulmonary artery pressure. In this review, epidemiological and pathophysiologic mechanisms for the development of group II PH are summarized. The conflicting data about the haemodynamic and possible parameters to diagnose passive versus reactive and 'out of proportion' PH are presented. The different therapeutic concepts, along with novel treatment strategies, are reviewed in detail and critically discussed regarding their effectiveness and safety.

  1. Medications Used in the Treatment of Ischemic Heart Disease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plummer, Nancy; Michael, Nancy, Ed.

    This module on medications used in the treatment of ischemic heart disease is intended for use in inservice or continuing education programs for persons who administer medications in long-term care facilities. Instructor information, including teaching suggestions, and a listing of recommended audiovisual materials and their sources appear first.…

  2. Nonstructural heart disease in the newborn. Observations during one year in a perinatal service.

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, R D; Izukawa, T; Mulholland, H C; Bloom, K R; Cook, D H; Swyer, P R

    1978-01-01

    One-third of 327 newborn infants referred to the perinatal service of the Hospital for Sick Children during 1975 with suspected cardiopulmonary disorders proved to have nonstructural heart disease. Most of these were term infants with transient tachypnoea or cyanosis who recovered. A history of fetal distress or difficult delivery was commonly associated. The haemodynamic disorder for most was a delay in the normal progress of the transitional circulation. Evidence of myocardial ischaemia was present in 40%, and about half of these developed congestive heart failure. Aids to diagnosis of the ischaemic complication included echocardiography and myocardial perfusion scanning. For a small proportion specific metabolic disturbances, myocarditis, or dysrhythmia seemed the primary cause but even for these there were reasonable grounds to suspect a prenatal origin. Current general supportive measures were of value in treatment. PMID:718241

  3. [The results of autogenic training in patients with ischemic heart disease after an aortocoronary bypass operation].

    PubMed

    Rakov, A L; Mandrykin, Iu V; Zamotaev, Iu N

    1997-02-01

    Were studied psychovegetative and somatic correlations in 115 patients with ischemic heart disease, having aortocoronary shunting operation and being at the sanatorium stage of the medical rehabilitation. To 70 patients was been carried out treatment with application of autogenous training (AT), to 45--without use of AT. The research has confirmed the presence in the patients psychological disadaptation, expressed essentially in asthenoneurotic and hypochondriac reactions. Is established, that estimation of expressiveness of emotional tension, investigated with the aid of Spilberger's psychometric scale, can be confirmed by parameters of peroxide oxidation of lipids and mathematical analysis of heart rythm. The use of variant of training modified by the authors has revealed improvement of clinical parameters, reflecting health state of the patients, which correlate with the data of the psychological test and the results of bicycle ergometry [correction of veloergometry].

  4. More Than Just the Heart: Transition and Psychosocial Issues in Adult Congenital Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Kovacs, Adrienne H; Utens, Elisabeth M

    2015-11-01

    Most infants born with congenital heart disease (CHD) are now expected to reach adulthood. However, adults with CHD of moderate or great complexity remain at elevated risk of heart failure, arrhythmias, additional surgeries and interventional procedures, and premature mortality. This creates a need for lifelong specialized cardiac care and leads to 2 sets of potential challenges: (1) the transition from pediatric to adult care and (2) the psychosocial implications of coping with a chronic and often life-shortening medical condition. Many adolescents struggle with the transition to adult care, and mood and anxiety disorders are not uncommon in the adult setting.

  5. Overview: Diagnosis of ischemic heart disease by noninvasive techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, M.H. )

    1991-09-01

    Noninvasive tests have greatly improved in their ability to diagnose coronary artery disease. In addition, new testing modalities have been added to the authors armamentarium. However, no test is clearly superior to all others in every clinical circumstance. Moreover, none have been shown to provide sensitivities and specificities consistently above 90%. Therefore, their use for diagnostic purposes in populations with a lower prevalence of disease is only of moderate value. Conversely, for the assessment of the functional significance of coronary artery disease or prognosis in patients with ischemic heart disease, the addition of noninvasive imaging modalities to exercise testing is of high value.

  6. 21 CFR 101.82 - Health claims: Soy protein and risk of coronary heart disease (CHD).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... heart disease (CHD). 101.82 Section 101.82 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Health Claims § 101.82 Health claims: Soy protein and risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). (a... risk of CHD. (1) Cardiovascular disease means diseases of the heart and circulatory system. CHD is...

  7. 21 CFR 101.82 - Health claims: Soy protein and risk of coronary heart disease (CHD).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... heart disease (CHD). 101.82 Section 101.82 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Health Claims § 101.82 Health claims: Soy protein and risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). (a... risk of CHD. (1) Cardiovascular disease means diseases of the heart and circulatory system. CHD is...

  8. 21 CFR 101.82 - Health claims: Soy protein and risk of coronary heart disease (CHD).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... heart disease (CHD). 101.82 Section 101.82 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Health Claims § 101.82 Health claims: Soy protein and risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). (a... risk of CHD. (1) Cardiovascular disease means diseases of the heart and circulatory system. CHD is...

  9. Heart MRI

    MedlinePlus

    Magnetic resonance imaging - cardiac; Magnetic resonance imaging - heart; Nuclear magnetic resonance - cardiac; NMR - cardiac; MRI of the heart; Cardiomyopathy - MRI; Heart failure - MRI; Congenital heart disease - MRI

  10. Three-dimensional Echocardiography in Valvular Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Kurklinsky, Andrew; Mankad, Sunil

    2012-01-01

    Recent technologic advances in 3-dimensional (3D) echocardiography, using parallel processing to scan a pyramidal volume, have allowed for a superior ability to describe valvular anatomy using both transthoracic and transesophageal echocardiography. Although still in evolution and at an early phase of adaptation with respect to its clinical application, 3D echocardiography has emerged as an important clinical tool in the assessment of valvular heart disease. Three-dimensional echocardiography provides unique perspectives of valvular structures by presenting "en face" views of valvular structures, allowing for a better understanding of the topographical aspects of pathology, and a refined definition of the spatial relationships of intracardiac structures. Three-dimensional echocardiography makes available indices not described by 2D echocardiography and has been demonstrated to be superior to 2D echocardiography in a variety of valvular disease scenarios. The information gained from 3D echocardiography has especially made an impact in guiding clinical decisions in the evaluation of mitral valve (MV) disease. The decision of early surgery in degenerative MV disease is based on the suitability of repair, and the suitability of repair is generally based on echocardiography. The superior understanding of MV anatomy afforded by 3D echocardiography has been shown to be quite valuable in this setting. This review will describe the contemporary use of 3D echocardiography in the assessment of valvular heart disease, including MV, aortic, tricuspid, and prosthetic valve abnormalities. This article illustrates how 3D echocardiography can complement current echocardiography techniques in the management of valvular heart disease.

  11. Sickle Cell Disease with Cyanotic Congenital Heart Disease: Long-Term Outcomes in 5 Children

    PubMed Central

    Adisa, Olufolake A.; Oster, Matthew E.; McConnell, Michael; Mahle, William T.

    2016-01-01

    Sickle cell disease is a risk factor for cerebrovascular accidents in the pediatric population. This risk is compounded by hypoxemia. Cyanotic congenital heart disease can expose patients to prolonged hypoxemia. To our knowledge, the long-term outcome of patients who have combined sickle cell and cyanotic congenital heart disease has not been reported. We retrospectively reviewed patient records at our institution and identified 5 patients (3 girls and 2 boys) who had both conditions. Their outcomes were uniformly poor: 4 died (age range, 12 mo–17 yr); 3 had documented cerebrovascular accidents; and 3 developed ventricular dysfunction. The surviving patient had developmental delays. On the basis of this series, we suggest mitigating hypoxemia, and thus the risk of stroke, in patients who have sickle cell disease and cyanotic congenital heart disease. Potential therapies include chronic blood transfusions, hydroxyurea, earlier surgical correction to reduce the duration of hypoxemia, and heart or bone marrow transplantation. PMID:28100970

  12. Orthotropic heart transplantation for adult congenital heart disease: a case with heterotaxy and dextrocardia.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Hikaru; Fukushima, Norihide; Ichikawa, Hajime; Sawa, Yoshiki

    2017-01-01

    A 41-year-old male with heterotaxy (left isomerism) and dextrocardia composed by single ventricle, absent inferior vena cava, bilateral superior vena cava (SVC), common atrioventricular valve has received orthotopic heart transplantation (HTx) after long waiting period as Status-1. Reconstructions of bilateral SVC and hepatic vein route were successful without use of prosthetic material, and the donor heart was placed in the left mediastinum. In spite of satisfactory early recovery, the patient expired 4 months after transplantation mainly from fungal infection which developed following humoral rejection. HTx for adult patients with complex congenital heart disease is demanding in technical as well as pre- and post-transplant management, and indication should be critically determined.

  13. Three‐dimensional CT scanning: a new diagnostic modality in congenital heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Ou, Phalla; Celermajer, David S; Calcagni, Giulio; Brunelle, Francis; Bonnet, Damien; Sidi, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    New generation multislice CT technology has changed the approach to non‐invasive assessment of congenital heart disease, in both paediatric and adult patients. This is mainly because of rapid advances in spatial and temporal resolution and in post‐processing capability. At Hôpital Necker‐Enfants Malades, CT with multiplanar and three‐dimensional reconstruction has become a routine examination in the evaluation of congenital heart disease planning surgery, complex interventional catheterisations and for follow‐up. It has proved to be an invaluable diagnostic and decision‐aiding methodology in these situations, as a complement to echocardiography and, increasingly, as a substitute for diagnostic angiography (which is usually associated with higher‐dose radiation and longer sedation times, as well as occasional morbidity). This review illustrates the current status of 64‐slice CT in congenital heart diseases, including assessment of the aorta, the coronary arteries, the pulmonary arteries, the systemic and pulmonary veins, and other intra‐ and extracardiac malformations. PMID:16952967

  14. Angiotensins as therapeutic targets beyond heart disease.

    PubMed

    Passos-Silva, Danielle Gomes; Brandan, Enrique; Santos, Robson Augusto Souza

    2015-05-01

    The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) plays a pivotal role in cardiovascular and hydro-electrolyte homeostasis. Blockade of the RAS as a therapeutic strategy for treating hypertension and related cardiovascular diseases is well established. However, actions of the RAS go far beyond the targets initially described. In this regard, the recent identification of novel components of the RAS, including angiotensin-(1-7) [Ang-(1-7)], Ang-(1-9), and alamandine, have opened new possibilities for interfering with the development and manifestations of cardiovascular and non-cardiovascular diseases. In this article, we briefly review novel targets for angiotensins and its therapeutic implications in diverse areas, including cancer, inflammation, and glaucoma.

  15. [The German National Disease Management Guideline "Chronic Heart Failure"].

    PubMed

    Weinbrenner, S; Langer, T; Scherer, M; Störk, S; Ertl, G; Muth, Ch; Hoppe, U C; Kopp, I; Ollenschläger, G

    2012-02-01

    Chronic heart failure (CHF) is an illness mostly affecting elderly people. In Germany CHF is one of the most common causes of death and at the same time one of the most common diagnosis in inpatient care. Due to the expected increase in life expectancy in the next few years experts predict a further step-up of the incidence. Against this background development of a national guideline on chronic heart failure was prioritised and accordingly the National Disease Management Guideline (NDMG) Chronic Heart Failure was developed by a multi- and interdisciplinary group. The guideline group comprised experts from all relevant scientific medical societies as well as a patient expert. The National Disease Management Guideline (NDMG) on Chronic Heart Failure aims at supporting patients and health care providers with respect to decisions on a specific health care problem by giving recommendations for actions. Recommendations are informed by the best available scientific evidence on this topic.Patients with CHF often suffer from multiple conditions. Due to this fact and the old age patients do have very complex and demanding health care needs. Thus accounting for co-morbidities is paramount in planning and providing health care for theses patients and communication between doctor and patient but also between all health care providers is crucial.Basic treatment strategies in chronic heart failure comprise management of risk factors and prognostic factors as well as appropriate consideration of co-morbidities accompanied by measures empowering patients in establishing a healthy life style and a self-dependant management of their illness.Psycho-social aspects have a very strong influence on patients' acceptance of the disease and their self-management. In addition they have a strong influence on therapy management of the treating physician thus they have to be addressed adequately during the consultation.The National Disease Management Guideline (NDMG) Chronic Heart Failure (CHF

  16. Kennedy Space Center Coronary Heart Disease Risk Screening Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tipton, David A.; Scarpa, Philip J.

    1999-01-01

    Coronary heart disease (CHD) is the number one cause of death in the U.S. It is a likely cause of death and disability in the lives of employees at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) as well. The KSC Biomedical Office used a multifactorial formula developed by the Framingham Heart Study to calculate CHD risk probabilities for individuals in a segment of the KSC population who require medical evaluation for job certification. Those individuals assessed to have a high risk probability will be targeted for intervention.

  17. AIDS

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000594.htm HIV/AIDS To use the sharing features on this page, ... immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is the virus that causes AIDS. When a person becomes infected with HIV, the ...

  18. Histopathological study on myocardial hypertrophy associated with ischemic heart disease.

    PubMed

    Ishijima, M

    1990-06-01

    The mode and causes of myocardial hypertrophy occurring in association with ischemic heart disease were studied. The investigation involved autopsied hearts (15 cases of subendocardial infarction, 27 of transmural infarction, 20 of non-infarcted three vessel disease and 17 controls) and biopsied materials obtained during coronary-aorta bypass graft surgery (23 patients with angina pectoris and 46 with myocardial infarction). The subendocardial infarction group showed most marked myocardial hypertrophy that reflected extensive infarction and fibrosis, dilatation of the left ventricular cavity and the loss of myocytes. Despite a marked decrease in the number of myocyte layers, the residual myocardium of the left ventricle was uniformly hypertrophic, accompanied by an increase in the heart weight. The larger the area of fibrosis, the more marked was myocardial hypertrophy irrespective of the luminal diameter of the responsible coronary artery. These findings indicate that myocardial hypertrophy associated with ischemic heart disease is enhanced by the compensatory mechanisms for a decrease in the contractile myocardium due to fibrosis.

  19. Progress in gene therapy of dystrophic heart disease.

    PubMed

    Lai, Y; Duan, D

    2012-06-01

    The heart is frequently afflicted in muscular dystrophy. In severe cases, cardiac lesion may directly result in death. Over the years, pharmacological and/or surgical interventions have been the mainstay to alleviate cardiac symptoms in muscular dystrophy patients. Although these traditional modalities remain useful, the emerging field of gene therapy has now provided an unprecedented opportunity to transform our thinking/approach in the treatment of dystrophic heart disease. In fact, the premise is already in place for genetic correction. Gene mutations have been identified and animal models are available for several types of muscular dystrophy. Most importantly, innovative strategies have been developed to effectively deliver therapeutic genes to the heart. Dystrophin-deficient Duchenne cardiomyopathy is associated with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), the most common lethal muscular dystrophy. Considering its high incidence, there has been a considerable interest and significant input in the development of Duchenne cardiomyopathy gene therapy. Using Duchenne cardiomyopathy as an example, here we illustrate the struggles and successes experienced in the burgeoning field of dystrophic heart disease gene therapy. In light of abundant and highly promising data with the adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector, we have specially emphasized on AAV-mediated gene therapy. Besides DMD, we have also discussed gene therapy for treating cardiac diseases in other muscular dystrophies such as limb-girdle muscular dystrophy.

  20. Radiation-induced heart disease in lung cancer radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Ming, Xin; Feng, Yuanming; Yang, Chengwen; Wang, Wei; Wang, Ping; Deng, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Radiation-induced heart disease (RIHD), which affects the patients’ prognosis with both acute and late side effects, has been published extensively in the radiotherapy of breast cancer, lymphoma and other benign diseases. Studies on RIHD in lung cancer radiotherapy, however, are less extensive and clear even though the patients with lung cancer are delivered with higher doses to the heart during radiation treatment. Methods: In this article, after extensive literature search and analysis, we reviewed the current evidence on RIHD in lung cancer patients after their radiation treatments and investigated the potential risk factors for RIHD as compared to other types of cancers. Result: Cardiac toxicity has been found highly relevant in lung cancer radiotherapy. So far, the crude incidence of cardiac complications in the lung cancer patients after radiotherapy has been up to 33%. Conclusion: The dose to the heart, the lobar location of tumor, the treatment modality, the history of heart and pulmonary disease and smoking were considered as potential risk factors for RIHD in lung cancer radiotherapy. As treatment techniques improve over the time with better prognosis for lung cancer survivors, an improved prediction model can be established to further reduce the cardiac toxicity in lung cancer radiotherapy. PMID:27741117

  1. Report of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Working Group: An Integrated Network for Congenital Heart Disease Research.

    PubMed

    Pasquali, Sara K; Jacobs, Jeffrey P; Farber, Gregory K; Bertoch, David; Blume, Elizabeth D; Burns, Kristin M; Campbell, Robert; Chang, Anthony C; Chung, Wendy K; Riehle-Colarusso, Tiffany; Curtis, Lesley H; Forrest, Christopher B; Gaynor, William J; Gaies, Michael G; Go, Alan S; Henchey, Paul; Martin, Gerard R; Pearson, Gail; Pemberton, Victoria L; Schwartz, Steven M; Vincent, Robert; Kaltman, Jonathan R

    2016-04-05

    The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute convened a working group in January 2015 to explore issues related to an integrated data network for congenital heart disease research. The overall goal was to develop a common vision for how the rapidly increasing volumes of data captured across numerous sources can be managed, integrated, and analyzed to improve care and outcomes. This report summarizes the current landscape of congenital heart disease data, data integration methodologies used across other fields, key considerations for data integration models in congenital heart disease, and the short- and long-term vision and recommendations made by the working group.

  2. The role of cardiac magnetic resonance in valvular heart disease.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Mattei, Juan C; Shah, Dipan J

    2013-01-01

    The prevalence of valvular heart disease is increasing as the population ages. In diagnosing individuals with valve disease, echocardiography is the primary imaging modality used by clinicians both for initial assessment and for longitudinal evaluation. However, in some cases cardiovascular magnetic resonance has become a viable alternative in that it can obtain imaging data in any plane prescribed by the scan operator, which makes it ideal for accurate investigation of all cardiac valves: aortic, mitral, pulmonic, and tricuspid. In addition, CMR for valve assessment is noninvasive, free of ionizing radiation, and in most instances does not require contrast administration. The objectives of a comprehensive CMR study for evaluating valvular heart disease are threefold: (1) to provide insight into the mechanism of the valvular lesion (via anatomic assessment), (2) to quantify the severity of the valvular lesion, and (3) to discern the consequences of the valvular lesion.

  3. Association of Heart Block with Uncommon Disease States

    PubMed Central

    Yahalom, Malka; Roguin, Nathan; Antonelli, Dante; Suleiman, Khaled; Turgeman, Yoav

    2013-01-01

    A variety of diseases, other than the common Lev-Lenègre disease, are associated with cardiac conduction system abnormalities. These include acute processes, such as acute rheumatic fever, and other disorders, such as sarcoidosis, connective tissue disorders, neoplasms, and bacterial endocarditis with cardiac abscess formation. The purpose of the study is to raise awareness of these rare conditions. We present 10 adult patients (4 males and 6 females) with a mean age of 47 years (range: 19-69), with various rare diseases associated with heart block, who needed temporary or permanent pacemaker therapy in the past two decades. These conditions included acute rheumatic carditis, Wegener granulomatosis, cardiac involvement of metastatic breast cancer, bacterial endocarditis, sarcoidosis, S/P chest radiotherapy, and quadriplegia with syringomyelia postspinal cord injury, and adult congenital heart block. We conclude that patients with these disorders should be followed periodically, to allow for early detection and treatment of cardiac conduction disturbances, with pacemaker therapy. PMID:24436606

  4. Micro- and macrovascular treatment targets in scleroderma heart disease.

    PubMed

    Dimitroulas, Theodoros; Giannakoulas, George; Karvounis, Haralambos; Garyfallos, Alexandros; Settas, Lucas; Kitas, George D

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac involvement in systemic sclerosis (SSc) is a frequent visceral complication that considerably affects the prognosis of the disease. The pathophysiologic hallmark is myocardial fibrosis which can progress leading to arrhythmia, right and/or left heart dysfunction and failure. Symptoms range from unusual to prominent and from mild to dramatic, but clinically overt disease is a poor prognostic factor. Primary myocardial involvement is related to focal ischemia due to transient coronary spasm, and the available data support that microvascular functional and structural abnormalities rather than macrovascular coronary involvement represent the main underlying mechanism of the disease. However, the existence and prevalence of atherosclerotic coronary artery disease in SSc remain to be determined, as several studies have generated conflicting reports. Despite the lack of effective targeted therapy for SSc itself, sensitive and quantitative techniques have demonstrated the ability of vasodilators to improve myocardial function and perfusion and to prevent the evolution of subclinical heart involvement to decompensated heart failure. Further research will provide a better understanding of the disease by detecting the potent contribution of coronary artery involvement, explaining differences in accelerated atherosclerosis between SSc and other autoimmune disorders, and opening directions for the development of novel treatment strategies for this life-threatening complication of SSc.

