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Sample records for aids related sclerosing

  1. Chronic sclerosing sialadenitis of the submandibular gland: an entity of IgG4-related sclerosing disease

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Tzu-Wei; Lien, Ching-Feng; Hsu, Tun-Yen; He, Hong-Lin

    2015-01-01

    Chronic sclerosing sialadenitis typically involves the submandibular gland. It usually occurs in the middle-aged and elderly adults with a slight male predominance. Recent evidences have suggested that it is an entity of IgG4-related sclerosing disease and has distinct histopathological features, such as a dense lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate, sclerosis and obliterative phlebitis. It is important to discriminate this entity from other diseases, trying to give effective treatment to the patients. In this report, we described a patient having chronic sclerosing sialadenitis in the submandibular gland. PMID:26339446

  2. Immunoglobulin G4-related sclerosing cholangitis diagnosed by liver biopsy: a case report.

    PubMed

    Furuta, Mitsuhiro; Eguchi, Hiroki; Takeda, Yoshiya; Fushiki, Kunihiro; Yasuda, Takeshi; Onozawa, Yuriko; Katayama, Masanobu; Tanaka, Motoo; Shigematsu, Tadashi; Bamba, Masamichi

    2017-01-01

    Patients with immunoglobulin (Ig) G4-related sclerosing cholangitis typically have a high serum IgG4 level. However, here we describe our experience of a patient with a normal serum IgG4 level for whom the cholangitis was diagnosed by liver biopsy. A 61-year-old male presented with elevated liver enzymes and a normal serum IgG4 level. The hilar, intrahepatic, and upper extrahepatic bile ducts were stenotic, with no evidence of a pancreatic lesion. We therefore performed a liver biopsy to differentiate between cholangiocarcinoma and primary sclerosing cholangitis. Pathological examination revealed lymphoplasmacytic infiltrates around the bile ducts with a storiform fibrosis. IgG4-positive plasma cells were also observed. These results fulfilled the Japanese diagnostic criteria for IgG4-related sclerosing cholangitis. When this condition is suspected, liver biopsy should be performed even when serum IgG4 levels are normal.

  3. First case of IgG4-related sclerosing cholangitis associated with autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Masutani, Hironori; Okuwaki, Kosuke; Kida, Mitsuhiro; Yamauchi, Hiroshi; Imaizumi, Hiroshi; Miyazawa, Shiro; Iwai, Tomohisa; Takezawa, Miyoko; Koizumi, Wasaburo

    2014-07-14

    To our knowledge, patients with immunoglobulin G4-related sclerosing cholangitis (IgG4-SC) associated with autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) have not been reported previously. Many patients with IgG4-SC have autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) and respond to steroid treatment. However, isolated cases of IgG4-SC are difficult to diagnose. We describe our experience with a patient who had IgG4-SC without AIP in whom the presence of AIHA led to diagnosis. The patient was a 73-year-old man who was being treated for dementia. Liver dysfunction was diagnosed on blood tests at another hospital. Imaging studies suggested the presence of carcinoma of the hepatic hilus and primary sclerosing cholangitis, but a rapidly progressing anemia developed simultaneously. After the diagnosis of AIHA, steroid treatment was begun, and the biliary stricture improved. IgG4-SC without AIP was thus diagnosed.

  4. Intrathoracic Involvements of Immunoglobulin G4-Related Sclerosing Disease.

    PubMed

    Fei, Yunyun; Shi, Juhong; Lin, Wei; Chen, Yu; Feng, Ruie; Wu, Qingjun; Gao, Xin; Xu, Wenbing; Zhang, Wen; Zhang, Xuan; Zhao, Yan; Zeng, Xiaofeng; Zhang, Fengchun

    2015-12-01

    To investigate clinical and radiological features of IgG4-related disease (IgG4-RD) patients with intrathoracic involvement. A prospective cohort study was performed and IgG4-RD patients were enrolled from January 2011 to March 2015 in Peking Union Medical College Hospital, in which the clinical and radiological characteristics of IgG4-RD patients with intrathoracic involvement were summarized. Out of total 248 cases with IgG4-RD, 87 cases had intrathoracic lesions, including 58 male cases and 29 female cases, with average age of 54.19 ± 13.80 years. Hilar and mediastinal lymphadenopathy were the most common manifestations of IgG4-related intrathoracic disease, accounting for 52.9% (46/87). Other imaging findings of pulmonary disease included: solid nodular (25.3%), round-shaped ground-glass opacities (9.2%), alveolar-interstitial type (20.7%), bronchovascular type (23.0%), pleural effusion (4.6%), and pleural nodules or thickening (16.1%). Only 27 patients presented with respiratory symptoms, including cough, breathless, chest pain, and asthma. Compared with patients without intrathoracic disease, IgG4-related intrathoracic disease had higher IgG4 and C-reactive protein level, and higher incidence of allergy, fever, and multi-organ involvement. Most of lung interstitial disease, mediastinal mass, and bronchial thickening were sensitive to corticosteroid and immunosuppressant therapy, while 36.3% (8/22) of solitary nodular lesions were unresponsive to treatment. Eight patients were on no treatment, with 5 cases remained stable, 2 patients improved spontaneously, and 1 patient was lost follow-up. Intrathoracic lesions are not rare in patients with IgG4-RD, involving bronchial thickening, nodules, ground glass opacity, pleural thickening/effusion, lymphadenopathy, etc. Efficacy of corticosteroid and immunosuppressant therapy were noted in most of patients with lung interstitial disease, mediastinal mass, and bronchial thickening.

  5. IgG4-related Sclerosing Mesenteritis in a 7-year-old Saudi Girl

    PubMed Central

    Hasosah, Mohammed Y.; Satti, Mohamed B.; Yousef, Yasmin A.; Alzahrani, Daifullah M.; Almutairi, Sajdi A.; Alsahafi, Ashraf F.; Sukkar, Ghassan A.; Alzaben, Abdullah A.

    2014-01-01

    Sclerosing mesenteritis (SM) is a rare, benign inflammatory disorder of unknown etiology, affecting the membranes of the digestive tract that involves lymphoplasmacytic inflammation, fat necrosis, and fibrosis of the mesentery. We report a child patient with a history of recurrent abdominal pain and fever who was found to have an intra-abdominal mass suspicious for malignancy. A tissue biopsy revealed the diagnosis of SM associated with IgG4-related systemic disease. The patient is currently maintained on 5 mg prednisone daily and no recurrence of symptoms was noted during the 24-month follow-up period. We emphasize, therefore, that SM can present clinical challenges and the presence of SM should cue clinicians to search for other coexisting autoimmune disorders that can have various outcomes. PMID:25434322

  6. IgG4 related sclerosing mastitis: expanding the morphological spectrum of IgG4 related diseases.

    PubMed

    Chougule, Abhijit; Bal, Amanjit; Das, Ashim; Singh, Gurpreet

    2015-01-01

    IgG4 related disease (IgG4RD) is a recently recognised condition characterised by mass forming lesions associated with storiform fibrosis, obliterative phlebitis, lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate rich in IgG4 positive plasma cells and elevated serum IgG4 levels. Although rare, mammary involvement has been reported as IgG4 related sclerosing mastitis, the morphological counterpart of a growing family of IgG4 related diseases. A total of 17 cases belonging to mass forming benign inflammatory breast lesions such as plasma cell mastitis, granulomatous lobular mastitis, non-specific mastitis and inflammatory pseudotumour were investigated as a possible member of IgG4 related sclerosing mastitis. Clinical, radiological, histopathological and immunohistochemistry findings were noted in all cases. Cases diagnosed as inflammatory pseudotumour showed all the histopathological features of IgG4RD along with increased number of IgG4 positive plasma cells and IgG4/IgG ratio >40%. However, only a few IgG4 positive cells were seen in plasma cell mastitis, granulomatous lobular mastitis and non-specific mastitis cases. These cases also did not fulfill the morphological criteria for the diagnosis of IgG4 related diseases. IgG4RD should be excluded in plasma cell rich lesions diagnosed on core biopsies by IgG4 immunostaining. This can avoid unnecessary surgery as IgG4 related diseases respond to simple and effective steroid treatment.

  7. Inflammatory aortic aneurysm: possible manifestation of IgG4-related sclerosing disease

    PubMed Central

    Raparia, Kirtee; Molina, Claudia P; Quiroga-Garza, Gabriela; Weilbaecher, Donald; Ayala, Alberto G; Ro, Jae Y

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we investigate the hypothesis that IgG4-related autoimmune reaction is involved in the formation of inflammatory aortic aneurysms (IAA). We obtained 23 cases of IAA and 11 cases of atherosclerotic aortic aneurysms (AAA) as control group. We evaluated the expression of IgG4 in both IAA study cases and AAA control cases. In addition, immunohistochemical expression of C-Kit, CD21, CD34, S-100 protein, SMA, vimentin, p53, beta-catenin, and ALK-1, and EBV-LMP1 expression by in situ hybridization were performed only in IAA cases. Of the 23 patients, 20 were males and 3 were females (M: F ratio 6.7:1); age ranged from 43 to 81 years (average 64.3 years). Histologically, all 23 cases of IAA formed a mass that displayed inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor-like features. All lesions stained strongly and diffusely for vimentin and SMA (100%); 17 stained strongly and focally for CD34 (74%); and all were negative for C-Kit, CD21, S-100 protein, p53, beta-catenin, EBV-LMP1, and ALK-1. The numbers of infiltrating IgG4-positive plasma cells in IAA cases exceed that of AAA cases. Score 3 (>50 plasma cells/one 40X field) of IgG4-positive plasma cells was only seen in IAA cases (13/23, 57%), whereas none of the 11 cases of AAA showed score 3 IgG4-positive plasma cells (P=0.0018, Fischer‘s exact test). Our findings suggest that IAA may be an aortic manifestation of the IgG4-related sclerosing disease. The high number of positive plasma cells, >50 plasma cells/one 40X field is more specific for the IAA than for AAA; however, lesser number can be seen in both IAA and AAA patients. PMID:23411750

  8. Sclerosing Lesions of the Orbit: A Review.

    PubMed

    Lokdarshi, Gautam; Pushker, Neelam; Bajaj, Mandeep S

    2015-01-01

    Orbital sclerosing inflammation is a distinct group of pathologies characterized by indolent growth with minimal or no signs of inflammation. However, contrary to earlier classifications, it should not be considered a chronic stage of acute inflammation. Although rare, orbital IgG4-related disease has been associated with systemic sclerosing pseudotumor-like lesions. Possible mechanisms include autoimmune and IgG4 related defective clonal proliferation. Currently, there is no specific treatment protocol for IgG4-related disease although the response to low dose steroid provides a good response as compared to non-IgG4 sclerosing pseudotumor. Specific sclerosing inflammations (e.g. Wegener's disease, sarcoidosis, Sjogren's syndrome) and neoplasms (lymphoma, metastatic breast carcinoma) should be ruled out before considering idiopathic sclerosing inflammation as a diagnosis.

  9. Immunoglobulin G4–related sclerosing disease of the paranasal sinuses: A case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Humphreys, Ian M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Immunoglobulin G4 (IgG4) related sclerosing disease (RSD) of the paranasal sinuses is a rare lesion of dense lymphoplasmacytic tissue, with a high proportion of IgG4+ plasma cells. We presented a rare case of IgG4-RSD with isolated involvement of the paranasal sinuses in the absence of multiorgan involvement. Methods: A case report and comprehensive literature review. Results: To our knowledge, only 11 cases of IgG4-RSD with paranasal sinus involvement have been reported. Patients with IgG4-RSD commonly present with epistaxis and symptoms that mimic chronic rhinosinusitis, e.g., rhinorrhea, nasal obstruction, and facial pressure. On imaging, an expansive and erosive process is described. Surgery provides tissue for immunohistologic evaluation; however, there is a paucity of evidence about the direct extent of surgical resection or medical therapies. Postoperative steroids were typically started, although the regimen was not standardized. Conclusion: Few cases of paranasal sinus IgG4-RSD have been reported in the literature. Evidence-based recommendations regarding treatment and surveillance of paranasal sinus IgG4-RSD are lacking; however, most reports describe systemic steroids as the mainstay of treatment. This single subject analysis, with a review of previously reported cases adds to the expanding body of data related to this rare disorder. PMID:27658185

  10. Treatment Option Overview (AIDS Related-Lymphoma)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma Treatment Childhood NHL Treatment Research AIDS-Related Lymphoma Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About AIDS-Related Lymphoma Go to Health Professional Version Key ...

  11. Stages of AIDS-Related Lymphoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma Treatment Childhood NHL Treatment Research AIDS-Related Lymphoma Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About AIDS-Related Lymphoma Go to Health Professional Version Key ...

  12. Treatment Options for AIDS-Related Lymphoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma Treatment Childhood NHL Treatment Research AIDS-Related Lymphoma Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About AIDS-Related Lymphoma Go to Health Professional Version Key ...

  13. General Information about AIDS-Related Lymphoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma Treatment Childhood NHL Treatment Research AIDS-Related Lymphoma Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About AIDS-Related Lymphoma Go to Health Professional Version Key ...

  14. Epigenetic regulation of HIV, AIDS, and AIDS-related malignancies.

    PubMed

    Verma, Mukesh

    2015-01-01

    Although epigenetics is not a new field, its implications for acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) research have not been explored fully. To develop therapeutic and preventive approaches against the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and AIDS, it is essential to understand the mechanisms of interaction between the virus and the host, involvement of genetic and epigenetic mechanisms, characterization of viral reservoirs, and factors influencing the latency of the virus. Both methylation of viral genes and histone modifications contribute to initiating and maintaining latency and, depending on the context, triggering viral gene repression or expression. This chapter discusses progress made at the National Institutes of Health (NIH), recommendations from the International AIDS Society Scientific Working Group on HIV Cure, and underlying epigenetic regulation. A number of epigenetic inhibitors have shown potential in treating AIDS-related malignancies. Epigenetic drugs approved by the US Food and Drug Administration and their implications for the eradication of HIV/AIDS and AIDS-related malignancies also are discussed.Past and current progress in developing treatments and understanding the molecular mechanisms of AIDS and HIV infection has greatly improved patient survival. However, increased survival has been coupled with the development of cancer at higher rates than those observed among the HIV/AIDS-negative population. During the early days of the AIDS epidemic, the most frequent AIDS-defining malignancies were Kaposi's sarcoma and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). Now, with increased survival as the result of widespread use in the developed world of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), non-AIDS defining cancers (i.e., anal, skin, and lung cancers, and Hodgkin disease) are on the increase in HIV-infected populations. The current status of AIDS-related malignancies also is discussed.

  15. IgG4-Related Sclerosing Disease, an Emerging Entity: A Review of a Multi-System Disease

    PubMed Central

    Divatia, Mukul; Kim, Sun A

    2012-01-01

    Immunoglobulin G4-related systemic disease (IgG4-RSD) is a recently defined emerging entity characterized by a diffuse or mass forming inflammatory reaction rich in IgG4-positive plasma cells associated with fibrosclerosis and obliterative phlebitis. IgG4-RSD usually affects middle aged and elderly patients, with a male predominance. It is associated with an elevated serum titer of IgG4, which acts as a marker for this recently characterized entity. The prototype is IgG4-related sclerosing pancreatitis or autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP). Other common sites of involvement are the hepatobiliary tract, salivary gland, orbit, and lymph node, however practically any organ can be involved, including upper aerodigestive tract, lung, aorta, mediastinum, retroperitoneum, soft tissue, skin, central nervous system, breast, kidney, and prostate. Fever or constitutional symptoms usually do not comprise part of the clinical picture. Laboratory findings detected include raised serum globulin, IgG and IgG4. An association with autoantibody detection (such as antinuclear antibodies and rheumatoid factor) is seen in some cases. Steroid therapy comprises the mainstay of treatment. Disease progression with involvement of multiple organ-sites may be encountered in a subset of cases and may follow a relapsing-remitting course. The principal histopathologic findings in several extranodal sites include lymphoplasmacytic infiltration, lymphoid follicle formation, sclerosis and obliterative phlebitis, along with atrophy and destruction of tissues. Immunohistochemical staining shows increased IgG4+ cells in the involved tissues (>50 per high-power field, with IgG4/IgG ratio >40%). IgG4-RSD may potentially be rarely associated with the development of lymphoma and carcinoma. However, the nature and pathogenesis of IgG4-RSD are yet to be fully elucidated and provide immense scope for further studies. PMID:22187229

  16. AIDS: A Strain on Family Relations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cleveland, Peggy H.

    A diagnosis of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) has both a physical and psychosocial impact that require substantial support. Relating to the families of origin concerning an AIDS diagnosis is a difficult task which sometimes results in rejection and sometimes results in support. In this study subjects (N=32) with AIDS described their…

  17. Poor response of initial steroid therapy for IgG4-related sclerosing cholangitis with multiple organs affected

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wei; Chen, Weijie; He, Xiaodong; Qu, Qiang; Hong, Tao; Li, Binglu

    2017-01-01

    Abstract IgG4-related sclerosing cholangitis (IgG4-SC) is a rare biliary manifestation in which many other organs might be affected. The purpose of our study was to investigate the different clinical characteristics and initial steroid response between IgG4-SC patients with and without other organs affected. A series of patients with IgG4-SC in the period from January 2006 to December 2015 at our hospital were included. The pancreas and major salivary glands were screened, and the initial corticosteroid therapy was given. Clinical information was collected and analyzed including demographics, clinical presentation, IgG4 serology, imaging features, and treatment outcomes. The study identified 72 IgG4-SC patients, including 60 males and 12 females. The mean age was 59.8 years old. Among these IgG4-SC patients, 10 patients had only bile duct involved, 42 patients had 2 organs involved and 20 patients had multiple organs involved. In patients with multiple organs involved, more complaints were given (mean 2.9 kinds), higher serum IgG4 levels were found (23458 ± 19402.7 mg/L), and more stricture lesions of biliary tract were shown. All 72 patients exhibited a disease response within 4 to 6 weeks of starting steroids. The remission rate in the multiple lesions group was lower (60%), and the recurrence rate is higher (83.3%). The relapse-free survival was 20.0 months in the single lesion group, which is longer than that in the multiple lesions group (3.1 months, P < 0.05). The IgG4-SC patients with multiple organs affected had more complaints, higher serum IgG4 levels, and poor response to initial steroids. PMID:28328835

  18. Primary sclerosing cholangitis

    PubMed Central

    Tinckler, Laurence

    1971-01-01

    The literature on the subject of sclerosing cholangitis is reviewed. The value of conserving the gall bladder, of operative cholangiography and of the administration of steroids in the management of these patients is emphasized. PMID:4947701

  19. Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis

    MedlinePlus

    SSPE; Subacute sclerosing leukoencephalitis; Dawson encephalitis; Measles - SSPE; Rubeola - SSPE ... Normally, the measles virus does not cause brain damage. But an abnormal immune response to measles or, possibly, certain mutant forms ...

  20. Sclerosing Cholangitis: Clinicopathologic Features, Imaging Spectrum, and Systemic Approach to Differential Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Nieun; Lee, Seung Soo; Byun, Jae Ho; Kim, Jin Hee; Kim, Hyoung Jung; Lee, Moon-Gyu

    2016-01-01

    Sclerosing cholangitis is a spectrum of chronic progressive cholestatic liver disease characterized by inflammation, fibrosis, and stricture of the bile ducts, which can be classified as primary and secondary sclerosing cholangitis. Primary sclerosing cholangitis is a chronic progressive liver disease of unknown cause. On the other hand, secondary sclerosing cholangitis has identifiable causes that include immunoglobulin G4-related sclerosing disease, recurrent pyogenic cholangitis, ischemic cholangitis, acquired immunodeficiency syndrome-related cholangitis, and eosinophilic cholangitis. In this review, we suggest a systemic approach to the differential diagnosis of sclerosing cholangitis based on the clinical and laboratory findings, as well as the typical imaging features on computed tomography and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging with MR cholangiography. Familiarity with various etiologies of sclerosing cholangitis and awareness of their typical clinical and imaging findings are essential for an accurate diagnosis and appropriate management. PMID:26798213

  1. [Aged woman's vulnerability related to AIDS].

    PubMed

    Silva, Carla Marins; Lopes, Fernanda Maria do Valle Martins; Vargens, Octavio Muniz da Costa

    2010-09-01

    This article is a systhematic literature review including the period from 1994 to 2009, whose objective was to discuss the aged woman's vulnerability in relation to Acquired Imunodeficiency Syndrome (Aids). The search for scientific texts was accomplished in the following databases: Biblioteca Virtual em Saúde, Scientific Eletronic Library Online (SciELO), Literatura Latino-Americana e do Caribe em Ciências da Saúde (LILACS) and Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System Online (MEDLINE). The descriptors used were vulnerability, woman and Aids. Eighteen texts were analyzed, including articles in scientific journals, thesis and dissertations. As a conclusion, it was noted that aged women and vulnerability to Aids are directly related, through gender characteristics including submission and that were built historical and socially. We consider as fundamental the development of studies which may generate publications accessible to women, in order to help them see themselves as persons vulnerable to Aids contagion just for being women.

  2. No mutations in the serotonin related TPH1 and HTR1B genes in patients with monogenic sclerosing bone disorders.

    PubMed

    Boudin, Eveline; Jennes, Karen; de Freitas, Fenna; Tegay, David; Mortier, Geert; Van Hul, Wim

    2013-07-01

    Since the identification of LRP5 as the causative gene for the osteoporosis pseudoglioma syndrome (OPPG) as well as the high bone mass (HBM) phenotype, LRP5 and the Wnt/β-catenin signaling have been extensively studied for their role in the differentiation and proliferation of osteoblasts, in the apoptosis of osteoblasts and osteocytes and in the response of bone to mechanical loading. However, more recently the direct effect of LRP5 on osteoblasts and bone formation has been questioned. Gene expression studies showed that mice lacking lrp5 have increased expression of tph1, the rate limiting enzyme for the production of serotonin in the gut. Furthermore mice lacking either tph1 or htr1B, the receptor for serotonin on the osteoblasts, were reported to have an increased bone mass due to increased bone formation. This led to the still controversial hypothesis that LRP5 influences bone formation indirectly by regulating the expression of thp1 and as a consequence influencing the production of serotonin in the gut. Based on these data we decided to evaluate the role of TPH1 and HTR1B in the development of craniotubular hyperostoses, a group of monogenic sclerosing bone dysplasias. We screened the coding regions of both genes in 53 patients lacking a mutation in the known causative genes LRP5, LRP4 and SOST. We could not find disease-causing coding variants in neither of the tested genes and therefore, we cannot provide support for an important function of TPH1 and HTR1B in the pathogenesis of sclerosing bone dysplasias in our tested patient cohort.

  3. Sclerosing idiopathic orbital inflammation.

    PubMed

    Brannan, Paul A; Kersten, Robert C; Kulwin, Dwight R

    2006-01-01

    A 5-year-old girl referred for orbital cellulitis was found to have a right orbital mass. Computed tomography revealed a mass occupying the inferotemporal orbit, extending into the maxillary sinus. Biopsy yielded a diagnosis of sclerosing idiopathic orbital inflammation. She was successfully treated with prednisone.

  4. Traditional beliefs about the cause of AIDS and AIDS-related stigma in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Kalichman, S C; Simbayi, L

    2004-07-01

    AIDS-related stigmas are pervasive in some segments of South African society and stigmas can impede efforts to promote voluntary counselling and testing and other HIV-AIDS prevention efforts. The current study examined associations among the belief that AIDS is caused by spirits and supernatural forces, AIDS-related knowledge and AIDS-related stigmas. A street intercept survey with 487 men and women living in a Black township in Cape Town, South Africa showed that 11% (n=54) believed that AIDS is caused by spirits and supernatural forces, 21% (n=105) were unsure if AIDS is caused by spirits and the supernatural, and 68% (n=355) did not believe that AIDS is caused by spirits and supernatural forces. Multiple logistic regression analyses controlling for participant age, gender, years of education and survey venue showed that people who believed HIV-AIDS is caused by spirits and the supernatural demonstrated significantly more misinformation about AIDS and were significantly more likely to endorse repulsion and social sanction stigmatizing beliefs against people living with HIV-AIDS. However, nearly all associations between beliefs that AIDS is caused by spirits and AIDS stigmas were non-significant when logistic regressions were repeated with AIDS-related knowledge included as a control variable. This finding suggests that relationships between traditional beliefs about the cause of HIV-AIDS and AIDS stigmas are mediated by AIDS-related knowledge. AIDS education efforts are urgently needed to reach people who hold traditional beliefs about AIDS to remedy AIDS stigmas.

  5. Relative Atomic Mass Scale: A Teaching Aid.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baumgartner, Erwin; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Proposes the use of a relative atomic mass (RAM) scale in which hydrogen is assigned a value from one as a teaching aid for better understanding the concept of RAM. Helps to clarify the ideas and concepts about this topic. (CW)

  6. Dentistry and HIV/AIDS related stigma

    PubMed Central

    Elizondo, Jesus Eduardo; Treviño, Ana Cecilia; Violant, Deborah

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To analyze HIV/AIDS positive individual’s perception and attitudes regarding dental services. METHODS One hundred and thirty-four subjects (30.0% of women and 70.0% of men) from Nuevo León, Mexico, took part in the study (2014). They filled out structured, analytical, self-administered, anonymous questionnaires. Besides the sociodemographic variables, the perception regarding public and private dental services and related professionals was evaluated, as well as the perceived stigma associated with HIV/AIDS, through a Likert-type scale. The statistical evaluation included a factorial and a non-hierarchical cluster analysis. RESULTS Social inequalities were found regarding the search for public and private dental professionals and services. Most subjects reported omitting their HIV serodiagnosis and agreed that dentists must be trained and qualified to treat patients with HIV/AIDS. The factorial analysis revealed two elements: experiences of stigma and discrimination in dental appointments and feelings of concern regarding the attitudes of professionals or their teams concerning patients’ HIV serodiagnosis. The cluster analysis identified three groups: users who have not experienced stigma or discrimination (85.0%); the ones who have not had those experiences, but feel somewhat concerned (12.7%); and the ones who underwent stigma and discrimination and feel concerned (2.3%). CONCLUSIONS We observed a low percentage of stigma and discrimination in dental appointments; however, most HIV/AIDS patients do not reveal their serodiagnosis to dentists out of fear of being rejected. Such fact implies a workplace hazard to dental professionals, but especially to the very own health of HIV/AIDS patients, as dentists will not be able to provide them a proper clinical and pharmaceutical treatment. PMID:26538100

  7. Mobility aid-related accidents in children.

    PubMed

    2012-02-01

    During the period 1991-2008, more than 63 000 children were examined in US emergency rooms following an accident related to a mobility aid: 40% of the children were less than 10 years old; 60% of the accidents occurred at home; and 4.4% of the children were hospitalised. Wheelchairs were the devices most often involved (67%), followed by crutches and walkers. Most accidents involving children under 10 years old were linked to a walker or wheelchair, and mainly resulted in head injuries. Most of the accidents in older children involved crutches and caused lower-limb sprains. In practice, the correct use of mobility aids should be explained to parents and children, and information given about the circumstances most likely to lead to accidents. Children using these devices should be supervised if necessary.

  8. Lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis (autoimmune pancreatitis): evaluation with multidetector CT.

    PubMed

    Kawamoto, Satomi; Siegelman, Stanley S; Hruban, Ralph H; Fishman, Elliot K

    2008-01-01

    Lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis is a form of chronic pancreatitis characterized by a mixed inflammatory infiltrate that centers on the pancreatic ducts. It is a cause of benign pancreatic disease that can clinically mimic pancreatic cancer. Preoperative detection of lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis is important because patients usually respond to steroid therapy. Patients with lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis are often referred for computed tomography (CT) when they are suspected of having a pancreatic or biliary neoplasm; therefore, it is important to search for potential findings suggestive of lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis when typical findings of a pancreatic or biliary neoplasm are not found. Typical CT findings include diffuse or focal enlargement of the pancreas without dilatation of the main pancreatic duct. Focal enlargement is most commonly seen in the head of the pancreas, and the involved pancreas on contrast material-enhanced CT images may be iso-attenuating relative to the rest of the pancreas, or hypo-attenuating, especially during the early postcontrast phase. Thickening and contrast enhancement of the wall of the common bile duct and gallbladder may reflect inflammatory infiltrate and fibrosis associated with lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis. There are several features seen at CT that may help to differentiate lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis from pancreatic cancer, such as diffuse enlargement of the pancreas with minimal peripancreatic stranding in patients with obstructive jaundice, an absence of significant pancreatic atrophy, and an absence of significant main pancreatic duct dilatation. When these findings are encountered, clinical, other imaging, and serologic data should be evaluated.

  9. Gene Therapy and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With AIDS-Related Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-23

    AIDS-Related Burkitt Lymphoma; AIDS-Related Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma; AIDS-Related Plasmablastic Lymphoma; AIDS-Related Primary Effusion Lymphoma; HIV Infection; AIDS Related Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

  10. Aids-Related Cancers in Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mbulaiteye, Sam M.

    2014-07-01

    Thank you Professor Zichichi for inviting me to give a talk about AIDS-related cancers in Africa. Let me begin by congratulating the team that organized the 46th Session of the Erice International Seminar Series, whose theme is THE ROLE OF SCIENCE IN THE THIRD MILLENIUM. I also congratulate the scientists from 38 countries who are attending these seminars. They are perpetuating the principle of SCIENCE WITHOUT SECRETS in the true spirit espoused by Archimedes, Galileo, and Fermi. It is a wonderful honor for me to be here to shed some light on the health impacts of the HIV epidemic in the area of cancer...

  11. Lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Plaza, Jose Antonio; Colonna, Jorge; Vitellas, Kenneth M; Frankel, Wendy L

    2005-10-01

    Lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis is a rare entity that has been described under many different names and constitutes a diagnostic challenge as it may simulate a neoplastic process. Herein, we report a case of a 61-year-old woman who presented to our institution complaining of left flank pain and was found to have normal levels of amylase and lipase. An abdominal magnetic resonance image showed thickening of the pancreatic tail and compression of the pancreatic duct. The radiographic differential included both chronic pancreatitis and a neoplastic process. She underwent an exploratory laparotomy, during which a pancreatectomy and splenectomy were performed. Grossly, the pancreas contained a yellowish white, firm homogeneous mass measuring 6.5 x 3.3 x 2.9 cm involving the entire pancreatic tail and hilum of the spleen. Histologically, pancreatic sections showed extensive fibrosis admixed with an inflammatory infiltrate. This infiltrate was composed mainly of lymphocytes with multiple germinal centers, as well as plasma cells and eosinophils that surrounded pancreatic ducts and extended into the peripancreatic adipose tissue. No malignancy was identified, and the process was diagnosed as lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis.

  12. Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Garg, R

    2002-01-01

    Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE) is a progressive neurological disorder of childhood and early adolescence. It is caused by persistent defective measles virus. Brain biopsies or postmortem histopathological examination show evidence of astrogliosis, neuronal loss, degeneration of dendrites, demyelination, neurofibrillary tangles, and infiltration of inflammatory cells. Patients usually have behavioral changes, myoclonus, dementia, visual disturbances, and pyramidal and extrapyramidal signs. The disease has a gradual progressive course leading to death within 1-3 years. The diagnosis is based upon characteristic clinical manifestations, the presence of characteristic periodic EEG discharges, and demonstration of raised antibody titre against measles in the plasma and cerebrospinal fluid. Treatment for SSPE is still undetermined. A combination of oral isoprinosine (Inosiplex) and intraventricular interferon alfa appears to be the best effective treatment. Patients responding to treatment need to receive it life long. Effective immunisation against measles is the only solution presently available to the problem of this dreaded disease. PMID:11807185

  13. Neurodegenerative mechanisms in subacute sclerosing panencephalitis.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Masaharu; Arai, Nobutaka; Satoh, Junichi; Suzuki, Hisaharu; Katayama, Kazunobu; Tamagawa, Kimiko; Morimatsu, Yoshio

    2002-10-01

    Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis is caused by persistent brain infection of mutated measles virus, showing inflammation, neuronal loss, and demyelination. We neuropathologically examined six autopsy cases of subacute sclerosing panencephalitis, using in situ nick end-labeling and immunohistochemistry. Both the neurons and glial cells in the cerebral cortex showed immunoreactive nuclei in the nick end-labeling in two cases with disease duration within 2 years, whereas they were confined to the glial cells in the demyelinated cerebral white matter in three cases with disease duration ranging from 2 to 10 years. The nuclei and cytoplasm were immunoreactive for 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine and 8-hydroxyguanosine, markers of oxidative damage to DNA and ribonucleic acid, respectively, in the cerebral cortex in three cases with disease duration within 9 years. In contrast, 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal-modified proteins, products of lipid peroxidation, were deposited in the demyelinated white matters in four cases with disease duration longer than 9 years. In three cases with long survival, the expression of glial glutamate transporters was reduced in the cerebral cortex. It is speculated in subacute sclerosing panencephalitis that apoptosis and oxidative stress to DNA can contribute to the early neuronal damage, whereas lipid peroxidation and disturbed glutamate transport may be related to the subsequent neurodegeneration.

  14. Certified Nurses' Aide Job-Related Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Massachusetts Career Development Inst., Springfield.

    This document, which is designed for students preparing to become a certified nurses' aide, contains instructional text and learning activities organized in nine sections. The following topics are covered: the role of the certified nurse's aide (job duties, personal health, professionalism, code of ethics); infection control (the infection…

  15. Association of primary sclerosing cholangitis with HLA-B8.

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, R W; Varghese, Z; Gaul, R; Patel, G; Kokinon, N; Sherlock, S

    1983-01-01

    The frequency of HLA antigens was studied in 25 patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis and compared with a control group of 562 kidney donors. Fourteen patients also had ulcerative colitis. A significant increase in the frequency of HLA-B8 (60%) was found in the primary sclerosing cholangitis patients compared with controls (25%) (p less than 0.001). HLA-B8 was found in eight patients with ulcerative colitis. The frequency of HLA-B12 was significantly decreased (8%) compared with controls (30%) (p less than 0.02). Piecemeal necrosis was observed on liver histology in 66% of HLA-B8 positive and 50% of HLA-B8 negative patients. Low titres of serum autoantibodies were frequently found in the primary sclerosing cholangitis group but did not correspond to the presence of HLA-B8. Raised serum concentrations of IgM and IgG were not related to HLA-B8. This study has shown that in patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis there exists a disease susceptibility gene closely associated with the B locus of the major histocompatibility complex which may be modified by other factors such as ulcerative colitis. Patients with ulcerative colitis and HLA-B8 may be particularly liable to develop primary sclerosing cholangitis. PMID:6600227

  16. Fungal infections in patients with AIDS and AIDS-related complex.

    PubMed

    Holmberg, K; Meyer, R D

    1986-01-01

    Persons with AIDS are predisposed to a variety of previously rare bacterial and fungal infections. Improvement in the quality and duration of survival of AIDS patients depends on the efficacy of treatment for these infections. Between 58-81% of AIDS patients contract fungal infections at some time, and 10-20% of AIDS patients die as a direct consequence of such infections. Oral candidiasis, commonly known as thrush, is the most common fungal infection among AIDS and AIDS Related Complex patients, occurring in 80-90% of cases. In a recent U.S. study, 59% of persons with oral candidiasis who were at high risk of contracting AIDS went on to develop Kaposi's sarcoma and other life- threatening infections. The most common life-threatening fungal infection experienced by AIDS patients is cryptococcosis, a disease occurring among 6% of American AIDS patients and having a mortality rate of 17% during initial infections and 75-100% on relapse. Other opportunistic infections associated with AIDS and AIDS Related Complex are bronchial candidiasis, invasive aspergillosis, disseminated histoplasmosis, and disseminated coccidioidomycosis. All are treatable but eradication i s difficult and relapse common.

  17. Cellular and humoral immunity in subacute sclerosing panencephalitis.

    PubMed Central

    Dhib-Jalbut, S S; Abdelnoor, A M; Haddad, F S

    1981-01-01

    Cellular and humoral immunity was studied in 26 patients with subacute sclerosing panencephalitis. Results were compared with those of 14 normal controls and 11 patients suffering from other neurological disorders. It was shown that cellular and humoral immune responses are adequate in subacute sclerosing panencephalitis. The persistently elevated levels of serum immunoglobulin G (IgG) and IgA indicated a persistent infection, and their progressive rise in later stages correlated with the progressive nature of the illness. IgG progressively increased with the clinical stage in the cerebrospinal fluid unaccompanied by a corresponding rise in the measles antibody titer. This suggests that antigenic determinants other than those tested play a role in the production of IgG in the cerebrospinal fluid. The progressive increase in the ratio of cerebrospinal fluid to serum IgG with the advance of the disease suggests synthesis of IgG locally in the central nervous system. Elevated measles antibody titer in serum and cerebrospinal fluid is a consistent aid in the diagnosis of subacute sclerosing panencephalitis. It is more specific in cerebrospinal fluid than in serum. Its level did not vary significantly with the clinical stages or duration of illness. Depressed serum complement activity has been detected in some subacute sclerosing panencephalitis patients in whom serum levels of the third and fourth components of the complement were normal. PMID:6973545

  18. Sclerosing Encapsulating Peritonitis

    PubMed Central

    Machado, Norman O.

    2016-01-01

    Sclerosing encapsulating peritonitis (SEP) is a rare chronic inflammatory condition of the peritoneum with an unknown aetiology. Also known as abdominal cocoon, the condition occurs when loops of the bowel are encased within the peritoneal cavity by a membrane, leading to intestinal obstruction. Due to its rarity and non-specific clinical features, it is often misdiagnosed. The condition presents with recurrent episodes of small bowel obstruction and can be idiopathic or secondary; the latter is associated with predisposing factors such as peritoneal dialysis or abdominal tuberculosis. In the early stages, patients can be managed conservatively; however, surgical intervention is necessary for those with advanced stage intestinal obstruction. A literature review revealed 118 cases of SEP; the mean age of these patients was 39 years and 68.0% were male. The predominant presentation was abdominal pain (72.0%), distension (44.9%) or a mass (30.5%). Almost all of the patients underwent surgical excision (99.2%) without postoperative complications (88.1%). PMID:27226904

  19. Secondary Sclerosing Cholangitis During Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Abdulqader, Yasir; Chuang, Keng-Yu; Ravi, Jyotsna

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of secondary sclerosing cholangitis that manifested itself during pregnancy. A tentative diagnosis of intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy was considered, but after her third delivery, a liver biopsy and imaging, as well as review of past records, confirmed the diagnosis of secondary sclerosing cholangitis. Maternal and fetal outcomes of primary sclerosis cholangitis have been reported, and this case highlights the importance of considering other diseases besides the benign intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy as a cause of cholestasis in pregnancy. PMID:27622193

  20. Physicians Mutual Aid Group: A Response to AIDS-Related Burnout.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garside, Bruce

    1993-01-01

    Describes origins and functioning of physician's mutual aid group for physicians providing primary care to people with Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). Offers suggestions related to overcoming resistance physicians might have to participating in such a group and reviews modalities that were helpful in facilitating participants' ability…

  1. Trends in AIDS incidence and AIDS-related mortality in British Columbia between 1981 and 2013

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Viviane D.; Lourenço, Lillian; Yip, Benita; Hogg, Robert S.; Phillips, Peter; Montaner, Julio S.G.

    2015-01-01

    Background Appropriate use of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) can markedly decrease the risk of progression to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and of premature mortality. We aimed to characterize the trends between 1981 and 2013 in AIDS-defining illnesses (ADIs) and in the number AIDS-related deaths in British Columbia (BC), Canada. Methods We included data of 3550 HIV-positive individuals, aged 19 years or older, from different administrative databases in BC. We estimated the relative risk of developing an ADI over time using a Negative Binomial model, and we investigated trends in the percentage of all deaths associated with AIDS using generalized additive models. Findings The number of ADIs has decreased dramatically to its lowest level in 2013. The peak of the AIDS epidemic in BC happened in 1994 with 696 ADIs being reported (rate 42 ADIs per 100 person-years). Since 1997, the number of ADIs decreased from 253 (rate 7 per 100 person-years) to 84 cases in 2013 (rate 1 per 100 person-years) (p-value equals to zero for the trend in the number of ADIs). We have also shown that out of 22 ADIs considered, only PCP maintained its prominent ranking (albeit with much reduced overall prevalence). Finally, we observed that over time very few deaths were related to AIDS-related causes, especially in the most recent years. Interpretation We showed that the number of new ADIs and AIDS-related mortality have been decreasing rapidly over time in BC. These results provide further evidence that integrated comprehensive free programs that facilitate testing, and deliver treatment and care to this population can be effective in markedly decreasing AIDS-related morbidity and mortality, thus suggesting that controlling and eventually ending AIDS is possible. Funding The British Columbia Ministry of Health, the US National Institutes of Health, the US National Institute on Drug Abuse, the Canadian Institutes of Health Research, and the Michael Institute for

  2. AIDS as social construction: text mining of AIDS-related information in the Italian press.

    PubMed

    Caputo, Andrea; Giacchetta, Agnese; Langher, Viviana

    2016-09-01

    Given the relevance of AIDS as a public health problem in the Italian context and of the role of mass media in the social construction of the phenomenon, the aim of the present study is twofold: (1) to explore the main AIDS-related themes in the Italian popular press; (2) to analyse the temporal trends of AIDS representations over the last decades. For the research, we decided to consult Italian newspaper articles produced between 1985 and 1990 and between 2005 and 2010 using the archives of the main two national newspapers (La Repubblica and Corriere della Sera), resulting in an overall sample of 446 newspaper articles. A computer-aided content analysis allowed the detection of five different thematic domains (clusters), respectively focused on: Medical care (7.47%), Family support (37.03%), Science and religion debate (27%), Social exclusion (17.6%) and Healthcare policies (10.9%). These thematic domains are conceived along two main latent dimensions (factors) which explain 72.47% of the data variance which respectively deal with: (1) Attitudes towards people with AIDS (care versus avoidance) and (2) Social mandate on AIDS (powerlessness versus control). The study results also reveal the potential evolution of representations of people with AIDS over time: from stigmatised subjects who represent a risk for the entire society within a climate of social control to people progressively symbolised as frail subjects that need to be taken care of.

  3. Psychological predictors of sexual behaviors related to AIDS transmission.

    PubMed

    Thompson, K L; Geher, G; Stevens, K F; Stem, S T; Lintz, M K

    2001-02-01

    This study was designed to assess the differential value of several psychological variables with regard to predicting safe-sex behavior. A sample of 94 male and 179 female undergraduate students, ranging in age from 16 to 66 years, were surveyed about sexual issues related to safe-sex practices. The survey included scales measuring participants' knowledge of transmission of AIDS, self-perception of safe-sex communication, fear and concern about AIDS, attitudes toward AIDS victims, and self-report of risky behavior. Several interesting relationships among predictor variables were found. For instance, favorable attitudes toward AIDS victims were positively correlated with knowledge about AIDS transmission, perceived communication with partners about safe sex, and fear of acquiring AIDS. However, only two predictor variables were independently predictive of self-reports of risky sexual behavior; specifically, fear about AIDS transmission was positively correlated with risky behavior, while communication was negatively correlated with risky behavior. These data suggest a need for a model that allows for complex, reciprocal relationships between the cognitive, emotional, and behavioral components of safe-sex practice. Implications are applied to research with college populations.

  4. Steroid-refractory ulcerative colitis and associated primary sclerosing cholangitis treated with infliximab.

    PubMed

    Duca, Ileana; Ramírez de la Piscina, Patricia; Estrada, Silvia; Calderón, Rosario; Spicakova, Katerina; Urtasun, Leire; Marra-López, Carlos; Zabaleta, Salvador; Bengoa, Raquel; Marcaide, María Asunción; García-Campos, Francisco

    2013-01-28

    Primary sclerosing cholangitis is an infrequent extraintestinal manifestation of ulcerative colitis. Damage to bile ducts is irreversible and medical therapies to prevent progression of the disease are usually ineffective. We describe a patient with long-standing ulcerative colitis, which was refractory to corticosteroid therapy who developed primary sclerosing cholangitis (biochemical stage II/IV) in the course of his pancolitis. Treatment with infliximab (5 mg/kg as an induction dose followed by maintenance doses every two months) was indicated because of steroid-dependent disease associated to primary sclerosing cholangitis as well as sacroiliitis and uveitis and previous episode of severe azathioprine-related hepatic toxicity. At present, after two years of follow-up, the patient is asymptomatic with normal liver tests and complete resumption of daily life activities. This case draws attention to the usefulness of anti-tumor necrosis factor-alpha therapy for the management of primary sclerosing cholangitis as extraintestinal manifestation of inflammatory bowel disease.

  5. Customer relations data aids marketing efforts.

    PubMed

    Werronen, H J

    1988-08-01

    A customer relations information system can help improve a hospital's marketing performance. With such a system, the author writes, a medical center can easily redirect its information systems away from the traditional transaction-oriented approach toward the building of long-lasting relationship with customers.

  6. Controversies in the management of primary sclerosing cholangitis

    PubMed Central

    Nayagam, Jeremy S; Pereira, Stephen P; Devlin, John; Harrison, Phillip M; Joshi, Deepak

    2016-01-01

    Primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) remains a rare but significant disease, which affects mainly young males in association with inflammatory bowel disease. There have been few advances in the understanding of the pathogenesis of the condition and no therapeutics with proven mortality benefit aside from liver transplantation. There remain areas of controversy in the management of PSC which include the differentiation from other cholangiopathies, in particular immunoglobulin G4 related sclerosing cholangitis, the management of dominant biliary strictures, and the role of ursodeoxycholic acid. In addition, the timing of liver transplantation in PSC remains difficult to predict with standard liver severity scores. In this review, we address these controversies and highlight the latest evidence base in the management of PSC. PMID:26925200

  7. Adolescents' Thoughts and Feelings about AIDS in Relation to Cognitive Maturity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Candida C.; Murphy, Lisa

    1990-01-01

    Studied adolescents' (N=163) formal operational reasoning in relation to Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) knowledge, AIDS fear, sexual knowledge, and reactions to AIDS victims. Found that advanced reasoning predicted better AIDS knowledge and general sexual knowledge. Advanced reasoning and AIDS knowledge were also linked with heightened…

  8. Neonatal cholestasis due to primary sclerosing cholangitis

    PubMed Central

    Shetty, Naman Sadanand; Shah, Ira

    2016-01-01

    Neonatal cholestasis is rarely caused due to primary sclerosing cholangitis, which is an inflammatory disease of the bile ducts, which results in obstructive fibrosis of the ducts. A 7-month-old male child presented with jaundice along with high-colored urine and clay-colored stools since birth. Liver biopsy showed mild bile duct proliferation with cholangioles showing bile and thrombi suggestive of primary sclerosing cholangitis.

  9. Management Of Primary Sclerosing Cholangitis

    PubMed Central

    Sandhu, Bimaljit S.

    2006-01-01

    Management of primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) can be divided into endoscopic, medical, and surgical treatments. Whereas endoscopic therapy is primarily used to manage dominant strictures, medical treatment is directed both at modifying course of the disease and at symptomatic relief. Ursodeoxycholic acid is the most promising disease-modifying agent. Corticosteroids and other immunosuppressive agents do not have a proven role. Cholestyramine and rifampicin improve pruritis but response to these agents cannot be reliably predicted. Opioid antagonists are useful in refractory pruritis. All patients with advanced PSC should be offered bone mineral-density measurement and, if needed, treatment for osteoporosis. These approaches are not mutually exclusive and are often used concurrently or in sequence depending on the clinical situation. Liver transplantation is the only therapy that improves survival. In this review, we discuss the various management options for PSC.

  10. AIDS

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000594.htm HIV/AIDS To use the sharing features on this page, ... immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is the virus that causes AIDS. When a person becomes infected with HIV, the ...

  11. The Impact of Multiple AIDS-Related Bereavement in the Gay Male Population.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Springer, Carrie A.; Lease, Suzanne H.

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the issue of AIDS-related loss and the correlative epidemic of AIDS-related bereavement. Notes that individuals are considered particularly susceptible to such bereavement when loss is multiple, as is often the case in the gay male population. Reviews the research exploring the impact of AIDS-related loss and suggests counseling…

  12. Sclerosing Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Parotid Gland

    PubMed Central

    Bidari-Zerehpoosh, Farahnaz; Naghibzadeh, Bijan; Jamali, Elena; Jamali, Moein; Mafi, Amirali; Bahrami-Motlagh, Hooman

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Mucoepidermoid carcinoma represents one of the most common malignant salivary gland tumors. However, the sclerosing morphologic variant is extremely rare with only 23 reported cases in the English-language literature since it was discovered in 1987. Case Report: Herein, we describe another case that was diagnosed in a 25-year-old woman presenting with a posterior auricular mass, as well as a review of the literature, which demonstrates that this is an extremely rare malignancy with no strict protocol for treatment. Conclusion: Pathologists must be aware of recognizing low grade sclerosing mucoepidermoid carcinoma which has metastatic potential and is frequently misdiagnosed as a benign lesion. PMID:27602340

  13. Measuring HIV/AIDS-Related Stigma across South Africa: A Versatile and Multidimensional Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Edward A.; Miller, Jacqueline A.; Newsome, Valerie; Sofolahan, Yewande A.; Airhihenbuwa, Collins O.

    2014-01-01

    Reducing HIV/AIDS-related stigma is critical in the fight against HIV/AIDS. Although national campaigns and prevention programs have been implemented across South Africa to address this critical concern, assessing the impact of these initiatives is difficult as it requires that measurement of HIV/AIDS-related stigma is uniform and comparable…

  14. Computer-aided diagnosis of alcoholism-related EEG signals.

    PubMed

    Acharya, U Rajendra; S, Vidya; Bhat, Shreya; Adeli, Hojjat; Adeli, Amir

    2014-12-01

    Alcoholism is a severe disorder that affects the functionality of neurons in the central nervous system (CNS) and alters the behavior of the affected person. Electroencephalogram (EEG) signals can be used as a diagnostic tool in the evaluation of subjects with alcoholism. The neurophysiological interpretation of EEG signals in persons with alcoholism (PWA) is based on observation and interpretation of the frequency and power in their EEGs compared to EEG signals from persons without alcoholism. This paper presents a review of the known features of EEGs obtained from PWA and proposes that the impact of alcoholism on the brain can be determined by computer-aided analysis of EEGs through extracting the minute variations in the EEG signals that can differentiate the EEGs of PWA from those of nonaffected persons. The authors advance the idea of automated computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) of alcoholism by employing the EEG signals. This is achieved through judicious combination of signal processing techniques such as wavelet, nonlinear dynamics, and chaos theory and pattern recognition and classification techniques. A CAD system is cost-effective and efficient and can be used as a decision support system by physicians in the diagnosis and treatment of alcoholism especially those who do not specialize in alcoholism or neurophysiology. It can also be of great value to rehabilitation centers to assess PWA over time and to monitor the impact of treatment aimed at minimizing or reversing the effects of the disease on the brain. A CAD system can be used to determine the extent of alcoholism-related changes in EEG signals (low, medium, high) and the effectiveness of therapeutic plans.

  15. AIDS-related beliefs and behaviours of Australian university students.

    PubMed

    Turtle, A M; Ford, B; Habgood, R; Grant, M; Bekiaris, J; Constantinou, C; Macek, M; Polyzoidis, H

    1989-04-03

    Parallel questionnaires that enquired into the beliefs and behaviours which related to the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) were administered by postal survey during August and September 1987 to two separate samples of students. Each sample comprised 300 students who were selected at random, were aged up to 30 years, and at the time were enrolled at The University of Sydney; the response rate was 70%. Results showed a high level of "correctness" of belief about AIDS and safer sexual practices. More than half the population had experienced sexual intercourse during 1987, 25% of whom had experienced sexual intercourse on a casual basis. A marked discrepancy was found between the knowledge of and the performance of safer sexual behaviours, as measured by two sets of key questions, which covered condom use in casual vaginal encounters and enquiry into a casual partner's history with regard to sexual experience, abuse of intravenous drugs and history of blood transfusions. A log-linear regression analysis showed no correlation between scores on the two sets of key questions on knowledge of safer sexual practices and the demographic variables of age, sex, sexual experience or religious commitment. It is suggested that an educational campaign that is directed at the problem of behavioural change will fail to be productive if it is focused narrowly on the knowledge of safer sexual techniques; in addition, it should take into account other attitudinal components, such as the perception of social pressures from peer-groups. Within this particular student population, the most-effective immediate stratagem may be to restructure the perceived personal and peer-group risks.

  16. AIDS-Related Stigma and Health Professionals in Puerto Rico

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Torres, Yamilette; Cintrón-Bou, Francheska N.; Varas-Díaz, Nelson

    2009-01-01

    This study addresses an important issue in the AIDS epidemic in Puerto Rico: AIDS stigma among health professionals and health profession students. AIDS stigma has been documented among health services providers such as doctors, nurses, psychologists, and social workers. It has detrimental effects of the services provided and the lives of people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA). The main objective of this study was to explore AIDS stigma manifestations among a sample composed of eighty health professionals and health profession students who participated in in-depth qualitative interviews. Four thematic categories stemmed from the data analysis process. These addressed the following subjects: social manifestations of stigma, stigma manifestations in the workplace, use of sensitive information to control PLWHA, and surveillance of PLWHA. Participants manifested instances of stigmatization they had witnessed in their work and training scenarios. Furthermore, they elaborated on the need to place effective surveillance mechanism on PLWHA in order to control the epidemic. PMID:21423837

  17. Study of HIV/AIDS-related knowledge among junior high-school students in Shanghai, China.

    PubMed

    Cai, Y; Shi, R; Li, S; Xu, G; Huang, H

    2012-03-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the HIV/AIDS-related knowledge among junior high-school students in Shanghai, China, and the factors influencing this knowledge. A cross-sectional study was conducted in 20 middle schools of two districts by a cluster-stratified selection procedure in Shanghai, China. The 2432 sampled students, aged from 11.1 to 16.7 years, completed a self-administered questionnaire of HIV/AIDS prevention. The results showed that the overall correct rate of HIV/AIDS-related knowledge was 62%. Using multivariable logistic regression analysis, we found that the main factors influencing HIV/AIDS-related knowledge among junior high school students were the type of school (odds ratio [OR] = 1.641), age (OR = 1.727), whether the student was a single child in the family (OR = 1.389), whether the student had previous HIV/AIDS-related education experience (OR = 2.003) and whether the student had ever discussed HIV/AIDS with their parents (OR = 1.282). The results indicate that HIV/AIDS-related knowledge among Shanghai junior high school students is not high enough, and more attention needs to be paid to enhance HIV/AIDS-related knowledge, especially among younger students from common type schools without HIV/AIDS-related education experience. We encourage Chinese parents to get involved in their children's HIV/AIDS prevention education.

  18. Steroid-refractory ulcerative colitis and associated primary sclerosing cholangitis treated with infliximab

    PubMed Central

    Duca, Ileana; Ramírez de la Piscina, Patricia; Estrada, Silvia; Calderón, Rosario; Spicakova, Katerina; Urtasun, Leire; Marra-López, Carlos; Zabaleta, Salvador; Bengoa, Raquel; Marcaide, María Asunción; García-Campos, Francisco

    2013-01-01

    Primary sclerosing cholangitis is an infrequent extraintestinal manifestation of ulcerative colitis. Damage to bile ducts is irreversible and medical therapies to prevent progression of the disease are usually ineffective. We describe a patient with long-standing ulcerative colitis, which was refractory to corticosteroid therapy who developed primary sclerosing cholangitis (biochemical stage II/IV) in the course of his pancolitis. Treatment with infliximab (5 mg/kg as an induction dose followed by maintenance doses every two months) was indicated because of steroid-dependent disease associated to primary sclerosing cholangitis as well as sacroiliitis and uveitis and previous episode of severe azathioprine-related hepatic toxicity. At present, after two years of follow-up, the patient is asymptomatic with normal liver tests and complete resumption of daily life activities. This case draws attention to the usefulness of anti-tumor necrosis factor-alpha therapy for the management of primary sclerosing cholangitis as extraintestinal manifestation of inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:23382642

  19. [Sclerosing lipogranuloma of the male genitals].

    PubMed

    Dimitrowa, J; Balabanowa, M; Zarnuschanow, P; Scharow, P

    1989-03-15

    We report on a 23-year-old male patient showing sclerosing lipogranuloma of the genitalia and surface ulceration of the penis. Histologic investigation revealed a granuloma of the foreign body type spreading both dermally and subcutaneously and showing cavities of varying sizes, resembling Swiss cheese, which were partly coated with macrophages. Histochemical tests with Sudan Ill, Sudan-black B and OsO4, as well as chromatographic analysis confirmed the presence of a hydrophobic unpolar lipid, such as liquid paraffin.

  20. Cytogenetic study of a pulmonary sclerosing hemangioma.

    PubMed

    Pareja, María J; Vargas, María T; Sánchez, Ana; Ibáñez, José; González-Cámpora, Ricardo

    2009-11-01

    Pulmonary sclerosing hemangioma (PSH) is an uncommon benign tumor that presents as a solitary asymptomatic and slow-growing nodule. It occurs in both young and old persons; peak incidence is in the fifth decade. Both sexes are affected by this tumor, but women more frequently than men. On histological examination, PSH shows prominent sclerotization and vascularization of the tissue. Recent studies conclude that PSH derives from type II pneumocytes, but the potential for progression and histogenesis remains controversial. We report a case of pulmonary sclerosing hemangioma in a 61-year-old woman with a neoplastic node 1 cm in diameter. The karyotype was 46,XX,t(8;18),der(14;15),+14 in all the cells analyzed. PTEN (10q23) and IgH (14q32) probes were analyzed in interphase nuclei and paraffin-embedded tissues of tumor cells. These chromosome abnormalities could provide information about the relationship of genetic changes to the biological properties of sclerosing hemangioma tumors.

  1. Social disparities, communication inequalities, and HIV/AIDS-related knowledge and attitudes in India.

    PubMed

    Ackerson, Leland K; Ramanadhan, Shoba; Arya, Monisha; Viswanath, Kasisomayajula

    2012-10-01

    Promoting awareness, increasing knowledge, and eliminating stigma is important for stopping the spread of HIV/AIDS. The relation of social determinants and communication inequalities with HIV/AIDS-related cognitive processes has not been studied previously in India. Gender-stratified Poisson regression models of 123,459 women and 73,908 men in the 2005-2006 National Family Health Survey were used to calculate relative risk estimates and 95% confidence intervals for these associations. Results indicated that there are significant inequalities in mass media use among different social classes. Education and wealth are strongly and positively associated with awareness of HIV/AIDS and knowledge about prevention and transmission of AIDS and negatively associated with HIV/AIDS-related stigma. These associations attenuated when use of various mass media types were added to the models with television showing the strongest effect. Mass media may be helpful in reducing social disparities in HIV/AIDS outcomes.

  2. AIDS-related primary Kaposi sarcoma of the nasopharynx.

    PubMed

    Çelenk, Fatih; Yilmaz, Metin; Asal, Korhan; Ekinci, Özgür; Tokgöz, Nil

    2011-06-01

    Primary nasopharyngeal Kaposi sarcoma is extremely rare, as only 1 case has been previously reported in the literature. We report a new case, which occurred in a 37-year-old man with a known history of acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). The patient presented with complaints of recurrent epistaxis and postnasal hemorrhage. Endoscopic examination detected a bluish, smooth, firm, nonpulsatile mass in the nasopharyngeal wall. Histopathologic findings on biopsy were consistent with Kaposi sarcoma. The tumor was successfully treated with radiotherapy. Kaposi sarcoma should be considered in the differential diagnosis of any AIDS patient who presents with recurrent unilateral nasal bleeding.

  3. Knowledge of laws regulating issues related to HIV and AIDS: development of the HIV/AIDS and the law scale.

    PubMed

    Paniagua, F A; Black, S A; O'Boyle, M; Jones, P

    1999-06-01

    42 middle-aged and older adults, ranging in age from 51 to 85 years, completed 10 items dealing with the assessment of knowledge regarding laws regulating issues related to HIV and AIDS. Participants also completed 40 items involving knowledge of risks for HIV infection. The Cronbach coefficient alpha and test-retest reliability coefficient on the HIV/AIDS and the Law Scale were .74 and .83, respectively. Over-all, the grand mean for correct answers was 46.9%, whereas the grand means for incorrect answers and "don't know" responses were 13.6% and 39.5%, suggesting substantial lack of knowledge of laws regulating issues related to HIV and AIDS. Women (50%) and younger participants (51 to 66 years old; 48.2%) showed more of this knowledge (50%) than men (43.0%) and older participants (46.2%). The sample reported a substantial amount of knowledge regarding HIV transmission assessed with factual (92.2% correct) and misconception (87.5% correct) items. The correlation between this knowledge and knowledge of laws regulating issues related to HIV and AIDS was .42 (p < .01). Research with this scale using adolescents and young adults as well as the utility of the scale in areas of clinical, legal, and policy development are discussed.

  4. Sclerosing Meningioma : Radiological and Clinical Characteristics of 21 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Ho; Se, Young-Bem; Dho, Yun-Sik; Choi, Seung Hong; Park, Sung-Hye

    2016-01-01

    Objective A rare subtype of meningioma, sclerosing meningioma is not included in the current World Health Organization classification of meningiomas and is classified into the category of other morphological variation subtypes. Sclerosing meningioma is often misdiagnosed to other non-benign meningioma or malignant neoplasm, so it is important to diagnose sclerosing type correctly. We analyzed the radiological and clinical characteristics of a series of sclerosing meningiomas. Methods Twenty-one patients who underwent surgery in one institute with a histopathologically proven sclerosing meningioma were included from 2006 to 2014. Eighteen tumors were diagnosed as a pure sclerosing-type meningioma, and 3 as mixed type. Magnetic resonance image was taken for all patients including contrast enhancement image. Computed tomography (CT) scan was taken for 16 patients. One neuroradiologist and 1 neurosurgeon reviewed all images retrospectively. Results In the all 16 patients with preoperative CT images, higher attenuation was observed in the meningioma than in the brain parenchyma, and calcification was observed in 11 (69%). In 15 of the 21 patients (71%), a distinctive very low signal intensity appeared as a dark color in T2-weighted images. Nine of these 15 tumors (60%) exhibited heterogeneous enhancement, and 6 (40%) exhibited homogeneous enhancement that was unlike the homogeneous enhancing pattern shown by conventional meningiomas. Ten patients had a clear tumor margin without peritumoral edema. Conclusion Although these peculiar radiological characteristics are not unique to sclerosing meningioma, we believe that they are distinctive features that may be helpful for distinguishing sclerosing meningioma from other subtypes. PMID:27847571

  5. Treatment options for spontaneous and postoperative sclerosing mesenteritis

    PubMed Central

    Klasen, Jennifer; Güller, Ulrich; Muff, Brigitte; Candinas, Daniel; Seiler, Christian A; Fahrner, René

    2016-01-01

    Sclerosing mesenteritis is a rare pathology with only a few described cases in the literature. The etiology is unclear; however, several potential triggers, including abdominal surgery and abdominal trauma, have been discussed. The pathology includes a benign acute or chronic inflammatory process affecting the adipose tissue of the mesenterium. Despite it being a rare disease, sclerosing mesenteritis is an important differential diagnosis in patients after abdominal surgery or patients presenting spontaneously with signs of acute inflammation and abdominal pain. We present here three cases with sclerosing mesenteritis. In two cases, sclerosing mesenteritis occurred postoperatively after abdominal surgery. One patient was treated because of abdominal pain and specific radiological signs revealing spontaneous manifestation of sclerosing mesenteritis. So far there are no distinct treatment algorithms, so the patients were treated differently, including steroids, antibiotics and watchful waiting. In addition, we reviewed the current literature on treatment options for this rare disease. PMID:27933138

  6. Sclerosing Mesenteritis: A Rare Cause of Small Bowel Obstruction.

    PubMed

    Harvin, Glenn; Graham, Adam

    2016-01-01

    Sclerosing mesenteritis falls within a spectrum of primary idiopathic inflammatory and fibrotic processes that affect the mesentery. The exact etiology has not been determined, although the following associations have been noted: abdominal surgery, trauma, autoimmunity, paraneoplastic syndrome, ischemia and infection. Progression of sclerosing mesentritis can lead to bowel obstruction, a rare complication of this uncommon condition. We report a case of a 66-year-old female with abdominal pain who was noted to have a small bowel obstruction requiring laparotomy and a partial small bowel resection. The pathology of the resected tissue was consistent with sclerosing mesenteritis, a rare cause of a small bowel obstruction. Sclerosing mesenteritis has variable rates of progression, and there is no consensus regarding the optimal treatment. Physicians should consider sclerosing mesenteritis in the differential diagnosis of a small bowel obstruction.