  5. Chronic mountain sickness, optimal hemoglobin, and heart disease.

    PubMed

    Vargas, Enrique; Spielvogel, Hilde

    2006-01-01

    For the male inhabitants of La Paz, Bolivia (3200-4100 m), and other high altitude regions in America and Asia, chronic mountain sickness (CMS) is a major health problem. Since CMS was first described by Carlos Monge in the Peruvian Andes in 1925, numerous research papers have been devoted to this topic, but many unanswered questions still exist with respect to the beginning of the disease and its cause(s). The experience with CMS has shown that an excessively high hemoglobin concentration is not favorable for high altitude acclimatization, and the hypothesis of theoretically "optimal" hematocrit and "optimal" hemoglobin has been made. The calculated optimal hemoglobin concentration of 14.7 g/dL for resting men in the Andes is discussed as theoretical and not applicable in real life. The most frequent congenital and acquired heart diseases are discussed, such as patent ductus, atrial septum defect, ventricle septum defect among congenital heart diseases and the still very frequent rheumatic valve cardiopathies and Chagas disease as acquired cardiopathies. Among the typical acquired heart diseases of the high altitude dweller, special attention is given to chronic cor pulmonale as a consequence of severe CMS with pulmonary hypertension.

  6. Women and Ischemic Heart Disease: Recognition, Diagnosis and Management

    PubMed Central

    Park, Seong-Mi

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is one of the most frequent causes of death in both males and females throughout the world. However, women exhibit a greater symptom burden, more functional disability, and a higher prevalence of nonobstructive coronary artery disease (CAD) compared to men when evaluated for signs and symptoms of myocardial ischemia. This paradoxical sex difference appears to be linked to a sex-specific pathophysiology of myocardial ischemia including coronary microvascular dysfunction, a component of the 'Yentl Syndrome'. Accordingly, the term ischemic heart disease (IHD) is more appropriate for a discussion specific to women rather than CAD or coronary heart disease. Following the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Heart Truth/American Heart Association, Women's Ischemia Syndrome Evaluation and guideline campaigns, the cardiovascular mortality in women has been decreased, although significant gender gaps in clinical outcomes still exist. Women less likely undergo testing, yet guidelines indicate that symptomatic women at intermediate to high IHD risk should have further test (e.g. exercise treadmill test or stress imaging) for myocardial ischemia and prognosis. Further, women have suboptimal use of evidence-based guideline therapies compared with men with and without obstructive CAD. Anti-anginal and anti-atherosclerotic strategies are effective for symptom and ischemia management in women with evidence of ischemia and nonobstructive CAD, although more female-specific study is needed. IHD guidelines are not "cardiac catheterization" based but related to evidence of "myocardial ischemia and angina". A simplified approach to IHD management with ABCs (aspirin, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors/angiotensin-renin blockers, beta blockers, cholesterol management and statin) should be used and can help to increases adherence to guidelines. PMID:27482251

  7. Higher coronary heart disease and heart attack morbidity in Appalachian coal mining regions

    SciTech Connect

    Hendryx, M.; Zullig, K.J.

    2009-11-15

    This study analyzes the U.S. 2006 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System survey data (N = 235,783) to test whether self-reported cardiovascular disease rates are higher in Appalachian coal mining counties compared to other counties after control for other risks. Dependent variables include self-reported measures of ever (1) being diagnosed with cardiovascular disease (CVD) or with a specific form of CVD including (2) stroke, (3) heart attack, or (4) angina or coronary heart disease (CHD). Independent variables included coal mining, smoking, BMI, drinking, physician supply, diabetes co-morbidity, age, race/ethnicity, education, income, and others. SUDAAN Multilog models were estimated, and odds ratios tested for coal mining effects. After control for covariates, people in Appalachian coal mining areas reported significantly higher risk of CVD (OR = 1.22, 95% CI = 1.14-1.30), angina or CHO (OR = 1.29, 95% C1 = 1.19-1.39) and heart attack (OR = 1.19, 95% C1 = 1.10-1.30). Effects were present for both men and women. Cardiovascular diseases have been linked to both air and water contamination in ways consistent with toxicants found in coal and coal processing. Future research is indicated to assess air and water quality in coal mining communities in Appalachia, with corresponding environmental programs and standards established as indicated.

  8. Heart Disease Could Cost U.S. $1 Trillion Per Year by 2035: Report

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_163587.html Heart Disease Could Cost U.S. $1 Trillion Per Year By ... estimates that nearly half of Americans will have heart disease in less than 20 years To use the ...

  9. Poor Diet Tied to Half of U.S. Deaths from Heart Disease, Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... html Poor Diet Tied to Half of U.S. Deaths From Heart Disease, Diabetes Study explores which foods ... 7, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Nearly half of all deaths from heart disease, stroke and diabetes in the ...

  10. Public Service Announcement: Heart Disease Doesn't Care What You Wear

    MedlinePlus

    ... Past Issues Public Service Announcement Heart Disease Doesn't Care What You Wear Past Issues / Summer 2006 ... page please turn Javascript on. Heart Disease Doesn't Care What You Wear IT'S THE #1 KI ...

  11. Establishment of an Australian National Genetic Heart Disease Registry.

    PubMed

    Ingles, Jodie; McGaughran, Julie; Vohra, Jitendra; Weintraub, Robert G; Davis, Andrew; Atherton, John; Semsarian, Christopher

    2008-12-01

    A National Genetic Heart Disease Registry has recently been established, with the aim to enroll every family in Australia with a genetically determined cardiomyopathy or primary arrhythmic disorder. The Registry seeks to further our understanding of the impact and burden of disease in this population; increase awareness and provide education to health professionals and families; and establish a large cardiac genetic cohort as a resource for approved research studies. The Registry is currently recruiting families with inherited cardiomyopathies (e.g. hypertrophic cardiomyopathy) and primary arrhythmogenic disorders (e.g. long QT syndrome), with scope to expand this in the future. Affected individuals, as well as their first-degree (at-risk) family members are eligible to enroll. Participants are currently being recruited from cardiac genetics clinics in approved recruitment sites and hope to expand to other Australian centres including general cardiology practice in the future. A significant focus of the Registry is to improve understanding and create awareness of inherited heart diseases, which includes ensuring families are aware of genetic testing options and current clinical screening recommendations for at-risk family members. A Registry Advisory Committee has been established under the NHMRC Guidelines, and includes a representative from each major recruitment centre. This committee approves all decisions relating to the Registry including approval of research studies. A National Genetic Heart Disease Registry will provide a valuable resource to further our knowledge of the clinical and genetic aspects of these diseases. Since most of the current data about the prevalence, natural history and outcomes of genetic heart diseases has emanated from the United States and Europe, characterising these Australian populations will be of significant benefit, allowing for more informed and specific health care planning and resource provision.

  12. Natural killer cells in inflammatory heart disease.

    PubMed

    Ong, SuFey; Rose, Noel R; Čiháková, Daniela

    2017-02-01

    Despite of a multitude of excellent studies, the regulatory role of natural killer (NK) cells in the pathogenesis of inflammatory cardiac disease is greatly underappreciated. Clinical abnormalities in the numbers and functions of NK cells are observed in myocarditis and inflammatory dilated cardiomyopathy (DCMi) as well as in cardiac transplant rejection [1-6]. Because treatment of these disorders remains largely symptomatic in nature, patients have little options for targeted therapies [7,8]. However, blockade of NK cells and their receptors can protect against inflammation and damage in animal models of cardiac injury and inflammation. In these models, NK cells suppress the maturation and trafficking of inflammatory cells, alter the local cytokine and chemokine environments, and induce apoptosis in nearby resident and hematopoietic cells [1,9,10]. This review will dissect each protective mechanism employed by NK cells and explore how their properties might be exploited for their therapeutic potential.

  13. Physical activity and coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Froelicher, V; Battler, A; McKirnan, M D

    1980-01-01

    This review deals with more recent investigations of the health benefit of regular aerobic exercise including studies in: epidemiology, echocardiography, animal research, and cardiac rehabilitation. Recent epidemiological studies support the preventative aspects of exercise in apparently healthy individuals. Echocardiographic studies suggest morphologic changes in young individuals. Recent animal research confirms previous results as well as documenting improvment in cardiac function even under hypoxic and ischemic conditions. Studies of cardiac rehabilitation suggest that medically supervised programs do not improve or worsen morbidity and mortality. The question of whether exercise training can cause cardiac effects in patients with coronary disease rather than just improve the response of the peripheral circulation to exercise may be answered using newer radionuclide techniques.

  14. Hepatic disease in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS).

    PubMed

    Lodenyo, Hudson; Segal, Issy

    2004-01-01

    The acquired immunodeficiency syndrome is now the leading cause of death in the world. Liver involvement in opportunistic infections and neoplasms affecting patients with human immunodeficiency disease syndrome are common. Many of these patients also take many medicines and toxins that are potentially harmful to the liver. This is an overview on the aetiology and possible diagnostic guide to determine liver involvement in patients with HIV infection. A literature review was performed on major published series on the liver and HIV infection between 1985 and 1999, both years inclusive. Data and opinions from 5 general reviews and 31 original articles from MEDLINE on liver disease in patients with HIV infection regarding aetiology, pathology, presentation and patient evaluation are summarised. The liver is frequently affected in patients with AIDS. The majority of the patients have hepatomegaly and abnormal liver enzymes secondary to involvement with opportunities infections, AIDS associated neoplasms and drug therapy. Most of the infections reach the liver by lymphohaematogeneous spread from other sites in the body. Methodical approach in patient evaluation is therefore essential for prompt diagnosis and treatment to minimise morbidity and early mortality.

  15. Center for fetal monkey gene transfer for heart, lung, and blood diseases: an NHLBI resource for the gene therapy community.

    PubMed

    Tarantal, Alice F; Skarlatos, Sonia I

    2012-11-01

    The goals of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) Center for Fetal Monkey Gene Transfer for Heart, Lung, and Blood Diseases are to conduct gene transfer studies in monkeys to evaluate safety and efficiency; and to provide NHLBI-supported investigators with expertise, resources, and services to actively pursue gene transfer approaches in monkeys in their research programs. NHLBI-supported projects span investigators throughout the United States and have addressed novel approaches to gene delivery; "proof-of-principle"; assessed whether findings in small-animal models could be demonstrated in a primate species; or were conducted to enable new grant or IND submissions. The Center for Fetal Monkey Gene Transfer for Heart, Lung, and Blood Diseases successfully aids the gene therapy community in addressing regulatory barriers, and serves as an effective vehicle for advancing the field.

  16. [Device-aided therapies in advanced Parkinson's disease].

    PubMed

    Timofeeva, A A

    2016-01-01

    Advanced stages of Parkinson's disease (PD) is a consequence of the severe neurodegenerative process and are characterized by the development of motor fluctuations and dyskinesia, aggravation of non-motor symptoms. Treatment with peroral and transdermal drugs can't provide an adequate control of PD symptoms and quality-of-life of the patients at this stage of disease. Currently, three device-aided therapies: deep brain stimulation (DBS), intrajejunal infusion of duodopa, subcutaneous infusion of apomorphine can be used in treatment of patients with advanced stages of PD. Timely administration of device-aided therapies and right choice of the method determine, to a large extent, the efficacy and safety of their use. Despite the high efficacy of all three methods with respect to the fluctuation of separate symptoms, each method has its own peculiarities. The authors reviewed the data on the expediency of using each method according to the severity of motor and non-motor symptoms, patient's age, PD duration, concomitant pathology and social support of the patients.

  17. Environmental risk factors for heart disease.

    PubMed

    O'Toole, Timothy E; Conklin, Daniel J; Bhatnagar, Aruni

    2008-01-01

    In this review, we discuss current evidence linking environmental pollutants to cardiovascular disease (CVD). Extensive evidence indicates that environmental factors contribute to CVD risk, incidence, and severity. Migrant studies show that changes in the environment could substantially alter CVD risk in a genetically stable population. Additionally, CVD risk is affected by changes in nutritional and lifestyle choices. Recent studies in the field of environmental cardiology suggest that environmental toxins also influence CVD. Exposure to tobacco smoke is paradigmatic of such environmental risk and is strongly and positively associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. In animal models of exposure, tobacco smoke induces endothelial dysfunction and prothrombotic responses and exacerbates atherogenesis and myocardial ischemic injury. Similar mechanism may be engaged by other pollutants or food constituents. Several large population-based studies indicate that exposure to fine or ultrafine particulate air pollution increases CVD morbidity and mortality, and the plausibility of this association is supported by data from animal studies. Exposure to other chemicals such as polyaromatic hydrocarbons, aldehydes, and metals has also been reported to elevate CVD risk by affecting atherogenesis, thrombosis, or blood pressure regulation. Maternal exposure to drugs, toxins, and infection has been linked with cardiac birth defects and premature CVD in later life. Collectively, the data support the notion that chronic environmental stress is an important determinant of CVD risk. Further work is required to assess the magnitude of this risk fully and to delineate specific mechanisms by which environmental toxins affect CVD.

  18. Transcriptional atlas of cardiogenesis maps congenital heart disease interactome.

    PubMed

    Li, Xing; Martinez-Fernandez, Almudena; Hartjes, Katherine A; Kocher, Jean-Pierre A; Olson, Timothy M; Terzic, Andre; Nelson, Timothy J

    2014-07-01

    Mammalian heart development is built on highly conserved molecular mechanisms with polygenetic perturbations resulting in a spectrum of congenital heart diseases (CHD). However, knowledge of cardiogenic ontogeny that regulates proper cardiogenesis remains largely based on candidate-gene approaches. Mapping the dynamic transcriptional landscape of cardiogenesis from a genomic perspective is essential to integrate the knowledge of heart development into translational applications that accelerate disease discovery efforts toward mechanistic-based treatment strategies. Herein, we designed a time-course transcriptome analysis to investigate the genome-wide dynamic expression landscape of innate murine cardiogenesis ranging from embryonic stem cells to adult cardiac structures. This comprehensive analysis generated temporal and spatial expression profiles, revealed stage-specific gene functions, and mapped the dynamic transcriptome of cardiogenesis to curated pathways. Reconciling known genetic underpinnings of CHD, we deconstructed a disease-centric dynamic interactome encoded within this cardiogenic atlas to identify stage-specific developmental disturbances clustered on regulation of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), BMP signaling, NF-AT signaling, TGFb-dependent EMT, and Notch signaling. Collectively, this cardiogenic transcriptional landscape defines the time-dependent expression of cardiac ontogeny and prioritizes regulatory networks at the interface between health and disease.

  19. Transcriptional atlas of cardiogenesis maps congenital heart disease interactome

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xing; Martinez-Fernandez, Almudena; Hartjes, Katherine A.; Kocher, Jean-Pierre A.; Olson, Timothy M.; Terzic, Andre

    2014-01-01

    Mammalian heart development is built on highly conserved molecular mechanisms with polygenetic perturbations resulting in a spectrum of congenital heart diseases (CHD). However, knowledge of cardiogenic ontogeny that regulates proper cardiogenesis remains largely based on candidate-gene approaches. Mapping the dynamic transcriptional landscape of cardiogenesis from a genomic perspective is essential to integrate the knowledge of heart development into translational applications that accelerate disease discovery efforts toward mechanistic-based treatment strategies. Herein, we designed a time-course transcriptome analysis to investigate the genome-wide dynamic expression landscape of innate murine cardiogenesis ranging from embryonic stem cells to adult cardiac structures. This comprehensive analysis generated temporal and spatial expression profiles, revealed stage-specific gene functions, and mapped the dynamic transcriptome of cardiogenesis to curated pathways. Reconciling known genetic underpinnings of CHD, we deconstructed a disease-centric dynamic interactome encoded within this cardiogenic atlas to identify stage-specific developmental disturbances clustered on regulation of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), BMP signaling, NF-AT signaling, TGFb-dependent EMT, and Notch signaling. Collectively, this cardiogenic transcriptional landscape defines the time-dependent expression of cardiac ontogeny and prioritizes regulatory networks at the interface between health and disease. PMID:24803680

  20. Peripheral arterial disease and chronic heart failure: a dangerous mix.

    PubMed

    Inglis, Sally C; Hermis, Adriana; Shehab, Sajad; Newton, Phillip J; Lal, Sara; Davidson, Patricia M

    2013-07-01

    Chronic heart failure (CHF) is associated with a high comorbidity burden, adverse impact on quality of life and high health care utilisation. Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) and CHF share many risk, pathophysiological and prognostic features, and each has been associated with increased morbidity and mortality. PAD often goes undetected, and yet in spite of the availability of screening tools, this is not commonly considered in CHF care. A review of the electronic databases Medline, CINAHL and Cochrane CENTRAL was undertaken using the MeSH terms peripheral arterial disease, peripheral vascular disease, intermittent claudication and heart failure to identify studies examining the prevalence and clinical outcomes of coexisting PAD in patients with CHF. Five studies were identified. There are limited data describing the impact of PAD on CHF outcomes. As PAD may contribute to decreased capacity to exercise and other self-care behaviours, identifying those at risk and providing appropriate therapy are important. Based on this review, patients who are smokers and those with diagnosed coronary heart disease and diabetes should be targeted for the screening of PAD.

  1. Prevalence of Dyslipidemia in Children with Congenital Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Fuenmayor, Gabriela; Redondo, Ana Carolina Costa; Shiraishi, Karen Saori; Souza, Rogerio; Elias, Patrícia Figueiredo; Jatene, Ieda Biscegli

    2013-01-01

    Dyslipidemia is one of the main risk factors associated with cardiovascular diseases. Few data on the impacts of congenital heart diseases are available with regard to the prevalence of dyslipidemia in children. Our study evaluated the lipid profile in children with congenital heart disease at a referral center. From January 2011 to July 2012, 52 pediatric patients had their lipid, metabolic and clinical profiles traced. The mean age was 10.4 ± 2.8 years and male/female rate of 1.38:1. Our population had 53.8% patients with high levels of total cholesterol and 13.4% (CI 95 %, from 6.6 to 25.2%) of them also presenting LDL levels ≥ 130 mg/dL, which characterizes dyslipidemia. The group of dyslipidemic patients presented only two obese individuals. Our data show that the presence of congenital heart disease does not lead to higher risk associated with the prevalence of dyslipidemia. Therefore, the screening of this specific population should follow the regular pediatric guidelines, which are also independent of the nutritional status of the children tested. PMID:24061754

  2. Illustrated Imaging Essay on Congenital Heart Diseases: Multimodality Approach Part III: Cyanotic Heart Diseases and Complex Congenital Anomalies

    PubMed Central

    Belaval, Vinay; Gadabanahalli, Karthik; Raj, Vimal; Shah, Sejal

    2016-01-01

    From the stand point of radiographic analysis most of the complex cyanotic congenital heart diseases (CHD), can be divided into those associated with decreased or increased pulmonary vascularity. Combination of a specific cardiac configuration and status of lung vasculature in a clinical context allows plain film diagnosis to be predicted in some CHD. Correlation of the position of the cardiac apex in relation to the visceral situs is an important information that can be obtained from the plain film. This information helps in gathering information about the atrio-ventricular, ventricular arterial concordance or discordance. Categorization of the cyanotic heart disease based on vascularity is presented below. Thorough understanding of cardiac anatomy by different imaging methods is essential in understanding and interpreting complex cardiac disease. Basic anatomical details and background for interpretation are provided in the previous parts of this presentation. PMID:27630924

  3. Hydroxytyrosol and Potential Uses in Cardiovascular Diseases, Cancer, and AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Vilaplana-Pérez, Cristina; Auñón, David; García-Flores, Libia A.; Gil-Izquierdo, Angel

    2014-01-01

    Hydroxytyrosol is one of the main phenolic components of olive oil. It is present in the fruit and leaf of the olive (Olea europaea L.). During the past decades, it has been well documented that this phenolic compound has health benefits and a protective action has been found in preclinical studies against several diseases. Here, we review its bioavailability in human beings and several assays showing significant results related with cardiovascular diseases, cancer, and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Mechanisms of action include potent anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory effects, among others. The importance of hydroxytyrosol in protection of low-density lipoproteins and consequently its implication in the reduction of cardiovascular disease risk has been highlighted by the European Food Safety Authority, concluding that 5 mg of hydroxytyrosol and its derivatives should be consumed daily to reach this effect at physiological level. We discuss the potential uses of this compound in supplements, nutraceutic foods, or topical formulations in the disease risk reduction. Finally, we conclude that more studies are needed to sustain or reject many other health claims not yet fully documented and to validate these newly available hydroxytyrosol-based products, because it seems to be a good candidate to reduce the risk of diseases mentioned. PMID:25988120

  4. Particulate matter and heart disease: Evidence from epidemiological studies

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, Annette . E-mail: peters@gsf.de

    2005-09-01

    The association between particulate matter and heart disease was noted in the mid-nineties of last century when the epidemiological evidence for an association between air pollution and hospital admissions due to cardiovascular disease accumulated and first hypotheses regarding the pathomechanism were formulated. Nowadays, epidemiological studies have demonstrated coherent associations between daily changes in concentrations of ambient particles and cardiovascular disease mortality, hospital admission, disease exacerbation in patients with cardiovascular disease and early physiological responses in healthy individuals consistent with a risk factor profile deterioration. In addition, evidence was found that annual average PM{sub 2.5} exposures are associated with increased risks for mortality caused by ischemic heart disease and dysrhythmia. Thereby, evidence is suggesting not only a short-term exacerbation of cardiovascular disease by ambient particle concentrations but also a potential role of particles in defining patients' vulnerability to acute coronary events. While this concept is consistent with the current understanding of the factors defining patients' vulnerability, the mechanisms and the time-scales on which the particle-induced vulnerability might operate are unknown.