  7. Sclerosing Mesenteritis: A Rare Cause of Small Bowel Obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Harvin, Glenn; Graham, Adam

    2016-01-01

    Sclerosing mesenteritis falls within a spectrum of primary idiopathic inflammatory and fibrotic processes that affect the mesentery. The exact etiology has not been determined, although the following associations have been noted: abdominal surgery, trauma, autoimmunity, paraneoplastic syndrome, ischemia and infection. Progression of sclerosing mesentritis can lead to bowel obstruction, a rare complication of this uncommon condition. We report a case of a 66-year-old female with abdominal pain who was noted to have a small bowel obstruction requiring laparotomy and a partial small bowel resection. The pathology of the resected tissue was consistent with sclerosing mesenteritis, a rare cause of a small bowel obstruction. Sclerosing mesenteritis has variable rates of progression, and there is no consensus regarding the optimal treatment. Physicians should consider sclerosing mesenteritis in the differential diagnosis of a small bowel obstruction. PMID:27403104

  8. Sclerosing cholangitis in baboons (Papio spp) resembling primary sclerosing cholangitis of humans.

    PubMed

    Arenas-Gamboa, A M; Bearss, J J; Hubbard, G B; Porter, B F; Owston, M A; Dick, E J

    2012-05-01

    Primary sclerosing cholangitis is a chronic and progressive cholestatic liver disease that has been extensively documented in the human literature. Although it shares many features in common with chronic lymphocytic cholangitis in cats, primary sclerosing cholangitis has never been reported in a nonhuman primate. Primary sclerosing cholangitis is characterized by the presence of intrahepatic and/or extrahepatic inflammation and concentric fibrosis of bile ducts, eventually leading to cirrhosis and hepatic failure. The pathogenesis and cause remain unknown, but the disease likely involves a multifactorial mechanism with genetic- and immune-mediated components. The authors report 2 cases that histologically resemble the condition in humans; they consist of 2 adult male baboons with a clinical history of chronic elevated liver enzymes. In both cases, the liver was histologically characterized by thick bands of fibrosis and mild lymphoplasmacytic periportal cholangiohepatitis with concentric periductal fibrosis, resulting in atrophy and loss of bile ducts. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed positivity of hepatocytes to cytokeratin 7. Masson stain demonstrated marked biliary fibrosis. This is the first report that resembles sclerosing cholangitis in a nonhuman primate, and it suggests that the baboon may provide a useful animal model for this condition in humans.

  9. A liver lesion in primary sclerosing cholangitis

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Sujata; Rajoriya, Neil; Wang, Lai Mun; Collier, Jane

    2015-01-01

    Primary sclerosing cholangitis is associated with an increased risk of cholangiocarcinoma; appropriate surveillance should be undertaken for this. Our case illustrates an unexpected liver lesion in such a patient, which would not have been detected with imaging alone. In suspected cancer, if a patient is not a candidate for liver resection, liver biopsy should be considered in case there is a treatment option for an alternative cause of the liver lesion. This is a careful decision to be made due to the risk of tumour seeding compromising cure and needs to be discussed via the hepatobiliary multidisciplinary team. PMID:25827915

  10. Exploring AIDS-Related Knowledge, Attitudes, and Behaviors of Female Mexican Migrant Workers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Organista, Pamela Balls; Organista, Kurt C.; Soloff, Pearl R.

    1998-01-01

    AIDS-related knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors were assessed among female migrant laborers (N=32). Results are reported regarding knowledge and beliefs about AIDS transmission, knowledge and beliefs about condom use, and actual use of condoms. Needs for health education and services, sexual power, and other implications of findings are…

  11. "She Told Them, Oh That Bitch Got AIDS": Experiences of Multilevel HIV/AIDS-Related Stigma Among African American Women Living with HIV/AIDS in the South.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Faith; Ingram, Lucy Annang; Kerr, Jelani; Buchberg, Meredith; Bogdan-Lovis, Libby; Philpott-Jones, Sean

    2016-07-01

    African American women bear a disproportionate burden of HIV/AIDS in the United States. Although they constitute only 13% of the US population, African Americans account for nearly 65% of all new HIV infections among American women. In addition, this population suffers comparatively greater adverse health outcomes related to HIV status. African American women living with HIV in the South may be further burdened by HIV/AIDS stigma, which is comparatively more pronounced in this region. To further explore this burden, we used narrative data and the Social Ecological Model to explore how African American women living with HIV in the US South recount, conceptualize, and cope with HIV/AIDS stigma at interpersonal, community, and institutional levels. Our narrative analysis suggests that HIV-positive African American women living in the South are vulnerable to experiences of multilevel HIV stigma in various settings and contexts across multiple domains of life. Stigma subsequently complicated disclosure decisions and made it difficult for women to feel supported in particular social, professional and medical settings that are generally regarded as safe spaces for noninfected individuals. Findings suggest that the debilitating and compounded effect of multilevel HIV/AIDS stigma on HIV-positive African American women in the South warrants closer examination to tailor approaches that effectively address the unique needs of this population.

  12. Sclerosing hemangioma: A diagnostic dilemma in fine needle aspiration cytology

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Jennifer; Zhou, Fang; Wei, Xiao-Jun; Kovacs, Sandor; Simsir, Aylin; Shi, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Sclerosing hemangioma of the lung is a benign neoplasm with a widely debated histogenesis. It has a polymorphic histomorphology characterized by a biphasic cell population of “surface cells” and “round cells” arranged in four general patterns: Papillary, solid, angiomatous, and sclerotic. This variability in histomorphology makes it difficult to diagnose sclerosing hemangioma by fine needle aspiration (FNA). We present a case of sclerosing hemangioma diagnosed on FNA with immunohistochemistry performed on an accompanied cell block. The clinical presentation, cytomorphology, immunohistochemistry, and differential diagnoses are discussed. PMID:27168758

  13. A Case of Feline Gastrointestinal Eosinophilic Sclerosing Fibroplasia

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Manabu; Onchi, Miyako; Ozaki, Masakazu

    2013-01-01

    Feline gastrointestinal eosinophilic sclerosing fibroplasia was diagnosed in an 8-month-old Scottish fold that had a primary gastrointestinal mass involving the stomach, duodenum and mesenteric lymph nodes. Histopathologically, the most characteristic feature of this mass was granulation tissue with eosinophil infiltration and hyperplasia of sclerosing collagen fiber. Immunohistochemically, large spindle-shaped cells were positive for smooth muscle actin and vimentin. This case emphasizes the importance of feline gastrointestinal eosinophilic sclerosing fibroplasia as a differential diagnosis of gastrointestinal neoplastic lesions such as osteosarcoma and mast cell tumor in cats. PMID:23723568

  14. A case of feline gastrointestinal eosinophilic sclerosing fibroplasia.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Manabu; Onchi, Miyako; Ozaki, Masakazu

    2013-03-01

    Feline gastrointestinal eosinophilic sclerosing fibroplasia was diagnosed in an 8-month-old Scottish fold that had a primary gastrointestinal mass involving the stomach, duodenum and mesenteric lymph nodes. Histopathologically, the most characteristic feature of this mass was granulation tissue with eosinophil infiltration and hyperplasia of sclerosing collagen fiber. Immunohistochemically, large spindle-shaped cells were positive for smooth muscle actin and vimentin. This case emphasizes the importance of feline gastrointestinal eosinophilic sclerosing fibroplasia as a differential diagnosis of gastrointestinal neoplastic lesions such as osteosarcoma and mast cell tumor in cats.

  15. Ergotism related to a single dose of ergotamine tartrate in an AIDS patient treated with ritonavir.

    PubMed

    Blanche, P; Rigolet, A; Gombert, B; Ginsburg, C; Salmon, D; Sicard, D

    1999-09-01

    We report a rare case of ergotism related to a single dose of ergotamine tartrate in a man with AIDS being treated with ritonavir. He was treated with a prostacyclin analogue and made a complete recovery.

  16. Analogies (Adages) as Aids for Comprehending Structural Relations in Text.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moreno, Virginia; Di Vesta, Francis J.

    1994-01-01

    In 2 experiments involving a total of 43 college students, adages (relational metaphors) were found to facilitate processing of general ideas and higher-order principles. The higher the degree of structural relations embedded in the titles of passages, the greater the recall and accessibility of system-related ideas. (SLD)

  17. Clinical features and management of primary sclerosing cholangitis

    PubMed Central

    Silveira, Marina G; Lindor, Keith D

    2008-01-01

    Primary sclerosing cholangitis is a chronic cholestatic liver disease characterized by inflammation and fibrosis of the bile ducts, resulting in cirrhosis and need for liver transplantation and reduced life expectancy. The majority of cases occur in young and middle-aged men, often in association with inflammatory bowel disease. The etiology of primary sclerosing cholangitis includes immune-mediated components and elements of undefined nature. No effective medical therapy has been identified. The multiple complications of primary sclerosing cholangitis include metabolic bone disease, dominant strictures, bacterial cholangitis, and malignancy, particularly cholangiocarcinoma, which is the most lethal complication of primary sclerosing cholangitis. Liver transplantation is currently the only life-extending therapeutic alternative for patients with end-stage disease, although recurrence in the allografted liver has been described. A PSC-like variant attracting attention is cholangitis marked by raised levels of the immunoglobulin G4 subclass, prominence of plasma cells within the lesions, and steroid responsiveness. PMID:18528931

  18. AIDS-related Pneumocystis jirovecii genotypes in French Guiana.

    PubMed

    Le Gal, Solène; Blanchet, Denis; Damiani, Céline; Guéguen, Paul; Virmaux, Michèle; Abboud, Philippe; Guillot, Geneviève; Kérangart, Stéphane; Merle, Cédric; Calderon, Enrique; Totet, Anne; Carme, Bernard; Nevez, Gilles

    2015-01-01

    The study described Pneumocystis jirovecii (P. jirovecii) multilocus typing in seven AIDS patients living in French Guiana (Cayenne Hospital) and seven immunosuppressed patients living in Brest, metropolitan France (Brest Hospital). Archival P. jirovecii specimens were examined at the dihydropteroate synthase (DHPS) locus using a PCR-RFLP technique, the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) 1 and ITS 2 and the mitochondrial large subunit rRNA (mtLSUrRNA) gene using PCR and sequencing. Analysis of typing results were combined with an analysis of the literature on P. jirovecii mtLSUrRNA types and ITS haplotypes. A wild DHPS type was identified in six Guianese patients and in seven patients from metropolitan France whereas a DHPS mutant was infected in the remaining Guianese patient. Typing of the two other loci pointed out a high diversity of ITS haplotypes and an average diversity of mtLSUrRNA types in French Guiana with a partial commonality of these haplotypes and types described in metropolitan France and around the world. Combining DHPS, ITS and mtLSU types, 12 different multilocus genotypes (MLGs) were identified, 4 MLGs in Guianese patients and 8 MLGs in Brest patients. MLG analysis allows to discriminate patients in 2 groups according to their geographical origin. Indeed, none of the MLGs identified in the Guianese patients were found in the Brest patients and none of the MLGs identified in the Brest patients were found in the Guianese patients. These results show that in French Guiana (i) PCP involving DHPS mutants occur, (ii) there is a diversity of ITS and mtLSUrRNA types and (iii) although partial type commonality in this territory and metropolitan France can be observed, MLG analysis suggests that P. jirovecii organisms from French Guiana may present specific characteristics.

  19. Patterns of gallium-67 scintigraphy in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and the AIDS related complex

    SciTech Connect

    Bitran, J.; Bekerman, C.; Weinstein, R.; Bennett, C.; Ryo, U.; Pinsky, S.

    1987-07-01

    Thirty-two patients with AIDS related complex (ARC) or acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) underwent /sup 67/Ga scans as part of their evaluation. Three patterns of /sup 67/Ga biodistribution were found: lymph node uptake alone; diffuse pulmonary uptake; normal scan. Gallium-67 scans were useful in identifying clinically occult Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia in seven of 15 patients with ARC who were asymptomatic and had normal chest radiographs. Gallium scans are a useful ancillary procedure in the evaluation of patients with ARC or AIDS.

  20. [Küttner's tumor (chronic sclerosing sialadenitis) - a rare cause of submandibular gland enlargement].

    PubMed

    Markowski, Jarosław; Gierek, Tatiana; Witkowska, Małgorzata; Paluch, Jarosław; Swiderek, Monika; Zielińska-Pająk, Ewa; Pająk, Jacek; Klimczak-Gołąb, Lucyna; Smółka, Katarzyna

    2011-01-01

    Küttner's tumor is a benign tumour-like lesion of the salivary glands. Predominantly affects the submandibular gland. It is also known as chronic sclerosing sialoadenitis or cirrhosis of submandibular gland. This is an underrecognized entity in the surgical pathology and cytology literature. Most patients experience recurrent pain, discharge and swelling that is often associated with eating, but others only have asymptomatic hard swelling of the submandibular gland. Histologic examination of the excised submandibular glands revealed preserved lobular architecture, thickening of interlobular septa by sclerotic tissue, dense lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate, preservation of ducts with periductal fibrosis, and variable loss of acini. The morphologic appearance, in conjunction with the elevated IgG4 expression, distinguishes chronic sclerosing sialadenitis from other inflammatory diseases of the salivary glands. Chronic sclerosing sialadenitis belongs to the spectrum of IgG4-related diseases. We present a case of Küttner's tumor in a 62-year-old female treated by surgery. Although this disease was first described by Küttner in 1896, this clinical entity which masquerades as carcinoma is underdiagnosed by many surgeons. There is not enough evidence to support any diagnostic means that could help in the differential diagnosis of this benign condition. Given the high rate of malignancy in firm, painless lesions of the submandibular gland, surgical excision is often advocated and Küttner's tumor is usually diagnosed by the histopathologist.

  1. Mirtazapine and mefloquine therapy for non-AIDS-related progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Epperla, Narendranath; Medina-Flores, Rafael; Mazza, Joseph J; Yale, Steven H

    2014-12-01

    Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) is an opportunistic infection of the human nervous system caused by the JC virus. We report what is, to the best of our knowledge, the second reported case using a combination of mefloquine and mirtazapine in a patient with non-AIDS-related PML with a good clinical outcome. Conversely, the recent trial of mefloquine in 21 patients with AIDS and 3 without AIDS failed to show a reduction of JC viral DNA levels in the cerebral spinal fluid. However, the positive clinical response seen in our patient after the initiation of this combination therapy suggests that further studies in the form of randomized controlled trials for the treatment of non-AIDS-related PML are warranted.

  2. Knowledge levels of pre-school teachers related with basic first-aid practices, Isparta sample*

    PubMed Central

    Sönmez, Yonca; Uskun, Ersin; Pehlivan, Azize

    2014-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate the levels of knowledge of pre-school teachers working in the province center of Isparta related with basic first-aid practices and some factors which affected these levels of knowledge. Material and Methods: In this cross-sectional, analytic study, 110 pre-school teachers working in the province center of Isparta constituted the population. A questionnaire questioning sociodemographic properties and the level of knowledge related with first-aid practices was applied under supervision. The level of knowledge was evaluated on a 20-point scale. In the analyses, Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U tests and Spearman’s rank correlation were used. The study was approved by the Ethical Committee for Clinical Studies of Süleyman Demirel University School of Medicine (registration number: 105). Results: The mean score of first-aid knowledge of the pre-school teachers was found to be 11.9±2.9. The least known issues included washing the wound by soap and water after a dog bite, information related with the necessity of immobilization of a child who has fallen from a high level and the phone number of National Poison Information Center (16.4%, 20.9% and 22.7%, respectively). The scores of the subjects whose knowledge of first-aid was evaluated to be well were higher compared to the subjects whose knowledge of first-aid was evaluated to be moderate (p=0.009) and poor (p=0.001). It was found that first-aid scores did not show significant difference in terms of age, working period, having received first-aid training and having faced with a condition requiring first-aid previously (p>0.05, for all comparisons). Conclusions: It was found that pre-school teachers had insufficient first-aid knowledge. Since the first-aid knowledge scores of the subjects who reported that they received first-aid training before did not show significant difference, it was thought that the quality of training was as important as receiving training. PMID

  3. Accounts from the field: a public relations perspective on global AIDS/HIV.

    PubMed

    Bardhan, Nilanjana R

    2002-01-01

    This study is a theoretical as well as empirical exploration of the power and cultural differentials that mark and construct various intersecting discourses, specifically media discourse, on global AIDS/HIV. It applies the language and concepts of public relations to understand how the press coverage of the pandemic is associated with the variables that impact the newsmaking process as well as the public and policy implications of macro news frames generated over time. Theoretical work in the areas of agenda setting and news framing also instruct the conceptual framework of this analysis. Narrative analysis is used as a methodology to qualitatively analyze three pools of accounts-from people either living with AIDS/HIV, involved in AIDS/HIV work, or discursively engaged in the media construction of the pandemic; from transnational wire service journalists who cover the issue at global and regional levels; and policy shapers and communicators who are active at the global level. These three communities of respondents represent important stakeholders in the AIDS/HIV issue. The findings are analyzed from a public relations standpoint. Perhaps the most important finding of this study is that the public relations approaches used to address AIDS/HIV related issues need to be grounded in context-specific research and communicative practices that bring out the lived realities of AIDS/HIV at grassroots levels. The findings also posit that those situated at critical junctions between various stakeholders need to cultivate a finely balanced understanding of the etic and emic intersections and subjectivities of global/local AIDS/HIV.

  4. Older female caregivers and HIV/AIDS-related secondary stigma in rural South Africa.

    PubMed

    Ogunmefun, Catherine; Gilbert, Leah; Schatz, Enid

    2011-03-01

    South Africa's HIV/AIDS epidemic poses a major public health threat with multi-faceted harmful impacts and 'socially complex' outcomes. While some outcomes relate to structural issues, others stem from society's attitudinal milieu. Due to negative attitudes toward People Living with HIV/AIDS, stigmatisation mars their own experience and often extends to those close to them, in particular their caregivers. Many of the caregivers in South Africa are older women; thus, older women are the focus of this paper, which aims to examine HIV/AIDS-related stigma from their perspective. This paper explores secondary stigma as a socio-cultural impact of HIV/AIDS through repeated semistructured interviews with 60 women aged 50-75 in the MRC/Wits Rural Public Health and Health Transitions Unit research site (Agincourt), many of whom had cared for a family member with HIV/AIDS. Respondents' narratives reveal that many older persons attribute high rates of death in their community to young persons' lack of respect for societal norms and traditions. The findings illustrate the forms and expressions of HIV/AIDS-related secondary stigma and their impacts on older female caregivers. The types of secondary stigma experienced by the respondents include physical stigma in the form of isolation and separation from family members; social stigma in the form of voyeurism and social isolation; and verbal stigma in the form of being gossiped about, finger-pointing and jeering at them. Despite mixed reports about community responses toward infected and affected people, HIV/AIDS-related stigma remains a cause for concern, as evidenced by the reports of older women in this study.

  5. Acculturation, alcohol consumption and AIDS-related risky sexual behavior among African American women.

    PubMed

    Hines, A M; Snowden, L R; Graves, K L

    1998-01-01

    The present study examined the relationship between acculturation, alcohol consumption and AIDS-related risky sexual behavior in a national probability sample of 533 African American women. Results indicated that women who were the heaviest drinkers were also the least acculturated. However, women most likely to engage in risky sexual behavior, including having multiple partners, being nonmonogamous or in a nonmonogamous relationship, and being nonmonogamous or in a nonmonogamous relationship and not using a condom consistently, were high in acculturation rather than low. Alcohol use proved related to risky sexual behavior when considered in conjunction with respondents' level of acculturation. Women at risk for contracting AIDS were not low acculturated African American women who drank heavily, but high acculturated African American women. Findings from this study extend our understanding of risk and contain implications for research and prevention efforts in the area of alcohol use and AIDS-related sexual behavior among African American women.

  6. Beyond SHM and CSR: AID and related cytidine deaminases in the host response to viral infection.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, Brad R; Papavasiliou, F Nina

    2007-01-01

    As the primary effector of immunoglobulin somatic hypermutation (SHM) and class switch recombination (CSR), activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) serves an important function in the adaptive immune response. Recent advances have demonstrated that AID and a group of closely related cytidine deaminases, the APOBEC3 proteins, also act in the innate host response to viral infection. Antiviral activity was first attributed to APOBEC3G as a potent inhibitor of HIV. It is now apparent that the targets of the APOBEC3 proteins extend beyond HIV, with family members acting against a wide variety of viruses as well as host-encoded retrotransposable genetic elements. Although it appears to function through a different mechanism, AID also possesses antiviral properties. Independent of its antibody diversification functions, AID protects against transformation by Abelson murine leukemia virus (Ab-MLV), an oncogenic retrovirus. Additionally, AID has been implicated in the host response to other pathogenic viruses. These emerging roles for the AID/APOBEC cytidine deaminases in viral infection suggest an intriguing evolutionary connection of innate and adaptive immune mechanisms.

  7. Venous angiomata: treatment with sclerosant foam.

    PubMed

    Pascarella, Luigi; Bergan, John J; Yamada, Clayton; Mekenas, Lisa

    2005-07-01

    Venous angiomata, or venous malformations, are often present at birth, although they may not be evident until later. They consist of a spongy tangle of veins, and these lesions usually vary in size. Treatment of venous angiomata is often requested for cosmetic reasons, but painful ulcerations, nerve compression, functional disability can command care. This presentation describes management using sclerosant foam as the treating agent. During a 30-month period ending March 2004, 1,321 patients were investigated for venous disorders at the Vein Institute of La Jolla. Fourteen (incidence 1%) were found to have venous angiomata (: nine women). The age range was 15-76 years (mean 30.8 +/- 18.6). Lesions were classified by the Hamburg system and were primarily venous, extratruncular in 12 patients and combined extratruncular and truncular in two patients. Eight patients, three males, had manifestations of lower extremity Klippel-Trenaunay (syndrome; six had only venous angiomas. Only 10 of the 14 patients were treated. All patients were studied by Doppler duplex examination. Selected lesions were chosen for helical computed tomographic studies. Magnetic resonance venography was also used to image the lesions, define the deep circulation, note connections with normal circulation, identify vessels for therapeutic access, and determine infiltration of the lesion into adjacent soft tissue. Foam was produced by the Tessari two syringes one three-way stopcock teclinique, with the air to Polidocanol ratio being 4 or 5 to 1. This was used at 1% or 2% concentration, specific for each patient. The SonoSite 190 plus Duplex Doppler was used for ultrasound guidance, whenever deep access was required and to monitor progress and effects of treatment. A goal was set for each patient before treatment was begun. Ten patients were treated, and four await treatment. The mean number of treatments was 3.6 +/- 2.8 (range 1-10). A primary goal of pain-free healing was set in patients with

  8. Subacute Sclerosing Panencephalitis in a Child with Human Immunodeficiency Virus Co-Infection

    PubMed Central

    Maurya, Pradeep Kumar; Thakkar, Mayur Deepak; Kulshreshtha, Dinkar; Singh, Ajai Kumar; Thacker, Anup Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis is a fatal infectious disease of childhood caused by persistence of the measles virus in the brain. The effect of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) co-infection on subacute sclerosing panencephalitis remains elusive and rare. We report a child who developed subacute sclerosing panencephalitis following a short latency period and a rapidly progressive course with HIV co-infection. PMID:27777245

  9. 33 CFR 209.325 - Navigation lights, aids to navigation, navigation charts, and related data policy, practices and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Navigation lights, aids to... ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURE § 209.325 Navigation lights, aids to navigation, navigation charts, and related data... procedure to be used by all Corps of Engineers installations and activities in connection with aids...

  10. 33 CFR 209.325 - Navigation lights, aids to navigation, navigation charts, and related data policy, practices and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Navigation lights, aids to... ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURE § 209.325 Navigation lights, aids to navigation, navigation charts, and related data... procedure to be used by all Corps of Engineers installations and activities in connection with aids...

  11. 33 CFR 209.325 - Navigation lights, aids to navigation, navigation charts, and related data policy, practices and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Navigation lights, aids to... ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURE § 209.325 Navigation lights, aids to navigation, navigation charts, and related data... procedure to be used by all Corps of Engineers installations and activities in connection with aids...

  12. 33 CFR 209.325 - Navigation lights, aids to navigation, navigation charts, and related data policy, practices and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Navigation lights, aids to... ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURE § 209.325 Navigation lights, aids to navigation, navigation charts, and related data... procedure to be used by all Corps of Engineers installations and activities in connection with aids...

  13. 33 CFR 209.325 - Navigation lights, aids to navigation, navigation charts, and related data policy, practices and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Navigation lights, aids to... ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURE § 209.325 Navigation lights, aids to navigation, navigation charts, and related data... procedure to be used by all Corps of Engineers installations and activities in connection with aids...

  14. Mortality Related to Chagas Disease and HIV/AIDS Coinfection in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Martins-Melo, Francisco Rogerlândio; Ramos, Alberto Novaes; Alencar, Carlos Henrique; Heukelbach, Jorg

    2012-01-01

    Chagas disease in patients with HIV infection represents a potentially serious event with high case fatality rates. This study describes epidemiological and clinical aspects of deaths related to Chagas disease and HIV/AIDS coinfection in Brazil, 1999–2007. We performed a descriptive study based on mortality data from the nationwide Mortality Information System. Of a total of about 9 million deaths, Chagas disease and HIV/AIDS were mentioned in the same death certificate in 74 cases. AIDS was an underlying cause in 77.0% (57) and Chagas disease in 17.6% (13). Males (51.4%), white skin color (50%), age group 40–49 years (29.7%), and residents in the Southeast region (75.7%) were most common. Mean age at death was significantly lower in the coinfected (47.1 years [SD ± 14.6]), as compared to Chagas disease deaths (64.1 years [SD ± 14.7], P < 0.001). Considering the lack of data on morbidity related to Chagas disease and AIDS coinfection, the use of mortality data may be an appropriate sentinel approach to monitor the occurrence of this association. Due to the epidemiological transition in Brazil, chronic Chagas disease and HIV/AIDS coinfection will be further complicated and require the development of evidence-based preventive control measures. PMID:22969814

  15. Intraductal location of the sclerosing adenosis of the breast.

    PubMed

    Unal, Bulent; Gur, A Serhat; Bhargava, Rohit; Edington, Howard; Ahrendt, Gretchen; Soran, Atilla

    2009-01-01

    Sclerosing adenosis is a benign breast disease with non-specific images on ultrasound or mammogram. It can mimic infiltrating carcinoma when the above mentioned imaging techniques are used. Herein we present a patient with breast cancer who received neoadjuvant chemotherapy and subsequently underwent mastectomy. Ductoscopy was performed to the mastectomised breast specimen as per the ductoscopy research protocol. Ductoscopy revealed several nodular lesions in the duct with no additional demonstrable intraductal pathology. The lesions were reported as sclerosing adenosis by pathologist. As to our knowledge, this is the first case in literature that demonstrates the use of ductoscopy in diagnosing the sclerosing adenosis in the breast tissue. Ductoscopy and development of ductoscopy guided biopsy techniques may be used as an early diagnostic method for the ductal breast lesions (Fig. 2, Ref. 10). Full Text (Free, PDF) www.bmj.sk.

  16. Child Abuse and Aids-Related Knowledge, Attitudes and Behavior among Adolescents in Zambia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slonim-Nevo, Vered; Mukuka, Lawrence

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To research the correlation between physical and sexual abuse by family members and AIDS-related knowledge, attitudes, self-efficacy and behavior among urban and rural adolescents in Zambia. Sample: The sample comprises 3,360 adolescents, aged 10-19, from urban and rural Zambia; 2,160 of them attended school, while 1,200 of them did…

  17. Nebraska Adolescents' HIV/AIDS Attitudes, Knowledge and Related Practices: 1989. Technical Report 22.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newman, Ian M.; And Others

    This report presents information from a survey of the knowledge, attitudes, and practices of Nebraska adolescents (N=1,240) in grades 9-12 related to the Human-Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)/Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). Schools were selected at random from each of the six classifications of Nebraska schools, and two or three…

  18. AIDS Related Stigma in Social Relations: A Qualitative Study in Turkey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kasapoglu, Aytul; Saillard, Elif Kus; Kaya, Nilay; Turan, Feryal

    2011-01-01

    The actual number of HIV/AIDS cases in Turkey is higher than the number of cases reported, and People Living with HIV (PLWHIV) may refrain from acknowledging their sickness or seeking help because of the stigma associated with HIV and fear of discrimination from their close friends, workmates, and even their families. In this paper we aim to…

  19. Unreported AIDS-defining opportunistic illnesses in persons reported with HIV-related severe immunosuppression.

    PubMed

    Lobato, M N; Klevens, R M; Li, J; Slutsker, L; Fleming, P L

    1999-09-01

    To better estimate the distribution of AIDS cases after the 1993 change in the case definition, we assessed the proportion of persons whose AIDS diagnosis was based on laboratory criteria for severe immunosuppression (CD4 count <200 cells/microl or <14%) and who also had an unreported opportunistic illness (OI) at the time of the CD4 report. Five U.S. reporting sites (Arizona; Los Angeles County, California; New Jersey; Oregon; and Washington State) reviewed AIDS cases reported between January 1 and June 30, 1993. From these sites, 3289 immunologic cases were reported; of these cases, 322 (9.8%; range, 1.6%-16.1%) were in persons who had an unreported OI. More of those who had an unreported OI were male, members of racial groups other than white, injection drug users, and had a CD4 count of <50 cells/microl at AIDS diagnosis. Because of recent advances in OI prophylaxis and treatment of HIV infection, studies monitoring HIV-related morbidity should assess the occurrence of OIs in a sample of persons reported with HIV and severe immunosuppression. Such assessment will ensure representative ascertainment of initial AIDS-defining OIs and thus improve the usefulness of the data for public health planning and the allocation of resources for patient care.

  20. Orphanhood by AIDS-Related Causes and Child Mental Health: A Developmental Psychopathology Approach

    PubMed Central

    Sharp, Carla; Jardin, Charles; Marais, Lochner; Boivin, Michael

    2016-01-01

    While the number of new HIV infections has declined, the number of orphans as a result of AIDS-related deaths continues to increase. The aim of this paper was to systematically review empirical research on the mental health of children affected by HIV/AIDS in the developing world, specifically with an eye on developing a theoretical framework to guide intervention and research. Articles for review were gathered by following the Preferred Reporting Items for Systemic Reviews and Meta Analyses (PRISMA standards), reviewed and then organized and synthesized with a Developmental Psychopathology framework. Results showed that the immediate and longterm effects of AIDS orphanhood are moderated by a number of important risk and protective factors that may serve as strategic targets for intervention. Research and clinical implications are discussed. PMID:27668289

  1. Understanding and Addressing AIDS-Related Stigma: From Anthropological Theory to Clinical Practice in Haiti

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Arachu; Farmer, Paul

    2005-01-01

    For the past several years, diverse and often confused concepts of stigma have been invoked in discussions on AIDS. Many have argued compellingly that AIDS-related stigma acts as a barrier to voluntary counseling and testing. Less compelling are observations regarding the source of stigma or its role in decreasing interest in HIV care. We reviewed these claims as well as literature from anthropology, sociology, and public health. Preliminary data from research in rural Haiti suggest that the introduction of quality HIV care can lead to a rapid reduction in stigma, with resulting increased uptake of testing. Rather than stigma, logistic and economic barriers determine who will access such services. Implications for scale-up of integrated AIDS prevention and care are explored. PMID:15623859

  2. Sclerosing stromal tumor of the ovary in a premenarchal female.

    PubMed

    Fefferman, Nancy R; Pinkney, Lynne P; Rivera, Rafael; Popiolek, Dorota; Hummel-Levine, Pascale; Cosme, Jaqueline

    2003-01-01

    Sclerosing stromal tumor (SST) is a rare benign ovarian neoplasm of stromal origin with less than 100 cases reported in the literature. Unlike the other stromal tumors, thecomas and fibromas, which tend to occur in the fifth and sixth decades, sclerosing stromal tumors predominantly affect females in the second and third decades. Computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and ultrasound findings have been described, but have not been reported previously in the pediatric literature. We present a case of SST of the ovary in a 10-year-old premenarchal female, the youngest patient to our knowledge reported in the literature, and describe the ultrasound and CT findings with pathologic correlation.

  3. Bilateral Sclerosing Stromal Ovarian Tumor in an Adolescent

    PubMed Central

    Naidu, Anjani; Chung, Betty; Simon, Mitchell; Marshall, Ian

    2015-01-01

    Sclerosing stromal tumor of the ovary is a rare, benign, sex cord stromal tumor occurring predominantly in younger women in the 2nd and 3rd decades of life. It typically presents unilaterally with only 2 previously reported cases of bilateral presentation. Common clinical presentations include pelvic or abdominal pain, a mass, or menstrual changes. Although occasionally presenting with hormonal manifestations, virilization as a result of androgen production by the tumor is rare. Here we present an extremely rare case of a sclerosing stromal ovarian tumor in a 14-year-old patient with bilateral presentation and with clinical and biochemical evidence of hyperandrogenemia. PMID:26064755

  4. HIV/AIDS Related Stigma and Discrimination against PLWHA in Nigerian Population

    PubMed Central

    Bulgiba, Awang; Oche, Oche Mansur; Adekunjo, Felix Oluyemi

    2015-01-01

    Background HIV/AIDS remain a major public health concern in Nigeria. People living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) face not only personal medical problems but also social problems associated with the disease such as stigma and discriminatory attitudes. This study provides an insight into HIV/AIDS related stigma and discrimination against PLWHA in Nigeria. Methods The data for this study was extracted from the 2013 Nigeria Demographic and Health Survey conducted by the National Population Commission. All men and women aged 15–49 years, permanent residents and visitors of the households were eligible for the interview. Several questionnaires were used in the survey, some covering questions on HIV/AIDS. Results A total of 56 307 men and women aged 15–49 years participated in this national survey. About half of the population in Nigeria have HIV stigma. Younger persons, men, those without formal education and those within poor wealth index are more likely to have stigma towards PLWHA. In addition, married people are more likely to have stigma on PLWHA and are more likely to blame PLWHA for bringing the disease to the community. Also about half of the population discriminates against PLWHA. However, those with higher levels of education and those from higher wealth index seem to be more compassionate towards PLWHA. About 70% in the population are willing to care for relative with AIDS, even more so among those with higher level of education. Conclusion There is a high level of HIV stigma and discrimination against PLWHA in the Nigerian population. Education seems to play a major role in the society with respect to HIV stigma and discrimination against PLWHA. Educating the population with factual information on HIV/AIDS is needed to reduce stigma and discrimination towards PLWHA in the community. PMID:26658767

  5. Relative rates of AIDS among racial/ethnic groups by exposure categories.

    PubMed Central

    Haverkos, H. W.; Turner, J. F.; Moolchan, E. T.; Cadet, J. L.

    1999-01-01

    The relative rates of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) were calculated among racial/ethnic populations using Centers for Disease Control and Prevention HIV (human immunodeficiency virus)/Surveillance reports assuming that racial/ethnic distributions reflect that of the US Census Data from 1990. For comparison, a rate of 1 was assigned to whites in each calculation. The overall relative rates were whites--1, African Americans--4.7, Hispanics--3, Asian/Pacific Islanders--0.4, and Native Americans--0.5. Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome surveillance data show higher rates of AIDS for African Americans and Hispanics compared with whites, Asians/Pacific Islanders, and Native Americans. The relative rates for African Americans and Hispanics compared with whites were highest for injecting drug users, heterosexual contact, and pediatric patients. These results led us to explore possible explanations for increased AIDS reporting in African Americans and Hispanics. We then explored available national datasets regarding those variables. The analyses indicate that variables such as access and receptivity to HIV prevention and treatment efforts, race/ethnicity, sexual behaviors, sexually transmitted diseases, socioeconomic status, and substance abuse interact in a complex fashion to influence HIV transmission and progression to AIDS in affected communities. PMID:10063784

  6. Understanding Internalized HIV/AIDS-Related Stigmas in the Dominican Republic: A Short Report

    PubMed Central

    Hampanda, Karen

    2016-01-01

    HIV/AIDS-related stigmas can become internalized, resulting in declines in physical and mental health. Pathways to internalized HIV-related stigma (IS), characterized by persistently negative, self-abasing thoughts, are not well established among women living with HIV/AIDS (WLWHA) in the Dominican Republic (DR). Identifying factors involved in self-directed shaming and blaming is important, given the high HIV prevalence in the DR’s most vulnerable populations. The present study sheds light on factors involved in negative and self-abasing thoughts in WLWHA in the DR by examining the relationship between depression, perceived HIV-related stigma from the community (PSC), perceived HIV-related stigma from family (PSF) and IS. The Internalized AIDS-Related Stigma Scale (IA-RSS), the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Short Depression Scale (CES-D 10), and an instrument designed to measure perceived HIV-related stigma from the community and family was administered to 233 WLWHA in Puerto Plata, DR. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and ordered multiple logistic regression. Results showed that depression (OR=1.60; p<0.05), PSC (OR=3.68; p<0.001), and PSF (OR=1.60; p<0.01) were positively associated with IS. These findings indicate that IS-reducing interventions should address HIV-related depression. Additionally, HIV-related treatment and care services should work with WLWHA to adopt healthier attitudes about how community members view people living with HIV/AIDS in the Dominican Republic. PMID:26466239

  7. Imaging features of complex sclerosing lesions of the breast

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the imaging features of complex sclerosing lesions of the breast and to assess the rate of upgrade to breast cancer. Methods: From March 2008 to May 2012, seven lesions were confirmed as complex sclerosing lesions by ultrasonography-guided core needle biopsy. Final results by either surgical excision or follow-up imaging studies were reviewed to assess the rate of upgrade to breast cancer. Two radiologists retrospectively analyzed the imaging findings according to the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System classification. Results: Five lesions underwent subsequent surgical excision and two of them revealed ductal carcinoma in situ (n=1) and invasive ductal carcinoma (n=1). Our study showed a breast cancer upgrade rate of 28.6% (2 of 7 lesions). Two lesions were stable on imaging follow-up beyond 1 year. The mammographic features included masses (n=4, 57.1%), architectural distortion (n=2, 28.6%), and focal asymmetry (n=1, 14.3%). Common B-mode ultrasonographic features were irregular shape (n=6, 85.7%), spiculated margin (n=5, 71.4 %), and hypoechogenicity (n=7, 100%). The final assessment categories were category 4 (n=6, 85.7%) and category 5 (n=1, 14.3%). Conclusion: The complex sclerosing lesions were commonly mass-like on mammography and showed the suspicious ultrasonographic features of category 4. Due to a high underestimation rate, all complex sclerosing lesions by core needle biopsy should be excised. PMID:24936496

  8. Pulmonary Hilar Tumor: An Unusual Presentation of Sclerosing Hemangioma

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Jui-Hung; Ho, Shang-Yun

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary sclerosing hemangioma is an uncommon benign tumor of the lung; however, on rare occasions it can arise from the pulmonary hilar region. Herein, we report a 53-year-old female patient who presented with a round opacity in the right upper lung field on a radiograph. Chest computed tomography scanning revealed a 3.1 cm mass in the right pulmonary hilum. Thoracoscopic tumor excision was subsequently performed. On pathohistologic study, the tumor was well defined and composed of round stromal cells and surface cells arranged in a papillary, sclerotic, solid, and hemorrhagic pattern. In immunochemical study, the round cells were positive for thyroid transcription factor-1 (TTF-1) and epithelial membrane antigen (EMA) and negative for cytokeratin. The surface cells were positive for TTF-1, EMA, and cytokeratin. Therefore, a final diagnosis of sclerosing hemangioma was confirmed. In conclusion, pulmonary sclerosing hemangioma is uncommon and rare in the pulmonary hilar region. CT scanning is useful to determine its benignity, although imaging features are not specific for a definite differential diagnosis from other pulmonary tumors. Therefore, tissue diagnosis is usually necessary, and pulmonary sclerosing hemangioma should be listed in the differential diagnoses of pulmonary hilar tumors. PMID:27761142

  9. Effects of Smoking on Non-AIDS-Related Morbidity in HIV-Infected Patients

    PubMed Central

    Shirley, Daniel K.; Kaner, Robert J.; Glesby, Marshall J.

    2013-01-01

    Tobacco smoking has many adverse health consequences. Patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection smoke at very high rates, and many of the comorbidities associated with smoking in the general population are more prevalent in this population. It is likely that a combination of higher smoking rates along with an altered response to cigarette smoke throughout the body in persons with HIV infection leads to increased rates of the known conditions related to smoking. Several AIDS-defining conditions associated with smoking have been reviewed elsewhere. This review aims to summarize the data on non-AIDS-related health consequences of smoking in the HIV-infected population and explore evidence for the potential compounding effects on chronic systemic inflammation due to HIV infection and smoking. PMID:23572487

  10. Eradication of HCV and non-liver-related non-AIDS-related events in HIV/HCV coinfection.

    PubMed

    Berenguer, Juan; Rodríguez-Castellano, Elena; Carrero, Ana; Von Wichmann, Miguel A; Montero, Marta; Galindo, María J; Mallolas, Josep; Crespo, Manuel; Téllez, María J; Quereda, Carmen; Sanz, José; Barros, Carlos; Tural, Cristina; Santos, Ignacio; Pulido, Federico; Guardiola, Josep M; Rubio, Rafael; Ortega, Enrique; Montes, María L; Jusdado, Juan J; Gaspar, Gabriel; Esteban, Herminia; Bellón, José M; González-García, Juan

    2017-01-21

    We assessed non-liver-related non-AIDS-related (NLR-NAR) events and mortality in a cohort of HIV/HCV-coinfected patients treated with interferon and ribavirin between 2000 and 2008. The censoring date was May 31, 2014. Cox regression analysis was performed to assess the adjusted hazard rate (HR) of overall death in responders and non-responders. Fine and Gray regression analysis was conducted to determine the adjusted sub-hazard rate (sHR) of NLR deaths and NLR-NAR events considering death as the competing risk. The NLR-NAR events analyzed included diabetes mellitus, chronic renal failure, cardiovascular events, NLR-NAR cancer, bone events, and non-AIDS-related infections. The variables for adjustment were age, sex, prior AIDS, HIV-transmission category, nadir CD4+ T-cell count, antiretroviral therapy, HIV-RNA, liver fibrosis, HCV genotype, and exposure to specific anti-HIV drugs. Of the 1,625 patients included, 592 (36%) had a sustained viral response (SVR). After a median five-year follow-up, SVR was found to be associated with a significant decrease in the hazard of diabetes mellitus (sHR 0.57 [95% CI, 0.35 - 0.93] P= .024) and decline in the hazard of chronic renal failure close to the threshold of significance (sHR 0.43 [95% CI, 0.17 - 1.09], P=.075).

  11. [Ideology and gender relations: a reception study about AIDS prevention campaigns].

    PubMed

    Roso, A

    2000-01-01

    This article refers to a reception research of seven television prevention campaigns, done in South Brazil - Porto Alegre, Rio Grande do Sul, with 38 women, ages 18-51 years old, from low-income class. The sample was divided in two groups: women that don't participate in groups that fight against AIDS/HIV and women that participates in groups that fight against AIDS/HIV. Based in a qualitative framework, the Depth Hermeneutic and the Feminist Theory were employed in order to study the ideology and gender relations underneath the campaigns' messages. The results indicate that for both groups of women television is an important source of AIDS related information, although they believe the campaigns do not stimulate the use of condom. While the first group of women agrees and identifies themselves with the majority of messages and images within the campaigns, the second group perceives that behind the messages the voice of the ideology operates, throughout a variety of strategies, to create and to establish relations of domination.

  12. Translational Research in NeuroAIDS: A Neuroimmune Pharmacology-Related Course

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Amanda; Shiramizu, Bruce; Nath, Avindra; Wojna, Valerie

    2010-01-01

    Neuroimmune pharmacology (NIP) can be considered a multidisciplinary science where areas of neuroscience, immunology, and pharmacology intersect in neurological disorders. The R25 training program titled “Translational Research in NeuroAIDS and Mental Health (TR-NAMH): An innovative mentoring program to promote diversity in NeuroAIDS Research (R25 MH080661)” at the Johns Hopkins University is a web-based interactive course with the goal to improve the capacity of high quality research by developing mentoring programs for (1) doctoral and postdoctoral candidates and junior faculty from racial and ethnic minorities and (2) non-minority individuals at the same levels, whose research focuses on NeuroAIDS disparity issues such as HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND). This web-based interactive course overcomes the limitations of traditional education such as access to expert faculty and financial burden of scientists from racial and ethnic minority groups in the field of NeuroAIDS research and NIP and identifies rich nurturing environments for investigators to support their careers. The TR-NAMH program identifies a cadre of talented students and investigators eager to commit to innovative educational and training sessions in NeuroAIDS and NIP. The interplay between NIP changes precipitated by HIV infection in the brain makes the study of HAND an outstanding way to integrate important concepts from these two fields. The course includes activities besides those related to didactic learning such as research training and long-term mentoring; hence, the newly learned topics in NIP are continually reinforced and implemented in real-time experiences. We describe how NIP is integrated in the TR-NAMH program in the context of HAND. PMID:20496178

  13. Internet use among people living with HIV/AIDS: coping and health-related correlates.

    PubMed

    Kalichman, Seth C; Cain, Demetria; Cherry, Charsey; Pope, Howard; Eaton, Lisa; Kalichman, Moira O

    2005-07-01

    People living with HIV/AIDS may experience health benefits from using the Internet for accessing health information as well as potential health hazards, including seeking sex partners online. This study examined how people with HIV/AIDS are using the Internet and how their Internet use may be associated with health behaviors. HIV-positive men (n = 347) and HIV-positive women (n = 72) who reported using the Internet were recruited from community services to complete an anonymous survey of their Internet use and associated factors. HIV-positive Internet users reported using the Internet for a wide range of purposes, with health related searches for information accounting for 1 of 3 Internet activities. People with greater income and more education were more likely to use the Internet for health functions. Health-related Internet use was related to a broader spectrum of health behaviors including HIV treatment adherence and health-related Internet use was associated with active coping strategies and indicators of better health. HIV-positive men and women are frequently using the Internet to access health-related information as well as for other nonhealth-related functions. Searching the Internet for health information can be conceptualized as an active coping strategy, occurring with other health-related behaviors and offering potential health benefits.

  14. Creating and sustaining an effective coaching culture in home care: one organization's performance improvement related to aides and aide retention.

    PubMed

    Flannery, Marki

    2011-05-01

    Relationships between aides and their supervisors are often challenging. Unproductive disciplinary conversations lead to increased dissatisfaction, low morale, high turnover, and stress levels among staff. This cycle can continue to spiral if not effectively addressed and aimed in a positive direction. This article shares the experience of an organization that addressed this concern through a performance improvement initiative.

  15. Addressing Ebola-related Stigma: Lessons Learned from HIV/AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Davtyan, Mariam; Brown, Brandon; Folayan, Morenike Oluwatoyin

    2014-01-01

    Background HIV/AIDS and Ebola Virus Disease (EVD) are contemporary epidemics associated with significant social stigma in which communities affected suffer from social rejection, violence, and diminished quality of life. Objective To compare and contrast stigma related to HIV/AIDS and EVD, and strategically think how lessons learned from HIV stigma can be applied to the current EVD epidemic. Methods To identify relevant articles about HIV/AIDS and EVD-related stigma, we conducted an extensive literature review using multiple search engines. PubMed was used to search for relevant peer-reviewed journal articles and Google for online sources. We also consulted the websites of the World Health Organization (WHO), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and the National Institutes of Health to retrieve up-to-date information about EVD and HIV/AIDS. Results Many stigmatizing attitudes and behaviors directed towards those with EVD are strikingly similar to those with HIV/AIDS but there are significant differences worthy of discussion. Both diseases are life-threatening and there is no medical cure. Additionally misinformation about affected groups and modes of transmission runs rampant. Unlike in persons with EVD, historically criminalized and marginalized populations carry a disproportionately higher risk for HIV infection. Moreover, mortality due to EVD occurs within a shorter time span as compared to HIV/AIDS. Conclusions Stigma disrupts quality of life, whether it is associated with HIV infection or EVD. When addressing EVD, we must think beyond the immediate clinical therapeutic response, to possible HIV implications of serum treatment. There are emerging social concerns of stigma associated with EVD infection and double stigma associated with EVD and HIV infection. Drawing upon lessons learned from HIV, we must work to empower and mobilize prominent members of the community, those who recovered from the disease, and organizations working at the grassroots

  16. AIDS-related illness trajectories in Mexico: findings from a qualitative study in two marginalized communities.

    PubMed

    Castro, R; Orozco, E; Eroza, E; Manca, M C; Hernández, J J; Aggleton, P

    1998-10-01

    This paper describes findings from a recent study examining how people affected directly and indirectly by the HIV/AIDS epidemic cope with HIV-related illness in Mexico. One-hundred-and-thirteen in-depth interviews were conducted with key informants in two contrasting communities: Ciudad Netzahualcóyotl (an economically marginalized community) and the gay community in Mexico City (a sexually marginalized community). This paper describes the AIDS-related wellness/illness careers or trajectories followed by individuals in both communities, and identifies critical points for material and emotional intervention. This career comprises four stages: (1) life before infection; (2) life surrounding the discovery of seropositivity; (3) living as an HIV-positive person; and (4) facing death. Comparisons are drawn between the processes of adjustment and coping found in both communities. In Ciudad Netzahualcóyotl, wellness/illness careers are closely linked to prevailing poverty and oppression, as well as the sense of urgency in which local people live their lives. In the case of the gay community, wellness/illness careers are associated with the intolerance and social repression faced by homosexual men. The paper concludes by suggesting possible interventions to improve the lives of people with HIV/AIDS in Mexico today.

  17. The dynamics of the production of AIDS-related stigma among pregnant women living with HIV/AIDS in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, Simone; Villela, Wilza; Fraga, Livia; Soares, Priscilla; Pinho, Adriana

    2016-12-15

    The study analyses the relationship between AIDS-related stigma and the processes of discrimination prior to diagnosis among pregnant women living with HIV/AIDS. The fieldwork involved interviews about the life trajectories of 29 pregnant women living with HIV/AIDS, recruited at two AIDS services in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The analysis revealed that before HIV diagnosis, social and gender inequalities experienced by these women reduced their access to material and symbolic goods that could have enhanced educational and career prospects and their ability and autonomy to exercise sexual and reproductive rights. Being diagnosed with HIV triggered fear of moral judgment and of breakdown in social and family support networks. Given these fears, pregnant women living with HIV/AIDS opt for concealment of the diagnosis. It is necessary for health services, NGOs and government agencies to work together to face the factors that fuel stigma, such as socioeconomic and gender inequalities, taboos and prejudices related to sexuality, and also develop actions to enable women to redefine the meaning of the disease.

  18. Diffuse sclerosing variant of papillary thyroid carcinoma--an update of its clinicopathological features and molecular biology.

    PubMed

    Pillai, Suja; Gopalan, Vinod; Smith, Robert A; Lam, Alfred K-Y

    2015-04-01

    Diffuse sclerosing variant of papillary thyroid carcinoma (DSVPTC) is an uncommon variant of papillary thyroid carcinoma. The aim of this review is to critically analyse the features of this entity. A search of the literature revealed 25 clinicopathological studies with in-depth analysis of features of DSVPTC. Overall, the prevalence of DSVPTC varies from 0.7-6.6% of all papillary thyroid carcinoma. Higher prevalence of DSVPTC was noted in paediatric patients and in patients affected by irradiation. DSVPTC tends to occur more frequently in women and in patients in the third decade of life. Macroscopically, DSVPTC can involve the thyroid gland extensively without forming a dominant mass. Microscopic examination of DSVPTC revealed extensive fibrosis, squamous metaplasia and numerous psammoma bodies. The latter pathological feature can aid in the pre-operative diagnosis of the entity by fine needle aspiration and ultrasound. Compared to conventional papillary thyroid carcinoma, DSVPTC had a higher incidence of lymph node metastases at presentation. Distant metastases were noted in approximately 5% of the cases. Patients with DSVPTC were recommended to be managed by aggressive treatment protocols. It is likely that as a result of this, the prognosis of the patients with DSVPTC was noted to be similar to conventional papillary thyroid carcinoma. Overall, cancer recurrence and cancer related mortality have been reported in 14% and 3%, respectively, of patients with DSVPTC. In immunohistochemical studies, DSVPTC showed different expression patterns of epithelial membrane antigen, galectin 3, cell adhesion molecules, p53 and p63 when compared to conventional papillary thyroid carcinoma. On genetic analysis, the occurrence of BRAF and RAS mutations are uncommon events in DSVPTC and activation of RET/PTC rearrangements are common. To conclude, DSVPTC has different clinical, pathological and molecular profiles when compared to conventional papillary thyroid carcinoma.

  19. Circulating Mediators of Inflammation and Immune Activation in AIDS-Related Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Nolen, Brian M.; Breen, Elizabeth Crabb; Bream, Jay H.; Jenkins, Frank J.; Kingsley, Lawrence A.; Rinaldo, Charles R.; Lokshin, Anna E.

    2014-01-01

    Background Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) is the most common AIDS-related malignancy in developed countries. An elevated risk of developing NHL persists among HIV-infected individuals in comparison to the general population despite the advent of effective antiretroviral therapy. The mechanisms underlying the development of AIDS-related NHL (A-NHL) are not fully understood, but likely involve persistent B-cell activation and inflammation. Methods This was a nested case-control study within the ongoing prospective Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study (MACS). Cases included 47 HIV-positive male subjects diagnosed with high-grade B-cell NHL. Controls were matched to each case from among participating HIV-positive males who did not develop any malignancy. Matching criteria included time HIV+ or since AIDS diagnosis, age, race and CD4+ cell count. Sera were tested for 161 serum biomarkers using multiplexed bead-based immunoassays. Results A subset of 17 biomarkers, including cytokines, chemokines, acute phase proteins, tissue remodeling agents and bone metabolic mediators was identified to be significantly altered in A-NHL cases in comparison to controls. Many of the biomarkers included in this subset were positively correlated with HIV viral load. A pathway analysis of our results revealed an extensive network of interactions between current and previously identified biomarkers. Conclusions These findings support the current hypothesis that A-NHL develops in the context of persistent immune stimulation and inflammation. Further analysis of the biomarkers identified in this report should enhance our ability to diagnose, monitor and treat this disease. PMID:24922518

  20. Knowledge, attitudes and risk behaviour related to HIV and AIDS: the case of international students in a Finnish university.

    PubMed

    Suominen, Tarja; Karanja-Pernu, Caroline; Kylmä, Jari; Houtsonen, Jarmo; Välimäki, Maritta

    2011-12-01

    The purpose of this pilot study was to illustrate international university students' knowledge of HIV and AIDS, attitudes towards HIV and AIDS and risk behaviours in relation to HIV and AIDS. Questionnaires were posted to 140 students, and 32 responded. Data were analysed statistically. The results indicated a fairly good knowledge level of HIV and AIDS. The majority of students were well aware of the general facts about HIV and AIDS, modes of transmission and main risk groups, and they were also aware of the universal precautions. The majority of students had positive attitudes towards persons with HIV and AIDS and were willing to care for them. The students identified well with risk behaviours. Most agreed that their knowledge level of HIV and AIDS did affect their risk behaviours, while others felt it was a matter of choice, personal attitude and practice. Choice is a determining factor for decisions made by students in relation to HIV and AIDS. Future research focusing on factors influencing these choices that put them at risk of contracting the HIV virus is recommended. Students also need to be enlightened on matters concerning symptoms of HIV and AIDS.

  1. Framing, agenda setting, and disease phobia of AIDS-related coverage in the South Korean mass media.

    PubMed

    Jung, Minsoo

    2013-01-01

    There has been little research on the concrete role of the press in discourses on AIDS. This study investigated the AIDS discourses created by the major media. In particular, from the perspective of the agenda-setting theory, it examines differences in the framing of AIDS-related news depending on the political orientation and news sources of the press. This study analyzed the thematic frames and news sources implied by AIDS-related coverage. The 2 major media representing conservatism and progressivism were selected as the objects of analysis. As for the search engine for content analysis, the Korean Integrated Newspaper Database System was used, and 151 articles containing "AIDS" or "HIV" over 5 years from January 2005 to December 2010 were analyzed. According to the results of the analysis, there were the 6 following frames: aid/support, accident, human rights, risk, prevention, and biomedicine. Whereas the conservative press in South Korea continued to frame AIDS in the traditional way, the progressive press tended relatively more often to attempt new agenda setting, from the perspective of human rights and inequality. However, both newspaper companies tended mostly to select experts as the sources of AIDS news, thus continuing to exclude infectees and civil and society organizations.

  2. Anomalous expression of chloride transporters in the sclerosed hippocampus of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy patients☆

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Xiaodong; Yang, Libai; Zhou, Jueqian; Zhu, Dan; Guo, Qiang; Chen, Ziyi; Chen, Shuda; Zhou, Liemin

    2013-01-01

    The Na+-K+-Cl- cotransporter 1 and K+-Cl- cotransporter 2 regulate the levels of intracellular chloride in hippocampal cells. Impaired chloride transport by these proteins is thought to be involved in the pathophysiological mechanisms of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy. Imbalance in the relative expression of these two proteins can lead to a collapse of Cl- homeostasis, resulting in a loss of gamma-aminobutyric acid-ergic inhibition and even epileptiform discharges. In this study, we investigated the expression of Na+-K+-Cl- cotransporter 1 and K+-Cl- cotransporter 2 in the sclerosed hippocampus of patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy, using western blot analysis and immunohistochemistry. Compared with the histologically normal hippocampus, the sclerosed hippocampus showed increased Na+-K+-Cl- cotransporter 1 expression and decreased K+-Cl- cotransporter 2 expression, especially in CA2 and the dentate gyrus. The change was more prominent for the Na+-K+-Cl- cotransporter 1 than for the K+-Cl- cotransporter 2. These experimental findings indicate that the balance between intracellular and extracellular chloride may be disturbed in hippocampal sclerosis, contributing to the hyperexcitability underlying epileptic seizures. Changes in Na+-K+-Cl- cotransporter 1 expression seems to be the main contributor. Our study may shed new light on possible therapies for patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis. PMID:25206700

  3. Pulmonary sclerosing hemangioma with a rare symptom: A case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Le; Sun, Chuntang; Huang, Yan; Li, Qiao; Tang, Huairong; Wang, Youjuan

    2017-01-01

    Pulmonary sclerosing hemangioma (PSH) is a relatively rare benign tumor. However, as it occurs only rarely, the natural course of the tumor is not well understood. In the present study, a case is presented of a 35-year-old woman who underwent intermittent fevers for more than one year. This case highlighted fever as a rare symptom of PSH. Fever is possibly one of the symptoms of PSH, although it is less likely to occur. Another symptom of the patient was that the tumor grew quickly in two months. The lesion was diagnosed as multiple sclerosing hemangioma of the lung (i.e., PSH), in which papillary, solid and sclerotic patterns appeared. Immunohistochemical evaluation of the lesion revealed positive staining for thyroid transcription factor 1 (TTF1), epithelial membrane antigen (EMA), pancytokeratin (PCK) and cytoskeleton 7 (CK7). In the present case study, the biological activity of PSH was identified to be aggressive. A review of the literature was performed in order to comment further on the clinical and pathological features of this rare disease. PMID:28357098

  4. Dynamic relation between working memory capacity and speech recognition in noise during the first 6 months of hearing aid use.

    PubMed

    Ng, Elaine H N; Classon, Elisabet; Larsby, Birgitta; Arlinger, Stig; Lunner, Thomas; Rudner, Mary; Rönnberg, Jerker

    2014-11-23

    The present study aimed to investigate the changing relationship between aided speech recognition and cognitive function during the first 6 months of hearing aid use. Twenty-seven first-time hearing aid users with symmetrical mild to moderate sensorineural hearing loss were recruited. Aided speech recognition thresholds in noise were obtained in the hearing aid fitting session as well as at 3 and 6 months postfitting. Cognitive abilities were assessed using a reading span test, which is a measure of working memory capacity, and a cognitive test battery. Results showed a significant correlation between reading span and speech reception threshold during the hearing aid fitting session. This relation was significantly weakened over the first 6 months of hearing aid use. Multiple regression analysis showed that reading span was the main predictor of speech recognition thresholds in noise when hearing aids were first fitted, but that the pure-tone average hearing threshold was the main predictor 6 months later. One way of explaining the results is that working memory capacity plays a more important role in speech recognition in noise initially rather than after 6 months of use. We propose that new hearing aid users engage working memory capacity to recognize unfamiliar processed speech signals because the phonological form of these signals cannot be automatically matched to phonological representations in long-term memory. As familiarization proceeds, the mismatch effect is alleviated, and the engagement of working memory capacity is reduced.

  5. How does susceptibility to proactive interference relate to speech recognition in aided and unaided conditions?

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Rachel J.; Rönnberg, Jerker

    2015-01-01

    Proactive interference (PI) is the capacity to resist interference to the acquisition of new memories from information stored in the long-term memory. Previous research has shown that PI correlates significantly with the speech-in-noise recognition scores of younger adults with normal hearing. In this study, we report the results of an experiment designed to investigate the extent to which tests of visual PI relate to the speech-in-noise recognition scores of older adults with hearing loss, in aided and unaided conditions. The results suggest that measures of PI correlate significantly with speech-in-noise recognition only in the unaided condition. Furthermore the relation between PI and speech-in-noise recognition differs to that observed in younger listeners without hearing loss. The findings suggest that the relation between PI tests and the speech-in-noise recognition scores of older adults with hearing loss relates to capability of the test to index cognitive flexibility. PMID:26283981

  6. Unhealthy Substance Use Behaviors as Symptom-Related Self-Care in HIV/AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Brion, John M.; Rose, Carol Dawson; Nicholas, Patrice K.; Sloane, Rick; Voss, Joachim G.; Corless, Inge B.; Lindgren, Teri G.; Wantland, Dean J.; Kemppainen, Jeanne K.; Sefcik, Elizabeth F.; Nokes, Kathleen M.; Kirksey, Kenn M.; Eller, Lucille Sanzero; Hamilton, Mary Jane; Holzemer, William L.; Portillo, Carmen J.; Mendez, Marta Rivero; Robinson, Linda M.; Moezzi, Shanaz; Rosa, Maria; Human, Sarie; Maryland, Mary; Arudo, John; Ros, Ana Viamonte; Nicholas, Thomas P.; Cuca, Yvette; Huang, Emily; Bain, Catherine; Tyer-Viola, Lynda; Zang, Sheryl M.; Shannon, Maureen; Peters-Lewis, Angelleen

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of symptoms in HIV disease can be associated with HIV disease itself, comorbid illness, and/or antiretroviral therapy. Unhealthy substance use behaviors, particularly substance-use behaviors including heavy alcohol intake, marijuana use, other illicit drug use, and cigarette smoking, are engaged in by many HIV-positive individuals, often as a way to manage disease-related symptoms. This study is a secondary data analysis of baseline data from a larger randomized-controlled trial of an HIV/AIDS Symptom Management Manual. In the present study, the prevalence and characteristics of unhealthy substance use behaviors in relation to HIV/AIDS symptoms are examined. Subjects were recruited from a variety of settings which provide HIV/AIDS care and treatment. The mean age of the sample (n=775) was 42.8 years (SD=9.6) and nearly thirty-nine percent (38.5%) of the sample was female. The racial demographics of the sample were: 28% African American, 28% Hispanic, 21% White/Caucasian, 16% African from Kenya or South Africa, 1% Asian, and 5% self-described as “Other.” The mean number of years living with HIV was reported to be 9.1 years (SD=6.6).Specific self-reported unhealthy substance-use behaviors were use of marijuana (n= 111; 14.3%), cigarette smoking (n=355; 45.8%), heavy alcohol use (n= 66; 8.5%), and illicit drugs (n= 98; 12.6%). A subset of individuals who identified high levels of specific symptoms also reported significantly higher substance use behaviors including amphetamine and injection drug use in addition to heavy alcohol use, cigarette smoking, and marijuana use. Implications for clinical practice include assessment of self-care behaviors, screening for substance abuse, and education of persons related to self-management across the trajectory of HIV disease. PMID:21352430

  7. Characterization of animal models for primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC).

    PubMed

    Fickert, Peter; Pollheimer, Marion J; Beuers, Ulrich; Lackner, Carolin; Hirschfield, Gideon; Housset, Chantal; Keitel, Verena; Schramm, Christoph; Marschall, Hanns-Ulrich; Karlsen, Tom H; Melum, Espen; Kaser, Arthur; Eksteen, Bertus; Strazzabosco, Mario; Manns, Michael; Trauner, Michael

    2014-06-01

    Primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) is a chronic cholangiopathy characterized by biliary fibrosis, development of cholestasis and end stage liver disease, high risk of malignancy, and frequent need for liver transplantation. The poor understanding of its pathogenesis is also reflected in the lack of effective medical treatment. Well-characterized animal models are utterly needed to develop novel pathogenetic concepts and study new treatment strategies. Currently there is no consensus on how to evaluate and characterize potential PSC models, which makes direct comparison of experimental results and effective exchange of study material between research groups difficult. The International Primary Sclerosing Cholangitis Study Group (IPSCSG) has therefore summarized these key issues in a position paper proposing standard requirements for the study of animal models of PSC.

  8. Management of haemangioma with sclerosing agent: a case report

    PubMed Central

    M K, Parvathidevi; Koppal, Shrinivas; Rukmangada, Thriveni; Byatnal, Amit R

    2013-01-01

    The use of multiple weekly intralesional injections of 3% sodium tetradecyl sulfate as a sclerosing agent for the management of facial haemangiomas is a safe treatment with acceptable results. As presented in this case report, this technique offers the patient considerable relief of symptoms with minimal complications. However, the possibility of second-stage surgery to correct residual deformity is still considered. Sclerotherapy with 3% sodium tetradecyl sulfate provides a good preparation for further surgery. PMID:24130207

  9. Sclerosing epithelioid fibrosarcoma metastasizing to the penile shaft

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Michael D.; Brimo, Fadi; Jung, Sungmi; Aprikian, Armen G.

    2016-01-01

    We present the case of a 50-year-old man with a periurethral mass. He was previously known for sclerosing epithelioid fibrosarcoma (SEF) of the left foot, having an amputation for local recurrence with >2 cm negative margins. A solid periurethral mass was surgically excised seven months later, yielding the diagnosis of metastatic SEF. This is the first documented metastasis of SEF to the penis. These sarcomas have proven difficult to treat, with high recurrence rates despite a multimodal approach. PMID:28096927

  10. HIV/AIDS related knowledge among school-going adolescents from the Middle East and North Africa.

    PubMed

    Boneberger, Anja; Rückinger, Simon; Guthold, Regina; Kann, Laura; Riley, Leanne

    2012-05-01

    The aim of this secondary analysis was to present cross-national data about HIV/AIDS related knowledge among 13- to 15-year-old school-going adolescents from the Middle East and North Africa. Data from 23673 school-going adolescents from seven countries (Jordan, Lebanon, Libyan Arab Jamahiriya, Morocco, Oman, Tunisia and United Arab Emirates) that undertook the Global School-Based Student Health Survey between 2004 and 2008 were analysed. HIV/AIDS related knowledge varied significantly between countries and gender. Research for this sensitive topic is scarce in this region. In addition, schools could be among the many key players for HIV/AIDS education.

  11. Women's voices: attitudes and behaviors of female Ghanaian sex workers regarding HIV prevention and AIDS-related stigma.

    PubMed

    Raingruber, Bonnie; Uwazie, Ernest; Bowie, Sylvester

    2010-08-01

    Attitudes and behaviors of sex workers have a pivotal influence on the spread of AIDS. A qualitative descriptive study was undertaken to elicit Ghanaian female sex workers' perspectives regarding effective methods of HIV prevention, sources of AIDS-related stigma, and challenges associated with sex work. Women described that: (1) sex work is hard; (2) they felt God would protect their health; (3) staying safe is both a gift and a priority; (4) sex work allows for autonomy; and (5) AIDS-related stigma is very real. To design effective prevention programs it is necessary to consider the culture and perspectives of those who will be served.

  12. An Integrated Intervention for Increasing Clinical Nurses' Knowledge of HIV/AIDS-Related Occupational Safety.

    PubMed

    He, Liping; Lu, Zhiyan; Huang, Jing; Zhou, Yiping; Huang, Jian; Bi, Yongyi; Li, Jun

    2016-11-07

    Background: Approximately 35 new HIV (Human Immunodeficiency Virus, HIV) cases and at least 1000 serious infections are transmitted annually to health care workers. In China, HIV prevalence is increasing and nursing personnel are encountering these individuals more than in the past. Contaminated needle-stick injuries represent a significant occupational burden for nurses. Evidence suggests that nurses in China may not fully understand HIV/AIDS (Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, AIDS) and HIV-related occupational safety. At this time, universal protection precautions are not strictly implemented in Chinese hospitals. Lack of training may place nurses at risk for occupational exposure to blood-borne pathogens. Objectives: To assess the effectiveness of integrated interventions on nurses' knowledge improvement about reducing the risk of occupationally acquired HIV infection. Methods: We audited integrated interventions using 300 questionnaires collected from nurses at the Affiliated Hospital of Xiangnan University, a public polyclinic in Hunan Province. The intervention studied was multifaceted and included appropriate and targeted training content for hospital, department and individual levels. After three months of occupational safety integrated interventions, 234 participants who completed the program were assessed. Results: Of the subjects studied, 94.3% (283/300) were injured one or more times by medical sharp instruments or splashed by body fluids in the last year and 95.3% considered their risk of occupational exposure high or very high. After the intervention, awareness of HIV/AIDS-related knowledge improved significantly (χ² = 86.34, p = 0.00), and correct answers increased from 67.9% to 82.34%. Correct answers regarding risk perception were significantly different between pre-test (54.4%) and post-test (66.6%) (χ² = 73.2, p = 0.00). When coming into contact with patient body fluids and blood only 24.0% of subjects used gloves regularly. The pre

  13. Creating Social Spaces to Tackle AIDS-Related Stigma: Reviewing the Role of Church Groups in Sub-Saharan Africa

    PubMed Central

    Skovdal, M.; Gibbs, A.

    2012-01-01

    An expanding body of literature explores the role of African church groups in facilitating or hindering the support of people living with AIDS and challenging or contributing to HIV/AIDS-related stigma. Treating church groups as social spaces in which HIV/AIDS-related stigma may potentially be challenged, we systematically review this literature, identifying five themes that highlight the complex and contradictory role of the church as a potential agent of health-enhancing social change. In many ways the church perpetuates HIV/AIDS-related stigma through (i) moralistic attitudes and (ii) its reinforcement of conservative gender ideologies. However some churches have managed move towards action that makes a more positive contribution to HIV/AIDS management through (iii) promoting various forms of social control for HIV prevention, (iv) contributing to the care and support of the AIDS-affected and (v) providing social spaces for challenging stigmatising ideas and practices. We conclude that church groups, including church leadership, can play a key role in facilitating or hindering the creation of supportive social spaces to challenge stigma. Much work remains to be done in developing deeper understandings of the multi-layered factors that enable some churches, but not others, to respond effectively to HIV/AIDS. PMID:20668927

  14. Photodynamic therapy for treatment of AIDS-related mucocutaneous Kaposi's sarcoma (Invited Paper)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schweitzer, Vanessa G.

    1992-06-01

    Since 1975, Phase I/II studies have demonstrated the successfulness of hematoporphyrin derivative photodynamic therapy (PDT) in the treatment of various malignancies of the skin, eye, bladder, lung, and head and neck. Moreover, in 1981 two cases of traditional Western cutaneous Kaposi's sarcoma (TKS) have been treated with photodynamic therapy with both early and late complete response. To date, attempts to cure and palliation of the more aggressive AIDS-related oral Kaposi's sarcoma with conventional radiation, chemotherapy or immunotherapy, or surgical excision have been limited and often associated with debilitating mucositis and further immunosuppression. Certain aspects of photodynamic therapy may be efficacious for treatment of mucocutaneous Kaposi's sarcoma: (1) the selective retention of hematoporphyrin derivative by neoplastic lesions (endothelial cell tumors); (2) a tumor- specific cytotoxic agent (i.e., free oxygen radical); (3) absence of systemic toxicity from immunosuppression; (4) the potential for retreatment without increasing side effects; and (5) porphyrin-mediated photoinactivation of enveloped viruses. Herein presented are seven cases of AIDS-related KS (EKS) with diffuse, superficial, and nodular mucocutaneous lesions treated with dihematoporphyrin derivative and photodynamic therapy with subsequent dramatic early partial and complete responses.

  15. Framing of AIDS in Africa: press-state relations, HIV/AIDS news, and journalistic advocacy in four sub-Saharan Anglophone newspapers.

    PubMed

    D'Angelo, Paul; Pollock, John C; Kiernicki, Kristen; Shaw, Donna

    2013-01-01

    This study offers the first systematic analysis of the impact of press-state relations, or media systems, on the HIV/AIDS news agenda in African news coverage. The premise is that media systems play a determining role in the degree to which journalists can independently advocate for social change when covering HIV/AIDS. Drawing on comparative research, four sub-Saharan countries were categorized into two media systems: Contained Democratic (South Africa, Nigeria) and Repressive Autocratic (Zimbabwe, Kenya). A sample of HIV/AIDS stories (n = 393) published from 2002-2007 in each country's leading Anglophone newspaper was content analyzed. Across all coverage, the topic of social costs was framed more for the responsibility borne by nongovernmental agents than governmental agents. In Contained Democratic media systems, however, story emphasis shifted toward government agents taking responsibility for addressing the social costs of HIV/AIDS. Prevention campaigns were framed more as progress than decline across all newspapers; however, campaigns were reported as being more efficacious in Contained Democratic systems than in Repressive Autocratic systems. No impact of media system on framing of medical developments was found. Results show the value of comparative analysis in understanding the agenda-setting process: with greater emphasis on positive efficacy and government initiative, the news agenda in Contained Democratic media systems can facilitate stronger positive societal-level responses than the news agenda in Repressive Autocratic media systems.

  16. Response to: Practice of first aid in burn related injuries in a developing country.

    PubMed

    Baker, Benjamin; Amin, Kavit; Khor, Wee Sim; Khwaja, Nadeem

    2015-12-01

    Traditional remedies for burns first aid are rarely compliant with current best practice. Greater Manchester is one of the most ethnically diverse regions in the UK. Our burns centre has noted the prevalent use of traditional remedies over recognised first aid prior to presentation. We review traditional burns remedies and highlight the importance of burns first aid education that is accessible to migrant communities.

  17. Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus in non-AIDS related lymphomas occurring in body cavities.

    PubMed Central

    Cesarman, E.; Nador, R. G.; Aozasa, K.; Delsol, G.; Said, J. W.; Knowles, D. M.

    1996-01-01

    DNA sequences belonging to the recently discovered Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), now provisionally designated human herpesvirus 8, have been previously identified in an uncommonly occurring subset of AIDS-related lymphomas, referred to as body-cavity-based lymphomas (BCBLs), which present as lymphomatous effusions. Pyothorax-associated lymphomas (PALS) are non-Hodgkin's lymphomas that arise in the pleural cavity after long-standing pleural inflammation resulting from therapeutic artificial pneumothorax or from tuberculosis pleuritis. Although PALs present as solid tumor masses, they are otherwise similar to BCBLs in that they also are B cell lymphomas, usually exhibit immunoblastic morphology, and contain Epstein-Barr virus. We investigated whether KSHV sequences are present in 2 BCBLs in patients without AIDS and 12 in Japanese and 2 French PALs. The 2 BCBLs were positive for KSHV sequences, whereaas all 14 PALs were KSHV negative. This finding strongly suggests that BCBLs and PALs are distinct clinicopathological entities and further strengthens the association between the presence of KSHV and an effusion phenotype. Based on these findings, we propose replacing the term body-cavity-based lymphoma with the term primary effusion lymphoma, which describes these non-Hodgkin's lymphomas more accurately and avoids confusion with other lymphomas that may occur in the body cavities, such as the PALs. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:8686762

  18. Primary Biliary Cirrhosis and Primary Sclerosing Cholangitis: a Review Featuring a Women's Health Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Marchioni Beery, Renée M.; Vaziri, Haleh; Forouhar, Faripour

    2014-01-01

    Primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) and primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) are two major types of chronic cholestatic liver disease. Each disorder has distinguishing features and variable progression, but both may ultimately result in cirrhosis and hepatic failure. The following offers a review of PBC and PSC, beginning with a general overview of disease etiology, pathogenesis, diagnosis, clinical features, natural course, and treatment. In addition to commonly associated manifestations of fatigue, pruritus, and fat-soluble vitamin deficiency, select disease-related topics pertaining to women's health are discussed including metabolic bone disease, hyperlipidemia and cardiovascular risk, and pregnancy-related issues influencing maternal disease course and birth outcomes. This comprehensive review of PBC and PSC highlights some unique clinical considerations in the care of female patients with cholestatic liver disease. PMID:26357630

  19. Focal autoimmune pancreatitis and chronic sclerosing sialadenitis mimicking pancreatic cancer and neck metastasis.

    PubMed

    Sun, Li; Zhou, Qiang; Brigstock, David R; Yan, Su; Xiu, Ming; Piao, Rong-Li; Gao, Yan-Hang; Gao, Run-Ping

    2014-12-14

    Type 1 autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) or chronic sclerosing sialadenitis (Küttner's tumour) is an uncommon disorder that has recently been confirmed as an IgG4-related disease. Here, we describe a rare case of a 53-year-old male patient who primarily presented with pancreatic body mass, left neck mass and several lumps in his lower lip mimicking pancreatic cancer (PC) and neck metastasis. The patient underwent pancreatic body mass and labial gland lumps resection as well as an ultrasound-guided biopsy of the left neck mass. He was diagnosed with IgG4-related focal type of AIP (f-AIP) and Küttner's tumour by immunohistochemistry. The patient responded well to corticosteroid therapy and remains healthy with no signs of recurrence at one year follow-up. The differentiation of f-AIP from PC is very important to avoid unnecessary pancreatic resection.

  20. Direct and indirect effects of enablers on HIV testing, initiation and retention in antiretroviral treatment and AIDS related mortality

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Background An enabling environment is believed to have significant and critical effects on HIV and AIDS program implementation and desired outcomes. This paper estimates the paths, directionality, and direct and indirect associations between critical enablers with antiretroviral treatment (ART) coverage and to AIDS-related mortality. Methods Frameworks that consider the role of enablers in HIV and AIDS programs were systematically reviewed to develop a conceptual model of interaction. Measurements for constructs of the model were pooled from the latest publicly available data. A hypothetical model, including latent/unobserved factors and interaction of enablers, program activities and outcomes, was analyzed cross-sectionally with structural equation modeling. Coefficients of the model were used to estimate the indirect associations of enablers to treatment coverage and the subsequent associated impact on AIDS related mortality. Findings The model’s fit was adequate (RMSEA = 0·084, 90% CI [0·062, 0·104]) and the indirect effects of enablers on outcomes were measured. Enablers having significant associations with increased ART coverage were social/financial protection, governance, anti-discrimination, gender equality, domestic AIDS spending, testing service delivery, and logistics. Interpretation Critical enablers are significantly correlated to outcomes like ART coverage and AIDS related mortality. Even while this model does not allow inference on causality, it provides directionality and magnitude of the significant associations. PMID:28225790

  1. Recruiting Chinese American adolescents to HIV/AIDS-related research: a lesson learned from a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yi-Hui; Salman, Ali; Wang, Fan

    2012-02-01

    The purpose of this article was to report identified barriers and challenges experienced in the recruiting process of Chinese American adolescents to a cross-sectional HIV/AIDS-related study. Snowball sampling method was used to recruit Chinese American adolescents from Chinese American communities in a U.S. Midwestern state. Barriers and challenges to recruitment were reviewed and analyzed from Chinese cultural perspectives in the hope of aiding researchers and health care providers understand and facilitate future recruitment of Chinese Americans for HIV/AIDS prevention studies. Barriers to recruitment were found related to the taboo topic of sexual issues in Chinese culture, unawareness and denial of HIV/AIDS risks, authoritarian parenting style in Chinese culture, and the required active consents. Facilitating factors of recruiting Chinese American adolescents to future HIV/AIDS prevention research or intervention programs are discussed. Information provided in this article may increase nurses' awareness of various barriers that they might encounter when they conduct research or address HIV/AIDS-related topics of Chinese American adolescents.

  2. The effects of two AIDS risk-reduction interventions on heterosexual college women's AIDS-related knowledge, attitudes and condom use.

    PubMed

    Ploem, C; Byers, E S

    1997-01-01

    An intervention combining AIDS information with condom eroticization, condom normalization, and communication skills training was found to increase both AIDS-related knowledge and condom use among Canadian college students. 112 unmarried female undergraduates (mean age, 18 years) were randomly assigned to this combination intervention (n = 49), an information-only intervention (n = 44), or a pre-test/post-test control group (n = 19). 80% of students had engaged in vaginal intercourse and 14% in anal intercourse. 84% of coitally active women had engaged in unprotected intercourse in the past year and 48% had not used condoms consistently with any sexual partner. Condom use in the pre-intervention period was associated with positive attitudes toward the method and the perception that condom use was normative among peers. One month after the interventions, both the combination and information groups, but not controls, showed an increase over baseline in AIDS-related knowledge. However, among the 36 students who were coitally active in the 1-month periods before and after the intervention, only the combination intervention was associated with increased condom use. In the combination group, the percentage of episodes of intercourse protected by condoms increased from an average of 21.8% in the month preceding the study to 50% during the 4-week follow-up period. Due to the small sample size and design of the study, it was not possible to determine which component of the multifaceted educational intervention was most responsible for this change.

  3. Event-related potential evidence of accessing gender stereotypes to aid source monitoring.

    PubMed

    Leynes, P Andrew; Crawford, Jarret T; Radebaugh, Anne M; Taranto, Elizabeth

    2013-01-23

    Source memory for the speaker's voice (male or female) was investigated when semantic knowledge (gender stereotypes) could and could not inform the episodic source judgment while event-related potentials (ERPs) were recorded. Source accuracy was greater and response times were faster when stereotypes could predict the speaker's voice at test. Recollection supported source judgments in both conditions as indicated by significant parietal "old/new" ERP effects (500-800ms). Prototypical late ERP effects (the right frontal "old/new" effect and the late posterior negativity, LPN) were evident when source judgment was based solely on episodic memory. However, these two late ERP effects were diminished and a novel, frontal-negative ERP with left-central topography was observed when stereotypes aided source judgments. This pattern of ERP activity likely reflects activation of left frontal or left temporal lobes when semantic knowledge, in the form of a gender stereotype, is accessed to inform the episodic source judgment.

  4. Seronegative Sjögren syndrome with asymptomatic autoimmune sclerosing pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Masayuki; Hamano, Hideaki; Yoshida, Takuhiro; Gono, Takahisa; Uehara, Takeshi; Kawa, Shigeyuki; Ikeda, Shu-ichi

    2007-01-01

    We report two elderly patients with seronegative Sjögren syndrome who showed benign swelling of the pancreas on computed tomography. Immunostaining of the biopsied lip tissue or serum examination confirmed an increase in production of IgG4, leading to a diagnosis of autoimmune sclerosing pancreatitis (ASP) as a cause of the asymptomatic swelling of the pancreas. Sicca symptoms and ASP spontaneously improved in one patient, and the other responded well to oral prednisolone. Seronegative Sjögren syndrome and ASP can concurrently occur as a clinical manifestation of the IgG4-related systemic disorder, particularly in elderly subjects, and, in such a case, corticosteroid may be a potent therapeutic option.

  5. An 111In-Pentetreotide Positive Sclerosing Pneumocytoma.

    PubMed

    Savelli, Giordano; Bnà, Claudio; Zambelli, Claudia; Illuminati, Sonia; Bonello, Luke

    2017-04-01

    A 43-year-old woman had an incidental lung mass identified on shoulder x-ray performed for pain. Contrast-enhanced CT showed a 38-mm mass in the medial segment of the right middle lobe, with features suggestive of carcinoid tumor. A In-pentetreotide scan showed intense uptake; furthermore, fine needle aspiration biopsy yielded neuroendocrine cells confirming the carcinoid hypothesis. However, definitive surgical histology showed a sclerosing pneumocytoma. This could potentially suggest that such rare tumors, with metastatic potential, could respond to somatostatin analogue treatment.

  6. Genetics Home Reference: SOST-related sclerosing bone dysplasia

    MedlinePlus

    ... hearing loss, vision loss, and a sense of smell that is diminished (hyposmia) or completely absent (anosmia). ... Bone Dysplasias MedlinePlus Encyclopedia: Facial Paralysis MedlinePlus Encyclopedia: Smell--Impaired General Information from MedlinePlus (5 links) Diagnostic ...

  7. Expression patterns of micro-RNAs 146a, 181a, and 155 in subacute sclerosing panencephalitis.

    PubMed

    Yiş, Uluç; Tüfekçi, Uğur Kemal; Genç, Şermin; Çarman, Kürşat Bora; Bayram, Erhan; Topçu, Yasemin; Kurul, Semra Hız

    2015-01-01

    Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis is caused by persistent brain infection of mutated virus, showing inflammation, neurodegeneration, and demyelination. Although many factors are emphasized in the pathogenesis of subacute sclerosing panencephalitis, the exact mechanism of neurodegeneration remains unknown. Micro-RNAs are small, noncoding RNAs that regulate gene expression at the posttranscriptional levels. Micro-RNAs are essential for normal immune system development; besides they are also implicated in the pathogenesis of many chronic inflammatory disorders. The aim of this study is to investigate the expression patterns of micro-RNAs 146a, 181a, and 155 in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of patients with subacute sclerosing panencephalitis. We enrolled 39 patients with subacute sclerosing panencephalitis and 41 healthy controls. Quantitative analysis of micro-RNAs 146a, 181a, and 155 were performed using specific stem-loop primers followed by real-time polymerase chain reaction. All of 3 micro-RNAs were upregulated in subacute sclerosing panencephalitis patients. In addition, the level of micro-RNA 155 expression was higher in stage 3 patients. But, micro-RNA 146a and 181a expression levels showed no association or correlation with clinically relevant data. Alteration of peripheral blood mononuclear cell micro-RNAs in subacute sclerosing panencephalitis may shed new light on the pathogenesis of disease and may contribute to the aberrant systemic rise in mRNA levels in subacute sclerosing panencephalitis.

  8. Reacting to AIDS-Related Suicide: Does Time since Diagnosis Matter?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Range, Lillian M.; Alliston, Jerry R.

    1995-01-01

    Undergraduates (n=296) read a fictional vignette concerning a person diagnosed with either terminal cancer or AIDS, and for varying lengths of time. Student reactions indicated that a person with AIDS is associated with greater stigma than a person with another fatal disease, regardless of how long ago the diagnosis was made. (JPS)

  9. "Doing Right by": Teacher Aides, Students with Disabilities, and Relational Social Justice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rutherford, Gill

    2011-01-01

    In this article, Gill Rutherford seeks to understand, from the perspectives of teacher aides, the influence of their work on the school experiences of New Zealand students with disabilities. Rutherford contributes to a growing body of international research regarding the role of teacher aides that documents the complex and ambiguous nature of…

  10. Responding to AIDS-Related Bereavement in the South African Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Demmer, Craig

    2007-01-01

    AIDS continues to be a death sentence for many individuals living in South Africa where it remains the leading cause of death. Little is currently known about what it is like to experience the loss of a loved one to AIDS from the South African perspective and how to assist individuals who are living in a context vastly different from similarly…

  11. Health Emergency 2003: The Spread of Drug-Related AIDS and Hepatitis C among African American and Latinos. Health Emergency Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Day, Dawn

    This report is the fifth in a series detailing the impact of the injection-related AIDS epidemic on African Americans and Latinos. Ten chapters include: (1) "Health Emergency: The Spread of AIDS among African Americans Who Inject Drugs"; (2) "Health Emergency: The Spread of AIDS Among Latinos Who Inject Drugs"; (3) "A…

  12. Knowledge, attitude, and practice of HIV/AIDS-related stigma and discrimination reduction among nursing students in southwest Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Farotimi, Adekunbi A; Nwozichi, Chinomso Ugochukwu; Ojediran, Tolulope D

    2015-01-01

    Background: One of the reported obstacles to the achievement of universal access to Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) prevention, treatment, care, and support programs includes stigma and discrimination from health workers, particularly nurses. Since nursing students would become future practising nurses and are most likely exposed to caring for people living with HIV/AIDS (PL WHA) during their training, it is of great importance to assess the knowledge, attitude, and practice of student nurses toward the reduction of HIV/AIDS-related stigma and discrimination. Materials and Methods: A descriptive survey research design was used. A total of 150 nursing students were selected using the simple random sampling technique of fish bowl method with replacement. Data were obtained using a self-administered (33-item) validated questionnaire to assess the knowledge, attitude, and practice of student nurses with regard to HIV/AIDS-related stigma and discrimination reduction strategies. Reliability of the tool was tested using Cronbach alpha (R) yielding a reliability value of 0.72. Data collected were analyzed with descriptive statistics of frequencies and percentages. Results: Majority (76.0%) of the respondents were females and 82.7% were married. Respondents were found to have high knowledge (94.0%) of strategies for reducing HIV/AIDS-related stigma and discrimination. Also, 64% had moderate discriminatory attitude, 74% engaged in low discriminatory practice, while 26% engaged in high discriminatory practice. Conclusions: Student nurses had adequate knowledge about strategies for reducing HIV/AIDS-related stigma and discrimination; negative discriminatory attitude toward PLWHA and some form of discriminatory practices exist in participants’ training schools. It is, therefore, recommended that an educational package on reduction of HIV/AIDS-related stigma and discrimination be developed and implemented for the participants. PMID:26793257

  13. [PRIMARY SCLEROSING CHOLANGITIS ASSOCIATED TO ULCERATIVECOLITIS AS A CAUSE OF CIRRHOSIS

    PubMed

    Tagle, Martín; Bussalleu, Alejandro

    1999-01-01

    We report case of a peruvian patient with cirrhosis due to primary sclerosing cholangitis, associated with ulcerative colitis. The patient presented initially with intermittent diarrhea, manifesting features of chronic liver failure which progressed rapidly.Primary sclerosing cholangitis is a progressive diasease affecting intra and extrahepatic billary radicles, and is associated with ulcerative colitis in the majority of cases. The diagnosis is made by cholangiography, showing areas of stenosis, irregularity and dilatation of the biliary tree.In this article we report the clinical presentation and course of the patient, reviewing recent literature with emphasis in the association between primary sclerosing cholangitis and ulcerative colitis.

  14. [Successful discontinuation of antifungal secondary prophylaxis in AIDS-related cryptococcosis].

    PubMed

    Negroni, R; Helou, S H; López Daneri, G; Robles, A M; Arechavala, A I; Bianchi, M H

    2004-01-01

    The clinical and laboratory data of 22 patients with AIDS related cryptococcosis who were able to interrupt antifungal secondary prophylaxis after HAART administration, are presented. They were 14 males and 8 females, between 15 and 50 years old (X: 34 years old). All patients presented fever and severe deterioration of their general health status, and 19 exhibited a meningeal syndrome. At the start of antifungal treatment, 59% of the cases presented < 50 CD4+ cells/microl, the median viral burden was 134,804 RNA copies/ml and the median titer of serum cryptococcal antigen was 1/3,000. Amphotericin B by intravenous route, (0.7 mg/kg/day) or fluconazole (600 to 800 mg/day) were given as a treatment of the initial episode, up to CSF cultures negativization. Oral fluconazole (200 mg/day) or intravenous amphotericin B, 50 mg twice a week, were given as a secondary prophylaxis. The secondary prophylaxis was interrupted when the patients had received HAART for an average lapse of 19 months (6 to 36 months) and the median CD4+ cell count was 249/microl. The follow up after secondary prophylaxis discontinuation lasted for a median lapse of 22 months. These data seem to show that secondary prophylaxis is not necessary when the patient are clinically asymptomatic and the CD4+ cell counts are above 150/microl.

  15. Human Exportin-1 is a Target for Combined Therapy of HIV and AIDS Related Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Boons, Eline; Vanstreels, Els; Jacquemyn, Maarten; Nogueira, Tatiane C; Neggers, Jasper E; Vercruysse, Thomas; van den Oord, Joost; Tamir, Sharon; Shacham, Sharon; Landesman, Yosef; Snoeck, Robert; Pannecouque, Christophe; Andrei, Graciela; Daelemans, Dirk

    2015-09-01

    Infection with HIV ultimately leads to advanced immunodeficiency resulting in an increased incidence of cancer. For example primary effusion lymphoma (PEL) is an aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphoma with very poor prognosis that typically affects HIV infected individuals in advanced stages of immunodeficiency. Here we report on the dual anti-HIV and anti-PEL effect of targeting a single process common in both diseases. Inhibition of the exportin-1 (XPO1) mediated nuclear transport by clinical stage orally bioavailable small molecule inhibitors (SINE) prevented the nuclear export of the late intron-containing HIV RNA species and consequently potently suppressed viral replication. In contrast, in CRISPR-Cas9 genome edited cells expressing mutant C528S XPO1, viral replication was unaffected upon treatment, clearly demonstrating the anti-XPO1 mechanism of action. At the same time, SINE caused the nuclear accumulation of p53 tumor suppressor protein as well as inhibition of NF-κB activity in PEL cells resulting in cell cycle arrest and effective apoptosis induction. In vivo, oral administration arrested PEL tumor growth in engrafted mice. Our findings provide strong rationale for inhibiting XPO1 as an innovative strategy for the combined anti-retroviral and anti-neoplastic treatment of HIV and PEL and offer perspectives for the treatment of other AIDS-associated cancers and potentially other virus-related malignancies.

  16. Monitoring HIV-Related Laws and Policies: Lessons for AIDS and Global Health in Agenda 2030.

    PubMed

    Torres, Mary Ann; Gruskin, Sofia; Buse, Kent; Erkkola, Taavi; Bendaud, Victoria; Alfvén, Tobias

    2017-01-13

    The National Commitments and Policy Instrument (NCPI) has been used to monitor AIDS-related laws and policies for over 10 years. What can be learnt from this process? Analyses draw on NCPI questionnaires, NCPI responses, the UNAIDS Law Database, survey data and responses to a 2014 survey on the NCPI. The NCPI provides the first and only systematic data on country self-reported national HIV laws and policies. High NCPI reporting rates and survey responses suggest the majority of countries consider the process relevant. Combined civil society and government engagement and reporting is integral to the NCPI. NCPI experience demonstrates its importance in describing the political and legal environment for the HIV response, for programmatic reviews and to stimulate dialogue among stakeholders, but there is a need for updating and in some instances to complement results with more objective quantitative data. We identify five areas that need to be updated in the next iteration of the NCPI and argue that the NCPI approach is relevant to participatory monitoring of targets in the health and other goals of the UN 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development.

  17. HIV/AIDS Knowledge and Health-Related Attitudes and Behaviors among Deaf and Hearing Adolescents in Southern Brazil

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bisol, Claudia Alquati; Sperb, Tania Mara; Brewer, Toye H.; Kato, Sergio Kakuta; Shor-Posner, Gail

    2008-01-01

    HIV/AIDS knowledge and health-related attitudes and behaviors among deaf and hearing adolescents in southern Brazil are described. Forty-two deaf students attending a special nonresidential public school for the deaf and 50 hearing students attending a regular public school, ages 15-21 years, answered a computer-assisted questionnaire. (There was…

  18. Blood vessel growth blocker may treat AIDS-related Kaposi’s sarcoma

    Cancer.gov

    Patients with an AIDS-associated cancer, Kaposi's sarcoma (KS), showed improvement after receiving the combination of bevacizumab, a cancer drug that blocks the growth of new blood vessels, and highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART).

  19. Detection of polyomavirus simian virus 40 tumor antigen DNA in AIDS-related systemic non-Hodgkin lymphoma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vilchez, Regis A.; Lednicky, John A.; Halvorson, Steven J.; White, Zoe S.; Kozinetz, Claudia A.; Butel, Janet S.

    2002-01-01

    Systemic non-Hodgkin lymphoma (S-NHL) is a common malignancy during HIV infection, and it is hypothesized that infectious agents may be involved in the etiology. Epstein-Barr virus DNA is found in <40% of patients with AIDS-related S-NHL, suggesting that other oncogenic viruses, such as polyomaviruses, may play a role in pathogenesis. We analyzed AIDS-related S-NHL samples, NHL samples from HIV-negative patients, peripheral blood leukocytes from HIV-infected and -uninfected patients without NHL, and lymph nodes without tumors from HIV-infected patients. Specimens were examined by polymerase chain reaction analysis with use of primers specific for an N-terminal region of the oncoprotein large tumor antigen ( T-ag ) gene conserved among all three polyomaviruses (simian virus 40 [SV40], JC virus, and BK virus). Polyomavirus T-ag DNA sequences, proven to be SV40-specific, were detected more frequently in AIDS-related S-NHL samples (6 of 26) than in peripheral blood leukocytes from HIV-infected patients (6 of 26 vs. 0 of 69; p =.0001), NHL samples from HIV-negative patients (6 of 26 vs. 0 of 10; p =.09), or lymph nodes (6 of 26 vs. 0 of 7; p =.16). Sequences of C-terminal T-ag DNA from SV40 were amplified from two AIDS-related S-NHL samples. Epstein-Barr virus DNA sequences were detected in 38% (10 of 26) AIDS-related S-NHL samples, 50% (5 of 10) HIV-negative S-NHL samples, and 57% (4 of 7) lymph nodes. None of the S-NHL samples were positive for both Epstein-Barr virus DNA and SV40 DNA. Further studies of the possible role of SV40 in the pathogenesis of S-NHL are warranted.

  20. Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis presenting as schizophrenia with an alpha coma pattern in a child.

    PubMed

    Kartal, Ayşe; Kurt, Ayşegül Neşe Çitak; Gürkaş, Esra; Aydin, Kurşad; Serdaroğlu, Ayşe

    2014-10-01

    Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis, a progressive neurodegenerative disorder of the central nervous system, can present atypically with uncharacteristic electroencephalographic (EEG) features at its onset albeit typically with progressive mental deterioration, behavioral changes, and myoclonic jerks. An atypical presentation of subacute sclerosing panencephalitis can lead to a delay in diagnosis, thus hindering early treatment. Herein, we describe a 14-year-old girl who presented with insomnia, amnesia, auditory and visual hallucinations. The patient's electroencephalography on admission showed an alpha coma pattern. In spite of antipsychiatric treatment (olanzapine 20 mg/d) for 3 months, a progressive deterioration in neurologic function was observed. Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis was suspected and diagnosis was confirmed by increased titers of measles antibodies in the cerebrospinal fluid. The attention of pediatricians should be drawn to psychiatric symptoms as possible initial presentations of subacute sclerosing panencephalitis in order to avoid needless diagnostic and treatment procedures.

  1. Atypical magnetic resonance imaging features in subacute sclerosing panencephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Das, Biplab; Goyal, Manoj Kumar; Modi, Manish; Mehta, Sahil; Chakravarthi, Sudheer; Lal, Vivek; Vyas, Sameer

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE) is rare chronic, progressive encephalitis that affects primarily children and young adults, caused by a persistent infection with measles virus. No cure for SSPE exists, but the condition can be managed by medication if treatment is started at an early stage. Methods and Results: Heterogeneity of imaging findings in SSPE is not very uncommon. But pial and gyral enhancements are very rarely noticed. Significant asymmetric onset as well as pial-gyral enhancements is not reported. Herein we present a case of 16 years adolescent of SSPE having remarkable asymmetric pial-gyral enhancements, which were misinterpreted as tubercular infection. Conclusion: Early diagnosis and treatment is encouraging in SSPE, although it is not curable with current therapy. Clinico-radiological and electrophysiological correlation is very important in diagnosis of SSPE, more gravely in patients having atypical image findings as in our index case. PMID:27293348

  2. Radiologic bone changes of polycystic lipomembranous osteodysplasia with sclerosing leukoencephalopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Maekelae, P.; Virtama, P.; Jaervi, O.; Hakola, P.

    1982-03-01

    More than 50 cases of polycystic lipomembranous osteodysplasia (PLO) with sclerosing leukoencephalopathy (SL) have been described in Finland, Sweden, Japan, and in the USA. Radiographic bone changes, including symmetrical cystic lesions in the small bones of the extremities and trabecular loss in the distal ends of the long tubular bones, represent primary abnormalities in the diagnosis of the disease. Neuropsychiatric symptoms, frontal syndrome, and pyramidal signs make the patients dangerous to themselves. They are often involved in traffic accidents are prone to multiple spontaneous or almost spontaneous fractures. PLO usually starts with slight bone pain around the age of 20 years. Progress is very slow during the next ten years, but faster after the age of 40 years. The patients usually die before the age of 50 years having total dementia and epileptiform convulsions.

  3. Primary sclerosing cholongitis: findings on cholangiography and pancreatography

    SciTech Connect

    MacCarty, R.L.; LaRusso, N.F.; Wiesner, R.H.; Ludwig, J.

    1983-10-01

    Cholangiograms of 86 patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) were compared with those of 82 patients with primary bile duct carcinoma and 16 with primary biliary cirrhosis. Multifocal strictures involving both intra- and extra-hepatic bile ducts were most common in PSC; they were diffusely distributed, short, and annular, alternating with normal or slightly dilated segments to product a beaded appearance. Very short, band-like strictures occurred in 18 patients; 9 also had diverticulum-like outpouchings. Fourteen patients had diverticula without band strictures. Both findings appear to be specific for PSC. Inflammatory bowel disease was seen in 57 patients (66%), who could not be distinguished cholangiographically from other PSC patients. Of 40 patients with adequate retrograde pancreatograms, 3 had abnormalities of the pancreatic ducts.

  4. Sclerosing angiomatoid nodular transformation of the spleen. A case report.

    PubMed

    Martínez Martínez, Pedro Jesús; Solbes Vila, Ramón; Bosquet Úbeda, Carlos Javier; Roig Álvaro, José María

    2017-03-01

    A 57 year old woman presenting with heartburn and a one month history of epigastric abdominal pain and left hypochondrium pain. After conducting an ultrasound scan and a CT scan, a low attenuation lesion in the spleen was found, and the definitive diagnosis was sclerosing angiomatoid nodular transformation of the spleen (STANT) which was based on a splenectomy and a pathologic study. SANT is a benign rare vascular disease consisting of proliferation of angiomatoid/vascular nodules which predominantly affects women aged 27 to 68. It is usually detected as a coincidental finding in asymptomatic patients. The presumptive diagnosis is established by imaging tests, especially CT and MR; and the final diagnosis is as well established on the basis of pathology after a splenectomy.

  5. [Can adolescents transfer their knowledge about AIDS into their partnership relations?].

    PubMed

    Ammon, A

    1991-01-01

    The following results are parts of two questionnaires carried out at Fachoberschule Freising in December 1988 and April 1990. The answers from the questions about the HIV-Test showed a considerable lack of detailed knowledge. Only 47% (in December 1988) respectively 20% (in April 1990) could correctly assess the meaning of a negative result of a HIV-Test. The pupils were very knowledgeable concerning the proper use of condoms (85-99%), however the actual usage varied and was strongly dependent on the assumed effect on the partner. Most young people talk about sexuality with their partners. The subject AIDS is discussed less often. If young people are able to talk about sexuality with their partners, 76% mention AIDS as well. But if they can't even talk about sexuality, 84% also avoid the subject AIDS. The consequences for further prevention are shown.

  6. mTOR activity in AIDS-related diffuse large B-cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Diaz-Perez, Julio A.; Preziosi, Michael; King, Charles C.; Jones, George A.; Jain, Sonia; Sun, Xiaoying; Reid, Erin G.; VandenBerg, Scott; Wang, Huan-You

    2017-01-01

    Background Patients infected with HIV have a significantly increased risk of developing non–Hodgkin lymphomas despite the widespread use of HAART. To investigate mTOR pathway activity in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) related diffuse large B-cell lymphoma AR-DLBCL, we used immunohistochemistry to examine the presence of the phosphorylated 70 ribosomal S6 protein-kinase (p70S6K), an extensively studied effector of mTOR Complex 1 (mTORC1) and the phosphorylated phosphatase and tensin homolog (pPTEN), a negative regulator of mTORC1 pathway. Materials and methods We evaluated tissue samples from 126 patients with AR-DLBCL. Among them, 98 samples were from tissue microarrays (TMAs) supplied by the Aids and Cancer Specimen Resource (ACSR), the remaining 28 samples were from cases diagnosed and treated at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD). The presence of p70S6K was evaluated with two antibodies directed against the combined epitopes Ser235/236 and Ser240/244, respectively; and additional monoclonal anti-bodies were used to identify pPTEN and phosphorylated proline-rich Akt substrate of 40kDa (pPRAS40). The degree of intensity and percentage of cells positive for p70S6K and pPTEN were assessed in all the samples. In addition, a subgroup of 28 patients from UCSD was studied to assess the presence of pPRAS40, an insulin-regulated activator of the mTORC1. The expression of each of these markers was correlated with clinical and histopathologic features. Results The majority of the patients evaluated were males (88%); only two cases (1.6%) were older than 65 years of age. We found high levels of both p70S6K-paired epitopes studied, 48% positivity against Ser235/236 (44% in ACSR and 64% in UCSD group), and 86% positivity against Ser240/244 (82% in ACSR and 100% in UCSD group). We observed more positive cells and stronger intensity with epitope Ser240/244 in comparison to Ser235/236 (p<0.0001). The degree of intensity and percentage of cells positive

  7. AIDS/HIV-Related Knowledge, Attitudes, and Risk Behavior. Minnesota Student Survey Report, 1989.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minnesota State Dept. of Education, St. Paul.

    The Minnesota Student Survey, including questions on Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) virus transmission and sexual activity, was completed by approximately 88,000 6th-, 9th-, and 12th-graders during the 1988-89 school year. Sexual activity questions were not asked of sixth graders. Over 90% of high school students knew about sharing…

  8. The Use of Graphs as Decision Aids in Relation to Information Overload and Managerial Decision Quality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chan, Siu Y.

    2001-01-01

    Discussion of information overload focuses on a study of masters degree students at a Hong Kong university that investigated the effectiveness of graphs as decision aids to reduce adverse effects of information overload on decision quality. Results of a simulation of a business prediction task with a sample of business managers are presented.…

  9. The HIV/AIDS epidemic in sub-Saharan Africa: thinking ahead on programmatic tasks and related operational research.

    PubMed

    Zachariah, Rony; Van Damme, Wim; Arendt, Vic; Schmit, Jean Claude; Harries, Anthony D

    2011-07-06

    Until now, we have all been desperately trying to run behind the HIV/AIDS epidemic and catch up with it, but despite all our efforts, the epidemic remains well ahead of us. In 2010, the antiretroviral treatment (ART) gap was about 60%, AIDS-related deaths were almost two million a year, and on top of these figures, for every one person started on ART, there were two new HIV infections. What is needed to change this situation is to think ahead of the epidemic in terms of the programmatic tasks we will be faced with and try to act boldly in trying to implement those tasks. From a programmatic perspective, we: a) highlight what needs to fundamentally change in our thinking and overall approach to the epidemic; and b) outline a number of key task areas for implementation and related operational research.

  10. Mortality related to tuberculosis-HIV/AIDS co-infection in Brazil, 2000-2011: epidemiological patterns and time trends.

    PubMed

    Lima, Mauricélia da Silveira; Martins-Melo, Francisco Rogerlândio; Heukelbach, Jorg; Alencar, Carlos Henrique; Boigny, Reagan Nzundu; Ramos, Alberto Novaes

    2016-11-03

    Co-infection of tuberculosis (TB)-HIV/AIDS is a persistent public health problem in Brazil. This study describes epidemiological patterns and time trends of mortality related to TB-HIV/AIDS co-infection. Based on mortality data from 2000-2011 (almost 12.5 million deaths), 19,815 deaths related to co-infection were analyzed. The average age-adjusted mortality rate was 0.97 deaths/100,000 inhabitants. The highest mortality rates were found among males, those in economically productive age groups, black race/color and residents of the South region. There was a significant reduction in the mortality coefficient at the national level (annual average percent change: -1.7%; 95%CI: -2.4; -1.0), with different patterns among regions: increases in the North, Northeast and Central regions, a reduction in the Southeast and a stabilization in the South. The strategic integration of TB-HIV/AIDS control programmes is fundamental to reduce the burden of mortality related to co-infection in Brazil.

  11. [Successful treatment with hyper-CVAD and highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART) for AIDS-related Burkitt lymphoma].

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Kazuhito; Nakazato, Tomonori; Sanada, Yukinari; Mihara, Ai; Tachikawa, Natsuo; Kurai, Hanako; Yoshimura, Yukihiro; Hayashi, Hiroyuki; Yoshida, Sachiko; Kakimoto, Tsunayuki

    2010-03-01

    A 38-year-old man was admitted to our hospital because of continuous fever and right facial palsy. He was diagnosed as HIV positive. Abdominal CT scan showed a large mass in the ascending colon. Gallium scintigraphy demonstrated increased uptake in the ascending colon. Colonoscopy was performed and histological examination of the colon tumor revealed Burkitt's lymphoma (BL). He received highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART) and his facial palsy improved. Because CD4 count was significantly low at 31/microl, he was treated with dose-adjusted EPOCH (DA-EPOCH) combined with HAART. Although the tumor was decreased in size by DA-EPOCH, we changed to the combination of hyper-CVAD/MTX-Ara-C alternating therapy with HAART in order to increase dose intensity. Six cycles of hyper-CVAD/MTX-Ara-C were performed and complete remission was obtained. In the HAART era, the survival of patients with AIDS-related diffuse large cell lymphoma (DLCL) improved dramatically, whereas the survival of similarly treated patients with AIDS-related BL remained poor. Our case suggests that intensive chemotherapy with hyper-CVAD/MTX-Ara-C combined with HAART may be well tolerated and effective in AIDS-related BL.

  12. Efficacy and safety of Stealth liposomal doxorubicin in AIDS-related Kaposi's sarcoma. The International SL-DOX Study Group.

    PubMed Central

    Goebel, F. D.; Goldstein, D.; Goos, M.; Jablonowski, H.; Stewart, J. S.

    1996-01-01

    The utility of current chemotherapeutic regimens in the treatment of AIDS-related Kaposi's sarcoma (AIDS-KS) is often compromised by both limited efficacy and substantial toxicity. Pegylated (Stealth) liposomal doxorubicin hydrochloride (SL-DOX) has been demonstrated specifically to deliver high concentrations of doxorubicin to Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) lesions. This phase II study was performed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of SL-DOX in the treatment of moderate to severe AIDS-KS. Patients were treated biweekly with 10, 20, or 40 mg m-2 SL-DOX. Tumour response was assessed according to AIDS Clinical Trials Groups (ACTG) criteria before each cycle. Best response was determined for 238 patients and was achieved after a mean of 2.3 cycles (range 1-20). Fifteen patients (6.3%) had a complete response to SL-DOX, 177 (74.4%) had a partial response, 44 (18.5%) had stable disease and two (0.8%) had disease progression. SL-DOX was well tolerated: ten patients discontinued therapy because of adverse events, in four cases because of neutropenia. Grade 3 or 4 neutropenia occurred after 281 of 2023 cycles (13.9%) but involved 137 of 240 patients (57.1%) for whom data were available. SL-DOX has substantial activity in AIDS-KS. Best response is typically seen after fewer than three cycles of chemotherapy and in some cases may be prolonged. The most important adverse event is neutropenia, which occurs after a minority of cycles but which may occur in over half of all patients. PMID:8611437

  13. Clinical significance of antibodies against neutrophils in patients with inflammatory bowel disease and primary sclerosing cholangitis.

    PubMed Central

    Seibold, F; Weber, P; Klein, R; Berg, P A; Wiedmann, K H

    1992-01-01

    The presence of perinuclear antibodies against neutrophils (pANCA) has been detected recently in sera of patients with inflammatory bowel disease and primary sclerosing cholangitis. In order to evaluate their clinical significance, sera from 126 patients with inflammatory bowel disease (80 Crohn's disease and 46 ulcerative colitis and 22 patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis were examined for pANCA by indirect immunofluorescence on liver sections and cytocentrifuge slides of neutrophils and by immunoblot. Perinuclear antibodies against neutrophils were found in 83% of patients with ulcerative colitis in 88% of patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis and inflammatory bowel disease, in 40% of patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis but without inflammatory bowel disease, and in 25% of patients with Crohn's disease using the immunofluorescence test. Titres of pANCA ranged from 1:10 to 1:1000 in ulcerative colitis and primary sclerosing cholangitis (median 1:100), whereas in Crohn's disease only four patients had titres of more than 1:10. The occurrence of pANCA did not correlate with clinical activity of Crohn's disease and primary sclerosing cholangitis whereas in ulcerative colitis high titres of pANCA were found mainly in active disease. Using an immunoblot system with sonified neutrophils as antigen, 82% of sera from patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis reacted with up to five different determinants, whereas only 12% of sera from patients with Crohn's disease and 11% of sera with ulcerative colitis detected one of the determinants, suggesting different antigens involved in pANCA reaction. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:1612483

  14. [AIDS related lymphomas: Histopathological subtypes and association with Epstein Barr virus and Human Herpes virus type-8].

    PubMed

    Corti, Marcelo; de Dios Soler, Marcela; Bare, Patricia; Villafañe, María F; De Tezanos Pinto, Miguel; Perez Bianco, Raúl; Narbaitz, Marina

    2010-01-01

    Non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHL) of the B-cell type are the second most common neoplasm among patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and AIDS. Here, we evaluated 48 cases of AIDS-related lymphomas (ARL) diagnosed at the Histopathological Division of the Instituto de Investigaciones Hematológicas of the National Academy of Medicine. Five were females and 43 were males with a median of age of 37 years at the time of the diagnosis. Micrometer sections were prepared and stained with hematoxilin-eosin; immunohistochemical examination for the presence of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) was carried out in 48/48 cases. Additionally, biotinilated oligonucleotides were used to determine the presence of DNA of the Human Herpes virus type-8 (HHV-8) in 14/14 biopsy smears corresponding to plasmablastic lymphomas (PL). All were fenotype B cell lymphomas with an aggressive course and advanced neoplasm disease at the time of diagnosis. Virological findings showed the strong association between EBV and AIDS-related NHL. According to the histopathological subtype, the EBV genome was detected in 16/21 (76%) diffuse large B cell lymphomas, 1/3 Burkitt lymphoma and 3/4 (75%) of primary central nervous system lymphomas. Globally, EBV genome was detected in 20/28 NHL of this series. Detection of HHV-8 was negative in all cases of PL. Hodgkin lymphoma were more frequent in males 18/20 (90%), with an aggressive clinical course and a significant predominance of the subtypes associated with worse prognosis (90% of cases). We detected a significant association between EBV and HL (90% of cases). We consider that all cases of AIDS related lymphomas should be assessed for the presence of EBV because its presence may play a role in the prognosis.

  15. AIDS orphans burden extended families. Zimbabwe survey finds that relatives struggle to care for surviving children.

    PubMed

    Mashumba, S

    1994-01-01

    The number of children in sub-Saharan Africa orphaned as a result of parental acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) is currently estimated at 2 million and expected to reach 10 million by the year 2000. A survey conducted in Zimbabwe's Manicaland Province in 1991 indicated that 6.8% of children up to 14 years of age had lost one or both parents to the AIDS virus. A follow-up study conducted in 1992 in a random sample of 250 urban and 250 rural households in this province found that 11% contained orphaned children; 80% had lost their father and 20% their mother. These children were being cared for by widowed mothers, aunts, sisters, or grandmothers. A third of caretakers were under 20 years old, while 20% were over 50 years of age. Compared to households with no orphans in residence, these households had lower incomes, worse living conditions, less access to medical care and education, and poorer food consumption. On the basis of these findings, nongovernmental organizations are designing programs to help caretaker households and communities cope with the stresses of care of AIDS orphans.

  16. Attachment style and coping in relation to posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms among adults living with HIV/AIDS.

    PubMed

    Gore-Felton, Cheryl; Ginzburg, Karni; Chartier, Maggie; Gardner, William; Agnew-Blais, Jessica; McGarvey, Elizabeth; Weiss, Elizabeth; Koopman, Cheryl

    2013-02-01

    Research indicates that a significant proportion of people living with HIV/AIDS report symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Moreover, attachment style has been associated with psychological and behavioral outcomes among persons living with HIV/AIDS. Attachment style may influence the ability to cope with traumatic stress and affect PTSD symptoms. To examine the association between attachment style and coping with PTSD symptoms, we assessed 94 HIV-positive adults on self-report measures of posttraumatic stress, coping, and attachment style. In multiple regression analysis, avoidant attachment and emotion-focused coping were positively and significantly associated with greater PTSD symptomatology. Support was also found for the moderating effects of avoidant and insecure attachment styles on emotion-focused coping in relation to greater PTSD symptoms. Taken altogether, these results suggest that interventions that develop adaptive coping skills and focus on the underlying construct of attachment may be particularly effective in reducing trauma-related symptoms in adults living with HIV/AIDS.

  17. Computer-analyzed EEG (CEEG) and dynamic brain mapping in AIDS and HIV related syndrome: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Itil, T M; Ferracuti, S; Freedman, A M; Sherer, C; Mehta, P; Itil, K Z

    1990-07-01

    In a group of HIV positive young male patients without any significant neuropsychiatric signs, computer-analyzed EEG (CEEG) and Dynamic Brain Mapping evaluations were conducted. These patients, who only had micro-neuropsychiatric symptoms, demonstrated CEEG profiles that more closely resemble those of patients diagnosed as suffering from mild dementia than age-related normals from our CEEG data base. The CEEGs of patients diagnosed as having Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS), compared to patients with HIV positive, showed greater similarity in CEEG patterns to severely demented patients than to normal control groups. The findings of this pilot study suggest that CEEG may be useful for early determination of the Central Nervous System's (CNS) involvement with the AIDS virus and monitoring the progress of the illness.

  18. Severe chronic venous insufficiency treated by foamed sclerosant.

    PubMed

    Pascarella, Luigi; Bergan, John J; Mekenas, Lisa V

    2006-01-01

    Our objective was to chronicle our experience in using sclerosant foam to treat severe chronic venous insufficiency (CVI). Forty-four patients with 60 limbs severely affected by severe CVI were entered into the study. They had lipodermatosclerosis, CEAP 4 (seven limbs); atrophie blanche or scars of healed venous ulcerations, CEAP 5 (18 limbs); and frank, open venous ulcers, CEAP 6 (35 limbs). Patients and limbs were collected into three groups. In group I, all limbs were treated with compression without intervention. Group II consisted of crossover patients who failed compression treatment. Group III consisted of patients treated promptly with sclerosant foam therapy without a waiting period of compression. A standing Doppler duplex reflux examination was done in all cases. Compression was by Unna boot or long stretch elastic bandaging. Foam was generated from Polidocanol 1%, 2%, or 3% by the two-syringe technique and administered under ultrasound guidance. Posttreatment compression was used for 14 days. In addition to clinical and ultrasound evaluation at 2, 7, 14, and 30 days, venous severity scoring was noted at entry and discharge. In group I, 12 patients were discharged from care within 6 weeks of initiating compression. All eight of the class 6 limbs had healed. Group II consisted of four CEAP class 5 limbs and eight class 6 limbs that had failed to heal with compression. Five of eight venous ulcers healed within 2 weeks, two more healed by 4 weeks, and one required 6 weeks to heal. In group III, 7 of 11 venous ulcers healed within 2 weeks and four more within 4 weeks. Venous severity scores reflected the success of treatment, with the greatest change occurring in group III and the least in group I. Limbs treated with foam had a statistically better outcome than those without (p = 0.041). One patient failed foam sclerotherapy, another had pulmonary emboli 4 months after foam treatment, and a single medial gastrocnemius thrombus was discovered 24 hr after

  19. Challenging empowerment: AIDS-affected South African children and the need for a multi-level relational approach.

    PubMed

    Ansell, Nicola

    2014-01-01

    Critics of empowerment have highlighted the concept's mutability, focus on individual transformation, one-dimensionality and challenges of operationalisation. Relating these critiques to children's empowerment raises new challenges. Drawing on scholarship on children's subjecthood and exercise of power, alongside empirical research with children affected by AIDS, I argue that empowerment envisaged as individual self-transformation and increased capacity to act independently offers little basis for progressive change. Rather it is essential to adopt a relational approach that recognises the need to transform power relationships at multiple levels. This analysis has implications for our wider understanding of empowerment in the 21st century.

  20. The Development, Pilot, and Field Test of the Core HIV/AIDS Knowledge Assessment for Undergraduate and Graduate Students in Counseling-Related Degree Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Acklin, Carrie

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a core HIV/AIDS knowledge assessment (CHAKA) for students enrolled in counseling-related degree programs. Although there are studies that examined counseling HIV/AIDS knowledge, the instruments that were used were limited in ways that may compromise the accuracy of the inferences that were made. This study…

  1. African women and vulnerability to HIV/AIDS: implications for female related cultural practices.

    PubMed

    Uwe, E A; Ekuri, E E; Asuquo, P N

    Violence against women in Africa dates back to primordial society, where cultural practices such as female genital mutilation and polygamous marriages were prescribed and supervised by male-dominated social structures. Women's status has always been at high risk, since such practices are male supervised. With the upsurge of the HIV/AIDS pandemic globally, research needs to focus on such cultural practices, the dangers of such practices, and possible eradication. The present article examines the change-resistant, prevailing religious, social, and psychological barriers to change.

  2. Ethical dilemmas related to counseling clients living with HIV/AIDS.

    PubMed

    Garcia, J G; Froehlich, R J; Cartwright, B; Letiecq, D; Forrester, L E; Mueller, R O

    1999-01-01

    This study tested an eight-factor model of client actions/decisions in terms of the extent to which professionals counseling persons with HIV/AIDS believed that those actions/decisions presented ethical dilemmas, and the frequency with which they encountered such actions. A confirmatory factor analysis lent initial support for the hypothetical eight-factor ethical-dilemma model for the ratings regarding the extent to which the participants believed those items constituted ethical dilemmas. Similar results were obtained for the frequency ratings, but in this case a second, competing model was equally plausible. Several significant predictors of participant ratings were found and are discussed.

  3. AIDS-Related Knowledge, Attitudes, Beliefs, and Behaviors in Los Angeles County

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-01-01

    Moreover, even when they occur, such changes may be difficult to sustain ( Edgar et al., 1989; Stall et al., 1990). Respondents’ own global reports of...34 Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, Vol. 40, No. 1, 1991, pp. 1-5. Coates, T. J., R. D. Stall, S. M. Kegeles, B. Lo, S. F. Morin , and L. McKusick, "AIDS...Washington, D.C., 109th ed., 1989. Edgar , T., S. L. Hammond, and V. S. Freimuth, "The Role of the Mass Media and Interpersonal Communication in Promoting

  4. Celiac disease (CD), ulcerative colitis (UC), and primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) in one patient: a family study.

    PubMed

    Cadahía, V; Rodrigo, L; Fuentes, D; Riestra, S; de Francisco, R; Fernández, M

    2005-12-01

    We discuss the case of a 17-year-old male who at the age of 7 was diagnosed with celiac disease (CD) together with ulcerative colitis (UC) and primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC). The patient was treated with gluten-free diet and immunosuppressive drugs (azathioprine), and currently remains asymptomatic. The patient's younger, 12-year-old sister was diagnosed with CD when she was 1.5 years old, and at 7 years she developed type-I diabetes mellitus, which was difficult to control. A family study was made, and both parents were found to be affected with silent CD. All were DQ2 (+). In relation to the case and family study, we provide a series of comments related to CD and its complications.