  5. Cardiovascular management in pregnancy: congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Brickner, M Elizabeth

    2014-07-15

    The population of adults with CHD continues to expand,and thus the number of women with CHD who contemplate pregnancy or become pregnant is also growing. Mothers with low-risk defects can be managed by general cardiologist,whereas those with more complex defects should be managed by or with the assistance of ACHD cardiologists. It is important to acknowledge that all patients with CHD may have unique anatomy or physiology, despite their classification as having a simple, moderate, or complex defect. As such, clinicians evaluating these patients should have adequate knowledge and expertise when assessing patient's risk for pregnancy,when performing imaging or hemodynamic studies, and when managing these patients during pregnancy. The American Board of Medical Specialties has recently recognized ACHD as a subspecialty of cardiovascular disease to treat the specialized needs of these patients in adulthood. ACHD experts can provide expertise in the management of specific defects or lesions, imaging techniques, prepregnancy risk assessment,and can manage these patients or comanage them with other medical providers during their pregnancy. Because many of these ACHD patients are lost to follow-up in adulthood, pregnancy represents a time when these patients seek medical care(and for some, represents a time of vulnerability and increased risk). This represents an opportunity to establish or reestablish care with ACHD specialists and to reestablish continuing long-term care for their CHD. Pregnancy also provides an opportunity to create partnerships between primary care physicians,adult cardiologists, and ACHD specialists to provide optimal care for these women throughout their lives.

  6. [Heart failure: the importance of a disease management program].

    PubMed

    Fabbri, Gianna; Gorini, Marco; Maggioni, Aldo P; Oliva, Fabrizio

    2007-06-01

    Heart failure remains a growing public health problem, hospitalizations represent the main cost component of heart failure care and the poor quality of life of patients is often worsened by frequent admissions. A multidisciplinary approach and specific disease management programs are a potentially useful instrument to reducing hospitalizations in heart failure patients. These concepts have recently been discussed in a consensus document by all the Scientific Societies involved in the care of heart failure patients. The effectiveness of intervention programs delivering continuity of care by a multidisciplinary team achieved a promising reduction in admissions, but the results of the studies have not been univocal for category of strategies and about the effect on survival. Telephone intervention significantly decreased heart failure admissions but not all-cause admissions and mortality. The multicenter randomized DIAL study, comparing a centralized telephone intervention program delivering continuity of care by a multidisciplinary team with usual care in patients with heart failure, confirms these findings. After a mean 16-month follow-up, there was a benefit mostly due to a significant reduction in admissions for heart failure, but mortality was similar in both groups. Data on 9000 patients from the IN-CHF registry show that hospitalizations are a serious problem in Italy: 44% of the patients had at least one hospitalization for heart failure in the year prior to the entry visit and this is the most powerful independent predictor of rehospitalization during the follow-up. Nearly a quarter of the population with follow-up data availability (92%) has been rehospitalized in the year after enrollment; patients in advanced functional class (32.1% hospitalization rate) and with ischemic etiology (25.0%) are more likely to be hospitalized than those in NYHA class I-II and without ischemic etiology. In a survey carried out recently in Italy, in 1152 patients admitted for

  7. Vasopressin receptor antagonists, heart failure, and polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Torres, Vicente E

    2015-01-01

    The synthesis of nonpeptide orally bioavailable vasopressin antagonists devoid of agonistic activity (vaptans) has made possible the selective blockade of vasopressin receptor subtypes for therapeutic purposes. Vaptans acting on the vasopressin V2 receptors (aquaretics) have attracted attention as a possible therapy for heart failure and polycystic kidney disease. Despite a solid rationale and encouraging preclinical testing, aquaretics have not improved clinical outcomes in randomized clinical trials for heart failure. Additional clinical trials with select population targets, more flexible dosing schedules, and possibly a different drug type or combination (balanced V1a/V2 receptor antagonism) may be warranted. Aquaretics are promising for the treatment of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease and have been approved in Japan for this indication. More studies are needed to better define their long-term safety and efficacy and optimize their utilization.

  8. Minimally invasive surgical treatment of valvular heart disease.

    PubMed

    Goldstone, Andrew B; Joseph Woo, Y

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac surgery is in the midst of a practice revolution. Traditionally, surgery for valvular heart disease consisted of valve replacement via conventional sternotomy using cardiopulmonary bypass. However, over the past 20 years, the increasing popularity of less-invasive procedures, accompanied by advancements in imaging, surgical instrumentation, and robotic technology, has motivated and enabled surgeons to develop and perform complex cardiac surgical procedures through small incisions, often eliminating the need for sternotomy or cardiopulmonary bypass. In addition to the benefits of improved cosmesis, minimally invasive mitral valve surgery was pioneered with the intent of reducing morbidity, postoperative pain, blood loss, hospital length of stay, and time to return to normal activity. This article reviews the current state-of-the-art of minimally invasive approaches to the surgical treatment of valvular heart disease.

  9. Tissue Doppler Imaging in Coronary Artery Diseases and Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Correale, Michele; Totaro, Antonio; Ieva, Riccardo; Ferraretti, Armando; Musaico, Francesco; Biase, Matteo Di

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies have explored the prognostic role of TDI-derived parameters in major cardiac diseases, such as coronary artery disease (CAD) and heart failure (HF). In these conditions, myocardial mitral annular systolic (S’) and early diastolic (E’) velocities have been shown to predict mortality or cardiovascular events. In heart failure non invasive assessment of LV diastolic pressure by transmitral to mitral annular early diastolic velocity ratio (E/E’) is a strong prognosticator, especially when E/E’ is > or =15. Moreover, other parameters derived by TDI, as cardiac time intervals and Myocardial Performance Index, might play a role in the prognostic stratification in CAD and HF. Recently, a three-dimensional (3-D) TDI imaging modality, triplane TDI, has become available, and this allows calculation of 3-Dvolumes and LV ejection fraction. We present a brief update of TDI. PMID:22845815

  10. Coronary heart disease in women: triglycerides and lipoprotein biology.

    PubMed

    Dayspring, Thomas D

    2002-01-01

    An examination of coronary heart disease in women over the past two decades in the United States reveals a disturbing gender difference that points to more treatment success in men than in women, which raises the question as to whether women have been as aggressively evaluated and treated. It is only over the last several years that evidence from randomized clinical trials on coronary heart disease etiology and treatment in women has become available. In addition, the previous widely held viewpoint that estrogen is cardioprotective and should be an integral part of pharmacologic therapy has been abandoned. Triglycerides and their very important influence on lipoproteins have emerged as a critical part of the pathobiological forces related to atherothrombosis in women.

  11. Mortality from cardiovascular diseases in various countries, with special reference to atherosclerotic heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Puffer, Ruth R.; Verhoestraete, Louis J.

    1958-01-01

    Data on cardiovascular mortality, by sex and age, in selected countries were analysed for the purpose of demonstrating geographical variations. In accordance with the system adopted in the International Statistical Classification of Diseases, Injuries, and Causes of Death, causes were divided into four groups: (1) arteriosclerotic and degenerative heart disease; (2) vascular lesions affecting the central nervous system; (3) other diseases of the heart; and (4) certain other diseases of the circulatory system. The discrepancies noted point to the need for a thorough investigation of the underlying causes of cardiovascular deaths in order to promote comparability of recording and classification. PMID:13585078

  12. Acute Kidney Disease After Liver and Heart Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Ana P; Vella, John P

    2016-03-01

    After transplantation of nonrenal solid organs, an acute decline in kidney function develops in the majority of patients. In addition, a significant number of nonrenal solid organ transplant recipients develop chronic kidney disease, and some develop end-stage renal disease, requiring renal replacement therapy. The incidence varies depending on the transplanted organ. Acute kidney injury after nonrenal solid organ transplantation is associated with prolonged length of stay, cost, increased risk of death, de novo chronic kidney disease, and end-stage renal disease. This overview focuses on the risk factors for posttransplant acute kidney injury after liver and heart transplantation, integrating discussion of proteinuria and chronic kidney disease with emphasis on pathogenesis, histopathology, and management including the use of mechanistic target of rapamycin inhibition and costimulatory blockade.

  13. A survey on computer aided diagnosis for ocular diseases

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Computer Aided Diagnosis (CAD), which can automate the detection process for ocular diseases, has attracted extensive attention from clinicians and researchers alike. It not only alleviates the burden on the clinicians by providing objective opinion with valuable insights, but also offers early detection and easy access for patients. Method We review ocular CAD methodologies for various data types. For each data type, we investigate the databases and the algorithms to detect different ocular diseases. Their advantages and shortcomings are analyzed and discussed. Result We have studied three types of data (i.e., clinical, genetic and imaging) that have been commonly used in existing methods for CAD. The recent developments in methods used in CAD of ocular diseases (such as Diabetic Retinopathy, Glaucoma, Age-related Macular Degeneration and Pathological Myopia) are investigated and summarized comprehensively. Conclusion While CAD for ocular diseases has shown considerable progress over the past years, the clinical importance of fully automatic CAD systems which are able to embed clinical knowledge and integrate heterogeneous data sources still show great potential for future breakthrough. PMID:25175552

  14. Primary prevention of ischaemic heart disease: WHO coordinated cooperative trial

    PubMed Central

    1979-01-01

    Elevated serum cholesterol concentrations are known to be predictive of ischaemic heart disease. It remained to be proven, however, whether reduction of clinically manifest ischaemic heart disease could be achieved by the lowering of elevated serum-cholesterol levels. In order to create a clear and simple unifactorial study design, a lipid-lowering substance (clofibrate) was administered to this effect in a double-blind trial to middle-aged male volunteers whose serum cholesterol levels were within the upper third of the distribution in their respective populations (Budapest, Edinburgh, Prague). After an average of 5.3 years of observation, and with a reduction of some 9% of the initial serum cholesterol levels, the incidence of ischaemic heart disease was reduced by 20% in the intervention group as compared with the placebo group, thus demonstrating the preventive value of lowering this plasma lipid. There was, however, a significant increase in total mortality and in non-cardiovascular mortality in the clofibrate group, precluding the community-wide use of this drug for reduction of serum cholesterol. The explanation of this is not clear, but possible mechanisms are discussed. PMID:317255

  15. Gluten Sensitivity among Egyptian Infants with Congenital Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    El-Alameey, Inas R.; Ahmed, Hanaa H.; Tawfik, Sawsan M.; Hassaballa, Fawzia; Gawad, Ayman M. Abdel; Eltahlawy, Eman

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Gastrointestinal symptoms are a common feature in infants with congenital heart disease. AIM: This study was designed to evaluate age-dependent serum levels of antigliadin antibodies among malnourished Egyptian infants with congenital heart disease (CHD) and gastrointestinal symptoms. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: This case-control study conducted on 60 infants with established congenital heart disease. They were subdivided into cyanotic and acyanotic groups, and each group includes 30 patients compared with thirty apparently healthy infants of matched age, sex, and social class. Serum antigliadin antibodies levels were measured using ELISA. RESULTS: The mean age of introduction of cereals in the diet and appearance of gastrointestinal symptoms were six months. On comparison with controls, patients showed highly significant higher serum levels of antigliadin antibodies (P < 0.000). On analysing risk factors using odds ratio, the age at onset of GIT symptoms, diarrhoea, abdominal pain, and distension had been found to be significantly associated with high serum antigliadin antibodies among malnourished CHD infants with a prediction of 95%. CONCLUSION: Serum IgA, IgM, and IgG class antibodies to gliadin play a significant role in the pathogenesis of malnutrition in infants with CHD. Gluten containing foods should never be introduced before the end of the six months. PMID:28293318

  16. Dietary cholesterol, heart disease risk and cognitive dissonance.

    PubMed

    McNamara, Donald J

    2014-05-01

    In the 1960s, the thesis that dietary cholesterol contributes to blood cholesterol and heart disease risk was a rational conclusion based on the available science at that time. Fifty years later the research evidence no longer supports this hypothesis yet changing the dietary recommendation to limit dietary cholesterol has been a slow and at times contentious process. The preponderance of the clinical and epidemiological data accumulated since the original dietary cholesterol restrictions were formulated indicate that: (1) dietary cholesterol has a small effect on the plasma cholesterol levels with an increase in the cholesterol content of the LDL particle and an increase in HDL cholesterol, with little effect on the LDL:HDL ratio, a significant indicator of heart disease risk, and (2) the lack of a significant relationship between cholesterol intake and heart disease incidence reported from numerous epidemiological surveys. Over the last decade, many countries and health promotion groups have modified their dietary recommendations to reflect the current evidence and to address a now recognised negative consequence of ineffective dietary cholesterol restrictions (such as inadequate choline intake). In contrast, health promotion groups in some countries appear to suffer from cognitive dissonance and continue to promote an outdated and potentially hazardous dietary recommendation based on an invalidated hypothesis. This review evaluates the evidence for and against dietary cholesterol restrictions and the potential consequences of such restrictions.

  17. Postoperative nosocomial infections among children with congenital heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jian; Yuan, Yan; Li, Peiling; Wang, Tuanjie; Gao, Jun; Yao, Jinhua; Li, Shujun

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To study the pathogen distribution, antimicrobial susceptibility and risk factors of postoperative nosocomial infections among children with congenital heart disease. Methods: Three hundreds children with congenital heart disease admitted to our hospital to receive surgeries from February 2010 to February 2013 were selected. Results: A total of 120 children were tested as positive by sputum culture, with the infection rate of 40.0%. The top five most common pathogenic microorganisms included Staphylococcus epidermidis, Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Candida albicans. S. epidermidis, S. aureus and Enterococcus were highly resistant to penicillin, azithromycin and erythromycin, moderately susceptible to levofloxacin and cefazolin, and completely susceptible to vancomycin. Multivariate Logistic regression analysis showed that hospitalization stay length, combined use of antibiotics, systemic use of hormones, mechanical ventilation and catheter indwelling were the independent risk factors of postoperative nosocomial infections (P<0.05). Conclusion: Nosocomial infection, which was the most frequent postoperative complication of pediatric congenital heart disease, was predominantly induced by Gram-positive bacteria that were highly susceptible to cephalosporins and vancomycin. Particular attention should be paid to decrease relevant risk factors to improve the prognosis. PMID:24948978

  18. Assessing the relationship between dental disease and coronary heart disease in elderly U.S. veterans.

    PubMed

    Loesche, W J; Schork, A; Terpenning, M S; Chen, Y M; Dominguez, B L; Grossman, N

    1998-03-01

    Several recent studies have shown a link between dental disease and coronary heart disease. The authors studied 320 U.S. veterans in a convenience sample to assess the relationship between oral health and systemic diseases among older people. They present cross-sectional data confirming that a statistically significant association exists between a diagnosis of coronary heart disease and certain oral health parameters, such as the number of missing teeth, plaque benzoyl-DL-arginine-naphthylamide test scores, salivary levels of Streptococcus sanguis and complaints of xerostomia. The oral parameters in these subjects were independent of and more strongly associated with coronary heart disease than were recognized risk factors, such as serum cholesterol levels, body mass index, diabetes and smoking status. However, because of the convenience sample studied, these findings cannot be generalized to other populations.

  19. Disseminated Mycobacterium avium complex disease in a patient with left ventricular assist device (Heart Mate II).

    PubMed

    Cordioli, Maddalena; Del Bravo, Paola; Rigo, Fabio; Azzini, Anna Maria; Merighi, Mara; Forni, Alberto; Concia, Ercole

    2015-09-01

    Although disseminated Mycobacterium avium complex disease occurs mainly in immunocompromised hosts, especially HIV-infected patients in the last stage of the disease (AIDS), this condition is still rare in immunocompetent subjects. We report the case of a Caucasian man who received a left ventricular assist device two years before as a bridge to heart transplantation, that began to present signs and symptoms of mycobacterial infection. The diagnostic work-up we performed showed the presence of Mycobacterium intracellulare in lungs and both peripherical and bone marrow blood. Although evaluated, we found no abnormalities in the patient's immune system that can be related to mycobacterial infection. The beginning of a specific therapy made the patient slowly improve and further nuclear medicine assay (PET-TC) showed a good reduction in radio-labelled drug captation.

  20. Shaving, coronary heart disease, and stroke: the Caerphilly Study.

    PubMed

    Ebrahim, Shah; Smith, George Davey; May, Margaret; Yarnell, John

    2003-02-01

    The relation between frequency of shaving and all-cause and cardiovascular disease mortality, coronary heart disease, and stroke events was investigated in a cohort of 2,438 men aged 45-59 years. The one fifth (n = 521, 21.4%) of men who shaved less frequently than daily were shorter, were less likely to be married, had a lower frequency of orgasm, and were more likely to smoke, to have angina, and to work in manual occupations than other men. Over the 20-year follow-up period from 1979-1983 to December 31, 2000, 835 men (34.3%) died. Of those who shaved less frequently than daily, 45.1% died, as compared with 31.3% among those who shaved at least daily. Men who shaved less frequently had fully adjusted hazard ratios (adjusted for testosterone, markers of insulin resistance, social factors, lifestyle, and baseline coronary heart disease) of 1.24 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.03, 1.50) for all-cause mortality, 1.30 (95% CI: 0.99, 1.71) for cardiovascular disease mortality, 1.08 (95% CI: 0.61, 1.92) for lung cancer mortality, 1.16 (95% CI: 0.90, 1.48) for coronary heart disease events, and 1.68 (95% CI: 1.16, 2.44) for stroke events. The association between infrequent shaving and all-cause and cardiovascular disease mortality is probably due to confounding by smoking and social factors, but a small hormonal effect may exist. The relation with stroke events remains unexplained by smoking or social factors.

  1. An android-based heart monitoring system for the elderly and for patients with heart disease.

    PubMed

    Pierleoni, Paola; Pernini, Luca; Belli, Alberto; Palma, Lorenzo

    2014-01-01

    The current trend in health monitoring systems is to move from the hospital to portable personal devices. This work shows how consumer devices like heart rate monitors can be used not only for applications in sports, but also for medical research and diagnostic purposes. The goal pursued by our group was to develop a simple, accurate, and inexpensive system that would use a few pieces of data acquired by the heart rate monitor and process them on a smartphone to (i) provide detailed test reports about the user's health state; (ii) store report records; (iii) generate emergency calls or SMSs; and (iv) connect to a remote telemedicine portal to relay the data to an online database. The system developed by our team uses sophisticated algorithms to detect stress states, detect and classify arrhythmia events, and calculate energy consumption. It is suitable for use by elderly subjects and by patients with heart disease (e.g., those recovering from myocardial infarction) or neurological conditions such as Parkinson's disease. Easy, immediate, and economical remote health control can therefore be achieved without the need for expensive hospital equipment, using only portable consumer devices.