  5. Sclerosing Mesenteritis: Multidisciplinary Collaboration Is Essential for Diagnosis and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    He, Huan; Zhi, Min; Zhang, Min; Su, Mingli; Chen, Huangwei; Kang, Liang; Huang, Yan; Zhou, Zhiyang; Gao, Xiang; Wang, Jianping; Hu, Pinjin

    2017-01-01

    Sclerosing mesenteritis (SM) is an extremely rare disease characterized by chronic non-specific inflammation, fat necrosis and fibrosis of the mesentery. We presented a 77-year-old man with progressive dyschezia, abdominal pain and mass in left lower quadrant. Computed tomography (CT) exhibited a thickened mesentery, enlarged lymph nodes and strand-like densities around the mesenteric vessels. However, laboratory investigation, colonoscopy and positron emission tomography did not provide any specific results for diagnosis. Because of the exacerbating abdominal pain, partial colectomy was performed and SM was diagnosed based on the pathological changes of mesentery including fat necrosis, multifocal lipid-filled macrophages, lymphocytes and multifocal fibrosis. Although SM is difficult to diagnose and often found by incident, progressive deterioration of abdominal symptoms and general status alteration are indicators of SM. Some typical imaging and pathologic manifestations are also helpful to SM diagnosis. There is no standard treatment for SM. Operation is preferred in those at the stage of fibrosis and particularly combined with intestinal obstruction. Therefore, a multidisciplinary collaboration is essential to diagnose and manage this rare disease, with combined approaches in gastroenterology, colorectal surgery, pathology and radiology. PMID:28270878

  6. Garré's sclerosing osteomyelitis: case report.

    PubMed

    de Moraes, Frederico Barra; Motta, Tainá Melo Vieira; Severin, Alessandra Assis; de Alencar Faria, Deniel; de Oliveira César, Fernanda; de Souza Carneiro, Siderlei

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to report on a rare case of Garré's sclerosing osteomyelitis. The patient was a 54-year-old woman with a history of treatment for lupus using corticoids for 20 years, and for osteoporosis using alendronate for five years. She presented edema and developed a limitation of left knee movement one year earlier, with mild effusion and pain on metaphyseal palpation, but without fever. She was in a good general state, without local secretion. Images of her knee showed trabecular osteolysis of the distal metaphysis of the femur and a periosteal reaction in both proximal tibias and both distal femurs, compatible with chronic osteomyelitis of low virulence and slow progression. Magnetic resonance imaging showed T2 hypersignal in the femur and tibia. Curettage was performed on the left distal femur, with release of secretion, but this was negative on culturing. A biopsy showed chronic infection and inflammation, fibrosis, xanthogranulomatous reaction and foci of suppuration. Antibiotic therapy was administered for six months. The etiology was not clarified: bacterial infection was suspected, but culturing was generally negative. The chronic process was maintained by low-virulence infection or even after treatment. The differential diagnoses were fibrous dysplasia, syphilis, pustulosis palmoplantaris, rectocolitis, Crohn's disease, SAPHO (synovitis, acne, pustulosis, hyperostosis and osteitis) and Paget's disease. The unifocal diseases were osteoid osteoma, Ewing's disease, osteosarcoma and eosinophilic granuloma.

  7. Sclerosing Mesenteritis: Multidisciplinary Collaboration Is Essential for Diagnosis and Treatment.

    PubMed

    He, Huan; Zhi, Min; Zhang, Min; Su, Mingli; Chen, Huangwei; Kang, Liang; Huang, Yan; Zhou, Zhiyang; Gao, Xiang; Wang, Jianping; Hu, Pinjin

    2017-02-01

    Sclerosing mesenteritis (SM) is an extremely rare disease characterized by chronic non-specific inflammation, fat necrosis and fibrosis of the mesentery. We presented a 77-year-old man with progressive dyschezia, abdominal pain and mass in left lower quadrant. Computed tomography (CT) exhibited a thickened mesentery, enlarged lymph nodes and strand-like densities around the mesenteric vessels. However, laboratory investigation, colonoscopy and positron emission tomography did not provide any specific results for diagnosis. Because of the exacerbating abdominal pain, partial colectomy was performed and SM was diagnosed based on the pathological changes of mesentery including fat necrosis, multifocal lipid-filled macrophages, lymphocytes and multifocal fibrosis. Although SM is difficult to diagnose and often found by incident, progressive deterioration of abdominal symptoms and general status alteration are indicators of SM. Some typical imaging and pathologic manifestations are also helpful to SM diagnosis. There is no standard treatment for SM. Operation is preferred in those at the stage of fibrosis and particularly combined with intestinal obstruction. Therefore, a multidisciplinary collaboration is essential to diagnose and manage this rare disease, with combined approaches in gastroenterology, colorectal surgery, pathology and radiology.

  8. Sclerosing Pneumocytoma of the Lung: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Arumugam, Vasugi Gramani; Thangavel, Periyasamy; Swaminathan, Rajendiran; Sunderaj, Ramya Rathinam

    2017-01-01

    Pulmonary Sclerosing Pneumocytoma (PSP) is a rare tumour of the lung and is always benign. Diagnosis is made incidentally following chest X-ray or chest CT scan performed for other clinical conditions. We report a case of PSP in a seven-year-old girl who got admitted for evaluation of an anterior mediastinal mass. Clinically, thought of teratoma or other germ cell tumour the mass was excised and sent for histopathological examination. Grossly, we received a pneumonectomy specimen measuring 13x11x8 cm with a nodular firm grey white lesion in the medial aspect of lower and middle lobe measuring 7.5x5.5x5 cm. Macroscopically, pleura was involved and adherent to the lung. Microscopy showed, an ill-defined lesion in the lung with extensive fibrosis and lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate. The lesion was composed of round to oval cells with ill defined cell border, moderate eosinophilic cytoplasm and bland nuclei. A panel of Immunohistochemical (IHC) markers was performed and the lesional cells were positive for Epithelial Membrane Antigen (EMA) and Thyroid Transcription Factor-1 (TTF-1). The prognosis after surgical resection is good and the patient is doing well.

  9. HIV/AIDS-related knowledge and behaviors among rural married migrant women in Shandong Province, China: a comparison study.

    PubMed

    Song, Yapei; Kang, Dianmin; Wang, Guoyong; Wei, Chongyi; Tao, Xiaorun; Huang, Tao; Qian, Yuesheng; Zhu, Tiwen; Yang, Shan; Yu, Shaoqi; Wang, Hong; Ma, Wei

    2015-02-01

    Migrant women in China are disproportionately affected by HIV/AIDS. This study described HIV/AIDS-related knowledge and behaviors among married migrant women in Shandong province in comparison to non-migrant local women and identified factors associated with HIV testing history and extramarital sex among married migrant women. A probability-based sample of 1,076 migrant and 1,195 local women were included in the analyses. Compared to local women, married migrant women had lower levels of HIV/AIDS knowledge and were more likely to have had premarital sex, extramarital sex, history of sexually transmitted diseases, and drug use. Less than a quarter of migrant women used condoms consistently in extramarital sex. Only 31.0 % of married migrant women had ever tested for HIV, and the rate of premarital HIV testing was very low. Multivariable analysis showed that married migrant women with a history of extramarital sex were more likely to be from Yunnan province, be living in Yantai city, be in their first marriage, have lower family income, have poor relationship with spouses, use drug, have a history of sexually transmitted diseases, and have lower social support. Our findings provide further evidence that married migrant women are at higher risk for HIV infection and that targeted interventions need to be developed for this population.

  10. The National NeuroAIDS Tissue Consortium (NNTC) Database: an integrated database for HIV-related studies.

    PubMed

    Cserhati, Matyas F; Pandey, Sanjit; Beaudoin, James J; Baccaglini, Lorena; Guda, Chittibabu; Fox, Howard S

    2015-01-01

    We herein present the National NeuroAIDS Tissue Consortium-Data Coordinating Center (NNTC-DCC) database, which is the only available database for neuroAIDS studies that contains data in an integrated, standardized form. This database has been created in conjunction with the NNTC, which provides human tissue and biofluid samples to individual researchers to conduct studies focused on neuroAIDS. The database contains experimental datasets from 1206 subjects for the following categories (which are further broken down into subcategories): gene expression, genotype, proteins, endo-exo-chemicals, morphometrics and other (miscellaneous) data. The database also contains a wide variety of downloadable data and metadata for 95 HIV-related studies covering 170 assays from 61 principal investigators. The data represent 76 tissue types, 25 measurement types, and 38 technology types, and reaches a total of 33,017,407 data points. We used the ISA platform to create the database and develop a searchable web interface for querying the data. A gene search tool is also available, which searches for NCBI GEO datasets associated with selected genes. The database is manually curated with many user-friendly features, and is cross-linked to the NCBI, HUGO and PubMed databases. A free registration is required for qualified users to access the database.

  11. Altered natural history of AIDS-related opportunistic infections in the era of potent combination antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, M A; French, M

    1998-01-01

    Since potent HIV protease inhibitor drugs became widely available in early 1996, many HIV clinical specialists have noted a marked decrease in the occurrence of AIDS-related opportunistic infections, and some specialists have reported unusual clinical presentations and manifestations of previously common opportunistic infections. In this article, we will review (1) the available data regarding recent trends in AIDS-related opportunistic infections incidence and manifestations, (2) clinical and immunologic evidence that potent combination antiretroviral therapy can alter the natural history of these opportunistic infections, and (3) the implications of these findings for current patient management practice and future clinical and immunologic research. As a preface to this review, however, it is important to acknowledge that any evaluation of the potential benefit of potent combination antiretroviral therapy in reducing the risk of serious opportunistic infections can be confounded by the concomitant use of prophylactic antimicrobial agents co-administered to prevent specific opportunistic infections. For example, it is standard clinical practice to administer trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (or another agent if trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole cannot be tolerated) to patients with an absolute CD4 lymphocyte count < 200 cells/microliters, unexplained chronic fever or a history of oropharyngeal candidiasis. Similarly, specific antimicrobial prophylaxis to prevent disseminated Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) infection in patients with absolute CD4 counts < 50 cells/microliters is also a widely recommended guideline. Although the relative efficacies of specific antimicrobial prophylaxis regimens in preventing the most common life- and sight-threatening opportunistic infectious complications of AIDS [Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia (PCP), disseminated MAC infection, and cytomegalovirus (CMV) retinitis] are now well established, these relative efficacies were established in

  12. Diffuse lymphoplasmacytic acalculous cholecystitis: a distinctive form of chronic cholecystitis associated with primary sclerosing cholangitis.

    PubMed

    Jessurun, J; Bolio-Solis, A; Manivel, J C

    1998-05-01

    Inflammation of the gallbladder is known to occur in patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC). However, the histological features of this form of cholecystitis have not been adequately defined. The aim of this study was to compare the inflammatory lesions of PSC-associated cholecystitis with those present in other cholecystopathies. The cases consisted of 11 gallbladders from patients with PSC who underwent liver transplantation. As controls, gallbladders from liver transplant patients with primary biliary cirrhosis (n = 4) and other chronic nonbiliary hepatopathies (n = 8), and 13 cholecystectomies from patients with chronic cholecystitis with (n = 10) and without (n = 3) lithiasis, were studied. The following histological features were tabulated on coded slides: presence, depth of involvement, and distribution of the inflammatory infiltrate, predominant cell type, presence of lymphoid aggregates, epithelial damage, metaplastic changes (pyloric or intestinal), fibrosis, smooth muscle hypertrophy, and presence of Rokitansky-Aschoff sinuses. At variance with the wide range of histological abnormalities present in other forms of chronic cholecystitis, most PSC-related cholecystitis showed a diffuse infiltrate (6 of 11) rich in plasma cells (6 of 11) predominantly confined to the lamina propria (9 of 11). The combination of these three features was present exclusively in PSC (5 of 11 PSC cholecystitis compared with 0 of 25 controls; P = .001). In conclusion, this study suggests that a characteristic form of cholecystitis may develop in patients with PSC.

  13. Sclerosing injections in midportion Achilles tendinopathy: a retrospective study of 25 patients.

    PubMed

    Clementson, Martin; Lorén, Ingemar; Dahlberg, Leif; Aström, Mats

    2008-09-01

    Sclerosing injections under ultrasonographic guidance is a new method of treatment for persistent pain in Achilles tendinosis. Good results, even superior to those of surgery, have been described. We report the outcome of 25 patients with midportion tendinosis receiving sclerosing treatment. Twenty-eight consecutive patients (29 tendons) with ultrasonographical findings of midportion tendinosis examined during the period November 2004 to November 2005 were identified in the database of the Department of Radiology, Malmö University Hospital. Twenty-five patients (26 tendons) were found suitable for treatment. Follow-up consisted of self-assessment questionnaire or phone interview. In 19 patients (20 tendons), results were good or excellent. Complications were few and mild. We conclude that sclerosing injections is a promising alternative to surgery in chronic Achilles midportion tendinosis. Our results are comparable to those obtained with surgery, but the procedure is less invasive. However, a few cases of tendinosis lack detectable neovessels and may still be candidates for surgery.

  14. Extra-acral cutaneous sclerosing perineurioma with CD34 fingerprint pattern.

    PubMed

    Macarenco, Ricardo S; Cury-Martins, Jade

    2017-04-01

    Sclerosing perineuroma is a variant of extraneural perineurioma that, as a rule, occurs in acral sites. However, it has also been occasionally reported in non-acral regions. Recently, CD34 expression in a pattern reminiscent of the human fingerprint has been observed in a subset of perineuriomas, but this immunohistochemical finding has not been documented in non-acral sclerosing perineuriomas. We report a case of sclerosing perineurioma presenting CD34 expression in a fingerprint-like pattern on the skin of the neck (a previously unreported site for this neoplasm) of a 56-year-old man. In addition, alpha smooth-muscle actin showed a similar pattern of expression, suggesting that the cell population implicated in the remarkable immunolabeling is most probably fibroblastic/myofibroblastic. Other immunohistochemical findings included epithelial membrane antigen and claudin1-positive lesional cells, and the absence of S100, glucose transporter protein 1, MUC4 and desmin.

  15. Compensation for research-related injury in NIH-sponsored HIV/AIDS clinical trials in Africa.

    PubMed

    Mamotte, Nicole; Wassenaar, Douglas; Singh, Nivedhna

    2013-02-01

    Concern has been voiced in the research ethics literature that under U.S. federal regulations U.S. sponsors, particularly the NIH, are not required to provide compensation for the treatment of research-related injury for trial participants or to allow grant funds to be used by investigators for appropriate insurance. This is problematic in developing country contexts because most participants are unlikely to have health insurance, resulting in overburdened and under-resourced health systems in many developing countries being responsible for providing care and treatment for research-related injury. This study provides preliminary insight into how respondent principal investigators of NIH-sponsored HIV/AIDS clinical trials in Africa and African research ethics committees deal with compensation for research-related injury. The majority of PIs surveyed provided free treatment for research-related injury, but few provided other forms of financial reparation to participants. The study also found that half of the PIs surveyed indicated that NIH funds were used for compensation, highlighting a contradiction between literature and practice. The majority of REC chairs surveyed indicated that their RECs routinely reviewed compensation plans for research-related injury and that their ethics application forms specifically requested information on compensation. Findings from one southern African country revealed that NIH funds were not used to provide treatment and/or financial reparation for research-related injury. Instead, PIs from this country relied on the government or the individual research participant (and/or their medical aid/health insurer) to cover the costs of research-related injury. The findings are discussed in the light of the recent (December 2011) U.S. Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethics report which recommends that research participants are morally entitled to compensation for research-related injury.

  16. Internalized HIV/AIDS-related stigma in a sample of HIV-positive people in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Hasan, M Tanvir; Nath, Samir Ranjan; Khan, Nabilah S; Akram, Owasim; Gomes, Tony Michael; Rashid, Sabina F

    2012-03-01

    Internalized stigma among people living with HIV/AIDS (PLHA) is prevalent in Bangladesh. A better understanding of the effects of stigma on PLHA is required to reduce this and to minimize its harmful effects. This study employed a quantitative approach by conducting a survey with an aim to know the prevalence of internalized stigma and to identify the factors associated with internalized stigma among a sample of 238 PLHA (male=152 and female=86) in Bangladesh. The findings suggest that there is a significant difference between groups with the low- and the high-internalized HIV/AIDS stigma in terms of both age and gender. The prevalence of internalized stigma varied according to the poverty status of PLHA. An exploratory factor analysis (EFA) found 10 of 15 items loaded highly on the three factors labelled self-acceptance, self-exclusion, and social withdrawal. About 68% of the PLHA felt ashamed, and 54% felt guilty because of their HIV status. More than half (87.5% male and 19.8% female) of the PLHA blamed themselves for their HIV status while many of them (38.2% male and 8.1% female) felt that they should be punished. The male PLHA more frequently chose to withdraw themselves from family and social gatherings compared to the female PLHA. They also experienced a higher level of internalized stigma compared to the female PLHA. The results suggest that the prevalence of internalized stigma is high in Bangladesh, and much needs to be done by different organizations working for and with the PLHA to reduce internalized stigma among this vulnerable group.

  17. Internalized HIV/AIDS-related Stigma in a Sample of HIV-positive People in Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Nath, Samir Ranjan; Khan, Nabilah S.; Akram, Owasim; Gomes, Tony Michael; Rashid, Sabina F.

    2012-01-01

    Internalized stigma among people living with HIV/AIDS (PLHA) is prevalent in Bangladesh. A better understanding of the effects of stigma on PLHA is required to reduce this and to minimize its harmful effects. This study employed a quantitative approach by conducting a survey with an aim to know the prevalence of internalized stigma and to identify the factors associated with internalized stigma among a sample of 238 PLHA (male=152 and female=86) in Bangladesh. The findings suggest that there is a significant difference between groups with the low and the high-internalized HIV/AIDS stigma in terms of both age and gender. The prevalence of internalized stigma varied according to the poverty status of PLHA. An exploratory factor analysis (EFA) found 10 of 15 items loaded highly on the three factors labelled self-acceptance, self-exclusion, and social withdrawal. About 68% of the PLHA felt ashamed, and 54% felt guilty because of their HIV status. More than half (87.5% male and 19.8% female) of the PLHA blamed themselves for their HIV status while many of them (38.2% male and 8.1% female) felt that they should be punished. The male PLHA more frequently chose to withdraw themselves from family and social gatherings compared to the female PLHA. They also experienced a higher level of internalized stigma compared to the female PLHA. The results suggest that the prevalence of internalized stigma is high in Bangladesh, and much needs to be done by different organizations working for and with the PLHA to reduce internalized stigma among this vulnerable group. PMID:22524116

  18. Clinical Analysis of Five Cases of AIDS-related Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Zuo, Shubo; Xu, Na; Li, Zhongkun; Li, Na; Xia, Hong; Ren, Hongtao; Bao, Huizheng

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Secondary malignancy is a major life-threatening complication facing patients afflicted with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). This study aimed to retrospectively review clinical features and treatment course of five patients with AIDS-associated non-Hodgkin lymphoma (A-NHL) in Jilin Tumor Hospital. Methods: Five A-NHL patients were retrospectively and consecutively hospitalized at our oncological unit between January 2012 and June 2014. All patients received pre-emptive highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) and chemotherapy, and were subsequently followed up at the outpatient clinic. All five patients were male, aged 27–53 years, and afflicted with A-NHL involving upper jaw, right inguinal region, right-side gingiva, mediastinum, or right-side neck. Histology showed diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (n = 3) or plasmablastic lymphoma (n = 2). Results: Two patients achieved complete remission after HAART and chemotherapy, whereas other three patients required a second-line treatment, with two achieving stable disease and one dying within a follow-up period of 0.5−2 years. Conclusion: The findings of the present study showed that A-NHL is a disease often diagnosed in the middle-to-late stages, with diverse clinical manifestations and short overall survival. In the cases reviewed in this study, HAART in combination with standard dose or high-dose chemotherapy, HAART and molecular targeted chemotherapy was administered, and these treatments proved to be effective for improving the prognosis of these patients. Moreover, the CD4+ cell count was important for determining the prognosis of patients. PMID:28083067

  19. Population Density and AIDS-Related Stigma in Large-Urban, Small-Urban, and Rural Communities of the Southeastern USA.

    PubMed

    Kalichman, Seth; Katner, Harold; Banas, Ellen; Kalichman, Moira

    2017-02-11

    AIDS stigmas delay HIV diagnosis, interfere with health care, and contribute to mental health problems among people living with HIV. While there are few studies of the geographical distribution of AIDS stigma, research suggests that AIDS stigmas are differentially experienced in rural and urban areas. We conducted computerized interviews with 696 men and women living with HIV in 113 different zip code areas that were classified as large-urban, small-urban, and rural areas in a southeast US state with high-HIV prevalence. Analyses conducted at the individual level (N = 696) accounting for clustering at the zip code level showed that internalized AIDS-related stigma (e.g., the sense of being inferior to others because of HIV) was experienced with greater magnitude in less densely populated communities. Multilevel models indicated that after adjusting for potential confounding factors, rural communities reported greater internalized AIDS-related stigma compared to large-urban areas and that small-urban areas indicated greater experiences of enacted stigma (e.g., discrimination) than large-urban areas. The associations between anticipated AIDS-related stigma (e.g., expecting discrimination) and population density at the community-level were not significant. Results suggest that people living in rural and small-urban settings experience greater AIDS-related internalized and enacted stigma than their counterparts living in large-urban centers. Research is needed to determine whether low-density population areas contribute to or are sought out by people who experienced greater AIDS-related stigma. Regardless of causal directions, interventions are needed to address AIDS-related stigma, especially among people in sparsely populated areas with limited resources.

  20. Ethnobotanical Study of Plants Used in the Management of HIV/AIDS-Related Diseases in Livingstone, Southern Province, Zambia

    PubMed Central

    Chinsembu, Kazhila C.

    2016-01-01

    Faced with critical shortages of staff, long queues, and stigma at public health facilities in Livingstone, Zambia, persons who suffer from HIV/AIDS-related diseases use medicinal plants to manage skin infections, diarrhoea, sexually transmitted infections, tuberculosis, cough, malaria, and oral infections. In all, 94 medicinal plant species were used to manage HIV/AIDS-related diseases. Most remedies are prepared from plants of various families such as Combretaceae, Euphorbiaceae, Fabaceae, and Lamiaceae. More than two-thirds of the plants (mostly leaves and roots) are utilized to treat two or more diseases related to HIV infection. Eighteen plants, namely, Achyranthes aspera L., Lannea discolor (Sond.) Engl., Hyphaene petersiana Klotzsch ex Mart., Asparagus racemosus Willd., Capparis tomentosa Lam., Cleome hirta Oliv., Garcinia livingstonei T. Anderson, Euclea divinorum Hiern, Bridelia cathartica G. Bertol., Acacia nilotica Delile, Piliostigma thonningii (Schumach.) Milne-Redh., Dichrostachys cinerea (L.) Wight and Arn., Abrus precatorius L., Hoslundia opposita Vahl., Clerodendrum capitatum (Willd.) Schumach., Ficus sycomorus L., Ximenia americana L., and Ziziphus mucronata Willd., were used to treat four or more disease conditions. About 31% of the plants in this study were administered as monotherapies. Multiuse medicinal plants may contain broad-spectrum antimicrobial agents. However, since widely used plants easily succumb to the threats of overharvesting, they need special protocols and guidelines for their genetic conservation. There is still need to confirm the antimicrobial efficacies, pharmacological parameters, cytotoxicity, and active chemical ingredients of the discovered plants. PMID:27069489

  1. Extensive Sclerosing Mesenteritis of the Rectosigmoid Colon Associated with Erosive Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Nobili, C.; Degrate, L.; Caprotti, R.; Franciosi, C.; Leone, B. E.; Romano, F.; Dinelli, M.; Uggeri, Fr.

    2009-01-01

    Sclerosing mesenteritis is a rare, idiopatic, usually benign, inflammatory process of the mesenteric adipose tissue. The most common site of involvement is the small bowel mesentery. We present a case of sclerosing mesenteritis of the rectosigmoid colon as a cause of severe abdominal pain, abdominal obstruction, and ischemic colic mucosal lesions. Contrast enema, colonoscopy, angiography, and CT were the imaging modalities used. A 20 cm diameter, fibrotic mass causing extensive compression of rectosigmoid colon was found at laparotomy. Histological examination showed extended fibrosis, inflammatory cells infiltration, lipophages, and granulomas within the mesenteric adipose tissue associated with erosive colitis. Clinical presentation and treatment are discussed. PMID:19365585

  2. [Sclerosing hemangioma presenting as a solitary lung nodule. Report of one case].

    PubMed

    Cardemil, Gonzalo; Fernández, Eduardo; Riffo, Paola; Reyes, Diego; Ledezma, Rodrigo; Mira, Magdalena; Morales, Claudia; Salguero, Jorge

    2004-07-01

    Lung sclerosing hemangioma is an uncommon tumor that presents as a solitary asymptomatic nodule and that affects middle age women. It derives from type II pneumocytes. We report a 52 years old female with a solitary lung nodule detected in a chest X ray requested for the diagnosis of an acute respiratory disease. The nodule was excised by video thoracoscopy and the frozen section biopsy was informed as a non small cell undifferentiated carcinoma. Therefore an inferior right lobectomy with lymph node resection was performed. The definitive biopsy was informed as a lung sclerosing hemangioma.

  3. MR and MRCP in the evaluation of primary sclerosing cholangitis: current applications and imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Elsayes, Khaled M; Oliveira, Erica P; Narra, Vamsidhar R; Abou El Abbass, Hatem A; Ahmed, Moustafa I; Tongdee, Ranista; Brown, Jeffrey J

    2006-01-01

    Primary sclerosing cholangitis is a progressive cholestatic disease of unknown etiology leading to cirrhosis and liver failure. Several imaging modalities have been used to study this disease, including ultrasonography, computed tomography and hepatobiliary scintigraphy, but accurate diagnosis was found to be best made with endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography or direct cholangiography. However, these 2 methods are invasive and may produce serious complications. Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography is a noninvasive imaging technique that has become very useful for diagnosing primary sclerosing cholangitis. Contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging provides pertinent information of extraductal abnormalities in addition to biliary ductal changes.

  4. Aids-related progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy: a retrospective study in a referral center in São Paulo, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Vidal, José E; Penalva de Oliveira, Augusto C; Fink, Maria Cristina D S; Pannuti, Cláudio S; Trujillo, J Roberto

    2008-01-01

    Few data are available about progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) from Brazil. The objectives of this study were to describe the main features of patients with PML and estimate its frequency among AIDS patients with central nervous system (CNS) opportunistic diseases admitted to the Instituto de Infectologia Emílio Ribas, São Paulo, Brazil, from April 2003 to April 2004. A retrospective and descriptive study was performed. Twelve (6%) cases of PML were identified among 219 patients with neurological diseases. The median age of patients with PML was 36 years and nine (75%) were men. Nine (75%) patients were not on antiretroviral therapy at admission. The most common clinical manifestations were: focal weakness (75%), speech disturbances (58%), visual disturbances (42%), cognitive dysfunction (42%), and impaired coordination (42%). The median CD4+ T-cell count was 45 cells/microL. Eight (67%) of 12 patients were laboratory-confirmed with PML and four (33%) were possible cases. Eleven (92%) presented classic PML and only one case had immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS)-related PML. In four (33%) patients, PML was the first AIDS-defining illness. During hospitalization, three patients (25%) died as a result of nosocomial pneumonia and nine (75%) were discharged to home. Cases of PML were only exceeded by cases of cerebral toxoplasmosis, cryptococcal meningoencephalitis, and CNS tuberculosis, the three more frequent neurologic opportunistic infections in Brazil. The results of this study suggest that PML is not an uncommon HIV-related neurologic disorder in a referral center in Brazil.

  5. Macaque homologs of EBV and KSHV show uniquely different associations with simian AIDS-related lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Bruce, A Gregory; Bielefeldt-Ohmann, Helle; Barcy, Serge; Bakke, Angela M; Lewis, Patrick; Tsai, Che-Chung; Murnane, Robert D; Rose, Timothy M

    2012-01-01

    Two gammaherpesviruses, Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) (Lymphocryptovirus genus) and Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) (Rhadinovirus genus) have been implicated in the etiology of AIDS-associated lymphomas. Homologs of these viruses have been identified in macaques and other non-human primates. In order to assess the association of these viruses with non-human primate disease, archived lymphoma samples were screened for the presence of macaque lymphocryptovirus (LCV) homologs of EBV, and macaque rhadinoviruses belonging to the RV1 lineage of KSHV homologs or the more distant RV2 lineage of Old World primate rhadinoviruses. Viral loads were determined by QPCR and infected cells were identified by immunolabeling for different viral proteins. The lymphomas segregated into three groups. The first group (n = 6) was associated with SIV/SHIV infections, contained high levels of LCV (1-25 genomes/cell) and expressed the B-cell antigens CD20 or BLA.36. A strong EBNA-2 signal was detected in the nuclei of the neoplastic cells in one of the LCV-high lymphomas, indicative of a type III latency stage. None of the lymphomas in this group stained for the LCV viral capsid antigen (VCA) lytic marker. The second group (n = 5) was associated with D-type simian retrovirus-2 (SRV-2) infections, contained high levels of RV2 rhadinovirus (9-790 genomes/cell) and expressed the CD3 T-cell marker. The third group (n = 3) was associated with SIV/SHIV infections, contained high levels of RV2 rhadinovirus (2-260 genomes/cell) and was negative for both CD20 and CD3. In both the CD3-positive and CD3/CD20-negative lymphomas, the neoplastic cells stained strongly for markers of RV2 lytic replication. None of the lymphomas had detectable levels of retroperitoneal fibromatosis herpesvirus (RFHV), the macaque RV1 homolog of KSHV. Our data suggest etiological roles for both lymphocryptoviruses and RV2 rhadinoviruses in the development of simian AIDS-associated lymphomas and indicate that the

  6. Computer Aided Drug Design Studies in the Discovery of Secondary Metabolites Targeted Against Age-Related Neurodegenerative Diseases.

    PubMed

    Scotti, Luciana; Scotti, Marcus Tullius

    2015-01-01

    Secondary metabolites are plant products that occur usually in differentiated cells, generally not being necessary for the cells themselves, but likely useful for the plant as a whole. Neurodegeneration can be found in many different levels in the neurons, it always begins at the molecular level and progresses toward the systemic levels. Usually, alterations are observed such as decreasing cholinergic impulse, toxicity related to reactive oxygen species (ROS, inflammatory "amyloid plaque" related processes, catecholamine disequilibrium, etc. Computer aided drug design (CADD has become relevant in the drug discovery process; technological advances in the areas of molecular structure characterization, computational science, and molecular biology have contributed to the planning of new drugs against neurodegenerative diseases. This review discusses scientific CADD studies of the secondary metabolites. Flavonoids, alkaloids, and xanthone compounds have been studied by various researchers (as inhibitory ligands in molecular docking; mainly with three enzymes: acetylcholinesterase (AChE; EC 3.1.1.7, butyrylcholinesterase (BChE; EC 3.1.1.8, and monoamine oxidase (MAO; EC 1.4.3.4. In addition, we have applied ligand-based-virtual screening (using Random Forest, associated with structure-based- virtual screening (docking of a small dataset of 469 alkaloids of the Apocynaceae family from an in-house data bank to select structures with potential inhibitory activity against human AChE. This computer-aided drug design study selected certain alkaloids that might be useful in further studies for the treatment of neurological disorders such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease.

  7. Assessing a conceptual framework of health-related quality of life in a HIV/AIDS population.

    PubMed

    Vidrine, Damon J; Amick, Benjamin C; Gritz, Ellen R; Arduino, Roberto C

    2005-05-01

    With the recognition of health-related quality of life (HRQOL) as an important outcome in the course of HIV-disease, it is important to gain a better understanding of the complex relationships among the various factors that influence it. This study assesses a conceptual framework of HRQOL, consisting of disease status, socio-economic status (SES), behavioral variables, symptom status, role-specific functional status and HRQOL, among a multiethnic, economically disadvantaged population of individuals living with HIV/AIDS. Self-report data were collected from 348 patients receiving care at a large HIV/AIDS care center, serving residents of a large metropolitan area. The relationships between the study variables were examined using structural equation modeling. Results indicated that the hypothesized framework provided a well-fitted solution to the data, chi2(44df) = 57.62], p = 0.08 and root mean square error of approximation = 0.03, 90% confidence interval 0.01; 0.05. This framework suggests that health-related variables fall along a continuum, beginning with disease status and ending in generic HRQOL. In addition, the framework suggests that behavioral factors (i.e., smoking status, alcohol consumption, and illicit drug use) and SES exert significant effects along this continuum and should be carefully considered when analyzing and interpreting HRQOL data.

  8. Unhealthy substance-use behaviors as symptom-related self-care in persons with HIV/AIDS.

    PubMed

    Brion, John M; Rose, Carol Dawson; Nicholas, Patrice K; Sloane, Rick; Corless, Inge B; Lindgren, Teri G; Wantland, Dean J; Kemppainen, Jeanne K; Sefcik, Elizabeth F; Nokes, Kathleen M; Kirksey, Kenn M; Eller, Lucille; Hamilton, Mary Jane; Holzemer, William L; Portillo, Carmen J; Mendez, Marta Rivero; Robinson, Linda M; Moezzi, Shahnaz; Rosa, Maria; Human, Sarie; Maryland, Mary; Arudo, John; Ros, Ana Viamonte; Nicholas, Thomas P; Cuca, Yvette; Huang, Emily; Bain, Catherine; Tyer-Viola, Lynda; Zang, Sheryl M; Shannon, Maureen; Peters-Lewis, Angelleen; Willard, Suzanne

    2011-03-01

    Unhealthy substance-use behaviors, including a heavy alcohol intake, illicit drug use, and cigarette smoking, are engaged in by many HIV-positive individuals, often as a way to manage their disease-related symptoms. This study, based on data from a larger randomized controlled trial of an HIV/AIDS symptom management manual, examines the prevalence and characteristics of unhealthy behaviors in relation to HIV/AIDS symptoms. The mean age of the sample (n = 775) was 42.8 years and 38.5% of the sample was female. The mean number of years living with HIV was 9.1 years. The specific self-reported unhealthy substance-use behaviors were the use of marijuana, cigarettes, a large amount of alcohol, and illicit drugs. A subset of individuals who identified high levels of specific symptoms also reported significantly higher substance-use behaviors, including amphetamine and injection drug use, heavy alcohol use, cigarette smoking, and marijuana use. The implications for clinical practice include the assessment of self-care behaviors, screening for substance abuse, and education of persons regarding the self-management of HIV.

  9. Hearing Aids

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Info » Hearing, Ear Infections, and Deafness Hearing Aids On this page: What is a hearing aid? ... the ear through a speaker. How can hearing aids help? Hearing aids are primarily useful in improving ...

  10. Women and HIV/AIDS

    MedlinePlus

    ... AIDS email updates Enter email Submit HIV and AIDS The human immunodeficiency (IH-myoo-noh-di-FISH- ... health Pregnancy and HIV View more HIV and AIDS resources Related information Birth control methods Sexually transmitted ...

  11. HIV/AIDS and Vaccines

    MedlinePlus

    ... NIAID). /* // ** // */ Prevention Research Vaccines Microbicides Related Topics on AIDS.gov Clinical Trials Immune System 101 HIV Vaccine ... Be the Generation Last revised: 12/09/2016 AIDS.gov HIV/AIDS Basics • Federal Resources • Using New ...

  12. Challenges to successful implementation of HIV and AIDS-related health policies in Cartagena, Colombia.

    PubMed

    Djellouli, Nehla; Quevedo-Gómez, María Cristina

    2015-05-01

    The Caribbean region presents the highest prevalence of HIV/AIDS worldwide after sub-Saharan Africa; leading to serious social, economic and health consequences at the local scale but also at the regional and global levels. In Colombia, a national plan to tackle the epidemic was formulated with little evidence that its implementation in the local context is effective. This study focused on Cartagena - one of Colombia's largest cities and an international touristic hub - that presents one of the highest HIV prevalences in the country, to investigate whether the national plan accounts for local specificities and what are the barriers to local implementation. Based on the Contextual Interaction Theory (CIT), this qualitative research relied upon 27 interviews and 13 life stories of local inhabitants and stakeholders, collected in a first fieldwork in 2006-2007. A follow-up data collection took place in 2013 with 10 participants: key policymakers and implementers, NGO representatives and local inhabitants. Barriers identified by the participants included: local population's understandings and beliefs on condom use; stigma and discrimination; lack of collaboration from the Church, the education sector and local politicians; corruption; high staff turnover; frequent changes in leadership; lack of economic and human resources; and barriers to health care access. The findings suggest that global influences also have an impact on the CIT framework (e.g. international organisations as a major financier in HIV prevention). The participants put forward several feasible solutions to implementation barriers. We discuss how several of the proposed solutions have been applied in other Latin American and Caribbean countries and yielded positive results. However, further research is needed to find possible ways of overcoming certain barriers identified by this study such as corruption, the lack of collaboration of the Church and barriers to health care access.

  13. The Relation of Patient Dependence to Home Health Aide Use in Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Scherer, Rachel K.; Scarmeas, Nikolaos; Brandt, Jason; Blacker, Deborah; Albert, Marilyn S.; Stern, Yaakov

    2009-01-01

    Background Although there has been much research devoted to understanding the predictors of nursing home placement (NHP) in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) patients, there is currently a lack of research concerning the predictors of home health care. The objective of this study was to examine whether the Dependence Scale can predict home health aide (HHA) use. Methods The sample is drawn from the Predictors Study, a large, multicenter cohort of patients with probable AD, prospectively followed annually for up to 7 years in three university-based AD centers in the United States. Markov analyses (n = 75) were used to calculate annual transition probabilities for the “new onset” of HHA use (instances where an HHA was absent at the previous visit, but present at the next visit) as a function of HHA presence at the preceding year’s visit and dependence level at that preceding year’s visit. Results The dependence level at the previous year’s visit was a significant predictor of HHA use at the next year’s visit. Three specific items of the Dependence Scale (needing household chores done for oneself, needing to be watched or kept company when awake, and needing to be escorted when outside) were significant predictors of the presence of an HHA. Conclusion The Dependence Scale is a valuable tool for predicting HHA use in AD patients. Obtaining a better understanding of home health care in AD patients may help delay NHP and have a positive impact on the health and well-being of both the caregiver and the patient. PMID:18840808

  14. The importance of IgG4 screening in patients diagnosed with primary sclerosing cholangitis in the past

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yanni; Zhou, Lu; Zhao, Xin; Song, Wenjing; Karunaratna, Nathasha; Wang, Bangmao

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: While primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) has been recognized for decades, immunoglobulin G4-related sclerosing cholangitis (IgG4-SC) has been correctly diagnosed only in recent years. PSC and IgG4-SC show similar clinical symptoms, serologic markers, and imaging results, but the treatment strategies and prognosis of patients differ. Patient concerns: Here, we present the case report of a patient diagnosed with PSC for 10 years and rediagnosed with IgG4-SC recently, to emphasize the importance of screening serum IgG4 levels in patients with previous diagnosis of PSC. Diagnoses: A 57-year-old woman with 10-year history of PSC was hospitalized due to pruritus. In 2004, the patient underwent cholecystectomy and cholangioenterostomy because of unexplained jaundice with pancreatic swelling. In the last 10 years, her liver enzyme levels were continuously elevated. The latest liver function profile showed elevated alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, and total bilirubin. IgG4 was 3.69 (0.03–2.01 g/L). Immunohistochemical staining of the surgical specimen showed >10 IgG4-positive plasma cells per high-power field, and IgG4+/IgG+ plasma cells >40%. Interventions and outcomes: She was treated with prednisone 40 mg once-daily and the dose was gradually tapered. The patient remains well after 18 months. Lessons subsections: Patients with IgG4-SC may be misdiagnosed as PSC due to lack of IgG4 screening. It is important to perform IgG4 screening in patients diagnosed as PSC. Steroid is effective to prevent disease progression in these patients. PMID:27977604

  15. Study on effectiveness of gemcitabine, dexamethasone, and cisplatin (GDP) for relapsed or refractory AIDS-related non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Dong Ta; Shi, Chun Mei; Chen, Qiang; Huang, Jing Ze; Liang, Jian Gang

    2012-11-01

    Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) remains the second most common malignant complication in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Even though NHL is commonly chemosensitive to primary treatment, failure or relapse still occurs in a large number of patients. We conducted this retrospective study to evaluate the efficacy and safety of gemcitabine, dexamethasone, and cisplatin (GDP) for relapsed or refractory AIDS-related NHL (AIDS-NHL). Forty-eight patients with relapsed or refractory AIDS-NHL were treated with intravenous combination chemotherapy with GDP. The overall objective response rate was 54.1% (95% confidence interval, CI, 40.1-68.3%), with 10 complete responses and 16 partial responses. The 2-year overall survival rate (OS) was 70.8% (95% CI 58.0-83.7%), and the 5-year OS was 41.7% (95% CI 27.7-55.6%). The 2-year progression-free survival rate (PFS) was 37.5% (95% CI 23.8-51.2%), and the 5-year PFS was 25.0% (95% CI 12.8-37.3%). The median progression-free survival was 8.8 months (95% CI 0-20.3 months), and the median overall survival was 40.6 months (95% CI 22.6-58.6 months). Patients with B cell tumors who relapsed but had no B symptoms were clinical stage I/II, had infiltration fewer than two extranodal sites, had CD4⁺ counts >200 cells/μL, and had lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) less than the upper limit of normal benefited from GDP. The level of LDH had a significant impact on the response rate to chemotherapy with GDP (P = 0.015). Myelosuppression was the main side effect; the incidence of grade 3-4 anemia was 8.3%; leukopenia, 37.5%; and thrombocytopenia, 48.3%. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to determine variables for OS and PFS. This study confirms that GDP is an effective and safe salvage regimen in relapsed or refractory AIDS-NHL, was associated with modest declines in CD4⁺ lymphocyte counts, and did not promote HIV-1 viral replication.

  16. Poverty-related stressors and HIV/AIDS transmission risks in two South African communities.

    PubMed

    Kalichman, Seth C; Simbayi, Leickness C; Jooste, Sean; Cherry, Chauncey; Cain, Demetria

    2005-06-01

    Community stress associated with poverty is related to health risks and poor health outcomes. Perceived community stress is specifically related to HIV transmission risk behaviors in the United States, but research has not examined these relationships in southern Africa, the region of the world with the highest rates of HIV infection and among the greatest poverty. Men (N=464) and women (N=531) living in impoverished adjacent communities distinguished by race (e.g., indigenous African and Coloured) completed anonymous surveys of perceptions of 10 poverty-related community stressors and measures of HIV risk-related behaviors. Indigenous African and Coloured communities differed in their perceptions of stressors, with Africans consistently viewing the 10 community stressors as more serious problems. In addition, perceived seriousness of lacking basic living resources was related to higher risk for HIV among Africans. Perceived community stress was also related to alcohol and drug use, but substance use did not mediate the association between perceived community stress and HIV risks. In the Coloured community, perceived community stressors were related to drug use, but perceived community stressors were not associated with HIV risks. These findings extend the findings of previous research to show that poverty-related stressors are associated with HIV transmission risks in some poverty-stricken communities and that these associations are not mediated by substance use.

  17. Case report 834: Chronic sclerosing osteomyelitis of the mandible with long bone periostitis.

    PubMed

    Stewart, A; Carneiro, R; Pollock, L; Shaw, D

    1994-04-01

    We present the case of a patient with primary chronic osteomyelitis of the mandible, the radiological appearance of which is compatible with a diagnosis of chronic sclerosing osteomyelitis. The accompanying femoral and tibial periosteal reactive new bone formation and the benign clinical course suggest that this presentation may represent a form of chronic multifocal osteomyelitis.

  18. AIDS-Related Stigma and Mental Disorders among People Living with HIV: A Cross-Sectional Study in Cambodia

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Siyan; Chhoun, Pheak; Suong, Samedy; Thin, Kouland; Brody, Carinne; Tuot, Sovannary

    2015-01-01

    Background AIDS-related stigma and mental disorders are the most common conditions in people living with HIV (PLHIV). We therefore conducted this study to examine the association of AIDS-related stigma and discrimination with mental disorders among PLHIV in Cambodia. Methods A two-stage cluster sampling method was used to select 1,003 adult PLHIV from six provinces. The People Living with HIV Stigma Index was used to measure stigma and discrimination, and a short version of general health questionnaire (GHQ-12) was used to measure mental disorders. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was conducted. Results The reported experiences of discrimination in communities in the past 12 months ranged from 0.8% for reports of being denied health services to 42.3% for being aware of being gossiped about. Internal stigma was also common ranging from 2.8% for avoiding going to a local clinic and/or hospital to 59.6% for deciding not to have (more) children. The proportions of PLHIV who reported fear of stigma and discrimination ranged from 13.9% for fear of being physically assaulted to 34.5% for fear of being gossiped about. The mean score of GHQ-12 was 3.2 (SD = 2.4). After controlling for several potential confounders, higher levels of mental disorders (GHQ-12≥ 4) remained significantly associated with higher levels of experiences of stigma and discrimination in family and communities (AOR = 1.9, 95% CI = 1.4–2.6), higher levels of internal stigma (AOR = 1.7, 95% CI = 1.2–2.3), and higher levels of fear of stigma and discrimination in family and communities (AOR = 1.5, 95% CI = 1.1–2.2). Conclusions AIDS-related stigma and discrimination among PLHIV in Cambodia are common and may have potential impacts on their mental health conditions. These findings indicate a need for community-based interventions to reduce stigma and discrimination in the general public and to help PLHIV to cope with this situation. PMID:25806534

  19. Welfare: Income and Relative Poverty Status of AFDC (Aid to Families with Dependent Children) Families.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-11-04

    spending pat- terns of the poor . Also, some researchers believe that valuing medical care in determining incomes can distort recipients’ relative poverty ...faster than the overall cost of living, and recent surveys have found low - income fami- lies spend less than one-third of their income on food. The poverty ...AR9 995 NFARE: INCOME AND RELATIVE POVERTY STATUS OF AFDC i/ (AIDMON FA IIS11H U EN R CONIG OFWASHINGTO DC HUMN RESOURCES DIV. S4 MOV 67

  20. Garrett County Aids AID

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Appalachia, 1975

    1975-01-01

    Garrett County, Maryland volunteered to act as a pre-overseas learning laboratory for AID (Agency for International Development) interns who practiced data collection and planning techniques with the help of local citizenry. (JC)

  1. AIDS in Rural California.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wooten, Donald B.

    1989-01-01

    Examines the increase in AIDS patients in rural California, which is greater than that in urban areas, including AIDS population projections through 1991. Describes differences between AIDS populations in rural and urban areas and relates these to state expenditure patterns and differential needs. (DHP)

  2. Sclerosing adenosis: Ultrasonographic and mammographic findings and correlation with histopathology

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ya-Ling; Chen, Jia-Jian; Chang, Cai; Gao, Yi; Wu, Jiong; Yang, Wen-Tao; Gu, Ya-Jia

    2017-01-01

    The present study was conducted to evaluate the radiological findings, particularly the ultrasonographic (US) characteristics of sclerosing adenosis (SA), and their correlation with histopathological results. A retrospective review identified 191 patients with a total of 200 lesions histopathologically confirmed as SA following breast surgery between July 2009 and December 2012. Of the 191 patients, 145 (151 lesions) with SA as the major component were included for US and mammographic (MG) analysis. All 145 patients analyzed were female, with a mean age ± standard deviation of 46.8±7.8 years (range, 25–71 years). All 145 patients underwent US examination and the imaging findings included heterogeneously echogenic areas in 9.3% (14/151), masses in 51.7% (78/151), masses with calcifications in 13.9% (21/151), focal acoustic shadowing in 4.0% (6/151) and were negative in 21.2% (32/151) patients. Among the 119 lesions with visible abnormalities, 87.4% (104/119) were hypoechoic, 58.0% (69/119) were irregular in shape, 52.1% (62/119) had an ill-defined margin, calcifications were found in 17.6% (21/119) and 7.6% (9/119) were hypervascular, while none of the characteristics mentioned above were significantly correlated with histopathology. A total of 136 patients underwent MG at the Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, and the imaging findings included microcalcifications in 31.6% (43/136), masses in 23.5% (32/136), asymmetric focal density in 14.7% (20/136), focal architectural distortion in 22.8% (31/136), and were negative in 7.4% (10/136). The mass lesions were fewer on MG compared with US (23.5 vs. 65.6%, respectively). The area under the curve of US distinguishing between benign and malignant lesions was significantly larger compared with that of MG (0.547 vs. 0.497, respectively; P=0.036). In the 60 lesions that were overestimated by Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System US category, one or more characteristics of malignancy were found on US imaging. The

  3. Specificity of anti-lymphocyte antibodies in sera from patients with AIDS-related complex (ARC) and healthy homosexuals.

    PubMed Central

    Warren, R Q; Johnson, E A; Donnelly, R P; Lavia, M F; Tsang, K Y

    1988-01-01

    The presence and specificity of anti-lymphocyte antibodies (ALA) was investigated in sera from male homosexuals with AIDS-Related Complex (ARC) as well as healthy homosexuals. Individuals in the healthy homosexual group had no detectable antibodies to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Antibodies reactive with normal peripheral blood mononuclear cells were detected by Western blot analysis in sera from both groups of homosexuals. Of those individuals whose sera contained ALA, 71% of ARC patients and 83% of healthy homosexuals had antibodies recognizing a 73 kilodalton (kD) molecule. ALA present in ARC sera reacted with CD3+, CD4+ and CD8+ lymphocytes while little reactivity with B cells was observed. Our results indicate that ALA appear in homosexuals prior to HIV infection and are reactive primarily with T lymphocytes. A 73 kD structure associated with the T cell membrane is frequently the target for these antibodies. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:3052941

  4. Stresses on Grandparents and Other Relatives Caring for Children Affected by HIV/AIDS

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linsk, Nathan L.; Mason, Sally

    2004-01-01

    This study investigated the needs of relative caregivers of children in the child welfare system whose parents had HIV. Families of children supported by the state child welfare agency were invited to participate in the study; 17 families reported that HIV affected them and 11 families did not identify HIV as an issue. The findings indicate that…

  5. Attitudes and beliefs related to HIV/AIDS in urban religious congregations: Barriers and opportunities for HIV-related interventions

    PubMed Central

    Bluthenthal, Ricky N.; Palar, Kartika; Mendel, Peter; Kanouse, David E.; Corbin, Dennis E.; Derose, Kathryn Pitkin

    2012-01-01

    HIV-related stigmas have been seen as a barrier to greater religious congregation involvement in HIV prevention and care in the United States and elsewhere. We explored congregational and community norms and attitudes regarding HIV, sexuality, and drug use through a qualitative case study of 14 diverse religious congregations in Los Angeles County, California between December 2006 and May 2008. Data collected included semi-structured interviews with 57 clergy and lay leaders across the congregations, structured observations of congregational activities, review of archival documents, and a questionnaire on congregational characteristics. Across and within congregations, we found a wide range of views towards HIV, people with HIV, and populations at risk for HIV, from highly judgmental and exclusionary, to “loving the sinner, not the sin,” to accepting and affirming. Attitudes and norms about HIV, homosexuality, and substance abuse appeared to be related to the type and intensity of congregational HIV-related activities. However, even among the higher activity congregations, we found a range of perceptions, including ones that were stigmatizing. Results suggest that affirming norms and attitudes are not a prerequisite for a congregation to initiate HIV activities, a finding relevant for HIV service providers and researchers seeking to engage congregations on this issue. HIV stigma-reduction is not a prerequisite for congregational HIV involvement: both may occur simultaneously, or one before the other, and they dynamically affect each other. Strategies that are congruent with congregations’ current levels of comfort and openness around HIV can themselves facilitate a process of attitudinal and normative change. PMID:22445157

  6. Online resources for persons recently diagnosed with HIV/AIDS: an analysis of HIV-related webpages.

    PubMed

    Horvath, Keith J; Harwood, Eileen M; Courtenay-Quirk, Cari; McFarlane, Mary; Fisher, Holly; Dickenson, Tina; Kachur, Rachel; Rosser, B R Simon; O'Leary, Ann

    2010-07-01

    The Internet is a major source of HIV-related information and resources for persons recently diagnosed with HIV/AIDS (PRDHA). This study examined the types of HIV-related websites that appear as a result of HIV-related keyword searches and the extent to which website information targets PRDHA. The first page of HIV-related webpages from 18 keyword searches was coded. Among 137 webpages meeting inclusion criteria, 63% represented HIV-informational websites, 31% targeted HIV-positive individuals, and over half contained or provided access to HIV prevention, treatment, and transmission information. Thirty-three percent of webpages contained or provided access to PRDHA-targeted information, with a greater percentage of those webpages having mobile, non-English, and "Ask the Expert" features compared with non-PRDHA targeted webpages. Implications for PRDHA include the following: (1) they should explore HIV-related websites to gain insight into the credibility of the information contained on those sites; (2) PRDHA must be aware that HIV-related websites have the potential to elicit dated, emotionally distressing, or irrelevant information; and (3) to obtain information that relates to their demographic and situational profile, they may wish to use specific key terms (e.g., "HIV women") rather than attempting to navigate webpages that arise from general search terms (e.g., "HIV"). Recommendations for future development of online resources for PRDHA include providing HIV-relevant information in a stepwise fashion, providing demographically targeted HIV information, and greater utilization of mobile technology.

  7. Assessment of broadcast media airings of AIDS-related public service announcements--United States, 1987-1990.

    PubMed

    1991-08-09

    Television and radio public service announcements (PSAs) are an integral part of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) public information campaigns. This report summarizes an assessment of airings of AIDS PSAs in the United States during October 1987-December 1990 that were produced by CDC's "America Responds to AIDS" (ARTA) campaign and other groups.* The assessment used data obtained from Broadcast Advertisers Reports (BAR) of the Arbitron Company.

  8. Diagnosis of sclerosing cholangitis with technetium 99m-labeled iminodiacetic acid planar and single photon emission computed tomographic scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Rodman, C.A.; Keeffe, E.B.; Lieberman, D.A.; Krishnamurthy, S.; Krishnamurthy, G.T.; Gilbert, S.; Eklem, M.J.

    1987-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether /sup 99m/Tc-iminodiacetic acid planar biliary scintigraphy combined with single photon emission computed tomography could detect sclerosing cholangitis and provide additional information regarding the extent and severity of disease. Thirteen patients with sclerosing cholangitis and 13 normal control subjects were studied. Scintigraphic results were also compared with previously reported studies of patients with isolated common bile duct obstruction and with primary biliary cirrhosis. The planar scintigraphy in patients with sclerosing cholangitis showed beading or bandlike constrictions of the biliary tract corresponding to lesions seen on cholangiography, and the image pattern was distinctly different from images obtained from patients with isolated common bile duct obstruction or primary biliary cirrhosis. The single photon emission computed tomography images of the liver in patients with sclerosing cholangitis demonstrated multiple focal areas of /sup 99m/Tc-iminodiacetic acid retention, representing bile stasis in intrahepatic bile ducts. Compared to controls, the mean hepatic clearance half-time of /sup 99m/Tc-iminodiacetic acid was markedly delayed in patients with sclerosing cholangitis (6-10 times normal). Individual patients with sclerosing cholangitis had wider variation in isotope clearance half-time from three regions of the liver than patients with isolated common bile duct obstruction, consistent with regional difference in disease severity and variable impairment of bile flow. In 4 patients with sclerosing cholangitis with incomplete filling of the right and left hepatic ducts at cholangiography, planar and single photon emission computed tomographic scintigraphy provided evidence of significant intrahepatic sclerosing cholangitis.

  9. The politics of protection: aid, human rights discourse, and power relations in Kyaka II settlement, Uganda.

    PubMed

    Clark-Kazak, Christina R

    2010-01-01

    This paper explores the conceptualisation and application of 'protection' by the United Nations High Commissioner (UNHCR), Ugandan government, and Congolese refugees in Kyaka II refugee settlement, Uganda. Analysing the origins and consequences of a demonstration against school fees, and drawing on other ethnographic data, it explores how different interpretations of this incident reflect different conceptions of, and approaches to, protection. Ugandan government officials viewed the demonstration as a security incident; Congolese and Ugandan adults responded with increased monitoring and 'sheltering' of children and young people; students justified the demonstration as a legitimate manifestation of their rights; while UNHCR promoted assistance and resettlement. The paper argues that prevailing protection responses, including 'sensitisation', sheltering, and resettlement, are de-contextualised from daily realities and fail to address the underlying power relations that undermine protection. It concludes with recommendations on how international refugee agencies can reorient assistance to address protection concerns in refugee contexts.

  10. Individual attitudes and perceived social norms: Reports on HIV/AIDS-related stigma among service providers in China

    PubMed Central

    Li, Li; Liang, Li-Jung; Wu, Zunyou; Lin, Chunqing; Wen, Yi

    2009-01-01

    This study examined HIV/AIDS-related stigma among Chinese service providers by comparing their personal attitudes toward people living with HIV/AIDS with their perception of social norms related to people living with HIV/AIDS. We randomly selected three provincial hospitals, four city/prefecture hospitals, 10 county hospitals, 18 township health clinics, and 54 village clinics from Yunnan, China. Doctors and nurses were randomly sampled proportionally to the doctor-nurse ratio of each hospital or clinic. Lab technicians were over-sampled in order to include an adequate representation in the analysis. A total of 1,101 service providers participated in a voluntary, anonymous survey where demographic characteristics, individual attitude and perceived social norms toward people living with HIV/AIDS, discrimination intent at work, general prejudicial attitude and knowledge on HIV/AIDS were measured. A majority of the sample demonstrated a similarity between their personal views and what they thought most people in society believe. Multiple logistic regressions revealed that participants who were younger or reported personal contact with people living with HIV/AIDS were significantly more likely to report personal attitudes toward the population that were more liberal than their perceived social norms. Holding a more liberal personal attitude toward people living with HIV/AIDS than perceived social norms was significantly and negatively related to the level of discrimination intent at work, perceived discrimination at interpersonal level and the level of general prejudicial attitude toward people living with HIV/AIDS. Results underscored the importance of understanding social norms and personal attitudes in studying HIV-related stigma and called for the incorporation of existing human capital into future HIV stigma reduction programs. Cette étude a examiné le VIH/SIDA lié à stigmatisation parmi les agences chinoises fournissant des soins en comparant leurs attitudes

  11. HIV/AIDS-related stigma and discrimination: accounts of HIV-positive Caribbean people in the United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Moji; Elam, Gillian; Gerver, Sarah; Solarin, Ijeoma; Fenton, Kevin; Easterbrook, Philippa

    2008-09-01

    This paper explores the effects of HIV/AIDS-related stigma and discrimination (HASD) on HIV-positive Caribbean people in the Caribbean and the UK. In-depth, semi-structured interviews were held with a purposively selected group of 25 HIV-positive people of Caribbean origin, using primary selection criteria of sex, age, sexuality and country of birth. Interviews with respondents revealed that they are keenly aware of the stigma surrounding HIV/AIDS, which some attribute to a particularly Caribbean combination of fear of contamination, homophobia, and ignorance, reinforced by religious beliefs. In fact, religion serves a double role: underpinning stigma and assisting in coping with HIV. HASD has usually occurred where respondents have lost or do not have control over disclosure. Compared to UK-born respondents, the accounts of Caribbean-born respondents, most of whom were born in Jamaica, include more reports of severe HASD, particularly violence and employment discrimination. All respondents mobilise a variety of strategies in order to avoid HASD, which have implications for their social interactions and emotional well being. While some manage to avoid the "spoiled identity" of the stigmatised, thereby creating their own understandings of HIV infection, these may remain individual-level negotiations. HASD affects HIV-positive Caribbean people at home and in the diaspora in a variety of ways: emotionally, mentally, financially, socially and physically. Interventions specifically addressing stigma and discrimination must be formulated for the UK's Caribbean population. Tackling stigma and discrimination requires more than education; it requires "cultural work" to address deeply entrenched notions of sexuality.

  12. Body-surface potential mapping to aid ablation of scar-related ventricular tachycardia.

    PubMed

    Sapp, John L; Gardner, Martin J; Parkash, Ratika; Basta, Magdy; Warren, James W; Horácek, B Milan

    2006-10-01

    We investigated whether body-surface potential mapping (BSPM) during catheter ablation of scar-related ventricular tachycardia (VT) could assist with the identification of VT exit sites. The study population consisted of 9 patients who underwent catheter ablation for VT, among whom 12 induced VTs with known exit sites were identified by entrainment criteria, pace mapping, or site of successful ablation. Paced activation was initiated at various intracardiac sites (20 +/- 4 sites per patient, a total of 180) documented by nonfluoroscopic electroanatomic mapping. During all episodes of VT and pacing, patients had a 120-lead electrocardiogram recorded, and we analyzed these electrocardiographic data--by means of a similarity coefficient (SC) calculated over 100 milliseconds after the initiation of depolarization--to assess the similarity between the BSPM sequences occurring during VTs and those induced by pacing. Based on 245 observations, the relationship between the SC and the distance of the pacing site from the VT exit site was then obtained for each individual VT by linear regression analysis: the distance D (in millimeters) from the VT exit site was related to SC by the regression equation D = slope (1 - SC2) + intercept. The parameters in this equation varied widely for the 12 VTs, but, in general, the nearer the pacing site was to the exit site, the better the goodness of match. This suggests that, although there is no universally applicable relationship between D and SC, BSPM could provide a useful adjunct to standard pace mapping, although additional processing--namely, an inverse calculation of epicardial potentials/isochrones--may be needed to reliably identify VT exit sites from body-surface electrocardiograms.

  13. HIV / AIDS

    MedlinePlus

    ... facebook share with twitter share with linkedin HIV/AIDS HIV, or human immunodeficiency virus, is the virus ... HIV/AIDS. Why Is the Study of HIV/AIDS a Priority for NIAID? Nearly 37 million people ...

  14. Hearing Aids

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Consumer Devices Consumer Products Hearing Aids Hearing Aids Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... to restrict your daily activities. Properly fitted hearing aids and aural rehabilitation (techniques used to identify and ...

  15. Hearing Aids

    MedlinePlus

    ... Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Hearing Aids KidsHealth > For Teens > Hearing Aids Print A A ... with certain types of hearing loss. How Hearing Aids Help So you went to audiologist and found ...

  16. CPAP, effective respiratory support in patients with AIDS-related Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Prevedoros, H P; Lee, R P; Marriot, D

    1991-11-01

    Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) related Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia (PCP) associated with severe respiratory failure is an increasingly common problem in major centres and is associated with a high mortality in previous and recent studies. Early in the epidemic, alternatives to invasive intensive care treatment were utilized in our institution and found to be successful. When respiratory failure developed, mask CPAP was used instead of intubation and ventilation. A retrospective review of 175 cases of HIV infected patients with confirmed first presentation PCP was undertaken. Treatment with our protocol resulted in an overall hospital mortality of 9%. Those patients who did not require supplemental oxygen or respiratory support had no in-hospital mortality. The group who required supplemental oxygen had a mortality of 10%. If respiratory failure supervened (severe respiratory distress, PaO2 less than 50 mmHg, SaO2 less than 90% on mask oxygen), CPAP was introduced. The mortality in this group was 22%. Only two patients were admitted to the intensive care unit for respiratory support after failure of CPAP. Both patients were intubated and received intermittent positive pressure ventilation (IPPV). Both patients died.