  2. Valvular heart disease with the use of fenfluramine-phentermine.

    PubMed

    Surapaneni, Phani; Vinales, Karyne L; Najib, Mohammad Q; Chaliki, Hari P

    2011-01-01

    Exposure to the anorectic drug fenfluramine, alone or in combination with phentermine, a noradrenergic central nervous system stimulant, has been associated with unusual cardiac valvular morphology and resultant regurgitation of the left- and right-sided heart valves. The prevalence of significant valvular disease associated with the use of these anorectic drugs is reported to be as high as 23%. Herein, we report the occurrence of multivalvular disease and pulmonary hypertension associated with fenfluramine-phentermine use, discovered in an obese 59-year-old woman before expected gastric bypass surgery.

  3. [Mechano-bioscience in heart disease and regenerative medicine.

    PubMed

    Kurotsu, Shota; Ieda, Masaki

    During cardiac development and maturation, the heart continuously receives hemodynamic stimuli, referred to mechanical stress. Mechanical stress governs both cardiac development and differentiation, and also plays an important role in the maintenance of cardiac homeostasis. Indeed, cardiac hypertrophic changes emerge as a result of adaptation to mechanical overload. However, it is difficult to measure the mechanical stress precisely. Therefore, the molecular mechanisms of hemodynamics-related diseases are minimally understood. The progress in mechanobioscience field has a potential to uncover the mechanisms of cardiac diseases, and is expected to result in drug discovery in the future.

  4. Manifestation of severe coronary heart disease after anabolic drug abuse.

    PubMed

    Mewis, C; Spyridopoulos, I; Kühlkamp, V; Seipel, L

    1996-02-01

    Anabolic steroids are frequently abused, thus increasing the risk of cardiovascular disease, despite the known unfavorable influence on lipid profiles. We report on a young bodybuilder who presented with ventricular tachycardia as the first manifestation of severe underlying coronary heart disease. Coronary angiogram revealed severe stenotic lesions in the right coronary artery and the left descending coronary artery, and hypokinetic regions corresponded to posterolateral and anterior myocardial infarctions. This young patient had a history without any coronary risk factors, but with a 2-year abuse of the anabolic steroid stanazolol. No report published so far has shown possible atherogenic consequences of long-term abuse of stanazolol.

  5. Ablation of Ventricular Tachycardia in Congenital and Infiltrative Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Wijnmaalen, Adrianus P; Zeppenfeld, Katja

    2017-03-01

    Radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFCA) is an important treatment modality to prevent ventricular tachycardia (VT) recurrence in patients with repaired congenital heart disease. Identification and ablation of anatomic isthmuses has improved acute ablation outcome with excellent VT-free survival in those with preserved biventricular function. Reports on RFCA for VT in patients with infiltrative disease are sparse and cardiac sarcoidosis seems to be the most prevalent cause for ventricular arrhythmia. Patients with active and ongoing inflammation are at high risk for VT recurrence. RFCA reduces the number of VT but often multiple procedures are required and long-term VT-free survival is unfavorable in those with left ventricular dysfunction.

  6. Heart Diseases--Prevention: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    MedlinePlus

    ... Association) Physical Activity and Your Heart (National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute) Also in Spanish Prevention (Department of Health ... Your Guide to a Healthy Heart (National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute) - PDF Your Guide to Physical Activity and ...

  7. CT imaging in congenital heart disease: an approach to imaging and interpreting complex lesions after surgical intervention for tetralogy of Fallot, transposition of the great arteries, and single ventricle heart disease.

    PubMed

    Han, B Kelly; Lesser, John R

    2013-01-01

    Echocardiography and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging are the most commonly performed diagnostic studies in patients with congenital heart disease. A small percentage of patients with congenital heart disease will be referred to cardiac CT subsequent to echocardiography when magnetic resonance imaging is insufficient, contraindicated, or considered high risk. The most common complex lesions referred for CT at our institution are tetralogy of Fallot, transposition complexes, and single ventricle heart disease. This review discusses the most common surgical procedures performed in these patients and the technical considerations for optimal image acquisition on the basis of the prior procedure and the individual patient history. Cardiac CT can provide the functional and anatomic information required for decision making in complex congenital heart disease. Image interpretation is aided by knowledge of the common approaches to operative repair and the residual hemodynamic abnormalities. Acquisition and interpretation that is both individualized to the patient's underlying disease and the specific clinical question is likely to maintain diagnostic accuracy while decreasing the potential risk of cardiac CT.

  8. Rheumatic heart disease screening: Current concepts and challenges.

    PubMed

    Dougherty, Scott; Khorsandi, Maziar; Herbst, Philip

    2017-01-01

    Rheumatic heart disease (RHD) is a disease of poverty, is almost entirely preventable, and is the most common cardiovascular disease worldwide in those under 25 years. RHD is caused by acute rheumatic fever (ARF) which typically results in cumulative valvular lesions that may present clinically after a number of years of subclinical disease. Therapeutic interventions, therefore, typically focus on preventing subsequent ARF episodes (with penicillin prophylaxis). However, not all patients with ARF develop symptoms and not all symptomatic cases present to a physician or are correctly diagnosed. Therefore, if we hope to control ARF and RHD at the population level, we need a more reliable discriminator of subclinical disease. Recent studies have examined the utility of echocardiographic screening, which is far superior to auscultation at detecting RHD. However, there are many concerns surrounding this approach. Despite the introduction of the World Heart Federation diagnostic criteria in 2012, we still do not really know what constitutes the most subtle changes of RHD by echocardiography. This poses serious problems regarding whom to treat and what to do with the rest, both important decisions with widespread implications for already stretched health-care systems. In addition, issues ranging from improving the uptake of penicillin prophylaxis in ARF/RHD-positive patients, improving portable echocardiographic equipment, understanding the natural history of subclinical RHD and how it might respond to penicillin, and developing simplified diagnostic criteria that can be applied by nonexperts, all need to be effectively tackled before routine widespread screening for RHD can be endorsed.

  9. Valvular heart disease in the community: a European experience.

    PubMed

    Iung, Bernard; Baron, Gabriel; Tornos, Pilar; Gohlke-Bärwolf, Christa; Butchart, Eric G; Vahanian, Alec

    2007-11-01

    The Euro Heart Survey on valvular heart disease included 5001 patients from 92 centers in 25 European countries in 2001: 71.9% had native valve disease and 28.1% had previously undergone valve surgery. Aortic stenosis (AS) and mitral regurgitation (MR) accounted for 43.1 and 33.6%, respectively, of single-valve diseases and were mostly caused by degenerative diseases. Mean age was 69 and 65 years, respectively, and at least one comorbidity was present in 36.3% of patients with AS and 41.7% with MR. Analysis of the therapeutic decision in patients with severe valve diseases showed that symptomatic patients were frequently denied surgery (32.3% in AS after the age of 75 and 51.3% in MR), more on the basis of age and left ventricular function than comorbidities. There was a better concordance between practice and guidelines concerning interventions in asymptomatic patients. These findings underline the need for better implementation of guidelines.

  10. Rheumatic heart disease screening: Current concepts and challenges

    PubMed Central

    Dougherty, Scott; Khorsandi, Maziar; Herbst, Philip

    2017-01-01

    Rheumatic heart disease (RHD) is a disease of poverty, is almost entirely preventable, and is the most common cardiovascular disease worldwide in those under 25 years. RHD is caused by acute rheumatic fever (ARF) which typically results in cumulative valvular lesions that may present clinically after a number of years of subclinical disease. Therapeutic interventions, therefore, typically focus on preventing subsequent ARF episodes (with penicillin prophylaxis). However, not all patients with ARF develop symptoms and not all symptomatic cases present to a physician or are correctly diagnosed. Therefore, if we hope to control ARF and RHD at the population level, we need a more reliable discriminator of subclinical disease. Recent studies have examined the utility of echocardiographic screening, which is far superior to auscultation at detecting RHD. However, there are many concerns surrounding this approach. Despite the introduction of the World Heart Federation diagnostic criteria in 2012, we still do not really know what constitutes the most subtle changes of RHD by echocardiography. This poses serious problems regarding whom to treat and what to do with the rest, both important decisions with widespread implications for already stretched health-care systems. In addition, issues ranging from improving the uptake of penicillin prophylaxis in ARF/RHD-positive patients, improving portable echocardiographic equipment, understanding the natural history of subclinical RHD and how it might respond to penicillin, and developing simplified diagnostic criteria that can be applied by nonexperts, all need to be effectively tackled before routine widespread screening for RHD can be endorsed. PMID:28163427

  11. Frequency of craniofacial pain in patients with ischemic heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Bakhshi, Mahin; Rezaei, Rezvan; Baharvand, Maryam

    2017-01-01

    Background Referred craniofacial pain of cardiac origin might be the only symptom of ischemic heart accidents. This study aimed to determine the frequency of craniofacial pain in patients with ischemic heart disease. Material and Methods This cross-sectional study was accomplished on 296 patients who met the criteria of having ischemic heart disease. Data regarding demographics, medical history and referred craniofacial pain were recorded in data forms. In addition, patients underwent oral examination to preclude any source of dental origin. Chi-square test, Student’s t-test and backward regression model were used to analyze the data by means of SPSS software version 21. P<0.05 was considered significant. Results A total of 296 patients were studied comprising of 211 men (71%) and 85 women (29%) with the mean age of 55.8. Craniofacial pain was experienced by 53 patients out of 296, 35 (66%) of whom were male and 18 (34%) were female. None of the patients experienced craniofacial pain solely. The most common sites of craniofacial pain were occipital and posterior neck (52.8%), head (43.3%), throat and anterior neck (41.5%) respectively. We found no relationship between craniofacial pain of cardiac origin with age, diabetes, hypertension, and family history. On the other hand, there was a significant relationship between hyperlipidemia and smoking with craniofacial pain of cardiac origin. Conclusions Radiating pain to face and head can be expected quite commonly during a cardiac ischemic event. Dental practitioners should be thoroughly aware of this symptomatology to prevent misdirected dental treatment and delay of medical care. Key words:Craniofacial pain, ischemic heart disease, myocardial infarction, angina pectoris, referred pain. PMID:28149470

  12. [The EMEA CHMP guidelines in coronary heart disease and chronic heart failure].

    PubMed

    Chauvenet, Marina

    2004-01-01

    The official regulatory recommendations for drug development and the granting of marketing authorisations are intended for use by pharmaceutical companies and the regulatory agencies. These recommendations are particularly useful in Europe, and allow harmonisation of the regulatory requirements between the different member states, thus facilitating further evaluation of the submission file and the registration process. The European guidelines are issued by the Committee for Human Medicinal Products (CHMP) of the European Agency for the Evaluation of Pharmaceutical Products (EMEA). The key points of the current guidelines regarding applications for phase III trials in coronary heart disease (stable angina, acute coronary syndromes) and chronic heart failure are presented. They are as follows: the definition of selected populations, the choice of criteria for evaluating efficacy and safety, the choice of comparators, and study duration etc.

  13. "The Heart Truth:" Using the Power of Branding and Social Marketing to Increase Awareness of Heart Disease in Women.

    PubMed

    Long, Terry; Taubenheim, Ann; Wayman, Jennifer; Temple, Sarah; Ruoff, Beth

    2008-03-01

    In September 2002, the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute launched The Heart Truth, the first federally-sponsored national campaign aimed at increasing awareness among women about their risk of heart disease. A traditional social marketing approach, including an extensive formative research phase, was used to plan, implement, and evaluate the campaign. With the creation of the Red Dress as the national symbol for women and heart disease awareness, the campaign integrated a branding strategy into its social marketing framework. The aim was to develop and promote a women's heart disease brand that would create a strong emotional connection with women. The Red Dress brand has had a powerful appeal to a wide diversity of women and has given momentum to the campaign's three-part implementation strategy of partnership development, media relations, and community action. In addition to generating its own substantial programming, The Heart Truth became a catalyst for a host of other national and local educational initiatives, both large and small. By the campaign's fifth anniversary, surveys showed that women were increasingly aware of heart disease as their leading cause of death and that the rise in awareness was associated with increased action to reduce heart disease risk.

  14. Control of inflammatory heart disease by CD4+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Barin, Jobert G; Čiháková, Daniela

    2013-05-01

    This review focuses on autoimmune myocarditis and its sequela, inflammatory dilated cardiomyopathy (DCMI), and the inflammatory and immune mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of these diseases. Several mouse models of myocarditis and DCMI have improved our knowledge of the pathogenesis of these diseases, informing more general problems of cardiac remodeling and heart failure. CD4(+) T cells are critical in driving the pathogenesis of myocarditis. We discuss in detail the role of T helper cell subtypes in the pathogenesis of myocarditis, the biology of T cell-derived effector cytokines, and the participation of other leukocytic effectors in mediating disease pathophysiology. We discuss interactions between these subsets in both suppressive and collaborative fashions. These findings indicate that cardiac inflammatory disease, and autoimmunity in general, may be more diverse in divergent effector mechanisms than has previously been appreciated.

  15. Rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease in Bangladesh: A review.

    PubMed

    Islam, A K M Monwarul; Majumder, A A S

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatic fever (RF) and rheumatic heart disease (RHD) are the most-common cardiovascular disease in young people aged <25 years, globally. They are important contributors to cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in Bangladesh. Classical risk factors, i.e. poverty, overcrowding, ignorance, and insufficient health care services were responsible for the high incidence and prevalence of these diseases over the last century. In concert with the progresses in socioeconomic indicators, advances in health sectors, improved public awareness, and antibiotic prophylaxis, acute RF came into control. However, chronic RHD continues to be prevalent, and the actual disease burden may be much higher. RHD predominantly affects the young adults, seriously incapacitates them, follows a protracted course, gets complicated because of delayed diagnosis and is sometimes maltreated. The treatment is often palliative and expensive. Large-scale epidemiological and clinical researches are needed to formulate evidence-based national policy to tackle this important public health issue in future.

  16. Of mice and men: molecular genetics of congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Troels Askhøj; Troelsen, Karin de Linde Lind; Larsen, Lars Allan

    2014-04-01

    Congenital heart disease (CHD) affects nearly 1 % of the population. It is a complex disease, which may be caused by multiple genetic and environmental factors. Studies in human genetics have led to the identification of more than 50 human genes, involved in isolated CHD or genetic syndromes, where CHD is part of the phenotype. Furthermore, mapping of genomic copy number variants and exome sequencing of CHD patients have led to the identification of a large number of candidate disease genes. Experiments in animal models, particularly in mice, have been used to verify human disease genes and to gain further insight into the molecular pathology behind CHD. The picture emerging from these studies suggest that genetic lesions associated with CHD affect a broad range of cellular signaling components, from ligands and receptors, across down-stream effector molecules to transcription factors and co-factors, including chromatin modifiers.

  17. Rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease in Bangladesh: A review

    PubMed Central

    Islam, A.K.M. Monwarul; Majumder, A.A.S.

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatic fever (RF) and rheumatic heart disease (RHD) are the most-common cardiovascular disease in young people aged <25 years, globally. They are important contributors to cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in Bangladesh. Classical risk factors, i.e. poverty, overcrowding, ignorance, and insufficient health care services were responsible for the high incidence and prevalence of these diseases over the last century. In concert with the progresses in socioeconomic indicators, advances in health sectors, improved public awareness, and antibiotic prophylaxis, acute RF came into control. However, chronic RHD continues to be prevalent, and the actual disease burden may be much higher. RHD predominantly affects the young adults, seriously incapacitates them, follows a protracted course, gets complicated because of delayed diagnosis and is sometimes maltreated. The treatment is often palliative and expensive. Large-scale epidemiological and clinical researches are needed to formulate evidence-based national policy to tackle this important public health issue in future. PMID:26896274

  18. Development of a questionnaire to measure heart disease risk knowledge in people with diabetes: the Heart Disease Fact Questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Julie; Lacey, Kimberly; Chyun, Deborah; Abbott, Gina

    2005-07-01

    This paper describes a paper and pencil questionnaire that measures heart disease risk knowledge in people with diabetes. The Heart Disease Fact Questionnaire (HDFQ) is a 25-item questionnaire that was developed to tap into respondents' knowledge of major risk factors for the development of CHD. Approximately half of these items specifically address diabetes-related CHD risk factors. Based on extensive pilot data, the current study analyzed responses from 524 people with diabetes to assess the psychometric properties. The HDFQ is readable to an average 13-year old and imposes little burden. It shows good content and face validity. It demonstrates adequate internal consistency, with Kuder-Richardson-20 formula = 0.77 and good item-total correlations. Item analysis showed a desirable range in P-values. In discriminant function analyses, HDFQ scores differentiated respondents by knowledge of their own cardiovascular health, use of lipid lowering medications, health insurance status, and educational attainment, thus indicating good criterion related validity. This measure of heart disease risk knowledge is brief, understandable to respondents, and easy to administer and score. Its potential for use in research and practice is discussed. Future research should establish norms as well as investigate its test-retest reliability and predictive validity.

  19. [Hyperhomocysteinemia and cardiovascular risk profile in ischemic heart disease and acid peptic disease comorbidity patients].

    PubMed

    Zharkova, A V; Orlovs'kyĭ, V F

    2014-01-01

    Present article is devoted to the study of the clinic features of ischemic heart desease associated with acid peptic disease. It was shown the more evident increase of myocardial infarction risk in associated pathology patients. Such results have to be caused by the special risk factor. As such factor we desided to study the hyperhomosysteinemia. During research there were discovered that the lowest vitamin B12 serum level and the highest homocysteine serum level have been registrated in associated pathology (ischemic heart disease and acid peptic disease according to long-term proton pump inhibitor use) patients. It was shown evident correlation between that changes and dyslipidemia.

  20. The pathophysiology of pulmonary hypertension in left heart disease.

    PubMed

    Breitling, Siegfried; Ravindran, Krishnan; Goldenberg, Neil M; Kuebler, Wolfgang M

    2015-11-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is characterized by elevated pulmonary arterial pressure leading to right-sided heart failure and can arise from a wide range of etiologies. The most common cause of PH, termed Group 2 PH, is left-sided heart failure and is commonly known as pulmonary hypertension with left heart disease (PH-LHD). Importantly, while sharing many clinical features with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), PH-LHD differs significantly at the cellular and physiological levels. These fundamental pathophysiological differences largely account for the poor response to PAH therapies experienced by PH-LHD patients. The relatively high prevalence of this disease, coupled with its unique features compared with PAH, signal the importance of an in-depth understanding of the mechanistic details of PH-LHD. The present review will focus on the current state of knowledge regarding the pathomechanisms of PH-LHD, highlighting work carried out both in human trials and in preclinical animal models. Adaptive processes at the alveolocapillary barrier and in the pulmonary circulation, including alterations in alveolar fluid transport, endothelial junctional integrity, and vasoactive mediator secretion will be discussed in detail, highlighting the aspects that impact the response to, and development of, novel therapeutics.

  1. [Pulmonary hypertension associated with congenital heart disease and Eisenmenger syndrome].

    PubMed

    Calderón-Colmenero, Juan; Sandoval Zárate, Julio; Beltrán Gámez, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension is a common complication of congenital heart disease (CHD). Congenital cardiopathies are the most frequent congenital malformations. The prevalence in our country remains unknown, based on birthrate, it is calculated that 12,000 to 16,000 infants in our country have some cardiac malformation. In patients with an uncorrected left-to-right shunt, increased pulmonary pressure leads to vascular remodeling and endothelial dysfunction secondary to an imbalance in vasoactive mediators which promotes vasoconstriction, inflammation, thrombosis, cell proliferation, impaired apotosis and fibrosis. The progressive rise in pulmonary vascular resistance and increased pressures in the right heart provocated reversal of the shunt may arise with the development of Eisenmenger' syndrome the most advanced form de Pulmonary arterial hypertension associated with congenital heart disease. The prevalence of Pulmonary arterial hypertension associated with CHD has fallen in developed countries in recent years that is not yet achieved in developing countries therefore diagnosed late as lack of hospital infrastructure and human resources for the care of patients with CHD. With the development of targeted medical treatments for pulmonary arterial hypertension, the concept of a combined medical and interventional/surgical approach for patients with Pulmonary arterial hypertension associated with CHD is a reality. We need to know the pathophysiological factors involved as well as a careful evaluation to determine the best therapeutic strategy.

  2. The Mitochondrial Translocator Protein and Arrhythmogenesis in Ischemic Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Akar, Fadi G.

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is a hallmark of multiple cardiovascular disorders, including ischemic heart disease. Although mitochondria are well recognized for their role in energy production and cell death, mechanisms by which they control excitation-contraction coupling, excitability, and arrhythmias are less clear. The translocator protein (TSPO) is an outer mitochondrial membrane protein that is expressed in multiple organ systems. The abundant expression of TSPO in macrophages has been leveraged to image the immune response of the heart to inflammatory processes. More recently, the recognition of TSPO as a regulator of energy-dissipating mitochondrial pathways has extended its utility from a diagnostic marker of inflammation to a therapeutic target influencing diverse pathophysiological processes. Here, we provide an overview of the emerging role of TSPO in ischemic heart disease. We highlight the importance of TSPO in the regenerative process of reactive oxygen species (ROS) induced ROS release through its effects on the inner membrane anion channel (IMAC) and the permeability transition pore (PTP). We discuss evidence implicating TSPO in arrhythmogenesis in the settings of acute ischemia-reperfusion injury and myocardial infarction. PMID:25918579

  3. Burn-induced subepicardial injury in frog heart: a simple model mimicking ST segment changes in ischemic heart disease.

    PubMed

    Kazama, Itsuro

    2016-02-01

    To mimic ischemic heart disease in humans, several animal models have been created, mainly in rodents by surgically ligating their coronary arteries. In the present study, by simply inducing burn injuries on the bullfrog heart, we reproduced abnormal ST segment changes in the electrocardiogram (ECG), mimicking those observed in ischemic heart disease, such as acute myocardial infarction and angina pectoris. The "currents of injury" created by a voltage gradient between the intact and damaged areas of the myocardium, negatively deflected the ECG vector during the diastolic phase, making the ST segment appear elevated during the systolic phase. This frog model of heart injury would be suitable to explain the mechanisms of ST segment changes observed in ischemic heart disease.

  4. Chocolate Consumption is Inversely Associated with Prevalent Coronary Heart Disease: The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Family Heart Study

    PubMed Central

    Djoussé, Luc; Hopkins, Paul N.; North, Kari E.; Pankow, James S.; Arnett, Donna K.; Ellison, R. Curtis

    2010-01-01

    Background and Aims Epidemiologic studies have suggested beneficial effects of flavonoids on cardiovascular disease. Cocoa and particularly dark chocolate are rich in flavonoids and recent studies have demonstrated blood pressure lowering effects of dark chocolate. However, limited data are available on the association of chocolate consumption and the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). We sought to examine the association between chocolate consumption and prevalent CHD. Methods We studied in a cross-sectional design 4,970 participants aged 25 to 93 years who participated in the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) Family Heart Study. Chocolate intake was assessed through a semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire. We used generalized estimating equations to estimate adjusted odds ratios. Results Compared to subjects who did not report any chocolate intake, odds ratios (95% CI) for CHD were 1.01 (0.76-1.37), 0.74 (0.56-0.98), and 0.43 (0.28-0.67) for subjects consuming 1-3 times/month, 1-4 times/week, and 5+ times/week, respectively (p for trend <0.0001) adjusting for age, sex, family CHD risk group, energy intake, education, non-chocolate candy intake, linolenic acid intake, smoking, alcohol intake, exercise, and fruit and vegetables. Consumption of non-chocolate candy was associated with a 49% higher prevalence of CHD comparing 5+/week vs. 0/week [OR=1.49 (0.96-2.32)]. Conclusions These data suggest that consumption of chocolate is inversely related with prevalent CHD in a general population. PMID:20858571

  5. Under pressure: pulmonary hypertension associated with left heart disease.

    PubMed

    Farber, Harrison W; Gibbs, Simon

    2015-12-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) associated with left heart disease (PH-LHD) is the most common type of PH, but its natural history is not well understood. PH-LHD is diagnosed by right heart catheterisation with a mean pulmonary arterial pressure ≥25 mmHg and a pulmonary capillary wedge pressure >15 mmHg. The primary causes of PH-LHD are left ventricular dysfunction of systolic and diastolic origin, and valvular disease. Prognosis is poor and survival rates are low. Limited progress has been made towards specific therapies for PH-LHD, and management focuses on addressing the underlying cause of the disease with supportive therapies, surgery and pharmacological treatments. Clinical trials of therapies for pulmonary arterial hypertension in patients with PH-LHD have thus far been limited and have provided disappointing or conflicting results. Robust, long-term clinical studies in appropriate target populations have the potential to improve the outlook for patients with PH-LHD. Herein, we discuss the knowledge gaps in our understanding of PH-LHD, and describe the current unmet needs and challenges that are faced by clinicians when identifying and managing patients with this disease.

  6. Role of modern 3D echocardiography in valvular heart disease

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) echocardiography has been conceived as one of the most promising methods for the diagnosis of valvular heart disease, and recently has become an integral clinical tool thanks to the development of high quality real-time transesophageal echocardiography (TEE). In particular, for mitral valve diseases, this new approach has proven to be the most unique, powerful, and convincing method for understanding the complicated anatomy of the mitral valve and its dynamism. The method has been useful for surgical management, including robotic mitral valve repair. Moreover, this method has become indispensable for nonsurgical mitral procedures such as edge to edge mitral repair and transcatheter closure of paravaluvular leaks. In addition, color Doppler 3D echo has been valuable to identify the location of the regurgitant orifice and the severity of the mitral regurgitation. For aortic and tricuspid valve diseases, this method may not be quite as valuable as for the mitral valve. However, the necessity of 3D echo is recognized for certain situations even for these valves, such as for evaluating the aortic annulus for transcatheter aortic valve implantation. It is now clear that this method, especially with the continued development of real-time 3D TEE technology, will enhance the diagnosis and management of patients with these valvular heart diseases. PMID:25378966

  7. Preconception Counseling for Women with Congenital Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Chun-Wei; Wu, Mei-Hwan; Wang, Jou-Kou; Lin, Min-Tai; Chen, Chun-An; Chiu, Shenn-Nan; Chiu, Hsin-Hui

    2015-01-01

    With advances that have been made over the recent decades in transcatheter and surgical interventions, most patients with congenital heart disease (CHD) can survive into adulthood. Overall, probably half of these surviving patients are female. When these female CHD patients reach childbearing age, however, pregnancy management will be a major issue. In order to meet the demands of fetal growth, the maternal cardiovascular system starts a series of adaptations beginning in early pregnancy. These adaptations include: decreased systemic and pulmonary vascular resistances, decreased blood pressure, expansion of the blood volume, increased heart rate and increased cardiac output. For women with CHD, this hemodynamic alteration may increase the risks of adverse cardiovascular events as well as the fetal and neonatal complications. Therefore, proper risk stratification and effective counseling for women with CHD who are planning their pregnancies is an important undertaking. PMID:27122914

  8. Congenital heart disease in India: a status report.

    PubMed

    Saxena, Anita

    2005-07-01

    Pediatric cardiac care in India is still in its infancy. We have no data on congenital heart disease (CHD) prevalence at birth or on proportional mortality from CHD. The resources are not only limited but also are at times improperly utilized. There are very few specialized pediatric cardiology training programs, those that are, are concentrated in certain regions of India and are often imparted through combined adult and pediatric programs. The existing number of trained personnel for pediatric cardiology and pediatric cardiac surgery is inadequate. Above all there is no national policy for pediatric heart care. Increasing awareness of the problem amongst the pediatricians through CMEs, seminars, symposia is likely to be most helpful in early diagnosis and timely referral of cases. Training programs exclusively dedicated to pediatric cardiology and pediatric cardiac surgery need to be established in centres with good standards of pediatric cardiac care.

  9. Pathways in heart failure disease management across socioeconomic spectra.

    PubMed

    Hebert, Kathy; Gogichaishvili, Ilia; Gopie, Stephanie; Arcement, Lee

    2011-12-01

    Caring for heart failure patients with a low socioeconomic status presents a unique set of challenges for health care providers. Heart failure disease management programs can integrate the use of teaching DVDs to overcome deficiencies in health literacy and take advantage of the Wal-Mart/Target $4 dollar medication program to provide life-saving medical therapy. In addition, open discussions with the patient and family regarding the costs of medications and the reality of what they can afford to pay monthly on a long term basis can guide the physician to prescribing medications by prioritizing use with a focus on evidence-based data for the medications with the highest mortality reduction. Finally, connecting inpatient visits to outpatient visits through the use of electronic medical records systems can facilitate avoidance of unnecessary repeat lab and diagnostic testing.

  10. Prognosis of patients with carcinoid heart disease after valvular surgery.

    PubMed

    Manoly, Imthiaz; McAnelly, Sarah-Louise; Sriskandarajah, Sanjeevan; McLaughlin, Kenneth Edward

    2014-08-01

    A best evidence topic in cardiac surgery was written according to a structured protocol. We addressed the following question: in patients who are diagnosed with carcinoid heart disease (CHD), do valvular surgeries improve their prognosis? Fifty percent of the patients with clinically diagnosed carcinoid syndrome had cardiac involvement which was present either as valvular dysfunction or as cardiac metastases. These patients often require surgery due to their heightened risk of cardiac disease. Altogether 217 relevant papers were identified as a result of the below-mentioned search, of which 10 papers represented the best evidence to answer the question. The author, journal, date and country of publication, patient group studied, study type, relevant outcomes, results and study weaknesses were tabulated. Of the patients who were identified to have carcinoid heart disease in different studies, 193 patients had valve procedure, mainly replacements at tricuspid, mitral and aortic valve positions and either valvuloplasty or replacement at pulmonary valve. Tricuspid and pulmonary valves represented the majority of the excised valves among patients undergoing valvular surgery for CHD. The pathology of carcinoid valve was attributed to the presence of plaque, causing thickening and retraction. Pure regurgitation was the most common finding in all the valves except pulmonary valve which had both stenosis and insufficiency. Thirty-day mortality was 17% (range 1-63%) and long-term survivors were reported to be alive at an average of 58 months (28-80 months) after the valve surgery. The evidence demonstrates that surgical intervention can lead to improved prognosis and reduce the symptoms of heart failure. Postoperative mortality was mainly due to the carcinoid disease itself and not as a complication of the surgery. Therefore, surgery could be considered for symptomatic palliation in carefully selected individuals.

  11. Three-view bedside ultrasound to differentiate acute decompensated heart failure from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Mantuani, Daniel; Nagdev, Arun

    2013-04-01

    Identifying the cause of acute dyspnea in the emergency department is often challenging, even for the most experienced provider. Distinguishing chronic obstructive pulmonary disease from acute decompensated heart failure in the acutely dyspneic patient who presents in respiratory distress is often difficult. Patients are often unable to give a detailed history when in extremis, yet primary management needs to be initiated before further testing can be completed. Bedside diagnostic ultrasound has emerged as a tool for emergency physicians to rapidly evaluate the cardiopulmonary status in patients presenting with undifferentiated shortness of breath [1-3]. A rapid 3-view sonographic evaluation of the heart, lungs, and inferior vena cava or “Triple Scan” may be a useful tool in identifying the cause of acute dyspnea and may aid the clinician in the initial management of the critically ill dyspneic patient. We present a case where a 3-view ultrasound examination, the “Triple Scan,” allowed for detection of new onset congestive heart failure and initiation of appropriate medical therapy without waiting for further standard diagnostic testing.

  12. Evaluation of the Heart to Heart Project: Lessons from a Community-Based Chronic Disease Prevention Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodman, Robert M.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Heart to Heart, a 5-year, community-based chronic disease prevention project, included walkathons, lectures, media messages, restaurant food labeling, and cooking seminars. Surveys and assessments of participants and nonparticipants indicated that the project had a slightly favorable effect on cholesterol and smoking but did not affect other…

  13. Chest pain for coronary heart disease in general practice: clinical judgement and a clinical decision rule

    PubMed Central

    Haasenritter, Jörg; Donner-Banzhoff, Norbert; Bösner, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Background The Marburg Heart Score (MHS) is a simple, valid, and robust clinical decision rule assisting GPs in ruling out coronary heart disease (CHD) in patients presenting with chest pain. Aim To investigate whether using the rule adds to the GP’s clinical judgement. Design and setting A comparative diagnostic accuracy study was conducted using data from 832 consecutive patients with chest pain in general practice. Method Three diagnostic strategies were defined using the MHS: diagnosis based solely on the MHS; using the MHS as a triage test; and GP’s clinical judgement aided by the MHS. Their accuracy was compared with the GPs’ unaided clinical judgement. Results Sensitivity and specificity of the GPs’ unaided clinical judgement was 82.9% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 72.4 to 89.9) and 61.0% (95% CI = 56.7 to 65.2), respectively. In comparison, the sensitivity of the MHS was higher (difference 8.5%, 95% CI = −2.4 to 19.6) and the specificity was similar (difference −0.4%, 95% CI = −5.3 to 4.5); the sensitivity of the triage was similar (difference −1.5%, 95% CI = −9.8 to 7.0) and the specificity was higher (difference 11.6%, 95% CI = 7.8 to 15.4); and both the sensitivity and specificity of the aided clinical judgement were higher (difference 8.0%, 95% CI = −6.9 to 23.0 and 5.8%, 95% CI = −1.6 to 13.2, respectively). Conclusion Using the Marburg Heart Score for initial triage can improve the clinical diagnosis of CHD in general practice. PMID:26500322

  14. Women and Heart Disease | Healthy Blood Pressure | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... please turn Javascript on. Special Section: Healthy Blood Pressure Women and Heart Disease Past Issues / Winter 2010 ... Truth Campaign" Urges Women To Take Good Blood Pressure Seriously February is American Heart Month, and the ...

  15. Q and A: Birth Control for Women with Congenital Heart Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research Home / Your Heart / Health Information / Birth Control Birth Control for Women with Congenital Heart Disease Of the ... woman and/or the baby. For these women, birth control is more than just a method to conveniently ...

  16. Dissecting the causal genetic mechanisms of coronary heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Clint L.; Assimes, Themistocles L.; Montgomery, Stephen B.; Quertermous, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Large-scale genome wide association studies (GWAS) have identified 46 loci that are associated with coronary heart disease (CHD). Additionally, 104 independent candidate variants (false discovery rate of 5%) have been identified.1–3 A majority of the causal genes in these loci function independently of conventional risk factors, and it is postulated that a number of the CHD associated genes regulate basic processes in the vascular cells involved in atherosclerosis, and that study of the signaling pathways that are modulated in this cell type by causal regulatory variation will provide critical new insights for targeting the initiation and progression of disease. In this review we will discuss the types of experimental approaches and data that are critical for understanding of molecular processes that underlie the disease risk at 9p21.3, TCF21, SORT1, and other CHD associated loci. PMID:24623178

  17. Genetic link between renal birth defects and congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    San Agustin, Jovenal T; Klena, Nikolai; Granath, Kristi; Panigrahy, Ashok; Stewart, Eileen; Devine, William; Strittmatter, Lara; Jonassen, Julie A; Liu, Xiaoqin; Lo, Cecilia W; Pazour, Gregory J

    2016-03-22

    Structural birth defects in the kidney and urinary tract are observed in 0.5% of live births and are a major cause of end-stage renal disease, but their genetic aetiology is not well understood. Here we analyse 135 lines of mice identified in large-scale mouse mutagenesis screen and show that 29% of mutations causing congenital heart disease (CHD) also cause renal anomalies. The renal anomalies included duplex and multiplex kidneys, renal agenesis, hydronephrosis and cystic kidney disease. To assess the clinical relevance of these findings, we examined patients with CHD and observed a 30% co-occurrence of renal anomalies of a similar spectrum. Together, these findings demonstrate a common shared genetic aetiology for CHD and renal anomalies, indicating that CHD patients are at increased risk for complications from renal anomalies. This collection of mutant mouse models provides a resource for further studies to elucidate the developmental link between renal anomalies and CHD.

  18. Genetic link between renal birth defects and congenital heart disease

    PubMed Central

    San Agustin, Jovenal T.; Klena, Nikolai; Granath, Kristi; Panigrahy, Ashok; Stewart, Eileen; Devine, William; Strittmatter, Lara; Jonassen, Julie A.; Liu, Xiaoqin; Lo, Cecilia W.; Pazour, Gregory J.

    2016-01-01

    Structural birth defects in the kidney and urinary tract are observed in 0.5% of live births and are a major cause of end-stage renal disease, but their genetic aetiology is not well understood. Here we analyse 135 lines of mice identified in large-scale mouse mutagenesis screen and show that 29% of mutations causing congenital heart disease (CHD) also cause renal anomalies. The renal anomalies included duplex and multiplex kidneys, renal agenesis, hydronephrosis and cystic kidney disease. To assess the clinical relevance of these findings, we examined patients with CHD and observed a 30% co-occurrence of renal anomalies of a similar spectrum. Together, these findings demonstrate a common shared genetic aetiology for CHD and renal anomalies, indicating that CHD patients are at increased risk for complications from renal anomalies. This collection of mutant mouse models provides a resource for further studies to elucidate the developmental link between renal anomalies and CHD. PMID:27002738

  19. Pulpal inflammation and incidence of coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Joshipura, Kaumudi J; Pitiphat, Waranuch; Hung, Hsin-Chia; Willett, Walter C; Colditz, Graham A; Douglass, Chester W

    2006-02-01

    Pulpal inflammation is primarily caused by coronal caries, and leads to root canal therapy (RCT). Chronic inflammation has been associated with various cardiovascular diseases. This study evaluates the association between pulpal inflammation (using RCT as a surrogate) and incident coronary heart disease (CHD). We report results among males from the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study (HPFS), excluding participants with prior cardiovascular disease or diabetes. We obtained RCT data from the HPFS cohort (n = 34,683). Compared to men without RCT, those with >/=1 RCT had a multivariate RR of 1.21 (95% CI 1.05-1.40) for CHD. The association was limited to dentists (RR = 1.38; 95% CI 1.14-1.67). There was no association among nondentists (RR = 1.03). Dental caries was not associated with CHD. The results suggest a possible modest association between pulpal inflammation and CHD.

  20. Vascular Disease in Young Indians (20-40 years): Role of Ischemic Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hiremath, Murugesh Shantaveeraya; Das, Mrinal Kanti; Desai, Devangkumar M; Chopra, Vijay Kumar; Biswas, Arup Das

    2016-01-01

    Coronary Artery Disease (CAD) occurs at a younger age in Indians with over 50% of Cardiovascular Disease (CVD) mortality occurring in individuals aged less than 50 years. Although several risk factors have been suggested; smoking, dyslipidemia and hypertension are major risk factors in the young. In this review, we have pooled the current evidence on Ischemic Heart Disease (IHD) in young (20-40 years) and provided an opinion for the effective management of IHD in young Indians. PMID:27790504

  1. Potential benefits of cell therapy in coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Grimaldi, Vincenzo; Mancini, Francesco Paolo; Casamassimi, Amelia; Al-Omran, Mohammed; Zullo, Alberto; Infante, Teresa; Napoli, Claudio

    2013-11-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the world. In recent years, there has been an increasing interest both in basic and clinical research regarding the field of cell therapy for coronary heart disease (CHD). Several preclinical models of CHD have suggested that regenerative properties of stem and progenitor cells might help restoring myocardial functions in the event of cardiac diseases. Here, we summarize different types of stem/progenitor cells that have been tested in experimental and clinical settings of cardiac regeneration, from embryonic stem cells to induced pluripotent stem cells. Then, we provide a comprehensive description of the most common cell delivery strategies with their major pros and cons and underline the potential of tissue engineering and injectable matrices to address the crucial issue of restoring the three-dimensional structure of the injured myocardial region. Due to the encouraging results from preclinical models, the number of clinical trials with cell therapy is continuously increasing and includes patients with CHD and congestive heart failure. Most of the already published trials have demonstrated safety and feasibility of cell therapies in these clinical conditions. Several studies have also suggested that cell therapy results in improved clinical outcomes. Numerous ongoing clinical trials utilizing this therapy for CHD will address fundamental issues concerning cell source and population utilized, as well as the use of imaging techniques to assess cell homing and survival, all factors that affect the efficacy of different cell therapy strategies.

  2. EMPLOYMENT OF PERSONS WITH EPILEPSY AND HEART DISEASE

    PubMed Central

    Lorbeer, Lloyd T.; Barron, Charles I.