  17. Visiting Holocaust-Related Sites with Medical Students as an Aid in Teaching Medical Ethics.

    PubMed

    González-López, Esteban; Ríos-Cortés, Rosa

    2016-05-01

    During the Nazi period numerous doctors and nurses played a nefarious role. In Germany they were responsible for the sterilization and killing of disabled persons. Furthermore, the Nazi doctors used concentration camp inmates as guinea pigs in medical experiments for military or racial purposes. A study of the collaboration of doctors with National Socialism exemplifies behavior that must be avoided. Combining medical teaching with lessons from the Holocaust could be a way to transmit Medical Ethics to doctors, nurses and students. The authors describe a study tour with medical students to Poland, to the largest Nazi extermination camp, Auschwitz, and to the city of Krakow. The tour is the final component of a formal course entitled: "The Holocaust, a Reflection from Medicine" at the Autónoma University of Madrid, Spain. Visiting sites related to the Holocaust, the killing centers and the sites where medical experiments were conducted has a singular meaning for medical students. Tolerance, non-discrimination, and the value of human life can be both learnt and taught at the very place where such values were utterly absent.

  18. Music mnemonics aid Verbal Memory and Induce Learning - Related Brain Plasticity in Multiple Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Thaut, Michael H; Peterson, David A; McIntosh, Gerald C; Hoemberg, Volker

    2014-01-01

    Recent research on music and brain function has suggested that the temporal pattern structure in music and rhythm can enhance cognitive functions. To further elucidate this question specifically for memory, we investigated if a musical template can enhance verbal learning in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) and if music-assisted learning will also influence short-term, system-level brain plasticity. We measured systems-level brain activity with oscillatory network synchronization during music-assisted learning. Specifically, we measured the spectral power of 128-channel electroencephalogram (EEG) in alpha and beta frequency bands in 54 patients with MS. The study sample was randomly divided into two groups, either hearing a spoken or a musical (sung) presentation of Rey's auditory verbal learning test. We defined the "learning-related synchronization" (LRS) as the percent change in EEG spectral power from the first time the word was presented to the average of the subsequent word encoding trials. LRS differed significantly between the music and the spoken conditions in low alpha and upper beta bands. Patients in the music condition showed overall better word memory and better word order memory and stronger bilateral frontal alpha LRS than patients in the spoken condition. The evidence suggests that a musical mnemonic recruits stronger oscillatory network synchronization in prefrontal areas in MS patients during word learning. It is suggested that the temporal structure implicit in musical stimuli enhances "deep encoding" during verbal learning and sharpens the timing of neural dynamics in brain networks degraded by demyelination in MS.

  19. Effect of media use on HIV/AIDS-related knowledge and condom use in sub-Saharan Africa: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Jung, Minsoo; Arya, Monisha; Viswanath, Kasisomayajula

    2013-01-01

    It is known that the level of HIV/AIDS-related knowledge and the degree of condom use varies by socioeconomic status (SES). However, there is limited research on the effect of mass media use on HIV/AIDS-related cognitive and behavioral outcomes in low-income countries and how it might influence the association between SES and HIV-related outcomes. We investigated the moderating effect of media use on the relationship between SES and HIV/AIDS-related knowledge and condom use in sub-Saharan Africa in terms of communication inequalities. Cross-sectional data from the Demographic Health Surveys from 13 sub-Saharan countries (2004-10) were pooled. Gender-stratified multivariable poisson regression of 151,209 women and 68,890 men were used to calculate adjusted relative ratios and 95% confidence intervals for the associations between SES, media use, HIV-related outcomes, and condom use. We found significant disparities in mass media use among people from different SES groups as well as among countries. Education and wealth are strongly and positively associated with awareness of HIV/AIDS and knowledge about transmission and prevention of HIV/AIDS and are significantly associated with condom use. These associations are attenuated when the use of various types of mass media is added to the models, with newspapers showing the strongest effect. The findings of this study suggest that media use has the potential to blunt the impact of socioeconomic status though not completely eliminate it. Thus, we need to pay attention to reducing communication inequalities among social groups and countries to moderate the effect of wealth and SES on HIV/AIDS.

  20. Music mnemonics aid Verbal Memory and Induce Learning – Related Brain Plasticity in Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Thaut, Michael H.; Peterson, David A.; McIntosh, Gerald C.; Hoemberg, Volker

    2014-01-01

    Recent research on music and brain function has suggested that the temporal pattern structure in music and rhythm can enhance cognitive functions. To further elucidate this question specifically for memory, we investigated if a musical template can enhance verbal learning in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) and if music-assisted learning will also influence short-term, system-level brain plasticity. We measured systems-level brain activity with oscillatory network synchronization during music-assisted learning. Specifically, we measured the spectral power of 128-channel electroencephalogram (EEG) in alpha and beta frequency bands in 54 patients with MS. The study sample was randomly divided into two groups, either hearing a spoken or a musical (sung) presentation of Rey’s auditory verbal learning test. We defined the “learning-related synchronization” (LRS) as the percent change in EEG spectral power from the first time the word was presented to the average of the subsequent word encoding trials. LRS differed significantly between the music and the spoken conditions in low alpha and upper beta bands. Patients in the music condition showed overall better word memory and better word order memory and stronger bilateral frontal alpha LRS than patients in the spoken condition. The evidence suggests that a musical mnemonic recruits stronger oscillatory network synchronization in prefrontal areas in MS patients during word learning. It is suggested that the temporal structure implicit in musical stimuli enhances “deep encoding” during verbal learning and sharpens the timing of neural dynamics in brain networks degraded by demyelination in MS. PMID:24982626

  1. Examining a Financial Climate of Support: How Institutional-Level Financial Aid Relates to Teamwork, Leadership, and Critical Thinking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Julie J.; Denson, Nida; Johnson, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    Financial aid plays a critical role in college access and student success. It plays an increasingly important role as the college-going population continues to diversify and the cost of college continues to rise at both public and private institutions. In this study, the authors examined whether institutional level financial aid has any direct…

  2. Exploring Ivorian Perspectives on the Effectiveness of the Current Ivorian Science Curriculum in Addressing Issues Related to HIV/AIDS

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ado, Gustave Firmin

    2014-01-01

    School-based HIV/AIDS science education has the potential to impact students when integrated into the science curriculum. However, this mixed method study shows that school-based HIV/AIDS science education is often not infused into career subjects such as science education but integrated into civics education and taught by teachers who lack the…

  3. Exploring Ivorian perspectives on the effectiveness of the current Ivorian science curriculum in addressing issues related to HIV/AIDS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ado, Gustave Firmin

    School-based HIV/AIDS science education has the potential to impact students when integrated into the science curriculum. However, this mixed method study shows that school-based HIV/AIDS science education is often not infused into career subjects such as science education but integrated into civics education and taught by teachers who lack the skills, knowledge, and the training in the delivery of effective school HIV/AIDS education. Since science is where biological events take place, it is suggested that HIV/AIDS science merits being taught in the science education classroom. This study took place in nine public middle schools within two school districts in Abidjan, Ivory Coast, one major urban city in the southern region. The study utilized triangulation of multiple data sources---both qualitative and quantitative. To substantiate the claims made in this study, a range of qualitative methods such as field notes and individual interviews with 39 teachers, 63 sixth grade students, 8 school administrators, and 20 community elders were used. For the quantitative portion 140 teachers and 3510 sixth grade students were surveyed. The findings from the study prioritize science education that includes HIV/AIDS science education for all, with emphasis on HIV/AIDS prevention in Ivory Coast. The factors that influence the implementation of HIV/AIDS curricula within the Ivorian sixth grade classrooms are discussed. Interview and survey data from students, teachers, school administrators, and community elders indicate that in the Ivorian school setting, "gerontocratic" cultural influences, religious beliefs, personal cultural beliefs, and time spent toward the discourse on HIV/AIDS have led to HIV/AIDS education that is often insufficient to change either misconceptions about HIV/AIDS or risky practices. It was also found that approaches to teaching HIV/AIDS does not connect with youth cultures. By reframing and integrating current HIV/AIDS curricula into the science

  4. Psychometric characteristics and race-related measurement invariance of stress and coping measures in adults with HIV/AIDS.

    PubMed

    Heckman, Bernadette Davantes; Berlin, Kristoffer S; Heckman, Timothy G; Feaster, Daniel J

    2011-02-01

    Measurement invariance is the extent to which scales have the same meaning across groups, a condition that is necessary prior to conducting between-group comparisons. As stress and coping research increasingly examines the adjustment efforts of African Americans and Caucasians living with chronic health conditions, it is first necessary to assess the equivalence of existing stress and coping measures for both racial groups. This study examined the psychometric properties and measurement invariance of four measures used frequently in stress and coping research. African Americans (n = 204) and Caucasians (n = 83) completed pre- and post-intervention surveys as part of a randomized clinical trial that tested if telephone-administered psychotherapies could reduce depressive symptoms in persons living with HIV/AIDS. Participants completed the ways of coping checklist (WOCC), the coping self-efficacy scale (CSES), the provision of social relations scale (PSRS), and the geriatric depression scale (GDS). Several WOCC subscales initially evidenced poor internal consistency (when computed using summated composites) that improved when measurement models were applied. The 12-week test-retest reliabilities of PSRS total and subscale scores were notably lower in African Americans than Caucasians. Analyses of race-related measurement invariance showed acceptable invariance for the GDS and the CSES but less certain invariance for the WOCC and PSRS. Stress and coping researchers should examine carefully the psychometric properties of study measures within and between racial groups prior to conducting tests of between-group differences.

  5. Sexual and reproductive health in HIV-related proposals supported by the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Collin, Camille; Mbizvo, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Objective To assess the sexual and reproductive health interventions included by countries in HIV-related proposals approved by the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria (Global Fund). Methods We examined the Global Fund database for elements and indicators of sexual and reproductive health in all approved HIV-related proposals (214) submitted by 134 countries, from rounds 1 to 7, and in an illustrative sample of 35 grant agreements. Findings At least 70% of the HIV-related proposals included one or more of the four broad elements: sexual and reproductive health information, education and communication; condom promotion/distribution; diagnosis and treatment of sexually transmitted infections; and prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV. Between 20% and 30% included sexual health counselling, gender-based violence, and the linking of voluntary counselling and testing for HIV with sexual and reproductive health services. Less than 20% focused on adolescent sexual and reproductive health, the rights and needs of people living with HIV, or safe abortion services. All these elements were rarely featured, if at all, in the grant agreements reviewed. Overall, however, sexual and reproductive health indicators did appear in most HIV-related proposals and in more than 80% of the grant agreements. Conclusion Country coordinating mechanisms and national-level stakeholders see in funding for sexual and reproductive health a means to address the problem of HIV infection in their respective national settings. However, we highlight some missed opportunities for linking HIV and sexual and reproductive health services. PMID:20072766

  6. GD-aided IOL (input-output linearisation) controller for handling affine-form nonlinear system with loose condition on relative degree

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yunong; Chen, Dechao; Jin, Long; Zhang, Yinyan; Yin, Yonghua

    2016-04-01

    Input-output linearisation (IOL) may encounter a singularity problem when applied to the tracking control of affine-form nonlinear system (AFNS), which may not have a well-defined relative degree. The singularity problem has occurred in the area of control for decades. In this paper, we incorporate the gradient dynamics (GD) into IOL, which leads to the GD-aided IOL method to solve the singularity problem, with the proposition of the loose condition on relative degree. Moreover, detailed theoretical analyses on tracking-error bound and convergence performance of the corresponding GD-aided IOL controller are presented. Simulations and comparisons substantiate that the proposed GD-aided IOL method is capable of completing the tracking-control task and conquering the singularity encountered in the AFNS.

  7. Pediatric Fulminant Leptospirosis Complicated by Pericardial Tamponade, Macrophage Activation Syndrome and Sclerosing Cholangitis

    PubMed Central

    Yeşilbaş, Osman; Kıhtır, Hasan Serdar; Yıldırım, Hamdi Murat; Hatipoğlu, Nevin; Şevketoğlu, Esra

    2016-01-01

    Background: Leptospirosis is a zoonotic infectious disease caused by pathogenic spirochetes of the genus Leptospira. Although it is usually asymptomatic and self-limited, severe potentially fatal illness accompanied by multi-organ failure may occur. Case Report: Here we report an unusual case of severe leptospirosis successfully treated with continuous venovenous hemofiltration (CVVHF) and therapeutic plasma exchange (TPE). The patient presented with pericardial tamponade, renal failure and macrophage activation syndrome, and later suffered prolonged jaundice and sclerosing cholangitis during hospitalization in the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU). To the best of our knowledge, sclerosing cholangitis due to leptospirosis has not been reported in the literature. Conclusion: Leptospirosis should be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis of sepsis and septic shock with fever, thrombocytopenia, jaundice and renal failure. TPE and CVVHF should start early after the diagnosis of leptospirosis with multiorgan failure. PMID:27761292

  8. [Association between Crohn's disease and primary sclerosing cholangitis in a 10 year old girl].

    PubMed

    Muñoz Lozón, Ana; Iglesias Blázquez, Cristina; Menéndez Arias, Cristina; Domínguez Sánchez, Patricia

    2016-06-01

    A 10 year old girl with diarrhea, abdominal pain, weight loss and fever of one month and a half of evolution. Analytical and sonographic findings raised the possibility of inflammatory bowel disease. Endoscopy and histology showed findings consistent with Crohn's disease. Treatment was initiated with mesalazine and exclusive enteral nutrition. Later corticosteroid treatment, immunosuppressive drugs and ursodeoxycholic acid were added due to cholestasis and persistent hypergammaglobulinemia. Magnetic resonance cholangiography and liver biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of concomitant primary sclerosing cholangitis. The association between Crohn's disease and primary sclerosing cholangitis is rare, predominantly in males between 20 and 40 years old and it presents a great clinical variability. The confirmation of the diagnosis requires magnetic resonance cholangiography or endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography. The prognosis is poor and there is no treatment to slow the progression of the disease.

  9. Sclerosing lipogranuloma of the eyelid: unusual complication following nasal packing in endoscopic sinus surgery

    PubMed Central

    Ramaswamy, Balakrishnan; Singh, Rohit; Manusrut, Manusrut; Hazarika, Manali

    2015-01-01

    An eyelid or orbital lipogranuloma can occur following nasal packing with liquid paraffin, petroleum jelly or an antibiotic-based cream. It usually presents a few weeks or months after the initial procedure. We present a report of three such cases of sclerosing lipogranuloma involving the eyelid, which occurred following a sinonasal surgery where nasal packing using petroleum jelly was performed. The typical clinical course and the classical histopathological features are highlighted. All cases were diagnosed by histopathological examination as sclerosing lipogranuloma. Complete surgical removal resulted in complete resolution on 1 month follow-up. The diagnosis is based on a high degree of suspicion following a detailed history of prior use of lipid-based products for nasal packing following endonasal surgery. Histopathology is diagnostic. Surgical excision is the treatment of choice, however, due to its infiltrative nature, it may be difficult to obtain a complete cure. PMID:25750223

  10. Extraneural Sclerosing Perineurioma of the Buccal Mucosa: A Case Report and Clinicopathologic Review

    PubMed Central

    Greene, David J.; Brodsky, Gilbert; Kabani, Sadru P.

    2010-01-01

    The perineurioma is an infrequently encountered benign peripheral nerve sheath tumor composed of a clonal proliferation of perineurial cells. Rare cases of perineurioma have been reported in the oral cavity. An extraneural sclerosing perineurioma arising in the buccal mucosa of a 17-year-old male is presented. Histopathologically, the tumor is composed of a well circumscribed nodular proliferation of spindle cells arranged in a storiform growth pattern, in some areas subtly arranged around vascular channels. The tumor cells reveal positive immunostaining for epithelial membrane antigen (EMA), collagen type IV and vimentin, and negative immunostaining for S-100 protein, consistent with a perineurial origin. To the best of our knowledge, this case represents the first report of an extraneural sclerosing perineurioma involving the oral cavity. PMID:20364337

  11. Measuring HIV- and AIDS-related stigma and discrimination in Nicaragua: results from a community-based study.

    PubMed

    Ugarte, William J; Högberg, Ulf; Valladares, Eliette C; Essén, Birgitta

    2013-04-01

    Psychometric properties of external HIV-related stigma and discrimination scales and their predictors were investigated. A cross-sectional community-based study was carried out among 520 participants using an ongoing health and demographic surveillance system in León, Nicaragua. Participants completed an 18-item HIV stigma scale and 19 HIV and AIDS discrimination-related statements. A factor analysis found that 15 of the 18 items in the stigma scale and 18 of the 19 items in the discrimination scale loaded clearly into five- and four-factor structures, respectively. Overall Cronbach's alpha of .81 for the HIV stigma scale and .91 for the HIV discrimination scale provided evidence of internal consistency. Hierarchical multiple linear regression analysis identified that females, rural residents, people with insufficient HIV-related transmission knowledge, those not tested for HIV, those reporting an elevated self-perception of HIV risk, and those unwilling to disclose their HIV status were associated with higher stigmatizing attitudes and higher discriminatory actions towards HIV-positive people. This is the first community-based study in Nicaragua that demonstrates that overall HIV stigma and discrimination scales were reliable and valid in a community-based sample comprised of men and women of reproductive age. Stigma and discrimination were reported high in the general population, especially among sub-groups. The findings in the current study suggest community-based strategies, including the monitoring of stigma and discrimination, and designing and implementing stigma reduction interventions, are greatly needed to reduce inequities and increase acceptance of persons with HIV.

  12. Sclerosing osteomyelitis of Garré: management of femoral pain by intramedullary nailing

    PubMed Central

    Vannet, Nicola Bader; Williams, Huw L M; Healy, Brendan; Morgan-Jones, Rhidian

    2014-01-01

    We describe a case of chronic sclerosing osteomyelitis of Garré in a 50-year-old woman occurring in her right femur and presenting with uncontrolled pain. The patient was initially treated with intramedullary reaming of the femur, but 3 years later re-presented with similar symptoms. This required further reaming and intramedullary nailing, achieving good clinical outcomes and lasting pain relief at 8-year follow-up. PMID:25538212

  13. [Diffuse sclerosing papillary carcinoma mimicking chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis. A unusual neoplasm variant].

    PubMed

    Pino Rivero, V; Pardo Romero, G; González Palomino, A; Pantoja Hernández, C G; Trinidad Ramos, G; Marcos García, M; Blasco Huelva, A

    2006-01-01

    We report the clinical case of a 39 years old female diagnosed as a chronic lymphocytic tiroiditis by F.N.A.B. with multinodular goiter of long evolution. The patient was operated by total thyroidectomy and her final anatomopathologic result was papillary carcinoma diffuse sclerosing variant. During the surgical act several cervical nodes were detected and removed being informed the most of them as metastasic. A review of the literature at respect of this malignant neoplasm is performed.

  14. Development and pilot testing of a decision aid for men considering genetic testing for breast and/or ovarian cancer-related mutations (BRCA1/2).

    PubMed

    Juan, Anne S; Wakefield, Claire E; Kasparian, Nadine A; Kirk, Judy; Tyler, Janet; Tucker, Kathy

    2008-12-01

    Despite the fact that both men and women can carry a breast/ovarian cancer-related mutation, the main emphasis in genetic counseling for breast/ovarian cancer-related risk remains on females. This study aimed to develop and pilot a decision aid specifically designed for men with a strong family history of breast and/or ovarian cancer who are considering genetic testing. The decision aid was developed by a multidisciplinary team of experts and a consumer representative. It was then reviewed by 27 men who had previously undergone genetic testing to identify a mutation in a BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene. All men who reviewed the decision aid indicated that they would recommend the booklet to other men in the same situation, and 96% of the sample (n = 26) reported being "very satisfied" or "satisfied" with the information contained in the decision aid. The decision aid was perceived by all participants as "very relevant" or "quite relevant" for men considering genetic testing. Ninety-three percent of men felt that it was easy to weigh the pros and cons of genetic testing with the help of the decision aid. The perceived impact on participants' emotions and understanding of the genetic testing process was also assessed. Several factors may hinder men from effectively weighing up the potential benefits and risks of genetic testing. A greater understanding of these issues may help health professionals to encourage men with a strong family history of breast and/or ovarian cancer to learn about cancer risk and the appropriate management strategies for themselves and their female relatives.

  15. The Design of a Survey Instrument to Aid in Identifying Sex Related Barriers to Employment and the Administration of That Instrument to Rural and Urban Employers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, B. Dolores; Mook, Corena

    A project was conducted to design a survey instrument that would help in identifying sex-related barriers to employment and to administer that instrument to employers in both rural and urban counties of Kansas. It was projected that the data derived from the survey could be used to aid in designing vocational education methods and techniques.…

  16. Longitudinal Effects of Coping on Outcome in a Randomized Controlled Trial of a Group Intervention for HIV-Positive Adults with AIDS-Related Bereavement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, Nathan B.; Tarakeshwar, Nalini; Ghebremichael, Musie; Zhang, Heping; Kochman, Arlene; Sikkema, Kathleen J.

    2006-01-01

    This study examined the longitudinal effects of coping on outcome one year following completion of a randomized, controlled trial of a group coping intervention for AIDS-related bereavement. Bereaved HIV-positive participants (N = 267) were administered measures of grief, psychiatric distress, quality of life, and coping at baseline,…

  17. The Unfinished Nature of Rights-Informed HIV- and AIDS-Related Education: An Analysis of Three School-Based Initiatives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miedema, Esther; Maxwell, Claire; Aggleton, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Over the past 25 years, there has been growing investment in concepts of rights in the areas of HIV prevention, care and treatment, including HIV- and AIDS-related education delivered in schools. Despite this increasing commitment to the notion of rights, few efforts appear to have been made to understand the varying conceptions of rights that…

  18. With and With"out": The Bereavement Experiences of Gay Men Who Have Lost a Partner to Non-AIDS-Related Causes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hornjatkevyc, Nina L.; Alderson, Kevin G.

    2011-01-01

    This study gives voice to the experiences of gay men who have lost a partner to non-AIDS-related causes, a subject that has received little attention in the psychological literature. Interviews were conducted with 8 gay men. An analysis informed by hermeneutic phenomenology generated themes and contextualized meanings regarding the participants'…

  19. Sociocultural Constraints: The Relation between Generations in the United States, Parental Education, Income, Hispanic Origin and the Financial Aid Packages of Hispanic Undergraduate Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Del Razo, Parvati Heliana

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to find out if the demographic variables of country of origin, generation in the United States (immigration status), income and parental education had an impact on the financial aid packages of Hispanic undergraduate students. This dissertation asked: What is the relation between generation in the United States,…

  20. How do women at risk of HIV/AIDS in Iran perceive gender norms and gendered power relations in the context of safe sex negotiations?

    PubMed

    Lotfi, Razieh; Ramezani Tehrani, Fahimeh; Merghati Khoei, Effat; Yaghmaei, Farideh; Dworkin, Shari L

    2013-07-01

    Sexual transmission of HIV/AIDS among women is growing in the Middle East region. Despite the fact that there are numerous gender-related sociocultural factors influencing HIV/AIDS protective behaviors, little gender-specificity is carried out in HIV prevention in Iran. In order to close this gap, we aimed to provide preliminary work that explored the perceptions that women at risk of HIV had about gender norms and gendered power and their ability to protect themselves against HIV/AIDS. Twenty-five semi-structured in-depth interviews were conducted with women at risk of HIV/AIDS, aged 21-49 years, at Voluntary Counseling and Testing Centers or Drop in Centers in Tehran, Iran. Results showed that perceived gender norms were essential barriers of protective behavior through sexual socialization, male control over condom use and sexual decision-making, male pleasure predominating in sexual encounters and sexual double standards, and economic dependencies. In the conclusions, we consider how HIV/AIDS preventive programs can be structured to be gender-sensitive and empowering in Iran.

  1. HIV/AIDS-related knowledge and misconceptions among women attending government-owned antenatal clinics in Gwagwalada Area Council of Abuja, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Otokpa, Aboh O; Lawoyin, Taiwo O; Asuzu, Michael C

    2013-03-01

    This study assessed the level of knowledge and misconceptions about HIV/AIDS transmission and prevention among women. Using a semi-structured pretested questionnaire we obtained relevant data from 420 respondents in five randomly selected antenatal clinics (ANCs) in Gwagwalada Area Council (GAC) of Abuja, Nigeria. Knowledge about the existence of HIV/AIDS was high (92.8%). Only 52.1% knew the cause of AIDS and 58.6% were aware that AIDS had no cure. About twenty percent of respondents believed that breast-milk could not transmit HIV and 27.9% were unaware that condom protects against HIV. Only 33.3% were aware that HIV infected persons may look and feel healthy. Mothers with at least secondary level education had significantly higher knowledge scores on HIV/AIDS transmission (X2 = 14.8, p = 0.01) than less educated mothers and less educated mothers were more likely to relate HIV infection to past misdeeds (X2 = 13.6, p = 0.01). Significant misconception concerning HIV transmission existed in the study population. More community outreach programmes to intensify HIV education and counseling in GAC is required.

  2. HIV and AIDS related knowledge, sources of information, and reported need for further education among dental students in Sudan- a cross sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Nasir, Elwalid Fadul; Åstrøm, Anne Nordrehaug; David, Jamil; Ali, Rouf Wahab

    2008-01-01

    Background Information on the HIV and AIDS-related knowledge among dental students provides a crucial foundation for efforts aimed at developing an appropriate dental curriculum on HIV and AIDS, and for attracting the attention of dental school educators towards the subject. Purposes Focusing on a census of dental students attending their 3rd, 4th and 5th study year at publicly – and privately funded dental faculties in Khartoum, this study aimed to assess the prevalence and socio-economic correlates of dental students' knowledge, sources of information and reported need for further education related to HIV and AIDS. Methods At the time of the survey (March–May 2007), the total number of dental students registered was 782 of which 642 (response rate 82%, mean age 21.7 year, 72% girls) completed anonymous self-administered questionnaires in supervised class room settings. Results A total of 49% and 86% had correct sum scores with respect to knowledge of transmission through contamination and through shaking hands and eating, respectively. About half the dental students recognized a need for further education across HIV related issues, varying from 75% (basic HIV/AIDS related issues) to 84% (patient management). Only 38% of the students had correct sum scores regarding various occupational groups at risk for contacting HIV and AIDS. Multiple logistic regression analysis revealed that compared to privately funded dental school students, publicly funded dental school students were less likely to have correct knowledge about modes of HIV transmission (OR = 0.6) and occupational risk groups (OR = 0.6) and to have received information from lectures/health care workers (OR = 0.5). Conclusion Students attending privately funded schools were more knowledgeable about various HIV related issues than students from publicly funded schools. About half of the students investigated had received HIV/AIDS information from various sources and reported need for further education

  3. High titer anti-HIV antibody reactivity associated with a paraprotein spike in a homosexual male with AIDS related complex.

    PubMed

    Ng, V L; Hwang, K M; Reyes, G R; Kaplan, L D; Khayam-Bashi, H; Hadley, W K; McGrath, M S

    1988-05-01

    We observed a human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected homosexual male with AIDS related complex (ARC) who had a serum globulin level of 80 g/L. Serum protein electrophoresis revealed a gamma globulin fraction of 40 g/L, of which 50% (20 g/L) was contained within a paraprotein spike, comprised predominantly of IgG kappa. This patient also had high titer anti-HIV antibodies in his serum, which were Western blot reactive at a final dilution of 1:500,000, and recognized gp120env, p66pol, p55gag, p53pol, p41gag, and p24gag. Because paraproteins in the past have been shown to be directed against specific antigens, we purified this patient's paraprotein using a modified high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)-hydroxylapatite procedure and tested the purified paraprotein for anti-HIV antibody activity. The purified paraprotein retained anti-HIV antibody activity to a final dilution of 1:100,000, and recognized p66pol, p55gag, p53pol, p41gag, and p24gag. The recognition of both "gag" and "pol" gene products suggested that the purified paraprotein might not be monoclonal in origin. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) demonstrated that the purified paraprotein contained at least two immunoglobulin light chain species (Mol wt 30 to 33 Kd). Affinity chromatography of the purified paraprotein using a p24-Sepharose 4B matrix separated the "gag" and "pol" antibody activities. Immunoglobulin gene rearrangement analysis of a bone marrow aspirate (which contained 15% plasma cells) failed to reveal a clonal population of immunoglobulin producing cells. We conclude that this patient's paraprotein accounted for most of the anti-HIV activity present in whole serum, and that this paraprotein was not monoclonal in origin.

  4. Spiritual Well-Being and Health-Related Quality of Life Among African–American Women with HIV/AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Holstad, Marcia McDonnell; DiIorio, Colleen; Laderman, Gary

    2010-01-01

    Many HIV-positive women regard spirituality as an important part of their lives and spirituality may have positive impact on their health-related quality of life (HRQOL). Particularly among African American women with HIV, spirituality may serve as a cultural and psychological resource. This descriptive, crosssectional study examined associations between spiritual well-being (SWB) and its components, existential well-being (EWB) and religious well-being (RWB), and dimensions of HRQOL among a non-random sample of 118 African American HIV-positive women. A secondary analysis of data from two similar, NIH-funded studies: The Get Busy Living (GBL) Project and the KHARMA Project, was conducted. Baseline data on women from both studies were combined into one database and statistical analyses, including descriptive, correlation and hierarchical regression analyses, were conducted. Existential well-being was significantly positively (β =.74; p=.014) associated with the physical composite of HRQOL and accounted for a significant amount of unique variance (10.0%) beyond that explained by socio-demographic variables, religious well-being (RWB), HIV medication adherence, CD4 cell count and percentage, HIV viral load, and depressive symptoms. EWB was also significantly positively (β =.57; p=.024) associated with the mental health composite of HRQOL. Depressive symptomatology was also significantly inversely (β =.40; p=.004) associated with mental HRQOL. EWB accounted for a significant amount of additional variance (6.3%) beyond that explained by other variables. Spirituality is an important factor in the lives and quality of life of African American women and women living with HIV/AIDS. Further research is needed to examine relationships between spirituality and HRQOL among HIV-positive African American women. PMID:21731593

  5. Hearing Aids

    MedlinePlus

    ... more in both quiet and noisy situations. Hearing aids help people who have hearing loss from damage ... your doctor. There are different kinds of hearing aids. They differ by size, their placement on or ...

  6. AIDS (image)

    MedlinePlus

    AIDS (acquired immune deficiency syndrome) is caused by HIV (human immunodeficiency virus), and is a syndrome that ... life-threatening illnesses. There is no cure for AIDS, but treatment with antiviral medicine can suppress symptoms. ...

  7. Nematode-associated intramural alimentary nodules in pumas are histologically similar to gastrointestinal eosinophilic sclerosing fibroplasia of domestic cats.

    PubMed

    Eckstrand, C D; Barr, B C; Woods, L W; Spangler, T; Murphy, B

    2013-05-01

    Intramural alimentary nodules in the gastric pylorus and proximal duodenum are a common finding in free-ranging pumas (Puma concolor) in North America, and are often associated with the presence of an indwelling nematode (most commonly Cylicospirura spp.). This study compares the histological, histochemical and immunohistochemical appearance of three proximal gastrointestinal nodules in pumas with four cases of eosinophilic sclerosing fibroplasia in domestic cats. Histologically, the pattern of inflammation and repair was strikingly similar, consisting of lamillated anastomosing trabeculae of dense sclerotic collagen with interspersed inflammatory cells and reactive fibroblasts. The stromal trabeculae were histologically reminiscent of osteoid and were uniformly positive for collagenous protein by Masson's trichrome stain and negative for mineralized osteoid deposits with Von Kossa's stain. Trabecular cells expressed osteonectin, but not osteocalcin immunohistochemically. Collectively, these findings are most consistent with a stroma comprised of dense collagenous trabeculae that resembles, but is distinct, from osteoid. Both the puma and domestic cat lesions demonstrated an eosinophilic inflammatory component; however, eosinophils were present in small numbers in the puma nodules relative to the nodules in domestic cats. These entities likely represent a unique and stereotypic gastrointestinal repair response of felids, given their similar histological, histochemical and immunohistochemical profiles.

  8. Role of Carbamazepine in the Symptomatic Treatment of Subacute Sclerosing Panencephalitis: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Ravikumar, Sandhya; Crawford, John Ross

    2013-01-01

    We describe the clinical presentation and clinical course of subacute sclerosing panencephalitis in a 13-year-old previously healthy boy who recently immigrated to the United States from Iraq. He presented with macular retinopathy, followed by progressive myoclonus and encephalopathy. After extensive workup, a diagnosis of subacute sclerosing panencephalitis was suspected by the presence of period epileptiform discharges on electroencephalogram and confirmed by elevated measles titers in the cerebrospinal fluid. Combination immunomodulatory therapy with isoprinosine, ribavirin, and intra-Ommaya interferon alpha did not result in clinical improvement. Within days following the administration of carbamazepine, there was remarkable improvement in the myoclonus and he was able to ambulate independently for a period of 4 months at which time he unfortunately progressed to a vegetative state. This case highlights the importance of carbamazepine as a potential first line symptomatic treatment of subacute sclerosing panencephalitis and provides a review of the literature on the subject. PMID:23533854

  9. How Do Professional Learning Communities Aid and Hamper Professional Learning of Beginning Teachers Related to Differentiated Instruction?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Neve, Debbie; Devos, Geert

    2017-01-01

    Research has shown that adequate support from the school environment is necessary to help beginning teachers in applying differentiated instruction (DI), but how schools can aid in this process remains unclear. This qualitative study explores how professional learning communities (PLCs), an indicator of a supportive school environment, can enhance…

  10. Can Addiction-Related Self-Help/Mutual Aid Groups Lower Demand for Professional Substance Abuse Treatment?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Humphreys, Keith

    1998-01-01

    Discusses the potential of self-help/mutual-aid groups as a way to reduce the demand for professional substance-abuse treatment and proposes a model that combines the two approaches for cost-effective and therapeutically effective networks of services. (SLD)

  11. AIDS-Related Stigmas and Safe-Sex Practices of African-American College Students: A Pilot Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chandler, Donald S., Jr.

    This study examined the safe-sex practices of African-American colleges students in light of culturally-specific beliefs that stigmatize Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) in the African-American community. A total of 21 self-selected, sexually-active African-American students (15 females and 6 males) aged 18-22 completed the AIDS…

  12. First Aid: Diaper Rash

    MedlinePlus

    ... Your 1- to 2-Year-Old First Aid: Diaper Rash KidsHealth > For Parents > First Aid: Diaper Rash A A A Diaper rash is a common skin condition in babies. ... rash is due to irritation caused by the diaper, but it can have other causes not related ...

  13. Increase of the prevalence of hepatitis B virus surface antigen related to immunodeficiency inherent in acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS).

    PubMed

    Ouattara, S A; Meite, M; Aron, Y; Akran, V; Gody, M; Manlan, L K; de-The, G

    1990-01-01

    During the period from January to December 1987, 2,191 serum samples were collected from different groups of the population in the Ivory Coast (1,126 healthy people selected from the general population, 416 blood donors, 112 healthy anti-HIV carriers, 173 AIDS patients, and 364 patients suffering from icterigenic hepatitis) and tested for anti-HIV (HIV-1 and HIV-2) antibodies, HBsAg, HBeAg, delta antigen (HDAg), and anti-delta (anti-HD) antibody. Anti-HIV antibodies were found in 30 (2.6%) of the general population. 55 (13.2%) blood donors, and 93 (25.5%) patients suffering from icterigenic hepatitis. HBsAg was observed in 103 (9.1%) of the general population, 45 (10.8%) blood donors, 15 (13.4%) healthy anti-HIV carriers, 59 (34.1%) AIDS patients, and 45 (40%) icterigenous hepatitis patients. The simultaneous presence of anti-HIV and HBsAg was noted in 4 (0.4%) of the general population, 8 (2%) blood donors, 15 (13.4%) healthy anti-HIV carriers, 59 (34.1%) AIDS cases, and 36 (10%) patients suffering from icterigenic hepatitis. A high prevalence of HBeAg and serological markers of infection by the delta agent were noted in the different groups. HDAg was noted only among AIDS patients or those suffering from icterigenic hepatitis, with a higher frequency among anti-HIV carriers. Our conclusion from this study is that healthy anti-HIV carriers are no more likely to be HBsAg carriers than the HIV-seronegative subjects. However, immunodeficiency induced previously by HIV infection is likely to be responsible for the high prevalence of HBsAg among AIDS patients.

  14. Autograft HIV-DNA load predicts HIV-1 peripheral reservoir after stem cell transplantation for AIDS-related lymphoma patients.

    PubMed

    Zanussi, Stefania; Bortolin, Maria Teresa; Pratesi, Chiara; Tedeschi, Rosamaria; Basaglia, Giancarlo; Abbruzzese, Luciano; Mazzucato, Mario; Spina, Michele; Vaccher, Emanuela; Tirelli, Umberto; Rupolo, Maurizio; Michieli, Mariagrazia; Di Mascio, Michele; De Paoli, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) is a widely used procedure for AIDS-related lymphomas, and it represents an opportunity to evaluate strategies curing HIV-1 infection. The association of autograft HIV-DNA load with peripheral blood HIV-1 reservoir before ASCT and its contribution in predicting HIV-1 reservoir size and stability during combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) after transplantation are unknown. Aiming to obtain information suggesting new functional cure strategies by ASCT, we retrospectively evaluated HIV-DNA load in autograft and in peripheral blood before and after transplantation in 13 cART-treated HIV-1 relapse/refractoring lymphoma patients. Among them seven discontinued cART after autograft infusion. HIV-DNA was evaluated by a sensitive quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). After debulking chemotherapy/mobilization, the autograft HIV-1 reservoir was higher than and not associated with the peripheral HIV-1 reservoir at baseline [median 215 HIV-DNA copies/10(6) autograft mononuclear cells, range 13-706 vs. 82 HIV-DNA copies/10(6) peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), range 13-479, p = 0.03]. After high dose chemotherapy and autograft infusion, HIV-DNA levels reached a plateau between month 6 and 12 of follow-up. No association was found between peripheral HIV-DNA levels at baseline and after infusion in both cART interrupting and not interrupting patients. Only in the last subgroup, a stable significant linear association between autograft and peripheral blood HIV-1 reservoir emerged from month 1 (R(2) = 0.84, p = 0.01) to month 12 follow-up (R(2) = 0.99, p = 0.0005). In summary, autograft HIV-1 reservoir size could be influenced by the mobilization phase and predicts posttransplant peripheral HIV-1 reservoir size in patients on continuous cART. These findings could promote new research on strategies reducing the HIV-1 reservoir by using the ASCT procedure.

  15. Identifying Strategies to Cope with HIV-Related Stigma in a Group of Women Living with HIV/AIDS in the Dominican Republic: A Qualitative Study.

    PubMed

    Rael, Christine Tagliaferri; Carballo-Diéguez, Alex; Norton, Rachel; Thorley, Eryka; Giguere, Rebecca; Sheinfil, Alan; Rios, Javier López

    2016-12-20

    Internalized HIV-related stigma negatively impacts the mental and physical health of women living with HIV/AIDS (WLWHA). Yet, some women can successfully confront stigma. The present work uses qualitative methods to investigate the successful stigma coping strategies displayed by 19 WLWHA who reported the least internalized stigma possible on the Internalized AIDS-Related Stigma Scale out of a larger pool of 233 WLWHA in San Felipe de Puerto Plata, Dominican Republic. Such strategies included, HIV disclosure control; preemptive disclosure of HIV-status; educating oneself/others about HIV; viewing HIV as a manageable condition; and looking to family, friends and partners for support. Our findings add to current knowledge about how WLWHA successfully manage internalized stigma, particularly in the context of the Dominican Republic. Clinicians should work closely with WLWHA to counsel them about the stigma coping strategies that best fit their life context.

  16. Newly Diagnosed Colonic Adenocarcinoma: The Presenting Sign in a Young Woman with Undiagnosed Crohn's Disease in the Absence of Primary Sclerosing Cholangitis and a Normal Microsatellite Instability Profile

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Ulcerative colitis has long been linked with an increased risk for colonic adenocarcinoma, whereas Crohn's disease (CD) has recently been reported to pose a similar increased risk. We report a 33-year-old healthy female with no family history who presented with abdominal pain and a colon mass. Histopathology revealed a moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma extending through the muscularis propria with metastatic lymph nodes and intact mismatch repair proteins by immunohistochemical expression and gene sequencing. The nonneoplastic grossly uninvolved background mucosa showed marked crypt distortion, crypt abscesses, CD-like lymphoid hyperplasia, transmural inflammation, and reactive epithelial atypia. Additional patient questioning revealed frequent loose stools since she was a teenager leading to diagnosis of a previously undiagnosed CD without primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC). The adenocarcinoma is suspected to be related to the underlying CD. Newly diagnosed adenocarcinoma in a young female as the presenting sign for CD in the absence of PSC is extremely rare. PMID:28255489

  17. [Sclerosing epithelioid fibrosarcoma of the paravertebral column. Case report and literature review].

    PubMed

    Puerta Roldán, Patricia; Rodríguez Rodríguez, Rodrigo; Bagué Rossell, Silvia; de Juan Delago, Manel; Molet Teixidó, Joan

    2013-01-01

    Sclerosing epithelioid fibrosarcoma (SEF) is a rare variant of low-grade fibrosarcoma, with specific histological and immunohistochemical features and a poor prognosis. We report a case of SEF of the paravertebral column in a 49-year old male who presented a paraspinal mass with extension into the L4-L5 neural foramen and invasion of the L5 nerve root. Histology of the tumourectomy specimen and its immunohistochemical study led to the diagnosis of SEF. This case was particularly unusual due to its paravertebral column location and, despite its low grade, illustrates the malignant potential of SEF.

  18. Sclerosing liposarcoma of epididymis: Role of chemical shift magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Ramanathan, Subramaniyan; Raghu, Vineetha; Kumar, Devendra; Sempiege, Venkata R P

    2016-01-01

    Sclerosing liposarcoma of epididymis is a rare extratesticular scrotal tumor with variable prognosis. Ultrasonography is the initial imaging modality of choice for the evaluation of scrotal mass and helps to differentiate testicular and extratesticular masses, thereby narrowing down the differential diagnosis. Magnetic resonance imaging with its excellent soft tissue resolution can help in the further characterization of the nature of the tumor. In this case report, we highlight the role of chemical shift imaging in making a confident preoperative diagnosis of liposarcoma thereby guiding optimal and timely management. PMID:27857462

  19. [Autoimmune hepatitis/primary sclerosing cholangitis overlap syndrome in adults: report of three cases].

    PubMed

    Santos, Oscar Mauricio; Muñoz Ortiz, Edison; Pérez, Camilo; Restrepo, Juan Carlos

    2012-04-01

    Overlap syndromes are cases of liver diseases that share clinical, serological, histological and radiological criteria of autoimmune hepatitis (AIH), primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) or primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC). No definitions have been fully established and therefore there is no solid evidence on the diagnosis and treatment. This article presents the cases of three adult patients with overlapping features of AIH and PSC. Orthotopic liver transplantation was considered the best therapeutic alternative due to advanced disease progression in one patient, while medical treatment was provided in the remaining two patients.

  20. Primary sclerosing cholangitis: a new cause of distal renal tubular acidosis

    PubMed Central

    Goutaudier, Valentin; Szwarc, Ilan; Serre, Jean-Emmanuel; Pageaux, Georges-Philippe; Argilés, Àngel

    2016-01-01

    We describe the first case of distal renal tubular acidosis (dRTA) associated with primary sclerosing cholangitis. A 26-year-old Lao-Thai male patient presented with severe jaundice, metabolic acidosis and hypokalaemia. He was diagnosed of dRTA. Liver transplantation resulted in correction of electrolyte disturbances and hyperbilirubinaemia. A fludrocortisone-furosemide test revealed normal urinary acidification, demonstrating no residual dRTA. This observation suggests that dRTA may be an early manifestation of bilirubin-associated nephropathy or the consequence of an immune mechanism. PMID:27994859

  1. Sclerosing lymphocytic lobulitis manifesting as suspicious microcalcifications with Hashimoto's thyroiditis in a young woman.

    PubMed

    Park, Sung Hee; Choi, Seung Joon; Jung, Hyun Kyung

    2013-01-01

    Sclerosing lymphocytic lobulitis (SLL) is a rare inflammatory disorder, which is also known as fibrous mastopathy and lymphocytic mastitis. It is commonly associated with autoimmune disorders, particularly type 1 diabetes and thyroiditis. We report the case of a 28-year-old woman diagnosed as SLL with Hashimoto's thyroiditis, but without diabetes. She presented suspicious microcalcifications without palpable mass in routine mammograms in both breasts. She had been diagnosed as Hashimoto's thyroiditis several years before and had been followed up in endo-clinics.

  2. Understanding and Treating Fatigue in Primary Biliary Cirrhosis and Primary Sclerosing Cholangitis.

    PubMed

    Jopson, Laura; Dyson, Jessica K; Jones, David E J

    2016-02-01

    Fatigue is a significant problem for patients with primary biliary cirrhosis and although experienced less by patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis, a minority still report significant fatigue. Fatigue is the symptom with the greatest impact on quality of life, particularly when associated with social dysfunction. The pathogenesis of fatigue in cholestatic liver disease is complex, poorly understood, and probably has central and peripheral components. Managing fatigue in cholestatic liver disease presents a challenge for clinicians given the complexity and its numerous associations. This article presents a structured approach to managing fatigue in cholestatic liver disease to improve fatigue severity and quality of life.

  3. Pence, Putin, Mbeki and Their HIV/AIDS-Related Crimes Against Humanity: Call for Social Justice and Behavioral Science Advocacy.

    PubMed

    Kalichman, Seth C

    2017-04-01

    Indiana, a large rural state in the Midwestern United States, suffered the worst North American HIV outbreak among injection drug users in years. The Indiana state government under former Governor and current US Vice President Mike Pence fueled the HIV outbreak by prohibiting needle/syringe exchange and failed to take substantive action once the outbreak was identified. This failure in public health policy parallels the HIV epidemics driven by oppressive drug laws in current day Russia and is reminiscent of the anti-science AIDS denialism of 1999-2007 South Africa. The argument that Russian President Putin and former South African President Mbeki should be held accountable for their AIDS policies as crimes against humanity can be extended to Vice President Pence. Social and behavioral scientists have a responsibility to inform the public of HIV prevention realities and to advocate for evidence-based public health policies to prevent future outbreaks of HIV infection.

  4. Predicting HIV/AIDS-Related Risk Behavior among Men Who Have Sex with Men: An Examination of Psychosocial Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sabato, Todd M.

    2009-01-01

    Men who have sex with men (MSM) continue to be disproportionately affected by the HIV/AIDS epidemic. They represent more than half of all persons living with HIV and over 60% of HIV-infected men. Although as a group MSM no longer account for the majority of new HIV infections, they are estimated to account for 43% of all new infections--more than…

  5. Monitoring HIV and AIDS Related Policy Reforms: A Road Map to Strengthen Policy Monitoring and Implementation in PEPFAR Partner Countries.

    PubMed

    Lane, Jeffrey; Verani, Andre; Hijazi, Mai; Hurley, Erin; Hagopian, Amy; Judice, Nicole; MacInnis, Ron; Sanford, Sallie; Zelek, Sarah; Katz, Aaron

    2016-01-01

    Achieving an AIDS-free generation will require the adoption and implementation of critical health policy reforms. However, countries with high HIV burden often have low policy development, advocacy, and monitoring capacity. This lack of capacity may be a significant barrier to achieving the AIDS-free generation goals. This manuscript describes the increased focus on policy development and implementation by the United States President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR). It evaluates the curriculum and learning modalities used for two regional policy capacity building workshops organized around the PEPFAR Partnership Framework agreements and the Road Map for Monitoring and Implementing Policy Reforms. A total of 64 participants representing the U.S. Government, partner country governments, and civil society organizations attended the workshops. On average, participants responded that their policy monitoring skills improved and that they felt they were better prepared to monitor policy reforms three months after the workshop. When followed-up regarding utilization of the Road Map action plan, responses were mixed. Reasons cited for not making progress included an inability to meet or a lack of time, personnel, or governmental support. This lack of progress may point to a need for building policy monitoring systems in high HIV burden countries. Because the success of policy reforms cannot be measured by the mere adoption of written policy documents, monitoring the implementation of policy reforms and evaluating their public health impact is essential. In many high HIV burden countries, policy development and monitoring capacity remains weak. This lack of capacity could hinder efforts to achieve the ambitious AIDS-free generation treatment, care and prevention goals. The Road Map appears to be a useful tool for strengthening these critical capacities.

  6. Monitoring HIV and AIDS Related Policy Reforms: A Road Map to Strengthen Policy Monitoring and Implementation in PEPFAR Partner Countries

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Achieving an AIDS-free generation will require the adoption and implementation of critical health policy reforms. However, countries with high HIV burden often have low policy development, advocacy, and monitoring capacity. This lack of capacity may be a significant barrier to achieving the AIDS-free generation goals. This manuscript describes the increased focus on policy development and implementation by the United States President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR). It evaluates the curriculum and learning modalities used for two regional policy capacity building workshops organized around the PEPFAR Partnership Framework agreements and the Road Map for Monitoring and Implementing Policy Reforms. A total of 64 participants representing the U.S. Government, partner country governments, and civil society organizations attended the workshops. On average, participants responded that their policy monitoring skills improved and that they felt they were better prepared to monitor policy reforms three months after the workshop. When followed-up regarding utilization of the Road Map action plan, responses were mixed. Reasons cited for not making progress included an inability to meet or a lack of time, personnel, or governmental support. This lack of progress may point to a need for building policy monitoring systems in high HIV burden countries. Because the success of policy reforms cannot be measured by the mere adoption of written policy documents, monitoring the implementation of policy reforms and evaluating their public health impact is essential. In many high HIV burden countries, policy development and monitoring capacity remains weak. This lack of capacity could hinder efforts to achieve the ambitious AIDS-free generation treatment, care and prevention goals. The Road Map appears to be a useful tool for strengthening these critical capacities. PMID:26914708

  7. The association between HIV/AIDS-related knowledge and perception of risk for infection: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Ndugwa Kabwama, Steven; Berg-Beckhoff, Gabriele

    2015-11-01

    This systematic review tries to elucidate the association between what people know about HIV/AIDS and how they perceive their risk of infection. The initial search for articles yielded 1,595 abstracts, 16 of which met the inclusion criteria. Five studies found a positive correlation, four reported a negative correlation and seven found no association between knowledge and risk perception. It was found that the existing psychometrically sound measure of HIV/AIDS risk perception had not been used in any of the studies. The context in which the risk is assessed is pivotal to whether an association between knowledge and the perceived risk is found. Biases in judgement such as optimistic bias, psychological distancing, anchoring bias and overconfidence also explain how knowledge may fail to predict risk perception. It was concluded that the association between HIV/AIDS knowledge and risk perception might follow a continuum from positive to no association and finally to negative. The hypothesis, however, still needs to be studied further.

  8. HIV/AIDS Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... HIV/AIDS Influenza Malaria Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) Tuberculosis Zika Virus Find a Funding Opportunity Opportunities & Announcements ... related co-infections, such as hepatitis, malaria, and tuberculosis. Treatment of HIV Infection In the early 1980s ...

  9. Plasma Fatty Acids in Zambian Adults with HIV/AIDS: Relation to Dietary Intake and Cardiovascular Risk Factors.

    PubMed

    Nyirenda, Christopher K; Kabagambe, Edmond K; Koethe, John R; Kiage, James N; Chi, Benjamin H; Musonda, Patrick; Blevins, Meridith; Bosire, Claire N; Tsai, Michael Y; Heimburger, Douglas C

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To determine whether 24 hr dietary recalls (DR) are a good measure of polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) intake when compared to plasma levels, and whether plasma PUFA is associated with markers of HIV/AIDS progression and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. Methods. In a cross-sectional study among 210 antiretroviral therapy-naïve HIV-infected adults from Lusaka, Zambia, we collected data on medical history and dietary intake using 24 hr DR. We measured fatty acids and markers of AIDS progression and CVD risk in fasting plasma collected at baseline. Results. PUFA intakes showed modest correlations with corresponding plasma levels; Spearman correlations were 0.36 (p < 0.01) for eicosapentaenoic acid and 0.21 (p = 0.005) for docosahexaenoic acid. While there were no significant associations (p > 0.05) between total plasma PUFA and C-reactive protein (CRP) or lipid levels, plasma arachidonic acid was inversely associated with CRP and triglycerides and positively associated with HDL-C, CD4+ T-cell count, and plasma albumin (p < 0.05). Plasma saturated fatty acids (SFA) were positively associated with CRP (β = 0.24; 95% CI: 0.08 to 0.40, p = 0.003) and triglycerides (β = 0.08; 95% CI: 0.03 to 0.12, p < 0.01). Conclusions. Our data suggest that a single DR is inadequate for assessing PUFA intake and that plasma arachidonic acid levels may modulate HIV/AIDS progression and CVD risk.

  10. Plasma Fatty Acids in Zambian Adults with HIV/AIDS: Relation to Dietary Intake and Cardiovascular Risk Factors

    PubMed Central

    Nyirenda, Christopher K.; Kabagambe, Edmond K.; Koethe, John R.; Kiage, James N.; Chi, Benjamin H.; Musonda, Patrick; Blevins, Meridith; Bosire, Claire N.; Tsai, Michael Y.; Heimburger, Douglas C.

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To determine whether 24 hr dietary recalls (DR) are a good measure of polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) intake when compared to plasma levels, and whether plasma PUFA is associated with markers of HIV/AIDS progression and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. Methods. In a cross-sectional study among 210 antiretroviral therapy-naïve HIV-infected adults from Lusaka, Zambia, we collected data on medical history and dietary intake using 24 hr DR. We measured fatty acids and markers of AIDS progression and CVD risk in fasting plasma collected at baseline. Results. PUFA intakes showed modest correlations with corresponding plasma levels; Spearman correlations were 0.36 (p < 0.01) for eicosapentaenoic acid and 0.21 (p = 0.005) for docosahexaenoic acid. While there were no significant associations (p > 0.05) between total plasma PUFA and C-reactive protein (CRP) or lipid levels, plasma arachidonic acid was inversely associated with CRP and triglycerides and positively associated with HDL-C, CD4+ T-cell count, and plasma albumin (p < 0.05). Plasma saturated fatty acids (SFA) were positively associated with CRP (β = 0.24; 95% CI: 0.08 to 0.40, p = 0.003) and triglycerides (β = 0.08; 95% CI: 0.03 to 0.12, p < 0.01). Conclusions. Our data suggest that a single DR is inadequate for assessing PUFA intake and that plasma arachidonic acid levels may modulate HIV/AIDS progression and CVD risk. PMID:26161268

  11. AIDS is your business.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Sydney; Simon, Jonathon; Vincent, Jeffrey R; MacLeod, William; Fox, Matthew; Thea, Donald M

    2003-02-01

    If your company operates in a developing country, AIDS is your business. While Africa has received the most attention, AIDS is also spreading swiftly in other parts of the world. Russia and Ukraine had the fastest-growing epidemics last year, and many experts believe China and India will suffer the next tidal wave of infection. Why should executives be concerned about AIDS? Because it is destroying the twin rationales of globalization strategy-cheap labor and fast-growing markets--in countries where people are heavily affected by the epidemic. Fortunately, investments in programs that prevent infection and provide treatment for employees who have HIV/AIDS are profitable for many businesses--that is, they lead to savings that outweigh the programs' costs. Due to the long latency period between HIV infection and the onset of AIDS symptoms, a company is not likely to see any of the costs of HIV/AIDS until five to ten years after an employee is infected. But executives can calculate the present value of epidemic-related costs by using the discount rate to weigh each cost according to its expected timing. That allows companies to think about expenses on HIV/AIDS prevention and treatment programs as investments rather than merely as costs. The authors found that the annual cost of AIDS to six corporations in South Africa and Botswana ranged from 0.4% to 5.9% of the wage bill. All six companies would have earned positive returns on their investments if they had provided employees with free treatment for HIV/AIDS in the form of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), according to the mathematical model the authors used. The annual reduction in the AIDS "tax" would have been as much as 40.4%. The authors' conclusion? Fighting AIDS not only helps those infected; it also makes good business sense.

  12. Leukemoid reaction, a rare manifestation of autoimmune hemolytic anemia in a case of small duct primary sclerosing cholangitis.

    PubMed

    Salagre, Kaustubh D; Sahay, Ravindra Nath; Patil, Anuja; Pati, Anuja; Joshi, Amita; Shukla, Akash

    2013-10-01

    A 48 year old lady presented with jaundice and exertional breathlesness. Her laboratory reports showed anaemia, reticulocytosis, leucocytosis, elevated Lactate Dehydrogenase (LDH), alkaline phosphatase levels, hyperbillirubinemia and positive direct Coomb's test. After ruling out all the other causes of autoimmunity and hemolytic anemia, she was diagnosed as leukemoid reaction due to autoimmune hemolytic anemia with primary sclerosing cholangitis. Patient showed immediate improvement after corticosteroids.

  13. Evaluating the effects of community-based organization engagement on HIV and AIDS-related risk behavior in Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Riehman, Kara S.; Kakietek, Jakub; Manteuffel, Brigitte A.; Rodriguez-Garcıa, Rosalía; Bonnel, Rene; N'Jie, N'Della; Godoy-Garraza, Lucas; Orago, Alloys; Murithi, Patrick; Fruh, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    International donors have increasingly shifted AIDS funding directly to community-based organizations (CBOs) with the assumption that responding to the epidemic is best achieved at the community level. The World Bank, ICF Macro, and the National Council for Population and Development in Kenya, conducted a study to evaluate the community response in Kenya. The study used a quasi-experimental design comparing seven study communities and seven comparison communities in Nyanza Province and Western Province. We examined the impact of CBO activity on individual and community-level outcomes, including HIV knowledge, awareness and perceptions, sexual risk behavior, and social transformation (gender ideology and social capital). The study consisted of two components: a household survey conducted in all 14 communities, and qualitative data collected in a subset of communities. Individuals in communities with higher CBO engagement were significantly more likely to have reported consistent condom use. Higher CBO engagement was associated with some measures of social capital, including participation in local and national elections, and participation in electoral campaigns. CBOs provide added value in addressing the HIV and AIDS epidemic in very targeted and specific ways that are closely tied to the services they provide (e.g., prevention education); thus, increasing CBO engagement can be an effective measure in scaling up prevention efforts in those areas. PMID:23745632

  14. Evaluating the effects of community-based organization engagement on HIV and AIDS-related risk behavior in Kenya.

    PubMed

    Riehman, Kara S; Kakietek, Jakub; Manteuffel, Brigitte A; Rodriguez-García, Rosalía; Bonnel, Rene; N'Jie, N'Della; Godoy-Garraza, Lucas; Orago, Alloys; Murithi, Patrick; Fruh, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    International donors have increasingly shifted AIDS funding directly to community-based organizations (CBOs) with the assumption that responding to the epidemic is best achieved at the community level. The World Bank, ICF Macro, and the National Council for Population and Development in Kenya, conducted a study to evaluate the community response in Kenya. The study used a quasi-experimental design comparing seven study communities and seven comparison communities in Nyanza Province and Western Province. We examined the impact of CBO activity on individual and community-level outcomes, including HIV knowledge, awareness and perceptions, sexual risk behavior, and social transformation (gender ideology and social capital). The study consisted of two components: a household survey conducted in all 14 communities, and qualitative data collected in a subset of communities. Individuals in communities with higher CBO engagement were significantly more likely to have reported consistent condom use. Higher CBO engagement was associated with some measures of social capital, including participation in local and national elections, and participation in electoral campaigns. CBOs provide added value in addressing the HIV and AIDS epidemic in very targeted and specific ways that are closely tied to the services they provide (e.g., prevention education); thus, increasing CBO engagement can be an effective measure in scaling up prevention efforts in those areas.

  15. Perceptions of Prostate Cancer Screening Controversy and Informed Decision Making: Implications for Development of a Targeted Decision Aid for Unaffected Male First-Degree Relatives

    PubMed Central

    Gwede, Clement K.; Davis, Stacy N.; Wilson, Shaenelle; Patel, Mitul; Vadaparampil, Susan T.; Meade, Cathy D.; Rivers, Brian M.; Yu, Daohai; Torres-Roca, Javier; Heysek, Randy; Spiess, Philippe E.; Pow-Sang, Julio; Jacobsen, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Purpose First-degree relatives (FDRs) of prostate cancer (PC) patients should consider multiple concurrent personal risk factors when engaging in informed decision making (IDM) about PC screening. This study assessed perceptions of IDM recommendations and risk-appropriate strategies for IDM among FDRs of varied race/ethnicity. Design A cross-sectional, qualitative Setting Study setting was a cancer center in southwest Florida. Participants The study comprised 44 participants (24 PC patients and 20 unaffected FDRs). Method Focus groups and individual interviews were conducted and analyzed using content analysis and constant comparison methods. Results Patients and FDRs found the PC screening debate and IDM recommendations to be complex and counterintuitive. They overwhelmingly believed screening saves lives and does not have associated harms. There was a strongly expressed need to improve communication between patients and FDRs. A single decision aid that addresses the needs of all FDRs, rather than separating by race/ethnicity, was recommended as sufficient by study participants. These perspectives guided the development of an innovative decision aid that deconstructs the screening controversy and IDM processes into simpler concepts and provides step-by-step strategies for FDRs to engage in IDM. Conclusion Implementing IDM among FDRs is challenging because the IDM paradigm departs from historical messages promoting routine screening. These contradictions should be recognized and addressed for men to participate effectively in IDM. A randomized pilot study evaluating outcomes of the resulting decision aid is underway. PMID:24968183

  16. An S100P-positive biliary epithelial field is a preinvasive intraepithelial neoplasm in nodular-sclerosing cholangiocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Nakanuma, Yasuni; Uchida, Tsuneyuki; Sato, Yasunori; Uesaka, Katsuhiko

    2017-02-01

    Nodular-sclerosing cholangiocarcinoma (NS-CCA) is a common CCA of the intrahepatic large, perihilar, and distal bile ducts. Intraepithelial biliary neoplasms, such as the mucosal extension of carcinoma and preinvasive neoplastic lesions (ie, biliary intraepithelial neoplasia) reportedly occur in the bile ducts around CCA. In the present study, we collectively refer to these intraepithelial lesions as "intraepithelial neoplasms of the bile duct (IENBs)". We examined the IENBs in 57 surgically resected cases of NS-CCA. S100P immunostaining was used to help detect IENBs. The IENBs formed field(s) of continuous neoplastic biliary epithelial cells and showed a flat, micropapillary, or papillotubular configuration. IENBs could be classified into 3 categories based on their atypia: group A (neoplastic but not enough for malignancy), B (neoplastic and sufficiently well differentiated for high-grade dysplasia), and C (overtly malignant and variably differentiated). IENB was found in 31 of 57 cases, with group C the most common (26 cases) followed by group B (22 cases) and group A (16 cases). The expression of cancer-related molecules and MIB-1 index of groups A and B differed from those of invasive CCA, whereas these features of group C were relatively similar to those of invasive CCA. In conclusion, IENB was not infrequently found in NS-CCA and could be classified into 3 grades. Preinvasive lesions (biliary intraepithelial neoplasias) are likely to be found in groups A and B, whereas cancerization would be included in group C. The classification of IENB may be useful for future studies of the preinvasive intraepithelial neoplastic lesions of NS-CCAs.

  17. Ethics, social forces, and politics in AIDS-related research: experience in planning and implementing a household HIV seroprevalence survey.