    1958-01-01

    Among persons who are often considered handicapped so far as employability is concerned are two groups deserving of special attention—persons with heart disease because of the ever-increasing number of them, and persons with epilepsy because of the extreme difficulty they have had in getting suitable jobs. A considerable number of persons with cardiac disease and a lesser number with epilepsy have been employed by the California Division of Lockheed Aircraft Corporation during the past ten years. It has been the experience there that the employment of such persons, once they are placed in jobs compatible with their physical limitations, has not resulted in unduly increasing the company's liability or labor cost and has not created operational problems of major proportions or jeopardized anyone's safety. Considerable research and effort are being expended by governmental and other agencies and associations to further enhance the safe placement of such persons. It is believed that these efforts, if coupled with realistic interpretation of the Workmen's Compensation Act in this regard, will bring about more liberal and widespread acceptance of persons with heart disease and epilepsy by industry. PMID:13500224

  3. Computational modeling and engineering in pediatric and congenital heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Marsden, Alison L.; Feinstein, Jeffrey A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review Recent methodological advances in computational simulations are enabling increasingly realistic simulations of hemodynamics and physiology, driving increased clinical utility. We review recent developments in the use of computational simulations in pediatric and congenital heart disease, describe the clinical impact in modeling in single ventricle patients, and provide an overview of emerging areas. Recent Findings Multiscale modeling combining patient specific hemodynamics with reduced order (i.e. mathematically and computationally simplified) circulatory models has become the defacto standard for modeling local hemodynamics and “global” circulatory physiology. We review recent advances that have enabled faster solutions, discuss new methods, (e.g. fluid structure interaction and uncertainty quantification), which lend realism both computationally and clinically to results, highlight novel computationally-derived surgical methods for single ventricle patients, and discuss areas in which modeling has begun to exert its influence including Kawasaki disease, fetal circulation, tetralogy of Fallot, (and pulmonary tree), and circulatory support. Summary Computational modeling is emerging as a crucial tool for clinical decision-making and evaluation of novel surgical methods and interventions in pediatric cardiology and beyond. Continued development of modeling methods, with an eye towards clinical needs, will enable clinical adoption in a wide range of pediatric and congenital heart diseases. PMID:26262579

  4. Pulmonary hypertension and right heart dysfunction in chronic lung disease.

    PubMed

    Zangiabadi, Amirmasoud; De Pasquale, Carmine G; Sajkov, Dimitar

    2014-01-01

    Group 3 pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a common complication of chronic lung disease (CLD), including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), interstitial lung disease, and sleep-disordered breathing. Development of PH is associated with poor prognosis and may progress to right heart failure, however, in the majority of the patients with CLD, PH is mild to moderate and only a small number of patients develop severe PH. The pathophysiology of PH in CLD is multifactorial and includes hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction, pulmonary vascular remodeling, small vessel destruction, and fibrosis. The effects of PH on the right ventricle (RV) range between early RV remodeling, hypertrophy, dilatation, and eventual failure with associated increased mortality. The golden standard for diagnosis of PH is right heart catheterization, however, evidence of PH can be appreciated on clinical examination, serology, radiological imaging, and Doppler echocardiography. Treatment of PH in CLD focuses on management of the underlying lung disorder and hypoxia. There is, however, limited evidence to suggest that PH-specific vasodilators such as phosphodiesterase-type 5 inhibitors, endothelin receptor antagonists, and prostanoids may have a role in the treatment of patients with CLD and moderate-to-severe PH.

  5. Imaging of congenital heart disease in adults: choice of modalities.

    PubMed

    Orwat, Stefan; Diller, Gerhard-Paul; Baumgartner, Helmut

    2014-01-01

    Major advances in noninvasive imaging of adult congenital heart disease have been accomplished. These tools play now a key role in comprehensive diagnostic work-up, decision for intervention, evaluation for the suitability of specific therapeutic options, monitoring of interventions and regular follow-up. Besides echocardiography, magnetic resonance (CMR) and computed tomography (CT) have gained particular importance. The choice of imaging modality has thus become a critical issue. This review summarizes strengths and limitations of the different imaging modalities and how they may be used in a complementary fashion. Echocardiography obviously remains the workhorse of imaging routinely used in all patients. However, in complex disease and after surgery echocardiography alone frequently remains insufficient. CMR is particularly useful in this setting and allows reproducible and accurate quantification of ventricular function and comprehensive assessment of cardiac anatomy, aorta, pulmonary arteries and venous return including complex flow measurements. CT is preferred when CMR is contraindicated, when superior spatial resolution is required or when "metallic" artefacts limit CMR imaging. In conclusion, the use of currently available imaging modalities in adult congenital heart disease needs to be complementary. Echocardiography remains the basis tool, CMR and CT should be added considering specific open questions and the ability to answer them, availability and economic issues.

  6. The role of palliative care in critical congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Mazwi, Mjaye L; Henner, Natalia; Kirsch, Roxanne

    2017-02-08

    Patients with critical congenital heart disease are exposed to significant lifetime morbidity and mortality. Prenatal diagnosis can provide opportunities for anticipatory co-management of patients between palliative subspecialists and the cardiac care team. The benefits of palliative care include support for longitudinal decision-making and avoidance of interventions not consistent with family goals. Effectively counseling families requires an up-to-date understanding of outcomes and knowledge of provider biases. Patient-proxy reported quality of life (QOL) is highly variable in this population and healthcare providers need to be aware of limitations in their own subjective assessment of QOL.

  7. The Myers-Briggs type indicator and coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Thorne, B M; Fyfe, J H; Carskadon, T G

    1987-01-01

    Researchers have for many years attempted to establish a relationship between coronary heart disease (CHD) and personality type. In our study, 103 subjects completed Form G of the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI). Comparisons were made between 93 CHD patients and an age-appropriate control group (Group C) on each of the four MBTI dimensions: Extraversion-Introversion, Sensing-Intuition, Thinking-Feeling, and Judging-Perceiving. The comparison between CHD patients and Group C showed that CHD patients were significantly more likely to prefer sensing and feeling.

  8. Perinatal and Delivery Management of Infants with Congenital Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Sanapo, Laura; Moon-Grady, Anita J; Donofrio, Mary T

    2016-03-01

    Advances in fetal echocardiography have improved prenatal diagnosis of congenital heart disease (CHD) and allowed better delivery and perinatal management. Some newborns with CHD require urgent intervention after delivery. In these cases, delivery close to a pediatric cardiac center may be considered, and the presence of a specialized cardiac team in the delivery room or urgent transport of the infant should be planned in advance. Delivery planning, monitoring in labor, rapid intervention at birth if needed, and avoidance of iatrogenic preterm delivery have the potential to improve outcomes for infants with prenatally diagnosed CHD.

  9. Epidemiology of coronary heart disease and acute coronary syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Quilis, Carme; Leischik, Roman; Lucia, Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this review is to summarize the incidence, prevalence, trend in mortality, and general prognosis of coronary heart disease (CHD) and a related condition, acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Although CHD mortality has gradually declined over the last decades in western countries, this condition still causes about one-third of all deaths in people older than 35 years. This evidence, along with the fact that mortality from CHD is expected to continue increasing in developing countries, illustrates the need for implementing effective primary prevention approaches worldwide and identifying risk groups and areas for possible improvement. PMID:27500157

  10. Germany's Disease Management Program: Improving Outcomes in Congestive Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Kottmair, Stefan; Frye, Christian; Ziegenhagen, Dieter J.

    2005-01-01

    Hospital admissions among patients with congestive heart failure (CHF) are a major contributor to health care costs. A comprehensive disease management program for CHF was developed for private and statutory health insurance companies in order to improve health outcomes and reduce rehospitalization rates and costs. The program comprises care calls, written training material, telemetric monitoring, and health reports. Currently, 909 members from six insurance companies are enrolled. Routine evaluation, based on medical data warehouse software, demonstrates benefits in terms of improved health outcomes and processes of care. Economical evaluation of claims data indicates significant cost savings in a pre/post study design. PMID:17288080

  11. Germany's disease management program: improving outcomes in congestive heart failure.

    PubMed

    Kottmair, Stefan; Frye, Christian; Ziegenhagen, Dieter J

    2005-01-01

    Hospital admissions among patients with congestive heart failure (CHF) are a major contributor to health care costs. A comprehensive disease management program for CHF was developed for private and statutory health insurance companies in order to improve health outcomes and reduce rehospitalization rates and costs. The program comprises care calls, written training material, telemetric monitoring, and health reports. Currently, 909 members from six insurance companies are enrolled. Routine evaluation, based on medical data warehouse software, demonstrates benefits in terms of improved health outcomes and processes of care. Economical evaluation of claims data indicates significant cost savings in a pre/post study design.

  12. Pulmonary and tricuspid valvuloplasty in carcinoid heart disease.

    PubMed

    Karimi, Ashkan; Pourafshar, Negiin; Fudge, James C

    2016-12-28

    A 26-year-old female with carcinoid heart disease consisting of severe pulmonary and tricuspid valve stenosis was admitted with line associated sepsis. She recovered from sepsis with antibiotics and aggressive fluid resuscitation but became grossly volume overloaded with evidence of tense ascites and lower extremity edema. She developed worsening renal and hepatic function due to congestive nephropathy and hepatopathy, which did not respond to intravenous diuretics, and she was deemed too sick for surgical pulmonary and tricuspid valve replacement. Pulmonary and tricuspid valvuloplasty was performed as a rescue measure to alleviate her congestive symptoms and improve her candidacy for valve replacement. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. [Diagnosis of ischemic heart disease in an organized population].

    PubMed

    Bluzhas, I N; Akialene, D A; Raugalas, E I

    1984-11-01

    In a simultaneous cardiological examination of the workers and employees of an electronics plant, a total of 3183 ECGs at the 12 standard leads were recorded with the help of the automatic ECG analysis system HP5600C. Parallelly, the ECGs were coded by the Minnesota Code. A group of high risk for coronary heart disease was identified on the basis of the questionnaire data and ECG findings and comprised 7.8% of the population studied. Pathological ECGs were registered in only 27.1% of the high risk group.

  14. Exercise stress echocardiography in patients with valvular heart disease.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Vishal; Newby, David E; Stewart, Ralph A H; Lee, Mildred; Gabriel, Ruvin; Van Pelt, Niels; Kerr, Andrew J

    2015-09-01

    Stress echocardiography is recommended for the assessment of asymptomatic patients with severe valvular heart disease (VHD) when there is discrepancy between symptoms and resting markers of severity. The aim of this study is to determine the prognostic value of exercise stress echocardiography in patients with common valve lesions. One hundred and fifteen patients with VHD (aortic stenosis (n=28); aortic regurgitation (n=35); mitral regurgitation, (n=26); mitral stenosis (n=26)), and age- and sex-matched controls (n=39) with normal ejection fraction underwent exercise stress echocardiography. The primary endpoint was a composite of death or hospitalization for heart failure. Asymptomatic VHD patients had lower exercise capacity than controls and 37% of patients achieved <85% of their predicted metabolic equivalents (METS). There were three deaths and four hospital admissions, and 24 patients underwent surgery during follow-up. An abnormal stress echocardiogram (METS <5, blood pressure rise <20 mmHg, or pulmonary artery pressure post exercise >60 mmHg) was associated with an increased risk of death or hospital admission (14% vs 1%, P<0.0001). The assessment of contractile reserve did not offer additional predictive value. In conclusion, an abnormal stress echocardiogram is associated with death and hospitalization with heart failure at 2 years. Stress echocardiography should be considered as part of the routine follow-up of all asymptomatic patients with VHD.

  15. Utilization of telemedicine by heart disease patients following hospitalization.

    PubMed

    Morguet, Andreas J; Kühnelt, Paul; Kallel, Antje; Rauch, Ursula; Schultheiss, Heinz-Peter

    2008-01-01

    NYHA class III and IV chronic heart failure has been established as a potential indication for telemedical care and monitoring already. We conducted a prospective study to assess the utilization of telemedical services by cardiac patients in order to identify further indications. A total of 540 patients (mean age 59 years) with various heart diseases participated for at least 30 days in a home-based telemedicine service programme. The two primary outcome measures were the rates of symptom-driven telephone calls (A) and ECG transmissions (B) per patient-year. The total follow-up was 68,649 days, with a median of 93 days. Symptomatic patients placed 713 calls and transmitted 221 ECGs. Poisson regression analysis with subset selection yielded four significant (P < 0.05) independent positive predictors of the use of the telemedicine service: (1) recent repeat (at least one previous) percutaneous coronary intervention (A, P = 0.010; B, P = 0.001); (2) recent cardioversion for atrial fibrillation or flutter (A, P < 0.0001; B, P < 0.0001); (3) ejection fraction (A, P = 0.012; B, P > 0.05); and (4) reciprocal of age (A, P < 0.0001; B, P > 0.05). These data suggest that telemedicine may benefit patients following repeat percutaneous coronary intervention or cardioversion for atrial fibrillation. Since patients availed themselves of telemedicine service less with deteriorating ejection fraction and increasing age, individuals with chronic heart failure will need dedicated programmes, especially when they are older.

  16. Cell therapy for heart disease after 15 years: Unmet expectations.

    PubMed

    Nigro, Patrizia; Bassetti, Beatrice; Cavallotti, Laura; Catto, Valentina; Carbucicchio, Corrado; Pompilio, Giulio

    2017-02-21

    Over the past two decades cardiac cell therapy (CCT) has emerged as a promising new strategy to cure heart diseases at high unmet need. Thousands of patients have entered clinical trials for acute or chronic heart conditions testing different cell types, including autologous or allogeneic bone marrow (BM)-derived mononuclear or selected cells, BM- or adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal cells, or cardiac resident progenitors based on their potential ability to regenerate scarred or dysfunctional myocardium. Nowadays, the original enthusiasm surrounding the regenerative medicine field has been cushioned by a cumulative body of evidence indicating an inefficient or modest efficacy of CCT in improving cardiac function, along with the continued lack of indisputable proof for long-term prognostic benefit. In this review, we have firstly comprehensively outlined the positive and negative results of cell therapy studies in patients with acute myocardial infarction, refractory angina and chronic heart failure. Next, we have discussed cell therapy- and patient-related variables (e.g. cell intrinsic and extrinsic characteristics as well as criteria of patient selection and proposed methodologies) that might have dampened the efficacy of past cell therapy trials. Finally, we have addressed critical factors to be considered before embarking on further clinical trials.

  17. [Congestive heart failure in patients with chronic kidney disease].

    PubMed

    Poskurica, Mileta; Petrović, Dejan

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular disorders are the most frequent cause of death (46-60%) among patients with advanced chronic renal failure (CRF), and on dialysis treatment. Uremic cardiomyopathy is the basic pathophysiologic substrate, whereas ischemic heart disease (IHD) and anemia are the most important contributing factors. Associated with well-know risk factors and specific disorders for terminal kidney failure and dialysis, the aforementioned factors instigate congestive heart failure (CHF). Suspected CHF is based on the anamnesis, clinical examination and ECG, while it is confirmed and defined more precisely on the basis of echocardiography and radiology examination. Biohumoral data (BNP, NT-proBNP) are not sufficiently reliable because of specific volemic fluctuation and reduced natural clearance. Therapy approach is similar to the one for the general population: ACEI, ARBs, β-blockers, inotropic drugs and diuretics. Hypervolemia and most of the related symptoms can be kept under control effectively by the isolated or ultrafiltation, in conjunction with dialysis, during the standard bicarbonate hemodialysis or hemodiafiltration. In the same respect peritoneal dialysis is efficient for the control of hypervolemia symptoms, mainly during the first years of its application and in case of the lower NYHA class (II°/III°). In general, heart support therapy, surgical interventions of the myocardium and valve replacement are rarely used in patients on dialysis, whereas revascularization procedures are beneficial for associated IHD. In selected cases the application of cardiac resynchronization and/or implantation of a cardioverter defibrillator are advisable.

  18. Perioperative Stroke in Infants Undergoing Open Heart Operations for Congenital Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jodi; Zimmerman, Robert A.; Jarvik, Gail P.; Nord, Alex S.; Clancy, Robert R.; Wernovsky, Gil; Montenegro, Lisa M.; Hartman, Diane M.; Nicolson, Susan C.; Spray, Thomas L.; Gaynor, J. William; Ichord, Rebecca

    2010-01-01

    Background The prevalence of perioperative stroke in infants undergoing operations for congenital heart disease has not been well described. The objectives of this study were to determine the prevalence of stroke as assessed by postoperative brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), characterize the neuroanatomic features of focal ischemic injury, and identify risk factors for its development. Methods Brain MRI was performed in 122 infants 3 to 14 days after cardiac operation with cardiopulmonary bypass, with or without deep hypothermic circulatory arrest. Preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative data were collected. Risk factors were tested by logistic regression for univariate and multivariate associations with stroke. Results Stroke was identified in 12 of 122 patients (10%). Strokes were preoperative in 6 patients and possibly intraoperative or postoperative in the other 6 patients, and were clinically silent except in 1 patient who had clinical seizures. Arterial-occlusive and watershed infarcts were identified with equal distribution in both hemispheres. Multivariate analysis identified lower birth weight, preoperative intubation, lower intraoperative hematocrit, and higher blood pressure at admission to the cardiac intensive care unit postoperatively as significant factors associated with stroke. Prematurity, younger age at operation, duration of cardiopulmonary bypass, and use of deep hypothermic circulatory arrest were not significantly associated with stroke. Conclusions The prevalence of stroke in infants undergoing operations for congenital heart disease was 10%, half of which occurred preoperatively. Most were clinically silent and undetected without neuroimaging. Mechanisms included thromboembolism and hypoperfusion, with patient-specific, procedure-specific, and postoperative contributions to increased risk. PMID:19699905

  19. AIDS and other Human Diseases: Teaching Science in the Context of Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iimoto, Devin

    2005-01-01

    A course on AIDS presents many interdisciplinary opportunities as well as interactive pedagogies. In an AIDS course at Whittier College, students learn about the biological basis and epidemiology of the disease, tackle current policy issues in the United States, and study the effect of the disease in Africa.

  20. "I'm Not Going to Die from the AIDS": Resilience in Aging with HIV Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emlet, Charles A.; Tozay, Shakima; Raveis, Victoria H.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Adults aging with HIV/AIDS can experience resilience in spite of the deleterious affects of the disease. This study seeks to examine the lived experiences of older adults with HIV/AIDS as it relates to strengths and resilience in dealing with this devastating disease. Design and methods: Semistructured in-depth interviews were conducted…

  1. Position statement of the World Heart Federation on the prevention and control of rheumatic heart disease.

    PubMed

    Remenyi, Bo; Carapetis, Jonathan; Wyber, Rosemary; Taubert, Kathryn; Mayosi, Bongani M

    2013-05-01

    In the 21(st) century, rheumatic fever (RF) and rheumatic heart disease (RHD) are neglected diseases of marginalized communities. Globally, RHD remains the most-common cardiovascular disease in young people aged <25 years. Although RF and RHD have been almost eradicated in areas with established economies, migration from low-income to high-income settings might be responsible for a new burden of RHD in high-income countries. The World Heart Federation (WHF) and its Working Group on RF and RHD unites global experts, combines their experience and enthusiasm, and provides a platform for RHD control. This paper is a declaration of the WHF institutional strategic goal--a 25% reduction in premature deaths from RF and RHD among individuals aged <25 years by the year 2025. The position statement affirms WHF commitments to five key strategic targets: comprehensive register-based control programmes, global access to benzathine penicillin G, identification and development of public figures as 'RHD champions', expansion of RHD training hubs, and support for vaccine development. In this paper, we also review existing barriers to RF and RHD control and identify the actions required to change the trajectory of control for these diseases. This approach provides the foundation for governments, civil society, patient advocates, clinicians, researchers, and funding agencies to develop partnerships and unify global efforts to control RF and RHD. The WHF plans to expand this position statement to an operational plan that will be founded on science, research, and quantifiable progress indicators to impact positively on the millions of people who are affected by RHD and its long-term sequelae.

  2. Chemotherapy Side Effects: A Cause of Heart Disease?

    MedlinePlus

    ... rare — and not all chemotherapy drugs carry the potential side effect of heart damage. Some anti-cancer treatments may cause temporary heart damage by weakening the heart muscle. These treatments include: A class of drugs known ...

  3. Prevalence of heart disease demonstrated in 60 years of the Arquivos Brasileiros de Cardiologia.

    PubMed

    Evora, Paulo Roberto Barbosa; Nather, Julio Cesar; Rodrigues, Alfredo José

    2014-01-01

    Considering the historical and academic relevance of the Brazilian Archives of Cardiology (ABC), as its MEDLINE indexing began in 1950, it was assumed as a hypothesis that the analysis of the publications over the last 60 years could reflect the changing trends of heart disease in Brazil. The study data were collected using a program developed for this purpose, allowing the automatic extraction of information from the MEDLINE database. The study information were collected by searching "Brazilian Archives of Cardiology AND selected parameter in English". Four observational groups were determined: (1) major groups of heart diseases (coronary artery disease, valvular heart disease, congenital heart disease and cardiomyopathies); (2) relevant diseases in clinical practice (cardiac arrhythmias, cor pulmonale, myocardial infarction and congestive heart failure); (3) cardiovascular risk factors (hypertension, diabetes, dyslipidemia and atherosclerosis); and (4) group determined due to the growing trend of publications on congestive heart failure seen in previous groups (congestive heart failure, myocardial infarction, rheumatic heart disease and Chagasic heart disease) All publications within the established groups were described, highlighting the increasing importance of heart failure and diabetes as risk factors. A relatively easy search was carried out, using the computer program developed for literature search covering six decades. Emphasizing the limitations of the study, we suggest the existence of an epidemiological link between cardiac diseases that are prevalent in Brazil and the publications of the Brazilian Archives of Cardiology.

  4. Rheumatic fever & rheumatic heart disease: the last 50 years.

    PubMed

    Kumar, R Krishna; Tandon, R

    2013-04-01

    Rheumatic fever (RF) and rheumatic heart disease (RHD) continue to be a major health hazard in most developing countries as well as sporadically in developed economies. Despite reservations about the utility, echocardiographic and Doppler (E&D) studies have identified a massive burden of RHD suggesting the inadequacy of the Jones' criteria updated by the American Heart Association in 1992. Subclinical carditis has been recognized by E&D in patients with acute RF without clinical carditis as well as by follow up of RHD patients presenting as isolated chorea or those without clinical evidence of carditis. Over the years, the medical management of RF has not changed. Paediatric and juvenile mitral stenosis (MS), upto the age of 12 and 20 yr respectively, severe enough to require operative treatement was documented. These negate the belief that patients of RHD become symptomatic ≥20 years after RF as well as the fact that congestive cardiac failure in childhood indicates active carditis and RF. Non-surgical balloon mitral valvotomy for MS has been initiated. Mitral and/or aortic valve replacement during active RF in patients not responding to medical treatment has been found to be life saving as well as confirming that congestive heart failure in acute RF is due to an acute haemodynamic overload. Pathogenesis as well as susceptibility to RF continue to be elusive. Prevention of RF morbidity depends on secondary prophylaxis which cannot reduce the burden of diseases. Primary prophylaxis is not feasible in the absence of a suitable vaccine. Attempts to design an antistreptococcal vaccine utilizing the M-protein has not succeeded in the last 40 years. Besides pathogenesis many other questions remain unanswered.

  5. 3D Printing to Guide Ventricular Assist Device Placement in Adults With Congenital Heart Disease and Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Farooqi, Kanwal M; Saeed, Omar; Zaidi, Ali; Sanz, Javier; Nielsen, James C; Hsu, Daphne T; Jorde, Ulrich P

    2016-04-01

    As the population of adults with congenital heart disease continues to grow, so does the number of these patients with heart failure. Ventricular assist devices are underutilized in adults with congenital heart disease due to their complex anatomic arrangements and physiology. Advanced imaging techniques that may increase the utilization of mechanical circulatory support in this population must be explored. Three-dimensional printing offers individualized structural models that would enable pre-surgical planning of cannula and device placement in adults with congenital cardiac disease and heart failure who are candidates for such therapies. We present a review of relevant cardiac anomalies, cases in which such models could be utilized, and some background on the cost and procedure associated with this process.

  6. The SCAI Structural Heart Disease Council: toward addressing training, credentialing, and guidelines for structural heart disease intervention.

    PubMed

    Feldman, Ted; Ruiz, Carlos E; Hijazi, Ziyad M

    2010-10-01

    The field of structural heart disease (SHD) intervention has grown rapidly over the past several years. While training program content, standards, credentialing, and board examinations for percutaneous coronary intervention have matured and become well developed, no such structure exists in the field of SHD. Recognition of the need for training program standards and SHD curriculum stimulated the SCAI to form a SHD council, described in this report. In the accompanying two articles, we report the results of a survey of the status of SHD training in programs in the United States and define a core curriculum for structural intervention training.

  7. Reductionism and holism in coronary heart disease and cardiac nursing.

    PubMed

    Chummun, Harry

    Reductionism and holism are two contrasting philosophies which provide scientific knowledge of disease processes, health dynamics and care interventions. While reductionism focuses on specific and perhaps narrow concepts, it enhances our in-depth knowledge of key health issues. Holism focuses on understanding how all the significant factors affecting the particular health issue are involved, so a more informed decision can be made about health intervention. This article explores the contribution each makes to our understanding of coronary heart disease (CHD) and to the preparation of nurses working in cardiac nursing. It proposes that pre- and post-registration nursing curricula reflect both reductionist and holistic approaches and therefore cardiac nurses are suitably trained to manage reductionist as well as holistic care for clients with CHD.

  8. Some Ethical Legal Issues in Heart Disease Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Pyng Jing

    2014-01-01

    Ethical concerns, cultural norms, and legal issues must be carefully considered when treating a patient with heart disease. Although physicians or surgeons must play a role in course of treatment decision making, they should be guided by evidence-based data and the preferences of patients and/or the patient’s parents. However, there is no obligation to provide this type of informed consultation and approval unless these ethical issues become law - which typically occurs through litigation. In this review, we examined common ethical principles that are integral to the regular decisions made by clinicians every day. Some special ethical issues and associated litigation, if any, which might occur perioperatively will also be reviewed. Finally, the final judgments of civil and criminal courts of Taiwan, particularly lawsuits involving physicians associated with coronary artery disease care or aortic aneurysm, will also be introduced. PMID:27122831

  9. Malignant Rheumatic Heart Disease Presenting as Quadrivalvular Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Santosh Kumar; Thakur, Ramesh; Krishna, Vinay; Varma, Chandra Mohan; Goel, Amit; Jha, Mukesh Jitendra; Kumar, Ashutosh; Mishra, Vikas; Tiwari, Pradyot; Sinha, Rupesh

    2015-01-01

    Rheumatic disease may involve the pulmonary valve, but is exceedingly rare. Simultaneous involvement of all four valves is more likely to be the result of combination of causes, such as congenital, rheumatic, infective or degenerative disease. A unitary cause for quadrivalvular involvement would be either rheumatic or myxomatous degeneration. A 16-year-old young boy presented with progressive exertional dyspnea for the past 3 years. On evaluation, he was in atrial fibrillation with congestive heart failure. On examination, evidence of stenosis of the mitral, aortic and tricuspid valves with a history of rheumatic fever in childhood was revealed. Transthoracic echocardiography showed the quadrivalvular involvement. Only few reports are available in the literature describing rheumatic quadrivalvar damage and that too in third and fourth decade. This is probably first to be reported in juvenile age group. PMID:28197258

  10. Lesions of endodontic origin and risk of coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Caplan, D J; Chasen, J B; Krall, E A; Cai, J; Kang, S; Garcia, R I; Offenbacher, S; Beck, J D

    2006-11-01

    A paucity of epidemiologic research exists regarding systemic health consequences of endodontic disease. This study evaluated whether incident radiographically evident lesions of endodontic origin were related to development of coronary heart disease (CHD) among 708 male participants in the VA Dental Longitudinal Study. At baseline and every three years for up to 32 years, participants (who were not VA patients) received complete medical and dental examinations, including full-mouth radiographs. Cox regression models estimated the relationship between incident lesions of endodontic origin and time to CHD diagnosis. Among those < or = 40 years old, incident lesions of endodontic origin were significantly associated with time to CHD diagnosis (p < 0.05), after adjustment for covariates of interest, with hazard ratios decreasing as age increased. Among those > 40 years old, no statistically significant association was observed. These findings are consistent with research that suggests relationships between chronic periodontal inflammation and the development of CHD, especially among younger men.

  11. Systolic time intervals in children with heart disease.

    PubMed

    Hedvall, G

    1983-03-01

    Of the systolic time intervals, the preejection period is known to correlate well with invasively measured isometric contraction time, and increase of the quotient preejection period/left ventricular ejection time (PEP/LVET) is considered to be of a good indicator of left ventricular failure. The different systolic time intervals have been recorded from the carotid pulse curve from 40 normal children, 20 aged five and 20 aged ten years. Their PEP/LVET was 0.31 +/- 0.04. Seventy-eight children with different heart diseases were then investigated. In patients with congenital total heart block or extrasystoles, there was a negative correlation between PEP/LVET and the R-R interval, in accordance with the Frank-Starling law. In patients with ventricular septal defects PEP/LVET differentiates between small and large shunts; the increased PEP/LVET of the latter normalizes after operation. The increased PEP/RVET of children with transposition of the great arteries is an expression of the inadequacy of the right ventricle as a systemic chamber. In aortic stenosis "normalization" of a previously decreased PEP/LVET may indicate early left ventricular failure. In primary myocardial disease registration of the systolic time intervals enables us to follow the left ventricular function more closely than is possible with invasive techniques.

  12. [Assessment of exercise capacity in congenital heart disease].

    PubMed

    Bouzo-López, Raquel; González-Represas, Alicia

    2016-01-01

    For many years, the treatment of congenital heart diseases has been a field in which, based on the seriousness of these conditions, treatment options were viewed with the greatest deference. This has conditioned, in many cases, the interventions to be undertaken in each. In this sense, exercise was thought to have a negative impact and thus the practise of almost any physical activity was limited. Although there has recently been a change in the paradigm with respect to exercise, this idea continues to hold sway. For many cardiopathies, the information obtained through a stress test is essential in order to implement and supervise an exercise program. The aim of this study is to analyze the parameters within the stress test which allow for an adequate stratification of the risk to subjects with congenital heart diseases who undertake exercise, as well as their values in accordance with the type of pathology, the gravity of such, and the age of the patients. Furthermore, these parameters will be analyzed for both their survival markers and the protocols that can best be adjusted for patients with these characteristic.

  13. Milk and other dietary influences on coronary heart disease

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, W. B.

    1998-01-01

    While dietary links to ischemic heart disease (IHD) and coronary heart disease (CHD) mortality have been studied for many years, the correlation has not clearly been resolved, especially for older populations. In this paper, a multi-country statistical approach involving 32 countries is used to find dietary links to IHD and CHD for various age groups aged 35+. For IHD, milk carbohydrates were found to have the highest statistical association for males aged 35+ and females aged 65+, while for females aged 35-64, sugar was found to have the highest association. In the case of CHD, non-fat milk was found to have the highest association for males aged 45+ and females aged 75+, while for females 65-74, milk carbohydrates and sugar had the highest associations, and for females aged 45-64, sugar had the highest association. A number of mechanisms have been proposed in the literature that might explain the milk carbohydrate or non-fat milk association. One of the most prominent theories is that animal proteins contribute to homocysteine (Hcy) production; however, milk more than meat lacks adequate B vitamins to convert Hcy to useful products. Lactose and calcium in conjunction with Hcy from consumption of non-fat milk may also contribute to calcification of the arteries.

  14. Depression, stress, and heart disease in earthquakes and Takotsubo cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Vieweg, W Victor R; Hasnain, Mehrul; Mezuk, Briana; Levy, James R; Lesnefsky, Edward J; Pandurangi, Ananda K

    2011-10-01

    The preponderance of evidence links depressive disorder and coronary heart disease (CHD). Despite this evidence, multiple clinical trials have failed to show that effective treatment of depression favorably modifies the development, clinical course, or outcome of comorbid CHD. Possible reasons for these failures include the heterogeneity of depression, limitations of assessment instruments, limited understanding of the biology of depressive disorders, lack of biological markers, and the observation that depression may be more a product of CHD than a true risk factor for it. In this commentary, to better address the effects of externally provoked stress on physical health, we examine evidence about 2 specific examples of stress and subsequent heart disease: earthquake-induced adverse cardiac events among individuals with coronary artery disease, and stress-induced Takotsubo cardiomyopathy. In the former case, existing studies suggest that the stress and distress of earthquakes accelerate the development of poor cardiac outcomes for individuals with established coronary artery disease. In the latter example, existing case studies indicate that the profound left ventricular dysfunction of Takotsubo cardiomyopathy tends to quickly normalize once the acute stress is relieved. Together, these examples indicate that the presence or absence of prestress medical illness and its severity may better determine the outcome of the medical illness than the nature and severity of the stress, including depression. That is, any effort to look at depression among individuals with medical illness must look carefully at the medical illness itself and consider depression a possible nonspecific stress. In patients with comorbid depression and CHD, we propose using the more firmly established CHD outcome measurements to better understand how depression or other stressors and their associated treatments influence the prognosis and outcome of this medical illness.

  15. Animal Models to Investigate the Pathogenesis of Rheumatic Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Rush, Catherine M.; Govan, Brenda L.; Sikder, Suchandan; Williams, Natasha L.; Ketheesan, Natkunam

    2014-01-01

    Rheumatic fever (RF) and rheumatic heart disease (RHD) are sequelae of group A streptococcal (GAS) infection. Although an autoimmune process has long been considered to be responsible for the initiation of RF/RHD, it is only in the last few decades that the mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of the inflammatory condition have been unraveled partly due to experimentation on animal models. RF/RHD is a uniquely human condition and modeling this disease in animals is challenging. Antibody and T cell responses to recombinant GAS M protein (rM) and the subsequent interactions with cardiac tissue have been predominantly investigated using a rat autoimmune valvulitis model. In Lewis rats immunized with rM, the development of hallmark histological features akin to RF/RHD, both in the myocardial and in valvular tissue have been reported, with the generation of heart tissue cross-reactive antibodies and T cells. Recently, a Lewis rat model of Sydenham’s chorea and related neuropsychiatric disorders has also been described. Rodent models are very useful for assessing disease mechanisms due to the availability of reagents to precisely determine sequential events following infection with GAS or post-challenge with specific proteins and or carbohydrate preparations from GAS. However, studies of cardiac function are more problematic in such models. In this review, a historical overview of animal models previously used and those that are currently available will be discussed in terms of their usefulness in modeling different aspects of the disease process. Ultimately, cardiologists, microbiologists, immunologists, and physiologists may have to resort to diverse models to investigate different aspects of RF/RHD. PMID:25414841

  16. Mechano-regulation of the beating heart at the cellular level--mechanosensitive channels in normal and diseased heart.

    PubMed

    Friedrich, Oliver; Wagner, Soeren; Battle, Andrew R; Schürmann, Sebastian; Martinac, Boris

    2012-01-01

    The heart as a contractile hollow organ finely tunes mechanical parameters such as stroke volume, stroke pressure and cardiac output according to filling volumes, filling pressures via intrinsic and neuronal routes. At the cellular level, cardiomyocytes in beating hearts are exposed to large mechanical stress during successive heart beats. Although the mechanisms of excitation-contraction coupling are well established in mammalian heart cells, the putative contribution of mechanosensitive channels to Ca²⁺ homeostasis, Ca²⁺ signaling and force generation has been primarily investigated in relation to heart disease states. For instance, transient receptor potential channels (TRPs) are up-regulated in animal models of congestive heart failure or hypertension models and seem to play a vital role in pathological Ca²⁺ overload to cardiomyocytes, thus aggravating the pathology of disease at the cellular level. Apart from that, the contribution of mechanosensitive channels (MsC) in the normal beating heart to the downstream force activation cascade has not been addressed. We present an overview of the current literature and concepts of mechanosensitive channel involvement in failing hearts and cardiomyopathies and novel data showing a likely contribution of Ca²⁺ influx via mechanosensitive channels in beating normal cardiomyocytes during systolic shortening.

  17. Cadmium in the blood and heart tissue of patients (smokers/non-smokers) with coronary heart disease

    SciTech Connect

    Spieker, C.; Bertram, H.P.; Stratmann, T.; Achatzy, R.; Kisters, K.; Zumkley, H.

    1986-01-01

    Cadmium has been implicated in the pathogenesis of human hypertension and arteriosclerotic heart disease. Various experiments showed that cadmium could influence the vasopressor-induced reactivity and the stress-strain characteristics of the blood vessel wall. Smoking is considered to be one of the risk factors in accumulating high amounts of cadmium in human organic tissue. Therefore, in the present study the cadmium content of the blood and the heart tissue was evaluated in smoking and non-smoking patients who suffered from coronary heart diseases and various vascular defects. Blood and heart tissue samples of 49 patients undergoing a heart operation were examined. The measurements were carried out with atomic absorption spectometry. Cadmium concentration in the blood was elevated significantly in smoking patients versus non-smokers. In the heart tissue samples of smoking patients cadmium was increased as well towards non-smoking patients. These data show that smoking influences the cadmium intake and it may support the opinion of different research groups that cadmium might have a toxic effect on the myocardium and that cadmium accumulation is another risk factor in the development of coronary heart disease. 10 references, 1 figure.

  18. Nutrition in the prevention of Coronary Heart Disease and the management of lipoprotein disorders

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is comprised of coronary heart disease (CHD), stroke, and peripheral vascular disease (PVD). CVD is caused by progressive narrowing and blockage of arteries supplying the heart, brain, and other tissues and organs. CVD is the leading cause of death and disability in our ...

  19. Geographic Variations in Incremental Costs of Heart Disease Among Medicare Beneficiaries, by Type of Service, 2012

    PubMed Central

    Ritchey, Matthew; Hockenberry, Jason; Casper, Michele

    2016-01-01

    Using 2012 data on fee-for-service Medicare claims, we documented regional and county variation in incremental standardized costs of heart disease (ie, comparing costs between beneficiaries with heart disease and beneficiaries without heart disease) by type of service (eg, inpatient, outpatient, post-acute care). Absolute incremental total costs varied by region. Although the largest absolute incremental total costs of heart disease were concentrated in southern and Appalachian counties, geographic patterns of costs varied by type of service. These data can be used to inform development of policies and payment models that address the observed geographic disparities. PMID:28033089

  20. Pregnancy and contraception in young women with congenital heart disease: General considerations

    PubMed Central

    Wald, Rachel M; Sermer, Mathew; Colman, Jack M

    2011-01-01

    Young women with heart disease are increasingly being seen in obstetrical referral centres owing, in large part, to the dramatic improvements in survival of young adults with congenital heart disease in recent years. Although pregnancies in most women with heart disease result in favourable outcomes, there are important exceptions that must be recognized. These exceptions pose significant mortality risk to the mother and/or the fetus. The present article outlines cardiovascular adaptations to pregnancy, general outcomes and management considerations for practitioners caring for pregnant young women with congenital heart disease. A lesion-specific review is published in a complementary article. PMID:22468131

  1. Diabetes mellitus is a coronary heart disease risk equivalent for peripheral vascular disease.

    PubMed

    Newman, Jonathan D; Rockman, Caron B; Kosiborod, Mikhail; Guo, Yu; Zhong, Hua; Weintraub, Howard S; Schwartzbard, Arthur Z; Adelman, Mark A; Berger, Jeffrey S

    2017-02-01

    Diabetes mellitus (diabetes) is associated with significantly increased risk of peripheral vascular disease. Diabetes is classified as a coronary heart disease (CHD) risk equivalent, but it is unknown whether diabetes is a CHD risk equivalent for peripheral vascular disease. The objective was to evaluate the odds of peripheral arterial disease (PAD) or carotid artery stenosis (CAS) among participants with diabetes, CHD, or both, compared with participants without diabetes or CHD, in a nationwide vascular screening database. We hypothesized that diabetes and CHD would confer similar odds of PAD and CAS.