    PubMed

    Hurley, P; Pinder, G

    1992-01-01

    A controversial proposal for a survey of HIV infection in a probability sample of U.S. household residents as part of the government's surveillance of the AIDS epidemic provided a number of challenges to survey science. These were compounded by ethical concerns and social sensitivities surrounding the topic. Questions about the ability of a voluntary survey to produce an accurate national estimate of infection demanded rigorous study. In 1987, the Centers for Disease Control began planning field tests of a survey to obtain blood samples and information about respondents' sexual behavior and drug use. The authors were part of the team deployed by the National Center for Health Statistics that, with the contractor staff from Research Triangle Institute, conducted studies in Pittsburgh and Dallas, but only after much was learned about developing processes and procedures for dealing both with broad community concerns and with the interests of those gravely touched by the epidemic.

  18. HIV/AIDS-related attitudes and oral impacts on daily performances: a cross-sectional study of Sudanese adult dental patients

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Few studies have investigated the relationships between HIV-related knowledge, fear of contagion in dental environments and Oral Impacts on Daily Performance (OIDP) among dental patients. Our objectives were to investigate the associations between HIV-related knowledge and fear of contagion in dental environments and OIDP among dental patients, and to evaluate whether those associations were modified by the frequency of dental service attendance. Methods A total of 1262 patients (mean age 30.7 years, 56.5% females) were recruited from the Khartoum Dental Teaching Hospital and the University of Science and Technology during March–July 2008. The participants underwent a full-mouth oral clinical examination and completed an interview in a face-to-face setting. Results Of the study participants, 41.4% had visited a dentist at least twice during the last 2 years, 96.2% had caries experience (DT > 0) and 79.1% reported oral impacts (OIDP > 0). The most frequently reported oral impacts were problems eating, sleeping and cleaning teeth. In total, 26.3% of the participants had HIV transmission knowledge, 75.6% knew people with HIV/AIDS and 58.7% perceived a high risk of cross-infection in dental environments. After adjusting for sociodemographic characteristics, frequency of dental service attendance and caries experience, patients who had high HIV-related information exposure, a positive attitude toward people with HIV/AIDS and a high perceived risk of cross-infection were more likely to report oral impacts, whereas patients who knew people with HIV/AIDS were less likely to report oral impacts. The association between OIDP and HIV transmission knowledge was modified by frequency of dental service attendance. Conclusions Dental patients who were informed about HIV and had a high HIV/AIDS risk perception were more likely to report impaired oral health-related quality of life than their less informed counterparts and those who perceived a low risk of

  19. Hearing Aids

    MedlinePlus

    ... hair cells (outer and inner rows). When the vibrations move through this fluid, the tiny outer hair ... ear to the brain. Hearing aids intensify sound vibrations that the damaged outer hair cells have trouble ...

  20. Teaching Aids

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnard, W. Robert, Ed.

    1976-01-01

    Provides evaluations of several aids for teaching chemistry. Included are The Use of Chemical Abstracts, Practical Technical Writing, Infrared Spectroscopy Programs, and a film titled "You Can't Go Back." (RH)

  1. Older Latina Women and HIV/AIDS: An Examination of Sexuality and Culture as they Relate to Risk and Protective Factors

    PubMed Central

    Beaulaurier, Richard L.; Craig, Shelley L.; De La Rosa, Mario

    2009-01-01

    Older Latina women are one of the least studied American demographic groups with regard to social, health, or sexual behavior. This could leave social workers and other geriatric professionals unprepared for dealing with HIV/AIDS in this population. Currently, older Latina women are one of the fastest growing groups of new AIDS cases. Twenty percent of all women ever diagnosed with the disease are Latina and 5.5% of Latinas infected with the virus are older. The number of diagnosed infections is increasing in older women, including Latinas, in spite of recent declines in infection rates with younger populations. There are also a potentially large number of cases that go misdiagnosed or undiagnosed. This article also addresses risk and protective factors related to gender roles, traditional Latino family values, religion, socioeconomic factors, health, and health care, with special attention to the triple jeopardy faced by this population by virtue of being female, seniors, and minorities. The article concludes with recommendations for the development of culturally competent practices with older Latinas and the development of a research agenda to better understand their risk-related and health-seeking behavior. PMID:19197629

  2. Ugandan HIV/AIDS orphans in charge of their households speak out: a study of their health-related worries.

    PubMed

    Satzinger, F; Kipp, W; Rubaale, T

    2012-01-01

    The number of children orphaned due to HIV/AIDS in sub-Saharan Africa was estimated in 2007 by UNAIDS at upwards of 12 million. In Uganda alone, 800,000 of the estimated 1.6 million orphans are said to be orphaned due to this cause. These children suffer life-long consequences from the loss of their parents. This study explores the situation of children living in child-headed households in Uganda's western Kabarole district. Through qualitative research, including in-depth interviews with 20 child heads of households, the health concerns of these children are documented. The interview data were analysed using qualitative research techniques. The study reveals that the psychological and physical effects of orphanhood are magnified for those living in child-headed households. In particular, it highlights the fears of theft and abuse which are a constant source of anxiety for these children. It reports that illness episodes among younger siblings are also particularly worrisome for child heads of households. The article concludes with recommendations for addressing this urgent problem in sub-Saharan Africa.

  3. Primary sclerosing cholangitis, Crohn's disease and HLA-B27 in black South African women.

    PubMed

    Buchel, O C; Bosch, F J; Janse van Rensburg, J; Bezuidenhout, E; de Vries, C S; van Zyl, J H; Middlecote, B D; de K Grundling, H; Fevery, J

    2012-12-01

    Crohn's disease is rare in South African black people and primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) is also rare in black patients with IBD, from South Africa. The presence of HLA-B27 is generally associated with seronegative spondylo-arthropathies and correlates with the occurrence of ankylosing spondylitis, recurrent mouth ulcers and uveitis, in patients with IBD. We describe two women with the combination of Crohn's disease, PSC and HLA-B27 from our cohort of the last 5 years of three black patients with Crohn's disease. Crohn's disease, PSC and HLA-B27 respectively, occur rarely in black South Africans and their concurrent presence in two black women suggests a pathogenetic link of HLA-B27 between Crohn's disease and PSC in this population. Female gender might be an additional determinant in this setting.

  4. Sclerosing sweat duct carcinoma of the nose with multiple cervical lymph node metastasis.

    PubMed

    Moon, Mi-Jin; Cho, Kyu-Sup; Lee, Yoon-Se; Nam, Su-Bong

    2012-08-01

    Sclerosing sweat duct carcinoma (SSDC) in the nose, a rare occurrence with no specific symptoms, is frequently confused with rhinophyma or other inflammatory disease. In this report, we describe a 64-year-old woman who presented with a mass on her nasal dorsum for 1 year. Initially, the tumor had been misdiagnosed as a rhinophyma and followed-up for 1 year. She was referred due to a persistent nasal and neck mass. Deep incisional biopsy was performed to produce sufficient tissue and the histopathologic results showed SSDC. We performed wide local excision and reconstruction using radial forearm musculocutaneous free flaps with a costal cartilage framework followed by bilateral neck dissection. SSDC is seldom recognized and is frequently clinically confused with benign syringoma prior to pathologic diagnosis. Wide and deep incisional biopsy is necessary for the correct diagnosis and successful treatment of SSDC.

  5. A Review of the Challenges Associated with the Diagnosis and Therapy of Primary Sclerosing Cholangitis

    PubMed Central

    Saadi, Mohammed; Yu, Christine

    2014-01-01

    Primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) is a chronic and progressive cholestatic liver disease that often leads to the development of cirrhosis. Complications of PSC include pruritus, fatigue, vitamin deficiencies, metabolic bone disease, dominant biliary strictures, gallstones, and hepatobiliary malignancies, most commonly cholangiocarcinoma (CCA). Despite the presumed autoimmune etiology of PSC, a clear benefit from immunosuppressive agents has not yet been established, and their use is limited by their side effects. Endoscopy is required in evaluation of biliary strictures in PSC to rule out the possibility of CCA. Liver transplantation is currently the only life-extending therapy for patients with end-stage disease. However, disease recurrence can be a source of morbidity and mortality as transplanted patients survive longer. Further studies are needed to develop an optimal therapeutic strategy for patients with PSC to decrease the incidence of complications of the disease, to decrease the need for transplantation, and to extend life expectancy. PMID:26357617

  6. Positron emission tomography demonstrated localized luxury perfusion in subacute sclerosing panencephalitis.

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, H; Fueki, N; Yoneyama, H; Ogawa, M; Sakuragawa, N

    1990-10-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) was performed on two patients in different stages of subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE) and compared with the concurrent computed tomography (CT) findings and clinical status. Case 1, which was in stage II, showed luxury perfusion in the anterior half of the cerebrum and decreases of cerebral blood flow and oxygen metabolism in the right frontal watershed zone, where CT showed low density. Case 2, which was in stage III, showed marked decreases of cerebral blood flow and cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen in all regions except the occipital region. The present PET study demonstrated that SSPE showed inflammatory-destructive progression and rostral-caudal progression. Further, it was suspected that low density on CT scan, especially in the watershed zone, resulted partly from disturbances in cerebral circulation.

  7. Severe infection with multidrug-resistant Salmonella choleraesuis in a young patient with primary sclerosing cholangitis

    PubMed Central

    Ferstl, Philip G; Reinheimer, Claudia; Jozsa, Katalin; Zeuzem, Stefan; Kempf, Volkhard AJ; Waidmann, Oliver; Grammatikos, Georgios

    2017-01-01

    Massive global spread of multidrug-resistant (MDR) Salmonella spp. expressing extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) and additional resistance to fluoroquinolones has often been attributed to high international mobility as well as excessive use of oral antibiotics in livestock farming. However, MDR Salmonella spp. have not been mentioned as a widespread pathogen in clinical settings so far. We demonstrate the case of a 25-year-old male with primary sclerosing cholangitis who tested positive for MDR Salmonella enterica serotype Choleraesuis expressing ESBL and fluoroquinolone resistance. The pathogen was supposedly acquired during a trip to Thailand, causing severe fever, cholangitis and pancreatitis. To our knowledge, this is the first report of Salmonella enterica serotype Choleraesuis in Europe expressing such a multidrug resistance pattern. ESBL resistance of Salmonella enterica spp. should be considered in patients with obstructive biliary tract pathology and travel history in endemic countries. PMID:28373776

  8. Sclerosing stromal tumour of the ovary presenting as precocious puberty: a rare neoplasm.

    PubMed

    Chaurasia, Jai Kumar; Afroz, Nishat; Maheshwari, Veena; Naim, Mohammed

    2014-03-31

    A 7-year-old Indian girl presented with symptoms of excessive development of breasts, early menarche, growth of pubic hairs, accelerated growth and abdominal distension. On clinical examination, a large right abdominopelvic mass was palpable. MRI revealed a large, heterogeneous, solid and cystic tumour in the right adnexal region, suggestive of an ovarian neoplasm. The hormonal profile showed markedly elevated oestradiol and low follicle-stimulating hormone levels. Clinical diagnosis of precocious puberty with right ovarian mass was concluded. Right-sided salpingo-oophorectomy was performed. Histopathology showed features consistent with sclerosing stromal tumour of the ovary. Postoperatively, signs and symptoms of precocity gradually regressed and her serum oestradiol level came down to normal. This is the first reported case from India.

  9. Oral Vancomycin Therapy in a Child with Primary Sclerosing Cholangitis and Severe Ulcerative Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Buness, Cynthia; Miloh, Tamir

    2016-01-01

    Primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC), a rare progressive liver disease characterized by cholestasis and bile duct fibrosis, has no accepted, effective therapy known to delay or arrest its progression. We report a 15 year old female patient diagnosed with PSC and moderate chronic active ulcerative colitis (UC) who achieved normalization of her liver enzymes and bile ducts, and resolution of her UC symptoms with colonic mucosal healing, after treatment with a single drug therapy of the antibiotic oral vancomycin. We postulate that the oral vancomycin may be acting both as an antibiotic by altering the intestinal microbiome and as an immunomodulator. Oral vancomycin may be a promising treatment for PSC that needs to be further studied in randomized trials. PMID:27738604

  10. Immunoglobulin G4-mediated sclerosing cholangitis as a risk factor for cholangiocarcinoma: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Koopman, Karin E.; Bloemena, Elisabeth; Kazemier, Geert; Klemt-Kropp, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Immunoglobulin (Ig)G4-mediated disease is a systemic autoimmune disease, which occasionally presents solely as sclerosing cholangitis (SC). IgG4-mediated SC is challenging to diagnose, as it may mimic cholangiocarcinoma radiologically, and carcinoma cells may produce IgG4. The diagnosis of IgG4-mediated disease is based on histological consensus criteria and response to corticosteroids. In addition to the radiological and histological overlap between IgG4-mediated SC and cholangiocarcinoma, IgG4-mediated SC may be considered as a risk factor for the development of cholangiocarcinoma. We herein present the case of a patient in whom cholangiocarcinoma developed in two lesions previously characterized as IgG4-mediated SC, including a suggested mechanism underlying the contribution of IgG4-mediated SC to the development of cholangiocarcinoma. PMID:28105357

  11. Ultrasonographic and clinicopathological features of feline gastrointestinal eosinophilic sclerosing fibroplasia in four cats.

    PubMed

    Weissman, Andrea; Penninck, Dominique; Webster, Cynthia; Hecht, Silke; Keating, John; Craig, Linden E

    2013-02-01

    Four cats with feline gastrointestinal eosinophilic sclerosing fibroplasia (FGESF) are described. Clinical signs included decreased appetite, weight loss, vomiting and diarrhea. Bloodwork abnormalities included mild neutrophilia (n = 2) and hyperglobulinemia with concurrent hyperproteinemia (n = 2). Ultrasonographically, a total of five solitary masses with mural thickening and loss of layering were identified in the stomach, duodenum, jejunum and colon. In one cat a second, separate lesion was diagnosed 3 weeks following surgical resection of one mass. Histopathologically, lesions were characterized by collagen trabeculae and mixed inflammatory cell infiltrates, predominantly eosinophils. Multiple areas of necrosis were also noted, which contained bacteria in 2/4 cats. In two cats, changes consistent with FGESF were also noted in the liver. All cats had surgical resection of their lesions. Two cats are still living at time of publication (43 and 24 months post-surgery). FGESF should be considered as a differential for intestinal masses in cats.

  12. [Non-variceal upper digestive hemorrhage: evaluation of endoscopic sclerosing treatment].

    PubMed

    Yuguero del Moral, L; López Morante, A J; Martín Lorente, J L; Ojeda Giménez, C

    1990-11-01

    We appraise the efficacy of endoscopic injection treatment in 112 patients with gastroduodenal bleeding lesion versus 78 control patients (historical group), employing adrenaline (29 patients), absolute ethanol (52 patients) o adrenaline and ethanol (31 patients) as sclerosants. We observe in the treated group a diminution in rebleeding, lower transfusional blood needs and shorter hospital staying, with high stadistic significance versus the control group (p less than 0,001). Among treated patients the larger relapsing index (29.6%) was in patients treated with adrenaline injection only, against the group treated with ethanol or adrenaline and ethanol (10.2%) (p less than 0.05). The demand of surgical treatment was not significant between both groups, except in patients with actively jet bleeding, because urgent treatment was necessary in 37.5% of endoscopically treated patients versus 88.8% in not endoscopically treated. The mortality was similar in both groups.

  13. Computer-aided DSM-IV-diagnostics – acceptance, use and perceived usefulness in relation to users' learning styles

    PubMed Central

    Bergman, Lars G; Fors, Uno GH

    2005-01-01

    Background CDSS (computerized decision support system) for medical diagnostics have been studied for long. This study was undertaken to investigate how different preferences of Learning Styles (LS) of psychiatrists might affect acceptance, use and perceived usefulness of a CDSS for diagnostics in psychiatry. Methods 49 psychiatrists (specialists and non-specialists) from 3 different clinics volunteered to participate in this study and to use the CDSS to diagnose a paper-based case (based on a real patient). LS, attitudes to CDSS and complementary data were obtained via questionnaires and interviews. To facilitate the study, a special version of the CDSS was created, which automatically could log interaction details. Results The LS preferences (according to Kolb) of the 49 physicians turned out as follows: 37% were Assimilating, 31% Converging, 27% Accommodating and 6% Diverging. The CDSS under study seemed to favor psychiatrists with abstract conceptualization information perceiving mode (Assimilating and Converging learning styles). A correlation between learning styles preferences and computer skill was found. Positive attitude to computer-aided diagnostics and learning styles preferences was also found to correlate. Using the CDSS, the specialists produced only 1 correct diagnosis and the non-specialists 2 correct diagnoses (median values) as compared to the three predetermined correct diagnoses of the actual case. Only 10% had all three diagnoses correct, 41 % two correct, 47 % one correct and 2 % had no correct diagnose at all. Conclusion Our results indicate that the use of CDSS does not guarantee correct diagnosis and that LS might influence the results. Future research should focus on the possibility to create systems open to individuals with different LS preferences and possibility to create CDSS adapted to the level of expertise of the user. PMID:15638940

  14. Sclerosing cholangitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... swelling (inflammation), scarring, and destruction of the bile ducts inside and outside of the liver. ... be caused by: Choledocholithiasis (gallstones in the bile duct) Infections in the liver, gallbladder, and bile ducts

  15. Ergogenic aids.

    PubMed

    Coyle, E F

    1984-07-01

    The catabolism of bodily fuels provides the energy for muscular work. Work output can be limited by the size of fuel reserves, the rate of their catabolism, the build-up of by-products, or the neurologic activation of muscle. A substance that favorably affects a step that is normally limiting, and thus increases work output, can be considered an ergogenic aid. The maximal amount of muscular force generated during brief contractions can be acutely increased during hypnosis and with the ingestion of a placebo or psychomotor stimulant. This effect is most obvious in subjects under laboratory conditions and is less evident in athletes who are highly motivated prior to competition. Fatigue is associated with acidosis in the working musculature when attempts are made to maximize work output during a 4 to 15-minute period. Sodium bicarbonate ingestion may act to buffer the acid produced, provided that blood flow to the muscle is adequate. Prolonged intense exercise can be maintained for approximately two hours before carbohydrate stores become depleted. Carbohydrate feedings delay fatigue during prolonged exercise, especially in subjects who display a decline in blood glucose during exercise in the fasting state. Caffeine ingestion prior to an endurance bout has been reported to allow an individual to exercise somewhat more intensely than he or she would otherwise. Its effect may be mediated by augmenting fat metabolism or by altering the perception of effort. Amphetamines may act in a similar manner. Water ingestion during prolonged exercise that results in dehydration and hyperthermia can offset fluid losses and allow an individual to better maintain work output while substantially reducing the risk of heat-related injuries.

  16. HIV/AIDS - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - HIV/AIDS ... The following organizations are good resources for information on AIDS : AIDS.gov -- www.aids.gov AIDS Info -- aidsinfo.nih.gov The Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation -- www. ...

  17. Types of Hearing Aids

    MedlinePlus

    ... Devices Consumer Products Hearing Aids Types of Hearing Aids Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... some features for hearing aids? What are hearing aids? Hearing aids are sound-amplifying devices designed to ...

  18. HIV/AIDS-related stigma in South African alcohol-serving venues and its potential impact on HIV disclosure, testing, and treatment-seeking behaviours

    PubMed Central

    Velloza, Jennifer; Watt, Melissa H.; Choi, Karmel W.; Abler, Laurie; Kalichman, Seth C.; Skinner, Donald; Pieterse, Desiree; Sikkema, Kathleen J.

    2015-01-01

    Alcohol-serving venues in South Africa are sites for high-risk behaviours that may lead to HIV transmission. Prevention and treatment interventions are sorely needed in these settings, but HIV-related stigma may limit their effectiveness. This study explored expressions of stigma among alcohol-serving venue patrons in Cape Town and examined the potential impact of stigma on HIV disclosure, testing, and treatment-seeking behaviours. A total of 92 in-depth interviews with male and female, Black and Coloured patrons were conducted. Transcripts were analysed via memo-writing and diagramming techniques. Many participants mentioned knowing other patrons living with HIV/AIDS (PLWH), and this visibility of HIV impacted expressions of HIV-related stigma. Participants discussed four forms of HIV-related stigma in the venues: fearing PLWH, fearing HIV acquisition, blaming others for spreading HIV, and isolating PLWH. HIV visibility and expressions of HIV-related stigma, particularly fear of isolation, influenced participants’ willingness to disclose their status. HIV-related stigma in the venues also appeared to indirectly influence testing and treatment-seeking behaviour outside the venue. Results suggest that efforts to change norms and reduce expressions of HIV-related stigma in alcohol-serving venues are necessary to successfully deliver tailored HIV prevention interventions and increase uptake of HIV testing and care in this important social setting. PMID:25630531

  19. Blindness, dancing extremities, and corpus callosum and brain stem involvement: an unusual presentation of fulminant subacute sclerosing panencephalitis.

    PubMed

    Singhi, Pratibha; Saini, Arushi Gahlot; Sankhyan, Naveen; Gupta, Pankaj; Vyas, Sameer

    2015-01-01

    A 4-year-old girl presented with acute visual loss followed 2 weeks later with loss of speech and audition, fulminant neuroregression, and choreo-athetoid movements of extremities. Fundus showed bilateral chorioretinitis. Electroencephalography showed periodic complexes. Measles antibody titers were elevated in both serum and cerebrospinal fluid, consistent with subacute sclerosing panencephalitis. Neuroimaging showed discontiguous involvement of splenium of the corpus callosum and ventral pons with sparing of cortical white matter. Our case highlights the atypical clinical and radiologic presentations of subacute sclerosing panencephalitis. Pediatricians need to be aware that necrotizing chorioretinitis in a child and/or atypical brain stem changes could be the heralding feature of this condition in endemic countries.

  20. Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor of the distal bile duct associated with lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis. Case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Martín Malagón, Antonio; López-Tomassetti Fernández, Eudaldo; Arteaga González, Iván; Carrillo Pallarés, Angel; Díaz Luis, Hermogenes

    2006-01-01

    Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor (IMT) or inflammatory pseudotumor has been described in various organs such as the liver, intestinal tract, spleen, kidney, bladder, lung, peritoneum and heart. However, its appearance in the periampullary region is uncommon and has rarely been reported in the literature. It is characterized histologically by myofibroblastic cell proliferation together with a mixed inflammatory infiltrate that clinically and radiologically mimics a malignant tumor. We report a case of IMT located in the distal common bile duct of a 51-year-old woman. She underwent Whipple resection with the initial diagnosis of cholangiocarcinoma; the pathologic diagnosis of the tumor was IMT of the distal bile duct associated with lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis. Referring to previously reported cases, suspected diagnosis of a malignant tumor made surgical excision the primary choice for symptom relief and in order to obtain a definitive diagnosis. IMT relationship with lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis is discussed.

  1. Diffuse sclerosing osteomyelitis (DSO) of the mandible in SAPHO syndrome: a novel approach with anti-TNF therapy. Systematic review.

    PubMed

    Marí, Antonio; Morla, Arnaud; Melero, Mireia; Schiavone, Rocio; Rodríguez, Jesus

    2014-12-01

    Diffuse sclerosing osteomyelitis of the mandible is now considered a local manifestation of SAPHO syndrome. This rare condition is thought to be of auto-inflammatory origin. The myriad of treatments shown in the literature, are basically empirical and reflect its unknown origin. We present a clinical case of refractory DSO treated with an anti-TNF drug (etanercept) with complete clinical remission. We advise against radical surgery and an interdisciplinary approach is recommended. A systematic literature review was also conducted.

  2. HIV-related stigma and self-disclosure: the mediating and moderating role of anticipated discrimination among people living with HIV/AIDS in Akure Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Olley, B O; Ogunde, M J; Oso, P O; Ishola, A

    2016-01-01

    Although links between HIV-related stigma and self-disclosure of HIV status among people living with HIV have been well established, it is unclear whether levels of perceived discrimination are differentially associated with self-disclosure. The present study using a multi-factorial survey design investigated the role of stigma and other self-related factors (e.g., anticipated discrimination, self-esteem, HIV-related factors [e.g., drug use combination; knowledge of duration of HIV diagnosis] and socio-demographic factors [e.g., multiple spouse; age, gender, educational level] and psychological distress [depression]) in self-disclosure among People living with HIV/AIDs has been added (PLWHA) on follow-up management in State Specialist Hospital Akure, Nigeria. One hundred and thirty nine HIV/AIDS patients (49 males and 90 females) participated in the study. Mean age and mean time in months since diagnosis were 39.56 ± 10.26 and 37.78 ± 48.34, respectively. Four variables: multiple spouse, anticipated discrimination, HIV-related stigma and self-esteem were related to self-disclosure at (p < .05). Product-term regression analyses demonstrated that perceived discrimination mediated the relationship between self-esteem (Sobel test: z = 2.09, Aroian = 2.06, p < .001), perceived stigma (Sobel test: z = 2.78, Aroaian = 2.75 p < .01) and self-disclosure. Interaction term analysis between HIV-related stigma t (5, 137) = 1.69, p > .05, self-esteem t (5, 137) = .59, p > .05 and anticipated discrimination were non-significant, suggesting a non-moderation effect of discrimination and disclosure. The results indicate that anticipated discrimination may impact HIV-related stigma to reduce self-disclosure among the PLWHAs in Akure, Nigeria. Interventions should incorporate anticipated discrimination in educational programs of HIV stigma in encouraging self-disclosure among PLWHAs.

  3. Successful administration of aggressive chemotherapy concomitant to tuberculostatic and highly active antiretroviral therapy in a patient with AIDS-related Burkitt's lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, C; Wyen, C; Hoffmann, C; Fätkenheuer, G

    2005-01-01

    Treatment of AIDS-related malignant lymphoma (ARL) remains a therapeutic challenge. There are concerns not only about infectious and haematological complications in HIV-infected patients during intensive chemotherapy, but also about potential interactions between chemotherapy and highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Current data on patients treated concomitantly with intensive chemotherapy and HAART are limited, and no data exist on patients with ARL suffering from active opportunistic infections. We report the case of a 38-year-old man with advanced HIV-1 infection, pulmonary tuberculosis and Burkitt's lymphoma. Intensive chemotherapy was administered in parallel with tuberculostatic therapy and HAART. Six months later, the patient achieved not only a complete remission of Burkitt's lymphoma and sustained viral suppression, but also a full recovery from tuberculosis. This case report provides some useful observations on the successful application of intensive chemotherapy in addition to tuberculostatic therapy and HAART in HIV-infected patients.

  4. Impact of Mental Health First Aid on Confidence Related to Mental Health Literacy: A National Study With a Focus on Race-Ethnicity

    PubMed Central

    Crisanti, Annette S.; Luo, Li; McFaul, Mimi; Silverblatt, Helene; Pyeatt, Clinton

    2017-01-01

    Objective Low mental health literacy (MHL) is widespread in the general population and even more so among racial and ethnic minority groups. Mental Health First Aid (MHFA) aims to improve MHL. The objective of this study was to determine the impact of MHFA on perceptions of confidence about MHL in a large national sample and by racial and ethnic subgroup. Methods The self-perceived impact of MHFA on 36,263 people who completed the 12-hour training and a feedback form was examined. Results A multiple regression analysis showed that MHFA resulted in high ratings of confidence in being able to apply various skills and knowledge related to MHL. Perceived impact of MHFA training differed among some racial and ethnic groups, but the differences were small to trivial. Conclusions Future research on MHFA should examine changes in MHL pre-post training and the extent to which perceived increases in MHL confidence among trainees translate into action. PMID:26522673

  5. Classroom Aids

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science Activities: Classroom Projects and Curriculum Ideas, 2007

    2007-01-01

    This article describes 6 aids for science instruction, including (1) the use of fudge to represent lava; (2) the "Living by Chemistry" program, designed to make high school chemistry more accessible to a diverse pool of students without sacrificing content; (3) NOAA and NSTA's online coral reef teaching tool, a new web-based "science toolbox" for…

  6. Floriculture Aide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Joyce; Looney, Era

    Designed for use in a self-paced, open-entry/open-exit vocational training program for a floriculture aide, this program guide is one of six for teachers of adult women offenders from a correctional institution. Module topic outlines and sample lesson plans are presented on eleven topics: occupational opportunities in the retail florist industry;…

  7. Can Cross-Cultural Understanding Aid Second Language Acquisition? Toward a Theory of Ethno-Lingual Relativity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Citron, James L.

    1995-01-01

    The term "ethno-lingual relativity" is a perspective that is not limited by one's own cultural and linguistic experiences, but rather is open to the contrasting cultural and linguistic patterns of other peoples. This article explores the hypothesis that having such a perspective might facilitate second language acquisition. (19 references)…

  8. Effects of Spirituality on Health-Related Quality of Life in Men with HIV/AIDS: Implications for Counseling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frame, Marsha Wiggins; Uphold, Constance R.; Shehan, Constance L.; Reid, Kimberly J.

    2005-01-01

    This study examined the association of spirituality and health-related quality of life among 226 HIV-positive men. Two measures of spirituality were used: the Spiritual Growth subscale from the Health-Promoting Lifestyle Profile II (S. N. Walker, K. R. Sechrist, & N. J. Pender, 1987) and the Spirituality subscale of the HIV Coping Instrument (L.…

  9. Dementia-Related Work Activities of Home Care Nurses and Aides: Frequency, Perceived Competence, and Continuing Education Priorities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, Debra G.; Kosteniuk, Julie G.; O'Connell, Megan E.; Dal Bello-Haas, Vanina; Stewart, Norma J.; Karunanayake, Chandima

    2016-01-01

    An understanding of the specific dementia learning needs of home care staff is needed to plan relevant continuing education (CE) programs and supports. The study's objective was to examine frequency and perceived competence in performing 20 dementia-related work activities, and identify CE priorities among home care staff. A cross-sectional survey…

  10. Systematic Review of the Effectiveness of Mass Communication Programs to Change HIV/AIDS-Related Behaviors in Developing Countries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bertrand, Jane T.; O'Reilly, Kevin; Denison, Julie; Anhang, Rebecca; Sweat, Michael

    2006-01-01

    This review systematically examined the effectiveness of 24 mass media interventions on changing human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-related knowledge, attitudes and behaviors. The intervention studies were published from 1990 through 2004, reported data from developing countries and compared outcomes using (i) pre- and post-intervention data, (ii)…

  11. Relating hearing loss and executive functions to hearing aid users' preference for, and speech recognition with, different combinations of binaural noise reduction and microphone directionality.

    PubMed

    Neher, Tobias

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge of how executive functions relate to preferred hearing aid (HA) processing is sparse and seemingly inconsistent with related knowledge for speech recognition outcomes. This study thus aimed to find out if (1) performance on a measure of reading span (RS) is related to preferred binaural noise reduction (NR) strength, (2) similar relations exist for two different, non-verbal measures of executive function, (3) pure-tone average hearing loss (PTA), signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and microphone directionality (DIR) also influence preferred NR strength, and (4) preference and speech recognition outcomes are similar. Sixty elderly HA users took part. Six HA conditions consisting of omnidirectional or cardioid microphones followed by inactive, moderate, or strong binaural NR as well as linear amplification were tested. Outcome was assessed at fixed SNRs using headphone simulations of a frontal target talker in a busy cafeteria. Analyses showed positive effects of active NR and DIR on preference, and negative and positive effects of, respectively, strong NR and DIR on speech recognition. Also, while moderate NR was the most preferred NR setting overall, preference for strong NR increased with SNR. No relation between RS and preference was found. However, larger PTA was related to weaker preference for inactive NR and stronger preference for strong NR for both microphone modes. Equivalent (but weaker) relations between worse performance on one non-verbal measure of executive function and the HA conditions without DIR were found. For speech recognition, there were relations between HA condition, PTA, and RS, but their pattern differed from that for preference. Altogether, these results indicate that, while moderate NR works well in general, a notable proportion of HA users prefer stronger NR. Furthermore, PTA and executive functions can account for some of the variability in preference for, and speech recognition with, different binaural NR and DIR settings.

  12. Relating hearing loss and executive functions to hearing aid users' preference for, and speech recognition with, different combinations of binaural noise reduction and microphone directionality

    PubMed Central

    Neher, Tobias

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge of how executive functions relate to preferred hearing aid (HA) processing is sparse and seemingly inconsistent with related knowledge for speech recognition outcomes. This study thus aimed to find out if (1) performance on a measure of reading span (RS) is related to preferred binaural noise reduction (NR) strength, (2) similar relations exist for two different, non-verbal measures of executive function, (3) pure-tone average hearing loss (PTA), signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and microphone directionality (DIR) also influence preferred NR strength, and (4) preference and speech recognition outcomes are similar. Sixty elderly HA users took part. Six HA conditions consisting of omnidirectional or cardioid microphones followed by inactive, moderate, or strong binaural NR as well as linear amplification were tested. Outcome was assessed at fixed SNRs using headphone simulations of a frontal target talker in a busy cafeteria. Analyses showed positive effects of active NR and DIR on preference, and negative and positive effects of, respectively, strong NR and DIR on speech recognition. Also, while moderate NR was the most preferred NR setting overall, preference for strong NR increased with SNR. No relation between RS and preference was found. However, larger PTA was related to weaker preference for inactive NR and stronger preference for strong NR for both microphone modes. Equivalent (but weaker) relations between worse performance on one non-verbal measure of executive function and the HA conditions without DIR were found. For speech recognition, there were relations between HA condition, PTA, and RS, but their pattern differed from that for preference. Altogether, these results indicate that, while moderate NR works well in general, a notable proportion of HA users prefer stronger NR. Furthermore, PTA and executive functions can account for some of the variability in preference for, and speech recognition with, different binaural NR and DIR settings. PMID

  13. Correlation of EGFR, pEGFR and p16INK4 expressions and high risk HPV infection in HIV/AIDS-related squamous cell carcinoma of conjunctiva

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Squamous cell carcinoma of conjunctiva has increased tenfold in the era of HIV/AIDS. The disease pattern has also changed in Africa, affecting young persons, with peak age-specific incidence of 30-39 years, similar to that of Kaposi sarcoma, a well known HIV/AIDS defining neoplasm. In addition, the disease has assumed more aggressive clinical course. The contributing role of exposure to high risk HPV in the development of SCCC is still emerging. Objective The present study aimed to investigate if immunohistochemical expressions of EGFR, pEGFR and p16, could predict infection with high risk HPV in HIV-related SCCC. Methods FFPE tissue blocks of fifty-eight cases diagnosed on hematoxylin and eosin with SCCC between 2005-2011, and subsequently confirmed from medical records to be HIV positive at the department of human pathology, UoN/KNH, were used for the study. Immunohistochemistry was performed to assess the expressions of p16INK4A, EGFR and pEGFR. This was followed with semi-nested PCR based detection and sequencing of HPV genotypes. The sequences were compared with the GenBank database, and data analyzed for significant statistical correlations using SPSS 16.0. Ethical approval to conduct the study was obtained from KNH-ERC. Results Out of the fifty-eight cases of SCCC analyzed, twenty-nine (50%) had well differentiated (grade 1), twenty one (36.2%) moderately differentiated (grade 2) while eight (13.8%) had poorly differentiated (grade 3) tumours. Immunohistochemistry assay was done in all the fifty eight studied cases, of which thirty nine cases (67.2%) were positive for p16INK4A staining, forty eight cases (82.8%) for EGFR and fifty one cases (87.9%) showed positivity for p-EGFR. HPV DNA was detected in 4 out of 40 SCCC cases (10%) in which PCR was performed, with HPV16 being the only HPV sub-type detected. Significant statistical association was found between HPV detection and p16INK4 (p=0.000, at 99% C.I) and EGFR (p=0.028, at 95% C.I) expressions

  14. Plasma polymer coatings to aid retinal pigment epithelial growth for transplantation in the treatment of age related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Kearns, Victoria; Mistry, Anita; Mason, Sharon; Krishna, Yamini; Sheridan, Carl; Short, Robert; Williams, Rachel L

    2012-08-01

    Subretinal transplantation of functioning retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells grown on a synthetic substrate is a potential treatment for age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a common cause of irreversible vision loss in developed countries. Plasma polymers give the opportunity to tailor the surface chemistry of the artificial substrate whilst maintaining the bulk properties. In this study, plasma polymers with different functionalities were investigated in terms of their effect on RPE attachment and growth. Plasma polymers of acrylic acid (AC), allyl amine (AM) and allyl alcohol (AL) were fabricated and characterised using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and water contact angle measurements. Octadiene (OD) hydrocarbon films and tissue culture polystyrene were used as controls. Wettability varied from hydrophobic OD to relatively hydrophilic AC. XPS demonstrated four very different surfaces with the expected functionalities. Attachment, proliferation and morphological examination of an RPE cell line and primary RPE cells were investigated. Both cell types grew on all surfaces, with the exception of OD, although the proliferation rate of primary cells was low. Good epithelial morphology was also demonstrated. Plasma polymerised films show potential as cell carrier surfaces for RPE cells in the treatment of AMD.

  15. Social support and social undermining as explanatory factors for health-related quality of life in people living with HIV/AIDS.

    PubMed

    Oetzel, John; Wilcox, Bryan; Archiopoli, Ashley; Avila, Magdalena; Hell, Cia; Hill, Ricky; Muhammad, Michael

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to examine the influence of social support (from personal networks and health care providers) and social undermining (from personal networks) on health-related quality of life (HRQOL; general health perceptions, physical functioning, and depression). Specifically, the authors aimed to identify the nature of the effects (direct, mediating, or moderating) of social support and social undermining on HRQOL. A total of 344 people living with HIV/AIDS and who were patients in a federally funded clinic in New Mexico completed a self-report survey questionnaire. The major findings of this study are the following: (a) social support and social undermining had direct and indirect effects on HRQOL-there was no evidence of a moderating effect of social support and social undermining; (b) for direct effects, social undermining was a stronger predictor of HRQOL than social support with social support variables having positive relations and social undermining variables having negative relations with HRQOL; and (c) for indirect effects, providers' social support partially mediated the influence of unstable employment/unemployment and social undermining on HRQOL.

  16. Depression and HIV/AIDS.

    PubMed

    Benton, Tami D

    2008-06-01

    HIV/AIDS continues to be a significant public health problem. Millions of people worldwide are infected with this virus daily, and thousands die yearly of AIDS-related illnesses. Despite rapid advances in our knowledge about HIV and its mode of transmission, we have been unable to find a cure or prevent new infections. Psychiatric comorbidity is associated with HIV/AIDS: as a risk factor for HIV infection, a comorbidity of HIV infection, sequelae of HIV/AIDS, and a potential mediator for progression to AIDS. In this article, we focus on depression, which is prevalent in HIV/AIDS. We review the evidence associating depression with HIV, the challenges in recognizing depression in HIV-positive individuals, and the psychopharmacologic strategies known to be effective in the treatment of HIV-positive individuals with depression.

  17. Living with HIV/AIDS in School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sedletter, 1993

    1993-01-01

    This newsletter article is concerned with understanding what schools can and must do to sustain life in the age of human immunodeficiency virus and Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (HIV/AIDS). The article looks at the incidence of AIDS and reviews legislation related to AIDS infection and school attendance. School policy as it relates to…

  18. Computer Aided Art Major.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibson, Jim

    The Computer Aided Art program offered at Northern State State University (Aberdeen, South Dakota), is coordinated with the traditional art major. The program is designed to familiarize students with a wide range of art-related computer hardware and software and their applications and to prepare students for problem-solving with unfamiliar…

  19. [Post-transfusional AIDS].

    PubMed

    Azzini, M; Maccabruni, A; Marcellini, M; Michelone, G; Dei Cas, A

    1987-01-01

    Two cases of post-transfusional AIDS in two premature babies who received blood of the same seropositive donor, are reported. The risk of the susceptibility to HIV infection of these patients, in relation to the immaturity of immune system and to the transfusional treatment often necessary in premature newborns, is stressed.

  20. Small duct autoimmune sclerosing cholangitis and Crohn colitis in a 10-year-old child. A case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Erling Peter; Bayat, Allan; Vyberg, Mogens

    2012-08-14

    Autoimmune sclerosing cholangitis is an overlap syndrome characterized by features of both autoimmune hepatitis and primary sclerosing cholangitis, the latter usually involving the large bile ducts. Autoimmune sclerosing cholangitis occurs more often in children than in adults and is frequently associated with inflammatory bowel disease, predominantly ulcerative colitis. We report a unique case of a 10-year-old Danish boy with severe small duct autoimmune sclerosing cholangitis and synchronic Crohn colitis. He was referred with a history of weight loss, abdominal pain, vomiting and diarrhea. Biochemical anomalies included elevated alanine aminotransferase, γ-glutamyl transferase and immunoglobulin G levels and the presence of smooth muscle antibodies and perinuclear antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies but normal alkaline phosphatase. Liver biopsy specimen revealed features of both autoimmune hepatitis and sclerosing cholangitis, the latter characterized by acute, hyperplastic and destructive inflammation--granulocytic epithelial lesion--of the small ducts. Magnetic resonance cholangiography was normal. Colonoscopic biopsies showed chronic inflammatory changes of the caecum and the ascending and transverse colon compatible with Crohn disease. Ursodeoxycholic acid and immunosuppressive treatment was initiated and within four weeks of treatment the general condition improved. Normalization of aminotransferase was seen at 21 weeks and γ-glutamyl transferase at 72 weeks after first admittance, while immunoglobulin G remained slightly increased. Virtual slides: The virtual slide(s) for this article can be found here: http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/1418596609736470.

  1. 78 FR 73075 - World AIDS Day, 2013

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-04

    ..., helping to dramatically reduce new infections and AIDS- related deaths. This year we celebrate the 10th... to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria's Replenishment Conference to enlist new partners,...

  2. Exploring a Tomato Landraces Collection for Fruit-Related Traits by the Aid of a High-Throughput Genomic Platform

    PubMed Central

    Parisi, Mario; Festa, Giovanna; Rigano, Maria Manuela; Picarella, Maurizio Enea; Mazzucato, Andrea; Barone, Amalia

    2015-01-01

    During its evolution and domestication Solanum lycopersicum has undergone various genetic ‘bottlenecks’ and extreme inbreeding of limited genotypes. In Europe the tomato found a secondary centre for diversification, which resulted in a wide array of fruit shape variation given rise to a range of landraces that have been cultivated for centuries. Landraces represent a reservoir of genetic diversity especially for traits such as abiotic stress resistance and high fruit quality. Information about the variation present among tomato landrace populations is still limited. A collection of 123 genotypes from different geographical areas was established with the aim of capturing a wide diversity. Eighteen morphological traits were evaluated, mainly related to the fruit. About 45% of morphological variation was attributed to fruit shape, as estimated by the principal component analysis, and the dendrogram of relatedness divided the population in subgroups mainly on the basis of fruit weight and locule number. Genotyping was carried out using the tomato array platform SolCAP able to interrogate 7,720 SNPs. In the whole collection 87.1% markers were polymorphic but they decreased to 44–54% when considering groups of genotypes with different origin. The neighbour-joining tree analysis clustered the 123 genotypes into two main branches. The STRUCTURE analysis with K = 3 also divided the population on the basis of fruit size. A genomic-wide association strategy revealed 36 novel markers associated to the variation of 15 traits. The markers were mapped on the tomato chromosomes together with 98 candidate genes for the traits analyzed. Six regions were evidenced in which candidate genes co-localized with 19 associated SNPs. In addition, 17 associated SNPs were localized in genomic regions lacking candidate genes. The identification of these markers demonstrated that novel variability was captured in our germoplasm collection. They might also provide a viable indirect

  3. Exploring a Tomato Landraces Collection for Fruit-Related Traits by the Aid of a High-Throughput Genomic Platform.

    PubMed

    Sacco, Adriana; Ruggieri, Valentino; Parisi, Mario; Festa, Giovanna; Rigano, Maria Manuela; Picarella, Maurizio Enea; Mazzucato, Andrea; Barone, Amalia

    2015-01-01

    During its evolution and domestication Solanum lycopersicum has undergone various genetic 'bottlenecks' and extreme inbreeding of limited genotypes. In Europe the tomato found a secondary centre for diversification, which resulted in a wide array of fruit shape variation given rise to a range of landraces that have been cultivated for centuries. Landraces represent a reservoir of genetic diversity especially for traits such as abiotic stress resistance and high fruit quality. Information about the variation present among tomato landrace populations is still limited. A collection of 123 genotypes from different geographical areas was established with the aim of capturing a wide diversity. Eighteen morphological traits were evaluated, mainly related to the fruit. About 45% of morphological variation was attributed to fruit shape, as estimated by the principal component analysis, and the dendrogram of relatedness divided the population in subgroups mainly on the basis of fruit weight and locule number. Genotyping was carried out using the tomato array platform SolCAP able to interrogate 7,720 SNPs. In the whole collection 87.1% markers were polymorphic but they decreased to 44-54% when considering groups of genotypes with different origin. The neighbour-joining tree analysis clustered the 123 genotypes into two main branches. The STRUCTURE analysis with K = 3 also divided the population on the basis of fruit size. A genomic-wide association strategy revealed 36 novel markers associated to the variation of 15 traits. The markers were mapped on the tomato chromosomes together with 98 candidate genes for the traits analyzed. Six regions were evidenced in which candidate genes co-localized with 19 associated SNPs. In addition, 17 associated SNPs were localized in genomic regions lacking candidate genes. The identification of these markers demonstrated that novel variability was captured in our germoplasm collection. They might also provide a viable indirect selection tool

  4. Mucin-producing bile duct carcinoma arising from primary sclerosing cholangitis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Yokomuro, Shigeki; Arima, Yasuo; Mizuguchi, Yoshiaki; Shimizu, Tetsuya; Kawahigashi, Yutaka; Kannda, Tomohiro; Arai, Masao; Uchida, Eiji; Akimaru, Koho; Tajiri, Takashi

    2007-02-01

    A 60-year-old woman with primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) and high levels of ALP, gamma-GTP, and DUPAN-2 was admitted to our institution for examination. The patient did not have ulcerative colitis or pancreatic intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm. Imaging studies revealed atypical dilation of bile ducts in the left lobe of the liver. Repeated cytologic examinations of the bile showed atypical cells consistent with adenocarcinoma. The patient underwent extended resection of the left lobe of the liver and was found to have intraductal papillary carcinoma with associated mucin-producing bile duct carcinoma. This carcinoma fills dilated bile duct lumens with mucin. This tumor differs morphologically from typical cholangiocarcinoma, which is usually seen in the late stages of PSC. Just one case of mucin-producing bile duct carcinoma arising from PSC has been reported worldwide. The patient has had no signs of recurrence after 27 months. Patients with mucin-producing bile duct carcinoma, as in the case of its pancreatic counterpart, may have a better prognosis and a higher survival rate than patients with typical cholangiocarcinomas.

  5. Severe sclerosing cholangitis after Langerhans cell histiocytosis treated by liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Yunhua; Zhang, Zhiheng; Chen, Maogen; Ju, Weiqiang; Wang, Dongping; Ji, Fei; Ren, Qingqi; Guo, Zhiyong; He, Xiaoshun

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a rare hematopoietic disorder of unknown pathogenesis. LCH diseases may occur in a single organ or multisystem organ. The patients with multisystem involvement usually have a poor prognosis. Liver involvement in multisystem LCH results in severe complications, such as obvious sclerosing cholangitis (SC) with jaundice. Methods: We reported a 31-year-old man developed severe SC due to multisystem LCH and was successfully treated by liver transplantation (LT). In addition, we firstly used tacrolimus and mycofenolate mofetil as immunosuppressants to treat LCH after LT. Results: We performed the immunosuppressants to deal with the LCH after LT, now the patient is currently well with normal liver function and no evidence of recurrence of LCH for 4 and a half years follow-up. Conclusion: LT should be recommended as an effective treatment for these adults with severe SC due to multisystem LCH. Finally, using tacrolimus and mycofenolate mofetil as immunosuppressants to treat LCH might be favorable to prevent LCH recurrence. PMID:28248858

  6. Whole-exome sequencing identifies recurrent AKT1 mutations in sclerosing hemangioma of lung

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Seung-Hyun; Kim, Min Sung; Lee, Sung-Hak; Park, Hyun-Chun; Choi, Hyun Joo; Maeng, Leeso; Min, Ki Ouk; Kim, Jeana; Park, Tae In; Shin, Ok Ran; Kim, Tae-Jung; Xu, Haidong; Lee, Kyo Young; Kim, Tae-Min; Song, Sang Yong; Lee, Charles; Chung, Yeun-Jun; Lee, Sug Hyung

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary sclerosing hemangioma (PSH) is a benign tumor with two cell populations (epithelial and stromal cells), for which genomic profiles remain unknown. We conducted exome sequencing of 44 PSHs and identified recurrent somatic mutations of AKT1 (43.2%) and β-catenin (4.5%). We used a second subset of 24 PSHs to confirm the high frequency of AKT1 mutations (overall 31/68, 45.6%; p.E17K, 33.8%) and recurrent β-catenin mutations (overall 3 of 68, 4.4%). Of the PSHs without AKT1 mutations, two exhibited AKT1 copy gain. AKT1 mutations existed in both epithelial and stromal cells. In two separate PSHs from one patient, we observed two different AKT1 mutations, indicating they were not disseminated but independent arising tumors. Because the AKT1 mutations were not found to co-occur with β-catenin mutations (or any other known driver alterations) in any of the PSHs studied, we speculate that this may be the single-most common driver alteration to develop PSHs. Our study revealed genomic differences between PSHs and lung adenocarcinomas, including a high rate of AKT1 mutation in PSHs. These genomic features of PSH identified in the present study provide clues to understanding the biology of PSH and for differential genomic diagnosis of lung tumors. PMID:27601661

  7. Garré’s sclerosing osteomyelitis: case report☆☆☆

    PubMed Central

    de Moraes, Frederico Barra; Motta, Tainá Melo Vieira; Severin, Alessandra Assis; de Alencar Faria, Deniel; de Oliveira César, Fernanda; de Souza Carneiro, Siderlei

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to report on a rare case of Garré’s sclerosing osteomyelitis. The patient was a 54-year-old woman with a history of treatment for lupus using corticoids for 20 years, and for osteoporosis using alendronate for five years. She presented edema and developed a limitation of left knee movement one year earlier, with mild effusion and pain on metaphyseal palpation, but without fever. She was in a good general state, without local secretion. Images of her knee showed trabecular osteolysis of the distal metaphysis of the femur and a periosteal reaction in both proximal tibias and both distal femurs, compatible with chronic osteomyelitis of low virulence and slow progression. Magnetic resonance imaging showed T2 hypersignal in the femur and tibia. Curettage was performed on the left distal femur, with release of secretion, but this was negative on culturing. A biopsy showed chronic infection and inflammation, fibrosis, xanthogranulomatous reaction and foci of suppuration. Antibiotic therapy was administered for six months. The etiology was not clarified: bacterial infection was suspected, but culturing was generally negative. The chronic process was maintained by low-virulence infection or even after treatment. The differential diagnoses were fibrous dysplasia, syphilis, pustulosis palmoplantaris, rectocolitis, Crohn's disease, SAPHO (synovitis, acne, pustulosis, hyperostosis and osteitis) and Paget's disease. The unifocal diseases were osteoid osteoma, Ewing's disease, osteosarcoma and eosinophilic granuloma. PMID:26229835

  8. Nodular sclerosing classical Hodgkin lymphoma masquerading as acute suppurative-necrotizing lymphadenitis.

    PubMed

    Florentine, Barbara D; Cohen, Alen N

    2014-03-01

    The diagnosis of nodular sclerosing classical Hodgkin lymphoma (NSCHL) by fine-needle aspiration (FNA) biopsy has historically been a diagnostic challenge due to the usual paucicellularity of the specimen. This case report, and other previously published reports, suggests that there is another facet to the potentially challenging diagnosis of this particular variant of Hodgkin lymphoma (HL): the presence of suppurative-necrotizing changes mimicking an infectious etiology. The patient presented here underwent FNA biopsy of an acutely enlarged supraclavicular lymph node and cytologic smears showed marked acute inflammation in a background of necrosis. A diagnosis of infectious suppurative lymphadenitis was made at that time. After a negative infectious work-up with infectious disease consultation, an excisional biopsy was performed and the patient was definitively diagnosed with NSCHL. The presence of neoplastic Hodgkin and Reed-Sternberg cells in the purulent exudate was minimal and only appropriately identified after retrospective review. This particular subtype of classical HL represents a potential pitfall in FNA biopsy cytology. Consequently, the cytopathologist and surgeon should always consider this entity in the differential diagnosis of a suppurative, lymphadenitis-like aspirate, and pursue repeat FNA or an excisional biopsy if there is any clinical index of suspicion.

  9. Pulmonary sclerosing hemangioma: a unique epithelial neoplasm of the lung (report of 26 cases)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Pulmonary sclerosing hemangioma (SH) is an uncommon tumor. The aim of this study was to identify the origin of pulmonary SH and summarize its clinicopathologic features. Methods Data of 26 cases of pulmonary SH were collected and reviewed, including their clinical symptoms, chest radiological examinations, treatments, and pathological findings. Results Female patients of pulmonary SH were markedly frequent (n=23, 88.46%). Solitary mass or nodule in the lung fields was the most common manifestation (n=24, 92.31%), especially in the right middle lobe (n=9, 34.62%). There were two kinds of tumor cells: lining cells and round cells. All tumors contained a mixture of papillary, solid, sclerotic, and hemorrhagic patterns. Immunohistochemistry with a variable number of antibodies was performed for some cases. All of the detected specimens revealed strong reaction of lining cells with epithelial markers, such as thyroid transcription factor-1 (TTF-1), epithelial membrane antigen (EMA), cytokeratin (CK), pancytokeratin (PCK), and cytokeratin 7 (CK-7), while round cells were positive with TTF-1 and EMA. Until the end of last contact, none of the patients died or suffered from the recurrence of the disease after surgical treatment. Conclusions Pulmonary SH is a unique neoplasm of the lung with a characteristic solitary mass or nodule. Pulmonary epithelium might be the primary origin of the tumor cells. PMID:23587094

  10. Central Retinal and Posterior Ciliary Artery Occlusion After Intralesional Injection of Sclerosant to Glabellar Subcutaneous Hemangioma

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuo, Toshihiko; Fujiwara, Hiroyasu; Gobara, Hideo; Mimura, Hidefumi; Kanazawa, Susumu

    2009-03-15

    The aim of this study is to describe vision loss caused by central retinal artery and posterior ciliary artery occlusion as a consequence of sclerotherapy with a polidocanol injection to a glabellar hemangioma. An 18-year-old man underwent direct injection with a 23-gauge needle of 1 mL of a polidocanol-carbon dioxide emulsion into the glabellar subcutaneous hemangioma under ultrasound visualization of the needle tip by radiologists. He developed lid swelling the next day, and 3 days later at referral, the visual acuity in the left eye was no light perception. Funduscopy revealed central retinal artery occlusion and fluorescein angiography disclosed no perfusion at all in the left fundus, indicating concurrent posterior ciliary artery occlusion. The patient also showed mydriasis, blepharoptosis, and total external ophthalmoplegia on the left side. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated the swollen medial rectus muscle. In a month, blepharoptosis and ophthalmoplegia resolved but the visual acuity remained no light perception. Sclerosing therapy for facial hemangioma may develop a severe complication such as permanent visual loss.

  11. [Primary sclerosing cholangitis of small ducts, associated with eosinophilic gastroenteritis. Case report and literature review.].

    PubMed

    González-Huezo, M S; Ruiz-Mejía, R; Rosales-Solís, A A; Carrillo-Ponce, C S

    2008-01-01

    Primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) is a chronic cholestatic liver disease of unknown etiology, probably immune-mediated. PSC is frequently associated with Inflammatory Bowel Disease, usually Ulcerative Colitis and less commonly with Crohn's disease. The small-duct PSC variant occurs in 5%of patients. Eosinophilic gastroenteritis (EG) is another chronic inflammatory disease, characterized by eosinophilic infiltration limited to the digestive tract, and probably of immunoallergic origin. EG is frequently observed in children but it's less commonly seen in adults. EG can affect any segment of the gastrointestinal tract, and recently it has been described an increase in the incidence of the esophagic variant, termed eosinophilic esophagitis.Ileocolonic involvement in EG is rare and clinical manifestations depend of the intestinal layer affected. Patients with mucosal infiltration complain of abdominal pain, fecal occult blood loss and/or protein-losing enteropaty, while signs and symptoms of obstruction are common in those with muscular EG, finally involvement of the serosal layer occurs in 10% and typically presents as eosinophil-rich ascitis. Response to steroids usually is excellent. There is a previous publication in the literature documenting the association of PSC and EG. Here we describe the first case of small-duct PSC associated to EG with ileocolonic involvement.

  12. [Epidemiology of subacute sclerosing panencephalitis in Okinawa, Japan (1977-2005)].

    PubMed

    Hirayasu, Kyomi; Oshiro, Satoshi; Nakada, Yukikatsu

    2010-11-01

    The epidemiology of subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE) has changed since the introduction of measles immunization in 1970's. We studied the incidence of SSPE in Okinawa. There were 22 cases (16 males and 6 females) of SSPE from 1977 to 2005 in Okinawa. The incidence was 0.63 per million population per year from 1977 to 1986, 0 from 1987 to 1993, 1.17 from 1994 to 1999 and 0.75 from 2000 to 2005. Twenty-one SSPE patients had a history of non-immunized measles and 19 of them (90%) had measles infection under 2 years of age. There were measles epidemic every 2-5 years in Okinawa. Ten of 21 cases contracted measles in 1990-1991. The percentage of patients with measles infection under 2 years of age during measles epidemics ranged from 46% to 56%. Early measles infection (under 2 years of age) is a risk factor for SSPE. Routine measles immunization to prevent measles infection is very important for the prevention of SSPE.

  13. Feline intestinal sclerosing mast cell tumour: 50 cases (1997-2008).

    PubMed

    Halsey, C H C; Powers, B E; Kamstock, D A

    2010-03-01

    This case series presents a unique and unreported variant of feline intestinal mast cell tumour recognized at the CSU Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory. Fifty cases of feline intestinal mast cell tumours described as having a significant stromal component were reviewed. Neoplastic cells formed a trabecular pattern admixed with moderate to abundant dense stromal collagen (sclerosis). Neoplastic cells had poorly discernible intracytoplasmic granules which demonstrated metachromasia with special histochemical stains consistent with mast cell granules. Additionally, a subset of cases stained for mast cell-specific tryptase and c-kit demonstrated positive immunoreactivity. Eosinophilic infiltrates were moderate to marked in almost all cases. Lymph node and hepatic metastases were present in 66% of the cases. Treatment and clinical outcome was available in 25/50 cases. Twenty-three of these patients died or were euthanized within 2 months of initial diagnosis. This is the first case series to characterize a sclerosing variant of intestinal mast cell tumour in the cat which appears to have a high propensity for metastasis and a guarded prognosis.

  14. Innumerable Liver Masses in a Patient with Autoimmune Hepatitis and Primary Sclerosing Cholangitis Overlap Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gharibpoor, Alireza; Mansour-Ghanaei, Fariborz; Sadeghi, Mahbobe; Gharibpoor, Faeze; Joukar, Farahnaz; Mavaddati, Sara

    2017-02-07

    BACKGROUND In patients with the diagnosis of autoimmune hepatitis (AIH), the presence of cholestatic features raise the possibility of an overlap syndrome with primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC). Here, we present a unique case with AIH-PSC overlap syndrome and innumerable liver masses. CASE REPORT A 26-year-old man presented with generalized icterus. Based on the serological findings of hypergamainmunoglobulinemia and positive anti-nuclear antibody tests, together with an abnormal cholangiogram, he was diagnosed with overlap syndrome (AIH-PSC). Liver imaging revealed innumerable liver masses with a benign appearance in the pathological evaluation. To rule out the colon abnormalities that usually coexist with such liver masses, colonoscopy was performed and showed no significant changes. The liver masses were nonmalignant and were resolved after immunosuppressant therapy. CONCLUSIONS Because AIH-PSC overlap syndrome is rare, it is suggested that radiological evaluation of the biliary tree should be performed routinely in adults diagnosed with AIH to reduce the missed diagnosis of overlap syndrome and liver masses.

  15. Expression of defective measles virus genes in brain tissues of patients with subacute sclerosing panencephalitis

    SciTech Connect

    Baczko, K.; Liebert, U.G.; Billeter, M.; Cattaneo, R.; Budka, H.; Ter Meulen, V.

    1986-08-01

    The persistence of measles virus in selected areas of the brains of four patients with subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE) was characterized by immunohistological and biochemical techniques. The five measles virus structural proteins were never simultaneously detectable in any of the bran sections. Nucleocapsid proteins and phosphoproteins were found in every diseased brain area, whereas hemagglutinin protein was detected in two cases, fusion protein was detected in three cases, and matrix protein was detected in only one case. Also, it could be shown that the amounts of measles virus RNA in the brains differed from patient to patient and in the different regions investigated. In all patients, plus-strand RNAs specific for these five viral genes could be detected. However, the amounts of fusion and hemagglutinin mRNAs were low compared with the amounts in lytically infected cells. The presence of particular measles virus RNAs in SSPE-infected brains did not always correlate with mRNA activity. In in vitro translations, the matrix protein was produced in only one case, and the hemagglutinin protein was produced in none. These results indicate that measles virus persistence in SSPE is correlated with different defects of several genes which probably prevent assembly of viral particles in SSPE-infected brain tissue.