  2. Lessons for Health Promotion from Selected Community-Based Heart Disease Prevention Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharma, Manoj; Galletly, Carol

    1997-01-01

    Discusses four key community-based coronary heart disease prevention interventions, elaborating on some of the challenges they encountered. The four interventions are the Stanford Three Community Study, Stanford Five-City Project, Minnesota Heart Health Program, and Pawtucket (Rhode Island) Heart Health Program. (SM)

  3. ESC Working Group on Valvular Heart Disease Position Paper: assessing the risk of interventions in patients with valvular heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Rosenhek, Raphael; Iung, Bernard; Tornos, Pilar; Antunes, Manuel J.; Prendergast, Bernard D.; Otto, Catherine M.; Kappetein, Arie Pieter; Stepinska, Janina; Kaden, Jens J.; Naber, Christoph K.; Acartürk, Esmeray; Gohlke-Bärwolf, Christa

    2012-01-01

    Aims Risk scores provide an important contribution to clinical decision-making, but their validity has been questioned in patients with valvular heart disease (VHD), since current scores have been mainly derived and validated in adults undergoing coronary bypass surgery. The Working Group on Valvular Heart Disease of the European Society of Cardiology reviewed the performance of currently available scores when applied to VHD, in order to guide clinical practice and future development of new scores. Methods and results The most widely used risk scores (EuroSCORE, STS, and Ambler score) were reviewed, analysing variables included and their predictive ability when applied to patients with VHD. These scores provide relatively good discrimination, i.e. a gross estimation of risk category, but cannot be used to estimate the exact operative mortality in an individual patient because of unsatisfactory calibration. Conclusion Current risk scores do not provide a reliable estimate of exact operative mortality in an individual patient with VHD. They should therefore be interpreted with caution and only used as part of an integrated approach, which incorporates other patient characteristics, the clinical context, and local outcome data. Future risk scores should include additional variables, such as cognitive and functional capacity and be prospectively validated in high-risk patients. Specific risk models should also be developed for newer interventions, such as transcatheter aortic valve implantation. PMID:21406443

  4. Global research priorities in rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Carapetis, Jonathan R; Zühlke, Liesl J

    2011-01-01

    We now stand at a critical juncture for rheumatic fever (RF) and rheumatic heart disease (RHD) control. In recent years, we have seen a surge of interest in these diseases in regions of the world where RF/RHD mostly occur. This brings real opportunities to make dramatic progress in the next few years, but also real risks if we miss these opportunities. Most public health and clinical approaches in RF/RHD arose directly from programmes of research. Many unanswered questions remain, including those around how to implement what we know will work, so research will continue to be essential in our efforts to bring a global solution to this disease. Here we outline our proposed research priorities in RF/RHD for the coming decade, grouped under the following four challenges: Translating what we know already into practical RHD control; How to identify people with RHD earlier, so that preventive measures have a higher chance of success; Better understanding of disease pathogenesis, with a view to improved diagnosis and treatment of ARF and RHD; and Finding an effective approach to primary prevention. We propose a mixture of basic, applied, and implementation science. With concerted efforts, strong links to clinical and public health infrastructure, and advocacy and funding support from the international community, there are good prospects for controlling these RF and RHD over the next decade. PMID:21677798

  5. What Is a Heart Murmur?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Heart Murmur Related Topics Anemia Congenital Heart Defects Heart Valve Disease Holes in the Heart How the Heart Works ... heart defect that is present since birth or heart valve disease. Depending on the heart problem causing the abnormal ...

  6. Management of Hypertension in Patients with Ischemic Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Agbor-Etang, Brian B; Setaro, John F

    2015-12-01

    Ischemic heart disease (IHD) affects about 16 million adults in the USA. Many more individuals likely harbor subclinical coronary disease. Hypertension (HTN) continues to be a potent and widespread risk factor for IHD. Among other Framingham risk factors of tobacco use, diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia, and left ventricular hypertrophy, HTN plays an independent role in augmenting IHD risk, as well as a multiplicative role with respect to adverse outcomes when HTN is present concurrently with the other major IHD risk factors listed above. Over the past two decades, numerous studies and guideline reports have been presented with the aims of (a) elucidating the pathophysiology of IHD, (b) delineating an ideal blood pressure (BP) threshold at which to institute pharmacotherapy, and (c) defining the optimal pharmacologic elements of a therapeutic regimen. While there are active debates surrounding the existence and relevance of the J curve in IHD patients who have HTN, as well as the numerical level of the BP cutoff justifying drug therapy in the general population, there is a general consensus that the BP target in IHD patients should be lower than 140/90 mmHg. The most appropriate class (or classes) of medication recommended will depend on the comorbid conditions associated with each individual patient. Overall, however, there is no major evidence underscoring a significant difference between drug classes, provided the target BP is achieved, although it should be pointed out that the most recent (2015) American Heart Association (AHA)/American College of Cardiology (ACC)/American Society of Hypertension (ASH) guideline statement now elevates beta-blockers (BB) to the same level of recommendation as other classes of hypertension drugs in the treatment of patients who have hypertension and ischemic heart disease. Although most agents that reduce blood pressure will correspondingly lower myocardial workload, BB may exhibit a special advantage in IHD patients because BB

  7. Wine and heart health

    MedlinePlus

    Health and wine; Wine and heart disease; Preventing heart disease - wine; Preventing heart disease - alcohol ... more often just to lower your risk of heart disease. Heavier drinking can harm the heart and ...

  8. Exome sequencing reveals novel IRXI mutation in congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Guo, Changlong; Wang, Qidi; Wang, Yuting; Yang, Liping; Luo, Haiyan; Cao, Xiao Fang; An, Lisha; Qiu, Yue; Du, Meng; Ma, Xu; Li, Hui; Lu, Cailing

    2017-03-30

    Genetic variation in specific transcription factors during heart formation may lead to congenital heart disease (CHD) or even miscarriage. The aim of the present study was to identify CHD‑associated genes using next generation sequencing (NGS). The whole exome DNA sequence was obtained from a stillborn fetus diagnosed with tricuspid atresia and complete transposition of the great arteries using high‑throughput sequencing methods. Subsequently, genetic variants of CHD‑associated genes were selected and verified in 215 non‑syndromic CHD patients and 249 healthy control subjects using polymerase chain reaction combined with Sanger sequencing. Genetic variants of previously reported CHD‑inducing genes, such as cysteine rich with EGF like domains 1 and cbp/p300‑interacting transactivator with Glu/Asp rich carboxy‑terminal domain 2, were discovered through the NGS analysis. In addition, a novel non‑synonymous mutation of the iroquois homeobox 1 (IRX1) gene (p.Gln240Glu) was identified. A total of three non‑synonymous mutations (p.Gln240Glu, p.Ser298Asn and p.Ala381Glu) of the IRX1 gene were verified in 215 non‑syndromic CHD patients, but not in 249 healthy volunteers. The results demonstrated that NGS is a powerful tool to study the etiology of CHD. In addition, the results suggest that genetic variants of the IRX1 gene may contribute to the pathogenesis of CHD.

  9. Exercise testing and stress imaging in valvular heart disease.

    PubMed

    Henri, Christine; Piérard, Luc A; Lancellotti, Patrizio; Mongeon, François-Pierre; Pibarot, Philippe; Basmadjian, Arsène J

    2014-09-01

    The role of exercise testing and stress imaging in the management of patients with valvular heart disease (VHD) is reviewed in this article. The American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association and the European Society of Cardiology/European Association of Cardiothoracic Surgery have recently put emphasis on the role of exercise testing to clarify symptom status and the use of stress imaging to assess the dynamic component of valvular abnormalities and unmask subclinical myocardial dysfunction that could be missed at rest. Recent studies have demonstrated the incremental prognostic value of exercise echocardiography for asymptomatic patients with severe aortic stenosis, moderate-severe mitral stenosis, and severe primary mitral regurgitation. In patients with low-flow, low-gradient aortic stenosis, dobutamine stress echocardiography is recommended to differentiate true severe from pseudosevere aortic stenosis. Data on the prognostic value of stress echocardiography in aortic regurgitation and functional mitral regurgitation are less robust. Data are sparse on the use of stress imaging in right-sided VHD, however recent studies using stress cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging offer some prognostic information. Although the strongest recommendations for surgical treatment continue to be based on symptom status and resting left ventricular repercussions, stress imaging can be useful to optimize risk stratification and timing of surgery in VHD. Randomized clinical trials are required to confirm that clinical decision-making based on stress imaging can lead to improved outcomes.

  10. Prophylactic digitalization preoperatively of patients with arteriosclerotic heart disease.

    PubMed

    Bille-Brahe, N E; Engell, H C; Sørensen, M B

    1981-02-01

    This study was undertaken to investigate the hemodynamic effect of prophylactic digitalization before major surgical procedures. Sixteen patients, all admitted for an elective vascular operation for arteriosclerotic disease and all with impaired left ventricular function, were investigated. In half of the patients, digitalis was given before the operation, the other half of the patients served as the control study. The measured parameters were pulmonary artery mean pressure, pulmonary capillary wedge pressure, central venous pressure, mean arterial blood pressure, heart rate, cardiac output, blood volume and arterial, as well as venous, oxygen content. Preoperatively, before digitalization, no significant differences were noted between the two groups at rest and during exercise. Before anesthesia and postoperatively, those given digitalis had improved cardiac function. Those in both groups, however, had a normal hemodynamic response to the surgical trauma. In this study, a definite answer is not provided concerning the usefulness of prophylactic digitalization but an increase in the ability of the digitalized heart to withstand the imposition of a pressure load postoperatively is suggested.

  11. Clinical Research Priorities in Adult Congenital Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Cotts, Timothy; Khairy, Paul; Opotowsky, Alexander R.; John, Anitha S.; Valente, Anne Marie; Zaidi, Ali N.; Cook, Stephen C.; Aboulhosn, Jamil; Ting, Jennifer Grando; Gurvitz, Michelle; Landzberg, Michael J.; Verstappen, Amy; Kay, Joseph; Earing, Michael; Franklin, Wayne; Kogon, Brian; Broberg, Craig S.

    2014-01-01

    Background Adult congenital heart disease (ACHD) clinicians are hampered by the paucity of data to inform clinical decision-making. The objective of this study was to identify priorities for clinical research in ACHD. Methods A list of 45 research questions was developed by the Alliance for Adult Research in Congenital Cardiology (AARCC), compiled into a survey, and administered to ACHD providers. Patient input was sought via the Adult Congenital Heart Association at community meetings and online forums. The 25 top questions were sent to ACHD providers worldwide via an online survey. Each question was ranked based on perceived priority and weighted based on time spent in ACHD care. The top 10 topics identified are presented and discussed. Results The final online survey yielded 139 responses. Top priority questions related to tetralogy of Fallot (timing of pulmonary valve replacement and criteria for primary prevention ICDs), patients with systemic right ventricles (determining the optimal echocardiographic techniques for measuring right ventricular function, and indications for tricuspid valve replacement and primary prevention ICDs), and single ventricle/Fontan patients (role of pulmonary vasodilators, optimal anticoagulation, medical therapy for preservation of ventricular function, treatment for protein losing enteropathy). In addition, establishing criteria to refer ACHD patients for cardiac transplantation was deemed a priority. Conclusions The ACHD field is in need of prospective research to address fundamental clinical questions. It is hoped that this methodical consultation process will inform researchers and funding organizations about clinical research topics deemed to be of high priority. PMID:24411207

  12. Rethinking the Poverty-disease Nexus: the Case of HIV/AIDS in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Pienaar, Kiran

    2015-12-19

    While it is well-established that poverty and disease are intimately connected, the nature of this connection and the role of poverty in disease causation remains contested in scientific and social studies of disease. Using the case of HIV/AIDS in South Africa and drawing on a theoretically grounded analysis, this paper reconceptualises disease and poverty as ontologically entangled. In the context of the South African HIV epidemic, this rethinking of the poverty-disease dynamic enables an account of how social forces such as poverty become embodied in the very substance of disease to produce ontologies of HIV/AIDS unique to South Africa.

  13. Occupational exposure to particulate air pollution and mortality due to ischaemic heart disease and cerebrovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Torén, Kjell; Bergdahl, Ingvar A; Nilsson, Tohr; Järvholm, Bengt

    2007-01-01

    Objectives A growing number of epidemiological studies are showing that ambient exposure to particulate matter air pollution is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease; however, whether occupational exposure increases this risk is not clear. The aim of the present study was to examine whether occupational exposure to particulate air pollution increases the risk for ischaemic heart disease and cerebrovascular disease. Methods The study population was a cohort of 176 309 occupationally exposed Swedish male construction workers and 71 778 unexposed male construction workers. The definition of exposure to inorganic dust (asbestos, man‐made mineral fibres, dust from cement, concrete and quartz), wood dust, fumes (metal fumes, asphalt fumes and diesel exhaust) and gases and irritants (organic solvents and reactive chemicals) was based on a job‐exposure matrix with focus on exposure in the mid‐1970s. The cohort was followed from 1971 to 2002 with regard to mortality to ischaemic heart disease and cerebrovascular disease. Relative risks (RR) were obtained by the person‐years method and from Poisson regression models adjusting for baseline values of blood pressure, body mass index, age and smoking habits. Results Any occupational particulate air pollution was associated with an increased risk for ischemic heart disease (RR 1.13, 95% CI 1.07 to 1.19), but there was no increased risk for cerebrovascular disease (RR 0.97, 95% CI 0.88 to 1.07). There was an increased risk for ischaemic heart disease and exposure to inorganic dust (RR 1.07, 95% CI 1.03 to 1.12) and exposure to fumes (RR 1.05, 95% CI 1.00 to 1.10), especially diesel exhaust (RR 1.18, 95% CI 1.13 to 1.24). There was no significantly increased risk for cerebrovascular disease and exposure to inorganic dust, fumes or wood dust. Conclusions Occupational exposure to particulate air pollution, especially diesel exhaust, among construction workers increases the risk for ischaemic heart disease. PMID

  14. Computational modelling for congenital heart disease: how far are we from clinical translation?

    PubMed Central

    Biglino, Giovanni; Capelli, Claudio; Bruse, Jan; Bosi, Giorgia M; Taylor, Andrew M; Schievano, Silvia

    2017-01-01

    Computational models of congenital heart disease (CHD) have become increasingly sophisticated over the last 20 years. They can provide an insight into complex flow phenomena, allow for testing devices into patient-specific anatomies (pre-CHD or post-CHD repair) and generate predictive data. This has been applied to different CHD scenarios, including patients with single ventricle, tetralogy of Fallot, aortic coarctation and transposition of the great arteries. Patient-specific simulations have been shown to be informative for preprocedural planning in complex cases, allowing for virtual stent deployment. Novel techniques such as statistical shape modelling can further aid in the morphological assessment of CHD, risk stratification of patients and possible identification of new ‘shape biomarkers’. Cardiovascular statistical shape models can provide valuable insights into phenomena such as ventricular growth in tetralogy of Fallot, or morphological aortic arch differences in repaired coarctation. In a constant move towards more realistic simulations, models can also account for multiscale phenomena (eg, thrombus formation) and importantly include measures of uncertainty (ie, CIs around simulation results). While their potential to aid understanding of CHD, surgical/procedural decision-making and personalisation of treatments is undeniable, important elements are still lacking prior to clinical translation of computational models in the field of CHD, that is, large validation studies, cost-effectiveness evaluation and establishing possible improvements in patient outcomes. PMID:27798056

  15. Pheochromocytoma complicated by cyanotic congenital heart disease: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Keiko; Namba, Noriyuki; Kubota, Takuo; Usui, Takeshi; Takahashi, Kunihiko; Kitaoka, Taichi; Fujiwara, Makoto; Hori, Yumiko; Kogaki, Shigetoyo; Oue, Takaharu; Morii, Eiichi; Ozono, Keiichi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract. Coincidental cyanotic congenital heart disease and pheochromocytoma is uncommon, although some cases have been reported. We describe a girl aged 15 yr and 11 mo with pheochromocytoma and tricuspid atresia treated by performing the Fontan surgery. The patient did not have any specific symptoms of syndrome related to pheochromoytoma or a family history of pheochromocytoma. During cardiac catheterization, her blood pressure increased markedly, and an α-blocker was administered. Catecholamine hypersecretion was observed in the blood and urine, and abdominal computed tomography revealed a tumor in the right adrenal gland. Scintigraphy showed marked accumulation of 123I-metaiodobenzylguanidine in the tumor, which led to a diagnosis of pheochromocytoma. We did not detect any germline mutations in the RET, VHL, SDHB, SDHD, TMEM127, or MAX genes. This patient had experienced mild systemic hypoxia since birth, which may have contributed to the development of pheochromocytoma. PMID:27212797

  16. Reducing methylglyoxal as a therapeutic target for diabetic heart disease.

    PubMed

    Vulesevic, Branka; Milne, Ross W; Suuronen, Erik J

    2014-04-01

    Diabetes is a well-known risk factor for the development of cardiovascular diseases. Diabetes affects cardiac tissue through several different, yet interconnected, pathways. Damage to endothelial cells from direct exposure to high blood glucose is a primary cause of deregulated heart function. Toxic by-products of non-enzymatic glycolysis, mainly methylglyoxal, have been shown to contribute to the endothelial cell damage. Methylglyoxal is a precursor for advanced glycation end-products, and, although it is detoxified by the glyoxalase system, this protection mechanism fails in diabetes. Recent work has identified methylglyoxal as a therapeutic target for the prevention of cardiovascular complications in diabetes. A better understanding of the glyoxalase system and the effects of methylglyoxal may lead to more advanced strategies for treating cardiovascular complications associated with diabetes.

  17. Putting Infection Dynamics at the Heart of Chagas Disease.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Michael D; Kelly, John M

    2016-11-01

    In chronic Trypanosoma cruzi infections, parasite burden is controlled by effective, but nonsterilising immune responses. Infected cells are difficult to detect because they are scarce and focally distributed in multiple sites. However, advances in detection technologies have established a link between parasite persistence and the pathogenesis of Chagas heart disease. Long-term persistence likely involves episodic reinvasion as well as continuous infection, to an extent that varies between tissues. The primary reservoir sites in humans are not definitively known, but analysis of murine models has identified the gastrointestinal tract. Here, we highlight that quantitative, spatial, and temporal aspects of T. cruzi infection are central to a fuller understanding of the association between persistence, pathogenesis, and immunity, and for optimising treatment.

  18. Coronary heart disease. The size and nature of the problem.

    PubMed Central

    Turner, R. W.

    1980-01-01

    In the U.K., coronary heart disease has reached epidemic proportions. It is the commonest cause of death after the age of 35 years and the fastest rate of increase is in early middle age. The epidemic is due mainly to our way of life. The most important factors are dietary, with smoking, physical inactivity and stress also contributing. Twenty independent working parties from different countries have reviewed the dietary evidence and reached a strong consensus on dietary recommendations. Little action has been taken in the U.K. The Coronary Prevention Group has been formed to consider the reasons for this inaction and also the implication for research, the government, the Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food, the Department of Health and Social Security, the food and agriculture industries, caterers, nutrition education and for individuals, of the dietary recommendations. PMID:7465457

  19. Congenital Heart Disease: The Crossroads of Genetics, Epigenetics and Environment

    PubMed Central

    Vecoli, Cecilia; Pulignani, Silvia; Foffa, Ilenia; Andreassi, Maria Grazia

    2014-01-01

    Congenital heart diseases (CHDs) are recognized as the most common type of birth malformations. Although recent advances in pre- and neonatal diagnosis as well as in surgical procedures have reduced the morbidity and mortality for many CHD, the etiology for CHD remains undefined. In non-syndromic and isolated (without a familial history or a Mendelian inheritance) forms of CHDs, a multifactorial pathogenesis with interplay between inherited and non-inherited causes is recognized. In this paper, we discuss the current knowledge of the potential molecular mechanisms, mediating abnormal cardiac development in non-syndromic and isolated CHD, including mutations in cardiac transcription factors, the role of somatic mutations and epigenetic alterations as well as the influence of gene-environment interactions. In the near future, the advent of high-throughput genomic technologies with the integration of system biology will expand our understanding of isolated, non-syndromic CHDs for their prevention, early diagnosis and therapy. PMID:25435801

  20. Coronary heart disease index based on longitudinal electrocardiography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, J. C.; Cronin, J. P.

    1977-01-01

    A coronary heart disease index was developed from longitudinal ECG (LCG) tracings to serve as a cardiac health measure in studies of working and, essentially, asymptomatic populations, such as pilots and executives. For a given subject, the index consisted of a composite score based on the presence of LCG aberrations and weighted values previously assigned to them. The index was validated by correlating it with the known presence or absence of CHD as determined by a complete physical examination, including treadmill, resting ECG, and risk factor information. The validating sample consisted of 111 subjects drawn by a stratified-random procedure from 5000 available case histories. The CHD index was found to be significantly more valid as a sole indicator of CHD than the LCG without the use of the index. The index consistently produced higher validity coefficients in identifying CHD than did treadmill testing, resting ECG, or risk factor analysis.