  16. Impaired Hepatic Adaptation to Chronic Cholestasis induced by Primary Sclerosing Cholangitis

    PubMed Central

    Milkiewicz, Malgorzata; Klak, Marta; Kempinska-Podhorodecka, Agnieszka; Wiechowska-Kozlowska, Anna; Urasinska, Elzbieta; Blatkiewicz, Malgorzata; Wunsch, Ewa; Elias, Elwyn; Milkiewicz, Piotr

    2016-01-01

    Pathogenesis of primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) may involve impaired bile acid (BA) homeostasis. We analyzed expressions of factors mediating enterohepatic circulation of BA using ileal and colonic (ascending and sigmoid) biopsies obtained from patients with PSC with and without ulcerative colitis (UC) and explanted PSC livers. Two-fold increase of BA-activated farnesoid X receptor (FXR) protein levels were seen in ascending and sigmoid colon of PSC patients with correspondingly decreased apical sodium-dependent BA transporter (ASBT) gene expression. This was associated with increased OSTβ protein levels in each part of analyzed gut. An intestinal fibroblast growth factor (FGF19) protein expression was significantly enhanced in ascending colon. Despite increased hepatic nuclear receptors (FXR, CAR, SHP), and FGF19, neither CYP7A1 suppression nor CYP3A4 induction were observed. The lack of negative regulation of BA synthesis may be accountable for lower levels of cholesterol observed in PSC in comparison to primary biliary cholangitis (PBC). In conclusion, chronic cholestasis in PSC induces adaptive changes in expression of BA transporters and FXR in the intestine. However hepatic impairment of expected in chronic cholestasis downregulation of CYP7A1 and upregulation of CYP3A4 may promote BA-induced liver injury in PSC. PMID:28008998

  17. Impact of Microbes on the Pathogenesis of Primary Biliary Cirrhosis (PBC) and Primary Sclerosing Cholangitis (PSC)

    PubMed Central

    Mattner, Jochen

    2016-01-01

    Primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) and primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) represent the major clinical entities of chronic cholestatic liver diseases. Both disorders are characterized by portal inflammation and slowly progress to obliterative fibrosis and eventually liver cirrhosis. Although immune-pathogenic mechanisms have been implicated in the pathogenesis of PBC and PSC, neither disorder is considered to be a classical autoimmune disease, as PSC and PBC patients do not respond to immune-suppressants. Furthermore, the decreased bile flow resulting from the immune-mediated tissue assault and the subsequent accumulation of toxic bile products in PBC and PSC not only perpetuates biliary epithelial damage, but also alters the composition of the intestinal and biliary microbiota and its mutual interactions with the host. Consistent with the close association of PSC and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), the polyclonal hyper IgM response in PBC and (auto-)antibodies which cross-react to microbial antigens in both diseases, an expansion of individual microbes leads to shifts in the composition of the intestinal or biliary microbiota and a subsequent altered integrity of epithelial layers, promoting microbial translocation. These changes have been implicated in the pathogenesis of both devastating disorders. Thus, we will discuss here these recent findings in the context of novel and alternative therapeutic options. PMID:27834858

  18. The Role of Genetic and Immune Factors for the Pathogenesis of Primary Sclerosing Cholangitis in Childhood

    PubMed Central

    Campos Silva, Soraya Luiza; Marques de Miranda, Débora; Ferreira, Alexandre Rodrigues

    2016-01-01

    Primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) is a rare cholestatic liver disease characterized by chronic inflammation of the biliary tree resulting in liver fibrosis. PSC is more common in male less than 40 years of age. The diagnosis of PSC is based on clinical, laboratory, image, and histological findings. A biochemical profile of mild to severe chronic cholestasis can be observed. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiography is the golden standard method for diagnosis, but magnetic resonance cholangiography is currently also considered a first-line method of investigation. Differences in clinical and laboratory findings were observed in young patients, including higher incidence of overlap syndromes, mostly with autoimmune hepatitis, higher serum levels of aminotransferases and gamma-glutamyl transferase, and lower incidence of serious complications as cholangiocarcinoma. In spite of the detection of several HLA variants as associated factors in large multicenter cohorts of adult patients, the exact role and pathways of these susceptibility genes remain to be determined in pediatric population. In addition, the literature supports a role for an altered immune response to pathogens in the pathogenesis of PSC. This phenomenon contributes to abnormal immune system activation and perpetuation of the inflammatory process. In this article, we review the role of immune and genetic factors in the pathogenesis of PSC in pediatric patients. PMID:27882046

  19. A case of feline gastrointestinal eosinophilic sclerosing fibroplasia associated with phycomycetes.

    PubMed

    Grau-Roma, L; Galindo-Cardiel, I; Isidoro-Ayza, M; Fernandez, M; Majó, N

    2014-11-01

    Feline gastrointestinal eosinophilic sclerosing fibroplasia (FGESF) is a recently described inflammatory condition of domestic cats with unknown aetiology. A proportion of cases of FGESF are associated with bacteria, but antibiotic treatment is ineffective. It has been hypothesized that genetically predisposed cats may develop FGESF in response to the introduction of bacteria or other antigens into the intestinal wall. A 9- month-old male Persian cat presented with a history of marked acute haematemesis. A mass (10 cm diameter) was detected within the pylorus and proximal duodenum and this was not surgically accessible. On necropsy examination the duodenal wall was seen to be markedly thickened with extensive mucosal ulceration. Microscopically, there were haphazardly oriented trabecular bands of dense eosinophilic collagen, separated by wide, clear areas containing variable numbers of fibroblasts, eosinophils, mast cells, neutrophils, macrophages, lymphocytes and plasma cells. Numerous pleomorphic, non-parallel walled, sparsely septate hyphae, characteristic of phycomycetes, were present within the collagen matrix. Colonies of gram-positive and gram-negative rods were also present within the lesion. This is the first description of FGESF with intralesional fungi.

  20. Natural history and prognostic factors in 305 Swedish patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis.

    PubMed Central

    Broomé, U; Olsson, R; Lööf, L; Bodemar, G; Hultcrantz, R; Danielsson, A; Prytz, H; Sandberg-Gertzén, H; Wallerstedt, S; Lindberg, G

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIMS--The course of primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) is highly variable and unpredictable. This study describes the natural history and outcome of PSC. These data were used to construct a prognostic model for patients with PSC. METHODS--A total of 305 Swedish patients with PSC were studied. The median follow up time was 63 (1-194) months and all patients could be traced for follow up. Some 79 patients died or had a liver transplant. The prognostic significance of clinical, biochemical, and histological findings at the time of diagnosis were evaluated using multivariate analysis. RESULTS--The estimated median survival from time of diagnosis to death or liver transplantation was 12 years. Cholangiocarcinoma was found in 24 (8%) of the patients and 134 (44%) of the patients were asymptomatic at the time of diagnosis. The estimated survival rate was significantly higher in the asymptomatic group (p < 0.001). However, 29 (22%) of the asymptomatic patients became symptomatic during the study period. It was found that age, serum bilirubin concentration, and histological stage at the time of diagnosis were independent predictors of a bad prognosis. These variables were used to construct a prognostic model. CONCLUSIONS--This prognostic model developed from a large homogeneous population of PSC patients should be of value for the timing of transplantation and patient counselling in PSC. PMID:8707097

  1. Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis in only one of identical twins. A seven-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Houff, S A; Madden, D L; Sever, J L

    1979-12-01

    We report a seven-year follow-up of identical twins, in one of whom subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE) developed. Primary measles infection occurred simultaneous in both twins at age 4. The affected twin sustained a grade 1 closed head injury within six months of her primary measles infection. At age 13, SSPE was diagnosed following the onset of personality change and myoclonic seizures. Measles antibody level was elevated in the serum and CSF. After remaining in stage 2 for five years, rapid mental and neurological deterioration occurred. Measles antibody level remained elevated, and oligoclonal IgG was present in both serum and CSF. Results of neurological examination as well as virological and immunological tests were normal in the unaffected twin. Besides the occurrence of head injury, factors known to be associated with SSPE were not obviously different in the twins. We have been unable to determine a difference that would easily explain the occurrence of SSPE in only one of two identical twins.

  2. HIV/AIDS Basics

    MedlinePlus

    ... Enter ZIP code or city Follow Act Against AIDS Act Against AIDS @talkHIV Act Against AIDS Get Email Updates on AAA Anonymous Feedback HIV/AIDS Media Infographics Syndicated Content Podcasts Slide Sets HIV/ ...

  3. High Accuracy of Common HIV-Related Oral Disease Diagnoses by Non-Oral Health Specialists in the AIDS Clinical Trial Group

    PubMed Central

    Shiboski, Caroline H.; Chen, Huichao; Secours, Rode; Lee, Anthony; Webster-Cyriaque, Jennifer; Ghannoum, Mahmoud; Evans, Scott; Bernard, Daphné; Reznik, David; Dittmer, Dirk P.; Hosey, Lara; Sévère, Patrice; Aberg, Judith A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Many studies include oral HIV-related endpoints that may be diagnosed by non-oral-health specialists (non-OHS) like nurses or physicians. Our objective was to assess the accuracy of clinical diagnoses of HIV-related oral lesions made by non-OHS compared to diagnoses made by OHS. Methods A5254, a cross-sectional study conducted by the Oral HIV/AIDS Research Alliance within the AIDS Clinical Trial Group, enrolled HIV-1-infected adults participants from six clinical trial units (CTU) in the US (San Francisco, New York, Chapel Hill, Cleveland, Atlanta) and Haiti. CTU examiners (non-OHS) received standardized training on how to perform an oral examination and make clinical diagnoses of specific oral disease endpoints. Diagnoses by calibrated non-OHS were compared to those made by calibrated OHS, and sensitivity and specificity computed. Results Among 324 participants, the majority were black (73%), men (66%), and the median CD4+ cell count 138 cells/mm3. The overall frequency of oral mucosal disease diagnosed by OHS was 43% in US sites, and 90% in Haiti. Oral candidiasis (OC) was detected in 153 (47%) by OHS, with erythematous candidiasis (EC) the most common type (39%) followed by pseudomembranous candidiasis (PC; 26%). The highest prevalence of OC (79%) was among participants in Haiti, and among those with CD4+ cell count ≤ 200 cells/mm3 and HIV-1 RNA > 1000 copies/mL (71%). The sensitivity and specificity of OC diagnoses by non-OHS were 90% and 92% (for EC: 81% and 94%; PC: 82% and 95%). Sensitivity and specificity were also high for KS (87% and 94%, respectively), but sensitivity was < 60% for HL and oral warts in all sites combined. The Candida culture confirmation of OC clinical diagnoses (as defined by ≥ 1 colony forming unit per mL of oral/throat rinse) was ≥ 93% for both PC and EC. Conclusion Trained non-OHS showed high accuracy of clinical diagnoses of OC in comparison with OHS, suggesting their usefulness in studies in resource-poor settings

  4. Teaching AIDS.

    PubMed

    Short, R V

    1989-06-01

    This article reviews a peer group Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) educational program at a university in Australia. Studies in the US have shown that most adolescents, although sexually active, do not believe they are likely to become infected with the Human Immunodeficiency Virus, and therefore do not attempt to modify their sexual behavior. A 1st step in educating students is to introduce them to condoms and impress upon them the fact that condoms should be used at the beginning of all sexual relationships, whether homosexual or heterosexual. In this program 3rd year medical students were targeted, as they are effective communicators and disseminators of information to the rest of the student body. After class members blow up condoms, giving them a chance to handle various brands and observe the varying degrees of strength, statistical evidence about the contraceptive failure rate of condoms (0.6-14.7 per 100 women-years) is discussed. Spermicides, such as nonoxynol-9 used in conjunction with condoms, are also discussed, as are condoms for women, packaging and marketing of condoms, including those made from latex and from the caecum of sheep, the latter condoms being of questionable effectiveness in preventing transmission of the virus. The care of terminal AIDS cases and current global and national statistics on AIDS are presented. The program also includes cash prizes for the best student essays on condom use, the distribution of condoms, condom key rings and T-shirts, and a student-run safe sex stand during orientation week. All of these activities are intended to involve students and attract the interest of the undergraduate community. Questionnaires administered to students at the end of the course revealed that the lectures were received favorably. Questionnaires administered to new medical and English students attending orientation week revealed that 72% of students thought the stand was a good idea and 81% and 83%, respectively found it

  5. Direct and indirect effects of perceived social support on health-related quality of life in persons living with HIV/AIDS.

    PubMed

    Bekele, Tsegaye; Rourke, Sean B; Tucker, Ruthann; Greene, Saara; Sobota, Michael; Koornstra, Jay; Monette, Laverne; Rueda, Sergio; Bacon, Jean; Watson, James; Hwang, Stephen W; Dunn, James; Guenter, Dale

    2013-01-01

    Research has established a link between perceived social support and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) among persons living with HIV/AIDS. However, little is known about the ways through which social support influences HRQOL. This study examined the direct and indirect effects of perceived social support on physical and mental HRQOL in a sample of 602 adults living with HIV in Ontario, Canada. Participants completed the Medical Outcomes Study-HIV (MOS-HIV) health survey, the MOS-HIV Social Support Scale (MOS-HIV-SSS), and the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression-Revised scale. Data on demographic and clinical characteristics were also collected. The direct and indirect effects of social support on the two MOS-HIV HRQOL summary measures, that is, physical health summary (PHS) and mental health summary (MHS), were estimated in multiple linear regression analyses. Perceived social support had significant direct effects on PHS (B=0.04, p<0.01) and MHS (B=0.05, p<0.01). It also had significant indirect effect on both PHS (B=0.04, p<0.01) and MHS (B=0.11, p<0.01), mediated by depressive symptoms. Interventions that enhance social support have the potential to contribute to better HRQOL either directly or indirectly by decreasing the deleterious effect of depressive symptoms on HRQOL.

  6. Animal bite - first aid - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100214.htm Animal bite - first aid - series—Procedure, part 1 To ... D.A.M., Inc. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Animal Bites A.D.A.M., Inc. is accredited ...

  7. Gingival pustules and sterile diffuse sclerosing osteomyelitis as a feature of synovitis, acne, pustulosis, hyperostosis, osteitis (SAPHO) syndrome.

    PubMed

    Chou, Annie; Schulman, Joshua M; Gross, Andrew J; Jordan, Richard C; Ramos, Daniel M

    2016-05-01

    Synovitis, acne, pustulosis, hyperostosis, osteitis (SAPHO) syndrome represents the rare co-occurrence of sterile inflammatory osteoarticular disease in association with a variety of cutaneous manifestations. Oral involvement is uncommon. The etiology of SAPHO is complex and is likely the combined result of infectious, genetic, and immunologic factors. Due to diverse clinical presentations, SAPHO is difficult to diagnose. Here, we describe the case of a 74-year-old man, who had a history of SAPHO syndrome and presented with gingival pustules and sterile diffuse sclerosing osteomyelitis of the mandible. This is the first case report describing neutrophilic mucositis as a feature of SAPHO.

  8. A Case Report on Multiple Stones in the Thyroid Gland in Association with Sclerosing Thyroiditis: An Unusual Encounter

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Ravish Kumar; Ekka, Nishith; Kumar, Vinod

    2017-01-01

    Stones are very frequently found in the gallbladder and urinary tract. Rarely the thyroid gland can be a site for stone formation. Few cases of calcification in thyroid gland have been described in the medical literature in association with papillary carcinoma and multinodular goiter. A unique case of a thyroid swelling studded with multiple stones in its parenchyma, in the histopathological background of sclerosing thyroiditis in an 80-year-old male is documented here. Surgical excision was undertaken with an uneventful postoperative period. PMID:28384929

  9. Providing Empowerment to the Person with AIDS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haney, Patrick

    1988-01-01

    Describes author's experiences after his own diagnoses of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) Related Complex (ARC) and AIDS itself. Discusses six ways for social workers to provide empowerment to persons with AIDS, which focus on the positive, the healing power of caring, reconnections, direction, victim mindset, and advocacy. (ABL)

  10. 45 CFR 707.10 - Auxiliary aids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Auxiliary aids. 707.10 Section 707.10 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) COMMISSION ON CIVIL RIGHTS ENFORCEMENT OF... § 707.10 Auxiliary aids. (a) The Agency shall furnish appropriate auxiliary aids where necessary...

  11. 45 CFR 707.10 - Auxiliary aids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Auxiliary aids. 707.10 Section 707.10 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) COMMISSION ON CIVIL RIGHTS ENFORCEMENT OF... § 707.10 Auxiliary aids. (a) The Agency shall furnish appropriate auxiliary aids where necessary...

  12. 45 CFR 707.10 - Auxiliary aids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Auxiliary aids. 707.10 Section 707.10 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) COMMISSION ON CIVIL RIGHTS ENFORCEMENT OF... § 707.10 Auxiliary aids. (a) The Agency shall furnish appropriate auxiliary aids where necessary...

  13. 45 CFR 707.10 - Auxiliary aids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Auxiliary aids. 707.10 Section 707.10 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) COMMISSION ON CIVIL RIGHTS ENFORCEMENT OF... § 707.10 Auxiliary aids. (a) The Agency shall furnish appropriate auxiliary aids where necessary...

  14. 45 CFR 707.10 - Auxiliary aids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Auxiliary aids. 707.10 Section 707.10 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) COMMISSION ON CIVIL RIGHTS ENFORCEMENT OF... § 707.10 Auxiliary aids. (a) The Agency shall furnish appropriate auxiliary aids where necessary...

  15. Innumerable Liver Masses in a Patient with Autoimmune Hepatitis and Primary Sclerosing Cholangitis Overlap Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gharibpoor, Alireza; Mansour-Ghanaei, Fariborz; Sadeghi, Mahbobe; Gharibpoor, Faeze; Joukar, Farahnaz; Mavaddati, Sara

    2017-01-01

    Patient: Male, 26 Final Diagnosis: AIH-PSC overlap syndrome Symptoms: Palpable liver more than 5 cm below the costal margin and both firm and nodular • 8-kg weight loss during the last 2 months • clay-colored stool • dark urine • general fatigue • generalized icterus • light abdominal tenderness in the right upper quadrant with isolated hepatomegaly • loss of appetite • neither spider angioma nor stigmata • no clinical evidence of ascites or lymphadenopathy • non-specific abdominal discomfort • normoactive bowel sound • pruritus Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Lab tests • MRCP • Pathological analysis Specialty: Gastroenterology and Hepatology Objective: Challenging differential diagnosis Background: In patients with the diagnosis of autoimmune hepatitis (AIH), the presence of cholestatic features raise the possibility of an overlap syndrome with primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC). Here, we present a unique case with AIH-PSC overlap syndrome and innumerable liver masses. Case Report: A 26-year-old man presented with generalized icterus. Based on the serological findings of hypergamainmunoglobulinemia and positive anti-nuclear antibody tests, together with an abnormal cholangiogram, he was diagnosed with overlap syndrome (AIH-PSC). Liver imaging revealed innumerable liver masses with a benign appearance in the pathological evaluation. To rule out the colon abnormalities that usually coexist with such liver masses, colonoscopy was performed and showed no significant changes. The liver masses were nonmalignant and were resolved after immunosuppressant therapy. Conclusions: Because AIH-PSC overlap syndrome is rare, it is suggested that radiological evaluation of the biliary tree should be performed routinely in adults diagnosed with AIH to reduce the missed diagnosis of overlap syndrome and liver masses. PMID:28167813

  16. Biliary Intraepithelial Neoplasia (BilIN) in Primary Sclerosing Cholangitis: The First Report from Iran

    PubMed Central

    Akbarzadeh, Laleh; Geramizadeh, Bita; Kazemi, Kurosh; Nikeghbalian, Saman; Malekhosseini, Seyedali

    2016-01-01

    Background Primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) as one of the most common chronic cholestatic liver diseases is a main predisposing factor for the development of cholangiocarcinoma (CCA). Biliary intraepithelial neoplasia (BilIN) is defined as precancerous bile duct epithelial changes, which can be eventually led to cholangiocarcinoma. There are very few studies about the frequency of BilIN in the patients with PSC and its correlation with paraclinical findings. Objectives In this study, we tried to find the frequency of BilIN in the patients with PSC and correlate its presence with clinicopathologic factors. Methods During two years (2014 - 15) of investigation, 80 explanted livers with the confirmed diagnosis of PSC were studied through precise inspection and thorough sectioning of the explanted livers. These findings were correlated with paraclinical findings to identify any predictor of these neoplastic epithelial changes. Results During the study period of 2 years, among 80 livers with confirmed diagnosis of PSC, there were 43 cases with different types of metaplasia. The frequency of epithelial changes was as below: 29 (35%) for pyloric metaplasia, 9 (10.8%) for mucinous metaplasia, 3 (3.6%) for intestinal metaplasia, 1 (1.2%) for osteoid metaplasia, and 1 (1.2%) for squamous metaplasia. There was no epithelial dysplasia in the study sample; however, according to the most recent reports, mucinous metaplasia is considered as BilIN 1; therefore, there would be 9 cases of BilIN I. There has been no statistically significant difference between PSC cases and those with BilIN in demographic variables, except for bilirubin and CA19-9 which were higher in the PSC cases with BilIN. Conclusions This study showed that the frequency of BilIN was low among Iranian patients with PSC. High bilirubin and CA19-9 can be predictors of the development of bile duct epithelial changes in patients with PSC. PMID:28123440

  17. Humoral and cellular immune responses to matrix protein of measles virus in subacute sclerosing panencephalitis.

    PubMed Central

    Dhib-Jalbut, S; McFarland, H F; Mingioli, E S; Sever, J L; McFarlin, D E

    1988-01-01

    The immune response to matrix (M) protein of measles virus was examined in patients with subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE) and controls. Antibodies specific for M and nucleocapsid (NC) proteins in 11 serum and 8 cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples from patients with SSPE were quantitated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay by using affinity-purified measles virus proteins. Geometric mean anti-NC antibody titers were higher in the serum (6.58 +/- 0.98 [mean +/- standard deviation]) and CSF (4.38 +/- 0.74) of SSPE patients compared with controls. Anti-M antibodies were present in the serum and CSF of all SSPE samples tested but in titers lower than those of anti-NC antibodies. Geometric mean anti-M antibody titer was 3.35 +/- 0.53 in sera from patients with SSPE compared with 3.05 +/- 0.66 in sera from patients with other neurological diseases and 3.12 +/- 0.74 in sera from healthy individuals. Geometric mean anti-M antibody titer was 2.59 +/- 0.86 in the CSF of eight patients with SSPE compared with a mean less than 1.00 for patients with other neurological disease (controls). Intrathecal synthesis of anti-M or anti-NC antibodies was established in four patients with SSPE. The cellular immune responses to M, F, HA, and NC proteins were examined in four of the patients with SSPE by lymphoproliferation and were not significantly different from those in five healthy controls. The results demonstrate humoral and cellular immune responses to M protein in patients with SSPE and indicate that it is unlikely that a defect in the immune response to this virus component accounts for the disease process in the patients studied. Images PMID:3373575

  18. Clinical course and prognosis of pediatric-onset primary sclerosing cholangitis

    PubMed Central

    Färkkilä, Martti; Arola, Johanna; Jaakkola, Tytti; Penagini, Roberto; Kolho, Kaija-Leena

    2015-01-01

    Background The natural history of pediatric-onset primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) and overlap with autoimmune hepatitis (PSC/AIH) is poorly known. Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical outcome of patients with pediatric-onset disease in a tertiary referral center. Methods We traced 33 patients (median age at diagnosis 16 years), with PSC or PSC/AIH in cholangiography and liver histology diagnosed between December 1993 and 2011, at Helsinki University Hospital. Diagnostic procedures and long-term follow-up were reassessed until the end of December 2013. Results PSC was confirmed in all 33 patients; 19 of them had an overlap with AIH. At diagnosis, three of 33 had cirrhosis. Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) was associated in 76% of the patients, mostly ulcerative colitis (70%); treatment of IBD being a minor determinant of the clinical outcome of liver disease. In the last follow-up (median nine years), all patients were alive, and no malignancy occurred. Most patients (91%) were on ursodeoxycholic acid and 12 PSC/AIH patients on immunosuppression. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiography during follow-up showed a progression of intra-hepatic disease in 12 patients (36%). Four patients (12%) had undergone liver transplantation, and one was listed; no recurrence of the disease in the graft was seen. Conclusion The clinical course and outcome of pediatric-onset PSC and PSC/AIH seem to be favourable in the majority of patients until early adulthood. In about one-third of patients, however, PSC is progressive, challenging the current treatment guidelines and warranting further studies on disease pathogenesis. PMID:27536366

  19. Patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis require more sedation during endoscopic retrograde cholangiography

    PubMed Central

    Keil, Carsten; Aguirre Dávila, Lukas; Framke, Theodor; Lenzen, Henrike; Manns, Michael P.; Lankisch, Tim O.; Voigtländer, Torsten

    2017-01-01

    Background and study aims Patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) require repeated endoscopic retrograde cholangiography (ERC). Our aim was to evaluate whether patients with PSC require higher doses of sedation during ERC. Patients and methods We retrospectively analyzed all patients undergoing ERC from 2006 to 2013 who received conscious sedation with propofol and midazolam. The duration of the intervention and a potential progression of propofol consumption or intervention time by visit number were analyzed. Univariable and multivariable analyses were performed to identify independent factors which influence propofol consumption. Results A total of 2962 ERC procedures were performed in 1211 patients. Patients with PSC (n = 157) underwent 461 ERC procedures whereas patients without PSC (n = 1054) had 2501 ERC examinations. The total median propofol dose was 450 mg (290 – 630 mg) for patients with PSC and 300 mg (200 – 450 mg) for the non-PSC group (P < 0.05). The propofol consumption in patients with PSC was increased by a factor of 1.24 (P = 0.0071) independent of intervention time. Younger age (< 60.8 years) and duration of the intervention were associated with a higher need for sedation by factors of 1.21 and 1.71, respectively (P < 0.0001). The robustness of the results was tested in a sensitivity analysis which confirmed the results (P < 0.0001). Conclusions Patients with PSC may require higher doses of sedation for ERC compared to other patient groups independent of age and duration of ERC. The higher dosage of sedation has to be taken into account when using ERC to treat a patient with PSC.

  20. HIV/AIDS prevention, faith, and spirituality among black/African American and Latino communities in the United States: strengthening scientific faith-based efforts to shift the course of the epidemic and reduce HIV-related health disparities.

    PubMed

    Sutton, Madeline Y; Parks, Carolyn P

    2013-06-01

    Black/African American and Latino communities are disproportionately affected by the domestic HIV/AIDS epidemic. Blacks/African Americans and Latinos are also more likely to report a formal, religious, or faith affiliation when compared with non-Hispanic whites. As such, faith leaders and their institutions have been identified in the National HIV/AIDS Strategy as having a vital role to serve in reducing: (1) HIV-related health disparities and (2) the number of new HIV infections by promoting non-judgmental support for persons living with and at risk for HIV/AIDS and by serving as trusted information resources for their congregants and communities. We describe faith doctrines and faith-science partnerships that are increasing in support of faith-based HIV prevention and service delivery activities and discuss the vital role of these faith-based efforts in highly affected black/African American and Latino communities.

  1. Knowledge, Beliefs and Attitudes about HIV/AIDS related issues, and the Sources of Knowledge among Health Care Professionals in Southern Nigeria.

    PubMed Central

    Umeh, Chiamaka N.; Ezedinachi, Emmanuel N.; Ross, Michael W.

    2006-01-01

    The HIV/AIDS pandemic has become one of the most important public health problems in recent times and it is having a profound impact on the lives of infected people and their families. There is an acknowledged burden of HIV/AIDS in Nigeria. As the prevalence of HIV/AIDS infection rises, health care professionals worldwide can expect greater clinical exposure to infected patients. Aims: The care of people living with AIDS presents a significant challenge to the health care sector. This study seeks to explore the relationship between sources of HIV/AIDS information and knowledge, and the relationship between knowledge of HIV/AIDS and care for people with AIDS among health care providers in three different levels of health care institutions in the Southern region of Nigeria. Mehods: Health care workers from two states in southern Nigeria completed a questionnaire that was designed to assess knowledge, attitudes and practices about HIV/AIDS. The sample was composed of 277 (65%) females and 135 (31.7%) males. Results: The results showed a fair level of knowledge among all health care professionals, with the highest knowledge among the doctors and the lowest among laboratory workers. There was a significant gender difference in the level of knowledge but the data suggested that knowledge did not differ by hospital settings. There were generally negative feelings and views about the care of HIV/AIDS patients among the professionals, these views being worst at the Community Health Centers and best at the Government Hospital. The greatest source of information for the majority of professionals was health talks/seminars, and those respondents who got their information from school scored the highest on the items on general knowledge of HIV/AIDS incidence, cause, transmission, and clinical treatment. Conclusions: The study showed a fair level of knowledge among all health care professionals, with the highest knowledge among the doctors and the lowest among laboratory workers

  2. AIDS.gov

    MedlinePlus

    ... concerns. Search Services Share This Help National HIV/AIDS Strategy Check out NHAS's latest progress in the ... from AIDS.gov Read more AIDS.gov tweets AIDS.gov HIV/AIDS Basics • Federal Resources • Using New ...

  3. Overexpression of MicroRNAs from the miR-17-92 Paralog Clusters in AIDS-Related Non-Hodgkin's Lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    Thapa, Dharma R.; Li, Xinmin; Jamieson, Beth D.; Martínez-Maza, Otoniel

    2011-01-01

    Background Individuals infected by HIV are at an increased risk for developing non-Hodgkin's lymphomas (AIDS-NHL). In the highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) era, there has been a significant decline in the incidence of AIDS-associated primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL). However, only a modest decrease in incidence has been reported for other AIDS-NHL subtypes. Thus, AIDS-NHLs remain a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in HIV infected individuals. Recently, much attention has been directed toward the role of miRNAs in cancer, including NHL. Several miRNAs, including those encoded by the miR-17-92 polycistron, have been shown to play significant roles in B cell tumorigenesis. However, the role of miRNAs in NHL in the setting of HIV infection has not been defined. Methodology/Principal Findings We used quantitative realtime PCR to assess the expression of miRNAs from three different paralog clusters, miR-17-92, miR-106a-363, and miR-106b-25 in 24 cases of AIDS-NHLs representing four tumor types, Burkitt's lymphoma (BL, n = 6), diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL, n = 8), primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL, n = 5), and primary effusion lymphoma (PEL, n = 5). We also used microarray analysis to identify a differentiation specific miRNA signature of naïve, germinal center, and memory B cell subsets from tonsils (n = 4). miRNAs from the miR-17-92 paralog clusters were upregulated by B cells, specifically during the GC differentiation stage. We also found overexpression of these miRNA clusters in all four AIDS-NHL subtypes. Finally, we also show that select miRNAs from these clusters (miR-17, miR-106a, and miR-106b) inhibited p21 in AIDS-BL and DLBCL cases, thus providing a mechanistic role for these miRNAs in AIDS-NHL pathogenesis. Conclusion Dysregulation of miR-17-92 paralog clusters is a common feature of AIDS-associated NHLs. PMID:21698185

  4. Prevalence and risk factors of HIV and syphilis, and knowledge and risk behaviors related to HIV/AIDS among men who have sex with men in Chongqing, China

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Wenzhe; Wu, Gohui; Zheng, Hui; Zhang, Wenjuan; Peng, Zhihang; Yu, Rongbin; Wang, Ning

    2016-01-01

    Abstract High HIV prevalence and incidence burdens have been reported in men who have sex with men (MSM) in Chongqing, China. We aimed to estimate the prevalence of HIV and other sexually transmitted infections (STIs), to appraise the knowledge and risk behaviors related to HIV/AIDS among MSM, and to analyze the possible causes of deviation between behavior and knowledge to make better strategies. We recruited 617 MSM from February to July in 2008 by using a respondent-driven sampling (RDS) method in Chongqing, China. Through the collection of questionnaire-based data and biological testing results from all objects, we launched a cross-sectional survey. STATA/SE was used for data analysis by frequency, ANOVA, rank sum test and logistic regression models. MSM with syphilis (OR=4.16, 95%CI: 2.35-7.33, P<0.0001) were more likely to be HIV infected. Being a company employee (OR=3.64, 95%CI: 1.22-10.08, P<0.0001) and having bought male for sex (OR=3.52, 95%CI: 1.10-11.32, P < 0.034) were associated with a higher probability of syphilis. MSM with younger age, higher education and greater monthly income had a higher mean knowledge score. MSM who had HIV testing had a higher mean knowledge score than those who never had. Students, venues for finding sex partners by Internet and homosexuals in MSM had a higher mean knowledge score compared to other occupations, venues for finding sex partners and sexual orientation. There is an urgent need for delivery of barrier and biomedical interventions with coordinated behavioral and structural strategies to improve the effect of HIV interventions among MSM. PMID:28276665

  5. "My mother told me I must not cook anymore"--food, culture, and the context of HIV- and AIDS-related stigma in three communities in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Okoror, T A; Airhihenbuwa, C O; Zungu, M; Makofani, D; Brown, D C; Iwelunmor, J

    The purpose of this study was to examine the role of food as an instrument in expressing and experiencing HIV/AIDS stigma by HIV-positive women and their families, with the goal of reducing discrimination. It goes beyond willingness to share utensils, which has been identified in HIV/AIDS research. As part of an ongoing capacity-building HIV/AIDS stigma project in South Africa, 25 focus groups and 15 key informant interviews were conducted among 195 women and 54 men in three Black communities. Participants were asked to discuss how they were treated in the family as women living with HIV and AIDS, and data was organized using the PEN-3 model. Findings highlight both the positive and negative experiences HIV-positive women encounter. Women would not disclose their HIV status to avoid being isolated from participating in the socio-cultural aspects of food preparation, while others that have disclosed their status have experienced alienation. The symbolic meanings of food should be a major consideration when addressing the elimination of HIV/AIDS stigma in South Africa.

  6. Quantifying and Projecting Relative Sea-Level Rise At The Regional Scale: The Bangladesh Sea-Level Project (BanD-AID)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shum, C. K.; Kuo, C. Y.; Guo, J.; Shang, K.; Tseng, K. H.; Wan, J.; Calmant, S.; Ballu, V.; Valty, P.; Kusche, J.; Hossain, F.; Khan, Z. H.; Rietbroek, R.; Uebbing, B.

    2014-12-01

    The potential for accelerated sea-level rise under anthropogenic warming is a significant societal problem, in particular in world's coastal deltaic regions where about half of the world's population resides. Quantifying geophysical sources of sea-level rise with the goal of improved projection at local scales remains a complex and challenging interdisciplinary research problem. These processes include ice-sheet/glacier ablations, steric sea-level, solid Earth uplift or subsidence due to GIA, tectonics, sediment loading or anthropogenic causes, hydrologic imbalance, and human processes including water retention in reservoirs and aquifer extraction. The 2013 IPCC AR5 concluded that the observed and explained geophysical causes of global geocentric sea-level rise, 1993-2010, is closer towards closure. However, the discrepancy reveals that circa 1.3→37.5% of the observed sea-level rise remains unexplained. This relatively large discrepancy is primarily attributable to the wide range of estimates of respective contributions of Greenland and Antarctic ice-sheets and mountain/peripheral glaciers to sea-level rise. Understanding and quantifying the natural and anthropogenic processes governing solid Earth (land, islands and sea-floor) uplift or subsidence at the regional and local scales remain elusive to enable addressing coastal vulnerability due to relative sea-level rise hazards, such as the Bangladesh Delta. This study focuses on addressing coastal vulnerability of Bangladesh, a Belmont Forum/IGFA project, BanD-AID (http://Belmont-SeaLevel.org). Sea-level rise, along with tectonic, sediment load and groundwater extraction induced land uplift/subsidence, have exacerbated Bangladesh's coastal vulnerability, affecting 150 million people in one of the world's most densely populated regions. Here we present preliminary results using space geodetic observations, including satellite radar and laser altimetry, GRACE gravity, tide gauge, hydrographic, and GPS/InSAR observed

  7. Re-validation of the Van Rie HIV/AIDS-related stigma scale for use with people living with HIV in the United States.

    PubMed

    Kipp, Aaron M; Audet, Carolyn M; Earnshaw, Valerie A; Owens, Jared; McGowan, Catherine C; Wallston, Kenneth A

    2015-01-01

    There is little consensus about which of the many validated human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) stigma scales should be regularly used, with few being re-validated in different contexts or evaluated for how they compare to other, existing HIV stigma scales. The purpose of this exploratory study was to re-validate the Van Rie HIV/AIDS-Related Stigma Scale, originally validated in Thailand and using a third-person wording structure, for use with people living with HIV in the United States. Adult HIV clinic patients completed a survey including the Berger and Van Rie scales, and measures of social support and depression. Eighty-five of 211 (40%) eligible participants provided data for both stigma scales. Exploratory factor analyses identified three factors to the Van Rie scale: Loss of Social Relationships (new subscale), Managing HIV Concealment (new subscale), and Perceived Community Stigma (original subscale). These subscales were moderately inter-related (r = 0.51 to 0.58) with acceptable to excellent reliability (Cronbach's alpha = 0.69 to 0.90). The Van Rie subscales were also moderately inter-correlated with the Berger subscales (r = 0.44 to 0.76), had similar construct validity, and tended to have higher mean stigma scores when compared with Berger subscales that were conceptually most similar. The revised Van Rie HIV-related Stigma Scale demonstrates good validity and internal consistency, offering a valid measure of HIV stigma with a three-factor structure. The third-person wording may be particularly suitable for measuring stigmatizing attitudes during an individual's transition from at-risk and undergoing HIV testing to newly diagnosed, a time when experiences of discrimination and processing issues of disclosure have not yet occurred. The stigma mechanisms for individuals making this transition have not been well explored. These scenarios, combined with the observed non-response to the Berger Enacted Stigma subscale items (a surprise finding), highlight

  8. A case of autoimmune pancreatitis associated with sclerosing cholangitis, retroperitoneal fibrosis and Sjögren's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Fukui, Toshiro; Okazaki, Kazuichi; Yoshizawa, Hazuki; Ohashi, Shinya; Tamaki, Hiroyuki; Kawasaki, Kimio; Matsuura, Minoru; Asada, Masanori; Nakase, Hiroshi; Nakashima, Yasuaki; Nishio, Akiyoshi; Chiba, Tsutomu

    2005-01-01

    We report a very rare case of autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) associated with sclerosing cholangitis, retroperitoneal fibrosis and Sjögren's syndrome. The patient had an enlarged pancreas, and autoantibodies were detected in the serum. Serum IgG and IgG4 concentrations were also elevated. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography revealed an irregular narrowing of the main pancreatic duct from the head to the body and sclerotic change in the intrapancreatic common bile duct, which later extended to the intrahepatic bile ducts. In addition, histological examination of the liver revealed lymphocytic sclerosis around the bile ducts, similar to the histology in the pancreas of AIP. Retroperitoneal tumors were diagnosed as retroperitoneal fibrosis by histological examination. Serological and functional abnormalities suggestive of Sjögren's syndrome were detected, and histological findings of the lip were compatible with Sjögren's syndrome. Immunohistochemistry of each lesion disclosed that most of the infiltrating lymphocytes were T cells with similar levels of both CD4+ and CD8+ cells. Moreover, some of the infiltrating plasma cells were positive for anti-IgG4 monoclonal antibody. These diseases were dramatically improved by steroid therapy. Although the pathophysiology of AIP is still unclear, the present case suggests a common pathophysiological mechanism for AIP, sclerosing cholangitis, retroperitoneal fibrosis and Sjögren's syndrome.

  9. AIDS and society.

    PubMed

    Singh, N K

    1991-08-01

    Noting the hysteria caused by an outbreak of AIDS among intravenous drug users in the state of Manipur, India, the author discusses the social and emotional aspects of the epidemic. Local media has been Manipur's main source of information concerning the outbreak, but this information has often been misleading and has served to stir up fear and hatred of HIV carriers. Many have even begun talking about an Isolation Centre. The author, the director of a drug rehabilitation center, relates his experiences in counseling 50 intravenous drug users on the subject of AIDS. He discovered that the group had very poor knowledge about the disease. When told about AIDS, they became alarmed at the possibility of dying. 1/2 of the group swore to take revenge on those who had introduced them to drugs, but the other 1/2 showed a more positive attitude, saying that they would like to help other drug addicts. The author also describes the case history of a patient who had succeeded in staying off of drugs for 8 months. HIV screening, however, revealed that the young man was seropositive. Somehow, a local newspaper got a hold of this information and published his name as a seropositive along with the names of others. Distraught by this, the young man returned to drugs. The author stresses that revealing the names of HIV carriers serves no social purpose, and in fact, only makes the problem worse. He recommends the following for dealing with the outbreak of AIDS: 1) intensive public health education on AIDS with the aim or removing unwarranted fears; 2) education to prevent drug addiction; 3) counselling to parents of drug addicts; and 4) the establishment of Seropositive Anonymous, an organization designed to help carriers deal with their problems.

  10. Modeling glaucoma in rats by sclerosing aqueous outflow pathways to elevate intraocular pressure

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, John C.; Cepurna, William O.; Johnson, Elaine C.

    2015-01-01

    Injection of hypertonic saline via episcleral veins toward the limbus in laboratory rats can produce elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) by sclerosis of aqueous humor outflow pathways. This article describes important anatomic characteristics of the rat optic nerve head (ONH) that make it an attractive animal model for human glaucoma, along with the anatomy of rat aqueous humor outflow on which this technique is based. The injection technique itself is also described, with the aid of a supplemental movie, including necessary equipment and specific tips to acquire this skill. Outcomes of a successful injection are presented, including IOP elevation and patterns of optic nerve injury. These concepts are then specifically considered in light of the use of this model to assess potential neuroprotective therapies. Advantages of the hypertonic saline model include a delayed and relatively gradual IOP elevation, likely reproduction of scleral and ONH stresses and strains that may be important in producing axonal injury, and its ability to be applied to any rat (and potentially mouse) strain, leaving the unmanipulated fellow eye as an internal control. Challenges include the demanding surgical skill required by the technique itself, a wide range of IOP response, and mild corneal clouding in some animals. However, meticulous application of the principles detailed in this article and practice will allow most researchers to attain this useful skill for studying cellular events of glaucomatous optic nerve damage. PMID:26003399

  11. Crawling Aid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    The Institute for the Achievement of Human Potential developed a device known as the Vehicle for Initial Crawling (VIC); the acronym is a tribute to the crawler's inventor, Hubert "Vic" Vykukal; is an effective crawling aid. The VIC is used by brain injured children who are unable to crawl due to the problems of weight-bearing and friction, caused by gravity. It is a rounded plywood frame large enough to support the child's torso, leaving arms and legs free to move. On its underside are three aluminum discs through which air is pumped to create an air-bearing surface that has less friction than a film of oil. Upper side contains the connection to the air supply and a pair of straps which restrain the child and cause the device to move with him. VIC is used with the intent to recreate the normal neurological connection between brain and muscles. Over repetitive use of the device the child develops his arm and leg muscles as well as coordination. Children are given alternating therapy, with and without the VIC until eventually the device is no longer needed.

  12. Positioning the image of AIDS.

    PubMed

    Cooter, Roger; Stein, Claudia

    2010-03-01

    AIDS posters can be treated as material objects whose production, distribution and consumption varied across time and place. It is also possible to reconstruct and analyse the public health discourse at the time these powerful images appeared. More recently, however, these conventional historical approaches have been challenged by projects in literary and art criticism. Here, images of AIDS are considered in terms of their function in and for a new discursive regime of power centred on the human body and its visualization. How images of AIDS came to be understood in Western culture in relation to wider political and economic conditions redefines the historical task.

  13. Heart attack first aid

    MedlinePlus

    First aid - heart attack; First aid - cardiopulmonary arrest; First aid - cardiac arrest ... of patients with unstable angina/non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction (updating the 2007 guideline and replacing the 2011 ...

  14. Buying a Hearing Aid

    MedlinePlus

    ... aids typically cannot be custom-fit. What are costs and styles of hearing aids? Hearing aids vary ... and for improvement in hearing tones. Real ear measurements may also be done, which determine how much ...

  15. Neurological Complications of AIDS

    MedlinePlus

    ... Patient & Caregiver Education » Fact Sheets Neurological Complications of AIDS Fact Sheet Table of Contents (click to jump ... Where can I get more information? What is AIDS? AIDS (acquired immune deficiency syndrome) is a condition ...

  16. HIV and AIDS

    MedlinePlus

    ... dientes Video: Getting an X-ray HIV and AIDS KidsHealth > For Kids > HIV and AIDS Print A ... serious infection. continue How Many People Have HIV/AIDS? Since the discovery of the virus in 1983, ...

  17. Restoration of hearing by hearing aids: conventional hearing aids – implantable hearing aids – cochlear implants – auditory brainstem implants

    PubMed Central

    Leuwer, R.; Müller, J.

    2005-01-01

    Aim of this report is to explain the current concept of hearing restoration using hearing aids. At present the main issues of conventional hearing aids are the relative benefits of analogue versus digital devices and different strategies for the improvement of hearing in noise. Implantable hearing aids provide a better sound quality and less distortion. The lack of directional microphones is the major disadvantage of the partially implantable hearing aids commercially available. Two different clinical studies about fully implantable hearing aids have been started in 2004. One of the most-promising developments seems to be the electric-acoustic stimulation. PMID:22073051

  18. Quantitation of intrathecal antibodies in cerebrospinal fluid of subacute sclerosing panencephalitis, herpes simplex encephalitis and multiple sclerosis: discrimination between microorganism-driven and polyspecific immune response.

    PubMed

    Jacobi, C; Lange, P; Reiber, H

    2007-07-01

    The detection of intrathecal antibody synthesis by qualitative methods or the Antibody-Index (AI) is a relevant tool for diagnosis of inflammatory neurological diseases. An increased AI can be observed for a causative antigen as well as part of a polyspecific immune response. The quantitation of the intrathecal antibody fraction in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), F(S), helps to discriminate both cases. In contrast to AI, F(S) needs an absolute antibody concentration detected in the ELISA in mg/L. The intrathecally synthesized, "local" antibody concentration in CSF (AB(Loc)) is expressed as the specific fraction of the intrathecally synthesized total IgG (IgG(Loc)) in CSF with F(S)=AB(Loc)/IgG(Loc) x 100 in %. F(S) for HSV or measles has about 20- to 60-fold higher values in virus-caused antibody synthesis in acute herpes simplex encephalitis (mean HSV-F(S)=8.9%) or subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (mean measles-F(S)=18.8%) compared to the polyspecific immune response against these antigens e.g., in multiple sclerosis (0.14% or 0.52%, correspondingly). F(S) helps also to avoid misinterpretations of an increasing AI in cases of therapy control, and allows direct comparison of relative antibody concentrations (R(S)) in blood and intrathecally synthesized fractions in CSF (F(S)): In multiple sclerosis patients F(S):R(S) has a mean ratio of about 3 for the measles, rubella and VZV antibodies. Together with the large variability we find by ranking that about two third of MS patients have no direct correlation of the relative concentrations in serum and intrathecal synthesis. So this concept gains increasingly relevance for analysis of the polyspecific immune response in brain.

  19. Evaluation of Biliary Calprotectin as a Biomarker in Primary Sclerosing Cholangitis.

    PubMed

    Gauss, Annika; Sauer, Peter; Stiehl, Adolf; Rupp, Christian; Krisam, Johannes; Leopold, Yvonne; Kloeters-Plachky, Petra; Stremmel, Wolfgang; Gotthardt, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    Primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) is a chronic inflammatory disease of the bile ducts with limited therapeutic options except liver transplantation. Reliable biomarkers to predict the disease course are unavailable, and currently employed disease activity scores such as the Mayo risk score (MRS) have limitations. The present study aims to evaluate biliary calprotectin as a marker of disease activity and prognosis in PSC.This is a monocentric retrospective observational study. Calprotectin concentrations were measured by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in bile samples collected by endoscopic retrograde cholangiography from 106 PSC patients and 20 controls. Biliary calprotectin concentrations were compared between the 2 groups. In PSC patients, results were evaluated with regard to the presence of dominant bile duct stenoses, bile microbiology, MRS, survival free of liver transplantation, and necessity for bile duct interventions in the further disease course.Median (interquartile ranges) biliary calprotectin concentrations were higher in PSC patients than in controls (3646 ng/mL, 249-9748 vs 116 ng/mL, 104-655; P < 0.001). In the PSC cohort, higher biliary calprotectin concentrations were associated with the presence of microbes in bile (P = 0.02), the occurrence of dominant bile duct stenosis at any time in the disease course (P = 0.005), and the necessity for future bile duct interventions (P = 0.02). Patients with biliary calprotectin concentrations above a cut-off of 11,610 ng/mL displayed significantly shorter transplantation-free survival than those with biliary calprotectin concentrations ≤11,610 ng/mL (P < 0.001). Univariate Cox regression analysis revealed high biliary calprotectin concentration (>11,610 ng/mL) as a risk factor of shorter transplantation-free survival of PSC patients (P < 0.001) beside high plasma alkaline phosphatase (ALP) concentration (>142.5 U/L) (P = 0.006), high MRS (≥2) (P < 0

  20. Social and Relational Aspects of Comprehending in One Fourth Grader's Unaided and Illustration-Aided Picturebook Retellings: Retelling as Co-Authoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lysaker, Judith T.; Nie, Alice Ying

    2017-01-01

    In this article, we present one fourth grader's unaided and illustration-aided retellings of "The Other Side." Using a qualitative clinical case study approach, we examine comprehending activity in these retellings using microethnographic discourse analysis in conjunction with dialogic self theory and a transactional model of reading.…

  1. Synchronous HIV/AIDS-related Epstein-Barr Virus-associated smooth muscle tumors in a 20-year-old female.

    PubMed

    Adam, Etai; Wang, Larry; Herrington, Cynthia; Bliss, David; Church, Joseph A

    2014-10-01

    We present a case of simultaneous endobronchial and adrenal Epstein-Barr Virus-associated smooth muscle tumors in a 20-year-old female with AIDS. Blood Epstein-Barr Virus polymerase chain reaction was negative at the time of diagnosis.

  2. [The AIDS patient in anesthesia].

    PubMed

    Jalowy, A; Flesche, C W; Lorenz, C

    1997-02-01

    Treatment of a patient with Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) is very challenging, and makes great demands on the anaesthesiologist. Any of an AIDS patient's vital organ systems may be compromised, either by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) itself, opportunistic infections, by tumours, or as a result of AIDS-related drug therapies. Infections of the lungs (e.g., Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia) are prevalent, and cardiac impairment can be found in as many as 50% of AIDS patients. In addition, disorders of the central and peripheral nervous system and water and electrolyte imbalances are often seen. Perioperatively, the AIDS patient is especially prone to infections as a result of a compromised immune system. The choice of anaesthetic procedure for the AIDS patient-aside from the type of operation-depends on the severity of the illness and progression of organ impairment. All anaesthesia personnel must be careful to avoid infection, as they frequently come in contact with the blood or body fluids of their patients. However, the risk of being infected by an AIDS patient is very low, provided hygiene regulations are followed strictly. The rate of seroconversion after accidental needle-stick injury is below 1%. If exposure does occur, regular serologic controls should be continued for one year. Prophylactic treatment with azidothymidine after exposition to HIV is recommended.

  3. Educating Brazilian workers about AIDS.

    PubMed

    1991-12-01

    This article contains a the script for a slide-tape presentation entitled Working Against AIDS, a presentation developed by the Brazil Family Planning Association (BEMFAM) which is designed to debunk common misconceptions about the disease. This audio-visual, which targets Brazilian workers, can be used during talks, seminars, and meetings. A discussion of the issues involved usually follows the presentation of Working Against AIDS. The presentation contains 30 illustrated slides (these are included in the article). The presentation begins by explaining that much of the information concerning AIDS is prejudicial and misleading. The next few slides point out some of the common misconceptions about AIDS, such as claims denying the existence of the disease, or suggestions that only homosexuals and prostitutes are at risk. The presentation then goes on to explain the ways in which the virus can and cannot be transmitted. Then it discusses how the virus destroys the body's natural defenses and explains the ensuing symptoms. Slides 14 and 15 point out that no cure yet exists for AIDS, making prevention essential. Slides 16-23 explain what actions are considered to be high risk and which ones do not entail risk. Noting that AIDS can be prevented, slide 24 says that the disease should not present an obstacle to spontaneous manifestations of human relations. The next slide explains that condoms should always be used when having sex with someone who could be infected with AIDS. Finally slides 26-30 demonstrate the proper way to use and dispose of a condom.

  4. Predictive value of cytokines and immune activation biomarkers in AIDS-related non-Hodgkin lymphoma treated with rituximab plus infusional EPOCH (AMC-034 trial)

    PubMed Central

    Epeldegui, Marta; Lee, Jeannette Y.; Martínez, Anna C.; Widney, Daniel P.; Magpantay, Larry I.; Regidor, Deborah; Mitsuyasu, Ronald; Sparano, Joseph A.; Ambinder, Richard F.; Martínez-Maza, Otoniel

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The aims of this study were to determine if pre-treatment plasma levels of cytokines and immune activation-associated molecules changed following treatment for AIDS-NHL with rituximab plus infusional EPOCH, and to determine if pre-treatment levels of these molecules were associated with response to treatment and/or survival. Experimental design We quantified plasma levels of B cell activation-associated molecules (sCD27, sCD30, sCD23) and cytokines (IL-6, IL-10, CXCL13) prior to and after the initiation of treatment in persons with AIDS-NHL (n=69) in the AIDS Malignancies Consortium (AMC) 034 study, which evaluated treatment of AIDS-NHL with EPOCH chemotherapy and rituximab. Results Treatment resulted in decreased plasma levels of some of these molecules (CXCL13, sCD27, sCD30), with decreased levels persisting for one year following the completion of treatment. Lower levels of CXCL13 before treatment were associated with complete responses following lymphoma therapy. Elevated levels of IL-6 pre-treatment were associated with decreased overall survival, while higher IL-10 levels were associated with shorter progression-free survival, in multivariate analyses. Furthermore, patients with CXCL13 or IL-6 levels higher than the median levels for the NHL group, as well as those who had detectable IL-10, had lower overall survival and PFS, in Kaplan Meier analyses. Conclusions These results indicate that CXCL13, IL-6 and IL-10 have significant potential as prognostic biomarkers for AIDS-NHL. PMID:26384320

  5. Relation of activation-induced deaminase (AID) expression with antibody response to A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccination in HIV-1 infected patients.

    PubMed

    Cagigi, Alberto; Pensieroso, Simone; Ruffin, Nicolas; Sammicheli, Stefano; Thorstensson, Rigmor; Pan-Hammarström, Qiang; Hejdeman, Bo; Nilsson, Anna; Chiodi, Francesca

    2013-04-26

    The relevance of CD4+T-cells, viral load and age in the immunological response to influenza infection and vaccination in HIV-1 infected individuals has previously been pointed out. Our study aimed at assessing, in the setting of 2009 A(H1N1)pdm09 influenza vaccination, whether quantification of activation-induced deaminase (AID) expression in blood B-cells may provide additional indications for predicting antibody response to vaccination in HIV-1 infected patients with similar CD4+T-cell counts and age. Forty-seven healthy controls, 37 ART-treated and 17 treatment-naïve HIV-1 infected patients were enrolled in the study. Blood was collected prior to A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccination and at 1, 3 and 6 months after vaccination. Antibody titers to A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccine were measured by hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assay while the mRNA expression levels of AID were measured by quantitative real time PCR. Upon B-cell activation in vitro, AID increase correlated to antibody response to the A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccine at 1 month after vaccination in all individuals. In addition, the maximum expression levels of AID were significantly higher in those individuals who still carried protective levels of A(H1N1)pdm09 antibodies after 6 months from vaccination. No correlation was found between CD4+T-cell counts or age at vaccination or HIV-1 viral load and levels of A(H1N1)pdm09 antibodies. Assessing AID expression before vaccination may be an additional useful tool for defining a vaccination strategy in immune-compromised individuals at risk of immunization failure.

  6. Acculturation, Beliefs about AIDS, and AIDS Education among New York City Hispanic Parents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Epstein, Jennifer A.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Interviews with 100 Hispanic parents of New York City schoolchildren found that most parents were well informed about the major AIDS transmission routes but held some erroneous beliefs about casual contagion. AIDS knowledge was negatively related to acculturation level. Parents' knowledge and beliefs about AIDS predicted what they thought students…

  7. Development Aid: A Guide to Facts and Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Silva, Leelananda

    This eight-chapter book provides information on Official Development Assistance (ODA), its importance in relation to developed and developing countries, and its prospects and limitations. Major areas discussed include: (1) the institutional evolution of development aid; (2) forms of ODA, including project aid, program aid, bilateral aid,…

  8. Theories of AIDS Transmission: Their Development and Implications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sigelman, Carol; And Others

    This study examined knowledge of AIDS transmission, attitudes toward interacting with people who have AIDS, and concerns about being personally affected by AIDS in childhood and adolescence. Subjects were 188 children and adolescents ranging from 6 to 18 years old. An open-ended interview covering a wide range of AIDS-related topics was conducted…

  9. Pharmacological inhibition of ASBT changes bile composition and blocks progression of sclerosing cholangitis in mdr2 knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    Miethke, Alexander G; Zhang, Wujuan; Simmons, Julie; Taylor, Amy; Shi, Tiffany; Shanmukhappa, Shiva Kumar; Karns, Rebekah; White, Shana; Jegga, Anil G; Lages, Celine S; Nkinin, Stephenson; Keller, Bradley T; Setchell, Kenneth D. R.

    2015-01-01

    Deficiency for mdr2, a canalicular phospholipid floppase, leads to excretion of low phospholipid “toxic” bile causing progressive cholestasis. We hypothesize that pharmacological inhibition of the ileal apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter (ASBT) blocks progression of sclerosing cholangitis in mdr2−/− mice. 30-day-old, female mdr2−/− mice were fed high-fat chow containing 0.006% SC-435, a minimally absorbed, potent inhibitor of ASBT, providing on average 11 mg/kg/day of compound. Bile acids (BA) and phospholipids were measured by mass spectrometry. Compared with untreated mdr2−/− mice, SC-435 treatment for 14 days increased fecal BA excretion by 8-fold, lowered total BA concentration in liver by 65%, reduced total BA and individual hydrophobic BA concentrations in serum by >98%, and decreased plasma ALT, total bilirubin, and serum alkaline phosphatase levels by 86, 93 and 55%, respectively. Liver histology of sclerosing cholangitis improved, and extent of fibrosis decreased concomitant with reduction of hepatic profibrogenic gene expression. Biliary BA concentrations significantly decreased and phospholipids remained low and unchanged with treatment. The phosphatidylcholine/BA ratio in treated mice corrected towards a ratio of 0.28 found in wild type mice, indicating decreased bile toxicity. Hepatic RNAseq studies revealed upregulation of putative anti-inflammatory and antifibrogenic genes, including Ppara and Igf1 and downregulation of several pro-inflammatory genes, including Ccl2 and Lcn2, implicated in leukocyte recruitment. Flow cytometric analysis revealed significant reduction of frequencies of hepatic CD11b+F4/80+ Kupffer cells and CD11b+Gr1+ neutrophils, accompanied by expansion of anti-inflammatory Ly6C− monocytes in treated mdr2−/− mice. Conclusion Inhibition of ASBT reduces BA pool size and retention of hydrophobic BA, favorably alters the biliary PC/BA ratio, profoundly changes the hepatic transcriptome, attenuates

  10. The pathology of AIDS.

    PubMed Central

    Macher, A M

    1988-01-01

    The acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) is a devastating new disease caused by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). This retrovirus causes profound immunoincompetence in its infected hosts, who are thereafter susceptible to develop myriad severe and relapsing protozoal, fungal, bacterial, viral, and arthropodal opportunistic infections, as well as unusual malignancies. The more than 50,000 patients who have developed AIDS in the United States have produced a sudden unexpected deluge of diagnostic dilemmas that are stressing laboratories of pathology everywhere. This paper describes the gross and microscopic pathology of the numerous complications in patients infected by HIV: (a) the prodromal AIDS-related complex with persistent generalized lymphadenopathy, (b) lymphoid infiltration of salivary gland and lung, including the complex of lymphoid interstitial pneumonitis-pulmonary lymphoid hyperplasia, (c) extranodal non-Hodgkin's lymphomas, (d) multifocal mucocutaneous and visceral Kaposi's sarcoma, (e) small cell undifferentiated (oat cell) carcinomas, (f) protozoal infections caused by Pneumocystis carinii, Toxoplasma gondii, Acanthamoeba, Cryptosporidium species (sp.), and Isospora belli, (g) the causes of chronic enteritis, (h) mycotic infections caused by Candida sp., Cryptococcus neoformans, Histoplasma capsulatum, Coccidioides immitis, and Sporothrix schenckii, (i) bacterial infections caused by Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare, M. tuberculosis, M. kansasii, Nocardia sp., Listeria monocytogenes, Legionella sp., Treponema pallidum, and others, (j) viral infections caused by cytomegalovirus, herpes simplex and zoster, polyomavirus (progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy), hepatitis B, molluscum contagiosum, and papillomavirus, (k) oral hairy leukoplakia, (l) subacute encephalopathy, and (m) Norwegian scabies. PMID:2836878

  11. Migrants and HIV / AIDS.

    PubMed

    Duckett, M

    2000-06-01

    This paper outlines some of the imperatives that should drive attention to the rights of legal and illegal migrants to health, particularly in relation to HIV/AIDS. It is noted that migrants can be especially vulnerable to HIV/AIDS/sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), but they are often excluded or simply missed in many prevention and care programs. In terms of the effects of globalization, it would seem that governments are required to ensure that this state of affairs does not continue. Evidence indicates that human rights and other ethical violations are occurring and need to be urgently addressed at local, national and international levels. In view of such, it is recommended that HIV/AIDS/STD prevention and care programs for migrant populations should be developed with and guided by migrant communities, and involving substantial community mobilization. Although some progress in preventing the spread of HIV to and from migrants have been documented, and projects addressing their needs have been made accessible, the challenge of dealing more comprehensively the complex issues involved still remains.

  12. Thailand's fear of AIDS patients.

    PubMed

    Sivaraman, S

    1995-07-01

    Because of a terrorist incident against Bangkok's Relief Center for HIV/AIDS Carriers, it is feared that a rising intolerance is occurring in Thailand. Such fears are damaging efforts to help those with HIV/AIDS. Misconceptions about the nature of HIV/AIDS continue to dominate Thai society. The Thai government is particularly worried that an overemphasis on HIV/AIDS will hurt tourism. According to the Population and Community Development Association, Thai people are infected with HIV at the rate of 500 per day and treatment costs may exceed $170 million a year by the year 2000. Unfortunately, the lack of nongovernmental institutions (other than Buddhist monasteries) and the lack of positive response from other Thai social institutions is driving relatives and friends to take care of the afflicted, and the terrorist attack shows that many Thai people are still unprepared for the challenge.

  13. The Master Hearing Aid

    PubMed Central

    Curran, James R.

    2013-01-01

    As early as the 1930s the term Master Hearing Aid (MHA) described a device used in the fitting of hearing aids. In their original form, the MHA was a desktop system that allowed for simulated or actual adjustment of hearing aid components that resulted in a changed hearing aid response. Over the years the MHA saw many embodiments and contributed to a number of rationales for the fitting of hearing aids. During these same years, the MHA was viewed by many as an inappropriate means of demonstrating hearing aids; the audio quality of the desktop systems was often superior to the hearing aids themselves. These opinions and the evolution of the MHA have molded the modern perception of hearing aids and the techniques used in the fitting of hearing aids. This article reports on a history of the MHA and its influence on the fitting of hearing aids. PMID:23686682

  14. An Investigation of the Relative Safety of Alternative Navigational System Designs for the New Sunshine Skyway Bridge: A CAORF (Computer Aided Operations Research Facility) Simulation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-09-01

    characteristics. Pilots were required to provided no added margin of safety beyond the bridge - use greater crab angles during thunderstorm scenarios...electronic navigation aids may would combine dolphins, complete island and horseshoe . "provide significantly improved navigational data" to island stuctures...The next two bridge piers on should not be so close to bridges that the success of navigat- either side would be protected by a horseshoe shaped ing

  15. Outcomes from a Randomized Controlled Trial of a Group Intervention for HIV Positive Men and Women Coping with AIDS-Related Loss and Bereavement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sikkema, Kathleen J.; Hansen, Nathan B.; Kochman, Arlene; Tate, David C.; DiFranceisco, Wayne

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of a group coping intervention for HIV-positive men and women who have lost a loved one(s) to AIDS in the past 2 years. Two hundred thirty-five participants, diverse with respect to race/ethnicity and sexual orientation, were randomly assigned to a 12-week cognitive-behavioral group intervention…

  16. Perceived sufficiency and usefulness of IEC materials and methods related to HIV/AIDS among high school youth in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Cherie, Amsale; Mitkie, Getenet; Ismail, Shabbir; Berhane, Yemane

    2005-04-01

    This study was conducted to assess the perceived sufficiency and usefulness of HIV/AIDS information, education and communication (IEC) messages and materials as well as to identify preferences for IEC sources and methods. Data were collected using a self-administered questionnaire and focus group discussions. A total of 901 students in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, participated in the study. Over three quarters of the respondents believed in the usefulness of IEC. IEC materials were perceived to be useful in increasing knowledge about HIV/AIDS by 456 (51%), to influence attitude by 357 (40%) and to acquire safer sexual practices by 382 (42%) of the respondents. None of the information sources and messages available for high school students highly satisfied the sufficiency indicators. Even though no single information source was highly preferred, radio and television ranked top. Life skills training was the most desired intervention by the students. IEC on HIV/AIDS was able to acquaint students with the disease rather than equipping them with knowledge and skill needed in their daily life. Therefore, appropriate and mutually reinforcing IEC messages with emphasis on life skill training are recommended.

  17. Food consumption patterns, diversity of food nutrients and mean nutrient intake in relation to HIV/AIDS status in Kisumu district Kenya.

    PubMed

    Onyango, Agatha Christine; Walingo, Mary Khakoni; Othuon, Lucas

    2009-09-01

    As the causes and consequences of the AIDS epidemic become clearer, so does the fundamental importance of food and nutritional security for HIV-affected individuals. Even as food insecurity remains a major problem in poor households, its effects are worsened in disease states like HIV infection. Food deficiency and nutritional inadequacy compromise an individual's physical status and work capacity, and may also diminish their resource base and household provisioning. The prevalence of HIV and AIDS in Kenya threatens food production systems, which intensifies poverty, increases the nutritional implications for HIV-infected individuals, accelerates the rate of orphanhood beyond what existing social networks can cope with, and basically affects all indicators of socio-economic development in the country. This cross-sectional study sought to assess food and nutrient intake in HIV-affected versus non-HIV-affected households. Purposive sampling was used to select 160 households (77 HIV-affected households and 83 non-HIV-affected households) in Kisumu district, a lowland area along Lake Victoria. A consolidated questionnaire that included a food-frequency checklist and personal 24-hour dietary recall was used to gather information from 40 households. The data were analysed quantitatively; descriptive statistics were mainly measures of central tendency, and inferential statistics involved chi-square tests and independent t-test samples. A table depicting food composition was used to compute the nutrient intake of each household. The findings reveal a significant relationship between a household's HIV/AIDS status and nutrient intake.

  18. How to Get Hearing Aids

    MedlinePlus

    ... Consumer Products Hearing Aids How to get Hearing Aids Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... my hearing aids? How do I get hearing aids? Before getting a hearing aid, you should consider ...

  19. Sclerosing Epithelioid Fibrosarcoma of the Bone: A Case Report of High Resistance to Chemotherapy and a Survey of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Grunewald, Thomas G. P.; von Luettichau, Irene; Weirich, Gregor; Wawer, Angela; Behrends, Uta; Prodinger, Peter M.; Jundt, Gernot; Bielack, Stefan S.; Gradinger, Reiner; Burdach, Stefan

    2010-01-01

    Sclerosing epithelioid fibrosarcoma (SEF) is a rare soft tissue sarcoma mostly occurring in extraosseous sites. SEF represents a clinically challenging entity especially because no standardized treatment regimens are available. Intraosseous localization is an additional challenge with respect to the therapeutical approach. We report on a 16-year-old patient with SEF of the right proximal tibia. The patient underwent standardized neoadjuvant chemotherapy analogous to the EURAMOS-1 protocol for the treatment of osteosarcoma followed by tumor resection and endoprosthetic reconstruction. Histopathological analysis of the resected tumor showed >90% vital tumor cells suggesting no response to chemotherapy. Therefore, therapy was reassigned to the CWS 2002 High-Risk protocol for the treatment of soft tissue sarcoma. To date (22 months after diagnosis), there is no evidence of relapse or metastasis. Our data suggest that SEF may be resistant to a chemotherapy regimen containing Cisplatin, Doxorubicin, and Methotrexate, which should be considered in planning treatment for patients with SEF. PMID:20396630

  20. Sclerosing mucoepidermoid carcinoma with eosinophilia of thyroid gland in a male patient: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Lai, Chi-Yun; Chao, Tzu-Chieh; Lin, Jen-Der; Hsueh, Chuen

    2015-01-01

    Sclerosing mucoepidermoid carcinoma with eosinophilia (SMECE) was first described by Chan et al in 1991. It is characterized by nest or strands of epidermoid tumor cells with squamous differentiation, rare mucous cells, prominent sclerotic stroma, eosinophilic and lymphoplasmacytic infiltration, and a background of chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis in the non-neoplastic thyroid gland. It is important to recognize SMECE of thyroid and differentiate it from squamous cell carcinoma or other neoplasms with squamous differentiation/metaplasia. In published cases, the SMECE of thyroid gland predominantly occurs in women. We report a case of SMECE of thyroid in a 45-year-old male patient. All cases in male patients were Caucasian described in English literature, and our case is the first one in Asian.

  1. Should Aid Reward Performance?

    PubMed Central

    Olken, Benjamin A.; Onishi, Junko; Wong, Susan

    2014-01-01

    We report an experiment in 3,000 villages that tested whether incentives improve aid efficacy. Villages received block grants for maternal and child health and education that incorporated relative performance incentives. Subdistricts were randomized into incentives, an otherwise identical program without incentives, or control. Incentives initially improved preventative health indicators, particularly in underdeveloped areas, and spending efficiency increased. While school enrollments improved overall, incentives had no differential impact on education, and incentive health effects diminished over time. Reductions in neonatal mortality in non-incentivized areas did not persist with incentives. We find no systematic scoring manipulation nor funding reallocation toward richer areas. PMID:25485039

  2. HIV infection and AIDS.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, A

    1996-09-01

    Many of the clinical features of HIV/AIDS can be ascribed to the profound immune deficiency which develops in infected patients. The destruction of the immune system by the virus results in opportunistic infection, as well as an increased risk of autoimmune disease and malignancy. In addition, disease manifestations related to the virus itself may occur. For example, during the primary illness which occurs within weeks after first exposure to HIV, clinical symptoms occur in at least 50% of cases, typically as a mononucleosis syndrome. HIV-related complications are rarely encountered in patients with preserved immunity (i.e. CD4 T-cell counts greater than 500 cells/mm3). Recurrent mucocutaneous herpes simplex (HSV), herpes zoster (VZV), oral candidiasis and oral hairy leukoplakia occur with increasing frequency as the CD4 count drops below this level. Immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) occurs in association with HIV and often presents early in the clinical course. The risk of developing opportunistic infections and malignancies typical of AIDS increases progressively as CD4 counts fall below 200 cells/mm3. The clinical manifestations of infections associated with AIDS tend to fall into well-recognized patterns of presentation, including pneumonia, dysphagia/odynophagia, diarrhoea, neurological symptoms, fever, wasting, anaemia and visual loss. The commonest pathogens include Candida albicans, Pneumocystis carinii, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Toxoplasma gondii, Cryptococcus neoformans, Mycobacterium avium intracellulare and cytomegalovirus. Malignant disease in patients with HIV infection also occurs in a characteristic pattern. Only two tumours are prevalent: Kaposi's sarcoma, a multifocal tumour of vascular endothelium which typically involves skin and mucosal surfaces; and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, which is typically high grade in phenotype, often arising within the central nervous system. The principles of therapy include reduction of HIV replication by antiretroviral

  3. Fuel dispenser aid

    SciTech Connect

    Bobst, J.M.

    1993-08-31

    A fuel dispenser aid is described for holding a trigger-like valve operating lever relative to a pistol grip-like handle portion of a valving device for dispensing gasoline or other fuels through a nozzle of the valving device, said fuel dispenser aid comprising: a mounting member formed of a material having a resilient, shape retaining character and configured for mounting over the pistol grip-like handle portion of the valving device, a flexible strap secured at a first end thereof to the mounting member and extending freely therefrom such that when the mounting member is mounted over the pistol grip-like handle portion of the valving device the free portion of the strap can he looped under the trigger-like valve operating lever and up to the mounting member, and fastening means for releasably and adjustably fastening the free portion of the strap to the mounting member after the free portion of the strap has been looped under the valve operating lever and up to the mounting member whereby the valve operating lever can be held in a desired set position relative to the handle portion of the valving device for dispensing fuel without requiring that the operating lever of the valving device continuously be manually held in said set position.

  4. Exploring HIV-testing intentions in young Asian/Pacific Islander (API) women as it relates to acculturation, theory of gender and power (TGP), and the AIDS risk reduction model (ARRM).

    PubMed

    Salud, Margaret C; Marshak, Helen Hopp; Natto, Zuhair S; Montgomery, Susanne

    2014-01-01

    While HIV rates are low for Asian/Pacific Islanders (APIs), they have been increasing, especially for API women in the USA. We conducted a cross-sectional study with 299 young API women (18-24 years old) in the Inland Empire region of Southern California to better understand their intention for HIV testing and their perceptions about HIV/AIDS. Data analyses included descriptive statistics, bivariate exploration for model building and multivariate analyses to determine variables associated with HIV-testing intentions. Results suggest that more lifetime sexual partners, greater perceived gender susceptibility, higher HIV/AIDS knowledge, sexually active, more positive attitudes about HIV testing and higher self-perceptions/experiences related to risk contribute to stronger intentions for HIV testing in young API women. Findings from this study will contribute to the limited literature on HIV/AIDS in API women and provide information that can be used for developing and implementing culturally appropriate programs that encourage HIV prevention and testing in this population.

  5. HIV/AIDS and blindness.

    PubMed Central

    Kestelyn, P. G.; Cunningham, E. T.

    2001-01-01

    Nearly 34 million people are currently living with HIV/AIDS: ocular complications are common, affecting 50% to 75% of all such patients at some point during the course of their illness. Cytomegalovirus retinitis is by far the most frequent cause of vision loss in patients with AIDS. Although the prevalence of cytomegalovirus retinitis is decreasing in industrialized countries because of the widespread availability of highly active antiretroviral therapy, between 10% and 20% of HIV-infected patients worldwide can be expected to lose vision in one or both eyes as a result of ocular cytomegalovirus infection. Less frequent but important causes of bilateral vision loss in patients with HIV/AIDS include varicella zoster virus and herpes simplex virus retinitis, HIV-related ischaemic microvasculopathy, ocular syphilis, ocular tuberculosis, cryptococcal meningitis, and ocular toxic or allergic drug reactions. At present, most patients with HIV/AIDS in developing countries who lose their vision have a very limited life expectancy. As antiretroviral therapy makes its way to these countries, however, both life expectancy and the prevalence of blindness related to HIV/AIDS can be expected to increase dramatically. PMID:11285664

  6. The Diffuse Sclerosing Variant of Papillary Thyroid Cancer Presenting as Innumerable Diffuse Microcalcifications in Underlying Adolescent Hashimoto's Thyroiditis: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Sun Hye; Hong, Hyun Sook; Lee, Eun Hye; Kwak, Jeong Ja

    2016-03-01

    Hashimoto's thyroiditis is the most common diffuse thyroid disease and is characterized by diffuse lymphocytic infiltration. However, the ultrasonographic findings of papillary thyroid carcinomas that arise from Hashimoto's thyroiditis in the pediatric and adolescent population are not well known.We report a rare ultrasonographic finding in a 22-year-old woman diagnosed with the diffuse sclerosing variant of papillary thyroid carcinoma that arose from underlying Hashimoto's thyroiditis: innumerable diffuse microcalcifications instead of a typical malignant-appearing nodule.

  7. Chemokine receptor CCR2b 64I polymorphism and its relation to CD4 T-cell counts and disease progression in a Danish cohort of HIV-infected individuals. Copenhagen AIDS cohort.

    PubMed

    Eugen-Olsen, J; Iversen, A K; Benfield, T L; Koppelhus, U; Garred, P

    1998-06-01

    We have investigated the role of the recently described mutation in CCR2b named 64I in relation to HIV resistance, CD4 T-cell counts, and disease progression in Danish individuals by polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based methods as well as sequenced full-length CXCR4 and CCR5 genes from HIV-infected long-term nonprogressors for possible mutations. In total, 215 Danish individuals were analyzed for 64I allele frequency; disease progression was followed in 105 HIV-1-positive homosexual Danish men from their first known positive HIV-1 test result and up to 11 years. In 87 individuals, the CD4 T-cell count was monitored closely. We found no significant difference in 64I allele frequency between HIV-1-seropositive persons (0.08), high-risk HIV-1-seronegative persons (0.11), and blood donors (0.06). No significant difference was observed in annual CD4 T-cell decline, CD4 T-cell counts at the time of AIDS, in AIDS-free survival as well as survival with AIDS, between 64I allele carriers and wild-type individuals. Among 9 long-term nonprogressors, 2 carried the 64I allele, while none of 9 fast progressors carried the 64I allele. However, this was not significantly different (p=.47). Long-term nonprogression could not be explained by CXCR4 polymorphism or other polymorphisms in the CCR5 gene than the CCR5delta32 allele. Furthermore, we were not able to detect any significant independent effect of the 64I allele on development to AIDS, overall survival, and annual CD4 T-cell decline in this cohort.

  8. Neurological Complications of AIDS

    MedlinePlus

    ... the neurological complications of AIDS. Some disorders require aggressive therapy while others are treated symptomatically. Medicines range ... certain bacterial infections, and penicillin to treat neurosyphilis. Aggressive antiretroviral therapy is used to treat AIDS dementia ...

  9. Unconsciousness - first aid

    MedlinePlus

    Loss of consciousness - first aid; Coma - first aid; Mental status change; Altered mental status ... person is unconscious and: Does not return to consciousness quickly (within a minute) Has fallen down or ...

  10. First Aid Tips

    MedlinePlus

    ... NEI for Kids > First Aid Tips All About Vision About the Eye Ask a Scientist Video Series ... Eye Health and Safety First Aid Tips Healthy Vision Tips Protective Eyewear Sports and Your Eyes Fun ...

  11. Home Health Aides

    MedlinePlus

    ... do the following: Assist clients in their daily personal tasks, such as bathing or dressing Provide basic ... social networks and communities Home health aides, unlike personal care aides , typically work for certified home health ...

  12. AIDS and Athletes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calabrese, Leonard H.; Kelley, Dennis

    1989-01-01

    This article discusses the onset and progression of AIDS, its importance as a public health issue, and reducing the risk of AIDS transmission among athletes and those who work with them, including team physicians and athletic trainers. (IAH)

  13. HIV/AIDS

    MedlinePlus

    ... at risk for serious infections and certain cancers. AIDS stands for acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. It is the final stage of infection with HIV. Not everyone with HIV develops AIDS. HIV most often spreads through unprotected sex with ...

  14. HIV/AIDS

    MedlinePlus

    ... yeast infection (thrush) Shingles (herpes zoster) Progression to AIDS If you receive no treatment for your HIV ... childbirth or breast-feeding. How does HIV become AIDS? HIV destroys CD4 cells — a specific type of ...

  15. HIV/AIDS Coinfection

    MedlinePlus

    ... Laotian Mongolian Spanish Turkish Vietnamese Hindi Subscribe HIV/AIDS Coinfection Approximately 10% of the HIV-infected population ... Control and Prevention website to learn about HIV/AIDS and Viral Hepatitis guidelines and resources. Home About ...

  16. AIDS and family planning.

    PubMed

    1992-01-01

    In 1991, an HIV prevention program advisor and a research/evaluation specialist for family planning programs discussed problems that affected HIV prevention and family planning services in Haiti before and after the coup of the Aristide government. Population activities began aimlessly in 1974 and HIV prevention efforts only began in 1988. After the coup, Haitians lost their newly found hope for meaningful development. All foreign assistance ended and they did not trust the army. In fact, other than essential child survival activities, no health and family planning services operated for several weeks. The situation grew worse after the economic embargo. 3 months after the coup, the US considered adding family planning assistance. Still little movement of condom, family planning, and health supplies left Port-au-Prince for the provinces which adversely affected all health related efforts. Condoms could no longer be distributed easily either in the socially marketed or US supplied condom distribution programs. Before the coup, HIV prevention and family planning programs depended on peer educators to educate the public (this approach made these programs quite successful), but the 2 experts feared that they would not return to those roles and that these programs would need to completely rebuild. Another concern was the large scale urban-rural migration making it difficult for them to continue care. Early in the AIDS epidemic, the Haitian government was on the defensive because the US considered Haitians as a high risk group so it did little to prevent HIV transmission. After 1988, HIV prevention activities in Haiti centered on raising awareness and personalizing the epidemic. The AIDS specialist noted, however, that a major obstacle to increasing knowledge is that AIDS is just 1 of many fatal diseases in Haiti. Moreover few health professionals in Haiti have ever had public health training.

  17. A Teaching Aids Exhibition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahanja, Salah

    1985-01-01

    Describes an exhibition for the benefit of teachers of English in Arab Primary Schools, which was prepared by third-year students at the Teachers College for Arab Teachers. The exhibition included games, songs, audiovisual aids, crossword puzzles, vocabulary, spelling booklets, preposition aids, and worksheet and lesson planning aids. (SED)

  18. Difficult Decisions: AIDS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slesnick, Irwin L.

    1988-01-01

    Focuses on public education about the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) epidemic. Discusses the problems of a second epidemic of fear and anxiety. Presents several questions for classroom discussion and analysis of the public fear of AIDS. Gives some statistics highlighting misinformation about AIDS. (CW)

  19. Stroke: First Aid

    MedlinePlus

    First aid Stroke: First aid Stroke: First aid By Mayo Clinic Staff A stroke occurs when there's bleeding into your brain or when normal blood flow to ... next several hours. Seek immediate medical assistance. A stroke is a true emergency. The sooner treatment is ...

  20. Creating Motivating Job Aids.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tilaro, Angie; Rossett, Allison

    1993-01-01

    Explains how to create job aids that employees will be motivated to use, based on a review of pertinent literature and interviews with professionals. Topics addressed include linking motivation with job aids; Keller's ARCS (Attention, Relevance, Confidence, Satisfaction) model of motivation; and design strategies for job aids based on Keller's…

  1. HIV and AIDS

    MedlinePlus

    ... A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness HIV and AIDS KidsHealth > For Teens > HIV and AIDS Print A A A What's in this article? ... in human history. HIV causes a condition called acquired immunodeficiency syndrome — better known as AIDS . HIV destroys a type ...

  2. Designing State Aid Formulas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhao, Bo; Bradbury, Katharine

    2009-01-01

    This paper designs a new equalization-aid formula based on fiscal gaps of local communities. When states are in transition to a new local aid formula, the issue of whether and how to hold existing aid harmless poses a challenge. The authors show that some previous studies and the formulas derived from them give differential weights to existing and…

  3. Preparation of perovskite-type oxides of cobalt by the malic acid aided process and their electrocatalytic surface properties in relation to oxygen evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Tiwari, S.K.; Chartier, P.; Singh, R.N. . Electrochemical Lab.)

    1995-01-01

    The electrocatalytic properties of perovskite-type cobalt oxides (La[sub 1[minus]x]Sr[sub x]CoO[sub 3], where x = 0, 0.2, 0.4), in the form of thin films on conductive supports, were studied by cyclic voltammetry and Tafel polarization techniques. The films had conductive and satisfactory adherent properties. The oxides were synthesized by a low temperature malic acid aided method. The cyclic voltammetry showed a pair of redox peaks prior to the onset of oxygen evolution on the oxide film with nickel support, while similar peaks were absent in the same oxide film on Pt and Ti. The anodic polarization studies indicated two Tafel slopes: 57 to 64 mV/decade at low and 100 to 130 mV/decade at high overpotentials, and first-order kinetics with respect to OH[sup [minus

  4. Perceptions of Women Living with AIDS in Rural India Related to the Engagement of HIV-Trained Accredited Social Health Activists for Care and Support

    PubMed Central

    NYAMATHI, ADELINE M.; WILLIAM, RAVI RAJ; GANGULY, KALYAN K.; SINHA, SANJEEV; HERAVIAN, ANISA; ALBARRÁN, CYNTHIA R.; THOMAS, ALEXANDRA; GREENGOLD, BARBARA; EKSTRAND, MARIA; RAMAKRISHNA, PADMA; RAO, PANTANGI RAMA

    2011-01-01

    A community-based participatory research study was conducted using focus groups with 39 women living with AIDS (WLA) in the rural setting of Andhra Pradesh, India. In addition, three nurses, two physicians, and five reproductive health accredited social health activists (ASHAs) took part in focus groups. The WLA offered insight into the benefits of HIV-trained ASHAs including emotional support, assistance with travel to health care providers and antiretroviral therapy medication adherence. Health care providers also identified benefits of using HIV-trained ASHAs and suggested modalities for how to train these individuals. These findings will contribute to the design of a future program of care involving HIV-trained ASHAs. PMID:21331322

  5. Dental students' HIV/AIDS-related knowledge, attitudes, and intentions: impact of the U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration's community-based dental partnership program.

    PubMed

    Hamershock, Rose A; Rajabiun, Serena; Fox, Jane E; Mofidi, Mahyar; Abel, Stephen N; York, Jill A; Kunzel, Carol; Sanogo, Moussa; Mayfield, Theresa G

    2014-08-01

    Access to oral health care for vulnerable populations is one of the concerns addressed by the U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration HIV/AIDS Bureau's Community-Based Dental Partnership Program (CBDPP). The program introduces dental students and residents at several dental schools to care for vulnerable patients through didactic and clinical work in community-based dental settings. This study of the dental students and residents in this program answered three questions: 1) What are their HIV knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors? 2) How has participation in the CBDPP impacted their knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors? 3) Has the intervention affected their work placement decisions and attitudes after graduation, particularly with respect to treating people living with HIV and other underserved populations? A total of 305 first- through fourth-year dental students and first- and second-year residents at five dental schools across the United States completed surveys before and after a community-based rotation and following graduation. Response rates at each of the five schools ranged from 82.4 to 100 percent. The results showed an increase in the participants' knowledge and positive attitudes regarding treatment for patients with HIV and other vulnerable populations post-rotation compared to pre-rotation. Results after graduation found that most respondents were practicing in private settings or in academic institutions as residents but were willing to treat a diverse patient population. These findings support the role of training programs, such as the CBDPP, for expanding the dental workforce to treating vulnerable populations including people living with HIV/AIDS.

  6. Space Derived Health Aids (AID, Heart Monitor)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    CPI's spinoff from miniaturized pace circuitry is the new heart-assist device, the AID implantable automatic pulse generator. AID pulse generator monitors the heart continuously, recognizes onset of fibrillation, then administers a corrective electrical shock. A mini- computer, a power source, and two electrodes which sense heart activity are included in the unit. An associated system was also developed. It includes an external recorder to be worn by AID patients and a physician's console to display the data stored by the recorder. System provides a record of fibrillation occurrences and the ensuing defibrillation.

  7. AIDS, Alcohol & Health Care. Chapter 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Acampora, Alfonso P., Ed.; Nebelkopf, Ethan, Ed.

    This document contains 10 papers from the ninth World Conference of Therapeutic Communities (TC) that deal with a variety of health-related subjects. Papers include: (1) "AIDS among IV Drug Users: Epidemiology, Natural History & TC Experiences" (Don C. Des Jarlais, et al.); (2) "AIDS and Therapeutic Communities: Policy Implications" (Don C. Des…

  8. Capitalization and the Incidence of School Aid.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyckoff, Paul Gary

    2001-01-01

    Summarizes goals of state education aid, presents a conceptual model of aid's welfare effects, and examines the literature of tax and expenditure effects. Capitalization changes the relative desirability of two goals; equalizing resources across districts becomes less important than equalizing school districts' actual spending levels. (Contains 45…

  9. Public Health Nursing for People with AIDS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dickinson, Dena; And Others

    Individuals with Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) or AIDS-related conditions (ARC) need continual care and support, at a level which can severely tax the health resources of a community. Public health nursing should have a central role in the effective and efficient response to this devastating problem. Since the early stages of the AIDS…

  10. STATE AID AND SCHOOL FISCAL POLICY.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    SAMTER, EUGENE C.

    THE EFFECTS OF A 1962 NEW YORK STATE AID TO EDUCATION ACT WERE INVESTIGATED IN RELATION TO AN OLD FOUNDATION PROGRAM. THIS STATE AID TO EDUCATION ACT WAS BASED ON THE CONCEPT OF SHARED COST. BOTH NEW AND OLD PROGRAMS WERE APPRAISED WITH RESPECT TO THE OBJECTIVES OF SCHOOL FISCAL POLICY--EQUITY OF SUPPORT (EQUAL TREATMENT OF EQUALS), EQUALIZATION…

  11. Workers' Reactions to AIDS and Other Illnesses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheehan, Eugene P.; And Others

    Previous research on the public's response to Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) has been concerned with attitudes and knowledge in relation to the disease itself. This study investigated people's willingness to interact with individuals with AIDS in the workplace. Participants (N=358) were college students with an average age of 25.…

  12. Space assembly fixtures and aids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloom, K. A.; Lillenas, A. N.

    1980-01-01

    Concepts and requirements for assembly fixtures and aids necessary for the assembly and maintenance of spare platforms were studied. Emphasis was placed on erectable and deployable type structures with the shuttle orbiter as the assembly base. Both single and multiple orbiter flight cases for the platform assembly were considered. Applicable space platform assembly studies were reviewed to provide a data base for establishing the assembly fixture and aids design requirements, assembly constraints, and the development of representative design concepts. Conclusions indicated that fixture requirements will vary with platform size. Larger platforms will require translation relative to the orbiter RMS working volume. The installation of platform payloads and subsystems (e.g., utility distribution) must also be considered in the specification of assembly fixtures and aids.

  13. What Is HIV/AIDS?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Subscribe Translate Text Size Print What Is HIV/AIDS? Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) HIV stands for human ... use the HIV Testing & Care Services Locator. GO Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) AIDS stands for acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. AIDS ...

  14. HIV, AIDS, and the Future

    MedlinePlus

    ... Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues HIV / AIDS HIV, AIDS, and the Future Past Issues / Summer 2009 Table ... and your loved ones from HIV/AIDS. The AIDS Memorial Quilt In 1987, a total of 1, ...

  15. Hearing Aid Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grugel, Richard N. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    Progress in hearing aids has come a long way. Yet despite such progress hearing aids are not the perfect answer to many hearing problems. Some adult ears cannot accommodate tightly fitting hearing aids. Mouth movements such as chewing, talking, and athletic or other active endeavors also lead to loosely fitting ear molds. It is well accepted that loosely fitting hearing aids are the cause of feedback noise. Since feedback noise is the most common complaint of hearing aid wearers it has been the subject of various patents. Herein a hearing aid assembly is provided eliminating feedback noise. The assembly includes the combination of a hearing aid with a headset developed to constrict feedback noise.

  16. Global NeuroAIDS Roundtable

    PubMed Central

    Achim, Cristian L.; Boivin, Michael J.; Brew, Bruce J.; Clifford, David B.; Colosi, Deborah A.; Ellis, Ronald J.; Heaton, Robert K.; Gallo-Diop, Amadou; Grant, Igor; Kanmogne, Georgette D.; Kumar, Mahendra; Letendre, Scott; Marcotte, Thomas D.; Nath, Avindra; Pardo, Carlos A.; Paul, Robert H.; Pulliam, Lynn; Robertson, Kevin; Royal, Walter; Sacktor, Ned; Sithinamsuwan, Pasiri; Smith, Davey M.; Valcour, Victor; Wigdahl, Brian; Wood, Charles

    2013-01-01

    In May 2012, the Division of AIDS Research at the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) organized the “Global NeuroAIDS Roundtable” in conjunction with the 11th International Symposium on Neurovirology and the 2012 Conference on HIV in the Nervous System. The meeting was held in New York, NY, USA and brought together NIMH-funded investigators who are currently working on projects related to the neurological complications of AIDS (NeuroAIDS) in Africa, Asia, Eastern Europe, and Latin America in order to provide an opportunity to share their recent findings and discuss the challenges encountered within each country. The major goals of the roundtable were to evaluate HIV-associated neurocognitive impairment and determine if it may be directly attributable to distinct HIV subtypes or clades and to discuss the future priorities for global NeuroAIDS research. At the “Global NeuroAIDS Roundtable”, presentations of preliminary research indicated that HIV-associated neurocognitive impairment is prevalent in all countries examined regardless of which HIV clade is present in the region. The only clear-cut difference between HIV-1 clades was in relation to subtypes A and D in Uganda. However, a key point that emerged from the discussions was that there is an urgent need to standardize neurocognitive assessment methodologies across the globe before definitive conclusions can be drawn regarding the relationship between HIV clade diversity and neuropathogenesis. Future research directions were also discussed at the roundtable with particular emphasis on the potential of viral and host factor molecular interactions to impact the pathophysiology of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) from a global perspective. PMID:23354550

  17. Comparing state-only expenditures for AIDS.

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, M J; Ryan, C C

    1988-01-01

    The State AIDS Policy Center at the Inter-governmental Health Policy Project (IHPP) at George Washington University surveyed all 50 states to determine state AIDS (acquired immunodeficiency syndrome) expenditures, without Medicaid or federal funds, for fiscal 1984-88. During this period, state-only expenditures increased 15-fold, to $156.3 million. Between fiscal 1986-1988, the distribution of state funding for AIDS patient care and support services doubled from 16 to 35 per cent and the number of states supplementing federal funds for testing and counseling increased from eight to 20. Five states continue to account for the largest AIDS appropriations. Of these, California leads in funding research; New York, Florida, and New Jersey have directed funds to provide care and services to IV (intravenous) drug users, prisoners, and children. The average state expenditure per diagnosed AIDS case is $3,323 and an increasing number of states with relatively low case loads are appropriating funds beyond this level. Across states, AIDS expenditures per person average $.65 and $.21 for education, testing and counseling--below the level recommended by the Institute of Medicine for AIDS prevention activities. Some jurisdictions support AIDS activities indirectly by shifting resources, often from their STD (sexually transmitted disease) programs--this trend deserves continuing review given the rise in STD cases and their relationship to diagnosed AIDS. PMID:3126674

  18. Third-world realities in a first-world setting: A study of the HIV/AIDS-related conditions and risk behaviors of sex trade workers in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada.

    PubMed

    Bird, Yelena; Lemstra, Mark; Rogers, Marla; Moraros, John

    2016-12-01

    The transmission and prevalence of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) among those employed as sex trade workers (STW) is a major public health concern. The present study describes the self-reported responses of 340 STW, at-risk for contracting HIV. The participants were recruited by selective targeting between 2009 and 2010 from within the Saskatoon Health Region (SHR), Saskatchewan, Canada. As of 2012, the SHR has the highest incidence rate of positive test reports for HIV in Canada, at more than three times the national average (17.0 vs. 5.9 per 100,000 people). Additionally, the epidemiology of HIV/AIDS in the SHR is different from that seen elsewhere in Canada (still mostly men having sex with men and Caucasians), with its new HIV cases predominantly associated with injection drug use and Aboriginal cultural status. The purpose of this study was to (a) describe the demographic and socio-economic characteristics of the STW in the SHR, (b) identify their significant life events, self-reported problems, knowledge, attitudes, behaviors, self-efficacy, and barriers regarding HIV, and (c) determine the significant independent risk indicators for STW self-reporting a chance of greater than 50% of becoming infected with HIV/AIDS. The majority of the study participants were females, who were never married, of Aboriginal descent, without a high school diploma, and had an annual income of less than $10,000. Using multivariate regression analysis, four significant independent risk indicators were associated with STW reporting a greater that 50% chance of acquiring HIV/AIDS, including experiencing sexual assault as a child, injecting drugs in the past four weeks, being homeless, and a previous Chlamydia diagnosis. These findings provide important evidence of the essential sexual and drug-related vulnerabilities associated with the risk of HIV infection among STW and offer insight into the design and implementation of effective and culturally sensitive public health

  19. DEMONSTRATION OF A BLOCKING FACTOR IN THE PLASMA AND SPINAL FLUID OF PATIENTS WITH SUBACUTE SCLEROSING PANENCEPHALITIS

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Aftab; Strong, Douglas M.; Sell, Kenneth W.; Thurman, Gary B.; Knudsen, Richard C.; Wistar, Richard; Grace, William R.

    1974-01-01

    Conflicting reports on the immune responsiveness of patients with subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE) have been reported. This report shows that the leucocytes from four SSPE patients exhibited strong sensitivity to both measles and SSPE virus preparations as measured by the macrophage migration inhibition test, mixed lymphocyte virus infected cell culture test, and the lymphotoxin assay. Earlier suggestions that a factor may be operating to suppress cellular reactivity are confirmed by the demonstration that the response of lymphocytes from SSPE patients could be blocked by the addition of SSPE spinal fluid or plasma. It was determined that the blocking factor was stable at –20°C, heat labile at 56°C for 30 minutes, trypsin and neuraminadase sensitive, and had a mol wt greater than 150,000 as determined by Sephadex G-200 gel chromatography. The blocking factor appeared to be specific for SSPE virus and did not block the response of lymphocytes to nonspecific mitogenic agents and other viral and bacterial agents. PMID:4593239

  20. Sclerosing Mesenteritis: Diverse clinical presentations and dissimilar treatment options. A case series and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Sclerosing mesenteritis (SM) is a rare pathological condition affecting the mesentery. It is a benign, non-specific inflammation of the adipose tissue of the mesentery of the small intestine and colon. It is characterized by a variable amount of chronic fibrosis. Its etiology is unknown, the pathogenesis is obscure, while the pathological characteristics of the disease are unspecific. The initial clinical presentation varies from typically asymptomatic to that of an acute abdomen. The diagnosis is suggested by computed tomography but is usually confirmed by surgical biopsies. Treatment is largely empirical; it is decided upon on the basis of the clinical condition of the patient, and usually a few specific drugs are used. Surgical resection is sometimes attempted for definitive therapy, although the surgical approach is often limited. We will present five cases of SM as well as a review of the available literature in order to state and compare a variety of clinical presentations, diverse possible etiologies and dissimilar treatment options. PMID:21635777

  1. Sclerosing odontogenic carcinoma presenting on the hard palate of a 43-year-old female: a case report.

    PubMed

    Wood, Andrew; Young, Fiona; Morrison, James; Conn, Brendon I

    2016-12-01

    We present a case of sclerosing odontogenic carcinoma (SOC) occurring on the hard palate of a 43-year-old female. The tumor presented as an asymptomatic firm swelling and histopathologically was characterized by widely dispersed nests and cords of bland cells infiltrating between hyalinized collagen fibers. Prominent perineural and intraneural invasion and erosion of bone was noted. The tumor cells showed staining with antibodies to pan-cytokeratin (PanCK), cytokeratin 19 (CK19), cytokeratin 5/6 (CK5/6), cytokeratin 14 (CK14), p63 and E-cadherin, but no staining with antibodies to carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), cytokeratin 7 (CK7), cytokeratin 20 (CK20), estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR) or S100. Staining for mucin with alcian blue/periodic acid-Schiff with diastase was equivocal, with no definite evidence of mucin or muciphages. An initial diagnosis of adenocarcinoma NOS was made upon incisional biopsy, with the prominent filing pattern and cytoplasmic vacuolization prompting consideration of metastatic breast cancer in the first instance. The true nature of the tumor became clear after staging investigations and surgical resection. The patient was treated by surgery alone and is disease-free after 17 months.

  2. Garre's sclerosing osteomyelitis caused by salmonella group D in a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus: an unusual complication.

    PubMed

    Elera-Fitzcarrald, Claudia; Alfaro-Lozano, José L; Pastor-Asurza, César A

    2015-12-01

    We report the case of a 35-year-old male, who was diagnosed with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) in 2010 based on the presence of articular, serous, renal, immune, and hematologic involvement. He also had secondary antiphospholipid syndrome (APS). He was treated with prednisone 10 mg per day, hydroxychloroquine 200 mg per day, methotrexate 12.5 mg per week, leflunomide 20 mg per day, and oral anticoagulation previous to the present event. He presented to emergency room with a 7 day disease duration characterized by pain in the left thigh, which increased with physical activity, resulting in claudication; he also had malaise and fever. The X-ray films showed periostitis of the lower half of the left femur with bone marrow narrowing; the scintigraphy showed marked increased uptake in the middle and distal thirds of the left femur, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed thickening and hyperintensity of the cortex of the diaphysis and distal epiphysis of the femur and endosteal irregularity. Empirical treatment was started with vancomycin for 3 weeks. Femur biopsy and cultures were performed, isolating Salmonella spp. group "D" Vi (-); treatment with cotrimoxazole and ceftazidime for 4 weeks followed by doxycycline and cotrimoxazole for 4 months were given with a favorable functional outcome. This is an unusual case of a young adult with Garre's sclerosing osteomyelitis associated to SLE and caused by salmonella. The literature is reviewed and the clinical conditions predisposing to this infection are discussed, particularly in patients with SLE.

  3. Sclerosing odontogenic carcinoma with benign fibro-osseous lesion of the mandible: an extremely rare case report.

    PubMed

    Irié, Tarou; Ogawa, Ikuko; Takata, Takashi; Toyosawa, Satoru; Saito, Noriko; Akiba, Masakazu; Isobe, Tomohide; Hokazono, Chie; Tachikawa, Tetsuhiko; Suzuki, Yoshio

    2010-10-01

    A case of sclerosing odontogenic carcinoma (SOC) admixed with a benign fibro-osseous lesion (BFOL) is reported herein. A 67-year-old male had paresthesia in the mental region. Computed tomography detected an intragnathic mass that was focally expansile with disappearance of cortical bone, and contained admixed radiolucency and radio-opacity. Under the pathological diagnosis as benign fibro-osseous lesion, it was surgically removed by curettage. Microscopic analysis showed that a few parts of the resected materials contained dispersed thin cords and small nests of epithelial cells accompanied by fibrous stroma. Cellular atypia and mitotic figures were not evident. The diagnosis of BFOL with hyperplastic and metaplastic odontogenic epithelia was ultimately made. Eight months after the operation, the lesion recurred and segmental mandibulectomy was carried out. Histologically, the lesion was predominantly occupied by the fibro-osseous component with irregular-shaped foci of epithelial component. The epithelial component exhibited mostly thin cord or small nest patterns and showed definite perineural infiltration. Immunohistochemically, the epithelial cells were positive for p63, cytokeratin (CK) 6 and CK19, and focally positive for CK7 but negative for vimentin. MIB-1 positive nuclei were inconspicuous. To the best of our knowledge, this report is the first case of SOC with BFOL.

  4. Unbelievable: AIDS reporting in the business press.

    PubMed

    Michael, K

    2000-01-01

    This article reviews some of the key AIDS-related issues highlighted in the business press over the last 2 years. AIDS reporting in the business press has done little to enlighten its audience. Reports on the macroeconomic impact of HIV/AIDS has been limited to repeated citations of 1-2% annual declines in GDP; still others show that it has only a small and statistically insignificant impact on macroeconomic indicators. Business in South Africa is projected to decrease by 2-50% in the productivity levels of its work force in the next 5-10 years. Moreover, 25% of the work force is expected to be infected with AIDS within the next 10 years, and death rates will rise to up to 18%. Illness and death, early retirement, medical assistance and health care, and training and recruitment have all been noted as potential areas of rising costs of AIDS to business. While business reporting tends to concentrate on this side of the epidemic, it has reported a range of issues related to AIDS and has highlighted several well-considered responses to HIV/AIDS. Recommendations to improve business press reporting on HIV/AIDS are given.

  5. [Cerebral infarction and intracranial aneurysm related to the reactivation of varicella zoster virus in a Japanese acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) patient].

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Chiharu; Okada, Kazumasa; Ohnari, Norihiro; Akamatsu, Naoki; Tsuji, Sadatoshi

    2013-01-01

    A 35-years-old right-handed man admitted to our hospital with a worsening of dysarthria, left facial palsy and left hemiparesis for 2 days. Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) was diagnosed when he was 28 years old. At that time, he also was treated for syphilis. After highly active antiretroviral treatment (HAART) was introduced at the age of 35 years old, serum level of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) was not detected, but the number of CD4+ T cells was still less than 200/μl. He had no risk factors of atherosclerosis including hypertension, diabetes and hyperlipidemia. He had neither coagulation abnormality nor autoimmune disease. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed acute ischemic infarction spreading from the right corona radiate to the right internal capsule without contrast enhancement. Stenosis and occlusion of intracranial arteries were not detected by MR angiography. Although argatroban and edaravone were administered, his neurological deficits were worsened to be difficult to walk independently. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) examination showed a mild mononuclear pleocytosis (16/μl). Oligoclonal band was positive. The titer of anti-varicella zoster virus (VZV) IgG antibodies was increased, that indicated VZV reactivation in the central nervous system (CNS), although VZV DNA PCR was not detected. Therefore, acyclovir (750 mg/day for 2 weeks) and valaciclovir (3,000 mg/day for 1 month) were administered in addition to stroke therapy. He recovered to be able to walk independently 2 month after the admission.Angiography uncovered a saccular aneurysm of 3 mm at the end of branch artery of right anterior cerebral artery, Heubner artery, 28 days after the admission. We speculated that VZV vasculopathy caused by VZV reactivation in CNS was involved in the pathomechanism of cerebral infarction rather than HIV vasculopathy in the case.

  6. AIDS: acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Gilmore, N. J.; Beaulieu, R.; Steben, M.; Laverdière, M.

    1983-01-01

    Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, or AIDS, is a new illness that occurs in previously healthy individuals. It is characterized by immunodeficiency, opportunistic infections and unusual malignant diseases. Life-threatening single or multiple infections with viruses, mycobacteria, fungi or protozoa are common. A rare neoplasm, Kaposi's sarcoma, has developed in approximately one third of patients with AIDS. More than 800 cases of AIDS have been reported in North America, over 24 of them in Canada. The majority of patients are male homosexuals, although AIDS has also developed in abusers of intravenously administered drugs, Haitian immigrants, individuals with hemophilia, recipients of blood transfusions, prostitutes, and infants, spouses and partners of patients with AIDS. The cause of AIDS is unknown, but the features are consistent with an infectious process. Early diagnosis can be difficult owing to the nonspecific symptoms and signs of the infections and malignant diseases. Therefore, vigilance by physicians is of utmost importance. PMID:6342737

  7. AIDS: acquired immunodeficiency syndrome *

    PubMed Central

    Gilmore, N.J.; Beaulieu, R.; Steben, M.; Laverdière, M.

    1992-01-01

    Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, or AIDS, is a new illness that occurs in previously healthy individuals. It is characterized by immunodeficiency, opportunistic infections and unusual malignant diseases. Life-threatening single or multiple infections with viruses, mycobacteria, fungi or protozoa are common. A rare neoplasm, Kaposi's sarcoma, has developed in approximately one third of patients with AIDS. More than 800 cases of AIDS have been reported in North America, over 24 of them in Canada. The majority of patients are male homosexuals, although AIDS has also developed in abusers of intravenously administered drugs, Haitian immigrants, individuals with hemophilia, recipients of blood transfusions, prostitutes, and infants, spouses and partners of patients with AIDS. The cause of AIDS is unknown, but the features are consistent with an infectious process. Early diagnosis can be difficult owing to the nonspecific symptoms and signs of the infections and malignant diseases. Therefore, vigilance by physicians is of the utmost importance. PMID:1544049

  8. Medical aid schemes respond to AIDS.

    PubMed

    Taylor, G

    1999-01-01

    The insurance and medical aid industries reacted strongly in the 1980s to alarmist predictions of the likely impact of HIV upon employee benefits. Actuaries and accountants moved quickly to contain the risk, and most medical aid trustees quickly implemented a total exclusion of HIV treatment from their benefits. For more than 1 decade, it was argued that HIV/AIDS is a self-inflicted illness, often categorized with other STDs. In response, healthcare providers simply bypassed insurance restrictions and compensation limits by masking patient diagnoses to reflect pneumonia or other ambiguous, yet fully reimbursable, illnesses. Now, common sense has finally prevailed as a few managed healthcare programs are stepping forward to break the impasse. The largest such program is Aid for AIDS, run by Pharmaceutical Benefit Management Ltd. for schemes within the Medscheme Group. The Group built an entirely new, secure unit off-site from their normal branches to guarantee the confidentiality of patients' records and diagnoses, while treatment guidelines have been issued to every practicing physician in the country.

  9. AIDS in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Ijsselmuiden, C; Evian, C; Matjilla, J; Steinberg, M; Schneider, H

    1993-01-01

    The National AIDS Convention in South Africa (NACOSA) in October 1992 was the first real attempt to address HIV/AIDS. In Soweto, government, the African National Congress, nongovernmental organizations, and organized industry and labor representatives worked for 2 days to develop a national plan of action, but it did not result in a united effort to fight AIDS. The highest HIV infection rates in South Africa are among the KwaZulu in Natal, yet the Inkatha Freedom Party did not attend NACOSA. This episode exemplifies the key obstacles for South Africa to prevent and control AIDS. Inequality of access to health care may explain why health workers did not diagnose the first AIDS case in blacks until 1985. Migrant labor, Bantu education, and uprooted communities affect the epidemiology of HIV infection. Further, political and social polarization between blacks and whites contributes to a mindset that AIDS is limited to the other race which only diminishes the personal and collective sense of susceptibility and the volition and aptitude to act. The Department of National Health and Population Development's voluntary register of anonymously reported cases of AIDS specifies 1517 cumulative AIDS cases (October 1992), but this number is low. Seroprevalence studies show between 400,000-450,000 HIV positive cases. Public hospitals cannot give AIDS patients AZT and DDI. Few communities provided community-based care. Not all hospitals honor confidentiality and patients' need for autonomy. Even though HIV testing is not mandatory, it is required sometimes, e.g., HIV testing of immigrants. AIDS Training, Information and Counselling Centers are in urban areas, but not in poor areas where the need is most acute. The government just recently developed in AIDS education package for schools, but too many people consider it improper, so it is not being used. The poor quality education provided blacks would make it useless anyhow. Lifting of the academic boycott will allow South African

  10. Music and hearing aids.

    PubMed

    Madsen, Sara M K; Moore, Brian C J

    2014-10-31

    The signal processing and fitting methods used for hearing aids have mainly been designed to optimize the intelligibility of speech. Little attention has been paid to the effectiveness of hearing aids for listening to music. Perhaps as a consequence, many hearing-aid users complain that they are not satisfied with their hearing aids when listening to music. This issue inspired the Internet-based survey presented here. The survey was designed to identify the nature and prevalence of problems associated with listening to live and reproduced music with hearing aids. Responses from 523 hearing-aid users to 21 multiple-choice questions are presented and analyzed, and the relationships between responses to questions regarding music and questions concerned with information about the respondents, their hearing aids, and their hearing loss are described. Large proportions of the respondents reported that they found their hearing aids to be helpful for listening to both live and reproduced music, although less so for the former. The survey also identified problems such as distortion, acoustic feedback, insufficient or excessive gain, unbalanced frequency response, and reduced tone quality. The results indicate that the enjoyment of listening to music with hearing aids could be improved by an increase of the input and output dynamic range, extension of the low-frequency response, and improvement of feedback cancellation and automatic gain control systems.

  11. Music and Hearing Aids

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Brian C. J.

    2014-01-01

    The signal processing and fitting methods used for hearing aids have mainly been designed to optimize the intelligibility of speech. Little attention has been paid to the effectiveness of hearing aids for listening to music. Perhaps as a consequence, many hearing-aid users complain that they are not satisfied with their hearing aids when listening to music. This issue inspired the Internet-based survey presented here. The survey was designed to identify the nature and prevalence of problems associated with listening to live and reproduced music with hearing aids. Responses from 523 hearing-aid users to 21 multiple-choice questions are presented and analyzed, and the relationships between responses to questions regarding music and questions concerned with information about the respondents, their hearing aids, and their hearing loss are described. Large proportions of the respondents reported that they found their hearing aids to be helpful for listening to both live and reproduced music, although less so for the former. The survey also identified problems such as distortion, acoustic feedback, insufficient or excessive gain, unbalanced frequency response, and reduced tone quality. The results indicate that the enjoyment of listening to music with hearing aids could be improved by an increase of the input and output dynamic range, extension of the low-frequency response, and improvement of feedback cancellation and automatic gain control systems. PMID:25361601

  12. AIDS and confidentiality.

    PubMed

    Kirkman, M B; Bell, S K

    1989-01-01

    AIDS has created many challenges for those who provide care for AIDS patients. One major challenge has been the request of many public officials for healthcare professionals to abandon the traditional view of confidentiality and to reveal AIDS patients' names. This ethical dilemma is explored and some ethical theories are presented as possible resolutions. The conclusion presented is that healthcare professionals must recognize that the power of the healthcare system over an AIDS patient is immense. Therefore, healthcare professionals must make a commitment to protect the patient's right to privacy by preventing any unauthorized disclosure at all costs.

  13. An assessment of global Internet-based HIV/AIDS media coverage: implications for United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS' Global Media HIV/AIDS initiative.

    PubMed

    Anema, A; Freifeld, C C; Druyts, E; Montaner, J S G; Hogg, R S; Brownstein, J S

    2010-01-01

    No studies to date have assessed the quantity of HIV/AIDS-related media on the Internet. We assessed the quantity of language-specific HIV/AIDS Internet-based news coverage, and the correlation between country-specific HIV/AIDS news coverage and HIV/AIDS prevalence. Internet-based HIV/AIDS news articles were queried from Google News Archives for 168 countries, for the year 2007, in the nine most commonly spoken languages worldwide. English, French and Spanish sources had the greatest number of HIV/AIDS-related articles, representing 134,000 (0.70%), 11,200 (0.65%) and 24,300 (0.49%) of all news articles, respectively. A strong association between country-specific HIV/AIDS news coverage and HIV/AIDS prevalence was found, Spearman's rank correlation: 0.6 (P < 0.001). Among countries with elevated HIV/AIDS prevalence (> or =10%), the volume of HIV/AIDS-specific media was highest in Swaziland (15.9%) and Malawi (13.2%), and lowest in South Africa (4.8%) and Namibia (4.9%). Increased media attention should be placed on countries with high HIV/AIDS prevalence and limited HIV/AIDS-specific news coverage.

  14. Girls' Success: Mentoring Guide about HIV and AIDS. Volume 2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Academy for Educational Development, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The issue of HIV and AIDS is a serious global issue that affects girls and boys, women and men, from all communities. Girls and women are particularly vulnerable to contracting HIV which can develop into AIDS. This guide for mentoring contains important information about HIV and AIDS related to young women and girls. The guide also provides ideas…

  15. The Role of Inner Asia in Early Russo-Chinese Relations: Teaching Aids for the Study of Inner Asia, No. 8.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sebes, Joseph S.

    Teaching about Inner Asia in the context of today's world can be accomplished by presenting the historical relations among China, Russia, and Inner Asia. Present day China-Russia policies and relations date back to earlier unequal treaties forced upon China by the West. China has historically attempted to maintain an isolationist position against…

  16. AIDS and sex tourism.

    PubMed

    Herold, E S; Van Kerkwijk, C

    1992-01-01

    Tourists traveling internationally lower their inhibitions and take greater risks than they would typically in their home cultures. Loneliness, boredom, and a sense of freedom contribute to this behavioral change. Some tourists travel internationally in search of sexual gratification. This motivation may be actively conscious or subconscious to the traveler. Billed as romantic with great natural beauty, Thailand, the Philippines, Brazil, the Dominican Republic, and Kenya are popular destinations of tourists seeking sex. The Netherlands and countries in eastern Europe are also popular. With most initial cases of HIV infection in Europe having histories of international travel, mass tourism is a major factor in the international transmission of AIDS. While abroad, tourists have sex with casual partners, sex workers, and/or other tourists. Far from all tourists, however, carry and consistently use condoms with these partners. One study found female and non white travelers to be less likely than Whites and males to carry condoms. The risk of HIV infection increases in circumstances where condoms are not readily available in the host country and/or are of poor quality. Regarding actual condom use, a study found only 34% of sex tourists from Switzerland to consistently use condoms while abroad. 28% of men in an STD clinic in Melbourne, Australia, reported consistent condom use in sexual relations while traveling in Asia; STDs were identified in 73% of men examined. The few studies of tourists suggest that a significant proportion engage in risky behavior while traveling. HIV prevalence is rapidly increasing in countries known as destinations for sex tourism. High infection rates are especially evident among teenage sex workers in Thailand. Simply documenting the prevalence of risky behavior among sex tourists will not suffice. More research is needed on travelers and AIDS with particular attention upon the motivating factors supporting persistent high-risk behavior.

  17. Examining the associations between HIV-related stigma and health outcomes in people living with HIV/AIDS: a series of meta-analyses

    PubMed Central

    Mitra, Sanjana; Chen, Shiyi; Gogolishvili, David; Globerman, Jason; Chambers, Lori; Wilson, Mike; Logie, Carmen H; Shi, Qiyun; Morassaei, Sara; Rourke, Sean B

    2016-01-01

    Objective To conduct a systematic review and series of meta-analyses on the association between HIV-related stigma and health among people living with HIV. Data sources A structured search was conducted on 6 electronic databases for journal articles reporting associations between HIV-related stigma and health-related outcomes published between 1996 and 2013. Study eligibility criteria Controlled studies, cohort studies, case-control studies and cross-sectional studies in people living with HIV were considered for inclusion. Outcome measures Mental health (depressive symptoms, emotional and mental distress, anxiety), quality of life, physical health, social support, adherence to antiretroviral therapy, access to and usage of health/social services and risk behaviours. Results 64 studies were included in our meta-analyses. We found significant associations between HIV-related stigma and higher rates of depression, lower social support and lower levels of adherence to antiretroviral medications and access to and usage of health and social services. Weaker relationships were observed between HIV-related stigma and anxiety, quality of life, physical health, emotional and mental distress and sexual risk practices. While risk of bias assessments revealed overall good quality related to how HIV stigma and health outcomes were measured on the included studies, high risk of bias among individual studies was observed in terms of appropriate control for potential confounders. Additional research should focus on elucidating the mechanisms behind the negative relationship between stigma and health to better inform interventions to reduce the impact of stigma on the health and well-being of people with HIV. Conclusions This systematic review and series of meta-analyses support the notion that HIV-related stigma has a detrimental impact on a variety of health-related outcomes in people with HIV. This review can inform the development of multifaceted, intersectoral interventions to

  18. Raising HIV/AIDS awareness through Cuba's Memorias project.

    PubMed

    Aragonés, Carlos; Campos, Jorge R; Nogueira, Oscar; Pérez, Jorge

    2011-04-01

    As long as there is no cure for AIDS, the only effective means of containing its spread is prevention, primarily through public education. Cuba's AIDS Prevention Group is a community-based organization whose main purpose is to support the National HIV/AIDS Program's prevention and education efforts. The Group's Memorias Project uses the creation and display of memorial quilts to put a human face on AIDS statistics and stimulate public reflection on issues related to the disease and society.

  19. Dermatology and HIV/AIDS in Africa

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jenny; McKoy, Karen; Papier, Art; Klaus, Sidney; Ryan, Terence; Grossman, Henning; Masenga, Elisante J; Sethi, Aisha; Craft, Noah

    2011-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus and the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) have greatly complicated dermatologic disease and the required care in most regions of Africa. Opportunistic infections, ectoparasites, Kaposi sarcoma, and skin manifestations of systemic infections are exceedingly common in patients with HIV/AIDS. Dermatologists have contributed significantly to our knowledge base about HIV/AIDS and have played an important educational role regarding the clinical manifestations historically. Because of the increased burden of skin disease in Africa due to the HIV/AIDS epidemic we must redouble our efforts to provide dermatology education to care providers in Africa. We review the burden of skin disease in Africa, how it relates to HIV/AIDS and global infectious disease, current educational strategies in Africa to address this need, and suggest potential solutions to move these efforts forward. PMID:21887061

  20. AIDS Fact Pack.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Population Options, Washington, DC.

    The three fact sheets presented in this document address issues surrounding adolescent sexuality and sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), especially the Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). The first fact sheet, "Young Women and AIDS: A Worldwide Perspective," suggests that since open discussions of adolescent sexuality have long been…

  1. Detecting Student Aid Fraud.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheppard, Jeffrey

    1998-01-01

    Describes the varied kinds of student aid fraud found to be occurring within and outside colleges and universities, and examines implications for public policy on student aid programs. Discusses specific fraud cases and their outcomes, and makes suggestions for institutional action if student fraud is suspected. (MSE)

  2. Computer Aids to Translation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krollmann, Friedrich

    1981-01-01

    Describes the structure and modes of operation of the Bundessprachenamt's (BSprA: Federal Office of Languages of the Federal Republic of Germany) terminology data bank as an aid to translation. Analyzes advantages and disadvantages of each user mode, and discusses probable developments in the immediate future of machine-aided translation. (MES)

  3. International Aid to Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benavot, Aaron

    2010-01-01

    Recent evidence highlights several worrisome trends regarding aid pledges and disbursements, which have been exacerbated by the global financial crisis. First, while overall development assistance rose in 2008, after 2 years of decline, the share of all sector aid going to the education sector has remained virtually unchanged at about 12 percent…

  4. AIDS as Metaphor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMillen, Liz

    1994-01-01

    Scholarly interest in Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) has spread throughout the humanities, attracting the attention of historians of medicine, political scientists, sociologists, public health scholars, and anthropologists. Most theorists hope their research will aid in policymaking or change understanding of the epidemic. (MSE)

  5. Hospital Nurse Aide. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iowa Univ., Iowa City. Coll. of Education.

    This report presents results of a project to revise the current 120-hour advanced nurse aide course to include all recommended minimum competencies. A three-page description of project objectives, activities, and outcomes is followed by a list of the competencies for the 75-hour nurse aide course for long-term care and for the 120-hour advanced…

  6. Preventing AIDS via Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    House, Reese M.; Walker, Catherine M.

    1993-01-01

    Compares the Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) epidemic to past epidemics, including social and political responses. Identifies populations at risk for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Discusses current social and economic factors affecting AIDS education programs. Makes recommendations and identifies resources for starting…

  7. THE AIDS MYTH

    PubMed Central

    Poehlmann, Karl Horst

    1996-01-01

    AIDS is now said to threaten humanity as a modern-day scourge. However, there is a group of scientists which maintains that this scare is unwarranted. Some arguments in favour of the re-evaluation of the AIDS hypothesis are presented in this article. PMID:22556763

  8. AIDS: Children Too.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lejeune, Genevieve, Ed.

    1994-01-01

    This journal issue is devoted to the many problems faced by children with Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) who live in both developing and developed countries. Section 1 provides general information on the pandemic, defining AIDS and exploring the social aspects of the disease. It also addresses child health, child mortality, moral and…

  9. Aid, Development, and Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klees, Steven J.

    2010-01-01

    The world faces pervasive poverty and inequality. Hundreds of billions of dollars in international aid have been given or loaned to developing countries though bilateral and multilateral mechanisms, at least, ostensibly, in order to do something about these problems. Has such aid helped? Debates around this question have been ongoing for decades,…

  10. BIBLIOGRAPHY OF TRAINING AIDS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MCKEONE, CHARLES J.

    THIS COMPILATION OF INSTRUCTIONAL AIDS FOR USE IN AIR-CONDITIONING AND REFRIGERATION TRAINING PROGRAMS CONTAINS LISTS OF VISUAL AND AUDIOVISUAL TRAINING AIDS AND GUEST LECTURERS AVAILABLE FROM MEMBER COMPANIES OF THE AIR-CONDITIONING AND REFRIGERATION INSTITUTE AS AN INDUSTRY SERVICE TO SCHOOL OFFICIALS INTERESTED IN CONDUCTING SUCH PROGRAMS. THE…

  11. AIDS and Chemical Dependency.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pohl, Melvin I.

    After defining HIV and the AIDS disease and outlining symptoms and means of infection, this fact sheet lists the ways alcohol and drugs are involved with the AIDS epidemic, noting that needle-sharing transmits the virus; that alcohol or mood-altering drugs like crack cocaine cause disinhibition, increase sex drive, encourage sex for drugs, and…

  12. First Aid: Falls

    MedlinePlus

    ... Your 1- to 2-Year-Old First Aid: Falls KidsHealth > For Parents > First Aid: Falls Print A A A en español Folleto de instructiones: Caídas (Falls) With all the running, climbing, and exploring kids ...

  13. Implantable Heart Aid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    CPI's human-implantable automatic implantable defibrillator (AID) is a heart assist system, derived from NASA's space circuitry technology, that can prevent erratic heart action known as arrhythmias. Implanted AID, consisting of microcomputer power source and two electrodes for sensing heart activity, recognizes onset of ventricular fibrillation (VF) and delivers corrective electrical countershock to restore rhythmic heartbeat.

  14. Inertially Aided Robotics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-12-31

    0031 dis~bti:,1 is uitsnjt( Deczmllcr 31: 1989 92-05530 2:.-: 3o : T >VE?-A ~ : Inertially Aided Robotics FINAL REPORT for Contract No. DAAHO1 -88-D-0057...1 2 Advantages of Inertially Aided Robotics ...86 iii List of Figures Figure 1 - Robot Manipulator having Joint Sensor Based Control ..................... 2

  15. Marketing Financial Aid

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huddleston, Thomas, Jr.; Batty, Burt F.

    1978-01-01

    Student financial assistance services are becoming a major part of the institutional marketing plan as traditional college-age students decline in numbers and price competition among institutions increases. The effect of financial aid on enrollment and admissions processes is discussed along with the role of the financial aid officer. (Author/LBH)

  16. Participative AIDS Education Methods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chambliss, Catherine; And Others

    Since assuring quality health care delivery to patients suffering from Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) and those who test positive for Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) is a priority, development of effective staff training methods is imperative. This pilot study assessed the effect on staff attitudes of a participative AIDS/HIV staff…

  17. Innovative Teaching Aids.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christner, Chris

    1988-01-01

    Describes the DACUM (Developing A CurriculUM) process and how it is used at Universal Technical Institute to determine what types of training aids to produce. Indicates that examining the employment needs of industry and educational needs of students enhances programs and promotes development of innovative aids. (JOW)

  18. First Aid: Burns

    MedlinePlus

    ... Your 1- to 2-Year-Old First Aid: Burns KidsHealth > For Parents > First Aid: Burns A A A Scald burns from hot water and other liquids are the most common burns in early childhood. Because burns range from mild ...

  19. The New Merit Aid

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dynarski, Susan

    2004-01-01

    Merit aid, a discount to college costs contingent upon academic performance, is nothing new. Colleges and private organizations have long rewarded high-achieving, college-bound high school students with scholarships. While merit aid has a long history in the private sector, it has not played a major role in the public sector. At the state level,…

  20. AIDS Epidemiological models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahmani, Fouad Lazhar

    2010-11-01

    The aim of this paper is to present mathematical modelling of the spread of infection in the context of the transmission of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). These models are based in part on the models suggested in the field of th AIDS mathematical modelling as reported by ISHAM [6].